Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Preceded by:
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Full Text



GiJ


t of the a Canal Museum






Tropic

Vol. VII, No. 28 Quarry Heights, I


Republic of Panama


Forms needed to
disconnect phones
COROZAL (USARSO PAO) - People who
clear quarters and need to disconnect their tele-
phone must fill out a Form 0010. The form will
indicate termination date and if you still owe gov-
ernment equipment. The form will allow for con-
tinued service until residents are ready to leave. For
information, call the Telephone Customer Service
at 285-4313/4354.

DEH announces
customer services
COROZAL (USARSO PAO) - The Directorate
of Engineering and Housing will be flushing water
mains 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday on Quarry Heights.
Water pressure will be considerably lower for
about one hour during this time.
Customer Service calls for repair of washers,
dryers, dishwashers and garbage disposals will be
responded to by the Directorate ofEngineering and
Housing contractor BADELAG, S.A., 7 a.m.-4
p.m. Monday-Friday. For repairs, call 285-4150/
4491/5588/5758.

Navy warfare unit
changes command
RODMAN NS (USNASTAPANCANAL
PAO) - Naval Special Warfare Unit Eight's change
of command ceremony will be held 9 a.m. Thurs-
day at U.S. Naval Station Panama Canal gymna-
sium. Commander Jack S. Mendez will assume
command from Commander Robert P. Schoultz.

Puerto Rico wants
U.S. SOUTHCOM
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) - Gov. Pedro
Rossello said July 5 he'd like to see the U.S.
Southern Command move its headquarters from
Panama to Puerto Rico.
The Southern Command is scheduled to move
from its Panama base by the end of 1999. The U.S.
Atlantic Command, based in Norfolk, Va., over-
sees military operations in the Caribbean.
Several states, including Florida, Texas and
Louisiana, reportedly are interested in hosting
SOUTHCOM.
"The Southern Command gives the appearance
of a continental defense for the Americas and our
public policy is to position Puerto Rico as a cen-
ter, as an asset in the meeting of the Americas,"
Rossello said.
Rossello supports statehood for Puerto Rico, a
Spanish-speaking U.S. commonwealth. His term
as governor ends in 1996, but he has said he'll
seek another four-year term.
A SOUTHCOM spokesman said that within a
year, the command will provide the defense sec-
retary its recommendations on a new home. The
official spoke on condition of anonymity.
Also July 5, 35 SOUTHCOM soldiers began
week-long military exercises at the former Ramey
AFB on Puerto Rico's west coast.
More than 2,000 political and environmental
activists staged a protest outside the former base
July 4 against U.S. military exercises. The dem-
onstrators, led by politicians who want Puerto
Rico's independence, argued that the exercises
pose a threat to the island's environment and resi-
dents.





*Briefly, Page 2.
*Haitian military warning, Page 4.
*Basketball, Page 9.


Panama's president-elect Ernesto Perez Balladares shakes hands with President Guillermo
Endara shortly after Panama's presidential election.



Hope for Haitians

Panama's president-elect willing to accept

Haitian migrants on military installations


PANAMA CITY, Panama (Reuters) - President-elect
Ernesto Perez Balladares said Sunday he was prepared to
accept a group of Haitian refugees at a U.S. military base in
Panama, but the migrants could stay for no longer than six
months.
Perez, speaking to reporters at Panama's Tocumen
airport before starting on a trip to Spain, Italy, the United
States and Mexico, did not say when the Haitians could
begin arriving in Panama and said they would be fewer than
the 10,000 requested by the United States.
Perez takes over for President Guillermo Endara Sept.
1. Endara had agreed last week to take in up to 10,000
Haitians and then changed his mind.
Perez said he would accept "a contingent of Haitian
refugees, but for not longer than six months" and that they
would have to be under "the control and the responsibility
of the U.S. government and Army."
They "would have no freedom of movement, they
would be practically prisoners" if they went to Panama, he
added.
At a stopover in Miami, Perez said later that a final
decision remained in the hands of Endara until he leaves
office Aug. 31.
"IfI were president today, we would accept the Haitians
under these conditions," Perez said in Miami.
Perez is due to meet President Bill Clinton in coming
days to discuss Haiti and other issues.
Both Perez and Endara met during the weekend with
former U.S. negotiator Sol Linowitz to discuss Haitian
refugee havens.
Nearly 20 years ago, Linowitz negotiated the Panama
Canal treaty for the United States, under which control of
the waterway reverts to Panama by the year 2000.
Endara has said he changed his mind about accepting
the refugees because a U.S. request to house them at
American military bases would violate the treaty.
He said last week that he had been bullied into his initial
consent by the United States. Political experts suggested




24th Wing introduces new squad-
ron-level "Iguana' Be Fit" health pro-
motion program.


that Endara's reversal came because of intense local criti-
cism.
Endara saidaftermeeting Linowitz Saturday that Panama
would not take in the refugees unless there was a "national
accord" involving Perez.
At a second meeting with Linowitz Sunday, Endara
repeated his refusal to accept the refugees at U.S. military
bases, accordingto Roberto Aleman, presidentof Panama's
Foreign Relations Council.
During the past week, U.S. officials have pressured
several Caribbean nations to help provide safe havens to the
thousands of Haitians taking to the sea to escape their
homeland.
The U.S. Coast Guard has picked up more than 14,000
Haitian boat people so far this month - a record. But the
torrent ofboat people slowed over the weekend, with Coast
Guard cutters rescuing a total of 644 Saturday and Sunday.
The Clinton administration said last week that Haitians
fleeing their politically troubled nation by sea would not
be eligible for resettlement in the United States. Only those
Haitians who seek political asylum at the U.S. Embassy in
Port-au-Prince will be eligible to come to the United States.
The U.S. government has also persuaded Grenada,
Antigua and Dominica to accept small numbers of the
Haitian refugees, while others are temporarily housed at a
U.S. naval base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
Conditions in Haiti have steadily worsened since a
military coup toppled elected President Jean-Bertrand
Aristide in 1991, and international economic sanctions
were slapped on the country.
Washington has increasingly hinted at possible military
action to restore Aristide.
But Secretary of State Warren Christopher said Sunday
the United States was not seeking an excuse to invade the
Caribbean country.
"We certainly aren't looking for an excuse to invade
Haiti," he said in an interview with Reuters. "We are
prepared to use force if necessary to protect U.S. interests."




Department of Defense announces
closure of European military facili-
ties.


Friday, July 15, 1994


Times


courtesy pnoto











Tropic Times'
July 15, 1994


Hasta Luego reception
slated for Tuesday
An Hasta Luego Reception will be held
2:45-4 p.m. Tuesday at the Fort Davis
Community Club. The event is for all mil-
itary and civilians leaving in July, August
and September. For information, call 289-
4021.


Olmsted Scholarship
open to officers
The George and Carol Olmsted Schol-
arship, given to officers to attend the De-
fense Language Institute, followed by in-
country language training, is accepting ap-
plications. The eligibility criteria is:
*Captains between 3-11 years of com-
missioned service as of April 1, 1995.
*Branch qualified.
*Defense language aptitute battery
score of at least 89.
*Graduate record exam score of 1,150.
*Grade point average of at least 3.5.
Officers must receive branch permis-
sion to compete and be compliance with
Army Regulation 621-7.
Personnel Command will hold a selec-
tion board Jan. 23, 1995 to select seven
candidates for presentation to the Olmsted
Foundation for final selection as Olmsted
Scholars, class for 1995.

Early release, retirement
programs change lists
The Fiscal Year 1995 enlisted early re-
lease program and early enlisted retirement
program has deleted some military occu-
pational specialities from eligible lists. The
early release program has deleted 29N,
staff sergeant and 39V sergeant first class
from category three. The retirement pro-
gram has deleted 29N staff sergeant and
39V sergeant first class from category C.

Air Force Thrift Shop
reopens with new look
The newly-organized Howard and Al-
brook Thrift Shop recently reopened with
a new appearance and under new manage-
ment. Servicemembers may sell personal
items through consignment at the Thrift
Shop, or they may pick up a bargain some-
one else wants to sell.
The thrift shop is open Mondays and
Thursday and the third Saturday of every
month from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. For
more information call 285-5989.

Support center holds
spouse orientation
The Howard Family Support Center is
offering a Right Start Spouse Orientation
in English 10-11 a.m. July 28. Offered
twice a month, in conjunction with the mil-
itary Right Start program, this orientation
offers an overview of the services and the
family-oriented FSC programs available
on Howard and Albrook.


Temperature
High: 88
Low: 77


High: 90
Low: 78


Weekend

weather

Pacific
Saturday
Tides
9:02 a.m. at 15.4 feet
3:33 p.m. at 2.1 feet

Sunday
10:03 a.m. at 15 feet
4:35 p.m. at 2.3 feet


L Briefly

AM flgh sheul


Saturday
5:40am C130 Howard AFB
New Castle, DE. (A)
1:55pm C5A Howard AFB
Charleston AFB, SC (0)
Sunday
7am B727 Howard AFB
Atlanta IAP (C)
Charleston SC, IAP
Monday
5:40am C130 Howard AFB
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
(V,CC)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Howard AFB
3:45pm 8727 Howard AFB (C,0)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Tuesday


This orientation will feature subject
matter experts speaking on job searches,
volunteering, financial assistance, and
workshops. People will also learn about
recommended shopping areas, contraband
information, maids, tours, and ID proce-
dures. For more information, call the Fam-
ily Support Center at 284- 5650.

Business association
meeting set for Monday
The American Business Women's As-
sociation, Panama Canal Charter Chapter,
will hold its monthly meeting 5 p.m. Mon-
day at the Curundu Restaurant. The pro-
gram for this meeting will be the installa-
tion of New Executive Board and New Af-
filiation Ceremony.

MTMC POV office set
for one day closure
The 1322nd Medium Port Command
POV section will close Tuesday. For in-
formation, call 282-3260.

Job search workshop
offered July 27
A Job Search Workshop will be of-
fered on resume writing July 27. This will
emphasize how to write an effective re-
sume, which items should be included, and
which should be excluded. The workshop
will be held at 10 a.m. at the Family Sup-
port Center.

Legal Assistance Office
closes July 28-29
Because of prior commitments, the Le-
gal Assiatnce Office, Building 154, Fort
Clayton will be closed July 28-29. Emer-
gencies will be handled on a case-by-case
basis. Call 287-6617.

Delta Force recruiters
looking for applicants
There will be a Delta Force Recruiting
visit now through July 29. To apply for
Delta Force, applicants must be male, 22
years or older, pass a background security
investigation, pass a five-event physical

Factoid: About 120 inches of rain fall
into Gatun Lake each year - enough
water to support the millions of gallons
needed to operate the Panama Canal
locks over that same period.


Temperature
High: 89
Low: 78


High: 89
Low: 78


Atlantic
Saturday
Tides
11:30 a.m. at 0.2 feet
7:15 p.m. at 1.2 feet

Sunday
12:25 p.m. at 0.2 feet
7:58 p.m. at 1.3 feet


5:40am C141 Howard AFB
Lrnsma, Peru
Santiago, Chile
La Paz, Bolilva
8:40am 8727 Howard AFB
Atlanta IAP (C)
Charleston SC, IAP
Wednesday
6:10am C130 Howard AFB
Bogota, Columbia
Howard AFB
Thursday
7:55am C5A Howard AFB
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Charleston AFB, SC (0)
11:40pm C141 Howard AFB
San Jose, Costa Rica
Guatemala City, Guatemala


fitness test, pass a modified HALO/Scuba
medical exam, be airborne qualified or vol-
unteer for airborne duty, have no history
of recurring disciplinary action and make
minimum two year commitment. Officers
are required to be a captain or major, a col-
lege graduate and have a minimum of 12
months of successful command at captain
level. Noncommissioned officers must be
a sergeant, staff sergeant or sergeant first
class, be qualified in a primary military oc-
cupational specialty and have a GT score
of 110 or higher. Call the U.S. Army South
Retention Office at 287-4665.

Book stores offer
July clearance sales
The Stars and Stripes Book Stores at
Howard Air Force Base, Corozal and Fort
Davis will hold a clearance sale through-
out July. Everything except hardcover
bestsellers, magazines and newspapers
have been slashed 30 percent. Magazines
are 10 percent off. For information, call
284-5643.

Rodman ammunition
supply point closed
Rodman Ammunition Supply Point
number one will be closed for a 100 per-
cent inventory July 25-29. All units with
scheduled training for this period, call 287-
5806 to reschedule turn-ins and issue
dates.

Volunteers needed for
Native American Month
Base officials need volunteers to help
plan and organize activities for the 1994
Howard AFB Native American Month ob-
servance. It will be held in November and
a volunteer in the rank of master sergeant
or higher is needed to chair the observance
committee.
Any volunteer who is interested in par-
ticipating in this ethnic activity - or who
would like to learn more about it - may
call Tech. Sgt. Jim Johnson at 284-5358.

Promise Keepers
conference planned
The sold out Promise Keepers Men's
Conference in Boulder, Colo., was de-
signed to develop strength and integrity
among men. A similar conference is
planned for July 29-30 at the Fort Clayton
Chapel. For more information, call Carson
Tavenner at 269-9022.

Navy MWR Office lists
current job openings
Navy Morale Welfare and Recreation
Non-appropriated Funds Civilian Person-
nel Office announces openings for the fol-
lowing positions:


Belize City, Belize
Howard AFB
Friday
6:40am C130 Howard AFB
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
San Jose, Costa Rica
Howard AFB
4:40pm C141 Howard AFB
Charleston AFB, SC
McGuire AFB, NJ
A- Active duty only
US- U.S. passport
O-Ovemight
C-Commercial Contract
V-Visa
M-Medevac
CC-Country Clearance


Recreation Assistant/Small Craft Oper-
ator, NF-0189-02 Flexible
Office Automation Clerk (Data Entry),
NF-0326-01, Flexible
Bartender Leader, LF-7405-01, Flexi-
ble
To apply submit an SF-171 to Rodman
Naval Station Building 65. For informa-
tion, contact Joanna Duran at 283-5341.

Enlisted performance
feedback changes
Raters now have 60 days instead of 30
to complete an enlisted feedback session
on an individual who has just received an
enlisted performance if there has been no
change in reporting officials.
Extending the time to 60 days allows
raters more time to prepare an accurate
evaluation, said Air Force Military Person-
nel Center officials at Randolph AFB,
Texas.
This change is effective immediately
and is being incorporated in the new Air
Force instruction 36-2403, covering the
enlisted evaluation system. For more in-
formation about the changes, call the ca-
reer enhancements section of the Military
Personnel Flight at 284-4661/5903.

Smoking cessation
classes start July 27
The next 8-week Habitrol Patch smok-
ing cessation class will start July 27 at the
Howard Clinic's conference room. Class-
es will meet from 12:45 to 1:45 p.m. every
Wednesday through September 14. Inter-
ested smokers should call 284-4713/3832
to make an appointment for a medical
screening. Class size is limited, so inter-
ested people should sign up early.

Air Force War College
enrollment needed soon
Howard Education Office officials ad-
vise immediate action for all majors and
lieutenant colonels interested in enrolling
in the 1994-95 Air Command and Staff
College or Air War College seminars. To
inquire about enrollment procedures and
requirements, call Linda Antoine at 284-
4863. The officials also request all military
members who've received annual needs
assessment surveys complete and return
them to the education office as soon as
possible. For more information, call 284-
6263.

Used automobile sale
set for Wednesday
Fleet Management Center-Panama will
hold a "spot bid sale" 9 a.m. Wednesday,
Building 308 Corozal. Used government
autos will be on sale. A pre-inspection will
take place Tuesday 9 a.m.-3 p.m. only.
For information, call 285-5417.


I











STraining


Tropic Times 3
July 15, 1994


24th Wing starts 'Iguana Be Fit' program

by Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - After doing
this workout routine for a few
months, "I Guana' Be Fit!"
OK, the grammar, syntax and
conjugation isn't exactly scholarly,
but the idea behind that statement
is worthy of Al Einstein, Bill
Faulkner and Bruce Jenner. It's ,
also the title of a new recognition
program here.
The 24th Wing health promo-
tion program has started the "I,
Guana' Be Fit!" program to recog-
nize squadrons who make out- "
standing contributions to the
healthful living of their assigned .
squadron members. They also have -. .4
an impressive "traveling trophy
that goes along with the quarterly .
award. . '"
The trophy was built from a . :
caricature designed by Marcia .
Irwin last year, said Donna Giroux,
installation health promotion man-
ager.
"We took it to a craftsman in
the interior and he carved it from a
single piece of wood," she said. "It
is huge, and everybody who sees it
agrees he did an incredible job."
"Squadrons can do a variety of
things to earn points toward win-
ning this award," said Melissa
Dragoo, health promotion assis-
tant. "These include having senior
leadership participate in health pro-
motion activities, initiating pro-
grams for improving squadron
members' health and fitness, and
ensuring that their personnel pass.
the cycle ergometry test."
Something else squadrons can
do is encourage all squadron mem-
bers to participate in the "TGIF"
(The Goal Is Fitness) Fun-Run
held every Friday at the Howard
Sports and Fitness Center.
The winners of this award will
get to display the "I Guana' Be
Fit!" trophy in their orderly room
for that quarter, and will earn brag-
ging rights throughout the base,
Dragoo said.
Giroux said the initial response ..
to the program has been great so
far, and many people have ex-
pressed a great deal of excitement
about it. "We hope interest will
grow even more in the coming
months."
People who would like to nom-
inate their squadron for the award
can get forms at Howard's health
promotion office, Room 101 in the u.s. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Steve McNally
Howard Clinic. For more informa- Winners of "Iguana Be Fit" award will geto display this trophy in their orderly room for that quarter, and earn bragging
tion, call 284-5870. rights throughout the base.


34 soldiers accept Pre-Ranger Course challenge


FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Atlan-
tic) - The offer was a 10-day course that
included combat survival classes, 5 a.m.-
physical training with at least one 10-mile
run and two 5-mile runs, a 15-mile foot
march, a combat water survival test, land
navigation and three days and four nights
in the jungle.
The reward for those who succeeded
in the 10-day course was a chance at 72
days of even more mentally and physical-
ly demanding tests at Fort Benning, Ga.
Although it may not seem inviting, 34
soldiers here jumped at the offer June 20
- the 10-day Pre-Ranger Course and 72-
day Ranger School are unavoidable steps
in earning a ranger tab, according to Sgt.
1st Class Robert T. Smallwood, noncom-
missioned officer in charge of 5th Battal-
ion, 87th Infantry's Preranger Course.
The 34 soldiers had dwindled to 15
only two days into the course, Smallwood
said.


"We lost them on the PT test on the first
day and the foot march on the second day,"
Smallwood said. "They had to march 15
miles in 3 1/2 hours."
The final graded event was the field
training exercise, which cut six more from
the course.
During the FTX, the soldiers had to put
what they learned during the first six days
to use, Smallwood said.
"They have to do two patrols a day and
incorporate ambushes and raids," he said.
"They're tactical 24-hours a day and get
two to three hours of sleep and one meal
each day."
The intent is to give the soldiers a small-
scale representation of what Ranger
School is like. Based on former pass rates,
the Pre-Ranger Course accomplishes that,
Smallwood said.
"We try to let them see exactly what
they'll see at Ranger School," he said. "A
lot of (the soldiers) are not used to it and


get smoked daily, but we're trying to in-
still a 'don't quit' attitude."
"In our last class last year, we had 18
start and seven finished (the Pre-Ranger
Course)," Smallwood added. "Six of those
seven earned their Ranger tabs, so we have
close to a 90-percent pass rate."
The Pre-Ranger Course is a good rep-
resentation of what Ranger School is like,
according to Sgt. Bishop Freesh, Compa-
ny C, 5th Bn., 87th Inf.
"This is a condensed version of the
school," said Freesh, one of the six who
earned ranger tabs in the most recent
Ranger School rotation. "It has almost ev-
erything they'll see in Ranger School, and
they come out of the course with a basic
idea of what to expect there."
His experience was a valuable asset to
the Ranger School hopefuls, Freesh said.
"I gave the soldiers tips whenever I
could, and a lot of them came to me with
questions about Ranger School," Freesh


said. "They wanted to hear horror stories."
Time doesn't allow the 5-87 instructors
to give an entirely accurate representation
of Ranger School, Smallwood said.
Ranger School's 72-day course is bro-
ken down into three phases, and the sol-
diers must pass each phase to earn the
Ranger tab, he said.
The soldiers must also work in four dif-
ferent environments: a city phase at Fort
Benning, Ga.; a desert phase at Fort Bliss,
Texas; a mountain phase at Camp Merril,
Ga.; and a jungle phase at Eglund AFB,
Fla.
Ranger School ends with a 12-day
graded FTX, Smallwood added.
The soldiers volunteer to endure the dif-
ficult 72-day school because of what a
"Ranger" stands for, Smallwood said.
"When a soldier earns his ranger tab, it
means he knows what he's doing," he said.
"He can be put in charge of anything and it
will get done."


gzl










4 Tropic Times News
July 15, 1994 J Military News



Haiti sends warning


Invasion supporters will be punished


PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) - The army-backed gov-
emment warned Haitians Tuesday against supporting outside
military intervention, while international condemnation poured
in over its order kicking out U.N. human rights observers.
The government message came hours after President Clinton
alluded again to the possibility of U.S. intervention to oust mili-
tary leaders and restore President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, who
was toppled in 1991.
"We have got to bring an end to this," Clinton said at a news
conference in Berlin.
Monday's order to expel members of the United Nations and
Organization of American States observer mission was "just the
latest expression of the desperation pf that illegal regime," Clin-
ton said.
Clinton's special adviser on Haiti, William Gray III, said Hai-
tian leaders should look at the increased U.S. military presence
off their shores and "interpret it as very serious." But he also
said any U.S. action would be in conjunction with the United
Nations.
Clinton said the expulsion "certainly validates the position
we've taken" that an invasion should not be ruled out. But he
acknowledged there was little support in the Western Hemi-
sphere for intervention and urged other countries to follow
Washington's lead and freeze the coup backers' financial assets.
The U.N. Security Council planned to discuss Haiti today and
was expected to issue a statement condemning the expulsion.
The Pentagon said 14 U.S. warships were now in waters near
Haiti, including eight directly involved with 15 Coast Guard cut-
ters in enforcing a U.N. trade embargo against the Caribbean


nation and dealing with a surge of Haitian refugees. Other ships
carried 2,000 Marines.
In a message read on local radio, Haiti's Information Ministry
declared: "All who call for invasion are liable to be punished ac-
cording to the law."
The message came as the U.N. and OAS monitors prepared to
leave Haiti after the army-installed government accused them on
Monday of disrupting state security and ordered them to leave with-
in 48 hours.
Mischa Gaillard, a socialist and leading Aristide supporter, ac-
cused the government of trying to provoke American intervention
with Monday's expulsion order.
"A lot of soldiers and their civilian backers prefer a military
intervention," he told The Associated Press.
Gaillard said intervention would limit popular retribution
against the military and give Haiti's traditional ruling elite a better
chance to subvert an open electoral process.
The rights observers expected to leave either by charter aircraft
or on a scheduled Air France flight to Guadeloupe, one of only
three weekly commercial flights to Haiti following a U.S.-led ban
on air traffic that took effect June 24.
One group of observers gathered at a mountainside hotel for
farewell photos. Others shredded documents and moved files from
offices, seeking to protect the identity of sources who reported kill-
ings, kidnapping and rapes since the 1991 military overthrow of
the democratically elected Aristide.
The joint U.N.-OAS mission was sent in February 1993 to in-
vestigate rights abuses. The 104 observers and administrative
workers file reports but have no enforcement power.


Clinton inactivates Berlin Brigade


BERLIN (AP) - President Clinton Tuesday called a united
Europe "our best partner" for prosperity and peace for the 21st
century as he enthusiastically embraced this once-divided city
as modem Europe's vital center.
At a news conference at the Reichstag, the restored parlia-
ment building the Nazis burned in 1933, Clinton also said it was
time for the United States and its European allies to "put some
meat on the bones of our efforts" to better coordinate policies.
As an example, Clinton announced the formation of two
U.S.-European task forces - one to recommend ways to
strengthen ties with the new democracies of eastern and central
Europe and the other to coordinate the fight against organized
crime, drug trafficking and money laundering.
These are problems that "know no borders," Clinton said.
Clinton, the first U.S. president to visit reunited Berlin, met
at the Reichstag with German Chancellor Helmut Kohl, Speak-
er of Parliament Rita Sussmuth, and European Commission
President Jacques Delors.
Later, he was to take another historic step, becoming the first
U.S. president since before the Cold War to enter what had been
"the eastern, Communist sector of the city.
Clinton was to stand before the majestic 200-year old
Brandenburg Gate -just inside what had been East Berlin -
and speak to Berliners. Some 25,000 were invited to the speech,
including many school children who were given the day off for
Clinton's visit.
"I believe our best partner as we look towards the 21st cen-
tury for prosperity and for peace is a Europe united in democra-
cy and free markets in common security," Clinton said at his
joint news conference with Kohl and Delors.
Kohl, at the news conference from a room in the Reichstag,
noted that one needed to "just look out the window" to see
signs of German unity. The building is adjacent to what had been
the Berlin Wall.
Clinton is the first American president since Harry Truman
in 1945 to visit the eastern part of the city.
Other presidents - Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Ronald
Reagan, John F. Kennedy - visited the western side of the city
and peered over at the East when the Cold War kept the city
divided.
In his Brandenburg Gate speech, Clinton had some hard acts
to follow in terms of presidential addresses in Berlin.
"Ich bin ein Berliner," John Kennedy declared June 26,
1963, identifying the United States with West Berlin, an island
of democracy surrounded by the Berlin Wall and communist
East Germany.
And Ronald Reagan June 12, 1987, stood before the Berlin
Wall and declared: "Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate. Mr.
Gorbachev, tear down this wall."
Kennedy spoke at the Berlin City Hall. Clinton's speech is
near the spot where Reagan spoke except that Reagan stood in
West Berlin facing both the wall and Brandenburg Gate behind
it.
The Berlin Wall has been torn down, the city is united and
Clinton inactivated the U.S. Army's elite Berlin Brigade, which


once confronted the Soviets and East Germans at Checkpoint
Charlie.
That ceremony marks the end of the U.S. military presence in
Berlin.
Clinton began the day jogging through a park near his hotel
with seven members of the brigade.
The Brandenburg Gate, meanwhile, was a center for Hitler's
storm troopers and later the greatest symbol of divided Germany.
Now it is part of the new, united and democratic Germany.
Clinton at day's end made a brief visit to the Jewish Communi-
ty Center, thereby stirring memories of the murder of 6 million
Jews by Germany and its collaborators.
Clinton was asked at the Reichstag news conference if Poland
would become the first former Warsaw Pact nation to be formally
admitted to NATO.
The president said that, while there was not yet a timetable for
admitting new members to the alliance, Poland had "virtually as-
sured they are at the front of that line." The president visited Po-
land earlier on the eight-day European trip that concludes today.
Clinton's visit coincided with a ruling today by Germany's
highest court that German troops can be sent abroad on U.N. mis-
sions, reversing a postwar policy adopted to keep the country from
ever again becoming a military threat.
Both Kohl and Clinton said they welcomed the decision. "I am
completely comfortable with that," Clinton said.
"Berlin is at the center of Europe, the center of its commerce, its
culture," Clinton said late Monday.


Seawolf


sub costs


increase
WASHINGTON (AP) - The first
Seawolf attack submarine is plagued
by cost overruns and construction
delays, congressional investigators
say, but the Pentagon insists the ves-
sel will join the fleet on schedule.
A report by the General Account-
ing Office made public Monday said
design and construction costs of the
nuclear-powered submarine went
$56 million over budget last year.
And, it said, those are only the latest
in a series of cost runups and delays
that have made the Seawolf one of
the most controversial items in the
defense budget.
Both the Pentagon and the Elec-
tric Boat Division of General Dy-
namics Corp., which builds the
Seawolf in Groton, Conn., defended
the work being done on the first of
what President Clinton hopes will be
three vessels.
Frank Kendall, a Defense De-
partment acquisition official in
charge of tactical warfare programs,
said Electric Boat will meet its de-
livery date of May 1996 for the first
submarine.
"Since the GAO completed its
audit work, the shipyard has made
significant progress," Kendall Wrote
in response to the report,
Electric Boat said that this year,
workers have completed Seawolf's
pressure hull nine days ahead of
schedule, tested the nuclear propul-
sion plant and begun training the
crew.
The first Seawolf is already
bought'and paid for. But the report
by the GAO, the investigative arm
of Congress, is sure to intensify next
year's debate on whether to build a
third Seawolf.
Congress has already partially
funded that project and Clinton is
expected to seek $1.4 billion next
year to complete the vessel. The
price tag on the first Seawolf is ex-
pected to be about $2.4 billion. The
second and third would cost slightly
less.
Earlier this month the Senate
voted unanimously to impose a cost
cap of $4.76 billion on the first two
subs. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz.,
says he will propose killing the third
Seawolf next year on grounds the
money could be better used "to
counter the clear and present threats
of today's world."
The GAO blamed the rising costs
on technical problems, poor coordi-
nation between the Electric Boat
yard and Seawolf engineers at
Tenneco's Newport News (Va.)
Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., and
the reduced number of Seawolfs to
be built. Since the first sub was or-
dered in 1989, construction costs
have, risen 59 percent while design
costs more than doubled.
The GAO blamed the Navy for
$223.3 million in construction cost
increases since 1989. Those prob-
lems included "late and unsuitable
government-furnished design data"
and faulty welds that stemmed in
part from the Navy's choice of a
newer, heavier-grade steel for the
Seawolf.











_ Military News


Tropic Times
July 15, 1994


Court rules in base closure commission's favor


WASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces Information
Service) - A recent U.S. Supreme Court decision halts le-
gal challenges aimed at stopping military base closures in
the United States.
The court unanimously ruled the Defense Base Clo-
sure and Realignment Commission complied with set re-
quirements when it recommended Philadelphia Naval
Shipyard for closure. The Pennsylvania shipyard is one of
82 stateside installations the commission voted in 1991 to
close or realign.
Shipyard employees and their unions, members of
Congress from New Jersey and Pennsylvania, state offi-
cials from New Jersey, Delaware and Pennsylvania and
the city of Philadelphia challenged the closure and realign-
ment process in Dalton vs. Spencer. Pennsylvania Sen.
Arlen Specter argued the case before the Supreme Court.
Specter argued the Navy, DoD and the realignment
commission violated requirements of the Defense Base
Realignment and Closure Act of 1990. He also made sim-
ilar allegations regarding the commission's recommenda-
tions to then-President George Bush. In his arguments,
Specter claimed the commission used improper criteria,
failed to place certain information in the record until after
the close of public hearings, and held closed meetings with
the Navy.
In delivering the court's opinion, Chief Justice Will-
iam Rehnquist said for the court to review recommenda-
tions, the report must be a "final agency action."
Rehnquist said DoD's and the commission's reports were
merely recommendations and are not final. Therefore,
they not subject to review.
Rehnquist then added the president's actions, in turn,
are not reviewable because the president is not an agency.
"Where a statute, such as the 1990 act, commits decision
making to the discretion of the president, judicial review
of the president's decision is not available," he said.
Jim Courter, the former member of Congress who
chairs the independent closure and realignment commis-
sion, hailed the rulings as "a unanimous rejection of all


WASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces Informa-
tion Service) - U.S. military facilities at 27 European
sites will close or reduce operations, Defense Depart-
ment officials announced. Sites named are in Germany,
the Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark and the England.
In addition, seven other European sites changed sta-
tus. Five installations originally slated to remain open
at reduced levels will now close, while two or iginally
slated to close will remain open.
The Air Force returns three sites to host nations and
partially returns one. The Holstebro Contingency Hos-
pital in Denmark, the United Kingdom's Nocton Hall
Contingency Hospital and Alzey Communication An-
nex in Sembach, Germany, will return to host nation
control. The Suelm Annex in Bitburg, Germany, be-
come s a partial return.

legal challenges to the military base closure process."
"We are very hopeful that this decision will bring an
end to the litigation that attempts to invalidate the pro-
cess," Courter said. "We are relieved and are anxious to
turn our full attention to the important task of closing un-
necessary military bases."
Courter added the finality provision thwarts efforts to
halt the base closing process. "The tremendous savings
associated with base closures would be unnecessarily de-
layed or never realized at all," he said.
Under the current act, the commission has recommend-
ed closure of 164 U. S. military installations and realign-
ment of 93 others. Officials estimate net savings of $5.8
billion during fiscal 1992-1999 from these closures.
According to the base closure act, the closing process
starts with a DoD recommendation. The commission takes
those recommendations and conducts its own survey,
holds public hearings and compiles separate recommen-


Of the 27 sites announced, 23 are Army posts, with
20 located in Germany. Military communities in
Nuremberg, Fulda, Augsburg and Karlsruhe are hard-
est hit, with 13 of the 23 closures involving the four
cities.
In Nuremberg, the Army returns the Feucht Storage
Facility and the Erlangen, Herzogenaurach and
Patoriusstrasse housing areas. Herzo Base and the
Nuremberg hospital, earlier named as partial returns,
become full returns.
In the Fulda area the Army returns four sites in
Reiterswiesen. The sites include the military airfield,
ammunition storage area and two training areas.
In Karlsruhe the Army will close Gerszewski Bar-
racks and Neureut Barracks, while Germershiem Army
Depot becomes a partial return.

dations. The commission combines its findings with DoD
recommendations for a closing list.
Once completed, the commission's list goes to the
president, who must either approve or disapprove it in its
entirety. The president may not add, delete, upgrade or
downgrade any base on the list.
If the president disapproves, the commission has one
month to review its findings and resubmit. A second pres-
idential disapproval kills base closures for the round.
If the president approves, he forwards the list with a
certification of approval to Congress. Congress then has
45 days to vote a joint resolution of disapproval. Like the
president, Congress must accept or reject the list in its en-
tirety. If no action occurs, the closure begins immediately.
Bush approved and forwarded the commission's 199 1
findings to Congress. Base closure proceedings began af-
ter the House of Representatives rejected a proposed joint
resolution, 364-60.


Gay Navy aviator defends disclosure
WASHINGTON (AP) - For Navy Lt. the military by going public., mony, telling him, "You don't real
Tracy Thome, facing discharge for reveal- Lt. Peter Dutton, a Navy attorney, said know much about him (Thorne) at a
ing his homosexuality, the first day of his the Pentagon's general policy was "essen- once he leaves the doors of Jefferson PI
military hearing was bittersweet. tially unchanged" by the new regulations. za."
"It means a great deal to me to have my "A shift in focus is not new law," he said. Thorne violated military regulations
family here with me," Thome told report- Under Pentagon policy both before and wearing his uniform and "publicly attack
ers Monday during a break, indicating his after "don't ask, don't tell," homosexual ing the military" in the "Nightline" broa
mother and sister. But he also said he was conduct is grounds for discharge, Dutton cast, Dutton said.
sorry his father couldn't be there. Dr. said. People can be discharged for homo- Lt. Larry Burch, one ofThome's att(
Roscoe Thorne died in a private plane sexual acts or for making statements neys, insisted that .Thorne criticized t
crash two weeks ago in Florida. "demonstrating a propensity" to engage in Pentagon's policy on gays in the servi
Luther Zeigler, one of Thorne's attor- such acts. but did not attack the military. Wearing t
neys, said Dr. Thorne recently told him he Thome was placed on inactive reserve uniform on television was a "minor m
wanted to make a statement for his son at in May 1993, but the Clinton administra- conduct," Burch said.
the Navy Board of Inquiry hearing. Soon tion agreed in January to return him to ac- The board's decision on Thorne will
after, he was dead, Zeigler said in an inter- tive duty while it seeks to discharge him. reviewed by Navy Secretary John Daltc
view. A former member of the Navy's "Fly- Thorne's attorneys told reporters th


At Monday's hearing, Throne's law-
yers told the three-member board that the
Pentagon's new "don't ask, don't tell"
policy cannot be applied retroactively to
his case. Thome, 27, disclosed his homo-
sexuality on ABC's "Nightline" in May
1992.
The policy didn't take effect until last
February, Zeigler said.
But a Navy attorney contended Thorne
violated the government policy on gays in


ing Tigers" bomber squadron, Thome now
works on information systems at the Na-
val Air Systems Command in Arlington,
Va.
Thorne is "a hard-charging young lieu-
tenant" who is "really an exemplary lieu-
tenant as far as his professional ability to
do the job," Cmdr. Craig Luigart, Thorne's
commanding officer, testified at the hear-
ing.
But Dutton challenged Luigart's testi-


lly
.ll,
la-

by
ck-
ad-

or-
he
ce
he
is-

be
on.
ey


would go to federal court if he is dis-
charged.
A similar hearing was scheduled today
in Norfolk, Va., to review the Navy's bid
to discharge Lt. j.g. R. Dirk Selland.
Selland, 25, acknowledged his homo-
sexuality to his commanding officer the
day after President Clinton took office in
January 1993. He said he did so because
Clinton pledged to lift the ban on gays
serving openly in the military.


Lesbian colonel returns to National Guard


CAMP MURRAY, Wash. (AP) - Two
years after Col. Margarethe Cammermeyer
was kicked out of the National Guard for
being a lesbian, the highly decorated Viet-
nam veteran was back at her old job Satur-
day.
A federal court ordered her reinstate-
ment last month, ruling her discharge
based on her sexual orientation was uncon-
stitutional. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals in San Francisco refused to delay
that order July 7.
A smiling Cammermeyer, dressed in a
camouflage uniform, arrived in an white
Mercedes-Benz and entered the main gate
at Washington National Guard headquar-
ters, south of Tacoma.
She returned to her job as chief of nurs-
ing services for the 164th Mobile Army


Surgical Hospital. As a regular reservist,
her work obligation is two days per month
and a 15-day annual training mission. The
job pays about $12,000 a year.
"She has to catch up on some adminis-
trative things. She has to get a new ID card.
She has to get a physical because she's
overdue," Guard spokeswoman Donna
Hubbert said.
Guard commander Maj. Gen. Greg
Barlow asked Cammermeyer to report to
work Saturday after the appeals court re-
jected the Justice Department's latest ef-
fort to block her reinstatement.
"I never knew the military to move so
fast," Cammermeyer said in a telephone
interview. "I'm more disappointed that it's
taken two years to get here."
The Justice Department wanted her re-


instatement delayed until its appeal could
be heard, or at least until the court rules in
a similar case involving a homosexual
Navy sonar instructor.
The 52-year-old Cammermeyer is a 26-
year military veteran who was awarded the
Bronze Star as an Army nurse in Vietnam.
She was discharged involuntarily in
1992, three years after disclosing her sex-
ual orientation during security clearance
interview. The military had maintained a
longstanding ban on homosexuality until
its recent revision to the policy commonly
called "don't ask, don't tell."
A Justice Department spokeswoman,
reached Friday night in Washington, D.C.,
declined to comment. The government's
appeal of the initial reinstatement order re-
mains pending.


More overseas bases slated to close


Navy fighter crashes
in the Sea of Japan
TOKYO (AP) - A U.S. Navy
fighter jet crashed on the flight
deck of the carrier USS Kitty Hawk
during a night landing in the Sea of
Japan. The two crew members
were in satisfactory condition, the
Navy said Tuesday.
In San Diego, Tracy Jennings,
wife of radar intercept officer Lt.
Cmdr. David Jennings, said her
husband apparently injured his feet
after his parachute snagged on the
F-14 Tomcat's tail and he landed
hard on the deck.
The pilot, whose name was not
released, suffered second- to third-
degree burns, she said.
Navy spokesman Dave Harvell
could not confirm the injuries.
Texas gets first
'troop to teacher'
WASHINGTON, D.C. (Ameri-
can Forces Information Service) -
Army Sgt. Maj. Lazaro Ramirez is
the first servicemember to partici-
pate in the Troops to Teachers tran-
sition program.
Ramirez will work with the El
Paso, Texas, Independent School
District as an bilingual elementary
school teacher starting with the
1994-1995 school year. The De-
partment of Defense will provide
Ramirez with a stipend to help pay
for certification through the Uni-
versity of Texas at El Paso. In addi-
tion, DoD will grant the school dis-
trict $37,000 over five years to sub-
sidize Ramirez' salary.
Others interested in the program
can apply at installation education
centers or transition offices. For
more information call 1-800-452-
6616 or write to:
DANTES
6490 Saufley Field Rd.
Pensacola, FL 32509-
5243.










Tropic Times
July 15, 1994


Kobbe soldier loses


$950 on phone card


Unauthorized phone calls
A Fort Kobbe soldier reported that an
unknown person gained access to his
phone card and personal identification
number, and made unauthorized phone
calls totalling more than $950.
Military police remind everyone to
safeguard all types of credit cards. If you
become a victim of a crime, contact the
military police at 287-4401.

Military Police Liaison Office
The Military Police Liaison Office will
investigate accidents involving U.S. mili-
tary vehicles and personally-owned vehi-
cle accidents involving injuries which oc-
cur outside of military controlled areas.
This is limited to military personnel, their
family members and Department of De-
fense civilians.
If the liaison investigator is unable to re-
spond to the scene of the accident, the driv-
er involved should accept the court citation
and contact the MPL office with all the in-
formation concerning the incident.
If requested, a Military Police Liaison
Investigator will translate in court. Contact
the MPL Office at 287-4300/4363 for
more information.

60-day Jail Sentence
A Curundu resident observed a person
on his patio and confronted him. When the
person threatened one of the family mem-
bers, the resident chased the man and de-
tained him until the military police arrived.
The person was taken to court where he re-
ceived a 60-day jail sentence.
Report suspicious activity to the mili-


tary police at 287-4401/4402.
Child neglect
The military police want to remind all
people not to leave young children unat-
tended at any time. According to U.S.
Army Garrison Regulation 210-1, children
9 years old and younger must be accom-
panied by an adult or supervised by a re-
sponsible person 13 years or older at all
times. People caught violating this regula-
tion will be cited for child neglect.

Panama Jack Anonymous Hotline
Anyone with information concerning
drug smuggling should contact the Pana-
ma Jack Anonymous Hotline at 285-4185.

The following are crime statistics for
on-post housing areas during the week of
June 17-23:
Pacific
Corozal - 1 larceny of secured private
property
Curundu - 1 larceny of unsecured private
property - 2 attempted housebreakings
Cocoli - 1 larceny of unsecured private
property
Fort Amador - 1 housebreaking/larceny
of secured private property
Off post
El Dorado - 1 larceny of secured private
property
Atlantic


None reported

None reported.


Off post


Post office customer


wary of 'timeliness'
Dear Mayors' Corner: 'Mayors'_5Corner
Talk about quality of life. What was , .
someone thinking when they decided to
stop shipping weekly magazines to us in nately, the 24th Air Postal Squadroi
a timely manner? Getting Newsweek does not own the entire process. We
and Business Week are an important have the ultimate responsibility for the
way we all keep in touch with home. delivery of your mail once it reaches ou
When it was just Newsweek we Air Mail Terminal.
weren't getting, we wrote the magazine. For some reason, SAPS personnel
It has been three weeks since we got started putting time-value publication
Business Week and we have heard peo- in bulk sacks about 45 days ago. Whei
pie complaining at the post office. we realized what was happening, wi
I talked to the chain of command at alerted our Joint Military Postal Activi
the post office. I know the theory is to ty-Atlantic liaisons of the situation, so
save money and still get magazines out they could pass this on to their counter
about a week after people in the states. parts in U.S.Postal Service.
That, in itself, is a reduction in our We also elevated this concern to ou
quality of life - getting 10-day-old lead agency, the Military Postal Servic
news when the idea is to make Panama Agency. The former commander of th
as much like home as possible. The re- 24th Wing, Brig. Gen. David Sawyei
ality is worse. The publications are even wrote a letter outlining his con
much later and even the post office ad- cems about mail movement in the the
mits the problem is massive. ater to the executive director of MPSA
Are magazines really being shipped The bottom line is we are sensitive t
by container to arrive in six weeks? The concerns of our customers and have ele
post office thinks so while the master vated it to the general office level. Ou
sergeant denies it. I want to know the goal is to provide the best customer sei
truth, even more, I want to know how vice. We are seeing a decrease in time
the problem is going to be solved, not value publications shipped through bul
how people are "working on it." mail and are optimistic the transit time
Out of it in Panama for these will improve.
Editor's note: To submit question
Dear Out of It: to the Mayoral Congress, send letter
Capt. Karen Jordan, chief of Postal to: Mayors' Corner, Publicity Chair
Operations, said: The "someone" you person, APO AA 34004 (MPS). Ano
refer to who is not sending your maga- nymity will be granted upon request
zines in a timely manner works in the The Tropic Times reserves the right t
Unites States Postal Service. Unfortu- edit letters and responses for brevity


Dear editor:
After reading your "Readers respond to teachers/hous-
ing issue" (July 8, 1994), we simply must reply.
First of all, the Tropic Times must be seriously criti-
cized for including only letters that opposed the housing
move. Surely, in all the responses that you received on
this issue, at least one was an intelligently written letter
that supported the DoD decision. Considering the sensi-
tivity of this issue, I can only guess as to why the editor
chose to present only the negative viewpoint to the thou-
sands of Tropic Times readers. This is in our opinion a
severe misrepresentation of the general feeling regarding
this policy.
To "An American Civilian" we have several things to
say in response to your letter. To begin with, let us look
closely at the title "DoDDS teacher" or, more specifically,
"Department of Defense Dependents Schools teacher." By
definition, the role that DoDDS personnel have here in
Panama is to support servicemembers and their families,
who in turn support you with national security and de-
fense. Are you so arrogant (read naive) to assume that you
have a comparable role to these soldiers, sailors, airmen
and Marines? What do you "defend" during the course of
your duty day as a teacher? To put it bluntly, without sol-
diers you would have no job, and indirectly, you work for
soldiers.
With this said, we would like to address some of your


comments. It is hard to believe that a mature adult could
possibly believe that a four star general "...is doing his
utmost to take away all our (your) benefits..." and inten-
tionally "targeting civilians for the belt tightening." This
is a paranoid reaction to what was surely a difficult deci-
sion for Gen. McCaffrey to carry out. We say "carry out"
because to think that the general would have made a deci-
sion for the Department of Defense without at least their
input is beyond reality.
Also,. educator, ask yourself this: Who is better
equipped to deal with catastrophes such as lack of sleep,
electrical outages, or water shortages? Is it the adult teach-
er, secure in their position, supposedly learned in how to
handle crisis? Or is it their dependent student, a senior in
high school, who is studying for his finals or SAT test that
will affect his entire future. The answer is clear, and your
position is a selfish one.
If what you want is equality, then we invite you to
come stay with the single soldier in his barracks. Come
share his 10 by 20 hard tile floor and bunk beds. He will
gladly move his things out of the locker to make some
room for yours, You are welcome to use the shower stalls
in the common bathrooms anytime you like and join us
for dinner in the dining facility. And if you want to feel
exceptionally "equal," come on out to the jungle and do
some studies on the human aroma when not showered for
13 days. You say, "we volunteered for this." So did you.
To "Balboa Elementary sixth grade teacher," our reply
is short. It can be said that excellent people are usually
excellent at what they do. Excellent people make excel-


This authorized unofficial command information pub- Chief...............................Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor
location is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Editor..... ..................................Maureen Sampson
Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Sports Editor............................................ Sgt. Lori Davis
Information Program of the Department of Defense, un- Staff Editors......... ..........................Sgt. Cass Purdum
der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S. Spc. John Hall
Southern Command. Spc. Tom Findtner
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the Rosemary Chong
official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Student hires.......... ...................................Floyd Able
Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. Nishawne Moran
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Charlotte Souffront
Telephone 285-6612. Southern Command Public Affairs Office........... 282-4278
Commander in Chief.............Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey Command Information Officer.............Patrick Milton
Director, Public Affairs.......................Col. James L. Fetig U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.............287-3007
Public Affairs Officer ..............Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder


JTropic Times


lent soldiers, excellent people make excellent ditch dig-
gers and excellent people should make excellent teachers.
So, to answer your letter, an excellent teacher could deal
with it.
Spc. Eric T. Miller and Cpl. Andrew A. Cooper

Dear Spc. Miller and Cpl. Cooper:
Believe it or not, yours is the first letter we received
supporting the Army's decision - but not the only one.
Because of lack of space, we can't print every letter writ-
ten on this subject. For an official response to the ques-
tions raised about this decision, see Page 16.
Here at the Tropic Times, we try to give fair represen-
tation to the entire American community living in Panama,
military or civilian. We appreciate your taking the time to
tell another side of the story.
We won't be printing any more letters on this housing
issue, but we thank all of you who responded.

Maureen Sampson, Tropic Times editor

Dear editor:
I was reading the June 24 issue of the Tropic Times
and came across the section entitled Focus on Panama.
The purpose of this letter is to thank you for the section
called Panama News summary.
My family does not speak Spanish but are very much
interested in our surroundings. The local news helps us to
understand our environment more. Many thanks.
Mrs. Roy A. Gedeon

Command Information Officer.................Beth Taylor
Managing Editor..........................Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
Editor.... ............... ............ Sgt. Robin M antikoski
Journalist........................ .....Sgt. Eric Hortin

24th Wing Public Affairs Office.........................284-5459
Public Affairs Officer..............Capt. Warren L. Sypher
Public Affairs Superintendent
Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham
Journalists................................ Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
Sgt. James A. Rush
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office..............283-5644
Public Affairs Officer...........................Diane Gonzalez
Photographer
Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor
U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic..........................289-4312
NCOIC......................................... Sgt. Richard Em ert


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_ _Commentary


Tropic Times 7
July 15, 1994


Women in combat


People on both sides of issue are entitled to their opinions


by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
USARSO Public Affairs Office
Allowing women into combat jobs has been in
the news for some time now. Even though the
idea of women in combat is gaining more
acceptance, many people are still against it. Everyone
has their own opinions and personal reasons for how
they feel.
I have been involved in many conversations over
lunch tables, coffee cups and just standing around
shooting the breeze about the subject. I am inundated
with various reasons as to why or why not women
should be allowed into combat jobs.
Most reasons I hear for both sides have merit and are
well thought out, intelligent opinions. I feel everyone is
entitled to their opinions, as long as they are well
thought out and intelligent - not based on old fashioned
stereotypes and outdated prejudices.
I'm thankful to say that I really haven't run into that
all that much, but it is still out there.
You know the old thinking like, "Women are the
fairer sex and shouldn't be expected to be in combat
killing and being killed." Such thoughts as, "Women are
the weaker sex and would never be able to survive on
the battle field."
For those of you who have this type of opinion, read
on - you might learn something. Now, don't get the
wrong idea and think this is only aimed at men, it isn't. I
have heard women out there with this same type of
thinking.
I'm not saying all women are cut out to be on the
front lines, they aren't - but neither are all men. I'm
also not saying all women should be allowed into
combat jobs, only those who can do it. What I am saying
is that those who are cut out for it and can do it should
be allowed the choice. Personally, it isn't something I
would opt to do, but for those who want to and can, they
should be allowed.
Now, many people have concerns as to how this
integration will work in a battlefield environment. There
are certain "needs" a woman has that just can't be met
on a battlefield. Things like bathroom facilities and
shower facilities - we all know a woman can't go one
day without a shower.
I don't know about most of you, but if I were on a
battlefield with the enemy shooting at me, having my
own personal bathroom and shower would be the last
thing on my mind. I.have been in field environments


where bathrooms and showers have been scarce, but I
have managed.
Granted, I didn't care much for crawling, eating and
sleeping in the dirt for days without a shower, but I
managed as anyone would. What, do men enjoy
battlefield conditions? Do men need bathrooms and
showers any less than women?
Like I said before - it all depends on the person,
man or woman.
Now, for a little history lesson. Women have been on
the front lines of combat since the beginning of time.
Through my research, I have found women military
leaders as far back as 39 AD. It was then that Trung Trac
and her sister Trung Nhi of Vietnam physically led the
first uprising in their country against the Chinese. To
this, day they are revered as heroes in their country's
history.
In the 1760s, the Russian empress, Catherine II,
borrowed a man's uniform, jumped on a horse and led
the rebel regiments in a coup.
Women have died in combat for centuries - as was
the case of the Rani of Jhansi, Lakshmi Bai of India. She
was killed leading her men in a battle to defend a fortress
from British assault in Gwalior in 1858.
In our own country's history such women as
Margaret Corbin and Mary Ludwig Hays McCauly
manned cannons when their husbands fell during battles
in the Revolutionary War.
Though Corbin and McCauly weren't actually
soldiers, Deborah Sampson and Sarah Emma Evelyn
Edmonds were. They disguised themselves as men,
joined the forces and fought valiantly in combat - on
the front lines as infantrymen.
Sampson, who enlisted in 1782 with the 4th Massa-
chusetts Regiment, fought in many battles and was
wounded several times before she was discovered and
forced out of the military. She did, however, collect
veterans disability pension and is the only genuine
woman veteran of the Revolutionary War.
Edmonds joined the Army shortly after the outbreak
of the Civil War with Company F, 2nd Michigan
Infantry. She took part in such battles as Blackburn's
Ford, Bull Run and the Pennsylvania Campaign. She
even went on to become aid to Col. Orlando Poe and
also earned the right to a military pension.
In more recent history, women have flown aircraft
during World War II, often coming under attack.
Women were also taken prisons of war in the Philip-
pines by the Japanese and, under terrible conditions,


survived to freedom. Though most of these women
weren't actually in the military nor were they in combat
jobs, they came into combat situations and came through.
Even those women who served in the military in
"traditional" jobs, often came into combat situations and
were sometimes needed on the front lines. In both Korea
and Vietnam, women often came under fire, many being
killed.
Our most recent cases were during Desert Shield and
Desert Storm. Women did their jobs, fought when
needed, and some were even captured or killed doing
their jobs during this battle - even though their jobs
weren't "combat" jobs.
With today's firepower, does it really matter if a
woman is in the rear as a nurse or on the front lines as a
meddic? Does it matter if she drives a truck full of
ammunition to the front lines or is there to help use it?
Granted, being on the front lines would not be my first
choice, but in many jobs, such as journalism, we may not
have a choice. Besides, does it really matter who is
snapping the shutter?
With a shrinking Army, we may not have a choice.
The Army has seen and survived changes throughout
its history that many thought would never happen. Racial
integration, women into the regular Army and now this.
It may be a bumpy ride, but we will survive as we
always do. After all, this is the United States Army.


I DietQoe


Should women be allowed to serve on combat duty?

- ,.- 71 � M � -a, I2,- =


"Of course, why not?
Soldiers like us get paid
the same for the same
rank. They shouldn't be
exempt."

Sgt. 1st Class
Aquilino Pizzarro
Headquarters Company,
41st Area Support Group


"If they want to, yes.
Women want to be
liberated, if they're in
the Army, they should
go to combat like any
other soldier."
Sgt. Eduardo Gonzalez
U.S. Army Medical
Department Activity


"Sure, why not? If men "Yes, definitely. In the
can do it, women can Air Force they should
too." be allowed to go in
combat. Women are
very capable."


Spc. Tara Terrell
308th Military Intelligence
Battalion


Tech Sgt. Yolanda Pittman
Defense Mapping Agency


"Yes, it's equally fair.
This issue has been long
misunderstood."


Staff Sgt. Rob Holmes
135th Airlift Squadron


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries - or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit
for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.







Tropic Times
July 15, 1994




Under construction


Citizen-soldiers fix Guatemalan countryside


1st Lt. Richard Blandy
109th Public Affairs Detachment
SABADILLA, Guatemala - The sound of heavy
construction machinery run by National Guard
engineers calling to each other in New York accents
must have seemed strange to the Mayan Indians
who make up most of the population here.
The construction in Guatemala is part of"Fuertes
Caminos-North," a U.S. military humanitarian
exercise in Latin America.
"Fuertes Caminos," a Spanish phrase meaning
"strong roads," is one of the U.S. Southern
Command's biggest training and nation-assistance
projects in Central America. Much of the work is
done by Reserve and Guard soldiers and airmen
performing their annual training obligations.
Each Guard engineer unit builds a portion of the
roads or bridges and prepares the site for the next
rotation. All construction equipment belongs to the
task force and is at the site when the Guard troops
arrive.
Members of the New York Army National
Guard's Company A, 152nd Engineer Battalion of
New York City recently traveled to the Central
Highlands of Guatemala to help build six miles of
road and improve 10 more. They also helped build
four timber trestle bridges. The dynamic landscapes
and rugged mountain terrain of the Central High-
lands posed staggering engineering difficulties for
Company A.
Company A's main task was to pour the concrete
foundation and reinforce abutment walls and pier
walls of the second bridge going up the mountain.
This required much strenuous work, said I st Lt.
Eduardo Martinez, Company A's 3rd Platoon
leader.
"We're basically a light engineering unit, not a


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construction engineering unit, so this is our first time
ever doing this," said Martinez, a construction worker
from New York City. "We'll make the forms to pour
the concrete. It consists of a lot of 'rebar' and wood
construction, carpentry and basic concrete mixing and
pouring. We're kind of rough around the edges, but
we're learning as we go along."
"The men are motivated because they're using a lot
of tools they don't always get the chance to use," he
added. "As long as the men are working they're
happy. They know it's for a good purpose. It's for the
people of Guatemala and they're motivated for that
reason alone."
The bridge is 30-feet-long and will support up to 60
tons. An old bridge at the site was poorly made and
fell down a long time ago, Martinez said.
The men of the 152nd held contests while they
worked to see who could drive three-foot spikes with a
sledge hammer into the large timbers spanning the
bridge in the least amount of swings.
Spc. Angel Pagan of New York City, a combat
engineer with the 152nd, often won these contests.
"It's a great learning experience," Pagan said. "The
next time we do something like this we'll be able to
do it faster and more efficiently."
Sgt. Richard Kmitch of Buffalo, a member of
Headquarters Detachment of the 152nd in Buffalo,
said safety is a major concern for everyone in Com-
pany A. Everyone working on the bridge must wear a
hard hat, goggles and drink plenty of water.
"It's different from anything we've done before,"
Kmitch said. "There's a lot of on-the-job training."
Many Sabadilla residents and several Guatemalan
soldiers who served as guards watched the men of the
152nd as they worked on the bridge.
"It is happiness to have such a highway and bridge
because before this it took 10 hours to walk to town,"
Lucio Cuc Sun, an elder resident of Sabadilla, said


through an interpreter. "I feel magnificent to have
them here to help us build this highway."
Cpl. Mike McFall of Lockburn said building
bridges in Guatemala was a great personal experi-
ence. "This is the second site I've been to," he said.
"I went to Coban (a town north of Sabadilla) and
finished work on a couple of schools. It makes you
feel pretty good because when you talk to the
soldiers and the people down here, you find out they
really need this stuff. They really need it and they
really appreciate it."
Lt. Col. Frank Fantasia, deputy commander of
Task Force Dirigo of the 94th U.S. Army Reserve
Command, said Guard engineers often passed
through the small town of Sabadilla on their way to
the roads and bridges. One of the first things Guard
soldiers learned when they arrived was the children
of Sabadilla didn't have many school supplies -
Guatemalan children can't attend school unless they
have a pencil and something to write on.
Returning units brought word of this back to the
United States and the arriving units started bringing
pencils and school supplies for the children.
Fantasia said the various engineering units have
found enough scrap supplies from the other projects
to build a school in Sabadilla. This was not on the
original list of projects, but the engineers have
volunteered to build the school.
"They (U.S. soldiers) are put into an environment
where they have a real mission to accomplish,"
Fantasia said. "In many cases, some of our engineers
have never had the chance to work with mortar and
brick and to build schools and bridges."
Fantasia said the morale for the exercise was
fantastic and the troops left with a real feeling of
satisfaction. He said beside providing Guatemala
with valuable assistance, the members of the 152nd
have received some valuable training..


Theater Suppo rt Element photo by Spc. Jayne Jackson " " - " . "
Spc. Steve Spicknall hands tools up to Staff Sgt. Brian . . -.
Barnhill, both of Company B, 5th Battalion, 159th Aviation - - .
Regiment, Fort Meade, Md. during annual training at La -. -... . . : - .
Aurora International Airport in Guatemala City as part of - - .,.- - - * -
"Fuertes Caminos." --'�.. -






Members of New York Army National Guard's Company A, 152nd Engineer Battalion drive


A










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Member
wall for
"Fuerte


INI





Tropic Times O
July 15, 1994 r


"It makes you feel pretty good because
when you talk to the soldiers and the people
down here, you find out they really need this
stuff. They really need it and they really
appreciate it."

Cpl. Mike McFall
152nd Engineer Battalion


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Theater Support Element photo by Spc Jayne A Jackson
of the New York Army National Guard and Guatemalan military erect a
he Chitul school in the Alta Verapaz province of Guatemala as part of
Caminos-North."


Theater Support Element photo by Spc. Jayne A. Jackson
Sgt. 1st Class Phillip Ceaser discusses Central American Highway 5 improvements
with another Maine Army National Guard soldier in Salama, Guatemala.


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STheater Support Element photo by 1s Lt. Orchard Blany


ikes into the timbers of a bridge they built in the central highlands of-Guatemala.
- a

- Theater Support Element photo by 1st Lt. Richard Blanoy
ikes into the timbers of a bridge they built in the central highlands of Guatemala.


Theater Support Element photo by 1st Lt. Richard Blandy
New York City National Guardsman 1st. Lt.
Eduardo Martinez talks with another engineer
from the 152nd Engineer Battalion while
building a bridge in Guatemala.


mI










10 Tropic Times
SJuly 15, 1994


Milestones


The following U.S. Southern Command Army majors
were selected for lieutenant colonel:
Juan Cardenas, Robert Cox, Stephen Donehoo, Orlan-
do Fernandez, Jerome Haggins, Maria Hain, Troy Lovett,
Hubert Newman, Virgil Priestly, Simeon Trombitas and
Bruce Yost.

To Sergeant First Class - Sharon Hodges of 56th Signal
Battalion.

To Sergeant - Gerry Spivey and Herman Wilson of 56th
Signal Battalion. Kenneth Smith of 154th Signal Battal-
ion. Daniel Mangel and Tremeyne Smith both of 3rd Spe-
cial Operations Support Command (Airborne).

To Specialist - Cynthia Cobb and Michael Payne of 154th
Signal Battalion.

To Private First Class - Emilio Hernandez III and
Michael Strasz of 154th Signal Battalion.



Meritorious Service Medal - Maj. Maria Cabrera, Capt.
Beverly McCormick, Sgt. 1st Class Diane Anderson, Sgt.
Arthur Holguin, Maj. Stacy Roth, Capt. Deborah Wessloh
and Staff Sgt. Michael Nicholson, all of U.S. Army Med-
ical Activity-Panama. Capt. Hung Nguyen of Headquar-
ters Company, 193rd Infantry Brigade (Light). Lt. Col.
Charles Lee, Maj. Nathaniel Stevenson and Maj. Kevin
Wendell, all of 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry (Light). Staff
Sgt. Douglas Seeks of 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th In-
fantry.

Army Commendation Medal - Spc. Barbara Jarboe of
U.S. Army Medical Activity-Panama. Capt. Winfort
Steward III, Staff Sgt. Charles Davis, Sgt.Reginald
Collins, Sgt. Eric Powell, Spec. Jefferey Slater, Spec.
Christopher Spaugy, all of 56th Signal Battalion. 1st Lt.
Tammy Pankratz, Staff Sgt. John Gomez and Sgt. James
Proctor, all of 154th Signal Battalion. Staff Sgt. Timothy
Cadle, Staff Sgt. Robert Hott, Sgt. Carlos Miranda, Spec.
Richard Morris, 1st Lt. Andrew Olsen, Cpl. Robert Peo-
ples, Capt. Walter Piatt, Spc. Jason Pyle, Maj. Robert
Scruggs, Staff Sgt. Vincente Vazquez, Sgt. 1st Class
Wiliam Veguilla, Spc. Robert Ward, Maj. Mark Wolfe,
all of Headquarters Company, 193rd Infantry Brigade
(Light). Sgt. Jeffery Adams, Sgt. Derek Cuvellier, Staff
Sgt. Karl Gay, Sgt. 1st Class Lavern Hovey, Staff Sgt.
Donald Lechel, Sgt. Charles Manchester, Spec. Steven
McCormick Sgt. John Mincey, Sgt. Kevin Rowland, Staff
Sgt. William Secules, Staff Sgt. Scott Shiver, Capt. James
Skidmore, Sgt. Edgar Soto, Staff Sgt. George Stefanski,
Staff Sgt. Terrence West, Sgt. David Wilson, all of 59th
Engineer Company. Spc. Eric Askew, Spec. Christian
Campese, 1st Lt. Bernhard Christianson, Sgt. 1st Class
William Coleman, Spc. Frank Espinoza, Staff Sgt. Anto-
nio Flores, Sgt. Ricky Fowler, Spc. Brennan Fox, 1st Lt.
Patrick Harvey, Staff Sgt. Byron Knox, Sgt. Hector
Maffia, Cpl. Christopher McLaughlin, 1st Lt. Laney Mill-
er, Staff Sgt. Albert Mouton, Cpl. Donald Purnell, Sgt. 1 st
Class Gregory Reid, Sgt. Jose Rivers, Sgt. Corey
Smallwood, Sgt. DeWayne Smith, Sgt. hemdatt Sukham,
all of 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Sgt. Steven Armstrong,
Sgt. Julio Bensimon, Staff Sgt. Mark Byrd, Staff Sgt. Brett
Campbell, Staff Sgt. Kevin Crice, Sgt. Scott Duffey, Staff
Sgt. David Goodwin, Sgt. 1st Class Tom Graves, Staff
Sgt. Shawn Henschen, Sgt. Michael Holmes, Staff Sgt.
John jackson, Spec. David Klaus, Sgt. Andrew Kocsis,
Staff Sgt. Christopher Lee, Sgt. Jonathan McBride, Staff
Sgt. Gary Mills, Sgt. William Nanse, Spc. David
Narducci, Spc. Darrell Paterson, Sgt. JefferyPauch, Staff
Sgt. Juan Perez, Sgt 1st Class John Price, Spc. Juan Wood,
all of 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry.

Army Achievement Medal - Sgt. 1st Class Kenneth
Roach, Staff Sgt. Alphonso Boards and Capt. Nancy Bard,
all of U.S. Army Medical Activity-Panama. Sgt. George
Ballard of 3rd Special Operations Support Command.
Cpl. John Keenan and Pfc. Tracy Lewis of 56th Signal
Battalion. Spc. Jonathan Frazier, Spc. Ryan Ickes, Spc.
Wesley Speaks and Spc. Brian Spence, all of 154th Sig-
nal Battalion. Spc. Jonathan Chance, Capt. Daniel
Goodale, Spc. Peter Metz, Sgt. Christopher Owens, Capt.
Walter Piatt, Pfc. Kenneth Reno, Sgt. Ernest White, Sgt.
Darryl Woodfolk, all of Headquarters Company, 193rd
Infantry Brigade (Light). Pvt.2 Mateo Avala, Spec. Jim-
my Chambless, Staff Sgt. Paul Colby, Pfc. Johnny Fulks,
Cpl. Nathan Greenleaf, Pvt.2 Jason Hall, Sgt. Robert
Hughes, Spec. Carl Kinkel, Staff Sgt. David Linvig, Pvt.2
Brian Loop, Spec. Daniel Moore, Sgt. Donald Parker,
Pvt.2 Dennis Pease, Sgt. Owen Rice, Sgt. William
Santoro, Spc. Eric Sloate, Spc. Andrew Sorge, Sgt. Kevin
Stafford, Pvt.2 Brian Walker, Cpl. Johnny Ward, Pfc. Jo-


seph Weinzapfel, Sgt. Jody Werkheiser and Staff Sgt.
Terrence West, all of 59th Engineer Company. Sgt.
Fredrick Dela Cruz of 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Sgt.
Tracy Irvin of 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry.

Certificate of Achievement - Sgt. Michael Schultz, Spc.
Jade Bourke, Spc. Kevin Norman and Spc. Gary Ryan,
all of 56th Signal Battalion. Pvt. Donald Forehand, Pvt.
Phillip Smith, Spc. Mark Stewart and Spc. Eric
Vongundun, all of 59th Engineer Company. Pvt. Joseph
Jenkins, Spc. Aaron McIntosh, Pfc. Austin Norris and Pvt.
Collin Walker, all of 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry.Safety
Award of Merit - Sgt. Michael Rone of 3rd Special Oper-
ations Support Command.



Basic Noncommissioned Officers' Course - Sgt. George
Ballard and Sgt. Tremeyne Smith both of 3rd Special Op-
erations Support Command.



The U.S. Army Jungle Operations Training Battalion
Dining Facility here was named the runner-up for the
small garrison category of the 1994 Philip A. Connelly
Awards Competition.
Representatives from the dining facility and U.S. Army
South will attend the Connelly Awards ceremony Aug.
21-24 in San Antonio.
The Connelly program was established in 1968 to rec-
ognize excellence in Army Food Service.
The JOTB Dining Facility was selected to represent
USARSO during post level competition and was evaluat-
ed in June by judges from the International Food Service
Executives Association and Department of the Army.
The dining facility was judged on various aspects of
food service which included administration, training, din-
ing facility quality, atmosphere and sanitation. Judging
was based on a 1,000-point scale on these categories.

Employee of the Quarter - Maj. Eric Franks, Maj.
Reymundo Lariosa, Chief Warrant Officer 2 Gary Klein,
Spc. David Hudson, Spc. Andrew Plumbtree, Soledad
Delgado, Marva Pringle, Angel Alvarado, Walckiria
Kieswetter and Alma Gonzalez, all of U.S. Army Medi-
cal Activity-Panama.

Drake Sprague of Troop 20 received his Eagle Scout dur-
ing an Eagle Court of Honor.

Company B, 193rd Support Battalion received the Com-
manding General's Physical Training Streamer with an
average of 261.96. The unit tested May 11. Chief Warrant
Officer 2 Willie Moye and Staff Sgt. Hipolito Gonzalez
received a 300 PT score.

Midshipman Craig Fishbough, a graduate of Balboa High
School, received the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy's
Silver Star for Academic Achievement. Fishbough also


earned his first varsity letter playing shortstop for the Mar-
iners, the Academy's baseball team.



Years of Service - 55 Years: John Hannaman of Direc-
torate of Engineering and Housing. 35 Years: Carol Scott
of Directorate of Engineering and Housing. 30 Years: Jose
Balmaceda and Eduardo Morgan of Directorate of Engi-
neering and Housing; Tomas Palacio of Directorate of
Community Activities; Arnold Rodriguez of Tobyhana
Army Depot. 25 Years: Caroline Calvo and Alan
Lawrence both of U.S. Army Medical Activity - Panama;
Maria Wallace of 56th Signal Battalion. 10 Years: Ricasio
Johnson of U.S. Army Medical Activity - Panama; Rich-
ard Peck of 56th Signal Battalion. 5 Years:Arturo Garcia
and Regino Gil of 56th Signal Battalion.

Sustained Superior Performance - Richard Chastain,
Jose Gonzalez, Carmen Castrellon, Linda Garman,
Roberto Stevenson, Jorge Solis and Rene Saucedo, all
from the 56th Signal Battalion.

Quality Step Increase - Juana Martinez of U.S. Army
Medical Activity-Panama.

Employee of the Quarter - Eric Ulloa, Enrique Sterling,
Douglas Akers, Susana Cantillo, Ingrid Pariente, Agnes
Flores, Soledad Delgado, Marva Pringle, Angel Alvarado,
Walckiria Kieswetter and Alma Gonzalez, all of U.S.
Army Medical Activity - Panama. Diogenes Rodriguez of
Directorate of Engineering and Housing. Doralys Rivera
of Directorate of Civilian Personnel.

Customer Service Award - Joan Rodriguez of Director-
ate of Community Activities; Army Career and Alumni
Program, Fort Clayton.

Cash Awards - Juan Rodriguez and Michelle Hunter,
both of U.S. Army Medical Activity-Panama. Ana
Chiquilani, Roy Matsunaga, Helene Robinson, Leonard
Wickham and Lyle Wickham of Directorate of Civilian
Personnel. Dorothy Cornwell, Jose Vega and Hubert
Walsh from Deputy Chief of Staff-Resource Manage-
ment. Alenandria Brathwaite from Directorate of Engi-
neering and Housing. Sandra Jicha from Directorate of
Plans, Training and Mobilization. Patricia Flynn from Pro-
tocol Office.

Promotion - Juan Rodriguez, Gloria Manfredo, Marcela
Moralez, Ingrid Ollar and Ashton Brooks, all from U.S.
Army Medical Activity - Panama.

Achievement Medal for Civilian Service - Robert Appin
and Toni Williams-Sanchez from Army Career and Alum-
ni Program, and Mara Cornejo and Sonja Kandrin from
Military Police Command

Time-off Award - Rebecca Fentress from Directorate of
Community Activities.


- ,--
"I . ' " *-'



























Members of the board Courtesy photo
The newly elected members of the Howard/Albrook Officers' Spouses Club Board are from
left: recording secretary Sarah Payne, welfare treasurer Barb Estill, first vice president Tom
McCarthy, president Chrystal Abair, second vice president Julie Fannie, corresponding
secretary Paulette Middleton and general treasurer Becky McCampbell.


^---<





































































Panamanian children dance at a school's o


Local civil officials greet Tech. Sgt. Reyes

Local civil officials greet Tech. Sgt. Reyes


SiP feature lTropic Times
nre July 15, 1994Sabog




































ZHOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA)-Ninety Air Force
SReservists from Portland, Ore., recently deployed here for
,Vol
















Staff Sgt. Wayne Goodard, utiities specialist,
mixes concrete for the clinic floor.













SPanamanian communities and on the island of Saboga.
The majority of the force, 86 men and women, belong
to the 939th Civil Engineering Squadron. Four others are


that operates out of the city's international airport.
Engineers and medics deployed in two increments of
about 45 people each for two weeks stints. This allowed
them to complete several complex projects that could not
....have been accomplished in a single two-week period, said
Capt. Daniel Grassnick, commander of the second
deployment.
Many projects were community service work in five
local villages and two projects within the former canal
zone. Most of the work involved school facilities, such as
roof and structural repairs, lighting and electrical installa-
tions, drainage and site improvements, and enhancement
of kitchens and eating facilities, Grassnick said. Another
project involved repairs to a medical clinic several miles
U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Steve McNally from Fort Clayton.
opening ceremony. "A valuable by-product of the work performed in these
communities is the acceptance and positive image the local
. . - people gain of the United States military," Grassnick said.
"The local civic leaders and citizens have expressed
S: their appreciation and gratitude, and for many of us, this
' has provided all the job satisfaction and motivation we
needed," he said.
Air Force civil engineer units use deployments like
''''these to provide training Base Engineer Emergency Forces

This most recent deployment has been extremely
successful at providing valuable work experience while at
the same time benefiting local communities, Grassnick

-- '"Training opportunities such as this one provide unit
members with the chance to work on complete projects
together as a team, and see the end results of their efforts
in a completed project," Grassnick said.
S '"I've been impressed with all the unit members'
Acceptance of the challenges presented to them, the
. ingenuity demonstrated to meet those challenges, and
. dedication exhibited, which has exceeded all our expecta-
tions," he said.
Because many members of the deployed force are
Employed in construction trades or associated industries as
Civilians, they were accustomed to working with estab-
S.lished building codes and being able to get materials at a
Local construction supply store. They soon learned this was
not the case in Panama.
"In the communities where the teams were, they had to
make their work conform to the local customs and
. . _r. ' practices, Grasnick said. "Many team members expressed
i'1! a high level of satisfaction at being able to complete the
"i "- *"'. projects using non-standard methods and still have a very
US Air Force photo by Senior Airman Steve McNally professional-looking end product that shows a high quality
Placencia, an electrician, of craftsmanship."










1 2Tropic Times
1 July 15, 1994


H history


9 &


^- "r- -


July 1944




Brett hails Fourth of July as solemn observance


FORT CLAYTON - The following are significant
World War II events that took place during July 1944:
July 3
Soviet troops take Minsk and capture 100,000 German
soldiers.
July 4
Lt. Gen. George H. Brett, commanding general of
the Panama Canal Department and the Caribbean
Defense Command, hails the Fourth of July as a day
of solemn observance, not only for the people of the
United States, but also for the peoples of Central and
South America who are joined with the U.S. in conti-
nental solidarity for the defense of the Western Hemi-
sphere.
July 6
A group of 81 General Service Navy Recruits begin
active duty according to an announcement from Na-
val District Headquarters. Of these, 78 are from the
Isthmus, two from Nicaragua and one from Costa
Rica. The first Panamanian to enter was 18-year old
Efrain Escalona from the province of Los Santos.
July 7
Pfc. Kenneth 0. Stubbs is awarded the Soldier's Med-
al at a formal review held at the Army's Sixth Air Force
base in the Galapagos Islands for outstanding heroism in
risking his life to save a comrade from drowning.
July 8
Col. James L. Craig, C.A.F., arrives in the Panama
Canal Department on direct assignment from the of-
fice of the Secretary of War to serve as Soldier Voting
Officer on the staff of the commanding officer, Lt.
Gen. Brett. Col. Craig has served two previous tours
of duty in Panama.
July 9
Brett publically lauds Warrant Officer Benjamin
C. Dunford, Jr., for his arrangement for the massed
band concert in Balboa Stadium on July Fourth.
Bundord, leader of the 4th Coast Artillery Band, was
in charge of the concert of combined bands of the
Army, Navy, the Republic of Panama, and the Pana-
ma Police, comprising more than 200 musicians.
Members of Post 1, Balboa American Legion, as-
semble to honor 26 of their fellow Legionnaires who
fought in World War I and are now serving again dur-
ing World War II.
July 10
Saipan falls to U.S. forces after 25 days of hard fight-
ing. Upward of 25,000 Japanese soldiers are killed, some
2,359 American die and more than 11,000 are wounded.


July 12
For tenatiously applying artificial respiration to an
unconscious comrade at Farfan Beach, three Mobile
Force soldiers are commanded by F. H. Wang, execu-
tive secretary of the Panama Canal Department for
their action. The three soldiers are Cpl. B.E.
Brodwing, Cpl. John E. McGintee and Pfc, Alexander
J. McCoy, all of Capt. Pettit's Signal unit of Mobile
Force.
July 13
Sixty-two enlisted men and nine officers of the
Coast Artillery Command sail through the "Big
Ditch" aboard a Coast Artillery mine planter. This is
the first in a series of such trips planned by the orien-
tation section of Col. Frederick A. Mountford's har-
bor defense organization "to acquaint the men with
the waterway they are defending."
July 14
It is announced that the Naval Air Transport Ser-
vice, in less that 36 hours, recently flew the two heavi-
est single items ever carried by air between the United
States and the Panama Canal Zone and thereby kept
vital fuel supplies flowing to the Navy's Task Force 58,
and at the same time preventing threatened serious in-
terruption to tanker production. The items carried
were main turbine engine rotors, each weighing over
10,000 pounds.

The Fort Kobbe Serve Unit played host to the
Patriettes at a novel Dinner-Dance. Tropics, palm
trees and glamour were shelved and "Main Street"
was carted to Panama in all its simplicity. There were
street signs, the Bijou and box office, a subway, a
newstand, and a barber shop.
July 15
The War Department announces in Washington
that Lt. Gen. Ben Lear was assigned to the command
of the Army Ground Forces. (Gen. Lear served a two-
year tour as Commanding General of the Pacific Sec-
tor and later of the Panama Mobile Force and left the
Isthmus in 1940.)
Sixty-one soldiers in anti-aircraft and harbor de-
fense batteries of the Coast Artillery Command are
promoted.
July 16
Naval authorities in Balboa announce the loss of a
Navy blimp in Caribbean waters. However, no enemy
action was involved as the blimp was forced down at
sea during a routine patrol flight.


July 18
Cabinet of Japanese Premier General Tojo falls and a
new one is formed under Kuniaki Koiso.
July 19
Army authorities announce that men and officers from
battlefronts will tell their personal experiences in a special
series of Mobile Force Orientation lectures designed to
bring first hand accounts of the world conflict.
Seven men are promoted to the rank of corporal in
the Coast Artillery Command, six in an anti-aircraft
gun battalion and one in an automatic weapons bat-
tery.
July 20
Acting Department War Bond officer discloses that
cash sales of United States War Savings Bonds and
Stamps to military personnel in the Panama Canal De-
partment during the month of June totaled
$285,414.35, the highest figure yet reached in any of
the previous War Bond Drives, and $85,500 more than
the total of cash sales for the two months of the fourth
War Loan Drive.
July 21
U.S. Marines and Army land on Guam.
July 23
A WAVE, the first servicewoman soldier from the
Mobile Force had ever seen, aside from the Army
nurses, cause the men to forget chow. Lt. Otilda Gray,
an officer of the Women's Reserve, U.S. Naval Re-
serve, dropped in to pay a friendly visit to Sgt. John
Densford of Headquarters Detachment, Panama Mo-
bile Force, and soon found herself surrounded by sev-
eral hundred soldiers. (She had promised the ser-
geant's sister she would check up on him when she
came to the Canal Zone.)
July 25
A breakout at St. Lo, France, by the U.S. First Army
under Gen. Omar Bradley leads to the collapse of the Ger-
man line in northwestern France. (Operation Cobra).
July 30
More than 1,100 former Panama Canal Company
and Railroad employees had entered the Armed Ser-
vice by July according to a list compiled by the Ad-
ministrative Branch. The Mechanical Division topped
the list with 176, the special Engineering Division was
next with 122, and the Municipal Division third with
119.
Editor's note: This timeline was compiled by
Dolores De Mena, USARSO historian, in commemo-
ration of the 50th Anniversary of WWII.


A&A-Aft

71a
















July 15, 1994


Sports

Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 13


.j~.*** ..~


Department of Defense photo by Sgt. Lori Davis
The Dog Pound's Freddy Epting (left) and the Jazz's Ray Lesene go after the
ball.


I ata Arts PageI


Hoops




Short teams


stretch season


by Sgt. Lori Davis
Tropic Times sports editor
FORT CLAYTON - The little guys
rocked the house at Reeder Physical
Fitness Center Tuesday night, battling
for position in the 5'10" and under
basketball championship tournament.
Rising to the occasion were the
Jazz, the Nets and the A Team. The
Jazz and Nets had to earn their playoff
positions, but A Team took the easy
way up the brackets when not a single
player from II Tuffshowed at the gym.
The tufff' guys were too busy work-
ing to come out and play, their coach
said.
The last game of the evening may
have passed without any action, but
the opener between the Jazz and the
Dog Pound had plenty to spare.
Edwin Brown got things going for
the Jazz, sinking three baskets, and
Ray Maxie contributed to the effort
with two baskets of his own.
But it was Shaffer Clark who was
making music for the Jazz. Clark pow-
ered his way into the paint and nailed
five baskets in the first half.
The Dog Pound fought back, but
their one-man bench gave little room
for flexibility. Alton Alexander and
Chris Thompson chalked up two buck-
ets each, but the dominant Dog was
Eric Collier with three baskets, a three-
pointer and two field goals.
The Jazz had the worn out Dogs
panting at the half with a 29-19 score.
The Jazz kept Collier away from
the hoop in the second half, holding
him to eight points, but Thompson
compensated with three baskets and a
three-pointer to help bring the Dog
Pound back.
The Dog Pound kept Jazz from
scoring from the floor, but the fouls
they racked up trying to stop the clock
put a comeback out of reach. Jazz
scored 11 points from the floor, but the
10 field goals it scored on put the Dog
Pound away.
The Jazz closed the game 50-40,
using those 10 points on field goals to
send the Dog Pound to the losers brack-
et.
The victory put the Jazz up against
the Nets, the top team in the league,
Thursday. Results were not available
at press time. The loser drops to the
losers bracket for a second chance in
tonight's game at the Center.


The second game of the evening
was the main event, the Nets versus
Bacardi. Bacardi was the Nets biggest
competition so far, coach Michael
Frazier said.
Bacardi may have been their big-
gest obstacle on the road to the cham-
pionship, but just like the 76-32
whoopin' they put on the A-Team July
10, the Nets beat the tar out ofBacardi.
The Nets started the first half doing
what they do best, moving the ball and
playing tight defense.
Time and again the Nets listened to
calls from Frazier on the bench to
"give the ball to (Gary) Mixon." Mixon
darted into the paint like a snake and
put eight points on the scoreboard.
Desperate Bacardi players tried to stop
him, but fouls turned into more points
as he scored six times on field goals.
When Mixon wasn't scoring Ray
Childress was. Childress added six
points to the Nets effort, and Phil
Mickles tossed in a three-pointer.
The strong man for Bacardi was
Charles Davis, scoring three times on
drives to the inside and putting in a shot
from downtown.
George Dudley backed up Davis
with 12 points.
Bacardi's strong play in the first
half was marred by a double technical
foul called against Alex Alameda.
Referee Julius Walker called Alameda
for a holding penalty, and Alameda
argued the call. After the technical foul
forunsportsmanlike conduct, Alameda
shoved Walker and was called for a
second technical and was thrown out
of the game.
With the score 30-22 at the half
Bacardi had a chance to come back.
Bacardi put the heat on Mixon in
the second half, but the Nets respond-
ed by spreading the scoring. Childress
chalked up six more points, followed
by Roy "Googie" Allen Jr. and Don
Owens with five each.
Mixon and Jeffrey Moses were both
held to two baskets, but they each
nailed four field goals.
The points on fouls were icing on
the cake for the Nets. The 66-46 win
over Bacardi put them up against the
Jazz Thursday, one game away from
the championship.
Results were not available at press
time
The championship game is sched-
uled for 1p.m. Sunday.


I an mor Pae-


Local instructors teaching Tang Soo Softball sailors finally nab a win in *SCN AM radio schedu
Do give students lessons in self the rescheduled Independence Day *Local sports schedule
defense, discipline and confidence, tournament. *U.S. Army 10-mile teal


Sotbl Page1-


le


Mn








1 4 Tropic Times
14July 15, 1994Sp rts



TKe way of tKe Kcvand


;`.-U Students of Tantv Soo Do learnci
confidence through marOtial arts
I, partial is defined by Random House as "disposed to war" and
art is "the realm of what is beautiful." These two principles
combined-the beauty of war-sound fiercely intimidating,
but martial arts are not so easily defined.
Martial arts are more involved in confidence and self assurance than
fighting, explained Debby Nissenbaum, a Tang Soo Do instructor. In
her class she teaches people kicks and punches, but she also teaches
them how to use their confidence to avoid conflict.
Dealing with conflict is the object of Tang Soo Do. A traditional
martial art from Korea, it was developed over the centuries for practical
self defense and was defined into its modem style by Grand Master
Hwang Khee in Korea in 1936, said instructor Arles Fernandez.
. "We stress techniques used in a real fight. It is more self defense
than sport, and we are not as interested in the beauty," Nissenbaum said.
It may not be pretty, but it is effective.
Korean martial arts favor circular attacks instead of the direct attacks
, 'of Japanese martial arts. They also favor use of the legs and feet where
/ * Japanese styles stress use of the hands and arms, she said.
fTang Soo Do, loosely translated "the way of the hand," got its name
because it incorporates more hand movements than most Korean martial
arts, making it a more balanced fighting style, Nissenbaum explained.
I *"This is very physical because we are dealing with the most power-
ful limbs you have," Fernandez said. "It is strenuous exercise and it will
show quickly if you are not in shape."
..."You can see results the first day," he added. "You will know what
Syou need to work on right away, especially people in the military. They
carry a pack through the jungle and think they are in shape, but this uses
different muscles."
One soldier getting a workout in the class is Darrel Prindle. Prindle
said he has gotten a lot out of his first year studying Tang Soo Do.
"I was looking for something to do and I was always interested in
martial arts. I chose Tang Soo Do because it's not widely known, it was
something different from what most people were learning," he said.
Prindle earned his green belt, the third belt, earlier this year. His
accomplishment affected not only how he fights but how he sees life.
"It makes me strive harder for perfection. I notice the little things
now," he said.
SAs he learns more through martial arts, Prindle said he feels like he is
getting closer to where he wants to be.
Prindle said he encourages everyone to try Tang Soo Do, especially
because the first lesson is free.
Story Canid photos by
Sgt. Lori Dacvis
Tropic Timev s sports eiditor-


Darrel Prindle executes a front snap kick.
'-,.J I HBi Hi i-


Jacquelyne Konz throws a center punch.

Jacquelyne Konz throws a center punch.


Instructor Debby Nissenbaum shows Rafael Jesus proper
leg extension for a turning back kick.











. ports


Tropic Times 1
July 15, 1994 1


Navy wins holiday softball tourney


FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Atlan-
tic) - The Navy sailed to the top spot in the
Atlantic Fourth ofJuly softball tournament,
Saturday, but not without a good challenge
from the 549th Military Police Company.
The Atlantic/Pacific softball tournament
was plagued by rain that kept the Pacific
teams from competing, and eventually
caused a one-week delay in the tourna-
ment's completion.
The first two days of the tournament saw
only two games actually played out.
In the July 2 opening game, the Navy
scrambled the 69th Signal, 11-1. The sail-
ors racked up three home runs in the game.
The 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry's Head-
quarters, Headquarters Company won over
the battalion's Company A by forfeit, but
tournament play was suspended because of
rain.
A forfeit by the MPs July 3 helped
Company C, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry
advance in the tournament, and Navy also
advanced by forfeit.
HHC edged out Co. C, 15-14, and Co. C
had its first loss in the tournament.
The MPs were on the winning side of a





SCN AM Radio 790/1420
airs baseball action
Tonight
8 p.m.: Baseball: St. Louis Cardinals at
Colorado Rockies
Saturday
7 p.m.: Baseball: Cleveland Indians at
Chicago Cubs
Sunday
12:30 p.m.: Baseball: San Fransisco
Giants at Montreal Expos
7 p.m.: Baseball: Detroit Tigers at Kan-
sas City Royals
Tuesday
9 p.m : Baseball: Baltimore Orioles at
Seattle Mariners
Wednesday
6:30 p.m.: Baseball: Florida Marlins at
Cinncinatti Reds
Thursday
7 p.m.: Baseball: Pittsburgh Pirates at
Houston Astros

Unit level basketball on
local sports schedule
*Army 5' 10" and under basketball
and 5' 11" and over basketball
The final game of the championship
tournament in both leagues is Sunday at
Reeder Physical Fitness Center. The game
brackets will be posted in the center.
*Air Force basketball
Monday
6:05 p.m.: Supply A vs. 310 Airlift
Support Squadron
7:05 p.m.: Civil Engineering Squadron
vs. Medical Group
8:05 p.m.: Mission Support Squadron
vs. 640 Air Mobility Support Squadron B
Tuesday
6:05 p.m.: Air Postal Squadron/Servic-
es vs. Communications B


forfeit when Co. A didn't show. Co. A was
out of the tournament from two forfeits, and
the tournament was postponed until the
following weekend.
The tournament finished up Saturday.
TRICO, a team of players from the 69th
Signal Company, U.S. Army Garrison,
Company D and Medical Department Ac-
tivity, dropped Co. C from the tournament,
8-7 in the first game. The Navy sunk HHC,
7-3, and the HHC squad was halfway out
the door.
The MPs, with a loss by forfeit against
them, slammed TRICO, 15-5, and began a
winning streak that made Navy work for the
title.
After toppling HHC, 6-2, the MPs hand-
ed the Navy its first loss, 6-3, and the
tournament was decided was by an "if"
game.
The Navy was back in form for the final
game of the tournament, crushing the MPs
10-3 and winning the tournament.
The six teams competing racked up 23
home runs during the tournament.
The Navy and Co. C led the teams in
homers with 8 and 7 respectively.

7:05 p.m.: Maintenance Squadron vs.
Airlift Support Squadron
8:05 p.m.: Supply A vs. Co. B, 536th
Eng. Bn.
Wednesday
6:05 p.m.: Med. Gp. vs. Headquarters
Support Co., 536th Eng. Bn.
7:05 p.m.: Communications A vs. Secu-
rity Police Squadron B
8:05 p.m.: AIRPS/SVS vs. Supply B
Thursday
6:05 p.m.: Co. A, 1st Bn. 228th Av. Reg.
vs. Headquarters and Headquarters Com-
pany, 1st Bn. 228th Av. Reg.
7:05 p.m.: Area Intelligence Squadron/
Operations Support Squadron vs. SPS B
8:05 p.m.: Transportation vs. Supply B
July 22
6:05 p.m.: 310 ALS vs. CES
7:05 p.m.: 1-228th vs. Supply B
8:05 p.m.: SPS B vs. MSS

Bailers beat Run & Gun
to take basketball title
The Ballers coasted to victory in the
Atlantic basketball tournamentatFort Davis
last week, taking the championship title
with a 61-52 win over Run & Gun.
The Ballers started with the bye, but won
a 67-46 game over against the Army/Navy
team. The win put them up against Run &
Gun in the next round of tournament play.
They played a close game, but the Ballers
56-45 win put Run & Gun down a game in
the double elimination tournament.
The gritty Run & Gun team faught back
in game two, but the Ballers shot them
down to earn the top spot in the Atlantic
community.

24th Medical Squadron
offers body sculpting 202
Health promotion officials from the 24th
Medical Squadron announce a 4-week body
sculpting class 10-11 a.m. August 2 at the


U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Rick Emert
Navy shortstop David Hauswirth beats Headquarters and Headquarters
Company's Michael Hale to the bag.


Howard Sports and Fitness Center. "Body
Sculpting 202," is a continuation of the
popular "Body Sculpting 101" previously
taught at the center. Taught by certified
fitness expert Stacey Robertson, this class
teaches students how to effectively use free
weights and machines to re-shape their
bodies and further improve their health and
fitness. Formore information, or to register
for the class, call health promotions at 284-
5870.

USARSO holds 10-miler
tryouts for men, women
Practice sessions and open tryouts will
be held for runners interested in the U.S.
Army South 10-Miler team.
Sessions are 6 -8 a.m. at Reeder Physical
Fitness Center. Trial days are 6 a.m. July 23,
Aug. 13 and Aug. 27 at the center.
For information, call Willie Moye at
287-6411, Sue Bozgoz at 287-6448 or the
Directorate of Community Activities Sports
Office at 287-4050.

Martial arts, aerobics
instructors needed
The Rodman Fitness Center is seeking
instructors for martial arts, water aerobics
and aerobics classes. Instructors must be
certified by an accredited agency. Call 283-
4222/4061 for more information.

Rodman sponsors Navy
intramural 5K Fun Run
The Rodman Morale, Welfare and Rec-
reation is sponsoring a 5K Fun Run 6:30
a.m. July 29. The race begins at the Rodman
Sports Office.
This event is open only to Navy
servicemembers, Department of Defense
civilians working with the Navy and their
family members.
There is no entry fee. Rosters for this


event are due today.
The unit with the most runners earns the
team award. There will be first and second
place awards for men's and women's divi-
sion. Call 283-4222 for information.

Howard, Albrook host
tennis ladder tourney
The Howard and Albrook sports and
fitness centers are hosting a tennis ladder
tournament. Each player starts at the bot-
tom of the ladder and the winners of each
match work their way up.
All players must play a match per week,
and players can challenge no more than two
rungs above or below their place on the
ladder. The tournament ends Aug. 1. Call
284-3451 to register.

Curundu Bowling Center
hosts no tap tournament
The Curundu Bowling Center is hosting
a no tap tournament 7:30 p.m. July 16. The
event is open to all bowlers.

Horoko Golf Course
offers free youth clinic
The Horoko Golf Course has free youth
golf clinics today, July 22 and 29. Classes
are 9-10 a.m. for ages I1-15 and 2-3 p.m.
for ages 7-10.
Clinics are taught by Horoko Golf Pro
Camilo Cetina. For more information, call
the Horoko Pro Shop at 283-6323/6346.

Pacific side rugby team
welcomes new players
The rugby football season, Pacific side
willhold its firstpractice 6 p.m. Thursdayat
Red Devil Field, Fort Kobbe. New players
are welcome. Practices will be held 6 p.m.
every Thursday at Red Devil Field. For
information, call 284-3667 or 223-7625.


StndnsS


DCA II
Ten Deep


U.S. Army Basketball
Championship Tournaments
5'11" and over
2 0
2 1


Run and Gun
The Dogg Pound
Jazz
Law Dawgs
Dynamics
Bull Dawgs


1 1
eliminated
eliminated


Skillz
Juice


Nets
A-Team
Dog Pound
Mo Money
Bacardi
Law Dawgs


eliminated
eliminated


5'10" and under
3 0
2 0
2 1
1 1
1 1
1 1
eliminated


II Tuff eliminated
Game Time eliminated
Pool eliminated

Men's over-30 volleyball
Championship Tournament
JOTB play for title
747th MI Bn. play for title
Navy eliminated
Garrison eliminated
*as of Thursday


i IL .. t










1 6 Tropic Times
0 July 15, 1994


News


Fighting crime


Security forces team up for

crime prevention night-out


RODMAN NS (USNAVSTAPAN-
CANALPAO) - One never ending thought
for all citizens - whether in the United
States or stationed abroad - is security.
For the last five years, during the first
week of August, the Naval Station Panama
Canal Security Department has sponsored
the National Crime Prevention Night Out.
This annual event is held all over the
United States, Canada and U.S. military
bases world wide.
Once a year, the National Crime Pre-
vention Night Out presents the opportunity
for police officers and residents to learn
more about each other, organize and fight
back against crime. This year the theme of
night out is Cooperation, Organization,
Prevention and Security - COPS for
short.
Here in Panama, we will celebrate Na-
tional Crime Prevention Night Out Aug. 5.
The event will kick off 5 p.m. at the Farfan
Bohio across from the Farfan swimming
pool.
There will be a parachute jump into the
baseball field in Farfan at 6 p.m. by Naval
Special Warfare Unit 8, static displays of
military police vehicles, a patrol boat from
Special Boat Unit 26 and a weapons dis-
play by the Marine Corps Security Force.
The Air Force's Mounted Horse Patrol
Unit and the Air Force's Key and Lock
Display also will be present.
Representatives from the Military Cus-


toms Branch, Contraband Control and En-
glish speaking representatives from both
the Panama National Police and the Judi-
cial Technical Police will answer questions
about law enforcement and criminal activ-
ity downtown. Family support group rep-
resentatives will also be present at the
event to answer questions about alcohol
and drug abuse.
Also available during the event are bi-
cycle registrations and operation Ident-a-
Kid fingerprinting kits. K9 Crime Biter
McGruffwill be there to have photos taken
with children and teach them some kid
crime facts.
In addition to getting advice about the
fight against crime and providing an inter-
action between the community and it's law
enforcement personnel, National Crime
Prevention Night Out gives people the op-
portunity to meet neighbors in a carnival
type atmosphere with music and entertain-
ment. Food and refreshments will be avail-
able at the bohio.
The Security Department of Naval Sta-
tion Panama invites all members of all ser-
vices and civilians to come out and partici-
pate. They will also try to break the record
for attendance and enter the night into a
worldwide attendance contest.
By showing support for each other in
this fight against crime through Coopera-
tion, Organization, Prevention and Secu-
rity, we can take a bite out of crime.


U.S. Navy photo
Petty Officer 2nd Class Richard Alfred Bauer helps with the "Identa-a-
kid" fingerprinting program during last year's National Crime Prevention
Night Out.


Court martial


results listed
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The follow-
ing court martial results are announced:

Pfc. Kelvin Slaton of 69th Signal Company was
convicted of larceny and obtaining services under
false pretenses. He was sentenced to reduction to pri-
vate one, forfeiture of $555 pay per month for three
months and confinement for three months.

Sgt. 1st Class Jorge Alduen-Silva of Company A,
193rd Support Battalion, was convicted of wrongful
use of cocaine. He was sentenced to reduction to staff
sergeant and forfeiture of $500 pay per month for
three months.

Sgt 1st Class Lonnie Foreman of Headquarters
Company, 93rd Material and Management Center,
was convicted of wrongful use of cocaine. He was
sentenced to reduction to staff sergeant, forfeiture of
$1,256 pay per month for six months and restriction
to the limits of the 93rd Material Management Com-
mand company area for two months.

Pfc. Reynaldo Havier of Company C, 1st Battalion
(Airborne), 508th Infantry Regiment, was convicted
of desertion, drunk driving and wrongful appropria-
tion of a motor vehicle. He was sentenced to reduc-
tion to private one, confinement for 15 months and a
bad-conduct discharge.

Pfc. Charles Mayfield III of 59th Engineer Com-
pany was convicted of larceny. He was sentenced to
reduction to private one, confinement for four months
and a bad-conduct discharge.

Sgt 1st Class William A. Jones of Headquarters
Company, U.S. Army Garrison-Panama, was con-
victed of rape, burglary and false swearing. He was
sentenced to reduction to private one, confinement for
six years, forfeiture of all pay and allowances and a
dishonorable discharge.


Crocker explains ending


teachers' housing privilege


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - A continuing
shortage of installation housing for soldiers and their fami-
lies, coupled with quality of life issues for soldiers,
prompted the recent U.S. Army South decision to cease
providing housing support to Department of Defense De-
pendents Schools-Panama employees.
USARSO notified DoDDS of this decision June 17,
1994. According to the applicable Interservice Support
Agreement, the action becomes effective 180 days from
that date (Dec. 14, 1994).
This decision was extremely difficult. Given that in-
stallation housing is an important, if not the most impor-
tant, component of quality of life for U.S. personnel who
are assigned to this theater, we had to consider all of the
costs and benefits of continuing to provide housing sup-
port as opposed to essentially dislodging families.
Our concern is to maximize available housing on post
for military personnel and their families, especially for
those soldiers in lower grades who don't have the equiva-
lent economic resources of civilian personnel.
We also noted that, unlike in 1984, civilian personnel
are eligible for tax-free Living Quarters Allowance
(LQA). Moreover, since November 1989, that LQA is not
reduced by rental costs for eligible civilian personnel.
USARSO's decision in no way discounts the contri-
bution DoDDS and its personnel make to DoD families.


Our entire community appreciates the dedicated effort of
DoDDs to provide a high standard of education for mili-
tary and civilian dependents in the Republic of Panama.
As USARSO and all U.S. Southern Command com-
ponents implement the Panama Canal Treaty of 1977, we
are committed to ensuring the highest quality of life for
all personnel. Many changes must undoubtedly occur as
personnel leave and facilities revert. Nevertheless, we will
take all necessary steps to prevent degradation of essen-
tial services to DoD personnel.
USARSO is prepared to provide all available assis-
tance to those DoDDS personnel affected by this action.
The USARSO Housing Referral Office located in Build-
ing 519, Fort Clayton, maintains listings of available local
housing by area, type of unit, and number of bedrooms.
We will also assist in the actual relocation of household
goods.
All DoDDS personnel may take advantage of these ser-
vices through Dec. 14, 1994. They are encouraged to visit
the Housing Referral Office and schedule an appointment
as soon as possible.

Maj. Gen. G.A. Crocker
Commanding General,
U.S. Army South


Foreign language pay testing underway


HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PA) - Qualification test-
ing for foreign language proficiency pay began July 1 and
ends Dec. 31.
Air Force members interested in qualifying for pay
during calendar year 1995 must contact their military per-
sonnel flight immediately for eligibility criteria and test
scheduling, according to Air Force Military Personnel
Center officials. Members currently receiving proficien-
cy pay must requalify for calendar 1995.
The program is voluntary and requires unit com-
mander certification, a secret or higher security clearance,
and a qualifying score on the Defense Language Profi-


ciency or Reading Proficiency Test.
Members who qualify can receive $50 to $100 per
month, depending on the level of proficiency. Those
people proficient in more than one dialect will receive pay
for only the dialect in which they are most proficient.
Spanish and Tagalog speakers must be in a language-
designate duty position to receive FLPP. Also, first-term
airmen must be serving in a designated position or speak
a critical language such as Russian, Chinese, Arabic or
Korean to receive this benefit.
For more information, call the military personnel
flight, 284-4661.









Tropictivities
A quality of life guide for the U.S. community in Panama


Page BI


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Department of Defense photo by Spc. Tom Findtner
Shark boat
Luis Neto, recreation aid for the Rodman Outdoor Recreation and Marina, moors the Vargas, a boat used for shark fishing trips. See story and photos
on Page B3.


Youth Services-Atlantic basketball
camp teaches children the funda-
mentals of the game.


I o m u n t yP a e 5


Preventive Medicine officials give
tips on fighting off mosquitoes dur-
ing the rainy season.


an more-


*Movies, Page B8
*TV, Page B9
*Potpourri, Page B12


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B2 Tropic Times
B July 15, 1994


L Youth news


Atlantic




hoops

Camp helps young

players improve skills
FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Atlantic) - More
than 60 6- to 12-year-olds came out for Youth Services-
Atlantic's Basketball Camp. This is the first year the
camp has been held here.
The two-week camp, which began June 27 and ends
today, leads into the Monday through Aug. 12 basket-
ball season.
The first week of the camp covered the fundamen-
tals of basketball, including: dribbling, passing, guard-
ing and shooting, said Margarita Martinez, Youth Ser-
vices-Atlantic.
Instructors let the youths spend a lot of time just
learning how to handle the ball. After each child found
his or her comfort zone, the drills picked up in pace.
During the second week, the young hoopsters put
what they learned to use in organized team practice,
Martinez added.
The center placed good sportsmanship at the top of
the list of 'must knows.' The children are starting to
play at a young age, and instilling good sportsmanship
now is very important.
"We teach the kids the games are for fun, not com-
petition," Martinez said. "We don't even keep score at
the Pee Wee games."
Some of the new basketball lovers said they did not
waht camp to end so soon, but added they were excited
about getting to play 'real' games during the season.
"The camp has been a great success," Martinez said.
"A lot of the kids had never touched a basketball before,
but they picked up the skills pretty fast."
Martinez said that often the parents were more excit-
ed during the games than the children.
"The fitness center was packed with parents cheer-
ing for their kids," she said. "They are very proud of
what the kids accomplished over such a short period of
time."
The youth basketball league is made up of three Pee
Wee teams and three Bantam teams. Each division
should play about 15 games, Martinez said.


Josh Price, .a professional basketball wantto
i�, ,.





' to










Courtesy photos by Chris Emert
Josh Price, a professional basketball want-to-
be, practices shooting from the free throw line.
More than 60 children participated in a two-
week camp that concentrated on technique.



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Michelle Carter and Greg Landrum practice jumping for the ball as camp organizer Margarita
Martinez and other players look on.


Albrook/Howard
*Youth centers 286-3195/284-4700:
Teen fishing trip departs Howard theatre at 5
a.m. tomorrow. Transportation, boat, guide, bait
and ice are included for only $25. Bring your own
fishing gear.
Teen bowl-a-thon Wednesday, 4-5:30 p.m. at
the Howard Bowling Center. Free bowling and a
special meal of a hamburger, fries and soda for
only $2. Teens 13-19 only. Sign-up at the Youth
Center.
Arts and crafts 3 p.m. Wednesday at both
centers. There is a $1 fee for supplies.
Gymnastics classes Saturdays. Ages 3-5 meet
noon-I p.m.; ages 6-12 rfieet 1-2 p.m.; intermedi-
ate classes meet 2-3 p.m. The cost is $13 per
month per person.
*Child Development Center 284-6135:
Openings are available in the part-time pro-
gram for children ages 6 months - 5 years. Open-
ings are for 25-hour enrollment - five hours a
day, five days a week.
Family Day Care Providers are needed in the
Albrook area. Call Jill Winter at 284-3711/6135
for information.
Captain T-Bird and Captain KC Youth
Summer Bowling Special includes three games
during open bowling and a free T-Bird or KC
sports bottle. Call 284-4818.

Clayton
*Youth Center 287-6451:
Arts & Crafts Mondays.
Cooking experiences Tuesdays.
Outdoor Games Thursdays.
Just for kids trip to EL Dorado Amusement
Park 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. tomorrow. Fee is $3.
Piano lessons 1-6 p.m. Tuesday and Wednes-
days. The fee is $30 for four half-hour lessons per
month.
Gymnastics for ages 5 and older 2:30-3:30
p.m. and 3:30-4:30 p.m. Monday and Wednes-
days.
Swimming with snacks and outdoor sports 2-
4 p.m. Monday.
*Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680:
Popcorn and movies Sundays.
Senior Teen Employment Program is a
year- round program to develop job skills and earn
money for teens 15-18 years old. Applications are
available at the center.
Sports cards collectors are invited to partici-
pate in the Sports Cards Expo 1-5 p.m. tomorrow.
Spaghetti night Wednesday.
Artifacts exhibit from South and Central
America Thursday.
*Child Development Center 287-3301:
Child Development Center provides high
quality, developmental child care for children 6
weeks to 12 years old. Full day care and hourly
care available. Call 287-5657.
Fall registration for the CDC Part-Day Pro-
gram will be held at Building 156, Fort Clayton
9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. as follows:
August 3 - all single and dual working parents;
August 4 - all other military and department of
defense civilian employees; August 5 - all others
who meet eligibility criteria.
Children registering for preschool must be two
by October 31, 1994. Military identification cards
for both parent and child, child's immunization
record and parent's latest pay voucher must be pre-
sented for registration. For more information call
Rebecca Fentress at 287-5507/5104.

Cocoli
*Cocoli Community Center 287-4119:
Arts and crafts, 3:30 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday.

Atlantic
*Espinar Youth Center 289-4605:
Teen sports 4-6 p.m. Monday and Wednes-
days.
Youth service day camp 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m.
Monday-Friday throughout July.
Football and cheerleader registration under
way through August. Coaches needed!









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Marina expands recreational services


Navy offers more charters,


facilities, equipment rentals


Valerie Van Essen, Rodman Outdoor recreation and Marina manager,
and Luis Neto, recreation aid, go over bike safety procedures.


by Pamela O'Connor
Navy Morale, Welfare
and Recreation Marketing


he Rodman Outdoor Recreation
and Marina has recently experi-
enced a sea change by undergoing
a major renovation of its facilities,
taking over Navy Morale, Welfare and
Recreation gear issue, and expanding its
fishing and charter programs. The marina
and gear issue, along with the Navy
MWR pools, have been consolidated into
one department, Outdoor Recreation, to
better serve the community. This
transformation is part of a larger reorga-
nization of the Navy MWR facilities
which included the change of Navy clubs
to all ranks.
"You wouldn't recognize the marina
office if you had seen it before the
renovation." said Valerie Van Essen,
outdoor recreation manager. "The
SeaBees did an amazing job of trans-
forming this place from a seven-room
maze into an open-format, single room
facility to house our expanded pro-
grams."
Lots of elbow-grease went into the
renovation. Walls were torn down, and
floors, ceilings and doors were replaced
to provide Van Essen and her crew with
the space needed to conduct both the
marina and gear issue business under one
roof.
Gear issue, previously managed by the
Rodman Fitness Center, still offers the
same wide array of gear: everything from
4-, 6-, and 8-person tents to party
canopies, canteens and golf clubs are
available for rent. Mountain bikes are
also rented on an hourly, daily or weekly
basis.
The Marina and Gear Issue Office is
open from 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday,
Tuesday, Thursday & Friday, and 6 a.m.
to 6 p.m. weekends and holidays. The


office is closed Wednesdays. For more
information or to reserve space for any of
the marina's programs, call 283-3147 or
283-3150.
Also as part of the renovation, the
marina's boats are being refurbished.
Sorely needed paint and reupholstery will
spiff up the Rodman recreation fleet for
the new programs and charters the marina
offers.
"We are really proud of our facilities,"
said Van Essen, "We offer the most
comprehensive marina for the U.S.
military community in Panama."
Among Rodman Marina's regularly-
scheduled programs are salt-water bottom
fishing trips. They used to be held
Wednesday and Thursday nights, but
now happen 6-11 p.m. every Tuesday
and Thursday aboard the 61-foot Black
Stallion. Avid fishers need only bring
rod, reel, tackle and refreshments; live
bait and coolers are provided.
Thrill seekers should sign up for the
marina's shark fishing trips that occur
every other Saturday. Leaving port at 6
a.m., the 42-foot Vargas cruises the
waters in search of hammerhead and tiger
sharks. Everything but refreshments is
supplied for this trip. The marina also
offers deep-sea, Gatun Lake bass and
Sunskiff bottom fishing charters. With
certification, authorized patrons can rent
Sunskiffs and Boston Whalers or Catalina
and Sunfish sailboats for half-days or full
days.
Prolific seas and warm weather for
outdoor recreation are two of Panama's
greatest assets. The Rodman Outdoor
Recreation Program provides all the
necessary elements to take advantage of
the recreation opportunities offered by
this natural bounty.


Tropic Times
July 15, 1994B


The Rodman Marina has a large fleet available for rent and charter trips.


Department of Defense photos by Spc. Tom Findtner










B 4 Tropic Times
SJuly 15, 1994


J Focus on Panama


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Courtesy photo
This photo was taken in 1954 of the Virgin of El Carmen statue sailing in a procession around Taboga island.


Virgin of El Carmen
sails in a procession
around the island
Different type of life awaits
you when you visit Taboga
Island - an hour away by
launch from Pier 18 in Balboa.
Here is a paradise for people tired
of the horns and pollution of the
modem city. There are no cars, but
there are beaches, water-skiing,
swimming and relaxation.
The picturesque island is linked to
the colorful history of Panama. It was
from this shore that Francisco Pizarro
departed with his men to later conquer
the rich Inca Empire.
Taboga, only 12 miles away, off the
Pacific coast with its white sand is a
favorite resort for both local and
visiting tourists. It is a quiet place -


perfect for honeymooners and for
people who simply want to go and
collect shells, or take a refreshing dip
in the crystal clear waters of its sunny
beaches.
Taboga is surrounded by a variety
of bougainvillaea and hibiscus flowers
in red, white and pink. The frangance
of roses and jasmine along its sidewalk
gives the island a garden atmosphere
and the name "Island of the Flowers."
There are two hotels on the island.
As you exit the pier you find Hotel
Taboga at the right. It's a modem
building, with air-conditioned rooms, a
restaurant, restrooms and swimming
pool. At low tide it connects with El
Morro Island.
If you turn left and continue to walk
along the hibiscus and bougainvillaea-
bedecked sidewalks you will come to
Hotel Chu. The hotel is a two-story
wooden structure that has comfortable,


but not luxurious rooms, a restaurant
that overlooks the ocean, and a
basement discotec and bar.
Taboga's small church "Iglesia San
Pedro" claims to be second oldest in
the hemisphere.
In Latin America, processions go
hand in hand with religion, because
catholicism is the dominant faith. They
are held in honor of the patron saint of
a country or city and are usually on
foot, over a route close to the commu-
nity's church or cathedral.
Some of the traditions and folklore
of the island date back to 1920 and is
the celebration of a water festival in
honor of the Virgin of El Carmen, the
patron saint of Taboga.
A number of boats, usually led by a
boat carrying the statue of the Virgin,
sail in a procession around the island.
The procession includes boats of all
types and sizes and pangas - the


flat-bottom canoes used by the
fishermen - all beautifully decorated
with people singing praises to their
patron saint.
Practically every community in
Panama has its patron saint. Elaborate
festivities are held each year in its
honor. The entire population partici-
pates with events such as music,
dances and fireworks.
Taboga's patron saint festivity will
be held Saturday. There will be music,
dancing, fireworks and more in the
main plaza in front of the church. This
year, the aquatic procession begins at
10 a.m. and will feature a giant
floating sea shell that the statue will be
placed in and sail around the island .



g ro ie ime"i s f


I a a a n w s s m a y ,:


Editor's note: The following summary of news
is taken from the Panamanian press. The transla-
tions and reports are unofficial and no guarantee
is made by the Tropic Times as to accuracy of
reporting or statements made here. Selection of
these stories does not imply any emphasis, judg-
ment or endorsement by the U.S. government.
These synopsis are intended only to give non-
Spanish speaking persons a flavor for events in
Panama.

July 11-14
Hoy
The paper refers to a report published Monday
concerning the alleged secret arrival in Panama of a
group of Haitian refugees. Panama's Acting Minister
of Foreign Relations Roberto Aleman is cited saying
he has no information about the alleged arrival of
Haitians in Panama. U.S. Southern Command
spokepersons are quoted as denying the reports. ac-
cording to the article, U.S. Embassy officials have
also denied the report and said they would issue a
press release on the sujbect. The paper adds that
reporters have tried unsuccessfully to gain access to


military bases to obtain photographs of the Haitians in
the area. According to the paper, the secrecy of Panama
and U.S. authorities is causing uncertainty in the coun-
try.
La Estrella, Critica Libre,
Hoy, La Prensa, El Panama
America, El Siglo,
These papers report that Panama President-elect
Ernesto Perez Balladares has stated that his government
will accept a reduced number of Haitian refugees stay-
ing on U.S. military bases in Panama for no more than
six months. Perez Balladares, who reportedly made the
statement before leaving on a tour of Europe and the
United States, is cited as conditioning the refugee issue
on the carrying out of medical exams and the guarantee
that the refugees will leave the country when the crisis
is over, saying that the United Sattes must be responsi-
ble for any damage that Panama may suffer because of
the presence of the refugees. The Perez Balladares
decision, the report explains, is based on humanitarian
reasons and a desire to help solve the Haitian crisis. Hoy
reports that several hundred Haitian refugees arrived in
Panama over the weekend and are being located in an


area called Camp Rousseau near Howard AFB.
According to the report, these Haitians are part of
the 10,000 refugees that President Guillermo Endara
agreed to accept and later changed his mind about
and are reportedly on U.S. military bases en route to
the island of Dominica, in case Endara does not
change his position of not allowing them to remain
on the bases.

El Panama America, Hoy,
La Estrella, La Prensa
Papers report that Panama President-elect Emesto
Perez Balladares will travel to Spain, Italy, the
United States and Mexico. He will reportedly met
with President Bill Clinton Wednesday and will
discuss aspects of the Panama Canal Treaty and free
trade agreement.

El Panama America
Reports that trial will begin Oct. 3 for deposed
Panama dictator Gen. Manuel Noriega and seven
former Panama Defense members accused of the
execution of nine Panama Defense Force officers
who participated in a 1989 coup against Noriega.


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Tropic Times B5
July 15, 1994 B


\I


Diamond winners


Department of Defense photo by Maureen Sampson


Army and Air Force Exchange Service representative Tom Goodloe, American Airlines
representative Nedelka Gonzalez and Southern Command Network's Staff Sgt. Larry Schneck
present prizes to winners of the Diamond FM Great American Giveaway contest that has been
going on for the past month. The winners are: Grand Prize - Rina Rodriguez won four round-
trip airline tickets to the continental United States, a 35mm camera and a set of luggage. 2nd
prize - Staff Sgt. Bobby Ortego won two round-trip airline tickets to the continental United
States and a set of luggage. 3rd prize - Senior Airman Scott Straley won two round-trip airline
tickets to the continental United States and a set of luggage.




Wet season blues


Preventive Medicine officials give


tips on fighting off mosquitoes


GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL
(MEDDAC PAO) - With the start of the wet season, on-
post residents will soon be hearing the mosquito spray truck
from Directorate of Engineering and Housing, Civil
Engineering Squadron, orNavy Public Works come through
your housing area, said Maj. Nelson Powers, chief of
Entomology, Preventive Medicine Service at Gorgas Army
Community Hospital.
"This is part of the organized mosquito control program
employed by all Department of Defense components in the
Canal area and the Panama Canal Commission."
The program for control ofAedes aegypti mosquitoes is
the elimination of containers that hold water. Other pro-
grams to control other types of mosquitoes involve water
management and applying insecticides to control both
immature and adult mosquitoes.
Adult mosquitoes are controlled using the insecticide
Malathion, periodically alternated with Resmethrin ap-
plied as a mist from a truck-mounted sprayer.
"Both insecticides are safe to humans," Powers said.
The control program is based on surveillance and moni-
toring by the Entomology Branch of the Preventive Med-
icine Service. Control operations begin when the mosquito
population density increases to a level which justifies
insecticide application.
"Frequently, after the first rains, we have a lot of
temporary mosquito activity which soon decreases," Pow-
ers said. "Insecticide applications at this time would not
have an impact on the population. However, once the rains
become periodic, then the mosquito population begins to
stabilize. At this time, insecticide application would be
beneficial."
During the dry season, spraying is temporarily sus-
pended and resumes in the wet season based on surveil-
lance data. This is done to protect the environment and
retard the resistance of the mosquito population to insecti-
cides. By altering Malathion with Resmethrin every few
months, this further serves to retard insecticide resistance,
Powers said.


Direct wetting by liquid or excessive exposure to the
spray may cause transient discomfort. The bad odor of
Malathion will not cause injury or illness.
Insecticide application at both Atlantic and Pacific
communities is done in the early evening from 6 p.m. to
sometimes as late as 10 p.m., when mosquitoes are most
active. In some areas, insecticide application is done in the
early morning from 5-7 a.m. when sand flies are most
active.
Treatment in some areas, like Albrook, is performed
twice a week (Tuesdays and Thursdays) while in other
areas like Clayton, Amador and Corozal it is done three
times a week (Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays).
Though the insecticides are safe, the following steps
should be followed by pedestrians and passersby while
spraying is taking place:


Helpful hints
*When following in an automobile, stay
at least 50 yards behind the spray truck.
*Take a different route to your destina-
tion.
*If walking or jogging, be aware of pre-
vailing wind direction and attempt to safely
move to the upwind side of the street.
*Don't let children chase the spray truck.
+Have children who are playing out-
doors move indoors or away from the street.
Even though brief inhalation of the mist
will not cause injury or permanent Illness,
avoid prolonged breathing of the mist.
Questions pertaining to mosquito con-
trol may be referred to the appropriate in-
stallation engineer or to the entomologist,
at Preventive Medicine Service, 282-5269/
5365.


Corozal
The Al-Anon Family Group, an anonymous
fellowship for family and friends of alcoholics,
meets 8 p.m.Tuesdays and Fridays in Building
6550, Hospital Road (near the veterinary clinic),
Corozal. Meetings are open to anyone. For more
information call 223-7193.

Clayton
The La Leche League meeting will be held 7
p.m. Tuesday at the Valent Recreation Center. The
topic will be "avoiding and overcomingbreastfeeding
difficulties." All pregnant women and their babies
are welcome. For information, call Debbie Owens at
236-0338.
A joint service for the entire English-speaking
community will be held 7 p.m. Sunday at the Cross-
roads Bible Church, Corozal. The service is
tocelebrate the 45th anniversary of "The Voice of
the Isthmus," Christian Radio HOXO. The guest
speaker will be Pastor Hormachea from "Insight for
Living."
Any licensed social worker in the Panama area
interested in performing home studies for adop-
tion cases should call the Adjutant General Passport
and Visa Branch at 287-4503/5207.
The Exceptional Family Member Program
Support Group meeting will be held 7:30-9 p.m.
Tuesday at the Valent Recration Center. All active
duty, retired military and Department of Defense
civilian families who have family members with
disabilities are invited to attend. For information,
call 287-4921.
The American Red Cross is sponsoring a com-
munity first aid and safety course 6-10 p.m.
Tuesday-Thursday on the third floor in Building
519. The class will feature instruction on adult and
infant CPR, safety procedures and first aid. For
information, call 287-5509.
The "Growing Godly Summer Bible Study"
will be held 9 a.m. daily until Aug. 23 at the Fort
Clayton Chapel. Child care is provided. Reserva-
tions must be made through the Child Development
Center. For information, call Charlotte Fredereich at
287-3188.
A first, aid class in Spanish for maids will be
held 8 a.m-5 p.m., July 23 on the third floor, Build-
ing 519. For information, call 287-5509.
Regular Islamic prayer services are held 12:30-
1:30 p.m. Friday at the Fort Clayton Chapel hall.
For more information, call 287-5859.
The Enlisted Spouses Club - Panama holds
meetings 7 p.m. the first Monday of each month at
the Fort Clayton Noncommissioned Officers' Club.
For information, call 287-3587.

Atlantic
The 555th Air Force National Guard from Tole-
do, Ohio will perform a concert for the Atlantic
Community 6 p.m. Monday at Fort Davis Theater.
Free coupons are available 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Monday-Friday at the Relocation Assistance Office
in Building 8348, Margarita Complex. For informa-
tion, call 289-4187.
For people transferring to new duty stations, the
Army Community Service Relocation Assistance
Office helps in the search for housing, employment
and educational possibilities for servicemembers
and their families. Call 289-4021/4636 for more
information.

Howard/Albrook
The Howard Family Support Center is offering a
Spouse Orientation in English 10-11 a.m. July 28.
This orientation offers an overview of the FSC
programs and the services available while you and
your family are stationed in Panama.
The Albrook Club is looking for an entertainer
to conduct karaoke sing-along. Interested people
must have an outgoing personality and must be able
to sing and entice others to do the same. For infor-
mation, call 286-3101.
Handcrafted arts and crafts and seasonal
displays are available at the Canal Crafters' Shoppe
in Building 804, AlbrookAFS. Classes available are
quilting, toll painting, bow making and cross stitch.
to sign up for a class, call 286-4500.









6 Tropic Times
July 15, 1994




RoD man $21 fee cover hors d'oeuvres, drinks not SnorkelingandscubatriptoDrake's July 23.
Rodman included. Cruise out to Taboga Island by Island 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. The fees are *Outdoor Recreation Center:
*Information, Tour and Travel: moonlight, while viewing Panama City's $22 for snorkelers, $45 for scuba divers. Isla Mamey snorkel/dive trip Satur-
The Navy ITT office hours of opera- dramatic skyline at night. Diving gear is included. Explore the fa- day. Enjoy a day of diving along the reefs
tion are 10:30a.m.-4p.m. Monday through Downtown Shopping Trip, 9 a.m. July mous island and dive for hidden treasures on the Atlantic coast. There is a $45 divers
Friday. 22, $8. Shop Panama City's department on the sea floor, fee.
El Valle Shopping Trip, 7 a.m. July stores. Mud bath tour in Penonome Posada Partial transits of the Panama Canal
31, $12. At least 12 people are needed. Albrook/Howard Viejas 7 a.m.-5 p.m. July 22, $20. Tour 7:30-11:30 a.m. Saturday, $40. A mini-
Shop for local handicrafts, plants, fruits Penonomeandvisitthefamousmudbaths. mum of 20 people is needed for a partial
d and vegetables and visit the nature pre- *Zodiac Community Activities Center: Tour departs from the Howard base the- transit any other day of the week.
/ serve. Free Zone shopping 8:30 a.m.-4:30 atre. There will be a Gatun Lake train
ft Free Zone shopping trip, 7 a.m. July p.m. every Friday in July, $13 for trans- Cla ton wreck dive Aug. 6.
28, $12. A minimum of 12 people is need- portation. Enjoy duty-free shopping in the Customized trips are available for
ed. city of Colon. *Valent Recreation Center: groups with a minimum of four or 10
Barro Colorado Island 6 a.m. Satur- Pollera festival in Las Tablas 10 a.m.- Free Zone-Colon 7 a.m.-3 p.m. Tues- people.
day, $65, a minimum of two people is 11 p.m. July 22, $25. Join in the celebra- day.
needed for the trip. Visit the tropical re- tion of St. Librada. The festivities include Panama City tour 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat- Balboa
4/ search island in the canal's Gatun Lake. a Pollera dance contest. urday. *Balboa Dive Club:
K/ Panama City tour 9 a.m. July 23 and El Valle shopping tour 6:30 a.m.-4:30 El Valle shopping trip 6:30 a.m.-3:30 The club is now accepting new mem-
27, $8. At least 10 people are needed. Visit p.m. July 24, $13. p.m. Sunday. bers. Divers must show a diving certifica-
the Church ofthe Golden Altar, theFrench *Outdoor adventures: Portobello historical tour, 9 a.m.-4 tion card to join and membership is $12
Plaza and more. El Valle horseback riding trip 7 a.m.- p.m. July 23. per diver per year. For information, write
// Moonlight Cruise 6:30 p.m. July 30, 4 p.m. July 23, $24. Barro Colorado 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. the club or call 263-8077 or 250-0075.


0 0

Albrook/H
*Zodiac Comi
Center:
Intro to scuba.
class is available.
Tae Kwon Do
class 6-7:30p.m. M
days and Fridays,
Beginner and a
and Spanish class(
every month.
Beginner and a
dience classes are h
Parade Field. Four
$32. A minimum
needed.
*Albrook Auto
Air condition
repair 12:30-5 p.i
cept Tuesday and
/ Wheel alignmei


toward radio classes Aug. 2-Sept. 30.
IUWa1 Classes will be held 7-9 p.m. Tues-
munity Activities days. Registration is ongoing.
Swimming three days a week.
, a free one-night *Fort Clayton Scuba Shop:
The phone is temporarily out
Korean karate of order because of renovations.
londays, Wednes- Call 287-6453/5807 for informa-
$25 per month. tion. /
advanced English Basic open-water scuba class,
es run four weeks $115.
Advanced open-water scuba,
advanced dog obe- $140.
held at the Howard Rescue scuba, $119.
-week class costs Underwater photography,
of five people is $99.
Sshop: Curundu
ing service and *Twin Oceans Pro Shop:
m. every day ex- Equipment available for scu-
Wednesday. ba, snorkel, tennis, camping and
nt diagnostic and other outdoor recreation-
__ 1-1-1 1 n - PA


///


//


///


service classes are held 3 -9 p.m. *Pacific Theatre Arts Centre:
Monday, Thursdays and Fridays, Monthly classes are available .--
10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sun- ranging from various dance les-
days. sons, guitar and martial arts. Call
Srlayton 286-3814 for information.

*Fort Clayton Boat Shop: Rodman
Bass fishing at Gatun Lake, $20 *Rodman Marina:
fee includes guide and fishing gear. A boating safety class will be
Deep sea fishing, $200 fee in- held 6-9 p.m. Monday and .
cludes captain, gear, lures and fuel. Wednesday at Building 24 (next
*Valent Recreation Center: to Pizza Hut) on Rodman NS. C
Korean karate class 6-8 p.m. Cost is $35 and includes all mate-
Tuesdays and Thursdays. Admission rials and qualification test drive.
to the first class is free. Beginner and advanced
A 10-week Spanish headstart swimming classes are available
class meets 6-8 p.m. Wednesday for adults and children age 5 and
and 5-7 p.m. Friday. The next class up. Classes are held at the Rod-
will begin Monday. man pool 3:30-5 p.m. Tuesday,
Private piano and guitar les- Thursdays, and Fridays. A mini- U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Brent Sykes
sons are available weekday evenings. mum of four is needed for each Passing through
The instructor meets privately with class. There is a $20 fee for 12
the students for 30 minutes. classes. Call 283-4253 for infor- Two ships are tied together on their way through the locks to avoid damage to
The center is offering amateur mation. the hull as the water level changes. Partial canal transits are available 7:30-
11:30 a.m. Saturday, Contact your Installation travel office for information.




Theatre Theatre Guild at 252-6786 for salary infor- from various dance, guitar and piano les- Bike trip
mation and specific dates. sons.
*Theater Guild of Ancon: *Pacific Theatre Arts Center: *Valent Recreation Center: *Road Knights Motorcycle Club:
The Theatre Guild is looking for a Advanced modern dance through Aug. The talent show "Countdown to Star- The Road Knights Motorcycle Club
musical director for the upcoming pro- 12. Previous dance training required. dom '94" vocal and musical performance will be participating in a ticket run 9
auction of"Nunsense II" who can play The theatre dance workshop begins event is open to all active duty military a.m. July 31 with the Hot Raiders Mo-
piano during rehearsal and performances. July 23. Classes are held 8:30-10:30 a.m. members. Registration deadline is July 30 torcycle Club. The run departs from the
The show will be performed in October. and 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. There is a max- at the center. Cash prizes will be awarded Banco Exterior on Avenida Balboa.
Auditions and rehearsals will begin in imum of 15 students. locally, and a winners will have a chance at There is a $5 fee. Non-members are
August.Call DL Sima at 284-3785 or the Monthly classes are available ranging a recording session in New York. invited to attend.
.4,










tices


Tropic Times
July 15, 1994 B


,,, >. : ~


Harr La Clair kicks up some mud as he goes off road in his Jeep. The 4X4 Club will be holding
its monthly meeting 7 p.m. Thursday in Building 2333 across from the main entrance to the Cocoli
housing area. Anyone interested in joining the club for off road adventure is welcome to attend,
or call Paul Haney at 282-9628.


///


A a 9


*Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts
Center:
Fabric painting classes 6:30-
8:30 p.m. the first and third Wednes-
day and Thursday of each month,
$7.50. Some supplies are available.
Stone stroke classes 11 a.m.
Sunday, $10. Paint ceramic figu-
rines to look like stoneware.
Custom frames to order and
do-it-yourself frame classes are
available.
The Ceramic Center, Building
198, is located near the Crafts Shop.
The center offers a special on mold


*Valent Recreation Center:
The screening room offers free
movies by calling the 24-hour mov-
ie line.
Better Opportunities for
Single Soldiers forum meets the
first Thursday of every month and
is open to all barracks residents.
Gloria's bazaar 1-9 p.m.


pouring. Rent two molds and get
the third free, every Friday and Sat-
urday in July (maximum six molds
each day).
*Canal Crafters:
Handmade arts and crafts are
available. Consignment and volun-
teers are welcome by the shop staff.
Current features include patriotic
displays. The shop is open 10 a.m.
-2 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday and Sat-
urday, Building 804, Albrook. Call
286-4500. Classes are available.
Sign up at the shop.
*Howard Skills Development


through July 24.
Freshwater pearl and jewelry
sale 1-7 p.m. today through Sun-
day.
- *Cocoli Community Center:
Arts and crafts for children
3:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays.
*Zodiac Community Center:
The activities room is avail-


Center:
Porceilain pouring class 10
a.m.-noon today and July 22.
Custom-designed T-shirt for
your organization. Call 284-6345
for information.
The 1994 photo contest is com-
ing in August. Call the center for
information.
Ongoing classes include stained
glass, cross-stitch, framing, clay
flower, pottery wheel throwing,
macrame, air brush techniques, and
lamp assembly. Several "how-to"
videos are available for viewing.


able to rent for private functions.
Call 284-6161 to reserve a date.
Subs on Top has take-out, eat-
in or delivery service to Kobbe,
Farfan, Howard and Gateway hous-
ing. Fax in orders at 284-6109 or
call 284-5848. It is open 11 a.m.-6
p.m. Monday-Friday and now 11
a.m.- 3 p.m. Saturday.


VIP


Phone guide


Pacific
24th Services Squadron Sports and
Recreational Rental Center, 284-6107
Albrook Auto Craft Shop, 286-3613
Albrook Club, 286-4128
Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333
Canal Crafters 286-4500
Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-5957
Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453
Clayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360
Clayton NCO Club, 287-3586
Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363
Clayton Scuba Shop 287-3355
Club Amador, 282-3534
Cocoli Recreation Center, 287-4119
Howard Auto Craft Shop, 284-3370
Howard Enlisted Members' Club, 284-4107
Howard Officers' Club, 284-4680
Howard Riding Stables 284-3770
Howard Skills Development Center, 284-6361
Howard Teen Center, 284-4700
Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-4510
The Loop, 287-3035
Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814
Quarry Heights Officers' Club, 282-4380
Rodman Annex, 283-5475
Rodman Club, 283-4498
Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150
Rodman Naval Station Information Tour
and Travel Office, 283-5307/4454
Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514
Valent Recreation Center, 287-6500
Zodiac Community Activities Center, 284-
6161
Atlantic
Aquativity Center, 289-4009
Davis Arts and Crafts Center, 289-5201
Davis Community Club, 289-5160
Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402
Outdoor Recreation, 289-4077
Sherman Arts and Crafts Center, 289-6313
Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-6104
Sundial Recreation Center, 289-3889/3300


Rec center news
*Sundial Recreation Center:
Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. Mon-
day, Wednesdays and Fridays.
Family exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday.
Karate 6-7 p.m. Monday and
Wednesday.
Spanish 6-7 p.m. Tuesday and


Friday.
Beginning Painting 6-8 p.m.
Monday and Wednesdays.
Ocean Breeze Recreation
Center:
The center offers a variety
of classes such as karate, cake
decorating, piano, Spanish, En-
glish, country line dancing and
jazz.


Atlantic tours
*Sundial Recreation Center:
Free Zone shopping 9 a.m. -
1:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Isla Grande 8 a.m.-5 p.m. July
24.
*Ocean Breeze Recreation Cen-
ter:
Portobello tour 8 a.m. Sunday.









B8 Tropic Times
SJuly 15, 1994


Movies


Location

Howard AFB
284-3583








Fort Clayton
287-3279








Fort Davis
289-5173


Today
7pm: PCU
(PG-13)
Jeremy Piven,
David Spade
9pm: Schindler's List
(R) Liam Neeson,
Ben Kingsley




7pm: 3 Ninjas Kick
Back (PG)
Max Elliott Slade,
Victor Wong
9pm: No Escape (R)
Ray Liotta,
Lance Henriksen




7pm: With Honors
(PG-13) Joe Pesci,
Brendan Fraser
9pm: Serial Mom (R)
Kathleen Turner,
Sam Waterston


Saturday Sunday
2pm: Clean Slate 2pm: Clean Slate
(PG-13) (PG-13)
Dana Carvey, Dana Carvey,
Valeria Golino Valeria Golino
7pm: Schindler's List 7pm: Threesome (R)
(R) Liam Neeson, Lara Flynn Boyle,
Ben Kingsley Stephen Baldwin
10:15pm: Threesome 9pm: PCU
(R) (PG-13)
Lara Flynn Boyle, Jeremy Piven,
Stephen Baldwin David Spade


2pm: 3 Ninjas Kick
Back (PG)
Max Elliott Slade,
Victor Wong
7pm: 3 Ninjas Kick
Back (PG)
Max Elliott Slade,
Victor Wong
9pm: Leprechaun 2
(R) Warwick Davis

7pm: Serial Morn (R)
Kathleen Turner,
Sam Waterston
9pm: Surviving the
Game (R) Ice T,
Rutger Hauer


Fort Sherman 7:30pm: Brainscan (R) 7:30pm:
289-517t3 Edward Furlong (PG-13) J
Frank Langella Brendan F



Fort Amador 7pm: Leprechaun 2 7pm: PC
284-3583 (R) Warwick Davis (PG-13)


With Honors
Joe Pesci,
Fraser


jeremy r ven,
David Spade


2pm: 3 Ninjas Kick
Back (PG)
Max Elliott Slade,
Victor Wong
7pm: No Escape (R)
Ray Liotta,
Lance Henriksen
9:15pm: The Favor (R)
Elizabeth McGovern,
Harley Jane Kozak

7pm: Surviving the
Game (R) Ice T,
Rutger Hauer






7:30pm: Serial Mom
(R) Kathleen Turner,
Sam Waterston


7pm: Clean Slate
(PG-13)
Dana Carvey,
Valeria Golino


Monday
7pm: Threesome (R)
Lara Flynn Boyle,
Stephen Baldwin
9pm: Clean Slate
(PG- 13)
Dana Carvey,
Valeria Golino




7pm: Leprechaun 2
(R) Warwick Davis
9pm: No Escape (R)
Ray Liotta,
Lance Henriksen






6pm: No show
555th Air Force Band







No show


No show


Tuesday
7pm: Schindler's List
(R) Liam Neeson,
Ben Kingsley


7pm: 3 Ninjas Kick
Back (PG)
Max Elliott Slade,
Victor Wong
9pm: The Favor (R)
Elizabeth McGovern,
Harley Jane Kozak




7pm: Serial Mom (R)
Kathleen Turner,
Sam Waterston


No show




No show


Wednesday
2pm: White Fang 2
(PG)
Scott Bairstow,
Charmaine Craig
7pm: No show
555th Air Force Band





2pm: D2: Mighty
Ducks Are Back (PG)
Emilio Estevez
Michael Tucker
7pm: No Escape (R)
Ray Liotta,
Lance Henriksen
9:15pm: The Favor (R)
Elizabeth McGovern,
Harley Jane Kozak

7pm: 3 Ninjas Kick
Back (PG)
Max Elliott Slade,
Victor Wong





No show


7pm: Schindler's List
(R) Liam Neeson,
Ben Kingsley


I I I


Thursday
7pm: Crooklyn (PG-
13)
Alfred Woodard,
Delroy Lindo
9pm: When a Man
Loves a Woman (R)
Andy Garcia,
Meg Ryan



7pm: Schindler's List
(R) Liam Neeson,
Ben Kingsley







7pm: No Escape (R)
Ray Liotta,
Lance Henriksen






7:30pm: 3 Ninjas
Kick Back (PG)
Max Elliott Slade,
Victor Wong

7pm: The Inkwell (R)
Larenz Tate,
Joe Morton


July 22


Howard AFB
7pm When a Man Loves
a Woman (R)
Andy Garcia
Meg Ryan
9pm The Inkwell (R)
Larenz Tate,
Joe Morton


Fort Clayton
7pm PCU (PG-13)
Jeremy Piven,
David Spade
9pm Schindler's List
(R)
Liam Neeson,
Ben Kingsley


Fort Davis
7pm 3 Ninjas Kick Back
(PG)
Max Elliott Slade,
Victor Wong
9pm No Escape (R)
Ray Liotta,
Lance Henriksen


Fort Sherman
7:30pm Serial Mom (R)
Kathleen Turner,
Sam Waterston


Fort Amador
7pm Crooklyn (PG-13)
Alfred Woodard,
Delroy Lindo


When a Man Loves a
Woman
Meg Ryan , Andy Garcia
In this powerful emotional drama, the
strength of a marriage is tested when the
couple must deal with a serious problem
that could destroy their relationship. R
(language), 126 min.

Crooklyn
Alfred Woodard, Delroy Lindo
Spike Lee moves in a new direction with
this deftly observed, touching and often
funny view of the life of a Brooklyn
family during the 1970s. PG-13 (drug
content), 130 min.

The Inkwell
Joe Morton, Larentz Tate
A shy black teenager and his experiences
at a social center on Martha's Vineyard
in the 1970s are the focus of this tender
and offbeat coming of age story. R (lan-
guage), 112 min.

PCU
Jeremy Piven, David Spade
In PCU, a renegade dorm sets out to defy
the rigid behavior of its fellow students at
a very politically correct university. It's
the free thinkers against the regimented
in a riotous collection of counter culture
clashes. PG- 13 (language, drug content,
some sensuality), 80 min.

Threesome
Lara Flynn Boyle, Stephen Baldwin
A clerical error assigns a young lady as
roommate to two gentlemen in the col-
lege dorm. Their sexual awakening is
somewhat confused as they try to sort out
their preferences in a comedy of the 90s.
R (strong sexuality, sex related dialogue),
93 min.

Clean Slate
Dana Carvey, Valeria Golino
Being a good private detective is tough
when you wake up each morning with


Now showing at Howard aND Clayton theaters.



Now showing at Howard and Clayton theaters.


your memory wiped completely clean.
Dana Carvey tries to deal with this pecu-
liarproblem as he ducks dangernot know-
ing why everyone wants to kill him. PG-
13 (language), 119 mmin.


3 Ninjas Kick Back
Max Elliott Slade, Victor Wong
The continuing adventure of ninja arts
students Rocky, Colt and Turn Turn picks
up with them on the way to Japan to
rescue grandma, fight bad guys and dis-
cover a cave of gold. PG (martial arts
action, mild language), 99 min.

Schindler's List
Liam Neeson, Ben Kingsley
Winner ofseven academy awards, Steven
Spielberg's powerful film account ofhow
a Jewish businessman saved thousands
of WWII Jews from death is a chilling
and realistic recreation of one of recent
history's most horrifying chapters. R (lan-
guage, actuality violence, some sexuali-
ty), 3 hrs, 15 min.

Surviving the Game
Ice T, Rutger Hauer
A homeless man gets involved in a
deadly hunting game, in which he's the
prey. Hunted by a group of very rich
thrill seekers in the wilderness of the
Pacific Northwest, Ice T uses his street
smarts to survive and teach them a lesson


in humanity. R (strong violence, lan-
guage), 96 min.

The Favor
Elizabeth McGovern,
Harley Jane Kozak
The Favor takes a light look at two
couples' intertwining relationships.
Who's in love with whom and for how
long is the basis for a romantic comedy
with a little different flavor. R (lan-
guage), 97 min.

No Escape
Ray Liotta,
Lance Henriksen
In this futuristic action-adventure, Ray
Liotta is a military man sent to a high
security prison and assigned to an iso-
lated island colony where two groups
of desperate criminals battle for con-
trol. He organizes the troops to battle
for freedom against the highly
mechanzied security forces. R (strong
violence, language), 118 min.

Leprechaun 2
Warwick Davis
Little Lop is in Los Angeles and he's
looking for a wife. The woman of his
dreams is not so inclined, and to further
unfuriate him-someone has taken some
of his gold. R (violence, nudity), 85
min.


cU

Rivn














TV Schedule


Channels 8 *1


Tropic Times B
July 15, 1994B


* Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time


Today


5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America
8:00 Basic Training Workout
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Murder, She Wrote
10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital
12:00 Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World
2:00 Oprah Winfrey
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Legends of the Hidden
Temple
4:30 I Love Lucy
5:00 Family Feud
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:30 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Wheel of Fortune
7:30 Entertainment Tonight
8:00 America's Funniest Home
Videos
8:30 Dave's World
9:00 Paradise **
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Cheers
10:30 David Letterman
11:30 Tonight Show
12:30 Rocko's Modem World
1:00 Movies: "National
Lampoon's European
Vacation"
2:35 "Seems Like Old Times"
4:15 "Caddyshack"
5:45 Videolinks
6:00 Headline News Break


Saturday


6:30 Headline News
7:00 Navy/Marine Corps News
7:30 Real News for Kids
8:00 Guts
8:30 Just for Kids!
Garfield and Friends **
Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles
Wild West C.O.W. Boys
of Moo Mesa
Batman Cartoon**
Cartoon Classics
Faerie Tale Theater
11:00 The Creative Spirit
12:00 Headline News
12:30 "3:10 to Yuma"
2:15 "National Lanipoon's
European Vacation"
4:00 Nova
5:00 Showtime at the Apollo
6:00 The Adventures of
Superman
6:30 Rescue 911
7:30 China Beach
8:25 Movie: "Back to School"
10:00 Headline News
10:30 Saturday Night Live
12:00 WWF Superstars of
Wrestling
1:00 Friday Night Videos
2:00 Movies: "The Young
Philadelphians"
4:15 "The Big Chill".


Sunday

6:00 CCMTV
6:30 Hour of Power
7:00 Voices of Faith
7:25 Catch the Spirit
8:00 Americas Black Forum +
I 8:30 Golf: "British Open" Final
Round
12:30 Headline News Break
12:45 On Stage ****
1:15 Double Feature: "Story of
Alexander Graham Bell"
3:00 "Cowboy"
4:30 Victory at Sea ****
5:00 Center Stage ****
6:00 Entertainment this
Week ****
7:00 Grace Under Fire ****
7:30 Movie: "A FewGoodMen"
10:00 ABC 20/20 ****
11:00 Middlemarch ****
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Meet the Press
1:30 Headline News
2:00 Sports Latenight
2:30 ABC World News Now
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Sports Machine
4:00 ABC World News Now
5:00 Headline News Break


Monday

5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America
8:00 Basic Training Workout
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Murder, She Wrote
10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Ilospital
12:00 I deadline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 Sports Machine
1:00 Another World
2:00 Oprah Winfrey
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Guts
4:30 I Love Lucy
5:00 Family Feud
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Wheel of Fortune
7:30 Entertainment Tonight
8:00 Roc
8:30 COPS
9:00 60 Minutes
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Cheers
10:30 David Letterman
11:30 Tonight Show
12:30 Headline News
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Arsenio Hall
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Tonight Show
4:30 Headline News
5:00 Headline News Break


Tuesday

5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America
8:00 Bodyshaping
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Murder, She Wrote
10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital
12:00 Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World
2:00 Sally Jesse Raphael
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Ghostwriter
4:30 I Love Lucy
5:00 Family Feud
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Wheel of Fortune
7:30 Entertainment Tonight
8:00 Answerline
9:00 48 Hours
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Cheers
10:30 David Letterman
11:30 Tonight Show
12:30 Headline News
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Arsenio Hall
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Tonight Show
4:30 Headline News
5:00 Headline News Break


Wednesday

5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America
8:00 Basic Training Workout
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Murder, She Wrote
10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital
12:00 Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World
2:00 Oprah Winfrey
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Shining Time Station
4:30 1 Love Lucy
5:00 Family Feud
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Wheel of Fortune
7:30 Entertainment Tonight
8:00 Fresh Prince of Bel-Air
8:25 Movie: "Sinatra Part 2"
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Cheers
10:30 David Letterman
11:30 Tonight Show
12:30 Headline News
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Arsenio Hall
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Tonight Show
4:30 Headline News
5:00 Headline News Break


Thursday

5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America
8:00 Bodyshaping
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Murder, She Wrote
10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital
12:00 Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday Report
12:30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World
2:00 Donahue
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Club Connect
4:30 I Love Lucy
5:00 Family Feud
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Wheel of Fortune
7:30 Entertainment Tonight
8:00 Murphy Brown
8:25 Movie: "Impulse"
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Cheers
10:30 David Letterman
11:30 Tonight Show
12:30 Headline News
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Arsenio Hall
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Tonight Show
4:30 Headline News
5:00 Headline News Break



j - -___


Today Saturday


5:30 Simulcast with Channels
8& 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Ghost Writer
5:00 Silver Spoons
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 Primetime Live
8:00 Renegade **
9:00 Movie: "Close
Encounters Of The Third
Kind"
11:25 SCN Late Edition
11:30 Nightline
12:00 M*A*S*H
12:30 Larry King Live
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Arsenio Hall
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Tonight Show
4:30 David Letterman
5:30 Simulcast with 8 & 10


6:30 Simulcast with Chan-
nels 8 & 10
8:30 Young Adult Theater
"The Adventure of
Winnie the Pooh"
" 15 and Getting Straight"
"Abby, My Love"
11:30 Real News For Kids
12:00 Silver Spoons
12:30 Sports Closeup
1:00 Movie:"Babes in
Toyland"
3:00 "Arsenic and Old Lace"
5:00 American Gladiators
6:00 Martin +
6:30 The Simpsons
7:00 Lois & Clark: The
Adventures of Superman
8:00 Star Trek: "Deep Space
Nine"
9:00 Herman's Head
9:30 Married With Children
10:00 Movie: "Family Business"
12:00 Headline News
12:30 Science and Technology
Week
1:00 The McLaughlin Group
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Entertainment This week
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Saturday Night Live
5:00 Videolinks
5:30 Headline News Break


* Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time


Sunday

6:00 Shining Time Station
6:30 The Sunshine Factory **
7:15 Goof Troop
7:40 Garfield and Friends
8:05 Darkwing Duck
8:15 Tiny Toon Adventures ***
8:40 EEK! The Cat ***
9:05 Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles
9:30 Science and Technology
Week
10:00 Motor Week
10:30 Sports Closeup
11:00 This Week in Baseball
11:30 This Old House
12:00 Mary Tyler Moore Show
12:30 Amish Cooking From
Quilt Country
1:00 Movie:"Old Yeller"
2:30 World Cup Soccer:
Finals
5:00 Quantum Leap
6:00 Fresh Prince of Bel-Air
6:30 Wonderful World of
Disney
7:30 Golden Girls
8:00 Movie: "In Crowd"
10:00 Day One
11:00 L.A. Law
12:00 Simulcast with 8 & 10


Monday

5:30 Simulcast with Channels 8
& 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Tiny Toon
Adventures ***
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Are You Afraid of the
Dark?
5:00 Club Connect
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 MacGyver
8:00 Melrose Place ***
9:00 Monday Night Movie:
"Backdraft"
11:00 Headline News
11:25 SCN Late Edition
11:30 Nightline
12:00 M*A*S*H
12:30 Simulcast with 8& 10


Tuesday

5:30 Simulcast with Channels
8 & 10
8:00 Donahue
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 EEK! The Cat ***
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Legends of The Hidden
Temple
5:00 Mickey & Donald
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 ALF
7:30 Home Improvement
8:00 Picket Fences
9:00 Martin
9:25 Movie: "Mass Appeal"
11:00 Headline News
11:25 SCN Late Edition
11:30 Nightline
12:00 M*A*S*H
12:30 Simulcast with 8&10


Wednesday

5:30 Simulcast with Channels
8 & 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
I 2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 GoofTroop
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Guts
5:00 Nick News: W5 ***
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 Hangin' with Mr.
Cooper
7:30 Seinfeld
8:00 Tour of Duty
9:00 NYPD Blue (VOC
10:00 Murder, She Wrote
11:00 Headline News Break
11:25 SCN Late Edition
11:30 Nightline
12:00 M*A*S*H
12:30 Simulcast with 8&10


Thursday

5:30 Simulcast with Channels
8&10
8:00 Sally Jesse Raphael
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
12:00 Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday.
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Garfield and Friends
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Get the Picture
5:00 The Wonder Years
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 Full House
7:30 Family Matters
8:00 Living Single *
8:30 Joe's Life
9:00 Dateline NBC
10:90 Miami Vice
11:00 Headline News Break
11:25 SCN Late Edition
11:30 Nightline
12:00 M*A*S*H
12:30 Simulcast with 8&10


Channels 8 & 10
Specials ,.,I
"Answerline, " 8 p.m. Tuesday
This month's topic is "Family Housing." Representatives from
the three services will answer your questions. You may call in
questions 7:30-9:00 p.m. by calling 287-4460.
Sports
Golf . . ..
"British Open" Final Round, 8:30 a.m. Sunday
Series Starts '
"Paradise," 9 p.m. today. (Replaces Baywatch) The story of a 1890s
gunfighter who unexpectedly inherits his sister's four young children. Stars '
Lee Horsley and Sigid Thornton.
"Garfield and Friends," 8:30 a.m. Saturday. (Replaces "Sonic The Hedgehog"
in "Just For Kids") Cartoonist Jim Davis' Garfield claws his way back into the
schedule, along with Jon and Odie, as America's favorite lasagna-loving over-
weight feline.
Primetime movies
"Back To School," 8:25 p.m. Saturday. Higher education will never be the same.
A wild and crazy self- made millionaire buys his way into college to join his son in
the freshman class. Stars Rodney Dangerfield and Sally Kellerman.
"A Few Good Men," 7:30 p.m. Sunday. A young, inexperienced Navy lawyer is
assigned to prosecute a case involving the death of a Marine. While his senior finally
gets him to take things seriously, his biggest problem is a belligerent Marine colonel.
Stars Tom Cruise and Jack Nicholson.
"Sinatra," 8:25 p.m. Wednesday. (Part 2) Now in his mid-30s, Sinatra finds
himself chasing actress Ava Gardner while his career begins a downward spiral.
Stars Philip Casnof and Gina Gershon.


Cable Channel 14
Sports
World Cup Soccer
Finals, 2:30 p.m. Sunday
Series starts
"Renegade," 8 p.m. today. (Replaces 21 Jump Street) He
was a cop and a good cop at that, but he committed the ultimate
Ssin by breaking the "Code of Silence" and testifying against other
1vj-1)k cops that had gone bad. Now, framed for murder, Reno Raines finds
'^ himself on the run, riding the highways of America on his Harley. Stars
" Lorenzo Llamas and Branscombe Richmond.
N ^ "The Sunshine Factory," 6:30 a.m. Sunday. (Replaces McGee and Me)
,' Welcome back to "The Sunshine Factory," the magical workshop where young
folks get together for friendship, fun and light-hearted lessons in solid Christian
values.
Primetime movies
"Close Encounters Of The Third Kind," 9 p.m. today. The most famous victim
of the Bermuda Triangle, Flight 19, is finally recovered intact - but without its pilots
- 35 years after the aircraft and crews disappeared off the Florida coast. Stars
Richard Dreyfus and Melinda Deaton.
"Family Business," 10 p.m. Saturday. Three generations of McMullen men have
a slight disagreement about the future of the family business...stealing. Patriarch
Jessie wants to teach the trade to his college drop-out grandson, Adam, by pulling off
one last big job before he retires. Stars Sean Connery and Dustin Hoffman.
"In Crowd," 8 p.m. Sunday. In this entertaining study of how the media can
manipulate its audience, a shamelessly devious DJ with a strong influence on his
teenage fans creates the coolest of the cool. Stars Donovan Leitch and Jennifer
Runyon.


I I


I
i













B 1O Tropic Times
BIO July 15, 1994


SClassified Ads


Duty-free merchandise

FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) - As a rem

in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Sou
Command regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or
cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege
ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to pr
tion under both, military and Panamanian laws. It is somi
permissible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are
Before such a sale, it is strongly recommended that the seller c
the Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-3117.


Female pekapoo (poodle-pekinese)
puppies, 6 weeks old, dewormed, tails
clipped, $60 each. 286-6391.

AKA/CCP mini pincher puppies,
champion bloodlines, available July
15. 284-3924.

Toy poodles, purebred 4 months old,
$125 each. Horse, mare, near
Kobbe, $75. 252-2889.

1 1/2 yr. old doberman, grt. w/kids, all
shots, ears and tail done, good guard
dog, $300. 287-6738.

Free to good home, 5 month old
female calico, shots needed. 264-
2034.

Free male kitten to a good home.
261-3486.

Free kitten, 9 wks old, shots to date,
female, gray and white. 283-5687.

Basset hound pups, akc/ccp, shots,
8wks, $300, males only. 284-4700.

Cream/gray seal-point Himalayan,
blue eyes, all shots updated,
declawed, able to breed, $225/obo.
286-4998.

Rottweiler, akc registered, 18 months
old, $450./obo. 286-6533.

Male boxer, 6 months old, fawn tail
cut, shots, champion bloodline,
family dog only. 287-4592.

Pure white, male cat, 5 months old,
playful, very good w/kids, some
shots. Free. 287-3335.

Chow-chow, black, female, ccp, 2
years old, needs stud service. 229-
4667.

Rottweiler puppies, ccp reg, cham-
pion sire, exc. show quality dam.
287-6195.

Free cat, declawed and neutered,
great w/children, litter box and food
included. 287-3480.

Registered akc black American
cocker spaniel for stud services.
286-4084.

Purebred poodle pups, tails cropped,
dewormed, black, $150. 221-3867.

Seal-point Himalayan-Persian,
male for stud service, cfa reg,
proven. 289-4354.

American bull dog, 2 months old, all
shots, excellent bloodline 262-0732.

Timber wolf, 4 yrs old, housetrained,
good w/children, includes carrier
and all equipment. $200. 289-3640.

3 yr old, aka reg., male rottweiler for
sale, great watch dog, $400. 284-
3993.

AKC rottweiler puppies, available
July 30, 7 males and 2 females,
$600. 284-3993.

Pitbull/rottweiler mix pups, 2
months old, male and female, col-
lect call operator, $125. 250-0311.

4 yr old TB gelding, English trained,
good jumper prospect, needs expe-
rienced rider, $1,000/obo. 284-6683.

Large kennel for dog, $75. 287-5630.

Siberian husky puppies, 4 female &
4 males, 4/papers 6wks old, $300.
284-3681 after 4:30.

Parrots, different types, sold to ap-
proved homes only, $40 ca. 284-
3799.






1991 Grand Voyager, luxury edition,
ac/at, low milage, ex cond, $18,200.
287-6233.

1992 Dodge Ram, W250 p/h 5.9
cummins turbo- intercooled disel
low mileage exc cond many extras,
$17,000. 286-4772.

1987 Ford Mercury XR4TI power ev-
erything. snrf not duty paid, $5,500/
obo 287-4383.

1985 Jeep Cherokee, 4dr, 4x4, 5 spd,
ps/pb, rims, alarm, radio/cass, tinted,
dtv oaid. $6,500. 287-5167.


1991 Buick Regal, 4 dr, at, as, pc, exc
cond, 29,000 mile, not dty paid,
$9,500. 264-8244.

1987 Chevy IROC Z-28, Turquoise, 5
speed, ac, t-top, alarm, neon lights,
$13,000/obo. 287-3999.

1993 Nissan Altima GLE, leather in-
terior, heads up display, cd/cass play-
er, all extras, $20,000 neg. 284-4498.

1988 Buick Skyhawk, $2,500. 287-
3284.

1986 Chevrolet Celebrity, am/fm,
good condition, $4,995. 286-3398.

1994 Daihatsu Charade, ac, am-fm,
cass, alarm, exc. cond., 10,000 km,
$6,700. 264-4105.

1986 Ford Bronco II XLT, good con-
dition. 285-5560, rm 10.

1985 Dodge Caravan, excellent con-
dition, $5,800/obo. 287-4136.

1976 Malibu Classic, $800/obo. 287-
4136.

1987 Chevey IROC Z-28, 5sp, ac, pb,
ps, pw, t-top, alarm, neon lights,
S11,000. 287-3999.

1979 Mercedes 450 SE, exc. cond.,
snrf, ac, am/fm cass, not duty paid,
$10,000/obo. 287-3887.

1988 Dodge Caravan LE, 6 cylinder,
ac, tinted windows, exc. cond., new
tires, $10,000. 287-3887.

1989 Pontiac Firebird, v-6, ak, auto,
am/fm cassette, power locks, win-
dows, tilt wheel, mint condition,
$8,500. 285-5006.

1985 Nissan Bluebird, diesel 2.0, ac,
pb, r/cass., new tires, excellent cond.,
dty pd, alarm, $5,000. 261-6830.

1990 Ford Tempo, 4cyl, ac. pwr steer-
ing, pwr brakes, pwr windows, pwr
locks, stereo w/tape, automatic trans-
mission, exc. cond., not dty pd,
$7700. 226-8626.

1991 Pathfinder, no US specs., not dty
paid, ac, am-fm cassette alarm, exc.
cond, $12,500. 286-3895.

Daewoo Racer 92 exc. cond. alarm,
am-fm, cass tinted glass/corrosion
protection, $6,000. 224-3550.

1986 Ford Taurus, 5 sp, new ac, br,
bat, trs, dty pd, pw, ps, Rad/cass, exc
cond. $7,000. 269-5700.

1990 Nissain truck, custom 600 watt
stereo, 5-star wheels, custom int, mir-
ror tint, $10,000. 287-5582.

PCSing, $1,200. Firm 1980 Capri runs
great sell by July 20 h235866
W856228 LV msg 235-5866.

1987 Ford Tempo, auto, ac, 4dr,
burgandy interior, exterior good
cond. $4,000/obo. 286-6328.

1991 Ford Explorer 4x4, like new
cond. 287-3627.

1986 Toyota Minivan, model f, ac/at,
ps, pl, pw, sr, pb, good cond, $6,000/
obo, dty paid. 224-4190.

1987 GMC 4x4, auto, camper shell
am/fm cass. new shocks and brakes
$5,600 232-4627.

1986 Taurus, dty pd, exc. cond., new
ac, pwr everything, $7,000/neg. 269-
5700.

1979 Chevy Caprice, good cond.,
$2,300/obo, $2,300/obo. 269-9363.

1977 Chrysler New Yorker, good
cond., new front brakes, starter and
alt, $1,300. 286-4171.

1992 Jeep Wrangler, 40L fuel injec-
tion, 18k miles, sport rims, carpeting,
$12,000. 269-6089.

1986 Jeep Cherokee 4 dr 4wd fully
loaded standard transmission,
$7,500/obo. 284-4684.

1987 Chevy Suburan, 4-wd, dual ac,
auto trans, new tires, low milage, dty
pd, exc. cond., $10,900. 252-5397.

1985 Nissan 200SX, tint, stereo, ac, 5
speed, ps, good running cond.,
$2,500. 230-1618.

1987 Jeep Wrangler, 6 cyl, 4wd, 5 spd,
exc. cond., $7,000/obo. 282-4523.

1987 Ford Taurus GL. fully loaded,
$6,000. 287-4193.

1991 Cutlass Supreme, pwr every-
thing, ac, snrf, cruise, lots more,
$11,500/obo. 286-6136.


1979 Grand Prix Pontia
green, runs well, $12,00

1986 Nissan 300ZX Tu
$7,000/obo. 1982 Toy
loaded, dty pd, $5,00
3232.

1991 Eagle Talon, load
drive, liter turbo engine
age, one owner, $13,50

1985 Ford F-150 XLT, 6
tilt, cruise, mag wheel
camper shell, not dty
236-4979.

1988 Jeep Comanche t
pb, ac,\ am/fm cass,
camper shell, bed liner,
5430.

1992 Jeep Wrangler, so
13,000 miles, exc. coni

1990 Dodge Caravan, 5
4 cyl, brown ext., $8,50

1991 Chrysler Imperia
low miles, one owner,
to-bumper warranty. 2

1990 Ford Aerostar X
low mileage, all access
not duty pd, $15,500. 2

1988 Ford Escort sta
exc. cond., many new
am/fm cass., ac, $5,00

1988 Jeep Commanche
am/fmin, cass, new tires
261-6418.

1986 Toyota 4-Runner
pb, stereo cass, black
$8,700. 260-8178.

1987 Toyota 4-Runner,
ac, cc, radio cass, dty I
236-2365.

1986 Ford Ranger, cam
pc, pb, dual tanks, $5,0
4332.

1992 Daihatzu Appi
45,000 km, excellent
$7,500. 286-6495.

1980 Chevy Impala, nev
fm cass, runs great, $1,:
4498.

1993 Aerostar, 6 cyl,
ps, pb, srs, tilt, ac, cruise
tint, $17,900. 284-48
Mark.

1972 Chevy Nova, cla
new tires, great shape,
3270.

1992 Chevy S-10 p/u, 5
pb, am-fm/cass, $8,601

1988 Buick Skyhawk
good, $2,000. 287-328

1985 Toyota p/u, double
spd, diesel eng, ac, ar
dty pd, $6,500. 236-30

1993 Jeep Cheroke Gi
exc. cond., low miles, fu
at, 5 year warranty, n
$23,900/obo. 286-3381

1982 VW p/u, diesel,
great, many new parts,
$2,800. 223-0962.

1993 Dodge Dakota LI
4x4, v-8, anti-lock bra
brush guard, camper
10,000 miles, $19,000.

1993 Nissan, 4dr, a/c,
exc. cond, $5,600. 236

1986 Audi 5000, duty p
viced, ex cond., $6,501

1983 LTD Crown Vict
running condition, not dt
able July 23, $2,000. 2

1992 Hyundai Sonata
owner, wdrs, 5sp, ac. ti
$10,500. 221-6457.

1979 GMC Jimmy 4x
cass, lifted, exc. cond.
4095.

1986 Chevy Nova, 5-sp
cass, tw, exc. cond.,
3044.

1991 Chevy, 5-spd, low
fm radio, $9,000. 287-

1984 Mercury Marquis
ac, pb, pw, ps, like ne"
284-4525.

1992 Pontiac Grand /
auto, abs, ac, tilt, am/I
tires, $12,000/neg. 283


1994 Daihatsu Charade,ac, am/fm cass,
alarm, exc cond, 10,000 km, $6,700.
264-4105.

1991 510 Blazer, 4x4, 2dr, ps, pb, ac,
inder, pw, pol, Tahoe packing, 32,000 miles,
uthern $14,000/obo. 286-4189.
utherR -------
Sused, 1992 CJS Jeep, good cond, $2,700.
rused, 252-2884.
hold-
1978 Jeep CJ-7, body rebuilt, new
osecu- paint, full and bikini tops, runs great,
times am/fm cassette, $4,750. 287-3572.

paid. 1981 Olds Cutlass Supreme, 2 dr Bur-
S gundy, not dty pd, new parts, $1,200/
contact obo. 220-4118 nights and evenings.

1989 Bronco, 6 cyl, man, ac, low
miles, exc. cond. 1988 Taurus GL.
252-5738.
c, 2 dr, light
00. 286-3992. 1980 Mercury Capri, runs good, nice
second car, $1,200. 223-5866.
urbo, loaded,
ota pickup, 1987 Suzuki Samurai, $3,500. 286-
.0/obo. 282- 4227.

1989 Mercury Topaz, exc. cond., pwr
led, all-wheel everything, new paint tires, $5,900.
e, low mile- 226-6473.
0. 269-3770.
1987 Mazda 626 LX, ac, power win-
cyl, 4.9L, ac, dows, power locks, chrome wheels,
s, bed liner, cass player, tinted windows, exc.
pd, $7,500. cond, $4,500. 287-5974.___
1993 Nissan Ford Altima GLE, leath-
truck, at, ps, er interior, heads up display, cd/cass
cruise, tilt, player, all extras, $16,000. 284-4498.
$8,000. 284-
1988 Ford Ranger XLT, 5-spd, v6, ac,
power steering & brakes, am/fm ste-
3ft bikini top, reo cass., $7,000/obo. 252-5400 af-
d. 284-5430. ter 5pm.

57,500 miles, 1989 Toyota Corolla, exc.cond., low
00. 286-3245. miles, ac, ps, am/fm cass., 5 spd, not
dty pd, $6,000. 264-0158.
I, exc. cond,
7/70 bumper- 1990 Dodge Spirit ES, v-6, ac, pwr
86-3398. everything, exc. stereo, 4dr, maroon
$5,500. 236-5125.
L, extended,
ories of XLT, 1988 Dodge Daytona, t-top, ps, pb, 4
287-6182. cyl, $3,500. 284-4031.

tion wagon, 1970 Ford Capri Classic, all extras,
parts, ps, p6, exc cond. 220-6091.
0. 286-3345.
1991 Mazda Navaho, 4x4, exc. cond,
ac, pb, ps, 45,000 miles, ac, am/fm cass,
& rims, 4wd $15,500. 236-2618.
1988 Ford Mustang LX, 60k, new
4x4, ac, ps, computer stereo and spks, looks &
, exc. cond, runs great, 4,700. 260-3130.
1986 Ford Areostar, 6 cyl, ac, at,
4-cyl, 5spd, good cond, not dty pd, $7,000/obo.
pd, like new. 282-3832.
1983 Chevy Celebrity, ps, pb, ac, am/
per shell, ac, fm, runs good, many new parts,
100/obo. 287- $2,500. 284-3825.
1979 Pontiac Bonneville, 4 dr, v8,
ause, at/ac, runs good, $1,750/obo. 284-5397.
t condition,
1978 F150 Ranger, rebuilt 351 Cleve-
land engine, ps, pb, 8 cyl, automatic,
w brakes am/ dty pd, $3,000/obo 252-2181.
200/obo. 287-
1989 Hyundai Excel, ac, radio/cass,
automatic, tinted windows, not dty
7 passengers, pd. 284-6171.
e, am/fm cass,
897, ask for 1985 Plymouth Voyager minivan,
new brake tires, grt shape, not dty pd,
$4,500. 284-4786.
assic, ac, ps,
$2,300. 260- 1990 Ford Tempo, needs body work,
4 dr, 4cyl, ps, pd, ac, automatic, tint-
ed windows, $3,800/obo. 287-4428.
5 spd, ac, ps,
0. 286-3692. 1989 Ford Ranger XTL, ac, ps, am/
fm cass, 4 cyl, camper shell, make
k, psc, runs offer that can't be refused, $6,500.
4. 284-5792.

e cab, 4dr, 4 1984 Buick Skyhawk station wgn,
m/fm stereo, wdr, pwr str, auto, air cond, one own-
199. er, clean, low miles, well maintained,
$4,500. 227-1777.
rand Laredo,
ill-time, 4wd, 1987 Oldsmobile Cutlass Calais, new
many extras, trans, tires & battery, power windows
1. w/tint, $3,500. 284-3379.

runs & looks 1990 Ford Taurus station wagon,
not dty paid, $6,500/obo. 1989 Ford Ranger p/u
$4,800/obo. 287-3829.

E, super cab, 1984 Sabaru wagon, 4spd, 4wd, lug-
akes, loaded, gage rack, ac. am/fm cass, duty free,
shell, under $3,250. 264-4612.
286-3085.
1984 Dodge Daytona, 5 spd engine
am/fm radio, overhauled, ac, good cond, leather
6-3099. interior, available Aug 15, $4,000.
287-3789.
pd, dealer ser-
0. 223-0962. 1993 Ford Thunderbird LX, loaded,
efi-v6, tinted windows, must sell,
oria, ac. good $13,500. 284-4306, call after I pm.
ty paid, avail-
286-6384. 1985 Ford Mustang LX, $3,500. 284-
5528.
GL, 1.8i one ---
inted, dty pd, 1984 Buick Skyhawk mini station
wagon, 4dr, automatic, power steer-
ing, one owner, clean, well main-
4, at, am/fm trained, low miles, $4,500. 264-7314.
$3,500. 284-
1990 Toyota Corolla, ac, 5 spd, 65,000
mi, great condition, $8,500. 236-
pd, ac, am/fm 2794.
$5,400. 287-
Will trade 1990 Escort LX parked in
St. Louis for car here. 262-7278
Smilage, am/
3270. 1979 Pontiac Gran Lemans, dry pd,
runs good, ps, pb, $1,000. 284-3940.
, exc. cond.,
w int, $4,000. 1986 Toyota Celica GT coupe. 5sp, 4
cyl, ac, amifm cassette, power
sunroof, more, $5,000. 287-6182.
AM SE, 2dr, - ..
fm cass, new 1985 Volvo 240 DI wagon, exc cond,
.-4472. one owner, $4,950. 286-4787.


Spn-spk maid Aug 15 mature good
work good w/kids & pets refs msg
for Tomasa. 287-6637.

Full-time bilingual maid excellent
care of household, cleaning, laun-
dry, ironing, honest, great with pets.
236-2618.

Great day maid reliable, honest
hardworking speaks english, good
w/children. avail. 5 Aug. 5 days a
week or day. 287-3572.

18 yr old babysitter nights and week-
ends have references loves kids.
230-1927.

Guitar instructor, able to teach on
weekends, will go to learner's
house. 252-5023. $5 half hour.


reliable, exc-worker two days a week,
ask for Rosa. 261-7939.

Honest reliable babysitter, maid, ex-
cellent with children available M-F,
$120. 287-3091.

Babysitter good with kids. 261-
1236._

Live-in maid/babysitter, honest and
reliable, exp, ref, M-F. 286-4978.

English speaking mature maid 9 rt
with kids Preterable mil Families
live-in day maid. 263-3627.

Licensed family day care full/part
time openings drop-ins welcome
ask for Angella. 284-3181.

Bilingual maid, clean and babysit,
avail 6am to noon M-T-W. Albrook
references. 286-4584.

C&M Photography, special on 8x10.
Let us come to you by appointment.
284-4392.

Bilingual live-out maid grt w/kids, grt
house keeping. 286-4737.

Honest, reliable Eng-spk maid, live-in
good w/kids. 260-9915.

Wilton mehtod cake decorating class-
es beginning in July ask for Carole.
282-3320.

Span spk maid, reliable honest depend-
able, will work one, two or three days
a week. Does ironing, cleaning, baby
sitting. 253-5239.

Span-spk maid honest reliable, hard
'working ref upon request. one day
a week. 286-3381.

Maid excellent honest reliable live
out. 252-1035.

College student tutor for math (alg,
trig, geom & Calc) Afternoons, 261-
2426 afternoons.

Bilinual live-out maid, M-F, gen
house work great w/children, flex-
ible 221-2780.

Honest live-out maid 5 days a week
Bilingual no ironing, $120. 224-2996
ask for Denise. 224-2996.

Bilingual, maid, cooks and cleans,
good w/kids. live-out. 260-7754.

Reliable day maid excellent cook,
honest, good w/kids 286-4571.

Experience babysitter and mother
will care for your children at her
house. 284-5127.

English-spk maid to work 1-2 dys
weekly ref Mon and Wed Panama
area 224-7521.

Honest, dependable, Bilingual live-
out maid. great with infants, 284-
5878 ask for Julie.

Bilingual maid good w/children
cooks and clean Mon-Fri. 260-
7754.

Eng-spk live-in maid maid good with
kids honest reliable ref 266-3649.

Bilingual maid, very good w/kids &
dog, can do ironing, cleaning, & take
care of small kids. 287-5218.






Jet ski Kawasaki, 250 cc w, alumi-
num trailer $1,495. fiberglass camp-
er fits Toyota doublecab truck. 252-
2889.

20' deep v offshore day cruiser
rigged for open water fishing, b/o.
287-3390.

23' Analapni boat w/94 Evinrude
175 hp. w/extras. $12,500. 252-2243.

Aluminum trailer for 8 to 12 foot
boat or jet ski. $225. 252-2243.





Gameboy w/12 games, 4-play
adapter, magnifier, light boy, carry-
ing case, much much more! $350
obo. 287-4546.

Unused Kenwood power and con-


trol amp. 350w, $300. equalizer $150,
tuner $125 mv-5d speakers $175 ea.
235-4096.

Aiwa 55w speakers $75, Sony car
speakers 4x6 $150, Jensen 4xl00,
Bose am5 $550. 235-4096.

Graphic equalizer, audio video re-
ceiver. b/o. 287-5994.

Zenith laptop IBM ps-2 color moni-
tor-new hard drive. $350. 230-0008.

IBM printer $135. 230-0008.

Kenwood 70701 stereo speakers 4,
movie time cable box tuner. 287-
4482.

Cannon 8mm. video camcorder,
$550, nintendo games, computer
games for IBM. call after 6p.m. 252-
2314.

Cannon ae-1 adn t-50 sir. camera w/
lens and acc. 252-6831.

Wireless head phones, Strax
earspeakers w/adaptor, Teac double
cass. Sony 15' color t.v. w/remote.
260-2104.

Commodore select edition, 40mb hd,
640k ram, dual disks and much more.
$800. 221-4917.

SNES w/2 games, $100, NCAA bas-
ketball $20, John Madden 94 $35.
286-4978.

Nintendo w/misc. items. $20. Nikko
radio controlled car w/batteries and
charger. 233-1229.

Epson comp. 20mb ram, w/dos 5.0,
WP 5.1, Lotus 1-2-3, includes printer.
$475. 264-3679.

4-track recorder, fostex x-18 w/efx
loop, pitch changes. $300. 287-5589.

Car hatchback speaker box-15' com-
plete almost new. $300/obo. 228-
4319.

Yamaha stereo cass. deck. $110. 252-
5792.

Scott am-fm stereo receiver, almost
new. $115/obo. 286-3381.

Quasar 20' ctv/vcr w/remote. $400.
Clayron car stereo $75. Pioneer eq/
amp. $150. 223-0579.

Sega CD games $25 ea. or .all for
$75. 284-5753.

Sony 5 disc player. $130, Pioneer tape
deck $100/obo. 286-4998.

2 Cerwan Vega speakers, 2 Pioneer
speakers, Nintendo w/games. 286-
6533.

Brothers word processor-WP 5750ds,
$400. white desk w/chair. $75. 287-
6623.

Yamaha elc. 8 drum set model. $250.
252-6831.

Apple IIGS, image writer, scanner
many programs. $900. 252-6404.

Sanyo Betamax-needs minor repair
$40, beta tapes $1 ea. 286-6196.

RCA prowonder camcorder. $400.
223-7111 rm. 124.

Macintosh tIc: 8/80, rgb monitor ext.
keyboard, modem, printer, $2,000.
223-7111 rm. 124.

SNES w/many extras $100, games
$25 ea. JVC vcr $150. 286-4693.

PB 4865x 25 mhz, with lots of extras.
287-3690.

Sony stereo w/cd player. $450. 285-
4538 Spc. Lowe rm. Il11.

Quasar tv/vcr monitor $450 obo. 285-
4538 Spc. Lowe rm. 111.

Euro voltage transformer and 220 v
power cords, adaptors, fans, mixer.
$100. 260-2957.

PB 286+comp. w/ 4mb ram software,
much more. $900. 260-2957.

Hitachi 20' color t.v. w/remote. $225.
228-2754.

Comnmodore 128 w/dot marix, and
much more. 287-3774.

25' RCA tv/sap $375. 286-3388.

RCA 25' t.v. w/stand $250. vcr-vhs 4
head $250, gas stove+grill $375. 223-
9865.

Tandy 1000ex comp. and cms moni-
tor. $200. 287-3441.

386 sx 20 4 meg. 130 mg. hard drive
plus many more. $900. 285-6870 rm.
210.

Sony Camcorder hi-8 stereo loaded
$1,250. Sega CD $225. 286-4084.

27' JVC color t v. w/remote. $400.
Nintendo w/games $95. 284-6491.

Compact cd player, dual cass. am-
fm 20 channel memory, 2 spkrs., re-
mote, grl. cond. $125. 284-3977._

Panasonic Omni movie camcorder w/
all ace. $650. 287-3641.

Smith Corona word processor 80001t
25sk. rom, modem, 3 5 disk drive, much
more. $250. 287-5392.

Super nintendo w/2 controllers, super















SClassified Ads


mario world. $65. 287-3073.

Sega Genesis w/controller, and sonic
the hedgehog game. $65. 287-3073.

RCA 26't.v. w/ universal remote.
$350. 286-4737.

Amiga comp. Im ram, software, ex.
drive, panasonic printer. $500. 286-
4571.

M5 mouse $40, WP 6.0 $95, M5
project for windows. $150. 282-4225.

Citizen 140-gsx 24 pin, color printer,
360x360 DPI. $150/obo. 284-6488.

Video camera curtis matches like
new. $400. new weed eater $30. 284-
4306.

Citizen 200gx color printer exc. cond.
$100. 287-4738.

JVC camcorder w/acc. Sega Game
Gear w/acc. and games. portable
cd. player. 230-0518.

Brother WP-75. $250. 223-6647.

486 sx 33mhz, 8mb, 260 mb hd, with
extras. $1,800. 226-4909.

8pc. Sansui stereo system, speak-
ers, w/acc. $600. 229-3525.

Typewriter IBM electric, correct-
able, exc. cond. $150. 228-0860.

Kenwood mv-5 speakers, exc. cond.
$200 pair. 286-3775.

SNES w/5 games and super pad,
exc. cond. $250. 287-4546.








Gold hoop earrings found at Ft.
Clayton pool in dressing rm. 286-
4331.



Household


15.2 cu. ft. upright frost free Whirl-
pool frezzer, $700. 2 lamps $60,
dresser and night stand, $300. 286-
3773.

Maytag w/d, heavy duty, ex. Flrge ca-
pacity. $850. 236-0338.

Whirlpool, 6 months old, like new,
$325. 236-0338.

Vaccum cleaner, used, works fine.
287-4170.

Table lamps. 233-3410.

Brass bed, king size. $350/obo. 287-
3627.

Sectional sofa, 4 pieces w/hide a bed.
252-2180.

GE refrigerator 24 cu. ft. GE washer
and dryer. 252-2180.

Kenmore heavy duty washer/dryer.
$650. 282-4538.

Carpets, various sizes, bedroom and
livingroom furn. 286-4571.

Carpets. 13x11.5 off white berber,
slightly used commercial style. $200.
pink/white berber never used. $400.
260-9824.

Ent. center. $80, infant car seat, ac,
plants, clothes. 264-4612.

A/c 18000 bill split system national.
$450. 236-1192.

Solid oak dining rm. set. with 6 chairs
exc. cond. $1,550. 286-3743___

Must sell all household goods. 283-
4021.

Sofa peach $1,000. love seat peach.
$800. 264-0695. _ _ __

King size mattress, box spring frame,
$600. 289-6564.

Couch love seat, chair., very good
cond. $950. 287-4788.

Living rm. set. brown w/vinyl cush-
ions. $200. 264-2342.

Sony stereo system w/cab. $450.
264-2342.

8pc. living rm. set, and Spc. dining
rm. set. $500. 284-4989.

3 beds, queen, double, I cabin bed,
refig. and frezeer, lots more. 261-
9665.

2pc. sectional beige. $400. 284-3528.

Sofa,large,white/blue/gray,
overstuffed, like new. $600. 269-
5700.

Dining rm. set, teak desk, end tables,
misc furn. 287-6233.

Danish LR set., 2 chairs, sofa. table.
$250. 260-5682.

3pc. couch $900, more. 284-3672.

Wooden patio furn. 50, curtains, 4
rugs. 284-5234.

LR. $300, formal Ir. $750. bookcase,
rug. 223-9865.


Whirlpool refrig. GE microwave,
comp. table, plants. 252-1104.

Kenmore heavy duty washer+dryer.
exc. cond. $800/obo. 287-3291.

Love seat, beige curtains for troop
qrts. wall unit, Pioneer spkrs. 230-
1927.

DR. set, br. set. 252-1104.

A/c's 5000, 6000, 10,000, rug, filing
cabniet. 287-5538.

Daybed w/pillows and comforter,
exc. cond. $500. 287-3441.

Rattan dr, Ir, sets. $800, ceiling fans
w/lights $70. 226-8116.

Whirlpool upright large freezer, exc.
cond. $650. 287-6182.

Kenmore dehumidifier, new cond.
$125/obo. 284-6336.

Metal full twin bunkbed $300, King
sized water bed $500, maple chest
drawers $300, plants. 287-3690.

A/C's various prices. 252-2287.

Couch grt. cond. $200. 284-5726.

Bamboo Ir. set, sofa, 2 chairs, coffee
table $400, dr set 4 chairs table $150.
264-6432.

GE washer/dryer set hvy dty. $850.
284-4897.

Hide-a-bed q-sz sofa matching love
seat and pillows, exc. cond. $700.
287-4193.

Furniture, book shelves, room
screens, toys, books, much more.
284-3379.

GE dryer, like new. $350/obo. 284-
5879.

Rocker w/padded seat and back,
$50, chair $15. 293-4472.

Med. blue rug 14x18 exc. cond. $125.
286-3674.

Car bed w/mattres, like new, $125.
262-1916.

Double dresser, 6 drawer with mir-
ror, t.v./video, brass bed, small bird
cage. 260-4463.

Oyster juice extractor, 2 spd., pulp
storage, easy to clean. $50/obo. 287-
5083.

Curtains for 3-bdrm. tropical qrts.,
9x12 rose carpet. 226-4227.

Twin beds, carpets, bicycles, vacu-
um cleaner, t.v., stereo, potted plants,
tables, lamps, curtains. 284-5194.

LR. set, 4 pieces, $700. rugs, rocking
chair. 284-6171. after 5 p.m.

Blue sofa exc. cond. $400/obo. 285-
4772.

Blue toddler car bed w/mattress, like
new. $140. 262-1916.

Black+gold ent. center, full size bed,
large carpets. 287-5790.

Bunk beds, $225, coffe table $40, Ir.
set $750. 287-4935.

5,000 btu a/c $300., 6 drawer dress-
er $150. 284-3036.

Coffee/end table. 287-3284.

Portable dishwasher, exc. cond.
$325. 236-0338.

Maytag ex. large capacity
washer+dryer. $850. 236-0338.

GE heavy duty washer/dryer $275
ea. 286-3398.

2 pc. couch $100, bamboo Ir. set. Iv.
msg. 284-5678.

Sofa sectional, 3 pc. w/2 recliners
and hide a bed. $750. 236-0597.

Antique trunk-1905, Ir. set, table,
desk, plants, fan, more! 269-3664.

GE freezer, 16 cu. ft., frost tree, needs
charging. $100/obo. 252-2608.






Yellow-head parrot, lost in the gate-
way area 1532c. 284-6599.






Sega Genesis games $25/ea, golf bag
w/head covers $25/ea, Etonic golf
shoes 8 1/2 men's. 287-4428 after 5
pm.

20" color TV w/r ctrl S175. 284-5093.

Garden plants 286-3587.

Twin bed, dresser, night Ibl, sofa, 2
chairs, end tbl, coffee tbl, a/c, dinette,
stereo. 252-1104.

Enjoyment of music book S20, In-
glish Comp II book S10, new beg.
Spanish book $40. all for PCC. 287-
6198.

Round tnp ticket to Miami on United
Airlines, open dates $250. 284-3880.


Indian hunter bow 50 lb. pull 38 in.
draw, w/ 5 arrow quiver & carrying
case $125. 287-3639.

Four Pirelli tires, 215/60 R 15, 2 mos.
old, like new $350. 252-2093 after 6
pmr.

AB machine/upside down machine
$50. 284-4724.

10 Cup coffee maker $10, 90 score
factory baseball card sets $10/ea.
287-3036.

Baby car seats $45, swing set (pa-
tio) $85. 226-8116._

Fold up crib $80, class A uniform
size 42 $75. 287-5583.

Exercise stepper $45, mini trampo-
line $15, Regina carpet steamer $20.
286-6196.

Plants for sale 286-3992.

Fish finder hummingbird TCRID-I
$250, child life jacket $12, training
potty $5. 236-2365.

Baby clothes $.50-2.00 ea. bassinet
$30, Disney playpen $35, VCR
$160, large trop. plants. 287-4592.

Suitcases $30/ea. hiking back pack
$40, metal detector, Sentra heavy
duty safe $175. 260-6159.

Huffy 12 speed ladies bike, audio/
video graphic equalizer receiver $75
ea. obo 287-5994.

New standard encyclopedia 20 vol
w/ 15 extra books & bookcase. 287-
3949.

25" Zenith color TV w/ R ctrl, 4 yrs
old $350/obo, car cover (never used)
$30. 286-6190.

Weider weight bench, w/ 110 lbs. but-
terflies & lat-pull equipment $150.
227-2271 after 5 pm.

Surfboard 6'5" $100. 252-7400.

Clothes, Aiwa turntable $30, Turbo
graphics game system & 3 tapes
$75. 282-3689.

1990/94 sports cards, baseball, bas-
ketball, & football sets & singles. 284-
3689.

Golf clubs all irons, 1-3-4-5 woods,
Ping Putter covers & white match-
ing bag $250. 252-1096.

Box liner D-50 or Mitsubishi p/u for
standard box $25. 287-6192.

Minolta camera w/ lens, tripod, flash,
bag, exc. cond. $200. 284-6784.

Haro extreme mountain bike $350,
Tekna Spectra dive fins, sz med. $35.
286-3820.

Marquis diamond bridal set, 1/4 ct. tl.
wt. 14k gold, 9 diamonds, exc. cond.
$350/obo. 286-4584.

Day bed $650, English Crosby
saddle, sz 16 1/2 $450. 284-4700.

Going to PCC or FSU, sales of books
286-3992.

Metal disk $115, crib bumper guard
$10, new Costa Rica hammock $50,
microwave $85. 236-2365.

Couch, loveseat, chair & otto man
$375, Mizuno golf clubs $300, Fisher
ST 840 speakers, 120 WPC $250, Su-
per NES & Sega games. 284-6631.

3 Carpet steamers, 3 shampoo ma-
chines, hot water machine, & more.
230-0008.

Goebel Black African porcelain fig-
urines $125/ca. 260-2104.

Rock CD's first come first serve $5-
6. 221-4977.

Rawlings baseball bat $15, Spalding
tennis racket & leather glove $20,
233-1229.

Exercise bike, like new $75. 286-
4792.

BR set, carpets, men's wedding
band, brand new sz 11. 284-4927 af-
ter 5 pm.

4 tires sz 185/70 R 13, $15ea. obo.
286-6338.

Baby walker $25, car seat $15, for
24 to 40 lb. bowling ball $10, Tandy
comp $180. 287-5736.__

6'0" Spectrum surfboard, new leash
& board bag included $300 252-
6971.

Air conditioner 8,000 BTU $110/obo.
284-4772.

Jenny Lind crib $70, child rocker
$20. 287-3689

Little peanut infant comforter,
bumper pads, sheet, wall hanging,
border from J.C Penney catalog S80
for set. 287-3689-

Queen size comforter, 4 pillow cases,
skirt, 2 set sheets, polyester S100/
obo. 287-3999.

Small washer/dryer, waterbed, 2 pull
bedroom set, carpels, refrigerator 14'.
bikes, best offers. 260-2445.,

Basketball hoop. goal, net & pole,
new, pd $115 sell fcr $85 284-3799


Lace wedding dress w/veil & head
piece, sz med. $575. 230-0227.

Super Allan aluminum racing bike,
23" x 23", 18 speed w/new avocet
$450. 227-6506.

Baby clothes, t-shirts, sleepers, all
$70/obo, monitor $20, crib light $10.
286-3778.

Baby clothes for girl, newborn thru
18 mos, shoes, bumper crib, car seat
cover & carrier cover, etc. 287-5974.

BBQ gas grill, 2 yrs. old, $60, little
tyke tree house $20. 287-5437.

Typewriter, brother AX-20 $75/obo.
286-3634.

Lawn mower, 3.5 cubic inch engine
$70/obo. 287-5682.

Dining table w/4 chairs $700, Fisher
Price high chair $55, RCA 26" TV w/
universal remote $350. 286-4737.

Books for Master's Program at Uni-
versity of Oklahoma. Large box
$125/obo. 262-10292

13" Craftsman Scroll saw $100, swing
set $125, Nintendo set 8 tapes $75.
285-4734.

Large coffee tbl $100, Evenflo car
seat $80, Fisher Price travel swing
$100. 284-4936.

Emeralds, unmounted, 100% certi-
fied $200 ea. plus. 252-5430.

Klipsch speakers, Brittanica ency-
clopedia, CD changer, turntable &
records, car bra for Escort, micro-
wave stand. 284-6682.

Super NES w/ madden 94 $150, BBQ
kettle $25, Minolta freedom dual
camera $100, 12 sp bike $90. 284-
5528.

Scuba gear; complete setup, very
reasonably priced, sold separately
or as set, U.S. divers & Beuchat. 286-
3121.

Wedding dress; off-white, pearled,
S: :. ..;::, ,;:: . .-.L . :z, :7. ,s.s
veil, purse, gloves, and shoes, $600.
252-3260.

Century baby swing, exc. cond. $20.
284-5223.

Keyboard, Yamaha PSR-200, $200,
small microwave $150. 285-6251 ask
for Spc. Ward.

Acoustic guitar, Yamaha FG-75, 3/
4 size, grt for kids $75. 286-3634.

1/4 Carat diamond engagement ring
& wedding band set, white gold, Ap-
praised at $500 will sell for $375.
287-4328.

Medium dog kennel, like new $20,
12 speed Schwinn LeTour, used very
little $150. 287-4328.

Girl's 20" Huffy bike $30. 287-3693.

Girl's clothes, sz 12/16, very good
cond. 235-4890 nights.

Tropical furniture, complete set $80,
Pioneer stereo, multi-CD, dbl cass. I
yr. old w/speakers. 287-4170.

Answering machine, G.E. like new
$35, toddler's bed, wooden, good
cond. $70. 287-6438.

Barney toddler's bed set $35, Big
Bird toddler's bed set w/curtain $50.
287-6438.

Set of tires P-195-75 RI5, good cond,
$80. 287-3335. -

Acoustic guitar, Yamaha FG-75 3/
4 sz, $75/obo. 286-3634.

Hot tub/jacuzzi party tub, 6'diame-
ter/3'deep, grt for personal relax-
ation or party fun, make offer. 233-
3410.






550 LTD Kawasaki w/helmet &
ferring. 284-3379. . _ ._ __

1984 Honda C2K 750 cc w/2 helmets


.$1,500/obo. 287-4738.

1985 Honda 100 XL, good cond, new
rear tire, 2 helmets $500. 252-6971
ask for Richard.

1993 Yamaha DT, dty pd, $1,400.
252-5397.

1982 Honda motor scooter $300.
287-3582.

1991 Yamaha 50 cc, avail. July 19.
$300/obo. 264-3679.

1967 Triumph Tiger Cub, rebuilt, re-
painted, many parts, make offer. 286-
3634.

1967 Triumph Tigercub, $1,700/obo.
286-3634.

YZ 80, Yamaha 1987 dirt bike $900.
252-6385.






Qtrs. 263B Corozal, by Commisary,
7-12.

Qtrs. 233 Albrook, multiple families,
0600-?

Qtrs. 279B Albrook, Sunday only,
9am-?

Qtrs. 1524D Howard, 8am-noon.

Qtrs. 663D Clayton, 7am-1 lam.

Qtrs. 244A Albrook, 7am-llam.

Qtrs. 446C Ft. Kobbe, 8-12pm.

Qtrs. 1515D Howard, 7am-?

Qtrs. 843B Clayton, 6am-noon.

Qtrs. 836B Clayton, 7am-12pm.

Qtrs. 615A Howard.

Qtrs. 681B Clayton, 7am-1 lam.

Qtrs. 522 Albrook, 7am-noon.

Qtrs. 356B Clayton, 7-1 lam.

QIrs. 503B Clayton.

Qtrs. 27C Amador, 7am-noon.

Qtrs. 630A Clayton.

Qtrs. 1525A & C, 6am.

Qtrs. 549D Clayton, Fri.-Sat.

Empire St. #3216 (Balboa), 6:30am,
front of Amador car wash, behind
Balboa police station.

Qtrs. 917B Estiva PI. La Boca, 7am-
llam.

Qtrs. 926B Clayton, 7am-noon.

Qtrs. 6408 Los Rios, 7am-10am.

Qtrs. 2069 Curundu, 7am-12.

Qtrs. 576B Howard AFB, 7am-noon.

Qtrs. 334A Albrook, 8am-12.

Qtrs. 5 Clayton, 7am-10:30.

Qtrs. 2610C Cocoli 8am-3pm.

Qtrs. 1174A Clayton 7am-Ilam.

Qtrs. 1109 Amador, Fri.-Sat.

Qtrs. 297B Albrook, 7am-lpm.

Qtrs. 805B Farfan, Howard 7am-
12pm.

Qtrs. 247 Albrook 7am-noon.

Qtrs. 826A FarFan, 8am-noon.

Qtrs. 7229B Cardenas, 7am-llam.

Qtrs. 620B Howard, 7am-noon.

Qtrs. 6398B Los Rios, 7am-noon.

Qtrs. 358B Clayton, 7:30am-noon.

Qtrs. 2241 Balboa, 7-10am.

Qtrs. 673A Howard, Elward St.
8:30am-lpm.

Qtrs. 214B Ancon 8am-lpm.

Qtrs. 18D Clayton.

Qtrs. 943A La Boca, 7-11am.


Tropic Times B1 1
July 15, 1994B 11


Qtrs. 607A Howard, 7am-I lam.

Qtrs. 446D Kobbe, Fri.-Sat.

Qtrs. 206A Albrook, 7-10am.

Qtrs. 7 Albrook, 7:30-10:30.

Qtrs. 671C Clayton, 7am-?

Qtrs. 4082D Howard, 7-?

Qtrs. 11 OB Albrook, 7am-noon.

Qtrs. 72A Howard, 7am-2pm.

Qtrs. 662B Howard 8am-12pm.

2trs. 154A Howard, 7am-10am.

Q2rs. 1556D Howard, 7am.

Qt2s. 859A Clayton, 7-1 lam.

62nd St. Los Angeles Talisman
Bldg. (Mary Jane bakery shop)
Apt. #2, 8-noon.

Qtrs. 628A Clayton, 7am-noon.

Qtrs. 381B Clayton.

Qtrs. 358B Clayton 7am-noon.

Qtrs. 331B Albrook, 8am-lpm.

Qtrs. 684C Clayton.

Qtrs. 570C Clayton.

Qtrs. 406B Clayton 6:30am-2pm.

Qtrs. 217A Albrook, 7am.

Qtrs. 800B Clayton 6am-noon.







Someone w/Business Manage-
ment expertise. 223-7111 ext: 427.

Wool dress green slacks, 34 waist,
34 length. 260-9818.

Babysitter to live-in while I'm TDY
and vacationing, must speak Eng.
284-4273.

Honest, reliable, live-out maid w/
refs. 230-1927.

Bilingual live-in/out maid, some
cleaning. Care of 7 yr. old, before &
after school, some cooking, refs.
286-6270. - -

Mature, honest, bilingual, flex. live-
in lady to care_ for family. 284-5476.

Your old aquariums and accesso-
ries. 289-4320.

Live-in maid to clean, cook, iron,
care for 1 yr, old, w/refs. $130. 252-
2077.

Ice machine in good cond. 286-
3192.

Military Parents of Multiple Club.
Come join us. 287-5083 Wendy.

Cheap motorcycle helmet. 229-
3915.

Bilingual, mature, live-in maid to
care for 12 yr. old in Cocoli, M-F,
some weekends. 283-6591.

Spanish guitar, Lional 0 gauge train,
for small boy. 252-1022.

Role-players interested in heroic or
fantasy gaming. AD&D, Rifts,
Champions, Shadowrun, more. 286-
6391.

18' Bass or ctr console boat, 90-115
hp motor, trl, all in exc. cond. 284-
6780.

Used vaccum cleaner, cheap, boat
ladder, boat paddle. 260-2536.

Empty plastic peanut butter jars w/
lids. 282-3320.

Military spouse to drive kids to &
from Clayton pool 18 Jul.-ll Aug.
$100. 269-7710 after 7 pm.

Live-in maid, Eng-spk, reliable,
good w/pets, some wkend req. 282-
3126.

Bilingual maid to watch 8 yr. old &
clean $150 per mo. 260-1128.


Tropic Times Ad Form


ANIMALS
AUTOMOBILES
AVAILABLE
BOATS & CAMPERS
ELECTRONICS
FOUND
HOUSEHOLD
LOST
MISCELLANEOUS
MOTORCYCLES
PATIO SALES
WANTED


SPONSOR'S NAME

ORG.


PRICE HOME PHONE

Check only one category per ad form. Only two ads per person each
week are allowed. Each ad form is limited to 15 words. Please type or
print neatly. Information listed below is not included in the ad, but is
required for publication. This information will not be released to third
parties. Deadline for the receipt of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for Friday's
edition. Ads are run on a space available, and may be held for a future
edition. Ads may be mailed to the Tropic Times, Unit 0936, APO AA
34002 or deposited in a drop box at the Albrook Post Office. Ads
offering weapons or sent by FAX will not be run.

RANK/GRADE


DUTY PHONE










B1 2 Tropic Times
B12 . July 15, 1994


6O--


HOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-171, DD 214
if claiming veteran preference, a copy of college
transcripts if claiming education and a copy of
CASP notice of rating if applicable. Submit a copy
of latest SF-50 if you are a Federal employee.
For more information regarding Army va-
cancy announcements (forms required, job re-
lated criteria, etc.), visit the Directorate of Civil-
ian Personnel, Building 560, Room 102, Corozal,
or call 285-5201.
*Note: One-on-one employment counseling
should be the first step in the job search.

SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE: Positions at
NM-5 level and above require specialized experi-
ence. Specialized experience is either education
above the high school level or work experience
directly related to the position being filled. Exam-
ple: Budget positions at or aboe the NM-5 level
required Budget experience or equivalent educa-
tion.
Vacancy announcements are also available at
the Sundial Recreation Center.
The Army civilian personnel office accepts
applications on a continuous basis for the
following positions. These announcements are
used to establish registers for permanent and
temporary future vacancies.

VB# 001 * General Clerical, NM-3'(Used to fill most clerical
position).
VB# 001A * General Clerical, NM-4 (Used to fill most
clerical position).
VB# 002 * Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Intermittent wk sch)

* CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is required.

VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) Requires
Cert + 6 mo recreation exp in the field.
VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Req 6 mos recreation
exp in the field.
VB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5
VB# 005A Secretary (Stenography), NM-6
VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5
VB# 006A Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-6

The following positions are Perm/temp, Full-time, Part-time,
Intermittent.

VB# 007 ** MEDICAL OFFICER, NE 12/13/14.
VB# 008 ** CLINICAL NURSE, (RN license required),
NM-9/10/1I1.
VB# 009 ** PRACTICAL NURSE, (LPN licence required),
NM-5

**Selectees for nurse and medical officer position will be
required to undergo a background check.

The following positions will be CLOSED until further notice

VB# 010 Manual Positions, MG-2
VB# 011 Manual Positions, MG-3
VB# 012 Manual Positions, MG-4
VB# 013 Manual Positions, MG-5
VB# 014 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-6
VB# 015 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-7
VB# 016 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-8
VB# 018 Supply Technician, NM-5
VB# 018A Supply Technician, NM-6

The following are limited to permanent status employees
only.

VB# 017 Administrative Services Assistant, NM-5
VB# 017A Administrative Services Assistant, NM-6

VB# VACANCIES TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 07-
15-94 CLOSE: 07-26-94

Pacific
373-94-ES Health Systems Specialist, NM-671-ll. USA
MEDDAC. Limited to MEDDAC/DENTAC permanent
employees, however applications for Temp Nte: 30 Sep 94, will
be accepted from all sources. U.S. license required.

374-94-NC Quality of Life Coordinator, NM-301-9. DCA/
FSD.

375-94-NC Social Services Assistant (Office Automation),
NM-186-6. USAG-Panama, DCA.

377-94-NC Material Handler, MG-6907-7. Sensitive. USAG-
Panama, DOL/Supply Div., Driver's license required. Limited
to veteran preference eligibles.

379-94-ES Accounting Technician, NM-525-6. DCSRM,
F&AO Div.

382-94-MW Supervisory Contract Specialist, NM-1102-12.
Sensitive. Temp Nte 1 yr. USAG-Panama, DOC, Corozal.

008-OC-94 Clinical Nurse, NM-610-9. USA MEDDAC, Dept
of Nursing. Limited to MEDDAC/DENTAC permanent
employees, however applications for Temp Nte: 30 Sep 94, will
be accepted from all sources. U.S. license required.

Atlantic
380-94-ES Pharmacy Technician, NM-661-5. Temp Nte: 30
Sep 94. USA MEDDAC. Ft. Sherman


Quarry Heights
*Officers' Club:
Breakfast buffet is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays
and 8-10 a.m. Saturday.
Old fashioned steak night 6-10 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Choose cut of beef to be charbroiled.

Club Amador
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet, $3.95 Fridays, featuring
soup, salad, selection of entree, special return rights.
Sunday brunch features the Ballet Folklorico Panameno
at noon.
Samba Tres 5-11 p.m. Friday throughout July.

Clayton
*The Loop:
CJ's Sports Bar offers daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m.-1
p.m. Mondays-Fridays. Pool tournaments are held 3:30 p.m.
Sunday.
Prizmz Night Club features a variety of music Wednes-
days-Saturdays to include jazz 5 p.m. Sunday.
For events or parties at the Prizmz Night Club or the
CJ's Sports Bar, call Sonia, 287-4716 or send a fax 287-4343.
+NCO Club:
Casa Maria will hold a taco eating contest today. The fee
is $8. There will be prizes for the winner and runner-up.
Domino championship match today in the Underground
Lounge.

Albrook/Howard
*Albrook Club:
Mini gourmet 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. The menu includes
petite scampi, aparagus soup, tomato and cucumber salad,
watermelon sorbet and a choice of breast of chicken
Monterrey or medallions of tenderloin bemaise or scampi
Milano, all served with vegetables and coconut a la Case
flambe
Steak night 6-9 p.m. Friday. Choose from rib eye, K.C.
strip, filet or prime rib. Dinner comes with vegetable, baked
potato, French fries or rice.
Fiesta de mariscos 6-9 p.m. Saturday. The seafood feast
platter features broiled corvina, stuffed crab, calamari rings,
peel-and-eat shrimp, a choice of potato or rice, cole slaw and
vegetables du jour. A la carte menu available.
Mongolian barbecue 6-8:30 p.m. Monday. Prepare your
plate, choose the meat, vegetables, seasonings, oils and have
chefs do the job outside on the open grills.
Sunday champagne brunch 10 a.m.-1 p.m. in the dining
room offers breakfast from cooked-to-order omelets, French
toast, hot lunches, salad and fruits, peel-and-eat shrimp, des-
serts and ice cream bar.
Mexican night buffet Thursdays includes tacos, fajitas,
taco salad and sopapillas for dessert.
Country western night Thursdays with free dance les-
sons at 7:30 p.m. Learn the two-step, line and couples danc-
es, the waltz, the cha cha and the swing. Country western
music 9-11 p.m.
Get jazzed 7-10 p.m. today and July 29 in the lounge and
relax to the music by recording artist Lowell Hopper.
Rock & reggae 7-10 p.m. July 22 live in the lounge to
the sounds of Rip Maynard.
For events or catering call 286-3557/3582.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club:
Sunday breakfast buffet 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. An assort-
ment of breakfast foods are available in the dining room.
Breakfast is served 6-9:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays; 7:30
a.m. Saturday.
Italian night 5:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday with Alfredo or
seafood fettuccini, lasagna, pasta mixta or pasta and shrimp
in a white wine sauce. A la carte menu is available.
Steak night special 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday in the din-
ing room. Select a cut and order a New York strip, rib eye or


SCN FM chedul


Southern Command Network
Diamond FM radio airs 91.5 Pa-
cific and 983 Atlantic on the FM
dial with live Diamond FM shows
at 5 and 11 a.m., 3 p.m. week-
days; 9 a.m.,4 and 9p.m. Satur-
days.


Weekdays
5-9am Diamond FM morning
crew, music and laughs
9:05-11am Country Musicw/ Gene
Price, Harry Newman
llam-lpm Diamond Cafe - oldies
request, 287-4512
i-3pm Unistar adult rock
3-6pm Diamond FM "After
noon Cartunes," music
& fun
6-7pm Charlie Tuna


Sunday
9-9:30am Cross Currents,
Christian rock
9:30-10am Love On The Rock,
popular music/inspira-
tional talk
10-1 lam 20lheCounidown Maga-
zine - Christian music
11-noon All That Jazz - Classical
and Contemporary Jazz
Noon-4pm American Country
Countdown
4-7pm Dick Clark Rock, Roll
and Remember, oldies
7-8pm Specialty Shows - rock
artist interviews and
music)
8-9pm King Biscuit Flower
Hour (live rock concert)
9-11pm Dr. Demento, comedy
music
llpm Unistar adult rock


7-9pm Urban Music with Don
Tracy and LaRita
Shelby
9:-llpm Diamond FM Rock
Block - album rock
Sllpm-5am Unistar Adult Rock


Saturday
9am-Noon Diamond FM Saturda)
Morning Music
Noon-4pm American top 40
4-6pm Diamond FM "Canal
Country"
6-7pm The House of Blues
7-9pm The Countdown - urban
contemporary hits
9-11pm Diamond FM "Quiet
Storm" - mellow urban
music
llpm Unistar adult rock


Club news


filet. To eat lighter, meals of chicken marinata, pasta, shrimp
vin blanc or shrimp Taboga are also available.
Mexican night and Texas barbecue ribs 5:30-8:30 p.m.
Wednesday. All-you-can-eat soft tacos. Fajitas, ribs or fish
are also available.
Seafood lover's special 5:30-9 p.m. Friday and Satur-
days. Enjoy an array of appetizers and main entrees of shrimp
and fish.
Bang up barbecue daily in the Breezeway, dine-in or
take-out. Enjoy the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or hot wings.
New family menu Tuesdays and Fridays featuring all the
past favorites plus new items such as jerked chicken, hand
made 1/2 pound hamburgers, baked ravioli and more.
For events or catering, call 284-4189.
#Howard Enlisted Members' Club Ballroom:
Disco Jet 9 p.m.-l a.m. today.
Friday night disco 9 p.m. Friday.
Bingo is back 3 p.m. Sunday with early-bird bingo at
2:45 and 6:30 p.m. Tuesday with early-bird bingo at 6:15.
Membership night 6:30 p.m. July 23. Enjoy food, fun
and jazz at the Enlisted Members' Clubs, free for members.
For special functions, call 284-4189.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club Casual Cove:
New country 8 p.m. to closing Fridays.
Country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. Wednes-
days in the Casual Cove. Learn the latest in line dancing, the
stomp, waltz and others. Music will be until midnight.
Night mug special Wednesdays. Buy a mug filled with
your favorite draft beverage & refills.
Karaoke 7 p.m. Sunday, 8 p.m. Tuesday.
Saturday and Monday nights disco 5 p.m.-l a.m.
Rock 'n' roll golden oldies 5-8 p.m: Tuesdays; 5 p.m.-
midnight Thursdays.
Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday. Bring you
card. You must be present to win.
*Top Three Club:
Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesday. Free all-you-can-eat.
Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday.
Karaoke 6 p.m. Friday.
Club closed Saturdays.
*Howard Officers' Club:
It's prime time 6-9 Fridays and Saturdays. Enjoy the
prime rib special.
Super social hours 5 p.m. Friday. Come and eat at the
complimentary buffet and enjoy music and dancing all night
long.
Game nights & progressive club card drawing 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Play pool or darts with a $2 entry fee, winner
takes all, club matches pot.
Dining room is closed Sunday and Wednesday nights.
The club is closed Sundays.
New lounge menu available Mondays-Saturdays.
For events or catering, call 284-3718.

Rodman
*Rodman Club - open to all ranks
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.-1
p.m. Mondays-Fridays.
Soup and sub night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Monday. Grill menu
is also available.
All-you-can-eat spaghetti 4:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Grill menu is also available.
Cook-your-own steak night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday
at the Rodman Bohio.
Fine dining 6-9 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays.
Upstairs Bar 4:30-8:30 p.m. Sundays-Thursdays; 6-9
p.m. Fridays-Saturdays.
Social hours & hors d'oeuvres, 3:30-11 p.m. Friday at
the Laguna Lounge and Rodman Bohio.
Dinner is served 6-9 p.m. Mondays-Sundays.
*Rodman Annex:
Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.-
1:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays.
The club is closed for evening and weekend service.


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PAGE 1

trop iC Times Vol. VII, No. 28 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, July 15, 1994 Forms needed to disconnect phones COROZAL (USARSO PAO) -People who clear quarters and need to disconnect their telephone must fill out a Form 0010. The form will indicate termination date and if you still owe government equipment. The form will allow for continued service until residents are ready to leave. For information, call the Telephone Customer Service at 285-4313/4354. DEH announces customer services COROZAL(USARSOPAO)-TheDirectorate ofEngineering and Housing will be flushing water mains 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday on Quarry Heights. Water pressure will be considerably lower for about one hour during this time. Customer Service calls for repair of washers, dryers, dishwashers and garbage disposals will be responded to by the Directorate of Engineering and Housing contractor BADELAG, S.A., 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday. For repairs, call 285-4150/ couresy photo 4491/5588/5758. Panama's president-elect Ernesto Perez Balladares shakes hands with President Guillermo Endara shortly after Panama's presidential election. Navy warfare unit changes command RODMAN NS (USNASTAPANCANAL PAO)-Naval Special Warfare Unit Eight's change of command ceremony will be held 9 a.m. Thurst da at .S. avalStation Panama Canal gymnaPanama's president-elect willing to accept will assume Pantianmisgresdent-eletw ingtato ns command from Commander Robert P. Schoultz. Haitian migrants on military installations Puerto Rico wants PANAMA CITY, Panama (Reuters) -President-elect that Endara's reversal came because of intense local critiErnesto Perez Balladares said Sunday he was prepared to cism. U.S. SOUTH VCOM acceptagroup ofHaitian refugees at a U.S. military base in Endara saidaftermeeting LinowitzSaturdaythat Panama SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) -Gov. Pedro Panama, but the migrants could stay for no longer than six would not take in the refugees unless there was a "national Rossello said July 5 he'd like to see the U.S. months. accord" involving Perez. Southern Command move its headquarters from Perez, speaking to reporters at Panama's Tocumen At a second meeting with Linowitz Sunday, Endara Panama to Puerto Rico. airport before starting on a trip to Spain, Italy, the United repeated his refusal to accept the refugees at U.S. military The Southern Command is scheduled to move States and Mexico, did not say when the Haitians could bases, accordingto RobertoAleman, presidentof Panama's from its Panama base by the end of 1999. The U.S. begin arriving in Panama and said they would be fewerthan Foreign Relations Council. Atlantic Command, based in Norfolk, Va., overthe 10,000 requested by the United States. During the past week, U.S. officials have pressured sees military operations in the Caribbean. Perez takes over for President Guillermo Endara Sept. several Caribbean nations to help provide safe havens to the Several states, including Florida, Texas and 1. Endara had agreed last week to take in up to 10,000 thousands of Haitians taking to the sea to escape their Louisiana, reportedly are interested in hosting Haitians and then changed his mind. homeland. SOUTHCOM. Perez said he would accept "a contingent of Haitian The U.S. Coast Guard has picked up more than 14,000 "The Southern Command gives the appearance refugees, but for not longer than six months" and that they Haitian boat people so far this month -a record. But the of a continental defense for the Americas and our would have to be under "the control and the responsibility torrent ofboatpeople slowed overthe weekend, with Coast public policy is to position Puerto Rico as a cenof the U.S. government and Army." Guard cutters rescuing a total of644 Saturday and Sunday. ter, as an asset in the meeting of the Americas," They "would have no freedom of movement, they The Clinton administration said last week that Haitians Rossello said. would be practically prisoners" if they went to Panama, he fleeing their politically troubled nation by sea would not Rossello supports statehood for Puerto Rico, a added. be eligible for resettlement in theUnited States. Only those Spanish-speaking U.S. commonwealth. His term At a stopover in Miami, Perez said later that a final Haitians who seek political asylum at the U.S. Embassy in as governor ends in 1996, but he has said he'll decision remained in the hands of Endara until he leaves Port-au-Prince will be eligible to come to the United States. seek another four-year term. office Aug. 31. The U.S. government has also persuaded Grenada, A SOUTHCOM spokesman said that within a "Ifl were president today, we would accept the Haitians Antigua and Dominica to accept small numbers of the year, the command will provide the defense secunder these conditions," Perez said in Miami. Haitian refugees, while others are temporarily housed at a retary its recommendations on a new home. The Perez is due to meet President Bill Clinton in coming U.S. naval base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. official spoke on condition of anonymity. days to discuss Haiti and other issues. Conditions in Haiti have steadily worsened since a Also July 5, 35 SOUTHCOM soldiers began Both Perez and Endara met during the weekend with military coup toppled elected President Jean-Bertrand week-long military exercises at the former Ramey former U.S. negotiator Sol Linowitz to discuss Haitian Aristide in 1991, and international economic sanctions AFB on Puerto Rico's west coast. refugee havens. were slapped on the count. More than 2,000 political and environmental Nearly 20 years ago, Linowitz negotiated the Panama Washington has increasingly hinted at possible military activists staged a protest outside the former base Canal treaty for the United States, under which control of action to restore Aristide. July 4 against U.S. military exercises. The demthe waterway reverts to Panama by the year 2000. But Secretary ofState Warren Christopher said Sunday onstrators, led by politicians who want Puerto Endara has said he changed his mind about accepting the United States was not seeking an excuse to invade the Rico's independence, argued that the exercises the refugees because a U.S. request to house them at Caribbean country. pose a threat to the island's environment and resiAmerican military bases would violate the treaty. "We certainly aren't looking for an excuse to invade dents. He said last week that he had been bullied into his initial Haiti," he said in an interview with Reuters. "We are consent by the United States. Political experts suggested prepared to use force ifnecessary to protect U.S. interests." 24th Wing introduces new squadDepartment of Defense announces +Briefly, Page 2. ron-level "Iguana'Be Fit"health proclosure of European military facili*Haitian military warning, Page 4. motion program. ties. *Basketball, Page 9.

PAGE 2

2Tropic Times.e July 15, 1994'B~el Hasta Luego reception AM f slated for Tuesday An Hasta Luego Reception will be held Saturday 5:40am C141 Howard AFB Belize City, Belize 2:5pm Tesa a te ot avs 5:40am C130 Howard AFB U~ma, Peru Howard AFB 2:45-4 pm. Tuesday at the Fort Davis New Castle, DE. (A) Santiago, Chile Friday Community Club. The event is for all mil1:55pm C5A Howard AFB La Paz, Boliva 6:40am C130 Howard AFB itary and civilians leaving in July, August Charleston AFB, SC (0) 8:40am B727 Howard AFB Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) and September For information, call 289Sunday Atlanta IAP (C) San Jose, Costa Rica 4021. 7am B727 Howard AFB Charleston SC, IAP Howard AFB Atlanta lAP (C) Wednesday 4:40pm C141 Howard AFB Charleston SC, IAP 6:10am C130 Howard AFB Charleston AFB, SC Olmsted Monday Bogota, Columbia McGuire AFB, NJ dScholarship 5:40am C130 Howard AFB Howard AFB AActive duty only open to officers Tegucigalpa, Honduras Thursday USU.S. passport The George and Carol Olmsted Schol(V,CC) 7:55am C5A Howard AFB 0-Overnight Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) C-Commercial Contract arship, given to officers to attend the DeHoward AFB Charleston AFB, SC (0) V-Visa fense Language Institute, followed by in3:45pm B727 Howard AFB (C,O) 11:40pm C1 41 Howard AFB M-Medevac country language training, is accepting apSoto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) San Jose, Costa Rica CC-Country Clearance plications. The eligibility criteria is: Tuesday Guatemala City, Guatemala *Captains between 3-11 years of commissioned service as of April 1, 1995. This orientation will feature subject fitness test, pass a modified HALO/Scuba Recreation Assistant/Small Craft Oper*Branch qualified matter experts speaking on job searches, medical exam, be airborne qualified or volator, NF-0 189-02 Flexible *Defense language aptitute battery volunteering, financial assistance, and unteer for airborne duty, have no history Office Automation Clerk (Data Entry), score of at least 89. workshops. People will also learn about of recurring disciplinary action and make NF-0326-01, Flexible *Graduate record exam score of 1,150recommended shopping areas, contraband minimum two year commitment. Officers Bartender Leader, LF-7405-01, Flexi*Grade point average of at least 3.5information, maids, tours, and ID proceare required to be a captain or major, a colble Officers must receive branch permisdures. For more information, call the Famlege graduate and have a minimum of 12 To apply submit an SF-171 to Rodman sion to compete and be compliance with ily Support Center at 2845650. months of successful command at captain Naval Station Building 65. For informaArmy Regulation 621-7. level. Noncommissioned officers must be tion, contact Joanna Duran at 283-5341. Personnel Command will hold a selecBusiness association a sergeant, staff sergeant or sergeant first candid ates f resen aion to the lmsed meeting set for Monday class, be qualified in a primary military ocEnlisted performance Fondaton for finaetion asthe Olmsted cupational specialty and have a GT score Foundation for final selection as Olmsted The American Business Women's Asof I10 or higher. Call the U.S. Army South feedback changes Scholars, class for 1995. sociation, Panama Canal Charter Chapter, Retention Office at 287-4665. Raters now have 60 days instead of 30 will hold its monthly meeting 5 p.m. Monto complete an enlisted feedback session Early release, retirement day at the Curundu Restaurant. The proBook stores offer on an individual who has just received an programs change lists amon fo meeutine wil beathd nesw AfJuly clearance sales enlisted performance if there has been no The iscl Yar 995 nlitedeary rtin o Ne Excutie BardandNewchange in reporting officials. The Fiscal Year 1995 enlsted early refiliation Ceremony. The Stars and Stripes Book Stores at Extending the time to 60 days allows lease program and early enlisted retirement Howard Air Force Base, Corozal and Fort raters more time to prepare an accurate program has deleted some military occuMTMC POV office set Davis will hold a clearance sale throughevaluation, said Air Force Military Personpational specialities from eligible lists. The for one day closure out July. Everything except hardcover nel Center officials at Randolph AFB early release program has deleted 29N, bestsellers, magazines and newspapers staff sergeant and 39V sergeant first class The 1322nd Medium Port Command have been slashed 30 percent. Magazines Texas. from category three. The retirement proPOV section will close Tuesday. For inare 10 percent off. For information, call and is being incorporated in the new Air gram has deleted 29N staff sergeant and formation, call 282-3260. 284-5643. Force instruction 36-2403, covering the 39V sergeant first class from category C. search workshop enlisted evaluation system. For more inAir Force Thrift Shop offered July 27 Rodman ammunition formation about the changes, call the casupply point closed reer enhancements section of the Military reopens with new look A Job Search Workshop will be ofRodman Ammunition Supply Point Personnel Flight at 284-4661/5903. The newly-organized Howard and Alfeared on resume writing July 27. This will number one will be closed for a 100 perbrook Thrift Shop recently reopened with emphasize how to write an effective recent inventor July 25-29. All units with Smoking cessation a new appearance and under new managesume, which items should be included, and y ment. Servicemembers may sell persona which should be excluded. The workshop scheduled training for this period, call 287classes start July 27 items through consignment at the Thrift will be held at 10 a.m. at the Family Sup5806 to reschedule turn-ins and issue The next 8-week Habitrol Patch smokShop, or they may pick up a bargain someport Center. dates. ing cessation class will start July 27 at the Howard Clinic's conference room. ClassThe thrift shop is open Mondays and Legal Assistance Office Volunteers needed for es will meet from 12:45 to 1:45 p.m. every Thursdays and the third Saturday of every closes July 28-29 Native American Month Wednesday through September 14. Intermonth from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. For Because of prior commitments, the LeBase officials need volunteers to help ested smokers should call 284-4713/3832 more information call 285-5989. gal Assiatnce Office, Building 154, Fort plan and organize activities for the 1994 to make an appointment for a medical Clayton will be closed July 28-29. EmerHoward AFB Native American Month obscreening. Class size is limited, so interSupport center holds gencies will be handled on a case-by-case servance. It will be held in November and ested people should sign up early. spouse orientation basis. Call 287-6617. a volunteer in the rank of master sergeant or higher is needed to chair the observance Air Force War College The Howard Family Support Center is Delta Force recruiters committee. enrollment needed soon offering a Right Start Spouse Orientation .Any volunteer who is interested in parHoward Education Office officials adin English 10-11 a.m. July 28. Offered looking for applicants ticipating in this ethnic activity -or who vise immediate action for all majors and twice a month, in conjunction with the milThere will be a Delta Force Recruiting would like to learn more about it -may lieutenant colonels interested in enrolling itary Right Start program, this orientation visit now through July 29. To apply for call Tech. Sgt. Jim Johnson at 284-5358. in the 1994-95 Air Command and Staff offers an overview of the services and the Delta Force, applicants must be male, 22 College or Air War College seminars. To family-oriented FSC programs available years or older, pass a background security Promise Keepers inquire about enrollment procedures and on Howard and Albrook. investigation, pass a five-event physical conference planned requirements, call Linda Antoine at 284The__ _ _ _ Plannse d eepers Men's 4863. The officials also request all military Factoid: About 120 inches ofrain fall The sold out Promise Keepers Men's members who've received annual needs W weekend into Gatun Lake each year -enough Conference in Boulder, Colo., was deassessment surveys complete and return water to support the millions of gallons signed to develop strength and integrity them to the education office as soon as weather needed to operate the Panama Canal among men. A similar conference is possible. For more information, call 284locks over that same period. planned for July 29-30 at the Fort Clayton 6263. Pacific Atlantic Chapel. For more information, call Carson Saturday Saturday Tavenner at 269-9022. Used automobile sale Temperature Tides Temperature Tides set for Wednesda High: 88 9:02 a.m. at 15.4 feet High: 89 11:30 a.m. at 0.2 feet Navy MWR Office lists s e nt neday Low: 77 3:33 p.m. at 2.1 feet Low: 78 7:15 p.m. at 1.2 feet current job openings held a "spot bid sale" 9 am. Wednesday, Sunday Sunday Navy Morale Welfare and Recreation Building 308 Corozal. Used government High: 90 10:03 a.m. at I5 feet High: 89 12:25 p.m. at 0.2 feet Non-appropriated Funds Civilian Personautos will be on sale. A pre-inspection will Low: 78 4:35 p.m. at 2.3 feet Low: 78 7:58 p.m. at 1.3 feet nel Office announces openings for the foltake place Tuesday 9 a.m.-3 p.m. only. lowing positions: For information, call 285-5417.

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a igTropic Time Tram~og __July 15, 19943J 24th Wing starts 'Iguana Be Fit' program by Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson 24th Wing Public Affairs 1-OWARD AFB -After doing this workout routine for a few months, "I Guana' Be Fit!" OK, the grammar, syntax and conjugation isn't exactly scholarly, but the idea behind that statement is worthy of Al Einstein, Bill Faulkner and Bruce Jenner. It's also the title of a new recognition program here. The 24th Wing health promo tion program has started the "I Guana' Be Fit!" program to recognize squadrons who make outstanding contributions to the healthful living of their assigned squadron members. They also have an impressive "traveling trophy" that goes along with the quarterly award. The trophy was built from a caricature designed by Marcia Irwin last year, said Donna Giroux, installation health promotion manager. "We took it to a craftsman in the interior and he carved it from a single piece of wood," she said. "It is huge, and everybody who sees it agrees he did an incredible job." "Squadrons can do a variety of things to earn points toward winning this award," said Melissa Dragoo, health promotion assistant. "These include having senior leadership participate in health promotion activities, initiating programs for improving squadron members' health and fitness, and ensuring that their personnel pass the cycle ergometry sest. Something else squadrons can do is encourage all squadron members to participate in the "TGIF" (The Goal Is Fitness) Fun-Run held every Friday at the Howard Sports and Fitness Center. The winners of this award will get to display the "I Guana' Be Fit!" trophy in their orderly room for that quarter, and will earn bragging rights throughout the base, Dragoo said. Giroux said the initial response to the program has been great so far, and many people have expressed a great deal of excitement about it. "We hope interest will grow even more in the coming months. People who would like to nominate their squadron for the award can get forms at Howard's health promotion office, Room 101 in the U.s. Air Force pholo by Senior Airman arena McNally Howard Clinic. For more informaWinners of "Iguana Be Fit" award will get-to display this trophy in their orderly room for that quarter, and earn bragging tion, call 284-5870. rights throughout the base. 34 soldiers accept Pre-Ranger Course challenge FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Atlan"We lost them on the PT test on the first get smoked daily, but we're trying to insaid. "They wanted to hear horror stories." tic) -The offer was a 10-day course that day and the foot march on the second day," still a 'don't quit' attitude." Time doesn't allow the 5-87 instructors included combat survival classes, 5 a.m.Smallwood said. "They had to march 15 "In our last class last year, we had 18 to give an entirely accurate representation physical training with at least one 10-mile miles in 3 1/2 hours." start and seven finished (the Pre-Ranger of Ranger School, Smallwood said. run and two 5-mile runs, a 15-mile foot The final graded event was the field Course)," Smallwood added. "Six of those Ranger School's 72-day course is bromarch, a combat water survival test, land training exercise, which cut six more from seven earned their Ranger tabs, so we have ken down into three phases, and the solnavigation and three days and four nights the course. close to a 90-percent pass rate." dies must pass each phase to earn the in the jungle. During the FTX, the soldiers had to put The Pre-Ranger Course is a good repRanger tab, he said. The reward for those who succeeded what they learned during the first six days resentation of what Ranger School is like, The soldiers must also work in four difin the 10-day course was a chance at 72 to use, Smallwood said. according to Sgt. Bishop Freesh, Compaferent environments: a city phase at Fort days of even more mentally and physical"They have to do two patrols a day and ny C, 5th Bn., 87th Inf. Benning, Ga.; a desert phase at Fort Bliss, ly demanding tests at Fort Benning, Ga. incorporate ambushes and raids," he said. "This is a condensed version of the Texas; a mountain phase at Camp Merril, Although it may not seem inviting, 34 "They're tactical 24-hours a day and get school," said Freesh, one of the six who Ga.; and a jungle phase at Eglund AFB, soldiers here jumped at the offer June 20 two to three hours of sleep and one meal earned ranger tabs in the most recent Fla. -the 10-day Pre-Ranger Course and 72each day." Ranger School rotation. "It has almost evRanger School ends with a 12-day day Ranger School are unavoidable steps The intent is to give the soldiers a smallerything they'll see in Ranger School, and graded FTX, Smallwood added. in earning a ranger tab, according to Sgt. scale representation of what Ranger they come out of the course with a basic The soldiers volunteer to endure the difI st Class Robert T. Smallwood, noncomSchool is like. Based on former pass rates, idea of what to expect there." ficult 72-day school because of what a missioned officer in charge of 5th Battalthe Pre-Ranger Course accomplishes that, His experience was a valuable asset to "Ranger" stands for, Smallwood said. ion, 87th Infantry's Preranger Course. Smallwood said. the Ranger School hopefuls, Freesh said. "When a soldier earns his ranger tab, it The 34 soldiers had dwindled to 15 "We try to let them see exactly what "I gave the soldiers tips whenever I means he knows what he's doing," he said. only two days into the course, Smallwood they'll see at Ranger School," he said. "A could, and a lot of them came to me with "He can be put in charge ofanything and it said. lot of (the soldiers) are not used to it and questions about Ranger School," Freesh will get done."

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A Tropic Times I!II~1YN w July 15, 1994tary News Hat sends warning Seawolf sub costs Invasion supporters wilI be punished IPORT-AU-PRINCF, Haiti (AP) -The army-backed govnation and dealing with a surge of laitian refu gees. Other ships emmen warned Haitians Tuesday against supporting outside carried 2,00 Marnes. military intervention, while international condemnation poured lI a message read on local radio, Haiti's Information Ministry WASHINGTON (AP) -The first in over its order kicking out U.N. human rights observers. declared: "All who call for invasion are liable to be punished acSeawolfattack submarine is plagued The government message came hours after President Clinton cording to the law." by cost overruns and construction alluded again to the possibility of U.S. intervention to oust miliThe message came as the U.N. and OAS monitors prepared to delays, congressional investigators tary leaders and restore President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, who leave Haiti after the arny-installed government accused them on was toppled in 1991. Monday of disrupting state security and ordered them to leave withsey, but the Pentagon insists the ves"We have got to bring an end to this," Clinton said at a news in 48 hours. conference in Berlin. Mischa Gaillard, a socialist and leading Aristide supporter, acA report by the General AccountMonday's order to expel members of the United Nations and cused the government of trying to provoke American intervention ing Office made public Monday said Organization of American States observer mission was "just the with Monday's expulsion order. design and construction costs of the latest expression of the desperationof that illegal regime," Clin"A lot of soldiers and their civilian backers prefer a military nuclear-powered submarine went ton said. intervention," he told The Associated Press. $56 million over budget last year. Clinton's special adviser on Haiti, William Gray III, said HaiGaillard said intervention would limit popular retribution And, it said, those are only the latest tian leaders should look at the increased U.S. military presence against the military and give Haiti's traditional ruling elite a better in a series of cost runups and delays off their shores and "interpret it as very serious." But he also chance to subvert an open electoral process. that have made the Seawolf one of said any U.S. action would be in conjunction with the United The rights observers expected to leave either by charter aircraft the most controversial items in the Nations. or on a scheduled Air France flight to Guadeloupe, one of only defense budget. Clinton said the expulsion "certainly validates the position three weekly commercial flights to Haiti following a U.S.-led ban Both the Pentagon and the Elecwe've taken" that an invasion should not be ruled out. But he on air traffic that took effect June 24. tric Boat Division of General Dyacknowledged there was little support in the Western HemiOne group of observers gathered at a mountainside hotel for namics Corp., which builds the sphere for intervention and urged other countries to follow farewell photos. Others shredded documents and moved files from Seawolf in Groton, Conn., defended Washington's lead and freeze the coup backers' financial assets. offices, seeking to protect the identity of sources who reported killthe work being done on the first of The U.N. Security Council planned to discuss Haiti today and ings, kidnappings and rapes since the 1991 military overthrow of what President Clinton hopes will be was expected to issue a statement condemning the expulsion. the democratically elected Aristide. three vessels. The Pentagon said 14 U.S. warships were now in waters near The joint U.N.-OAS mission was sent in February 1993 to inFrank Kendall, a Defense DeHaiti, including eight directly involved with 15 Coast Guard cutvestigate rights abuses. The 104 observers and administrative partment acquisition official in ters in enforcing a U.N. trade embargo against the Caribbean workers file reports but have no enforcement power. charge of tactical warfare programs, said Electric Boat will meet its dei ~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ lvr nton n ciae D rin rg e a.ofMay 1996 for the first Clinton inactivates Berlin Bnigade sum:arine. "Since the GAO completed its BERLIN (AP) -President Clinton Tuesday called a united audit work, the shipyard has made Europe "our best partner" for prosperity and peace for the 21st significant progress," Kendall wrote century as he enthusiastically embraced this once-divided city in response to the report, as modem Europe's vital center. Electric Boat said that this year, At a news conference at the Reichstag, the restored parliaworkers have completed Seawolfs ment building the Nazis burned in 1933, Clinton also said it was pres hve nined ed of time for the United States and its European allies to "put some pressure hull nine days ahead of meat on the bones of our efforts" to better coordinate policies. hedule, tested the nuclear propulAs an example, Clinton announced the formation of two sion plant and begun training the U.S.-European task forces -one to recommend ways to crew. strengthen ties with the new democracies of eastern and central The first Seawolf is already Europe and the other to coordinate the fight against organized bought'and paid for. But the report crime, drug trafficking and money laundering, by the GAO, the investigative arm These are problems that "know no borders," Clinton said. of Congress, is sure to intensify next Clinton, the first U.S. president to visit reunited Berlin, met year's debate on whether to build a at the Reichstag with German Chancellor Helmut Kohl, Speakthird Seawolf. er of Parliament Rita Sussmuth, and European Commission Congress has already partially President Jacques Delors. funded that project and Clinton is Later, he was to take another historic step, becoming the first expected to seek $1.4 billion next U.S. president since before the Cold War to enter what had been year to complete the vessel. The 'the eastern, Communist sector of the city. price tag on the first Seawolf is exClinton was to stand before the majestic 200-year old pected to be about $2.4 billion. The Brandenburg Gate -just inside what had been East Berlin -second and third would cost slightly and speak to Berliners. Some 25,000 were invited to the speech, less. including many school children who were given the day off for Earlier this month the Senate Clinton's visit. voted unanimously to impose a cost "I believe our best partner as we look towards the 21st cen Clinton cap of $4.76 billion on the first two tury for prosperity and for peace is a Europe united in democrasubs. Sen. John MoCain, R-Ariz., cy and free markets in common security," Clinton said at his once confronted the Soviets and East Germans at Checkpoint says he will propose killing the third joint news conference with Kohl and Delors. Charlie. Seawolf next year on grounds the Kohl, at the news conference from a room in the Reichstag, That ceremony marks the end of the U.S. military presence in noted that one needed to "just look out the window" to see Berlin. money could be better used "to signs of German unity. The building is adjacent to what had been Clinton began the day jogging through a park near his hotel counter the clear and present threats the Berlin Wall. with seven members of the brigade. of today's world." Clinton is the first American president since Harry Truman The Brandenburg Gate, meanwhile, was a center for Hitler's The GAO blamed the rising costs in 1945 to visit the eastern part of the city. storm troopers and later the greatest symbol of divided Germany. on technical problems, poor coordiOther presidents -Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Now it is part of the new, united and democratic Germany. nation between the Electric Boat Reagan, John F. Kennedy -visited the western side of the city Clinton at day's end made a brief visit to the Jewish Communiyard and Seawolf engineers at and peered over at the East when the Cold War kept the city ty Center, thereby stirring memories of the murder of 6 million Tenneco's Newport News (Va.) divided. Jews by Germany and its collaborators. Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., and In his Brandenburg Gate speech, Clinton had some hard acts Clinton was asked at the Reichstag news conference if Poland the reduced number of Seawolfs to to follow in tenns of presidential addresses in Berlin. would become the first former Warsaw Pact nation to be formally be built. Since the first sub was or"Ich bin ein Berliner," John Kennedy declared June 26, admitted to NATO. dered in 1989, construction costs 1963, identifying the United States with West Berlin, an island The president said that, while there was not yet a timetable for have risen 59 percent while design of democracy surrounded by the Berlin Wall and communist admitting new members to the alliance, Poland had "virtually ascosts more than doubled. East Gennany. sured they are at the front of that line." The president visited PoThe GAO blamed the Navy for And Ronald Reagan June 12, 1987, stood before the Berlin land earlier on the eight-day European trip that concludes today. $223.3 million in construction cost Wall and declared: "Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate. Mr. Clinton's visit coincided with a ruling today by Germany's increases since 1989. Those probGorbachev, tear down this wall." highest court that German troops can be sent abroad on U.N. -islems included "late and unsuitable Kennedy spoke at the Berlin City Hall. Clinton's speech is sions, reversing a postwar policy adopted to keep the country from govemment-funishcd design data" near the spot where Reagan spoke except that Reagan stood in ever again becoming a military threat. go faulty welds that stemmed in West Berlin facing both the wall and Brandenburg Gate behind Both Kohl and Clinton said they welcomed the decision. "I am part from the Navy's choice of a it. completely comfortable with that," Clinton said. par heav y's she f a The Berlin Wall has been torn down, the city is united and "Berlin is at the center of Europe, the center of its commerce, its newer, heavier-grade steel for the Clinton inactivated the U.S. Anny's elite Berlin Brigade, which culture," Clinton said late Monday. Seawolf

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# My IIIa ry CWSTropic Times tary News July 15,1994 Court rules in base closure commission's favor WASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces Information Service) -A recent U.S. Supreme Court decision halIts le-mecor'snMore overseas bases slated to close gal challenges aimed at stopping military base closures in M o e v rs a b s s sl t d o c o e the United States. WASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces InformaOf the 27 sites announced, 23 are Army posts, with The court unanimously ruled the Defense Base Clotion Service) -U.S. military facilities at 27 European 20 located in Germany. Military communities in sure and Realignment Commission complied with set resites will close or reduce operations, Defense DepartNuremberg, Fulda, Augsburg and Karlsruhe are hardquirements when it recommended Philadelphia Naval ment officials announced. Sites named are in Germany, est hit, with 13 of the 23 closures involving the four Shipyard for closure. The Pennsylvania shipyard is one of the Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark and the England. cities. 82 stateside installations the commission voted in 1991 to In addition, seven other European sites changed staIn Nuremberg, the Army returns the Feucht Storage close or realign. tus. Five installations originally slated to remain open Facility and the Erlangen, Herzogenaurach and Shipyard employees and their unions, members of at reduced levels will now close, while two or iginally Patoriusstrasse housing areas. Herzo Base and the Congress from New Jersey and Pennsylvania, state offislated to close will remain open. Nuremberg hospital, earlier named as partial returns, cials from New Jersey, Delaware and Pennsylvania and The Air Force returns three sites to host nations and become full returns. the city ofPhiladelphia challenged the closure and realignpartially returns one. The Holstebro Contingency HosIn the Fulda area the Army returns four sites in meant process in Dalton vs. Spencer. Pennsylvania Sen. pital in Denmark, the United Kingdom's Nocton Hall Reiterswiesen. The sites include the military airfield, Arlen Specter argued the case before the Supreme Court. Contingency Hospital and Alzey Communication Anammunition storage area and two training areas. Specter argued the Navy, DoD and the realignment nex in Sembach, Germany, will return to host nation In Karlsruhe the Army will close Gerszewski Barcommission violated requirements of the Defense Base control. The Suelm Annex in Bitburg, Germany, beracks and Neureut Barracks, while Germershiem Army Realignment and Closure Act of 1990. He also made simcome s a partial return. Depot becomes a partial return. ilar allegations regarding the commission's recommendations to then-President George Bush. In his arguments, Specter claimed the commission used improper criteria, legal challenges to the military base closure process." dations. The commission combines its findings with DoD failed to place certain information in the record until after "We are very hopeful that this decision will bring an recommendations for a closing list. the close ofpublic hearings, and held closed meetings with end to the litigation that attempts to invalidate the proOnce completed, the commission's list goes to the the Navy. cess," Courter said. "We are relieved and are anxious to president, who must either approve or disapprove it in its In delivering the court's opinion, Chief Justice Willturn our full attention to the important task of closing unentirety. The president may not add, delete, upgrade or iam Rehnquist said for the court to review recommendanecessary military bases." downgrade any base on the list. tions, the report must be a "final agency action." Courter added the finality provision thwarts efforts to If the president disapproves, the commission has one Rehnquist said DoD's and the commission's reports were halt the base closing process. "The tremendous savings month to review its findings and resubmit. A second presmerely recommendations and are not final. Therefore, associated with base closures would be unnecessarily deidential disapproval kills base closures for the round. they not subject to review. layed or never realized at all," he said. If the president approves, he forwards the list with a Rehnquist then added the president's actions, in turn, Under the current act, the commission has recommendcertification of approval to Congress. Congress then has are not reviewable because the president is not an agency. ed closure of 164 U. S. military installations and realign45 days to vote a joint resolution of disapproval. Like the "Where a statute, such as the 1990 act, commits decision ment of 93 others. Officials estimate net savings of $5.8 president, Congress must accept or reject the list in its enmaking to the discretion of the president, judicial review billion during fiscal 1992-1999 from these closures. tirety. Ifno action occurs, the closure begins immediately. of the president's decision is not available," he said. According to the base closure act, the closing process Bush approved and forwarded the commission's 199 1 Jim Courter, the former member of Congress who starts with a DoD recommendation. The commission takes findings to Congress. Base closure proceedings began afchairs the independent closure and realignment commisthose recommendations and conducts its own survey, ter the House of Representatives rejected a proposed joint sion, hailed the rulings as "a unanimous rejection of all holds public hearings and compiles separate recommenresolution, 364-60. Navy fighter crashes Gay Navy aviator defends disclosure in the Sea of Japan TOKYO (AP) -A U.S. Navy WASHINGTON (AP) -For Navy Lt. the military by going public. mony, telling him, "You don't really fighter jet crashed on the flight Tracy Thorne, facing discharge for revealLt. Peter Dutton, a Navy attorney, said know much about him (Thorne) at all, deck of the carrier USS Kitty Hawk ing his homosexuality, the first day of his the Pentagon's general policy was "essenonce he leaves the doors of Jefferson Pladuring a night landing in the Sea of military hearing was bittersweet. tially unchanged" by the new regulations. za. Japan. The two crew members "It means a great deal to me to have my "A shift in focus is not new law," he said. Thorne violated military regulations by were in satisfactory condition, the family here with me," Thome told reportUnder Pentagon policy both before and wearing his uniform and "publicly attackNavy said Tuesday. ers Monday during a break, indicating his after "don't ask, don't tell," homosexual ing the military" in the "Nightline" broadIn San Diego, Tracy Jennings, mother and sister. But he also said he was conduct is grounds for discharge, Dutton cast, Dutton said. wife of radar intercept officer Lt' sorry his father couldn't be there. Dr. said. People can be discharged for homoLt. Larry Burch, one of Thorne's attorCmdr. David Jennings, said her Roscoe Thorne died in a private plane sexual acts or for making statements neys, insisted that Thorne criticized the husband apparently injured his feet crash two weeks ago in Florida. "demonstrating a propensity" to engage in Pentagon's policy on gays in the service after his parachute snagged on the Luther Zeigler, one of Thorne's attorsuch acts. but did not attack the military. Wearing the F-14 Tomcat's tail and he landed neys, said Dr. Thome recently told him he Thorne was placed on inactive reserve uniform on television was a "minor mishard on the deck. wanted to make a statement for his son at in May 1993, but the Clinton administraconduct," Burch said. The pilot, whose name was not the Navy Board of Inquiry hearing. Soon tion agreed in January to return him to acThe board's decision on Thorne will be released, suffered secondto thirdafter, he was dead, Zeigler said in an intertive duty while it seeks to discharge him. reviewed by Navy Secretary John Dalton. degree burns, she said. view. A former member of the Navy's "FlyThorne's attorneys told reporters they Navy spokesman Dave Harvell At Monday's hearing, Throne's lawing Tigers" bomber squadron, Thorne now would go to federal court if he is discould not confirm the injuries. yers told the three-member board that the works on information systems at the Nacharged. Pentagon's new "don't ask, don't tell" val Air Systems Command in Arlington, A similar hearing was scheduled today Texas gets first policy cannot be applied retroactively to Va. in Norfolk, Va., to review the Navy's bid t a his case. Thorne, 27, disclosed his homoThome is "a hard-charging young lieuto discharge Lt. j.g. R. Dirk Selland. troop to teacher sexuality on ABC's "Nightline" in May tenant" who is "really an exemplary lieuSelland, 25, acknowledged his homoWASHINGTON, D.C. (Ameri1992. tenant as far as his professional ability to sexuality to his commanding officer the can Forces Information Service) -The policy didn't take effect until last do the job," Cmdr. Craig Luigart, Thorne's day after President Clinton took office in Army Sgt. Maj. Lazaro Ramirez is February, Zeigler said. commanding officer, testified at the hearJanuary 1993. He said he did so because the first servicemember to particiBut a Navy attorney contended Thorne ing. Clinton pledged to lift the ban on gays pate in the Troops to Teachers tranviolated the government policy on gays in But Dutton challenged Luigart's testiserving openly in the military. sition program. Ramirez will work with the El Paso, Texas, Independent School District as an bilingual elementary Lesbian colonel returns to National Guard school teacher starting with the CAMP MURRAY, Wash. (AP) -Two Surgical Hospital. As a regular reservist, instatement delayed until its appeal could 1994-1995 school year. The Deyears after Col. Margarethe Cammermeyer her work obligation is two days per month be heard, or at least until the court rules in partment of Defense will provide was kicked out of the National Guard for and a 15-day annual training mission. The a similar case involving a homosexual Ramirez with a stipend to help pay being a lesbian, the highly decorated Vietjob pays about $12,000 a year. Navy sonar instructor. for certification through the Uninam veteran was back at her old job Satur"She has to catch up on some adminisThe 52-year-old Cammermeyer is a 26versity of Texas at El Paso. In addiday. trative things. She has to get a new ID card. year military veteran who was awarded the tion, DoD will grant the school disA federal court ordered her reinstateShe has to get a physical because she's Bronze Star as an Army nurse in Vietnam. trict $37,000 over five years to subment last month, ruling her discharge overdue," Guard spokeswoman Donna She was discharged involuntarily in sidize Ramirez' salary. based on her sexual orientation was unconHubbert said. 1992, three years after disclosing her sexOthers interested in the program stitutional. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Guard commander Maj. Gen. Greg ual orientation during security clearance can apply at installation education Appeals in San Francisco refused to delay Barlow asked Cammermeyer to report to interview. The military had maintained a centers or transition offices. For that order July 7. work Saturday after the appeals court relongstanding ban on homosexuality until more information call 1-800-452A smiling Cammermeyer, dressed in a jected the Justice Department's latest efits recent revision to the policy commonly 6616 or write to: camouflage uniform, arrived in an white fort to block her reinstatement. called "don't ask, don't tell." DANTES Mercedes-Benz and entered the main gate "I never knew the military to move so A Justice Department spokeswoman, 6490 Saufley Field Rd. at Washington National Guard headquarfast," Cammermeyer said in a telephone reached Friday night in Washington, D.C., Pensacola, FL 32509ters, south of Tacoma. interview. "I'm more disappointed that it's declined to comment. The government's 5243. She returned to herjob as chief of nurstaken two years to get here." appeal of the initial reinstatement order reing services for the 164th Mobile Army The Justice Department wanted her remains pending.

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Tropic Times July 15, 1994 V i e Kobbe soldi r loses Post office customer $950 on phone card wary of 'timeliness' Unauthorized phone calls Dear Mayors' Corner: A Fort Kobbe soldier reported that an Talk about quality of life What was unknown person gained access to his someone thinking when they decided to phone card and personal identification tary police at 287-4401/4402. stop shipping weekly magazines to us in nately, the 24th Air Postal Squadron number, and made unauthorized phone Child neglect a timely manner? Getting Newsweek does not own the entire process. We calls totalling more than $950. The military police want to remind all and Business Week are an important have the ultimate responsibility for the Military police remind everyone to people not to leave young children unatway we all keep in touch with home. delivery of your mail once it reaches our safeguard all types of credit cards. If you tended at any time. According to U.S. When it was just Newsweek we Air Mail Terminal. become a victim of a crime, contact the Army Garrison Regulation 210-1, children weren't getting, we wrote the magazine. For some reason, SAPS personnel military police at 287-4401. 9 years old and younger must be accomIt has been three weeks since we got started putting time-value publications panied by an adult or supervised by a reBusiness Week and we have heard peoin bulk sacks about 45 days ago. When Military Police Liaison Office sponsible person 13 years or older at all ple complaining at the post office. we realized what was happening, we The Military Police Liaison Office will times. People caught violating this regulaI talked to the chain of command at alerted our Joint Military Postal Activiinvestigate accidents involving U.S. milition will be cited for child neglect. the post office. I know the theory is to ty-Atlantic liaisons of the situation, so tary vehicles and personally-owned vehisave money and still get magazines out they could pass this on to their countercle accidents involving injuries which ocPanama Jack Anonymous Hotline about a week after people in the states. parts in U.S.Postal Service. cur outside of military controlled areas. Anyone with information concerning That, in itself, is a reduction in our We also elevated this concern to our This is limited to military personnel, their drug smuggling should contact the Panaquality of life -getting 10-day-old lead agency, the Military Postal Service family members and Department of Dema Jack Anonymous Hotline at 285-4185. news when the idea is to make Panama Agency. The former commander of the fense civilians. as much like home as possible. The re24th Wing, Brig. Gen. David Sawyer, Ifthe liaison investigator is unable to reThe following are crime, statistics for ality is worse. The publications are even wrote a letter outlining his conspond to the scene ofthe accident, the drivon-post housing areas during the week of much later and even the post office adcerns about mail movement in the theer involved should accept the court citation June 17-23: mits the problem is massive. ater to the executive director of MPSA. and contact the MPL office with all the inPacific Are magazines really being shipped The bottom line is we are sensitive to formation concerning the incident. Corozal -I larceny of secured private by container to arrive in six weeks? The concerns of our customers and have cleIf requested, a Military Police Liaison property post office thinks so while the master vated it to the general office level. Our Investigator will translate in court. Contact Curundu -1 larceny of unsecured private sergeant denies it. I want to know the goal is to provide the best customer serthe MPL Office at 287-4300/4363 for property -2 attempted housebreakings truth, even more, I want to know how vice. We are seeing a decrease in timemore information. Cocoli -1 larceny of unsecured private the problem is going to be solved, not value publications shipped through bulk property how people are "working on it." mail and are optimistic the transit times 60-day Jail Sentence Fort Amador -I housebreaking/larceny Out of it in Panama for these will improve. A Curundu resident observed a person of secured private property Editor's note: To submit questions on his patio and confronted him. When the Off post Dear Out of It: to the Mayoral Congress, send letters person threatened one of the family memEl Dorado -1 larceny of secured private Capt. Karen Jordan, chief of Postal to: Mayors' Corner, Publicity Chairhers, the resident chased the man and deproperty Operations, said: The "someone" you person, APO AA 34004 (MPS). Anotamned him until the military police arrived. Atlantic refer to who is not sending your maganymity will be granted upon request. iThe person was taken to court where he reNone reported zines in a timely manner works in the The Tropic Times reserves the right to ceived a 60-day jail sentence. Off post Unites States Postal Service. Unfortuedit letters and responses for brevity, Report suspicious activity to the miliNone reported. ___________________________________ comments. It is hard to believe that a mature adult could lent soldiers, excellent people make excellent ditch digpossibly believe that a four star general ".is doing his gers and excellent people should make excellent teachers. utmost to take away all our (your) benefits." and intenSo, to answer your letter, an excellent teacher could deal Dear editor: tionally "targeting civilians for the belt tightening." This with it. After reading your "Readers respond to teachers/housis a paranoid reaction to what was surely a difficult deciSpe. Eric T. Miller and Cpl. Andrew A. Cooper ing issue" (July 8, 1994), we simply must reply. sion for Gen. McCaffrey to carry out. We say "carry out" First of all, the Tropic Times must be seriously critibecause to think that the general would have made a deciDear Spe. Miller and Cpl. Cooper: cized for including only letters that opposed the housing sion for the Department of Defense without at least their Believe it or not, yours is the first letter we received move. Surely, in all the responses that you received on input is beyond reality. supporting the Army's decision -but not the only one. this issue, at least one was an intelligently written letter Also, educator, ask yourself this: Who is better Because oflack of space, we can't print every letter writthat supported the DoD decision. Considering the sensiequipped to deal with catastrophes such as lack of sleep, ten on this subject. For an official response to the questivity of this issue, I can only guess as to why the editor electrical outages, or water shortages? Is it the adult teachtions raised about this decision, see Page 16. chose to present only the negative viewpoint to the thouer, secure in their position, supposedly learned in how to Here at the Tropic Times, we try to give fair represensands of Tropic Times readers. This is in our opinion a handle crisis? Or is it their dependent student, a senior in tation to the entire American community living in Panama, r severe misrepresentation of the general feeling regarding high school, who is studying for his finals or SAT test that military or civilian. We appreciate your taking the time to this policy. will affect his entire future. The answer is clear, and your tell another side of the story. To "An American Civilian" we have several things to position is a selfish one. We won't be printing any more letters on this housing say in response to your letter. To begin with, let us look If what you want is equality, then we invite you to issue, but we thank all of you who responded. closely at the title "DoDDS teacher" or, more specifically, come stay with the single soldier in his barracks. Come "Department of Defense Dependents Schools teacher." By share his 10 by 20 hard tile floor and bunk beds. He will Maureen Sampson, Tropic Times editor definition, the role that DoDDS personnel have here in gladly move his things out of the locker to make some Panama is to support servicemembers and their families, room for yours, You are welcome to use the shower stalls Dear editor: who in turn support you with national security and dein the common bathrooms anytime you like and join us I was reading the June 24 issue of the Tropic Timnes fense. Are you so arrogant (read naive) to assume that you for dinner in the dining facility. And if you want to feel and came across the section entitled Focus on Panama. have a comparable role to these soldiers, sailors, airmen exceptionally "equal," come on out to the jungle and do The purpose of this letter is to thank you for the section and Marines? What do you "defend" during the course of some studies on the human aroma when not showered for called Panama News summary. your duty day as a teacher? To put it bluntly, without sol13 days. You say, "we volunteered for this." So did you. My family does not speak Spanish but are very much diers you would have no job, and indirectly, you work for To "Balboa Elementary sixth grade teacher," our reply interested in our surroundings. The local news helps us to soldiers. is short. It can be said that excellent people are usually understand our environment more. Many thanks. With this said, we would like to address some of your excellent at what they do. Excellent people make excelMrs. Roy A. Gedeon This authorized unofficial command information pubChief.Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor Command Information Officer. Beth Taylor lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Editor.Maureen Sampson Managing Editor.Staff Sgt. Jane Usero Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Sports Editor.Sgt. Lori Davis Editor.Sgt. Robin Mantikoski Information Program of the Department of Defense, unStaff Editors.Sgt. Cass Purdum Journalist.Sgt. Eric Hortin der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S. Spc. John Hall Southern Command. Spe. Tom Findtner 24th Wing Public Affairs Office.284-5459 Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the Rosemary Chong Public Affairs Officer.Capt. Warren L. Sypher official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Student hires.Floyd Able Public Affairs Superintendent Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. Nishawne Moran Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Charlotte Souffront Journalists.Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson Telephone 285-6612. Southern Command Public Affairs Office.282-4278 Sgt. James A. Rush Commander in Chief.Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey Command Information Officer.Patrick Milton U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 Director, Public Affairs.Col. James L. Fetig U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.287-3007 Public Affairs Officer.Diane Gonzalez Public Affairs Officer.Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder Photographer TTU Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor Ei EiU.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.289-4312 # -o p iC1c1 s NCOIC.Sgt. Richard Emert

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Tropic Times Commentary -.11-ommenary July 15, 19941 Women in combat People on both sides of issue are entitled to their opinions by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero where bathrboms and showers have been scarce, but I USARSO Public Affairs Officehaemngd Granted, I didn't care much for crawling, eating and allowing women into combat jobs has been in sleeping in the dirt for (lays without a shower, but I the news for some time now. Even though the managed as anyone would. What, do men enjoy idea of women in combat is gaining more battlefield conditions? Do men need bathrooms and acceptance, many people are still against it. Everyone showers any less than women? has their own opinions and personal reasons for how Like I said before -it all depends on the person, they feel, man or woman. I have been involved in many conversations over Now, for a little history lesson. Women have been on lunch tables, coffee cups and just standing around the front lines of combat since the beginning of time. shooting the breeze about the subject. I am inundated Through my research, I have found women military K with various reasons as to why or why not women leaders as far back as 39 AD. It was then that Trung Trac should be allowed into combat jobs. and her sister Trung Nhi of Vietnam physically led the Most reasons I hear for both sides have merit and are first uprising in their country against the Chinese. To well thought out, intelligent opinions. I feel everyone is this, day they are revered as heroes in their country's entitled to their opinions, as long as they are well history. thought out and intelligent -not based on old fashioned In the 1760s, the Russian empress, Catherine II, stereotypes and outdated prejudices. borrowed a man's uniform, jumped on a horse and led I'm thankful to say that I really haven't run into that the rebel regiments in a coup. all that much, but it is still out there. Women have died in combat for centuries -as was You know the old thinking like, "Women are the the case of the Rani of Jhansi, Lakshmi Bai of India. She fairer sex and shouldn't be expected to be in combat was killed leading her men in a battle to defend a fortress survived to freedom. Though most of these women killing and being killed." Such thoughts as, "Women are from British assault in Gwalior in 1858. weren't actually in the military nor were they in combat the weaker sex and would never be able to survive on In our own country's history such women as jobs, they came into combat situations and came through. the battle field." Margaret Corbin and Mary Ludwig Hays McCauly Even those women who served in the military in For those of you who have this type of opinion, read manned cannons when their husbands fell during battles "traditional" jobs, often came into combat situations and on -you might learn something. Now, don't get the in the Revolutionary War. were sometimes needed on the front lines. In both Korea wrong idea and think this is only aimed at men, it isn't. I Though Corbin and McCauly weren't actually and Vietnam, women often came under fire, many being have heard women out there with this same type of soldiers, Deborah Sampson and Sarah Emma Evelyn killed. thinking. Edmonds were. They disguised themselves as men, Our most recent cases were during Desert Shield and I'm not saying all women are cut out to be on the joined the forces and fought valiantly in combat -on Desert Storm. Women did their jobs, fought when front lines, they aren't -but neither are all men. I'm the front lines as infantrymen. needed, and some were even captured or killed doing also not saying all women should be allowed into Sampson, who enlisted in 1782 with the 4th Massatheir jobs during this battle even though their jobs combat jobs, only those who can do it. What I am saying chusetts Regiment, fought in many battles and was weren't "combat" jobs. is that those who are cut out for it and can do it should wounded several times before she was discovered and With today's firepower, does it really matter if a be allowed the choice. Personally, it isn't something I forced out of the military. She did, however, collect woman is in the rear as a nurse or on the front lines as a would opt to do, but for those who want to and can, they veterans disability pension and is the only genuine ineddic? Does it matter if she drives a truck full of should be allowed. woman veteran of the Revolutionary War. ammunition to the front lines or is there to help use it? Now, many people have concerns as to how this Edmonds joined the Army shortly after the outbreak Granted, being on the front lines would not be my first integration will work in a battlefield environment. There of the Civil War with Company F, 2nd Michigan choice, but in many jobs, such as journalism, we may not are certain "needs" a woman has thatjust can't be met Infantry. She took part in such battles as Blackburn's have a choice. Besides, does it really matter who is on a battlefield. Things like bathroom facilities and Ford, Bull Run and the Pennsylvania Campaign. She snapping the shutter? shower facilities -we all know a woman can't go one even went on to become aid to Col. Orlando Poe and With a shrinking Army, we may not have a choice. day without a shower. also earned the right to a military pension. The Army has seen and survived changes throughout I don't know about most of you, but if I were on a In more recent history, women have flown aircraft its history that many thought would never happen. Racial battlefield with the enemy shooting at me, having my during World War II, often coming under attack. integration, women into the regular Army and now this. own personal bathroom and shower would be the last Women were also taken prisons of war in the PhilipIt may be a bumpy ride, but we will survive as we thing on my mind. I.have been in field environments pines by the Japanese and, under terrible conditions, always do. After all, this is the United States Army. Direct Quotes Should women be allowed to serve on combat duty? "Of course, why not? "If they want to, yes. "Sure, why not? If men "Yes, definitely. In the "Yes, it's equally fair. Soldiers like us get paid Women want to be can do it, women can Air Force they should This issue has been long the same for the same liberated, if they're in too." be allowed to go in misunderstood." rank. They shouldn't be the Army, they should combat. Women are exempt." go to combat like any very capable." Sgt. 1st Class other soldier." Aquilino Pizzarro Sgt. Eduardo Gonzalez Spc. Tara Terrell Tech Sgt. Yolanda Pittman Staff Sgt. Rob Holmes Headquarters Company, U.S. Army Medical 308th Military Intelligence Defense Mapping Agency 135th Airlift Squadron 41st Area Support Group Department Activity Battalion The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries -or responses to commentariesto the Tropic Tiies. The staff reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

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Tropic Times July 15, 1994 Under UInstruction Citizen-soldiers fix Guatemalan countryside construction engineering unit, so this is our first time through an interpreter. "I feel magnificent to have 1st Lt. Richard Blandy ever doing this," said Martinez, a construction worker them here to help us build this highway." 109th Public Affairs Detachment from Ne'w York City. "We'll make the forms to pour Cpl. Mike McFall of Lockburn said building SABADILLA, Guatemala -The sound of heavy the concrete. It consists of a lot of 'rebar' and wood bridges in Guatemala was a great personal expericonstruction machinery run by National Guard construction, carpentry and basic concrete mixing and ence. "This is the second site I've been to," he said. engineers calling to each other in New York accents pouring. We're kind of rough around the edges, but "I went to Coban (a town north of Sabadilla) and must have seemed strange to the Mayan Indians we're learning as we go along." finished work on a couple of schools. It makes you who make up most of the population here. "The men are motivated because they're using a lot feel pretty good because when you talk to the The construction in Guatemala is part of "Fuertes of tools they don't always get the chance to use," he soldiers and the people down here, you find out they Caminos-North," a U.S. military humanitarian added. "As long as the men are working they're really need this stuff. They really need it and they exercise in Latin America. happy. They know it's for a good purpose. It's for the really appreciate it." "Fuertes Caminos," a Spanish phrase meaning people of Guatemala and they're motivated for that Lt. Col. Frank Fantasia, deputy commander of "strong roads," is one of the U.S. Southern reason alone." Task Force Dirigo of the 94th U.S. Army Reserve Command's biggest training and nation-assistance The bridge is 30-feet-long and will support up to 60 Command, said Guard engineers often passed projects in Central America. Much of the work is tons. An old bridge at the site was poorly made and through the small town of Sabadilla on their way to done by Reserve and Guard soldiers and airmen fell down a long time ago, Martinez said. the roads and bridges. One of the first things Guard performing their annual training obligations. The men of the 152nd held contests while they soldiers learned when they arrived was the children Each Guard engineer unit builds a portion of the worked to see who could drive three-foot spikes with a of Sabadilla didn't have many school supplies roads or bridges and prepares the site for the next sledge hammer into the large timbers spanning the Guatemalan children can't attend school unless they rotation. All construction equipment belongs to the bridge in the least amount of swings. have a pencil and something to write on. task force and is at the site when the Guard troops Spc. Angel Pagan of New York City, a combat Returning units brought word of this back to the arrive. engineer with the 152nd, often won these contests. United States and the arriving units started bringing Members of the New York Army National "It's a great learning experience," Pagan said. "The pencils and school supplies for the children. Guard's Company A, 152nd Engineer Battalion of next time we do something like this we'll be able to Fantasia said the various engineering units have New York City recently traveled to the Central do it faster and more efficiently." found enough scrap supplies from the other projects Highlands of Guatemala to help build six miles of Sgt. Richard Kmitch of Buffalo, a member of to build a school in Sabadilla. This was not on the road and improve 10 more. They also helped build Headquarters Detachment of the 152nd in Buffalo, original list of projects, but the engineers have four timber trestle bridges. The dynamic landscapes said safety is a major concern for everyone in Comvolunteered to build the school. and rugged mountain terrain of the Central Highpany A. Everyone working on the bridge must wear a "They (U.S. soldiers) are put into an environment lands posed staggering engineering difficulties for hard hat, goggles and drink plenty of water. where they have a real mission to accomplish," Company A. "It's different from anything we've done before," Fantasia said. "In many cases, some of our engineers Company A's main task was to pour the concrete Kmitch said. "There's a lot of on-the-job training." have never had the chance to work with mortar and foundation and reinforce abutment walls and pier Many Sabadilla residents and several Guatemalan brick and to build schools and bridges." walls of the second bridge going up the mountain. soldiers who served as guards watched the men of the Fantasia said the morale for the exercise was This required much strenuous work, said 1st Lt. 1 52nd as they worked on the bridge. fantastic and the troops left with a real feeling of Eduardo Martinez, Company A's 3rd Platoon "It is happiness to have such a highway and bridge satisfaction. He said beside providing Guatemala Member leader. because before this it took 10 hours to walk to town," with valuable assistance, the members of the 152nd wall for "We're basically a light engineering unit, not a Lucio Cuc Sun, an elder resident of Sabadilla, said have received some valuable training "Fuerte _4' Theater Suppo rt Element photo by Spc Jayne Jackson Spc. Steve Spicknall hands tools up to Staff Sgt. Brian Barnhill, both of Company B, 5th Battalion, 159th Aviation Regiment, Fort Meade, Md. during annual training at La Aurora International Airport in Guatemala City as part of -"Fuertes Caminos." _7 Members of New York Army National Guard's Company A, 152nd Engineer Battalion drive

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Tropic Times July 15, 1994 9 "It makes you feel pretty good because when you talk to the soldiers and the people down here, you find out they really need this stuff. They really need it and they really appreciate it." Cpl. Mike McFall 152nd Engineer Battalion ,44) 4x& Theater Support Element photo by Spc Jayne A Jackson of the New York Army National Guard and Guatemalan military erect a Theater Support Element phcto by S Jayne A Jackson he Chitul school in the Alta Verapaz province of Guatemala as part of Sgt. 1st Class Phillip Ceaser discusses Central American Highway 5 improvements Caminos-North." with another Maine Army National Guard soldier in Salama, Guatemala. Theater Suppor Elemen phot by'sILt R harS Bandy New York City National Guardsman 1st. Lt. Eduardo Martinez talks with another engineer from the 152nd Engineer Battalion while building a bridge in Guatemala. Theater Suppor Element photo by 1tt Lt Rtchard Blnny ikes into the timbers of a bridge they built in the central highlands of Guatemala.

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Io Tropic Times__ 10July 15, 1994iestones Military promotions The following U.S. Southern Command Army majors were selected for lieutenant colonel: Juan Cardenas, Robert Cox, Stephen Donehoo, Orlando Fernandez, Jerome Haggins, Maria Hain, Troy Lovett, Hubert Newman, Virgil Priestly, Simeon Trombitas and Bruce Yost. To Sergeant First Class -Sharon Hodges of 56th Signal Battalion. To Sergeant -Gerry Spivey and I lerman Wilson of 56th Signal Battalion. Kenneth Smith of 154th Signal Battalion. Daniel Mangel and Tremeyne Smith both of 3rd Special Operations Support Command (Airborne). To Specialist -Cynthia Cobb and Michael Payne of 154th Signal Battalion. To Private First Class -Emilio Hernandez Ill and Michael Strasz of 154th Signal Battalion. =ilitary awards=5 Meritorious Service Medal -Maj. Maria Cabrera, Capt. Beverly McCormick, Sgt. Ist Class Diane Anderson, Sgt. Arthur Holguin, Maj. Stacy Roth, Capt. Deborah Wessloh and Staff Sgt. Michael Nicholson, all of U.S. Army MedCourtesy photo ical Activity-Panama. Capt. Hung Nguyen of HeadquarMem bears of the board ters Company, 193rd Infantry Brigade (Light). Lt. Col. The newly elected members of the Howard/Albrook Officers' Spouses Club Board are from Charles Lee, Maj. Nathaniel Stevenson and Maj. Kevin left: recording secretary Sarah Payne, welfare treasurer Barb Estill, first vice president Tom Wendell, all of 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry (Light). Staff McCarthy, president Chrystal Abair, second vice president Julie Fannie, corresponding fanty. secretary Paulette Middleton and general treasurer Becky McCampbell. Army Commendation Medal -Spe. Barbara Jarboe of seph Weinzapfel, Sgt. Jody Werkheiser and Staff Sgt. earned his first varsity letter playing shortstop for the MarU.S. Army Medical Activity-Panama. Capt. Winfort Terrence West, all of 59th Engineer Company. Sgt. iners, the Academy's baseball team. Steward III, Staff Sgt. Charles Davis, Sgt.Reginald Fredrick Dela Cruz of 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Sgt. Collins, Sgt. Eric Powell, Spec. Jefferey Slater, Spec. Tracy Irvin of 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry. Civilian awards Christopher Spaugy, all of 56th Signal Battalion. Ist Lt. Tammy Pankratz, Staff Sgt. John Gomez and Sgt. James Certificate of Achievement -Sgt. Michael Schultz, Spc. Years of Service -55 Years: John Hannaman of DirecProctor, all of 154th Signal Battalion. Staff Sgt. Timothy Jade Bourke, Spe. Kevin Norman and Spc. Gary Ryan, torate of Engineering and Housing. 35 Years: Carol Scott Cadle, Staff Sgt. Robert Hott, Sgt. Carlos Miranda, Spec. all of 56th Signal Battalion. Pvt. Donald Forehand, Pvt. of Directorate of Engineering and Housing. 30 Years: Jose Richard Morris, 1st Lt. Andrew Olsen, Cpl. Robert PeoPhillip Smith, Spc. Mark Stewart and Spe. Eric Balmaceda and Eduardo Morgan of Directorate of Engiples, Capt. Walter Piatt, Spc. Jason Pyle, Maj. Robert Vongundun, all of 59th Engineer Company. Pvt. Joseph neering and Housing; Tomas Palacio of Directorate of Scruggs, Staff Sgt. Vincente Vazquez, Sgt. I st Class Jenkins, Spe. Aaron McIntosh, Pfc. Austin Norris and Pvt. Community Activities; Arnold Rodriguez of Tobyhana Wiliam Veguilla, Spc. Robert Ward, Maj. Mark Wolfe, Collin Walker, all of 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry.Safety Army Depot. 25 Years: Caroline Calvo and Alan all of Headquarters Company, 193rd Infantry Brigade Award of Merit -Sgt. Michael Rone of 3rd Special OperLawrence both of U.S. Army Medical Activity -Panama; (Light). Sgt. Jeffery Adams, Sgt. Derek Cuvellier, Staff ations Support Command. Maria Wallace of56th Signal Battalion. 10 Years: Ricasio Sgt. Karl Gay, Sgt. 1st Class Lavern Hovey, Staff Sgt. Johnson of U.S. Army Medical Activity -Panama; RichDonald Lechel, Sgt. Charles Manchester, Spec. Steven Graduations ard Peck of 56th Signal Battalion. 5 Years:Arturo Garcia McCormick Sgt. John Mincey, Sgt. Kevin Rowland, Staff and Regino Gil of 56th Signal Battalion. Sgt. William Secules, Staff Sgt. Scott Shiver. Capt. James Basic Noncommissioned Officers' Course -Sgt. George Skidmore, Sgt. Edgar Soto, Staff Sgt. George Stefanski, Ballard and Sgt. Tremeyne Smith both of 3rd Special OpSustained Superior Performance -Richard Chastain, Staff Sgt. Terrence West, Sgt. David Wilson, all of 59th erations Support Command. Jose Gonzalez, Carmen Castrellon, Linda Garman, Engineer Company. Spe. Eric Askew, Spec. Christian Roberto Stevenson, Jorge Solis and Rene Saucedo, all Campese, 1st Lt. Bernhard Christianson, Sgt. 1st Class Special achievements from the 56th Signal Battalion. William Coleman, Spc. Frank Espinoza, Staff Sgt. Antonio Flores, Sgt. Ricky Fowler, Spe. Brennan Fox, 1st Lt. The U.S. Army Jungle Operations Training Battalion Quality Step Increase -Juana Martinez of U.S. Army Patrick Harvey, Staff Sgt. Byron Knox, Sgt. Hector Dining Facility here was named the runner-up for the Medical Activity-Panama. Maffia, Cpl. Christopher McLaughlin, 1st Lt. Laney Millsmall garrison category of the 1994 Philip A. Connelly er, Staff Sgt. Albert Mouton, Cpl. Donald Purnell, Sgt. Ist Awards Competition. Employee of the Quarter -Eric Ulloa, Enrique Sterling, Class Gregory Reid, Sgt. Jose Rivers, Sgt. Corey Representatives from the dining facility and U.S. Army Douglas Akers, Susana Cantillo, Ingrid Pariente, Agnes Smallwood, Sgt. DeWayne Smith, Sgt. hemdatt Sukham, South will attend the Connelly Awards ceremony Aug. Flores, Soledad Delgado, Marva Pringle, Angel Alvarado, all of5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Sgt. Steven Armstrong, 21-24 in San Antonio. Walckiria Kieswetter and Alma Gonzalez, all of U.S. Sgt. Julio Bensimon, Staff Sgt. Mark Byrd, Staff Sgt. Brett The Connelly program was established in 1968 to recArmy Medical Activity -Panama. Diogenes Rodriguez of Campbell, Staff Sgt. Kevin Crice, Sgt. Scott Duffey, Staff ognize excellence in Army Food Service. Directorate of Engineering and Housing. Doralys Rivera Sgt. David Goodwin, Sgt. Ist Class Tom Graves, Staff The JOTB Dining Facility was selected to represent of Directorate of Civilian Personnel. Sgt. Shawn Henschen, Sgt. Michael Holmes, Staff Sgt. USARSO during post level competition and was evaluatJohn jackson, Spec. David Klaus, Sgt. Andrew Kocsis, ed in June by judges from the International Food Service Customer Service Award -Joan Rodriguez of DirectorStaff Sgt. Christopher Lee, Sgt. Jonathan McBride, Staff Executives Association and Department of the Army. ate of Community Activities; Army Career and Alumni Sgt. Gary Mills, Sgt. William Nanse, Spc. David The dining facility was judged on various aspects of Program, Fort Clayton. Narducci, Spe. Darrell Paterson, Sgt. JefferyPauch, Staff food service which included administration, training, dinSgt. Juan Perez, Sgt 1st Class John Price, Spe. Juan Wood, ing facility quality, atmosphere and sanitation. Judging Cash Awards -Juan Rodriguez and Michelle Hunter, all of 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry. was based on a 1,000-point scale on these categories. both of U.S. Army Medical Activity-Panama. Ana Chiquilani, Roy Matsunaga, Helene Robinson, Leonard Army Achievement Medal -Sgt. Ist Class Kenneth Employee of the Quarter -Maj. Eric Franks, Maj. Wickham and Lyle Wickham of Directorate of Civilian Roach, Staff Sgt. Alphonso Boards and Capt. Nancy Bard, Reymundo Lariosa, Chief Warrant Officer 2 Gary Klein, Personnel. Dorothy Cornwell, Jose Vega and Hubert all of U.S. Army Medical Activity-Panama. Sgt. George Spc. David Hudson, Spe. Andrew Plumbtree, Soledad Walsh from Deputy Chief of Staff-Resource ManageBallard of 3rd Special Operations Support Command. Delgado, Marva Pringle, Angel Alvarado, Walckiria meant. Alenandria Brathwaite from Directorate of EngiCpl. John Keenan and Pfc. Tracy Lewis of 56th Signal Kieswetter and Alma Gonzalez, all of U.S. Army Medineering and Housing. Sandra Jicha from Directorate of Battalion. Spc. Jonathan Frazier, Spe. Ryan Ickes, Spc. cal Activity-Panama. Plans, Training and Mobilization. Patricia Flynn from ProWesley Speaks and Spe. Brian Spence, all of 154th Sigtocol Office. nal Battalion. Spe. Jonathan Chance, Capt. Daniel Drake Sprague of Troop 20 received his Eagle Scout durGoodale, Spe. Peter Metz, Sgt. Christopher Owens, Capt. ing an Eagle Court of Honor. Promotion -Juan Rodriguez, Gloria Manfredo, Marcela Walter Piatt, Pfc. Kenneth Reno, Sgt. Ernest White, Sgt. Moralez, Ingrid Ollar and Ashton Brooks, all from U.S. Darryl Woodfolk, all of Headquarters Company, 193rd Company B, 193rd Support Battalion received the ComArmy Medical Activity -Panama. Infantry Brigade (Light). Pvt.2 Mateo Avala, Spec. Jimmanding General's Physical Training Streamer with an my Chambless, Staff Sgt. Paul Colby, Pfc. Johnny Folks, average of261.96. The unit tested May 11. Chief Warrant Achievement Medal for Civilian Service -Robert Appin Cpl. Nathan Greenleaf, Pvt.2 Jason Hall, Sgt. Robert Officer 2 Willie Moye and Staff Sgt. Hipolito Gonzalez and Toni Williams-Sanchez from Army Career and AlumHughes, Spec. Carl Kinkel, Staff Sgt. David Linvig, Pvt.2 received a 300 PT score. ni Program, and Mara Cormejo and Sonja Kandrin from Brian Loop, Spec. Daniel Moore, Sgt. Donald Parker, Military Police Command Pvt.2 Dennis Pease, Sgt. Owen Rice, Sgt. William Midshipman Craig Fishbough, a gratuate of Balboa High Santoro, Spc. Eric Sloate, Spc. Andrew Sorge, Sgt. Kevin School, received the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy's Time-off Award -Rebecca Fentress from Directorate of Stafford, Pvt.2 Brian Walker, Cpl. Johnny Ward, Pfc. JoSilver Star for Academic Achievement. Fishbough also Community Activities.

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___ ~#fe tureTropic Times1 Feature 1994 Xi U 5 Air Force Reserve phoin Staff Sgt. Wayne Goodard, utilities specialist, mixes concrete for the clinic floor. \ Facelift: Portland reservists renovate Saboga HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) -Ninety Air Force Reservists from Portland, Ore., recently deployed here for training on a variety of construction projects in nearby Panamanian communities and on the island of Saboga. The majority of the force, 86 men and women, belong to the 939th Civil Engineering Squadron. Four others are from the 939th Medical Services Squadron. .Both units are of the 939th Air Rescue Wing headquartered in Portland that operates out of the city's international airport. Engineers and medics deployed in two increments of about 45 people each for two weeks stints. This allowed them to complete several complex projects that could not have been accomplished in a single two-week period, said Capt. Daniel Grassnick, commander of the second deployment. Many projects were community service work in five local villages and two projects within the former canal zone. Most of the work involved school facilities, such as roof and structural repairs, lighting and electrical installations, drainage and site improvements, and enhancement of kitchens and eating facilities, Grassnick said. Another project involved repairs to a medical clinic several miles U.S. Air Force photo by Senio Airman sieve McNally from Fort Clayton. Panamanian children dance at a school's opening ceremony. "A valuable by-product of the work performed in these communities is the acceptance and positive image the local people gain of the United States military," Grassnick said. "The local civic leaders and citizens have expressed their appreciation and gratitude, and for many of us, this has provided all the job satisfaction and motivation we needed," he said. Air Force civil engineer units use deployments like these to provide training Base Engineer Emergency Forces members. This most recent deployment has been extremely successful at providing valuable work experience while at the same time benefiting local communities, Grassnick 4 said. "Training opportunities such as this one provide unit members with the chance to work on complete projects together as a team, and see the end results of their efforts in a completed project," Grassnick said. "I've been impressed with all the unit members' acceptance of the challenges presented to them, the ingenuity demonstrated to meet those challenges, and dedication exhibited, which has exceeded all our expectations," he said. Because many members of the deployed force are employed in construction trades or associated industries as civilians, they were accustomed to working with established building codes and being able to get materials at a local construction supply store. They soon learned this was not the case in Panama. K l "In the communities where the teams were, they had to make their work conform to the local customs and practices," Grasnick said. "Many team members expressed a high level of satisfhction at being able to complete the projects using non-standard methods and still have a very U.S Air Force photo by Senior Airmn Stevo McNally professional-looking end product that shows a high quality Local civil officials greet Tech. Sgt. Reyes Placencia, an electrician. of craftsmanship."

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Troic Times .i ii t r __ 12 Jul 1594J Histoy ul 1944 Brett hails Fourth of July as solemn observance FORT CLAYTON -The following are significant July 12 July 18 World War II events that took place during July 1944: For tenatiously applying artificial respiration to an Cabinet of Japanese Premier General Tojo falls and a July 3 unconscious comrade at Farfan Beach, three Mobile new one is formed under Kuniaki Koiso. Soviet troops take Minsk and capture 100,000 German Force soldiers are commanded by F. H. Wang, execuJuly 19 soldiers. tive secretary of the Panama Canal Department for Army authorities announce that men and officers from July 4 their action. The three soldiers are Cpl. B.E. battlefronts will tell their personal experiences in a special Lt. Gen. George H. Brett, commanding general of Brodwing, Cpl. John E. McGintee and Pfc, Alexander series of Mobile Force Orientation lectures designed to the Panama Canal Department and the Caribbean J. McCoy, all of Capt. Pettit's Signal unit of Mobile bring first hand accounts of the world conflict. Defense Command, hails the Fourth of July as a day Force. Seven men are promoted to the rank of corporal in of solemn observance, not only for the people of the July 13 the Coast Artillery Command, six in an anti-aircraft United States, but also for the peoples of Central and Sixty-two enlisted men and nine officers of the gun battalion and one in an automatic weapons batSouth America who are joined with the U.S. in contiCoast Artillery Command sail through the "Big tery. nental solidarity for the defense of the Western HemiDitch" aboard a Coast Artillery mine planter. This is July 20 sphere. the first in a series of such trips planned by the orienActing Department War Bond officer discloses that July 6 tation section of Col. Frederick A. Mountford's barcash sales of United States War Savings Bonds and A group of81 General Service Navy Recruits begin bor defense organization "to acquaint the men with Stamps to military personnel in the Panama Canal Deactive duty according to an announcement from Nathe waterway they are defending." partment during the month of June totaled val District Headquarters. Of these, 78 are from the July 14 $285,414.35, the highest figure yet reached in any of Isthmus, two from Nicaragua and one from Costa It is announced that the Naval Air Transport Serthe previous War Bond Drives, and $85,500 more than Rica. The first Panamanian to enter was 18-year old vice, in less that 36 hours, recently flew the two heavithe total of cash sales for the two months of the fourth Efrain Escalona from the province of Los Santos. est single items ever carried by air between the United War Loan Drive. July 7 States and the Panama Canal Zone and thereby kept July 21 Pfc. Kenneth 0. Stubbs is awarded the Soldier's Medvital fuel supplies flowing to the Navy's Task Force 58, U.S. Marines and Army land on Guam. al at a formal review held at the Army's Sixth Air Force and at the same time preventing threatened serious inJuly 23 base in the Galapagos Islands for outstanding heroism in terruption to tanker production. The items carried A WAVE, the first servicewoman soldier from the risking his life to save a comrade from drowning. were main turbine engine rotors, each weighing over Mobile Force had ever seen, aside from the Army July 8 10,000 pounds. nurses, cause the men to forget chow. Lt. Otilda Gray, Col. James L. Craig, C.A.F., arrives in the Panama an officer of the Women's Reserve, U.S. Naval ReCanal Department on direct assignment from the ofThe Fort Kobbe Serve Unit played host to the serve, dropped in to pay a friendly visit to Sgt. John fice of the Secretary of War to serve as Soldier Voting Patriettes at a novel Dinner-Dance. Tropics, palm Densford of Headquarters Detachment, Panama MoOfficer on the staff of the commanding officer, Lt. trees and glamour were shelved and "Main Street" bile Force, and soon found herself surrounded by sevGen. Brett. Col. Craig has served two previous tours was carted to Panama in all its simplicity. There were eral hundred soldiers. (She had promised the serof duty in Panama. street signs, the Bijou and box office, a subway, a geant's sister she would check up on him when she July 9 newstand, and a barber shop. came to the Canal Zone.) Brett publically lauds Warrant Officer Benjamin July 15 July 25 C. Dunford, Jr., for his arrangement for the massed The War Department announces in Washington A breakout at St. Lo, France, by the U.S. First Army band concert in Balboa Stadium on July Fourth. that Lt. Gen. Ben Lear was assigned to the command under Gen. Omar Bradley leads to the collapse of the GerBundord, leader of the 4th Coast Artillery Band, was of the Army Ground Forces. (Gen. Lear served a twoman line in northwestern France. (Operation Cobra). in charge of the concert of combined bands of the year tour as Commanding General of the Pacific SecJuly 30 Army, Navy, the Republic of Panama, and the Panator and later of the Panama Mobile Force and left the More than 1,100 former Panama Canal Company ma Police, comprising more than 200 musicians. Isthmus in 1940.) and Railroad employees had entered the Armed SerMembers of Post 1, Balboa American Legion, asSixty-one soldiers in anti-aircraft and harbor device by July according to a list compiled by the Adsemble to honor 26 of their fellow Legionnaires who fense batteries of the Coast Artillery Command are ministrative Branch. The Mechanical Division topped fought in World War I and are now serving again durpromoted. the list with 176, the special Engineering Division was ing World War II. July 16 next with 122, and the Municipal Division third with July 10 Naval authorities in Balboa announce the loss of a 119. Saipan falls to U.S. forces after 25 days of hard fightNavy blimp in Caribbean waters. However, no enemy Editor's note: This timeline was compiled by ing. Upward of25,000 Japanese soldiers are killed, some action was involved as the blimp was forced down at Dolores De Mena, USARSO historian, in commemo2,359 American die and more than 11,000 are wounded. sea during a routine patrol flight. ration of the 50th Anniversary of WWII.

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July 15, 1994 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 13 Ops Short teams stretch season by Sgt. Lori Davis The second game of the evening Tropic Times sports editor was the main event, the Nets versus Bacardi. Bacardi was the Nets biggest FORTCLAYTON -Thelittleguys competition so far, coach Michael rocked the house at Reeder Physical Frazier said. Fitness Center Tuesday night, battling Bacardi may have been their bigfor position in the 5'10" and under gest obstacle on the road to the chainbasketball championship tournament pionship, but just like the 76-32 Rising to the occasion were the whoopin' theyputon the A-Team July Jazz, the Nets and the A Team. The 10, the Nets beatthe tarout ofBacardi. Jazz and Nets had to earn their playoff The Nets started the first halfdoing positions, but A Team took the easy what they do best, moving the ball and way up the brackets when not a single playing tight defense. player from II Tuffshowed at the gym. Time and again the Nets listened to The tufff" guys were too busy workcalls from Frazier on the bench to ing to come out and play, their coach "give the ballto(Gary)Mixon."Mixon said. darted into the paint like a snake and -The last game of the evening may put eight points on the scoreboard. have passed without any action, but Desperate Bacardi players tried to stop the opener between the Jazz and the him, but fouls turned into more points Dog Pound had plenty to spare. as he scored six times on field goals. Edwin Brown got things going for When Mixon wasn't scoring Ray the Jazz, sinking three baskets, and Childress was. Childress added six Ray Maxie contributed to the effort points to the Nets effort, and Phil with two baskets of his own. Mickles tossed in a three-pointer. But it was Shaffer Clark who was The strong man for Bacardi was making music for the Jazz. Clark powCharles Davis, scoring three times on ered his way into the paint and nailed drivestothe inside and putting in a shot five baskets in the first half from downtown. The Dog Pound fought back, but George Dudley backed up Davis Depattment of Defense photo by Donna Martne their one-man bench gave little room with 12 points. The Nets' Ronald Childress tries to block Bacardi's Charles Davis as he drives for flexibility. Alton Alexander and Bacardi's strong play in the first in for the score. Chris Thompson chalked up two buckhalf was marred by a double technical ets each, but the dominant Dog was foul called against Alex Alameda. Eric Collier with three baskets, a threeReferee Julius Walker called Alameda pointer and two field goals. for a holding penalty, and Alameda The Jazz had the worn out Dogs argued the call. Afterthe technical foul panting at the half with a 29-19 score. forunsportsmanlike conduct, Alameda The Jazz kept Collier away from shoved Walker and was called for a the hoop in the second half, holding second technical and was thrown out him to eight points, but Thompson of the game. compensated with three baskets and a With the score 30-22 at the half three-pointer to help bring the Dog Bacardi had a chance to come back. Pound back. Bacardi put the heat on Mixon in The Dog Pound kept Jazz from the second half, but the Nets respondscoring from the floor, but the fouls ed by spreading the scoring. Childress they racked up trying to stop the clock chalked up six more points, followed put a comeback out of reach. Jazz by Roy "Googie" Allen Jr. and Don scored 11 points from the floor, but the Owens with five each. 10 field goals it scored on put the Dog MixonandJeffrey Moses wereboth Pound away. held to two baskets, but they each The Jazz closed the game 50-40, nailed four field goals. using those 10 points on field goals to The points on fouls were icing on send theDogPoundto the losersbrackthe cake for the Nets. The 66-46 win et. over Bacardi put them up against the The victory put the Jazz up against Jazz Thursday, one game away from the Nets, the top team in the league, the championship. Thursday. Results were not available Results were not available at press Department o Defense photo by Sgt. Lor Dvs at press time. The loser drops to the time The Dog Pound's Freddy Epting (left) and the Jazz's Ray Lesene go after the losers bracket for a second chance in The championship game is schedball, tonight's game at the Center. uled for lp.m. Sunday. Local instructorsteaching Tang Soo Softball sailors finally nab a win in *SCN AM radio schedule Do give students lessons in self the rescheduled Independence Day *Local sports schedule defense, discipline and confidence. tournament. *U.S. Army 10-mile team

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14Tropic TiS orts 1July15, 1994 TWk a f e o tk VA4 StACevds of Tone Soo Do leaP covificde-n'ce G-Oui0L Mvcwficil ats artial is defined by Random House as "disposed to war" and art is "the realm of what is beautiful." These two principles combined-the beauty of war-sound fiercely intimidating, but martial arts are not so easily defined. Martial arts are more involved in confidence and self assurance than fighting, explained Debby Nissenbaum, a Tang Soo Do instructor. In her class she teaches people kicks and punches, but she also teaches them how to use their confidence to avoid conflict. Dealing with conflict is the object of Tang Soo Do. A traditional martial art from Korea, it was developed over the centuries for practical self defense and was defined into its modem style by Grand Master Hwang Khee in Korea in 1936, said instructor Arles Fernandez. "We stress techniques used in a real fight. It is more self defense than sport, and we are not as interested in the beauty," Nissenbaum said. It may not be pretty, but it is effective. Korean martial arts favor circular attacks instead of the direct attacks of Japanese martial arts. They also favor use of the legs and feet where Japanese styles stress use of the hands and arms, she said. Tang Soo Do, loosely translated "the way of the hand," got its name because it incorporates more hand movements than most Korean martial arts, making it a more balanced fighting style, Nissenbaum explained. "This is very physical because we are dealing with the most powerful limbs you have," Fernandez said. "It is strenuous exercise and it will show quickly if you are not in shape." "You can see results the first day," he added. "You will know what you need to work on right away, especially people in the military. They carry a pack through the jungle and think they are in shape, but this uses different muscles." One soldier getting a workout in the class is Darrel Prindle. Prindle said he has gotten a lot out of his first year studying Tang Soo Do. "I was looking for something to do and I was always interested in martial arts. I chose Tang Soo Do because it's not widely known, it was something different from what most people were learning," he said. Prindle earned his green belt, the third belt, earlier this year. His accomplishment affected not only how he fights but how he sees life. "It makes me strive harder for perfection. I notice the little things now," he said. As he learns more through martial arts, Prindle said he feels like he is getting closer to where he wants to be. Prindle said he encourages everyone to try Tang Soo Do, especially because the first lesson is free. sfoy CIVC pkofos by 59f. Lori Dcivis TPropic Times sportsecditoy Darrel Prindle executes a front snap kick. Jacquelyne Konz throws a center punch. Instructor Debby Nissenbaum shows Rafael Jesus proper leg extension for a turning back kick.

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Tropic Times Pa rts -July 15,1994 Navy wins holiday softball tourney FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Atlanforfeit when Co. A didn't show. Co. A was tic) -The Navy sailed to the top spot in the outofthe tournament from two forfeits, and Atlantic Fourth ofJuly softball tournament, the tournament was postponed until the Saturday, but not without a good challenge following weekend. from the 549th Military Police Company. The tournament finished up Saturday. The Atlantic/Pacific softball tournament TRICO, a team of players from the 69th was plagued by rain that kept the Pacific Signal Company, U.S. Army Garrison, teams from competing, and eventually Company D and Medical Department Accaused a one-week delay in the tournativity, dropped Co. C from the tournament, ment's completion. 8-7 in the first game. The Navy sunk H HC, The first two days ofthe tournament saw 7-3, and the HHC squad was halfway out only two games actually played out. the door. In the July 2 opening game, the Navy The MPs, with a loss by forfeit against scrambled the 69th Signal, 11-1. The sailthem, slammed TRICO, 15-5, and began a ors racked up three home runs in the game. winning streak that made Navywork forth The 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry's Headtitle. quarters, Headquarters Company won over After toppling HHC, 6-2, the MPs handthe battalion's Company A by forfeit, but ed the Navy its first loss, 6-3, and the tournament play was suspended because of tournament was decided was by an "if" rain, game. A forfeit by the MPs July 3 helped The Navy was back in form for the final Company C, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry game of the tournament, crushing the MPs advance in the tournament, and Navy also 10-3 and winning the tournament. '' advanced by forfeit. The six teams competing racked up 23 HHC edged out Co. C, 15-14, and Co. C home runs during the tournament. U.S. Army photo by g Rick Emert had its first loss in the tournament. The Navy and Co. C led the teams in Navy shortstop David Hauswirth beats Headquarters and Headquarters The MPs were on the winning side of a homers with 8 and 7 respectively. Company's Michael Hale to the bag. 7:05 p.m.: Maintenance Squadron vs. Howard Sports and Fitness Center. "Body event are due today. Sports Shorts Airlift Support Squadron Sculpting 202," is a continuation of the The unit with the most runners earns the 8:05 p.m.: Supply A vs. Co. B, 536th popular "Body Sculpting 101" previously team award. There will be first and second SCN AM Radio 790/1420 Eng. Bn. taught at the center. Taught by certified place awards for men's and women's diviWednesday fitness expert Stacey Robertson, this class sion. Call 283-4222 for information. airs baseball action 6:05 p.m.: Med. Gp. vs. Headquarters reaches students how to effectively use free Tonight Support Co., 536th Eng. Bn. weights and machines to re-shape their Howard, Albrook host 8 p.m.: Baseball: St. Louis Cardinals at 7:05 p.m.: Communications A vs. Secubodies and further improve their health and Colorado Rockies rity Police Squadron B fitness. Formore information, or to register t Saturday 8:05 p.m.: AIRPS/SVS vs. Supply B for the class, call health promotions at 284The Howard and Albrook sports and 7 p.m.: Baseball: Cleveland Indians at Thursday 5870. fitness centers are hosting a tennis ladder Chicago Cubs 6:05 p.m.: Co. A, 1st Bn. 228th Av. Reg. tournament. Each player starts at the botSunday vs. Headquarters and Headquarters ComUSARSO holds 10-miler tom of the ladder and the winners of each 12:30 p.m.: Baseball: San Fransisco pany, 1 st Bn. 228th Av. Reg. match work their way up. Giants at Montreal Expos 7:05 p.m.: Area Intelligence Squadron! tryouts for men, women All players must play match per week, 7 p.m.: Baseball: Detroit Tigers at KanOperations Support Squadron vs. SPS B Practice sessions and open tryouts will and players can challenge no more than two sas City Royals 8:05 p.m.: Transportation vs. Supply B be held for runners interested in the U.S. rungs above or below their place on the Tuesday July 22 Army South I0-Miler team. ladder. The tournament ends Aug. 1. Call 9 p.m : Baseball: Baltimore Orioles at 6:05 p.m.: 310 ALS vs. CES Sessionsare6-8 a.m. at ReederPhysical 284-3451 to register. Seattle Mariners 7:05 p.m.: 1-228th vs. Supply B Fitness Center. Trial daysare 6 a.m. July23, Wednesday 8:05 p.m.: SPS B vs. MSS Aug. 13 and Aug. 27 at the center. Curundu Bowling Center 6:30 p.m.: Baseball: Florida Marlins at For information, call Willie Moy aet at tournament Cinneinatti Reds Bailers beat Run & Gun 287-6411, Sue Bozgoz at 287-6448 or the hosts no tap tun m n Thursday Directorate of Community Activities Sports The Curundu Bowling Center is hosting 7 p.m.: Baseball: Pittsburgh Pirates at to take basketball title Office at 287-4050. a no tap tournament 7:30 p.m. July 16. The Houston Astros The Ballers coasted to victory in the event is open to all bowlers. AtlanticbasketballtournamentatFortDavis Martial arts, aerobics Unit level basketball on last week, taking the championship title instructors needed Horoko Golf Course with a 61-52 win over Run & Gun. local sports schedule TheBallersstartedwiththebye,butwon The Rodman Fitness Center is seeking offers free youth clinic *Army 5' 10" and under basketball a 67-46 game over against the Army/Navy instructors for martial arts, water aerobics The Horoko Golf Course has free youth and 5' 11" and over basketball team. The win put them up against Run & and aerobics classes. Instructors must be golf clinics today, July 22 and 29. Classes The final game of the championship Gun in the next round of tournament play. certifiedby an accredited agency.Call 283are 9-10 a.m. for ages 11-15 and 2-3 p.m. tournament in both leagues is Sunday at They playedaclose game, but the Ballers 4222/4061 for more information, for ages 7-10. Reeder Physical Fitness Center. The game 56-45 win put Run & Gun down a game in Clinics are taught by Horoko Golf Pro brackets will be posted in the center. the double elimination tournament. Rodman sponsors Navy Camilo Cetina. For more information, call *Air Force basketball The gritty Run & Gun team caught back .the Horoko Pro Shop at 283-6323/6346. Monday in game two, but the Ballers shot them intramural 5K Fun Run 6:05 p.m.: Supply A vs. 310 Airlift down to earn the top spot in the Atlantic The Rodman Morale, Welfare and RecPacific side rugby team Support Squadron community. reation is sponsoring a 5K Fun Run 6:30 7:05 p.m.: Civil Engineering Squadron a.m. July29. Therace begins atthe Rodman welcomes new players vs. Medical Group 24th Medical Squadron Sports Office. The rugby football season, Pacific side 8:05 p.m.: Mission Support Squadron This event is open only to Navy willholditsfirstpractice6p.m.Thursdayat vs. 640 Air Mobility Support Squadron B offers body sculpting 202 servicemembers, Department of Defense Red Devil Field, Fort Kobbe. New players Tuesday Health promotion officials from the 24th civilians working with the Navy and their are welcome. Practices will be held 6 p.m. 6:05 p.m.: Air Postal Squadron/ServicMedicalSquadronannouncea4-weekbody family members. every Thursday at Red Devil Field. For es vs. Communications B sculpting class 10-11 a.m. August 2 at the There is no entry fee. Rosters for this information, call 284-3667 or 223-7625. U.S. Army Basketball Skillz eliminated 11 Tuff eliminated Championship Tournaments Juice eliminated Game Time eliminated 5'11" and over Pool eliminated DCA II 2 0 5'10" and under Ten Deep 2 1 Jazz 3 0 Men's over-30 volleyball Run and Gun 2 1 Nets 2 0 Championship Tournament The Dogg Pound 1 I A-Team 2 1 JOTB play for title Jazz I I Dog Pound I 1 747th MI Bn. play for title Law Dawgs I I Mo Money I 1 Navy eliminated Dynamics eliminated Bacardi I 1 Garrison eliminated Bull Dawgs eliminated Law Dawgs eliminated *as of Thursday

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16Tropic TimesNews 1. July 15. 1994 N w _ Fighting crime Security forces team up for crime prevention night out RODMAN NS (USNAVSTAPANtoms Branch, Contraband Control and EnCANALPAO) -One never ending thought glish speaking representatives from both for all citizens -whether in the United the Panama National Police and the JudiStates or stationed abroad -is security. cial Technical Police will answer questions For the last five years, during the first about law enforcement and criminal activweek of August, the Naval Station Panama ity downtown. Family support group repCanal Security Department has sponsored resentatives will also be present at the the National Crime Prevention Night Out. event to answer questions about alcohol This annual event is held all over the and drug abuse. United States, Canada and U.S. military Also available during the event are bibases world wide. cycle registrations and operation Ident-aOnce a year, the National Crime PreKid fingerprinting kits. K9 Crime Biter vention Night Out presents the opportunity McGruff will be there to have photos taken for police officers and residents to learn with children and teach them some kid more about each other, organize and fight crime facts. back against crime. This year the theme of In addition to getting advice about the night out is Cooperation, Organization, fight against crime and providing an interPrevention and Security -COPS for action between the community and it's law short. enforcement personnel, National Crime Here in Panama, we will celebrate NaPrevention Night Out gives people the optional Crime Prevention Night Out Aug. 5. portunity to meet neighbors in a carnival The event will kick off5 p.m. at the Farfan type atmosphere with music and entertainBohio across from the Farfan swimming ment. Food and refreshments will be availpool. able at the bohio. There will be a parachute jump into the The Security Department of Naval Stabaseball field in Farfan at 6 p.m. by Naval tion Panama invites all members of all serSpecial Warfare Unit 8, static displays of vices and civilians to come out and particimilitary police vehicles, a patrol boat from pate. They will also try to break the record Special Boat Unit 26 and a weapons disfor attendance and enter the night into a play by the Marine Corps Security Force. worldwide attendance contest. The Air Force's Mounted Horse Patrol By showing support for each other in U.S. Navy photo Unit and the Air Force's Key and Lock this fight against crime through CooperaPetty Officer 2nd Class Richard Alfred Bauer helps with the "ldenta-aDisplay also will be present. tion, Organization, Prevention and Secukid" fingerprinting program during last year's National Crime Prevention Representatives from the Military Cusrity, we can take a bite out of crime. Night Out. Court martial Crocker explains ending results listed teachers' housing privilege FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -A continuing Our entire community appreciates the dedicated effort of FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The followshortage of installation housing for soldiers and their famiDoDDs to provide a high standard of education for miliing court martial results are announced: lies, coupled with quality of life issues for soldiers, tary and civilian dependents in the Republic of Panama. prompted the recent U.S. Army South decision to cease As USARSO and all U.S. Southern Command comPfc. Kelvin Slaton of 69th Signal Company was providing housing support to Department of Defense Deponents implement the Panama Canal Treaty of 1977, we convicted of larceny and obtaining services under pendents Schools-Panama employees. are committed to ensuring the highest quality of life for false pretenses. He was sentenced to reduction to priUSARSO notified DoDDS of this decision June 17, all personnel. Many changes must undoubtedly occur as vate one, forfeiture of $555 pay per month for three 1994. According to the applicable Interservice Support personnel leave and facilities revert. Nevertheless, we will months and confinement for three months. Agreement, the action becomes effective 180 days from take all necessary steps to prevent degradation of essenthat date (Dec. 14, 1994). tial services to DoD personnel. Sgt. Ist Class Jorge Alduen-Silva of Company A, This decision was extremely difficult. Given that inUSARSO is prepared to provide all available assis193rd Support Battalion, was convicted of wrongful stallation housing is an important, if not the most importance to those DoDDS personnel affected by this action. use of cocaine. He was sentenced to reduction to staff tant, component of quality of life for U.S. personnel who The USARSO Housing Referral Office located in Buildsergeant and forfeiture of $500 pay per month for are assigned to this theater, we had to consider all of the ing 519, Fort Clayton, maintains listings of available local three months. costs and benefits of continuing to provide housing suphousing by area, type of unit, and number of bedrooms. port as opposed to essentially dislodging families. We will also assist in the actual relocation of household Sgt 1st Class Lonnie Foreman of Headquarters Our concern is to maximize available housing on post goods. Company, 93rd Material and Management Center, for military personnel and their families, especially for All DoDDS personnel may take advantage ofthese serwas convicted of wrongful use of cocaine. He was those soldiers in lower grades who don't have the equivavices through Dec. 14, 1994. They are encouraged to visit sentenced to reduction to staff sergeant, forfeiture of lent economic resources of civilian personnel. the Housing Referral Office and schedule an appointment $1,256 pay per month for six months and restriction We also noted that, unlike in 1984, civilian personnel as soon as possible. to the limits of the 93rd Material Management Comare eligible for tax-free Living Quarters Allowance mand company area for two months. (LQA). Moreover, since November 1989, that LQA is not reduced by rental costs for eligible civilian personnel. Maj. Gen. G.A. Crocker Pfc. Reynaldo Havier of Company C, 1st Battalion USARSO's decision in no way discounts the contriCommanding General, (Airborne), 508th Infantry Regiment, was convicted bution DoDDS and its personnel make to DoD families. U.S. Army South of desertion, drunk driving and wrongful appropriation of a motor vehicle. He was sentenced to reduc-F tion to private one, confinement t Foreign language pay testing underway bad-conduct discharge. HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PA) -Qualification testciency or Reading Proficiency Test. Pfc. Charles Mayfield III of 59th Engineer Coming for foreign language proficiency pay began July 1 and Members who qualify can receive $50 to $100 per pany was convicted of larceny. He was sentenced to ends Dec. 31. month, depending on the level of proficiency .Those reduction to private one, confinement for four months Air Force members interested in qualifying for pay people proficient in more than one dialect will receive pay and a bad-conduct discharge. during calendar year 1995 must contact their military perfor only the dialect in which they are most proficient. sonnel flight immediately for eligibility criteria and test Spanish and Tagalog speakers must be in a languageSgt 1st Class William A. Jones of Headquarters scheduling, according to Air Force Military Personnel designate duty position to receive FLPP. Also, first-term Company, U.S. Army Garrison-Panama, was conCenter officials. Members currently receiving proficienairmen must be serving in a designated position or speak victed of rape, burglary and false swearing. He was cy pay must requalify for calendar 1995. a critical language such as Russian, Chinese, Arabic or sentenced to reduction to private one, confinement for The program is voluntary and requires unit cornKorean to receive this benefit. six years, forfeiture of all pay and allowances and a mander certification, a secret or higher security clearance, For more information, call the military personnel dishonorable discharge. and a qualifying score on the Defense Language Profiflight, 284-4661.

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Jroictivities July 15, 1994 A quality of life guide for the U.S community in Panama Page B1 WINN -r -t Deparment of Defense photo by Spc Tom Fndtner Shark boat Luis Neto, recreation aid for the Rodman Outdoor Recreation and Marina, moors the Vargas, a boat used for shark fishing trips. See story and photos on Page B3. S -.0-C~m nt S C.ae.5,, -C S 0 Youth Services-Atlantic basketball Preventive Medicine officials give +Movies, Page B8 camp teaches children the fundatips on fighting off mosquitoes dur+TV, Page B9 mentals of the game. ing the rainy season. &Potpourri, Page B12

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DlTropic Times V u f e s _ _ B2_July15 1994 Youth news AtIantic Aibrook/Howard *Youth centers 286-3195/284-4700: Teen fishing trip departs Howard theatre at 5 a.m. tomorrow. Transportation, boat, guide, bait and ice are included for only $25. Bring your own fishing gear. h o o p sthHoadBwigCne.Febolnada Teen bowl-a-thon Wednesday, 4-5:30 p.m. at 1 the Howard Bowling Center. Free bowling and a C am p helps young special meal of a hamburger, fries and soda for only $2. Teens 13-19 only. Sign-up at the Youth players im prove skills Arts and crafts 3 p.m. Wednesdays at both FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Atlantic) -More centers. There is a $1 fee for supplies. than 60 6to 12-year-olds came out for Youth ServicesGymnastics classes Saturdays. Ages 3-5 meet Atlantic's Basketball Camp. This is the first year the ate classes meet 2-3 p.m. The cost is $13 per camp has been held here. month per person. The two-week camp, which began June 27 and ends m Child Development Center 284-6135: today, leads into the Monday through Aug. 12 basket9 Openings are available in the part-time proball season. gram for children ages 6 months5 years. OpenThe first week of the camp covered the fundamenings are for 25-hour enrollment -five hours a tals of basketball, including: dribbling, passing, guardday, five days a week. ing and shooting, said Margarita Martinez, Youth SerFamily Day Care Providers are needed in the vices-Atlantic. Albrook area. Call Jill Winter at 284-3711/6135 Instructors let the youths spend a lot of time just for information. learning how to handle the ball. After each child found Captain T-Bird and Captain KC Youth his or her comfort zone, the drills picked up in pace. Summer Bowling Special includes three games During the second week, the young hoopsters put during open bowling and a free T-Bird or KC what they learned to use in organized team practice, sports bottle. Call 284-4818. Martinez added. The center placed good sportsmanship at the top of C a t the list of 'must knows.' The children are starting to play at a young age, and instilling good sportsmanship Youth Center 287-6451: now is very important. "We teach the kids the games are for fun, not comCooking experiences Tuesdays. petition," Martinez said. "We don't even-keep score at Outdoor Games Thursdays. the ee We gaes."Just for kids tip to EL Dorado Amusement the Pee Wee games. Park 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. tomorrow. Fee is $3. Some of the new basketball lovers said they did not Piano lessons 1-6 p.m. Tuesdays and Wedneswant camp to end so soon, but added they were excited days. The fee is $30 for four half-hour lessons per about getting to play 'real' games during the season. month. "The camp has been a great success," Martinez said. Gymnastics for ages 5 and older 2:30-3:30 "A lot of the kids had never touched a basketball before, p.m. and 3:304:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesbut they picked up the skills pretty fast." days. Martinez said that often the parents were more excitSwimming with snacks and outdoor sports 2ed during the games than the children. 4 p.m. Monday. "The fitness center was packed with parents cheer*Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680: ing for their kids," she said. "They are very proud of Popcorn and movies Sundays. what the kids accomplished over such a short period of couesy photos by Chris Eme Senior Teen Employment Program is a time." Josh Price, a professional basketball want-toyearround program to develop job skills and earn The youth basketball league is made up of three Pee be, practices shooting from the free throw line, money for teens 15-18 years old. Applications are Wee teams and three Bantam teams. Each division More than 60 children participated in a twoavailable at the center. should play about 15 games, Martinez said. week camp that concentrated on technique. Sports cards collectors are invited to participate in the Sports Cards Expo 1-5 p.m. tomorrow. Spaghetti night Wednesday. Artifacts exhibit from South and Central America Thursday. ..>*Child Development Center 287-3301: Child Development Center provides high quality, developmental child care for children 6 weeks to 12 years old. Full day care and hourly care available. Call 287-5657. Fall registration for the CDC Part-Day Program will be held at Building 156, Fort Clayton 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. as follows: August 3 -all single and dual working parents; August 4 -all other military and department of defense civilian employees; August 5 -all others who meet eligibility criteria. Children registering for preschool must be two by October 31, 1994. Military identification cards foi both parent and child, child's immunization record and parent's latest pay voucher must be presented for registration. For more information call Rebecca Fentress at 287-5507/5104. Cocoli *Cocoli Community Center 287-4119: Arts and crafts, 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. Atlantic *Espinar Youth Center 289-4605: Teen sports 4-6 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays. Youth service day camp 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday-Friday throughout July. Football and cheerleader registration under Michelle Carter and Greg Landrum practice jumping for the ball as camp organizer Margarita way through August. Coaches needed! Martinez and other players look on.

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____ ___ ____ ___ ____ ___ j~j~IiL k~a IIII L'L IILTropic Times 3 Entertainment Jul B3 19 The Rodman Marina has a large fleet available for rent and charter trips. Department of Defense photos by Spc. Tom Findner Marina expands recreational services Navy offers more charters, facilities, equipment rentals he Rodman Outdoor Recreation office is closed Wednesdays. For more and Marina has recently experiinformation or to reserve space for any of A enced a sea change by undergoing the marina's programs, call 283-3147 or a major renovation of its facilities, 283-3150. taking over Navy Morale, Welfare and Also as part of the renovation, the Recreation gear issue, and expanding its marina's boats are being refurbished. fishing and charter programs. The marina Sorely needed paint and reupholstery will and gear issue, along with the Navy spiff up the Rodman recreation fleet for MWR pools, have been consolidated into the new programs and charters the marina one department, Outdoor Recreation, to offers. better serve the community. This "We are really proud of our facilities," transformation is part of a larger reorgasaid Van Essen, "We offer the most nization of the Navy MWR facilities comprehensive manna for the U.S which included the change of Navy clubs military community in Panama." to all ranks. Among Rodman Marina's regularlyYou wouldn't recognize the marna scheduled programs are salt-water bottom office if you had seen it before the fishing trips. They used to be held renovation." said Valerie Van Essen, Wednesday and Thursday nights, but outdoor recreation manager. "The now happen 6-11 p.m. every Tuesday SeaBees did an amazing job of transand Thursday aboard the 61-foot Black forming this place from a seven-room Stallion. Avid fishers need only bring maze into an open-format, single room rod, reel, tackle and refreshments; live facility to house our expanded probait and coolers are provided. grams." Thrill seekers should sign up for the Lots of elbow-grease went into the marina's shark fishing trips that occur renovation. Walls were tom down, and every other Saturday. Leaving port at 6 floors, ceilings and doors were replaced a.m., the 42-foot Vargas cruises the to provide Van Essen and her crew with waters in search of hammerhead and tiger the space needed to conduct both the sharks. Everything but refreshments is marina and gear issue business under one supplied for this trip. The marina also Valerie Van Essen, Rodman Outdoor recreation and Marina manager, roof. offers deep-sea, Gatun Lake bass and and Luis Neto, recreation aid, go over bike safety procedures. Gear issue, previously managed by the Sunskiff bottom fishing charters. With Rodman Fitness Center, still offers the certification, authorized patrons can rent same wide array of gear: everything from Sunskiffs and Boston Whalers or Catalina by Pamela O'Connor 4-, 6-, and 8-person tents to party and Sunfish sailboats for half-days or full Navy Morale, Welfare canopies, canteens and golf clubs are days. available for rent. Mountain bikes are Prolific seas and warm weather for and Recreation Marketing also rented on an hourly, daily or weekly outdoor recreation are two of Panama's basis. greatest assets. The Rodmuan Outdoor The Marina and Gear Issue Office is Recreation Program provides all the open from 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday, necessary elements to take advantage of Tuesday, Thursday & Friday, and 6 am. the recreation opportunities offered by to 6 p.m. weekends and holidays. The this natural bounty.

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1B34 FJuly 15, 1994 focuss on Panama TropicrTimesphoto I4, Z. _p i 6, a Courtesy photo This photo was taken in 1954 of the Virgin of El Carmen statue sailing in a procession around Taboga island. Virgin of El Carmen perfect for honeymooners and for but not luxurious rooms, a restaurant flat-bottom canoes used by the people who simply want to go and that overlooks the ocean, and a fishermen -all beautifully decorated sails in a procession collect shells, or take a refreshing dip basement discotec and bar. with people singing praises to their in the crystal clear waters of its sunny Taboga's small church "Iglesia San patron saint. around the island beaches. Pedro" claims to be second oldest in Practically every community in 4 different type of life awaits Taboga is surrounded by a variety the hemisphere. Panama has its patron saint. Elaborate you when you visit Taboga of bougainvillaea and hibiscus flowers In Latin America, processions go festivities are held each year in its Island -an hour away by in red, white and pink. The frangance hand in hand with religion, because honor. The entire population particilaunch from Pier 18 in Balboa. of roses and jasmine along its sidewalk catholicism is the dominant faith. They pates with events such as music, Here is a paradise for people tired gives the island a garden atmosphere are held in honor of the patron saint of dances and fireworks. of the horns and pollution of the and the name "Island of the Flowers, a country or city and are usually on Taboga's patron saint festivity will modem city. There are no cars, but There are two hotels on the island. foot, over a route close to the commube held Saturday. There will be music, there are beaches, water-skiing, As you exit the pier you find Hotel nity's church or cathedral. dancing, fireworks and more in the swimming and relaxation. Taboga at the right. It's a modern Some of the traditions and folklore main plaza in front of the church. This The picturesque island is linked to building, with air-conditioned rooms, a of the island date back to 1920 and is year, the aquatic procession begins at the colorful history of Panama. It was restaurant, restrooms and swimming the celebration of a water festival in 10 a.m. and will feature a giant from this shore that Francisco Pizarro pool. At low tide it connects with El honor of the Virgin of El Carmen, the floating sea shell that the statue will be departed with his men to later conquer Morro Island. patron saint of Taboga. placed in and sail around the island the rich Inca Empire. If you turn left and continue to walk A number of boats, usually led by a Taboga, only 12 miles away, off the along the hibiscus and bougainvillaeaboat carrying the statue of the Virgin, Pacific coast with its white sand is a bedecked sidewalks you will come to sail in a procession around the island. 1W. (kommUrIj &hoit, favorite resort for both local and Hotel Chu. The hotel is a two-story The procession includes boats of all 7,iipie JneAs taff visiting tourists. It is a quiet place -wooden structure that has comfortable, types and sizes and pangas -the Panama news summary Editor's note: The following summary of news military bases to obtain photographs of the Haitians in area called Camp Rousseau near Howard AFB. is taken from the Panamanian press. The translathe area. According to the paper, the secrecy of Panama According to the report, these Haitians are part of tions and reports are unofficial and no guarantee and U.S. authorities is causing uncertainty in the counthe 10,000 refugees that President Guillermo Endara is made by the Tropic Times as to accuracy of try agreed to accept and later changed his mind about reporting or statements made here. Selection of and are reportedly on U.S. military bases en route to ..La Estrella, Critica Libre, the island of Dominica, in case Endara does not these stories does not imply any emphasis, judgment or endorsement by the U.S. government. Hoy, La Prensa, El Panama change his position of not allowing them to remain These synopsis are intended only to give nonAmerica, El Siglo,bases. Spanish speaking persons a flavor for events in A eia lmgo Panama. These papers report that Panama President-elect El Panama America, Hoy, Ernesto Perez Balladares has stated that his government La Estrella, La Prensa July 11-1 4 will accept a reduced number of Haitian refugees staying on U.S. military bases in Panama for no more than Papers report that PanamaPresident-elect Ernesto Hoy six months. Perez Balladares, who reportedly made the Perez Balladares will travel to Spain, Italy, the The paper refers to a report published Monday statement before leaving on a tour of Europe and the United States and Mexico. He will reportedly met concerning the alleged secret arrival in Panama of a United States, is cited as conditioning the refugee issue with President Bill Clinton Wednesday and will group of Haitian refugees. Panama's Acting Minister on the carrying out of medical exams and the guarantee discuss aspects ofthe Panama Canal Treaty and free of Foreign Relations Roberto Aleman is cited saying that the refugees will leave the country when the crisis trade agreement. he has no information about the alleged arrival of is over, saying that the United Sattes must be responsiHaitians in Panama. U.S. Southern Command ble for any damage that Panama may suffer because of El Panama America spokepersons are quoted as denying the reports. acthe presence of the refugees. The Perez Balladares Reports that trial will begin Oct. 3 for deposed cording to the article, U.S. Embassy officials have decision, the report explains, is based on humanitarian Panama dictator Gen. Manuel Noriega and seven also denied the report and said they would issue a reasons and a desire to help solve the Haitian crisis. Hoy former Panama Defense members accused of the press release on the sujbect. The paper adds that reports that several hundred Haitian refugees arrived in execution of nine Panama Defense Force officers reporters have triCd unsuccessfully to gain access to Panama over the weekend and are being located in an who participated in a 1989 coup against Noriega.

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__ #j9~IIIU~i~w ewsTropic Times omm niv n wsJuly 15, 1994IF. Community acewsie BV Corozal The Al-Anon Family Group, an anonymous fellowship for family and friends of alcoholics, meets 8 p.m.Tuesdays and Fridays in Building 6550, Hospital Road (near the veterinary clinic), Corozal. Meetings are open to anyone. For more information call 223-7193. Clayton The La Leche League meeting will be held 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Valent Recreation Center. The topic will be "avoiding and overcoming breastfeeding difficulties." All pregnant women and their babies are welcome. For information, call Debbie Owens at 236-0338. A joint service for the entire English-speaking community will be held 7 p.m. Sunday at the Crossroads Bible Church, Corozal. The service is tocelebrate the 45th anniversary of "The Voice of the Isthmus," Christian Radio HOXO. The guest speaker will be Pastor Hormachea from "Insight for Living." Any licensed social worker in the Panama area interested in performing home studies for adoption cases should call the Adjutant General Passport and Visa Branch at 2874503/5207. Department of Defense photo by Maureen Sampson The Exceptional Family Member Program Diam ond w winners Support Group meeting will be held 7:30-9 p.m. Tuesday at the Valent Recration Center. All active Army and Air Force Exchange Service representative Tom Goodloe, American Airlines duty, retired military and Department of Defense representative Nedelka Gonzalez and Southern Command Network's Staff Sgt. Larry Schneck civilian families who have family members with present prizes to winners of the Diamond FM Great American Giveaway contest that has been disabilities are invited to attend. For information, going on for the past month. The winners are: Grand Prize -Rina Rodriguez won four roundcall 287-4921. trip airline tickets to the continental United States, a 35mm camera and a set of luggage. 2nd The American Red Cross is sponsoring a comprize -Staff Sgt. Bobby Ortego won two round-trip airline tickets to the continental United munity first aid and safety course 6-10 p.m. States and a set of luggage. 3rd prize -Senior Airman Scott Straley won two round-trip airline Tuesday-Thursday on the third floor in Building tickets to the continental United States and a set of luggage. 519. The class will feature instruction on adult and infant CPR, safety procedures and first aid. For information, call 287-5509. The "Growing Godly Summer Bible Study" S w will be held 9 a.m. daily until Aug. 23 at the Fort Clayton Chapel. Child care is provided. Reservations must be made through the Child Development Center. For information, call Charlotte Fredereich at Preventive Medicine officials give A8first aid class in Spanish for maids will be held 8 am-S p.m., July 23 on the third floor, Build99. I .Ping 519. For information, call 287-5509. tipS on fih in Off m mosquitoes Regular Islamic prayer services areheld 12:301:30 p.m. Fridays at the Fort Clayton Chapel hall. GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL Direct wetting by liquid or excessive exposure to the For moreinformation, call 287-5859. (MEDDAC PAO) -With the start of the wet season, onspray may cause transient discomfort. The bad odor of meetings 7p.m. the first Monday of each month at post residents will soon be hearing the mosquito spray truck Malathion will not cause injury or illness. the Fort Clayton Noncommissioned Officers' Club. from Directorate of Engineering and Housing, Civil Insecticide application at both Atlantic and Pacific For information, call 287-3587. Engineering Squadron,orNavyPublic Workscome through communities is done in the early evening from 6 p.m. to your housing area, said Maj. Nelson Powers, chief of sometimes as late as 10 p.m., when mosquitoes are most Entomology, Preventive Medicine Service at Gorgas Army active. In some areas, insecticide application is done in the Atlantic Community Hospital. early morning from 5-7 a.m. when sand flies are most The 555th Air Force National Guard from Tole"This is part ofthe organized mosquito control program active. do, Ohio will perform a concert for the Atlantic employed by all Department ofDefense components in the Treatment in some areas, like Albrook, is performed Community 6 p.m. Monday at Fort Davis Theater. Canal area and the Panama Canal Commission." twice a week (Tuesdays and Thursdays) while in other Free coupons are available 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. The program for control ofAedes aegypti mosquitoes is areas like Clayton, Amador and Corozal it is done three Monday-Friday at the Relocation Assistance Office the elimination of containers that hold water. Other protimes a week (Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays). in Building 8348, Margarita Complex. For informagrams to control other types of mosquitoes involve water Though the insecticides are safe, the following steps tion, call 289-4187. management and applying insecticides to control both should be followed by pedestrians and passersby while For people transferring to new duty stations, the immature and adult mosquitoes. spraying is taking place: Army Community Service Relocation Assistance Adult mosquitoes are controlled using the insecticide _______ ____ _____ Office helps in the search for housing, employment Malathion, periodically alternated with Resmethrin apand educational possibilities for servicemembers plied as a iiiist from a truck-mounted sprayer. Helpful nand their families. Call 289-4021/4636 for more "Both insecticides are safe to humans," Powers said. information. The control program is based on surveillance and moni*When following in an automobile, stay tiring by the Entomology Branch of the Preventive Mcdat least 50 yards behind the spray truck. Howard/Albrook icine Service. Control operations begin when the mosquito *Take a different route to your destinapopulation density increases to a level which justifies tion. The HowaridFamily Support Center is offeng a insecticide application. +If walking or jogging, be aware of p -g "Frequently, after the first rains, we have a lot of valling wind direction and attempt to safely programs and the services available while you and temporary mosquito activity which soon decreases," Powmove to the upwind side of the street. your family arc stationed in Panama. ers said. "Insecticide applications at this time would not *Don'tletchildrenchasethespraytruck. Th cAlbrook Clubislooking for an entertainer have an impact on the population. However, once the rains *Have children who are playing outto conduct karaoke sing-along. Interested people become periodic, then the mosquito population begins to doors move Indoors or away from the street. must have an outgoing personality and must be able stabilize. At this time, insecticide application would be Even though brief Inhalation of the mist to sing and entice others to do the same. For inforbeneficial. will not cause injury or permanent illness, nation, call 286-3101. During the dry season, spraying is temporarily susavoid prolonged breathing of the mist. Handcrafted arts and crafts and seasonal pended and resumes in the wet season based on surveilQuestions pertaining to mosquito condisplays are available at the Canal Crafters' Shoppe lance data. This is done to protect the environment and trol may be referred to the appropriate inin Building 804,Albrook AFS. Classes availableare retard the resistance of the mosquito population to insectistallation engineer or to the entomologist, quilting, toll painting, bow making and cross stitch. cides. By altering Malathion with Resmethrin every few atP vn269/ o gn up for a class a kn 286-45tt. months, this further serves to retard insecticide resistance, 36 PrvetveMdiinerie,28-26/ tosin___ora_____al126450 Powers said. 5365.

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Tropic Times B July 15, 1994N $21 fee cover hors d'oeuvres, drinks not Snorkeling and scuba trip to Drake's July 23. Rodman included. Cruise out to Taboga Island by Island 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. The fees are *Outdoor Recreation Center: *Information, Tour and Travel: moonlight, while viewing Panama City's $22 for snorkelers, $45 for scuba divers. Isla Mamey snorkel/dive trip SaturThe Navy ITT office hours of operadramatic skyline at night. Diving gear is included. Explore the faday. Enjoy a day of diving along the reefs tion are I 0:30a.m.-4 p.m. Monday through Downtown Shopping Trip, 9 a.m. July mouse island and dive for hidden treasures on the Atlantic coast. There is a $45 divers Friday. 22, $8. Shop Panama City's department on the sea floor. fee. El Valle Shopping Trip. 7 a.m. July stores. Mud bath tour in Penonome Posada Partial transits of the Panama Canal 31, $12. At least 12 people are needed. A b .H w rViejas 7 a.m.-5 p.m. July 22, $20. Tour 7:30-11:30 a.m. Saturdays, $40. A miniShop for local handicrafts, plants, fruits Alrook/1owar Penonome and visit the famous mudbaths. mum of 20 people is needed for a partial and vegetables and visit the nature pre+Zodiac Community Activities Center: Tour departs from the Howard base thetransit any other day of the week. serve. Free Zone shopping 8:30 a.m.-4:30 atre. There will be a Gatun Lake train /> F ~ ~wreck dive Aug. 6. Free Zone shopping trip, 7 a.m. July p.m. every Friday in July, $13 for transredayoC i e Avg.l6 28, $12. A minimum of 12 people is needportation. Enjoy duty-free shopping in the Customized trips are available for ed. city of Colon. *Valent Recreation Center: groups with a minimum of four or 10 Barro Colorado Island 6 a.m. SaturPollera festival in Las Tablas 10 a.m.Free Zone-Colon 7 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuespeople. day, $65, a minimum of two people is II p.m. July 22, $25. Join in the celebraday. Balboa needed for the trip. Visit the tropical retion of St. Librada. The festivities include Panama City tour 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Satsearch island in the canal's Gatun Lake. a Pollera dance contest. urday. *Balboa Dive Club: Panama City tour 9 a.m. July 23 and El Valle shopping tour 6:30 a.m.-4:30 El Valle shopping trip 6:30 a.m.-3:30 The club is now accepting new mem27, $8. At least 10 people are needed. Visit p.m. July 24, $13. p.m. Sunday. bers. Divers must show a diving certificathe Church ofthe Golden Altar, the French *Outdoor adventures: Portobello historical tour, 9 a.m.-4 tion card to join and membership is $12 Plaza and more. El Valle horseback riding trip 7 a.m.p.m. July 23. per diver per year. For information, write Moonlight Cruise 6:30 p.m. July 30, 4 p.m. July 23, $24. Barro Colorado 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. the club or call 263-8077 or 250-0075. radio classes Aug. 2-Sept. 30. Albrook/Howard Classes will be held 7-9 p.m. Tues*Zodiac Community Activities days. Registration is ongoing. Center: Swimming three days a week. Intro to scuba, a free one-night *Fort Clayton Scuba Shop: class is available. The phone is temporarily out Tae Kwon Do Korean karate of order because of renovations. class6-7:30 p.m. Mondays, WednesCall 287-6453/5807 for informadays and Fridays, $25 per month. tion. Beginner and advanced English Basic open-waterscuba class, and Spanish classes run four weeks $115. every month. Advanced open-water scuba, Beginner and advanced dog obe$140. dience classes are held at the Howard Rescue scuba, $119. Parade Field. Four-week class costs Underwater photography, $32. A minimum of five people is $99. needed. *Albrook Auto shop: Air conditioning service and *Twin Oceans Pro Shop: repair 12:30-5 p.m. every day exEquipment available for scucept Tuesday and Wednesday. ba, snorkel, tennis, camping and Wheel alignment diagnostic and other outdoor recreation. service classes are held 3-9 p.m. *Pacific Theatre Arts Centre: Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays, Monthly classes are available 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays and Sunranging from various dance lesdays. sons, guitar and martial arts. Call Clayton 286-3814 for information. *Fort Clayton Boat Shop: Rodman Bass fishing at Gatun Lake, $20 *Rodman Marina: fee includes guide and fishing gear. A boating safety class will be Deep sea fishing, $200 fee inheld 6-9 p.m. Monday and eludes captain, gear, lures and fuel. Wednesday at Building 24 (next *Valent Recreation Center: to Pizza Hut) on Rodman NS. Korean karate class 6-8 p.m. Cost is $35 and includes all mateTuesdays and Thursdays. Admission rials and qualification test drive. to the first class is free. Beginner and advanced A 10-week Spanish headstart swimming classes are available class meets 6-8 p.m. Wednesdays for adults and children age 5 and and 5-7 p.m. Fridays. The next class up. Classes are held at the Rodwill begin Monday. man pool 3:30-5 p.m. Tuesdays. Private piano and guitar lesThursdays, and Fridays. A mi /US Navy pnoto by Paty uticer 2nd .lass et Sykes sons are available weekday evenings. rum of four is needed for each h h P.S ptyods k The instructor meets privately with class. There is a $20 fee for 12 the students for 30 minutes. classes. Call 283-4253 for inforTwo ships are tied together on their way through the locks to avoid damage to The center is offering amateur nation. the hull as the water level changes. Partial canal transits are available 7:3011:30 a.m. Saturdays, Contact your installation travel office for information. Theatre Guild at 252-6786 for salary inforfrom various dance, guitar and piano lesBike trip Theatre mation and specific dates. sons. *Theater Guild of Ancon: *Pacific Theatre Arts Center: +Valent Recreation Center: *Road Knights Motorcycle Club: The Theatre Guild is looking for a Advanced moderndancethrough Aug. The talent show "Countdown to StarThe Road Knights Motorcycle Club musical director for the upcoming pro12. Previous dance training required. dom '94" vocal and musical performance will be participating in a ticket run 9 duction of "Nunsense II" who can play The theatre dance workshop begins event is open to all active duty military a.m. July 31 with the Hot Raiders Mopiano during rehearsal and performances. July 23. Classes are held 8:30-10:30 a.m. members. Registration deadline is July 30 torcycle Club. The run departs from the The show will be performed in October. and 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. There is a maxat the center. Cash prizes will be awarded Banco Exterior on Avenida Balboa. Auditions and rehearsals will begin in imum of 15 students. locally, and a winners will have a chance at There is a $5 fee. Non-members are August.Call DL Sima at 284-3785 or the Monthly classes are available ranging a recording session in New York. invited to attend. ///I

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ticesTmTropic TimesB 7 Muddin' Toi -MeptoP one guide Harr La Clair kicks up some mud as he goes off road in his Jeep. The 4X4 Club will be holdingPaic its monthly meeting 7 p.m. Thursday in Building 2333 across from the main entrance to the Cocoli 24th Services Squadro Sports and housing area. Anyone interested in joining the club for off road adventure is welcome to attend, Recreational Rental Center, 284-6107 or call Paul Haney at 282-9628. Albrook Auto Craft Shop, 286-3613 Albrook Club, 286-4128 Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333 A , -Canal Crafters 286-4500 Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-5957/ *Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts pouring. Rent two molds and get Center: Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453 Center: the third free, every Friday and SatPorceilain pouring class 10 Clayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360 Fabric painting classes 6:30urday in July (maximum six molds a.m.-noon today and July 22. Clayton NCO Club, 287-3586 8:30 p.m. the first and third Wedneseach day). Custom-designed T-shirt for Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363 day and Thursday of each month, *Canal Crafters: your organization. Call 284-6345 Clayton Scuba Shop 287-3355 $7.50. Some supplies are available. Handmade arts and crafts are for information. Club Amador, 282-3534 Stone stroke classes I I a.m. available. Consignment and volunThe 1994 photo contest is comCocoli Recreation Center, 287-4119 Sundays, $10. Paint ceramic figuteers, are welcome by the shop staff. ing in August. Call the center for Howard Auto Craft Shop, 284-3370 rines to look like stoneware. Current features include patriotic information. Howard Enlisted Members' Club, 284-4107 Custom frames to order and displays. The shop is open 10 a.m. Ongoing classes include stained Howard Officers' Club, 284-4680 do-it-yourself frame classes are -2 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday and Satglass, cross-stitch, framing, clay H oward Riding Stables 284-3770 available. urday, Building 804, Albrook. Call flower, pottery wheel throwing, H oward Skills Development Center, 284-6361 The Ceramic Center, Building 286-4500. Classes are available. macrame, air brush techniques, and Howard Teen Center, 284-4700 198, is located near the Crafts Shop. Sign up at the shop. lamp assembly. Several "how-to" Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-4510 The center offers a special on mold *Howard Skills Development videos are available for viewing. The Loop, 287-3035 Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814 Quarry Heights Officers' Club, 282-4380 Rodman Annex, 283-5475 Rodman Club, 283-4498 Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150 Rodman Naval Station Information Tour *Valent Recreation Center: through July 24. able to rent for private functions. TwnTa O fsiroeo 28-545 The screening room offers free Freshwater pearl and jewelry Call 284-6161 to reserve a dale. Twin Rceain P Centhrp 28-6504 movies by calling the 24-hour movsale 1-7 p.m. today through SunSubs on Top has take-out, earVln erainCne,2760 ie line. day. in or delivery service to Kobbe, -616C1 mnt civte ene,24 Better Opportunities for +Cocoli Community Center: Farfan, Howard and Gateway housAlni Single Soldiers forum mneets the Arts and crafts for children ing. Fax in orders at 284-6109 or Aln first Thursday of every month and 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. call 294-5848. It is open I I a.m.-6 Aquativity Center,af (2 er,4209-5 is open to all barracks residents. -OZodiac Community Center: p.m. Monday-Friday and now I I ai omntyCu,2956 Gloria's bazaar 1-9 p.m. The activities room is availam.3 p.m. Saturdays. Dcai BremmuRnity o Cenue, 289-646 2 Outdoor Recreation, 289-4077 Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-6104 A ,, Sundial Recreation Center, 289-3889/3300 Rec center news FrdysAtlantic to r Beginig Painting 6-8 p.m. *SnilRcetoCner *Sundial Recreation Center: Mondays and Wednesdays. Frene Rehoeping Cenaer: Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. Mon*Ocean Breeze Recreation Fe oesopn ~ day, Wednesdays and Fridays. Center: 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. Family exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m. The center offers a variety 2.Isla Grande 8 a.m.-5 p.m. July Wednesdays. of classes such as karate, cake 24 Karate 6-7 p.m. Mondays and decorating, piano, Spanish, En*Ocean Breeze Recreation CenWednesdays. glish, country line dancing and ter: Spanish 6-7 p.m, Tuesdays and jazz. Portobello tour 8 a.m. Sunday. // 7/ /Z

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Tropic Times AL I Location Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Howard AFB 7pm: PCU 2pm: Clean Slate 2pm: Clean Slate 7pm: Threesome (R) 7pm: Schindler's List 2pm: White Fang 2 7pm: Crooklyn (PG(PG-13) (PG-13) (PG-13) Lara Flynn Boyle, (R) Liam Neeson, (PG) 13) 284-3583 Jeremy Piven, Dana Carvey, Dana Carvey, Stephen Baldwin Ben Kingsley Scott Bairstow, Alfred Woodard, David Spade Valeria Golino Valeria Golint 9pm: Clean Slate Charmaine Craig Delroy Lindo 9pm: Schindler's List 7pm: Schindler's List 7pm: Threesome (R) (PG-13) 7pm: No show 9pm: When a Man (R) Liam Neeon, 0R) Liam Neeson, Lara Flynn Boyle, Data Carvey, 555th Air Force Band Loves a Woman (R) Ben Kittgsley Bett Kingsley Stephen Baldwin Valeria Golino Andy Garcia, 10:15pm: Threesome 9pm: PCU Meg Ryan (R) (PG-13) Lara Flytt Boyle, Jerety Piven, Stephen Baldwin David Spade Fort Clayton 7pm: 3 Ninjas Kick 2pm: 3 Ninjas Kick 2pm: 3 Ninjas Kick 7pm: Leprechaun 2 7pm: 3 Ninjas Kick 2pm: -2 Mighty 7pm: Schindler's List Back (P1G) lck (P() 1ack (PG) (R) Warwick Davis Back (PG) Docks Are Back (PG) (R) Liam Neeson, Max Elliott Slade, Max Illioit SILOi Max Elliott Slade, 9pm: No Escape (R) Max Elliott Slade, Emilio Estevec Bee Kingsley Victor Wong vicor Wong Victor Witg Ray Liotta, Victor Wong Michael Tucker 9pm: No Excape (R) 7tm: Nt iop Kick 7pm: No Escape (R) Lance Henriksen 9pm: The Favor (R) 7pm: No Escape (R) Ray L iotia. Back (1G) Ray Liona, Elizabeth Mc~overn. Ray Liotta, i tetriks Mix ElI (ion SI A. Lance lienriksen Harley Jane Kozak Lance Henriksen v'iOr Wong 9:15pm: Tlte Favor (R) 9:15pm: The Favor (R) i9pm: Leprechaun 2 Elizabthl McGovern, Elizabeth McGovern, (R) Warwick Davis Harley Jane Kozak larley Jane Kozak Fort Davis 7pm: With Honors 7pm: Serial Mot, (R) 7pm: Surviving the 6pm: No show 7pm: Serial Mom (R) 7pm: 3 Ninjas Kick 7pm: No Escape (R) 289-5173 (PG-13) Joe Pesci, Kathleent urner, Game (R) Ice T, 555th Air Force Band Kathleen Turner, Back (PG) Ray Liotta, Brendan Fraser Sam Waterston Rutger Haer Sam Waterston Max Elliott Slade, Lance Henriksen 9pn: Serial Mom (R) 9pm: Srviving the Victor Wong Kathleen Tnrner, Gan (R) ice T, Sam Waterston Rutger Hauer Fort Sherman 7:30pm: Brainscan (R) 7:30pm: With Honors 7:30pm: Serial Mom No show No show No show 7:30pm: 3 Ninjas 2 Edward Furlong (PG-13) Joe Pesci, (R) Kathleen Turner, Kick Back (PG) Frank Langella Brendan Fraser Sam Waterston Max Elliott Slade, Victor Wong Fort Amador 7pm: Leprechaun 2 7pm: PCU I 7pm: Clean Slate No show No show 7pm: Schindler's List 7pm: The Inkwell (R) 284-3583 (R) Warwick Davis (PG-13) (PG-13) (R) Liam Neeson, Larenz Tate, Jeremy Piven, Dana Carvey, Ben Kingsley Joe Morton David Spade Valeria Golino July 22 When a Man Loves a Woman Meg Ryan Andy Garcia Howard AFIB In this powerful emotional drama, the 7pm When a Man Loves strength of a marriage is tested when the couple must deal with a serious problem a Woman (R) that could destroy their relationship. R Andy Garcia (language), 126 min. Meg Ryan 9pm The Inkwell (R) Crooklyn Larenz T ate, Alfred Woodard, Delroy Lindo Spike Lee moves in a new direction with Joe Morton this deftly observed, touching and often R funny view of the life of a Brooklyn Fort Clayton family during the 1970s. PG-13 (drug Now showing at Howard and Clayton theaters. content), 130 min. your memory wiped completely clean. in humanity. R (strong violence, Ian7pm PCU (PG-13) Dana Carvey tries to deal with this pecuguage), 96 min. Jeremy Piven, The Inkwell liarproblemashe ducksdangernotknowDavid Spade Joe Morton, Larentz Tate ing why everyone wants to kill him. PGThe Favor 9pm Schindler's List Ashy black teenager and his experiences 13 (language), 119 min. Elizabeth McGovern, at a social center on Martha's Vineyard Harley Jane Kozak (R) in the 1970s are the focus of this tender 3 Ninjas Kick Back The Favor takes a light look at two Liam Neeson, and offbeat coming of age story. R (lanMax Elliott Slade, Victor Wong couples' intertwining relationships. Ben Kingsley guage), 112 mm. The continuing adventure of ninja arts Who's in love with whom and for how students Rocky, Colt and Tum Tum picks long is the basis for a romantic comedy PCU up with them on the way to Japan to with a little different flavor. R (IanFort Davis Jeremy Piven, DavidSpade rescue grandma, fight bad guys and disguage), 97 min. 7pm 3 Ninjas Kick Back In PCU, a renegade dorm sets out to defy cover a cave of gold. PG (martial arts the rigid bchaviorofits fellow students at action, mild language), 99 nin No Escape (PG) a very politically correct university. It's Ray Liotta, Max Elliott Slade, the free thinkers against the regimented Schindler's List Lance Henriksen Victor Wong in a riotous collection of counter culture Liam Neeson, Ben Kingsley In this futuristic action-adventure, Ray 9pm No Escape (R) clashes. PG-13 (language, drug content Winnerofsevenacademyawards, Steven Liotta is a military man sent to a high Ray Liotta, some sensudity) 80 m .Spielberg's powerful film account ofhow security prison and assigned to an isoa Jewish businessman saved thousands lated island colony where two groups Lance Henriksen Threesome of WWII Jews from death is a chilling of desperate criminals battle for conLara Flynn Boyle, Stephen Baldwin and realistic recreation of one of recent trol. He organizes the troops to battle Fort Sherman A clerical error assigns a young lady as history'smosthorrifying chapters. R(lanfor freedom against the highly roommate to two gentlemen in the colguage, actuality violence, some sexualimechanzied security forces. R (strong 7:30pm Serial Mom (R) lege dorm. Their sexual awakening is ty), 3 hrs, 15 min. violence, language), 118 min. Kathleen Turner, somewhat confused as they try to sort out Sam Waterston their preferences in a comedy of the 90s. Surviving the Game Leprechaun 2 R (strong sexuality, sex related dialogue), Ice T, Rutger Hauer Warwick Davis 93 min. A homeless man gets involved in a Little Lop is in Los Angeles and he's Fort Amador deadly hunting game, in which he's the looking for a wife. The woman of his Clean Slate prey. Hunted by a group of very rich dreams is not so inclined, and to further 7pm Crooklyn (PG-13) Dana Carvey, Valeria Golino thrill seekers in the wilderness of the unfuriatehim someonehastakensome Alfred Woodard, Being a good private detective is tough Pacific Northwest, Ice T uses his street of his gold. R (violence, nudity), 85 Delroy Lindo when you wake up each morning with smarts to survive and teach them a lesson min.

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T Schedule Tropic Times B9 A TV SceduleJuly -15,-1994 & *Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event *Program moved to new day and time Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30 NBC Ness at Sunrise 6:30 Headline News 6:00 CCMT IV 5:30 NBC Nes at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:00 Good Morning America 7:00 Navy/Marino Corps Ness 61:30 Hore f Power 6:00 1oed Morning America 6:00 Good Morning Ameria 6:00 Goad Meminig America 6:00 Good Morning America 8:00 Basic Training Workont 7:30 Real News ir Kids 7:00 Voiceso .Faith 8:00 Basic Training Wrekiut 8:00 Bodyslaping 8:00 Basic Training Workont 8:00 llndysihaping 8:30 Sesaie Street 0:01 Guts 7:25 Cath the Spirit :3(1 Sesame Stieet X:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesamre Street 0:30 Sesamne Street 9:310 Murder. Sie Wroc 0:3( Jst ti Kits :100 Americas Black iorumt 9:3I Murder, She Wrote 9:30 Murder, She Wrote 9:30 Mnrder, She Wrote 9:30 Murder, She Wrote 10:25 Guiding Light Grfield and trietds 830 11 Gol:"rtishOpen" Final 10:25 itiding Light 10:25 Giding Light 10:25 Guiding Light 10 25 Guiding Light I1:10 GeCerl. Hospital Teenage utan Ninja Rontid 11:10 Gernera all I1 1:0 Cieneral Hspi sIn 1: GeneralHospital :0 Ge2nerl Hospital (2:00 Iledline News Break Turles 12:30 leidllne News Break 12:00 H Ne t, I 0lleadlii News Break 0 deadline News Be k 12(0 ileadline News Break 12:1 SCN Midday Wild West C.OW. Boys 12:45 On Stage **** 12:15 SCN Midday 12: 15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12 15 SCN Midday Repn 12:30 Sportscenter of Mon Mesa IA 5 Double Feature: "Story of 12:30 Spurts Machine 12:30 Sportscenter 12:30 Sportscener 12:30 Spuriscenter 1:00 Another World Btman Cartoon** Alesander Guirani Bell" 1:00 Another World L00 Another World 1:00 Another World 1 00 Another World 2:00 Oprab Winfrey Cartn Classic 3:00 "Cowboy" 2:00 Oprah Winfey 2 00 Santy Jesse Raphael 2:00 Oprah Winlery 2:00 Donahue 3:00 Price is Right Faerie Tale heater 4 30 Victory at Sea: :** 3:00 lrice is Right 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 4:00 Legends of (lie Hidden (1:00 The Creative Spirit 5:00 Center Stage 4:00 Gts 4:00 Ghostwriter 4:00 Shining Time Station 4:00 Club Connect Temple 12:00 Ieadline News 6:00 Enrtainment this 4:30 1 Love Lucy 4:30 1 Love Lucy 4:30 1 Love Lucy 4:30 1 Love Lucy 4:30 I Lnne Lucy ( 2:30 "3:10 o Yma" Wehk **** 5:00 Family Feud 5:00 Family Feud 5:00 Family Feud 5:00 Family Feud 5:00 Family Feud 2:15 "National Lampoon's 7:00 Grace Under Fire 5:30 Showbie Today 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:30 Showbie Today 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Shwbie Today European Vacation" 7:30 Movie:"A FewGood Men" 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:13 Headline News Break 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Repori 4:00 Nova .10:00 ABC 20/20 e*** 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 World News Tonight 6:15 Headline News Break : 6:30 headline News Break 5:00 Showtine at the Apollo 11:00 Middlemarchn*** 6:30 World News Tonight 7:00 Wheel of Fortune 630 World NewsTonight 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 6:00 The Adventures of 12:00 Headline News 7:00 Wheel of Fortune 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 7:00 Wheel of Fortune 7:00 Wheel of Fortune 7:00 Wheel of Fortune Superman (2:30 Meet the Press 7:30 Entertrainment Tonight 0:00 Answertine 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 7:30 Entertainment Tonight 7:30 Entertainmnt Tonight 6:30 Rescue 911 1:30 -lHeadline News 8:00 Roc 9:00 48 Hours 8:00 Fresh Prince of Bel-Air 8:00 Murphy Brown 8:00 America's Funniest Home 7:30 China Beach 2:00 Sports Latenight 8:30 COPS 10:00 SCN Lute Edition 825 Movie: "Sinatra Part 2" 8:25 Movie: "impulse" Videos 8:25 Movie: "Back to School" 2:30 ABC World News Now 9:00 60 Minutes 10:05 Cheers 10 00 SCN Late Edition (0:00 SCN Late Edition 8:30 Dave's World (0:00 Headline News 3:00 Headline News 10:00 SCN Late Edition I 10:30 David Letterman t005 Cheers (0:05 Cheers 9:0( Paradise* 10:30 Saturday Night Live 3:30 Sports Machine (0:05 Cheers 1:30 Tonight Show 10:30 David Letterman (0:30 David Letterman 10:00 SCN Late Edition 12:r30 WWF Superstars of 4:00 ABC World News Now 10:30 David Letterman 12:30 Headline News 1 :30 Tonight Show 11:30 Tonight Show 10:05 Cheers Wrestling 5:00 Headline News Break 11:30 Tonight Shuw 1:00 Nightline 12:3O Headline News 12:30 Headline News 10:30 David Letternian 1:00 Friday Night Videos (2:30 Headline News 1:30 Sports Latenight 1:00 Nightline 1:00 Nightline 1:30 Tonight Show 2:00 Movies: "The Young (:00 Nightline 2:00 Arsenin Hall 1:30 Sports Latenight 1:30 Spurts Latenight 12:30 Rocko's Modern World Philadelphians" 1:30 Sports Latenight 3:00 Headline News 2:00 Arsenio Hall 2:00 Arsenio [fall 1:00 Movies: "National 4:15 "THe Big Chill" 2:00 Arsenio hll 3:30 Tonight Show 3:00 Headline News 3:00 Headline News Lampoon's European 3:00 Headline News 4:30 Headline News 3:30 Tonight Show 3:30 Tonight Show Vacation 3:30 Tonight Show 5:00 Headline News Break 4:30 Headline News 4:30 Headline News 2:35 "Seems Like Old Times" 4:30 Headline News 5:00 Headline News Break 5:00 Headline News Break 4:15 "Caddyshack" 5:00 Headline News Break 5:45 Videolinks 6:00 Headline News Break C able channel 14 Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time Today C Saturday Sunday 1 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30 Simudcast with Channels 6:30 Simulcast with Chan6:00 Shining Time Station 5:30 Simulcast with Channels 8 5:30 Simulcast with Channels 5:30 Simulcast with Channels 5:30 Simulcast with Channels 8& 10 nets & 10 6:30 The Sunshine Factoryu* & 10 8&0& 8 & 10 8:00 Oprah Wintrey 0:30 Young Adult Theater 7:15 Goof Troop 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Donahue 8:00 Opmh Winfrey 8:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 9:00 Today "The Adventure of 7:40 Garfield and Friends 9:09:00 Toda:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 11:00 Star Trek Winnie the Pooh" 8:05 Darkwing Duck I 1:00 Star Trek 0 Star Trek ((1:00 Star Trek (1:00 Star Trek 12:00 Headline News Break "s and Getting Straight" 8:15 Tiny Toon Adventures ** 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:00 Headline News Break 12:15 SCN Midday "Abby, My Love" 0:40 EEK! The Cat *** 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday. 12:30 All My Children ((:30 Real News For Kids 9:05 Teenage Mutant Ninja (2:30 All Mp Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 1:30 One Life to Live 12:00 Silver Spoons Turtles 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 2:30 Young and the Restless 12:30 Sports Closeup 9:3 Science and Technology 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 3:30 Teenage Mutant Ninja (:00 Movie:"Bhes in Week 3:30 Tiny Toon 3:30 EEK! The Cal *** 3:30 Goof Troop 3:30 Garfield and Friends Turtles Toyland" I 10:00 Motor Week Adventures n* 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:03 Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fmggle Rock 3:00 "Arsenic and Old Lace" 10:30 Sports Closeup 4:00 FraggleRick 4:30 Legends of The Hidden 1 4:30 Guts 4:30 Get the Picture 4:30 Ghost Writer 5:00 American Gladiators ((:00 This Week in Basehall 4:30 Are You Afraid of the Temple 5:00 Nick News: W5 ** 5:00 The Wonder Years 5:00 Silver Spoons 6:00 Martin + 1:30 This Old House Dark? 5:00 Mickey & Donald 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:30 The Cushy Show 6:30 The Simpsons 1200 Mary Tyler Moore Show 5:00 Club Connect 5:30 The Cosby Show 6:00 SCN Evening Report 600 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 7:00 Lois & Clark: The 12:30 Amish Cooking From 5:30 The Cosby Show 600 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break Adventures of Superman Quilt Country 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:30 NBC Nightly News 0:00 Star Trek: "Deep Space 1:00 Movie:"Old Yeller" 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 NBC Nightly News 7:00 Hangin' with Mr. 7:00 Full House 7:00 Primetime Live Nine" 2:30 World Cup Soccer: 6:30 NBC Nightly News 7:00 ALF Cooper 7:30 Family Matters 8:00 Renegade ** 9:00 Herman's Head Finals 7:00 McGyver 7:30 Home Improvement 7:30 Seinfeld 00 Living Single* 9:00 Movie: "Close 9:30 Married With Children 5:00 Quanuim Leap 0:00 Melrose Place nun 8:00 Picket Fences 8:00 Toor of Duty 8.30 Joe's Life Encounters Of The Third 10:00 Movie:"Family Business" 6:00 Fresh Prince nf Bet-Air 9:00 Monday Night Movie: 9:00 Martin 9:00 NYPD Blue (VOC 9:00 Dateline NBC Kind" (2:00 headline News 6:30 Wonderful World of "Backdraft" 9:25 Movie: "Mass Appeal" 10:00 Murder, She Wrote 10:00 Miami Vice 11:25 SCN Late Edition (2:30 Science and Technology Disney ((:00 Headline News 11:00 Headline News 11:00 Headline News Break ((:00 Headline News Break :11:30 Nightline Week 7:30 Golden Girls .1:25 SCN Late Edition 11:25 SCN Late Edition 1:25 SCN Late Edition ((:25 SCN Late Edition 12:00 M*A*S*H 1:00 The Mc Laughlin Group '8:00 Movie: "In Crowd" 1:30 Nightline 11:30 Nightline 1:30 Nightline ( :30 Nightline 12:30 Larry King Live (:30 Sports Lamenight (0:00 Day One 12:00 M*A*S*H : M 1:00 M 'M*A*S*H 12:00 M*A*S*i 1:30 Sports Lalenight 2:00 Entertainment This week 11:00 L.A. Law 12:30 Simulcast with 8&10 12:30 Simulcast with 8&10 12:30 Simulcast with 8&10 12:30 Simulcast with 8&10 2:00 Arsenio Hall 3:00 H-edline News 12:00 Simulcast with 8 & 10 3:00 Headline News 3:30 Saturday Night Live 3:30 Tonight Show 5:00 Videolinks 4:30 David Letterman 5:30 Headline News Break 5:30 Simulcast with 8 & 10 Channels 8 & 10 Cable Channel 14 Specials Sports "Answerline, 8 p.m. Tuesday .World Cup Soccer This month's topic is "Family Housing." Representatives from Finals, 2:30 p.m. Sunday the three services will answer your questions. You may call in Series starts questions 7:30-9:00 p.m. by calling 287-4460. "Renegade," 8 p.m. today. (Replaces 21 Jump Street) He Sports was a cop and a good cop at that, but he committed the ultimate Golf sin by breaking the "Code ofSilence" and testifying against other "British Open" Final Round, 8:30 a.m. Sunday cops that had gone bad. Now, framed for murder, Reno Raines finds Series Starts .himself on the run, riding the highways ofAmerica on his Harley. Stars "Paradise," 9 p.m. today. (Replaces Baywatch) The story of a 1890s Lorenzo Llamas and Branscombe Richmond. gunfighter who unexpectedly inherits his sister's four young children. Stars "The Sunshine Factory," 6:30 a.m. Sunday. (Replaces McGee and Me) Lee Horsley and Sigid Thornton. Welcome back to "The Sunshine Factory," the magical workshop where young "Garfield and Friends," 8:30 a.m. Saturday. (Replaces "Sonic The Hedgehog" folks get together for friendship, fun and light-hearted lessons in solid Christian in "Just For Kids") Cartoonist Jim Davis' Garfield claws his way back into the values. schedule, along with Jon and Odie, as America's favorite lasagna-loving overPrimetime movies weight feline. "Close Encounters Of The Third Kind," 9 p.m. today. The most famous victim Primetime movies ofthe Bermuda Triangle, Flight 19, is finally recovered intact -but without its pilots "Back To School," 8:25 p.m. Saturday. Higher education will neverbe the same. -35 years after the aircraft and crews disappeared off the Florida coast. Stars A wild and crazy selfmade millionaire buys his way into college to join his son in Richard Dreyfus and Melinda Deaton. the freshman class. Stars Rodney Dangerfield and Sally Kellerman. "Family Business," 10 p.m. Saturday. Three generations of McMullen men have "A Few Good Men," 7:30 p.m. Sunday. A young, inexperienced Navy lawyer is a slight disagreement about the future of the family business.stealing. Patriarch assigned to prosecute a case involving the death ofa Marine. While his senior finally Jessie wants to teach the trade to his college drop-out grandson, Adam, by pulling off gets him to take things seriously, his biggest problem is a belligerent Marine colonel. one last big job before he retires. Stars Sean Connery and Dustin Hoffman. Stars Tom Cruise and Jack Nicholson. "In Crowd," 8 p.m. Sunday. In this entertaining study of how the media can "Sinatra," 8:25 p.m. Wednesday. (Part 2) Now in his mid-30s, Sinatra finds manipulate its audience, a shamelessly devious DJ with a strong influence on his himself chasing actress Ava Gardner while his career begins a downward spiral. teenage fans creates the coolest of the cool. Stars Donovan Leitch and Jennifer Stars Philip Casnof and Gina Gershon. Runyon.

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Tropic Times Classiied Ads B1o July 15, 1994Ad 1994 Daihatsu Charadeac / ss, tro amp. 350w, $300. equalizer $150, alarm, exc cord, 10,000 kn 56,700 aner 5125 n,-5d speakers $175 ca. Duty-free merchandise 105 p p6 2514096. 1991 510 BAazer, 4x4, 2d,, ps, pb, re, Aiwa 55w speakers $75, Sony car FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) -As a reminder, pm, pai Tahoc packing, 32,000 mles, $6 maid ag 15 gcd speaker, 4x6 150 lesc 4 $14 ,000/obo. 206-4189. pa-sp g g Bose a5 $550. 235-4096. in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern work good s/kids & pets rIs mg [992 -god cod, $,70D forTmoa 2876637 -Graphic cqoiacc, audio vidco ccCommand regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used, 92 CJS Jccp gcod ccnd, $2,700. forTomisa. 207-6637. Grlht e 287-59d4. cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege holdlmbligoal mai llcnl Z 970 Jccp CJ-7, body rcbuitt, ocm carc of booschold, cleaning, laonZcnitb laptop IBM ps-2 colormners. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecupaint, f11l and bikini tops. inns gmat, dry, inning, honest, great with pes. tor-new hard drive. $350. 230-0000. tion under both, military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes "fn_ ce $47 17-3572. 236-218. G~oil ay aidrelabl, tornest IBM priotcr $13. ,230-0000. permissible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid. 19C1 OldsCallass Sopmn drBr Grca ay maid rcliablc oncs -7 goody, not dty pd, ncm parts, $1,2001 hardmorktng speaks cnlisb, good Kcnmood 70701 stcrco spcatkcrs 4, Before such a sale, it is strongly recommended that the seller contact cbo. 220-4 18 nights and ceig. w/chldrn. avsil. 5 Aug. 5 days a movitime cabin box nr. 287the Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-3117. 199 Bronco, 6 cyl, man, a4 milcx, cxc. cond. 1988 Taarus GL. 18 yr old babysiter nigbls and wckCannon 8mn. iidco camcorder, 252-5738. ends Lave references loves kids. $550, oinlendo games, computer 1991 Buick Rcgal, 4 dr, at, as, Pe cx, 1979 Grand Prix Pontiac, 2 dc, light 230-1927. games for IBM. call aficr 6p.m. 252ond, 29,000 mile, nor dty paid, gren,_ros molt, $12,000. 206-3992. 1980 Mercury Capri, runs good, nice 2314. -m s9,500. 264-0244 second car, $1,200. 223 5866 Guitar inslruclor, able to teach on --1906 Nissan 300ZX Trbo., loaded, weekends, will go to learner's Cannon ac-I adn t-50 sIr camera w/ 1987 Chevy IROC Z-28, Ttrqtoise, 5 $7,000/obo. 1982 Toyota pickup, 1987 Suzuki Samurai, $3,550. 286hoose. 252-5023. $5 half hon. Inns and acc. 252-6831. cnal, pekapoo (pocdle-p kis) specd, ac, t-lop, alarm, ncot lights, loaded, dty pd, $5,000/oho. 2824227. poppis, 6 weeks old, adorned, tails $13,000/obo. 287-3999. 3232. Wireless head phones, Strax clipped, $60 each. 286-6391. 1989 Mcccry Topaz, exc. cond., pwr reliable, cxc-wockcr two days a week, carspokcrs w/adaptor, Tcac double 1993 Nissan Altinta GLE, leather in1991 Eagle Talon, loaded, alt-mhcl cvcrything, new paint tircs, $5,900. ask for Rosa. 261-7939. cass. Sony 15' color Lv. w/remolte. AKA/CCP mini pincher poppies, trrior, heads up display, cd/cass playdrive, life, turbo engine, low ile226-6473. 260-2104. champion bloodlines, available July er, all extras, $20,000 neg. 284-4498. age, one owner, $13,500. 269-3770. Honest reliable babysiter, maid, x15. 284-3924. 1987 Mazda 626 LX, ar, power wincrltent with children available M-F, Commodore select edition, 40mb hd, 1988 Buick Skyhawk, $2,500. 2871905 Ford F-150 XLT, 6 cyl, 4.9L, ac, dows, power locks, cbrome whcts, $120. 207-3091. 640k ram, dual disks and much more. Toy poodles, purebred 4 months old, 3284. till, cruise, mag wheels, bed liner, cass player, tinted windows, exc. $800. 221-4917. $125 each. Horse, marc, ncar camper shell, not dty pd, $7,500. rond, $4,500. 287-5974. Babysitter good with kids. 261Kobbc, $75. 252-2889. 1986 Chevrolet Celebrity, am/fm, 236-4979. 1236. ONES w/2 games, $100, NCAA hasgood condition, $4,995. 286-3398. -1993 Nissan Ford Altima GLE, leathketball $20, John Madden 94 $35. 1 1/2 yr. old doberman, gO. i/kids, all 1988 Jeep Comanche track, 1, ps, cr interior, heads up display, ed/cass Livc-in maid/babysilte, honest and 286-4970. shots, ears and tail done, good guard 1994 Daihatso Charadc, ac, am-fm, ph, ac, am/fm cass, cruise, tilt, player, alt extras, $16,000. 284-4498. reliable, exp, ref, M-P. 206-4970. dog, $300. 287-6738. ass, alarm, exc. cond., 10,000 kin, camper xhell, bed liner, $8,000. 204Nintendo w/misc. items. $20. Nikko $6,700. 264-4105. 5430. 198 ford Ranger XLT, 5-spd, nO, ac, English speaking mature maid 9 r radin controlled car w/batteriex and Pree to good home, 5 month old power steering & brakes, om/fm stwith kids Preterable mil Families charger. 233-1229. female calico, shots needed. 2641986 Ford Bronco It XLT, good con1992 Jep Wrangler, soft bikini top, ra cans., $7,000/aba. 252-5400 afiv-in day maid. 263-3627. 2034. ditin. 285-5560, rm 10. 13,000 mitos, xc. rood. 284-5430. Icr 5pm. Epson comp. 20mb ram, i/dos 5.0, Licensed family day care full/part WP 5.1, Louis 1-2-3, includes printer. Free male kitten to a good home. 1905 Dodge Caravan, excellent con1990 Dodge Corovn, 57,500 miles, 1989 Toyota Corolla, exc.cond., low time openings drop-ins welcome $475. 264-3679. 261-3486. edition, $5,800/obo. 287-4136. 4 cyl, brown ext., $8,500. 286-3245. mites, ac, ps, am/fm cass., 5 spd, not ask for Angella. 284-3101. dry pd, $6,000. 264-0158. 4-trock recorder, foster x-18 m/efx Free kitten, 9 wks old, shots to date, 1976 Malibu Classic, $800/obo. 2871991 Chrysler Imperial, cxc. cnd, Bilingual maid, clean and babysit, loop, pitch changes. $300. 287-5589. female, gray and white. 283-5687. 4136. -law miles, one owner, 7/70 bumper1990 Dodge Spirit ES, v-6, oc, pwr avail 6am to noon M-T-W. Albrook to-bumpar warranty. 286-3398. everything, exc. stereo, 4dr, maroon references. 286-4504. Car hatchback speaker bs-15' comBasset hound pups, akc/cap, shots, 1987 Cherry IROC Z-28, 5sp, a, p' $5,500. 236-5125. plete almost nm. $300/aba. 228Omks, $300, motes only. 284-4700. ps, pw, t-lop, alarm, neon lights, 1990 Ford Aerostar XL, extended, C&M Photography, special on 8xtO. 4319. $11,000. 2873999. low mileage, all accessories of XLT, 1988 Dodge Daytona, I-top, ps, pb, 4 Let us come to you by appointment. Cream/gray seat-point Himalayan. not duy pd, $15,500. 287-6182. cyl, $3,500. 284-4031. 284-4392. Yamaha ster. cass. deck. $110. 252blor eyes, alt shots npdatbd, 1979 Merced.s 450 SE, cxc. cnd., 5792. declawd, able to bread, $225/bao. sarf, ar, am/fm cass, not duty paid, 1988 Ford Escort station wagon, 1970 Ford Capri Classic, all extras, Bilingual lire-out maid gr w/kids, gr 286-4998. $10,000/obo. 287-3887. exc. cond., many new parts, ps, p6, exc road. 220-6091. house keeping. 286-4737. Scott am-fm stereo recirer, almost am/fm cass., or, $5,000. 286-3345. arm. $115/abo. 206-3301. Rottwiter, ake registered, 10 months 1988 Dodge Coarn LE, 6 cylinder, 1991 Macdo Naaha, 4x4, exc. rand, Honest, reliabe Eng-spk maid, lire-in old, $450./obo. 286-6533. or, tinted windows, ec. coad., r ar 1988 Jeep Commanche, or, pb, ps, 45,000 mites, or, am/fm cass, good w/kids. 260-9915. Quasar 20' ctv/vcr w/remote. $400. tires, $10,000. 287-3887. am/fm, cass, new tires & rims, 4wd $15,500. 236-2618. Clayron car stereo $75. Pioneer eq/ Male boxer, 6 months old, fawn til 261-6418 Wilton mehtod cake decorating classamp. $150. 223-0579. cut, shots, champion bloodline, 1989 Pontiac Firebird, v-6, ak, into, 1988 Ford Mustang LX, 60k, new en beginning in July ask for Caroe. family dog only. 287-4592. am/fm cassette, power locks, win1986 Toyota 4-Runner 4x4, a, ps, computer stereo and spks, looks & 282-3320. Sega CD games $25 ea. or all for dows, tilt wheel, mint condition, ph, stereo cass, black, exe. cond, runs great, 4,700. 260-3130. $75. 284-5753. Pure white, male car, 5 months old, $8,500. 285-5006. $8,700. 260-8178. Sponspkmaid, reliablehonestdependplayful, very good w/kids, some 1986 Ford Areostar, 6 cyl, ac, at, able, will work one, two or three days Sony 5 disc player. $130, Pioneer tape shots. Free. 287-3335. 1985 Nissan Bluebird, diesel 2.0, ac, 1987 Toyota 4-Runner, 4-cyl, 5spd, good cond, not dy pd, $7,000/obo. a week. Does ironing, cleaning, baby deck $100/oho. 286-4998. ph, r/cass., new tires, excellent cond., ac, cc, radio cass, dty pd, like new. 282-3832. sitting. 253-5239. Chow-chow, black, female, cup, 2 dty pd, alarm, $5,000. 261-6830. 236-2365. 2 Ceran Vega speakers, 2 Pioneer years old, needs stud service. 2291983 Chevy Celebrity, ps, pb, ae, am/ Spon-spk maid honest reliable, hard speakers, Nintendo w/games. 2864667. 1990 Ford Tempo, 4cyl, ac,. pwr steer1986 Ford Ranger, camper shell, or, fin, eons good, many new parts, working ref upon request. one day 6533. ing, pwr brakes, pwr windows, pwr pc, pb, dual tanks, $5,000/obo. 287$2,500. 284-3825. a week. 286-3381. Rotweiler puppies, cep reg, chanlocks, stereo w/tape, automatic Irons4332 Brothers word rocessor-WP 5750ds, pion sire, exc. show quality dam. mission, exc. cond., not dty pd, 1979 Pontiac Bonneville, 4 dr, v8, Maid excellent honest reliable live $400. white desk w/chair. $75. 287287-6195. $7700. 226-8626. 1992 Dihaazu Applause, al/ar, ins good, $1,750/oho. 284-5397. oat. 252-1035. 6623. 45,000 im, excellent condition, Free cat, declawed and neutered, 1991 Pathfinder, no US specs., not dty $7,500. 286-6495 1978 F150 Ranger, rebuilt 351 CleveCollege student tutor for math (alg, Yamaha alr. 8 drum set model. $250. great w/children, litter box and food paid, uc, am-fm cassette alarm, cxc. land engine, ps, ph, 0 cyl, automatic, trig, geomn & Cale) Afermoans, 261252-6831. included. 287-3480. cond, $12,500. 286-3895. 1980 Chevy Impala, new brakes a/na dry pd, $3,000/obo 252-2181. 2426 afternoons. fm cass, inns great, $1,200/obo. 287Apple IGS, image writer, scanner Registered ake black American Daewoo Racer 92 exr. cand. alarm, 4498. 1989 Hyundai Excel, r, radio/cass, Bilinual ive-out maid, M-F, gen many programs. $900. 252-6404. racker spaniel for std services. am-fm, ross tinted glass/corrosion automatic, tinted windows, not dty house mark great w/children, flex206-4084. protection, S6,000. 224-3550. 1993 Aerostar, 6 cyl, 7 passengers, pd 284-6171221-2780 Sanyo Betma-needs minor repair .--ps, pb, s2s, tilt, or, rine, amm ross, $40, beta tapes $1 ca. 286-6196. Purebred poodle pups, tails cropped, 1986 Ford Taurs, 5 sp, acm ac, be, tint, $17,900. 284-4897, ask for 1985 Plymouth Voyager minivan, Honest ire-eat maid 5 days a week deformed, black, $150. 221-3867. bat, its, dty pd, pw, ps, Rod/css, cxc Mark. nr brake tires, gt shape, not dty pd, Bilingual n. ironing, $120. 224-2996 RCA praownder camcorder. $400. cond. $7,000. 269-5700. 04,500. 284-4786. ask for Denise. 224-2996. 223-7111 rm. 124. Seal-point Himalayan-Persian, -1972 Chevy Nova, classic, ar, ps, mote for stud service, cfa reg, 1990 Nisstn truck, costam 600 walt new tires, great shape, $2,300. 2601990 Ford Tempo, needs body work, Bilingual, maid, cooks and cleans, Macintosh B1 8/80, gb manaor ext proven. 289-4354. stereo, 5-star wheels, rastem int, mir3270. 4 dr, 4cyl, ps, pd, ac, automatic, tintgood w/kids. lire-oat. 260-7754. keyboard, modem, printer, $2,000. ror tint, $10,000. 287-5582. --ed windows, $3,000/oba. 27-14428. --American bull dog, 2 months old, alt 1992 Chevy S-10 p/n, 5 spd, ra, p Reliable day maid excellent cook, shots, excellent bloodline 262-0732, PCSing, $1.200. firm 1900 Capri ins ph, om-fm/cass, $8,600. 286-3b92. 1989 Ford Ranger XTL, a, ps, am/ honest, good w/kids 286-4571 ONES w/many etr$100, games great sell by Joly 20 h235866 --fa cans, 4 cyl, camper shell, make $25 ca JVC n 150. Timbec -o1f, 4 yen old, houetrained, W056228 LV msg 235-5866. 1988 Buick Skyhaik, pse, runs offer that can't be refused, $6,500. Experience babysitter and or Bw good s/children, include carrier good, $2,000. 27-3204. 284-5792ar hdre at h PB 4865x 25 3 r, ith los o and alt equipment. $200. 289-3640. 1987 Ford Tenpo, auto ac, 4dr, -----0 ----2 4 ------house. 284-5127 207-3690. burgandy interior, exterior good 1985 Toyota p/a, double cab, 4dr, 4 1904 Buick Skyhiwk station wg, ngtish-spk maid to wxrk 1-2 dys Sony stereo w/rd ptuyer. 450. 2053 yr old, ka reg., malt. rottile tor cond. $4,000/obo. 286-6378, pd, diesel eng, ac, an/fan stero, wdr, pwr str, auto, aic rand, one .wn45 S pe / l 1 2 sale, grat match dog, $400. 294-dty pd, $6,500. 236-3099 er, clean, ow miles, melt maintained, weekly ref Mon and wed Panama 4 S wn rm. 3993. 1991 Ford Explorer 4x4, like new $4,500. 227-1777. area 224-7521^ Quasar tn/ncr monitor $450 aba. 205amnd. 287-3627. 1993 Jeep Cheroke Grand Laredo, 458ss -.l S AKC rottweiler puppies, available -.od., low miles, full-time, 4wd, 1907 ldsnobile Cutlass Calais, new Honest, dependable, Bilingual live4538 c. Lowe rm. 11. July 30,7 mates and 2 females, 1986 Toyota Minivan, model f, at/at 5 year Wrrany, many extras, trans, Ores & battery, power windows otmd. great h infants. 24ne and 220 v $600. 284-3993 ps, pl, pm, sr, pb, good cond, $6,000/ $23,900/abo. 286-3381. w/tint, $3,500. 284-3379. 5878 ask for Julie. Eo nodags, mixer. hbo, dty paid. 224-4190, -----o, -adptars,, f2, mis Pitbull/rottweiler mix pups, 2 1982 VW p/u, diesel, mns & looks 1990 Ford Tauros station wagon, Bilingual anaid good children 10.260-2957. months old, mate tnd female, cal 1907 GMC 4x4, aato, ttnper shell gre, many new pans, not dly paid, $6,500/obe. 1989 Ford Ranger p/u '.oks and clean Mon-Fri. 260P 286+comp w/ 4ram so -war, call opcrattrc, $125, 250-0311, tn/fm cans. new shoks and brakes $2,900. 223-0962 $4,800/oba. 207-3829 7754 much more. $900. 260-2957. $5,600 232-4627. ---75 ../. 4 yr old TB gelding, English ined, 1993 Dodge Dakota LE, per cab, 194 Saba a 4pd d pk d d o Hitachi 20' or t w/reo 225. good jmper prospect, needs expe1986 Taur, dty pd, cxc. rend., new 4s4, r-8, anti-ock brakes, leaded, gage raek, ac, am/fn as, duty free kids honest reliabe 0r 2 3649 228-2754. rennced xder, $1,000/aba. 284 6693. at, pwn everything, $7,000/neg. 269brush goard, rampee sbell, under $3,250. 264-4612 B ga ry ad 3d & Large kenel for dog. 75 2079630 5700. -5 7 105000 miles, $19,000. 206-3085 dk a nas8& k Conodae 120 a/dot mar,-. and --1984 Dodge Daytoa, I spt engine d ,dirunng, cei, & much mtore. 207-3774. 1979 Chevy Caprice. gaod cond., 1993 Nissan, 4dr, a/, an/fa radio, overhnaoed. ac. good co a kd 9 07-li Siberian husky puppits. 4 teaat & $2,300/aba. 12,3110/ab. 269-9363 xe. rand. $5,600. 236-3099. interior, available Aug 15, $4,000 25' RCA t/sap $375. 286-3388. 4 inales, 4/papers wnks ntd, $300. ----------207-3709. 284-361 after 4:30. 1977 Chrysler New Yorker, good 1986 Audi 5000, duty pd, dealer ser--RCA 25' tn. wn/statd $250. nr-vhs 4 atnd., new front brakes, starter and viced, e cand., $6,500. 223-0962. 1993 Ford Thunderbird LX, loaded, had 250, gas stoe+grill S375. 223Prnots, different ,ypts sold to ap It, $1,300. 286-4171. --i-v6, tinted wind s 9865. proved193 LTD Cro Victoria, ac. good $13,500. 24306, 3799 1992 Jeep Wrangler, 40L fuel injecrunning condition, not dty paid, avail-It0tex romp. and rats 284 an, l8k mites, spar rims, carpeting, able July 23, $2,000. 286-6384. 1985 Ford Mustang 3,500 284. r 95. b a .$200. 287-3441. $12,000. 269-6089. --5520.its Toyola dl b 1992 Hyandai Scnt GL, 1.Oi one ---------38 sx 20 4 meg. 130 mg. tord drive Automobiles 986 Jeep Chennkee 4 d, 4wd fully omner, wdrs, 5sp, ar. tinted, dty pd, 1904 Brick $kyhaw many more. $900. 205-6070 ml oaded standard transmission, stoos. 221-6457. agon 4dr, autat, p 10. $7,500/oo. 2464 ng, one o, lean, rgg or open water ihg 9 y 1979 GMC Jimmy 4x4, at, an/fm trained, lam miles, $4,500. 264-7314. _879t) Sony Camcorder hi-8 stereo loaded 199!,Grand Voyager, luxury edition, 1987 Chevy Subrn. 4-md, dual a, cans, hfed, exc. cond. $3,500. 284-----.$1,250 Segt CD $225. 206-4084. ac/al, Ion milage, cx road, $10,200 auto trans, arm tites, low milage, dty 4095 1990 Toyota Corolla, or, 5 spd. 05,000 23 Aaalapni boat w/94 Eniarade 207-6233. pd, xc. cond., $10,900. 252-5397 mi, great condition, 58,500. 236175 hp._w/rxtras. 512500 22243. 27 JVC coltr tv. m/remole. $400. 1986 Chevy Nova, 5-spd, a-,an/fm 2794 .Nintendo w/games $95. 284-6491. 1992 Dodge Rain, W250 p/h 5.9 1985 Nissan 200SX, tint, stereo, ac, 5 cass, tw, exc. cond., $5,400. 287-----------Ahtminum trader for to 12 foot commins turboitercooled diseI speed, ps, good running nd.3044. Will trade 1990 Eso LX pkdin boat or jet ski. $225. 252-2243. Co impact d player, dual cass. amlo mileageexcond many xtras, $2,500. 230-1618. -St Lois for car here 262-7278 fm 0 a nel .m ry. 2 pkrs., re$17,000. 286-4772 1991 Chevy, 5-spd, low ailage, an/ --l---d-----ine, g cond. $125. 204-3977. .2 -1987 Jeep Wrangler, 6 cyl. 4.d, 5 spd, fan rtdio, $9,000. 287-3270 1979 pontiac Gran Leman d pd E iPstroars 1907 ford Mercury XR4TI pow eccxc. rand., $7,000/obo. 282-4523. --inns good, ps, ph, S ,000 284-3940cc Pa .m movie ca273 rder0w 194 M r qi ---1 --c. $650 287-34. orybh g. sf t duty 2Id-, $5,500/ 1987 Ford Taurus GL, htlly loaded. ac, p, pw, ps, like new in, $4000. 1906 Toyota Celira GT coup, 'sp, 4 Gameby w/12 gayin a 4-play $6,000. 287-4193. 284-4525. 'cyl, c. am. ete power p n i h by carry Smith Corona word prssar 800011 s tnroof m e5,000 28-62 a much more $350 skomode 3. disk drivemcb 1985 Jeep Cherokee, 4dr, 4x4,5 spd. 1991 Catlass Supreme, pwt eney1992 Pontiac frand AM IE, 2dr, -ob. 27-4546. mir. $253. 207-5392. ps/ph, ims, alarm, radic/cass, tinted, thing, ac, snrI, crus. ots tore, as9, abs. a, tit, at/fm cans, nrw 1905 Vatvo 740 DI wagan, e csnd, d1, paid. $6,500. 287-5167. $11,500/abo. 206-6136. tites, St2,00/neg. 283-4472. -e ner, $4,950. 706-4767. Unused K enwoad pamer and ranSonper nendo in 2 controller. super

PAGE 27

C__# assified Aies11 Ads July 15, 1994BJPl ma-o world._$65. 287-3073. Whirlpool refrig. GE miIrowave, indian boner bow 50 lb. pull 38 is. Lace wedding dress wveil & head $1,500/obo. 207-4738 Qrs 607A Howard. 7om-1llm romp. table. plants. 252-1104. draw, w/ S arrow qoinor & carrying piece, sz med. S575. 230-0227. Sega Goresis w/aotrollor, snd sosir ---case $125. 287-3639. 1985 Honda 100 XL, good cond, new Qtrs. 446D Kobb, Fri-Sat. rhe hedgehog game. $65. 287-3073. Kenomor heavy duty washor+dryer. -Sopor Allon olmin .m rariog bike, rear ,ire, 2 hlmels $500. 252-0971 ex. cord. $800/.b. 287-3291. Four Pirelli tires, 215/60 R 15,2 .os. 23" x 23", 18 speed w/rew av000 sh for Rirhard. Qtrs. 206A Albrook, 7-0im. RCA 26'1.v. m/ oniversd remo .-old, like new $350. 252-2093 after 6 $450. 227-6506. 1993 aha DT, dy pd, 01,400. Qrs 7 Alhrok, 7:30-I 30. 5350. 286-4737. Love seat, beige ors for trop p. Y7 T ,: qrs. sall soit, Pi oneer spkrs. 230Baby clothes, t-shirls, sleepers, Il 252-5397. Cyr, 7-9 Amign comp. 1m am, s 1927. A3 maisne/upside down machine $70/ohs, monitor $20, crib light $0. 19r Hds moyr 7cm -300. drive, aao i rne.$ 0 .2 6 -------$50. 284-4724. 28 6-3778 1 8 o d oo c oe 3 0 457, pasoic printer. 0500. 200 DR. set, h, st. 252-1104. 050.--------4. --3---287-3582. Qirs. 4082D Howard, 7.10 Cup coffee maker $10, 90 scare Baby clothes for girl, newborn tho MS lmOUS $40, WP 6.0 $95, M5 A/'s 5000, 6000, 10,000, wg, iling factory baseball card sets $10/es. 8 was, shoes, bumper crib, ar sea 1991 Yamahla 50 ce, avail. July 19. Qtrs. I 10B Albrook, 7am-noao. project for windows. $150. 282-4225. c8biel. 287-5538. 207-3036. caner & cer cover, rto. 287-5974. $300/ohs. 204-3679. QIrs. 72A Howard, 7am-2pm. Citizrn 140-gsx 24 pin, color printer, Daybed w/pillows and cnforler, Baby car soas $45, swing set (paBBQ gas grill, 2 yrs. old, $60, little 1967 Trismph Tiger Cub, reboilt, ro Q662B Howard 8im-12m. 360s360 DPL. $150/obo. 284-6488. exc. cood. $500. 287-344L fo) $85. 226-8116. tyke Tre house $20. 287-5437. pained, wary paris, woke offer. 2803034. 2rs. 154A Howard, 7am-10am. Video camera curtis sallies like Rarran dr, IT, sers. $800, filing fans Fold up crib $00, class A uniform Typewriter, brother AX-20 $75/obo. 1907 Triurpi Tigerrub, $1,700/.D a new. $400. oew wed eter $30. 284m/lighus 070. 226-8116. sire 42 $75. 287 5583. 286-3634. 96 Tr --mp 280-3034. Q2rs. 1556D Howard, 7am. 436.__ Whirlpool upright large frozer, exc. Exercise stepper $45, Mini trmpoLawn slower, 3.5 cubic inch engine YZ 80, Yamh2 1987 dir bike S900 Q5s 859A Clayton, 7-i lam. Ciliren 200gx color printer ec. cad, cond. $650. 287-6182. line $15, Regina carpet steamer $20. $70/obo. 287-5682. -68d $100. 287-4738. 286-6190. d ne c 286 6_96252-6385. 62nd St. Los Angeles Talisman Kenrre dehssmidifer, arm rood. Dining table w/4 chairs $700, Fisher Bldg. (Mary Jane bakery shap) JVC camrardrr w/.r. Saga Ganse $[25/b. 284-6336. Plants for sale 286-3992. Price high chair $55, RCA 26" TV w/ Apt. 92, 8-noon. Gear w/arc. .od games. portable --universal rematr $350. 286-4737. cd. player. 230-051. Metal fsll ti bunkbed $300, King Fish Inder hummingbird TCRID-I Patio Sales Qirs. 628A Clayton, 7-m-raon. sized waler bed $500, maple ceslt $250, child life jacket $12, training Books for Master's Program at UniBrother WP-75. $250. 223-6647. drosers $300, plants. 287-3690. potty $5. 236-2365. versity of Oklahoma. Large boo Qirs. 381B Clayton. $125/obfo. 262-10292 Qtrs. 263B Comex.), by Commnisary, 486 sx 33mhz, 8mb. 260 Mb hd, with A/C's various prices. 252-2287. Baby clothes &.50-2.00 es. bassinel ---7.12. Qirs. 358B Clayton 7am-noon. .$1,800. 26-4909. $30, Disney playpen $35, VCR 13" Craflsmon Scroll saw $100, swing rr 2-4 .Coh h.cd. $200. 284-5726. $160, large lop. plaoss. 287-4592. set $125, Ninendo set 8 tapes $75. Qtrs. 233 Albrook, multiple families, Qrs. 3311B Albroak, 8am-lpm. 8pe. Sanssi stereo system, speak285-4734 0600-" ors. w/ae. $600. 229-3525. Bamboo ir. sel, sofs, 2 chairs, coffee Saircases $30/ea hiking back pock ~ Qirs. 684C Claytontable $400, dr sr1 4 chairs iuble $150. $40, metal deteclar, Sentr heavy Large coffee t1l $100. Evenflo car Qrs. 279B Albroak, Sunday only, 570C Cr Typewriter IBM electric, correct264-6432. duty safe $175. 260-6159. srar $80, Fisher Prie trv swing 9am-? ---. Clayton able, exe. cond. $150. 228-0860. $--244936.' Pris. 4ra6B Clayo :3m-2pm. b,_oeard .15 8 8. c .GE w 1sher/dryer set hvy dty. $850. Huffy 12 speed ladies bike, Madio/ $100. 284Qirs. 1524D Howard, Qrs. 406B Clayton m-0n-n. Kenwsad mv-S speakers, exr. card. 284-4897. vidra graphic equalizer receiver $75 Emrralds, unmounted, 100% cerli-Qirs. 217A Albook, 7am. S200 pain. 286-3775. Hid--bed q-s sfa mrcehing loe. a. abs 287-5994. ---fied $200 ea. plus. 252-5430. Qtrs. 663D Clayton, 7amtlam. SNES w/5 gsmrs and super pad, seat and pillows, exc. cond. $700. New standard encyclopedia 20 vol Klipsch speakers, Brilttaric ecyQirs. 244A Albrook, 7amlam. Qrs 8000 Cla rosm r exc. cond. $250. 287-4_546. 287-4193. __ __ __ w/ 15 extra books & bookese. 287clopedia, CD changer, luronlblr &Kbb, 8-12p. Furniture, book shelves, room 3949. records, car bra for Esrr, mricraQars, 4111 PK, --m screens, toys, books, musch more. 25" Zenith color TV w/ R col, 4 yrs wove island. 284-6682. Qtrs. 1515D Howard, 7am-? 284-3379. -old $350/obo, car cover (never used) Super NES w/ madden 94 $150, BBQ Qirs. 843B Clayton, 6sm-nean. GE dryer, like new. $350/abs. 284$30. 286-6190. kettle $25, Minolta freedom dual 5879. camera $100, 12 op bike $90. 284Qirs._8360 Clayn, 7am-2pm.e iB 5879. Wider weight bench, w/ 110 lbs. but5528, nManage Racker in/podded seal and back, coies & la-pull equipment $150. -Qirs. 615A Howard. ment sxpoolrs 223 0t 427 Gold h Porriogs frind at Fto r $15. 2 4 227-2271 afler 5 pm. Scuba gear; complete, snup, very lk 34 1o028 CT on Pool In. dressing m.286$50, chair $15. 293--4472. -5preasonably priced, said separlly Qirs. 681B Clayton, 7am-I lam. Was dress r sak 34 worst 4331. Md. blue rug 14x18 oxc. ond. $125. Soriboard 6'5" $100. 252-7400. or as set, U.S. divers & Beuchat. 28046-h.2312Cars. 522 Albrook, 7am-non. 286-3674. Clothes, Aiwa lumable $30, Turbo 3 -2s Bobysitter to live-in while I'm TDY -d rpmeics game system & 3 tapes Wedding dros; off-white, pearled Qirs. 356B Clayton, 7-i lam. saod cvrationing, must speak Eng. Ca e nwholike new, $125. gri 202-3689. :n--=2844273 26-116 ---.-------, -----------Qtrs. 5050 Claylan. 1990/94 spools cords, baseball, hasveil, purse, gloves, and shoes, $600. -Honest, reliable, live-out maid w/ Double dresser, 6 drawer with Mirk1990/9, & adss sgl. 24 252-3260. _____ .Qrs. 27C Amador, 7am-noao. res. 230-1927. 5.2 u .uprk fr F re W h ror, is/video, brass bed, small bird k---------b------& sing-l. 284---------15p2 f ezer $700. 2 famps $0 rage. 200-4463. 3089. Century baby swing, ec. card. $20. Qirs. 630A Clayton. Bilingual live-in/out maid, some dool 170 so lkand $300 80 20443 284-5223. laig a f r lbfr dresser andM jcit stand, $300. 286Glf clubs all irons, 1-3-4-5 woods, 24_cleaning. Caro of7 yr. old, befre & 3773. Oyster juice extractor, 2 spd., pulp Y a R $2, Qrs. 1525A & C, 6am. ____ts r school, same choking, refs. storage, easy ha clean. $50/aba. 287Ping P n Overs 286 11 mirowae $286-0270. Maytag w/d, eapvy duty .ge 5083. rug bag $250. 252-1096. small microve $150. 285-6251 ask Qtrs. 549D Clayton, Fri.-Sa._ pacity. $850. 236-0338 C Boo liner D-50 or Mitsubishi p/. I Spe._Ward. #32o6 Ba-b a_6_3_ Mature, honest, bilingual, ors. liveCurains far 3-bdm. rpicl qrs., H o Empire St3. ( 6 ),a' in lady care for amity 284-5476 WhpO, 6 monkhs ad, ike new, 9x12 rse carper. 2264227. s ndrd boa $ 28 box $25. 287-6192. Acoustic guiaF, Yamaha FG-75, 3/ front of Amadar car wash, behind -n--f-f-----._24--$325 236-0338. M cymees w/ e r s 4 size, gsfar kids 075. 286-3634. Balboa police staliOn. Your old aquariums and accessoTwin beds, curpe"s, bicyeies, car M cmera 289-4320. Vaccum cleaner, used, works fine. co cleaner, t.v., stereo, piled plants, ,exc. card. 200. 4/4 Coral diamond engagemnO ring Qirs. 9170 Esivs Pr. La Ba, 7ams -. 287-4178. sables, lamps, cuolsins. 284-5194. Hors x m i bike 0350, & wedding band set, white gold, Ap11am. Live-in maid to clean, cook, iron, Table lamps. 233-3410. LR. set, 4 pieces, $700. rugs, cking Tekos Spectra dive firs, so med. $35 praed $500 will sell fr $375layton 7am-non. care far I yr, aid, w/refs. $130. 252Talam~rps. 233-327-38.Q41020,lasn, -207 chair. 284-6171. after 5 p.m. 280-5820 -2077. Brass bed, king size. $350/obo. 287Medium dsg kennel, like new $20, Qirs. 6408 Las Ris, 7am-10-m. lee machine in good cond. 2863627. Blue s.fo ec. cond. $400/osb. 285u d 12 speed Schinn LeTaur, used very 3192 4772. sni. 14k gold, 9 diands, our. card. little $15 287-4328. QTrs. 2069 Curad., 7am-12. $ectiinai sofa, 4 pieces i/hide abed. .$350/abo. 286-4584. Military Parents of Multiple Club. 252-2180. Blue toddler car bed w/maltress, like DaGirl's 20" Huffy bike $30. 287-3693 Qirs. 576B Howard AFB,_7sm-naan. MiCo onos. 27f MuWpen new. $140 262-1916. D b $ E C Ca mo s. 78 en. GE refigerator 24 cu. fl. GE washer saddle, sz h6 1/2 $450. 284-4700. Girl's clothes, sz 12/16, very good Qirs. 334A Aibroak, 8om-12. Cheap masarcycle holme. 229and dryer. 252-2180. Black+gold ent. cenTer, falu size bed, cond. 235-4890 nightsQrs. 5 Cisyhan. 7am-10:30. 3915. carge carpets. 287-5790. Going so FCC or F$U, sale if ooks Kenmore heavy duty washer/dryer. 286-3992. Tropical furniture, mipvl-i01ad80 0650. 282-4538. Bunk beds, $225, coffe table 040, hr. Pioneer sierra, multi-CD, dbl 1 Qirs. 2610C Cli 8w-3-1-Bilingual, mo2 r live-in C.,aid is ________ ,o_ r $750r 287-4935.M-1a disk $115, crib bumperc god adi/pkes27-4170. Qr.IlACiyo core far 12 yr. aid in Caral, M-F. Cspe5, 287-4935. i-. b-d---and -$10, new Cost Rica hammock $50, yr old w/speakers. 287Q-rs. 1174A Clayton 7am-llam. s-ne weekends. 283-6591 livirgrsom firm. 286-4571. 5,000 bu s/c 0300., 6 drawer dressmicraravo $85. 236-2365. __ Answering machine, G.E. like new Qrs. 1109 Amadar, Fr.-Sal. Spanish guitar, Lional G gunige train, .or $150. 284-3036. $35, ddler's bed, wooden, good for soill bay. 252-1022. Carpets. 13xl.5 ,ff white berbr, Cuouh, Ivscat, Thai, & it r man cond $70. 287-643S. Qrs. 297B Alibroak, 7am-ipm. --slightly used commercial syl. $200. Coffee/end table. 287-3284. $375, Mieoa gulf clubs $300, Fisher --Role-players interested in hrir or pink/while herber never used. $400. -ST 840 speakers, 120 WPC $250, SirBarney saddler's bed set $35, Big Qrs. 051 Farfan, Howard 7anfantasy gaming. AD&D, Rifis, 260-9824. Portable dishwasher, exc cond, per NES & Sega games. 284-6631. Bird tsddler's bed set in/curin $50. 12pm. ,.Clharmpors, Shaduwrn, MOre. 286--------$325. 236-0338. 3 ap ts a nr,3 s a p o M 287-6438. ---_ -_ --_ Ent. center. $80, infant car seat, 0 3 Carper stelmers, 3 shampsa ------------.Qs 247 Albreak 7am-nn. 391. pliant, clashes. 264-4612. Maytag es. large capacity chines, hot water machine, & more. Set of ioes P-195-75 R 15, goad rand, ---18' Sass ar .r .onsa. boaT, 90-115 wasiserdryor. $850. 236-0338. 230-0008 $81 0 287-3335 Qirs. S26A FarFan, 8am1-n1 n. -h p monor, Ir, all in ,c. cid. 204A/c 18000 bill split system nsional. 67 $450. 236-1192. GE scary duty washer/dryer $275 Garbel Black Africsa porcelain igAcaustic guitar, Yaiaha FG-75 3/ Qnrs. 7229B Cardeinas, 7am-liar -a. 28-3398. urinIs ,125/ca. 260-2104. 4 sz, $75/aba. 286-3634. Used vacsrm cleaner, -1he5, boar Solid Oak dMMg em. se .wil 6 chairs itr 620Bl Howard, 7a-aoo. ddle 20-2536 c.Od. $1,550. 286-3743. 2 yr. rauch $i00, bambsa Ic. sri. is. Rack CD's first came firsl sosvs 65,la isb/jacuzzi parry ou, 6'dremog. 284-5678. 6. 221-4977. er/3'dep, gri for personal rbsQs. 63981 Los Ris, 7aMb-nasn. Mton s ell c l i srsobraid goad,. 203/ 5 Or ert---, rs -s-fer. 233-n -----pry plaslie pei si bser jars sw/ 41121. Sas seclional, 3 p. w/2 recciners Rawlings baseball bit $15, Spahing 34k 3 Qirs. 3560 Clayion 7:30a-n.o lids., 282-3320. and hisl, a bc. S751. 236-0597. Tii racr & /rer Qrs. 2241 Bialb-a, 7-10ami. Miliay Iose to drive kids & Sif/ peach 51,0/0. leve soal pouch. 233-1229. -r.m Clayton ool 18 Jul.-11 Aug $800 264-0695 Aniiue rusnk-1905I, cl. se, lable, -Ad. f 6o 7710 pe 7 JA dsk, pi/s, far, Tric! 269-3664. E ecise bike, like slew $75. 206 Qtrs.c73A hard, Ilwurd SI. $ilI 269-7711 uer 7 pm. Kig sie miatress, box spring frame. G------Live-in sraid, Eg-spk, reliable, $1,10. 289-6564. GE feree, lri cu 0., frisi lrce,ned------6-charging. $l00/obo. 252-260. I1R se, c nrpels, en's werddg Qirs. 2141B Ancon Sim -lpm. gnd l/pets, sm wkend seq 282Caich lov seas, chair., vry gid bN sd, brand new s II. 294-4927 ia StrIngD 4Kal/iaki w1/licliel & ond. $950. 287-4788. o r -lingisual id Io watch 8 yr. old & 984 Honda C2K 7%0c w/2 hlmeQrs. 943A I-, Bocal, 7-1la Iima S150 pIM-. 260-1128. Living m. set. brown n/vinyl crsis-4 iressr 185/70 ht 13, $15ca. Oile os. $200. 264-2342 28-6338. --Sony sIcrei sysmn w/cab. $450. Yellaw-head parr., lost in Te gaeBaby aiIlker $25, c/se scsi I15, Ir 264-2342. wayI~ Irea 1532e. 204-0599. 24 Ia 40 lb. bawling ball $10, Tandy c2iMp 01180. 287-5736. Tropic Times Ad Form 8pc. living rm. se, and Spc. ding -li--h em. sri 0500. 84-4989 ---6'0" Sypensrss ssribiardoews esch /ANML m.s $50. 284-4989. Miscel& bicard ba included 0300. '5'3 beds, queer, double, I c/bin bed, 6971 [ AUTOMOHILES refig. and fecer, Isis mare. 261-oi AVAILABlE 9605 Air cndiiiner 1,051 BTU $Lll/cbo I BOATS & CAMPERS Sega Genesis games 025/ca, golf bci 254-4772. wn/irad c rs $s-ns 225/c-, EO]ic gulf ---] ELECTRONICS PRICE HOMI PHONE 2pm. secrians beige. 0400. 204-3520. shsAr 8 1/2 men's. 287-4426 aftye 5 Jenny Lind rih 70, child rocker ] OUND Safui, iuur ,swlsi /b isu e /grsy pin. $20. 287-3689 HOUSEHOLD Check 'irly sac ceuicgory per ad form. Orly to Lids per person each avers ufled, like new. 60/1. 2692, -LOST sock ar ill sed. Each ad fisIr is limited 4) IS vcrds. Pleise type or o"","I~dlikeTo' 600 1920" color T V w/r Itrl N175. 2X4-5093. Lil penhinfant comELANOU forfit aerti 5700. -p d/, t, 'all hanging, M I SCELLANEUS pr ealy. I nsiaisn ]scd beirw is nto inuded it the iS, huh is Gairde pLins 296 3587 birder from J.C. Peany curalosig 81/ MOTORCYCLES iciUsired Icr plblicali/c. This mifrmairn win li Ice r ilesd 1), ,a hird I)inig rle, T iak desk, ond tables, for se, 287-3689. PATIO SALES paries. e/idlirc fr lie -rcipt if Iads cs 9 a.r. Monday Io hridy's mis farm. 287-6233. Tsin bed. dresss. icghi fl, s'A, ,id l, c'f/e l .u .dintcie, Qce/i ci c soul re, 4 pIll-e h isanish 1.0. sIi. 2 cAiis, sal aide. siecei. 252-Il/4 ck/r/ 2 ei slihe is. plicir SI[/ udii Ad/ y iled r the /rI imcs. Lft 0936, APO AA $25/. 260-5682 itbc 27,ii/i/9 340012 r ep icid in a drip bux at lhe Alcs-k [', icc, O ,. Ads neome Of me 9ireOok/2/ lifering saponrrs or slt hy FAX will nf be run. 3p. odi $900, gliccc 2X 11k I0,. ie beg Scal 1,ilihlec drec, iwaierbe, 2lc/ i W oode patis furn. 50, curia/4s, foSpai ccck 94/I al cur 'CC. 207 bais--m /ei, capeCsc fe/ri//ic la SPONSCR'S NAM RANK/GRAE uigs. 204-5234. 6I1. bckcc. hesi cc/ics 260-2445, ORG UT'Y PiHfNEi LIZ $300, fierr/l Ir. 0750. boOkcas, Ruind rip licks Miicii ci Ucies askbill hop. gi/al, 0ie & pcle. ORY rip. 223-9865. Airlines, apan dalec $250 284-30i 0,ew p.d Sl/I /ell for $5, 284-3799

PAGE 28

B Tropic Timecs io p u r B12 July151994otpourri Employment Cunw filet. To eat lighter, meals of chicken marinata, pasta, shrimp vin blans or Shrimp Taboga are also available. HOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-171, DD 214 ouarry Heights Mexican night and Texas barbecue ribs 5:30-8:30 p.m. if claiming veteran preference, a copy of college Q r Wednesdays. All-you-can-eat soft tacos. Fajitas, ribs or fish transcripts if claiming eduation and a copy of *Officers' Club: are also available. CASP notice of rating if applicable. Submit a copy Breakfast buffet is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays Seafood lover's special 5:30-9 p.m. Fridays and Saturof latest SF-50 if you are a Federal employee. and 8-10 a.m. Saturdays. days. Enjoy an array of appetizers and main entrees of shrimp For more information regarding Army vaOld fashioned steak night 6-10 p.m. Tuesdays and and fish. cancy announcements (forms required, job reThursdays. Choose cut of beef to be charbroiled. Bang up barbecue daily in the Breezeway, dine-in or late criteria, etc.), visit the Directorate ofCiviltake-out. Enjoy the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or hot wings. ian Personnel, Building 560, Room 102, Corozal, Club Amador New family menu Tuesdays and Fridays featuring all the or call 285-5201. All-you-can-eat lunch buffet, $3.95 Fridays, featuring past favorites plus new items such as jerked chicken, hand *Note: One-on-one employment counseling soup, salad, selection of entree, special return rights. made 1/2 pound hamburgers, baked ravioli and more. should be the first step in the job search. Sunday brunch features the Ballet Folklorico Panameno For events or catering, call 284-4189. at noon. *Howard Enlisted Members' Club Ballroom: Samba Tres 5-11 p.m. Fridays throughout July. Disco Jet 9 p.m.-I a.m. today. SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE: Positions at Friday night disco 9 p.m. Fridays. NM-5 level and above require specialized experiClayton Bingo is back 3 p.m. Sundays with early-bird bingo at ence. Specialized experience is either education 2:45 and 6:30 p.m. Tuesday with early-bird bingo at 6:15. above the high school level or work experience *The Loop: Membership night 6:30 p.m. July 23. Enjoy food, fun directly related to the position being filled. ExamCJ's Sports Bar offers daily lunch specials 1:30 a.m.-l and jazz at the Enlisted Members' Clubs, free for members. ple: Budget positions at or above the NM-5 level Sundays. For special functions, call 284-4189. required Budget experience or equivalent educaPrizmz Night Club features a variety of music Wednes+Howard Enlisted Members' Club Casual Cove: tion. days-Saturdays to include jazz 5 p.m. Sundays. New country 8 p.m. to closing Fridays. Vacancy announcements are also available at For events or parties at the Prizmz Night Club or the Country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. Wednesthe Sundial Recreation Center. CJ's Sports Bar, call Sonia, 287-4716 or send a fax 287-4343. days in the Casual Cove. Learn the latest in line dancing, the The Army civilian personnel office accepts +NCO Club: stomp, waltz and others. Music will be until midnight. applications on a continuous basis for the Casa Maria will hold a taco eating contest today. The fee Night mug special Wednesdays. Buy a mug filled with following positions. These announcements are is $8. There will be prizes for the winner and runner-up. your favorite draft beverage & refills. used to establish registers for permanent and Domino championship match today in the Underground Karaoke 7 p.m. Sundays, 8 p.m. Tuesdays. Lounge. Saturday and Monday nights disco 5 p.m.-1 a.m. temporary future vacancies. Rock 'n' roll golden oldies 5-8 p.m. Tuesdays; 5 p.m.Albrook/Howard midnight Thursdays. VB# 001 General Clerical, NM-3(Used to fill most clerical *Albrook Club: Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursdays. Bring you position), cardoo YoCusleursettown vs O001A General Clerical, NM-4 (Used to fill most Mini gourmet 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. The menu includes card. You must be present to win. clerical position). petite scampi, aparagus soup, tomato and cucumber salad, *Top Three Club: VB# 002 Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Intermittent wk sch) watermelon sorbet and a choice of breast of chicken Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesdays. Free all-you-can-eat. Monterrey or medallions of tenderloin bernaise or scampi Club card drawing 6-7:30 p.m. Thursdays. CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is required. Milano, all served with vegetables and coconut a ]a Case Karaoke 6 p.m. Fridays. flambe Club closed Saturdays. VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) Requires Steak night 6-9 p.m. Friday. Choose from rib eye, K.C. *Howard Officers' Club: Cert +6 mo recreation exp in the field. It's prime time 6-9 Fridays and Saturdays. Enjoy the VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Req 6 mos recreation strip, filet or prime rib. Dinner comes with vegetable, baked exp in the field. potato, French fries or rice. prime rib special. VB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5 Fiesta de mariscos 6-9 p.m. Saturdays. The seafood feast Super social hours 5 p.m. Fridays. Come and eat at the VB# 005A Secretary (Stenography), NM-6 platter features broiled corvina, stuffed crab, calamari rings, complimentary buffet and enjoy music and dancing all night VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5 peel-and-eat shrimp, a choice of potato or rice, cole slaw and long. VB# 006A Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-6 vegetables dujour. A la carte menu available. Game nights & progressive club card drawing 7 p.m. h o Mongolian barbecue 6-8:30 p.m. Monday. Prepare your Wednesdays. Play pool or darts with a $2 entry fee, winner Intermittent, plate, choose the meat, vegetables, seasonings, oils and have takes all, club matches pot. chefs do the job outside on the open grills. Dining room is closed Sunday and Wednesday nights. VB# 007 ** MEDICAL OFFICER, NE 12/13/14. Sunday champagne brunch 10 a.m.-l p.m. in the dining The club is closed Sundays. VB# 008 ** CLINICAL NURSE, (RN license required), room offers breakfast from cooked-to-order omelets, French New lounge menu available Mondays-Saturdays. NM-9/10/11. toast, hot lunches, salad and fruits, peel-and-eat shrimp, desFor events or catering, call 284-3718. VB# 009 **PRACTICAL NURSE, (LPN licence required), serts and ice cream bar. NM-5 Mexican night buffet Thursdays includes tgcos, fajitas, Rodman **Selectees for nurse and medical officer position will be taco salad and sopapillas for dessert. +Rodman Club -open to all ranks required to undergo a background check. Country western night Thursdays with free dance lesAll-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.-l sons at 7:30 p.m. Learn the two-step, line and couples dancp.m. Mondays-Fridays. The following positions will be CLOSED until further notice es, the waltz, the cha cha and the swing. Country western Soup and sub night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays. Grill menu music 9-11 p.m. is also available. VB# 010 Manual Positions, MG-2 Get jazzed 7-10 p.m. today and July 29 in the lounge and All-you-can-eat spaghetti 4:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Vl 012 Manual Positions, MG.4relax to the music by recording artist Lowell Hopper. Grill menu is also available. VB# 013 Manual Positions, MG-5 Rock & reggae 7-10 p.m. July 22 live in the lounge to Cook-your-own steak night 4:30-8:30 p.m. Thursdays VB# 014 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-6 the sounds of Rip Maynard. at the Rodman Bohio. VB# 015 MotoF Vehicle Operator, MG-7 For events or catering call 286-3557/3582. Fine dining 6-9 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays. VB# 016 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-8 +Howard Enlisted Members' Club: Upstairs Bar 4:30-8:30 p.m. Sundays-Thursdays; 6-9 VB# 018 Supply Technician, NM-5 Sunday breakfast buffet 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. An assortp.m. Fridays-Saturdays. VB# 018SA Supply Technician, NM-6 ment of breakfast foods are available in the dining room. Social hours & hors d'oeuvres, 3:30-11 p.m. Fridays at Breakfast is served 6-9:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays; 7:30 the Laguna Lounge and Rodman Bohio. The following are limited to permanent status employees a.m. Saturdays. Dinner is served 6-9 p.m. Mondays-Sundays. only. Italian night 5:30-8:30 p.m. Thursdays with Alfredo or *Rodman Annex: VB# 017 Administrative Services Assistant, NM-5 seafood fettuccini, lasagna, pasta mixta or pasta and shrimp Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Mondays-Fridays. VB# 017A Administrative Services Assistant, NM-6 in a white wine sauce. A la carte menu is available. All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.Steak night special 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesdays in the din1:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays. VB# VACANCIES TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 07ing room. Select a cut and order a New York strip, rib eye or The club is closed for evening and weekend service. 15-94 CLOSE: 07-26-94 Pacific 373-94-ES Health Systems Specialist, NM-671-l. USA MEDDAC. Limited 10 MEDDAC/DENTAC permanent C FM s h d l employees, however applications for Tenip Nte: 30 Sep 94, will be accepted from all sources. U.S. license required. Southern CommandNetwork 79pm Urban Music with Don 374-94-NC Quality of Life Coordinator, NM-301-9. DCA/ Diamond FM radio airs 91.5 PaTracy and LaRita 9-9:30am Cross Currents, FSD. cific and 98.3 Atlantic on the FM Shelby Christian rock idial with liveDiamond FM shows 9:-11pm Diamond FM Rock 9:30-10am Love On The Rock, 375-94-NC Social Services Assistant (Office Automation), a 5an 11an.3pm.we-Block -album rock popular music/inspiraNM-186-6. USAG-Panama, DCA. at 5 and 11 a.m., 3 p.m week topar talk days; 9 a.m., 4 and 9 p.m. SaturIlpm-5am Unistar Adult Rock tional talk 377-94-NC Material Handler, MG-6907-7. Sensitive. USAGdays 10lam2 the Countdown MagaPanama, DOL/Supply Div., Driver's license required. Limited -zin -Christian music to veteran preference eligibles. Saturdays 11-noon All That Jazz -Classical and Contemporary Jazz 379-94-ES Accounting Technician, NM-525-6. DCSRM, 9am-Noon Diamond FM Saturday Noon-4pm American Country F&AO Div. 5-9am Diamond FM morning Morning Music Countdown 382-94-MW Supervisory Contract Spcialist, NM. 10212. crew, music and laughs Noon-4pm American top 40 4-7pm Dick Clark Rock, Roll Sensitive. Temp Nie I yr. USAG-Ppana, DOC, C-o-12. 9:05-1lam Country Musicw/Gene 4-6pm Diamond FM "Canal and Remember, oldies Price, Harry Newman Country" 7-8pm Specialty Shows -rock ( -()C-94 Clinical Nurse, NM-610-9. USA MEDDAC. Dept I lam-1pm Diamond Cafe -oldies 6-7pm The House of Blues artist interviews and of Nursing. Litmited to MEDDAC/DENTAC permnent request, 287-4512 7-9pm The Countdown -urban music) emtployees, however appliwotions for Temp Nte: 301 Sep 94, will.reus,27427-p heC nton-rbnuic bem pted row apl iourcs. U.r Tieemtse3reqtire p9. s-3pm Unistar adult rock contemporary hits 8-9pm King Biscuit Flower 3-6pm Diamond FM "After 9-11pm Diamond FM "Quiet Hour (live rock concert) Atbijiie noon Cartunes," music Storm" -mellow urban 9-11pm Dr. Deimento, comedy 38(-94-S Pharmacy Technician, NM-661-5. Temrp Ne: 30 & fun music music Sp 94. USA MIIlDDAi. 1i. Shei,,n -7pnn Chrlio Ttna II pot Uniser adutl rock II pr Unisar adult rock