Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text



G17/I of the Pwlama c~aimalmsemwn


.Tropic
w -_


Ousrry Heights. ReDublic of Panama


Friday, May 27,1994


Panamanian policeman
shoots U.S. soldier
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - A U.S.
Army soldier assigned to Headquarters Company,
5th Battalion, 87th Infantry at Fort Davis, was
wounded outside Colon when he allegedly failed to
stop for members ofthe Panamanian National Police
(PNP).
Shortly after 2 a.m. Thursday, the PNP allegedly
attempted to stop Staff Sgt. Maurice Neal's vehicle
because the headlights were off. The PNP reported
that Neal fled in the vehicle toward the Four Comers
intersection, failed to stop at a PNP check point, and
continued down the Transisthmian Highway to the
town of Sabanitas approximately 10 miles south of
Colon where, according to the PNP, he failed to stop
at another road block. The PNP then fired on the
vehicle, wounding Neal in his left shoulder.
Nealwastakenby ambulancetoAmadorGuerrero
Hospital in Colon where his condition is reported as
stable. The incident is currently under investigation
by U.S. and Panamanian authorities.

Rear admiral selected
new deputy commander
QUARRY HEIGHTS (Tropic Times) - Rear
Adm. James Blenn Perkins III has been selected as
the deputy commander in chief, U.S. Southern Com-
mand. The effective date has not been announced.
He was born Aug. 28, 1942 in Long Beach, N.J.,
and began his career as a midshipman at the U.S.
Naval Academy July 5, 1960.
His first assignment was from June 1964 to Oct.
1966 aboard the USS Saratoga. He's also served on
the USS Henderson, USS John Willis, USS Downes
and commanded the USS Schofield.
In 1982, Perkins was the Chief ofNaval Person-
nel. After that assignment he was the commander of
Destroyer Squadron Nine; the deputy and chief of
staffofthe Naval Surface Force Pacific; commander
of U.S. Naval Forces, Marianas/USCINCPAC, Re-
public of Guam and U.S. Trust Territory. His most
recent assignment was commander of Amphibious
Group Three.

Rehearsal, ceremony
to close Clayton roads
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The fol-
lowing areas will be closed off from 6 a.m. to
approximately 11 a.m., Thursday and June 3, for
rehearsal and the farewell ceremony for the 193rd
Infantry Brigade (Light):
*Hawkins Avenue, from the intersection by the
Bowling Center to Child Development Services
*The parking lot adjacent to the Chapel
*The parking lot across the street from Building
95.

DEH announces water
flushing schedule
The Directorate of Engineering and Housing will
be flushing water mains 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. on the
following dates: June 15, Fort Amador; June 17,
Cocoli; June 20, Fort Kobbe; June 22-23, Corozal;
July 2-3, Fort Clayton; July 6, Curundu; July 10,
Quarry Heights. Water pressure will be lower for
about one hour during this time.





The Army and Air Force hold activi-
ties to promote safety day, focus on
101 critical days of summer.


T

rI


4









.'


Chairman visits Panama Department of Defense photo
Special Operations Command South Commander Brig. Gen. Kenneth Bowra, 24th Wing
Commander Brig. Gen. David A. Sawyer and U.S. Army South Commanding General Maj. Gen.
George A. Crocker meet with Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. John M. Shalikashvili for a
working lunch at the Quarry Heights Officers' Club Saturday. During his visit, Shalikashvili
received a briefing on quality of life from Command Sgt. Major Franklin D. Thomas, and briefings
on counterdrug operations and the future of the roles and missions of the U.S. Southern
Command after the year 2000. For a full report, see next week's Tropic Times.


Locals select D.C.
FORT AMADOR (USARSO PAO) - Representatives
from the Atlantic and Pacific communities selected three
quality of life issues that will be presented at the Army
Family Action Program Conference in Washington, D.C.
later this year.
The representatives were presented with the top issues
selected during the Atlantic and Pacific AFAP conferences
held March 17 and April 12.
During the conference, the representatives discussed the
issues that ranged from family services and community/
consumer services to medical/dental services and reloca-
tion and housing.
The representatives selected the top three issues and
came up with recommendations.
The top three issues were:
* Kindergarten is too short. For example, on the Atlantic
side it lasts only two hours including nap and lunch time.
*Army hospitals require family members of


conference issues
servicemembers E-5 and above to pay a surcharge for meals
consumed in hospital dining facilities. Frequently there are
no other acceptable sources of nutritional food at the
hospital.
The cost for meals, including surcharge, creates an
unnecessary expense to the family that already must con-
tend with the emotional stress of caring for a sick child or
spouse.
The study group recommended changing AR 40-330
and exempt the immediate family members of in-patients
from paying the surcharge.
* Single soldiers option for length of tour. Married
soldiers can choose short tours (hardship) or complete tour
(with family members).
The group also recommended career soldiers whether
single or married should do three-year tours. Single soldiers
should be given an option of a two- or three-year tour
OCONUS:


Army program to curtail domestic violence


WASHINGTON (AP) - Spouse and child abuse is on
the rise among military families, and the Army will assign
civilian counselors to hundreds of military units next month
in an effort to curb it, a Pentagon spokesman said Monday.
Confirmed cases of spousal abuse in the military rose from
12 per 1,000 spouses in 1988 to 18.1 per 1,000 in 1993,
according to Lt. Col. Doug Hart.
Child abuse cases rose from six per 1,000to6.6per 1,000
during the same period, he said.
On average, one child or spouse dies each week at the
hands of a relative in military families, statistics the indicate.
The increase has Pentagon and congressional officials
worried, though the rate of child abuse is still about half that
in the general population, according to a report Monday in
The New York Times.
Part of the increase might be attributed to better reporting
of incidents, the Times said. Butmilitary experts also believe
cutbacks in the military and the impact they have on people's
careers are playing a role.



The 1-508th Infantry prepares to
inactivate, reflects on past achieve-
ments.


"There's no question that the downsizing has had a real
impact on the active-duty military and their families," said
Peter J. McNelis, a former Army colonel who heads the
Military Family Institute at Marywood College in Scranton,
Pa. "You can't talk to anyone without getting the sense
they're tense and feel that the system is letting them down."
Some members of Congress are concerned. At a recent
meeting to discuss the status of women in the military,
female senators and senior military leaders talked about
domestic violence, the Times said.
"Part of the problem is that there is a let's-sweep-it-
under-the-rug attitude about all this," contended Sen.
Barbara Boxer, D-Calif. "The military needs to be realistic
and admit there is a problem."
The Pentagon has established a panel to review child
deaths at three major military hospitals and the Defense
Department has commissioned a study of 7,000 children of
service members at 25 bases, Pentagon spokesman Hart
said.



*New era for El Salvador, Page 5.
*World War II history, Page 11.
*Loop wins title, Page 12.


, af-.


Vol. vii, INIU. .Z


Times


44


Vni Vil Nn 11







' - a~
- *4 -


2 Tropic Times
May 27, 1994

24th Wing Public Affairs
makes story corrections
HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) - The
Tropic Times published two articles May
20 with errors.
The promotions story on page one had
mistakes regarding the promotion rates of
majors and senior master sergeants
throughout the Air Force.
During the March majors board, 2,326
officers were selected for in-the-zone-pro-
motion out of 3,146 eligible for a rate of
74 percent. Fourteen percent, or 109 cap-
tains, were selected out of 786 for above-
the-zone-promotion. Of the 7,523 eligible
for below-the-zone-promotion, 106 or 1.4
percent were chosen.
Master sergeants eligible for promotion
to E-8 were selected at a rate of 4.62 per-
cent. This resulted in 1,101 NCOs being
selected out of 23,827.
An error was also made in the noncom-
missioned officer retraining article on page
two. Phase II of the program will run July
16-Aug.16 this year. If enough volunteer
retrainees are not found during the first two
phases, the third phase will be implement-
ed with involuntary retraining. For more
information, call 284-3817/4808.

Commissaries close
because of Memorial Day
The Corozal and Fort Espinar commis-
saries will be closed Thursday in obser-
vance of Memorial Day. The Howard
commissary will be closed Tuesday.

Ethnic extravaganza
held today at Howard
The 24th Wing and the 24th Mission
Support Squadron invite all members of
Panama's American military community
to participate in the Asian Pacific Ameri-
can Heritage activities planned for today
at the Howard Parade Field.
Activities run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
and include many cultural presentations,
including song, dance and martial arts


-** Briefly


AMCfih scedule


Saturday
5:40 am C130 Howard AFB
Louisville, Ky. (Active duty)
1:45 pm C5A Howard AFB
Charleston AFB. SC (0)
Kelly AFB, Texas
Sunday
No scheduled departures
Monday
3:45 pm B727 Howard AFB
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (0,C)
Tuesday
8:40 a.m. B727 Howard AFB


demonstrations. People may also buy
lunch from the wide variety of ethnic cui-
sine, and beverages will also be available.
For more information about the day's ac-
tivities, call 284-3410.

Civilian personnel office
closes Tuesday
The Directorate of Civilian Personnel,
buildings 560 and 6523, Corozal will be
closed 7:15 - 9:30 a.m. Tuesday.

1-508th holds all-ranks
dinner Wednesday
The 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th In-
fantry will be holding its all-ranks dinner
6 p.m. Wednesday at the Club Amador.
The event is open to present and former
members of the battalion and their spouses
or guests. The uniform is dress blues, dress
mess or mess whites and will cost $20 per
person. For reservations, call 2nd Lt. Scott
Schoner at 284-3862.

Association sponsors
June 21 luncheon
The Armed Forces Communications
and Electronics Association Luncheon will
be at 11:30 a.m. June 21 at Club Amador.


AAFES sets holiday hours


COROZAL (USARSO PAO) - The
hours of operation for the Army and Air
Force Exchange System - Panama for Mon-
day in observance of Memorial Day are as
follows:
Pacific
Corozal
Main PX - 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Sweets Reflections - 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
Frank's Franks - 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
Anthony's Pizza - 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
Wok Works - closed
Casa de Amigos - closed
Bakery - closed
Commissary Frank's Franks - closed

Fort Clayton
Shoppette (95) - closed
Frank's Franks (95) - closed
Anthony's Pizza - 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
Burger King - 8 a.m.-8 p.m.
Popeye's - 6 a.m.-10 p.m.
Frank's Franks (by Burger King) -
closed
Clayton Plaza Shoppette - 7 a.m.-mid
night
Shoppette (519) - 8 a.m.-10 p.m.
Snack bar (519) - closed
Auto parts store - 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
Car Care Center - closed
Clothing Sales - closed

Fort Amador
Shoppette - 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Albrook
Shoppette - 7 a.m.-10 p.m.
Snack bar - 8 a.m.-2 p.m.
Anthony's Pizza - 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
Frank's Franks - 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Video rental - 9 a.m.-9 p.m.
Furniture store - 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Shoe store - 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Toyland/Outdoor- 10 a.m.- 4 p.m.
Class Six - 10 a.m.-9 p.m.


Beauty and Barber shops - 8:30 a.m. -5
p.m.

Howard AFB
Main BX - 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Shopppette - open 24 hours
Class Six - 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Cafeteria - 7 a.m.-2 p.m.
Anthony's Pizza - 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
Clothing Sales - closed
Service station - 6:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m.
Beauty and barber shops - 8:30 a.m. -5
p.m.

Fort Kobbe
Shoppette/video rental - 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Burger King - 8 a.m.-3 p.m.

Miscellaneous
Quarry Heights shoppette - closed
Gorgas Hospital shoppette - closed
Curundu School cafeteria - closed
Cocoli shoppette - closed
Balboa school cafeteria - closed
Curundu Service Station - 6 a.m.-mid
night
Atlantic
Fort Espinar
Shoppette - closed
Fort Davis
Main PX - 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Auto parts store - 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Gas station - 8 a.m.-6 p.m.
Cafeteria - 8 a.m.-I p.m.
Anthony's Pizza - 11 a.m.-10 p.m.
Burger King - 11 a.m.-9 p.m.
Clothing Sales - closed
Shoppette - 10 a.m. -6 p.m.
Mini-shoppette - 8 a.m. -6 p.m.

Fort Sherman
Shoppette - noon-6 p.m.
Gas station - closed
Anthony's Pizza - noon-4 p.m.


Atlanta IAP
Charleston IAP, S.C.


Wednesday
5:55 am C130 Howard AFB
San Salvador, El Salvador
Sote Cano AB,. Honduras
Howard AFB
5:40 am C141 Howard AFB
Kelly AFB, Texas
Charleston AFB, SC
Thursday
5:55 a.m. C-5A Howard AFB
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Charleston AFB, SC (0)
Dover AFB, Del.


Vendor's exposition will be held display-
ing the latest in communication and auto-
mation equipment. For information, call
287-6819.

Medical squadron offers
anger control course
The 24th Medical Squadron's Behav-
ioral Science Clinic is sponsoring an anger
management group for people who have
difficulty controlling their temper.
Officials need to determine the number
of people in the community who would
like to attend and also the best time slot for
holding group meetings.
Group members will learn anger man-
agement techniques to help them gain con-
trol over their lives and themselves. Peo-
ple interested in participating should call
284-6410/6457.

Public affairs specialist
position available soon
The Navy Morale, Welfare and Recre-
ation, Nonappropriated Funds Civilian
Personnel Office announces the future
opening of a public affairs specialist posi-
tion in the Navy Services/Marketing Divi-
sion. MWR is seeking people with a back-
ground in journalism, advertising, writing
and graphic design.
For more information, call Joanna
Duran at 283-5341.

Fuel handlers' course
registration under way
There will be a fuel handlers' course
June 6-10 at the Company A, 193rd Sup-
port Battalion Motor Pool. Space and
study materials are limited so units must
register by Thursday. For information, call
287-5366/5463.

World War II mementos
needed for birthday ball
World War II memorabilia is needed
for the Army Birthday Ball. Memorabilia
will be displayed in secure areas of Club
Amador. For information, call the U.S.
Army South Public Affairs Office at 287-
3007.

Atlantic clerical exam
set for 10 a.m. June 8
There will be a clerical examination for
family members in the Atlantic communi-
ty 10 a.m. June 8 at the Fort Davis Educa-
tion Center, Building 235. To register, call
285-4218.

Boy Scout camp needs
volunteer support staff
The Panama Canal District of the Boy
Scouts of America needs volunteers to act
as program and support staff during its up-
coming summer camp.
The program staff includes archery
range and waterfront directors, and the
support staff includes kitchen cooks and
medical personnel.
Scouts and staff will live in the jungle
operations training area at Fort Sherman.
The staff will arrive at Fort Sherman on


June 3
5:40 am C130 Howard AFB
Managua, Nicaragua (CC)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Howard AFB
US- U.S. passport
O-Overnight
C-Commercial Contract
V-Visa
M-Medevac
CC-Country Clearance
*Effectively immediately, all
passengers are allowed to wear ci-
vilian clothing, AMC officials said.


June 18, and leave when the camp ends
June 29. People interested in participating
should begin their permissive temporary
duty, temporary active duty requests soon.
For more information, call Johnathan
Hilton at 284-5567/3516 or Kathy
MacPhail at 285-6548.

Spot bid sale slated for
June 8 at Corozal
A spot bid sale will be held 9 a.m. June
8 at Building 308, Corozal. The inspection
time is 9 a.m.-3 p.m. June 7. Used U.S.
government cars, buses and trucks will be
sold. For more information, call 285-
5417.

Zodiac sponsors Swap
and Shop sale June 4
The Zodiac Community Activities Cen-
ter is sponsoring a Swap and Shop sale 7
a.m.-2 p.m. June 4 at the Howard AFB Big
Tree Bohio. For more information, call
284-6161.

Nova Southeastern
needs instructors
Nova Southeastern needs qualified in-
structors with U.S. degree. There are im-
mediate openings to teach English as a sec-
ond or foreign language.
Medium- to long-range opening are
available in computer science; manage-
ment theory and applications; managerial
economics; art and society; Latin Ameri-
can literature; English communication and
writing; macroeconomics; and govern-
ment and society.
For more information, visit the Diablo
Clubhouse, Building 5051, 9 a.m.- 6 p.m.
or call 252-2071/2494.

World War II veterans
needed for celebration
World War II veterans are needed to
participate in Fourth of July activities. In-
terested veterans should call the U.S.
Army South Public Affairs Office at 287-
3007 today.

Balboa class of 1964
holds 30-year reunion
The Balboa High School class of 1964
will hold its 30-year reunion July 28-31 at
the Holiday Inn in Clearwater, Fla. Grad-
uates who know of any classmates' ad-
dress changes should contact Salonick
Barber at 404 Marble Cove Way, Seal
Beach, Calif., 90740, telephone (310) 430-
5880; Sherry Sabo Hozack at 2286 Ame-
thyst Drive, Santa Clara, Calif., 95051,
telephone (408) 984-5226; or Jane
Holgerson Thompson at 476 East Yale
Loop, Irvine, Calif., 92714, telephone
(714) 733-2789.

'Carribean Affair' set for
June 4 at Clayton pool
A Memorial Day party, "A Carribean
Affair," will be held 9 p.m. June 4 at the
Fort Clayton pool.
Call 287-3042 or 238-8462 for infor-
mation.









Training


Tropic Times
May 27, 1994


Live fire

Realism prepares

troops for battle

PENA RANGE COMPLEX (USAR-
SO PAO Atlantic) - No matter how realis-
tic the scenarios are, many training exer-
cises lack one bit of realism that could
prove costly on the battlefield - firing
with live ammunition.
About 60 soldiers from Company A,
5th Battalion, 87th Infantry (Light) had
that realism in a May 17 live fire here.
"I think they got a lot out of it," said
Capt. Gary Garay Company A command-
er. "When they work with live rounds, it's
more realistic and it forces them to be more
aware of what they're doing."
Firing with live ammunition also makes
the soldiers aware of safety considerations,
Garay said.
"It makes them more alert, more care-
ful," he said. "They realize that if they
make a mistake, they could kill someone."
The safety aspect came into play in the
planning stage and was a key consider-
ation throughout the exercise, Garay said.
"Before the exercise started, we had to
submit our range plan to range control," he
said, "and the soldiers were given a safety
briefing before they got any ammunition."
Additionally, the soldiers ran through
the scenario with blanks before they were
issued live ammunition.
"We issued them blanks, and they did
everything exactly as they would in the
live fire," Garay said. "If someone made a
mistake, we could correct it before the live
fire started."
The safety measures paid off as the ex-
ercise ended with no injuries, Garay said.


-~14


5th Battalion, 87th Infantry (Light) soldiers cut through concertina wire.


The overall success of the exercise can
be attributed to a lot of practice, he said.
"We do live fire exercises monthly," he
said. "We try to vary the locations and sce-
narios from month to month so that the sol-
diers don't fall into a routine."


The Company A soldiers have marks-
manship and other weapons training
throughout the month, but the live fire ex-
ercises seem to be the most effective train-
ing tool, Garay said.
"When you know your magazine is


U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Rick Emert


loaded with live rounds, your adrenaline
rushes and you pay more attention to what
you're doing," he said. "When it's all over,
it heightens your confidence. You feel
confident that you could do well in a real
world mission."


Exercise tests Gorgas Hospital's readiness, mettle

S;. " A. s - by Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski
. .USARSO Public Affairs Office


U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski
Capt. Nancy Bard (center) rolls a "casualty" as Cpl. Triease Mack finishes paperwork.


GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL -
Medical personnel from Gorgas Army Community Hos-
pital put their emergency response skills to the test during
a mass casualty exercise May 17.
The exercise tasked the Medical Department Activity
soldiers' ability to work as a team, test their alert rosters,
and to react according to their Emergency Preparedness
Plan, said Capt. Deborah Wesloh, operations officer.
"Mass casualty accidents happen all the time which
overtasks the staff on duty requiring everyone to respond,"
she said. "That's why we practice where people go and
how they do it."
Sgt. 1st Class Earnest Armstrong, evaluator for the ex-
ercise said that these types of exercises are important to
all involved.
"Because we are the only hospital for DoD personnel
in Panama, it's important that we get this down pact," he
said. "It's my job to ensure that they are geared in the right
direction."
The scenario involved the crash of a CH-47 Chinook
that injured 15 people.
The exercise was a total team effort that included mili-
tary and civilian personnel, and administrative and medi-
cal soldiers, Wesloh said.
Medical personnel from the 24th Medical Group,
Howard AFB, prepared the injured people for the flight,
while soldiers from the 214th Medical Detachment load-
ed the patients onto Blackhawks and flew them to Gor-
gas.
Once at the helo-pad, the Gorgas staff went to work.
The patients' first stop was the triage area where they
were placed in categories according to their injuries, said
Dr. Guillermo Arana, triage officer-in-charge. The pa-
tients were placed into four categories: immediate, de-
layed, minimal and expectant.
"The idea of triage is to send the patients to the proper
place to be taken care of," he said.
From triage, the patients were taken to the appropriate
areas, where personnel were standing by ready to treat the
patients.
Wesloh said the bi-annual event is important for ev-
eryone at the hospital.











4Tropic Times
May 27, 1994


*News


Safety


AF focuses on


101 critical days

by Sgt. James A. Rush
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - The 24th Wing caught the "safety
fever" that spread though the Department of Defense May
. . 19 kicking off the 101 critical days of summer with a
"FOD Walk" on the flightline and commander's call at
the base theater.
. Air Force flightline workers fanned out across the run-
way and parking areas to collect foreign objects that could
d cause damage to aircraft. They formed up at the north end
of the flightline and proceeded toward the fire department.
Brig. Gen. David A. Sawyer, 24th Wing commander,
hosted a safety day commander's call soon after. At the
gathering, Sawyer announced the latest finder of the
"Golden Bolt," a plastic card planted on the flightline to
keep workers on the lookout for FOD. Staff Sgt. Paul
Bonanno, and later Army Staff Sgt. Jeffrey Barlow, spot-
ted the bolt and received a book of coupons good for dis-
counts at Army and Air Force Exchange facilities in Pan-
ama.
.,The commander's call featured Maj. Gen. Walter
Worthington, U.S. Southern Command deputy command-
er in chief, as a guest speaker. The general recited several
safety stories and statistics. Worthington's briefing fo-
- caused on challenging listeners to remember two things
V'from his speech and recall them when they come to work
.. ..~ "* . ...... 101 days later.
-, * ..,. .Wing safety chief, Lt. Col. Mark Fry, added his com-
. ments as well. When the formation was dismissed, mili-
..' tary members returned to their duty sections to take part
. .in unit safety orientations.
Several displays and briefings focusing on the day's
4. _.theme were held throughout the day. This included water
U.S. Air Force photo safety at the base pool; ground and weapons safety meet-
Master Sgt. Johnny Wilford prepares to administer in-water cardiopulmonary resuscitation to ings; and flight safety briefings for aircrews, maintenance
Milton Collazos. Water safety was one of themes focused on during safety day. personnel and spouses.


Joint Task Force stands down


by Sgt. Eric Hortin
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT CLAYTON - Joint Task Force
- Panama took a day to promote safety
within its ranks May 19.
"We decided to schedule it for May 19
because it was convenient to all command-
ers," said Staff Sgt. Ronnie Byrd, U.S.
Army South Safety Office. "That was
when the least training was going on."
Units conducted training and classes on
subjects of individual safety such as AIDS
awareness, water safety, driving safety,
vehicle inspections, stress and suicide pre-
vention.
"The stand down is so people can stop
and look at what they're doing," Byrd said.
"Then you can say, 'Here's what we're


doing right. Here's what we're doing
wrong. Here's where we need to im-
prove.'"
Although the military work environ-
ment was the largest emphasized area,
home safety was also stressed.
The 36th Explosive Ordnance Detach-
ment Set up a collection point for materi-
als that could have proposed safety prob-
lems to those who had them in their homes.
"Usually what we receive is small arms
ammunition," said 1st Sgt. Beverly
Marchica, 36th EOD. "Sometimes we do
get hand grenades and smoke grenades.
This time we took in about 5,000 rounds
of small arms ammunition."
The rounds themselves may not seem
to pose much of a hazard for those who
have them in their homes, but unforeseen


circumstances could make them very un-
safe.
"There could be problems when small
children play with them - that's not a
good practice," Marchica said. "If a home
catches fire, then we have rounds 'cook-
ing-off'"
Grenades, whether smoke, fragmenta-
tion or 40mm, can pose life-threatening
dangers, Marchica said. If dropped, frag-
mentation and 40mm could explode, and
may kill someone. Smoke grenades pose a
bum hazard should they ignite.
Although most soldiers are careful
about what they do, both at work and at
home, Byrd said safety can't be stressed
too much.
"It keeps you alive," Byrd said. "It
gives the commanders the chance to ac-


for safety
complish the mission. It gives the individ-
ual a chance to look at what he's doing and
keep himself and his family safe."
Safety doesn't remain the sole respon-
sibility of military members, though. Ci-
vilians took part in promoting the day's
safety theme as well.
The Directorate of Community Activi-
ties and their employees were a part of an
all-out effort to inspect the DCA fleet of
128 vehicles. Vehicles turned up at inspec-
tion points on both the Atlantic and Pacific
side throughout the day to judge their road-
worthiness.
Although Safety Standdown Day hap-
pens only semiannually to emphasize
work and home safety, keeping safety at
the forefront should be an every day oc-
currence.


Rainy season poses challenge for safety conscious


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Rainy season,
which runs until late December, can cause hazardous con-
ditions for drivers and pedestrians.
Drivers must be aware of the problems that may occur,
said Jeannie Hickman, U.S. Army South command safety
officer.
"This time of year poses a challenge to the driver unfa-
miliar to driving in the Republic of Panama, and extreme
caution and concentration must be used whenever you're
behind the wheel," she said.
Panama's annual rainfall is about 67 inches, with the
heaviest rains coming in November. But it doesn't take a
downpour to cause serious problems for drivers, she said.
The rain causes roads to become slippery. During dry
season, a film of oil builds up and, as the rain mixes with
the oil and grease residue, produces a slippery film.


Drivers also need to be aware that center lines and lane
markings may be more slippery than the roads themselves.
"Even a little rain poses a considerable hazard,"
Hickman said. "So slow down as it starts to rain."
Puddles, flooded roads and intersections can also be
dangerous.
"Be cautious going through puddles. Potholes can be-
come filled with water," she said. "Flooded intersections
are also a favorite place for unscrupulous characters to rob
you."
Another problem is poor visibility. Visibility is often
limited because of rain and humidity. Drivers should slow
down or pull off to the side until the rain stops, Hickman
said.
Making sure vehicles are in top condition is another
way to make driving safer, she said. Poor road and weath-


er conditions won't be as hazardous if drivers check wip-
er blades, brakes, tire wear and air pressure before the need
arises.
Driving isn't the only rainy season hazard. Drainage
ditches can fill to the brim and become raging rivers.
"Parents must educate children never to play in or near
a drainage ditch," she said. "Children have been caught in
the torrent and drowned."
Adults also need to be careful when mowing their
lawns during the rainy season.
"Several people have lost their toes when they attempt-
ed to use power mowers to cut their lawn without ade-
quate foot protection," she said.
"The best advise for people at any time, whether it be
rainy or dry season, is to use common sense in all activi-
ties."











L Military News


El Salvador begins new era


by 1st Lt. Jim Knotts
U.S. Southern Command Public Affairs Office

SAN SALVADOR, EL SALVADOR - A new era be-
gan here April 24 when the Salvadoran people voted in a
runoff election to choose their first democratic govern-
ment since the end of a 12-year civil war. As the Salva-
doran people move forward to rebuild peace, another era
of sorts has come to a close.
The U.S. military advisory program to the Salvadoran
Air Force that lasted 32 years ended when Maj. Dale M.
Abemathy, a U.S. Army helicopter pilot, closed the advi-
sor's office, coincidentally just two days before the runoff
election.
The move toward peace and the downsizing of the Sal-
vadoran military has decreased the need for the U.S. advi-
sor, Abernathy said. As he completed his one-year as-
signment, Abemathy was not replaced in El Salvador.
The advisory program was manned with a U.S. Air
Force officer beginning in 1962. In 1982, a U.S. Army
advisor for helicopter operations was added to the pro-
gram. Last year, the U.S. Air Force advisor was not re-
placed, leaving Abernathy as the lone advisor.
"My primary job was to look for systemic problems
and ways to improve maintenance procedures to bring the
Salvadoran aircraft to the highest level of readiness possi-
ble," Abernathy said. The Salvadorans are now running
this program on their own.
Stationed at the Salvadoran Ilopango Air Base, the
headquarters for the Salvadoran Air Force, Abernathy
routinely coordinated with the many U.S. aviation sup-
port agencies to arrange for Salvadorans to attend mainte-
nance training, pilot training, and test pilot training in the
United States.
As El Salvador transitioned to peace and reduced its
military size, Abernathy arranged for a team from the
United States to help the Salvadorans identify which air-
craft were in the best shape to retain in service. He also
coordinated for a U.S. Army maintenance mobile training
teams to help the Salvadorans improve their maintenance
systems.
Although he feels he made many positive contributions
to the Salvadoran Air Force during his tour, Abernathy
said he believes he benefited most from the experience.
"I learned a lot about El Salvador." he said. "When I
came here, I didn't know anything. I think lots of people


back home have a stereotype of Latin America that sim-
ply isn't true. The Salvadorans are very professional.
They know what they're doing, and they appreciate our
help."
As a foreign area officer, this was Abemathy's second
assignment in Latin America. Before going to El Salva-
dor, he attended the Argentine equivalent of Command
and General Staff College and foreign area officer orien-
tation in Argentina. He, said he felt his assignment to El
Salvador greatly enhanced his knowledge and understand-
ing of Latin America that will be helpful in future assign-
ments.
Another career-broadening experience for Abernathy
was the opportunity to fly the Hughes 500E helicopter,
which is flown by the Salvadoran Air Force. Abernathy
received his Salvadoran flight wings during a special cer-
emony on the Salvadoran Air Force Day, which was at-
tended by President Alfredo Cristiani and Minister of De-
fense Brig. Gen. Humberto Corado. Air Force Day is the
only day of the year Salvadoran pilots receive their flight
wings.
This achievement adds to his resume of flight experi-
ence in U.S. Army CH-47D, UH-1 H, and OH-58A and C
model helicopters.
Abemathy is quick to give credit to the U.S. Military
Group in El Salvador, which gave him great latitude to
work with the Salvadorans on projects they mutually
agreed would be most beneficial. But the best thing about
the assignment for Abernathy was the opportunities to rep-
resent the United States to our allies.
"When I came here, I just wanted to be an ambassador
of my country. That opportunity was the best part of the
job, and I think I was pretty successful at it," Abernathy
said.
His sentiments were echoed by Col. Juan A. Martinez
Varela, commander of the Salvadoran Air Force, at a spe-
cial going-away ceremony held in Abernathy's honor.
Varela expressed his profound thanks for Abernathy's
positive contributions to the Salvadoran Air Force.
Although the new era of peace is still getting under
way in El Salvador, the era of advisors to the Salvadoran
Air Force has ended.
Abernathy returns to a flying assignment at Fort
Rucker, Ala., after a reunion with his wife, Vickie, who
has lived with her parents in Nashville, Tenn., during the
major's unaccompanied tour.


SOTO CANO AB, Palmerola
(Joint Task Force Bravo) - Members
from the Medical Element here pro-
vided health checkups, clothing, toys
and supplies to the Nazareth Orphan-
age in Comayagua, Honduras May
19.
Health checkups are a monthly
activity at the orphanage said Lt.
Karen Perry, MEDEL nurse. Two
doctors and a nurse provide care for
the children.
"Providing these children medical
attention is a bona fide mission for
us," Perry said. "We do basic check-
ups and provide necessary medicine
along with instructions about how to
use it."


Each child has his or her own
medical record where the results of
each checkup are recorded. A trans-
lator accompanies the medical staff
to help eliminate language barrier
problems.
Soldiers and airmen were also
able to help the orphanage get uni-
forms for the children.
They raised money through T-
shirts sales to buy the material. The
material was given to Sister Carmen
Beteta, director of the orphanage.
who made the uniforms - light blue
shirts with dark pants for the boys
and skirts for the girls.
The clothing, toys, and supplies
brought by members of the 163rd Air


Refueling Group medical unit from
March AFB, Ca. included clothing,
shoes, infant formula and personal
hygiene supplies such as toothpaste
and soap.
"The people in our unit put the
word out to the community and the
donations poured in," said Staff Sgt.
Marc Draper, unit patient administra-
tor. "And we're not done yet - more
is coming on another plane."
Draper said helping the Honduran
people has been a fulfilling experi-
ence.
"It's been a great experience to
help the people and work with the
U.S. Army. We're all one big team
- here to help."


AAFES reassures military popcorn lovers


DALLAS (Army News Service) -
Military popcorn lovers everywhere
can relax. Despite recent reports of
movie popcorn rivalling a "Big Mac"
in fat content, Army and Air Force
Exchange Service popcorn is actual-
ly low in saturated fat. The difference
is in the popping oil.
Many off-base establishments pop
with coconut oil, which is high in sat-
urated fat. But AAFES doesn't.
"The popping oil AAFES uses is
a special oil made from either partial-
ly hydrogenated soybean or corn oil,


both low in saturated fat," said Lt.
Col. Karen Hobson, AAFES staff di-
etitian. She added that AAFES also
flavors its popcorn with seasoning
salt.
AAFES tested many brands of
popcorn oil before choosing the soy-
bean and corn oils, Hobson said. And
AAFES uses a popping recipe that
calls for a 4-1 ratio of corn to oil. This
is less than the 3-1 ration the industry
recommends. This alone lowers the
fat content of AAFES popcorn,
Hobson said.


Three cups of AAFES popcorn has
130 calories. While 45 percent of the
calories come from fat, only one gram
comes from saturated fat.
Hobson said the only way to have
oil- and fat-free popcorn is to use an
air popper and add nothing. Adding
butter or other toppings and season-
ings to the AAFES popcorn elimi-
nates the low- fat benefit.
AAFES pops corn for military the-
aters, Sweet Reflections snack shops,
snack bars, shoppettes and cafeterias
worldwide.


Tropic Times 5
May 27, 1994


'Soldiers' magazine wants
photos for December issue
WASHINGTON (Army News Service) - If you
can "point and shoot" a camera, you can help "Sol-
diers" magazine celebrate the Army's 219th birth-
day.
Photographers of all types - amateur and pro-
fessional, military and civilian - are needed to
record what's happening on your Army installation,
June 14. These pictures will support "This is Our
Army," a 32-page photo feature to appear in the
December 1994 issue of "Soldiers."
The magazine needs photos that tell a story and
capture the faces of soldiers, families and Army ci-
vilians. Shoot what is unique to your installation,
something you may see every day, but which oth-
ers may never get the chance to see.
The "Soldiers" staff is looking for imagination
and creativity; posed shots will be screened out. The
staff is looking for the best photos from the field,
for a worldwide representation of what makes the
Army what it is.
Here are some basic rules to keep in mind:
*Photos must be shot in the 24-hour period of
June 14.
*Submit processed color slides, or 5"x7" or
8"xl0" black-and- white prints.
*Photos should be printed for magazine quali-
ty. Newspaper photojournalists often print photos
lighter and with less contrast.
*Include the full name, rank and service, as ap-
plicable, of the photographer; names of identifiable
people in the photo; details on what's happening in
the photo; and the location of the photo. Cutlines
must be attached individually to the photo or slide.
Submissions will not be used without complete
photo credits and outlines.
*Photos must be processed and received by
"Soldiers" by Aug. 31. Photos and accompanying
information will not be returned.
Send your photos of June 14 activities to: SOL-
DIERS, 9325 Gunston Rd., Suite S108, Fort
Belvoir, Va., 22060-5581. If you have questions,
call Staff Sgts. Larry Lane or Doug Ide at (703)
806-4504 or Defense Switching Network 656-
4504.

Guide helps AF officers
understand evaluations
RANDOLPH AFB, Texas (Air Force News
Service) - As part of the continuing officer evalua-
tion system re-education effort, officials at the Air
Force Military Personnel Center here have released
a new orientationguide entitled "Officer Evalua-
tion System New Senior Rater Guide."
This orientation guide provides an OES intro-
duction to all newly appointed senior raters and has
been sent to all Air Force and joint management
level directors of personnel for distribution. High-
lights of the guide include important points when
dealing with key OES aspects of performance
feedback, performance reports, promotion recom-
mendations, and management -level evaluation
boards.
It has been five years since the OES was imple-
mented and many of the senior raters who were tar-
geted during initial Air Force-wide training have
moved on. Lt. Gen. Billy J. Boles, the Air Force's
deputy chief of staff for personnel, focused on this
fact in a recent memorandum to all senior raters.
"The new guide is aimed at education senior rat-
ers who have not had the benefit of formal train-
ing," Boles said. "Information contained in the
guide will get new senior raters started on the right
foot."
Boles has also emphasized the need for officers
to periodically remind themselves of OES princi-
ples.
"All officers must understand that we will not
tolerate less than full compliance with the OES pol-
icies and procedures," Boles said.
"We need the make certain everyone knows and
understands the specific restrictions outlined in the
governing directive (Air Force Regulation 36-10,
Officer Evaluation System," said Maj. Gen. Burt
Davitte, AFMPC commander. "Credibility of the
OES among the officer corps relies on all senior
raters knowing and adhering to the same rules."
The guide for new senior rates is one of a series
of initiatives designed to reeducate the officer
corps, and key people in managing the system,
about the philosophy, principles, roles and respon-
sibilities of the OES.


Medical troops give Honduran


orphans check-ups, clothes, toys











6Tropic Times
May 27, 1994


Voices


Kobbe soldier charged with disorderly conduct


I * Proos Mrsals Crer-


Unwanted guest
A Fort Kobbe soldier was recently
charged with disorderly conduct when it
was determined that he was harassing a
Fort Clayton resident. He was seen ringing
the person's doorbell and banging on the
back door several times. When he received
no response, he then made several harass-
ing phone calls to the residence. The mili-
tary police were summoned and the person
was taken to the MP station and processed.
If being victimized or receiving harass-
ing phone calls, notify the MPs at 287-
4401 or 289-5133.
Drunk and disorderly
A Fort Kobbe soldier was charged with
disorderly conduct resulting from his ac-
tions while at an off-post establishment last
week. He was highly intoxicated and was
seen pushing patrons at the El Rancho Club
and using profane language. The MPs took
the soldier to the MP station where he was
charged. Whether on or off-post, personnel
will be held accountable for their actions.
If someone is seen acting in a belligerent
manner, call the MPs at 287-4401 or 289-
5133.
Forger caught at Gorgas
A Fort Davis soldier was apprehended
at Gorgas Army Community Hospital af-
ter he altered a prescription form last week.
He forged an "X" on a Department of De-
fense prescription form trying to get 10
more pills than he was prescribed. He was
charged with forgery and attempted larceny
of government property.
Altering a prescription is a crime, pun-
ishable under both military and civilian'


law. People knowing of anyone known to
be doing similar practices, should be re-
ported to the MPs at 287-4401 or 289-
5133.
Driving in Panama
When driving off U.S. installations,
U.S. servicemembers, civilian employees
and their family members are obligated to
obey local Panamanian laws in every re-
spect. The Military Police remind U.S. per-
sonnel of the following:
*Obey instructions from the Panama-
nian police (PNP).
*Stop when requested to do so by the
PNP.
*Never attempt to flee from the police
whether they are on foot or in their ve-
hicles.
ID check time change
One-hundred percent ID checks will be
done at all Army installation gates begin-
ning at 6 p.m., July 1. The MPs would ap-
preciate everyone's cooperation and pa-
tience during this transitional period. For
information, call the MPs at 287-4401.

The following crimes occurred in on
and off post housing areas May 6-12:
Pacific
Quarry Heights - one larceny of secured
private property
Curundu - one larceny of unsecured pri-
vate property
Off post
Bethania - one larceny of secured private
property
Panama City - two larcenies of secured
private property


Asian-Pacific Heritage Month


Infantry soldier looks back on Vietnamese roots


FORT KOBBE (USARSO PAO) - Hiep Pham doesn't
remember much about his life in the small village of
Phuoc-Tinh in Vietnam - he was only 4 years old when
his family fled the country in 1975.
Pham's father, who was a soldier in the South Viet-
nam Army, decided to leave his homeland for the sake of
his family's safety. He set sail in a small boat to search for
anywhere he could find the safety to raise his family.
"Because my father was a soldier with the South Viet-
nam Army, his life was in jeopardy once Saigon fell," said
Pham, now a specialist with the 1st Battalion (Airborne),
508th Infantry. "After the fall, other South Vietnamese
soldiers were being taken prisoners by the communists."
Pham said he doesn't really remember much of what
happened in Vietnam because he was so young, but his
father has told him of the experience.
"My father has told me about leaving Vietnam in a boat
with the rest of our family, and about being picked up by
a U.S. Navy ship and brought to the United States," he
said.
Pham said he's glad his family moved to the states be-
cause life in Vietnam would not have afforded him the
opportunities he now has.
"I know if we had stayed, our lives wouldn't have been
as good," he said. "Vietnam is not only a poor country,
but my family may not have survived at all."
Since arriving in the states, his father worked and then
retired from AT&T.
Pham now has had the chance to follow his goals, one


This authorized unofficial command information pub-
lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic
Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces
Information Program of the Department of Defense, un-
der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S.
Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the
official view of the U.S. government, the Department of
Defense or the U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002
Telephone 285-6612.
Commander in Chief.............Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey
Director, Public Affairs....................Col. James L. Fetig



kTropic Tim


of which was to become a high school math teacher.
"I was going to college and majoring in math educa-
tion," he said. "Then I joined the Army because I needed
help to pay for and finish my education."
Though Pham's father was a soldier, he doesn't con-
sider his joining the Army as following in his father's foot-
steps.
"My father was a soldier, but he was a farmer first," he
said. "He didn't even know I was joining the Army until I
had already joined."
Though his father was surprised, he was very support-
ive. His mother, however, was like any other mother -
worried.
Since joining, Pham's goals have changed a bit.
Though he may still become a math teacher, he hasn't
ruled out other routes.
"The military is a good experience for me, but I don't
see myself making a career out of it," he said.
Even with the Army not being a career move for him,
Pham said his time in the Army has been good. He said he
does miss his family and his mother's cooking, but has
enjoyed his time here.
Being a U.S. soldier and U.S. citizen hasn't made
Pham forget his roots or ignore his heritage, however.
"It's where I came from and I carry it with me," he
said. "It's part of who I am, it's my heritage."
Reflecting on his heritage isn't a one-time-a-year
thing Pham does only during Asian-Pacific Heritage
Month. It is something he thinks about every day.


Chief.............................Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor
Editor.................................................. M aureen Sam pson
Sports Editor.............................................. Sgt. Lori Davis
Staff Editors..... ............................ Sgt. E.J. Hersom
Spc. John Hall
Rosemary Chong
Student Intern........ ..........................Juan Carlos Palacio
Southern Command Public Affairs Office...........282-4278
Command Information Officer.............Patrick Milton
U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.............287-3007
Public Affairs Officer.............Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder
Command Information Officer..................Beth Taylor
Editor........................................... Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
Co-editor............................. Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski


ies


Spc. Hiep Pham


Journalists........................................... Sgt. Eric Hortin
Spc. Alexander C. White
24th Wing Public Affairs Office.........................284-5459
Public Affairs Officer.................Capt. Warren L. Sypher
Public Affairs Superintendent
Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham
Journalists................................Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
Sgt. James A. Rush
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office..............283-5644
Public Affairs Officer...........................Diane Gonzalez
Photographers
Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor
Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano J. Mays
U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic..........................289-4312
NCOIC............................................ Sgt. Richard Emert











- Commentary


Tropic Times
May 27, 1994


101 critical days of summer



Memorial-Day-to-Labor-Day safety stressed


by Bill Speed
24th Wing Ground Safety Manager
F or most of the year
we live normal,
orderly lives. Up in the
morning, breakfast with the
family, and off to work. We're confident
that junior and "sis" will be on the 7:05
bus to school, the maid will arrive
sometime around 8:30 and will stay until
you or the spouse return home.
Everyone knows the routine, it's what
we do. It is safe, non-stressful and non-
threatening. Then, all of a sudden, school
lets out, permanent change of station


moves start taking place, schedules get
revised to support the mission, and a
critical period begins.
The time between Memorial Day
weekend in May and Labor Day week-
end in September is designated the "101
Critical Days of Summer."
Although it is always "summer" in
Panama, three major holidays, vacation-
ing school children, and generally
increased activities combine to present a
greater potential for accidents during this
period than any other time of the year.
When planning our vacation trips, do
we schedule regular rest stops and pre-
book lodging along the route? Do we


allow time to enjoy the sights, or do we
just whiz past them? More importantly,
are we relaxed and rested before we start
the trip, or are we stressed out right up to
the last minute?
I'm sure you can see that it does make
a difference.
The "101 Critical Days of Summer"
campaign in Panama is unique because it
coincides wiih the beginning of the "rainy
season." When driving, the rain can hide
immense potholes in the road, as well as
cause cars to hydroplane and skid. At the
beach, rain makes the water murky,
causing poor visibility. On the water,
sudden weather changes can create


tremendously high winds and deadly
lightning strikes - treacherous phe-
nomena for people fishing from boats.
Whether we like it or not, we are
creatures of habit. Our daily routines
seldom vary. We are comfortable in
familiar surroundings with people we
know. When events upset this routine,
we become stressed and react in extraor-
dinary ways. We don't have a set
routine to follow, so we improvise -
and often make mistakes.
Remember, advance planning and
preparation can help make your "101
Critical Days of Summer" safe and
happy days.


'Death is never fair,' remember people who served


by Chaplain Leon Kircher
USARSO Family Life Chaplain
I t was the middle of August 1990. The 3rd
Battalion (PATRIOT), 43rd Air Defense
Artillery, of which I was chaplain, was
preparing to deploy to Saudi Arabia. Foxtrot
Battery would deploy first, followed by Delta Battery. It
was a tense time for all of us.
Preparing vehicles and PATRIOT Missile equipment
for the flight was an around-the-clock operation, but our
soldiers performed admirably. Within seven days of our
deployment notice there were two PATRIOT Missile
Batteries on the ground in Riyadh and King Khalid
International Airport.
The wait in the desert, for what we thought would be
an imminent attack, was mind-numbing. As the battalion
"Morale Officer," I did all I could to ease the tension and
give the soldiers something to do in the meantime. We
were actually happy to hear of the Jan. 15 deadline. At
least something would happen.
On January 21, it did happen, at least for us. We
were listening to the American Football Conference
Championship Game on short-wave radio when the
sirens started blaring. We grabbed our TA-50 and
chemical suits, and started for our bunkers.
But before we were able to put our gear on, a series
of explosions sounded. Tripping over each other in the


confusion, I looked in the sky to see what I thought were
falling stars. They weren't falling stars, though. They
were SCUDs and they were heading right toward us.
The sergeant major yelled for us to get up and into the
bunkers. That evening, now referred to by those in Air
Defense Artillery as the "Battle of Riyadh," 3rd
Battalion, 43rd Air Defense Artillery shot down six
SCUD Rockets - four by Foxtrot Battery and two by
Delta.
During the confusion, the two batteries had expended
all of their missiles. A number of soldiers ran downrange
to reload the missile launchers; a dangerous thing to do.
One soldier in particular, Spc. Anthony Riggs, was
one of the first at the launchers. While the Air Force
cleared debris off the runways, our soldiers were able to
reload the launchers in record time in preparation for
another SCUD attack. Fortunately, that was it for the
night.
It was not the last attack however. The 3rd Bn, 43rd
ADA went on to record the greatest number of SCUDs
shot down in the war - 20 in all. Riggs was later
commended for his heroism.
Anthony Riggs came from the inner city looking to
the Army to make something of himself. He was a good
soldier and a regular attendee at my field services.
Because of his efforts in Saudi Arabia, he was one of the
first to return home in early March 1991.
Although there is still much speculation concerning


the circumstances, there is no question of what hap-
pened.
Within one week of his return, he was gunned down
in the streets of Detroit.
At first we didn't believe it was him. He was too nice
of a guy. But within 24 hours the Red Cross confirmed
our fear. While newspeople gathered from all over the
world, I preached a memorial sermon entitled: "Death is
Never Fair."
Anthony Riggs was our unit's only casualty in Desert
Storm. Yet his death came not as the result of a SCUD
attack, but in the streets of our country.
For me, Anthony Riggs represents the best and
brightest the United States has to offer.
His picture now hangs in Delta Battery, 3-43 ADA's
barracks at Fort Bliss, Texas. New soldiers would come
by and ask who he was. "Just a good Delta soldier," the
men would reply. "Death is Never Fair," would be my
thought.
This Memorial Day we will gather to remember those
who have fallen while serving their country. Yet now we
have a new and younger class of military who fell in our
most recent war.
These young people bring to light the fact that there
is still a great desire to serve our land and the great
freedoms it represents.
This Memorial Day, keep him, and all of our fallen
comrades, in your prayers.


I Dirctuots


What person or group will you think of this Memorial Day?


"My father. He fought
in World War II in the
Battle of the Bulge."


"My brother. He passed
away three years ago."


"Veterans of World
War II like my grandfa-
ther."


"All soldiers who have "Military people who
died, my daughter, and have died in wars."
people who are sad
because they have lost
loved ones."


Capt. Jeff Golden
630th Air Operations
Squadron


Sgt. 1st Class Audry Martin
Headquarters Company, U.S.
Army Garrison


Pfc. Kelly Gretler
Medical Department Activity


Marilyn Bennett
Department of Defense
civilian employee family
member


Sgt. Vanessa Lopez
470th Military Intelligence
Brigade


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries - or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit
for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.








Tropic Times
May 27, 1994


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The Company C, 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry "Comman
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Tropic Times
May 27, 1994


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Taking the plunge


1 st Battalion, 508th Infantry (Airborne)

A Commandos leap from CH-47 Chinook


BLUE DROP ZONE, Gatun Lake - "Take a
flying leap." "Go jump in a lake."
Well, Company C, 1st Battalion (Airborne),
508th Infantry, did both - and loved it.
Nearly 100 "Commandos" leaped out the back
of a CH-47 Chinook helicopter into Gatun Lake
Wednesday as part of the battalion training being
conducted through the month of May.
"We're doing this training to keep proficient in
case of water landing or water insertions," said 1 st
Lt. Thomas Bertrand, battalion intelligence. "We
do it because there is a different method of landing
in the water than on land."
A 3:15 a.m. manifest call started what turned
out to be a fun day for the paratroopers. A quick
bus ride to Fort Davis, an even quicker breakfast,
distribution of parachutes and flotation devices


and the airborne soldiers were ready to take the
plunge.
When the helicopters arrived, the anxious troops
loaded up and buckled up. When the jumpmaster
gave the signal to hook up, they prepared to take
that first big step. At 1,600 feet, the moment the
soldiers had waited for arrived.
Pass after pass, olive mushrooms sprouted in
the sky behind the Chinook and fell to the water.
Small pontoon boats patrolling the waters buzzed
around, plucking the soaked soldiers and their
parachutes from the Panama Canal.
"It's a lot softer than landing on the ground,"
Bertrand said. "It's not a 'fun-jump,' but it's so
different that it makes it more enjoyable than a
regular jump. Other units, because of their geo-
graphic locations, don't get to do this like we do."


story and photos by

Sgt. Eric Hortin

USARSO Public Affairs Office


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1 O Tropic Times
0U May 27, 1994


~iHistory


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1st Battalion (Airborne) 508th Infantry paratroopers fill the sky. U.S. Army photo


1-508th Infantry looks back on its 50 years


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -
The skies over Panama will soon no
longer be dotted with parachutes as the 1 st
Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry,
closes its doors in October and completes
the final step in its historical lineage that
spans more than 50 years.
The 508th will be honored in a farewell ceremony
June 3 as it and other 193rd Infantry Brigade (Light)
units inactivate as part of the Treaty Implementation
Plan.
Many of the more than 600 soldiers assigned to the
508th have already begun to move on to other assign-
ments, both in and out of Panama. Soldiers will be
leaving on a weekly basis until the inactivation is
complete. The unit has also redistributed or turned in
more than 40 percent of its operational equipment.
The 1st Bn. (Airborne), 508th Inf., began its trek
through history when it was activated as the 508th
Parachute Infantry Oct. 20, 1942, at Camp Blanding,
Fla.
Soon after, the unit entered World War II as a part of
the D-Day invasion into Normandy, France. During the
airborne assault, the battalion suffered more than 50
percent casualties. Even with this amount of casualties,
the unit still seized all of its objectives and was awarded
the French Croix de Guerre and the French Fourragere.
The Red Devils remained an active part of the war by
participating in such missions as the Battle of the Bulge
and Operation Market Garden, one of the largest
airborne assaults in history.
Not only did the battalion stand out as a unit,
individuals distinguished themselves as heroes. One
such hero was 1st Sgt. Leonard Funk.
Funk was awarded the Medal of Honor for saving a
508th guard detail which had been taken prisoner. Of the
90 German soldiers involved, Funk killed nearly half
and wounded the rest.
As a result of superior actions during the war, the
508th was chosen by General of the Army Dwight D.
Eisenhower as his guard of honor. The unit was then
inactivated in November 1946.
After nearly 20 years, the 508th was once again


brought into action in 1964 under the 3rd Brigade, 82nd
Airborne Division, to take part in Operation Power Pack
in the Dominican Republic to restore peace and security.
With the American involvement in Vietnam and the
outbreak of the Tet Counteroffensive, the paratroopers
of the 508th were called on again. The Red Devils
played major roles in various phases of the Tet Counter-
offensive and served with distinction for 22 months.
The Vietnam conflict was a costly one for the 508th
with 212 paratroopers making the ultimate sacrifice.
In 1983, the unit also played a part in Operation
Urgent Fury on the island of Grenada and, within days,
helped to defeat the People's Republican Army and
rescue the Americans who were there. The 508th then
remained in the tiny country for one month as a peace-
keeping force.
Brought to Panama under the 193rd Inf. Bde. in
1987, the 508th took part in Operation Just Cause as the
command and control element of Task Force Red Devil.
The unit successfully secured Fort Amador and
played a major role seizing the Commandancia ini
Panama City. During this conflict, two Red Devils gave
their fullest. The Vanado Drop Zone near Vera Cruz
beach, now the Deblois-Coats Drop Zone, carries their
names with honor.
Many of the soldiers in the unit today served during
the actions of Operation Just Cause and before. As one
long-time 508th soldiers said, "The Red Devils always
seem to bring people back."
"I arrived in the battalion when it was still the 2nd
Battalion (Airborne), 187th Infantry, and was with it
when it was redesignated the 1st Bn. (Airborne), 508th
Inf., in 1987," said Staff Sgt. David Goodwin, Company
C.
After serving with the 508th during Just Cause,
Goodwin spent a couple years in the states but couldn't
wait to get back to the 508th.
"I came back in 1992 to find my old command
sergeant major had become the brigade command
sergeant major," he said. Along with this change,
Goodwin also found many other fellow Red Devils had
moved up the chain but had remained Red Devils.
They had remained Red Devils whose mission today
involves many aspects to include training, support,
airborne and air assault operations and providing the


Interior Installation, Guard for the protection of U.S.
defense sites in the Pacific community.
The unit participates in such exercises as brigade field
training exercises, live fire exercises, platoon evalua-
tions, close-quarters combat training as well ismany
airborne assaults into Deblois-Coats and the Gatun drop
zones.
In addition to the soldier-type activities, the unit also
supports the command with such things as static
equipment displays for various distinguished visitors and
for other activities such as the Armed Forces Week kick-
off.
Another of the many aspects of the 508th mission is
participating in platoon exchanges with Honduras to
help foster good relations and share professional ideas
and methods. Through this program, a platoon of 508th
soldiers travels to Honduras while a platoon of
Honduran soldiers travels here to participate in joint
training.
The 508th also supplies a company-sized unit to the
Jungle Operations Training Battalion at Fort Sherman.
This unit augments the opposing force company with
soldiers from the Battalion Scout Platoon, a squad of
engineers and a company forward infantry support team.
Throughout recent years, the 508th mission has seen
changes, but many of the soldiers have remained the
same.
"This was the first infantry brigade I was assigned
to," said 1st Sgt. Christopher Lowe, Company A. "Little
did I know as a private, that this would be the unit I
would spend most of my career with."
Lowe, who has been a Red Devil for more than 13
years, shares a pride in the unit, as well as the sadness of
seeing the unit inactivated, with fellow Red Devils.
"I understand why the unit is going away, but if
anyone asks me how I feel about it, I would say, 'not
happy at all,'" Lowe said.
"I am saddened that the 508th is leaving," Goodwin
said. "I am just glad I got to be part of it and saw it from
the beginning in Panama to the end."
Almost 52 years to the date, the 1st Bn. (Airborne),
508th Inf., will be stricken from the active rolls of the
U.S. Army Oct. 15 as the soldiers of the unit pack up,
say farewells, encase the battalion colors and move on to
other units.


Aft. 19-12;
'?T�I- ell


ob










World War HI




May, 1944


Peru's inspector general

visits here as guest of Brett
FORT CLAYTON - The following chance of the ceremony that joined the
are significant World War II events that flags of the United States and Brazil as a
took place during May 1944: pledge of continued unity.


May 2
Capt. Donovan E. Smith, Director,
Panama Coast Artillery Command
Training Center, announces the gradua-
tion of 10 soldiers from an anti-aircraft
gun battalion in the height finder course
at the Enlisted Division of the Training
Center. Following the graduation cere-
mony, 12 enlisted men are promoted
from Monroe's infantry unit of the Mo-
bile Force.
Capt. Marvin S. Bennett, on duty
with an Assistant Chief of Staff of the
Caribbean Defense Command is pro-
moted to major.

May 3
U.S. officials announce the arrival of
Gen. Eloy G. Ureta Montehermoso, In-
spector General of the Army of Peru and
commander-in-chief of the armed forc-
es of that country in event of war. Ureta
arrived the previous evening and re-
mained as an overnight guest of Gen.
George H. Brett, commanding general
of the Caribbean Defense Command
and of the Panama Canal Department,
before resuming his journey to the Unit-
ed States.

May 4
The promotion of 29 enlisted men,
members ofMaj. L.B. Anderson's Sixth
Air Force Headquarters Squadron at Al-
brook Field, is announced by Air Force
Headquarters.

May 8
Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower sets D
Day for Normany invasion as June 5.
This is postponed to June 6.

May 9
Col. B. B. Millenthal, Panama Canal
Department Special Service Officer, de-
parts for the United States to attend con-
ferences at the Special Service School,
Washington D.C., Lee University, Vir-
ginia, and at Headquarters, Special Ser-
vice Divison in New York.
Panama Mobile Force headquarters
announce the promotion of 25 enlisted
men.

May 10
James V. Forrestal is appointed Sec-
retary of the Navy.

May 11
Allied Armies in Italy open drive on
Rome at 11 p.m. with tremendous bom-
bardment of Gustav Line by weapons of
U.S. Fifth and British Eighth Armies.

May 12
The first unit of the Brazilian Air
Force to be trained within the Sixth Air
Force of the United States is activated
when Lt. Col. Nero Moura formally re-
ceives the command during a review in
the presence of Lt. Gen. George H.
Brett. Brett presents the new unit with
the colors of the United States and Bra-
zil.
Col. Raimundo V. Aboim, Brazilian
Air Attache to Panama, presents the
command. Lt. Jose Carlos de Mirando
Corea, acting adjutant to the Brazilian
commanding officer, read the address
for Moura which stressed the signifi-


May 13
Maj. Gen. W. E. Shedd, command-
ing general of the Antilles Department
and former Deputy Commander of the
Panama Canal Department, arrives at
Albrook Field for a short visit. Shedd is
accompanied by Rear Adm. Theodore
Chandler, commander of the United
States forces in the Curacao-Aruba sec-
tor.

May 17
Brig. Gen. Joseph C. Mehaffey takes
the oath of office as the ninth Governor
of the Panama Canal, succeeding Gov-
ernor Glen E. Edgerton. The oath is ad-
ministered, in the Governor's office, by
A. T. Schmidt, Chief Clerk of the then
Supply Department and a notary pub-
lic.
Succeeding governor Mehaffey as
Engineer of Maintenance, is Col.
Francis K. Newcommer. Another top
appointment was that of Col. Jame G.
Sleese as Assistant to the governor, hav-
ing served as Executive Assistant to the
Engineer of Maintenance since February
1941.

May 18
The 36th Division begins movement.
to Anzio beachhead. Cassino, the key
point in the German's Gustav line in Ita-
ly, is evacuated by Germans after two
months of bitter resistance.

May 19
The promotion of 21 enlisted men as-
signed to Capt. Glenn H. Moffit's head-
quarters battery, is announced by the
Panama Coast Artillery Command.

May 20
After mopping up the northeast tip of
Insoemoar Island, New Guinea, Task
Force Tornado assault force returns to
mainland, turning over control of island
to Army Air Forces.

May 23
The U.S. Army opens general of-
fense and breaks out at Anzio beach-
head.

May 24
Carrier aircraft of the Fifth Fleet at-
tack Wake Island in the South Pacific.

May 27
Lt. Gen. George Brett, and Rear
Adm. Harold C. Train, commander of
the Panama Sea Frontier, head a group
of more than 200 military and civic lead-
ers at a reception for Col. Joseph R.
Koch, Panama Canal Department Chap-
lain, who had completed nearly four
years of service on the isthmus. The re-
ception is held at the Tivoli Hotel.
Forty-four new blue stars are added
to the service flag at Balboa High
School. Each star represents a former
student or teacher serving in the armed
forces. By the end of May 1944, the
BHS flag proudly displayed 207 blue
stars.

Editor's note: This timeline was com-
piled by Dolores De Mena, USARSO
historian, in commemorantion of the
50th Anniversary of WWII.


Tropic Times 1
May 27, 1994 L1


- -"1
The 75mm Pack Howitzer M1920. Photo courtesy of the USARSO Historian


Pack artillery helped in


Panama canal defense


by Dolores DeMena
USARSO Historian

FORT CLAYTON - The 75-mm. pack
howitzer belonged to a specialized group
of weapons assigned for use in mountain-
ous country where motorized or horse-
drawn artillery could not go. Easy disas-
sembly for packing on mule-back was es-
sential.
Pack Artillery played an important part
in many operations connected with the de-
fense of the Panfama Canal, as much of the
terrain in the vicinity of the canal could
only be crossed by artillery of that type.
A first post-WWl model, the M1920
was soon found unsatisfactory, chiefly be-
cause recuperator, piston rod, and trail
were inadequate. The next six years saw
intensive work on models designed to cor-
rect these weaknesses and to furnish a
mountain gun at least as powerful as new
foreign types. Greater range was particu-
larly desired. The weapon standardized in
1927 as the 75-mm. Pack Howitzer MI
had a range of 9,200 yards and weighed
1,269 pounds in firing position. It took
rank as one of the most efficient artillery
weapons yet devised.
"It is a remarkable weapon with a great
future," said the the chief of field artillery,
"In its adaptability under pack, it has ex-
ceeded any expectations which could rea-
sonably have been held -considering the
power of the weapon."
Some modifications, chiefly of the re-
coil mechanism, and a new carriage were
completed during the 30s. Despite the use-
fulness, only 32 pack howitzers had been
manufactured by July 1, 1940.
Carrying out the missions of the vari-
ous units of the Panama Mobile Force
brought to the front divergent views on the
relative importance of animal and motor
transport. In 1940, the commanding offic-
er of the 33rd Infantry urged elimination
of horses. He said, however, that pack
mules were essential."
"We must use machines wherever pos-
sible in order to save man power. But first
of all, we must use the proper technical
team to achieve tactical success. Man
hasn't yet made the machine that will re-
place the foot or mounted soldier or their
ally, the pack mule," he said.
"Nature has conspired to render diffi-
cult the development of extensive road
nets through the jungles of Panama. Our
pack soldiers are a specially chosen lot be-
cause the work is hard, the marches long
and fast," he said. They must be at least 5
feet 10 inches in height and be able to
march between 3.5 and 4 miles in 50 min-
utes of every marching hour. Minimum


A first post-WWI model, the
M1920 was soon found unsat-
isfactory, chiefly because
recuperator, piston rod, and
trail were inadequate. The next
six years saw intensive work on
models designed to correct
these weaknesses and to
furnish a mountain gun at least
as powerful as new foreign
types.

weight for these soldiers at enlistment is
150 pounds with a view to building up to
condition weight with arduous work and
the army ration. Efficiency of this program
is exemplified by the execution by the 2nd
Field Artillery Battalion's 26-mile march
into Fort Clayton, on the termination of the
last Panama Mobile Force maneuver, in
seven hours."
He praised the howitzer-mule pack
team.
"We have the world's best pack mules
and our 75-mm howitzer is strictly an
American product. It will stop a tank dead
in its track. The gun breaks down into six
loads for pack transportation, or in other
words, six mules carry one howitzer. It is
a quick-firing piece with curved fire range
of five miles. All ammunition and supplies
are carried on pack mules. Each battery has
its own maintenance section. Thus
equipped, it is the most independent of all
arms."
The answer to "Why Pack Artillery in
Panama" was summed up as follows: The
gun is invincible, the mule invulnerable,
the packers, drivers, and gunners, a hardy
race of toughened, straight shooting, hard
walking artillerymen whose equals are not
to be found in any army.
The commanding general of the Mobile
Force insisted that horses were necessary
for units deployed off the roads and under
conditions requiring that commanding of-
ficers be mounted as the only means of
giving them a speed greater than that of
their dismounted troops.
The situation in Panama was rapidly
changing while this controversy was go-
ing on. Considerable road construction
was going forward and tremendous ad-
vances were being made in mechanized
transport. The use of weapons, and han-
dling of troops in difficult terrain was un-
der study. These advances, more than the
arguments of the proponents of motorized
equipment, eventually culminated in the
elimination of the use of animals.
















Sports

Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Page 12


The Loopwinschampionship


The Loop beats F-Troop 2-0


to take women's volleyball title , ..
by Sgt. Lori Davis F-Troop came back in the second game with a '-
Tropic Times Sports Editor seven-point run before The Loop got on track.
Paula Walker substituted for Powell in game


FORT CLAYTON - The oopss" in the May 20
game between The Loop and F-Troop stood for
more than the team's names, it marked F-Troop's
defeat as three straight serves by The Loop's Wendy
McDermotto passed unanswered.
"When I was serving I was thinking, 'We have
them,'" McDermotto said. "I saw them switching
their setters positions and I took advantage of it."
Those serves catching nothing but gym floor
was a sad way for F-Troop to go down. They put up
a good fight, but The Loop pounded them 15-7,15-
12 with great serving, killer spikes and solid de-
fense.
While F-Troop struggled to stay alive, The Loop
played a roller-coaster game. Crucial plays sparked
a series of scoring drives, but mistakes shut the team
down until it could get it's game back on track.
"When you make a mistake
yourthinking about whatyouhave a-
to do to get points back. Then
boom, you get it and your all back j . i
in the game," said The Loop's
Michelle Cranford.. B
Boom was right.'One of those '
come-back plays in the first game
was her spike that pounded into F-
Troop's mid-court like jack ham-
mer. That shot made the crowd go
wild and set The Loop on fire.
"Things were really flowing. I
felt it, it was there in my hand, and
it made me more intense,"
Cranford said. 4
Intensity was the word as The
Loop's Karen Powell came to the
service line. Her solid serves car-
ried The Loop to a four-point scor-
ing drive before McDermotto
served the closing shot, endingthe
first game 15-7. The Loop's K


Air Force
by Sgt. James A. Rush
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - Fifty-three runners
crawled out of bed Saturday for the 6:30
a.m. start ofthe ninth annual U.S. Air Force
Fitness Month 5K and 10K Run hosted
Saturday by the 24th Services Squadron
here.
Bill Young, racing in the 40 and over
category, posted the best time for the short
race. His time of 20:31.05 easily won his
age group and made him 11 seconds better
than Brett Campbell who finished second at
20:42.32. Ben Knight took second in the 40
and over category with a time of 21:38.10.
Campbell finished first among the age
30-39 entrants. His closest age group com-
petition came from Don Ballaro who turned
in a time of 21:02.67 time


I Bo ligSa


two and used her height advantage to block shots at
the net. Walker faced off against F-Troop's Dana
Finley in a duel of the tall blockers and spikers.
F-Troop tried to rally late in game two with a set-
and-spike combination between setter Patty Schuttle
and Finley, but The Loop thwarted them with
strong blocking and sent the ball back into F-
Troop's mid-court.
The Loop went on an eight-point run served by
Lilly Hinjosa and never looked back. F-Troop
looked worn out as they watched McDermotto's
serves go by.
"We didn't play the way we expected to," Finley S-
said. "We were not as relaxed as we wanted to be."
"They (F-Troop) were really tough in each game
(during the regular season). She (Finley) is a really
good player," Powell said.


Department of Defense photo by Sgt. Lor Davis
aren Powell powers up for a serve.


U.S. Air Force hoto by Sgt. James A. Rush
The Loop's Wendy McDermotto goes up for a spike against
F-Troop's Patty Schuttle.


shows fitness with
Two seconds ahead of Ballaro was Bob followed Doyle at 35:16.65.
Ramsey, who at 21:00.58 won the 19-29 FuplioMarcianohadthe fastest finish in
year-old division. Gary Spencer was sec- the 10Kraceat38:30.26. Coming in second
ond in this group with a time of 22:41.55. to him in the 30-39 age group was Jesus
Karen Thomas outran all other women ' Carrera at 41:11.12.
and won the age 19-29 group, clocking in at Tim Olinger won the 40 and over divi-
23:14.64. Jackie White was a distant sec- sion with a time of 40:31.23 two minutes
ond at 27:24.56. ahead of Pablo Cercenia who finished at
Jessie Carrera, entered in the 30-39 age 42:28.71.
group, kept pace with the leader, but fell off Scott Hancock turned in a 54:02.38 to
by just more than a minute to 24:26.54. The take the 19-29 category.
time was fastest among her division, how- Wilfred Drego would have had the fast-
ever. Second place finisher Linda Henson est time for both races had he not chosen to
crossed at 36:46.06. withdraw just before crossing the finish
Priscilla Veliz was the fastest female in line. The runner sprinted from the fitness
the 40 and over category. Her time of center to Howard Elementary School and
40:02.45 beat out Lottie Silas' 43:18.12. back in slightly more than 18 minutes to
Cory Barret, at 39:38.91, and Morgan complete halfofhis 10K. He neared the end
Doyle, at 37:05.31, finished first in their of the 10K however, and quit because he
respective youth divisions. Rinthea Henson has "a house full of trophies already and


�Voleybal Pae 1


5/1OK run
didn't want another," according to race
official Senior Airman Mike West.
Nancy Thompson was the fastest wom-
an entered in the 1 OK. Her time of45:08.45
placed ahead of Carol Baines' 51:15.63 in
the 19-29 age group.
Carol Barrett won the age 30-39 divi-
sion finishing at 54:31.68. Judy Heslop
took second turning in a time of 1:03:16.00.
Every competitor received a medal and
the first 50 got a T-shirt. The top two
runners in each category received a trophy
as well.
Alan Jones, president of the Isthmian
Road Runners, was on-hand to keep a log of
club members who ran. Road Runners are
awarded points for each club-sanctioned
race in which they compete. A champion is
chosen based on total points at the end of the
year.


I andmore age


Army wrestlers win in freestlye and Curundu Cougars women's volley-
Greco-Roman competition at ball team takes first place in regular
Armed Forces championship. season play.


*SCN AM radio schedule
*Memorial Day basketball
*Local sports schedule


Mav 27.1994


May A/ 17 .


� TA y J I J J i











SSports


Tropic Times 1
May 27, 1994 �J


Southern Command Network's coach James Nuells and official Felipe Di
looks on.


SCN 'executes' I


by Sgt. Lori Davis
Tropic Times Sports Editor
FORT CLAYTON - Talk of play execu-
tion came from both sidelines during Tues-
day's game between the Southern Com-
mand Network and Headquarters and Head-
quarters Company, 193rd Infantry (Light),
but SCN killed 193rd's offensive game and
advanced to 6-1.
Before the game started it looked like
SCN would have to win against the officials
as well as the infantry. Referee Felipe Diaz
spoke with SCN's James Nuells before the
kick-off about disputes from a previous
game.
The officials concerns about a clean
game were taken care of after speaking with
Nuells and assuring themselves SCN was
not the team involved in the dispute, Diaz
said.
With the controversy behind it, SCN
took the field and kicked offto the 193rd. Its
defense started hot, shutting down 193rd's
offense.


The 193rd returned the favor on S.CN's
opening possession, forcing quarterback
John Jackson to scramble and overthrow
receivers, getting the ball after four plays.
The 193rd started a long drive after the
turnover on downs, picking up yardage on
pitches to the outside and going to the air. A
15 yard holding penalty against SCN
brought 193rd within scoring distance, but
SCN made up for their mistake when Jack-
son snagged an interception on the next
play.
SCN started a drive of its own with a
pass to Jerome Caple for a first down, but
the 193rd came back with an interception of
its own courtesy of Quin Burrows.
The 193rd tried to rally after the turn-
over, but were forced to punt after the SCN
defense pressured quarterback Mike
Wallace to pass into heavy coverage.
SCN took over once again and started its
last drive of the half. Its chance for a score
almost died when a 193rd defender tipped
Jackson's pass and nearly came up with an
interception.


department of ueiense pnouou y Sgt. i.ri uDivis
az settle a dispute from an earlier game as SCN quarterback John Jackson


H -IHC, 19
Facing a fired-up defense, SCN called
its trademark play - three receivers heavy
on the right, Jackson tried to rattle 193rd,
but a delay by the officials gave the defense
time to set up and block the pass.
SCN followed up with the same play
and pick up a first down when Jackson
connected with Reco Calhoun. Two plays
later Jackson found Leopold Medina for a
touchdown. SCN failed to score on the
extra point, making the score 6-0.
With only 28 seconds on the clock 193rd
tried to go long to Burrows, but once again
the SCN defense pressured Wallace and
forced the pass.
Still anyone's game at the half, both
teams talked the same strategy during the
break.
"Execution," said 193rd's Rodney
Watson. "Our plays are working and were
moving the ball, there are just isolated plays
ruining our drives."
"More pressure and execution," echoed
Nuells from the SCN bench.
Defensive pressure from both teams


Irri 1Q-0n


i


stopped the offense in its tracks on their
opening possessions, but SCN bounced
back on their second drive.
Caple proved to be the m an to go to as
he caught a pass to bring SCN within 10
yards of the end zone, then caught touch-
down pass on fourth down. Jackson over-
threw Jay Rourk for the extra point to leave
the score 12-0.
Two scores from a comeback, 193rd
tried to pick up the pace with fast passes and
pitches to the outside to give their running
backs room to move. The SCN defense
dogged 193rd receivers and came after
Wallace.
Once again forced by defensive pres-
sure, Wallace was picked off by Jackson
who ran back for a touchdown. Mark Lewis
caught the pass for the extra point for the
final score of the game.
The key to SCN's string of victories is
the team effort. Every team member plays
hard and executes, Nuells said.
"We can't wait to whip on 56th Signal
(top team in the Red League)," he added.


Services compete in bowling championship


by Sgt. 1st Class Steve Barrett
American Forces Information Service
WASHINGTON - The Army's Lance Lonsdale and the
Navy's Lana Mink captured combined titles at the Armed
Forces Bowling championships, held last month at Camp
Lejeune, N.C.
Bowlers competed in team bowling, doubles, mixed
doubles and singles. Each competitor rolled six games per
event, with individual scores from all combined to decide
the overall champions.
Lonsdale, assigned with the Army Personnel Command
in Alexandria, Va., averaged 199.41 during the four-event
competition. He finished second in individual singles com-
petition and teamed with Dan Heinzelman of Fort Hood,
Texas, for a third place finish in the men's doubles compe-
tition.
Army's William Anthony of Fort Eustis, Va., finished


second, Marine Corps Randall Biesman of Albany Marine
Corps Logistics Base, Ga., took third.
Mink, stationed at Randolph AFB, Texas, averaged
195.75 during the competition. That was 10 pins per game
better than Air Force's Deb Wolfe of MacDill AFB, Fla.
Third place went to Army's Debra Riefflin of Fort Meade,
Md.
Besides winning the overall title, Mink combined with
Norm Palomares of the San Francisco Naval Recruiting
District to win the mixed doubles competition.
She also finished fourth in singles and teamed with
Deanne Foust of the USS Shenandoah for second place in
women's doubles.
In singles competition, Army's Esther Navarro of Fort
Hood rolled a six-game average 198.5 to win the women's
event. Wolfe finished second and Air Force's Enna Vaughan
of Tinker AFB, Okla., took third.
Air Force's Paul Aldridge, also of Tinker, won the


men's individual event, averaging 203 in beating Lonsdale.
Heinzelman took third.
Beisman and Marine Corps' Charles Beatty of Marine
Corps Air Station, Cherry Point, S.C., won the men's
doubles competition.
Riefflin and Army's Celethia Abner of Fort Lewis,
Wash., captured the women's doubles.
The Army won both the men's and women's team
competition held the first day. Lonsdale, Heinzelman,
Anthony, David Newell (Fort McClellan, Ala.), Svet
Vukomanovich (Oklahoma City) and James Ramg'e (Fort
Meade) bowled to a 323-pin victory over the Marine Corps.
The Air Force finished third.
The Army women's team, comprised of Riefflin,
Navarro, Abner, Suzanne Niegum (Fort Lewis, Wash.),
Elaine Stevens (Columbus, Ohio) and Debra Smith
(Goodfellow AFB, Texas) defeated the Marine Corps by
182 pins in winning its title. The Navy finished third.


9











1 4Tropic Times
1 May 27, 1994


SSports


Cougars take first


Curundu women's volleyball

team finish season with victory


by Jennifer Penkoske
Tropic Times contributor


CURUNDU - The Curundu Cougars
women's varsity volleyball team wrapped
up its season with a 2-1 win over the Pana-
ma Canal College Green Devils.
The Cougars triumphed after a long
match of three games against the Green
Devils.
The Cougars started hot with a 15-12
win in game one, but faltered against the
Green Devils with a 15-7 loss in game two.
The Cougars regrouped for the last game
and came back to beat the Green Devils 15-
8.
Jessica Penkoske led the Cougars in


U.S. Air Force
Unit-level Flag Football
American League
W L


24th SPS
617thALSS
Co. B, 536th
24th CS
1-228th
24th Trans.
HHC, 536th
National
24th Supply
24th OSS/AINS
24th CES
Co. A, 536th
24th Misfits
Navy
24th Med.


Air Force Womens Softball
Sassy 5 0 -
Comedy Crew 4 1 1
Navy 1 4 4
536th 0 5 5
Atlantic womens volleyball
Hustlers 8 2 -2


7 0
5 2
4 1
3 3
2 4
1 6
0 6
League
7 0
5 2
3 3
3 4
3 4
2 5
1 6


scoring with 14 points from the line, fol-
lowed by Marcia Tunon with eight and
Bonnie Kemp and Shawna Sears each with
five points. Audrey Ernest chalked up three
points and Tyara Juarez scored two.
The Cougars win over the Green Devils
capped off a 6-2 season that enabled the
Cougars to capture the regular season league
championship.
The Cougars first-place showing comes
on the heels of last year's winless, last-
place effort.
The Cougars put their regular season
victory behind them to concentrate on the
post-season tournament. The team has spent
the last week fine-tuning their game to win
next week's championship.


Le Jit 8 3 .5
747th MI 7 3 1
The Diggers 5 4 2.5
Delta Dames 4 6 4
Al's Angels 4 8 5
Light Fighters 0 11 8.5
U.S. Army
Unit-level Flag Football
Red League
56th Sig. 6 0 -
SCN 6 1 .5
534th MP Co. 4 2 2
Co. E, 1-228th 5 3 2
HHC, LEA 2 3 3.5
214th Med. Not reported
MEDDAC Not reported
White League
41st ASG 7 1 -
142nd Med. 4 2 2.5
470th MI Not reported
59th Eng. Not reported
HHC, 193rd Not reported
Blue League
HHC, 1-508th 2 3 -
Co. C, 1-508th Not reported
Co. A, 1-508th Not reported
*as of Thursday


Army wrestlers win at Armed Forces championship


by Sgt. 1st Class Stephen Barrett
Armed Forces Information Service

FLORIDA - Army wrestlers captured 12 of 20 titles in
winning the 1994 armed forces championships held re-
cently at Pensacola Naval Air Station, Fla.
Soldiers grappled to six freestyle and six Greco-Roman
titles in claiming their fifth straight armed forces champi-
onship.
They also captured four second-place finishes while
scoring 77 team points.
The Marine Corps scored 58 points to take second place
followed by Navy (5-1) and Air Force (32). Winners
advanced to the U.S. National Amateur Wrestling Cham-
pionships atthe Las Vegas Convention Center April 20- 23.
Four Army wrestlers nabbed two title seach, winning
both freestyle and Greco-Roman titles. Shon Lewis cap-
tured the 136.5- pound title, Derrick Waldroup won both
crowns at 198, Jerry Jackson took top honors at 220, and
Jeffrey Green earned two victories in unlimited competi-
tion.
In freestyle wrestling, Army's Keith Sieracki and James
Gressley captured their respective weight classes.
Sieracki recorded the only championship pinfall, de-
feating Marine Corps Rikk Walters in 2:03 for the 163-
pound title.
Gressley, the 180.5 pound champion, defeated Marine
Anthony Esposito, 5-0.
Army Greco-Roman winners were Jason Tolbert, a 5-
1 victor over the Navy's Steven Mays, and Kenneth


Owens, who defeated Navy's Raymond Borja, 3-2.
The Marine Corps captured five individual titles. Four
came in freestyle wrestling, where they dominated the
lighter weight classes.
Keith Wilson, seeing his first armed forces competition
in three years following knee surgery, won both freestyle
and Greco-Roman titles at 149.5 pounds. A senior member
of the Marine Corps team, Wilson has high hopes of
stopping the Armys five-year reign.
"They've (Army) got many experienced wrestlers and
they train really well," Wilson said.
"We've got a lot of new guys who haven't wrestled
Greco and are learning," he said. "They stayed good and we
got better, so next year we'll give them a challenge."
In other Marine Corps victories, Jeremy Walker won
the 105.5 title, beating Army's Rafael Mejia, 12-1. George
Williams beat Army's Trevor Humphrey, 13-4 for the
114.5 title, while Duaine Martin captured the 125.5 crown
with a 7-3 victory over Air Force's Tom Tingley.
Navy wrestlers captured the remaining three titles, all in
Greco-Roman competition. Dustin Waugh edged Walker,
9-8 at 105.5; Robert DeMerritt beat Williams, 5-4 at 114.5;
and Nathaniel Jackson took the 180.5 title, beating Air
Force'sJeremy Edwards, 4-3.
Results are as follows:
Freestyle
105.5 pounds - Jeremy Walker (USMC) def. Rafael Mejia
(A), 12-1.
114.5 - George Williams (USMC) def. Trevor Humphrey
(A), 13-4.


125.5 - Duaine Martin (USMC) def. Tom Tingley (AF), 7-
3.
136.5 - Shon Lewis (A) def. John Antonelli (USMC), 12-
11.
149.5 - Keith Wilson (USMC) def. Jeffrey Flynn (A), 13-
2.
163 - Keith Sieracki (A) pinned Rikk Walters (USMC),
2:03.
180.5- James Gressley (A) def. Anthony Esposito (USMC),
5-0.
198 - Derrick Waldroup (A) def. Tom Storey (N), 5-4.
220 - Jerry Jackson (A) def. Stevie Brown (N), 13-3.
UNL - Jeffrey Green (A) def. Russell Putney (AF), 11-0.
Greco-Roman
105.5 pounds - Dustin Waugh (N) def. Jeremy Walker
(USMC), 9-8.
114.5- Robert DeMerritt(N) def. George Wiliiams(USMC),
5-4.
125.5 - Jason Tolbert (A) def. Steven Mays (N), 5-1.
136.5 - Shon Lewis (A) def. John Antonelli (USMC), 9-0.
149.5 - Keith Wilson (USMC) def. Rodney Smith (A), 4-
1.
163 - Kenneth Owens (A) def. RaYmond Borja (N), 3-2.
180.5 - Nathaniel Jackson (N) def. Jeremy Edwards(AF),
4-3.
198 - Derrick Waldroup (A) def. Marvin Vike (USMC), 3-
0.
220 - Jerry Jackson (A) def. Michael Johnson (USMC), 4-
0.
UNI - Jeffrey Green (A) def. Matthew Lamb (N), 3-1.


S "*."










..











A.











i. -. _ . ..-- - - ' ,.







Running home U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Rick Emert

Alan F. Dodson, commander, U.S. Army Garrison Atlantic, is the first
to finish for his team in the Armed Forces Day Fun Run at Fort Davis
May 13. Three-mile run results (team competition):1st place - 549th
Military Police Company, 71:32: Donald Troxler, James V. Redmon,
Eric D. Brunken and David Bice.


- - -1











SSports Shorts


Tropic Times1 5
May 27, 1994 1


SCN AM Radio 790/1420
airs Indy 500, basketball
Tonight
8 p.m.: Basketball: Houston at Utah
(Game #3)
Saturday
2:30 p.m.: Basketball: New York at In-
diana (Game #3)
6 p.m.: Baseball: Houston at Philadel-
phia
Sunday
10 a.m.: Indianapolis 500 Race
7 p.m.: Baseball: Detroit at Minnesota
Monday
2:30 p.m.: Basketball: New Tork at Indi-
ana (Game #4)
7 p.m.: Baseball: St. Louis at Los Ange-
les
Tuesday
6 p.m.: Baseball: Chicago White Sox at
N.Y. Yankees
or
8 p.m.: Basketball: Utah at Houston
(Game #5)

Football, softball action
in local sports schedule
*Army unit-level flag football
Tuesday
6 p.m.: 534th Military Police Company
vs. 470th Military Intelligence, Mothers
Field


7 p.m.: HHC, 1st Battalion, 508th Inantry
(Airborne) vs. 59th Engineer Detatchment,
Mothers Field
Wednesday
6 p.m.: 56th Signal Battalion vs. HHC,
193rd Infantry (Light), Mothers Field
7 p.m.: Medical Activity vs. 214th
Mediacl Detatchment, Mothers Field
8 p.m.: 41st Area Support Group vs.
HHC, 1-508th, Mothers Field
*Air Force unit-level flag football
Tuesday
6:05 p.m.: 617th Airlift Support Squad-
ron vs. 24th Transportation Squadron
7:05 p.m.: 24th Security Police Squad-
ron vs. 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation Regi-
ment
8:05 p.m.: Company B, 536th Engineer
Battalion vs. 24th Comunication Squadron
Wednesday
6:05 p.m.: Company A, 536th Engineer
Battalion vs. 24th Medical Group
7:05 p.m.: 24th Civil Engineer Squadron
vs. 24th Operations Support Squadron
8:05 p.m.: 24th Supply vs. 24th Services
Squadron
Thursday
6:05 p.m.: 24th SPS vs. 24th CS
7:05 p.m.: 1-228th vs. 24th Trans.
8:05 p.m.: 617th ALSS vs. Co. B, 536th
*Air Force women softball
Playoffs, Tuesday-June 3
*Women's volleyball, Atlantic
Fronius Fitness Center hosts all games


Ae *





















-. . ..












- L .. .,


' ' ' if~lH~




Air time Tropic Times file photo

Jungle Operations Training Battalion Knight's Lonnie Pearson takes
to the air as a defender tries to block his shot during the 1991 U.S.
Army South Company Level Basketball Championship. Several bas-
ketball competitions will be held this Memorial Day weekend.
*There will be a Memorial Day basketball tournament Saturday-
Monday at the Fronius Fitness Center. Registration is closed. Call
289-3108 for more information.
* The Reeder Physical Fitness Center will sponsor a three-point
shot Memorial Day basketball tournament. Registration for the event
is open through Monday. For more information call 287-3861.


Wednesday
6 p.m.: Hustlers vs. 747th MI
7 p.m.: Al's Angels vs. 2 Le Jit
8 p.m.: Delta Dames vs. The Diggers

Davis center sponsors
mini marathon Saturday
The third annual Mini Marathon of the
Americas begins 6:30 a.m. Saturday at the
Fronius Fitness Center. The categories will
be U.S. military, open, female and over 40.
Entry fee is $8. For more information, call
289-3294.

Valent Recreation Center
offers martial arts course
The Korean martial art, Tang Soo Do, is
taught 6-8 p.m. each Tuesday and Thursday
at the Valent Recreation Center. The class is
taught by Arles Fernandez. Classes are
open to adults and children ages 4 and over.
For information, call Miguel Briceno at
287-6500.

Registration for women's
triathlon ends June 8
The Albrook and Howard sports and
fitness centers are sponsoring a women
triathlon June 11. The triathlon begins 6:30
a.m. at the Albrook Swimming Pool.
The race includes a 500-meter swim,
20-kilometer bicycle race and a 5-kilome-
ter run. Trophies will be awarded to the top
three competitors in the following age cat-
egories: 19-29, 30-39 and 40 and over.
There is no entry fee for this event.
Registration deadline is June 8. For more
information call the Albrook SFC at 286-
3364, or call the Howard SFC at 284-3451.

Heavy competition for
male, female powerlifters
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center
is sponsoring a powerlifting competition
June 25. There will be a weigh-in 6:30 a.m.
and a 7 a.m. rules briefing the day of the
contest. Competition begins 7:30 a.m.
The registration deadline is June 11.
Trophies will be awarded for first and sec-
ond place in each male and female class
(light, medium and heavy).
Trophies will also be awarded in both the
men's and women's category to the lifter
who has the highest body-weight-to-weight-
lifted ratio. For more information call the
Howard SFC at 284-3451.

Rodman Marina offers
shark fishing June 18, 26
A shark fishing trip is available through
the Rodman Marina 6-8 p.m. June 18 and
26 aboard The Vargas.The trip costs $30
per person. All fishing equipment is includ-
ed in the fee. Call Rodman Marina at 283-
3147 for more information.

Basketball registration
opens for Atlantic youth
Registration for youth basketball for the
Atlantic community continues until Tues-
day. There will be a clinic June 15. The
season opens June 16. Call 289-4605/4289.

USARSO holds 10-miler
tryouts for men, women
Practice sessions and three open try-outs
will be held beginning in June for those
runners interested in making the U.S. Army
South Ten-Miler team.
Practice sessions will be 6 -8 p.m. begin-
ning June I at Reeder Gym. The three trial
days will be held at 6 a.m. July 23, Aug. 13
and Aug. 27 at Reeder Gym.
The six top male and female runners
selected will then go on to the 1994 Army
10-Miler Championships Oct. 16 in Wash-
ington, D.C.
The coach encourages commanders to
identify and support potential 10-mile run-


ners.
For information, call Willie Moye at
287-6441, Sue Bozgoz at 287-6448 or the
Directorate ofCommunity Activities Sports
Office at 2874050.

Basketball registration
open at Rodman NS
Registration for the Rodman NS basket-
ball program is under way. The league is
open to servicemembers, Department of
Defense civilians and family members.
There is no entry fee.
A letter of intent is due to the Rodman
Sports Office by June 10. Organizational
meeting/coaches clinic is 5 p.m. June 21 at
the Rodman Fitness Center. For more infor-
mation call 283-4222/4061.

Fitness month ends with
tennis, horse shoes
The Howard and Albrook sports and
fitness centers are sponsoring a singles ten-
nis tournament and a horse shoe tourna-
ment Saturday in celebration of U.S. Air
Force Month of Fitness.
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center
is taking appointments for body fat analysis
during May. Call 284-3451 for more infor-
mation.

Rodman hosts Fitness
Month 1, 2, 3K fun runs
The Rodman Fitness Center will host a
National Fitness Month 1 K, 2K and 3K Fun
Run/Walk for family members 7 a.m.
Monday. Check in time is 6:15 a.m. Regis-
tration is free.
The run is open to Navy Family member
teams or children ages 6-17. A family team
includes a 2K run/walk with two or more
members of the same family.
One team member must be a youth 6-17
years old. Family members 5 years old or
under may be carried or pushed in a stroller
to finish. Call 283-4222 for more informa-
tion.

Albrook needs bowlers
for new mixed league
The Albrook BowlingCenterneeds more
men and women bowlers to play in a new
mixed leauge. Registration is $10 and week-
ly play costs $6. The league starts 6:30 p.m.
Monday and runs 16 weeks. For more
information call 286-4260.

Atlantic fishing tourney
open until June 30
Entrytothe PanamaCanal TarponClub's
annual Roy Rinehart fishing tournament is
open until June 30. Entries must be caught
in Atlantic waters, including the Chagres
River, and may include tarpon, marlin, sail-
fish, wahoo, red snapper, grouper, shark,
barracuda, dolphin fish, tuna, jack or king-
fish.
For information about the tournament
rules and registration fee, call 243-5316.

Amador Golf Course
hosts Fathers Day event
The deadline to sign up for the Father's
Day Tournament is June 15. The event is
scheduled for June 18. The format will be
two-person select shot. The entry fee of$ 10
includes lunch.
An Independence Day Tournament is
scheduled for July 2. The format will be
three-person best ball. The $12 entry fee
includes lunch. The sign up deadline is June
29.
The course will host a medal play tour-
nament Aug. 20. Flights will be determined
by sign ups. Prizes will be awarded to net
and gross winners. The $15 entry fee in-
cludes lunch. The sign up deadline is Aug.
17.
Call 282-4511/4838 for information
about course programs.











S6 Tropic Times
0 May 27, 1994


News


- - . .... . _ * . ..



Remembering those who served Department of Defense photo by Spc. John Hall
Marines prepare to perform a 21-gun salute at the Corozal American Cemetary. The local Canal Area Veterans organization wilt sponsor a
Memorial Day service 9 a.m. Monday at the cemetery. The service will feature a color guard and music from the 79th Army Band. A memorial
service at sea will be held 7-9 a.m. Monday near the last buoy at the mouth of the Pacific channel. Participants will be transported via landing
craft leaving the U.S. Naval Station Panama Canal Marina at 7 a.m.


May 27, 1994

Memorial Day Proclamation


To all Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines

As Americans, we are truly fortunate. We're strong and capable -
morally, economically, and militarily. Through nearly 218 years of
courage, hard work, and respect for the law, the United States has
become an example to the free nations of the world. This special posi-
tion and the blessings of liberty have been secured through the great
sacrifices of our Armed Forces. For those sacrifices, we are thankful
and reflective this Memorial Day.

Americans remember many of the battles vividly - the Marne, Midway,
the Coral Sea, Normandy, Inchon, Khe Sanh, Tet 68, Grenada, Panama,
Desert Storm, and Mogadishu. These battles cost the United States a-
million dead young Americans to preserve more than 200 years of freedom.

Our families and veterans will always remember their loved ones and
comrades who died for our country. On Monday, 30 May 1994 - Memorial Day
- all of us in SOUTHCOM who are privileged to now stand guard for
America should pause and take strength from their example.





Barry R. McCaf
General, U.S. Army
Commander in Chief


Thrift plan boosts


civilian retirement
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Civilian employees
covered by the Civil Service Retirement Systems or the Feder-
al Employees Retirement System who are interested in saving
some money for retirement can now do so during the Thrift
Savings Plan open season that ends July 31.
This savings program offers a tax-deferred retirement fund
with several investment options for civilian employees.
It can be used against loans, but the main purpose is for re-
tirement, said Jared Garman, chief of Technical Services Divi-
sion at the Directorate of Civilian Personnel.
Garmen said the Thrift Savings Plan is actually better than
most Individual Retirement Accounts offered to the public.
While the IRAs are also tax-deferred, the ceiling on how much
money can go into an IRA is less than the Thrift Savings Plan.
During open season, investors can begin contributing to the
program, change the amount deducted from their pay, or re-
allocate contributions to accounts among three investment
funds by taking payroll deductions which are deposited into an
account with the U.S. government.
During this period, eligible employees may also make a
Thrift Savings Plan election if their latest appointment to a po-
sition covered by the FERS or CSRS was made before Jan. 1,
or the latest appointment to a position covered by FERS or
CSRS was made before July 1 and the member had been eligi-
ble to participate in the Thrift Savings Plan during a prior open
season.
If the employee stopped contributing to the Thrift Savings
Plan before Jan. 1, contributions can be resumed this open sea-
son. If an employee stopped contributing after Dec 31, they
may not begin contributing again until the next Thrift Savings
Plan open season, Nov. 15.
To enroll in the Thrift Savings Plan or change your enroll-
ment election, you must complete TSP-1, Thrift Savings Plan
Election Form, which is available at the Directorate of Civilian
Personnel, Benefits Branch, Room 101, Building 560, Corozal.
It must be completed and submitted no later than July 29.
The pamphlet "Summary of the Thrift Savings Plan for Fed-
eral Employees," describes the Thrift Savings Plan in detail
and the flyer "Open Season Update, 15 May to 31 July 1994"
contains basic information about this Thrift Savings Plan open
season. For information, call 285-5745/5941/5284.


Community efforts control dengue fever mosquitos


GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL (U.S.
ARMY MEDDAC PAO) - This past dry season, the mos-
quito that causes dengue fever, Aedes aegypti, has been at
low levels in the city of Panama, said Panama Ministry of
Health officials.
This mosquito is sporadically found or absent in a few
locations throughout the military installations in Panama,
said Maj. Nelson Powers, chief of Entomology, Preven-
tive Medicine Service at Gorgas Army Community Hos-
pital.
Because this mosquito breeds only in artificial contain-
ers, Powers attributes the low mosquito population to the
sanitation efforts being done in yards and at work sites.
"Preventive Medicine wishes to thank the village may-
ors and members of the military community who have


been conscientious about keeping their quarters, yards and
work areas free of containers that could collect water and
serve as breeding sites," Powers said.
"Without their help and dedication we would no doubt
have a problem of actual Aedes aegypti breeding on our
installations."
During the last wet and dry seasons, there were 14 cases
involving Panamanian nationals and no reported cases in-
volving U.S. military or family members, officials said.
It is only through the community's help and the support
of Preventive Medicine's community educational program
that this .mosquito-transmitted disease was avoided, he
said.
With the start of the wet season, Preventive Medicine
is continuing the programs of education and monitoring as


well as checking for potential breeding sites of this mos-
quito on military installations.
This monitoring program will consist of placing black,
one-pint jars filled with water and containing a strip of red
paper at various areas on the installations. The jars will
be checked every week for the presence of mosquito eggs.
If any are found, the Directorate of Engineering and
Housing Pest Control section will take measures to elimi-
nate the breeding sites and treat with insecticides.
"If you find one of these jars, which is marked 'Pre-
ventive Medicine,' please leave it alone," Powers said.
"Preventive Medicine again wishes to thank (the com-
munity) for the diligence and is requesting continued sup-
port for the oncoming wet season in fighting this mosqui-
to," he said.


Uw7


lw










Tropictivities
A quality of life guide for the U.S. community in Panama


May 27.1994


Page BI


Ghost from the past U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
Chris Harkins, a member of Outriders Charities, gets ghouled up for the mini haunted house at Valent Recreation Center's presentation, Encore: A
Valent Retrospective. See story and photos, Page B3.


Cristobal junior/senior high stu-
dents show elementary students
chemistry can be fun.


Corozal veterinary clinic offers mi-
crochip implant to keep pets pro-
tected.


*Movies, Page B8
*TV, Page B9
*Potpourri, Page B12


--1 -1, .---


.... j 7










B2 Tropic Times
D May 27, 1994


Youth news


Albrook/Howard
*Youth Centers 286-3195/284-4700:
Howard and Albrook youth centers will be closed Mon-
day for Memorial Day.
Pre-Teen Dance today at Howard Youth Center for ages
8-13. DJ music, snack bar will be open.
Registration for Youth Services summer day Camp pro-
gram June 2-4 Howard Camp: Register at the Howard Youth
center, Bldg. 696, from noon-6 p.m.. June 2-4 Ft. Clayton
Camp: Register at the Ft. Clayton Youth center, Bldg 155, from
noon-6 p.m..
Saturday Gymnastics classes now available at Howard
Youth center, for ages 3 and up. Cost $13.00 per month.
Bicycle challenge 3 p.m. Tuesday at Howard for all ages in
honor of American Bike Month.
Gymnastics classes Saturdays. Ages 3-5 meet noon-I p.m.;
ages 6-12 meet 1-2 p.m.; intermediate classes meet 2-3 p.m.
Cost is $13 per month.
*Hideout Teen Center 284-5487:
The teen center at Farfan has been closed temporarily.
Activities have been rescheduled to the Howard or Albrook
youth centers. Call 284-4700 for more information.
*Child Development Center 284-6135:
Openings available in part-time program for children ages
6 months - 5 years. Openings are for 25-hour enrollment -
five hours per day, five days a week.

Clayton
*Youth Center 287-6451:
Cooking Experiences every Tuesday
Second Annual Wacky Olympics 9 a.m. Saturday. Out-
door parent/child competitive games will be held at Building
155, Fort Clayton.
American Stars Gymnastics meet Tuesdays and Thurs-
days. Ages 3-5 meet 2-3 p.m.; ages 6-8 meet 3-4 p.m.; ages 9
and up and advanced meet 4-5 p.m. Lessons cost $20.
Outdoor Games every Thursday.
Performing children's troupe seeks youths who like to
sing, dance and perform. They meet 4-6 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday.
Tae Kwon Do 5:30-7 p.m. Wednesday and Fridays for
ages 5-18, $25.
Piano lessons 1-6 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesdays. The fee
is $30 for four half-hour lessons per month.
Gymnastics for ages 5 and older 2:30-3:30 p.m. and 3:30-
4:30 p.m. Monday and Wednesdays
Arts & Crafts every Monday. Cooking experience every
Tuesday.
Youth Services is hosting a talent show for youths up to 18
years old at 6 p.m., today.
*Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680:
Senior teen dance tonight for ages 15-18. The $1.50 fee
includes sodas.
Senior Teen Employment Program is a year- round pro-
gram to develop job skills and earn some money, for teen be-
tween 15 - 18 years old. Applications available at the cent'
Talent Show at 6 p.m., today.
Carwash benefit for teen employment, 8 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Triathlon tournament 4 p.m. Friday. Compete in pool,
football and ping pong.
Traveling neighborhood soccer game 1-5 p.m., Sunday.
Popcorn and movies every Sunday.
Volleyball 3:30-5:30 p.m. Sunday.
Softball practice 2:30-4:30 p.m. Sunday.
*Child Development Center 287-3301:
Child Development Center provides high quality, devel-
opmental child care for children 6 weeks to 12 years old. Full
day care and hourly care available call 287-5657.

Cocoli
*Cocoli Community Center 287-4119:
Arts and crafts, 3:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays.

Atlantic
*Espinar Youth Center 289-4605:
Pool party 6 -9 p.m., today. Transportation and snacks pro-
vided
Teddy bear bingo 3-4:30 p.m. today, $.25 per card.
Saturday sports noon-6 p.m. Saturday.
Teen sports 4-6 p.m. Monday and Wednesdays.
Cooking class 4-6 p.m. Monday, $1.
Study with a buddy and tutoring 4-6 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday.
Pre-teen Monthly Pool Party 6-9 p.m., noon - 6 p.m. to-
day. Transportation and snacks provided.
Youth Services and Cristobal High School Prom, Satur-
day, at the Special Effect Teen Center.


U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Rick Emeret
Chemistry student Horace Hogan demonstrates a density lab to a kindergarten class.



Cristobal hosts fair


FORT ESPINAR (USARSO
PAO Atlantic) - Atomic weights,
formulas and understanding the
periodic chart may contribute to
the perceived difficulty of learn-
ing chemistry.
When Cristobal Junior/Se-
nior High School chemistry stu-
dents stepped into the shoes of
their teacher, however, they
showed the students ofGulick El-
ementary School that chemistry
can also be fun.
"It was good to have the high


school students doing the chem-
istry labs, because I think the
younger students look up to
them," said Roz Baitel, Cristobal
Junior/Senior High School chem-
istry teacher. "Seeing other stu-
dents working with chemistry
showed them it isn't that difficult,
and it heightened their interest in
science."
The high school students
benefited from the science dem-
onstrations as well, Baitel said.
"They worked on their indi-


vidual labs for a month off and
on," she said. "They had to do the
labs so many times that it rein-
forced the concepts in their
minds."
The high school students also
came away from the day with a
better understanding of the effort
it takes to teach.
"After an entire day of teach-
ing these chemistry concepts to
the elementary students, my stu-
dents figured out how tiring
teaching can be," Baitel said.


Curundu Junior High School


honors 17 students of month


CURUNDU (Department of
Defense Dependents School
PAO) - Seventeen students were
chosen for April's Student of the
Month program at Curundu Jun-
ior High School.
Each month, part of the fac-
ulty select students who perform
academically and socially in their
classes. These students serve as
be positive role models for their
classmates and friends.
Students must show leader-
ship qualities, volunteer to assist
other students, exhibit proper
classroom behavior and have a
positive attitude toward school,
teachers, classmates, and faculty
members.
Special recognition was
given to Jackie McCormick, who
helps prepare the programs. Niki
Nakamura played two musical
selections on the piano.
April "Students of the


Courtesy pt
Aaron Bedwell and Denise Rodaniche select a book.


Month" were: Edqardo Busquets,
Dwayne McFarlane, Brooke
Farnsworth, Jenna Webeck, Eric
Hellzen, Gary Beal, Zamira
Jimenez, Daniel Beech, Christo-


pher Nickell, Deris Medina,
Frank Pigeon, Corey Ellis, Eloy
Benedetti, Evelyn Cunmdngs,
Megann Kostelny, Aaron
Bedwell and Stacy Medina.


Honor society initiates members


CURUNDU (Department of
Defense Dependents School -
PAO) - The Curundu Junior
High School's Crossroads Chap-
ter of the National Junior Honor
Society inducted 24 new mem-
bers. The new members are:
Charmaine Archer, Laquita
Armstrong, Sara Chao, Lucia
Chong, Ching Chou, Elizabeth
Coomer, Brain Faye, Kristan
Gibson, Megan Higgins, Joanna
Korolyshyn, Mary Leigh, Ashly
Lester, Frank Linton, Fred
Maduro, Deris Medina, Miriam
Rodriguez, Ariadne Samaniego,
Matt Smiley, Elizabeth Smith,


Kristy Springer, Ronald Staha,
Earl Hemple, and Lhoris Wilson.
Stephanie Sutherland, Master
of Ceremonies, opened the induc-
tion ceremony.
Brett Sueger led the Pledge of
Allegiance, Nick Roberts spoke
on scholarship, Kathy Bottin
spoke on citizenship, Cheryl
Eckerle explained services, Katie
Shaha extolled leadership, and
Melanie Rojas talked about char-
acter.
The presentation of Member-
ship cards and pins was handled
by Sasha Dhaene and Dr. Charles
Reno. Tammy Shaffer led the ini-


tiates in the Honor Society
pledge.
The congratulatory remarks
were given by Brig. Gen. David
A. Sawyer, Commander, 24th
Wing at Howard AFB.
Sawyer's inspirational mes-
sage encouraged the students to
set their goals higher and work
hard to attain them.
Refreshments were served in
a reception for all the members,
parents, and guests following the
ceremony.
Jane Loudat, sponsor of the
Honor Society, gave the new
members their certificates.









*Entertainment


1~


Stephanie Schroer pets one of the animals at the livestock exhibit during Encore: A Valent Retrospective.


Encore:
T s thstaffofthe Valent Recreation
Center put its best foot forward in
an all-out effort during the judging of
an Army-wide recreation center competi-
tion May 14 and 15.
The presentation, Encore: A Valent
Retrospective, was representative of
dozens of programs the center has offered
the community throughout the year, said
Maria Rios, program coordinator.
The judges from the Forces Command
competition travel throughout the United
States and overseas to determine which
center presents the best effort in program-
ming, she said.
Winning this competition seven times
in the past, the Valent staff and an
entourage of volunteers worked almost
around the clock to get the program
together.
"This year we chose to bring back
segments of the community's favorite
past programs in this presentation," Rios
said.
In this way, not only do the judges
have a better idea of the programming,
but the community benefits as well with
another opportunity to see some of their
favorite programs again.
Visitors to the center had the chance to
revisit the haunted house and have an
early - or late - visit with Santa. They
were also able to take part in coffee
tasting and browse through many vendors
selling things ranging from pet care
products to coins and stamps.
An abundance of entertainment was
on hand throughout the program with
dancers from throughout Central and
South America, fashion shows, dog


Valent Recreation Center rejuvenates Il

past events, exhibits for competition
In- JTj
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. ._ . .
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Representatives from the Society for Creative Anachronism Chris "Cole
of the Hill" Cole and Michael "Ivan" Manchester match blows.
obedience demonstra- poisonous plants
tions and a step back story and photos by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero and animals of
in time with the USARSO Public Affairs Office Panama, coins and


Society for Creative
Anachronism with armor-clad men
locked in combat.
Automobiles, motorcycles, boats,
tanks, aircraft and ships of war were also
available for visitors to look at. Though
the tanks, aircraft and ships of war were
of the tabletop version, the works of
model builders was a big draw.
Other exhibits on hand were livestock,


stamps, molas,
ceramic and pottery, art and a Native
American Heritage display.
As well as tasting coffee and dining
on various foods sold in the food court,
visitors had the rare opportunity to feast
on a various styles of gumbo at the
gumbo cooking contest.
Several cooks brought their creations
in to be judged by gumbo expert, Boston


Boston Patterson, judge, tastes one
of the entries of the gumbo cooking
contest.
Patterson. A gumbo cook for nearly 30
years, this Department of Defense civilian
and retired master sergeant learned his
craft through his marriage to a "Creole
girl" when he was only 19 years old.
"Even though I've been divorced for
years, my best memories of the marriage
are of my children and gumbo," he said.
Taking first place in the gumbo contest
was Miriam Washington. Coming in
second was Lydia Moore and in third was
Elizabeth Saxon.
The final announcement of the
winning recreation center in this Army-
wide competition will be made this
summer. But, win or lose, the Valent
Recreation Center will continue to
provide quality programming for the
military community, Rios said.


Tropic TimesB3
May 27, 1994B


I










B 4 Tropic Times
B May 27, 1994


- Focus on Panama


f.s


"Rol'


Javier Martinez carves one of his bateas at Steven Circle in Balboa.


IDatea are part of our culture


U aime Martinez is a slim
young man with an intense
look on his face. He is shy,
but he gets his message across.
Martinez has been carving and
painting bateas and totumas (wooden
plates and pumpkin shell recipients)
for the past four years.
Martinez was a farmer in
Penonome, Cocle province before
engaging in the batea business.
He worked in his garden planting
vegetables.
"In those days a farmer used to earn
enough money to support his family,"
Martinez said.
He left his town and moved to the
city looking for better days in his
future. The economic situation
became hard and the fact that he
attended school up to sixth grade made
it difficult to find a job.
Once in the city he was able to
work with the Cuna Indians at Steven
Circle in Balboa. He worked with
them for about one year and then
decided to go on his own and started
his business.
Martinez begin his experiment with
bateas and totumas, hand carved
wooden plates and pumpkin shells
recipients. These wooden plates are
used for everything in the interior of
Panama from carrying the laundry to
and from the river and cleaning rice to
serving plates.
In addition to being used as
decorative items, bateas can be used as
wall hangings or serving trays and as
sourvenir gifts.
Martinez makes his bateas from
cedro espino (a type of mahagony).
Bateas are made in different shapes
and sizes.
He sands the wood until it feels
smooth and applies a sanding sealer to
cover the pores. Then using a carving
tool, he carves out his own creativities
that can be any kind of animals such
as birds, frogs, macaws, picturesque


scenery, flags, maps and others.
Using nature's colors, he paints his
drawings. When it is completely dry,
he applies a coat of varnish as the final
process in the batea-making.
The bateas are very popular among
the tourists visiting the isthmus.
Martinez also carves picture frames
for the molas.
The totumas or pumpkin shell
recipients are used to store water, in the
kitchen, to drink water and also as
dinner plates.
He gets them from Penonome. He
cuts them in half, cleans the inside and
dips them in a bleach solution. The
drying process takes two days. Later he
sands them and With a lead pencil
sketches the drawings and select the
different painting colors.
Martinez said, "I try not to repeat
the drawings unless otherwise or-
dered." He uses acrylic paint and it
takes him one week to paint 15
totumas.
Martinez also makes Christmas
ornaments. He carves and paints small
bateas and bells figures as well as small
pumpkin shells to decorate the tree.
Martinez works eight hours a day
and makes enough money to support
his wife and two children.
"At least, this is an honest and
decent job. I work hard," Martinez said.
While carving on a picture frame, he
talked about his plans for the future.
"My big dream is to be able to buy
more carpentry tools and have my shop
to do more woodcrafts. I would like to
work on jewelry chests, trays, statues
and others," he said.
Martinez smiles and looked up
toward the horizon and with a sad
voice said, "I miss my days back
in the interior; life is so different
and quite. We have a better environ-
ment."
Martinez's bateas and totumas
are available at Steven Circle in
Balboa.


These colorful bateas and totumas are some of Martinez's creations.
These colorful bateas and totumas are some of Martinez's creations.


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Department of Defense photos by Petty Officer 2nd Class Bill Lewis









Community news


Tropic Times B5
May 27, 1994 B5


Comnt atvte


J


Department of Defense photos by Sgt. Lori Davis
Capt. Russell Wiessinger scans a patient for a microchip that will be inserted under the animal's
skin for identification purposes.


Microchip helps pet owners


permanently protect animals


COROZAL (Veterinary Treatment Facility) - Each day
pets are lost or stolen, and many never make it back home.
Animals are often destroyed because owners cannot be
located for identification of the pet. Even owners who put
collars with ID tags on their pet can lose the animal if the
collar is removed. However, a new way to permanently
protect your pet is available at the Veterinary Treatment
Facility-Corozal.
The microchip identification method is a system featur-
ing a small computer chip encoded with an identification
number, said Capt. Russell Wiessinger, commander VTF-
Corozal. The chip is encased in a biocompatable tube so it
will be accepted by the animals body, and is small enough
to fit into a hypodermic needle. The device is injected under
the animals skin and remains there throughout the animal's
life, unable to be lost or altered.
The process is as simple as routine vaccinations, he said.
The microchip ID method is permanent, inexpensive
and is not painful for the animal, he said.
The microchip is a passive transponder activated by a
radio signal. A hand-held scanner is passed over the pet to
read the encoded ID number. The number appears on the
scanner's screen, providing positive ID of the animal.
Owners can register the pet's number with a national
registry to ensure rapid ID.
A registry of animals implanted here will be kept on file
at Corozal and be included in the pet's records to ensure
lost or stolen pets returned to the clinic will be returned tc
their families as soon as possible. Call 285-5866/5867 for
more information between 8 a.m.and 4 p.m.


I


The microchip is small enough to fit inside a
hypodermic needle.


Time key in replacing knocked out teeth


HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) - Americans knock
out an estimated five million teeth each year in accidents
and rough play according to the Academy of General
Dentistry. Knocked out teeth can be reinserted, however, if
patients follow some simple instructions and head straight
for a dentist.
When a tooth is knocked out, time is ofthe essence. The
ligament that holds it in place can regrow and secure it as
firmly as before, according to Caplt. Mark D. Nill, general
dental officer at the clinic here.
"After 30 minutes, the chance that a tooth can be
replanted drops sharply," he said. "Once the tooth leaves
your mouth, cells in its outer layer begin to die. To keep
these cells alive, the tooth must be transported to the dentist
in conditions similar to the environment of your mouth."
Ideally, the tooth should first be rinsed and gently


inserted in its socket while waiting to see the dentist, Nill
said.
"If this isn't possible, hold the tooth in your mouth or
immersed it in cold water or milk which contains many of
the same minerals as saliva," Nill said. "Successfully
reattaching a tooth depends upon the conditions it was kept
in after it left the mouth."
Children's permanent teeth are more likely to replant
solidly because children have great healing abilities, he
said. Baby teeth have little chance of successful
reimplantation.
Dentists will adjust the tooth in the socket and fasten it
with wire or bonding materials. It may take up to eight
weeks to see whether the tooth reattaches itself and a root
canal may be required within a month since the nerve
usually dies, Nill said.


A


Quarry Heights
Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey, commander in chief,
U.S. Southern Command,.will host a reception for
distinguished SOUTHCOM volunteers at Quar-
ters 1, Quarry Heights, 2 p.m. June 3.

Gorgas
People who need to be screened for command
sponsorship and out-processing to the United States
or overseas for the Exceptional Family Member
Program must now schedule appointments. Family
members will no longer be seen on a walk-in basis.
For appointments, call 282-5339/5607.

Clayton
Nominations are now being accepted for the
1995 Ten Outstanding Young Americans Award
program. Nominations should be sent to Aichel
Tam at the Directorate of Civilian Personnel, Build-
ing 560, Corozal, by April 22, 1995. Call 285-5611/
4111.
The Enlisted Spouses Club - Panama holds
meetings 7 p.m. the first Monday of each month at
the Fort Clayton Noncommissioned Officers' Club.
For information, call 287-3587.
The American Red Cross is sponsoring a com-
munity first aid and safety course on the third
floor in Building 519, 6 -10 p.m. June 21-23. The
class will feature instruction on adult and infant
CPR, safety procedures and first aid. For informa-
tion, call Abbe Lester at 287-5509.
Regular Islamic prayer services are held 12:30-
1:30 p.m. each Friday at the Fort Clayton Chapel
hall. For more information, call 287-5859.
The Welcome to Panama Newcomer's Orien-
tation Tour will be held 8 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Thursday
and June 8. Participants will meet at the Fort Clayton
Noncommissioned Officers' Club. The tour in-
cludes an information fair, a tour of historical sites
and Miraflores Locks, shopping, an authentic Pan-
amanian lunch and a dance exhibition. The cost for
lunch is $5.50.
Child care is provided at the Fort Clayton Child
Development Center by reservation only at 287-
5657. To make reservations for the orientation, call
287-5073.
For people transferring to new duty stations, the
Army Community Service Relocation Assistance
Office helps in the search for housing, employment
and educational possibilities. For more information,
call 289-4021/4636.

Atlantic
Free coupons are available 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Monday-Friday at the Relocation Assistance Office
in Building 8348, Margarita Complex.

Howard/Albrook
Volunteers are needed in family services to
help with the loan closet, base brochure library, and
layette program. Family services is open 10 a.m.-3
p.m. Volunteers get free child care and can visit the
facility or call 284-5860.

Miscellaneous
Applications for the student summer hire pro-
gram are available the Directorate of Civilian Per-
sonnel and at the schools. The program runs June
20-Aug. 31 and is limited to full-time students
attending U.S. schools. Students must be 16-23
years old. They will earn $3 per hour and work 20
hours per week with some working up to 40 hours
per week. For more information, call 285-5201/
4155.
Toastmasters International - Panama will hold
meetings Thursday and June 16 at the Panama Canal
Training Center. For information, call 287-5689.
Anthony's Pizza offers free home delivery to
Quarry Heights, Curundu, Albrook AFS, Corozal,
Fort Clayton and Amador by calling 287-5745/
4718. Delivery is available to Howard AFB, Fort
Kobbe, Farfan, Rodman Naval Station and Cocoli
by calling 284-6744/6252/6254.










B6 Tropic Times
OMay 27, 1994


// / /*
S * S S


/ /
K, / // 4'


JN


Rodman
informationn, Tour and Travel:
The Navy ITT office new hours of
operation are 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday.
Barro Colorado Island 6 a.m. June 11
and 25, $65, a mininmim of two people is
needed. Visit the tropical research island
in the canal's Gatun Lake.
Panama City Tour 9 a.m. June 9 and
25, $8, minimum of 10 people is needed.
Visit the Church of the Golden Altar,
French Plaza and more.
Moonlight Cruise 6:30 p.m. June 3
and 24, $21. Cruise Panama and Taboga
Bay on the 61-foot Black Stallion.
Free Zone Shopping 7 a.m. Monday
and June 15, $12, minimum of of 12
people needed. Shop for gold, watches,
small electronics and fine linens.
Dinner & jazz at Las Bovedas Res-
taurant, 7 p.m. June 3, $6 transportation
fee. A minimum of 10 people is needed.
El Valle Shopping Trip, 7 a.m. June 5
and 26, $12. Twelve people are needed.
Shop for local handicrafts, plants, fruits
and vegetables and visit the nature pre-
serve.
San Blas Island June 17-18, $149. A
minimum of two people is needed. Visit
the San Bias Archipielago and shop for


molas handicrafts and snorkel in the crys-
tal clear waters.
Albrook/Howard
*Zodiac Community Activities:
El Valle market shopping 6:30 a.m.-
4 p.m. June 5, $13. Bring extra money for
lunch.
Dining out at Plaza Paitilla 6-10 p.m.
Thursday, $4 for transportation. Enjoy a
night on the town with fine dining and
entertainment.
Free Zone shopping 8:30 a.m.-4:30
p.m. June 3, $13 for transportation. Enjoy
duty free shopping in the city of Colon.
*Outdoor adventures:
Peacock bass fishing on Gatun Lake
5 a.m.-2 p.m., $25 per person. Cost in-
cludes transportation, boat with guide, bait,
ice and coolers for fish. Bring your own
fishing gear.
Conoeing and barbecue on the
Chagres River 8 a.m.-2 p.m., $20 per
person. Cost includes transportation,
conoes, safety equipment, guide and bar-
becue lunch. Bring drinks, snacks,
sunscreeeen and a hat.
Snorkeling or scuba near Drake's
Island 7 a.m.-5 p.m. June 5, $22 snorkel/
$47 scuba. Package includes transporta-
tion to launching point near Portobello and


snorkel or scuba equipment. This is the
legendary burial spot of SirFrancis Drake.
Gold panning in Las Cumbres 8 a.m.-
3 p.m., $65 per person. Pan for gold the
old fashioned way in a proven gold pro-
ducing river. Bring a sack lunch, cooler
with beverages, hat and suntan lotion.
Deep Sea fishing 6 a.m.-noon Satur-
day, $50. Fish for marlin and sailfish on
the 65-foot Catyani.
Gold panning 8 a.m-3 p.m. today,
$12. Pan for gold on the Chagres River.
Bring a sack lunch and drinks.
Clayton
*Valent Recreation Center:
Shimmey Beach 9 a.m.-5 p.m.June 4.
Taboga guided tour 7 a.m.-7 p.m.
June 5.
Churches and architecture tour 9
a.m.-l p.m. June I1.
Free Zone shopping 7 a.m.-3 p..m.
June 17.
Costa Rica tour July 1-4. Register by
June 20. Trip includes three nights/four
days at Hotel Gran Costa Rica, round-trip
ticket and city tour.
*Outdoor Recreation Center:
Partial transits of the Panama Canal
7:30-11:30 a.m. Saturday, $40. A mini-
mum of 20 people is needed for partial


transit any day of the week.
Playa Blanca snorkel and dive trip
June 4.
Horse back riding in El Valle June 11.
Gatun Lake train wreck dive June 18.
Customized trips are available for
groups with a minimum of four or 10
people.
Balboa
*Balboa Dive Club:
The Club is now accepting entries to
the 1994 Scuba Olympics to be held June
11 at the Albrook Pool. There will be
separate events for scuba and snorkel.
Prizes include two trips to Honduras from
Copa Airlines, dive light, tank trays, com-
puter software, subscriptions and various
dive packages from Scuba Panama and
Buzo. Entry fees are $5 for the first two
events and $3 for each additional event.
Pick up an application at the Albrook or
Howard pool, 'he Zodiac Recreation Cen-
ter or write Unit 0967 APO AA 34(X)2 or
call 263-8077.
Dive trip to Aquatic Park in Portobelo
June 25-26. The cost is $25 per person and
includes accommodations, four boat dives
and a barbecue. Sign up by June 8. Write
Unit 0967 APO AA 34002 or call 263-
8077.


am


.. ..7 ;77V7/-


offered twice a week. Basic, 1-3 p.m. inter- . .
AlBro /H a rd mediate, 5-7 p.m.
*Zodiac Community Activities Cen- Basic and intermediate sewing les-
ter.sons are offered twice a week. Basic classes
Intro to scuba, a free one-night class is are 3-5 p.m., intermediate classes are 5-7
available. p.m.
Open-water scuba June 6 at Howard Basic/intermediate cake decorating
Pool and June 11 at the Albrook Pool. meets 6-8 p.m. twice a week.
Call the center to arrange scuba classes Dog obedience class 7-9:15 p.m. Mon-
if these don't fit in your schedule. day, Wednesday and Friday, $00. .
Classes in ladies water exercise, begin- Basic/intermediate English classes are c
ning and advanced swimming for adults held Monday-Thursday. ".
and children, diving board and lap swim- Private piano and guitar lessons are
ming are available at Howard or Albrook available weekday evenings. The instruc-
pools. Call the center for details. tor meets privately with the students for 30
Martial Arts classes are offered minutes.
through the recreation center and both Swimming three days a week.
youth centers. *Fort Clayton Scuba Shop:
Beginner and advanced English and The phone is temporarily out of or-
Spanish classes begin monthly and run derbecauseofrenovations.Call287-6453/
four weeks. 5807 for information.
Beginner and advanced dog obedi- Basic open-water scuba class, $115.
ence classes are held at the Howard Parade Advanced open-water scuba, $140.
Field. Four-week class costs $32. A mini- Rescue scuba, $119.
mum of five people is needed. Underwater photography, $99. -
*Albrook Auto shop: Curundu
Air conditioning service and repair C rundu
12:30-5 p.m. every day except Tuesday *Twin Oceans Pro Shop:
and Wednesday. Equipment available for scuba, snor-
Wheel alignment diagnostic and ser- kel, tennis, camping and other outdoor
vice 3-9 p.m. Monday, Thursday and Fri- recreation.
day, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. *Pacific Theatre Arts Centre: Veteran speaker Courtesy photo
Clayton Monthlyclasses available ranging from Ve
various dance lessons, voice, guitar and Vietnam veteran 1st Lt. (Ret.) Clebe McClary, United States Marine
*Fort Clayton Boat Shop: piano and martial arts. Call 286-3814. Corps will visit the military installations in Panama to share his story
Bass fishing at Gatun Lake, $20 fee Rodman June 5-9. Throughout the week, McClary will speak to the military
includes guide, boat, bait and rods. communities during Moral Courage Seminars and God and Country
Deep sea fishing, $200 fee includes *Rodman Marina: Seminars. McClary is the author of the book "Living Proof." He has
captain, gear, lures and fuel. A boating safety class will be held 6- spoken at Billy Graham Crusades and is the recipient of the George
*Valent Recreation Center: 9 p.m. June 13 and 15 and JulyI11 and 13 Washington Medal of Freedom and the Gen. Omar Bradley Spirit of
Korean karate class 6-8 p.m. Tues- at Building 24 (next to Pizza Hut) on Washington Medal of Freedom and the Gen. Omar Bradley Spirit of
days and Thursdays. Admission to the first Rodman. Cost is $35 and includes all ma- Independence Award. He now travels around the country speaking at
class is free. trials and qualification test drive. Call the churches, veteran organizations and military installations. The sched-
Indian Guyami sewing lessons are Rodman Marina at 283-3147. ule for his visit includes:
June 5 - 8:45 a.m. Clayton Protestant Service
11 a.m. Albrook Protestant Service
June 6 - 10 a.m. - Howard Theater - Moral Courage Seminar
7 p.m. - Howard/Kobbe Chapel - God and Country Rally
June 7 - 10 a.m. - Davis Theater - Moral Courage Seminar
7 p.m. Davis Theater - God and Country Rally
June 8 - 3 p.m. - Clayton Theater - Moral Courage Seminar
For information, call 287-5568.


za







Tropic Times
ties May 27, 1994 B
tices


//


/

Ks


/


Phone guide


Melanie Bales and Ted Turnipseed perform a scene from "Opera Comique," an adult farce that
will be entered in the 1994 Forces Command Festival of Performing Arts. The comedy will be
performed 8 p.m. tonight and Saturday. Tickets are $8. Call 286-3814 for reservations.




*Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts tures seasonal displays and is open tion 10:15 a.m. June 9.
Center: 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Saturday, *Howard Skills Development
Fabric painting classes 6:30- Building 804, Albrook. Call 286- Center:
8:30 p.m. the first and third Wednes- 4500. Sign up-.for classes at the Free Mother of Pearl applica-
day and Thursday of each month, shop: tion demo 3-3:30 p.m. Saturday.
$7.50. Some supplies are available. Special project quilting Santa Free ceramic pouring class 10
Stone stroke classes 11 a.m. wall hanging isl0:30 a.m. Wednes- a.m.-noon Tuesday.
Sunday, $10. Paint ceramic figu- day and runs 6-8 weeks. Free ceramic pouring class in
rines to look like stoneware. Quilting classes run the first, Spanish 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday.
Custom frames to order and second and fourth Tuesday of the The 1994 photo contest is com-
do-it-yourself frame classes are month; intermediate 10:15 a.m.- ing in August. Call for details.
available. noon; beginner 12:15- 2 p.m. Ongoing classes include stained
The Ceramic Center, Building Free crochet demo will be held glass, cross-stitch, framing, clay
198,islocatedneartheCraftsShop. 10:15 a.m. June 6. flower, pottery wheel throwing,
*Canal Crafters: Tole painting class will be held macrame, air brush techniques, and
Handmade arts and crafts are 10:15 a.m. Thursday. The cost is lamp assembly. Several "how-to"
available. Consignment and volun- $11. videos are available for free view-
teers are welcome. The shop fea- Free paper mold demonstra- ing.
//


Pacific
24th Services Squadron Sports and
Recreational Rental Center, 284-6107
Albrook Auto Craft Shop, 286-3613
Albrook Club, 286-4128
Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333
Anchorage Club, 283-4332
Canal Crafters 286-4500
Chief Petty Officers' Club, 283-5475
Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-5957
Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453
Clayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360
Clayton NCO Club, 287-3586
Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363
Clayton Scuba Shop 287-3355
Club Amador, 282-3534
Cocoli Recreation Center, 287-4119
Howard Auto Craft Shop, 284-3370
Howard Enlisted Members' Club, 284-4107
Howard Officers' Club, 284-4680
Howard Riding Stables 284-3770
Howard Skills Development Center, 284-6361
Howard Teen Center, 284-4700
Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-4510
The Loop, 287-3035
Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814
Ouarrv Heights Officers' Club, 282-4380


? Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150
Rodman Naval Station Information Tour
and Travel Office, 283-5307/4454
m ' ' eTwin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514
Valent Recreation Center, 287-6500
*Valent Recreation Center: information, is open to all barracks residents. Zodiac Community Activities Center, 284-
The screening room offers free Refreshments and cookies 2 *Cocoli Community Center: 6161
movies. Calling the 24-hour movie p.m. Saturday. Arts and crafts for children Atlantic
line at 287-4367. Fresh water pearls will be on 3:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday. Aquativity Center, 289-4009
Star Trek 27-hour movie mara- sale 1-7 p.m. Thursday throughJune Celebrate the birthays of the Davis Arts and Crafts Center, 289-5201
thon 8 p.m. tonight through 11 p.m. 5. month 6p.m. today.Cake, icecream Davis Community Club, 289-5160
Saturday. Army art historical print exhi- and kool-aid will be served. Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402
Dart players may win a $1,(X)0 bition June 9-17 in honor of flag Karaoke coming soon. Outdoor Recreation, 289-4077
first prize and large merchandise day. +Zodiac Community Center: Sherman Arts and Crafts Center, 289-6313
prizes during this year's dart tour- Glass and crystal display June Subs on Top has take-out, eat-in Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-6104
nament at the Valent Recreation 6-12. ordelivery service to Kobbe,Farfan, Sundial Recreation Center, 289-3889/3300
Center. Qualify for the June tourna- Better Opportunities for Howard and Gateway housing. Fax
ment by playing at Valent. Contact Single Soldiers forum meets the in orders at 284-6109 or call 284-
Anne Kellyat at287-4500 formore first Thursday of every month and 5848. B .

/7/7",, /


Atlantic tours
*Sundial Recreation Center:
Barro Colorado 6 a.m. June 4.
Post exchange shopping 8 a.m. June 4.
El Valle 5:30 a.m. June 19.
*Ocean Breeze Recreation Center:
Free Zone 9 a.m-1:30 p.m. Wednesday and June 11.
Taboga Island 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. June 4.
El Valle 5:30 a.m.-5 p.m. June June 5.


Colon historical tour 9 a.m.-2 p.m. June 8.
Shopping June 11.
Rec center news
*Ocean Breeze Recreation Center:
The center offers a variety of classes such as karate,
cake decorating, piano, Spanish, English, country line
dancing and jazz. Call 289-6402 for details.
Aquarium exhibit June 11.
Pool tournament June 19.


*Sundial Recreation Center:
Mini triathalon 7 a.m. June 18.
Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. Monday, Wednesday and
Friday.
Family exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m. Wednesday.
Piano 10:30-11 a.m.Wednesday.
Karate 6-7 p.m. Monday and Wednesday.
Gymnastics/ballet 5:30-6 p.m. Thursday.
Spanish 6-7 p.m. Tuesday and Friday.
Painting 6-8 p.m. Monday and Wednesday.


/z///








B8 Tropic Times
B May 27, 1994


-ItM-.ovies


June 3


Howard AFB
pl I Major League I11
(PG-13)
Charlie Sheen,
Tom Berenger
pmni The Paper (R)
Michael Keaton.
Glenn Close


Fort Clayton
7pm Monkey Trouble
(PG) Thora Birch.
Mimi Rogers
9pm 8 Seconds (PG-13)
Luke Perry,
Stephen Baldwin

Fort Davis
7pm Guarding Tess
(PG-13)
Shirley MacLaine
Nicholas Cage
9pm What's Eating
Gilbert Grape
(PG-13)
Johnny Depp,
Juliette Lewis

Fort Sherman
7:30pm The Ref (R)
Denis Leary,
Judy Davis


Fort Amador
7pm Jimmy Hollywood
(R)
Joe Pesci,
Christian Slater


Major League i
Charlie Sheen, Tom Berenger
After having won their championship,
the Cleveland Indians have slumped back
into their old losing ways. it seems the
players have been distracted by expen-
sive cars, doing endorsements and other
nonbaseball activities. When the manag-
er suffers a heart attack the team catcher
takes over and tries to get everyone back
into the winning streak. PG (some rude
language), 100 min.

Jimmy Hollywood
Joe Pesci, Christian Slater
Hoping to get attention and to achieve
fame for himself, an out-of-work actor
becomes a vigilante superhero on the
streets of Hollywood. R (language), 110
min.

The Paper
Michael Keaton, Glenn Close
Trying to beat the deadline for a story in
the New York Sun newspaper, an editor
rushes to expose a major scandal which
could possibly lead to the release of two
innocent young men charged with mur-
der. R (strong language , 112 min.

The Chase
Charlie Sheen, Kristie Swanson
Falsely accused of a bank robbery, Jack
Hammond escapes; steals a BMW with a
young heiress in it; and makes a high
speed run for the Mexican border. PG- 13
(violence, a scene of sensuality and some
language), 88 min.

What's Eating
Gilbert Grape
Johnny Depp, Juliette Lewis
A small town young man living in a
dysfunctional family for whom he's the
sole backbone and support discovers life
can be fun when a new girl moves to
town. PG- 13 (elements of mature subject
matter), 117 min.


Now showing at Clayton and Davis theaters.


Angie
Geena Davis, Stephen Rea
A vulnerable, single woman has to deal
with complicated relationships and crit-
icism from her family and friends while
learning responsibility for herself and
her new baby. R (language), 108 min.

Guarding Tess
Shirley MacLaine,
Nicholas Cage
Nicholas Cage is the special agent in
charge of the secret service detail as-
signed to guard the widow of a former
U.S. president at her home in a small
Ohio town. His purpose in life is to get
another assignment and her's is to make
his life miserable. PG-13 (for some lan-
guage), 95 min.

Lightning Jack
Paul Hogan, Cuba Gooding Jr.
A bungling outlaw teams up with a very
perceptive mute partner to enjoy a life of
crime while eluding the law in the Old
West. PG-13 (sexual conent), 98 min.


Sugar Hill
Wesley Snipes,
Michael Wright
The godfather of a New York City
crime-empire fights desperately to break
free of the world he created before it
destroys him and his family. R (intense
drug related violence, graphic heroin
use, strong language), 123.min.

The Ref
Denis Leary, Judy Davis
Comedian Denis Leary is cast as a
hapless jewel thief who kidnaps a bick-
ering married couple on Christmas Eve
and ends up being a hostage in the
couple's home. R (language), 97 min.

China Moon
Ed Harris,
Madeleine Stowe
A small town detective falls for a rich
married woman and remains blindly in
love until he has to investigate a murder
he'd rather not solve. R (sensuality,
language, violence), 99 min.


Location Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
Howard AFB 7pm: Monkey Trouble 2pm: Monkey Trouble 2pm: Monkey Trouble 7pm: Monkey Trouble 7pm: 8 Seconds (PG- 7pm: Major League II 7pm: The Paper (R)
284-3583(PG) Thora Birch, Mimi (PG) Thora Birch, Mimi (PG)Thora Birch, Mimi (PG) Thora Birch, Mimi 13) Luke Perry, Stephen (PG) Charlie Sheen, Michael Keaton, Glenn
24- Rogers Rogers Rogers Rogers Baldwin Tom Berenger Close
9pm: 8 Seconds (PG- 7pm:8Seconds(PG-13) 7pm: Naked Gun 33 9pm: Naked Gun 33 1/3 9pm: Jimmy Hollywood 9pm: The Paper (R) 9pm: Jimmy Hollywood
13)LukePerry,Stephen Luke Perry, Stephen 1/3 (PG-13) C. Leslie (PG-13) C. Leslie Niel- (R) Joe Pesci, Christian Michael Keaton, Glenn (R) Joe Pesci, Christian
Baldwin Baldwin Niel-sen, Priscilla sen, Priscilla Presley Slater Close Slater
9pm: Naked Gun 33 Presley
1/3 (PG-13) C. Leslie 9pm: 8 Seconds (PG-
Niel-sen, Priscilla 13) Luke Perry,Stephen
Presley Baldwin


FortClayton 7pm: Guarding Tess 2pm: ErnestrideAgain 2pm: Mr. Doubtfire 7pm: The Chase (R) 7pm: Guarding Tess 7pm: Monkey Trouble 7pm: 8 Seconds (PG-
287-3279 (PG-13) Shirley Mac- (PG) Jim Varney (PG-13) Robin Will- Charlie Sheen, Kristie (PG-13) Shirley Mac- (PG)Thora Birch, Mimi 13) Luke Perry, Stephen
Laine, Nicholas Cage 7pm: Guarding Tess iams, Sally Field . Swanson Laine, Nicholas Cage Rogers Baldwin
9pm: What's Eating (PG-13) Shirley Mac- 7pm: What's Eating 9pm: What's Eating 9pm: The Chase (R) 9pm: 8 Seconds (PG- 9pm: Naked Gun 33 1/3
Gilbert Grape (PG-13) Laine, Nicholas Cage Gilbert Grape (PG-13) Gilbert Grape (PG-13) Charlie Sheen, Kristie 13) Luke Perry, Stephen (PG-13) C. Leslie Niel-
Johnny Depp, Juliette 9pm: The Chase (R) Johnny Depp, Juliette Johnny Depp, Juliette Swanson Baldwin sen, Priscilla Presley
Lewis Charlie Sheen, Kristie Lewis Lewis
Swanson 9pm: Guarding Tess
(PG-13) Shirley Mac-
Laine, Nicholas Cage

FortDavis 7pm: Lightning Jack 7pm: Lightning Jack 7pm: TheRef(R)Denis 7pm: Sugar Hill (R) 7pm: Angie (R) Geena 7pm:TheRef(R)Denis 7pm: Guarding Tess
289-5173 (PG-13) Paul Hogan, (PG-13) Paul Hogan, Leary, Judy Davis Wesley Snipes, Michael Davis, Stephen Rea Leary, Judy Davis (PG-13) Shirley Mac-
Cuba Gooding Jr. Cuba Gooding Jr. Wright Laine, Nicholas Cage
9pm: Angie (R) Geena 9pm: Sugar Hill (R)
Davis, Stephen Rea Wesley Snipes, Michael
Wright



Fort Sherman 7:30pm: Sugar Hill (R) 7:30pm: Angie (R) 7:30pm: Lightning No show No show No show 7:30pm: What's Eat-
289-5173 Wesley Snipes, Michael Geena Davis, Stephen Jack (PG-13) Paul ing Gilbert Grape (PG-
Wright Rea Hogan, Cuba Gooding 13) Johnny Depp,
Jr. Juliette Lewis

Fort Amador 7pm: Naked Gun 33 7pm: Major League II 7pm: The Paper (R) No show No show No show 7pm: Jimmy Holly-
284-3583 1/3 (PG-13) C. Leslie (PG) Charlie Sheen, MichaelKeaton, Glenn wood (R) Joe Pesci,
Niel-sen, Priscilla Tom Berenger Close Christian Slater
Presley


I













* TV Schedule


Tropic Times B
May 27, 1994B


* Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved tonew day and time


Today

5:30am NBC News at Sunrise
6 00 Good Morning America
8:00 Basic Training Workout
8 30 Sesame Street
9:30 Highway To Heaven ***
10:25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital
Noon Headline News
12:30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World
2:00 Oprah Winfrey
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Channel One
4:15 Newsroom
4:30 Legend of The Hidden
Temple
5:00 Wheel of Fortune
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 Headline News
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Jeopardy!
7:30 America's Funniest
Home Videos
8:00 Dave's World
8:30 Baywatch
9:30 CBS Evening News
10:05 Entertainment Tonight
10:35 Tonight Show
11:35 David Letterman
12:35amHeadline News Break
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Movies: "Little Man
Tate"
3:10 "Original Intent"
4:50 Videolinks
5:30 Headline News
6:00 Headline News Break


Saturday


6:30am Headline News
7:00 Navy/Marine Corps
News
7:30 Real News For Kids
8:0130 Name Your Adven-
ture ***
8:30 Just for Kids!
Sonic The Hedgehog
CRO
Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles
BeetleJuice ***
EEKT The Cat
10:30 Nature
11:30 Clive James' Fa me In
The 20th Century
12:30pm Headline News
1:00 Young Adult Theatre:
"Sneakers"
2:00 Movie: "Forever Am-
ber"
4:30 Motorweek
5:00 Showtime At The
Apollo
6:00 Headline News
6:30 Rescue 911 **
7:30 China Beach
8:25 Movie: "Police Acade-
my"
10:00 Headline News
10:30 Saturday Night Live
Midnight World Wrestling Fed-
eration
1:00 Friday Night Videos
2:00 Movies: "Dial M For
Murder"
3:35 "Phantom Of The Rue
Morgue"
5:00 Videolinks
5:30 Headline News Break


Sunday


6.00am CCMTV
6:30 Hour of Power
7.00 Voices Of Faith
7.25 Catch The Spirit
8:00 CBS Sunday Morning
9:30 Face The Nation
10.00 Special - Indy 500
2.30pm Movies: "Left Hand Of
God"
4:00 "Walk Don't Run"
6:00 Austin City Limits
6:55 ABC News "20/20"
7-45 Evening Movie:
"Broadcast News"
10:00 Entertainment This Week
11:00 Poirot V
Midnight Headline News
12:30 Meet The Press
1:30 Headline News
2:00 Sports Latenight
2:30 ABC World News Now
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Sports Machine
4:00 ABC World News Now
5:00 Headline News Break


Monday

5:30am NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America
8:00 Basic Training Workout
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Murder, She Wrote **
10.25 Guiding Light
11 10 General Hospital
Noon Headline News
12:30 Sports Machine
1:00 Another World
2:00 Oprah Winfrey
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Channel One
4:15 Newsroom
4:30 Guts **
5:00 Wheel Of Fortune
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 Headline News
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Jeopardy!
7:30 Roc
8:00 COPS
8:30 60 Minutes
9:30 CBS Evening News
10:00 Entertainment To night
10:30 Holiday Movie Special:
"Silver Streak"
12:30pm Headline News
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Arsenio Hall
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Tonig ht Show
4:30 Headline News
5:00 Headline News Break


__ _ _ __ _ _ _ __ I _ __ _ _ _ __ _ _ _I. _I___ __I__ __I _ __ _I___ _ __


Changes 8 1


-t


* Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time


CbeS - an f1


Today

5:30am Simulcast with Chan-
nels 8 & 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
Noon Headline News
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and Restless
3:30 Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Ghost Writer
5:00 Silver Spoons
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 Headline News
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 Primetime Live
8:00 21 Jump Street
9:00 Movie: "An Innocent
Man"
11:00 Headline News
11:30 Arsenio Hall
12:30am Headline News
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Arsenio Hall
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Tonight Show
4:30 David Letterman
5:30 Simulcast with Chan-
nels 8 & 10


Saturday


6:30am Simulcast with Channels
8& 10
10:30 Faerie Tale Theater
11:30 Real News For Kids
Noon Headline News
12:30 Sports Closeup
1:00 Bradshaw On Home-
coming
2:00 NBA Basketball:
Knicks vs. Pacers
4:30 Headline News
5:00 Science & Technology
5:30 American Gladiators +
6:30 The Simpsons
7:00 Lois & Clark: The Ad-
ventures of Superman
8:00 Star Trek: "Deep Space
Nine"
9:00 Herman's Head
9:30 In Living Color ***
10:00 Headline News
10:30 Saturday Night Live
Midnight WWF Superstars
1:00 Friday Night Videos
2:00 Entertainment This
Week
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Saturday Night Live.
5:00 Videolinks
5:30 Headline News Break


Sunday


Monday


Tuesday


Wednesday


S -I- i* *i +


6:00am Lamb Chop's Play-A-
Long
6:30 McGee And Me
6:50 Sonic The Hedgehog
.7:15 Disney'sLittleMermaid
7:35 CRO
8:00 Tiny Toons Adventures
8:20 Classic Cartoons **
8:45 EEK! The Cat
9:05 Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles
9:30 Science & Tee hnology
Week
10:00 Motor Week
10:30 Sports Closeup
11:00 This Week In Baseball
11:30 Wall Street Journal +
Noon Headline News
12:30 Frugal Gourmet +
1:00 Spencer For Hire +
2:00 Headline News
2:30 NBA Basketball:
Rockets vs. Jazz
5:00 Headline News
5:30 Quantum Leap +
6:30 Wonderful World Of
Disney
7:30 Golden Girls
8:00 Grace Under Fire
8:30 Movie: "Back To The
Future"
10:30 Headline News
11:00 L.A. Law
Midnight Simulcast 8 & 10


5:30am Simulcast with Channels
8& 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey
9:00 Today
11:00 All My Children +
Noon One Life To Live +
1:00 Young and Restless +
2:00 NBA Basketball:
Knicks vs. Pacers
4:30 Headline News
5:00 Club Connect
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 Headline News
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 MacGyver
8:00 Melrose Place
9:00 Movie: "Back To The
Future 11"
11:00 Headline News
11:30 Arsenio Hall
12:30 Simulcast with 8 &10


5:30am Simulcast with Channels
8 & 10
8:00 Donahue
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
Noon Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and Restless
3:30 EEK! The Cat
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Legend Of The Hidden
Temple
5:00 Mickey & Donald
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 Baby Talk
7:30 Wings ***
8:00 Picket Fences
9:00 Martin
9:30 Movie: "Blaze"
11:30 SCN Late Edition
11:35 Arsenio Hall
12:35am Simulcast with 8 &10


Thursday


5:30am Simulcast with Channels 5:30am Simulcast with Chan-


8& 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
Noon Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and Restless
3:30 Sonic The Hedgehog
4:0 0 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Guts **
5:00 Nick News: W5
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 Hangin' With Mr. Co-
oper
7:30 Seinfeld
8:00 Tour Of Duty
9:00 NYPD Blue
10:00 Murder, She Wrote
11:00 Headline News
11:30 SCN Late Edition
11:35 Arsenio Hall
12:35am Simulcast with 8&10


nels 8 & 10
8:00 Sally Jesse Raphael
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
Noon Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and Restless
3:30 Disney's Little Mer-
maid
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Get The Picture
5:00 The Wonder Years
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 Full House
7:30 Step By Step
8:00 Living Single *
8:30 Coach
9:00 Dateline NBC
10:00 Miami Vice
11:00 Headline News
11:30 SCN Late Edition
11:35 Arsenio Hall
12:35am Simulcast with 8&10


Channels 8 & 10


Cable Channel 14


Sports ,l,"^ ^ Sports
"Indianapolis 500," 10 a.m. Sunday NBA basketball
Series starts Knicks vs. Pacers, 2:30 p.m. Saturday
"Rescue 911," 6:30 p.m. Saturday. Real-life footage and Rockets vs. Jazz, 2:30 p.m. Sunday
dramatic recreations trace rescue and emergency response Knicks vs. Packers, 2 p.m. Monday
situations around America. Hosted by William Shatner. Series starts
"Murder, She Wrote," 9:30 a.m. Monday. (Replaces - "Classic Cartoons," 8:20a.m. Sunday. (Replaces BeetleJuice)
"Highway To Heaven") A celebrated mystery writer with a Five groups of fully animated cartoons. Each group highlights
penchant for solving crimes finds herself involved in bizarre and exciting entertainment subjects.
colorful adventures. Stars Angela Landsbury and Tom Bosley. "Guts," 4:30 p.m. Wednesday. (Replaces Name Your Adventure) Mike
"Guts," 4:30 p.m. Monday. (Replaces "Name Your Adventure") Sweat, O'Malley's back to host "Guts," the action sports show where young people
agility, and strain will get contestants over the outrageous obstacles and into the live out their greatest sports fantasies. The action is fast, furious and funny as
finals for totally awesome prizes. Hosted by Mike O'Malley. regular children get the chance to prove they've got the guts to go for the glory.
Primetime movies Primetime movies
"Police Academy," 8:25 p.m. Saturday. When the police academy doors are "An Innocent Man," 9 p.m. Friday. A mixup in addresses during a drug raid lead
opened to anybody, the swarm is a colorful assort ment of sizes, shapes, and two crooked cops to kick in the door ofthe wrong house and frame Jimmie Rainwood,
eccentricities. Stars Steve Guttenberg, Kim Cattrall and Bubba Smith. an innocent man, for a crime he didn't commit. Stars Tom Selleck and F. Murray
"Broadcast News," 7:45 p.m. Sunday. An up-and-coming news producer must Abraham.
choose between an old friend with talent and integrity, or a young, not too bright "Back To The Future," 8:30 p.m. Sunday and 9 p.m. Monday. A teenager at the
hunk. Stars Holly Hunter, William Hurt and Jack Nicholson. wheel of a DeLorean car converted into a time machine, roars back 30 years to 1955
"Those She Left Behind," 7:50 p.m. Wednesday. A successful businessman and meets his parents when they were his age. Stars Michael J. Fox and Christopher
takes on the tough personal challenges of solo parenting when his wife dies during Lloyd.
child-birth. Stars Gary Cole, Joana Kerns and Mary Page Keller. "Blaze," 9:30 p.m. Tuesday. Paul Newman goes all out as the larger-than-life
"Murder: By Reason Of Insanity," 7:50 p.m. Thursday. The true story of an progressive Louisiana governor, Earl Long in this late 1950s story of back-room
immigrant couple who can't make good on the American dream, a dream that for politics and Long's scandalous love affair with the larger-than-life Bourbon Street
them turns into a nightmare. Stars Candice Bergen and Eli Wallach. stripper Blaze Starr. Stars Lolita Davidovich and Robert Wuhl.


Tuesday

5:30am NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America
8.00 Bodyshaping
8'30 Sesame Street
9.30 Murder She Wrote
10:25 Guiding Light
I1:10 General Hospital
Noon Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12.30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World
2:00 Sally Jesse Raphael
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Channel One
4:15 Newsroom
4:30 Ghostwriter
5:00 Wheel of Fortune
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Jeopardy!
7:30 Beauty And The Beast
8:30 48 Hours
9:30 CBS Evening News
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Entertainment Tonight
,10:35 David Letterman ****
11:35 Tonight Show ****
12:30am Headline News
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Arsenio Hall
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Tonight Show
4:30 Headline News
5:00 Headline News Break


Wednesday

5.30am NBC News at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America
8:00 Basic Training Workout
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Murder, She Wrote
10.25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital
Noon Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World
2:00 Oprah Winfrey
3.00 Price is Right
4:00 Channel One
4:15 Newsroom
4:30 Lamb Chop's Play-A-
Long
5:00 Wheel of Fortune
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Jeopardy!
7:25 Fresh PrinlceOf Bel Air
7:50 Movie: "Those She Left
Behind"
9:30 CBS Evening News
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Entertainment Tonight
10:35 David Letterman
11:3.5 Tonight Show
12:30am Headline News
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Arsenio Hall
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Tonight Show
4:30 Headline News
5:00 Headline News Break


Thursday

5:30am NBC News at Sunrise
6"00 Good Morning America
8:00 Bodyshaping
8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Murder, She Wrote
10.25 Guiding Light
11:10 General Hospital
Noon Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday Report
12:30 Sportscenter
1:00 Another World
2:00 Donahue
3:00 Price is Right
4:00 Channel One
4:15 Newsroom
4:30 Club Connect
5:00 Wheel of Fortune
5:30 Showbiz Today
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Jeopardy!
7:25 Murphy Brown
7:50 Movie: "Murder: By
Reason Of Insanity"
9:30 CBS Evening News
10:00 SCN Late Edition
10:05 Entertainment Tonight
10:35 David Letterman
11:35 Tonight Show
12:30am Headline News
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Arsenio Hall
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Tonight Show
4:30 Headline News
5:00 Headline News Break


I I i I I











B 10 Tropic Times
BD May 27, 1994


S Classified Ads


French toy poodle, male puppy,
dewormed, tail docked, $100.
236-0991.
German shepherd pups, CCP reg,
exc pedigree. 228-2643.
Hamster, male, female w/lg cage,
many tubes, $100. 252-2319.
CCP regrottweilerpuppies, show
quality Dam, champion sire,
$650.287-6195.
Doberman pincher puppies, 5
wks, males, females, $175. 260-
1522.
Miniature poodle puppies, $150;
mare, $125; German shepherd
for stud. 252-2889.
Miniature donkey for stud ser-
vice, $100.225-4749.
Weimaraner, 2 yrs old male for
stud service. 285-6374.
TB mare, 9 yrs old, 16.1 hands
trained Eng. 223-7980 ask for
Angela.
Weimaraner puppies, 5 wks old,
$300 ea. 233-2021.
Two Ig Oscar fish, $40 both. 282-
3490.
German shepherd pups, 7 wks
old, exc pedigree, CCP reg, male,
female, $350. 252-2291.
Purebred golden retriever pun-
pies, avail now. 289-4044.
French mini toy poodle puppy,
6 wksolc, tail docked, dewormed,
$200.226-5395.
TB gelding, 4 yrs, lunges, trained
Eng, good jumper prospect,
$1,000.284-6683.
Shar-pei puppy, 6 wks old, shots,
female, $250. 284-4376.
Amazon red head parrot w/pa-
pers, $95. 286-4775.
Free, male kitten tabby desper-
ately needs a home. 268-2973.
Free, female kitten, 5 mos old.
284-5176.
Free, med size puppy, 5 mos old,
good w/children, food & kennel
incl. 286-4928.
Free to good home, two kittens
found abanoned. 226-0194.
Free to good home kittens, 2 sol-
id blk, other 3 striped. 287-3875.






1991 Geo Metro LSI, needs out-
side work, $3,500/obo. 284-6776.
1988 Dodge Daytona, at, 4 cyl,
ac, am-fim stereo cass, tintedglass,
$4,500.287-5842.
1988 Nissan Sunny, std, 4 cyl,
tinted glass, am-fm stereo cass,
$3,200.287-5842.
1993 Dodge Grand Caravan, ps,
pb, tw, cc, pm, hitch, running
bds, 8,000 mi, $18,000. 284-
6883.
1986 Mitsubishi Galant SS, very
good cond, not dty pd, $5,000/
obo. 269-5700.
1986 S-15 Jimmy 4x4, ac, pw,
pb, 2dr, V6, at OD, grt shape,
$6,500.224-2876.
1986 Toyota Minivan, at, ps, ac,
pb, sr, radio cass, good cond, dty
pd, $6,500. 224-4190.
1980 Ford Granada, new tires,


tinted glass, radio, $2,000. 287-
4481.

1983 GMC Custom van, new tires,
ac, at, grt shape, $5,000.287-5976.
1989 Honda Accord LX, full ex-
tras, exc cond, not dty pd, $8,000.
263-4495.
1986 Mitsubishi Montero, 4WD,
ac, ps, pw, radio fm cass, 5 sp, new
tires, exc cond, $7,000.252-5397.
1987 Hyundai Excel GL, one own-
er, 4dr, 5 sp, ac, tinted glass, am-
fm cass, exc cond, dty pd, $3,900.
284-5699.

1991 Chevy Camaro RS, t-tops,
V8, ac, pl, custom wheels, am-fm
cass, $13,500. 236-0597.

1979 Pontiac Bonneville, 4dr, V8,
good cond, runs good, $2,000.284-
5397.
1991 Nissan Pathfinder, low mi,
US specs, $20,285.260-1946.
1988 Toyota Camry LE sedan, at,
ac, all pwr, tilt, cruise, $6,700/
obo.223-7050.

1988 VW, GOL-GI, ac, tinted
glass, 4 sp, hitch, 23,000 mi, am-
fm cass, exc cond, dty pd, $4,500.
252-5393.
1978 Ford F150 Ranger, rebuilt
351 eng, chrome, dty pd, $3,700/
obo. 252-2181.
1985 Chevy S-10 Blazer 4x4, ac,
2.8L, V6, loaded, dty pd, $6,100/
obo. 252-2181.
1990 Ford Tempo, 4 cyl, ac, ps,
pb, pw/d, pl, stereo cass, at, exc
cond, not dty pd, $8,500. 226-
8626.
1991 Ford Ranger p/u, ac, ps, pb,
at, match bed cap, $7,600. 282-
3985.
1991 Jeep Wrangler Sahara Ed, 6
cyl, ac, soft top, fully loaded, exc
cond, $12,500/obo. 289-5960.
1992 Toyota Corona, 4dr sedan,
at, ac, radio cass, new tires, avail
June 15, $9,600/obo. 269-1374.
1989 Jeep Cherokee, 4.0L, V6,
4dr, ac, pb, not dty pd, $10,500.
284-5921.
1991 Geo Metro, at, good cond,
needs little work outside, $3,500/
obo. 284-6776.
1988 full size Ford Bronco, V8,
4x4, at, radio cass, exc cond, dty
pd, $8,000. 243-5686 after 5pm.
1988 VW Vanagan van, new int,
ac, tinted glass, 8 pass, exc cond,
$9,500.284-6698.
1981 Oldsmobile Cutlass Su-
preme, ps, pb, many new parts,
good cond, not dty pd, $1,800/
obo. 230-1139.
1973 VW Fastbk, needs work,
$550; Ford 5 sp trans, $350. 287-
5088.
1992 Mercury Sable, at, ps, pw/
locks, ac, radio cass, 14,000 mi,
$17,000, 223-7675.
1982 Volvo 240 DL, 5 sp, ac, ps,
pb, runs grt, needs minor body
work, $2,200. 286-4799.
1987 Dodge Caravan, V6, ac, ps,
$6,000..286-3875.
1983 Chevy Celebrity, 2dr, dty
pd,4 cyl, at, ps, ac, am-fm, $2,700;
1987 DodgeCaravan, 2.6L, 7 pass,
at, ps, ac, am-fm avail July 1,
$7,900.287-4743.
1986 Nissan Stanza van/wgn, ac,
am-fm cass, at, exc cond, $6,500.
260-0284.
1978 Chevy Caprice Classic wgn,
ps, pb, ac, new parts, runs grt. 286-
4393 ask for Joe.


1989 Ford F-1504x4 king cab, 8'
bed, w/liner, towing pkg, all man-
uals, $10,500. 284-4839 after
6pm.
1993 Daihatsu Charade, 9,000k,
5dr, am-fm cass, alarm, avail June
17, not dty pd, $7,000. 260-6199
after 7pm.
1984 Plymouth Voyager, ac, ps,
pb, stereo, runs/lks grt, not dty pd,
$4,500.284-4283.
1990 Toyota Corolla, 16 val, ac,
cd, US specs, not dty pd, 5 sp, 4dr,
$6,000.286-3420.
1991 Toyota 4x4, extra cab, ac,
am-fm cass, 40,000 mi, new tires.
285-4588.

1973 Chevy Impala, 4dr, runs grt,
$800/obo. 286-4671.
1978 Caprice Classic, mint cond,
at, ac, 350 eng, am-fm radio, dty
pd, $4,500/obo. 55-5577 LD#.
1992 Pontiac Grand Am, loaded,
$13,500; 1988Chrysler LeBaron,
loaded, $5,000; 1973 Ford p/u,
dty pd, $1,000. 262-1204.

1987 VW Amazon, 4dr, 4 sp, ac,
pull out stereo, 78k, good cond,
dty pd, $3,000/obo. 286-3687.
1987 Dodge Lancer, exc cond,
ac, cruise, sr, 5 sp, am-fm cass,
$4,100.284-6172.
1990 Hyundai Excel, ac, at, sr, 5
sp, dty not pd, $5,000/obo. 260-
7025.
1986 Toyota 4x4 p/u, not dty pd,
$5,000.252-5428.
1991 Toyota Corona, 4dr, at, ps,
pb, ac, am-fm, $7,000.260-1224.
1986 Toyota van, 49k mi, new
tires, brakes, dual ac, at, exc cond,
avail June 25, $6,500. 286-4571.
1988 Jeep truck, 4 cyl, 4WD, ac,
ps, p, new tires, best offer. 261-
6418.
1984 Dodge Ramcharger, good
cond, runs grt, ps, pb, ac, $4,000/
obo. 264-8933.
1987 Toyota LE, 4dr, ac, radio,
std, $4,600.286-4882.
1989 Isuzu p/u, good cond, cus-
tom wheels, bedliner, sr, stereo,
$6,500.287-3844.
1990 Nissan show trk, custom
600w stereo, int, wheels, alarm,
exhaust, $15,000/obo. 260-2354."
1979 Caprice wgn, grt shape,
many new parts, $1,700. 287-
6736.
1981 Camaro, 8 cyl, no rust, load-
ed, ac, stereo, air shocks, $2,000.
286-6132.
1985 Ford Escort sta/wgn, 4 sp,
ac, sr, exc cond, $2,800. 287-
5925.
1986 Peugeot 505, ps, ac, pi, tint-
ed, many new parts, good cond,
$6,000/obo. 285-5591.
1986 Chrysler Laser, 4 cyl, cruise,
ac, ps, am-fm cass, new paint, exc
cond, one owner, $4,800. 260-
4564.
1986 Honda DX hatchbk, am-fm
cass, ac, 5 sp, $4,000. 286-3124.
1989 Astro Van LT, all options,
tow pkg, low mi, $11,995/obo.
287-4571.
1985 Nissan Bluebird, new tires,
dty pd, 4 dr, tinted, good cond,
pw, alarm, $4,500. 260-6148.
1985 Honda Accord, 4dr sedan,
grt cond, best offer. 285-4898.
1990 Dodge Spirit ES, ac, pwr
everything, exc stereo, $6,000/
neg. 236-5125.


Duty-free merchandise

FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) - As a reminder,
in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern
Command regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used,
cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege hold-
ers. Violations to these dispositions ma\ subject violators to prosecu-
tion under both. military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes
permissible to sell an item. but only if Panamanian taxes are paid.
Before such a sale. it is strongly recommended that the seller contact
the Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-3117.


1991 Ford F-150 4x4, ac, V8 302,
3 spare tires, low mi, exc cond,
$17,000/neg. 264-0328.
1985 Plymouth Reliant, dty pd,
good cond, $3,000.287-6424.

1991 Ford Explorer sport, ac, pwr,
2dr, 2 w/o clean, $14,000/obo.
287-6486.
1985 Jeep Grand Wagoneer 4x4,
ac, at, leather, pw/d, ps, low mi,
dty not pd, exc cond, $7,200/obo.
287-4393.

1987 Honda CRX, Sony am-fm
cass, runs good, $2,200.282-3826.
1987 Ford Ranger XLT Supercab,
pb, ps. 5 sp, new tires/shocks, not
dty pd, $5,500. 284-6838.
1992 Nissan Bluebird, at, 4dr, all
pwr, avail end June, not dty pd,
$9,000.283-6895. .
1988 VW Gold, 4 cyl, at, ac, ps,
am-fm cass, new paint, parts,
43,000 mi, dty pd, $4,600. 260-
4564.
1985 Honda Civic, 4dr, 5 sp, ac,
am-fm cass, runs grt, dty pd,
$3,800.260-9842.
1984 Jeep Cherokee, at, ac, very
lo mi, runs grt, $5,500.260-9842.
1985 Ford Escort, 5 sp, 1.9L, ac,
am-fm cass, good cond, $2,500.
284-5287.
1986 Jeep Cherokee, 5 sp, ac, ps,
pb, clean, 4dr, low mi, $6,250/
obo. 286-6133.
1978 Ford Granada, runs good,
new batt, '94 reg, $800/obo. 269-
9227.
1991 Honda Prelude Si, cd, cass,
alarm, pw, ps, alloy rims, sr, new
tires, ac, 2dr,tinted, $14,500.284-
4355.
1979 Oldsmobile 88, good cond
$1,850; 1979OldsmobileCutlass,
$1,750, not dty pd, 284-3593.
1986 Suzuki Samurai 4x4, 4 cyl,
ac, radio cass, running bds, parts,
tire, dty pd, good cond, avail June
20, $4,950.268-3261.
1977 Mercury, 2dr, good mi, runs
grt, make offer. 287-3944.
1983 Chevy Suburban, at, ac, 4dr,
52,000 mi, $3,995. 282-3188.
1985 Nissan Sentra, 2dr, 5 sp, ac,
cass, 50,000 mi, US specs, $2,499.
282-3188.

1991 Z28 Camaro, ac, am-fm cass,
pb, ps, under Bluebook, $11,465.
256-6830.

1978 Ford T-bird, runs/lks grt, ac,
ps, pb, $2,100/obo. 287-3675.

1988 Chrysler LeBaron convert,
53,000 mi, exc cond, not dty pd,
$9,000.264-5805.
1983 Datsun 280ZX, 5 sp, t-tops,
ac, $4,900. 286-4004.
1987 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera,
runs good, $2,100/obo. 287-4935.






Eng-spk maid, Amador only, exc
w/kids, highly recommended,
Tues. 282-3497.
Span-spk mature housekeeper, M-
T-F, good refs,. 231-2585 ask for
Chela.
Exp mature maid, 3-5 days a wk,
clean, irons, refs. 286-6295.
Bilingual honest maid, 5 days a
week. 221-9538.
Span-spk live-in maid, honest,
hard working, grt w/kids. 282-
3694 ask for Mari.
Typist, Atlantic side, $2 a page.
289-4619.
Babysit in your home, Clayton
only. 287-4577 ask for Amy.
Span-spk live-in/out maid, hon-
est, good w/kids, clean, cook, exp
mature. 231-5489 ask for Otilia.
Span-spk maid, part time, clean,
babysit, exc refs. 286-4290.
Bilingual live-out maid, clean,
laundry, iron, babysit, prefer
Howard/Albrook. 284-3184.
Span-spk housekeeper, good w/


children, M-F, some wkends,
avail Tuesday. 287-3521.
Eng-spk day maid, M-W-F, pre-
fer mil family. 263-3627.
Span-spk live-out maid, refs,
cooks, exc w/kids. 221-2801.
Bilingual maid, babysitting for
Sat-Sun, carpet cleaning. 252-
6815.

Honest maid, 2-3 days, wkends,
babysits w-exp, refs. 282-4727
ask for Alexia.
Bilingual mature maid, grt w/
kids. 263-9264 M-F, 8am-6pm.
Babysitter w/exp, 17-yr-old, de-
pendable, nights, wkends. 230-
1927.
Exp honest hard working maid,
Tues, refs. 287-5928.
Bilingual live-in maid, reliable,
grt w/children. 264-8865.
Live-in housekeeper, trustwor-
thy, dependable. 286-4489.
Honest housekeeper, bilingual,
T-Th-F. 285-4434.
Honest day maid, good worker,
gen house work, bilingual. 233-
3025.
Eng-spk live-in/out maid, hon-
est,excw/kids, cleans, M-F. 287-
5595.
Full time maid, grt w/children,
M-F. 221-7843 ask for Belinda.
Summer tutoring for elementary
students, certified teacher, exp
w/children havingspecial needs.
282-3673.
Eng-spk live-out maid, day work
or wkend, babysits. 287-6572.
Eng-spk maid, mature, honest,
dependable, grtw/children, avail
June 15. 284-6838 after 6pm.





16' Orlando Clipper, 60hp
Yamaha, trolling, depth finder,
kicker, many other extras,
$5,000/neg. 286-4775.
18' 1987 Bayliner, 85hp motor,
exc cond, $7,500/obo. 263-5792
eves.
21' Romery, 4 cyl Perkins diesel,
exc cond, $9,000. 252-5100.
Horse trlr, hvy dty, 2 axle, elec
brakes, dty pd, $5,000/obo. 252-
6467.
16 1/2' fiberglass fishing boat,
45hp Mariner motorw/elec start,
trlr, o/b tank, more, $4,200. 287-
3572.
Eez-in o/b motortracket for up to
40hp, $190; rocker stopper, $5
ea; 4-step boarding ladder, $20;
13" trlr springs, $15ea; 12" keel
roller, $15. 252-6046.

18' Glastron V-hull, like new
120hp Evinrude, 48 gal gas tank,
$5,500.286-4571.
16' Deep-V, 60hp overhauled o/
b, exc cond. 286-3174.
15'bass boat, 50hpJohnson, dual
elec anchors, trolling motor, fish
finder, exc cond, $2,750. 286-
4004.
Alum canoe, $400. 287-4248.





Teac X-1000R reel-to-reel tape
deck, exc cond, 4 reel incl, $200.
230-1078.
Kenwood cd, remote, recharge
batt, $130. 287-5729 ask for
Matt.
IBM PC & Mitsubishi monitor,
adapted board. 283-5631 Iv msg.
Nikon F3-hp camera; Nikon
mount lens, bag, flash w/tele at-
tach, diving equip. 284-3227.
286 computer, 120meg hd,
SVGA card, 3.25, 1.44 meg flop-
py dr, 4meg Ram, 16mhz, sound
blaster procard, Windows 3.1,
Dos 6.2, $600. 287-4471.
Nintendo, Super Nintendo


games, $10-up; Kenwood car ste-
reo sys, spker box, amp, cass rec,
sell togetheror separate. 287-6284
after 5pm.

IBM Commodore computer w/
printer, manuals, like new, $850/
obo. 284-4238.
C-64 computer, dd, printer, joy-
sticks, games, programs books,
$325/obo.286-6295.
DJ equip, 2 Gemini tumtbls, ste-
reo pre-amp mixer, 1 yrold, $525/
obo. 282-3237.
Bose 601 spkers, $500 pr. 284-
5820.
JVC VHS-C camcorder w/batt,
case, exc cond, mil only, $550.
284-4120.
Bose concerto loud spkers com-
plete w/equal, pedestals, $1,500.
225-3697.
2 dbl jet printers, $1,500-$450;
computer, $400; fax, $300; laser
jet, $350; laptop, $300.233-2021.
Packard Bell 386SX, 5mb, 80mb,
VGA, sound blaster, Dos 6.2,5.25-
3.5 floppies, $950. 287-6834.
Sony digital receiver, VCR cap,
$100; Technics cd, all options,
remote, $150.223-6675.

Pwr surge protector w/tel modem
protection, never used, $30. 260-
5336.

Technics center spker for surround
sound, 140w. 264-9741.
Fisher stereo sys w/2 spkers sys,
50w, $200. 286-4084.
Yamaha stereo cass, $95; SC elec-
tronic typewriter, $225.252-5792.
Port Panasonic electronic type-
writer, extra ribbons, $100. 223-
8858.
Bass amp sys, 2-10", 4-10"
hartkee's, l-18"jbl,swr,200w,ab
100w amps, $1,200. 286-3895.
Audio vox car spker sys, TV, cd
mini sys, phone answer mach,
record album collection, best of-
fer. 243-5617.
PB 48625SX, new cond, SVGA
monitor, 170meg hd, 4 meg Ram,
software, $1,099.261-4682.
Canon camera w/Starf 28mm,
Canon 50mm, 135mm lenses, incl
flash, 3 UV filters, carrying cases,
$450.285-4878. __

PB 286NT cpu w/4mb Ram,
keybd, mouse, Dos 6.2, licensed
software, $500/obo. 260-2957.
IBM notebk, 386SLC/25mhz,
85mb hd, int fax modem, ext VGA
port, mouse, 5.51bs, $1,200. 261-
4682.
386 computer, 8 meg, 486 math
coprocessor, 27mhz, 250megtape
backup, sound blaster, 120meg hd,
$2,000.286-6132.
Sony component sys, dbl deck,
cd, dbl bass, surround sound, Ig
remote, all digital, $425/obo. 285-
5592.
Macintosh classic computer &
Hewlett Packard printer, software,
best offer. 287-4178.
Sony Betamax S120, $50, w/re-
mote, Kenwood compact disc,
$110.233-4996.
AST 486SX/33mhz, 6mb Ram,
210hb hd, cd rom, 3.5-5.25 dd,
Dos 6.2, SVGA color monitor,
software, cds, $1,800. 238-8313.
IBM compat 286, 12mhz, 40meg
hd, VGA, 3.5-5.25 dd, mouse,
sound blaster, Panasonic printer,
$650/obo. 264-1768.
Port personal printer, $50. 284-
4634.
IBM PC compat w/monitor, priner,
desk, $500; Gameboy, 5 games,
corner plus access, $150. 284-
5372.
Car audio, mb-quart,jl audio, au-
dio control, precision pwr. 284-
3669 ask for Marck.

GE 19"colorTV,$165; JVCVCR,
$175; JVC port component sys,
dbl cass, $105. 287-6308.

Camcorder, 6 mos old, $500;
acoustat spkers, $250 pr. 282-
4225.










.Classified Ads


Tropic Times B
May 27, 1994B1l


Cd for auto, new, Sony detach-
able face for security, $325.284-
6244.
GE dual cass radio, 5 band equal,
$75; Vivitar 35mm camera wi
case, $30. 287-5392.
SC word processor, 80001t,256k.
Ram, modem, 3.5 dd, needs print-
er, $250. 287-5392.






Two carpets, brn, beige, approx
12x15, $75 ea, both $125. 287-
3231.
Two navy floral loveseats, $300
ea,; full szfutton/couch, solidpine,
new matt, $400; dog crate x-lg,
neg. 284-5685.
Modular sofa, 6 chrs, 2 tbls, $450.
233-2021.
Blue sofa, overstuffed style, like
new, $600; dbl matt, box springs,
metal frame, $150.269-5700.
New RCA 20" TV, remote con-
trol, $300; oak ent center, glass
doors, $180, bmr strato lounger,
adjust, $100. 264-4976.
Q-sz sofabed, leather sofa, $650.
260-1946.
DR tbl, 6 chrs, $400; computer
desk, $60; asst bookshelves. 236-
2618.
K-sz waveless waterbed w/12
drawers, $350, 13"TV,$100,TV
cabinet, $50. 236-2618.
Sears20" pwrlawnmowerw/rear
grass catcher, $100. 286-3129.
Daybed, $100; golf clubs w/bag,
$200; side-by-side refrig/frzer,
$600.282-3832.
Whirlpool elec dryer, wht, exc
cond, $275. 282-3985.
Kolcraft dbl stroller, $40, ent cen-
ter for TV-VCR, $40. 284-4725.
Trestle tbl, 2 chrs w/arms, 2 bench-
es, seats 8, $350; 6-drawer dress-
er w/o mirror & night stand, $90.
284-6682.
Mini blinds to fit window in 3BR
trop, $250. 284-3194.
Carpets, 10x12, 12x14, $75 ea;
12x22, $100, all tan. 284-3194.
Hot Point 600w microwave w/
temp problem, all features, exc cond,
$100.287-3231.
German high chr, $50, tbl, $100;
vacuum, $50; baby carrier, $10.
287-5190.
Side-by-side refrig, frost free,
$625/obo. 223-3639.
12x15 mauve carpet, $75. 284-
3529.
Speed queen hvy dty washer/dry-
er, good cond, Ig cap, like new,
$750/obo. 284-4238.
Bentwood rocker, $35; dishwash-
er, $35; glass coffee/end tbls, $30;
Commodore 128d complete,
$150/obo. 287-3628.
8pc LR set, gt cond, $800. 284-
4282.
K-sz matt, box spring, frame,
$600.289-6564.
Amana22 cuftrefrig; Tappan gas
dbl oven, selfclean; patio fum,
lounge mirror. 263-8579.
Lg Q-sz sofabed, loveseat, chr w/
pillows, exc cond, $850/obo. 230-
1972.
Youth bed, $100. 252-2717 5-
8pm.
GE side-by-side refrig, $650; DP
adjust weight bench w/leg ext,
steel wts, $75. 284-5372.
Whirlpool side-by-side 25 cuft
refrig/frzer, ice/water dispenser,
4700.252-2760.
Loveseat, curtains for trop, 10 sp
bike, 400w Pioneer spkers. 230-
1927.
JVC 26" color TV, wks grt, $300;
12xl5 dustygmncarpet,$100.287-
5976.
Whirlpool 18 cuft refrig/frzer,
$600; GE 24 cuft side-by-side,
$900, both exc cond; DR set,


chrome/glass, $700/neg. 264-
9676.
Dinette set, 4 chrs, 42" round tbl,
$300; kitchenaid, washer/dryer,
grt shape, $600.284-5479.
Four carpets, 9x 12, exc cond, $50-
$90; Sears dehumidifier, used
once, $175. 260-0284.
Outdr round tbl, 6 high chrs, wht,
good cond, $275; bbq grill w/
tank, plastic cover, $180. 236-
0984.
Whirlpool dishwasher, like new,
$250.284-4283.
L-shaped wood bunk bed w/3
drawer dresser, not matt, new
cond, $200/obo. 260-9345.
DR, tbl, 6 chrs, china cab, $950
set; sell separate $450-$700.287-
5277.
Sofa, loveseat, exc cond, cream,
$500; 18,000 btu ac, exc cond,
$325. 260-6533.
Sofa, loveseat, chr, 2 end/coffee
tbls, good cond, $1,200/obo. 286-
3834.
30" gas stove; washer/dryer; GE
side-by-side refrig; chest frzer; 3
acs. 264-4253.
Rocker/recliner, Q-sz sofa sleep-
er, lamps & shades, bamboo DR
set, dishwasher, suitcases, best
offer. 243-5617.
Broyhill sofa, 1 1/2 yr old, gm/
coral shell design, $400. 287-
5928.
6,000 btu ac, 110v, $175. 284-
3731.
Q-sofa sleeper, $300/obo; sofa,
loveseat, overstuffed chr w/pil-
lows, $800;/obo; 12x15, 3x6
cream carpets. 283-5391.
JVC stereo w/cd, spkers, $500/
obo; floor lamp, $65/obo. 283-
5391.
GE 23.5 cuft side-by-side refrig/
frzer, ice/water dispenser, hvy dty
washer; 15.6 cuft GE frzer, no
frost. 252-1257.
Like new butcher block top, port
dishwasher, $250. 286-8674 af-
ter 5pm.
Computerdesk, $75; carpet, 9x 12
beige, $45; 9x12 dk brn, $20.
286-4626.
Rugs,�8xl0turquoise, 1 x12 mint
grn, 6x9 rust, $50-under. 282-
5281.
Full size futon w/floral cover,
$250/obo. 284-5083 after 5pm.
Beige-mauve floral design sofa,
$250; microwave, $100/obo. 284-
5726.
Q-sz Somma pillowtop waveless
waterbed w/hdbd, all linen, $700/
obo; sofa, loveseat, $500/obo.
286-4693 after 5pm.
GE 23.5 cuft refrig/frzer; Magic
Chev 4-bumer stove; GE hvy dty
washer; Admiral 16.7 cuft, up-
right frzer. 264-5160.
Hot Point washer/dryer, exc cond,
$400 set; lawn mower, new, $100.
286-3333.
Two microwave cabinets; micro-
wave oven; curio shelves; metal
garage shelves. 286-3345.
Maytag washer, Wards, dryer, Ig
cap, sold as set, $600/obo. 286-
4294.
GE refrig, $700; still new BR
fum, $1,250.286-4824.
Food processor, $25; Nintendo,
$90; VCR, $130; child's carbed,
$250/obo. rocking horse, $20.
284-3733.
Upright frzer, 20.7 cuft, almost
new, $600. 287-5925.
Upright vacuum w/detachable
hand held vacuum, $80. 252-
2319.
Wall-to-wall carpeting fits 3BR
housing in 500/600 areas, avail
June 15,neg. 287-3171.
Sears wet/dry vacuum & steam
carpet cleaner, hvy dty, high cap,
avail June 17, neg. 287-3171.
Loveseat, $100; dryer, $200;
wood tbl, $10; 9x12 carpet, $60.
287-6199.


Baby bed converts to Jr bed, oak
wood, linen avail, $200. 287-
5225.
Quality carpets, 12x15 blue,$175;
cream, $150; oak finish ent cen-
ter, $175; delux vacuum, $150.
269-2095.
Couch, loveseat by Bassett, exc
cond, $375/obo. 287-3321.
BR set, dresser w/mirror, chest of
drawers, 2 night stands, Q or full
sz bed, $1,180. 269-0356.
Full sz matt, box springs, $165;
men's dress blues 39R, men's
clothes, plants, men's watch, cur-
tains, misc. 269-0356.

RCA 20" color TV, radio flyer
wgn w/rails. 286-3587.
Sofa, loveseat, chaise lounge,
computer desk, dishwasher, sm
dresser, 12" girl's bike, adult
bikes. 286-4489.
GE washer/dryer, hvy dty, $650;
child BR set, chest, night tbl,
$325; child's gym set, $95. 260-
4393.
Asst colors 9x12 rugs; Mickey
comforterw/sheets, drapes, deco,
$65; gas grill, $125; dbl dr20cuft
refrig, exc cond, $850.260-4393.
Sofa, coffee/end tbls, $550; LR
curtains, $50 set; wine rack, $10;
2 bikes, $65-$85; plants, $3-$15,
more. 269-5224.
Acs, 14,000 btu, 10,000 ac parts,
desk, patio furm, sm refrig. 252-
2730.
Whirlpool 18,000 btu ac, $350;
GE 6,000, $150. 252-2287.
4pc BR set, $495. 268-3261.
Refrig, like new. 256-6830.
Whirlpool 8ft upright frzer, cht,
like new, $225. 282-3188.






1974 Ford J302 cyl heads, exc
cond, comes w/2 barrel intake w/
all bolts, $325/obo. 287-6484.
Comic books, D.C. & Marvel,
most popular series, priced by
sales guide. 286-4797.
Sm wall unit/bookcase, 2dr, $40.
224-6113.
Ford 302 eng, new gaskets, $200/
obo. 287-6175.
Ceramic faces. See Qtrs 259A
Albrook.
1/4ct diamond solitaire engage
ring, marquis cut, 14ktgold,$350/
obo. 285-5901.
Replica WWI fighter plane ultra
It SES, needs minor repairs, bro-
ken propeller, will trade for mo-
torcycle or $2,000 w/hanger. 230-
1312.
Lg & sm house plants. 287-5271.
Rock polisher, saw, tumblers w/
many extras, $1,200/neg. 252-
6610.
Exer bike, $50; HF receiver, $65;
8x10 camping tent, $80; ground
school, instructions video, $100.
286-4278.
Pontiac Fiero parts. 287-3192.
10 sp girl's race bike, $50. 260-
1078.
Westone guitar, G 15 amp, $300;
20" boy's Mongoose, $50. 289-
6383 ask for West.
K-sz sheet set, blk/wht striped,
never used, $18. 283-5425 after
6pm.
Carver stereo pre-amp, $150;
Sony cd player w/remote, $75;
outdoor bar w/2 stools, $150; re-
cliner, $75; DJ Its, $150. 284-
6698.
Metal bunk beds full/twin. 284-
4634.
Spear guns Voit, exc cond. 252-
5100.
Hoover quick vac, $20; changing
tbl $15. 230-1972.
2 shirts & I pr shorts for Jr Girl
Scout uniform plus 2 Jr G.S.
books, $20. 252-2080 eves.


Girl's roller skates, $30; Huffy
boy's bike, $50; yard swing set,
$20.252-6817.
Lg dog airline carrier, $30. 261-
6602.
American Airline/Eagle credit
note for airfare woth $140, will
sell for $90. 252-2889.
High chr, $20. 252-2717 5-7pm.
Baby chr/bouncer, $20; battery
oper swing, $40; snugli carrier,
$20; dbl stroller, $125.286-3637.
Lg baby stroller, fair cond, $25;
elec typewriter, good cond, $50.
287-3319.

Lawn mower, $100; Ig Panasonic
microwave/convect oven, $300;
brass noodle cart, $40.287-5976.
Crib, $45; walker, boys's bike,
tricycle. 261-1292.
Male class A uniform 40L, good
cond, $75. 287-4299.
Exercise wts; med sz bird cage.
252-2676.

Darkrm equip to make blk/wht
photos, $100. 284-5586.
Infant bassinet, $35; bike, $40;
aquarium, $45; x-lg rods, $20 ea,
rabbit cage, $40; 10,000lbs winch
& bumper. 252-6046.
New am specs 1965 windshield,
4-5 lug rims w/tires. 285-4450
ask for Chris.
Britannica encyclopedia, 39 vol;
Comptons encyclopedia, 35 vol,
exc cond, $795 both. 252-6566.
Recliner, good cond, $150; blue
drapes for 1000 area, $100-$60.
287-6736.
Wedding dress, sz 5/6, neg. 223-
7463 after 5pm.
Britannica encyclopedia, 32 vol,
like new, $500. 284-5072.
Zenith 19" TV, $165; touch phone,
$15; makeup mirror, skatebd. 252-
5185.
Zenith 26" TV, as is, $200; di-
nette set, $300; 1/4 ct marquis cut
engage ring, $450/obo. 286-6190.
Patio settee, tbl, chr w/cushions,
$125; rowing machine, $50.287-
3572.
Surfbd, 3 fin, $100; men's dk gray
suit, sz 40R, autumn 9x12 rug,
$135.252-2028.
Euro voltage transformer, 220-
1 lOv, applian, fans, food mixer,
misc, $100/obo. 260-2957.
Weider flex I110homegym,$175.
286-3674 after 5pm.
Electronic stepper, $125; proform
auto incline treadmill, $280.286-
3674 after 5pm.
RCA 19" color TV, $150; infant
stroller, $50: misc clothes, baby
items. 286-6521.
New CostaRican hammock, $55;
metal desk, $130; crib padding,
$14; Graco duo stroller, $25.236-
2365.
Portland microwave oven, $95;
fish finder, $250. 236-2365.
Car seat, $15, stroller, $20, high
chr, $10, baby toilet, $10, plants,
$5-$20; 19" color TV, needs au-
dio, $100; Nintendo games, $30
ea. 260-4393.


Kenmore washer/dryer, $500/
obo; Atari games, $$2-$5;
Nintendo games, $10, sm crib,
$90.282-4390.
Blue Topaz, marquis shaped w/
fantasy cut.6 sm diamonds, $200;
11 x15 cream carpet, $50. 287-
6395.
Sm block Chevy parts, 307 block,
heads, crank, pistons, radiator,
tires. 283-3485.
Patio tbl, chrs, umbrella, charcoal
grill. 286-4489.
All-purpose trailer, $400 firm.
287-5589.
Gas grill, grtcond, $60.287-4335.
Panasonic VCR, $200/obo;
weider ski mach, $60/obo; dirt
devil vacuum $25; patio furn,
$75; golf clubs, $50. 284-5234.
Coupon for wkend at Santa Clara
Beach cabins, value $192.50, sell
$150.252-1257.
Seven sheets counter top, $77.
252-2989.

Rugs, misc. 287-6778.
Uniden satellite disc (parabolic),
$300/obo. 287-5974.
3 tires P225.70RI5, $50; 16"
child's bike, $15. 284-3793.
Cosco side- swing tray high chr,
$35; FP up to 401bs car seat, $35;
Graco batt swing, $40 all exc cond.
285-4885.

Rowing mach, $30; Fuji lite wt
bike, good cond, $50; baby swing,
$20; couch, loveseat, $30, needs
work. 282-3826.

Play yard, $60; baby monitor, $30;
snugli infant carrier, $20; infant
head support/Gerger bottle warm-
er. 286-3772.
Trop plants, ferns, hibiscus, cac-
tus, more. 286-3587.






1982 HondaFT500, runs/Iks good
w/helmet, $900/obo. 289-4699 af-
ter 6pm.
1981 HondaExpress Moped 50cc,
under 2,000 mi, exc cond $575.
287-3321.
1981 Honda Express II1 Moped,
2,100 mi,helmet,4450.232-5622.
Transalp V600, 2,800 mi, dty pd,
7 mos old, $3,800. 287-5394.
Honda new tires 130/90-15 tube
or tubeless, 4 ply thread, $49.
225-4749.





Qtrs. 309A Clayton, 9am-?

Qtrs. 506B-513 Clayton, 6:30-
10am.

Qtrs. 541B Clayton, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs. 610D Clayton, 7am.

Qtrs. 613C Clayton, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs. 641B Clayton.

Qtrs. 644C Clayton, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs. 684C Clayton.


Qtrs. 813A Clayton, 8am-noon.
Qtrs. 850B Clayton, 7am-?
Qtrs. 900B Clayton, 7am-noon,
Monday.
Qtrs. 904B Clayton.
Qtrs. 1031A Clayton, 7-lam.
Qtrs. 1176A Clayton.Qtrs.2384C
Cocoli, 7am-lpm, Sat-Sun.
Qtrs. 56 Albrook, 8am-noon.
Qtrs. 135A Albrook.
Qtrs. 203 Albrook, 9am-3pm.
Qtrs. 209A Albrook, 8-1 lam.
Qtrs. 314B Albrook, 7am.
Qtrs. 59B, Howard, 8am-noon.
Qtrs. 148A Howard, 8am.
Qtrs. 595B Howard, 8am-noon.
Qtrs. 614It Howard, /-i lam.
Qtrs. 1536B Howard, 7am-noon.
Qtrs. 377B Kobbe, 7-10 Oam.
Qtrs. 2069 Curundu, 7am.
Qtrs. 2312 Curundu, 8am.
Qtrs. 5424 Diablo, 7-10am.
Qtrs. 2350A Balboa, 7-10ani.
Qtrs. 1009A La Boca, 7am-noon.






Japanese books or video tapes.
287-3896.
Will pay guide value for DC/
Maruel silver/golden aged com-
ics, 1940s-1980s. 289-5364 Iv
msg.

X-lg dog shipping kennel in good
cond.282-3398.

Live-out maid, cook, clean, laun-
dry, iron, refs, $11 Omo. 260-3485.
Cylinder head for '85 Mercury
Lynx, 4 cyl, 2.6L, 2bbl carb, ac,
std. 287-5798.
PCC textbk, art & ideas. 260-
5336.
Mature full time maid, live-out,
refs. 252-2676.
Bilingual wkend housekeeper, in-
fant care, refs,g rt w/toddlers, gen
house work. 286-3890.

Typist for one week, pay by page.
284-5586.
Acs for parts, any size or condi-
tion. 252-2287.
Beauty trim rings, polished for
15x7 rally wheels; ac-heater blow-
er box for 71-72 Chevelle, El
Camino. 283-3485.
Class A Army 44R, preferably
officer. 284-5180.
Two tennis rackets, oversize head,
metal frame, reasonably priced.
261-6507 Iv msg.
Live-in maid to clean, cook, iron,
care for 1 -yr-old, refs, starts July
11, $130-$140mo. 252-2077.

Old 15" Army trlr rim, 4 holes
3.5" center, any amount. 225-
4749.
Pint and half-pint canning jelly
jars. 282-3673.


^ Tropic Times Ad Form


ANIMALS
] AUTOMOBILES
AVAILABLE
BOATS & CAMPERS
] ELECTRONICS
] FOUND
HOUSEHOLD
] LOST
MISCELLANEOUS
MOTORCYCLES
PATIO SALES
WANTED



SPONSOR'S NAME


ORG.


PRICE


HOME PHONE__


Check only one category per ad form. Only two ads per person each
week are allowed. Each ad form is limited to 15 words. Please type or
print neatly. Information listed below is not included in the ad, but is
required for publication. This information will not be released to third
parties. Deadline for the receipt of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for Friday's
edition. Ads are run on a space available, and may be held for a future
edition. Ads may be mailed to the Tropic Times, Unit 0936, APO AA
34002 or deposited in a drop box at the Albrook Post Office. Ads
offering weapons or sent by FAX will not be run.
RANK/GRADE


DUTY PHONE


-C-.









Tropic Times
B12� May 27, 1994


Os--


HOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-171, DD 214
if claiming %eleran preference, a copy of college
transcripts if claiming eduation and a copy of
C ASP notice of rating ifapplicable- Submit a cop)
of latest SF-50 if you are a Federal employee.
For more information regarding Arm) %a-
cancy announcements (forms required, job re-
lated criteria, etc.). isit the Directorate of Cit il-
ian Personnel, Building 560. Room 102.Corozal,
or call 285-5201.
"Note: One-on-one employment counseling
should be the first step in the job search.

SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE: Positions at
NM-5 level and abme require specialized experi-
ence. Specialized experience is either education
abo e the high school level or work experience
directly related to the position being filled. Exam-
ple: Budget positions at or abome the NM-5 hlecl
required Budget experience or cquiialent educa-
rion.
Vacancy\ announcements are also available at
the Sundial Recreation Center.
The Arm) civilian personnel office accept%
applications on a continuous basis for the
following positions. These announcements are
used to establish registers for permanent and
temporary future vacancies.

Army

V'B# 001 * General Clerical, NM-3 (Used to
fill most clerical position).
VB# 001A * General Clerical. NM-4 (Used to
fill most clerical position).
VB# 00* Sales Store Checker, NM-3
(Intermittent wk sch)

* CASP Examination (CEO. notice of rating)
is required.

VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4
(Lifeguard) Requires Cert + 6 mo recreation exp
in the field.
VB# 004 Recreation Assistant NM-4 (Req 6
mos recreation exp in the field.
VB# 005 Secretary (Stenograph)). NM-5
VB# 005A Secretary (Stenography). NM-6
VB# 006 Secretary "(T ping/Office
Automation), NM-5
VB# 006A Secretary (Typing/Office
Automation). NM-6
VB# 017 Administrative Services Assistant,
NM-5
VB# 017A Administratite Senrvices Assistant.
NM-6
VB# 018 Supply Technician, NM-5
VB# 018A Supply Technician, NM-6

The following positions are Perm/Temp Full-
time. Part-time. Intermittent.

VB# 007 ** MEDICAL OFFICER, NE 12/131
14.
VB# 008 ** CLINICAL NURSE. (RN license
required). NM-9/10i/ I.
VB# 009 ** PRACTICAL NURSE. (LPN
licence required), NM-5

" Selectees for nurse and medical officer
position will be required to undergo a
background check.

The follow ing are limited to veteran preference
eligibles and permanent employees only.


NIB#4 010
%'B 01
%'B4 012
VBH 0 13
NVB/ 0 14
v B# 0 15
%'B# 0 16


Manual Positions. MG-2
Manual Positions, MG-3
Manual Positions, MG-4
Manual Positions, MG-5
Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-6
Motor Vehicle Operator. MG-'7
Motor Vehicle Operator. MG-8


VB# VACANCIES TITLE AND LOCATION
OPEN: 05-27-94 CLOSE: 06-07-94

Pacific
310-9t4-VL Teller. NM-530-5.
31 1-94-FL SecretarN (Sleno.Office Automation),
NNI-318-8. Sensitive.


~fotpDourri


Clb ci-


Quarry Heights
*Officers' Club:
Breakfast buffet is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Monday-Fri-
day and 8-10 a-m. Saturday.
Old fashioned steak night 6-10 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Choose cut of beef to be charbroiled.
Social hour 5-8 p.m. Friday.

Club Amador
Typical Panamanian buffet 6-9 p.m. Wednesday in La
Concha.
Grupo Samba Tres Friday nights in the Bridge Lounge.

Clayton
*The Loop:
CJ's Sports Bar offers daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m.-1I
p.m. Monday-Friday. Pool tournaments are held 3:30 p.m.
Sunday.
Prizmz Night Club features a variety of music Wednes-
day-Saturday to include jazz 5 p.m. Sunday.
*NCO Club:
The ballroom will be closed through Monday for reno-
vations.
Country and western dance lessons are held 7-9 p.m.
Sunday and Mondays in the Corral Lounge.
Rock 'n' roll music is offered 7 p.m.-l a.m. Wednesday
and 7-11 p.m. Thursday at the Underground Lounge.
Salsa dance lessons 7 p.m. Thursday with Vibraciones
Latinas at the Underground Lounge, free.
Casa Maria special today through Tuesday, Sonoran:
two chimichangas, a taco salad, Spanish rice, sour cream and
melted cheese.

Albrook/Howard
Free ride program is offered to all Air Force club pa-
trons who have had too much to drink. Check with the night/
duty manager or bartender.
*Albrook Club:
Enjoy blues and jazz 7-10 p.m. today by recording artist
Lowell Hopper in the lounge.
Karaoke in the lounge today.
Steak night Friday. Choose from rib eye, K.C. strip, filet
or prime rib. Dinner comes with vegetable, baked potato,
French fries or rice.
Fiesta de mariscos Saturday nights. The seafood feast
features different platters and clam chowder, shrimp cocktail
or ceviche. The combination platter includes broiled corvina,
stuffed crab, calamari rings, peel-and-eat shrimp, a choice of
potato or rice, cole slaw and vegetables du jour. A la carte
menu available.
Mongolian barbecue 6-9 p.m. Tuesday. Prepare your
plate, choose the meat, vegetables, seasonings, oils and have
chefs do the job outside on the open grills.
Sunday champagne brunch 10 a.m.-1 p.m. in the dining
room offers breakfast from cooked-to-order omelets, French
toast, hot lunches, salad and fruits, peel-and-eat shrimp, des-
serts and ice cream bar.
The club will be closed Monday for Memorial Day. The
club also closes after lunch the first Tuesday of each month
for maintenance.
For events or catering call 286-3557/3582.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club:
Memorial Weekend All Nighters Sunday in the Casual
Cove.
The June 4 grand reopening of the upstairs lounge and
ballroom includes a Panamanian night. Menu features
sancocho, arroz con polio, platano en tentacion, arroz con
pina and typical Panamanian beverages. After dinner .
entertainmnet follows. Tickets are on sale at the cashier cage
window for $8.95.


Monday.
The Breezeway will operate normal hours Monday and
the Casual Cove opens 4 p.m. with check cashing at the bar.
The cashier cage will be closed.
Karaoke 7 p.m. Sunday and Tuesday in the Casual Cove.
Weekend breakfast is served 7-10:30 a.m. Saturday
and 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Sunday. Begin the day with a stay
slim plate or French toast, Belgium waffles with a choice of
toppings, the crew chief deluxe, or a hearty breakfast burrito.
Breakfast is served 6-9:30 am. Monday-Friday.
Country and western dance lessons Wednesday nights
in the Casual Cove. Learn the latest in line dancing, the
stomp, waltz and others. A dance follows.
Italian nights 5:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday with Alfredo
or seafood fettuccini, lasagna, pasta mixta or pasta and shrimp
in a white wine sauce. A la carte menu available.
Steak lovers 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday nights in the dining
room. Select a cut and order a New York strip, rib eye or
filet. To eat lighter, meals of chicken marinata, pasta, shrimp
vin blanc or shrimp Taboga are also available.
Disco nights 5 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday and Saturday.
Bang up barbecue in the Breezeway, dine-in or take-
out. Enjoy the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or hot wings.
For events or catering, call 284-4189.
*Top Three Club
Jazz guitarist Lowell Hopper 7-10 p.m. Saturday with
live entertainment of jazz and blues. This performance is
open to all ranks.
Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesday.
Smoke free every first and third Saturday of the month.
*Howard Officers' Club:
Enjoy a prime special 6-9 Fridays and Saturdays.
Social hours 5-7 p.m. Monday; 5-6 p.m. Wednesday
and 4-6 p.m. Friday with Club Card drawings. Music is 8
p.m.-midnight.
Super Thursday night buffet. Adults $7.95 all-you-can-
eat, children from 6 to 12, $2.95, and children under 6 eat
free.
For events or catering, call 284-3718.

Rodman
The Rodman Club, Rodman Annex, the Laguna Lounge
and Rodman Bohio is open to all ranks. The Anchorage Club
will be converted into a fitness center and is scheduled to
open by June.
*Rodman Club:
Lunch is served 11 am.-I p.m. Monday-Sunday.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.in.-1
p.m. Mondays-Fridays.
Dinner is served Monday-Sunday.
Soup and sub night 3:30-8:30 p.m. Monday. Grill menu
is also available.
All-you-can-eat chicken 3:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Grill menu is also available.
Cook-your-own steak night 3:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday
at the Rodman Bohio.
Fine dining 6-9 p.m. Friday-Saturday.
Upstairs Bar 3:30-8:30 p.m. Sunday through Thursday;
6-9 Friday-Saturday.
Social hours and hors d'oeuvres, 3:30-11 p.m. Friday at
the Laguna Lounge and Rodman Bohio.
*Rodman Annex:
Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Monday-Friday.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.-
1:30 p.m. Monday-Friday.
The club is closed for evening and weekend service.
Davis
*Davis Community Club:
Scrumptious Sunday brunch 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
Mongolian barbecue 6-8:30 p.m. Thursday.
Mexican dinner special 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Country and rock nights 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m. today. There


The dining room will be'closed for breakfast and lunch will be a cover charge.


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PAGE 1

0 0 Vol. V1I, No. 21 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, May 27, 1994 Panamanian policeman shoots U.S. soldier FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -A U.S. Army soldier assigned to Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry at Fort Davis, was wounded outside Colon when he allegedly failed to stop for members ofthe Panamanian National Police (PNP). Shortly after 2 a.m. Thursday, the PN P allegedly attempted to stop Staff Sgt. Maurice Neal's vehicle because the headlights were off. The PNP reported that Neal fled in the vehicle toward the Four Comers intersection, failed to stop at a PNP check point, and continued down the Transisthmian Highway to the town of Sabanitas approximately 1.0 miles south of Colon where, according to the PNP, he failed to stop at another road block. The PNP then fired on the vehicle, wounding Neal in his left shoulder. Neal wastakenby ambulanceto AmadorGuerrero Hospital in Colon where his condition is reported as stable. The incident is currently under investigation by U.S. and Panamanian authorities. Charm an visits Panam a Department dt Detense photo Rear admiral selected Special Operations Command South Commander Brig. Gen. Kenneth Bowra, 24th Wing Commander Brig. Gen. David A. Sawyer and U.S. Army South Commanding General Maj. Gen. new deputy com m ander George A. Crocker meet with Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. John M. Shalikashvili for a QUARRY HEIGHTS (Tropic Times) -Rear working lunch at the Quarry Heights Officers' Club Saturday. During his visit, Shalikashvili Adm. James Blenn Perkins III has been selected as received a briefing on quality of life from Command Sgt. Major Franklin D. Thomas, and briefings thedeputy commanderinchief,U.S.SouthernComon counterdrug operations and the future of the roles and missions of the U.S. Southern mand. The effective date has not been announced. Command after the year 2000. For a full report, see next week's Tropic Times. He was bom Aug.28, 1942 in Long Beach, N.J., and began his career as a midshipman at the U.S. select conference Naval Academy July 5, 1960. Locals seetD.C. co frneissues His first assignment was from June 1964 to Oct. FORT AMADOR (USARSO PAO) -Representatives servicemembersE-5 and abovetopay asurcharge formeals 1966 aboard the USS Saratoga. He's also served on from the Atlantic and Pacific communities selected three consumed in hospital dining facilities. Frequently there are the USS Henderson, USS John Willis, USS Downes quality of life issues that will be presented at the Army no other acceptable sources of nutritional food at the and commanded the USS Schofield Family Action Program Conference in Washington, D.C. hospital. In 1982, Perkins was the Chief ofNaval Personlater this year. The cost for meals, including surcharge, creates an nel. After that assignment he was the commander of The representatives were presented with the top issues unnecessary expense to the family that already must conDestroyer Squadron Nine; the deputy and chief of selected during the Atlantic and Pacific AFAP conferences tend with the emotional stress of caring for a sick child or staffoftheNaval Surface Force Pacific; commander held March 17 and April 12. spouse. of U.S. Naval Forces, Marianas/USCINCPAC, ReDuring the conference, the representatives discussed the The study group recommended changing AR 40-330 public of Guam and U.S. Trust Territory. His most issues that ranged from family services and community/ and exempt the immediate family members of in-patients recent assignment was commander of Amphibious consumer services to medical/dental services and relocafrom paying the surcharge. Group Three. tion and housing. Single soldiers option for length of tour. Married The representatives selected the top three issues and soldiers can choose short tours (hardship) or complete tour Rehearsal, ceremony came up with recommendations. (with family members). The top three issues were: The group also recommended career soldiers whether to close Clayton roads *Kindergartenistooshort.Forexample,ontheAtlantic singleormarriedshoulddothree-yeartours. Singlesoldiers side it lasts only two hours including nap and lunch time. should be given an option of a twoor three-year tour FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The fol*Army hospitals require family members of OCONUS: lowing areas will be closed off from 6 a.m. to approximately 11I a.m., Thursday and June 3,t-for Infntr Brigade (Light) Army program to curtail domestic violence rehearsal and the farewell ceremony for the 19;3rd Ar ypo am t cu aid me icv ln e *Hawkins Avenue, from the intersection by the WASHINGTON (AP) -Spouse and child abuse is on "There's no question that the downsizing has had a real Bowling Center to Child Development Services the rise among military families, and the Army will assign impact on the active-duty military and their families," said *TB e parking lot adjacent to the Chapel civilian counselors to hundreds ofimilitary units next month Peter J. McNelis, a former Army colonel who heads the T in an effort to curb it, a Pentagon spokesman said Monday. Military Family lnstituteat woodCollegeinScranton, *The parkig lot across the street from Buildig Confirmed cases ofspousal abuse in the military rose from Via. "You can't talk to anyone without getting the sense 12 per 1,000 spouses in 1988 to 18.1 per 1,000 in 1993, they're tense and feel that the system is letting them down." according to Lt. Col. Doug Hart. Some members of Congress are conceded. At a recent DE H announces water Child abusecasesrosefromsix per 1,000to6.6per 1,000 meeting to discuss the status of women in the military, flushing schedule during the same period, he said. female senators and senior military leaders talked about On average, one child or spouse dies each week at the domestic violence, the Times said. The Directorate of Engineering and Housing will hands ofa relative in military families, statistics the indicate. "Part of the problem is that there is a let's-sweep-itbe flushing water mains 8 a.m. -6 p.m. on the The increase has Pentagon and congressional officials under-the-rug attitude about all this," contended Sen. following dates: June 15, Fort Amador; June 17, worried, though the rate ofchild abuse is still about halfthat Barbara Boxer, D-Calif. "The military needs to be realistic Cocoli; June 20, Fort Kobbe; June 22-23, Corozal; in the general population, according to a report Monday in and admit there is a problem." July 2-3, Fort Clayton; July 6, Curundu; July 10, The New York Times. The Pentagon has established a panel to review child Quarry Heights. Water pressure will be lower for Partoftheincreasemightbeattributedtobetterreporting deaths at three major military hospitals and the Defense about one hour during this time. ofincidents, the Times said. Butmilitary experts also believe Department has commissioned a study of7,000 children of cutbacksinthemilitaryandtheimpacttheyhaveonpeople's service members at 25 bases, Pentagon spokesman Hart careers are playing a role. said. The Army and Air Force hold activiThe 1-508th Infantry prepares to +New era for El Salvador, Page 5. ties to promote safety day, focus on inactivate, reflects on past achieve*World War II history, Page 11. 101 critical days of summer. ments. *Loop wins title, Page 12.

PAGE 2

Tropic Times M e& May 27, 1994 24th Wing Public Affairs makes story corrections HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) -The Saturday Atlanta lAP ToiTiepulished two articles Ma 5:40 amn C1 30 Howard AFB Charleston lAP, S.C. June 3 F Tropic Times puise ay (Active duty) 5:40 am C130 Howard AF 20 with errors. Wednesday Managua, Nicaragua (CC) The promotions story on page one had 1:45 pm CSA Howard AFB 5:5S am C130 Howard AFB Soto Cano AB, Honduras mistakes regarding the promotion rates of Charleston AFB, SC (0) San Salvador, El Salvador Howard AFB majors and senior master sergeants Kelly AFB, Texas Soto Cano AB, Honduras Howard AFB USU.S. passport throughout the Air Force. Sunday 5:40 am C1141 Howard AFB 0-Overnight During the March majors board, 2,326 No scheduled departures Kelly AFB, Texas C-Commercial Contract officers were selected for in-the-zone-proCharleston AFB, SC V-Visa motion out of 3,146 eligible for a rate of Monday M.Medevac 74 Fourteen percent, or 109 cap3:45 pm B727 Howard AFB Thursday CC-Country Clearance percent. Soto CanoAB, Honduras(0,C) 5:55 a.m. C-5A Howard AFB *Effectivel immediately all tains, were selected out of 786 for aboveSoto Cano AB, Honduras m the-zone-promotion. Of the 7,523 eligible Tuesday Charleston AFB, SC (0) passengers are allowed to wear cifor below-the-zone-promotion, 106 or 1.4 6:40 a.m. B727 Howard AFB Dover AFS, Del. vilion clothing, AMC officials said. percent were chosen. Master sergeants eligible for promotion to E-8 were selected at a rate of 4.62 perdemonstrations. People may also buy Vendor's exposition will be held displayJune 18, and leave when the camp ends cent. This resulted in 1,101 NCOs being lunch from the wide variety of ethnic cuiing the latest in communication and autoJune 29. People interested in participating selected out of 23,827. sine, and beverages will also be available. mation equipment. For information, call should begin their permissive temporary An error was also made in the noncomFor more information about the day's ac287-6819. duty, temporary active duty requests soon. missioned officer retraining article on page tivities, call 284-3410. For more information, call Johnathan two. Phase II of the program will run July Medical squadron offers Hilton at 284-5567/3516 or Kathy 16-Aug.16 this year. If enough volunteer Civilian personnel office an ser control course MacPhail at 285-6548. retrainees are not found during the first two phases, the third phase will be implementcloses Tuesday The 24th Medical Squadron's BehavSpot bid sale slated for ed with involuntary retraining. For more The Directorate of Civilian Personnel, ioral Science Clinic is sponsoring an anger information, call 284-3817/4808. buildings 560 and 6523, Corozal will be management group for people who have June 8 at COroZal closed 7:15 -9:30 a.m. Tuesday. difficulty controlling their temper. A spot bid sale will be held 9 a.m. June Commissaries close Officials need to determine the number 8 at Building 308, Corozal. The inspection 1-508th holds all-ranks of people in the community who would time is 9 a.m.-3 p.m. June 7. Used U.S. because of Merorial Day like to attend and also the best time slot for government cars, buses and trucks will be The Corozal and Fort Espinar commisdinner Wednesday holding group meetings. sold. For more information, call 285saries will be closed Thursday in obserThe 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th InGroup members will learn anger man5417. vance of Memorial Day. The Howard fantry will be holding its all-ranks dinner agement techniques to help them gain concommissary will be closed Tuesday. 6 p.m. Wednesday at the Club Amador. trol over their lives and themselves. PeoZodiac sponsors Swap The event is open to present and former ple interested in participating should call Ethnic extravaganza members of the battalion and their spouses 284-6410/6457. and Shop sale Ju ne 4 h or guests. The uniform is dress blues, dress The Zodiac Community Activities Cenheld today at Howard mess or mess whites and will cost $20 per Public affairs specialist ter is sponsoring a Swap and Shop sale 7 The 24th Wing and the 24th Mission person. For reservations, call 2nd Lt. Scott a.m.-2 p.m. June 4 at the Howard AFB Big Support Squadron invite all members of Schoner at 284-3862. position available soon Tree Bohio. For more information, call Panama's American military community The Navy Morale, Welfare and Recre284-6161. to participate in the Asian Pacific AmeriAssociation sponsors ation, Nonappropriated Funds Civilian can Heritage activities planned for today Personnel Office announces the future Nova Southeastern at the Howard Parade Field. June 21 luncheon opening of a public affairs specialist posiActivities run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Armed Forces Communications tion in the Navy Services/Marketing Divineeds instructors and include many cultural presentations, and Electronics Association Luncheon will sion. MWR is seeking people with a backNova Southeastern needs qualified inincluding song, dance and martial arts be at 11:30 a.m. June 21 at Club Amador. ground in journalism, advertising, writing structors with U.S. degree. There are imand graphic design. mediate openings to teach English as a secFor more information, call Joanna ond or foreign language. Duran at 283-534 1. Mediumto long-range opening are Ss h id available in computer science; manageFuel handlers' COUrse ment theory and applications; managerial COROZAL (USARSO PAO) -The Beauty and Barber shops -8:30 a.m. -5 economics; art and society; Latin Amerhours of operation for the Army and Air p.m. registration under way can literature; English communication and Force Exchange System -Panama for MonThere will be a fuel handlers' course writing; macroeconomics; and governday in observance of Memorial Day are as Howard AFB June 6--10 at the Company A, 193rd Supment and society. follows: Main BX -10 a.m.-6 p.m. port Battalion Motor Pool. Space and For more information, visit the Diablo Pacific Shopppette -open 24 hours study materials are limited so units must Clubhouse, Building 5051, 9 a.m.6 p.m. Main PC -10 a.m.-6 p.m. Cafeteria -a.rn.-2 p.m. register by Thursday. For information, call or call 252-2071/2494. Sweets Reflections -9:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Anthony's Pizza -1 a.m.-8 p.m. 287-5366/5463. Frank's Franks -10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Clothing Sales -closed World War I veterans Anthony's Pizza -10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Service station -6:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. World War II mementos needed for celebration Wok Works -closed Beauty and barber shops -8:30 a.m. -5 Casa de Amigos -closed p.m. needed for birthday ball World War 11 veterans are needed to Bakery -closed World War 11 memorabilia is needed participate in Fourth of July activities. InCommissary Frank's Franks -closed Fort Kobbe for the Army Birthday Ball. Memorabilia terested veterans should call the U.S. Shoppette/video rental -10 a.m.-4 p.m. will be displayed in secure areas of Club Army South Public Affairs Office at 287Fort Clayton Burger King -8 a.m.-3 p.m. Amador. For information, call the U.S. 3007 today. Shoppette (95) -closed Frank's Franks (95) -closed Miscellaneous Army South Public Affairs Office at 287Anthony's Pizza -I I a.m.-8 p.m. Quarry Ileights shoppette -closed 3007. Balboa class of 1964 Burger King -8 a.m.-8 p.m. Gorgas Hospital shoppette -closed holds 30-year reunion Popeye's -6 a.m.-10 p.m. Curundu School cafeteria -closed Atlantic clerical exam Frank's Franks (by Burger King) -Cocoli shoppette -closed The Balboa High School class of 1964 closed Balboa school cafeteria -closed set for 10 a.m. June 8 will hold its 30-year reunion July 28-31 at Clayton Plaza Shoppette -7 a.m.-mid Curundu Service Station -6 a.m.-mid There will be a clerical examination for the Holiday Inn in Clearwater, Fla. Gradnight night family members in the Atlantic communiuates who know of any classmates' adShoppette (519) -8 a.m.-10 p.m. Atlantic ty 10 a.m. June 8 at the Fort Davis Educadress changes should contact Salonick Snack bar (519) -closed Fort Espinar tion Center, Building 235. To register, call Barber at 404 Marble Cove Way, Seal Auto pans store -9 a.m.-2 p.m. Shoppette -closed 285-4218. Beach, Calif., 90740, telephone (310) 430Car Care Center -closed 5880; Sherry Sabo Hozack at 2286 AmeMain PX -10 a.m.-6 p.m. Boy Scout camp needs thyst Drive, Santa Clara, Calif., 95051, Fort Amador Auto parts store -10 a.m.-2 p.m. volunteer support staff telephone (408) 984-5226; or Jane Shoppette -9 a.m.-5 p.m. Gas station -8 a.m.-6 p.m. Holgerson Thompson at 476 East Yale Cafeteria -8 a.m.-] p.m. The Panama Canal District of the Boy Loop, Irvine, Calif., 92714, telephone Albrook Anthony's Pizza -I1 a.m.-10 p.m. Scouts of America needs volunteers to act (714) 733-2789. Shoppette -7 am.-l0 p.m. Burger King -t I a.m.-9 p.m. as program and support staff during its upSnack bar -8 a.m.-2 p.m. Clothing Sales -closed coming summer camp. 'Carribean Affair' set for Anthony's Pizza -I t a.m.-8 p.m. Shoppette -10 a.m. -6 p.m. The program staff includes archery Frank's Franks -10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mini-shoppette -8 a.m. -6 p.m. range and waterfront directors, and the June 4 at Clayton pool Video rental -9 a.m.-9 p. support staff includes kitchen cooks and A Memorial Day party, "A Carribean Fumiture store -10 a.m.-4 p.m. medical personnel. Affair," will be held 9 p.m. June 4 at the Shoe store -10 a.m.-4 p.m. Shoppette -noon-6 p.m. Scouts and staff will live in the jungle Fort Clayton pool. Toyland/Outdoor10 a.m.4 p.m. Gas station -closed Class Six -10 a.m.-9 p.m. Anthony's Pizza -noon-4 p.m. operations training area at Fort Sherman. Call 287-3042 or 238-8462 for inforThe staff will arrive at Fort Sherman on mation.

PAGE 3

Tropic Times Training May 27,19943 Live fire & Realism prepares troops for battle PENA RANGE COMPLEX (USARSO PAO Atlantic) -No matter how realistic the scenarios are, many training exercises lack one bit of realism that could prove costly on the battlefield -firing with live ammunition. About 60 soldiers from Company A, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry (Light) had that realism in a May 17 live fire here. "I think they got a lot out of it," said Capt. Gary Garay Company A commander. "When they work with live rounds, it's more realistic and it forces them to be more aware of what they're doing. Firing with live ammunition also makes the soldiers aware of safety considerations, Garay said. "It makes them more alert, more carefil," he said. "They realize that if they make a mistake, they could kill someone." The safety aspect came into play in the planning stage and was a key consideration throughout the exercise, Garay said. "Before the exercise started, we had to submit our range plan to range control," he said, "and the soldiers were given a safety briefing before they got any ammunition." Additionally, the soldiers ran through the scenario with blanks before they were issued live ammunition. 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry (Light) soldiers cut through concertina wire. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Rick Emert "We issued them blanks, and they did everything exactly as they would in the The overall success of the exercise can The Company A soldiers have marksloaded with live rounds, your adrenaline live fire," Garay said. "If someone made a be attributed to a lot of practice, he said. manship and other weapons training rushes and you pay more attention to what mistake, we could correct it before the live "We do live fire exercises monthly," he throughout the month, but the live fire exyou're doing," he said. "When it's all over, fire started." said. "We try to vary the locations and sceercises seem to be the most effective trainit heightens your confidence. You feel The safety measures paid off as the exnarios from month to month so that the soling tool, Garay said. confident that you could do well in a real ercise ended with no injuries, Garay said. diers don't fall into a routine." "When you know your magazine is world mission." Exercise tests Gorgas Hospital's readiness, mettle by Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski USAFRSO Public Affairs Office GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL Medical personnel from Gorgas Army Community Hospital put their emergency response skills to the test during a mass casualty exercise May 17. The exercise tasked the Medical Department Activity 2 soldiers' ability to work as a team, test their alert rosters, and to react according to their Emergency Preparedness Plan, said Capt. Deborah Wesloh, operations officer. "Mass casualty accidents happen all the time which overtasks the staff on duty requiring everyone to respond," she said. "That's why we practice where people go and how they do it." Sgt. 1st Class Earnest Armstrong, evaluator for the exercise said that these types of exercises are important to 4 all involved. "Because we are the only hospital for DoD personnel in Panama, it's important that we get this down pact," he said. "It's my job to ensure that they are geared in the right direction." The scenario involved the crash of a CH-47 Chinook that injured 15 people. The exercise was a total team effort that included military and civilian personnel, and administrative and medical soldiers, Wesloh said. Medical personnel from the 24th Medical Group, Howard AFB, prepared the injured people for the flight, while soldiers from the 214th Medical Detachment loaded the patients onto Blackhawks and flew them to Gorgas. Once at the helo-pad, the Gorgas staff went to work. The patients' first stop was the triage area where they were placed in categories according to their injuries, said Dr. Guillermo Arana, triage officer-in-charge. The pa1 Wtients were placed into four categories: immediate, delayed, minimal and expectant. "The idea of triage is to send the patients to the proper place to be taken care of," he said. From triage, the patients were taken to the appropriate areas, where personnel were standing by ready to treat the patients. U 5 Arry photo by Sgt Robin A. Mantikoski Wesloh said the bi-annual event is important for evCapt. Nancy Bard (center) rolls a "casualty" as Cpl. Triease Mack finishes paperwork. eryone at the hospital.

PAGE 4

4 Tropic Times 'May 27, 1994 ews Safety AF focuses on 101 critical days by Sgt. James A. Rush 24th Wing Public Affairs HOWARD AFB The 24th Wing caught the "safety fever" that spread though the Department of Defense May 19 kicking off the 101 critical days of summer with a "FOD Walk" on the flightline and commander's call at the base theater. Air Force flightline workers fanned out across the runway and parking areas to collect foreign objects that could cause damage to aircraft. They formed up at the north end of the flightline and proceeded toward the fire department. Brig. Gen. David A. Sawyer, 24th Wing commander, hosted a safety day commander's call soon after. At the gathering, Sawyer announced the latest finder of the "Golden Bolt," a plastic card planted on the flightline to keep workers on the lookout for FOD. Staff Sgt. Paul Bonanno, and later Army Staff Sgt. Jeffrey Barlow, spotted the bolt and received a book of coupons good for discounts at Army and Air Force Exchange facilities in Panama. The commander's call featured Maj. Gen. Walter Worthington, U.S. Southern Command deputy commander in chief, as a guest speaker. The general recited several safety stories and statistics. Worthington's briefing focused on challenging listeners to remember two things from his speech and recall them when they come to work 101 days later. Wing safety chief, Lt. Col. Mark Fry, added his comments as well. When the formation was dismissed, military members returned to their duty sections to take part in unit safety orientations. Several displays and briefings focusing on the day's 4A theme were held throughout the day. This included water .Force photo safety at the base pool; ground and weapons safety meetMaster Sgt. Johnny Wilford prepares to administer in-water cardiopulmonary resuscitation to ings; and flight safety briefings for aircrews, maintenance Milton Collazos. Water safety was one of themes focused on during safety day. personnel and spouses. Joint Task Force stands down for safety by Sgt. Eric Hortin doing right. Here's what we're doing circumstances could make them very uncomplish the mission. It gives the individUSARSO Publc Affa/rs Office wrong. Here's where we need to imsafe. ual a chance to look at what he's doing and prove.' "There could be problems when small keep himself and his family safe." FORT CLAYTON -Joint Task Force Although the military work environchildren play with them -that's not a Safety doesn't remain the sole respon-Panama took a day to promote safety ment was the largest emphasized area, good practice," Marchica said. "If a home sibility of military members, though. Ciwithin its ranks May 19. home safety was also stressed. catches fire, then we have rounds 'cookvilians took part in promoting the day's "We decided to schedule it for May 19 The 36th Explosive Ordnance Detaching-off" safety theme as well. because it was convenient to all commandment Set up a collection point for materiGrenades, whether smoke, fragmentaThe Directorate of Community Activiers," said Staff Sgt. Ronnie Byrd, U.S. als that could have proposed safety probtion or 40mm, can pose life-threatening ties and their employees were a part of an Army South Safety Office. "That was lems to those who had them in their homes. dangers, Marchica said. If dropped, fragall-out effort to inspect the DCA fleet of when the least training was going on." "Usually what we receive is small arms mentation and 40mm could explode, and 128 vehicles. Vehicles turned up at inspecUnits conducted training and classes on ammunition," said 1st Sgt. Beverly may kill someone. Smoke grenades pose a tion points on both the Atlantic and Pacific subjects of individual safety such as AIDS Marchica, 36th EOD. "Sometimes we do bum hazard should they ignite. side throughout the day to judge their roadawareness, water safety, driving safety, get hand grenades and smoke grenades. Although most soldiers are careful worthiness. vehicle inspections, stress and suicide preThis time we took in about 5,000 rounds about what they do, both at work and at Although Safety Standdown Day hapvention. of small arms ammunition." home, Byrd said safety can't be stressed pens only semiannually to emphasize "The stand down is so people can stop The rounds themselves may not seem too much. work and home safety, keeping safety at and look at what they're doing," Byrd said. to pose much of a hazard for those who "It keeps you alive," Byrd said. "It the forefront should be an every day oc"Then you can say, 'Here's what we're have them in their homes, but unforeseen gives the commanders the chance to accurrence. Rainy season poses challenge for safety conscious FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Rainy season, Drivers also need to be aware that center lines and lane er conditions won't be as hazardous if drivers check wipwhich runs until late December, can cause hazardous conmarkings may be more slippery than the roads themselves. er blades, brakes, tire wear and air pressure before the need ditions for drivers and pedestrians. "Even a little rain poses a considerable hazard," arises. Drivers must be aware of the problems that may occur, Hickman said. "So slow down as it starts to rain." Driving isn't the only rainy season hazard. Drainage said Jeannie Hickman, U.S. Army South command safety Puddles, flooded roads and intersections can also be ditches can fill to the brim and become raging rivers. officer. dangerous. "Parents must educate children never to play in or near "This time of year poses a challenge to the driver unfa"Be cautious going through puddles. Potholes can bea drainage ditch," she said. "Children have been caught in miliar to driving in the Republic of Panama, and extreme come filled with water," she said. "Flooded intersections the torment and drowned." caution and concentration must be used whenever you're are also a favorite place for unscrupulous characters to rob Adults also need to be careful when mowing their behind the wheel," she said. you." lawns during the rainy season. Panama's annual rainfall is about 67 inches, with the Another problem is poor visibility. Visibility is often "Several people have lost their toes when they attemptheaviest rains coming in November. But it doesn't take a limited because of rain and humidity. Drivers should slow ed to use power mowers to cut their lawn without adedownpour to cause serious problems for drivers, she said. down or pull off to the side until the rain stops, Hickman quate foot protection," she said. The rain causes roads to become slippery. During dry said. "The best advise for people at any time, whether it be season, a film of oil builds up and, as the rain mixes with Making sure vehicles are in top condition is another rainy or dry season, is to use common sense in all activithe oil and grease residue, produces a slippery film. way to make driving safer, she said. Poor road and weathties."

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Tropic Times My27, 1994 Military News may 27 1994 El Salvador begins new era 'Soldiers' magazine wants photos for December issue by 1st Lt. Jim Knotts back home have a stereotype of Latin America that simWASHINGTON (Army News Service) -If you U.S. Southern Command Public Affairs Office ply isn't true. The Salvadorans are very professional. can "point and shoot" a camera, you can help "SolThey know what they're doing, and they appreciate our diers" magazine celebrate the Army's 219th birthSAN SALVADOR, EL SALVADOR -A new era behelp." day. gan here April 24 when the Salvadoran people voted in a As a foreign area officer, this was Abernathy's second Photographers of all types -amateur and prorunoff election to choose their first democratic govemassignment in Latin America. Before going to El Salvafessional, military and civilian -are needed to ment since the end of a 12-year civil war. As the Salvador, he attended the Argentine equivalent of Command record what's happening on your Army installation, doran people move forward to rebuild peace, another era and General Staff College and foreign area officer orienJune 14. These pictures will support "This is Our of sorts has come to a close. tation in Argentina. He, said he felt his assignment to El Army," a 32-page photo feature to appear in the The U.S. military advisory program to the Salvadoran Salvador greatly enhanced his knowledge and understandDecember 1994 issue of "Soldiers." Air Force that lasted 32 years ended when Maj. Dale M. ing of Latin America that will be helpful in future assigncapture the faces ofsoldiers, families and Army ciAbernathy, a U.S. Army helicopter pilot, closed the adviments. vilians. Shoot what is unique to your installation, sor's office, coincidentally just two days before the runoff Another career-broadening experience for Abernathy something you may see every day, but which othelection. was the opportunity to fly the Hughes 500E helicopter, ers may never get the chance to see. The move toward peace and the downsizing of the Salwhich is flown by the Salvadoran Air Force. Abernathy The "Soldiers" staff is looking for imagination vadoran military has decreased the need for the U.S. advireceived his Salvadoran flight wings during a special cerand creativity; posed shots will be screened out. The sor, Abernathy said. As he completed his one-year asemony on the Salvadoran Air Force Day, which was atstaff is looking for the best photos from the field, signment, Abernathy was not replaced in El Salvador. tended by President Alfredo Cristiani and Minister of Defor a worldwide representation of what makes the The advisory program was manned with a U.S. Air fense Brig. Gen. Humberto Corado. Air Force Day is the Army what it is. Force officer beginning in 1962. In 1982, a U.S. Army only day of the year Salvadoran pilots receive their flight Here are some basic rules to keep in mind: advisor for helicopter operations was added to the prowings. *Photos must be shot in the 24-hour period of gram. Last year, the U.S. Air Force advisor was not reThis achievement adds to his resume of flight experiJune 14. placed, leaving Abernathy as the lone advisor. ence in U.S. Army CH-47D, UH-IH, and OH-58A and C *Submit processed color slides, or 5"x7" or "My primary job was to look for systemic problems model helicopters. 8"x 10" black-andwhite prints. and ways to improve maintenance procedures to bring the Abernathy is quick to give credit to the U.S. Military *Photos should be printed for magazine qualiSalvadoran aircraft to the highest level of readiness possiGroup in El Salvador, which gave him great latitude to ty. Newspaper photojournalists often print photos ble," Abernathy said. The Salvadorans are now running work with the Salvadorans on projects they mutually lighter and with less contrast. this program on their own. agreed would be most beneficial. But the best thing about *Include the full name, rank and service, as apStationed at the Salvadoran Ilopango Air Base, the the assignment for Abernathy was the opportunities to repplicable, of the photographer; names of identifiable headquarters for the Salvadoran Air Force, Abernathy resent the United States to our allies. people in the photo; details on what's happening in routinely coordinated with the many U.S. aviation sup"When I came here, I just wanted to be an ambassador the photo; and the location of the photo. Cutlines port agencies to arrange for Salvadorans to attend mainteof my country. That opportunity was the best part of the must be attached individually to the photo or slide. nance training, pilot training, and test pilot training in the job, and I think I was pretty successful at it," Abernathy phot rons a nt be used without complete Unitd Sttes sai. .*Photos must be processed and received by As El Salvador transitioned to peace and reduced its His sentiments were echoed by Col. Juan A. Martinez "Soldiers" by Aug. 31. Photos and accompanying military size, Abernathy arranged for a team from the Varela, commander of the Salvadoran Air Force, at a speinformation will not be returned. United States to help the Salvadorans identify which aircial going-away ceremony held in Abernathy's honor. Send your photos of June 14 activities to: SOLcraft were in the best shape to retain in service. He also Varela expressed his profound thanks for Abernathy's DIERS, 9325 Gunston Rd., Suite S108, Fort coordinated for a U.S. Army maintenance mobile training positive contributions to the Salvadoran Air Force. Belvoir, Va., 22060-5581. If you have questions, teams to help the Salvadorans improve their maintenance Although the new era of peace is still getting under call Staff Sgts. Larry Lane or Doug Ide at (703) systems. way in El Salvador, the era of advisors to the Salvadoran 806-4504 or Defense Switching Network 656Although he feels he made many positive contributions Air Force has ended. 4504. to the Salvadoran Air Force during his tour, Abernathy Abernathy returns to a flying assignment at Fort said he believes he benefited most from the experience. Rucker, Ala., after a reunion with his wife, Vickie, who Guide helps AF officers "I learned a lot about El Salvador." he said. "When I has lived with her parents in Nashville, Tenn., during the understand evaluations came here, I didn't know anything. I think lots of people major's unaccompanied tour. RANDOLPH AFB, Texas (Air Force News Service) -As part of the continuing officer evaluaM d pJtion system re-education effort, officials at the Air M e ICal troops Hive Uuran Force Military Personnel Centerhere have released a new orientationguide entitled "Officer Evaluation System New Senior Rater Guide." orphans check-upS c others toys This orientation guide provides an OES introduction to all newly appointed senior raters and has SOTO CANO AB, Palmerola Each child has his or her own Refueling Group medical unit from been sent to all Air Force and joint management (Joint Task Force Bravo) -Members medical record where the results of March AFB, Ca. included cloth level directors of personnel for distribution. Highfrom the Medical Element here proeach checkup are recorded. A transshoes, infant formula and personal lights of the guide include important points when vided health checkups, clothing, toys lator accompanies the medical staff hygiene supplies such as toothpaste ee ack performance respects of m rformance and supplies to the Nazareth Orphanto help eliminate language barrier and soap. mendations, and management -level evaluation age in Comayagua, Honduras May problems. "The people in our unit put the boards. 19. Soldiers and airmen were also word out to the community and the It has been five years since the OES was impleHealth checkups are a monthly able to help the orphanage get unidonations poured in," said Staff Sgt. mented and many ofthe senior raters who were taractivity at the orphanage said Lt. forms for the children .Marc Draper, unit patient administrageted during initial Air Force-wide training have Karen Perry, MEDEL nurse. Two They raised money through Ttor. "And we're not done yet -more moved on. Lt. Gen. Billy J. Boles, the Air Force's doctors and a nurse provide care for shirts sales to buy the material. The is coming on another plane." deputy chief of staff for personnel, focused on this the children. material was given to Sister Carmen Draper said helping the Honduran fact in a recent memorandum to all senior raters. "Providing these children medical Beteta, director of the orphanage. people has been a fulfilling experi"The new guide is aimed at education senior ratattention is a bona fide mission for who made the uniforms -light blue ence. ers who have not had the benefit of formal trainus," Perry said. "We do basic checkshirts with dark pants for the boys "It's been a great experience to guide will get new senior raters started on the right ups and provide necessary medicine and skirts for the girls. help the people and work with the foot." along with instructions about how to The clothing, toys, and supplies U.S. Army. We're all one big team Boles has also emphasized the need for officers use it." brought by members of the 163rd Air -here to help" to periodically remind themselves of OES princiAA FES reassures IllItary popcorn lovers All officers must understand that we will not tolerate less than full compliance with the OES polDALLAS (Army News Service) -both low in saturated fat," said Lt. Thiee cups ofAAFES popcorn has icies and procedures," Boles said. Military popcom lovers everywhere Col. Karen Hobson, AAFES staff di130 calories. While 45 percent of the "We need the make certain everyone knows and can relax. Despite recent reports of etitian. She added that AAFES also calories come from fat, only one gam understands the specific restrictions outlined in the movie popcorn rivalling a "Big Mac" flavors its popcom with seasoning comes from saturated fat. governing directive (Air Force Regulation 36-10, in fat content, Army and Air Force salt. Hobson said the only way to have Officer Evaluation System," said Maj. Gen. Burt Exchange Service popcom is actualAAFES tested many brands of oiland fat-free popcorn is to use an Davitte, AFMPC commander. "Credibility of the ly low in saturated fat. The difference popcorn oil before choosing the soyair popper and add nothing. Adding OES among the officer corps relies on all senior is in the popping oil. bean and corn oils. Hobson said. And butter or other toppings and seasonraters knowing and adhering to the same rules." Many off-base establishments pop AAFES uses a popping recipe that ings to the AAFES popcorn elimi.9> guide for new senior rates is one ofa series with coconut oil, which is high in satcalls for a 4-1 raio ofcom to oil. This nates the lowfat benefit. of initiaives designed to reeducate the officer urated fat. But AAFES doesn't. is less than the 3-1 ration the industry AAFES pops com for military thecorps. and key people in managing the system, "The popping oil AAFES uses is recommends. This alone lowers the aters, Sweet Reflections snack shops the philosophy, principles, roles and respona special oil made from either partialfat content of AAFES popcorn, snack bars, shoppettes and cafeterias I ly hydrogenated soybean or corn oil, H-obson said. worldwide.

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6 TropicTimes UMay 27, 1994 V ie Kobbe soldier charged with disorderly conduct r A unwanted gues law. People knowing of anyone known to Fort Kobbe soldier was recently should be recharged with disorderly conduct when it porte psat sh744d br was determined that he was harassing a ported to the MPs at 287-4401 or 289-illililk.6. 15133. Fort Clayton resident. He was seen ringing Driving in Panama the person's doorbell and banging on the When driving off U.S. installations, back door several times. When he received U.S. servicemembers, civilian employees no response, he then made several harassand their family members are obligated to ing phone calls to the residence. The miliobey local Panamanian laws in every retary police were summoned and the person spect. The Military Police remind U.S. perwas taken to the MP station and processed. sonnel of the following: If being victimized or receiving harass*Obey instructions from the Panamaing phone calls, notify the MPs at 287nian police (PNP). 4401 or 289-5133. *Stop when requested to do so by the Drunk and disorderly PNP. A Fort Kobbe soldier was charged with *Never attempt to flee from the police disorderly conduct resulting from his acwhether they are on foot or in their vetions while at an off-post establishment last hicles. week. He was highly intoxicated and was ID check time change seen pushing patrons at the El Rancho Club One-hundred percent ID checks will be and using profane language. The MPs took done at all Army installation gates beginthe soldier to the MP station where he was ning at 6 p.m., July 1. The MPs would apcharged. Whether on or off-post, personnel preciate everyone's cooperation and pawill be held accountable for their actions. tience during this transitional period. For If someone is seen acting in a belligerent information, call the MPs at 287-4401. manner, call the MPs at 287-4401 or 2895133. The following crimes occurred in on Forger caught at Gorgas and off post housing areas May 6-12: A Fort Davis soldier was apprehended Pacific at Gorgas Army Community Hospital afQuarry Heights -one larceny of secured ter he altered a prescription form last week. private property He forged an "X" on a Department of DeCurundu -one larceny of unsecured prifense prescription form trying to get 10 vate property more pills than he was prescribed. He was Off post charged with forgery and attempted larceny Bethania -one larceny of secured private of government property. property Altering a prescription is a crime, punPanama City -two larcenies of secured ishable under both military and civilian private property Asian-Pacific Heritage Month Infantry soldier looks back on Vietnamese roots FORT KOBBE (USARSO PAO) -Hiep Pham doesn't of which was to become a high school math teacher. remember much about his life in the small village of "I was going to college and majoring in math educaPhuoc-Tinh in Vietnam -he was only 4 years old when tion," he said. "Then I joined the Army because I needed his family fled the country in 1975. help to pay for and finish my education." Pharm's father, who was a soldier in the South VietThough Pham's father was a soldier, he doesn't connam Army, decided to leave his homeland for the sake of sider his joining the Army as following in his father's foothis family's safety. He set sail in a small boat to search for steps. anywhere he could find the safety to raise his family. "My father was a soldier, but he was a farmer first," he "Because my father was a soldier with the South Vietsaid. "He didn't even know I was joining the Army until I nam Army, his life was in jeopardy once Saigon fell," said had already joined." Pham, now a specialist with the 1st Battalion (Airborne), Though his father was surprised, he was very support508th Infantry. "After the fall, other South Vietnamese ive. His mother, however, was like any other mother soldiers were being taken prisoners by the communists." worried. Pham said he doesn't really remember much of what Since joining, Pham's goals have changed a bit. happened in Vietnam because he was so young, but his Though he may still become a math teacher, he hasn't father has told him of the experience. ruled out other routes. "My father has told me about leaving Vietnam in a boat "The military is a good experience for me, but I don't with the rest of our family, and about being picked up by see myself making a career out of it," he said. a U.S. Navy ship and brought to the United States," he Even with the Army not being a career move for him, said. Pham said his time in the Army has been good. He said he q Pham said he's glad his family moved to the states bedoes miss his family and his mother's cooking, but has cause life in Vietnam would not have afforded him the enjoyed his time here. opportunities he now has. Being a U.S. soldier and U.S. citizen hasn't made "I know if we had stayed, our lives wouldn't have been Pham forget his roots or ignore his heritage, however. as good," he said. "Vietnam is not only a poor country, "It's where I came from and I carry it with me," he but my family may not have survived at all." said. "It's part of who I am, it's my heritage." Since arriving in the states, his father worked and then Reflecting on his heritage isn't a one-time-a-year retired from AT&T. thing Pham does only during Asian-Pacific Heritage Pham now has had the chance to follow his goals, one Month. It is something he thinks about every day. Spc. Hiep Pham This authorized unofficial command information pubChief.Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor Journalists.Sgt. Eric Hortin lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Editor.Maureen Sampson Spc. Alexander C. White Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Sports Editor.Sgt. Lori Davis 24th Wing Public Affairs Office.284-5459 Information Program of the Department of Defense, unStaff Editors.Sgt. E.J. Hersom Public Affairs Officer.Capt. Warren L. Sypher der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S. Spc. John Hall Public Affairs Superintendent Southem Command. Rosemary Chong Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the Student Intern.Juan Carlos Palacio Journalists.Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Southern Command Public Affairs Office.282-4278 Sgt. James A. Rush Defense or the U.S. Southem Command. Command Information Officer.Patrick Milton U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.287-3007 Public Affairs Officer.Diane Gonzalez Telephone 285-6612. -Public Affairs Officer.Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder Photographers Commander in Chief.Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey Command Information Officer.Beth Taylor Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor Director, Public Affairs.Col. James L. Fetig Editor. .Staff Sgt. Jane Usero Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano J. Mays Co-editor.Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski U.S. Army South PAO-A tlantic. ..289-4312 NCOIC .Sgt. Richard Em ert #_Tropic Times_

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Tropic Times 7 Commentary May27,19947 101 critical days of summer MemorialDay-to-Labor-Day safety stressed Bill Sped moves start taking place, schedules get allow time to enjoy the sights, or do we tremendously high winds and deadly by Bil Gp nd revised to support the mission, and a just whiz past them? More importantly, lightning strikes -treacherous phe24th Wing Ground Safety Manager critical period begins. are we relaxed and rested before we start nomena for people fishing from boats. F or most of the year The time between Memorial Day the trip, or are we stressed out right up to Whether we like it or not, we are we live normal, weekend in May and Labor Day weekthe last minute? creatures of habit. Our daily routines orderly lives. Up in the end in September is designated the "101 I'm sure you can see that it does make seldom vary. We are comfortable in morning, breakfast with the Critical Days of Summer." a difference. familiar surroundings with people we family, and off to work. We're confident Although it is always "summer" in The "101 Critical Days of Summer" know. When events upset this routine, that junior and "sis" will be on the 7:05 Panama, three major holidays, vacationcampaign in Panama is unique because it we become stressed and react in extraorbus to school, the maid will arrive ing school children, and generally coincides wiih the beginning of the "rainy dinary ways. We don't have a set sometime around 8:30 and will stay until increased activities combine to present a season." When driving, the rain can hide routine to follow, so we improvise you or the spouse return home. greater potential for accidents during this immense potholes in the road, as well as and often make mistakes. Everyone knows the routine, it's what period than any other time of the year. cause cars to hydroplane and skid. At the Remember, advance planning and we do. It is safe, non-stressful and nonWhen planning our vacation trips, do beach, rain makes the water murky, preparation can help make your "101 threatening. Then, all of a sudden, school we schedule regular rest stops and precausing poor visibility. On the water, Critical Days of Summer" safe and lets out, permanent change of station book lodging along the route? Do we sudden weather changes can create happy days. 'Death is never fair,' remember people who served by Chaplain Leon Kircher confusion, I looked in the sky to see what I thought were the circumstances, there is no question of what hapUSARSO Family Life Chaplain falling stars. They weren't falling stars, though. They pened. were SCUDs and they were heading right toward us. Within one week of his return, he was gunned down t was the middle of August 1990. The 3rd The sergeant major yelled for us to get up and into the in the streets of Detroit. Battalion (PATRIOT), 43rd Air Defense bunkers. That evening, now referred to by those in Air At first we didn't believe it was him. He was too nice Artillery, of which I was chaplain, was Defense Artillery as the "Battle of Riyadh," 3rd of a guy. But within 24 hours the Red Cross confirmed preparing to deploy to Saudi Arabia. Foxtrot Battalion, 43rd Air Defense Artillery shot down six our fear. While newspeople gathered from all over the Battery would deploy first, followed by Delta Battery. It SCUD Rockets -four by Foxtrot Battery and two by world, I preached a memorial sermon entitled: "Death is was a tense time for all of us. Delta. Never Fair." Preparing vehicles and PATRIOT Missile equipment During the confusion, the two batteries had expended Anthony Riggs was our unit's only casualty in Desert for the flight was an around-the-clock operation, but our all of their missiles. A number of soldiers ran downrange Storm. Yet his death came not as the result of a SCUD soldiers performed admirably. Within seven days of our to reload the missile launchers; a dangerous thing to do. attack, but in the streets of our country. deployment notice there were two PATRIOT Missile One soldier in particular, Spc. Anthony Riggs, was For me, Anthony Riggs represents the best and Batteries on the ground in Riyadh and King Khalid one of the first at the launchers. While the Air Force brightest the United States has to offer. International Airport. cleared debris off the runways, our soldiers were able to His picture now hangs in Delta Battery, 3-43 ADA's The wait in the desert, for what we thought would be reload the launchers in record time in preparation for barracks at Fort Bliss, Texas. New soldiers would come an imminent attack, was mind-numbing. As the battalion another SCUD attack. Fortunately, that was it for the by and ask who he was. "Just a good Delta soldier," the "Morale Officer," I did all I could to ease the tension and night. men would reply. "Death is Never Fair," would be my give the soldiers something to do in the meantime. We It was not the last attack however. The 3rd Bn, 43rd thought. were actually happy to hear of the Jan. 15 deadline. At ADA went on to record the greatest number of SCUDs This Memorial Day we will gather to remember those least something would happen. shot down in the war -20 in all. Riggs was later who have fallen while serving their country. Yet now we On January 21, it did happen, at least for us. We commended for his heroism. have a new and younger class of military who fell in our were listening to the American Football Conference Anthony Riggs came from the inner city looking to most recent war. Championship Game on short-wave radio when the the Army to make something of himself. He was a good These young people bring to light the fact that there sirens started blaring. We grabbed our TA-50 and soldier and a regular attendee at my field services. is still a great desire to serve our land and the great chemical suits, and started for our bunkers. Because of his efforts in Saudi Arabia, he was one of the freedoms it represents. But before we were able to put our gear on, a series first to return home in early March 1991. This Memorial Day, keep him, and all of our fallen of explosions sounded. Tripping over each other in the Although there is still much speculation concerning comrades, in your prayers. Direct Quotes What person or group will you think of this Memorial Day? "My father. He fought "My brother. He passed "Veterans of World "All soldiers who have "Military people who in World War II in the away three years ago." War II like my grandfadied, my daughter, and have died in wars." Battle of the Bulge." ther." people who are sad because they have lost loved ones." Capt. Jeff Golden Sgt. 1st Class Audry Martin Pfc. Kelly Gretler Marilyn Bennett Sgt. Vanessa Lopez 630th Air Operations Headquarters Company, U.S. Medical Department Activity Department of Defense 470th Military Intelligence Squadron Army Garrison civilian employee family Brigade member The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the Department of Defense orthe U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries -orresponses to commentaries-to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

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8 Tropic Times May 27, 1994 wi am Mw uw aa* Matz Sgt 1 st Cls efe
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Tropic Times May 27, 1994 os" load up. Taking the plunge 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry (Airborne) Commandos leap from CH-47 Chinook BLUE DROP ZONE, Gatun Lake -"Take a and the airborne soldiers were ready to take the flying leap." "Go jump in a lake." plunge. Well, Company C, 1st Battalion (Airborne), Whenthehelicoptersarrived,theanxioustroops 508th Infantry, did both -and loved it. loaded up and buckled up. When the jumpmaster Nearly 100 "Commandos" leaped out the back gave the signal to hook up, they prepared to take of a CH-47 Chinook helicopter into Gatun Lake that first big step. At 1,600 feet, the moment the Wednesday as part of the battalion training being soldiers had waited for arrived. conducted through the month of May. Pass after pass, olive mushrooms sprouted in "We're doing this training to keep proficient in the sky behind the Chinook and fell to the water. case of water landing or water insertions," said Ist Small pontoon boats patrolling the waters buzzed Lt. Thomas Bertrand, battalion intelligence. "We around, plucking the soaked soldiers and their do it because there is a different method of landing parachutes from the Panama Canal. in the water than on land." "It's a lot softer than landing on the ground," A 3:15 a.m. manifest call started what turned Bertrand said. "It's not a 'fun-jump,' but it's so out to be a fun day for the paratroopers. A quick different that it makes it more enjoyable than a bus ride to Fort Davis, an even quicker breakfast, regular jump. Other units, because of their geodistribution of parachutes and flotation devices graphic locations, don't get to do this like we do." story and photos by Sgt. Eric Hortin USARSO Public Affairs Office an's

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1OTropic Times __ i Q y___ _ 10 Mast27y1994 _____ 1st Battalion (Airborne) 508th Infantry paratroopers fill the sky. U.S. Army photo 1-508th Infantry looks back on its 50 years FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -brought into action in 1964 under the 3rd Brigade, 82nd Interior Installation Guard for the protection of U.S. The skies over Panama will soon no Airborne Division, to take part in Operation Power Pack defense sites in the Pacific community. in the Dominican, Republic to restore peace and security. The uinit participates in such exercises as brigade field I onger be dotted with parachutes as the I1st With the American involvement in Vietnam arid the training exercises, live fire exercises, platoon,evaluaBattalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry, outbreak of the Tet Counteroffensive, the paratroopers tions, close-quarters combat training as well 6s,many closes its doors in October and completes Of the 508th were called on again. The Red Devils airborne assaults into Deblois-Coats and the Gatun drop ..played major roles in various phases of the Tet Counterzones. the final step in its historical lineage that offensive and served with distinction for 22 months. In addition to the soldier-type activities, the unit also spans more than 50 years. The Vietnam conflict was a costly one for the 508th supports the command with such things as static The 508th will be honored in a farewell ceremony with 212 paratroopers making the ultimate sacrifice. equipment displays for various distinguished visitors and June 3 as it and other 193rd Infantry Brigade (Light) In 1983, the unit also played a part in Operation for other activities such as the Armed Forces Week kickUnits inactivate as part of the Treaty Implementation Urgent Fury on the island of Grenada and, within days, off. Plan. helped to defeat the People's Republican Army and Another of the many aspects of the 508th mission is Many of the more than 600 soldiers assigned to the rescue the Americans who were there. The 508th then participating in platoon exchanges with Honduras to 508th have already begun to move on to other assignremained in the tiny Country for one month'as a peacehelp foster good relations and share professional ideas merits, both in and out of Panama. Soldiers will be keeping force. arid methods. Through this program, a platoon of 508th leaving on a weekly basis until the inactivation is Brought to Panama under the 193rd Inf. Bde. in soldiers travels to H onduras while a platoon of complete. The unit has also redistributed or turned in 1987, the 508th took part in Operation Just Cause as the IHonduiran soldiers travels here to participate in joint more than 40 percent of its operational equipment. command and control element of Task Force Red Devil. training. The I st Bn. (Airborne). 508th Inf., began its trek The unit successfully secured Foil Amnador and The 508th also supplies a company-sized unit to the ,hrough history when it was activated as the 508th played a major role seizing the Commandancia in Jungle Operations Training Battalion at Fort Sherman. Parachute Infantry Oct. 20, 1942, at Camip Blanding, Panamna City. During this conflict, two Red Devils gave This unit auigments the opposing force company with Fla. their fullest. The Vanado Drop Zone near Vera Cruz soldiers fr-om the Battalion Scout Platoon, a squad of Soon after, the unit entered World War I I as a part of beach, now the Deblois-Coats Drop Zone, carries their -engineers and a company forward infantry support leamn. the D-Day invasion into Normandy, France. During the names with honor. Throughout recent years, the 508th mission has seen airborne assault, the battalion Suffered more than 50 Many of the soldiers in the unit today served during changes, but many of the soldiers have remained the percent casualties. Even with this amount of casualties, the actions of Operation Just Cause and before. As one same. the unit still seized all of its objectives and was awarded long-time 508th soldiers said, "The Red Devils always "TIhis was the first infantry brigade I was assigned the French Croix de Guerre and the French Fourragere. seem to bring people back." to," said I st Sgt. Christopher Lowe, Company A. "Little The Red Devils remained an active part of the war by "I arrived in the battalion when it was still the 2nd did I know as a private, that th is would be the unit I participating in such missions as the Battle of the Bulge Battalion (Airborne), 187th Infantry, arid was with it would spend most of my career with." and Operation Market Garden, one of the largest when it was redesignated the I st Bn. (Airborne), 508th Lowe, who has been a Red Devil for more than 13 airborne assaults in history. Inf., in 1987," said Staff Sgt. David Goodwin, Company years, shares a pride in the unit, as well as the sadness of Not only did the battalion stand out as a unit, C. seeing the unit inactivated, with fellow Red Devils. individuals distinguished themselves as heroes. One After serving with the 508th during Just Cause, "I understand why the unit is going away, but if such hero was I st Sgt. Leonard Funk. Goodwin spent a Couple years in the states but couldn't anyone asks me how I feel about it, I would say, 'not Funk was awarded the Medal of Honor for saving a wait to get back to the 508th. happy at all,"' Lowe said. 508th guard detail which had been taken prisoner. Of the "I came back in 1992 to find my old command "I am saddened that the 508th is leaving," Goodwin 90 German soldiers involved, Funk killed nearly half sergeant major had become the brigade command said. "I am just glad I got to be part of it and saw it from and wounded the rest. sergeant major," he said. Along with this change, the beginning in Panama to the end." As a result of superior actions during the war, the Gioodwin also found many other fellow Red Devils had Almost 52 years to the date, the I st Bn. (Airborne), 508th was chosen by General of the Army Dwight D. moved up the chain but had remained Red Devils. 508th Inf., will be stricken from the active rolls of the Eisenhower as his guard of honor. The unit was then They had remained Red DevilIs whose mission today U.S. Army Oct. 15 as the soldiers of the unit pack up, inactivated in November 1946. involves many aspects to include training, support, say farewells, encase the battalion colors and move on to After nearly 20 years, the 508th was once again airborne and air assault operations and providing the other units.

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__ ~iX ~r~d _______ Tropic Times # World War H May 27, 1994 May, 9u 44 Peru's inspector general visits here as guest of Brett FORT CLAYTON -The following cance of the ceremony that joined the are significant World War I events that flags of the United States and Brazil as a took place during May 1944: pledge of continued unity. May 2 May 13 Capt. Donovan E. Smith, Director, Maj. Gen. W. E. Shedd, commandPanama Coast Artillery Command ing general of the Antilles Department Training Center, announces the graduaand former Deputy Commander of the tion of 10 soldiers from an anti-aircraft Panama Canal Department, arrives at gun battalion in the height finder course Albrook Field for a short visit. Shedd is at the Enlisted Division of the Training accompanied by Rear Adm. Theodore Center. Following the graduation cereChandler, commander of the United mony, 12 enlisted men are promoted States forces in the Curacao-Aruba secThe 75mm Pack Howitzer M1920 Photo courtesy of the USARSO Histonan from Monroe's infantry unit of the Motor. bile Force bapte FMcearvin S. Bennett, oil duty May 17 Pa k a tler e p d i with an Assistant Chief of Staff of the Brig. Gen. Joseph C. Mehaffey takes Caribbean Defense Command is prothe oath of office as the ninth Governor moted to major. of the Panama Canal, succeeding Govemor Glen E. Edgerton. The oath is adPan ama canal defense May 3 ministered, in the Governor's office, by U.S. officials announce the arrival of A. T. Schmidt, Chief Clerk of the then by Dolores DeMena A first post-WWI model, the Gen. Eloy G. Ureta Montehermoso, InSupply Department and a notary pubUSARSO Historian spector General of the Army of Peru and lic. M1 920 was soon found unsatcommander-in-chief of the armed forcSucceeding governor Mehaffey as FORT CLAYTON -The 75-mm. pack isfactory, chiefly because es ofthat country in event of war. Ureta Engineer of Maintenance, is Col. howitzer belonged to a specialized group reCuperator piston rod, and arrived the previous evening and reFrancis K. Newcomer. Another top of weapons assigned for use in mountainmained as an ovemight guest of Gen. appointment was that of Col. Jame G. ous country where motorized or horsetrail were inadequate. The next George H. Brett, commanding general Sleese as Assistant to the governor, havdrawn artillery could not go. Easy disassix years saw intensive work on of the Caribbean Defense Command ing served as Executive Assistant to the sembly for packing on mule-back was esmodels designed to correct and of the Panama Canal Department, Engineer ofMaintenance since February sential. before resuming his journey to the Unit1941. Pack Artillery played an important part1 these weaknesses and to ed States. in many operations connected with the defurnish a mountain gun at least May 18 fense of the Pan'ama Canal, as much of the as powerful as new foreign May 4 The 36th Division begins movement .terrain in the vicinity of the canal could types The promotion of 29 enlisted men, to Anzio beachhead. Cassino, the key only be crossed by artillery of that type. members of Maj. L.B. Anderson's Sixth point in the German's Gustav line in ItaA first post-WWI model, the M1920 Air Force Headquarters Squadron at Ally, is evacuated by Germans after two was soon found unsatisfactory, chiefly beweight for these soldiers at enlistment is brook Field, is announced by Air Force months of bitter resistance. cause recuperator, piston rod, and trail 150 pounds with a view to building up to Headquarters. were inadequate. The next six years saw condition weight with arduous work and May 19 intensive work on models designed to corthe army ration. Efficiency of this program May 8 The promotion of2l enlisted men asrect these weaknesses and to furnish a is exemplified by the execution by the 2nd Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower sets D signed to Capt. Glenn H. Moffit's headmountain gun at least as powerful as new Field Artillery Battalion's 26-mile march Day for Normany invasion as June 5. quarters battery, is announced by the foreign types. Greater range was particuinto Fort Clayton, on the termination of the This is postponed to June 6. Panama Coast Artillery Command. larly desired. The weapon standardized in last Panama Mobile Force maneuver, in 1927 as the 75-mm. Pack Howitzer Ml seven hours." May 9 May 20 had a range of 9,200 yards and weighed He praised the howitzer-mule pack Col. B. B. Millenthal, Panama Canal After mopping up the northeast tip of 1,269 pounds in firing position. It took team. Department Special Service Officer, deInsoemoar Island, New Guinea, Task rank as one of the most efficient artillery "We have the world's best pack mules parts for the United States to attend conForce Tornado assault force returns to weapons yet devised. and our 75-mm howitzer is strictly an ferences at the Special Service School, mainland, turning over control of island "It is a remarkable weapon with a great American product. It will stop a tank dead Washington D.C., Lee University, Virto Army Air Forces. future," said the the chief of field artillery, in its track. The gun breaks down into six ginia, and at Headquarters, Special Ser"In its adaptability under pack, it has exloads for pack transportation, or in other vice Divison in New York. May 23 ceeded any expectations which could reawords, six mules carry one howitzer. It is Panama Mobile Force headquarters The U.S. Army opens general ofsonably have been held considering the a quick-firing piece with curved fire range announce the promotion of 25 enlisted fense and breaks out at Anzio beachpower of the weapon." of five miles. All ammunition and supplies men. head. Some modifications, chiefly of the reare carried on pack mules. Each battery has coil mechanism, and a new carriage were its own maintenance section. Thus May 10 May 24 completed during the 30s. Despite the useequipped, it is the most independent of all James V. Forrestal is appointed SecCarrier aircraft of the Fifth Fleet atfulness, only 32 pack howitzers had been arms." retary of the Navy. tack Wake Island in the South Pacific. manufactured by July 1, 1940. The answer to "Why Pack Artillery in Carrying out the missions of the variPanama" was summed up as follows: The May 11 May 27 ous units of the Panama Mobile Force gun is invincible, the mule invulnerable, Allied Armies in Italy open drive on Lt. Gen. George Brett, and Rear brought to the front divergent views on the the packers, drivers, and gunners, a hardy Rome at I I p.m. with tremendous bomAdm. Harold C. Train, commander of relative importance of animal and motor race of toughened, straight shooting, hard bardment of Gustav Line by weapons of the Panama Sea Frontier, head a group transport. In 1940, the commanding officwalking artillerymen whose equals are not U.S. Fifth and British Eighth Armies. of more than 200 military and civic leader of the 33rd Infantry urged elimination to be found in any army. ers at a reception for Col. Joseph R. of horses. He said, however, that pack The commanding general ofthe Mobile May 12 Koch, Panama Canal Department Chapmules were essential." Force insisted that horses were necessary The first unit of the Brazilian Air lain, who had completed nearly four "We must use machines wherever posfor units deployed off the roads and under Force to be trained within the Sixth Air years of service on the isthmus. The resible in order to save man power. But first conditions requiring that commanding ofForce of the United States is activated ception is held at the Tivoli Hotel. of all, we must use the proper technical ficers be mounted as the only means of when Lt. Col. Nero Moura formally reForty-four new blue stars are added team to achieve tactical success. Man giving them a speed greater than that of ceives the command during a review in to the service flag at Balboa High hasn't yet made the machine that will retheir dismounted troops. the presence of Lt. Gen. George H. School. Each star represents a former place the foot or mounted soldier or their The situation in Panama was rapidly Brett. Brett presents the new unit with student or teacher serving in the armed ally, the pack mule," he said. changing while this controversy was gothe colors of the United States and Braforces. By the end of May 1944, the "Nature has conspired to render diffiing on. Considerable road construction zil. BHS flag proudly displayed 207 blue cult the development of extensive road was going forward and tremendous adCol. Raimundo V. Aboim, Brazilian stars. nets through the jungles of Panama. Our vances were being nade in mechanized Air Attache to Panama, presents the pack soldiers are a specially chosen lot betransport. [he use of weapons, and hancommand. Lt. Jose Carlos de Mirando Editor's note: This timeline was comcause the work is hard, the marches long ding of troops in difficult terrain was onCorea, acting adjutant to the Brazilian piled by Dolores De Mena, USARSO and fast," lie said. I he must he at least 5 der study. Ihese advances, more than the commanding officer, read the address historian, in commemorantion of the feet 10 inches in height and be able to arguments of the proponents of motorized for MoUra which stressed the signifi50th Anniversary of WWII march between 3.5 in 14 miles m 50 minequipment, eventualy culminated in the utes of every marching hour. Niinimum elimination of the use of animals.

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Sports May 27, 1994 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 12 The Loopwins championship The Loop beats F-Troop 2-0 to take women'svolleyball title by Sgt. Lori Davis F-Troop came back in the second game with a T i T s port Editr seven-point run before The Loop got on track. Paula Walker substituted for Powell in game FORT CLAYTON -The "oops" in the May 20 two and used her height advantage to block shots at game between The Loop and F-Troop stood for the net. Walker faced off against F-Troop's Dana more than the team's names, it marked F-Troop's Finley in a duel of the tall blockers and spikers. defeat as three straight serves by The Loop's Wendy F-Troop tried to rally late in game two with a setMcDermotto passed unanswered. and-spike combinationbetweensetterPatty Schuttle When I was serving I was thinking, 'We have and Finley, but The Loop thwarted them with them, McDermotto said. I saw them switching strong blocking and sent the ball back into Ftheir setters positions and I took advantage of it." Troop's mid-court. Those serves catching nothing but gym floor The Loop went on an eight-point run served by was a sad way for F-Troop to go down. They put up Lilly Hinjosa and never looked back. F-Troop a good fight, but The Looppounded them 15-7, 15looked worn out as they watched McDermotto's 12 with great serving, killer spikes and solid deserves go by. fense. "We didn'tplay the way we expected to," Finley While F-Troop struggled to stay alive, The Loop said. "We were not as relaxed as we wanted to be." played a roller-coaster game. Crucial plays sparked "They (F-Troop) were really tough in each game a series ofscoring drives, but mistakes shut the team (during the regular season). She (Finley) is a really down until it could get it's game back on track. good player," Powell said. "When you make a mistake yourthinkingaboutwhatyouhave to do to get points back. Then boom, you get it and your all back in the game," said The Loop's Michelle Cranford. Boom was right. 'One of those come-back plays in the first game was her spike that pounded into FTroop's mid-courtlike ajackhammer. That shot made the crowd go wild and set The Loop on fire. "Things were really flowing. I felt it, it was there in my hand, and it made me more intense," Cranford said. Intensity was the word as The Loop's Karen Powell came to the serviceline. Her solid serves carriedThe Looptoafour-pointscoring drive before McDermotto U.S. Air Forcephoto by Sqt. James A. RUSh served the closingshot, endingthe Deparimenit o Defonse photo by Sgt. Lori Davis The Loop's Wendy McDermotto goes up Tor a spike against first game 15-7. The Loop's Karen Powell powers up for a serve. F-Troop's Patty Schuttle. Air Force shows fitness with 5/10K run ySgt. James A. Rush Two seconds ahead of Ballaro was Bob followed Doyle at 35:16.65. didn't want another," according to race by Wg Jumls A.ars Ramsey, who at 21:00.58 won the 19-29 Fuplio Marcianohad the fastest finish in official Senior Airman Mike West. 24th Wing Public Affairs year-old division. Gary Spencer was secthe IOK race at 38:30.26. Coming in second Nancy Thompson was the fastest womHOWARD AFB -Fifty-three runners ond in this group with a time of22:41.55. to him in the 30-39 age group was Jesus an entered inthe 10K. Her time of45:08.45 crawled out of bed Saturday for the 6:30 Karen Thomas outran all other women Carrera at 41:11.12. placed ahead of Carol Baines' 51:15.63 in a.m. start ofthe ninth annual U.S. Air Force and won the age 19-29 group, clocking in at Tim Olinger won the 40 and over divithe 19-29 age group. Fitness Month 5K and 10K Run hosted 23:14.64. Jackie White was a distant secsion with a time of 40:31.23 two minutes Carol Barrett won the age 30-39 diviSaturday by the 24th Services Squadron ond at 27:24.56. ahead of Pablo Cercenia who finished at sion finishing at 54:31.68. Judy Heslop here. Jessie Carrera, entered in the 30-39 age 42:28.71. took second turning in atime of 1:03:16.00. Bill Young, racing in the 40 and over group, kept pace with the leader, but fell off Scott Hancock turned in a 54:02.38 to Every competitor received a medal and category, posted the best time for the short by just more than a minute to 24:26.54. The take the 19-29 category. the first 50 got a T-shirt. The top two race. His time of 20:31.05 easily won his time was fastest among her division, howWilfred Drego would have had the fastrunners in each category received a trophy age group and made him I I seconds better ever. Second place finisher Linda Henson est time for both races had he not chosen to as well. than BrettCampbell who finished second at crossed at 36:46.06. withdraw just before crossing the finish Alan Jones, president of the Isthmian 20:42.32. Ben Knight took second in the 40 Priscilla Veliz was the fastest female in line. The runner sprinted from the fitness Road Runners, was on-handtokeepa logof and over category with a time of21:38.10. the 40 and over category. Her time of center to Howard Elementary School and club members who ran. Road Runners are Campbell finished first among the age 40:02.45 beat out Lottie Silas' 43:18.12. back in slightly more than 18 minutes to awarded points for each club-sanctioned 30-39 entrants. His closest age group comCory Barret, at 39:38.91, and Morgan complete half ofhis 10K. He neared the end race in which they compete. A champion is petition came from Don Ballaro who turned Doyle, at 37:05.31, finished first in their of the 10 K however, and quit because he chosen based on total points atthe end ofthe in a time of21:02.67 time respective youth divisions. Rinthea Henson has "a house full of trophies already and year. -e r win inrt aed Pap 15 Army wrestlers win in freestlye and Curundu Cougars women's volley+SCN AM radio schedule Greco-Roman corm petition at ball team takes first place in regular *Memorial Day basketball Armed Forces championship, season play. 1Local sports schedule

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# S p oTropic Times o May 27,1994 13 Department of Defense photo by Sgt. Lori Davs Southern Command Network's coach James Nuells and official Felipe Diaz settle a dispute from an earlier game as SCN quarterback John Jackson looks on SCN'executes' HHC, 193rd, 19-0 Sgt. Lori Davis The 193rd returned the favor on S!CN's Facing a fired-up defense, SCN called stopped the offense in its tracks on their by Tgm. Lort di opening possession, forcing quarterback its trademark play -three receivers heavy opening possessions, but SCN bounced Tropic Times Sports Editor John Jackson to scramble and overthrow on the right, Jackson tried to rattle 193rd, back on their second drive. FORT CLAYTON -Talk ofplay execureceivers, getting the ball after four plays. but a delay by the officials gave the defense Caple proved to be the m an to go to as tion came from both sidelines during TuesThe 193rd started a long drive after the time to set up and block the pass. he caught a pass to bring SCN within 10 day's game between the Southern Comturnover on downs, picking up yardage on SCN followed up with the same play yards of the end zone, then caught touchmandNetworkand Headquarters and Headpitches to the outsideand goingto the air. A and pick up a First down when Jackson down pass on fourth down. Jackson overquarters Company, 193rd Infantry (Light), 15 yard holding penalty against SCN connected with Reco Calhoun. Two plays threw Jay Rourk for the extra point to leave but SCN killed 193rd's offensive game and brought 193rd within scoring distance, but later Jackson found Leopold Medina for a the score 12-0. advanced to 6-1. SCN made up for their mistake when Jacktouchdown. SCN failed to score on the Two scores from a comeback, 193rd Before the game started it looked like son snagged an interception on the next extra point, making the score 6-0. tried to pick up the pace with fast passes and SCN would have to win against the officials play. With only 28 seconds on the clock 193rd pitches to the outside to give their running as well as the infantry. Referee Felipe Diaz SCN started a drive of its own with a tried to go long to Burrows, but once again backs room to move. The SCN defense spoke with SCN's James Nuells before the pass to Jerome Caple for a first down, but the SCN defense pressured Wallace and dogged 193rd receivers and came after kick-off about disputes from a previous the 193rd came back with an interception of forced the pass. Wallace. game. its own courtesy of Quin Burrows. Still anyone's game at the half, both Once again forced by defensive presThe officials concerns about a clean The 193rd tried to rally after the turnteams talked the same strategy during the sure, Wallace was picked off by Jackson game were taken care ofafter speaking with over, but were forced to punt after the SCN break. who ran back for a touchdown. Mark Lewis Nuells and assuring themselves SCN was defense pressured quarterback Mike "Execution," said 193rd's Rodney caught the pass for the extra point for the not the team involved in the dispute, Diaz Wallace to pass into heavy coverage. Watson. "Our plays are working and were final score of the game. said. SCN took over once again and started its moving the ball, there are just isolated plays The key to SCN's string of victories is With the controversy behind it, SCN last drive of the half. Its chance for a score ruining our drives." the team effort. Every team member plays took the field and kicked offtothe 193rd. Its almost died when a 193rd defender tipped "More pressure and execution," echoed hard and executes, Nuells said. defense started hot, shutting down 193rd's Jackson's pass and nearly came up with an Nuells from the SCN bench. "We can't wait to whip on 56th Signal offense. interception. Defensive pressure from both teams (top team in the Red League)," he added. Services compete in bowling championship by Sgt. 1st Class Steve Barrett second, Marine Corps Randall Biesman of Albany Marine men's individual event, averaging 203 in beating Lonsdale. American Forces Information Service Corps Logistics Base, Ga., took third. Heinzelman took third. Mink, stationed at Randolph AFB, Texas, averaged Beisman and Marine Corps' Charles Beatty of Marine WASHINGTON -The Army's Lance Lonsdale and the 195.75 during the competition. That was 10 pins per game Corps Air Station, Cherry Point, S.C., won the men's Navy's Lana Mink captured combined titles at the Armed better than Air Force's Deb Wolfe of MacDill AFB, Fla. doubles competition. Forces Bowling championships, held last month at Camp Third place went to Army's Debra Riefflin of Fort Meade, Riefflin and Army's Celethia Abner of Fort Lewis, Lejeune, N.C. Md. Wash., captured the women's doubles. Bowlers competed in team bowling, doubles, mixed Besides winning the overall title, Mink combined with The Army won both the men's and women's team doubles and singles. Each competitor rolled six games per Norm Palomares of the San Francisco Naval Recruiting competition held the first day. Lonsdale, Heinzelman, event, with individual scores from all combined to decide District to win the mixed doubles competition. Anthony, David Newell (Fort McClellan, Ala.), Svet the overall champions. She also finished fourth in singles and teamed with Vukomanovich (Oklahoma City) and James Ramg'e (Fort Lonsdale, assigned with the Army Personnel Command Deanne Foust of the USS Shenandoah for second place in Meade) bowled to a 323-pin victory over the Marine Corps. in Alexandria, Va., averaged 199.41 during the four-event women's doubles. The Air Force finished third. competition. He finished second in individual singles comIn singles competition, Army's Esther Navarro of Fort The Army women's team, comprised of Riefflin, petition and teamed with Dan Heinzelman of Fort Hood, blood rolled a six-game average 198.5 to win the women's Navarro, Abner, Suzanne Niegum (Fort Lewis, Wash.), Texas, for a third place finish in the men's doubles compeevent. Wolfefinished second andAirForce's Enna Vaughan Elaine Stevens (Columbus, Ohio) and Debra Smith tition. of Tinker AFB, Okla., took third. (Goodfellow AFB, Texas) defeated the Marine Corps by Army's William Anthony of Fort Eustis, Va., finished Air Force's Paul Aldridge, also of Tinker, won the 182 pins in winning its title. The Navy finished third.

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14 ropic Times pot_ ________ 14May 7, 1994 pots Cougars take first Curundu women's volleyball team finish season with victory by Jennifer Penkoske scoring with 14 points from the line, folTropic Times contributor lowed by Marcia Tunon with eight and -Bonnie Kemp and Shawna Sears each with CURUNDU -The Curundu Cougars five points. Audrey Ernest chalked up three women's varsity volleyball team wrapped points and Tyara Juarez scored two. up its season with a 2-1 win over the PanaThe Cougars win over the Green Devils ma Canal College Green Devils. capped off a 6-2 season that enabled the The Cougars triumphed after a long Cougarstocapturetheregularseason league match of three games against the Green championship. Devils. The Cougars first-place showing comes The Cougars started hot with a 15-12 on the heels of last year's winless, lastwin in game one, but faltered against the place effort. Green Devils with a 15-7 loss in game two. The Cougars put their regular season The Cougars regrouped forthe lastgame victory behind them to concentrate on the and came back to beat the Green Devils 15post-season tournament. The team has spent 8. the last week fine-tuning their game to win Jessica Penkoske led the Cougars in next week's championship. Le Jit 8 3 .5U.S. Air Force 747th M 1 7 3 1 Unit-level Flag Football The Diggers 5 4 2.5 American League Delta Dames 4 6 4 W L GB Al's Angels 4 8 5 24th SPS 7 0 -Light Fighters 0 11 8.5 617thALSS 5 2 2 U.S. Army Co. B, 536th 4 1 2 Unit-level Flag Football 24th CS 3 3 3.5 Red League 1-228th 2 4 4.5 56th Sig. 6 0 24th Trans. 1 6 6 SCN 6 1 .5 HHC, 536th 0 6 6.5 534th MP Co. 4 2 2 National League Co. E, 1-228th 5 3 2 24th Supply 7 0 -HHC, LEA 2 3 3.5 24th OSS/AINS 5 2 2 214th Med. Not reported 24th CES 3 3 3.5 MEDDAC Not reported Co. A, 536th 3 4 4 White League 24th Misfits 3 4 4 41st ASG 7 1 Navy 2 5 5 142nd Med. 4 2 2.5 24th Med. 1 6 6 470th MI Not reported Air Force Womens Softball 59th Eng. Not reported .s Amy photo by Sgt. Ro, Eme Sassy 5 0 -HIC, 193rd Not reported Running hom e Comedy Crew 4 1 1 Blue League Navy 1 4 4 HHC, 1-508th 2 3 -Alan F. Dodson, commander, U.S. Army Garrison Atlantic, is the first 536th 0 5 5 Co. C, 1-508th Not reported to finish for his team in the Armed Forces Day Fun Run at Fort Davis Atlantic womens volleyball Co. A, 1-508th Not reported May 13. Three-mile run results (team competition):1st place -549th Hustlers 8 2 -2 *as of Thursday Military Police Company, 71:32: Donald Troxier, James V. Redmon, Eric D. Brunken and David Bice. Arry wrestler win at Armed Forces championship by Sgt. 1st Class Stephen Barrett Owens, who defeated Navy's Raymond Borja, 3-2. 125.5 -Duaine Martin (USMC) def. Tom Tingley (AF), 7Armed Forces Information Service The Marine Corps captured five individual titles. Four 3. came in freestyle wrestling, where they dominated the 136.5 -Shon Lewis (A) def. John Antonelli (USMC), 12FLORIDA -Army wrestlers captured 12 of20 titles in lighter weight classes. I1. winning the 1994 armed forces championships held reKeith Wilson, seeing his first armed forces competition 149.5 -Keith Wilson (USMC) def. Jeffrey Flynn (A), 13cently at Pensacola Naval Air Station, Fla. in three years following knee surgery, won both freestyle 2. Soldiers grappled to six freestyle and six Greco-Roman and Greco-Roman titles at 149.5 pounds. A senior member 163 -Keith Sieracki (A) pinned Rikk Walters (USMC), titles in claiming their fifth straight armed forces champiof the Marine Corps team, Wilson has high hopes of 2:03. onship. stopping the Armys five-year reign. 180.5 -JamesGressley(A)def Anthony Esposito(USMC), They also captured four second-place finishes while "They've (Army) got many experienced wrestlers and 5-0. scoring 77 team points. they train really well," Wilson said. 198 -Derrick Waldroup (A) def. Tom Storey (N), 5-4. The Marine Corps scored 58 points to takesecond place "We've got a lot of new guys who haven't wrestled 220 -Jerry Jackson (A) def. Stevie Brown (N), 13-3. followed by Navy (5-1) and Air Force (32). Winners Grecoand are learning,"he said."They stayed goodandwe UNL -Jeffrey Green (A) del. Russell Putney (AF), 11-0. advanced to the U.S. National Amateur Wrestling Chaingot better, so next year we'll give them a challenge." Greco-Roman pionshipsatthe LasVegas Convention Center April20-23. In other Marine Corps victories, Jeremy Walker won 105.5 pounds -Dustin Waugh (N) def. Jeremy Walker Four Army wrestlers nabbed two title seach, winning the 105.5 title, beating Army's Rafael Mejia, 12-1. George (USMC), 9-8. both freestyle and Greco-Roman titles. Shon Lewis capWilliams beat Army's Trevor Humphrey, 13-4 for the I14.5-RobertDeMerritt(N)def.GeorgeWiliiams(USMC), tured the 136.5pound title, Derrick Waldroup won both 114.5 title, while Duaine Martin captured the 125.5 crown 5-4. crowns at 198, Jerry Jackson took top honors at 220, and with a 7-3 victory over Air Force's Tom Tingley. 125.5 -Jason Tolbert (A) def. Steven Mays (N), 5-1. Jeffrey Green earned two victories in unlimited competiNavy wrestlers captured the remaining three titles, all in 136.5 -Shon Lewis (A) def. John Antonelli (USMC), 9-0. tion. Greco-Roman competition. Dustin Waugh edged Walker, 149.5 -Keith Wilson (USMC) def Rodney Smith (A), 4In freestyle wrestling, Army's Keith Sieracki and James 9-8 at 105.5; Robert DeMerritt beat Williams, 5-4 at 1 14.5: 1. Gressley captured their respective weight classes. and Nathaniel Jackson took the 180.5 title, beating Air 163 -Kenneth Owens (A) def. RaYmond Borja (N), 3-2. Sieracki recorded the only championship pinfall, deForce'sJeremy Edwards, 4-3. 180.5 -Nathaniel Jackson (N) del. Jeremy Edwards(AF), feating Marine Corps Rikk Walters in 2:03 for the 163Results are as folows: 4-3. pound title. Freestyle 198 -Derrick Waldroup (A) del. Marvin Vike (USMC), 3Gressley, the 180.5 pound champion, defeated Marine 105.5 pounds -Jeremy Walker (UISMC) def. Rafael M'jia 0. Anthony Esposito, 5-0. (A), 12-1. 220 -Jerry Jackson (A) def. M ichael Johnson (USMC), 4Army Greco-Roman winners were Jason Tolbert, a 5114.5 -George Williams (USMC) def. Irevor H umphrey 0. I victor over the Navy's Steven Mays, and Kenneth (A), 13-4. UNI -Jelfiey Green (A) def Matthew Lamb (N), 3-1.

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Tropic Times1 pors Short May7 1994 15 Wednesday ners. 6 p.m.: Hustlers vs. 747th Ml: For information, call Willie Moye at 7 p.m.: Al's Angels vs. 2 Le jit 287-6441, Sue Bozgoz at 287-6448 or the 8 p.m.: Delta Dames vs. The Diggers Directorate ofCommunity Activities Sports Office at 287-4050. Davis center sponsors mini marathon Saturday Basketball registration The third annual Mini Marathon of the open at Rodman NS Americas begins 6:30 a.m. Saturday at the Registration forthe Rodman NS basketFronius Fitness Center. The categories will ball program is under way. The league is be U.S. military, open, female and over 40. open to servicemembers, Department of Entry fee is $8. For more information, call Defense civilians and family members. 289-3294. There is no entry fee. A letter of intent is due to the Rodman Valent Recreation Center Sports Office by June 10. Organizational meeting/coaches clinic is 5 p.m. June 21 at offers martial arts course the Rodman Fitness Center. For more inforIf The Korean martial art, Tang Soo Do, is mation call 283-4222/406 1.taught 6-8 p.m. each Tuesday and Thursday atthe Valent Recreation Center. The class is Fitness month ends with taught by Arles Fernandez. Classes are open to adults and children ages 4 and over. tennis, horse shoes For information, call Miguel Briceno at The Howard and Albrook sports and 287-6500. fitness centers are sponsoring a singles tennis tournament and a horse shoe tournaRegistration for women's ment Saturday in celebration of U.S. Air Force Month of Fitness. tiathion ends June 8 The Howard Sports and Fitness Center The Albrook and Howard sports and is taking appointments for body fat analysis fitness centers are sponsoring a womens during May. Call 284-345 I for more infortriathlon June II. The triathlon begins 6:30 nation. a.m. at the Albrook Swimming Pool. The race includes a 500-meter swim, Rodman hosts Fitness 20-kilometer bicycle race and a 5-kilometer run. Trophies will be awarded to the top Month 1, 2, 3K fun runs three competitors in the following age catThe Rodman Fitness Center will host a egories: 19-29, 30-39 and 40 and over. National Fitness Month l K,2K and 3K Fun There is no entry fee for this event. Run/Walk for family members 7 a.m. Registration deadline is June 8. For more Monday. Check in time is 6:15 a.m. Regisinformation call the Albrook SFC at 286tration is free. 3364, or call the Howard SFC at 284-3451. The run is open to Navy Family member teams or children ages 6-17. A family team Heavy competition for includes a 2K run/walk with two or more members of the same family. male, female powerlifters Oneteam member must bea youth6-17 The Howard Sports and Fitness Center years old. Family members 5 years old or Arroprl rmesfie phoo is sponsoring a powerlifting competition under may be carried or pushed in a stroller Air tim e June 25. There will be a weigh-in 6:30 a.m. to finish. Call 283-4222 for more informaJungle Operations Training Battalion Knight's Lonnie Pearson takes and a 7 a.m. rules briefing the day of the tion. to the air as a defender tries to block his shot during the 1991 U.S. contest. Competition begins 7:30 a.m. The registration deadline is June 11. Albrook needs bowlers Army South Company Level Basketball Championship. Several basTrophies will be awarded for first and secketball competitions will be held this Memorial Day weekend. ond place in each male and female class for new mixed league There will be a Memorial Day basketball tournament Saturday(light, medium and heavy). TheAlbrook BowlingCenterneeds more Monday at the Fronius Fitness Center. Registration is closed. Call Trophies will also be awrded in both the men and women bowlers to play in a new 289-3108 for more information. men's and women's category to the lifter mixedleauge.Registration is$lOandweek* The Reeder Physical Fitness Center will sponsor a three-point who has the highestbody-weight-to-weightly play costs $6. The league starts 6:30 p.m. shot Memorial Day basketball tournament. Registration for the event lifted ratio. For more information call the Monday and runs 16 weeks. For more is open through Monday. For more information call 287-3861. Howard SFC at 284-3451. information call 286-4260. Rodman Marina offers Atlantic fishing tourney SCN AM Radio 790/1420 7 p.m.: HHC, Ist Battalion, 508thl Inantry shark fishing tilJ ne (Airbome) vs. 59th Engineer Detatchment, shark fishing June 18, 26 open until June 30 airs Indy 500, basketball Mothers Field A shark fishing trip is available through Entrytothe PanamaCanal Tarpon Club's Tonight Wednesday the Rodman Marina 6-8 p.m. June 18 and annual Roy Rinehart fishing tournament is 8 p.m.: Basketball: Houston at Utah 6 p.m.: 56th Signal Battalion vs. H HC, 26 aboard The Vargas.The trip costs $30 open until June 30. Entries must be caught (Game #3) 193rd Infantry (Light), Mothers Field per person. All fishing equipment is includin Atlantic waters, including the Chagres Saturday 7 p.m.: Medical Activity vs. 214th ed in the fee. Call Rodman Marina at 283River, and may include tarpon, marlin, sail2:30 p.m.: Basketball: New York at InMediacl Detatchment, Mothers Field 3147 for more information. fish, wahoo, red snapper, grouper, shark, diana (Game #3) 8 p.m.: 41st Area Support Group vs. barracuda, dolphin fish, tuna, jack or king6 p.m.: Baseball: Houston at PhiladelHHC, 1-508th, Mothers Field Basketball registration fish. phia *Air Force unit-level flag football For information about the tournament Sunday Tuesday opens for Atlantic youth rules and registration fee, call 243-5316. 10 a.m.: Indianapolis 500 Race 6:05 p.m.: 617th Airlift Support SquadRegistration for youth basketball for the 7 p.m.: Baseball: Detroit at Minnesota ron vs. 24th Transportation Squadron Atlantic community continues until TuesAmador Golf Course Monday 7:05 p.m.: 24th Security Police Squadday. There will be a clinic June 15 The 2:30 p.m.: Basketball: New Tork at Indiron vs. I st Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiseason opens June 16. Call 289-4605/4289. hosts Fathers Day event ana (Game #4) ment The deadline to sign up for the Father's 7 p.m.: Baseball: St. Louis at Los Ange8:05 p.m.: Company B, 536th Engineer USARSO holds 1 0-miler Day Tournament is June 15. The event is les Battalion vs. 24th Comunication Squadron scheduled for June 18. The format will be Tuesday Wednesday tryouts for men, women two-person select shot. The entry fee of$10 6 p.m.: Baseball: Chicago White Sox at 6:05 p.m.: Company A, 536th Engineer Practice sessions and three open try-outs includes lunch. N.Y. Yankees Battalion vs. 24th Medical Group will be held beginning in June for those An Independence Day Tournament is or 7:05 p.m.:24th Civil Engineer Squadron runners interested in making the U.S. Army scheduled for July 2. The format will be 8 p.m.: Basketball: Utah at Houston vs. 24th Operations Support Squadron South Ten-Miler team. three-person best ball. The $12 entry fee (Game #5) 8:05 p.m.: 24th Supply vs. 24th Services Practice sessions will be 6 -8 p.m. beginincludes lunch. The sign up deadline is June Squadron ning June 1 at Reeder Gym. The three trial 29. Football, softball action Thursday days will be held at 6 a.m. July 23, Aug. 13 The course will host a medal play tour6:05 p.m.: 24th SPS vs. 24th CS and Aug. 27 at Reeder Gym. nament Aug. 20. Flights will be determined in socal sports schedule 7:05 p.m.: 1-228th vs. 24th Trans. The six top male and female runners by sign ups. Prizes will be awarded to net *Army unit-level flag football 8:05 p.m.: 617th ALSS vs. Co. B, 536th selected will then go on to the 1994 Army and gross winners. The $15 entry fee inTuesday *Air Force womens softball I0-Miler Championships Oct. 16 in Washcludes lunch.The sign up deadline is Aug. 6 p.m.: 534th Military Police Company Playoffs, Tuesday-June 3 ington, D.C. 17. vs. 470th Military Intelligence, Mothers *Women's volleyball, Atlantic The coach encourages commanders to Call 282-4511/4838 for information Field Fronius Fitness Center hosts all games identify and support potential 10-mile runabout course programs.

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16 Tropic Times 16 ay 719 News 'aft, Rem em bering those w ho served Deparmen of Defense pht by Sp. John Hall Marines prepare to perform a 21-gun salute at the Corozal American Cemetary. The local Canal Area Veterans organization will sponsor a Memorial Day service 9 a.m. Monday at the cemetary. The service will feature a color guard and music from the 79th Army Band. A memorial service at sea will be held 7-9 a.m. Monday near the last buoy at the mouth of the Pacific channel. Participants will be transported via landing craft leaving the U.S. Naval Station Panama Canal Marina at 7 a.m. Thrift plan boosts civilian retirement FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Civilian employees covered by the Civil Service Retirement Systems or the Federal Employees Retirement System who are interested in saving Ma 27, 1994 some money for retirement can now do so during the Thrift Savings Plan open season that ends July 31. This savings program offers a tax-deferred retirement fund Memorial Day Proc lamation with several investment options for civilian employees. It can be used against loans, but the main purpose is for re, tirement, said Jared Garman, chief of Technical Services DiviTo all Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines sion at the Directorate of Civilian Personnel. Garnen said the Thrift Savings Plan is actually better than As Americans, we are truly fortunate. We're strong and capable -most Individual Retirement Accounts offered to the public. morally, economically, and militarily. Through nearly 218 years of While the IRAs are also tax-deferred, the ceiling on how much courage, hard work, and respect for the law, the United States has money can go into an IRA is less than the Thrift Savings Plan. become an example to the free nations of the world. This special posiDuring open season, investors can begin contributing to the tion and the blessings of liberty have been secured through the great program, change the amount deducted from their pay, or resacrifices of our Armed Forces. For those sacrifices, we are thankful allocate contributions to accounts among three investment and reflective this Memorial Day. funds by taking payroll deductions which are deposited into an account with the U.S. government. y he Mame, MDuring this period, eligible employees may also make a Americans remember many of the battles vividly -te an Midway, Thrift Savings Plan election if their latest appointment to a pothe Coral Sea, Normandy, Inchon, Khe Sanh, Tat 68, Grenada, Panama, sition covered by the FERS or CSRS was made before Jan. 1, Desert Storm, and Mogadishu. These battles cost the United States a or the latest appointment to a position covered by FERS or million dead young Americans to preserve more than 200 years of freedom. CSRS was made before July 1 and the member had been eligible to participate in the Thrift Savings Plan during a prior open Our families and veterans will always remember their loved ones and season. comrades who died for our country. On Monday, 30 May 1994 -Memorial Day If the employee stopped contributing to the Thrift Savings -all of us in SOUTHCOM who are privileged to now stand guard f or Plan before Jan. 1, contributions can be resumed this open seaAmerica should pause and take strength from their example. son. If an employee stopped contributing after Dec 31, they may not begin contributing again until the next Thrift Savings Plan open season, Nov. 15. To enroll in the Thrift Savings Plan or change your enrollment election, you must complete TSP-1, Thrift Savings Plan Election Form, which is available at the Directorate of Civilian Personnel, Benefits Branch, Room 101, Building 560, Corozal. Barry R. McCaf It must be completed and submitted no later than July 29. General, U. S. Army The pamphlet "Summary of the Thrift Savings Plan for FedCommander in Chief eral Employees," describes the Thrift Savings Plan in detail and the flyer "Open Season Update, 15 May to 31 July 1994" contains basic information about this Thrift Savings Plan open season. For information, call 285-5745/5941/5284. Community efforts control dengue fever mosquitos GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL (U.S. been conscienious about keeping their quarters, yards and well as checking for potential breeding sites of this mosARMY MEDDAC PAO) -This past dry season, the moswork areas free of containers that could collect water and quito on military installations. quito that causes dengue fever, Aedes aegypti, has been at serve as breeding sites," Powers said. This monitoring program will consist of placing black, low levels in the city of Panama, said Panama Ministry of "Without their help and dedication we would no doubt one-pint jars filled with water and containing a strip ofred Health officials. have a problem of actual Aedes aegypti breeding on our paper at various areas on the installations. The jars will This mosquito is sporadically found or absent in a few installations." be checked every week for the presence ofmosquito eggs. locations throughout the military installations in Panama, During the last wet and dry seasons, there were 14 cases If any are Ibund, the Directorate of Engineering and said Maj. Nelson Powers, chief of Entomology, Preveninvolving Panamanian nationals and no reported cases inHousing Pest Control section will take measures to climitive Medicine Service at Gorgas Army Community Hosvolving U.S. military or family members, officials said. nate the breeding sites and treat with insecticides. pital. It is only through the community's help and the support "If you find one of these jars, which is marked 'PreBecause this mosquito breeds only in artificial containof Preventive Medicine's community educational program ventive Medicine,' please leave it alonc," Powers said. ers, Powers attributes the low mosquito population to the that this .mosquito-transmitted disease was avoided, he "Preventive Medicine again wishes to thank (the comsanitation efforts being lone in yards and at work sites. said. mnunity) for the diligence and is request g continued sup"Preventive Medicine wishes to thank the village nayWith the start of the wet season. Preventive Medicine port for the oncoming wet season in fighting this mosquiors and members of the military community who have is continuing the programs ofeducation and monitoring as to," be said.

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Top1 etvties May 27, 1994 A quality of life guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page BI Ghost from the past U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero Chris Harkins, a member of Outriders Charities, gets ghouled up for the mini haunted house at Valent Recreation Center's presentation, Encore: A Valent Retrospective. See story and photos, Page B3. Cristobal junior/senior high stuCorozal veterinary clinic offers mi+Movies, Page B8 dents show elementary students crochip implant to keep pets pro*TV, Page B9 chemistry can be fun. tected. *Potpourri, Page B12

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B2Ma 9 Youth news Albrook/Howard *Youth Centers 286-3195/284-4700: Howard and Albrook youth centers will be closed Monday for Memorial Day. Pre-Teen Dance today at Howard Youth Center for ages 8-i3. DJ music, snack bar will be open. Registration for Youth Services summer day Camp program June 2-4 Howard Camp: Register at the Howard Youth center, Bldg. 696, from noon-6 p.m. June 2-4 Ft. Clayton Camp: Register at the Ft. Clayton Youth center, Bldg 155, from noon-6 p.m. Saturday Gymnastics classes now available at Howard Youth center, for ages 3 and up. Cost $13.00 per month. Bicycle challenge 3 p.m. Tuesday at Howard for all ages in honor of American Bike Month. C Gymnastics classes Saturdays. Ages 3-5 meet noon-I p.m.; ages 6-12 meet 1-2 p.m.; intermediate classes meet 2-3 p.m. Cost is $13 per month. US Army photo by Sgt. Rck Emeret *Hideout Teen Center 284-5487: Chemistry student Horace Hogan demonstrates a density lab to a kindergarten class. The teen center at Farfan has been closed temporarily. Activities have been rescheduled to the Howard or Albrook youth centers. Call 284-4700 for more information. +Child Development Center 284-6135:r" .is d b lhts fr Openings available in par-timne program for children ages 6 months -5 years. Openings are for 25-hour enrollment FORT ESPINAR (USARSO school students doing the chemvidual labs for a month off and five hours per day, five days a week. PAO Atlantic) -Atomic weights, istry labs, because I think the on," she said. "They had to do the formulas and understanding the younger students look up to labs so many times that it reinperiodic chart may contribute to them," said Roz Baitel, Cristobal forced the concepts in their Clayton the perceived difficulty of learnJunior/Senior High School chemminds." *Youth Center 287-6451: ing chemistry. istry teacher. "Seeing other stuThe high school students also Cooking Experiences every Tuesday When Cristobal Junior/Sedents working with chemistry came away from the day with a Second Annual Wacky Olympics 9 a.m. Saturday. Outnior High School chemistry stushowed them it isn't that difficult, better understanding of the effort door parent/child competitive games will be held at Building dents stepped into the shoes of and it heightened their interest in it takes to teach. 155, Fort Clayton. their teacher, however, they science." "After an entire day of teachAmerican Stars Gymnastics meet Tuesdays and Thursshowed the students ofGulick ElThe high school students ing these chemistry concepts to days. Ages 3-5 meet 2-3 p.m.; ages 6-8 meet 3-4 p.m.; ages 9 ementary School that chemistry benefited from the science demthe elementary students, my stuand up and advanced meet 4-5 p.m. Lessons cost $20. can also be fun. onstrations as well, Baitel said. dents figured out how tiring Outdoor Games every Thursday. "It was good to have the high "They worked on their mditeaching can be," Baitel said. Performing children's troupe seeks youths who like to sing, dance and perform. They meet 4-6 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. CUrUIu Junior ig Sc Coo Tae Kwon Do 5:30-7 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays for Piano lessons 1-6 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays. The fee h ~ 1 d O f -.th is $30 for four half-hour lessons per month. honors 17 s o m onth Gymnastics for ages 5 and older 2:30-3:30 p.m. and 3.304:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays CURUNDU (Department of Arts & Crafts every Monday. Cooking experience every Defense Dependents School Tuesday. PAO) -Seventeen students were Youth Services is hosting a talent show for youths up to 18 chosen for April's Student of the years old at 6 p.m., today. Month program at Curundu Jun*Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680: ior High School. Senior teen dance tonight for ages 15-18. The $1.50 fee Each month, part of the facincludes sodas. ulty select students who perform Senior Teen Employment Program is a yearround proacademically and socially in their gram to develop job skills and cam some money, for teen beclasses. These students serve as tween 15 -18 years old. Applications available at the cent be positive role models for their Talent Show at 6 p.m., today. classmates and friends. Carwash benefit for teen employment, 8 a.m. -3 p.m. Students must show leaderTriathlon tournament 4 p.m. Fridays. Compete in pool, ship qualities, volunteer to assist football and ping pong. other students, exhibit proper Traveling neighborhood soccer game 1-5 p.m., Sunday. classroom behavior and have a Popcorn and movies every Sunday. positive attitude toward school, Volleyball 3:30-5:30 p.m. Sundays. teachers, classmates, and faculty courtesy photo Softball practice 2:30-4:30 p.m. Sundays. members. ..Aaron Bedwell and Denise Rodaniche select a book. *Child Development Center 287-3301: Special recognition was Child Development Center provides high quality, develgiven to Jackie McCormick, who Month"were: Edqardo Busquets, pher Nickell, Deris Medina, opmental child care for children 6 weeks to 12 years old. Full helps prepare the programs. Niki Dwayne McFarlane, Brooke Frank Pigeon, Corey Ellis, Eloy day care and hourly care available call 287-5657. Nakamura played two musical Farnsworth, Jenna Webeck, Eric Benedetti, Evelyn Cunmdngs, selections on the piano. Hellzen, Gary Beal, Zamira Megann Kostelny, Aaron April "Students of the Jimenez, Daniel Beech, ChristoBedwell and Stacy Medina. Cocon *Cocoh Community Center 287-4119 Honor society initiates members Arts and crafts, 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. CURUNDU (Department of Kristy Springer, Ronald Staha, tiates in the Honor Society Defense Dependents School -Earl Hemple, and Lhoris Wilson. pledge. PAO) -The Curundu Junior Stephanie Sutherland, Master The congratulatory remarks *Espinar Youth Center 289-4605: High School's Crossroads Chapof Ceremonies, opened the inducwere given by Brig. Gen. David Pool party 6 -9p.m., today. Transportation and snacks proter of the National Junior Honor tion ceremony. A. Sawyer, Commander, 24th vided Society inducted 24 new memBrett Sueger led the Pledge of Wing at Howard AFB. Teddy bear bingo 3-4:30 p.m. today, $.25 per card. bers. The new members are: Allegiance, Nick Roberts spoke Sawyer's inspirational mesSaturday sports noon-6 p.m. Saturday. Charmaine Archer, Laquita on scholarship, Kathy Bottin sage encouraged the students to Teen sports 4-6 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays. Armstrong, Sara Chao, Lucia spoke on citizenship, Cheryl set their goals higher and work Study with a buddy and tutoring 4-6 p.m. Tuesdays and Chong, Ching Chou, Elizabeth Eckerle explained services, Katie hard to attain them. Thursday. Coomer, Brain Faye, Kristan Shaha extolled leadership, and Refreshments were served in Pre-teen Monthly Pool Party 6-9 p.m., noon -6 p.m. toGibson, Megan Higgins, Joanna Melanie Rojas talked about chara reception for all the members, day. Transportation and snacks provided. Korolyshyn, Mary Leigh, Ashly acter. parents, and guests following the Youth Services and Cristobal High School Prom, SaturLester, Frank Linton, Fred The presentation of Memberceremony. day, at the Special Effect Teen Center. Maduro, Deris Medina, Miriam ship cards and pins was handled Jane Loudat, sponsor of the Rodriguez, Ariadne Samaniego, by Sasha Dhaene and Dr. Charles lonor Society, gave the new Mat Smiley, Elizabeth Smith, Reno. Tammny Shaffer led the inimembers their certificates.

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~j9IuAI~JI1IIIIIILTropic Times Entetament :a 2B3 Stephanie Schroer pets one of the animals at the livestock exhibit during Encore: A Valent Retrospective. Valent Recreation Center rejuvenates fI Encore: past events, exhibits for competition he staff of the Valent Recreation Center put its best foot forward in an all-out effort during the judging of an Army-wide recreation center competi tion May 14 and 15. The presentation, Encore: A Valent Retrospective, was representative of dozens of programs the center has offered the community throughout the year, said Maria Rios, program coordinator. The judges from the Forces Command w competition travel throughout the United States and overseas to determine which center presents the best effort in programming, she said. Winning this competition seven times in the past, the Valent staff and an entourage of volunteers worked almost B around the clock to get the program Boston Patterson, judge, tastes one together. oftheentries ofthe gumbo cooking "This year we chose to bring back contest. segments of the community's favorite Patterson A gumbo cook for nearly 30 past programs in this presentation," Rios years, this Deparment of Defense civilian said. and retired master sergeant learned his In this way, not only do the judges craft through his marriage to a "Creole have a better idea of the programming, Representatives from the Society for Creative Anachronism Chris "Cole girl" when he was only 19 years old. but the community benefits as well with of the Hill" Cole and Michael "Ivan" Manchester match blows. "Even though I've been divorced for another opportunity to see some of their obedience demonstrapoisonous plants years, my best memories of the marriage favorite programs again. tions and a step back story and photos by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero and animals of are of my children and gumbo," he said. Visitors to the center had the chance to in time with the USARSO Public Affairs Ofice Panama, coins and Taking first place in the gumbo contest revisit the haunted house and have an Society for Creative stamps, molas, was Miriam Washington. Coming in early -or late -visit with Santa. They Anachronism with armor-clad men ceramic and pottery, art and a Native second was Lydia Moore and in third was were also able to take part in coffee locked in combat. American Heritage display. Elizabeth Saxon. tasting and browse through many vendors Automobiles, motorcycles, boats, As well as tasting coffee and dining The final announcement of the selling things ranging from pet care tanks, aircraft and ships of war were also on various foods sold in the food court, winning recreation center in this Armyproducts to coins and stamps. available for visitors to look at. Though visitors had the rare opportunity to feast wide competition will be made this An abundance of entertainment was the tanks, aircraft and ships of war were on a various styles of gumbo at the summer. But, win or lose, the Valent on hand throughout the program with of the tabletop version, the works of gumbo cooking contest. Recreation Center will continue to dancers from throughout Central and model builders was a big draw. Several cooks brought their creations provide quality programming for the South America, fashion shows, dog Other exhibits on hand were livestock, in to be judged by gumbo expert, Boston military community, Rios said.

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'topic limes B4FMaocus on Panama Department of Defense photos by Petty Uficer 2nd Class Bill Lewis Javier Martinez carves one of his bateas at Steven Circle in Balboa. batCa8 arC p rL of our culture aime Martinez is a slim scenery, flags, maps and others. young man with an intense Using nature's colors, he paints his look on his face. He is shy, drawings. When it is completely dry, but he gets his message across. he applies a coat of varnish as the final Martinez has been carving and process in the batea-making. painting bates and totumas (wooden The bateas are very popular among plates and pumpkin shell recipients) the tourists visiting the isthmus. for the past four years. Martinez also carves picture frames Martinez was a farmer in for the molas. -Penonome, Codle province before The totumas or pumpkin shell engaging in the batea business. recipients are used to store water, in the He worked in his garden planting kitchen, to drink water and also as vegetables. dinner plates. "In those days a farmer used to earn He gets them from Penonome. He enough money to support his family," cuts them in half, cleans the inside and Martinez said. dips them in a bleach solution. The IHe left his town and moved to the drying process takes two days. Later he city looking for better days in his sands them and With a lead pencil future. The economic situation sketches the drawings and select the became hard and the fact that he different painting colors. attended school up to sixth grade made Martinez said, "I tty not to repeat it difficult to find a job. the drawings unless otherwise orOnce in the city he was able to dered." He uses acrylic paint and it work with the Cuna Indians as Steven takes him one week to paint 15 Circle in Balboa. He worked with totumas. them for about one year and then Martinez also makes Christmas decided to go on his own and started ornaments. He carves and paints small his business. bateas and bells figures as well as small Martinez begin his experiment with pumpkin shells to decorate the tree. bateas and totumas, hand carved Martinez works eight hours a day wooden plates and pumpkin shells and makes enough money to support recipients. These wooden plates are his wife and two children. used for everything in the interior of "At least, this is an honest and i Panama from carrying the laundry to decent job. I work hard," Martinez said. and from the river and cleaning rice to While carving on a picture frame, he serving plates. talked about his plans for the future. In addition to being used as "My big dream is to be able to buy decorative items, bateas can be used as more carpentry tools and have my shop wall hangings or serving trays and as to do more woodcrafts. I would like to sourvenir gifts. work on jewelry chests, trays, statues Martinez makes his bateas from and others," he said. cedro espino (a type of mahagony). Martinez smiles and looked up These colorful bates and totumas are some of Martinez's creations. Bateas are made in different shapes toward the horizon and with a sad and sizes. voice said, "I miss my days back He sands the wood until it feels in the interior; life is so different smooth and applies a sanding sealer to and quite. We have a better environstord cover the pores. Then using a carving ment." tool, he carves out his own creativities Martinez's bateas and totumas that can be any kind of animals such are available at Steven Circle in Tropic TVmes .stavJ as birds, frogs, macaws, picturesque Balboa.

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#3~mm mwlew -__Tropic Times ]IA ---.#Community news May27 1994B5 Quarry Heights Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey, commander in chief, U.S. Southern Command, will host a reception for distinguished SOUTHCOM volunteers at Quarters 1, Quarry Heights, 2 p.m. June 3. Gorgas People who need to be screened for command sponsorship and out-processing to the United States or overseas for the Exceptional Family Member Program must now schedule appointments. Family P members will no longer be seen on a walk-in basis. For appointments, call 282-5339/5607. Clayton Nominations are now being accepted for the 1995 Ten Outstanding Young Americans Award program. Nominations should be sent to Aichel Tam at the Directorate ofCivilian Personnel, Building 560, Corozal, by April 22, 1995. Call 285-5611/ 4111. The Enlisted Spouses Club -Panama holds meetings 7 p.m. the first Monday of each month at ..the Fort Clayton Noncommissioned Officers' Club. A For information, call 287-3587. The American Red Cross is sponsoring a community first aid and safety course on the third floor in Building 519, 6 -10 p.m. June 21-23. The class will feature instruction on adult and infant CPR, safety procedures and first aid. For informaCapt. Russell Wiessinger scans a patient for a microchip that will be inserted under the animal's tion, call Abbe Lester at 287-5509. skin for indentification purposes. Regularislamic prayerservices are held 12:30931M rh pnS hallFor more information, call 287-5859. M icr chip help p,,,L v nerThe Welcome to Panama Newcomer's Orientation Tourwill be held 8 a.m. -2:30 p.m. Thursday ro and June 8. Paricipants will meet at the Fort Clayton peri'riari tly Nnomsied Officers' Club. The rour inpermnftanent yal pr.ecn irmalsm cludes an information fair, a tour of historical sites and Miraflores Locks, shopping, an authentic PanCOROZA L (Veterinary Treatment Facility) -Each day amanian lunch and a dance exhibition. The cost for pets are lost or stolen, and many never make it back home. unch is $5.0 Animals are often destroyed because owners cannot be e i t y s C t located for identification of the pect. Even owners who out 'ahid care is provided at the Fort Clayton Child collars with ID tags on their pet can lose the animal if the -evelopment Center by eser/ation only at 287 if57. To maKe reservations f'orthe orientation, call collar is removed. However, a new way to permanently 67 es73 protect your pet is available at the Veterinary Treatment o7-o073 Facility-Corozal. or neopie transferring to new duty stations, the The microchip identification method is a system featurArmy Community Service Relocation Assistance :og a small computer chip encoded with an identification tfice helps in the search for housing, employment number, said Capt. Russell Wiessinger, commander VTFand educational possibilities. For more in formation, Corozal. The chip is encased in a biocompatable tube so it call 289-4021/4636. will be accepted by the animals body, and is small enough to fit into a hypodermic needle. The device is injected under the animals skin and remains there throughout the animal's life, unable to be lost or altered. Free coupons are available 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. The process is as simple as routine vaccinations, he said. Monday-Friday at the Relocation Assistance Office The microchip ID method is permanent, inexpensive in Building 8348, Margarita Complex. and is not painful for the animal, he said. The microchip is a passive transponder activated by a w a rd/A lbrook radio signal. A hand-held scanner is passed over the pet to H read the encoded ID number. The number appears on the Volunteers are needed in family services to scanner's screen, providing positive ID of the animal. help with the loan closet, base brochure library, and Owners can register the pet's number with a national layette program. Family services is open 10 a.m.-3 registry to ensure rapid ID. p.m. Volunteers get free child care and can visit the A registry ofanimals implanted here will be kept on file facility or call 284-5860. at Corozal and be included in the pet's records to ensure lost or stolen pets returned to the clinic will be returned tc their families as soon as possible. Call 285-5866/5867 for The microchip is small enough to fit inside a M iscellaneous more information between 8 a.m.and 4 p.m. hypodermic needle. Applications for the student summer hire program are available the Directorate of Civilian Personnel and at the schools. The program runs June Ti me key i n replacing knocked out teeth 31andis limited to full-time students HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) -Americans knock inserted in its socket while waiting to see the dentist, Nill attending U.S. schools. Students must be 16-23 out an estimated five million teeth each year in accidents said. years old. They will eam $3 per hour and work 20 and rough play according to the Academy of General "If this isn't possible, hold the tooth in your mouth or hours per week with some working up to 40 hours Dentistry. Knocked out teeth can be reinserted, however, if immersed it in cold water or milk which contains many of per week. For more information, call 285-5201/ patients follow some simple instructions and head straight the same minerals as saliva," Nill said. "Successfully 4155. for a dentist. reattaching a tooth depends upon the conditions it was kept Toastmasters International -Panama will hold When a tooth is knocked out, time is ofthe essence. The in after it left the mouth." meetings Thursday and June 16 at the Panama Canal ligament that holds it in place can regrow and secure it as Children's permanent teeth are more likely to replant Training Center. For information, call 287-5689. firmly as before, according to Capt. Mark D. Nill, general solidly because children have great healing abilities, he Anthony's Pizza offers free home delivery to dental officer at the clinic here. said. Baby teeth have little chance of successful Quarry Heights, Curundu, Albrook AFS, Corozal, "After 30 minutes, the chance that a tooth can be reimplantation. Fort Clayton and Amador by calling 287-5745/ replanted drops sharply," he said. "Once the tooth leaves Dentists will adjust the tooth in the socket and fasten it 4718. Delivery is available to Howard AFB, Fort your mouth, cells in its outer layer begin to die. To keep with wire or bonding materials. It may take up to eight Kobbe, Farfan, Rodman Naval Station and Cocoli these cells alive, the tooth mustbe transported tothedentist weeks to see whether the tooth reattaches itself and a root by calling 284-6744/6252/6254. in conditions similar to the environment of your mouth." canal may be required within a month since the nerve Ideally, the tooth should first be rinsed and gently usually dies, Nill said.

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4~Tropic Times B610ay27, 1994 // / /7 7/W/N// / Rod man molas handicrafts and snorkel in the cryssnorkel or scuba equipment. This is the transit any day of the week. *Information, Tour and Travel: tal clear waters. legendaryburial spotof SirFrancis Drake. Playa Blanca snorkel and dive trip The Navy 1 office new hours of A od panning in Las Cumbres 8 a.m.June 4. opertionareA0:3 aomoto pom.Mon 3 p.m., $65 per person. Pan for gold the Horseback riding inEl Valle June 11. eday through Friday. *Zodiac Community Activities: old fashioned way in a proven gold proGatun Lake train wreck dive June 18. Barro Colorado Island 6 a.m. June I 1 El Valle market shopping 6:30 a.m.ducing river. Bring a sack lunch, cooler Customized trips are available for and 25, $65, a minimim of two people is 4 p.m. June 5, $13. Bring extra money for with beverages, hat and suntan lotion. groups with a minimum of four or 10 needed. Visit the tropical research island lunch. Deep Sea fishing 6 a.m.-noon Saturpeople. in the canal's Gatun Lake. Dining out at Plaza Paitilla 6-10 p.m. day, $50. Fish for marlin and sailfish on Balboa Panama City Tour 9 a.m. June 9 and Thursday, $4 for transportation. Enjoy a the 65-foot Caryani. 25. $8, minimum of 10 people is needed. night on the town with fine dining and Gold panning 8 a.m-3 p.m. today, *Balboa Dive Club: Visit the Church of the Golden Altar, entertainment. $12. Pan for gold on the Chagres River. The Club is now accepting entries to French Plaza and more. Free Zone shopping 8:30 a.m.-4:30 Bring a sack lunch and drinks. the 1994 Scuba Olympics to be held June Moonlight Cruise 6:30 p.m. June 3 p.m. June 3. $13 fortransportation. Enj 'y 11 at the Albrook Pool. There will be / and 24, $21. Cruise Panama and Taboga duty free shopping in the city of Colon. separate events for scuba and snorkel. Bay on the 61-foot Black Stallion. Outdoor adventures: *Valent Recreation Center: Prizes include two trips to Honduras from Free Zone Shopping 7 a.m. Monday Peacock bass fishing on Gatun Lake Shimmey Beach 9 a.m.-5 p.m.June 4. Copa Airlines, dive light, tank trays, comand June 15, $12, minimum of of 12 5 a.m.-2 p.m., S25 per person. Cost inTaboga guided tour 7 a.m.-7 p.m. putter software, subscriptions and various F people needed. Shop for gold, watches, cludes transportation, boat with guide, bait, June 5. dive packages from Scuba Panama and small electronics and fine linens. ice and coolers for fish. Bring your own Churches and architecture tour 9 Buzo. Entry fees are $5 for the first two Dinner & jazz at Las Bovedas Resfishing gear. a.m.-I p.m. June 11. events and $3 for each additional event. taurant, 7 p.m. June 3, $6 transportation Conoeing and barbecue on the Free Zone shopping 7 a.m.-3 p.m. Pick up an application at the Albrook or fee. A minimum of 10 people is needed. Chagres River 8 a.m.-2 p.m., $20 per June 17. Howard pool, -he Zodiac Recreation Cen/ El Valle Shopping Trip, 7 a.m. June 5 person. Cost includes transportation, Costa Rica tour July 1-4. Register by ter or write Unit 0967 APO AA 34(X)2 or and 26, $12. Twelve people are needed. cones, safety equipment, guide and barJune 20. Trip includes three nights/four call 263-8077. Shop for local handicrafts, plants, fruits becue lunch. Bring drinks, snacks, days at Hotel Gran Costa Rica, round-trip Dive trip to Aquatic Parkin Portobelo and vegetables and visit the nature presunscreecen and a hat. ticket and city tour. June 25-26. The cost is $25 per person and serve. Snorkeling or scuba near Drake's *Outdoor Recreation Center: includes accommodations, four boat dives San Blas Island June 17-18, $149. A Island 7 a.m.-5 p.m. June 5, $22 snorkel/ Partial transitsofthe Panama Canal and a barbecue. Sign up by June 8. Write minimum of two people is needed. Visit $47 scuba. Package includes transporta7:30-11:30 a.m. Saturdays, $40. A miniUnit 0967 APO AA 34002 or call 263the San Blas Archipielago and shop for tion to launching pointnear Portobello and mum of 20 people is needed for partial 8077. Albrook/Howard offend twiceaweek. Basic, 1-3p.m. inter*Zodiac Community Activities CenBasic and intermediate sewing leser. sons are offered twice a week. Basic classes Intro to scuba, a free one-night class is are 3-5 p.m., intermediate classes are 5-7 available. p.m. Open-water scuba June 6 at Howard Basic/intermediate cake decorating Pool and June I 1 at the Albrook Pool. meets 6-8 p.m. twice a week. Call the center to arrange scuba classes Dog obedience class 7-9:15 p.m. Monif these don't fit in your schedule, day, Wednesday and Friday, $(,J. Classes in ladies water exercise, beginBasic/intermediate English classes are ning and advanced swimming for adults held Monday-Thursday. and children, diving board and lap swimPrivate piano and guitar lessons are ming are available at Howard or Albrook available weekday evenings. The instrucpools. Call the center for details. tor meets privately with the students for 30 Martial Arts classes are offered minutes. through the recreation center and both Swimming three days a week. youth centers. *Fort Clayton Scuba Shop: 07 Beginner and advanced English and The phone is temporarily out of orSpanish classes begin monthly and run der becauseofrenovations.Call287-6453/ four weeks. 5807 for information. Beginner and advanced dog obediBasic open-water scuba class, $115. enceclasses are held at the Howard Parade Advanced open-water scuba, $140. Field. Four-week class costs $32. A miniRescue scuba, $1 19. mum of five people is needed. Underwater photography, $99. *Albrook Auto shop: Air conditioning service and repair 12:30-5 p.m. every day except Tuesday *Twin Oceans Pro Shop: and Wednesday. Equipment available for scuba, snorWheel alignment diagnostic and serkel, tennis, camping and other outdoor vice 3-9 p.m. Monday, Thursday and Frirecreation. day, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. *Pacific Theatre Arts Centre: Courtosy photo Monthly classes available ranging from Veteran speaker ayton various dance lessons, voice, guitar and Vietnam veteran 1st Lt. (Ret.) Clebe McClary, United States Marine *Fort Clayton Boat Shop: piano and martial arts. Call 286-3814. Corps will visit the military installations In Panama to share his story Bass fishing at Gatun Lake, $20 fee Rodman June 5-9. Throughout the week, McClary will speak to the military inludes guide, boat, bait and rods. communities during Moral Courage Seminars and God and Country DeepSeminars. McClary Is the author of the book "Living Proof." He has captain, gear, lures and fuel. A boating safety class will be held 6semkna Bcly Is the author of the Georgs *Valnt ecratin Ceter 9 ~m.June13 nd 5 ad Juy 1 an 13 spoken at Billy Graham Crusades and is the recipient of the George Koren karae lasCenter .m. Tuesat Building 24 (15 and iza Han Washington Medal of Freedom and the Gen. Omar Bradley Spirit of days and Thursdays. Admission to the first Rodman. Cost is $35 and includes all maIndependence Award. He now travels around the country speaking at class is free. terials and qualification test drive. Call the churches, veteran organizations and military installations. The schedIndian Guyami sewing lessons are Rodman Marina at 283-3147. ule for his visit includes: June 5 -8:45 a.m. Clayton Protestant Service 11 a.m. Albrook Protestant Service June 6 -10 a.m. -Howard Theater -Moral Courage Seminar 7 p.m. -Howard/Kobbe Chapel -God and Country Rally June 7 -10 a.m. -Davis Theater -Moral Courage Seminar 7 p.m. Davis Theater -God and Country Rally June 8 -3 p.m. -Clayton Theater -Moral Courage Seminar For information, call 287-5568.

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Tropic Times P7 tices May 27, 1994 33 D/prtmet ol Wen ph-to by M-Sampson Aristocratic comedy* Melanie Bales and Ted Turnipseed perform a scene from "Opera Comique," an adult farce that 24haeriesS ifiSc rs n will be entered In the 1994 Forces Command Festival of Performing Arts. The comedy will be R4h eriesSnaadRena Cents 2846d performed 8 p.m. tonight and Saturday. Tickets are $8. Call 286-3814 for reservations. Aebreona Antl Crafte, 28-36107 Albrook Club, 286-4128 Albrook Ridn Sble 34287-4411/3333 Canal Crafters 286-4500 *Fort Clayton Arts and Crafis tures seasonal displays and is open tion 10: 15 a.m. June 9. Chief Petty Officers' Club, 283-5475 4 Center: 10 a.m.-2 p.m. MondaySaturday, *Howard Skills Development Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-5957 Fabric painting classes 6:30Building 8(4, Albrook. Call 286Center: Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453 8:30 p.m. the first and third Wednes4500. Sign upfor classes at the Free Mother of Pearl applicaClayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360 day and Thursday of each month, shop: tion demo 3-3:30 p.m. Saturday. Clayton NCO Club, 287-3586 $7.50. Some supplies are available. Special project quilting Santa Free ceramic pouring class 10 Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363 Stone stroke classes I I a.m. wall hanging islO:30 a.m. Wednesa.m.-noon Tuesday. Clay ton Scuba Shop 287-3355 Sundays, $ 10. Paint ceramic figuday and runs 6-8 weeks. Free ceramic pouring class in Club Amador, 282-3534 fines to look like stoneware. Quilting classes run the first, Spanish I I a.m.I p.m. Thursday. Cocoli Recreation Center, 287-4119 Custom frames to order and second and fourth Tuesday of the The 1994 photo contest is comHoward Auto Craft Shop, 284-3370 do-it-yourself frame classes are month; intermediate 10:15 a.m.ing in August. Call for details. Howard Enlisted Members' Club, 284-4107 available. noon; beginner 12:152 p.m. Ongoing classes i ncludestained Howard Officers' Club, 284-4680 The Ceramic Center, Building Free crochet demo will be held glass, cyross-stitch, framing, clay Howard Riding Stables 284-3770 198, is located near the Crafts Shop. 10: 15 a.m. June 6. flower, pottery wheel throwing, Howard Skills Development Center, 284-6361 *Canal Crafters: Tole painting class will be held macrame, air brush techniques, and Howard Teen Center, 284-47(X) Handmade arts and crafts are 10: 15 a.m. Thursday. The cost is lamp assembly. Several "how-to" Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-45 10 available. Consignment and volun$11. videos are available for free viewThe Loop, 287-3035 teers are welcome. The shop feaFree paper mold demonstraing. Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814 Quarry Heights Officers' Club, 282-4380 Rodman Marina, 293-3147/3150 Rodman Nava Staton Inforation Tour Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514 Vatant Recreation Center, 287-6500 ale an eTr information. is open to all barracks residents. Zodiac Co unity Activities Center, 284 The screening room otn ers free Refreshment v and cookies 2 Coco.h Community C center: 616 movies. Calling the 24-hour movie p.m. Saturday. Arts and crafts for children Atlantic line at 287-4367. Fresh water pearls will be on 3:/0 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday. Aquativity Center, 289-4009 Star Trek 27-hour movie mara'4sale 1-7 p.m. Thursday through June Celebrate the birthdays of the o A C2 thon 8 p.m. tonight through I I p.m. 5. month 6p.m.today.Cake,icecream Davis CrtsmandiCaty CC r, 289-5 Saturday. Army art historical print ex-hiand kool-aid will he served. Ocean 'Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402 Dart players may win a $ f1,000 bition June 9-17 in honor of lag Karaoke coming soon. Outdoor Recreation, 289-4077 first prize and large merchandise day. mZodiac Com unity Center: Sherman Arts and Crafts Center, 289-6313 pFari ing this year's dat tourGlassand crystal dCisplay ne Subs on Top has take-out Cat-in Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-6104 nament at the Valent Recreation 6-12. or del iveryservicetoKobbeFarfan Sundial Recreation Center, 289-3889/3300 Center.hQualify for the June tournaBetter Opportunities for Howard and Gateway housing. Fax ment by playing at Valevt. Contact Single Soldiers forum meets the in orders at 2 p4-6109 or call 284 Anne Kelly at at 287-4500 for more first Thursday of every month and 5848. Atlantic tours Colon historical tour 9 a.m.-2 p.m. June 8. +Sundial Rereation Center,: Shopping June 1 1. Mini triathalon 7 a.m. June I S. *Sundial Recreation Center: Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. Monday, Wednesday and Barro Colorado 6 a.m. June 4. Rec center news Friday. Post exchange shopping 8 a.m. June 4. *Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: Family exercise 9:30-10:30 a.m. Wednesday. El Valle 5:30 a.m. June 19. The center offers a variety ofclasses such as karate, Piano 10:30-11 a.m.Wednesday. *Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: cake decorating, piano, Spanish, English, country line Karate 6-7 p.m. Monday and Wednesday. Free Zone 9 a.m-1:30 p.m. Wednesday and June 11. dancing and jazz. Call 289-The2 for details. Gymnastics/ballet 5:30-6 p.m. Thursday. Taboga Island 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m. June 4. Aquarium exhibit June 11. Spanish 6-7 p.m. Tuesday and F-riday. El Valle 5:30 a.m.-5 p.m. June June 5. Pool tournament June 19. Painting 6-8 p.m. Monday and Wednesday.

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B8 Tropic Tines M v e __ _ __ B8ay 2.19 movies Location Soday Saturday Sunday Mtonday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Howard AFB 7pm: Monkey Trouble 2pm: Monkey Trouble 2pm: Monkey T pm M ey Trouble 7pm: 8 Seconds (PG7pm: Major League II 7pm: The Paper (R) PG)ThoraBirch,Mimti (PG)ThoraBirch, Mimi (PG)Thora Birh, Mimi (PG)Thor Birch, Mimi 13) Luke Perry, Stephen (PG) Charlie Sheen, Michael Keaton, Glenn 284-3583 Rogers Rogers Rogers Rogers Baldwin Tom Berenger Close 9pm: g Seconds (PG7pm:8Seconds(PG-13) 7pm: Naked Gun 33 9pm: Naked Gun 33 1/3 9pm: Jimmy Hollywood 9pm: The Paper (R) 9pm: Jimmy Hollywood ) LukePerryStephen Luke Perry, Stephen 1/3 (PGC lie PG C Leslie Niel(R) Joe Pesci, Christian Michael Keaton, Glenn (R) Joe Pesci, Christian Baldwin Baldwin Niel-sen, Prisc ita sen, Priscilla Presley Slater Close Slater 9pm: Naked Gun 33 Presley 1/3 (PG-13) C. Leslie 9pm: 8 Seconds (PGNiel-sen, Priscilla 13)LukePerry,Stephen Presley Baldwin Fort Clayton 7pm: Guarding Tess 2pm: EmestrideAgain 2pm: Mr. Doubtfire 7pm: The Chase (R) 7pm: Guarding Tess 7pm: Monkey Trouble 7pm: 8 Seconds (PG287-3279 (PG-13) Shirley Mac(PG)JimVarney (PG-13) Robin WillCharlie Sheen, Kristie (PG-13) Shirley Mac(PG)ThoraBirch,Mimi 13)LukePerryStephen Laine, Nicholas Cage 7pm: Guarding Tess iams, Sally Field Swanson Laine, Nicholas Cage Rogers Baldwin 9pm: What's Eating (PG-13) Shirley Mac7pm: What's Eating 9pm: What's Eating 9pm: The Chase (R) 9pm: 8 Seconds (PG9pm: Naked Gun 33 1/3 Gilbert Grape (PG-13) Laine, NicholasCage Gilbert Grape (PG-13) Gilbert Grape (PG-13) Charlie Sheen, Kristie 13)LukePerry,Stephen (PG-13) C. Leslie NielJohnny Depp, Juliette 9pm: The Chase (R) Johnny Depp, Juliette Johnny Depp, Juliette Swanson Baldwin sen, Priscilla Presley Lewis Charlie Sheen, Kristie Lewis Lewis Swanson 9pm: Guarding Tess (PG-13) Shirley MacLaine, Nicholas Cage Fort Davis 7pm: Lightning Jack 7pm: Lightning Jack 7pm: TheRef(R)Denis 7pm: Sugar Hill (R) 7pm: Angie (R) Geena 7pm:TheRef(R)Denis 7pm: Guarding Tess 289-573 (PG-13) Paul Hogan, (PG-13) Paul Hogan, Leary, Judy Davis Wesley Snipes, Michael Davis, Stephen Rea Leary, Judy Davis (PG-13) Shirley MacCuba Gooding Jr. ICuba Gooding Jr. Wright Laine, Nicholas Cage 9pm: Angie (R) Geena 9pm: Sugar Hill (R) Davis, Stephen Rea Wesley Snipes, Michael Wright Fort Sherman 7:30pm: Sugar Hill (R) 7:30pm: Angie (R) 7:30pm: Lightning No show No show No show 7:30pm: What's Eat289-5173 Wesley Snipes, Michael Geena Davis, Stephen Jack (PG-13) Paul ing Gilbert Grape (PGWright Rea Hogan, Cuba Gooding 13) Johnny Depp, Jr. Juliette Lewis Fort Amador 7pm: Naked Gun 33 7pm: Major League 11 7pm: The Paper (R) No show No show No show 7pm: Jimmy Holly1/3 (PG-13) C. Leslie (PG) Charlie Sheen, MichaelKeaton,Glenn wood (R) Joe Pesci, 284-3583 Niel-sen, Priscilla Tom Berenger Close ChristianSlater Presley Ju ne 1:3 Malor League 10 '_harlie Sheen, T'om 3eernger Ater having won hcir cnamoionship Hoard AFB Ceveiano nanshaveslumoedoa '.-Io heir tio losrt ways. seemss :ie em Major League R layers rave meen distracted yxe(PC3) s've cars, coing endorsements and oter C a S e 'heii onasebal ctivtes hen theman Tom Rerenger .' -rtufers a neart attack ne team ctcr m ThePape (R)ages over anci tries to get efvery ooe:)a" 1 ::to Tie inningg streak. PG "Somte roe --is Kdt language j00 min. ) mvy Hollywood Fort Clayton Joe pesci. Christian siaber Hoping to get attention and to achieve 4 7 m Monkey Trouble fame for himself, an out-of-work actor (PG) Thorn Birch, becomes a vigilante superhero on 'te Mimi Rogers streets of Hollywood. R (language), 110 9pm 8 Seconds (PG-13) min. Luke Perry, .Now showing at Clayton and Davis theaters. Stephen Baldwin The Paper Michael Keaton, Glenn Close Fort Davis Trying to beat the deadline for a story in Angie Sugar Hill the New York Sun newspaper, an editor Geena Davis, Stephen Rea Wesley Snipes, 7pm Guarding Tess rushes to expose a major scandal which A vulnerable, single woman has to deal Michael Wright (PG-13) could possibly lead to the release of two with complicated relationships and critThe godfather of a New York City Shirley MacLaine innocent young men charged with muricism from her family and friends while crime-empire fights desperately to break Nicholas Cage der. R (strong language), 112 min. learning responsibility for herself and free of the world he created before it her new baby. R (language), 108 min. destroys him and his family. R (intense 9pm What's Eating drug related violence, graphic heroin Gilbert Grape The Chase Guarding Tess use, strong language), 123 min. (PG-13) Charlie Sheen, Kristie Swanson Shirley MacLame, Johnny Depp, Falsely accused of a bank robbery, Jack Nicholas Cage' Juliette Lewis Hammond escapes; steals aBMW with Nicholas Cage is the special agent in Denis Leary, Judy Davis young heiress in it; and makes a high charge of the secret service detail asComedian Denis Leary is cast as a speed run for the Mexican border. PG-13 signed to guard the widow of a former haplessjcwel thiefwho kidnaps a bickFort Sherman (vlenceasceneofaensualityandsome U.S. president at her home in a small ring marriedcoupleonChristmas Eve 7:30pm The Ref (R) language), 88 mi. Ohio town. His purpose in life is to get and ends up being a hostage in the another assignment and her's is to make couple's home. R (language), 97 mm, Dems Le y, What's Eating his life miserable. PG-13 (for some IanJudy Davis Gilbert Grape guage), 95 min. China Moon Johnny Depp, Juliette Lewis Ed Harris, Fort Amador A small town young man living in a Lightning Jack Madeleine Stowe dysfunctional family for whom he's the Paul Hogan, Cuba Gooding Jr. A small town detective falls for a rich 7pm Jimmy Hollywood sole backbone and support discovers life A bungling outlaw teams up with a very married woman and remains blindly in (R) can be fun when a new girl moves to perceptive mute partner to enjoy a life of love until he has to investigate a murder Joe Pesci, town. PG-13 (elements ofmature subject crime while eluding the law in the Old he'd rather not solve. R (sensuality, Christian Slater matter), 117 min, West. PG-13 (sexual conent), 98 min. language, violence), 99 min.

PAGE 25

__Tropic Times 10 I TV Schedule May 27, 1994 _B9 C hAhnels & 10 Mature Theme **Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved tonew day and time Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30am NBC News at Surise 6:30am deadline News 6 00om CCMTV 5 30mn NB Newst Snruise 5:30am NBC Ness it sorie o NBC NesatSuais 5 l0on NBC News at Sunse 6.00 Good Moming Amn -ca 7:00 Nay/Marin Corp s 6:30 loir of Powr 6:00 Good Morning Amlica 6:00 Good Morig An-ric 6.00 Good Morning Arnoci 6:00 Good Morning America 8:00 Basic rising Workoot News 7 00 Voices Of Faith 8:00 Ilis I raining Workoui 8:0 Bodysiog 8.00 Basic Training Workout 8:00 Bodyshoping 0:20 esrame Sireed 7 30 Roal Nws For Kids 7:25 CaicI lhe Spirit 8.30 Ssame Streol 0:30 osome SSrSt1 8:30 Seom e Strei 0:30 Sesone Siroci 9:30 liglwy To loeaen 0 S0130 Naie Yarn Ad-rn800 CBSS Sunday Mominig :30 Murdor, She Wroie 9:30 Murder Sho Wrote 9.30 Murdor, She Wrote 9:30 Murder, She Wrote 10:25 Guiding light fare **.30 Faco The Nation 10:25 Goidiig ight 10.25 (Gidiog Light 10:2S Guidinig Light 1 10:25 Guiding Light II:10 Goneral Hospital 8.30 Jiislthr Kids! 10:00 Special: Indy 511 I1:10 Gnral tospita! It 10 Genoral Hospital 11:1 Gereral Hospiial 1:10 General Hospital Neon teadliie News Soir 'he ledgehog 2:30prm Movies 'Let Hoand Of Noo Ieadlino News Noon Ileadline News Break Noon deadline News Break Nom Headliie Noes Br k 123 0 S poscointr CRO God" 12.30 Sports Machine 12:15 SCN Midday 12 15 SCN Midday 12.15 SCN Midday Report 1:00 Another World Teenage Mutait Niija 4 00 "Walk Don't RIIn" I 00 Another World 12:30 Sprascenter 12:30 Spuscenter 12:30 Sporsceter 2:00 Oprah Winfrey 'rtles 600 Austin City Limits ? 00 Oprah Winfrey 1:00 Another World 1 00 Another World 1:00 Another World 3:00 Price is Right Beertlecice 655 ABC News's "20/2 3:t1 Price is Right 2:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 2 00 Oprah Winfrey 2.00 Donahue 400 Channiel One EEK!I The Cat 7:45 Evening Movie 4:00 Cliarel Oie 3.00 Price is Right 3 00 Price is Right 3.00 Pice is Right 4:15 Nesroomn 18.30 Nature "Broadcast News" 415 Newsrm 4 00 Cha 00 Channel One 4:00 Chrnel tOne 30 Legend of The Hidden I 1:30 Clive James' Fa ie in 10:00 Entertaitnent TisWeek 4 30 Guts 4:15 Newsroom: Newsroam 4.15 Newsroom Orempe The 20th Century 11:00 Poirot V 5:00 Wheel Of Fortune 430 Ghostrit430 Lamb Chop's Ploy-A4:30 Club Connect 5:00 Wheel of Fortune 12:3pm Headline News Midnight Headline News 5:30 Showbiz loday 5:00 Wheel of Fortune Long 5:00 Wheel of Fitane 5:30 Showhi Today' 1:00 Young Adult Theatre: 12:38 Meet Tire Pe 6:00 Headline News 5:30 Showbiz Todny 5:00 Wheel of Fortune 5:30 Showbiz 'Today 600 Ieadline News "Sneakers" 1:30 Headline News 6.30 World News Tonight 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5 :0 Showbiz Today 6:00 SCN evening Report 6:30 World News Tonight 2:00 Movie: "Forever An2:00 Sports Latenigt 7:08 Jeopardy! 6:15 Headlirne News Break 600 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News Break 7:00 Jeopardy! ber" 2:30 ABC World News Now 7:30 Roe 6:30 World News Tonight 615 Headline News Break 6:30 World News tonight 7:30 America's Funniest 4:38 Motorweek 3:00 Headline News 8:00 COPS 7:00 Jeopardy! 630 World News Tonight 7:00 Jeopardy! Home Videos 5:00 Showtime At The 3:30 Sports Machine 8:30 60 Minutes 7:30 Beauty And Tire Beast 7:0 Jeopardy! 7:25 Murphy Brown 800 Dose's World Apollo 4:00 ABC World News Now 930 CBS Evening News 8:30 48 Hours 7:25 Fresh Prinlee Of Bel Air 7:50 Movie: "Murder: By 8:30 Baywatel 6:00 Headline News 5:00 Headline News Break 1000 Entertalincnt To night 9:30 CBS Evening News 7:50 Movie: "Those She Left Reason Of Insanity" 9:30 CBS Evening News 6:30 Rescue 911 10 30 Holiday Movie Special: 10:00 SCN Late Edition Behind" 9:30 CBS Evening News 10:5 Etiertainment Tonight 7:30 China Beach "Silver Streak" 10:05 Entertairment tonight 9:30 CBS Evening News 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:35 Tonight Show 8:25 Movie: "Police Acade12:30pm Headline News '10:35 David Lettennan *** 10.00 SCN Late Edition 10:05 Entertainnient Tottight 11:35 David Letleman mry" 1:00 Nightline 11:35 Tonight Show *** 18:05 Entertainment Tonight 10:35 David Letteran 12:35amHeadline News Break 10:00 Headline News 1:30 Sports Lateniglt 12:o30am deadline News 10:35 David Letterman 1:35 Tonight Show 1:00 Nightline 10:30 Satirday Night Live 2:00 Arsei Hall 1:00 Nightlire 11:35 Tonight Show 12:30am Headline News 1:30 Movies: "Lite Man Midnight World Wrestling Fed3:00 Headline News 1:30 Sports Latenight 12:30ani Headline News 1:00 Nightline Tate" eration 3.30 Toig lt Show 2:08 Arsenio Hall 1:00 Nightline 1:30 Sports Latenight 3:18 "Origital Intent" 1:00 Friday Night Videos 4.30 Headline News 3:00 Feadli e News 1:38 Sports Latenight 2:00 Arsenie Ilall 4:50 Videolinks 2:00 Movies: "Dial M For 5:00 Headline News Break 3:30 Tonight Show 2:0 Arsenio Hall 3:00 Hteadline News 5:30 Headline News Murder" 4:30 Headline News 3:00 Headline News 3:30 Tonight Show 6:88 deadline News Break 3:35 "Phantom Of Tire Rue 5:00 Headine News Break '3:30 Tonight Show 4:30 lHeadline News Morgue" 4:38 Headline News 5:00 Headline News Break 5:00 Videolinks 580 Hadline News Break 5 30 lHeadline News Break C a l c a 1 Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event ****Program moved to new day and time Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30amn Simulcast with Chan6:30am SnmulcastwithChannels 6:00am Lamb Chop's 'lay-A5:30am Simulcast with Channels 5:30am Simulcast with Channels 5:30am Simulcast with Channels 5:30am Simulcast with Channels 8 & 10 8 & 10 Long 8 & 10 8 &0 8 & 10 nes8 & 10 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 10:30 Ferie Tale Theater 6.30 McGee And Me 800 Oprali Winfrey 8:00 Donahue 0800 Oprat Winfrey 8:00 Sally Jesse Raphel 9:00 Today 11:30 Real News For Kids 6:50 Soic The Hedgehog 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today I 1:00 Star Trek Noon Headline News 7:15 Disney's Little Mermaid 11:00 All My Children + 11:00 Star Trek 1:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek Nootn Headline News 12:30 Sports Closeup 7:35 CRO Noon One Life To Live + Noon I Headline News Break Noon Headline News Break Noon Headlite News Break 12:30 All My Children 1:00 Bradshaw On Home8:00 T iry Toons Adventures 1:00 Young and Restless + 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 1:30 One Life to Live coming 8:20 Classic Cartoons 2:00 NBA Basketball: 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 2:30 Young and Restless 2:00 NBA Basketball: 8:45 EEK! The Car Knicks vs. racers 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 3:30 Teenage Mutant Nitja Knicks vs. Pacers 9:05 Teenage Mutant Ninja 4:30 Headline News 2:30 Young and Restless 2:50 Young and Restless 2:30 Young and Restless Turtles 4:30 Headline News Turles 5:00 Club Conuec 3.30 EEK! Tie Cat 3:30 Soitic The Hedgehog 3:30 Disney's Little Mer4:00 Fraggle Rock 5:00 Science & Technology 9:30 Science & Tee hiology 5:30 The Cosby Show 4.00 Fraggle Rock 4:0 C Fraggle Rock maid 4:30 Giost Writer 5:30 American Gladiators + Week 6:00 Headline News 4:30 Legend Of The Hidden 4:30 Guts 4:00 Fraggle Rock 5:00 Silver Spoons 6:30 Thre Simpsons 10:00 Motor Week 6:30 NBC Nightly News Temple 5:00 Nick News: W5 4:30 Get The Picture 5:30 Tie Cosby Show 7:00 Lois & Clark: The Ad10:38 Sports Closep 7:00 MacGyser 5:00 Mickey & Donald 5:30 The Coshy Show 5:00 Tie Wonder Years 6:00 Headline News ventures of Supermar 11:00 This Week In Baseball 8:00 Melrose Place 5:30 The Coshy Show 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:30 The Cosby Show 6:30 NBC Nightly News 8:00 Star Trek: "Deep Space 11:30 Wall Street Journal + 9:00 Movie: "Buck To The 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News Break 6:00 SCN Evening Report 7:00 Primetime Live Nine" Noon deadline News Future 11" 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:15 1 headline News Break 8:00 21 Junp Street 9:00 Hernan's Head 12:30 Frugal Gourmet + 11:00 IHeadline News 6:30 NBC Nightly News 7:00 Hangin' With Mr. Co6.30 NBC Nightly News 9:00 Movie: "An Innocent 9:30 In Living Color n** 1:0 Spencer For Hire + I1:30 Arserio Hall 7:00 Baby Talk oper 7:00 Full House Main" 10:00 deadline News 2:00 Headline News 12:30 Simulcast with 8 &10 7.30 Wings *** 7:30 Seinfeld 7:30 Step By Step 11:00 Headline News 10:30 Saturday Night Live 2:30 NBA Basketball: 8:00 Picket Fences 8:00 Tour Of Duty 8:00 Living Single 11:30 Arsenio I tall Midnight WWF Suporstars Rockets vs. Jazz 900 Martin 900 NYPD Blue 830 Coach 12:30am Hieadline News 1:00 Friday Night Videos 5:00 Headline News 9:30 Movie. "Blare" 10:00 Murder, She Wrote 9:00 Dateline NBC 1:00 Nightline 2:00 Entertainmetr This 5:30 Quntantm Leap + 11:30 SCN Late Edition 11:00 Headline News 10:00 Miami Vice 1:30 Sports Latenight Week 6:30 Woiderfiul World Of 1:35 Arsenio Hall 1:30 SCN Late Edition 11.00 Ileadlie News 2:00 Arsenio Hall 3:00 Hteadline News Disney 12:35am Simutcast with 8 &10 11:35 Arsenio 'all 11:30 SCN Late Edition 3:00 Headline News 3:30 Saturday Night Live 7:30 Golden Gals 12:35am Simlcast with S& I 11:35 Arsenio tall 3:30 Tonight Shtow 5:00 videoliaks 8:00 Grace Under Fire 12:35Sam acast with 8&10 4:30 David Lettenna., 5 30 Headline News Break 8:30 Movie: "Back To Thne 5:30 Simulcast with ChaFuttre" tels 8 & 10 10:30 deadline News 11:00 LA. Law Midnight Sinlcast 8 & 10 Channels 8 & 10 Cable Channel 14 Sports Sports "Indianapolis 500," 10 a.m. Sunday NBA basketball Series starts Knicks vs. Pacers, 2:30 p.m. Saturday "Rescue 911," 6:30 p.m. Saturday. Real-life footage and Rockets vS. Jazz, 2:30 p.m. Sunday dramatic recreations trace rescue and emergency response Knicks vs. Pacers, 2 p.m. Monday .situations around America. Hosted by William Shatner. Series starts "Murder, She Wrote," 9:30 a.m. Monday. (Replaces "Classic Cartoons," 8:20 a m. Sunday. (Replaces BeetleJuice) "Highway To Heaven") A celebrated mystery writer with a Five groups of full) animated cartoons. Each group highlights penchant for solving crimes finds herself involved in bizarre and :q' exciting entertainment subjects. colorful adventures. Stars Angela Landsbury and Tom Bosley. "Guts," 4:30 p.m. Wednesday. (Replaces Name Your Adventure) Mike "Guts," 4:30 p.m. Monday. (Replaces "Name Your Adventure") Sweat, O'Malley's back to host "Guts," the action sports show where young people agility, and strain will get contestants over the outrageous obstacles and into the 7 live out their greatest sports fantasies. The action is fast, furious and funny as finals for totally awesome prizes. Hosted by Mike O'Malley. regular children get the chance to prove they've got the guts to go for the glory. Primetime movies Primetime movies "Police Academy," 8:25 p.m. Saturday. When the police academy doors are "An Innocent Man," 9 p.m. Friday. A mixup in addresses during a drug raid lead opened to anybody, the swarm is a colorful assort meant of sizes, shapes, and two crooked cops to kick in the door ofthe wrong house and frame Jimmie Rainwood, eccentricities. Stars Steve Guttenberg, Kim Cattrall and Bubba Smith. an innocent man, for a crime he didn't commit. Stars Tom Selleck and F. Murray "Broadcast News," 7:45 p.m. Sunday. An up-and-coming news producer must Abraham. choose between an old friend with talent and integrity, or a young, not too bright "Back To The Future," 8:30 p.m. Sunday and 9 p.m. Monday. A teenager at the hunk. Stars Holly Hunter, William Hurt and Jack Nicholson. wheel of a DeLorean car converted into a time machine, roars back 30 years to 1955 "Those She Left Behind," 7:50 p.m. Wednesday. A successful businessman and meets his parents when they were his age. Stars Michael J. Fox and Christopher takes on the tough personal challenges of solo parenting when his wife dies during Lloyd. child-birth. Stars Gary Cole, Joana Kerns and Mary Page Keller. "Blaze," 9:30 p.m. Tuesday. Paul Newman goes all out as the larger-than-life "Murder: By Reason Of Insanity," 7:50 p.m. Thursday. The true story of an progressive Louisiana governor, Earl Long in this late 1950s story of back-room immigrant couple who can't make good on the American dream, a dream that for politics and Long's scandalous love affair with the larger-than-life Bourbon Street them turns into a nightmare. Stars Candice Bergen and Eli Wallach. stripper Blaze Starr. Stars Lolita Davidovich and Robert Wuhl.

PAGE 26

BlO Trop27c T9m Classified Ads 1991 Ford F-I 50 4x4, ac, V8 302, children, M-F, some wkends, ganes, $10-up; Kenwood car ste3 spare tires, low mi, exc cond, avail Tuesday. 287-3521. reo sys, spker box, amp, cass eec, D uty-free m erc handlSe $ 17,000/neg 264-0328. Engspk day maid, WF prell togetherorseparate. 287-6284 FORT CLA Y TON (Contraband Control Office) -As a reminder, 1985 Plymouth Reliant, dty pd, fer Mil family. 263-3627. B m c pur good cood, $3,000. 287-6424. IBM Commodore computer w/ in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern Span-spk live-out naid, refs, printer, manuals, like new, $850/ Command regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used, 1991 Ford Explorer sport, ac,pwr, cooks, exc w/kids. 221-2801. obo. 2844238. cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege hold287-648c. Bilingual maid, babysitting for C-64 computer, dd, printer, joyers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu1985 Jeep Grand Wagoneer 44, at-Sun, carpet cleaning. 252sticks, games. programs books, 1 1985 Jeep Grad Wagonuer 40, 6815. -$2/b.8-25 tion under both, military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes ac, at, leather, pw/d, ps, low mi, Permissible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid. dty not pd, exc cond, $7,200/obo. I lonesi maid, 2-3 days, wkends, DJ equip, 2 Gemini tumtbls, ste2874393. babysits w-exp, refs. 22-4727 rco pre-amp mixer, I yrold, $525/ Before such a Sale, it is strong reco mBlended that the seller contact ask for Alexia. obo. 282-3237. the Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-3117. 1987 1londa CRX, Sony amds-fm$ cass, runs good, 2 ,200.282-3826. Bilingual mature maid, gri w/ Bose 601 spkers, $500 pr. 284kids. 263-9264 M-F, 8am-6pm. 5820. tinted glass, radio, $2,000. 2871989 Ford F-1504x4 king cab, 8' 987 Ford Rager XLT Supercab a 4481. bed, w1liner,lcowingpkg, all manpb, ps. 5sup, new tires/shocks 'not Babysitier w~exp, 17-yr-old, deJVC VI-S-C camcorder wlbart, Anm s44a.sw$10,00.w284-483 p afte diy d,$5,500. 284-6838. pendable, nights, wkends. 230case, exc cond, mil only, $550. '183MCusorivn ewrc tals, $10,500. 284-4839 after JP_ 1927.2410 l983GMCCustomvan, newlires, 6pm. 1992 Nissan Bluebird, at, 4dr all 197 284-4120. acaf r French toy poodle, male puppy, at gthape,$5,000. 287-5976. o'19NisnBubra,4,al xhnetadwrkgmi, Frme ta oed, 10e p1993 Daihatsu Charade, 9,000k pwr, avail end June, not dty pd, Exp honest hard working maid, Bose concerto loud spkers comdewormed, tail docked, $100. 1989 Honda Accord LX, full ex5dr, am-fm cass, alarm,avail June $9,000.283-6895. T ues, refs. 287-5928 -plete w/equal, pedestals, $1,500. 236-0991. [rar, exe cond, not dry pd, $8,000. 17, not dty pd, $7,000. 260-6199 1988 VW Gold, 4 cyl, lingual live-in maid, reliable, 225-3697. Germanshepherdpups,CCPreg, 263-4495. after7pmam-fm cass, new paint, parts, grt w/children. 264-8865. 2 dbl jet printers, $1,500-$450; exc pedigree. 228-2643. 1986 Mitsubishi Montero, 4WD, 1984 Plymouth Voyager, ac, ps, 43,000 mi, dty pd, $4,600. 260Live-in housekeeper, trustworcomputer, $400; fax, $300; laser Hamster, male, female w/g cage ac, ps, pw, radio fm cass, 5 sp, new ph, stereo, runs/lks grt, not dry pd, 4564 -thy, dependable. 286-4489. jet, $350; laptop, $300. 233-2021. many tubes, $100. 252-2319. tires, exc cond, $7,000.252-5397. $4,500.284-4283. 1985 Honda Civic, 4dr, 5 sp, ac, Honest housekeeper, bilingual, Packard Bell 386SX, 5mb, 80mb, CCP reg rottweilerpuppies, show 19871HyundaiExcel GL,oneown1990 Toyota Corolla, 16 val, ac, am-fm cass, runs grt, dty pd, T-Th-F. 285-4434. VGA,soundblaster,Dos6.2,5.25quality Dam champion site er, 4dr, 5 sp, ac, tinted glass, amed, USspecs,notdtypd,5sp,4dr $3,800.260-9842. 3.5 floppies, $950. 287-6834. $650.287-6195. 'm cass ex cond, d y pd, $3,900. $6,000. 286-3420. 1984 Jeep Cherokee, at, ac, very n ho ma d, guod work33 Sony digital receiver, VCR cap, Doberman pitcher puppies, 5 1991Che1991 Toyota 4x4, extra cab, ac, lomi, runs grt, $5,500. 260-9842. 3025 $100; Technics cd, all options, wk, males, female, $175,201 Cv o I-tops am-fm cass,40,000 mi, new tires 1985 Ford Escort, 5 sp, 1.9L ac Engspk I n/ maid, ho remote, $150. 223-6675. 1522. sV8, c, p1, custom wheels, ant-7 2854588. am-fm cass, good cond, $2,500. cut, exew/kids, cleans, M-F.2nPwr surge protector w/tel modem cars, $13,500.r236-0597. neersed,$3.26-287Miniaturepoodle puppies,$150; 1973 Chevy impala, 4dr, runs grt, 2 -5595. protection, never used, $30. 260mare, $125; German shepherd 19 Poniac Bonneville 4drV8, $800/obo. 286-4671. .1986 Jeep Cherokee, S up, ac, ps Full time maid, gr w/children, for stud.252-2889. 571978CapriceClassic,mintcond, ph, clean, 4dr, low mi, $6,250/ M-F. 221-7843 ask for Belinda. Technics centerspkerforsurround 5397. ______b___286-6__33_ sound, 140w. 264-9741. Miniature donkey for stud ser.at, ac, 350 eng, am-fm radio, dty mi-r rf-mna Fihe sr sys 264k974 ys vice, $100. 2254749. US 8ss $20,2n85 6 o0 -9 pd, $4,500/obo .55-5577 LD#. 1978 Ford Granada, runs good, Studmer tutor n foe el p Fisher stereo sys w/2 spkers sys, Weimaraner, 2 yrs old male for 1992 Pontiac Grand Am, loaded, new batt, '94 reg, $800/obo. 269w/children havingspecial needs. 50w, $200. 286-4084. stud service. 285-6374. 1988ToyotaCamry LE sedan, at, $13 500; 1988 Chrysler LeBaron, 9227. 282-3673. Yamahastereocass,$95;SCelecT ac, all pwr, tilt, cruise, $6,700/ loaded, $5,000; 1973 Ford p/u, 1991 Honda Prelude Si, cd, cass, -otronictypewriter,$225.252-5792. TB mare, 9 yrs old, 16.1 hinds obo. 223-7050dry pdt $1,000. 262-1204,Eng.spkhlve-ciut maid, day work trained Eng. 223-7980 ark for o $ -alarm, pw, ps, alloy rims, sr, new or wkend, babysits. 287-6572. Port Panasonic electronic typeAngela. 1988 VW, GOL-GI, ac, tinted 1987 VW Amazon, 4dr, 4sp, ac, tires, ac,2dr, tinted, $14,500.284glass, 4 sp, hitch, 23,000 mi, ampull out stereo, 78k, good condo, 4355._ Eng-spk maid, mature, honest writer, extra ribbons, $100. 223Weimaraner puppies, 5 wks old, fm cass, exc cond, dty pd, $4,500dey pd, $3,000/obo. 286--3687 1979 Oldsmobile 88, good cond dependable, grtw/children, avail $300 ea. 233-2021. 252-5393. 1,850;l979oldsmo s June 15. 284-6838 after6pm. Bass amp sys, 2-10", 4-10" h -1987 Dodge Lancer, exe cond, hartkee's -18"jbl,swr 200wab TwogOscar fish,$40 both.2821978 Ford F150 Ranger $ sr, 5 sp, am-fm cass, $1,750, not dty pd, 284-3593. 100w amps, 1,200. 286-3895. 3490. 35 eng chronic, dy pd, $3,700/ $4,100.284-6172. 1986 Suzuki Samurai 4x4, 4 cyl, Bp Audio vox car spker sys, TV, d German shepherd pups, 7 wks 1990 H-lyundai Excel, ac, at, sr, 5 ac, radio cass, running bds, parts, mini sys, phone answer mach, old,exc pedigree, CCP reg, male, 1985 Chevy S-10 Blazer 4x4, ac, sp dty not pd, $5,000/obo. 260tire, dty pd, good cond, avail June record album collection, best offemale,$350.252-2291. 2.8L,V6,loaded,dtypd,$6,100! 7025. .20, $4,950. 268-3261. 16' Orlando Clipper, 60hp fer. 243-5617. obo. 252-2181.Yaatrlngdphfdr Purebred golden retriever puo1986 Toyota 4x4 p/u, not dty pd, "977 Mercury,2dr, good mi, runs Yamaha, trolling, depth finder, pies, avail now. 289-4044. 1990 Ford Tempo, 4 cyl, ac, ps, $5,000.252-5428. girt, make offer. 287-3944. kicker, many other extras, PB 48625X, new cond, SVGA pb, pw/d, pl, stereo cass, at, exc ',0neg. 2864775. monitor, I70meg ld, 4 meg Ram, French mini toy poodle puppy, cond, not dty pd, $8,500. 2261991 Toyota Corona, 4dr, at, ps, 1983 Chevy Suburban, at, ac 4dr, software, $1,099. 261-4682. 6wksolc,tail docked, dewormed, 8626. pb,acam-fm,$7,000. 260-1224 52,000 mi, $3,995. 282 318 18' 1987 Bayliner, 8hp motor, $200. 226-5395. ____________ -.exceond, $7,500/abo. 263-5792 Canon camera w/Starf 28mm, $ 1991 Ford Ranger p/u, ac, ps, pb, 1986 Toyota van, 49k mi, new 1985 Nissan Sentra, 2dr, 5 sp, ac, eves. Canon 50mm, 135mm lenses, incl TBgelding,4yrs,lunges,trained at, match bed cap, $7,600. 282tires, brakes, dual ac,at, execond cars,50,000mi, US specs,$2,499. flash, 3 UV filters, carrying cases, Eng, good jumper prospect, 3985. avail June 25, $6,500. 286-4571. 282-3188 ex cond, $9,000. 252-5-100. $1,000.284-6683. 1991 JeepWranglerSaharaEd,6 988Jeeptruck,4cyl,4WD ac 991Z28 Camaro, ac, am-fm cas, PB 286NT cpu w/4mb Ram, Shar-pei puppy, 6 wks old, shots, cyl, ac, soft top, fully loaded, exc ps, p, new tires, best offer. :61 pb, ps, under Bluebook, $11,465. Hore I, hvy dty, 2 axle, c keyd mouse, Dos 6.2, licensed female, $250. 284-4376. cond, $12,500/obo. 289-5960. 6418. 256-6830. brakes, dry pd, $5,000/obo. 252software, $500/oho. 260-2957. ____________________ ____________________6467. Amazon red head parrot w/pa1992 Toyota Corona, 4dr sedan, 1984 Dodge Ramcharger, good 78 Ford T-bird, runs/lks grt, ac, 16 fiberglass fishing boat, I notebk, 386SLC/25mhz, pers, $95. 2864775. at, ac, radio cass, new tires, avail cond, runs grt, ps, pb, ac, $4,000/ pspb,$2,00o. 287-3675. -4 Miber at, 85mb hd, 1 f bax modem, ext VGA 45hp Mariner motor w/elec start, port, mouse, 5.5lhu, $ 1,200. 261 Free, male kitten tabby desperJune 15, $9,600/obo. 269-1374. obo. 264-8933. 1988 Chrysler LeBaron convert, trIr, o/b tank, more,$4,200.2874682. ately needs a home. 268-2973. 1989 Jeep Cherokee, 4.OL, V6, 1987 Toyota LE, 4dr, ac, radio, 53,000 mi, exc cond, not dty pd, 3572. $9,000.264-5805. 386 computer, 8 meg, 486 math Free, female kitten, 5 mos old. 4dr, ac, ph, not dry pd, $10,500. sid,$4,600.286-4882. -5 -Eez-ino/bmotortracket forupto coprocessor,27mhz,250meg tape 284-5176. 284-5921. 1989 Isuzu p/u, good cond, cus1983 Datsun 280ZX, 5 sp, t-tops, 40hp, $190; rocker stopper, $5 backup,sound blaster, 120meghd, 1991 Geo Metro, at, good cond, tom wheels, bedliner, sr, stereo, ac, $4,900. 286-4004. ca; 4-step boarding ladder, $20; $2,000. 286-6132. Free, med size puppy,wrmos old, $6,SOO. 287-3844. 13" irlr springs, $1 5ea; 12" keel good w/children, food & kennel needs 1987 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera, roller, $15. 252-6046. Sony component sys, dbl deck, incl. 286-4928. obo.284-6776. 1990 Nissan show irk, custom runsgood,$2,100/obo.2874935. c d, dbl bass, surround sound, Ig 1988 full size Ford Bronco, V8, 600w stereo, int, wheels, alarm, 18' Glastron V-hull, like new remote, all digital, $425/obo. 285Free to good home, wo kiens 4x4, at, radio cass, exc cond, dy exhaust,$15,000/obo.260-2354. 120hp Evinrue,48gal gatank, 5592. found abandoned. 226-0194. pd, $8,000. 243-5686 after 5pm. Available $5,500 286-4571. Freetgo k1979 Caprice wgn, grt shape, Maciitosh classic computer & Fd tk oh m ksien 2-7 1988 VW Vanagan van, new int, many new parts, $1,700. 28716' Deep-V, 60hp overhauled a/ Hewlett Packard printer, software, id blk, other 3 striped. 287-3875. ac, tinted glass, 8 pass, exc cond, 6736. b, exc cond. 286-3174. best offer. 287-4178. $9,500. 284-6698. Eng-spk maid, Amador only, exc 1981 Camaro,8cyl,norust,loadw/kids, highly recommended, 15bassboat, 50hpJohnson,dual Sony Betamax S120, $50, w/re1981 Oldsmobile Cutlass Sted, ac, stereo, air shocks, $2,000. Tues. 282-3497. elccanfhors,trollingmotorfish mote, Kenwood compact disc, Automobiles preme, ps, pb, many new parts, 286-6132. finder, exc cond, $2,750. 286$110233-4996. good cond, not dty pd, $1,800/ Span-spkmaturehousekeeper,M4004. oho.230-1139. 1985 Ford Escort sta/wgn, 4 sp, T-F, good refs,. 231-2585 ask for AST 486SX/33mhz, 6mb Ram, 1991 Geo Metro LSI, needs outb ac, sr, exc cond, $2,800. 287Chela. Alum caince, $400. 287-4248. 210hb ltd, cd rom, 3.5-5.25 dd, sidework,$3,500/obo.284-6776. 1973 VW Fastbk, needs work, 5925. Dos 6.2, SVGA color monitor, $550; Ford S sp trans, $350. 287-Exp nature maid, 3-5 days asvk, software, eds, $1,800. 238-8313. 1988 Dodge Daytona, at, 4 cyl, 5088. 1986 Peugeot 505, ps, ac, pl, tintclean, irons, refs. 286-6295. E acam-fmstereocass,iintedglass, ed, many new parts, good cond, .IBM compact 286, I 2mhz, 40mteg $4,500. 287-5842. 1992 Mercury Sable, at, ps, pw/ $6,000/obo. 285-5591. Bilingual honest maid, 5 days a hd, VGA, 3.5-5.25 dd, mouse, 1988 Nissan Sunny, s1, c, locks, ac, radio cass, 14,000 mi, week. 221-9538. sound blaster, Panasonic printer, S d 4 I $17,000,223-7675. 1986ChryslerLaser,4cyl,cruise, Tac X-I000R reel-to-reel tape $650/obo. 264-1768. tinted glass, am-fm stereo cass, ac, ps, am-fm cass, new paint, exc Span-spk live-in maid, honest, deck cxc cond, 4 reel incl, $200. $3,200. 287-5842. 1982 Volvo 240 DL, 5 sp, ac, ps, cond, one owner, $4,800. 260hard working, gri w/kids. 282230-1078. Port personal printer, $50. 284ph, runs gr, needs minor body 4564. 3694 ask for Mari. 4634. 1993 Dodge Grand Caravan, ps work, $2200 28 Kenwood cd, remote, recharge --_ pb, 1w, cc, pm, hitch, running w $ 64799. -1986 HondaDXhatchbk, am-fm Typist, Atlantic side, $2 a page. balt, $130. 287-5729 ask for IBM PCcompat w/monitor,priner, bds, 8,000 mi, $18,000. 2841987 Dodge Caravan, V6, ac, ps, cass, ac, 5 sp, $4,000. 286-3124. 289-4619. Matt. desk, $500; Gameboy, 5 games, 6883. -$6,000.286-3875. earner plus access, $150. 2846 -1989 Astro Van LT, all options, Babysi in your home, Clayton IBM PC & Mitsubishi monitor, 5372. 1986 Mitsubishi Galant SS, very 1983 Chevy Celebrity, 2dr, dty tow pkg, low mi, $11,995/obo. only. 287-4577 ask for Amy. adapted oard.283-5631 lv msg. good cond, not dty pd, $5,000/ pd, 4 cyl, at, ps, ac, am-fm, $2,700; 287-4571. Span-spk live-in/out maid, honNikon F3-hp cancer; Nikon Caraudio, mb-quart,jl audio, auobo. 269-5700. 1987 DodgeCaravan, 2.6L, 7 pass, N Blbd -til uest, good w/kids, clean, cook, exp N In F3hp fasb /ika dio control, precision pwr. 284at, ps, ac, am-fim avail July 1 1985 issan ueir, nw tires' mature. 231-5489 ask for Otilia. mouni ens, ag, as w/ec at3669 ask for Marck. 1986 S-15 Jimmy 4x4, ac, pw, $7,900.287-4743. dty pd, 4 dr, tinted, good cond, tach, diving equip. 284-3227. pb, 2dr, V6, at 013, gr shape, --pw, alarm, $4,500. 260-6148 Span-spk maid, part time, clean, GE 19"colorTV,$165;JVCVCR, $6,500.224-2876. 1986 Nissan Stanza van/wgn, ac, babysit, exc refs. 286-4290. 286 copuer, 2meg hd $175 JVC port component sys -am-fm cass, at, cxc cond, $6,500. 1985 H onda Accord, 4dr sedan, SVGAcard, 3.25, .44 meg flopdbl $5; J105. 287-6308 1986 Toyota Minivan, at, ps, ac, 260-0284. grt cond, best offer. 2854898. Bilingual live-out maid, clean, py dr, 4meg Ram, 16mhz, sound cass ph, sr, radio cass, good cond, diy laundry, iron, babysit, prefer blaster procard, Windows 3.1, Camcorder, 6 mss old, $500 pd. $6,500. 224-4190. 1978 Chevy Caprice Classic wgn, 1990 Dodge Spirit ES, ac, pwr Howard/Albrook. 284-3184. Dos 6.2, $600. 287-4471. acoa pr, 2sol pr022 ps,pb,ac,newparts,runsgrt.286everything, exc stereo, $6,000/ acoustat spkers, $250 pr. 2921980 Ford Granada, new tires, 4393 ask for Joe. neg.236-5125. Span-spk housekeeper, good w/ Nintendo, Super Nintendo 4225.

PAGE 27

Tropic Times Classified Ads May27 1994 J1 Cd for auto, new, Sony detachchrome/glass, $700/neg. 264Baby bed converts to Jr bed, oak Girl's roller skates, $30; Huffy Kenmore washer/dryer, $500/ Qtrs. 813A Clayton, 8am-noon. able face for security, $325. 2849676. wood, linen avail, $200. 287boy's bike, $50; yard swing set, obo; Atari games, $$2-$5; 6244. 5225. $20. 252-6817. Nintendo games, $10, sm crib, Qtrs. 850B Clayton, 7am-? --Dinetteset, 4 chirs, 42" round bil, ----$90 282-4390. Gl dual cass radio, 5 band equal. $300: kitchenaid. washer/dryer, Qualitycarpets, 12xt5blue,$175; Lg dog airline carrier, $30. 261-Qtrs. 9001B Clayton, 7am-noon, $75; Vivitar 35nm camera w/ grt shape, $600. 284-5479. cream, $150; oak finish cit Cels6602. Blue topaz, marquis shaped w/ Monday ._ __ case, $30.287-5392. ter, $175; delux vacuum, $150. .fattasycut.6smdiamonds,$200 Qtrs 904B Clayton -Fourcarpets,9x12,exccond,$50269-2095. Anmerican Airline/Eagle credit I Ix5 cream carpet, $50. 287SCwordprocessor,80001t,256k. $90: Sears delhsumidifier, used note for airfare worth $140, will 6395. Qtrs. 1031A Clayton, 7-I lam. Rans, modem, 3.5 dd, needs printonce, $1 75. 260-0284. Couch, loveseat bsy Bassett, exc sell for $90. 252-2889. er, $250 287-5392. cond, $375/obo. 287-3321 .StblockChevyparts,307 block, Qtrs. It 76AClayton.Qtrs. 2384C Outdr round thl, 6 high citrs, witl, -h--igh chr, $20. 252-2717 5-7pm. heads, crank, pistons, radiator, Cocoli, 7amI pnt, Sat-Sus. good cond, $275; bbq grill w/ 1 BR set, dresser w/sirror, chest of tank, plastic cover, $180. 236drawers, 2 night stands, Q or full Baby chr/bouncer, $20; battery ---Qtrs. 56 Abrook, 8an-noon. 0984. sz bed, $1,180. 269-0356. opera swing, $40; sougi carrier, Patiotblchrs,umbrella,charcoal $20; dblstroller,$125.286-3637. grill. 286-4489. Qtrs. 135A Albrook. Whirlpool dishwasher, like new, Full sz mat, box springs, $165, Two carpets, binl, beige, apprsx $250.284-4283. men's dress blues 39R, men's Lg baby stroller, fair cond, $25; All-purpose trailer, $400 firm. Qtrs. 203 Albrook, 9ans-3pm. Th $e, biplants,, ben's watccurelect typewriter, good cond, $50. 287-5589. 12x15, $75 ca, both $125. 287L-shaped wood bunk bed w/3 lts, issis26 287-3319. Qtrs. 209A Albrook,8-1 lam. 3231. tans, ms. 269-0356. drawer dresser, not matt, new .asgrillgrtcond,$60. 287-4335. Qtrs. 314B Albrook, 7an. Two navy floral loveseits, $30(1 condo, $200/obo. 260-9345. RCA 20" color 'TV, radio flyer Lawnmower,$100;lg Panasonic avy sfuooul sesidpne, $6 s i 9 wgn w/rails. 286-3587. microwave/convect oven, $300; Panasonic VCR, $200/obo; Qtrs 59B, Howard, 8am-noon. ea,; fudl szfutton/couch,solid pine, DR, INl, 6 chrs, China cab, $950 brass noodle cart, $40.287-5976. weider ski mach, $60/obo; dirt new matt, $400; dog crate x-lg, set sell separate$450-$700. 287Sofa, loveseat, chaise lounge, devil vacuum $25; patio furn, Qtrs. 148A Howard, 8am. neg.284-5685-____5277. computer desk, dishwasher, sm b, 845; walker, boys's bike, $75; golf clubs, $50. 284-5234. Modular sofa, 6 chrs, 2 this, $450. Sofa, loveseat, exc cond, cream, dresser, 12" girl's bike, adult tricycle. 26a1-1292. t Qirs 5950 Howard, 8aCn-aoon 233-2021. $500; 18,000 bitt ac, exe cond, b -Male class A uniform 40L, good Beach cabins, value $192.50, sell Qirs. 054b iowara, s-i lam. Bluesofa, overstuffedstyle, like 325. 260-6533. GE washer/dryer, hvy dty, $650; cond, $75. 287-4299. -$150.252-1257. Qirs. t536B0oward,7am-noon. new, $600 dbl malt, box springs, S oa, loveseat, Bl, 2 en/o ch d set, chest, night 2i, Exercise wts; med sz bird cage. Seven sheets counter top, $77. Qirs. 3770 Kobbe, 7-l0am. metal frame, 8150. 269-5700. ibos, good cd, 1 200/o.286 $325; child's gym set, $95. 260252-2676. 252-2989.bbe 71 am tlgo od 120oo284393. 252-2989 _________ New RCA 20" TV, rensote con3834Darkrm equip to make blk/whit Rugs msc 287-6778. Qtrs. 2069 Curundu, 7am. trol, $300; oak ct center, glass 3gAsst colors 9x12 rugs; Mickey photos, $100. 284-5586.2Qrs. 209 Curundu, 7am. doors, $180, b strati lounger s 30" gas stove; washer/dryer; GE comforierw/sheeis, drapes, deco, Uniden satellite disc (parabolic), adjust, $100. 264-4976. side-by-side refrig; chest frzer; 3 $65; gas grill, $125; dbl dr20cuft Infant bassinet, $35; bike, $40; $300/obo. 287-5974. Qtrs. 5424 Diablo, 7-1Oam. adjust $acs. 264-4253. refrig, exe cond, $850. 260-4393. aquarium, $45; x-lg rods, $20 ea, Q-sz sofabed, leather sofa, $650. Rocker/recliner, Q-sz sofa sleepSofa, cfftee/end tbis, $550 LR rabbitcage,$40; 10,000lbsiwinch 3 tires P225.70R15, $50; 16" Qtrs. 2350A Balboa, 7-10ani. 260-1946. er, 1ms & shades bamboo DR artans,$50set winrack $ & bumper. 252-6046. child's bike, $15. 284-3793. er, mps crtas, 50 et;win rak, _ ---Qirs. lOO9A L aBoca, 7amn-noon. DR tbl, 6 chrs, $400; computer set, dishwasher, suitcases, best 2 bikes, $65-$85; plants, $3-$15, New am specs 1965 windshield, Cosco sideswing tray high chr, desk, $60; asst bookshelves. 236offer. 243-5617. more. 269-5224. 4-5 lug rims w/tires. 285-4450 $35; FP up to 40lbs car seat, $35; 2618. Broyhill sofa, 1 1/2 yr old, gm/ Aes, 14,000 bit, 10,000 ac parts, ask for Chris. Gracobatswing,$4allexccond. K-sz waveless waterbed w/l2 coral shell design, $400. 287desk, patio furn, sns refrig. 252Britannica encyclopedia, 39 vol; 2 drawers,$350, 13"TV,$100,TV 5928. -2730. Comptons encyclopedia, 35 vol, Rowing mach, $30; Fuji lite wt cabinet, 850.236-2618. 6,000 bin ac, l 8175. 284WIll 18,000 bi $350; ex cond, $795 both. 252-6566. bike,good cond,$50;babyswing, Japanese books or video tapes. 3731. GE $ 25-27 R ie goo c $ blu 820; couch, loveseat, $30, needs 287-3896. Sears20" pwr lawn mower w/rear 3 -GE 6,000, $150. 252-2287. Recliner, good condo, $150; blue work. 282-3826. grass catcher, $100. 286-3129. Q-sofa sleeper, $300/obo; sofa, 4pc BR set, $495. 268-3261 drapes for 1000 area, $100-860. Will pay guide value for DC/ loveseat, overstuffed chr w/pil'287-6736. Playyard,$60; baby monitor,$30; Maruel silver/golden aged comDay bed, $ s00; gofclb/bag' lows, $800;/obo; 12x15, 3x6 Refrig, like new. 256-6830. Wedding dress, se5/6, neg. 223snugh infant carrier, $20; infant ics, 1940s-1980s. 289-5364 lv $200; side-by-side ref'rig/freer, Wedn rss /,ng 2head support/Gerger bottle warmmsg $600.282-3832. cream carpets. 283-5391. Whirlpool 8f upright frzer cht 7463 after 5pm. ea. 286-3772. Whilpol80upigst rerch, ________________er. 286-3772, Whirlpool elec dryer, wht, exc JVC stereo w/cd, spkers, $500/ like new, $225. 282-3188. Britannica encyclopedia, 32 vol, Trop plants, ferns, hibiscus, cacX-lg dog shipping kennel in good Whirpoo elec dryer, whibo ex-L Toelatfrs hbsucc cond. 282-3398. cond, $275. 282-3985. 5391 oor amp, o. -like new, $500. 284-5072. tus, more. 286-3587. Live-out maid, cook, clean, launKolcraft dbl stroller, $40, entcenGE 23.5 Cott side-by-side refri sce an S Zenith 19"TV,$165;touchsplsone, dry, iron, refs, $1 l0mo.260-3485. ter for TV-VCR, $40. 284-4725. 2. f y e $15; makeupmirror, skatebd. 252frzer, ice/waterdispenser,thvy dty 5185. yCylinder head for '85 Mercury Trestletl,2chrsw/aurms,2blenchwaisher; 15.6 Cott GE firzer, no 515ooc ce ylnxe 4ea fyo, 2.6 5 2bb cry es,seats 8, $350; 6-drawer dressfrost. 252-1.257. 1974 Ford J302 cyl heads, exe Zenith 26" TV, as is, $200; disd. 287-5798. er w/o mirror & night stand, $90. cond, comes w/2 barrel intake w/ nette set, $30); 1/4 ct marquis cut 284-6682. Like new butcher block top, port all bolts, $325/obo. 287-6484. engage ring, $450/obo.286-6190. 1982 HondaFT500,runs/lks good PCC textbk, art & ideas. 260dishwasher, $250. 286-8674 afw/helmet,$900/obo.2894699 af5336 Mini blinds to fit window in 3BR ter 5pit. Comic books, D.C. & Marvel, Patio settee, tbl, chr w/cushions, ter 6pm. trop, $250. 284-3194. most popular series, priced by $125; rowing machine, $50. 287Mature full time maid, live-out, Conputerdesk, $75; carpet, 9x12 sales guide. 286-4797. 3572. 1981 Honda Express Moped 50cc, refs. 252-2676. Carpets, 10x12, 12x14, $75 ea; beige, $45; 9x12 dk bin, $20. under 2,000 mi, exc cond $575. I 2x22, $100, all tan. 284-3194. 286-4626. Sol wall unit/bookcase, 2dr, $40. Surfbd,3 fin, 8100; men's dk gray 287-3321. Bilingual wkend houskeeper, in.224-6113. suit, sz 40R, autumn 9x12 rug, fantcare, refs,grtw/oddlers,gen Hot Point 600w microwave w/ Rugs, 8xlturquoise, I Ix2mst $135.252-2028. 1981 Honda Express 11 Moped' house work 286-3890. tempproble,all features,exccond, gin, 6x9 rust, $50-under. 282Ford302eng,newgaskets,$200/ -2,100mi,hehmet,4450.232-5622. $100.287-3231. 5281. obo. 287-6175. Euro voltage transforner, 220Typist for one week, pay by page. I lOv, applian, fans, food mixer, Transalp V600, 2,800 mi, dy pd, 284-5586. German high chr, $50, tbl, $100; Full size futon w/floral cover, Ceramic faces. See Qtrs 259A mise, $100/obo. 260-2957. 7nmos old, $3,800. 287-5394. vacuum, $50; baby carrier, $10. $250/obo. 284-5083 after 5pm. Albrook. Acs for parts, any size or condi287-5190. .Weider fiex I1 lhomse gym, 8175. Bond a new tires 130/90-15 tube lion. 252-2287 Beige-mauve floral design sofa, 1/4ct diamond solitaire engage 286-3674 after 5pm. or tubeless, 4 ply thread, $49. i Side-by-side refrig, frost free, $250;microwave,$100/obo.284ring,marquiscus, l4ktgohd,$350/ 225-4749. Beauty trim rings, polished for $625/obo. 223-3639. 5726. obo.285-5901 Electronic stepper, $125; proform I 5x7 rally wheels; ac-hicaterblowauItoinclinetreadmill,$280.286er box for 71-72 Chevelle, El 12x15 mauve carpet, $75. 284Q-sz Somma pillowtop waveless Replica WWI fighter plane ultra 3674 after Spm. Patio Sales Camino.283-3485. 3529. waterbed w/hdbd, all linen,$700/ It SES, needs minor repairs. broobo; sofa, loveseat, $500/obo. ken propeller, will trade for T1oRCA 19" color TV, $150; infant Class A Army 44R, preferably Speed queen hvydty washer/dry286-4693 after 5pm. torcycleor$2,000w/hanger. 230stroller, $50: misc clothes, baby _officer. 284-5180. er, good cond, Ig cap, like new, 1312. items.286-6521. Qtrs. 309A Clayton, 9am-'? $750/obo. 284-4238. GE 23.5 cuft refrig/frzer; Magic --wtennisrackets,oversize head, Chev 4-burner stove; GE ivydty Lg&smhouse plants. 287-5271. New Costa Rican hammock, $55; Qirs. 506B-513 Clayton, 6:30metal frame, reasonably priced. Bentwoodrocker,$35;dishwashwasher; Admiral 16.7 cuft, upmetal desk, $130; crib padding, tla --261-6507 lv msg. er, $35; glass coffee/end tbis, $30; right frzer. 264-51 60. Rock polisher, saw, tumblers w/ $14; Graco duosiroller, $25 236Commodore 128d complete, many extras, $1,200/neg. 2522365. Qrs.5410 Clayton,-7-Iam. Livc-inmaidtoclean,cook,iron, $150/obo. 287-3628. Hot Pointwasher/dryer, exc cond, 6610. 61ODC ayton,7 care for I-yr-old, refs, starts July $400set;lawn mower,new,$00. Portland microwave oven, $95; QIrs 6 am. -,$130-$140mo. 252-2077. 8pc LR set, gi cond, $800. 284286-3333. Exer bike, $50; HF receiver, $65; fish finder, $250. 236-2365. Qts. 613C Clayton 7-11 am 4282. -8xC10 camping 7ent, $80; ground -Old 15" Army trIr rim, 4 holes Twomicrowavecabiness;nicroschool instructions video, $100. Car seat, $15, stroller, $20, high Qtrs. 641B Clayton. 3.5" center, any amount. 225K-sz matt, box sprig, frame, wave oven; curio shelves; metal 286-4278. chr, $10, baby toilet, $10, plants, -4749. $600.289-6564. garage shelves. 286-3345. $5-$20; 19" color TV, needs auQtrs. 644C Clayton, 7-i tam. Ansna22 refrig;TappanPoiac Firo parts. 287-3 192 dio, $100; Nintendo games, $30 ----Pint and half-pint canning jelly g Maytag washer, Wards, dryer, Ig ,a. 260-4393 Qtrs 684C Clayton. dbl oven, selfehean; patio furn, cap, sold as set, $600/obo. 28610 sp girl's race bike, 850. 260Jars. 282-3673. lounge mirror. 263-8579. 4294. .1078. Lg Q-sz sofabed, lovescat, chr w/ GE refrig, $700; still new BR Westone guitar, G 15 amp, $300; pillows,exc cond,$850/obo.230furn, $1,2S0. 286-4824. 20" boy's Mongoose, $50. 289Tropic Times Ad Form 1972. -------6383 ask for West. Food processor, $25; Nintendo, Youth bed, $100. 252-2717 5$90; VCR, $130; child's carbed, K-sz sheet set, blk/wht striped, 8pm. ___ $250/obo. rocking horse, 820. never used, $18. 283-5425 after U MO ANIMALS ______294-3731_ 6pm. ___D AUTOMOBILES -__ GE side-by-siderefrig, $650; DP 284-733.m.--AVAILABLEadjust weight bench w/leg ext, Upright frzer, 20.7 cult, almost Carver stereo pre-amp, $150; [ BOATS & CAMPERS ---steel wis, $75. 284-5372. new, $600. 287-5925. Sony cd player w/remote, $75; ] ELECTRONICS PRICE HOME PHONE outdoor bar w/2 stools. $150; re7 FOUND Whirlpool side-by-side 25 cuft Upright vacuum w'/detachable liner, $75; DJ is, $150. 284[j HOUSEHOLD Check only one category per ad form. Only two ads per person each refrig/frzer, ice/water dispenser, hand held vacuum, $80. 2526698. B LOST week are allowed. Each ad form is limited to 15 words. Please type or 4700. 252-2760.a23f9.2 MISCELLANEOUS print neatly. Inforination listed below is not included in the ad, but is Iovesa-, curt-ins for --p10 -p ---o---all carpeting fits 3 R 4634. MOTORCYCLES required for publication. This information will not be released to third bike, 400w Pioneer spkers. 230uiWall-g in 0 areas vil B 4 .PATIO SALES parties. Deadline for the receipt of ads is 9 a.m. Monday fod Friday's 1927. Juneeieneg.2877hous1g. Spear guns Voit, cxc cond 2521 WANTED edition. Ads are run on a space available, and nay be held for a future -n -e.5100. edition. Ads may be mailed to the Tropic 7us. Unit 0936, APO AA JVC 26" colorTV,wksgrt,$300; Sears wet/dry vacaun & steam -34002 or deposited in a drop box at the Albrook Post Office. Ads 12x 15 dusty grm carpet, $100.287carpet cleaner, hvy dry, bigh cap, I over quick vac $20; changing offering weapons or sent by FAX will not be run. 5976. avail June 17, neg. 287-3171. tbl$15. 230-1972. SPONSOR'S NAME RANK/GRADE Whirlpool 18 cuft refrig/frzer, Loveseat, $100; dryer, $200; 2 shirts & I pr shorts for Jr i il $600; GE 24 cut side-by-side, wood IbN, $10; 9x12 carpet, $60. Scout uniform plus 2 Jr G.S. ORG. _____ _UTY PHONE $900, both exc cond; DR set, 287-6199. books, $20. 252-2080 eves. -.

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12Tropic Times B12 a27, Potpourri M onday. The Breezeway will operate normal hours Monday and HOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-471, DD 214 Quarry He i the Casual Cove opens 4p.m. with check cashing at the bar. if claiming veteran preference, a copy of college The cashier cage will be closed. transcripts if claiming eduation and a copy of +0licers' Club: Karaoke 7 p.m. Sunday and uesday in the Casual Cove. CASP noticeofratingifapplicable. Submit a copy Breakfast buffet is served 6:30-8:30 airs. Monday-FriW eek pm bre a a nd served 7 in the Cauays --Weekend breakfast is sre-10:30 aim. Saturdavs of latest SF-50 if you are a Federal employee, day and 8-10 am. Saturdaysand 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Sundays. Begin the day with a stay For more information regarding Army VaOld fashioned steak night 6-10 p.m. I uesdays and sLui plate or French toast, Belgium waffles with a choice of cancy announcements (forms required, job re1 htrsdays Choose cut of beef t he ctarhroiled. toppings, the crew chiief deluxe, or a hearty breakfirst burrito. lated criteria, etc.), visit the Directorate of CivilSocial hour 1-8 p.m. Fridays. Breakfast is served 6-9:30 am. Monday-Friday. ian Personnel, Building 560, Room 102, Corozal, Country and western dance lessons Wednesday nights 6, Club Amador inl the Casual Cove. Learn the latest in line dancing, the or call 285-5201. Typical Panamanian buffet 6-9 p.m. Wednesdays in La stomp. waltz and others. A dance fbliows. *Nnstomp One-n-on empoyen couneelin Concha.,0vs *Notte: One-mn.-one voployntt counuse g Concha. Italian nights 5:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday with Alfredo should be the first step in the job search. Grupo Sam ba Tres Friday nights in the Bridge Lounge. or seafood fettuccini, lasagna, pasua mixta or pasta and shrimp _~l:Cl _LIZED EClayton in white wine sauce. A Ia carte menu available. Steak lovers 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday nights in the dining NM-1 level and above require specialized experi+ l oop: room. Select a cut and order a New York strip, rib eye or ence. Specialized experience is either education CJ's Sports Bar otters daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m.-l filet. To eat lighter, meals of chicken marinata, pasta, shrimp above the high school level or work experience pits. Monday-Friday. Pool tournaments are held 3:30 p.m. vin blane or shrimp Taboga are also available. directly related to the position being filled. ExamSundays. Disco nights 5 p.m.-l a.m. Friday and Saturday. pie: Budget positions at or above the NM-S level Prizmz Night Club features a variety of iusic WednesBang up barbecue in the Breezeway, dine-itn or takerequired Budget experience or equivalent educaday-Saturday to include jazz 5 p.M. Sundays. out. Enjoy the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or sot wings. *NCO Club: For events or catering, call 284-4189. io The ballroom will be closed through Monday for renso*Top 'lhree Club Vacancy announcements are also available at nations. Jazz guitarist L.owCll Htopper 7-10 p.m. Saturdays with the Sundial Recreation Center. Country and western dance lessons are held 7-9 p.M. live entertainment of jazz and blues. This performance is The Army civilian personnel office accepts Sssindays and Mondays in the Corral Lounge. open to all ranks. applications on a continuous basis for the Rock 'n' roll music is offered 7 p.m.-I a.m. Wednesdays Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesdays. following positions. These announcements are and 7-11 p.m. Thursdays at the Underground Lounge. Smoke free every first and third Saturday of the month. used to establish registers for permanent and Salsa dance lessons 7 p.m. Thursdays with Vibraciones towardd Officers' Club: temporary future vacancies. Latinas at the Underground Lounge, free. Enjoy a prime special 6-9 Fridays and Saturdays. Casa Maria special today through Tuesday, Sonoran: Social hours 5-7 p.m. Mondays; 5-6 p.m. Wednesday Army two chimichangas, a taco salad, Spanish rice, sour cream and and 4-6 p.m. Friday with Club Card drawings. Music is 8 melted cheese. p.m.-midnight. fill most clerical position .NM-.3 (Used t Super Thursday night buffet. Adults $7.95 all-you-cans r Gesn .Aeat, children from 6 to 12, $2.95, and children under 6 eat VB# 001A General Clerical, NM-4 (Used to Free ride program is offered to all Air Force club pafree. fill most clerical position). trons who have had too much to drink. Check with the night/ For events or catering, call 284-3718. VB# 0* Sales Store Checker, NM-3 duty manager or bartender. (Intermittent wk sch) *Albrook Club: Rodman Enjoy blues and jazz 7-10 p.m. today by recording artist The Rodman Club, Rodman Annex, the Laguna Lounge CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) Lowell I lopper in the lounge, and Rodman Boohi is open to all ranks. The Anchorage Club is required. Karaoke in the lounge today. will be converted into a fitness center and is scheduled to Steak night Friday. Choose from rib eye, K.C. strip, filet open by June. VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 or prime rib. Dinner comes with vegetable, baked potato, *Rodman Club: (Lifeguard) Requires Cert + 6 mo recreation exp French fries or rice. .Lunch is served I I a.m.-I p.m. Monday-Sunday. in the field. Fiesta de mariscos Saturday nights. The seafood feast All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.in.-I VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Req 6 features different platters and clam chowder, shrimp cocktail p.m. Mondays-Fridays. los recreation exp in the ficl. or ceviche. The combination platter includes broiled corvina, Dinner is served Monday-Sunday. V1340s 5 recrato x nten fie pld ) -stuffed crab, calamari rings, peel-and-eat shrimp, a choice of Soup and sub night 3:30-8:30 p.m. Mondays. Grill menu VB# 05 Secretary (Stenography), NM-S potato or rice, cole slaw and vegetables du jour. A la carte is also available. VB#005A Secretary (Stenography), NM-6 menu available. All-you-can-eat chicken 3:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. VB# 006 Secretary -(Typing/Office Mongolian barbecue 6-9 p.m. Tuesday. Prepare your Grill menu is also available. Automation), NM-S plate, choose the meat, vegetables, seasonings, oils and have Cook-your-own steak night 3:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday VB# 006A Secreta ry (Typing/Office chefs do the job outside on the open grills. at the Rodman Bohio. Automation), NM-6 Sunday champagne brunch 10 a.m.-I p.m. in the dining Fine dining 6-9 p.m. Friday-Saturday. VB# 017 Administrative Services Assistant, room offers breakfast from cooked-to-order omelets, French Upstairs Bar 3:30-8:30 p.m. Sunday through Thursday; NM-5 toast, hot lunches, salad and fruits, peel-and-eat shrimp, des6-9 Friday-Saturday. VB# 017A AdministratIve Services Assistant, sets and ice crcam bai. Social hours and hors d'oeuvres, 3:30-11 p.m. Fridays at NM-6 The club will be closed Monday for Memorial Day. The the Laguna Lounge and Rodman Bohio. VB# 018 Supply Technician, NM-5 club also closes after lunch the first Tuesday of each month *Rodman Annex: VB# 1O8A Supply Technician, NM-6 for maintenance. Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Monday-Friday. For events or catering call 286-3557/3582. All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu II a.m.The following positions are Perm/Temp Full*Htoward Enlisted Members' Club: 1:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. Memorial Weekend All Nighters Sunday in the Casual The club is closed for evening and weekend service. time, Part--time, Intermittent.CoeThclbiclsdfrvnngadwkndevc. Cove. a i The June 4 grand reopening of the upstairs lounge and Davis V# 007 ** MEDICAL OFFICER, NE 12/13/ ballroom includes a Panamanian night. Menu features *Davis Community Club: 14. sancocho, arroz con polo, platano en tentacion, arroz con Scrumptious Sunday brunch 10:30 a.mn.-I:30 p.m. VB# W08 ** CLINICAL NURSE, (RN license pina and typical Panamanian beverages. After dinner Mongolian barbecue 6-8:30 p.m. Thursday. required), NM-9/O/1l. entertairunnet follows. Tickets are on sale as the cashier cage Mexican dinner special 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. VB# 009 ** PRACTICA L NURSE, (LPN window for $8.95. Country and rock nights 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m. today. There licence required), NM-5 The dining room will be'closed for breakfast and lunch will be a cover charge. **Selectees for nurse and medical officer position will bie required to undergo a A r schedu background check. Thursday The Southern Command Network's 1t:35pm KSFO Sports Byline USA 1:35am KSFO Sports Byline USA The following are limited to veteran preference AM Radio features America's most7:35a The Law Show eligibles and permanent employees only. listened to radio programs. Live Monday 8:35ams Technovation coverage of breaking news stories and I:05amu NPR's CartalkI*0mAMte lIIat VB# 010 Manual Positions, MG-2 special events is provided. 3:30amm NPtR's Living On liarth Friday V11# 011 Manual Positions, MG-3 SCN AM Radio is the news, sports 7:30am What's mite Story 1:35am KSFO Spoirts Byline USA VB# 012 Manual Positions, MG-4 and information station AM 790 Pacific 8:05am On Computers 7:35am American Montage VBll 0 13 Manual Posxitions, MG( -S and AM 1420 Atlantic. 1:30am Robert/JamesExchange 8:35am thie Itook Show 1:30pm Georgetown University FoVB# 014 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-6 Tuesday rum VB# 015 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-7 Monday-Friday 1:35am KSFO Sponls Bylhine USA Saturday VB# 016 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-8 5a National Public Radio Morning 7:35ams At PontoliI Hilton :35am KSFO Sports Byline USA Lditimn 8:35asm Tlme Fnvironment Show 6:05am On Conmputers VB# VACANCIES TITLE AND LOCATION 9:54am Paul I lanvey News I :30pm Soundings 7am NPR's Weekend lidition PE 05 COSE 06 4 in Ime RUS LiaughSho 8:35pn All Special Assigniient 10:05am NPR's Cartalk OE:0--91 (LS:00-912 05pm Pal I lamey Newss mid CssimS n a mentary (Repeat 1:17 pus) Wednesday Sunday Pacific 2:05pm aul I larmey Rest of the Stoy 10s I ocus m hlie family 310-94-VL Teller, NM-530-5. Repeats 10 :5pm) 1:35st KS ports ylin ISA 2:15am NPRs s I Pert 311-F4-E. Secretary (Steno/Office Automati 4 NR's All iling Considred 7:3am t lie est iof Our Kmswsledge 4:05aum NPI's Caralk 3 -96:05pi American 'ubli' Radliss's :35amu Ilie I health Show :05am Motitir rdiss NM-318-. Sensitive. Marketplace I 30pm SOciul houiht 7ast NPR s Weekend edition