Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text




Gift of the


STrop ic


VolVIINo29


Quarry Heights, Rep


Times

public of Panama Friday, July 22, 1994


No accident'


Balladares says bomb


Caused plane crash


Department of Defense photo by Tech. Sgt. Kevin Koelling
Col. William J. Leszczynski, Jr. assumes command of Joint Task
Force - Bravo from Col. James F. Knight during a ceremony on Soto
Cano AB, Honduras.

JTF- Bravo changes hands
by Capt. William Mason III than words," Leszczynski said.
JTF-Bravo Pubt. lic Affairs Officer Knights was awarded the Defense
JTF-Bravo Public Affairs Officer Superior Service Medal by Maj. Gen.
SOTO CANO AB, Honduras - Col. Walter T. Worthington, Deputy Corn-
William Leszczynski, Jr. assumed com- mander in Chief, United States Southern
mand of Joint Task Force - Bravo from Command and the Honduran Medal of
Col. James F. Knight July 15 during a Merit (1st Class) by Gen. Lazaro Avila
driving rainstorm. Soleno, Chief of Staff of the Honduran
"Those present here today represent Armed Forces.
the hundreds of soldiers, noncommis- "Today ends one era and marks the
sioned officers, officers, and civilians beginning of another in the proud heri-
that I have and the pleasure of serving tage of the incredibly successful accom-
with over the past 22 years and who have plishments and contributions that Joint
done so much to make this day possible," Task Force-Bravo and United States
Leszczynski said. "I am both honored Southern Command has affected on the
and privileged to have been selected to national security of Honduras," Knight
command this great organization." said.


Leszczynski comes to Soto Cano from
Fort Benning Ga.
"It's great to be part ofan organization
where the personnel are exceptionally
disciplined, highly proficient, quietly pro-
fessional, and actions always speak louder


"The nations assistance, humanitari-
an relief and counterdrug programs that
have developed together are bases on
mutal support for the democratic pro-
cess, the fight against drug traffickers
and regional stability," he said.


PANAMA CITY (Reuters) - A bomb
caused the crash of a commuter plane in
Panama that killed 21 people, most of them
Jewish, Panama's President-elect Ernesto
Perez Balladares said Wednesday.
"The only objective information we
have is that apparently it (the crash) was
not an accident but a planted bomb inside
the plane," Perez Balladares told CNN dur-
ing a trip to Washington, D.C.
Later Wednesday, U.S. officials said
they will help Panama investigate why the
airplane apparently exploded in mid-air
Monday, killing the 21 passengers, includ-
ing several prominent Jewish Panamanian
businessmen.
Earlier, Panama's Jewish community
called for an exhaustive investigation to
determine whether the apparent explosion
was sabotage.
The Israeli embassy said 12 of the 21
victims aboard the domestic flight were
Jewish, and at least four were Israeli.
News of the crash stirred concern
among Jews here mindful of Monday's
bombing of a Buenos Aires Jewish com-
munity center which killed 37 people.
"There is a great worry that this crash
was caused by foul play,"Yacky
Eskenazy, human relations director of the
local chapter of B'nai Brith, told Reuters.
"We will want answers."
However, most of the speculation in
Panama City centred around one Jewish
victim who was under investigation by
Italian authorities for alleged money


laundering links to Colombia's Medellin
cocaine cartel, according to press reports.
Panama's police spokesman Manuel
Coloma said the man had been kidnapped
by Colombian drug lords last year and re-
leased.
Panamanian investigators Wednesday
had not ruled out sabotage but said a full
investigation would take two to three days.
"Any statement now about sabotage is
pure speculation," government spokesman
Louis Martinz said.
U.S. embassy officials in Panama City
said three investigators from the National
Transportation Safety Board arrived
Thursday to help in the investigation.
An eyewitness told Reuters he saw the
twin-engine commuter plane explode as it
flew in heavy rains in a mountainous jun-
gle area near Colon. "I was working in the
area when I heard a big explosion and saw
a fireball," farm worker Armando
Mendoza said.
Reports on Panamanian radio said res-
cue crews picked up the 21 crash victim's
- some who had been thrown as far as 1
mile (1.6 kilometres) from the wreckage.
Israeli officials did not want to publicly
speculate on the crash's cause. "It's too
early to tell anything, we will just have to
wait," Israeli embassy official Din Heiman
said in Panama City.
Most of the passengers were business-
men who worked at the Colon Free Trade
Zone, a duty-free center which is a magnet
for foreign businessmen.


WASHING-
TON, D.C.
(Reuters) - Pres-
ident Bill
Clinton told
Panamanian
President-elect -I
Ernesto Perez
Balladares
Wednesday that
the United States
would honor its Balladares
commitment to
transfer control of the Panama Canal by
the end of the century.
Perez, who takes office Sept. 1, repeat-
ed his promise to accept an estimated
10,000 Haitian refugees at U.S. bases in
Panama for up to six months.
Clinton and Perez met for the first time
in the Oval Office. White House Press Sec-
retary Dee Dee Myers said afterward that


both leaders expressed their commitment
to a "close and cooperative relationship"
between the two countries.
This spirit, she said, will "guide their
efforts to ensure a smooth transfer of the
Panama Canal and associated properties to
full Panamanian control between now and
December 31, 1999."
She added: "President Clinton reaf-
firmed that the United States will honor its
treaty commitments to Panama and ex-
pressed his commitment to work closely
with President-elect Perez. Balladares in
implementing these historic treaties."
The treaty giving up U.S. control of the
Canal to Panama was ratified in 1978 by
the Senate.
The two leaders also discussed Pana-
ma's commitment to stem narcotics-re-
lated money laundering in Panama. Myers
said Clinton offered technical assistance to
help Panama achieve this goal.


Company B, 5th Battalion, 87th In-
fantry soldiers get to "tear things
up."


1,- iltay ew Pg


I an m ore


Department of Defense officials say *Briefly, Page 2.
all sick Gulf War veterans to get *Perry visits Macedonia, Page 5.
treatment. *Hoops championship, Page 13.


Clinton, Balladares discuss

canal treaty, Haitian issues


I


tic"u-nal Afusaw.
Ar-











2Tropic Times
July 22, 1994


L-A Briefly


Paper recycling tip
saves offices money
Offices with computer equipment that
includes laser printers can easily cut paper
costs and requirements by printing out
draft documents on recycled paper. Recy-
cling paper in this matter is simple, accord-
ing to base officials.
Just line through the verbiage, (to avoid
confusion on which side one should read)
turn the page over and feed it back through
the laser printer. Officials estimate that
100 percent participation in this practice
can reduce consumption by nearly 50 per-
cent.


Air Force Thrift Shop
reopens with new look
The newly-organized Howard and Al-
brook Thrift Shop recently reopened with
a new appearance and under new manage-
ment.
Servicemembers may sell personal
items through consignment at the Thrift
Shop, or they may pick up a bargain some-
one else wants to sell. The thrift shop is
open Mondays and Thursdays and the
third Saturday of every month from 9:30
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. For more information call
285-5989.

Support center holds
spouse orientation
The Howard Family Support Center is
offering a Right Start Spouse Orientation
in English 10-11 a.m. Thursday.
Offered twice a month, in conjunction
with the military Right Start program, this
orientation offers an overview of the ser-
vices and the family-oriented FSC pro-
grams available on Howard and Albrook.
This orientation will feature subject matter
experts speaking on job searches, volun-
teering, financial assistance, and work-
shops.
People will also learn about recom-
mended shopping areas, contraband infor-
mation, maids, tours, and ID procedures.
For more information, call the Family Sup-
port Center at 284-5650.

Legal Assistance Office
closed for two days
Because of prior commitments, the Le-
gal Assistance Office, Building 154, Fort
Clayton will be closed Thursday and July
29. Emergencies will be handled on a case-
by-case basis. Call 287-6617.

Book stores offer
July clearance sales
The Stars and Stripes Book Stores at
Howard AFB, Corozal and Fort Davis will
hold a clearance sale throughout July. Ev-
erything except hardcover bestsellers,
magazines and newspapers have been
slashed 30 percent. Magazines are 10 per-


Temperature
High: 87 F
Low: 77 F

High: 88
Low: 77


AM flgh sheul


Saturday
5:40am C130 Howard AFB
Louisville, KY (A)
1:55pm C5A Howard AFB
Charleston AFB, SC
Kelly AFB, TX (0)
Sunday
7am B727 Howard AFB
Atlanta IAP (C)
Charleston IAP, SC
Monday
5:40am C130 Howard AFB
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Howard AFB
3:45pm B727 Howard AFB (C,0)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)


cent off. For information, call 284-5643.

Rodman ammunition
supply point closed
Rodman Ammunition Supply Point
number one will be closed for a 100 per-
cent inventory Monday through July 29.
All units with scheduled training for this
period, call 287-5806 to reschedule turn-
ins and issue dates.

Volunteers needed for
Native American Month
Base officials need volunteers to help
plan and organize activities for the 1994
Howard AFB Native American Month ob-
servance. It will be held in November and
a volunteer in the rank of master sergeant
or higher is needed to chair the observance
committee.
Any volunteer who is interested in par-
ticipating in this ethnic activity - or who
would like to learn more about it - may
call Tech. Sgt. Jim Johnson at 284-5358.

Promise Keepers
conference planned
The sold out Promise Keepers Men's
Conference in Boulder, Colo., was de-
signed to develop strength and integrity
among men. A similar conference is
planned for July 29-30 at the Fort Clayton
Chapel. For more information, call Carson
Tavenner at 269-9022.

Enlisted performance
feedback changes
Raters now have 60 days instead of 30
to complete an enlisted feedback session
on a person who has just received an en-
listed performance if there has been no
change in reporting officials.
Extending the time to 60 days allows
raters more time to prepare an accurate
evaluation, said Air Force Military Person-
nel Center officials at Randolph AFB,
Texas.
This change is effective immediately
and is being incorporated in the new Air
Force instruction 36-2403, covering the


Weekend weather


Factoid: The only difference between hurricanes, ty-
phoons and cyclones is location. Hurricanes occur in the
western hemisphere (North Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and
Eastern Pacific). Typhoons occur in the eastern hemi-
sphere (West Pacific). Cyclones occur in the Indian
Ocean.


Pacific
Saturday
Tides
4:11 p.m. at 16.7 feet
10:25 p.m. at 0.7 feet
Sunday
4:43 a.m. at 16.8 feet
11:07 p.m. at 0.8 feet


Temperature
High: 86
Low: 75

High: 87
Low: 75


Atlantic
Saturday
Tides
12:09 a.m. at 1.2 feet
8:06 a.m. at 0.2 feet
Sunday
1:04 a.m. at 1.1 feet
8:51 a.m. at 0.2 feet


Forecast: Mostly cloudy skies, afternoon thunderstorms.


Tuesday
5:40am C141 Howard AFB
Brasilia, Brazil (V,O)
Asuncion, Paraguay
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (V,O)
La Paz, Boliva
8:40am B727 Howard AFB
Atlanta, GA IAP (C)
Charleston SC, IAP
Wednesday
5:40am Cl 130 Howard AFB
Managua, Nicaragua
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Howard AFB (V, CC)
5:40am C141 Howard AFB
Kelly AFB, TX
Charlston AFB, SC (M)


enlisted evaluation system. For more infor-
mation about the changes, call the career
enhancements section of the Military Per-
sonnel Flight at 284-4661/5903.

Air Force War College
enrollment needed soon
Howard Education Office officials ad-
vise immediate action for all majors and
lieutenant colonels interested in enrolling
in the 1994-95 Air Command and Staff
College or Air War College seminars. To
inquire about enrollment procedures and
requirements, call Linda Antoine at 284-
4863. The officials also request all mili-
tary members who've received annual
needs assessment surveys complete and
return them to the education office as soon
as possible. For more information, call
284-6263.

Tobacco cessation
classes available
People who use smokeless tobacco and
want to quit can get help from the 24th
Medical Squadron Health Promotion of-
fice. An 8-week smokeless tobacco cessa-
tion class, will be held 11 a.m. to noon
Aug. 4, 11 a.m. to noon at the Howard
Clinic.
An evening version of the popular
Habitrol Patch smoking cessation class
will be held 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. Wednesday
Aug. 10-Sept. 28 at the Howard Family
Support Center, Building 707. Potential
participants in either class must set up an
appointment for a medical screening prior
to the class start date. Class size will be
limited, so participants should sign up ear-
ly. For more information, call 284-5870.

Air Force Commandants
needed for NCO schools
Air Force officials are seeking qualified
chief master sergeants to serve as com-
mandants at two noncommissioned offic-
ers academies. Openings exist at
Goodfellow, AFB, Texas, and Tyndall
AFB, Fla., with respective reporting dates
of June 30, 1995 and July 31, 1995. For
more information, call the military person-
nel flight customer service section at 284-
3508.

Adopt-A-Det program
needs donations
Base officials invite and encourage
Howard AFB and Albrook AFS commu-
nity members to participate in the Adopt-
A-Det program by donating unneeded
items (books, magazines, board games,
playing cards, etc.). For more information,
call Maj. James Dula at 284-3456.

New bilingual ID card
issue starts this week
The adjutant General Pass and Identifi-


Thursday

5:55am C5A Howard AFB
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Charleston AFB, SC
Friday
9:55pm C141 Howard AFB
Charleston AFB, SC

A- Active duty only
US- U.S. passport
0-Overnight
C-Commercial Contract
V-Visa
M-Medevac
CC-Country Clearance


cation Card section began issuing the new
bilingual identification card to active duty
personnel and family members this week.
The cards are being issued by Major Sup-
port Commands. The following is the
schedule for issue:
U.S. Army South, Military Police Bat-
talion, Monday-July 29.
617th Special Operations Aviation De-
tachment, U.S. Army Criminal Investiga-
tions Division Command, Southern Com-
mand Network, Special Operations Com-
mand - South, 3rd Special Operations Sup-
port Command, Aug. 1-5.
41st Area Support Group, Aug. 8-12.
128th Aviation Brigade, Aug. 15-19.
Headquarters, Southern Command,
Aug. 22-26.
U.S. Army Medical and Dental Activi-
ties, Aug. 29-Sept. 2.
536th Engineer Battalion, Sept. 6-9.
470th Military Intelligence Brigade,
Sept. 12-16.
106th Signal Brigade, Sept. 19-23 and
26-30.
For information, call 287-3006/6406.

CID recruiting briefings
held each Friday
The Criminal Investigations Division
holds recruiting briefings 10 a.m. each Fri-
day at Building 705, Corozal. For infor-
mation, call Special Agent Erin Milanes at
285-4314/4745.

Amateur Radio License
Exam slated for August
The Amateur Radio License Exam will
be held 9 a.m. Aug. 6 at the Panama Canal
Training Center in Balboa. For reserva-
tions and information on study materials,
call 252-7400.

Spanish class worth
four promotion points
The next mini-immersion Spanish class
will be held 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 1-12. in
Building 128, Fort Clayton. The class is
held Monday-Friday. Soldiers can earn
four promotion points after completing the
course. For information and registration,
call 287-5412/3960.85-6922.

Water utility opens
office in Diablo Heights
Panama's water utility has opened an
office in Building 5553, Diablo Heights.
the office is open 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. week-
days to accept payments on water bills.
For information, call 252-2879.

Resource Center offers
credit by examination
The Learning Resource Center offers
college credit by examination on a con-
tinuing basis 8 a.m.-noon and 1-4 p.m. at
Building 128, Fort Clayton. Self-Study
materials are available. For information,
call 287-4892.













~Tramng_


Tropic Times
July 22, 1994


Attack force sweeps under smoke screen


by Sgt. Eric Hortin
USARSO Public Affairs Office
PINA FIRE POINT - The in-
fantry trains for war. More often
than not, though, squad and team
assault training involves the use
of blank rounds. But every once
in a while, soldiers get the chance
to really tear things up.
A little work paid off for
Company B, 5th Battalion, 87th
Infantry when it practiced an as-
sault on an enemy support opera-
tions center. The first go-round
was with blank ammunition, the
second with live rounds.
Their day started early with an
air insertion into the jungle ap-
proximately three kilometers
from the objective. After hours
trudging through the jungle, the
soldiers reached their objective.
After a quick reconnaissance
of the area, the soldiers quickly
moved into position. With two
M-60 machine guns on a rise
overlooking the target, the assault
force crept slowly down the hill
to take the objective.
The machine guns started fir-
ing on the target, giving the main
attack force the opportunity to get


closer to the concertina wire sur-
rounding the area. For nearly four
minutes, the machine guns didn't
let up. When the firing stopped, it
was too late for enemy reaction.
The attack force lobbed
smoke grenades over the fence
and started cutting through the
wire. In a matter of minutes, the
attack force had swept through
the compound and was taking in-
ventory of the captured items.
The first assault ended.
Then the live ammunition was
handed out and the attacking
force went through the whole op-
eration again, with the exception
of the stroll through the foliage.
"This was pretty good. One of
the best movements in the jungle
I've been on," said Pfc. Mark
Hinchee. "The squad leaders took
their time to find the best way to
get to the objective.
"Since this was a platoon
movement, it was a lot easier to
maintain control. It was a good
pace, we had no injuries and we
could focus on the mission,"
Hinchee said.
With those things going for
the soldiers, it's almost no won-
der they like tearing things up.


2nd Lt. John Stone prepares a status report after the U.S. Army photos by Sgt. Eric Hortin
assault using Pfc. Jason Witcher's radio. Spc. Lonnie Schablin crawls under the wire.


� . . ..4.. -1; L
"- ' . ", _ ,, '.. ,.. ." " . -l T ,v.. j _ �.2 "X


Spc. Kevin Clark cuts through triple-strand concertina wire.










4Tropic Times
July 22, 1994


DoD: All



sick gulf



vets to get



treatment
WASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces Information
Service) - "Come in and let us help you." That's the mes-
sage from top Defense Department officials to veterans
who feel they have a Persian Gulf war-related sickness.
To make reporting easier for veterans, DoD set up a
toll-free number- 1-800-796-9699. To quell fears of ca-
reer reprisals, Edwin Dom, undersecretary of defense for
personnel and readiness, put a hold on involuntary sepa-
rations of people who feel they have a gulf-related illness.
Dom said such members must request separation or re-
tirement in writing or be medically retired or separated
through the disability system with an established diagno-
sis.
Since the end of Operation Desert Storm veterans have
complained of a range of symptoms they believe are re-
lated to their gulf service. Doctors have been unable to
diagnose the cause of many of these illnesses. A recent
National Institute of Health Technology Assessment
Workshop found that these undiagnosed symptoms con-
stitute not a single disease or "Persian Gulf Syndrome,"
but rather a range of illnesses with overlapping symptoms
and causes.
Some people have theorized the diseases may be linked
to chemical or biological warfare agents. A blue ribbon
panel led by Nobel laureate Dr. Joshua Lederberg found
no persuasive evidence that the Iraqis used chemical or
biological weapons in the gulf, DoD officials announced
in a June 23 press conference. Still, to quiet skeptics who
believe the department is hiding information, Deputy De-
fense Secretary John Deutch ordered an unprecedented
declassification of documents related to Desert Storm ill-
nesses.
Before that, Defense Secretary William J. Perry and
Army Gen. John Shalikashvili, chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff, released a joint letter urging veterans to
come forward and speak freely: "There are many hazards
of war, ranging from intense combat to environmental ex-
posures. Anyone who has health problems resulting from
those hazards is entitled to health care. If you are experi-
encing problems, please come in for a medical examina-
tion."
"We care deeply about people who have served their
country," said Dr. Stephen Joseph, assistant secretary of
defense for health affairs. "I want to tell everyone out there
- if you're ill and you think that's related to your gulf
service, come into the system, get on the registry and let
us work with you in the medical exam."
To get into the system, people in the United States can
call 1-800-796-9699. People overseas should report to
their nearest military treatment facility. People will be
treated and entered on a registry to help officials track ill-
nesses. Both DoD and the Department of Veterans Af-
fairs are cooperating on a registry of people with gulf-re-
lated symptoms. DoD already has about 300 people on its
active duty Persian Gulf registry.
DoD standardized the procedure for treatment. Medi-
cal personnel will examine patients and take a history of
any symptoms. Depending on reported symptoms, pa-
tients will undergo laboratory testing. Then they will re-
ceive further testing and treatment as needed.
Joseph said he wants medical facilities to examine as
many people as possible - everyone who is sick. "We've
tried to make this inclusive. We don't want to put up bar-
riers. This is not a research project, this is a treatment pro-
gram. But at the same time, seeing many individuals will
give us signposts for the whole group."
People eligible for the program include active duty
members, retirees, ready Reservists, full-time National
Guardsmen and family members who are eligible for mili-
tary health care. Depending on their medical status and
eligibility, Reservists will receive care from military or
VA facilities.
Joseph said he hopes the release of Lederberg's report
and the declassification of gulf health information will
convince people DoD isn't trying to hide anything on
chemical or biological warfare.
"It's hard to prove a negative. Still, a very distinguished
independent panel found no persuasive evidence that bio-
logical or chemical weapons were used in the gulf," Jo-
seph said.


StMilitary News


inwlmW HP. m * -. ,~ t.-un'.-- . . "m v
U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Eric Hortin
Col. Jonathan Cofer (left) is handed the Military Police Brigade guidon by Maj. Gen. G.A.
Crocker, U.S. Army South commander, as Col. John Mumma watches.


Cofer takes over MP brigade


by Sgt. Eric Hortin
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT CLAYTON - "This is it for me...with a capi-
tal 'I-T.'"
For Col. John Mumma, those words had a double
meaning. The first was when Mumma handed over the
command of the Military Police Brigade - Panama to
Col. Jonathan Cofer July 14 at the change of command
ceremony at Soldiers Field. The second was his retire-
ment after 26 years of service.
Mumma was presented the Legion of Merit and his
Certificate of Retirement by Maj. Gen. G.A. Crocker,
U.S. Army South commander. Mumma's wife, Ceci,
was awarded a certificate for her part during her
husband's career.
For Cofer, this command will be the third time he
has been in Panama. His first time was as the executive
officer and commander of the 534th Military Police


Company. The second time was as part of a rotation
unit while he was assigned as the executive officer of
the 716th Military Police Battalion, Fort Riley, Kan.
"This is a great country, the weather's fantastic and
the MPs are ready to go to work," Cofer said. "I hope I
can do as much as Colonel Mumma."
Cofer was commissioned a Distinguished Military
Graduate from LaSalle College where he received a
Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology in 1972.
He has held positions stateside and. overseas from
platoon leader to chief of the Combatting Terrorism
Branch in Washington, D.C.
Cofer's military schools include the Armor Officer
Basic Course, Scout Platoon Leaders Course, MP Of-
ficers Advanced Course, Combined Arms and Service
Staff School, Systems Automation Course, Command
and General Staff College and the Army War College.
Cofer is joined by his wife, Karen, and two sons,
Jonathan II and Jacob.


WASHINGTON, D.C. (Air
Force News Service) - The Air Force
has fully implemented its Year of
Training initiative to provide the op-
portunity for resident professional
military education to all eligible per-
sonnel, said to Lt. Gen. Billy J.
Boles, deputy chief of staff, person-
nel, in a recent message to major
command vice commanders.
Schoolhouse production now
meets requirements and attendance
backlogs have been eliminated, ac-
cording to Boles.
"This means attending resident
PME is now institutionalized as a
'normal career event' for enlisted
personnel," he said.
As a consequence, the old enlisted
PME system is being phased out.
Active duty enrollment in the Exten-
sion Course Institute correspondence
courses for airman leadership school,
NCO academy and senior NCO
academy ended July 1.
The reason for this, according to
personnel officials, is simple. Since
enlisted members will attend PME in
residence, the Air Force no longer
needs a non-resident PME program


for its active duty members.
Because in-resident opportunities
for Air National Guard and Reserve
personnel is limited, the correspon-
dence courses will continue to be
available for those organizations.
To keep promotion competition
equitable, a plan to phase in changes
to the promotion system has been de-
veloped. Master sergeants have until
Sept. 30, 1995, to complete the
Course 0008 and receive credit dur-
ing promotion consideration.
For senior master sergeant cycles
95E8 and 96E8 (February 1995 and
1996 boards) and chief master ser-
geant cycle 94E9 (October 1994
board), PME will continue as part of
the promotion equation - 15 points
awarded under the Weighted Airman
Promotion System for NCO Acad-
emy - and PME histories will con-
tinue to be included on the selection
brief made available to the evaluation
board members.
Beginning with promotion cycle
97E8 (February 1997 senior master
sergeant board) and the 95E (Octo-
ber 1995 chief master sergeant
board), PME will be removed from


the evaluation board process.
Without PME histories, promotion
boards will now have to focus more on
actual performance in their selections,
according to Boles.
"Evaluation report ratings and en-
dorsements should be based on duty
performance, job knowledge, leader-
ship, managerial skill, and judgment,"
the general said.
"Evaluators need to know their
people in terms of how well they per-
form their assigned duties; set and en-
force standards; display initiative; fos-
ter teamwork; and communicate
ideas."
Since performance is intended to
count as the new discriminating factor,
rating officials are cautioned against
replacing PME with some other extra-
neous factor, like off-duty education.
"Full resident PME attendance has
been an Air Force goal for many years
- some said it was a dream," Boles
said. "That dream's come true - and
we must make the most of it."
For more information on PME, call
Senior Master Sgt. Rick Hofsommer at
the Military Personnel Flight, 284-
5606.


The year of training


Air Force meets education goals










S __Military News


U.S. Air Force photo
Nighthawk
The F-117 stealth aircraft officially took the name "Nighthawk" June 24, according to Air Combat Command.
The name was among the first group submitted when 12th Air Force officials began the process of naming the
aircraft Oct. 4, 1990. Originally, the name was reserved by Sikorsky aircraft for HH-60D helicopters.


Perry visits U.S. troops in Macedonia


SKOPJE, Macedonia (AP) - Defense
Secretary William Perry praised U.S.
Army soldiers today for helping keep the
peace in this tiny landlocked republic af-
flicted with simmering ethnic tension.
"Every peaceful day that passes is a
tribute to your success," Perry told about
100 of the 500 U.S. Army soldiers posted
here under a United Nations peacekeeping
mandate.
"Your goal is simple: Keep the peace by
deterring aggression," Perry told the sol-
diers arrayed in U.N. blue berets and Army
camouflage uniforms.
Perry came to this former Yugoslav re-
public while on a one-week tour of Balkan
states in an attempt to promote peace in a
region afflicted by the two-year Bosnian
War.


The U.S. Army has had several hun-
dred troops here since July of last year and
the present contingent from Schweinfurt,
Germany, is scheduled to remain through
December.
Their mission has been to monitor the
border with Serbia and Bulgaria in order
to keep the Bosnian war from spreading.
Macedonia - which has an ethnic
makeup that includes Serbs, Greeks, Alba-
nians, and others - faces a potential eth-
nic conflict given disputes over the terri-
tory and the representation of the various
ethnic groups in the local government.
Macedonia is bordered by four hostile
nations.
Greece disputes the countries name,
Bulgaria contends that people in
Macedonia are actually Bulgarians, it's


~1

47:


Albanian minority says they are mistreat-
ed and the Serbs would like to reclaim the
tiny republic into its Yugoslav federation.
The U.S. force is part of the United Na-
tions peacekeeping force of 1,200 that in-
cludes Finnish and Norwegian troops.
Perry flew by Blackhawk helicopter
that had been painted white and bore a
U.N. insignia to observe a U.S. Army pla-
toon posted some 25 miles northeast of
Skopje.
The U.S. battalion commander, Lt. Col.
John Baggott, said the U.S. forces had
been well received by the people in
Macedonia and had encountered no diffi-
culties during their daily patrols along the
republic's rugged northern border.
"It's been very quiet along the border,"
Baggott said.


"I


'V


/, Navy photo
US Navy photo


Change of command
Master Chief Petty Officer Bert Patterson presents Cmdr. William Fitzgerald a shadow box of memories
during his change of command ceremony at the U.S. Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical Training
School July 15.


AF mulls


buying


C-17s
WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) -
The argument for buying scores
more C- 17 transport planes rests on
faulty cost analysis, a congressional
agency reported Monday.
A report by the General Ac-
counting Office, an investigative
arm of Congress, concluded that an
evaluation of the wide-body trans-
port versus other cargo plane op-
tions tilted unfairly in favor of the
C-17. The GAO cited "question-
able assumptions" about the reli-
ability of the aircraft, the cost sav-
ings compared to other options, and
the need for a large fleet of planes
that can land heavy cargo on short
runways.
Under current Pentagon plans,
the Air Force would buy a total of
40 wide-body C-17s at a total cost
of $21.3 billion or $533 million per
plane, making it the most expensive
cargo plane ever purchased by the
military. The fiscal 1995 defense
budget pending in Congress con-
tains funding for six planes and
President Clinton is expected to
seek eight more next year; 26 C- 17s
are already on order or in service.
At issue in the GAO report was
a possible Pentagon move to buy 80
more C- 17s in later years for a total
of 120 planes. Withthe C-17 al-
ready under close congressional
scrutiny over design and perfor-
mance problems, Defense Secretary
William Perry has said the adminis-
tration will decide on that question
in the fall of 1995.
The GAO challenged a cost
analysis conducted for the Pentagon
by the independent Institute for De-
fense Analyses. The institute com-
pared an airlift fleet made up en-
tirely of C-17s with other options
that mixed fewer C-17s with older
military airlifters or commercial op-
tions such as a modified Boeing
747.
The analysis was based on three
questionable assumptions, the GAO
said: that the C-17 would be highly
valuable in the defense of Saudi
Arabia because of its ability to reach
remote, short-runway airfields; that
the C-17 can fly more hours per
day; and that the C-17 would sub-
stitute for the older C-130 in flying
routine deliveries within theaters of
operations.
The GAO said the C-17 has yet
to prove it can fly an average of
15.2 hours per day, a calculation
based on such factors as the avail-
ability of air crews and spare parts
and the time it takes to load and un-
load.
"If the reliability does not im-
prove, the C-17 is not likely to
achieve its planned mission capable
rate," the report said.
DoD and Air Force officials, re-
sponding to the report, maintained
that airfield availability would
likely be constrained in another Per-
sian Gulf war. They argued that if
Congress fully funds the C-17 pro-
gram it will be reliable and meet
daily use goals. And they said the
C- 17 should be credited with some
cost savings for performing mis-
sions within military theater instead
of C-130s.


Tropic Times
July 22, 1994


All


I . I


all










Tropic Times
July 22, 1994


-**oies


Pool patron confused about base passes


Dear Mayors' Corner:
I would like to have a few questions
concerning pool passes answered. We are
residents of the Fort Kobbe area and
bought a pool pass from Fort Clayton. Be-
cause of the location, we use the Howard
AFB pool frequently.
The staff at the Howard pool ques-
tioned why I was using a Clayton pass for
the Howard pool. I replied that the Clayton
staff had told me that a Clayton pass was
good for any military pool, as well as
Shimmey Beach. The Howard pool staff
member, however, informed me that, since
I lived on Kobbe, I need a pool pass for
Howard only.
The price differences between passes is
tremendous. Clayton charges $8.50 per


month while Howard charges $15 per
month. Because of our work schedules and
weather conditions, our use varies from
month to month.
I realize that one pool is operated by
the Army and the other by the Air Force,
but isn't there a way to standardize the
price?
Heated up on Fort Kobbe

Dear Heated,
I routed your letter to Hector Sanchez,
chief of Outdoor Recreation Division, Fort
Clayton, who responded: On Feb. 4, 1994,
the U.S. Army, Air Force and Navy signed


a memorandum of understanding which
stipulates that all swimming pools will
honor each other's memberships and
passes on a reciprocal basis.
The memorandum states that patrons
must buy memberships or passes from
their respective service organizations.
There are two exceptions to this policy,
however. Army personnel stationed at Fort
Kobbe should buy their passes from the
Air Force Morale, Welfare and Recreation
at Howard AFB and Navy personnel sta-
tioned at Fort Amador should buy their
passes from Amador pool.
The reason for these two exceptions is


that people living at Amador and Kobbe
will most likely use the swimming pools
in their respective communities as their pri-
mary recreational swimming facility.
Because of these exceptions, customers
are asked by pool staff to buy their pass at
their residence.
As for prices, the level of Air Force
funding is the primary cause of the differ-
ences in pool pass prices.
Editor's note: To submit questions to
the Mayoral Congress, send letters to:
Mayors' Corner, publicity chairperson
APO AA 34004 (MPS). Anonymity will
be granted upon request. The Tropic
Times reserves the right to edit letters
and resposnses for brevity.


Gunmen take aim at motorist


Gunmen
in Curundu
A Fort Clayton resi-
dent was driving by the
laundry area in
Curundu last week
when two men stood in
the road and pointed
pistols at her, causing
her to stop. The driver
then put the vehicle in
reverse and fled the
area.
The Military Police
advise residents to use
caution when driving
through this area. If
similar acts are seen,
leave the area and then
notify the MPs at 287-
4401


Mugging on
Central Avenue
A sailor on tempo-
rary duty in Panama was victimized on Central Avenue in
Panama City last week. While shopping, he was ap-
proached by three unknown men who knocked him down
and fled with his wallet containing a credit card, $200 and
personal effects.
Everyone is reminded to travel in groups and never
show large amounts of cash while traveling off post.

Taking a bite out of crime
A K-9 team saw a man wandering around the Cocoli
housing area during the early morning hours. The man
became violent when asked to show his ID card. The man
was bitten several times after resisting arrest. He was
searched and a lock-blade knife was found.
After getting medical attention, the man was charged
with drunk and disorderly conduct, resisting apprehension
and carrying a concealed weapon.
If suspicious activities are seen, call the MPs at 287-
4401 or 289-5133.

Theft at shoe store
An enterprising man was arrested at the Albrook Shoe
Store when he tried to cash in on a good deal last week.

This authorized unofficial command information pub-
lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic
Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces
Information Program of the Department of Defense, un-
der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S.
Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the
official view of the U.S. government, the Department of
Defense or the U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002
Telephone 285-6612.
Commander in Chief...............Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey
Director, Public Affairs.................... Col. James L. Fetig



STropic Tiim


The young man initially tried on a pair of tennis shoes,
went to the refund counter and tried to get a refund on the
shoes, even though they had not been purchased. He was
arrested and charged with larceny by false pretenses.
If other entrepreneurs acts are seen, call the store man-
agement or the MPs at 287-4401 or 289-5133.

Panama Jack anonymous hotline
Anyone with information about drug smuggling
should call the Panama Jack anonymous hotline at 285-
4185.

The following crimes occurred in on and off post hous-
ing June 24-30.

Pacific
Corozal 700 area - one larceny of secured private prop-
erty
Fort Kobbe 400 area - one larceny of secured private
property
Off post
Bethania - two larcenies of secured private property
Panama City - one larceny of secured private property

Chief.............................Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor
Editor.............. ................................ M aureen Sam pson
Sports Editor........ ................................. Sgt. Lori Davis
Staff Editors.... ............................ Sgt. Cass Purdum
Spc. John Hall
Spc. Tom Findtner
Rosemary Chong
Student hires............... ............................... Floyd Able
Nishawne Moran
Charlotte Souffront
Southern Command Public Affairs Office...........282-4278
Command Information Officer.............Patrick Milton
U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office................287-3007
Public Affairs Officer.............Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder


Dear Editor:
I want to take this opportunity to extend my ap-
preciation to the medical and nursing staff of
Gorgas Hospital. I had a Nissen Procedure per-
formed on June 29,1994. The professional treat-
ment and outstanding patient care I received before,
during and after my surgery were exemplary.
First of all, I would like to thank Dr. Mendez in
the Internal Medicine Clinic for providing excel-
lent treatment and care during the past three years.
His patience and attention given to my case are
greatly appreciated and made it a lot easier for me
to make the decision to have surgery.
I would place my life in the hands of Dr. Arana
anytime. The time spent explaining what to expect
before, during and after the surgery, I'm sure, is part
of the reason I have recovered so swiftly. Needless
to say, his handy work will remain a pleasant re-
minder of his professional abilities.
From the time I was told I was a candidate for
surgery, the nurses, in each department I visited be-
ginning with the General Surgery Clinic to the nurs-
es on Ward 6, were pleasant, courteous and very
professional.
My experience in the operating room could not
have gone more smoothly thanks to Ms. Hayden
and the anesthesiologist. They spent all the time I
needed to understand what preparations were go-
ing to happen when I arrived for surgery and the
treatment I would receive in the recovery room. Not
once did I feel uncomfortable or concerned of what
to expect.
And finally, I want to thank all the personnel on
Ward 6. I have a very special thanks to nurses Mary
Garner, Charmin Ford and Elizabeth Colon. Nurses
Gamer and Ford did wonders helping me cope with
pain, tubes, and confusion which I guess is normal
for patients who have just had major surgery. Their
gentleness, encouragement and humor not only
helped me but also relieved a lot of tension my wife
was feeling. Nurse Colon followed through on the
evening shift with the same tender care. She was
exceptional in helping me cope with the tubes I had
down my throat, a condition that affected me more
than I anticipated. My first hours after surgery were
at least bearable and not a nightmare due to the pro-
fessional nursing treatment. I have nothing but
praise and admiration for all the other nurses and
staff on Ward 6. Their knowledge and experience
far exceeded anything I expected.
Richard S. Zornes


Command Information Officer.................Beth Taylor
Managing Editor....................taff Sgt. Jane Usero
Editor........................................ Sgt. Robin M antikoski
Journalist.............................................. Sgt. Eric Hortin
24th Wing Public Affairs Office.........................284-5459
Public Affairs Officer..............Capt. Warren L. Sypher
Public Affairs Superintendent
Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham
Journalists............................... Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
Sgt. James A. Rush
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office..............283-5644
Public Affairs Officer...........................Diane Gonzalez
Photographers
Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor
Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays
U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic..................... 289-4312
NCOIC............................................ Sgt. Richard Emert










J. Commentary


Sexual harassment

Officials offer definition, give quiz

to test your working knowledge
by Tech. Sgt. Jim Johnson" number of complaints filed with social
Th g . actions or unit commanders.
24th Wing Social Actions Unfortunately, some individuals know
O h no, not another article on what sexual harassment is but don't think
sexual harassment. they will get caught or reported. For these
I'm sure some of you said this people, it is just a matter of time before
to yourself when you read the title. Often they are standing in front of their
people ask me why we continue to write commander awaiting punishment.
articles and hold classes concerning For concerned folks, below is a quick
sexual harassment. The answer is very test to refresh your memory about sexual
simple. Sexual harassment is still harassment. Read each statement and
occurring and sexual harassment indicate whether it is true or false. Call
complaints are on the rise. me at social actions, 284-5358, if you
Despite the Air Force's education have any questions.
efforts concerning sexual harassment, 1. Unwanted sexual attention will go
many still wonder, "What exactly is away if you ignore it.
sexual harassment?" 2. If I don't mean to sexually harass
I could quote Air Force Regulation another person, there is no way my
30-2, Social Actions Program, however, I behavior could be considered sexual
think a common sense definition is more harassment.
appropriate. 3. Some people don't complain about
In essence, sexual harassment is any sexual harassment because they don't ,
unwelcome form of sexual conduct. This want to get the other person in trouble.
includes a very broad range of behaviors. 4. If I make sexual comments about
Here are a few common examples: someone and they don't ask me to stop,
*Sexual comments, jokes and then the comments are welcome.
innuendoes 5. If I confront someone but they
*Repeated requests for dates continue to harass me, I could complain
*Questions about a person's sex life to the social actions office.
or sexual preferences 6. Sexual harassment is a form of
*Sexual gestures (i.e. licking lips, discrimination that involves unwelcome
leering, staring at a specific body part, sexual advances or verbal/physical
winking, etc.) conduct of a sexual nature.
*Starting rumors of a sexual nature 7. Men can't file sexual harassment
about someone complaints.
+Cornering or blocking a person 8. About 90 percent of all sexual
*Unsolicitied or unwanted touching harassment complaints are filed by
of any kind females against males.
*Whistles or catcalls 9. Sexually suggestive pictures or
As you can see, sexual harassment can objects in the workplace can't be
involve many activities. So how to we considered a form of sexual harassment.
eliminate it? Hopefully through preven- 10. Telling someone to stop his or her
tion and the key to prevention is educa- unwanted sexual behavior usually doesn't
tion. do any good.
If people understand what constitutes Answers: 1) False, 2) False, 3) True,
sexual harassment, most will monitor 4)F alse, 5) True, 6) True, 7) False, 8)
their behavior and we will reduce the True, 9) False, 10) False.


Tropic Times 7
July 22, 1994 7


Tips can help make


welcome special


by Chap. Mark A. Gefaller
U.S. Naval Station Panama
H ow special that day is for us
all! Those first few days at
home are magical, with
romance, warm feelings and the
flowering once again of love. If only
we could hang on to good thoughts
forever.
Living is filled with love, though it
will bring some adjustment periods.
Because relationships separation has
been rateropted for a time, you have
both experienced many different things
which have challenged you both to
grow as individuals.
You know better than anyone how
difficult or rewarding separation has
been. Now your eagerly looking
forward to that special reunion ahead.
The best way to welcome your
special someone into the everyday
routine of the home once again is with
patience and love.
Although he or she knows better,
his or her mind last remembers life
months ago. Many things may be
different: the furniture may have been
moved, your hair style may have
changed, you may treasure a certain
amount of the independence you've
enjoyed.
Yes, it will be good to have your
loved one home. But, be understanding
if he or she complains just a little.
Months of change are a great deal to
come to grips with in just a few short
days.
Feelings of frustration are not
uncommon for both members of a
relationship. These are temporary
feelings and will pass soon.


To help you in preparing to love
your soldier, sailor, airman or Marine
when he or she comes home.
Here are a few thoughts:
*Remember that you love each
other and always will, nothing will
ever come between you.
*Always speak in love. Don't let
anger or frustration get the better of
you. Once spoken, words cannot be
unsaid. This also means don't dig up
past problems.. Stick to here-and-now
issues.
*Use "I" statements and avoid
"you." Say thin, like, "feel...when..."
Nothing will make each other more
defensive than starting a sentence with
"You."
*Speak from your heart not your
head, "I feel..." Statements are yours
and cannot be judged. Look at each
other in the eye and refrain from name
calling.
*Listen to everything each other
has to say. So often we respond
without having a clear understanding
of what the other is trying to say. That
means turn off the TV and other
distractions that stop you from talking
it through. Be respectful of thoughts
and feelings.
*Trust and honesty are to be
treasured in any relationship. To fool ,
with these will destroy a relationship's
foundations. No mind games and no
abusing each other's weak spots.
Respect each other and discuss things
always in love.
Never be afraid to seek profes-
sional assistance when needed. If a
relationship is worth having, it's worth
keeping.
God bless you all.


I Di ec Q u te .


What do you consider sexual harassment?


"',


I


"Touching too much -
there's friendly and not
so friendly."




Christy Ford
Civilian family member


"When you're forced to
do something you don't
feel is correct."




Sgt. Argelis Melendez
Company B, 193rd Support
Battalion


"Touching somebody
that doesn't want to be
touched."




Spc. Doug May
Company B, 154th Signal
Battalion


"Anything that's of-
fending toward you
because of your gen-
der."



Meleina Fillmore
Army family member


"When you walk down
the street and people
whistle at you."




Maria Ucros
Deputy Chief of Staff for
Intelligence


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries - or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit
for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.


loll







Tropic Timnes
July22, 1994


1993 beauty queen dedicated


rei4MtaM eoMmuuft le woe


4 fier working full-time as an
occupational help nurse
for the Panama Canal Commission at
Gatun Locks, Jihna Lewis de Ortiz
made the three hour roundtrip drive
along the rugged Trans-Isthmian
Highway to Panama City in pursuit of
a dream.
For two months, six days a week,
Ortiz followed the routine religiously.
Until 11 p.m., her evenings were spent
training in a gym and studying in a
classroom. Then she would get back
in her car for the long haul home.
Ortiz's efforts were rewarded
when she was judged the 1993 Mrs.
Beauty of Panama pageant winner.
After a year as queen, she relinguished
her crown Saturday with the knowl-
edge that she was able to accomplish
some good during her tenure.
For Ortiz, 38, life is all about
making sacrifices for that which is im-
portant. The giving of herself to com-


munity service always has been at the
top of her list. She believes winning
the title of Mrs. Beauty enabled her to
do the kinds of positive deeds she had
only wished to perform before.
"I looked at the event as not only
a beauty contest, but as a chance to do
community service," Ortiz said.
In giving back to the communi-
ties on the Atlantic side, Ortiz played
a leading role in organizing the dona-
tion of toy and food gifts to the or-
phaned children of Ciucudaela Jesus
de Maria last Christmas. Ortiz also
made arrangements to improve the
orphanage's nursery facilities so that
it now is able to provide first-rate
treatment. In addition, Ortiz assisted
the Lyon's Club in providing food,
shelter and clothing for victims of a
fire that ravaged a number of outly-
ing communities.
Ortiz takes a proactive approach
to trying to solving the social and eco-


nomic ills that surround her world.
"I think we should do all we can to
help our countrymates," Ortiz said. "We
can make changes ourselves. We can't
just sit back and wait for the govern-
ment to get things done."
Ortiz said she is especially proud to
have participated in the Mrs. Panama
pageant because of the message it sends
out to the rest of society.
"Some people think beauty stops
when women have children," Ortiz said.
"I don't believe that. I think we have to
go beyond the limits that are put upon
us."
Reflecting back on her year as Mrs.
Panama, Ortiz feels that she has matured
and become more focused.
"I learned a lot about myself" she
said. "I 've come to appreciate my fam-
ily and what I have around me."
Ortiz and her husband, Luis, have
been married 15 years and have two
sons, Luis Jr., 12, and Josimar, 6.


of

A:


4


Courtesy photo
Jilma Lewis de Ortiz waves to a crowd of admirers, after winning the 1993 Mrs. Beauty of Panama
crown.


. ,- * . ,
- ' - " '. '-



"" " " 2 .. . �' '** '''' *" ., -".



Ariadne Aguilera de Branca poses for a family photo
"' . ...... ... * ' "'.*'- W *-' _: . :' --^ ,.

Ariadne Aguilera de Branca poses for a family photo


(iuaqeatd eardekLait
0 /2 lhile watching the 1993 Mrs. Beauty of Panama B
pageant on television, Ariadne a rigo
Aguilera de Branca, a SOUTI-COM travel coordinator, and a
became convinced that she could be a contestant, too. chor
After consulting with her husband, and gaining his en- seled
couragement and support, she decided to try out for this F
year's competition. taped
Saturday, Branca was named first runner-up in the "I
1994 contest. said.
However, Branca is quick to point out that there B
was more to the event than just standing on stage and shed I
smiling for the cameras. was sl
The process began with Branca and more than one contact
hundred other women submitting applications for con- please
sideration as participants in the event. Then the candi- "I
dates were interviewed and evaluated, before the field said."
was reduced to about 30 hopefuls. From this pool, B
Branca and 11 other finalists were chosen, based on the citize
potential they demonstrated during television screen exerci
tests. before


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~ I



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.5.


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.4.

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/


raph with husband Jose Antonio and children Jean Carlo (left) and Jean Paul.




Akifl deep



e"U frEmwiqo o& beauIA*


anca, 30, said the finalists were forced to undergo
ous training program that included weightlifting
obics. They also attended modeling, casting and
raphy classes. In addition, the women were coun-
n the importance of proper diet and nutrition.
r two months, the contestants were weighed and
weeklyy to measure their progress.
had no idea it would be so much work," Branca

anca said her looks changed dramatically after she
pounds and five inches of body fat. Her long hair
ortened and her eye glasses were replaced with
lenses to further alter her appearance. Branca is
with the results.
n not going back to the way I was before," she
y husband likes me this way better and so do I."
anca, .a Panama City native and naturalized U.S.
plans on maintaining her "new" beauty through
and diet, but not at the intensity level required
he pageant.



ieL IV 40ze. 7om ( dne,
7mpde 7hime Ata4fi


"I'm cutting back to three nights a week, and I
promised my husband I would be home by 6:30," she
said.
Branca gives credit to her family for supporting her
endeavor and making the sacrifices necessary to allow
her to participate.
She believes the contest gave her and her family a
greater appreciation for each other. She said her hus-
band gained a better understanding of what she does
because he had to assume many ofher family responsi-
bilities, such as shopping and taking their children plac-
es. Meanwhile, the time she spent from her family,
made her realize just how important they are to her.
As for future career plans, Branca is open to mod-
eling and television commercial offers.
"If it comes my way, IIl do it, but rm not going
out looking for it," she said.
Branca and her husband, Jose Antonio Branca,
have been married eight years and have two sons, Jean
Paul, 5, and Jean Carlo, 2.


-4-e


Courtesyphoto
1994 Mrs. Beauty of Panama First Runner-up Ariadne Aguilera
de Branca.


Tropic Times 9
July22, 1994


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Milestones


U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Eric Hortin
Lt. Col. Lawrence Pippins (left) takes the 92nd Military Police Battalion guidon from Col. John
Mumma.

Pippins assumes MP battalion command


by Sgt. Eric Hortin
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT CLAYTON - Command of the 92nd Mili-
tary Police Battalion changed hands in a ceremony July
13 at Soldiers Field.
Lt. Col. Lawrence Pippins, incoming commander,
took the reins and the guidon from Lt. Col. Gerald
Prentice.
"This has been a great tour of duty and it has been
the people who made it great," Prentice said of his two
years in command. "They are committed to making a
difference, and they have."
Pippins received his commission after graduating
from the University of South Florida in 1976. He has
served in many positions overseas and in the United





To First Lieutenant - Cathy Carman and Andrew Pero,
both of Headquarters Support Company, 536th Engineer
Battalion.

To Specialist - Anthony Morales, David Thompson and
James Vesta all of Headquarters Support Company, 536th
Engineer Battalion. Trevor Petzoldt of Company A, 536th
Engineer Battalion. William Schlott of Company B, 536th
Engineer Battalion.

To Private First Class - William Baumgartner and
Michael Cunningham, both of Company B, 536th Engi-
neer Battalion. Howard Bryant and Tanja Mestlin, both
of Company A, 536th Engineer Battalion.

To Private Two - James Lively of Company A, 536th
Engineer Battalion. Geoffrey Marks, Miguel McGhee and
Stacey Wharton, all of Company B, 536th Engineer Bat-
talion.



Legion of Merit - Chief Warrant Officer 4 James Johnson
of 536th Engineer Battalion.

Meritorious Service Medal - Sgt. 1st Class Allen Albert


States. Pippins comes from Korea, where he served as
the commander of U.S. Army Troop Command.
"One observation I've made since I've been in coun-
try is that the MPs are proud and professional," Pippins
said. "I'm very proud to now be a part of this outstand-
ing unit, and I will work to continue the unit's tradition
of excellence in Panama."
Pippins holds a Master of Arts degree in Criminal
Justice and Urban Police Administration and a Bache-
lor of Arts degree in Criminal Justice. He is a graduate
of the basic and advanced Infantry Officers Courses,
the Combined Arms Service Staff School and the U.S.
Army Command and General Staff College.
Prentice and his wife, Cynthia, will travel to his next
assignment in Washington. D.C., to the Personnel
Readiness Division, Office of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.


and 1st Sgt. Hubert Green, both of the 536th Engineer
Battalion.

Army Commentation Medal - Sgt. 1st Class Luis
Martinez, Sgt. 1 st Class Joseph Myers, Sgt. 1 st Class Jorge
Rosa, Spc. Bernardo Bownall Spc. Bemardo Brown and
Spc. Kenneth Dixon, all of Headquarters Support Com-
pany, 536th Engineer Battalion. Sgt. 1st Class Jeffrey
Kemble, Staff Sgt. Ramon DeGracia Jr., Staff Sgt. Robert
Dyer, Spc. Ollie Cole and Spc. Garrett Gallo, all of Com-
pany A, 536th Engineer Battalion. Staff Sgt. Juan DeJesus
and Staff Sgt. Sidney Johnson, both of Company B, 536th
Engineer Battalion.

Joint Service Commendation Medal - Staff Sgt. Mary
M. Ball, U.S. Southern Command.

Air Force Commendation Medal - Senior Airman
Ricardo D. San Jose, 640th Air Mobility Support Squad-
ron.

Army Achievement Medal - Sgt. Ted Sargent, Spc.
Brian Machesky, Spc. Victor Rojas, Pfc. Timothy
Harrington and Pfc. Jay Hildebrand, all of Headquarters
Support Company, 536th Engineer Battalion. Spc. Kevin
Dorsey of Company A, 536th Engineer Battalion.

Air Force Achievement Medal - Sgt. Edward B.
Vincent, 24th Transportation Squadron.


Reenlistments - Senior Airman Brady C. Ipock, Staff
Sgt. Dennis E. Narucki, Tech Sgt. John A. Roberts, and
Master Sgt. Will Sherman, 24th Security Police Squad-
ron; Staff Sgt. Calvin C. Cooper Jr., Senior Airman. Marc
C. Porter, Staff Sgt. Miguel Ramos, Senior Airman
Michelle D. Shillato, and Master Sgt. Sherrill A.. J.
Stewart, 24th Civil Engineering Squadron; Staff Sgt.
Carlos A. Marrero, 24th Operations Squadron; Sgt. Cher-
yl L. Ellis, Tech Sgt. James M. Lucas, Staff Sgt. Pam
Mahoney, Staff Sgt. David Roberts, Senior Master Sgt.
James E. Simpkins, and Staff Sgt. Wayne C. Stewart, 24th
Supply Squadron; Staff Sgt. Adalberto Acosta, 24th Med-
ical Squadron; Senior Airman Stephen S. Straley, 24th
Maintenance Squadron; Staff Sgt. Joseph F. Collelo and
Staff Sgt. William R. Pendleton Jr., 310th Airlift Squad-
ron; Staff Sgt. Matthew A. Trischler, 24th Services
Squadron; Tech Sgt. Benjamin D. Brewer Jr. and Senior
Lawrence J. Broussard, 24th Wing; Staff Sgt. David C.
Ames and Senior Airman Israel B. Parker, 640th Air Mo-
bility Support Squadron; and Master Sgt. Jose A.
Ciceraro, U.S. Southern Command.


The following are birth announcements from the Army
Community Service New Parent Program:
NEVERETTE, Christopher Ian; born to Spc. William
and Irene Neverette; June 1.
REYNOLDS, Gregory Martin; born to Staff Sgt. John
Martin and Thaira Reynolds; June 23.
STUKEY, Chelsie; born to Spc. Lisa and Stephen
Stukey; June 24.
TURNER, Stephen; born to Spc. David and Gena
Turner; June 2.
FRANK, Devon Antonio; born to Spc. Michael and
Monica Frank; June 30.
JASSO, Daniel Esteban; born to Chief Warrant Offic-
er 2 Henry and Luz; June 22.
KEELER, Aubrey; born to Capt. Joseph and Lori
Keeler; June 2.
LEE, Jasmine Lee; born to Sgt. William and Angela
Lee; June 2.
ALEXANDER, Damien Tyler James; born to Special-
ists Tereasa and Damien James; June 15.
LINDBERG, Kevin; born to Spc. Eric and Sarah
Lindberg; June 26.
QUIROS, Querube Anett; born to Franklin(retired)
and Auristela; June 4.
BROWN, Janis Ranee; born to Sgt. Rufus and Jenni-
fer Brown; June 27.
GREEN, Brittany; born to Spc. James and Amy Green;
June 25.
FERNANDEZ, Alex; born to Cpl. Joel and Joan
Fernandez; June 4.
PADILLA, Dariam; born to Sgt. Eduardo and Lourdes
Padilla; June 25.
BOST, Thomas, III; born to Sgt. Thomas and Azucena
Bost; June 14.
VALDEZ, Lani; born to Spc. Frank and Misti Valdez;
May 5.
WOODFOLK, Aaliyah; born to Sgt. Darryl and
Yvette Woodfolk; June 28.
CASAREZ, Alexus; born to Spc. Delilah Casarez;
June 21.
PRESLEY, Justin Cole and Megan Leigh; born to Sgt.
Jay and Laurie Presley; July 11 .MORTENSEN, Steven;
born to Staff Sgt. Jeffery and Sgt. Lisa Mortensen; July
12.
EADDIE, Terrance; born to Spc. Nathaniel and
Marnita Eaddie; July 11.
SCHARTZMAN, Madeline Renee; born to 2nd Lt. Jo-
seph Charles and Geri Schwatzman; July 8.
HERNANDEZ, Crystal Marie; born to Sgt. Russ and
Paula Hernandez; June 7.
LAUDERDALE, Derace; born to Derace and Joana
Lauderdale; June 2.
HILLBURG, Kimberly Lauren; born to Spc. Ronald
and Iliana Hillburg; June 3.
LEE, Richard; born to Sgt. Richard and Aura Lee; June
9.
EIMER, Ashly Lynn; born to Spc. Roy Lee and Rosa
Eimer; June 7.
HEATH, Michael James; born to Spc. James and
Jeannette Heath; June 19.
JONES, Arri Kristina; born to Sgt. Laurence and Julie
Jones; June 20.
BEDOUET, Youlna; born to Spc. Jean and Daycee
Bedouet; May 17.


10 Tropic Times
10 July 22, 1994










-**Fe~ature.


Tropic Times
July 22, 1994 iL


Flying friends



Tips kee

by Floyd Able
Tropic Times student hire
COROZAL - Pairrots are popular pets here in Panama.
They can live anywhere from 15-25 years, so owners
should know how to properly care for their birds.
Parrots need cages large enough to spread their wings
and move freely. Wire or iron cages are the best. Large
parrots also need play areas where they can exercise daily,
said officials at the Corozal Veterinary Treatment Facility.
Cages should be placed away from loud noises, gases,
fumes and other odors. Keep birds away from television
sets because the frequency can damage it's nervous system.


p parrots
Cages should be easy to maintain, and food and water
dishes should be cleaned daily to prevent diseases. Stainless
steel, ceramic or plastic dishes are easiest to keep clean.
Cages need to be cleaned once a week with a solution of
chlorine bleach at a strength of 1 fluid ounce to 1 1/2 pints
of water.
When shopping for a parrot, the cage should suit the
type of bird. There are several kinds of parrots to choose
from.
Yellow heads, red heads, pericos (dwarf parrots), or-
ange chinned parrakeets and macaws are some of the more
popular breeds of parrots. The most common ones seen are
yellow and red heads - macaws are usually rare because


. . , . , .= . . . -, .. sp, - . 1 .
Department of Defense photo by Floyd Able
A parrot sharpens its beak while playing outside. Birds need time outside their cages for exercise
and to take care of their claws and beaks.


: healthy

they are found deeper in Panama's interior, Corozal VTF
officials said.
Red or yellow head parrots are usually make better pets
when purchased at an early age. Young parrots are much
easier to train. Older birds may not be as susceptible to
training and can cause problems later. Also, if the bird will
be left alone most of time it is better to buy two birds of the
same type to be companions.
There are a few differences between the various types of
parrots. Red heads are not usually as talkative as yellow
heads, and they sometimes have temper tantrums. On the
other hand, they are not as noisy as yellow heads. Yellow
heads love to talk.
Macaws are very different from yellow and red heads.
They are very aggressive and can be hard to get along with,
but they are also more colorful than other parrots and have
a longer life span, officials said.
Once an owner chooses a parrot or macaw, the next step
is introducing it to the rest of the family. It may be nervous
at first, so it is better to put the bird in its cage and leave the
door open so it can get used to its new surroundings when
it is ready.
After a few days have passed and the parrot has become
accustomed to its new home, owners should consider
whether or not to have the bird's wings clipped. If so, it is
best to have a veterinarian clip them the first few times until
the owner feels confident to do it himself.
Clipping a bird's wings involves cutting the contour
feathers. The procedure prevents the bird from flying long
distances for a few months. The bird will be able to glide,
and will be able to fly normally when the feathers grow
back, officials said.
Trimming a parrot's nails and beak are also part of its
health care.
If the bird gets out of the cage a lot, the owner shouldn't
have to worry about its nails and beak. But if it doesn't,
owners must trim them for their pet. The tips of the foward-
pointing claws should not meet or overlap the backward-
pointing claws.
Trimming a parrots' claws is a delicate job because there
are many blood vessels in their toes. Have a veterinary
surgeon trim them to avoid accidentally cutting the bird,
officials said.
Exotic birds require special care. There are books on
care of exotic birds at the Fort Clayton Library, and the staff
at the Corozal Veterinary Treatment Facility can answer
questions.


Air Force 'buys local' at trade fair


by Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - Last week's trade fair
was an "unqualified success," said Martha
Carey, director of business programs for
the 24th Contracting Squadron here.
"We put on the trade fair to support the
'Buy Panama'emphasis in the treaty," Carey
explained. "The treaty requires us to buy
locally if we can, and ifthe price and quality
of the product is comparable."
Every year Southern Command sets a
monetary goal for downtown purchases by
military customers. For Fiscal Year 1994
the goal was $18 million. "We've already
surpassed that goal, and we're just now
getting into the heavy buying season," Carey
said.
"We held a symposium July 14 to ex-
plain the procedures required for selling to
base customers," said Judy Young, a con-
tract specialist with the contracting squad-
ron and a driving force behind the fair.
"More than 135 vendors showed up for
the symposium," she added, "and about 80
of them returned July 15, during the actual
trade fair to display their goods and services
in the ballroom and the lounge ofthe Howard
Enlisted Club."
Items displayed at the trade fair included
refrigerators and security systems, office
and cleaning supplies and computer com-
ponents, and mobile phones and pagers and
sporting goods. Candy and toy manufac-
turers set up booths next to real estate


brokers and car rental agencies. The diver-
sity of products available extended to one
company's display of its innovative system
for lightning strike protection.
"This is an excellent opportunity for us,"
said Linnette Ruiz, one of the local busi-
nesswomen who participated in the trade
fair. "Very often we have something we can
provide the customers, something they re-
ally need, but they don't know where to go
to find us and we have no way to find them.
"At this trade fair, we can let potential
customers know where we are and what we
have to offer."
"I'm making a lot of good contacts here
today," said JeffCaston, another local mer-
chant. "They include not only Americans,
but also other Panamanian vendors who
have products and services that comple-
ment my own. I hope we can do this again."
Caston's final sentiment was repeated
by many of the people who attended the
fair, both vendors and potential customers.
In fact, the fair received such a popular
response from both buyers and sellers that
contracting officials say they're going to try
and make it an annual affair.
"This has been a positive, 'win-win'
situation for all of the fair participants,"
Carey said. "Everyone who had anything to
say had only positive comments, there was
absolutely no negativity at all.
"That doesn't happen too often," she
concluded, "so when it does, you know
you've got a winner and you want to do it
again."


U S Air Force photo
Lorena Zerr (left) writes down the address and phone number of her
office supplies store after having given away all of her printed business
cards.










2 Tropic Times
July 22, 1994


History


World War II stamps:


The Panama Canal and its outposts add color


by Richard B. Graham
Tropic Times contributor

In the years before World War II, strategists felt
that the Panama Canal made it unnecessary to maintain a
two-ocean United States Navy. The thought was that
ships could be shifted through the canal to meet
aggression in either ocean.
U.S. naval construction before 1940 planned no
warships that couldn't traverse the Panama Canal,
although for some ofthe locks were measured literally in
inches.
The one-fleet concept was based on the idea that
heavy gun emplacements at each end of the Panama
Canal could keep it open against any enemy ships that
might evade the screening fleet.
At the beginning of WWII, the guns and emplacements
defending the Panama Canal, manned by the U.S. Coast
Artillery, were considered among the most powerful
such installations in the world.
Only as WWII approached was it recognized that
air power could easily bypass the gun emplacements and
that German influence in South America could lead to
bases for enemy bombers to attack the canal.
The locks and dams of the canal and the huge
earthen embankments of the Gailard and Culebra cuts
were considered especially vulnerable to bombs that
could close the canal for weeks.
It was also recognized that air and naval bases, not
only in the Canal Zone but also in its approach from the
Caribbean and the Pacific, would be needed to combat
submarines and to serve as outposts and warning
system base for the defense of the canal.
Before 1939, only a few bases existed that were
available to the United Sates, one such base being
Guantanamo Bay Naval Base in Cuba.
Beginning in the late 1930's, air bases were built not
only in the Canal Zone but also in Puerto Rico.
The field bore the name Borinquen Field throughout
the war, but its name was changed to Ramey Air Force
Base in 1947. However, Army post office (APO) 845,
assigned April 20, 1942, continued to be used until 1965,
when it became APO 09845.
Figure 2 shows three covers from other Caribbean
bases. The top cover was mailed at APO 852, Camp
Hardwood, Charlotte Amalie, Virgin Islands, in October
1942.
The middle cover originated at the U.S. Navy's
Guantanamo Bay base (the return address says "Gtmo,"
the common Navy abbreviation). The
cover has an inverted-dial machine cancel
applied in April 1942.
The bottom cover originated at APO .
632, Batista Field, at San Antonio de los
Banos, near Havana, Cuba.
West of the Panama Canal, the
problem of long-range detection of
attackers approaching the canal was more
difficult, as there were few islands where
bases could be built.
Beta Air base was built on Seymour
Island (as named on Army maps) in the
Galapagos Islands. Covers from APO 662
at that location are occasionally seen. One
was pictured in this column March 17, .
1986.


An important air base was developed
at Rio Hato, located in the Republic of
Panama, about 60 miles west of the Canal
Zone. A privately operated runway had
existed there before the war, and Army
fliers could land there under arrangements
with the owner.
When war came, Rio Hato was
developed into a major base with long
runways that would accommodate long-
range planes.
Figure 3 shows two covers from the
base. The top cover is so identified by its
return address, "99th Bomb Sq. Rio Hato,
Albrook Field P.O." The Albrook Field


Oct. 8, 1941, machine cancel on the 15 cent Canal
Zone airmail stamp confirms the location.
The bottom cover in Figure 4 shows three more
covers from troops in the Canal Zone. Although such
covers may not have been sent by units known for
participation in the war, from a postal history standpoint
they are quite interesting.
The top cover in Figure 4 is from Albrook Field,
Canal Zone, which was the headquarters of the 6th U.S.
Amy Air Force. It was mailed June 5, 1942 by an
officer of the 16th Pursuit Group.
The middle cover, mailedJuly 22,1942, only
several weeks later, is from a member ofthe same
unit, but, as the cover shows, a great deal has
changed. This cover bears a U.S. stamp rather than
a Canal zone stamp, and it has the postmark of
APO 825, assigned to Albrook Field, July 1,1942.
The change from using postmarks with base
names to APO numbers markings probably
involved far more problems than normal in that the
stamps used at post offices had to be changed
from Canal Zone issues to those of the United
States.
This probably accounts for bases in the Canal
Zone making the switch to APO numbers much
later than other U.S. bases abroad did.
Another difference in the top two covers in
Figure 4 is that their unit designations, as given in
the return addresses, changed from the 16th
Pursuit Group to 16th Fighter Group in the weeks I
between when the two covers were mailed. F
The bottom cover in Figure 4 was sent from
the Army Engineers at Diablo Heights, Canal Zone, a
March 3, 1943. Although part ofthe Army, this a
unit had no APO, being part of the Canal Zone (
administration and engaged in construction. P(
Of added interest is that the postage is paid M
by a 15 cent Canal Zone airmail stamp with the
"OFFICIAL/PANAMA CANAL" overprint (Scott
CO3).
Troops at bases in the Caribbean and the
Canal Zone mostly never fired a shot in combat
while at those stations.
Although the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor
caused anxious anticipation ofa similar air attack
on the Canal Zone that might have closed the
canal at a critical point in the war, no such attack
materialized. A large troop buildup just before the
war reduced gradually as the war progressed.


Figure 2. Covers from Caribbean bases, 1942-45:
(top) from APO 852 at Camp Hardwood, Charoltte
Amalie, Virgin Islands, sent Oct. 21, 1942; (mid-
dle) from the Guantanamo Naval Base in Cuba,
postmarked April 16, 1942, with the dial inverted;
and (bottom) from APO 632 at Batista Field near
Havana, Cuba, Feb. 10, 1945.


Covers from troops on such stations are not at all
rare, except for a few locations where only a small
number of people were assigned.
Generally, the troops wrote many letters that give
us some very interesting covers.

Editor's note: This article was originally pub-
lished in the Linn Stamp News.


igure 4. Covers from the Canal Zone. (top) and
middle from Albrook Field sent a few weeks
part before and after APO 825 was assigned.
bottom) from the Canal Zone administration,
ostmarked at Diablo Heights, Canal Zone,
arch 3, 1943.


Figure 1. (Top) cover from Borinquen Field, Puerto
Rico, Dec. 23, 1941, before and APO number was
assigned and (bottom), May 4, 1942, just after
APO 845 was assigned.


Figure 3. Covers from the airfield at Rio Hato,
Republic of Panama, operated on conjunction
with Albrook Field at Balboa, Canal Zone. (Top)
from Albrook Field Oct. 8, 1941, before an APO
was opened at Rio Hato. (Bottom) from APO 838
at Rio Hato, mailed Jan. 20, 1943.














Sports

Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 13


5'10 and under championship



Nets cruise to victory, 66-56


1z


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/

Department of Defense photo by Sgt. Lod Davis
The Nets Phil Mickles looks for an open man as he turns away from Mo' Money defender Tony Lambert. Mickles'
skills as a point guard were a valuable part of the Nets offensive strategy in their championship win over Mo'
Money.


Directorate of Community Activities
11 beatthe Jazz, 63-41 to win in 5'11"
and over basketball championship.


Jungle Operations Training Battal-
ion wins the Atlantic men's over-30
volleyball championship.


*SCN AM radio schedule
*Local sports schedule
*Body sculpting


July 22, 1994


by Sgt. Lori Davis
Tropic Times sports editor
FORT CLAYTON - Beating up on the
competition was the Nets trademark. They
did just that in the championship just like
they did in the regular season with its 8-1
record.
Mo' Money fought its way up the brack-
ets to reach the championship, but the title
game was out of its reach early in the game.
The Nets roster was too packed with
talent and skill. Mo' Money might have had
a chance if it needed to contain a couple of
high scorers, but the Nets spread the offense
and routed their opposition.
The Nets poured on the pressure in the
first half. Dow Owens sunk two shots from
downtown and added two free throws to
lead the scoring drive, followed by Ray
Childress and Phil Mickles scored inside
and from beyond the three-point line for,
seven points each.
Moving the ball worked well for the
Nets, but Mo' Money could only cash in on
Johnny Ward and Tony Lambert. Ward
lead the way with six points inside and a
three-pointer, and Lambert followed with
six points inside.
In spite of Ward and Lamberts efforts,
the first half was all Nets. Gary Mixon put
up six points, and Bernard Grimsley and
Jeffrey Moses added five to the drive, push-
ing the Nets to a 40-22 lead at the half.
Something inspired Ward during that
halftime break, because he came back play-
ing like a one-man team. He opened the half
with three baskets and ended up scoring 14
points in the half, 23 points for the game.
Ward's fire lit John Gooch. Usually a
strong man inside, Gooch sunk only one
basket in the first half, but he got back into
his game to score 10 points in the second
half.
This tag-team offense pulled Mo' Mon-
ey closer to the Nets, out-scoring them 34-
26 in the second half. It just wasn't enough
to make up for the big lead the Nets built in
the opening half.
"Our front line bought us through,"
Mickles said. "Our forwards, Mixon, Moses
and Childress, were strong down low and
they turned it on for us."
"We also have outstanding ball han-
dling ability, and we are not concentrated
on one person so we can spread our game."
The Nets' victory, and their strong reg-
ular season play, was a result of total team
effort, Mixon said. The team worked well
together, but in his opinion, Mickles stood
out.
"The team had outstanding execution,
and we have an outstanding point guard in
Mickles," he said.
Gooch took the loss graciously, and
gave the Nets credit for a well played game.
"We just got outplayed," he said. "We
started to get the ball down low, but they
stopped us. Defense won the game."











14 ATropic Times
1 July 22, 1994


LSports


DCA II wins championship


by Sgt. Lori Davis
Tropic Times sports editor

FORT CLAYTON - The Directorate of Community
Activities II went into the half with only a three-point edge,
but it spent the second half cutting the Jazz's offense down


to size to take the 5' 11" and over basketball title 63-41.
DCA II spent the regular season at the top of the
standings, the underdog Jazz came through the brackets to
take a stab at the Cinderella team.
An upset seemed within the Jazz's grasp as it split the
scoring between Michael Burton with three three-pointers

F 77-Z


Department ot Defense photo by Sgt. Lon Davis
The Jazz's Martin Pleasant goes to the air to get a pass by DCA II's Tony Thacker.


and Kellsey Moore, Gregory Hunter and Martin Pleasant
with two buckets on the inside.
Pleasant got the Jazz off to a strong start, opening the
game with two baskets, but DCA II locked him down for
the rest of the half.
Not to be outdone, DCA II's Tony Thacker and Michael
Frazier opened up the game from downtown, putting in two
three-pointers.
DCA II fought back by spreading its offense with Steve
Alexander sinking six points, Jeff Fernandez and Thacker
putting up five points each, and Lee Brown and Anthony
Mitchell chalking up two baskets each.
The fast-break pace worked for the Jazz in the first half
as it pushed the ball down the court and got inside before
DCA II could set its defense.
DCA II slashed the Jazz's hopes of stealing the cham-
pionship by slowing down the pace in the second half by
keeping the Jazz's forwards out ofthe paint. DCA II captain
Chris Dale said his team moved from a 1-3-1 to a 2-3
defense to block their shooting.
The change in tactics worked, and the Jazz offense fell
apart.
Hunter, Burton and Pleasant found the basket for only
two points each, and Moore's only score was off two field
goals.
Jazz managed to contain Mitchell and Fernandez, but
the DCA II offense kept ahead of the Jazz with 10 points
from Brown and six points from Alexander.
Brown not only ruled the scoreboard with 16 points, he
added insult to injury by trotting down the court and
dunking the ball at the buzzer while the hapless Jazz players
watched with defeat.
"We played hard team ball," Dale said after the victory.
"The guys knew where each other would be, and we limited
the turnovers."
"We beat them in the regular season, but we knew we
couldn't ease up on the intensity," he said. " Most of the
players on this team have been on the winning team for
three years, so we wanted to keep the streak going."


Soccer buffs gear



up for Davis Cup


by Sgt. Rick Emert
USARSO PAO-Atlantic

FORT DAVIS - Soccer buffs who
weren't able to get enough of World Cup
'94 may be interested in signing up for the
smaller scale Davis Cup '94.
Cristobal High School soccer "freaks"
Jimmy Dodson and Rob Bernhardt came
up with the idea for the co-ed adult soccer
tournament. Dodson and Bernhardt were
most valuable players for defense and of-
fense respectively for the Cristobal High
School soccer team.
"We've both been playing since we
were about 5 years old," Dodson said. "We
met last summer and it's been non-stop
soccer ever since. Our walls are covered
with soccer posters."
"One thing I miss about the states is that
you can play soccer all year long - indoor
and outdoor," Bernhardt added.
Here, the two can only play organized
soccer during the school year. That's some-
thing they'd like to see changed.
"We've really only been able to play in
the school league - once a year," Dodson
said. "We met some other people that play
soccer, and that's when we got the idea for
the tournament."
To start the round-robin tournament, the
two made a flier and distributed 300 copies
throughout the Atlantic community.
They've had assistance from Atlantic sports


director Jaime Powell and Fronius Gym
manager Ricardo Ford, Dodson said.
With four eight-person teams already
formed, the Davis Cup could kick off by
next week.
"We have four teams signed up right
now," Dodson said. "I know of five more
that are formed but haven't signed up yet."
Each team must have a minimum of
seven players and one substitute; a head
coach that will determine the team's roster
and all players must be military ID card
holders.
"We wanted it to be just for the military
community," Dodson said. "The Colon
teams have been playing together for a long
time, and it wouldn't be as much fun for
teams that haven't played much soccer if
they were getting slaughtered by the Colon
teams."
Additionally, the tournament offers sol-
diers a change from the regular sports of-
fered like basketball, football and softball,
Dodson said.
"So far we only have six teenagers," he
said. "The rest of the people who have
signed up are soldiers. I think they like it
because it's something different for them to
do."
Although it is not set up as a unit compe-
tition, military units can sign up teams for
the league.
For more information or to sign up, call
289-3108.


* ~..


~'i:;1'*


U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Rick Emmert
Jimmy Dodson (bottom) gets the ball past Rob Bernhardt.












Sports


Tropic Times
July 22, 19941


Jungle warriors win

volleyball victory
FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Atlantic) - Jungle
Operations Training Battalion outdid 747th Military
Intelligence Battalion, 14-16, 15-12, 15-13 in the
Atlantic Over-30 Volleyball Championship here July
14.
JOTB claimed its first victory in the championship
tournament from a U.S. Army Garrison-Atlantic for-
feit.
In game two, the 747th served the Navy its first loss
with a 15-0, 15-9 crushing defeat.
Game three pitted 747th against JOTB for the first
time in the tournament. The 747th took the first match,
15-4, but turned the tables on the 747th team and came
back to win the next two, 15-13 and 15-9.
The first match in the loser's bracket went to
USAG from a Navy forfeit. Navy edged out USAG,
15-13 in the last two matches to drop USAG from the
tournament.
The 747th slammed Navy, 15-6 and 15-3 in game
five, earning the right to challenge JOTB for the
championship title.
The 747th already had one loss, and had to win the
game to remain in the championship. As in the first
match-up between the two, the 747th took the first
match, 16-14. JOTB poured it on and outscored the
747th in the last two matches, 15-12, 15-13, and won
the championship.


Forehand TropicTimesfilephoto
Becky Wilbur tries to return a shot during a tennis tournament at a local hotel. The Howard and
Albrook sports and fitness centers are hosting a tennis ladder tournament. Players start at the
bottom and winners of each match work their way up. All players must play a match per week, and
players can challenge no more than two rungs above or below them. The tournament ends Aug.
1. Call 284-3451 to register.


SCN AM Radio 790/1420
airs baseball action
Tonight
6 p.m.: Baseball: Chicago White Sox at
Cleveland Indians
Saturday
12:35 p.m.: Baseball: San Fransisco
Giants at New York Mets
6 p.m.: Baseball: San Diego Padres at
Phildelphia Phillies
Sunday
3 p.m.: Baseball: New York Yankees at
California Angels
7 p.m.: Baseball: Atlanta Braves at St.
Louis Cardinals
Monday
7 p.m.: Baseball: Minnesota Twins at
Detroit Tigers
Tuesday
3 p.m : Baseball: Los Angeles Dodgers
at San Fransisco Giants
Wednesday
7 p.m.: Baseball: Chicago White Sox at
Kansas City Royals
Thursday
6:30 p.m.: Baseball: Milwaukee Brew-
ers at Toronto Blue Jays

Unit level basketball on
local sports schedule
*Air Force basketball
Today
6:05 p.m.: 310th Airlift Support Squad-
ron vs. 24th Civil Engineering Squadron
7:05 p.m.: Co. A, 1st Battalion, 228th
Aviation Regiment
8:05 p.m.: 24th Security Police Squad-
ron A vs. 24th Mission Support Squadron
Monday
6:05 p.m.: 24th Civil Engineering Squad-




* U.S. Air Force


AIRPS/SVS
Co. A, 1-228th Av.
AIS/OSS
Trans.
Supply (B)


Baskteball
nerican League
rthern Division
W L GB
2 0 -
0 0 -
0 0 -
0 0 -
0 1 1.5


ron vs. 24th Maintenance Squadron Supply
A
7:05 p.m.: 24th Air Postal Squadron/
Services vs. 24th MSS
8:05 p.m.: 24th Area Intelligence Squad-
ron/Operations vs. 24th Transportation
Squadron
Tuesday
6:05 p.m.: 24th Communications Squad-
ron B vs. 640th Air Mobility Support Squad-
ron B
7:05 p.m.: Co. B, 536th Engineer Battal-
ion vs. 24th CS A
8:05 p.m.: Co. A, 1-228th Av. vs. 24th
Supply B
Wednesday
6:05 p.m.: Headquarters, Headquarters
Company, 1-228th Av. vs. 24th MSS
7:05 p.m.: 24th CS B vs. 24th Trans.
8:05 p.m.: 24th MS vs. 310th ALSS
Thursday
6:05 p.m.: 24th CES vs. 24th SPS B
7:05 p.m.: 640th AMSS vs. Co. B, 536th
Eng.
8:05 p.m.: 24th Supply A vs. 24th MS
July 29
6:05 p.m.: 640 AMSS B vs. SPS A
7:05 p.m.: HHC, 1-228th Av. vs. 24th
AIS/OSS
8:05 p.m.: AIRPS/SVS vs. 24th Trans.

24th Medical Squadron
offers body sculpting 202
Health promotion officials from the 24th
Medical Squadron announce a four-week
body sculpting class 10-11 a.m. Aug. 2 at
the Howard Sports and Fitness Center.
"Body Sculpting 202," is a continuation of
the popular "Body Sculpting 101" previ-
ously taught at the center. Taught by certi-
fied fitness expert Stacey Robertson, this
class teaches students how to effectively
use free weights and machines to re-shape
theirbodies and further improve their health


MSS
SPS (A)
HHC, 1-228th Av.
640th AMSS (B)
Commo. (B)


Supply (A)
640th AMSS (A)


and fitness. For more information, or to
register for the class, call health promotions
at 284-5870.

USARSO holds 10-miler
tryouts for men, women
Practice sessions and open tryouts will
be held for runners interested in the U.S.
Army South 10-Miler team.
Sessions are 6 -8 a.m. at Reeder Physical
Fitness Center. Trial days are 6 a.m. Satur-
day, Aug. 13 and Aug. 27 at the center.
For information, call Willie Moye at
287-6411, Sue Bozgoz at 287-6448 or the
Directorate of Community Activities Sports
Office at 287-4050.

Rodman center hosts
ping-pong tournament
The Rodman Fitness Center will hold an
intramural ping-pong tournament Aug. 9-
12, beginning at 6:30 a.m. each day. The
deadline for registration is Aug. 5. The
tournament is open to all active duty mili-
tary, Department of Defense civilians and
family members ages 18 years and up. Call
283-4222 for more information.

Jam '94 features open
softball tournament
As part of the Jam '94 Labor Day festiv-
ities, Rodman NS will hold an open slow-
pitch softball tournament from Sept. 2-5.
Cash prizes and trophies will be awarded
for the first, second, and third place teams
and the first and second most valuable
players.
The tournament is open to all military
and civilians over the age of 17. There is a
$150 team entry fee, and participation is
limited to the first 15 teams who pay the
entry fee before the Aug. 26 deadline. Each


Southern Division
1 0 -
0 0 -
0 0 -
0 1 1
0 1 1
National League
Eastern Division
2 0 -
0 0 -


Commo. (A)
Co. B, 536th Eng.
Med. Grp.

CES
HSC, 536th Eng.
310th ALS
SPS (B)
Maint. Sq.


team is limited to 15 players.
A coaches' meeting will be held 4:30
p.m. Aug. 31 at the Rodman Fitness Center.
Call 283-4222 for more information.

Rodman holds Jam '94
basketball tournament
As part of the Jam '94 Labor Day festiv-
ities, Rodman NS will hold a basketball
tournament from Sept. 3-5. Trophies will
be awarded to the first and second place
teams, and first and second most valuable
players.
The tournament is open to all military
and civilians ages 17 and up3. There is a $75
entry fee, participation is limited to the first
ten teams who pay the entry fee before the
Aug. 26 deadline. Each team is limited to 12
players.
A coaches' meeting will be held 6:30
p.m. August 31 at the Rodman Fitness Cen-
ter. Call 283-4222 for more information.

Rodman NS marina
sponsors shark fishing
There will be a shark fishing trip 6 a.m.-
1 p.m. July 30 aboard the 42' Vargas. The
trip departs from Rodman Marina. All fish-
ing equipment is included, there is a $38 fee
per person.
There a maximum ofeight people. Call
Rodman Marina 283-3147 for more infor-
mation.

Young bowlers get
own league at Albrook
The Albrook Youth Bowling League
meeting will be held 10 a.m. July 30 at the
Albrook Bowling Center. Th e bowling
season for children ages 5-18 years will
begin Aug. 6. For more information, call
287-4758/6795.


1 0 .5
0 1 1.5
0 2 2
Western Division
1 0 -
1 0
1 1 .5
0 1 1
0 1 1
*as of Thursday


. .
.-. w A -**


- I





�,--( .~- ~t


/1(1


1 Tropic Times
16 July 22, 1994


1,ILNews


Army Community Service


celebrates 29th birthday


by Sgt. Rick Emert
USARSO PAO Atlantic
MARGARITA COMPLEX - August 1965. The films
at military theaters in Panama included "McHale's Navy"
with Ernest Borgnine, "Kissin' Cousins" with Elvis
Presley and "Spartacus" with Kirk Douglas.
-U.S. Southern Command's newspaper, "Buccaneer"
gave way to the new "Southern Command News."
And Army Community Service came to Panama just
weeks after then Army Chief of Staff Gen. Harold K.
Johnson announced its creation.
Although Johnson made the announcement, it was the
efforts of Lt. Col. Emma M. Baird that resulted in the cre-
ation of ACS.
Baird was born in October 1912 and joined the Wom-
en's Army Corps in 1942. In 1963 she was assigned to the
Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel. There,
she worked to establish a program that would address the
needs of military families. As a result of her efforts, Army
Community Services was established July 25, 1965.
Baird was awarded the Legion of Merit for her work
with ACS and awarded a second Legion of Merit when
she retired in 1968. She continued to work with ACS after
retiring. She served as treasurer and special advisor to the
director at Fort Bliss ACS until her death in 1987.
ACS has come a long way in its 29 years of helping
Army families. ACS guidance went from a three-page
section in the Child Development Services regulation to
its own Army regulation and from a few services to more
than 20 services offered to meet the needs of the Army
population, according to Gabriela Soto, director, Army
Community Services-Atlantic.
Each of the services offered can be broken down into
several more specific services, Soto added.
ACS relocation includes: programs for bi-cultural fam-


ilies, newcomer's orientation, sponsorship program, Hasta
Luego and pre/post move briefings. The Family Advo-
cacy Program comprises troop training, commanders'
training, training of professionals working with children
and community awareness. Consumer Affairs and Finan-
cial Assistance cover debt collection assistance, check
management, budget management, financial workshops,
individual counseling and financial advice to soldiers
separating from the Army.
Relocation, FAP and financial planning are but three
of the many services provided by ACS, but they may very
well be the most important services offered here, Soto
said.
"Relocation is a biggie," she said. "It includes bi-cul-
tural issues and newcomers' orientation. We've placed
more emphasis on relocation recently and provided more
resources for the community."
Additionally, the Atlantic community drawdown may
result in changes to the services ACS offers, Soto said.
"During the transition time, from February to June
1995, there will probably be a greater demand for pro-
grams aimed at soldiers," she said. "After that, programs
like FAP, family member employment and the Exception-
al Family Member Program will begin to fade here; there
just won't be many families left."
None of the services will disappear prematurely, she
said.
"We will provide whatever services are needed until
the last family or last soldier leaves the Atlantic commu-
nity," she said.
Accomplishing that will require a move to Fort Sher-
man, as Forts Davis and Espinar close, by October 1995,
Soto said.
"We're (ACS) aware of the difficult times coming for
soldiers, civilians and their families," she said. "We're
prepared to help during those times."


Competition needs local talent


WASHINGTON, D.C. (Tropic Times) - Searching for
musically talented military servicemembers, the USO/
,AT&T Countdown to Stardom '94 is headed to Fort Clay-
ton Aug. 13. Servicemembers from all U.S. military bases
in Panama may participate.
Active-duty U.S. personnel on more than 25 partici-
pating military bases will have the chance to perform in a
musical/vocal competition Aug. 13-Sept. 30. Local judg-
ing panels will select first-, second- and third-place win-
ners who will receive $500, $250 and $100, respectively.
With support from United Services Organization and
AT&T, Morale, Welfare and Recreation departments are
coordinating the events on each base.
A videotape of each base's first-place winning perfor-
mance will be submitted to a panel of entertainment in-
dustry judges in the United States including Earth, Wind
and Fire legend Philip Bailey, recording star Vanessa Wil-
liams, publicist Sheila Eldridge and President of R&B
LIVE Ramon Hervey, among others.
These judges will select an overall winner to receive
$5,000 and a trip to New York for a recording session at
Sony Music Studios.
While describing his experience, Air Force Tech. Sgt.
Louis Edwards, last year's grand prize winner, said,"It was


'V


U.S. Air Force photo


a great opportunity to record at Sony Music Studios and
to get to work with some of the professional engineers,
meet some of the great recording producers, and record in
the same studios as some of the world's best recording
artists. I was a star for a day!"
"There is literally chart-busting musical talent hidden
in the ranks of our military," said USO Celebrity Enter-
tainment Director Dave Mitchell. "USO and AT&T hope
to find them and make them stars."
Contestants on base will also be stars for the day, as
family and friends cheer them on. For more fun and ex-
citement, audience members will have the chance to win
door prizes throughout the event.
"In addition to highlighting the very talented folks in
our military, we want to work with local MWRs to pro-
vide an evening of entertainment for the entire base com-
munity," said AT&T Military Market Manager Pam
Storms. "It has always been AT&T's objective to support
those serving our country so far from home with enter-
tainment programs in addition to many diverse communi-
cations services."
The USO is supported by individual and corporate do-
nations, United Way and the Combined Federal Cam-
paign.


Jamerson to receive

fourth star today

at Davis-Monthan
Lt. Gen. James L. Jamerson will be
promoted to general today during a
change of command ceremony at Davis-
Monthan AFB, Ariz. He will become the
commander in chief, U.S. Air Forces in
Europe; commander, Allied Air Force
Central Europe, NATO; and Air Force
component commander for U.S.
European Command, Ramstein AFB,
Germany. Lt. Gen. Thomas R. Griffith will
replace Jamerson as the 12th Air Force
commander.


Death of



a form

SF-171 becomes

obsolete Dec. 31
WASHINGTON, D.C. (AFIS) - "Taps" will
sound for SF 171 - the application form for fed-
eral jobs - Dec. 31.
The federal government will no longer print or
stockpile the venerable form after that date.
Still, don't feel bad if you've just spent money
for SF- 171 computer software. Applicants will
have the option of using the old form, said Office
of Personnel Management officials.
OPM Director Jim King said his agency pub-
lished a proposal ending the SF-171 in the June 22
Federal Register. Officials expect the proposal to
be final following a 30-day comment period and
Office of Management and Budget approval.
"The intent of the proposal is to make it easier
for people to apply for federal jobs," King said.
"The SF-171 is too cumbersome and sends the
wrong message when we are trying to move to a
more customer-friendly and flexible system."
Agencies should begin phasing in SF- 171 alter-
natives this year. DoD officials said they will be
ready with SF-171 alternatives by Jan. 1, 1995.
Next year applicants will have the option of us-
ing a resume, an electronic file or a written format.
Applicants for certain hard-to-fill jobs can already
apply over the telephone.
OPM will help agencies with the change to
computerized and telephone hiring systems. Agen-
cies choosing not to invest in computer or tele-
phone hiring systems can hire OPM as a contrac-
tor to process applications.
OPM officials said the new proposal highlights
the agency's commitment to simplify the applica-
tion process through computerized hiring. Job -
seekers will use a pencil to mark answers about
their qualifications on computer-scannable forms
and send them in with their resumes. Applicants
without resumes can complete a mini-form that
will be provided upon request.
OPM officials said the new format will save
time for both applicants and personnel offices. The
average federal job seeker takes at least eight hours
to complete an SF-171, according to Mary Ann
Maloney, an agency spokesperson. But the appli-
cant isn't the only one inconvenienced. "Even a
good personnel specialist can take up to 90 min-
utes processing an SF-171," she added.
Officials said the new computer forms will take
about 40 minutes for an average applicant to pro-
vide basic qualifications and another 15 minutes to
answer specific questions for each agency applied
to. Computer scanners can read up to 1,500 appli-
cations an hour.
King said the computerized format will mean
the easiest way to apply for a job will be to review
OPM's centralized list ofagencyjob openings and
follow the simple instructions given.
People with computers and modems can access
the list though the Federal Job Opportunities Bul-
letin Board at 1-912-757-3100. Or job applicants
can use touch screen computers in federal employ-
ment information centers throughout the country
or in their state employment offices. TDD num-
bers for the hearing impaired are also available at
these centers.
Vice President Albert Gore's National Perfor-
mance Review recommended eliminating the
form. Gore called the SF-171 "a symbol
of a system that's so tied up in it's own red tape
that it fails to serve either the government or the
applicant for a government job."











Tropictivities
A quality of life guide for the U.S. community in Panama


July 22, 1994


Page Bl


Days of knights U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
Branwyn nic Niall (Bronwyn Larkins) of the Panama chapter of the Society for Creative Anachronism receives a gift from Duchess Elsphet (Vicki
Loehr) during the duchess' visit from Florida. Watching the presentation is Larkins' husband Kael of the Highland Isle (Shayne Larkins). See story
and photos on Page B3.


A Balloon bouquet delivery ser-
vice is now available through the
Senior Teen Center.


I o m untyPa e 5


I an mor -


A pre-marital seminar for couples *Movies, Page B8
wishing to "tie the knot" is slated to *TV, Page B9


begin Aug. 3 at Fort Clayton.


-,U-


I


*Potpourri, Page B12









B2 Tropic Times
July 22, 1994


j Youth news


Pink gorillas bombard


community with balloons


by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT CLAYTON - No, you
aren't seeing things. That really is
a pink gorilla in a tutu holding a
balloon.
The Senior Teen Center now
offers the community a fun way
to tickle and embarrass their
friends and loved ones on birth-
days, anniversaries, weddings
and any other special occasion
with the new Balloon Bouquet
service.
Balloon bouquets can be de-
livered not only by a pink gorilla,
but also a normal-colored gorilla,
horse, chicken or rabbit. Clowns,
Uncle Sam, Santa, snowmen and
reindeer are also available to de-
liver balloons.
The delivery service is avail-
able for Fort Clayton, Albrook
AFS, Quarry Heights and Gorgas
Army Community Hospital, said
Kris Hem, recreation assistant
with Youth Services.
There are many kinds of bal-
loons available - plain, de-
signed and the metallic-type
mylar balloons, filled with either
air or helium, Hem said.
Prices vary depending on the
type and amount of balloons, and
whether they are delivered or
picked up and if they are deliv-
ered in costume, Hem said.
"There are balloons with mes-
sages for birthdays, get wells and
love," she 'said. "There are also
balloons with Alf, Big Bird and
flags."
Hem also pointed out that if
someone has a special type of
balloon the center doesn't carry,
they can bring it in and the center
will fill and deliver it.
"We are, however, planning
to increase our stock to a wider
range in the future," she said.
Though this service is a fun
addition to the community's
quality of life, it is ultimately a
quality of life increase for the
teens who run it, Hem said.


tj~,


U. S. Army pnoto by Stan sgt. Jane Usero
Spc. Tina Davis of U.S. Army Medical Activity - Panama accepts a
balloon from a Youth Services pink gorilla.


The service, which began about
three weeks ago, is run by and for teen-
agers 15-18 years old through the Se-
nior Teen Employment Program.
"The business is set up more for the
learning experience than for the prof-
it," she said. "The money earned is put
back into the service to buy supplies
and pay the teens."
Once the teens are trained and on
the on-call roster, they are called in as
needed when orders come in, Hem
said.


"Since we are on an on-call basis,
we ask that delivery orders be placed
at least 24 hours in advance," she said.
"This way we can assure customer sat-
isfaction."
For people wanting a bouquet with-
out delivery, same day service is avail-
able.
To place an order, call 287-3464
12:30-8:30 p.m. Monday-Friday and
11 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. All
orders for delivery must be paid for
before the delivery is made.


Best, brightest students rank FSU 10th
TALLAHASSEE - Florida State University has made is a great achievement, but these rankings far better sig-
the top 10 list of the annual college referral service of nify Florida State's status as a top institution of higher
"Who's Who Among American High School Students." education," D'Alemberto said.
Florida State was the 10th most frequent choice of This is the first year Who's Who has published its top
more than 100,000 of America's best and brightest high referrals list.
school students who asked that a specific college be no- Florida State ranked ninth last year and was 10th on
tified of their recognition in Who's Who. the 1992 list. In a recent survey conducted by Who's
"To know that the majority of this country's top stu- Who, nearly half of the students named (48 percent) said
dents want to tell Florida State Univer- V that quality of academics and reputation
sity about their academic achievements are their most important considerations in
confirms our position among the na- selecting a college. More.than a third of
tion's best universities," said President respondents (37 percent) said that cost,
"Sandy" D'Alemberte. loans or scholarships were the most im-
D'Alemberte said additional proof portant considerations.
of Florida State's national recognition The vast majority of Who's Who stu-
includes its reclassification this year to dents go on to colleges or universities af-
a Research University I by the Carnegie , ter graduating from high school.
Foundation for the Advancement of Who's Who Among American High
Teaching. / School Students is a recognition and ser-
Also in 1991, FSU ranked as the na- vice program that honors more than
tion's second most popular institution 700,000 of America's best and brightest
among white high school students and high school students each year.
the eighth most popular with black stu- Student's with a "B" average or bet-
dents based on where they sent the re- ter who have demonstrated leadership in
sults of their Scholastic Aptitude Test academic areas and extracurricular activ-
scores. cities are nominated for recognition by
"Our national football championship their teachers and civic organizations.


=1


Albrook/Howard
*Youth centers 286-3195/284-4700:
Gorgona Beach trip 8 a..m.- 4 p.m. Thursday.
Must register by Monday. $15 per person.
Arts and crafts 3 p.m. Wednesday at both cen-
ters. There is a $1 fee for supplies.
Gymnastics classes Saturdays. Ages 3-5 meet
noon-1 p.m.; ages 6-12 meet 1-2 p.m.; intermediate
classes meet 2-3 p.m. The cost is $13 per month per
person.
*Child Development Center 284-6135:
Family Day Care Providers are needed in the
Albrook area. Call Jill Winter at 284-3711/6135 for
information.
Captain T-Bird and'Captain KC Youth Sum-
mer Bowling Special includes three games during
open bowling and a free T-Bird or KC sports bottle.
Call 284-4818.

Clayton
*Youth Center 287-6451:
Anything you want to do day, today.
Arts and crafts Mondays.
Cooking experiences Tuesdays.
Outdoor Games Thursdays.
Monthly disco birthday pool party Saturday. Pre-
teens 6-9 p.m. and junior teens 8-11 p.m.
Piano lessons 1-6 p.m. Tuesday and Wednes-
days. The fee is $30 for four half-hour lessons per
month.
Gymnastics for ages 5 and older 2:30-3:30 p.m.
and 3:30-4:30 p.m. Monday and Wednesdays.
Swimming at the Clayton pool 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday.
Dominos Pizza trip July 29, 1-2 p.m. Fee is $2.
*Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680:
Popcorn and movies Sundays.
Senior Teen Employment Program is a year-
round program to develop job skills and earn money
for teens 15-18 years old. Applications are available
at the center.
Free Zone shopping trip 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. today,
Howard teen center will join in. Minimum 20 per-
sons, fee is $2 each.
Teen dance with Electro Disco today, 7:30-11:30
p.m. Center will be closed at 6:30 p.m.
Shimmey Beach trip Saturday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
*Child Development Center 287-3301:
Child Development Center provides high quali-
ty, developmental child care for children 6 weeks to
12 years old. Full day care and hourly care available.
Call 287-5657.
Fall registration for the CDC Part-Day Program
will be held at Building 156, Fort Clayton 9:30 a.m.
to 2:30 p.m. as follows:
Aug. 3 - all single and dual working parents; Aug.
4 - all other military and Department of Defense civil-
ian employees; Aug. 5 - all others who meet eligibili-
ty criteria.
Children registering for preschool must be 2 by
Oct. 31, 1994. Military identification cards for both
parent and child, child's immunization record and par-
ent's latest pay voucher must be presented for regis-
tration. For more information call Rebecca Fentress
at 287-5507/5104.

Cocoli
*Cocoli Community Center 287-4119:
Arts and crafts, 3:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thurs-
days.

Atlantic
*Espinar Youth Center 289-4605:
Teen sports 4-6 p.m. Monday and Wednesdays.
Saturday sports, noon to 6 p.m.
Youth service day camp 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Mon-
day-Friday throughout July.
Flag football and cheerleader registration under
way through August. Coaches needed. Mandatory
parents meeting Sept. 8.
Old fashioned games, noon-6 p.m., Saturday.
Make your own Sundae 3-6 p.m. Saturday.
Lock in for pre teens, 6-11 years old, 8 p.m. to 8
a.m. July 30.
Just for kids trip to Portobelo and Playa Langosta
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.









Tropic TimesB 3
July 22, 1994B


SCOibble


'~ ...--~


Ages



revisited


P 7f!

46btm~
ilk



Ms,&


a q
~ - -


f .
4 ;..;


Daffydd ap Emrys (David Thistlehawk-Ranck), a member of the Society for Cre
tests his skills during the archery competition.


S' oyalty recently visited here as Queen Una of
I 4 Blackberry Hollow and Duchess Elsphet
stepped out of the days of knights and into the 20th
century to witness tournaments, conduct a court, and
participate in a feast fit for kings.
Not left behind in the days of old were the pomp and
circumstance that accompanies any royalty. Also not left
behind were the crown jewels, ruffles and lace, leather
and armor, and bows and staffs worn and wielded in a
time of romance, magistry and mystery.
The queen and duchess, also known as Ann Kennedy
and Vicki Loehr of Florida, came here to visit the
Panama chapter of the Society for Creative Anachro-
nism. This is a world-wide society whose members
reenact life in Europe in a time period spanning 460-
1650 AD.
"Each person picks their own time period," said
Shayne Larkins, known as Kael of the Highland Isle
within the society. "Once they pick a time period, they
research the types of clothing, weapons and customs of
that period and bring it to life."
The "characters" portrayed by society members can
be from any part of the world, not just Europe, Larkins
said. As long as the people portrayed were know to the
English courts of the day, characters could be from
places such as China, Japan and even American Indians.
"The key is to be as thorough and realistic as
possible," he said. "Of course, there are adjustments that
have to be made for down here. Some materials are just
not available, but we stick as close as possible to the
authentic materials."
In addition to individual research, members get
together and share ideas, knowledge and craftsmanship,
he said. The group also shares fighting and weapons
. techniques at weekly fighting and archery practices.
The society gets together each Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.
at Valent for meetings and discussions. They also try to
S,, .hold fighting and archery practice on Saturdays and
Sunday. Fighter practice is usually 12:30 p.m. on
Sunday near the Clayton pool and archery is held
Saturday at 10 a.m. at the Fort Clayton driving range
near the Senior Teen Center. For more information, stop
by one of the meetings or practices or call 287-4696,
Larkin said.
In addition to the meetings and practices, the society
members perform for various functions throughout the
m '. military community and visit Department of Defense
S' Dependent Schools to speak to students about the
medieval days.
Larkins also said all of the meetings and practices are
open to anyone interested in the society or wanting to
native Anachronism, find out more about it.
"The only prerequisite needed to join the society is an
interest in the Middle Ages," he said. "We are always
- looking for new members to share ideas and good times
with."


) I..' ,\


*1~
- q~
- ~


Queen Una of Blackberry Hollow (Ann Kennedy of Florida) and her court, from left, Connall Anfael
(Chris Russel), Duchess Elsphet (Vicki Loehr), Lady Dunlaith na Suilledonie (Faith Norris), Ciaran
(Shayne Larkins Jr.), and Kael of the Highland Isle (Shayne Larkins).

story and photos by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
USIRSO Public Rffairs Office


A helmet reminiscent of the Middle Ages is only
part of a fighter's armor for members of the
Society for Creative Anachronism.


* Entertainment


lN


ion


� '*-









B 4 Tropic Times
B July 22, 1994


_F Focus on Panama


-. . .-. S.'


-* 1-1 0 1 1-


. DepartmentofDefensephotosbyRosemaryChong
The building of the Faculty of Law and Political Sciences in the University of Panama. DepartrentofDefensephotosby RosemaryChong


Education goes back into Panama's history


One of the main roles of the
universities in Panama is to
participate in the many
changes in the contemporary age.
Serving as a permanent guide of
orientation of the interrelations of the
nation and environmental happenings
in the world and is another purpose.
The country is subject to the new
scientific and tecluological progress in
tis fascinating era and has to meet
that challenge.
The planning of education pro-
grams must be in accordance with the
problems, business affairs and per-
spectives of the nation. A university
education should produce well-trained
professionals in agreement with this
period of time.
hInstitutions of higher-level learning:
*The University of Panama was
established in 1935. It is the official
university of Panama. The university
campus is located in El Cangrejo
residential area of the city. The
University of Panama offers the
opportunity of acquiring a higher level
education for people who want to be
better prepared to meet the challenges
of a highly competitive future.
The university is staffed with a


group of professors that ensures the
students attending the institution a well
and balanced education.
The university consists of 14
faculties. The Faculty of Management
and Accounting; Public Management;
Architecture; Agricultural Sciences
(located in Chiriqui Province); Exact
and Natural Sciences; Social Commu-
nications; Law and Political Sciences;
Economics; Education; Nursing;
Pharmacy; Humanities; Medicine and
Dentistry.
The university has seven Regional
Centers in the interior of the country -
Azuero, Code, Colon, Chiriqui, Los
Santos, Veraguas and La Chorrera.
Students aspiring to enter the -
university must take a placement test,
psychology test and aptitude test. The
tests are not difficult and anyone who
doesn't pass the tests can take an
orientation training course in order to
be administed. There is a registration
fee.
*The Santa Maria La Antigua
University, is a Roman Catholic,
private and non-profit institution. It
began in 1965 in the Cathedral Plaza at
the Archbishop's Palace in Panama
City.
The USMA campus is now located


on Ricardo J. Alfaro Avenue (Tumba
Muerto) and has modern facilities.
There are the faculties of Administra-
tive Science, Technology, Natural
Sciences, Law and Political Sciences,
Humanities, Religious Sciences and
Social Sciences.
*The Technology University of
Panama was established in 1975. Its
main campus is in the city of Panama
and has seven Regional Centers, in
Bocas del Toro, Chiriqui, Veraguas,
Code, Herrera, Los Santos, Colon
and La Chorrera.
It has five faculties - Civil
Engineering, Electrical Engineering,
Industrial Engineering, Mechanical
Engineering and Computer Systems
Engineering.
Students can earn four degrees:
Tecluician in Engineering; Bachelor
in Technology, Bachelor in Engineer-
ing and Master of Science.
*Other universities include the
Universidad del Istmo, the
Universidad a Distancia and the
Universidad Latinoamericana de
Ciencia y Tecnologica with headquar-
ters in Costa Rica.


This monument is dedicated to Dr.
Octavio Mendez Pereira, the first dean
of the University of Panama.


I P a a a n w s u m r


Editor's note: The following sunmmnary of
news is taken from the Panamanian press. The
translations and reports are unofficial and no
guarantee is made by the Tropic Times as to
accuracy of reporting or statements made here.
Selection of these stories does not ihnply any
emphasis, judgluent or endorsement by the U.S.
government. These synopsis are intended only to
give non-Spanish speaking persons a flavor for
events in Panamna.
July 18-21
La Estrella de Panama
Recently, 87 members of the Panana National Police
attended a three-week first aid course conducted by
the Panama Canal Commission. PNP agents were
awarded certificates of attendance.

El Siglo
The President of the Panamanian Human Rights
Committee, Roberto Troncoso, supports the possible
granting of political asylum to Raoul Cedras, chief of
Haitian military forces, provided an invasion of Haiti
can be avoided.


La Prensa
MianmiiHeraldreporter, Tim Johnson, interviewed with
Panama President Guillermo Endara, quoting Endara
as saying that when lie leaves office Sept. 1, he will not
miss the power as much as he will miss the Presidential
Palace domestic staff. Endara reportedly says that he is
anxious to leave and happy that his term is aboutto end,
a term that le reportedly did not enjoy because it is not
pleasant to say "no" and it is not pleasant to make
unpopular decisions.

El Panama America,
La Prensa
Papers cites President Guillermo Endara as saying that
the Clinton Administration has submitted a new pro-
posal for Panama to accept 10,000 Haitian refugees
who would be located at Contractor's Hill, an area
controlled by the Panama Canal Commission. Endara
reportedly said that he, personally, sees no problem
with this, because the area is isolated from tile Panama-
nian population. However, Endara reportedly said that
he would not make any decisions until the Panamanian
public is convinced by Panama President-elect


Ernesto Perez Balladares that it is a good idea
to accept the refugees.

El Panama America
Paper reports that during a ceremony held by the
French Embassy to commemorate the French Rev-
olution, officials recognized the approximately 22
thousand French citizens who died during the
effort by France to build a canal in the Isthmus of
Panama.

La Prensa
Paper's "Primera Plana" column reports that the
Panama Railroad tourist train will have a special
schedule for the Summit Gardens ecology fair July
30-31.

Hoy, La Estrella
Papers cites Panama Minister of Commerce
Hannodio Arias saying that in spite ofthe fact that
the gasoline currently being distributed inthe coun-
try passes specifications required by his ministry,
a sample has been sent to the United States for a
more thorough analysis. Results will reportedly be
announced Monday.


4v.


by Rosemary Chong, Tropic Times staff


IMMORMIRM









S___Community news




Marriage retreat



Couples re-establish intimacy,


successful communication skills
SANTA CLARA (USNAVSTAPANCANAL PAO) - Swafford said it was a complete success. All attending
Five married couples got together recently to improve their said the experience was well worth it. And the couples
marriages. The Naval Station Chapel invited couples from invited all married couples to enjoy the experience.
the military community to attend a Marriage Enrichment "Getting to know one another again was truly a great
Retreat in Santa Clara. experience. We learned a lot about ourselves and our
The focus of the retreat was simply reestablishing feelings during this retreat," one couple said.
intimacy and developing couples' communication skills, Swafford said intimacy is a high priority in marriages,
said Cmdr. Ron Swafford, chaplain in charge of the and that intimacy was the main focus of the retreat. The
Chaplains Religious Enrichment Development Operation. couples said after the retreat, they felt like newlyweds.
"The assumptions and goals of the CREDO retreat Members of the Naval Chapel hope to see this retreat as
program are for those who are willing to dedicate a a yearly opportunity for all interested couples. They en-
significant part of their lives to making their marriages courage members of the community to call if interested in
succeed," he said. making the event happen more often.









i'N


, , - ' �"



Courtesy photo
Troy and Jill Ivie kiss at a recent retreat for married couples. Each person had to create a gift from
nature during the retreat. The kiss was a "sealing of the gift."


Pre-marital seminar required for many


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The next pre-
marital seminar will be held 7-8:30 p.m. Aug. 3, 10, 17 and
24 in Building 156, Fort Clayton.
Anyone wanting to get married in Panama is encour-
aged to attend. Those marrying in the church, on or off
post, are required to attend.
Couples wanting to marry in the Catholic church must
complete this seminar at least five to six months before the
marriage date.
A certificate to verify attendance will be issued at the
last session. Those needing to make up a class need only
attend the session they missed.
For information, call Chap. Leon Kircher.

Session I, Aug. 3 - Chap. Leon Kircher
* Local laws and regulations on marriage in Panama
* What do we bring to our marriage?


* Expectations in marriage
* Children and others

Session II, Aug. 10 - Chap. Paul O'Neil
* All couples change
* Uncovering sexuality

Session III, Aug. 17 - Chap. Bob Neske
* Communications
* Money, possessions and work
* Here comes everyone (parents)

Session IV, Aug. 24 - Chaplains Paul Bolton and Leon
Kircher
* Sneak preview of the years ahead
* Why a wedding'?
* Catholic marriage requirements


Self help classes slated forAugust


COROZAL (USARSO PAO) - Monthly Directorate
of Engineering and Housing self help classes are held 9-
10 a.m. Tuesday at the PACE Improvement Center,
Corozal.
For information, call 285-6213. Subjects for August
classes are:

Week l
General Information on home repairs: entomology;
horticulture; kitchen appliances and painting.


Week 2
Carpentry: door hinges; locks, hardware; available
tools; native hardwoods; plywood types, grades and
uses.
Week 3
Electrical: circuit breakers, fuses; receptacles, switch-
es; fluorescent, light bulbs.
Week 4
Plumbing: stoppages; toilet repairs and replacements;
shower heads.


Tropic Times B5
July 22, 1994B


Corozal
The Al-Anon Family Group, an anonymous
fellowship for family and friends of alcoholics,
meets 8 p.m.Tuesdays and Fridays in Building
6550, Hospital Road (near the veterinary clinic),
Corozal. Meetings are open to anyone. For more
information call 223-7193.

Clayton
A Welcome to Panama Orientation Tour will
be 8 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Aug. 11 at the Fort Clayton
Noncommissioned Officers Club. The tour includes
an information fair, tours of historical sites and the
Miraflores Locks, an authentic Panamanian lunch
and dance exhibition. Free child care will be given
by calling 287-5657. For reservations, call 287-
5073.
Any licensed social worker in Panama interested
in performing home studies for adoption cases
should call the Adjutant General Passport and Visa
Branch at 287-4503/5207.
The Exceptional Family Member Program
Bowling Blast will be 9 a.m.- 1 p.m. Saturday at the
Curundu Bowling Center, Building 2057. EFMP
members and their children under 12 years old bowl
free. All other must pay 50 cents and shoes are free
for all. All active duty, retired and Department of
Defense civilians are invited. For information, call
287-5073.
The "Growing Godly Summer Bible Study"
will be held 9 a.m. daily until Aug. 23 at the Fort
Clayton Chapel. Child care is provided. Reserva-
tions must be made through the Child Development
Center. For information, call Charlotte Fredereich at
287-3188.
Regular Islamic prayer services are held 12:30-
1:30 p.m. Friday at the Fort Clayton Chapel hall.
For more information, call 287-5859.
The Enlisted Spouses Club - Panama holds
meetings 7 p.m. the first Monday of each month at
the Fort Clayton Noncommissioned Officers' Club.
For information, call 287-3587.

Atlantic
For people transferring to new duty stations, the
Army Community Service Relocation Assistance
Office helps in the search for housing, employment
and educational possibilities for servicemembers
and their families. Call 289-4021/4636 for more
information.
The American Red Cross is offering a commu-
nity first aid and safety course 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Tuesday and Wednesday at the Sundial Recreation
Center. For information, call 289-3595.

Howard/Albrook
The Howard Family Support Center is offering a
Spouse Orientation in English 10-11 a.m. Thurs-
day. This orientation offers an overview of the FSC
programs and the services available to people living
in Panama.
The Albrook Club is looking for an entertainer
to conduct karaoke sing-along. Interested people
must have an outgoing personality and must be able
to sing and entice others to do the same. For infor-
mation, call 286-3101.
Handcrafted arts and crafts and seasonal
displays are available at the Canal Crafters Shoppe
in Building 804, Albrook AFS. Classes available are
quilting, toll painting, bow making and cross stitch.
to sign up for a class, call 286-4500.

Miscellaneous
The Nutrition Care Division of Gorgas Army
Community Hospital is initiating a journal club. If
interested, call 282-5119.
The Officer and Civilian Wives' Club needs a
volunteer who has desk top publishing layout and
design experience to assist with the OCWC-P month-
ly newsletter - The Huaca. For information, call
Cheryl Ayers at 261-4565.
Nominations are now being accepted for the
1995 Ten Outstanding Young Americans Award
program. Nominations should be sent to Aichel
Tam at the Directorate CPO, Building 560, Corozal,
by April 22, 1995. Call 285-5611 for information.








B6 ^Tropic Times
B U July 22, 1994


N


$/ $21fee cover hors d'oeuvres, drinks not Isla Grande weekend July 29-31. vice Friday through Monday. Fees are $35
Rodman included. Cruise out to Taboga Island by Peacock bass fishing 5 a.m.-2 p.m. adults and $20children 12and under round
*Information. Tour and Travel: moonlight, while viewing Panama City's Sunday and July 30, $25 per person. trip, $25 adutls and $15 children one way.
The Navy ITT office hours of opera- dramatic skyline at night. Gold panning 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednes- Sun Splash tour to Jamaica travel
tionare 10:30a.m.-4p.m. Monday through Downtown Shopping Trip, 9 a.m. to- day, $12. opportunity to Montego Bay. Packet in-
Friday. day, $8. Shop Panama City's department Snorkeling and scuba diving to cludes airfare, three nights hotel
El Valle Shopping Trip, 7 a.m. July stores. Drakes Island 7 a.m.-5 p.m. July 31, $22 accommodations, and transfer. Optional
31, $12. At least 12 people are needed. Albrook/Howard for snorkelers, $45 for divers.. tours can be scheduled upon request. Pric-
Shop for local handicrafts, plants, fruits es vary between $300-$600 depending on
and vegetables and visit the nature pre- *Zodiac Community Activities Center: lytOn the hotel.
serve. Free Zone shopping 8:30 a.m.-4:30 *Valent Recreation Center: There will be a Gatun Lake train
FreeZoneshoppingtrip,7a.m.Thurs- p.m. every Friday in July, $13 for trans- Portobello historical tour, 9 a.m.-4 wreck dive Aug. 6.
day, $12. A minimum of 12 people is portation. Enjoy duty-free shopping in the p.m. Saturday. Customized trips are available for
needed, city of Colon. Barro Colorado 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. groups with a minimum of four or 10
Barro Colorado Island 6 a.m. Satur- El Valle shopping tour 6:30 a.m.-4:30 Saturday. people.
day, $65, a minimum of two people is p.m. Sunday, $13. Churches andarchitecture, 9 a.m.-1 Balboa
needed for the trip. Visit the tropical re- Horse racing at the Hippodrome noon- p.m. Aug. 6.
search island in the canal's Gatun Lake. 5 p.m. July 1, $5. *Outdoor Recreation Center: *Balboa Dive Club:
Panama City tour 9 a.m. Saturday Italian dining out 6-10 p.m. Wednes- Partial transits of the Panama Ca- The club is now accepting new mem- r
and Wednesday, $8. At least 10 people are day, $4. nal 7:30-11:30 a.m. Saturday, $40. A bers. Divers must show a diving certifica-
needed. Visit the Church of the Golden *Outdoor adventures: minimum of 20 people is needed for a tion card to join and membership is $12
Altar, the French Plaza and more. El Valle horseback riding trip 7 a.m.- partial transit any other day of the week. per diver per year. For information, write
Moonlight Cruise 6:30 p.m. July 30, 4 p.m. Saturday, $24. There is Contadora Island transit ser- the club or call 263-8077 or 250-0075.

/// / /\ //


,'ro Awar 1 1/ *radio classes Aug. 2-Sept. 30..
Classes will be held17-9 p.m.Tues- N
*Zodiac Community Activities days. Registration is ongoing. v0
ntr Swimming three days a week.
Intro to scuba, a free one-night *Fort Clayton Scuba Shop:
class is available. The phone is temporarily out
Tae Kwon Do Korean karate of order because of renovations.-
class 6-7:30 p.m. Monday, Wednes- Call 287-6453/5807 for informa- '
days and Fridays, $25 per month, tion.
Beginner and advanced English Basic open-water scuba class, .
and Spanish classes run four weeks $115.
every month. Advanced open-water scuba,
Beginner and advanced dog obe- $140.:
dience classes are held at the Howard Rescue scuba, $119. A
Parade Field. Four-week class costs Underwater photography,
$32. A minimum of five people is $99.
needed.
*Albrook Auto shop: Curundu
Air conditioning service and *Twin Oceans Pro Shop:
repair 12:30-5 p.m. every day ex- Equipment available for scu- y -'
cept Tuesday and Wednesday. ba, snorkel, tennis, camping and
Wheel alignment diagnostic and other outdoor recreation.
service classes are held 3-9 p.m. *Pacific Theatre Arts Centre:
Monday, Thursdays and Fridays, Monthly classes are available
10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sun- ranging from various dance les-
days. sons, guitar and martial arts. Call
Clayton 286-3814 for information.
*Fort Clayton Boat Shop: Rodman
Bass fishing at Gatun Lake, $20 *Rodman Marina:
fee includes guide and fishing gear. A boating safety class will be -
Deep sea fishing, $200 fee in- held 6-9 p.m. Monday and
cludes captain, gear, lures and fuel. Wednesday at Building 24 (next .
* Valent Recreation Center: to Pizza Hut) on Rodman NS.
Korean karate class 6-8 p.m. Cost is $35 and includes all mate- - -
Tuesdays and Thursdays. Admission rials and qualification test drive.' 1 '
to the first class is free. Beginner and advanced
A 10-week Spanish headstart swimming classes are available
class meets 6-8 p.m. Wednesday for adults and children age 5 and ..
and 5-7 p.m. Friday. The next class up. Classes are held at the Rod-
will begin Monday. man pool 3:30-5 p.m. Tuesday,
Private piano and guitar les- Thursdays, and Fridays. A mini- "Tropic Timesrtile p
sons are available weekday evenings. mum of four is needed for each Rom antic m om ent
The instructor meets privately with class. There is a $20 fee for 12
the students for 30 minutes. classes. Call 283-4253 for infor- Ralph and Sheila Jones share a romantic moment at the scenic waterfall in
The center is offering amateur nation. Valle. Trips to El Valle for shopping and sight seeing are offered through
installation travel offices.





Theatre dom '94" vocal and musical performance July 31 with the Hot Raiders Motorcycle Run to Margarita 8 a.m. Saturday. The
event is open to all active duty military Club. The run departs from the Banco Ex- is a $10 fee for each participant. The r
*Pacific Theatre Arts Center: members. Registration deadline is July 30 terior on Avenida Balboa. There is a $5 fee. starts at Curundu Elementary School.
The theatre dance workshop begins at the center. Cash prizes will be awarded The Road Knights is also sponsoring a
Saturday. Classes are held 8:30-10:30 a.m. locally, and a winners will have a chance at poker run 9 a.m. Sunday. The entry fee is Children
and 10:30a.m.-12:30p.m.Thereis amax- a recording session in New York. $6.50. The run starts at the Bridge of the *Rodman NS Chapel
imum of 15 students. Outdoors Americas. Non-members are invited to at- A youth concert will be held at t
Entertainment Outdoors tend both activities. For more information, Rodman NS Chapel starting 6 p.m. S
*Road Knights Motorcycle Club: call 285-5050 or 229-3635. urday. The New 72, a performing a
*Valent Recreation Center: The Road Knights Motorcycle Club +4X4 Club group from St. Louis, Mo., will be pi
The talent show "Countdown to Star- will be participating in a ticket run 9 a.m. The 4X4 Club is sponsoring a Poker forming. Call 283-4148 for information


hoto

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'Ii'


Tropic Times
July 22, 1994B


%1 Courtesy file photo
Singing soldiers
Twenty-two soldiers from throughout the Army will treat other soldiers, family members and
civilians to four nights of a musical variety celebration of America in early August as part of the
1994 U.S. Army Soldier Show. The ensemble will present performances 7:30 p.m. Aug. 3 and 4
at the Fort Clayton theater; 7:30 p.m. Aug. 5 at the Fort Davis theater; and 7:30 p.m. Aug. 6 at


Howard AFB theater.


A a. S

*Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts
Center:
Fabric painting classes 6:30-
8:30 p.m. the first and third Wednes-
day and Thursday of each month,
$7.50. Some supplies are available.
Stone stroke classes 11 a.m.
Sunday, $10. Paint ceramic figu-
rines to look like stoneware.
Custom frames to order and
do-it-yourself frame classes are
available.
The Ceramic Center, Building
198, is located near the Crafts Shop.
The center offers a special on mold


pouring. Rent two molds and get
the third free, every Friday and Sat-
urday in July (maximum six molds
each day).
*Canal Crafters:
Handmade arts and crafts are
available. Consignment and volun-
teers are welcome by the shop staff.
Current features include patriotic
displays.
The shop is open 10 a.m. -2 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday,
Building 804, Albrook. Call 286-
4500. Classes are available. Sign
up at the shop.


*Valent Recreation Center: through Sunday. able
The screening room offers free *Cocoli Community Center: Call
movies by calling the 24-hour mov- Arts and crafts for children S
ie line. 3:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays. in c
Better Opportunities for *Zodiac Community Center: Farf
, Single Soldiers forum meets the New hours for the center are 11 ing.
first Thursday of every month and a.m.-6 p.m. Mondays-Fridays and call
is open to all barracks residents. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. p.m
Gloria's bazaar 1-9 p.m. The activities room is avail- a.m.





Rec renter news Mondays and Wednesdays. a.m
*Ocean Breeze Recreation I
*Sundial Recreation Center: Center: a.m.
Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. Mon- The center offers various I
day, Wednesdays and Fridays. classes such as karate, cake dec- day,
Family exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m. orating, Spanish and jazz.
Wednesday. Atlantic tour ter:
Spanish 6-7 p.m. Tuesday and Atlantic tours
Friday. *Sundial Recreation Center: Satu
Beginning Painting 6-8 p.m. Portobello historical tour 8 R


*Howard Skills Development
Center:
Porceilain pouring class 10
a.m.-noon today.
Christmas in July greenware
sale 10 a.m.-6 p.m. July 29.
The 1994 photo contest is com-
ing in August. Call the center for
information.
Ongoing classes include stained
glass, cross-stitch, framing, clay
flower, pottery wheel throwing,
macrame, air brush techniques, and
lamp assembly. Several "how-to"
videos are available for viewing.


k to rent for private functions.
284-6161 to reserve a date.
Subs on Top has take-out, eat-
or delivery service to Kobbe,
fan, Howard and Gateway hous-
Fax in orders at 284-6109 or
284-5848. It is open 11 a.m.-6
. Monday-Friday and now 11
,- 3 p.m. Saturday.


Phone guide

Pacific
24th Services Squadron Sports and
Recreational Rental Center, 284-6107
Albrook Auto Craft Shop, 286-3613
Albrook Club, 286-4128
Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333
Canal Crafters 286-4500
Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-5957
Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453
Clayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360
Clayton NCO Club, 287-3586
Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363
Clayton Scuba Shop 287-3355
Club Amador, 282-3534
Cocoli Recreation Center, 287-4119
Howard Auto Craft Shop, 284-3370
Howard Enlisted Members' Club, 284-4107
Howard Officers' Club, 284-4680
Howard Riding Stables 284-3770
Howard Skills Development Center, 284-6361
Howard Teen Center, 284-4700 "
Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-4510
The Loop, 287-3035
Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814
Quarry Heights Officers' Club, 282-4380
Rodman Annex, 283-5475
Rodman Club, 283-4498
Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150
Rodman Naval Station Information Tour
and Travel Office, 283-5307/4454
Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514
Valent Recreation Center, 287-6500
Zodiac Community Activities Center, 284-
6161


Atlantic
Aquativity Center, 289-4009
Davis Arts and Crafts Center, 289-5201
Davis Community Club, 289-5160
Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402
S Outdoor Recreation, 289-4077
Sherman Arts and Crafts Center, 289-6313
Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-6104
Sundial Recreation Center, 289-3889/3300


.-4 p.m. Saturday.
'anama City shopping tour 8
.-5 p.m. July 30.
sla Grande 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun-
, July 31.
*Ocean Breeze Recreation Cen-

Remon Race Track 10 a.m.
irday.
Rio Mar beach 7 a.m. Sunday.


a.-',
w., >
/
/
/
/









B8 Tropic Times
SJuly 22, 1994


SMovies


Location

Howard AFB
284-3583








Fort Clayton
287-3279








Fort Davis
289-5173


Fort Sherman
289-5173



Fort Amador
284-3583


Today
7pm: PCU
(PG-13)
Jeremy Piven,
David Spade
9pm: Schindler's List
(R) Liam Neeson,
Ben Kingsley


7pm: PCU (PG-13)
Jeremy Piven,
David Spade
9pm: Schindler's List
(R) Liam Neeson,
Ben Kingsley


Saturday
2pm: Clean Slate
(PG-13)
Dana Carvey,
Valeria Golino
7pm: Schindler's List
(R) Liam Neeson,
Ben Kingsley
10:15pm: Threesome
(R) Lara Flynn Boyle,
Stephen Baldwin


2pm: Clean Slate
(PG-13) Dana Carvey,
Valeria Golino
7pm: Schindler's List
(R) Liam Neeson,
Ben Kingsley
10:15pm: Threesome
(R) Lara Flynn Boyle.


Stephen Baldwin


7pm: 3 Ninjas Kick 2pm: 3 Ninjas Kick
Back (PG) Back (PG)
Max Elliott Slade, Max Elliott Slade,
Victor Wong Victor Wong
9pm: No Escape (R) 7pm: The Favor (R)
Ray Liotta, Elizabeth McGovern,
Lance Henriksen Harley Jane Kozak
9pm: Leprechaun 2
(R) Warwick Davis


7:30pm: Serial Mom
(R) Kathleen Turner,
Sam Waterston


7:30pm: No Escape
(R) Ray Liotta,
Lance Henriksen


Sunday
2pm: Clean Slate
(PG-13)
Dana Carvey,
Valeria Golino
7pm: Threesome (R)
Lara Flynn Boyle,
Stephen Baldwin
9pm: PCU
(PG-13) Jeremy Piven,
David Spade

2pm: Clean Slate
(PG-13) Dana Carvey,
Valeria Golino
7pm: Threesome (R)
Lara Flynn Boyle,
Stephen Baldwin
9pm: PCU (PG-13)
Jeremy Piven,
David Spade


7pm: The Favor (R)
Elizabeth McGovern,
Harley Jane Kozak
9:15pm: No Escape
(R) Ray Liotta,
Lance Henriksen



7:30pm: Surviving
the Game (R)
Ice T,
Rutger Hauer


Monday
7pm: Threesome (R)
Lara Flynn Boyle,
Stephen Baldwin
9pm: Clean Slate
(PG-13)
Dana Carvey,
Valeria Golino


7pm: Threesome (R)
Lara Flynn Boyle,
Stephen Baldwin
9pm: Clean Slate
(PG-13)
Dana Carvey,
Valeria Golino


7pm: Leprechaun 2
(R) Warwick Davis
9pm:


No show


Tuesday


7pm: Schindler's List
(R) Liam Neeson,
Ben Kingsley


7pm: Schindler's List
(R) Liam Neeson,
Ben Kingsley


7pm: No Escape (R)
Ray Liotta,
Lance Henriksen


No show


Wednesday


i iI


2pm: White Fang 2
(PG)
Scott Bairstow,
Charmaine Craig
7pm: No show
555th Air Force Band


2pm: White Fang 2
(PG) Scott Bairstow,
Charmaine Craig
7pm: Crooklyn
(PG-13)
Alfred Woodard,
Delroy Lindo
9:30pm: The Inkwell
(R) Larenz Tate,
Joe Morton

7pm: The Favor (R)
Elizabeth McGovern,
Harley Jane Kozak


-4----


No show


I ii -i


7pm: When a Man
Loves a Woman (R)
Andy Garcia,
Meg Ryan


7pm: White Fang 2
(PG) Scott Bairstow,
Charmaine Craig


7pm: Crooklyn
(PG-13)
Alfred Woodard,
Delroy Lindo


No show


No show


III I =IIIm m


7pm: The Crow (R)
Brandon Lee,
Ernie Hudson


Thursday


7pm: Crooklyn
(PG-13)
Alfred Woodard,
Delroy Lindo
9pm: When a Man
Loves a Woman (R)
Andy Garcia,
Meg Ryan


7pm: Crooklyn
(PG-13)
Alfred Woodard,
Delroy Lindo
9:30pm: When a Man
Loves a Woman (R)
Andy Garcia,
Meg Ryan



7pm: PCU (PG-13)
Jeremy Piven,
David Spade






7:30pm: Schindler's
List (R)
Liam Neeson,
Ben Kingsley

7pm: Beethoven's
2nd (PG)
Charles Grodin


July 29



Howard AFB
7pm Beethoven's 2nd
(PG)
Charles Grodin
9pm The Crow (R)
Brandon Lee,
Ernie Hudson


Fort Clayton
7pm When a Man Loves
a Woman (R)
Andy Garcia
Meg Ryan
9pm The Inkwell (R)
Larenz Tate,
Joe Morton



Fort Davis
9pm Schindler's List
(R)
Liam Neeson,
Ben Kingsley



Fort Sherman
7:30pm No Escape (R)
Ray Liotta,
Lance Henriksen



Fort Amador
7pm Four Weddings and
a Funeral
(R)
Andiee MacDoweIl,
Hugh Grant


The Crow
Brandon Lee, Ernie Hudson
A dead musician rises from the grave
to avenge his and his fiancee's murders.
Superbly stylized version of James
O'Barr's graphic novel is compelling
and the performance of the late Brandon
Lee fits the mood perfectly. R (strong
violence, language, drug use, some sex-
uality), 100 min.

Beethoven's 2nd
Charles Grodin, Bonnie Hunt
America's favorite canine star,
Beethoven, the king-sized gallant St.
Bernard is back in an all-new adventure.
This time he's fallen in love. PG (mild
language, unapt teen behavior), 89 min.

When a Man Loves a
Woman
Meg Ryan, Andy Garcia
In this powerful, emotional drama, the
strength of a marriage is tested when the
couple must deal with a serious problem
that could destroy their relationship. R
(language), 126 min.

Crooklyn
Alfred Woodard, Delroy Lindo
Spike Lee moves in a new direction with
this deftly observed, touching and often
funny view of the life of a Brooklyn
family during the 1970s. PG-13 (drug
content), 130 min.

The Inkwell
Joe Morton, Larentz Tate
A shy black teenager and his experiences
at a social center on Martha's Vineyard
in the 1970s are the focus of this tender
and offbeat coming of age story. R (lan-
guage), 112 min.

PCU
Jeremy Piven, David Spade
In PCU, a renegade dorm sets out to defy
the rigid behavior of its fellow students at
a very politically correct university. It's


"TWOTHUMS UK
- IK L IIII


Now showing at Howard and Amador
theaters.
the free thinkers against the regimented
in a riotous collection of counter culture
clashes. PG- 13 (language, drug content,
some sensuality), 80 min.

No Escape
Ray Liotta,
Lance Henriksen
In this futuristic action-adventure, Ray
Liotta is a military man sent to a high
security prison and assigned to an isolat-
ed island colony where two groups of
desperate criminals battle for control. He
organizes the troops to battle for free-
dom against the highly mechanzied se-
curity forces. R (strong violence, lan-
guage), 118 min.


Threesome
Lara Flynn Boyle,
Stephen Baldwin
A clerical error assigns a young lady as
roommate to two gentlemen in the col-
lege dorm. Their sexual awakening is
somewhat confused as they try to sort
out their preferences in a comedy of the
90s. R (strong sexuality, sex related
dialogue), 93 min.

Clean Slate
Dana Carvey, Valeria Golino
Being a good private detective is tough
when you wake up each morning with
your memory wiped completely clean.
Dana Carvey tries to deal with this
peculiar problem as he ducks danger,
not knowing why everyone wants to
kill him. PG-13 (language), 119 min.

3 Ninjas Kick Back
Max Elliott Slade,
Victor Wong
The continuing adventure of ninja arts
students Rocky, Colt and Turn Turn
picks up with them on the way to Japan
to rescue grandma, fight bad guys and
discover a cave of gold. PG (martial
arts action, mild language), 99 min.

Schindler's List
Liam Neeson, Ben Kingsley
Winner of seven academy awards,
Steven Spielberg's powerful film ac-
count of how a Jewish businessman
saved thousands of WWII Jews from
death is a chilling and realistic recre-
ation of one of recent history's most
horrifying chapters. R (language, actu-
ality violence, some sexuality), 3 hrs,
15 min.

Leprechaun 2
Warwick Davis
Little Lop is in Los Angeles and he's
looking for a wife. The woman of his
dreams is not so inclined, and to further
unfuriate him- someone has taken some
of his gold. R (violence, nudity), 85
min.


,












gjTV Schedule


Tropic Times
July 22, 1994B


* Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time


Today Saturday


5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America
8:00 Basic Training Workout
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Murder, She Wrote
10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Ilospital
12:00 Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World
2:00 Oprah Winfrey
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Legends of the Hidden
Temple
4:30 1 Love Lucy
5:00 Family Feud
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:30 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Wheel of Fortune
7:30 Entertainment Tonight
8:00 America's Funniest Home
Videos
8:30 Dave's World
9:00 Paradise
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Cheers
10:30 David Letterman
11:30 Tonight Show
12:30 Rocko's Modem World
12:55 Movies: "A Few Good
Men"
3:15 "Mass Appeal"
4:50 "Cowboy"


6:30 Headline News
7:00 Navy/Marine Corps News
7:30 Real News for Kids
8:00 Guts
8:30 Just for Kids!
Garfield and Friends
Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles
Wild West C.O.W. Boys of
Moo Mesa
Batman Cartoon
Cartoon Classics
Faerie Tale Theater
11:00 Special: The Quality
Revoution
!12:00 Headline News
:12:30 Movie:
"The Caine Mutiny"
'2:35 "Run Till You Fall"
4:00 Nova
S5:00 Showtime at the Apollo
6:00 The Adventures of
Superman
6:30 Rescue 911
7:25 China Beach
18:20 Movie: "The Rape of Dr.
Willis"
10:00 Headline News
10:30 Saturday Night Live
12:00 WWF Superstars of
Wrestling
12:45 Friday Night'Videos
1:45 Movies: "Close Encounters
of the Third Kind"
4:00 "Impulse"


Sunday


6:00 CCMTV
6:30 Hour of Power
7:00 Voices of Faith
7:30 Catch the Spirit
8:00 CBS Sunday Morning
9:30 Face the Nation
10:00 Washington Week in
Review
10:30 This Week w/Brinkley
11:30 America's Black Forum
12:00 NASCAR:"Talladega500"
3:30 LPGA: Women's Open
Finals
5:00 Center Stage
6:00 Entertainment this Week
7:00 Grace Under Fire
7:30 Movie: "Out of Africa"
,10:30 ABC 20/20
I 1:30 Middlemarch
'12:30 Meet the Press
1:30 Headline News
2:00 Sports Latenight
2:30 ABC World News Now
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Sports Machine
14:00 ABC World News Now
5:00 Headline News Break


Monday

15:30 NBC News at Sunrise
16:00 Good Morning America
8:00 Basic Training Workout
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Murder, She Wrote
10:25 Guiding Light
I1:10 General Hospital
12:00 Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 Sports Machine
1:00 Another World
12:00 Oprah Winfrey
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Guts
4:30 1 Love Lucy
5:00 Family Feud
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Wheel of Fortune
7:30 Entertainment Tonight
8:00 Roc
8:30 Murphy Brown ****
9:00 60 Minutes
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Cheers
10:30 David Letterman
11:30 Tonight Show
12:30 Headline News
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Arsenio Hall
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Tonight Show
14:30 Headline News
15:00 Headline News Break


Changes 8 *1


Tuesday

5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America
8:00 Bodyshaping
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Murder, She Wrote
10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital
112:00 Headline News Break
1l2:15 SCN Midday
12:30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World
12:00 Sally Jesse Raphael
13:00 Price is Right
4:00 Ghostwriter
4:30 1 Love Lucy
5:00 Family Feud
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
17:00 Wheel of Fortune
7:30 Entertainment Tonight
8:00 Beauty and The Beast
9:00 48 Hours
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Cheers
10:30 David Letterman
11:30 Tonight Show
12:30 Headline News
11:00 Nightline
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Arsenio Hall
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Tonight Show
4:30 Headline News
5:00 Headline News Break


Wednesday

5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America
8:00 Basic Training Workout
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Murder, She Wrote
10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital
12:00 Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World
2:00 Oprah Winfrey
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Shining Time Station
4:30 I Love Lucy
5:00 Family Feud
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Wheel of Fortune
7:30 Entertainment Tonight
8:00 Fresh Prince of Bel-Air
8:30 Beverly Hills 90210 **
9:30 Cops ****
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Cheers
10:30 David Letterman
11:30 Tonight Show
12:30 Headline News
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Arsenio Hall
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Tonight Show
4:30 Headline News
5:00 Headline News Break


I 6 Calechnnl 4


* Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time


Today

5:30 Simulcast with Channels
8 & 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Ghost Writer
5:00 Silver Spoons
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 Primetime Live
8:00 Renegade
9:00 Movie: "Project X"
11:00 Headline News
11:25 SCN Late Edition
11:30 Nightline
12:00 M*A*S*H
12:30 Larry King Live
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Arsenio Hall
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Tonight Show
4:30 David Letterman
5:30 Simulcast with 8&10


Saturday

6:30 Simulcast with Channels
8& 10
8:30 Young Adult Theater
Cheetah
Can A Guy Say No
Everyday Heroes
11:30 Real News for Kids
12:00 The Goodwill Games
1:00 MLB Baseball: Reds vs.
Cubs
4:00 21 Jump Street
5:00 American Gladiators
6:00 The Honeymooners
6:30 The Simpsons
7:00 Lois & Clark: The
Adventures of Superman
8:00 Star Trek: "Deep Space
Nine"
9:00 Herman's Head
9:30 Married With Children
10:00 Movie: "Tap"
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Science and Technology
Week
1:00 The McLaughlin Group
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Entertainment This week
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Saturday Night Live
5:00 Videolinks
5:30 Headline News Break


Sunday Monday


6:30 The Sunshine Factory
7:00 Goof Troop
7:25 Garfield and Friends
7:55 Darkwing Duck
8:20 Batman **
8:40 Where on Earth is
Carmen Sandiego? **
9:05 Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles
9:30 Science and Technology
Week
10:00 Motor Week
10:30 Sports Closeup
11:00 This Week in Baseball
11:30 This Old House
12:00 Mary Tyler Moore Show
12:30 Amish Cooking from
Quilt Country
1:00 Wall Street Journal Report
1:30 Movie: "The Littlest
Outlaw"
2:45 Movie: "Mary Poppins"
5:05 Quantum Leap
6:00 Wonderful World of
Disney +
7:00 The Goodwill Games
9:30 Golden Girls +
10:00 L.A. Law
11:00 Turning Point **
12:00 Simulcast with 8&10


5:30 Simulcast with Channels
8& 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Batman **
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Are You Afraid of the
Dark?
! 5:00 Club Connect
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 MacGyver
8:00 Movie:"Gaby, a True
Story"
110:00 Eye to Eye w/Connie
Chung
11:00 Headline News
I 11:25 SCN Late Edition
11:30 Nightline
12:00 M*A*S*H
12:30 Simulcast with 8&10


Tuesday ,Wednesday


5:30 Simulcast with Channels
8 & 10
8:00 Donahue
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 WhereOnEarth IsCarmen
Sandiego? **
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Legends of the Hidden
Temple ***
5:00 Mickey and Donald
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 ALF
7:30 Home Improvement
8:00 Picket Fences ***
9:00 Martin
9:25 Movie: "Honey, I Blew Up
The Kids"
11:00 Headline News
11:25 SCN Late Edition
11:30 Nightline
12:00 M*A*S*H
12:30 Simulcast with 8&10


Thursday


5:30 Simulcast with Channels 5:30 Simulcast with Channels
8& 10 I 8&10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Sally Jesse Raphael
9:00 Today 9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 GoofTroop 3:30 Garfield and Friends
4:00. Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Guts 4:30 Get The Picture
5:00 Beakman's World ** 5:00 The Wonder Years
5:30 The Cosby Show ,5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 Hangin' With Mr. Cooper 7:00 Full House
7:30 Seinfeld 7:30 Family Matters
8:00 Tour Of Duty 8:00 Living Single *
9:00 NYPD Blue *** 8:30 Joe's Life
10:00 Murder, She Wrote 9:00 Dateline NBC
11:00 Headline News Break 10:00 Miami Vice
11:25 SCN Late Edition 11:00 Headline News Break
11:30 Nightline 11:25 SCN Late Edition
12:00 M*A*S*H 11:30 Nightline
12:30 Simulcast with 8&10 12:00 M*A*S*H
1 12:30 Simulcast with 8&10


Channels 8 & 10

Sports
NASCAR: Talladega 500, noon Sunday '
LPGA: Women's Open Finals, 3:30 p.m. Sunday
Specials
The Quality Revolution, 11 a.m. Saturday
Reporter Collin Sidor explores the factors that led to the
decline in American manufacturing including an analysis of i .
the errors that have compounded the problems of low productivity, '" " .....
morale and profits.
Series starts '
"Beverly Hills 90210," 8:30 p.m. Wednesday. The students all look a little "'
older than most teens, and their lives seem to run in a much faster lane in Los
Angeles' most exclusive zip code area at Beverly Hills High. Stars Jason Priestly,
Shannon Doherty and Luke Perry.
Prime time movies
"The Rape of Dr. Willis," 8:20 p.m. Saturday. A female doctor is brutally raped
and in a twisted turn of events she finds herself charged with murder when the
accused dies in surgery even though she has tried to save his life. Stars Jaclyn Smith,
Dan Butler and Robin Thomas.
"Out Of Africa," 7:30 p.m. Sunday. A story set in the early 20th century story
of a marriage of convenience and the unrequited love of another. Set in the stunning
wilds of South Africa. Stars Meryl Streep, Robert Redford and Klaus Brandauer.
"Julia," 7:55 p.m. Thursday. In the years before WWII, an author travels into
Hitler's Germany to locate her childhood friend who has joined the resistance
against the Nazis. Stars Jane Fonda, Vanessa Redgrave and Jason Robards.


g Cable Channel 14

Sports
ttI'' ~The Goodwill Games, noon Saturday
MLB Baseball
Reds vs. Cubs, 1 p.m. Saturday
The Goodwill Games, 7 p.m. Sunday
Series starts
S"Batman," 8:20 a.m. Sunday and 3:30 p.m. Monday. (Re-
^ j'.;t." , places Tiny Toon Adventures) Batman, the famous Caped Crusader,
i returns as the nemesis of crime and evil in Gotham City. No crime is too
small, no injustice too insignificant to keep-millionaire-playboy Bruce
ii Wayne from leaping into action as Batman.
. . "Where On Earth is Carmen Sandiego?" 8:40 a.m. Sunday and 3:30
Tuesday. (Replaces EEK! The Cat) Adapted from the famous computer game, the
ever elusive super-thief Carmen Sandiego makes her style of crime seem easy. She
always leaves a clue, but the trick is to figure out what it means and where in the world
she'll be next.
Prime time movies
"Project X," 9 p.m. today. When a young chimpanzee is drafted to take part in
a deadly military experiment, he has only his wits to fall back on. With the help of
a would-be pilot and expert chimp teacher, he and his fellow chimps pit themselves
against U.S. military might in a desperate attempt to save themselves from certain
destruction. Stars Matthew Broderick and Helen Hunt.
"Tap," 10 p.m. Saturday. An ex-con, Max Washington, is torn between his former
career as a jewel thief and his love of tap dancing. But regardless of how easy the
money comes by boosting jewels, the call of the tap isjust too strong. Stars Gregory
Hines and Sammy Davis Jr.


Thursday

5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America
8:00 Bodyshaping
* 8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Murder, She Wrote
10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital
S12:00 Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday Report
12:30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World
2:00 Donahue
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Club Connect
4:30 1 Love Lucy
5:00 Family Feud
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Wheel of Fortune
7:25 Entertainment Tonight
7:55 Movie: "Julia"
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Cheers
10:30 David Letterman
I 1:30 Tonight Show
12:30 Headline News
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Arsenio Hall
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Tonight Show
4:30 Headline News
5:00 Headline News Break


a-
"A














10 Tropic Times
B0IU July 22, 1994


SClassified Ads


Duty-free merchandise

FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office)- As a reminder,
in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern
Command regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used,
cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege hold-
ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu-
tion under both, military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes
permissible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid.
Before such a sale, it is strongly recommended that the seller contact
the Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-3117.


Chow Chow puppies, female $150,
male $200, all shots, 221-7423. after
2:30.

3mo old kitten free to good home.
286-4982.

Shepherd puppies, CCP, all shots,
dewormed. 228-2643.

Rottweiler puppies. CCP reg, avail
now, exc pedigree. 287-6195, Stacy.

AKC/CCP miniature pinscher pup-
pies. 284-3924.

15.3h Bay TB Gelding, easy to han-
dle. 287-4598. Crystal.

lOyr old TB mare trained English,
need exp rider. 223-7880.

German shepherd, 2yr old male,
$200. 287-5839.

Free to gd home, 2-3mo old male
kittens. 260-9318.

Boxer puppies, with pedigree, 6wks
old, $350. 287-6382.

2 male puppies, Cocker spamcel, Ger-
man Shepherd. 260-5809.

Duel reg Staffordshire terrier/UKC
Pitbull puppies, $250 ca. 284-5670.

Free 18,mos old black&white male
cat, declawed, has all shots, neutered.
282-4691.

Free kittens avail. 287-4272.

Boxer, male 8mos old, ears&tail out,
$200, free female Boxer 9mos 287-
6247.

Boxer female, 3yrs, spayed, gd dog,
$50/obo. 284-6171.

AKC/CCP miniature Pinscher pup-
pies. $600. 284-3924.

2 free cats to good home, male &
female, neutered, spayed, both
declawed. 263-4792.

8mo old Pil Bull w/papers, $100.
228-6608.

Black Cocker spaniel, 9wks, has Ist
shots. $250. 283-4531.

AKC reg Rottweilcr puppies. 284-
3993.

American Bulldogs, 2mos old, $800.
262-0732..

Kittens looking for gd home, 282-
4474.

Black female cat, litter trained, lov-
ing, grt w/kids. 282-4474.

Male Doberman/lHusky mix, needs
to be trained, $60 neg. 287-3671.

Red nose male American Pitbull lor
stud service. 239-431 I.

Free to gd home, medium sz
brown&white family dog. 284-5632.

Siberian Ilusky puppies, ready now,
$300. 284-3681.





1986 Chevy Celebrity, am/fim, gd
cond, $4,500/obo. 286-3398.

1977 Toyota 4x4, $6,200 286-4896.

1978 VW camper, $4,600. 286-4896.

1988 Ford Taurus, 4cyl. 4dr, gd cond,
$4,000. 261-2550.

1991 Hyundai Excel, dry pd. ac, am/
fm/radio, tinted win, $4,500. 226-
0334.

1979 Camaro LT, ac, JVC stereo,
pb, ps, SI,8011/obo. 260-5601.

1988 Toyota Corolla, 5spd, ac, 2dr,
sunroof, am/fm/cass., not dty pd,
$6,500/obo. 263-4804.

1986 Buick Century Lmunited V6,


at, ac, gd cond, $4,800/obo. 285-
5560, Ssg. Terrell._

1986 Ford Bronco XLT, 4wd, loaded,
gd cond, $5,800/obo. 285-5560, Ssg.
Terrell.

1992 Daewood Racer, low miles, am/
fm/cass, alarm, gd cond, $6,000. 224-
3550.

1990 Saab 900, 16 valve, 4dr, ac, am/
fm/cass, tinted win, 5spd, exc cond,
$19,500. 285-4381.

1986 Toyota Celica GT Coupe, 5spd,
am/fm/cass, pwr sunroof, $4,500/obo.
287-6182.

1985 Chrysler Lebaron, 4cyl, at, ac,
loaded, exc cond, $3,400. 233-0873.

1985 Hilux dbl cab p/u, ac, am/fm/
stereo, bedliner, dty pd, $6,300. 236-
3099.

1993 Nissan Sentra, 5spd, ac, am/fmr
radio, $5,500. 236-3099.

1991 Pathfinder, 4cyl, 2dr, loaded,
not dty pd, $11,500. 286-3895.

1993 Jeep Cherokee Grand Laredo
4x4, at, 4wd, low miles, Ig tires, 5 yr
warranty, $23,900/obo. 286-3381.

1983 Nissan 280zx, ac, std, radio, t-
top, dry pd, $4,900. 221-4164.

1975 Buick Lesabre, needs transmis-
sion, dty pd, $650/obo. 286-6439.

1991 Cutlass Supreme, 4dr, pwr ev-
erything, ac, lots more, $11,500. 286-
6136.

1989 Hyundai Excel, at, ac, 4dr, ste-
reo, not dry pd, $4,500/obo. 284-
6171.

1993 Dodge Dakota LE, V8, anti-lock
brakes, loaded, camper shell, under
10,000 miles, $19,000. 286-3085.

1972 Plymouth Duster, 8cyl, $1,000.
287-6174.

1988 Nissan Pathfinder 4x4, 6cyl, ac,
ps, pb, exc cond, $9,800. 284-3524.

1986 Ford Aerostar, 6cyl, ac, at, gd
cond, not dty pd, $7,700/obo. 282-
3822.

1990 Toyota Carolla, exc cond, am/
fm/cass, not dty pd, $6,500. 236-2794.

1983 Honda Civic, 4dr, 5spd, ac, runs
grt, $2,500. 223-8850.

1989 Ford Tempo, 4dr, 78k, ac, ps, pl,
cruise control, exc cond, $6,300. 284-
6381.

1989 Ford Ranger p/u XLT, ac, $6,500.
284-5792.

1986 Chevy Camaro, 5spd, ac, pw,
am/fm/cass, runs gd, needs paint,
$3,800. 284-5930.

1987 Ply Rel sedan, not dty pd, 262-
2813.

1981 CJ-7 Jeep, 4cyl, hard top&bikini
top, $3.2011. 269-5762.

1988 Olds Cutlass Cailias, ac, at, gd
cond, $4,00/obo., 287-6247.

1988 Jeep Comanche, ac, pb, ps, am/
fm/cass, new tires, neg. 261-6418.

1983 Chevy Malibu, ac, ps, pb, pw,
am/fm/cass, not dty pd, $2,700. 286-
3489,

1989 Plymouth Colt 4spd, 1.5 en-
gine, $3,500/obo. 284-4329.

1980 Honda, ac, at, $2,500 286-3290.

1985 Jeep, 4dr, ac, at, ps, pb, $7,500.
286-3290.

1988 BMW, 2dr, am/fn/cass, ac, not
dry pd, $8,500. 261-6119.

1972 Chevy Nova, ac, ps, new tires,
runs gd, $2,100, 260-3270.

1992 Voyager, 22k miles, cxc cond,
$13,000. 282-4385.

1991 Chevy p/u, low mileage. 287-
32701

1987 Chevy S-10 p/u. ac. .am/nim/cass.


camper top, $8,000. 284-6220.

1987 Chrysler LeBaron, at, ac, pw,
ps, pl, am/fm/cass, gd cond, $4,000/
obo. 289-4138.

1987 Ford Tempo GL, 4dr, ac, $3,500.
284-6356.

Mercedes 450 SE, exc cond, sunroof,
ac, am/fm/cass, $10,000/obo. 287-
3887.

1988 Dodge Caravan, 6cyl, new tires,
exc cond, $10,000. 287-3887.

1983 Chevy Citation, exc cond,
$2,300/obo. 287-4477.

1962 Chrysler wagon, $3,500. 252-
5124.

1992 Chevy S-10 p/u, pb, ps, am/fm/
cass, exc cond, $8,400. 286-3692.

1991 Jeep Wrangler, soft top w/biki-
ni top, $12,500. 282-3971.

1994 Daihutsu, ac, am/fm/cass,
alarm, exc cond, $6,700. 264-4105.

1993 Ford Escort, 5dr, am/fm/cass,
exc cond, $9,200. 263-4792.

1984 Audi, ac, pw, at, runs ok,
$3,000/obo. 223-7980.

1987 Ford Taurus GL, fully loaded,
$6,000/neg. 287-4193.

1978 Jeep CJ-7 new paint, full & biki-
ni, run grt, $4,400. 287-3572.

1989 Ford Ranger 4x4, V6, ad, ps, pb,
pb, 5spd, $8,500. 263-4786.

1991 Chevy Blazer, fully loaded,
Tahoe package, exc cond, $14,000/
obo. 286-4189.

1990 Ford Aerostar XL, low mileage,
all acc, $15,000/obo. 287-6182.

1989 Toyota Tercel, 2dr, ac, am/fm/
cass, 4cyl, tinted win, not dty pd,
$6,000. 269-7334.

1987 Chevy Iroc, Z-28, 5spd, ac, pb,
ps, pw, t-top, $11,000. 287-3999.

1979 Ford Mustang, ac, ps, am/fm/
cass, new tires, new shocks, gd cond,
$2,800. 260-5614.

1985 Nissan Bluebird, 5spd, ac, pb,
alarm, new tires, exc cond, $4,200.
261-6830.

1984 VW Quantun, at, ac, pb, ps, am/
fm/cass, 4dr, runs gd, $3,000. 287-
3335.

1986 Volvo, 4dr, ac, 4cyl, tinted win,
exc cond, neg. 236-0749.__-

1988 Ford Escort, 4dr, 4cyl, ac, ps,
am/fm, $5,000/obo. 224-3180.

1989 Plymouth Colt. 284-4396. _

1985 Porschc, 944, 5spd, ac, all pow-
er, sunroof, $12,000/obo. 284-4227.

1986 Toyota Minivan, ac, at. pb, ps,
pl, pw, sunroof, gd cond, $6,000/obo.
224-41911.

1978 Nova, ps, many new parts, runs
grI, not dty pd, $900/obo. 287-4139.

1976 Malibu Classic, $450. 287-
4136.

1985 Dodge Caravan, 4cyl, grt cond,
$5,300. 287-4136.

1992 Jeep Wrangler, 21k miles, 6cyl,
am/fm/cass, exc cond, $13,500/obo.
269-6337.

1986 Mercury Topaz, 4dr, ac, ps, pb,
cruise, an/fm/cass, runs gd, $3,000.1111
289-4598.

1991 Ford Explorer XLT, dty pd,
$18.000/obo. 251-8821.

1978 Chevy Caprice classic, ac, new
tires, power everything, exc cond,
S 1,900. 289-4232.

1991 Mercury Capri, con top, ac, pw,
alarm, new tires. 287-4692

1987 Toyola Corolla, tinted win, ac,
new tires, $4,800/obo. 283-5619.

1988 Jeep Wrangler Laredo, 6cyl. ps,
5sod. $9.500. 284-5796.


1-973 VW bug, very gd cond, $1,800.
289-3875.

1991 Ford Tempo s,at p, p,, am/
fm/cass, $7,900. 284-6739.

1991 Chevy p/u 5spd, ac, stereo, low
miles, 4cyl, $6,500. 284-4242.

1991 Chevy Cavalier, $6,600. 287-
4889.

1991 Acura Integra, 4dr, ac, all pwr,
$14,000/obo. 269-6220.

1991 Chevy p/u, 4cyl, ps, ac, stereo,
antilock & power brakes, 5spd, low
miles, $6,500. 251-9337.

1991 Hyundai Excel 4dr, ac, alarm,
dty pd, exc cond, $5,600/obo. 226-
5279.

1991 Ford F-150XLT p/u, V8, loaded,
like new, $14,000/obo. 269-9588.

1991 Camaro, ac, v8, pw, stand,
$10,500. 252-2065._

1978 Honda Accord, hatchback, not
dty pd 260-4463.

1979 Grand Prix Pontiac, 2dr, needs
body work, $800/obo. 286-3992.

1981 Ford T-bird, $6,500. 252-5120.

1987 Chevy Suburban, R-10 1/2 ton,
4wd, ac, new tires, exc cond, $10,000.
252-5397.

1987 Subaru XT, stand, $2,500/obo.
287-3084.

1987 Ford Tempo, 4cyl, ac, am/fm/
cass, gd cond, $4,000/obo. 286-6328.

1987 Dodge Charger, new paint, 5spd,
sunroof, $4,100. 284-4376.

1987 Suzuki Samurai, 4wd, w/soft-
top, am/fm/cass, $3,500. 286-4227.

1986 Dodge Ram, not dty pd, 5spd,
$3,800/obo. 264-7778.

1985 Buick Park Ave, loaded, gd cond,
$4,500. 289-6204.

1992 Jeep Wrangler, soft/bikini,
13,000 miles, exe cond, $12,500. 284-
5430.

1988 Jeep Comanche, at, ps, pb, ac,
am/fm/cass, camper top, bed liner,
$8,000. 284-5430.

1992 Toyota p/u, 4cyl, loaded, runs
grt, exc cond, $2,500. 284-3754.

1990 Dodge Caravan, 4cyl, $8,500.
286-3245.

1977 Buick Regal, gd cond, $2,000.
260-2104.

1984 Honda Prelude EX, exc cond,
not dty pd, $3,500/obo. 286-3992.

1983 Toyota Tercel, exc cond, $3,200/
obo. 220-2024.

1990 Olds Cutlass Supreme, ps, pb,
ac, not dty pd, $12,500. 287-4223.

1985 Dodge Caravan, ac, pw, grt cond,
$7,000/OBO. 287-3834

1972 VW, $1,000/obo. 282-5130.

1983 Honda Accord, exc cond,
$3,200/obo. 282-3450.





Eng spk live-in maid, honest, reliable.
224-3483.

Bilingual maid, gd w/kids, ref avail.
287-5639.

Span honest, reliable maid, exc w/kids.
286-3992.

Exc maid for day work, $15 per day, gd
cook, gd w/kids. 286-4571.

Honest, reliable, day maid, Eng spk.
236-4504.

Honest, reliable bi-lingual maid, exc
w/kids. 284-3482.

Full time live-in maid, honest, grt w/
kids, w/rcf. 284-5796.

Span spk maid will do gen house wrk.
231-8121 Sexona.

Span spk live-in maid, grt w/kids. 284-
5024.

Maid, M-F, spks little Eng. 264-9399

Eng spk maid, w/ref, M-F. 220-8155.

Honest&reliable childcare 221-2683

Eng spk maid, T&T, w/ref. 286-3471.

Live in house boy for cleaning laun-
dry w/ref. 221-1596.

Eng spk maid live-in/out, M-F. 221-
5285.
Honest, reliable 24yr old babysitter.


some Eng, w/exp. 226-5797.

Spn spk maid, reliable. 287-3526.

Eng spk day maid, w/ref. 286-3773.

Grt day maid, Eng spk w/ref. 260-
3235.

Honest, reliable day maid, w/ref.
262-2815.

Military spouse/mother to care for
children at home, p/ftime. 284-4492.

Bi-lingual maid, gd w/kids. 287-
6491.

Babysitter, gd w/kids, w/ref. 261-
1236.

Bi-lingual housekeeper. 224-4660.

Full time maid, honest, gd w/kids.
287-4934.

Eng spk housekeeper, gd w/kids.
287-3572.

Live-in miad/babysitter, honest, w/
ref. 286-4978.

18yr old babysitter, wrk nights &
wkends. 230-1927.

College student for babysitting/pet
care. 253-7091.

Mature, honest maid, 3 days. 286-
4685.

Bi-lingual maid, gd w/kids. 287-
3592.

Maid, reliable, honest, gd worker.
287-6522.

Housekeeper 2 days a wk. 260-5586.

Honest, reliable housekeeper, M-F.
260-6533.

Family home care provider, full time
openings. 283-6281. Carla.





Turbo trolling motor & marine bat-
tery, $180. 287-4584.

Aluminum V-shaped 14', w/motor
& access, $1,800. 287-4584.

Boat/fbrgls/21 ft-c/cbn-gal/tlr,
V6GM/omc/od-I 5HP/kr-rdo-
dphfdr. 243-5278 7-9 pm.

Mobile marine radio, $195. 226-
3312.

225 HP Johnson outboard motor,
$2,500. 287-5391.

16' Hobie Cat w/trailer, $1,800. 252-
5428.

21' Romery 4cyl perking diesel,
sleeps 2, ready to fish, $9,000/obo.
252-5100.





Camcorder $300, Gameboy w/games
$87, electric typewriter $100, JVC
VCR $200/obo. 286-4494.

Apple IIGS, color printer, monitor,
scanner, 3 disk drvs. w/programs incl.
word perfect, $700. 252-6404.

Electric organ. 287-4992.

Apple 2E comp, games, monitor,
keyboard, best offer. 287-6174.

Sanyo stereo, w/cd/dbl cass, like new,
$300. 236-0984.

25" Sylvania console color TV, $150/
obo. 287-3395.

20" Goldstar color TV w/built-in
VCR, $350. 286-3773.

VCR-VHS $250, TV $229, TV stand
$80, TV w/stand $789. 223-9865.

Brothers WP, PC compatible, many
options, $400. 287-6623.

386/16mhz, Im Ram, 100m lid,
Soundblaster w/speakers, Windows,
5.0 DOS, misc. software. 286-4121.

7" JVC color TV $100. 282-4234.

Panasonic TV, 24" w/table $1,000,
15 Super Nintendo games $35/ca.
260-8148.

Stereo set-combo. 252-1104.

Refrigerator, microwave. 252-1104

Genesis & Scga CD game sys. w/6-
button controller, $370. 252-2319

Nikon cameras, lenses & extra lens-
es. 283-3220.

386SX 16, 4m Ram, 80m lid, VGA
monitor, software $795, lHP Laserjet
Ill, like new $750/neg. 283-3583.

35mm Olympus OM2 w/50mm lens,
cir polarizer. $100/obo. 252-2319.


Scott am/fm stereo component receiv-
er, digital, 190w, exc cond, $115/obo.
286-3381.

Commodore 64/128, color monitor,
keyboard, mouse, 5 l/2k mem expan-
sion, software, $250/obo. 287-3534.

Sanyo Beta HI-FI stereo VCR, gd cond,
w/20 new tapes. 264-9741.

5.5" Emerson am/fm, color TV w/adapt-
er, RCA 12" color TV, both in exc cond.
252-6566.

SC word processor typewriter $225,
Fisher TV 19" bilingual, timer clock
stereo, remote control, $300. 228-
3099.

VCR, Zenith, needs cleaning $100,
Kaypro letter quality printer $100.
282-4538.

Realistic pro-2020 scanning receiver,
like new $225. 264-3070 ask for Tony.

486DX, 25mhz, 8mb, 160mb hd, CD
Rom, VGA monitor, speakers, sound
board & more, $1,800. 233-0974.

SNES, 5 games, super control pad, exc
cond, $250/neg. 287-4546.

Game boy, 12 games, Dr. Mario, Home
Alone, Ishido, Final Fantasy 1,11, much
more, exc cond, $350/neg. 287-4546.

SC lap top 8000, w/3.5 drv, fax/mo-
dem capabilities, & rechargable bat-
teries, printer avail, $300. 236-0984.

Kenwood tuner, 7 disk CD, Pioneer
A-80 amp, Teac cass, AR-15 speakers,
turmtbl, rack, $550. 282-3375.

Trade Super Nintendo games for other
games, John Madden 94, Megamax &
others, call w/list. 284-6979.

Various old comps, monitors &
accessories, I Lanier copier. 285-6867.

Epson FX, 20mb, 5 1/4 drv, w/moni-
tor $250, Panasonic printer $225,
Epson printer 810XL $175. 226-8626.

Mortal Kombat cartridge for Sega Gen-
esis, $40. 287-4733.

Pioneer surround sound receiver $400,
JVC CD changer $250, Cerwin Vega
speakers, 400w $550. 284-4227.

New 6 channel mixer, w/cffects, send
stereo return, leds pre-amp inputs, mic/
line, $180. 286-4171.

Euro appliances, 1,500w volt trans-
former (220 > 110v), $100. 260-2957.

Packard Bell 286NT comp, 14" moni-
tor, 24-pin printer, software, lots of.
extras, $850. 260-2957.

12' satellite dish antenna, complete
(Uniden), $1,800/obo. 287-4139.

2 record players w/multiple headset
stations, use for school or language
training, 530. 264-2001.

Sony CD radio cass corder, new, $290.
236-0749.

286 Wang exc cond, $600. 230-0008.

SC word processor 8000LT, 256k Ram,
modem, 3.5 disk drv, requires printer,
$250. 287-5392.

Pentax 35mm camera w/80-200mm
zoom lens & 135mm telephoto lens,
not automatic, $300. 287-5392.

IBM PS/2 exc cond, new hard drv,
$350. 230-0008.

PB386/25 mz, 107mb hd, DOS 6.2,
Wind, more $1,100/obo, Star 1020 cdr
printer $150, both $1,200. 285-4734.

Kenwood 7070L stereo speakers (4),
walnut cabinet. 5 way (15" woofer)
120w. 287-4182.

Panafax, exc cond $250, IBM pro-print-
er $125, Wang 286 w/new 130mg hd
$650, Zenith lap-top $495. 230-0008.

2 MTX 10" subwoofers in factory box
w/Alpine crossover, $225. 285-6875
Room 216.

2 Cerwin Vega speakers, 2 Pioneer
speakers, Nintendo w/power pad, gun
& games, neg. 286-6533.

486 DX66 VLB, 256 cache, 8mb Ram.
420 mnib hd, CD Rom, printer, 17" mon-
itor, software, more, $5,000. 284-6695.

286 PB Legend 40mb hd, 4mb Ram,
DOS 6.0, Soundblaster pro, 2 speak-
ers, software, 5.25, 3.5. 284-6695.

RCA VI IS camcorder, VI IF7 marine ra-
dios (1 base, I portable). Best offer.
229-3403.

Carver DPL-33 surround processor
$280, Infinity VS-1 speaker $100, pair
Bose $120, recl-reel $150. 284-6482.

Sony am/fm mega bass discman, $170
260-9768














*Classified Ads


Tropic Times B 1
July 22, 1994 Il


Sears 19" color TV w/remote,cxc cond,
$125. 284-6398.

486 w/monitor, 6mb Ram, 2X CD
Rom, 340mb, 107mb hd, speakers,
printer, CDs, more, $2,500. 284-6739.

Kenwood equalizer $75, Nintendo
gun, running pad, 9 games $90, C.B.
$25. 284-6323.

PC Sansui stereo sys, w/2 infinity
speakers, 150w ea., black entertain-
ment center, gd cond, $700. 229-3525.

SC typewriter XL 1900, $75. 284-
4627.

Sega game gear, 6 games, super wide
gear, outlet adapter, TV, tuner $220/
obo. 289-3689 Fowler.

Sony amp, 200w per channel, speak-
ers, cass, turntable, $250. 287-3925.

Sony camcorder Hi-8 stereo, loaded
$1,200, Sega CD $200. 286-4084.

Gibson Epiphone electric guitar,
rosewood fretboard w/case, $250/
neg. 286-6495 ask for Skippy.

Sega CD games $25/ea, all $75. 284-
6176.





Softside wtrbed, refrig 19.7cu/ft, chi-
na cabinet, VCR Panasonic, various
dressers, all in exc cond. 262-2552.

Solid wood DR set, formal w/or w/
out hutch reasonable. 282-3575.

Washer/dryer, white, $200/for both.
260-7661.

Like new Kenmore heavy duty, large
cap washer & dryer, $650 for both.
286-6134.

Carpet 20'xl2' $175, 12'xl5' $100,
micro $100, car seat $35, baby swing
$20, change tbl $100. 286-4334.

Whirlpool washer/dryer, heavy duty,
$800/for set. 287-4182.

Baby crib, bed w/5 drawers, $375.
223-7829.

Couch w/matching chair, $200/obo.
287-6795.

Sleeper single waterbed $75, LR suite
$300, patio set $70, stepper $65, 284-
4376.

Comer sofa, $300. 284-6388.

5x8 Dhrurrie rug $100, 4x6 Dhrurrie
rug $50,3x5 Flokati $30, antique piece
sofa $225. 260-9768.

Kenmore chest freezer, almost new,
$300. 284-4183.

LR suite, sleeper single waterbed,
stepper exerciser, patio set, best offer.
284-4376.

Fum for sale, 3 pc set br firm, couch,
love seat, recliner, coffee tbl & 2 end
tbls, gd cond, best offer. 287-6638.

K-sz wtrbed, rose mirror hdbd, 6-
drawers $450, oriental carpet 5x8,
blue, burg, beige $60. 282-3793.

12,000 btu GE ac $300, GE dryer
$250, 2 Gilins fan hunter elite items,
only 6 mos use. 287-4986.

6 pc LR set, exc cond $1,000/obo,
bedrm furm & more. 287-6770.

Sofa & love seat, burgundy color, 8
mos old, $500. 226-1757.

2 pc sect, beige color, L-shaped, gd
cond, $400. 284-3528.

1 sofa bed w/2 cream bamboo chairs,
yellow sofa, assorted pale colors,
material in gd cond, $300. 264-1462.

Bunk bed, dresser, desk, room divid-
er, LR set, micro stand, sleeper single
waterbed. 284-4376.

Whirlpool port dishwasher, power
clean, energy saver, $200. 287-6393.

All-foam couch $60, steel dresser $75,
mahogany dining tbl w/6 carved chair
$400, Jap floor lamp $25. 262-2813.

Mini blinds, white, complete set for 2
bedrm, used, $175/$275 installed.
286-3634.

Sturdy, traditional 3-seater couch, bl,
gd cond, $225. 282-3123.

2 rm carpets $125, Sansui stereo sys
w/speakers $1,500, vac cleaner $30,
toys, misc clothes. 284-3934.

Curtains & carpets. 286-4787.

Korean style bl lacquer wardrobe cab-
inets, no scratches & will deliver, 2
ea, $700. 260-7888.

16.5 CF freezer $500, bedrm set bl


$1,900, dining rm & china bl $2,200.
285-5935.

3 piece LR set, br, g couch, recliner, 2
end tbis & coffee tbis, gd cond neg.
287-6638.

DR tbl, 6 chairs & triple china cabi-
net, solid oak wood/antique pecan
finish, Stanley, $1,600. 283-3220.

Q-sz comforter, bed skirt, pillow
shams, exc cond $75, 7 white sheer
curtains, 40"x63", $15. 282-4234.

Hide-a-bed, Q-sz w/matching love
seat & pillows, new cond, $675. 285-
6374.

36" Whirlpool elec stove, 4 burners,
oven, exc cond, $150. 233-0873.

GE refrigerator 23 cu/ft, GE washer/
dryer. 252-2180.

Chest type freezer $500, sofa $250,
bed $100, Papason chair $100, Dish
washer $50, TVs $25 & more. 261-
9665.

Reclining sofa chair w/massage op-
tion, $325. 282-3180.

Picnic tbl w/bench seats, misc car
care fluids, $40. 286-3345.

End tbls, dining tbl, chairs, baby fum,
clothing, misc items, neg. 287-5439.

Whirlpool upright ig freezer, exc
cond, $650/obo. 287-6182.

Rugs 6x9 tan, 10x12 br & gray mixed
tweed $35, bathroom shelf/cabinet
$20/obo. 284-6171.

LR $325, formal LR $750, rugs $200/
ca, wickerchairs $50/ea, curtains, desk.
223-9865.

Montgomery Ward heavy duty elec
dryer, $225. 286-6234.

BI leather recliner w/matching otto-
man $175, Kawai organ $1,000/obo.
286-3527.

20x15 dark green wall-to-wall carpet
$175, K/Q-sz bed, dinette set, dress-
ers (5 drawers). 252-1257.

Bamboo sofa, 2 chairs & coffee tbl,
exc cond, $550. 284-5678.

GE washer/dryer, large cap, heavy
duty, $650. 282-3778.

Love seat wall unit, curtains for troop
qtrs, outdoor patio umbrella, Pioneer
2-way speakers 150w. 230-1927.

3 pc bedrm set & misc furn. 252-1104.

Tbl, 4chrs $285, Futon bl/white $150,
12xl5 blue rug $75, green 6x4, 25
white shelves $90, 5/8 carat diamond
ring $350. 284-4920.

Full bedrm set, 5 pc $200, dresser w/
mirror, desk & chair, child's rm $150.
252-2759.

2 Ig carpets (beige 10x14, blue 12x16)
fits base housing $50/for both, FSU
books variety, cheap $50. 284-4220.

Beige carpet w/pad 12x 15, Singer sew-
ing mach $250, dishwasher $250,
sofa, love seat $400. 284-5018.

Set golf clubs $200, vacuum cleaner
Kenmore $50. 286-4494.

Micro $250, 8pc set china $75, stove
hood $30, stone ware dishes -8 pc
$30, rug shampooer $40. 252-6986.

Christmas tree $25, stereo $35. 286-
4498.

GE refrig (2-dr, ice maker) $1,300,
GE gas stove $450, washer $450,
Nintendo $40, games $10. 261-9974.

Big rocker recliner, exc cond, very
comfortable, $350/obo. 287-3319.

Sofa bed Q-sz. 264-9741 after 6pm.

Refrig/freezer, ice maker, 5pc bedrm
$1,500, bamboo swing, 15.6cu/ft
freezer, 8pc bedrm $1,300. 252-1257.

3 pc LR set $300, coffee tbl, 2 end tbis
$200, entertainment center $85, all
$500. 260-7100.





Grill BBQ w/tank, exc cond, cover
incl, $130. 236-0984.__ ___

Micro oven $75, 10-sp bike $75. 260-
7100.

Dyed rattan LR & DR sets $800/ea,
ceiling fan w/lamp $70, misc tools.
226-8116.

9'xl2' chocolate br carpet, $30. 287-
6192.

Dbl bed w/hdbd, matt/box spring, &
3 sets sheets, gas grill. 287-4280 6-
9pm only.


Office conference table $200, office
display cabinets $180/ea. 226-8626/
3278.

Corner curio cabinet, wood $400, di-
nette 4 chairs $250, 26" boy's bike
$30. 283-4225.

China pots, bar chairs, LR tbl, post-
ers, baby stroller. 230-0392.

Danish twin beds w/matt & drawers,
beautiful wood color, $150/ca. 236-
0984.

Gerry guardian infant/toddler car seat
$30, 2m Ram 1 l/2m chips, $50. 287-
3534.

4 rims Honda 1994 #14 and covers
$20ea.2874584.

Complete nursery bedding set, pastel
bunny design $70. 282-3628.

Computer Software IBM comparable.
286-3634.

Swing set $700, child car seat $25,
baby swing $40. 284-6381.

Jenny Lind crib - needs mattress $70,
Jenny Lind changing tbl $60, carseat
$50, stroller $60. 286-3484.

Men's ping pong table with every-
thing extra paddles, nets very gd cond,
$150. 252-2561.�

Weight set and bench, $100. 228-
1339 after 4:30.

Men's 26" bike $50, med cat carrier
$20. 269-5762 after 6 pm.

Whirlpool Dehumidifier, $100. 284-
4392.

White desk with chair $75, Barney
curtains 2 sets $35, Barney toddler
bed set $40. 287-6623.

4-6 hole 15" inch rims white spoke
$25 ca. 252-2561.

Extra ig suitcase $50, foot locker $9,
men dexter loafers 7 1/2 $18. 252-
7400.

Minolta X6-1 35mm camera 50mm
lens, 135mm telephoto lens, tripod
and cleaning kit, $150. 286-4674.

Sega game gear w/hook up to cig
lighter $70, dressers w/mirror $70.
today's kids kitchen $20. 287-6838.

Rockford fosgate punch 15" car
subwoofer 250w never used $100,
Super NES games $25-30. 286-4674.

Little tikes table $20, golf club set w/
bag $35. Nintendo & extras $50,
games $10. 287-6539.

Danish children desk (2) wht w/red
legs, good size $35ea. 236-0984.

Baby clothes, swings $20, monitor
$20, criblight $10, bottle warmer
$10, humidifier $10. 286-3778.

Golf clubs all iron, 1-3-4-5 woods
ping putter covers and white match-
ing bag, $250. 252-1096.

Treadmill like new $500, originally
$800. 252-6649.

Child's kitchen set 1 piece w/fridge,
stove, micro table, like new $80. 287-
3871.

Weider weight bench with butterfly
and lat-pull attachments 110 lbs
$150. 287-3271.

Baby items, hamster cage 260-1290.

Street tread rear motorcycle tire 120/
90hl6 brand new $35. 229-3915.

Century car seat, good to 40 lbs $35.
282-3375.

Assorted blazer all colors, sizes 6-8.
252-6989.

100 fabulous old assorted magazines
perfect cond. 252-6989.

Wed gown w/vail, rm for alt $750/
neg, 10/12 row mach $40, formal
gown, bl & bik. sz 10, bo. 260-0766.

G.E. Washer, dryer $750, vertical
blinds sliding glass door $150, nu-
merous sz color blinds $15. 287-5833.

High chair Fisher Price ladies Reebok
golf shoes size 7 1/2 never used 286-
4737.

Playpen, stroller, baby sleepingbag
sterilizer, elec bottle warmer carseat/
carrier, more baby items 256-6436.

2-nelspot paint pistols w/paint pal-
lets $50. 264-2001.

Brand new pool stick, 2 pair ladies
size 8 ropers. 261-6507.

Crib bumper, cover for car seat and
carrier for babies clothes, shoes socks,
diapers, crib toys, crib cover sheets.
287-5974.


Evenflo deluxe one-step infant tod-
dler car seat grt cond $45. 287-3420.

Wht terrace set w/six chairs round
plastic table and high chairs, good
cond $315. 236-0984.

Flex force exercise machine stair step-
per, branch press butterfly, like new
$200. 285-5486.

2 igloo 120 quart Ice chests, like new
$125ca. 282-4538.

Girls 12" bike, 3 mths old $40, german
tricyle w/adult push bar $40. 282-
3375.

10 speed bike, good cond $75. 286-
6333._

Charbroil BBQ, needs burner, good
cond $30/obo. 286-6333.

Golfers 1,3,4 metal wood set $110,
titanium shaft 282-5586.

Ford V-6/171/2.8 eng w/trans, radia-
tor, starter, brake/pads, alternator, pwr
steering lbbl carburetor. 260-5164.

Colemean back pack w/frame $50, dry-
er $200, the w/4 chain $200, 24" road
runner bike $200. 286-3396.

2 8,000 BTU aircond one runs good,
one needs compressor $400. 286-
4896.

Lace and silk wedding dress no veil,
never used, for skinny person size
medium $200. 287-3874.

Super NES, Sega, Sega CD, Gameboy
NES best offer. 252-5162.

Ency Britanica, 39 vol. Comptons
ency, 32 volumes, both in exc cond.
252-6566.

Dress blues jacket $50, 5 pair of ser-
vice stripes for blues $15. 287-4140.

Bikes - boys 20" $150, girls 20" $30,
woman's 10 sp $50. 284-6638.

PCC books: Modem Civilization to
1715; Art Through the Ages, new
cond. Best offer. 284-4730.

Sears 2.5 HP edger like new $180/
obo 284-3326.

110 lb wall unit bench and all attach-
ments $80. Ask for Melvin, 286-4695.

Complete silkscreen printing system
for shirts-hats, printer, dryer, inks and
screen never used $3,000 289-4781.

Bike rack pack $15, Avocet Cross K
tires 26x1.9 $20, Deore DX pedals w/
toe clips $20 pr. 284-6339.

Ronal car wheels and tires alloy 17"
235/145zr, 245/45zr, fits Audi, BMW,
Mustang $2,000. 264-8059.

4 beige carpets $100 total, 2 - 14x12s,
6x9, 9x15; Amana micro $50. 282-
3026.

13" Samsung TV w/remote $200, pink
ice 10kt gold ring $180. 286-3999.

Lg dog house $20. 284-4984.
Wash/dry $600, New Age ency $175,
laser disc player w/movies $60, car
seat, booster seat, crib $75. 284-3137.

Weight set, exc cond, $125/neg. 287-
4546.

Indian hunter bow 501bs pull, 38"
draw, exc cond, $125. 287-3639.

4 steel 72 cu ft scuba tanks, $50. 252-
6272.

Toys, baby clothes, baby items, kitch-
en items, hdbd & 2 night tables $100,
picnic tbl & chairs $50. 286-4795.

Baby walker, stroller & pushchair.
286-6533.

Ladies Reebok golf shoes size 7 1/2

r---


never used $40. 286-4737.

Playpen new $50, curtains $20, PCC
books varied price. 287-6198.

FSU text book for Sociology (Syg 1000
GED) new 287-3547.

Morey boogie board $30, Oakley sun-
glasses, Cannondale bike - Shimano
components $400. 269-6337.

Man's mountain bike, Murray like new
w/accesories. $100. 283-6375.

Classic Brunswick pool table needs
some woodwork $600. 283-6375.

1/2kt round cut diamond ring, I clarity
and H color $980, chair seat $25. 287-
4830.

Soloflex Clone, bikes, acoustic guitar,
speakers-400w, Funk Wagnalls,
Salvant, Cumbre ency. 289-5860.

Carpet, beige, 18" comm squs, fiber
glass backing, high quality, 700 yds
avail at $4 yd. 283-3583.

FSU books for sale. 282-4680.

Deluxe dble stroller used once, rock n'
ride infant car seat/carrier. 284-4027.

Men's 26" mtn bike $50, women's bike
$50. 285-4734.

Samurai swords w/stand $200,
Nintendo, 6 games w/gun and carry
bag $100. 252-5023.





1988 Honda Asscot 500cc, looks gd,
reliable, $1,200. 269-9558.

1993 Yamaha DT 125, dty pd, $1,400.
252-5397.

Suzuki Samurai Eagle Rims, alarm,
dependable trans, $4,500. 287-3697
after 7pm.

1985 Honda XL 100, exc cond, w/2
helmets, $600. 252-6971 noon-6pm.

1983 Yamaha Seca, inci 2 helmets,
spare tires & parts, runs good, $1,500.
266-5797.

1985 Yamaha Virago 1,000cc, low
mileage great bike, $2,000. 284-4220.

Kawasaki Ninja 600-R parts (1984-
86). 224-5427.

1988 Honda CB-700 Nighthawk, new
tires, battery & mufflers, good shape,
$2,800/obo. 224-5427.

1976 Montessa 348 Cota, gd cond,
many spare parts, $750. 261-2550.





Qtrs D 1115A Clayton 7-11am.

Qtrs 1537C Howard 9 am.

Qtrs 61A Albrook.

Qtrs 2511 B Cocoli 9am-12pm

Qtrs 284B Albrook 8-11am.

Qtrs 1033A Clayton 8am-lpm.

Qtrs 646C Clayton 7am-?

Qtrs 611B Howard 7am-noon.

Qtrs 167 Howard 7am._

Qtrs 285B Albrook 7am-noon.

Qtrs 429A Kobbic 7am-noon.

Qtrs 55B Mitchum Ave Howard.

Qtrs 562B Howard 7am-noon.

Qtrs 409C Kobbie 7am-noon.

Qtrs 1115A 7-1 lam.

House 76, 62B East St, Villa Lilla (San
Fco) Panama, today.


Qtrs 27 Amador.

Qtrs 2022B Curundu 7-10:30am.

Qtrs 564 Balboa.

Qtrs 943 La Boca.

Qtrs 828B Clayton.

7273 A Cardenas.

1334 Amador, by pool.

Qtrs 2509A Cocoli 8am-?

Qtrs 555A Howard.

Qtrs 238A Albrook 8am-lpm.

Qtrs 663D Clayton.

Qtrs 2485B Pyle St (below Morgan
Ave) Balboa Sat-Sun 8-?

Qtrs 685 Clayton 6-11am.

Qtrs 1530C Howard 7am-noon.

Qtrs 94A Howard 7am-noon.

Qtrs 337B Clayton 7am-lpm.

Qtrs 401 A Clayton.

Qtrs 263B Corozal 7am-noon.

Qtrs 29 Albrook 8am-noon.

Qtrs 217A Albrook 7am.






Organist to play at my wedding Aug.
13, 2pm, Albrook Chapel. 284-6741
Tammy or Jason Rm 323.

Role- players interested in heroic
and fantasy gaming AD&D, Rifts,
Champions, Shadow Run & more!
286-6391.

Live-in maid to cook, clean, laun-
dry, little ironing for adult & baby,
M-S. 282-3589.

Want male purebred Pomaranian for
stud svc AKC reg. 287-3686.

Spanish guitar model 37 or equiva-
lent & lionel 0 gauge train, for small
boy. 252-1096.

Dive master/instructor. 252-6272.

Bike car carrier for 2 or 3 bikes. 252-
5428.

Manual typewriter reasonable price.
284-4027.

Employment for Spanish live-in
maid hard working good with chil-
dren honest avail after Aug 9. Helen
after 6pm. 260-4996.

Extra work for my honest, depend-
able day maid 2 days a week, gen
cleaning/ childcare. 287-4421.

Wagner power painter or similar
electric paint sprayer of any size or
type 289-4082.
Persons interested in starting mtn
bike club Howard side of bridge for
weekend rides. 284-6339.

Scrap lumber all sizes new/old. I
will haul away. 284-4242.

Live-in mature Spanish hskpr cares
for 3 children, cooks, cleans, irons
refs, starts at $160. 25)-5853.

Experienced carpenter to do fum re-
pair at reasonable price. 286-6'.96.

Exc bilingual part time maid/hskIr
avail, honest, reliable, mature wi
refs. 287-5439. _ _ _

17' or longer ladder. 269-6728.

Nordick Track or similar, reasonable
price, good cond. 284-4220.

5' cyclone fence with poles (if avail).
287-3836 after 6pm.

Live-in maid preferably eng spk, re-
liable, good w/kids 260-1290.

Info from people who bought/sold
Pekingese puppies mid-Oct 1989
Howard/Kobbe. 252-6989.


Tropic Times Ad Form


ANIMALS
AUTOMOBILES
AVAILABLE
BOATS & CAMPERS
ELECTRONICS
FOUND
HOUSEHOLD
LOST
MISCELLANEOUS
MOTORCYCLES
PATIO SALES
WANTED




SPONSOR'S NAME


PRICE HOME PHONE

Check only one category per ad form. Only two ads per person each
week are allowed. Each ad form is limited to 15 words. Please type or
print neatly. Information listed below is not included in the ad, but is
required for publication. This information will not be released to third
parties. Deadline for the receipt of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for Friday's
edition. Ads are run on a space available, and may be held for a future
edition. Ads may be mailed to the Tropic Times, Unit 0936, APO AA
34002 or deposited in a drop box at the Albrook Post Office. Ads
offering weapons or sent by FAX will not be run.

RANK/GRADE


DUTY PHONE


fjK-,"













B12 Tropic Times
B.1 . July 22, 1994


--ILXOtp "Urr


HOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-171, DD 214 if
claiming veteran preference, a copy of college tran-
scripts if claiming education and a copy of CASP
notice of rating if applicable. Submit a copy of latest
SF-50 if you are a Federal employee.
For more information regarding Army vacancy
announcements (forms required, job related crite-
ria, etc.), visit the Directorate of Civilian Personnel,
Building 560, Room 102, Corozal, or call 285-
5201.
*Note: One-on-one employment counseling should
be the first step in the job search.

SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE: PositionsatNM-
5 level and above require specialized experience.
Specialized experience is either education above the
high school level or work experience directly related
to the position being filled. Example: Budget posi-
tions at or above the NM-5 level required Budget
experience or equivalent education.
Vacancy announcements are also available at the
Sundial Recreation Center.
The Army civilian personnel office accepts
applications on a continuous basis for the following
positions. These announcements are used to establish
registers for permanent and temporary future
vacancies.
VB# 001 * General Clerical, NM-3 (Used to fill most cleri-
cal position).
VB# 001 A * General Clerical, NM-4 (Used to fill most cler-
ical position).
VB# 002 * Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Intermittent wk sch)

* CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is required.

VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) Requires
Cert + 6 mo recreation exp in the field.
VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Req 6 mos recreation
exp in the field.
VB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5
VB# 005A Secretary (Stenography), NM-6
VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5
VB# 006A Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-6

The following positions are Perm/Temp, Full-time, Part-
time, Intermittent.

VB# 007 ** MEDICAL OFFICER, NE 12/13/14.
VB# 008 ** CLINICAL NURSE, (RN license required),
NM-9/10/11.
VB# 009 ** PRACTICAL NURSE, (LPN licence required),
NM-5

** Selectees for nurse and medical officer position will be
required to undergo a background check.

VB# 010 Manual Positions, MG-2. Closed until further no-
tice.
VB# 011 Manual Positions, MG-3. Closed until further no-
tice.
VB# 012 Manual Positions, MG-4. Closed until further no-
tice.
VB# 013 Manual Positions, MG-5. Closed until further no-
tice.
VB# 014 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-6. Closed until fur-
ther notice.
VB# 015 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-7. Closed until fur-
ther notice.
VB# 016 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-8. Closed until fur-
ther notice.
VB# 018 Supply Technician, NM-5. Closed until further
notice.
VB# 018A Supply Technician, NM-6. Closed until further
notice.

VB# 017 Administrative Services Assistant, NM-5. Limit-
ed to permanent status employees only.

VB# 017A Administrative Services Assistant, NM-6. Lim-
ited to permanent status employees only.

VB# VACANCIES TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 07-
22-94 CLOSE: 08-02-94

Pacific
383-94-LA (3) COMPUTER OPERATOR, NM-332-7. Sen-
sitive. Shift Work. USA ISC, HHD 106th Sig Bde Ft. Clayton.

384-94-JH COMPUTER SPECIALIST, NM-334-1 1. Sensi-
tive. HQ, SOCSOUTH, Albrook. Top Secret clearance is re-
quired. Driver's license required.

385-94-JH BIOCHEMICAL TEST ASSISTANT (OFFICE
AUTOMATION), NM-303-5. USAG, Corozal. Driver's li-
cense required.

357A-94-LA COMPUTER ENGINEER, NM-854-12. 106th
Sig Bde, Ft. Clayton. Candidates who applied under VB# 357-
94-LA, need not reapply.

286-94-JH (2) STAFFING CLERK (OFFICE AUTOMA-
TION), NM-203-5. USARSO, DCP, Corozal. Temp Ntc 1 Year.
Qualified typist. Bilingual. Limited to veteran preference eligi-
bles.

Note: VB#373-94-ES HEALTH SYSTEMS SPECIALIST,
NM-671-1 1, is amended to read area of consideration open to all
sources. U.S. license is not required.


I I


Quarry Heights
*Officers' Club:
Breakfast buffet is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-Fri-
days and 8-10 a.m. Saturday.
Old fashioned steak night 6-10 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Choose cut of beef to be charbroiled.

Club Amador
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet, $3.95 Fridays, featuring
soup, salad, selection of entree, special return rights.
Sunday brunch features the Ballet Folklorico Panameno
at noon the first Sunday of each month.
Samba Tres 5-11 p.m. taday and July 29.

Clayton
*The Loop:
CJ's Sports Bar offers daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m.-
1 p.m. Mondays-Fridays. Pool tournaments are held 3:30
p.m. Sunday.
Prizmz Night Club features a variety of music Wednes-
days-Saturdays and jazz 5 p.m. Sunday.
For events or parties at the Prizmz Night Club or CJ's
Sports Bar, call 287-4716 or send a fax to 287-4343.
*NCO Club:
Casa Maria special for Aug. 1-15: tortilla, two flautas,
rice, frijoles, sour cream and guacamole, $5.50 per person.
The club is offering a radio amateur class 7-9 p.m.
Tuesday Aug. 2-Sept. 30. Registration is ongoing.

Albrook/Howard
*Albrook Club:
Rip Maynard 7-10 p.m. today live in the lounge.
Steak night 6-9 p.m. Friday. Choose from rib eye, K.C.
strip, filet or prime rib. Dinner comes with vegetable, baked
potato, French fries or rice.
Fiesta de mariscos 6-9 p.m. Saturday. The seafood feast
platter features broiled corvina, stuffed crab, calamari rings,
peel-and-eat shrimp, a choice of potato or rice, cole slaw and
vegetables du jour. A la carte menu available.
Mongolian barbecue 6-8:30 p.m. Monday. Prepare your
plate, choose the meat, vegetables, seasonings, oils and have
chefs do the job outside on the open grills.
Sunday champagne brunch 10 a.m.-1 p.m. in the dining
room offers breakfast from cooked-to-order omelets, French
toast, hot lunches, salad and fruits, peel-and-eat shrimp, des-
serts and ice cream bar.
Italian night special 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Mexican night buffet Thursdays includes tacos, fajitas,
taco salad and sopapillas for dessert.
Country western night Thursdays with free dance les-
sons at 7:30 p.m. Learn the two-step, line and couples danc-
es, the waltz, the cha cha and the swing. Country western
music 9-11 p.m.
Get jazzed 7-10 p.m. today and July 29 in the lounge and
relax to the music by recording artist Lowell Hopper.
For events or catering call 286-3557/3582.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club - Dining Room:
Sunday breakfast buffet 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. An assort-
ment of breakfast foods are available in the dining room.
Breakfast is served 6-9:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays; 7:30
a.m. Saturday.
Italian night 5:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday with Alfredo or
seafood fettuccini, lasagna, pasta mixta or pasta and shrimp
in a white wine sauce. A la carte menu is available.
Steak night special 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday in the din-
ing room. Select a cut and order a New York strip, rib eye or
filet. To eat lighter, meals of chicken marinata, pasta, shrimp
vin blanc or shrimp Taboga are also available.
Mexican night and Texas barbecue ribs 5:30-8:30 p.m.



Chapl scedul


Pacific
Amador Chapel
Building 108. Phone: 282-3610
8:30am Catholic Mass (Sunday)
9:30am CCD Catholic, Building 109
(Sunday)
1030am Episcopal Worship Service
(Sunday)
Clayton Chapel
Building 64, Phone: 287-5859
11 30am Daily Catholic Mass
5pm Catholic Mass (Saturday)
8:45am Collectie Protestant Sen ice
(Sunda))
10:30am Catholic Mass (Sunda))
10:30am Protestant Sunday School (Sun-
day,Building 156,287-3497)
12:30pmGospel Service (Sunday)
5:30pm CCD Catholic, Building, 156
(Sunday)
6pm Evening Service (Sunday)
Corozal Chapel
Building 112, Phone: 285-6717
7:30pm Jewish (first Friday of month)
10am Hispanic Catholic Mass (Sunday)
1pm Pentecostal Worship (Sunday)
7pm Sunday School (Friday)


Wednesday. All-you-can-eat soft tacos. Fajitas, ribs or fish
are also available.
Seafood lover's special 5:30-9 p.m. Friday and Satur-
days. Enjoy an array of appetizers and main entrees of shrimp
and fish.
Bang up barbecue daily in the Breezeway, dine-in or
take-out. Enjoy the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or hot wings.
New family menu Tuesdays and Fridays featuring all the
past favorites plus new items such as jerked chicken, hand
made 1/2 pound hamburgers, baked ravioli and more.
For events or catering, call 284-4189.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club Ballroom:
Henry J 9 p.m.-l a.m. all evening today.
Friday night disco 9 p.m. Friday.
Bingo is back 3 p.m. Sunday with early-bird bingo at
2:45 and 6:30 p.m. Tuesday with early-bird bingo at 6:15.
Membership night 6:30 p.m. Saturday. Enjoy food, fun
and jazz at the Enlisted Members' Clubs, free for members.
For special functions, call 284-4189.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club Casual Cove:
New country 8 p.m. to closing Fridays.
Country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. Wednes-
days in the Casual Cove. Learn the latest in line dancing, the
stomp, waltz and others. Music will be until midnight.
Night mug special Wednesdays. Buy a mug filled with
your favorite draft beverage and refills.
Karaoke 7:30 p.m. Sunday, 8 p.m. Tuesday.
Saturday and Monday nights disco 5 p.m.-l a.m.
Rock 'n' roll golden oldies 5-8 p.m. Tuesday; 5 p.m.-
midnight Thursdays.
Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday. Bring you
card. You must be present to win.
*Top Three Club:
Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesday. Free all-you-can-eat.
Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday.
Karaoke 6 p.m. Friday.
Club closed Saturdays.
*Howard Officers' Club:
It's prime time 6-9 Fridays and Saturdays. Enjoy the
prime rib special.
Super social hours 5 p.m. Friday. Come and eat at the
complimentary buffet and enjoy music and dancing all night
long.
Game nights and progressive club card drawing 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Play pool or darts with a $2 entry fee, winner
takes all, club matches pot.
Dining room is closed Sunday and Wednesday nights.
The club is closed Sundays.
New lounge menu available Mondays-Saturdays.
For events or catering, call 284-3718.

Rodman
*Rodman Club - open to all ranks
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.-1
p.m. Mondays-Fridays.
Soup and sub night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Monday. Grill menu
is also available.
All-you-can-eat beef and burgundy, 4:30-8:30 p.m.
Wednesday. Grill menu is also available.
Cook-your-own steak night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday
at the Rodman Bohio.
Fine dining 6-9 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays.
Upstairs Bar 4:30-8:30 p.m. Sundays-Thursdays; 6-9
p.m. Fridays-Saturdays.
Social hours & hors d'oeuvres, 3:30-11 p.m. Friday at
the Laguna Lounge and Rodman Bohio.
Dinner is served 6-9 p.m. Mondays-Sundays.
*Rodman Annex:
Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.-
1:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays.
The club is closed for evening and weekend service.


Tradition)
1-2pm Protestant Confirmalion

Atlantic
Davis Chapel
Building 32. Phone: 289-3319
11:30am Catholic Mass(Tuesday-Friday)
Noon Catholic Spanish Mass(Sundav)
1:30pm Protestant Hispanic Service
(Sundai)
Sherman Chapel
Building 152. Phone: 289-6481
8:30am Collectise Protestant Worship
(Sunda3)
10am Prolestant Sunday School
Espinar Chapel
Building 224, Phone: 289-4616
9am Catholic English Mass (Sunday)
9am Protestant Sunday School at
Espinar Elementary
10:15am CCD Catholic Sunday School at
Espinar Elementary
10:15am Collective Protestant Worship
(Sunday)
11:30pmGospel Sunday School
12:20pm Gospel Service (Sunday)
6:30pm Gospel Bible Study (Sunday)
Islamic Prayer Services 12:30-1:30 p.m.
Friday, Fort Clayton ChapeL 287-5859.


Gorgas Hospital
Building 254, Phone: 282-5507
12:15pmDall) Carbholic Mass (2nd floor)
Weekday worship (As an-
nounced)
Albrook Chapel
Building 860, Phone: 284-3948
Bam Spanish Catholic Mass (Sunday)
9am Confessions (Sunday)
9:15am Catholic Mass (Sunda)I
9:45am Protestant Sunday School
S11am General Prolestant Se-nice
Howard Chapel
Building 500. Phone: 284-3948
I 1:30am Dall) Catholic Mass
4:30pm Confessions (Saturday)
5pm Catholic Mass (Saturday)
9:30am GeneralProtestant Service (Sun-
day)
11am Catholic Mass (Sunday)
12:30pmGospel Service (Sunday)
Rodman Chapel
Building 40, Phone: 283-4148
8-9am Catholic Mass
10-11 am General Protestant Service (Sun-
day)
11l:15am ProtestantCommunion (Iuthern




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Iropi mesll eA Vol. VII, No. 29 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, July 22, 1994 No accident' Balladares says bomb caused plane crash PANAMA CITY (Reuters) -A bomb laundering links to Colombia's Medellin caused the crash of a commuter plane in cocaine cartel, according to press reports. Panama that killed 21 people, most ofthem Panama's police spokesman Manuel Jewish, Panama's President-elect Ernesto Coloma said the man had been kidnapped Perez Balladares said Wednesday. by Colombian drug lords last year and re"The only objective information we leased. have is that apparently it (the crash) was Panamanian investigators Wednesday not an accident but a planted bomb inside had not ruled out sabotage but said a full the plane," Perez Balladares told CNN durinvestigation would take two to three days. ing a trip to Washington, D.C. "Any statement now about sabotage is Later Wednesday, U.S. officials said pure speculation," government spokesman they will help Panama investigate why the Louis Martinz said. airplane apparently exploded in mid-air U.S. embassy officials in Panama City Monday, killing the 21 passengers, includsaid three investigators from the National ing several prominent Jewish Panamanian Transportation Safety Board arrived businessmen. Thursday to help in the investigation. Earlier, Panama's Jewish community An eyewitness told Reuters he saw the called for an exhaustive investigation to twin-engine commuter plane explode as it determine whether the apparent explosion flew in heavy rains in a mountainous junwas sabotage. gle area near Colon. "I was working in the The Israeli embassy said 12 of the 21 area when I heard a big explosion and saw victims aboard the domestic flight were a fireball," farm worker Armando Jewish, and at least four were Israeli. Mendoza said. News of the crash stirred concern Reports on Panamanian radio said resamong Jews here mindful of Monday's cue crews picked up the 21 crash victims bombing of a Buenos Aires Jewish com-some who had been thrown as far as 1 munity center which killed 37 people. mile (1.6 kilometres) from the wreckage. "There is a great worry that this crash Israeli officials did not want to publicly was caused by foul play,"Yacky speculate on the crash's cause. "It's too Eskenazy, human relations director of the early to tell anything, we will just have to local chapter of B'nai Brith, told Reuters. wait," Israeli embassy official Din Heiman "We will want answers." said in Panama City. However, most of the speculation in Most of the passengers were businessPanama City centred around one Jewish men who worked at the Colon Free Trade victim who was under investigation by Zone, a duty-free center which is a magnet Department of Defense photo by Tech. Sgt. Kevin Koalling Italian authorities for alledged money for foreign businessmen. Col. William J. Leszczynski, Jr. assumes command of Joint Task Force -Bravo from Col. James F. Knight during a ceremony on Soto Clinton Balladares discuss Cano AB, Honduras. JTF-Bravo changes hands canal treaty, Haitian issues than words," Leszczynski said. WASHINGboth leaders expressed their commitment JTF-Bravo Public Affairs Officer Knights was awarded the Defense TON, D.C. to a "close and cooperative relationship" v P A Superior Service Medal by Maj. Gen. (Reuters) -Presbetween the two countries. SOTO CANO AB, Honduras -Col. Walter T. Worthington, Deputy Comident Bill This spirit, she said, will "guide their William Leszczynski, Jr. assumed commander in Chief, United States Southern Clinton told efforts to ensure a smooth transfer of the mand of Joint Task Force -Bravo from Command and the Honduran Medal of P a n a m a n i a n Panama Canal and associated properties to Col. James F. Knight July 15 during a Merit (1st Class) by Gen. Lazaro Avila President-elect full Panamanian control between now and driving rainstorm. Soleno, Chief of Staff of the Honduran Ernesto Perez December 31, 1999." "Those present here today represent Armed Forces. B a I I a d a r e s She added: "President Clinton reafthe hundreds of soldiers, noncommis"Today ends one era and marks the t sioned officers, officers, and civilians beginning of another in the proud heriWednesday that firmed hat the United States will honor its that I have and the pleasure of serving tage ofthe incredibly successful accomthe United States treaty commitments to Panama and cxwith overthe past 22 years and who have plishments and contributions that Joint would honor its Balladares pressed his commitment to work closely done so much to make this day possible," Task Force-Bravo and United States commitment to with President-elect Perez. Balladares in Leszczynski said. "I am both honored Southern Command has affected on the transfer control of the Panama Canal by implementing these historic treaties." and privileged to have been selected to national security of Honduras," Knight the end of the century. The treaty giving up U.S. control of the command this great organization." said. Perez, who takes office Sept. 1, repeatCanal to Panama was ratified in 1978 by LeszczynskicomestoSotoCanofrom "The nations assistance, humanitaried his promise to accept an estimated the Senate. Fort Benning Ga. an relief and counterdrug programs that 10,000 Haitian refugees at U.S. bases in The two leaders also discussed Pana"lt'sgreattobepartofanorganization have developed together are bases on Panama for up to six months. ma's commitment to stem narcotics-rewhere the personnel are exceptionally mutal support for the democratic proClinton and Perez met for the first time lated money laundering in Panama. Myers disciplined, highly proficient, quietlyprocess, the fight against drug traffickers in the Oval Office. White House Press Seesaid Clinton offered technical assistance to fessional, and actions alwaysspeak louder and regional stability," he said. rotary Dee Dee Myers said afterward that help Panama achieve this goal. K -__________Mi _tary_ retar DeeaD e yr4si aftrad that elpPnm civhsga Company B, 5th Battalion, 87th InDepartment of Defense officials say *Briefly, Page 2. fantry soldiers get to "tear things all sick Gulf War veterans to get *Perry visits Macedonia, Page 5. up." treatment. +Hoops championship, Page 13.

PAGE 2

Tropic Times Briefy July 22, 1994 $ Paper recycling tip AMC flight schedule ---saves offices money Offices with computer equipment that 5:40am C130 Sar Tuesday Thursday 5:0r 10Howard AFB 5:40amn C141 Howard AFB includes laser printers can easily cut paper Louisville, KY (A) Brasilia, Brazil (V,O) 5:55am C5A Howard AFB costs and requirements by printing out 1:55pm C5A Howard AFB Asuncion, Paraguay Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) draft documents on recycled paper. RecyCharleston AFB, SC Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (V,O) Charleston AFB, SC cling paper in this matter is simple, accordKelly AFB, TX (0) La Paz, Boliva Friday Sunday 8:40am B727 Howard AFB 9:55pm C141 Howard AFB ing to base officials. 7am B727 Howard AFB Atlanta, GA IAP (C) Charleston AFB, SC Just line through the verbiage, (to avoid Atlanta IAP (C) Charleston SC, IAP confusion on which side one should read) Charleston IAP, SC Wednesday turn the page over and feed it back through Monday 5:40am C1 30 Howard AFB AActive duty only the laser printer. Officials estimate that 5:40am C130 Howard AFB Managua, Nicaragua USU.S. passport 100 percent participation in this practice Tegucigalpa, Honduras Soto Cano AB, Honduras 0-Overnight Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) Howard AFB (V, CC) C-Commercial Contract can reduce consumption by nearly 50 perHoward AFB 5:40am C141 Howard AFB V-Visa cent. 3:45pm B727 Howard AFB (CO) Kelly AFB, TX M-Medevac Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) Charlston AFB, SC (M) CC-Country Clearance Air Force Thrift Shop reopens with new look cent off. For information, call 284-5643. enlisted evaluation system. For more inforcation Card section began issuing the new The newly-organized Howard and Almation about the changes, call the career bilingual identification card to active duty brook Thrift Shop recently reopened with Rodman ammunition enhancements section of the Military Perpersonnel and family members this week. a new appearance and under new managesupply point closed sonnel Flight at 284-4661/5903. The cards are being issued by Major Supmntwapearaneandndenewmne R n A itin Aport Commands. The following is the mentRodman Ammunition Supply Point Air Force War College schedule for issue: Servicemembers may sell personal number one will be closed for a 100 perU.S. Army South, Military Police Batitems through consignment at the Thrift cent inventory Monday through July 29. enrollment needed soon talion, Monday-July 29. Shop, or they may pick up a bargain someAll units with scheduled training for this Howard Education Office officials ad617th Special Operations Aviation Deone else wants to sell. The thrift shop is period, call 287-5806 to reschedule tumvise immediate action for all majors and tachment, U.S. Army Criminal Investigaopen Mondays and Thursdays and the ins and issue dates. lieutenant colonels interested in enrolling tions Division Command, Southern Comthird Saturday of every month from 9:30 in the 1994-95 Air Command and Staff mand Network, Special Operations Coma.m. to 1:30 p.m. For more information call Volunteers needed for College or Air War College seminars. To mand -South, 3rd Special Operations Sup285-5989. Native American Month inquire about enrollment procedures and port Command, Aug. 1-5. requirements, call Linda Antoine at 28441st Area Support Group, Aug. 8-12. Support center holds Base officials need volunteers to help 4863. The officials also request all mili128th Aviation Brigade, Aug. 15-19. spouse orientation plan and organize activities for the 1994 tary members who've received annual Headquarters, Southern Command, Howard AFB Native American Month obneeds assessment surveys complete and Aug. 22-26. The Howard Family Support Center is servance. It will be held in November and return them to the education office as soon U.S. Army Medical and Dental Activioffering a Right Start Spouse Orientation a volunteer in the rank of master sergeant as possible. For more information, call ties, Aug. 29-Sept. 2. in English 101l a.m. Thursday. or higher is needed to chair the observance 284-6263. 536th Engineer Battalion, Sept. 6-9. Offered twice a month, in conjunction committee. 470th Military Intelligence Brigade, with the military Right Start program, this Any volunteer who is interested in parSept. 12-16. orientation offers an overview of the serticipating in this ethnic activity -or who 106th Signal Brigade, Sept. 19-23 and vices and the family-oriented FSC prowould like to learn more about it -may classes available 26-30. grams available on Howard and Albrookcall Tech. Sgt. Jim Johnson at 284-5358. People who use smokeless tobacco and For information, call 287-3006/6406. This orientation will feature subject matter want to quit can get help from the 24th experts speaking on job searches, volunPromise Keepers Medical Squadron Health Promotion ofCID recruiting briefings teering, financial assistance, and workconference planned free. An 8-week smokeless tobacco cessaheld each Friday shops. to lswl ehl ~.t on TeCiia netgtosDvso People will also learn about recomThe sold out Promise Keepers Men's tion class,will be held 11 ta t noon The Crnminal Investigations Division mended shopping areas, contraband inforConference in Boulder, Colo., was deAug. a.m. o noon a owar holds recruiting briefings 10 a.m. each Frimation, maids, tours, and ID procedures. signed to develop strength and integrity Clinic. day at Building 705, Corozal. For inforFormore information, callthe Family Supamong men. A similar conference is An evening version of the popular nation, call Special Agent Erin Milanes at port Center at 284-5650. planned for July 29-30 at the Fort Clayton witrob Petc smoking cWednesdays Chapel. For more information, call Carson w gTavenner at 269-9022. Aug.10-Sept. 28 at the Howard Family Amateur Radio License Lega Assstane OficeSupport Center, Building 707. Potential closed for two days participants in either class must set up an Exam slated for August Because of prior commitments, the LeEnlisted performance appointment for a medical screening prior The Amateur Radio License Exam will gal Assistance Office, Building 154, Fort feedback changes to the class start date. Class size will be be held 9 a.m. Aug. 6 at the Panama Canal Clayton will be closed Thursday and July Raters now have 60 days instead of 30 limited, so participants should sign up earTraining Center in Balboa. For reserva29. Emergencies will be handled on a caseto complete an enlisted feedback session ly. For more information, call 284-5870. tions and information on study materials, by-case basis. Call 287-6617. on a person who has just received an enlisted performance if there has been no Air Force Commandants Spanish class worth Book stores offer change in reporting officials. needed for NCO schools .. Extending the time to 60 days allows four promotion points July clearance sales Air Force officials are seeking qualified raters more time to prepare an accurate chief master sergeants to serve as com-Spanish class The Stars and Stripes Book Stores at evaluation, said Air Force Military Personma ants n o sed cwill be held 8:30 a.m.4 p.m. Aug. 112. in Howard AFB, Corozal and Fort Davis will nel Center officials at Randolph AFB, mandants at two noncommissioned office Building 128, Fort Clayton. The class is hold a clearance sale throughout July. EvTexas. ers academies. Openings exist at held Monday-Friday. Soldiers can earn erything except hardcover bestsellers, This change is effective immediately Goodfellow AFB, Texas, and Tyndall four promotion points after completing the magazines and newspapers have been and is being incorporated in the new Air AFB, Fla., with respective reporting dates course. For information and registration, slashed 30 percent. Magazines are 10 perForce instruction 36-2403, covering the of June 30, 1995 and July 31, 1995. For call 287-5412/3960.85-6922. more information, call the military personnel flight customer service section at 284Water utility opens Weekend weather 3508. ae tlt pn *neoffice in Diablo Heights Factoid: The only difference between hurricanes, typhoons and cyclones is location. Hurricanes occur in the Adopt-A-Det program Panama's water utility has opened an office in Building 5553, Diablo Heights. western hemisphere (North Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and needs donations Eastern Pacific). Typhoons occur in the eastern hemiBase officials invite and encourage days to accept payments on water bills. sphere (West Pacific). Cyclones occur in the Indian Howard AFB and Albrook AS commuFor infonnation, call 252-2879. Ocean.HwrAFan lro F oi" Frifrntocl25-89 Pacific Atlantic nity members to participate in the AdoptSaturday Saturday A-Det program by donating unneeded Resource Center offers Temperature Tides Temperature Tides items (books, magazines, board games, High: 87 F 4:It p.m. at 16.7 feet High: 86 12:09 a.m. at 1.2 feet playing cards, etc.). For more information, credit by examination Low: 77 F 10:25 p.n. at 0.7 feet Low: 75 8:06 a.m. at 0.2 feet call Maj. James Dula at 284-3456. The Learning Resource Cntcr offers Sunday Sunday college credit by examination on a conHigh: 88 4:43 a.m. at 16.8 feet IHigh: 87 1:04 a.m. at 1.1 feet New bilingual ID card tnuing basis 8 aFin noon and 1-4 p.m. at Low: 77 11:07 p.m. at 0.8 feet Low: 75 8:51 a.rn at 0.2 feet Building 128, Fort Clayton. Self-Study issue starts this week materials are available. For information, Forecast: Mostly cloudy skies, afternoon thunderstorms. The adjutant General Pass and Identiftcall 287-4892.

PAGE 3

__ __Tr j aining 3___ ___ _ _ Tropic Times ammgJuly 22, 1994 Attack force sweeps under smoke screen by Sgt. Eric Hortin closer to the concertina wire surUSARSO Public Affairs Office rounding the area. For nearly four ------minutes, the machine guns didn't PINA FIRE POINT -The inlet up. When the firing stopped, it fantry trains for war. More often was too late for enemy reaction. than not, though, squad and team The attack force lobbed assault training involves the use smoke grenades over the fence of blank rounds. But every once and started cutting through the in a while, soldiers get the chance wire. In a matter of minutes, the to really tear things up. attack force bad swept through A little work paid off for the compound and was taking inCompany B, 5th Battalion, 87th ventory of the captured items. Infantry when it practiced an asThe first assault ended. sault on an enemy support operaThen the live ammunition was tions center. The first go-round handed out and the attacking was with blank ammunition, the force went through the whole opsecond with live rounds. eration again, with the exception Their day started early with an of the stroll through the foliage. ~ air insertion into the jungle ap"This was pretty good. One of proximately three kilometers the best movements in the jungle from the objective. After hours I've been on," said Pfc. Mark trudging through the jungle, the Hinchee. "The squad leaders took soldiers reached their objective. their time to find the best way to After a quick reconnaissance get to the objective. of the area, the soldiers quickly "Since this was a platoon moved into position. With two movement, it was a lot easier to M-60 machine guns on a rise maintain control. It was a good overlooking the target, the assault pace, we had no injuries and we force crept slowly down the hill could focus on the mission," to take the objective. Hinchee said. The machine guns started firWith those things going for ing on the target, giving the main the soldiers, it's almost no wonattack force the opportunity to get der they like tearing things up. A)0 2nd Lt. John Stone prepares a status report after the US. Army photos by Sgt. Eric Horin assault using Pfc. Jason Witcher's radio. Spc. Lonnie Schablin crawls under the wire. pkrSpc. Kevin Clark cuts through triple-strand concertinta wire.

PAGE 4

A Tropic Times ~1 I L k e s_ _ July 22, 1994 M f t r ______________ _ __ DoD: All treatment WASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces Information Service) -"Come in and let us help you." That's the message from top Defense Department officials to veterans who feel they have a Persian Gulf war-related sickness. To make reporting easier for veterans, DoD set up a toll-free number -1-800-796-9699. To quell fears of career reprisals, Edwin Dom, undersecretary of defense for personnel and readiness, put a hold on involuntary separations of people who feel they have a gulf-related illness. Dom said such members must request separation or retirement in writing or be medically retired or separated through the disability system with an established diagnosis. Since the end of Operation Desert Storm veterans have complained of a range of symptoms they believe are related to their gulf service. Doctors have been unable to U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Er, Horin diagnose the cause of many of these illnesses. A recent Col. Jonathan Cofer (left) is handed the Military Police Brigade guidon by Maj. Gen. G.A. National Institute of Health Technology Assessment Cracker, U.S Army South commander, as Cal. John Mumma watches. Workshop found that these undiagnosed symptoms constitute not a single disease or "Persian Gulf Syndrome," but rather a range ofillnesses with overlapping symptoms Cofer takes over M P brigade and causes.Coetae ovrM bigd Some people have theorized the diseases may be linked Company. The second time was as part of a rotation to chemical or biological warfare agents. A blue ribbon by Sgt. Eric Hortin unit while he was assigned as the executive officer of panel led by Nobel laureate Dr. Joshua Lederberg found USARSO Public Affairs Office i the 716th Military Police Battalion, Fort Riley, Kan. no persuasive evidence that the Iraqis used chemical or FORT CLAYTON -"This is it for me.with a capi"This is a great country, the weather's fantastic and biological weapons in the gulf, DoD officials announced tal 'I-T."' the MPs are ready to go to work," Cofer said. "I hope I in a June 23 press conference. Still, to quiet skeptics who For Col. John Mumma, those words had a double can do as much as Colonel Mumma." believe the department is hidng formation, Deputy Demeaning. The first was when Mumma handed over the Cofer was commissioned a Distinguished Military fense Secretary John Deutch ordered an unprecedented command of the Military Police Brigade -Panama to Graduate from LaSalle College where he received a declassification of documents related to Desert Storm illCol. Jonathan Cofer July 14 at the change of command Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology in 1972. Before that, Defense Secretary William J. Perry and ceremony at Soldiers Field. The second was his retireHe has held positions stateside and overseas from Army Gen. John Shalikashvili, chairman of the Joint ment after 26 years of service. platoon leader to chief of the Combatting Terrorism A yef o hf Sta harelas hvjitlettr urairang te t Mumma was presented the Legion of Merit and his Branch in Washington, D.C. Chiefs of Staff, released a joint leTtere urgg veterans to Certificate of Retirement by Maj. Gen. G.A. Crocker, Cofer's military schools include the Armor Officer come forward and speak freely: "There are many hazards U.S. Army South commander. Mumma's wife, Ceci, Basic Course, Scout Platoon Leaders Course, MP Ofof war, ranging from intense combat to environmental exwas awarded a certificate for her part during her ficers Advanced Course, Combined Arms and Service postures. Anyone who has health problems resulting from husband's career. Staff School, Systems Automation Course, Command those hazards is entitled to health care. If you are experiFor Cofer, this command will be the third time he and General Staff College and the Army War College. fencing problems, please come i for a medical examiahas been in Panama. His first time was as the executive Cofer is joined by his wife, Karen, and two sons, tion. ir officer and commander of the 534th Military Police Jonathan II and Jacob. "We care deeply about people who have served their country," said Dr. Stephen Joseph, assistant secretary of defense for health affairs. "I want to tell everyone out there The ye of training if you're ill and you think that's related to your gulf Th ar service, come into the system, get on the registry and let us work with you in the medical exam." To get into thesystem, people in the United States can Air Force meets education goals call 1-800-796-9699. People overseas should report to their nearest military treatment facility. People will be WASHINGTON, D.C. (Air for its active duty members. the evaluation board process. treated and entered on a registry to help officials track illForce News Service) -The Air Force Because in-resident opportunities Without PME histories, promotion nesses. Both DoD and the Department of Veterans Afhas fully implemented its Year of for Air National Guard and Reserve boards will now have to focus more on fairs are cooperating on a registry of people with gulf-reTraining initiative to provide the oppersonnel is limited, the corresponactual performance in their selections, lated symptoms. DoD already has about 300 people on its portunity for resident professional dence courses will continue to be according to Boles. active duty Persian Gulf registry. military education to all eligible peravailable for those organizations. "Evaluation report ratings and enDoD standardized the procedure for treatment. Medisonnel, said to Lt. Gen. Billy J. To keep promotion competition dorsements should be based on duty cal personnel will examine patients and take a history of Boles, deputy chief of staff, personequitable, a plan to phase in changes performance, job knowledge, leaderany symptoms. Depending on reported symptoms, panel, in a recent message to major to the promotion system has been deship, managerial skill, and judgment," tients will undergo laboratory testing. Then they will recommand vice commanders. veloped. Master sergeants have until the general said. ceive further testing and treatment as needed. Schoolhouse production now Sept. 30, 1995, to complete the "Evaluators need to know their Joseph said he wants medical facilities to examine as meets requirements and attendance Course 0008 and receive credit durpeople in terms of how well they permany people as possible -everyone who is sick. "We've backlogs have been eliminated, acing promotion consideration. form their assigned duties; set and entried to make this inclusive. We don't want to put up barcording to Boles. For senior master sergeant cycles force standards; display initiative; fosriers. This is not a research project, this is a treatment pro"This means attending resident 95E8 and 96E8 (February 1995 and ter teamwork; and communicate gram. But at the same time, seeing many individuals will PME is now institutionalized as a 1996 boards) and chief master serideas." give us signposts for the whole group." 'normal career event' for enlisted geant cycle 94E9 (October 1994 Since performance is intended to People eligible for the program include active duty personnel," he said. board), PME will continue as part of count as the new discriminating factor, members, retirees, ready Reservists, full-time National As a consequence, the old enlisted the promotion equation -15 points rating officials are cautioned against Guardsmen and family members who are eligible for mica -PME system is being phased out. awarded under the Weighted Airman replacing PME with some other extratary health care. Depending on their medical status and Active duty enrollment in the ExtenPromotion System for NCO Acadneous factor, like off-duty education. iVA facilities. sion Course Institute correspondence emy -and PME histories will con"Full resident PME attendance has Joseph said he hopes the release of Lederberg's report courses for airman leadership school, tinue to be included on the selection been an Air Force goal for many years and the declassification of gulf health information will NCO academy and senior NCO briefrmade available to the evaluation -some said it was a dream," Boles convince people DoD isn't trying to hide anything on academy ended July 1. board members. said. "That dream's come true -and chemical or biological warfare. The reason for this, according to Beginning with promotion cycle we must make the most of it." "It's hard to prove a negative. Still, a very distinguished personnel officials, is simple. Since 97E8 (February 1997 senior master For more information on PME, call independent panel found no persuasive evidence that bioenlisted members will attend PME in sergeant board) and the 95E (OctoSenior Master Sgt. Rick H ofsommer at logical or chemical weapons were used in the gulf," Joresidence, the Air Force no longer ber 1995 chief master sergeant the Military Personnel Flight, 284seph said. needs a non-resident PME program board), PME will be removed from 5606.

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Tropic Timesr Military Ne July 22, 19945 AF mulls buying C-17s WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) The argument for buying scores more C-17 transport planes rests on faulty cost analysis, a congressional agency reported Monday. A report by the General Accounting Office, an investigative arm of Congress, concluded that an evaluation of the wide-body transport versus other cargo plane options tilted unfairly in favor of the C-17. The GAO cited "questionable assumptions" about the reliability of the aircraft, the cost savings compared to other options, and the need for a large fleet of planes that can land heavy cargo on short runways. Under current Pentagon plans, the Air Force would buy a total of 40 wide-body C17s at a total cost of $21.3 billion or $533 million per plane, making it the most expensive cargo plane ever purchased by the military. The fiscal 1995 defense budget pending in Congress conU.S. Air Force pholo tains funding for six planes and Nighthaw k President Clinton is expected to The F-1 17 stealth aircraft officially took the name "Nighthawk" June 24, according to Air Combat Command. seek eight more next year; 26 C-17s The name was among the first group submitted when 12th Air Force officials began the process of naming the are already on order or in service. aircraft Oct. 4, 1990. Originally, the name was reserved by Sikorsky aircraft for HH-60D helicopters. At issue in the GAO report was -a possible Pentagon move to buy 80 more C-17s in later years for a total Q ina of120 planes. With the C-17 alPerry visits U.S. troops in Macedonia rucon scrutiny over design and perforSKOPJE, Macedonia (AP) -Defense The U.S. Army has had several hunAlbanian minority says they are mistreatmance problems, Defense Secretary Secretary William Perry praised U.S. dred troops here since July of last year and ed and the Serbs would like to reclaim the William Perry has said the adminisArmy soldiers today for helping keep the the present contingent from Schweinfurt, tiny republic into its Yugoslav federation. tration will decide on that question peace in this tiny landlocked republic afGermany, is scheduled to remain through The U.S. force is part of the United Nain the fall of 1995. flicted with simmering ethnic tension. December. tions peacekeeping force of 1,200 that inThe GAO challenged a cost "Every peaceful day that passes is a Their mission has been to monitor the cludes Finnish and Norwegian troops. analysis conducted for the Pentagon tribute to your success," Perry told about border with Serbia and Bulgaria in order Perry flew by Blackhawk helicopter by the independent Institute for De100 of the 500 U.S. Army soldiers posted to keep the Bosnian war from spreading. that had been painted white and bore a fense Analyses. The institute comhere under a United Nations peacekeeping Macedonia -which has an ethnic U.N. insignia to observe a U.S. Anny plapared an airlift fleet made up enmandate. makeup that includes Serbs, Greeks, Albatoon posted some 25 miles northeast of timely of C-I 7s with other options that mixed fewer C-17s with older "Your goal is simple: Keep the peace by nians, and others -faces a potential ethSkopje. military airlifters or commercial opdeterring aggression," Perry told the solnic conflict given disputes over the terriThe U.S. battalion commander, Lt. Col. tons such as a modified Boeing diers arrayed in U.N. blue berets and Army tory and the representation of the various John Baggott, said the U.S. forces had ta f camouflage uniforms. ethnic groups in the local government. been well received by the people in The analysis was based on three Perry came to this former Yugoslav reMacedonia is bordered by four hostile Macedonia and had encountered no diffiquestionable assumptions, the GAO public while on a one-week tour of Balkan nations. culties during their daily patrols along the said: that the C-17 would be highly states in an attempt to promote peace in a Greece disputes the countries name, republic's rugged northern border. valuable in the defense of Saudi region afflicted by the two-year Bosnian Bulgaria contends that people in "It's been very quiet along the border," Arabia because of its ability to reach War. Macedonia are actually Bulgarians, it's Baggott said. remote, short-runway airfields; that the C-17 can fly more hours per day; and that the C-17 would substitute for the older C-130 in flying routine deliveries within theaters of operations. The GAO said the C-17 has yet to prove it can fly an average of t, 15.2 hours per day, a calculation based on such factors as the availability of air crews and spare parts and the time it takes to load and unload. "If the reliability does not inprove, the C-17 is not likely to achieve its planned mission capable rate," the report said. DoD and Air Force officials, responding to the report, maintained that airfield availability would likely be constrained in another Persian Gulf war. They argued that if Congress fully funds the C-17 program it will be reliable and meet .S. NAv hot daily use goals. And they said the C-17 should be credited with some Change of com m an cost savings for performing misMaster Chief Petty Officer Bert Patterson presents Cmdr. William Fitzgerald a shadow box of memories sions within military theater instead during his change of command ceremony at the U.S. Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical Training of C-I30s. School July 15.

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6TropicTimes 6U Jly 22, 1994 V ~ e Pool patron confused about base passes Dear Mayors' Corner: -that people living at Amador and Kobbe I would like to have a few questions y n-4 will most likely use the swimming pools concerning pool passes answered. We are in their respective communities as their priresidents of the Fort Kobbe area and month while IHtoward charges $15 per a memorandum of understanding which mary recreational swimming facility. bought a pool pass from Fort Clayton. Bemonth. Because of our work schedules and stipulates that all swimming pools will Because of these exceptions, customers cause of the location, we use the Howard weather conditions, our use varies from honor each other's memberships and are asked by pool staff to buy their pass at AFB pool frequently. month to month. passes on a reciprocal basis. their residence. The staff at the Howard pool quesI realize that one pool is operated by The memorandum states that patrons As for prices, the level of Air Force tioned why I was using a Clayton pass for the Army and the other by the Air Force, must buy memberships or passes from funding is the primary cause of the differthe Howard pool. I replied that the Clayton but isn't there a way to standardize the their respective service organizations. ences in pool pass prices. staff had told me that a Clayton pass was price? There are two exceptions to this policy, Editor's note: To submit questions to good for any military pool, as well as Heated up on Fort Kobbe however. Army personnel stationed at Fort Mayoral Congr Shimmey Beach. The Howard pool staff Kobbe should buy their passes from the the Mayor Conress, send letters to: member, however, informed me that, since Dear Heated, Air Force Morale, Welfare and Recreation Mayors' Corner, publicity chairperson I lived on Kobbe, I need a pool pass for I routed your letter to Hector Sanchez, at Howard AFB and Navy personnel stabe granted upon request. The Tropic Howard only. chiefofOutdoor Recreation Division, Fort tioned at Fort Amador should buy their Time res the rght Te Trs The price differences between passes is Clayton, who responded: On Feb. 4, 1994, passes from Amador pool. Tds reserves the right to edit letters tremendous. Clayton charges $8.50 per the U.S. Army, Air Force and Navy signed The reason for these two exceptions is and responses for brevity. Provost Marshal's Corner Dear Editor: Ie 0an to tak thsopruiytxedm p Gunmen take aim at motorist preciation to the medical and nursing staff of Gorgas Hospital. I had a Nissen Procedure perGunmen formed on June 29,1994. The professional treatin Curundu ment and outstanding patient care I received before, A Fort Clayton residuring and after my surgery were exemplary. dent was driving by the First of all, I would like to thank Dr. Mendez in laundry area in the Internal Medicine Clinic for providing excelCurundu last week lent treatment and care during the past three years. when two men stood in His patience and attention given to my case are the road and pointed greatly appreciated and made it a lot easier for me pistols at her, causing to make the decision to have surgery. her to stop. The driver I would place my life in the hands of Dr. Arana then put the vehicle in anytime. The time spent explaining what to expect reverse and fled the before, during and after the surgery, FIm sure, is part area. of the reason I have recovered so swiftly. Needless The Military Police to say, his handy work will remain a pleasant readvise residents to use b' j minder of his professional abilities. caution when driving From the time I was told I was a candidate for through this area. If surgery, the nurses, in each department I visited hesimilar acts are seen I ginning with the General Surgery Clinic to the nursleave the area and then es on Ward 6, were pleasant, courteous and very notify the MPs at 287professional. 4401 My experience in the operating room could not have gone more smoothly thanks to Ms. Hayden Mugging on and the anesthesiologist. They spent all the time I Central Avenue needed to understand what preparations were goA sailor on tempo...ing to happen when I arrived for surgery and the rary duty in Panama was victimized on Central Avenue in The young man initially tried on a pair of tennis shoes, treatment I would receive in the recovery room. Not Panama City last week. While shopping, he was apwent to the refund counter and tried to get a refund on the once did I feel uncomfortable or concerned of what proached by three unknown men who knocked him down shoes, even though they had not been purchased. He was to expect. and fled with his wallet containing a credit card, $200 and arrested and charged with larceny by false pretenses. And finally, I want to thank all the personnel on personal effects. If other entrepreneurs acts are seen, call the store manWard 6. 1 have a very special thanks to nurses Mary Everyone is reminded to travel in groups and never agement or the MPs at 287-4401 or 289-5133. Garner, Charmin Ford and Elizabeth Colon. Nurses show large amounts of cash while traveling off post. Garner and Ford did wonders helping me cope with Panama Jack anonymous hotline pain, tubes, and confusion which I guess is normal Taking a bite out of crime Anyone with information about drug smuggling for patients who have just had major surgery. Their A K-9 team saw a man wandering around the Cocoli should call the Panama Jack anonymous hotline at 285gentleness, encouragement and humor not only housing area during the early morning hours. The man 4185. helped me but also relieved a lot of tension my wife became violent when asked to show his ID card. The man was feeling. Nurse Colon followed through on the was bitten several times after resisting arrest. He was The following crimes occurred in on and off post housevening shift with the same tender care. She was searched and a lock-blade knife was found. ing June 24-30. exceptional in helping me cope with the tubes I had After getting medical attention, the man was charged down my throat, a condition that affected me more with drunk and disorderly conduct, resisting apprehension Pacific than I anticipated. My first hours after surgery were and carrying a concealed weapon. Corozal 700 area -one larceny of secured private propat least bearable and not a nightmare due to the proIf suspicious activities are seen, call the MPs at 287erty fessional nursing treatment. I have nothing but 4401 or 289-5133. Fort Kobbe 400 area -one larceny of secured private praise and admiration for all the other nurses and property staff on Ward 6. Their knowledge and experience Theft at shoe store Off post far exceeded anything I expected. An enterprising man was arrested at the A brook Shoe Bethania -two larcenies of secured private property Richard S. Zornes Store when he tried to cash in on a good deal last week. Panama City -one larceny of secured private property This authorized unofficial command information pubChief .Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor Command Information Officer.Beth Taylor lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Editor.Maureen Sampson Managing Editor.StaffSgt. Jane Usero Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Sports Edito.Sgt. Lori Davis Editor.Sgt. Robin M antikoski Information Program of the Department of Defense, unStaff Editors.Sgt. Cass Purdum Journalist.Sgt. Eric Hortin der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S. Spc. John lall 24th Wing Public Affairs Office.284-5459 Southern Command. Spe. Tom Findtner Public Affairs Officer.Capt. Warren L. Sypher Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the Rosemary Chong Public Affairs Superintendent official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Student hires.Floyd Able Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham Defense or the U.S. Southem Command. Nishawne Moran Joumalists.StaffSgt. Rian Clawson The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Charlotte Souffront Sgt. James A. Rush Telephone 285-6612. Southern Command Public Affairs Office.282-4278 U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 Commander in Chief.Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey Command Infornation Officer.Patrick Milton Public Affairs Officer.Diane Gonzalez Director, Public Affairs.Col. James L. Fetig U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.287-3007 Photographers Public Affairs Officer. Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano Mays U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic. 289-4312 -* T o p ic TCi e s NCOC.Sgt. Richard Fimert

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Tropic Times 7 Comment July 22, 1994 I Sexualharassment lips can help make Officials offer definition, give quiz welcome special to test your working knowledge number of complaints filed with social by Chap. Mark A. Gefaller To help you in preparing to love by Tech. Sgt. Jim Johnson on r unit commanders U.S. Naval Station Panama your soldier, sailor, airman or Marine 24th Wing Social Actions -when he or she comes home. Unfortunately, some individuals know special that day is for LS Here are a few thoughts: h no, not another article on what sexual harassment is but don't think H ose tt days at Heeme thought: sexual harassment. they will get caught or reported. For these all! Those first few days at *Remenber that you love each I'm sure some of you said this people, it is just a matter of time before home are magical, with other and always will, nothing will. to yourself when you read the title. Often they are standing in front of their romance, warm feelings and the ever come between you. people ask me why we continue to write commander awaiting punishment. flowering once again of love. If only *Always speak in love. Don't let articles and hold classes concerning For concerned folks, below is a quick we could hang on to good thoughts anger or frustration get the better of sexual harassment. The answer is very test to refresh your memory about sexual forever. you. Once spoken, words cannot be simple. Sexual harassment is still harassment. Read each statement and Living is filled with love, though it unsaid. This also means don't dig up occurring and sexual harassment indicate whether it is true or false. Call will bring some adjustment periods. past problems. Stick to here-and-now complaints are on the rise. me at social actions, 284-5358, if you Because relationships separation has issues. Despite the Air Force's education have any questions. been rateropted for a time, you have *Use "I" statements and avoid efforts concerning sexual harassment, 1. Unwanted sexual attention will go both experienced many different things "you." Say thina like, "feel.when." many still wonder, "What exactly is away if you ignore it. both experienged y bifferenNothing wi make e l hen." sexual harassment?" 2. If I don't mean to sexually harass which have challenged you both to Nothing will make each other more I could quote Air Force Regulation another person, there is no way my grow as individuals. defensive than starting a sentence with 30-2, Social Actions Program, however, I behavior could be considered sexual You know better than anyone how "You." think a common sense definition is more harassment. difficult or rewarding separation has *Speak from your heart not your appropriate. 3. Some people don't complain about been. Now your eagerly looking head, "I feel." Statements are yours In essence, sexual harassment is any sexual harassment because they don't forward to that special reunion ahead. and cannot be judged. Look at each unwelcome form of sexual conduct. This want to get the other person in trouble. The best way to welcome your other in the eye and refrain from name includes a very broad range of behaviors. 4. If I make sexual comments about special someone into the everyday calling. Here are a few common examples: someone and they don't ask me to stop, routine of the home once again is with *Listen to everything each other *Sexual comments, jokes and then the comments are welcome. patience and love. has to say. So often we respond innuendoes 5. If I confront someone but they Although he or she knows better, without having a clear understanding *Repeatensbu a person s sex life o te social action ofc d m his or her mind last remembers life of what the other is trying to say. That or sexual preferences 6. Sexual harassment is a form of months ago. Many things may be means toM off the TV and other *Sexual gestures (i.e. licking lips, discrimination that involves unwelcome different: the furniture may have been distractions that stop you from talking leering, staring at a specific body part, sexual advances or verbal/physical moved, your hair style may have it through. Be respectful ofthoughts winking, etc.) conduct of a sexual nature. changed, you may treasure a certain and feelings. *Starting rumors of a sexual nature 7. Men can't file sexual harassment amount of the independence you've *Trust and honesty are to be about someone complaints. enjoyed. treasured in any relationship. To fool *Comering or blocking a person 8. About 90 percent of all sexual Yes, it will be good to have your with these will destroy a relationship's *Unsolicitied or unwanted touching harassment complaints are filed by loved one home. But, be understanding foundations. No mind games and no of any kind females against males. if he or she complains just a little. abusing each other's weak spots. *Whistles or catcalls 9. Sexually suggestive pictures or Months ofechange are a great deal to Respect each other and discuss thigs As you can see, sexual harassment can objects in the workplace can't be involve many activities. So how to we considered a form of sexual harassment. come to grips with in just a few short always in love. eliminate it? Hopefully through preven10. Telling someone to stop his or her ays. -Never be afraid to seek profestion and the key to prevention is educaunwanted sexual behavior usually doesn't Feelings of frustration are not sional assistance when needed. If a tion. do any good. 1 uncommon for both members of a relationship is worth having, it's worth If people understand what constitutes Answers: 1) False, 2) False, 3) True. relationship. These are temporary keeping. sexual harassment, most will monitor 4)F also, 5) True, 6) True, 7) False, 8) feelings and will pass soon. God bless you all. their behavior and we will reduce the True, 9) False, 10) False. D u -What do you consider sexual harassment? IRM "Touching too much "When you're forced to "Touching somebody "Anything that's of"When you walk down there's friendly and not do something you don't that doesn't want to be fending toward you the street and people so friendly." feel is correct." touched." because of your genwhistle at you." der." Christy Ford Sgt. Argelis Melendez Spc. Doug May Meleina Fillmore Maria Ucros Civilian family member Company B, 193rd Support Company B, 154th Signal Army family member Deputy Chief of Staff for Battalion Battalion Intelligence The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries -or responses to commentaries -to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

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Tropic Times July22, 1994 1993 beauty queen dedieated fler working full-time as an munity service always has been at the nomic ills that surround her world. occupational help urse top of her list. She believes winning "I think we should do all we can to for the Panama Canal Commission at the title of Mrs. Beauty enabled her to help our countrymates," Ortiz said. "We Gatun Locks, Jilma Lewis de Ortiz do the kinds of positive deeds she had can make changes ourselves. We can't made the three hour roundtrip drive only wished to perform before. just sit back and wait for the governalong the rugged Trans-Istlimian "I looked at the event as not only ment to get things done." Highway to Panama City in pursuit of a beauty contest, but as a chance to do Ortiz said she is especially proud to a drean. community service," Ortiz said. have participated in the Mrs. Panama For two months, six days a week, In giving back to the communipageant because ofthe message it sends Ortiz followed the routine religiously. ties on the Atlantic side, Ortiz played out to the rest of society. Until 11 p.m., her evenings were spent a leading role in organizing the dona"Some people think beauty stops training in a gym and studying in a tion of toy and food gifts to the orwhen women have children," Ortiz said. classroom. Then she would get back phaned children of Ciucudaela Jesus "I don't believe that. I think we have to in her car for the long haul home. de Maria last Christmas. Ortiz also go beyond the limits that are put upon Ortiz's efforts were rewarded made arrangements to improve the us." when she was judged the 1993 Mrs. orphanage's nursery facilities so that Reflecting back on her year as Mrs. Beauty of Panama pageant winner. it now is able to provide first-rate Panama, Ortiz feels that she has matured Afler a year as queen, she relinguished treatment. In addition, Ortiz assisted and become more focused. her crown Saturday with the knowlthe Lyon's Club in providing food, "1 learned a lot about myself" she edge that she was able to accomplish shelter and clothing for victims of a said. "I 've come to appreciate my famsome good during her tenure. fire that ravaged a number of outlyily and what I have around me." For Ortiz, 38, life is all about ing communities. Ortiz and her husband, Luis, have making sacrifices forthat which is inmOrtiz takes a proactive approach been married 15 years and have two portant. The giving of herself to comto trying to solving the social and ecosons, Luis Jr., 12, and Josimar, 6. Ariadne Aguilera de Branca poses for a family photo while watching the 1993 Mrs. Beauty of Panama B pageant on television, Ariadne a rigo Aguilera de Branca, a SOUTIICOM travel coordinator, and a became convinced that she could be a contestant, too. chor After consulting with her husband, and gaining his enseled couragement and support, she decided to try out for this year's competition. taped Saturday, Branca was named first runner-up in the "I 1994 contest. said. However, Branca is quick to point out that there B was more to the event than just standing on stage and shed 1 smiling for the cameras, was sl The process began with Branca and more than one contac hundred other woien submitting applications for conplease sideration as participants in the event. 'Ihen the candi"I dates were interviewed and evaluated, before the field said." was reduced to about 30 hopefuls. From this pool, B Branca and 11 other finalists were chosen, based on the citize potential they deionsrated during television screen exerci tests. before Courtesyphoto Jilma Lewis de Ortiz waves to a crowd of admirers, after winning the 1993 Mrs. Beauty of Panama crown.

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Tropic Times July22, 1994 raph with husband Jose Antonio and children Jean Carlo (left) and Jean Paul. anca, 3 0, said the finalists were forced to undergo "I'm cutting back to three nights a week, and I ous trailing program that included weightlifting promised my husband I would be home by 6:30," she obics. They also attended modeling, casting and said. raphy classes. In addition, the women were counBranca gives credit to her family for supporting her a the importance of proper diet and nutrition. endeavor and making the sacrifices necessary to allow 1 r two months, the contestants were weighed and her to participate. vekly to measure their progress. She believes the contest gave her and her family a had no idea it would be so much work," Branca greater appreciation for each other. She said her husband gained a better understanding of what she does anca said her looks changed dramatically after she because lie had to assume many oflher family responsipounds and live inches of body fat. Her long hair bilities, such as shopping and taking their children placortened and her eye glasses were replaced with es. Meanwhile, the time she spent from her family, lenses to further alter her appearance. Branca is made her realize just how important they are to her. with the results. As for future career plans, Branica is open to modn not going back to the way I was before," she cling and television commercial offers. y husband likes me this way better and so do I." "If it comes my way, I'1 do it, but I'm not going anca, a Panama City native and naturalized U.S. out looking for it," she said. plans on maintainig her "new" beauty through Branca and her husband, Jose Antonio Branca, and diet but not at the intensity level required have been married eight years and have two sons, Jean he pageant. Paul, 5, and Jean Carlo, 2. Courtesy phot. 1994 Mrs. Beauty of Panama First Runner-up Ariadne Aguilera de Branca.

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tOTropic Times 10 July 22,s1994 _ Reenlistments Reenlistments -Senior Airman Brady C. Ipock, Staff Sgt. Dennis E. Narucki, Tech Sgt. John A. Roberts, and Master Sgt. Will Sherman, 24th Security Police Squadron; Staff Sgt. Calvin C. Cooper Jr., Senior Airman. Marc C. Porter, Staff Sgt. Miguel Ramos, Senior Airman IMichelle D. Shillato, and Master Sgt. Sherrill A. J. Stewart, 24th Civil Engineering Squadron; Staff Sgt. Carlos A. Marrero, 24th Operations Squadron; Sgt. Cheryl L. Ellis, Tech Sgt. James M. Lucas, Staff Sgt. Pam Mahoney, Staff Sgt. David Roberts, Senior Master Sgt. James E. Simpkins, and Staff Sgt. Wayne C. Stewart, 24th T Supply Squadron; Staff Sgt. Adalberto Acosta, 24th Medical Squadron; Senior Airman Stephen S. Straley, 24th Maintenance Squadron; Staff Sgt. Joseph F. Collelo and Staff Sgt. William R. Pendleton Jr., 310th Airlift Squadron; Staff Sgt. Matthew A. Trischler, 24th Services Squadron; Tech Sgt. Benjamin D. Brewer Jr. and Senior Lawrence J. Broussard, 24th Wing; Staff Sgt. David C. Ames and Senior Airman Israel B. Parker, 640th Air Mobility Support Squadron; and Master Sgt. Jose A. Ciceraro, U.S. Southern Command. The following are birth announcements from the Army Community Service New Parent Program: NEVERETTE, Christopher Ian; born to Spc. William and Irene Neverette; June 1. A: REYNOLDS, Gregory Martin; born to Staff Sgt. John Martin and Thaira Reynolds; June 23. STUKEY, Chelsie; born to Spc. Lisa and Stephen Stukey; June 24. TURNER, Stephen; born to Spc. David and Gena Tumer; June 2. FRANK, Devon Antonio; born to Spc. Michael and U S Army photo by Sgt. E Hort, Monica Frank; June 30. Lt. Col Lawrence Pippins (left) takes the 92nd Military Police Battalion guidon from Col. John JASSO, Daniel Esteban; bom to Chief Warrant OfficMumma. cr 2 Henry and Luz; June 22. KEELER, Aubrey; born to Capt. Joseph and Lori Pippins assumes MP battalion command -1 LEE, Jasmine Lee: born to Sgt. William and Angela by Sgt. Eric Hortin States. Pippins comes from Korea, where he served as Lee; June 2. USARSO Pubiic A fairs Office the commander of I.S. Anny troop Command. AL EXANDER, Damien Tyler James; born to Special"One observation I've made since I've been in coonists Tereasa and Damien James; June 15. FORT CLAYTON -Command of the 92nd Mili7rY is that the MPs are proud and professional," Pippins LINDBERG. Kevin: born to Spc. Eric and Sarah ,ary Police Battalion changed hands in a ceremony July said. "I'm very proud to now be a part of this outstandLindberg; June 26. 13 at Soldiers Field. ing unit, and I will work to continue the unit's tradition QUIROS, Querube Anett; born to Franklin(retired) Lt. Col. Lawrence Pippins, incoming commander, of excellence in Panama." and Auristela; June 4. took the reins and the guidon from Lt. Col. Gerald Pippins holds a Master of Arts degree in Criminal BROWN Janis Ranee; bom to Sgt. Rufus and JenniPrentice. Justice and Urban Police Administration and a BacheBROWN Jn 27 "This has been a great tour of duty and it has been lor of Arts degree in Criminal Justice. He is a graduate the people who made it great," Prentice said of his two of the basic and advanced Infantry Officers Courses GREEN, Brittany; bum to Spe. James and Amy Green; years in command. "They are committed to making a the Combined Anns Service Staff School and the U.S. June 25. difference, and they have." Arny Command and General Staff College. FERNANDEZ, Alex; born to Cpl. Joel and Joan Pippins received his commission after graduating Prentice and his wife, Cynthia, will travel to his next Fernandez; June 4. from the University of South Florida in 1976. He has assignment in Washington. D.C., to the Personnel PADILLA, Dariam; born to Sgt. Eduardo and Lourdes served in many positions overseas and in the United Readiness Division, Office of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Padilla: June 25. BOST, Thomas, III; born to Sgt. Thomas and Azucena and_____Sgt._HubertGreen,_bothofte_536thEngineer Bost; June 14. and 1st Sgt. Hubert Green, bosh of the 536th Engineer VALDEZ, Lani; born to Spc. Frank and Misti Valdez; Promotions Battalion. May 5. WOODFOLK, Aaliyah; born to Sgt. Darryl and To First Lieutenant -Cathy Carman and Andrew Pero, Army Commentation Medal -Sgt. Ist Class Luis Yvette Woodfolk; June 28. both of Headquarters Support Company, 536th Engineer Martinez, Sgt. I st Class Joseph Myers, Sgt. Ist Class Jorge CASAREZ, Alexus; born to Spe. Delilah Casarez; Battalion. Rosa, Spc. Bernardo Bownall Spc. Bernardo Brown and June 21. Spc. Kenneth Dixon, all of Headquarters Support ComPRESLEY, Justin Cole and Megan Leigh: born to Sgt. To Specialist -Anthony Morales, David Thompson and pany, 536th Engineer Battalion. Sgt. 1st Class Jeffrey Jay and Laurie Presley; July 11 .MORTENSEN, Steven; James Vesta all of Headquarters Support Company, 536th Kemble, Staff Sgt. Ramon DeGracia Jr., Staff Sgt. Robert born to Staff Sgt. Jeffery and Sgt. Lisa Mortensen; July Engineer Battalion. Trevor Petzoldt ofCompany A, 536th Dyer, Spe. Ollie Cole and Spe. Garrett Gallo, all of Com12. Engineer Battalion. William Schlott of Company B, 536th pany A, 536th Engineer Battalion. Staff'Sgt. Juan DeJesus EADDIE, Terrance; born to Spc. Nathaniel and Engineer Battalion. and Staff Sgt. Sidney Johnson, both of Company B, 536th Mamita Eaddie; July 11. Engineer Battalion. SCHARTZMAN, Madeline Renee; born to 2nd Lt. JoTo Private First Class -William Baumgartner and seph Charles and Geri Schwatzman; July 8. Michael Cunningham, both of Company B, 536th EngiJoint Service Commendation Medal -Staff Sgt. Mary HERNANDEZ, Crystal Marie; born to Sgt. Russ and neer Battalion. Howard Bryant and Tanja Mestlin, both M. Ball, U.S. Southern Command. Paula Hernandez; June 7. of Company A, 536th Engineer Battalion. LAUDERDALE, Derace; born to Derace and Joana Air Force Commendation Medal -Senior Airman Lauderdale; June 2. HILLBURG, Kimberly Lauren; born to Spe. Ronald To Private Two -James Lively of Company A, 536th Ricardo D. San Jose, 640th Air Mobility Support Squadand Iliana Hillburg; June 3. Engineer Battalion. Geoffrey Marks, Miguel McGhee and ron. LEE, Richard; burn to Sgt. Richard and Aura Lee; June Stacey Wharton, all of Company B, 536th Engineer Bat9. talion. Army Achievement Medal -Sgt. Ted Sargent, Spc. EIMER, Ashly Lynn; born to Spc. Roy Lee and Rosa Brian Machesky, Spc. Victor Rojas, Pfc. Timothy Eimer; June 7. A rHarrington and Pfc. Jay Hildebrand, all of HeadqUarters HEATH, Michael James; born to Spc. James and Support Company, 536th Engineer Battalion. Spc. Kevin Jeannette Heath; June 19. Legion of Merit -Chief Warrant Officer 4 James Johnson Dorsey of Company A, 536th Engineer Battalion. JONES, Arri Kristina; born to Sgt. Laurence and Julie of 536th Engineer Battalion. Jones: June 20. Air Force Achievement Medal -Sgt. Edward B. BEDOUET, Youlna; born to Spe. Jean and Daycee Meritorious Service Medal -Sgt. Ist Class Allen Albert Vincent, 24th Transportation Squadron. Bedouct; May 17.

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~I~ieaures _Tropic Tim~es Features July22, 1994 Flying friends Tips keep parrots healthy by Floyd Able Cages should be easy to maintain, and food and water they are found deeper in Panama's interior, Corozal VTF Tropic Times student hire dishes should be cleaned daily to prevent dieases. Stainless officials said. steel, ceramic or plastic dishes are easiest to keep clean. Red or yellow head parrots are usually make better pets COROZAL -Parrots are popular pets here in Panama. Cages need to be cleaned once a week with a solution of when purchased at an early age. Young parrots are much They can live anywhere from 15-25 years, so owners chlorine bleach at a strength of 1 fluid ounce to 1 1/2 pints easier to train. Older birds may not be as susceptible to should know how to properly care for their birds. of water. training and can cause problems later. Also, if the bird will Parrots need cages large enough to spread their wings When shopping for a parrot, the cage should suit the be left alone most oftime it is better to buy two birds ofthe and move freely. Wire or iron cages are the best. Large type of bird. There are several kinds of parrots to choose same type to be companions. parrots also need play areas where they can exercise daily, from. There are a few differences between the various types of said officials at the Corozal Veterinary Treatment Facility. Yellow heads, red heads, pericos (dwarf parrots), orparrots. Red heads are not usually as talkative as yellow Cages should be placed away from loud noises, gases, ange chinned parrakeets and macaws are some ofthe more heads, and they sometimes have temper tantrums. On the fumes and other odors. Keep birds away from television popular breeds ofparrots. The most common ones seen are other hand, they are not as noisy as yellow heads. Yellow setsbecausethe frequencycan damage it's nervous system. yellow and red heads -macaws are usually rare because heads love to talk. Macaws are very different from yellow and red heads. They are very aggressive and can be hard to get along with, but they are also more colorful then other parrots and have a longer life span, officials said. Once an owner chooses a parrot or macaw, the next step is introducing it to the rest of the family. It may be nervous at first, so it is better to put the bird in its cage and leave the door open so it can get used to its new surroundings when it is ready. After a few days have passed and the parrot has become accustomed to its new home, owners should condsider whether or not to have the bird's wings clipped. If so, it is best to have a veterinarian clip them the first few times until the owner feels confident to do it himself. Clipping a bird's wings involves cutting the contour feathers. The procedure prevents the bird from flying long distances for a few months. The bird will be able to glide, and will be able to fly normally when the feathers grow back, officials said. Trimming a parrot's nails and beak are also part of its health care. Ifthe bird gets out of the cage a lot, the owner shouldn't ave to worry about its nails and beak. But if it doesn't, Owners must trim them for their pet. The tips ofthe fowardpointing claws should not meet or overlap the backwardpointing claws. Trimming a parrots' claws is a delicatej ob because there are many blood vessels in their toes. Have a veterinary srgeon trim them to avoid accidentally cutting the bird, officials said. Exotic birds require special care. There are books on Department of Defense photo by Floyd Able care ofexotic birds at the Fort Clayton Library, and the staff A parrot sharpens its beak while playing outside. Birds need time outside their cages for exercise at the Corozal Veterinary Treatment Facility can answer and to take care of their claws and beaks. questions. Air Force 'buys local' at trade fair by Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson brokers and car rental agencies. The diver24th Wing Public Affairs sity of products available extended to one company's display of its innovative system HOWARD AFB -Last week's trade fair for lightning strike protection. was an "unqualified success," said Martha "This is an excellent opportunity for us, Carey, director of business programs for said Linnette Ruiz, one of the local busithe 24th Contracting Squadron here. nesswomen who participated in the trade "We put on the trade fair to support the fair. "Very often we have something we can 'BuyPanama' emphasisinthetreaty,"Carey provide the customers, something they reexplained. "The treaty requires us to buy ally need, but they don't know where to go locally if we can, and ifthe price and quality to find us and we have no way to find them. of the product is comparable." "At this trade fair, we can let potential Every year Southern Command sets a customers know where we are and what we monetary goal for downtown purchases by have to offer." military customers. For Fiscal Year 1994 "I'm making a lot of good contacts here the goal was SIS million. "We've already today," said JeffCaston, another local mersurpassed that goal, and we'rc just now chant. "They include not only Americans, gettingintotheheavybuyingseason,"Carey but also other Panamanian vendors who said. have products and services that comple"We held a symposium July 14 to exment my own. I hope we can do this again." plain the procedures required for selling to Caston's final sentiment was repeated base customers," said Judy Young, a conby many of the people who attended the tract specialist with the contracting squadFair, both vendors and potential customers. ron and a driving force behind the fair. In fact, the fair received such a popular "More than 135 vendors showed up far response from both buyers and sellers that the symposium," she added, "and about 80 contracting officials say thcy'regoing to try of them returned July 15, during the actual and make it an annual affair. iradefairtodisplaytheirgoodsandservices "This has been a positive, 'win-win' intheballroom andthe lounge ofthe Howard situation for all of the fair participants,' Enlisted Club." Carey said. "Everyone who had anything to Items displayed at the trade fair included say had only positive comments, there was refrigerators and security systems, office absolutely no negativity at all. and cleaning supplies and computer com"That doesn't happen too oftent," she U S. Aocn photo ponents,andmobilephoncsandpagersand concluded, "so when it does, you know Lorena Zerr (left) writes down the address and phone number of her sporting goods. Candy and toy manuacyou've got n winner and you want to do it office supplies store after having given away all of her printed business turers set up booths next to real estate again." cards.

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12 Tropic Times 4 o July 22, 1994 sto World War II stamps: The Panama Canal and its outposts add color Oct. 8, 1941, machine cancel on the 15 cent Canal Covers from troops on such stations are not at all Tropic Times contributor Zone airail stamp confirms the location. rare, except for a few locations where only a small The bottom cover in Figure 4 shows three more number of people were assigned. In the years before World War II, strategists felt covers from troops in the Canal Zone. Although such Generally, the troops wrote many letters that give that the Panama Canal made it unnecessary to maintain a covers may not have been sent by units known for us some very interesting covers. two-ocean United States Navy. The thought was that participation in the war, from a postal history standpoint ships could be shifted through the canal to meet they are quite interesting. aggression in either ocean. The top cover in Figure 4 is from Albrook Field Editor's note: This article was originally pubU.S. naval construction before 1940 planned no Canal Zone, which was the headquarters of the 6th U.S. lished in the Linn Stamp News. warships that couldn't traverse the Panama Canal, Amy Air Force. It was mailed June 5, 1942 by an although for some ofthe locks were measured literally in officer of the 16th Pursuit Group. inches. Themiddlecover,mailedJuly22,1942,only The one-fleet concept was based on the idea that several weeks later, is from a memberofthe same heavy gun emplacements at each end of the Panama unit, but, as the cover shows, a great deal has -1 ,. Canal could keep it open against any enemy ships that changed. This cover bears a U.S. stamp rather than might evade the screening fleet. a Canal zone stamp, and it has the postmark of At the beginning of WWII, the guns and emplacements APO 825, assigned to Albrook Field, July 1, 1942. defending the Panama Canal, manned by the U.S. Coast The change from using postmarks with base Artillery, were considered among the most powerful names to APO numbers markings probably such installations in the world. involved far more problems than normal in that the Only as WWII approached was it recognized that stamps used at post offices had to be changed El IR MAI air power could easily bypass the gun emplacements and from Canal Zone issues to those of the United -H N that German influence in South America could lead to States. .EL':lAt bases for enemy bombers to attack the canal. This probably accounts for bases in the Canal m i5 tl The locks and dams of the canal and the huge Zone making the switch to APO numbers much earthen embankments ofthe Gailard and Culebra cuts later than other U.S. bases abroad did. were considered especially vulnerable to bombs that Another difference in the top two covers in -' could close the canal for weeks. Figure 4 is that their unit designations, as given in It was also recognized that air and naval bases, not the return addresses, changed from the 16th only in the Canal Zone but also in its approach from the Pursuit Group to 16th Fighter Group in the weeks Caribbean and the Pacific, would be needed to combat between when the two covers were mailed. Figure 4. Covers from the Canal Zone (top) and submarines and to serve as outposts and waning The bottom cover in Figure 4 was sent from middle from Albrook Field sent a few weeks system base for the defense of the canal. theArmy Engineers at DiabloHeights, Canal Zone, apart before and after APO 825 was assigned Before 1939, only a few bases existed that were March 3, 1943. Although part ofthe Army, this (Bpttob)fo anaA Po a saind available to the United Sates, one such base being unit had no APO, being part of the Canal Zone (Bottom) from the Canal Zone administration GuantanamoBayNavalBaseinCuba. administration and engaged in construction. postmarked at Diablo Heights, Canal Zone, Beginning in the late 1930's, air bases were built not Of added interest is that the postage is paid March 3, 1943. only in the Canal Zone but also in Puerto Rico. by a 15 cent Canal Zone airmail stamp with the The field bore the name Borinquen Field throughout "OFFICIAL/PANAMA CANAL" overprint (Scott 6 the war, but its name was changed to Ramey Air Force co3). Base in 1947. However,Army post office(APO) 845, Troops at bases in the Caribbean and the assigned April 20, 1942, continued to be used until 1965, Canal Zone mostly never fired a shot in combat when itbecame APO 09845. while at those stations. Figure 2 shows three covers from other Caribbean Although the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor bases. The top cover was mailed at APO 852, Camp caused anxious anticipation of a similar air attack Hardwood, Charlotte Amalie, Virgin Islands, in October on the Canal Zone that might have closed the 1942. canal at a critical point in the war, no such attack The middle cover originated at the U.S. Navy's materialized. A large troop buildupjust before the Guantanamo Bay base (the return address says "Gtmo," war reduced gradually as the war progressed. r,' the common Navy abbreviation). The & cover has an inverted-dial machine cancel appliedinApril 1942. The bottom cover originated at APO 632, Batista Field, at San Antonio de los (PmsmE BanosU,near Havana, Cuba. Figure 1. (Top) cover from Borinquen Field, Puerto West of the Panama Canal, the ,-. S Rico, Dec. 23, 1941, before and APO number was problemoflong-rangedetectionof R PSHRCH --assigned and (bottom), May 4, 1942, just after attackers approaching the canal was more S. A. APO 845 was assigned. difficult, as there were few islands where bases could be built. Avr WrBeta Air base was built on Seymour Island (as named on Army maps) in the Galapagos Islands.Covers from APO662 at that location are occasionally seen. One was pictured in this column March 17, 1986. An important air base was developed 4 at Rio Hato, located in the Republic of A A MAiL Panama, about 60 miles west ofthe Canal VIA AIR MAIL Zone. A privately operated runway had existed there before the war, and Army -it fliers could land there under arrangements .f with the owner. When war came, Rio Hato was L developed into amajor base with long Figure 2. Covers from Caribbean bases, 1942-45: runwaysthatwouldaccommodatelong(top) from APO 852 at Camp Hardwood, Charoitte Figure 3. Covers from the airfield at Rio Hato, rangeplanes. Amalie, Virgin Islands, sent Oct. 21, 1942; (midRepublic of Panama, operated on conjunction Figure 3 shows two covers from the die) from the Guantanamo Naval Base in Cuba, with Albrook Field at Balboa, Canal Zone. (Top) base. The top cover is so identified by its postmarked April 16, 1942, with the dial inverted; from Albrook Field Oct. 8, 1941, before an APO return address, "99th Bomb Sq. Rio Hato, and (bottom) from APO 632 at Batista Field near was opened at Rio Hato. (Bottom) from APO 838 Albrook FieldP.O."heAlbrookField Havana, Cuba, Feb. 10, 1945. at Rio Hato, mailed Jan. 20, 1943.

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July 22, 1994 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 13 5'10 and under championship Nets cru ise to victory, 66-56 by Sgt. Lori Davis Tropic Times sports editor FORT CLAYTON -Beating up on the competition was the Nets trademark. They did just that in the championship just like they did in the regular season with its 8-1 record. Mo' Money fought its way up the brackets to reach the championship, but the title game was out of its reach early in the game. The Nets roster was too packed with talentandskill. Mo' Money might have had a chance if it needed to contain a couple of high scorers, but the Nets spread the offense and routed their opposition. The Nets poured on the pressure in the first half Dow Owens sunk two shots from downtown and added two free throws to lead the scoring drive, followed by Ray Childress and Phil Mickles scored inside and from beyond the three-point line for, seven points each. Moving the ball worked well for the Nets, but Mo' Money could only cash in on Johnny Ward and Tony Lambert. Ward lead the way with six points inside and a three-pointer, and Lambert followed with 7 six points inside. In spite of Ward and Lamberts efforts, the first half was all Nets. Gary Mixon put up six points, and Bernard Grimsley and Jeffrey Moses added five to the drive, pushing the Nets to a 40-22 lead at the half. Something inspired Ward during that halftime break, because he came back playing like a one-man team. He opened the half with three baskets and ended up scoring 14 points in the half, 23 points for the game. Ward's fire lit John Gooch. Usually a strong man inside, Gooch sunk only one basket in the first half, but he got back into his game to score 10 points in the second half. This tag-team offense pulled Mo' Money closer to the Nets, out-scoring them 3426 in the second half It just wasn't enough to make up for the big lead the Nets built in the opening half. "Our front line bought us through," Mickles said. "Ourforwards, Mixon, Moses and Childress, were strong down low and they turned it on for us." "We also have outstsanding ball handling ability, and we are not concentrated on one person so we can spread our game." The Nets' victory, and their strong regular season play, was a result of total team effort, Mixon said. The team worked well together, but in his opinion, Mickles stood out. "The team had outstanding execution, and we have an outstanding point guard in Mickles," he said. Gooch took the loss graciously, and Department of Defense photo by Sgt. Lon Davis gave the Nets credit for a well played game. The Nets Phil Mickles looks for an open man as he turns away from Mo' Money defender Tony Lambert. Mickles' "We just got outplayed," he said. "We skills as a point guard were a valuable part of the Nets offensive strategy in their championship win over Mo' started to get the ball down low, but they Money. stopped us. Defense won the game." Basketball Page 14 Volleyball Page 15 and more Page 15'. Directorate of CommunityActivities Jungle Operations Training Battal*SCN AM radio schedule I beat the Jazz, 63-41 to win in 5'11" ion wins the Atlantic men's over-30 *Local sports schedule and over basketball championship. volleyball championship. *Body sculpting

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14Tropic Times L p rs_ 14July 22, 1994 sorts DCAII wins championship by Sgt. Lori Davis to size to take the 5'11" and over basketball title 63-41. and Kellsey Moore, Gregory Hunter and Martin Pleasant Tropic Times sports editor DCA II spent the regular season at the top of the with two buckets on the inside. standings, the underdog Jazz came through the brackets to Pleasant got the Jazz off to a strong start, opening the FORT CLAYTON -The Directorate of Community take a stab at the Cinderella team. game with two baskets, but DCA II locked him down for Activities II went into thehalfwith only a three-point edge, An upset seemed within the Jazz's grasp as it split the the rest of the half. but it spent the second halfeutting the Jazz's offense down scoring between Michael Burton with three three-pointers Not to be outdone, DCA II's Tony Thacker and Michael Frazier opened up the game from downtown, putting in two three-pointers. DCA II fought back by spreading its offense with Steve Alexander sinking six points, Jeff Fernandez and Thacker putting up five points each, and Lee Brown and Anthony Mitchell chalking up two baskets each. The fast-break pace worked for the Jazz in the first half as it pushed the ball down the court and got inside before DCA II could set its defense. DCA II slashed the Jazz's hopes of stealing the championship by slowing down the pace in the second half by keeping the Jazz's forwards out ofthe paint. DCA II captain Chris Dale said his team moved from a 1-3-1 to a 2-3 defense to block their shooting. The change in tactics worked, and the Jazz offense fell apart. Hunter, Burton and Pleasant found the basket for only two points each, and Moore's only score was off two field J goals. Jazz managed to contain Mitchell and Fernandez, but the DCA II offense kept ahead of the Jazz with 10 points from Brown and six points from Alexander. Brown not only ruled the scoreboard with 16 points, he added insult to injury by trotting down the court and dunking the ball at the buzzer while the hapless Jazz players watched with defeat. "We played hard team ball," Dale said after the victory. N."The guys knew where each other would be, and we limited the turnovers. "We beat them in the regular season, but we knew we couldn't ease up on the intensity," he said. Most of the players on this team have been on the winning team for Department of Defense photo by Sgt L vis three years, so we wanted to keep the streak going." The Jazz's Martin Pleasant goes to the air to get a pass by DCA II's Tony Thacker. Soccer buffs gear up for Davis Cup by Sgt. Rick Emert director Jaime Powell and Fronius Gym USARSO PAO-Atlantic manager Ricardo Ford, Dodson said. With four eight-person teams already FORT DAVIS -Soccer buffs who formed, the Davis Cup could kick off by weren't able to get enough of World Cup next week. '94 may be interested in signing up for the "We have four teams signed up right smaller scale Davis Cup '94. now," Dodson said. "I know of five more Cristobal High School soccer "freaks" that are formed but haven't signed up yet." Jimmy Dodson and Rob Bemhardt came Each team must have a minimum of up with the idea for the co-ed adult soccer seven players and one substitute; a head tournament. Dodson and Bernhardt were coach that will determine the team's roster most valuable players for defense and ofand all players must be military ID card fense respectively for the Cristobal High holders. School soccer team. "We wanted it to be just for the military "We've both been playing since we community," Dodson said. "The Colon were about 5 years old," Dodson said. "We teams have been playing together for a long met last summer and it's been non-stop time, and it wouldn't be as much fun for soccer ever since. Our walls are covered teams that haven't played much soccer if with soccer posters." they were getting slaughtered by the Colon "One thing I miss about the states is that teams." T you can play soccer all year longindoor Additionally, the tournament offers soland outdoor," Bernhardt added. diers a change from the regular sports ofHere, the two can only play organized fered like basketball, football and softball, .soccer during the school year. That's someDodson said. thing they'd like to see changed. "So far we only have six teenagers," he "We've really only been able to play in said. "The rest of the people who have the school league -once a year," Dodson signed up are soldiers. I think they like it said. "We met some other people that play because it's something different forthem to soccer, and that's when we got the idea for do." the tournament Although it is not setup as a unit compe To start the roond-robin tournament, the tition, military units can sign up teams for two made a flier and distributed 300 copies the league. throughout the Atlantic community. For more information or to sign up, call U.S Army photo by Sgt Rick Emmert They'vehadassistancefromAtlanticsports 289-3108. Jimmy Dodson (bottom) gets the ball past Rob Bernhardt.

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____ ____ ___ ~ Spo ts ___Tropic Times pots July22,1994 Jungle warriors win volleyball victory FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Atlantic) -Jungle Operations Training Battalion outdid 747th Military Intelligence Battalion, 14-16, 15-12, 15-13 in the Atlantic Over-30 Volleyball Championship here July 14. JOTB claimed its first victory in the championship tournament from a U.S. Army Garrison-Atlantic forfeit. In game two, the 747th served the Navy its first loss 5 with a 15-0, 15-9 crushing defeat. Game three pitted 747th against JOTB for the first time in the tournament. The747th took the first match, 15-4, but turned the tables on the 747th team and came back to win the next two, 15-13 and 15-9. The first match in the loser's bracket went to USAG from a Navy forfeit. Navy edged out USAG, 15-13 in the last two matches to drop USAG from the tournament. The 747th slammed Navy, 15-6 and 15-3 in game five, earning the right to challenge JOTB for the championship title. The 747th already had one loss, and had to win the Forehand Tropic Times file photo game to remain in the championship. As in the first match-up between the two, the 747th took the first Becky Wilbur tries to return a shot during a tennis tournament at a local hotel. The Howard and match, 16-14. JOTB poured it on and outscored the Albrook sports and fitness centers are hosting a tennis ladder tournament. Players start at the 747th in the last two matches, 15-12, 15-13, and won bottom and winners of each match work their way up. All players must play a match per week, and the championship. players can challenge no more than two rungs above or below them. The tournament ends Aug. 1. Call 284-3451 to register. ronvs. 24th Maintenance Squadron Supply and fitness. For more information, or to team is limited to 15 players. Sports Shorts A register forthe class,callhealth promotions A coaches' meeting will be held 4:30 7:05 p.m.: 24th Air Postal Squadron/ at 284-5870. p.m. Aug. 31 at the Rodman Fitness Center. SCN AM Radio 790/1420 Services vs. 24th MSS Call 283-4222 for more information. 8:05 p.m.:24th Area Intelligence SquadUSARSO holds 10-miler airs basebagh action ron/Operations vs. 24th Transportation Rodman holds Jam '94 Tonight Squadron tryouts for men, women 6 p.m.: Baseball: Chicago White Sox at Tuesday Practice sessions and open tryouts will basketball tournament Cleveland Indians 6:05p.m.: 24th Communications Squadbe held for runners interested in the U.S. As part ofthe Jam '94 Labor Day festivSaturday ronBvs. 640thAirMobilitySupportSquadArmy South I0-Miler team. ities, Rodman NS will hold a basketball 12:35 p.m.: Baseball: San Fransisco ron B Sessionsare6 -8 a.m. at Reeder Physical tournament from Sept. 3-5. Trophies will Giants at New York Mets 7:05 p.m.: Co. B, 536th EngineerBattalFitness Center. Trial days are 6 a.m. Saturbe awarded to the first and second place 6 p.m.: Baseball: San Diego Padres at ion vs. 24th CS A day, Aug. 13 and Aug. 27 at the center. teams, and first and second most valuable Phildelphia Phillies 8:05 p.m.: Co. A, 1-228th Av. vs. 24th For information, call Willie Moye at players. Sunday Supply B 287-6411, Sue Bozgoz at 287-6448 or the The tournament is open to all military 3 p.m.: Baseball: New York Yankees at Wednesday Directorate of Community Activities Sports and civilians ages 17 and up3. There is a $75 California Angels 6:05 p.m.: Headquarters, Headquarters Office at 287-4050. entry fee, participation is limited to the first 7 p.m.: Baseball: Atlanta Braves at St. Company, 1-228th Av. vs. 24th MSS ten teams who pay the entry fee before the Louis Cardinals 7:05 p.m.: 24th CS B vs. 24th Trans. Rodman center hosts Aug.26 deadline. Each team is limitedto 12 Monday 8:05 p.m.: 24th MS vs. 310th ALSS players. 7 p.m.: Baseball: Minnesota Twins at Thursday ping-pong tournament A coaches' meeting will be held 6:30 Detroit Tigers 6:05 p.m.: 24th CES vs. 24th SPS B The Rodman Fitness Centerwill hold an p.m. August 31at the Rodman Fitness CenTuesday 7:05 p.m.: 640th AMSS vs. Co. B, 536th intramural ping-pong tournament Aug. 9ter. Call 283-4222 for more information. 3 p.m: Baseball: Los Angeles Dodgers Eng. 12, beginning at 6:30 a.m. each day. The at San Fransisco Giants 8:05 p.m.: 24th Supply A vs. 24th MS deadline for registration is Aug. 5. The Rodman NS marina Wednesday July 29 tournament is open to all active duty mili7 p.m.: Baseball: Chicago White Sox at 6:05 p.m.: 640 AMSS B vs. SPS A tary, Department of Defense civilians and sponsors shark fishing Kansas City Royals 7:05 p.m.: HHC, 1-228th Av. vs. 24th family members ages 18 years and up. Call There will be a shark fishing trip 6 a.m.Thursday AIS/OSS 2834222 for more information. 1 p.m. July 30 aboard the 42' Vargas. The 6:30 p.m.: Baseball: Milwaukee Brew8:05 p.m.: AIRPS/SVS vs. 24th Trans. trip departs from Rodman Marina. All fishers at Toronto Blue Jays Jam '94 features open ing equipment is included, there is a $38 fee 24th Medical Squadron softball tournament peesn. Unit level basketball on offers body sculpting 202 As part ofthe Jam'94 Labor Day festivRodman Marina 283-3147 for more inforlocal sports schedule Health promotion officials from the24th ities, Rodman NS will hold an open slowmation. *Air Force basketball Medical Squadron announce a four-week pitch softball tournament from Sept. 2-5. Today body sculpting class 10-11 a.m. Aug. 2 at Cash prizes and trophies will be awarded Young bowlers get 6:05 p.m.: 310th Airlift Support Squadthe Howard Sports and Fitness Center. for the first, second, and third place teams ron vs. 24th Civil Engineering Squadron "Body Sculpting 202," is a continuation of and the first and second most valuable own league at Albrook 7:05 p.m.: Co. A, 1st Battalion, 228th the popular "Body Sculpting 101" previplayers. The Albrook Youth Bowling League Aviation Regiment ously taught at the center. Taught by certiThe tournament is open to all military meeting will be held 10 a.m. July 30 at the 8:05 p.m.: 24th Security Police Squadfied fitness expert Stacey Robertson, this and civilians over the age of 17. There is a Albrook Bowling Center. Th e bowling ron A vs. 24th Mission Support Squadron class teaches students how to effectively $150 team entry fee, and participation is season for children ages 5-18 years will Monday use free weights and machines to re-shape limited to the first 15 teams who pay the begin Aug. 6. For more information, call 6:05 p.m.:24th Civil Engineering Squadtheirbodies and further improve their health entry fee before the Aug. 26 deadline. Each 287-4758/6795. Standings--U.S. Air Force Southern Division Commo. (A) 1 0 .5 Baskteball MSS 1 0 -Co. B, 536th Eng. 0 1 1.5 American League SPS (A) 0 0 -Med. Grp. 0 2 2 Northern Division HHC, 1-228th Av. 0 0 -Western Division WA L GB 640th AMSS(B) 0 1 1 CES 1 0 AIRPS/SVS 2 0 -Commo. (B) 0 1 I HSC, 536th Eng. I 0 Co. A, l-228th Av. 0 0 -National League 3 10th ALS 1 1 .5 AIS/OSS ) 0 -Eastern Division SPS (B) 0 1 1 Trans. ) 0 -Supply (A) 2 0 Maint. Sq. 0 1 1 Supply (B) 0 1 1.5 640th AMSS (A) 0 0 -*as of Thursday

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Tropic Times 1 .JJuly 22, 1994 N ws Armatty Community Service Daho celebrates 29th birthday by Sgt Rick Emert lies, newcomer's orientation, sponsorship program, Hasta USARSO PAO Atlantic Luego and pre/post move briefings. The Family Advocacy Program comprises troop training, commanders' MARGARITA COMPLEX -August 1965. The films training, training of professionals working with children at military theaters in Panama included "McHale's Navy" and community awareness. Consumer Affairs and FinanS F-17 1 becom es with Ernest Borgnine, "Kissin' Cousins" with Elvis cial Assistance cover debt collection assistance, check Presley and "Spartacus" with Kirk Douglas. management, budget management, financial workshops, U.S. Southern Command's newspaper, "Buccaneer" individual counseling and financial advice to soldiers obsolete D ec. 3 1 gave way to the new "Southern Command News." separating from the Army. And Army Community Service came to Panama just Relocation, FAP and financial planning are but three WASHINGTON, D.C. (AFIS) -"Taps" will weeks after then Army Chief of Staff Gen. Harold K. of the many services provided by ACS, but they may very sound for SF 171 -the application form for fedJohnson announced its creation. well be the most important services offered here, Soto eral jobs -Dec. 31. Although Johnson made the announcement, it was the said. The federal government will no longer print or efforts of Lt. Col. Emma M. Baird that resulted in the cre"Relocation is a biggie," she said. "It includes bi-culstockpile the venerable form after that date. ation of ACS. tural issues and newcomers' orientation. We've placed Still, don't feel bad if you've just spent money Baird was born in October 1912 and joined the Wommore emphasis on relocation recently and provided more for SF171 computer software. Applicants will en's Army Corps in 1942. In 1963 she was assigned to the resources for the community." have the option of using the old form, said Office Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel. There, Additionally, the Atlantic community drawdown may o e Pe on M ng he ofdi frsa she worked to establish a program that would address the result in changes to the services ACS offers, Soto said. of Personnel Management officials. needs of military families. As a result of her efforts, Army "During the transition time, from February to June OPM Director Jim King said his agency pubCommunity Services was established July 25, 1965. 1995, there will probably be a greater demand for prolished a proposal ending the SF-171 in the June 22 Baird was awarded the Legion of Merit for her work grams aimed at soldiers," she said. "After that, programs Federal Register. Officials expect the proposal to with ACS and awarded a second Legion of Merit when like FAP, family member employment and the Exceptionbe final following a 30-day comment period and she retired in 1968. She continued to work with ACS after al Family Member Program will begin to fade here; there Office of Management and Budget approval. rettnng. She served as treasurer and special advisor to the just won't be many families left." "The intent of the proposal is to make it easier director at Fort Bliss ACS until her death in 1987. None of the services will disappear prematurely, she for people to apply for federal jobs," King said. ACS has come a long way in its 29 years of helping said. "The SF--171 is too cumbersome and sends the Any families. ACS guidance went from a three-page "We will provide whatever services are needed until wrong message when we are trying to move to a section in the Child Development Services regulation to the last family or last soldier leaves the Atlantic commuwrengtmeagenhen exe y tem." its own Army regulation and from a few services to more nity," she said. more customer-friendly and flexible system." than 20 services offered to meet the needs of the Army Accomplishing that will require a move to Fort SherAgencies should begin phasing in SF-171 alterpopulation, according to Gabriela Soto, director, Army man, as Forts Davis and Espinar close, by October 1995, natives this year. DoD officials said they will be Community Services-Atlantic. Soto said. ready with SF-171 alternatives by Jan. 1, 1995. Each of the services offered can be broken down into "We're (ACS) aware of the difficult times coming for Next year applicants will have the option of usseveral more specific services, Soto added. soldiers, civilians and their families," she said. "We're ing a resume, an electronic file or a written format. ACS relocation includes: programs for bi-cultural fainprepared to help during those times." Applicants for certain hard-to-fill jobs can already apply over the telephone. OPM will help agencies with the change to cies choosing not to invest in computer or teleWASHINGTON, D.C. (Tropic Times) -Searching for a great opportunity to record at Sony Music Studios and phone hiring systems can hire OPM as a contracmusically talented military servicemembers, the USO/ to get to work with some of the professional engineers, tor to process applications. ,AT&T Countdown to Stardom '94 is headed to Fort Claymeet some of the great recording producers, and record in OPM officials said the new proposal highlights ton Aug. 13. Servicemembers from all U.S. military bases the same studios as some of the world's best recording the agency's commitment to simplify the applicain Panama may participate. artists. I was a star for a day!" tion process through computerized hiring. Job Active-duty U.S. personnel on more than 25 partici"There is literally chart-busting musical talent hidden seekers will use a pencil to mark answers about pating military bases will have the chance to perform in a in the ranks of our military," said USO Celebrity Entertheir qualifications on computer-scannable forms musical/vocal competition Aug. 13-Sept. 30. Local judgtainment Director Dave Mitchell. "USO and AT&T hope and send them in with their resumes. Applicants ing panels will select first-, secondand third-place winto find them and make them stars." within resumes. Api at ners who will receive $500, $250 and $100, respectively. Contestants on base will also be stars for the day, as without resumes can complete a mini-form that With support from United Services Organization and family and friends cheer them on. For more fun and exwill be provided upon request. AT&T, Morale, Welfare and Recreation departments are citement, audience members will have the chance to win OPM officials said the new format will save coordinating the events on each base. door prizes throughout the event. time for both applicants and personnel offices. The A videotape of each base's first-place winning perfor"In addition to highlighting the very talented folks in average federal job seeker takes at least eight hours mance will be submitted to a panel of entertainment inour military, we want to work with local MWRs to proto complete an SF-171, according to Mary Ann dustry judges in the United States including Earth, Wind vide an evening of entertainment for the entire base comMaloney, an agency spokesperson. But the appliand Fire legend Philip Bailey, recording star Vanessa Wilmunity," said AT&T Military Market Manager Pam cant isn't the only one inconvenienced. "Even a hams, publicist Sheila Eldridge and President of R&B Storms. "It has always been AT&T's objective to support good personnel specialist can take up to 90 minLIVE Ramon Hervey, among others. those serving our country so far from home with enterutes processing an SF171," she added. These judges will select an overall winner to receive tainment programs in addition to many diverse communiOfficials said the new computer forms will take $5,000 and a trip to New York for a recording session at cations services." Sony Music Studios. The USO is supported by individual and corporate doabout 40 minutes for an average applicant to proWhile describing his experience, Air Force Tech. Sgt. nations, United Way and the Combined Federal Camvide basic qualifications and another 15 minutes to Louis Edwards, last year's grand prize winner, said,"It was paign. answer specific questions for each agency applied to. Computer scanners can read up to 1,500 applications an hour. Jam erson t reCeive King said the computerized format will mean the easiest way to apply for a job will be to review fourth star today OPM's centralized list ofagencyjob openings and follow the simple instructions given. at Davis-M onthan People with computers and modems can access Lt. en.Jame L.Jam rsonwil be the list though the Federal Job Opportunities ButJV Lt. Gen. James L. Jamerson will be promoted to general today during letin Board at 1-912-757-3100. Or job applicants can use touch screen computers in federal employchange of command ceremony at Davisment information centers throughout the country Monthan AFB, Ariz. He will become the or in their state employment offices. TDD numcommander in chief, U.S. Air Forces in hers for the hearing impaired are also available at Europe; commander, Allied Air Force these centers. Central Europe, NATO; and Air Force Vice President Albert Gore's National Perforcomponent commander for U.S. nance Review recommended eliminating the European Command, Ramstein AFB, fonn. Gore called the SF-171 "asymbol Germany. Lt. Gen. Thomas R. Griffith will of a system that's so tied up in it's own red tape Jamerson as the 12th Air Force that it fails to serve either the government or the rela e .applicant for a government job." J S, Air Force photo commander.

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Tropictivities uly 22,1994 A quality of ife guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page B1 itt 4v4 DS. Army photo by Sta Sgt Jane Usr Days of knights Branwyn nic Niall (Bronwyn Larkins) of the Panama chapter of the Society for Creative Anachronism receives a gift from Duchess Elsphet (Vicki Loehr) during the duchess' visit from Florida. Watching the presentation is Larkins' husband Kael of the Highland Isle (Shayne Larkins). See story and photos on Page B3. YCheesag -rrm Mn6 M1 Md.-more A Balloon bouquet delivery serA pre-marital seminar for couples *Movies, Page B8 vice is now available through the wishing to "tie the knot" is slated to TV, Page F Senior Teen Center. begin Aug. 3 at Fort Clayton. K Potpourri, Page F12

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DlTropic Times t u h B2 July22,Youth news Pink gorillas bombard A"" com m nit v~ith all00 l 5 *Youth centers 286-3195/2844700: community with balloons GogaBac ri amp.Thursday. Must register by Monday. $15 per person. by Saff gt. ane seroArts and crafts 3 p.m. Wednesdays at both cenby Staff Sgt. Jane Usero USARO Pulic ffais Oficeters. There is a $1 fee for supplies. USARSO Public Affairs Office Gymnastics classes Saturdays. Ages 3-5 meet FORT CLAYTON -No, you noon-1 p.m.; ages 6-12 meet 1-2 p.m.; intermediate aren't seeing things. That really is classes meet 2-3 p.m. The cost is $13 per month per a pink gorilla in a tutu holding a person. balloon. *Child Development Center 284-6135: The Senior Teen Center now Family Day Care Providers are needed in the offers the community a fun way Albrook area. Call Jill Winter at 284-3711/6135 for to tickle and embarrass their information. friends and loved ones on birth Captain T-Bird and'Captain KC Youth Sumdays, anniversaries, weddings mer Bowling Special includes three games during and any other special occasion open bowling and a free T-Bird or KC sports bottle. with the new Balloon Bouquet Call 284-4818. service. Balloon bouquets can be deP C a t livered not only by a pink gorilla, but also a normal-colored gorilla, *Youth Center 287-6451: horse, chicken or rabbit. Clowns, Anything you want to do day, today. Uncle Sam, Santa, snowmen and Arts and crafts Mondays. reindeer are also available to deCooking experiences Tuesdays. liver balloons. Outdoor Games Thursdays. The delivery service is availMonthly disco birthday pool party Saturday. Preable for Fort Clayton, Albrook teens 6-9 p.m. and junior teens 8-11 p.m. AFS, Quarry Heights and Gorgas Piano lessons 1-6 p.m. Tuesdays and WednesArmy Community Hospital, said 1 days. The fee is $30 for four half-hour lessons per Kris Hern, recreation assistant Gymnastics for ages 5 and older 2:30-3:30 p.m. ThY ervmanyis ofand 3:304:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays. There are many kinds of balSwimming at the Clayton pool 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. loons available -plain, deMonday. signed and the metallic-type Dominos Pizza trip July 29, 1-2 p.m. Fee is $2. mylar balloons, filled with either *Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680: air or helium, Hem said. Popcorn and movies Sundays. Prices vary depending on the Senior Teen Employment Program is a yeartype and amount of balloons, and round program to develop job skills and cam money whether they are delivered or for teens 15-18 years old. Applications are available picked up and if they are delivat the center. ered in costume, Hern said. Free Zone shopping trip 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. today, "There are balloons with mesHoward teen center will join in. Minimum 20 persages for birthdays, get wells and sons, fee is $2 each. love," she said. "There are also U my photo by Staff spi Jane Usero Teen dance with Electro Disco today, 7:30-11:30 balloons with Alf, Big Bird and Spc. Tina Davis of U.S. Army Medical Activity -Panama accepts a p.m. Center will be closed at 6:30 p.m. flags." balloon from a Youth Services pink gorilla. *Child Development Center 287-3301: Hern also pointed out that if The service, which began about "Since we are on an on-call basis, Child Development Center provides high qualisomeone has a special type of three weeks ago, is run by and for teenwe ask that delivery orders be placed ty, developmental child care for children 6 weeks to balloon the center doesn't carry, agers 15-18 years old through the Seat least 24 hours in advance," she said. 12 years old. Full day care and hourly care available. they can bring it in and the center nior Teen Employment Program. "This way we can assure customer satCall 287-5657. will fill and deliver it. "The business is set up more for the isfaction." Fall registration for the CDC Part-Day Program "We are, however, planning learning experience than for the profFor people wanting a bouquet withwill be held at Building 156, Fort Clayton 9:30 a.m. -to increase our stock to a wider it," she said. "The money earned is put out delivery, same day service is availto 2:30 p.m. as follows: range in the future," she said. back into the service to buy supplies able. Aug. 3 -all single and dual working parents; Aug. Though this service is a fun and pay the teens." To place an order, call 287-3464 4 -all other military and Department of Defense civiladdition to the community's Once the teens are trained and on 12:30-8:30 p.m. Monday-Friday and ian employees; Aug. 5 -all others who meet eligibiliquality of life, it is ultimately a the on-call roster, they are called in as 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. All ty criteria. quality of life increase for the needed when orders come in, Hern orders for delivery must be paid for Children registering for preschool must be 2 by. teens who run it, Hem said. said. before the delivery is made. Oct. 31, 1994. Military identification cards for both parent and child, child's immunization record and parhstudents rU 1ent's latest pay voucher must be presented for registration. For more information call Rebecca Fentress TALLAHASSEE -Florida State University has made is a great achievement, but these rankings far better sigat 287-5507/5104. the top 10 list of the annual college referral service of nify Florida State's status as a top institution of higher "Who's Who Among American High School Students." education," D'Alemberto said. Florida State was the 10th most frequent choice of This is the first year Who's Who has published its top CoCOiI more than 100,000 of America's best and brightest high referrals list. *Cocoli Community Center 287-4119: school students who asked that a specific college be noFlorida State ranked ninth last year and was 10th on Arts and crafts, 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thurstified of their recognition in Who's Who. the 1992 list. In a recent survey conducted by Who's days. "To know that the majority of this country's top stuWho, nearly half of the students named (48 percent) said dents want to tell Florida State Univerthat quality of academics and reputation sity about their academic achievements are their most important considerations in confirms our position among the naselecting a college. More.than a third of *Espinar Youth Center 289-4605: tion's best universities," said President respondents (37 percent) said that cost, Teen sports 4-6 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays. "Sandy" D'Alemberte. loans or scholarships were the most imSaturday sports, noon to 6 p.m. D'Alemberte said additional proof portant considerations. Youth service day camp 8:30 a.m.-3 pin. Monof Florida State's national recognition The vast majority of Who's Who studay-Friday throughout July. includes its reclassification this year to dents go on to colleges or universities atFlag football and cheerleader registration under a Research University I by the Carnegie ter graduating from high school. wa tblg ags cheese .ander Foundation for the Advancement of Who's Who Among American High way through August. Coaches needed. Mandatory Teaching. School Students is a recognition and serparents meeting Sept. 8. Also in 1991, FSU ranked as the navice program that honors more than Old fashioned games, noon-6 p.m., Saturday. tion's second most popular institution 700,000 of America's best and brightest Make your own Sundae 3-6 p.m. Saturday. among white high school students and high school students each year. Lock in for pre teens, 6-11 years old, 8 p.m. to 8 the eighth most popular with black stuStudent's with a "B" average or beta.m. July 30. dents based on where they sent the reter who have demonstrated leadership in Just for kids trip to Portobelo and Playa Langosta sults of their Scholastic Aptitude Test academic areas and extracurricular activ9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. scores. &A cities are nominated for recognition by "Our national football championship A their teachers and civic organizations.

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______ ~jLJILI~aIIIII IILTropic Times EntertAnment B3y2 ,19 revisited loyalty recently visited here as Queen Una of Blackberry Hollow and Duchess Elsphet stepped out of the days of knights and into the 20th century to witness tournaments, conduct a court, and r participate in a feast fit for kings. Not left behind in the days of old were the pomp and circumstance that accompanies any royalty. Also not left behind were the crown jewels, ruffles and lace, leather and armor, and bows and staffs worn and wielded in a time of romance, magistry and mystery. The queen and duchess, also known as Ann Kennedy and Vicki Loehr of Florida, came here to visit the Panama chapter of the Society for Creative Anachronism. This is a world-wide society whose members reenact life in Europe in a time period spanning 4604 1650 AD. "Each person picks their own time period," said Shayne Larkins, known as Kael of the Highland Isle within the society. "Once they pick a time period, they research the types of clothing, weapons and customs of that period and bring it to life." The "characters" portrayed by society members can be from any part of the world, not just Europe, Larkins said. As long as the people portrayed were know to the English courts of the day, characters could be from places such as China, Japan and even American Indians. "The key is to be as thorough and realistic as possible," he said. "Of course, there are adjustments that have to be made for down here. Some materials are just not available, but we stick as close as possible to the authentic materials." In addition to individual research, members get together and share ideas, knowledge and craftsmanship, he said. The group also shares fighting and weapons techniques at weekly fighting and archery practices. The society gets together each Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. at Valent for meetings and discussions. They also try to hold fighting and archery practice on Saturdays and Sundays. Fighter practice is usually 12:30 p.m. on Sundays near the Clayton pool and archery is held Saturdays at 10 a.m. at the Fort Clayton driving range near the Senior Teen Center. For more information, stop by one of the meetings or practices or call 287-4696, Larkin said. In addition to the meetings and practices, the society members perform for various functions throughout the military community and visit Department of Defense Dependent Schools to speak to students about the medieval days. Larkins also said all of the meetings and practices are open to anyone interested in the society or wanting to Daffydd ap Emrys (David Thistlehawk-Ranck), a member of the Society for Creative Anachronism, find out more about it. tests his skills during the archery competition. "The only prerequisite needed to join the society is an interest in the Middle Ages," he said. "We are always looking for new members to share ideas and good times with." Queen Una of Blackberry Hollow (Ann Kennedy of Florida) and her court, from left, Connall Anfael (Chris Russel), Duchess Elsphet (Vicki Loehr), Lady Dunlaith na Suilledonie (Faith Norris), Ciaran (Shayne Larkins Jr.), and Kael of the Highland Isle (Shayne Larkins). story an photos by Staff Sgt. Jane Isero A helmet reminiscent ofthe Middle Ages is only CISFIRE3O Public Alfiairs Office part of a fighter's armor for members of the Society for Creative Anachronism.

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B4'lmcs Fous on Panama B4_July22, 1994 ~O _ _ _ _ _ The building of the Faculty of Law and Political Sciences in the University of Panama. Education goes back into Panama's history ne of the main roles of the group of professors that ensures the on Ricardo J. Alfaro Avenue (Tumba universities in Panama is to students attending the institution a well Muerto) and has modern facilities. participate in the many and balanced education. There are the faculties of Administrachanges in the contemporary age. The1 university consists of 14 tive Science, Technology, Natural Serving as a pernsaneiit guide of fisculties. The Faculty of Management Sciences, Law and Political Sciences, orientation of the interrelations of the and Accountiing; Public Management; Humanities, Religious Sciences and nation and environmental happenings Archilcoare; Agricultural Sciences Social Sciences. in the world and is another purpose. (located in Chiriqui Province); Exact *The Technology University of The country is subject to the new and Natural Sciences; Social ComitnPanama was established in 1975. Its scientific and technological progress in nicatioiis; Law and Political Sciences; main campus is in the city of Panama this fascinating era and has to meet Economics; Education; Nursing; and has seven Regional Centers, in I that challenge. Phsariacy; Hunanities; Medicine and Bocas del Toro, Chiriqui, Veraguas, The planning of education proDentistry. Cocle, Herrera, Los Santos, Colon grams must be in accordance with the The university has seven Regional and La Chorrera. problems, business affairs and perCenters in the interior of the country -It has five faculties -Civil spectives of the nation. A university Azuero, Cocle, Colon, Chiriqui, Los Engineering, Electrical Engineering, education should produce well-trained Santos, Veraguas and La Chorrera. Industrial Engineering, Mechanical professionals in agreement with this Students aspiring to enter the Engineering and Computer Systems period oftime. university must take a placement test, Engineering. psychology test and aptitude test. The Students can earn four degrees: Institutions of higher-level learning: tests are not difficult and anyone who Technician in Engineering; Bachelor *The University of Panama was doesn't pass the tests can take an in Technology, Bachelor in Engineerestablished in 1935. It is the official orientation training course in order to ing and Master of Science. university of Paniama. The university be administed. There is a registration *Other universities include the campus is located in El Caigrejo fee. Universidad del Istmo, the residential area of the city. The *The Santa Maria La Antigua Universidad a Distancia and the University of Panama offers the University, is a Roman Catholic, Universidad Latinoamericana de This monument is dedicated to Dr. opportunity of acquiring a higher level private and non-profit institution. It Cieicia y Teciologica with headquarOctavio Mendez Pereira, the first dean education for people who want to be began ii 1965 in the Cathedral Plaza at ters in Costa Rica. of the University of Panama. better prepared to meet the challenges the Archbishop's Palace in Panama of a higly competitive future. City. The university is staffed with C The USMA campus is now located by Rosemary Chong, Tropic Times staff Ernesto Perez Balladares that it is a good idea Editor's note: The following suinunary of La Prensa to accept the refugees. newls is takes froim the Pa annumnhiu pres's. Thle AianiJlercihdrepolter, Tim Johinsoin, interviewed with translations and reports are unolicial and no Panama President Guillermo Endara, quoting Endara El Panama America accacy of ro r ting or stats ents ias le as saying that when he leaves office Sept. 1, he will not Paper reports that during a ceremony held by the Selection of these stories does not imly any miss the power as muds as he will miss the Presidential French Embassyto commemorate the French Revc tphasis, jud thent or endorsenient by the U.S. Palace domestic staff. Endara reportedly says that he is olution, officials recognized the approximately 22 government. Thesesynopsisareintendled only to anxioustoleaveand happythathistermisabouttoend, thousand French citizens who died during the -panish speakig persons ; .r r a term that he reportedly did not enjoy because it is not effort by France to build a canal in the Isthlmus of events in Panama. pleasant to say "no" and it is not pleasant to make amana. unpopular decisions. July 18-21 La Prensa El Panama America, Paper's "Primera Plana" column reports that the La Estrella de Panama Panama Railroad tourist train will have a special Recently, 87 niembersof the PamamaNational Police La Prensa schedule forthe SummitGardens ecologyfairJuly attended a three-week first aid course conducted by Papers cites Presideist Guillermo Endara as saying that 30-31. the Panama Canal Commission. PNP agents were the Clinton Administration has submitted a new proawarded certificates ofattendance. posal for Panama to accept 10,000 Haitian refugees Hoy, La Estrella who would be located at Contractor's Hill, ali area El Siglo controlled by the Panama Canal Commission. Endara Paprnod ias saia t inspte of t fact tat The President of the Panamanian Hiuman Rights reportedly said that he, personally, sees no problem the gasoline currently being distributed inIthe counCommittee, Roberto Troiscoso, supports the possible with this, becauseitse area is isolated from the Panamatry passes specifications required by his ministry, granting of political asylumi to Raoul Cedras, chief of nian population. However, Endara reportedly said that a sample has been sent to the United States for a I laitias military forces, provided ass invasion of I laiti he would not make any decisions until the Panamanian more thorough analysis. Results will reportedly be cais be avoided. public is convinced by Panama President-elect announced Monday.

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Tropic Times Community news July 22,B1994 Community activities a Marriage retreat corozal The Al-Anon Family Group, an anonymous fellowship for family and friends of alcoholics, Couples re-establish intim acy, meets 8 p.m.Tuesdays and Fridays in Building 6550, Hospital Road (near the veterinary clinic), Corozal Meetings are open to anyone. For more successful communication skills ifraincl 2-13 SANTA CLARA (USNAVSTAPANCANAL PAO) -Swafford said it was a complete success. All attending Fivemarriedcouplesgottogetherrecentlytoimprovetheir said the experience was well worth it. And the couples marriages. The Naval Station Chapel invited couples from invited all married couples to enjoy the experience. A Welcome to Panama Orientation Tour will the military community to attend a Marriage Enrichment "Getting to know one another again was truly a great be 8 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Aug. 11 at the Fort Clayton Retreat in Santa Clara. experience. We learned a lot about ourselves and our NoncommissionedOfficersClub.Thetourincludes ,, an information fair, tours of historical sites and the The focus of the retreat was simply reestablishing feelings during this retreat," one couple said. Miraflores Locks, an authentic Panamaian lunch intimacy and developing couples' communication skills, Swafford said intimacy is a high priority in marriages, and dance exhibition. Free child care will be given said Cmdr. Ron Swafford, chaplain in charge of the and that intimacy was the main focus of the retreat. The by calling 287-5657. For reservations, call 287Chaplains Religious Enrichment Development Operation. couples said after the retreat, they felt like newlyweds. 5073. "The assumptions and goals of the CREDO retreat Members of the Naval Chapel hope to see this retreat as Any licensed social worker in Panama interested program are for those who are willing to dedicate a a yearly opportunity for all interested couples. They enin performing home studies for adoption cases significant part of their lives to making their marriages courage members of the community to call if interested in should call the Adjutant General Passport and Visa succeed," he said. making the event happen more often. Branch at 287-4503/5207. The Exceptional Family Member Program Bowling Blast will be 9 a.m.1 p.m. Saturday at the Curundu Bowling Center, Building 2057. EFMP members and their children under 12 years old bowl free. All other must pay 50 cents and shoes are free for all. All active duty, retired and Department of Defense civilians are invited. For information, call 287-5073. The "Growing Godly Summer Bible Study" will be held 9 a.m. daily until Aug. 23 at the Fort Clayton Chapel. Child care is provided. Reservations must be made through the Child Development Center. For information, call Charlotte Fredereich at 287-3188. RegularIslamic prayerservices areheld 12:301:30 p.m. Fridays .at the Fort Clayton Chapel hall. For more information, call 287-5859. The Enlisted Spouses Club -Panama holds meetings 7 p.m. the first Monday of each month at the Fort Clayton Noncommissioned Officers' Club. For information, call 287-3587. Atlantic For people transferring to new duty stations, the Army Community Service Relocation Assistance Office helps in the search for housing, employment and educational possibilities for servicemembers Courtesy photo and their families. Call 2894021/4636 for more Troy and Jill Ivie kiss at a recent retreat for married couples. Each person had to create a gift from information. ,r dThe American Red Cross is offering a communature during the retreat. The kiss was a "sealing of the gift. nity first aid and safety course 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday at the Sundial Recreation Center. For information, call 289-3595. Pre-marital seminar required for many FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The next pre* Expectations in marriage Howard/Albrook marital seminar will be held 7-8:30 p.m. Aug. 3, 10, 17 and Children and others The Howard Family Support Center is offering a 24 in Building 156, Fort Clayton. Spouse Orientation in English 1011 a.m. ThursAnyone wanting to get married in Panama is encourSession II, Aug. 10 -Chap. Paul O'Neil day. This orientation offers an overview ofthe FSC aged to attend. Those marrying in the church, on or off All couples change programs and the services available to people living post, are required to attend. Uncovering sexuality in Panama. Couples wanting to many in the Catholic church must The Albrook Club is looking for an entertainer complete this seminar at least five to six months before the Session III, Aug. 17 -Chap. Bob Neske to conduct karaoke sing-along. Interested people marriage date. Communications must have an OUtgoingpersonality and mustbeable A certificate to verify attendance will be issued at the Money, possessions and work t hav an oting ersonalty am e able last session. Those needing to make up a class need only + Here comes everyone (parents) nation. call 286-311 attend the session they missed. aincll2-10. For infor action, call Chap. Leon Kircher. Session IV, Aug. 24 -Chaplains Paul Bolton and Leon Handcrafted arts and crafts and seasonal Kircher displays areavailable at the Canal Crfiers Shoppe Session 1, Aug. 3 -Chap. Leon Kircher Sneak preview oftihe years ahead in building no4,Arook AS.Classesavailableare Local laws and regulations on marriage in Panama 4 Why a wedding? quisig tor ainting, h akigadco45tt. What do we bring to our mariage? + Catholic marriage requirementsto sign up o class 84500. Miscellaneous Self Ic se td r u ust The Nutrition Care Division of Gorgas Army Community I hospital is initiating a journal club. If interested, call 282-5119. COROZAL (USARSO PAO) -Monthly Directorate Week 2 The Officer and Civilian Wives' Club needs a ofEngieeri ng and Housing selfhclp classes are held 9Carpentry: door hinges; locks, hardware; available volunteer who has desk top publishing layout and 10 a.m. Tuesdays at the PACE Improvement Center, tools; native hardwoods: plywood types, grades and designexperiencetoassistwitihtheOCWC-PmonthCorozal. uses. ly newsletter -The Huaca. For information, call For infonnation, call 285-6213. Subjects for August Week 3 Cheryl Ayers at 261-4565. classes are: Electrical:circuitbreakers, fuses; receptacles, switchNominations are now being accepted for the es; fluorescent, light bulbs. 1995Ten Outstanding Young Americans Award Week I Week 4 program. Nominations should be sent to Aichel General Information on home repairs: entomology; Plumbing: stoppages; toiletrepairsand replacements; Ta at the Directorate CPO, Building 560, Corozal, horticulture; kitchen appliances and painting. shower heads. by April 22, 1995. Call 285-56 Ior infonnation.

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Tropic Times .LP6)July 22, 1994 $21 fee cover hors d'oeuvres, drinks not Isla Grande weekend July 29-31. vice Friday through Monday. Fees are $35 Rodman included. Cruise out to Taboga Island by Peacock bass fishing 5 a.m.-2 p.m. adults and $20children 12 and under round informationn, Tor and Travel: moonlight, while viewing Panama City's Sunday and July 30, $25 per person. trip, $25 adutls and $15 children one way. The Navy ITT office hours of operadramatic skyline at night. Gold panning 8 a.m.-3 p.m. WednesSun Splash tour to Jamaica travel tion are 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday through Downtown Shopping Trip, 9 a.m. today, $12. opportunity to Montego Bay. Packet inFriday. day, $8. Shop Panama City's department Snorkeling and scuba diving to cludes airfare, three nights hotel El Valle Shopping Trip, 7 a.m. July stores. Drakes Island 7 a.m.-5 p.m. July 31, $22 accomodations, and transfer. Optional 31, $12. At least 12 people are needed. Albrook/Howard foi snorkelers, $45 for divers., tours can be scheduled upon request. PricShop for local handicrafts, plants, fruits C y es vary between $300-$600 depending on and vegetables and visit the nature pre+Zodiac Community Activities Center: C the hotel. serve. Free Zone shopping 8:30 a.m.-4:30 *Valent Recreation Center: There will be a Gatun Lake train FreeZoneshoppingtrip,7a.m.Thursp.m. every Friday itt July, $13 for transPortobello historical tour, 9 a.m.-4 wreck dive Aug. 6. day, $12. A minimum of 12 people is portation. Enjoy duty-free shopping in the p.m. Saturday. Customized trips are available for needed. city of Colon. Barro Colorado 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. groups with a minimum of four or 10 Barro Colorado Island 6 a.m. SaturEl Valle shopping tour 6:30 a.m.-4:30 Saturday. people. day, $65, a minimum of two people is p.m. Sunday, $13. Churches andarchitecture, 9 a.m.-l Balboa needed for the trip. Visit the tropical reHorse racing at the Hippodrome noonp.m. Aug. 6. search island in the canal's Gatun Lake. 5 p.m. July 1, $5. *Outdoor Recreation Center: *Balboa Dive Club: Panama City tour 9 a.m. Saturday Italian dining out 6-10 p.m. WednesPartial transits of the Panama CaThe club is now accepting new memand Wednesday, $8. At least 10 people are day, $4. nal 7:30-11:30 a.m. Saturdays, $40. A hers. Divers must show a diving certificaneeded. Visit the Church of the Golden *Outdoor adventures: minimum of 20 people is needed for a tion card to join and membership is $12 Altar, the French Plaza and more. El Valle horseback riding trip 7 a.m.partial transit any other day of the week. per diver per year. For information, write Moonlight Cruise 6:30 p.m. July 30, 4 p.m. Saturday, $24. There is Contadora Island transit serthe club or call 263-8077 or 250-0075. Aibrok/H wad radio classes Aug. 2-Sept. 30. Albrook/Howard Classes will be held 7-9 p.m Tues *Zodiac Community Activities days. Registration is ongoing. Center: -Swimming three days a week. Intro to scuba, a free one-night *Fort Clayton Scuba Shop: class is available. The phone is temporarily out Tae Kwon Do Korean karate of order because of renovations. class 6-7:30 p.m. Mondays, WednesCall 287-6453/5807 for informadays and Fridays, $25 per month. tion. Beginner and advanced English Basic open-water scuba class, and Spanish classes run four weeks $115. every month. Advanced open-water scuba, Beginner and advanced dog obe$140. dience classes are held at the Howard Rescue scuba, $119. Parade Field. Four-week class costs Underwater photography, $32. A minimum of five people is $99. needed. _____ ____Curundu *Albrook Auto shop: Air conditioning service and *Twin Oceans Pro Shop: repair 12:30-5 p.m. every day exEquipment available for scucept Tuesday and Wednesday. ba, snorkel, tennis, camping and Wheel alignment diagnostic and other outdoor recreation. service classes are held 3-9 p.m. +Pacific Theatre Arts Centre: Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays, Monthly classes are available 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays and Sunranging from various dance lesdays. sons, guitar and martial arts. Call 286-3814 for information. *Fort Clayton Boat Shop: Rod man Bass fishing at Gatun Lake, $20 *Rodman Marina: fee includes guide and fishing gear. A boating safety class will be Deep sea fishing, $200 fee inheld 6-9 p.m. Monday and eludes captain, gear, lures and fuel. Wednesday at Building 24 (next *Valent Recreation Center: to Pizza Hut) on Rodman NS. Korean karate class 6-8 p.m. Cost is $35 and includes all mateTuesdays and Thursdays. Admission rials and qualification test drive. to the first class is free. Beginner and advanced A 10-week Spanish headstart swimming classes are available class meets 6-8 p.m. Wednesdays for adults and children age 5 and and 5-7 p.m. Fridays. The next class up. Classes are held at the Rodwill begin Monday. man pool 3:30-5 p.m. Tuesdays, Private piano and guitar lesThursdays, and Fridays. A miniTropic ies ie photo sonsare available weekday evenings. mum of four is needed for each Rom antic m om ent The instructor meets privately with class. There is a $20 fee for 12 R the students for 30 minutes. classes. Call 283-4253 for inforRalph and Sheila Jones share a romantic moment at the scenic waterfall in El The center is offering amateur mation. Valle. Trips to El Valle for shopping and sight seeing are offered through _r installation travel offices. dom '94" vocal and musical performance July 31 with the Hot Raiders Motorcycle Run to Margarita 8 a.m. Saturday. There event is open to all active duty military Club. The run departs from the Banco Exis a $10 fee for each participant. The run *Pacific Theatre Arts Center: members. Registration deadline is July 30 terror on Avenida Balboa. There is a $5 fee. starts at Curundu Elementary School. The theatre dance workshop begins at the center. Cash prizes will be awarded The Road Knights is also sponsoring a Saturday. Classes are held 8:30-10:30 a.m. locally, and a winners will have a chance at poker run 9 a.m. Sunday. The entry fee is Children and 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. There is a maxa recording session in New York. $6.50. The run starts at the Bridge of the *Rodman NS Chapel imum of 15 students. Americas. Non-members are invited to atA youth concert will be held at the Entertainment Outdoors tend both activities. For more information, Rodman NS Chapel starting 6 p.m. Sat*Road Knights Motorcycle Club: call 285-5050 or 229-3635. urday. The New 72, a performin arts *Valent Recreation Center: The Road Knights Motorcycle Club *4X4 Club group from St. Louis, Mo., will be perThe talent show "Countdown to Starwill be participating in a ticket run 9 a.m. The 4X4 Club is sponsoring a Poker forming. Call 283-4148 for information. /Z/Z Z/1Z/Z7

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ticesTropic Times BD 7 tices Juy22B7 g / 44 Courtesy file photo Singing soldiers Phone guide Twenty-two soldiers from throughout the Army will treat other soldiers, family members and civilians to four nights of a musical variety celebration of America in early August as part of the Pacific 1994 U.S. Army Soldier Show. The ensemble will present performances 7:30 p.m. Aug. 3 and 4 24th Services Squadron Sports and at the Fort Clayton theater; 7:30 p.m. Aug. 5 at the Fort Davis theater; and 7:30 p.m. Aug. 6 at Recreational Rental Center, 284-6107 Howard AFB theater. Albrook Auto Craft Shop, 286-3613 Albrook Club, 286-4128 Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333 A Canal Crafters 286-4500 Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-5957 *Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts pouring. Rent two molds and get *Howard Skills Development Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453 Center: the third free, every Friday and SatCenter: Clayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360 Fabric painting classes 6:30urday in July (maximum six molds Porceilain pouring class 10 Clayton NCO Club, 287-3586 8:30 p.m. the first and third Wedneseach day). a.m.-noon today. Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363 day and Thursday of each month, +Canal Crafters: Christmas in July greenware Clayton Scuba Shop 287-3355 $7.50. Some supplies are available. Handmade arts and crafts are sale 10 a.m.-6 p.m. July 29. Club Amador, 282-3534 Stone stroke classes I 1 a.m. available. Consignment and volunThe 1994 photo contest is comCocoli Recreation Center, 287-4119 Sundays, $10. Paint ceramic figuteers are welcome by the shop staff. ing in August. Call the center for Howard Auto Craft Shop, 284-3370 rines to look like stoneware. Current features include patriotic information. Howard Enlisted Members' Club, 284-4107 Custom frames to order and displays. Ongoing classes include stained Howard Officers' Club, 284-4680 do-it-yourself frame classes are The shop is open 10a.m. -2p.m. glass, cross-stitch, framing, clay Howard Riding Stables 284-3770 available. Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, flower, pottery wheel throwing, HowardSkillsDevelopment Center, 284-6361 The Ceramic Center, Building Building 804, Albrook. Call 286macrame, air brush techniques, and Howard Teen Center, 284-4700 198, is located near the Crafts Shop. 4500. Classes are available. Sign lamp assembly. Several "how-to" Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-4510 The center offers a special on mold up at the shop. videos are available for viewing. The Loop, 287-3035 Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814 Quarry Heights Officers' Club, 282-4380 Rodman Annex, 283-5475 Rodman Club, 283-4498 Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150 Rodman Naval Station Information Tour *Valent Recreation Center: through Sunday. able to rent for private functions. and Travel Office, 283-5307/4454 The screening room offers free *Cocoli Community Center: Call 284-6161 to reserve a date. Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514 -_Q__Valent Recreation Center, 287-6500 movies by calling the 24-hour movArts and crafts for children Subs on Top has take-out, eatZodiac Community Activities Center, 284ie line. 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. in or delivery service to Kobbe, ay i e Better Opportunities for *Zodiac Community Center: Farfan, Howard and Gateway housAtlantic Single Soldiers forum meets the New hours for the center are I 1 ing. Fax in orders at 284-6109 or first Thursday of every month and a.m.-6 p.m. Mondays-Fridays and call 284-5848. It is open I 1 a.m.-6 Aquativity Center, 289-5201 is open to all barracks residents. I 1 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays. p.m. Monday-Friday and now 11 Davis Community Club, 289-5160 Gloria's bazaar 1-9 p.m. The activities room is availa.m.3 p.m. Saturdays. cean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402 Outdoor Recreation, 289-4077 / /Sherman Arts and Crafts Center, 289-6313 Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-6104 -Sundial Recreation Center, 289-3889/3300 Mondays and Wednesdays. a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday. Rec center news *Ocean Breeze Recreation Panama City shopping tour 8 *Sundial Recreation Center: Center: a.m.-5 p.m. July 30. Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. MonThe center offers various Isla Grande 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, Wednesdays and Fridays. classes such as karate, cake decday, July 31. Family exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m. orating, Spanish and jazz. *Ocean Breeze Recreation CenWednesdays. ter Spanish 6-7 p.m. Tuesdays and Atlantic tours Remon Race Track 10 a.m. Fridays. *Sundial Recreation Center: Saturday. Beginning Painting 6-8 p.m. Portobello historical tour 8 Rio Mar beach 7 a.m. Sunday. /Z

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STropicm Movies B 8 July 22, 1994__ __ __ j~ I v s__ _ _ ___ _ _ Location Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Howard AFB 7pm: PCU 2pm: Clean Slate 2pm: Clean Slate 7pm: Threesome (R) 7pm: Schindler's List 2pm: White Fang 2 7pm: Crooklyn 284-3583 (PG-13) (PG-13) (PG-13) Lara Flynn Boyle, (R) Liam Neeson, (PG) (PG-13) Jeremy Piven. Dana Carvey, Dana Carvey, Stephen Baldwin Ben Kingsley Scott Bairstow, Alfred Woodard, David Spade Valeria Golino Valeria Golino 9pm: Clean Slate Charmaine Craig Delray Lindo 9pm: Schindler's List 7pm: Schindler's List 7pm: Threesome (R) (PG-13) 7prm: No show 9pm: When a Man (R) Liam Neeson, (R) Liam Neeson, Lara Flynn Boyle, Dana Carvey, 555th Air Force Band Loves a Woman (R) Ben Kingsley Ben Kingsley Stephen Baldwin Valeria Golino Andy Garcia, 10:15pm: Threesome 9pm: PCU Meg Ryan (R) Lara Flynn Boyle, (PG-13) Jeremy Piven, Stephen Baldwin David Spade Fort Clayton 7pm: PCU (PG-13) 2pm: Clean Slate 2pm: Clean Slate 7pm: Threesome (R) 7pm: Schindler's List 2pm: White Fang 2 7pm: Crooklyn 287-3279 Jeremy Piven, (PG-13) Dana Carvey, (PG-13) Dana Carvey, Lara Flynn Boyle, (R) Liam Neeson, (PG) Scott Bairstow, (PG-13) David Spade Valeria Golino Valeria Golino Stephen Baldwin Ben Kingsley Charmaine Craig Alfred Woodard, 9pm: Schindler's List 7pm: Schindler's List 7pm: Threesome (R) 9pm: Clean Slate 7pm: Crooklyn Delroy Lindo (R) Liam Neeson, (R) Liam Neeson, Lara Flynn Boyle, (PG-13) (PG-13) 9:30pm: When a Man Ben Kingsley Ben Kingsley Stephen Baldwin Dana Carvey, Alfred Woodard, Loves a Woman (R) 10:15pm: Threesome 9pm: PCU (PG-13) Valeria Golino Delroy Lindo Andy Garcia, (R) Lara Flynn Boyle, Jeremy Piven, 9:30pm: The Inkwell Meg Ryan Stephen Baldwin David Spade (R) Larenz Tate, Joe Morton Fort Davis 7pm: 3 Ninjas Kick 2pm: 3 Ninjas Kick 7pm: The Favor (R) 7pm: Leprechaun 2 7pm: No Escape (R) 7pm: The Favor (R) 7pm: PCU (PG-13) 289-5173 Back (PG) Back (PG) Elizabeth McGovern, (R) Warwick Davis Ray Liotta, Elizabeth McGovern, Jeremy Piven, Max Elliott Slade, Max Elliott Slade, Harley Jane Kozak 9pm: Lance Henriksen Harley Jane Kozak David Spade Victor Wong Victor Wong 9:15pm: No Escape 9pm: No Escape (R) 7pm: The Favor (R) (R) Ray Liotta, Ray Liotta, Elizabeth McGovern, Lance Henriksen Lance Henriksen Harley Jane Kozak 9pm: Leprechann 2 (R) Warwick Davis Fort Sherman 7:30pm: Serial Mom 7:30pm: No Escape 7:30pm: Surviving No show No show No show 7:30pm: Schindler's 289-5173 (R) Kathleen T crner, (R) Ray Liotta, the Game (R) List (R) Sam Waterston Lance Henriksen Ice T, Liam Neeson, Rutger Hauer Ben Kingsley Fort Amador 7pm: When a Man 7pm: White Fang 2 7pm: Crooklyn No show No show 7pm: The Crow (R) 7pm: Beethoven's 284-3583 Loves a Woman (R) (PG) Scott Bairstow, (PG-13) Brandon Lee, 2nd (P0) Andy Garcia, Charmaine Craig Alfred Woodard, Ernie Hudson Charles Grodin Meg Ryan Delroy Lindo Threesome July 29 The Crow Lara Flynn Boyle, Brandon Lee, Ernie Hudson Stephen Baldwin A dead musician rises from the grave A clerical error assigns a young lady as Ao dvene msian isfe's muhere roommate to two gentlemen in the colHoward AFB to avenge his and his fiancee's murders, lege dorm. Their sexual awakening is Superbly stylized version of James "Ai UiforgettA ble Cel. ratios somewhat confused as they try to sort 7pm Beethoven's 2nd O'Barr's graphic novel is compelling (iftleua Spirit out their preferences in a comedy ofthe (PG) and the performance of the late Brandon .Lee fits the mood perfectly. R (strong I is Otnit'al. 111artbrakinig 'rid 90s. R (strong sexuality, Sex related Charles Grodin ...dialogue), 93 min. violence, language, drug use, some sexlluinrlirg. iegI iast imazi1g. d 9pm The Crow (R) uality), 100 min. -i.asci Brandon Lee, Clean Slate Ernie Hudson Beethoven's 2nd Ifs Great. Aild Garcia andi Dana Carvey, Valeria Golino Charles Grodin, Bonnie Hunt Meg Rii eliver Oscar Being a good private detective is tough America's favorite canine star, -when you wake up each morning with Fort Clayton Beethoven, the king-sized gallant St. lielerfrac. your memory wiped completely clean. -'ni .kii-Iiix' Dana Carvey tries to deal with this 7pm When a Man Loves Bernard is back in an all-new adventure. ar Croe is he de a ner, This time he's fallen in love. PG (mild nPowcl 1 11( 1c1j1 peculiar problem as he ducks danger, a Woman (R) language, unapt teen behavior), 89 min. .not knowing why everyone wants to Andy Garcia fl() ()1tt of 1())! kill him. PG13 (language), 119 min. Meg Ryan When a Man Loves a 3" Nin'a .. 9pm The Inkwell (R) Woman 3 as ick ack Max Elliott Slade, Larenz Tate, Meg Ryan Andy Garcia Victor Wong Joe Morton In this powerful, emotional drama, the The continuing adventure ofninja arts strength of a marriage is tested when the students Rocky, Colt and Tum Tum couple must deal with a serious problem ...picks up with them on the way to Japan that could destroy their relationship. R to rescue grandma, fight bad guys and S r' ist (language), 126 mindiscover a cave of gold. PG (martial )Schindler's List arts action, irld language), 99 min. (R) Liam Neeson, Alfred Woodard, Delroy Lindo Schindler's List Spike Lee moves in a new direction with Now showing at Howard and Amador Liam Neeson, Ben Kingsley Ben Kingsley this deftly observed, touching and often theaters. Winner of seven academy awards. funny view of the life of a Brooklyn family during the 1970s. PG-13 (drug the free thinkers against the regimented Steven Spielberg's powerful film acFort Sherman content), 130 mm. in a riotous collection ofcoUnter culture count of how a Jewish businessman clashes. PG13 (language, drug content, saved thousands of WWII Jews from 7:30pm No Escape (R) The Inkwell some sensuality), 80 min. death is a chilling and ralisti recre The Ikwellation of one of recent history's most Ray Liotta, Joe Morton, Larentz Tate No Escape horrifying chapters. R (language, actuLance Henriksen Ashy black teenagerand hisexperiences Ray Liotta, ality violence, some sexuality), 3 hrs, at a social center on Martha's Vineyard Lance Henriksen 15 ruin. in the 1970s are the focus of this tender In this futuristic action-adventure, Ray Fort Amadorand ng of age story. R (anLiotta is a military man sent to a high Leprechaun 2 security prison and assigned to an isolatWarwick Davis 7pm Four Weddings and ed island colony where two groups of Little Lop is in Los Angeles and he's a Funeral PCU desperate criminalsbattle forcontrol. He looking for a wife. The woman of his (R) Jeremy Piven, David Spade organizes the troops to battle for freedreams is not so inclined, and to further ( e MIn PCU, arenegade dorm sets outtodefy dom against the highly mechanzied seunfuriate him -someone has taken some Adjee Macowell, therigidbehaviorofitsfellowstudentsat curity forces. R (strong violence, lanof his gold. R (violence, nudity), 85 Hugh Grant a very politically correct university. It's guage), 118 min. min.

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Tropic Times 10 I V Schedule July22 1994 C channels 8 & 10 Mature Theme Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5 30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:30 headline News 6:00 CCMTV 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:3(1 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sinrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:00 Good Merning America 7:00 Nasy/Marine Corps News 6:30 losr f Power '6:00 Good Mering America '6:0) God Mrinig Anerica 6:00 Good Mriing Aierica 6:00 Good Morning America 8:00 Basic Training Workout 7:30 Real News for Kids 7:00 Voices of Faith 800 Basic Training Workout 8:0: Bedyshaping 0:00 Basic Training Workeut 0:00 Bodyshaping 8:30 Sesame Sireet 0:00 Gits 7:31 Catch lie p Sesase Sireet 8:3( Sesamie Siree 0:30 Sesame Street 0:30 Sesamie Street 9:30 Murder. Sse Wre 8:3) JsI for Kids! 8:01) CBS Sunday Morning 9:30 Murder, She Wrei 9:30 Murder, She Wrote 9:30 Mactier, She Wrote 9:30 Murder. She Wroe (0:25 Guiding Light Garfield Lind Itiends 9:30 Face the Nation 10:25 Guiding Light ;10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light I:)) GSenerail llispiial Teenage MitantNinja 1:000 WashingtoWeek in l (O General lIcsspiial I1:10 GenerAl (espital II:)) Genera) Hespital 11:10 General Hospital 12:10 H deadline News Break TrL Re11ews 12:) -esdline Nes Break 12:00 1 Ieadline News Break 12:1)11 I leridline News Break 12:00 headline News Break 12:15 SCN Midday Wiks Wes) C.O.W. Bes of 10:30 This Week s/Brinkley ,2 :S SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday Repor 12:3) Sportscenter Moo Mes'a 11:30 Aierici's Black Farm 12:3:1 Sports Machie 12:30 Sporiscenier 12:31) Spertscenter 12:30 Spritscenter (:00 Anreilser Wirid Ba.'iitmansir Caritus 12:0 NASCAR: "Talladega500" 1:1) Anther World 1:00 Another World 1:)) Anoiher Wend i:0 Aneiher World 2:00 Opralt Wiin're Caoon Classics 3:30 LPGA: Woren's Open 2,00 Oprah Winfrey 2:)) Silly Jesse Raphael 2:00 Oprah Winfrey 2:00 Donaue 3:1)1) Price is Right ght tias 1)3: Prier Rig3 Right 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 4:00 Legends rf the liddet I1 100 Special: The Quality 5:00 Center Stage 4:00 Guts 4:)0) (hostwrier 4:00 Shiisng imte Stalion 4:00 Club Connect Terple Resction 6:00 nlertaiient his Week '4:30 I Love Lucy 4:3( I Love Lucy 4:30 1 Loe Lucy 4:30 1 Love Lucy 4:30 1 Love Lucy 12: Ileadline News 2:1 G1 rice kde Fitr 5:00 Fmitly Fetd 5:00 Faintly Feud 5:00 Family Feud 5:00 F mily Feud 5:00 my Feu d 2: 3) Movie: 7:30 M iie: "Out of A fra" 5:30 Sowlbiz Today 5:30 Slhcwbie Today 6:00 SCN Ruening Report 5:30 Showbie Today 5:30 Showhi, Today "Ite Caine Mutiny" 10:30 ABC 20/20 6)00 SCN lEening Report 6:00 SCN Evening report 6:15 1leadline News Break 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:1 SCN Evening Repert 2:35 "Run 'ill YOU Fail" _1:3) Middleiarcl 6:15 headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:310 World News Tsnigh 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 leadlie News Bweik 4:01 Nosa (2:30 Meet tie Press 6:30 World News Tonight 6:3) World News Tonight 7:00 Wheel of Fortune 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News 1 night 5:00 Shwimre at [se Apollo (:30 I eadline New 7:00 Wheel f Fortune 7:00 Wheel of Forune 7:30 Entertainmeni Tonight 7:00 Wheel of Frlune 7:01) Wheel 1 Fortune 6:00 1 ie Adventures of 2:0) Sports Laeright 7:30 Entertainmeni Tonight 7:30 Entertainmient Tonight 8:00 1resh Prince cf Bel-Air 7:25 Entertainment Tonight 7:30 Entertainment Tonight Supernan 2:30 ABC World News Now 800 Roe 8:00 Beauly and The Beast 8:30 Beverly Hills 90210 u* 7:55 Morie: "Julia" 0:00 America'slunniestiHome 6:30 Rescue 911 3:00 HleadlineNew ': Murphy Brown **** 9:00 48 Hours 9:30 Cops *a** 10:00 SCN Late Edition Videos 7:25 China Beach 3:30 Sports Machine 9:0 60 Minutes 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:05 Cheers 8:30 Dave's World 8:20 Movir: "The Rape of Dr. 4:00 ABC World News Now 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:05 Cheers 10:05 Cheers 10:30 David Letternian 9:00 Paradise Willis" 5:00 Headline News Break 10 05 Cheers 10:30 Darid Leterman 10:30 David Letterman 11:30 Tonight Sham 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:00 headline News 10:30 David Lettennan 1:30 Tonight Show 11:30 Tonight Show 12:30 Headline News 10:05 Cheers 10:30 Saturday Night Live I1:30 Tonight Show 12:30 Headline News 12:30 Headline News 1:00 Nightline 10:30 David Letterman 12:00 WWF Superstars of 12:30 Headline News 1:00 Nightline 1:00 Nightline 1:30 Sports Latenight 11:30 Tonight Show Wrestling 1 00 Nightline 1:30 Sports Lalenight 1:30 Sports Latenight 2:00 Arsenio Hall 12:30 Rocko's Modern Wernd 12:45 Friday Night Videos : Sprts Lalenight 2:00 Arseni hall 2:00 Arsenio Hall 3:00 Headline News 12:55 Movies: "A Few Good 1:45 Mories: "Close Encounters 2:00 Arsenio k1ll 3:00 Headline News 3:00 Headline News 3:30 Tonight Show Men" ofhe Third Kind" 3:00 Headline News 3:30 Tonight Show 3:30 Tonight Show 4:30 Headliune News 3:15 "Mass Appeal" 4:00 "Inpulse" 3:30 Tonight Show 4:30 headline News 4:30 Headline News 5:00 Headline News Break 4:50 "Cowboy" 4:30 Headline News 5:00 Ieadline News Break 5:00 Headline News Break 5:00 Headline News Break C able channel 14 Mature Theme uu Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30 Sinsucast with Channels 6:30 Simulcast with Channels 6:30 The Sunshine Factory 5:30 Simulcast with Channels 5 30 Simulcast with Channels 5:30 Simulcast with Channels 5:30 Simulcast with Channels 8& 10 8& to 7:00 GoofTroop 8& 10 8& 10 8& 10 8& 10 0:00 Oprah Wintrey 8:30 Young Adult Theater 7:25 Gareld and Friends 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Donahue 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 9:00 Today Cheetah 7:55 Darkwing Dick 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today (1:00 Star Trek Can A Guy Say No 8:20 Batan *u 1:00 Star Trek 11:00 Slur Trek 1:00 Star Trek 1:00 Star Trek 12:00 Headline News Break Everyday Heroes 0:40 Where on Eartt is 12 00 Headline News Break 12:00 leadline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:15 SCN Midday 11:30 Real News for Kids Crmen Sandiego? C 12:15 SCIN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:30 All My Children 12:00 The Goodwill Gaies 9:05 Teenage Mutant Nija 12: 30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 1:30 One Life to Live 1:00 MLB Baseball: Reds s. Turtles 1:0 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 2:30 Young and lie Restless Cubs 9:30 Scieoce and Technology ':30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 3:30 Teenage Mutant Ninja 4:00 21 Jump Street Week 3:30 Balman ** 3:30 WhereOnEarthtIsCarmen 3:30 Goof Troop 3:30 Garfield and Friends Turtles 5:00 American Gladiators 10:00 Moor Week 4:00 Fraggle Rock Sandiego? ** 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fraggle Rock 6:00 The Honeymooners 10:30 Sports Closeup 4:30 Are You Afraid of the 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:30 Guts 4:30 Get The Picture 4:30 Ghost Writer 6:30 The Simpsons 11:00 This Week in Baseball Dark? 4:30 Legends of the Hidden 5:00 Beakinan's World en 3:00 The Wonder Years 5:00 Si!rer Spoons 7:00 Lois & Clark: The 11:30 This Old Heuse 5:00 Club Connect .Temple *** 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:30 TIre Cosby Show Adventures of Superman 12:00 Mary Tyler Moore Show 5:30 The Cosby Slow 5:00 Mickey and Donald 6:00 SCN Ernitng Report 6:00 SCN Erening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 8:00 Star Trek: "Deep Space 12:30 Anish Cooking from 6:00 SCN Evening Report J 5:30 The Cosby Show 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break Nine" Quilt Country 6:15 Headline News Break 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:30 NBC Nightly News 9:00 Hlerman's lead 1:00 Wall Street Journal Report 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:15 Headline News Break 7:00 Hangin' With Mr. Cooper 7:00 Full blouse 7:00 Primetime Live 9:30 Married With Childre 1:30 Movie: "The Littlest 7:00 MacGyver 6:30 NBC Nightly News 7:30 Seiofeld 7:30 Fanily Matters 8:00 Renegade 10:00 Movie: "Tap" Outlaw" 8:00 Movie:"Gaby, a True 7:00 ALF 8:00 Tour Of Duty 8:00 Living Single 9:00 Movie: "Project X" 12:00 Headline News 2:45 Movie: "Mary Poppins" Story" 7:30 Home Improvement 9:00 NYPD Blue *** 8:30 Joe's Life (1:00 Headline News 12:30 Sciece and Technology 5:05 Quantum Leap 10:00 Eye to Eye w/Connie 8:00 Picket Fences *** 10:00 Murder, She Wrote 9:00 Dateline NBC I 1:25 SCN Late Edition Week 6:00 Wonderfl World of Chung 9:00 Martin ((:00 I deadline News Break 10:00 Miami Vice 11:30 Nightline 1:00 The McLaughlin Group Disney+ 1 1:00 Headline News 9:25 Movie:"Honey, I BlewUp I 1:25 SCN Late Edition (:00 Heallineews Break 12:00 M*AS*H 1:30 Sports Latenight 7:00 The Goodwill Games I :25 SCN Late Edition The Kids" 11:30 Nightline ((:25 SCN Late Edition (2:30 Larry King Live 2:00 Enertaininel This week 9:30 Golden Girls + 11:30 Nighiline 11:00 Headline News 12:00 M*A*S*H ((:30 Nightline 1:30 Sports Laternight 3:00 Headline News 10:00 L.A. Law 12:00 MCA*SCH 1:25 SCN Late Edition 12:30 Simulcast with 8&10 12:00 MCA*S*H 2:00 Arsenio Flall 3:30 Saturday Night Live 11:00 Turning Point CC (2:30 Simulcast with 8&l0 (1:30 Nightline 12:30 Simulcast with 8&10 3:00 Feadline News 5:00 Videotinks (2:00 Simulcast mitt 8&l0 12:00 M*ACSih 3:30 Tonight Show 5:30 Headline News Break (2:30 Simulcasi with 8&l0 4:30 David Letterman 5:30 Simulcast with 8&10 -1Sports and specials Channels 8 & 10 Cable Channel 14 Sports Sports NASCAR: Talladega 500, noon Sunday -'! ..The Goodwill Games, noon Saturday LPGA: Women's Open Finals, 3:30 p.m. Sunday MLB Baseball Specials Reds vs. Cubs, I p.m. Saturday The Quality Revolution, 11 a.m. Saturday The Goodwill Games, 7 p.m. Sunday Reporter Collin Sidor explores the factors that led to the Series starts decline in American manufacturing including an analysis of "Batman," 8:20 a.m. Sunday and 3:30 p.m. Monday. (Rethe errors that have compounded the problems of low productivity placesTinyToon Adventures) Batman, the famousCaped Crusader, morale and profits. returns as the nemesis oferime and evil in Gotham City. No crime is too small, no injustice too insignificant to keep millionaire-playboy Bruce Series startsJ Wayne from leaping into action as Batman. "Beverly Hills 90210," 8:30 p.m. Wednesday. The students all look a little ,, "Where On Earth is Carmen Sandiego?" 8:40 a.m. Sunday and 3:30 older than most teens, and their lives seem to rin in a much faster lane in Los Tuesday. (Replaces EEK! The Cat) Adapted from the famous computer game, the Angeles' most exclusive zip code area at Beverly Hills High. Stars Jason Priestly ever elusive super-thief Carmen Sandiego makes her style of crime seem easy. She Shannon Doherty and Luke Perry. always leaves a clue, but the trick is to figure out what it means and where in the world Prime time movies she'll be next. "The Rape ofDr. Willis," 8:20 p.m. Saturday. A female doctor is brutally raped Prime time movies and in a twisted turn of events she finds herself charged with murder when the "Project X," 9 p.m. today. When a young chimpanzee is drafted to take part in accused dies in surgery even though she has tried to save his life. Stars Jaclyn Smith, a deadly military experiment, he has only his wits to fall back on. With the help of Dan Butler and Robin Thomas. a would-be pilot and expert chimp teacher, he and his fellow chimps pit themselves "Out Of Africa," 7:30 p.m. Sunday. A story set in the early 20th century story against U.S. military might in a desperate attempt to save themselves from certain of a marriage of convenience and the unrequited love of another. Set in the stunning destruction. Stars Matthew Broderick and Helen Hunt. wilds of South Africa. Stars Meryl Streep, Robert Redford and Klaus Brandauer. "Tap," 10 p.m. Saturday. An ex-con, Max Washington, is torn between his former "Julia," 7:55 p.m. Thursday. In the years before WWII, an author travels into career as ajewel thief and his love of tap dancing. But regardless of how easy the Hitler's Germany to locate her childhood friend who has joined the resistance money comes by boosting jewels, the call of the tap isjust too strong. Stars Gregory against the Nazis. Stars Jane Fonda, Vanessa Redgrave and Jason Robards. Hines and Sammy Davis Jr.

PAGE 26

llTropic IrtesAd B10 l 2 Classified Ads 1973 VW bug, very gd cord, $1,800. some ug, rn/cp. 226-5797. Scott ar/fin stereo component reei'289-3875. t, digital, 190., x cond, $1 15/obo. D uty -free m erch anise 1991 Fod Tempo, at, p,, pb, p, a Spo pk muid, efil. 287-3526. 286-338 FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office)As a reminder, fm/cass, $7,900. 284-6739. Etg spk day maid, w/rcf. 296-3773. Comrodcre 64/128, color monitor, in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern 1991 Chevy p/c 5spd, uc, stereo, low G day muid, Eng spk w/ref. 260keyoan, ow e, 5 1/2b me27 esp.miles, 425yob, $6,57.353-444 Command regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used, rtlex 4,y1 $650. 204242. 23, Sanyo Beta 2-F tro VCR,gdwnd, cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege hold1991 Clhey Cav i $er. $6,600. 287620 .reliable day maid, w/ref. ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu489 m/nerson urm/fr7,colorTVw/udupt Isti no ~Military' spuemte ocr orRA2cosTVbthiecod tion under both, military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes 14 ^etnoi" 2iea 4d "c al pwr Ide t home/p/fftime.2044492. 2526566r.C $c,00oo 2,-20 25 2-6566. ,boh nax od permissible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid. -Bi-lingsul maid, gd w/kids. 2897SC w p2-er6 Before such a sale, it is strongly recommended that the seller contact 1991 Chevy p/u, 4cyl, ps, ac, stereo, / antilock & pIwer brakes, spd, low Fisher Tiv 19" bilingual, timer clock the Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-3117. miles, $6,500. 251-9337. Babysitter, gd w/kids, wnref. 261stereo, cemose cool, $300. 228..---.-1991 Hyundai Excel 4dr, ase, alarm, 1236. 3099. f, at, gd ond, $4,S00/,,bso. 205eaipe tlop, 8,000,. 284-6220. dty pd, ese cotd, $5,600/obo. 226Bi-lingual housekeeper. 224-4660. VCR, Zenith, needs cleaing $100, l 560, Sg. Tere 5279. Kayp" letter quality ptsler $100. 1987 Clhrysler Leliaro, at, ac, pI, Full time tmaid, hOinest, gd r/kids 282-4538. i986 FlO d l rinc XLT, 4wd, laded, ps, pl, a/fni/cass, gd ceid, S4,000/ 1991 Ford F-150XLT p/u, V8, lisded' 207-4934. Chas Ches puppies, feat, %,j(), gd cod, $5,800/obi. 285-5560, Ssg. ibi. 209-4138. like new, $14,000/ab. 269-9580 -Realistic pro-2020 scaning receiver, owal $20 all suis, 221-7421fe Terellt Eng spk housekeeper, gd w/kids. like new $225. 264-3070 ask for Tony. 20 ,1992 shoesod2Ra-e423.owarules, 1907 Ford Tepo GL, 4dr, ad, $3,500. 1991 Camaro, ac, v8, pw, stud, 287-3572. 2:30. 1992 Diewood Racer, low mile,, am/ 284-6356. $10,500. 252-2065. 46DX, 25mh, 8mb, 160mb ld, CD 3mo old killi I l e /css. alarm, gd cond, 6,000. 224Live-in miad/babysitter, honest, w/ Root, VGA monitor, speakers, sound 3m6-902 3550, Mercedes 450 SE, evc cond, sunroof, 1970 Honda Accord, hatchback, ot ref 286-4978. board & more, $1,800. 233-0974. 286-4982 ac, am/fn/cuss, SI 0,000/obo. 207dty pd 260-4463. Shepherd yippies, CCP. al shots, 1990 Sasb 900, 16 salve. 4dr, ac, am,/ 3887. 1979 Grand Pris Pontia, 2dr needs Istyr old babysitter, wrk rights & SNES, 5 games, super control pad, exe deformed. 228-2643. fm/cass, tinted win, 5spd. ese cond, body work, $800/obo. 286-3992 kends. 230-1927 cond, $250/neg. 287-4546. $19,500. 285-438 1. 1980 Dodge Caravan, 6eyl, new tires, R tt--il-Pppies. CCxc cossd, $10,000. 287-3887. College student foe babysitting/pet Game boy, 12 games, Dr. Mario, Home Roteie ppieCCPrg, "'ail -1981 Ford T-bird, S6,500. 252-5120. cr exe pedigree. 287-i195, Stacy 9 C GT care. 253-7091. Alone, Ishido, Final Fantasy 1,11, much am/ft/cass, pwr sunroof, $4,500/ibo. Chevy Ci1ai7, eve cood' more, e cord, $350/neg. 287-4546. $2u300/obo. 287-4477. Mature, honest maid, 3 days. 286AKC/CCP mniassre pisscher PuP287-61822.__ 4wd, ac, new tires, eve cord, $10,000. 4605. SC lap top 8000, w/3.5 drv, fax/mopies 284-3924. 1985 Chrysler Lebaron, 4cyl, at, ac, 1962 Clrysler wagon, $3,500. 252252-5397. -dem capabilities, & rechargable bat15.3h Bay TB Gelding, easy ti banloaded, esc cond, $3,400. 233-0873. 5124 1987 Suar XT, sd, $2,50/obo /kids. 287eies, printer avail, $300. 236-0994. 3592. dIe. 207-4590. Crystal. 287398 1995 Iilix dbl cab p/u, ac, am/fm/ 1992 Chevy S-10 p/u, ph, ps, an/fn/ 287-3004 Kenwood tuner, 7 disk CD, Pioneer 10yr old TB mace trained English, stereo, bedliner, dty pd, $6,300. 236cans, exe cord, $8,400. 286-3692. 1987 Ford Tempo, 4cy], ac, am/m/ Maid, reliable, honest, gd worker. A-80amrp, Teac cass, AR-I5 speakers, need exp rider. 223-7880. 3099. 1991 Jeep Wrangler, soft top w/bikicass, gd cod, $4,000/ob. 26-632./ 276522. -tumrtbl. rack, $550. 282-3375. cusgdcod $,0r/b, 06630 11 $12 500 282-3971. Houselkeeper 2 days a wk. 260-5 586. TlSprNtld ae o te German shepherd, 2yr old nale, 1993 Nissa, Sentra, 5spd, ac, am/fm i o $, ..-1987 Dodge Charger, new paint, 5spd, Trade Super Niterdo games for other $200. 287-5839. radio, $5,500. 236-3099. -1994 Daihus, ac, am/fm/cass, sunroof, $4,100. 284-4376. Honest, reliable housekeeper, M-F. games, John Madden 94, Megamax & others, call rn/list. 284-6979. Free to gd home, 2-3mo old male 1991 Pathfinder, 4cyl, 2dr, loaded, alarm, exe cond, $6,700. 264-4105. 1987 Suzuki Samurai, 4wd, w/so260-6533. kittens. 260-9318. not dly pd, $11,500. 286-3895. 1993 Ford Escort. 5dr, am/fm/cuss, top, am/fm/cass, $3,500. 286-4227. Family borne care provider, full time Various old comps, monitors & -og--2 C a accesories, I Lanier copier. 285-6067. Boser puppies, 'itl peeigree, 6wks 1993 Jeep Cherokee Grand Laredo use cord, $9,200. 263-4792. 1906 Dodge Rum, not dty pd, 5s pd old. $350. 287-6382. 4x4, at. 4,d, low miles, g tires, 5y 1984 Audi, ac, pw, at, runs ok, $3,800/obo. 264-7778 pson FX, 20mb, 5 1/4 drv, w/moniwarrally, $23,900/oho. 296-3381. 23,0l/ii 223-790. -$50, Panasonic primer $225, 2 male puppies, Cocker spaniel, Gee-----1985 Buick Park Ave, loaded, gd od, pon printer 81XL $175. 226-8626. man Shepherd. 260-5809. 1983 Nissan 280zs, ac, sad, radio., t197 Ford Tausm GL, fully loaded, $4,500. 289-6204. Duel ceg Stafirdshiire icrrir/K top, dty Id, $4,900. 221-4164. $6,000/eg 27-4193. --Turbo trolling motor & raine batMortal Kombas cartridge fop Sega Gen-1992 Jeep Wrangler, soft/bikini, cary, $180. 287-4584. esis, $40. 287-4733. Pitbull puppies, $250 ea. 284-S670. 1975 Buick Lesabre., needs transmis1978 Jeep CJ-7 new paint, full & biki13,000 miles, exc cond, $12,500. 204Free 18 mos old black/hise male sion, dsy pd, $650/obo. 286-6439. i, cus grt. $4,400. 287-3572 5430. Aluminar V-shaped 14, w/motor Pioneer soroound sound receiver $400, F--m-g& access, $1,800. 287-4584. JVC CD changer $250, Cerwin Vega cat, declawved, has all ssois, -tutered. 1991 Cullass Supreme, 4dr, pw cv1989 Ford Ranger 4x4, V6, ac, ps, ph, 1988 Jeep Comanche, at, ps, pb, ac, speakers, 400w $550. 284-4227. 282-469L. __ -rythig, se, lts more, $11,500. 286ph, 5spd, $8,500. 263-4786. am/fm/cans, camper top, bed liner, Boat/fbrgls/2 I fl-c/ebn-gal/rlr, F.3. -------$8,000. 284-5430. V6GM/ome/od5HP/kr-rduNew 6 channel mixer, w/cffects, send Free kittens asvail. 207-4272. 1991 Chevy Blazer, fully loaded, dphfdr. 243-5278 7-9 pm. stereo return, leds pro-amp inputs, mic/ 1989 Hyundai Excel, at, ac, 4dr, stcTaloe package, ex cond, $14,000/ 1992 Toyota p/u, 4cyl, loaded, mrus line, 818. 286-4171. Boxer, male old, out, eo, sot dsy pd, $4,500/obo. 284obs. 206-4109 grt, exe cond, $2,500. 284-3754. Mobile marine radio, $195. 226-$200. free female lBoxer 9mtos 2076171. b-------3312. Euro appliance, 1,500w volt trans6247. 1990 Ford Aurostar XL, low mileage., 1990 Dodge Caravan, 4eyl, $8,500. former (220> 110,), $100. 260-2957. 1993 Dodge Dakota Lb, VS, ann-lock all ace, $15,000/obo. 287-6182. 286-3245. 225 HP Johnson outboard motor, Baser female, 3yrs, spayed, gd dog, brakes, loaded, camper shell, under $2,500. 287-5391. ___ Packard Bell 286NT comp, 14" moni$50/oho. 284-6171. 10,000 nles., $19,000. 286-3085. 1989 Toyota Terel, 2dr, ac, am/fn/ 1977 Buick Regal, gd cord, $2,000. sor, 24-pin printer, software, lots of cuss, 4eyl, tinted win, rot dty p4, 260-2104. 16' Hobie Cat w/trailer, $1,800. 252 extras, $850. 260-2957. AKC/CCP miniamre Pinscer pup1972 Plymouth Duster. cyl, $1,000. $6,000. 269-7334. t4nt.--w-n-------pies, $600. 284-3924. 287-6174. ____ ---1984 Honda Prelude EX, exe cond, 12' satellite dish antenna, complete 1987 Chevy 1roe, Z-28, 5spd, ac, ph, not dty pd, $3,500/nbo. 286-3992. 21' Romery 4cyl perking diesel, (Uriden), $l.80lt/obo. 27-4139. 2 free caus so good homne, male & 1988 Nissan Pahfinder 4x4, 6eyl, ac, ps, pm, s-mop, $11,000. 287-3999. sleeps 2, ready to fish, $9,000/obo. temale, neutered. spayed, both ps, ph, exc cond $9,0011. 284-3524. 1983 Toyota Tercel, exc cond, 03,200/ 252-5100. 2 record players "/multiple headset deelaied. 263-4792. 1979 Ford Mustang, ac, ps, am/fm/ obo. 220-2024. s mxions, use for school or language -1986 Ford Acosta, heyl. ac, at gd cass, new tires, sew shocks, gd cond, ---------trining, S30. 264-2001. 8mo old Pit Bull w/papers, $100. ornd, noi dty pd, $7,700/obo. 282$2,0.1 260-5614. 1990 Olds Cutlass Supreme, ph, Electronics 22 _6608. 3822. ---------hac, not dry pd, $12,500. 287 4223 Sony CD radio caiss corder, new, $290. 1905 Nissass Bluebird, 5spd, ac, pb,.3-04 Black C ocker spaniel, 9wks, has s1 1990 Toyota Carolla, ax cotid, am alarm, new ires, exc cad, $4,200. 1985 Dodge Caravas, ac, pw, get cad, Camcorder $300, Gameboy w/gaies 236-0749 shows. $251. 283-4531. fm/cass, not dsy pd, $6,500. 236-2794. 261-6830. $7,000/G1lD. 287-3834 $07, electric typewriter $100, JVC 206 Wana ex coand, $600. 230-0008. VCR $200/obo. 28h-4494 AKC reg Rttsweiler puppies. 2841983 H1Inada Civic, 4dr. 5spd, ac, runs 1984 VW Quann at, ac, ph, ps, am/ 1972 VW, $1,000/oabo. 282-5130. SC word processor 8000LT, 256k Rant 3993. gt $2,5110. 223-005_ 0c/cass, 4dr, russ gd, $3,000. 207Apple lIGS, color printer, monitor, stodem, 3.5 disk dcv, requires printer, ulldog, o .19 Fr Tp, 4r, 7k, ac, ps, p 3335. 93 Honda Accard, exe cond, scanner,3 disk dcvs. w/progranms incl. $250. 287-5392. Amictai Basildigs, 2mcas nold, $001. 0 ae ecpc d,7k c 5 1 $3,200/oho. 282-3450. word pel, $700. 252-6404-----------262-0732. cruise caonlrol, xc cind, $6.300. 2841906 Volvo, 4de, ac, 4eyl, tinted win, .---60 Pnax 35m .m.ra w/80-200mm 6381. cxc cnd, neg. 236-0749 E r gats. 2"74992. P enlas & n 35mmetra oo / ens Killes looking lo, gd home, 282A a l photo l 4474 1989 Fird Rungerp/u XLT,at,$6,500. 1988 Ford Escort, 4dr, 4eyl, a, ps, Apple 2E -,p, games, montr, not un aid, $300 287-5392 284-5792 am/fm, $5,000/abo. 224-3180 keyboard, best fer n 87-6174. BM PS/' ,x, cn.,,w hard 1r,, Black female cast, litter rained, e-Eng spk lice-in maid, lioness, reliable, -e ---best -------b4tog gr w/aids. 282-4474. 1986 Chevy Camiaro, spd, ac. pw, 199 Plymohllc Colt. 284-4396 224-3483. Sanyostereo n/cd/dbl cass like rew, $350 230-0000. S 2 -am/fms/cass, ruts gd, usedls pa.iakt, Melale D1berman/Hlsky mi nsceds $3,800. 284 5930. 1985 Porschie, 944. 5spd, atc, all PwBilingual maid, gd w/kids, ref avail. $3Wi 236-09n4 PB36/25 mz, 107mb td, DOS 6.2, so he rained, Sl eg. 207-371. 1907 Ply Rlch sedan s d d 22.r, snrf, $2,000/ob. 284-4227. 287-5639. 25" Sylvania console color TV, $150/ Wind, m $1,00/ob, STaV 1020 al I, e .1,$0-P27-6L 197Py IU ea, o dy pd 262---b. m 1 q, 50. hoth, $1,200. 285-4734. 1913, 1986 Toyota Minivan, al, at, PI" Ps"oo 8-33 Red naise mcale Att ricaa lPishall lief10orcatsMccvsc te i.~~ Span ltaciest. reliable maid, exe wm/kids. isn 8 -5 pris----10,-als--------434 Red.,,a aIA .Puullorpl, pw, asurool, gd cold, $6,000/obo. SaItc, hbe i,,,,/d.Kenw-oI 7070L srespeak,,s (4), stud service. 239-431 1 1981 (J-7 Jep, 4cyl hard sop&bikini 24i4 ir d 286-3992 20" Gildstar color TV w/buil-in t5p, 03.211. 219-5752. -VCR, $350. 286-3773. walnut cabet, 5 way (15' wofer) Free at gd homue, teth s0 1970 Nova, ps, any new pacts, ru xma md oray w20%,rk,$155perlaygt l2lw. 287-4182 brown&wiile tiimily dlg. 284-5632. 1988 0lds Cutlass C(ilas, ac, at, gd grt, not dy pd. $901h/Aa. 207-4139. cook, gd w/kids. 286-4571. VCR-V 1 $25.0, TV $229, TV stand Pandax.xcord $50,13M pro-printcausal $4,hll/uibii., 207-1c247. $611 T V w/staidt $709. 223-9065. Puca scivsah051 IMpapit Siberiaon husky pappies. ready tw, 1976 Malibu C assic, $4511 207Honsest, reliable, day mcicd, Fng spk $ $125, Wang 286 w/new 130mg hd $300. 284-3681. l988 Jeep Cusminche. ac, pb, Is, nm/ 4136 236-4504. BIlthers WP, PC compatible, mauy S650, Zncith lapyop l495. 230-000,. im/caiss, stew laces. neg. 261-6410.h ctiscc 04111. 287-6623. MXI'viiaufc a lcuivhm do il,,de.6 -4 1 1905 Dodge Carvan, 4cyl, gi -nds Honest, riable bi-ligual lad, ax2 2 MTX ca" st, iao box Automobiles 1983 Chevy Mahibu, ac. p,. ph, Ie, S5,300, 27-4136. /kids. 284-3482. S6/16mhz, li Rant, 100mi lad, /Alpin, cross. $225. 285-6875 am/fm/cass, nc lly pd, $2,700. 286 Suniblaister /speakers, Windows R m 21 3489. 1992 Jeep Wrangle, 2sf stiles, 6ly, Fill time lve-m mma, hcunsses. l DOS, nise. saOtw0s1re. 286-4121. 1906 Chevy Celebrisy, ans/im, gal sum/ li/ass, ese cattish 013,501/ ba. kids, tire f. 284-5796. cric Vegt speakfers, 2Pine d, 4,00/ .211-1311, 99 .m. C,,, 4,,pd, 1, n',l ,,-337,, ,e214171 7" JVC calor TV $100. 2082-4234 s peaks, Ninldo w/pwer pad, gain ,$3/,00/9 bC 4-4. Sn1 337 spk maid will dl gets haus wk& gaes eg 286-61U533 1977 Toyota 4x4, 1,6.200. 286-4896. gn ustb Mecury Topaz, 4d., ac. p, pl, 231-8121 Sexaena. ITV, 24" w/table S1000, a a s-3290 N15 Supr Nntendo game $35/ca. 4Is lXi6 V1B. 25 cuache Omc Rasc 970 VW camp1, 4,00. 286-4896. 190p11 I/. as. 52.1111Ian spk hhvmail, ger c/kids 2s1 6x 1-. nsg 9111, C Div-t Rm ,ni, 17" mn190 Fusd Taus 4l. 4/,,0.g/. cIl 98 Jcp, 4dr c, a, p p,, 7,5n. at4-ic.r sofiwreoae, in h,000. 284-6695. 098Fr ars cy,4r dcn, '6-329h 19591 Fated Fxplasrer XLT /ss p4, cire ustiaba. 252-1 1h4. S4,000. 261-2550. Mu2 1ail, M-F spks lsite tag. 264 9319 21. ethl loaged4lhmb lad, 4m)l H, lRia. $1N,000/elb. 211-8821. Petirtor mirwv D( 6.S1 04 1991 Hlhundai Ecxcel, dly pd, ac, .i/ 1988 BMW, 2/, acts il/ca-ss, ac, ams EnIgl shut. 251881. 10w sp spk maid, acf, M-F. 220-X15s. --111 hal, si dur'l21s4er carts. 2 spe5kfu'atis, W11, c 4h 2 d y pd, sth,500. 21 6119. 1970 Clesy Caprice clasui Sect C1 game sys, w Iscr, s& tutr, 1) '1 a"4,4, tires, pa everyhng. cxc c.,ud IHs reliablee chila-e. 221 26N3. u n rollr "370. 25 2-319 llA V1 uu ac 0334 1972 Chevy Nova, ac, ps, ln tires. 01,900. 289-4232 199 Lz-J( rns gd, l2.100, 260 3270. E99g s~a l~ c rapk, maid, T &T, w/e.286-37 ; io 17rs .ns.s & exr es is( base, I porabe). It "A"r 1979 h jmsouti I C, ac. JVf sucesso, tisg,0.11,2c-7 1991 Mecsry C'apI, cast rasp, c pnw scsfnuul ,8.cs 0c37 Nas. cuaa-322a. cuss xst as -3rs hls tle ph, ps, S1,80/ab. 260-56011992 Vsyager, 22k ies. xc ca. nd, alarm, n-w ires 2l7-4692. Like ir, use Ib I,,uuig LIun$1f,000 282-4W dry ./,,f 221-1596 36SX l6, 4cc Roliml licm haul A Carves DPI -33 s 1uun u riar 198l Tcysta (Cci olla, splac,. 2r,1187 Tiyat f lsa, ited, ?d, i9l7ry, sa/tware $795, lP I aserjes 920, islity V5-I speaker 1111, pate r ti l am/fciss., ts adty pd, l19 Cheap p/, us. Isiage 202nwi tunes, a4,,01/ t7us. 235 Enul I ag pk sad use-n Il 5555. .Itc it ll $75 0/eg. 209-3593 .Iaise 6121, reel-tech IS15H 28464X2 $6,500olb. 263-4804 32110. 5s "8 J' Wrcehi Taaangler tad 1 y ; smm y11mus (5M0 2 w/cau, cus Stty ami, stiess dis m an, s i70. 198 hl1uick Ictu -i V6, 1987 lucy 5-l p i. S c, a m ucss. 5s. 95 lls 284-5795s HIn-st, aehiabl 24y il, iahuiiter, eta pslsricer. 0111 O. 252-219 260 97oit

PAGE 27

Tropic Times1 Classified Ads 1994B11 Sears 19" oolorTVw/remote,exceond, $1,900, dining nm & clhina bi $2,200. Office conference table $200, office Evenflo diluxe one-step infant tordneera used $40. 2864737. Qtrs 27 Amador. $i25. 284-6398. 285-5935. display cabinets $180/ea. 226-8626/ dier car s-at grt cond $45. 287-3420. 3278. Playpen new $50, curtains $20, PCC Qtrs 2022B Curundu 7-10:30am. 486 w/monitor, 6mb Ram, 2X CD 3 piece LR set, br, Ig couch, recliner, 2 -------Wht terrace set w/six chairs round books varied price. 287-6198. Qtrs 504 Balboa. Ram, 340mb, 107mb hd, speakers, end tbis & coffee tbls, gd cond seg. C e curio cabinet, wood $400, diplastic table and high chairs, good F50 ttbook for Sociology (Syg 1000 printer, CDs, more, $2,500. 284-6739. 207-6638. netle 4 chairs $250, 26" bay's bikc cond $315. 236-0984 FSU e b S igyyg. Qts 943 La Boca. $30. 203-4225 -GED)_new 207-3547. Kenwood equalizer $75, Nintendo DR tbl, 6 chairs & triple china cabi---Flox force exercise machine stair stepQres 828B Clayton. gun, raning pad, 9 games $90, C.B. net, solid oak wood/antique pecan China pots, bar chairs, LR t1, postper, branch press butterfly, like new Morey boogie board $30, Oakley sun$25. 284-6323. nish, Stanley, $1,600. 283-3220. ers, baby stroller. 230-0392. $200. 285-5486. glasses, Cannondale bike -Shimano 7273 A Cardenas. ------components $400. 269-6337. PC Sansni stereo sys, w/2 infinily Q-se comforter, bed skirt, pillow Danish twin beds w/nmatt & drawers, 2 igloo 120 qsart Ice chests, like new 1334 Amador, by pool. speakers, 150w ea., black etterainshums, e cond $75, 7 white sheer beautiful wood color, S150i/a. 236$l25ea. 282-4538. Man s moantan bk.e,2 Murray hlke new Qnr 2509A Cochliram-? w/acesores. $108. 283-6375. Qr 59 Ccl ament center, gd cond, $700. 229-3525. curtains, 40"x63", $15. 282-4234. 0984. -----_-_-Girls 12" bike, 3 mtbs old $40, germanQts5AHwrd SC typewriter XL 1900, $75. 284Hide-a-bed, Q-sz w/matching love Gerry guardian infant/toddler car seal tricyle w/adult posh bar $40. 282Classic Brunswick pool table needs Qirs 555A 4627. seat & pillows, new eand, $675. 285$30, 2m Ram I 1/2m chips, $50. 2873375. some woodwork $600. 283-6375. Qirs 238A Albrook 8am-lpm. 6374._ _ __ 3534._ _12tadctdaodrnIdnt, Qr 6DCatn Sega game gear, 6 games, super wide 3 3 ---10 speed bike, good cond $75. 286t/2kt rund ear diamond ring, I clarity Qtrs 6630 Clayton. gear, outlet adapter, TV, inner $220/ 36" Whirlpool elee stove, 4 barters, 4 rims Honda 1994 014 and covers 6333. and H color $980, chair seat $25. 287aba. 289-3689 Fowler. oven, e condo, $150. 233-0873. $20ea.2874584. 4830. Qus 24850 Pyle --_Chaubroil BBQ,Ae) Balboa Sat-Son 8. Sony amp, 200w per channel, speakGE refrigerator 23 c/fi, GE wisser/ Complete nursery bedding set, pastel cond $30/aba. 286-6333. sp aker one, bikes acoustic linar -1am. er,_ cass, urntable, $258. 287-3925. dryer. 252-2180. bunny design $70. 282-3628. -spekers-4 w, Punk Wgns, Qs 685 Clayton 6-I----. Golfers 1,3,4 metal wood set $110, Salvant, Cumbre ency. 289-5860. Qtrs 1530C Howard 7am-noon. Sony camcorder Hi-8 stereo, loaded Chest type freezer $500, sofa $250, Computer Software IBM comparable. titanium shaft 282-5586. $1,200, Sega CD $200. 286-4084. bed $100, Papason chair $100, Dish 286-3634. Carpet, beige, 18" comm squs, fiber Qtrs 94A Howard 7am-noon. washer $50, TVs $25 & more. 261rod V-6/171/2.8 eng w/trans, radiaglass backing, high quality, 700 yds ---Gibson Epiphone electric guitar, 9665. Swing set $700, child car seat $25, tar, starter, brake/pads, allerneatr, pwr avail at $4 yd. 283-3583. Qrs 337BClayton 7um-lpm. .,sewood frelboard w/ase, $250! ---baby swing $40. 204-6381. steering lbbi carburatar. 260-5164. ----------P5-FS books far sale. 282-4600. ___ Qtrs_401AClayton. neg. 286-6495 ask for Skippy. Reclining sofa chair w/mussage op ion, $325. 282-3100. Jenny Lind crib -needs mattress $70, Colemean backpackw/frame$50, drySega CD games $25/ea, all $75. 284Jenny Lind changing tbl $60, carseut er $200, the w/4 chain $200, 24" road Deluxe dble stroller used once, rock n' Qtrs 2630 Corozal 7am-noon 6176 Picnic tbl w/betch seats, misc car $50, stroller $60. 286-3484. runner bike $200 286-3396. ride infant car sea/arrie. 284-4027. Qtrs 29 Albrook 8am-raon. eure fluids, $40. 286-3345. Mns2"mnbk 5,wmnsbk -------------------Men's ping pang table with every2 8,000 BTU aircond one runs good, Me'A26"k bike $50, women's bike 7am. End this, dining tbl, chairs, baby forn, thing extra paddles, nets very gd cond, one needs compressor $400. 286$50. 285-4734. clothing, mise items, neg. 287-5439. $150 252-2561. 409_ ______ 6 Samurai swords w/stand $200, Softsid wtrbed, refi-ig 19.7u/ft, chiWhirlpool upright Ig freezer, ex Weight set an'd bench, $100. 228Lace and silk wedding dress no c; 1, Nintendo, 6 games w/gun and carry na nabitet, VCR Panasonic, various cond, $650/obo. 287-6182. 1339 after 4:30. never used, for skitny person size bag $100. 252-5023. dressers, all in exe coed. 262-2552. --medium $200. 287-3874. -----Rugs 6x9 lan, 10x12 be & gray t.ixed Men's 26" bike $50, wed cat carrier --Organist to play at my wedding Aug. Solid wood DR set, formal I/or w/ tweed $35, bathroom shelf/cabinet $20. 269-5762 after 6 pm. Super NES, Sega, Sega CD, Gmheboy MTturCyCyeS 13, 2m, Albraok Chapel. 284-6741 out hutch reasonable. 282-3573. $20/aba. 284-6171. NES best offer. 252-5162. Tammy or Jason R 323. Whirlpaol Dehumidifier, $100. 284-1988 Honda Asscot 500cc, looks gd, Washer/dryer, white, $200/far both. LR $325, formal LR $750, rugs $200/ 4392. Ency Britanica, 39 vol. Comptons reliable, $1,200. 269-9558. Roleplayers interested in heroic 260-7661. ._ ca,wickerchairs$50/ea, urtains,desk. ency, 32 volumes, both in ev cend. hand minsy gang AD&D, Rifts, 223-9865. White desk with chair $75, Barney 252-6566. 1993 Yamaha DT 125, rty pd, $1,400. champions, Sadow Run & more! Like new Knr heavy duty, large -curtains 2 sets $35, Barney toddler 5 pn 252-5397. 286 6391. cap washer & dryer, $650 for both. Montgomery Ward heavy duty elee bed set $40. 287-6623. Dress blues jacket $50, L pair of see-Live-in maid to cook, clean, laun26-6134dryer, $225. 286-6234. vice stripes for blues $15. 287-4140. Suzuki Samurai Eagle Rims, alarm, dry, little ironing for adult & baby, Caret28'12 $75,12slS $00 01lethe rclner --~' 4-6 tale I5" inch rims while spoke -depeadable leans, $4,500. 287-3697 M-S._202-3509. Carpet 20'x2' $175, 12'x5 g $100, BI leather recliner watching otto$25 ca. 252-2561. Bikes -boys 20" $150, girls 20" $30, after 7pm. le Wan male purebred Pomur8a35fo mir $MO, a, seat $35, baby swung trial' $175, Kawai organ S1,000/obo. woman's 10 sp $50. 284-6638. eWant male purebred Pomanian for $20, change tbl $100. 286-4334. 286-3527. Extra hg suitcase $50, foot locker $9, 1985 Honda XL 100, ese cond, w/2 stud sve AKC reg. 287-3686. waser/rye,-a ,men desler loafers 7 1/2 $18. 252PCC books: Modem Civilization to helmets, $608. 252-6971 noan-6pm Whirlpool washer/dryer, heavy duty, 20x 5 dark green wall-to-wall carpet 7400. 1715; Art Through the Ages, new -.----.---Spaish guitar model 37 or equiva$800/fr set. 287-4 8 ___ $175, K/Q-sz bed, dinette set, dresscond. Best offer. 284-4730. 1983 Yamaha Seca, icel 2 helmets, lent & lonel 0 gauge train, for small Bas (5 bws w/7 Minolta X6-l 35mm camera 0m spare tires & parts, runs good, $1,500. y. 252-1096. Baby crib, bed i/5 drawers, $3755 lens, 135mm telepltot lens, tripod Sears 2.5 HP edger like new $180/ 266-5797. Dive master/instructor. 252-6272. 223-7829. Bamboo sofa, 2 chairs & coffee thl, and cleaning kit, $150. 286-4674. aba 284-3326. Cou cair,1111bb c cond, $550. 284-5678. 1 985 Yamaha Virago 1,000cc, low Bike car carrier for 2 or 3 bikes. 252Caueh w/matching ehair, $200/obo. Sega game gear w/hook up to cig I 10 lb wall unit bench and all atubmileage great bike, $2,000. 284-4220. 5428. 287-6795. GE washer/dryer, large cap, heavy lighter $70, dressers w/mirror $70. ments $80. Ask for Melvin, 206-4695. Sleeper single waterbed $75, LR suie duty, $650. 282-3778. today's kids kitchen $20. 287-6838. Kawasaki Ninja 600-R parts (1984Manual typewriter reasonable price. Complete silkscreen printing system 86). 224-5427. 284-4027. $380, patio set $70, stepper $65, 204Love seat wall unit, curtains for troop Rockford fosgate punch I5" car for shirts-hats, printer, dryer, inks ad 4376. Employment I.r Spanish live-or 436. qtrs, outdoor patio umbrella, Pioneer subwoofer 250w never used $100, screen never used $3,000 289-4781. 1988 Honda CB-700 Nighthawk, new maid hard working good with chilCoier sofa, $300. 284-6388 2-way speakers 150w. 230-1927. Super NES games $25-30. 286-4674. tires, battery & mufflers, good shape, dren honest avail after Aug 9. Helen __mer____s__ _____-__ Bike rock pack $15, Avocet Cross K $2,88/aba. 224-427. after bpm. 260-4996. 5x8 Dhrurrie rug $100, 4x6 Dhrurrie 3 pbedrm Set & isfr-. 252-1104. Little tikes table $20, golfelub set w/ tires 26xl.9 $20, Deore DX pedals w/ bag $35. Nintendo & exaras $50, toe clips $20 p. 284-6339. 1976 Mnessa 348 Cola, gd cond, Extra work for my honest, dependrug $5i0, 3xg Flo$kati $30, antique piece n1. 287-6539. many spae parts_ $750. 262550. able day maid 2 days a week, gen nofa $225. 260-9768. 12x15 hine rug $75, gren 6x4, 25 -Ronal car wheels and tirs alloy 17" cleaning/ childcare. 287-4421. white shelves $90, 5/8 carat diamond Danish children desk (2) wht w/red 235/145zr, 245/45zr, fits Audi, BMW, $300. 84-4183. ring $350. 284-4920. legs, good size $35ea. 236-0984. Mustang $2,000. 264-8059. eatto Sales espmyc ofin"any r sieor LR suite, sleeper Single watrbed, Full bedrm set, 5 pc $200, dresser w/ Baby clothes, swings $20, monitor 4 beige carpets $100 total, 2 -14x12s, type 289-4082. stepper eercser, paio set, best oe, mirror, desk & chair, child's rm $150. $20, criblight $10, bottle warmer 6x9, 9x15; Amana micro $50. 282Qtrs D II5A Clayton 7-Ilam Persuns interested in starting man '____ h'" ai il 3CFwd9a ike lub Howard side of bridge for 284-4376. 252-2759. $10, humidifier $10. 286-3778. 3026. -Qtrs 1537C Howard9 am. weekend rides. 284-6339. Fum for sale, 3 pc set br fum, couch, 2 Ig carpets (beige 10x14, blue 12x6) Golf clubs all iron, 1-3-4-5 woods 13" Samsung TV wi/remote $200, pink Qtrs 61A Albrook. Scrap lumber all sizes new/old. I love seat, recliner, coffee tbl & 2 end fits base housing $58/far both, FSU ping puter covers and white matchice 10ks gold ring $180. 286-3999. will haul away. 2844242. bIk varey hep$.24-4220. ngb, 2.22-1096. utr 251 Cci9m-2pm ibis, gd cend, best offer. 287-6638. hooks variety, cheap $50. 284 inghag$250._252 -Lg dog house $20. 2844984LiQa-irnsature Spanish hskpr car s K-e wied, rose mirror W 6Beige carpet i/pod 12x5,SingersewTreadmill like new $500, originally Qirs 284B Albrook 8-I lam, for 3 children, cooks, cleans, irons K-awrsz wS4, rienta rpe dbd6 ing much $250, dishwasher $250, $800. 252-6649. Wash/dry $600, New Age ency $175, ---t---rfsstars .1 $160. 251-5853. drawers $450, oriental carpet Sx8, soalv et$0.2451.laser dise player in/movies $60, car Qars_1833A Clayton_8am-lpm. e~~trsa 10_5-83 blue, burg, beige $60. 282-3793. 8, sofa, love se.at $480. 284-5018. -__ lae icpae /oi_ 6.cr-_p. d. enrt of e bl, bug, beige60. 2823793. -----Child's kitchen set I piece wlfridge, seas, booster seal, crib $75. 284-3137. Qtrs 646C Clayton 7am-' Esperiened eurpentee sods Orn re12,000 btu GE ac $300, GE dryer Set golf clubs $200, vacuum cleaner stove, micro table, like new $80. 287-11 1 -pair at reasonable prie. 286-6.96. $250, 2 Gilins far hunter elite items, Kenmare $50. 286-4494. 3871. Weight set, exe cond, $125/reg. 287Qtrs 611B3 Howard 7am-noon. Exc bilingual part time maid/hsk4546. avi, oe_,rlabemtuew only 6 ruos use. 287-4986. Micro $250, 8pe set china $75, stove Weider weight bench with butterfly -Qrs 167 howard 7a honest, reliable, are w Qtrs167 owad 7a. aeefs. '207-5439. 6 pc LR set, ene cond $l,0010/.ia hood $30, stone ware dishes -8 pc and las-pull attachments 110 lbs Indian hunter bow 50bs pull, 38" -m--bed' tu & aeo d 287-6770. $30, rug shumpoaer $40. 252-6986. $150. 287-3271. draw, exe cord, $125. 287-3639. Qtrs 285B Albrook 7m___n 17' or longer ladder. 269-6728. Sofia & I. seeat, hugudy eolor, 8 Christmas tree $25, stereo $35. 286Baby items, hamster cage 260-1290. 4 steel 72 c ft scuba tanks, $50. 252Qnrs 429A Kobbie 7am-noon Nerdick Track or similar, reasonable 4490.y6272. price, good cond. 284-4220. aons old, 5500. 226-1757. -----Street tread rear motorcyle tire 120/ --2--Qtrs 55B Mitchum Ave Howard. 2 pc sect, beige color, L-shaped, gd GE refrg (2-dr, ice maker) $1,300, 90h]6 brand .w $35. 229-3915. Toys, baby clothLst baby items, kitchG Qefs 562B Hiced 7am-aoone $,7 86 rQwith poles (ifHvwa). 'od, $400. 204-3528. GE gas stove $450, washer $450, en items, hdbd & 2 night tbles $lob, 49 -7a. .297-3836 afer 6pm. ___ nd, $40. 24-328.Nintendo $40, games $10. 261-9974. Cennary cur seat, good to 44 lbs $3. picnic Fba & chairs $50. 286-4795. Qars 409C Kobbie 7am-naon. Live-in maid pretfrably erg spk, reI sofa bed w/2 cream bamboo chairs 282.-3375. -I liable, good w/kids 260-1290. yelowsoaasortd al clos. Big rocker reclI/rer, e cond, very Baby walker, stroller & pasheltair. Qirs I' I5A 7-I lam. Yellow so Bs rrad$0 264.462 comfortable, $350/obo. 287-3319. Assorted blazer all colors, sizes 6-8. 206-6333. Info from people who bought/sold material i. gd ord, $300. 26421462 252-6989. --.--House 76, 62B East S, Villa Lilla (San Pekingese puppies mid-Oct 1989 BLnk bed, dresser, desk, rom dividSofa bed Q-s. 264-9741 after 6pm,. 1 ulous old assured magazine Ladtes Reebok glf shoes sie 7 1/2 Fco) Panama; today. Hoard/Kobbe. 252-6989. my, LR set, micra stand, sleeper tingle Refrig/freezer, ice maker, 5pc beders perfect cond. 252-6989.-.-.-------waterbed. 284-4376. $1,500, bamboo swing, 15.6c/ft freezer, 8pc bedrm $1,300. 252-1257. Wed gown w/vail, rs for all $750/ Whirlpool port dishwasher, per rep, 10/12 row mach $40, formal F clean, energy saver, $200. 287-6393. 3 pe LR set $300, coffee tbh, 2 end tbis gown, bli & blk. sz 10, bo. 260-0766. Tropic Tim es Ad Form All-foam cocl$60, steel deeser$75 $200, entertainment cense, $85, all ahoganydn/shh6/,s eeldee $500. 260-7100. G.E. Washer, dryer $750, vertical ANIMALS mahogany diong bl w/ rved chair __blinds sliding glass door $150, nol AUTOMOBILES -$400, Jap foar lamp $25. 262-2813. in s eo00 bds $15. 287-5833. L AVAILABLEMiscellaneous """750 AVIBL Mini blinds, whihe, complete set foe 2 High chair Fisher Price ladies Reebok ] BOATS & CAMPERS bedm, used, S175/$275 installed golf sha size 7 1/2 never used 286ELECTRONICS PRICE HOME PHONE 286-3634. _____Grill BBQ w/tank, exc cond, cover 4737. FOUND enl, $130. 236-0984.--] HOUSEHOLD Check only one category per ad form. Only two ads per person each Srdy, traditional 3-seater coos, b, --------------Playpen, stroller, baby sleepingbag [] LOST week are allowed. Each ad form is limited to 15 words. Please type er gd card, $225. 282-3123. Micro oven $75, l0-sp bike $75. 260sterilizer, lec bottle warmer carsea/ MISCELLANEOUS print neatly. Information listed below is not inclUded in the ad, bat is 7100. _ carrier, more baby items 256-6436. [MOTORCYCLES required for publication. This information will t be released to tb/ed 2 or carput $12'5, Sansui stereo sys---__ othr w/speakers $1,500, cac cleuser 830, Dyed rattan LR & DR sets $800/ca, 2-nelspas paint pistols w/paint pal -PATIO SALES parties. Deadline fter the receipt of ads is 9 an. Monday foe Friday's toys, misc clothes 284-3934 ceiling fan w/lamp $70, misc to/s. lets $50. 264-2001. WANTED edition. Ads are run en a space available, and tray be held fir a future 226-8116 .editit. Ads my I e mailed to the Trspir Times, Unit 0936, APO AA Curtains & carpets. 286-4787 Brand new pool stick, 2 pair lad/cs 34002 or deposited in a drop box at fite Albrook Post Office. Ads 9'x12' chocolate be carpet, $30. 287size 6 ropers. 261-0507. offering weapons or sent by FAX will not be run. KIrean style bt ace wardrobe cab6I 92. nets, no scratches & will deliver, 2 Crib bumper, cover fr car st and SPONSOR'S NAME RANK/GRADI/ Sa, $700. 260-7888. Dbl bed s/hdbd, matt/bo spring, & cain/cr for babies clothes, shsssocks, 3 sets s ets, gas grill 287-4280 6din pers, crib toys, crib cssver sucets, ORG. DUTY PHONI, 16.5 CO freezer $500, bedrm set bl 9pm osly. 287-5974.

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B 'Tropic Times Jop ur B12. Jul0y22, 1994 B12 Potp ourriWednesdays. All-you-can-eat soft tacos. Fajitas, ribs or fish are also available. HOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-171, DD 214 if Quarry Heights Seafood lover's special 5:30-9 p.m. Fridays and Saturclaiming veteran preference, a copy of college tranua Hdays. Enjoy an array of appetizers and main entrees of shrimp scripts if claiming eduation and a copy of CASP *Officers' Club: and fish. notice of rating if applicable. Submit a copy of latest Breakfast buffet is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-FriBang up barbecue daily in the Breezeway, dine-in or SF-50 if you are a Federal employee. days and 8-10 a.m. Saturdays. take-out. Enjoy the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or hot wings. For more information regarding Army vacancy Old fashioned steak night 6-10 p.m. Tuesdays and New family menu Tuesdays and Fridays featuring all the announcements (forms required, job related criteThursdays. Choose cut of beef to be charbroiled. past favorites plus new items such as jerked chicken, hand ria, etc.), visit the Directorate ofCivilian Personnel, .made 1/2 pound hamburgers, baked ravioli and more. Building 560, Room 102, Corozal, or call 2855201. All-you-can-eat lunch buffet, $3.95 Fridays, featuring *Howard Enlisted Members' Club Ballroom: *Note: One-on-one employment counseling should soup, salad, selection of entree, special return rights. Henry J 9 p.m.-I a.m. all evening today. be the first step in the job search. Sunday brunch features the Ballet Folklorico Panameno Friday night disco 9 p.m. Fridays. at noon the first Sunday of each month. Bingo is back 3 p.m. Sundays with early-bird bingo at Samba Tres 5-11 p.m. taday and July 29. 2:45 and 6:30 p.m. Tuesday with early-bird bingo at 6:15. SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE: PositionsatNMMembership night 6:30 p.m. Saturday. Enjoy food, fun 5 level and above require specialized experience. Clayton and jazz at the Enlisted Members' Clubs, free for members. Specialized experience is either education above the For special functions, call 2844189. high school level OC work experience directly related J Sports Bar offers daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m.*Howard Enlisted Members' Club Casual Cove: to the position being filled. Example: Budget posi1 p.m. Mondays-Fridays. Pool tournaments are held 3:30 New country 8 p.m. to closing Fridays. tions at or above the NM-5 level required Budget p.m. Sundays. Country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. Wednesexperience or equivalent education. Prizmz Night Club features a variety of music Wednesdays in the Casual Cove. Leam the latest in line dancing, the Vacancy announcements are also available at the days-Saturdays and jazz 5 p.m. Sundays. stomp, waltz and others. Music will be until midnight. Sundial Recreation Center. For events or parties at the Prizmz Night Club or CJ's Night mug special Wednesdays. Buy a mug filled with The Army civilian personnel office accepts Sports Bar, call 287-4716 or send a fax to 287-4343. your favorite draft beverage and refills. applications on a continuous basis for the following *NCO Club: Karaoke 7:30 p.m. Sundays, 8 p.m. Tuesdays. positions. These announcements are used to establish Casa Maria special for Aug. 1-15: tortilla, two flautas, Saturday and Monday nights disco 5 p.m.-I am. registers for permanent and temporary future rice, frijoles, sour cream and guacamole, $5.50 per person. Rock 'n' roll golden oldies 5-8 p.m. Tuesday; 5 p.m.The club is offering a radio amateur class 7-9 p.m. midnight Thursdays. vacancies. Tuesday Aug. 2-Sept. 30. Registration is ongoing. Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursdays. Bring you VB# 001 General Clerical, NM-3 (Used to fill most cleriALbro k/Hcard. You must be present so win. cat position). A ibrooIk toward *Top Three Club: VB#001A General Clerical, NM-4(Used to fill most cler*Albrook Club: Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesdays. Free all-you-can-eat. ical position). Rip Maynard 7-10 p.m. today live in the lounge. Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursdays. VB# 002 Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Intermittent wk sch) Steak night 6-9 p.m. Friday. Choose from rib eye, K.C. Karaoke 6 p.m. Friday. CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is required. strip, filet or prime rib. Dinner comes with vegetable, baked Club closed Saturdays. potato, French fries or rice. *Howard Officers'Club: VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) Requires Fiesta de mariscos 6-9 p.m. Saturdays. The seafood feast It's prime time 6-9 Fridays and Saturdays. Enjoy the Cert + 6 rao recreation exp in the field. platter features broiled corvina, stuffed crab, calamari rings, prime rib special. VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Req 6 mos recreation peel-and-eat shrimp, a choice of potato or rice, cole slaw and Super social hours 5 p.m. Fridays. Come and eat at the exp in the field. vegetables du jour. A la carte menu available. complimentary buffet and enjoy music and dancing all night VB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5 Mongolian barbecue 6-8:30 p.m. Monday. Prepare your long. VBf# 005A Secretary (Stenography), NM-6 plate, choose the meat, vegetables, seasonings, oils and have Game nights and progressive club card drawing 7 p.m. VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5 chefs do the job outside on the open grills. Wednesdays. Play pool or darts with a $2 entry fee, winner VB#8 006A Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-6 joke outsi, onu ththe opntils Sunday champagne brunch 10 a.m.-I p.m. in the dining takes all, club matches pot. The following positions are Perm/Temp, Full-time, Partroom offers breakfast from cooked-to-order omelets, French Dining room is closed Sunday and Wednesday nights. time, Intermittent. toast, hot lunches, salad and fruits, peel-and-eat shrimp, desThe club is closed Sundays. sets and ice cream bar. New lounge menu available Mondays-Saturdays. VB# 007 on MEDICAL OFFICER, NE 12/13/14. Italian night special 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesdays. For events or catering, call 284-3718. VB# 008 CLINICAL NURSE, (RN license required), Mexican night buffet Thursdays includes tacos, fajitas, NM-9/10/11. taco salad and sopapillas for dessert. Rodman NM-#009 PRACTICAL NURSE, (LPN licence required)' Country western night Thursdays with free dance les*Rodman Club -open to all ranks sons at 7:30 p.m. Leam the two-step, line and couples dancAll-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.-I ** Sclectees for nurse and medical officer position will be es, the waltz, the cha cha and the swing. Country western p.m. Mondays-Fridays. required to undergo a background check. music 9-1 1 p.m. Soup and sub night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays. Grill menu Get jazzed 7-10 p.m. today and July 29 in the lounge and is also available. VB# 010 Manual Positions, MG-2. Closed until further norelax to the music by recording artist Lowell Hopper. All-you-can-eat beef and burgundy, 4:30-8:30 p.m. tice. For events or catering call 286-3557/3582. Wednesdays. Grill menu is also available. VB# 011 Manual Positions, MG-3. Closed until further no*Howard Enlisted Members' Club -DininE Room: Cook-your-own steak night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Thursdays VB# 012 Manual Positions, MG-4. Closed until further noSunday breakfast buffet 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. An assortat the Rodman Bohio. rice. meant of breakfast foods are available in the dining room. Fine dining 6-9 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays. VB# 013 Manual Positions, MG-5. Closed until further noBreakfast is served 6-9:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays; 7:30 Upstairs Bar 4:30-8:30 p.m. Sundays-Thursdays; 6-9 tice. a.m. Saturdays. p.m. Fridays-Saturdays. VB# 014 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-6. Closed until furItalian night 5:30-8:30 p.m. Thursdays with Alfredo or Social hours & hors d'oeuvres, 3:30-11 p.m. Fridays at there notice. seafood fettuccini, lasagna, pasta mixta or pasta and shrimp the Laguna Lounge and Rodman Bohio. VB# 015 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-7. Closed until furin a white wine sauce. A la carte menu is available. Dinner is served 6-9 p.m. Mondays-Sundays. ther 016 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-s. Closed until furSteak night special 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesdays in the din*Rodman Annex: ther notice. ing room. Select a cut and order a New York strip, rib eye or Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays. VB# 015 Supply Technician, NM-5. Closed until further filet. To eat lighter, meals of chicken marinara, pasta, shrimp All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu II a.m.notice. vin blanc or shrimp Taboga are also available. 1:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays. VB# 018A Supply Technician, NM-6. Closed until further Mexican night and Texas barbecue ribs 5:30-8:30 p.m. The club is closed for evening and weekend service. notice. VB# 017 Administrative Services Assistant, NM-5. Limited to permanent status employees only. --------------VB#N017A Administrative Services Assistant, NM-6. Lim-pra tCon ited to permanent status employees only. Pacific Gorgas Hospital Building 254, Phone: 282-5507 Atlantic VBI4 VACANCIES TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 07Amador Chape 12:15pmDaily Catholic Mass (2nd floor) 22-94 CLOSE: 08-02-94 Building 108, Phone: 282-3610 Weekday worship (As anDavis Chapel 8:30am Catholic Mass (Sunday) nounced) Building 32, Phone: 289-3319 Pacific 9:30am CCD Catholic, Building 109 11:30am Catholic Mass(Tuesday-Friday) 383-94-LA (3) COMPUTER OPERATOR, NM-332-7. Sen(Sunday) Albrook Chapel Noon CatholicSpanishMass(Sunday) sitive. Shift Work. USA ISC, HID 106th Sig Bde Ft. Clayton. 1030am Episcopal Worship Service Building 860, Phone: 284-3948 1:30pm Protestant Hispanic Service (Sunday) Sam Spanish Catholic Mass (Sunday) (Sunday) 394-94-JH4 COMPUTER SPECIALIST, NM-334-ll. Sensi9amaConfessionsl(Sunday Sherman Chapel tive. HQ, SOCSOUrl, Albrook. Top Secret clearance is reCatholic Mass (Sunday) quired. Driver's license reqsiredBuilding 64, Phone: 287-5859 9:45am Protestant Sunday School Building 152, Phone: 289-6481 11:30am Daily Catholic Mass 11am General Protestant Service 8:30am Collective Protestant Worship 35-9-J BOCEICL ES ASSTNT(OFIE 5pm Catholic Mass (Saturday) (Sunday) 8:.G N45am CollEMtive Protestant Sev ice Howard Chapel loam Protestant Sunday School AU T O M A TIO N), N M-3ir-5. U G o a D i -(Sunday) Building 500, Ph on : 284-3948 E sp in ar C h a p e l reuse required. 10:30am Catholic Mass (Sunday) 11:30amDally Catholic Mass EslIng2 Po e 357A-94-LA COMPUTER ENGINEER, NM-854-12. 106th 10:30amProtestant Sunday School (Sun4:30pm Confessions (Saturday) Building 2 Phone: 2 s(461 y Sig Bde, Ft. Clayton Candidates who applied under VB9 357day,Bluilding 156, 287-3497) 5pm Catholic Mass (Saturday) 9m Catholic English Mass (Sunday) 9Ld, Fdot a n ddshp dnr12:30pmGospel Service (Sunday) 9:30am General Protestant Service(Sun9am Protestant Sunday School at 5 ~Esporar Elementary 5:30pm CCD Catholic, Building, 156 day) 10:15am CCD Catholic Sunday School at 2X6-94-.11 (2) STAFFING CLERK (OFFICE AUTOMA(Sunday) l1am Catholic Mass (Sunday) Espinar Elementary TiON), NM-203-5. USARSO, DCI', Caruzaf Temp Nte Y 6pm Evening Service (Sunday) 12:30pmGospel Service (Sunday) 10:15am Collective Proestant Worship Qualified typist. Bilingual Limited t veterans preference eligiCorozal Chapel Rodman Chapel (Sunday) beItuilding 112, Phone: 285-6717 Building 40, Phone: 2834148 I1:3opmGospel Sunday School 7:30pm Jewish (first Friday of month) 8-9am Cathlstic Mass 12:20pmGospel Service (Sunday) Note: VI//373-94--S I EALTI I SYSEMIS l SPI 1 ALIS toam ItispanicCathtoic M.sss(S"uday) 10-11amGeneraIProtestantService(Sn.6:30pm Gospel Bible Study (Sunday) NMI-s711, is ame dled tio ead je -a~c iden ion 1-,/ 1 tt pm lentccssal Wnrchip (lcy) iay) Islamic Prover Services 12:30--1:311 ip.m. 1rces IS. Pae i> not reqicre 7pm S'uday Su! I (eridal I1:1 am Pr' stant Cumunmuni i(uthers Fridays. Fort Clat rol Chapel. 287-5859.