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The tropic times

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Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
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Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text




Gift of the Panama Canal Museum


STropic


Times


Vol. VII. No. 14


Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Friday, April 8, 1994


Joint rescue saves


shark attack victims


by Sgt. James A. Rush
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - Helping hands
spanned two continents to provide life-
saving medical care to shark attack victims
off the rocky shores of Easter Island.
A medical evacuation team here flew to
the island in a KC-135R Stratotanker March
24 to recover Phil Buffington and Heather
Boswell, crewmembers ofthe National Oce-
anic and Atmospheric Administration re-
search vessel Discoverer.
Swimming in the open seas with ship-
mates the morning of March 23, Buffington
and Boswell were attacked by a shark be-
lieved to be a great white.
The shark, with "a head the size of a
Volkswagon and a dorsal fin nearly a yard
long," struck Buffington first, according to
reports.
"There were about seven of us in the
water...between the skiff and the Discov-
erer," Buffington said. "We were in clear
water. With a mask on, I could see 100 feet
through the water and people on deck could
see 20 deep easily."
Because of the excellent visibility in the
water, Buffington thinks the shark ap-
proached from under the Discoverer, be-
cause it managed to catch everyone by
surprise.
"It came out of nowhere. Nobody saw
it," Buffington said. "I had no visual con-
tact at first. I felt it before I saw it. It hit me
so hard my arms went down and my hands
told me it was a shark because I've touched
them before."
For a brief moment the swimmer found


himself staring into the eye of his attacker,
then suddenly, he was free.
"I don't know if I pushed myself away,
or if the sharkjust spit me out of its mouth,"
Buffington said. "I began yelling 'Shark!'
and headed to the skiff. I knew I had been
hit, but didn't realize I was bleeding. I'm
lucky it didn't continue to bite me."
Boswell was climbing into the skiffwhen
the shark latched on to her left leg and
pulled her under. Moments later, they re-
surfaced and people in the small boat were
able to grab her by the arms. Boswell's leg
was severed in the "tug-of-war" that fol-
lowed.
Co-workers applied direct pressure to
the wound and Boswell was rushed to the
Discoverer's medical facility. Chief medi-
cal officer Lt. Cmdr. June Lane, a former
flight nurse with intensive care unit experi-
ence, applied a tourniquet and started two
IVs.
"They did an excellent job," said Capt.
Alan Quittenton, one of two Air Force
flight nurses on the mission. "If not for
them, Heather certainly would have been
gone."
TheDiscoverer's medical staffstruggled
to keep Boswell alive as the ship raced to
Easter Island. Buffington's injuries were
comparatively minor, needing 40 to 50
stitches to close. The primary threat to him
was infection, Quittenton said.
Capt. Mike McCallister, the ship's com-
manding officer, radioed the Joint Rescue
Coordination Center in Hawaii requesting
assistance.
Shortly after 2 p.m., the phones at the
Story continues on Pages 8-9


�nn -.




U.S. Air Force photo by Sgt. James A. Rush
Tech. Sgt. Wayne Schwalk (right) holds intravenous fluids as flight medic Army
Sgt. Mark T. Mulls transfers Heather Boswell and her stuffed gorilla Georgie
from the KC-135R to a helicopter at Howard AFB.


Citizen-soldiers help U.S. woman in Guatemala


U.S. National Guardsmen, Reservists on training exercise demonstrate
life-saving abilities to rescue woman falsely accused of stealing babies


QUARRY HEIGHTS (USSOUTHCOM PAO) - A
task force of U.S. Army Reservists and National Guards-
men in Guatemala to build clinics and repair roads was
thrust unexpectedly into another humanitarian mission to
help save the life of a critically injured American citizen
March 29.
The soldiers deployed to Guatemala in January for a
six-month training exercise to build medical clinics and
repair roads and bridges in remote areas as part of an ex-
ercise called Fuertes Caminos, or "Strong Roads" in Span-
ish.
They were the nearest U.S. military unit with the capa-
bility to provide life-saving assistance to a woman who
was attacked by a mob in the village of San Cristobal
Verapaz.
False rumors of Americans stealing babies in Guate-
mala apparently precipitated the assault.
The 51-year-old woman sought refuge in the local po-
lice station when the crowd, estimated at more than 300,
became violent and started throwing rocks. The mob then
stormed the police station and severely beat the woman.
Another U.S. citizen, called upon to interpret, appar-
ently escaped with less severe injuries. He was later
treated and released.
The woman needed help. While about 100 Guatema-




Better Opportunities for Single Sol-
diers targets improving barracks
conditions.


lan soldiers rushed to the village to restore order, the U.S.
Southern Command, U.S. Army South in Panama, the
U.S. Military Advisory Group and the American Embassy
in Guatemala began coordinating efforts to provide medi-
cal assistance and transportation support to the victim.
Task Force Dirigo, the name of the U.S. military engi-
neering task force, located near Salama, Guatemala, was
the answer.
After Guatemalan authorities evacuated the uncon-
scious woman to Coban, the regional capital, Task Force
Dirigo sent a medical team to Coban to assess the extent
of the victim's wounds and to provide medical treatment.
While on the way, the team received word that the Guate-
malans were transporting the victim to the task force base
camp at Salama.
There the woman received medical care from the
Army medical team, part of the 309th Field Hospital based
in Boston, Mass. The woman had suffered severe wounds,
including a fractured skull, a broken arm and leg, and mul-
tiple stab wounds. Her condition was critical, but stable.
"The Guatemalan physicians did an excellent job in
initial resuscitation measures," said Dr. (Maj.) Joel
Abramovitz, a neurosurgeon with the 309th. "The care she
received from them was important to getting her here
alive," he said.




Rodman NS Port Services opens
its doors to world-traveling ocean-
farers.


Abramovitz is from Newton, Mass. and practices
neurosurgery at New England Medical Center in Boston.
The Army medical personnel stabilized the woman,
improved her breathing, and gave her three pints of
blood.
"When the patient came in, we were able to fall right in
and do what needed to be done," Abramovitz said. "The
team did an excellent job."
Near midnight, a Task Force Dirigo UH-1 "Huey" he-
licopter crew, from the 112th Medical Company (Air Am-
bulance), from Bangor, Maine Army National Guard,
evacuated the patient to Herera Llerandi Hospital in Gua-
temala City.
The evacuation helicopter was piloted by Chief War-
rant Officer 4 Leonard Dietz, of Atkinson, Maine, who is
qualified for night operations.
"In every instance, people were doing the job they are
trained to do, from the medevac crew, to the military po-
lice, to the trauma team that responded," said Winchester,
Mass. native Lt. Col. Frank Fantasia, the task force ex-
ecutive officer.
"This is an excellent example of different Federal agen-
cies working together," Fantasia said.
Task Force Dirigo is composed of Maine Army Na-
tional Guardsmen, and U.S. Army Reservists from the
94th Army Reserve Command, headquartered at
Hanscom AFB, Mass., who deploy to Guatemala for two-
week training periods.




*Reserves cut thousands, Page 4.
*Perry talks on Korea, Page 5.
*Bowler rolls 300 game, Page 11.


-











2 Tropic Times
April 8, 1994


-- -- - - ____m - - - �Nws


Guard units build school

for 300 El Cristal children


by Liliana Levy-Dutram
USARSO Public Affairs Office
EL CRISTAL, Panama (USARSO
PAO) - Air National Guard units from
Vermont, Washington, Idaho and Arizona,
recently rotated deployments to Panama to
work on an elementary school here that
will be used by about 300 children.
The project was part of the joint U.S. -
Panama humanitarian assistance exercise,
Cosecha Amistad 1994.
Roy Thomas Marquez, community res-
ident, said the community helped the
guardsmen by mixing cement, setting
blocks, painting and performing any other
tasks necessary. They also cooked and
shared typical Panamanian dishes with the
soldiers.
"We had a great time working togeth-
er," Marquez said. "The residents feel very
grateful for what the soldiers have done.
We worked hand-in-hand to accomplish
this."
The needs of the El Cristal residents
motivated the citizen-soldiers to put forth
an extra effort to finish the project, said
Capt. Richard Yanez, Arizona Air Nation-


al Guard and officer-in-charge of the
project.
"The guys wanted to stay (working)
longer hours because they wanted to finish
the school and do the best job they could
for the kids," he said.
The Arizona Air National Guard dis-
played commitment to the mission even
before landing, said Lt. Col. Louis Pawlik,
commander of the Arizona Air National
Guard 162nd Civil Engineering Squadron.
"Two days before leaving (the United
States) we got a call asking us to bring
sheets of corrugated fiberglass to make
skylights in the classrooms," he said. "The
skylights weren't in the original plans, but
they were needed because there's no elec-
tricity here. The materials weren't avail-
able in Panama, so we brought them from
Arizona."
This project is a good example of total
forces support, Pawlik said.
"This project was an example of good
team effort," he said. "We had active duty
and national guard components working
together as well as Army support. Every-
one came together to share their tools and
expertise to make it all happen."


Commanders' conference Department of Defense photo by Patrick Milton
Speaking before the Component Commanders' Conference are: (from
left) Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey, commander-in-chief, U.S. Southern Com-
mand; Maj. Gen. G.A. Crocker, commanding general, U.S. Army South; Lt.
Gen. William M. Keys, commander, Marine Corps Forces Atlantic; Adm.
Henry H. Mauz Jr., commander-in-chief U.S. Atlantic fleet; and Lt. Gen.
James L. Jamerson, commander U.S. Southern Air Force.


Single soldiers' program takes on
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Better Oppor- through self-help and expanded self-help programs.
tunities for Single Soldiers is a program for soldiers by These two programs are available through the Direc-
soldiers to improve the quality of life and give recreation- torate of Engineering and Housing and are designed to
al activities for the single soldier, use soldiers and available supplies to repair and upgrade
Through the monthly meetings, unit representatives existing facilities, Holzworth said.
bring soldier concerns to the attention of the appropriate "The bottom line is, even though we can't get the big
staff in attendance, said Sgt. Patricia Lammie, 69th Signal bucks, there are things we can do," he said.
Company representative. Even though money isn't available for new construc-
During the last meeting, Col. Donald Holzworth, the tion, money has been made available for a barracks re-
U.S. Army South Deputy Chief of Staff - Engineers, ex- newal program, Holzworth said.
plained the barracks revitalization plan and what USAR- "We have just been awarded a $7.2 million contract
SO is doing to improve the single soldiers' living condi- for a barracks renewal project," he said. "We are going to
tions. do the Fort Kobbe barracks as those (soldiers) are the ones
"We have a thing called the barracks revitalization pro- who will be staying here until 1999."
gram and what that's designed to do is put resources into Holzworth went on to explain that the plan includes
the areas where you live," he said. basic repairs to 12 barracks over the next two years. A
"General Thomas Sullivan, Chiefof Staffofthe Army, new plan has also been developed to change three-man
has recognized that it is critical to the readiness of the rooms into two-man rooms, he said.
Army to take care of both our families and the single sol- Three model rooms will be constructed first so soldiers
dier," Holzworth said. "Some may think we have neglect- can make assessments of the improvements before the fl-
ed single soldiers in the past few years. We are rectifying nal plan is implemented, Holzworth said.-
that." The new rooms will increase the square footage avail-
Because of Congress not approving spending for new able to each soldier from 90 to 120 square feet and will
construction overseas, it is necessary to stretch the revital- include built-in closets with sliding, securable doors.
ization dollars that are provided, he said. This can be done These closets will be big enough to hold a refrigerator,


barracks issues
microwave and stereo and will be located so as to divide
the room to provide privacy. The new rooms will also
have new furniture, carpeting and ceiling fans, he said.
"The basic philosophy is - this is your home,"
Holzworth said.
Holzworth asked unit commanders if achieving and
maintaining excellent living conditions for their single sol-
diers was a part of their vision for their commands. If not,
he challenged each of them to put that in their vision.
"One of my missions is the care of soldiers and fami-
lies," said Maj. Gen. G.A. Crocker, USARSO command-
ing general who was also at the February meeting.
"Are we going to build new barracks? No. Are we go-
ing to forget about it and say, well, we're going to be out
of here? No. We are going to do something in between
that seems to make sense. That's the policy."
Though barracks conditions is a top subject at most
BOSS meetings, other subjects are addressed, Lammie
said. At the March meeting, Staff Judge Advocate and In-
spector General representatives were in attendance.
BOSS meeting are held 2 p.m. the first Thursday of
each month at Valent Recreation Center, Fort Clayton.
Soldiers who want to find an answer or find out more
about the program can attend the meetings, see their unit
representatives or call Anne Kelly at 287-6500.


Student programs stress no-drug, no-alcohol activities


by Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski
USARSO Public Affairs Office

BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL - Students from Balboa
High School are learning for themselves, and teaching oth-
ers that they don't have to do drugs or drink to have fun.
The students are not a specially selected group, but
normal high school students interested in everyday living.
These students are all members of either Parents, Re-
sources and Drug Education, known as PRIDE, or Stu-
dents Against Drug Drivers.
PRIDE is a drug-prevention program for high school
students that encourages them to reach out to friends,
younger students and the community with a drug-free
message, said Rita Sosa, PRIDE coordinator.
"Joining PRIDE is a personal decision for the stu-
dents," Sosa said.
"It's important that we start (discouraging drugs and
alcohol) young. It's very important for this type of posi-
tive peer pressure."
Joan Othon, SADD coordinator, said SADD offers stu-
dents the awareness of the dangerous of drinking and driv-
ing, the opportunity for non-alcohol related activities and
to spread the message against drinking and driving.
"The target of the group to make the population aware
of the drinking and driving problem," she said. "During
my generation, drugs and alcohol was a big issue. For a
long time it wasn't cool to say you didn't drink. The effort


is growing."
While the two groups are separate programs, their em-
phasis is very much the same - to participate in non-
alcohol and non-drug related activities and to encourage
other students to do so also.
Paul Edwards, 16, a PRIDE member, said he feels it's
important to be part of the programs and help others.
"All my friends know where I stand. I don't drink or
do drugs. And a lot of my friends don't incorporate drink-
ing and smoking around me," Edwards said.
"I feel that I can influence them through positive peer
pressure.
Renee Stewart, 17, a SADD member echoes the im-
portance of the programs.
"It's important that we make students aware of the
dangers of drinking and driving," she said. "And for
many of the students, their own experiences with friends
or family draws them even closer to the program."
As part of the program, the groups meet once a week.
During their meeting, the students plan non-drug and al-
cohol related activities such as end-of-year parties, and
trips.
They also plan activities they'll be participating in to
spread their message, such as their involvement in the
Drug Abuse Resistance Education, which was held at the
local Department of Defense elementary schools, and by
setting up a booth at the Directorate of Community Ac-
tivities Health Fair.


"The target of the group to make the
population aware of the drinking and
driving problem. During my generation,
drugs and alcohol was a big issue. For a
long time it wasn't cool to say you didn't
drink. The effort is growing."

Joan Othon
Students Against Drunk Drivers coordinator

One of the highlights of the year's activities was the
attendance of 30 Balboa High School students to the
1994 PRIDE World Drug Conference held in Philadel-
phia in early March.
The conference was a two-day event to educate stu-
dents and adults on drug and alcohol abuse. The week-
end offered the students a chance to participate in work-
shops, listen to people talk about their personal experi-
ence with drug and alcohol, and learn how present their
message to other students.
The trip was sponsored by the Alcohol and Drug
Abuse Prevention and Control Program.
"Some of the workshops were really good," said
PRIDE member Alex Sosa. "I learned a lot from the
speakers."


SNews










Feature


Tropic Times 3
April 8, 1994 J


r.





















U.S. Navy photos by Petty Officer 2nd Class Ralph Radford
Petty Officer 2nd Class Al Ondreka (left) Ensign Ruddy Garmendez (center) and Reserve Lt. Charles L. Schott cruise through the waterways near Rodman.
0 U/


To weary world travelers -


Port Services opens doors


by Diane Gonzalez
USNAVSTAPANCANAL PAO
A U.S. warship is finishes a
three-month tour on the high seas
of the Pacific. The ship makes its
way to the Panama Canal ready for a voy-
age to the Atlantic Ocean. The ship needs
fuel and a place to dock before continuing
its transit through the canal.
This is where Port Services at Rodman
NS comes into the picture. Port Services
provides total support .for U.S. and Allied
ships and submarines, said Cmdr.
Lawrence P. Dukes, port operations offi-
cer.
"We provide canal transit support," he
said. "We also provide port facilities, tele-
phone services, shore power and fuel ser-
vices for the ships and submarines."
Port Services maintains liaison and co-
ordinates operational matters with the
U.S. Southern Command, Air Force
Southern Air Division and the Panama Ca-
nal Commission, as well as incoming
ships.
The Port Services crew is also kept
busy with other tasks, that includes the
maintenance of its own small boat fleet.
The fleet includes five Boston Whalers,
one MK-6, and a Captain's Gig. These
small craft are used for support exercises
with the Seals team and the Seabees. The
crews also take visitors to Gatun Lake on
sight-seeing tours.
Home for Port Services consists of
three large piers and several workshops.
The piers are 700-feet long and have


had up to nine ships tied up at the same
time. One of the longest vessels to visit
was the USS Long Beach at 721 feet.
"We have the best deep water piers in
South America," Dukes said.
But not all the work is done at the pier.
The in-house workshops provide welding
and electronics, and mechanical areas pro-
vide the thrust of the crew's work.
Working in an international atmosphere
is the most interesting part of the job, said
Port Services crew member Petty Officer
2nd Class Al Ondreka.
"We are the fleet support for the cross-
roads of the world," Ondreka said.
Among the "interesting" things
Ondreka has experienced during his three-
year stay here was watching the Japanese
Training Fleet come into port, he said.
"They do the same job as we do," he
said. "Watching them brought me closer
to other allied navies."
Another sight was seeing a decommis-
sioned U.S. ship come into port as a new
Greek warship, he said.
The work is tiresome at times, but it has
its pluses, Ondreka said
"We get a ship in here about every two
weeks," he said. "It's a good place to learn
the job. I enjoy working with the guys."
Recently, Port Services finished help-
ing the sailing ship Gloria get underway.
Gloria is a training ship from Cartagena,
Colombia. During that vessel's stay many
of the sailors exchanged ball caps with the
Rodman crew. It's that part of the interna-
tional flavor that makes Ondreka's work
enjoyable, he said.


Seaman Elizabeth Render paints the Captain's Gig.











4Tropic Times
April 8, 1994


A Military News


AP LaserPhoto
U.S. Army Reservists check out a helicopter at the Armed Forces Reserve Center in Los Angeles.
California is scheduled to lose 2,828 Reservists in fiscal year 1994.



Reserves to cut 55,100



troops during fiscal year


WASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces Information
Service) - Secretary of Defense William Perry has an-
nounced the reserve components will cut thousands of bil-
lets and inactivate hundreds of units during fiscal 1994.
Defense reserve affairs officials said these actions are
in line with post-Cold War plans to reduce and reshape
the reserve forces.
The reserve drawdown will eliminate 55,100 Army,
Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force slots. The officials
emphasize many personnel cuts will come through attri-
tion, retirements and fewer accessions.
States shouldering the brunt of unit inactivations will
be California, Illinois, New York, Pennsylvania, Massa-
chusetts, Ohio, Indiana and Minnesota. Under the fiscal
1994 plan, New York will lose 5,217 billets; Pennsylva-
nia, 4,254; Illinois, 3,179; Massachusetts, 3,017; Califor-
nia, 2,828; Ohio, 2,684; Indiana, 2,389; and Minnesota,
2,199. South Carolina, Arkansas, Kansas and Rhode Is-
land face the least impact, each losing 40 slots or fewer.
Officials noted these figures are not the same number
of personnel who will be affected. Reserve component
personnel will have a chance to join another unit within a
reasonable distance of where they live. Because it's hard
to say how many individuals will accept transfers, the
number who will be involuntarily separated is difficult to
determine, officials said.
Although Reserve components face additional cuts in
the future, they'll not be reduced at the rate of active duty
forces, officials said. Reserve components will be sized
and shaped to ensure success of the DoD strategy to win


two nearly simultaneous major regional contingencies.
"We're doing this through the application of'compen-
sating leverage,' which uses the reserve components to
control peacetime costs and to reduce the risks associated
with smaller active forces," Perry explained.
"The fiscal 1994 reductions set the stage for our five-
year plan to reduce and reshape reserve forces to meet
end strength levels established through the Bottom-up
Review," he added. "Additional reductions are expected
to be announced each year until the full plan is achieved,
no unit-specific final decisions have been reached beyond
those announced as part of this package."
Perry emphasized individual military services identi-
fied specific units for inactivation. He said the following
key areas will be emphasized as DoD continues to man-
age the restructuring and drawdown:
*Enhanced force readiness: The increased reliance the
Bottom-up Review placed on the reserve components re-
quires focus on improving the readiness of remaining re-
serve forces.
*Domestic responsibilities: The ability to respond
when needed to domestic emergencies is an important el-
ement of national security. The states have the primary
responsibility to respond to domestic emergencies. Ac-
cordingly, the drawdown has been implemented in a way
to minimize the impact on the states' ability to respond to
these needs.
*Protect people: The transition benefits authorized by
Congress will be used to reduce the impact on guardsmen
and reservists leaving the force during the drawdown.


Secretary Perry: Actions in
Korea meant to avoid war
WASHINGTON (Air Force News Service) -
Defense Secretary William Perry said "It's con-
ceivable" U.S. pressure on North Korea to stop its
nuclear program might provoke the North Koreans
"into unleashing a war," but he said it is a risk worth
taking.
Perry told NBC's "Meet the Press" program the
risk of provoking war is less dangerous now than
later, when the north may have many nuclear
bombs if it does not dismantle its nuclear weapons
program.
"We do not want and will not provoke a war
over this or any other issue in Korea," Perry said.
"But we will take very firm stands and very strong
actions. It is conceivable that those actions might
provoke the North Koreans into unleashing a war
and that is a risk that we are taking."
Using unusually strong language, Perry said the
North Koreans "are lying when they say they are
not developing a nuclear program" and in fact,
"they may have one, possibly two bombs at this
time."
The North Koreans "are embarked on a program
of development which could get them a dozen or
more bombs a year," Perry said. "That's what we're
trying to stop right now," he added.
Perry said the risk of applying pressure to North
Korea will only become more dangerous if the ef-
fort is delayed months or years. He also warned that
the administration was concerned the North Kore-
ans could send its nuclear bombs to the Mideast
"where they are now selling their missiles." "This
is a matter of very, very great concern to us," he
told reporters.
The Defense Secretary cautioned that, "We are
not on the brink of war. This is not an imminent
crisis. I don't believe a war is going to result from
it."
But, he added, "We must be very clear about
how we are standing firm on this so there is no mis-
understanding on their part" and so "there's no pos-
sibility for confusion that could lead them to take
actions, military actions, like they did in the first
Korean War because they underestimated our in-
tentions."
United States, South Korea
postpone exercise decision
WASHINGTON (Air Force News Service) -
Saturday's edition of the Los Angeles Times reports
that the United States and South Korea have agreed
to postpone any decision on reviving theirjoint mil-
itary exercises to give North Korea time to respond
to a new United Nations Security Council state-
ment urging it to allow full inspection of its nuclear
plants.
The postponement was announced in a news
conference by Han Sung Joo, South Korea's for-
eign minister, following meetings with Defense
Secretary William J. Perry and other top U.S. poli-
cy-makers. U.S. officials later confirmed the post-
ponement.
The action is largely symbolic, since the annual
exercises are not considered essential to allied mil-
itary operations. But strategists hope the delay will
give North Korea, which has made the exercises a
visible bargaining chip in the dispute, a face-sav-
ing way to comply.


DoD reminds voters not to forget state elections


WASHINGTON, D.C. (American
Forces Information Service) - With the
spotlight on the 1994 federal campaign,
many Defense Department voters often
forget local elections that may affect their
families now and themselves later.
These elections include campaigns for
mayors, state senators and assemblymen,
parish superintendents, county sheriffs,
judges, coroners and clerks. Additional is-
sues may range from local beautification
campaigns to multimillion-dollar highway
construction.
Workers in the Federal Voting Assis-
tance Program are not only emphasizing
the importance of the federal campaign.
They are also encouraging voters to play
their parts in state, county, city and district
campaigns.
"I think state and local elections have


just as much impact on the military as the
national elections," said Phyllis Taylor,
program director.
Taylor gives an example that occurred
in Nevada last year.
"The military absentee vote not only
determined who won that election, but
which party controlled the Senate," she
said. "The absentee ballots are making a
difference."
She said local officials make daily de-
cisions on education, local taxes and prop-
erty taxes.
"Many military families own property
and intend to return to those locations
where they are now voting absentee," she
said. "Voting is the only process where
they're able to voice themselves and have
impact on their communities."
Voting on those local issues isn't an


easy task, she said. Because they don't see
the day-to-day activities of their home-
towns, voters must research the issues con-
cerning candidates.
Unit voting assistance officers can of-
fer some help, but Taylor said, they're not
responsible for keeping up on, candidates
and issues.
"Their responsibility is getting voters
registered and to tell individuals where to
get the information," she said.
Voters may write to state political par-
ties and contact the League of Women
Voters for information. Local newspapers
often provide voters balanced coverage of
candidates, and family members back
home often give absentees an "inside" look
at how the election affects their home.
In 1988, Federal Voting Assistance
Program officials created a new informa-


tion channel. They established the Voting
Information Center, a toll-free telephone
service at the Pentagon providing election
information and assistance to service
members and DoD employees. Originally,
the service provided congressional and gu-
bernatorial candidates a channel to leave
recorded messages on election issues.
Yet, Taylor said, it also allows service-
members access to each state's secretary
of state to get local election information.
Callers may not get recorded information,
but Taylor said voters could leave their re-
quests with center personnel for forward-
ing to each state.
Taylor said voters can get information
they need any time, but it won't do much
good if the voter doesn't register and vote.
"The rules are different for each state," she
said.












Military News


Perry: United States won't


send more air power to Bosnia


WASHINGTON
(Air Force News Ser-
vice) - The United
States will not send
more air power into
Bosnia despite new at-
tacks by Bosnian
Serbs on several Mus-
lim strongholds, De-
fense Secretary Will-
iam Perry said Sunday.
"We're not looking
at extensions of the use
of that air power today,
but you could con-
ceive of another situa- Perry
tion like Sarajevo aris-
ing where we might consider it," he said, referring to the bomb-
ing of a Sarajevo market in February, which prompted NATO
to threaten air strikes.
New attacks were reported Saturday on the Muslim enclave
of Gorazde, which has been under siege by Bosnian Serbs for
more than a year. In Prijedor, in northwestern Bosnia, the Red
Cross made plans to evacuate thousands of Muslims and Croats


being terrorized by Serbs.
Appearing on NBC-TV's "Meet the Press," Perry was asked if
the United States would be willing to stand by if Prijedor and
Gorazde fell to the Serbs.
"We will not enter the war to stop that from happening," Perry
said.
Appearing on the same program, Lt. Gen. Michael Rose, com-
mander of the U.N. forces in Bosnia, said sending in U.S. troops
would help speed the peace process.
"I mean, the arrival of any troops here will help that peace pro-
cess," he said.
But Perry reiterated the U.S. position that it will not send in
ground troops until a peace accord is signed by all sides.
"We are prepared to send a substantial number of troops to
sustain a peace agreement once a peace agreement is reached, but
we're not prepared to send troops in the meantime," he said.
On another subject, Perry said he does not expect Russia to be
allowed to place more troops on its northern and southern borders
to keep an eye on the former republics. Fearing instability and
turmoil there could spread, Russia would like the West to alter an
agreement setting troop levels, The New York Times reported.
"I do not expect a change in the treaty which limits the Rus-
sians that way," Perry said. "I think this is going to be a big prob-
lem if they insist on it."


DoD homosexual policy now in effect


WASHINGTON, D.C. (American
Forces Information Service) - After a de-
lay, the Defense Department's new homo-
sexual policy is now in effect.
Edwin Dorn, assistant secretary of de-
fense for personnel and readiness, believes
it is a policy all service members can sup-
port. At the base is the "don't ask, don't
tell, don't pursue" policy proposed in De-
cember by former Secretary of Defense
Les Aspin and endorsed by President Bill
Clinton.
"What we've tried to do is make it ab-
solutely clear that what concerns us is a
person's conduct," Dor said. "We want
every American to have an opportunity to


serve in the military subject only to his or
her willingness to abide by the military's
standards of conduct."
Dorn said the policy supports unit co-
hesion and readiness. "What we've said is,
if you conduct yourself badly, you're out,"
Dorn said. "If you conduct yourself ac-
cording to our rules, we will respect your
privacy and we expect you to respect the
privacy of others.
"This policy is the kind all military per-
sonnel can respect," he continued. "What
it says is that we respect individual rights
- including the right to privacy. But it
also says we have some standards we ex-
pect you to live up to. Military personnel


want their individual rights respected, but
they also know there is a code of conduct
to which everyone has to adhere. I think
this policy will go down well if seen in that
light."
The new policy was supposed to be ef-
fective in early February. Dorn said there
were many small details to work out. "We
fashioned department policy, then the
(military) services had to respond with pol-
icies of their own," Dorn said.
"Whenever that process occurs there's
a possibility of miscommunication or of
some significant differences in interpreta-
tion, and that's what we were trying to
work out."


Leave-sharing program made more flexible


WASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces Informations Ser-
vice) - The Office of Personnel Management recently made the
leave-sharing program more flexible. The interim rules are ef-
fective immediately.
Now, agencies have independent authority to set up both
leave transfer programs and leave banks. Before, agencies had
to ask OPM's permission to set up a leave bank program.
Also, agencies can now have both leave banks and leave-
transfer programs, and eligible employees will be able to take
leave from both programs during the same medical emergency.
Through both programs, employees can now transfer leave to
employees in other agencies if they wish, as well.


The new rules make it easier to qualify as a leave recipient. Be-
fore, program administrators had to consider the amount of ad-
vanced leave an employee had available in addition to earned an-
nual and sick leave. Now, only earned annual and sick leave will
be considered.
Finally, when employees deplete the leave donated to them, they
can use any annual or sick leave they accrue while in a shared-
leave status.
"This program...creates a family-friendly workplace and gives
agencies the flexibility they need to be responsive to their employ-
ees," said OPM Director Jim King, who announced the recent
changes.


Tropic Times
April 8, 1994 5


Murderer apologizes
WASHINGTON (Air Force
News Service) - A U.S. Army ser-
geant who repeatedly stabbed his
wife's lover and then cut off the
dead man's head apologized to the
victim's relatives Saturday.
Sgt. Stephen J. Schap, convicted
of murder a day earlier, Saturday
addressed a U.S. military court
whose jury then recommended that
he be sentenced to less than the
mandatory life in prison. A military
commander is to make the final de-
cision.
Choking back tears, it was the
first time the 26-year-old Baltimore
man spoke to the court that put him
on trial for killing Spc. Gregory
Glover with an Army survival knife
at the Fulda army base Dec. 7.
"I'm sorry I'm the man respon-
sible," said Schap, who murdered
Glover after learning that he was
having an affair with Schap's wife
and that she was pregnant with
Glover's baby.
The court in Hanau found Schap
guilty of premeditated murder, rul-
ing against the defense attorney's
argument that Schap had acted in a
spontaneous outburst of rage.
Under U.S. military law, the
conviction carries an automatic life
sentence. Fivejurors, however, rec-
ommended a maximum sentence of
30 years. A sixth juror recommend-
ed 20 years and the jury president
recommended life. Lt. Gen. Jerry
Rutherford, commander of the Ar-
my's V Corps, has 60 days to de-
'cide whether to exercise clemency.

Committee checks
Navy overbilling
WASHINGTON (Air Force
News Service) - A Congressional
committee found April 1 that the
makers of an unmanned reconnais-
sance aircraft billed the Navy $544
for a spark plug connector that sells
at a hardware store for about $10.
Three Navy employees were
subjected to an investigation when
they told their superiors about the
spark plug, so the frustrated
whistleblowers took the matter up
with the congressional committee.
Representative Norman Sisisky
(D-Va.) who heads the House
Armed Services investigations sub-
committee, blamed overworked
and "sloppy" officials for failing to
look into apparent gouging.


World resort offers servicemembers new vacation spots


WASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces Information
Service) - Servicemembers now have six inexpensive
places to spend a vacation following the recent opening of
Shades of Green on Walt Disney World Resort. In most
cases, patrons pay about half of what comparable local
commercial hotel resorts charge.
In addition to the Shades of Green, the first armed forc-
es recreation center in the continental United States, there
are centers in Korea and Hawaii and three in Germany.
Although the centers focus on providing inexpensive
vacation spots for junior enlisted service members and
their families, they're a bargain for everybody from pri-
vate to general, officials said. Nightly room rates are on a
sliding scale based on rank.
First priority for reservations goes to active duty and
retired military personnel, their dependents and immedi-
ate family members. This category includes former ser-
vice members separated under special incentive programs
for two years after the date of their discharge.
Reserve and National Guard personnel, including re-
tirees and those who retired without pay ("gray-area retir-
ees"), and their families are eligible to use the facilities.
Cadets and midshipmen of the service academies, and
active duty members and retirees of the National Oceanic
and Atmospheric Administration and the Public Health
Service can also use the facilities.


Several other categories are eligible to use the centers,
including some disabled veterans, former prisoners of war,
Medal of Honor recipients, unmarried former and surviv-
ing spouses of military personnel, NATO armed forces
personnel assigned or attached to a U.S. military unit or
installation, DoD civilian employees and physicians un-
der contract. Full-time Red Cross personnel supporting
troops overseas are eligible on a space-available basis.
Also, personnel providing logistical support to the Amer-
ican military can use the facilities.
For reservations at Shades of Green, write or call:
Shades of Green on Walt Disney World Resort
PO Box 22789
Lake Buena Vista, FL 32830
1-407-824-3665; 1-407-824-3600 (fax).
The rate for junior enlisted service members E-I
through E-5 is $49 per room per night. That's for up to
two adults and three children with no added costs for cots
and cribs. The nightly rate for E-6s and E-7s, 0-1s and 0-
2s and WO-1 is $73. Those in grades 0-3 through 0-5,
WO-2 to WO-5 and E-8 and E-9 pay $85; 0-6 and above
pay $92.
For the center in I awaii, write or call:
Hale Koa Hotel
2055 Kalia Road
Honolulu, HI 96815-1998


1-800-367-6027; 1-808-949-4807 (fax).
Nightly room rates at the Hale Koa are based on rank
and type of room - standard, superior, parkview,
oceanview or oceanfront. Rates for E-1 to E-5 run from
$47 for a standard room to $82 for an oceanfront room. E-
6 through E-9, WO-I to WO-3, 0-1 through 0-3 and wid-
ows pay $60 to $98.
Rates run from $75 to $114 for WO-4 and WO-5, O-
4s and above and foreign officers.
Telephone numbers for centers in Germany are:
Berchtesgaden: 011-49-8652-61057, fax 011-49-
8652-62768.
Chiemsee: 011-49-8051-803172, fax 011-49-8051-
803158.
Garmisch: 011-49-8821-750575, fax 011-49-8821-
3942.
Nightly rates range from $32 to $95. Apartments are
available in Berchtesgaden for $85 to $125 per night.
Room rates for E-l through E-5 are from $32 nightly at
Chiemsee and Garmisch. The top rate is $56 at Chiemsee
and $53 in Garmisch.
For the Dragon Hill in South Kprea, call 011-822-790-
0016, fax 011- 822-792-0036. Dragon Hill rates run
from $38 to $78 per night, depending on the person's
rank. Kitchenettes with microwaves are available upon
request.











6 Tropic Times
April 8, 1994


* Voices


Parts isn't just parts for Nissan owner


Dear Mayors' Corner:
I own a 1991 Nissan Sentra that needs
parts that I am not able to get at our auto-
motive parts store on Fort Clayton. They
never carry enough parts in stock or the
necessary parts to keep this particular
make of car running.
In case of an unexpected break down, it
takes two weeks to get the parts. Owners
of these cars, or any other car, shouldn't
have to deal with buying parts on the econ-
omy or have to wait for ordered parts when
an emergency happens in order to do prop-
er maintenance.
It is an injustice for everyone in this
community who owns a car. If the Auto
Parts Store doesn't have the needed parts,
they should help locate a possible source
with the parts. The store should order more
than one of the needed parts to ensure they
have them in stock instead of waiting for
supply and demand.
Backyard Mechanic

Dear Backyard:
You are right. Our parts situation has


been a problem that the Army and Air
Force Exchange Service is working to cor-
rect. Since the installation of a computer-
based parts look-up to give information
about commonly requested and sold parts,
the new system has been misused.
More training will be given to those us-
ing the system to ensure timely and neces-
sary basic stock orders are placed and
stocked. We regret this inconvenience and
sincerely hope that our improved ordering
procedures will result in better stocks of
commonly used parts and accessories.

Dear Mayors' Corner:
I would like to know who selects the
clothing that the Post Exchange sells?
Why is it necessary for the exchange to
carry "My Name is Panama" clothing
when it is sold in half the stores in Pana-
ma? Exchanges in the United States al-
ways carry a larger quantity of clothes and
much better styles. I feel that our need for


better quality and more up-to-date styles is
greater because the exchange is the only
store we have on post.
Low prices are important, but 1 would
rather pay more if I could get better quali-
ty, better and a more up-to-date selection.
You could move the shoe store to a small-
er location, since having so few shoes in
such a big area is such an obvious waste of
space, and open a clothing outlet that car-
ries fashionable clothing for people crav-
ing clothing with style.
Soldiers Seeking Style

Dear Soldiers:
The Army and Air Force Exchange
Service has experienced a major problem
this season on timely receipt of fashion
clothing from our distribution center in
Dallas. In the United States, spring and
summer merchandise starts arriving in
stores in December and January. Panama
used to get the initial shipments in January


as well when this merchandise was
shipped by the Air Mobility Command.
Because of a military cut-back on
spending, our fashion clothing is now
shipped by ocean vessel which has in-
creased our lead time by at least six weeks.
So our problem has not been a lack of
styles as much as it has been a lack of mer-
chandise all-together.
During the interval we had to supple-
ment our fashion clothing by increasing
the amount of clothing bought through lo-
cal vendors. "My Name is Panama" was
one of the major contributors. Our fashion
clothing is now arriving almost daily so,
hopefully, your concerns will be taken care
of.
Editor's note: This column allows
community members to submit ques-
tions to the Mayoral Congress. Letters
should be mailed to: Mayors' Corner,
Publicity Chairperson, APO AA 34004.
Anonymity will be granted upon re-
quest. The Tropic Times reserves the
right to edit letters and responses for
brevity, clarity and propriety.


Officials catch local loan-shark using allotments


Local loan-shark
Two people took advantage of a third person by charg-
ing $200 interest on a $300 loan. The loan was paid by
allotment and, once paid off, the allotment was stopped.
The third person's signature was then forged on a new
allotment form to restart the allotment which credited the
loan-sharks' account with an additional $1,100. The two
were charged with forgery, larceny of private property and
conspiracy.
Forgery and loan-sharking are illegal. Anyone with in-
formation about loan-sharking, call the Provost Marshal's
Office at 287-5252.

Money order fraud
A Fort Clayton soldier was apprehended for cashing
seven worthless money orders totaling $1,000 at the Mer-
chants National Bank. When the money orders were iden-
tified as counterfeit, the soldier said he had bought them
from someone else, believing them to be real. Both peo-
ple were charged with larceny of private property, con-
spiracy and counterfeit U.S. currency.
Only buy money orders from a reputable establish-
ment.

Drunk and disorderly
When military police answered a complaint of loud
noises coming from a Fort Espinar quarters, the occupant
became loud and aggressive toward them and used pro-
fanity. The occupant was charged with drunk and disor-
derly conduct.
Before drinking alcohol, know the limit. Don't allow
a few drinks to jeopardize a career.

Rainy season again
Now that rainy season is beginning, the MPs remind
everyone to use caution when travelling. Heavy rains can
cause flooding and hazardous driving conditions. Strand-
ed motorists often times become victims of crime in these
flooded areas.
Always remain alert and keep windows up and doors
locked. If approaching a flooded area, take a different
route and don't give a thief the opportunity to strike. Mon-
itor the Southern Command Network for updated traffic
reports and see the command grid map.


This authorized unofficial command information pub-
lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic
Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces
Information Program of the Department of Defense, un-
der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S.
Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the
official view of the U.S. government, the Department of
Defense or the U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002
Telephone 285-6612.
Commander in Chief.................Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey
Director, Public Affairs.......................Col. James L. Fetig



Trropic Tim


Prvot ashal'sCone


Panama Jack anonymous hotline
Anyone with information about drug smuggling
should call the Panama Jack anonymous hotline at 285-
4185.
The following crimes occurred in on and off post hous-
ing areas March 25-31.


Chief.............................Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor
Editor.......................................Staff Sgt. Richard Puckett
Sports Editor.............................................Sgt. Lori Davis
Staff Editors........ ........................Sgt. E.J. Hersom
Spc. John Hall,
Rosemary Chong
Maureen Sampson
Student Intern..................................Juan Carlos Palacio
Southern Command Public Affairs Office..........282-4278
Command Information Officer..............Patrick Milton
U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office..............287-3007
Public Affairs Officer...................Maj. Melanie Reeder
Command Information Officer.................Beth Taylor
Editor...........................................Staff Sgt. Jane Usero


Pacific
Morgan Avenue - one larceny of unsecured private prop-
erty
Fort Kobbe - one larceny of secured private property
Off post and Atlantic
None reported


Journalists.................................Sgt. Eric S. Hortin
Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski
Spc. Alexander C. White
24th Wing Public Affairs Office.........................284-5459
Public Affairs Officer..............Capt. Warren L. Sypher
Public Affairs Superintendent
Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham
Journalists................................Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson
Sgt. James A. Rush
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.............283-5644
Public Affairs Officer...........................Diane Gonzalez
Photographers
Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor
Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano J. Mays
U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.........................289-4312
NCOIC......................... ............ Sgt. Richard Emert






Page
Missing
or
Unavailable






Page
Missing
or
Unavailable






Page
Missing
or
Unavailable






Page
Missing
or
Unavailable














Sports

Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Page 11


Department of Defense photo by Sgt. Lori Davis


U.S. Army Garrison's Scott Carr smacks a hit in the March 31 tie-breaker game with 142nd Medical Detachment. USAG won the game 7-5, and took first place
in the white league of Army unit level softball. The 56th Signal Company and Company A, 154th Signal Battalion also battled for first place in the Red League
during their Tuesday night game. See Page 13.


Bowler scores 300



in Albrook league

by Sgt. Lori Davis "Once the ball leaves your hand you know (it will be
by Sgt. orts Davis a strike)," he said.
Tropic Times Sports Editor "It's hard to get a perfect game in Panama or any-
ALBROOKAFS - There are few things in life that are where overseas," he said. "Back in the states there are
perfect, but Patrick Beckford was just that March 29 more lanes to practice at, and better bowlers to compete
when he bowled his first sanctioned 300 game in the with."


Albrook men's Wednesday night league.
Beckford bowled his first 300 in 1988 in a non-
sanctioned tournament, and followed that with a 299 the
following week, but he said this perfect game was like
doing it for the first time all over again.
He said he had been bowling very well in recent
weeks and felt this 300 game coming.
"You get that feeling when you bowl close several
times. The week before I bowled 279, just one strike
away," he said.
After coming so close, Beckford said he had a feeling
about this game.
"After the first six frames people start to root for you.
In the 10th frame all the bowlers stop and watch you," he
said.
"You get to the 10th frame and your legs start to feel
weak. You don't feel it in your upper body, your lower
body is where you feel it," he said.
"I was just hoping this was going to be it. I came so
close so many times," Beckford said.
"You have to hit the ball in the pocket to get the strike.
You concentrate on that pocket."
"You have to know how the lanes react. The Albrook
lanes are oily up front and dry in the back. This gives you
a strong finish. You want the ball to glide and snap at the
dry point so it will pick up speed and be forced into the
pocket,' he explained.



Women's over-30 volleyball at
Reeder Physical Fitness Center
starts the 1994 season.


It was back in the United States that Beckford achieved
his other big bowling accomplishment.
"I was in the Air Force Worldwide Bowling Tourna-
ment in Las Vegas in 1987," he said. "I finished seventh
overall and my team finished in second place out of 93
teams."
To earn the seventh-place spot, Beckford competed
against more than 500 other bowlers, he said.
Beckford went to the tournament in Las Vegas only
three years after starting his bowling career. Becoming
a bowler had a lot to do with fate, he said.
"Ten years ago I didn't even know what a bowling
alley looked like," he said. "I started bowling then
because I was stationed at Minot Air Force Base in North
Dakota."
The harsh northern weather kept Beckford from
playing his favorite sport, soccer. The wind and snow
drove him indoors to the social spot on base, he said.
"It was really cold there and there was nothing else to
do,' Beckford said. "I was hanging out at the bowling
alley and started to bowl."
From bowling to pass the time on cold winter days to
worldwide tournaments and perfect games, the next step
for Beckford is a sanctioned 800 series. His perfect game
was part of a 758 series, so he is close to his newest
challenge.
"I know I can do it," he said.


Army white league and red league
battles for first place going into the
U.S. Army South Tournament.


Major League baseball
players visit Panama
COROZAL (Tropic Times)- Six former Major League
baseball players will visit military bases here as part of the
"MCI Ambassadors of Baseball" tour.
Ron LeFlore, Paul Blair, Tug McGraw, Manny
Sanguillen, John Steams and Jimmy Wynn will visit the
Pacific and Atlantic communities through Sunday, sign-
ing autographs and playing celebrity softball games.
Federal endorsement of sponsor not intended.
Schedule of events:
Today
Noon-1:30 p.m.Fort Davis Post Exchange (autograph
session)
3 p.m. Fort Espinar Youth Center (photo and auto-
graph session)
4:30 p.m. Fort Davis softball field (softball game)
Saturday
11 a.m.- 1:30 p.m. Corozal post exchange (autograph
session)
3 p.m. Fort Clayton Youth Center (photo and auto-
graph session)
4:30 p.m. Mother's Field, Fort Clayton (softball game)
Sunday
Noon-3 p.m. Howard Sports and Fitness Center
(autograph session)
4-5:30 p.m. Weekly Field, Howard AFB (softball
game)

American Society golf
tournament Saturday
COROZAL (Tropic Times) - The American Society
of Panama will hold it's third annual scholarship fund
golf tournament 7:30 a.m. Saturday at the Fort Amador
Golf Course.
There is a $36 entry fee. Entry forms are available at
the Fort Amador, Horoko, Panama and Brazo GolfClubs.


*SCN AM radio sports
*Memorial Day hoops
*Short distance running events
L j


April 8. 1994


Kickin' up dirt











12 ropic Times
April 8, 1994


S__Sports


Olympic bobsledding



Navy SEAL races for Samoa


by Sgt. 1st Class Steve Barrett
American Forces Information Service
WASHINGTON - For the first time in history, Ameri-
can Samoa competed in the Olympic Winter Games. The
three-man contingent representing the U.S. territory proudly
marched into the ski jumping-venue in Lillehammer, Nor-
way, site of the opening ceremonies.
Carrying the territory's flag was a U.S. Navy SEAL,
who found the thrill of the ceremonies just as fulfilling as
his runs down the Olympic bobsled course.
"It's a feeling youjust can't describe," said Senior Chief
Petty Officer Faauuga Tia Muagututia, a 19-year Navy
veteran who piloted the team's two-man bobsled.
"It felt great because there's so much pride in carrying
your nation's flag in a ceremony like that. To sit and put
those feelings into words - it can't be done."
Bobsled? American Samoa? Why is a tropical island
country competing in bobsled at the Winter Games? And
how did a SEAL, the Navy counterpart to Army and Air
Force special operations forces, end up in such a wintry
mix?
The story spurs images of 1988, when Jamaica entered
two- and four-man bobsled teams at the XV Olympic
Winter Games in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Its participa-
tion received great publicity and criticism as a gimmick.
Muagututia, 35, said the venture had its beginnings back
in 1991 when he heard from longtime friend Frank
Manumaleuga, a former linebacker with the Kansas City
Chiefs. Manumaleuga, now a member of the American
Samoan Olympic Committee, told Muagututia that state-
side investors were interested in sponsoring a bobsled team
at the 1992 Winter Games in Albertville, France.
"Initially, the investors went to Guam," said Muagututia,
assigned to the Navy SEAL Delivery Vehicle Team 1 at
Naval Air Station Coronado, Calif.
"The people in Guam said they weren't interested but
referred them to our committee."
When he got the initial call, competing was not a reality.
The last-minute request didn't give the Navy noncommis-
sioned officer enough time to plan, train and still complete
his mission. So, he had to decline the offer.
However, the American Samoan Olympic Committee
found they could not compete in Albertville anyway.
Bobsled teams must enter and score points in a series of
races governed by the Federation oflnternational Bobsleigh
and Tobaggan. Teams must score 20 points to qualify for
Olympic bobsledding. Furthermore, teams must compete
and tally points in World Cup competition on two separate
continents.
With Albertville out, the Samoans started plans for
Lillehammer. Muagututia was in those plans. Now able to
schedule his training time around duty, he got permission
from his commander to train and compete for American
Samoa over the next two years. He went to Calgary and
completed a mandatory driving course, qualifying him to
pilot sleds in competition.
But to compete, Muagututia had to find a brakeman. The
spot required a person with strength and speed to push the
sled, plus work with the driver in forming a cohesive team
while navigating the course.
While earning his driving credentials in Calgary,
Muagututia found another Samoan as a brakeman.
"The problem was he was too big and slow for compet-
itive bobsledding," Muagututia said. "We talked about it
and decided it would be better if I found another brake-
man.
He found one in Brad Kiltz of Indianapolis. Kiltz had


worked with Team
USA, but never formal-
ly competed. Under In-
ternational Olympic
Committee rules, teams
from U.S. territorial
possessions may recruit
athletes from the Unit-
ed States, provided they
haven't competed with
a U.S. team for two -S
years. Kiltz met that re-
quirement.
Eleven months after
the Albertville games,
Muagututia and Kiltz
raced together at Lake
Placid, N.Y., site of the
1932 and 1980 Winter
Olympics. Once they
met their North Ameri-
can race requirements,
they traveled to Europe.
Over the next 5'V
weeks, the Samoan bob-
sled team competed in
World Cup events.
"We knew we need-
ed to start collecting
points if we wanted to
go to Lillehammer,"
said Muagututia. "That
meant going to Austria,
Switzerland and wher-
ever the events were so
we could qualify."
Muagututia started I
learning some tricks to
improve his time and -,
make his sled more
competitive in Europe.
"Coaches from oth-
er teams would come
up, give us encourage-
ment and pass on some
advice," Muagututia
said. "Many teams were
glad to see us make the
effort to compete inter-
nationally and by help- Navy Senior Chief Petty Offic
ing us, they help im- SEAL Delivery Vehicle Tearr
prove the competition." American Samoa's two-man
By the time they fin- Lillehammer, Norway.
ished the 1993 season,
the American Samoan team earned 43 federation points, 23
more than needed to qualify them for Lillehammer. How-
ever, they could not challenge the Europeans, who again
dominated both two- and four-man Olympic events.
The American Samoan sled finished 38th in a 43-team
field, but Tia left the competition encouraged by fellow
bobsledders.
"Our team got a lot of encouragement from the Swiss
and Germans to keep going with our program," he said.
"They want competition, and they want to see the little
countries like us, Jamaica and Puerto Rico succeed."
It won't be the last time American Samoa competes in
the Winter Games. Muagututia said the sponsorship re-
mains to finance both two- and four-man bobsled teams at


F ~ ira


AFIS photo by Ken Hackman
er Faauuga Tia Muagututia, assigned to the Navy
S1 at Naval Air Station Coronado, Calif., drove
bobsled at the XVII Olympic Winter Games in


the XVIII Olympic Winter Games in Nagano, Japan.
By then, he hopes there is an extra stripe on his uniform,
retirement in his future and more bobsled races under his
belt.
"We started something that the people in Samoa are
proud of," said Muagututia.
"Many people didn't even know we were competing
until they saw our sled race, but it brought much pride and
celebration out. Now we have to continue, and the more
people (competing), the better."
He also plans a return to Olympic competition in
Nagano, driving both two- and four-man sleds.
"If they beat me out, fine," Muagututia said. "But
they're going to have to beat me. I want to'go back."


Army unit level softball
Red League
56th Sig. 19 5 -
Co. A, 154th 17 6 1.5
Co. E, 1-228th 17 6 1.5
HHC, LEA 16 6 2
534th MP 15 8 3.5
MEDDAC 13 10 5.5
HHD, 56th 9 13 9
3rd SOSC 8 13 9.5
92nd PSC 7 13 10
Co. E, 154th 6 13 10.5
HHC, 128th 6 15 11.5


DENTAC 5 16 12.5
HHC, USAG/IG 4 18 14
White League
HHC,USAG 20 3 -
142nd MED 19 4 1
Co. C,1-508th 15 6 4
310th MI 14 6 4.5
Co. B, 1-508th 10 6 6.5
Co.B, 193rd Spt. 11 8 7
565th Ord. 12 9 7
HHD, 470th 10 8 7.5
SOUTHCOM 10 9 8
41st ASG 7 13 11.5


59th Eng. 6 14 12.5
HHC, 193rd 6 14 12.5
DCSRM 6 15 13
Co. A, 193rd Spt. 2 17 16
Green League
JOTB 11 1 -
747th MI 11 1 -
NSGA 10 2 1
TRICO 9 3 2
HHC, 5-87th 8 4 3
PCC 8 5 3.5
549th MP 7 5 4
Navy Gold 6 6 5


Co. A, 5-87th 4 8 7
3-7th SF 4 8 7
408th MI 4 8 7
Air Force Softball Standings
Post Season Tournament
24th SP#1 2 0
536th Eng. 2 0
24th Med. 1 1
24th Sup. I 1
24th SP#.2 1 2
24th MSSQ 1 2
617th ALS 0 2
24th OSS/AIS 0 2


I --- �II 1�-� 9 � I


,I












L Sports


Tropic Times 13
April 8, 1994 J


Signal slugfest



56th upsets Co. A, 154th, 21-20


by Sgt. Lori Davis
Tropic Times Sports Editor
FORT CLAYTON - Things
looked grim for 56th Signal Battal-
ion in the opening inning of its tie-
breaker game for first place in the
Army unit level red league when
Company A, 154th Signal Battal-
ion nailed hit after hit, chalking up
nine runs.
The 154th seemed unstoppable,
butthe56th stopped them andturned
the game around, winning 21-20
after trailing 15-5 in the third in-
ning.
The 154th came into the game
like a powerhouse, batting through
its lineup in the first inning. Six
batters got on board and two scored
before Tony McCubbins, caught a
fly to right field to make the first out
of the game.
The ninth run was batted in by
Samuel Tatum before ending the
154th hitting streak.
The 154th took the field with the
9-0 lead and a lot of confidence, but
56th managed to shake them witl
some strong offense of its own.
ScottDindingercametotheplate
with two men on and hit what was
to be the first ofmany home runs on
the night. A rejuvenated 56th team
started its comeback.
The 56th scored twice more to
end the first inning down by 9-5,
but 154th stretched its lead to 12-5
off home runs by Stencil Walters
and Carlos Rentas and a Tony
Cassort RBI triple in the second
inning.
The 56th seemed to lose steam.
It went three-up, three-down in the


Department of Defense photo by Sgt. Lori Davis
The 154th Signal Battalion's Jay Rourk beats the throw to the 56th Signal Battalion's Paul Riccitelli at the plate as umpire Karen


Powell watches the play.
second and third innings.
The 154th stretched its lead in the third inning.
David Williams, Gary Mixon and Walters were
batted in, boosting their team's lead to 15-5.
- The fourth inning marked the turning point for
both teams. The 154th's Tatum drove Jessie Hus-
band in with a triple to right field, but 56th defense
shut the 154th down, catching the next two fly balls
to retire the inning at 16-8.
The 56th took the plate and started its way back
with three runs in the fourth.


The 56th came back in the fifth with four
more runs, one offanother Dindinger home
run. 154th's only score of the inning was
off another Walter's home run.
Presley and Mike Parrish caught two
liners and Reginald Pride made the play at
first to hold 154th scoreless in the sixth.
The 56th scored five runs off six hits in
the sixth inning to tie 154th 17-17.
The 154th got back in front in the sev-
enth with three runs scored by Williams,


Mixon and Jay Rourk, once again forcing
56th to come from behind.
Dindinger came to the plate with a 20-20
tie with a runner in scoring position and hit
the winning run off an error at first base.
"They're a good team but the pressure
got to them and their hitters stopped hit-
ting," said 56th coach Dan Swistak.
"We had a 15-5 lead, but they started
getting hits. Base hits beat home runs be-
cause they move players," Husband said.


USAG beats out


142nd Med


N\ ,'


Department of Defense photo by Sgt. Lor Davis
Edmund Tallon and third baseman Effrain Ramos watch a hit to the outfield.


by Sgt. Lori Davis
Tropic Times Sports Editor.-
FORT CLAYTON - The competi-
tion was white hot in the tie-breaking
game for first place in the white league.
U.S. Army Garrison took on the 142nd
Medical Battalion for the top spot going
into this weekend's U.S. Army South
softball tournament.
The 142nd gave USAG a run for its
money, but USAG walked away the
number one team in the league with a 7-
5 victory.
USAG jumped to a 2-0 lead in the
first inning with a string of hits by Scott
Carr, David Crichton, T.C. Campbell
and Jorge Bonilla. A couple of snags in
the outfield and plays at first base kept
142nd scoreless the first two innings.
After a scoreless second inning
USAG started back at the top of its
batting order and scored again with the
Carr, Crichton and Campbell lineup,
adding three more runs to their lead.
Bonilla caught 142nd's Nick
Whittington's hit to center and Bernard
Grimsley threw back-to-back strike outs
to close the third.
Following four frustrating innings
and a five-run deficit, the 142nd offense
came into the fifth like a new team.
Edmund Tallon, Kevin Upson and
Eric Benson got on board with a series of
hits and Nick Whittington hit a grand


7-5


slam, pulling 142nd within one run of
tying USAG.
USAG chalked up two more runs in
the sixth inning off an Effrain Ramos
triple that drove in Campbell and Bonilla.
The 142nd answered back in the bot-
tom of the sixth with one more run, but
USAG shut it down with three back-to-
back infield snags. -
Tallon put up a valiant defensive fight
in the top of the seventh. The 142nd
short-stop caught a fly ball and worked
with second baseman Benson to make
the last two outs.
The game ended with a USAG defen-
sive play. Bolander nailed a shot into
center, but Bonilla made the catch and
secured first place for USAG.
"This was a tough game," said Scott
Carr, USAG coach and short stop. "This
is the third time we've played them, and
every time it's gone down to the last
batter."
The 142nd coach and right center
fielder Upson said the game was an
unusual one for his team.
"We're not a power hitting team,
we're a base hitting team. The home run
was uncharacteristic for us," he said.
On the defensive side, Upson said his
team made key errors.
"You have to have good defense to
win these games" he said. " We came
back to 5-4, but they had good defense in
the last two innings."


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1 Tropic Times
?April 8, 1994


SSports


Soccer, volleyball

Coaches hold tryouts for new talent and

count on returning stars this season


by Sgt. Lori Davis
Tropic Times Sports Editor
BALBOA - Just like athletes trying to make it in
the pros, student athletes in Department of Defense
Dependents Schools here went into the draft for the
upcoming sports season.
Hopeful athletes tried out for boys and girls
volleyball and boys soccer last week.
During the Monday to Wednesday try-outs coach-
es from Balboa High School, Curundu Junior.High
School and the Panama Canal College watched the
fresh crop of athletes show their stuff.
Although there are only three schools involved in
sports competition on the Pacific side of the isthmus
there are four teams. Students here go through the
draft process for the Balboa Bulldogs, Balboa Red
Machine, Curundu Cougars, and the PCC Green
Devils.
The Cristobal High School Tigers' tryouts are for
Cristobal students and previous students who now
attend PCC but still live on the Atlantic side, said
Gayle Rankin, Cristobal Tigers girl's volleyball
coach.
"In the Pacific draft, the team that finished last the
year before picks first. All the coaches evaluate
(prospective players) for three days and have a draft
meeting at the end," said Fred Bales, Curundu Cou-
gars girls volleyball coach.
Everyone trying out for a sport is drafted by one
of the teams and then tries to make that team, he said.
Players drafted in previous seasons stay with their
team throughout their academic career in Panama, he
said.
Unfortunately some players are no longer with
their teams. Permanent change of station moves and
graduations cause many changes to the roster.
The Curundu Cougars have lost two key players
from their girls team, Bales said. Gladys Hattabaugh,
last seasons team captain, graduated from PCC and








t �








<* ^.- -^ ^^^
'^ W ^ * 44

* * '*I


Henry Davis, Balboa Red Machine goalie, stops a shot.


Magda Tavarez, a talented young setter, moved.
Pacific volleyball coaches are on the lookout for
strong players to fill their vacancies and help them
challenge the Cristobal Tigers. They are the team to
beat, Bales said.
Both the Cristobal Tigers boys and girls volley-
ball teams went undefeated in regular season play
last year. The boys took the top spot in the post
season tournament while the girls were upset by the
first place Balboa Bulldogs and the second place
PCC Green Devils, Rankin said.
With few changes to either roster, the Cristobal
Tigers are looking forward to another strong year.
All-Isthmus players Kent Grubbs, Ricky Alvarez
and Jon Lu are back to lead the boys team this season,
said Troy Oliver, Cristobal Tigers boys volleyball
coach.
Honorine Millar, a strong hitter and team mem-
ber for three years, is back to power the girls team,
Rankin said.
Millar has been with her team longer than some
older players have been with their soccer teams. In
only their second year operating under the draft
process, soccerplayers and coaches have adjusted to
their roster changes.
"Last year everyone was thrown into the pot. You
may have had a player on your team for years but he
was not picked up for your team," said Rick
Dahlstrom, PCC Green Devils boys soccer coach.
The draft works well, he said. Last year the teams
were closely matched and there were many good
games.
The draft was good for his team, Dahlstrom said.
"Last year we were very young and we played
very well and finished second," he said. This year
most everybody is returning and I expect a good
season.
The boys and girls volleyball regular season
begins in two weeks and boys soccer starts in three
weeks.


br~

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LLJP~..


Panama Armed Forces Running Association


Group promotes running in Panama


by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -
The Panama Armed Forces Running Asso-
ciation offers runners the opportunity to
participate in a year-long running champi-
onship and helps organizations conduct
running events, officials said.
"The goal ofthe association is to encour-
age running in Panama," said Allen Jones,
association president.
The association runs the year-long Pan-
ama Armed Forces Running Champion-
ship in which runners compete throughout
the year for point totals, he said.


"The championship is open to both
Americans and Panamanians and each run-
ner earns points for the various races they
run in," Jones said.
The point system is designed so runners
are on equal footing, he said. The system
calculates various statistics such as age,
time and average standings.
With this system, even though you may
cross the finish line first, someone else may
earn higher total points for the run because
of the other factors, Jones said.
"The runners have about 50 sanctioned
runs they can choose from throughout the
year," he said. "Those in the championship
don't have to run in every race, but they


must run in at least one per month to keep
their points competitive."
For people who run in more than one
race each month, the highest score for
that month is added to their total points,
Jones said.
"The more races the runner partici-
pates in, the better chance there is for a
higher score," he said.
As of March, the high total points for
the championship is held by Panamanian
Gil Balbuena with Ricardo Roman of the
Air Force only three points behind.
For information about coordinating a
run or about the championship, call Jones
at 287-5444.


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Department of Defense photos by Sgt. Lon Davis
Tony Cooksey, forward for the Curundu Cougars, uses his
head during soccer practice.


Players named to

All-lsthmian team
COROZAL (Tropic Times) - After
regular season competition the following
students were named to the 1993-94 All-
Isthmian Girls Tennis Team:
Alexis Vidaurri, Balboa Bulldogs,
Balboa High School
Nicole Nassirr, Curundu Cougars,
Balboa High School
Lisa Rojas, Balboa Red Machine,
Balboa High School
Anyse Matheny, Panama Canal Col-
lege Green Devils, Balboa High School
Abby Higley, Balboa Red Machine,
Balboa High School
Dayra Chinasing, Cristobal Tigers,
Cristobal High School


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Tropic Times 15
April 8,1994 1%


SSports Shorts


SCN AM 790, 1420 radio
airs baseball, basketball
Southern Command Network's AM 790
Pacific and 1420 Atlantic will broadcast the
following sports this weekend.
Tonight
6 p.m. Baseball: Detroit at N.Y. Yan-
kees
Saturday
12:30 p.m. Baseball: Seattle at Toronto
9 p.m. Baseball: Atlanta at Los Angeles
Sunday
2:30 p.m. Basketball: Phoenix at Seattle
7 p.m. Baseball: Florida at San Diego

Armed Forces Running
Association 5-mile run
The Armed Forces Running Associa-
tion is sponsoring a 5-mile run April 16.
The run starts 7 a.m. at the Fort Clayton
pedestrian gate. Competitors earn points in
the Panama Armed Forces Running Cham-
pionship.
Call 287-5444 for more information.

American Red Cross
softball tournament
The American Red Cross is sponsoring
a softball tournament April 29-May 1.
Teams can register for the tournament by
calling 287-3103. There is a $74 team fee
and the registration deadline is April 20.
The tournament starts 3 p.m. at Clover-
leaf field, Fort Clayton.
Individuals can enter the home run der-
by before the first game April 29. There is
a $10 entry fee.
All proceeds benefit the American Red
Cross.

Davis hosts Memorial
Day hoops tournament
There will be a Memorial Day basket-
ball tournament May 28-30 at the Fronius
Fitness Center. Registration is May 1-20.
Teams are limited to 10 players. Call 289-
3108 for more information.

Fitness month triathlon
starts at Espinar pool
There will be a fitness month triathlon
starting at the Fort Espinar pool 6:30 a.m.
May 14. Events include swimming, bicy-
cling and running. Call 289-4189 for more
information.

Fronius starts beach
volleyball registration
Registration for 4-on-4 beach volley-
ball is May 2-25. Games will be played at
Shimmey Beach. There will be an organi-
zational meeting May 27 at the Fronius
Fitness Center. Call 289-3108 for more
information.

Military Comptrollers
sponsors fun run
An American Society ofMilitary Comp-
trollers Run For Fun will be held 7 a.m.
April 23 at Building 210, Fort Clayton.
There will be four age categories, tro-
phies, prizes and free T-shirts to the first
100 registrants.
Runners can pre-register in Building
519, Fort Clayton, at the Finance Office.
Call 287-5319/5855 for more information.

Howard, Albrook begin
bowling sign-ups
The Howard and Albrook bowling cen-
ters are signing up bowlers to form summer
bowling leagues. Visit the centers or call
284-4818 for more information.

Security police sponsor
softball tournament
The 24th Security Police Squadron will


host a co-ed softball tournament today
through Sunday at Howard AFB's Weekly
Field. Cost is $100 plus one 12-inch and
one 11 -inch ball. Formore information, call
Norm Poppell, 284-3392 after 5 p.m.

Intramural flag football
league kicks off in April
Registration for flag football is open
until Wednesday. There will be an organi-
zational meeting noon April 16 at the Sun-
dial Recreation Center. Play begins April
18. Call 289-3889 for more information.

Over-30 volleyball league
registration ends in April
Registration is open for over-30 volley-
ball Monday through April 29. There will
be an organizational meeting 6 p.m. May 2
at the Fronius Fitness Center. Call 286-
3108 for information.

Amador Golf Course
schedules tee-off times
The Amador Golf Course is using pre-
scheduled starting times for teeing off Sat-
urday, Sunday and U.S. holidays. Only
groups of three or four may reserve tee-
times before 10 a.m. on these days.
Reservations may be called in begin-
ning the Wednesday before the weekend's
play.

Howard, Albrook host
flag football tournament
The Howard and Albrook Sports and
Fitness Centers will host a flag football
tournament April 25 at Weekly Field. Play-
ers must register at either center by April 18.
Call 284-3451 for more information.

Howard, Albrook centers
triathlon set for April 16
The Howard and Albrook sports and
fitness centers are sponsoring a -triathlon
April 16. Registration for the event ends
Wednesday. The event includes a 500-
meter swim at the Howard pool, a 20-
kilometer bike race and a 5-kilometer run.
The event is for individuals only. Call 284-
3451 for more information.

Football, softball, soccer
registration continues
Registration for the Directorate of Com-
munity Activities unit flag football is ongo-
ing.
Women's soccer registration has been
extended through April 15.
Desert Storm softball registration is on-
going until April 15.
Call the DCA Sports Division Office at
287-4050 for more information.

Rodman looking for
martial arts instructors
The Rodman Fitness Center is looking
for certified instructors to teach martial arts,
aerobics and water aerobics. For more
information contact Morise Conerly at the
Rodman Fitness Center, 283-4222/4061.

Bowling centers offer
deals for children in April
The Curundu and Clayton bowling cen-
ters are celebrating the Month of the Mili-
tary Child throughout April.
The centers are offering special prices
and free shoe rentals for school-age chil-
dren.

Introductory sailing
lessons for 15 and over
Sailing lessons are provided through the
Moral, Welfare and Recreation Division
monthly. Lessons are 9 a.m.-l p.m. the last
Saturday and Sunday of one month and the
first Saturday and Sunday the following


month. Classes are limited to 10 students
who must be at least 15 years old.
Sign up for classes at the Fort Clayton
Boat Shop. An affidavit of good health and
a swim test is required.
Students will get a qualification card
that allows them to rent sailboats and to
enroll in the intermediate sailing course at
Rodman Naval Station after completing
this course. Call 287-6453 for more infor-
mation.

Fronius center offers tall,
short basketball leagues
The Fronius Fitness Center offers 5' 10"
and under and 5'11" and over basketball
leagues. Registration is April 17-May 18.
There will be an organizational meeting
noon May 21 at the Fronius Fitness Center.
Call 289-3108 for more information.

Amador Golf Course
hosts open house
There will be an open house 4:30-7:30
p.m. April 16 at the Amador Golf Course.
The open house will feature new merchan-
dise from the 1994 Professional GolfAsso-
ciation Show. Call 282-4511 for more in-
formation.

Horoko Golf Course
changes hours
The Horoko Pro Shop is open Monday
through Friday from 6:45 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Saturday, Sunday and 6:15 a.m. to 6 p.m.
holidays.
The driving range hours are 6:45 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Thurs-


day, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday and Friday
and. 6:15 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Sunday
and holidays.
The restaurant will be open 10 a.m. to 11
p.m. Monday, Thursday and Friday, 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday and
6 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday, Sunday and
holidays.

Reeder offers men's
over-30 volleyball clinic
The Reeder Physical Fitness Center of-
fers ongoing volleyball clinics forthe men's
over 30 volleyball league. Call 287-3861
for more information.

Fronius gym starts
over-30 basketball
There will be an organizational meeting
for over-30 basketball 6 p.m. tonight at the
Fronius Fitness Center. Call 289-3108 for
information.

Curundu center no-tap
tourney sign-up posted
Sign ups for the monthly no-tap tourna-
ment sponsored by the Curundu Bowling
Center will begin 6:30 p.m. April 16. Call
286-3914 for more information.

American sportsman
celebrate anniversary
The American Pacific Sportsman Asso-
ciation will celebrate its 26th anniversary
noon April 23 at the clubhouse.
For information, call 252-5613/5083/
5613.


Spike it
Zonian's Jessica Sanchez plays the net during the 1993 women's volley-
ball season. Registration for this season for the Atlantic community is open
until Tuesday. There will be an organizational meeting 5 p.m. Tuesday at
the Fronius Fitness Center. League starts play Thursday. Call 289-3108
for information.













News


16 Tropic Times
�April 8, 1994


Police destroy drug labs
PANAMA CITY (Reuters) - Panamanian po-
lice forces said they destroyed several small co-
caine-producing laboratories and coca plantations
in the remote Darien jungle bordering Colombia.
Some 115 Panamanian police officers stormed
three laboratories in the northeastern Darien prov-
ince of Tacarcuna and arrested three Colombian
men over the weekend, police major Santiago
Fundora told a news conference.
Police planes then fumigated about 190 acres of
coca plants, the raw material for cocaine.
Police officials did not say how much, if any
cocaine paste produced by the laboratories was
seized in the operation.
Elements of U.S. Army South provided some
transportation and logistical support for this opera-
tion, USARSO officials said.
The operation is the second in a year aimed at
halting the spread of cocaine production in the
Darien jungle by Colombian guerillas and peasant
Panamanian farmers.

Fiesta Fair starts soon
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The Fi-
esta Panama Fair - Pacific will be Thursday through
April 17 at Jarman Field.
Activities will begin with a fun run and walk at
4:10 p.m. at Reeder Physical Fitness Center and
opening ceremonies at 5 p.m. on Jarman Field. Af-
ter the opening, the 79th Army Band Jazz Combo
will perform. The evening will continue with the
Fort Davis Elementary School dancers and a De-
partment of Defense show, "the Ges Work."
Throughout the four-day fair, there will be many
live performances as well as 15 carnival rides,
sporting events and more than 50 food and game
booths. Caines Capers, a DoD show magician, will
also perform April 16-17.
The fair will be open 5-11 p.m. Thursday, 4
p.m.-midnight April 15, 3 p.m.-midnight April 16
and 3-11 p.m. April 17. Fort Clayton will be an
open post during operation hours of the fair.

Dining facility selected
FORT SHERMAN (USARSO PAO-Atlantic)
- The Jungle Operations Training Battalion dining
facility was recently selected as a finalist for the
Phillip A. Connelly award.
The Galley will represent U.S. Army South in
the small dining facility category at the Department
of the Army level competition, said Sgt. 1st Class
Geodfry W. Miller, dining facility manager.
The dining facility was judged in October by a
three-person team from Installation Food Service,
Corozal. Judging-was based on sanitation, troop
accessibility, food preparation, menu, nutrition, de-
cor and service, Miller said.
"We have a very unique dining facility," he
said. "We deal with all services, even foreign sol-
diers."
The Galley's small size gives its staff an advan-
tage, he said.
"We can put more emphasis on cooking," he
said. "We take pride in our work and get very good
meals out to the soldiers we serve."


McCaffrey addresses



School of the Americas


by 1st Lt. Jim Knotts
USSOUTHCOM Public Affairs

QUARRY HEIGHTS - De-
spite recent criticism, the School
of the Americas should be turn-
ing out more graduates instead of
fewer, said Gen. Barry McCaf-
frey, commander-in-chief, U.S.
Southern Command.
McCaffrey made his remarks
Monday during a visit to the
school at Fort Benning, Ga..
Students attending the course,
like U.S. Army Maj. Ricardo
Riera, echoed his sentiment.
"The School of the Americas
is the principal forum for U.S. and
Latin militaries to meet on a com-
mon ground, and to further our
relationship's future with joint
and combined operations in
United Nations peacekeeping op-
erations," Riera said of his class-
mates at the school. "This course


Department of Defense photo
Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey, commander-in-chief of U.S. Southern Com-
mand, addresses students and faculty at the School of the Americas at
Fort Benning, Ga. Monday.


allows us to enhance our cooperative security, to exchange
information and develop common doctrine that will help in
future operations we undertake with our Latin neighbors."
Riera, who served as a SOUTHCOM counterdrug op-
erations officer from August 1990 to August 1993, is at-
tending the Command and General Staff College at the
school.
"In every case, the students in my class consider them-
selves to be the protectors of democracy and human rights
within their respective countries," Riera said. "We've all
learned that supporting democracy and human rights is our
common objective, and it's the responsibility of our mili-
taries to stay on that path."
The School of the Americas, which has existed in some
form since 1946, teaches officers and noncommissioned of-
ficers from the U.S. military and allied nations around the
world. All of the classes are conducted completely in Span-
ish, and range in scope from joint operations, to combat
medic courses, to resources management. In 1994 about
90 percent of the school's graduates will be from Latin
America, school officials said.
Last year, the school came under attack from human
rights groups who charge some of the Latin American
graduates have committed human rights abuses after leav-
ing the school.
Congress cut in half the International Military Educa-
tion and Training budget, which is a primary source of
funding for the school. Allied students' tuition is paid by
their own country, by U.S. foreign assistance such as IMET,
or a mixture of the two.
After a recent trip to the school, Senator Sam Nunn,
chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, gave
the school his support. McCaffrey added is support during
an address to students during his visit.
"We must listen very carefully to our critics and learn
from them," McCaffrey said. "I think the contributions of


the human rights advocates have been enormously im-
portant to all of us. Personally, I would welcome their
active scrutiny of what goes on in the School of the
Americas, and I think we'll profit from it."
McCaffrey said last year's budget cuts were "a func-
tion of our apparent failure so far to explain why we
think these funds are so important."
Riera thinks the attacks on the school are'short-
sighted.
"In my personal opinion, you can't blame the school,
the institution, for what individuals do," Riera said.
"There are two elements echoed in every course - the
subordination of the military to their democratically-
elected civilian leadership and respect for human rights."
Riera prefers to concentrate on the positives, how-
ever.
"This course is great. We develop professional rela-
tionships, but the personal relationships are the ones you
carry throughout the rest of your life and look forward
to continuing," Riera said. "I know I'll always have a
place to stay when I want to visit Latin America."
Riera's class contains students from Venezuela,
Mexico, Colombia, Bolivia, Dominican Republic, Peru,
Honduras and Argentina. The allied students are from
all branches of their countries' active duty military, na-
tional guard and even some police forces.
All of the 10 active duty U.S. Army students have
completed at least one tour in SOUTHCOM. There are
also U.S. Air Force, Army National Guard and Army
Reserve students in the class.
The course is the same as the one taught at Fort
Leavenworth, Kan., except conducted all in Spanish at
the School of the Americas. All of the U.S. students were
chosen to attend the course at Fort Benning versus Fort
Leavenworth because of their Spanish-speaking ability,
officials said.


Army engineer rescues local man from killer bees


by Sgt. Eric S. Hortin
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT KOBBE (USARSO PAO) - An
engineer soldier braved a large swarm of
Africanized bees in an attempt to save a
man's life March 24.
Spc. Jose Soto, from Company A,
536th Engineer Battalion, was participat-
ing in common task skills training when
he heard yelling coming from outside the
fenceline.
"I was about to perform the first task
when I heard this Panamanian guy start
calling out," Soto said. "I was the only
one who understood what he was saying."
Without hesitating, Soto jumped up
and ran toward the fence, followed closely
by Sgt. 1st Class Arthur Rood, Service
Company, 536th Eng. Bn.
"I didn't know what was going on at
first," Rood said. "I thought the guy had
gotten caught in the concertina wire while


climbing the fence. Then I got closer and
saw the bees all over the guy. I started call-
ing out, 'Call 911!' "
In the meantime, Soto had scaled up
and over the fence. Before Soto could get
to the victim, the bees started coming at
him and he backed off.
"The DEH (firemen) just happened to
be in the area and they came over," Soto
said. "They tried to stop the bees with a
fire extinguisher, but the bees started at-
tacking them. Then they tried to hose
down the guy with water, but the bees
were still attacking."
At that point, Soto told the firemen to
hose him down. Soto then sprinted to the
nearly unconscious victim through a cloud
of nearly 2,000 bees.
He picked the man up and ran back to
the fence against the force of the pressure
hose and with the Africanized bees in hot
pursuit.
Soto's next problem was how to get the


man over the eight-foot fence topped with
concertina wire.
The man was barely conscious and
could only weakly grab onto the fence,
Soto said. The victim was going into se-
vere shock because of the estimated 1,000
bee stings on the head, neck, back, arms
and legs he had suffered.
"The man looked like he had new hair
because of all the stingers in him," Soto
said.
One of the firemen came over with a
ladder, and used it to get the man over the
fence. The ambulance pulled up moments
later. The bees were still stinging the Pana-
manian man, though, so Soto and others
were busy smacking the insects off him as
much as possible. The bees even followed
the victim into the ambulance.
After everything had settled down,
Soto went back to his room to get cleaned
up and go to the troop medical clinic.
When Soto looked in the mirror, he re-


alized he had been stung nearly 20 times in
his head and neck.
"I got scared a little bit, seeing that guy
being tore up like that, yelling and crying
for help," Soto said. "It was a really nasty
picture."
Although no one knew what happened
to the injured man, Rood credits Soto with
doing more than what most would have
tried.
"If it wasn't for him (Soto) the guy
would have died right there," Rood said.
"I thought Soto didn't know what he was
doing or he was crazy. I guess he did know
what to do. I'm impressed."
Soto was presented an Army Achieve-
ment Medal for his actions. Soto's actions
have brought him attention and a new
nickname - "Hero" - but he downplays
it as much as possible.
"I didn't pay too much attention to what
was happening, I just did it," Soto said. "It
was a human thing to do."


s"~PC,




Full Text

PAGE 1

Tropic Times Vol. VII, No. 14 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, April 8, 1994 Joint rescue saves shark attack victims by Sgt. James A. Rush himself staring into the eye of his attacker 24th Wing Public Affairs then suddenly, he was free. "I don't know if I pushed myself away, HOWARD AFB -Helping hands orifthesharkjustspitmeoutofitsmouth," spanned two continents to provide lifeBuffington said. "I began yelling 'Shark!' saving medical care to shark attack victims and headed to the skiff. I knew I had been off the rocky shores of Easter Island. hit, but didn't realize I was bleeding. I'm A medical evacuation team here flew to lucky it didn't continue to bite me." the island in a KC1 35R Stratotanker March Boswell was climbing into the skiffwhen 24 to recover Phil Buffington and Heather the shark latched on to her left leg and Boswell,crewmembersoftheNationalOcepulled her under. Moments later, they reanic and Atmospheric Administration resurfaced and people in the small boat were search vessel Discoverer. able to grab her by the arms. Boswell's leg Swimming in the open seas with shipwas severed in the "tug-of-war" that folmates the morning of March 23, Buffington lowed. and Boswell were attacked by a shark beCo-workers applied direct pressure to lieved to be a great white. the wound and Boswell was rushed to the The shark, with "a head the size of a Discoverer's medical facility. Chief mediVolkswagon and a dorsal fin nearly a yard cal officer Lt. Cmdr. June Lane, a former long," struck Buffington first, according to flight nurse with intensive care unit experireports. ence, applied a tourniquet and started two "There were about seven of us in the IVs. water. between the skiff and the Discov"They did an excellent job," said Capt. erer," Buffington said. "We were in clear Alan Quittenton, one of two Air Force water. With a mask on, I could see 100 feet flight nurses on the mission. "If not for through the water and people on deck could them, Ileather certainly would have been see 20 deep easily." goxte. Because of the excellent visibility in the The Discoverer 's medical staffstruggled water, Buffington thinks the shark apto keep Boswell alive as the ship raced to proached from under the Discoverer, beEaster Island. Buffington's injuries were cause it managed to catch everyone by comparatively minor, needing 40 to 50 surprise. stitches to close. The primary threat to him "It came out of nowhere. Nobody saw was infection, Quittenton said. it," Buffington said. "I had no visual conCapt. Mike McCallister, the ship's comtact at first. I felt it before I saw it. It hit me manding officer, radioed the Joint Rescue so hard my arms went down and my hands Coordination Center in Hawaii requesting U.S. Air Force photo by Sgt. James A. Rush told me it was a shark because I've touched assistance. Tech. Sgt. Wayne Schwalk (right) holds intravenous fluids as flight medic Army them before." Shortly after 2 p.m., the phones at the Sgt. Mark T. Mulls transfers Heather Boswell and her stuffed gorilla Georgie Fora briefmoment the swimmer found Story continues on Pages 8-9 from the KC-1 35R to a helicopter at Howard AFB. Citizen-soldiers help U.S. woman in Guatemala U.S. National Guardsmen, Reservists on training exercise demonstrate Abramovitz is from Newton, Mass. and practices l neurosurgery at New England Medical Center in Boston. life-saving abilities to rescue woman falsely accused of stealing babies The Anny medical personnel stabilized the woman, QUARRY HEIGHTS (USSOUTHCOM PAO) -A Ian soldiers rushed to the village to restore order, the U.S. improved her breathing, and gave her three pints of task force of U.S. Army Reservists and National GuardsSouthern Command, U.S. Army South in Panama, the blood. men in Guatemala to build clinics and repair roads was U.S. Military Advisory Group and the American Embassy "When the patient came in, we were able to fall right in thrust unexpectedly into another humanitarian mission to in Guatemala began coordinating efforts to provide mediand do what needed to be done," Abramovitz said. "The help save the life of a critically injured American citizen cal assistance and transportation support to the victim. team did an excellent job." March 29. Task Force Dirigo, the name of the U.S. military engiNear midnight, a Task Force Dirigo UH-l "Huey" heThe soldiers deployed to Guatemala in January for a neering task force, located near Salama, Guatemala, was licopter crew, from the 112th Medical Company (Air Amsix-month training exercise to build medical clinics and the answer. balance), from Bangor, Maine Army National Guard, repair roads and bridges in remote areas as part of an exAfter Guatemalan authorities evacuated the unconevacuated the patient to Herera Llerandi Hospital in Guaercise called Fuertes Caminos, or"Strong Roads" in Spanscious woman to Coban, the regional capital, Task Force temala City. ish. Dirigo sent a medical team to Coban to assess the extent The evacuation helicopter was piloted by Chief WarThey were the nearest U.S. military unit with the capaof the victim's wounds and to provide medical treatment. rant Officer 4 Leonard Dietz, of Atkinson, Maine, who is bility to provide life-saving assistance to a woman who While on the way, the team received word that the Guatequalified for night operations. was attacked by a mob in the village of San Cristobal malans were transporting the victim to the task force base "In every instance, people were doing the job they are Verapaz. camp at Salama. trained to do, from the medevac crew, to the military poFalse rumors of Americans stealing babies in GuateThere the woman received medical care from the lice, to the trauma team that responded," said Winchester, mala apparently precipitated the assault. Army medical team, part of the 309th Field hospital based Mass. native Lt. Col. Frank Fantasia, the task force cxThe 5 1-year-old woman sought refuge in the local poin Boston, Mass. The woman had suffered severe wounds, ecutive officer. lice station when the crowd, estimated at more than 300, including a fractured skull, a broken arm and leg, and mul"This is an excellent example of different Federal agenbecame violent and started throwing rocks. The mob then tiple stab wounds. Her condition was critical, but stable. cies working together," Fantasia said. stormed the police station and severely beat the woman. "The Guatemalan physicians did an excellent job in Task Force Dirigo is composed of Maine Army NaAnother U.S. citizen, called upon to interpret, apparinitial resuscitation measures," said Dr. (Maj.) Joel tional Guardsmen, and U.S. Army Reservists from the ently escaped with less severe injuries. He was later Abramovitz, a neurosurgeon with the 309th. "The care she 94th Army Reserve Command, headquartered at treated and released. received from them was important to getting her here Hanscom AFB, Mass., who deploy to Guatemala for twoThe woman needed help. While about 100 Guatemaalive," he said, week training periods. P 2 Fatur Pae 3d m1r1 Better Opportunities for Single SolRodman NS Port Services opens *Reserves cut thousands, Page 4. diers targets improving barracks its doors to world-traveling ocean*Perry talks on Korea, Page 5. conditions. farers. *Bowler rolls 300 game, Page 11.

PAGE 2

2 Tropic Times -April 8, 1994 Guard units build school for 300 El Cristal children by Liliana Levy-Dutram al Guard and officer-in-charge of the by L liaLevy A am c -projectUSARSO Pubic Affairs Office "The guys wanted to stay (working) EL CRISTAL, Panama (USARSO longer hours because they wanted to finish PAO) -Air National Guard units from the school and do the best job they could Vermont, Washington, Idaho and Arizona, for the kids," he said. recently rotated deployments to Panama to The Arizona Air National Guard diswork on an elementary school here that played commitment to the mission even will be used by about 300 children. before landing, said Lt. Col. Louis Pawlik, The project was part of the joint U.S. -commander of the Arizona Air National Panama humanitarian assistance exercise, Guard 162nd Civil Engineering Squadron. Cosecha Amistad 1994. "Two days before leaving (the United Roy Thomas Marquez, community resStates) we got a call asking us to bring ident, said the community helped the sheets of corrugated fiberglass to make guardsmen by mixing cement, setting skylights in the classrooms," he said. "The blocks, painting and performing any other skylights weren't in the original plans, but -tasks necessary. They also cooked and they were needed because there's no elecshared typical Panamanian dishes with the tricity here. The materials weren't availsoldiers. able in Panama, so we brought them from "We had a. great time working togethArizona." er," Marquez said. "The residents feel very This project is a good example of total Commanders' conference Deparment of Defense photo by Patrick Milton grateful for what the soldiers have done. forces support, Pawlik said. Speaking before the Component Commanders' Conference are: (from We worked hand-in-hand to accomplish "This project was an example of good left) Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey, commander-in-chief, U.S. Southern Comthis." team effort," he said. "We had active duty mand; Maj. Gen. GA. Crocker, commanding general, U.S. Army South; Lt. The needs of the El Cristal residents and national guard components working Gen. Mam M. G.A. Comk er, Marine Cors U.s Atlant; Ad. motivated the citizen-soldiers to put forth together as well as Army support. EveryGen. William M. Keys, commander, Marine Corps Forces Atlantic; Adm. an extra effort to finish the project, said one came together to share their tools and Henry H. Mauz Jr., commander-in-chief U.S. Atlantic fleet; and Lt. Gen. Capt. Richard Yanez, Arizona Air Nationexpertise to make it all happen." James L. Jamerson, commander U.S. Southern Air Force. Single soldiers' program takes on barracks issues FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Better Opporthrough self-help and expanded self-help programs. microwave and stereo and will be located so as to divide tunities for Single Soldiers is a program for soldiers by These two programs are available through the Directhe room to provide privacy. The new rooms will also soldiers to improve the quality of life and give recreationtorate of Engineering and Housing and are designed to have new furniture, carpeting and ceiling fans, he said. al activities for the single soldier. use soldiers and available supplies to repair and upgrade "The basic philosophy is -this is your home," Through the monthly meetings, unit representatives existing facilities, Holzworth said. Holzworth said. bring soldier concerns to the attention of the appropriate "The bottom line is, even though we can't get the big Holzworth asked unit commanders if achieving and staff in attendance, said Sgt. Patricia Lammie, 69th Signal bucks, there are things we can do," he said. maintaining excellent living conditions for their single solCompany representative. Even though money isn't available for new construcdiers was a part of their vision for their commands. If not, During the last meeting, Col. Donald Holzworth, the tion, money has been made available for a barracks rehe challenged each of them to put that in their vision. U.S. Army South Deputy Chief of Staff -Engineers, exnewal program, Holzworth said. "One of my missions is the care of soldiers and famiplained the barracks revitalization plan and what USAR"We have just been awarded a $7.2 million contract lies," said Maj. Gen. G.A. Crocker, USARSO commandSO is doing to improve the single soldiers' living condifor a barracks renewal project," he said. "We are going to ing general who was also at the February meeting. tons. do the Fort Kobbe barracks as those (soldiers) are the ones "Are we going to build new barracks? No. Are we go"We have a thing called the barracks revitalization prowho will be staying here until 1999." ing to forget about it and say, well, we're going to be out gram and what that's designed to do is put resources into Holzworth went on to explain that the plan includes of here? No. We are going to do something in between the areas where you live," he said. basic repairs to 12 barracks over the next two years. A that seems to make sense. That's the policy." "General Thomas Sullivan, Chief of Staffofthe Army, new plan has also been developed to change three-man Though barracks conditions is a top subject at most has recognized that it is critical to the readiness of the rooms into two-man rooms, he said. BOSS meetings, other subjects are addressed, Laminie Army to take care of both our families and the single solThree model rooms will be constructed first so soldiers said. At the March meeting, Staff Judge Advocate and Indier," Holzworth said. "Some may think we have neglectcan make assessments of the improvements before the fispector General representatives were in attendance. ed single soldiers in the past few years. We are rectifying nal plan is implemented, Holzworth said. BOSS meeting are held 2 p.m. the first Thursday of that." The new rooms will increase the square footage availeach month at Valent Recreation Center, Fort Clayton. Because of Congress not approving spending for new able to each soldier from 90 to 120 square feet and will Soldiers who want to find an answer or find out more construction overseas, it is necessary to stretch the revitalinclude built-in closets with sliding, sCeCurable doors. about the program can attend the meetings, see their unit ization dollars that are provided, he said. This can be done These closets will be big enough to hold a refrigerator, representatives or call Anne Kelly at 287-6500. Student programs strss no-drug, no-alcohol activities by Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski is growing. USARSO Public Affairs Office While the two groups are separate programs, their em"The target of the group to make the ---phasis is very much the same -to participate in nonpopulation aware of the drinking and BALBOA HIGH SCHOOL -Students from Balboa alcohol and non-drug related activities and to encourage High School are leading for themselves, and teaching othother students to do so also. ers that they don't have to do drugs or drink to have fun. Paul Edwards, 16, a PRIDE member, said he feels it's drugs and alcohol was a big issue. For a The students are not a specially selected group, but important to be part of the programs and help others. long time it wasn't Cool to say you didn't normal high school students interested in everyday living. "All my friends know where I stand. I don't drink or drink. The effort is growing." These students are all members of either Parents, Redo drugs. And a lot of my friends don't incorporate drinksources and Drug Education, known as PRIDE, or Stuing and smoking around me," Edwards said. dents Against Drug Drivers. "I feel that I can influence them through positive peer Joan Othon PRIDE is a drug-prevention program for high school pressure." Students Against Drunk Drivers coordinator students that encourages them to reach out to friends, Renee Stewart, 17, a SADD member echoes the imyounger students and the community with a drug-free portance of the programs. One of the highlights of the year's activities was the message, said Rita Sosa, PRIDE coordinator. "It's important that we make students aware of the attendance of 30 Balboa High School students to the "Joining PRIDE is a personal decision for the studangers of drinking and driving," she said. "And for 1994 PRIDE World Drug Conference held in Philadeldents," Sosa said. many of the students, their own experiences with friends phia in early March. "It's important that we start (discouraging drugs and or family draws them even closer to the program." The conference was a two-day event to educate stualcohol) young. It's very important for this type of posiAs part of the program, the groups meet once a week. dents and adults on drug and alcohol abuse. The weektive peer pressure." During their meeting, the students plan non-drug and alend offered the students a chance to participate in workJoan Othon, SADD coordinator, said SADD offers stucool related activities such as end-of-year parties, and shops, listen to people talk about their personal experidents the awareness ofthe dangerous ofdrinking and drivtrips. ence with drug and alcohol, and learn how present their ing, the opportunity for non-alcohol related activities and They also plan activities they'll be participating in to message to other students. to spread the message against drinking and driving. spread their message, such as their involvement in the The trip was sponsored by the Alcohol and Drug "The target of the group to make the population aware Drug Abuse Resistance Education, which was held at the Abuse Prevention and Control Program. of the drinking and driving problem," she said. "During local Department of Defense elementary schools, and by "Some of the workshops were really good," said my generation, drugs and alcohol was a big issue. For a setting up a booth at the Directorate of Community AcPRIDE member Alex Sosa. "I learned a lot from the long time it wasn't cool to say you didn't drink. The effort tivities Health Fair. speakers."

PAGE 3

___ ______ _~#J~atue______Tropic Times A Feature April 8, 1994 .3 U.S. Navy photos by Petty Officer 2nd Class Ralph Radford Petty Officer 2nd Class Al Ondreka (left) Ensign Ruddy Garmendez (center) and Reserve Lt. Charles L. Schott cruise through the waterways near Rodman. Commn' Ashore To woory world trovolrs Port Sorvicos opons doors by Diane Gonzalez had up to nine ships tied up at the sameUSNAVSTAPANCANAL PAO time. One of the longest vessels to vist was the USS Lontg Beach at 721 feet. AU.S. warship ts finishes a"We have the best deep water piers in three-month tour on the high seas South America," Dukes said. of the Pacific. The ship makes its But not all the work is done at the pier. way to the Panama Canal ready for a voyThe in-house workshops provide welding age to the Atlantic Ocean. The ship needs and electronics, and mechanical areas profuel and a place to dock before continuing vide the thrust of the crew's work. its transit through the canal. Working in an international atmosphere This is where Port Services at Rodman is the most interesting part of the job, said NS comes into the picture. Port Services Port Services crew member Petty Officer provides total support for U.S. and Allied 2nd Class Al Ondreka. ships and submarines, said Cmdr. "We are the fleet support for the crossLawrence P. Dukes, port operations offiroads of the world," Ondreka said. cer. Among the "interesting" things "We provide canal transit support," he Ondreka has experienced during his threesaid. "We also provide port facilities, iedeyear stay here was watching the Japanese phone services, shore power and fuel serTraining Fleet come into port, he said. vices for the ships and submarines." "They do the same job as we do," he Port Services maintains liaison and cosaid. "Watching them brought me closer ordinates operational matters with the to other allied navies." U.S. Southern Command, Air Force Another sight was seeing a decommisSouthemn Air Division and the Panama Casioned U.S. ship come into port as a new nal Commission, as well as incoming Greek warship, he said. ships. The work is tiresome at times, but it has The Port Services crew is also kept its pluses, Ondreka said busy with other tasks, that includes the "We get a ship in here about every two maintenance of its own small boat fleet, weeks," he said. "It's a good place to leamn The fleet includes five Boston Whalers, the job. I enjoy working with the guys. one MK-6, and a Captain's Gig. These Recently, Port Services finished helpsmall craft are used for support exercises ing the sailing ship Gloria get underway. Seaman Elizabeth Render paints the Captain's Gig. with the Seals team and the Seabees. The Gloria is a training ship from Cartagena, crews also take visitors to Gatun Lake on Colombia. During that vessel's stay many sight-seeing tours, of the sailors exchanged ball caps with the Home for Port Services consists of Rodman crew. It's that part of the intermathree large piers and several workshops. tional flavor that makes Ondreka's work The piers are 700-feet long and have enjoyable, he said.

PAGE 4

STropic Times # Mitary News m'April 8, 1994 /uug 4y Secretary Perry: Actions in Korea meant to avoid war WASHINGTON (Air Force News Service) Defense Secretary William Perry said "It's cont -ceivable" U.S. pressure on North Korea to stop its nuclear program might provoke the North Koreans "into unleashing a war," but he said it is a risk worth taking. Peny told NBC's "Meet the Press" program the risk of provoking war is less dangerous now than later, when the north may have many nuclear bombs if it does not dismantle its nuclear weapons program. "We do not want and will not provoke a war over this or any other issue in Korea," Perry said. "But we will take very firm stands and very strong actions. It is conceivable that those actions might provoke the North Koreans into unleashing a war and that is a risk that we are taking." Using unusually strong language, Perry said the North Koreans "are lying when they say they are not developing a nuclear program' and in fact, they may have one, possibly two bombs at this The North Koreans "are embarked on a program of development which could get them a dozen or more bombs a year," Perry said. "That's what we're trying to stop right now," he added. Perry said the risk of applying pressure to North Korea will only become more dangerous if the efAP LaserPhoo fort is delayed months or years. He also waned that the administration was concerned the North KoreU.S. Army Reservists check out a helicopter at the Armed Forces Reserve Center in Los Angeles. ans could send its nuclear bombs to the Mideast California is scheduled to lose 2,828 Reservists in fiscal year 1994. "where they are now selling their missiles." "This is a matter of very, very great concern to us," he told reporters. Reserves to cut 55,1O 0 The Defense Secretary cautioned that, "We are not on the brink of war. This is not an imminent crisis. I don't believe a war is going to result from troo s u n sca yea But, he added, "We must be very clear about .r how we are standing firm on this so there is no isWASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces Information two nearly simultaneous major regional contingencies. understanding on their part and so "there's no posService) -Secretary of Defense William Perry has an"We're doing this through the application of'compenactions, military actions, like they did in the first nounced the reserve components will cut thousands of bilsating leverage,' which uses the reserve components to Korean War because they underestimated our inlets and inactivate hundreds of units during fiscal 1994. control peacetime costs and to reduce the nsks associated Kentihus." Defense reserve affairs officials said these actions are with smaller active forces," Perry explained. tensions. in line with post-Cold War plans to reduce and reshape "The fiscal 1994 reductions set the stage for our fiveUnited States, South Korea the reserve forces. year plan to reduce and reshape reserve forces to meet The reserve drawdown will eliminate 55,100 Army, end strength levels established through the Bottom-up postpone exercise decision Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force slots. The officials Review," he added. "Additional reductions are expected WASHINGTON (Air Force News Service) emphasize many personnel cuts will come through attrito be announced each year until the full plan is achieved, Saturday's edition of the Los Angeles Tiies reports tion, retirements and fewer accessions. no unit-specific final decisions have been reached beyond that the United States and South Korea have agreed States shouldering the brunt of unit inactivations will those announced as part of this package." to postpone any decision on reviving theirjoint milbe California, Illinois, New York, Pennsylvania, MassaPerry emphasized individual military services identiitary exercises to give North Korea time to respond chusetts, Ohio, Indiana and Minnesota. Under the fiscal fled specific units for inactivation. He said the following to a new United Nations Security Council state1994 plan, New York will lose 5,217 billets; Pennsylvakey areas will be emphasized as DoD continues to manment urging it to allow full inspection of its nuclear nia, 4,254; Illinois, 3,179; Massachusetts, 3,017; Califorage the restructuring and drawdown: plants. nia, 2,828; Ohio, 2,684; Indiana, 2,389; and Minnesota, *Enhanced force readiness: The increased reliance the The postponement was announced in a news 2 199. South Carolina, Arkansas, Kansas and Rhode IsBottom-up Review placed on the reserve components reconference by Han Sung Joo, South Korea's forland face the least impact, each losing 40 slots or fewer. quires focus on improving the readiness of remaining reeign minister, following meetings with Defense Officials noted these figures are not the same number serve forces. Secretary William J. Perry and other top U.S. poliof personnel who will be affected. Reserve component *Domestic responsibilities: The ability to respond cy-makers. U.S. officials later confirmed the postpersonnel will have a chance to join another unit within a when needed to domestic emergencies is an important eli ponement. reasonable distance of where they live. Because it's hard ement of national security. The states have the primary The action is largely symbolic, since the annual to say how many individuals will accept transfers, the responsibility to respond to domestic emergencies. AcI exercises are not considered essential to allied milnumber who will be involuntarily separated is difficult to cordingly, the drawdown has been implemented in a way itary operations. But strategists hope the delay will determine, officials said. to minimize the impact on the states' ability to respond to give North Korea, which has made the exercises a Although Reserve components face additional cuts in these needs. visible bargaining chip in the dispute, a face-savthe future, they'll not be reduced at the rate of active duty *Protect people: The transition benefits authorized by ing way to comply. forces, officials said. Reserve components will be sized Congress will be used to reduce the impact on guardsmen and shaped to ensure success of the DoD strategy to win and reservists leaving the force during the drawdown. DoD reminds voters not to forget state elections WASHINGTON, D.C. (American just as much impact on the military as the easy task, she said. Because they don't see tion channel. They established the Voting Forces Information Service) -With the national elections," said Phyllis Taylor, the day-to-day activities of their homeInformation Center, a toll-free telephone spotlight on the 1994 federal campaign, program director. towns, voters must research the issues conservice at the Pentagon providing election many Defense Department voters often Taylor gives an example that occurred ceming candidates. information and assistance to service forget local elections that may affect their in Nevada last year. Unit voting assistance officers can ofmembers and DoD employees. Originally, families now and themselves later. "The military absentee vote not only fer some help, but Taylor said, they're not the service provided congressional and guThese elections include campaigns for determined who won that election, but responsible for keeping up on, candidates bernatorial candidates a channel to leave mayors, state senators and assemblymen, which party controlled the Senate," she and issues. recorded messages on election issues. parish superintendents, county sheriffs, said. "The absentee ballots are making a "Their responsibility is getting voters Yet, Taylor said, it also allows servicejudges, coroners and clerks. Additional isdifference." registered and to tell individuals where to members access to each state's secretary sues may range from local beautification She said local officials make daily deget the information," she said. of state to get local election information. campaigns to multimillion-dollar highway cisions on education, local taxes and propVoters may write to state political parCallers may not get recorded information, construction. erty taxes. ties and contact the League of Women but Taylor said voters could leave their reWorkers in the Federal Voting Assis"Many military families own property Voters for information. Local newspapers quests with center personnel for forwardtance Program are not only emphasizing and intend to return to those locations often provide voters balanced coverage of ing to each state. the importance of the federal campaign. where they are now voting absentee," she candidates, and family members back Taylor said voters can get information They are also encouraging voters to play said. "Voting is the only process where home often give absentees an "inside" look they need any time, but it won't do much their parts in state, county, city and district they're able to voice themselves and have at how the election affects their home. good if the voter doesn't register and vote. campaigns. impact on their communities." In 1988, Federal Voting Assistance "The rules are different for each state, she "I think state and local elections have Voting on those local issues isn't an Program officials created a new informasaid.

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.I!LIII4IY ewsTropic Times Military News April 8, 1994 Perry: United States won Murderer apologizes WASHINGTON (Air Force News Service) -A U.S. Army sergatwho repeatedly stabbed his send more air power to Bosnia ita hove ad aoe tot dead man's head apologized to the WASHINGTON being terrorized by Serbs. victim's relatives Saturday. (Air Force News SerAppearing on NBC-TV's "Meet the Press," Perry was asked if Sgt. Stephen J. Schap, convicted vice) -The United the United States would be willing to stand by if Prijedor and of murder a day earlier, Saturday States will not send Gorazde fell to the Serbs. addressed a U.S. military court more air power into "We will not enter the war to stop that from happening," Perry whose jury then recommended that Bosnia despite new atsaid. he be sentenced to less than the tacks by Bosnian Appearing on the same program, Lt. Gen. Michael Rose, commandatory life in prison. A military Serbs on several Musmander of the U.N. forces in Bosnia, said sending in U.S. troops commander is to make the final delim strongholds, Dewould help speed the peace process. cision. fense Secretary Will"I mean, the arrival of any troops here will help that peace proChoking back tears, it was the iam Pery said Sunday. cess," he said. first time the 26-year-old Baltimore "We're not looking But Perry reiterated the U.S. position that it will not send in man spoke to the court that put him at extensions of the use ground troops until a peace accord is signed by all sides. on trial for killing Spc. Gregory of that air power today, "We are prepared to send a substantial number of troops to Glover with an Army survival knife but you could consustain a peace agreement once a peace agreement is reached, but at the Fulda army base Dec. 7. ceive of another situaPerry we're not prepared to send troops in the meantime," he said. "I'm sorry I'm the man respontion like Sarajevo arisOn another subject, Perry said he does not expect Russia to be sible," said Schap, who murdered ing where we might consider it," he said, referring to the bomballowed to place more troops on its northem and southern borders Glover after learning that he was ing of a Sarajevo market in February, which prompted NATO to keep an eye on the former republics. Fearing instability and having an affair with Schap's wife to threaten air strikes. turmoil there could spread, Russia would like the West to alter an and that she was pregnant with New attacks were reported Saturday on the Muslim enclave agreement setting troop levels, The New York Times reported. Glover's baby. of Gorazde, which has been under siege by Bosnian Serbs for "I do not expect a change in the treaty which limits the RusThe court in Hanau found Schap more than a year. In Prijedor, in northwestern Bosnia, the Red sians that way," Perry said. "I think this is going to be a big probguilty of premeditated murder, rulCross made plans to evacuate thousands of Muslims and Croats lem if they insist on it." ing against the defense attorney's D o Dtneu outburst of rage. DoD homosexual policy now in effect ere that mchay a ateh conviction carries an automatic life WASHINGTON, D.C. (American serve in the military subject only to his or want their individual rights respected, but sentence. Fivejurors, however, recForces Information Service) -After a deher willingness to abide by the military's they also know there is a code of conduct ommended a maximum sentence of lay, the Defense Department's new homostandards of conduct." to which everyone has to adhere. I think 30 years. A sixthjuror recommendsexual policy is now in effect. Dom said the policy supports unit cothis policy will go down well ifseen in that ed 20 years and the jury president Edwin Dom, assistant secretary of dehesion and readiness. "What we've said is, light." recommended life. Lt. Gen. Jerry fense for personnel and readiness, believes if you conduct yourself badly, you're out," The new policy was supposed to be efRutherford, commander of the Arit is a policy all service members can supDom said. "If you conduct yourself acfective in early February. Dorm said there my's V Corps, has 60 days to deport. At the base is the "don't ask, don't cording to our rules, we will respect your were many small details to work out. "We cide whether to exercise clemency. tell, don't pursue" policy proposed in Deprivacy and we expect you to respect the fashioned department policy, then the cember by former Secretary of Defense privacy of others. (military) services had to respond with polCommittee checks Les Aspin and endorsed by President Bill "This policy is the kind all military pericies of their own," Don said. Navy overbilling Clinton. sonnel can respect," he continued. "What "Whenever that process occurs there's "What we've tried to do is make it abit says is that we respect individual rights a possibility of miscommunication or of WASHINGTON (Air Force solutely clear that what concems us is a -including the right to privacy. But it some significant differences in interpretaNews Service) -A Congressional person's conduct," Dom said. "We want also says we have some standards we extion, and that's what we were trying to committee found April I that the every American to have an opportunity to pect you to live up to. Military personnel work out." makers of an unmanned reconnaissance aircraft billed the Navy $544 for a spark plug connector that sells Leave-sharin program, made rore flexible at a hardware store for about 5 10. Lh rThree Navy employees were WASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces Informations SerThe new rules make it easier to qualify as a leave recipient. Besubjected to an investigation when vice) -The Office of Personnel Management recently made the fore, program administrators had to consider the amount of adthey told their superiors about the leave-sharing program more flexible. The interim rules are efvanced leave an employee had available in addition to earned anspark plug, so the frustrated fective immediately. nual and sick leave. Now, only earned annual and sick leave will whistleblowers took the matter up Now, agencies have independent authority to set up both be considered. with the congressional committee. leave transfer programs and leave banks. Before, agencies had Finally, when employees deplete the leave donated to then, they Representative Norman Sisisky to ask OPM's permission to set up a leave bank program. can use any annual or sick leave they accrue while in a shared(D-Va.) who heads the House Also, agencies can now have both leave banks and leaveleave status. Armed Services investigations subtransfer programs, and eligible employees will be able to take "This program. creates a family-friendly workplace and gives committee, blamed overworked leave from both programs during the same medical emergency. agencies the flexibility they need to be responsive to their employand "sloppy" officials for failing to Through both programs, employees can now transfer leave to ees," said OPM Director Jim King, who announced the recent look into apparent gouging. employees in other agencies if they wish, as well. changes. World resort offers servicemembers new vacation spots WASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces Information Several other categories are eligible to use the centers, 1-800-367-6027; 1-808-949-4807 (fax). Service) -Servicemembers now have six inexpensive including some disabled veterans, former prisoners of war, Nightly room rates at the Hale Koa are based on rank places to spend a vacation following the recent opening of Medal of Honor recipients, unmarried former and survivand type of room -standard, superior, parkview, Shades of Green on Walt Disney World Resort. In most ing spouses of military personnel, NATO armed forces occanview or oceanfront. Rates for E-l to E-5 run from cases, patrons pay about half of what comparable local personnel assigned or attached to a U.S. military unit or $47 for a standard room to $82 for an oceanfront room. Ecommercial hotel resorts charge. installation, DoD civilian employees and physicians on6 through E-9, WOI to WO-3, 0-1 through 0-3 and widIn addition to the Shades of Green, the first arned forcder contract. Full-time Red Cross personnel supporting ows pay $60 to $98. es recreation center in the continental United States, there troops overseas are eligible on a space-available basis. Rates run from $75 to $114 for W04 and WO-5, 0are centers in Korea and Hawaii and three in Germany. Also, personnel providing logistical support to the Amer4s and above and foreign officers. Although the centers focus on providing inexpensive ican military can use the facilities. Telephone numbers for centers in Germany are: vacation spots for junior enlisted service members and For reservations at Shades of Green, write or call: Berchtesgaden: 0 11-49-8652-61057, fax 0 11-49their families, they're a bargain for everybody from priShades of Green on Walt Disney World Resort 8652-62768. vate to general, officials said. Nightly room rates are on a PO Box 22789 Chiemsee: 0 11-49-8051-803172, fax 0 11-49-8051 sliding scale based on rank. Lake Buena Vista, FL 32830 803158. First priority for reservations goes to active duty and 1-407-824-3665; 1-407-824-3600 (fax). Garmisch: 011-49-8821-750575, fax 011-49-8821retired military personnel, their dependents and immediThe rate for junior enlisted service members F-1 3942. ate family members. This category includes former serthrough E-5 is $49 per room per night. That's for up to Nightly rates range from $32 to $95. Apartments are vice members separated under special incentive programs two adults and three children with no added costs for cots available in Berchtesgaden for $85 to $125 per night. for two years after the date of their discharge. and cribs. The nightly rate for E-6s and E-7s, 0-Is and 0Room rates for F-I through F-5 are from $32 nightly at Reserve and National Guard personnel, including re2s and WO-1 is $73. Those in grades 0-3 through 0-5, Chiemsee and Garnisch. The top rate is S56 at Chicmsee tirees and those who retired without pay ("gray-area retirWO-2 to WO-5 and [-8 and E-9 pay S85: 0-6 and above and 553 in Garmisch. ees"), Land their families are eligible to use the facilities. pay $92. For the Dragon I ill in South Kprea, call 0il -822-790Cadets and midshipmen of the service academics, and For the center in I lawaii, w rite or call: 0016. Fax 011822-792-01116. Diraon Iill rates run active duty members and retirees of the National Oceanic 1ale Koa I Itel fno 538 to S78 per night, depending on the person's and Atmospheric Administration and the PuLiI ICalth 2055 Kalia Road rank. Kitchenette; vilth itcnowaves are avaliIhle ipon Service can also use the facilities. Honolulu., I 96815-1 99 request.

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6 Tropic Times ices April 8, 1994 _. V 0i e Parts isn't just parts for Nissan owner Dear Mayors' Corner: as well when this merchandise was I own a 1991 Nissan Sentra that needs Mayors Cor er shipped by the Air Mobility Command. parts that I am not able to get at our autoBecause of a military cut-back on motive parts store on Fort Clayton. They been a problem that the Army and Air better quality and more up-to-date styles is spending, our fashion clothing is now never carry enough parts in stock or the Force Exchange Service is working to corgreater because the exchange is the only shipped by ocean vessel which has innecessary parts to keep this particular rect. Since the installation of a computerstore we have on post. creased our lead time by at least six weeks. make of car running. based parts look-up to give information Low prices are important, but I would So our problem has not been a lack of In case of an unexpected break down, it about commonly requested and sold parts, rather pay more if I could get better qualistyles as much as it has been a lack of mertakes two weeks to get the parts. Owners the new system has been misused. ty, better and a more up-to-date selection. chandise all-together. of these cars, or any other car, shouldn't More training will be given to those usYou could move the shoe store to a smallDuring the interval we had to supplehave to deal with buying parts on the econing the system to ensure timely and neceser location, since having so few shoes in ment our fashion clothing by increasing omy or have to wait for ordered parts when sary basic stock orders are placed and such a big area is such an obvious waste of the amount of clothing bought through loan emergency happens in order to do propstocked. We regret this inconvenience and space, and open a clothing outlet that carcal vendors. "My Name is Panama' was er maintenance, sincerely hope that our improved ordering ries fashionable clothing for people cravone of the major contributors. Our fashion It is an injustice for everyone in this procedures will result in better stocks of ing clothing with style. clothing is now arriving almost daily so, community who owns a car. If the Auto commonly used parts and accessories. Soldiers Seeking Style hopefully, your concerns will be taken care Parts Store doesn't have the needed parts, of. they should help locate a possible source Dear Mayors' Corner: Dear Soldiers: Editor's note: This column allows with the parts. The store should ordermore I would like to know who selects the The Army and Air Force Exchange community members to submit questhan one of the needed parts to ensure they clothing that the Post Exchange sells? Service has experienced a major problem tions to the Mayoral Congress. Letters have them in stock instead of waiting for Why is it necessary for the exchange to this season on timely receipt of fashion should be mailed to: Mayors' Corner, supply and demand. carry "My Name is Panama" clothing clothing from our distribution center in Publicity Chairperson, APO AA 34004. Backyard Mechanic when it is sold in half the stores in PanaDallas. In the United States, spring and Anonymity will be granted upon rema? Exchanges in the United States alsummer merchandise starts arriving in quest. The Tropic Times reserves the Dear Backyard: ways carry a larger quantity of clothes and stores in December and January. Panama right to edit letters and responses for You are right. Our parts situation has much better styles. I feel that our need for used to get the initial shipments in January brevity, clarity and propriety. Officials catch local loan-shark using allotments Local loan-shark Two people took advantage of a third person by chargProvost Marshal's Corner ing $200 interest on a $300 loan. The loan was paid by allotment and, once paid off, the allotment was stopped. The third person's signature was then forged on a new allotment form to restart the allotment which credited the loan-sharks' account with an additional $1,100. The two were charged with forgery, larceny of private property and conspiracy. Forgery and loan-sharking are illegal. Anyone with information about loan-sharking, call the Provost Marshal's Office at 287-5252. Money order fraud A Fort Clayton soldier was apprehended for cashing seven worthless money orders totaling $1,000 at the Merchants National Bank. When the money orders were identified as counterfeit, the soldier said he had bought them from someone else, believing them to be real. Both people were charged with larceny of private property, conspiracy and counterfeit U.S. currency. Only buy money orders from a reputable establishment. Drunk and disorderly When military police answered a complaint of loud noises coming from a Fort Espinar quarters, the occupant became loud and aggressive toward them and used profanity. The occupant was charged with drunk and disorderly conduct. Before drinking alcohol, know the limit. Don't allow a few drinks to jeopardize a career. Rainy season again Now that rainy season is beginning, the MPs remind everyone to use caution when travelling. Heavy rains can cause flooding and hazardous driving conditions. Stranded motorists often times become victims of crime in these flooded areas. Panama Jack anonymous hotline Pacific Always remain alert and keep windows up and doors Anyone with information about drug smuggling Morgan Avenue -one larceny ofunsecured private proplocked. If approaching a flooded area, take a different should call the Panama Jack anonymous hotline at 285erty route and don't give a thief the opportunity to strike. Mon4185. Fort Kobbe -one larceny of secured private property itor the Southern Command Network for updated traffic The following crimes occurred in on and off post housOff post and Atlantic reports and see the command grid map. ing areas March 25-31. None reported This authorized unofficial command information pubChief.Senior Master Sgt. Steve Taylor Journalists. Sgt. Eric S. Hortin lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Editor.Staff Sgt. Richard Puckett Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Sports Editor.Sgt. Lori Davis Spc. Alexander C. White Information Program of the Department of Defense, unStaff Editors.Sgt. E.J. Hersom 24th Wing Public Affairs Office.284-5459 der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S. Spc. John Hall, Public Affairs Officer.Capt. Warren L. Sypher Southern Command. Rosemary Chong Public Affairs Superintendent Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the Maureen Sampson Master Sgt. Dale Mitcham official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Student Intern.Juan Carlos Palacio Journalists.Staff Sgt. Rian Clawson Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. Southern Command Public Affairs Office.282-4278 Sgt. James A. Rush The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Command Information Officer.Patrick Milton U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 Telephone 285-6612. U.S. Anny South Public Affairs Office.287-3007 Public Affairs Officer.Diane Gonzalez Commander in Chief.Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey Public Affairs Officer.Maj. Melanie Reeder Photographers Director, Public Affairs. .Col. James L. Fetig Command Information Officer.Beth Taylor Petty Officer 2nd Class Roberto R. Taylor Editor. .Staff Sgt. Jane Usero Petty Officer 2nd Class Delano J. Mays U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic. .289-4312 NCOIC .Sgt. Richard Emert Tropic Times

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April 8,1994 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 11 Kicking' up dirt Department of Defense photo by Sgt. Lori Davis U.S. Army Garrison's Scott Carr smacks a hit in the March 31 tie-breaker game with 142nd Medical Detachment. USAG won the game 7-5, and took first place in the white league of Army unit level softball. The 56th Signal Company and Company A, 154th Signal Battalion also battled for first place in the Red League during their Tuesday night game. See Page 13. Maor League baseball Bowler scores 300 players visit Panama COROZAL (Tropic Times) -Six former Major League baseball players will visit military bases here as part ofthe "MCI Ambassadors of Baseball" tour. Ron LeFlore, Paul Blair, Tug McGraw, Manny Sanguillen, John Steams and Jimmy Wynn will visit the Pacific and Atlantic communities through Sunday, signby Sgt. Lori Davis "Once the ball leaves your hand you know (it will be ing autographs and playing celebrity softball games. by S o is a strike)," he said. Federal endorsement of sponsor not intended. Tropic Times Sp__s EditorJ"It's hard to get a perfect game in Panama or anySchedule of events: ALBROOKAFS-Thereare fewthings inlifethatare where overseas," he said. "Back in the states there are Today perfect, but Patrick Beckford was just that March 29 more lanes to practice at, and better bowlers to compete Noon-1:30 p.m.Fort Davis Post Exchange (autograph when he bowled his first sanctioned 300 game in the with." session) Albrook men's Wednesday night league. Itwas back inthe United Statesthat Beckford achieved 3 p.m. Fort Espinar Youth Center (photo and autoBeckford bowled his first 300 in 1988 in a nonhis other big bowling accomplishment. graph session) sanctioned tournament, and followed that with a 299 the "I was in the Air Force Worldwide Bowling Touma4:30 p.m. Fort Davis softball field (softball game) following week, but he said this perfect game was like ment in Las Vegas in 1987," he said. "I finished seventh Saturday doing it for the first time all over again. overall and my team finished in second place out of 93 11 a.m.1:30 p.m. Corozal post exchange (autograph He said he had been bowling very well in recent teams." session) weeks and felt this 300 game coming. To earn the seventh-place spot, Beckford competed 3 p.m. Fort Clayton Youth Center (photo and auto"You get that feeling when you bowl close several against more than 500 other bowlers, he said. graph session) times. The week before I bowled 279, just one strike Beckford went to the tournament in Las Vegas only 4:30 p.m. Mother's Field, Fort Clayton (softball game) away," he said. three years after starting his bowling career. Becoming Sunday Aftercoming so close, Beckford said he had a feeling a bowler had a lot to do with fate, he said. Noon-3 p.m. Howard Sports and Fitness Center about this game. "Ten years ago I didn't even know what a bowling (autograph session) "Afterthe firstsix frames people start to root for you. alley looked like," he said. "I started bowling then 4-5:30 p.m. Weekly Field, Howard AFB (softball In the 10th frame all the bowlers stop and watch you," he because I was stationed at Minot Air Force Base in North game) said. Dakota." "You get to the 10th frame and your legs start to feel The harsh northern weather kept Beckford from A merican Society golf weak. You don't feel it in your upper body, your lower playing his favorite sport, soccer. The wind and snow A body is where you feel it," he said. drove him indoors to the social spot on base, he said. "I was just hoping this was going to be it. I came so "It was really cold there and there was nothing else to Saturday close so many times," Beckford said. do,' Beckford said. "I was hanging out at the bowling COROZAL (Tropic Times) -The American Society "Youhave tohitthe ballin the pockettogetthestrike. alley and started to bowl." of Panama will hold it's third annual scholarship fund You concentrate on that pocket." From bowling to pass the time on cold winter days to golf tournament 7:30 a.m. Saturday at the Fort Amador "You have to know how the lanes react. The Albrook worldwide tournaments and perfect games, the next step Golf Course. lanes are oily up front and dry in the back. This gives you for Beckford is a sanctioned 800 series. His perfect game There is a $36 entry fee. Entry forms are available at a strong finish. You want the ball to glide and snap at the was part of a 758 series, so he is close to his newest the Fort Amador, Horoko, Panama and Brazo GolfClubs. dry point so it will pick up speed and be forced into the challenge. pocket,' he explained. "I know I can do it," he said. Volleyball Page 12 Softball Page 13 and more Page 15 Women's over-30 volleyball at Army white league and red league *SCN AM radio sports Reeder Physical Fitness Center battles for first place going into the *Memorial Day hoops starts the 1994 season. U.S. Army South Tournament. *Short distance running events

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12 Tropic Times April 8, 1994 or s Olympic bobsledding Navy SEAL races for Samoa worked with Team by Sgt. 1st Class Steve Barrett USA, butne eaAmerican Forces Information Service USA, but never formal -----ly competed. Under InWASHINGTON -For the first time in history, Ameriternational Olympic can Samoa competed in the Olympic Winter Games. The Committeerules, teams three-man contingent representing the U.S. territory proudly from U.S. territorial marched into the ski jumping-venue in Lillehammer, Norpossessions may recruit way, site of the opening ceremonies. athletes from the UnitCarrying the territory's flag was a U.S. Navy SEAL, edStates,providedthey who found the thrill of the ceremonies just as fulfilling as haven't competed with his runs down the Olympic bobsled course. a U.S. team for two "It's a feeling youjust can't describe," said Senior Chief years. Kiltz met that rePetty Officer Faauuga Tia Muagututia, a 19-year Navy quirement. veteran who piloted the team's two-man bobsled. Eleven months after "It felt great because there's so much pride in carrying the Albertville games, your nation's flag in a ceremony like that. To sit and put Muagututia and Kiltz those feelings into words -it can't be done." raced together at Lake Bobsled? American Samoa? Why is a tropical island Placid, N.Y., site ofthe country competing in bobsled at the Winter Games? And 1932 and 1980 Winter how did a SEAL, the Navy counterpart to Army and Air Olympics. Once they Force special operations forces, end up in such a wintry met their North Amerimix? can race requirements, The story spurs images of 1988, when Jamaica entered they traveledto Europe. twoand four-man bobsled teams at the XV Olympic Over the next 5/ Winter Games in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Its participaweeks,the Samoanbobtion received great publicity and criticism as a gimmick. sled team competed in Muagututia, 35, said the venture had its beginnings back World Cup events. in 1991 when he heard from longtime friend Frank "We knew we needManumaleuga, a former linebacker with the Kansas City ed to start collecting Chiefs. ManumalCuga, now a member of the American points if we wanted to Samoan Olympic Committee, told Muagututia that statego to Lillehammer," side investors were interested in sponsoring a bobsled team said Muagututia. "That at the 1992 Winter Games in Albertville, France. meant going to Austria, "Initially, the investors went to Guam,"said Muagututia, Switzerland and wherassigned to the Navy SEAL Delivery Vehicle Team I at ever the events were so Naval Air Station Coronado, Calif. we could qualify." "The people in Guam said they weren't interested but Muagututia started referred them to our committee." leading some tricks to When he got the initial call, competing was not a reality. improve his time and The last-minute request didn't give the Navy noncommismake his sled more sioned officer enough time to plan, train and still complete competitive in Europe. his mission. So, he had to decline the offer. "Coaches from othHowever, the American Samoan Olympic Committee er teams would come found they could not compete in Albertville anyway. up, give us encourageBobsled teams must enter and score points in a series of ment and pass on some races governed by the Federation oflnternational Bobsleigh advice," Muagututia and Tobaggan. Teams must score 20 points to qualify for said. "Manyteamswere Olympic bobsledding. Furthennore, teams must compete glad to see us make the and tally points in World Cup competition on two separate effort to compete interAFIS photo by Ken Hackman continents. nationally and by helpNavy Senior Chief Petty Officer Faauuga Tia Muagututia, assigned to the Navy With Albertville out, the Samoans started plans for ing us, they help imSEAL Delivery Vehicle Team 1 at Naval Air Station Coronado, Calif., drove Lillehammer. Muagututia was in those plans. Now able to prove the competition." American Samoa's two-man bobsled at the XVII Olympic Winter Games in schedule his training time around duty, he got permission By the timethey finLillehammer, Norway. from his commander to train and compete for American ished the 1993 season, Samoa over the next two years. He went to Calgary and the American Samoan team earned 43 federationpoints,23 the XVIII Olympic Winter Games in Nagano, Japan. completed a mandatory driving course, qualifying him to more than needed to qualify them for Lillehammer. HowBy then, he hopes there is an extra stripe on his uniform, pilot sleds in competition. ever, they could not challenge the Europeans, who again retirement in his future and more bobsled races under his But tocompete, Muagututiahadto findabrakeman. The dominated both twoand four-man Olympic events. belt. spot required a person with strength and speed to push the The American Samoan sled finished 38th in a 43-team "We started something that the people in Samoa are sled, plus work with the driver in forming a cohesive team field, but Tia left the competition encouraged by fellow proud of," said Muagututia. while navigating the course. bobsledders. "Many people didn't even know we were competing While eating his driving credentials in Calgary, "Our team got a lot of encouragement from the Swiss until they saw our sled race, but it brought much pride and Muagututia found another Samoan as a brakeman. and Germans to keep going with our program," he said. celebration out. Now we have to continue, and the more "The problem was he was too big and slow for compet"They want competition, and they want to see the little people (competing), the better." itive bobsledding," Muagututia said. "We talked about it countries like us, Jamaica and Puerto Rico succeed." He also plans a return to Olympic competition in and decided it would be better if I found another brakeIt won't be the last time American Samoa competes in Nagano, driving both twoand four-man sleds. man." the Winter Games. Muagututia said the sponsorship re"If they beat me out, fine," Muagututia said. "But He found one in Brad Kiltz of Indianapolis. Kiltz had mains to finance both twoand four-man bobsled teams at they're going to have to beat me. I want to go back." StandingS Army unit level softball DENTAC 5 16 12.5 59th Eng. 6 14 12.5 Co. A, 5-87th 4 8 7 Red League HHC, USAG/1G 4 18 14 HHC, 193rd 6 14 12.5 3-7th SF 4 8 7 56th Sig. 19 5 -White League DCSRM 6 15 13 408th MI 4 8 7 Co. A, 154th 17 6 1.5 HIHC, USAG 20 3 -Co. A, 193rd Spt. 2 17 16 Air Force Softball Standings Co. E, 1-228th 17 6 1.5 142nd MED 19 4 1 Green League Post Season Tournament HHC, LEA 16 6 2 Co. C,I-508th 15 6 4 JOTB 11 1 -24th SP#1 2 0 534th MP 15 8 3.5 310th MI 14 6 4.5 747th MI 11 1 -536th Eng. 2 0 MEDDAC 13 10 5.5 Co. B, 1-508th 10 6 6.5 NSGA 10 2 1 24th Med. I I HIHD, 56th 9 13 9 Co .B, 193rd Spt. 11 8 7 TRICO 9 3 2 24th Sup. I I 3rd SOSC 8 13 9.5 565th Ord. 12 9 7 HHC, 5-87th 8 4 3 24th SPA2 1 2 92nd PSC 7 13 10 HHD,470th 10 8 7.5 PCC 8 5 3.5 24th MSSQ 1 2 Co. F, 154th 6 13 10.5 SOUTHCOM 10 9 8 549th MP 7 5 4 617th ALS 0 2 HHC, 128th 6 15 11.5 41st ASG 7 13 11.5 Navy Gold 6 6 5 24th OSS/AIS 0 2

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P# S__Tropic Times S orts Apri8, 1994X. Signal slugfest 56th upsets Co. A, 154th, 21 20 by Sgt. Lori Davis Tropic Times Sports Editor FORT CLAYTON -Things looked grim for 56th Signal Battalion in the opening inning of its tiebreaker game for first place in the Army unit level red league when Company A, 154th Signal Battalion nailed hit after hit, chalking up nine runs. The 154th seemed unstoppable, butthe56th stopped them andturned the game around, winning 21-20 after trailing 15-5 in the third inning. The 154th came into the game like a powerhouse, batting through its lineup in the first inning. Six batters got on board and two scored before Tony McCubbins. caught a fly to right field to make the first out of the game. The ninth run was batted in by Samuel Tatum before ending the 154th hitting streak. The 134th took the fieldwith the 9-0 lead and a lot ofconfidence, bul 56th managed to shake them witlsome strong offense of its own. DepaIment of Defense photo by St. Lor Davs ScottDindingercametotheplate The 154th Signal Battalion's Jay Rourk beats the throw to the 56th Signal Battalion's Paul Riccitelli at the plate as umpire Karen with two men on and hit what was Powell watches the play. to be the first ofmany home runs on the night. A rejuvenated 56th team second and third innings. The 56th came back in the fifth with four Mixon and Jay Rourk, once again forcing started its comeback. The 154th stretched its lead in the third inning. more runs, one offanother Dindingerhome 56th to come from behind. The 56th scored twice more to David Williams, Gary Mixon and Walters were run. 154th's only score of the inning was Dindinger came tothe plate witha20-20 end the first inning down by 9-5, batted in, boosting their team's lead to 15-5. off another Walter's home run. tie with a runner in scoring position and hit but 154th stretched its lead to 12-5 The fourth inning marked the turning point for Presley and Mike Parrish caught two the winning run off an error at first base. off home runs by Stencil Walters both teams. The 154th's Tatum drove Jessie Husliners and Reginald Pride made the play at "They're a good team but the pressure and Carlos Rentas and a Tony band in with a triple to right field, but 56th defense first to hold 154th scoreless in the sixth, got to them and their hitters stopped hitCassort RBI triple in the second shut the 154th down, catching the next two fly balls The 56th scored five runs off six hits in ting," said 56th coach Dan Swistak. inning. to retire the inning at 16-8. the sixth inning to tie 154th 17-17. "We had a 15-5 lead, but they started The 56th seemed to lose steam. The 56th took the plate and started its way back The 154th got back in front in the sevgetting hits. Base hits beat home runs belt went three-up, three-down in the with three runs in the fourth. enth with three runs scored by Williams, cause they move players," Husband said. USAG beats out 142nd Med., 7-5 by Sgt. Lori Davis slam, pulling 142nd within one run of Tropic Times Sports Editor ge runs in USAG chalked up two orernsi FORT CLAYTON -The competithe sixth inning off an Effrain Ramos tion was white hot in the tie-breaking triplethatdroveinCampbellandBonilla. game for first place in the white league. The 142nd answered back in the hotU.S. Army Garrison took on the 142nd tom of the sixth with one more run, but Medical Battalion for the top spot going USAG shut it down with three back-tointo this weekend's U.S. Army South back infield snags. softball tournament. Tallon put up a valiant defensive fight The 142nd gave USAG a run for its in the top of the seventh. The 142nd money, but USAG walked away the short-stop caught a fly ball and worked number one team in the league with a 7with second baseman Benson to make 5 victory. the last two outs. USAG jumped to a 2-0 lead in the ThegameendedwithaUSAG defenfirst inning with a string of hits by Scott sive play. Bolander nailed a shot into Carr, David Crichton, T.C. Campbell center, but Bonilla made the catch and and Jorge Bonilla. A couple of snags in secured first place for USAG. the outfield and plays at first base kept "This was a tough game," said Scott 142nd scoreless the first two innings. Carr, USAG coach and short stop. "This After a scoreless second inning is the third time we've played them, and USAG started back at the top of its every time it's gone down to the last batting order and scored again with the batter." Carr, Crichton and Campbell lineup, The 142nd coach and right center 4 ~ adding three more runs to their lead. fielder Upson said the game was an Bonilla caught 142nd's Nick unusual one for his team. Whittington's hit to center and Bemard "We're not a power hitting team, Grimsley threw back-to-backstrike outs we're a base hitting team. The home run to close the third. was uncharacteristic for us," he said. Following four frustrating innings On the defensive side, Upson said his and a five-run deficit, the 142nd offense team made key errors. came into the fifth like a new team. "You have to have good defense to Edmund Tallon, Kevin Upson and win these games" he said. We came Department of Defense photo by Sgt. Lo Davis Eric Benson got on board with a series of back to 5-4, but they had good defense in Edmund Tallon and third baseman Effrain Ramos watch a hit to the outfield. hits and Nick Whitington hit a grand the last two innings."

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14 Tropic Times __April 8, 1994 Sp r s Soccer, volleyball Coaches hold tryouts for new talent and count on returning stars this season by Sgt. Lori Davis Magda Tavarez, a talented young setter, moved. Tropic Times Sports Editor Pacific volleyball coaches are on the lookout for strong players to fill their vacancies and help them BALBOA -Just like athletes trying to make it in challenge the Cristobal Tigers. They are the team to the pros, student athletes in Department of Defense beat, Bales said. Dependents Schools here went into the draft for the Both the Cristobal Tigers boys and girls volleyupcoming sports season. ball teams went undefeated in regular season play Hopeful athletes tried out for boys and girls last year. The boys took the top spot in the post volleyball and boys soccer last week. season tournament while the girls were upset by the During the Monday to Wednesday try-outscoachfirst place Balboa Bulldogs and the second place es from Balboa High School, Curundu Junior.High PCC Green Devils, Rankin said. School and the Panama Canal College watched the With few changes to either roster, the Cristobal fresh crop of athletes show their stuff. Tigers are looking forward to another strong year. Although there are only three schools involved in All-Isthmus players Kent Grubbs, Ricky Alvarez sports competition on the Pacific side of the isthmus and Jon Lu are back to lead the boys team this season, there are four teams. Students here go through the said Troy Oliver, Cristobal Tigers boys volleyball draft process for the Balboa Bulldogs, Balboa Red coach. Machine, Curundu Cougars, and the PCC Green Honorine Millar, a strong hitter and team memDevils. ber for three years, is back to power the girls team, The Cristobal High School Tigers' tryouts are for Rankin said. Cristobal students and previous students who now Millar has been with her team longer than some attend PCC but still live on the Atlantic side, said older players have been with their soccer teams. In Gayle Rankin, Cristobal Tigers girl's volleyball only their second year operating under the draft coach. process, soccerplayers and coaches have adjusted to "In the Pacific draft, the team that finished last the their roster changes. year before picks first. All the coaches evaluate "Last year everyone was thrown intothepot. You (prospective players) for three days and have a draft may have had a player on your team for years but he meeting at the end," said Fred Bales, Curundu Couwas not picked up for your team," said Rick gars girls volleyball coach. Dahlstromn, PCC Green Devils boys soccer coach. Everyone trying out for a sport is drafted by one The draft works well, he said. Last year the teams ofthe teams and then tries to make that team, he said. were closely matched and there were many good Players drafted in previous seasons stay with their games. team throughout theiracademic career in Panama, he The draft was good for his team, Dahlstrom said. said. "Last year we were very young and we played Unfortunately some players are no longer with very well and finished second," he said. This year their teams. Permanent change ofstation moves and most everybody is returning and I expect a good graduations cause many changes to the roster. season. The Curundu Cougars have lost two key players The boys and girls volleyball regular season from theirgirls team, Bales said. Gladys Hattabaugh, begins in two weeks and boys soccer starts in three last seasons team captain, graduated from PCC and weeks. Department of Defense phots by Sgt Lorn Davis Tony Cooksey, forward for the Curundu Cougars, uses his Henry Davis, Balboa Red Machine goalie, stops a shot. head during soccer practice. Players named to Panama Armed Forces Running Association All-Isthmian team Group promotes running in Panama COROZAL (Tropic Times) -After regularseasoncompetition the following by Staff Sgt. Jane Usero "The championship is open to both must run in at least one per month to keep students were named to the 1993-94 All. USARSO Public Affairs Office Americans and Panamanians and each runtheir points competitive." Isthmian Girls Tennis Team: --ner eams points for the various races they For people who run in more than one Alexis Vidaurri, Balboa Bulldogs FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -run in," Jones said. race each month, the highest score for Balboa High School The Panama Armed Forces Running AssoThe point system is designed so runners that month is added to their total points, Nicole Nassirr, Curundu Cougars, ciation offers runners the opportunity to are on equal footing, he said. The system Jones said. B iolbaHi S C Cou participate in a year-long running champicalculates various statistics such as age, "The more races the runner particiBalboa High School R onship and helps organizations conduct time and average standings. pates in, the better chance there is for a Lisa Rojas, Balboa Red Machine, running events, officials said. With this system, even though you may higher score," he said. Anyse Matheny, Panama Canal Col"The goal ofthe association is toencourcross the finish line first, someone else may As of March, the high total points for lege Green Devils, Balboa High School age running in Panama," said Allen Jones, earn higher total points for the run because the championship is held by Panamanian AbHiglsy, Balboa Hh Mchol association president. of the other factors, Jones said. Gil Balbuena with Ricardo Roman ofthe Abby Higley, Balboa Red Machine, The association runs the year-long Pan"The runners have about 50 sanctioned Air Force only three points behind. Bboa High School Frifrainaotcodntn Dayr Chinasing, Cristobal Tigers ama Armed Forces Running Championruns they can choose from throughout the For information about coordinating a D rC anCristobal Tige rs ship in which runners compete throughout year," he said. "Those in the championship run or about the championship, call Jones the year for point totals, he said. don't have to run in every race, but they at 287-5444.

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~j2~pUL~ ~3IUIL ~Tropic Times1 Sprs Shorts Ar 8,1994 SCN AM 790, 1420 radio host a co-ed softball tournament today month. Classes are limited to 10 students day, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday and Friday through Sunday at Howard AFB's Weekly who must be at least 15 years old. and. 6:15 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Sunday airs baseball, basketball Field. Cost is $100 plus one 12-inch and Sign up for classes at the Fort Clayton and holidays. Southern Command Network's AM 790 one 11 -inchball. Formore information, call Boat Shop. An affidavit of good health and The restaurant will be open 10 a.m. to I 1 Pacific and 1420 Atlantic will broadcast the Norm Poppell, 284-3392 after 5 p.m. a swim test is required. p.m. Monday, Thursday and Friday, 10 following sports this weekend. Students will get a qualification card a.m. to 6p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday and Tonight Intramural flag football that allows them to rent sailboats and to 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday, Sunday and 6 p.m. Baseball: Detroit at N.Y. Yanenroll in the intermediate sailing course at holidays. keeps league kicks off in April Rodman Naval Station after completing Saturday Registration for flag football is open this course. Call 287-6453 for more inforReeder offers men's 12:30 p.m. Baseball: Seattle at Toronto until Wednesday. There will be an organmation. over-30 volleyball CliniC 9 p.m. Baseball: Atlanta at Los Angeles zational meeting noon April 16 at the Sunvr3 volyalcic Sunday dial Recreation Center. Play begins April Fronius center offers tall, The Reeder Physical Fitness Center ofmay P18. Call 289-3889 for more information. fers ongoingvolleyball clinics forthemen's 2:30 p.m. Basketball: Phoeix at Seattle short basketball leagues over 30 volleyball league. Call 287-3861 7 p.m. Baseball: Florida at San Diego Over-30 volleyball league The Fronius Fitness Center offers 5'l10" for more information. and under and 5'11" and over basketball Armed Forces Running registration ends in April leagues. Registration is April 17-May 18. Fronius gym starts Association 5-mile run Registration is open for over-30 volleyThere will be an organizational meeting ball Monday through April 29. There will noon May 21 at the Fronius Fitness Center. over-30 basketball The Armed Forces Running Associabe an organizational meeting 6 p.m. May 2 Call 289-3108 for more information. There will be an organizational meeting tion is sponsoring a 5-mile run April 16. at the Fronius Fitness Center. Call 286for over-30 basketball 6 p.m. tonight at the The run starts 7 a.m. at the Fort Clayton 3108 for information. Amador Golf Course Fronius Fitness Center. Call 289-3108 for pedestrian gate. Competitors earn points in information. thePanamaArmedForces Running ChamAmador Golf Course hosts open house pionship. There will be an open house 4:30-7:30 Curundu center no-tap Call 287-5444 for more information. schedules tee-off times p.m. April 16 at the Amador Golf Course. The Amador Golf Course is using preThe open house will feature new merchantourney sign-up posted American Red Cross scheduled starting times for teeing off Satdise from the 1994 Professional GolfAssoSign ups for the monthly no-tap tournasoftball tournament urday, Sunday and U.S. holiglays. Only ciation Show. Call 282-4511 for more inment sponsored by the Curundu Bowling ..groups of three or four may reserve teeformation. Center will begin 6:30 p.m. April 16. Call The American Red Cross is sponsoring times before 10 a.m. on these days. 286-3914 for more information. a softball tournament April 29-May 1. Reservations may be called in beginHoroko Golf Course Teams can register for the tournament by ning the Wednesday before the weekend's American sportsman calling 287-3103. There is a $74 team fee play. changes hours and the registration deadline is April 20. The Horoko Pro Shop is open Monday celebrate anniversary The tournament starts 3 p.m. at CloverHoward, Albrook host through Friday from 6:45 a.m. to 6 p.m. The American Pacific Sportsman Assoleaf field, Fort Clayton. Saturday, Sunday and 6:15 a.m. to 6 p.m. ciation will celebrate its 26th anniversary Individuals can enter the home run derflag football tournament holidays. noon April 23 at the clubhouse. by before the first game April 29. There is The Howard and Albrook Sports and The driving range hours are 6:45 a.m. For information, call 252-5613/5083/ a $10 entry fee. Fitness Centers will host a flag football to 5 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Thurs5613. All proceeds benefit the American Red tournament April25 at Weekly Field. PlayCross. ers must registerat eithercenterby April 18. Call 284-3451 for more information. Davis hosts Memorial Day hoops tournament Howard, Albrook centers Day h ops ourn ment triathlon set for April 16 There will be a Memorial Day basketball tournament May 28-30 at the Fronius The Howard and Albrook sports and Fitness Center. Registration is May 1-20. fitness centers are sponsoring a -triathlon Teams are limited to 10 players. Call 289April 16. Registration for the event ends 3108 for more information. Wednesday. The event includes a 500meter swim at the Howard pool, a 20Fitness month triathlon kilometer bike race and a 5-kilometer run. The event is for individuals only. Call 284starts at Espinar pool 3451 for more information. There will be a fitness month triathlon starting at the Fort Espinar pool 6:30 a.m. Football, softball, soccer May 14. Events include swimming, bicycling and running. Call 289-4189 for more information. Registration forthe Directorate ofCommunity Activities unit flag football is ongoFronis strts eaching. Fronius starts beach "Women's soccer registration has been volleyball registration extended through April 15. Registration for 4-on-4 beach volleyDesert Storm softball registration is onball is May 2-25. Games will be played at going until April 15. Shimmey Beach. There will be an organiCall the DCA Sports Division Office at zational meeting May 27 at the Fronius 287-4050 for more information. Fitness Center. Call 289-3108 for more information. Rodman looking for martial arts instructors Military Comptrollers The Rodman Fitness Center is looking sponsors fun run forcertified instructors to teach martial arts, AnAmericanSocietyofMilitaryCompaerobics and water aerobics. For more trollers Run For Fun will be held 7 a.m. information contact Morise Conerly at the April 23 at Building 210, Fort Clayton. Rodman Fitness Center, 283-4222/4061. There will be four age categories, trophies, prizes and free T-shirts to the first Bowling centers offer 100 registrants. dasi pi Runners can pre-register in Building deals for children in April 519, Fort Clayton, at the Finance Office. The Curundu and Clayton bowling cenCall 287-5319/5855 for more information. ters are celebrating the Month of the Military Child throughout April. Howard, Albrook begin The centers are offering special prices and free shoe rentals for school-age chilbowling sign-ups dren. The Howard and Albrook bowling cenr, c rms WIe photo tersare signingupbowlers to formsummer Introductory sailing Spike it bowling leagues. Visit the centers or call lessonscfor 1and oZ i' ic 284-4818 for more information. lessons for 15 and ove Zonian's Jessica Sanchez plays the net during the 1993 women's volleySailinglessons are provided through the ball season. Registration for this season for the Atlantic community is open Security police sponsor Moral, Welfare and Recreation Division until Tuesday. There will be an organizational meeting 5 p.m. Tuesday at sspon r t monthly. Lessons are 9 a.m.-I p.m. the last the Fronius Fitness Center. League starts play Thursday. Call 289-3108 softball tournament Saturday and Sunday of one month and the for information. The 24th Security Police Squadron will first Saturday and Sunday the following

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16 Tropic Timesews _IApril 8, 1994 Police destroy drug labs McCaffrey addresses PANAMA CITY (Reuters) -Panamanian poy lice forces said they destroyed several small cocaine-producing laboratories and coca plantations in the remote Darien jungle bordering Colombia. Some 115 Panamanian police officers stormed School of the Am ericas three laboratories in the northeastern Darien prov--ince of Tacarcuna and arrested three Colombian by 1st Lt. Jim Knotts men over the weekend, police major Santiago USSOUTHCOM Public Affairs Fundora told a news conference. Police planes then fumigated about 190 acres of QUARRY HEIGHTS -Decoca plants, the raw material for cocaine. spite recent criticism, the School Police officials did not say how much, if any of the Americas should be turncocaine paste produced by the laboratories was ing out more graduates instead of seized in the operation. fewer, said Gen. Barry McCafElements of U.S. Army South provided some frey, commander-in-chief, U.S. transportation and logistical support for this operaSouthern Command. tion, USARSO officials said. McCaffrey made his remarks The operation is the second in a year aimed at Monday during a visit to the halting the spread of cocaine production in the school at Fort Benning, Ga. Darien jungle by Colombian guerillas and peasant Students attending the course, Panamanian farmers. like U.S. Army Maj. Ricardo Riera, echoed his sentiment. Fiesta Fair starts soon "The School of the Americas FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The Fiis the principal fornm for U.S. and esta Panama Fair -Pacific will be Thursday through Lati militaries to meet on a corApril 17 at Jarman Field. mon ground, and to further our Activities will begin with a fun run and walk at relationship's future with joint 4:10 p.m. at Reeder Physical Fitness Center and and combined operations in Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey, commander-in-chief of U.S. Southern Conopening ceremonies at 5 p.m. on Jarman Field. AfUnited Nations peacekeeping opGnd adrs sMudent andeulty at h f U.hoolSofthe r s Cm ter the opening, the 79th Army Band Jazz Combo erations," Riera said of his classmand, addresses students and faculty at the School of the Americas at will perform. The evening will continue with the mates at the school. This course Fort Davis Elementary School dancers and a Deallows us to enhance our cooperative security, to exchange the human rights advocates have been enormously impartment of Defense show, "the Ges Work." information and develop common doctrine that will help in portant to all of us. Personally, I would welcome their Throughout the four-day fair, there will be many future operations we undertake with our Latin neighbors." active scrutiny of what goes on in the School of the live perfotances as well as 15 carnival rides, Riera, who served as a SOUTHCOM counterdrug opAmericas, and I think we'll profit from it." sporting events and more than 50 food and game rations officer from August 1990 to August 1993, is atMcCaffrey said last year's budget cuts were "a funcbooths. Caies Capers, a DOD show magician, will tending the Command and General Staff College at the tion of our apparent failure so far to explain why we also perform April 16-17. school. think these funds are so important." The fair will be open 5-11 p.m. Thursday, 4 "In every case, the students in my class consider themRiera thinks the attacks on the school are'shortp.m.-midnight April 15, 3 p.m.-midnight April 16 selves to be the protectors of democracy and human rights sighted. and 3-11 p.m. April 17. Fort Clayton will be an within their respective countries," Riera said. "We've all "In my personal opinion, you can't blame the school, open post during operation hours of the fair. learned that supporting democracy and human rights is our the institution, for what individuals do," Riera said. common objective, and it's the responsibility of our mili"There are two elements echoed in every course -the Dining facility selected taries to stay on that path." subordination of the military to their democraticallyThe School of the Americas, which has existed in some elected civilian leadership and respect for human rights." FORT SHERMAN (USARSO PAO-Atlantic) form since 1946, teaches officers and noncommissioned ofRiera prefers to concentrate on the positives, how-The Jungle Operations Training Battalion dining ficers from the U.S. military and allied nations around the ever. facility was recently selected as a finalist for the world. All of the classes are conducted completely in Span"This course is great. We develop professional relaPhillip A. Connelly award. ish, and range in scope from joint operations, to combat tionships, but the personal relationships are the ones you The Galley will represent U.S. Army South in medic courses, to resources management. In 1994 about carry throughout the rest of your life and look forward the small dining facility category at the Department 90 percent of the school's graduates will be from Latin to continuing," Riera said. "I know I'll always have a of the Army level competition, said Sgt. Ist Class America, school officials said. place to stay when I want to visit Latin America." Geodfry W. Miller, dining facility manager. Last year, the school came under attack from human Riera's class contains students from Venezuela, The dining facility was judged in October by a rights groups who charge some of the Latin American Mexico, Colombia, Bolivia, Dominican Republic, Peru, three-person team from Installation Food Service, graduates have committed human rights abuses after leavHonduras and Argentina. The allied students are from Corozal. Judging was based on sanitation, troop ing the school. all branches of their countries' active duty military, naaccessibility, food preparation, menu, nutrition, de-Congress cut in half the International Military Educational guard and even some police forces. cor and service, Miller said. tion and Training budget, which is a primary source of All of the 10 active duty U.S. Army students have "We have a very unique dining facility," he funding for the school. Allied students' tuition is paid by completed at least one tour in SOUTHCOM. There are said. "We deal with all services, even foreign soltheir own country, by U.S. foreign assistance such as IMET, also U.S. Air Force, Army National Guard and Army diers." or a mixture of the two. Reserve students in the class. The Galley's small size gives its staffan advanAfter a recent trip to the school, Senator Sam Nunn, The course is the same as the one taught at Fort tage, he said. chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, gave Leavenworth, Kan., except conducted all in Spanish at "We can put more emphasis on cooking," he the school his support. McCaffrey added is support during the School of the Americas. All of the U.S. students were said. "We take pride in our work and get very good an address to students during his visit. chosen to attend the course at Fort Benning versus Fort meals out to the soldiers we serve. "We must listen very carefully to our critics and learn Leavenworth because of their Spanish-speaking ability, from them," McCaffrey said. "I think the contributions of officials said. Army engineer rescues local man from killer bees by Sgt. Eric S. Hortin climbing the fence. Then I got closer and man over the eight-foot fence topped with alized he had been stung-nearly 20 times in USARSO Public Affairs Office saw the bees all over the guy. I started callconcertina wire. his head and neck. ---ing out, 'Call 911!' The man was barely conscious and "I got scared a little bit, seeing that guy FORT KOBBE (USARSO PAO) -An In the meantime, Soto had scaled up could only weakly grab onto the fence, being tore up like that, yelling and crying engineer soldier braved a large swarm of and over the fence. Before Soto could get Soto said. The victim was going into sefor help," Soto said. "It was a really nasty Africanized bees in an attempt to save a to the victim, the bees started coming at vere shock because of the estimated 1,000 picture." man's life March 24. him and he backed off. bee stings on the head, neck, back, arms Although no one knew what happened Spe. Jose Soto, from Company A, "The DEH (firemen) just happened to and legs he had suffered, to the injured man, Rood credits Soto with 536th Engineer Battalion, was participatbe in the area and they came over," Soto "The man looked like he had new hair doing more than what most would have ing in common task skills training when said. "They tried to stop the bees with a because of all the stingers in him," Soto tried. he heard yelling coming from outside the fire extinguisher, but the bees started atsaid. "If it wasn't for him (Soto) the guy fenceline. tacking them. Then they tried to hose One of the firemen came over with a would have died right there," Rood said. "I was about to perform the first task down the guy with water, but the bees ladder, and used it to get the man over the "I thought Soto didn't know what he was when I heard this Panamanian guy start were still attacking." fence. The ambulance pulled up moments doing or he was crazy. I guess he did know calling out," Soto said. "I was the only At that point, Soto told the firemen to later. The bees were still stinging the Panawhat to do. I'm impressed." one who understood what he was saying." hose him down. Soto then sprinted to the manian man, though, so Soto and others Soto was presented an Army AchieveWithout hesitating, Soto jumped up nearly unconscious victim through a cloud were busy smacking the insects offhim as ment Medal for his actions. Soto's actions and ran toward the fence, followed closely of nearly 2,000 bees. much as possible. The bees even followed have brought him attention and a new by Sgt. 1st Class Arthur Rood, Service He picked the man up and ran back to the victim into the ambulance. nickname -"Hero" -but he downplays Company, 536th Eng. Bn. the fence against the force of the pressure After everything had settled down, it as much as possible. "I didn't know what was going on at hose and with the Africanized bees in hot Soto went back to his room to get cleaned "I didn't pay too much attention to what first," Rood said. "I thought the guy had pursuit. up and go to the troop medical clinic. was happening, I just did it," Soto said. "It gotten caught in the concertina wire while Soto's next problem was how to get the When Soto looked in the mirror, he rewas a human thing to do."


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