Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text




Gift of the Panama Canal Museum


SNews

1r right to wear 'the





Ouarrv Heights. Republic of Panama


Val~ VI L No- 19


Tropic Times
May 6, 1994


V52


Friday, May 6, 1994


Last of Liberty ships


.1.


UOil


Department of Defense photo by Staff Sgt. Richard F
Jim Conwell, 57, SS Jeremiah O'Brien crew member, steers
vessel out of Rodman NS and toward the Miraflores Locks.


makes canal
RODMAN NS (USNAVSTAPANCANAL Crew n
PAO) - History has a way of repeating itself, and around and
for 24 hours Saturday, visitors here may have felt war. The
like they had entered a time warp. nated with
Liberty ship S.S. Jeremiah O'Brien arrived Rear Adm
here just as it did nearly 50 years ago, crew on George Jal
deck, line handlers in place, flying all her World The crev
War II flags. and began
This time the O'Brien and her all-volunteer One cre
crew of 55, average age 71, were on a special bal with
mission. They were stopping over for provisions Schneider.
and to transit the Panama Canal on the way to crew mem
Normandy for the 50th anniversary of D-Day. World Wa
Crew members were treated to a ceremony in Schnei
honor ofthis celebration. Pier 2 South was decked 1943 and s
out with red, white and blue bunting honoring the Now, the o
servicemembers who died in the June 6, 1944, ingbusine:
battle. use his inf
Speakers such as Rodman NS commander "When
Capt. Arthur N. Rowley III, U.S. Army South they toldrr
Commander Maj. Gen. G.A. Crocker, and Navy said. "I vo
League President Wilbur Vantine praised the journey. N
crew's drive and desire to take part in D-Day Colema
activities, million to ]
Volunteers resurrected the O'Brien from na- targeting ta
tional monument status to a full sea going vessel nessmen f
which took several years. "This sh
'ucketi Visitors were able to meet and welcome the my time al
the crew ofthe O'Brien when a special barbecue was back," he&
held for them at the Rodman Anchorage Club. O'Brie


transit
members, veterans and friends gathered
d talked about their memories of the
gathering lasted two hours and culmi-
h Rowley, retired Merchant Marine
. Thomas Patterson and retired Capt.
hn cutting a 50th anniversary cake.
w departed the station Sunday morning
its transit of the canal.
;w memberwho disembarked at Cristo-
the 120 ship riders was Coleman
Schneider, 70, was the only current
ber who served on the 0 O'Brien during
r II.
der first boarded the vessel as a cadet in /
served on three voyages with the craft.
owner of one of the largest embroider-
sses in the world, Schneider is trying to
luence to help keep the craft afloat.
I first asked about going on this voyage
ie that there was already a full crew," he
lunteered to do anything to go on this
tow I'm going to do a little more."
an said he is trying to raise more than $1
bring the ship to New York, N.Y. He's
alk shows, major advertisers and busi-
or donations.
hip gave me so many memories during
board, now I'm going to give something
said.
n coverage continues on Pages 8-9.


250 civilian jobs axed by Sept. 30


COROZAL (USARSO PAO) - More than 250
civilian jobs will be eliminated in U.S. Army South
Sept. 30 as part of manpower reductions, officials
said.
In conjunction with this, the U.S. Army South
commanding general has approved the use of Vol-
untary Separation Incentive Pay. This incentive is a
federal-wide program offered to employees before
a reduction-in-force which will help minimize the
number of involuntary separations, said Jack
Penkoske, Directorate of Civilian Personnel direc-
tor.
Permanent employees (U.S. or non-U.S.) may
be eligible for Voluntary Separation Incentive Pay.
Only employees in designated surplus skill catego-
ries, competitive levels, will be offered VSIP.
This incentive pay is used to encourage certain
employees to voluntarily resign or retire and is
made in a lump-sum cash payment, he said.
The severance pay formula is used to compute
the amount of the payment, but in no case can VSIP
exceed $25,000, he said.
A calculation form can be obtained at the DCP
office to help estimate the incentive amount but is
only an estimate. -
Voluntary Early Retirement Authority is also
approved for use with the incentive and will allow
some employees meeting reduced age and service
requirements to retire early with an immediate
annuity, Penkoske said.
Employees covered under the Civil Service Re-
tirement System who retire under the early retire-
ment authority will have their annuity reduced by
two percent per year for each year under age 55, he
said.
There is no reduction for employees covered
under Federal Employees Retirement System.
"If you apply for and are offered VSIP, you must


agree to separate voluntarily by resignation or re-
tirement by June 30," Penkoske said.
"The voluntary nature of the action eliminates
any entitlement you may have to severance pay,
lump sum retirement annuity, priority placement
program and any other program you may have
been eligible for had your separation been involun-
tary."
In addition, if the employee is reemployed by the
federal government within five years of separation,
he must repay the entire VSIP amount, he said.
To apply for incentives, employees must submit
a completed Request for Personnel Action, Stan-
dard Form 52.
Part E of the form must show if the employee
plans on retiring or resigning.
SF-52s must be at the Benefits Branch by 4 p.m.
May 31 and your date of separation must be no later
than June 30, Penkoske said. Applications received
on or before 4 p.m. May 18 will be processed first
and the acceptance period may be extended or
terminated.
Ifthe number of employees applying for separa-
tion incentive exceeds the number of incentives
available for a specific organization or occupation,
applications within that organization or occupation
will be processed in order of seniority using the
Service Computation Date for leave, he said.
"For each VSIP granted, we must be able to
document that one permanent employee is saved
from involuntary separation," Penkoske said.
"The Chiefof Staff is the final approval author-
ity for VSIP actions with the U.S. Army South and
the U.S. Army Garrison commander is the final
approval authority for garrison positions."
For more information, call the Benefits Branch
at 285-5745 or the Recruitment and Placement
Division at 285-4155.


National elections set for Sunday
FORT CLAYTON (JTF-PANAMA) - National elections will
be held in the Republic of Panama Sunday.
As Panamanians prepare to go to the polls and participate in the
selection of the country's leadership, U.S. forces, civilian compo-
nents and their family members are reminded they must respect
Panamanian sovereignty and in no way become involved in the
election process, officials said.
Polling locations in Panama will be open 7 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Sunday. Heavy traffic congestion is expected in urban areas.
The Atlapa Convention Center in Panama City, command grid
map coordinates A and B 17-19, will serve as the main electoral
center and location for international media.
Panamanian police will set up barricades on streets adjacent to
the convention center today through Tuesday. Security will be
tight in this area and U.S. personnel living near this area or staying
at the Caesar Park Hotel (formerly the Marriott) may experience
delays, detours and heavy traffic.
Personnel are advised to plan sufficient travel time to and from
destinations during this period and to monitor the Southern Com-
mand Network for updates.

Alcohol sales, weapons banned
FORT CLAYTON (JTF-PANAMA) - Because of elections in
the Republic of Panama Sunday, all bars will be closed and there
will be no public consumption or purchasing ofalcohol in Panama
from noon Saturday to noon Monday.
There will also be no sales ofalcoholic beverages in shoppettes,
exchange facilities, Class VI stores or any other installation
establishment where alcohol can be purchased and taken from the
premises during this time. Sales and consumption at clubs or other
authorized facilities will be permitted on the premises only. No
alcoholic beverages will be sold for take out.
Privately owned weapons may not be carried off military
installations Sunday.
All requests for firearms permits, to include renewals, are
temporarily suspended until May 31.


aturePage


News Page00-


.~n mor I0 '.


More than 250 soldiers earn right to
wear coveted Expert Infantrymen's


Howard AFB Base Operations *Gore salutes military, Page 4.
keeps flights, visitors coming and *Reserve efforts, Page 10.


*Echo challenge, Page 12.


Vol. V 11, INO. la


-1-4


Bad ge.


going.


- *











News


ME 'I ii ~


. I


Red Cross safety course
slated for May 17-19
An American Red Cross first aid and
safety course will be held 6-8 p.m. May
17-19 on the third floor of Building 519,
Fort Clayton. For information, call 287-
5509.

Clerical administrative
test to be held May 27
The Clerical Administrative Support
Positions "CASP TEST" will be held 8:30
a.m.-noon May 27 at the Central Examin-
ing Office. Transportation will be available
from Valent Recreation Center. The bus
will be leave at 7:30 a.m. A SF-171 must
be submitted to the Civilian Personnel Of-
fice before the examination. For informa-
tion, call 285-5201.

Private pilot course
begins 6 p.m. Monday
There will be a private pilot ground
school course 6 p.m. Monday at the Al-
brook AFS Youth Center. For information,
call 263-5044.

Separation briefing starts
today at Building 519
A pre-separation briefing will be 1:30
p.m. today in Building 520, Fort Clayton.
The briefing is designed to help all soldiers
who are within 120 days of separating


neter- L chang es 'freedom

swer questions. For information, call 287- i' n il c
4753/4155. flights', civilian clothing rules


Panama poi7-- usiny
radars near school zones
Because of numerous complaints about
speeding throughout the Balboa Elemen-
tary and High School area, the Panamani-
an National Police will now use radars to
detect speeding. Motorists will be issued a
traffic citation if caught speeding. For
more information, call 287-3376.

Ordnance detachment
to hold amnesty day
In conjunction with U.S. Army South
Safety Stand Down Day, the 36th Ord-
nance Detachment will sponsor an Ammu-
nition and Explosives Amnesty Day 7:30
a.m.-3:30 p.m. May 19. Turn-in points will
be on SCN Field, Fort Clayton; the Fort
Davis softball field; Building 533,
Corozal; Building 734, Howard Air Force
Base; and Ammunition Supply Point num-
ber one, Rodman Naval Station.

128th Aviation Brigade
sponsors dining out
The 128th Aviation Brigade will hold a
dining out May 20 at the Club Amador.
People wanting to attend should make res-
ervations by May 13 by calling 287-5418.

Medical Material Branch
closes for inventory
The U.S. Army Medical Activity - Pan-
ama Medical Material Branch will be
closed for inventory next week. The dead-
line for submitting medical supply requests
is Monday. For information, call 282-
5209/5114.


AM flgh sheul


Saturday
5:40 am C-130 Howard AFB
St. Joseph, Mo. (U.S.)
1:55 pm C-5A Howard AFB
Charleston AFB, SC (0)
Dover AFB, Del.
Sunday
No scheduled departures
Monday
5:55 am C-130 Howard AFB
San Salvador, El Salvador
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Howard AFB
3:45 p.m. B-727 Howard AFB


Soto Cano AB, Honduras (C)
Tuesday
5:40 a.m. C-141 Howard AFB
Brasilia, Brazil (V, 0)
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Montevideo, Uruguay (0)
Brasilia, Brazil
8:40 a.m. B-727 Howard AFB
Atlanta IAP (C)
Charleston IAP, SC
Wednesday
5:25 am C-130 Howard AFB
San Jose, Costa Rica (V,CC)
Howard AFB


Defense department
civilians need leave
A Department of Defense civilian em-
ployee needs donated leave. Richard
Tedesco, a Directorate of Logistics em-
ployee, suffered a heart attack and had to
travel to the United States for open-heart
surgery. Tedesco returned to Panama in
January, but suffered a relapse.
Leave donations are also needed for
Mayra Berlioz, secretary for the U.S. Mil-
itary Group - Honduras. She needs an eye
operation. Anyone wanting to donate
through the Voluntary Leave Transfer Pro-
gram can complete a Leave Donation
Form 44. Forms should be submitted to the
Directorate of Civilian Personnel, Labor
and Employee Development Division,
Building 560, Corozal, Room 201. For in-
formation, call 285-6720.

Fuel handlers course
registration under way
There will be a fuel handlers' course
June 6-10 at the Company A, 193rd Sup-
port Battalion Motor Pool. Space and
study materials are limited so units must
register by May 26. For information, call
287-5366/5463.

World War II mementos
needed for birthday ball
World War II memorabilia is needed to
be used during the Army Birthday Ball.
Memorabilia will be displayed in secure
areas of Club Amador. For information,
call the U.S. Army South Public Affairs
Office at 287-3007.

Atlantic clerical exam set
for 10 a.m. June 8
There will be a clerical examination for
family members in the Atlantic communi-
ty 10 a.m. June 8 at the Fort Davis Educa-
tion Center, Building 235. To register, call
285-4218.

Job search seminars
to be held May 18
Job search seminars and professional
counseling in Spanish are available at the
Army Career and Alumni Program Job
Assistance Center for Department of the
Army Panamanian civilian employees.
Topics include finding employment infor-
mation, writing a curriculum, practicing
networking, interviewing and salary nego-
tiations. Classes are scheduled to begin
May 18. For more information, call 287-
5844.

PACE center offers
training Tuesday
Self help training will be held 10 a.m.
Tuesday at the PACE Improvement Cen-
ter, Building 340 Corozal at the Director-
ate of Engineering and Housing entrance.
Call 285-6213 for more information.


HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PA) -
Space available "Freedom Bird" flights
have begun, offering customers space
available travel from the Howard pas-
senger terminal to Heartsfield Interna-
tional Airport in Atlanta via commercial
contract flights.
Passengers cannot return to Howard
directly from Atlanta - at least, not
traveling space-A - because there are
no passenger service specialists current-
ly assigned to Atlanta. There are plans
for return service later this year, said a
passenger service representative here.
Passengers who depart the space-A
flight in Atlanta will not be stranded
stateside, but they will have to travel to
Charleston AFB, S.C. to get the free trip
back, said Jacalyn Castro, assistant su-
perintendent of the passenger terminal.
"Passengers can sign up for space-A
travel at this terminal, before departure
from Howard. We'll forward the names

79th Army Band holds
final dry season concerts
The 79th Army Band will play dry sea-
son concerts 6 p.m. May 13 at the Fort
Davis Theater and May 15 at the Amador
Gazebo.

Womens business group
meeting set for Monday
A meeting for the American Business
Women's Association Panama Canal
Charter Chapter will be held 5 p.m. Mon-
day at the Italian Cuisine restaurant in Cu-
rundu. The guest speaker, Dradine Lee, an
international Jazzercise instructor, will talk
about fitness, health and franchising. For
information, call 260-4744.

CPO announces medical
positions available soon
The Directorate of Civilian Personnel
has announced intermittent positions avail-
able for registered nurses, licensed practi-
tioner nurses, emergency medical techni-
cians and operating room technicians.
People with experience in maternal or
child, medical or surgical, critical care,
emergency room, pediatrics, orthopedics,
operating room and clinics are needed. A
current U.S. nursing license is required for
registered nurses and licensed practitioner
nurses.
Applicants selected will attend a three-
week orientation course and will have the
opportunity to work in their specialty.
They will then be placed on an on-call ros-
ter for the area and called in to work as
needed. For information, call 285-4116.

Boy Scout camp needs
volunteer support staff
The Panama Canal District/Boy Scouts
of America needs volunteers to act as pro-
gram and support staff during its upcom-
ing summer camp. The program staff in-



Thursday
7:55 a.m. C-5A Howard AFB
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Charleston AFB, SC (0)
May 13
5:40 am C-130 Howard AF'B
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Howard AFB
US- U.S. passport
0-Overnight
C-Commercial Contract
V-Visa
M-Medevac
CC-Country Clearance


16 Tropic Times
1 May 6, 1994


"aP

)

t




t


to Charleston, and they'll already be on
the waiting list when they arrive there,"
Castro said.
'Another space available change al-
lows almost all military members to
board space-available flights in civilian
attire.
"Active duty Army, Navy and Air
Force members can now board all Air
Force and commercial contract aircraft in
civilian clothes, regardless of their duty
status or destination," Castro said. "Only
the Marines are still required to wear mil-
itary uniforms on military aircraft."
Passengers who choose to wear civil-
ian clothing must ensure it is neat and
clean, warm enough for the trip, and ap-
propriate for the mode of travel and the
departure and destination points, Castro
said.
Anyone with questions about the
changes may call the terminal at 284-
5702.

cludes archery range and waterfront direc-
tors, and the support staff includes kitchen
cooks and medical personnel.
Scouts and staff will live in the jungle
operations training area at Fort Sherman.
The staff will arrive at Fort Sherman on
June 18, and leave when the camp ends
June 29.
People interested in participating
should begin their permissive temporary
duty, temporary active duty requests soon.
For more information, call Johnathan
Hilton at 284-5567/3516 or Kathy
MacPhail at 285-6548.

American Society holds
elections Thursday
The American Society elections for the
board of directors will be held 7 p.m.
Thursday at Club Amador.

DRMO holds spot bid
sale May 16 at Corozal
The Defense Reutilization and Market-
ing Office will hold a local spot bid sale 7
a.m. May 16 in Building 745, Corozal. In-
spection is open the same day. Call Ada
Tweed at 285-4754.

Officers' council
changes meeting time
The Company Grade Officers Council,
serving captains and lieutenants in Pana-
ma, has changed its meeting schedule to
3:30 p.m. the second Friday of each month
at the Howard Officers' Club.

Sealed bids accepted for
1988 Toyota pickup
Sealed bids will be accepted until May
14 for a 1988 Toyota pickup truck. The
minimum bid is $500. For information on
where to submit bids, call the Howard
Auto Skills Center at 284-3370.

Christian musical festival
begins noon May 14
A Christian music festival will be held
noon- 8 p.m. May 14 at McGrath Field be-
hind the Gamboa swimming pool. Chris-
tian praise groups from Panama and the
canal area will participate.

3-week parenting class
begins Tuesday
Members of the Howard/Albrook com-
munity with children between the ages of
6 and 12 years old may attend a three-week
parenting class that meets Tuesdays and
Thursday beginning Tuesday. Call 284-
6410.











SjNews


Tropic Times
May 6,1994


269 infantrymen earn right to wear 'the badge'


by Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski
USARSO Public Affairs Office
EMPIRE RANGE - Call for fire, communications, in-
dividual movement techniques, employ a claymore mine,
first aid, Nuclear, Biological and Chemical...all of these
are tasks that can either make or break an infantry unit in
combat.
During peacetime, knowing and performing these tasks
can earn infantry soldiers one of an infantrymen's most
difficult and prized possessions - the Expert
Infantrymen's Badge.
In the past two weeks, nearly 340 soldiers from 5th
Battalion, 87th Infantry (Light); 1st Battalion (Airborne),
508th Infantry; and various other units with infantry sol-
diers attempted the task.
Of those soldiers, 269 proved they could meet the chal-
lenge and earn themselves the Expert Infantrymen's
badge.
"It was very impressive. There was a lot of preparation
by both the battalions and a lot of enthusiasm," said Com-
mand Sgt. Maj. Claus Madsen, 193rd Infantry Brigade
(Light), sergeant major.
Throughout the week, the infantry soldiers were tested
on their proficiency in 23 tasks, which varied from as-
sembling an M-249 Squad Automatic Weapon to com-
pleting a 12-mile road march.
The soldier must perform each of the tasks correctly
and in a certain amount of time, officials said.
The only way a soldier did not receive their EIB was to
receive two no-go's on one station or three no-go's over-
all. Once disqualified, the soldier must wait another year
before trying again.
Spc. Byron McNeil of Company B, 5-87th Inf., has
been trying to get his EIB for four years.
"So far it's been simple, small mistakes that got me
no-gos," McNeil said on the second day of testing.
"But I'm really confident that I'm going to get it this
year."
Spc. Mark Steele from Headquarters Company, 5- 87th


A 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry soldier lays wire for a Claymore mine.


Inf., said he was also confident about getting his EIB.
"This is my first time going for my EIB," said the
former Marine.
"This is really different from what I did in the Ma-
rines. They do more written tests, where we do more ac-
tual action things."
Pfc. Peter Salvarlis from Co. A, 1st Bn., 508th Inf.,
earned his EIB after only two attempts.
Salvarlis said that it's important to most infantry sol-
diers to get their EIB because "it proves you are the best


soldier you can be.
"It's pride....when you see somebody else has it and
you don't, you want it," he said.
"It's important to many infantrymen to get their
EIB because it's the only award where you test soldiers
on their individual skills and not as a team," Salvarlis
said.
"We can only coach them to a certain point but when
they get up to the tester, there's nobody to help," Salvarlis
said.


'Unofficial ambassador' takes


role in Venezuela seriously


by 1st Lt. Jim Knotts
U.S. Southern Command Public Affairs Office


CARACAS, ,
Venezuela - At '. "
some time, most
military members
have been called .
"unofficial am- -
bassadors," sug-
gesting the great
impact they can
have as represen-
tatives of the
United States
while overseas. -
This title cer-
tainly applies to
U.S. Air Force Capt. Wonzie L. Gardner
Capt. Wonzie L. Gardner, Jr., joint logistics officer for
the U.S. military group here.
Gardner and the other military group members
work directly with the Venezuelans to provide assis-
tance in purchasing U.S. military equipment and train-
ing packages, and coordinating exercises and ex-
changes to military schools.
As logistics officer, Gardner's job is to handle all
foreign military sales to Venezuela.
"The host nation gives us a shopping list," Gardner
said. "We find the appropriate system and then see if
they can sustain it. What differentiates us from some
other countries is we provide a total package - hard-
ware, training, and spare parts."
He has the unique position of pulling double duty
by providing the same service, plus training support,
for the neighboring country of Guyana. Historically,
Venezuela and Guyana have disputed their boundary,
with Venezuela claiming most of western Guyana.
Being the U.S. contact for both countries puts
Gardner's ambassadorial skills to the test.
"This job gives the military group the opportunity
to bring the two countries together," he said. "We try
to keep the lines of communication open between the
two militaries, so if something happens, we can avert a
crisis by having the two sides talk to each other."
This assignment also offers many other challenges.


"Going overseas is challenging enough," said
Gardner, who grew up following his Air Force father
all over the world. "But going overseas where you
don't have the support system common to most mili-
tary bases adds a degree of difficulty."
As do most of the military group members,
Gardner's family is with him. With no military com-
missary or medical facilities, the daily chores more dif-
ficult for his wife, Vanessa; their son, Wonzie; and
daughter, Jarielle.
"An experience like this either strengthens the
family unit or tears it apart. I feel it's strengthening
mine. It's a real credit to our spouses to function like
they do, and most spouses perform admirably," he said.
"What this teaches you is to become self-sufficient
and use your ingenuity." he added. "It tests everything
you've ever been taught. You learn a lot of things
about yourself. It's a challenge, but a challenge that
can be met."
The job offers unique rewards, however.
"The most rewarding part of my job is providing an
idea of how to do something differently that not only
helps their militaries, but helps Venezuelan or
Guyanese society as a whole," Gardner said.
Gardner has gained a special appreciation for things
most military people take for granted.
"After being here, I love going to Panama. When I
go through the gate at Howard Air Force Base and have
that airman salute me, a chill goes down my spine and
my eyes well up with tears. Everyone should be sent
away just so they learn to appreciate all the things the
military has to offer," Gardner said.
Gardner takes his job as "unofficial ambassador" se-
riously, too. Working through a local church, Gardner
volunteers his time to work with local children.
He reaches people who normally wouldn't come
into contact with the U.S. military.
"As a military member, you can have more of an
impact. You can show the kids we're not bad people.
We have a military mission, but we're still active in the
community," Gardner said.
Volunteering has given him a new perspective on
the United States.
"If we can get people in the U.S. who are
complaining, make them come abroad and see how
others live, they'd stop complaining," he said.


AF legal defense


marks 20 years


of independence

ALBROOK AFS (USAF Judiciary/Area Defense
Counsel) - Air Force Defense Services are celebrating 20
years of independence.
Before 1974, legal services - both defense and pros-
ecution - were provided by the base legal office. Attor-
neys were chosen by the Staff Judge Advocate from attor-
neys assigned to the legal office. The SJAand his or her
assistants were under command of and rated by the Wing
Commander.
This practice led Air Force members to think that their
assigned defense counsel had an interest in pleasing the
command - maybe at the expense of the accused
member's legal representation, said Capt. Michael A.
Sciales, Area Defense Counsel.
After much thought and study, a separate command
was developed where JAGs assigned to defense services
were permanently assigned to this command and were out-
side the influence of the local command. The program
worked out well and was made permanent, Sciales said.
The present Defense Counsel service falls under the Air
Force Judiciary. Each base is assigned one or more de-
fense counsel, whose sole job is to provide legal service
for members accused of crimes or facing other adverse or
administrative actions, Sciales said.
Defense counsel are usually selected from a base staff,
based on their experience and ability to operate indepen-
dently.
,JAGs selected for assignment as Area Defense Coun-
sels receive a permanent change of assignment to the Air
Force Judiciary and are no longer attached to a Wing or
other component unit, Sciales said. Area Defense Coun-
sels are supported by a circuit defense counsel - a lawyer
responsible for several bases - and are rated by the Chief
Circuit Defense Counsel - a lawyer responsible for a dis-
trict or region.
Each Area Defense Counsel is part of a team, fiercely
independent and committed to giving members with the
best defense possible.
Defense Services has been living up to this obligation
for the past 20 years and will continue to do so in the fu-
ture, Sciales said.











4Tropic Times
May 6, 1994


_ Military News


Gore applauds DoD employees'efforts for change


WASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces Informatiun
Service) - In most places in America, the way to test a
cake is to taste it.
But until a Defense Department employee stepped in,
the way to test a cake according to military specifications
was:
"After the cake is cooled for two hours at 69 degrees F
plus or minus 5 degrees, at a relative humidity of 50 per-
cent, plus or minus 5 percent, the cake is set on two cylin-
ders, each 4 inches in diameter which are spaced at least 6
inches apart. Then wait for two minutes and check for
cracks."
Jeffrey Jones, assistant deputy undersecretary of de-
fense for logistics, took a look at this specification and
said, "No more." He initiated a program to do away with
military specifications for all military mess hall food.
"Milspec food is being replaced by real food," was how
Vice President Al Gore put it during a March Pentagon
town meeting on reinventing government. The vice presi-
dent's visit was a follow-up to a meeting held in August
1993.
"You told me then about the worst frustration of all (in
working for the federal government : the public's
misperception that the main problem with the federal gov-
ernment is lazy and ineffective civil servants," Gore said.


"The president and I are firmly convinced that the prob-
lem is not federal employees. It is federal employees
trapped in bad systems and outdated procedures and un-
productive regulations and burdensome red tape."
Gore said the Clinton administration's response is to
give every federal employee a mandate to change the sys-
tem. "For years the federal government has taught the peo-
ple that work for it that if you stick your neck out to try
something new, you may get your head chopped off," he
said. "An important part of (employee) empowerment is
to change the culture so mistakes are seen as an opportu-
nity to learn."
If employees make mistakes in good faith, then they
should not be penalized. "If every time someone makes a
mistake the whole bureaucracy plays 'Gotcha' and comes
down like a ton of bricks (on the employee), then (man-
agement) shouldn't be surprised that nobody tries any-
thing new," Gore said.
An important part of Gore's message at the Pentagon
was customer service. DoD's customers are the American
people, and it is the mission of every person in the organi-
zation to ensure the country's freedom and security. "In
day-to-day terms, much of what you do is produce goods
and services for the men and women in uniform," he
said.


"There's your best opportunity to become more cus-
tomer driven."
He pointed to the milspec example as a success story.
In another, he spoke of the workers in the Air Force Dis-
trict of Washington's travel section who streamlined and
automated travel voucher payments. In that case, finance
officials cut the number of steps taken to issue payment
from 17 to as few as four.
The Air Force had another example with a complete
revision of its regulatory system. Gore said they started
with nearly 1,600 separate regulations totaling 55,000
pages. The team cut this to 160 policy statements each
about three pages long. All this is on customer-friendly
compact discs.
Tthe Naval Air Systems Command North Island De-
pot, Calif., received the USA Today Quality Award for its
work in empowering employees to make changes.
Gore talked about an Army program where the clinics
call 'high-risk' people to set up appointments rather than
having people trying to dial into a constant busy signal.
"But changing the culture is a real challenge," he said.
"The heart of it is very simply a mandate to change from a
system of centralized control based on mistrust of federal
employees to a system characterized by clear goals, a few
guiding principles and trust in our people."


Joulwan calls for credible U.S. presence in Europe


WASHINGTON, D.C. (American
Forces Information Service) - Maintaining
a credible U.S. presence, nuclear
counterproliferation and quality of life is-
sues top the list of concerns for the com-
mander of U.S. forces in Europe.
Army Gen. George A. Joulwan, su-
preme allied commander Europe and
commander, U.S. European Command,
said the collapse of the Iron Curtain was a
two-edged sword. The former Warsaw
Pact countries and former Soviet Union
dropped the fetters of communism.
"In the short term, however, it has al-
lowed a host of historic animosities to re-
surface and fester," he told the Senate
Armed Services Committee.
"The tragic situation in the former Yu-
goslavia, though an extreme example, is
hardly an aberration," he said. "Other ar-
eas are ripe for future conflict caused by
ethnic and religious strife, resurging na-
tionalism or territorial disputes."
Joulwan, the former commander-in-
chief, U.S. Southern Command, said
NATO is key to stability in the region. The
NATO alliance is the only organization in
the area with the tools, infrastructure and
command arrangement already in place.
"No organization on the horizon can
replace NATO," he said. "Likewise, no
other country can replace U.S. leadership.
It is the glue that binds the alliance togeth-
er. The price of our leadership of NATO
is a credible, active forward presence. The
permanent force we will have in Europe
at the end of the drawdown provides a
minimum presence."
Joulwan said NATO is going through
a fundamental metamorphosis in response
to the changing era. "The alliance has op-
erated out of area, proving itself as a tool
for enforcing United Nations resolutions
in the Balkans," he said.
Another aspect of this change is the
Partnership for Peace program. Joulwan


supports the program designed to extend
the concept of collective security to other
European and former Soviet nations.
The proliferation of weapons of mass
destruction poses "the most potential for
disaster," he said. Russia maintains control
of all ICBMs, long-range, nuclear-capable
bombers and ballistic missile submarines.
Still, NATO faces an arsenal of 23,000
nuclear warheads. "Of equal, if not great-
er, concern for the future is the possibility
of weapons of mass destruction and the
technology to deliver them falling into the
wrong hands - rogue states or terrorists,"
Joulwan said. "This holds the possibility
for a truly nightmare scenario."
He supports full implementation of
both strategic nuclear reduction treaties
and indefinite extension of the Nonprolif-
eration Treaty. He also calls for full partic-
ipation in the Chemical Weapons Conven-
tion.
Joulwan said NATO and the United
States should bring all available instru-
ments of power to bear on this problem
and further called for development of a vi-
able theater missile defense system.
"Theater missile defense plays a key
role in minimizing two critical dangers to
U.S. security - the proliferation of weap-
ons of mass destruction and regional
threats to U.S. interests," he said. "Theater
missiles present a problem from their de-
structive potential, not only from a military
aspect, but also from a political aspect due
to their potential as a terror weapon to
threaten population centers."
To combat the threat, the only deployed
system is the Army's Patriot system. How-
ever, several new systems are in final stag-
es of development. Joulwan said Europe-
an Command and Supreme Headquarters
Allied Powers Europe are involved in de-
veloping theater missile requirements,
doctrine, policy and strategy.
"I fully support efforts to upgrade ex-


Gen. George A. Joulwan
isting systems and develop improved the-
ater missile defense," he said. "The lack of
an effective theater missile defense is a
potential war stopper for (Europe); this
threat puts our theater and our allies' forc-
es at risk."
Joulwan called on Congress to provide
for a reasonable quality of life for service
members and their families. "Our troops
and their families have endured many
hardships while carrying out the highest
operations tempo ever in the midst of the
largest military drawdown since World
War II," he said. "They have and will
make tremendous sacrifices for their coun-
try. We should not take advantage of their
commitment or there could come a time
when we will not be able to keep top-notch
people in the armed forces."
To keep readiness high, he asked Con-
gress to fund unanticipated contingencies
and not make the services take the money
from their operations and maintenance
budgets.


U.S. Supreme Court to make honoraria ban ruling


WASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces Information Ser-
vice) - The U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether the honorar-
ia ban violates federal employees' right to free speech.
A court spokesperson said the justices will probably hear ar-
guments in the late fall. A decision is unlikely before spring 1995.
The ban is part of the 1989 Ethics in Government Act. It bans
federal employees and military officers from writing or speaking
for pay outside their government jobs. Enlisted members and non-
commissioned officers are not subject to the ban.
The ban went into effect Jan. 1, 1991. It applies only to speak-
ing and nonfiction writing for newspapers and magazines. It ap-
plies even if employees write or speak on a subjects totally unre-
lated to official duties. The ban does not apply to books, photog-
raphy, artwork and other means of expression.
The ban was originally intended to prevent members of Con-


gress, their staffs and political appointees from receiving money
for speeches or newspaper articles. In the last stages of debate,
Congress extended the law to most federal civilian employees.
Lower courts have repeatedly found the honoraria ban to be
unconstitutional. Therefore, the Department of Justice asked the
Supreme Court to rule on the case to get a final decision. On April
18, the court agreed to hear the case.
Until the Supreme Court renders a decision, Office of Gov-
ernment Ethics guidance issued Feb. 2, 1994, still applies, said
Mike Korwin of the ethics office. Thus, the honoraria ban will
not be enforced unless and until the Supreme Court rules it is
constitutional. That guidance means employees who have been
keeping payments in escrow can take them out. That also means
employees can accept payment for writing or speaking that had
been subject to the ban.


U.S., Thai troops
conduct Cobra Gold
WASHINGTON (American
Forces Information Service) - A to-
tal of 24,000 U.S. and Thai service-
members are participating in Cobra
Gold exercises in Thailand.
The participants are testing joint/
combined land and air operations,
combined naval operations, and
amphibious and special operations.
U.S. servicemembers came from
Marine Forces Pacific, U.S. Army
Pacific, Pacific Air Forces and the
Pacific Fleet. In addition, troops
came from Special Operations
Command Pacific, Forces Com-
mand, Air Mobility Command and
elements of the Air National Guard
and Air Force Reserve. This is the
13th year for Cobra Gold.

Numbers of troops
shrink by 3,616
WASHINGTON, D.C. (Ameri-
can Forces Information Service) -
U.S. armed forces shrank 3,616 in
February to 1,668,929. The military
is 84,715 servicemembers smaller
than it was at the same time last
year. On Feb. 28, 1994, there were
566,318 soldiers, 491,092 sailors,
175,838 Marines and 435,681 air-
men.

Vietnam vet named
to memorial post
WASHINGTON, D.C. (Ameri-
can Forces Information Service) -
The Women in Military Service for
America Memorial Foundation ap-
pointed Mary R. Stout to its board
of directors.
Stout, a former Army nurse and
Vietnam veteran, will help raise
funds for the Women's Memorial,
to be built at the entrance of Arling-
ton National Cemetery outside
Washington.

Military names top
photographers '
WASHINGTON, D.C. (Ameri-
can Forces Information Service) -
Marine Staff Sgt. Eamie Grafton, a
photographer with Pacific Stars and
Stripes, and Marine Staff Sgt. Al
Moore, a videographer based in
Quantico, Va. won the 1993
military photographer and
videographer of the year awards.











*_ Military News


Tropic Times 5
May 6, 1994


Rangers train on carrier U.S. Navy photo by Joe Hendricks
Rangers train on carrier
U.S. Army Rangers from the 2nd Battalion, 75th Regiment, practice their skills with a mortar while embarked on a joint service exercise on board the aircraft
carrier USS George Washington. The deployment of Rangers and Air Force helicopters aboard the carrier is a test of Atlantic Command's joint force packaging.


Troops beginning phase 2 of 'Fuertes Caminos'


QUARRY HEIGHTS (USSOUTHCOM PAO) - At
the invitation of the government of El Salvador, U.S.
Army engineers from the Reserve Component in the Unit-
ed States and support soldiers from Panama have begun
phase II of"Fuertes Caminos-94."
FC '94 is a combined engineering exercise with the
Salvadoran military that ends Aug. 20. During the four-
month exercise, U.S. Army and Salvadoran military engi-
neers and community volunteers will repair or construct
six schools and one medical clinic in the south-central de-
partment of La Paz. Also, a U.S. Army well drilling team
from Panama will drill six potable water wells in the same
area.
This exercise is a follow-up to the first Fuertes
Caminos engineering exercise conducted in El Salvador
from August to December of last year in which the 536th
Engineer Battalion of U.S Army South and Salvadoran
military engineers participated. They completed 13
schools, one community center, five water wells and
worked in the area of Zacatecoluca in the La Paz Depart-
ment. They also prepared six foundations for school
projects during the second phase.
Following the arrival of the 30-member advance party
(including the task force commander), the first contingent
of 157 troops and equipment arrived in San Salvador Sun-
day on a C-5A and a L-1011 aircraft. The bulk of the
engineering equipment and vehicles also arrived Sunday
by boat at the Salvadoran port ofAcajutla. From there they


traveled by convoy to the base camp located at the Salva-
doran Miraflores military installation.
A few communications specialists and well drillers
from USARSO's 106th Signal Brigade and the 536th de-
ployed from Panama, and additional well drillers will fol-
low by mid-May.
Task Force Vulcan - the command and control ele-
ment for the exercise - is composed of units from the
121st U.S. Army Reserve Command, the 167th Corps
Support Command of the Alabama National Guard and
U.S. Army South. About 280 U.S. soldiers will deploy to
El Salvador every two weeks for a total of seven two-week
training periods. The duration staff of the task force will
number about 120 soldiers.
The scope of the engineer work includes extensive re-
pairs in two of the six schools involved, construction of
27 new classrooms and an auditorium. Latrine facilities
will be constructed in five schools, and fences for three
schools will be built. In addition, an ambulance entrance
and a 'fence will be constructed at the medical clinic.
The principal objective of Fuertes Caminos is to pro-
vide training opportunities for U.S. military units, while
demonstrating continued U.S. support for strengthening
democracy in El Salvador and assisting the people of El
Salvador. This training includes mobilization and deploy-
ment from the United States to a remote environment, per-
formance of humanitarian and civic action projects in El
Salvador and redeployment to the United States.


Postal service issues stamp honoring Buffalo Soldiers


WASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces Information
Service) - The U.S. Postal Service has issued 185 million
29-cent commemorative stamps honoring a group of lit-
tle-known American heroes.
"Buffalo Soldiers changed the face of American mili-
tary history forever, but they never received due recogni-
tion," said Navy Cmdr. Carlton Philpot, chairman of the
Buffalo Soldier Education and Historical Committee.
"I hope the stamp will motivate historians, students,
teachers and publishers to write and teach about Buffalo
Soldiers' accomplishment and achievements."
The stamp dramatically depicts four mounted African-
American soldiers, said Monica A. Hand of the Postal
Service corporate relations office in Washington. A sol-


dier in the foreground has his rifle at the ready, and the
other three troopers fill the background. Military artist
Mort Kantsler of Oyster Bay, N.Y., designed the stamp.
The stamp was dedicated in Dallas April 22 during cer-
emonies hosted by the Afro-American Postal League
United for Success, or A-PLUS, and is one of 15 being
released this year featuring African-Americans.
Philpot said the stamp was the last of his committee's
goals. The first two were the dedication of a Buffalo Sol-
dier monument at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., and a national
resolution making July 28, 1992, Buffalo Soldier Day
across the nation. Philpot said the committee's main goal
now is to get the legacy of Buffalo Soldiers into history
books in classrooms across America by the year 2000.


-p


DoDDs consolidating

European offices
WASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces Infor-
mation Service) - The Department of Defense Depen-
dents Schools system is consolidating its three Euro-
pean regional offices to save money and increase ef-
ficiency, but not at students' expense.
DoDDS officials promise no educational pro-
grams will be cut in the downsizing effort, ordered
by a 1993 defense management review decision. Ad-
ministrative slots will be cut, however. The officials
estimate the consolidation and cuts will save.$27.5
million by fiscal 1997.
"We have to reduce staffing by 95 work-years,
consolidate regional offices from five to three and dis-
trict offices from 19 to nine," DoDDS director John
Stremple said. "When you're cutting the number of
students and teachers you have, it's common sense to
cut the number of administrative employees, too."
He said the European consolidation will be com-
plete by July 1. The new regional office, in
Wiesbaden, Germany, will manage seven district of-
fices re-formed from the current 12. The Pacific Re-
gion will maintain its current two district offices, in
Seoul, South Korea, and Yokota Air Base, Japan. The
Panama Region consolidated with the island schools
(Newfoundland, Bermuda and Cuba) in 1992.
Edwin Dorn, undersecretary of defense for per-
sonnel and readiness, asked DoDDS to maintain lev-
el of service as much as possible during the draw-
down.
"The teacher-to-student ratio and monetary level
per child will stay the same," Stremple said. "I ask
parents and teachers to be patient. There may be some
short-term disruptions, but we're fortunate we
haven't had a reduction in force and don't anticipate
one."
Stremple set up a consolidation committee with
representatives from all concerned groups to make
the transition as smooth as possible.
"We're maintaining quality. We're committed to
maintaining strong academic core programs," he said.
"We will continue to offer children an education in
which parents can have the greatest confidence."










6 Tropic Times
May 6, 1994 Voices


Lack of cost of living allowance concerns reader


Dear Mayors' Corner:
I would like to know why we don't get
cost of living allowances here? The gro-
ceries alone kill the budget. The prices in
the commissaries here are higher than in
Hawaii and you get COLA there.
Also, why doesn't the Corozal Com-
missary change the prices on the shelves?
The last time I bought groceries, at least
five of the items where rung up at a higher
price than that displayed on the shelf.
Could you please help me with these
questions?
Why No COLA

Dear Why:
I submitted your questions to Lt. Col.
John McNulty, commissary commander,
and he gave the following answer:
The pricing in Panama commissaries is
done through receipt pricing.
Receipt pricing is done each time a
product comes in from the United States


and there are changes in the prices. If there
is a change in price, that receipt document
is processed into the inventory account
system. The price changes are then trans-
mitted to the three stores and loaded into
their scanner systems which prints new la-
bels to be put on the shelves.
There should be a short time span be-
tween updating the cash registers and the
shelf labels and we try to keep these chang-
es to a minimum by doing the price chang-
es after hours.
About the price differences between
Hawaii and Panama - a price compari-
son was done recently using 10 randomly
selected items. In all but one case, Panama
prices were lower. The one item not priced
lower was priced the same.
We strongly encourage all of our cus-
tomers to look for the management of the


commissary if they feel something is
wrong while they shop. We will answer all
your questions and, hopefully, you will
leave as a satisfied customer.

Dear Mayors' Corner:
My concern, and that of my neighbors
at Quarry Heights, is the vehicles not con-
forming to Panama Traffic Regulation that
are being allowed on post.
According to Article 8 of the regula-
tion, all vehicles must have mufflers and
baffles to reduce noise levels - this in-
cludes motorcycles.
Recently, pizza delivery motorcycles
have been seen - and heard - on post in
increasing numbers. Not one of these mo-
torcycles has baffles which results in ex-
cessive noise. At times, it seems the mo-
torcycles are inside the living room.


It is requested that the military police
take appropriate action.
Peace and Tranquillity

Dear Peace:
MP Liaison Investigators have talked
with the manager of the establishment in
question and told him about the problem.
The MPs will continue to monitor the com-
pliance of this issue. This should correct
the noise problem so further actions won't
have to be taken that could result in dis-
continuing this service to the community.
Editor's note: This column allows
community members to submit ques-
tions to the Mayoral Congress. Letters
should be mailed to: Mayors' Corner,
Publicity Chairperson, APO AA 34004
(MPS). Anonymity will be granted
upon request. The Tropic Times reserves
the right to edit letters and responses for
brevity, clarity and propriety.


Contraband control nabs 7 non-ID card holders


Bogus privileges
Contraband Control Investigators apprehended seven
people last week for alleged unauthorized possession of
military identification cards. All of the people were civil-
ians working for local contractors and five were also
charged with allegedly illegally possessing APO boxes.
Wrongfully possessing military ID cards and APO box-
es are serious offenses and will result in the responsible
parties being charged. Anyone knowing of someone abus-
ing these privileges should call the military police at 287-
4401 or 289-5133.

Bad community relations
An incident at the Fort Clayton pedestrian gate last
week led to six people being charged by the MPs. Three
civilians and three military were involved in a verbal alter-
cation that turned physical. The six were apprehended and
charged with breach of peace. Two of the civilians were
also charged with unlawful entry when it was discovered
they were on post without proper identification.
People signing guests on to post are reminded they are
responsible for the conduct of the guests while on post.
Be sure to know the rules and regulations before signing
anyone on post.

Costly telephone calls
A Fort Kobbe soldier was the victim of a theft that cost
him nearly $2,000 when someone gained access to his call-
ing card and personal identification number and made sev-
eral unauthorized calls.
If a calling card has been compromised, notify the tele-
phone company immediately and call the MPs at 287-4401
or 289-5133.

Exceeded established limitations
Several people have been charged recently with ex-
ceeding established limitations on controlled items. Some
exceeded the limitations by more than twice the monthly
allowance. Everyone should be aware of the monthly lim-
itations placed on various items at exchange facilities and
commissaries.
If an event is planned that will require more than the
amount authorized, request an exception to policy from
the Garrison Commander's office.
For more information, call the U.S. Southern Com-
mand Contraband Control Section at 286-3303/3304.
The following crimes occurred in on and off post
housing April 22-28.

This authorized unofficial command information pub-
lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic
Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces
Information Program of the Department of Defense, un-
der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S.
Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the
official view of the U.S. government, the Department of
Defense or the U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002
Telephone 285-6612.
Commander in Chief.................Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey
Director, Public Affairs.............. Col. James L. Fetig



j*Tropic Tim


Prvot ashal'sCone


Pacific
Fort Clayton 400 housing area - one larceny of secured
private property
Corozal 300 area - one larceny of secured private prop-
erty
Fort Kobbe 800 area - one larceny of secured private
property

Chief.............................Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor
Editor..........................................Staff Sgt. Richard Puckett
Sports Editor.............................................. Sgt. Lori Davis
Staff Editors............................................. Sgt. E.J. Hersom
Spc. John Hall
Rosemary Chong
Maureen Sampson
Student Intern...................................... Juan Carlos Palacio
Southern Command Public Affairs Office...........282-4278
Command Information Officer.............Patrick Milton
U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.............287-3007
Public Affairs Officer...............Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder
Command Information Officer.................Beth Taylor
Editor........................................... Staff Sgt. Jane Usero


ies


Atlantic
Fort Espinar - two larcenies of unsecured private prop-
erty
Fort Sherman - two larcenies of secured private property


None reported


Off post


Journalists............................................. Sgt. Eric Hortin
Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski
Spc. Alexander C. White
24th Wing Public Affairs Office.........................284-5459
Public Affairs Officer..............Capt. Warren L. Sypher
Public Affairs Superintendent
Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham
Journalists................................Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
Sgt. James A. Rush
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office..............283-5644
Public Affairs Officer...........................Diane Gonzalez
Photographers
Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor
Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano J. Mays
U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic..........................289-4312
N CO IC ..............................................Sgt. Richard Em ert










L Commentary


Tropic Times 7
May 6, 1994 I


Battling stress


Drawdown pressures add to everyday problems


by Jerry W. Armstrong, M.S.
Director, Howard Family Support Center
L ife changes, transitions, and
traumas can have a dramatic
impact on a family. Often,
critical life events of one family
member will send ripples throughout
the rest of the family, impacting each
family member in different ways.
Many people handle trying
situations well and grow through
such experiences.
Others, however, experience
difficulty in adjusting and become
distressed. Stress is a part of every-
day life.
Most of the time, we keep it
under control, but several changes
occurring over short periods of time,
such as a move to a new duty station,
loss of friends, change in schools,
divorce, and unexpected crisis can
cause anxiety and emotional distress.
Current reductions in the Depart-
ment of Defense increase levels of
competition to achieve, present
pressures to conform to organization
or structure, and call for the produc-
tion of quality results in a sometimes
complex, technological environment.
Some people set their goals so
high that when the goal is not
reached, they feel like failures.
Disappointment can be overwhelm-
ing.
Stress factors encountered by
military service members and their
families include moving, financial
strain, loss of possessions, environ-
ment, critical change in the family
unit such as divorce or death,
expectations to excel in work or
social relationships, lack of commu-
nication, health problems, alcohol
and drug abuse, embarrassment, fast-
paced life style, isolation, inadequate

Direc Quot


access to daily needs or services, neglect
or abuse, and other similar stressors.
Indicators of trouble
Stress reactions tend to be cumulative
and may create a "last straw" effect


when too many problems are encoun-
tered over a short period of time.
Clues that indicate a person may need
help include suffering a serious loss or
humiliation; changes in appetite or sleep;


fatigue; sudden change in social
activities such as use of alcohol or
drugs; remarks about feeling hopeless;
giving away possessions or throwing
away valuable belongings; losing
interest in activities; and withdrawal
from friends.
What can you do?
Encourage the person to talk, and
above all, be a good listener. Human
contact promotes hope. Ask the person
how he or she feels and display a gentle
attitude with your response.
For example you might say "You
seem as if you've been down. Have
you?"
If the person responds "yes," don't
make them feel guilty for having these
feelings, but acknowledge that everyone
has these feelings sometimes. Show
that you care.
Listen and be supportive, but realize
that your friend may need specialized
help.
If the person refuses to seek help,
contact family members, a chaplain or
the person's commander.
There's a good chance that the
seriousness of the person's problem may
have gone undetected, and someone
needs to be informed.
Finally, don't take matters into your
own hands. A person experiencing
severe distress and sending signals of
self-destructive behavior needs immedi-
ate help from trained professionals.
Within the Air Force, available
helping resources include chaplains,
behavioral science professionals,
medical professionals, family support
staff, commanders and first sergeants.
Similar resources are available with the
Army and Navy components.
If you would like more information
on this subject, contact the Howard
AFB Family Support Center, Building
707, phone 284-5650.


How do you handle stress?


"I get involved with
activities around the
base, especially sports."




Joe Parrish
U.S. Air Force
civilian employee


"I take it one day at a "I write, sew, dance and


time and overcome each
obstacle subsequently.
Don't overload yourself
and keep a positive
attitude."
Cpl. Joseph V. Benson
Marine Corps Security
Force Company - Panama


take it one day at a time.
Stress is not always bad.
Thinking positive
helps."

Tech Sgt. Pat Dupar
24th Mission Support
Squadron


"Most times, stress is
best relieved by watch-
ing comedies or just
talking with friends."



Seaman Stephen P. Black
Naval Marine Corps Reserve
Center, Panama Canal Det.


"When I get stressed
out, I first try to take a
moment for myself,
then, I go play 18
holes."

Capt. Bob Marasco
24th Services Squadron


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries - or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit
for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.


"-'.


,.Misr
, \J







Tropic Times
May 6, 1994


ft a


I


Richard Brannon, 75, acting chief engineer of the Jeremiah O'Bran.
Richard Brannon, 75, acting chief engineer of the Jeremiah O'Brian.


'/

~


K
&
41 ~j ~


I


*r"


.4


Retired Merchant Marine Read Adm. Thomas Patterson, on the
Affrr "p- 2


DoD photo by Senior Master Sgt Steve Taylor
bridge deck of the Jeremiah O'Brien.



- q ,


DoD photo by Staff Sgt Richard Puckett
James Brumbaugh, one of 120 shipriders Sunday, takes a look
through the O'Briens' forward gun sight.


DoD photo by Senior Master Sgl Steve Taylor
Retired Merchant Marine Capt.
George Jahn, O'Brien's skipper.


DoD pnot, oy Stlalr gt Richard Pucketl
The SS Jeremiah O'Brien enters San Miguel locks,
cira 1994.







Tropic Times 9
May 6, 1994 9


The


Last


Liberty


The O'Brien makes way for




the shores of Normandy


By Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor
Chief, Tropic Times
It was hard to keep up. The 135-degree heat
was dripping wet, yet there was virtually
no sweat on his aged, but rugged face. At
75, Richard Brannan was serving as chief engineer,
and just getting him to sit still for a moment was a
challenge. He was busy with the 1940s-vintage
steam engine that was propelling us through the
Panama Canal.
Finally, he stopped for a moment, elbow on
knee, but never took his eyes off the engine while
waiting for another command from the bridge.
There wasn't much time to talk. "If you really
want to know what I'm like, think of Ben Canon."
That was in reference to a series of articles that ran
in the 1930s Saturday Evening Post about a mer-
chant marine engineer. But whether or not he is
like the original Ben Canon, this engineer from the
"bay area of California" sailed through "his"
engine room like a spry cat after a mouse, leaving
'nothing to chance.
The ship itself, as if returning from the dead, is
the last floating survivor of the Normandy invasion
of World War II, and is now on yet one more
voyage, manned by a volunteer crew that averages
62 years young.
The SS Jeremiah O'Brien and its crews plan to
be in Normandy, France, by June 6 to take part in


the 50th anniversary celebration of that historic
event. (See related story, page 1.)
And in another repeat of history again, the
0 'Brien sailed through the Panama Canal for its
third time Sunday. It had been through once in
1944 and once again in 1945.
But the "highlight" of the O 'Brien 's career
began on June 6, 1944, when the Allies invaded the
European mainland.
Operation Overlord, as it was known, began 15
minutes after midnight with the dropping of two
battalions of British and American pathfinders into
the moonlit sky over Normandy.
Offshore, more than 200,000 soldiers rode more
than 5,000 ships across the English Channel toward
five beaches along the Normandy coast. What
author Cornelius Ryan would later describe as "the
longest day in history," the invasion had begun the
liberation of the continent from Nazi domination.
The O'Brien sailed.the next day from
Southampton, England, (some accounts put it June
9) for Omaha beach with 700 soldiers aboard. From
the personal log of one of the crew: "Saturday,
June 10, 1944. Arrived at the Omaha beachhead.
Thousand of ships were in the harbor, of all types.
Warships provided a semi-circle of protection."
The O'Brien would make 11 such trips to the
Normandy beaches during its fourth voyage to
England.
This voyage is the eighth for the O 'Brien, which


The seven war


voyages of the

rpm ia h O" B r ien


J I.1 &I. P 9 / 9- 1 P % _1 - 1 IV I- L / I P"
Some 2,751 Liberty-class ships were built during
World War II to carry cargo and personnel for the
Allied armed forces. The Jeremiah O'Brien was hull
number 806. The keel was laid on May 6, 1943 and
launched just six weeks later on June 19, 1943. At 441
feet, it has a deadweight tonnage of 10,735 tons.
The O'Brien has a reciprocating steam-powered
engine and will propel the ship at 11 knots. With a fuel
capacity of 287,113 gallons, it can cruise 19,000
nautical miles. The ship could carry 700 soldiers and/
or more than 9,000 tons of cargo.
In building the Liberty ships, the U.S. strategy was
to build them faster than they could be sunk. Simple in
design, and simple to operate, Liberty ships could be
built in less than a month; the average for all 2,751
was 40 days.
The O'Brien made seven voyages during World
War II, and two of them brought it through the Panama
Canal.
Those voyages were:
Voyage One: July 10, 1943 to Sept. 11, 1943
Portland, Maine: Boston, Mass.; Halifax, Nova Scotia;
Aultbea, Scotland; Methil, Scotland; London, England:
Southend, England: Methil, Scotland; Aultbea, Scotland:
Gourock, Scotland; New York, N.Y.
Voyage Two: Sept. 14, 1943 to Nov. 3, 1943
New York, N.Y.: Jersey City, N.J.; Liverpool, England:
New York, N.Y.
Voyage Three: Nov. 19, 1943 to March 24, 1944
New York, N.Y.: Loch Ewe, Scotland: Methil. Scotland:


---' - .--__ - . . U-.
A Liberty ship in the North Atlantic, 1943
Immingham, England: Methil, Scotland: Loc Ewe, Scotland:
St. John, New Brunswick: Halifax, Nova Scotia: Obnan,
Scotland; Leith, Scotland: Loch Ewe, Scotland: New York,
N.Y.
Voyage Four: March 25, 1944 to Oct. 12, 1944
New York, N.Y.; Brooklyn, N.Y.; Newport, Wales;
Courock-the-Clyde, Scotland; Southampton, England: I 11
trips between Southampton and Normandy: Cherbourg,
France: Mumbles Point, England; Milford Haven England:
New York, N.Y.
Voyage Five: Oct. 14, 1944 to Dec. 15, 1944
Hoboken, N.J.; Cnstobal, Panama; Antofgasta, Chile;
Callao, Peru; Balboa. Panama: West Wego: La., New
Orleans: La.
Voyage Six: Dec. 16, 1944 to July 10, 1945
New Orleans, La.; Houston, Texas: Balboa, Panama:
Manus, Admiralty Islands; Hollandia. New Guinea:
Tacloban, Phillipmes: San Jose, Phillipines; Subic Bay,
Phillipmes; Hollandia. New Guinea: Subic Bay, Phillipines:
San Fernando, Phillipines; San Francisco, Calif
Voyage Seven: July I1, 1945 to Jan. 17, 1946
San Francisco. Cahf.: San Pedro. Cahf.: Port Darwin.
Australia: Calcutta, India: Shanghai. China: Manila,
Phillipines: Freemantle, Australia: San Francisco. Calif.


began in San Francisco, where the 441-foot ship is
berthed as a museum.
While the oldest reported crew member on the
ship was the captain at 78 (no one could find out
the age of the admiral, and he wasn't saying), the
youngest was just 19.
"You can learn so much just being on this ship.
Everyone is a master.
You can't find this much
experience anywhere,"
said Nate Whitlock, a
cadet from the Merchant
Marine Academy, Kings
Point, N.Y.
Whitlock is one of 54
men and one woman who
volunteered to crew the
0 'Brien for its three-
month trip. And it was Nate Whitlock,
volunteers, led by retired
Merchant Marine Rear Adm. Thomas Patterson,
who saved the ship from decay in a shipgraveyard,
destined to be sold for scrap.
As a member of the Maritime Administration in
1962, Patterson came across the O'Brien, and
eventually it was the last Liberty-class ship left out
of 2,751 originally built during World War II.
Patterson became the ship's only hope. It would
take a lot of money, a lot of time, a lot of people to
restore the ship, to build a working, living museum
out of its rusted, ancient hull.
"I didn't know what to do," Patterson told us as
we stood on O'Brien's bridge deck, surrounded by
the cliffs of the Galliard Cut, half-way through the
Canal.
But as he spun his tale of raising money, equip-
ment and supplies to refit the ship, we all gained a
sense of the enormity of the project, which took
decades to complete.
To board the 0 'Brien was like boarding a ship
just out of the shipyards, but from a time past.
After sitting in a shipyard for 33 years, its crew of
volunteers began on March 29, 1978, when five
volunteers logged the first 35 hours. More than
400,000 would follow in the years ahead.
The ship doesn't look old, but everything about it
is old. While there are two other World War II
ships still afloat, the O 'Brien is the only original
still remaining, Patterson said. From the engine
room to the radio room, the ship still operates with
its original equipment. There have been additions,
such as new lifeboats to meet Coast Guard stan-
dards, but the original, restored lifeboats still sit on
the O'Brien 's decks.
The group of ancient mariners, after two years
"hard labor" and nearly $1 million raised from
government grants, and private and corporate
donations, got the ship sea worthy once more.
Then, on May 21, 1981, the O'Brien sailed again.
The story of the Jeremiah O'Brien could truly
be called a labor of love.
"These guys have a genuine love for what they
do," said cadet Whitlock, a native of Ft. Worth,
Texas. "They're passing on an art form, one that's
declining..."
(Staff Sgt. Richard Puckett contributed to this report.)


I


,' -I.....









0 Tropic Times
S May 6, 1994


* Reserve News


Cosecha Amistad


Reservists repair jungle village


by Spc. Patrick Toner
132nd Public Affairs Detachment

SETAGANTI, Panama - A little boy scooted through
a construction zone as hard-hat wearing men yelled and
motioned to him to get out - it's not safe. They were
worried about him, but they still got a chuckle out of it.
This child, however, didn't understand the men
yelling. They were speaking English, while he spoke
Spanish. The little boy lives in Setaganti, a tiny town in
the Darien province of Panama. The workers were
citizen-soldiers of the Michigan Army National Guard's
107th Engineer Battalion based in Ishpeming. They
recently ventured to Panama for their two-week annual
training period.
Setaganti is located about 30 miles northwest of the
Colombian border. The villagers are mainly farmers, who
work sugar cane fields. This little village of about 180
people didn't offer much in the way of luxury, but there's
a little stream the locals had dammed off, and on their
breaks, the soldiers loved to cool off in the water. The
children didn't let them slow down much though.
The troops brought a Nerf football with them played
toss in a stream with some youths from the village, said
Sgt. Doug Liberty, a Marquette, Mich, resident from the
107th's Headquarters Company.
"The kids wouldn't stop playing. One of them hit me
square in the face with it. This is after it had gotten
soaked through so it weighed a ton. It's great." Liberty
said.
"We've been giving candy to the kids," said 1st Sgt.
Crary Lafreniere of Ishpeming, the unit's top enlisted
person. The first sergeant said his troops enjoy the
children's company during downtime.
Down time at an Army engineer worksite is often
scarce, but because of the searing heat and high humidity
of the region, the soldiers were required to stop working
during the hot hours between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m.
But when they were working, they were working
hard, the soldiers said. They came here as part of U.S.
Southern Command's efforts to strengthen ties with the


people of Central and South America. The recent trip was
one of many that U.S. Reserve Component forces make
to the SOUTHCOM area each year. In 1994, 22,000
citizen-soldiers are slated to work in the homelands of
other southern neighbors.
Their mission here was to rebuild a school. The roof
had been leaking for years, and there were no doors or
windows.
Most of their projects are, like this one, for the benefit
of local residents who have no capability to complete such
construction work on their own although they are certainly
willing to pitch in and help. In this particular case, a little
too eager.
The Setaganti residents started work on their school
before the U.S. engineers arrived and when the troops got
here, they found things a little different than they were in
December, and had to adjust some of their plans and
equipment.
Problems like this don't bother the troops, who said
they always welcome a challenge. This unit is the fifth of
six rotations that deployed or will deploy to the remote
province of Darien in about a five-month period that
began in January.
This year's mission in Darien called "Cosecha
Amistad," a or harvest friendship, is the first of its kind
so deep into the Panamanian rainforests.
In addition to the school roof, the unit rebuilt a
decaying basketball court in the center of town and
constructed a new, sanitary latrine for the school children
to use.
The town's residents weren't the only ones who benefit
from these deployments. The chance to train in remote
locations is a great opportunity for the Michigan troops,
who often experience a hard time finding projects such as
these in the United States.
"The troops are really enjoying it," Lafreniere said.
"It's a morale builder for them. They're actually
accomplishing something and it gives us a chance to
cross-train people in a real-world environment."
The citizen-soldiers are completely isolated from other
U.S. military units. They received supplies every so often


Theater Support Element photo by Spc. Patrick Toner
Michigan Army National Guard Sgt. Mark Rude-
ness, 107th Engineer Battalion, moves rocks out of
the way of reservists reroofing a school house.

by helicopter, which is one of only two ways they can be
reached. The other is by boat. Other than the supply
flights, and if necessary, medical flights, they are out on
their own in the wilds of Panama.
Their only way to communicate with the locals is
through their interpreter, Spc. Ronald Reece, a Greenbelt,
Md. guardsman fluent in Spanish. He and a small group
of guardsmen from around the country, were here on the
duration staff that traveled to each of the five project
locations as the units arrived to work on them.
These troops managed to build a few friendships while
they built the schools. The Panamanian school children
they helped will likely remember the friendly, Michigan
Army National Guard troops every time they sit in the
school they helped to build.


Guardsman spends 'vacation' building school in Darien


by Spc. Patrick Toner
132nd Public Affairs Detachment
SETAGANTI, Panama - The term "va-
cation" holds different meanings for many
people. For some, it means beaches and
sun. For others, a nice camper and some
woods. For a L'Anse, Mich., man, it means
rebuilding a school in the tropical heat and
humidity somewhere in the jungle of rural
Panama.
Staff Sgt. Jim Baker of the Army Na-
tional Guard's Detachment 1, Company
A, 107th Engineer Battalion, headquar-
tered in Ishpeming, Mich., recently
worked with 50 of his fellow citizen-sol-


diers in the village of Setaganti, Panama
for his two-week annual training.
A typical day for Baker was 12 hours
of enduring 90-plus degree heat and high
humidity while rebuilding the Setaganti
school.
That's certainly not a vacation by most
people's standards, but Baker saw it dif-
ferently.
"I haven't had a vacation since 1978,"
Baker said. "I kind of look at the Guard as
my vacation. It lets me forget about my
business for awhile."
For the last eight years, Baker and his
wife Ruth have owned and operated "In
the Mind's Eye," a photography and art


Theater Support Element photo by Spc. Patrick Toner
Michigan Army National Guard Staff Sgt. Jim Baker, 107th Engineer Battalion,
helps rebuild a school in the province of Darien.


supply store in L'Anse.
"Photography has been my hobby for
years. In fact, I used it as my cover in Viet-
nam.
Cover?,
It seems Baker decided that he'd rather
join the Army than get drafted. So he was
assigned to military intelligence and sent
to Vietnam to act as an interrogator.
"They taught me the Vietnamese lan-
guage, interrogation skills - and, of
course, a lot about paperwork," Baker said.
"You can interrogate all you want, but it
won't matter if you don't get it on the right
form.
"Military intelligence troops in war
zones don't wear identifying patches or
rank," said Baker. "So I posed as a pho-
tographer. That was what I had to say I was
in case anyone who shouldn't know
asked."
Baker spent nearly two years in Viet-
nam before returning to the United States
and a job as a respiratory therapy trainee at
a hospital in Traverse City, Mich.
"I applied for that job because it was
the only one around," he said, "And I al-
ways joked with my boss that the only rea-
son I got it was that I couldn't get drafted."
After working for five years in Lansing,
he and his family, which by then included
Jessica and Jeremiah, moved to L'Anse.
While there, he drew up some blueprints
for the house he wanted built.
"I took the blueprints to several contrac-
tors," he said, "but I thought they all
wanted too much money for the job, so I
decided to build it myself."
On weekends and evenings, he did just
that.
He doesn't get to spend much time in


the house, though. The business requires a
lot of work and he and Ruth have their
hands full with it.
He doesn't mind getting away for a few
weeks now and then. This year is certainly
a change, though. Baker and members of
the 107th deployed to the province of
Darien on the far southeastern end of
Panama.
The troops were there as part of a joint
U. S. and Panamanian exercise called
"Cosecha Amistad," a Spanish phrase
meaning "harvest friendship."
The 107th Engineers re-roofed the
school and built a new adjoining latrine.
They also built a basketball court, and
some of the soldiers deployed to Setaganti
brought basketballs for the children to play
with.
"This has been going super,"Baker
said. "I'm not a heat person, but it's worth
it."
"We're doing good work, helping
people. The training is different, too. Usu-
ally on annual training we do tactical work
(such as digging anti-tank ditches with
backhoes, laying and dismantling
minefields or laying barbed wire). This
year, we're concentrating on actual con-
struction," he said.
Despite his many years of service, this
is Baker's first overseas deployment since
Vietnan -- quite a stretch of time, and quite
a different mission, he added.
Soon, the "vacationing" Baker will re-
turn to L'Anse and his store. But the work
he and the other citizen-soldiers of the
Michigan Army National Guard's 107th
have accomplished will stay, hopefully
making things a little better for the people
of Panama.












Feature


- -....
2Y1 '~
,~ *.
'S.


'I'
XI
I'


Tropic Times 1
May 6, 1994 11


m


I ~ ~


4a~4

& A


S.


At,


Tech. Sgt. Ricardo Morgan reports in from the front of base operations. Approximately 1,500 VIPs receive


U.S. Air Force photos by Sgt. James A. Rush
their welcome to Howard AFB here.


Flightline


renzy


Base Operations keep

airfield problem-free

by Sgt. James A. Rush
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - To get into the best restaurants, pa-
trons have to make reservations. The busier the restau-
rant, the earlier they've got to call to get seating.
To touch down on the flightline here, aircrews have to
plan ahead also. Howard AFB sees so much business,
planes have to call in advance to ensure there's a spot to
park.
The base flightline is on the small side, according to
Master Sgt. Ronnie Ward, chief of airfield management
here. Its runway is a mere 8,500 feet long. Parking rows,
which are given phonetic alphabet labels, run from Alpha
to India.
Base Operations here gives incoming crews the Prior
Permission Required clearance necessary to fly to
Howard. PPR requests must be submitted and approved
before crews ever take off. Base operations coordinates
them with the maintenance element in the 24th Wing
Command Post to plan parking locations.
"They have to call at least 24 hours in advance to see if
there's space available," Ward said. "There's not a lot of
room to work with here so we have to keep close tabs on
all the aircraft here."
Six to 10 different airframes representing the Air Force,
Army, Navy and Marine Corps commonly reside here.
Fixed wing and helicopters, jets and propeller-driven, all
may be seen here.
"With all four services operating out of here, Howard
is really a challenging airfield to manage," Ward said.
"We consistently find ourselves juggling aircraft to try to
meet mission requirements and satisfy everyone's opera-
tional needs."
Managing the flightline also includes regular inspec-
tions. Ward and his staff identify needed repairs to the
pavement, runway lights and aircraft barriers.
During these inspections, they keep an eye out for stray
items that could cause damage if sucked into an engine.
Called "FOD" for the foreign object damage caused by
such incidents. This includes everything from dead ani-


mals to dropped nuts and bolts. !]
Many of the planes flying into
Howard bring distinguished visitors
whose first glimpse of the 24th Wing is
the welcome sign outside of the base
operations building. Nearly 1,500 VIPs
came through here last year.
Tech. Sgt. Ricardo Morgan, super- ,
intendent of airfield management, is
one of the faces that greeted them as
they passed the dispatch desk inside
base operations.
"Romeo Mike" to his fellow dis-
patchers, Morgan has rubbed elbows
and shook hands with U.S. politicians
and general officers as well as foreign
ambassadors and heads of state.
"It's a great part of the job because
they come talk to the dispatchers. We
get a lot of recognition for our hard
work," Morgan said. "One of the most
memorable people was former Presi-
dent (Jimmy) Carter. He was one of the
most down-to-earth people I've met." Staff Sgt. Cal
Pilots flying out of the base meet with a dispatcher to
file a flight plan. The dispatcher inputs the mission data
into a computer that feeds the information to the air traf-
fic control system to prevent conflict with other aircraft.
Classified flights are not added to this database, but must
be kept as well in the event of an accident.
"This gives us a means of tracking planes and pre-
venting collisions," said chief dispatcher Staff Sgt.
Carlos "Mo" Marrero. "Also, if an aircraft goes down,
we can check the flight plan and at least have an idea
where to begin looking."
Before they leave, crews check the Notice-to-Airman
board. The notices give up-to-date information, such as
runway conditions, about airfields around the world.
Dispatchers regularly change the NOTAMS, which are
listed alphabetically.
The goal of most airfield management duties is to
keep the mission operating smoothly. Should complica-
tions occur however, they maintain the base's primary
and secondary crash nets also. Key agencies are tied to-
gether by these hotlines to speed the wing's response to
accidents.
Business often gets hectic with pilots wanting to file
secret and normal flight plans, VIPs coming through, and
other crew members requesting NOTAMS. Of course
the phone is ringing all through this as well.
"It is stressful. There's so many things that we deal
with at one time, you need to be focused on the job,"
Morgan said.
"When you see that flight go out on time and the mis-
sion completed, it's pretty rewarding," he said.


Ar


rlos Marrero updates the Notice-to-Airman board.


Sgt. Marchea Hunley inputs a flight plan as Staff
Sgt. Carlos Marrero handles the phone.


I

de.


. * i
















ports

Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Echo Challenge


Multi-event competition breaks

routine unit physical training


by Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT CLAYTON - The four-person
team from Company E, 142nd Medical
Battalion, proved it could out-shoot, out-
navigate and out-endure the entire battal-
ion during "Echo Challenge" April 20.
The event, sponsored each year by one
of the three companies in the battalion, was
meant to provide a challenging and com-
petitive atmosphere for the soldiers, said
Capt. Mike Rector, Co. E commander.
This event helps promote esprit de corps
and stresses physical fitness, endurance,
land navigation and marksmanship skills,
he said.
"It really brings the companies together
and gets them out of the routine PT," he
said.
The competition was scored according
to either the best time or best overall score,
depending on the event, Rector said.
The competition began at 6 a.m. with a
4 1/2 mile, timed orienteering course
throughout Fort Clayton. During this event,
the team plotted its points on a map and then
found its points. The team could not move
to its next point until the entire team reached
the point.
"It was kind of fun to see the faster
soldiers pushing the slower soldiers," Rec-
tor said.
"The toughest part was running," said
1st Lt. Joe Munoz of Co. E. "We were the


first team to finish plotting our points, but
some of the shortcuts we tried to take took
us up some steep hills."
The team from Headquarters Company,
142nd Med. Bn., finished in first place by
completing the course in 42:25, followed
by Co. E with 47:50 and 489th Transporta-
tion Detachment at 48:10.
Every team was given the grid coordi-
nates for the Fort Clayton Pool as its last
point, which was the location for the sec-
ond event.
At the pool, two members from each
team had to compete in a 200-meter swim.
Munoz also competed in the swimming
event.
"Going straight from running to swim-
ming definitely tires you out," he said.
Demetrica Bell, from the 489th Trans.
Det. team, said the hardest part of the
orienteering course was trying to keep ev-
erybody together while running.
Headquarters Company again came in
first place with 4:29, Co. E with 4:35 and
489th Trans. Det. at 5:46.
Still wet from the swim competition, the
soldiers moved on to the M- 16 shoot. Dur-
ing this event, each team had one target in
which each member had to fire five rounds.
"The one catch to the event was that
each team only had two weapons," Rector
said.
"That meant each member had to know
their battle-site zero."
The team was scored by the total hits on


U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski
Soldiers of Company E, 142nd Medical Battalion, run to finish the litter carrying


competition.
the target. The 489th Trans. Det. took first
place with a score of 159, followed by Co.
E with 149 and Headquarters Co. with 125.
After firing weapons, the teams tossed
tires around. During this event, each mem-
ber had to throw a High Mobility Multi-
purpose Wheeled Vehicle tire as far as they
could. The team was then scored on the
total team measurements.
For this event Co. E took first place with
519 inches, 489th with 432 inches and
HHC with 290 inches.
The teams finished with the litter obsta-
cle carry. For this event, each team had to
carry a litter with a "victim" on it over four
wooden obstacles and then under them.
Bell said this event showed his team's


best effort as a team.
"It was all technique and time," Bell
said. "We worked together and got the best
time."
The 489th finished in 40 seconds, fol-
lowed by Co. E with 56 seconds and finally
HHC in 1:08.
Overall, the competition promoted what
it was designed to promote: challenge, com-
petition, esprit de corps and physical fit-
ness, Rector said.
"You could really feel the team pushing
each other," Munoz said.
"We really came together and showed a
lot of team effort," he said.
"Everything was teamwork," Bell said.
"You couldn't be an individualist."


Green Devils lead

men's volleyball

CURUNDU (Curundu Junior High School) - The Pan-
ama Canal College men's volleyball team began its 1994
interscholastic season with a win against the Balboa Bull-
dogs April 22 at the PCC Gym.
After getting offto a slow start in both games, the Devils
won the match 15-13, 15-13.
The PCC effort was paced by Ryan Poggenpohl, who
led the team in kills and all around play. William Pohl was
the leading server for the Devils.
The Bulldogs won the junior varsity match.
The Green Devils visited the Curundu Cougars April
29. The Devils came away with another victory after losing
the first game. The Cougars, led by Gabe Fernandez and
Fred Adams, came from behind to win 15-13. The Devils
held off the Cougars rally to win the second game 15-11
and took the final game of the two-out-of-three contest
with a 15-0 win.
Pohl did well serving with 16 for 17 including on ace.
He had 11 straight in the final game. Pohl also had four
kills.
Three Devils had 100 percent serves: Jay Slough with
eight, Tony Miranda with 14, and Chad Graham with 14.
Poggenpohl led the team in blocks with four.
Injunior varsity play, the Devils won in two games. Leo
Wheeler was 10 for 10 in serving and he had two kills.


I aqebl Pag


Nutrition plays


in maximizing

GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL
(MEDDAC PAO) - Physical activity is beneficial to
health and proper nutrition is a key component in
maximizing the ability to maintain higher levels of
physical activity, medical officials here said.
The goal of a physical activity program is to reduce
body fat and maintain lean body tissue, said Isabel
Gonzalez, dietitian at the Outpatient Nutrition Clinic,
Nutrition Care Division at Gorgas Army Community
Hospital.
"A well-planned, individualized dietary program is
necessary and needs to be individualized based on age,
gender, type of sport, genetics and individual variation,"
she said.
Athletes who train exhaustively or compete in pro-
longed endurance events should have a diet high in
carbohydrates such as starches, vegetables, breads and
pastas, Gonzalez said.
"These carbohydrates will facilitate maximal muscle
glycogen stores and greater energy reserves for aerobic
and anaerobic activity resulting in greater endurance
and delayed fatigue," she said.
"The need for protein in athletes is not as much as we
might think," Gonzalez said. "Athletes who want to
increase muscle mass should meet their energy intake.


I Fl g f o t b al P a g 1 4


important role


activity levels
Protein and amino acid supplements will not increase
muscle mass or contribute to athletic performance. Ex-
ceeding the requirement for protein will result in amino
acid being stored as fat."
Another factor for those participating in athletic activ-
ity is replacing water at a faster rate so not to cause
dehydration, she said. Dehydration will not only affect
muscle strength, endurance and coordination, but increas-
es the risk of heat injuries such as cramps, heat exhaustion
and heat strokes.
To replace lost fluid, body weight should be measured
before and after training sessions, Gonzalez said.
"One pound of lost fluid should be replaced with 16-
ounces of water," Gonzalez said. "Two cups of water
should be consumed two hours prior to starting the exer-
cise session, followed by two more cups 15-20 minutes
before endurance exercise."
In hot and humid climates such as in Panama, athletes
should drink 4-6 ounces of plain cool water every 15
minutes, she said.
To support training efforts, athletes must eat a well-
balanced and varied diet on a daily basis and make sure
they drink plenty of water, Gonzalez said.
For information about nutrition for athletic perfor-
mance and fitness, call 282-5119.


and morePage1
S S.1


Air Force senior enlisted advisor 56th Signal Battalion shows "No
wins Howard intramural racquet- Mercy" defending league title in
ball championship. season opening flag football game.


+SCN AM radio sports
*Sailing lessons
*Aerobics classes


May 6, 1994


Page 12


^A










i Sports


Tropic Times 13
May 6,1994 1


Chief takes racquetball title


HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) - Racquetball players
competed in male and female categories during the intra-
mural championship tournament held at the sports and
fitness center here throughout April.
Chuck Shaffer, 24th Wing senior enlisted advisor,
earned top honors by dropping Horace Whatley of the 24th
Security Police Squadron to capture the A category for the
base's top players."B" division was for intermediate skill
levels and "C" was for novices.
Shaffer had to forfeit his first match because he was on
temporary duty elsewhere and had to battle through the
losers' bracket to reach the finals.
Once there, he had to beat Whatley twice.
"I didn'tknow what to expectofhim (Shaffer). I'd never
played him in singles before," Whatley said.
The security police first sergeant already has champion-
ship trophies from Moody AFB, Ga., and placed third in the
former Strategic Air Command in 1991.
Despite recovering from back surgery less than a year
ago, he was looking to add Howard's championship to his
collection.
"My game plan going in was to slow down the game. He
had a reputation for being a runner," Whatley said.
"I wanted to control the ball and take him out of his
game. It worked for a while, that's why I was able to score
as well as I did," he said.
Shaffer wore Whatley down, however. Quite literally
pinging off the walls, Shaffer forced some long rallies that
drained his opponent and enabled him to pull away.
Leon David of the 24th Supply Squadron took first in
the B category.
He blazed through the winners' bracket finishing 5-0.
The 24th Mission Support Squadron's Roland Smith was
David's final victim and runner-up for the category.
The C category finals featured a showdown between
two members of the 24th Air Intelligence Squadron.
Michael Mulligan made it through seven matches unde-
feated and beat Charles Hamilton in the AIS showdown
finals.
Estela Shaffer nearly joined her husband in the winner's
circle in the women' competition.
She sent last year's champion Diane Bowman to the
losers' bracket only to face her again in the finals.
Bowman managed to knock Shaffer off twice and
successfully defend her title.


"to


U.S. Air Force photo by Sgt. James A. Rush


Chuck Shaffer serves against Horace Whatley.


Airman swats competition like birdies


24th Wing senior enlisted advisor sweeps

base intramural racquetball championship


by Sgt. James A. Rush
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - The 24th Wing's senior enlisted
advisor took office in September 1993 and wasted no time
getting involved in intramural sports programs here.
Chuck Shaffer helped the 24th Mission Support Squad-


ron to playoffappearances in vol-
leyball and softball. In horse-
shoes, he took Jerry "Ringmas-
ter" Armstrong to an if-game
showdown and finished runner-
up. The chief blasted the birdie
and went undefeated in the bad-
minton tourney.
Through it all, he was just
getting warmed up for his favor-
ite sport ...racquetball.
The intramural racquetball
championship tournament here
was held in April. Shaffer's cal-
endar was marked and he had
been eyeing the competition for


"The key to winn
good all-around pla
young people have
but shot making an
alone will lose whei
making, physical at
egy. You've got to
part of the game as
Chuck Shaffer
Raquetball champion, si


months, but as the season opener approached, the chief had
to leave Panama on a temporary duty assignment.
Because ofhis absence, Shaffer's first match was forfeit
and he fell to the losers' bracket.
The chief had to take the long road to the finals where


he faced Horace Whatley of the 24th Security Police
Squadron.
"I've had to play through the losers' bracket before, but
this was the first time I've never played a game in the
winner's bracket," Shaffer said.
"What you had at the end was essentially two unbeaten
players," he said.
With the forfeit hanging over him, Shaffer had to beat
Whatley twice to win the double-
ling is to be a elimination tournament.
He mixed up his serves forc-
yer. A lot of ing Whatley to move all over the
a good game, court while trying to keep the
d physical ability securitypolicemanfromusinghis
n faced with shot forehand swing.
The tiresome strategy proved
)ility and strat- too much for Whatley, who is
have the smart recovering from back surgery he
well."had during the past year.
well. Shaffer won back-to-back
games to take the title and extend
senior enlisted advisor his string of base championships.
--- Shafferhas dominated the rac-
quetball scene at each ofhis assignments during the past 10-
12 years.
He was the Air force Logistics Command champion in
1990 and finished sixth in the entire Air Force that same
year.


A fiercly competitive nature has driven him ever since
he began playing shortly after entering the service 26 years
ago.
"I was taught by an experienced seniormaster sergeant,"
Shaffer said. "He used to beat me like a stepchild, but he
made a mistake and took 30 days of leave. I stayed in the
court the whole time he was gone and he never beat me
again."
More than 2 1/2 decades wiser, Shaffer is now the
"experienced" player, but he isn't likely to make the same
mistake as his mentor.
Shaffer plays three to five times a week, wearing out
opponents young and old.
"The key to winning is to be a good all-around player,"
Shaffer said.
"A lot of young people have a good game, but shot
making and physical ability alone will lose when faced with
shot making, physical ability and strategy. You've got to
have the smart part of the game as well."
Shaffer places Whatley and Pete Waugh, both senior
master sergeants, among the racquetball elite here.
"We're able to pick out our opponents' weaknesses and
capitalize on them," he said.
"If I tried to play a power game against Pete, he'd kick
my butt," Shaffer said.
"You have to force your opponent out ofhis or her game,
otherwise, you'll probably get beat."
With the intramural racquetball season conquered,
Shaffer faces 11 months of being the player to beat at
Howard.
It's also eight months until volleyball season starts, so in
the meantime..."I haven't decided whether I'm gonna play
flag football or not."


^A-*".









SA Tropic Times
1 U'May 6, 1994


S Sports


Cornerback Ronnie Thomas and safety Eric Brown
swarm to the ball during Tuesday's game.




No




Mercy



56th begins


title defense
by Staff Sgt. Richard Puckett
Editor, Tropic Times
he battle cry echoed across the field for a brief
instant. Once completed, the players of the
56th Signal Battalion went to work. There
were no heckles, no chuckles, no smiles, and no taunts.
This was business.
The referee signals the start of the game and the
"businessmen" punch in.
For two months, these players will be commuting to
and from the gridiron with just one goal in mind -
back-to-back U.S. Army South flag football champion-
ships.
The team, which rolled through the competition in
1993 enroute to a 17-0 record and a title, is trying to
maintain a business-like attitude to carry it, said assistant
coach and halfback Jeff Harris.
Spurred on by a new no-nonsense disciplinarian head
coach Kenneth Hunter, the team began its quest
Tuesday night against Co. E, 228th Aviation Battalion.
The 56th defense led the way, swarming the 228th
backfield, giving its offense ample opportunity to score.
Former Howard University and 1993 Army Turkey
Bowl quarterback Darrell Moore responded. Moore
tossed two touchdowns and carried in another and
Harris ran in one as the 56th rolled 30-6.
It was an impressive win, considering the 56th didn't
pull out all the stops, said fellow Turkey Bowler Harris.
"We tried a few things in the opener, but we didn't
give away all our secrets," he said. "A lot of the other
teams were scouting us so we didn't show too much."
Harris credits a new attitude with keeping the team
focused on winning, despite a rotating roster that
changes from game to game.
"Sergeant Hunter has really made an impact on this
team," he said. "He put people into positions where they
can play and make an impact. Now instead of just
having one person at each position we have role players
who can step in and perform."
The team has also canned the on-field arguments that
plagued the championship squad in 1993, Harris said.
The players now focus solely on doing their jobs.
Hunter takes over a team packed with returning
players and rich with college football experience.


Department of Defense photos by Staff Sgt. Richard Puckett
Quarterback Darrell Moore, 56th Signal Battalion, makes a run for the end zone.


Flag football starts
FORT CLAYTON (Tropic Times) - The 1994
U.S. Army South flag football season kicked off
Monday night at Mother's Field.
Fifteen Pacific teams will be vying for the cham-
pionship which wraps up at the end of June.
Games start at 6,7 and 8 p.m., Monday through
Friday up until June 20 at Mother's Field and Fort
Kobbe.
Tonight's games start off with Headquarters
Company Law Enforcement Activity against Medi-
cal Department Activity at 6 p.m. The 214th Medi-
cal Detachment plays 41st Area Support Group at
7 p.m. and 59th Engineer Company squares off
against Headquarters Company. 193rd Infantry
Brigade at 8 p.m.
Ten 56th players were named to the 1993 Army
Turkey Bowl team.
That experience will prove crucial to the team's
success, Harris said. Great team speed adds to the already
potent mix of talent. The secondary alone boasts two
guys who pull down 4.4, 40-yard dashes.
Two-time Turkey Bowl veteran Eric Brown and
Balboa Relays sprinter Tony Wright form a deadly duo.
But the offensive and defensive lines are the team's
crux, Harris said.
"We don't have a lot of big guys out there," Harris
said. "We put players in there who are playmakers. A lot


of teams think you just put your biggest guys out there
and you can run, but this isn't tackle football. Speed will
beat size."
Another aspect of the team that often goes over-
looked is fan support, Harris said. The team now packs
the stands with a large group of faithful followers
including the battalion commander, Lt. Col. Darrell
Holland.
"The colonel is one of our biggest fans," Harris said.
"It really makes a difference having people out there
supporting us. It gets us pumped up and can really have
an impact on the opposition."
As far as the competition goes, Harris sees the 142nd
Medical Battalion as the team's chief concern.
"MEDDAC (U.S. Army Medical Department
Activity) was our toughest competition last year, but
they don't look too good," he said.
"SCN has done a lot of talking so far, but I've seen
them practice. They've got people playing where they
want to play instead of where they should play. What
they really need is a leader. Most teams do," Harris said.
Leadership is one thing that 56th has, Harris said.
"Because of the way our coach practices us we are
prepared to win," he said. "He's instilled an attitude in
us that keeps us playing nonstop regardless of the
score.
The team's motto "No Mercy" held true in game one,
Harris said.
"The offense and the defense didn't let up," Harris
said. "People were still making plays and playing hard.
We've got to keep up that reputation."












L _Sports Shorts


SCN AM 790, 1420 radio
airs NBA playoffs
Southern CommandNetwork's AM 790
Pacific and 1420 Atlantic will broadcast the
following sports this weekend.
Saturday
12:30 p.m.: Baseball: Cleveland at Bal-
timore
4:06 p.m.: 120th Kentucky Derby
6 p.m.: Baseball: Philadelphia at Florida
Sunday
7 p.m.: Baseball: Los Angeles at San
Francisco

Korean martial arts
taught in Curundu area
The Korean martial art, Tang Soo Do, is
taught 5:30-7 p.m. each Tuesday and Thurs-
day in Building 2060 in the Curundu hous-
ing area. The classes are open to children 4
years old and older and adults. For informa-
tion, call 286-3814.

Air Force fitness month
activities scheduled
The Howard and Albrook sports and
fitness centers have several activities and
events scheduled during May in celebra-
tion of U.S. Air Force Month of Fitness.
Saturday: 3-on-3 basketball tourna-
ment, three-point shot tournament at the
Howard Sports and Fitness Center.
May 15:4-on-4 volleyball and racquet-
ball doubles tournaments.
May 21:9th annual U.S. Air Force 5/10
kilometer fun run.
May 28: singles tennis tournament and
horseshoe tournament.
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center
is taking appointments for body fat analysis
during May. Call 284-3451 for more infor-
mation.

Rodman sponsors open
soccer tournament
Registration is under way for the Rod-
man open soccer tournament May 14-15 at
Rodman NS. Entry fee is $75.
Call 283-4222/4061 for more informa-
tion.

Fitness month triathlon
starts at Espinar pool
There will be a fitness month triathlon
starting at the Fort Espinar pool 6:30 a.m.
May 14.
Call 289-4189 for more information.

Fronius, Reeder offer tall,
short basketball leagues
The Fronius Fitness Center offers 5'10"
and under and 5' 1" and over basketball
leagues. Registration is open through May
18. There will be an organizational meeting
noon May 21 at the Fronius Fitness Center.
Call 289-3108 for more information.
Reeder Physical Fitness Center also has


U.S. Army volleyball
Men's Over-30 Volleyball


Side Out I
FUBAR
Side Out II
Slow Motion
Morgan Ave.
Ghettos Boys


W L GB
9 1
8 1 .5
5 4 3.5
3 7 6
1 6 6.5
1 9 8


Womens Volleyball
Zonians 8 1 -
The Loop 7 1 .5
F-Troop 6 3 2
Chrysler 5 4 3
Chaos 7 7 3.5
Side Out 4 5 4
Hard Bodies 0 8 7.5
*as of Monday


started registration for 5'10" and under and
5'11" and over basketball. Registration is
open through May 23. There will be a
basketball clinic 6 p.m. May 25 at the
Reeder Physical Fitness Center.

Basketball registration
opens for Atlantic youth
Registration for youth basketball for the
Atlantic community continues until May
31. There will be a clinic June 15. The
season opens June 16.
Call 289-4605/4289 to register.

Coaches needed for
Atlantic youth sports
Youth Sports - Atlantic needs coaches
for the upcoming basketball and flag foot-
ball seasons.
Call 289-4605/4289 for more informa-
tion or to volunteer.

Army fun run kicks off
Armed Forces Week
U.S. Army South is coordinating an
Armed Forces Day Fun Run May 13, as a
kick-off to Armed Forces Week.
The run will start 6 a.m. at Reeder Phys-
ical Fitness Center, Fort Clayton. There will
be a 3-mile run for unit teams and a 5-mile
open event.
Officials recommend registration for the
fun run by Tuesday, but it will be open until
the morning of the run.
The race is sanctioned by the Panama
Armed Forces Running Association. Cred-
it will be given to the running associations
season totals.
For registration or more information,
call 287-4050.

Memorial Day three-point
shot contest at Reeder
The Reeder Physical Fitness Center will
sponsor a three-point shot Memorial Day
basketball tournament. Registration for the
event is open through May 30.
For more information call 287-3861.

Register for July Fourth
flag football tournament
Registration for the Directorate ofCom-
munity Activities July Fourth flag football
tournament is open until June 28. Call 287-
4050 for information.
For more information call 287-3861/
4713.

Fronius starts beach
volleyball registration
Registration for 4-on-4 beach volley-
ball is Monday through May 25. There will
be an organizational meeting May 27 at the
Fronius Fitness Center.
Call 289-3108 for more information.

Davis hosts Memorial
Day hoops tournament
There will be a Memorial Day basket-
ball tournament May 28-30 at the Fronius
Fitness Center. Registration ends May 20.
Teams are limited to 10 players.
Call 289-3108 for more information.

Fitness month triathlon
starts at Espinar pool
There will be a fitness month triathlon
starting at the Fort Espinar pool 6:30 a.m.
May 14.
Call 289-4189 for more information.

Introductory sailing
lessons for 15 and up
Sailing lessons are provided through the
Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation Di-
vision monthly. Lessons are 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
the last Saturday and Sunday of one month


and the first Saturday and Sunday the fol-
lowing month. Classes are limited to 10
students who must be at least 15 years old.
Sign up for classes at the Fort Clayton
Boat Shop. An affidavit of good health and
a swim test is required.
Students will get a qualification card
that allows them to rent sailboats and to
enroll in the intermediate sailing course at
Rodman NS after completing this course.
Call 287-6453 for more information.

Howard, Albrook offer
aerobic fitness classes
Step Aerobic classes are 8:45-9:45 a.m.
and 4:45-5:45 p.m. Monday, Wednesdays
and Fridays at the Howard Sports and Fit-
ness Center.
Jazzercise classes are 5-6 p.m. Mon-
days, Wednesdays and Fridays at the Al-
brook Sports and Fitness Center.
Lunch time aerobic classes are 11:30
a.m.-12:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays
at the howard Sports and Fitness Center.
Call the Howard Sports and Fitness Cen-
ter at 284-3451 or the Albrook Sports and
Fitness Center at 286-4260 for more infor-
mation.

Rodman hosts Fitness
Month 1, 2, 3k fun runs
The Rodman Fitness Center will host a
National Fitness Month 1 K, 2Kand3KFun
Run/Walk for family members 7 a.m. May
30. Check in time is 6:15 a.m. Registration
is free. Run is open to Navy Family member
teams or children ages 6-17. A family team
includes a 2K run/walk with two or more
members of the same family. One team
member must be a youth 6-17 years old.
Family members 5 years old or under may
be carried or pushed in a stroller to finish.
Call 283-4222 for more information.

Howard sponsors fitness
improvement training
Fitness Improvement Training classes
are 5:30-6:30 a.m. Monday, Wednesdays
and Fridays at the Howard Sports and Fit-
ness Center.
FIT classes include a calisthenic super
circuit work-out aimed to improve muscu-
lar endurance, flexibility and the cardiovas-
cular system. Participants must be evalu-
ated on the amount of exercise that can be
performed in the class before the program
will begin. Call 284-3451 for more infor-
mation.

Reeder fitness center
offers daily aerobics
Reeder Physical Fitness Center has free
aerobics 9:15-10:15 a.m: Monday through
Friday. Classes include warm-up, cardio-
vascular workout, cool down and floor
work. Call 287-3861 for more information.

Howard center offers
lunch bunch basketball
TheHoward Sports and Fitness Center
offers lunch bunch basketball 10:30 a.m.-
12:30 p.m. Monday, Wednesdays and Fri-
days and 10 a m.-l p.m. Saturday and
Sunday. Call 286-3307 for more informa-
tion.

'Rock and Bowl' at the
Howard Bowling Center
Bowl to your favorite oldies at the
Howard Bowling Center 9 p.m. until clos-
ing Mondays through Thursdays. Bowl
unlimited games and enjoy snackbar spe-
cials. Call 284-4818 for more information.

Rodman center looks for
martial arts instructors
The Rodman Fitness Center is looking
for certified instructors to teach martial arts,
aerobics and water aerobics. For more in-


Court's open
Open play tennis is available 9
a.m. Wednesday at the courts
behind the Howard Youth Center.
Call 284-3451.

formation contact Morise Conerly at the
Rodman Fitness Center, 283-4222/4061.

Howard, Albrook begin
bowling sign-ups
The Howard and Albrook bowling cen-
ters are signing up bowlers to form summer
bowling leagues. Visit the centers or call
2844818 for more information.

Sunskiff/Boston Whaler
rental fees changed i
The Rodman Marina announces that ef-
fective Sunday, daily rental fee on the
Sunskiff will be $86 and will include 36
gallons of gas instead of the previously
allotted 16 gallons.
Half-day rental for the Sunskiff will be
$43 with 18 gallons ofgas. Daily rental rate
for the Boston Whaler will be $62 and will
include 24 gallons of gas, a six gallon in-
crease.
Half-day rental for the Boston Whaler
will be $31 with 12 gallons of gas. Call the
Rodman Marina at 283-3147 for more in-
formation.

Rodman will host softball
championships today
The second annual Interservice Softball
Championships will be held at 6 p.m. today
and 9 a.m. Saturday at Symington Field,
Rodman Naval Station. Army, Navy and
Air Force will compete in this six team
double elimination tournament. Call the
Rodman Fitness Center at 283-4222 for
more information.

Black Stallion available
for fishing, cruises
The 61-foot Black Stallion is available
for Pina Bay Marlin fishing, deep-sea fish-
ing, cruising or Moonlight Cruise charters
for large orsmall groups. The42-foot Vargas
is also available for charter from Rodman
NS.
For more information, contact the Rod-
man Marina at 283-3147/3150.


Tropic Times 15
May 6, 19941










Tropic Times News
May 6, 1994


.� 4 -




w 4


Thanks U.S. Air Force photo by Sgt. James A, Rush

Brig. Gen. David A. Sawyer, 24th Wing commander, speaks to community
leaders at a luncheon in a Veracruz restaurant April 28. The event was held to
thank Howard AFB for its support in the town's development. A photo book
commemorating several Air Force projects in Veracruz was presented to
Sawyer, The town is located on the coast near Howard's back gate.

Army Career and Alumni Program


Local program offers


job search training

by Staff Sgt. Arthur C. Johnston fields such as teaching and law enforcement.
USARSO Public Affairs Office *Workshops and classes in resume and
cover letter writing - using dedicated, user-
FORT CLAYTON - Servicemembers friendly software and a laser printer, the cli-
or civilian employees who are leaving ent is able to develop impressive-looking,
federal service don't have to face their high-quality resumes and cover letters that are
impending change without help. The custom-tailored for each job prospect.
Army Career and Alumni Program and *Application for Federal Employment - a
the Job Assistance Center are available to specialized computer program to generate a
give, not only assistance and guidance, clean, crisp laser printed document to use in
but training to help those separating find applying for government positions using the
a job. Standard F6rm 171.


ACAP is now seeking to offer more
on-site training at various work sites.
The first two steps of the transition
process are offered to requesting job sites
that have at least 10 qualifying people.
Another service available from ACAP
and JAC is the Army Employer Alumni
Network. This database contains more
than 11,000 employers who have ex-
pressed interest in hiring veterans and
Department of Defense civilians.
Other services available are:
*The Transition Bulletin Board - an
on-line computer bulletin board help
wanted list of jobs that are available.
*The Defense Outplacement Referral
System - allows clients the opportunity to
put an electronic copy of their resume in a
data bank in Washington, D.C., where
employers use the data base to fill posi-
tions worldwide.
*Public and Community Service - a
program required for all early retirees that
lists clients for positions in public service


There are 60 ACAP sites worldwide but
ACAP Panama is unique because it's the only
site that provides transition assistance to local
nationals, said Oscar Leon, JAC Contract In-
stallation manager.
Initial preparations for the Panamanian
Project began about a year ago the Transitionr
Assistance Office hired bilingual counselors
who spent many hours translating the semi-
nar and workshop into Spanish, he said.
"On March 22, the JAC received and in-
stalled the Spanish version of Word Perfect,
giving the center the capability of generating
resumes and cover letters in Spanish as well
as English," he said.
People who qualify have 90 days of ACAP
services available to them after transitioning.
The Fort Clayton ACAP will refer clients to a
center near their home.
More than 4,500 clients have been pro-
cessed through the Fort Clayton office since
1991 and more than 100 new clients start the
transaction process each month, officials said.
For more information, call 287-5844.


PCC enrollment rates increase


BALBOA (Tropic Times) - Registra-
tion rates at the Panama Canal College's
off-campus programs increased 109 per-
cent in the last term, officials said.
The military education centers around
Panama are a big part of the recent suc-
cess according to Warland DeJanon, the
director of the Servicemember Opportu-
nity College Armed Forces Degree pro-
gram.
DeJanon credited the management of
Army's Dennis Fritz and the Air Force's
John Cox for his program's improve-
ments.
Ninety-five percent of all students who
attend off campus SOCAD program
classes are servicemembers, he said.


Only a small percentage of the students are
spouses or family members, DeJanon said.
One reason for the lack of family member
enrollment may be the lack of tuition assis-
tance provided, he said.
Only the Air Force offers assistance for
family members, he said he hopes the Army
will soon follow.
PCC also provides special courses for the
military called Battalion Courses, he said.
These courses are molded for units that are
in need of special classes and are able to take
these classes together, daily or at specific
times, he said.
The 109 percent increase in enrollment
does not include these special Battalion
Courses.


A look at
-.. "Mexico -
-z El Salvador
SBelize
G t'e Facts about El Salvador: The
' Ncaragua�. country is the most densely
populated and industri-
San Salvad V alized nation in Central
America. It is about the
Honduras size of Massachusetts.
The capital is San
' Costa Rica Salvador and it


" PANMA,- accounts
: - "A N ' for 25


percent of
the country's
population. Coffee, sugar, cotton and shrimp are the nation's chief
exports. The government is a constitutional democracy. Peace accords
signed in 1992 ended a 12-year civil war. The country gained its
independence September 15, 1821. The official language is Spanish.
Facts about the U.S. Military Group: The 10-man U.S. Military
Group is commanded by Army Col. Rudy Jones. The MILGROUP is
located at the U.S. Embassy in San Salvador. Its mission is to work
directly with the host nation military and provide assistance in
training, exercises, student exchanges, and purchases of equipment.


McCaffrey discusses


future of U.S. military

by 1st Lt. Jim Knotts
U.S. Southern Command Public Affairs Office
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador - By 1997, the United States will have a
refined armed forces, with a new structure and a new doctrine - but will
remain the best in the world. That's one of the messages delivered April 26
by Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey, commander-in-chief of the U.S. Southern Com-
mand, to the members of the U.S. Military Group stationed here.
McCaffrey visited El Salvador April 26-27 to learn how Salvadorans view
regional security issues, and more about the U.S. Military Group here. This
is his first visit to El Salvador since assuming his present position Feb. 17.
During a luncheon with the military group members, McCaffrey said the
dramatic changes that have touched every part of the U.S. Armed Forces over
the last few years will continue through 1997 as the force structure is changed
to meet the requirements of the Defense Department Bottom Up Review. At
the end of the process, the United States will have its smallest force since
1939, and will spend its smallest share of the nation's gross national product
since 1936.
"We'll leave about 100,000 people in Europe and about 100,000 in the
Pacific," McCaffrey said.
The majority of the rest of the force will be based in the continental United
States, he said.
What all this means for U.S. servicemembers is more change.
"But at the end, we'll have, without a doubt, the best armed forces in the
world," he said.
McCaffrey said President Bill Clinton expressed his view that there are
two areas of growth for the United States: the Pacific Rim and Latin America.
Based on recent trends, by the year 2000, the United States will trade more
goods with Latin America than Europe, which offers a win-win situation for
the United States and its Latin American allies. Many Latin American na-
tions have expressed interest in having the North American Free Trade Agree-
ment extended to Latin America, creating the largest free market trade zone
in the world.
Economic development is expected to be the central topic among hemi-
spheric leaders when they meet for the Summit of the Americas in Miami in
December.
Although security issues are not a separate agenda item for the summit,
McCaffrey said the leaders there will have the opportunity to design a frame-
work that will lead to development in the Americas for the next 50 years,
which will lead to future discussions on regional security.
In El Salvador, where the first democratic elections took place last week
since the 12-year civil war ended there in 1992, McCaffrey expressed his
optimism for the future.
"What a proud moment for El Salvador," he said. "I am personally proud
of what you [the U.S. Military Group] do here. When I look at you today, I
see the result of lots of hard work and dedication."
The next step for the U.S. military in El Salvador is to help the Salvadoran
military in its efforts to help build peace and stability. This process is already
under way, with the joint Salvadoran-U.S. humanitarian assistance exercise
called "Fuertes Caminos," or "strong roads." The first part of this two-part
exercise started Sept. 2, 1993. The second part began Sunday and will con-
tinue until August. U.S. servicemembers will help repair or build six schools
and one medical clinic, and drill six water wells.










Tropictivities
A quality of life guide for the U.S. community in Panama


May 6, 1994


Page BI


Teen spirit Department of Defense photo by Maureen Sampson
Megan McCallum does a cheer during rehearsal of the play "Vanities" at the Ancon Theatre Guild. See story and photos, Page B3.


I Yot esPg B2.-1


I PanmaPa


I an more


Boy Scouts from Troop 6 trek New page focuses on activities in *Movies, Page B8
ocean-to-ocean and earn the 50- Panama. This week features the *TV, Page B9
miler award. Presidential Palace. *Potpourri, Page B12


mm�


I












B2 Tropic Times
May 6, 1994


-#Youth news


Boy Scouts trek ocean-to-ocean


by Gregory Faye
Tropic Times contributor
ALBROOK - The cayuco race, it
wasn't. But for 22 Boy Scouts and adult
leaders from troop six, the 63-mile trek by


canoe and foot from the Atlantic to the Pa-
cific was every bit as memorable.
The event allowed the scouts to eamthe
"50-Miler Award" and gave them the
chance to test their water and camping
skills away from the comforts of home.











,, _, _ - . .
. . "


Courtesy photo by Gregory Faye
Troy Phillips from Troop Six paddles in the Panama Canal.


For people who have traveled the ca-
nal, 63 miles is obviously not the most di-
rect route available. However, in the inter-
est of safety, accessibility to areas suited
for camping and going a bit further to see
some terrific scenery, the miles added up.
Beginning with an over-nighter at Shel-
ter Point at FortSherman, the scouts took
one last opportunity to organize supplies
and equipment for the trip.
The first day of travel consisted of a
hike to Fort San Lorenzo where canoes
were loaded for a scenic few hours of ca-
noeing up the Chagres River to Gatun
Dam.
Canoes and supplies were shuttled to
the top of the dam for the first night's camp
on the shore of Gatun Lake.
A hearty breakfast was the first order
of business the following morning as ev-
eryone prepared for their first day canoe-
ing on the lake. Unlike the narrow confines
of the Chagres, wide open Gatun Lake was
vulnerable to brisk dry season winds.
Choppy waters with crests of two feet
make taking an unscheduled swim a con-
stant concern for riders in a canoe filled
with supplies and sitting low in the water.
As the route of the canoes crossed the
path of the Panama Canal, wakes from
passing ships presented another hazard.
Toward the end of the second day of
canoeing, the chosen route through Pena
Blanca Bay put the winds at the backs of
the scouts.
While this increased the speed of travel
and removed the hazard of waves ap-
proaching the sides of canoes, this leg of
the trip also entered an area of submerged
tree stumps.
Moving with the wind at a faster pace,
stumps were often hit before they could be
seen and avoided. Fortunately, nobody
was swamped or capsized.
Clearings were nearly non-existent the
second night and campers pitched tents in
any open spots they could find in the
jungle. Many merely stretched hammocks
between trees and settled down for the
night, at least until the rain started falling.
Day three brought more high-speed
travel over stumps, a wrong turn in search
of the main canal and more heavy winds


on the open lake.
As the troop left the lake and entered
the restricted confines of the San Pedro leg
of the canal, staying clear of passing ships
and their wakes became a more immediate
concern than before.
An integral element of the 50-Miler
Award is working on projects to enhance
the cleanliness or physical condition of the
route taken or improve facilities along the
way, officials said.
Another important part of any scout
outdoor trip is the opportunity to work on
merit badges and advancement. From the
trip's beginning, skills in basic scouting,
canoeing, cooking, camping, orienteering
and other areas were worked on and im-
proved.
The third night's camp, at Governor's
Island, also provided an opportunity for
carefree swimming in protected waters
and a chance to relax a bit. A late night
caiman hunt was successful and a young
specimen was brought back to camp for a
picture before being released.
For some, day four proved to be the
most taxing. After about four miles of ca-
noeing, the group put in at the Gamboa
boat dock and were ferried to Mandingo
point to begin an 18-mile trek on foot to
Rodman NS.
Because of the narrow passage through
the Empire leg of the canal, and the hazard
to canoes of passing tugs and very large
wakes, access to that stretch of water was
restricted.
Up until this point, the scouts had been
spared from any significant rain during the
trip. As luck would have it, though, down-
pours throughout the hike soaked every-
one and contributed to more than a few
rashes and blisters.
A night's rest and some hot food set the
stage for the final day. Reunited with ca-
noes brought from Gamboa, a final dash
of about seven miles was made under the
Bridge of the Americas, around Flamenco
Island to the finish at the beach on the
northwest shore of Perico Island.
After a few hours of cleaning and stor-
ing equipment, the ocean-to-ocean adven-
ture ended with water activity of a differ-
ent nature...long, hot showers.


I ot ctvte


Albrook/Howard
*Youth Centers 286-3195/284-4700:
Pre-teen dances 7:30 p.m. tonight and May 20
at Albrook, May 13 and 27 at Howard for ages 8-
13.
Gymnastics classes start Saturday and will be
held every Saturday. Ages 3-5 meet noon-I p.m.;
ages 6-12 meet 1-2 p.m.; intermediate classes meet
2-3 p.m. Cost is $13 per month.
A parents meeting will be held 7 p.m. Monday
at the Howard Youth Center.
*Hideout Teen Center 284-5487:
The teen center at Farfan has been closed tem-
porarily. Activities have been rescheduled to the
Howard or Albrook Youth Centers. Call 284-4700
for more information.
Clayton
*Youth Center 287-6451:
Instructors are needed for the 1994 Summer
Sensations Youth Program for flower arranging,
knitting, macrame, general crafts, science and the
world. Contact the Directorate of Community
Activites Procurement Division, third floor, Build-
ing 519.
Junior jazzercise 3:30-4:30 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday for ages 6-12.
American Stars Gymnastics meet Tuesdays
and Thursdays. Ages 3-5 meet 2-3 p.m.; ages 6-8
meet 3-4 p.m.; ages 9 and up and advanced meet 4-
5 p.m. Lessons cost $20.
Tae Kwon Do 5:30-7 p.m. Wednesday and Fri-
days for ages 5-18, $25.


Piano lessons 1-6 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesdays.
$30 for four half-hour lessons per month.
Gymnastics for ages 5 and older 2:30-3:30 p.m. and
3:30-4:30 p.m. Monday and Wednesdays.
Performing children's troupe seeks youths who like
to sing, dance and perform. They meet 4-6 p.m. Tuesday
and Thursdays.
Video games Wednesdays. Bring your Sega or
Nintendo games.
*Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680:
Triathlon tournament 4 p.m. Friday. Compete in
pool, football and ping pong.
Volleyball 3:30-5:30 p.m. Sunday.
Softball practice 2:30-4:30 p.m. Sunday.
*Child Development Center 287-3301:
Register children six weeks to 12 years in any of the
Army Child Development Services programs: full day,
hourly, part day, school age or family child care.
Alternative child care options, baby sitter training and
referral and volunteer training are also available.
Cocoli
*Cocoli Community Center 287-4119:
Arts and crafts, 3:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays.
Atlantic
*Espinar Youth Center 289-4605:
Teens and pre-teens Mother's Day shopping trip
to Panama City 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday.
Friday the 13th party 3-6 p.m. May 13.
Shimmey Beach and zoo adventure 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
May 14.
After school water balloon challenge 3-4:30 p.m.


May 19.
Teen sports 4-6 p.m. Monday and Wednesdays.
Cooking class 4-6 p.m. Monday, $1.
Study with a buddy and tutoring 4-6 p.m. Tues-
days and Thursdays.
Scouts
Boy Scouts meet:
Troop 5 - 7 p.m. Thursdays' Balboa Union Church
Troop 6 - 7 p.m. Thursday, LDS Church
Troop 8 - 7 p.m. Monday, Fort Espinar Thrift Shop
Troop 16 - 6 p.m. Wednesday, Howard Riding
Stables
Troop 20 - 7 p.m. Wednesday, Albrook Building
812
Troop 128 - 7 p.m. Thursday, Clayton Building
520.
Call 285-6548 for Cub Scout information.
Cub Scout Day Camp 9 a.m.-2 p.m. June 20-24
includes swimming and sport activities. Call Sandra
Wetting at 260-3466 for more information.
Boy Scouts of America Summer Camp June 23-
29 at the Jungle Operations Training Battalion area at
Fort Sherman. Call Johnathan Hilton at 284-5667/3516
or Kathy MacPhail at 285-6548.
Adult volunteers are needed for the Cub Scouts
Day Camp and the Boy Scouts Summer Camp. Cub
Scouts need camp counselors, sports, range and ar-
chery directors and more. Call Sandra Wetting at 260-
3466.
Boy Scouts need kitchen and medical help, people
with a boating license, and more. Call Kathy MacPhail
at 285-6548.


-A-W










-j* Enertainment-


Tropic Times
May 6, 1994 J


LouAnn Cook, Megan McCallum and Traci Ferguson rehearse a scene from the comedy "Vanities."


S1" C Cheerleaders explore


v %11 i life after high school


T he opening night performance
of the Ancon Theatre Guild's
"Vanities" had the audience
rolling with laughter.
It's an extremely funny show about
three cheerleaders and their evolution
from high school to adulthood.
The show stars LouAnn Cook, Traci
Ferguson and Megan McCallum. They


Eoe."nt
Exainn


are all entertaining in their roles.
McCallum's facial expressions and
gestures are outstanding.
These three actresses work well
together. They demonstrate great comic
timing and are quick to pick up on each
other's lines. This made for an evening of
nonstop entertainment.
The play is directed by DL Sima and


runs Thursdays through Saturdays until
May 14. To avoid missing any of the
action, audience members should show
up a little early because the play starts
promptly at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $8 and
can be reserved by calling 252-6786.
"Vanities" is one of those plays
almost everyone can relate to, because
almost everyone knows somebody like


Quarry Heights


Gorgas Amvy Hoeptal


PC.C.
SAnconH i

The Theatre Guild Ba
ofAnconAvenue



Roosevelt Avenue m


McOovelds


I * *


Gaillord Highwaoy


To Albrook/Corozal/Clayton --P


Produce Mariel


Police Station



Map to the Theatre Guild of Anc


Map to the Theatre Guild of Ancon


To Cevoedu


one of the characters in this show. It
brings back memories of high school,
and how simple life was then.
The first act is very bubbly. How
could it not be with three girls dressed
like cheerleaders discussing school dance
decorations? The three all seem to be
working towards the same common goal
- being popular.
The second act shows the ladies in
college - all part of the same sorority.
They act a lot like they did in high
school, but they seem to be heading in
different directions.
By the third act, the audience realizes
these women live in entirely different
worlds. The three musketeers are now
three distinct individuals. It's kind of sad,
actually.
"Vanities" is the last show of the
Theatre Guild's season. It's also the last
opportunity to see LouAnn Cook and
Traci Ferguson - both have been in
numerous Isthmian productions -
perform on the local stage. They will be
leaving Panama this summer.
Farewells aside, this is a great show.
The set is full of fine detail. The script is
full of laughs. And the three actresses
pull it together to make for a fun evening
at the theater.


story and photo
by Maureen Sampson
Tropic Times staff









B4 Tropic TimeMay 6, 1994 Focus on Panama

The house of the presidents



Presidential Palace shares rich lore


From a private home, to a customs
house, to a national bank, to a school
house and to the seat of government -
that's the history of Panama's Presi-
dential Palace.
Three hundred seventeen years ago, and today the
Presidential Palace stands out elegantly in front of
the Panama Bay. In the hallways of the second floor
are four statues that represent the virtues men should
possess: Justice, Perseverance, Duty and Work.
Two years after Old Panama was destroyed by the
pirate Henry Morgan, the limits of the new city were
established by Luis de Lozada Quinones. Lozada
established the new city, and built himself a fabulous
private residence in which he not only lived, but also
conducted his official business.
Upon his death, the Spanish crown converted the
residence into a Customs House, serving this purpose
until 1849.
In 1857 it was decreed that the building be sold.
The sale did not take place and it was converted into
a school house for male students.
It was not until 1885 that it finally became the
Presidential Palace. The top floor was set aside for
official receptions and residential area for the
president and his family.
In the process of rearrangement, a Yellow Room
was established and Colombian artist Epifanio Garay
was assigned to paint oval shaped portraits of the
Governors of the Sovereign State of Panama,
beginning in 1885. The name Yellow Room came as
a result of the predominant golden color in its
decorations.
In 1922, during the third and last administration of
President Belisario Porras, the Presidential Palace
was renovated by Peruvian architect Leonardo
Villanueva Meyer, who converted it from a primitive
colonial style structure into a more modem building.
Besides adding a third floor, which now serves as
private residence for the president and his family, he
built a Moorish patio graced by beautiful white
herons, the first of which were brought from Darien
and presented to President Porras as a gift by a
friend.
New murals were painted by Panamanian artist
Roberto Lewis, depicting historic events during the
government of President Juan Demostenes
Arosemena in 1936-38. Some of the paintings were
picturesque sceneries of Taboga Island and the
presidential family in those days. Lewis had before
decorated the National Theater.
Many curious anecdotes may be said about those
who have occupied the Presidential Palace. Three
presidents have ruled Panama, not by election, but by
appointment: Dr. Manuel Amador Guerrero in 1904,
Enrique Jimenez in 1945 and Demetrio B. Lakes in
1972.
Three other have been president without being
elected specifically for that purpose: Dr. Harmodio
Arias, Secretary of Government and Justice in 1931;
Ricardo Adolfo De la Guardia, Minister of Govern-
ment and Justice in 1941 and Dr. Bemardino Ruiz,
Minister of Labor and Welfare in 1963.
The longest resident of the Presidential Palace had
been Dr. Belisario Porras: 9 1/2 years. The shortest,
Engineer Emesto Jaen Guardia: only three hours.
The 25 presidents before Robert F. Chiari were all
bom in Colombia. There have also been cases of
father and son being president: Federico Boyd in
1916 and Dr. Augusto Samuel Boyd in 1939;
Rodolfo Chiari in 1912, 1923 and 1924, and Roberto
F. Chiari in 1940 and 1949.
There is also the case of brothers. Dr. Harmodio
Arias in 1931 and 1932 and Dr. Amulfo Arias in
1940, 1949 and 1968; Dr. Sergio Gonzalez Ruiz in
1961 and 1962 and Dr. Bernardino Gonzalez Ruiz in
1963.
There has been weddings in the Presidential
Palace only twice - that of Ricardo Adolfo De la
Guardia in 1943 and President Guillermo Endara
Galimany in 1990.


-00


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Department of Defense photos by Petty Officer 2nd Class Bill Lewis
The Presidential Palace stands out in front of the Panama Bay.


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White herons surround the patio fountain.







-�ICommuWnity


/

!


U.S. Army photo
Helicopter tour
Children get a tour of an Army helicopter at Fort Clayton's quadrangle. U.S. Army South will kick off Armed
Forces Week May 13 with static displays, a fun run and 79th Army Band concerts. See top brief (right)


Teens take on 'moot'court case


by Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs
BALBOA - The dictionary defines "moot" in many
ways: subject to argument, debatable, theoretical or hypo-
thetical, and purely academic. All of these may apply to the
"moot court" that Balboa High School students participat-
ed in recently.
The moot court competition ran through the week and
culminated on "Law Day," April 29. This day is designated
each year to try and enhance public awareness of the law
and the legal profession and the effect it has on people's
everyday lives.
"We do the moot court exercises in conjunction with the
American Bar Association's 'Law Day' celebration," said
Clea Efthimiadis, an attorney in the office of the general
counsel for the Panama Canal Commission. "It gives the
students an opportunity to try out their advocacy skills in
an educational environment."
It also goes a long way toward teaching the premise that
laws are not in place solely to tell people what they can't
do, she said.
"This shows the students that laws also protect people's
rights and help them when those rights have been vio-
lated," she said.
The chief of military justice with the 24th Wing staff
judge advocate, Capt. Steve Coney, said he enjoyed
participating in the moot court procedures.
"Working with other area lawyers fosters much better
community relations," he said. "Also, these moot court
sessions give me a chance to meet and work with other legal
professionals from the local community, an opportunity I
wouldn't otherwise have."
Last year, the professionals from Panama's U.S. gov-
ernment legal community coordinated activities and won
a public service award for the ABA's "Law Day U.S.A.
Competition." A large part of their coordinated activities
was centered upon the moot court competition.
The competition paired students representing either the
plaintiff or the defendant in a hypothetical sexual harass-
ment case occurring in the school environment. It was
based on an actual case that went through the California
court system.
The panels of "judges" hearing student counsel argu-
ments were primarily members of the American legal
community - lawyers, clerks and paralegals - and were


Law Day meant to

enhance awareness
ALBROOK AFS - Law Day is meant to heighten
people's awareness of the law, said Capt. Mike Sciales,
area defense counsel for Air Force members assigned
in Panama.
"Very often people don't know about the laws that
affect them, and they don't find out until they get busted
and try to explain why they broke the law," he
explained. "This is obviously not effective or even
helpful, so our emphasis is on pro-active work."
He speaks at commander's calls to let people know
about potential legal problems and how to avoid them.
"Sex, checks, drugs, alcohol and failure to go are the
major reasons people come see the ADC,' Sciales said.
"Recent statistics show that our number one problem
is people writing bad checks."
Although this problem area can have far-reaching
repercussions - extra fees and charges, placement on
a "bad check list" that disallows cashing checks in the
future, control roster, loss of pay and even discharge it
is not too difficult to avoid, he.said.

augmented by interested lay people.
The students who presented to the "court" with the most
convincing arguments for their clients advanced to the next
round.
After four days of competition, the co-counsel team of
Adrienne Kinghom and Benjamin Smith finally emerged
as the victors, with Chelsea Coffey and Jessica Penkoske
as runners-up.
Coffey and Penkoske said they got involved in the moot
court competition because they thought it would be a
challenge, and because they thought it would be good
public speaking experience for their future careers in
broadcast journalism.
"I really don't think I could make a living as a lawyer
though," Penkoske said. "I'd feel terrible if someone put
their life in my hands and I lost their case."
Members of the winning team each received a cash
award of$50, while the runners-up each received $30. Both
pairs were also honored at the April 29 Law Day Luncheon.


Steps can prevent 'pregnancy gingivitis'


HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) - Pregnant women
should take extra steps to avoid gingivitis, a condition that
leaves gums swollen and tender, according to an advisory
from the Academy of General Dentistry.
Factors such as shifts in hormonal concentrations, par-
ticularly increases in estrogen and progesterone, have been
linked to changes in gum tissue and the onset of gingivitis
during pregnancy, the academy found.
"A recent study shows the condition has been reported
in 30-100 percent of pregnant women," academy spokes-
person Fred Magaziner, D.D.S., said.
Symptoms usually occur by the second month of preg-
nancy and increase until the eighth month, with most
symptoms disappearing naturally after delivery ifthe mother
follows proper oral hygiene practices of brushing and


flossing, Magaziner said.
The dentist recommends brushing and flossing twice a
day. A woman planning to become pregnant should see a
dentist to get a head start on controlling "pregnancy gingi-
vitis."
"The severity of the gingivitis depends upon the moth-
er's willingness to take care of herself and practice decent
oral hygiene methods," Magaziner said. "Ifgingivitis is not
treated, it can lead to more advanced periodontal disease
that continues past pregnancy."
If toothbrushing induces "morning sickness" nausea or
bleeding gums, the dentist encourages rinsing with
antiplaque and fluoride mouthwashes and finger-cleaning
the teeth with a dry washcloth. (Story courtesy of the
Academy of General Dentistry)


Tropic Times 5
May 6, 1994B 5


Clayton
Armed Forces Week kicks off May 13. Events
of the day begin 6 a.m. with 3-and 5-mile fun runs
and static displays will be displayed 11 a.m.-4 p.m.
in Clayton Park including a health booth with
cholesterol check, information about dengue fever,
Africanized honey bees, snakes and plants. Other
booths will display the Army Career and Alumni
Program, Army andAir Force Exchange Service car
sales and handicrafts. The Association of the U.S.
Army will sponsor a picnic at 12:30p.m. and fun run
awards will be presented at 4 p.m. Volleyball,
frisbee golfand horseshoe matches will run through-
out the day.
Nominations are now being accepted for the
1995 Ten Outstanding Young Americans Award
program. Nominations should be sent to Aichel
Tam at the Directorate ofCivilian Personnel, Build-
ing 560, Corozal, by April 22. Call 285-5611/4111.-
Regular Islamic prayer services are held 12:30-
1:30 p.m. each Friday at the Fort Clayton Chapel
hall. For more information, call 287-5859.
Army Community Services are offering free
parentingclasses 6-8:30p.m. MondayandWednes-
day and May 13, 16 and 18 on the top floor of
Building 155, Fort Clayton. For information, call
287-6643.
The American Red Cross is offering a first aid
class for maids in Spanish 8 a.m.-5 p.m. May 21 on
the third floor of Building 519, Fort Clayton. For
information, call 287-5509.
Family member jobs skills training will be
held 8 a.m.-noon May 13 at the Fort Clayton Non-
commissioned Officers' Club. No registration is
required. For more information, call 285-5201.
Vendors interested in selling handicrafts at the
U.S. Army salute to Armed Forces Week should
call the U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office at
287-3007. Space is limited.
The Exceptional Family Member Program
support group meeting will be 7:30-9 p.m. May 17
at the Valent Recreation Center. The presentation
will be summer activities for youth and children. For
information, call 287-5073/4921.
A La Leche League meeting will be 7 p.m. May
17 at the Valent Recreation Center. The meeting will
feature the advantages of breastfeeding for mother
and baby. For information, call 287-5729.

DoDDS
The Department ofDefense Dependents Schools
will conduct pre-registration next week. Students
will be given registration packets Monday to be
returned by May 13. Kindergarten registration is
also under way.
Children who will be 5 years old by Oct. 31
should register. Take the child's birth certificate, an
agency sponsorship letter or travel orders, shot
records and ID cards. For more information, call
286-3867.

Howard/Albrook
Volunteers are needed in family services to
help with the loan closet, base brochure library, and
layette program. Family services is open 10 a.m.-3
p.ri. Volunteers get free child care and can visit the
facility or call 284-5860.
A spouse job search workshop is offered 10
a.m. Tuesday to provide family members with
information about local job opportunities, and how
to effectively search for a job in Panama. Call 284-
5650.

Atlantic
The 79th Army Band dry season concerts will
be held today and May 13 behind the Fort Davis
Exchange and Sunday and May 15 at the Amador
Gazebo. All concerts begin at 6 p.m.
The American Red Cross-Atlantic is offering a
community first aid and safety class 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
May 23 and 9 a.m.-3 p.m. May 24 at the Sundial
Recreation Center. For information, call 289-3595.

Miscellaneous
Toastmasters International - Panama will hold
meetings June 2 and June 16 at the Panama Canal
Training Center. For information, call 287-5689.












Tropic Times
D t May 6, 1994






Rodman *Outdoor adventures: naturalist guide and lunch. Balboa
*Information. Tour and Travel: Snorkel or dive San Blas Islands May Free Zone shopping 7 a.m.-3 p..m. Balboa
Free Zone Shopping Wednesday and 13. May 23. *Balboa Dive Club:
May 30, $12, 7 a.m. departure, minimum Fish for marlin and sailfish Tuesday Chiriqui highlands tour May 27-30. Honduras Bay Island of Roatan div-
of 12 people are needed. Shop for small and May 26 on the 65-foot Catyani. Visit Boquete, Volcan, Cerro Punta and ing trip May 28-June 4. Deadline to sign
electronics, gold. watches and fine linen. *Road Knights Motorcycle Club: David. up is Wednesday. $930 fee includes trans-
Moonlight Cruise May 13. $21, 6:30 Ticket run May 15. Bikers will depart Isla Grande May 28. Fee includes portation, hotel accommodations at
p.m. departure. Cruise Panama and Taboga from Banco Exterior on Avenida Balboa boat transportation. Anthony's Key Resort, all meals, three
Bay on the 61-foot Black Stallion. Hors at 9 a.m. Entry is $5 per person and in- Costa Rica tour July 1-4. Register by guided boat dives per day, dolphin dive
D'oeuvres included. cludes food and drinks at each stop. The June 20. Trip includes three nights/four and snorkel, tanks, weights and all resort
Dinner and Jazz at Las Bovedas Res- event is open to everyone. Call Danie days at Hotel Gran Costa Rica, round-trip activities. Call 284-5117 or 250-0346.
/ taurant May 13, $6 transportation fee, 7 Cooper at 285-5050 or 229-3635 for de- ticket and city tour. The Club is now accepting entries to
S p.m. departure from Rodman, minimum tail. *Outdoor Recreation Center: the 1994 Scuba Olympics to be held June
of 10 people needed. Enjoy french cui- Poker run May 22. The riders will Partial transits of the Panama Ca- 11 at the Albrook Pool. There are seven
sine at the famous "Las Bovedas" restau- depart from the 24 Hour Store in Diablo nal 7:30-11:30a.m. Saturday, $40. Mini- events -- four for snorklers and three for
/ rant in the French Plaza and enjoy jazz Heights at 9 a.m. Entry fee is $5 per person mum of 20 people required for partial divers. There are also two two-person team
music. and includes beverages. The event is open transit any day of the week. events. Prizes include two trips to Hondu-
/ Panama City Tour 9 a.m. May 14 & to everyone. Call Dannie Cooper at 25- Cerro Azul trail hike 7 a.m.-3 p.m. ras from Copa Airlines, dive light, tank
/ 26, $8, minimum of 10 people needed. 5050 or 229-3635 for details. May 14. Hike a portion of the famous trail trays, computer software, subscriptions
Visit the Church of the Golden Altar, Cla0ytn and see Soberania National Park in and various dive packages from Scuba
French Plaza. Panama's interior. Fee includes transpor- Panama and Buzo. Entry fees are $5 for the


Chiriqui Highland Tour May 27-30,
starts at $200. Visit Boquete, the coffee
plantation, David, Volcan and Cerro Punta.
Meals, hotel and transportation included.
minimum of 12 people needed for the trip.
/ Albrook/Howard
'/ *Zodiac Community Activities:
Panama Viejo and Miraflores locks
tour 9 a.m.-5 p.m. May 14, $10. Visit the
area where pirate Henry Morgan hid his
gold, then see how the Miraflores Locks
work.
Memorial Weekend on Contadora
Island May 28-31. Register by May 25.
Call the center for details.


YValent Recreation Lenter:
Shades of Green hotel in Disney World,
special rates are available for this and any
other hotel in Orlando, Fla.
Panama City shopping tour 8 a.m.
Saturday.
Adventures in nature jungle walk 8
a.m.- 1 p.m. May 21. Families can follow a
tour guide through "El Charco Trail" in the
rain forest. Also visit the Summit Botani-
cal Garden.
Barro Colorado Island tour May 21,
$35 per person. Travel up the Panama
Canal in Gatun Lake to the Smithsonian
Tropical Research Institute island. The
tour includes transportation, a bilingual


station and lunch.
Isla Mamey snorkel/dive trip May
21.
White water rafting in Costa Rica
May 27-30. $340 fee includes airfare,
hotel transfers, city tour, and one day
rafting with lunch. Non-rafting toura are
also available.
San Bias snorkel/dive trip May 28-
30. Fee includes lodging, airfare, meals,
fourguided dives and tank transport. Non-
divers get free snorkel gear and island
tour.
Customized trips are available for
groups with a minimum of four or 10
people.


first two events anad $3 fior each additional
event. Pick up an application at the Albrook
or Howard pool, the Zodiac Recreation
Center or write Unit 0967 APO AA 34002
or call 263-8077.
Club meeting 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at
the Curundu Restaurant across from the
Pacific Theatre Arts Centre. Arcadio
Rodaniche will give a presentation on the
declining reef system in Panama.
Infromation on diving in Panama and up-
coming trips will be available.
Dive trip to Aquatic Parkin Portobelo
June 25-26. Costs, $25 per. person and
includes accommodations, four boat dives .
and a barbecue. Sign up by June 8.


/


* 0


Aibrook/Howard
*Zodiac Community Activities Cen-
ter:
Intro to scuba, a free one-night class is
available.
Open-water scuba May 16 at Howard
Pool.
Rescue scuba Monday at Howard pool.
Call the center to arrange scuba classes
if these don't fit in your schedule.
Classes in ladies water exercise, begin-
ning and advanced swimming for adults
and children, diving board and lap swim-


days and Thursdays. Admission to the first
class is free.
Indian Guyami sewing lessons are
offered twice a'week. Basic, 1-3 p.m.
intermediate, 5-7 p.m.
Basic and intermediate sewing les-
sons are offered twice a week. Basic classes
are 3-5 p.m., intermediate classes are 5-7
p.m.
Basic/intermediate cake decorating
meets 6-8 p.m. twice a week.
Dog obedience class 7-9:15 p.m. Mon-
day, Wednesday and Friday, $60.
Basic/intermediate English classes are


ming are available at Howard or Albrook held Monday-Thursday. .
pools. Call the center for details. Six-week Spanish classes. Basic class, .
Martial Arts classes are offered 6-7p.m. Monday and Wednesday or Tues-
through the recreation center and both day and Thursday. Intermediate class, 7-
/ youth centers. 8 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday, $25.
/ Beginner and advanced English and *Fort Clayton Scuba Shop:
Spanish classes begin monthly and run The phone is temporarily out of or-
S four weeks. The next ones are offered der. Call 287-6453/5807 for information.
Monday through May 26. Basic open-water scuba class, $115.
Beginner and advanced dog obedi- Advanced open-water scuba, $140.
ence classes are held at the Howard Parade Rescue scuba, $119.
Field. Four-week class costs $32. A mini- Underwater photography, $99.
mum of five people are needed. Rodman
*Albrook Auto shop:
Air conditioning service and repair *Rodman scuba:
12:30-5 p.m. every day except Tuesday Open water scuba starts May 17.
and Wednesday. Equipment and textbooks are provided.
Wheel alignment diagnostic and ser- Call 283-5307 for details.
vice 3-9 p.m. Monday, Thursday and Fri- Curundu
day. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. u nd"
Clayton *Twin Oceans Pro Shop:
Equipment available for scuba. snor-
*Fort Clayton Boat Shop: kel, tennis and outdoorrecreation.Call286-
Bass fishing at Gatun Lake, $20 fee 6514.
includes guide, boat, bait and rods. *Pacific Theatre Arts Centre: ....
Deep sea fishing, $200 fee includes Monthly classes available ranging from - /.. ---
S captain, gear, lures and fuel. various dance lessons, guitar and piano
*Valent Recreation Center: and martial arts. Call 286-3814'for more /Department of Defense photo by Petty Officet 2nd Class 8,ill Lewis
Korean karate class 6-8 p.m. Tues- information. Statuesque
This monument to Simon Bolivar's liberation of the Latin American coun-
7 tries can be seen during a Colonial Panama tour.



/. //, ///,













notices


Horse play
Stephanie Jones rides a horse on


Tropic TimesB
May 6, 1994B)


77


Musical theater
Atlantic Music and Theater will
perform the family musical com-
edy "Annie" 7 p.m. May 13, 14,
and 21 and 2 p.m. May 15 and 22 at
the Cristobal High School audito-
rium. "Annie" will be an entry in
the annual Forces Command Festi-
val of Performing Arts.
Rec center news
*Ocean Breeze Recreation Cen-
ter:
The center offers a variety of
classes such as karate, cake deco-
rating, piano. Spanish, English,
country line dancing and jazz. Call
289-6402 for details.


*Sundial Recreation Center:
Kunayalla Day 9 a.m. May 14
features Kuna dancers, mola and
handicraft sales.
Bake and decoration demon-
stration May 19.
Pool tips for 8-ball May 26.
Horseshoe tournament, Satur-
days.
Pool tournament, Saturdays.
Thursday are Wonderful, a
program for women, Thursdays.
Atlantic tours
*Sundial Recreation Center:
Taboga Island 7 a.m. Saturday.
Rio Mar Beach 6 a.m.Sunday.
Colon City historical and shop-
ping tour 9 a.m. Wednesday and


May 25.
Barro Colorado 7 a.m. May
14.El Valle tour 5:30 a.m. May 15
and 29.
Free Zone 9 a.m. May 18.
Isla Grande 7 a.m. May 22.
Guatemala.or Costa Rica May
27-30.
*Ocean Breeze Recreation
Center:
El Valle 5 a.m. May 15.
Isla Grande 8 a.m. Saturday.
Bird watching 8 a.m. Sunday.
Nata historical May 14.
Remon Race Track 10 a.m.
May 21.
Portobelo & Langosta Beach
9 a.m. May 22.
Rio Mar May 28.


//" /// /


* 0


/


I
Phone guide
Pacific
24th Services Squadron Sports and
Recreational Rental Center, 284-6107
Albrook Auto Craft Shop, 286-3613
Albrook Club, 286-4128
Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333
Anchorage Club, 283-4332
Canal Crafters 286-4500
Chief Petty Officers' Club, 283-5475
Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-5957
Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453
Clayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360
Clayton NCO Club, 287-3586
Clavton Outdoor Recreation Center. 287-3363


*Howard Skills Development videos are available. teers are welcome. The shop fea- Clayton Scuba Shop 287-3355
Center: *Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts tures seasonal displays and is open / Club Amador, 282-3534
Free porcelain pouring class Center: 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Saturday, / Cocoli Recreation Center, 287-4119
2-4 p.m. today. 10 a.m.-noon May Fabric painting classes 6:30- Building 804. Albrook. Sign up for / Howard Auto Craft Shop, 284-3370
13. 8:30p.m. the first and third Wednes- classes at the shop: 7 Howard Enlisted Members' Club, 284-4107
Free ceramic pouring class in day and Thursday of each month, Toll painting class 10 a.m. Howard Officers' Club, 284-4680
English 1-3 p.m. Wednesday $7.50. Some supplies are furnished. Monday and May 16. Howard Riding Stables 284-3770
Free ceramic pouring class in Stone stroke classes 11 a.m. Special project quilting Santa Howard Skills Development Center, 284-
Spanish 4-6 p.m. Thursday. Sunday, $10. Paint ceramic figu- wall hanging 10:30 a.m. Wednes- * 6361
Stained glass class meets 5-7 rines to look like stoneware. day, runs 6-8 weeks. Howard Teen Center, 284-4700
p.m. Thursday. Custom frames to order and Free cross stich class 10:30a.m. Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-4510
Cross-stitch class meets Tues- do-it-yourself frame classes are May 13. The Loop, 287-3035
days. available. Free stencil class 10:30 a.m. Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814
Framing classes are available. The Ceramic Center, Building May 20. Quarry Heights Officers' Club, 282-4380
Call 284-6361 for details. 198 is located behind the Crafts Quilting class first, second and Rodman Marina 283-3147/3150/
Ongoing classes include clay Shop. fourth Tuesday; intermediate-10:15 / Rodman Naval Station Information Tour
flower, pottery wheel throwing, *Canal Crafters: a.m.-noon; beginner-12:15- 2 p.m. and Travel Office, 283-5307/4454
macrame, air brush techniques, and Handmade arts and crafts are Free bow makingdemo 10a.m. Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514
lamp assembly. Several "how-to" available. Consignment and volun- Wednesdays. / Valent Recreation Center, 287-6500
, Zodiac Community Activities Center, 284-
////// 7/ //// / / 7k / / // 6161 /
/ / / 616/ / / Atlantic
- - - Aquativity Center. 289-4009
Davis Arts and Crafts Center, 289-5201
*Valent Recreation Center: Indian crafts from the Darien nament 7-10 p.m. May 21. /Davis Community Club, 289-5160
The screening room offers free all day May 16-19. Now showing laser disc movies / Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402
/ movies. Calling the 24-hour movie +Cocoli Community Recreation 7 p.m. Friday in May. / Outdoor Recreation, 289-4077
line at 287-4367. Center: Toursavailable.Call287-4119. Sherman Arts and Crafts Center, 289-6313
// Gumbo cooking contest 3 p.m. Arts and crafts for children *Zodiac Community Center: / Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-6104
May 14. Three categories to be 3:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday. Subs on Top has take-out, eat- Sundial Recreation Center, 289-3889/3300
judged. Sign up by Wednesday. Mother's Day dinner at La in or delivery service to Kobbe,
/ Encore: A Valent retrospec- Cascada 7-9 p.m. Saturday. free Farfan. Howard and Gateway hous-
/ tive special event 11 a.m.-5 p.m. ride for Mom. ing. Fax in orders at 284-6109 or
May 14-15. Armed Forces Day pool tour- call 284-5848.

Z' //// ////Y // //////// ///// / ///////,/////////


Theatre
*Ancon Theatre Guild:
The comedy "Vanities" runs tonight, Saturday and
Thursday through May 14. Curtain time is 8 p.m. Call
252-6786 for reservations.
*Pacific Theatre Arts Centre:
"Opera Comique," an adult farce that will be entered
in the 1994 Forces Command Festival of Performing Arts
will be performed 8 p.m. Thursday through May 28. Call
286-3814 for reservations.
Attitude Adjustment
The first monthly "Attitude Adjustment" party will
be held at the Rodman Club Bohio next to the Rodman /
": Pool 3:30-11 p.m. today. The event is open to all ranks.
Activities include live music from the band "Killer Coa-
A t n l u rbCtimundi," free hors d'oeuvres 5-7 p.m., sand volleyball 4-
5 p.m., youth games and prizes 4-5 p.m., watermelon
A-eating/seed spitting contest 5-6 p.m., limbo contest, prizes.
Rental Specials
The Howard Sports and Recreational Rental Center
Ihas rental specials through the month of May. Call for
details. The center will be closed May 30.
Department of Defense photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Bill Lewis

a trail in El Valle.








BD Tropic Times
0 May 6, 1994


l Movies


Location Today Saturday

Howard AFB 7pm: BlankCheck(PG): 2pm: BlankCheck(PG)
284-3583 Brian Bonsell, Miguel Brian Bonsell, Miguel
Ferrer Ferrer
9pm: Ace Ventura: Pet 7pm: Ace Ventura: Pet
Detective (PG-13) Jim Detective (PG-13) Jim
Carrey, Sean Young Carrey, Sean Young
9pm: China Moon (R)
Ed Harris, Madeleine
Stowe


Fort Clayton 7pm: Blue Chips (PG- 2pm: Greedy (PG-13)
13) Nick Nolte, Mary Michael J. Fox, Kirk
287-3279 McDonnell Douglas
9pm: On DeadlyGround 7pm: On Deadly Ground
(R) Steven Seagal, (R) Steven Seagal,
Michael Caine Michael Caine
9:30pm: Blue Chips
(PG-13) Nick Nolte,
Mary McDonnell


Fort Davis 7pm: Mrs. Doubtfire 7pm: Mrs. Doubtfire
289-5173 (PG-13) Robin Will- (PG-13) Robin Will-i
iams, Sally Field iams, Sally Field
9:15pm: The Getaway 9:15pm: The Getaway
(R) Alec Baldwin, Kim (R) Alec Baldwin, Kim
Basinger Basinger


Fort Sherman
289-5173


Fort Amador
284-3583


7:30pm: Reality Bites 7:30pm: Ernest Rides
(PG-13) Winona Ryder, Again (PG) Jim Vamey
Ethan Hawke


7pm: China Moon (R): 7pm: Lightnfng Jack
Ed Harris, Madeleine (PG-13) Paul Hogan,
Stowe Cuba Gooding Jr.


Sunday Monday Tuesday
2pm: BlankCheck(PG) 7pm: BlankCheck(PG) 7pm: Ace Ventura: Pet
Brian Bonsell, Miguel Brian Bonsell, Miguel Detective (PG-13) Jim
Ferrer Ferrer Carrey, Sean Young
7pm: China Moon (R) 9pm: Ace Ventura: Pet 9pm: China Moon (R)
Ed Harris, Madeleine Detective (PG-13) Jim Ed Harris, Madeleine
Stowe Carrey, Sean Young Stowe
9pm: Ace Ventura: Pet
Detective (PG-13) Jim
Carrey, Sean Young


2pm: Blue Chips (PG- 7pm: Greedy (PG-13)
13) Nick Nolte, Mary Michael J. Fox, Kirk
McDonnell Douglas
7pm: Greedy (PG-13) 9:15pm: Philadelphia
Michael J. Fox, Kirk (PG-13) Tom Hanks,
Douglas Denzel Washington
9:15pm: On Deadly
Ground (R) Steven
Seagal, Michael Caine


7pm: On Deadly Ground
(R) Steven Seagal,
Michael Caine
9:30pm: Blue Chips
(PG-13) Nick Nolte,
Mary McDonnell


7pm: Reality Bites(PG- 7pm: The Getaway (R) 7pm: Reality Bites (PG-
13) Winona Ryder, Alec Baldwin, Kim 13)WinonaRyder,Ethan
Ethan Hawke Basinger Hawke
9pm: Mrs. Doubtfire
(PG-13) Robin Will-
iams, Sally Field


7:30pm: The Getaway No show
(R) Alec Baldwin, Kim
Basinger


7pm: BlankCheck(PG) No show
Brian Bonsell, Miguel
Ferrer


No show


No show


Wednesday


Thursday


7pm: Lightning Jack 7pm: Sugar Hill (R)
(PG-13) Paul Hogan, Wesley Snipes, Michael
Cuba Gooding Jr. Wright
9pm: Sugar Hill (R) 9:30pm: LightningJack
Wesley Snipes, Michael (PG-13) Paul Hogan,
Wright Cuba Gooding Jr.





7pm: Ace Ventura: Pet 7pm: Philadelphia (PG-
Detective (PG-13) Jim 13) Tom Hanks, Denzel
Carrey, Sean Young Washington
9pm: China Moon (R) 9:30pm: China Moon
Ed Harris, Madeleine i (R)EdHarris,Madeleine
Stowe Stowe


7pm: Greedy (PG-13) 7pm:OnDeadly Ground
Michael J. Fox, Kirk (R) Steven Seagal,
Douglas Michael Caine


No show




No show


7:30pm: Blue Chips
(PG-13) Nick Nolte,
Mary McDonnell


7pm: Ace Ventura: Pet
Detective (PG-13) Jim
Carrey, Sean Young


May 13


Howard AFB

7pm Lightning Jack
(PG-13)
Paul Hogan
Cuba Gooding Jr.
9pm Angie (R)
Geena Davis,
Stephen Rea

Fort Clayton
7pm Blank Check (PG)
Brian Bonsell,
Michael Ferrer
9pm Ace Ventura: Pet
Detective (PG-13)
Jim Carrey,
Sean Young


Fort Davis
NOTE: No movie will be
scheduled.
6pm The 79th Army Band
will be performing a
concert.


Fort Sherman

7:30pm Greedy (PG-13)
Michael J. Fox,
Kirk Douglas


Fort Amador

7pm Sugar Hill (R)
Wesley Snipes,
Michael Wright


Lightning Jack
Paul Hogan, Cuba Gooding Jr.
A bungling outlaw teams up with a very
perceptive mute partner to enjoy a life of
crime while eluding the law in the old
west. PG-13 (sexual conent), 98 min.

Sugar Hill
Wesley Snipes, Michael Wright
The godfather ofa New York City crime-
empire fights desperately to break free of
the world he created before it destroys
him and his family. R (intense drug relat-
ed violence, graphic heroin use, strong
language), 123 min.

The Ref
Denis Leary, Judy Davis
Comedian Denis Leary is perfectly cast
as a hapless jewel thief who kidnaps a
bickering married couple on Christmas
Eve and ends up being a hostage in the
couple's home. R (language), 97 min.

Ace Ventura
Jim Carrey, Sean Young
When a pet dolphin is believed to have
been kidnapped along with a prominent
sports celebrity, Ace Ventura, Pet
Dectective is called in for the job. PG-13
(off color humor, some nudity), 86 min.

China Moon
Ed Harris, Madeleine Stowe
A small town detective falls for a rich
married woman and remains blindly in
love until he has to investigate a murder
he'd rather not solve. R (sensuality, lan-
guage, violence), 99 min.

Blank Check
Brian Bonsell, Miguel Ferrer
An 11-year-old boy hit by a car driven by
a mobster is given a blank check to pay
for bike repairs. The boy writes the check
for a million dollars and the bank actual-
ly cashes it. PG (language, some threat-
ening situations), 100 min.


Lit" IN d f1 v -0 k~l10 film i INXIJIAb


420", z.mm

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GREEDY


,~ ~r'


Where there a will...theres a relative.


Now showing at the Clayton, Davis and Sherman theaters.


On Deadly Ground
Steven Seagal, Michael Caine
An Alaskan oil worker is left to die in the
Artic wilderness afterthreatening to go
public about unsafe drilling practices.
Things heat up after Seagal is rescued
and gears up to take on the oil company
heavies. R (strong violence, language),
120 min.

Greedy
Michael J. Fox, Kirk Douglas
A shameless bunch of money grubbing
relatives fight for the immense fortune of
eccentric Joe McTeague, whom they hope
will die soon. When Uncle Joe takes in a
sexy pizza delivery girl as his nurse,
everyone panics and asks Danny, his
beloved, long-lost nephew to help get rid
of the seductive new rival. PG-13 (lan-
guage), 113 min.

Blue Chips
Nick Nolte, Mary McDonnell
Nick Nolte stars as a college basketball
coach who must walk a fine line in his
recruitment of new players. The politics
of college ball are exposed as the coach'
tries to keep his program alive in the face
of conflicting pressures. The story fea-
tures Shaquille O'Neal. PG-13 (lan-
guage), 108 min.


Mrs. Doubtfire
Robin Williams, Sally Field
Robin Williams is an out-of-work voice
over-artist suffering through a messy
divorce. Because hisjobless status caus-
es his wife to get custody of the chil-
dren, Williams disguises himself an
older woman to get a job as nanny for
his children. PG-13 (sexual referenc-
es), 125 min.

Reality Bites
Winona Ryder, Ethan Hawke
Winona Ryder is a college graduate
trying to make sense out of her life. She
is torn between two lovers, a poetic true
materitive. PG- 13 (language, drug con-
tent, sensuality), 99 min.

The Getaway
Alec Baldwin, Kim Basinger
Alec Baldwin is a hardened criminal
who will do anything to get out of jail.
Kim Basinger is his wife who will do
anything to help him. His return to
freedom is celebrated with a bang and
a robbery. This action-thriller is an up-
date of the 1972 Sam Peckinpah ver-
sion of the story. R (violence, sexuality,
language), 113 min.


i i i i i


-r


f-


I


1
















I Channels 8&*0


Tropic Times
V ScheduleMay 6,1994


* Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event


Today Saturday Sun

5:30am NBC News at Sunrise 6:30am SRTV Washington Re- 6:00an
6:00 Good Morning America port 6:30
8:00 Basic Training Workout 7:00 Navy/Marine Corps 7:00
8:30 Sesame Street News 7:25
9:30 Highway To Heaven 7:30 Real News For Kids 8:00
10:25 Guiding Light 8:00 Name Your Adventure 9:30
11:10 General Hospital 8:30 Just for Kids! 10:00
Noon Headline News Sonic The Hedgehog 10:30
12:30 Sportscenter CRO 11:30
1:00 Another World Teenage Mutant Ninja
2:00 Oprah Winfrey Turtles Noon
3:00 Price is Right BeetleJuice 12:30
4:00 Channel One Batman *** 1:00
4:15 Newsroom 10:30 Nature 3:20
4:30 Legend of The Hidden 11:30 Clive James' Fame In 5:00
Temple The 20th Century 5:30
5:00 Wheel of Fortune 12:30pm Headline News 6:00
5:30 Showbiz Today 1:00 Young Adult Theatre: 6:55
6:00 Headline News "A Tale Of Four 7:45
6:30 World News Tonight Wishes" 8:40
7:00 Jeopardy! 1:45 Movie: "StrangersOn A 11:00
7:30 America's Funniest I Train" Midnig
Home Videos 3:30 "Paths Of Glory" 12:30
8:00 Baywatch 5:00 World Wrestling Feder- 1:30
9:00 Dave's World ation 2:00
9:30 CBS Evening News 5:50 Headline News 3:00
10:05 Entertainment Tonight 6:20 Unsolved Mysteries 3:30
10:35 Tonight Show 7:10 China Beach 4:00
11:35 David Letterman 8:00 Movie: "Zorba The 5:00
12:35am Headline News Break Greek"
1:00 Nightline I 10:30 Saturday Night Live
1:30 Movies: "A Thousahd Midnight Showtime At Apollo
Heroes" 1:00 Friday Night Videos
3:00 In The Line Of Duty: 2:00 Movies: "Wait Until
"Ambush In Waco" Dark"
4:40 Videolinks 3:50 "The Best 75Man"
5:30 Headline News 5:40 Headline News Break
6:00 Headline News Break


iday Mor

mCCMTV 5:30am
Hour of Power 6:00
Voices Of Faith 8:00
Catch The Spirit ** 8:30
CBS Sunday Morning 9:30
Face The Nation 10:25
Headline News I1:10
Turning Point + Noon
Washington Week In 12:15
Review 12:30
Headline News 1:00
America's Black Forum 2:00
Movie: "Auntie Marne" 3:00
"The Fireball" 4:00
Headline News 4:15
Grand Ole Opry Live 4:30
Austin City Limits 5:00
ABC News "20/20" 5:30
Poirot V ** 6:00
Movie: "Barabbas" 6:15
Entertainment This Week 6:30
ht Headline News 7:00
Meet The Press 7:30
Sports Latenight 8:00
ABC World News Now 8:30
Headline News 9:30
Sports Machine 10:00
ABC World News Now 10:05
Headline News Break 10:35
1 1:35


12:35am
1:00
1:30
2:00
3:00
3:30
4:30
5:00


iday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday

n NBC News at Sunrise 5:30am NBC News at Sunrise 5:30am NBC News at Sunrise I 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise
Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America, 6:00 Good Morning America
Basic Training Workout 8:00 Bodyshaping ** 8:00 Basic Training Workout 8:00 Bodyshaping **
Sesame S street 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street
Highway To Heaven 9:30 Highway To Heaven 9:30 Highway To Heaven 9:30 Highway To Heaven
Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light
General Hospital 11:10 General Hospital 11:10 General Hospital 11:10 General Hospital
Headline News Break Noon Headline News Break Noon Headline News Break Noon Headline News Break
SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday Report
Sports Machine 12:30 Sportscenter 12:30 Sportscenter 12:30 Sportscenter
Another World 1:00 Another World 1:00 Another World 1:00 Another World
Oprah Winfrey 2:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 2:00 Oprah Winfrey 2:00 Donahue
Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right
Channel One 4:00 Channel One 4:00 Channel One 4:00 Channel One
Newsroom 4:15 Newsroom 4:15 Newsroom 4:15 Newsroom
Name Your Adventure 4:30 Ghostwriter 4:30 Lamb Chop's Play-A- 4:30 Club Connect
Wheel Of Fortune 5:00 Wheel of Fortune Long 5:00 Wheel of Fortune
Showbiz Today 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:00 Wheel of Fortune 5:30 Showbiz Today
SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:30 Showbiz Today 6:00 SCN Evening Report
Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News Break
World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 World News Tonight
Jeopardy! 7:00 Jeopardy! 6:30 World News Tonight 7:00 Jeopardy!
ROC 7:30 Answerline 7:00 Jeopardy! 7:30 Fresh Prince Of Bel Air
Cops 8:30 48 Hours I 7:20 Murphy Brown 7:55 Movie: "Texas Cheer-
60 Minutes 9:30 CBS Evening News 7:50 Movie: "Hold The leaderMurdering Mom"
CBS Evening News 10:00 SCN Late Edition Dream" (Part I) 9:30 CBS Evening News
SCN Late Edition 10:05 Entertainment Tonight 9:35 CBS Evening News 10:00 SCN Late Edition
Entertainment Tonight 10:35 Tonight Show 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:05 Entertainment Tonight
Tonight Show 11:35 David Letterman 10:05 Entertainment Tonight 10:35 Tonight Show
David Letterman 12:35am Headline News Break 10:35 Tonight Show 11:35 David Letterman
n Headline News Break 1:00 Nightline 11:35 David Letterman 12:35am Headline News Break
Nightline 1:30 Sports Latenight 12:35am Headline News Break 1:00 Nightline
Sports Latenight 2:00 Arsenio Hall 1:00 Nightline 1:30 Sports Latenight
Arsenio Hall 3:00 Headline News 1:30 Sports Latenight 2:00 Arsenio Hall
Headline News 3:30 Tonight Show 2:00 Arsenio Hall 3:00 Headline News
Tonight Show 4:30 Headline News 3:00 Headline News 3:30 Tonight Show
Headline News' 5:00 Headline News Break 3:30 Tonight Show 4:30 Headline News
Headline News Break 4:30 Headline News 5:00 Headline News Break
5:00 Headline News Break


Cbeca nnel 1- 4


* Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event


Today

5:30am Simulcast with Chan-
nels 8 & I 0
8:00 Oprah Winfrey
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
Noon Headline News
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Batman: The Car-
toon ***
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Ghost Writer
5:00 Silver Spoons
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 Headline News
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 NBA Basketball: TBA
9:30 Headline News
10:00 2142 Jump Street +
11:00 Headline News
11:35 Arsenio Hall
12:35am Headline News Break
1:00 Nightline
1:30 Sports Latenight
2:00 Arsenio Hall
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Tonight Show
4:30 David Letterman
5:00 Simulcast with 8& 10


Saturday

5:30am Simulcast with Channels
8& 10
10:30 Lois & Clark: The New
Adventures of Super-
man
11:30 NBA Basketball: TBA
2:30pm Headline News
3:00 This Week In Baseball +
3:30 Kentucky Derby -
5:00 Headline News
5:30 American Gladiators +
6:30 The Simpsons
7 :00 Star Trek: "Deep Space
Nine" ***
8:00 Simon And Simon
9:00 Herman's Head
9:30 In Living Color
10:00 Headline News
10:30 Saturday Night Live
Midnight Showtime At Apollo
1:00 Friday Night Videos
2:00 Entertainment This
Week
3:00 Headline News
3:30 Saturday Night Live
5:00 Videolinks
5:30 Headline News Break


Sunday

6:00am Bugs Bunny Mother's
Day Special
6:30 What's Up Mom?
6:50 Sonic The Hedgehog
7:15 Disney's Little Mermaid
7:35 CRO
8:00 Tiny Toons Adventures
8:20 BeetleJuice
8:45 EEK! The Cat
9:05 Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles **
9:30 Science & Technology
Week
10:00 Motor Week
10:30 Sports Closeup
11:00 NBABasketballSecond
Round Game
2:00pm NBA Basketball Second
Round Game
5:00 Quantum Leap
6:00 Headline News
6:30 Wonderful World of
Disney
7:30 Golden Girls
8:00 Grace Under Fire
8:25 Movie: "Cat People" *
10:00 Day One
11:00 L.A. Law
Midnight Simulcast with 8&10


Monday

5:30am Simulcast with Channels
8& 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
Noon Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Tiny Toons Adventures
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Clarissa Explains It All
5:00 Club Connect
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 MacGyver
8:00 Melrose Place
8:50 Movie: "The Prince Of
Tides"
11:00 Headline News
11:30 SCN Late Edition
11:35 Arsenio Hall
12:35am Simulcast with 8&10


Tuesday


Wednesday Thursday


5:30am Simulcast with Channels 5:30am Simulcast with Channels


8& 10
8:00 Donahue
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
Noon Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 EEK! The Cat
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Legend Of The Hidden
Temple
5:00 Mickey & Donald **
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 Baby Talk
7:30 Wings
8:00 Picket Fences
9:00 Coach
9:30 Movie: "Overkill: The
Aileen Wuornos Story
11:10 Headline News
11:30 SCN Late Edition
11:35 Arsenio Hall
12:35am Simulcast with 8& 10


8& 10
8:00 Oprah Winfrey
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
Noon Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
.2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Sonic The Hedgehog
4:00 Fraggle Rock
4:30 Name Your Adventure
5:00 Nick New: W5
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 Full House
7:30 Seinfeld
8:00 Tour Of Duty
9:00 NYPD Blue
10:00 Murder, She Wrote
11:00 Headline News
11:30 SCN Late Edition
11:35 Arsenio Hall
12:35am Simulcast with 8&10


5:30am Simulcast with Chan-
nels 8 & 10
8:00 Sally Jess e Raphael
9:00 Today
11:00 Star Trek
Noon Headline News Break
12:15 SCN Midday
12:30 All My Children
1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 Young and the Restless
3:30 Disney's Little Mer-
maid
4:00 Fraggle R Iock
4:30 Get The Picture **
5:00 The Wonder Years
5:30 The Cosby Show
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:15 Headline News Break
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 Step By Step
7:30 Hangin' With Mr. Co-
oper
8:00 Martin
8:30 Living Single *
9:00 Magnum PI
10:00 The Equalizer ***
11:00 Headline News
11:30 SCN Late Edition
11:35 Arsenio Hall
12:35am Simulcast with 8&10


Channels 8 & 10


Cable Channel 14


Specials ''/ Sports
"Answerline," 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. Col. Michael McConnell, ,. The Kentucky Derby, 3:30 p.m. Saturday
commander of U.S. Army Medical Department Activity, Panama, NBA Basketball
is this month's guest to answer your questions about Gorgas Teams to be announced, 7 p.m. today
Army Community Hospital. Call in questions 6:30-8:30 p.m. Teams to be announced, 11:30 a.m. Saturday
at 287-4460. Teams to be announced, 11 a.m. Sunday
Series starts " ' Teams to be announced, 2 p.m. Sunday
"Catch The Spirit," 7:25 a.m. Sunday. (Replaces "Jesuit " , e Specials
Journal") A news magazine with a spiritual look at current events and ' "Bugs Bunny Mother's Day Special," 6 a.m. Sunday. Bugs and the
people making the news. Hosted by Hilly Hicks and Anisa Mehdi. ., Warner Bros. cartoon gang take a look at the Mother's Day mayhem
"Poirot V," 7:45 p.m. Sunday. (Replaces " Sharpe's Rifles") Agatha created over the years by a slightly tipsy...and very sloppy...stork.
Christie's maddeningly fastidious Belgian sleuth and his bumbling assistant "What's Up Mom?" 6:30 a.m. Sunday. Cartoon Bruin Buttons the Bear finds
return to solve more baffling crimes Stars David Suchet, Hugh Fraser, and Paula out that you can't mess with Mother Nature in this animated special designed
Moran. especially for the little ones.


"Bodyshaping," 8 a.m. Tuesday and Thursdays. (Replaces "Body By Jake")
The Bodyshapers and their guests will shape you up with specially developed
exercises for muscle toning, strength and body symmetry.
Primetime movies
"Zorba The Greek," 8 p.m. Saturday. A naive young Englishman goes to the
Mediterranean isles to salvage the family business, but his activities become mostly
personal. Stars Anthony Quinn, Alan Bates and Irene Papas.
"Barabbas," 8:40 p.m. Sunday. The criminal released in Christ's place finds
himself enslaved, and then ends up in the gladiator's arena fighting for his life. Stars
Anthony Quinn, Ernest Borgnine and Jack Palance.
"Hold The Dream, " 7:50 p.m. Wednesday. (Part 1) In this sequel to the record
breaking "A Woman Of Substance," a self-made millionairess struggles to assure
her empire's future. Stars Deborah Kerr, Jenny Seagrove and Stephen Collins.


Series starts
"Mickey and Donald," 5 p.m. Tuesday. (Replaces Full House) This Disney classic
is packed full of action and adventure as Mickey and Donald and all of their pals get
together to entertain the entire family.
Star Trek: "Deep Space Nine," 7 p.m. Saturday. (Replaces Star Trek: "The Next
Generation") Armed Forces Radio and Television Service beams back aboard
Federation space station Deep Space Nine as the intergalactic intrigue and infighting
continues on this popular spin-off of Star Trek: "The Next Generation." Stars Nana
Visitor and Avery Brooks.
Primetime movies
"Cat People," 8:25 p.m. Sunday. In this stylish, spooky remake of the original 1942
classic, a young woman discovers that the act of love can trigger an explosive series
of events that can only leave tragic consequences. Stars Nastasia Kinski and Malcolm
McDowell.














10Tropic Times
Bl May 6, 1994


t__ Classified Ads


Duty-free merchandise

FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) - As a reminder,
in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern
Command regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used,
cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege hold-
ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu-
tion under both, military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes
permissible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid.
Before such a sale, it is strongly) recommended that the seller contact
the Contraband Control Section for ad% ice at 286-3117.


Chow chow pups, 3 mos old, male, fe-
male, ccp reg, $300. 282-3383.

Irish setter male puppies, champion fa-
ther, view by appt. 232-5622.

Yellow head baby parrot, hand raised,
$75. 284-4392.

Yellow lab, grt w/kids, shots, 6 mos old,
misc dog items Incl, $125. 282-3194.

Purepoodle, wht/apricot, playful w/kids,
all shots, $85. 287-5870.

Cocker spaniel puppies, females, males,
reddish blondes,creams, $200.286-3226.

German shepherd pups, ccp reg, exc ped-
igree. 228-2643.

Brindle boxer, 6 mos old, male, all shots,
ears/tail cropped, $175. 230-0957.

2 parakeets w/lg cage. 286-4489.

Akc/ccp reg Akita pups, avail May 23,
$500. 287-5934.

Male peek-a-poo, 2 mos old, tail docked.
$80. 252-2597.

Purebred boxer puppies, 7 wks,$175.
282-4824.

Toy French poodle, male puppy, $175.
236-0951.

Siamese seal-point, long hair female, 2
yrs old. 284-5696.

Doberman, 2 yrs old, grt watchdog, grt
w/kids, male, $200. 287-6421.

Seal-point Himalayan-Persian male for
stud service, cfa reg, proven. 289-4354
eves, ask for John.

Free, kitten, female, 4 mos old. 284-
5176.

Free, cat to good home. 284-3989.

Female tortoise shell cat, has shots, litter
box, food dish, toys incl, approx 1 yr old,
free. 287-5126.

Free, female cat to good home, grt w/
children. 261-3486.

Free, kittens to good home. 283-5325.

2 free, kittens to good home. 260-5800 Iv
msg.

2 free, male kittens, 4 wks old. 286-6179.

Free to good home, 5 yr old female
doberman, grt children. 284-4839.

Free, kittens, male, female, I mos old to
good home. 287-6294.







1992 Nissan Bluebird, at, 4dr, all pwr,
avail end-June, not dty pd, $9,000. 283-
6895.

1970 Mercedes 250CE, 2dr coupe, at, ac,
pw, dty pd, good cond, $5,500. 263-
6011.

1987 Toyota Van LE, 4WD, 5 sp, dual
ac, dry pd, loaded, $9,000. 263-6011.

1991 Ford Explorer, sport, 2dr, $14,000.
287-6486.

1986 Mitsuishi Lancer, 4dr, at, new tires,
good cond, $3,500. 287-6399.

1991 Pontiac Firebird, at, t-tops, V8,
$12,600. 287-4585.

1978 Pontiac Grand Prix, ac, good cond,
$3,000/obo. 287-5049.

1986 Toyota van, at, pb, cc, 42k mi, new
tires, brakes, exc cond, avail June 20,
$7,000/obo. 284-5180.

1981 Volvo 244GL, ac, ps, pb, am-fm
radio cass, pw, pl, $5,000. 287-5391.

1979 Dodge Ramcharger 4x4, at, pl, ac,
many new parts, runs good, body fair,
$2,600/neg. 283-5380.

1986Chevy Customized van, not dty pd,
sold as is, $2,500/obo. 285-5020.

1979 Olds Delta 88, ac, w/new parts,
runs grt, $3,000. 287-4586 after 5pm.

1978 Volvo 264GL, dty pd, runs grt,
looks good, new parts, batt, $1,995. 228-
0537.

1989 Chevy Astro Van, every option,
front/rear ac, $12,500. 287-4571.


1990 Ford Tempo, fully loaded, at, ac, ps,
pl, alarm, needs body work. 287-4428
after 5pm.

1976 BMW 530i, ac, 4 sp, cass, 4dr, not
dty pd, $2,900/obo. 286-6398.

1991 Pontiac Firebird, V8, t-tops, at, ac,
pw, pl, $12,600. 287-4585.

1991 Honda Quintet, ac, 4dr, am-fm ra-
dio, runs good, 5 sp, dty pd, $1,700. 264-
4758 after 6pm.

1987 Hyundai Excel, 2dr, hatchbk, US
specs, runs grt, not dty pd, $2,500. 284-
5582.

1990 Ford Escort LX, 2dr, 5 sp, ac, exc
cond, avail end-May, $5,300. 269-0356.

1985 BMW, new tires, good cond, ps, pb,
pw, pl. 235-4015.

1983 HondaAccord, $700/obo. 284-4575.

1986 Ford Escort, 4dr, 4 cyl, 5 sp, $2,200.
285-6871.

1970 Pontiac Firebird, 350 2 bbl carb,
reconditioned trans, $750/obo. 252-2155.

1982 Honda Accord, 5 sp, not dty pd, avail
June 6, $2,200.

1980 Ford Bronco 4x4 Ranger, runs grt,
33" tires, dty pd. 282-3194.

1986 Isuzu 1-Mark, 5sp, 2dr, US specs, ac,
am-fm cass, runs grt, $2,800. 287-5329.

1983 Chevy Malibu sta/wgn, rebuilt 327,
runs good, $1,800/obo. 286-3626.

1986 Jeep Cherokee, 4dr, 5 sp, ps, pb, ac,
low mi. 286-6133.

1987 Hyundai Excel, 3dr, hatchbk, US
specs, not dty pd, $2,500. 284-5582.

1993 Jeep Grand Cherokee, at, full time,
4WD, low mi, Ig tires, extras, like new,
$21,000. 286-3381.

1985 Honda Civic, 4dr, 5 sp, ac, dty pd,
$4,200; 1984 Jeep Cherokee, 2dr, at, ac,
trir hitch, $5,500. 260-9842.

1990 Geo Metro LSI convert, 31k, ac,
airbag, new tires, good gas, exc cond,
$7,000. 284-5483.

1991 Dodge Shadow ES, $6,500. 284-
5308 Seehafer.

1988 Toyota 4x4, custom paint, mags,
Alpine w/equal. 284-5644 after 4pm.

1987 Dodge Caravan SE, ps, pb, am-fm
cass, ac, 7 pass, $7,500/obo. 284-3496.

1985 Nissan King Cab deluxe, loaded w/
camper shell, ps, pb, pw, sr, pl, at, am-fm,
ac, $4,900/obo. 284-373 1.

1989 Chevy Camaro, loaded, low mi, ac-
cess, V6 2.8L, t-top, like new. $8,500.
252-6956.

1991 Nissan Sentra sta/wgn, 5 sp, ac, am-
fm radio, alarm, dty pd, exc cond, $7,500.
230-1961 after 5pm.

1977 Plymouth Volare, 2dr, ps, pb, new
batt, trans, runs good, dry pd, $500. 264-
6474.

1982 Ford Laser, good cond, $2,000.252-
6515.

1983 Mitsubishi L300 Minivan, exc cond,
$3,800. 252-6515.

1987 Ford Tempo GI, 4dr, ac, ps, tilt,
cruise, am-fm cass, 5 sp, low mi, one
owner, $4,000/obo. 223-5724.

1987 Chevy Nova, 1.6 Toyota eng, 4 cyl,
ac, 4dr, dty pd, good cond, std, 5 spd,
$4,600. 229-4478.

1987 Nissan Sentra, 2dr, 5 sp, good cond,
$3,600/obo. 284-6398.

1985 Ford Bronco II XLT, fully equipped,
4WD, exc cond, $6,000/obo. 256-6672.

1988 Chevy Beretta GT, 2.8 6 cyl, am-fm
cass, tilt, cruise, abs, mfi, ps, ac, $6,000/
obo. 287-5433.

1986 Buick Century, 4dr, 4 cyl, ac;am-fm
cass, at, dty not pd, $3,000. 283-6938.

1984 Chevy Chevette, good cond, ac, ps,
chrome rims, dty pd, $1,800. 226-5644.

1989 Hyundai Excel, ac, at, am-fm cass,
low mi, one owner, $4,500. 287-4433.

1987 Chrysler LeBaron, at, ac, all pwr,
stereo, loaded, rear spoiler, new brakes,
$4,900. 289-4138.

1992 Nissan Altima, 18,000km, 4 dr, dty
pd, $15,000. 236-0984. __

1986 Honda Prelude, ac, at, ps, ph, new
tires, sport wheels, best offer. 261-6418.


1988 Jeep, 4 cyl, ac, ps, pb, new tires, dty
pd, best offer. 261-6418.

1984 Chevy S-10 Blazer4x4, Tahoe pkg,
not dty pd, 80,000 mi, $5,500.282-4235.

1992 Lada, exc cond, low mil, dty pd,
$3,500. 260-5336.

1979 Chevy Monte Carlo, V8, at, ps, pb,
grt cond, am-fm cass, $1,500/obo. 284-
6904 Rm 306 Eric.

1992 Feroza, loaded, dry pd, $10,500;
1979 Fiat Spider convert, $1,950. 252-
2287.

1992 Nissan Sentra, 5 sp, dry not pd,
$4,500/obo. 267-5408.

1990 BMW 316i, dty not pd, 2dr, ac, am-
fm radio, exc cond, $10,000. 260-7728.

1991 Eagle Talon,ac, ps, abs, alloi wheels,
5 sp, am-fm cass, equal, alarm, loaded,
$15,000. 263-9569.

1992 Jeep Cherokee sport, 12,000 km,
grt cond, ac, sr, spare tire, warranty,
$17,000. 223-4347.

1990 Chevy Cavalier Z24, ac, am-fmr
cass, new tires, alum wheels, exc cond,
38,000 mi, at, US specs, below bluebook,
-$7,500. 284-6626.

1988 Nissan Stanza wgn, ac, am-fm cass,
at, tint, alum wheels, new tires, US specs,
$4,500/obo. 284-6626.

1980 CJ-7, new tires, rebuilt carb, clutch,
$4,800. 286-6541.

1986 Pontiac Grand Am, fm radio, 4 cyl,
2dr, '94 insp, exc cond, dry pd, $3,800.
224-9663.

1979 Mercury Cougar, V8, good cond,
$1,500. 286-6541.

1985 Nissan Sentra, at, ac, 4dr, am-fm
stereo, $3,300. 286-4628.

1988 Nissan Sentra, 4 sp, am-cm, ac,
$4,900/obo. 287-3997.

1991 Buick Regal, 4dr, ac, ps, pb, exc
shape, not dtypd, $9,900. 64-8244.

1985 Honda Prelude, 5 sp, ac, runs good,
not dty pd, $4,000. 287-6838.

1991 Lumina Chevy Minivan, exc cond,
ps, cc, pb, am-fm cass, lug rack, $14,000.
236-0978.

1990 Ford Ranger Lariet XLT, V6, ac 5
sp, $6,800/obo. 284-4667.

1988 Ford T-bird, sports & turbo pkgs,
new ac, ps, all pwr, 6 sp, lux int. low mi,
4 cyl, de, $11,500. 282-3099.

1986 Hyundai GLS, ac, am-fm radio, US
specs, one owner, 76,000 mi, good cond,
$3,250. 287-3978.

1987 Subaru GL sta/wgn, 4WD, low mi,
exc cond, ac, tape deck, new tires, roof
rack, $4,350. 282-5280.

1991 Ford Bronco XLT, low mi, exc
cond, $17,000/obo. 284-4275.

1987 Chevy S-10 p/u, 4WD, ac, ext cab,
camper top, V6, exc cond, new tires,
$8,000. 284-6220.

1986 Nissan 300ZX, t-top, ac, ps, pw, exc
cond, $6,800. 223-7128.

1986 Chevy p/u, 4WD, 6 cyl, at, 5sp,
camper shell, exc cond, $5,800/obo. 286-
4726.

1989 Mercury Topaz, 4 cyl, pwr every-
thing, new paint, exc shape, $7,900.286-
4726.

1988 Chevy Corsica, 2.8L, at, ac, ps, duty
not pd, $4,900. 223-5386.

1987 Dodge Ram p/u, 4 cyl, at, ac, exc
cond, not dty pd, $6,900/neg. 252-5994.

1992 Nissan Sentra II, ac, pb, am-fm
cass, 4dr, full seat covers, alarm, tint, exc
cond, dty pd, $8,500. 269-5828.

1984 Chevy S-10 Blazer4x4, ps pb, am-
fm,. cruise, ac. not dty pd,. $5,500/obo.
282-9233.

1986 Olds, 4 dr, pl, pw, ac, am-fm radio,
exc cond, $2,000. 283-4127.

1990 Mitsubishi Lancer, rustproof, alarm,
ac, cass, 4 spkers, exc cond. 226-2390.

1991 Hyundai Excel, 4 cyl, 5 sp, $6,000/
obo; 1993 Mazda MX3, loaded, V6,
$20.500/obo 269-9915.

1970 Land Rover, $2,000/obo. 284-4275.

Chevy Camaro Z-28, low mi, ac, ps, pb.
am-fm radio cass, exc cond, Bluebook/
obao.256-6830.

1991 Nissan Sentra XE, am-fm cass, ac,


4dr, not dty pd, $6,000. 287-6292.

1987 Olds Cutlass Ciera, runs good,
$2,300. 287-4935.

1991 Chevy Beretta GTZ, 5 sp, quad 4,
loaded, like new, limited warranty, Alpine
alarm, $12,800/obo. 229-1964.

1979 Ford F-100 p/u, 6 cyl, 3 sp, shell, 8'
bed, good cond, not dty pd, $1,995/obo.
269-1732.

1987 Toyota p/u, 4 spd, am-fm cass, US
specs, $4,500/obo. 282-3844.

1984 Buick Regal Lid, onw owner, at, ac,
pb, ps, pl, seat, new tires, batt, radiator,
$3,500/obo. 230-1978.

1986 Renault Alliance, 58k mi, ac, am-
fm, exc cond, $2,500. 286-3799.

1978 Ford T-bird, runs/looks good, ac, ps,
pb, $2,500/obo. 287-3675.

1989 Chrysler 5th Ave, good cond, 4dr,
pb, ps, pw, $7,000. 287-4588.

1989 Nissan Sentra, ac, am-fm, $,500/
obo. 284-3374.

1987 Dodge Lancer, exc cond, new ac, ps,
clutch, sr, am-fm cass, $5,000/obo. 284-
6172.

1991 Nissan Sentra sta/wgn, 5 sp, ac, exc
cond, radio, ps, dty pd, one owner, $7,400.
230-1961.

1980 Olds Cutlass Calais, ac, ps, pb, low
mi, decent int, $2,000. 287-6421.

1973 Chevy Impala, 4dr, runs grt, $1,000/
obo. 286-4671.

1991 Isuzu Impulse, ac, 5 sp, tint, am-fm
radio cass, not dty pd, $16,000. 286-4294.

1988 BMW 318i, 2dr, ac, sr, am-fm cass,
not dty pd, shadow line, $8,500. 261-
6119.

1988 Plymouth Voyager, V6,52k, ac, am-
fm radio cass, exc cond, $9,000. 287-
3198.

1985 Isuzu Trooper 4x4, $4,995. 228-
1255.

1988 Nissan Stanza GXE, 5 sp, ac, radio/
cass, pwreverything,sr,64,000mi. $5,750/
obo. 286-6129.

1978 Chevy p/u,4WD, dry pd, rebuilt eng,
camper shell, runs grt, 8 cyl, $2,100. 282-
3497.

1991 Nissan Pathfinder 4x2, ac, all pwr,
US specs, $15,800. 252-5525.

1983 Honda Prelude, 5 sp, ac, am-fm sr,
good cond, not dty pd, $3,000/obo. 287-
3636.

1983 Datsun 280ZE, new tires, t-tops,
nose bra, cover, exc cond, $6,000. 286-
4004.

1986 Honda CRX-si, one owner, low mi,
immaculate cond, $4,500. 286-4004.

1987 Plymouth Minivan, ps, pb, tilt, ac,
am-fm, 6 cyl, $5,000. 289-4552.

1981 Mercury Lynx, 4dr, at, 4 cyl, am-fm,
ps, pb, low mi, $2,000. 289-4552.

1985 Chevy S-10 Blazer, Tahoe pkg, fully
loaded, 2WD, look/runs good, not dry pd,
$5,200. 284-4274.

1986 Chevy Camaro, V6, ps, ac, pb,
$4,000/neg. 260-3119.

1992 Jeep Wrangler, 20k mi, 4.0L V6 eng,
good cond, $14,500. 269-6337. __

1990 Jeep Wrangler Sahara, soft top, one
owner, 28,000 mi, not dty pd, $9,500 firm.
289-5109.

1991 Chevy S-10ps, pb, ac, 5sp, 4 cyl, am-
fm cass, 25,000k, $7,000/neg. 51-9337
LD#.

1986 Ford Taurus, loaded, $3,500/obo.
287-6125.

1980 Ford Ltd sta/wgn, ps, pb, good cond,
$1,200. 252-2193 dly hrs.

1986 Camaro Iroc-Z, 5 sp, V8, t-tops, am-
fm cass, $5,500. 283-4736.

1991 Ford Explorer 4x4 Eddie Bauer Ed,
new tires, running bds, low mi, ps, pb, at,
extras, $19,000. 284-3685.

1982 Ford Bronco XLT, full size, am-fmn
cass, exc cond, $16,000. 284-5872.

1992 Dodge Daytona, all extras, low mi,
like new, $12,000. 263-9814.

1989 Ford Bronco, full size Ed Bauer pkg,
hwymi,likenew,$14,500/obo. 287-3657.

1989 Isuzu p/u w/bedliner, 5 sp, runs grt,
$4,750. 284-4720.

1985 Mitsubishi p/u, 4 sp, 4 cyl, camp
shell, lux rim, long bed, am-fm cass, gas,
dty pd, ex cond, $4,600. 224-7689.

1987 Chevy Cavalier, 2dr, 5 sp, one own-
er, ps, pb, am-fm cass, 89,000 mi, runs grt,
not dty pd, $3,500. 289-4924.

1984 Mazda 323, ac, am-fm cass, new
tires, grt cond, dry pd, $2,600/obo. 221 -
2619.

1978 Mercury Monarch, at, ac, pw, ps,
am-fm cass, dry pd, fully loaded, exc cond,
$3,500/obo. 232-6056.

1984 Ford sta/wgn, 302 V8, needs work,
not dty pd, best offer. 243-7380.
1991 PontiacGrandAm,exccond,$7,500/
obo. 289-3875 Iv msg.


1991 Eagle Summit, good cond, ac, ps,
am-fm cd, dty pd, 4dr, runs like new,
$7,000/obo 289-4358.

1992 Pontiac Grand Am SE, 2dr, at, ps,
abs, pl, am-fm cass, tilt, exc cond,
$13,500/obo. 283-4472.

1986 Subar u GL 4x4 sta/wgn. 77,000
mi, exc cond, ac, $4,000. 284-5269.

1989 Volvo 240DL, dry not pd, exc
cond, extras, $10,000. 223-3189.

1936 Dodge, parked across from
Curundu gas station, $6,000/neg. 269-
5700.

1986 Mitsubishi Galant SS, at, ps, pb,
ac, am-fm cass, not dry pd, very good
cond, $5,500. 269-5700.

1986 Toyota Minivan, ac, at, pb, am-fm
cass, dble sr, dty pd, exc cond, $6,500/
obo. 224-4190.

1983 Trans Am, t-top, am-fm cass. 287-
3778.

1991 Dodge Daytona, 4 cyl, 5 sp, no ac,
am-fm, exc cond, $4,900/obo. 228-4061.

1983 Chevy Chevette, grt cond, new
paint, tint glass, 4 sp, ac, $1,500. 287-
5330.

1990 Toyota Corolla, 16 valve, ac, cd,
ps, pb, 5 sp, lo mi, $7,500/obo. 286-
3420.

1983 Chevy p/u, exc cond. 260-5605
after 6pm.







Bilingual live-in maid, grt w/infants,
refs. 287-4586.

Eng-spk mature maid, M-W. 221 5391.

Maid, grt w/children, avail June 10, off
post only. 287-5330.

Honest, dependable, 17-year-old
babysiter, nights, wkends. 230-1927.

Span-spk exc maid, 3 days a wk, honest,
hard working, mature, prefers Albrook.
286-3382.

Bilingual honest dependable maid, grt
w/children, M-T-W-F. 286-3129 ask for
Gisela.

Bilingual live-out maid, exc w/sm chil-
dren, refs. 287-6674.

American,nanny/babysitter, highly qual-
ified, refs, prefers Clayton, Albrook.
230-1206 ask for Michelle.

Bilingual maid, wkdays, grt w/children,
live-out, refs. 287-6349.

Exp mature maid, 3 days wk, cleans,
irons, grt w/children, honest, refs.

Reliable Eng-spk maid, live-in/out, grt
w/kids, refs, avail now. 260-3505.

Live-in housekeeper/sitter, refs. 286-
4489.

Day maid, M-F. 266-6583 ask for Ange-
la.

Honest, reliable live-in maid, good w/
kids, refs. 226-7344.

Exp maid, grt w/kids, live-in, some Eng,
honest, cooks, cleans. 286-6121 ask for
Omaira.

Span-spk housekeeper, honest, hard
working, refs, Tues. 252-6404.

Span-spk maid, one day a wk, honest,
hard working, refs avail upon request.
286-3381.

Exc bilingual maid, cooks, cleans, irons,
grt w/kids, animals. 286-3813.

Professional nurse to care for newboms,
adult patients. 262-9039.

Mature bilingual maid. Wed, exc refs.
283-3374.

Span-spk maid. refs, exp, good w/kids.
284-6674.

Span-spk maid, part time, days to clean,
babysit, exc refs. 286-4290.

Teenage babysitter, M-F after 3pm,
wkends anytime, grt w/kids. 252-2543
ask for Tamela.

Honest, reliable days worker, T-W-F,
good refs. 224-8090.

Eng-spk reliable maid, exc w/kids, high-
lyrecom, any days. 284-4982 T-W.

Span-spk live-out maid, good worker,
M-F. 287-3897. ask for Surilda.

Day maid, except worker, does every-
thing but cook, some Eng, avail May 20,
$120mo 287-6494.







48' wooden sailboat, restored, diesel eng,
7 sails, stove/oven, electronics, 9' skiff,
4 anchors, exc cond, $16,000.252-2066.

16 1/2'fiberglass boat& trier,45hp,elec
start motor,exccond, $4,500.287-3572.

16' Orlando Clipper, trlr, 60hp yamaha
motor, kicker, depth finder, extras,
$5,000/neg. 286-4775.


15' bass boat. 50hp OB, pwr tilt, 2 elec
anchors, trolling motor, fish finder, $3,000.
286-4004.

Bass tracker bass boat, panfish special,
40hpw/trim, tilt, live well, trolling motor,
depth fidner, anchor amter, cover, $5,200.
287-6299.

Yamaha OB motor, $ 1,500. 221-6457.

Inline 6 cyl Chevy gas marine eng, approx
175hp, exc cond, complete, $1,100. 286-
3185.

13' Loa inflatable Zodiac Mark II, all
access, grt shape, $2,150; Magellan 5000D
gps, new, $790. 282-5524.







386 XZ15 5meg Ram, sound blaster,
40meg hd, 1200 baud modem, software,
$1,000. 287-5391.

Lg transformer, 220-1 1Ov, fans, a mixer,
more, $100, European applian 220v. 260-
2957.

Packard Bell 286+ w/4mb Ram, modem,
sound card, VGS; Dos 6.2, software, $600/
obo. 260-2957.

Sony 8m camcorder, exc cond, still new,
$475. 286-4920.

VGA color monitor, $200,IBM proprinter,
needs repair, $45, old cass deck, $45.224-
3632.

Sansui stereo, 270w, amp, tuner, equal,
dbl cass, cd, oak cabinet/glass doors,
$375.obo. 282-3080.

Nintendo, Super Nes games, $10-$40,
Commodore 64 computer, software, $50.
286-4571.

Crown CR amp, 80-80w per chan, $75.
252-2028.

Sansui spkers,4-way w/16" woofers, $200.
286-4775.

PB laptop 386SX20, 40meg hd. 6meg.
3.5, lots of programs, fax modem, $800.
287-6294.

Kenwood 55w receiver, dual cass, multi/
single cd. timer, cabinet, sell separate,
$700.286-3819.

14" color TV, $100, VHS-6 camcorder,
$550. 282-4225.

Alpine 7903 cd, exc.cond, $250/obo. 289-
4683.

Sony component sys, dbl deck, cd, dbl
cass, surround sound, remote, all digital,
$425. 287-5592.

Canon T-80 autofocus camera, 35-70mm.
50mm, 75-200mm zoom, case, speedlite
299t flash, $475. 256-6356.

Pioneer receiver, $250, Panasonic VCR,
$200, Infinity spkers, $200, Marantz tape
player, $100. 226-7708.

25" Sony TV, $200, equal, $80, JVC VCR,
$380,c d, $220. 226-7708.

Apple lie computer w/Imagewriter print-
er, new cond, $400. 252-2193 dty hrs.

Packard Bell 286, 40mg hd, I meg Ram,
5.25-3.5 dd, mouse, monitor, printer, $600.
286-4097.

Yaesu FT5100 dual band ham radio, Yacsu
FT2400H 2 mtr ham radio w/dmtf. 264-
9741.

2 meter on the glass mobile antenna. 264-
9741.

Video digitizer for Amiga computer,
digiview gold w/copy stand,camera, $250/
obo. 252-2319.

Graphic equal, $85, audiolvideo receiver,
$65, coffee/2 end tbis, $250. 261-8295.

Minolta X-700cameraw/28-85 zoom lens,
flash, bag, all manuals, $400/obo. 284-
4239.

Minolta Maxxum 7XI camera w/28-200
zoom lens, 2x teleconverter, access, like
new, $900 firm. 252-2319.

4mb Simm chips, 72 pin, 70ons, $125 ca
firm. 286-3398.

Game Genie forGameboy, new, $35.287-
5770.

486SX125 Mhz, 2mb Ram, 107mb hd,
modem, 3.6-5.25 dd, Dos 5.0, Windows
3.1, Lotus Works, others, VGA color
monitor, $1 , 100, desk, $175. 286-4879.

New 4.2 bose spkers, $175 287-3630.

Casco keybd piano, 7 mos old, $120, com-
puter printer, working good, $40. 287-
3978.

Technics quartz turntbl. dd, $100,
Kenwood a/v surround amp, 237w, like
new, $400. 252-5829.

Panasonic dot matrix printer, wide body,
$275, Logitech hand scanner, 256 gray
scale, $250. 252-5829.

150w Sanyo receiver-amp, dual cass, turn-
er, $250. 269-5828.

Sony 8mm handycam, remote, 8x zoom
lens, batt, case, super imposer, 3 yrs old,
$600. 287-3690.

IBM 386 computer,40meg hd, color moni-
tor, printer, programs. Aiwa dbl cass, $175
VHS. $150, 14" TV, $135. 268-3261.














IC classified Ads


Gateway P5-60, 540mb hd, 16mb Ram,
2x cd-rom, fast pci bus, 15" color moni-
tor, combo floppy dr, sound blaster 16,
tower case, $3,750. 256-6356

IBM notebook 386 SLC-25mhz, 85mb
hd, internal fax modem, ext VGA port,
mouse, 5.51bs, $1,300. 261-4682.

Nintendo games, Maniac Mansion, Fes-
ters, Quest, Paperboy, Wrestlemania, Su-
per Mario Bros, Duck Hunt, $20 ca. 264-
9677.

Hitachi 19" color TV, $200. 286-4226.

Nintendo Gameboy, game, spell checker,
cleaning kit, recharge batt pack, 2 player
adaptor, $120. 286-4494.

Yamaha T-70 tuner, M-70 preamp, no
amp, $150 both. 289-6536._ _ __

2400 baud modem, I ea internal. ext, $35
ea 289-6536.

Bose Omni Vector 100w stereo spker,
good cond,.$120 pr/neg 287-5625.

Sega Genesis, 3 games, $180 all. 284-
2989.

IBM compact pc, $395, color monitor,
$195, exc cond, software. 239-9709.

Emerson 286pc, like new, VGA monitor,
software, $750/obo. 284-4779.

Sega Genesis cd WWF Rage in the Cage,
Stellar fire cd, $30 ea. 287-4733.

Color TV w/new universal remote,
$75.286-6646.

Atari 800X1 computer w/1050 dd, $80,
and 130XE w/1050dd, $90. 224-6939.

Stereo set, Kenwood amp processor, dbl
cass deck, tumtbl, cd, spkers, grt sound,
$500.287-5976.






L-shaped wood bunk bed w/3-drawer
dresser, no matt, new cond, $250/obo.
260-9345.

Sofa, loveseat, $800, stereo, TV cabinet,
clothes, toys, plants. 284-5002.

GE 4-bumrner range/oven, GE 6 cyl wash-
er, x-hvy dty, like new. 232-5622.

Wall unit, floral It blue loveseat, curtains
for trop, 10sp bike, Pioneer 4-way spkers,
400w max. 230-1927.

Antique Italian vanity dresser w/mirror,
match 3-section wardrobe, solid wood,
$600 both. 260-6429.

Whirlpool port dishwasher, runs good,
$45, boy & girl 20" bikes $25 ea. 286-
4571.

BR set w/dresser, chest of drawers, 2
night stands, full sz bed, $1,350, sm din-
ing tbl, men's clothes, more. 269-0356.

5pc BR set, less than I yr old, matt, box
spring, frame,$1,300. 287-3871.

Couch, recliners, TVs, cabinets, comput-
er desks, artificial trees, Macintosh com-
puter, printer, frzer, misc fum. 260-9842.

Broyhill couch, almost new, shell design,
$500. 287-5928._

Sofa, loveseat, $500, coffee/2 end tbis,
$250, beige rug, $60. 287-4334.

Microwave cart, $80, computercart, $100,
ceiling fan, new, $49, Hoover vacuum,
$100. 226-7708.

13pc rattan LR. DR, bar, $900, bookcase,
$100, desk, $100. 226-7708.

Pinewood shelf, coffee tbl w/glass, $450.
230-0392.

New Whirlpool washer/dryer, Ig cap,
$850/obo. 284-3696.

Sm ac w/window mounts for trop qtrs.
284-4985.

Lg microwave, $75. 284-3529.

Whirlpool washer/dryer, good working
cond, $150. 252-6515._

Sears washer/dryer, $550, port Jacuzzi,
$1,950, Jr golf set, $25. 286-3927. _

Sm diningrm tbl, 2 match chrs, exc cond,
4250. 287-4794.

Outdoor round tbl, 6 high chrs, good
cond, $300. 236-0984.-

DR set, 6 chrs, chrome/glass, GE 24 cuft
refrig/frzer, Whirlpool refrig/frzer. 264-
9676.

Q-sz waterbed w/soft wide rails, under
dressers, used 2 mos, $200, microwave,
$45, dryer, $45. 260-2411.

K-sz waterbed, 6 drawers, hdbd w/mir-
ror, heater, new semi-waveless mal, $400.
284-5699.

Childcraft youth bed, crib, dresser,
childcraft dresser/changing tbl, top qual-
ity, like new, $550/obo. 284-3496.

Frzer, $575, dryer, ac, $275, furn, LR,
BR, dinettes. 282-5494.

Twin bed w/frame, box spring, $150.
286-4883.

BR set, girl's single canopy, lingerie cab-
inet, dresser, mirror, exc cond, $800.286-
6291
Hide-a-bed loveseat, mauve/teal on


cream, exc cond, $330. 287-6890.

Crib w/matt, changing tbl, $150, micro-
wave stand, $40, wooden high chr, $40/
obo, blue valances. 287-3271.

Carpet 15x20 beige, $110, 8x12 pink,
$35, Samsungmicrowave, $70.287-3978.

2 sets plaid, denim curtains w/matching
table cover, 3 pillow covers, gnri cond,
$40. 284-4776.

GE 40" wht electric range, $250. 228-
4630.

Roadmaster 24" bike, 10 sp, $80, dining
ibl, 4 chrs, $140. 252-2314.

BIk leather sofa sleeper, chr, $600, blk
glass DR set, $175. 287-5820.

Oak ent center, cxc cond, $300/obo. 282-
3497.

GE dryer, like new, used 6 mos, $385.
286-3836. _ _

Beige swivel rocker recliner, $250. 287-
3690.

Whirlpool 19 cuft, side-by-side refrig/
frzer w/icemaker, $610. 256-6830.

Panasonic stereo VCR, $250, dirt devil
vacuum, $25, wider, ski machine, $60.
284-5234.

2 patio chrs, 2 sm end tbis, good cond,
need cushions, all $80 282-5630.

BR set w/vanity, 2 night stands, 4pc rat-
tan patio set, $90. 268-3261.

Rocker-recliner, California K-sz matt, box
spring, dishwasher, garbage disposal, car
spkers, best offer. 243-5617__ _

Q-sz sofabed, comfortable, loveseat, like
new, $950. 260-6688.

Westinghouse 18,000 blu ac w/papers,
very good cond, $400/obo. 228-4153 af-
ter 6pnm

TV stand, $150, hdbd, $100, coffee/end
tbis, $300, computer desk, $175. 238-
9106.

7' sofa highbk, $400,2 upholstered swiv-
el rockers, 5x4 area rug, $150 ea, Q-sz
sleeper, $150/obo. 264-9677.

Redwood picnic tbl, 3 benches, $20, 10
roll-up shades, wht/beige, new, $10 ca,
rocker, $15, sm desk, $10. 286-4226.

Baby car seat, bottle sterilizer. 252-5036.

TV stand, $50, night stand. $50. 260-
3145.

7pcDR set,_cabinet,$580/obo. 286-3185.

Q-sz waterbed w/heater, liner, hdbd, dk
walnut finish, $300. 286-3326.___

Whirlpool upright frzer, 18.5 cuft, no
frost, $525, sofa sleeper, exc cond, $450.
252-5525.

Maytag washer, Wards dryer, Ig cap, grt
cond, sold as set, 3 yrs old, $600. 286-
4294.

Kenmore washer/dryer, $500, IBM comp,
printer, $350, lifestyle 1900 walk/jog,
$200, misc items. 228-1255.

Speed queen washer/dryer, hvy dry, exc
cond, $575. 283-6889.

K-sz bed, box spring, frame, $600. 289-
6564.

Whirlpool hvy dty super cap washer/dry-
er, used 6 mos, like new, $800.236-1010.

Whirlpool dishwasher, exc cond, $150.
282-3980.

Round glass top dinette, 4 blk chrs, $350/
obo, blk/brass comer stand, $85/obo. ce-
ramic decorations blk/red. 284-5021.

Full-sz bed, matt, springs, dresser, mir-
ror, chest, solid wood, maple finish, $650.
287-4935.

Wht sofa, loveseat, 9x12 red carpet,
$1,100. 284-4138.

Sunbeam 30,000 btu gas grill, patio fum,
plants, Barbie jeep, carpet, dresser, mini
blinds, more. 284-5087.

4BR trop wall-to-wall carpet, Nintendo
sys, 14 games, 5-drawers 2dr cab, dresser
w/wing mirror. 284-5087.

Wht canister set, $20, 5 rd throw pillows,
$4 ea, blk ceramic decoration. 284-5021.

K-sz waveless waterbed, mirror, lights,
dbl pedestal, 8-drawer cab, padded rails,
exc cond, $500. 284-3685.

2pc blue L-shaped sec sofa w/Q sleeper,
exc cond, $675. 284-3685.

Whirlpool thin twin washer/dryer com-
bo, used 1 yr, $650. 236-0108 Iv msg.

Whirlpool 12 cuft upright frzer, like new,
$375/obo. 287-3231.

DR tbl, 6 chrs, rattan w/glass top, exc
cond, $500. 252-5642.

L-shaped couch, loveseat, chr, brn, $200.
287-4543.

L-shaped wood bunk bed, 3-drawerdress-
er, no matt, new cond, $250. 260-9345.
Wedding dress, petite, veil, tramin, ring
pillow, never used, $250. 286-3337.

Lg sofa, It blue design, good cond, $600,
dbl matt, springs, metal frame, $150 269-
5700.
Singersewmg machine, $175. 228-1036.


Wall-to-wall carpet, mini blinds, plants.
284-5434.

LR set, $350. 287-3778.

Computer tbl, $45, Ig micro, $300, micro
stand, $35, noodle cart, $45. 287-5976.






Baby yellow head parrot in PCC Corozal
housing area. 252-1257.

Dinosaur watch at girl's softball game in
Cardenas. 252-6829.

Hubcap in front of exchange office on
Albrook, April 26. 2843-4227.






Little Tykes stroller, shopping cart, $10
ca. 252-6829.

Propane gas barbecue grill, 2 yrs old,
$130/obo. 287-6494.

Stereo, dbl cass w/stand, exc cond, $150,
recliner, $100, microwave, $100, clean
air machine w/filters, $25. 284-5598.

Brazilian tipsurfbd, 3 fin, $100, men's dk
gray suit, sz 40R, autumn 9x 12 rug, $35.
252-2028.

New rig, Javelin harness, Manta Square
Mian, Raven II Square Reserve, $2,100.
282-5524.

Jeep stock bumper, $20. 284-4392.

Med size bird cage, $30. 252-2676.

Wt machine w/wts, hardly used, $140,
solid oak wood dlb bed, $150.286-4920.

Dbl run/jog stroller, $250, Nintendo
games, $ 10, Sega games, $20, VHS mov-
ies, $8. 287-5332.

FSU books, English, nutrition. 287-4170.

Wall-to-wall carpets, I 10sqyd,roomcar-
pets. 287-4571.

Trop blinds, fits 800 area, It blue, $100.
287-5482.

Male dress blues, 39 short, $75, men's
clothes, misc computer items. 269-0356.

Coupon for wkend at Las Sirenas Beach
cabins for 5 people, $150. 252-1257

Girl's bike 20", $40, radio flyer wagon w/
rails, $20, FSU psychology book, 40,
plants. 286-3587.

Little Tykes Sesame Street playhouse w/
slide, no roof, $95, tap shoes, sz 11, $6.
dehumidifier, $70. 287-5327.

Men's 25 diamond wedding band, $400/
obo. 285-6880.

Record album collection, car cover, ste-
reo sys, phone answer mach, hammocks,
best offer. 243-5617.

Batt infant swing, $50, 2 Sega games,
Golf, Fantasy Star, $30 ea, Bell bike
helmet, $50. 286-6176.

Conn trombone, artist model w/attachs,
exc cond, $600/obo. 289-4683.

Steel door w/door frame, rattan glass top
tbl, dryer. 260-5605.

Deluxe century stroller, like new, $850,
baby bath, pad, $5. 287-5587.

Line regulator, $80. 261-1712.

Ragedy Ann mirror, $20, wt bench, $15,
child's bike parts, $15, make-up mirror,
$20. 282-5630.

Computer programs, Harvard Graphics,
Word Perfect, Corel Draw, Dbase, Cross
Talk, Norton Desktop 2.2, pc tools. 287-
5820 after 5pm.

Sega Genesis, 16 pit, 2 control pads, 3
games, 94 Football Holyfield boxing,
SonicHhedgehog, $125. 289-4138.

Wedding dress, sz 7/8, Demetrio's de-
sign, veil, $800/obo. 223-4986.

Lg igloo cooler, $50, 2 patio chrs, 2 end
tbls, $80, bag, $25. 282-5630._

Nintendo games, $15, Nintendo machine,
1 game, $80, Q-sz matt set, $200, more.
287-3335.

Acs, Whirlpool 18,000, $350, National
8,000 ac, $175, industrial shelves, best
offer. 252-2287.

Airciser elec exer bike, $125. 286-3812.

Fisher Price push 'n' go dump truck, $25/
obo, baby winter clothes, blue shower
curtain, $10. 287-3271.

Sears lifestylertreadmill, 1.5hp,program-
mable, push-button incline, exc cond
$700. 287-4496. _

Wedding, night, maternity clothes, sz 5/
6, judo suit, med, $15, Rock 'n' Roll
records, ladies shoes sz 3. 252-2042.

LR set, antique closet, buffets, dbl dr
refrig. 252-5124.

Prom dresses, T & knee-length,szs 9/10
& 5/6 peach satin skirt, scoop neckline,
blk strapless, $25ca. 284-5778.

FSU books, SyglO00, Apl1501, Woh
1030, ArhH2000, Ant 321 Ix, Pch 2700.
287-6737.


Marquis diamond bridal set, 1/4ct, TW wt
9 diamonds, 14k gold bands, exc cond,
$350/obo. 286-4585.

Baby crib w/matt, sheets, $ 100, new baby
walker, $5. 224-1133 ext 23.

Cypress Gardens slalom ski, exc cond,
$100. 283-6425.

Whirlpool 22cuftrefrig/frzer, $400, stain-
less steel dbl kitchen sink w/faucets, $110,
Pioneer stereo components, no cd $900.
252-1190.

Remote car parts, VCR, need repairs,
$50, Oster hair trimmer, $20, wedding
dress, sz 9/10, $75. 284-3590.

Engjumpmg saddle, sz 17 from Argenti-
na. 226-2390.

Dresserw/mirror, needs work, $90, Little
Tykes rocking rocket, new, $22, bra for
Nissan Sentra, $80. 287-6292.

Surfboards, 6', $100,6'7,$165.286-4727.

Two Oriental dividors/screens, $350 ea.,
2-seat kitchen tbl, $60, FisherPrice picnic
tbl, $50. 260-6159.

Brunswick mahogany pool tbl, 8x4 ft,
$2,800. 287-5222.

Parachute, Vector container, pegasus 220'
main, new body 178 reserve, good cond,
$1,200/neg. 287-5625.

Household, plants. 229-1964.

2 girl's bikes, Broyhill sofa, chr, Chinese,
100% wool rug, sz 8x5, reasonable prices.
262-0371.

Aphex aural exciter w/big bottom, new,
$200. 287-5589.

GE dishwasher w/butcher blk top, $225,
Panasonic micro/convec oven, $250, mi-
cro cabinet, $125, dehumidifier, $120.
284-6172.

Long bed camper shell, $200. 284-3475.

Little Tykes vanity w/chr, like new, $35,
Christmas lights, $3 ea. 287-4588.

Bassinet, $40, BR curtains for trop, $20
ea, sturdy running stroller, $80, Word
Processor, $ 100/obo. 286-6129.

Baseball cards, all $120. 287-5592.

Port car ramps, $45, wine rack, $10, an-
tique Chinese chest, $30, cowboy boots,
$80, radio electronic parts. 252-2042.

Flex cross training sys w/stepper, exc
cond, $175. 284-5696.

Clothes, Aiwa turmtbl, $30, turbo graph-
ics game sys, 3 tapes, $80. 284-3689.

Sports cards, trade, sale, 93-94 base-,
basket-, football. 284-3689.

Playpen, $30, car seat, $40, bassinet, $10,
child's bike seat, $15, potty trainer, $10,
more. 284-4036.

Encyclopedia Britannica w/grt books,
$1,500. 287-5826 after 6pm.

Girl's 24" 10 sp bike, $85, child's scooter,
$30 both $100. 282-3980.

12 sp racing bike, Shimano 600 comp,
new paint, $375, revolution bike shoes, sz
10 1/2, $60. 235-9818.

7'4 surfbd, $125/obo, Santa Cruz skatebd,
tracker trucks,$60. 235-9818.

Matemity clothes, 1g, exc cond, $100 box.
284-5076.

Craftman lawn mower, 20" blade, I pull
to start, exc cond, $120. 284-5076.

Hi Tec boots sz 8 1/2, $30, Oakley Blades
sunglasses, $20, boogie bd, $50/obo. 269-
6337.

Vacuum, $45, microwave, $95, 2 in I
game tbl, dbl matt, $25. 284-5422.

Lg & sm plants. 283-3571.

Canon AE-1 program, 1.4 lens, 300EZ
flash, $395. 263-9632.

Weddingdresssz1I, $800/obo. 285-4629.

2 bm carpets, approx 12x 15, $80 ea. 287-
3231.

3 formals sz 11/12, $50, math for gen
education book for PCC. 287-6198.


Books, Am Gov't, Enc 1101, Intro to
lnter'l Rel. 284-4720.

Alpine tracker ski machine exer, $50.
252-5642.

4pc luggage set, best offer. 260-3130.

Metal woods for lefties 1-3-5 w/dynmaic
gold plus shafts, $125/obo. 284-5493.
FP kitchen, $60, changing tbl, $40, Ig FP
pool, $25, bbq grill, $30. 284-6670.

6-string Yamaha acoustic, grt cond, $150.
287-4733.

Baby swing, carrier, bassinet, never used,
$90. 286-6646.

FSU book, The Science of Nutrition, 6th
ed, new, $50. 287-3148.

Sofa, loveseat, peach/mnt gmn, $900.285-
5935.

Rain lamp, $50, Miss Manners book, $20,
VHS The Aging Process. 224-6939.





1986 Kawasaki Ninja 600R, cxc cond,
runs grt, some new parts, 284-6529.

1984 Honda Nighthawk 700cc, low miles,
one owner, 2 match helmets, $1,500,284-
3685.

1981 Honda CX 500, runs good, $700,
287-5483.

Yamaha 50 MX shaft drive, needs work,
$375,.286-6133.

Honda V600 Transalp, 2,000 mi, dty pd,
287-5394.






Qtrs. 331 A, Clayton, 8 am- I pm Satl.

Qtrs. I1141A, Clayton, Sat. ceramics,
clothes, bike

Qtrs. 322 Morgan PI., Balboa. 8 am-noon
Sat.

Qtrs. 651B Howard, Sat.

Qtrs. 1164A Clayton, 7 am-2 pm Sat,
books, clothes, sm appl.

Qtrs. 124B Albrook 7-11 am Sat. toys,
strollers, dishes.

Qtrs. 242A Albrook 8 am- I pm Sat. fum.

Qtrs. 603 Clayton, Sat,'clothes, hsehld
items, kit set, vacuum

Qtrs.901 B Clayton, 7-11 am Sat, clothes,
toys, frig.

Qtrs. 94B Howard, Sat, bikes, toys, comp
pgrms.

Qtrs. 2048 Curundu, Sat.

Qtrs. 207A Albrook, 7-11 am Sat. clothes,
hsehld items.

Qtrs. 48A Albrook, 7 am-noon Sat.

Qtrs. 98B Albrook, 8-11 am Sat.

Qtrs. 589A Howard, 7 am-noon Sat. girls
bdrm set, toys, clothes.

Qtrs. 180 Howard, 7:30am-noon.

Qtrs. 554D Clayton, 7:30 am-noon Sat,
adult/baby clothes, hsehld items, chairs.

Qtrs. 640B Howard 7 am-noon Sat.
clothes, furn, Yamaha stereo.

Qtrs. 403A Kobbe, Sat, clothes, elec, furn.

Qtrs. 138B Howard, 7-10 am Sat, stereo,
clothes, fuim.

Qtrs. 1561A Howard 7-11 am Sat, baby
items, toys, carpets, fumrn.

Qtrs. 430 Clayton, 7 am Sat, DR, baby
furn.

Qtrs. 580D Clayton, 8:30 am Sat.

Qtrs. 1025A Clayton, 8 am-noon Sat,
furn, carpet, Ig dog ken. clothes.

Qtrs. 136B Howard Sat, furn, baby items,
clothes, comp.


Tropic Times B
May 6, 1994 11


Qtrs. 542B Curundu Hgts, 8-10 am Sat.

Qtrs. 1553C Howard, 8 am Sun.

Qtrs. 1533B Howard, 8-11 am Sat, frig,
bikes, stereo, baby items, clothes.

Qtrs. 126B Albrook, 7 am-noon Sat,
clothes, fum, toys, sm stereo.

Qtrs. 128A Albrook, 7-11 am Sat, toys.
Books, clothes

Qtrs. 723D Clayton 7 am-noon Sat.

Qtrs. 328B Kobbe, 7-11 am Sat, clothes,
-.hsehld items, app, fum.

Qtrs. 2386A Cocoli, 8 am-noon Sat.

Qtrs. 1216C Amador, 8 am-noon Sat,
stereos, apps, elec.

Qtrs. 68A Howard, 7-11 am Sat, fumn,
clothes, grill.

Qtrs. 180 Howard, 8-11:30 am Sat.

Qtrs. 412B Amador, 8 am-noon Sat, baby
items, blinds, mat clothes. _

Qtrs. 617A Howard, 7-11 amSat, clothes,
toys.

Qtrs. 60A Howard, 8 am-noon Sat,
clothes, hsehld items, rugs, toys.

Qtrs. 369B Clayton, 8 am-noon Sat.






Span-spk maid weekdays, babysit, wash,
fold clothes. 287-4772.

Curio cab, new or used, reas priced. 224-
3632.

Housesitter June 16-Aug. 3 on Albrook.
286-4392.

Printer forlIBM compat, working nmexpen.
269-8981 6-9 pm. . ___

Live-out bilingual maid weekdays, exc
w/kids, refs required. 285-4831.

Wall to wall carpet for Howard 4 br trop,
reas priced. 284-4774.

Slide proj, will pay up to $50. 269-0356.

Person to repair & reupholster wicker/
rattan patio fum, reas rates. 286-3775.

Bilingual live-in maid to care for infant,
housekeeping, refs. 260-7077 after p.m.

Span-speak maid from interior, cook,
clean, iron. 252-2355 after 6 p.m.

Day maid, good worker,'gen house clean-
ing, resp, honest. 233-3025.

Chihuahua puppy, $150 or less, papers
not necess. 286-3819.

Moms on Albrook w/i Imo- 1 /2yrolds
to form playground in my home. 286-
6176.

Collie male for stud service, prefer Amer-
ican bred ASAP. 261-3325.

Kicker, long shaft, 7-15 hp, Johnson or
Evinrude, exc con. 286-6243 after 5_p.m.

Window tinting for car, my home,
Howard, must offer guarantee. 284-4239.

Q-sz bed, playhouse, plastic slide,
powerwhcels. 260-24 11..

Eng-spk babysitter, varying hours, need
refs, CPR certified. 286-3173.

Span-spk live in maid, honest, no school
w/refs. 252-2756 1-3 pm.

Mil recc nanny/maid, primary infcare, It
hsewk, M-F 7 am-5:30 p.m. 287-4280.

Live-in maid, grt w/kids, clean, cook,
iron, Mon-Sat. 252-5036.

Bilingual live-in maid, exc w/ kids, pets,
cleans, cooks, laundry, irons. 286-3678.

Stateside auto tags, exchange or buy.
252-2540.

Trade sm pet carrier for med. 286-4004.

Little Tykes cottage farm, gd cond, areas
priced. 261-1480.

Ping pong tbil gd shape, $100.286-4290.


L* Tropic Times Ad Form


Lj ANIMALS
3 AUTOMOBILES
3 AVAILABLE
i BOATS & CAMPERS
E[ ELECTRONICS
3 FOUND
3 HOUSEHOLD
3 LOST
3 MISCELLANEOUS
3 MOTORCYCLES
3 PATIO SALES
3 WANTED




SPONSOR'S NAME


PRICE HOME PHONE

Check only one category per ad form. Only two ads per person each
week are allowed. Each ad form is limited to 15 words. Please type or
print neatly. Information listed below is not included in the ad, but is
required for publication. This information will not be released to third
parties. Deadline for the receipt of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for Friday's
edition. Ads are run on a space available, and may be held for a future
edition. Ads may be mailed to the Tropic Times, Unit 0936, APO AA
34002 or deposited in a drop box at the Albrook Post Office. Ads
offering weapons or sent by FAX will not be run.
RANKIGRADE


DUTY PHONE










Tropic Times
May 6, 1994


S.--


HOW TO APPLY: Submit a SF-171, DD 214 if claim-
ing veteran preference, a copy of college transcripts if
claiming education and a copy of CASP notice of rating if
applicable. Submit a copy of latest SF-50 if you are a
Federal employee.
For more information regarding Army vacancy an-
nouncements (forms required, job related criteria, etc.),
visit the Directorate of Civilian Personnel, Building 560,
Room 102, Corozal, or call 285-5201.
*Note: One-on-one employment counseling should be
the first step in the job search.

SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE: Positions at NM-5
level and above require specialized experience. Special-
ized experience is either education.above the high school
level or work experience directly related to the position
being filled. Example: Budget positions at or above the
NM-5 level required Budget experience or equivalent
education.
Vacancy announcements are also available at the
Sundial Recreation Center.
The Army civilian personnel office accepts appli-
cations on a continuous basis for the following positions.
These announcements are used to establish registers for
permanent and temporary future vacancies.
Army
VB# 001 * General Clerical, NM-3 (Used to fill most clerical
position).
VB# 001A * General Clerical, NM-4 (Used to fill most
clerical position).
VB# 002 * Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Intermittent wk sch)
* CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is required.
VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) Requires
Cert + 6 mo recreation exp in the field.
VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Req 6 mos recreation
exp in the field.
VB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5
VB# 005A Secretary (Stenography), NM-6
VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5
VB# 006A Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-6
VB# 017 Administrative Services Assistant, NM-5
VB# 017A Administrative Services Assistant, NM-6
VB#018 Supply Technician, NM-5
VB# 018A Supply Technician, NM-6
The following positions are Permanent/Temporary, Full-
time, Part-time, Intermittent.
VB# 007 ** Medical Officer, NE 12/13/14.
VB# 008 ** Clinical Nurse, (RN license required), NM-9/
10/11.
VB# 009 ** Practical Nurse, (LPN licence required), NM-5
** Selectees for nurse and medical officer position will be
required to undergo a background check.
The following are limited to veteran preference eligibles and
permanent employees only.
VB# 010 Manual Positions, MG-2
VB# 011 Manual Positions, MG-3
VB# 012 Manual Positions, MG-4
VB# 013 Manual Positions, MG-5
VB# 014 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-6
VB# 015 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-7
VB# 016 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-8


VB# VACANCIES TITLE AND LOCATION
06-94 CLOSE: 05-17-94


285-94-JH
Sept. 94.
286-94-JH
1 yr. (SCI)
287-94-JH
Sensitive.
288-94-JH
I yr.
289-94-JH
Sept. 94.
291-94-JH
Sept. 94.


OPEN: 05-


Pacific
Contract Specialist, NM-1102-11. Temp Nte: 30

2 Electronics Mechanic, MG-2604-11. Temp Nte:

Electronics Mechanic Supervisor, MS-2604-12.

2 Electronics Mechanic, MG-2604-10. Temp Nte:

Contract Specialist, NM-1102-9. Temp Nte: 30

Accounting Technician, NM-525-7. Temp Nte: 30


292-94-ES Interdisciplinary, NM-185/180-9. Temp Nte: 30
Sept. 94.
293-94-NC Personnel Clerk (Office Automation), NM-203-
5. Temp Nte: I yr. Limited to veteran preference candidates only.
Bilingual English/Spanish.
294-94-NC Material Handler (Forklift Operator), MG-6907-
6. Limited to permanent and veteran preference candidates only.
295-94-EL Logistics Management Specialist, NM-346-12.
Sensitive.
296-94-JH Electronics Mechanic, MG-2604-10. Sensitive
(Top Secret).
297-94-VL Emergency Medical Technician, NM-640-5.
Temp Nte: 30 Sept. 94. Shift work. US/EMT license required,
driver's license required.
298-94-ES Emergency Medical Technician, NM-640-3.
Temp Nte: 30 Sept. 94. Shift work. US/EMT license required,
driver's license required.
299-94-ES Practical Nurse, NM-620-6. Temp Nte: 30 Sept.
94. Shift work. US license required.
Atlantic
290-94-ES Clinical Nurse, NM-610-10.


~~Potpourri



I - -- -


Quarry Heights
*Officers' Club:
Breakfast buffet is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Monday-Fri-
day and 8-10 a.m. Saturday.
Steak night 6-9 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays. All-
you-can-eat salad bar and a glass of wine.
Social hour 5-8 p.m. Friday.

Club Amador
Pre-Mother's Day dinner 6-10 p.m. Saturday. Special
dinner selection and music by Dolores in La Concha. Res-
ervations required.
Mother's Day Sunday buffet brunch 10:30 a.m.-2:30
p.m. with live entertainment. Reservations accepted Sat-
urday for members only.
Typical Panamanian buffet 6-9 p.m. Hednesdays in
La Concha.
Grupo Samba Tres Friday nights in the Bridge
Lounge.

Clayton
*The Loop;
CJ's Sports Bar offers daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m.-
1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Pool tournaments are held 3:30
p.m. Sunday s.
Prizmz Night Club features a- %ariet, of music
b ednesday-Sunday to include jazz 5 p.m. Sunday.
*NCO Club:
The ballroom will be closed through May 30 for reno-
ations.
Mother's Day Sunday buffet 4:30-8 p.m.
Country and western dance lessons are held 7-9 p.m.
Sunday, and Mondays in the Corral Lounge.
Rock "n' roll music is offered 7 p.m.-I a.m. WV-dnes-
days and 7-11 p.m. Thursdays at the Underground
Lounge.
Salsa dance lessons 7 p.m. Thursday with Vibraciones
Latinas at the Underground Lounge, free.
Casa Maria special through May15, bistek ranchero,
bistek picado, special sauce. Spanish rice. three corn tor-
rillas and refried beans.

Albrook/Howard
*AlbrookC lub:
Enjoy blues and jazz 7-10 p.m. today by recording art-
ist Lowell Hopper in the lounge.
Karaoke in the lounge May 13 and 27.
Steak night Frida). Choose from rib eye, K.C. strip.
rilet or prime rib. Dinner comes with vegetable, baked
potato, French fries or rice.
Fiesta de mariscos Saturday nights. Treat yourself to
a seafood feast with different platters featuring clam
chowder, shrimp cocktail or resiche. The combination
platter includes broiled corsina, stuffed crab, calamari
rings, peel and eat shrimp, a choice of potato or rice, cole
slaw and vegetables du jour. A la carte menu available.
Mongolian BBQs Monday:s. Prepare your plate,
choose the meat, vegetables. seasonings, oils and have
chefs do the job outside on the open grills.
Sunday champagne brunch 10 a.m.-I p.m. in the din-
ing room offers breakfast from cooked to order omelets.
French toast, hot lunches, salad and fruits, peel and eat
shrimp, desserts and ice cream bar.
Italiano nights Wednesday and May 18. Choose from
tortellini. lasagna, tossed salad and complete your meal
with garlic bread.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club:
Karaoke 7 p.m. Sundays and Tuesdays in the Casual
Co e.
All Nighlers May 14 and 29 Memorial Dai.
Weekend breakfast is served 7-10:30 a.m. Saturday
and 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Sunday. Begin your day with a
sta) slim plate or French toast, Belgium waffles with a
choice of toppings, the crew chief deluxe, or a hearty
breakfast burrito.


Monday-Friday breakfast 6-9:30 a.m.
Country and western dance lessons Wednesday nights
in the Casual Cove. Learn the latest in line dancing, the
stomp, waltz and others. A dance follows.
Italian nights 5:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday with Alfredo
or seafood fetluceini. lasagna, pasta mixta or pasta and
shrimp in a white wine sauce. A la carte menu available.
Steak lovers 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday nights in the din-
ing room. Select your cut and order a New Vork strip, rib
eye or filet. To eat lighter, you can order a chicken
marinara. pasta, shrimp vin blanc or shrimp Taboga.
Seafood specials 5:30-8:30 p.m. Friday or Saturday.
Choose from shrimp Taboga, Pacific cornina. pasta and
shrimp in a white wine sauce or Caribbean shrimp.
Mlexican night special 5:30-8:30 p.m. All-you-can-eat
soft tacos, a half pound of chicken or beef fajilas. corvina
Veracruz or Texas style barbecue ribs.
Rock 'n' roll 5 p.m. Thursday in the Casual Cove.
Disco nights 5 p.m.-I a.m. Friday and Saturday.
Bang up barbecue in the Bree/eway. dine-in or take-
out. Enjoy the ribs. brisket, chopped beef or hot wings.
*Top Three Club
Jazz 7-10 p.m. Saturday with Lowell Hopper. This
performance is open to all ranks.
Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesday.
Smoke free 1st and 3rd Saturday of the month.
*Howard Officers' Club:
Children's night out 5:30-6 p.m. Monday with a pizza
buffet for ages 3-12. Games 6-7 p.m. and Italian buffet
for parents in the dining room. all-you-can-eat for $7.95.
Prime time 6-9 Fridays and Saturdays.
Social hours 5-7 p.m. Monday s: 5-6 p.m. % ednesdays
and 4-6 p.m. Friday with Club Card drawings. Music is
8 p.m.-midnighl.
Super Thursday night buffet. Adults $7.95 all-you-
can-eal, children from 6 to 12, $2.95, and children under
6 eat free.

Rodman
The Rodman Club, Rodman Annex, the Laguna
Lounge and Rodman Bohio will be open to all ranks. The
Anchorage Club will close and be converted into the new
Fitness Center slated to open mid-June.
*Rodman Club:
Two-for-one steak night, $15.95 6-9 p.m. today.
Choose from New Nork steak. T-bone or porterhouse.
Lunch is served II a.m.-I p.m. Monday-Friday.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet. $4.95 11 a.m.-l p.m.
Monday.
Dinner specials and grill 3:30-8:30 p.m. Sundays-
Thursdays.
Fine dining 6-9 p.m. Friday-Saturday.
Upstairs Bar 3:30-8:30 p.m. Sunday through
Thursday; 6-9 Fridays through Saturdays.
Laguna Lounge. Social hours 3:30-11 p.m. Friday
only.
Rodman Bohio 4-10 p.m. Friday only,. new circular
bar and two decks located beside the Rodman pool.
Attitude Adjustment 3:30-11 p.m. today at the
Rodman Bohio. Sand volleyball, children's games,
watermelon eating and seed spitting contests, limbo, free
hors d'oeuvres and live music hy "Killer Coatimundi"
band
*Rodman Anne%:
Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Monday-Friday.
All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu II a.m.-
1:30 p.m. Monday-Friday.
Club closed for evening and weekend senrice.

Davis
*Da is Community Club:
Mother's Day Sunday brunch. 10:30 a.m.-l:30 p.m.
with door prizes gisen esery half-hour. The event is free
for mothers.
Mongolian barbecue 6-8:30 p.m. Thursday and May
26.
Mexican dinner special 6-8:30 p.m. May 25.
Country and rock nights 8 p.m.-l:30 a.m. May 27.
There will be coser charge.


SNAM rado.6scedul


The Southern Command Network's
AM Radio features America's most-
listened to radio programs. Live
coverage of breaking news stories and
special events is provided.
SCN AM Radio is the news, sports
and information station AM 790 Pacific
and AM 1420 Atlantic.


Monday-Friday
5am National Public Radio Morning
Edition
9:54am Paul Harvey News
I lam The Rush Limbaugh Show
12:05pm Paul Harvey News and Com-
mentary (Repeat 1:17 p.m.)
2:05pm Paul Harvey Rest of the Story
(Repeats 10:05pm)
4pm NPR's All Thing Considered
6:05pm American Public Radio's
Marketplace


11:35pm KSFO Sports Byline USA


1:05am
3:30am
7:30am
8:05am
1:30am



1:35am
7:35am
8:35am
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1:35am
7:35am
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Monday
NPR's Cartalk
NPR's Living On Earth
What's the Story
On Computers
Robert/JamesExchange

Tuesday
KSFO Sports Byline USA
AP Portfolio
The Environment Show
Soundings
AP Special Assignment

Wednesday
KSFO Sports Byline USA
The Best of Our Knowledge
The Health Show
Social Thought


1:35am
7:35am
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1:35am
7:35am
8:35am
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Thursday
KSFO Sports Byline USA
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Friday
KSFO Sports Byline USA
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Saturday
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Tropic Times News May 6, 19943 Mrn right to wear 'the ba ae' Vol. VII, No. 18 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, May 6, 1994 Last of Liberty shiwps makes canal transit RODMAN NS (USNAVSTAPANCANAL Crew members, veterans and friends gathered PAO) -History has a way of repeating itself, and around and talked about their memories of the for 24 hours Saturday, visitors here may have felt war. The gathering lasted two hours and culmilike they had entered a time warp. nated with Rowley, retired Merchant Marine Liberty ship S.S. Jeremiah O'Brien arrived Rear Adm. Thomas Patterson and retired Capt. here just as it did nearly 50 years ago, crew on George Jahn cutting a 50th anniversary cake. deck, line handlers in place, flying all her World The crew departed the station Sunday morning War II flags. and began its transit of the canal. This time the O'Brien and her all-volunteer One crew member who disembarked at Cristocrew of 55, average age 71, were on a special bal with the 120 ship riders was Coleman mission. They were stopping over for provisions Schneider. Schneider, 70, was the only current and to transit the Panama Canal on the way to crew member who served on the O'Brien during Nornandy for the 50th anniversary of D-Day. World War II. Crew members were treated to a ceremony in Schneider first boarded the vessel as a cadet in honorofthis celebration. Pier2 South was decked 1943 and served on three voyages with the craft. out with red, white and blue bunting honoring the Now, the owner of one of the largest embroiderservicemembers who died in the June 6, 1944, ing businesses in the world, Schneider is trying to battle. use his influence to help keep the craft afloat. Speakers such as Rodman NS commander "When I firstasked aboutgoingon this voyage Capt. Arthur N. Rowley III, U.S. Army South they told me that there was already a full crew,"he Commander Maj. Gen. G.A. Crocker, and Navy said. "I volunteered to do anything to go on this League President Wilbur Vantine praised the journey. Now I'm going to do a little more." crew's drive and desire to take part in D-Day Colemansaidheistryingtoraisemorethan $1 activities. million to bring the ship to New York, N.Y. He's Volunteers resurrected the O'Brien from natargeting talk shows, major advertisers and busitional monument status to a full sea going vessel nessmen for donations. -which took several years. "This ship gave me so many memories during Department of Defense photo by Staff Sgt. Richard Pucket Visitors were able to meet and welcome the my time aboard, now I'm going to give something Jim Conwell, 57, SS Jeremiah O'Brien crew member,steers the crewofthe O'Brien when a special barbecue was back," he said. vessel out of Rodman NS and toward the Miraflores Locks. held for them at the Rodman Anchorage Club. O'Brien coverage continues on Pages 8-9. 250 civilian jobs axed by Sept. 30 National elections set for Sunday FORT CLAYTON (JTF-PANAMA) -National elections will COROZAL (USARSO PAO) -More than 250 agree to separate voluntarily by resignation or rebe held in the Republic of Panama Sunday. civilian jobs will be eliminated in U.S. Army South tirement by June 30," Penkoske said. As Panamanians prepare to go to the polls and participate in the Sept. 30 as part of manpower reductions, officials "The voluntary nature of the action eliminates selection of the country's leadership, U.S. forces, civilian composaid. any entitlement you may have to severance pay, In conjunction with this, the U.S. Army South lump sum retirement annuity, priority placement nents and their family members are reminded they must respect commanding general has approved the use of Volprogram and any other program you may have election r ee an id. untary Separation Incentive Pay. This incentive is a been eligible for had your separation been involunelion process, officials said. feder-al-wide program offered to employees before tary." Polling locations in Panama will be open 7 a.m.-4:30 p.m. fedeal-ide rogam fferd t empoyes bfore tar. -Sunday. Heavy traffic congestion is expected in urban areas. a reduction-in-force which will help minimize the In addition, ifthe employee is reemployedby the The Atlapa Convention Center in Panama City, command grid number of involuntary separations, said Jack federal government within five years ofseparation, Thp coordin etndCnt7-19, winaserCetas theman rd Penkoske, Directorate of Civilian Personnel direche must repay the entire VSIP amount, he said. map coordinates A and B 17-19, will serve as the main electoral tor, To apyfor incentives, employees must submit cne n oainfritrainlmda apply Panamanian police will set up barricades on streets adjacent to Permanent employees (U.S. or non-U.S.) may a completed Request for Personnel Action, Stanthe convention center today through Tuesday. Security will be be eligible for Voluntary Separation Incentive Pay. dard Form 52. tight in this area and U.S. personnel livinginearthis area or staying Only employees in designated surplus skill categoPart E of the form must show if the employee at the Caesar Park Hotel (formerly the Marriott) may experience ries, competitive levels, will be offered VSIP. plans on retiring or resigning. delays, detours and heavy traffic. This incentive pay is used to encourage certain SF-52s must heat the Benefits Branch by 4p.m. Personnel are advised to plan sufficient travel time to and from employees to voluntarily resign or retire and is May31 and your date ofseparation must be no later destinations during this period and to monitor the Southern Commade in a lump-sum cash payment, he said. than June 30, Penkoske said. Applications received desdintork dur tpdates. The severance pay formula is used to compute on or before 4 p.m. May 18 will be procensed first mand Network for updates the amount ofthe payment, but in no case can VSIP and the acceptance period may be extended or exceed $25,000, he said. terminated. Alcohol sales, weapons banned A calculation form can be obtained at the DCP Ifthe number ofemployees applying for separaFORT CLAYTON (JTF-PANAMA) -Because of elections in office to help estimate the incentive amount but is tion incentive exceeds the number of incentives the Republic of Panama Sunday, all bars will be closed and there only an estimate. -available for a specific organization or occupation, will be no public consumption or purchasing ofalcohol in Panama Voluntary Early Retirement Authority is also applications within that organization or occupation from noon Saturday to noon Monday. approved for use with the incentive and will allow will be processed in order of seniority using the There will also be no sales ofalcoholic beverages in shoppettes, some employees meeting reduced age and service Service Computation Date for leave, he said. exchange facilities, Class VI stores or any other installation requirements to retire early with an immediate "For each VSIP granted, we must be able to establishment where alcohol can be purchased and taken from the annuity, Penkoske said. document that one permanent employee is saved e isen whe al s and cased atakenbsrom the Employees covered under the Civil Service Refrom involuntary separation," Penkoske said. authorized facilities will be permitted on the premises only. No tirement System who retire under the early retire"The Chiefof Staffis the final approval authoralcoholic beverages will be sold for take out. ment authority will have their annuity reduced by ity for VSIP actions with the U.S. Army South and Privately owned weapons may not be carried off military two percent per year for each year under age 55, he the U.S. Army Garrison commander is the final installations Sunday. said. approval authority for garrison positions.' All requests for firearms pennits, to include renewals, are There is no reduction for employees covered For more information, call the Benefits Branch temporarily suspended until May 31 under Federal Employees Retirement Systm s at i85 5745 or the Recruitment and Placement "Ifyou applytfor tndareofferc(IVSIPyolinist Divison at 285-4155. More than 250 soldiers earn right to Howard AFB Base Operations *Gore salutes military, Page 4. wear coveted Expert Infantrymen's keeps flights, visitors coming and *Reserve efforts, Page 10. Badge. going. *Echo challenge, Page 12.

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Tropic Times May 6, 1994 Panama police using Veterradars near school zones and finance will De ing to anAMC changes 'freedom Because of numerous complaints about swer questions. For information, call 287speeding throughout the Balboa Elemen4753/4155. tary and High School area, the Panamanian National Police will now use radars to Defense department HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PA) -to Charleston, and they'll already be on detect speeding. Motorists will be issued a civilians need leave Space available "Freedom Bird" flights the waiting list when they arrive there," traffic citation if caught speeding. For have begun, offering customers space Castro said. more information, call 287-3376. A Department of Defense civilian emavailable travel from the Howard pasAnother space available change alployee needs donated leave. Richard senger terminal to Heartsfield Internalows almost all military members to Ordnance detachment Tedesco, a Directorate of Logistics emtional Airport in Atlanta via commercial board space-available flights in civilian ployee, suffered a heart attack and had to to hold amnesty day travel to the United States for open-heart conPassengers cannot return to Howard "Active duty Army, Navy and Air In conjunction with U.S. Army South surgery. Tedesco returned to Panama in directly from Atlanta -at least, not Force members can now board all Air Safety Stand Down Day, the 36th OrdJanuary, but suffered a relapse. traveling space-A -because there are Force and commercial contract aircraft in nance Detachment wit[ sponsor an AmmuLeave donations are also needed for no passenger service specialists currentcivilian clothes, regardless of their duty nition and Explosives Amnesty Day 7:30 Mayra Berlioz, secretary for the U.S. Milly assigned to Atlanta. There are plans status or destination," Castro said. "Only a.m.-3:30 p.m. May 19. Turn-in points will itary Group -Honduras. She needs an eye for return service later this year, said a the Marines are still required to wear milbe on SCN Field, Fort Clayton; the Fort operation. Anyone wanting to donate passenger service representative here. itary uniforms on military aircraft." Davis softball field; Building 533, through the Voluntary Leave Transfer ProPassengers who depart the space-A Passengers who choose to wear civilCorozal; Building 734, Howard Air Force gram can complete a Leave Donation flight in Atlanta will not be stranded ian clothing must ensure it is neat and Base; and Ammunition Supply Point numForm 44. Forms should be submitted to the stateside, but they will have to travel to clean, warm enough for the trip, and apber one, Rodman Naval Station. Directorate of Civilian Personnel, Labor Charleston AFB, S.C. to get the free tnip propriate for the mode of travel and the and Employee Development Division, back, said Jacalyn Castro, assistant sudeparture and destination points, Castro 128th Aviation Brigade Building 560, Corozal, Room 201. For iperintendent of the passenger terminal. said. sponsors dining out formation, call 285-6720. "Passengers can sign up for space-A Anyone with questions about the travel at this terminal, before departure changes may call the terminal at 284The 128th Aviation Brigade will hold a Fuel handlers course from Howard. We'll forward the names 5702. dining out May 20 at the Club Amador. People wanting to attend should make resregistration. under way ervations by May 13 by calling 287-5418. There will be a fuel handlers' course 79th Army Band holds cludes archery range and waterfront direcJune 6-10 at the Company A, 193rd Supconcerts tors, and the support staff includes kitchen Medical Material Branch port Battalion Motor Pool. Space and final dry season cooks and medical personnel. study materials are limited so units must The 79th Army Band will play dry seaScouts and staff will live in the jungle closes for inventory register by May 26. For information, call son concerts 6 p.m. May 13 at the Fort operations training area at Fort Sherman. The U.S. Army Medical Activity -Pan287-5366/5463. Davis Theater and May 15 at the Amador The staff will arrive at Fort Sherman on ama Medical Material Branch will be Gazebo. June 18, and leave when the camp ends closed for inventory next week. The deadWorld War 11 mementos -, June 29. line for submitting medical supply requests Womens business group People interested in participating is Monday. For information, call 282needed for birthday ball should begin their permissive temporary 5209/5114. World War 11 memorabilia is needed to meeting set for Monday duty, temporary active duty requests soon. be used during the Army Birthday Ball. A meeting for the American Business For more information, call Johnathan Red Cross safety course Memorabilia will be displayed in secure Women's Association Panama Canal Hilton at 284-5567/3516 or Kathy areas of Club Amador. For information, Charter Chapter will be held 5 p.m. MonMacPhail at 285-6548. slated for May 17-19 call the U.S. Army South Public Affairs day at the Italian Cuisine restaurant in CuAn American Red Cross first aid and Office at 287-3007. rundu. The guest speaker, Dradine Lee, an American Society holds safety course will be held 6-8 p.m. May international Jazzercise instructor, will talk 17-19 on the third floor of Building 519, Atlantic clerical exam set about fitness, health and franchising. For elections Thursday Fort Clayton. For information, call 287information, call 260-4744. The American Society elections for the 5509. for 10 a.m. June 8 board of directors will be held 7 p.m. There will be a clerical examination for CPO announces medical Thursday at Club Amador. Clerical administrative family members in the Atlantic communiposition available soon ty 10 a.m. June 8 at the Fort Davis Educap tDRMO holds spot bid test to be held May 27 tion Center, Building 235. To register, call The Directorate of Civilian Personnel The Clerical Administrative Support 285-4218. has announced intermittent positions availsale May 16 at Corozal Positions "CASP TEST" will be held 8:30 able for registered nurses, licensed practiThe Defense Reutilization and Marketa.m.-noon May 27 at the Central ExaminJob search seminars tioner nurses, emergency medical techniing Office will hold a local spot bid sale 7 ing Office. Transportation will be available cians and operating room technicians. a.m. May 16 in Building 745, Corozal. Infrom Valent Recreation Center. The bus to be held May 18 People with experience in maternal or spection is open the same day. Call Ada will be leave at 7:30 a.m. A SF-171 must Job search seminars and professional child, medical or surgical, critical care, Tweed at 285-4754. be submitted to the Civilian Personnel Ofcounseling in Spanish are available at the emergency room, pediatrics, orthopedics, flee before the examination. For informaArmy Career and Alumni Program Job operating room and clinics are needed. A Officers' council tion, call 285-5201. Assistance Center for Department of the current U.S. nursing license is required for Army Panamanian civilian employees. registered nurses and licensed practitioner changes meeting time Private pilot course Topics include finding employment infornurses. The Company Grade Officers Council, mation, writing a curriculum, practicing Applicants selected will attend a threeserving captains and lieutenants in Panabegins 6 p.m. Monday networking, interviewing and salary negoweek orientation course and will have the ma, has changed its meeting schedule to There will be a private pilot ground tiations. Classes are scheduled to begin opportunity to work in their specialty. 3:30 p.m. the second Friday ofeach month school course 6 p.m. Monday at the AlMay 18. For more information, call 287They will then be placed on an on-call rosat the Howard Officers' Club. brook AFS Youth Center. For information, 5844. ter for the area and called in to work as call 263-5044. needed. For information, call 285-4116. Sealed bids accepted for PACE center offers 1988 Toyota pickup Separation briefing starts training Tuesday Boy Scout camp needs Sealed bids will be accepted until May today at Building 519 Self help training will be held 10 a.m. volunteer support staff 14 for a 1988 Toyota pickup truck. The A pre-separation briefing will be 1:30 Tuesday at the PACE Improvement CenThe Panama Canal District/Boy Scouts minimum bid is $500. For information on p.m. today in Building 520, Fort Clayton. ter, Building 340 Corozal at the Directorof America needs volunteers to act as prowhere to submit bids, call the Howard The briefing is designed to help all soldiers ate of Engineering and Housing entrance. gram and support staff during its upcomAuto Skills Center at 284-3370. who are within 120 days of separating Call 285-6213 for more information. ing summer camp. The program staff inChristian musical festival AMC fh se begins noon May 14 Saturday Soto Cano AS, Honduras (C) Thursday A Christian music festival will be held 5:40 am C-130 Howard AFB 7:55 am, C-SA Howard AFB noon8 p.m. May 14 at McGrath Field beSt, Joseph, Mo. (U.S.) Tuesday Soto Cano AB, Honduras hind the Gamboa swimming pool. Chris5:40 am. C-141 Howard AFB Charleston AFB, SC (0) tian praise groups from Panama and the 1:55 pm C-5A Howard AFB Brasilia, Brazil (V, 0) canal area will participate. Charleston AFB, SC (0) Buenos Aires, Argentina May 13 Dover AFB, Del. Montevideo, Uruguay (0) 5:40 am C-130 Howard AFB Brasilia, Brazil Tegucigalpa, Honduras 3-week parenting class Sunday Soto Cano AB, Honduras No scheduled departures 8:40 a.m. B-727 Howard AFP Howard AFB begins Tuesday Atlanta IAP (C) Members of the Howard/Albrook comMonday Charleston lAP, SC USU.S. passport 5:55 am C-130 Howard AFB O-Overnight unity with children between the ages of San Salvador, El Salvador Wednesday C-Commercial Contract 6 and 12 years old may attend a three-week Soto Cano AB, Honduras 5:25 am C-130 Howard AFB V-Visa parenting class that meets Tuesdays and Howard AFB San Jose, Costa Rica (V,CC) M-Medevac Thursdays beginning Tuesday. Call 2843:45 p.m. B-727 Howard AFB Howard AFB CC-Country Clearance 6410.

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___ __ _ _ j~ ew sTropic Times News May 6,1994 Y 269 infantrymen earn right to wear 'the badge' by Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski USARSO Public Affairs Office EMPIRE RANGE -Call for fire, communications, individual movement techniques, employ a claymore mine, first aid, Nuclear, Biological and Chemical. all of these are tasks that can either make or break an infantry unit in combat. During peacetime, knowing and performing these tasks can earn infantry soldiers one of an infantrymen's most difficult and prized possessions -the Expert Infantrymen's Badge. In the past two weeks, nearly 340 soldiers from 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry (Light); 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry; and various other units with infantry soldiers attempted the task. Of those soldiers, 269 proved they could meet the challenge and earn themselves the Expert Infantrymen's badge. "It was very impressive. There was a lot of preparation by both the battalions and a lot of enthusiasm," said Command Sgt. Maj. Claus Madsen, 193rd Infantry Brigade (Light), sergeant major. Throughout the week, the infantry soldiers were tested on their proficiency in 23 tasks, which varied from assembling an M-249 Squad Automatic Weapon to completing a 12-mile road march. The soldier must perform each of the tasks correctly U.s. Army photo by Sgt. Robin A. Mantikosi and in a certain amount of time, officials said. A 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry soldier lays wire for a Claymore mine. The only way a soldier did not receive their EIB was to receive two no-go's on one station or three no-go's overInf., said he was also confident about getting his EIB. soldier you can be. all. Once disqualified, the soldier must wait another year "This is my first time going for my EIB," said the "It's pride.when you see somebody else has it and before trying again. former Marine. you don't, you want it," he said. Spe. Byron McNeil of Company B, 5-87th Inf., has "This is really different from what I did in the Ma"It's important to many infantrymen to get their been trying to get his EIB for four years. rines. They do more written tests, where we do more acEIB because it's the only award where you test soldiers "So far it's been simple, small mistakes that got me tual action things." on their individual skills and not as a team," Salvarlis no-gos," McNeil said on the second day of testing. Pfc. Peter Salvarlis from Co. A, 1st Bn., 508th Inf., said. "But I'm really confident that I'm going to get it this earned his EIB after only two attempts. "We can only coach them to a certain point but when year." Salvarlis said that it's important to most infantry solthey get up to the tester, there's nobody to help," Salvarlis Spc. Mark Steele from Headquarters Company, 5-87th dies to get their EIB because "it proves you are the best said. AF legal defense 'Unofficial ambassador'takes marks 20 years role in Venezuela seriously of ind e pe nd e nce by 1st Lt. Jim Knotts "Going overseas is challenging enough," said U.S. Southern Command Public Affairs Office Gardner, who grew up following his Air Force father ALBROOK AFS (USAF Judiciary/Area Defense --all over the world. "But going overseas where you Counsel) -Air Force Defense Services are celebrating 20 CARACAS, don't have the support system common to most miliyears of independence. Venezuela -At tary bases adds a degree of difficulty." Before 1974, legal services -both defense and prossome time, most As do most of the military group members, caution were provided by the base legal office. Attormilitary members Gardner's family is with him. With no military comhave been called missary or medical facilities, the daily chores more difneys were chosen by the Staff Judge Advocate from attor"unofficial amcult for his wife, Vanessa; their son, Wonzie; and neys assigned to the legal office. The SJA-and his or her bassadors," sugdaughter, Jarielle. assistants were under command of and rated by the Wing gesting the great "An experience like this either strengthens the Commander. impact they can family unit or tears it apart. I feel it's strengthening This practice led Air Force members to think that their have as represenmine. It's a real credit to our spouses to function like assigned defense counsel had an interest in pleasing the tatives of the they do, and most spouses perform admirably," he said. command -maybe at the expense of the accused United States "What this teaches you is to become self-sufficient member's legal representation, said Capt. Michael A. while overseas. and use your ingenuity." he added. "It tests everything Sciales, Area Defense Counsel. This title cer.you've ever been taught. You learn a lot of things After much thought and study, a separate command tainly applies to about yourself It's a challenge, but a challenge that was developed where JAGs assigned to defense services U.S. Air Force Capt. Wonzie L. Gardner can be met." were permanently assigned to this command and were outCapt. Wonzie L. Gardner, Jr., joint logistics officer for The job offers unique rewards, however. side the influence of the local command. The program the U.S. military group here. "The most rewarding part of my job is providing an worked out well and was made permanent, Sciales said. Gardner and the other military group members idea of how to do something differently that not only The present Defense Counsel service falls under the Air work directly with the Venezuelans to provide assishelps their militaries, but helps Venezuelan or Force Judiciary. Each base is assigned one or more detance in purchasing U.S. military equipment and trainGuyanese society as a whole," Gardner said. fense counsel, whose sole job is to provide legal service ing packages, and coordinating exercises and exGardner has gained a special appreciation forthings for members accused of crimes or facing other adverse or changes to military schools. most military people take for granted. administrative actions, Sciales said. As logistics officer, Gardner's job is to handle all "After being here, I love going to Panama. When I Defense counsel are usually selected from a base staff, foreign military sales to Venezuela. go through the gate at Howard Air Force Base and have based on their experience and ability to operate indepen"The host nation gives us a shopping list," Gardner that airman salute me, a chill goes down my spine and dently. said. "We find the appropriate system and then see if my eyes well up with tears. Everyone should be sent JAGs selected for assignment as Area DeIense Counthey can sustain it. What differentiates us from some away just so they learn to appreciate all the things the .other countries is we provide a total package -hardmilitary has to offer," Gardner said. sets receive a permanent change ofassignment to the Air ware, training, and spare parts." Gardner takes his job as "unofficial ambassador" seForce Judiciary and are no longer attached to a Wing or He has the unique position of pulling double duty riously, too. Working through a local church, Gardner other component unit, Sciales said. Area Defense Counby providing the same service, plus training support, volunteers his time to work with local children. sels are supported by a circuit defense counsel -a lawyer for the neighboring country of Guyana. Historically, He reaches people who normally wouldn't come responsible for several bases -and are rated by the Chief Venezuela and Guyana have disputed their boundary, into contact with the U.S. military. Circuit Defense Counsel -a lawyer responsible for a diswith Venezuela claiming most of western Guyana. "As a military member, you can have more of an trict or region. Being the U.S. contact for both countries puts impact. You can show the kids we're not bad people. Each Area Defense Counsel is part of a team, fiercely Gardner's ambassadorial skills to the test. We have a military mission, but we're still active in the independent and committed to giving members with the "This job gives the military group the opportunity community," Gardner said. best defense possible. to bring the two countries together," he said. "We try Volunteering has given him a new perspective on Defense Services has been living up to this obligation to keep the lines of communication open between the the United States. for the past 20 years and will continue to do so in the futwo militaries, so if something happens, we can avert a "If we can get people in the U.S. who are ture, Sciales said, crisis by having the two sides talk to each other." complaining, make them come abroad and see how This assignment also offers many other challenges. others live, they'd stop complaining," he said.

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4 Tropic Times XI 4May6, 1994 Mihitary News Gore applauds DoD employees'efforts for change WASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces Information "The president and I are firmly convinced that the prob"There's your best opportunity to become more cusService) -In most places in America, the way to test a lem is not federal employees. It is federal employees tomer driven." cake is to taste it. trapped in bad systems and outdated procedures and unHe pointed to the milspec example as a success story. But until a Defense Department employee stepped in, productive regulations and burdensome red tape." In another, he spoke of the workers in the Air Force Disthe way to test a cake according to military specifications Gore said the Clinton administration's response is to trict of Washington's travel section who streamlined and was: give every federal employee a mandate to change the sysautomated travel voucher payments. In that case, finance "After the cake is cooled for two hours at 69 degrees F tem. "For years the federal government has taught the peoofficials cut the number of steps taken to issue payment plus or minus 5 degrees, at a relative humidity of 50 perple that work for it that if you stick your neck out to try from 17 to as few as four. cent, plus or minus 5 percent, the cake is set on two cylinsomething new, you may get your head chopped off," he The Air Force had another example with a complete ders, each 4 inches in diameter which are spaced at least 6 said. "An important part of (employee) empowerment is revision of its regulatory system. Gore said they started inches apart. Then wait for two minutes and check for to change the culture so mistakes are seen as an opportuwith nearly 1,600 separate regulations totaling 55,000 cracks." nity to learn." pages. The team cut this to 160 policy statements each Jeffrey Jones, assistant deputy undersecretary of deIf employees make mistakes in good faith, then they about three pages long. All this is on customer-friendly fense for logistics, took a look at this specification and should not be penalized. "If every time someone makes a compact discs. said, "No more." He initiated a program to do away with mistake the whole bureaucracy plays 'Gotcha' and comes Tthe Naval Air Systems Command North Island Demilitary specifications for all military mess hall food. down like a ton of bricks (on the employee), then (manpot, Calif., received the USA Today Quality Award for its "Milspec food is being replaced by real food," was how agement) shouldn't be surprised that nobody tries anywork in empowering employees to make changes. Vice President Al Gore put it during a March Pentagon thing new," Gore said. Gore talked about an Army program where the clinics town meeting on reinventing government. The vice presiAn important part of Gore's message at the Pentagon call 'high-risk' people to set up appointments rather than dent's visit was a follow-up to a meeting held in August was customer service. DoD's customers are the American having people trying to dial into a constant busy signal. 1993. people, and it is the mission of every person in the organi"But changing the culture is a real challenge," he said. "You told me then about the worst frustration of all (in zation to ensure the country's freedom and security. "In "The heart of it is very simply a mandate to change from a working for the federal goverment): the public's day-to-day terms, much of what you do is produce goods system of centralized control based on mistrust of federal misperception that the main problem with the federal govand services for the men and women in uniform," he employees to a system characterized by clear goals, a few emiment is lazy and ineffective civil servants," Gore said. said. guiding principles and trust in our people." Joulwan calls for credible U.S. presence in Europe U.S., Thai troops WASHINGTON, D.C. (American supports the program designed to extend conduct Cobra Gold Forces Information Service) -Maintaining the concept of collective security to other WASHINGTON (American a credible U.S. presence, nuclear European and former Soviet nations. Forces Information Service) -A tocounterproliferation and quality of life isThe proliferation of weapons of mass tal of 24,000 U.S. and Thai servicesues top the list of concerns for the comdestruction poses "the most potential for members are participating in Cobra mander of U.S. forces in Europe. disaster," he said. Russia maintains control Gold exercises in Thailand. Army Gen. George A. Joulwan, suof all ICBMs, long-range, nuclear-capable The participants are testing joint/ preme allied commander Europe and bombers and ballistic missile submarines. combined land and air operations, commander, U.S. European Command, Still, NATO faces an arsenal of 23,000 combined naval operations, and said the collapse of the Iron Curtain was a nuclear warheads. "Of equal, if not greatamphibious and special operations. two-edged sword. The former Warsaw er, concern for the future is the possibility U.S. servicemembers came from Pact countries and former Soviet Union of weapons of mass destruction and the Marine Forces Pacific, US. Army dropped the fetters of communism. technology to deliver them falling into the Pacific, Pacific Air Forces and the "In the short term, however, it has alwrong hands -rogue states or terrorists," Pacific Fleet. In addition, troops lowed a host of historic animosities to reJoulwan said. "This holds the possibility came from Special Operations surface and fester," he told the Senate for a trly nightmare scenario." Command Pacific, Forces ComArmed Services Committee. He supports full implementation of mand, Air Mobility Command and "The tragic situation in the former Yuboth strategic nuclear reduction treaties elements of the Air National Guard goslavia, though an extreme example, is and indefinite extension of the Nonprolifand Air Force Reserve. This is the hardly an aberration," he said. "Other arration Treaty. He also calls for full partic13th year for Cobra Gold. eas are ripe for future conflict caused by ipation in the Chemical Weapons ConvenGen. George A. Jouwan ethnic and religious strife, resurging nation. Numbers of troops tionalism or territorial disputes." Joulwan said NATO and the United isting systems and develop improved theshrink b 3,616 Joulwan, the former commander-inStates should bring all available instruater missile defense," he said. "The lack of SHIN by 3,61 6 chief, U.S. Southern Command, said ments of power to bear on this problem an effective theater missile defense is a WASHINGTON, D.C (AmenNATO is key to stability in the region. The and further called for development of a vipotential war stopper for (Europe); this can Forces Information Service) NATO alliance is the only organization in able theater missile defense system. threat puts our theater and our allies' forcU.S. armed forces shrank 3,616 in the area with the tools, infrastructure and "Theater missile defense plays a key es at risk." February to 1,668,929. The military command arrangement already in place. role in minimizing two critical dangers to Joulwan called on Congress to provide is 84,715 servicemembers smaller "No organization on the horizon can U.S. security -the proliferation of weapfor a reasonable quality of life for service than it was at the same time last replace NATO," he said. "Likewise, no ons of mass destruction and regional members and their families. "Our troops year. On Feb. 28, 1994, there were other country can replace U.S. leadership. threats to U.S. interests," he said. "Theater and their families have endured many 566,318 soldiers, 491,092 sailors, It is the glue that binds the alliance togethmissiles present a problem from their dehardships while carrying out the highest 175,838 Marines and 435,681 airer. The price of our leadership of NATO structive potential, not only from a military operations tempo ever in the midst of the men. is a credible, active forward presence. The aspect, but also from a political aspect due largest military drawdown since World permanent force we will have in Europe to their potential as a terror weapon to War II," he said. "They have and will Vietnam vet named at the end of the drawdown provides a threaten population centers." make tremendous sacrifices for their counto memorial post minimum presence. To combat the threat, the only deployed try. We should not take advantage of their Joulwan said NATO is going through system is the Army's Patriot system. Howcommitment or there could come a time WASHINGTON, D.C. (Ameria fundamental metamorphosis in response ever, several new systems are in final stagwhen we will not be able to keep top-notch can Forces Information Service) to the changing era. "The alliance has opes of development. Joulwan said Europepeople in the armed forces." The Women in Military Service for erated out of area, proving itself as a tool an Command and Supreme Headquarters To keep readiness high, he asked ConAmerica Memorial Foundation apfor enforcing United Nations resolutions Allied Powers Europe are involved in degress to fund unanticipated contingencies pointed Mary R. Stout to its board in the Balkans," he said. veloping theater missile requirements, and not make the services take the money ofdirectofrs. Another aspect of this change is the doctrine, policy and strategy. from their operations and maintenance Stout, a former Army nurse and Partnership for Peace program. Joulwan "I fully support efforts to upgrade exbudgets. Vietnam veteran, will help raise funds for the Women's Memorial, -' to be built at the entrance of ArlingU.S. Supreme Court to make honoraria ban ruling ton National Cemetery outside Washington. WASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces Information Sergress, their staffs and political appointees from receiving money vice) -The U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether the honorarfor speeches or newspaper articles. In the last stages of debate, Military names top ia ban violates federal employees' right to free speech. Congress extended the law to most federal civilian employees. A court spokesperson said the justices will probably hear arLower courts have repeatedly found the honoraria ban to be photographers guments in the late fall. A decision is unlikely before spring 1995. unconstitutional. Therefore, the Department of Justice asked the WASHINGTON, D.C. (AmeriThe ban is part of the 1989 Ethics in Government Act. It bans Supreme Court to rule on the case to get a final decision. On April can Forces Information Service) federal employees and military officers from writing or speaking 18, the court agreed to hear the case. Marine Staff Sgt. Earie Grafton, a for pay outside their govemmentjobs. Enlisted members and nonUntil the Supreme Court renders a decision, Office of Govphotographer with Pacific Stars and commissioned officers are not subject to the ban. ernment Ethics guidance issued Feb. 2, 1994, still applies, said Stripes, and Marine Staff Sgt. Al The ban went into effect Jan. 1, 1991. It applies only to speakMike Korwin of the ethics office. Thus, the honoraria ban will Moore, a videographer based in ing and nonfiction writing for newspapers and magazines. It apnot be enforced unless and until the Supreme Court rules it is Quantico, Va. won the 1993 plies even if employees write or speak on a subjects totally unreconstitutional. That guidance means employees who have been military photographer and lated to official duties. The ban does not apply to books, photogkeeping payments in escrow can take them out. That also means videographer of the year awards. raphy, artwork and other means of expression. employees can accept payment for writing or speaking that had The ban was originally intended to prevent members of Conbeen subject to the ban.

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_ _ _ __ _ _ __T opic Times_ Military News May 6,1994 17 W11 .M U.S. Navy photo by Joe Hendricks Rangers train on carrier U.S. Army Rangers from the 2nd Battalion, 75th Regiment, practice their skills with a mortar while embarked on a joint service exercise on board the aircraft carrier USS George Washington. The deployment of Rangers and Air Force helicopters aboard the carrier is a test of Atlantic Command's joint force packaging. DoDDs consolidating Troops beginning phase 2 of 'Fuertes Caminos' QUARRY HEIGHTS (USSOUTHCOM PAO) -At traveled by convoy to the base camp located at the SalvaEuropean offices the invitation of the government of El Salvador, U.S. doran Miraflores military installation. Army engineers from the Reserve Component in the UnitA few communications specialists and well drillers WASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces Infored States and support soldiers from Panama have begun from USARSO's 106th Signal Brigade and the 536th demation Service) -The Department of Defense Depenphase II of"Fuertes Caminos-94." ployed from Panama, and additional well drillers will foldents Schools system is consolidating its three EuroFC '94 is a combined engineering exercise with the low by mid-May. pean regional offices to save money and increase efSalvadoran military that ends Aug. 20. During the fourTask Force Vulcan -the command and control eleficiency, but not at students' expense. month exercise, U.S. Army and Salvadoran military engiment for the exercise -is composed of units from the DoDDS officials promise no educational proneers and community volunteers will repair or construct 121st U.S. Army Reserve Command, the 167th Corps grams will be cut in the downsizing effort, ordered six schools and one medical clinic in the south-central deSupport Command of the Alabama National Guard and by a 1993 defense management review decision. Adpartment of La Paz. Also, a U.S. Army well drilling team U.S. Army South. About 280 U.S. soldiers will deploy to ministrative slots will be cut, however. The officials from Panama will drill six potable water wells in the same El Salvador every two weeks for a total of seven two-week estimate the consolidation and cuts will save.$27.5 area. training periods. The duration staff of the task force will million by fiscal 1997. This exercise is a follow-up to the first Fuertes number about 120 soldiers. "We have to reduce staffing by 95 work-years, Caminos engineering exercise conducted in El Salvador The scope of the engineer work includes extensive reconsolidate regional offices from five to three and disfrom August to December of last year in which the 536th pairs in two of the six schools involved, construction of trict offices from 19 to nine," DoDDS director John Engineer Battalion of U.S Army South and Salvadoran 27 new classrooms and an auditorium. Latrine facilities Stremple said. "When you're cutting the number of military engineers participated. They completed 13 will be constructed in five schools, and fences for three students and teachers you have, it's common sense to schools, one community center, five water wells and schools will be built. In addition, an ambulance entrance cut the number of administrative employees, too." worked in the area of Zacatecoluca in the La Paz Departand a fence will be constructed at the medical clinic. He said the European consolidation will be comment. They also prepared six foundations for school The principal objective of Fuertes Caminos is to proplete by July 1. The new regional office, in projects during the second phase. vide training opportunities for U.S. military units, while Wiesbaden, Germany, will manage seven district ofFollowing the arrival of the 30-member advance party demonstrating continued U.S. support for strengthening fices re-formed from the current 12. The Pacific Re(including the task force commander), the first contingent democracy in El Salvador and assisting the people of El gion will maintain its current two district offices, in of 157 troops and equipment arrived in San Salvador SunSalvador. This training includes mobilization and deploySeoul, South Korea, and Yokota Air Base, Japan. The day on a C-5A and a L10 11 aircraft. The bulk of the ment from the United States to a remote environment, perPanama Region consolidated with the island schools engineering equipment and vehicles also arrived Sunday formance of humanitarian and civic action projects in El (Newfoundland, Bermuda and Cuba) in 1992. by boat at the Salvadoran port ofAcajutla. From there they Salvador and redeployment to the United States. Edwin Dorn, undersecretary of defense for personnel and readiness, asked DoDDS to maintain level of service as much as possible during the drawPostal service issues stam p honoring Buffalo Soldiers down. WASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces Information dier in the foreground has his rifle at the ready, and the "The teacher-to-student ratio and monetary level Service) -The U.S. Postal Service has issued 185 million other three troopers fill the background. Military artist per child will stay the same," Stremple said. "I ask 29-cent commemorative stamps honoring a group of litMort Kantsler of Oyster Bay, N.Y., designed the stamp. parents and teachers to be patient. There may be some tle-known American heroes. The stamp was dedicated in Dallas April 22 during cershort-term disruptions, but we're fortunate we "Buffalo Soldiers changed the face of American miliemonies hosted by the Afro-American Postal League haven't had a reduction in force and don't anticipate tary history forever, but they never received due recogniUnited for Success, or A-PLUS, and is one of 15 being one. tion," said Navy Cmdr. Carlton Philpot, chairman of the released this year featuring African-Americans. Stremple set up a consolidation committee with Buffalo Soldier Education and Historical Committee. Philpot said the stamp was the last of his committee's representatives from all concerned groups to make "I hope the stamp will motivate historians, students, goals. The first two were the dedication ofa Buffalo Solthe transition as smooth as possible. teachers and publishers to write and teach about Buffalo dier monument at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., and a national "We're maintaining quality. We're committed to Soldiers' accomplishment and achievements," resolution making July 28, 1992, Buffalo Soldier Day maintaining strong academic core programs," he said. The stamp dramatically depicts four mounted Africanacross the nation. Philpot said the committee's main goal "We will continue to offer children an education in American soldiers, said Monica A. Hand of the Postal now is to get the legacy of Buffalo Soldiers into history which parents can have the greatest confidence." Service corporate relations office in Washington. A solbooks in classrooms across America by the year 2000.

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T Iropic Thies SMay6, Voices Lack of cost of living allowance concerns reader Dear Mayors' Corner: It is requested that the military police I would like to know why we don't get take appropriate action. cost of living allowances here? The groPeace and Tranquillity ceries alone kill the budget. The prices in and there are changes in the prices. Ifthere commissary if they feel something is the commissaries here are higher than in is a change in price, that receipt document wrong while they shop. We will answer all Dear Peace: Hawaii and you get COLA there. is processed into the inventory account your questions and, hopefully, you will MP Liaison Investigators have talked Also, why doesn't the Corozal Coinsystem. The price changes are then tansleave as a satisfied customer. with the manager of the establishment in missary change the prices on the shelves? mitted to the three stores and loaded into question and told him about the problem. The last time I bought groceries, at least their scanner systems which prints new laDear Mayors' Corner: The MPs will continue to monitor the comfive of the items where rung up at a higher bels to be put on the shelves. My concern, and that of my neighbors pliance of this issue. This should correct price than that displayed on the shelf. There should be a short time span beat Quarry Heights, is the vehicles not conthe noise problem so further actions won't Could you please help me with these tween updating the cash registers and the forming to Panama Traffic Regulation that have to be taken that could result in disquestions? shelflabels and we try to keep these changare being allowed on post. continuing this service to the community. Why No COLA es to a minimum by doing the price changAccording to Article 8 of the regulaes after hours. tion, all vehicles must have mufflers and Editor's note: This column allows Dear Why: About the price differences between baffles to reduce noise levels -this incommunity members to submit quesI submitted your questions to Lt. Col. Hawaii and Panama -a price comparieludes motorcycles, tions to the Mayoral Congress. Letters John McNulty, commissary commander, son was done recently using 10 randomly Recently, pizza delivery motorcycles sPuli be mailed on APos' Corner and he gave the following answer: selected items. In all but one case, Panama have been seen -and heard -on post in (MPS). Anonymity will be granted The pricing in Panama commissaries is prices were lower. The one item not priced increasing numbers. Not one of these moupon request. The Tropic Tnes reserves done through receipt pricing. lower was priced the same. torcycles has baffles which results in exthe right to edit letters and responses for Receipt pricing is done each time a We strongly encourage all of our cuscessive noise. At times, it seems the mobrevity, clarity and propriety. product comes in from the United States tomers to look for the management of the torcycles are inside the living room. Contraband control nabs 7 non-ID card holders Bogus privileges Contraband Control Investigators apprehended seven Provost Marshals Corner people last week for alleged unauthorized possession of military identification cards. All of the people were civilians working for local contractors and five were also charged with allegedly illegally possessing APO boxes. Wrongfully possessing military ID cards and APO boxes are serious offenses and will result in the responsible parties being charged. Anyone knowing ofsomeone abusing these privileges should call the military police at 2874401 or 289-5133. Bad community relations An incident at the Fort Clayton pedestrian gate last week led to six people being charged by the MPs. Three civilians and three military were involved in a verbal altercation that turned physical. The six were apprehended and charged with breach of peace. Two of the civilians were also charged with unlawful entry when it was discovered they were on post without proper identification. People signing guests on to post are reminded they are responsible for the conduct of the guests while on post. Be sure to know the rules and regulations before signing -anyone on post. Costly telephone calls A Fort Kobbe soldier was the victim of a theft that cost him nearly $2,000 when someone gained access to his calling card and personal identification number and made several unauthorized calls. Ifa calling card has been compromised, notify the telephone company immediately and call the MPs at 287-4401 or 289-5133. Exceeded established limitations Several people have been charged recently with exceeding established limitations on controlled items. Some exceeded the limitations by more than twice the monthly allowance. Everyone should be aware of the monthly limitations placed on various items at exchange facilities and commissaries. If an event is planned that will require more than the Pacific Atlantic amount authorized, request an exception to policy from Fort Clayton 400 housing area -one larceny of secured Fort Espinar -two larcenies of unsecured private propthe Garrison Commander's office, private property erty For more information, call the U.S. Southern ComCorozal 300 area -one larceny of secured private propFort Sherman -two larcenies of secured private property mand Contraband Control Section at 286-3303/3304. erty The following crimes occurred in on and off post Fort Kobbe 800 area -one larceny of secured private Off post housing April 22-28. property None reported This authorized unofficial command information pubChief.Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor Journalists.Sgt. Eric Hortin lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Editor.StaffSgt. Richard Puckett Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Sports Editor.Sgt. Lori Davis Spc. Alexander C. White Information Program of the Department of Defense, unStaff Editors.Sgt. E.J. Hersom 24th Wing Public Affairs Office.284-5459 der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S. Spc. John Hall Public Affairs Officer.Capt. Warren L. Sypher Southern Command. Rosemary Chong Public Affairs Superintendent Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the Maureen Sampson Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Student Intern.Juan Carlos Palacio Journalists. ..Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. Southern Command Public Affairs Office. 282-4278 Sgt. James A. Rush The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Command Information Officer. Patrick Milton U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 Telephone 285-6612. U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.287-3007 Public Affairs Officer.Diane Gonzalez Commander in Chief .Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey Public Affairs Officer. Lt. Col. Melanie Reeder Photographers Director, Public Affairs Col. James L. Fetig Command Information Officer.Beth Taylor Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor Editor.Staff Sgt. Jane Usero Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano J. Mays 1U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.289-4312 -* T ro p ic T im e s NCOIC. .Sgt. Richard Emert

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Tropic Times 7 ommentaMay6, 1994 Baffling stress Drawdown pressures add to everyday problems by Jerry W. Armstrong, M.S. fatigue; sudden change in social by Jrry .Amstrng, .S.activities such as use of alcohol or Director, Howard Family Support Center atvte uha s fachlo drugs; remarks about feeling hopeless; ife changes, transitions, and giving away possessions or throwing traumas can have a dramatic away valuable belongings; losing impact on a family. Often, interest in activities; and withdrawal critical life events of one family from friends. member will send ripples throughout What can you do? the rest of the family, impacting each Encourage the person to talk, and family member in different ways. above all, be a good-listener. Human Many people handle trying contact promotes hope. Ask the person situations well and grow through how he or she feels and display a gentle such experiences. attitude with your response. Others, however, experience For example you might say "You difficulty in adjusting and become seem as if you've been down. Have distressed. Stress is a part of everyyou?" day life. If the person responds "yes," don't Most of the time, we keep it make them feel guilty for having these under control, but several changes feelings, but acknowledge that everyone occurring over short periods of time, has these feelings sometimes. Show such as a move to a new duty station, that you care. loss of friends, change in schools, Listen and be supportive, but realize divorce, and unexpected crisis can that your friend may need specialized cause anxiety and emotional distress. help. Current reductions in the DepartIf the person refuses to seek help, ment of Defense increase levels of contact family members, a chaplain or competition to achieve, present the person's commander. pressures to conform to organization There's a good chance that the or structure, and call for the producseriousness of the person's problem may tion of quality results in a sometimes have gone undetected, and someone complex, technological environment. needs to be informed. Some people set their goals so Finally, don't take matters into your high that when the goal is not own hands. A person experiencing reached, they feel like failures. severe distress and sending signals of Disappointment can be overwhelmself-destructive behavior needs immediing. ate help from trained professionals. Stress factors encountered by Within the Air Force, available military service members and their helping resources include chaplains, families include moving, financial behavioral science professionals, strain, loss of possessions, environmedical professionals, family support ment, critical change in the family staff, commanders and first sergeants. unit such as divorce or death, Similar resources are available with the expectations to excel in work or access to daily needs or services, neglect when too many problems are encounArmy and Navy components. social relationships, lack of commuor abuse, and other similar stressors. tered over a short period of time. If you would like more information nication, health problems, alcohol Indicators of trouble Clues that indicate a person may need on this subject, contact the Howard and drug abuse, embarrassment, fastStress reactions tend to be cumulative help include suffering a serious loss or AFB Family Support Center, Building paced life style, isolation, inadequate and may create a "last straw" effect humiliation; changes in appetite or sleep; 707, phone 284-5650. 6 -How do you handle stress? "I get involved with "I take it one day at a "I write, sew, dance and "Most times, stress is "When I get stressed activities around the time and overcome each take it one day at a time. best relieved by watchout, I first try to take a base, especially sports." obstacle subsequently. Stress is not always bad. ing comedies or just moment for myself, Don't overload yourself Thinking positive talking with friends." then, I go play 18 and keep a positive helps." holes." attitude." Joe Parrish Cpl. Joseph V. Benson Tech Sgt. Pat Dupar Seaman Stephen P. Black Capt. Bob Marasco U.S. Air Force Marine Corps Security 24th Mission Support Naval Marine Corps Reserve 24th Services Squadron civilian employee Force Company -Panama Squadron Center, Panama Canal Det. The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries -or responses to commentaries -to the Tropic Timoes. The staff reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

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8 Tropic Times May 6, 1994 DOD photo by Senr Mastor Sgt. Sowe Taylor Richard Brannon, 75, acting chief engineer of the Jeremiah O Brian. AA R T) phvr by Sernor MIisterSg SgteI Taylor Retired Merchant Marine Read Adm. Thomas Patterson, on the bridge deck of the Jeremiah O'Brien. g DoD photo by SwahSg RS har PckE D pn1, Se.Mas-e1 Sg Se-e Tayh' D b 4 OybW .ho kue. James Brumbaugh, one of 120 shipriders Sunday, takes a look Retired Merchant Marine Capt. The SSJeremiah O'Brienenters San Miguel locks, through the O'Briens'forward gun sight. George Jahn, O'Brien's skipper. cira 1994.

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Tropic Times Ch May 6, 1994 The Last ibert The O'Brien makes way for the shores of Normandy the 50th anniversary celebration of that historic began in San Francisco, where the 441-foot ship is By Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor event. (See related story, page 1.) berthed as a museum. Chief, Tropic Times -And in another repeat of history again, the While the oldest reported crew member on the I t was hard to keep up. The 135-degree heat O'Brien sailed through the Panama Canal for its ship was the captain at 78 (no one could find out was dripping wet, yet there was virtually third time Sunday. It had been through once in the age of the admiral, and he wasn't saying), the no sweat on his aged, but rugged face. At 1944 and once again in 1945. youngest was just 19. 75, Richard Brannan was serving as chief engineer, But the "highlight" of the O'Brien 's career "You can learn so much just being on this ship. and just getting him to sit still for a moment was a began on June 6, 1944, when the Allies invaded the Everyone is a master. challenge. IHe was busy with the 1940s-vintage European mainland. You can't find this much steam engine that was propelling us through the Operation Overlord, as it was known, began 15 experience anywhere, Panama Canal. minutes after midnight with the dropping of two said Nate Whitlock, a Finally, he stopped for a moment, elbow on battalions of British and American pathfinders into cadet from the Merchant knee, but never took his eyes off the engine while the moonlit sky over Normandy. Marine Academy, Kings waiting for another command from the bridge. Offshore, more than 200,000 soldiers rode more Point, N.Y. There wasn't much time to talk. "If you really than 5,000 ships across the English Channel toward Whitlock is one of 54 want to know what I'm like, think of Ben Canon." five beaches along the Normandy coast. What men and one woman who That was in reference to a series of articles that ran author Cornelius Ryan would later describe as "the volunteered to crew the in the 1930s Saturday Evening Post about a merlongest day in history," the invasion had begun the O'Brien for its threechant marine engineer. But whether or not he is liberation of the continent from Nazi domination. month trip. And it was Nate Whitlock, like the original Ben Canon, this engineer from the The O'Brien sailed.the next day from volunteers, led by retired "bay area of California" sailed through "his" Southampton, England, (some accounts put it June Merchant Marine Rear Adm. Thomas Patterson, engine room like a spry cat after a mouse, leaving 9) for Omaha beach with 700 soldiers aboard. From who saved the ship from decay in a ship.graveyard, nothing to chance. the personal log of one of the crew: "Saturday, destined to be sold for scrap. The ship itself, as if returning from the dead, is June 10, 1944. Arrived at the Omaha beachhead. As a member of the Maritime Administration in the last floating survivor of the Normandy invasion Thousand of ships were in the harbor, of all types. 1962, Patterson came across the O'Brien, and of World War II, and is now on yet one more Warships provided a semi-circle of protection." eventually it was the last Liberty-class ship left out voyage, manned by a volunteer crew that averages The O'Brien would make I 1 such trips to the of 2,751 originally built during World War II. 62 years young. Normandy beaches during its fourth voyage to Patterson became the ship's only hope. It would The SSJeremiah O'Brien and its crews plan to England. take a lot of money, a lot of time, a lot of people to be in Normandy, France, by June 6 to take part in This voyage is the eighth for the O'Brien, which restore the ship, to build a working, living museum out of its rusted, ancient hull. "I didn't know what to do," Patterson told us as The seven w ar we stood on O'Brien 's bridge deck, surrounded by the cliffs of the Galliard Cut, half-way through the Canal. voyages of the But as he spun his tale of raising money, equipment and supplies to refit the ship, we all gained a sense of the enormity of the project, which took Jeremiah O'Brien _decades to complete. Some 2,751 Liberty-class ships were built during To board the O'Brien was like boarding a ship World War II to carry cargo and personnel or the just out of the shipyards, but from a time past. Allied armed forces. The Jermiah O'Briein was hul After sitting in a shipyard for 33 years, its crew of number 806 The keel was laid on May 6, 1943 and volunteers began on March 29, 1978, when five launched just six wscks later on June 19, 19.3. At 441 A Ltbety ship in the North Atlanttc, 194 volunteers logged the first 35 hours. More than feet, it has a deadweight tonnage of 10,735 tons. 00,000 ld follow 3 hy rs Mha Thc ( Brien has a reciprocating stcanm-piswered immingham. England Methil, Scotland: Loc Ew C, Scotland, 400.0 would follow in the years ahead. engine and will propel the ship at I I knots. With a fuel St tohn, Nes Brau ick: Halifs, Nma Scotia: Ohinat. The ship doesn't look old. hut everything about it capacity of 287,1 13 gallons, it can cruise 19,000 Scotland: Leith, Scotland: Loch Ewe, Scitland: New York, i.s old. While there are two other World War II nautical miles. The ship could carry 700 soldiers and N.Y. ships still afloat, the O'Brien is the only original or more than 9,000 tons of cargo. -oyage Four: March 25, 1944 to Oct. 12, 1944 still remaining, Patterson said. From the engine In building the Liberty ships, the U.S. strategy was Nes York. N.Y.: Brookly'n. N.Y.: Newpor. Wales: room to the radio room, the ship still operates with to build them faster than they could be sunk. Simple in Courock-the-Clyde, Scotland: Southamptiin, England: I t its original equipment. There have been additions, design, and simple to operate, Liberty ships could be trips betw een Southampton and Normandy: Cherbourg, built in less than a month; the average for all 2,751 France: Mumbles Point, England: Milford 1aven England: such as new lifeboats to meet Coast Guard stanwas 40 days. New York. N.Y. dards, but the original, restored lifeboats still sit on The O'Brien made seven voyages during World Voyage Five: Oct. 14, 1944 to Dec. 15, 1944 the O'Brien's decks. War II, and two of them brought it through the Panama Hoboken, N.J.: Cristobal. Panama: Antofgasta, Chile: The group of ancient mariners, after two years Canal. Callao, Peru: Balboa, Panama: west wego: La., Nes "hard labor" and nearly $I million raised from Those voyages were: Orleans: La. gvrmn rns n rvt n oprt VoYage One: July 10, 1943 to Sept. 11, 1943 Vo age Six: Dec. 16, 1944 to July 10, 1945 government grants, and private and corporate Ponland, Maine: Boston, Mass.: Halifax, Nova Scotia: New Orleans, La.: Houston, Texas: Balboa, Panama: donations, got the ship sea worthy once more. Aulibea, Scotland: Methil. Scotland; London, England: Manus, Admiralty Islands: Hollandia, Nes Guinea: Then, on May 21, 1981, the O'Brien sailed again. Southend, England: Meihil, Scotland: Aulibea, Scotland: Tacloban, Phillipines: San Jose. Philhpines; Subic Bay, The story of the Jeremiah O'Brien could truly Gourock. Scotland: Nes York, N.Y. Phillipines: Hollandia. New Guinea: Subic Bay, Phillipines: be called a labor of love. Voyage T"o: Sept. 14, 1943 to Nov. 3, 1943 San Femando, Phillpines: San Francisco. Calif. "These guys have a genuine love for what they Nes York, N.Y.: Jersey Cits. N.J.: Liverpool, England: voyage Seven: Jub I1, 1945 to Jan. 17, 1946 do," said cadet Whitlock, a native of Ft. Worth, New York. N.Y. San Francisco. Calif. San Pedro. Calif.: Port Darwin. Vouage Three: Nov. 19, 1943 to March 24, 1944 Australia: Calcutta, India: Shanhai. China: Manda, Texas. "They're passing on an art form, one that's News York. N.Y.: Loch Ewe. Scoiland: Methilk Scotland: Phillpines: Freemantle, Australia: San Francisci. Calif. declining. (Staff Sgt. Richard Puckett contributed to this report.)

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1OTropic Times N w 10 Reserve News Cosecha Amistad Reservists repair jungle village by Spc. Patrick Toner people of Central and South America. The recent trip was 132nd Public Affairs Detachment one of many that U.S. Reserve Component forces make -to the SOUTHCOM area each year. In 1994, 22,000 SETAGANTI, Panama -A little boy scooted through citizen-soldiers are slated to work in the homelands of a construction zone as hard-hat wearing men yelled and other southern neighbors. motioned to him to get out -it's not safe. They were Their mission here was to rebuild a school. The roof worried about him, but they still got a chuckle out of it. had been leaking for years, and there were no doors or This child, however, didn't understand the men windows. yelling. They were speaking English, while he spoke Most of their projects are, like this one, for the benefit Spanish. The little boy lives in Setaganti, a tiny town in oflocal residents who have no capability to complete such the Darien province of Panama. The workers were construction work on their own although they are certainly citizen-soldiers of the Michigan Army National Guard's willing to pitch in and help. In this particular case, a little 107th Engineer Battalion based in Ishpeming. They too eager. recently ventured to Panama for their two-week annual The Setaganti residents started work on their school training period. before the U.S. engineers arrived and when the troops got Setaganti is located about 30 miles northwest of the here, they found things a little different than they were in Colombian border. The villagers are mainly farmers, who December, and had to adjust some of their plans and work sugar cane fields. This little village of about 180 equipment. people didn't offer much in the way of luxury, but there's Problems like this don't bother the troops, who said a little stream the locals had dammed off, and on their they always welcome a challenge. This unit is the fifth of breaks, the soldiers loved to cool off in the water. The six rotations that deployed or will deploy to the remote children didn't let them slow down much though. province of Darien in about a five-month period that Theater Suppori Elemeni photo by Spc. Pairick Tone, The troops brought a Nerf football with them played began in January. Michigan Army National Guard Sgt. Mark Rudetoss in a stream with some youths from the village, said This year's mission in Darien called "Cosecha ness, 107th Engineer Battalion, moves rocks out of Sgt. Doug Liberty, a Marquette, Mich, resident from the Amistad," a or harvest friendship, is the first of its kind the way of reservists reroofing a school house. 107th's Headquarters Company. so deep into the Panamanian rainforests. "The kids wouldn't stop playing. One of them hit me In addition to the school roof, the unit rebuilt a by helicopter, which is one of only two ways they can be square in the face with it. This is after it had gotten decayingbasketball court in the center of town and reached. The other is by boat. Other than the supply soaked through so it weighed a ton. It's great." Liberty constructed a new, sanitary latrine for the school children flights, and if necessary, medical flights, they are out on said. to use. their own in the wilds of Panama. "We've been giving candy to the kids," said 1st Sgt. The town's residents weren't the only ones who benefit Their only way to communicate with the locals is Crary Lafreniere of Ishpeming, the unit's top enlisted from these deployments. The chance to train in remote through their interpreter, Spc. Ronald Reece, a Greenbelt, person. The first sergeant said his troops enjoy the locations is a great opportunity for the Michigan troops, Md. guardsman fluent in Spanish. He and a small group children's company during downtime. who often experience a hard time finding projects such as of guardsmen from around the country, were here on the Down time at an Army engineer worksite is often these in the United States. duration staff that traveled to each of the five project scarce, but because of the searing heat and high humidity "The troops are really enjoying it," Lafreniere said. locations as the units arrived to work on them. of the region, the soldiers were required to stop working "It's a morale builder for them. They're actually These troops managed to build a few friendships while during the hot hours between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. accomplishing something and it gives us a chance to they built the schools. The Panamanian school children But when they were working, they were working cross-train people in a real-world environment." they helped will likely remember the friendly, Michigan hard, the soldiers said. They came here as part of U.S. The citizen-soldiers are completely isolated from other Army National Guard troops every time they sit in the Southern Command's efforts to strengthen ties with the U.S. miltary units. They received supplies every so often school they helped to build. Guardsman spends 'vacation' building school in Darien by Spc. Patrick Toner dies in the village of Setaganti, Panama supply store in L'Anse. the house, though. The business requires a 132nd Public Affairs Detachment for his two-week annual training. "Photography has been my hobby for lot of work and he and Ruth have their A typical day for Baker was 12 hours years. In fact, I used it as my cover in Viethands full with it. SETAGANTI, Panama -The term "vaof enduring 90-plus degree heat and high nam." He doesn't mind getting away for a few cation" holds different meanings for many humidity while rebuilding the Setaganti Cover? weeks now and then. This year is certainly people. For some, it means beaches and school. It seems Baker decided that he'd rather a change, though. Baker and members of sun. For others, a nice camper and some That's certainly not a vacation by most join the Army than get drafted. So he was the 107th deployed to the province of woods. For a L'Anse, Mich., man, it means people's standards, but Baker saw it difassigned to military intelligence and sent Darien on the far southeastern end of rebuilding a school in the tropical heat and ferently. to Vietnam to act as an interrogator. Panama. humidity somewhere in the jungle of rural "I haven't had a vacation since 1978," "They taught me the Vietnamese lanThe troops were there as part of a joint Panama. Baker said. "I kind of look at the Guard as guage, interrogation skills -and, of U. S. and Panamanian exercise called Staff Sgt. Jim Baker of the Army Namy vacation. It lets me forget about my course, a lot about paperwork," Baker said. "Cosecha Amistad," a Spanish phrase tional Guard's Detachment 1, Company business for awhile." "You can interrogate all you want, but it meaning "harvest friendship." A, 107th Engineer Battalion, headquarFor the last eight years, Baker and his won't matter if you don't get it on the right The 107th Engineers re-roofed the tered in Ishpeming, Mich., recently wife Ruth have owned and operated "In form. school and built a new adjoining latrine. worked with 50 of his fellow citizen-solthe Mind's Eye," a photography and art "Military intelligence troops in war They also built a basketball court, and zones don't wear identifying patches or some of the soldiers deployed to Setaganti rank," said Baker. "So I posed as a phobrought basketballs for the children to play tographer. That was what I had to say I was with. in case anyone who shouldn't know "This has been going super,"Baker asked." said. "I'm not a heat person, but it's worth Baker spent nearly two years in Vietit." nam before returning to the United States "We're doing good work, helping and a job as a respiratory therapy trainee at people. The training is different, too. Usu-a hospital in Traverse City, Mich. ally on annual training we do tactical work "I applied for that job because it was (such as digging anti-tank ditches with the only one around," he said, "And I albackhoes, laying and dismantling ways joked with my boss that the only reamnineFields or laying barbed wire). This son I got it was that I couldn't get drafted." year, we're concentrating on actual conAfter working for five years in Lansing, struction," he said. he and his family, which by then included Despite his many years of service, this Jessica and Jeremiah, moved to L'Anse. is Baker's first overseas deployment since While there, he drew up some blueprints Vietnan -quite a stretch of time, and quite for the house he wanted built. a different mission, he added. "I took the blueprints to several contracSoon, the "vacationing" Baker will retors," he said, "but I thought they all turn to L'Anse and his store. But the work wanted too much money for the job, so I he and the other citizen-soldiers of the decided to build it myself." Michigan Army National Guard's 107th Theater Suppot Element photo by Sp. Patrick Toner On weekends and evenings, he did just have accomplished will stay, hopefully Michigan Army National Guard Staff Sgt. Jim Baker, 107th Engineer Battalion, that. making things a little better for the people helps rebuild a school in the province of Darien. He doesn't get to spend much time in of Panama.

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Feature __1_1____ U. Air Force photos by Sgt. James A. Rush Tech. Sgt. Ricardo Morgan reports in from the front of base operations. Approximately 1,500 VIPs receive their welcome to Howard AFB here. N mals to dropped nuts and bolts. Many of the planes flying into liafi le Howard bring distinguished visitors whose first glimpse of the 24th Wing is the welcome sign outside of the base operations building. Nearly 1,500 VIPs came through here last year. Tech. Sgt. Ricardo Morgan, superintendent of airfield management, is flr~tr~n Qone of the faces that greeted them as Base Operations keep they passed the dispatch desk inside base operations. airfield problem -free "Romeo Mike" to his fellow dispatchers, Morgan has rubbed elbows by Sgt. James A. Rush and shook hands with U.S. politicians 24th Wing Public Affairs and general officers as well as foreign -ambassadors and heads of state. HOWARD AFB -To get into the best restaurants, pa"It's a great part of the job because trons have to make reservations. The busier the restauthey come talk to the dispatchers. We rant, the earlier they've got to call to get seating. get a lot of recognition for our hard To touch down on the flightline here, aircrews have to work," Morgan said. "One of the most plan ahead also. Howard AFB sees so much business, memorable people was former Presiplanes have to call in advance to ensure there's a spot to dent (Jimmy) Carter. He was one ofthe park. most down-to-earth people I've met." Staff Sgt. Carlos Marrero updates the Notice-to-Airman board. The base flightline is on the small side, according to Pilots flying out of the base meet with a dispatcher to Master Sgit Ronnie Ward, chief of airfield management file a flight plan. The dispatcher inputs the mission data here. Its runway is a mere 8,500 feet long. Parking rows, into a computer that feeds the information to the air trafwhich are given phonetic alphabet labels, run from Alpha fic control system to prevent conflict with other aircraft. to India. Classified flights are not added to this database, but must Base Operations here gives incoming crews the Prior be kept as well in the event of an accident. Permission Required clearance necessary to fly to "This gives us a means of tracking planes and preHoward. PPR requests must be submitted and approved venting collisions," said chief dispatcher Staff Sgt. before crews ever take off. Base operations coordinates Carlos "Mo" Marrero. "Also, if an aircraft goes down, them with the maintenance element in the 24th Wing we can check the flight plan and at least have an idea Command Post to plan parking locations. where to begin looking." "They have to call at least 24 hours in advance to see if Before they leave, crews check the Notice-to-Airman there's space available," Ward said. "There's not a lot of board. The notices give up-to-date information, such as room to work with here so we have to keep close tabs on runway conditions, about airfields around the world. all the aircraft here." Dispatchers regularly change the NOTAMS, which are Six to 10 different airframes representing the Air Force, listed alphabetically. Army, Navy and Marine Corps commonly reside here. The goal of most airfield management duties is to Fixed wing and helicopters, jets and propeller-driven, all keep the mission operating smoothly. Should complicamay be seen here. tions occur however, they maintain the base's primary "With all four services operating out of here, Howard and secondary crash nets also. Key agencies are tied tois really a challenging airfield to manage," Ward said. gether by these hotlines to speed the wing's response to "We consistently find ourselves juggling aircraft to try to accidents. meet mission requirements and satisfy everyone's operaBusiness often gets hectic with pilots wanting to file tional needs." secret and normal flight plans, VIPs coming through, and Managing the flightline also includes regular inspecother crew members requesting NOTAMS. Of course tions. Ward and his staff identify needed repairs to the the phone is ringing all through this as well. pavement, runway lights and aircraft barriers. "It is stressful. There's so many things that we deal During these inspections, they keep an eye out for stray with at one time, you need to be focused on the job," items that could cause damage if sucked into an engine. Morgan said. Called "FOD" for the foreign object damage caused by "When you see that flight go out on time and the misSgt. Marchea Hunley inputs a flight plan as Staff such incidents. This includes everything from dead anision completed, it's pretty rewarding," he said. Sgt. Carlos Marrero handles the phone.

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May 6, 1994 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 12 Multi-event competition breaks routine unit physical training first team to finish plotting our points, but < bSgt. Rub A.ai O kisome of the shortcuts we tried to take took USARSO Pubic Affairs Office us up some steep hills." FORT CLAYTON -The four-person TheteamfromHeadquartersCompany, team from Company E, 142nd Medical 142nd Med. Bn., finished in first place by Battalion, proved it could out-shoot, outcompleting the course in 42:25, followed 7 navigate and out-endure the entire battalby Co. E with 47:50 and 489thTransportaion during "Echo Challenge" April 20. tion Detachment at 48:10. The event, sponsored each year by one Every team was given the grid coordiofthe three companies in the battalion, was nates for the Fort Clayton Pool as its last meant to provide a challenging and compoint, which was the location for the seepetitive atmosphere for the soldiers, said ond event. Capt. Mike Rector, Co. E commander. At the pool, two members from each This event helps promote esprit de corps team had to compete in a 200-meter swim. and stresses physical fitness, endurance, Munoz also competed in the swimming s. Army photo by Sgt. Robin A. Mantkoski land navigation and marksmanship skills, event. Soldiers of Company E, 142nd Medical Battalion run to finish the litter carrying he said. "Going straight from running to swim"It really brings the companies together ming definitely tires you out," he said. competition. and gets them out of the routine PT," he Demetrica Bell, from the 489th Trans. the target. The 489th Trans. Det. took first best effort as a team. said. Det. team, said the hardest part of the place with a score of 159, followed by Co. "It was all technique and time," Bell The competition was scored according orienteering course was trying to keep evE with 149 and Headquarters Co. with 125. said. "We worked together and got the best to either the best time or best overall score, erybody together while running. After firing weapons, the teams tossed time." depending on the event, Rector said. Headquarters Company again came in tires around. During this event, each memThe 489th finished in 40 seconds, folThe competition began at 6 a.m. with a first place with 4:29, Co. E with 4:35 and ber had to throw a High Mobility Multilowed by Co. E with 56 seconds and finally 4 1/2 mile, timed orienteering course 489th Trans. Det. at 5:46. purpose Wheeled Vehicle tire as far as they HHC in 1:08. throughout Fort Clayton. During this event, Stillwet from the swim competition, the could. The team was then scored on the Overall, the competition promoted what theteam plotted its points on a map and then soldiers moved on to the M-16 shoot. Durtotal team measurements. itwas designed to promote: challenge, comfound its points. The team could not move ing this event, each team had one target in Forthis eventCo. E took first place with petition, esprit de corps and physical fittoitsnextpointuntiltheentireteamreached whicheachmemberhadtofirefiverounds. 519 inches, 489th with 432 inches and ness, Rector said. the point. "The one catch to the event was that HHC with 290 inches. "You could really feel the team pushing "It was kind of fun to see the faster each team only had two weapons," Rector The teams finished with the litter obstaeach other," Munoz said. soldiers pushing the slower soldiers," Recsaid. cle carry. For this event, each team had to "We really came together and showed a tor said. "That meant each member had to know carry a litter with a "victim" on it over four lot of team effort," he said. "The toughest part was running," said their battle-site zero." wooden obstacles and then under them. "Everything was teamwork," Bell said. 1st Lt. Joe Munoz of Co. E. "We were the The team was scored by the total hits on Bell said this event showed his team's "You couldn't be an individualist." Green Devils lead Nutrition plays important role men's volleyball in maXimizing activity levels CURUNDU (Curundu Junior High School) -The Panama Canal College men's volleyball team began its 1994 GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL Protein and amino acid supplements will not increase interscholastic season with a win against the Balboa Bull(MEDDAC PAO) -Physical activity is beneficial to muscle mass or contribute to athletic performance. Exdogs April 22 at the PCC Gym. health and proper nutrition is a key component in ceeding the requirement for protein will result in amino Aftergettingofftoaslowstartinbothgames,theDevils maximizing the ability to maintain higher levels of acid being stored as fat." won the match 15-13, 15-13. physical activity, medical officials here said. Another factor for those participating in athletic activThe PCC effort was paced by Ryan Poggenpohl, who The goal of a physical activity program is to reduce ity is replacing water at a faster rate so not to cause led the team in kills and all around play. William Pohl was body fat and maintain lean body tissue, said Isabel dehydration, she said. Dehydration will not only affect the leading server for the Devils. Gonzalez, dietitian at the Outpatient Nutrition Clinic, muscle strength, endurance and coordination, but increasThe Bulldogs won the junior varsity match. Nutrition Care Division at Gorgas Army Community es the risk of heat injuries such as cramps, heat exhaustion The Green Devils visited the Curundu Cougars April Hospital. and heat strokes. 29. The Devils came away with another victory after losing "A well-planned, individualized dietary program is To replace lost fluid, body weight should be measured the first game. The Cougars, led by Gabe Fernandez and necessary and needs to be individualized based on age, before and after training sessions, Gonzalez said. Fred Adams, came from behind to win 15-13. The Devils gender, type ofsport, genetics and individual variation," "One pound of lost fluid should be replaced with 16held off the Cougars rally to win the second game 15-11 she said. ounces of water," Gonzalez said. "Two cups of water and took the final game of the two-out-of-three contest Athletes who train exhaustively or compete in proshould be consumed two hours prior to starting the exerwith a 15-0 win. longed endurance events should have a diet high in cise session, followed by two more cups 15-20 minutes Pohl did well serving with 16 for 17 including on ace. carbohydrates such as starches, vegetables, breads and before endurance exercise." He had 11 straight in the final game. Pohl also had four pastas, Gonzalez said. In hot and humid climates such as in Panama, athletes kills. "Thesecarbohydrateswill facilitate maximal muscle should drink 4-6 ounces of plain cool water every 15 Three Devils had 100 percent serves: Jay Slough with glycogen stores and greater energy reserves for aerobic minutes, she said. eight, Tony Miranda with 14, and Chad Graham with 14. and anaerobic activity resulting in greater endurance To support training efforts, athletes must eat a wellPoggenpohl led the team in blocks with four. and delayed fatigue," she said. balanced and varied diet on a daily basis and make sure Injunior varsity play, the Devils won in two games. Leo "The need for protein in athletes is not as much as we they drink plenty of water, Gonzalez said. Wheeler was 10 for 10 in serving and he had two kills. might think," Gonzalez said. "Athletes who want to For information about nutrition for athletic perforincrease muscle mass should meet their energy intake. mance and fitness, call 282-5119. *. 4 and more Page. 15 Air Force senior enlisted advisor 56th Signal Battalion shows "No *SCN AM radio sports wins Howard intramural racquetMercy" defending league title in *Sailing lessons ball championship. season opening flag football game. *Aerobics classes

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Tropic Times1 May 6, 1994 Chief takes racquetball title HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) -Racquetball players competed in male and female categories during the intramural championship tournament held at the sports and fitness center here throughout April. Chuck Shaffer, 24th Wing senior enlisted advisor, earned top honors by dropping Horace Whatley ofthe 24th Security Police Squadron to capture the A category for the base's top players."B" division was for intermediate skill levels and "C" was for novices. Shaffer had to forfeit his first match because he was on temporary duty elsewhere and had to battle through the losers' bracket to reach the finals. Once there, he had to beat Whatley twice. "I didn't know what to expectofhim (Shaffer). I'drnever played him in singles before," Whatley said. The security police first sergeant already has championshiptrophies fromMoody AFB, Ga., andplacedthird inthe former Strategic Air Command in 1991. Despite recovering from back surgery less than a year ago, he was looking to add Howard's championship to his collection. "My game plan going in was to slow down the game. He had a reputation for being a runner," Whatley said. "I wanted to control the ball and take him out of his game. It worked for a while, that's why I was able to score as well as I did," he said. Shaffer wore Whatley down, however. Quite literally pinging off the walls, Shaffer forced some long rallies that drained his opponent and enabled him to pull away. Leon David of the 24th Supply Squadron took first in the B category. He blazed through the winners' bracket finishing 5-0. The 24th Mission Support Squadron's Roland Smith was David's final victim and runner-up for the category. The C category finals featured a showdown between two members of the 24th Air Intelligence Squadron. Michael Mulligan made it through seven matches undefeated and beat Charles Hamilton in the AIS showdown finals. Estela Shaffer nearlyjoined her husband in the winner's circle in the womens' competition. She sent last year's champion Diane Bowman to the losers' bracket only to face her again in the finals. Bowman managed to knock Shaffer off twice and U.S. Air Force photo by Sgt. James A. Rush successfully defend her title. Chuck Shaffer serves against Horace Whatley. Airman swats competition like birdies A fiercly competitive nature has driven him ever since 24th W ing senior enlisted advisor sweeps he began playingshortly afterentering the service26 years base intramural racquetball championship "lwastaughtbyanexperiencedseniormstersergeant," Shaffer said. "He used to beat me like a stepchild, but he by Sgt. James A. Rush he faced Horace Whatley of the 24th Security Police made a mistake and took 30 days of leave. I stayed in the 24th Wing Public Affairs .Squadron. court the whole time he was gone and he never beat me "I've had to play through the losers' bracket before, but again." HOWARD AFB -The 24th Wing's senior enlisted this was the first time I've never played a game in the More than 2 1/2 decades wiser, Shaffer is now the advisor took office in September 1993 and wasted no time winner's bracket," Shaffer said. "experienced" player, but he isn't likely to make the same getting involved in intramural sports programs here. "What you had at the end was essentially two unbeaten mistake as his mentor. Chuck Shaffer helped the 24th Mission Support Squadplayers," he said. Shaffer plays three to five times a week, wearing out ronto playoffappearances involWith the forfeit hanging over him, Shaffer had to beat opponents young and old. leyball and softball. In horseWhatley twice to win the double"The key to winning is to be a good all-around player," shoes, he took Jerry "Ringmas"The key to winning is to be a elimination tournament. Shaffer said. ter" Armstrong to an if-game all-around A lot of He mixed up his serves fore"A lot of young people have a good game, but shot showdown and finished runnerplayer. ing Whatley to move all over the making and physical ability alone will lose when faced with up. The chief blasted the birdie young people have a good game, court while trying to keep the shot making, physical ability and strategy. You've got to and went undefeated in the badbut shot making and physical ability security policeman fromusing his have the smart part of the game as well." minton tourney. forehand swing. Shaffer places Whatley and Pete Waugh, both senior Through it all, he was Justalone will ose when faced with shot The tiresome strategy proved master sergeants, among the racquetball elite here. getting warmed up for his favormaking, physical ability and strattoo much for Whatley, who is "We're able to pick out our opponents' weaknesses and ite sport racquetball. egy. You've got to have the smart recovering from back surgery he capitalize on them," he said. The intramural racquetball of the had during the past year. "If I tried to play a power game against Pete, he'd kick championship tournament here pat game as we. Shaffer won back-to-back my butt," Shaffer said. was held in April. Shaffer's calChuck Shaffer games to take the title and extend "You haveto force your opponent out ofhisor hergame, endar was marked and he had Raquetball champion, senior enlisted advisor his string of base championships. otherwise, you'll probably get beat." been eyeing the competition for.-ShafferhasdominatedtheracWith the intramural racquetball season conquered, months,butastheseasonopenerapproached,thechiefhad quetballsceneateachofhisassignmentsduringthepast 10Shaffer faces 11 months of being the player to beat at to leave Panama on a temporary duty assignment. 12 years. Howard. Because ofhis absence, Shaffer's first match was forfeit He was the Air force Logistics Command champion in It's also eight months until volleyball season starts, so in and he fell to the losers' bracket. 1990 and finished sixth in the entire Air Force that same the neantime."I haven't decided whether l'm gonna play The chief had to take the long road to the finals where year. flag football or not."

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14Tropic Times Sports 14 May 6, 1994 Cornerback Ronnie Thomas and safety Eric Brown swarm to the ball during Tuesday's game. No Mercy 56th begins title defense by Staff Sgt. Richard Puckett Editor, Tropic Times he battle cry echoed across the field for a brief instant. Once completed, the players of the 56th Signal Battalion went to work. There were no heckles, no chuckles, no smiles, and no taunts. This was business. The referee signals the start of the game and the "businessmen" punch in. For two months, these players will be commuting to and from the gridiron with just one goal in mind -Department of Defense photos by Staff Sgt Rchard ett back-to-back U.S. Army South flag football championQuarterback Darrell Moore, 56th Signal Battalion, makes a run for the end zone. ships._______________________ The team, which rolled through the competition in of teams think you just put your biggest guys out there 1993 enroute to a 17-0 record and a title, is trying to Fla and you can run, but this isn't tackle football. Speed will maintain a business-like attitude to carry it, said assistant F l beat size." coach and halfback Jeff Harris. FORT CLAYTON (Tropic Tim-es) -The 1994 Another aspect of the team that often goes overSpurred on by a new no-nonsense disciplinarian head U.S. Army South flag football season kicked off looked is fan support, Harris said. The team now packs coach Kenneth Hunter, the team began its quest Monay night at Mother's FIed. the stands with a large group of faithful followers Tuesday night against Co. E, 228th Aviation Battalion. Fifteen Pacific teams will be'vying for the chamincluding the battalion commander, Lt. Col. Darrell The 56th defense led the way, swarming the 228th piouship which wraps up at the end of June. Holland. backfield, giving its offense ample opportunity to score. Games start at 6,7 and 8 p.m, Monday through "The colonel is one of our biggest fans," Harris said. Former Howard University and 1993 Army Turkey Friday up until June 20 at Mother's Field and Fort "It really makes a difference having people out there Bowl quarterback Darrell Moore responded. Moore Kobbe. supporting us. It gets us pumped up and can really have tossed two touchdowns and carried in another and Tonight's games start off with Headquarters an impact on the opposition." Harris ran in one as the 56th rolled 30-6. Company Law Enforcement Activity against MediAs far as the competition goes, Harris sees the 142nd It was an impressive win, considering the 56th didn't cal Department Activity at 6 p.m. The 214th MediMedical Battalion as the team's chief concem. pull out all the stops, said fellow Turkey Bowler Harris. cal Detachment plays 41st Area Support Group at "MEDDAC (U.S. Army Medical Department "We tried a few things in the opener, but we didn't 7 p.m. and 59th Engineer Company squares off Activity) was our toughest competition last year, but give away all our secrets," he said. "A lot of the other against Headquarters Company, 193rd Infantry they don't look too good ," he said. teams were scouting us so we didn't show too much." Brigade at 8 p.m. "SCN has done a lot of talking so far, but I've seen Harris credits a new attitude with keeping the team -them practice. They've got people playing where they focused on winning, despite a rotating roster that Ten 56th players were named to the 1993 Army want to play instead of where they should play. What changes from game to game. Turkey Bowl team. they really need is a leader. Most teams do," Harris said. "Sergeant Hunter has really made an impact on this That experience will prove crucial to the team's Leadership is one thing that 56th has, Harris said. team," he said. "He put people into positions where they success, Harris said. Great team speed adds to the already "Because of the way our coach practices us we are can play and make an impact. Now instead ofjust potent mix of talent. The secondary alone boasts two prepared to win," he said. "He's instilled an attitude in having one person at each position we have role players guys who pull down 4.4, 40-yard dashes. us that keeps us playing nonstop regardless of the who can step in and perform." Two-time Turkey Bowl veteran Eric Brown and score." The team has also canned the on-field arguments that Balboa Relays sprinter Tony Wright form a deadly duo. The team's motto "No Mercy" held true in game one, plagued the championship squad in 1993, Harris said. But the offensive and defensive lines are the team's Harris said. The players now focus solely on doing their jobs. crux, Harris said. "The offense and the defense didn't let up," Harris Hunter takes over a team packed with returning "We don't have a lot of big guys out there," Harris said. "People were still making plays and playing hard. players and rich with college football experience. said. "We put players in there who are playmakers. A lot We've got to keep up that reputation."

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_____ ~ 1 port k~IUIL ~Tropic Times potsShots My61995 SCN AM 790,1420 radio started registration for 5'10" and underand and the first Saturday and Sunday the fol5'll" and over basketball. Registration is lowing month. Classes are limited to 10 airs NBA playoffs open through May 23. There will be a students who must be at least 15 years old. Southern CommandNetwork'sAM 790 basketball clinic 6 p.m. May 25 at the Sign up for classes at the Fort Clayton Pacific and 1420 Atlantic will broadcast the Reeder Physical Fitness Center. Boat Shop. An affidavit ofgood health and following sports this weekend. a swim test is required. Saturday Basketball registration Students will get a qualification card 12:30 p.m.: Baseball: Cleveland at Balthat allows them to rent sailboats and to timore opens for Atlantic youth enroll in the intermediate sailing course at 4:06 p.m.: 120th Kentucky Derby Registration for youth basketball for the Rodman NS after completing this course. 6 p.m.: Baseball: Philadelphia at Florida Atlantic community continues until May Call 287-6453 for more information. Sunday 31. There will be a clinic June 15. The 7 p.m.: Baseball: Los Angeles at San season opens June 16.offer Call 289-4605/4289 to register. Francisco aerobic fitness classes Coaches needed for Step Aerobic classes are 8:45-9:45 a.m. Korean martial arts .and 4:45-5:45 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays taught in Curundu area Atlantic youth sports and Fridays at the Howard Sports and FitThe Korean martial art, Tang Soo Do, is Youth Sports -Atlantic needs coaches ness Center. Tghe:Koreah artial artan ToohDosfor the upcoming basketball and flag footJazzercise classes are 5-6 p.m. Monday in Building 2060 in the Curundu housball seasons days, Wednesdays and Fridays at the Aldin aBea.uTilasses 20 i n t C drn h -Call 2894605/4289 for more informabrook Sports and Fitness Center. ing area The classes are open to children tion or to volunteer. Lunch time aerobic classes are 11:30 years old and older and adults. For informa-am-130p.TusysndhrdysK \ tion, call 286-3814. a.m.-12:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays Army fun run kicks off at the howard Sports and Fitness Center. Air Force fitness month Armed Forces Week CalltheHowardSportsandFitnessCenter at 284-3451 or the Albrook Sports and activities scheduled U.S Army South is coordinating an Fitness Center at 286-4260 for more inforThe Howard and Albrook sports and kick-off to AAred Forces Week. nation. fitness centers have several activities and The run will start 6 a.m. at Reeder Physevents scheduled during May in celebraicalFitnessCenter,FortClayton.There will Rodman hosts Fitness tion ofU.S. Air Force Month of Fitness. be a 3-mile run for unit teams and a 5-mile Month 1, 2, 3k fun runs Saturday: 3-on-3 basketball toumaopen event. mettheepontsht ounaen a e nee. The Rodman Fitness Center will host a meant, three-point shot tournament at the Officials recommendregistration forthe National Fitness Month IK, 2Kand3KFun Howard Sports and Fitness Center. fu n run by Tuesday, but it will be open until Run/Walk for family members 7 a.m. May May 15: 4-onvolleyball and racquetthe morning of the run. 30. Check in time is 6:15 a.m. Registration Co t' ball doubles tournaments. The race is sanctioned by the Panama is free. Run is open toNavy Fa eily member Court open kilometer nnua Armed Forces Running Association. Credteams or children ages 6-17. A family team Open play tennis is available 9 kmer fungs un. s tit will be given to the running associations includes a 2K run/walk with two or more a.m. Wednesdays at the courts May 28: singles tennis tou ament and season totals. members of the same family. One team behind the Howard Youth Center. horesoetornmet.For registration or more information, member must be a youth 6-17 years old. Call 284-3451. The Howard Sports and Fitness Center call 2874050 Family members 5 years old or under may284 is taking appointments for body fat analysis-Fa lyebes5easodrudemy during May. Call 284-3451 for more inforbe carried or pushed in a stroller to finish. dtin .CMemorial Day three-point Call 283-4222 for more information. formation contact Morise Conerly at the nation. shot contest at Reeder Rodman Fitness Center. 283-4222/4061. Rodman sponsors open The ReederPhysicalFitnessCenterwill Howard sponsors fitness Howard, Albrook begin sponsor a three-point shot Memorial Day improvement training soccer tournament basketball tournament. Registration for the Fitness Improvement Training classes bowling sign-ups Registration is under way for the Rodevent is open through May 30. are 5:30-6:30 a.m. Mondays, Wednesdays The Howard and Albrook bowling cenman open soccer tournament May 14-15 at For more information call 287-386 1. and Fridays at the Howard Sports and Fitters are signing up bowlers to form summer Rodman NS. Entry fee is $75. Call 2834222/4061 for more informal ness Center. bowling leagues. Visit the centers or call tion. Register for July Fourth FIT classes include a calisthenic super 284-4818 for more information. flag football tournament circuit work-out aimed to improve muscularehdurance,flexibility andthecardiovasSunskiff/Boston Whaler Fitness month triathlon Registration forthe DirectorateofComcular system. Participants must be evalustarts at Espinar pool munity Activities July Fourth flag football ated on the amount of exercise that can be rental fees changed tournament is open until June 28. Call 287-program The Rodman Marina announces that efThere will be a fitness month triathlon 4050 for information. will begin. Call 284-3451 for more inforfective Sunday, daily rental fee on the starting at the Fort Espinar pool 6:30 a.m. For more information call 287-3861/ mation. Sunskiff will be $86 and will include 36 May 14. 4713. gallons of gas instead of the previously Call 289-4189 for more information. Reeder fitness center allotted 16 gallons. Fronius starts beach Half-day rental for the Sunskiff will be Fronius, Reeder offer tall, volleyball registration offers daily aerobics $43 with l8gallonsofgas. Daily rental rate Reeder Physical Fitness Center has free for the Boston Whaler will be $62 and will short basketball leagues Registration for 4-on4 beach volleyaerobics 9:15-10:15 a.m. Monday through include 24 gallons of gas, a six gallon inThe Fronius Fitness Center offers 5'10" ball is Monday through May 25. There will Friday. Classes include warm-up, cardiocrease. and under and 5'l1" and over basketball be an organizational meeting May 27 at the vascular workout, cool down and floor Half-day rental for the Boston Whaler leagues. Registration is open through May Fronius Fitness Center. work. Call 287-3861 for more information. will be $31 with 12 gallons of gas. Call the 18. There will be an organizational meeting Call 289-3108 for more information. Rodman Marina at 283-3147 for more innoon May 21 at the Fronius Fitness Center. Call 289-3108 for more information. Davis hosts Memorial Howard center offers formation. Reeder Physical Fitness Center also has Day hoops tournament lunch bunch basketball Rodman will host softball The Howard Sports and Fitness Center There will be a Memorial Day basketTer Spot an d itness Ce:3 e championships today St nd ng al tunaen ay283 a teFrnis offers luinch bunch basketball 10:30 am.-to a Ball tournament May 28-30 at the Fronius 12:30p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and FriThe second annual Interservice Softball Fitness Center Registration ends May 20 days and 10 a m.-1 p.m. Saturdays and Championships will be held at 6 p.m. today U.S. Army volleyball Teams are limited to 10 players Sundays. Call 286-3307 for more informaand 9 a.m. Saturday at Symington Field, Men's Over-30 Volleyball Call 289-3108 for more information. tion. Rodman Naval Station. Army, Navy and W L GB Air Force will compete in this six team Side Out 1 9 1 -Fitness month triathlon 'Rock and Bowl' at the double elimination tournament. Call the FUBAR 8 1 .5 -Rodman Fitness Center at 283-4222 for Side Out II 5 4 3.5 starts at Espinar pool Howard Bowling Center more information. Stow Motion 3 7 6 There will be a fitness month triathlon Bowl to your favorite oldies at the Morgan Ave. 1 6 6.5y Ghettos Boys 1 9 8 starting at the Fort Espinar pool 6:30 a.m. Howard Bowling Center 9 p.m. until closBlack Stallion available May 14. ing Mondays through Thursdays Bowl Women Volleyball Call 289-4189 for more information. unlimited games and enjoy snackbar spefor fishing, cruises onasop 8 -5 cials. Call 284-4818 for more information. The 61-foot Blck Stallion is available eF-Troop 6 3 2 Introductory sailing for Pina Bay Marlin fishing, deep-sca fishChrysler 5 4 3 sadmnn center looks for ing, cruising or Moonlight Cruise charters Chaos 7 7 3.5 lessons for 15 and up .centerfor Sid S u f'orlarge or small groups. Thie42-foot ngs ideSailing lessons are provided through the martial arts instructors is also available for charter from Rodinan Hard Bodies 0 8 7.5 Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation DiThe Rodman Fitness Center is looking NS. vision monthly. Lessons are 9 am-I p.m. for certified instructors toteach martial arts, For more information, contact the Rodthe last Saturday and Sunday ofone month aerobics and water aerobics. For more inman Marina at 283-3147/3 150.

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16 Tropic Times May 6, 1994 ews McCaffrey discusses future of U.S. military by 1 st Lt. Jim Knotts U.S. Southern Command Public Affairs Office SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador -By 1997, the United States will have a refined arned forces, with a new structure and a new doctrine -but will remain the best in the world. That's one of the messages delivered April 26 by Gen. Bany R. McCaffrey, commander-in-chief of the U.S. Southern Command, to the members of the U.S. Military Group stationed here. McCaffrey visited El Salvador April 26-27 to learn how Salvadorans view regional security issues, and more about the U.S. Military Group here. This is his first visit to El Salvador since assuming his present position Feb. 17. During a luncheon with the military group members, McCaffrey said the dramatic changes that have touched every part of the U.S. Armed Forces over the last few years will continue through 1997 as the force structure is changed T kUs u., Force photo by Sgt James A, Rush to meet the requirements of the Defense Department Bottom Up Review. At Thanks the end of the process, the United States will have its smallest force since Brig. Gen. David A. Sawyer, 24th Wing commander, speaks to community 1939, and will spend its smallest share of the nation's gross national product leaders at a luncheon in a Veracruz restaurant April 28. The event was held to since 1936. than HoardAFB or ts uppot i th ton's eveopmnt. phto ook "We'll leave about 100,000 people in Europe and about 100,000 in the thank Howard AFB for its support in the town's development. A photo book Pacific," McCaffrey said. commemorating several Air Force projects in Veracruz was presented to The majority of the rest of the force will be based in the continental United Sawyer. The town is located on the coast near Howard's back gate. States, he said. -What all this means for U.S. servicemembers is more change. Army Career and Alumni Program "But at the end, we'll have, without a doubt, the best armed forces in the world," he said. McCaffrey said President Bill Clinton expressed his view that there are Local prog ram offers two areas ofgrowth for the United States: the Pacific Rim and Latin America. L Based on recent trends, by the year 2000, the United States will trade more goods with Latin America than Europe, which offers a win-win situation for SCr 9I the United States and its Latin American allies. Many Latin American najob search traifling tions have expressed interest in having the North American Free Trade Agreement extended to Latin America, creating the largest free market trade zone by Staff Sgt. Arthur C. Johnston fields such as teaching and law enforcement. in the world. USARSO Public Affairs Office *Workshops and classes in resume and Economic development is expected to be the central topic among hemicover letter writing -using dedicated, userspheric leaders when they meet for the Summit of the Americas in Miami in FORT CLAYTON -Servicemembers friendly software and a laser printer, the cliDecember. or civilian employees who are leaving ent is able to develop impressive-looking, Although security issues are not a separate agenda item for the summit, federal service don't have to face their high-quality resumes and cover letters that are McCaffrey said the leaders there will have the opportunity to design a frameimpending change without help. The custom-tailored for each job prospect. work that will lead to development in the Americas for the next 50 years, Army Career and Alumni Program and *Application for Federal Employment -a which will lead to future discussions on regional security. the Job Assistance Center are available to specialized computer program to generate a In El Salvador, where the first democratic elections took place last week give, not only assistance and guidance, clean, crisp laser printed document to use in since the 12-year civil war ended there in 1992, McCaffrey expressed his but training to help those separating find applying for government positions using the optimism for the future. a job. Standard Form 171. "What a proud moment for El Salvador," he said. "I am personally proud ACAP is now seeking to offer more There are 60 ACAP sites worldwide but of what you [the U.S. Military Group] do here. When I look at you today, I on-site training at various work sites. ACAP Panama is unique because it's the only see the result of lots of hard work and dedication." The first two steps of the transition site that provides transition assistance to local The next step for the U.S. military in El Salvador is to help the Salvadoran process are offered to requesting job sites nationals, said Oscar Leon, JAC Contract Inmilitary in its efforts to help build peace and stability. This process is already that have at least 10 qualifying people. stallation manager. under way, with the joint Salvadoran-U.S. humanitarian assistance exercise Another service available from ACAP Initial preparations for the Panamanian called "Fuertes Caminos," or "strong roads." The first part of this two-part and JAC is the Army Employer Alumni Project began about a year ago the Transition exercise started Sept. 2, 1993. The second part began Sunday and will conNetwork. This database contains more Assistance Office hired bilingual counselors tinue until August. U.S. servicemembers will help repair or build six schools than 11,000 employers who have exwho spent many hours translating the semiand one medical clinic, and drill six water wells. pressed interest in hiring veterans and nar and workshop into Spanish, he said. Department of Defense civilians. "On March 22, the JAC received and inOther services available are: stalled the Spanish version of Word Perfect, *The Transition Bulletin Board -an giving the center the capability of generating A lo o k at on-line computer bulletin board help resumes and cover letters in Spanish as well Mexico wanted list ofjobs that are available. as English," he said. Mi Dv S The Defense Outplacement Referral People who qualify have 90 days of ACAP E a lv ad o r System -allows clients the opportunity to services available to them after transitioning. Belze put an electronic copy of their resume in a The Fort Clayton ACAP will refer clients to a Facts about El Salvador: The data bank in Washington, D.C., where center near their home. Guatamac i employers use the data base to fill posiMore than 4,500 clients have been proout e mnd dustry tions worldwide. cessed through the Fort Clayton office since pop1 "ation indCstral *Public and Community Service -a 1991 and more than 100 new clients start the san alsad aized nation in Central program required for all early retirees that transaction process each month, officials said. America. It is about the lists clients for positions in public service For more information, call 287-5844. Honduras size of Massachusetts. The capital is San ~'Costa Rica Salvador and it PCC enrollment rates increase cSaccount1 --accounts BALBOA (Tropic Times) -RegistraOnly a small percentage of the students are PANAVA for 25 tion rates at the Panama Canal College's spouses or family members, DeJanon said. off-campus programs increased 109 perOne reason for the lack of family member cent in the last term, officials said. enrollment may be the lack of tuition assisthe country The military education centers around tance provided, he said. [ population. Coffee, sugar, cotton and shrimp are the nation's chief Panama are a big part of the recent sucOnly the Air Force offers assistance for exports. The government is a constitutional democracy. Peace accords cess according to Warland DeJanon, the family members, he said he hopes the Arny signed in 1992 ended a 12-year civil war. The country gained its director of the Servicemember Opportuwill soon follow. -nity College Armed Forces Degree proPCC also provides special courses far the independence September 15, 1821. The official language is Spanish. gram. military called Battalion Courses, he said. Facts about the U.S. Military Group: The 10-man U.S. Military Dejanon credited the management of These courses are molded for units that arc Group is commanded by Arniy Col. Rudy Jones. The NIL(;ROIIP is Army's Dennis Fritz and the Air Force's in need of special classes and are able to take located at the U.S. Embassy in San SaiN ador. Its mission is to wsork John Cox for his program's improvethese classes together, daily or at specific directly swith the host nation ilitary and provide assistance in ments. times, lie said. Ninety-five percent of all students who Ihe 101) percent increase in enrollment iraiiing, exercises. siudeni exchanges, and purchases of equipment. attend ofTf campus SOCAD program (loes niot iiclude these special IBattal ion classes are servicenembers, he said. Courses.

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May 6, 1994 A quality of life guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page BI Teen spirit Deparment of Defense photo by Maureen Sampson Megan MoCallum does a cheer during rehearsal of the play 'Vanities" at the Ancon Theatre Guild. See story and photos, Page B3. Boy Scouts from Troop 6 trek New page focuses on activities in +Movies, Page B8 ocean-to-ocean and earn the 50Panama. This week features the *TV, Page B9 miler award. Presidential Palace. *Potpourri, Page B12

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DlTropic Times ~Y uhnw May Youth news Boy Scouts trek ocean-to-ocean by Gregory Faye canoe and foot from the Atlantic to the PaFor people who have traveled the caon the open lake. Tropic Times contributor cific was every bit as memorable. nal, 63 miles is obviously not the most diAs the troop left the lake and entered The event allowed the scouts to eamthe rect route available. However, in the interthe restricted confines of the San Pedro leg ALBROOK -The cayuco race, it "50-Miler Award" and gave them the est of safety, accessability to areas suited ofthe canal, staying clear of passing ships wasn't. But for 22 Boy Scouts and adult chance to test their water and camping for camping and going a bit further to see and their wakes became a more immediate leaders from troop six, the 63-mile trek by skills away from the comforts of home. some terrific scenery, the miles added up. concern than before. Beginning with an over-nighter at ShelAn integral element of the 50-Miler ter Point at Fort Sherman, the scouts took Award is working on projects to enhance one last opportunity to organize supplies the cleanliness or physical condition of the and equipment for the trip. route taken or improve facilities along the The first day of travel consisted of a way, officials said. hike to Fort San Lorenzo where canoes Another important part of any scout were loaded for a scenic few hours of caoutdoor trip is the opportunity to work on noting up the Chagres River to Gatun merit badges and advancement. From the Dam. trip's beginning, skills in basic scouting, Canoes and supplies were shuttled to canoeing, cooking, camping, orienteering the top of the dam for the first night's camp and other areas were worked on and imon the shore of Gatun Lake. proved. -fA hearty breakfast was the first order The third night's camp, at Governor's W of business the following morning as evIsland, also provided an opportunity for eryone prepared for their first day canoecarefree swimming in protected waters ing on the lake. Unlike the narrow confines and a chance to relax a bit. A late night of the Chagres, wide open Gatun Lake was caiman hunt was successful and a young vulnerable to brisk dry season winds. speciman was brought back to camp for a Choppy waters with crests of two feet picture before being released. make taking an unscheduled swim a conFor some, day four proved to be the stant concern for riders in a canoe filled most taxing. After about four miles of cawith supplies and sitting low in the water. noting, the group put in at the Gamboa As the route of the canoes crossed the boat dock and were ferried to Mandingo path of the Panama Canal, wakes from point to begin an 18-mile trek on foot to passing ships presented another hazard. Rodman NS. Toward the end of the second day of Because of the narrow passage through canoeing, the chosen route through Pena the Empire leg of the canal, and the hazard Blanca Bay put the winds at the backs of to canoes of passing tugs and very large the scouts. wakes, access to that stretch of water was While this increased the speed of travel restricted. and removed the hazard of waves apUp until this point, the scouts had been proaching the sides of canoes, this leg of spared from any significant rain during the the trip also entered an area of submerged trip. As luck would have it, though, downtree stumps. pours throughout the hike soaked everyMoving with the wind at a faster pace, one and contributed to more thin a few stumps were often hit before they could be rashes and blisters. seen and avoided. Fortunately, nobody A night's rest and some hot food set the was swamped or capsized. stage for the final day. Reunited with caClearings were nearly non-existent the noes brought from Gamboa, a final dash second night and campers pitched tents in of about seven miles was made under the any open spots they could find in the Bridge of the Americas, around Flamenco jungle. Many merely stretched hammocks Island to the finish at the beach on the between trees and settled down for the northwest shore of Perico Island. night, at least until the rain started falling. After a few hours of cleaning and storDay three brought more high-speed ing equipment, the ocean-to-ocean advencourtesy photo by Gregory Faye travel over stumps, a wrong turn in search ture ended with water activity of a differTroy Phillips from Troop Six paddles in the Panama Canal. of the main canal and more heavy winds ent nature.long, hot showers. Albrook/Howard Piano lessons 1-6 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays. May 19. *Youth Centers 286-3195/2844700: $30 for four half-hour lessons per month. Teen sports 4-6 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays. Pre-teen dances 7:30 p.m. tonight and May 20 Gymnastics for ages 5 and older 2:30-3:30 p.m. and Cooking class 4-6 p.m. Mondays, $1. at Albrook, May 13 and 27 at Howard for ages 83:304:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays. Study with a buddy and tutoring 4-6 p.m. Tues13. Performing children's troupe seeks youths who like days and Thursdays. Gymnastics classes start Saturday and will be to sing, dance and perform. They meet 4-6 p.m. Tuesdays held every Saturday. Ages 3-5 meet noon-I p.m.; and Thursdays. couts ages 6-12 meet 1-2 p.m.; intermediate classes meet Video games Wednesdays. Bring your Sega or Boy Scouts meet: 2-3 p.m. Cost is $13 per month. Nintendo games. Troop 5 -7 p.m. Thursdays,' Balboa Union Church A parents meeting will be held 7 p.m. Monday +Senior Teen Center 287-3464/4680: Troop 6 -7 p.m. Thursdays, LDS Church at the Howard Youth Center. Triathlon tournament 4 p.m. Fridays. Compete in Troop 8 -7 p.m. Mondays, Fort Espinar Thrift Shop *Hideout Teen Center 284-5487: pool, foosball and ping pong. Troop 16 -6 p.m. Wednesdays, Howard Riding The teen center at Farfan has been closed temVolleyball 3:30-5:30 p.m. Sundays. Stables porarily. Activities have been rescheduled to the Softball practice 2:30-4:30 p.m. Sundays. Troop 20 -7 p.m. Wednesdays, Albrook Building Howard or Albrook Youth Centers. Call 284-4700 *Child Development Center 287-3301: 812 for more information. Register children six weeks to 12 years in any of the Troop 128 -7 p.m. Thursdays, Clayton Building Clayton Army Child Development Services programs: full day, 520. hourly, part day, school age or family child care. Call 285-6548 for Cub Scout information. *Youth Center 287-6451: Alternative child care options, baby sitter training and Cub Scout Day Camp 9 a.m.-2 p.m. June 20-24 Instructors are needed for the 1994 Summer referral and volunteer training are also available. includes swimming and sport activities. Call Sandra Sensations Youth Program for flower arranging, Cocol Wetting at 260-3466 for more information. knitting, macrame, general crafts, science and the Boy Scouts of America Summer Camp June 23world. Contact the Directorate of Community *Cocoli Community Center 287-4119: 29 at the Jungle Operations Training Battalion area at Activites Procurement Division, third floor, BuildArts and crafts, 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. Fort Sherman. Call Johnathan Hilton at 284-5667/3516 ing 519. or Kathy MacPhail at 285-6548. Junior jazzercise 3:30-4:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Adult volunteers are needed for the Cub Scouts Thursdays for ages 6-12. *Espinar Youth Center 289-4605: Day Camp and the Boy Scouts Summer Camp. Cub American Stars Gymnastics meet Tuesdays Teens and pre-teens Mother's Day shopping trip Scouts need camp counselors, sports, range and arand Thursdays. Ages 3-5 meet 2-3 p.m.; ages 6-8 to Panama City 8 a.m.-4 p.n. Saturday. chery directors and more. Call Sandra Wetting at 260meet 3-4 p.m.; ages 9 and up and advanced meet 4Friday the 13th party 3-6 p.m. May 13. 3466. 5 p.m. Lessons cost $20. Shimmey Beach and zoo adventure 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Boy Scouts need kitchen and medical help, people Tae Kwon Do 5:30-7 p.m. Wednesdays and FriMay 14. with a boating license, and more. Call Kathy MacPhail days for ages 5-18, $25. After school water balloon challenge 3-4:30 p.m. at 285-6548.

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i#J~ntrtainm nt __ Tropic Timesfl Entetaiment 6,1994 LouAnn Cook, Megan MoCallum and Traci Ferguson rehearse a scene from the comedy 'Vanities." Cheerleaders explore life after hish school he opening night performance are all entertaining in their roles. runs Thursdays through Saturdays until one of the characters in this show. It of the Ancon Theatre Guild's MeCallum's facial expressions and May 14. To avoid missing any of the brings hack memories of high school, "Vanities" had the audience gestures are outstanding. action, audience members should show and how simple life was then. rolling with laughter. These three actresses work well up a little early because the play starts The first act is very bubbly. How It's an extremely funny show about together. They demonstrate great comic promptly at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $8 and could it not he with three girls dressed three cheerleaders and their evolution timing and are quick to pick up on each can he reserved hy calling 252-6786. like cheerleaders discussing school dance from high school to adulthood, other's lines. This made for an evening of "Vanities" is one of those plays decorations? The three all seem to be The show stars LouAnn Cook, Traci nonstop entertainment. almost everyone can relate to, because working towards the same common goal Ferguson and Megan MeCallum. They The play is directed by DL Sima and almost everyone knows somebody like -being popular. The second act shows the ladies in Gorgas Army HcspftaI Ouarr Heighos college -all part of the same sorority. Exam ng POCC. They act a lot like they did in high Offie Anon Hn Ad r aion school, but they seem to be heading in different directions. The Theatre Guild By the third act, the audience realizes of Ancot these women live in entirely different worlds. The three musketeers are now BOc .h three distinct individuals. It's kind of sad, Flooovot Avnuo"Vanities" is the last show of the Theatre Guild's season. It's also the last ^nee T a"smon Monaopportunity to see LouAnn Cook and -t--p --Traci Ferguson -both have been in -numerous Isthmian productions-GaIIlard Highway W To Albrook/Corozal/Clayton -+ perform on the local stage. They will be Prodco Mrkoileaving Panama this summer. ~1 Police station Farewells aside, this is a great show. The set is full of fine detail. The script is full of laughs. And the three actresses pull it together to make for a fun evening at the theater. PcpccsNFW story and photo Map to the Theatre Guild of Ancon by Maureen &~ampson Tropic Time& atafl'

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~4Tropic Times ocs,1P am __ B4 Ma Fcus on Panama The house of the presidents Presidential Palace shares rich lore From a private home, to a customs house, to a national bank, to a school house and to the seat of government that's the history of Panama's Presidential Palace. Three hundred seventeen years ago, and today the Presidential Palace stands out elegantly in front of the Panama Bay. In the hallways of the second floor are four statues that represent the virtues men should possess: Justice, Perseverance, Duty and Work. Two years after Old Panama was destroyed by the pirate Henry Morgan, the limits of the new city were established by Luis de Lozada Quinones. Lozada established the new city, and built himself a fabulous private residence in which he not only lived, but also conducted his official business. Upon his death, the Spanish crown converted the residence into a Customs House, serving this purpose until 1849. In 1857 it was decreed that the building be sold. The sale did not take place and it was converted into a school house for male students. \ It was not until 1885 that it finally became the Presidential Palace. The top floor was set aside for official receptions and residential area for the president and his family. In the process of rearrangement, a Yellow Room was established and Colombian artist Epifanio Garay was assigned to paint oval shaped portraits of the Governors of the Sovereign State of Panama, beginning in 1885. The name Yellow Room came as a result of the predominant golden color in its decorations. In 1922, during the third and last administration of President Belisario Porras, the Presidential Palace was renovated by Peruvian architect Leonardo Villanueva Meyer, who converted it from a primitive colonial style structure into a more modern building. Besides adding a third floor, which now serves as private residence for the president and his family, he built a Moorish patio graced by beautiful white herons, the first of which were brought from Darien and presented to President Porras as a gift by a friend. New murals were painted by Panamanian artist Roberto Lewis, depicting historic events during the government of President Juan Demostenes Arosemena in 1936-38. Some of the paintings were picturesque sceneries of Taboga Island and the presidential family in those days. Lewis had before decorated the National Theater. Many curious anecdotes may be said about those who have occupied the Presidential Palace. Three Depahment of Defense phoos by Petty Oficer 2nd Class Bill Lewis presidents have ruled Panama, not by election, but by The Presidential Palace stands out in front of the Panama Bay. appointment: Dr. Manuel Amador Guerrero in 1904, Enrique Jimenez in 1945 and Demetrio B. Lakes in 1972. Three other have been president without being elected specifically for that purpose: Dr. Harmodio Arias, Secretary of Government and Justice in 1931; Ricardo Adolfo De la Guardia, Minister of Government and Justice in 1941 and Dr. Bernardino Ruiz, Minister of Labor and Welfare in 1963. The longest resident of the Presidential Palace had been Dr. Belisario Porras: 9 1/2 years. The shortest, Engineer Ernesto Jaen Guardia: only three hours. The 25 presidents before Robert F. Chiari were all born in Colombia. There have also been cases of father and son being president: Federico Boyd in 1916 and Dr. Augusto Samuel Boyd in 1939; 7rpie I&eL f4/ Rodolfo Chiari in 1912, 1923 and 1924, and Roberto F. Chiari in 1940 and 1949. There is also the case of brothers. Dr. Harmodio Arias in 1931 and 1932 and Dr. Arnulfo Arias in 1940, 1949 and 1968; Dr. Sergio Gonzalez Ruiz in 1961 and 1962 and Dr. Bernardino Gonzalez Ruiz in 1963. There has been weddings in the Presidential Palace only twice -that of Ricardo Adolfo De la Guardia in 1943 and President Guillermo Endara Galimany in 1990. White herons surround the patio fountain.

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~# TommuityTropi Times B5A C u tynews May6, 1994 -% Clayton Armed Forces Week kicks off May 13. Events -of the day begin 6 a.m. with 3-and 5-mile fun runs and static displays will be displayed 11 a.m.-4 p.m. in Clayton Park including a health booth with cholesterol check, information about dengue fever, Aficanized honey bees, snakes and plants. Other booths will display the Army Career and Alumni Program, Army and Air Force Exchange Service car sales and handicrafts. The Association of the U.S. Army will sponsor a picnic at 12:30 p.m. and fun run awards will be presented at 4 p.m. Volleyball, frisbee golfand horseshoe matcheswill runthrough% out the day. Nominations are now being accepted for the 1995 Ten Outstanding Young Americans Award program. Nominations should be sent to Aichel Tam at the Directorate ofCivilian Personnel, Building 560, Corozal, by April 22. Call 285-5611/4111. U.S. Army photo Regular Islamic prayer services are held 12:301:30 p.m. each Friday at the Fort Clayton Chapel hall. For more information, call 287-5859. Children get a tourof an Army helicopter at Fort Clayton's quadrangle. U.S. Army South will kick off Armed Army Community Services are offering free Forces Week May 13 with static displays, a fun run and 79th Army Band concerts. See top brief (right) parentingclasses 6-8:30p.m. Monday andWednesday and May 13, 16 and 18 on the top floor of T Building 155, Fort Clayton. For information, call Teens ta on mootCOU cse 287-6643 The American Red Cross is offering a first aid by Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson class for maids in Spanish 8 a.m.-5 p.m. May 21 on 24th Wing Public Affairs Law D ay m meant to the third floor of Building 519, Fort Clayton. For information, call 287-5509. BALBOA -The dictionary defines "moot" in many S Family member jobs skills training will be ways: subject to argument, debatable, theoretical or hypoenhan Ce dV ad. JS held 8 a.m.-noon May 13 at the Fort Clayton Nonthetical, and purelyacademic. All of these may applyto the commissioned Officers' Club. No registration is "moot court" that Balboa High School students participatALBROOK AFS -Law Day is meant to heighten required. For more information, call 285-5201. ed in recently. people's awareness ofthe law, said Capt. Mike Sciales, Vendors interested in selling handicrafts at the The moot court competition ran through the week and area defense counsel for Air Force members assigned U.S. Army salute to Armed Forces Week should culminatedon "Law Day," April29. This day is designated in Panama. call the U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office at each year to try and enhance public awareness of the law "Very often people don't know about the laws that 287-3007. Space is limited. and the legal profession and the effect it has on people's affectthem, and they don't find outuntil they get busted The Exceptional Family Member Program everyday lives. and try to explain why they broke the law," he supportgroupmeetingwillbe7:30-9p.m. May17 "We do the moot court exercises in conjunction with the explained. "This is obviously not effective or even at the Valent Recreation Center. The presentation American Bar Association's 'Law Day' celebration," said helpful, so our emphasis is on pro-active work." will be summeractivities foryouth and children. For Clear Efthimiadis, an attorney in the office of the general He speaks at commander's calls to let people know information, call 287-5073/4921. counsel for the Panama Canal Commission. "It gives the about potential legal problems and how to avoid them. A La Leche League meeting will be 7 p.m. May students an opportunity to try out their advocacy skills in "Sex, checks, drugs, alcohol and failure to go are the 17 at the Valent Recreation Center. The meeting will an educational environment." major reasons people come see the ADC,' Sciales said. feature the advantages of breastfeeding for mother It also goes a long way toward teaching the premise that "Recent statistics show that our number one problem and baby. For information, call 287-5729. laws are not in place solely to tell people what they can't is people writing bad checks." do, she said. Although this problem area can have far-reaching "This shows the students that laws also protect people's repercussions -extra fees and charges, placement on rights and help them when those rights have been vioa "bad check list" that disallows cashing checks in the The Department ofDefense Dependents Schools lated," she said. future, control roster, loss of pay and even discharge it will conduct pre-registration next week. Students The chief of military justice with the 24th Wing staff is not too difficult to avoid, he.said. will be given registration packets Monday to be judge advocate, Capt. Steve Coney, said he enjoyed returned by May 13. Kindergarten registration is participating in the moot court procedures. augmented by interested lay people. also under way. "Working with other area lawyers fosters much better The students who presented to the "court" with the most Children who will be 5 years old by Oct. 31 community relations," he said. "Also, these moot court convincing arguments for their clients advanced to the next should register. Take the child's birth certificate, an sessions give me achance to meet andwork with other legal round. agency sponsorship letter or travel orders, shot professionals from the local community, an opportunity I After four days of competition, the co-counsel team of records and ID cards. For more information, call wouldn't otherwise have." Adrienne Kinghom and Benjamin Smith finally emerged 286-3867. Last year, the professionals from Panama's U.S. govas the victors, with Chelsea Coffey and Jessica Penkoske emnment legal community coordinated activities and won as runners-up. a public service award for the ABA's "Law Day U.S.A. Coffey andPenkoske said they got involved in the moot Howard/Aibrook Competition." A large part of their coordinated activities court competition because they thought it would be a Volunteers are needed in family services to was centered upon the moot court competition. challenge, and because they thought it would be good help with the loan closet, base brochure library, and The competition paired students representing either the public speaking experience for their future careers in layette program. Family services is open 10 a.m.-3 plaintiff or the defendant in a hypothetical sexual harassbroadcast journalism. p.n. Volunteers get free child care and can visit the ment case occurring in the school environment. It was "I really don't think I could make a living as a lawyer facility or call 284-5860. based on an actual case that went through the California though," Penkoske said. "I'd feel terrible if someone put A spouse job search workshop is offered 10 court system. their life in my hands and I lost their case." a.m. Tuesdays to provide family members with The panels of "judges" hearing student counsel arguMembers of the winning team each received a cash information about local job opportunities, and how ments were primarily members of the American legal award of$50, while the runners-up each received $30. Both to effectively search for a job in Panama. Call 284community -lawyers, clerks and paralegals -and were pairs were also honored at the April 29 Law Day Luncheon. 5650. Steps can prevent 'pregnancy gingivitis' Atlantic The 79th Army Band dry season concerts will HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) -Pregnant women flossing, Magaziner said. be held today and May 13 behind the Fort Davis should take extra steps to avoid gingivitis, a condition that The dentist recommends brushing and flossing twice a exh a and day an Mahind the Amadis leaves gums swollen and tender, according to an advisory day. A woman planning to become pregnant should see a Gazebo. All concerts begin at 6 p.m. from the Academy of General Dentistry. dentist to get a head start on controlling "pregnancy gingiThe American Red Cross-Atlantic is offering a Factors such as shifts in hormonal concentrations, parvitis." community first aid and safety class 9 a.m.-2 p.m. ticularly increases in estrogen and progesterone, have been "The severity of the gingivitis depends upon the mothMay 23 and 9 a.m.-3 p.m. May 24 at the Sundial linked to changes in gum tissue and the onset of gingivitis er's willingness to take care of herself and practice decent creation Center. For information, call 289-3595. during pregnancy, the academy found. oralhygiene methods," Magazinersaid."lfgingivitis is not "A recent study shows the condition has been reported treated, it can lead to more advanced periodontal disease in 30-100 percent of pregnant women," academy spokesthat continues past pregnancy." Miscellaneous person Fred Magaziner, D.D.S., said. If toothbrushing induces "morning sickness"nausea or Toastmasters Interational -Panama will hold Symptoms usually occur by the second month of pregbleeding gums, the dentist encourages rinsing with meetings June 2 and June 16 at the Panama Canal nancy and increase until the eighth month, with most antiplaque and fluoride mouthwashes and finger-cleaning training Center. For information, call 287-5689. symptomsdisappearingnaturallyafterdeliveryifthemother the teeth with a dry washcloth. (Story courtesy of the follows proper oral hygiene practices of brushing and Academy ofGeneral Dentistry)

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Tropic Times May 6, 1994 / X R odrman +Outdoor adventures: naturalist guide and lunch. *Information, Tour and Travel: Snorkel or dive San Bias Islands May Free Zone shopping 7 am.-3 p.m. Free Zone Shopping Wednesday and 13. May 23. *Balboa Dive Club: May 30, $12, 7 a.m. departure. minimum Fish for marlin and sailfish Tuesday Chiriqui highlands tour May 27-30. Honduras Bay Island of Roatan divof 12 people are needed. Shop for small and May 26 on the 65-foot Catyani. Visit Boquete, Volcan. Cerro Punta and ing trip May 28-June 4. Deadline to sign electronics, gold. watches and fine linen. +Road Knights Motorcycle Club: David. up is Wednesday. $930 fee includes transMoonlight Cruise May 13. $21, 6:30 Ticket run May 15. Bikers will depart Isla Grande May 28. Fee includes portation, hotel accomodations at p.m. departure.Cruise Panama and Taboga from Banco Exterior on Avenida Balboa boat transportation. Anthony's Key Resort, all meals, three Bay on the 61-foot Black Stallion. Hors at 9 a-m. Entry is $5 per person and inCosta Rica tour July 1-4. Register by guided boat dives per day, dolphin dive D'oeuvres included. cludes food and drinks at each stop. The June 20. Trip includes three nights/four and snorkel, tanks, weights and all resort Dinner and Jazz at Las Bovedas Resevent is open to everyone. Call Danie days at Hotel Gran Costa Rica, round-trip activities. Call 284-5117 or 250-0346. taurant May 13, $6 transportation fee, 7 Cooper at 285-5050 or 229-3635 for deticket and city tour. The Club is now accepting entries to p.m. departure from Rodman, minimum tail. *Outdoor Recreation Center: the 1994 Scuba Olympics to be held June of 10 people needed. Enjoy french cuiPoker run May 22. The riders will Partial transits of the Panama CaI at the Albrook Pool. There are seven sine at the famous "Las Bovedas" restaudepart from the 24 Hour Store in Diablo nal7:30-11:30a.m. Saturdays,$40. Minievents -four for snorklers and three for rant in the French Plaza and enjoy jazz Heights at 9 a.m. Entry fee is $5 per person mum of 20 people required for partial divers. There are also two two-person team music. and includes beverages. The event is open transit any day of the week. events. Prizes include two trips to HonduPanama City Tour 9 a.m. May 14 & to everyone. Call Dannie Cooper at 25Cerro Azul trail hike 7 a.m.-3 p.m. ras from Copa Airlines, dive light, tank 26, $8, minimum of 10 people needed. 5050 or 229-3635 for details. May 14. Hike a portion ofthe famous trail trays, computer software, subscriptions Visit the Church of the Golden Altar, and see Soberania National Park in and various dive packages from Scuba French Plaza. Panama's interior. Fee includes transporPanama and Buzo. Entry fees are $5 for the Chiriqui Highland Tour May 27-30, +Valent Recreation Center: tation and lunch. first two events and $3 for each additional starts at $200. Visit Boquete, the coffee Shades ofGreen hotel in Disney World, Isla Mamey snorkel/dive trip May event. Pick up an application at the Albrook plantation, David, Volcan and Cerro Punta. special rates are available for this and any 21. or Howard pool, the Zodiac Recreation Meals, hotel and transportation included. other hotel in Orlando, Fla. White water rafting in Costa Rica Center or write Unit 0967 APO AA 34002 minimum of 12 people needed for the trip. Panama City shopping tour 8 a.m. May 27-30. $340 fee includes airfare, or call 263-8077. Saturday. hotel transfers, city tour, and one day Club meeting 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at Albrook/H oward Adventures in nature jungle walk 8 rafting with lunch. Non-rafting toura are the Curundu Restaurant across from the *Zodiac Community Activities: a.m.I p.m. May 21. Families can follow a also available. Pacific Theatre Arts Centre. Arcadio Panama Viejo and Miraflores locks tour guide through "El CharcoTrail"'in the San Bias snorkel/dive trip May 28Rodaniche will give a presentation on the tour 9 a.m.-5 p.m. May 14, $10. Visit the rain forest. Also visit the Summit Botani30. Fee includes lodging, airfare, meals, declining reef system in Panama. area where pirate Henry Morgan hid his cal Garden. fourguided dives and tank transport.NonInfromation on diving in Panama and upgold, then see how the Miraflores Locks Barro Colorado Island tour May 21, divers get free snorkel gear and island coming trips will be available. work. $35 per person. Travel up the Panama tour. DivetriptoAquaticParkinPortobelo Memorial Weekend on Contadora Canal in Gatun Lake to the Smithsonian Customized trips are available for June 25-26. Costs, $25 per.person and Island May 28-31. Register by May 25. Tropical Research Institute island. The groups with a minimum of four or 10 includes accommodations, four boat dives Call the center for details. tour includes transportation, a bilingual people. and a barbecue. Sign up by June 8. Albrook/H toward days and Thursdays. Admission to the first class is free. *Zodiac Community Activities CenIndian Guyami sewing lessons are ter; offered twice a 'week. Basic, 1-3 p.m. Intro to scuba, a free one-night class is intermediate, 5-7 p.m. available. Basic and intermediate sewing lesOpen-water scuba May 16 at Howard sons are offered twice a week. Basic classes Pool. are 3-5 p.m., intermediate classes are 5-7 Rescue scuba Monday at Howard pool. p.m. Call the center to arrange scuba classes Basic/intermediate cake decorating if these don't fit in your schedule. meets 6-8 p.m. twice a week. Classes in ladies water exercise. beginDog obedience class 7-9:15 p.m. Monning and advanced swimming for adults day, Wednesday and Friday, $60. and children, diving board and lap swimBasic/intermediate English classesare ming are available at Howard or Albrook held Monday-Thursday. pools. Call the center for details. Six-week Spanish classes. Basic class, / Martial Arts classes are offered 6-7 p.m. Monday and Wednesday or Tuesthrough the recreation center and both day and Thursday. Intermediate class, 7youth centers. 8 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday, $25. Beginner and advanced English and *Fort Clayton Scuba Shop: Spanish classes begin monthly and run The phone is temporarily out of orfour weeks. The next ones are offered der. Call 287-6453/5807 for information. Monday through May 26. Basic open-water scuba class, $115. Beginner and advanced dog obediAdvanced open-water scuba, $140. ence classes are held at the H toward Parade Rescue scuba, $119. Field. Four-week class costs $32. A miniUnderwater photography, $99. mum of five people are needed. Ro a *Albrook Auto shop: Air conditioning service and repair +Rodman scuba: 12:30-5 p.m. every day except Tuesday Open water scuba starts May 17. and Wednesday. Equipment and textbooks are provided. / Wheel alignment diagnostic and serCall 283-5307 for details. vice 3-9 p.m. Monday, Thursday and Friday. l aim.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Cur / Cl *+Twin Oceans Pro Shop: / Clayton T "'" Shp Equipment available for scuba, snor*Fort Clayton Boat Shop: kel, tennis andoutdoor recreation.Call286Bass fishing at Gatun Lake, $20 fee 6514. includes guide, boat, bait and rods. *Pacific Theatre Arts Centre: Deep sea fishing, $200 fee includes Monthlyclassesavailablerangingfrom captain, gear, lures and fuel. various dance lessons, guitar and piano +Valent Recreation Center: and martial arts. Call 286-3814' for more Deparotet of Doe-se photo Ly Pey Ofcer 2nd class B1 Loop Korean karate class 6-8 p.m. Tuesinformation. / tatuesque I This monument to Simon Bolivar s liberation of the Latin American countries can be seen during a Colonial Panama tour / 7 / 7 /."

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Tropic Times notices May 6 1994 Theatre I )"'P Ancon Theatre Guild: ActvitiThe comedy "Vanities" frns tonight, Saturday and Thursday through May 14. Curtain time is 8 p.m. Call S h Jons n252-6786 for reservations. iPacific Theatre Ars Cetre: "Opera Comique," an adult farce that will be entered in the 1994 Forces Command Festival of Performing Arts will be performed 8 p.m. Thursday through May 28. Call te a2R6-3814 for reservations. Attitude Adjustment T a aThe first monthly "Attitude Adjustment" party will be held at the Rodman Club Bohio next to the Rodman ce tePool 3:30-1 p.m. today. The event is open to all ranks. Activities include live music from the band "Killer Coaa timundi," free hors d'oeuvres 5-7 p.m., sand volleyball 45 p.m., youth games and prizes 4-5 p.m., watermelon eating/seed spitting contest 5-6 p.m., limbocontest, prizes. Rental Specials o aThe Howard Sports and Recreational Rental Center s8-0as re ta sp cials through the month of May. Call for details. The center will be closed May 30. Horse play and Cat C 2 / Stephanie Jones rides a horse on a trail in El Valle. -7 7 7 MClayton*Sundial Recreation Center: May 25. *Hoa ls Delen Kunayalla Day 9 a.m. May 14 Barro Colorado 7 a.m. May Atlantic Music and Theater will features Kuna dancers, mola and 14.El Valle tour 5:30 a.m. May 15 perform the family musical comhandicraft sales. and 29. edy "Annie" 7 p.m. May 13, 14, Bake and decoration demonFree Zone 9 a.m. May 18. and 21 and 2 p.m. May 15 and 22 at stration May 19. Isla Grande 7 a.m. May 22. the Cristobal High School auditoPool tips for 8-ball May 26. Guate shalaor Costa Rica May rium. "Annie" will be an entry in Horseshoe tournament, Satur27-30. the annual Forces Command Festidays. !00cean Breeze Recreation val of Performing Arns. Pool tournament, Saturdays. Center: Pprc gqie C Thursday are Wonderful, a El Valle 5 a.m. May 15. Rec center news program for women, Thursdays. Isla Grande a.m. 10:3y. H d Pacific *cean Breeze Recreation Cen-Bird watching 8 a.m. Sunday. 24th Services Squadron Sports and Co t cAtlantic tours Naa historical May 14. Recreational Rental Center, 284-6107 The center offers a variety of a Sundial Recreation Center: Remon Race Track 10 a.m. Albrook Auto Craft Shop, 286-3613 classes such as karate, cake decoTaboga Island 7 a.m. Saturday. May 21. Albrook Club, 286-4128 ratiEnin as english, Rio Mar Beach 6 a.m.Sunday. Portobelo & Langosta Beach Albrook Riding Stables 287-4411/3333 country line dancing and jazz. Call Colon City historicaland shop9 a.m. May 22. Anchorage Club, 283-4332 289-6402 for details. ping tour 9 a.m. Wednesday and Rio Mar May 28. Canal Crafters 286-4500 Chief Petty Officers' Club, 283-5475 Clayton Arts andRerato s Center, 287-5957 Clayton Boat Shop 287-6453 Clayton Ceramic Center, 287-4360 Clayton NCO Club, 287-3586 Clayton Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363 DHoward Skills Development videos are available. teers are welcome. The shop feaClayton Scuba Shop 287-3355 Center: IFort Clayton Arts and Crafts tures seasonal displays and is openDC mmuni, Cl2-3934 Free porcelain pouring class Center: 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Saturday,oo Recreation, 28-4 2-4 p.m. today, 10 a.m.-noon May Fabric painting classes 6:30Building 804. Albrook. Sign up for h a At Craft -3 13. 8:30p.m. the firstand third Wednesclasses at the shop: Coward Enlisted Members' Club, 284-4107 Free ceramic pouring class in day and Thursday of each month. Toll painting class 10 a.m. Huwal Reces' Cenb, 28-88 English 1-3 p.m. Wednesday $7.50.Some supplies are furnished. Monday and May 16. toR Free ceramic pouring class in Stone stroke classes I a.m. Special project quilting Santa Spanish 4-6 p.m. Thursday Sundays, $10. Paint ceramic figuwall hanging 10:30 a.m. WednesStained glass class meets 5-7 rines to look like stoneware. day, runs 6-8 weeks. p.m. Thursday. Custom frames to order and Free cross stich class 10:30a.m. Howard Wood Craft Shop 284-45 10 Cross-stitch class meets Tuesdo-it-yourself frame classes are May 13. The Loop, 287-3035 days. available. Free stencil class 10:30 a.m. Pacific Theatre Arts Centre 286-3814 Framing classes are available. The Ceramic Center, Building May 20. Quarry Heights Officers' Club, 282-4380 Call 284-6361 for details. 198 is located behind the Crafts Quilting class first, second and Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150 Ongoing classes include clay Shop. fourth Tuesday intermed iate10: 15 /XRodman Naval Station [nformation Tour flower, pottery wheel throwing, *Canal Crafters: a.m.-noon: beginner-12:152 p.m. and Travel Office, 283-5307/4454 macrame, air brush techniques, and Handmade arts and crafts are Free bow making demo 10 a. m. Twin Oceans Pro Shop 286-6514 lamp assembly. Several "how-to" available. Consignment and volunWednesdays. Valent Recreation Center, 287-6500 Zodiac Community Activities Center, 284//A6 Atlantic --Aquativity Center. 289-4009 Davis Arts and Crafts Center, 289-5201 *Valent Recreation Center: Indian crafts from the Darien nament 710 p, m. May 2 1. Davis Community Club, 289-5160 The screening room offers free all day May 16-19. Now showing laser-disc movies Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402 movies. Calling the 24-hour movie *Cocoli Community Recreation 7 p.m. Fridays in May. Outdoor Recreation, 289-4077 line at 287-4367. Center: Toursavailable. Call 287-4119. Sherman Arts and Crafts Center, 289-63 13 Gumbo cooking contest 3 p.m. Arts and crafts for children +Z.odiac Commtunit Center SemnSuaSo,2960 May 14. Three categories to be 3:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday. Subs on Top has take-out, catSundial Recreation Center, 289-3889/3300 judged. Sign up by Wednesday. Mother's Day dinner at La in or delivery service to Kobbe. Encore: A Valent retrospecCascada 7-9 pm. Saturday. free Farfan.,How ardaLnd Gaiew ay hustive special event 11 ~mprm. ride fmr Moml. iny. FAx in ordecr, at 8-19r May 14-15. Armed Forces Day pool tourcall 84-'848.

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Tropic Times M ovies Location Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Howard AFB 7pm: BlankCheck(PG) 2pm: BlankCheck(PG) 2pm: BlankCheck(PG) 7pm: BlankCheck(PG) 7pm: Ace Ventura: Pet 7pm: Lightning Jack 7pm: Sugar Hill (R) 284-3583 Brian Bonsell, Miguel Brian Bonsell, Miguel Brian Bonsell, Miguel Brian Bonsell, Miguel Detective (PG-13) Jim (PG-13) Paul Hogan, Wesley nipes, Michael Ferrer Ferrer Ferrer Ferrer Carrey, Sean Young Cuba Gooding Jr. Wright 9pm: Ace Ventura: Pet 7pm: Ace Ventura: Pet 7pm: China Moon (R) 9pm: Ace Ventura: Pet 9pm: China Moon (R) 9pm: Sugar Hill (R) 9:30pm: LightningJack Detective (PG-13) Jim Detective (PG-13) Jim Ed Harris, Madeleine Detective (PG-13) Jim Ed Harris, Madeleine Wesley Snipes, Michael (PG-13) Paul Hogan, Carrey, Sean Young Carrey, Sean Young Stowe Carrey, Sean Young Stowe Wright Cuba Gooding Jr. 9pm: China Moon (R) 9pm: Ace Ventura: Pet Ed Harris, Madeleine Detective (PG-13) Jim Stowe Carrey, Sean Young Fort Clayton 7pm: Blue Chips (PG2pm: Greedy (PG-13) 2pm: Blue Chips (PG7pm: Greedy (PG-13) 7pm: On DeadlyGround 7pm: Ace Ventura: Pet 7pm: Philadelphia(PG13) Nick Nolte, Mary Michael J. Fox, Kirk 13) Nick Nolte, Mary Michael J. Fox, Kirk (R) Steven Seagal, Detective (PG-13) Jim 13)Tom Hanks, Denzel 287-3279 McDonnell Douglas McDonnell Douglas Michael Caine Carrey, Sean Young Washington 9pm:OnDeadlyGround 7pm:OnDeadlyGround 7pm: Greedy (PG-13) 9:15pm: Philadelphia 9:30pm: Blue Chips 9pm: China Moon (R) 9:30pm: China Moon (R) Steven Seagal, (R) Steven Seagal, Michael J. Fox, Kirk (PG-13) Tom Hanks, I (PG-13) Nick Nolte, Ed Harris, Madeleine (R)EdHarris,Madeleine Michael Caine Michael Caine Douglas Denzel Washington Mary McDonnell Stowe Stowe 9:30pm: Blue Chips 9:15pm: On Deadly (PG-13) Nick Nolte, Ground (R) Steven Mary McDonnell Seagal, Michael Caine Fort Davis 7pm: Mrs. Doubtfire 7pm: Mrs. Doubifire 7pm: Reality Bites(PG7pm: The Getaway (R) 7pm: Reality Bites (PG7pm: Greedy (PG-13) 7pm:On Deadly Ground 289-5173 (PG-13) Robin Will(PG-13) Robin Will13) Winona Ryder, Alec Baldwin, Kim 13)WinonaRyder, Ethan Michael J. Fox, Kirk (R) Steven Seagal, irns, Sally Field iarms, Sally Field Ethan Hawke Basinger Hawke Douglas Michael Caine 9:15pm: The Getaway 9:15pm: The Getaway 9pm: Mrs. Doubtfire (R) Alec Baldwin, Kim (R) Alec Baldwin, Kim (PG-13) Robin WillBasinger Basinger ians, Sally Field Fort Sherman 7:30pm: Reality Bites 7:30pm: Ernest Rides 7:30pm: The Getaway No show No show No show 7:30pm: Blue Chips 289-5173 (PG-13) Winona Ryder, Again (PG) Jim Varney (R) Alec Baldwin, Kim PG-I3 Nik Nol Ethan Hawke Basinger Mary McDonnell Fort Amador 7pm: China Moon (R) 7pm: Lightning Jack 7pm: BlankCheck(PG) No show No show No show 7pm: Ace Ventura: Pet 284-3583 Ed Harris, Madeleine (PG-1I) Paul Hogan, Brian Bonsell, Miguel Detective (PG-13) Jun Stowe Cuba Gooding Jr. Ferrer Carrey, Sean Young Coming soonN hlig May 13 Lightning Jack n (I) PIfv J Paul Hogan, Cuba Gooding Jr. A bungling outlaw teams up with a very Howard AFB perceptive mute partner to enjoy a life of DUCIC M -SUB IFAC_,crime while eluding the law in the old 7pm Lightning Jack west. PG-13 (sexual conent), 98 min. (PG-13) *MNELM.^ -Sugar Hill U .V. Paul Hogan Wesley Snipes, Michael Wright TMEb'RE FAILV' Cuba Gooding Jr. The godfather ofa New York City crime9pm Angie (R) empire fights desperately to break free of Geena Davis, the world he created before it destroys him and his family. R (intense drug relatStphnRea ed violence, graphic heroin use, strong Where thtles a Will others a relative -^ language), 123 mm. Fort Clayton The Ref Now showing at the Clayton, Davis and Sherman theaters. 7pm Blank Check (PG) Denis Leary, Judy Davis Brian Bonsell, Comedian Denis Leary is perfectly cast On Deadly Ground Mrs. Doubtfire Michael Ferrer as a hapless jewel thief who kidnaps a Steven Seagal, Michael Caine Robin Williams, Sally Field bickering married couple on Christmas An Alaskan oil worker is left to die in the Robin Williams is an out-of-work voice 9pm Ace Ventura: Pet Christ a tcwlens fe hetnn og f Eve and ends up being a hostage in the Artic wilderness after threatening to go over-artist suffering through a messy Detective (PG-13) copeshm.R(agae,9 i. public about unsafe drilling practices. divorce. Because hisjobless Status causJmC ,couple's home. R (language), 97 mi. Things heat up after Seagal is rescued im Carrey and gears up to take on the oil company es his wife to get custody of the chilSean Young Ace Ventura heavies. R (strong violence, language), dren, Williams disguises himself an 120 mm. older woman to get a job as nanny for Jim Carrey, Sean Young his children. PG-13 (sexual referencFort Davis When a pet dolphin is believed to have Greedy es), 125 min. NOTE: No movie will be been kidnapped along with a prominent Michael J. Fox, Kirk Douglas scheduled. sports celebrity, Ace Ventura, Pet A shameless bunch of money grubbing Reality Bites Detective iscalled in forthejob. PC-13 relatives fight for the immense fortune of Winona Ryder, Ethan Hawke 6pm The 79th Army Band (off color humor, some nudity), 86 min. eccentric Joe McTeague, whom they hope Winona Ryder is a college graduate will be performing a will die soon. When Uncle Joe takes in a trying to make sense out of her life. She concert. China Moon sexy pizza delivery girl as his nurse, is torn between two lovers, a poetic true Ed Harris, Madeleine Stowe everyone panics and asks Danny, his materitive. PG13 (language, drug conA small town detective falls for a rich beloved, long-lost nephew to help get rid Fort Sherman married woman and remains blindly in of the seductive new rival. PG-13 (lantent, sensuality), 99 min. love until he has to investigate a murder guage), 113 min. 7:30pm Greedy (PG-13) he'd rather not solve. R (sensuality, lanThe Getaway Michael J. Fox, guage, violence), 99 min. Blue Chips Alec Baldwin, Kim Basinger Kirk Douglas BNick Nolte, Mary McDonnell Alec Baldwin is a hardened criminal Blank Check Nick Nolte stars as a college basketball who will do anything to get out ofjail. Brian Bonsell, Miguel Ferrer coach who must walk a fine line in his Kim Basinger is his wife who will do Fort Amador An I 1-year-oldboyhitbyacardrivenby recruitment ofnew players. The politics anything to help him. His return to a mobster is given a blank check to pay of college ball are exposed as the coach' freedom is celebrated with d bang nd Hill (R) forbike repairs. The boy writes the check tries to keep his program alive in the face a robbery. This action-thriller is an upfor a million dollars and the bank actualof conflicting pressures. The story feadate of the 1972 Sam Peckinpah verWesley Snipes, ly cashes it. PG (language, some threattures Shaquille O'Neal. PG-13 (lansion ofthestory. R (violence,sexuality, Michael Wright ening situations), 100 min. guage), 108 min. language), 113 min.

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Tropic Time 2 TV Schedule May 6, 1994 B9 Channels 8& 10* Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30am NBC News at Surise 6:30am SRTV Washington Re6 00am CCMTV 5:30am NBC News at Sunrise 5:30am NBC News at Sunrise 5:30am NBC News at Sunrise 5:30 NBC News at Sunrise 6:00 Good Morning America port 6:31) Hotur of Power 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Morning America 8:00 Basic Training Workout 7:00 Navy/Marine Corps 7:00 Voices Of Faith 8:00 BasicTraining Workot 8:00 Bodyshaping n* 8:00 Basic Training Workout 8:00 Bodyshaping ** 0:30 Sesame Street News 7:25 Catchl The Spirit :30 Sesame S reel 0:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street 9:30 Highway To Heaven 7:30 Real News For Kids 8:00 CBS Sunday Morning 9:30 1Hlighway To H aven 9:30 Highway To Heaven 9:30 Highway To Heaven 9:30 Highway To Heaven 10:25 Guiding Light 8:00 Name Your Adsenture 9:30 Face The Nation 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light l1:10 General Hospital 8:30 Just for Kids! 10:00 Headline News 1:10 General hospital 11:10 General Hospital I1:10 General Hospital 11:10 General Hospital Noon Headline News Sonic The Hedgehog 10:30 Turning Point + Noon Headline News Break Noon Headline News Break Noon Headline News Break Noon Headline News Break 12:30 Sportscenter CRO 11:30 Washington Week In 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday Report 1:00 Another World Teenage Mutant Ninja Review 12:30 Sports Machine 12:30 Sportscenter 12:30 Sportscenter 12:30 Sportscenter 2:00 Oprah Winfrey Turtles Noon Headline News 1:00 Another World 1 00 Another World 1:00 Another World 1:00 Another World 3:00 Price is Right Beetlejuice 12:30 America's Black Foram 2:00 Oprah Winfey 2:00 Sally Jesse Raphael 2:00 Oprah Winfrey 2:00 Donahue 4:00 Channel One Batnan *** 1:00 Movie: "Auntie Maine" 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 3:00 Price is Right 4:15 Newsroom 10:30 Nature 3:20 "The Fireball" 4:00 Channel One 4:00 Channel One 4:00 Channel One 4:00 Channel One 4:30 Legend of Me Hidden 1 1:30 Clive James' Fame In 5:00 Headline News 4:15 Newsroom4:15 Newsroom 4:15 Newsroom 4:15 Newsroom Temple The 20th Century 5:30 Grand Ole Opry Live 4:30 Name Your Adventure 4:30 Ghostwriter 4:30 Lamh Chop's Play-A4:30 Club Connect 5:00 Wheel of Fortune 12:30pm Ileadline News 6:00 Austin City Limits 5:00 Wheel Of Fortune 5:00 Wheel of Fortune Long 5:00 Wheel of Fortune 5:30 Showbiz Today 1:00 Young Adult Theatre: 6:55 ABC News "20/20" 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:00 Wheel of Fortune 5:30 Showbiz Today 6:00 Headline News "A Tale Of Four 7:45 Poirot V ** 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:30 Showbiz Today 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:30 World News Tonight Wishes" 8:40 Movie: "Barabas" 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News Break 7:00 Jeopardy! 1:45 Movie:"StrangersOnA 11:00 Entertainment This Week 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 World News Tonight 7:30 America's Funniest Train" Midnight Headline News 7:00 Jeopardy! 7:00 Jeopardy! 6:30 World News Tonight 7:00 Jeopardy! Home Videos 3:30 "Paths OfGlory" 12:30 Meet The Press 7:30 ROC 7:30 Answerline 7:00 Jeopardy! 7:30 Fresh Prince Of Bel Air 8:00 Baywatch 5:00 World WrestlingFeder1:30 Sports Latenight 8:00 Cnps 8:30 48 Hours 7:20 Murphy Brown 7:55 Movie: "Texas Cheer9:00 Dave's World atinn 2:00 ABC World News Now 8:30 60 Minutes 9:30 CBS Evening News 7:50 Movie: "Hold TIe leader Murdering Mom" 9:30 CBS Evening News 5:50 Headline News 3:00 Headline News 9:30 CBS Evening News 10:00 SCN Late Edition Dream" (Part 1) 9:30 CBS Evening News 10:05 Entertainment Tonight 6:20 Unsolved Mysteries 3:30 Sports Machine 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:05 Entertainment Tonight 9:35 CBS Evening News 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:35 Tonight Show 7:10 China Beach 4:00 ABC World News Now 10:05 Entertainment Tonight 10:35 Tonight Show 10:00 SCN Late Edition 10:05 Entertainment Tonight 11:35 David Lettertoan 0:00 Movie: "Zorba The 5:00 Headline News Break 10:35 Tonight Show 11:35 David Letterman 10:05 Entertainment Tonight 10:35 Tonight Show 12:35am Headline News Break Greek" 11:35 David Letternan 12:35am Headline News Break 10:35 Tonight Show 11:35 David Letterman 1:00 Nightline 10:30 Saturday Night Live 12:35am Headline News Break 1:00 Nightline 11:35 David Letterman 12:35am Headline News Break 1:30 Movies "A Thousahd [ Midnight Showtime At Apollo 1:00 Nightline 1:30 Sports Latenight 12:35am Headline News Break 1:00 Nightline Heroes" 1:00 Friday Night Videos 1:30 Sports Latenight 2:00 Arsenio Hall 1:00 Nightline 1:30 Sports Latenight 3:00 In The Line Of Duty: 2:00 Movies: "Wait Until 2:00 Arsenio Hall 3:00 Headline News 1:30 Sports Latenight 2:00 Arsenio Hall "Ambush In Waco" Dark" 3:00 Headline News 3:30 Tonight Show 2:00 Arsenio Hall 3:00 Headline News 4:40 Videolinks 3:50 "The Best 75Man" 3:30 Tonight Show 4:30 Headline News 3:00 Headline News 3:30 Tonight Show 5:30 Headline News 5:40 Headline News Break 4:30 Headline News 5:00 Headline News Break 3:30 Tonight Show 4:30 Headline News 6:00 Headline News Break 5:00 Headline News Break 4:30 Headline News 5:00 Heudline News Break 5:00 Headline News Break Cable channel 14* Mature Theme ** Series Begins ***Series Ends + Program time change because of live event Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30am Simulcast with Chan5:30am Simulcast with Channels 6:00am Bugs Bunny Mother's 5:30am Simulcast with Channels 5:30am Simulcast with Channels 5:30am Simulcast with Channels 5:30am Simulcast with Channels8 &0 8 & J0 Day Special 8& 10 8& 10 8& 10 nels 8 & 10 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 10:30 Lois & Clark: The New 6:30 What's Up Mom? 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Donahue 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Sally Jess e Raphael 9:00 Today Adventures of Super6:50 Sonic The Hedgehog 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 11:00 Star Trek man 7:15 Disney's Little Mermaid I 1:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek 11:00 Star Trek H1:00 Star Trek Noon Headline News 11:30 NBA Baskethall: TBA 7:35 CRO Noon Headline News Break Noon Headline News Break Noon Headline News Break Noon Iteadline News Break 12:30 All My Children 2:30pm Headline News 8:00 Tiny Toons Adventures 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 1:30 One Life to Live 3:00 ThisWeek In Baseball'+ 8:20 BeetleJuice 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 2:30 Young and the Restless 3:30 Kentucky Derby -8:45 EEK! The Cat 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 3:30 Batman: The Car5:00 Hceadline News 9:05 Teenage Mutant Ninja 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless 2:30 Young and the Restless ton .* 5:30 American Gladiators + Turtles ** 3:30 Tiny Toons Adventures 3:30 EEK! The Cat 3:30 Sonic The Hedgehog 3:30 Disney's Little Mer4:00 Fraggle Rock 6:30 The Simpsons 9:30 Science & Technology 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fraggle Rock maid 4:30 Ghost Writer 7 :00 Star Trek: "Deep Space Week 4:30 Clarissa Explains It All 4:30 Legend Of The Hidden 4:30 Name Your Adventure 4:00 Fraggle Rlock 5:00 Silver Spoons Nine" *** 10:00 Motor Week 5:00 Club Connect Temple 5:00 Nick New: W5 4:30 Get The Picture cc 5:30 The Cosby Show 8:00 Simon And Simon 10:30 Sports Closeup 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:00 Mickey & Donald ** 5:30 The Cosby Show 5:00 The Wonder Years 6:00 Headline News 9:00 Herman's Head 11:00 NBA Basketball Second 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5:30 The Cosby Show 6:00 SCN Evening Report 5 30 The Cosby Show 6:30 NBC Nightly News 9:30 In Living Color Round Game 6:15 Headline News Break 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:15 Headline News Break 600 SCN Evening Report 7:00 NB3A Basketball: TBA 10:00 Headline News 2:00pm NBA Basketball Second 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:15 Headline News Break 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:15 eadline News Break 9:30 Headline News 10:30 Saturday Night Live Round Game 7:00 MacGyver 6:30 NBC Nightly News 7:00 Full House 6:30 NBC Nightly News 10:00 2142 Jump Street + Midnight Showtime At Apollo 5:00 Quantum Leap 0:00 Melrose Place 7:00 Baby Talk 7:30 Seinfeld 700 Step By Step 11:00 Headline News 1:00 Friday Night Videos 6:00 Headline News 8:50 Movie: "The Prince Of 7:30 Wings 8:00 Tour OfDuty 7:30 Hangin' With Mr. Co11:35 Arsenio Hall 2:00 Entertainment This 6:30 Wonderful World of Tides" 8:00 Picket Fences 9:00 NYPD Blue oper 12:35am -leadline News Break Week Disney 11:00 Headline News 9:00 Coach 10:00 Murder, She Wrote 800 Martin 1:00 Nightline 3:00 I leadline News 7:30 Golden Girls 11:30 SCN Late Edition 9:30 Movie: "Overkill: The 11:00 Headline News 0 30 Living Single 1:30 Sports Latenight 3:30 Saturday Night Live 8:00 Grace Under Fire 11:35 A rsento all Aileen Wunos Story 11:30 SCN Late edition 9:00 Magnum PI 2:00 Arsenio Hall 5:00 Videolinks 8:25 Movie: "Cat People" -12:35am Simulcast with 8&10 11:10 Headline News 11 :35 Arsenia tall 1190 Tle Eq1Ualier *** 3:00 Ileadline News 5:30 Headline News Break 10:00 Day One 11:30 SCN Late Edition I2:35am Simulcast with 8& 10I 1):00 leadtline News 3:30 Tonight Show 11:00 L.A. Law 11:35 Arsenio lhall 1130 SCN Late Edition 4:30 David Letterman Midnight Simulcast with 8&10 12:35am Simulcast with 8&10 11:35 Arsenio Hall 5:00 Simulcast with 8&10 12: 5am Simulcasi with & 10 Channels 8 & 10 Cable Channel 14 Specials Sports "Answerline," 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. Col. Michael McConnell, The Kentucky Derby, 3:30 p.m. Saturday commander of U.S. Army Medical Department Activity, Panama, NBA Basketball is this month's guest to answer your questions about Gorgas Teams to be announced, 7 p.m. today Army Community Hospital. Call in questions 6:30-8:30 p.m. Teams to be announced, 11:30 a.m. Saturday at 287-4460. Teams to be announced, I a.m. Sunday Series starts J, Teams to be announced, 2 p.m. Sunday "Catch The Spirit," 7:25 a.m. Sunday. (Replaces "Jesuit Specials Journal") A news magazine with a spiritual look at current events and "Bugs Bunny Mother's Day Special," 6 a.m. Sunday. Bugs and the people making the news, Hosted by Hilly Hicks and Anisa Mehdi. Warner Bros. cartoon gang take a look at the Mother's Day mayhem "Poirot V," 7:45 p.m. Sundays. (Replaces Sharpe's Rifles") Agatha created over the years by a slightly tipsy.and very sloppy.stork. Christie's maddeningly fastidious Belgian sleuth and his bumbling assistant om?" 6:30 a.m.Sunday. Cartoon Brui Buttons the Bear finds return to solve more baffling crimes Stars David Suchet, Hugh Fraser, and Paula out that you can't mess with Mother Nature in this animated special designed Moran. especially for the little ones. Series starts "Bodyshaping," 8 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. (Replaces "Body By Jake") "Mickey and Donald,"5 p.m. Tuesday. (Replaces Full House) This Disney classic The Bodyshapers and their guests will shape you up with specially developed is packed full of action and adventure as Mickey and Donald and all oftheir pals get exercises for muscle toning, strength and body symmetry. together to entertain the entire family. Primetime movies Star Trek: "Deep Space Nine," 7 p.m. Saturday. (Replaces Star Trek: "The Next "Zorba The Greek," 8 p.m. Saturday. A naive young Englishman goes to the Generation") Amed Forces Radio and Televisior Service beams back aboard Mediterranean isles to salvage the family business, but his activities become mostly Federation space station Deep Space Nine as the intergalactic intrigue and infighting personal. Stars Anthony Quinn, Alan Bates and Irene Papas. continues on this popular spin-off of Star Trek: "The Next Generation." Stars Nana "Barabbas," 8:40 p.m. Sunday. The criminal released in Christ's place finds Visitor and Avery Brooks. himself enslaved, and then ends up in the gladiator's arena fighting for his life. Stars Primetime movies Anthony Quinn, Ernest Borgnine and Jack Palance. "Cat People," 8:25 p.m. Sunday. In this stylish, spooky remake of the original 1942 "Hold The Dream, 7:50 p.m. Wednesday. (Part I) In this sequel to the record classic, a young woman discovers that the act of love can trigger an explosive series breaking "A Woman Of Substance," a self-made millionairess struggles to assure ofevents that can only leave tragic consequences. Stars Nastasia Kinski and Malcolm her empire's future. Stars Deborah Kerr, Jenny Seagrove and Stephen Collins. McDowell.

PAGE 26

1lTropic Times ~9 a sfe B10 May6 1994Classiied Ads ----~ dnotdtypd $6 000. 27 .991 I IEg Smit, good od, ac,p, 5' bss bo,0hpO .pw tlt, 2 el m-i m od, dlty pd. 4dr, rans like host.ow.lligmo ,fsfide,$3,O0. 907 7 lds 'otloss oIt, ono good, $7,0/obo 209-4330. 26-4004. Duty-free merchandise ,200/ 493-~1992 P-1-ia Grand Am, SE, 2drp, Bass 1raker bass bor, paFish sp-nal, FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office) -As a reminder, 1 Clety et',a GTZ, 5 s, oqad 4, abs p, ,a-fm ass, til, ex0 cold. 40hptrim, tilt, Iive wellt1ollig1,to, ,ded,ike lited ty.Alpine S13.500/ibo. 283-4472. depthfidneronchorater,cover,85,205. in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern al-a,$12.800ob. 229-904 -202299. 1986 Subaru GL 4x4 sla/wga. 77,000 2-62-99 --Command regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used, 1979 Ford F 100, /., 6oy!, 3 op, htol, S e d, aG, $4,000. 284-5769, Yamaha OB motor, $1,500. 22-6457. cannot be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege holdbed, good ortd, not dty pd, S't9953obD 269o72d,98 oto $10D,00y0 opd 22-309 linpcoo hevygasmarplet,appr.206 ers. Violations to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecu290217oyo -p989 ,odv os0to,-t. as, US px, m F987 Toyida p/n, 4 spd, am-fimn as US ------ta, ----00 ---------319 15 ,c. -r S ,10 ,2 tion under both, military and Panamanian laws. It is sometimes pecs,$4,500/obo 282-3044. 1936 Dodge, parked 3acs From --5 Permissible to sell an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid. 1984 Buick Rgal Ldd, on. owner, ,tti, $6,00/oog. 269Lgoha 50 iagelMa i50 o Before such a sale, it is strongly recommended that the seller contact ib, p,, pi. oeat, raw tios, attt, Itor 0, gs, aon $790 282M5524. 03,500/obo. 230-197K. 1986 Mitsubishi Galon SS, .1, ps, pb. the Contraband Control Section for advice at 286-3117. --acom-fmcas, no dy pd, very good 1986 Renault Alliance, 58k, on, ac, a.cond, $5,500. 269-5700._ fin, ex cond, $2,500. 286-3799. Electronics 1990 Ford Tetpo, folly loaded, at, an, ps, 1988 Jeep, 4 cyl, 0c, ps, ph, new lties, day 1986 Toyota Minivan, a, at, pb, am-fm arm, oneed body work. 287-4428 pd, best offer. 261-6418. 1978 Food T-bied, mos/looko good, oc, ps, cooo, dble oc, dty pd, c coed, $6,500! An m afer 4m --k -, pb, $2,500/obo. 287-3675. obo. 224-4190. __ -1984ChevyS-10B-lar4x4,Taobopkg, 306 XZ15 5mog Ram, sold blooter, 1976 BMW 530, ac, 4 sp, cass, 4dr, not doid fy pd,80,000 mi, $5,500.22-4235. 1989 Chrysler 5ih Ase, good cood, 4d, 193 TronsoAm, t-top, m-fmcoo. 28740mcg hd, 1200 baud modem, software, Ch.w chow pp, 3 Mes old, maie, fidty pd, $2,900/obo. 286-6398. pb, ps, pw, $7,000. 287-4588. 3778. 1,000 287-5391 male, cop eg, $300. 282-3383. 1992 Lado, exoc cod, low mil, diy pd, 1991 Pootioc Firebiod, V8, 1-tops 0., a 0, $3,500. 260-5336. 1989 Nissan Seotro, oc, am-fm, S,500/ 1991 Dodge Daytono, 4 cyl, 5 p, o a, Lg rasforme, 220-1 lv, far, mixer, prsh setter ale puppies, champion fapw, pl, $12,600. 287-458. -obo. 284-3374. am-fm, exccond,$4,90D/obo.228-4061. morc, $180, Europe. pplioo 220v. 260ther, vanw by appt. 232-5622. 979 Chevy Monte Carlo, V8, at, p0, pb, 2957. 1991i Hooda Quinte, lc, 4dr, am-fm ago cood, am-fm cas, $1,500/obo. 2841987 Dodge Lancer, exc cod,ew c, ps, 1983 Chevy Chesee, gro cod, new Yellow head baby parrot, hand mioed, dio, mo good, 5 sp, diy pd, $1,700. 2646904 Rm 306 For. cloth, sr, am-fm cass, $5,000/obo. 284paiot, in glass, 4 p. , $1,500. 287Packood Bell 286+ w/4mb Ram, modem, $75. 284-4392. 4758 aoer 6pm. 6172. 5330. soondcrd,VGS;Dos6.2,softwre,$600/ 1992 Ferozo, loaded, dty pd, $10,500; -obo. 260-2957. Yelowlob,gtwkidsosbots,6 mosoold, 1987 lydla Excel, 2d., hatchbk, US 1979 Fiat Spider convert, $1,950. 2521991 Nisso Soeola ta/wgo, 5 sp, 0, e0 1990 Toyota Corolla, 16 valve, ac, d, mioc dog items iol, $12). 282-3194. spoco, moo grt, oot dty pd, $2,500. 2842287. oond, rodio,ps,dtypd, one owner, $7,400 ps, pb, 5 op. lo ml, $7,500/obo. 286Sony fm camcorder, eoc cood, still new, 3382. 238-1 961. 3428. $425. 286-4928. Porepoodle,whT/aprcot,playfolw/kids, -----1992 Nison Sentra, 5 sp dty not pd, all hots, 885. 287-5870. 1990 Ford Escort LX, 2dc, 5 sp, a, e0 $4,500/obo. 267-5488. 1980 Olds Catlass Calais, 00, ps, pb, low 1983 Chevy p/., ec cood. 260-5605 VGAcolor monitor,$200, IBM poprinter, Coc -cood, oail eod-My,_ $5,300. 269-0356. mi, decent jot, $2,00. 282-6421. ofoer 6pm. necds rpai, $45, old cass deck, $45. 224Cospootel popptes, females, mats, ------l990 BMW 3161, dty not pd, 2d, ac, am3632. reddisobbloode,cram,$200.286-3226. 1985 BMW, oew tir, good cod, ps, pb, fm radio, eoc cood, $10,000. 260-7728. 1973 Chevy Impala,4d, runs go, $1,000 pl. 233-013 199! Eaglcgolo.cppo abwt p 235-4015. _nobo. 286-4671. Selsi sttee, 270w, amp, in,o, equal, Grasphpscpregxeed '2 1a 91 199Eag1.a.1on "'.ps 'pbstral.oiwheels, Available ch' aas, Id, ak cahneamhss iokigree. 228-2643. 1983 HoodaAccord,$700/obo.284-4575. 3 op, am-fm coso, equal, alarm, loaded, 1991 looza impulse, Sc,3 p t, mm 375.bo. 282-3880. ____________$13,000. 263-9569. tadio cass,oot dtypd, $16,000. 86-4294. Brindlebooe,6mos old, male,allshots, 1986 Fod Escort, 4dr, 4 oyl, 5 sp, $2,200. -----Nintedo, Super Nes games, $10-$40, enooltail cropped, $175. 230-0957 -285-6871. 1992 Jeep Cherokee sport, 2,000 km, 1988 BMW 3181, 2dr, ac, ocat-fmcaoo, Biliogual lite-i maid, grt w/infaots, Commodord 64 compte, sofwace, $50. 2 grt cood, 0a sr, spore tire, warmaty, not dty pd, shadow line, $8,00. 261cifs. 287-4586. 2864571. 2parakeets w/g age. 286-4489. 1970 Pontiac Firebird, 350 2 b1 carb, $17,000. 223-4347. 6119. 2 -9-1acokodtiooedicrans,$750/obo. 252-2 155 Crown CR imp, 80-80 per ha, $7. $300. r282-3934. 1990 Cheoy Cavalier Z24, ac, am-fm 1988 Plymouth Voyager, V6,52k, ac, am 252-2028. $5 _8 94 ---1982 HnodaAccod, 5sp,oot dty pd,vcail cass, new tires, alum wheels, ex, cod, fm radio cas, exc cond, $9,000. 287Maid, grt w/childcc, avail Joe 10, off Mainpka-po,,2 mooldtoil docked. ooJune6,$2,200. 38000 mi,at,USspecs,belowblebook, 3198. pOtolp. 287-5330. Saosuispkccr,4-wayw/16"woofers,$200. $2,300.--p 2284-6626. l ockd-286-4720. $80. 232-2597. 1980 Ford Broco 4s4 Rge, mrs go, $7,500 284-6626 --1985 z Trooper 4x4, $4,995. 228Honest, dependable, 17-yeor-old ---4--5 Pocobred bISec pappico, 7 wk,$175. 33" tirco, dty pd. 282-3194. 1988 Nissoot.ana wgo,ac,am-Fmcas, 1255. babysiter, rights, wkcods. 230-1927. PB laptop 386SX20, 40meg hd, meg, 282-4824. bat, whels, 7ek tires, US sps 3.5, lots ofpaogrms, fax modeo, $800. 96b 2-Mork,5sp,t2dXUSEspecsap, , 1988 Nissan Stanza GX, sp, diO/ pa-pkcmad,3dayswk,oet, 287-6294. Toy Freoch poodle, mom poppy, $173. at-fmo cas, n gr, $2,800. 287-5329 casopwccsorytbitg,or,64,W0toi.$5,750/ hard working mature, prefers Albrook. ----236-091. p pp $9 CJ-7, oowtires, rebailtcarb,clatoh, obo. 286-6129. 286-3382 Kenwood 55w ocoivert doal coss. 23. 1903 Cbcy MaItboust/wgo, rebitt to7, $4 00 206-6541 omgle od. Imer, cabioet, sll scprmc, e-poict, gbbfm 2s m good, $1,00/bo. 286-3626. 1979 Chevy p/o,4WD, dty pd,ebilteng, Btigual honest dependable toald, go $700. 286-3819. ios old 284-3696. -1I986 Pontiac Grand Am, fm rdio,4 cyl, campr shell, runs grt, 8 cyl, $2,100, 282w/hIldren, M-T-W-F. 286-3129okfor 1986 Jeep Chrtokc, 4d, 5 op, ps, pb, ac, 2dr, '94 insp, c cood, dry pd, $3,800. 3497._ G In _____ --14" color TV, $100, VIIS-6 tamcardor, Dooma 2m lgowtbdg o w Iomoi. 286-6133. -. 2496. ____$350. 202-4223. Doboman, 2 y 2s old, gt -chd.g, gr3 4-9663. --1991 Nissan Pathfiodor 4s2, a, all pw, Bilingual ve-oct maid, exc w/sm hil--2w/kidsmal,$200.287-6421. 1987 Hyndai Excel, 3dr, hathbk, US 1979 Mercory Cougar, V8, good cond, US pec, $15,880. 252-5523. drc, .fs, 287-6674. Alpio. 7903 od, co cood,$250/obo. 209Seal-poiot Himalayn-Persian male for specs, oot dty pd, $2,300. 284-552.__ $1,500. 286-6541. --193 Hond Prelude, 5 sp, am-fm r, Ameori oopnny/babysioe,highly qual4603. stod service, efa ceg, proven. 289-4354 1993 Jeep Grand Cborakoe, at, full titm, 1985 Nissan Seotra, at, ac, 4d,, am-fi good cood, ot dy pd, $3,00/bo 287if d, refs, prefers Clayton, Albrook. Sony cotmpOnlnt sy dbl dcok, ed, dbl eves, ask for John. 4WD, low ml, Ig tires, extras, like new, otereo $3,300. 286-4628. 3636. 230-1206 ask for Michell. cooo, orroond soond, rmoe, all digital, Frceo, killo, feale, moo old. 2 $21,000. 286-338 1 -$425. 281-5592. 5176 1988 Nissan Sentr, 4 op, am-cm, ac, 1983 Datsuo 280ZE, new tiro, I-tops Btltogoalotad,wkday,grtw/cildo, 1985 Honda Civic, 4dr, 5 sp, ac, dty pd, $4,900/obo. 287-3997. 0ose bra, cover, co cod, $6,000. 286toe-ot,_refo. 287-6349. .Caoon T-80autofoc camea, 35-70mm, free, cal to good bome, 284-3989. 4,200; 984 Jeep Cherokee, 2dr, at, -n-o---------4004 Fop I md 3 days k 50mm, 75-200mm zoom. coot, optodlite S gtr hitch, $5,500. 260-9842. 1991 Buick Regal, 4d, ac, ps, pb, exr cleans, 299t flash, $475. 256-6356. Femaletotoiseshellcat, has shots,litter ape, not dtypd, $9,988. 64-8244. 1986 Honda CRX-oi, one owner, low m, roos, go w/children, hooeot, refs. 1990 Goeo Melro LSI cort, 31k, 0c, -immaculate cord, $4,38. 286-4004. Pioer receiver, $238, Panaseoc VCR, bfree. 287312, toy l?98, aprxIyrod orrniecad 450.2604 Reliable Fog-opk maidt, is-io/o, goi $288, roeaot.pc $200, M.ritVCp, box, fod d2s87-5 ys1in26. approx yr ld airbag, new tire, good gas,, cond, 1985 Honda Prelude, 5 sp,ac, rums good, $200, Infiniy pk.,s, $200, Mantz ape $7,000. 284-5483. not dty pd, $4,000. 287-6838. 1987 Plymouth Minivan, p., pb, tilt, ac, w/kid, ofs, asoil now. 260-3505. player, $100. 226-7708. Proc femle ct togoodbomo gotto!am-fm, 6 oyl. $5,800. 289-4332. cre, e -ca to good home, gr2-w/ 1991 Dodge Shadow ES, $6,500. 2841991 Lumina Chevy Minivan, eoc cond, 'Live-io hoosekeeper/oite, reF. 2862" Sony TV,$200,eqal,$80,JVC VCR, 5308 Sehafr. ps, c, pb, am-fm cass, llgrack, $14,000. 1981 Mercury Lynx, 4dr, at, 4 cyl, am-fm, 9 -$380, d, $228. 226-7708. Free, kie to goodhome. 283-32 Toyoa 4x4, custom paint, mags, 236-0978. p, pb,ow m, $2,00. 289-452. DaymaidM-F.266-63akforAgeApple e computer w/imagewite print2 free, kioeosto good home.260-5800 1, Alpine w/equal. 284-5644 after 4pm. 1990 Ford Ranger Lariet XLT, V6, ac 5 1985 Cheoy S-10 Bl.zer, Thoepkg, fully I-o new coed, $400. 252-2193 dty hrs mog. _sit, $6,800/obo. 284-4667. loaded, 2WD, look/rmos good, not dty pd, I eltable ho-b maid, good / 1987 Dodge Caoravan SE, ps, pb, am-fm --$5,200. 284-4274. Hids, rf bl 226d,4dw Packard Bell 286,t40omg h, I mg Rtm. 2 free, malekioens,4wksold.286-6179. cass, do, 7 pass, $7,500/obo. 284-3496. 1988 Ford T-hird, sports & urbo pkgs, 1 Chev Cakido, cefo. 226-7344. p r5.25-3.5dd, moascmontt, protr,$600. new 286-4092. 193 ioaeRig o dloelode w new ac, po, oHl pwr,6osp, loo lot, lam ml, 1986 Cbesy Camaro, V6, p0, 00, pb' xopmaid, grom/kids,Iiv-io,osome Eg 6407 Free to good home, 5 yr old Female 1985 Nissa King Cab deluxe, loaded w/ 4 op, do, $1 5,08. 282-3099. $4,080/oeg. 260-3! 19. doemono, gr w/children. 284-4839. camper obeil, ps pw, or, Ps at, am-fm, --hoeol, cooks, ens. 286-21 ask For Y eso FT5'00doalhaodhmrad ioY aesu ac,$4,900/obo. 284-3731. 1986HyundaiGLS,ac,om-fmcrdio, US 1992JeepWrangler,20km,4.OLV6eng, Omnatra ._. FT2400H 2 int bham radio w/dmtf. 264Free, kittens, male, female, I mos old to specs, oe o er, 76,000 m, good cod, good cod, $14,500. 269-633. Span-pk h kper, h hard good home. 287-6294. 1989 Cheovy Camaro, loaded, low m, ac$3258 287-3928. an,, pa-p oukp. goot bard $ -_ 974-, ces, V6 2.8L, I-top, like new. $8,500. 1518-9, -1990 Jeep Wrangler Sahara, oft top, one working, roef, Tooo. 252-6404. 2 meter on the glass mohileantnoa. 264252-6956. 1987 Sbaru GL o /wgo,4WD, lowmi, otlwer,28,000m,eotdlypd,$9,500 firm. Span-spk mid, one day .wk, honest, 9741, eoc coed, sc, tape dock, ne tire s roof 289-5109._ hood working, teo avail upon d t fr g Automobiles "99I Nissancseons/gn,5sp.acI0Mrack, $4,350. 282-5288. Video digilizer for Amiga computer, fm radio, alarm, dty pd, second, $7,300. --1991 Chevy-10ps,pb,.c,o5p.4cyl,am286-3381. digisiewgoldw/copystand,camera,$250/ 230-1961 after 5pm. 199! Ford Bronco XLT, low ml, eoc Fm caos, 25,000k, $7,000/,og. 51-9337 Exc bihinalmfssis, obo. 252-2319. 1992 Nissan Bluebird, at, 4dr, all pwr., 1977 Plymouth Volare, 2dr, ps, pb, new coed, $17,000/obo. 2844275. LD# ---go w/kids, aoimalo. 206-3813. Graphio eqoal, $85, aadio/sidceoeiser, vail nd-Jue, not dy pd, $9,000,293bao, trans, runs good, dty pd, $500. 2641987 Chevy S-10 plo, 4WD, oc, eta cab, 1986 Ford Taurs, loaded, $3,500/obo. $65, colffec/2 end this, $250. 26 -0295. 6 89 5 .6 4 74 ._ cam to p, V 6 e c con d, n ew tires, 2 87-6 12 5 .------ado lt p at e t .26 2 -9 0 39 .1970~$ ,000.0E 2r.pc a M 284-6228. adptet,22-09__ MioeltoX-700c.crow/28-O5z.oomtlens. 972OMorcedeo2SOCE,2drcoope,at,oc, 1982FordLoo,goodcood,$2,000.2521980FordLtdsa/wgrps,pb,,goodcond, ,ash, bag, all manuals, $400/oho. 284pw, dty pd, good cond, $5,500. 2636515. $ 0 986NisoM300ZX,t-op,c,ps,pw,o 2193d o Mtore ligo maid, Wed, oc r2fo. 4239 6011. cood $6,880. 223-7128. _1983MitsbishiL300Minivn, x coood, c986 C6mar0 2'3.7-Z, sp, id, --fops amMinocha Maxxum 7XI camera c w/2p-20to 1987 Toyota Van LE, 4WD, 5 sp. dl $3,800. 252-6515. 1986 Chevy pl/, 4WD, 6 cyl, at, 5sp, fm caso, $5,500. 283-4736. $pao-spk matd, refo, exp, goad w/kido. Moole, 2x m Xcaerr aress, k ac, dty pd, loaded, $9,000. 263-60 I. ---cmporshell, ec cornd, $5,800/obo. 286284-6674 ----newoo .2t 2-2 009. 1987 Ford Tempo GI, 4d, 00, ps, tilt, 4726 1991 Ford Fxplotrr 4o4 Eddic Bao.r Ed, pc-k m-d pSmy319 1991 Food Explorer, poi,2d, $14,00. Iiso, am-fm co, S sp, low mi, oe --new ores, run m g bds, low m, ps, babys, exc rfs. 286-4290. 4 b Simm hips, 72 pi, 70 $125 da 287-6486. $4,000/oho. 223-5724. 989 Mercury Topaz, 4 cyl, pwr everyxs, $19,000. 284-3685. firm. o 26 3398. 4726g 1982 Fod aiBrooXLTfalli.2 -Teenage babyoloor, M-F after 3pm, 1986 Mitsuishi Lancer, 4dr, at, new tires, F97CeyNoa .oyona eng, 4 cyl' 4726.,a rnee ae 79026 1982 Ford Bronco XLT, Fail sie m-fm wknsayie r /is 5-53 GiameGeni farGameboy.new, 535.287good coed, $3,500. 287-6399. oc, 4dr, dty pd, good coed, old, 5 spd, --cas, exc cod, $16,000. 284-5872 wkcodo ayinmo go i/do 34foraTm3. 5770. 8$4,600.229-4478. 1988ChcyCorsica, 2.L,t,ac,p, duty ----.1991 Pontiac Firebird, at, t-top, V8, ot pd, $4,900. 223-5386. 1992 Dodge Daytona, all extras, low mi, 486SX25 Mhz, 2mb Ram, 107mb hd, $12,600. 287-4585 I987 Niooao Sentra, 2dc, 5sp, good od, like new, $12,000. 263-9814. Hooedot efs. d24k modem, 3.6-3.23 dd, Doo 5.0, Windowo $3,600/obo. 284-6398. 1987 Dodge Ram p/o, 4 cyl, at, ac, good r----3.1, Lo3s Works, other., VGA calor $3,000/obo. 287-5049. i985 FordBroncoI XILT,fullyeqaipped, wydtdi pd, $6900/og.mi likeo ew, $14,500/o. 282-3637 o e omg mooyitdys.0. 4WD, co coed, $6,000/obo. 256-6672. 1992 Nissan Scotra 11, ac, pb, am-fm New 4.2 bose spkro, $175. 287-3630. 1986 Toyotasao, at, pb, cc, 42k mi, tow 00ss 4dr, fol soot cooero, alarm lot, coo 1909 Iooo p/u w/bedin, 5 Sp r, gmgt, tires, brakes, -xa cond, avail Jue 20, 1988 Chevy Beretta GT, 2.8 6 cyl, am-fm ca,,, drp pd, $8,300. 269-82 c $4,750. 284-4720. --M-F. 287-3897. ask For Sorilda. -acokeybdpiao,.7osold,$120,com$7,000/obo. 284-5180. cass, tilt, cmio-, abs, mfi, ps, a, $6,000/ poter prmte, working good, $40. 287obo. 287-5433. I 904 CChey S-l0 Blazer 4x4, po, pb,am1985 Mitsubishi p/a, 4 op. 4 cyl, "mp Day maid excep worker, does every3978 1 98! Volo 244GL, 00, ps, pb. am-fm -fPm, cmtoe, 00, 00t dty pd, $5,500/obo. ohall, loo rim, cog bd, at-fm ass, Day mol, .oo, sotkcEg, does Myp397 radiocao, pw, pl, $,000. 287-5391. 1986 Buick Century, 4dr, 4 oy, ac, am-fm 202-9233. dty pd, e coed, $4,600. 224-7689. .,. 87M649 Techcs q0 turtbl, dd, $100, cass, at, dy not pd, $3,000. 283-6938 .-Koowood a/v oarround amp, 237w, like 1979 Dodge Ramchargcr 4S4, at, place 1986 Oldo, 4 dr, pI, pin, ac, am-fm radio, 1987 Chevy Co.lier, 2d, 5 sp, one dw ew $400. 232-9829. many new parts, moo good, body fair, 1984 Chcy Chesttce, good cond, a, ps, eccoed, $2,000. 203-4127. or, ps, ph. am-fm cass, 89,000 mi, rns gro, $2,600/oeg. 203-3380. ohrome rims, dty pd, $1,800 226-5644. not dty pd. $3,500. 289-4924B Pni d., m.16,, prime.,it, body1990 Misbishi Lanm-rrusaproof,alrm, $275, Logatcb hand soaooor, 256 gray 1986CheyCsomized san, notdty pd, 1909 1lyodat Fooel, ao, at, am-fm coss, oc,cas, 4 spkeoo, ex0 cod. 226-2390. 1984 Mazda 323, m-. cass, c scale, $250. 252-5829. sold as is, $2,500/obo. 285-5020. Iown mi, one ownrc, $4,500. 287-4433. ires, go aond, dty pd, $2,600/ttbo 221.-1991 Hyundai Excel, 4 cyl, 5 op, 6,000' 2619. 40'woodeosatlboat,rcstorcd, delelng, 150w Sn y.o.reciv.r-amp, doi cass,. tum1979 Olds Delta 88, ac, in/new pars, 1987 Chrysler LeBaron, a, ac, all pwr, obo; 1993 Mazda MX3, loaded, Vo, 7 saio, stoo/ovt. I loctroois, 9'skIff, cr, $230. 269-528. mos gro. $3,000. 202-4586 afltr Ipt. so loaded, reor opoilr, new brakes, $20,50/oho. 269-9915. 1978 Mercury Monarch. a0 p. ps 4tanoors, ox od,$I6,000.2S2-2066. $4,900. 289-4130 am-fmcass,dty pd, follyloddx.ccond, -----,--------Sony 0mm hoodycam, comoto, x zoom 1978 Volvo 264GL, dry pd, Sit, --I97okoo.d/ooob2,000/obr.284-427 /3,30bbrs 232-6056. b_ I 'S& trior,4Shpclc coo, hatI, cs, satupr tmposr, 3 yrs tld, !ottko good, oew poros, bot, $1,993.2281992 Nissan Altitt, I 8,000km, 4 dr, dty Chevy Camarao Z-28, low mi, 00, ps, p, 1984 Ford sta/I g, 302 VS, oods work, star motor. cocond, $4,500.27-3572. $650. 287-3690 0537. pd, $1 3,000 236-0984 ato-fm radioass, ex cond, Bluebttok/ not dty pd, bet offer 243-7380. obo. 256-6830. 16' Orlando Cltpper, nrho, 60hp yamaha IBM 386omtoptr,40mg tLd.oolor mom1989 Chevy Astro Vao, o.ory opion, 1906 1oodo re lude, 01, p, ph, ne 1991 PontiacGrandAmccood,$7,500 motor, kic, depth fiodo, cotrts, tor,printorprotgrsAi1dlass,$i75, foot/rear ac, $12,500. 297-4571. ptrs, opor -hos, bet offct. 26! -6418 1991 Niso.s. Sentro XL, om-fm 0ass. an, obo. 289-3875 h mog $5,000/ocg. 206-4775 VhS. $130, 4" IV, $133 268-326!

PAGE 27

CEassified Ads May6 1994B11 Geway P5-60, 540mb hd, 16mb Ra, cream, exs cond, $330. 287-6890 Wall-to-wll carpet, mini blinds, plants. Mrqis diamondbnidal set, 1/ct, TW wt Books, Am G ', Etc 1101, nr .Qrs 54B Curmndo lgtn, 8-I0 am Sot 2x d-rodm, Iast pei bos, 15" color moIiV 284-5434. ) diamonds, 14k gold bands, ex. cond. lnter' Rel. 284-4720. in, combo floppy dr, soand blastsr 16, Crib w/m,31, chsgitng dbl, S15i, m5cro -S350/obo. 286-4505. 0 Qrs 153C IHoord, am Son. w..$3,750. 256356 -e staod, $40, wooden high ch, $40/ LR st, $350 287-3778. Alpine irackor ski machine exer, S. w s. -obo, blue aalnces. 207-3271 Bby crib wmattshts, $100, nw baby 202-5642. Qts 1533B Htoard. 8-1 1 m Sat, fig, IBM notebook 386 SLC-25mhz, 85mb Compwtertbl, $45, 1g mic, $300 micr walkr, $5. 224-1133 nxt 23 stereo, baby items, s hd, intrnl xodem, est VGA pon, Crpoe 15x20 boige, $1 10, 8x12 pink, snd, $35, nodle run, $45. 287 5976 4pc lggag si, bst offer 260330 moost, .ls, $1,300. 261-462. $35, Samsng mi$ow e,$700287-3978. Cypress Gardens slalom ski, ex d, M_ nds for lefties 1,-3-5 /yrnmarc Ahes, f2u y smo Ninendo games, Mania MnsisnPF2 ses plaid, dnoim us/insmadhitg -2 -2 gold plus shafts, $125/obo 204 5493 ters, QuestP ,Pperboy,W restlemani, Soshbn cone, 3 pillow covers, go -od, sW p -12 coflefig /fi $400,scriFP 12A Albrk 7-Il h gm Sot, tgFyperMri Bros, Dick In, $2-. 64-cb s m $10, pool $25, $b grill, $30 b 284-660 9623. Pinr mstcotmponents, no cd $900. pol 2,bqgil3.2462 Qms. 723D Clayton 2 sm-noon Osa. --------GE 40" whi elneriw atge, $250. 228 Babyyellwheadparrt iCCCeroz 252-1-90. 6s.ingYsmahacostic,gro onsd,$150. Hitachi 19" colon TV, $2110. 200-4226 4630 -hOsisgarea. 252-1257. 2m7p4733 Qirs. 328B Kobbe, 7-1 1 an Sat, cloths, Mtsinnd G bsyRmgm sar Pies, VCR, need repairsie__I_______0_gsebld itos, app, in. Roadmasr24" bike, 10,sp, $80, dinng Dinosaur watch at girl's softball game in 150, Oster hair trimmer, $20, wedding Baby swisg pr, b r cleaning kit, recharge bt p"ck, 2 playr thl, 4 chs, $140. 252-2314. Cards. 252-629. dress., ,9/0, $75. 284 3591) $90. 286-6646. Qrs. 2386A CoIs Xt Sa. sdapter, $120. 286-4494. -Bslk leaher sda sleper, m, S500,k ap in Crst of change ofac n Etgjsmpisgsaddle,sz 17 from Argeanti FSU1 book, The Sience of Natriion, 6tt Qtrs. 1216C Amodonr, 8 at-noon Sat, Yamah, T-70 luner, M-70 prmp, n. Iess DR s,, SA17b. 287-5920. sAbrook, April 26 2843-4227. n. 226-2390. _,_ ic $50. 2287-3148. sere, apps, ole. amp, $100 both. 289-h536 --Oak et -enior, x cond, $300/sbo. 282D dresser w /m irror, ne ds mark, $90, Lull S la, l p each/ nt g 900.285Q 4,s 68A h wa d, 71 a m S l, furn, 2400beadmodem, I eaintomsloxt, $35 3497 Tykes ocking racket, nuw, $22, bra for f935hco.hb, grill ou 209-653 .--GE der, like .1w, use 6 ms, 118. Miscellaneous Nissan Sentra, $80. 20 Q6292 ---,--I--Bae0 V,[,10 -c ie, 9R83.1 ain Iamp,$S50, Miss M.nesbo 121, ts 8 Hwr,8l13 mS Bo Omist Vctr ss steno, spker, 26-383t. Surbords,6',$l00,6'7,$165.286-42 Rainsi.VHS The Aging process. 224-6939. gosdcond, 120pr/nog. 27-5625. Qtrs 412BAmador, am-tsonSat,baby Bgigo sswiel rsckornoclinor, $250, 287Littl Tykos strtllr, shopping com, $10 To t Oriental ivids/s n $350 a ims blind, ma, dhs Sega Genesis, 3 gants, $10 oal. 2843690. es. 252-6829. .2-soaskith b,$60,Fis r Psicpic-'989 -bn, $50. 260-61 59. Motorcycles Qms 6[7AII.ard 7.mSatcloudes 2909. Whirlpool I9 -sRi, side-by-side mfrig/ Prspane gas barberse grill, 2 yro sd, -$2 0ys. IBM cnapat p,, $395, color onit-r, rzee wo/icemaker, $10. 250-6830. $135/tbO. 287-6494. Brsnswik mahogany pool Ibl, 8x4 $195. oxc cord, software. 239-9709. $2,800. 287-5222. 1906 Kawosaki Ninja bOOR, e cond, Q-ns. 60A toward, 8 am-nosn Sat, PaaoncstroVC,$20 irt dcm, Sjro b aswsad x od 10 ugrt e new prarns, 284-6529ltehelies us os ETmon 286p,, like tw, VGA monsir, -acoum, $25, widen, ski m 60cne, $60. recliner $100, icrowaso, $100, can Parache,Vectrontainerpegas220'i il it g fware ,$750/obsi 284-4779 284-5234 .ar machine w/filt-r, $25. 204-5598. nisi. sow body 178 reemr, good cord, 1 984 lenda Nighthawk 700cc, lowmiles, Qirs. 39B Clayton, 8 Sit -$1,.200/seg. 287-5h25. ___ onesiwner, 2mwords belmeis, $1,5111,204Sega Geesisd WWF Rge in the Cage, 2 patio csrs, 2 sm end bis, gold Snd, Brazilian 2ip su2d 3 fin $00 mn' d 3605. ri, Orsedtl ip .o.lbd, 3 OsS$ 100. nice'sl dk8 Stelar fire cd, $30 ea. 287-4733 teed cshios, all $80. 282-5630. gray suit,, s 40R, atmn 9x12 rg, $35. Household, plants. 229-1964. 252-2020. 1981 lends CX 500, wits gosd, $700, Citir TV w/new niersal resmstie, BR s1 in/sanity. 2 sighs stands, 4ps rat2 girl'slbke, Broyhil sofocbr, Chinese, 207-5483. $75.286646. uanp -set, $90. 269-32b] New rig. Javelin harmless, Mania Sqsaro 10tuwoal rug,sz8x5, resnableprice. -Atari omMin onpe/1050 dd. $90 Rock-recli .CafoaK-s.ab, Miass Rs"tn II Square Reserve, $2,100. 262-037L Yamaha 50 MX sbaf drive, needs work, Ak25524 $375, 28b-6133. SN-s maid wekdays, babysit, sh, and 130XE w/105dd, $90. 224-6939. spring. dishwasher, garbage disposal, car 29~ Aphexssurl exeiser s/big b154m, new, Cold sloths's. 202-4222. --pkers, bent offer_043.561. Jeep stock bumper, $20. 284-4392 $200. 287-5589. Honda V6OI Trnslp, 2,000 mi dip pd Stereo set. Kenwoad snp processor, b462E7-5394, urio ecb, nw sir stod, reas pr/cad. 224sass desk, ismibi, ed, spkers, gr ostnd, Q-sz seabed, comforuible. losesest. like Mid size bird cage, $30, 252-2676 GE dishwasher I b tchr blk top, $225, 3632 $500. 207-5976. sow, $950. 260b668. Panasoni mi on ve $250, inWr machine w/wts, hardly sed, $140, ooabina, $125, dbomdif, $120 H 6 Alb Westisgiouse 1,00his b 2 1 /pprs' solid oh sotod dlb boil,$150.286-4920. 284-6172 aio Sales 286-4 tern gosid sand. $400/aba. 220-41l53 of----------------------H pi. Dbl r,,i,/jo strlle, $250, Nintieda LIng p p $200. 4347 r M p Ckginixpet. -gamte, $10 Sego gaoms,$20,VHSsos2908 m TV stand, $150, Plbd, $100. ce/Se end ios. $8. 27-5332 Littlc Tykes vaniy w/ch,, Iik, ew, $ 35, Qr 3A Cyt 0 $am-pmSuu bis. $300. onpster desk. $175. 23 Chirisas lights, $3 -287-4588. -bii taid to days, en L-shapsd wood bank bed w.3-dtaws'r 9106. FS/boksEnglosontriion.287-4170. Qtrs. I 14[A, Cloytso, Sat. ceramics, w/kids, refs rsqured 285-4831. dresser, so man, sew ond, $250/ciba.-. --Bases, $40, BR caurins for rop, $211 clobes, bike 260-9345. 7'sofarighbk,$400,2i holseedsni -Wal-to-walIcarpets, Ilosqydrontcsres, sourdy morning seller, $80, Word Walltsiwallcarpet llsHoward4bnep, ei rackers, So4 area rg. $150 -7 Q-sz pes. 287-4571. P "r.cssar,$100/aba. 286-6129. Qtrs. 322 Morgas PI.,Balboa. an-uroon areas priced. 284-4774. SOafs, oeseat, $8111, ssereo,.TV sabines, sheepor, $150/aba. 264 1077. --------5 a. clothes, says, plants. 284-5002. ---Trop blinds, firs 00 area, Is blue, $100. Baseball cards, all $120. 27 5,92 -Slide proj, will pay up to $50. 269-0356. Redwood pisoic hlI, 3 benches, $20, 10 287-5402 -Qrs. 651B Howard, Sat. GE4-bresangss/tvt, GE 6 cyliwashroll-up shades, wlt/bcige, nw, $10 eS -Pon ear ramps, $45, wins rak, $10, anPrson to repair & reaphols sticker, er, x-hvy dsy, like s-w. 232-5622. rcker, $15, smi desk, $10. 286-4226. Male dress blues, 39 sits, $75, rite's isue Chinese &b1, $30 s,,by b Qr. I I(A laylon, 7 am-2 pmo Sos, r-an pai. fnm, roan rates. 286-3775. clothes,imis computer 1-1ms 269-0356. $So, radio electronic Par.s, 252-2042. bank, cloths, son unppl. WSall trusi, loral Is blue laovseat.,uas Baby sarseat, battle oterilizr. 2S52-5036. -a------p ----cBilingual lie-i maid a sane for inant, fO sa. 2p0spbikePianeer4-nayspkers, -----Coon forwknd aiLas Sirras Beach s Flexoro training sys w steppepr, as Qtrs, 124B Albroak 7-1 1 am Str, ays, houseepig,ref.260-7077fter6p.m. 400w man. 230-1927. TV stand, $5O. night staod, $5O. t60cab/its r people, $150. 252-1257. cnd, $175. 294-569%. strollers, dinls3145. Span-speak nuod Crun intro, cook, Antique lia, sanily dresser w/mrror, Girl'sbike20", $40,rdio flyerwaga w/ Clotbs, Awa umbl, $30, ufrbs graph Qrs. 242A Albiook 8 m-l po St. furn. clean, iron. 252-2355 after 6 p. match 3-sti o wardrobe, stlt4 wood, 7pc DR seicabsct,$900/tba.28b3 185. rails, $20, FSU psychology book, 40, is game sys, 3 pes, $00. 284-3689 Qurn. 603 Clayton, Sot, clothes, hsehld Daymad,gnodwoker/genhooseclea$b600 boib. 260-0429. plants. 286-3587. --Q-s wsrerbed w/haes, liner, hdbd, dk -Sports eards, trade, sale, 93-94 base-, items, kit set, vacuum ___ ing, .sp, bonst. 233-3025. Whirlpool port dishwashcr, irns gad, walout Fnish, $300. 286-3326. Little Tykes Sesame Street playhouse w/ basket-, football. 284-3689. $45, boy & girl 20" bikes $25 a. 286slide, no roof, $95, tap shoes, s 11, $6. Q.,.901 BClayton,7-1 li SoIclotlen, Cibsobua poppy. $150 or less, paper 4571. Whirlpoal upright frzr, 18.5 cOu, 5 dehumidifier, $70. 2875327. Playpen, $30, carsea, $40, bssiet, $10, toys, frig. not neces. 286-3819. --fros,$525,sofasleeper second, $450. --child's bike nst, $15, pty trainer, $10' Qrs.94BHowordachbikisdtoyscmp Momsbok Albrookw/ ImoI /2 yr olds BR set w/drasser, best of drawers, 2 252-5525. Men's 25 diamond wedding band, $4001 mnre. 284-4036. -pg B H a Sorm playgoun i m m e 286night stands, 1611 sz bed, $1,350, sw dinobo. 295-6880. -pm. 617o playground in my Iric. 286ing bl, men's loshen, mere. 269-0356 Maytag washer, Wards dryer. Ig 0p, gr --ncyclopedia Britannica w/gst books, Q71. 2$48_Cowodo, Sa. ros d, sold as set, 3 yrs old, $600. 286Record alb. collection, car coe one$1,500. 287-5826 after 6pm. ---Colliemale forest service, preferAmerSpc BR set, less than I yr old, mars, boo 4294. reo sys,. phone onwer mach, hammocks.7s ican b red A A.2 -2 spring, frame, $1,300. 287-3871. best offer. 243-5617. Gill's24 l0spbik,$85,childoscoota QMs207AAlbnook,7-1 lam Sa.clothe, ico bred ASAP. 21-3325. Kenmore washer/dryer,$S500, IBM comp, $30 both $100. 282-3980d K gp Couch. recliners, TVs, cabinets, compalprinter, $350, lifosryler 1900 wolk/jog, Bank infas swing, $50, 2 Sega gomes, .s8 b k7Kicker, long .hah. 7-IS hp, Joenpor erdcks,. rifial rnes, MacIntosh com$200, misc ins. 228-1255Golf, Fantasy Star, $30 e, Bell bike 12 sp oasisg bike, Shiman 600 comp, Q 4 Einide, eon 286 poterprner, fier,misc on. 260-9842. helmet, $50. 286-6176. new paint,$375, revolutionbikeshoes, sz Qs. 98B Albrook, 8-Il am Sat. Window rioting far car, my home, Speed qu-en washer/dryer, hoy dsy, eon 10 1/2, $60. 235-9818. Howarms offerg-uarnte.284-4239. Broyhill conch,. alostoew, shell design., ond, $575. 283-6889. Cons irmbone, -isi model w/atochs, Qus 589A Howard, 7 am-noon S0. girls s g s $500. 287-5928. exccod. $600/obo. 289-4683. 7'4srfbd,$125/ob., SntaCmz skatebd, bdrm set, leys, clothes. Q-sz bed, playhouse, plasnic slide, ---K-ne bed. boo spring, frame, $600. 289-----rockr lrmcks,$60. 235-9818. pwrwheels 260-241. Sofa, looeseal, $500, eoff1e/2 end tbls. 6564. S ,eel door w/door frame, rattan glass top QMtri 18$ H a S:100ne-noonrs. 180 Howard, 7p30am-ooon.2125$, bangs rng, ShO. 287-4334. tbdre. 6-60.Maeniyc__e,_,ex od,__ o__n-pkbbyievrynhusne Whirlpool hby dty sopercap washer/dry l, dryer. 260-5605 -284-5076_ Qitrs. 554D Clayton, 7:30 am-no Sat, Esg-,pk bbstitte rg I r,-37 Microwavecar,$80,computercas,.$100, erased 6 mos, lik new,$800. 236-1010. Delx entryy stroller, like new, $850, adult/hby loshes, hschld items, chains. -f CPR -e 8ceiling an, new, $49, Hoovr0"acuum, baby bartbpod $5. 287-5587. Crafman lows mower, 20" blade, I pull $105. 226-7708. Whirpool dishwasher, exn cond, $15. .aort, 00 coed, $120. 284-5876. enrs, 60 H r 7 5 ,s. 640B Howard 7 am-i, Sd wft 252-2756 1-3 p 282-3980. Linregolatonr, $80. 261-1712. clothes._Corn, Yan oma sioreo. lipcran, LRDR, br,$900hbokcase, Hi Tec boots sz8 1/2,$30, Oakley Blades -Mil recc naey/maid, primary i cann, I $100, desk, $100. 226-7708. Round glasstopdiete,4blkchrs,$350/ Ragedy Annmirror, $20, wt bench, VI5, sunglasses,$20,boogijbd,$50/obo.269Qtr. 403A Kobbe, Sal, clothes, le, on. hsik, M-F 7 sni-5:3ft p m. 2874 280. obo, blk/brass comer stand, $85/obo. cechild's bike parts, $15, make-up miror, 6337. Pinwodsblf,ooffeetblw/glams, $450. mnoic deonranioss bIk/ned. 284-5021 $20. 282-5630. Qr. 138B Howard,7-10 am tso Li-in aid, g w/ki, le, -k, 230-0392 ---Vacuum, $45, microwave, $95, 2 in clothes, murn in Moid. gi2ca ok -----Fll--sz bed, aa, springs, dress-r, corCompcer prgms, Harvard Graphics, game 0bl, dbl pat, $25. 284-5422. ---5---0---New Whirlpool woshcr/dryor, Ig dsp, rohest,solid wod, map], finish, $650 Ward Perfect, Corel Draw, Dbse, Cross Qus. 1561A Howard 7-li a Sn baby Blgoal live-i moidec w/ kid, pets, $850/ob. 284-3696. 287-4935. Talk, Noun Desktop 2.2, po tools. 287Lig & m plants. 283-3571 -items, toys, care f --s a Sm -w/-dowmoun., or op q,,. W~dsofs 9s2 rd -,c,, 582 aftr 5m, ook,82ualaf uer 86p6m8 S ww w s t qs ,v 5820ed oncSpin.pet,____ -----Canon AE-l program, 1.4 lees, 300EZ Qnrs. 430 Clayton, 7 om Sal, DR, baby 284-4985. $1L100. 284-4138. Sego Genesis, 16 pit, 2 colnOl pads, 3 guish, $395. 263-9632. fn. Suaeside a.,. .as, exchange or bay. Lg microwave, $75. 284-3529. Sunbeam 30,000 bto gas grill, patio fr, gae, 94 Football Holheddg 'us5. weddig des s 1,$800/b.285-4629). s C -2540 plam, arpt.dresor fon, Soticblledgeag. S$125. 289-413ft8 sdsunosl ,80o2542. Qnro 59ftDClayton, 9 30a a .sn po one o tid 8-04 plants, Brbie jeep, cet,, drss, pamn ----------------Trade spe carrier for med. 286-4004. Whirlpool washer/dryer, good working blinds, more. 284-5087. Wedding dress, sz 7/8, Demetria's de2brnarpts, approx 12x15,$80ea.287Qnrs. 1025A Clayton, 8 am-soon Sot, cond, $150. 252-6515. --$800/obo 223-4986. 3231. fain, oarpe, Ig dog ken, cloihes. I mic Tykes cottage fI/on, gd cond, res 4BR trap wail-to-wall carpet, Nintendo sgn, -i, >e -priced .261-1490. Seas wausher/dryer, $550, pan Jacuzzi, oyo, I4games, 5-drowers 2desb, dresser Lg igloo cooler, $50, 2 patio chro, 2 end 3 formal s 11/12, $50, math for g-n Qurs. t3bB Howard Sot. Coin, haby icros, $1,950,Jrgaolset, $25. 286-3927. w/wing mirror. 284-5087. Ibis, $80, bag, $25. 282-5630. education book for PCC. 287-6198. clothes, romp. Ping pong tl, gd shape,$10. 286-4290. Si diningrm tbl, 2mach chrOO~s, e nd, Whn canisuerse, $21, 5 rd thruswpiilows, Nsnemdo gamws $l5, Ninterni achine, 4250. 297-4794. 4 ca, blk ceronmi dcratian. 284-5021, 1 game, $80, Q-sz mall set, $200, nora. 0. K al-be' "i"' liht'. 287-3335. Condonor roond 101. 6 high ohrs, good K-ne wooeloss waterbed, moirrour, lights 287 3335 --T o i i e Ad or cond, $300. 236-0984. di pedestal. 8-drawer cab, padded rails, Acs, Whirlpool 18,000, $350, Narnral Tim es Form exR ctrd, $500. 284-3685. K,000 as $175, industrial shelves, bent DR set,h6clrrs, chrome/gioss, GE 24nuft refrig/frer, Whirlpool refrig/frzer. 2642pc blue L-shaped sos nof. w/Q leepea, ffr 252-22-7. ANIMA LS 9676. exc cold, $675. 24-3685. Amrsisrelsssssr biks, $125. 286-3812. ] AUTOMOBILES Q-sz waterbed i/soft wide rails, andor Whirlpoi thin us wosher/dryer comFis s P le push'n'godumptrck, $25' [i AVAILABLE dresrs. used 2 nnos, $200. mnicrowa, bosed I pm, $6511. 236-0108 Is msg, ab, baby wue, clothes, blue shra Li BOATS & CAMPERS $45, dryer, $45. 260-241 I. rtan, $10 287-3271. ] ELECTRONICS PRICE HOME PHONE Whirlpl 12,uftaprighf-zer,I/knE, PRICE HOME-PHONE K-ne waterbed, 6 drawer, hd wo/$37/b 2873231. Serlftylrtadmil, .hp programL HOUSEHO Check only one category per ad fo .Only two ads per rsn c ror,beaier,newsemi-wavelessmatt,$400-moohle posh-bombsn incline, cxc ceoulnO SH LDCokoldneelgr e ad f. Ol iu o esr at 284-5699. DR I, 6 shns, ratis w/glass top. soc $700. 287-4496. [ LOST week are allowed. Each ad form is limited Io 15 words. Please Iype or coed, $500. 252-5642. -__ M E N p _t _nformLOiTn led below is not inluded m the ad but is sltildcrufiyt bed -bnth, topqs-, bahpbeah aeoaci.bn 20 edoogt ioeiyciit', no iMISCELLANEOUS print neeatly. Information Itsle eo snl nlddi h cbl Chlsslurfd ysn/nb bed,ihu shaon, e ocI sal r.$21 edng ihmramy, rny.hlike ses, g550/b r 284b 6 j-su -a, ie, $15, R k 'o Roll Li MOTORCYCLES required for publication. This information will not he released o third -49( 287-4543 -records lades shoe, 3. 252-2042. PATIO SALES paries. Deadline for the reenipt of ads is 9 a.m. Muiday for Friday s Frosti$575. dryI an, 1,$275. Coin. CR, L-,hapcdodhskbod.3-dm crdr.D WANTED ediiion. Ads ore run on a space available, and may be held for a f future BR. di 5 dryr $ ,2R2-5494, so at, n cond, $250 21-9341 LR set, an ue closer, buffts. dbl dr edition. Ads may be mIiled to the Tropic Times, Unit 0936, APO AA refrig 252-5124 -34(02 or deposited in a drop box a the Albrook Post Ofhfce. Ads Twi6 bed i/frame. bo sprng, 0150 Wndding drss, pot, veil, to. ring Prom Slresses T & knce-leng hszs 9 10 offering weapons or seat by FAX will not be run. 200-4803. pillo -necer usesd, $2511 286-3337. &56pecca/sk.oopmccir. & 5/6 peah s-in skirc, scoopneki, BR set,girl'ss inglecaopy, lungemresbLgsofs, I, blu dest, go did ond, $600, hlk strapless, S25es 284-5778 SPONSOR'S NAME RANK!GRADE nordresser,minor,e xs 86nd,$0 06dbl mat2s pringsmtalfrom.bSO.2696291. 5700. FSU books, Sygo100, Apt1501, Wel R DUTY PHONE 1030, ArliH42000, Ant 321. Ich /lG270. Hide-a-bed hvseat, amauetnal ar Snsgerswigmahrine,$75. 228-1036. 2S7-6737

PAGE 28

B'2 ~ Tropic Times B May 6, 1994 Monday-Friday breakfast 6-9:30 am. Country and western dance lessons Wednesday nights HiOW TO APPL cSumit a SF17 1, DD 214 i Q claimin the Casual Cove. Learn the latest in line dancing, the ing veteran preference, a copy college transcripts if Quastomp, waltz and others. A dance follows. claiming eduation and a copy of CASP notice of rating if *Officers' Club: Italian nights 5:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday with Alfredo I applicable. Submit a copy of latest SF-50 if you are a Breakfast buffet is served 6:30-8 30 a.m. Monday-Fror seafood fettuccini, lasagna, pasta mixta or pasta and Federal employee, day and 8-10 a.m. Saturday. shrimp in a white wine sauce. A la carte menu available. For more information regarding Army vacancy anSteak night 6-9 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. AllSteak lovers 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday nights in the dinnouncements (tenms required], job related criteria, etc.), visine D ire d, Ponel, Bildin .you-can-eat salad bar and a glass of wine. ing room. Select your cut and order a New York strip, rib visit the Directorate of Civilian Personnel, Buildling 560, Sci hr5-pm.Fdyseyorie.T atigeyucnodrachke Room102 Cooza, orcal 28-52 1, ocil hur -8 pm. ridys.eye or filet. To eat lighter, you can order a chicken Room 102, Corozal, or call 2 c5-5201. Soilhu 8p marinata, pasta, shrimp vin blanc or shrimp Taboga. the *Note: One-on-one employment counseling should be C Amador Seafood specials 5:30-8:30 p.m. Friday or Saturday. Pre-Mother's Day dinner 6-10 p.m. Saturday. Special Choose from shrimp Taboga, Pacific corvina, pasta and SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE positions at NM-S dinner selection and music byDolores in La Concha. Res shrimp in a white wine sauce or Caribbean shrimp. Pe a ZEDabove require specialized experience. Specialervations required. Mexican night special 5:30:30 p.m. All-you-can-eat level and sized experience.iSpthralervationstheqghred. oft tacos, a half pound of chicken or beef fajitas, corvina sized experience is either education above the lrigh shool Mother's Day Sunday buffet brunch 10:30 a.m.-2;30 Veracruz or Texas style barbecue ribs. level or work experience directly related to the position p.m. with live entertainment. Reservations accepted SatRock an' roll 5 p.m. Thursday in the Casual Cove. being filled. Example: Budget positions at or above the urday for members only. Disco nights 5 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday and Saturday. NM-5 level required Budget experience or equivalent Typical Panamanian buffet 6-9 p.m. Wednesdays in Bang up barbecue in the Breezeway, dine-in or takeeducation. La Concha. out. Enjoy the ribs, brisket, chopped beef or hot wings. Vacancy announcements are also available at the Grupo Samba Tres Friday nights in the Bridge *Ton Three Club Sundial Recreation Center. Lounge. Jazz 7-10 p.m. Saturdays with Lowell Hopper. This The Army civilian personnel office accepts applications on a continuous basis for the following positions. Clayton eo dance on to a ran These announcements are used to establish registers for Taco bar 5 p.m. Wednesdays. permanent and temporary future vacancies. *The Loop: Smoke free 1st and 3rd Saturday of the month. Army CJ's Sports Bar offers daily lunch specials 11:30 a.m.*oward Officers' Club: VB001gotGenera Clerical, NM(Used to fill mast clerical 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Pool tournaments are held 3:30 Children's night out 5:30-6 p.m. Monday with a pizza p Bsitian#( p m. Sundays. buffet for ages 3-12. Games 6-7 p.m. and Italian buffet p Bsi0). General Clerical NM-4 (Used Prizmz Night Club features a variety of music for parents in the dining room, all-you-can-eat for $7.95. clerical position). Wednesday-Sunday to include jazz 5 p.m. Sundays. Prime time 6-9 Fridays and Saturdays. VB# 002 Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Intermittent wk sch) *NCO ClubSocial hours 5-7 p.m. Mondays; 5-6 p.m. Wednesdays The ballroom will be closed through May 30 for renoand 4-6 p.m. Fridays with Club Card drawings. Music is CASP Examination (CEO, notice ofrating) is required. vations. 8 p.m.-midnight. VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) Requires Mother's Day Sunday buffet 4:30-8 p.m. Super Thursday night buffet. Adults $7.95 all-youCeor + 6 ma recreation exp in the field. Country and western dance lessons are held 7-9 p.m. can-eat, children from 6 to 12, $2.95, and children under VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Req 6 mos recreation Sundays and Mondays in the Corral Lounge. 6 eat free. exp in the field. Rock In' roll music is offered 7 p.m.-1 a.m. Wednes Rodman VB# 005 Secretary (Stenagraphy), NM-S days and 7-11 p.m. Thursdays at the Underground VB# 005A Secretary (Stenography), NM-6 Lounge. The Rodman Club, Rodman Annex, the Laguna VB) 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-6 Salsa dance lessons 7 p.m. Thursdays with Vibraciones Lounge and Rodman Bohin will be open to all ranks. The 7 Administ native Services Assistant, NM-S Latinas at the Underground Lounge, free. Anchorage Club will close and be converted into the new VB# 117A Administnitive Services Assistant, NM-6 Casa Maria special through May15, bistek ranchero, Fitness Center slated to open mid-June. VB# 0l8 Supply Technician, NM-S bistek picado, special sauce, Spanish rice, three corn tor+Rodman Club: VB#) OSA Supply Technician, NM-6 tillas and refried beans. Two-for-one steak night, $15.95 6-9 p.m. today. Choose from New York steak, T-bone or porterhouse. The following positions are Permanent/Temparary, FullAlbro okHo ward Lunch is served 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Monday-Friday. time, Pa-time, Intermittent.Club All-you-can-eat lunch buffet, $4.95 11 a.m.-1 p.m. VB# 007 ** Medical Officer, NE 12/13/14. Enjoy blues and jazz7-10 p.m. today by recording artMonday. VB# 008 n* Clinical Nnrse, (RN license required), NM-9/ ist Lowell Hopper in the lounge. Dinner specials and grill 330-8:30 p.m. Sundays10/11 Karaoke in the lounge May 13 and 27. Thursdays. VB# 009 nn Practical Nurse, (LPN licence required), NM-5 Steak night Friday. Choose from rib eye, K.C. strip, Fine dining 6-9 p m. Friday-Saturday. ** Selectees for nurse and medical officer position will be filet or prime rib. Dinner comes with vegetable, baked Upstairs Bar 3:30-8:30 p.m. Sundays through required to undergo a background check. potato, French fries or rice. Thursdays; 6-9 Fridays through Saturdays. Fiesta de mariscos Saturday nights. Treat yourself to Laguna Lounge. Social hours 3:30-11 p.m. Fridays The fallawing are limited Ia veteran preference eligibles and a seafood feast with different platters featuring clam only. permanent emplayces anty. chowder, shrimp cocktail or ceviche. The combination Rodman Bobio 4-10 p.m. Fridays only, new circular VB# 010 Manual Positions, MG-2 platter includes broiled corvina, stuffed crab, calamari bar and two decks located beside the Rodman pool. VB# 01 Manual Positions, MG-3 rings, peel and eat shrimp, a choice of potato or rice, cole Attitude Adjustment 3:30-11 p.m. today at the VB# 012 Manual Positions, MG-4 slaw and vegetables du jour. A la carte menu available. Rodman Bohio. Sand volleyball, children's games, VB# 014 Motor VehiiOrs, MG-5 Mongolian BBQs Mondays. Prepare your plate, watermelon eating and seed spitting contests, limbo, free VB# 0 14 Met.r Vehicle Operator, MG-6 choose the meat, vegetables, seasonings, oils and have hors d'oeuvres and live music by "Killer Coatimundi" VB# 015 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-7 chefs do the job outside on the open grills. band VB# 016 Motor Vehicle Operator, MG-8 Sunday champagne brunch 10 a.m-1 p.m. in the din*Rodman Annex: VB# VACANCIES TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 05ing room offers breakfast from cooked to order omelets, Breakfast is served 6:30-8:30 a.m. Monday-Friday. 16-94 CLOSE: 05-17-94 French toast, hot lunches, salad and fruits, peel and eat All-you-can-eat lunch buffet and grill menu 11 a.m.Pacific shrimp, desserts and ice cream bar. 1:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. 285-94-Jli Contract Specialist, NM-ll102-11. Temp Ncc: 30 Italiano nights Wednesday and May 18. Choose from Club closed for evening and weekend service. Sept. 94. tortellini, lasagna, tossed salad and complete your meal 2e-94t 2N with garlic bread. Davis 286-94-JH 2 Electronics Mechanic, MG-2604-1J."Temp Nte: towardd Enlisted Members' Club: *Davis Community Club: I yr. (SCI) Karaoke 7 p.m. Sundays and Tuesdays in the Casual Mother's Day Sunday brunch, 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. 287-94-JH Electronics Mechanic Supervisor, MS-2604-12. ove. with door prizes given every half-hour. The event is free Sensitive. All Nighters May 14 and 29 Memorial Day. for mothers. Weekend breakfast is served 7-10:30 a.m. Saturdays Mongolian barbecue 6-8:30 p.m. Thursday and May 288-94-JHl 2 Electronics Mechanic, MG-2604-10. Temp Nie: and 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Sundays. Begin your day with a 26. yr. stay slim plate or French toast, Belgium waffles with a Mexican dinner special 6-8:30 p.m. May 25. 289-94-MH Contract Specialist, NM-1102-9. Temp Ne: 30 choice of toppings, the crew chief deluxe, or a hearty Country and rock nights 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m. May 27. Sept. 94. breakfast burrito. There will be cover charge. 291-94-JH1 Accounting Technician, NM-525-7. Temp Nie: 30------Sept. 94. 292-94-ES Interdisciplinary, NM-185/180-9. Tenip Nte: 30 SCN AM radigschedule Sept. 94. Thursday 293-94-NC Personnel Clerk (Office Automation), NM-203The Southern Command Network's 11:35pm KSFO Sports Byline USA 1:35am KSFO Sports Byline USA 5. Temp Nie: 1 yr. Limited to veteran preference candidates only. AM Radio features America's most7:35am The Law Show Bilingual English/Spanish. listened to radio programs. Live Monday 8:5amir Teehnovation liteedtorai prgas 1:30pm A Matter ofiHealili 294-94-NC Material Handler (Forklift Operator), MG-6907coverage of breaking news stories and 1:05am NPR's Carualk 6. Limited to permanent and veteran preference candidates only. special events is provided. 3:30am NPR's Living On EarLh Friday 295-94-EL Logistics Management Specialist, NM-346-12. SCN AM Radio is the news, sports 7:30 an What's the Story 1:35am KSFO Spons Byline USA Sensitive. and information station AM 790 Pacific 8:05am On Computers 7:35am American Montage and M 120 tlatic1:3am obet/Jmesxchnge 8:3am The Blook Show 296-94-Jl Electronics Mechanic, MG-2604-10. Sensitive and AM 1420 Atlantic. :30an RobelanesExchang pm Georgetown University (Top Secret). Tuesday nm 297-94-VL Emergency Medical Technician, NM-640-5. Monday-Friday 1:35am KSFO Sponls Byline USA Saturday Temp Nte: 30 Sept. 94. Shift work. US/EMT license required, 5am National Public Radio Morning 7:35am AP Portfolio driver's e red. don 835am The Environment Shwam FO Spans Byline USA driser's 'Iiceurs 6 llS5ur On ( Irprr 98-94-ES Emergency Medical Techaician, N-9:54a Paul I Harvey Newvs 1:30pm Soundings 7ar NPIRs Weekend Itihro NM-640-3. I I am The Rush Limnbauclh Show 6:35pm AP Special Assignmnt 10'Wiam NPR's Cantalk Temp Ntc: 30 Sept. 94. Shift work. US/EMT license required, 12:05pm Paul Harvey News aid Cour.driver's license required, metary (Repeat 1:17 p.m Wednesday Sunday 299-94-ES Practical rse, NM-62 -6. Temp Nte 30 Sept. 2:05pm Paul Harvey Rest of Ire Story u0an ocus n th,, Iamily 94-Sht ,k. Uaic Nse equpNic (Repeats 10:05pm) 1:35am KSFO Spors Iylie USA 2Isan NPR, 5 1 Prcstm 4pm NPR's All Thing (onsidered 7:35am T he Best Of orr Kowledge 4:I5um NPR s C nalk Atlantic 6:0 pro American Pulic Radio's 8:,5am Ihe Healh h Sow &5:a MItontr ao 290-94-ES Clinical Narse, NNi-610-10. Markrplce 1:30rpm Social Th[rrght 7UmT 5P? ) Weckerd 'dii


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INGEST IEID EVZKNBK9N_WMSF2N INGEST_TIME 2011-07-12T21:01:51Z PACKAGE UF00098947_00139
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES