Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text





Tift of the Panama Canal Museam


Tropic T

Ouarry Heights, Republic of Panama


times


Friday, June 17, 1994


~- -


- -.. -.~


U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Eric Hortin
Soldiers from the 128th Aviation Brigade prepare two CH-47 "Chinook" helicopters to provide disaster relief assistance to victims of an earthquake
in Colombia.


U.S. troops aid earthquake victims


QUARRY HEIGHTS (USSOUTHCOM
PAO) - At the request of the Colombian
government through the U.S. Embassy, the
U.S. Southern Command dispatched ur-
gently needed disaster relief supplies to
Colombiaovertheweekend. SOUTHCOM
also deployed two CH-47 "Chinook" heli-'
copters and 37 soldiers from its Army com-
ponent to provide assistance in the wake of
the disaster caused by mud slides following
the earthquake June 6.
Early Saturday morning, a shipment of
132 rolls of plastic sheeting and 700 five-
gallon collapsible water containers, weigh-
ing about 20,600 pounds, was airlifted by a
C-130 "Hercules" aircraft from Howard
AFB to Neiva Airport, 150 miles South-
west of Bogota.
The 325,000 square feet ofplastic sheet-
ing is being used to provide temporary
shelter for 1,000 homeless persons.
Since their arrival Sunday, the two "Chi-


nooks" have flown about three missions
each per day. During these missions, they
have transported 276,000 pounds of cargo
such as medical supplies, food, water, shel-
ter material and clothing; as well as 140
passengers from areas that were inaccessi-
ble by other means.
The supplies and assistance were re-
quested by Paul Bell, regional advisor for
the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance
under the U.S. Agency for International
Development, and approved by the Depart-
ments of State and Defense after U.S. Am-
bassador Morris Busby declared a state of
disaster June 9.
Following coordination by SOUTH-
COM's J4/Logistics Directorate, the sup-
plies were withdrawn from the OFDA-
owned disaster relief stockpile stored at
Rodman NS and transported to nearby
Howard AFB by U.S. Army South person-
nel. There, the materials were prepared


onto five pallets and loaded by airmen with
the 640th Air Mobility Support Squadron
into a U.S. Air Force Reserve C- 130 aircraft
from Chicago here on rotational duty.
Shortly after having returned to Panama
Saturday afternoon, the same aircraft air-
lifted an advance party of eight soldiers
(aviators, communication specialists and
fuel handlers) to Colombia to make ar-
rangements for the main body of29 soldiers
who deployed Sunday morning on two
CH-47 helicopters and a C-130 aircraft
along with equipment.
The Tandem-rotor, medium lift Chi-
nooks and aircrews are from USARSO's
128thAviationBrigade, based at Fort Kobbe
and adjacent Howard AFB. The task force
includes key support personnel in the areas
of weather forecasting, air traffic control,
civil-military operations, medical special-
ists and security.
The mission of the deployment is to


augment the efforts of the Colombian gov-
ernment by providing personnel evacua-
tion, relief, and medical supply transporta-
tion.
The airport at Neiva serves as the staging
point for relief supplies that are being air-
lifted to the affected areas by helicopter.
The affected region is isolated after bridges
and roads in the areas were destroyed.
The earthquake, which measured 6.7 on
the Richter scale, hit near Cali in southern
Colombia at about 8:27 p.m. June 6, caus-
ing a mud slide at El Huila. The mud slide
caused a blockage of the river which con-
tributed to subsequent flooding.
As of June 9, the Colombian Red Cross
had reported 253 dead, 116 injured, 600
missing, and some 5,200 homeless.
The search for missing residents contin-
ues.
The task force will return to Panama
upon completion of its mission.


Civilian loses limbs during


medical evacuation mission


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -A U.S. civilian
sustained serious injuries during a medical evacuation
mission in Panama June 10.
A UH-60 "Blackhawk" helicopter from the 214th
Medical Detachment responded to a request by Pana-
ma's National Air Service to pick up and evacuate Luis
Delgado, 44, from the village of Mulatupo in the San
Bias Islands.
Delgado, who was visiting the San Blas Islands, was
reportedly suffering from gastritis and internal bleed-
ing.
Once the helicopter arrived at the village, the air-
craft's crewchiefkept children and villagers away from
the helicopter for safety reasons.
The medic disembarked and went to a small clinic
where he made contact with Delgado, who was instructed


Col. (Brig. Gen. elect) Richard E.
Brown III takes the reigns as 24th
Wing's new commander.


to remain at the clinic while the medic retrieved a litter
from the aircraft.
Initial eyewitness reports said during the rescue,
Delgado disregarded instructions and went to the air-
craft, climbed on the auxilliary fuel tank and onto the
aircraft stowage wing. Subsequently, Delgado threw his
arms and body into the turning rotor blades, sustaining
severe injury to both arms. Medics on the scene provid-
ed immediate life-saving assistance and stabilized
Delgado. The aircraft was shut down and inspected.
Delgado was transported to Gorgas Army Commu-
nity Hospital where he was listed in stable condition.
Doctors were unable to attach the severed limbs.
Delgado's wife flew to Panama after she was contacted
by the U.S. Embassy.
The incident is currently under investigation.


New housing referral policy affects
soldiers seeking off-post residenc-
es.


Airmen rescue


Colombian girl
HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA)- Wing medics and C-
27A Spartan crewmembers came to the rescue of a one-
year-old girl who needed a ride from Araracuara, Colombia
to Leticia, Colombia June 9.
The child suffered from malnutrition and amoebic dys-
entery. Having no electricity and only the most basic of
medical supplies, the one-room jungle hospital she was in
couldn't effectively treat her. Dense tropical forests made
overland transportation impossible, so Air Force medical
evacuation support was requested.
The Joint Rescue Coordination Center here arranged for
aeromedical personnel and equipment to be loaded on a C-
27 that departed Howard at 7:30 a.m. The plane flew into
the remote radar site at Araracuara where the toddler was
waiting.
Upon arrival in Leticia, the child was placed in the care
ofColombian physicians. Nofurtherwordofhercondition
has been received, but she is expected to recover according
to JRCC officials.



*Coronet Oak, Pages 8 & 9.
*+1-228 inactivation, Page 10.
*Scuba Olympics, Page 12.


VOL V H, 11 U. I.#


Va.VILN. 2


V7-1 A7Nn 7TA A





Briefly


2 Tropic Times
June 17, 1994

Missed delivery?
call 269-3220
If you live on a military installation and
do not receive a Tropic Times at your quar-
ters by 8 a.m., call 269-3220.

Correction to June 10
Tropic Times issue
The headline for the 193rd Infantry Bri-
gade (Light) farewell ceremony (Tropic
Times issue, June 10, 1994) was incorrect.
The brigade did not case its colors during
the ceremony. The unit will case its colors
in a ceremony in October.

License plate deadline
extended to June 30
Because of delays in the processing of
the Vehicle Registration Certificates, the
Directorate of Land and Traffic Transpor-
tation of the government of Panama has
announced the extension of the period to
purchase the 1994 license plates to June
30.

Job Assistance Center
needs career counselor
The Army Career and Alumni Pro-
gram's Job Assistance Center is looking
for an experienced career counselor. Ap-
plicant must have Master's degree in coun-
seling, Human Resources, Training or as-
sociated discipline. Computer literary and
knowledge of Word Perfect is required.
Must spread, read and write English. Flu-
ency in oral and written Spanish is pre-
ferred. For information, call 2874040.

Some customer services
change repair hours
Customer service calls for repair of
washers, dryers, dishwashers and garbage
disposals will be responded to by the Di-
rectorate of Engineering and Housing
contractor, Badelag, S.A., 7 a.m.- 4 p.m.
Monday through Fridays only. Call 285-
4150/4491/5588/5758.

Personnel reviews done
for sergeant major board
Personnel Qualification Reviews are
being conducted from now until June 24 at
the enlisted records section, Building 519.
The PQRs are being held for command
sergeant major selection, promotion to ser-
geant major, resident Sergeants Major
Course and Quality Management Program
Selection board to be held Sept. 13. For
information, call 287-4658.

Building 519 service
limited June 30
Personnel and Finance Services at
Building 519, Fort Clayton will be limited
because of the U.S. Army Garrison Sports
Day, June 30.

VFW holds meeting
6 p.m. Tuesday
The Department of the Panama Canal,
Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United
States will hold an administrative meeting
6 p.m. Tuesday at Post 3822, Ancon. All
department and post officers are requested
to attend. All members may attend.

Job search seminars
in Spanish set for July 20
Job Search Seminars in Spanish will be
held July 20. Seminars are available at the
Army Career and Alumni Program Job
Assistance Center for qualified Depart-
ment of the Army Panamanian civilian
employees. Learn how to find employment
information, write a curriculum vitae,


practice networking and conduct a suc-
cessful job interview. For information, call
287-5844.

Association sponsors
luncheon Tuesday
The Armed Forces Communications
and Electronics Association Luncheon
will be 11:30 a.m. Tuesday at Club Ama-
dor. A vendor's exposition will be held
displaying the latest in communication
and automation equipment. For informa-
tion, call 287-6819.

Air Force corrects
foreign language pay
Some Air Force members receiving
foreign language proficiency pay will see
their June 1 pay reduced.
Because of a computer programming
problem, the entitlement was erroneously
stopped in May for about 2,500 people,
according to officials at the Military Per-
sonnel Center, Randolph AFB, Texas.
Officials corrected the problem for
some members; however, others will see
a $200 to $400 reduction in pay. Those
people will get their money starting with
their June 15 paychecks.
Members who face financial hardship
because of this problem should contact
their local military finance office or the
Air Force Aid Society for assistance.

Medical squadron
holds parenting class
The 24th Medical Squadron's Family
Advocacy Outreach Program will sponsor
a parenting class for mothers and fathers
who have children between 6 and 12 years
old. Classes will be held Tuesday, Thurs-
day and June 28, and 30, and July 5 and 7
in Building 850, the Albrook Youth Cen-
ter.
Parents will learn about child develop-
ment, management of challenging behav-
ior, and methods for increasing a child's
self-esteem.
Attendees should reserve their place in
the three week class by calling 284-6410/
6457 before Monday.

July 4 vendors signups
begin Monday at Clayton
Arts and crafts vendors interested in
participating in Fourth of July activities
must sign up at Building 519, Fort Clay-
ton, Room 355. Registration begins Mon-
day. Call 287-5347 for information.

Corozal bookstore
changes operating hours
The Corozal Stars and Stripes Book-
store has changed its operating hours to 10
a.m.-7 p.m. Monday through Saturday and
10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday.


8:40am B757 Howard AFB
Atlanta IAP (C)
Charleston SC, IAP

Wednesday
5:40am C130 Howard AFB
Managua, Nicaragua (CC)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Howard AFB

Thursday
5:40am C141 Howard AFB
San Jose, Costa Rica
Guatemala City, Guatemala
(CC, 0)
Belize City, Belize
Howard AFB

7:55am C5A Howard AFB


Pre-retirement meeting
set for 9 a.m. June 27
A pre-retirement orientation will be
held 9 a.m. June 27 at the conference room
in Building 520, Fort Clayton. The orien-
tation is for people who are retiring within
the next six months. For more information,
call 287-6417.

Officer candidate board
to be held July 15
An Officer Candidate School board
will be held 9 a.m. July 15 at Building 519,
Fort Clayton. Applications need to be
turned into Building 519, Room 51 no lat-
er than July 6. For more information, call
287-6313/6655.

Boy Scout camp needs
volunteer support staff
The Panama Canal District of the Boy
Scouts of America needs volunteers to act
as program and support staff during its up-
coming summer camp.
The program staff includes archery
range and waterfront directors, and the
support staff includes kitchen cooks and
medical personnel.
Scouts and staff will live in the jungle
operations training area of Fort Sherman.
The staff will arrive at Fort Sherman June
18, and leave when the camp ends June 29.
People interested in participating
should begin their permissive temporary
duty, temporary active duty requests soon.
For more information, call Johnathan
Hilton at 284-5567/3516 or Kathy
MacPhail at 285-6548.

Toastmasters' meetings
to be held July 7, 21
Toastmasters International - Panama
will hold meetings 5 p.m. July 7 and 21 at
the Panama Canal Training Center. For
more information, call 287-5689.

Medical squadron offers
anger control course
The 24th Medical Squadron's Behav-
ioral Science Clinic is sponsoring an anger
management group for people who have
difficulty controlling their temper.
Officials need to determine the number
of people in the community who would
like to attend, and also the best time slot
for holding group meetings.
Group members will learn anger man-
agement techniques to help them gain con-
trol over their lives and themselves. Peo-
ple interested should call 284-6410/6457.

Howard Dental Clinic
offers training program
The Howard Dental Clinic is offering a
Red Cross dental assistant training pro-


Saturday
1:55pm C5A Howard AFB
Charleston AFB, SC

Sunday
7am B727 Atlanta IAP (C)
Charleston IAP, SC

Monday
5:40am C130 Howard AFB
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Howard AFB

Tuesday
5:40am C141 Howard AFB
Lima, Peru (CC)
Santiago, Chile (0)
La Paz, Bolivia


Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Charleston AFB, SC (0)

June 24
6:40am C130 Howard AFB
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
San Jose, Costa Rica
Howard AFB

5:40am C141 Howard AFB
Charleston AFB, SC
McGuire AFB, NJ

US- U.S. passport
O-Overnight
C-Commercial Contract
V-Visa
M-Medevac
CC-Country Clearance

gram. The program will last about six
months and will teach the basic skills of
dental assisting. Applications are being ac-
cepted at the dental clinic, Building 192.
For more information, call Staff Sgt.
Michael Fedak at 284-3009/4558.

VFWs request members
to support July 4 event
The Department of the Panama Canal,
Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United
States will march in the 4th of July parade.
All members are requested to support the
event. All members will assemble in the
Burger King parking lot at 8:30 a.m. and
move to the parade line at 8:45 a.m. Uni-
form is the VFW shirt or a white short
sleeve shirt, dark trousers and the VFW
hat. There will be extra hats available.
Also, the VFW will sponsor a booth at
4th of July festivities on Soldiers Field.
The purpose of the booth is to inform the
public of what the VFW stands for and to
recruit new members. Volunteers are
needed to staff the booth.
For information, call Ed Lesesne at
260-3363.

Balboa class of 1964
holds 30-year reunion
The Balboa High School class of 1964
will hold its 30-year reunion July 28-31 at
the Holiday Inn in Clearwater, Fla. Grad-
uates who know of any classmates' ad-
dress changes should contact Salonick
Barber at 404 Marble Cove Way, Seal
Beach, Calif., 90740, telephone (310) 430-
5880; Sherry Sabo Hozack at 2286 Ame-
thyst Drive, Santa Clara, Calif., 95051,
telephone (408) 984-5226; or Jane
Holgerson Thompson at 476 East Yale
Loop, Irvine, Calif., 92714, telephone
(714) 733-2789.

DEH announces water
flushing schedule
The Directorate of Engineering and
Housing will be flushing water mains 8
a.m. - 6 p.m. on the following dates: to-
day, Cocoli; Monday, Fort Kobbe;
Wednesday and Thursday, Corozal; July
2-3, Fort Clayton; July 6, Curundu; July
10, Quarry Heights. Water pressure will
tend to be lower for about one hour during
this time.

Support center holds
job search workshop
The Howard Family Support Center
will offer a job search workshop Wednes-
day at the FSC. The workshop will begin
at 10 a.m. and will provide military spous-
es a variety of information on techniques
for effectively searching for a job in the
local economy.
For more information about the work-
shop, call 284-5650.












~~Feature


Tropic Times
June 17, 1994


a -'B' i


I


'~'.. -~2~


Col. Larry A. Black, 24th Wing vice commander; Brig. Gen. David A. Sawyer, outgoing 24th Wing commander; and Lt. Gen. James L. Jamerson,
12th Air Force commander review the troops.



Wing gets new commander


HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) -
Members of the 24th Wing bid farewell
to one commander and welcomed
another on the flightline here Monday.
Col. (Brig. Gen. select) Richard E.
Brown III accepted command of the
wing after Brig. Gen. David A. Sawyer
relinquished it to Lt. Gen. James L.
Jamerson, 12th Air Force commander,
who officiated the ceremony.
During his remarks, Jamerson
congratulated Sawyer for his success
during the past two years. He also
alerted Brown to the diverse mission he
would be responsible for as the new
commander.
"Without a doubt, this is one of the
most challenging wings in Air Combat
Command," he said. "This is the
gateway to South America and you (the
24th Wing) are the tip of the Air Force
spear in the war on drugs."
Sawyer, after taking a moment to
recognize his wife's birthday, finished
with a message to Air Force troops
present.
"It has been a privilege to command
the best wing in the Air Force for the
past two years," he said. "Remember
however, it can always be improved.
You can be proud of your accomplish-
ments, but never be content to sit back


and listen for applause."
Sawyer leaves Panama for Vicenza,
Italy. There he will become deputy
commander, 5th Allied Tactical Air
Force, North Atlantic Treaty Organiza-
tion, overseeing the allied efforts of
Operation Deny Flight and the humani-
tarian relief operations over Bosnia.
Brown comes to Panama from
Europe where he served as chief, Joint
Operations and Plans Section, Opera-
tions/Logistics Division, Supreme
Headquarters Allied Powers Europe,
Mons, Belgium.
"It's a great honor to be standing
here," he said. "I think you'll find my
style of leadership is similar to that of
General Sawyer. Our primary job is
mission accomplishment. Very close to
that, however, is maintaining a family
atmosphere where people enjoy their
work and get to have some fun too."
The ceremony concluded with a
pass in review by wing units. Men and
women from the operations and
logistics groups, wing staff agencies
and support group stepped to the beat
of music provided by the Heartland
Band of America of Offutt AFB, Neb.
The support group element included
flights from the security police
working dog and horse patrol sections.


Col. (Brig. Gen. select) Richard E. "Tex" Brown III, incoming 24th Wing
commander, addresses members of his new command.



U.S. Air Force photos
by Senior Master Sgt. Boyd Belcher
and Staff Sgt. Roswell Lamar


Members of the 24th Security Police Squadron Military Working Dog
Section pass in review.


iTW


I


ARM











Tropic Times
June 17, 1994


Hemisphere


Assessment team acts as Gorgas extension


by Capt. Jim Knotts
USSOUTHCOM Public Affairs
QUARRY HEIGHTS - How do you provide health
care to servicemembers stationed 3,000 miles from the
nearest 9-1-1 number? That's the challenge for the U.S.
Southern Command and its Military Groups in 16 coun-
tries throughout Latin America. The answer is the Com-
mander-in-Chief s Health Assessment Team.
The six-member team, which is an extension of Gor-
gas Army Community Hospital, provides the Army's
health risk appraisal for servicemembers and their fami-
lies, as well as other U.S. personnel assigned to the U.S.
Embassies, said Lt. Col. Jeanne Picariello, the team chief
and a registered nurse. The other members of the team
are: Dr. (Maj.) Carlos Parrado, chief of the Gorgas De-
partment of Medicine; Laurie Rowley, nutritionist;
Cristina Pena, social worker; Sgt. Bill Venable, medic;
and Luann Smith, data base manager.
"The appraisal includes cholesterol screening, blood
pressure, height, weight, body fat percentage, and lifestyle
recommendations to reduce a person's risk level for
chronic disease, specifically cardiovascular disease and
cancer," Picariello said. The team also provides educa-
tion and counseling individually and in groups.
The team assists the embassy medical staffs that pro-



Team to make


drilling history


in El Salvador

by Sgt. Terry Mann
367th Public Affairs Detachment

CUARTEL DE MIRAFLORES, El Salvador -
While drilling water wells in support of Task Force
Vulcan here, a team of well drillers from Fort Kobbe
will etch a place in the annals of the U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers.
The team will be the first Army well drilling unit
to sink a water well powered by an above-ground die-
sel pump called the airlift pumping system. The nine-
man team will also train a team of six Salvadoran
Army Engineer well drillers.
"We'll make water well drilling history when we
sink the four wells running off the airlift pumping sys-
tems," said Staff Sgt. Joseph Quinlan, noncommis-
sioned officer in charge of the water well projects.
"The pumps will be used in communities that do not
have electricity.
"The airlift pumping systems eliminate moving
parts in the well hole," he said. "All the maintenance
is done above ground."
In all, six water wells will be drilled in support of
the task force which is the second phase of Fuertes
Caminos in El Salvador. Fuertes Caminos, which
means strong roads in Spanish, is a joint exercise be-
tween the governments of El Salvador and the United
States.
The exercise is sponsored by U.S. Southern Com-
mand.
"The four communities getting the airlift pumping
systems are remote villages with shallow, hand-dug
wells," Quinlan said. "The wells are easily contami-
nated and usually go dry during El Salvador's dry sea-
son.
The villages, with the support of El Salvador's wa-
ter development agency, will construct water storage
tanks and distribution lines, he said. Once operation-
al, the wells will pump water at a rate of about 50
gallons per minute.
"Last year, I spent four months in El Salvador,"
said Pfc. David Thompson, mechanic with the 536th
team.
"While driving through villages in convoys, I saw
women and children carrying heavy water containers
up mountain roads to their villages.
"They'll appreciate the wells the Salvadorans and
us drill in their villages and I like knowing that I
helped to make getting water easier for them,"
Thompson said.


vide day-to-day service to U.S. military members, and
usually visits some of the quality of life facilities to make
health recommendations to the Military Group command-
ers.
The only such team of all the U.S. unified commands,
the SOUTHCOM team averages one visit a month, or
more depending on airlift. To reduce costs and carry the
large amount of equipment needed, the team always uses
available military airlift, Picariello said. Between 120-130
people can be screened each day, which usually lasts 12-
14 hours for the team members with set-up and tear-down
time, Parrado said.
Besides the standard health appraisal and education
classes, the team provides other specialized training when-
ever possible.
"We try to address stress issues," Pena said. "Many of
these people are living in distant places where it's not easy
to get back to the states. They feel isolated. Some live in
areas where there's a significant security threat, which also
causes stress," Pena said.
"We've been asked to give seminars on how family
members overseas can arrange care for their elderly par-
ents in the states. We sometimes do lectures on women's
health issues, and provide lists of resources in the states
for use by family members. We provide another point of
contact for help, another person to talk to for support."


Besides the classes, the team tries to demonstrate the
lessons they teach.
"I had one man walk in who had very high blood pres-
sure, so I asked if he felt all right," Pena said. "He said
'Yes' because he had just finished a cigarette. He expect-
ed a lecture, but instead I took his blood pressure 20 min-
utes later to show him the change and how much the ciga-
rettes were affecting his body every time he lit up."
Venable works with the Embassy Marine Security
Guards providing casualty care, trauma management, and
first response technique classes. This training also counts
as part of their noncommissioned officer professional de-
velopment. Venable conducts CPR update training and
evaluates embassy plans for casualty evacuation and treat-
ment.
"There is no '9-1-1' and some places don't have doc-
tors (at the embassies), so the Marine Security Guards may
be most of the medical response in a crisis," Venable said.
Although the work is intensive, the team members all
feel they are doing an important job, and are always made
to feel welcome wherever they go.
"People literally flood the place," Parrado said. Peo-
ple are encouraged to sign up for screening times before
the team arrives, but the schedule quickly fills up as the
news spreads through word of mouth. "We have to turn
people away every trip" the doctor said.


AJ


Theatre Support Element photo by 1st Lt. Barry Relchenbaugh
Sgt. Brent Davis (right) changes the bit on a drill at the worksite of a new school being built in El
Salvador. With Davis are two Salvadoran soldiers, Sgt. Santos Nicolas Hernandez (left) and Pvt.
Diaz Acevedo.


Engineers renovate base camp


by Sgt. Terry Mann
367th Public Affairs Detachment
CUARTEL DE MIRAFLORES,
El Salvador - Their hammers start
swinging around 4 a.m., about an
hour before the Salvadoran sun ris-
es above a volcano overlooking
Task Force Vulcan's base camp.
Breakfast comes a few hours later
- the heat doesn't wait for the hun-
gry.
The 90th Civil Engineer Squad-
ron from F.E. Warren AFB, Chey-
enne, Wyo., deployed here to reno-
vate and expand a base camp for the
second phase of Fuertes Caminos in
El Salvador.
The exercise includes humanitar-
ian and civic action projects de-
signed to strengthen democracy in
the host nation.
Task Force Vulcan, a part of FC,
is the first task force in El Salvador
spearheaded by the Army Reserve.
The 926th Engineer Group from
121st Army Reserve Command,
Birmingham, Ala., will conduct the
civic action projects with support
from Alabama National Guard's
167th Corps Support Command,


also from Birmingham, and a contin-
gent of active duty components.
"I asked my crew how they want-
ed to do it and everybody agreed to
work a few hours before breakfast so
we could get more work done before
the temperature soared," said Staff
Sgt. Kenneth Neighly, noncommis-
sioned officer in charge of the prime
base emergency engineer force car-
penter team for the 90th CES.
The 35-man team includes car-
penters, surveyors, electricians,
plumbers and masons who have de-
ployed to renovate 48 tent platforms
and build 28 new platforms to house
the soldiers who will participate in
the task force. The team engineers
will also rebuild four shower facili-
ties and provide electricity and
plumbing to the base camp.
After completing the base camp,
the team prepared the construction
sites for the U.S. Army Reserve en-
gineers who arrived in May. The civ-
ic action projects include renovating
23 classrooms, one village assembly
hall and building a fence and garage
for a medical clinic. Sir. water wells
will also be drilled by the 536th En-
gineer Battalion from Fort Kobbe.


"This mission is important be-
cause this is the first time most of us
have deployed overseas," said Air-
man 1st Class Kenny Raff.
Raff, whose specialty is with heat-
ing, ventilation and air conditioning
systems, also works as a carpenter,
mason, plumber and electrician.
"We all pitch in and help where
we're needed," he said.
"Being in this extreme heat and
pulling off our mission shows initia-
tive, motivation and resourcefulness
by everyone here," said 1st Lt. Paul
Daffin, officer in charge of the car-
penter team.
"This type of mission builds con-
fidence and cohesiveness with the
unit, because the crews can see tangi-
ble results in their work," he said.
One example of the cohesiveness
to be found in this crew is Senior Air-
man Margaret Montoya, a dispatcher
with the 90th CES. Normally she
spends her days in Cheyenne coordi-
nating teams and projects to work
sites. In El Salvador, she joined the
carpenters in building tent platforms.
"I love this work," she said. "Not
only does it get me out of the office,
but it helps us build better relations


4 whl�


ji














L Military News


Tropic Times 5
June 17, 1994 5


Combat

Some women

say they're ready
FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. (AP) -
As military leaders consider whether
female soldiers should get more
chances to serve in combat, seven
women in the 101st Airborne Divi-
sion say ability - not gender - is
what counts in a fight.
"I think women should be allowed
in any area of combat," Spc. Tracy
Stephens, 26, a clerk from Socorro,
N.M., said in an interview. "This is a
very hot issue for me."
Stephens described in great detail
and with much enthusiasm the mobile
artillery operated by her husband,
who is stationed at Fort Sill, Okla. She
said she would like to do that, too.
Army Secretary Togo West is to
make a recommendation on whether
women should be allowed to serve as
pilots of special operation unit heli-
copters and operators of the Multiple
Launch Rocket System, a key artillery
weapon.
Defense Secretary William Perry
must approve any change.
The 101st Airborne has been test-
ed in battle from World War II to
Vietnam to Somalia, where one mem-
ber, helicopter pilot Michael Durant,
was shot down and captured. Images
of his swollen face filled television
screens and the covers of newspapers
and magazines.
Two women Blackhawk helicop-
ter pilots at this base on the Tennes-
see-Kentucky border say women
should have the opportunity to volun-
teer for combat.
"That just opens you up to another
area where you have to go out and
prove yourself first, and there's a lot
of females that are capable of being
able to do that," said 1st Lt. Teena
M.C. Fawcett, 26, of Omaha, Neb.
Fawcett and Capt. Jane O'Connor,
33, of Warrensburg, N.Y., said wom-
en must be given a chance to advance,
although both women said they had
no personal interest in being in com-
bat.
"Let's make sure that if you open
up a field for women, make sure that
it's completely open to the top so she
can progress," said O'Connor, whose
husband is a special operations unit
pilot.
"I just hate to see a woman thrown
in there and be a captain and not be
able to become a company command-
er over there," she said. "If they're
going to open this, it's got to be wide
open.
"And they've got to be able to ac-
cept that if she's really good, then she
can be a company commander over
there as a major."
Two clerks in a supply unit point-
ed out that women, in effect, already
are in combat, whether or not they've
been assigned a combat role.
"When we were in Somalia and
they needed people to go out in the
convoys, we put the helmets on and
we put the flak vests on," said Pfc.
Kimberly McGee, 23.
McGee works as a high-tech radio
operator and spent 133 days in Soma-
lia.
"I can't see the difference because
if we were there and had the men with
us, there was no difference. They still
shot at us. And we had to shoot back.
And if that's not combat - maybe it
wasn't the biggest war you've ever
seen - but if it's not combat, then
what is it?"


Off-post residences need



housing office approval


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - U.S. Army South per-
sonnel wanting to reside on the local economy must now check
with the Housing Referral Office, Building 519 for authorized
addresses, said Directorate of Engineering and Housing officials.
"What this change means to U.S. Army South personnel is
that before seeking a lease in Panama, sponsors select properties
they are interested in renting from a multiple listing system locat-
ed at the Housing Referral Office," said Col. M. Jeffry Petrucci,
U.S. Army Garrison commander. "There will be growing pains
with this upgrade of service, but I am confident that this program
will ensure that while you are looking for a home, you will know
the rental price prior to visiting the premises"
The change to the current procedures came in an effort to es-
tablish fair rental prices in advance of lease negotiations and to
deter any pricing variance based on rank and resulting Overseas
Housing Allowance.
"In the past, personnel dealt directly with local real estate
agents and came to the Housing Office basically to close the deal,"
said Dick Davis, chief of the Housing Office. "The perception
existed that similar properties were offered at different prices de-
pending on rank and the associated OHA rates, which is common
knowledge."


Under the new procedure, realtors and landlords must list their
properties with the Housing Referral Office. The Housing Refer-
ral Office will then verify that the rent listed is reasonable.
Only properties that are verified and listed in the new system
will be approved for leasing. In addition, the listed price cannot
be increased and will remain the same across the board for all
ranks regardless of OHA rates, Davis said.
If personnel lease a property which is not listed with HRO,
they will not receive OHA, Davis said.
To receive housing on the local economy, personnel must first
check with their local HRO.
A housing briefing is held 1:15 p.m. every Thursday at Build-
ing 520. The briefing informs customers about how to rent prop-
erty, the responsibilities of landlords and realtors, the documents
required to start OHA, entitlements and up-front monies that are
required, said Alex Brathwaite, chief of Housing Referral Office.
"At HRO, our aim is to provide you with world class service.
To avoid long waiting lines, we would ask customers to call for
an appointment to review the HRO listing of properties,"
Brathwaite said.
For information or to make a housing appointment, call 287-
5413.


Peters assumes command of 640th


HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) - The
617th Airlift Support Squadron received a
new leader and a new name June 6 during
a change of command redesignationn cere-
mony at the Air Mobility Command ter-
minal here.
Col. Jack F. Peters is commander of .the
renamed 640th Air Mobility Support
Squadron. He replaces Col. John W.
Harbison who began his command tour in
July 1992.
Peters, a native of Hartley, Iowa, grad-
uated from Mankato State University,
Mankato, Minn., in 1971 and earned his
commission through Officer Training
School the next year.
The colonel has piloted CH-53 and C-
141 aircraft. Other assignments include
Fort Rucker, Ala.; Royal Thai AFB, Thai-
land; Warren AFB, Wyo.; Norton AFB,
Calif.; Maxwell AFB, Ala.; and Scott
AFB, Ill.
He is married to the former Diane L.
Scarff of Mount Pleasant, Iowa. They have
two children, Mike and Nancy.
The unit Peters takes charge of traces
its history back to March 1966 where it
was first activated at Da Nang Airport,
Republic of Vietnam. The 617th was inac-
tivated in 1972, but two decades later re-
activated here.


* � ...., . .1'-. . . .3 ' .
U.S. Air Force photo
Lt. Gen. Malcolm B. Armstrong, 21st Air Force commander, incoming
640th Air Mobilty Support Command commander, Col. Jack F. Peters and
outgoing 670th commander Col. John W. Harbison watch squadron
members case the 617th Airlift Support Squadron flag.

With its new name, the unit gains a new Central America and the tree branch is the
patch. It features a toucan standing on a unit showing the supportive relationship
tree branch. The bird represents South and squadron members have with the region.


Air Force drops harassment probe


WASHINGTON (AP) - The Air Force halted a criminal in-
vestigation of a sergeant who claimed the probe was merely a
reprisal for her testifying about on-the-job sexual harassment
Monday.
Air Force Secretary Sheila Widnall also granted the request of
Sgt. Zenaida Martinez that she be trained as an equal opportunity
officer.
Widnall met with Martinez for more than an hour at the Penta-
gon after the 27-year-old security police officer charged that her
superiors were trying to scuttle her career after she publicly com-
plained about sexual harassment.
The meeting came under pressure from lawmakers on Capitol
Hill who were outraged by the Martinez case. Lawmakers were
particularly incensed because Martinez's latest run-in with her
superiors stemmed from an appearance she made in March be-
fore the House Armed Services Committee in a hearing on ha-
rassment.
After returning to her base at Mildenhall, England, from that
appearance, Martinez submitted a $200 taxi cab receipt which the
Air Force paid. Earlier this month her superiors informed her that
she was under criminal investigation over the cab fare.
Widnall told Martinez that Gen. Robert C. Oaks, the Air Force
European commander, reviewed the case and ordered the crimi-
nal investigation halted. Widnall also said that orders issued last
week requiring Martinez to transfer from Mildenhall to McGuire
AFB in New Jersey had been rescinded.


Widnall then asked Martinez if she wanted to stay in the Air
Force and what the service could do to help her career. Martinez
said she wanted to train to become an equal opportunity officer.
Widnall agreed to make the arrangements. According to Susan
G. Barnes, Martinez's attorney, Widnall offered no apology and
did not discuss whether any officers at Mildenhall would be pun-
ished.
"I'm very grateful that she took an interest," Martinez said of
Widnall. "But I want a career, and that means we need to enforce
these sexual harassment laws. There's nothing to prevent some-
thing like this happening to me again."
Martinez is still pursuing a lawsuit filed last fall regarding her
original sexual harassment charge. She alleges that a superior of-
ficer repeatedly made advances on her, warning that her career
could be hurt if she failed to comply. She told the Armed Servic-
es Committee in March that after complaining of the harassment
- her evidence included a tape recording of the officer - she
was passed up for promotion, denied commendations and taken
off security police duty.
The dispute over the taxi fare led Martinez to file a separate
complaint with the Pentagon inspector general.
Martinez also met with Reps. Patricia Schroeder, D-Colo., and
Ronald Dellums, D-Calif., the chairman of the House Armed
Services Committee.
Schroeder said she would propose legislation to close loop-
holes in existing federal whistleblower protection laws.










Tropic Times
June 17, 1994


'Y5!ices


Loud late show crowd offends moviegoers


Dear Mayors' Corner:
Recently, my family and I attended the
7 p.m. show at the Fort Clayton Theater.
Towards the end of the movie, the man-
agement allowed the lobby to fill up with
people waiting to see the late show. These
people became very loud and disruptive,
entering the balcony at one time. If people
can't or won't be considerate, then the
management shouldn't allow them in the
lobby until the first show is over.
The Critic

Dear Critic:
Donna Kelso from the Army and Air
Force Exchange Service management
made the following reply:
We apologize for the inconvenience
you suffered during your visit to our the-
ater. Unfortunately, this happens as you
said because other people fail to be con-
siderate. We have discussed your concerns
with management and theater supervisors
and will do everything we can to control
this situation in the future. Should this oc-
cur again, bring it to our attention imme-
diately so we can ask people to reduce the
noise or leave. Call 286-3640, 8 a.m.-4
p.m., Monday - Friday to voice comments.


Dear Mayors' Corner:
Where is the mail? In the past months, I
have noticed that the postal service is get-
ting worse. Why should it take six to eight
weeks for a magazine to get here? In late
February, I overheard two postal workers
talking that soon they would be getting
several containers of fourth class mail in
early March. True to their word, in the first
week of March my mailbox was stuffed
with the magazines I subscribe to. I sub-
scribe to about 10 magazines. Because
some of the mail dated back to December,
I was overwhelmed with magazines and
catalogs for several days.
I can understand an extra five- or 10-
day delay in fourth class, but a 6-8 week
delay is stretching it a little; Many of the
magazines and catalogs that I receive offer
limited time specials that become worth-
less to me considering the delay.
Being far from home, mail is one of the
few things that keeps us living like Ameri-
cans. Can this situation be improved?
Another Dissatisfied
Postal Patron


Dear Dissatisfied:
This response was given by Capt.
Karen Jordan, chief of operations of the
24th Air Postal Squadron.
To properly explain what is happening,
it is necessary to take you through the pro-
cess of fourth class mail delivery.
If you order something from a compa-
ny, the local post office in the states ac-
cepts it and then it is transported to the
Bulk Mail Center in Bayonne, N.J. It is
then loaded onto a tractor trailer and sent
to Port Everglades, Fla. The contractor has
six days to make this journey. It is then
loaded onto a ship and when the ship is
filled, it travels to Panama. The boat trip
takes 14 days. The ship docks in Colon and
a contractor brings it to the Albrook Post
Office where the mail is sorted for its Pan-
amanian destinations.
The mail is taking longer to arrive in
Panama; however it still meets the standard
that the U.S. Postal Service has set for de-
livery of fourth class. My suggestion to
customers who do not want to pay for pri-
ority mail is to send smaller packages.


Third and fourth class packages that weigh
less than 15 pounds and are less than 60
inches in combined length and girth are
upgraded to space available status and
flown from the Bulk Mail Center.
The conversation that you overheard,
referred to current inbound mail. We re-
ceive, on average, three to four containers
of mail per week.
We invite customers to come in and see
our operation and welcome volunteers. I
want to assure you that we are committed
to provide quality service and are working
hard to solve all problems associated with
second, third and fourth class mail.
Volunteers are needed at all area Post
Offices and may contact Capt. Jordan at
286-3107 or Maggie Coleman, Installation
Volunteer Coordinator in Building 519.

Editor's note: This column allows
community members to submit ques-
tions to the Mayoral Congress. Letters
should be mailed to: Mayors' Corner,
Publicity Chairperson, APO AA 34004
(MPS). Anonymity will be granted
upon request. The Tropic Times reserves
the right to edit letters and responses for
brevity, clarity and propriety.


Dear Editor:
April 19 was the U.S. Army South volunteer rec-
ognition luncheon. It was held in honor of and recog-
nized many USARSO volunteers, yet several issues
of the Tropic Times have been published and not one
word about these volunteers has been printed. We
have read about the Navy's and Air Force's volun-
teers and there has been a huge, two-page pictorial
about tattoos. Yet nothing about USARSO volun-
teers.
Now, I ask you, what exactly are your priorities?
Can you imagine USARSO operating one or two
weeks without its volunteers? I think not. These peo-
ple and groups work very hard - solely from the
goodness of their hearts - and they don't volunteer
for recognition but they definitely deserve it. And yet,
you saw fit to overlook them - way to go.
Your paper is usually very informative, widely
read and very up-to-date on the issues that affect our
community. By completely overlooking this recog-
nition day, you have created a huge oversight on your
part.
I ask you to please correct this. USARSO could
not run as smoothly as it does if it were not for its
volunteers.
A Very Disappointed Reader

Dear Disappointed:
As the editor of the U.S. Army South Public Af-
fairs Office, I would like to extend my apologies for
not covering the volunteer luncheon that you talked
about.
I fully and wholeheartedly agree that volunteers
are what makes this, and any other community, run
more smoothly and that we could not function as well
without them. They are a vital part of this communi-
ty and deserve any recognition passed their way.
We will do a better job at giving the proper cover-
age to the volunteers of the U.S. Army South com-
munity in the future.
Staff Sgt. Jane Usero



This authorized unofficial command information pub-
lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic
Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces
Information Program of the Department of Defense, un-
der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S.
Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the
official view of the U.S. government, the Department of
Defense or the U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002
Telephone 285-6612.
Commander in Chief.................Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey
Director, Public Affairs..................... Col. James L. Fetig



k Tropic Tim


Dog attacks girl on Fort Espinar


Girl attacked by dog
A family member was attacked by a neighbor's dog on
Fort Espinar last week. The young girl went to the quar-
ters to visit a friend when she was attacked by a dog that
was chained by the building. The girl was taken to the
hospital where she received seven stitches in her right
arm. The owner was charged despite the dog being on a
chain.
Pet owners are responsible for the actions of their pets
at all times. For information, call the military police at
287-4401 or 289-5133.

Alcohol leads to conviction
A soldier became combative while MPs were attempt-
ing to diffuse a situation on Fort Clayton last week. The
soldier apparently had too much to drink, and failed to
listen to instructions. He was arrested and charged with
drunk and disorderly conduct. While at the MP station,
the soldier became disrespectful to the noncommissioned
officer processing him and was further charged.
Don't let alcohol cloud judgement. Whether on or off-
duty, people are responsible for their actions. For infor-
mation, call the MPs at 287-4401 or 289-5133.

Misuse of a government vehicle
Two soldiers were charged with misappropriating gov-
ernment vehicles in separate incidents last week. In the
first incident, the soldier was seen downtown in civilian
attire, talking with a couple of women. In the second inci-
dent, a soldier was seen driving two Panamanian women
in a government-owned vehicle. Both soldiers were ar-
rested and charged with the violation.
Misappropriation of a government vehicle is a serious
offense punishable under Article 121 of the Uniform Code
of Military Justice. Questions concerning this offense can
be directed to the MPs at 287-4401 or 289-5133.

Panama Jack anonymous hotline
Anyone with information concerning drug smuggling
should contact the Panama Jack anonymous hotline at
285-4185.


Chief.............................Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor
Editor.................................................. M aureen Sam pson
Sports Editor.............................................. Sgt. Lori Davis
Staff Editors................................................. Spc. John Hall
Rosemary Chong
Southern Command Public Affairs Office...........282-4278
Command Information Officer.............Patrick Milton
U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.............287-3007
Public Affairs Officer..............Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder
Command Information Officer.................Beth Taylor
Editor......................................... Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
Co-editor.................................. Sgt. Robin M antikoski
Journalist.............................................. Sgt. Eric H ortin


The following crimes happened in on and off post
housing areas May 27 - June 2:
Pacific
Fort Clayton 300 housing area - one larceny of se-
cured private property
Morgan Avenue - one larceny of unsecured private
property
Corozal 600 housing area - one larceny of secured
private property
Fort Kobbe 800 area - one larceny of unsecured pri-
vate property
Atlantic
Fort Davis - two larcenies of secured private property
Fort Espinar - one larceny of secured private proper-
ty
Fort Sherman - one larceny of secured private prop-
erty
Off post
Bethania - one larceny of secured private property and
one larceny of unsecured private property
El Dorado - one larceny of secured private prop-
erty

The latest on "Gotcha" Cards
One-hundred-sixty-nine "GOTCHA" cards were is-
sued to the following housing areas from April 24 to May
23.

Fort Clayton
500 area - 5
600 area - 21
700 area - 6
1000 area - 3
1100 area - 2
Corozal - 79
Fort Kobbe
300 area - 1
Cocoli - 1


24th Wing Public Affairs Office.........................284-5459
Public Affairs Officer..............Capt. Warren L. Sypher
Public Affairs Superintendent
Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham
Journalists................................ Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
Sgt. James A. Rush
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office..............283-5644
Public Affairs Officer...........................Diane Gonzalez
Photographer
Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor
U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.......................... 289-4312
NCOIC...........................................Sgt. Richard Emert












r _Commentary


Tropic Times 7
June 17, 1994


A tale of abuse through the eyes of a child


Editor's note: This is a fictional account
of what could happen to a victim of child
abuse.

by Sgt. Rick Emert
USARSO PAO - Atlantic
I'm really very lucky to be here.
It's quiet most of the time and I
get a lot of rest. I spend most of
my time listening to the radio and
television, but I can't complain.
A lady comes in a few times a day to talk
to me. She strokes my hair and tells me
about things that happened to her the day
before. She has a nice voice. A happy voice.
She has two kids - a boy and a girl. The
boy is in second grade. He plays little league
baseball and got his first hit of the season
over the past weekend. She told me that
Monday.
He's the same age as me. She says we
look alike - sort of. She got him a bike for
his birthday last week, and he's getting
better at riding it. She didn't think he'd ever
learn to ride it. The first week he fell every
time he got on it and she said it was a good
thing she was a nurse and knew how to
bandage scraped knees.
Sometimes she sounds sad when she
talks about her son. I think it's because I
remind her of him.
When she comes in with the doctor, she
doesn't talk to me much. The doctor has
cold hands and smells like mint. He doesn't
talk to me at all, only to the lady. Usually I
can't hear what they say because they
whisper.
When I do hear them, they talk about
things I don't understand, about machines. �
My parents don't come here. I think they
feel sorry for me or they're sad that I have to
stay here. It's OK that they don't come,
though. It's very quiet and I get a lot of rest.
Even if they did come I couldn't see
them or hug them or go home with them. I
could only listen to them.
They would probably like that, though.
They liked it when I was quiet. I always
tried to be quiet, but sometimes I would
forget and they would get mad at me.
The day I came here, I forgot to be
quiet.
I'm not supposed to bother my dad right
when he gets home from work. I know I'm
not supposed to. But that day in school I
found out we were having a father and son
fishing trip. I was excited and I wanted to
tell him. We never went fishing before.
He was talking to my mother, but I
interrupted him. I knew I shouldn't have, but
I had to tell him about the fishing trip. He
yelled at me and told me to be quiet.
I tried to be quiet, but they kept talking,
and I had to tell him about the fishing trip. I


Direct Quot


interrupted again and tried to yell out about
the fishing trip before he could tell me to be
quiet.
He hit me in the face, and I fell. I tried
not to cry, but it hurt. My mother was
telling me to go upstairs, but I really wanted
to tell him about the fishing trip.
He came over to me, and I tried to stop
crying so I could tell him about the trip, but
I couldn't get the words out.
He picked me up by my shirt and started


shaking me - because I was crying like a
baby and I'm not a baby, I'm seven.
I was holding his arms and trying to stop
crying, but I couldn't stop. He kept shaking
me and I felt something click in my neck
and my arms fell down. I couldn't move
them - I still can't.
He let go of me, and I remember hitting
the wall. I saw his face, he was so mad. His
face was red and he was sweating because I
made him mad.


That's the last thing I ever saw.
Not being able to see isn't so bad, but I
wish I could talk or move my arms and
legs. I don't breathe right either, and I can't
eat real food.
It's very quiet here, except for the
machines that beep and the radio and
television and the lady who talks to me.
I'm always quiet, though. I think my dad
would be proud of how quiet I'm being if
he came to see me.


Family advocacy parenting classes battle abuse


FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO - At-
lantic) - Childhood years are the carefree
years-playing baseball after school, Sun-
day afternoons at the park.
But 75 children who have lived right
here in Panama's U.S. Army communities
may try to forget their childhood; to re-
member would mean reliving the trauma of
emotional and physical abuse.
Those children were the victims in 75
substantiated cases of abuse in the Pacific
and Atlantic military communities here in
1993, said Myrna Coughlin, Family Advo-
cacy Program specialist, Army Commu-
nity Services-Atlantic.
Although the number of substantiated
cases was 15 less than in 1992, reports of
abuse could increase, Coughlin said.
"In the past, therewas a lack of informa-
tion and general knowledge about what is
considered abuse," she said. "The number
of reported cases of abuse goes up and
down from year to year. It may increase
again due to stress from the drawdown."
The Family Advocacy Program keys in
on preventing abuse in military communi-
ties, she said.
The classes cover four basic topics
which include active communication skills,
resolving parent/child conflicts, value col-
lisions and improved family life, she said.
"Parents love their children and don't
want to hurt them, but sometimes we disci-
pline our children the way we were disci-
plined," she said. "If we know better, we
can implement other methods when disci-
plining our children."
Although spanking may be accepted
among parents, it may be considered abuse
in some cases. The alternatives are more
affective and safer, Coughlin said.
One alternative to spanking is "time
out."
"Time out is a working way to negotiate
with children - when done properly," she
said. "It gives the child time to consider
what happened, why they got in trouble and
how they can prevent doing it again.


"If they're in the comer too long, it be-
comes too much," she said. "We recommend
one minute per year of age."
The free classes don't reach everyone.
"There is a stigma when it comes to attend-
ing parenting classes," she said. "Parents think:
'If I go to the class it means I don't know how
to raise my children,' or 'My neighbors will
think I'm in trouble with the law.'"
Among the reported and substantiated cases
of emotional abuse, neglect is the most com-
mon, Coughlin said.
"Our major problem has been the supervi-
sion of children," she said. "When parents
don't provide supervision or care for their
children, that's neglect. We try to make par-
ents aware that an accident can happen in just
two seconds."
There is a positive note concerning ne-
glect.
"The allegations of neglect have dimin-
ished greatly because of the response from the
community and the increase in awareness."
Other forms of emotional abuse may be too
subtle to recognize, let alone report, she said.
"There are so many ways to emotionally
abuse human being: belittling, teasing, threat-
ening, blaming, humiliating and criticizing,"
she said. "It's not necessarily a physical threat,
but it will have a lasting affect on the person."
A way to counter these forms of emotional
abuse is to look at it from the other person's
point of view, she said.
"Listen to the words you're saying and
imagine how you would feel if they were
being said to you," she said. "It is possible to
communicate with a child without shouting or
calling him names.
"Whatever he did wrong, tell him how it
made you feel and why it was wrong," Coughlin
said. "Most likely the child will learn from this
and your relationship will still be in tact."
The services available to the military com-
munity are numerous and valuable, she said.
"We are aware that soldiers aren't just
soldiers; they're parents, spouses and family
members as well. We try to open programs
and provide resources for them, but unfortu-


nately many find out about them when it's
too late."
Along with resources and classes aimed
at families, FAP also provides training for
unit commanders, law enforcement per-
sonnel, Department of Defense Depen-
dents Schools teachers and employees of
agencies dealing with children, she said.
If a case of abuse is reported, it's likely
one or more ofthese agencies will become
involved. Reports of child abuse are most
often made at military police stations, emer-
gency rooms, Social Work Services or
ACS, Coughlin said.
A report of abuse results in an investi-
gation within 24 hours by the FAP thera-
pist and law enforcement personnel from
either the military police, Military Police
Investigations or Criminal Investigations
Command and medical personnel if
necessary. Then the child and parents are
interviewed and the case is presented at the
next monthly meeting of the Family Advo-
cacy Case Management Team, she said.
The FACMT is a group of 12-15 people
that meet monthly to determine;if cases of--
abuse are substantiated based on the evi-
dence and to determine treatment, Coughlin
said.
It may be necessary to remove the child
from the home before the FACMT reviews
the case.
In the past three years, 12 children have
been placed in foster care in the Atlantic
community, Coughlin said.
"Our primary concern is to protect the
victims. If the victims need protection, we
will give it to them immediately."
Although it may seem malicious, child
abuse is rarely done to purposely torment a
child, Coughlin said.
"I like to believe that parents have a
genuine concern to do better for their chil-
dren. Every parent's dream is to see their
child succeed in life and to be nappy."
And to be able to ease the stress and
responsibility of adulthood by remember-
ing times of baseball and picnics.


What would you do if you suspected a child was being abused?


"Make proper notifica-
tion to authorities and
take the child from
who's abusing them."
Petty Officer 1st Class
Luis Rivera
Inter-American Naval
Telecommunications Network
t;;^





















Telecommunications Network


"I would report it to the
proper authorities, like
CID."


Spc. Emily Britt
Criminal Investigations
Division


.k A.


hI



N41


"Notify the police and
let them take care of it."


Tech Sgt. Chris Diehl
24th Weather Squadron


"I would report it to the
MPs."


Ulia Walker
Army family member


4 . -M '~ -


step in and do some-
thing about it."


Sgt. Jamison Rucks
534th Military Police
Company


SThe opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the Department
of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries - or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity
and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.






Tropic Times
June 17, 1994


Theater Support Element photo by Pvt. Bnan D. Hennon
From left to right, members of Company D 3rd Battalion, 7th Special Forces (Airborne) Sgt. 1st Class
Andrew S. Griffith from Oklahoma, Sgt. Ian P. Pucek from Illinois and Sgt. James D. Wade from Georgia
prepare to jump from a C-130 "Hercules" transport plane flown by the 123rd Airlift Wing of the Kentucky
Air National Guard in Panama. The 123rd was in Panama to support Operation Coronet Oak which
provides air crews and support teams for ongoing supply missions in Central and South America.



Operation




Coronet Oak


Air Guard, reservists keep

SOUTHCOM mission flying
3rd Special Operations Support Command said that
by Pvt. Brian D. Hennon without the National Guard his unit wouldn't get as
109th Public Affairs Detachment much jump time which is crucial to its training.
------- "We've jumped with the Guard several times and they
A group of Kentuckians recently ran an overnight are just as professional as any regular-Army unit I've
delivery service in Central and South America. seen," said Mann. "We rely on the guys in the back of
"Whatever they need, we deliver," said the plane more than anyone and they all know what
Master Sgt. David M. Fink, first sergeant of they're doing."
the 123rd Airlift Wing of the Kentucky Air National While training at home, the 123rd's missions are
Guard from Louisville. mostly limited to simulating what it did in Panama.
Fink, a full-time civil service technician in Louisville, "The pilots and crew are in a real-world situation -
and about 200 other Kentuckians were at Howard AFB here. We've flown earthquake-relief missions and
for their two-week annual training. They were part of search-and-rescue missions. We directly affect many
Coronet Oak, an operation comprised totally of Air people," said Fink.
Guard and Air Force Reserve personnel. The 123rd does more than fly military operations. It
Coronet Oak tasks Air National Guard and Air Force also flies humanitarian missions all over the world.
Reserve with continuously providing C-130 "Hercules" Staff Sgt. Patrick Maloney from Louisville,
transport aircraft, air crews and support teams for loadmaster for the 123rd and a cargo handler for United
ongoing supply and transportation missions throughout Parcel Service has flown in hurricane relief missions for
Central and South America. both Hurricanes Hugo and Andrew in Florida.
The mission supports the U.S. Southern Command, a "We fly search-and-rescue missions in the event that
unified command of 10,000 Army, Navy, Marine, Coast ships are overdue or we have a downed plane," said
Guard and Air Force personnel responsible for all U.S. Maloney.
military operations in Central and South America. The More recently, some members were called upon to aid
region encompasses one-tenth of the world's land mass. the United Nations effort in Bosnia while gaining
"Using C-130 'Hercules' transport planes, we airlift experience and working long hours.
items such as mail, food and other household goods to "I served three tours in Bosnia pulling 12 and 16 hour
radar sites and embassies anywhere in South America shifts, flying humanitarian missions," said Navigator
and Central America," said Coronet Oak Mission Capt. Steven L. Cochran from Louisville. "The best
Commander Lt. Col. William Hooper Jones of Louis- people I've flown with have been in the Guard. Most
ville. guardsmen were in the Air Force full time and brought
"We also resupply the U.S. Drug Enforcement that experience back to the Guard."
Agency and aid them with drug interdiction missions Cochran is not the only one who feels the "cream of
and transport personnel," Jones said. the crop" is in the Kentucky Air National Guard.
One of the 123rd's missions while in Panama was to Jones served in Coronet Oak 18 times and has been in
air drop personnel from Special Operations Command- every country in Central and South America.
South. "The experience level of the air crews and the entire
1st Lt. David S. Mann who was the primary support package is higher than any active duty station
jumpmaster for one of the jumps and a member of the I've seen," he said.


S
pp


Members of Special Operations Command South
"Hercules" transport plane flown in Panama by the







Tropic Times 9
June 17, 1994


STheater support Element pnoto Dy fvt. Brian U. Haennon
A member of Special Operations Command South jumps from
a C-130 "Hercules" transport plane while a jumpmaster checks
for anymore troops disembarking the aircraft flown by members
of the 123rd Airlift Wing of the Kentucky Air National Guard.


Theater Support Element photo by Pfc. Nancy Hutton
hd the 3rd Special Operations Support Command jump from a C-130
i23rd Airlift Wing of the Kentucky Air National Guard.


Theater Support Element photo by Spc. Art Wiederhold
Tech. Sgt. Greg Rukavina of the 139th Airlift Group, Missouri National Guard,
checks the fuel line connection of a C-130 transport plane prior to its flight to La
Paz, Bolivia.


at









1O fTropic Times
10 June 17, 1994


F1eature.-


Aviators case colors at final formation

by Sgt. Eric Hortin
USARSO Public Affairs Office
HOWARD AFB - "Joker Flight" isn't flying any-
more. The pilots, crewchiefs and soldiers of Company
B, 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation stood in their final for-
mation as an active unit Wednesday as their leaders
cased the unit colors.
The unit is one of the first in Panama to formally
inactivate as part of the Panama Canal Treaty Imple-
mentation Plan.
Co. B, 1st Bn., 228th Avn. was originally activated
4i Feb. 1, 1963, with the 1lth Air Assault Division. The
unit was reassigned to the 1st Cavalry Division and
went to Vietnam.
The unit was awarded a Presidential Unit Citation,
a Valorous Unit Award and two Meritorious Unit
........ Commendations for its actions in Vietnam.
After a series of inactivations, activations and a brief
time at Fort Hood, Texas, as an attack helicopter bat-
talion, the unit was reactivated here Oct. 16, 1987.
The unit was reorganized as a Theater Army Avia-
tion Company, controlling UH-I1H Hueys and OH-58
' Iroquois helicopters, and C-1I2F fixed-wing aircraft. Its
mission included aviation support, intelligence gather-
ing, and transporting of people and cargo to U.S. em-
bassies in the region. The unit distinguished itself dur-
ing Operation Just Cause, providing air assault power
during the Renacer Prison raid.
Company B distinguished itself again Sept. 3, 1993,
by being the first unit of the 128th Aviation Brigade to
receive the U.S. Army South Commanding General's
Physical Training Streamer.
The unit continued to support its primary mission,
supporting nation-building projects, humanitarian mis-
sions and deployments to several Central and South
American countries.
All that ended May 25, when the last of the unit's
Hueys was loaded up at Howard and taken to the states.
"I've spent a lot of my years and alot of flight expe-
rience here in Panama," said Chief Warrant Officer 4
Charles Blankenship, who was here when the unit was
first activated iri Panama. "It's sort ofsad to see it come
to an end."
* ' The pilots, crewchiefs and soldiers of Co. B, 1st Bn.,
228th Avn. will be reassigned to units throughout the
U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Eric Hortin Army, but many of them will continue the unit tradi-
1st Sgt. Matthew Poore, Company B, 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation, encases the guidon. tion of "Giving nightmares to all the right people."

He started at $70 a month


Command Sgt. Maj. looks back on 30-year career


by Spc. Alexander C. White
USARSO Public Affairs Office
COROZAL - The year _
1964 was a time when the .-
country was still weeping
over the assassination of its .
beloved president, inequality '
in civil rights was beginning r ,? ,,,.
to be contested and the Unit- :
ed States was sending its sons
and daughters to a distant
country to fight a war they did
not understand. . .;.
Many of this era were "'
questioning political purpos- McWhorter
es and trying to find excuses
to escape responsibilities. But among all this turmoil, a
young man of 18 years decided it had to be better than
becoming a factory worker in Hamilton, Ohio.
Now, 30 years later, a white-haired Command Sgt.
Maj. Randall D. McWhorter, 470th Military Intelligence
Brigade command sergeant major, reflects on his decision
and sees that it was a good direction to take.
"I had a very narrow focus being raised in Ohio,"
McWhorter said. "I hadn't even seen an ocean or flown
in a plane."
He said that what the Army provided him with was a
wealth of knowledge and experience that he couldn't have
gotten growing up in his hometown.
Before graduating from Taft High School, McWhorter
received notice that he was to report to the local military
in-processing station for a pre-induction physical. He de-
cided to enlist in the Army before the results came back.
"I chose the Army because my brother was a Marine
and my uncles were all in the Navy," McWhorter said.
"To be honest, one day I was home trying on my uncle's
uniform and I decided then that I did not want to be wear-
ing bell bottoms and have to button 16 buttons everyday."


But, McWhorter explained, it was a decision he was
glad he made. Initially, he entered the military as a light-
vehicle driver, but in 1975 he went back to school to be-
come a counterintelligence agent.
At the time of his enlistment, McWhorter's mentors
were old World War II and Korean War veterans, he said.
He learned from their experiences and hardships and then
applied them to his success.
"Promotions were slow," McWhorter said. "I had been
the first sergeant to be promoted in my unit in two years."
McWhorter stayed in the Army not because of the ad-
vancement, but because he was learning from his adven-
tures; and the simple fact that he liked Army life.
"It allowed me to expand my horizons and gave me
the opportunity to help people and go places," he said.
When McWhorter joined the Army there was a large
influx of draftees who were older and had their lives dis-
rupted by being pulled out of college or factories.
"They couldn't wait to get back home," he said. "It's
different today, the soldiers are younger and the NCOs
are smarter."
McWhorter said that is why it is harder to convince
soldiers to stay in. He said that with their intelligence and
desire, they feel they can get so much more out of being a
civilian.
McWhorter has to disagree.
"When a soldier asks me about a future in the Army I
ask him, 'do you have a road map to success that you want
to follow?' "McWhorter said. "I tell him straight forward,
you're not going to get rich here (in the Army). Stay in
only if you enjoy it...no other profession can give you this.
If you're in it for the money, you're in it for the wrong
reasons.
McWhorter says his position is like being a parent -
watching the children grow. He tries to make them see
reality.
"I tell them 'Go back home and see what the guys are
doing on the block,' " McWhorter said. "I went home
one time and talked to an old friend of mine. When I asked


"Success to me is being able to look in
the mirror at the end of the day and say 'I
have done the best that I could do today,'
and then wake up the next morning and try
to do the same thing over again. It's time
to go, though, when one of those soldiers I
helped already retired as sergeant major."
Command Sgt. Maj.
Randall D. McWhorter
470th Military Intelligence Battalion


what it was like to be a civilian, he explained that one
week out of the year he packs up the car, gathers his fam-
ily, and heads off to Myrtle Beach. After his vacation he
goes back to work.
"That might be fine for a lot of people, but I can't see a
better job then what the Army has to offer," he said. "You
can take the learning experience that you gained here and
apply it to life, at being a success."
Passing his knowledge on to younger soldiers has been
his greatest success, McWhorter said. Watching others
succeed has been part of the satisfaction of being in the
Army.
"Success to me is being able to look in the mirror at the
end of the day and say 'I have done the best that I could
do today,' and then wake up the next morning and try to
do the same thing over again," he said. "It's time to go,
though, when one of those soldiers I helped already re-
tired as sergeant major."
"I have been fortunate to serve my country,"
McWhorter said. "It's not very often that a guy who start-
ed out working for $70 a month has the opportunity to
become a success."

















June,


l history




1944


Tropic Times 11
June 17, 1994


D-Day invasion, Operation Overlord begins in Normandy
FORT CLAYTON - The following are
significant World War II events that took
place during June 1944:


June 4
Col. William Ewen Shipp, a West
Point graduate and a United States Mil-
itary Attache for Asuncion, Paraguay
and Quito, Ecuador, is announced as
the new Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2,
Panama Canal Department, succeeding
the late CoL Carl H. Strong, who died
April 4 in Quito while on a military mis-
sion.

Headquarters, Panama Canal De-
partment, announces the promotion of
eight officers at Quarry Heights. To
major are: Melvin J. Greaves and
James J. Ainsworth. To captain: Janon
F. Embury, Felix N. Fidelibum, Eugenio
L. Santoni. To first lieutenant: William
D. Chumbley, Herbert W. Kirchoff,
Charles G. Marvin.

Allied Forces enter Rome on Trinity
Sunday. Out of respect for the religious
holiday, the American Fifth and British
Eighth armies do not occupy the city until
the next morning.

June 5
Planes carrying troops of the 101st Air-
borne Division begin taking off at 10:15
p.m. from England. Both the 101st and
82nd Airborne Divisions are to make as-
sault jumps in Normandy in preparation
for the amphibious landing.

June 6
Four classes in various phases of
anti-aircraft operation graduate from
the Enlisted Division of the Panama
Coast Artillery Command Training
Center. The 46 students who complet-
ed courses received diplomas from
Capt. Donovan E. Smith, director of the
training school. There were two 22-
week classes in anti-aircraft target de-
tection equipment maintenance, a 16-
week course in wire communications,
and a 14-week course for anti-aircraft
fire control electricians.

The Normandy invasion (designated D-
Day) begins. Code named Operation
Overlord, the invasion includes landings
on five beachheads in Normandy, France.
The operation, under command of Gen.
Dwight D. Eisenhower, involved more
than 4,000 ships, 3,000 planes, and Allied
troops eventually numbering more than
4,000,000.

June 7
Maj. Gen. Daniel Van Voorhis, com-
manding general of the Caribbean De-
fense Command and of the Panama Ca-
nal Department from Jan. 6, 1940 to
Sept. 18, 1941, is decorated during a
special service in his honor at Fort
Hayes, Ohio, with the Legion of Merit
in recognition of outstanding services in
the Caribbean.
The citation commended the retired
general for planning and effecting an
extensive construction and expansion
program in the area and for placing in


' :~'4'~ I
- *a*,.*
,,-7 (*'*


- q--1~ &
.V~ A -

1. h-'. -


motion "adequate administrative and
tactical wartime measures to insure the
safety of the Caribbean area and the
Panama Canal."

June 12
Germans launch their flying bombs
against Great Britain.

June 15
The Honorable Avra M. Warren,
newly appointed United States Ambas-
sador to Panama, and his family, are
greeted by Panamanian and U.S. mili-
tary and civilian authorities at Albrook
Field. Among those officials to greet the
distinguished diplomat were Lt. Gen.
George H. Brett, commanding general
of the Panama Canal Department and
the Caribbean Defense Command, Cap-
tain Ellis S. Stone, acting commandant
of the 15th Naval District and the Pana-
ma Sea Frontier, and Col. H. K. New-
comer, the acting governor of the Pana-
ma Canal.

Ambassador Warren's arrival in
Panama had been deferred in order to
complete negotiations with Bolivia for
the transfer of approximately eighty
Axis prisoners of war rounded up by the
Bolivian Government, all of whom were
transferred by U.S. Army planes to the


Canal Zone for temporary internment.

U.S. Marine Corps and Army troops in-
vade the Marianas island of Saipan.

June 16
Bombing of Japan begins with a raid on
the island of Kyushu by U.S.
Superfortresses.

June 19-20
The U.S. Fifth Fleet scores a decisive
victory in the Battle of the Philippine Sea
(Great Marianas Turkey Shoot). In a sin-
gle battle Japanese naval aviation is virtu-
ally eliminated as a factor in the outcome
of the war.

June 22
Brig. Gen. Ralph H. Wooten, former
commanding general of the Air Force
Command, Col. Homer W. Ferguson,
chief of the Sixth Air Force, Col. H. G.
Yopp, provost marshal, Panama Canal
Department, receive letters of commen-
dation from Lt. Gen. George Brett, for
successful combined efforts transport-
ing internees from Bolivia to the Canal
Zone.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs
into law the "G.I. Bill of Rights," provid-
ing educational benefits to U.S. veterans.


Ambassador Avra M. Warren pre-
sents his credentials to Panamanian
President de la Guardia.

On occasion of the Fifth War Loan
Drive in the Canal Zone, local military
set up displays of mortars, jungle equip-
ment, rocket launchers, and other such
equipment, some of it price-tagged so
that the bond-buying public could see
what their money was purchasing.
Thousands of Zonians turned out to see
the displays and to buy bonds. The goal
was to raise a million dollars.

Other local war repercussions: The
Canal Zone ration board OK'd the re-
capping of spare tires; up until the end
of June motorists had been driving on
four recaps, and the hope that they
would not have to use their worn-out
spares.

A 30 mile-an-hour speed limit, re-
duced to 20 miles at night when car
headlights were painted, was restored
for open road driving in the Canal
Zone.

Editor's note: This timeline was
compiled by Dolores De Mena, USAR-
SO historian, in commemoration of the
50th Anniversary of WWII.














Sports

Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Divers rise to olympic

by Sgt. Lori Davis breathing contest and the scuba don, Hodgson said.
Tropic Times Sports Editor During the buddy breathing event, a team of divers
swims two laps of the pool sharing one tank of air. One
ALBROOK AFS - Scuba divers and snorkelers went teammate swims in full diving gear while the otherhas only
for the gold Saturday at the Albrook pool during the 1994 a mask, fins and a weight belt to keep him submerged.
Scuba Olympics. This event is particularly difficult because it is hard to
The Scuba Olympics is an annual competition spon- swim aerobically while sharing the tank, Hodgson said.
scored by the Balboa Dive Club. Divers and snorkelers The most popular event is the scuba don, Hodgson said.
compete in five individual events and two team events. "They have to get into the deep end. Their gear is on the
Events for snorkelers include the 50-meter ping pong bottom of the pool. They have to go down withjust a mask,
push, 3-legged, 2-fin race and the 50-meter mask/snorkel/ get their gear on and swim to the shallow end. When they
1-fin race. get there everything has to be on correctly."
Inthepingpongracecompetitorsswimonelengthofthe "It's one of the events that has a skill you learn in a
pool, pushing a ping pong ball with their mask only, said scuba class, the rest are just for fun," she said.
Wendy Hodgson, club member and olympics official. One of the events that is just for fun is the high jump.
The 3-legged swim is the same as a 3-legged race on Participants must push off the pool floor and spring from
land, and in the mask/snorkel/1-fin race swimmers must the water, tagging a rope tied to a bell. The bell hangs from
race one length of the pool with one fin, she said. a diving board, and olympic officials raise the bell until the
Scuba divers compete in the 50-meter golf ball scuba, last competitor misses the rope.
carrying a golf ball on a spoon as they swim one length of The Balboa Dive Club is able to sponsor the event with
the pool. Divers show their practical skills in the buddy help from the local community. The Fort Clayton Dive
~ � ~g


challenge
Shop provides scuba tanks, the Howard Zodiac Recreation
Center and 24th Services Squadron provided the pool for
us to use today, and of course the life guards. Rodman also
helped us with some of the equipment," Hodgson said.
"It's a family event, the whole family can participate,"
Hodgson said. "We have kids out here and it's a good day
for everyone to come out."
Scuba Olympics results:
50-meter golf ball scuba Polk-4'11"
Morgan Polk-2:24:48 50-meter mask/snorkel/1-fin
Sharon Peisel-l:39.71 race
Jake Holbrook-2:41:25 Ivan Klasovsky-0:40:67
50-meter ping pong push de Greef-0:43.96
Polk-0:57.44 Scot Cheben-0:46.80
Nico de Greef-1:09:08 Scuba don
Oliver Klasovsky-1:28.57 Garcia-1:42:12*
3-legged 2-fin race Norman Kane-2:15.84
de Greef/John Jackson-0:42.41* Pat Romero-2:17.34
Ivan/Oliver Klasovsky-0:50.20 100-meter buddy breathing
Ed Garcia/Holbrook-0:51.73 Garcia/Holbrook-2:26.94*
High jump de GreeflPolk-2:49.88
de Greef-5'3"* Dave Hodgson/Kane-incomplete
Ivan Klasovsky-5'1" *denotes olympic record
z ,M7 .. ,1- .M MF ..1�*_1-MW_, &.L ,JN ."


4 ~4x
J6 t I .


Pat Romero springs from the water to ring the bell in the high jump competition of the Scuba Olympics.


Volybl Pag. ee14


Directorate of CommunityActivities
II tears up the competition in 5'11"
and over basketball action.


Department of Defense photo by Sgt. Lori Davis


an mor Pa S.


June 17, 1994


Page 12


Red Machine and Cougars take *SCN AM radio schedule
volleyball titles in the high school *Local sports standings
championship tournament. *Powerlifting


o










LSports


Tropic Times 1
June 17, 1994 J1


DCA II smokes Dynamics, 67-39


by Sgt. Lori Davis
Tropic Times Sports Editor
FORT CLAYTON - The Directorate of
Community Activities II team burned down
the house Monday, using the Dynamics as
kindling in its 67-39 victory.
DCA II started smoking Dynamics quick-
ly. DCA II's Lee Brown dominated the early
part of the opening half, sinking three baskets.
Thomas White followed Brown's lead, scor-
ing from the inside and going for three from
downtown.
DCA II's offense was fed by a vicious
defense, denying Dynamics again and again.
DCA II's ball hawking led to several fast
breaks, baffling Dynamics as it struggled to
catch up.
Dynamics' Rod Stokes led his team in
offensive scoring in the first half, putting
seven points on the board. Orlando Grimsley
chalked up two baskets, but Dynamics were
blocked constantly by the tough DCA II de-
fense.
DCA II's Tony Thacker got into the game
late in the first half, but he burned up the court
once he got his hands on the ball.
Going strong to the inside, he powered
through Dynamics' defense, sinking three bas-
kets. When he couldn't blaze a path through
the crowd, he dropped back and shot for three-
pointers. Thacker proved just as deadly from
the line, making all four of his foul shots.
Scoring off free throws was icing on the
cake for DCA II, which jumped out to a 38-16
lead at the half.


DCA II played hot in the first half, but it
opened the second half like an inferno.
DCA II's defense stripped Dynamics of the
ball several times. It rifled passes down the
court to a waiting Brown, who went to the net
and jammed the ball home, growling like a
madman.
Three jams by Brown sent Dynamics to the
bench for a time out. The break didn't do much
for the Dynamics game, but they did interrupt
DCA II's pace.
Dynamics fought for points at every op-
portunity and after the time out. Stokes led his
team on offense again, putting eight more
points on the scoreboard.
Dynamics' Daryl Richardson warmed up,
scoring from the outside for six points.
DCA II didn'tmatch it's scoring drive from
the first half, in part because of the stepped up
defense of Dynamics. DCA II responded to the
challenge with expert ball control and player
versatility.
I Brown ruled the paint with 10 points, and
his rebounding skills brought down many
missed shots and gave DCA IIa second chance.
Tommy Irvin went to the hoop for two baskets
and scored on a three-point shot.
"These guys are really ball smart," said
DCA II coach Phil Mickles.
"The balance is there," he explained. "They
shouldn't have any problems because the play-
ers are interchangeable. Thacker can go low
and rebound, or he can shoot three-pointers
and Brown is a force down low."
"If these guys stay hungry, there is no limit
to what they can do," he said.


Department of Defense photo by Sgt.L Lori Davis
Dynamics' Greg Alexander (left) and Michael Grimes crash to the
floor as Artherrall Taylor reaches for the rebound.


Home stretchU.S Army photo by Spc. George Furbush
Home stretch
Maria Richley finishes the last event of the women's
triathlon Saturday, the 5K run. The competition,
sponsored by the Howard and Albrook sports and
fitness centers, included a 500-meter swim and a
20K bicycle race. Results from the triathlon are as
follows:
*29 and under Gwynne Ebert-1:36:48.30
Nancy Thompson-1:24:47.18 Maria Richley-1:42:43.51
+30-40 *41 and over
Michelle Fraley-1:17:25.11 Jane Loudat-1:17:26.22
Coco Jardine-1:35:10:53 Diane Bowman-1:44:05.06


Army, Navy volleyball


teams win championship


by Sgt. 1st Class Stephen Barrett
American Forces Information Service

CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C. - The Army and Navy
captured team championships at the 1994 armed
forces volleyball tournament, held May 9-13 here.
In men's competition Army went unbeaten in six
matches. Army clinched the championship with a 15-
11, 8-15, 16-14, 16-17, 15-13 win over second-place
Navy (4-2).
The Army completed tournament play the next
day with a 15-7, 15-8, 15-4 win over the Marine
Corps.
The Marines (2-4) finished third, followed by Air
Force (0-6).
The Navy women duplicated the Army men's
feat, going unbeaten in claiming the women's title.
Navy clinched a tie for the crown with a 16-17, 15-0,
15-8, 1 5-4 win over Army (4-2). They then won the
championship by crushing the Marine Corps 15-2,
15-0, 15-2.
Air Force (2-4) finished third, followed by the
Marine Corps (0-6).
The Army grabbed five of the 13 positions on the
men's armed forces team. Earning spots were Jason
Hodell (Schofield Barracks, Hawaii), Craig Rich-
mond (Fort Stewart, Ga.), and Thomas Porr (Fort
Campbell, Ky.), Damon Dicus (Fort Benning, Ga.)
and Justin Rhea (Fort Carson, Colo.).
Also named to the team were Air Force's Joseph
Shirvinsky (Travis Air Force Base, Calif.) and Todd
Ajari (Castle Air Force Base, Calif).
The Navy placed David Foster (Naval Base, San
Diego) and Ross Holcomb (USS Nimitz) and Tim
Krause (Fort Meade, Md.). The Ma rine Corps added
Kevin Kelliher (Naval Air Station, Whiting Field,
Fla.) and Matthew Studer (Okinawa) and Lawrence
Daley (Naval Air Station, Long Beach, Calif.).
The Navy also placed six women on the armed
forces team that competed at U.S. Nationals May 29
through June 6 in Tulsa, Okla.
Diana Foster (Navy Amphibious Base, San Di-
ego) and Heidi Fleming (U.S. Naval Academy, An-


napolis, Md.), Michelle Robinson (Naval Training
Center, Orlando, Fla.) and Karen Griffith (Naval Air
Station, Corpus Christi, Texas), Lisa Clark (Rota,
Spain) and Susan Ryals (Hanza, Okinawa) captured
nearly half the team 's 13 slots.
The Army placed Margaret Stewart (Korea), and
Romona Sualua (Fort Lewis, Wash. ), Kristine Morrill
(Fort Bragg, N.C.) and Elizabeth Howlett (Schofield
Bar- racks) on the team.
Also named were Air Force Jennifer Block (Wright-
Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio) and Marine Corps
Julie Ingersoll (Camp Lejeune, N.C.) and Danielle
Dillard (Okinawa).
Tournament Scores
Men
Navy def. Marine Corps 15-6, 6-15, 15-10, 15-13.
Army def. Air Force 5-15, 15-4, 15-2, 11-15, 15-9.
Army def. Navy 15-4, 16-14, 15-13.
Marine Corps def. Air Force 15-2, 17-15, 15-3.
Army def. Marine Corps 15-12, 13-15, 15-9, 17-15,
15-6.
Navy def. Air Force 17-15, 15-7, 15-10.
Army def. Air Force 15-9, 15-13, 15-13.
Army def. Navy 15-13, 16-14, 4-15, 7-15, 16-14.
Navy def. Marine Corps 15-8, 15-2, 15-8.
Marine Corps def. Air Force 15-11, 8-15, 16-14, 16-
17, 15-13.
Navy def. Air Force 15-4, 15-11, 15-10.
Army def. Marine Corps 15-7, 15-8, 15-4.

Women
Navy def. Marine Corps 15-2, 6-15, 15-6, 15-2.
Army def. Air Force 14-16, 15-8, 15-10, 15-7.
Navy def. Army 16-14, 15-8, 16-14.
Air Force def. Marine Corps 15-3, 15-12, 15-9.
Army def. Marine Corps 15-2, 15-5, 15-8.
Navy def. Air Force 15-7, 15-10, 15-1.
Army def. Air Force 15-13, 15-0, 15-12.
Navy def. Army 16-17, 15-0, 15-8, 15-4.
Navy def. Marine Corps 15-2, 15-0, 15-2.
Air Force def. Marine Corps 15-7, 15-11, 15-6.
Navy def. Air Force 15-12, 14-16, 15-8, 15-13.
Army def. Marine Corps 15-6, 15-1, 15-10.


- IL


A











14 Tropic Times
1 June 17, 1994


I Sports


Red Machine is numberone
by Marilyn Wruck ..-
Tropic Times contributor
BALBOA-The 1994men's
volleyballseasoncametoaclose - .+. -
June 2-3 with two exciting dou- - -
ble elimination tournaments.
,-M-, D- W4 -h )h 1x 1 ..


Sne talooa KRed Machine
squared offagainst the Cristobal
Tigers June 2 in the junior varsi-
ty competition. The Tigers de-

the tournament, forcing the
Balboa team to win two matches
to take the title.
Red Machine's Curtis
Haynes, Chris Bowman, Frank
Linton, Michael Chase, Danny
Norman and Danny Powell led
the Red Machine to victory in
earning the championship tro-
phy.
The varsity contest stretched
through the following nightwith
games continuing almost to mid-
night. As expected, the high-
light of the tournament was the
competition between the The 19
CristobalTigers and Balboa Red Rojas,
Machine. left); T
Both teams entered the post
season tournament at 7-1. Their only losses
were to each other. This tournament was
expected to settle the score on which team
was number one.
Red Machine defeated the Tigers in the
early rounds, sending them to the loser's
bracket. The Tigers fought their way back
to the finals and turned the tables on Red


couumay piPuiu
94 Balboa High School's Red Machine championship team. Standing (from left); coach Edgar Harrison, Lisa
Chris Corrigan, Chris Hovan, Joey Zornes, Jose Busquets, Kathy Lopez, coach Dionisio Dixon. Kneeling (from
omas Ellis, coach Marilyn Wruck, Buddy Bottin.


Machine, defeating it in three tough games.
However, the loss was the first for Red
Machine, setting up another game for the
championship title. The Tigers would have
to repeat their performance to take first
place.
The Tigers lost their bite in the final
three game battle against the Red Machine.


The score finally settled, the Red Machine
ended the season as the top team in men's
volleyball.
Tournament results:
Junior Varsity
1-Red Machine
2-Tigers
3-Devils


4-Cougars
5-Bulldogs

1-Red Machine
2-Tigers
3-Bulldogs
4-Devils
5-Cougars


Varsity


Cougars win championship title


by Jessica Penkoske
Tropic Times contributor


CURUNDU - The women's varsity volleyball season
came down to the wire June 3 with the final game of the
championship tournament.
The Panama Canal College Green Devils advanced in
the single elimination tournament by defeating the Balboa


High School Red Machine. The Curundu Cougars also
advanced to the final round with a win over the Cristobal
Tigers.
The Cougars got out to a great start with a 15-8 opening
game against the Devils. However, the Devils came back to
challenge the regular season champion Cougars with a 15-
5 win in game two.
Tied 1-1 going into the final match, the Devils threat-


:k-.:. . , j " * " . f - ' . . . . -"
� .r" .' " , '. - , :


The 1994 Cristobal Junior High School Cougars championship team. Standing (from left); Coach N(
Audrey Ernest, Brandie Marx, Eileen Santa, Kim Myers, Bonnie Kemp, Jessica Penkoske, Tasha Ten
Leticia Brown. Kneeling (from left); Marlene Foster and Shauna Sears. Sitting; Marcia Tunon, team ca
present: Carrie Van Matre, Tyara Juarez and Elizabeth Van Patton.


ened to take the championship when they went ahead of the
Cougars, 14-12.
On the verge of defeat, the Cougars' Shauna Sears
served four straight points to give the Cougars the game,
16-14, and the championship title.
Jessica Penkoske led the scoring from the line with 11
points, followed by Marcia Tunon with seven, Bonnie
Kemp and Sears with six each and Eileen Santa with four.
S. . Audrey Ernest rounded out the scoring with
two points.
"'.. - The Cougars' tournament victory con-
tinued their winning streak from the regular
season. Other members of the 1994 Cou-
Sgars varsity team include TyraJuarez, Tasha
Tenurier, Brandie Marx, and Marlene Fos-
ter. The Cougars were supported by man-
agers Kim Myers and Leticia Brown.
"After our league title of first place
champions, there was still one thing lacking
to end our dream season with a happy
ending,'" coach Nora Kemp said. "That was
to win the tournament title, which we final-
ly earned by defeating the PCC Green Dev-
ils."
Once you start winning, the hardest
thing to do is maintain your winning streak,
Kemp said.
"The Cougar team never gave up. At the
beginning of the season I told the Tropic
Times that these girls will always be win-
Sners in life in whatever they do, and they
have ended the season honoring that state-
ment," Kemp said.
, .:- "I am very proud ofthe team for digging
ourtesy photo deep within themselves and finding an in-
ora Kemp, ner strength to become champions for 1994
iturier and and to chalk it up as one more victory in
iptain. Not their lives. Congratulations Cougars," she
added.


1












. Sports Shorts


Tropic Times 15
June 17, 19941


SCN AM Radio 790/1420
airs baseball, basketball
Tonight
8 p.m.: Basketball: N.Y. KnicksatHous-
ton (game #5)
Saturday
Noon: Baseball: Boston at Cleveland
6 p.m.: Baseball: Cincinnati at Atlanta
Sunday
1:30 p.m.: Baseball: Seattle at Kansas
City
6 p.m.: N.Y. Knicks at Houston (game
#6)
or
7 p.m.: Baseball: Philadelphia at
Montreal
Monday
7 p.m.: Baseball: Teaxas at Chicago

Unit level football, hoops
on local sports schedule
*Army unit-level flag football
Today-Mothers Field
6 p.m.: 41st Area Support Group vs. Co.
E, 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment
7 p.m.: 214th Medical detachment vs.
56th Signal Battalion
Monday-Mothers Field
6 p.m.: 214th Med. Det. vs. Southern
Command Network
7 p.m.: Co. C, 1 st Battalion, 508th Infan-
try vs. 470th Military Intelligence
8 p.m.: 534th Military Police Company
vs. Co. A, 1-508th
*Army 5' 10" and under basketball
Reeder Physical Fitness Center
Saturday
11 a.m.: Game Time vs. Nets
Noon: Dog Pound Vs. Pool
1 p.m.: Mo Money vs. II Tuff
2 p.m.: Law Dawgs vs. A-Team
3 p.m.: Bacardi vs. Jazz
Monday
6 p.m.: II Tuff vs. Jazz
7 p.m.: Pool vs. Mo Money
8 p.m.: Nets vs. Dog Pound
Wednesday
6 p.m.: Law Dawgs vs. Bacardi
7 p.m.: Jazz vs. Game Time
8 p.m.: A-Team vs. II Tuff
*Army 5' 11" and over basketball
Reeder Physical Fitness Center
Today
6 p.m.: Juice vs. Ten Deep
7 p.m.: Dynamics vs. The Dogg Pound
8 p.m.: Skillz vs. DCA II
Tuesday
6 p.m.: The Dogg Pound vs. Run and
Gun
7 p.m.: Dynamics vs. Juice
8 p.m.: Ten Deep vs. Bull Dawgs
Thursday
6 p.m.: Law Dawgs vs. Skillz
7 p.m.: Run and Gun vs. DCA II
8 p.m.: Jazz vs. The Dogg Pound
*Army 5' 10" and under basketball
Fronius Fitness Center
Today
6 p.m.: Naval Station-Galeta Island vs.
Jungle Operations Training Battalion
7 p.m.: Army&Navy vs. Run&Gun
8 p.m.: Ballers vs. Small World
Saturday
10 a.m.: Run&Gun vs. Small World
11 a.m.: NSGAvs. 1097th BoatCompa-


Monday
6 p.m.: Army&Navy vs. JOTB




U.S. Army
Unit-level Flag Football
Red League
56th Sig. 9 0
SCN 7 3
Co. E, 1-228th 8 4
534th MP Co. 5 4
214th Med. 5 5
HHC, LEA 3 7
MEDDAC 2 8
White League
41st ASG 9 2
142nd Med. 5 4
470th MI 4 7
59th Eng. dropped out


Pumping iron U.S. Air Force photo by SgL James A. Rush

David Strepmke does some barbell curls to get in shape for an upcoming powerlifting tournament. The
Howard Sports and Fitness Center is sponsoring a powerlifting competition June 25. There will be a weigh-
in 6:30 a.m. and a 7 a.m. rules briefing the day of the contest. Competition begins 7:30 a.m. Trophies will'
be awarded for first and second place in each male and female class (light, medium and heavy). For more
information call the Howard SFC at 284-3451.


7p.m.: Small World vs. 1097th BoatCo.
Wednesday
6 p.m.: Run & Gun vs. 1097th Boat Co.
7 p.m.: Ballers vs. JOTB
*Army men's over 30 volleyball
Tuesday
6 p.m.: 747th Military Intelligence Bat-
talion vs. Bushmaster
7 p.m.: Garrison vs. Navy
Thursday
6 p.m.: 747th MI vs. Bushmaster
7 p.m.: Navy vs. Garrison

Air Force runner places
in track championship
Air Force runner Rick Roman, currently
the top ranked competitor in the Panama
Armed Forces Running Association Cham-
pionship, placed fourth in the 10,000-meter
run at the Air Force Track and Field Cham-
pionships at Fort Sill, Okla., May 27-29.
Roman was first among Air Force com-
petitors with a 31:42 time, and was bested
by three competitors in the open category.
The winning time was 31:08.
Roman was the 1993 Panama Armed
Forces Running Association champion.
The association is sponsoring a 5-K run
7 a.m. Sunday starting at the Balboa High
School. There is also a 5-mile run 7 a.m.
June 25 starting at the Fort Clayton pedes-
trian gate. Call Allen Jones at 287-5444 for
more information about upcoming running
events sponsored by the association.
Runners earn points based on their per-
formance in each running event. Panama
Armed Forces Running Association stand-
ings as of Tuesday:
606 Ricardo Roman


HHC, 193rd 0 7
Blue League
HHC, 1-508th 6 4
Co. A, 1-508th 4 6
Co. C, 1-508th 0 6
Green League
2.5 HHC, 5-87th 13 1
2.5 Co. B, 5-87th 9 4
4 Navy 8 6
4.5 JOTB 8 5
6.5 549th MP 6 8
8.5 Co. A, 5-87th 6 8
747th MI 5 9
1097th Boat Co. 0 14
3 U.S. Army Basketball
5 5'11" and over
Ten Deep 2 0


602 Miguel Campos
591 Clint Davis
564 Willie Moye
564 Richard Downie
563 Sue Bozgoz

All-isthmian men's team
named for volleyball
The following athletes have been named
to the 1994 men's all-isthmian soccer team:
Steve Acosta, Red Machine, Panama
Canal College
Billy Wing, Red Machine, Balboa High
School
Tony Cooksey, Cougars, Balboa HS
Joe Shaha, Cougars, Balboa HS
Luis Juliao, Cougars, PCC
RobertBernhardt, Tigers, CristobalHigh
School
Billie Price, Tigers, Cristobal HS
Joe Gutierrez, Bulldogs, Balboa High
School
Efrain Sanchez, Bulldogs, Balboa HS
Bruce Chastain, Devils, Balboa HS
Adam Beach, Devils, Balboa HS

USARSO holds 10-miler
tryouts for men, women
Practice sessions and open try-outs will
be held in June for runners interested in the
U.S. Army South 10-Miler team.
Sessions are 6-8 a.m. at Reeder Physical
Fitness Center. Trial days are 6 a.m. July 23,
Aug. 13 and Aug. 27 at the center.
For information, call Willie Moye at
287-6411, Sue Bozgoz at 287-6448 or the
Directorate of Community Activities Sports
Office at 287-4050.


Jazz 2 1 .5
Skillz 1 0 .5
DCA II 1 0 .5
The Dogg Pound 1 0 .5
Dynamics 1 0 .5
Juice I 1 1
Run and Gun 0 1 1.5
Bull Dawgs 0 2 2
Law Dawgs 0 3 2.5
5'10" and under-Pacific
Mo Money 3 0 -
Nets 1 0 1
Jazz 1 0 I
Dog Pound 1 0 1
11 Tuff I1 1.5
Bacardi 1 1 1.5
A-Team 0 1 2


U.S. Army Garrison to
hold battalion sports day
Heaquarters Command, U.S. Army Gar-
rison will hold a Battalion Sports Day from
6 a.m. - 1 p.m. June 30.
The activities will begin with a battalion
run at 6 a.m. and sporting events will be
played throughout the day.
Players will include personnel from
Headquarters Company USARSO and
USAG, 92nd Personnel Services company
and 79th Army Band. For information, call
your unit organizers.

Bowling center offers
school vacation discount
The Fort Clayton Bowling Center is
offering a "school is out" discount games
and free shoe rental deal for school-age
children through June. Call the center at
287-6636.

Rodman sponsors Navy
intramural 5K Fun Run
The Rodman Morale, Welfare and Rec-
reation is sponsoring a 5K Fun Run 6:30
a.m. July 1. The race begins at the Rodman
Sports Office.
This event is open only to Navy
servicemembers, Department of Defense
civilians working with the Navy and their
family members. There is no entry fee,
roster are due to the Sports office June 24.
The unit with the most runners receive
team award. First and second place awards
for men's and women's division. Call 283-
4222/4061 for more information.


Law Dawgs 0 2 2.5
Game Time 0 2 2.5
Pool 0 2 2.5
5'10" and under-Atlantic
Army & Navy 2 0
Ballers 2 0
Small World I 1 1
NSGA 0 1 1.5
Run & Gun 0 1 1.5
1097th Boat Co. 0 1 1.5
JOTB not reported
Men's over-30 volleyball
Bushmaster 2 0
747th MI Bn. 3 1
Garrison 0 2 1.5
Navy 1 3 2
*as of Wednesday










1 6Tropic Times
1 June 17, 1994


H News


New program helps


disabled children


"I


-J,.


U.S Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto Taylor
Crew members of Special Boat Unit 26 perform in a training exercise in a
Boston Whaler. An article about SBU 26 will soon be featured in Atlanta's
premier boating magazine, Boating World. The magazine usually focuses
on recreational power boats.


Special Boat Unit 26


to star in state-side


boating fan magazine
RODMAN NS (USNAVSTAPAN- Lake for a sunrise to sunset training exercise.
CANAL PAO) - Special Boat Unit 26 here It didn't take long for Edwards to understand
will be the "stars" of an upcoming article the rigorous life of these boats. Lt. Nicholas
in Atlanta's premier boating magazine, Ettens directed boat drivers and crew through
Boating World. a routine of maneuvers to show how the
The magazine typically focuses on rec- whalers reacted. Edwards said he was truly
rational powerboats up to 35 feet in amazed.
length. But this time, Billy Sims, editor of "I can't believe these boats," he said,
the magazine, decided it would be infor- "they react as fast as you can think." And
mative to weekend fishermen and water- they do. Within seconds these boats can ma-
skiers to learn about the demanding and never around and in anything, SBU 26
dramatic life of a Boston Whaler in Pana- members said.
ma. Ettens was asked about the work the unit
Sims chose 46-year-old Maurey does with its SEALS companions. Edwards
Edwards, editor of Alaska's Marine Digest wanted to see a simulated insertion and ex-
and maritime editor for Staithe Feature traction - putting SEALS on shore and
Syndicate to do the story. Edwards recent- withdrawing them. It was so fast Edwards
ly covered Navy subjects such as the asked for it to be done again because he
USNS WATERS, the new Cyclone Class didn't get the photos he wanted. Crew mem-
coastal patrol ships and Special Operation bers grinned when he said this, because that's
Command's Mark V Program their job - to get the SEALS in and out in
The core of the story "is to show the ac- seconds.
tual use of a Whaler in dramatic and ex- Ettens, a SEAL, took this opportunity to
treme action," Edwards said. "We looked brag about his men. "They know their whal-
at Naval and Army operations around the ers from stem to stem. They can fix them
world and decided Panama is where we anywhere, anytime, no matter what extenu-
would find these boats pushed to the wall." ating conditions exist," he said.
Edwards said most whalers "carry a 10- Edwards said he was more than satisfied
year warranty on the boats, but those used with the close-up look at these whalers in an
in Panama are pretty much used up in environment unlike any other. His story will
three. We wanted to know why." appear in an upcoming edition of Boating
SBU 26 took Edwards out to Gamboa World.


.-I GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY
HOSPITAL (USARSO PAO) - A new
program designed to help children, birth
to three years old, who have special
needs is now in its infant stages here.
The Early Intervention Program has
been adopted world-wide by the Depart-
ment of Defense to help children with
disabilities and their families get the help
they need in the critical early years, said
Carol Zilka, project manager.
"The EIP will provide many services
for infants and toddlers with disabilities,
and their parents," she said. "Children
who are entitled to health care from Gor-
gas will be eligible for EIP."
Zilka also emphasizes that the pro-
gram is a DoD program and the Army is
-1-. U 1-1 .. -. All --


vices available through the
program are avail-
able for all branch-
es of the service
here.
"The Army is
responsible for
running the pro-
gram here and in
Europe and Korea,
but it is open to ev-
eryone eligible for
health care servic-
es," she said.
The program
originally began in
1991 when Con- A
gress passed an
amendment to the
1986 Individuals
With Disabilities
Education Act. I terv
This amendment
charged the DoD with providing infants
and toddlers with early intervention ser-
vices through either the medical or edu-
cational system. DoD decided on the
health care system.
"We have until September 1995 to
have the program fully implemented,"
Zilka said. "I came on board about three
months ago and have begun to tailor the
program to the needs of Panama."
The program will be a centerpiece for
families with children with special
needs. It will provide an avenue for them
to find needed services, facilities and
care, she said.
Through the program, a service co-
ordinator will help each family during
the assessment process when the child's
developmental achievements and the
family's concerns and priorities for their
child are determined, Zilka said.
"The service coordinator will then
work with the family to develop a writ-
ten plan for services and ensure the ser-
vices are provided in a setting that


re


Rainy season brings beauty, need for
HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) - The time of the the perceived higher temperatures," Speed said. "We seek shelter
year has come when the weather man has to use the sec- must make certain adjustments, many of which we do Drainage di
ond of his two daily reports. Instead of "sunny and hot," automatically, like carrying an umbrella." flow quickly
the forecast changes to "humid with a strong possibility There are other adjustments many people do not in- With the
of rain later." stinctively make, several of which are key to surviving next worry
Precipitation in Panama more often resembles stand- the dangers that accompany the rain. Automobile tires To counter
ing under Niagara Falls than a rain storm, but that's no require particular attention. If they are worn or defective, defensively.
reason to get the rainy season blues, according to Bill they should be replaced immediately, Speed said. "Use all)
Speed, ground safety manager here. "One habit that I've developed is to have my car ser- to pull off
"I always look forward to the rainy season. With it viced in June and December," he said. "The tires are in- Speed said.
comes relief from the pungent odor of burning grass," said spected, rotated and balanced. During the December ser- need your li
Speed, a resident of Panama for 15 years. "The trees are vicing, the alignment is checked also, thereby ensuring "To enjo
once again green and in full bloom, bearing signs of early quick passage of Panama's annual safety inspection." adjust our c
fruit such as mangoes, avocados and rose apples. Deep Getting from here to there during the rainy season pos- Learn to co
sea fishing is best during this time of year also." es difficulties as well. The sudden rain storms bring se- of pleasant
With the rain, however, comes increased humidity, as vere lightning strikes and turbulent winds, making walk- of being pa
well as the need to keep rain gear constantly on hand. ing or driving hazardous. your actions
"With all the moisture in the air, we feel oppressed by Children should be taught, by word and example, to sion should


adjustments
indoors during electrical storms, Speed said.
itches should be avoided also. Flood waters
y through them to the ocean.
eir vehicles already safety-checked, drivers'
is reduced visibility from inclement weather.
this, slow down, turn on headlights and drive

your senses behind the wheel and be prepared
the road if visibility is severely hampered,"
"Remember, if you need your wipers, you
ghts. Others may need to see you.
y the wonders of living in the tropics, we must
own attitudes. Courtesy must be emphasized.
ntrol your stress level by singing or thinking
things. Curse if you must, but practice the art
patient " Speed said. "Take responsibility for
s and always be ready to make the right deci-
the unexpected occur."


I only the lead agency liere. All ser-


001


makes sense for the child and the family,"
she said. "This plan is called the Individ-
ualized Family Service Plan and will help
determine the setting which may be the
parent's home, the child care center, a
babysitter's home or the hospital.
"Before, families had to find these ser-
vices on their own, - there was no coordi-
nated effort," Zilka said. "By the time
these parents were able to find out what
was available to them and the services and
facilities they needed, the infant was a
toddler.
"By this time, the child has lost crucial
time and may be experiencing develop-
mental delays," she said. "The earlier you
can help, the better it is for both the child
and the family."
The EIP is a program set up for
children up to three years
old. After the third
birthday, the child
then falls under the
care of the education
system, Zilka said.
Here, that would be
the Department of
Defense Dependents
Schools.
"The program
helps infants and
toddlers who have
disabilities such as
slow development,
late talking, severe
Early behavior problerfis
and birth defects,"
she said. "It will act
t (as a single contact
ntl n for the families so
1ltIoN they can find out
what is available to
them and know where to go early on."
When the program becomes fully op-
erational, it will work directly with such
facilities as the pediatrics and well-baby
clinics, the Child Development Services,
Army Community Service and chaplains,
Zilka said.

"We also plan to conduct a public
awareness campaign as well as try to be-
come part of the initial in-processing
briefings given to in-coming military per-
sonnel," she said. "Right now, we are do-
ing research and coming up with models
for the program.
"It is important to know that this is not
an Army-only program," Zilka said. "It is
a program open to all services. It is also
important to know that it is not replacing
the EFMP, but becoming an integral part
of it."
Though the program is still in its in-
fancy, anyone wanting to know more
about the program can call 282-5658/
5339.












Tropictivities
A quality of life guide for the U.S. community in Panama


June 17, 1994


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Department of Defense photo by Maureen Sampson


Southern Command Network's Air Force Sgt. Kevin Brown plays frisbee on one of Panama's many beaches. See story and photos, Page B3.


Students from Gulick's 1987 kin-
dergarten class dig up their time
capsule.


24th Security Police Squadron
announce the winners of their


"name the filly" contest.


I a n m or ,


*Movies, Page B8
*TV, Page B9
*Potpourri, Page B12


Page Bl


-. k.i ,.I


445,


Beach bum


RhlowIIIIImmw


* . .<<*-".*- it.at'wn


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B2 Tropic Times
June 17, 1994




Albrook/Howard
*Youth centers 286-3195/284-4700:
School's Out Summer Dance will be held
7:30-10:30 p.m. today at the Howard Youth Cen-
ter for children 8-13 years old.
Kids Swap and Shop will be held 2-4 p.m.
Tuesday at the Howard center.
A pre-teen dance will be held 7:30-10:30 p.m.
June 24 at the Howard center for children 8-13
years old.
Arts and crafts 3 p.m. every Wednesday at
both centers. There is a $1 fee for supplies.
Gymnastics classes Saturdays. Ages 3-5 meet
noon-I p.m.; ages 6-12 meet 1-2 p.m.; intermedi-
ate classes meet 2-3 p.m. The cost is $13 per
month per person.
Afternoon pizza and movie, 3 p.m. today,
$2.50 per child.
*Child Development Center 284-6135:
Openings are available in the part-time pro-
gram for children ages 6 months - 5 years. Open-
ings are for 25-hour enrollment - five hours a
day, five days a week.
The 1994 Summer Reading Program will
run June 27-Aug. 2 at the Howard library. Chil-
dren 3-6 will meet 9-10 a.m. Monday for story
hour. Children ages 7-11 will meet 9-10 a.m.
Tuesday for the reading club. Registration will
be June 14-27. For more information, call 284-
6249.
An "Explore New Worlds" poster theme
contest is under way until July 19. Call 284-4818/
4260.
Captain T-Bird and Captain KC Youth
Summer Bowling Special includes three games
during open bowling and a free T-Bird or KC
sports bottle. Call 284-4818.
*Zodiac Community Activities Center 284-
5650/3865:
Resume writing for teens will be held June
28 at the center.

Clayton
*Youth Center 287-6451:
Cooking experiences every Tuesday.
American Stars Gymnastics meet Tuesdays
and Thursdays. Ages 3-5 meet 2-3 p.m.; ages 6-8
meet 3-4 p.m.; ages 9 and up and advanced meet
4-5 p.m. The lessons cost $20.
Outdoor Games every Thursday.
Performing children's troupe seeks youths
who like to sing, dance and perform. They meet
4-6 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays.
Tae Kwon Do 5:30-7 p.m. Wednesday and
Friday for ages 5-18, $25.
Piano lessons 1-6 p.m. Tuesday and Wednes-
days. The fee is $30 for four half-hour lessons per
month.
Gymnastics for ages 5 and older 2:30-3:30
p.m. and 3:30-4:30 p.m. Monday and Wednes-
days
Arts & Crafts every Monday.
*Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680:
Senior Teen Employment Program is a
year- round program to develop job skills and earn
money, for teens 15-18 years old. Applications are
available at the center.
Triathlon tournament 4 p.m. Friday. Com-
pete in pool, football and table tennis.
Popcorn and movies every Sunday.
Volleyball 3:30-5:30 p.m. Sunday.
Softball practice 2:30-4:30 p.m. Sunday.
*Child Development Center 287-3301:
Child Development Center provides high
quality, developmental child care for children 6
weeks to 12 years old. Full day care and hourly
care available call 287-5657.

Cocoli
*Cocoli Community Center 287-4119:
Arts and crafts, 3:30 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday.

Atlantic
+Espinar Youth Center 289-4605:
Teen sports 4-6 p.m. Monday and Wednes-
days.
Just For Kids bowling and pizza, 6-9 p.m.
Saturday, $3.
Cooking class 4-6 p.m. Monday, $1.


W _Youth news


U.S. Army photo
Members of the Society for Creative Anachronism perform for Los Rios Elementary students.

Los Rios students receive reading honor


LOS RIOS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (USARSO
PAO) - The Students of Los Rios Elementary School were
rewarded for a school year's worth of hard work May 20.
A Renaissance Reading Celebration, organized by
teachers, the Parent/Teachers Organization and the 3rd
Special Operations Support Command (Airborne), was
held to recognize students who read more than 20,509
books for enjoyment over the past year.
More than 200 students, from kindergarten through
sixth grade participated in the day's events which began
with demonstrations by the Society for Creative Anachro-
nism. The society members dressed as knights and maid-
ens from the Middle Ages and acted out sword fights and
jousting.
The actors also led the students in dancing and songs
from that time period.


Afterwards, the students were treated to a barbecue
lunch that was prepared by 3rd SOSC soldiers.
The 35 soldiers who participated in the events said they
enjoyed it as much as the students did.
"It was worth spending our day off having fun with the
students and it gave us and them a chance to do some-
thing different," Spc. Thomas Mattison said.
"The school received exceptionally fine support from
the soldiers of 3rd SOSC and the Parent/Teacher Associa-
tion," said Roberta Berger, Los Rios Elementary School
principal. "The students and the teachers greatly appreci-
ate their efforts."
The day was a great experience, with the students get-
ting the chance to spend the day with the paratroopers as
well as the soldiers using their resources to enhance the
U.S. Army South community, Berger said.


Capsule reacquaints Gulick kindergartners


FORT ESPINAR (USARSO PAO Atlantic) - Some
students from Gulick Elementary School got reacquaint-
ed with their past June 3.
Twelve students from Gulick's 1987 kindergarten class
were reunited to unearth a time capsule they buried.
The impending closure of Fort Espinar and Gulick El-
ementary School forced the time capsule to be opened six
years prematurely, said Mary Perkins, who taught the kin-
dergarten class that buried it.
"We buried the time capsule so the students would
have something later on to remember those years," she
said. "Those students were the class of 2000. My intent
was to dig the capsule up the year they graduated and mail
their items to them."
Perkins knew the school was expected to close before
2000, but the fact escaped her when she came up with the
idea of the time capsule.
"I don't know what I was thinking," she said. "I knew
it was going to close down. When I realized that, I vowed
that I would dig it up right before I left Panama and take it
with me in my household goods."
Fortunately, that wasn't necessary. Perkins and
Gulick's school nurse discovered that many of those orig-


inal students were back in Panama, and some had been
here the whole time, she said.
"We found 12 of the students that were here to bury
it," she said. "I knew that we'd never again have that many
of them back here at one time."
As the 12 students gathered to dig up their not-too-dis-
tant past, the students admitted that they couldn't remem-
ber what they had buried. But when they opened the cap-
sule, the memories flooded back, bringing a particularly
sad memory for one of the students, Perkins said.
"There was a girl in the class whose mother was diag-
nosed with cancer the year we buried the time capsule,
and she died the next year," she said. "When we opened
the time capsule, there was a cassette tape from her moth-
er in it."
Perkins added an item to the capsule as well, she said.
"I found a letter that I had written about that particular
group of students," she said. "It said what a good group of
kids they were and that, if we had to leave our future to
anyone, these were the kind of students that should run
the world."
Perkins plans to mail items to the rest of the students
who were unable to attend the ceremony, she said.


Balboa thespians invited to perform in states


BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL (Tropic Times) - The
Thespian Troupe #314 from Balboa High School has been
invited to perform on the main stage of Festival '94 by the
International Thespian Society. The society, a component
of the Educational Theatre Association, was formed more
than 60 years ago to strengthen the cause of educational
theatre and serves a membership of more than 3,000
schools world-wide.
This year's festival, to be held at Ball State University
in Muncie, Indiana, marks the society's 30th celebration


of high school theatre. The week-long festivities, to be
held Tuesday through June 26, include more than 30 dif-
ferent workshops presented by theatre professionals and
representatives from more than 25 colleges and universi-
ties auditioning delegates for scholarships. More than 60
productions will be presented by high schools.
Led by its director Jo Anne Mitchell, the troupe will
present a cutting of "The Dining Room," to more than
2,000 delegates. Students from the United States, Canada
and New Zealand will be viewing the performance.









*Travel


Tropic TimesB 3
June 17, 1994 B.


Bohios on the beach offer protection from the elements at Playa Corona.


Lite's a



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(

t ~


Pla&� Corom o lers ft in Ike sun


e n a plateau overlooking the ocean just two
minutes past the entrance of the road
leading to El Valle lies Playa
Corona. It is a little bit of heaven right here
in Panama.
You can come for the day or weekend. For a day
trip, bring your own food and just sit and relax with the
cool ocean breeze.
Paul Uliantzeff, a native Russian, came to Panama 18
years ago. He enjoys people and cooking so he has a
hotel where he can do both. He has worked hard to
make the grounds appealing and provide a setting where
guests can enjoy peace, quiet and the ocean's sound.
Uliantzeff enjoys the company of his guests and
spends his evenings telling them stories about his life in
Russia. He also has a large selection of compact discs
and encourages his guests to set the tone for the evening
by picking out the music they want to hear. He even
sings along sometimes.
In the evening after he has fed his guests his special-


ty, a seafood mix for two, they can enjoy the twilight
with Uliantzeff outside on the patio or inside with
modem electricity - thanks to a generator.
The surfers there enjoy sizable waves during tidal
changes and Boogie Board enthusiasts say they enjoy
themselves all day long.
The beach is a mix of black and white sand, and in
some areas, there are a few rocks. Once you get to the
oceanfront you can see for yourself-- when the tide is
out - what the Pacific ocean has uncovered.
While you're at Playa Corona treat yourself to a side
trip to El Valle - if you haven't been already - and
see the wonderful zoo they have. Then top the day off
with an ice cream sundae at the shop just down the street
from the El Valle marketplace.
After sight-seeing and buying souvenirs, head back
to Playa Corona for a quiet evening out on the patio, a
romantic stroll along the beach or join others in the main
patio area for cards, dinner or small talk. It's a relatively
inexpensive trip and one well worth remembering.


story and photos by Diane onzalez
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B4 Tropic Times
SJune 17, 1994


i Focus on Panama


Vendors make a living on Panama City streets


a ou see them carry
boxes up and down
the street, take out the
items and display them in
their little booths along Central
Avenue. For the small-time peddler,
organization and hard work can
amount to dividends.
The people who perform this type
of business work very hard - seven
days a week - no matter the weather.
They don't have a definite hour of
operation. It all depends on how the
day moves along. Some days are slow,
other days sales may be good -
especially on payday.
Items such as thread, needles,
combs, knives, earrings, necklaces,
bracelets, flashlights, sunglasses,
bobby pins and fruits are some of the
many items sold by peddlers on their
vending stands.
Things you might not even be
looking for you may find in the
"buhoneros" stands at fabulous
prices. Even shoes. This last item
seems to be the "hot item" nowadays
for the "buhoneros."
"Competition is strong and hard,"
Carlas Martinez said. Martinez
supports her two brothers and mother
and has been doing this job for four
years.
Setting an attractive booth, good
prices and good merchandise are the
main tools for success in this every
day business.
"We are poor people and in order to
obtain something in life we have to


A s times goes on
and years go by,
the peddlers have be-
come part of our
cutlure. They express
their feelings in what
they do. As low income
people, they have great
dreams of some day
overcoming their pov-
erty.


make big efforts and sacrifices,"
Martinez said. "Working on your own
helps you make enough to bring home
a daily living."
"Trying to keep the business going
is not an easy task. I get up at 5 a.m.
every day and leave my house to start
out my business early," she said. "My
biggest sales happen in the morning
when people are going to work. Some
forget their lunches and always buy
some of my munchies."
Martinez believes in the saying, "El


que madruga, Dios lo ayuda," or "He
who gets up early, receives the help of
God." She thinks being a peddler is an
honest way of making a living and
supporting her family.
"Business out in the streets is very
difficult for everyone. You have to
deal with the roughness of weather,
traffic, strikes, parades, etc., and that
slows down our sales," she said.
In Panama, peddling has become a
controversy. It has its pros and cons
and lots of enemies, but many people
depend on this type of business.
"Our greatest enemies are the
owners of the big stores - many times
foreigners - that think we are in
competition with their businesses.
They have tried many times to get us
out of the streets in our country,"
Martinez said..
Some peddlers consider back-to-
school season one of the most profit-
able times in this business. Their main
items for sale are school supplies such
as note pads, bond paper, pencils,
school bags, ball point pens, rulers,
tape, book covers, labels and more.
Peddlers, street vendors and many
other people who work on their own
are found all over the streets day after
day trying to earn a living.
"Good or bad days don't matter.
Keeping our aim high is really what
counts," Martinez said. "Today is not a
good day, but tomorrow the sun will be
bright for us and the next day will be
better. This keeps our spirits going
high."


El

Z!


t"� R,04"" C4*Si T4,0� T;-� 44


I









community news


Students net $4,000 in scholarships


FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Atlantic) - The Atlan-
tic Community Women's Club recently invested $4,000
for the continued education of four high school students
here.
The ACWC awarded scholarships to four seniors from
Cristobal Junior/Senior High School at a May 24 dinner at
the Fort Davis Community Club.
The chance at earning one of the scholarships was open
to all seniors and first-year college students, but ACWC
only received five applications, said Tina Dodson, ACWC
president.
The recipients were chosen from those applications
based on grade point average, community involvement and
an essay that had to be submitted with the application,
Dodson added.
The recipients and amounts of each scholarship were:


Aubrey Thomas, $500; KentGrubbs, $1,000; Marc Johnson,
$1,000; and Todd Cox, $1,500.
These scholarships bring the total the organization has
donated for continued education to $4,600.
Additionally, the ACWC has donated nearly $2,400 to
various community agencies like American Red Cross,
Department of Defense Dependents Schools and the Girl
Scouts, Dodson said.
The club has two main sources of income - its annual
Christmas Bazaar and the Thrift Shop on Fort Espinar
which is open 10 a.m.- 2 p.m. Monday, Wednesdays and
Friday.
"It's important to give this money back to the commu-
nity, because it's our community," Dodson said. "Any
amount we can give back enhances our families and makes
this a better community."


Security police name their filly 'Elly'


HOWARD AFB (24th
Wing/PA) - The name m e
Elly was chosen from ' J
1,560 suggestions to name
the 24th Security Police
Squadron's filly during a .
contest held March 31-
May 2.
Amanda Staton, a stu-
dent at Howard Elementa-
ry School submitted Elly
as the winning name. In * .,
all, the 24th SPS received i
2,265 entries, many sug- Amanda Stanton and Elly
gesting the same name,
from nine Department of Defense Dependents Schools in
Panama.
Staton, the daughter of Master Sgt. Alan and Sharon
Staton, got her idea from the pronunciation of L.E., a
common abbreviation for Air Force law enforcement
activities.
The committee felt Elly is a feminine name as well as an
inspirational one, said Staff Sgt. Jacqueline White, 24th


SPS Crime Prevention Noncommissioned Officer.
The winner was selected by a committee of senior
noncommissioned officers. Members were given only the
entries, not the names of the students making the submis-
sion, to keep the contest fair, according to White. Each
judge narrowed his choices to three and from there the fmai
selection was made.
Staton received a $100 savings bond from the 24th SPS
and a $50 gift certificate from the Army and Air Force
Exchange Service. She was also given a photo of herself
with the newly-named filly.
"The contestwas great success," said Lt. Col. Natividad
Gonzalez, 24th SPS commander. "There were so many
good names submitted that I decided to give one of them to
our new horse also."
Justice, suggested by four students, is the name of the
new horse. Suzie Gachez, daughter of Roberto and Eliza-
beth Gachez; Chad Hirata, son of Tech. Sgt. Dalton and
Mary Hirata; Christina Short, daughter of StaffSgt. Daphne
and Marvin Wade; and Danielle Wheeler, daughter of Sgt.
1st Class Jack and Anita Wheeler, each received a $10
AAFES certificate and a gift from the 24th SPS Crime
Prevention Section.


~. 9'.


Appreciation Day U.S. Air Force photo
Alejandro Lombardo, a janitor in Building 703 at Howard AFB, shakes hands with Chief Master
Sgt. Charles Shaffer, 24th Wing senior enlisted advisor, during the Kuna Appreciation Day f ish
fry. About 150 Kunas who work at Howard and Albrook attended the event which was hosted
by the base chapel and 241h Services Squadron.


Curundu
TheU.S. Army South Pacific Community Chapel
Vacation Bible School will be Monday through
June 24 at the Curundu Junior High School. Volun-
teers are needed to staffthe event. Interested military
personnel should call their unit chaplain. For infor-
mation, call 287-303 1.

Gorgas
The Pacific Health Consumers Committee
monthly meeting will be held 3 p.m. June 28 at the
Headquarters conference room at Gorgas Army
Community Hospital. Representatives from mili-
tary units, civilian organizations and spouses groups
are invited to attend. For information, call Elsa
Bermudez at 282-5233.

Clayton
An Exceptional Family Member Program sup-
port group potluck dinner will be held 7 -8:30 p.m.
Tuesday at the Youth Center, Building 155, Fort
Clayton. All active duty, retired military and De-
partment of Defense civilian families who have
family members with disabilities are invited to
attend. If special services or accommodations are
needed because ofa disability, call 287-5073/4921.
The American Red Cross Summer Youth
Program orientation will be held 9 a.m. Monday
at the Fort Clayton Youth Center, Building 155.
Volunteers must be 14 years old, have attended an
orientation and be available for at least four weeks
of service. Call the Red Cross at 287-5509.
An organizational meeting to form a Young
Mother's Support Group will be held at 10 a.m.
Monday at the U.S. Southern Command Chaplain's
Office, Building 156, Fort Clayton. Call Chaplain
Leon Kircher at 287-5255/3497.
The "Growing Godly Summer Bible Study"
will be held daily at 9 a.m. from now until Aug. 23
at the Fort Clayton Chapel. Child care is provided.
Reservations must be made through the Child De-
velopment Center. For information, call Charlotte
Fredereich at 287-3188.
A first aid class in Spanish for maids will be
held 8 a.m-5 p.m., July 23 Pn the third floor,
Building 519. For information, call 287-5509.
The Youth in Christ Come Along With Jesus
Program will be held 6:30- 8 a.m. Monday through
June 24 at Clayton Chapel. The program is open to
seventh to 12th graders. For information, call the
Fort Clayton Chapel.
The La Leche League meeting will be held 7
p.m. Tuesday at the Valent Recreation Center. All
pregnant and breastfeeding women and their babies
are welcome. Discussion topic will be "Your new
baby - getting breastfeeding off to a good start."
For information, call Debbie Owens at 236-0338.
The American Red Cross is sponsoring a com-
munity first aid and safety course on the third
floor in Building 519, 6 -10 p.m. Tuesday through
Thursday. The class will feature instruction on adult
and infant CPR, safety procedures and first aid. For
information, call Abbe Lester at 287-5509.
Regular Islamic prayer services are held 12:30-
1:30 p.m. each Friday at the Fort Clayton Chapel
hall. For more information, call 287-5859.
For people transferring to new duty stations, the
Army Community Service Relocation Assistance
Office helps in the search for housing, employment
and educational possibilities. Call 289-4021/4636.

Miscellaneous
The Diamond FM Great American Giveaway
contest continues until July 7. Participants can sign
up at the Howard AFB, Corozal or Fort Davis main
exchanges, and listen to Southern Command Net-
work radio at 91.5 FM Pacific/98.3 FM Atlantic for
details. Prizes include airline tickets to the United
States, 35mm cameras, luggage. The grand prize
drawing will be July 8.

Atlantic
The American Red Cross is offering a commu-
nity first aid and safety course 9 a.m.-3 p.m. July
26-27 at the Sundial Recreation Center.
Forinformation, call 289-3595.

0-


Tropic Times
June 17, 1994B5


Community activities I--,


I










DB6 Tropic Times
B 6June 17, 1994


//


0 0 0 0


Rodman
*Information, Tour and Travel:
The Navy ITT office hours of opera-
tion are 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday through
Friday.
El Valle Shopping Trip, 7 a.m. June
26, $12. At least 12 people are needed.
Shop for local handicrafts, plants, fruits
and vegetables and visit the nature Ore-
serve.
Panama City Tour 9 a.m. June 25,
$8, minimum of 10 people is needed. Visit
the Church of the Golden Altar, French
Plaza and more.
Barro Colorado Island 6 a.m. June
25, $65, a minimum of two people is
needed for the trip. Visit the tropical re-
search island in the canal's Gatun Lake.
San Bias Island today and Saturday,
$149. A minimum of two people is need-
ed. Visit the San Blas Archipielago and
shop for molas and other handicrafts and
snorkel in the crystal clear waters near the
island.
' Albrook/Howard
+Zodiac Community Activities Center:


Free Zone shopping 8:30 a.m.-4:30
p.m. today and June 24, $13 for transpor-
tation. Enjoy duty-free shopping in the
city of Colon.
El Valle shopping tour 6:30 a.m.-
4:30 p.m. Sunday. The fee is $13 per
person.
Darien Indian village 7 a.m.-7 p.m.
Saturday $25 per person.
Factory outlet shopping 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
Tuesday $4 per person.
Isla Grande Father's Day weekend
today through Sunday.
Mud bath tour in Penonome Posada
Viejas 7 a.m.-5 p.m. June 25.
San Carlos family beach trip June 26.
*Outdoor adventures:
Peacock bass fishing 5 a.m.-2 p.m.
Sunday, $25 per person.
El Valle horseback riding with lunch
at a local restaurant Saturday.
Canoeing and barbecue lunch on the
Chagres 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday and June
25, .$20 per person.
Visit Panama 7-9 p.m. June 24. There
will be newcomer's show at the Zodiac
Community Activities Center.


White water rafting in Chiriqui June
30-July 4.
Snorkel and scuba June 24-26 at San
Bias.
Clayton
*Valent Recreation Center:
Free Zone shopping 7 a.m.-3 p..m.
today.
Costa Rica tour July 1-4. Register by
Monday. Trip includes three nights/four
days at Hotel Gran Costa Rica, round-trip
ticket and city tour.
*Outdoor Recreation Center:
Partial transits of the Panama Ca-
nal 7:30-11:30 a.m. Saturday, $40. A
minimum of 20 people is needed for a
partial transit on any other day of the
week.
Gatun Lake train wreck dive Satur-
day.
Customized trips are available for
groups with a minimum of four or 10
people.
There are fives spots available for a
Chriqui whitewater rafting trip June
24-26. The fee is $160 for adults and $125


for youths ages 12-18. Fee includes lodg-
ing, meals, a tour of Boquete/Cerro Punto
area and one-day rafting.
Balboa
*Balboa Dive Club:
Dive trip to Aquatic Park in Portobelo
June 25-26. The cost is $25,per person and
includes accommodations, four boat dives
and a barbecue.
Sign up by Wednesday by writing to:
Unit 0967 APO AA 34002 or calling 284-
5177 or 250-0346.
Dive trip to the San Bias Islands July
2-4. The cost is $310 per person and in-
cludes transportation, accommodations,
meals, beverages, six tanks, shipment of
equipment, two boat dives per day. A
deposit of $100 is required to reserve a
space. Write or call the club or call 250-
0346.
The club is now accepting new mem-
bers. Divers must show a diving certifica-
tion card to join and membership is $12
per driver per year. For more information,
write the club or call 263-8077 or 250-
0075.


*0*


Albrook/Howard
*Zodiac Community Activities Cen-
ter:
Intro to scuba, a free one-night class is
available.
Water exercise class for beginning to
advanced swimming for adults at both
pools.
Tae Kwon Do Korean karate class 6-
7:30 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Fri-
day, $25 per month.
Beginner and advanced English and
Spanish classes begin monthly and run
four weeks. Classes are under way through
June 30.
Beginner and advanced dog obedi-
ence classes are held at the Howard Parade
Field. Four-week class costs $32. A mini-
mum of five people is needed.
*Albrook Auto shop:
Air conditioning service and repair
12:30-5 p.m. every day except Tuesday
and Wednesday.
Wheel alignment diagnostic and ser-
vice classes are held 3-9 p.m. Monday,
/ Thursday and Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday.
/ Clayton
*Fort Clayton Boat Shop:
Bass fishing at Gatun Lake, $20 fee
includes guide, boat, bait and rods.
Deep sea fishing, $200 fee includes
captain, gear, lures and fuel.
+Valent Recreation Center:
Korean karate class 6-8 p.m. Tues-
days and Thursdays. Admission to the first


class is free.
Ten week Spanish headstart class
meets 6-8 p.m. Wednesday and 5-7 p.m.
Friday. The next class will be held July
4.
Private piano and guitar lessons are
available weekday evenings. The instruc-
tor meets privately with the students for 30
minutes.
Swimming three days a week.
*Fort Clayton Scuba Shop:
The phone is temporarily out of or-
der because of renovations. Call 287-6453/
5807 for information.
Basic open-water scuba class, $115.
Advanced open-water scuba, $140.
Rescue scuba, $119.
Underwater photography, $99.
Curundu
*Twin Oceans Pro Shop:
Equipment available for scuba, snor-
kel, tennis, camping and other outdoor
recreation.
*Pacific Theatre Arts Centre:
Monthly classes available ranging from
various dance lessons, voice, guitar and
piano and martial arts. Call 286-3814 for
information.
Rodman
*Rodman Marina:
A boating safety class will be held 6-
9 p.m. July 11 and 13 at Building 24 (next
to Pizza Hut) on Rodman NS. Cost is $35
and includes all materials and qualifica-
tion test drive. Call the Rodman Marina at
283-3147.


)


Stackin' fish Department of Defense photo by Sgt. Rick Emert
Staekin' fish


Spc. Brie
up his ca
4 unit. Am


// / /
0- . - - - /^

held Saturday
Disco Cove.
An "all-night" disco will be held Sat- The designal
urday and Sunday at the Howard Enlisted programs will 1
Members' Club. Theatre
The designated safe driver and safe ride Theatre
programs will be in effect. *Pacific Th
An "all night" kicker dance will be Advanced


in Shalosky of the 747th Military Intelligence Battalion, lines
itch in a peacock bass fishing tournament sponsored by his
long the line-up is his winner in the smallest fish category.





and Sunday at the Casual through Aug. 12. Previous dance training
required.
ted safe driver and safe ride *National Concert Association of Pan-
be in effect. ama:
The Budapest Chapter Orhestra has
included Panama in its 1994 tour. These
theatre Arts Center: 20 musicians will perform July 12 direct-
modern dance Monday ed by James Brooks-Bruzzese.









Tropic Times B7
notices June 17, 1994
otices


r -rv





~ _u_,.b-


ar Owl Y


Coutesy photo


El Valle


Allison Russell enjoys the view in El Valle on a horseback riding trip. The Zodiac Community
Activities Center is sponsoring a horseback riding trip to El Valle Saturday.


../ / /
A g


*Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts
Center:
Fabric painting classes 6:30-
8:30 p.m. the first and third Wednes-
day and Thursday of each month,
$7.50. Some supplies are available.
Stone stroke classes 11 a.m.
Sunday, $10. Paint ceramic figu-
rines to look like stoneware.
Custom frames to order and
do-it-yourself frame classes are
available.
The Ceramic Center, Building
198, is located near the Crafts Shop.



/



*Valent Recreation Center:
/ The screening room offers free
movies. Calling the 24-hour movie
line at 287-4367.
Dart players may win a $1,000
first prize and large merchandise
prizes during this year's dart tour-
nament at the Valent Recreation
Center. Qualify for the June tourna-
ment by playing at Valent. Call
Anne Kelly at 287-6500.


*Canal Crafters:
Handmade arts and crafts are
available. Consignment and volun-
teers are welcome by the shop staff.
The shop features seasonal dis-
plays and is open 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Monday through Saturday, Build-
ing 804, Albrook. Call 286-4500.
Classes are available. Sign up at the
shop.
Quilting classes run the first,
second and fourth Tuesday of the
month; intermediate 10:15 a.m.-
noon; beginner 12:15-2 p.m.


*Howard Skills Development
Center:
Free porcelain pouring class
10 a.m.-noon today. Bring or buy
slip and tools.
The 1994 photo contest is com-
ing in August. Call for details.
Ongoing classes include stained
glass, cross-stitch, framing, clay
flower, pottery wheel throwing,
macrame, air brush techniques, and
lamp assembly. Several "how-to"
videos are available for free view-
ing.


Army art historical print exhi- Watermelon day 3 p.m. June
bition in honor of flag day today. 25.
Better Opportunities for *Zodiac Community Center:
Single Soldiers forum meets the The activities room is avail-
irst Thursday of every month and able to rent for private functions.
s open to all barracks residents. Call 284-6161 to reserve a date.
*Cocoli Community Center: Subs on Top has take-out, eat-
Arts and crafts for children in or delivery service to Kobbe,
3:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday. Farfan, Howard and Gateway hous-
Father's Day picnic 2 p.m. Sat- ing. Fax in orders at 284-6109 or
urday. call 284-5848.





5:30-6 p.m. Thursday. Pool tournament Sunday.


/ 2- -.-.... .. .....w Spanish 6-7 p.m. tuesday and
+Sundial Recreation Center: Friday.
Mini triathlon 7 a.m. Saturday. Beginning Painting 6-8 p.m.
Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. Mon- Monday and Wednesday.
day, Wednesday and Friday. *Ocean Breeze Recreation
Family exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m. Center:
Wednesday. The center offers a variety of
A Piano 10:30-11 a.m. Wednesday. classes such as karate, cake deco-
A Karate 6-7 p.m. Monday and rating, piano, Spanish, English,
J Wednesday. country line dancing and jazz. Call
Gymnastics and ballet lessons 289-6402 for information.
.4


Pacific
24th Services Squadron Sports and
Recreational Rental Center, 284-6107
Albrook Auto Craft Shop, 286-3613
Albrook Club, 286-4128
Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333
Anchorage Club, 283-4332
Canal Crafters 286-4500
Chief Petty Officers' Club, 283-5475
Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-5957
Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453
Clayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360
Clayton NCO Club, 287-3586
Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363
Clayton Scuba Shop 287-3355
Club Amador, 282-3534
Cocoli Recreation Center, 287-4119
Howard Auto Craft Shop, 284-3370
Howard Enlisted Members' Club, 284-4107
Howard Officers' Club, 284-4680
Howard Riding Stables 284-3770
Howard Skills Development Center, 284-6361
Howard Teen Center, 284-4700
Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-4510
The Loop, 287-3035
Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814
Quarry Heights Officers' Club, 282-4380
Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150
Rodman Naval Station Information Tour
and Travel Office, 283-5307/4454
Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514
Valent Recreation Center, 287-6500
Zodiac Community Activities Center, 284-
6161
Atlantic
Aquativity Center, 289-4009
Davis Arts and Crafts Center, 289-5201
Davis Community Club, 289-5160
Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402
Outdoor Recreation, 289-4077
Sherman Arts and Crafts Center, 289-6313
Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-6104
Sundial Recreation Center, 289-3889/3300


Atlantic tours
*Sundial Recreation Center:
Panama overnight, 8 a.m. June
25-26.
*Ocean Breeze Recreation
Center:
El Valle 5:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun-
day.
Colon historical tour 9 a.m.-2
p.m. Thursday.


~~s~1:
~ .l.* ~
.1


Rec center news


f

i









B8 Tropic Times
SJune 17, 1994


# --Movies


Location

Howard AFB
284-3583


Fort Clayton
287-3279


Fort Davis
289-5173


Today
I 7pm: Cops &
Robbersons (PG)
Chevy Chase,
Jack Palance
9pm: The Chasers (R)
Tom Berenger,
William McNamara


Saturday
2pm: Cops &
Robbersons (PG)
Chevy Chase,
Jack Palance
7pm: The Chasers (R)
Tom Berenger,
William McNamara
9pm: Above the Rim
(R) Duane Martin,
Leon
Tupac Shakur


Sunday
2pm: Cops &
Robbersons (PG)
Chevy Chase,
Jack Palance
7pm: Above the Rim
(R) Duane Martin,
Leon
Tupac Shakur
9pm: The Chasers (R)
Tom Berenger,
William McNamara


Monday
7pm: Cops &
Robbersons (PG)
Chevy Chase,
Jack Palance
9pm: Above the Rim
(R) Duane Martin,
Leon
Tupac Shakur


Tuesday
7pm: Brainscan (R)
Edward Furlong,
Frank Langella
9pm: In the Name of
the Father (R)
Daniel Day-Lewis,
Emma Thompson


i i i - +


2pm: D2: Mighty
Ducks Are Back (PG)
Emilio Estevez,
Michael Tucker
7pm: Clifford (PG)
Martin Short,
Charles Grodin


7pm: Major League II
(PG) Charlie Sheen,
Tom Berenger
9pm: The Paper (R)
Michael Keaton,
Glenn Close


2pm: D2: Mighty
Ducks Are Back (PG)
Emilio Estevez,
Michael Tucker
7pm: Clifford (PG)
Martin Short,
Charles Grodin
9pm: White Fang 2
(PG) Scott Bairstow,
Charmaine Craig

7pm: Major League II
(PG) Charlie Sheen,
Tom Berenger
9pm: Jimmy
Hollywood (R)
Joe Pesci,
Christian Slater


7pm: D2: Mighty
Ducks Are Back (PG)
Emilio Estevez,
Michael Tucker
9pm: Clifford (PG)
Martin Short,
Charles Grodin


7pm: The Paper (R)
Michael Keaton,
Glenn Close


7pm: White Fang 2
(PG) Scott Bairstow,
Charmaine Craig
9pm: D2: Mighty
Ducks Are Back (PG)
Emilio Estevez,
Michael Tucker


7pm: Major League II
(PG) Charlie Sheen,
Tom Berenger


7pm: Clifford (PG)
Martin Short,
Charles Grodin
9pm: White Fang 2
(PG) Scott Bairstow,
Charmaine Craig


7pm: Jimmy Hollywood
(R) Joe Pesci,
Christian Slater


Wednesday
7pm: Bad Girls (R)
Madeleine Stowe,
Mary Stuart Masterson
9pm: Brainscan (R)
Edward Furlong,
Frank Langella





7pm: Above the Rim
(R) Duane Martin,
Leon, Tupac Shakur
9pm: The Chasers (R)
Tom Berenger,
William McNamara


7pm: White Fang 2
(PG) Scott Bairstow,
Charmaine Craig


Thursday
7pm: Thumbelina (G)
Animated
9pm: Bad Girls (R)
Madeleine Stowe,
Mary Stuart Masterson


7pm: Cops &
Robbersons (PG)
Chevy Chase,
Jack Palance
9pm: Above the Rim
(R) Duane Martin,
Leon
Tupac Shakur



7pm: Clifford (PG)
Martin Short,
Charles Grodin


Fort Sherman 7:30pm: Jimmy 7:30pm: The Paper 7:30pm: Major No show No show No show 7:30pm: White Fang 2
289-5173 Hollywood (R) Joe (R) Michael Keaton, League II (PG) (PG) Scott Bairstow,
Pesci, Christian Slater Glenn Close Charlie Sheen, Charmaine Craig
Tom Berenger

Fort Amador 7pm: Naked Gun 33 7pm: In the Name of 7pm: Brainscan (R) No show No show No show 7pm: Bad Girls (R)
284-3583 1/3 (PG-13) the Father (R) Edward Furlong, Madeleine Stowe,
Leslie Nielsen, Daniel Day-Lewis, Frank Langella Mary Stuart Masterson
Priscilla Presley Emma Thompson


June 24


Howard AFB
i 7pm Thumbelina
(G)
Animated
9pm Bad Girls (R)
Madeleine Stowe.
Mary Stuart
Masterson


Fort Clayton
7pm Cops & Robbersons
(PG)
Chevy Chase,
Jack Palance
9pm The Chasers (R)
Tom Berenger,
William McNamara


Fort Davis
7pm D2: Mighty Ducks
Are Back (PG)
Emilio Estevez,
Michael Tucker
9pm White Fang 2
(PG)
Scott Bairstow
Charmaine Craig


Fort Sherman
7:30pm Clifford (PG)
Matin Short
Charles Grodin


Fort Amador


7pm


In the Name of
the Father (R)
Daniel Day-Lewis
Emma Thompson


Abovethe

Duane Martin, eCI iU T1 1 1
Leon
Kyle-Lee Watson is
a promising high "Better than the fi t!
school basketball ,
player torn between I ^ r a l
dealing drugs on the -., o�,,-
streets of Harlem and '
trying to reach his A. " A hilarious home run!"
goal with the Nation- ,. "
al Basketball Associ-
ation. R (pervasive
strong language, vio-
lence), 98 min.

The Chasers 6
Tom Berenger,
William McNamara *
A couple of mis- ....
match Navy shore
patrolmengettherou- Now showing at Davis and Sherman theaters.


tine assignment to es-
cort a prisoner from local detention back
to the base. The prisoner is the lovely
Erika Eleniak who takes every opportu-
nity to escape. Cross-country madness
ensues as the captive tries every possible
way to gain her freedom. R (strong lan-
guage, scene of sexuality), 105 min.

Cops & Robbersons
Chevy Chase,
Jack Palance
Chevy Chase's home life is wrecked
when he has to help the police stake out
his neighbor suspected of being with the
Mafia. PG (mild violence, language, some
comic nudity), 95 min.

Clifford
Martin Short,
Charles Grodin
Martin Short plays Clifford, a 10-year-
old boy who is cute and adorable except
when he doesn't get his way.While his
parents are in Hawaii he makes his un-
cle's life unbearable just because he


won't take him to Dinosaur World. PG,
98 min.

D2: Mighty Ducks
Are Back
Emilio Estevez,
Michael Tucker
Everyone's favorite misfit hockey team
hits the ice again for a new season of
hilarity. This time out, the coach moves
to Los Angeles to head the Goodwill
Games. As the Ducks flock along, they
leave a trail of comic chaos in their wake.
PG (mild language), 107 min.

White Fang 2
Scott Bairstow,
Charmaine Craig
The adventure-filled sequel to the hit
1992 Disney family film is a spectacular
outdoor saga based on Jack London's
legendary animal creation, White Fang.
He and his new human partner face dan-
ger and excitement when they take on a
greedy mining company. PG (mild ac-
tion, violence), 105 min.


Major
League II
Charlie Sheen,
Tom Berenger
After having won
their champion-
ship, the Cleveland
Indians have
slumped back into
their old losing
ways. It seems the
players have been
distracted by ex-
pensive cars, doing
endorsements and
other nonbaseball
activities. PG
(some rude lan-
guage), 100 min.

Jimmy
Hollywood
Joe Pesci,
Christian Slater


Hoping to get attention and to achieve
fame for himself, an out-of-work actor
becomes a vigilante superhero on the
streets of Hollywood. R (language),
110 min.

The Paper
Michael Keaton,
Glenn Close
Trying to beat the deadline for a story in
the New York Sun newspaper, an editor
rushes to expose a major scandal which
could possibly lead to the release of two
innocent young men charged with mur-
der. R (strong language), 112 min.

Naked Gun 33 1/3
Leslie Nielsen,
Priscilla Presley
Leslie Nielsen returns for an all new
adventure with all new dialogue and
some new costumes. This time, now
retired police Lt. Frank Drebin is drawn
back to undercover duty when he stum-
bles into a terrorist plot. PG-13 (off
color humor), 83 min.











#TV Schedule


Tropic Times B
June 17, 1994B 9


nl * Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time

Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
5:30am NBC News at Sunrise 6:30am Headline News 6:00am CCMTV 5:30am NBC News at Sunrise 5:30am NBC News at Sunrise 5:30am NBC News at Sunrise 5:30am NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America 7:00 Navy/MarineCorpsNews 6:30 Hour of Power 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America
8:00 Basic Training Workout 7:30 Real News For Kids 7:00 Voices Of Faith 8:00 Basic Training Workout 8:00 Bodyshaping 8:00 Basic Training Workout 8:00 Bodyshaping
8:30 Sesame Street 8:00 Guts 7:25 Catch The Spirit 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Murder She Wrote 8:30 Just for Kids! 8:00 CBS Sunday Morning 9:30 Murder, She Wrote 9:30 Murder, She Wrote 9:30 Murder, She Wrote 9:30 Murder, She Wrote
10:25 Guiding Light Sonic The Hedgehog 9:30 Face The Nation 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Sally Jesse Ra-
11:10 General Hospital CRO *** 10:00 Washington Week In 11:10 General Hospital 11:10 General Hospital 11:10 General Hospital phael ****
Noon Headline News Break Teenage Mutant Ninja Review Noon Headline News Break Noon Headline News Break Noon Headline News Break 11:10 General Hospital
12:15 SCN Midday Turtles 10:30 This Week w/Brinkley 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday. Noon Headline News Break
12:30 Sportscenter WildWestC.O.W.Boys 11:30 America's Black Forum 12:30 Sports Machine 12:30 Sportscenter 12:30 Sportscenter 12:15 SCN Midday Report
1:00 Another World Of Moo Mesa Noon NASCAR: Michigan 1:00 Another World 1:00 Another World 1:00- Another World 12:30 Sportscenter
2:00 Oprah Winfrey EEK! The Cat 400 2!00 Oprah Winfrey 2:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 2:00 Oprah Winfrey 1:00 Another World
3:00 Price is Right 10:30 Nature 3:00 PGA: U.S. Open Final 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 2:00 Donahue
4:00 Channel One 11:30 "Hidden Assets: Em- Round 4:00 Channel One 4:00 Channel One 4:00 Channel One 3:00 Price is Right
4:15 Newsroom poweringAmerica's 5:00 Science and Technology 4:15 Newsroom 4:15 Newsroom 4:15 Newsroom 4:00 Channel One
4:30 Legends of The Hidden Workers" Week 4:30 Guts 4:30 Ghostwriter 4:30 Shining Time Station 4:15 Newsroom
Temple 12:30pm Headline News 5:30 On Stage 1994 ** 5:00 Wheel Of Fortune 5:00 Wheel of Fortune 5:00 -Wheel of Fortune 4:30 Club Connect
5:00 Wheel of Fortune 1:00 Young Adult Theatre: 6:00 Center Stage 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:00 Wheel of Fortune
5:30 Showbiz Today "The Fourth Man" 7:00 ABC News "20/20" 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report .6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report 1:50 Movires: "Lassie: Ad- 8:00 Movie: "Without Warn- 6:30 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:30 Headline News Break ventures Of Neeka" ing: The James Brady 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight 3:05 "Bless The Beasts And Story" 7:00 Jeopardy! 7:00 Jeopardy! 7:00 Jeopardy! 6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Jeopardy! The Children" 9:35 Headline News Break 7:30 Roc 7:30 Answerline: "Youth 7:25 Fresh Prince Of Bel Air 7:00 Jeopardy!
7:30 America's Funniest 5:00 Showtime At The 10:00 Entertainment This 8:00 COPS Services" 7:50 Movie: "To Be The 7:25 Murphy Brown
Home Videos Apollo Week 8:30 60 Minutes 8:30 48 Hours Best" (Part 1) 7:50 Movie: "To Be The
8:00 Dave's World 6:00 Headline News 11:00 Poirot V 9:30 CBS Evening News 9:30 CBS Evening News 9:30 CBS Evening News Best" (Part 2)
8:30 Baywatch 6:30 Rescue 911 Midnight Headline News 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:00 SCN Late Edition 9:30 CBS Evening News
9:30 CBS Evening News 7:30 China Beach 12:30 Meet The Press 10:05 Entertainment Tonight 10:05 Entertainment Tonight 10:05 Entertainment Tonight 10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:00 SCN Late Edition 8:25 Movie: "Police Acade- 1:30 Headline News 10:35 David Letterman 10:35 David Letterman 10:35 David Letterman 10:05 Entertainment Tonight
10:05 Entertainment Tonight my 2: Their First As- 2:00 Sports Latenight 11:30 Tonight Show 11:30 Tonight Show 11:30 Tonight Show 10:35 David Letterman
10:35 David Letterman signment" 2:30 ABC World News Now 12:30am Headline News 12:30am Headline News 12:30am Headline News 11:30 Tonight Show
11:30 Tonight Show 10:00 Headline News 3:00 Headline News 1:00 Nightline 1:00 Nightline 1:00 Nightline 12:30am Headline News
12:30am Headline News 10:30 Saturday Night Live 3:30 Sports Machine 1:30 Sports Latenight 1:30 Sports Latenight 1:30 Sports Latenight 1:00 Nightline
1:00 Nightline Midnight World Wrestling Fed- 4:00 ABC World News Now 2:00 Arsenio Hall 2:00 Arsenio Hall 2:00 Arsenio Hall 1:30 Sports Latenight
1:30 Movies: "Glengarry eration 5:00 Headline News Break 3:00 Headline News 3:00 Headline News 3:00 Headline News 2:00 Arsenio Hall
Glen Ross" 1:00 Friday Night Videos 3:30 Tonight Show 3:30 Tonight Show 3:30 Tonight Show 3:00 Headline News
3:15 "Dog Day Afternoon" 2:00 Movies: "Couch Trip" 4:30 Headline News 4:30 Headline News 4:30 Headline News 3:30 Tonight Show
5:15 Videolinks 3:35 "Back To School" 5:00 Headline News Break 5:00 Headline News Break 5:00 Headline News Break- 4:30 Headline News
5:30 Headline News 5:10 Videolinks1 5:00 Headline News Break
6:00 Headline News Break 5:30 Headline News Break 500 Headlne News Break


C b e c al * Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time

Today Saturday Sunday ,Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday -
5:30am Simulcast with Chan- 6:30am Simulcast with Chan- 6:00am Shining Time Station 5:30am Simulcast with Chan- 5:30am Simulcast with Chan- 5:30am Simulcast with Chan- 5:30am Simulcast with Chan-
nels 8 & 10 nels 8& 10 6:30 McGeeAndMe nels 8 & 10 nels8& 10 nels8& 10 nels8& 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey 10:30 World Cup Soccer: 6:50 Sonic The Hedgehog 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Donahue 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Sally Jesse Raphael
9:00 Today Switzerland vs The 7:15 Disney's Little Mermaid 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek United States 7:35 Darkwing Duck ** 11:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek
Noon Headline News Break 1:00 Movies: "Friendly Per- 8:00 Tiny Toons Adventures Noon Headline News Break Noon Headline News Break Noon Headline News Break Noon Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday suasion" 8:20 Classic Cartoons 12:15. SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 All My Children 3:20 "Runaway Father" 8:45 EEK! The Cat 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live 5:00 American Gladiators 9:05 Teenage Mutant Ninja 1:30 One Life To Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless 6:00 Headline News Turtles 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Teenage Mutant Ninja 6:30 The Simpsons 9:30 Science & Technology 3:30 Tiny Toons Adventures 3:30 EEK! The Cat 3:30 Sonic The Hedgehog 3:30 Disney's Little Mer-
Turtles 7:00 Lois & Clark: The Ad- Week 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fraggle Rock maid
4:00 Fraggle Rock ventures Of Superman 10:00 Motor Week 4:30 Clarissa Explains It All 4:30 Legend Of The Hidden 4:30 Guts 4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Ghost Writer 8:00 Star Trek: "Deep Space 10:30 Sports Closeup 5:00 Club Connect Temple 5:00 Nick News: WS 4:30 Get The Picture
5:00 Silver Spoons Nine" 11:00 This Week In Baseball 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:00 Mickey & Donald 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:00 The Wonder Years
5:30 The Cosby Show 9:00 Herman's Head 11:30 This Old House 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:30 The Cosby Show 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report 9:30 Married With Children Noon Headline News 6:15 Headline News Break 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News Break 6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break 10:00 Headline News 12:30 Mary Tyler Moore Show 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News 10:30 Saturday Night Live 1:00 Frugal Gourmet 7:00 MacGyver 6:30 NBC Nightly News 7:00 Hangin' With Mr. 6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 Primetime Live Midnight WWF Superstars 1:30 Movie: "Robin And 8:00 Melrose Place 7:00 Alf Cooper 7:00 Full House
8:00 NBA Basketball: Finals 1:00 Friday Night Videos Marian" 9:00 Movie: "Cold Sassy 7:30 Home Improvement 7:30 Seinfeld 7:30 Family Matters
Game #5 2:00 Entertainment This 3:20 Perry Mason: "The Case Tree" 8:00 Picket Fences 8:00 NBA Basketball: Finals 8:00 Living Single *
10:30 21 Jump Street+ Week Of The Avenging Ace" 10:40 SCIMED Health Test 9:00 Martin Game #7 (if necessary) 8:30 Joe's Life
11:25 SCN Late Edition 3:00 Headline News 5:00 Wonderful World "The Fat Or Fit Test" 9:25 Movie:Stephen King's 10:30 NYPD Blue + 9:00 Dateline NBC
11:30 Nightline 3:30 Saturday Night Live Of Disney + 11:00 Headline News "Sleepwalkers" 11:25 SCN Late Edition 10:00 Miami Vice
Midnight M*A*S*H 5:00 Videolinks 6:00 NBA Basketball: Finals 12:30am Simulcast with 8&10 11:25 SCN Late Edition 11:30 Nightline 11:00 Headline News
12:30 Larry King Live 5:30 Headline News Break Game #6 11:30 Nightline 12:00 M*A*S*H or 11:25 SCN Late Edition
1:30 Sports Latenight 8:30 Headline News 12:00 M*A*S*H 8:00 Tour Of Duty 11:30 Nightline
2:00 Arsenio Hall 9:00 Movie: "The Where- 12:30am Simulcast with 8&10 9:00 NYPD Blue 12:00 M*A*S*H
3:00 Headline News about Of Jenny" 10:00 Murder, She Wrote 12:30am Simulcast with 8&10
3:30 Tonight Show 10:40 Grace under Fire 11:00 Headline News
4:30 David Letterman 11:05 Day One 11:25 SCN Late Edition
5:30 Simulcast with 8&10 Midnight Simulcast with 8&10 11:30 Nightline
12:00 M*A*S*H
12:30 Simulcast with 8&10


Channels 8 & 10
Sports ,i,
X.T. . . . . . . . ... . . . . ...** A A. J/' .W 'i


Cable Channel 14
Sports


NASCAR: Michigan 400, noon Sunday ,'.M " 4!Wj41 NBA Basketball
PGA: U.S. Open Final Round, 3 p.m. Sunday Finals Game # 5, 8 p.m. today
Specials Finals Game # 6, 6 p.m. Sunday
Answerline: "Youth Services," 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. This Finals Game # 7, 8 p.m. Wednesday
month's topic is "Youth Services Summer Programs." Rep- World Cup Soccer
resentatives from the three services will answer questions. Switzerland vs. The United States, 10:30 a.m. Saturday
, ! -Switzerland vs. The United States, 10:30 a.m. Saturday
Call from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at 287-4460. . Series starts
Ties sat r ' Series starts
SSeries starts B "Darkwing Duck," 7:35 a.m. Sunday. (Replaces CRO) Do-gooder
"Hidden Assets: Empowering America's Workers," 11:30 a.m. Satur- ' Darkwing Duck saves the world from danger and destruction as Disney's
day. A look at how progressive American companies are learning to listen to ' latest animated hero. An adoptive single father and ace avenger balances
their employees and the benefits they reap from empowering these hidee parenting his precocious daughter Gosalyn with courageous crime fighting.
assets. Primetime movies
"On Stage 1994," 5:30 p.m. Sunday. This perennial country and western music "Cold Sassy Tree," 9 p.m. Monday. In 1906, Miss Love Simpson becomes the
series returns with another season of country stars captured in performances "on object of a scandal in the small town of Cold Sassy Tree, Ga., when she marries

Primetime movies Rucker Blackeslee, the much older proprietor of the town's general store, only three
"Police Academy 2: Their First Assignment," 8:20 p.m. Saturday. The Police weeks after his first wife died. The town and his family are shocked by his hasty
Academy gang returns to wage war on a bootlicking lieutenant and a gang ofruffians marriage. Stars Faye Dunaway and Richard Widmark.
led by the infamous "Meathead." Stars Steve Guttenberg and Howard Hessmin. "The Whereabouts Of Jenny," 8:30 p.m. Sunday. In this made-for-TV film, a
"Without Warning: The James Brady Story," 8 p.m. Sunday. The true story of divorced father fights to maintain a relationship with his daughter, who disappears
the wounding of press secretary James Brady during the assassination attempt on when his ex-wife and her new husband go into hiding under the Federal Witness
President Reagan and his battle to recover. Stars Beau Bridges and Joan Allen. Protection Program. Stars Ed O'Neill and Debrah Farentino.
"To Be The Best," 7:25 p.m. Wednesday. (Part 1) Romantic passions and greed Stephen King's "Sleepwalkers," 9:25 p.m. Tuesday. Based on an original script
for corporate power propel this soapy drama based on the sequel to Barbara Taylor by horromiester Stephen King, this gore-spattered excursion into terror follows the
Bradford's novels "A Woman of Substance" and "Hold The Dream." Stars Lindsay exploits of a mother/son family of shape changing creatures known as "Sleepwalk-
Wagner, Anthony Hopkins and Stephanie Beacham. ers." Stars Brian Krause and Madchen Amick.












S Classified Ads


B I Tropic Times
0 1 June 17, 1994


Duty-free merchandise

FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) - As a reminder,
in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern
Command regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used,
cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege hold-
ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu-
tion under both, military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes
permissible to sell an item. but only if Panamanian taxes are paid.
Before such a sale, it is strong) recommended that the seller contact
the Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-3117.


Wht male cat, 5 mos old, good w/kids,
some shots, $10. 287-3335.

CCP rottweiler puppies, females,
champion sire, show quality Dam,
avail June 30, $650. 287-6195.

Two yellow head parrots, Ig cage,
exerciser/climbing pole, access, pa-
pers, grt talkers, $300 for all. 286-
3441.

Borzoi puppies, pedigreed, reg,
wormed, shots, yet still affordable.
252-5648.

Male Saymoyed, 5 mos old, some
shots, needs a home, not reg, $75.
286-6132.

CCP/AKC reg basset hound pups,
males, females, $500. 50-0289 LD#.

Free, mix breed dog, all shots, neu-
tered, exc watch dog; free to good
home, kittens, 13 wks, box trained.
236-2035.

Female boxer, 8 mos old, brindle w/
cage, ears-& tail cropped, all shots, grt
w/kids, $250/obo. 286-4524.

German shepherd puppies, CCP reg,
exc pedigree, females, $350. 256-
6378.

Female longhaired blue Persian, CFA
reg for stud service of same kind.
260-8885.

Free, 2 kittens, 12 mos old, spayed &
neutered, litter trained, shots record,
good w/kids. 264-9677.

Free, white/blk kittens. 282-4608.

Golden retriever puppies, CCP reg,
shots, dewormed, ready to go. 289-
4044.

Boxer puppies, tails cropped, shots,
avail July 1. 286-4096 ask for Apryl.

Two colorful 10" Oscars, $40 both.
282-3490.

Free, 2 male & female kittens, grt w/
kids, shots, access. 289-4232.

Cocker spaniel puppies, champagne
color. 252-1257.

Purebred pomeranians, males, female,
avail July 6, $250; will take $100
deposit. 287-4471.

Pitbull/rottweiler puppies, I mosold,
$200. 50-0311 LD#.

German shepherd, 2 yrs old, grt w/
kids, male, well trained, $200/obo.
282-3778.

Cocker spaniel pups, blond, avail July
17, $150. 252-2641.

Doberman pinscher female for stud
services. 286-3371.






1988 Mazda MX-6, 2dr, at, ac, pw, sr,
5-star rims w/BF Goodrich tires, exc
cond, $10,000/neg. 286-3137.

1992 Ford Ranger XLT 4x4, ac, std,
4.0L V6, cd, bedliner, neg. 264-9059.

1993 Toyota Tercel, 5 sp, all extras,
exc cond, $8,200. 223-2550.

1990 Eagle Talon Tsi, turbo, 5 sp, all
extras, exc cond, $8,700. 223-2550.

1991 Jeep Wrangler, 4 cyl, sports
wheels, am-fm cass, bikini/soft tops,
exc cond, $10,000. 287-6934.

1990 Olds Cutlass Supreme, 4dr, pw/
d, pb, ps, ac, cass, 27,000 mi, not dty
pd, $15,000. 287-4223.

1989 Jeep Comanche, 50,000k, ps,
pb, ac, camper top, new tires, am-fm
cass, 5 sp, 4.0L, bedliner, $8,000.
226-0793.

1988 Dodge Daytona, 2dr, coupe, ac,
tinted, sr, am-fm cass, $4,200. 287-
5842.

1974 Maverick, am-fm cass, runs grt,
trans needs rebuilt, $900. 264-5327.


1993 Toyota p/u truck, Pioneer stereo,
ac, big tires, std, $15,000. 283-3439.

1981 Ford Fairmont, 4 cyl, ac, am-fmin
radio, new tires, starter, alternator,
$1,800. 284-5078.

1992 Dodge Caravan, good cond, 4
cyl, not dty pd, $12,500. 233-0744.

1988 Dodge Caravan SE, ps, pb, tw,
cc, at, tilt, good cond, dtynotpd, $7,500.
286-3327.

1991 Chevy S-10 p/u, 4 cyl, ps, pb,
alrb, 5 sp, ac, stereo cass, 28,000 mi,
not dty pd, $7,000/obo. 284-4292.

1983 Chevy Blazer, V6, 4WD, super
cond, many options, $4,500.283-3831
eves.

1978 Dodge Monaco, at, ps, pb, pw, pl,
tilt, ac, $800. 283-6330.

1991 GMC p/u, grt bargain, $5,800.
50-0363 LD#.

1986 Toyota Landcruiser4x4,4dr, die-
sel, not dty pd, $9,000. 252-6193.

1983 Buick Skylark, 4dr, at, ps, pb,
am-fin, cruise, 6 cyl, $2,000.289-5084.

1975 Chevy Camaro, good cond,
$1,000. 282-3410.

1989 Ford Phrobe, fully loaded, new
tires, good cond, $6,000. 243-5688.

1986 Mazda RX7, std, ac, radio cass,
runs good, new paint, tires, $4,500.
285-6544.

1990 F-150 XLT 4x4 w/8' bed, loaded,
low mil, Bluebook, $15,500; asking
$14,500/obo. 260-9356.

1986 Mazda RX7, exc cond, custom
wheels, ac, am-fm stereo cass, $6,500.
282-4415.

1986 Toyota Minivan mod F, ac, at, ps,
pb, pw, sr, radio cass, good cond, dty
pd, $6,000. 224-4190.

1991 Plymouth Voyager LE, V6, fully
loaded, at, ac, exc cond, $18,200. 287-
6233.

1980 Chevy Monza, 2dr, 4 sp, exc
mech cond, not dty pd, $1,000/obo.
282-3589.

1993 Jeep Wrangler, new cond, low
mil, stereo, $12,300. 264-9817.

1988 Jeep Suzuki Samurai 4x4 con-
vert, US specs, 1300cc, 5 sp, ac, wide
rims, soft top, $5,700. 252-2913.

1990 Honda Accord LX, 5 sp, am-fm
cass, pwr everything, exc cond,
$10,000. 287-5146.

1987 GMC p/u, 4WD, at, ps, pb, am-
fm cass, camper shell, $6,200. 230-
0957.

1990 Isuzu Trooper 4x4, V6, ac, am-
fm radio, ps, pb, 5 sp, exc cond, not dty
pd, $11,950. 260-0943.

1986 S- 15 Jimmy GMC 4x4, grt shape,
at, ac, pb, ps, new paint, radio. 224-
2876.

1991 Nissan Pathfinder, loaded, exc
cond, US specs. 260-1946.

1992 Mercury Grand Marquis, 18,000
mi, fully loaded, 4dr, at, exc cond, one
owner, $17,000. 282-3029.

1987 Mazda 626, 4dr, at, pw, pl, exc
cond, $6,000. 282-3029.

1987 Olds Cutlass Ciera, runs good,
$2,100/obo. 287-4935.

Plymouth Voyager Minivan, ac, new
tires, batt, good cond, $5,000. 284-
4786.

1989 Ford E-250 van, 12 pax, not dty
pd, dual tanks, ac, $10,900. 287-6236.

1990 Buick Century, 4dr, at, 6 cyl, ac,
ps, pb, am-fm cass, dty not pd, $7,400.
252-5376.

1988 Mustang LX, 60k, new comput-
er, tires, stereo/spkers, Iks/runs grt,
$5,600/obo. 260-3130.

1989 Firebird, at, 2.8, loaded w/low
mi, t-tops, stereo, $8,000/obo. 282-
3691.

1988 Jeep Cherokee 4x4, 2dr, ps, pb,
ac, 5 sp, exc cond, dty not pd, $11,000.
256-6373.


1990 Ford Phrobe, exc cond, $12,500/
obo. 287-6199.

1991 Chevy Astro Van CL, V6, at w/
OD, full pwr, ac, exc cond, $13,900.
287-6297.

1988 Dodge Shadow hatchbk, ac, pw,
pl, runs good, needs paintjob, $3,000.
287-6297.

1978 Ford T-bird, runs/Iks grt, ac, ps,
pb, $1,500. 287-3675.

1974 Ford Torino Ranchero p/u, V8
351, dty not pd, camper, best offer.
252-6844.

1988 VW Golf, dty pd, ps, ac, pb, at,
new paint, parts, like new cond, 45,000
mi, $3,700. 260-4564.

1991 Buick Regal, 4dr, at, ac, 28,000,
exc cond, not dty pd, $9,900. 264-
8244.

1992 Mitsubishi Eclipse GSX, twin
cam 16 valve turbo, 5 sp, 4WD, ac, cd,
dty pd, $20,000. 286-3925.

1984 Audi 80, 4dr, pw, pd, ac, good
cond. 223-7980.

1984 Volvo 760 GLE, all extras, exc
cond, $5,500/obo. 252-2031.

1990 Dodge Caravan, 57,000 mi,
$8,500 firm. 286-3245.

1979 Ford F 150 Ranger, super cab w/
camper shell, pb, ps, ac, 8 cyl, $3,900.
252-5006.

1988 Ford Escort, ps, pb, new tires,
ac, cd, amp, spkers, high mi, runs grt,
$3,995/obo. 286-3734.

1988 Ford Ranger 4x4, loaded, low
mi, exc cond, not dty pd, $12,000.
282-4383.

1978 Jeep CJ-5, 6 cyl, soft top, grt
cond, $4,500. 260-1740.

1980 Chevy Impala, new brakes, am-
fm stereo cass, runs grt, $1,500/obo.
287-4498.

1977 Dodge Aspen sta/wgn, ps, pb,
good running cond, $650/neg. 235-
0122.

1987 Suzuki Samurai, 4WD, 2 tops,
$3,600. 286-3674 after 5pm.

1980 Ford Bronco Ranger, V8 351,
no rust, exc cond, runs grt, removable
top, dty pd, best offer. 282-3194 after
5pm.

1990 Toyota Tercel, ac, at, 16,000 mi,
not dty pd, $7,500. 284-6326.

1991 Mazda 626, low mi, ac, ps, pb,
radio cass, exc cond, $9,500. 252-
5047.

Isuzu p/u, custom wheels, sr, bedliner,
cd w/amp & spkers, Iks/runs good,
$6,000. 287-3844.

1988 Chevy Corsica, 4dr, good cond,
at, $4,200. 287-6180.

1988 Plymouth Sundance, 49,000 mi,
5 sp, 4 cyl, runs grt, $2,500.286-3796.

1993 Nissan Bluebird, ac, at, 22,000
km, grt cond, $9,500. 286-3796.

1989 Nissan p/u, bedliner, ac, new
tires, one owner, low mi, exc cond,
$5,950. 236-3099.

1985 Toyota p/u, dty pd, $3,950/obo.
236-3099.

1981 BMW 320i, runs grt, ac, not dty
pd, $3,900. 282-4383.

1988 Toyota Corolla, 4dr, low mi,
1.3L, 4 sp, ac, cass, super cond, not
dty pd, $4,400. 282-4098.

1992 Pontiac Gran Am SE, 2dr, load-
ed, $12,500; 1988 Chrysler LeBaron,
2dr coupe, loaded, $5,000. 262-1204.

1984 Mitsubishi Tredia, 4dr, new ac,
brakes, 4 cyl, at, am-fm tinted, alarm,
good cond, avail July 10, $3,200.260-
7386.

1990 Cadillac Sedan De Ville, load-
ed, $14,000/neg. 260-6183.

1989 Plymouth Voyager, 4 cyl, clean,
runs grt, $7,450. 284-3285.
1989 Aerostar XLT, ac, pb, pw, ps,
am-fm stereo, $10,000. 286-4781.

1983 Honda Accord, 4dr, ac, pw, 5 sp,


not dty pd, $1,900. 252-5567.

1985 Audi 5000, fuel injec, 4dr, US
specs, not dty pd, $5,400. 264-9974.

1985 Toyota Cressida, 4dr, at, full ex-
tras, exc cond, $5,300. 252-6079.

1985 Audi, grt cond, best offer. 282-
6007 Rm 3 eves.

1989 Mercury Topaz, new paint, tires,
ac, all pwr, exc cond, $5,900. 226-
6473.

1971 VW German Super Beetle, 4 sp,
US specs, new tires, rebuitlt eng, cus-
tom int, $2,200. 284-4399.

1992 Chevy S-10 p/u, 5 sp, ac, pb, ps,
am-fmi cass, $9,000. 286-3692.

1993 Ford Tempo, 5,000 mi, 4dr, at,
ac, exc cond, not dty pd, $ 10,000/obo.
284-6875 eves. 284-6875.

1985 Nissan 200SX, good running
cond, 2dr coupe, ps, pb, ac, $3,000.
230-1618.

1991 Mazda Miata, 1800cc, sport pkg,
8,000 km, hd/soft tops, cd, alarm, US
specs, dty pd. 264-3210.

1988 Jeep Commanche, ac, pb, ps, am-
fm cass, 4x4WD, new tires rims, best
offer. 261-6418.

1986 Pontiac 6000LE, exc cond, grt
gas mi, ac, pw, pb, am-fm cass, $3,500.
286-6172.

1975 Olds Vista Cruiser, ac, ps, pb,
pw, new tires, dty pd, good cond, $900.
284-5452.

1986 Toyota p/u, dty pd, $6,700/obo.
283-3487.

1991 Toyota 4x4, V6, ac, am-fm cass,
40,000 mi, $12,800. 285-4588.

1988 Voyager Minivan, ps, pb, ac, at,
streo, 66k mi, exc cond, $7,300 firm.
286-4340.

1988 BMW 318i Shadow line, sr, ac,
am-fm cass, 2dr, not dty pd, $8,500.
261-6119.

1985 Ford Bronco II XLT, fully equip,
4WD, exc cond, $6,000/obo. 256-6672.

1983 Toyota Cressida 2.0cc, 4 cyl, at,
4dr, ac, am-fm radio cass, tinted, exc
cond, neg. 236-0749.

1986 Volvo 740GLE, at, 4 cyl, 4dr, ac,
tinted, sr, US specs, exc cond, neg.
236-0749.

1988 Montero 4x4, at, dty pd, loaded,
$14,500/obo. 269-5700.

1988 Dodge Grand Caravan, ac, fully
loaded, exc cond, $10,000. 287-3887.

1979 Mercedes 450SE, exc cond, ac,
sr, not dty pd, $10,000. 287-3887.

1989 Ford Tempo, 4dr, at, ac, US specs,
cruise, not dty pd, $6,800/obo. 286-
3527.






Maid, reliable, honest exc, refs. 252-
1035.

Full time maid, grt w/children, fluent
in Eng, refs, avail June 24. 284-3685
ask for Andrea.

Maid, M-F, honest, good house keep-
er. 266-8180.

Honest live-out maid, 5 days a week,
bilingual. 266-0747.

Eng-spk maid, days T-W. 224-7521.

Exc typist to incl drawings, graphics
using Words/Haravard Graphics, Win-
dows. 261-2426 after 1pm.o

Bilingual live-in maid, M-F, honest,
good w/children, grt worker. 262-7278
ask for Marcia.

Bilingual babysitter, live-in/out, any
day. 283-6393 ask for Zuleika.

Bilingual honest, hard working live-in
housekeeper/babysitter, M-F w/refs,
avail July 1. 289-3944.

Translations, Eng-Span by certified
translator. 269-8772.

Eng-spk maid, M-W-F, gen house
cleaning, grt refs. 287-6438.

Honest, reliable maid, bilingual, live-
out, 5 days a week. 266-0747.

Bilingual maid/babysitter, hardworker,
dependable w/refs. 262-6026 ask for
Debbie.

Honest, hard working live-in/daily
maid, loves children, Eng-Span. 287-
6370.

Honest, reliable, Eng-spk live-in maid,
good w/kids. 286-3830.
Housekeeper/cook, M-Th, refs, likes
ironing, $15 day. 252-2540.
Live-in babysitter, M-F, honest, reli-


able, exp, refs. 286-4978.

Eng-spk honest, reliable maid, M-F,
refs, avail now. 234-0013 ask for
Jean.

Bilingual live-out maid, M-W-F, grt
w/pets. 221-5022.

Honest babysitter, collegeeduc, some
Eng, wkends only. 264-3546 ask for
Veronica.

Forcurls, perms, manicure, pedicure.
287-6870 ask for Sandra.

Mature Span maid, honest,hard work-
ing, grt w/kids, highly recommend-
ed, daily, avail June 30. 282-3232.

Eng-spk maid, reliable, honest, M-F,
live-out, grt w/kids. 262-9819.

Honest Eng-spk maid, exc w/kids,
refs, full time, M-F. 286-4781 ask for
Sandra.

Live-in maid, child care, depend-
able. 286-4489.

Maid, carpet cleaning, babysitting,
wkends. 252-6815 ask for Malene.

Babysitter w/exp, 18-year-old, de-
pendable, nights, wkends. 230-1927.

Full time, live-out housekeeper/
babysitter, avail June 20, refs. 286-
3897.

Span-spk live-out maid, honest,
hardworker, good w/kids, M-F. 286-
6132.

Exc maid, bilingual, honest, reliable,
grt refs, Tues only. 287-5928.

Span-spk maid, mature, honest, reli-
able, highly recommended, days only,
prefer Farfan, Howard, Kobbe area.
286-4792.

Day maid, M-F, honest, bilingual,
good worker, gen house cleaning.
266-9136.

Eng-spk live-in/out maid, honest.
224-7765 after 7pm.






21' Radon walk around w/platform,
225hp, 200 gal fuel, 30 gal water, Ig
fish box, $17,900. 252-2694. '

20' Cobia cuddy cabin, 140hp
Mercruiser, best offer. 287-3390.

16' Deep-V, 60hp overhauled, runs
grt, lots of extras. 286-4981.

Sm boat trlr, 19' long, used for flat
bottom boat; camper shell, fits Ford
Ranger, best offer. 252-2675.

14' inflatable Zodiac, alum floor
board, $1,000. 252-1174 after 4pm.

Three horse trlr, strong, Ig tack area,
may be used as utility trlr, $3,000/
obo. 286-4498.






Amiga 500, 1 meg, software, TV/
monitor, desk, $599. 284-6496.

Packard Bell legend 386x,4mb Ram,
Dos 6.2, Windows, MSworks, more.
$975. 287-6236.

Compaq laptop, 486/25mhz, 8mb
Ram, int fax modem, 120mb hd;
Canon bubble jet printer, security
cable, bag, all $2,000. 252-6124.

PB386 computer w/200 mb hd, 4mb
Ram, math coprocessor; 2 hexigon
curio cabs. 284-5999.

Packard Bell 386/33, 85mb hd, 3.5-
5.25 floppy drives, mouse, fax/mo-
dem, color monitor, software, desk,
$1,000 all. 223-2550.

TV/VCR monitor, Sony stereo w/cd,
$700/obo. 285-4538.

Sega cd games, $25 ea, all $150.284-
6176.

386sxl6, dual floppies, 80hd, 2meg
Ram, cd-rom, sound card, svga 256
color monitor, software, $1,200.284-
5137.

DJ equip, 2 Genesis tumtbls, stereo
pre-amp mixer, almost new, $500.
282-3237.

Panasonic turntbl, $35; Yamaha
keybd,$85; 13"colorTV,$150.284-
3082.

Commodore 64, monitor, keybd, disk
drive, mouse,joystick, sofwate, mem
exp unit, exc cond, $300. 2831-4629.

Sony color Watchman, exc cond,
$150. 289-3400 Iv msg for Rm 309.

JVC VHS camcorder w/access, extra
batt, exc cond, $400. 284-6383.

Super Nintendo, Genesis games, Le-


thai Enforcer, Sim City, $35-$50.284-
5127.

Kenwood audio cab, $80; Sharp VHS
camcorder, zoom case, $350.287-3274.

Packard Bell 386 sx, 2hd, 3 Rams,
5.25-3.5 floppies, Windows 3.1, Dos
6.0, Words Window, Lotus 1, 2, 3,
more software, $1,200. 289-3656.

Sega game gear, $80; games $15ea;
TV tuner, $75. 285-4909 ask for Penn
after 4pm.

Carver M 1.5 pwr amp, pre-amp, cass
deck, dbx range controller, graphic eq,
cd. 261-6453.

Personal computer 286 IBM compat,
like new, loaded w/colormonitor, $525.
239-9709.

SC laptop 8000 w/3.5 dr, fax/modem
cap, rechar batts, $350. 236-0984.

Pentax 35mm, tripod, flash, cleaning
set, bag, manuals, $275. 230-0957.

Nintendo action set, 8 games, $100;
printer, 24 pin, $150. 287-5486.

486dx33, 8mb Ram, 340hd, 15" fit
screen tower case, 16 bit sound card
voice regulator, loaded w/progrms,
desk, chr, $1,995/obo. 286-3734.

VHS camcorder, $500; acostat spker,
$250; 9600 bps ext fax/modem, $120.
282-4225.

JVC 25" color TV, stand, $450. 287-
5137.

Samsung 13" color TV, sleep, timer,
remote,hardly used, $170. 260-2019.

Sony am-fm cass/corder, cfs 220, $45.
235-0122.

386sx/16mhz port, 2mb Ram, 100mb
hd, vga math coprocessor, MS Dos 6.1,
Word perfect 5.0, $995. 260-9172.

Gateway 2000 486dx2/66 15" fltscreen
svga, 424mb hd, 8m Ram, sound blast-
er 2x cd, 16 bit sound card, $2,700.
287-3844.

Component spker box w/2 10" pwr
acoustik woofers, max 300w, $230/
obo. 260-2019.

Nintendo tapes, Mario Bros, Tetris,
GuerrillaWar, Pinball, goodprice. 286-
4881.

Car-two 15 subwoofer4 tweeter, 2 mid
in box, 1000w chan, $300. 228-4319.

Kaypro 16 letter quality printer, $100/
obo; VCR, $150 as is. 282-4538.

C128 computer, dd, printer, software,
$250; hooked on math sat, $100;
Britannica Encyclopedia set, $300.
284-5072.

Xt computer 5.25-3.5 fd, 30mb hd,
monitor, $675; exer rowing mach, $65;
cb ant w/coax cables, $75. 252-5567.

486dx33 w/monitor, 14.4 fax/modem,
8m Ram, tape backup, sbpro card w/
spkers, software, color printer, $2,000.
286-4731.

Console TV, $300; elec typewriter,
$130. 287-3072.

Computer games, IBM compat, $10;
Nintendo games $8-$15. 252-2314.

Sega Genesis games, $15-$30ea. 286-
3482.

Amiga 500 Commodore computer w/
color monitor, remaining software,
$500/obo. 286-3692.

486sx/25mhz, 2mb Ram, 107mb hd,
vga color monitor, programs, modem,
desk, chr, exc cond, I yr old, $1,150.
286-4879.

IBM proprinter xl, IBM printer,
Okidata 83-a nec daisy wheel, $65-
$150. 230-0008.

Mitsubishi 4-head vcr, microwave.
282-4527.

Super NES sys w/3 games, $175; John
Madden 94, $45; Sony stereo sys w/
spkers, $850. 286-4978.

Compton's Interactive encyclopedia
for Windows on cd rom, $50; qemm
ver 6 mem mgr for 386/486 pcs, $20.
286-4347.

Kodak printer, $100; musical keybd,
$60. 287-6777.

Panasonic printer, 24 pin, exc cond,
upgrading to laser, $150. 282-3628.

Cd w/remote, many fucntions, plays
single cds, exc cond, $100. 223-6675.

Canon photography outfit, 4 cameras,
lens, many extras. 252-6831.

7pc Kenwood rack stereo sys plus 2
350w spkers, $500. 284-4834.






K-Q sz beds; 12x27 gm rug; L-shaped














couch; dinette set, BR set, 23.6 refrig;
frzer. 252-1257.

Sofa, loveseat, $400/obo; Nintendo
w/pwer pad, games, $100; Sony cart
stereo, 10" woofers, amp. 286-6533.

Blk lacquer 5 pc Q-sz BR set, $2,000;
dining tbl, china, $2,500. 286-6556.

Matching sofa sleeper, loveseat, ivory
color, new cond, $750. 285-6374.

Dishwasher, 1 yr old, $300; 20" TV,
$300. 252-2285.

GE elec range, 40", wht, $250. 228-
4630.

New solid oak ent center w/glass doors,
$350. 287-4935.

Q-sz sofa sleeper, teak wall unit, mi-
crowave, stereo w/4 spkers, sect sofa
sleeper. 284-4486.

DR Mediterranean, 6chrs, chinaclos-
et, $1,000. 284-5392.

18 cuft refrig/frzer, $150; Samsung
21" color TV, $125; asst paperback
books. 282-2039.

Crib w/matt converts to toddler bed w/
match changing tbl, night stand, rock-
er, exc cond, solid wood, $400. 284-
5778.

Lg refrig/frzer, $550/obo; gas stove,
$275/obo; K-sz waterbed, $360/obo.
284-3635 ask for Pat.

Refrigs, $750-$150; chest frzer, $150;
Ig console color TV, $275; washer/
dryer, $250; dinette, 6 chrs, $150; 4
ceiling fans, $50ea, more. 256-6373.

GE oven/range, used 7 wks, privi-
leged cardholder only, $400. 284-
4593.

BR set, hdbd, Ig dresser, 2 night tbls,
$450;4tiresw/rims, $30ea; VCRVHS,
good cond, $85. 269-3538.

Ent center, carpet, ac, all good cond,
neg. 286-3732.

Floor lamp, $25; Kenmore washer/
dryer, $650; lawn mower, $135. 284-
3082.

Full szbed, exc cond, matt, box spring,
frame, $70. 284-6489.

Ceiling fan w/lights, $175.243-5366.

8pc LR set, dining tbl, 4 chrs, together
or separate, $700/obo. 284-4989.

Four carpets, beige/mixed earthtones,
$25 ea. 284-4489.

Kenmore port dishwasher, good cond,
$80. 284-3634.

8pc mauve sect seating in new cond,
lamps incl, $550. 287-4830.

Coffee tbl, $150; teak TV stand, $200;
sect sofa, $300; DR sets, more. 287-
6233.

Sage gmrn 12x15 carpet, $100; Weber
bbq, Ig, $25. 286-6291.

Microwave oven; wooden bar, 2 stools;
misc items, $150 ea. 284-5570.

DR set, Ig china cab, tbl w/2 ext, 6
chrs, server w/slate inlay top, $2,000.
282-3328.

Ent center, $150; quality carpets,
12x15 blue, $165; cream $150; up-
right vacuum w/attachs, $145; rattan
room divider, $15. 269-2095.

Sofa, chr, ottoman, good cond, $300.
284-5084.

Whirlpool 18.5 cuft frzer, new cond,
no frost, $525. 230-0957.

Child's gym set, $95; tempo bunk
bed, twin/full sz w/matt, $450; coffee
tbl, $150; rugs, 9x12, $65; recliner,
$125. 260-4393.

Asst Nintendo games, $25-$30/obo;
Huffy 20" boy bike, $85; 12" bike,
$60. 260-4393.

Curtains, $200; tea cart, $50; pictures,
$10; camping tbl, $50; kitchen, laun-
dry, bathrm items. 282-4414.
Curtains, beige w/blkout, 96x84, 2
sets, $40ea. 263-3697.

Genuine brass bed, new, Q-sz, no matt,
$850. 261-6486.
Single matt, spring, $125; wooden
stereo cabinet on roller, $25; bikes,
$15-$25. 287-6777.

Teakwood wall unit, good cond, $550;
Little Tykes playhouse, like new,$175.
226-1221.

Wall unit; floral beige loveseat; cur-
tains for trop; 10 sp bike, ; Pioneer 4-
way spkers, 400w max. 230-1927.

Amana 22 cuft refrig, $700; Tappan
gas dbl oven, selfclean, $800; both
exc cond. 263-8579.

Dining set, brass, wood/glass, 4 chrs,
$100; full sz bed, no hdbd, chest of
drawers dresser, $100. 284-5778.

Q-sz sofabed, loveseat, chr, exc cond,


$750; blk/gold mirrored coffee tbl,
$50. 230-1972.

Washer/dryer, x-hvy dty, Ig cap, used
one year, $645. 256-6830.

Sofas, dbl BR set, solid cherry; DR,
BR, LR tbls, wing back chr. 282-
5524.

Dinette set; carpets; misc furn; baby
items. 284-6875 eves/wkends.

Carpet 12x 15, $100; microwave cab-
inet, $85, more. 286-3345.

Plants, Oriental room dividers, $400
ea; Oriental flowerpaint, $400; kitch-
en tbl for two, $60. 260-6159.

Sharp m/w, $190; personal w/p sys,
$375; both less than 6 mos. 287-4673.

4pc beige sect sofa w/hide-a-bed; Q-
full sz matts; lawn mower. 252-2180.

Kenmore washer/dryer, used 3 yrs,
exc cond, sold as set only, $700. 282-
4538.

GE 30" gas, 4-bumer stove, like new
$425. 260-9172.

Tan 10x12 carpet, $75. 284-3194.

Sect couch, 2 yrs old, coffee tbl, $650/
obo. 284-3285.

Maple American DR set, 8 chrs, tbl,
hutch, $3,000. 252-6732.

Loveseat; wall unit; Pioneer spkers,
150w; curtains fortrop qtrs. 230-1927.

GE 24 cuft refrig, side-by-side, $900;
Whirlpool 18 cuft refrig/frzer, $600,
both exc cond. 264-9676.

Broyhill oak desk, hutch, chr, $250/
obo. 262-0371.

Span dresser, $450; desk-file draw-
ers, $95; oak comode; antique, huge
glass bottle for lamp, $25. 264-9228.

Drapery rods, brass lanterns, chinese
design. 232-5258.

Sofa sleeper, full sz, $375. 252-5525.

Nursery bedding, honey bunning de-
sign, quilt, bedskirt, sheets, bumper;
lamp, clock, wall hanging, some wall
paper, $60. 282-3628.

Ent center, good cond, $50; toddler
bike, $40. 287-4591.

Port dishwasher, butcher block top,
$230. 286-3674 after 5pm.

Curtains; Betamovie; Betamax; DR
barrill 4 chrs; carpets 26x14, $200;
Oriental carpets, 18xl2red. 282-3099.

K-sz waterbed w/mirrored hdbd, $400;
mirrored 9-drawer dresser, $400; pa-
tio settee, tbl, chr w/cushiones, $125.
287-3572.

Lane recliner, $75; Century car seat,
$25; Hoover vacuum, $25.286-6373.

GE 21 cuft refrig/frzer, side-by-side,
beige, 2 yrs old, $750. 226-2297.

Wall unit, exc cond, $550; Whirlpool
27 cuft side-by-side refrig/frzer, ice
maker, water dis, $1,500; china cabi-
net, 41,300. 226-1221.

GE refrig/frzer, 23.5 cuft; Admiral
16.7 cuft upright frzer; Magic Chef4-
burner stove; GE hvy dy washer. 264-
5160.

Sofabed, $300; acs avail June 25. 260-
1946.

DR, 6 chrs; Q-sz bed, 2 night tbls, 8-
drawer chest, dresser w/mirror; GE
microwave w/tbl, mw-safe cookware.
252-1104.

Whirlpool refrig, computer desk,
plants. 252-1104.

Coffee/end tbis w/glass tops, 3pc set,
$250. 286-3142.

3pc LR set, $700/obo; 3 end tbIs,
$100; DR tbi, 4 chrs, $350/obo, all 5
mos old. 260-9267.

Blue carpet 10x12, $100; blue cur-
tains down stairs trop, $200; Ig desk,
old, $25; boy's curtains, $25. 284-
5271.

Broyhill sofa, almost new, gm/coral
shell design, $400. 287-5928.

6 shelfbookcase, $5; carpet for maids
qtrs, $10; RCA 25" colortraklTV. 286-
3587.

Loveseat, sofabed, $300/obo; 7' couch,
$200/obo; dk rattan coffee/2 end tbIs,
$300/obo. 287-4894.

Exercycle,$190;Q-szwaterbed, $550;
desk, $120; sm patio tbl, $20; book-
shelves, Victorian dresser. 264-9228.

Pre-colombian reproduction style tbis,
used as patio or balcony fum. 223-
4290 eves.

Lg sofa, It blue/gray design, ovrstf
style, like new, $600 firm. 269-5700.

Rugs,rose 14xl6,blue 14xl8;drapes,
2pr wht, 2pr gmr w/valances, sheer


panels. 286-3674 after 5pm.


Set of keys at NCO Club June 3; 10
keys on ring w/tag that says
"Loadsamonkey." Keys are needed
very badly. 260-8154






2 vert blinds, fits 3 bdrm, $175 for
both, Fisher Price car seat up to 40 lbs,
$25, swing set $100, Suzuki 4 wheel-
er, $50. 284-3685.

1982 Olds Cutlass parts. 287-5974.

Rims/BF Goodrich tires, 5 holes 114
mm, 195/50R15, $1,000/neg. Mazda
orig 5 holes rims/Pirelli tires 185/
60R14,114 mm, $550neg. 286-3137.

Encyclo Brittanica, Compton's
Encylco, Emerson 5.5" color TV am-
fmn radio w/adaptor. 252-6566.

Pro Schwinn mt bike 21 spd w/clip
away wheels, $400 new asking $175.
261-8395 ask for Seth.

Small pet carrier, $15. 286-4340.

Rebuilt GM 12V alternator, $45, used
Ford 12V alternator, $30. 286-3643.

PCC textbook music appreciation,
$35. 260-5336.

Smith Corona Daisy wheel printer.
$140. 236-0984.

Surfboard 6'4" Chris Watson single
fin, $100. Camera Minolta X3001
35mm manual, $100. 264-9059.

Wht couch, scotchguarded, $600. 284-
4138.

Officer dress greens 44R, 34 waist
pants. 264-9059.

Jeep Wrangler driver's side rearview
mirror. $60. 223-2550.

10 spd bike, $55, rattan LR, $300,
pole lamp, $25, Brother typewriter,
$90, chandelier, $40. 252-2208.

Bench seat forToyota $100/obo. 284-
5269.

Scuba Ig BCD 2 pockets, soft back
rapid exhaust/inflator, $125. 225-
4957.

4 formal dresses brand new sz 5-6.
$50 ea. 284-6489.

One-way ticket to Miami for June 28
American Airlines, $120. 286-6340.

His, hers Murry 12-spd bikes, $75ea.
289-4958.

Wedding dress, sz 12, embroid appli-
que, sequins, pearls, $200.236-3391.

Ronco food dehydrator, 7 trays used
once, $70, elec racking house, $60,
attanower mach, $35. 284-3592.

Happy camper port travel crib, $60.
284-6195.

Antique sonata phono all orig nee-
dles, w/records, $400 obo. 284-6696.

1/2 kt. diamond ring, 14 kt gold, $950,
baby chair, $25. 287-4830.

Books for master of public
administration program at Okla. U,
$125 obo. 262-1029.
Scuba pro console, compass, depth
gauge, tank press slate, $75/neg. 284-
5180.

Little Tykes kitchen, other toys, $50
neg. 284-5180.

Century car seat, up to 40 lbs, $40.
287-6438.

GE answering mach, $35. 287-6438.

Crib 'n' bed w/linen, $200. 287-5225.

Comic books DC Marvel Spiderman,
Batman, more, most in very fine or
mint cond. 286-4797.

Tejna Scuba flippers, scuba mask,
small scratches on fins, $75.286-4829.

Five wht mini blinds, $60, rose carpet,
$35, Weber grill, $45. 284-5699.

Carpets, $100, BBQ $65, men's golf
clubs, mini blinds, plants. 286-4322.

4 sets of blk curtains for trop house
$40, minnie mouse curtain for chill,
$15. 286-4285.

Lined drapes, 60wx981 $80, Europe-
an ball gowns sz 6, $20, tuxedo 38R,
$80. 282-4242.

Pro form stepper computer display
new $140. 285-6374.

Computer desk/chair $105, 4 pc lugg
set $75, sm pet carrier, Ladyshave
razor, twin bedding. 260-3130.


GE re fig/freezer, washer, dryer, Magic
Chef range. 260-0943.

Children's toys, shoes, clothes, elec
razor, $20, men's bball shoes. 287-
4420.

Parachute sq main, sq reserve, javelin
container new, Megellan GPS new.
282-5524.

Men's 26in 10 spd bike, $50. 285-
5980, Rm 319.

AC 5,000 btu $200, Kolcraft deluxe
stroller, $70, turtles w/aquar. 287-
5222.

Weider wt bench w/bar, $25. 261-
3261.

3 dresses, small desk, comp desk, food
dehydrator, men's bike, 10 spd, $40.
287-3799.

Genesis system, games 2 ctrl pds, CD
player, $550. 287-6194.

Easy glider, $50. 287-6194.

Trailer frame, axle assembly, $45.252-
2180.

Carpet 9X12 salmon w/pad, $85, wa-
ter heater leaks water, $40. 260-1740.

Bunk bed full, twin, TV outdoor an-
tenna. 286-3786.

New playpen without pad, $60, coun-
try ceiling lamp, $125, Hoover
shampooer, polisher, $65, tupperware.
252-2675.

2 airline tickets one-way Philadelphia
to Panama, $200 ea. 268-3261.

94 DB Sorrento mt. bike, new Alivio
components, $400. 226-1158.

Clothes, Aiwa tumtbl, $30, washer &
dryer, $700, Turbo graphix game sys-
tem, 3 tapes, 284-3689.

Vacuum w/attach, $70, fry daddy, $10,
pig cookie jar, $5, coffee maker, $15,
dishes, $10, score bball sets, $20ea,
tape cases, $10ea. 287-3036.

Huge hanging ferns, plants. 284-3194.

Wedding dress sz 12 w/veil, $800 neg.
282-3194.

Weider wt bench w/150 lbs, $150,
men's Texas brand boots, sz 12EE,
$40. 287-3423.

U.S. auto tags for sale or trade. 252-
2540.

Front bumper/grill for S-10, $50, la-
dies diamond wedding ring. 286-4189.

2 sm children's bikes, $20 ea, booster
car seat, $20. 286-4189.

Men's mt bike, Murray 18 spd, $130.
287-6180.

Archery outfit, 2 compound bows,
access. 252-6831.

Front bumper for Mazda 626, 1992
model,,$150. 230-1373.

Golf set w/bag, $200, ping pong tbl,
$180, wedding band, 14k gold. 287-
3877.

75 of 79 original Star Trek series tapes,
$8.50ea. 284-6183.

25 diffbaby outfits, sleepers, T-shirts,
all $70/obo, crib light. $10, baby car-
rier, $12. 286-3778.

E6 clarinet w/case $250, many plants
w/pots, FSU textbooks. 287-3572.

Microwave $75, gas grill $50, ac $110.
287-3295.

18 spd 24" men's bike $75,10 spd 24"
girl's bike $50. 287-3295.

Gas water heater, 30-gal. $200. 252-
2797.

Dress blue set 33R $50 microwave,
$100, VCR $100, carpets. 284-3491.

Multi-gym w/aerobic stepper, bench
press, $150. 252-6277.


Rugs, pink 12x15 w/pad $160, blue
9x12 w/pad $120, brown 9x12, $80.
263-3697.

Plants. 232-5258.

Lace wedding dress, headpiece, 2 veils
sz 7-8. 230-0227.

Golf clubs $125, microwave $300,
desks $75 ea, rugs, curtains, bed, vac-
uum. 284-3174.

3 tennis rackets, Prince tricomp 90,
Prince pro oversize, Wilson Sting 95,
$50-70. 286-4275.

Sports cards 93-94, baseball, basket-
ball, football, sets, singles. 284-3689.

Baby car seat, walker, $25. 286-3142.

Ceramic molds. 284-6727.

Today's kid tricycle, $23, baby crib w/
matt, $125, 8x10berberbrug, $45.287-
6292.

Tropical plants. 286-3587.

9x12 mauvecarpet$55 obo. 286-4524.

Carpet dry cleaning, shampoo mach,
$550-$850. 230-0008.

Baby running stroller. 287-3424.






1991 Honda Shadow 600cc, $3,500.
289-4958.

1988 Honda Elite 50, manual, helmet,
vest, gas can incl, exc cond, $500.
286-4480.

1987 Yamaha Virago 750cc, low mi,
blk/chrome, runs good, $2,000/obo.
260-9356.

1987 Honda, moped, low mi, exc cond,
$450. 287-6734.

Honda Goldwing Interstate 1100cc,
grt cond, all trims, many extras. 287-
6535.

1982 Montesa 349 cota, exc cond,
many new parts, extras. 261-3486.






Qtrs. 1109 Amador, 8 am-?

Qtrs. 8A Clayton..,

Qtrs. 198A Clayton, 7am-noon.

Qtrs. 92 Clayton, 7 am-lpm.

Qtrs. 373A Clayton, 8am-noon.

Qtrs. 541C Clayton, 8am-noon.

Qtrs. 547B-548B Clayton, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs. 553 Clayton, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs. 570C Clayton.

Qtrs. 610C Clayton, 7am-?

Qtrs. 643D Clayton.

Qtrs. 673D Clayton.

Qtrs. 800C Clayton, 6am-noon.

Qtrs. 1042B Clayton, 8am-noon.

Qtrs. 1103D, Clayton,.

Qtrs. 6579A Corozal.

Qtrs. 1982B Curundu, 7:30-10am.

Qtrs. 2541 A Cocoli, 7am-? Sat-Sun.

Qtrs. 33 Albrook, 7am-noon.

\qtrs. 76B Albrook.

Qtrs. 82A Albrook, 8-1 lam.

Qtrs. 107B Albrook, 7-10am.

Qtrs. 116A Albrook, 8am-2pm.

Qtrs. 209A Albrook, 8am-noon


SClassified Ads


S__Tropic Times Ad Form


ANIMALS
AUTOMOBILES
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FOUND
] HOUSEHOLD
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edition. Ads are run on a space available, and may be held for a future
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Tropic Times Bl1
June 17, 1994 B IL


Qtrs. 56A Howard, 7-1 am.

Qtrs. 69A Howard, 7am-noon.

Qtrs. 80A Howard, 7am.

Qtrs. 84A&B Howard.

Qtrs. IlIB Howard, 8-1 lam.

Qtrs. 134A Howard, 7am-2pm.

Qtrs. 138A Howard, 8am-noon.

Qtrs. 552A Howard, 8am-nnon.

Qtrs. 558B Howard, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs. 636B Howard, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs. 647A Howard, 8-1 lam.

Qtrs. 654B Howard.

Qtrs. 1516C Howard, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs. 360A Kobbe, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs. 405 Kobbe, 8am-lpm.

Qtrs. 421 Kobbe, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs. 442A Kobbe, 7am-noon.

Qtrs. 3084 Marine Barracks, 7-10am.

Qtrs. 6336B Los Rios, 8am-noon.

Qtrs. 5345B Diablo, 7am-noon.

Qtrs. 5786B Diablo, 7am-noon.

Qtrs. 761C Balboa.

Qtrs. 2300A Balboa, 7-10am.

Hangar #25 at the end of Walker Ave,
Diablo.






Mil spouse to drive kids from Albrook
to Clayton for the summer activities,
$60 for 20 round trips. 286-3143
eves.

Tutor for 7& 10-year-olds, Eng-spk,
1 hr daily. Call 286-3143 eves to set
times.

Little Tykes or Fisher Price easel, bus,
car, kitchen, good cond, reasonable
price. 287-6887.

Screened patio enclosure for3BRtrop.
284-4339.

Bilingual live-out maid, infant care,
clean, iron, babysit, occasional eves,
refs, $100mo. 282-3594.

415" 5-hole rims/wheels, good price.
289-4958.

Full time maid, mature, Eng-spk, refs.
252-2676.

Secure storage space, maid's quarters,
boat house; will rent. 282-3593.

Used fenced to hold Ig dogs. 252-
2540.

Screening and frame work for carport
area, 3BR trop. 284-4339.

A tutor and someone to teach children
fundamentals of basketball and ten-
nis. 286-3143 eves.

Wall-to-wall carpeting for 3BR trop
housing. 286-3373 after 5pm.

Live-in maid w/refs to cook, iron, gen
house work. 284-5999.

Handyman for Saturday 10am-3pm,
$3 per hr, lunch incl. 283-6393.

Ping pong table in good cond. 284-
5630.

Reliable, mature, honest live-in maid,
cleaning, child/animal are, must work
flexible hrs, refs. 260-3455.

Live-in maid, must spk Eng, good
cook, take care of house, 2 children,
$100mo. 261-5343 after 9:30 pm.

Ifyou like to donate house plants call,
262-1029.












B 12 Tropic Times
B12^ June 17, 1994


HOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-171. DD 214 if
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you are a Federal employee.
For more information regarding Army vacancy
announcements (forms required. job related criteria,
etc.), visit the Directorate of Civilian Personnel, Build-
ing 560, Room 102, Corozal. or call 285-5201.
*Note: One-on-one employment counseling should
be the first step in the job search.

SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE: Positions at NM-5
level and above require specialized experience. Special-
ized experience iseither education above I he high school
lev el or work experience directly related to the position
being filled. Example: Budget positions at or above the
NM-5 level required Budget experience or equivalent
education.
Vacancy announcements are also available at the
Sundial Recreation Center.
The Army civilian personnel office accepts
applications on a continuous basis for the following
positions. These announcements are used to establish
registers for permanent and temporary) future
vacancies.
V'B# 001 * General Clerical, NM-3 (Used to fill most
clerical position).
VB# 001A * General Clerical. NM-4 IUsed to fill most
clerical position).
VB# 002 - Sales Store Checker. NM-3 tintermitient
wk sch)
* CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is
required.

VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard)
Requires Cert + 6 mo recreation ep in the field.
VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Req b6 mos
recreation exp in the field.
VB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5
VB# 005A Secretars tStenography). NM-6
VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation). NM-5
VB1# 006A Secretary (Typing/Office Automation.) NM-
6

The following positions are PermiTemp. Full-time,
Part-time, Intermittent.
VB# 007 " MEDICAL OFFICER, NE 1I13/14.
VB# 008 "* CLINICAL NURSE. (RN license
required), NM-9/10Jl I.
V'B# 009 "* PRACTICAL NURSE. (LPN licence
required), NM-5
"* Selectees for nurse and medical officer position will
be required ro undergo a background check.
The following are limited to veteran preference eligibles
and permanent employees only.
VB# 010 Manual Positions, MG-2
VB# 011 Manual Positions. MG-3
VB# 012 Manual Positions, MG-4
VB# 013 Manual Positions. MG-5
VB# 014 Moror Vehicle Operator, MG-6
VB# 015 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-7
VB# 016 Motor Vehicle Operator. MG-8
VIB# 017 Administrative Services ..Assistant. NM-5
VB# 017A Administralive Services Assistant, NM-6
VB# 018 Supply Technician, NM-5
% B# 018A Supply Technician, NM-6
Pacific Worldwide Announcement
335-94-JH Intelligence Specialist (Operations). GS-132-12.
INSCOM-Panama. 310th MI BN. Position is under C1PMS
Excepted Service. Must be able to obtain and maintain a
Top Secret/Special Intelligence %ecurit) clearance. Bilingual
(Eng/Spanish). Driver's license. Closes: 7-19-94
VB# \ ACANCIES TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN:
06-17-94 CLOSE: 06-28-94
3394-VC Inlelligence Clerk (Office Automation). GS-134-
5. Sensitive. USSOUTHCOM. Quarr, Heights. Must be able
to obtain a Top Secret clearance. Position is under CIPMS.
Excepted Services.

336-44-SS Electronics Mechanic. MG-2604-1 I. Sensitive.
USAG. DOL. Must be able to operate a government vehicle
not to exceed I 1/4 Ion capacity. All sources.

337-94-KF Housing Referral Assistant. NM-1101-5. HQ.
LiSAG-Panama. DEH.

338-94-NC Facilily Manager, NM-1640-6. remp Promotion
Nre: I yr. Limited to veterans preference candidates only.

287A-94-JHI Electronics Mechanic Supervisor. MS-2604-12.
Sensitive. Tobyhanna Army Depot. Candidates who applied
under VB#287-94-JH, need not reapply. All sources.

339-94-LA Security Specialist (Auromation), GS-080-7/9.'10.
Sensitise. LISAG-Panama. Top Secretl SBI) clearance is
required. This position is in the Exceptt-d Sen ice. If position
is filled with a irmp employee he/she must re-compele for the
higher grade.

340-94-LA Teli-communications Mechanic SuperiLur, MS-
2502-13. Sensitit.. .Sth Si nal Balltalion.

341-94-LA Computer Specialist, NM-374-11. Sensitive.
106th, DOIM. Security clearance is required.

Note: VB#326-94-VL is amended to read Medical Aid
(Diets), NM-640-4.


Potpourri





Quarry Heights
*Officers' Club:
Breakfast buffet is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Monday-Fri-
day and 8-10 a.m. Saturday.
Old fashioned steak night 6-10 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Choose cut of beef to be charbroiled.
Father's Day luncheon 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. today.
Father's Day dinner, Saturday featuring chateaubriand
for two, twice-baked potato with medley of vegetables ac-
companied by a glass of wine.

Club Amador
Father's Day special champagne brunch 10:30 a.m.-
2:30 p.m. Saturday. New menu, live entertainment. Adults
$9.95 and children half price.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet $3.95 Fridays, featuring
soup, salad, selection of entree, special return rights.

Clayton
*The Loop:
CJ's Sports Bar offers daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m.-l
p.m. Monday-Friday. Pool tournaments are held 3:30 p.m.
Sunday.
Prizmz Night Club features a variety of music Wednes-
day-Saturday to include jazz 5 p.m. Sunday.
*NCO Club:
Casa Maria specials include meat or chicken, refried
beans, lettuce, tomatoes, onions and sour cream, with a spe-
cial sauce $4.75. Mexican shish-kabob: kabobs roasted, on-
ions, peppers and tomatoes served with Spanish rice and
retried beans.

Albrook/Howard
*Albrook Club:
Steak night 6-9 p.m. Friday. Choose from rib eye, K.C.
strip, filet or prime rib. Dinner comes with vegetable, baked
potato, French fries or rice.
Fiesta de mariscos 6-9 p.m. Saturday nights. The sea-
food feast platter features broiled corvina, stuffed crab,
calamari rings, peel-and-eat shrimp, a choice of potato or rice,
cole slaw and vegetables du jour. A la carte menu available.
Father's Day Sunday champagne brunch 10 a.m.-1
p.m. in the dining room offers breakfast from cooked-to-or-
der omelets, French toast, hot lunches, salad and fruits, peel-
and-eat shrimp, desserts and ice cream bar.
Mongolian barbecue 6-8:30 p.m. Monday. Prepare your
plate, choose the meat, vegetables, seasonings, oils and have
chefs do the job outside on the open grills.
Italian night special Wednesday.
Mexican night buffet Thursday includes tacos, fajitas,
taco salad and sopapillas for dessert.
Country western night Thursdays with free dance les-
sons at 7:30 p.m. Learn the two-step, line and couples danc-
es, the waltz, the cha cha and the swing. Country western
music 9-11 p.m.
Enjoy blues and jazz live 7-10 p.m. June 24 by record-
ing artist Lowell Hopper in the lounge.
Rock & Reggae 7-10 p.m. today in the lounge to the
sound of Rip Maynard.
For events or catering call 286-3557/3582.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club:
Sunday breakfast buffet 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. An assort-
ment of breakfast foods are available in the dining room.
Breakfast is served 6-9:30 a.m. Monday-Friday; 7:30
a.m. Saturday.
Italian nights 5:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday with Alfredo
or seafood fettuccini, lasagna, pasta mixta or pasta and shrimp
in a white wine sauce. A la carte menu available.
Steak night special 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday nights in the
dining room. Select a cut and order a New York strip, rib eye
or filet. To eat lighter, meals of chicken marinata, pasta,
shrimp vin blanc or shrimp Taboga are also available.


Mexican night and Texas barbecue ribs 5:30-8:30 p.m.
All-you-can-eat soft tacos. Fajitas, ribs or fish are also avail-
able.
Seafood lover's special 5:30-8:30 p.m. Friday and Sat-
urdays. Enjoy an array of appetizers and main entrees of
shrimp and fish.
Bang up barbecue in the Breezeway, dine-in or take-
out. Enjoy the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or hot wings.
For events or catering, call 284-4189.
*Top Three Club
Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesday. All-you-can-eat free.
Karaoke 6 p.m. Friday nights.
Club closed Saturdays.
*Howard Officers' Club:
Enjoy a prime special 6-9 Fridays and Saturdays.
Super social hours 5 p.m. Friday. Come and eat at the
complimentary buffet and enjoy music and dancing all night
long.
Super Thursday night buffet 6-8:30 p.m. Adults $7.95
all-you-can-eat, children from 6 to 12, $2.95, and children
under 6 eat free.
Mexican night 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. Sample 'South
of the Border' entrees.
Game nights & progressive club card drawing 7 p.m.
Wednesday featuring a dart tournament with a $2 entry fee,
winner takes all, club matches pot.
Rock & Reggae 5-9 p.m. June 24 in the lounge to the
sound of Rip Maynard.
Disco jet 9 p.m.-l a.m. today in the Ballroom.
All-night disco 8 p.m.-5 a.m. Saturday in the ballroom.
Enjoy a middle-of-the-night breakfast at 2 a.m. The designed
safe driver and safe ride programs will be in effect.
Bingo is back 2 p.m. Sunday with early-bird bingo at
1:45. 6:30 p.m. Tuesday with early-bird bingo at 6:15.
Casual Cove - All nite kicker dance 8 p.m.-5 a.m. Satur-
day.
New country 8 p.m. to closing Fridays.
Country and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. Wednes-
day nights in the Casual Cove. Learn the latest in line danc-
ing, the stomp, waltz and others. Music will be until mid-
night.
Karaoke 7 p.m. Sunday, 8 p.m. Tuesday.
Saturday & Monday night disco 5 pm..-1 a.m.
Country music night 7 p.m.-midnight Wednesday. Free
dance lessons 7-8 p.m.
Rock 'n' roll golden oldies 5-8 p.m. Tuesday; 5 p.m.-
midnight Thursday.

Rodman
*Rodman Club - open to all ranks:
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.-1
p.m. Mondays-Fridays.
Soup and sub night 3:30-8:30 p.m. Monday. Grill menu
is also available.
Grill menu 3:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday.
All-you-can-eat beef and burgundy 3:30-8:30 p.m.
Wednesday. Grill menu is also available.
Cook-your-own steak night 3:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday
at the Rodman Bohio.
Fine dining 6-9 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays.
Upstairs Bar 3:30-8:30 p.m. Sunday through Thursday;
6-9 Fridays-Saturdays.
Social hours & hors d'oeuvres, 3:30-11 p.m. Friday at
the Laguna Lounge and Rodman Bohio.
Dinner is served 6-9 p.m. Monday through Sunday.
*Rodman Annex:
Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Monday-Friday.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.-
1:30 p.m. Monday-Friday.
The club is closed for evening and weekend service.
Davis
*Davis Community Club:
Father's Day Sunday brunch 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
Jazz & blues concert 7-10 p.m. Sunday featuring Lowell
Hopper. 289-5160 for information.


IS NAM rdiose dule I


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AM Radio features America's most-
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coverage of breaking news stories and
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PAGE 1

Tropic Times Vol. V1I, No. 24 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, June 17, 1994 U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Erc Hortmn Soldiers from the 128th Aviation Brigade prepare two CH-47 "Chinook" helicopters to provide disaster relief assistance to victims of an earthquake in Colombia. U.S. troops aid earthquake victims QUARRY HEIGHTS (USSOUTHCOM nooks" have flown about three missions onto five pallets and loaded by airmen with augment the efforts of the Colombian govPAO) -At the request of the Colombian each per day. During these missions, they the 640th Air Mobility Support Squadron emient by providing personnel evacuagovernment through the U.S. Embassy, the have transported 276,000 pounds of cargo into a U.S. AirForce Reserve C-130 aircraft tion, relief, and medical supply transportaU.S. Southern Command dispatched ursuch as medical supplies, food, water, shelfrom Chicago here on rotational duty. tion. gently needed disaster relief supplies to ter material and clothing; as well as 140 Shortly after having returned to Panama The airport atNeiva serves as the staging Colombiaoverthe weekend. SOUTHCOM passengers from areas that were inaccessiSaturday afternoon, the same aircraft airpoint for relief supplies that are being airalso deployed two CH-47 "Chinook" helible by other means. lifted an advance party of eight soldiers lifted to the affected areas by helicopter. copters and 37 soldiers from its Army comThe supplies and assistance were re(aviators, communication specialists and The affected region is isolated after bridges ponent to provide assistance in the wake of quested by Paul Bell, regional advisor for fuel handlers) to Colombia to make arand roads in the areas were destroyed. the disastercaused by mud slides following the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance rangements forthemainbodyof29 soldiers The earthquake, which measured 6.7 on the earthquake June 6. under the U.S. Agency for International who deployed Sunday morning on two the Richter scale, hit near Cali in southern Early Saturday morning, a shipment of Development, and approved by the DepartCH-47 helicopters and a C-130 aircraft Colombia at about 8:27 p.m. June 6, caus132 rolls of plastic sheeting and 700 fivements of State and Defense after U.S. Amalong with equipment. ing a mud slide at El Huila. The mud slide gallon collapsible water containers, weighbassador Morris Busby declared a state of The Tandem-rotor, medium lift Chicaused a blockage of the river which coning about 20,600 pounds, was airlifted by a disaster June 9. nooks and aircrews are from USARSO's tributed to subsequent flooding. C-130 "Hercules" aircraft from Howard Following coordination by SOUTH128thAviationBrigade,basedatFortKobbe As of June 9, the Colombian Red Cross AFB to Neiva Airport, 150 miles SouthCOM's J4/Logistics Directorate, the supand adjacent Howard AFB. The task force had reported 253 dead, 116 injured, 600 west of Bogota. plies were withdrawn from the OFDAincludes key support personnel in the areas missing, and some 5,200 homeless. The 325,000 square feet ofplastic sheetowned disaster relief stockpile stored at of weather forecasting, air traffic control, The search for missing residents contining is being used to provide temporary Rodman NS and transported to nearby civil-military operations, medical specialues. shelter for 1,000 homeless persons. Howard AFB by U.S. Army South personists and security. The task force will return to Panama Sincetheirarrival Sunday, thetwo"Chinel. There, the materials were prepared The mission of the deployment is to upon completion of its mission. -Airmen rescue Civilian loses limbs during Colmb iangir Colombian girl medical evacuation mission HOWARDAFB(24thWing/A)-WingmedicsandC27A Spartan crewmembers came to the rescue of a oneFORT CLAYTON(USARSO PAO)AU.S. civilian to remain at the clinic while the medic retrieved a litter year-old girl who needed a ride fromAraracuara, Colombia sustained serious injuries during a medical evacuation from the aircraft. to Leticia, Colombia June 9. mission in Panama June 10. Initial eyewitness reports said during the rescue, The child suffered from malnutrition and amoebic dysA UH-60 "Blackhawk" helicopter from the 214th Delgado disregarded instructions and went to the airentery. Having no electricity and only the most basic of Medical Detachment responded to a request by Panacraft, climbed on the auxilliary fuel tank and onto the medical supplies, the one-room jungle hospital she was in ma's National Air Service to pick up and evacuate Luis aircraft stowage wing. Subsequently, Delgado threw his couldn't effectively treat her. Dense tropical forests made Delgado, 44, from the village of Mulatupo in the San arms and body into the turning rotor blades, sustaining overland transportation impossible, so Air Force medical Blas Islands. severe injury to both arms. Medics on the scene providevacuation support was requested. Delgado, who was visiting the San Blas Islands, was ed immediate life-saving assistance and stabilized The Joint Rescue Coordination Centerhere arranged for reportedly suffering from gastritis and internal bleedDelgado. The aircraft was shut down and inspected. aeromedical personnel and equipment to be loaded on a Cing. Delgado was transported to Gorgas Army Commu27 that departed Howard at 7:30 a.m. The plane flew into Once the helicopter arrived at the village, the airnity Hospital where he was listed in stable condition. the remote radar site at Araracuara where the toddler was craft's crewchiefkept children and villagers away from Doctors were unable to attach the severed limbs. waiting. the helicopter for safety reasons. Delgado's wife flew to Panama after she was contacted Upon arrival in Leticia, the child was placed in the care The medic disembarked and went to a small clinic by the U.S. Embassy. ofColombian physicians. Nofurtherword ofhercondition where he made contact with Delgado. whowas instructed The incident is currently under investigation. has been received, but she is expected to recover according to JRCC officials. Col. (Brig. Gen. elect) Richard E. New housing referral policy affects *Coronet Oak, Pages 8 & 9. Brown Ill takes the reigns as 24th soldiers seeking off-post residenc+1-228 inactivation, Page 10. Wing's new commander. es. +Scuba Olympics, Page 12.

PAGE 2

Tropic Times June 17, 1994 Missed delivery? A flight schedue call 269-3220 f If youlive on a military installation and Saturday 8:40am B757 Howard AFB Soto Cano AB, Honduras do not receive a Tropic Times at your quar1:55pm C5A Howard AFB Atlanta 1AP (C) Charleston AFB, SC (0) ters by 8 a.m., call 269-3220. Charleston AFB, SC Charleston SC, lAP June24 Correction to J une 10 Sunday Wednesday 6:40am C130 Howard AFB 7am B727 Atlanta IAP (C) 5:40am C130 Howard AFB Soto Cano AB, Honduras Tropic Times issue Charleston IAP, SC Managua, Nicaragua (CC) San Jose, Costa Rica The headline for the 193rd Infantry BriSoto Cano AB, Honduras Howard AFB grade (Light) farewell ceremony (Tropic Monday Howard AFB Times issue, June 10, 1994) was incorrect. 5:40am C130 Howard AFB 5:40am C141 Howard AFB The brigade did not case its colors during Tegucigalpa, Honduras Thursday Charleston AFB, SC the bereongd e i l case its colors Soto Cano AB, Honduras 5:40am C141 Howard AFB McGuire AFB, NJ the ceremony. The unit will case its colors Howard AFB San Jose, Costa Rica in a ceremony in October Guatemala City, Guatemala USU.S. passport Tuesday (CC, 0) O-Overnight License plate deadline 5:40am C141 Howard AFB Belize City, Belize C-Commercial Contract extended to June 30 Lima, Peru (CC) Howard AFB V-Visa Santiago, Chile (0) M-Medevac Because of delays in the processing of La Paz, Bolivia 7:55am C5A Howard AFB CC-Country Clearance -.~~~the Vehicle Registration Certificates, thce_______________ Directorate of Land and Traffic Transporgram. the program will last about six tation of the government of Panama has practice networking and conduct a sucPre-reie t metig months and will teach the basic skills of announced the extension of the peiod to cessful job interview. For information, call purchase the 1994xlensn e pe to 287-5844. set for 9 a.m. June 27 dental assisting. Applications are being acpurchase the 1994 license plates to June -A pre-retirement orientation will be cepted at the dental clinic, Building 192. Association sponsors held 9 a.m. June 27 at the conference room For more information, call Staff Sgt. Job Assistance Center luncheon Tuesday in Building 520, Fort Clayton. The orienMichael Fedak at 284-3009/4558. luncheon Tuesday tation is for people who are retiring within needs career counselor The Armed Forces Communications the next six months. For more information, VFWs request members The Army Career and Alumni Proand Electronics Association Luncheon call 287-6417. to support July 4 event gram's Job Assistance Center is looking will be 11:30 a.m. Tuesday at Club AmaThe Deparent of the Panama Canal, for an experienced career counselor. Apdor. A vendor's exposition will be held Officer candidate board Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United plicant must have Master's degree in coundisplaying the latest in communication Offbe cadiJuly 1 a Stas wf Frein the Unted seling, Human Resources, Training or asand automation equipment. For informato be held 15 States will march in the 4th ofJuly parade. associated discipline. Computer literary and tion, call 287-6819. An Officer Candidate School board All members are requested to support the knowledge of Word Perfect is required. will beheld 9 a.m. July 15 at Building 519, event. All members will assemble in the Must sped, read and write English. FluAir Force corrects Fort Clayton. Applications need to be Burger King parking lot at 8:30 a.m. and ency in oral and written Spanish is prelanguage pay turned into Building 519, Room 51 no latmove to the parade line at 8:45 a.m. Uniferred. foreignor in rin a s-4040 er than July 6. For more information, call form is the VFW shirt or a white short For information, call 2874040. Some Air Force members receiving 287-6313/6655. sleeve shirt, dark trousers and the VFW Some foreign language proficiency pay will see hat. There will be extra hats available. chane respa r so r s their June 1 pay reduced. Boy Scout camp needs Also, the VFW will sponsor a booth at change repair hours Because of a computer programming 4th of July festivities on Soldiers Field. Customer service calls for repair of problem, the entitlement was erroneously volunteer support staff The purpose of the booth is to inform the washers, dryers, dishwashers and garbage stopped in May for about 2,500 people, The Panama Canal District of the Boy public of what the VFW stands for and to disposals will be responded to by the Diaccording to officials at the Military PerScouts of Amienca needs volunteers to act recruit new members. Volunteers are rectorate of Engineering and Housing sonnel Center, Randolph AFB, Texas. as program and support staff during its upneeded to staff the booth. contractor, Badelag, S.A., 7 a.m.4 p.m. Officials corrected the problem for coming summer camp. For information, call Ed Lesesne at Mondays through Fridays only. Call 285some members; however, others will see The program staff includes archery 260-3363. 4150/4491/5588/5758. a $200 to $400 reduction in pay. Those range and waterfront directors, and the people will get their money starting with support staff includes kitchen cooks and Balboa class of 1964 Personnel reviews done their June 15 paychecks. medical personnel. .holds 30-year reunion Members who face financial hardship Scouts and staff will live in the jungle for sergeant major board because of this problem should contact operations training area of Fort Sherman. The Balboa High School class of 1964 Personnel Qualification Reviews are their local military finance office or the The staff will arrive at Fort Sherman June will hold its 30-year reunion July 28-31 at being conducted from now until June 24 at Air Force Aid Society for assistance. 18, and leave when the camp ends June 29. the Holiday Inn in Clearwater, Fla. Gradthe enlisted records section, Building 519. People interested in participating uates who know of any classmates' adThe PQRs are being held for command Medical squadron should begin their permissive temporary dress changes should contact Salonick sergeant major selection, promotion to serholds parenting class duty, temporary active duty requests soon. Barber at 404 Marble Cove Way, Seal geant major, resident Sergeants Major For more information, call Johnathan Beach, Calif, 90740, telephone (310)430Course and Quality Management Program The 24th Medical Squadron's Family Hilton at 284-5567/3516 or Kathy 5880; Sherry Sabo Hozack at 2286 AmeSelection board to be held Sept. 13. For Advocacy Outreach Program will sponsor MacPhail at 285-6548. thyst Drive, Santa Clara, Calif., 95051, information, call 287-4658. a parenting class for mothers and fathers telephone (408) 984-5226; or Jane who have children between 6 and 12 years Toastmasters' meetingS Holgerson Thompson at 476 East Yale Building 519 service old. Classes will be held Tuesday, Thursto held J l 7, Loop, Irvine, Calif., 92714, telephone day and June 28, and 30, and July 5 and 7 be dJuly 1 (714) 733-2789. limited June 30 in Building 850, the Albrook Youth CenToastmasters International -Panama Personnel and Finance Services at ter. will hold meetings 5 p.m. July 7 and 21 at DEH announces water Building 519, Fort Clayton will be limited Parents will learn about child developthe Panama Canal Training Center For because of the U.S. Army Garrison Sports ment, management of challenging behavmore information, call 287-5689. flushing schedule Day, June 30. ior, and methods for increasing a child's The Directorate of Engineering and self-esteem. Medical squadron offers Housig will be flushing water mains 8 VFW holds meeting Attendees should reserve their place in a m. -6 p.m. on the following dates: tothe three week class by calling 284-6410/ anger control course day, Cocoli; Monday, Fort Kobbe; 6 p.m. Tuesday (457 before Monday. The 24th Medical Squadron's BehavWednesday and Thursday, Corozal; July The Departent of the Panama Canal, ioral Science Clinic is sponsoring an anger 2-3, Fort Clayton; July 6, Curundu; July Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United July 4 vendors signups management group for people who have 10, Quarry Heights. Water pressure will States will hold an administrative meeting difficulty controlling their temper. tend to be lower for about one hour during 6 p.m. Tuesday at Post 3822, Ancon. All begin Monday at Clayton Officials need to determine the number this time. department and post officers are requested Arts and crafts vendors interested in of people in the community who would to attend. All members may attend. participating in Fourth of July activities like to attend, and also the best time slot Support center holds must sign up at Building 519, Fort Clayfor holding group meetings. Job search seminars ton, Room 355. Registration begins MonGroup members will learn anger manjob search workshop Spanish set for July ~ day. Call 287-5347 for information, agement techniques to help them gain conThe Howard Family Support Center in Spanish set for July 20 trol over their lives and themselves. Peowill offer a job search workshop WednesJob Search Seminars in Spanish will be Corozal bookstore ple interested should call 284-6410/6457. day at the FSC. The workshop will begin held July 20. Seminars are available at the at 10 a.m. and will provide military spousArmy Career and Alumni Program Job changes operating hours Howard Dental Clinic es a variety of information on techniques Assistance Center for qualified DepartThe Corozal Stars and Stripes Bookfor effectively searching for a job in the ment of the Army Panamanian civilian store has changed its operating hours to 10 offers training program local economy. employees. Learn how to find employment a.in.-7 p.m. Monday through Saturday and The Howard Dental Clinic is offering a For more information about the workinformation, write a curriculum vitae, 10 asin-5 p.m. Sunday. Red Cross dental assistant training proshop, call 284-5650.

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Tropic Times # '-Feature 43 June 17 1994 /T ~C Col. Larry A. Black, 24th Wing vice commander; Brig. Gen. David A. Sawyer, outgoing 24th Wing commander; and Lt. Gen. James L. Jamerson, 12th Air Force commander review the troops. Wing gets new commander HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) -and listen for applause." Members of the 24th Wing bid farewell Sawyer leaves Panama for Vicenza, to one commander and welcomed Italy. There he will become deputy another on the flightline here Monday. commander, 5th Allied Tactical Air Col. (Brig. Gen. select) Richard E. Force, North Atlantic Treaty OrganizaBrown III accepted command of the tion, overseeing the allied efforts of wing after Brig. Gen. David A. Sawyer Operation Deny Flight and the humanirelinquished it to Lt. Gen. James L. tarian relief operations over Bosnia. Jamerson, 12th Air Force commander, Brown comes to Panama from who officiated the ceremony. Europe where he served as chief, Joint During his remarks, Jamerson Operations and Plans Section, Operacongratulated Sawyer for his success tions/Logistics Division, Supreme during the past two years. He also Headquarters Allied Powers Europe, alerted Brown to the diverse mission he Mons, Belgium. would be responsible for as the new "It's a great honor to be standing commander. here," he said. "I think you'll find my "Without a doubt, this is one of the style of leadership is similar to that of most challenging wings in Air Combat General Sawyer. Our primary job is Command," he said. "This is the mission accomplishment. Very close to gateway to South America and you (the that, however, is maintaining a family 24th Wing) are the tip of the Air Force atmosphere where people enjoy their spear in the war on drugs." work and get to have some fun too." Sawyer, after taking a moment to The ceremony concluded with a recognize his wife's birthday, finished pass in review by wing units. Men and with a message to Air Force troops women from the operations and present. logistics groups, wing staff agencies "It has been a privilege to command and support group stepped to the beat the best wing in the Air Force tor the of music provided by the Heartland past two years," he said. "Remember Band of America of Offutt AFB, Neb. however, it can always be improved. The support group element included You can be proud of your accomplishflights from the security police ments, but never be content to sit back working dog and horse patrol sections. Col. (Brig. Gen. select) Richard E. "Tex" Brown Ill, incoming 24th Wing commander, addresses members of his new command. U.S. Air Force photos by Senior Master Sgt. Boyd Belcher and Staff Sgt. Roswell Lamar Members of the 24th Security Police Squadron Military Working Dog Section pass in review.

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Tropic Times June 17, 1994 Assessment team acts as Gorgas extension by Capt. Jim Knotts vide day-to-day service to U.S. military members, and Besides the classes, the team tries to demonstrate the USSOUTHCOM Public Affairs usually visits some of the quality of life facilities to make lessons they teach. health recommendations to the Military Group command"I had one man walk in who had very high blood presQUARRY HEIGHTS -How do you provide health ers. sure, so I asked if he felt all right," Pena said. "He said care to servicemembers stationed 3,000 miles from the The only such team of all the U.S. unified commands, 'Yes' because he had just finished a cigarette. He expectnearest 9-1-1 number? That's the challenge for the U.S. the SOUTHCOM team averages one visit a month, or ed a lecture, but instead I took his blood pressure 20 minSouthern Command and its Military Groups in 16 counmore depending on airlift. To reduce costs and carry the utes later to show him the change and how much the cigatries throughout Latin America. The answer is the Coilarge amount of equipment needed, the team always uses rettes were affecting his body every time he lit up." mander-in-Chief's Health Assessment Team. available military airlift, Picariello said. Between 120-130 Venable works with the Embassy Marine Security The six-member team, which is an extension of Gorpeople can be screened each day, which usually lasts 12Guards providing casualty care, trauma management, and gas Army Community H ospital, provides the Anry's 14 hours for the team members with set-up and tear-down first response technique classes. This training also counts health risk appraisal for servicemembers and their famitime, Parrado said. as part of their noncommissioned officer professional delies, as well as other U.S. personnel assigned to the U.S. Besides the standard health appraisal and education velopment. Venable conducts CPR update training and Embassies, said Lt. Col. Jeanne Picariello, the team chief classes, the team provides other specialized training whenevaluates embassy plans for casualty evacuation and treatand a registered nurse. The other members of the team ever possible. ment. are: Dr. (Maj.) Carlos Parrado, chief of the Gorgas De"We try to address stress issues," Pena said. "Many of "There is no '9-1-1' and some places don't have doepartment of Medicine; Laurie Rowley, nutritionist; these people are living in distant places where it's not easy tors (at the embassies), so the Marine Security Guards may Cristina Pena, social worker; Sgt. Bill Venable, medic; to get back to the states. They feel isolated. Some live in be most of the medical response in a crisis," Venable said. and Luann Smith, data base manager. areas where there's a significant security threat, which also Although the work is intensive, the team members all "The appraisal includes cholesterol screening, blood causes stress," Pena said. feel they are doing an important job, and are always made pressure, height, weight, body fat percentage, and lifestyle "We've been asked to give seminars on how family to feel welcome wherever they go. recommendations to reduce a person's risk level for members overseas can arrange care for their elderly par"People literally flood the place," Parrado said. Peochronic disease, specifically cardiovascular disease and ents in the states. We sometimes do lectures on women's ple are encouraged to sign up for screening times before cancer," Picariello said. The team also provides educahealth issues, and provide lists of resources in the states the team arrives, but the schedule quickly fills up as the tion and counseling individually and in groups. for use by family members. We provide another point of news spreads through word of mouth. "We have to turn The team assists the embassy medical staffs that procontact for help, another person to talk to for support." people away every trip" the doctor said. Team to make drilling history in El Salvador by Sgt. Terry Mann 367th Public Affairs Detachment CUARTEL DE MIRAFLORES, El Salvador While drilling water wells in support of Task Force Vulcan here, a team of well drillers from Fort Kobbe will etch a place in the annals of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The team will be the first Army well drilling unit to sink a water well powered by an above-ground diesel pump called the airlift pumping system. The nineman team will also train a team of six Salvadoran i Army Engineer well drillers. "We'll make water well drilling history when we sink the four wells running off the airlift pumping systems,' said Staff Sgt. Joseph Quinlan, noncommisTheatre Support Element photo by tst Lt. Barry Reichenbaugh sioned officer in charge of the water well projects. Sgt. Brent Davis (right) changes the bit on a drill at the worksite of a new school being built in El "The pumps will be used in communities that do not Salvador. With Davis are two Salvadoran soldiers, Sgt. Santos Nicolas Hernandez (left) and Pvt. have electricity. Diaz Acevedo. "The airlift pumping systems eliminate moving parts in the well hole," he said. "All the maintenance Engineers renovate base cam p is done above ground,"En in esr ov t baecm In all, six r whihells will be dried in supports by Sgt. Ter Mann also from Birmingham, and a contin"This mission is important be367th Public Affairs Detachment gent of active duty components. cause this is the first time most of us Caminos in El Salvador. Fuertes Caminos, which --"I asked my crew how they wanthave deployed overseas," said Airmeans strong roads in Spanish, is a joint exercise beCUARTEL DE MIRAFLORES, ed to do it and everybody agreed to man Ist Class Kenny Raff. tween the governments of El Salvador and the United El Salvador -Their hammers start work a few hours before breakfast so Raff, whose specialty is with heatStates. swinging around 4 a.m., about an we could get more work done before ing, ventilation and air conditioning The exercise is sponsored by U.S. Southern Comhour before the Salvadoran sun risthe temperature soared," said Staff systems, also works as a carpenter, mand. es above a volcano overlooking Sgt. Kenneth Neighly, noncommismason, plumber and electrician. "The four communities getting the airlift pumping Task Force Vulcan's base camp. sioned officer in charge of the prime "We all pitch in and help where systems are remote villages with shallow hand-dug Breakfast comes a few hours later base emergency engineer force carwe're needed," he said. sye s Quilare rem e v es w ihsll ow hree asily nd g --the heat doesn't wait for the hunpenter team for the 90th CES. "Being in this extreme heat and wells, Quinlan said. The wells are easily contamigry The 35-man team includes carpulling off our mission shows initianated and usually go dry during El Salvador's dry seaThe 90th Civil Engineer Squadpenters, surveyors, electricians, five, motivation and resourcefulness son. ron from F.E. Warren AFB, Cheyplumbers and masons who have deby everyone here," said Ist Lt. Paul The villages, with the support of El Salvador's waenne, Wyo., deployed here to renoployed to renovate 48 tent platforms Daffin, officer in charge of the carter development agency, will construct water storage vate and expand a base camp for the and build 28 new platforms to house penter team. tanks and distribution lines, he said. Once operationsecond phase of Fuertes Caminos in the soldiers who will participate in "This type of mission builds conal, the wells will pump water at a rate of about 50 El Salvador. the task force. The team engineers fidence and cohesiveness with the gallons per minute. The exercise includes humanitarwill also rebuild four shower faciliunit, because the crews can see tangi"Last year, I spent four months in El Salvador," ian and civic action projects deties and provide electricity and ble results in their work," he said. said Pfc. David Thompson, mechanic with the 536th signed to strengthen democracy in plumbing to the base camp. One example of the cohesiveness team. the host nation. After completing the base camp, to be found in this crew is Senior AirTask Force Vulcan, a part of FC, the team prepared the construction man Margaret Montoya, a dispatcher While driving through villages in convoys, I saw is the first task force in El Salvador sites for the U.S. Army Reserve enwith the 90th CES. Normally she women and children carrying heavy water containers spearheaded by the Army Reserve. gineers who arrived in May. The civspends her days in Cheyenne coordiup mountain roads to their villages. The 926th Engineer Group from ic action projects include renovating nating teams and projects to work "They'll appreciate the wells the Salvadorans and 121st Army Reserve Command, 23 classrooms, one village assembly sites. In El Salvador, she joined the us drill in their villages and I like knowing that I Birmingham, Ala., will conduct the hall and building a fence and garage carpenters in building tent platforms. helped to make getting water easier for them," civic action projects with support for a medical clinic. Si:water wells "I love this work," she said. "Not Thompson said. from Alabama National Guard's will also be drilled by the 536th Enonly does it get me out of the office, 167th Corps Support Command, gineer Battalion from Fort Kobbe. but it helps us build better relations

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Military News : Tropic Times ____ ew s ____June_17, 1994 Combat Off-post residences need Some women ofc say they're ready housing office approval FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. (AP) As military leaders consider whether FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -U.S. Army South perUnder the new procedure, realtors and landlords must list their female soldiers should get more sonnel wanting to reside on the local economy must now check properties with the Housing Referral Office. The Housing Referchances to serve in combat, seven with the Housing Referral Office, Building 519 for authorized ral Office will then verify that the rent listed is reasonable. women in the 10 1st Airborne Diviaddresses, said Directorate of Engineering and Housing officials. Only properties that are verified and listed in the new system sion say ability -not gender -is "What this change means to U.S. Army South personnel is will be approved for leasing. In addition, the listed price cannot what counts in a fight. that before seeking a lease in Panama, sponsors select properties be increased and will remain the same across the board for all "I think women should be allowed they are interested in renting from a multiple listing system locatranks regardless of OHA rates, Davis said. in any area of combat," Spc. Tracy ed at the Housing Referral Office," said Col. M. Jeffry Petrucci, If personnel lease a property which is not listed with HRO, Stephens, 26, a clerk from Socorro, U.S. Army Garrison commander. "There will be growing pains they will not receive OHA, Davis said. N.M., said in an interview. "This is a with this upgrade of service, but I am confident that this program To receive housing on the local economy, personnel must first very hot issue for me." will ensure that while you are looking for a home, you will know check with their local HRO. Stephens described in great detail the rental price prior to visiting the premises" A housing briefing is held 1:15 p.m. every Thursday at Buildand with much enthusiasm the mobile The change to the current procedures came in an effort to esing 520. The briefing informs customers about how to rent propartillery operated by her husband, tablish fair rental prices in advance of lease negotiations and to erty, the responsibilities of landlords and reactors, the documents who is stationed at Fort Sill, Okla. She deter any pricing variance based on rank and resulting Overseas required to start OHA, entitlements and up-front monies that are said she would like to do that, too. Housing Allowance. required, said Alex Brathwaite, chief of Housing Referral Office. Army Secretary Togo West is to "In the past, personnel dealt directly with local real estate "At HRO, our aim is to provide you with world class service. make a recommendation on whether agents and came to the Housing Office basically to close the deal," To avoid long waiting lines, we would ask customers to call for women should be allowed to serve as said Dick Davis, chief of the Housing Office. "The perception an appointment to review the HRO listing of properties," pilots of special operation unit heliexisted that similar properties were offered at different prices deBrathwaite said. copters and operators of the Multiple pending on rank and the associated OHA rates, which is common For information or to make a housing appointment, call 287Launch Rocket System, a key artillery knowledge." 5413. weapon. Defense Secretary William PerryPe rsa um scm ndo 64 t muste Peters assumes command of 640th The 101st Airborne has been tested in battle from World War II to HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) -The Vietnam to Somalia, where one mem617th Airlift Support Squadron received a ber, helicopter pilot Michael Durant, new leader and a new name June 6 during was shot down and captured. Images a change of command /redesignation cereof his swollen face filled television mony at the Air Mobility Command terscreens and the covers of newspapers minal here. and magazines. Col. Jack F. Peters is commander of the Two women Blazkhawk helicoprenamed 640th Air Mobility Support ter pilots at this base on the TennesSquadron. He replaces Col. John W. see-Kentucky border say women Harbison who began his command tour in should have the opportunity to volunJuly 1992. teer for combat. Peters, a native of Hartley, Iowa, grad"That just opens you up to another uated from Mankato State University, area where you have to go out and Mankato, Minn., in 1971 and earned his prove yourself first, and there's a lot commission through Officer Training of females that are capable of being School the next year. able to do that," said 1st Lt. Teena The colonel has piloted CH-53 and CM.C. Fawcett, 26, of Omaha, Neb. 141 aircraft. Other assignments include Fawcett and Capt. Jane O'Connor, Fort Rucker, Ala.; Royal Thai AFB, Thai33, of Warrensburg, N.Y., said womland; Warren AFB, Wyo.; Norton AFB, en mustbe given a chance to advance, Calif.; Maxwell AFB, Ala.; and Scott although both women said they had AFB, Ill. no personal interest in being in corHe is married to the former Diane L. pnoto bat. ScarffofMount Pleasant, Iowa. They have Lt. Gen. Malcolm B. Armstrong, 21st Air Force commander, incoming "Let's make sure that ifyou open two children, Mike and Nancy. 640th Air Mobilty Support Command commander, Col. Jack F. Peters and up a field for women, make sure that The unit Peters takes charge of traces outgoing 670th commander Col. John W. Harbison watch squadron it's completely open to the top so she its history back to March 1966 where it members case the 617th Airlift Support Squadron flag. can progress," said O'Connor, whose was first activated at Da Nang Airport, husband is a special operations unit Republic of Vietnam. The 617th was inacWith its new name, the unit gains a new Central America and the tree branch is the pilot. tivated in 1972, but two decades later repatch. It features a toucan standing on a unit showing the supportive relationship "I just hate to see a woman thrown activated here. tree branch. The bird represents South and squadron members have with the region. in there and be a captain and not be able to become a company commandrbote,"mead "iteyr Air Force drops harassment probe going to open this, it's got to be wider ed psh a sm n p ob open WASHINGTON (AP) -The Air Force halted a criminal inWidnall then asked Martinez if she wanted to stay in the Air "And they've got to be able to ac_ vestigation of a sergeant who claimed the probe was merely a Force and what the service could do to help her career. Martinez cept that if she's really good, then she reprisal for her testifying about on-the-job sexual harassment said she wanted to train to become an equal opportunity officer. can be a company commander over Monday. Widnall agreed to iiake the arrangements. According to Susan there as a major." Air Force Secretary Sheila Widnall also granted the request of G. Barnes, Martinez's attorney, Widnall offered no apology and Two clerks in a supply unit pointSgt. Zenaida Martinez that she be trained as an equal opportunity did not discuss whether any officers at Mildenhall would be puned out that women, in effect, already officer. ished. are in combat, whether or not they've Widnall met with Martinez for more than an hour at the Penta'I'm very grateful that she took an interest," Martinez said of been assigned a comb roe gon after the 27-year-old security police officer charged that her Widnall. "But I want a career, and that means we need to enforce "When we were in Somalia and superiors were trying to scuttle her career after she publicly cornthese sexual harassment laws. There's nothing to prevent somethey needed people to go out in the plained about sexual harassment. thing like this happening to me again." convoys, we put the helmets on and The meeting came under pressure from lawmakers on Capitol Martinez is still pursuing a lawsuit filed last fall regarding her we put the flak vests on," said Pfc. Hill who were outraged by the Martinez case. Lawmakers were original sexual harassment charge. She alleges that a superior ofKimberly McGee, 23. particularly incensed because Martinez's latest run-in with her fleer repeatedly made advances on her, warning that her career McGee works as a high-tech radio superiors stemmed from an appearance she made in March becould be hurt if she failed to comply. She told the Armed Servicoperator and spent 133 days in Soiafore the House Anned Services Committee in a hearing on haes Committee in March that after complaining of the harassment ha. rassment. -her evidence included a tape recording of the officer -she "I can't see the difference because After returning to her base at Mildenhall, England, from that was passed up for promotion, denied comnendations and taken ifwe were there and had the men with appearance, Martinez submitted a $200 taxi cab receipt which the off security police duty. us, there was no difference. They still Air Force paid. Earlier this month her superiors informed her that The dispute over the taxi fare led Martinez to file a separate shot at us. And we had to shoot back. she was under criminal investigation over the cab fare. complaint with the Pentagon inspector general. And if that's not combat -maybe it Widnall told Martinez that Gen. Robert C. Oaks, the Air Force Martinez also met with Reps. Patricia Schroeder, D-Colo., and wasn't the biggest war you've ever European commander, reviewed the case and ordered the crimiRonald Dellums, D-Calif., the chairman of the Ilouse Armed seen -but if it's not combat, then nal investigation halted. Widnall also said that orders issued last Services Committee. what is it?" week requiring Martinez to transfer from Mildenhall to McGuire Schroeder said she would propose legislation to close loopAFB in New Jersey had been rescinded. holes in existing federal whistleblower protection laws.

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6 Tropic Times j 9 c s __ June 17, 1994Voices Loud late show crowd offends moviegoers Dear Mayors' Corner: Third and fourth class packages that weigh Recently, my family and I attended the M y r C m less than 15 pounds and are less than 60 7 p.m. show at the Fort Clayton Theater. inches in combined length and girth are Towards the end of the movie, the manDear Mayors' Corner: Dear Dissatisfied: upgraded to space available status and agement allowed the lobby to fill up with Where is the mail? In the past months, I This response was given by Capt. flown from the Bulk Mail Center. people waiting to see the late show. These have noticed that the postal service is getKaren Jordan, chief of operations of the The conversation that you overheard, people became very loud and disruptive, ting worse. Why should it take six to eight 24th Air Postal Squadron. referred to current inbound mail. We reentering the balcony at one time. If people weeks for a magazine to get here? In late To properly explain what is happening, ceive, on average, three to four containers can't or won't be considerate, then the February, I overheard two postal workers it is necessary to take you through the proof mail per week. management shouldn't allow them in the talking that soon they would be getting cess of fourth class mail delivery. We invite customers to come in and see lobby until the first show is over. several containers of fourth class mail in If you order something from a compaour operation and welcome volunteers. I The Critic early March. True to their word, in the first ny, the local post office in the states acwant to assure you that we are committed week of March my mailbox was stuffed cepts it and then it is transported to the to provide quality service and are working -Dear Critic: with the magazines I subscribe to. I subBulk Mail Center in Bayonne, N.J. It is hard to solve all problems associated with Donna Kelso from the Army and Air scribe to about 10 magazines. Because then loaded onto a tractor trailer and sent second, third and fourth class mail. Force Exchange Service management some of the mail dated back to December, to Port Everglades, Fla. The contractor has Volunteers are needed at all area Post made the following reply: I was overwhelmed with magazines and six days to make this journey. It is then Offices and may contact Capt. Jordan at We apologize for the inconvenience catalogs for several days. loaded onto a ship and when the ship is 286-3107 or Maggie Coleman, Installation you suffered during your visit to our theI can understand an extra fiveor 10filled, it travels to Panama. The boat trip Volunteer Coordinator in Building 519. ater. Unfortunately, this happens as you day delay in fourth class, but a 6-8 week takes 14 days. The ship docks in Colon and said because other people fail to be condelay is stretching it a little. Many of the a contractor brings it to the Albrook Post Editor's note: This column allows siderate. We have discussed your concerns magazines and catalogs that I receive offer Office where the mail is sorted for its Pancommunity members to submit queswith management and theater supervisors limited time specials that become worthamanian destinations. tions to the Mayoral Congress. Letters and will do everything we can to control less to me considering the delay. The mail is taking longer to arrive in should be mailed to: Mayors' Corner, this situation in the future. Should this ocBeing far from home, mail is one of the Panama; however it still meets the standard Publicity Chairperson, APO AA 34004 cur again, bring it to our attention immefew things that keeps us living like Amerithat the U.S. Postal Service has set for de(MPS). Anonymity will be granted diately so we can ask people to reduce the cans. Can this situation be improved? livery of fourth class. My suggestion to upon request. The Tropic Times reserves noise or leave. Call 286-3640, 8 a.m.-4 Another Dissatisfied customers who do not want to pay for prithe right to edit letters and responses for p.m., Monday -Friday to voice comments. Postal Patron ority mail is to send smaller packages. brevity, clarity and propriety. Dear Editor: Dog aftacks girl on Fort Espinar April 19 was the U.S. Army South volunteer recGirl attacked by dog ognition luncheon. It was held in honor of and recogA family member was attacked by a neighbor's dog on Provost Marshal S Corner nized many USARSO volunteers, yet several issues Fort Espinar last week. The young girl went to the quarof the Tropic Times have been published and not one ters to visit a friend when she was attacked by a dog that The following crimes happened in on and off post word about these volunteers has been printed. We was chained by the building. The girl was taken to the housing areas May 27 -June 2: have read about the Navy's and Air Force's volunhospital where she received seven stitches in her right Pacific teers and there has been a huge, two-page pictorial arm. The owner was charged despite the dog being on a Fort Clayton 300 housing area -one larceny of seabout tattoos. Yet nothing about USARSO volunchain. cured private property teers. Pet owners are responsible for the actions of their pets Morgan Avenue -one larceny of unsecured private Now, I ask you, what exactly are your priorities? at all times. For information, call the military police at property Can you imagine USARSO operating one or two 287-4401 or 289-5133. Corozal 600 housing area -one larceny of secured weeks without its volunteers? I think not. These peoprivate property ple and groups work very hard -solely from the Alcohol leads to conviction Fort Kobbe 800 area -one larceny of unsecured prigoodness of their hearts -and they don't volunteer A soldier became combative while MPs were attemptvate property for recognition but they definitely deserve it. And yet, ing to diffuse a situation on Fort Clayton last week. The Atlantic you saw fit to overlook them -way to go. soldier apparently had too much to drink, and failed to Fort Davis -two larcenies of secured private property Your paper is usually very informative, widely listen to instructions. He was arrested and charged with Fort Espinar -one larceny of secured private properread and very up-to-date on the issues that affect our drunk and disorderly conduct. While at the MP station, ty community. By completely overlooking this recogthe soldier became disrespectful to the noncommissioned Fort Sherman -one larceny of secured private propnition day, you have created a huge oversight on your officer processing him and was further charged. erty part. Don't let alcohol cloud judgement. Whether on or offOff post I ask you to please correct this. USARSO could duty, people are responsible for their actions. For inforBethania -one larceny ofsecured private property and not run as smoothly as it does if it were not for its mation, call the MPs at 287-4401 or 289-5133. one larceny of unsecured private property volunteers. El Dorado -one larceny of secured private propA Very Disappointed Reader Misuse of a government vehicle erty Two soldiers were charged with misappropriating govDear Disappointed: ernment vehicles in separate incidents last week. In the The latest on "Gotcha" Cards As the editor of the U.S. Army South Public Affirst incident, the soldier was seen downtown in civilian One-hundred-sixty-nine "GOTCHA" cards were isfairs Office, I would like to extend my apologies for attire, talking with a couple of women. In the second incisued to the following housing areas from April 24 to May not covering the volunteer luncheon that you talked dent, a soldier was seen driving two Panamanian women 23. about. in a government-owned vehicle. Both soldiers were arI fully and wholeheartedly agree that volunteers rested and charged with the violation. Fort Clayton are what makes this, and any other community, run Misappropriation of a government vehicle is a serious 500 area -5 more smoothly and that we could not function as well offense punishable under Article 121 of the Uniform Code 600 area -21 without them. They are a vital part of this communiof Military Justice. Questions concerning this offense can 700 area -6 ty and deserve any recognition passed their way. be directed to the MPs at 287-4401 or 289-5133. 1000 area -3 We will do a betterjob at giving the proper cover1100 area -2 age to the volunteers of the U.S. Army South comPanama Jack anonymous hotline Corozal -79 munity in the future. Anyone with information concerning drug smuggling Fort Kobbe Staff Sgt. Jane Usero should contact the Panama Jack anonymous hotline at 300 area -I 2854185. Cocoli -I This authorized unofficial command information pubChief ..Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor 24th Wing Public Afiairs Office. 284-5459 lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Editor.Maureen Sampson Public Affairs Officer.Capt. Warren L. Sypher Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Sports Editor.Sgt. Lori Davis Public A affairs Superintendent Information Program of the Department of Defense, unStaff Editors.Spc. John Hall Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S. Rosemary Chong Journalists.StaffSgt. Rian Clawson Southern Command. Southern Command Public Affairs Office.282-4278 Sgt. James A. Rush Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the Command Information Officer.Patrick Milton U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 official view of the U.S. government, the Department of U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.287-3007 Public Affairs Officer.Diane Gonzalez Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. Public Affairs Officer.L.Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder Photographer The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Command Information Officer.Beth Taylor Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor Telephone 285-6612. Editor. .Staff Sgt. Jane Usero U.S. Army South PAO-Atlaniic.289-4312 Commander in Chief.Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey Co-editor.Sgt. Robin Mantikoski NCOIC.Sgt. Richard Fmert Director, Public Affairs.Col. Jam es L. Fetig Journalist.Sgt. Erie Hortin -#Tropic Times

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Tropic Times 7 .r Commentar June 17, 1994 A tale of abuse through the eyes of a child Editor's note: This is a fictional account interrupted again and tried to yell out about shaking me -because I was crying like a That's the last thing I ever saw. of what could happen to a victim of child the fishing trip before he could tell me to be baby and I'm not a baby, I'm seven. Not being able to see isn't so bad, but I abuse. quiet. I was holding his arms and trying to stop wish I could talk or move my arms and He hit me in the face, and I fell. I tried crying, but I couldn't stop. He kept shaking legs. I don't breathe right either, and I can't by Sgt. Rick Emert not to cry, but it hurt. My mother was me and I felt something click in my neck eat real food. USARSO PAO -Atlantic telling me to go upstairs, but I really wanted and my arms fell down. I couldn't move It's very quiet here, except for the -to tell him about the fishing trip. them -I still can't. machines that beep and the radio and 'm really very lucky to be here. He came over to me, and I tried to stop He let go of me, and I remember hitting television and the lady who talks to me. It's quiet most of the time and I crying so I could tell him about the trip, but the wall. I saw his face, he was so mad. His I'm always quiet, though. I think my dad get a lot of rest. I spend most of I couldn't get the words out. face was red and he was sweating because I would be proud of how quiet I'm being if my time listening to the radio and He picked me up by my shirt and started made him mad. he came to see me. television, but I can't complain. A lady comes in a few times a day to talk to me. Shte strokes my hair and tells me abu tigstathppnd ohe hedy Family advocacy parenting classes baffle abuse before. She has a nice voice. A happy voice. She has two kids -a boy and a girl. The FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO -At"If they're in the comer too long, it benately many find out about them when it's boy is in second grade. He plays little league lantic) -Childhood years are the carefree comes too much," she said. "We recommend too late." baseball and got his first hit of the season years-playing baseball afterschool, Sunone minute per year of age." Along with resourcesand classesaimed over the past weekend. She told me that day afternoons at the park. The free classes don't reach everyone, at families, FAP also provides training for Monday. But 75 children who have lived right "There is a stigma when it comes to attendunit commanders, law enforcement perHe's the same age as me. She says we here in Panama's U.S. Army communities ing parenting classes,"she said. "Parents think: sonnel, Department of Defense Depenlook alike -sort of. She got him a bike for may try to forget their childhood; to re'If I go to the class it means I don't know how dents Schools teachers and employees of his birthday last week, and he's getting memberwouldmean reliving the traumaof to raise my children,' or 'My neighbors will agencies dealing with children, she said. better at riding it. She didn't think he'd ever emotional and physical abuse. think I'm in trouble with the law."' If a case of abuse is reported, it's likely learn to ride it. The first week he fell every Those children were the victims in 75 Amongthereported andsubstantiatedcases one or more ofthese agencies will become time he got on it and she said it was a good substantiated cases of abuse in the Pacific of emotional abuse, neglect is the most cominvolved. Reports of child abuse are most thing she was a nurse and knew how to and Atlantic military communities here in mon, Coughlin said. oftenmadeat military police stations,emerbandage scraped knees. 1993, said Myrna Coughlin, Family Advo"Our major problem has been the supervigency rooms, Social Work Services or Sometimes she sounds sad when she cacy Program specialist, Army Commusion of children," she said. "When parents ACS, Coughlin said. talks about her son. I think it's because I nity Services-Atlantic. don't provide supervision or care for their A report of abuse results in an investiremind her of him. Although the number of substantiated children, that's neglect. We try to make pargation within 24 hours by the FAP theraWhen she comes in with the doctor, she cases was 15 less than in 1992, reports of ents aware that an accident can happen in just pist and law enforcement personnel from doesn't talk to me much. The doctor has abuse could increase, Coughlin said. two seconds." either the military police, Military Police cold hands and smells like mint. He doesn't "In thepast, there was a lack ofinformaThere is a positive note concerning neInvestigations or Criminal Investigations talk to me at all, only to the lady. Usually I tion and general knowledge about what is glect. Command and medical personnel if can't hear what they say because they considered abuse," she said. "The number "The allegations of neglect have diminneccessary. Then the child and parents are whisper. of reported cases of abuse goes up and ished greatly because of the response from the interviewed and the case is presented at the When I do hear them, they talk about down from year to year. It may increase community and the increase in awareness." next monthly meeting ofthe Family Advothings I don't understand, about machines. again due to stress from the drawdown." Other forms ofemotional abuse may be too cacy Case Management Team, she said. My parents don't come here. I think they The Family Advocacy Program keys in subtle to recognize, let alone report, she said. The FACMT is agroupof 12-15 people feel sorry for me or they're sad that I have to on preventing abuse in military communi"There are so many ways to emotionally that meet monthly to determine.if cases of stay here. It's OK that they don't come, ties, she said. abuse ahuman being: belittling, teasing, threatabuse are substantiated based on the evithough. It's very quiet and I get a lot of rest. The classes cover four basic topics ening, blaming, humiliating and criticizing," dence andtodetermine treatment, Coughlin Even if they did come I couldn't see which include active communication skills, shesaid."It'snot necessarilya physical threat, said. them or hug them or go home with them. I resolving parent/child conflicts, value colbut it will have a lasting affect on the person." It may be necessary to remove the child could only listen to them. lisions and improved family life, she said. A way to counter these forms ofemotional from the homebefore the FACMT reviews They would probably like that, though. "Parents love their children and don't abuse is to look at it from the other person's the case. They liked it when I was quiet. I always want to hurt them, but sometimes we discipoint of view, she said. In the pastthree years, 12 children have tried to be quiet, but sometimes I would pline our children the way we were disci"Listen to the words you're saying and been placed in foster care in the Atlantic forget and they would get mad at me. plined," she said. "If we know better, we imagine how you would feel if they were community, Coughlin said. The day I came here, I forgot to be can implement other methods when discibeing said to you," she said. "It is possible to "Our primary concern is to protect the quiet. plining our children." communicate with a child without shouting or victims. If the victims need protection, we I'm not supposed to bother my dad right Although spanking may be accepted calling him names. will give it to them immediately." when he gets home from work. I know I'm amongparents, it may be consideredabuse "Whatever he did wrong, tell him how it Although it may seem malicious, child not supposed to. But that day in school I in some cases. The alternatives are more madeyou feelandwhy it waswrong,"Coughlin abuse is rarely done to purposely torment a found out we were having a father and son affective and safer, Coughlin said. said. "Most likely the child will learn from this child, Coughlin said. fishing trip. I was excited and I wanted to One alternative to spanking is "time and your relationship will still be in tact." "I like to believe that parents have a tell him. We never went fishing before, out." The services available to the military comgenuine concern to do better for their chilHe was talking to my mother, but I "Time out is a workingway to negotiate munity are numerous and valuable, she said. dren. Every parent's dream is to see their interrupted him. I knew I shouldn't have, but with childrenwhen doneproperly,"she "We are aware that soldiers aren't just child succeed in life and to be nappy." I had to tell him about the fishing trip. He said. "It gives the child time to consider soldiers; they're parents, spouses and family And to be able to ease the stress and yelled at me and told me to be quiet. what happened, why they got in trouble and members as well. We try to open programs responsibility of adulthood by rememberI tried to be quiet, but they kept talking, how they can prevent doing it again. and provide resources for them, but unfortuing times of baseball and picnics. and I had to tell him about the fishing trip. I Direct Quotes What would you do if you suspected a child was being abused? "Make proper notifica"I would report it to the "Notify the police and "I would report it to the "Calls the MPs and tion to authorities and proper authorities, like let them take care of it." MPs." step in and do sometake the child from CIL)." thing about it." who's abusing them." Petty Officer 1st Class Spc. Emily Britt Tech Sgt. Chris Diehl Ulia Walker Sgt. Jamison Rucks Luis Rivera Criminal Investigations 24th Weather Squadron Army family member 534th Military Police Inter-American Naval Division Company Telecommunications Network The opinions expressed on this page are those ofthe commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries -or responses to commentaries -to the Tropic Times. The staffreserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

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Tropic Times June 17, 1994 Theater Support Element photo by Pvt. Bian D. Hennon From left to right, members of Company D 3rd Battalion, 7th Special Forces (Airborne) Sgt. 1st Class Andrew S. Griffith from Oklahoma, Sgt. Ian P. Pucek from Illinois and Sgt. James D. Wade from Georgia prepare to jump from a C-130 "Hercules" transport plane flown by the 123rd Airlift Wing of the Kentucky Air National Guard in Panama. The 123rd was in Panama to support Operation Coronet Oak which provides air crews and support teams for ongoing supply missions in Central and South America. Coronet O Air Guard, reservists keep SOUTHCOM mission flying 3rd Special Operations Support Command said that by Pvt. Brian D. Hennon without the National Guard his unit wouldn't get as 109th Public Affairs Detachment much jump time which is crucial to its training. --_"We've jumped with the Guard several times and they group of Kentuckians recently ran an overnight are just as professional as any regular-Army unit I've delivery service in Central and South America. seen," said Mann. "We rely on the guys in the hack of "Whatever they need, we deliver," said the plane more than anyone and they all know what Master Sgt. David M. Fink, first sergeant of they're doing." the 123rd Airlift Wing of the Kentucky Air National While training at home, the 123rd's missions are Guard from Louisville. mostly limited to simulating what it did in Panama. Fink, a full-time civil service technician in Louisville, "The pilots and crew are in a real-world situation and about 200 other Kentuckians were at Howard AFB here. We've flown earthquake-relief missions and for their two-week annual training. They were part of search-and-rescue missions. We directly affect many Coronet Oak, an operation comprised totally of Air people," said Fink. Guard and Air Force Reserve personnel. The 123rd does more than fly military operations. It Coronet Oak tasks Air National Guard and Air Force also flies humanitarian missions all over the world. Reserve with continuously providing C-130 "Hercules" Staff Sgt. Patrick Maloney from Louisville, transport aircraft, air crews and support teams for loadmaster for the 123rd and a cargo handler for United ongoing supply and transportation missions throughout Parcel Service has flown in hurricane relief missions for Central and South America. both Hurricanes Hugo and Andrew in Florida. The mission supports the U.S. Southern Command, a "We fly search-and-rescue missions in the event that unified command of 10,000 Army, Navy, Marine, Coast ships are overdue or we have a downed plane," said Guard and Air Force personnel responsible for all U.S. Maloney. military operations in Central and South America. The More recently, some members were called upon to aid region encompasses one-tenth of the world's land mass. the United Nations effort in Bosnia while gaining "Using C-130 'Hercules' transport planes, we airlift experience and working long hours. items such as mail, food and other household goods to "I served three tours in Bosnia pulling 12 and 16 hour radar sites and embassies anywhere in South America shifts, flying humanitarian missions," said Navigator and Central America," said Coronet Oak Mission Capt. Steven L. Cochran from Louisville. "The best Commander Lt. Col. William Hooper Jones of Louispeople I've flown with have been in the Guard. Most ville. guardsmen were in the Air Force full time and brought "We also resupply the U.S. Drug Enforcement that experience back to the Guard." Agency and aid them with drug interdiction missions Cochran is not the only one who feels the "cream of and transport personnel," Jones said. the crop" is in the Kentucky Air National Guard. One of the 123rd's missions while in Panama was to Jones serve ed in Coronet Oak 1 times and has been in air drop personnel from Special Operations Commandevery country in Central and South America. South. "The experience les el of the air crews and the entire 1st Lt. David S. Mann who was the primary suppor. package iC higher than an; acti' e dut; station Members of Special Operations Command South jumpmas.ter for one of the jumps and a member of the 1'\e seer h said. "Hercules" transport plane flown in Panama by the

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Tropic Times June 17, 1994 Theater Support Element photo by Pvt. Brian D. Hennon A member of Special Operations Command South jumps from a C-1 30 "Hercules" transport plane while a jumpmaster checks for anymore troops disembarking the aircraft flown by members of the 123rd Airlift Wing of the Kentucky Air National Guard. vq "In Theater Support Element photo by Pfc Nancy Hutton nd the 3rd Special Operations Support Command jump from a C-130 Teater Support Element photo by Spc Art ederhold 23rd Airlift Wing of the Kentucky Air National Guard tech. Sgt. Greg Ruiavima of the 139th Airlift Group, Missouri National Guard, 3 r ',nsporf plnr prior to its flight to La Pez. 5-,ivia,

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Tropic Times 10 June17 1994Features Aviators case colors at final formation by Sgt. Eric Hortin USARSO Public Affairs Office HOWARD AFB"Joker Flight" isn't flying anymore. The pilots, crewchiefs and soldiers of Company B, I st Battalion, 228th Aviation stood in their final formation as an active unit Wednesday as their leaders cased the unit colors. The unit is one of the first in Panama to formally inactivate as part of the Panama Canal Treaty Implementation Plan. Co. B, 1st Bn., 228th Avn. was originally activated Feb. 1, 1963, with the 1 lth Air Assault Division. The unit was reassigned to the 1st Cavalry Division and went to Vietnam. The unit was awarded a Presidential Unit Citation, a Valorous Unit Award and two Meritorious Unit Commendations for its actions in Vietnam. After a series of inactivations, activations and a brief time at Fort Hood, Texas, as an attack helicopter battalion, the unit was reactivated here Oct. 16, 1987. The unit was reorganized as a Theater Army Aviation Company, controlling UH-I H Hueys and OH-58 Iroquois helicopters, and C-12F fixed-wing aircraft. Its mission included aviation support, intelligence gathering, and transporting of people and cargo to U.S. embassies in the region. The unit distinguished itself during Operation Just Cause, providing air assault power during the Renacer Prison raid. Company B distinguished itself again Sept. 3, 1993, by being the first unit of the 128th Aviation Brigade to receive the U.S. Army South Commanding General's Physical Training Streamer. The unit continued to support its primary mission, supporting nation-building projects, humanitarian missions and deployments to several Central and South American countries. All that ended May 25, when the last of the unit's Hueys was loaded up at Howard and taken to the states. "I've spent a lot of my years and alot of flight experience here in Panama," said Chief Warrant Officer 4 Charles Blankenship, who was here when the unit was first activated ini Panama. "It's sort of sad to see it come to an end." The pilots, crewchiefs and soldiers of Co. B, 1st Bn., 228th Avn. will be reassigned to units throughout the U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Eric Hortin Army, but many of them will continue the unit tradi1st Sgt. Matthew Poore, Company B, 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation, encases the guidon. tion of "Giving nightmares to all the right people." He started at $70 a month Command Sgt. Maj. looks back on 30-year career by Spc. Alexander C. White But, McWhorter explained, it was a decision he was USARSO Public Affairs Office glad he made. Initially, he entered the military as a light"Success to me is being able to look in vehicle driver, but in 1975 he went back to school to beCOROZAL -The year come a counterintelligence agent. the mirror at the end of the day and say 'I 1964 was a time when the At the time of his enlistment, McWhorter's mentors have done the best that I could do today,' country was still weeping were old World War II and Korean War veterans, he said. over the assassination of its He learned from their experiences and hardships and then and then wake up the next morning and try beloved president, inequality applied them to his success. to do the same thing over again. It's time in civil rights was beginning "Promotions were slow," McWhorter said. "I had been to be contested and the Unitthe first sergeant to be promoted in my unit in two years." to go, though, when one of those soldiers I ed States was sending its sons McWhorter stayed in the Army not because of the adhelped already retired as sergeant major." and daughters to a distant vancement, but because he was learning from his advenCommand Sgt. Maj. country to fight a war they did tures; and the simple fact that he liked Army life. not understand. "It allowed me to expand my horizons and gave me Randall D. McWhorter Many of this era were the opportunity to help people and go places," he said. 470th Military Intelligence Battalion questioning political purposMcWhorter When McWhorter joined the Anny there was a large es and trying to find excuses influx of draftees who were older and had their lives disto escape responsibilities. But among ill this turmoil s rupted by being pulled out of college or factories. what it was like to be a civilian, he explained that one young man of 18 years decided it had to be bettei than "They couldn't wait to get back home," he said. "It's week out of the year he packs up the car, gathers his fainbecoming a factory worker in I iamilton, Ohio. different today, the soldiers are younger and the NCOs ily, and heads off to Myrtle Beach. After his vacation he Now, 30 years later, a white-haired Command Sgt. are smarter." goes back to work. Maj. Randall D. McWhorter, 470th Military Intelligence MCWhorter said that is why it is harder to convince "That might be fine for a lot ofpeople, but I can't see a Brigade command sergeant major, reflects on his decision soldiers to stay in. He said that with their intelligence and better job then what the Army has to offer," he said. "You and sees that it was a good direction to take. desire, they feel they can get so much more out of being a can take the leading experience that you gained here and "I had a very narrow focus being raised in Ohio," civilian. apply it to life, at being a success." McWhorter said. "I hadn't even seen an ocean or flown McWhorter has to disagree. Passing his knowledge on to younger soldiers has been in a plane." "When a soldier asks me about a future in the Any I his greatest success, McWhorter said. Watching others He said that what the Army provided him with was a ask him, 'do you have a road map to success that you want succeed has been part of the satisfaction of being in the wealth ofknowledge and experience that he couldn't have to follow?' "McWhorter said. "I tell him straight forward, Army. gotten growing up in his hometown. you're not going to get rich here (in the Army). Stay in "Success to me is being able to look in the mirror at the Before graduating from Taft High School, McWhorter only if you enjoy it.no other profession can give you this. end of the day and say 'I have done the best that I could received notice that he was to report to the local military If you're in it for the money, you're in it for the wrong do today,' and then wake up the next morning and try to in-processing station for a pre-induction physical. He dereasons." do the same thing over again," lie said. "It's time to go, cided to enlist in the Army before the results came back. McWhorter says his position is like being a parent -though, when one of those soldiers I helped already re"I chose the Army because my brother was a Marine watching the children grow. He tries to make them see tired as sergeant major." and my uncles were all in the Navy," McWhorter said. reality. "I have been fortunate to serve my country," "To be honest, one day I was home trying on my uncle's "I tell them 'Go back home and see what the guys are McWhorter said. "It's not very often that a guy who startuniform and I decided then that I did not want to be weardoing on the block,' McWhorter said. "I went home ed out working for $70 a month has the opportunity to ing bell bottoms and have to button 16 buttons everyday." one time and talked to an old friend of mine. When I asked become a success."

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Tropic Times June_17, 1994 X IL June, 1944 D-Day invasion, Operation Overlord begins in Normandy FORT CLAYTON -The following are significant World War II events that took place during June 1944: June 4 Col. William Ewen Shipp, a West Point graduate and a United States Military Attache for Asuncion, Paraguay and Quito, Ecuador, is announced as the new Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, Panama Canal Department, succeeding the late Col. Carl H. Strong, who died April 4 in Quito while on a military mission.Headquarters, Panama Canal Department, announces the promotion of eight officers at Quarry Heights. To major are: Melvin J. Greaves and James J. Ainsworth. To captain: Janon F. Embury, Felix N. Fidelibum, Eugenio L. Santoni. To first lieutenant: William D. Chumbley, Herbert W. Kirchoff, Charles G. Marvin. Allied Forces enter Rome on Trinity Sunday. Out of respect for the religious holiday, the American Fifth and British Eighth armies do not occupy the city until the next morning. June 5 Planes carrying troops of the 101st Airbome Division begin taking off at 10: 15 p.m. from England. Both the 101st and 82nd Airborne Divisions are to make assault jumps in Normandy in preparation 7"J. for the amphibious landing. June 6 Four classes in various phases of .; anti-aircraft operation graduate from .the Enlisted Division of the Panama -\ -/. Coast Artillery Command Training Center. The 46 students who completed courses received diplomas from motion "adequate administrative and Canal Zone for temporary internment. Ambassador Avra M. Warren preCapt. Donovan E. Smith, director of the tactical wartime measures to insure the sents his credentials to Panamanian training school. There were two 22safety of the Caribbean area and the U.S. Marine Corps and Army troops inPresident de la Guardia. week classes in anti-aircraft target dePanama Canal." vade the Marianas island of Saipan. tection equipment maintenance, a 16On occasion of the Fifth War Loan week course in wire communications, June 12 June 16 Drive in the Canal Zone, local military and a 14-week course for anti-aircraft Germans launch their flying bombs Bombing ofJapan begins with a raid on set up displays of mortars, jungle equipfire control electricians. against Great Britain. the island of Kyushu by U.S. ment, rocket launchers, and other such Superfortresses. equipment, some of it price-tagged so The Normandy invasion (designated DJune 15 that the bond-buying public could see Day) begins. Code named Operation The Honorable Avra M. Warren, June 19-20 what their money was purchasing. Overlord, the invasion includes landings newly appointed United States AmbasThe U.S. Fifth Fleet scores a decisive Thousands of Zonians turned out to see on five beachheads in Normandy, France. sador to Panama, and his family, are victory in the Battle of the Philippine Sea the displays and to buy bonds. The goal The operation, under command of Gen. greeted by Panamanian and U.S. mili(Great Marianas Turkey Shoot). In a sinwas to raise a million dollars. Dwight D. Eisenhower, involved more tary and civilian authorities at Albrook gle battle Japanese naval aviation is virtuthan 4,000 ships, 3,000 planes, and Allied Field. Among those officials to greet the ally eliminated as a factor in the outcome Other local war repercussions: The troops eventually numbering more than distinguished diplomat were Lt. Gen. of the war. Canal Zone ration board OK'd the re4,000,000. George H. Brett, commanding general capping of spare tires; up until the end of the Panama Canal Department and June 22 of June motorists had been driving on June 7 the Caribbean Defense Command, CapBrig. Gen. Ralph H. Wooten, former four recaps, and the hope that they Maj. Gen. Daniel Van Voorhis, comtain Ellis S. Stone, acting commandant commanding general of the Air Force would not have to use their worn-out manding general of the Caribbean Deof the 15th Naval District and the PanaCommand, Col. Homer W. Ferguson, spares. fense Command and of the Panama Cama Sea Frontier, and Col. H. K. Newchief of the Sixth Air Force, Col. H. G. nal Department from Jan. 6, 1940 to comer, the acting governor of the PanaYopp, provost marshal, Panama Canal A 30 mile-an-hour speed limit, reSept. 18, 1941, is decorated during a ma Canal. Department, receive letters of commenduced to 20 miles at night when car special service in his honor at Fort dation from Lt. Gen. George Brett, for headlights were painted, was restored Hayes, Ohio, with the Legion of Merit Ambassador Warren's arrival in successful combined efforts transportfor open road driving in the Canal in recognition of outstanding services in Panama had been deferred in order to ing internees from Bolivia to the Canal Zone. the Caribbean. complete negotiations with Bolivia for Zone. The citation commended the retired the transfer of approximately eighty Editor's note: This timeline was general for planning and effecting an Axis prisoners of war rounded up by the President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs compiled by Dolores De Mena, USARextensive construction and expansion Bolivian Government, all of whom were into law the "G.I. Bill of Rights," providSO historian, in commemoration of the program in the area and for placing in transferred by U.S. Army planes to the ing educational benefits to U.S. veterans. 50th Anniversary of WWII.

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Sports June 17, 1994 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 12 Divers rise to olympic challenge by Sgt. Lori Davis breathing contest and the scuba don, Hodgson said. Shop provides scuba tanks, the Howard Zodiac Recreation Tropic Times Sports Editor During the buddy breathing event, a team of divers Center and 24th Services Squadron provided the pool for swims two laps of the pool sharing one tank of air. One us to use today, and of course the life guards. Rodman also ALBROOK AFS -Scuba divers and snorkelers went teammate swims in full diving gear while the otherhas only helped us with some of the equipment," Hodgson said. for the gold Saturday at the Albrook pool during the 1994 a mask, fins and a weight belt to keep him submerged. "It's a family event, the whole family can participate," Scuba Olympics. This event is particularly difficult because it is hard to Hodgson said. "We have kids out here and it's a good day The Scuba Olympics is an annual competition sponswim aerobically while sharing the tank, Hodgson said. for everyone to come out." sored by the Balboa Dive Club. Divers and snorkelers The most popular event is the scuba don, Hodgson said. Scuba Olympics results: compete in five individual events and two team events. "They have to get into the deep end. Their gear is on the 50-meter golf ball scuba Polk-4'1 I" Events for snorkelers include the 50-meter ping pong bottom of the pool. They have to go down withjust a mask, Morgan Polk-2:24:48 50-meter mask/snorkel/1-fin push, 3-legged, 2-fin race and the 50-meter mask/snorkel/ get their gear on and swim to the shallow end. When they Sharon Peisel-1:39.71 race jake Hotbrook-2:4t :25 Ivan Kiasovsky-0:40:67 1-fin race. get there everything has to be on correctly." 50-meter ping pong push de Greef-O0:43.96 In the ping pong race competitors swim one length ofthe "It's one of the events that has a skill you learn in a Polk-0-57.r g Scot Chebcn-0:46.80 pool, pushing a ping pong ball with their mask only, said scuba class, the rest are just for fun," she said. Nico de Greef-1:09:08 Scuba don Wendy Hodgson, club member and olympics official. One of the events that is just for fun is the high jump. Oliver Klasovsky-1:28.57 Garcia-1:42:12* The 3-legged swim is the same as a 3-legged race on Participants must push off the pool floor and spring from 3-legged 2-fin race Norman Kane-2:15.84 land, and in the mask/snorkel/I-fin race swimmers must the water, tagging a rope tied to a bell. The bell hangs from de Greet/John Jackson-0:42.41* Pat Romero-2:17.34 race one length of the pool with one fin, she said. a diving board, and olympic officials raise the bell until the Ivan/Oliver Klasovsky0:50.20 100-meter buddy breathing Ed Garcia/Hoibrook-0:5 i1.73 GarciaffHolbrook-2:26.94Scuba divers compete in the 50-meter golf ball scuba, last competitor misses the rope. High jump de GreefTPolk-2:49.88 carrying a golf ball on a spoon as they swim one length of The Balboa Dive Club is able to sponsor the event with de Greef-5'3"* Dave Hodgson/Kane-incomplete the pool. Divers show their practical skills in the buddy help from the local community. The Fort Clayton Dive Ivan Klasovsky-5' I" *denotes olympic record Y, -Z Department of Defense photo by Sgt. Lori Davis Pat Romero springs from the water to ring the bell in the high jump competition of the Scuba Olympics. Basketl P e 1 V P e -4 and more Page 15 Directorate of CommunityActivities Red Machine and Cougars take *SCN AM radio schedule 11 tears up the competition in 5'11" volleyball titles in the high school *Local sports standings and over basketball action. championship tournament. *Powerlifting

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___ __ __ L1 pu1L~Tropic Times 1 SportsJune 17, 1994 13 DCA 11 smokes Dynamics, 67-39 by Sgt. Lori Davis -DCA II played hot in the first half, but it Tropic Times Sports Editor opened the second half like an inferno. DCA II's defense stripped Dynamics of the FORT CLAYTON -The Directorate of ball several times. It rifled passes down the Community Activities II team burned down court to a waiting Brown, who went to the net the house Monday, using the Dynamics as and jammed the ball home, growling like a kindling in its 67-39 victory. madman. DCA II started smoking Dynamics quickThreejams by Brown sent Dynamics to the ly. DCA II's Lee Brown dominated the early bench for a time out. The break didn't do much part of the opening half, sinking three baskets. for the Dynamics game, but they did interrupt Thomas White followed Brown's lead, scorDCA II's pace. ing from the inside and going for three from Dynamics fought for points at every opdowntown. portunity and after the time out. Stokes led his DCA It's offense was fed by a vicious team on offense again, putting eight more defense, denying Dynamics again and again. points on the scoreboard. DCA It's ball hawking led to several fast Dynamics' Daryl Richardson warmed up, breaks, baffling Dynamics as it struggled to scoring from the outside for six points. catch up. DCA II didn't match it's scoring drive from Dynamics' Rod Stokes led his team in the first half, in part because of the stepped up offensive scoring in the first half, putting defense ofDynamics. DCA II respondedto the seven points on the board. Orlando Grimsley challenge with expert ball control and player chalked up two baskets, but Dynamics were versatility. blocked constantly by the tough DCA II deBrown ruled the paint with 10 points, and fense. his rebounding skills brought down many DCA II's Tony Thacker got into the game missedshotsandgaveDCAl asecondchance. late in the first half, but he burned up the court Tommy Irvin went to the hoop for two baskets once he got his hands on the ball. and scored on a three-point shot. Going strong to the inside, he powered "These guys are really ball smart," said through Dynamics' defense, sinking three basDCA II coach Phil Mickles. kets. When he couldn't blaze a path through "The balance is there," he explained. "They the crowd, he dropped back and shot for threeshouldn't have any problems because the playpointers. Thacker proved just as deadly from ers are interchangeable. Thacker can go low the line, making all four of his foul shots. and rebound, or he can shoot three-pointers Scoring off free throws was icing on the and Brown is a force down low." Department of Defense photo by Sgt. Lori Davis cake for DCA II, which jumped out to a 38-16 "If these guys stay hungry, there is no limit Dynamics' Greg Alexander (left) and Michael Grimes crash to the lead at the half. to what they can do," he said. floor as Artherrall Taylor reaches for the rebound. Army, Navy volleyball teams win championship by Sgt. 1st Class Stephen Barrett napolis, Md.), Michelle Robinson (Naval Training American Forces Information Service Center, Orlando, Fla.) and Karen Griffith (Naval Air Station, Corpus Christi, Texas), Lisa Clark (Rota, CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C. -The Army and Navy Spain) and Susan Ryals (Hanza, Okinawa) captured captured team championships at the 1994 armed nearly half the team 's 13 slots. forces volleyball tournament, held May 9-13 here. The Army placed Margaret Stewart (Korea), and In men's competition Army went unbeaten in six Romona Sualua (Fort Lewis, Wash. ), Kristinc Morrill matches. Army clinched the championship with a 15(Fort Bragg, N.C.) and Elizabeth Howlett (Schofield x 11, 8-15, 16-14, 16-17, 15-13 win over second-place Barracks) on the team. Navy (4-2). Also namedwere Air Force Jennifer Block(WrightThe Army completed tournament play the next Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio) and Marine Corps day with a 15-7, 15-8, 15-4 win over the Marine Julie Ingersoll (Camp Lejeune, N.C.) and Danielle Corps. Dillard (Okinawa). The Marines (2-4) finished third, followed by Air Tournament Scores Force (0-6). Men The Navy women duplicated the Army men's Navy def Marine Corps 15-6, 6-15, 15-10, 15-13. feat, going unbeaten in claiming the women's title. Army def. Air Force 5-15, 15-4, 15-2, 11-15, 15-9. Navy clinched a tie for the crown with a 16-17, 15-0, Army def. Navy 15-4, 16-14, 15-13. 15-8,1 5-4 win over Army (4-2). They then won the Marine Corps def. Air Force 15-2, 17-15, 15-3. championship by crushing the Marine Corps 15-2, Army def. Marine Corps 15-12, 13-15, 15-9, 17-15, 15-0, 15-2. 15-6. Air Force (2-4) finished third, followed by the Navy def. Air Force 17-15, 15-7, 15-10. Marine Corps (0-6). Army def. Air Force 15-9, 15-13, 15-13. The Army grabbed five ofthe 13 positions on the Army def. Navy 15-13, 16-14, 4-15, 7-15, 16-14. men's armed forces team. Earning spots were Jason Navy def. Marine Corps 15-8, 15-2, 15-8. Hodell (Schofield Barracks, Hawaii), Craig RichMarine Corps def Air Force 15-11, 8-15, 16-14, 16mond (Fort Stewart, Ga.), and Thomas Porr (Fort 17, 15-13. Campbell, Ky.), Damon Dicus (Fort Benning, Ga.) Navy def. Air Force 15-4, 15-11, 15-10. and Justin Rhea (Fort Carson, Colo.). Army def. Marine Corps 15-7, 15-8, 15-4. Also named to the team were Air Force's Joseph U.S. Army photo by Sp,. George Furbus Shirvinsky (Travis Air Force Base, Calif.) and Todd Women Hom e stretch Ajari (Castle Air Force Base, Calif.). Navy def. Marine Corps 15-2, 6-15, 15-6, 15-2. The Navy placed David Foster (Naval Base, San Army def. Air Force 14-16, 15-8, 15-10, 15-7. Maria Richley finishes the last event of the women's Diego) and Ross Holcomb (USS Nimitz) and Tim Navy def. Army 16-14, 15-8, 16-14. triathlon Saturday, the 5K run. The competition, Krause(Fort Meade, Md.). The Marine Corps added Air Force def. Marine Corps 15-3, 15-12, 15-9. sponsored by the Howard and Albrook sports and Kevin Kelliher (Naval Air Station, Whiting Field, Army def. Marine Corps 15-2, 15-5, 15-8. fitness centers, included a 500-meter swim and a Fla.) and Matthew Studer (Okinawa) and Lawrence Navy def. Air Force 15-7, 15-10, 15-1. 20K bicycle race. Results from the triathlon are as Daley (Naval Air Station, Long Beach, Calif.). Army def. Air Force 15-13, 15-0, 15-12. follows: *29 and under Gwynne Ebert-1:36:48.30 The Navy also placed six women on the armed Navy def. Army 16-17, 15-0, 15-8, 15-4. Nancy Thompson-1:24:47.18 Maria Richley-1:42:43.51 forces team that competed at U.S. Nationals May 29 Navy def. Marine Corps 15-2, 15-0, 15-2. +30-40 +41 and over through June 6 in Tulsa, Okla. Air Force der. Marine Corps 15-7, 15-11, 15-6. Michelle Fraley-1:17:25.11 Jane Loudat-1:17:26.22 Diana Foster (Navy Amphibious Base, San DiNavy def. Air Force 15-12, 14-16, 15-8, 15-13. Coco Jardine-1:35:10:53 Diane Bowman-1:44:05.06 __________ go) andl Heidi Flemning (t .S. Naval Academy, AnArmy def. Marine Corps 15-6, 15-1, 15-10.

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14Tropic Timres 14Jun Sports RedMachine isnumberone by Marilyn Wruck Tropic Times contributor BALBOA -The 1994 men's volleyball season came to a close June 2-3 with two exciting double elimination tournaments. The Balboa Red Machine squaredoffagainst the Cristobal RE Tigers June 2 in thejunior varsity competition. The Tigers defeated Red Machine earlier in the tournament, forcing the Balboa team to win two matches to take the title. Red Machine's Curtis Haynes, Chris Bowman, Frank Linton, Michael Chase, Danny Norman and Danny Powell led the Red Machine to victory in t earning the championship trophy. The varsity contest stretched through thefollowingnightwith games continuing almost to midnight. As expected, the highlight of the tournament was the C-ftesy pho competition between the The 1994 Balboa High School's Red Machine championship team. Standing (from left coach Edgar Harrison, Lisa CristobalTigersandBalboaRed Rojas, Chris Corrigan, Chris Hovan, Joey Zornes, Jose Busquets, Kathy Lopez, coach Dionisio Dixon. Kneeling (from Machine. left); Tomas Ellis, coach Marilyn Wruck, Buddy Bottin. Both teams entered the post season tournament at 7-1. Their only losses Machine, defeating it in three tough games. The score finally settled, the Red Machine 4-Cougars were to each other. This tournament was However, the loss was the first for Red ended the season as the top team in men's 5-Bulldogs expected to settle the score on which team Machine, setting up another game for the volleyball. Varsity was number one. championship title. The Tigers would have Tournament results: 1-Red Machine Red Machine defeated the Tigers in the to repeat their performance to take first Junior Varsity 2-Tigers early rounds, sending them to the loser's place. 1-Red Machine 3-Bulldogs bracket. The Tigers fought their way back The Tigers lost their bite in the final 2-Tigers 4-Devils to the finals and turned the tables on Red three game battle against the Red Machine. 3-Devils 5-Cougars Cougars win championship title by Jessica Penkoske High School Red Machine. The Curundu Cougars also ened to take the championship when they went ahead ofthe Tropic Times contributor advanced to the final round with a win over the Cristobal Cougars, 14-12. Tigers. On the verge of defeat, the Cougars' Shauna Sears CURUNDU -The women's varsity volleyball season The Cougars got out to a great start with a 15-8 opening served four straight points to give the Cougars the game, came down to the wire June 3 with the final game of the game against the Devils. However, the Devils came back to 16-14, and the championship title. championship tournament. challenge the regular season champion Cougars with a 15Jessica Penkoske led the scoring from the line with 11 The Panama Canal College Green Devils advanced in 5 win in game two. points, followed by Marcia Tunon with seven, Bonnie the single elimination tournament by defeating the Balboa Tied 1-1 going into the final match, the Devils threatKemp and Sears with six each and Eileen Santa with four. Audrey Ernest rounded out the scoring with two points. The Cougars' tournament victory continued their winning streak from the regular season. Other members of the 1994 Cougars varsity team include Tyra Juarez, Tasha Tenurier, Brandie Marx, and Marlene Foster. The Cougars were supported by man-agers Kim Myers and Leticia Brown. "After our league title of first place 4 'i champions, there was still one thing lacking to end our dream season with a happy ending,"coachNora Kemp said. "That was to win the tournament title, which we finally earned by defeating the PCC Green Devils. Once you start winning, the hardest thing to do is maintain your winning streak, KTnmp said. The Cougar team never gave up. At the beginning of the season I told the Tropic Times that these girls will always be winners in life in whatever they do, and they have ended the season honoring that statement," Kemp said. "I am very proud ofthe team for digging courtesy photo deep within themselves and finding an inThe 1994 Cristobal Junior High School Cougars championship team. Standing (from left); Coach Nora Kemp, ner strength to become champions for 1994 Audrey Ernest, Brandie Marx, Eileen Santa, Kim Myers, Bonnie Kemp, Jessica Penkoske, Tasha Tenturier and and to chalk it up as one more victory in Leticia Brown. Kneeling (from left); Marlene Foster and Shauna Sears. Sitting; Marcia Tunon, team captain. Not their lives. Congratulations Cougars," she present: Carrie Van Matre, Tyara Juarez and Elizabeth Van Patton. added.

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Tropic Times Spots Shorts 5June 17, 19945 SCN AM Radio 790/1420 airs baseball, basketball Tonight 8p.m.: Basketball: N.Y. Knicks atiHouston (game #5) Saturday Noon: Baseball: Boston at Cleveland 6 p.m. Baseball Cincinnati at Atlanta Sunday 1:30 p.m.: Baseball: Seattle at Kansas City 6 p.m.: N.Y. Knicks at Houston (game #6) or 7 p.m.: Baseball: Philadelphia at Montreal Monday 7 p.m.: Baseball: Teaxas at Chicago Unit level football, hoops on local sports schedule *Army unit-level flag football Today-Mothers Field 6p.m.: 41st Area Support Group vs. Co. E, 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment 7 p.m.: 214th Medical detachment vs. 56th Signal Battalion Monday-Mothers Field 6 p.m.: 214th Med. Det. vs. Southern U.S. Air Force photo by Sgi. James A. Rush Command Network Pumping iron 7 p.m.: Co. C, 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry vs. 470th Military Intelligence David Strepmke does some barbell curls to get in shape for an upcoming powerlifting tournament. The 8 p.m.: 534th Military Police Company Howard Sports and Fitness Center is sponsoring a powerlifting competition June 25. There will be a weighvs. Co. A, 1-508th in 6:30 a.m. and a 7 a.m. rules briefing the day of the contest. Competition begins 7:30 a.m. Trophies will *Army 5' 10" and under basketball be awarded for first and second place in each male and female class (light, medium and heavy). For more Reeder Physical Fitness Center information call the Howard SFC at 284-3451. Saturday 11 a.m.: Game Time vs. Nets Noon: Dog Pound Vs. Pool 7 p.m.: Small Worldvs. 1097th BoatCo. 602 Miguel Campos U.S. Army Garrison to 1 p.m.: Mo Money vs. II Tuff Wednesday 591 Clint Davis 2 p.m.: Law Dawgs vs. A-Team 6 p.m.: Run & Gun vs. 1097th Boat Co. 564 Willie Moye hold battalion sports day 3 p.m.: Bacardi vs. Jazz 7 p.m.: Ballers vs. JOTB 564 Richard Downie Heaquarters Command, U.S. ArmyGarMonday *Army men's over 30 volleyball 563 Sue Bozgoz prison will hold a Battalion Sports Day from 6 p.m.: II Tuff vs. Jazz Tuesday 6 a.m. -1 p.m. June 30. 7 p.m.: Pool vs. Mo Money 6 p.m.: 747th Military Intelligence BatAll-isthmian men's team The activities will begin with a battalion 8 p.m.: Nets vs. Dog Pound talion vs. Bushmaster run at 6 a.m. and sporting events will be Wednesday 7 p.m.: Garrison vs. Navy named for volleyball played throughout the day. 6 p.m.: Law Dawgs vs. Bacardi Thursday The following athletes have been named Players will include personnel from 7 p.m.: Jazz vs. Game Time 6 p.m.: 747th MI vs. Bushmaster to the 1994 men's all-isthmian soccer team: Headquarters Company USARSO and 8 p.m.: A-Team vs. II Tuff 7 p.m.: Navy vs. Garrison Steve Acosta, Red Machine, Panama USAG, 92nd Personnel Services company *Army 5' 11" and over basketball Canal College and 79th Army Band. For information, call Reeder Physical Fitness Center Air Force runner places Billy Wing, Red Machine, Balboa High your unit organizers. Today School 6 p.m.: Juice vs. Ten Deep in track championship Tony Cooksey, Cougars, Balboa HS Bowling center offers 7 p.m.: Dynamics vs. The Dogg Pound AirForce runner Rick Roman, currently Joe Shaha, Cougars, Balboa HS 8 p.m.: Skillz vs. DCA II the top ranked competitor in the Panama Luis Juliao, Cougars, PCC school vacation discount Tuesday Armed Forces RunningAssociation ChamRobertBernhardt, Tigers, Cristobal High The Fort Clayton Bowling Center is 6 p.m.: The Dogg Pound vs. Run and pionship, placed fourth in the 10,000-meter School offering a "school is out" discount games Gun run at the Air Force Track and Field ChamBillie Price, Tigers, Cristobal HS and free shoe rental deal for school-age 7 p.m.: Dynamics vs. Juice pionships at Fort Sill, Okla., May 27-29. Joe Gutierrez, Bulldogs, Balboa High children through June. Call the center at 8 p.m.: Ten Deep vs. Bull Dawgs Roman was first among Air Force comSchool 287-6636. Thursday petitors with a 31:42 time, and was bested Efrain Sanchez, Bulldogs, Balboa HS 6 p.m.: Law Dawgs vs. Skillz by three competitors in the open category. Bruce Chastain, Devils, Balboa HS Rodman sponsors Navy 7 p.m.: Run and Gun vs. DCA II The winning time was 3 1:08. Adam Beach, Devils, Balboa HS 8 p.m.: Jazz vs. The Dogg Pound Roman was the 1993 Panama Armed intramural 5K Fun Run *Army 5' 10" and under basketball Forces Running Association champion. USARSO holds 10-miler The Rodman Morale, Welfare and RecFronius Fitness Center The association is sponsoring a 5-K run reation is sponsoring a 5K Fun Run 6:30 Today 7 a.m. Sunday starting at the Balboa High tryouts for men, women a.m. July 1. The race begins at the Rodman 6 p.m.: Naval Station-Galeta Island vs. School. There is also a 5-mile run 7 a.m. Practice sessions and open try-outs will Sports Office. Jungle Operations Training Battalion June 25 starting at the Fort Clayton pedesbe held in June for runners interested in the This event is open only to Navy 7 p.m.: Army&Navy vs. Run&Gun trian gate. Call Allen Jones at 287-5444 for U.S. Army South 1 0-Miler team. servicemembers, Department of Defense 8 p.m.: Ballers vs. Small World more information about upcoming running Sessions are 6 -8 a.m. at Reeder Physical civilians working with the Navy and their Saturday events sponsored by the association. Fitness Center. Trial days are 6 a.m. July 23, family members. There is no entry fee, 10 a.m.: Run&Gun vs. Small World Runners eam points based on their perAug. 13 and Aug. 27 at the center. roster are due to the Sports office June 24. 11 a.m.:NSGAvs. 1097th Boat Compaformance in each running event. Panama For information, call Willie Moye at The unit with the most runners receive ny Armed Forces Running Association stand287-6411, Sue Bozgoz at 287-6448 or the team award. First and second place awards Monday ings as of Tuesday: Directorate of Community Activities Sports for men's and women's division. Call 2836 p.m.: Army&Navy vs. JOTB 606 Ricardo Roman Office at 287-4050. 4222/4061 for more information. S 0 2 -5IHC, 193rd 0 7 7 Jazz 2 1 .5 Law Dawgs 0 2 25 Blue League Skillz 1 0 .5 Game Time 0 2 2.5 U.S. Army IiHC, 1-508th 6 4 -DCA 11 1 0 .5 Pool 0 2 2.5 Unit-levei Flag Football Co. A, 1-508th 4 6 2 The Dogg Pound 1 0 .5 5'10" and under-Atlantic Red League Co. C, 1-508th 0 6 4 Dynamics 1 0 .5 Army & Navy 2 0 56th Sig. 9 0 -Green League Juice I I I Ballers 2 0 SCN 7 3 2.5 H HiC, 5-87th 13 1 -Run and Gun 0 i 1.5 Small World I I I Co. E, 1-228th 8 4 2.5 Co. B, 5-87th 9 4 2.5 Bull Dawgs 0 2 2 NSGA 0 1 I'S 534th MP Co. 5 4 4 Navy 8 6 3 Law Dawgs 0 3 2.5 Run & Gan 0 1 1.5 214th Med. 5 5 4 JOTB 8 5 3 5'10" and under-Pacific 1097th Boat Co. 0 1 1 5 IliC, LEA 3 7 6.5 549th Mi1 6 8 4 Mo Money 3 0 -JO TIB not reported MEDDAC S s 5.5 Co. A, 5-87th 6 5 5 Nets 1 0 I Men's over-30 volleyball White League 747th Ml 5 9 6 Jazz 1 0 1 Bushmaster 2 It 41st ASG 9 1 -1197th Boat Co. 0 14 10 Dog Pound 1 0 1 747th MlItt. 3 I 142nd Med. 5 4 3 U.S. Army Basketbali I Tell I 1 1.5 G0rrison I 2 1 470th Ml 4 7 5 '" and over Bacardi I I 1.5 Navy 1 3 2 59th Eng. dropped out ITen Dep 2 0 A-Teatt I 2 *ns of Wednesday

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' Tropic Times 16June 17 1994 New s New program helps disabled children GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY makes sense for the child and the family," HOSPITAL (USARSO PAO) -A new she said. "This plan is called the Individprogram designed to help children, birth ualized Family Service Plan and will help to three years old, who have special determine the setting which may be the needs is now in its infant stages here. parent's home, the child care center, a The Early Intervention Program has babysitter's home or the hospital. been adopted world-wide by the Depart"Before, families had to find these serment of Defense to help children with vices on their own, -there was no coordidisabilities and their families get the help nated effort," Zilka said. "By the time they need in the critical early years, said these parents were able to find out what Carol Zilka, project manager. was available to them and the services and "The EIP will provide many services facilities they needed, the infant was a for infants and toddlers with disabilities, toddler. and their parents," she said. "Children "By this time, the child has lost crucial who are entitled to health care from Gortime and may be experiencing developgas will be eligible for EIP." mental delays," she said. "The earlier you Zilka also emphasizes that the procan help, the better it is for both the child gram is a DoD program and the Army is and the family." only the lead agency here. All serThe EIP is a program set up for Crew members of Special Boat Unit 26 perform in a training exercise in a vices available through the children up to three years Boston Whaler. An article about SBU 26 will soon be featured in Atlanta's program are availold. After the third premier boating magazine, Boating World. The magazine usually focuses able for all branchbirthday, the child es o f the service thcn falls under the on recreational power boats. here. care of the education "The Army is system, Zilka said. responsible for Here, that would be running the prothe Department of grain here and in Defense Dependents Europe and Korea, Schools. to star in state-side eryone eligible for helps infants and health ,are servictoddlers who have es," she said. disabilities such as boating fan magazine eslow development, originally began in late talking, severe RODMAN NS (USNAVSTAPANLake foi a sunrise to sunset training exercise. 1991 when Conbehavior probletns CANAL PAO) -Special Boat Unit 26 here It didn't take long for Edwards to understand gress passed an and birth defects," will be the "stars" of an upcoming article the rigorous life of these boats. Lt. Nicholas amendment to the she said. "It will act in Atlanta's premier boating magazine, Ettens directed boat drivers and crew through 1986 Individuals as a single contact Boating World. a routine of maneuvers to show how the With Disabilities for the families so The magazine typically focuses on recwhalers reacted. Edwards said he was truly Education Act. nterv they can find out reational powerboats up to 35 feet in amazed. This amendment what is available to length. But this time, Billy Sims, editor of "I can't believe these boats," he said, charged the DoD with providing infants them and know where to go early on." the magazine, decided it would be infor"they react as fast as you can think." And and toddlers with early intervention serWhen the program becomes fully opmative to weekend fishermen and waterthey do. Within seconds these boats can mavices through either the medical or eduerational, it will work directly with such skiers to learn about the demanding and neuver around and in anything, SBU 26 cational system. DoD decided on the facilities as the pediatrics and well-baby dramatic life of a Boston Whaler in Panamembers said. health care system. clinics, the Child Development Services, ma. Ettens was asked about the work the unit "We have until September 1995 to Army Community Service and chaplains, Sims chose 46-year-old Maurey does with its SEALS companions. Edwards have the program fully implemented," Zilka said. Edwards, editor ofAlaska's Marine Digest wanted to see a simulated insertion and exZilka said. "I came on board about three and maritime editor for Staithe Feature traction -putting SEALS on shore and months ago and have begun to tailor the "We also plan to conduct a public Syndicate to do the story. Edwards recentwithdrawing them. It was so fast Edwards program to the needs of Panama." awareness campaign as well as try to bely covered Navy subjects such as the asked for it to be done again because he The program will be a centerpiece for come part of the initial in-processing USNS WATERS, the new Cyclone Class didn't get the photos he wanted. Crew memfamilies with children with special briefings given to in-coming military percoastal patrol ships and Special Operation bers grinned when he said this, because that's needs. It will provide an avenue for them sornel," she said. "Right now, we are doCommand's Mark V Program their job -to get the SEALS in and out in to find needed services, facilities and ing research and coming up with models The core of the story "is to show the acseconds. care, she said. for the program. tual use of a Whaler in dramatic and exEttens, a SEAL, took this opportunity to Through the program, a service co"It is important to know that this is not treme action," Edwards said. "We looked brag about his men. "They know their whalordinator will help each family during an Army-only program," Zilka said. "It is at Naval and Army operations around the ers from stem to stem. They can fix them the assessment process when the child's a program open to all services. It is also world and decided Panama is where we anywhere, anytime, no matter what extenudevelopmental achievements and the important to know that it is not replacing would find these boats pushed to the wall." ating conditions exist," he said. family's concerns and priorities for their the EFMP, but becoming an integral part Edwards said most whalers "carry a 10Edwards said he was more than satisfied child are determined, Zilka said. of it." year warranty on the boats, but those used with the close-up look at these whalers in an "The service coordinator will then Though the program is still in its inin Panama are pretty much used up in environment unlike any other. His story will work with the family to develop a writfancy, anyone wanting to know more three. We wanted to know why." appear in an upcoming edition of Boating ten plan for services and ensure the serabout the program can call 282-5658/ SBU 26 took Edwards out to Gamboa World. vices are provided in a setting that 5339. Rainy season brings beauty, need for adjustments HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) -The time of the the perceived higher temperatures," Speed said. "We seek shelter indoors during electrical storms, Speed said. year has come when the weather man has to use the secmust make certain adjustments, many of which we do Drainage ditches should be avoided also. Flood waters ond of his two daily reports. Instead of "sunny and hot," automatically, like carrying an umbrella." flow quickly through them to the ocean. the forecast changes to "humid with a strong possibility, There are other adjustments many people do not inWith their vehicles already safety-checked, drivers' of rain later." stinctively make, several of which are key to surviving next worry is reduced visibility from inclement weather. Precipitation in Panama more often resembles standthe dangers that accompany the rain. Automobile tires To counter this, slow down, turn on headlights and drive ing under Niagara Falls that a rain storm, but that's no require particular attention. If they are worn or defective, defensively. reason to get the rainy season blues, according to Bill they should be replaced immediately, Speed said. "Use all your senses behind the wheel and be prepared Speed, ground safety manager here. "One habit that I've developed is to have my car serto pull off the road if visibility is severely hampered," "I always look forward to the rainy season. With it viced in June and December," he said. "The tires are inSpeed said. "Remember, if you need your wipers, you comes relief from the pungent odor of buying grass," said spected, rotated and balanced. During the December serneed your lights. Others may need to see you. Speed, a resident of Panama for 15 years. "The trees are vicing, the alignment is checked also, thereby ensuring "To enjoy the wonders of living in the tropics, we must once again green and in full bloom, bearing signs of early quick passage of Panama's annual safety inspection." adjust our own attitudes. Courtesy must be emphasized. fruit such as mangoes, avocados and rose apples. Deep Getting from here to there during the rainy season posLearn to control your stress level by singing or thinking sea fishing is best during this time of year also." es difficulties as well. The sudden rain storms bring seof pleasant things. Curse if you must, but practice the art With the rain, however, comes increased humidity, as vere lightning strikes and turbulent winds, making walkof being patient," Speed said. "Take responsibility for well as the need to keep rain gear constantly on hand. ing or driving hazardous. your actions and always be ready to make the right deci"With all the moisture in the air, we feel oppressed by Children should be taught, by word and example, to sion should the unexpected occur.

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00 TropictivitiesPe June 17, 1994 A quality of ife guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page BI Beach bum Departmen of Deense phIII by Maureen Sampson Southern Command Network's Air Force Sgt. Kevin Brown plags fri sbee on one of Panama's many beaches. See story and photos, Page B3. Students from Gulick's 1987 kin24th Security Police Squadron 1,Movies, Page B8 dergarten class dig up their time announce the winners of their -0TV Page 69 capsule. "name the filly" contest. !-Potpourri, Page B12

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B2 Tropic Times 2Jun 17, 1994 Youth news Albrook/Howard *Youth centers 286-3195/284-4700: School's Out Summer Dance will be held 7:30-10:30 p.m. today at the Howard Youth Center for children 8-13 years old. Kids Swap and Shop will be held 2-4 p.m. Tuesday at the Howard center. ~ A pre-teen dance will be held 7:30-10:30 p.m. June 24 at the Howard center for children 8-13 years old. Arts and crafts 3 p.m. every Wednesday at both centers. There is a $1 fee for supphes. Gymnastics classes Saturdays. Ages 3-5 meet noon1 p.m.; ages 6-12 meet 1-2 p.m.; intermediate classes meet 2-3 p.m. The cost is $13 per month per person. Afternoon pizza and movie, 3 p.m. today, $2.50 per child. *Child Development Center 284-6135: Openings are available in the part-time program for children ages 6 months -5 years. OpenP ings are for 25-hour enrollment five hours a day, five days a week. The 1994 Summer Reading Program will run June 27-Aug. 2 at the Howard library. ChilI dren 3-6 will meet 9-10 a.m. Mondays for story hour. Children ages 7-11 will meet 9-10 a.m. Tuesdays for the reading club. Registration will be June 14-27. For more information, call 2846249. An "Explore New Worlds" poster theme contest is underway until July 19. Call 284-4818/ 4260. Captain T-Bird and Captain KC Youth Summer~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Boln pca nldstregmsUS Army photo Summer Bowling Special includes three games Members of the Society for Creative Anachronism perform for Los Rios Elementary students. during open bowling and a free T-Bird or KC sports huttle. Call 284-4818. L s R o e e v o o *Zodiac Community Activities Center 284 Los Rios students receive reading honor 5650/3865: w held June LOS RIOS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (USARSO Afterwards, the students were treated to a barbecue Resume writing for teens will be PAO) -The Students of Los Rios Elementary School were lunch that was prepared by 3rd SOSC soldiers. rewarded for a school year's worth of hard work May 20. The 35 soldiers who participated in the events said they A Renaissance Reading Celebration, organized by enjoyed it as much as the students did. Clayton teachers, the Parent[Teachers Organization and the 3rd "It was worth spending our day offhaving fun with the *Youth Center 287-6451: Special Operations Support Command (Airborne), was students and it gave us and them a chance to do someCooking experiences every Tuesday. held to recognize students who read more than 20,509 thing different," Spc. Thomas Mattison said. American Stars Gymnastics meet Tuesdays books for enjoyment over the past year. "The school received exceptionally fine support from and Thursdays. Ages 3-5 meet 2-3 p.m.; ages 6-8 More than 200 students, from kindergarten through the soldiers of 3rd SOSC and the Parent/Teacher Associameet 3-4 p.m.; ages 9 and up and advanced meet sixth grade participated in the day's events which began tion," said Roberta Berger, Los Rios Elementary School 4-5 p.m. The lessons cost $20. with demonstrations by the Society for Creative Anachroprincipal. "The students and the teachers greatly appreciOutdoor Games every Thursday. nism. The society members dressed as knights and maidate their efforts." Performing children's troupe seeks youths ens from the Middle Ages and acted out sword fights and The day was a great experience, with the students getwho like to sing, dance and perform. They meet jousting. ting the chance to spend the day with the paratroopers as 4-6 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays. The actors also led the students in dancing and songs well as the soldiers using their resources to enhance the Tae Kwon Do 5:30-7 p.m. Wednesday and from that time period. U.S. Army South community, Berger said. Fridays for ages 5-18, $25. Piano lessons 1-6 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays. The fee is $30 for four half-hour lessons per Capsule reacquaints Gulick kindergartners month. FORT ESPINAR (USARSO PAO Atlantic) -Some inal students were back in Panama, and some had been Gymnastics for ages 5 and older 2:30-3:30 students from Gulick Elementary School got reacquainthere the whole time, she said. p.m. and 3:30-4:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesed with their past June 3. "We found 12 of the students that were here to bury days Twelve students from Gulick's 1987 kindergarten class it," she said. "I knew that we'd never again have that many Arts & Crafts every Monday. were reunited to unearth a time capsule they buried. of them back here at one time. *Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680: The impending closure of Fort Espinar and Gulick ElAs the 12 students gathered to dig up their not-too-disSenior Teen Employment Program is a ementary School forced the time capsule to be opened six tant past, the students admitted that they couldn't rememyearround program to develop job skills and eam years prematurely, said Mary Perkins, who taught the kinber what they had buried. But when they opened the capmoney, for teens 15-18 years old. Applications are dergarten class that buried it. sule, the memories flooded back, bringing a particularly available at the center. "We buried the time capsule so the students would sad memory for one of the students, Perkins said. Triathlon tournament 4 p.m. Fridays. Comhave something later on to remember those years," she "There was a girl in the class whose mother was diagpete in pool, foosball and table tennis. said. "Those students were the class of 2000. My intent nosed with cancer the year we buried the time capsule, Popcorn and movies every Sunday. was to dig the capsule up the year they graduated and mail and she died the next year," she said. "When we opened Volleyball 3:30-5:30 p.m. Sundays. their items to them." the time capsule, there was a cassette tape from her mothSoftball practice 2:30-4:30 p.m. Sundays. Perkins knew the school was expected to close before er in it." *Child Development Center 287-3301: 2000, but the fact escaped her when she came up with the Perkins added an item to the capsule as well, she said. Child Development Center provides high idea of the time capsule. "I found a letter that I had written about that particular quality, developmental child care for children 6 "1 don't know what I was thinking," she said. "I knew group of students," she said. "It said what a good group of weeks to 12 years old. Full day care and hourly it was going to close down. When I realized that, I vowed kids they were and that, if we had to leave our future to care available call 287-5657. that I would dig it up right before I left Panama and take it anyone, these were the kind of students that should run with me in my household goods." the world." Cocoli Fortunately, that wasn't necessary. Perkins and Perkins plans to mail items to the rest of the students tGlick's school nurse discovered that many of those origwho were unable to attend the ceremony, she said. +Cocoli Community Center 287-4119: Arts and crafts, 3:30 p.m. Tuesday and Balboa thespians invited to perform in states BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL (Tropic Times) -The of high school theatre. The week-long festivities, to be Atlantic Thespian Troupe #314 from Balboa High School has been held Tuesday through June 26, include more than 30 dif*Espinar Youth Center 289-4605: invited to perform on the main stage of Festival '94 by the ferent workshops presented by theatre professionals and Teen sports 4-6 p.m. Monday and WednesInternational Thespian Society. The society, a component representatives fnrm more than 25 colleges and universiday. sof the Educational Theatre Association, was formed more ties auditioning delegates for scholarships. More than 60 dayust For Kids bowling and pizza, 6-9 p.m. than 60 years ago to strengthen the cause of educational productions will be presented by high schools. Saturday, $3. theatre and serves a membership of more than 3,000 Led by is director In Anne Mitchell, the troupe will schools world-wide. present a cutting of "The Dining Room," to more than Cooking class 4-6 p.m. Monday, $1. This year's festival, to be held at Ball State University 2,000 dIrleattes. Students from the United States, Canada in Muncie, Indiana, marks the society's 30th celebrilon and Ncw /ealand will be viewing the performance.

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__ ____ __ K~i~ swel __ Tropic Times W Travel June 17B1994 Bohios on the beach offer protection from the elements at Playa Corona.4N,, U, e -@% plateau overlooking the ocean just two ty, a seafood mix for two, they can enjoy the twilight minutes past the entrance of the road with Uliantzeff outside on the patio or inside with leading to El Valle lies Playa modern electricity -thanks to a generator.Corona. It is a little bit of heaven right here The suffers there enjoy sizable waves during tidal in Panama. changes and Boogie Board enthusiasts say they enjoy .--t~ You can come for the day or weekend. For a day themselves all day long. trip, bring your own food and just sit and relax with the The beach is a mix of black and white sand, and i cool ocean breeze, some areas, there are a few rocks. Once you get to the Paul Uliantzeff, a native Russian, came to Panama 18 oceanfront you can see for yourselfwhen the tide i years ago. He enjoys people and cooking so he has a out -what the Pacific ocean has uncovered. hotel where he can do both. He has worked hard to While you're at Playa Corona treat yourself to a side make the grounds appealing and provide a setting where trip to El Valle -if you haven't been already -and guests can enjoy peace, quiet and the ocean's sound. see the wonderful zoo they have. Then top the day off Uliantzeff enjoys the company of his guests and with an ice cream sundae at the shop just down the street spends his evenings telling them stories about his life in from the El Valle marketplace. Russia. He also has a large selection of compact discs After sight-seeing and buying souvenirs, head backand encourages his guests to set the tone for the evening to Playa Corona for a quiet evening out on the patio,a by picking out the music they want to hear. He even romantic stroll along the beach or join others in the main sings along sometimes. patio area for cards, dinner or small talk. It's a relativelyIn the evening after he has fed his guests his specialinexpensive trip and one well worth remembering. r -r n laeu o rykn th an justos by efo ixfto hy cann G na e njytetiih miue p"s thA VnTrMCc L MO roa wit Smal aquaticlf e ormscanbe ounddurn glo tide.

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U 1 Tropic Times a B4 focus on Panama W ~Vendors make a living on Panama City streets mA ou see them carry que madruga, Dios lo ayuda," or "He boxes up and down who gets up early, receives the help of the street, take out the s times goes on God." She thinks being a peddler is an items and display them in -honest way of making a living and their little booths along Central and years go by, supporting her family. Avenue. For the small-time peddler, pe des"Business out in the streets is very organization and hard work can the pe deshave bedifficult for everyone. You have to amount to dividends. deal with the roughness of weather, The people who perform this type come part of oulr traffic, strikes, parades, etc., and that of business work very hard -seven slows down our sales," she said. -days a week -no matter the weather. cutlure. They express In Panama, peddling has become a They don't have a definite hour of controversy. It has its pros and cons operation. It all depends on how the their feelings in what and lots of enemies, but many people day moves along. Some days are slow, depend on this type of business. other days sales may be good -they do. As low income "Our greatest enemies are the especially on payday. owners of the big stores -many times Item suh a theadneeles peplethe ha e geat foreigners -that think we are in combs, knives, earrings, necklaces, d competition with their businesses. bracelets, flashlights, sunglasses, dreams of some d yThey have tried many times to get us bobby pins and fruits are some of the ..out of the streets in our country," many items sold by peddlers on their overcoming their povMartinez said. vending stands. Some peddlers consider back-toThings you might not even be erty. school season one of the most profitlooking for you may find in the able times in this business. Their main "buhoneros" stands at fabulous items for sale are school supplies such prices. Even shoes. This last item as note pads, bond paper, pencils, seems to be the "hot item" nowadays make big efforts and sacrifices," school bags, ball point pens, rulers, for the "buhoneros." Martinez said. "Working on your own tape, book covers, labels and more. "Competition is strong and hard," helps you make enough to bring home Peddlers, street vendors and many Carlas Martinez said. Martinez a daily living." other people who work on their own -supports her two brothers and mother "Trying to keep the business going are found all over the streets day after and has been doing this job for four is not an easy task. I get up at 5 a.m. day trying to earn a living. 3 1 1 2 years. every day and leave my house to start "Good or bad days don't matter. Setting an attractive booth, good out my business early," she said. "My Keeping our aim high is really what prices and good merchandise are the biggest sales happen in the morning counts," Martinez said. "Today is not a main tools for success in this every when people are going to work. Some good day, but tomorrow the sun will be day business, forget their lunches and always buy bright for us and the next day will be "We are poor people and in order to some of my munchies." better. This keeps our spirits going obtain something in life we have to Martinez believes in the saying, "El high." 1A w __ <,R~. 4, ~~T~~

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__ ___Commun________ June 17, 1994 ewB Students net$4,000 in scholarships FORT DAVIS(USARSO PAO Atlantic)The AtlanAubreyThomas, $500; KentGrubbs, $1,000; MarcJohnson, tic Community Women's Club recently invested $4,000 $1,000; and Todd Cox, $1 ,500. Curundu for the continued education of four high school students These scholarships bring the total the organization has TheU.S.ArmySouthPacificCommunityChapel here donated for continued education to $4,600. Vacation Bible School will be Monday through The ACWC awarded scholarships to four seniors from Additionally, the ACWC has donated nearly $2,400 to June 24 at the Curundu Junior High School. VolunCristobal Junior/Senior High School at a May 24 dinner at various community agencies like American Red Cross teers are needed to staffthe event. Interested military the Fort Davis Community Club. Department of Defense Dependents Schools and the Girl personnel should call their unit chaplain. For inforThe chance at eating one of the scholarships was open Scouts, Dodson said. nation, call 287-3031. to all seniors and first-year college students, but ACWC The club has two main sources of income -its annual only received five applications, said Tina Dodson, ACWC Christmas Bazaar and the Thrift Shop on Fort Espinar president. which is open 10 a.m.2 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Gorgas The recipients were chosen from those applications Fridays. The Pacific Health Consumers Committee based on grade pointaverage, community involvement and "It's important to give this money back to the commumonthly meeting will be held 3 p.m. June 28 at the an essay that had to be submitted with the application, nity, because it's our community," Dodson said. "Any Headquarters conference room at Gorgas Army Dodson added. amount we can give back enhances our families and makes Community Hospital. Representatives from miliThe recipients and amounts of each scholarship were: this a better community." taryunits, civilian organizations and spouses groups are invited to attend. For information, call Elsa Security police name their filly 'Elly' Bermudezat282-5233. HOWARD AFB (24th SPS Crime Prevention Noncommissioned Officer. Clayton Wing/PA) -The name The winner was selected by a committee of senor An Exceptional Family Member Program supElly was chosen from noncommissioned officers. Members were given only the port group potluck dinner will be held 7 -8:30 p.m. 1,560 suggestions toname entries, not the names of the students making the submisTuesday at the Youth Center, Building 155, Fort the 24th Security Police sion, to keep the contest fair, according to White. Each Clayton. All active duty, retired military and DeSquadron's filly during a judge narrowed his choices to three and from there the finai apartment of Defense civilian families who have contest held March 31selection was made. family members with disabilities are invited to May 2. Staton received a $100 savings bond from the 24th SPS attend. If special services or accommodations are Amanda Staton, a stuand a $50 gift certificate from the Army and Air Force needed because ofa disability, call 287-5073/4921. dent at Howard ElementaExchange Service. She was also given a photo of herself The American Red Cross Summer Youth ry School submitted Elly with the newly-named filly. ,, Program orientation will be held 9 a.m. Monday as the winning name. In "Thecontestwasagreatsuccess, said Lt.Col.Natividad at the Fort Clayton Youth Center, Building 155. all, the 24th SPS received Gonzalez, 24th SPS commander. "There were so many Volunteers must be 14 years old, have attended an 2,265 entries, many sugAmanda Stanton and Elly good names submitted that I decided to give one ofthem to orientation and be available for at least four weeks gesting the same name, our new horse also." ofservice. Call the Red Cross at 287-5509. from nine Department of Defense Dependents Schools in Justice, suggested by four students, is the name of the An organizational meeting to form a Young Panama. new horse. Suzie Gachez, daughter of Roberto and ElizaMother's Support Group will be held at 10 a.m. Staton, the daughter of Master Sgt. Alan and Sharon beth Gachez; Chad Hirata, son of Tech. Sgt. Dalton and Monday at the U.S. Southern Command Chaplain's Staton, got her idea from the pronunciation of L.E., a MaryHirata; ChristinaShort,daughterofStaffSgt. Daphne Office, Building 156, Fort Clayton. Call Chaplain common abbreviation for Air Force law enforcement and Marvin Wade; and Danielle Wheeler, daughter of Sgt. Leon Kircher at 287-5255/3497. activities. Ist Class Jack and Anita Wheeler, each received a $10 The "Growing Godly Summer Bible Study" The committee felt Elly is a feminine name as well as an AAFES certificate and a gift from the 24th SPS Crime will be held daily at 9 a.m. from now until Aug. 23 inspirational one, said Staff Sgt. Jacqueline White, 24th Prevention Section. at the Fort Clayton Chapel. Child care is provided. Reservations must be made through the Child Development Center. For information, call Charlotte Fredereich at 287-3188. A first aid class in Spanish for maids will be held 8 a.m-5 p.m., July 23 on the third floor, Building 519. For information, call 287-5509. The Youth in Christ Come Along With Jesus Program will be held 6:30-8 a.m. Monday through June 24 at Clayton Chapel. The program is open to seventh to 12th graders. For information, call the Fort Clayton Chapel. The La Leche League meeting will be held 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Valent Recreation Center. All pregnant and breastfeeding women and their babies are welcome. Discussion topic will be "Your new baby -getting breastfeeding off to a good start." For information, call Debbie Owens at 236-0338. The American Red Cross is sponsoring a community first aid and safety course on the third floor in Building 519, 6 -10 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday. The class will feature instruction on adult and infant CPR, safety procedures and first aid. For information, call Abbe Lester at 287-5509. Regular Islamic prayer services are held 12:301:30 p.m. each Friday at the Fort Clayton Chapel hall. For more information, call 287-5859. For people transferring to new duty stations, the Army Community Service Relocation Assistance Office helps in the search for housing, employment and educational possibilities. Call 289-4021/4636. Miscellaneous The Diamond FM Great American Giveaway contest continues until July 7. Participants can sign up at the Howard AFB, Corozal or Fort Davis main exchanges, and listen to Southern Command Network radio at 91.5 FM Pacific/98.3 FM Atlantic for details. Prizes include airline tickets to the United AI States, 35mm cameras, luggage. The grand prize drawing will be July 8. Appreciation Day U.S. Air Force phoio Atlantic The American Red Cross is offering a commuAlejandro Lombardo, a janitor in Building 703 at Howard AFB, shakes hands with Chief Master unity first aid and safety course 9 a.m.-3 p.m. July Sgt. Charles Shaffer, 24th Wing senior enlisted advisor, during the Kuna Appreciation Day fish 26-27 at the Sundial Recreation Center. fry. About 150 Kunas who work at Howard and Albrook attended the event which was hosted Forinformation, call 289-3595. by the base chapel and 24th Services Squadron.

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Tropic Times June 17, 1994 Rodman Free Zone shopping 8:30 a.m.-4:30 White water rafting in Chiriqui June for youths ages 12-18. Fee includes lodg*Information, Tour and Travel: p.m. today and June 24, $13 for transpor30-July 4. ing, meals, a tour of Boquete/Cerro Punto The Navy ITT office hours of operatation. Enjoy duty-free shopping in the Snorkel and scuba June 24-26 at San area and one-day rafting. tionare 10:30 a.m.-4p.m.Monday through city of Colon. Bias. Balboa Friday. El Valle shopping tour 6:30 a.m.Balboa El Valle Shopping Trip, 7 a.m. June 4:30 p.m. Sunday. The fee is $13 per y *Balboa Dive Club: 26, $12. At least 12 people are needed. person. *Valent Recreation Center: DivetriptoAquaticParkinPortobelo Shop for local handicrafts, plants, fruits Darien Indian village 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Free Zone shopping 7 a.m.-3 p.m. June 25-26. Thecost is $25,per person and and vegetables and visit the nature preSaturday $25 per person. today. includes accommodations, fourboat dives serve. Factory outlet shopping 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Costa Rica tour July 1-4. Register by and a barbecue. Panama City Tour 9 a.m. June 25, Tuesday $4 per person. Monday. Trip includes three nights/four Sign up by Wednesday by writing to: $8, minimum of 1C people is needed. Visit Isla Grande Father's Day weekend days at Hotel Gran Costa Rica, round-trip Unit 0967 APO AA 34002 or calling 284the Church of the Golden Altar, French today through Sunday. ticket and city tour. 5177 or 250-0346. Plaza and more. Mud bath tour in Penonome Posada *Outdoor Recreation Center: Dive trip to the San Bias Islands July Barro Colorado Island 6 a.m. June Viejas 7 a.m.-5 p.m. June 25. Partial transits of the Panama Ca2-4. The cost is $310 per person and in25, $65, a minimum of two people is SanCarlosfamily beachtripJune26. nal 7:30-11:30 a.m. Saturdays, $40. A cludes transportation, accomodations, needed for the trip. Visit the tropical re*Outdoor adventures: minimum of 20 people is needed for a meals, beverages, six tanks, shipment of search island in the canal's Gatun Lake. Peacock bass fishing 5 a.m.-2 p.m. partial transit on any other day of the equipment, two boat dives per day. A San Bias Island today and Saturday, Sunday, $25 per person. week. deposit of $100 is required to reserve a $149. A minimum of two people is needEl Valle horseback riding with lunch Gatun Lake train wreck dive Saturspace. Write or call the club or call 250ed. Visit the San Bias Archipielago and at a local restaurant Saturday. day. 0346. shop for molas and other handicrafts and Canoeing and barbecue lunch on the Customized trips are available for The club is now accepting new memsnorkel in the crystal clear waters near the Chagres 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday and June groups with a minimum of four or 10 bers. Divers must show a diving certificaisland. 25, $20 per person. people. tion card to join and membership is $12 Visit Panama 7-9 p.m. June 24. There There are fives spots available for a per driver per year. For more information, Albrook/Howard will be newcomer's show at the Zodiac Chriqui whitewater rafting trip June write the club or call 263-8077 or 250*Zodiac Community Activities Center: Community Activities Center. 24-26. The fee is $160 for adults and $125 0075. class is free. Albrook/Howard Ten week Spanish headstart class *Zodiac Community Activities Cenmeets 6-8 p.m. Wednesdays and 5-7 p.m. ter: Fridays. The next class will be held July Intro to scuba, a free one-night class is 4. available. Private piano and guitar lessons are Water exercise class for beginning to available weekday evenings. The instruc, advanced swimming for adults at both tor meets privately with the students for 30 pools. minutes. Tae Kwon Do Korean karate class 6Swimming three days a week. 7:30 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Fri*Fort Clayton Scuba Shop: day, $25 per month. The phone is temporarily out of orBeginner and advanced English and derbecause ofrenovations. Call 287-6453/ Spanish classes begin monthly and run 5807 for information. fourweeks. Classes are underway through Basic open-water scuba class, $115. June 30. Advanced open-water scuba, $140. Beginner and advanced dog obediRescue scuba, $119. ence classes are held at the Howard Parade Underwater photography, $99. Field. Four-week class costs $32. A minimum of five people is needed. *Albrook Auto shop: *Twin Oceans Pro Shop: Air conditioning service and repair Equipment available for scuba, snor12:30-5 p.m. every day except Tuesday kel, tennis, camping and other outdoor and Wednesday. recreation. Wheel alignment diagnostic and ser*Pacific Theatre Arts Centre: vice classes are held 3-9 p.m. Monday, Monthlyclassesavailablerangingfrom Thursday and Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. various dance lessons, voice, guitar and Saturday and Sunday. piano and martial arts. Call 286-3814 for information. *Fort Clayton Boat Shop: Rodman Bass fishing at Gatun Lake, $20 fee *Rodman Marina: includes guide, boat, bait and rods. A boating safety class will be held 6Deep sea fishing, $200 fee includes 9 p.m. July I 1 and 13 at Building 24 (next Defense psoto by Sgi. Rick Emer captain, gear, lures and fuel. to Pizza Hut) on Rodman NS. Cost is $35 *Valent Recreation Center: and includes all materials and qualificaKorean karate class 6-8 p.m. Tuestion test drive. Call the Rodman Marina at Spc. Brian Shalosky of the 747th Military Intelligence Battalion, lines days and Thursdays. Admission to the first 283-3147. up his catch in a peacock bass fishing tournament sponsored by his unit. Among the line-up is his winner in the smallest fish category. held Saturday and Sunday at the Casual through Aug. 12. Previous dance training Disco Cove. required. An "all-night" disco will be held SatThe designated safe driver and safe ride *National Concert Association of Panurday and Sunday at the Howard Enlisted programs will be in effect. ama: Members' Club. The Budapest Chapter Orhestra has The designated safe driver and safe ride included Panama in its 1994 tour. These programs will be in effect. *Pacific Theatre Arts Center: 20 musicians will perform July 12 directAn "all night" kicker dance will be Advanced modern dance Monday ed by James Brooks-Bruzzese. S /h

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Tropic Times notices June 17, 1994 Phone guide El Valle Pacific 24th Services Squadron Sports and Allison Russell enjoys the view in El Valle on a horseback riding trip. The Zodiac Community Recreational Rental Center, 284-6107 Activities Center Is sponsoring a horseback riding trip to El Valle Saturday. Albrook Auto Craft Shop, 286-3613 Albrook Club, 286-4128 Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333 A Anchorage Club, 283-4332 Canal Crafters 286-4500 *Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts *Canal Crafters: *Howard Skills Development Chief Petty Officers' Club, 283-5475 Center: Handmade arts and crafts are Center: Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-5957 Fabric painting classes 6:30available. Consignment and volunFree porcelain pouring class Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453 8:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesteers are welcome by the shop staff. 10 a.m.-noon today. Bring or buy Clayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360 day and Thursday of each month, The shop features seasonal disslip and tools. Clayton NCO Club, 287-3586 $7.50. Some supplies are available. plays and is open 10 a.m.-2 p.m. The 1994 photo contest is comClayton Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363 Stone stroke classes I I a.m. Monday through Saturday, Building in August. Call for details. Clayton Scuba Shop 287-3355 Sundays, $10. Paint ceramic figuing 804, Albrook. Call 286-4500. Ongoing classes include stained Club Amador, 282-3534 rines to look like stoneware. Classes are available. Sign up at the glass, cross-stitch, framing, clay Cocoli Recreation Center, 287-4119 Custom frames to order and shop. flower, pottery wheel throwing, Howard Auto Craft Shop, 284-3370 do-it-yourself frame classes are Quilting classes run the first, macrame, air brush techniques, and Howard Enlisted Members' Club, 284-4107 available. second and fourth Tuesday of the lamp assembly. Several "how-to" Howard Officers' Club, 284-4680 The Ceramic Center, Building month; intermediate 10:15 a.m.videos are available for free viewHoward Riding Stables 284-3770 198, is located near the Crafts Shop. noon; beginner 12:15-2 p.m. ing. Howard Skills Development Center, 284-6361 Howard Teen Center, 284-4700 Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-4510 The Loop, 287-3035 Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814 Quarry Heights Officers' Club, 282-4380 Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150 Rodman Naval Station Information Tour *Valent Recreation Center: Army art historical print exhiWatermelon day 3 p.m. June and Travel Office, 283-5307/4454 The screening room offers free bition in honor of flag day today. 25. Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514 movies. Calling the 24-hour movie Better Opportunities for *Zodiac Community Center: Valent Recreation Center, 287-6500 line at 287-4367. Single Soldiers forum meets the The activities room is availZodiac Community Activities Center, 284Dart players may win a $1,000 first Thursday of every month and able to rent for private functions. Atlantic first prize and large merchandise is open to all barracks residents. Call 284-6161 to reserve a date. Aquativity Center, 289-4009 prizes during this year's dart tour*Cocoli Community Center: Subs on Top has take-out, eatDavis Arts and Crafts Center, 289-5201 nament at the Valent Recreation Arts and crafts for children in or delivery service to Kobbe, Davis Community Club, 289-5160 Center. Qualify for the June touma3:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday. Farfan, Howard and Gateway housOcean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402 ment by playing at Valent. Call Father's Day picnic 2 p.m. Sating. Fax in orders at 284-6109 or Outdoor Recreation, 289-4077 Anne Kelly at 287-6500. urday. call 284-5848. Sherman Arts and Crafts Center, 289-6313 Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-6104 Sundial Recreation Center, 289-3889/3300 news 5:30-6 p.m. Thursday. Pool tournament Sunday. Rec center nSpanish 6-7 p.m. Tuesday and Atlantic tours *Sundial Recreation Center: Friday. A n t Mini triathalon 7 a.m. Saturday. Beginning Painting 6-8 p.m. *Sundial Recreation Center: Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. MonMonday and Wednesday. Panamaovernight,8 a.m.June day, Wednesday and Friday. *Ocean Breeze Recreation 25-26. Family exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m. Center: *Ocean Breeze Recreation Wednesday. The center offers a variety of Center: Piano 10:30-11 a.m. Wednesday. classes such as karate, cake decoEl Valle 5:30 a.m.-5 p.m. SunKarate 6-7 p.m. Monday and rating, piano, Spanish, English, day. Wednesday. country line dancing and jazz. Call Colon historical tour 9 a.m.-2 Gymnastics and ballet lessons 289-6402 for information. p.m. Thursday. //x /MIX>// /'

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B8June 17, 1994Movies Location Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Howard AFB 7pm: Cops & 2pm: Cops & 2pm: Cops & 7pm: Cops & 7pm: Brainscan (R) 7pm: Bad Girls (R) 7pm: Thumbelina (G) 284 Robbersons (PG) Robbersons (PG) Robbersons (PG) Robbersons (P0) Edward Furlong, Madeleine Stowe, Animated -3583 hevy Chase, Chevy Chase, Chevy Chase, Chevy Chase, Frank Langella Mary Stuart Masterson 9pm: Bad Girls (R) Jack Palance Jack Palance Jack Palance Jack Palance 9pm: In the Name of 9pm: Brainscan (R) Madeleine Stowe, 9pm: The Chasers (R) 7pm: The Chasers (R) 7pm: Above the Rim 9pm: Above the Rim the Father (R) Edward Furlong, Mary Stuart Masterson Tom Berenger, Tom Berenger, (R) Duane Martin, (R) Duane Martin, Daniel Day-Lewis, Frank Langella William McNamara William McNamara Leon Leon Emma Thompson 9pm: Above the Rim Tupac Shakur I Tupac Shakur (R) Duane Martin, 9pm: The Chasers (R) Leon Tom Berenger, Tupac Shakur William McNamara Fort Clayton 2pm: D2: Mighty 2pm: D2: Mighty 7pm: D2: Mighty 7pm: White Fang 2 7pm: Clifford (PG) 7pm: Above the Rim 7pm: Cops & 287-3279 Ducks Are Back (PG) Ducks Are Back (PG) Ducks Are Back (PG) (PG) Scott Bairstow, Martin Short, (R) Duane Martin, Robbersons (PG) Emilio Estevez, Emilio Estevez, Emilio Estevez, Charmaine Craig Charles Grodin Leon, Tupac Shakur Chevy Chase, Michael Tucker Michael Tucker Michael Tucker 9pm: D2: Mighty 9pm: White Fang 2 9pm: The Chasers (R) Jack Palance 7pm: Clifford (PG) 7pm: Clifford (PG) 9pm: Clifford (PG) Ducks Are Back (PG) (PG) Scott Bairstow, Tom Berenger, 9pm: Above the Rim Martin Short, Martin Short, Martin Short, Emilio Estevez, Charmaine Craig William McNamara (R) Duane Martin, Charles Grodin Charles Grodin Charles Grodin Michael Tucker Leon 9pm: White Fang 2 Tupac Shakur (PG) Scott Bairstow, Charmaine Craig Fort Davis 7pm: Major League p Major League II' 7pm: The Paper (R) 7pm: Major League it 7pm: JimmyHollywood 7pm: White Fang 2 7pm: Clifford (PG) 289-5173 (PG) Charlie Sheen, (PG) Charlie Sheen, Michael Keaton, (PG) Charlie Sheen, (R) Joe Pesci, (PG) Scott Bairstow, Martin Short, Tom Berenger Tom Berenger Glenn Close Tom Berenger Christian Slater Charmaine Craig Charles Grdin 9pm: The Paper (R) 9pm: Jimmy Michael Keaton, Hollywood (R) Glenn Close Joe Pesci, Chnstian Slater Fort Sherman 7:30pm: Jimmy 7:30pm: The Paper 7:30pm: Major No show No show No show 7:30pm: White Fang 2 289-5173 Hollywood (R) Joe (R) Michael Keaton, League II (PG) (PG) Scott Bairstow, Pesci, Christian Slater Glenn Close Charlie Sheen, Charmaine Craig Tom Berenger Fort Amador 7pm: Naked Gun 33 7pm: In the Name of 7pm: Brainscan (R) No show No show No show 7pm: Bad Girls (R) 284-3583 1/3 (PG-13) the Father (R) Edward Furlong, Madeleine Stowe, Leslie Nielsen, Daniel Day-Lewis, Frank Langella Mary Stuart Masterson Priscilla Presley Emma Thompson Coming soonNosh in June 24 Above the Major Rim League II Duane Martin, Charlie Sheen, Howard AFB Leon Tom Berenger 7pm Thumbelina Kyle-Lee Watson is After having won a promising high their champion(G)"Btethntefr! school basketball ship,theCleveland Animated player torn between ay dA. Indians have 9pm Bad Girls (R) dealing drugs on the slumped hack into Madeleine Stowe, streets of Harlem and their old losing Mary Stuart trying to reach his tAf& S ffW u ways. It sects the Masterson goal with the Nationplayers have been al Basketball Associdistracted by exation. R (pervasive pensive cars, doing Fort Clayton s language, vio-,.endorsements and lence), 98 min. -other nonbaseball 7pm Cops & Robbersons I activities. PG (PG) The Chasers (some rude lanChevy Chase, Tom Berenger, guage), 100 Jack Palance William McNamara 9pm The Chasers (R) A couple of misTom Berenger, matched Navy shore Hollywood William McNamara patrolmen get the rouNow showing at Davis and Sherman theaters. Joe Pesci, tine assignment to esChristian Slater court a prisoner from local detention back won't take him to Dinosaur World. PG, Hoping to get attention and to achieve Fort Davis to the base. The prisoner is the lovely 98 mm. fame for himself, an out-of-work actor 7pm D2: Mighty Ducks Erika Eleniak who takes every opportuMighty Ducks becomes a vigilante superhero on the nity to escape. Cross-country madness D2: streets of Hollywood. R (language), Are Back (PG) ensues as the captive tries every possible Are Back l10 min. Emilio Estevez, way to gain her freedom. R (strong lan~ Emilio Estevez, Michael Tucker guage, scene of sexuality), 105 min. Michael Tucker The Paper 9pm White Fang 2 Everyone's favorite misfit hockey team Michael Keaton, (PG) Cops & Robbersons hits the ice again for a new season of Glenn Close Scott Bairstow Chevy Chase, hilarity. This time out, the coach moves Trying to beat the deadline forastory in Jack Palance to Los Angeles to head the Goodwill the New York St0t newspaper ian editor Charmaine Craig C ak hom e Games. As the Ducks flock along, they rushes to expose a majorscandal which when he has to help the police stake out leave a trail ofcomic chaos in their wake. could possibly lead to the release oftwo Fort Sherman his neighbor Suspected of being with the PG (mild language), 107 min. innocent young men charged with mur30m Clifford (PG) Mafia. PG (mild violence, language, some White Fang 2 der. R (strong language), 112 mi. comic nudity), 95 min. Matin Short Scott Bairstow, Naked Gun 33 1/3 Charles Grodin Charmaine Craig Leslie Nielsen, The adventure-filled sequel to the hit Priscilla Presley Martin Short, 1992 Disney family film is a spectacular Leslie Nielsen returns for an all new Fort Amador Charles Grodin outdoor saga based on Jack London's adventure with all new dialogue and Martin Short plays Clifford, a 10-yearlegendary animal creation, White Fang. some new costumes. This time, now 7pm old boy who is cute and adorable except He and his new human partner face danretired police Lt. Frank Drebin is drawn the Father (R) when he doesn't get his way.While his ger and excitement when they take on a back toundercover duty when he stumDaniel Day-Lewis parents are in Hawaii he makes his ungreedy mining company. PG (mild acbles into a terrorist plot. PG--13 (off Emma Thompson cle's life unbearable just because he tion, violence), 105 min. color humor), 83 min.

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_____ Sch duleTropic Time TV June 17e199d4 B9 C channels 8 & 10 Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30am NBC News at Sunrise 6:30am Headline News 6:00am CCMTV 5:30am NBC News at Sunrise 5:30am NBC News at Sunrise 5:30am NBC News at Sunrise 5 30am NBC News at Sunrise 6:00 Good Morning America 7:00 Na'y/MarineCorpsNews 6:30 Hourof ower 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good MorningAmerica 0:00 Basic Training Workoat 7:30 Real News Far Kids 7:00 Voices Of Faith 8:00 BasicTraining Workout 8:00 Bodyshaping 8:00 Basic Training Workout 8:00 Bodyshaping 8:30 Sesame Street 0:00 Guts 7:25 Catch The Spirit 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street 9:30 Murder She Wrote 0:30 Just for Kids! 8:00 CBS Sunday Morning 9:30 Murder, She Wrote 9:30 Murder, She Wrote 9:30 Murder, She Wrote 9:30 Murder, She Wrote 0:25 Guiding Light .Sonic The Hedgehog 9:30 Face The Nation 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Sally Jesse Ra11:10 General Hospital CRO nn* 10:00 Washington Week tn 1 10:t General Hospital t1:I0 General Hospital 11:10 General Hospital phal .* Noon Headline News Break Teenage Mutant Ninja Review Noon Headline News Break Noon Headline News Break Noon Headline News Break 11:10 General Hospital 12:15 SCN Midday Turtles 10:30 This Week w/Brinkley 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday. Noon Headline News Break 12:30 Sportscenter Wild WesC.O.W.Boys 11:30 America'sBlackForum 12:30 Sports Machine 12:30 Sportscenter 12:30 Sporiscenter 12:15 SCN Midday Report 1:00 Another World : Of Moo Mesa Noon NASCAR: Michigan 1:00 Another World 1:00 Another World : 1:00 Another World 12:30 Sportscenter 2:00 Oprah Winfrey EEK! The Cat 400 2:00 Oprah Winfrey 2:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 2:00 Oprah Winfrey 1:00 Anther Wortd 3:00 Price is Right 10:30 Nature 3:00 PGA: U.S. Open Final 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 2:00 Donahue 4:00 Channel One 11:30 "Hidden Assets: FmRound 4:00 Channel One 4:00 Channel One 4:00 Channel One 3:00 Price is Right 4:15 Newsroom poweringAmerica's 5:00 Science and Technology 4:15 Newsroom 4:15 Newsroom 4:15 Newsroom 4:00 Channel One 4:30 Legends of The Hidden Workers" Week 4:30 Guts 4:30 Ghostwriter 4:30 Shining Time Station 4:15 Newsroom Temple 12:30pm Headline News 5:30 On Stage 1994 5:00 Wheel Of Fortune 5:00 Wheel of Fortune 5:00 -Wheel of Fortune 4:30 Club Connect 5:00 Wheel of Fortune 1:00 Young Adult Theatre: 6:00 Center Stage 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:00 Wheel of Fortune 5:30 Showbiz Today "The Fourth Man" 7:00 ABC News "20/20" 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report .6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:30 Showbiz Today 6:00 SCN Evening Report 1:30 Movires: "Lassie: Ad8:00 Movie: "WithoutWarn6:30 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:30 Headline News Break ventures Of Neeka" ing: The James Brady 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 World News Tonight 3:05 "Bless The Beasts And Story" 7:00 Jeopardy! 7:00 Jeopardy! 7:00 Jeopardy! 6:30 World News Tonight 7:00 Jeopardy! The Children" 9:35 Headline News Break 7:30 Roc 7:30 Answerline: "Youth 7:25 Fresh Prince Of Bel Air 7:00 Jeopardy! 7:30 America's Funniest 5:00 Showtime At The 10:00 Entertainment This 8:00 COPS Services" 7:50 Movie: "To Be The 7:25 Murphy Brown Home Videos Apollo Week 8:30 60 Minutes 8:30 48 Hours Best" (Part I) 7:50 Movie: "To Be The 8:00 Dave's World 6:00 Headline News 11:00 Poirot V 9:30 CBS Evening News 9:30 CBS Evening News 9:30 CBS Evening News Best" (Parl 2) 0:30 Baywatch 6:30 Rescue 911 Midnight Headline News 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:00 SCN Late Edition 9:30 CBS Evening News 9:30 CBS Evening News 7:30 China Beach 12:30 Meet The Press 10:05 Entertainment Tonight 10:05 Entertainment Tonight 10:05 Entertainment Tonight 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:00 SCN Late Edition 8:25 Movie: "Police Acade1:30 Headline News 10:35 David Letterman 10:35 David Letterman 10:35 David Letterman 10:05 Entertainment Tonight 10:05 Entertainment Tonight my 2: Their First As2:00 Sports Latenight 11:30 Tonight Show 11:30 Tonight Show 11:30 Tonight Show 10:35 David Letterman 10:35 David Letterman signment" 2:30 ABC World News Now 12:30am Headline News 12:30am Headline News 12:30am Headline News 11:30 Tonight Show 11:30 Tonight Show 10:00 Headline News 3:00 Headline News 1:00 Nightline 1:00 Nightline 1:00 Nightline 12:30am Headline News 12:30am HeadlineNews 10:30 Saturday Night Live 3:30 Sports Machine 1:30 Sports Latenight 1:30 Sports Latenight 1:30 Sports Latenight 1:00 Nightline 1:00 Nightlne Midnight World Wrestling Fed4:00 ABC World News Now 2:00 Arsenio Hall 2:00 Arsenio Hall 2:00 Arsenio Hall 1:30 Sports Latenight 1:30 Movies: "Glengarry ration 5:00 Headline News Break 3:00 Headline News 3:00 Headline News 3:00 Headline News 2:00 Arsenio Hall Glen Ross 1:00 Friday Night Videos 3:30 Tonight Show 3:30 Tonight Show 3:30 Tonight Show 3:00 Headline News 3:15 "Dog Day Afternoon" 2:00 Movies: "Coch Trip" 4:30 Headline News 4:30 Headline News 4:30 Headline News 3:30 Tonight Show 5:15 Videlinks 3:35 "Back To School" 5:00 Headline News Break 5:00 Headline News Break 5:00 Headline News Break 4:30 Headline News 5:30 Headline News 5:10 Videolinks 5:00 Headline News Break 6:00 Headline News Break 5:30 Headline News Break i C abe channl 14 Mature Theme ** Series Begins *CSeries Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30am Simulcast with Chan6:30am Simulcast with Chan6:00am Shining Time Station 5:30am Simulcast with Chan5:30am Simulcast with Chan5:30am Simulcast with Chan5:30am Simulcast with Channels 8 & 10 nels 8 & 10 6:30 McGee And Me nels 8 & 10 nels 8 & 10 nels 8 & 10 nels 8 & 10 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 10:30 World Cup Soccer: 6:50 Sonic The Hedgehog 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Donahue 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 9:00 Today Switzerland vs The 7:15 Disney's Little Mermaid 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 11:00 Star Trek United States 7:35 Darkwing Duck nn 11:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek Noon Headline News Break 1:00 Movies: "Friendly Per8:00 Tiny Toons Adventures Noon Headline News Break Noon Headline News Break Noon Headline News Break Noun Headline News Break 12:15 SCN Midday suasion 8:20 Classic Cartoons 12:15. SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:30 All My Children 3:20 "Runaway Father" 8:45 EK! The Cat 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 1:30 One Life to Live 5:00 American Gladiators 9:05 Teenage Mutant Ninja 1:30 One Life To Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 2:30 Young and the Restiess 6:00 Headline News Turtles 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 3:30 Teenage Mutant Ninja 6:30 The Simpsons 9:30 Science & Technology 3:30 Tiny Toons Adventures 3:30 EEK! The Cat .3:30 Sonic The Hedgehog 3:30 Disney's Little MerTurtles 7:00 Lois & Clark: The AdWeek 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fraggle Rock maid 4:00 Fraggle Rock ventures Of Superman 10:00 Motor Week 4:30 Clarissa Explains It All 4:30 Legend Of The Hidden 4:30 Guts 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:30 Ghost Writer 8:00 Star Trek: "Deep Space 10:30 Sports Closeup 5:00 Club Connect -Temple 5:00 Nick News: WS 4:30 Get The Picture 5:00 Silver Spoons Nine" 11:00 This Week In Baseball 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:00 Mickey & Donald 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:00 The Wonder Years 5:30 The Cosby Show 9:00 Herman's Head 11:30 This Old House 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:30 The Cosby Show 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:30 The Cosby Show 6:00 SCN Evening Report 9:30 Married With Children Noon Headline News 6:15 Headline News Break 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News Break 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News Break 10:00 Headline News 12:30 Mary Tyler Moore Show 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 NBC Nightly News 10:30 Saturday Night Live 1:00 Frugal Gourmet 7:00 MacGyver 6:30 NBC Nightly News 7:00 Hangin' With Mr. 6:30 NBC Nightly News 7:00 Primetime Live Midnight WWF Superstars 1:30 Movie: "Robin And 8:00 Melrose Place 7:00 Alf Cooper 7:00 Full House 8:00 NBA Basketball: Finals 1:00 Friday Night Videos Marian" 9:00 Movie: "Cold Sassy 7:30 Home Improvement 7:30 Seinfeld 7:30 Family Matters Game 85 2:00 Entertainment This 3:20 Perry Mason: "The Case Tree" 8:00 Picket Fences 8:00 NBA Basketball: Finals 8:00 Living Single 10:30 21 Jump Street + Week Of The Avenging Ace" 10:40 SCIMED Health Test 9:00 Martin Game #7 (if necessary) t:30 Joe's Life 11:25 SCN Late Edition 3:00 Headline News 5:00 Wonderful World "The Fat Or Fit Test" 9:25 Movie:Stephen King's 10:30 NYPD Blue + 9:00 Dateline NBC 11:30 Nightline : 3:30 Saturday Night Live Of Disney + 11:00 Headline News "Sleepwalkers" 11:25 SCN Late Edition 10:00 Miami Vice Midnight M*A*S*H 5:00 Videolinks 6:00 NBA Basketball: Finals 12:30am Simulcast with 8&10 11:25 SCN Late Edition 11:30 Nightline 11:00 Headline News 12:30 Larry Ring Live 5:30 Headline News Break Game 96 11:30 Nightline 12:00 M*A*S*H or 11:25 SCN Late Edition 1:30 Sports Latenight 8:30 Headline News 12:00 M*A*SCH 8:00 Tour Of Duty -11:30 Nightline 2:00 Arsenio Hall 9:00 Movie: "The Where12:30am Simulcast with 8&10 9:00 NYPD Blue 12:00 M*A*SnH 3:00 Headline News about Of Jenny" 10:00 Murder, She Wrote 12:30am Simulcast with 8&10 3:30 Tonight Show 10:40 Grace under Fire 11:00 Headline News 4:30 David Lettermun 11:05 Day One 11:25 SCN Late Edition 5:30 Simulcast with 8&t0 Midnight Simulcast with 8&10 11:30 Nightline 12:00 M*A*S*H 12:30 Simulcast with 8&10 Channels 8 & 10 Cable Channel 14 Sports Sports NASCAR: Michigan 400, noon Sunday NBA Basketball PGA: U.S. Open Final Round, 3 p.m. Sunday Finals Game # 5, 8 p.m. today Specials Finals Game # 6, 6 p.m. Sunday Answerline: "Youth Services," 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. This Finals Game # 7, 8 p.m. Wednesday month's topic is "Youth Services Summer Programs." RepWorld Cup Soccer resentatives from the three services will answer questions. Swtzerland VS The United States, 10:30 am. Saturday Call from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at 287-4460. Series starts Series starts "Darkwing Duck," 7:35 a.m. Sunday. (Replaces CRO) Do-gooder "Hidden Assets: Empowering America's Workers," 11:30 a.m. Saturd'l Darkwing Duck saves the world from danger and destruction as Disney's day. A look at how progressive American companies are learning to listen to latest animated hero. An adoptive single father and ace avenger balances their employees and the benefits they reap from empowering these "hidden -h asses "parenting his precocious daughter Gosalyn with courageous crime fighting. assets." Primetime movies "On Stage 1994," 5:30 p.m. Sunday. This perennial country and western music "Cold Sassy Tree," 9 p.m. Monday. In 1906, Miss Love Simpson becomes the series returns with another season of country stars captured in performances "on object of a scandal in the small town of Cold Sassy Tree, Ga., when she marries stage" in Nashville, Tenn. ojc fasadlmtes altw fC l as re aw e h are Primetime movies Rucker Blackeslee, the much older proprietor of the town's general store, only three "Police Academy 2: Their First Assignment,"8:20 p.m. Saturday. The Police weeks after his first wife died. The town and his family are shocked by his hasty Academy gang returns to wage war on a bootlicking lieutenant and agang ofruffians marriage. Stars Faye Dunaway and Richard Widmark. led by the infamous "Meathead." Stars Steve Guttenberg and Howard Hessm'n. "The Whereabouts Of Jenny," 8:30 p.m. Sunday. In this made-for-TV film, a "Without Warning: The James Brady Story," 8 p.m. Sunday. The true story of divorced father fights to maintain a relationship with his daughter, who disappears the wounding of press secretary James Brady during the assassination attempt on when his ex-wife and her new husband go into hiding under the Federal Witness President Reagan and his battle to recover. Stars Beau Bridges and Joan Allen. Protection Program. Stars Ed O'Neill and Debrah Farentino. "To Be The Best," 7:25 p.m. Wednesday. (Part 1) Romantic passions and greed Stephen King's "Sleepwalkers," 9:25 p.m. Tuesday. Based on an original script for corporate power propel this soapy drama based on the sequel to Barbara Taylor by horromiester Stephen King, this gore-spattered excursion into terror follows the Bradford's novels "A Woman of Substance" and "Hold The Dream." Stars Lindsay exploits of a mother/son family of shape changing creatures known as "SleepwalkWagner, Anthony Hopkins and Stephanie Beacham. ers." Stars Brian Krause and Madchen Amick.

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flTropic TimesAd B10 June17 1994 Classified Ads .nbt diy pd, $1,900. 252-5567. able, ep, refs. 286-4978. thal Enforcer, Sim City, $35-$50. 2845127. fl a 1985 Audi 5000, fuel injer, 4dr, US Eog-spk honest, reliable maid, M-F. --a ~ specs, not dty pd, $5,400. 264-9974. refs, avail now. 234-0013 ask for Kenwood audio cab, 8 ; Sharp VHS cean damorder zoom cas,$350.287-3274. FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office)As a reminder, 1985 Toyota Cressida, 4dr, at, full exin accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern t, exc rood,_S5.300. 252-6079. Biligoal l 22.maid M-W-F grI ackard Bel 36 s 2bd 3 Rams, wpt.221-5022, 5.25-3,5 floppies, Windows 3.1, Dos Command regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used, 95udi, 6007Rs3 eves. Hlonesibabysitterrallege edu,some more so1ware, SI,200. 289-3656. cannot be giventransferred or generally sold to non-privilege holdEng, wkends only. 264-3546 ask for -----------------------------a---------ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu1989 Mlrcry Topaz, new paint, ttres, Veronia. TV tone 575. 2809 as Penn ar, all owr, c rood, S5,9l. 226SeagttgearTVSe.$75g285-4909askf Pen tion under both, military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes 6473. Forcurls,perms,manicure,pedicure. after4pm. 207-6070 ask for Sandra. permissible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid. 1971 VW German Super Beetle, 4 sp, -6.sr Carver M 1.5 pwr amp, pre-mp, ass before such a sale, it is strongly recommended that the seller contact US specs, new tires, rebuitlt eng, cosMutarespun maid, honest,hard workdeck, dbx range controller, graphic eq, tom int, $2,200. 284-4399. ing, gt w/kids, highly recommendrd. 261-6453. the Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-31 17. ed, daily, avail June 30. 282-3232. -. 1992 Chevy S-0 p/, 5 p, or, pb ps, Personal computer 286 IBM cmpat, am-fm cass, $9,000. 286-3692. Eng-spkmaid,reliable,honest,M-F, likenew,loadedw/colormoiur,$525. 1993 Toyota p/u truck, Pioneerstereo, 1990 Ford Phrbe, ecscond, $12,500/ live-out, grt w/kids. 262-9819. 239-9709. a-, big tires, sid, $15,000. 283-3439. oba. 207-6199. 1993 Ford Tempo, 5,000 mi, 4dr, at, Aac, exc cond, not dry p, $10,000/obo. Honest Eng-spk oaid, exc w/kids, SC laptop 8000 w/3.5 dr, fax/modem 1981 Ford Fairmot, 4 cyl, a, an-fOt 1991 Chevy Astro Van CL, V6, at ./ 284-6875 eves. 284-675. refs, full time, M-F. 286-4781 ask for cap, rechlar hats, $350. 236-0984. radio, new tires, starter, alternator, OD, full pwr, a, exc cond, $13,900. Sandra. Whnalecat,5 mosold, goodw/kids, $1,00. 284-5078. 287-6297. 1985 Nissan 200SX, good running Pentax 35mm, Iripod, flash, cleaning sowe sh, $10. 287-3335 rond, 2d, coupe, ps, ph, or, $3,000. Live-in maid, child care, dependset, bag, mauls, $275. 230-0957. 1992 Dodge Caravan, good cond, 4 1988 Dodge Shadow hatchbk, ac,pw, 230-1618. able. 286-4489. CCP ouweiler puppies, females, yl, not dry pd, $12,500. 233-0744. pl,ru9sgoodneedspainljob,53,000 Nintendo action set, 8 games, $100; champion sire, show quality Dam, 287-6297. 1991 Mazda Miala, 1800cc, sport pkg, Maid, carpet cleaning, babysiliing, printer, 24 pin, $150. 287-5486. avail June 30, $650. 287-6195. 1988 Dodge Caravan SE, ps, pb, tw, --8,000 kin, hd/soft tops, cd, alarm, US wkends. 252-6815 ask for Malene. c,at,til, goodcond,dlynotpd.$7,500. 1978 Ford T-bird, runs/lks gr, a, ps, specs, dty pd. 264-3210. 486ds33, 8mb Rm, 340hd, 15" 11 Two yellow head parrots, Ig cage, 286-3327. pb, $1,500. 287-3675. Babysitter w/exp, 18-year-old, descreen tower case, 16 bit sound card eserciser/climbing pole, access, pa1981Jeep Conmanche,uc, pb, ps, ampenduble,nighis, wkends.230-1927 voice regulator, loaded w/progrms, pers, grt talkers, $300 for all. 2861991 Chevy S-10 p/u, 4 cyl, ps, pb, 1974 Ford Torino Ranchero p/u, V8 fm cass, 4x4WD, new tires rims, best desk chr SI,995/obo. 286-3734. 3441. arb, 5 sp, ac, stereo css, 28,000 ml, 351, dly not pd, camper, best offer. offer. 261-6418. Full time, live-out housekeeper/ d not dty pd, $7,000/obo. 284-4292. 252-6844. babysitter, avail June 20, refs. 286VIS camcorder, $500; acostat spker, Borzoi puppies, pedigreed, reg, 1986 Pontiac 6000LE, exc cond, gr 3897 $250; 9600 bps ext fax/modem, $120. wormed, shos, yet still affordable. 1983 Chevy Blazer, V6, 4WD, super 1980 VW Golf, dty pd, ps, ac, ph, at, gas mi,ac, pw, pb,uam-fmcass, $3,500. 282-4225. 252-5648. cond,manyoptions,$4,500.283-3831 newpaint,parts,likenewcond,45,000 286-6172. Span-spk live-out mtaid, honest, -4225. eves. mi, $3,700. 260-4564. hardworker, good w/kids, M-F. 286JVC 25" color TV, stand, $450. 287MAle Saymoyed, 5 mos old, some 1975 Olds Vista Cruiser, ac, ps, pb, 6132. 5137. shots, needs a home, not reg, $75. 1978Dodge Monaco, at,ps,pb, pw,pl, 1991 Buick Regal,4dr, at, ac,28,000, pw,new tires,dty pd,good cond, $900. 286-6132 tilt, ar, $800. 283-6330. exe rond, not dity pd, $9,900. 264284-5452. Exc maid,bilngual,honest, reliable, Samsung 13" color TV, sleep, timer, 0244. get refs, Tues only. 287-5928. remotehardly used, $170. 260-2019. CCP/AKC ceg basset hound pups, 1991 GMC p/u, grt bargain, $5,800. 1986 Toyota p/u, dty pd, $6,700/obo. males, females, $500. 50-0289 LD#. 50-0363 LD#. 1992 Mitsubishi Eclipse GSX, twin 283-3487. Span-spk maid, mature, honest, cellSony am-fm ass/corder, cfs 220, $45. cam 16valveturbo, 5sp,4WD, ac, cd, able,highlyrecommendeddaysonly, 235-0122. Free, mis breed dog, all shots, neu1986Toyota Landcruiser4x4,4dr, diedty pd, $20,000. 286-3925. 1991 Toyota 4x4, V6, ac, am-f cats, prefer Farfan, Howard, Kobbe area. --. --tered, ex watch dog; free to good sel, not diy pd, $9,000. 252-6193. 40,000 mi, $12,800. 285-4580. 206-4792. 386sx/I6nhz port, 2ntb Ram, I t00mb home, kittens, 13 wks, box trained. 1984 Audi 80, 4dr, pw, pd, ac, good hd, vg mathcoprocessor, MS Dos6.1, 236-2035 1983 Buick Skylark, 4dr, at, ps, ph, rood. 223-7980. 1988 Voyager Minivan, ps, ph, an, at, Day maid, M-F, honest, bilngual, Wod perfect 5.0, $995. 260-9172. am-fm, cruise,6,yl, $2,000. 289-5084. -stro, 66k mi, exc cond, $7,300 firm. good worker, ge house cleaning. Female bover, 8 moo old, brindle w/ .97 Chey Catn-, goo rod, 1984 Volvo 760 GLE, all extras, exc 286-4340. 266-9136 Gateway2000486dx2/66 15" fltscreen cge,earv&aileroppedallshosgr 97 cond, $5,500/obo. 252-2031. sga,424mbhd,8mRamsoundblastn/kids, $250/oo. 286-4524. 81,000. 22-3410. 1988 BMW 318i Shadow line sr, ac, Eng-spk Ive-/out maid, honest. e 2x cd, 16 bit sound card, $2,700. 1990 Dodge Caravan, 57,000 mi, am-fO cuss, 2dr, no dry pd, $8,500. 224-7765 after 7pm287-3844 German shepherd puppies, CCP meg, 1989 Ford Phrobe, fully loaded, new $8,500 firm. 286-3245. 261-6119. exr pedigree, females, $350. 256sires, good rood, $6,000. 243-5688. Component saker boo w/2 10" pwr 6378 -1979 Ford F I50 Ranger, super cab w/ 1985 Ford Bronco it XLT, fully equip, acoustik woofers, max 300w, $230/ -_ _ 1986 Mazda RX7, ld, cr, radio cass, campe shell, pb, ps, ac,8 cyl, $3,900. 4WD, exccond,$6,000/obo. 256-6672. obo. 260-2019. FemalelonghairedbluePersin, CFA tns good, new paint, tires, $4,500. 252-5006. -----reg for stud service of same kind. 285-6544. 1983 Toyota Cressida 2.0cr, 4 cyl, at, Nintendo tapes, Mario Bros, Tetris, 260-388s. 1990 F 150 XLT 4x4 w/8'bed oaded 1988 Ford Escort, ps, ph, new tires, 4dr, ac, am-fh radio cass, tinted, c 21' Rad.n walk arund w/platfere, GuerrillaWar, Pinball,goodprice.286or, cd, amp, spkers, high mi, runs gr, cond, neg. 236-0749. 4a86 low mil, Bluebook, 815,500; asking $3,995/obo. 286-3734 225hp, 200 gal fuel, 30 gal water, Ig 488 nured, itter trai e sho record $14,500/obo. 260-9356. 1986 Volvo 740GLE, at, 4cyl, 4dr, ac, fish box, $17,900 252-2694. Car-two 15subwoofer4tweeter,2mid good wtrids. 264-9677. 1986 Mazda RX7, exc cued, custom 19 Ford Ranger 4x4, loaded, low tinted, sr, US specs, ex cond, neg. 20 Cobia cuddp cabin i4hp n box, tOOow chan, $300. 228-4319. ml, nor rand, not dity Pdl, $12,800. 236-0749. Mencm nser best offer 287-3390. Free, white/blk kittens. 282-4608. wheels, ac, am-ffm stereo cass, $6,500. 282-4383. Kaypro 16 letter quality printer, $100/ 282-4415. 1 988 Montero 4x4, a, dty pd, loaded, 16' Dep-V, 60hp overhauled, runs obo; VCR, $150 as is. 282-4538. Golden retriever puppies, CCP reg, 1978 Jeep CJ-5, 6 cyl, soft top, gr $14,500/obo. 269-5780. 16 Deep V, exrp 28r-498_ shots, dewormed, ready to go. 2891986Toyota Minivan modF,ac,at,ps, cond, $4,500. 260-1740. gO, tots of e 286-981. C128 computer, dd, printer, software, 4044. pb, pm, sr, radio cass, good cond, dty 1988 Dodge Grand Caruvan, ac, fully $250; hooked on .Ih a, $100; ___________________________n Sm boat 1cm,, 19' tong, usedt for flat $20hokdnmahat$10 pd, $6,000. 224-4190. 1980 Chevy Impala, new brakes, amloaded, exc cond, $10,800. 287-3887. bottom boat; camper shell, fits Ford Britannica Encyclopedia set, $300. Boe upies21tails cropped, o 1991 Plymouth Voyager LE, V6, fully cass, runs gr, 1,500/b. 1979 Mercedes 450SE, exc cond, Ranger, best offer. 252-2675. 284-5072. loaded, at, ac, exc cond, $10,200.287sr, not dty pd, $10,000. 287-3887. 4, inflatable Zodiac, alum floor Xt computer 5.25-3.5 fd, 30mb h, Two colorful 10" Oscars, $40 both. 6233. 1977 Dodge Aspen s/wgn, ps, ph, 1989Ford T US board, $1,000. 252-1174 after 4pm. monitor,$675; xerrwingmch,$65; 282-3490. good running cond, $650/neg. 235dempe,4dat w/coax cable, $75. 252-5567. -1980 Chevy Motza, 2dr, 4 sp, exc 0122. cruise, not dy pd, $6,800/obo. 286ee home tc, strong, ig tack area, Free, 2 male & female kittens, gro w/ mech cond, not diy pd, $1,000/obo. 3527. map be used as utility rinc, $3,000/ 486dx33 w/monitor, 14.4 fax/modem, kids, shots, access. 289-4232. 282-3589. 1987 Suzuki Samurai, 4WD, 2 tops, obo 286-4490. 8m Rum, tape backup, sbpro card ./ $3,600. 286-3674 after 5pm. spkers, software, color printer, $2,000. Cocker spaniel puppies, champagne 1993 Jeep Wrangler, new coind, Inw, 286-4731, color. 252-1257. mil, stereo, $12,300. 264-9817. 1980 Ford Bronco Ranger, V8 351, Available no rust, exe cood, runs gt, removable E lectroi s Console TV, $300; .1.c typewriter, Purebred pomeranians,males, female, 1988 Jeep Suzuki Samurai 4x4 contop, diy pd, best offer. 282-3194 after $130. 287-3072. avail Juiy 6, $250; will take $100 vert, US specs, 1300cc 5 sp, ac, wide 5pm. Maid, reliable, honest exc, refs. 252deposit. 287-4471. rims, soft top, $5,700. 252-2913. 1035 Computer games, IBM compat, $10; 1998 Toyota Tercel, ac, at, 16,000mi, -Amiga 500, 1 meg, software, TV/ Nintendo game.,s $8-$15. 252-2314. Pitbull/rottweilerpuppies, I mosold, 1990 Honda Accord LX, 5 sp, am-fm not diy pd, $7,500. 284-6326. Full time maid, grt w/children, fluent monitor, desk, $599. 284-6496. $200. 50-0311 LD#. cass, pwr everything, exc cond, in eg refs avail June 24. 284-3685 Sega Genesis games, $15-$30ea. 286$10,000. 287-5146. 1991 Mazda 626, low mi, ac, ps. ph, ask fs, a PackardBell legend 386x,4mb Ram, 3482. German shepherd, 2 pro uld, gr ml radio cuss, exc cond, $9,500. 252aDos 6.2, Windows, MS works, more. kids, male, well trained, $200/obo. 1987 GMC p/u, 4WD, at, ps, pb, am5047. Maid, M-F, honest, good house keep$975. 287-6236. Amiga 500 Commodore computer w/ 282-3778. fm cuss, camper shell, $6,200. 230er 266-8180 color monitor, remaining software, 0957. Isuzup/u, custom wheels, sr, bedliner, --Compaq laptop, 486/25mhz, 8mb $500/obo. 286-3692. Cockerspaniel pups, blond, avail July cd w/amp & spkers, iks/runs good, Honest live-out maid, 5 days a week, Ram, int fax modem, 120mb hd; 17, $150. 252-2641. 1990 saz Trooper 4x4, V6, ac, am$6,000. 287-3844. bilingual. 266-0747. Canon bubble jet printer, security 486sx/25mhz, 2mb Ram, 107mb hd, fm radio, ps, pb, 5 sp, exc cond, nt dity cable, bag, all $2,000. 252-6124. vga color monitor, progrns, modem, Doberman pinscher female for stud pd, $11,950. 260-0943. 1988 Chevy Corsica, 4dr, good rood, Eng-spk maid, days T-W. 224-7521. desk, cr, exc cond, I yr old, $1,150. services. 286-3371. 1 at, $4,200. 287-6180. PB386 computer w/200 mb hd, 4mb 286-4879. 986 S-I5 JimmyGMC4x4,grtshape, Exc typist to incl drawings, graphics Ram, math coprocessor; 2 hexigon at, ac, ph, ps, new paini, radio. 2241988 Plymouth Sundance,49,000mi, using Words/HaravardGraphics, Wincurio cubs. 284-5999. IBM proprinter xl, IBM printer, 2876. 5sp,4cyl,runsgrt,$2,500.286-3796. dows. 261-2426 after 1pm. Okidata 83-a nec daisy wheel, $65Automobi__es Packard Bell 386/33, 85mb hd, 3.5$158. 230-0080 1991 Nissan Pathfinder, loaded, exc 1993 Nissan Bluebird, ac, at, 22,000 Bilingual live-in maid, M-F, honest, 5.25 floppy drives, mouse, fax/mo----rood,_US specs. 260-1946. km, grt cond, $9,500. 286-3796. good w/children, grt worker. 262-7278 dem, color monitor, software, desk, Mitsubishi 4-head vr, microwave. 1988 Mazda MX-6, 2dr, at, ac, pw, sr, 1992 Mercury Grand Marquis, 18,000 1989 Nissan p/u, bedliner, ac, new ask foe Marcia. $1,000 all. 223-2550. 282-4527. 5-star rims /BF Goodrich tie, ex mi, fully loaded, 4d,,at, ,xc cond, one tires, one owner, low mi, exc cond, Bilingual babysitter, live-lu/out, any TV/VCR monior, Sony stereo /d, SuperNESsysw/3games,$175; Jon rood, $10,000/neg. 286-3 137 owner, $17,000. 202-3029. $5,950. 236-3099. __ day. 283-6393 ask for Zuleika. $700/nbo. 285-4538. Madden 94, $45; Sony stereo oys w/ 1992 Ford Runger XLT 4x4, ac, otd, 1987 Mazda 626, 4dr, a, p pw exc l985 Toyota p/u, dy pd, $3,950/obo Bilingual honest, hard working live-in Segacd $gmes,S25,all $150.284spkcr, $850. 286-4978. 4.0LV6,cd,bedliner,neg.264-9059. cond, $6,000. 282-3029. 236-3099. hoosekeepen/babyite, M-F wmef, 6176. Compto's Interactive encyclopedia 1993 Toyota Tecel, 5 sp, all extras, 0987 Olds Cutlass Ciera, runs good, 1981 BMW 320i, runs grt, ac, not dty avail July 1. 289-3944. 3 flopies, 2meg for Windows on cd rom, $50; qemm ex cond, $8,200. 223-2550. $2,100/oo. 287-4935. pd, $3,900. 282-4383 T n p bceted R dro pps card, g e 6 mem mgr far 386/486 pcs, $20. Translations, Eng-Span by certified Ram, cd-rom, so.nd card, svga 256 286-4347. 1990 Eagle Talon Tsi, tmrbo, 5 sp, .ll Plymouth Voyager Minivan, ac, new 1988 Toyota Corolla, 4dr, low mi, translator. 269-8772. color monitor,saftware,$l,200.284---extras, ex cond, $8,700. 223-2550. ires, batt, good rood, $5,000. 284.3L, 4 sp, a, css, super cd, nt Eg-spk mid, M-W-F, gen h s 5137. Kodak printer, $100; musical keybd, Ed-p ad -WF e os $68. 287-6777. 1991 Jeep Wrangler, 4 cyl, sports 4786. i pd, $,400. 2824098. -cleaning, go refs. 287-6438. DJ equip, 2 Genesis turntbls, stereo -wheels, am-fm css, bikini/toft tops, 1989 Ford E-250 von 12 pox not dip 1992 Pontiac Gran Am SE, 2dr, load.pre-amp mixer, almost new, $500. Panasonic printer, 24 pin, exc cond, ex cond, $10,000. 287-6934. pd,duoltanks,ac,Sl0,900 -, 2d, 512,500; 1988 ChryslerLeBa2n, Honest, reliable maid, bilingual, live202-3237. upgrading Ia laser, $158. 282-3628. pd,_d_,._____k,_as, $ 16,900 287-6230. 2dcoumpe, lodedS5,000.262-1204. out,S5 days a meek. 266-0747. 28-27.ugadnt lsr$10 9232. l990OldsCulassSupreme,4dr,pw/ 1998 Bui k Ced6rc 1B Panasonic toul, $35; Yamaha Cd w/remote, many funoltions, plays d, p, p, a ass, 27,000 m, not d 4 $y ac' 1984 Mitsubishi Tredia, 4dr, new ac, Bingualmid/bbyit,hadok, keybd, $85; 13" color TV, S150.284single cds, ex cond, $100. 223-6675. pd, $15,000. 287-4223 25 -ss376, brakes, 4 cyl, ', am-fh tinted, alarm, dependable w/refs. 262-6026 ask for 3082. 252-5376. goodrondavailJulyl8,$3,280.260Debbie. ---Cnonphotographyoutfit, 4 cameras, 1989 Jeep Comanche, 50,000k, ps, 1988 Mustang LX, 60k, new compu.t7386. -Honest, band working live-i/daily Commodore64, monitor, keybd, disk lens, many extras. 252-683 1 ph, a, ramper top, oem lines, sm-fm er, tines, stereo/pkers, Ikls/runs gi, 1990 Cadillac Sedan De Ville, loadmaid, loves children, Eng-Span. 287drive,7mosejopiksowae mew Kenood rak t ee o y plus 2 cuss, 5 sp, 4.OL, bedliner, $8,800. $5,600/abo. 260-3130. ed, $14,000/neg. 260-6183. 6370. xp nt, ex cond, $300. 283-4629 350w pke $500 284-4834 226-0793. 50 pk,,sS500.284_4834. 1989 Firebird, at, 2.8, loaded w/low 1989 Plymouth Voyager, 4 cyl, clean, Honestreliable, Eng-spk live-in maid, Sony color Watchman, ex cond, 1988 Dodge Daytona, 2dr, coupe, ac, mi, -tops, stereo, $8,000/obo. 282runs grt $7,450. 284-3285. good w/kids. 286-3830. $l50. 289-3400 v msg for Rm 309 tinted, on, am-fm cass, $4,200. 2873691. Household 5842. ---1989 Aerostar XLT, a, pb, pw, ps, Housekeeper/cook, M-Th. ref, likes JVC VHS ramordr in/ s a -1988 Jeep Cherokee 4x4, 2dr. p, ph, am-fm stereo, $10,000. 286-4781. ironing, $15 day. 252-2540. bat, exc cond, $400 284-6383 1974 Maverick, at-fm cass, runs grt, a, 5 sp, exc rood, diy not pd $1 1,000. Irano needs rebuilt, S900. 264-5327. 256-6373. 1903 Honda Accord. 4dr, ac, pw, 5sp, Live-iv babysitter, M-F, honest, celiSuper Nintendo, Genei games, LK-Q bd 12x27 gr rug; L hoped

PAGE 27

lassifiedTropic Times 11 asii dAds June 17, 1994 JEO JL couch; dinetteset, BR set,23.6 refrig; $750; bik/gold mirrored coffee tbl, panels. 286-3674 after 5mp. GErefrig/freezer,washerdryer,Magic Rugs, pink 12xl5 w/pad $160, blue Qtrs. 56A Howard, 7-llam. frzer. 252-1257. $5(. 230-1972. Chef range. 260-0943. 9x12 ./pad $120, brown 9x12, $80. -263-3(97. Qors. 69A Hosward, 7am-naon. Sofa, loveseat, $400/obo; Nintende Washer/dryer, x-hvy dty,lgcap,used Children's toys, shoes, clothes, clee -1--------------------w/pwer pad, games, $100; Sony cart one year, S645. 256-6830. ramor. $20, men's hall shes. 287Plants. 232-5258. Qtrs. 80A Howard, 7am. stereo, 10" woofers, amp. 286-6533. 4420. -Sofas, dhl BOR set, solid cherry; DR, -------Lace wedding dress,beadpiece,2veils Qtrs. 84A&B Htoward. Bk lacquer 5 pe Q-sz BR set, $2,000. BR, LIR this, wing barc chr. 282Parachute sq tain, sq reserve, javelit sz.230-0227 Qtrs. II lB Howard, 8-I tam. ding thl, china. $2,500. 296-6556. 5524. Set of keyscontaer new, Megellan GP new. keys on ring w/tag that says 262-5524 Golf clubs $125, microwave $300 Qtr 134A Howard. 7a-2pts. Matchingsofasleeper, loveseat, ivory Ditette set; carpets; isc fain; hahy 'Loadsantnkey." Keys areneeded -desks $75 ea, rugs, curtains, bed, vacrs 4 r color, new condo, $750. 205-6374. tens. 204-60875 eves/wkends. very badly. 260-8154 Men's 26in 10 spd bike, $50. 285num. 284-3174. Qtrs. 138A Howard, Oant-noon. 5980, Rm 3 19. Dishwasher, I yr old, $300; 20" TV. Carpet 12x,15, 1100; micrwave cab--3 tennis rackets, Prince tricomp 90, Qtrs. 552A Howard, gam-nnn. $300. 252-2285. inet, $85, more. 286-3345. AC 5,000 btu $200, Kolcraft deluxe Prince pro oversize, Wilson Sting 95, s stroller, $70, turtles w/aquar. 287$50-70. 286-4275. Qtrs. 558B Howard, 7-It am. GE elec range, 40", wht, $250. 228Plants, Oriental realtm dividers, $400 5222. 4630. ea; Oriental flower paint, $400; kitch-Sports cards 93-94, baseball, basketQtrs. 636B Howard, 7-1I an. en thl for two, $60. 260-61592 vert blinds, fits 3 bdnrt, $175 far Weider wt bench w/bar, $25. 261ball, football, sets, singles. 284-3689. Newsolidoak enteeterw/glassdaors, -at----ser-r-ee-----pta--, 3261. ayasawle,$5 8-12 Qtrs. 647AHoward, 0-1 tatm. $350. 287-4935. Srairp in/., $190; persona w/t sys both,h isher Price carseat upto40 lbs, -Bbykrsoper$2.8-3d $375; both less than 6 was.287-473. 25, wing se $100, .zki 4 whorl3 dresses, small desk,ocamp desk, food Qtrs. 654B Howard. Q-sz sofa sleeper, teak wall unit, o---er, $50. 284-3685. dehydrator, men's bike, 10 spd, $40. Ceramic molds. 284-6727. Qum 15/6C Howard, 7-Ilam. crowave, stereo w/4 spkers, sect sofa 4pc beige sect sofa w/hlide-a-bed; Q1982 Ods Cutlass parts. 287-5974. 287-3799. Qtrs.'15d6CiHywerd,37-hyrrn. sleeper. 284-4486. full sz watts; lawn mawer. 252-2180. T982Olds ttrsspares 287-574. -Today' kid r36yA $23 b7by ribmw Rims/BF Goodrictires, 5 holes 114 Genesis system, games 2 ctrl pds, CD ma, $ 125,l0 berberrg, $45. 287Qtrs. 360A Kobbe,7-lam. R Medi9erranean,6chrschinacosKenmore washer/drer, used 3 ys 95/515, $1,000ng. Mazda plye 276194 6292. ts 405 Kob 8 -lp et, $1,000. 284-5392. exe cond, sold as setaonly, $700. 282m,15SRS$,0/e.Mza P.'~,e .________ 4538. orig 5 holes rims/Pirelli tires 185/ Tropical plants.286-3587 18 cuft refrig/frer, $150; Samsung 4538--60R14, tl4mm,$550neg.286-3137. Easy glider, $50. 287-6194. -Qtrs. 421 Kobbe, 7-11am. 21" color TV, $125; asset paperback GE 30" gas, 4-burner stove, like new Enc cl. Brittani Campton's Trailerframe,axleassembly,$45.2529x12mauvecarpet$S55obo.2864524. Qrs.442A Kobbe,7am-noon. books. 282-2039 $425. 260-9172. EcloBianaCmt's 210--_22 34 2 -7_ Encylco, Emerson 5.5" color TV amCarpet dry cleaning, shampoo mach, Crib w/matt converts totoddlerbed w/ Tan 10x12 carpet, $75 284-3194. f radio wi/adaptor. 252-6566. Carpet 9X12 salmon w/pad, $85, wa$550-$850. 230-0008. watch changing thl, night stand, rockip ter heater leaks water, $40. 260-1740 Qtrs. 633614 Los Rios, 8am-noon. er, re cond, solid wood, $400. 204Sectcouch, 2yrsold,coffeetbl,$650/ Pro Schwinn mt bike 21 spd w/clip r e..Baby running stroller. 287-3424. 5778. o. 284-3285. away wheels, $400 new asking $175. Bunk bed full, twin, TV outdoor anQtrs. 5345B Diablo, 7am-noun. 261-8395 ask for Seth. terra. 286-3786. Lg refrig/frzer, $550/obo; gas stove, Maple American DR set, 8 crs, dbl, $275/obo; K-sz waterbed, $360/ab. hut__,_$3,000._252-6732. Small peteaer, $15. 2064340. New playpen without pad, $60, conMotorcycles 284-3635ask torPat ReabuitGM l2Valternator $45,used try filing lamp, $125, Hoover Q*rs. 761C Blboa. LodseI;wV 206-3843er pkrs shampooer,potisher,$65,tupperware Refrigs, $750-$150; chest frzer, $S150; 15w; curtains for trap qts 230-1927. Ford 12V alternator, $30. 2.252-2675. 1991 H onda Shadow 600cc, $3,500. Qtrs. 2300A Balboa, 7-1 Oam. Ig console color TV, $275; washer/ 24uft refrig, side-by-side, $900; PCC textbook music appreciation, 289-4958. Hangar#25 attteendofWalkerAve, dryer, $250; dine, 6 ekes, $150; 4c82 2 airline ickets one-way ---dep~i Dablo.5 t[i edo~lkrAe ceiling fans, $SOea, more. 256-6373. Whirlpool 18 cot refrig/frzer, $600, $35. 260-5336. to Panama, $200 ea. 268P6.h Pa 988Honda lite5,.manualelet, Diabo. both eve cond. 264-9676. Smith Corona Daisy wheel printer, vest, gas can iet, ex cond, $500 GE oven/range, used 7 wks, privi236-0984. 94 DB Sorrento mt. bike, new Alivio 206-4480. leged cardhlder only, $400.2 Broyhill oak desk, hutch, cp, s250/ $140. 4593. obo. 262-0371. -Surfboard 6'4" Chris Watson single components, $400. 226-1 1987 Yamaha Viago 750 ow mi, d0, Clothes, Aiwa tarutil, $30, washer & blk/chrome, runs good, $2,000/aba. BR set, fdod, Ig dresser, 2 night this, Span dressr, $450; desk-file drawOin, $100. Camera Minolta X300 erR, $95; ak s mode; antique, huge 35nmm manual, $100 264-9059 dryer, $700, Turbo graphic game sys260-9356. $450;4ltresw/ims,$30e; VCR VHS, grs $95; orlamd nt5 26 g .-terw, 3 tapes, 284-3689. -Mil spousemtidrive kids from Albrook good cond, $85. 269-3538. glass bottle for lump, $25.264-9228. Wht couch,scotchguarded, 8600.2841987 Hondamoped, lowmi,exccond, to Clayton for the summer activities, Drapery rods, brass 4138. Vcuumw/attach,$70, frydaddy,$10, $450. 287-6734. $60 for 20 round trips. 286-3143 Ent center, carpet, ac, all good cond, lantems chtnese pig cookie jar, $5, coffee maker, $15, eves. neg. 206-3732. design. 232-5258. Officer dress greens 44R, 34 waist dishes, $10, score ball sets, $20ea, Honda Goldwing Interstate 1100cc, eyes. Sofa sleeper, full s, $375. 252-5525 pants. 264-9059. tape cases, $IOea. 287-3036. grt cond, all trios, many extras. 287Tutor for7&l0-year-olds, Eng-spk, Floor lamp, $25; Keinmore washer/' 6535. 1 hr daily. Call 286-3143 eves to set dryer, $650; lawn mower, $135. 284Nursery bedding, honey burning deJeep Wrangler driver's side rearview Huge hanging ferns, plants. 284-3194. limes. 3082. sign, quilt, hedskirt, shes, bumper; irror. $60. 223-2550. 1982 Monlesa 349 cowa, exe cond, lam, clock, wall hanging, sotme mro ..Wedding dress sz n2 w/veil, $800 neg, any ew parts, extras. 261-3486. Little Tykes or Fisher Price easel, has, fullszbed, exccondmatb6spring, mpl gg ew 10 spd bike, $55, raltan LR, $300, 282-3194. car, kitchen, good cond, reasonable frame, $70. 284-6489. paper, $60. 282-3628. pole lamp, $25, Brother typewriter, price. 287-6887. 25 28 Weider ml bench in/I50 Ibs, $150, Ent center, good cord, $50; toddler $90, chandelier, $40. 2220 Ceiling fan w/lights,$175.243-5366. E 87-4e5, 9 Benchalir, $ 2 men's Texas brand hoots, sz 12EE, ScSreenedpaioenclosure for3BRtrop. hike, $48. 2874591. BenchseatforT y.ta$100/nba.284$40. 287-3423. 2844339 separate, d00/nb .4chrs together Port dishwasher, butcher block top, 5269. U.S. auto tags for sale or trade. 252Bilingual live-out maid, infant care, or $230. 286-3674 after 5pm. Scuba Ig BCD 2 pockets, soft back 2540. Qitrs, 1109 Amador, 8 am-? clean, iron, babysit, occasional eyes, our carpe2s,be8ge/mixedearthtones, Curtains; Betawovie; Betamax; DR rapid exhaust/inflator, $125. 225Front bumper/grill far S-10, $50, ]a$25~~~~ -a 284-4489 4ru bumer/ril furJ --10 $50,4 a-0b 49s5A7.yu. es Om.28-54 barill 4 O e ks; carpets 26x14, $200; 4 diesdiamond weddingring.286-4189. Qtrs. 198A Clayton, 7am-noon. 415" 5-holerims/wheels,goodprice. Kenmureportdishwasher,goodeond, Orientalcarpets, l8x12red.282-3899. 4 formal dresses brand new sz 5-6. 289-4958. $80. 284-3634. K-szaterbedw/wirroredhdbd,$400; $50 ra. 284-6489. 2 sw children's bikes, $20 ea, booster Qtrs. 92 Clayton, 7 am-pm. --, iure /iurdiil$0; $0c.2468. -car seal, $20. 286-4189. Fullltime maid, mature,tsng-spk, refs. Spe mauve sect seating in new cond, mirrored 9-drawer dresser, $400; paOne-way ticket to Miami for June 28 Qtrs. 373A Clayton, 8am-noon. 252-2676, lamps inl, $550. 287-4830. tio settee, tbl, chr w/cushiones, $125. American Airlines, $120. 286-6340 Men's mn bike, Murray 18 spd, $130. 287-3572. AmericnAirlnes,_$20._28_6340 287-6180. Qtrs. 541C Clayton, 8om-noon. Secure storage space, maid's quarters, Coffee$l,$150;teakTVstand,$200; His, hers Murry 12-spd bikes, $75ea. boat house; will rent. 282-3593. sect sofa, $300; DR sets, more. 287Lane recliner, $75; Century car seat, Archery oulft, 2 compound bows, Qrs. 547-548B Clayton, 7-1 l am. 6233. $25; Hoovervacuwm, $25. 286-6373. access. 252-6831. Used fenced to hold Ig dogs. 252..Wedding dress, sz 12, embroid appliQtrs. 553 Clayton, 7I tam. 2540.Sage gru 12x 15 carpet, $100; Weber GE 21 cuft refrig/frzer, side-by-side, qs ins, p Iarls $200 236-339 Front bumper fur Mazda 626, 1992 bbq, g, $25. 286-6291. beige, 2 yrs old, $750. 226-2297. qu, -3391, model,.$150. 230-1373. Qtrs. 570C Clayton. Screening and frame murk forcarpurt R wooenbasars; W 1ni eh 7 trays used area, 3BR Irmp. 284-4339. Microwaveoven;mwoodenbar,2sools; Wall unit, ex coed, $550; Whirlpool one,o $7 ehdracking house, $60 Golf set w/bag, $200, ping pong tbl, Qrs. 610C Clayton, 7am-? raise items, $150 ma 284-5570. u27 cu side-by-side refig/fzer, icech, $35. 284-3592. $180, wedding band, 14k gold. 287tr. 643D Clayon A tutor and someone to teach children maker, mater dis, $1,500; china cabi-3877. Q 6 -fundamentals uf basketball and tenDR set, Ig china cab, tbl w/2 ext, 6 net, 41,300. 226-1221_ Happy camper port travel crib, $60. Qrs. 673D Clayton nis. 286-3143 eves. chrs, server w/slate inlay top, $2,000. 2 75of79originalStrTrekseriestapes, 282-3328. GE refrig/frzer, 23.5 cuft; Admiral 284-6195. $8.50ea. 284-6183. Qts. 800C Clayton, 6am-noon. Wall-to-mall carpeting for 3BR mp 16.7 cuft upright fezer; Magic Clef4Antique sonata phono all orig nee-housing. 286-3373 after 5pm. El center, $150; quality carpets, burnerstove; GE hvy dy washer. 264dles, w/records, $400 obo. 284-6696. 25 diffbaby outfts, sleepers, T-shirts. Qtrs. 1 042B Clayton, Sam-noon. 12x15 blue, $165; cream $150; up5160. all $70/obo, crib light. $10, baby earLive-in maid w/refs to cook, iron, gen right vacuum w/attachs, $145; rattan l/2 k1. diamond ring, 14 kt gold, $950, rier, $12. 286-3778. Qrs. 1 103D, Clayton,. house work. 284-5999. room divider, $15. 269-2095. So fabed,$300; aesuvailJune25. 260baby chair, $25. 287-4830. 1946. E6 clarinet w/case $250, many plants Qtrs. 6579A Corozal. Handyman for Saturday 10am-3pm, Sofa, eke, ottoman, good rood, $300. Books for master of public w/pots, FSU textbooks. 287-3572. $3 per hr, lunch nel. 283-6393. 284-5084. DR, 6 ches; Q-sz bed, 2 night tbls, 8administration program at Okia. U, Qtrs. 1982B Curundu, 7:30-10am. drawer chest, dresser in/mire; GE $125 obo. 262-1029. M 5Ping pong table in good cond. 284Whirlpool 18.5 ruft froer, new coed, microwave w/tbl,mw-safcookware. 287-3295. Qtrs. 2541A Cocohi, 7am-? Sat-Sun5630. no frost, $525. 230-0957. 252-1104. Scuba pro console, compass, depth gauge, tank press slate, $75/eg 18 spd 24" men sike$75, I spd 24 Reliable, 24a-re, Ines. e-innmid, Child's gym set, $95; tempo bunk Whirlpool refrig, computer desk, 5180 girl's bike $50. 287-3295. q_ 6 okeaning,chitd/animataremustwok bed, twin/full sz win/mutt, $450; coffee plants. 252-1104. Gas water heater, 30-gal. $200. 252\qtrs. 76B Albrook flexible bs, refs. 260-3455. tbl, $150; rugs, 9x12, $65; recliner, Little Tykes kitchen, other toys, $50 2797. Qtrs. 82A Albrook, 8-I lam. $125. 260-4393. Coffee/end this w/glass tops, 3pc set, teg. 284-51.80. -Live-in maid, must spk Eng, good --$250. 286-3142. -Dress blue set 33R $50 microwave, Qtrs. 107B Albroak, 7-I0am. cook, take care of house, 2 children, Asst Nintendo games, 825-$30/obo; Century car seat, up to 40 lbs, $40. $100, VCR $100, carpets. 284-3491. $100mo. 261-5343 after 9:30 pm. Huffy 20" bay bike, $85; 12" bike, 3pc LR set, $700/oba; 3 end tbis, 287-6438. -Ou-rs. II6A Albrtik, 8m-2pm. $60. 260-4393. $100; DR tbl, 4 ches, $350/nbo, all 5 -Multi-gym w/aerobic stepper, bench -----Ifyon like todonatehouse plartscall, ms old. 260-9267. $0GE at ting $0ach, $35. 287-648,press, $150. 252-6277. Qtrs. 209A Alberok, 8am-noon 262-1029. $10; camping tbl, $50; kitchen, launBlue carpet 10x12, $100; blue curCribn' bed /hinen,$200. 287-5225. dry, bathm items. 282-4414. trains down stairs top, $200; Ig desk, old, $25; boy's curtains, $25. 284Comic books DC Marvel Spiderusan, Curtains, beige w/bikout, 96x84, 2 5271. Batman, more, most in very fine or Tro ic Times Ad Form sets, $40ea.263-3697. -----mint cood. 286-4797. Broyhill sofa, almost new, gm/coral Genuinebrassbed,new,Q-sz,nomat, shell design, $400. 287-5928. Tejna Scuba flippers, scuba mask, $850. 261-6486. .__. smallscrutchesnnfins,$75.286-4829. [II ANIMALS Single mtt, spring, 125; wooden 6shelfookcase,$5;carpetfo aids AUTOMOBILES ---stereo cabinet on roller, $25; bikes, qtrs,$l0;RCA25"cnlortrakTV.2g6Fivewhtminiblinds,$60,rosecarpet, [7 AVAILABLE --S 15-b25. 287-6777. 3587. $35, Weber grill, $45. 284-5699. LI] BOATS & CAMPERS -. Teakwood wallunit, good cnnd, $550. Loveseat,sofabed,$300/obo;7'couch, Carpets, $100, BBQ $65, mee's gslf I ELECTRONICS PRICE HOME PHONE LittleTykesplayouse, like new,$175' $200/.b.; dk ratan coffee/2 end tbis, clubs, mini blinds, plants. 286-4322. FOUND 226-1221. $300/aba. 287-4894. HOUSEHOLD Check only one category per ad form. Only Iwo ads per person each --4 sets of bLk curtains for trop hos LOST week are allowed. Each ad form is limited to 15 words. Please type or Wall unit; floral beige loveseat; curEsercycle,$190;Q-szwaterbed,$55; $40, minnie mouse curtain fur chil-4 MISCELLANEOUS print neatly. Information listed below is not included in the ad, but is talus fortop; 0sp hike, ; Pionee 4desk, $120; si patio tbl, $20; book$15. 286-4205. MOTORCYCLES required for publication. This information will not be released to third way spkers, 400w max. 230-1927. shelves, Viclarian dresser2-9228 Lined drapes, 60wx991 $80, EuropeJ PATIO SALES parties. Deadline for the receipt of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for Friday's Amana 22 cal refeig, $700; Tappan Pre-colombian reproductionstyle atls, an ball gowns sz 6, $20, tuxedo 38R, E WANTED edition. Ads are run on a space available, and may be held for a future gas dbl oven, selfelean, $900; both used as patio or balcony furm. 223$80. 282-4242. edition. Ads may be mailed to the Tropic Times, Unit 0936, APO AA exft eend 263-8579. 4290 34002 or deposited in a drop box at the Albrook Post Office. Ads Pr farm stepper computer display r Dining set, brass, wood/glass, 4 cars, Lg sofa, It blue/gray design, itstsf new $ 140. 285-6374. offering weapons or sent by FAX will nut be run. S100; full sz bed, no hdbd, chest of style, like new, $600 fir. 269-9700. SPONSOR'S NAMERANK/GRAD drawers dresser, $100. 284-5778. Computer desk/chair,$05,4 pc logg SPOSO'S AM -ugsrose 14x16,blue 14s18;drapes, set S75, sm pet carrier, Ladyshave Q-szsofabed, loveseat,chr,esccond, 2pr wit, 2pr gin 0valantes, sheer razor, twin bedding. 260-3130. ORG. DIUTY PHONE

PAGE 28

B1B Tropic Times B1 June 17, 1994 jo L ot1wr Mexican night and Texas barbecue ribs 5:30-8:30 p.m. All-you-can-eat soft tacos. Fajitas, ribs or fish are also availHOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-171, DD 214 fable claiming veteran presence, a copy of college tranQHeiSeafood lover's special 5:30-8:30 p.m. Fridays and Satscripts ifelaiming eduation and acopy of CASP notice +Officers' Club: urdays. Enjoy an array of appetizers and main entrees of of rating if applicable. Submit a copy of latest SF-50 if Breakfast buffet is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Monday-Frishrimp and fish. you are a Federal employee, day and 8-10 a.m. Saturdays. Bang up barbecue in the Breezeway, dine-in or takeFor more information regarding Army vacancy Old fashioned steak night 6-10 p.m. Tuesdays and out. Enjoy the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or hot wings. announcements (forms required, job related criteria, Thursdays. Choose cut of beef to be charbroiled. For events or catering, call 284-4189. etc.),visitthe Directorate ofCivilian Personnel, BuildFather's Day luncheon 11:30 am.-I p.m. today. *Top Three Club ing 560, Room 102, Corozal, or call 285-5201. Father's Day dinner, Saturday featuring chateaubriand Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesdays. All-you-can-eat free. *Note: One-on-one employment counseling should for two, twice-baked potato with medley of vegetables acKaraoke 6 p.m. Friday nights. be the first step in the job search. companied by a glass of wine. Club closed Saturdays. *Howard Officers' Club: SPECiALIZED EXPERFENCE: Positions at NI-5 Club Amador Enjoy a prime special 6-9 Fridays and Saturdays. levelandaboverequirespecialized experience. SpecialFather's Day special champagne brunch 10:30 a.m.Super social hours 5 p.m. Fridays. Come and eat at the izedexperienceiseithereducationabove thehigh school 2:30 p.m. Saturday. New menu, live entertainment. Adults complimentary buffet and enjoy music and dancing all night level or work experience directly related to the position $9.95 and children half price. long. being filled. Example: Budget positions at or above the All-you-can-eat lunch buffet $3.95 Fridays, featuring Super Thursday night buffet 6-8:30 p.m. Adults $7.95 NM-5 level required Budget experience or equivalent soup, salad, selection of entree, special return rights. all-you-can-eat, children from 6 to 12, $2.95, and children education. under 6 eat free. Vacancy announcements are also available at the Clayton Mexican night 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. Sample 'South Sundial Recreation Center. of the Border' entrees. The Army civilian personnel office accepts +The Loop: Game nights & progressive club card drawing 7 p.m. applications on a continuous basis for the following CJ's Sports Bar offers daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m.-I positions. These announcements are used to establish p.m. Monday-Friday. Pool tournaments are held 3:30 p.m. winer takes all, club matches pot. registers for permanent and temporary future Sundays.Rock & Reggae 5-9 p.m. June 24 in the lounge to the vacancies. Prizmz Night Club features a variety of music Wednesock Regana9d.m day-Saturday to include jazz 5 p.m. Sundays. sound of .ip Maynard. VB# 001 General Clerical, NM-3 (Used to fi1 most *NCO Club: Disco jet 9 p.m.-I a.m. today in the Ballroom. clericalpostion)Casa Maria specials include meat or chicken, refried All-night disco 8 p.m.-5 a.m. Saturday in the ballroom. VB# 001A General Clerical, NM-4 (Used to fill most bwith a pe Enjoy a middle-of-the-night breakfast at 2 a.m. The designted clerical p *itais). r bans, lettuce, tomatoes, onions and sour cream, rtasesafe driver and safe ride programs will be in effect. VB# i2 S.les Store Checker, NM-3 ituermeent cial sauce $4.75. Mexican shish-kabob: kabobs roasted, onBingo is back 2 p.m. Sundays with early-bird bingo at wk sch) ions, peppers and tomatoes served with Spanish rice and -CASP Exmnto CEO, notice of rating) Is refried beans. 1:45. 6:30 p.m. Tuesday with early-bird bingo at 6:15. required. C ECasual Cove -All nite kicker dance 8 p.m.-5 a.m. Saturrequired. Albrook/Howard day. VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) *Albrk Club: New country 8 p.m. to closing Fridays. Requires Cert + 6 mo recreation exp in the field. nih -Crh o iry and western dance lessons 7-8 p.m. WednesVB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Req 6 moe nights in the Casual Cove. Learn the latest in line danerecreation .exp in the field. strip, filet or prime rib. Dinner comes with vegetable, baked ing, the stomp, waltz and others. Music will be until midVB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5 potato, French fries or rice. night. VB# 00A Secretary (Stenography), NM-4 Fiesta de mariscos 6-9 p.m. Saturday nights. The seaKaraoke 7 p.m. Sunday, 8 p.m. Tuesday. VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5 food feast platter features broiled corvina, stuffed crab, Saturday & Monday night disco 5 pm.-l a.m. VB#006A Secretary (Ty piig/OtIte Automation), NMcalamari rings, peel-and-eat shrimp, a choice of potato or rice, Country music night 7 p.m-midnight Wednesday. Free 6 cole slaw and vegetables du jour. A la carte menu available. dance lessons 7-8 p.m. Father's Day Sunday champagne brunch 10 a.m.-i Rock 'n' roll golden oldies 5-8 p.m. Tuesday; 5 p.m.The following positions are Perm/Temp, Full-time, p.m. in the dining room offers breakfast from cooked-to-ormidnight Thursday Part-timfe, IntermlittennonghtTusdy P IB# 007 ** MEDICAL OFFICER, NE 12/13/14. der omelets, French toast, hot lunches, salad and fruits, peelVB# 008 ** CLINICA]L NU RSE, (RN license and-eat shrimp, desserts and ice cream bar. Rodman required), NM-9/10/11. Mongolian barbecue 6-8:30 p.m. Monday. Prepare your *R VB# 009 ** PRACTICAL NURSE, (LPN licence plate, choose the meat, vegetables, seasonings, oils and have A-odman Club -open to all ranks: required), NM-5 chefs do the job outside on the open grills. All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu y. a.m.-I Italian night special Wednesday. p.m. Mondays-Fridays. ** Selectees for nurse and medical officer position will Mexican night buffet Thursday includes tacos, fajitas, Soup and sub night 3:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays. Grill menu be required to undergo a background check. is also available. The foliowag are limited to veteran preferece elgbles taco salad and sopapillas for dessert. i l a e.Tuesdays. and permanent employees only. Country western night Thursdays with free dance lesAllyeu 3:30-8:30 p.m. VB# 010 Manual Positions, MG-2 sons at 7:30 p.m. Learn the two-step, line and couples dancWednesday G n d is a3s: pia. VB# 011 Manual Positions, MG-3 es, the waltz, the cha cha and the swing. Country western Ced -sday. Grill menu is also available. VB# 012 Manual Positions, MG-4 music 9-11 p.M. Cook-your-own steak night 3:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday VB# 013 Manual Positions, MG-5 Enjoy blues and jazz live 7-10 p.m. June 24 by recordat the Rodman Bohio. VB# 014 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-7 ing artist Lowell Hopper in the lounge. Fine dining 6-9 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays. VB# 015 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-7 Rock & Reggae 7-10 p.m. today in the lounge to the Upstairs Bar 3:30-8:30 p.m. Sunday through Thursday; VB# 016 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-8 sound of Rip Mayard. 6-9 Fridays-Saturdays. VB# 017 AdminIstrative Services Assistant, NM-5 Social hours & hors d'oeuvres, 3:30-11 p.m. Fridays at VB# 017A Administrattve Services Assistant, NM-6 For events or catering call 286-3557/3582.the Laguna Lounge and Rodman Bohio. VB# 018 Supply Technician, NM-5 *Howard Enlisted Members' Club: Dinner is served 6-9 p.m. Monday through Sunday. VB#0I8A Supply Technician,NM-6 Sunday breakfast buffet 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. An assort*Rodman Annex: Pacific Worldwide Announcement ment of breakfast foods are available in the dining room. Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Monday-Friday. 335.-94-JB Intelligence Specialist (Operations), GS-t32-t2Breakfast is served 6-9:30 a.m. Monday-Friday; 7:30 All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu II am.INSCOM-Panam. 310th M1 BN. Position Is under CIPMS a.m. Saturday. Excepted Service. Most be able to obtain and maintain a 1:30 p.m. Monday-Fnday. Tiop Secret/Special Inteligence security clearance. Bilingual Italian nights 5:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday with Alfredo The club is closed for evening and weekend service. (Eng/Spanish). Driver's license. Closes: 7-19-94 or seafood fettuccini, lasagna, pasta mixta or pasta and shrimp Davis VB# VACANCIES TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: in a white wine sauce. A la carte menu available. 06-17-94 CLOSE: 06-28-94 Steak night special 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday nights in the *Davis Community Club: 34-94-VC e e CGdining room. Select a cut and order a New York strip, rib eye Father's Day Sunday brunch 10:30 a.m.1:30 p.m. 5. Sensitie. USSOU TI COM.Qur leighsts. M ebable or filet. To eat lighter, meals of chicken marinata, pasta, Jazz & blues concert 7-10 p.m. Sunday featuring Lowell to obtain a Top Secret clearance. Position Is under CIPMS. shrimp vin blanc or shrimp Taboga are also available. Hopper. 289-5160 for information. Excepted Services. -___________________-___________________________ 336-94-SS Electronics Mechanic, MG-2604-1L. Sensitive. -_-USAG, DOL. Must be able to operate a government vehicle SCN AM radio schedule not to exceed 1 1/4 ton capacity. All sources. Thursday 337-94-KF Housing Referral Assistant, NM-1101.5. HQ, The Southern Command Network's 11:35pm KSFO Sports Byline USA 1:35am KSFO Sports Byline USA USAG-Pananma. DELI. AM Radio features America's most7:35am The Law Show 338-94-NC Facility Manager,NM-1640-6. Temp Promotion listened to radio programs. Live Monday 8:35a Tehiio. ion Nte: 1 yr. Limited to veterans preference candidates only. coverage of breaking news stories and L:OSam NPR's Cartalk 1:30pm A Matter ott Icaith special events is provided. 3:30am NPR's Living On Earth Friday 287A-94-JH Electronics Mechanic Supervisor, MS-2604-12. SCN AM Radio is the news, sports 7:30am What's the Story 1:35am KSFO Sports Byline USA Sensitive. Tobyhanna Army Depot. Candidateswho applied and information station 790 AM Pacific 8:05anm On Computers 7:35am American Montage under VB#287-94-JH, need not reapply. All sources. and 1420 AMAtlantic. 1 30min, Robert/iJamesExchasge 8:35am The Book Show 1:30pm Georgetown University Fo339-94-LA Security Specialist (Automation), GS-080-7/9/10. Tuesday run Sensitive. USAG-Panama. Top Secret (SBI) clearance is Monday-Friday required. This position is in the Excepted Service. If position 1:35u. KSFO Sports Byline USA Saturday is filled with a temp employee he/she must re-compete for the Sam National Public Radio Morning 7:35am AP Portfolio I 35ant KSFO Sports Byline USA higher grade. Edition 8:35am The Environment Shosv 6:05am On Computers 9:54am Past Harvey News 1:30pm Soundings 7aNPR's Veekend Edition 340-94-LA Teiecon aunications M mechanic Supervisor M1 -t l ]am The Rush Limbaugh Show ,:35p AP special Assiignmet 10 0: im N ,s C rtalk 2502-13. Sensitive. 56th Signal Battalion. I 2:O5pn Paul Harvey News and Cammentary (Repeat 1: 17 p, m Weanesuay Si ,nday 341-94-LA Computer Specialist, NM-374-1l. Sensitive. 2:05pm Pau I Irvey Resof the Story I m o"', n the F mly 106th, DOIM. Security clearance is required. (Repits AI t:05pm) "am KMs prs By I US :km N PR s I i rnt 4pmu NPR's All TIg Cr,(,oside 7: 35akm Th, Best our KnwedmifmNRs atlk Note: VB#326-94-VL is amended to read Medical Aid 6:05pm Amricai ublic Radi's 5:i5,im The R1a1lt STow :utm \t vitar radi (Diets), NM-640-4 Marpice :lpm .'I I vm I l s Weeken Editian