Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text



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Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, Feb. 18,1994


McCaffrey takes charge of SOUTHCOM


by SMSgt. Steve Taylor
Chief, Tropic Times
HOWARD AFB - Gen. Barry R.
McCaffrey pledged continued cooperation
with Latin American nations in the fight for
democracy at his assumption of command
ceremony here Thursday morning.
"We can fight the drug cartels, and also
fight for democracy, and keep up our hon-
orable military role and the human rights of


the people," he told visitors in Spanish.
McCaffrey was nominated to assume
command of USSOUTHCOM in November
after Gen. George A. Joulwan was selected
to be Supreme Allied Commander Europe.
McCaffrey was confirmed by the Senate
Feb. 7 and promoted to general Tuesday.
McCaffrey, in a message to the people
of Latin America, also said in Spanish that
"As I walk into my new duty, I assure you
that you have a new companion and a true


friend and a very comprehensive neighbor
willing to cooperate. I feel deep respect for
your sovereignty..."
During his speech, McCaffrey outlined
priorities for his command. He vowed to
continue an open and friendly relationship
with Latin American military organizations,
to support the U.S. ambassadors through-
out Latin America, and to fully implement
the Panama Canal Treaty.
"We will take great pride in jointly work-


*4' ' = "A~'~ ~
-. *.~,


l t.. .
- . . X. - - -.
.' '-.. .. "- - � . ' ''. :t -. -



Department of Defense photo by Sgt. Lori Davis
Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff; Maj. Gen. George A. Crocker, commander, U.S. Army South;
CSM Franklin D. Thomas, command sergeant major, U.S. Southern Command; and Gen. Barry L. McCaffrey, com-
mander-in-chief, USSOUTHCOM, review the troops during McCaffrey's assumption of command Thursday.


ing to successfully accomplish this historic
mission by 31 December 1999," McCaffrey
said about the treaty.
He also commented on the role of
SOUTHCOM's military people.
"To the service men and women of the
Southern Command, let me underscore
again - you are the unofficial ambassadors
of the United States of America,"
McCaffrey said. "The self-discipline, the
energy and the talent you bring to your
duties in cooperation and support in Latin
America bring honor to all of us."
Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff, attended the cer-
emony.
Shalikashvili thanked the "men and
women of Southern Command for the mag-
nificent performance during the last two
years...I know you will carry (this) into the
challenges of the future."
Shalikashvili also commented on oppor-
tunities for the next century.
"The nations of this hemisphere will
benefit from an explosion of democracy, of
peace, and of shared prosperity...the
achievement of our common goals rests on
our ability to work hand in glove with our
regional partners, defeat common threats
to our security," Shalikashvili said. "This
remains our central focus and it is a pur-
pose-you're fulfilling grandly."
After the ceremony, Shalikashvili told
the Tropic Timhes and Southern Cimmand
Netx ork th. t Fjijst want to leave every-
one with the thought that I and all the joint
chiefs deeply jppreciale %%hai you'ree doing
- to the men and woinen. to the Lnmuhe;s. to.
the civilian workforce, you're'Ireal heroes
and we appreciate you greatly."


Black History Month Atlantic 'Fiesta Panama' opens
S_ - - _ opens---


events to continue
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO)
- In recognition of Black History
Month, the following events have
been planned for February:
Through Wednesday - 11:30 a.m.
ethnic lunches at various dining facili-
ties. Call unit dining facilities for date.
*Today - 10 a.m. wellness booth at
Corozal Main Exchange
*7 p.m. youth skit, "African Cul-
ture Through a Child's Eyes." Fash-
ion show, Valent Recreation Center
*Saturday - 8 p.m. boat ride from
Pier 18
*Sun. - 6 p.m. play, "Matters of the
Mind," Club Amador
*Thurs. - 6 p.m. Junior Achieve-
ment awards presentations at Valent
Recreation Center
*Feb. 26 - 6:30 a.m. Black History
Prayer Breakfast at Gorgas Army Com-
munity Hospital
*2 p.m. movie, "Malcom X," at
Fort Clayton Theater
*Feb. 27 - 12:30 p.m. Religious Ser-
vice at Fort Clayton Chapel


FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO) - The Directorate of Community
Activities-Atlantic "Fiesta Panama" fair kicks off today with
games, sports events and tournaments, demonstrations and a De-
partment of Defense show through Monday.
The fair is open 3 p.m.-midnight today-Sunday and 3-11 p.m.
Monday.
During the three-day event Fort Davis will be an open post, U.S.
Anny South officials said.
Sports events include a women's softball tournament begin-
ning today and a men'.s softball tournament beginning Saturday.
Children's activities Saturday include a sack race, balloon stomp,
egg toss and tug-of-war.
There are karate, gymnastics and aerobic demonstrations as


i












I
I


well as folkloric, country line dancing and ballet groups. Other
programs include the Cristobal High School Choir and cheerlead-
ers, the Fort Davis Elementary School dancers and bands such as
the Nes y Los Sensacionales rap band, Afinque, Bahia Banda Show
and the DoD rock band, "The Gatherings."
Games include basketball toss, speed ball, dunk tanks and dart
blackjack.
Food for all tastes are available with Asian, Panamanian and
American favorites as well as the fair traditions of popcorn and
cotton candy.
Carnival rides for all ages are also on the field with rides for the
strong at heart as well as kiddie rfdes.
For a schedule of events see page 2.


Dengue fever mosquito population falling off
GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL (USARSO PAO) "Occasional breeding sites are still being found in the housing
- The population of the dengue fever mosquito, the aedes aegypti, areas on military installations," said Manuel Correa, supervisory
is declining because of the dry season, officials said. biologist with the Entomology Section. "Inspections by Preven-
There were 14 documented cases of dengue fever in 1993 - all tive Medicine personnel have shown that in some instances rain
but one are from Santa Librada and all cases have been Panama- gutters are blocked and still holding water.
nian Nationals with no U.S. military or family members being af- "We are asking quarters residents to check their rain gutters
fected, said Panama Ministry of Health officials. and ensure they are not blocked and collecting water," he said.
Recent meetings have been held with the Centers for Disease "Residents whose quarters are on the second floor where roof
Control, the Panama Canal Commission and the Panama Ministry gutters are not easily and safely accessible, should contact their
of Health to discuss educational and community action programs appropriate work order section and have the gutters inspected and
to control this mosquito, said Maj. Nelson Powers, chief of Ento- cleaned."
mology, Preventive Medicine Service at Gorgas Army Community "Although the number of cases of dengue remains low, we
Hospital. must not get careless," Powers said.


Fort Sherman Troop Medical Clinic
improving service with new
deployable system.


- Stay ew :,-le5-


an More-


Adm. Frank Kelso retires early hop- *Riot control, page 3.
ing Tailhook scandal finally put to *Carnival, pages 8&9.
rest. *Softball, page 12.


17-1 XTTT XT- 'Y












aN ews


Fort Sherman medical clinic



gets new deployable system


FORT SHERMAN (Gorgas Army Community Hospital) - The
new Deployable Medical Systems at the Fort Sherman Troop
Medical Clinic will improve medical service and the quality of
life for the Atlantic community, officials said.
"The three DEPMEDS will be used for pharmacy, radiology
and laboratory services and are part of a plan to provide medical
care at the future Fort Sherman Health Clinic," said Angela
Mendez, Treaty Implementation Project officer at the U.S. Army
Medical Department Activity - Panama.
With the upcoming turnover of the Coco Solo Health Clinic
this year, USA MEDDAC developed a plan for the health care of
the Atlantic community and, with limited space and scarce dol-
lars, the use of DEPMEDS came about, she said.
Once the concept was researched, it was found that what the
systems offered was ideal for the Atlantic community.
"It was a creative solution to the problem of providing quality
medical care where it is most needed," said Col. Bernard Gore
Jr., deputy commander for administration. "The systems will
compliment the health clinic while providing soldiers with the
best of medical equipment to handle emergencies and daily ser-
vices.
'This is the first time this type of portable field equipment has
been used in conjunction with a permanent building," he said.
The DEPMEDS arrived here in September from Ogden, Utah,
and were fielded and loaded by a team of representatives from the
Atlantic Directorate of Engineering and Housing, U.S. Army
Medical Materiel Agency and USA MEDDAC, Mendez said. It
took the team two weeks to get the DEPMEDS up and running.
The systems have been used in recent wartime situations such
as Operation Desert Storm and are also used at Soto Cano, Hon-
duras, and on many military training sites in the United States,
said Maj. Ronnie Brannon, chief of logistics at USA MEDDAC.
The DEPMEDS can be moved later and used in other areas
allowing tax dollars to be used for more than one mission, he
said.
"The systems will retain their capability, even after the mis-
sion for this operation is completed," Brannon said. "In this case,
the DEPMED modules are being used in place of more expensive
commercial equipment."
It has been estimated that using the DEPMEDS in lieu of con-
struction will save more than $250,000, Mendez said.
Saving money wasn't the only reason DEPMEDS were used,


'Fiesta Panama'


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -
The schedule for the Atlantic "Fiesta
Panama" fair is as follows:
Today
*Men's and women's softball tourna-
ment, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. through Monday
*Balloon stomp, 3 p.m.
*Sack race, 3:30 p.m.
*Egg toss, 4 p.m.
*Tug-of-war, 5 p.m.
*Karate demonstration, 6 p.m.
*Folkloric dance group, 6:40 p.m.
*Line dancing show, 7:20 p.m.
*Ballet show, 8 p.m.
*Nes y Los Sensacionales band, 8:40
p.m.


U.S. Army photo
A new Deployable Medical System is lifted to the first floor
of the Fort Sherman clinic.
she said. The systems contain state of the art equipment such as
microscopes, cabinetry, refrigerators, dispensers and x-ray stor-
age capabilities. Fully equipped, the DEPMEDS will provide
the same, or better services now offered at the Coco Solo Health
Clinic.
At the same time, the Atlantic DEH is renovating the Fort
Sherman TMC, Mendez said. When completed, the TMC will
be a 7,000-square-foot, full-service outpatient clinic. In addition
to the DEPMEDS, the new Fort Sherman Health Clinic will of-
fer emergency services, dental care, preventive medicine, com-
munity and occupational health and family medicine, Mendez
said.
Installing the DEPMEDS is one phase of a three-phase plan
in the renovation of the Fort Sherman TMC, Mendez said.
The clinic is expected to be completed in the spring and will
be operated by the staff of USA MEDDAC.


Wtlantic fair events


*DoD band, "The Gathering," 9:25
p.m.
*Bambulain, 10:55 p.m.
Saturday
*Karate demonstration, 5:30 p.m.
*79th Army Band, 6 p.m.
+Danzas y Proyecciones del Atlantico
Folkloric group, 8 p.m.
*DoD band, 'The Gathering," 9 p.m.
*Afinque band, 10 p.m.
Sunday
*Cristobal High School cheerleaders,
6 p.m.
+ROTC drill team, 6:15 p.m.
*Cristobal High School choir, 6:30
p.m.


*Jazz Junction, 7:15 p.m.
*Sports and swimwear fashion show,
8:15 p.m.
*Raki Slaki one-man show, 8:45
p.m.
*DoD band, "The Gathering," 9:30
p.m.
*Bahia Banda Show, 10:45 p.m.
Monday
*Gymnastic demonstration and Jazz
troupe, 6 p.m.
*Karate demonstration, 6:30 p.m.
*Nes y Los Sensacionales rap band, 7
p.m.
*DoD band, "The Gathering," 7:30
and 9:30 p.m.


*?s


Exchange, commissaries
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The hours of op- Albrook AFS
eration for the Army and Air Force Exchange System - Shoppette-8 a.m.-10
Panama and commissaries for Monday in observance of Snack bar- 8 a.m.-1 p.
Presidents Day are as follows: Anthony's Pizza - 11 a
Corozal Frank's Franks - 10 a.r
Main PX - 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Video rental - 9 a.m.-9
Sweets Reflections - 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Furniture store - 10 a.n
Frank's Franks - 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Shoe store - 10 a.m.-4
Anthony's Pizza - 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Toyland/Outdoor livin
Wok Works - closed Class Six - 10 a.m.-6 p
Casa de Amigos - closed Howard AFB
Fort Clayton Main PX - 10 a.m.-5 p
Shoppette (95) - closed Class Six - 10 a.m.-6 p
Frank's Franks (95) - closed Cafeteria - 7 a.m.-l p.m
Anthony's Pizza - 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Anthony's Pizza - 11 a
Burger King - 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Clothing Sales - closed
Popeye's - 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Service station - 6:30 a
Frank's Franks (by Burger King) - closed Fort Kobbe
Clayton Plaza Shoppette - 7 a.m.-midnight Shoppette/video rental
Shoppette (519) - 8 a.m.-9 p.m. Burger King - 8 a.m.-5
Auto parts store - 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Miscellaneous
Clothing Sales - closed Quarry Heights shoppe
Fort Amador Gorgas Hospital shop
Shoppette - 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Curundu School cafetei


list holiday operating hours


).m.
m.
.m.-8 p.m.
p.m.
n.-4 p.m.
p.m.
g- 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
.m.

.m.
.m.
n.
.m.-8 p.m.

.m.-6:30 p.m.

- 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
:30 p.m.

tte - closed
ette - closed
ria - closed


Cocoli shoppette - closed
Balboa school cafeteria - closed
Curundu Service Station - 6 a.m.-midnight


Atlantic
Fort Espinar
Shoppette - 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Fort Davis
Main PX - 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Auto parts store - 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Gas station - 8 a.m.-6 p.m.
Cafeteria - closed
Anthony's Pizza - 11 a.m.-10 p.m.
Burger King - 11 a.m.-9 p.m.
Clothing Sales - closed
Fort Sherman
Shoppette - noon-6 p.m.
Gas station - closed
Anthony's Pizza - noon-6 p.m.

Commissaries
The Corozal and Fort Espinar commissaries will be closed
Monday and Wednesday. The Howard commissary will be
closed Tuesday.


Tropic Times
Feb. 18, 1994


AF conducts

internal survey
HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA)
- Air Force members recently com-
pleted an exterior analysis of the 24th
Wing's environmental policies and
procedures during an internal Envi-
ronmental Compliance Assessment
and Management Program evalua-
tion Jan. 31-Feb. 4, officials said.
ECAMP is part of the Air Force's
effort to improve environmental
management and compliance world-
wide. It ensures environmental prob-
lems are addressed and that correc-
tive measures are quickly imple-
mented, according to Capt. Gieg
Long, 24th Wing ECAMP manager.
The internal audit is a precursor
to the external evaluation planned for
this fall. The Air Combat Command
team, scheduled to arrive in Septem-
ber, will review the wing's assess-
ments and conduct its own survey.
"The internal ECAMP is the key
to assessing our environmental pro-
gram and is a very valuable manage-
ment tool," said Col. Larry W. Black,
24th Wing vice commander. Black
has headed up external ECAMP
teams at Offutt AFB, Neb., and Lan-
gley AFB, Va.
"What we need to do now is ag-
gressively follow-up on the findings,"
he said. "We want to make sure we
have solid, permanent fixes."
Areas inspected were on Howard
and Albrook, the Defense Reutiliza-
tion and Marketing Office at Corozal
and the Red Tank Landfill .managed �
by the Panama Canal Commission.
Seven teams assessed procedures
connected with natural and cultural
resources; air emissions; hazardous
materials; pesticides; petroleum, oil
and lubricants; special programs;
water quality; and solid and hazard-
ous waste.
The internal teams were very com-
prehensive in its evaluation of the
wing. Each team was composed of
specialists from the various environ-
mental protocols.
"Overall, the team found the wing
was doing an excellent job of manag-
ing its environmental programs.
People were highly motivated and
exceptionally environmentally con-
scious," Long said.
The initial draft ECAMP report
listing preliminary findings is due out
in later this month. Unit command-
ers will be given the opportunity to
review and respond to each finding
before a final version is completed.
Once the report is final, programs
will be developed to correct discrep-
ancy areas, officials said.











*Dhpng-


Tropic Times
Feb. 18, 1994


549th MPs help keep peace in 'Barcelona'

External evaluation

tests riot control skills


by Spec. Alexander C. White
USARSO Public Affairs Office
EMPIRE RANGE- Soldiers ofthe 549th
Military Police Battalion were sent to
"Barcelona" Feb. 6-11, to help the govern-
ment maintain peace during a "civil un-
rest."
Things appeared to get out of hand Feb.
10 Just as the unit was preparing to go home.
Protesters approached the battalion's com-
pound demanding to speak to the com-
mander, harassing and taunting the sol-
diers both verbally and physically. Atabout
5 p.m., about 40 rioters breached the com-
pound throwing projectiles at the posted
guards.
This was the scenario for the 549th
MP's final exercise during the battalion's
external evaluation last week.
The unit came here to be evaluated on
its proficiency in a war-time atmosphere,
said Maj. Keith Wettig, S-3 for the 549th
MP Bn. The unit hoped to achieve a train-
ing standards that would keep them pre-
pared for a hostile environment, Wettig
said.
"We've been here since Sunday," said
Wettig. "The evaluation mission started
Monday focusing on the standard military
police tasks; battle field circulation control,
area security, enemy prisoner of war, law
and order and civil disturbance.
"This is the cumulating civil distur-
bance exercise that ended the deployment."
Only part of the training is designed to
prepare the 549th for a wartime mission,
Wettig said.
"It's hard to do battlefield exercise con-
trol without being in a field environment,"
he said.
The battalion deployed 112 soldiers and
recruitedopposition forces from within the
battalion and the 470th Military Intelli-
gence Brigade and the U.S. Army Garri-
son.
There were 45 opposing forces to pro-
vide the necessary support helping main-
tain a realistic scenario.
"The OPFOR's main mission was to
demonstrate and irritate the MPs during
various missions which included enemy


A protestor taunts a 549th Military Police Company soldier during the external evaluation.


prisoner of war, peaceful demonstrations
and violentparticipation," said Spec. Daniel
Boda, 470thMIBde. "The objective was to
train MPs to react in various situations.
This demonstration was to evaluate their
reaction time to various trouble."
It is hard to create a riot and at the same
time control it, said 1st Lt. Ronald Tuczak,
training officer, 92nd Military Police Bat-
talion.
The major problem is that the soldiers
participating tend to get wrapped up in the
exercise and forget it is only fantasy. Sol-
diers get to see how realistic this can be and
train right, he said.
"One of our METL (Mission Essential


Task List) tasks is to conduct civil distur-
bance (exercises)," Tuczak said. "We try to
create a realistic, hard training role yet, at
the time, be safe."
This turns into a big leadership chal-
lenge when the whole objective is to dis-
burse the crowd, he said. The soldiers are
challenged in controlling an outside force.
"It's easy to train inside the unit, the
challenge comes from the outside (where
unstable factors are involved)," Tuczak
said.
Soldiers like Spec. Dale Foster, Head-
quarters platoon, 549th MP Bn., learned a
lot of things he usually does not encounter
in a garrison environment.


For Cpl. Martin Williams, 4th platoon,
549th MP Bn., it was definitely an eye-
opening experience.
"I'm new to the MP Corps. I used to be
in artillery," he said. "I never knew they
were so combat-oriented. I thought they
were just geared toward a garrison atmo-
sphere."
Because of an exercise like this, Wil-
liams said that he got a lot out of it. In the
same manner, Spec. Jerry Bice, 1 stplatoon,
549th MP Bn, also got a lot of insight.
"I think this is as realistic training as I've
seen," Bice said. "The company as a whole
put in a lot of hours which I think brought
it closer."


Fort Drum military police expand travel itinerary


by SSgt. James B. O'Connor
1st Platoon, 511th Military Police Company
FORT CLAYTON - New York, Luxembourg, Ger-
many, England and a list of other places that could be the
itinerary for the world tour of a rock band are only a few of
the stops displayed on the backs of the shirts worn by the
1st Platoon, 511th Military Police Company from Fort
Drum, N.Y.
Its current assignment is to provide military police
support to units in the U.S. Southern Command area of
operation.
SSgt. Joseph Semyone, platoon sergeant, 1st Platoon,
511th MP Co., explained that to accomplish this mission
the platoon has taken a proactive and aggressive attitude
when it comes to law enforcement.
"Members of the platoon are manning their posts
outside the post exchange, the commissary and other
important facilities," Semyone said. "They are also provid-
ing a bike patrol for the Curundu housing area."
This patrol has been aggressive in apprehending tres-
passers in the Corozal and Curundu areas, said Lt. Col.
Gerald Prentice, commander 92nd Military Police Battal-
ion.
The platoon has been finding that, as the number of
apprehended trespassers goes up, other crimes go down,
he said.
"On one account, Sergeant (Scott) Sullivan has been


"This is truly a company that can rapidly
deploy anywhere and execute any
mission...Just a quick glance at their
right shoulders gives glimpses of experi-
ences in Operation Urgent Fury, Just
Cause, Desert Storm and Restore
Hope."

Sgt. Kenneth K. Wilson
1st platoon, 511th Miltary Police Company

especially adept at finding trespassers," said 2nd Lt. Robert
L. Berry, platoon leader, 1st Platoon, 511th MP Co.
"In a recent two-day period he had apprehended one
(trespasser) on each day."
Another mission of the first platoon is the loss-preven-
tion of government property.
"Last week, while on a routine patrol of the fence lines
PFC (Daniel) Rich discovered a cache of stolen govern-
ment property," said Sgt. William Dilts, 3rd squad leader,
1st Platoon, 511th MP Co.
'"This contributed to preventing a significant loss to the
Army, " he said.
First platoon draws on experience from such units as the
82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, N.C.; 24th Infantry


Division (Mechanized), Fort Stewart, Ga.; 3rd Armor
Division, Germany; 7th Infantry Division, Fort Ord, Ca-
lif.; and the 3rd Infantry Division, Germany. From these
units, the platoon has put together a diverse portfolio of
military knowledge.
"If you dig deep, you find among these soldiers former
combat infantrymen, field artillerymen, drug suppression
team members, traffic accident investigators, military
police investigators, special reaction team members, pro-
tective services team members and light fighters," said Sgt.
Kenneth J. Wilson, 2nd squad leader, 1st platoon, 511th
MP Co.
"This is truly a company that can rapidly deploy
anywhere and execute any mission," he said.
The combat patch worn by several members of the unit
show their ability to move into action under any circum-
stance.
"Just a quick glance at their right shoulders gives
glimpses of experiences in Operation Urgent Fury, Just
Cause, Desert Storm and Restore Hope," Wilson said.
All members of the platoon are extremely motivated
and dedicated to bringing maximum law enforcement
support to the community they now serve, here in Panama,
Berry said.
"First Platoon 'combat MPs,' is adapting well to their
new environment," Berry said. "I don't see them having
any problems completing their mission while deployed
here."











*Ho bemish


U.S. aims drug war at Colombia


JUANCHACO, Colombia (AP) - Colombia is now on
the front line of Washington's Andean drug war, despite
protests from some Colombians denouncing U.S. mili-
tary involvement as an invasion of sovereignty.
U.S. officials believe Colombia has done more to com-
bat drug traffickers than Bolivia or Peru, whose anti-drug
aid may be cut because they appear less eager to stem
drug smuggling.
Coca leaves, the raw material used to make cocaine,
are mostly grown in Bolivia and Peru. Colombia's drug
cartels process the coca and smuggle it to world markets.
The United States has backed the Colombian
government's anti-drug efforts by giving it tens of mil-
lions of dollars a year in aid to fight the nation's drug
lords, and has sent troops and other personnel.
The presence of about 250 American soldiers, in addi-
tion to U.S. drug agents and other personnel, has become
a hot issue in this year's congressional and presidential
elections.
One hundred of the soldiers are building a military
base in central Colombia to help Colombian forces go
after traffickers and guerrillas, maintaining U.S.-built ra-
dars that nab drug flights and training Colombian troops.
The Council of State, Colombia's highest court over-
seeing government administration, declared on Feb. 8 the
presence of U.S. troops illegal, saying President Cesar
Gaviria should have consulted Congress before inviting
them.
Gaviria said he would ignore the "absurd" ruling,
pointing out that U.S. surveillance technology and mili-
tary training helped Colombia maul the Medellin cartel
and kill its leader, Pablo Escobar, last December.
"Would we be more free, more sovereign and more
independent living under the tyranny of Escobar's narco-


terrorism?" the president asked.
Much of the criticism has been directed against the
presence of 150 U.S. soldiers in Juanchaco, a sweltering
village on the Pacific coast, on what is billed as a hu-
manitarian mission: building a school and a clinic.
American combat engineers clad in jungle fatigues lay
bricks, hammer nails and mix mortar in a seemingly in-
nocent pursuit. They say they are here to conduct engi-
neering exercises under difficult conditions: an intense,
tropical sun; torrential rains; poor soil; and a remote site
where construction materials are hard to find.
"It opens our eyes to a different culture, a different
way of doing things," said a soldier who identified him-
self only as Capt. Clark, as he guzzled water from his
canteen to ward off heat exhaustion.
But many politicians suspect there is more to the mis-
sion given the proximity of the world's largest cocaine
cartel in Cali, 60 miles to the east.
Gaviria aides say the Cali cartel - apparently ner-
vous about the U.S. troop presence in its backyard - has
mounted a disinformation campaign to stir opposition to
the U.S. presence.
Given the American tradition of nabbing drug traf-
fickers on foreign soil - Honduran kingpin Juan Ramon
Matta Ballesteros in 1987 and Panamanian leader
Manuel Noriega four years ago - the Cali bosses have
reason to be uneasy.
But bringing the kingpins to justice cannot be achieved
in a single lightning raid.
A senior law enforcement, official in Bogota said the
task may be greater than the Clinton administration envi-
sions, because drug kingpins have corrupted many gov-
ernment officials with their billions and because their ten-
tacles reach throughout Colombian society.


SambaA Laserhoto
Samba dancers celebrate during a parade Monday in Rio de Janiero's Sambadrome Arena.



Gaviria salutes Peruvian president
BOGOTA, Colombia (AP)-
President Cesar Gaviria praised Pe-
ruvian leader Alberto Fujimori for
attacking terrorists and drug traf-
fickers and improving Peru's fragile
economy.
Colombia and Peru are beginning
to win the battle against "the narco-
trafficking, violence and terrorism
that have so oppressed our people in
the past decade," Gaviria said at a
banquet Monday in Fujimori's
honor.
As proof of success, Gaviria
pointed to Peru's 1992 arrest of
Abimael Guzman, leader of the
Shining Path guerrillas, and
Colombia's killing in December of AP LaserPhoto
Medellin drug cartel chief Pablo Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori (right) was praised by Colombian
Escobar. President Cesar Gaviria for his anti-drug efforts.


Honduran mine


explosion kills 3
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras (AP) - A mine
planted near the border with El Salvador exploded
over the weekend, killing a peasant, his pregnant
wife and their 10-year-old son, authorities said
Sunday.
The accident occurred Saturday in an area
known as San Lorenzo, about 125 miles south-
east of Tegucigalpa, police said.
The peasant, Maximum Lainez, accidently
struck the mine when he was working, killing
him, his wife, Santos Garcia, 30, and their son,
Eduvines.
At least 200 Honduran peasants have been
killed in similar mine accidents near the Salva-
doran and Nicaraguan borders over the last de-
cade. Insurgents from both El Salvador and Nica-
ragua commonly planted mines along the border
to prevent their enemies from following them into
Honduran territory.
An inter-American defense group commis-
sioned by the Organization of American States in
1992 has plans to remove or destroy hundreds of
thousands of mines planted in Honduras and in
neighboring countries.

3 Colombia oil

wells dynamited
BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) - Leftist rebels dy-
namited three wells at Colombia's main oil field,
the first attack there since the field started pump-
ing oil a decade ago, officials said Tuesday.
The bomb attacks late Monday at the Cano
Limon oil field in eastern Colombia damaged the
wells' electrical systems, but did not force a sus-
pension in production, oil industry officials said
on condition of anonymity.
A fourth bomb was deactivated beforeit went
off, one official said.
The National Liberation Army, a leftist rebel
group, has been attacking Colombian oil pipelines
since 1986 to force authorities to stop sharing pe-
troleum profits with foreign and private interests.
But this was the first time the guerrillas attacked
the oil field.
It was not clear how the rebels got past tight
security at the oil field, which produces 230,000
barrels of oil per day and is operated by the U.S.-
based company, Occidental Petroleum. The state
oil company, Ecopetrol, owns half of Cano
Limon's oil.
The rebels blew up sections of Colombia's
main oil pipeline 39 times last year and five times
so far this year.

Colombia signs peace

accord with militias
BOGOTA (Reuters) - The Colombian govern-
ment signed a preliminary peace accord Tuesday
with two urban militia groups in Medellin aimed
at stopping their violent brand of street justice and
seeing them lay down their arms.
Interior Minister Fabio Villegas signed the ac-
cord with militia leaders representing about 400
armed youths in the country's second largest and
most violent city, located 150 miles northwest of
Bogota.
"The signing of this accord with the militias is
an important process in attaining peace in
Medellin and Colombia," said Villegas at the
signing ceremony at city hall.
Under the accord, the first of its kind in
Medellin, the government and militia groups
agree to continue negotiating the eventually lay
down arms and return to civilian life.
The militias operate as vigilante groups in poor
neighborhoods of the city, where the state's pres-
ence is practically non-existent. They impose their
own form of justice against suspected criminals
and other unwanted people.
Villegas said the militias were a product of the
violence that erupted in the late 1980s in Medellin
after now-deceased cocaine king Pablo Escobar
and his cartel declared war against the govern-
ment.
Other militia groups, some of them holding
loose ties with Marxist guerrillas, still operate.


4 Tropic Times
Feb. 18, 1994


I


i











SMiitarv News


Tropic Times
Feb. 18, 1994


Report: U.S.

bought Soviet

hardware
WASHINGTON (AP) - Cash-
poor Poland sold sophisticated Soviet
military hardware to the United
States in the 1980s in a number of
secret deals through third parties, The
Washington Post reported.
The U.S. military obtained top-of-
the-line air-defense systems, radar,
armed helicopters, torpedoes, tanks
and self-propelled artillery from the
Soviet-supplied Polish arsenal with
payments that went through foreign
intermediaries, the newspaper said in
Tuesday's editions.
The deals apparently were moti-
vated largely by Poland's need for
hard currency in view of its large debt
and the effects of Reagan administra-
tion economic sanctions, it said.
The story, attributed to unidenti-
fied U.S. intelligence and other gov-
ernment officials, said the intermedi-
aries - arms dealers and other busi-
nessmen - may have paid commis-
sions from the estimated $150 mil-
lion to $200 million in sales to some
Polish defense 'officials who helped
make the deals work or simply
looked the other way.
There was no direct evidence that
Poland's communist leader in the
1980s, Gen. Wojciech Jaruzelski,
was personally involved in the deals,
but given their scale and sensitivity,
top levels of the Polish Defense Min-
istry must have given their tacit ap-
proval, the Post said.
Jarulzelski, interviewed in War-
saw, was .quoted as saying he neither
knew about nor approved the arms
sales and calling them "almost com-
pletely improbable" and risky. He
said the Soviet Union kept a close eye
on weapons systems sent to Poland
and that his government would not
have planned or approved such deals.
To give the sales plausibility, the
Post said, export documents said the
exported arms were destined for So-
viet allies in the Middle East.


8 F-15Es land on base in Italy


AVIANO AIR BASE, Italy (AP) -
Eight of the U.S. Air Force's most sophis-
ticated warplanes arrived Monday at one
of the key staging areas for possible
NATO air strikes around Sarajevo.
The group of F-15E fighter-bombers,
dispatched from the 492nd Fighter Squad-
ron based in Lakenheath, England, are
part of NATO plans to increase the fire-
power and range of the air arsenal that
could take part in attacks.
There are 45 other U.S. and British
planes at Aviano Air Base, about 50 miles
northeast of Venice, enforcing the "no-
fly" zone over Bosnia-Herzegovina. War-


planes at the Italian-U.S. base also are be-
ing readied in case NATO orders air
strikes around the Bosnian capital, which
has been under siege from ethnic Serb
forces.
Dozens of warplanes from other
NATO nations are at Italian bases or air-
craft carriers in the region.
The F-15E, the strike version of the re-
nowned "Eagle" fighter jet, is the most
sophisticated warplane in the U.S. Air
Force. It has a longer flight i ige and en-
hanced capabilities to hit ground targets
using night-scope equipment and laser-
guided bombs.


Aircraft from Aviano could be over
Sarajevo in less than 45 minutes.
The United States, Britain and France
have sent aircraft carriers in the Adriatic,
and other NATO nations have dispatched
additional planes and equipment to bases
in Italy to prepare for possible attacks or
bolster forces monitoring the "no-fly"
zone.
The 16-nation North Atlantic Treaty
Organization has given the Bosnian Serbs
until Sunday to place their heavy weapons
around Sarajevo under U.N. surveillance.
NATO said it could order air strikes if ar-
tillery attacks resume before the deadline.


NORTHFIELD, Vt. (AP) - At the nation's oldest private mili-
tary college, women have been part of the cadet corps for 20 years,
living in the same dorms as men and barking orders to rookies of
both sexes every morning.
The possibility of such integration has polarized and enraged
many at The Citadel and Virginia Military Institute.
But at Norwich University, it's too commonplace for concern.
There were a few awkward moments when the all-male school
merged with all-female Vermont College in 1972, said George
Turner, then an English teacher at Norwich.
"Some of the little corporals yelled a little louder and spat
tobacco juice a little more often -just to remind everybody of
the differences," Turner said. "But it was really no big deal."
Fred Rodell, a 1985 Norwich graduate, said men and women
managed to work together just fine. "The few women who went
through the military training while I was there were pretty well
respected for going through what we did."
There are 102 women among the 941 cadets this year at Nor-
wich, the only private military college remaining in the country.
Women first enrolled in the corps of cadets in 1974, more than
150 years after the school was founded in 1819. Alumni include
Army Chief of Staff Gen. Gordon Sullivan.
Administrators want to boost the percentage of women in the
corps up to 15 percent from 11 percent by 2000, university Presi-
dent Richard Schneider said.
Tradition drives the ritual and structure at military institu-
tions. Yet by breaking its all-male tradition, Norwich was actu-
ally keeping in step with another custom: that of preparing stu-
dents for the world beyond the campus, said Maj. Margaret
Evans, a Norwich assistant commandant and alumna.
"The other schools that don't have women in them right now,


or that don't have men in them right now, they're not doing their
students any favors," Evans said.
"The workforce - the world - has men and women in it and
we have to learn how to deal with life and work with all of them,"
she said.
Nevertheless, The Citadel and VMI, the nation's last two
state-financed military colleges, are fighting to keep women out
of their cadet corps. The schools say they want to continue offer-
ing a unique educational environment.
VMI, fighting a Justice Department lawsuit claiming it dis-
criminates against women, has offered to set up a separate, all-
female military college at Mary Baldwin College, a former fin-
ishing school.
At the proposed Virginia Women's Institute for Leadership,
there would be no boot camp indoctrination, no barracks without
privacy. Women would play tennis and golf while VMI's 1300
cadets learn boxing and karate.
- At The Citadel, Shannon Faulkner is attending classes while
battling to join the cadets. She cannot drill, eat or live with the
1,964-member corps.
Last month, Chief Justice William Rehnquist ordered the
South Carolina college to let Faulkner in while her lawsuit ask-
ing to join the corps is pending.
"We knew it was coming," freshman cadet Timothy Terese
said then. "But no matter what, we didn't lose faith and were
hoping the lawyers would come through for us."
At Norwich, some students say they understand why cadets
have fought to keep women from classrooms and drill squads.
"What the other schools are afraid of is change," said sopho-
more Tricia Angelini. "They are afraid they won't be able to do
the same things anymore."


Navy's top admiral
WASHINGTON
(AP) - Adm. Frank - .
Kelso II, the Navy's
top uniformed officer,
said Tuesday he has
requested early retire-
ment so the Navy "can . ,
finally close this diffi-
cult chapter" of the '
Tailhook sex abuse
scandal. . -"
Kelso, at a news '. ."
conference in his Pen- ., .
tagon office, said he
will retire April 30 -
two months earlier
than scheduled - be-
cause he believed the Kelso
issues associated with
Tailhook were resolved and top Pentagon leaders had
backed his integrity and honesty.
Kelso, speaking to a room filled with reporters and
television cameras, said, "As the chief of naval opera-
tions, I had a responsibility to lead the Navy through the
process of changing the climate which allowed this inci-
dent to occur. Having done so it is my intention to submit
my request for retirement as of 30 April, 1994."
Kelso said he took the step on his own and had not
been asked to resign by Defense Secretary William Perry
and Secretary of the Navy John Dalton.
"I became the lightning rod for Tailhook," Kelso said
explaining his decision to step down early in order to put
the incident behind the naval service.
"With Secretary of Defense Perry's strong endorse-


to retire 2 months earlier than planned


ment, reaffirming my honor, integrity and leadership, we
can finally close this difficult chapter," Kelso said.
Kelso's announcement came a day after the admiral
opened a public push to rebut a Navy judge's finding is-
sued last week that Kelso knew about sexual misdeeds at
the 1991 Tailhook aviators' convention and interfered
with the investigation of the sex abuse scandal.
"I think this is the end of Tailhook," Kelso said. He
said it would be up to President Clinton to choose a new
chief of naval operations and he said he would work with
that person to ensure a smooth change of command.
Pentagon officials, speaking on condition of anonym-
ity, said a likely replacement would be Adm. Michael
Boorda, NATO's southern flank commander now in
charge of the potential alliance bombing campaign in
Yugoslavia.
Another admiral frequently mentioned as a contender
for the spot is Charles Larson, commander of the Pacific
command.
"I regard Admiral Kelso as a man of the highest in-
tegrity and honor," Defense Secretary William Perry said
in a statement issued at the Pentagon.
In an apparent attempt to blunt the harsh language of
the judge's ruling, Perry noted that the Pentagon's in-
spector general "found no credible evidence" that Kelso
had specific knowledge of the sexual misconduct at the
1991 aviators convention and found "no evidence" that
Kelso sought to thwart the Navy's investigation into the
scandal.
Navy Secretary John Dalton also issued a statement,
saying that even though he has "questioned the leader-
ship which permitted the excesses of Tailhook to take
place, I have never questioned the personal integrity and
honor of Frank Kelso."


"It is...important that we put the bitterness of Tailhook
behind us. The time for healing is now," Dalton said. He
said the lessons of the incident are ones that the men and
women of the Navy and Marine Corps "must never for-
get."
Kelso's retirement was prompted by a judicial deci-
sion issued last week in Norfolk by a Navy judge who
faulted Kelso for interfering in the Tailhook investiga-
tion and contended the admiral had witnessed untoward
conduct at the 1991 Tailhook convention.
The 1991 convention of the Tailhook Association, a
booster organization of Navy and Marine Corps aviators,
produced a scandal when dozens of women, including
some female officers, alleged they were molested during
a night of drunken debauchery in a Las Vegas hotel hall-
way.
Kelso authorized the Navy Monday to release written
statements by colleagues and supporters disputing the
judge's findings.
The documents appear to have been hastily assembled
last week following a Feb. 8 assertion by the Navy judge,
Capt. William T. Vest Jr., accusing Kelso of covering up
his knowledge of the misconduct at the Tailhook conven-
tion.
Included is a memo dated Feb. 11 from the senior
Tailhook investigator saying that Vest failed to back up
his charges.
"We have identified several discrepancies in the
court's opinion that call into question the factual basis for
the court's conclusion that Adm. Kelso had specific and
detailed knowledge of those events and the implication
that he lied to federal investigators and the court," wrote
Derek J. Vander Schaaf, the Navy's deputy inspector gen-
eral.


20 years and running


Vermont military academy admitted


female cadets without a fuss in 1972


a/









Tropic Times
Feb. 18,1994


A Voices


Gas station customer suffers embarrassment


Dear Mayors' Corner:
I was at the Curundu Gas Station late
in the evening recently and bought some
gas. After paying by check, I couldn't
leave because someone was parked in front
of me. So I went into the shoppette to buy
a few things. When I went back to my car
and tried to pull out, one of the attendants
approached me and accused me of not pay-
ing for my gas.
After an embarrassing situation, I
showed him a copy of the check I had writ-
ten. I was calm and didn't want to make a
scene and possibly get into trouble.
I didn't want to make a big deal out of
what I considered an isolated incident, but
I would like to know how I can be sure it
doesn't happen again? If I hadn't written
a check, I would have been had. Are re-
ceipts available upon request? What kind
of system is used to keep up with pay-


ments? Are we supposed to pay before we
pump, or what?
This was an embarrassing and infuri-
ating situation and I feel I deserve some
explanation.
A Disgruntled Customer

Dear Disgruntled:
I submitted your letter to the Army and
Air Force Exchange Service and they said
that, on this occasion, the attendant didn't
follow the procedure established by train-
ing. The proper procedure is to cancel all
transactions when the customer pays for
items.
At this time there is no system in place
that can automatically generate a receipt
for the customer. The customer is wel-


come to request a proof of purchase, but it
will have to be hand-written.
AAFES officials said they will do ev-
erything possible to prevent such a misun-
derstanding in the future and they apolo-
gize for the situation.

Dear Mayors' Corner:
I can't believe that the on-post cafete-
rias no longer sell empanadas. Could you
please look into this matter? I can't think
of any good reason to stop selling
empanadas.
Misses Empanadas

Dear Misses:
AAFES reports that because of a recent
inspection of the Corozal Bakery by the


American Bakery Association, it was rec-
ommended that they stop making
empanadas because it .wasn't a vital part
of a bakery operation and they were out of
compliance with the bakery standard op-
eration procedures.
The bakery is trying to find a way to
produce this item somewhere else but
hasn't been successful in finding a loca-
tion.

Editor'snote: Thiscolumnallowscom-
munity members to submit questions to
the Mayoral Congress. Letters should be
mailed to: Mayors' Corner, Publicity
Chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS).
Anonymity will be granted upoinrequest.
The Tropic Times reserves the right to
edit letters and responses for brevity,
clarity and propriety.


Working dogs help MPs nab thieves in Curundu
40-day jail sentence
Three people cut a hole in the fence and a roof of a PM'
building in the Curundu area last week. They were ap-
prehended by military police after one person tried to run
and was bitten by an MP working dog. The two people
were taken to night court where they were sentenced to 40
days in jail.
Report suspicious activity to the MPs at 287-4401 or
289-5133.


Five days community service
Three people were apprehended for unlawful entry af-
ter they were seen walking along the inside of the fence-
line of Corozal. They were taken to a Panamanian court
where they were sentenced to five days of community ser-
vice.

Unsecured property stolen
Officials remind residents and employees to secure
their property at all times.
More than $100 dollars was stolen from an purse last
week while, in another incident, $150 was stolen from an
unsecured desk drawer.
Always secure valuables to avoid becoming a victim of
crime. If a victim, call 287-4401 or 289-5133.

Sentenced to six months
A person was caught near the commissary with four
cases of peanut butter last week. He was taken to a Pana-
manian court where he was sentenced to six months in
jail.

Anonymous drug hotline
Anyone with information about drug smuggling
should call the Panama Jack anonymous hotline at 285-
4185.
The following crimes occurred in on-post housing ar-
eas Feb. 4-10.

Pacific
Fort Clayton 500 housing area - one larceny of unse-
cured private property
Fort Clayton 1-26 housing area - one larceny of unse-
cured private property
Curundu housing area - one larceny of unsecured pri-
vate property
Quarry Heights housing area - one housebreaking and
larceny of secured private property

This authorized unofficial command information pub-
lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic
Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces
Information Program of the Department of Defense, un-
der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S.
Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the
official view of the U.S. government, the Department of
Defense or the U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002
Telephone 285-6612.
Commander in Chief..................Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey
Director, Public Affairs.....................Col. James L. Fetig



itjTropic Tim


Cocoli housing area - one larceny of unsecured private
property
Atlantic
None to report
The following crimes occurred to U.S. citizens in off-
post housing Feb. 4-10.

Chief.... .............................SMSgt. Steve Taylor
Editor......... ............................. SSgt. Richard Puckett
Sports Editor..............Sgt. E. J. Hersom
Staff Editors......... ............................. Sgt. Lori Davis
Spec. John Hall
Rosemary Chong
Maureen Sampson
Volunteer Assistant.... ....................... Josephine Beane
Student Intern................................... Juan Carlos Palacio
Southern Command Public Affairs Office..........282-4278
Command Information Officer..............Patrick Milton
U.S. Army So uth Public Affairs Office..............287-3007
Public Affairs Officer.................Maj. Melanie Reeder
Command Information Officer................Beth Taylor


Pueblo Nuevo area - one larceny of secured private prop-
erty
Bethania area - two larcenies of secured private prop-
erty
Vacamonte area - one larceny of secured private prop-
erty

Editor........................................ ......SSgt. Jane U sero
Journalists.......................... ............ Sgt. Eric Hortin
Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski
Spec. Alexander C. White
24th Wing Public Affairs Office.......................284-5459
Public Affairs Officer..............Capt. Warren L. Sypher
Public Affairs Superintendent.....MSgt. Dale Mitcham
Journalists.... ......................... SSgt. Rian Clawson
Sgt. James A. Rush
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.............283-5644
Public Affairs Officer.........................Diane Gonzalez
Photographers..........................PH2 Roberto R. Taylor
PH2 Delano J. Mays
U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic....... ............289-4312
NCOIC......................................... Sgt. Richard Emert









C Commentary


Tropic Times7
Feb. 18, 1994


To skate or not to skate: is that the question?


by SSgt. Richard Puckett
Editor, Tropic Times
Monday evening, I
finally had enough. I just
couldn't take anymore.
Everywhere I looked
there it was. CNN, SCN, ESPN, all of
the N's were hitting me with just one
more story about Nancy Kerrigan and
Tonya Harding. Who really cares?
Ever since that fateful night when
Kerrigan was attacked and uttered those
now famous words - "Why me, Why
anyone?" the world just hasn't been the
same.
Now no evening is complete without
the latest Harding vs. Kerrigan update.
Be it a standard shot of Harding leaving
practice or Kerrigan smiling at a crowd
in Lillehammer, Norway, these two are
everywhere.
But when I turned on the television
Monday night and flipped to CNN, I
finally snapped. Apparently the Comedy
Network was hosting tryouts for a
Kerrigan and Harding skit. Skaters and
non-skaters alike took to a rink in New
York taking their own swing at stardom.
All this at the expense of one of
America's favorite sports.
Every four years America and the
world adopts a sweetheart from figure
skating to fall in love with. Dorothy
Hamill, Peggy Fleming and Katarina
Witt head a list of women who've earned
that spotlight. This time out though, that
halo has been tainted. Sure Kerrigan is
America's darling. But everyone loves
the poor little victim. If this had never
happened, we may never have heard of
either of these two women. Now
Kerrigan and Harding are forever linked.
What is the big deal anyway? Sure it
makes great entertainment. But once you
get past the surface, it paints a very
disturbing picture of where our country is
headed.
Whether or not Harding is guilty of
knowing or not will eventually be
revealed. Either Tonya will admit it or

Pi-S1!?utes


..1


AP LaserPhoto
Tonya Harding celebrates her victory at the 1991 U.S. Figure Skating Cham-
pionships in Minneapolis. Kerrigan (right) finished third.


the FBI will finally bring charges against
her. Gold medal or no gold medal, this
entire incident has given the American
sports world a black eye. One that won't
go away too soon.
But it's just one more chapter in the
continually degrading world of sports.


No longer are the athletes sacred to the
fans. They are very reachable. What's to
stop anyone from taking out a star
pitcher or quarterback the day before a
championship game? It's even scarier to
think that the competition may be
plotting it first.


Should Tonya Harding skate in the Olympics?


T~Vfr


IX


"I don't think she
should. I don't believe
her. "




Spec. Kelly Allen
Company A, 154th Signal
Battalion


"I think so. They
haven't proven any-
thing."




SrA. Maurice Compton
24th Communications
Squadron


"Well, I think she
should until proven
guilty."




Tina Ipock
Air Force family member


"No I don't. I think she
had a big part in it. She
shouldn't represent our
country."



A1C Marck McMahan
617th Airlift Support Squadron


"Yes. You're innocent
until proven guilty.
That's American jus-
tice."



Cecilia Vikstrom
Army family member


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries -- or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit
for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.


In the past several years, there seems
to be more and more cases like this.
You've got little league coaches shooting
each other after games, mothers trying to
take out cheerleaders to make room for
their daughters and fans stabbing tennis
stars to help their own favorites get to the
top.
Well, people would like to say that the
1980s were a decade of greed and that
may be true. The 1990s are carrying on
that tradition, but it has become a decade
of vengeance.
No longer do people just sit at home
sniviling about losing the big game. Now
they are thinking about how to "ensure"
victory next time out.
Even the Olympic flame isn't bright
enough to extinguish these dark
thoughts and actions. Lillehammer is
putting on a fantastic show and showing
off its best for the world to see, but no
one is looking.
People just want to see what happens
when Tonya and Nancy get into the rink
together for the first time.
So what's next? Will Jim Kelly pay
off American Airlines to take out the
NFC so that the Bills could finally win a
Super Bowl? Maybe Patrick Ewing will
get Shaquille O'Neal to bump off Scottie
Pippen so the Knicks can get to the NBA
finals.
When will this snowy soap opera end?
Maybe never. Every year the money, the
stakes and the pressure go up.
A gold medal could mean millions in
marketing around the world. But assault,
and even murder are becoming all too
common prices for money and stardom.
It's a dangerous wide world of sports.
There's no fun in it anymore, just
fear. It's the fear that's driving big name
stars out of the game. The top stars are
shying away from fans and becoming
more and more aloof. They've become
victims of their own success.
Is this what earning that 15 minutes
of fame is coming to? Go for the gold,
but remember to wear your bullet-proof
vest.


fe%
,u


il�








Tropic Times
Feb. 18, 1994


vi


Panama

celebrates

year ly fiesta
by Rosemary Chong .
Tropic Times staff

PENONOME - Hundreds of people ,
visited Las Mendozas swimming resort
Saturday to participate in the
Penonome Water Carnival.
Traditional and original decorated
balsa floats cruised down the Zarati ,
river kicking off Carnival '94.
All around Panama from Las Tablas
to Taboga, thousands of residents took
to the streets to celebrate the annual
festival.
In Las Tablas elaborate displays
depicting Roman and Greek mythology
highlighted the five-day event.
The queens were decked out in lavish
costumes and handmade crowns "
designed by local artists.
Although its not the biggest celebra- -- -(
tion, the Penonome event remains
popular because of its uniqueness. 'L ^
The water carnival became a reality
when a group of native "Penon- -
omenos" tried to offer the beautiful
waters of the Zarati river as a tourist-
attraction to its natives and visitors and
organized the aquatic or water carni-
vals.


In 1970, with Queen Carlota Arauz,
started the second stage of the water
carnival with a parade of floats slowly
lazing down the river.
Today, there are several princesses,
some lavishly adorned and others
scantily clad. They wave cheerfully
under headdresses of glass beads,
rhinestones and plumes, sometimes
gripping their headgear in staunch
rebellion to dry-season gusts. They are
part of the parade and compete against
each other with decorated floats made
by local artists.
This year the 1995 Black Queen
candidates also participated in the
water carnival.
This carnival has its own personality
and what makes the difference is the
parade that takes place down the river.
The water carnival goes back to
1921 when queen Bertilda Guardia
displayed her beauty and grace in a
primitive balsa float and paraded down
the crystal waters of the river.
Members of the U.S. military
community also took part in this year's
events. The various services sponsored
tours to Penonome and Las Tablas.
About 80 people went on the Penonome
trip, Navy Morale, Welfare and
Recreation officials said
Every year more than 40,000 people
gather at the Juan D. Arosemena road
for the "mojaderas" and "tunas" and
dance around day and night to the
music of the "murgas." Several local
groups of "comparsas" (singer/dancers)
compete for honors.
Carnival ended Wednesday morning
(Ash Wednesday) with the burial of the
sardine, to begin the first day of Lent.


The crowd enjoys the culecos Sunday at


)~
a


4
4~ ~!


Vielka Mendoza, a 1995 Panamanian black queen candidate, dances in Penonome.


A float cruises down the Zarati River in Penonome Saturday.
A float cruises down the Zarati River in Penonome Saturday.


Ana Luisa Sayavedra Cano, 1994 Carniv
crowds during Saturday night's parade.


A.










Tropic Times
Feb. 18, 1994 7


.9

~z.


Photos courtesy of La Estreila


Congos de Colon perform their traditional dances during the Carnival de Comparsas parade in Panama City Tuesday.


Department ot Defense pnoto Dy Sgt. E.J. Hersom
I Queen of Calle Arriba de Las Tablas waves to the


s Tablas.


I It


gill


NOW..








STropic Times
' OFeb. 18, 1994


Feature


TI1"-7' j


Theater Support Element photo by Spec. Brian Lepley
Capt. Mike Nelson takes off in his F-16 Fighting Falcon at Howard AFB. Nelson was one of 11 pilots from the 179th Fighter Squadron, 148th Fighter Wing,
Minnesota Air National Guard flying counterdrug missions in Central America.


Mach


2


Counterdrug mission 'pumps' Minnesota pilots


Theater Support Element photo by SSgt. Mike Simpkins
1st Lt. Scott Verville buckles his safety gear before takeoff.


by Spec. Brian Lepley
367th Public Affairs Detachment


A piercing horn erupts, shattering
the midday calm in the small
suite of rooms in the Operation
Coronet Nighthawk hangar. Coffee is
abandoned and flight manuals left behind
as two F-16 fighter jet pilots dash down a
narrow hall toward the stairs.
The signal was only a test, however.
The Minnesota Air National Guard pilots
walk back to the briefing room and the te-
dium of their 24-hour alert status.
But the potential of pulling nine G's at
Mach 2, 45,000 feet above the earth is
enough to stir the adrenaline of the Duluth
residents.
"Look at that," Capt. Mike Nelson said,
pulling up the sleeve of his flight suit, re-
vealing an armful of goose bumps. "Just
the bell going off gets me pumped!"
Nelson and Maj. Mike Robbins of the
179th Fighter Squadron, 148th Fighter
Group, Minnesota Air National Guard,
return to their wait. Should a suspicious
airplane drift into the area of operations,
the bell sounds for real, sending the citi-
zen-airmen and their aircraft screaming
into the sky.
Air National Guard F-15 and F-16
units staff Coronet Nighthawk during two-
week annual training periods year-round
at Howard. The fighter jets act as inter-
ceptors, with pilots visually identifying
and monitoring aircraft suspected of
smuggling drugs.
"We have land- and sea-based radar
and the jets working in unison," said
CMSgt. Joe White, of Howard's 24th Mis-
sion Support Squadron. "When the radar
picks something unusual up in the sky, we
get the call."
Most of the 11 pilots here from the
179th Squadron are veterans of drug in-
terdiction duty in Central America and
Florida. This tour is Nelson's third trip to
Panama. He flies several missions in
Florida each year.
"We have no power to deter or arrest
these planes. Our job is to make an ID and
follow them within a certain area," Nelson
says. "Then the pilots from Florida pick
them up. Ultimately, the Drug Enforce-


ment Agency will make an arrest, if nec-
essary.
. "I just spoke to some of our pilots irl
Florida. They said we must be doing a
good job down here because they haven't
had any business."
The action hadn't been all that hot and
heavy at Howard during this fortnight ei-
ther, Robbins said.
"It has been slow but it isn't surpris-
ing," added the veteran of four trips to this
Central American duty station. "Trans-
porting drugs depends on a lot of things
- the growing season, flying conditions,
the pressure they feel from authorities.
"Since this is the dry season, the vis-
ibility is much clearer. They'll be more
active in the rainy season, when the skies
are overcast."
Another reason for the lack of flights is
the success of the ongoing program.
"When we first started coming here we
flew a lot," Nelson says.
"It has tapered off each year," Robbins
said. "They get wiser in evading us; we
get smarter and catch up to their tactics.
But it seems we do less flying each time
we come down."
But two weeks here provides training
these two University of Minnesota-Duluth
graduates can't get during drill weekends.
"When we fly back home, it's practice.
Down here, we're performing a real-world
mission, but not in a wartime situation,"
Nelson said.
"This gives us the best possible oppor-
tunity to fly the missions that we practice
for all year, an air defense mission,"
Robbins adds.
The pilots also appreciate the challenge
of flying in the diverse climate that this
part of the hemisphere offers. But above
and beyond the invaluable training oppor-
tunity Coronet Nighthawk provides for
these pilots, they do not lose sight of the
service they're providing their country.
"The mission here is very important.
This is one of the major threats to our
country (illegal drugs), so there is a rush
when you're actually going out and doing
the job instead of training," Robbins said.










SWorld War H


Tropic Times
Feb. 18,1994


MP Branch presence in Panama


dates back to pre-World War II


by Dolores De Mena
USARSO Historian
FORT CLAYTON - The U.S. War Department set up
a Military Police Branch in 1917 and soon after the
United States entered into World War I, two companies
were activated in the Panama Canal Department. When
the MP Branch was inactivated at the close of the war,
the two Panama MP companies continued as organiza-
tional units.
All personnel were equipped with sidearms when the
companies were first activated. Company A (Department
Headquarters post) stationed at Quarry Heights was au-
thorized 150 men and Company B, stationed at Fort De
Lesseps, was authorized 75 men.
Until 1940, newly assigned MPs received six weeks of
formal instruction and training and were then given a
patrol assignment with an experienced member of the
company. During WWII, formal training of the two com-
panies continued, but greatly augmented Panama Canal
Department strength and occupation of defense sites ad-
jacent to interior Panamanian and other Central Ameri-
can towns made heavy demands upon MP organizations.
Designations of Panama Canal Department MP units
in 1940 were the Panama Pacific Military Police Com-
pany and the Panama Atlantic Military Police Company.
They were reorganized and redesignated the 20th MP
Company and the 19th MP Company respectively July
5, 1940, with an authorized strength of 257 enlisted men
for each company.
Before WWII, the original MP mission was connected
with maintenance of high standards of appearance and
conduct of U.S. Army personnel while off duty in the two
principal cities of Panama. As the United States entered
the war, this mission no longer covered the MP operation
of the command, although the mission of the 19th and
20th MP companies remained relatively unchanged. The
area mission, however, brought other MP units into the
Panama Canal Department to support wartime missions
connected with the security of vital defense installations
of both military and civilian nature.
A notable extension of MP authority relieved field
forces of the Panama Mobile Forces and Security Com-
mand of many interior guard and security details. One of
these duties, which was temporary, brought about the or-
ganization of a MP escort guard company to conduct the
canal's anti-sabotage mission guarding interned prison-
ers and escort them to the United States.
By 1942, MP units on duty in the Panama Canal De-
partment were: 19th Military Police Company, 20th
Military Police Company, Military Police Platoon
(Panama Mobile Force), 760th Military Police Battalion,
278th Military Police company, 236th Military Police
Company, 1380th Military Police Company (Aviation)
and the 344th Military Police Escort Guard Company.
The security mission of the MP in the Panama area
was a wartime development. Before the onset of the
emergency, security of posts, structures and materials was
the responsibility of the post commander. The lack of


A notable extension of MP authority
relieved field forces of the Panama
Mobile Forces and Security Command
of many interior guard and security
details. One of these duties, which
was temporary, brought about the
organization of a MP escort guard
company to conduct the canal's anti-
sabotage mission to guard interned
prisoners and escort them to the
United States.


centralized authority and responsibility created confusion.
Traffic regulations strictly enforced at one post were ne-
glected at an adjoining post. However, when the United
States entered into the war, authority was centralized un-
der the provost marshal.
The provost marshal pressed for security precautions
and convinced higher authorities that the MP's could not
effectively safeguard military property and enforce secu-
rity regulations in unfenced areas. As a result, fences
were placed around military installations.
In 1941, the entire area became a construction camp
as the canal's defenses were modernized to meet the
threat of war. The disorderly recruitment of construction
personnel was rectified by the creation of a Central Labor
Office under the Panama Canal. Employees were finger-
printed and issued identification cards.
For the first time in the Panama Canal Department,
civilians were provided with official and uniform identi-
fication. Security deficiencies at the posts were corrected
and control of entry to posts was well coordinated.
At the end of the war, the entry of privately owned
vehicles on military reservations rose sharply and by 1948
the distribution of post automobile tags was a responsibil-
ity of the sector commanders, who in turn, relegated the
responsibility to the sector provost marshals.
Security of prisoners was a well-defined PM responsi-
bility since the arrival of Army units in the Panama the-
ater. The Panama Canal Department guardhouse origi-
nally functioned at Fort Amador until it was moved to
Corozal during WWI. However, the Corozal guardhouse
was structurally unsatisfactory and a concrete structure
was built at Fort Clayton during WWIH.
Before completion of the Fort Clayton building, how-
ever, the guardhouse operation was temporarily trans-
ferred to Camp Empire which had been constructed in
1942 to accommodate Axis and Japanese internees. Be-
fore the designation of the Fort Clayton building as the
USACARIBE Guardhouse, two guardhouses were main-
tained. Atlantic sector prisoners were confined at Fort
Gulick and Pacific sector prisoners at Fort Clayton.


FORT CLAYTON - The following are significant
World War H events that took place in February 1944.
Feb. 1
Troops of V Amphibious Corps open attack for main
objectives at the Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands,
Southwest Pacific.
Initial Joint Plan, NEPTUNE (formulated by air,
ground, and naval planners) for invasion of Normandy is
issued. The code name NEPTUNE is restricted than the
term OVERLORD as it applies only to movement across
the channel and seizure of beachhead in Normandy.
Feb. 2
Roi Island in the Marshall Islands is taken by the 4th
Marine Division and positions are secured on Namur and
Kwajalein. For the first time Allied troops set foot on
prewar Japanese territory.
U.S. 6th Army headquarters moves from Australia to
Cape Cretin, New Guinea.
Feb. 6
Twenty-four soldiers graduate from the Enlisted
Specialist School of the Coast Artillery Command
Training Center in Panama. Ten completed an anti-
aircraft detection course, eight a wire communications
course, and six a searchlight electrician's course.
Feb. 8
Maj. Joe A. McEachern, Assistant Chief of Staff,
Panama Canal Department is awarded the Medal of
Distinction by the Republic of Nicaragua by President


Anastasio Somoza in recognition of his services in the
construction of the recently completed Pan American
Highway in Nicaragua.
Feb. 11
Capt. Donovan E. Smight, director of the Coast Ar-
tillery Command Training Center announces the
graduation of 67 soldier students from the Enlisted
Specialist School. Thirty-seven completed a course in
medical field service, 26 as qualified radio operators,
13 as anti-aircraft detection equipment operators,
nine as anti-aircraft fire control and two in radio
maintenance.
Feb. 12
Combined Chiefs of Staff issue directive to Gen.
Dwight D. Eisenhower on his duties as Supreme Allied
Commander, Allied Expeditionary Force, that will invade
the European continent. Target date is set as May, 1944.
Feb. 17
Lt Gen. George H. Brett, Commanding General
of the Caribbean Defense Command and of the
Panama Canal Department, travels to Quito, Ecua-
dor, on a special mission and bestows the Order of the
Legion of Merit upon Col. Hector Salgado, Com-
mander, Carabaneros, and Maj. Coruelio Izquierdo,
Ecuadoran Army.
During a reception offered by Ecuadorian president,
Carlos Arroyo del Rio, Brett urges "united support of con-
stituted democratic government through strong military


leaders, during the present troubled World conditions."
Adm. Harry Hill's Eniwetok Expeditionary Group in-
vades Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands, (Operation
CATCHPOLE) following preliminary naval gunfire, air
bombardment, and minesweeping operations.
Feb. 21
Headquarters, Quarry Heights, announces Col.
Francis E. Howard, Provost Marshal of the Panama
Canal Department, is to be honored with a full mili-
tary parade and review marking the completion of a
four-year tour of duty. The ceremony will be held on
the Coast Artillery Quadrangle at Fort Clayton.
Feb. 24
During a review, Col. Francis E. Howard, presents
a $1,000 War Bond to PFC Bryce F. Eck, of the MP's
who recently lost his left leg in a motorcycle accident.
Feb. 25
A Pollera Ball at the Panama Union Club in honor
of Lt. Gen. George H. Brett, presided by Queen Elisa
Arosemena, Union Club Carnival sovereign, ends the
Bomber Fund Drive exceeding its $15,000 goal.
Feb. 29
A U.S. Army force lands in Admiralty Islands, South-
west Pacific.
By the end of February 1944, selective service reg-
istration in the canal zone and in Panama of U.S. citi-
zens 18 to 44 years old was completed. The number of
canal zone registrants as of Dec. 1,1943, totaled 2,744.

Editor's note: This timeline was compiled by
Dolores De Mena, USARSO, historian, in commemo-
ration of the 50th Anniversary of WWIL


Veteran looks back

on 'Old Panama'

by SSgt. Jane Usero
USARSO Public Affairs Office

FORT CLAYTON - .
Elton Boyer remembers a
Panama where the only "
way to the Atlantic was
by train, where only
jungle stood between
Fort Clayton and Howard
"Air Field," a time when I I
Quarry Heights was big-
ger than Panama City
and when cigarettes were
6 cents a pack. Boyer
The Panama this re-
tired U.S. Army Air Corps soldier remembers is that
of 1939-43 when he was stationed with the 7th Re-
connaissance Squadron at France Field near Fort
Davis.
"My unit was moved several times while I was
here. Once they sent us to David and all there was
there was us and a grassy field."
Boyer, who is visiting Panama for the first time
in more than 50 years, spent nine months in Peru
and conducted goodwill missions throughout South
and Central America in B-17 and B-18 bombers.
"Most of the places we went, the people had never
seen bombers before and it was a real treat for them,
and us," the Seal Beach, Calif., native said.
The unit of six aircraft was moved to Howard Air
Field where when World War II broke out.
"I remember being in the barracks when I heard
the Japanese had bombed Pearl Harbor. I remember
thinking, 'why would they do a thing like that?'
"We remained in the canal zone during the war
as a protective force," he said. "As part of our mis-
sion, we flew many mock bombing runs over the ca-
nal from Howard Air Field."
Boyer worked his way from flight engineer to
pilot and served 17 years, eight on foreign duty.
Of course, Panama is much different today.
"The buildings are the same as when I was here,
at least on the outside," he said. "In what use to be
my barracks, there is a PX and all sorts of stuff. As a
matter of fact, I ate a meal on one floor and was able
to buy a postcard where my bunk use to be."
Another difference is the buildings and people.
"The buildings are unreal," he said. "All these
buses and people - it (Panama) has grown tremen-
dously. I can't believe all the people."
Coming back to his old stomping grounds has
brought back many good memories for the retired
airline pilot and has impressed in his mind the vast
changes not only in Panama, but also in the military.
"Our old bombers pale in comparison to the types
of aircraft the military has now," he said. "The mili-
tary of today is really something else."


Nicaragua honors canal officer


J


'-/













Sports


Feb. 18,1994 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 12



Race for the playoffs heats


Supply stretches streak

to 20, SPs step to 12-0


by Sgt. James A. Rush
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB- Defending champion.
24th Supply Squadron had little trouble
with Company B, 1st Battalion, 228thAvia-
tionBrigade, polishing itoff 14-2insoftball
action Feb. 11 at Weekly Field here.
Other winners that night were the 617th
Airlift Support Squadron, 24th Transpor-
tation Squadron and Company A, 1st Bat-


talion, 508th Infantry.
The victory stretches supply's win streak
to 20 straight going back to the 1993 season
and playoffs. It also keeps it in step with the
National League's 24th Security Police
Squadron (12-0).
This year's season is half over. Supply
and the cops will not meet during the
regular season setting up a potential
undefeated showdown in the playoffs.
While supply owns the AmericanLeague


South, the North Division is a king-of-the-
hill competition with ALSS currently on
top.
Airlift support claimed the top spot by
pushing down the 24th Air Postal Squad-
ron (13-5). The win pads its record to 8-4.
Four other teams in the division have four
to six losses.
Only the 24th Communications Squad-
ron Team 2 is out of the North's playoff
hunt.
At 0-11, COMM 2 is the only intramu-
ral team to fail to record a win during the
first half of the season.
The 1-508th won by forfeit over Com-
pany C, 1-228th in the evening's opener.
In the final game of the night, the Na-


tional League's 24th Transportation Squad-
ron squared off against Western Division
rival 24th Weather Squadron.
It was the most closely contested game
of the night, but transportation eeked out a
10-6 win thanks to a late-game scoring
surge.
Weather led for the first four innings.
Three times scores in the first and one in the
third game gave it a 4-0 advantage.
The roof collapsed in the top of the fifth
however.
Transportation's bottom five batters
scored on a four-hit rally. Another run in
the sixth and four more in the seventh was
enough cushion to absorb Weather's last
inning rally.


Paddlers across the isthmus pre-
pare for the upcoming cayuco race
spectacle.


Crank it
Menaseche Sports leftfielder Sharon Harday cranks it to the fence for an inside-the-park home run against All Guts No Glory Tuesday evening at Fort Clayton.
Menaseche Sports dominated the game and has led the Women's Softball League most of the season. All Guts No Glory has played like its name and trails
the league at (1-7).


and More page 15

*Black History Month softball
*Ybuth soccer season
*SCN radio sports


Olympics page 13

Signal soldiers find alternative to
organizational days in the form of
Silly Olympics.









Tropic Times 1
Feb. 18,19941


1__Sports


Silly olympians mock 4


organizational days a 4


by SSgt. Jane Usero
USARSO Public Affairs Office

FORT CLAYTON-The 56th Signal
Battalion was the first U.S. Army South
unit to hold the Unit "Silly" Olympics
that will be held at unit organization
days and culminate with a USARSO-
wide competition July 4.
"We hope to get all the units to
participate and the winning teams go on
to the Fourth of July competition," said
Sgt. Patricia Lammie, Olympic coordi-
nator for the 56th.
The Unit"Silly" Olympics is planned
to begin at the unit and move up to
battalion and brigade levels before reach-
ing the USARSO competition, she said.


"The games include several fun things
such as tug-of-war, tricycle rides, secret
events and watermelon pass," Lammie
said.
"But, the unit itself really comes up
with the events and just about anything
goes."
The main purpose of the Olympics is
to take what some see as "mandatory
fun" and make it really fun for every-
body and brings the unit together, she
said.
"We started with few volunteers, but
ended up with more than enough for the
teams," Lammie said.
Units wanting to set up a Unit "Silly"
Olympics for their organization day can
call Lammie at 285-6715.


- V

Yv


U.S. Army photo by SSgt. Jane Usero
Headquarters Detatchment, 56th Signal Battalion, pulls a win.


U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Mildred Navarrro
Millie Amat, an Army family member, stretches in the unit stretch competition of the
Unit Silly Olympics.


Women's Softball League


Team
Menascehe Sports
Chryler
Nujak Swing
Comedy Crew
Kamikazes
Lady Torpedoes
All Guts No Glory
as of Monday


W L
8 1
6 3
6 2
4 5
3 6
2 6
1 7


GB

2
2 1/2
4
5
5 1/2
6 1/2


Atlantic Women's Softball League
Team W L GB
2 La Jit 6 0 -
Hustlers 4 2 2
Ladies Cammanej 2 4 4
Panthers 0 6 6

Reeder Over 30 Basketball League


Team
The Friends
Knights
The Posse
Jazz
Barcardi
Los Medios
Co. E 308th MI
MEDDAC
SOUTHCOM2
SOUTHCOM


W L
11 0
11 2
9 4
8 5
7 5
3 8
6 7
3 9
2 10
1 11


GB

1
2
2 1/2
4
5 1/2
5 1/2
7
7 1/2
8 1/2


Army Unit Level Softball League
White League


Team
310th MI
HHC USAG
142nd Med
SOUTHCOM
HHD 470th MI
Co. B 1-508th
Co. C 1-508th
41st ASG
56th ORD Det.
Co. B 193rd Spt.
59th Eng.
DCSRM
HHC 193rd Inf.
Co. A 193rd Supt.


Red League
Team W L
56th Signal Bat. 8 2
Co. E 1-228th 7 2
HHC LEA 7 3
Co. A 154th Sig. 6 2
534th MP Co. 5 3
MEDDAC 6 4
HHD 56th Sig. 4 6
HHC 1-228th 4 6
92nd PSC 3 5
3rd SOSC 4 6


GB

1/2
1/2
2
2 1/2
2 1/2
3
4 1/2
3 1/2
4
4 1/2
6 1/2
7
7 1/2


GB

1/2
1
1
1 1/2
2
4
4
4
4


555th MP Co.
HHCUSAG/IG
Co. B 154th Sig


Gre
Team
747th MI
TRICO
JOTB
PCC
549th MP Co.
HSGA
3-7th SF
Co. A 5-87th
Navy Gold
HHC 5-87th
Co. C 5-87th
408th MI
Marines
Co. B 5-87th


en Lea;


6 5
8 5 1/2
7 6
as of Monday

gue
L Gb
0 -
0 1/2
0 1
1 1 1/2
2 21/2
2 21/2
2 21/2
1 21/2
4 4
2 3 1/2
1 3
2 3 1/2
5 5
0
as of Monday


Howard Softball League
National League
Eastern Division
Team W L GB
24th AIS/OSS 9 3 -
24th MEDS 8 3 1/2
617th SOAD 8 4 1


HHC 1-508th
24th COMM #1
24th SVS
617th ALSS #2
Western Division
24th SPS#1
24th MSSQ
24th SVS
24th TRANS
HHC 1-228th
24th WS
24th CES #2


2
2 1/2
4
7


3 1/2
6
6
9
10
10 1/2


American League
Southern Division
Team W L G
24th SUPS 11 0 -
536th ENG 9 2 2
24thCES#1 6 3 6
24 AIRPS 5 7 6
310ALS 3 7 7
C Co. 1-228 1 9 9
Northern Division
617th ALSS #1 8 4 -
24th MS 7 5 1
24th SPS #2 6 5 1
B Co. 1-228 4 4 2
Co. A 1-508 3 6 3
24th COMM #2 0 11 7
as of


B


1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2


1/2

1/2
1/2
Wednesday











S4 Tropic Times
-4 Feb. 18, 1994


~Lsp-orts


"There's nothing that can be done about that," she said.
"Some of the patch boats are very fast."
Race times have improved by more than five hours since
Ship-10-Gamboa left Cristobal.
* - ' The following are the winning boats since the race
began. Not all of the times and winners were available and
although the boat may have won several times, the crews


change frequently
Year Categor
1993 Male


1992



1991



1990



1989



1988



1987



1986


Department of Defense photo by Sgt. E.J. Hersom
Gamboa paddlers, Lee Gibson, Jose Gonzales, Tyler Quinn and Chris Corrigan, work out in Misconcep-
tion. The Gamboa teams have the potential to all finish in the top 10, said Lou Husted, trainer.


Paddlers prepare for annual


cayuco canal run spectacle


by Sgt. E.J. Hersom
Tropic Times Sports Editor
GAMBOA - The teams seen paddling the crew-compe-
tition-looking boats with canoe oars around the canal
recently are preparing for the 1994 Panama Canal District
Boy Scouts of America Annual Ocean to Ocean Cayuco
Race set for March 25.
This year's canal run is the 41st of the time-honored
event that began in 1954 when Ship-10-Gamboa won the
race with a time of 10 hours and 30 minutes.
The journey through the canal is 50 miles of team-
powered paddling staged in three days beginning at the
Panama Canal Yacht Club in Cristobal. The second day is
launched the following day from the boat ramp at the south
end of Gatun Locks. The third begins at the finishing
beacon of the second and ends at the Diablo boat ramp.
Grueling is the word used most to describe the event.
The boats more than 40 teams compete in yearly are
hollowed trees cut from forests near lakes and rivers.
"It's truly the natives' mode of transportation," said
Llori Gibson, a race committee member.
The Espave tree is the cayuco makers' choice because
it floats well and doesn't rot, she said.
Cayuco racing has run in the Gibson family for years.
Jay Gibson, Llori's husband, used to race, but now builds
cayucos and trains teams.
He's owned up to five boats and won in 1974 in the NIC,
which stands for Non Illitimus Carborundum or "Don't Let
the Bastards Get You Down."
His latest project Deception has been more than a year


in the making and will be paddled by his 14-year-old-son,
Chris, who is competing in his first cayuco race.
Deception is thesisLer boat of Misconception and raced
in the regatta leading up to the race in 1993, but Jay held
the boat out of the race for refinements.
Deception has an innovative design like nothing the
race has ever seen before, Llori said.
Jay made the boat with a convex bow so that Chris and
other young paddlers can ride on top of waves and break
through the water easier, he said.
The design of Deception is no great secret, Jay said, but
paddlers across the isthmus have been speculating about
it.
Other speculations in the area concern Lee's, Chris'
brother, third design of the cayuco race patch.
Details of the patch design are scarce and shrouded in
secrecy, but will include the Gamboa Bridge and have four
points, sources said. No other details were available about
the patch except that each part of it is symbolic, Llori said.
Lee earned the privilege of designing the patch by
winning the trophy category of the race - a feat he
accomplished three years in a row in Misconception.
Only Exporer Scouts 14-21 years old can actually win
the race and receive trophies. Other contestants fall into the
patch category and by finishing the race, earn the patch.
The patch contestants are mainly out for fun, but some
want to be up on stage with the trophy winners, Llori said.
The race committee has looked into possibilities, but it
won't happen. The race has a staggered start with the
trophy category leaving first, but the patch boats still catch
up, she said.


y Boat Time Unit/Ship
Miconception unavail. Post 10


COED Spontaneous
Combustion
Female Great
Expectations
Patch Ultimate Most
Male Misconcpetion
COED the Most
Female Great Expect.
Patch Mister Most
Male Misconception
COED Spontaneous C.
Female Bruised Reed
Patch Fire
Male Utmost
COED Spontaneous C.
Female the Most
Patch Slave Galley
Male Utmost
COED Spontaneous C.
Female Bruised Reed
Patch Ultimate Most
Male Snafu
COED Rosa De America
Female Bruised Reed
Patch Ultimate Most
Male NIC
COED Rosa De America
Female Bruised Reed
Patch Mister Most
Male Scenic Route
COED Rosa De America
Female Situation
Hopeless


Patch Almost
1985 Male Due Process
COED the Most
Female Bejuco
Patch Bruised Reed
1984 Male NIC
COED Situation H.
Female Bejuco
Patch the Most
1983 Male NIC
COED Situation H.
Female Relax
Patch Cardiac Arrest
1982 Male Due Process
COED the Most
Female Great Expectations
Patch Cardiac Arrest
1981 Male Due Process
COED Tequila Sunrise
Female Dejuco
1980 Male Almost
1979 Male Due Process
1978 Male Dear Dick
1977 Male NIC
1976 Male NIC
Female El Bejuco unavail
Patch Nihon Maru
1975 Male Due Process
COED La Flecha
Female Crimson Tide
1974 Male NIC
Female P-29-Curundu
1973 Male NIC
Female S-9-2
1972 Male NIC
Patch Predator
1971 Male NIC
1970 Male Destiny
1969 Male Destiny
1968 Male NIC unavw
1967 Male Bejuco
1966 Male Bejuco
1965 Male Bejuco
1964 Male Bejuco
1963 Male Cojeme Si Puedes
1962 Male Homer's Folly
1961 Male P-20 Balboa
1960 Male Cojeme Si Puedes
1959 Male Cojeme Si Puedes
1958 Male S-9-Cristobal
1957 Male P-12-Gatun
1956 Male P-12-Gatun
1955 Male P-12-Gatun
1954 Male S-10-Gamboa


6:07:28 Post 10

6:08:48 Post 21
unavailable
5:20.14 Post 10
6:11:09 Post 21
6:18:10 Post 21
5:50:35 unavail
5:24:49 Post 10
5:42:38 Post 10
6:20:08 Post 10
7:50:39 Ship 9
5:25:51 Post 21
5:23:23 Post 10
6:42:34 Post 21
7:22:27 Post 21
5:26:51 Post 21
5:23:33 Post 10
6:15:15 Post 10
6:57:35 Post 21
5:31:35 Post 21
6:36:13 Rovers
6:27:03 Post 10
6:18:35 Post 21
5:33:24 Post 21
6:46:02 Rovers
6:38:34 Post 10
5:47:23 Post 21
6:46:22 Ship 9
6:40:37 Rovers


6:59:58
6:52:16
5:45:37
6:26:15
6:59:00
6:20:36
5:42:03
6:30:08
6:45:07
6:10:58
5:45:45
5:41:34
7:09:44
8:51:18
5:38:54
6:00:09


Post 21'
Post 21
Ship 9
Post 21
Post 21
Post 21
Post 21
Post 21
Post 21
Post 21
Post 21
Post 21
Post 21
Post 21
Post 21
Post 21


6:25:38 Post 21
7:14:59 Post 21
5:43:05 Post 21
unavail Post 21
unavail Post 21
unavail Post 21
unavail Post 21
6:08:53 Post 21
5:35:41 Post 12
5:48:02 Post 12
Post 21
unavail Post 29
5:39:36 Ship 8
6:52:27 Post 1
7:38:51 Ship 8
6:14:16 Post 21
unavailable
5:46:20 Post 21
9:24:02 Post 1
5:46:41 Post 21
unavailable
6:09:57 Post 21
6:10:58 Post 1
6:11:13 Post I
ailable Squadron 15
unavail Post 21
6:52:38 Post 21
6:20:58 Post 21
7:48:57 Post 21
unavail Ship 10
unavail Ship 10
unavail Post 20


7:25:46
7:29:37
unavail
unavail
unavail
unavail
10:30:00


Post 3
Post 3
Ship 9
Post 12
Post 12
Post 12
Ship 10










Tropic Times 15
Feb. 18, 1994 1


L _Sports Shorts


SCN AM radio airs pro,
college, olympic sports
Southern Command Network's AM 790
Pacific and 1420 Atlantic will broadcastthe
following sports this weekend.
Tonight
Pro basketball: Seattle at Orlando, 8
p.m.
Saturday
Olympic hockey: Sweden vs. Team
U.S.A., 1:45 p.m.
College basketball: UCLA at Arizona, 4
p.m.
Sunday
Pro basketball: Chicago atN.Y. Knicks,
1p.m.
College basketball: Louisville vs. Temple
at Orlando, Fla., 3:45 p.m.
Monday
Olympic hockey: Italy vs. TeamU.S.A.,
1:45 p.m.
College basketball: Fla. State at Florida,
8 p.m.

Fronius hosts birthday
softball tournament
The Fronius Physical Fitness Center
will holds a Presidents Day men's and
women's softball tournament Saturday
through Monday. An organizational meet-
ing will be held Thursday. The entrance fee
is $50 for women's teams and $75 for
men's teams. Call the center at 289-3108
for more information.

AUSA sponsors running
events at Reeder gym
There will be a U.S. Army South Presi-
dents Day fun run 7 a.m. Saturday atReeder
Physical Fitness Center. The run, spon-


scored by the Association of the U.S. Army,
includes an 800-yard dash and 1- and 3-
mile runs for all ages. The 5-mile run is for
children 15 years old and up. The cost is $6.
For more information, call the center at
287-6442

Fort Clayton range hosts
pistol competition
A practical pistol competition will be
held March 5 at the Fort Clayton Pistol
Range. Registration will be 9 a.m. and the
first shot will be 9:30 a.m. The competition
is open to active duty members in single or
four-man team events. For registration,
fees or information, call 287-5647.

Bowling centers offer
President's Day specials
The Howard and Albrook Bowling Cen-
ters will offer bowling specials in honor of
Presidents Day Sunday. Games will cost 75
cents. The monthly no-tap tournament will
be held Feb. 27. For more information, call
the Howard center at 284-4818 or the
Albrook center at 286-4260.

DENTAC sponsors run
against tooth decay
The U.S. Army Dental Activity- Panama
will host the 10th Run From Decay fun run
8 a.m. Feb. 26 at the Albrook AFS track.
The run is open to children 5-12 years old
who have bilingual identification cards.
The children will run in age and sex catego-
ries in 200 meters and 1/4 mile races and
prizes will be awarded. Registration forms
can be picked up at Department of Defense
Dependents Schools, the Fort Clayton Den-
tal Clinic and the Gorgas Army Commu-


nity Hospital Dental Clinic. Late registra-
tion will be at the track 7-7:30 a.m. on race
day. For information, call Chris Merida at
287-3609/3904.

Fitness center accepts
Tae Kwon Do forms
Applications for the Tae Kwon Do train-
ing camp at Fort Indiantown Gap, Pa., are
available at the Howard Sports and Fitness
Center. Application deadline is Feb. 26 and
are available for active duty airmen. Call
the center at 284-3451 for more informa-
tion.

Wanted: skilled soccer
players born after '82
Internationals coach Jose Soto is look-
ing for skilled soccer players born after
Aug. 1982 to compete in a city-wide com-
petition being held March 3 to April 30.
Tryouts will be held 5 p.m. Monday and
Tuesday at the Albrook Soccer Field. For
more information call, Jose Soto at 286-
4591.

Fitness center teaches
better fitness classes
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center
holds Fitness Improvement Training
Classes 6:05-7 a.m. and 2:05-3 p.m. Mon-
day, Wednesday and Friday at the center.
The classes consists of a calisthenic super
circuit work out that is aimed at improving
muscular endurance, cardiovascular sys-
tems and flexibility. Students mustbeevalu-
ated on the amount of exercise they are
capable of performing in a class before the
program starts. Call the center at 284-3451
for more information.

Sports registration open
at Reeder fitness center
Registration for the following sports
events has begun at the Directorate of
Community Activities Sports Branch on
Fort Clayton: Desert Storm softball pro-
gram; unit level flag football and women's
soccer. Call 287-4050 for more informa-
tion.

Reeder hosts history
month tournament
The Reeder Physical Fitness Center is
hosting a Black History Month basketball
tournament Feb. 26 - Feb. 28. Registration
and fee are required to enter. Call 287-3861
for more information.

Fitness center teaches
self-directed aerobics
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center
offers self-directed aerobics programs -
"Ski the Appalachian Trail" and "Climb
Mount Everest." For more information,
call 284-3451.

Howard, Albrook pools
offer swimming classes
The Howard and Albrook pools invite
parents and their children to enroll in swim-
ming lessons. The pools also have water
aerobics classes available. Call the Zodiac
Recreation Center at 284-3569 or the
Albrook Pool at 286-3555.

Davis pool hosts swim
meet 'Fiesta Panama'
The Fort Davis Pool will host the begin-
ners swimming meet "Fiesta Panama" 10
a.m. Saturday. Registration deadline is to-
day. Categories are doggie kick, front kick,
back kick and free style. Age groups are for
4-12 year olds.
Call the Davis pool at 289-3272 for
more information.


Atlantic center offers free
weekday step aerobics
The Fronius Physical Fitness Center
offers free step aerobics 9-10 a.m. week-
days. Participants musthavetheirown step.
Call the center at 289-3108.

Curundu Bowling Center
holds Green Pin Bowling
The Curunidu Bowling Center holds
Green Pin Bowling Sundays. Make a strike
when the green pin is in the number one
position and that game is free. Call the
center at 285-3914 for more information.

Fitness center offers free
weekday aerobics class
The Reeder Physical Fitness Center has
free aerobics 9:15-10:15 a.m. weekdays.
Each workout has a warm up, cardiovascu-
lar workout, cool down and floorwork. Call
the center at 287-3861 for more informa-
tion..

Reeder honors president
with three-pointer contest
Reeder Physical Fitness Center will cel-
ebrate George Washington's Birthday with
a basketball three-point shot contest Mon-
day. Registration will be the day of the
event. Call the center at 287-3861 for more
information.

Military Sailing Club
holds courses until June
The Military Sailing Club will hold
several four-day sailing courses through
June. Each class will be held over the last
weekend and first weekend of the month.
The $75 cost includes the rental fee of the
boat, instructor and a certification card that
can be used to take the intermediate sailing
course at Rodman Naval Station. Classes
are limited to the first 10 students to sign up
and pay. People who are not in the first 10
will be scheduled for future classes. The.
winners of the Morale, Welfare and Recre-
ationsailboatclass race Feb. 7 were: Emmilio
Kourany in first, Marcelyn Downer in sec-
ond, Brad Hittle in third and Ron Stitts in
fourth. Call Steve Rasmussen at 287-5968,
John Stobie at 285-4634 or stop by the Fort
Clayton Boat Shop.

Howard fitness center
sets new aerobic hours
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center
will have step aerobic classes 8:45 a.m.
Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Classes
cost $1. Call 284-3451 for more informa-
tion.

Youth services seeks
youth soccer coaches
Youth Services Atlantic needs coaches
for the upcoming youth soccer season. Reg-
istration for the season is also under way.
Space is limited. Sign up at the Building
219, Fort Espinar.

Fitness center hosts free
play volleyball weekdays
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center
will hold free-play volleyball 6:30-8:30
p.m. weekdays. Call the center at 284-345
for more information.

Rodman Fitness Center
rents mountain bikes
The Rodman Fitness Centerrents moun-
tain bikes on a hourly, daily or weekly basis.
Prices are $1 per hour, $5 per day, $25 per
week. A $25 deposit is required for rentals
taken off Rodman Naval Station. Call 283-
4222/4061.


Tennis anyone?
The monthly Crossroads Tennis Club tournament will be Feb. 26-27 at the
Diablo Heights Tennis Courts with categories for men, women and
children. Registration deadline is 6 p.m. Wednesday. For registration
information, call Mike Goldstein at 264-5160 or Wally Murdoch at 252-
2969.











Tropic Times
'16 Feb. 18, 1994


*News


AF recruiters scout locals


by SSgt. Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - Three U.S. Air
Force recruiters from Patrick AFB's 333rd
Recruiting Squadron recently left Florida
to visit Howard AFB and to recruit young
men and women interested in an Air Force
career.
The group's visit follows almost six
years of absence in the local community,
said recruiting operations supervisor
MSgt. Gerard Baker.
"Although Army recruiters have a per-
manent presence in Panama," he said,
"Air Force recruiters haven't been here
since 1988."
The team sought recruits at Balboa
High School and Panama Canal College.
Team members also made individual ap-
pointments with people who called in with
inquiries.
The team members were pleased with
the results of their efforts here, said senior


liaison TSgt. Bill Turner.
"We've gotten tremendous results
here, much better than we expected," he
said.
In fact, the recruiting team was so
happy with the local response that they
extended their stay two days.
The basic requirements for prospective
Air Force recruits are to be between the
ages of 17 and 27 and be either a U.S. citi-
zen or a resident alien of the United States.
"Many people watch the news or read
news articles about the drawdown of the
armed forces and believe the Air Force is
no longer interested in recruiting them,"
Turner said. "This is definitely not the
case. People who meet our two basic re-
quirements are welcome to give us a call
and explore Air Force opportunities fur-
ther."
A dozen local people expressed inter-
est in the Air Force and took the Armed
Services Vocational Aptitude Battery.
Four of those were actually sworn in, said


Maj. James Dula, Mission Support Squad-
ron commander.
Although the recruiters have returned
to Patrick, they have left in place a process
so people can pursue a personal interest in
an Air Force career.
Dula (284-3456) and MSSQ first ser-
geant MSgt. Johnny Wilford (284-3416)
will be the local liaison for the Air Force
recruiters in their absence. People may
also call the recruiters directly at Defense
Switching Network 854-4686 or commer-
cial (305) 591-7326.
Before the recruiters' visit, there was
no avenue for people to take when they
considered joining the U.S. Air Force,
Dula said. "We now have a system to en-
sure everyone who wants to join has the
means to do so."
The recruiting team is scheduled to re-
turn here in about four months.
"Since they had such an outstanding
response this time out, they'll be back,"
Dula said.


U.S. teams help improve Uruguay's water


QUARRY HEIGHTS (US-
SOUTHCOM PAO) - The U.S.
Office of Defense Cooperation
at the U.S. Embassy in
Montevideo wrapped its 1993
with assistance programs. ..
Doctors, lawyers, engineers
and command post controllers
headed a list of experts who ar-
rived to participate in exercises
and information exchanges with .
Uruguayan civilian and military
officials. .
DoD medical supplies do-
nated to the Ministry of Public
Health benefited the Uruguayan
population at large, officials
said. But the most visible assis-
tance helped provide water for
farmers and paint for a school-
house. . '
"We were very pleased to ! 4 - .
play a part in building a stron-
ger sense of community with
these projects," said ODC Chief,
Air Force colonel William A.
Jordan.
The United States and Uru- Cmdr. William McKeeve
guay ended a 2-year model Uruguayan school childr
project to develop reliable water Rodgers, and Whidbey Is,
sources for some of Uruguay's neighborhood Oct..26.
small farmers. The 24 wells, af-
fecting about 380 acres, will help producers compete in the more
competitive environment of the evolving Common Market of the
South. It will also serve as a model for civilian drilling opera-
tions.
In 1992, U.S. Army Engineers from the 6th Well Drilling
Detachment of the 536th Engineer Battalion, U.S. Army South
drilled 12 wells near Montevideo and 12 more near the city of
Salto in 1993 as part of Exercise Fuertes Caminos South.
The Uruguayan government's Ministry of Agriculture se-
lected the drilling sites and made arrangements with farm own-
ers. The government also brought fuel and gravel to each site,
while farmers paid for electrical hookups for irrigation systems.
Uruguayan drilling companies, government engineers and stu-
dents observed operations to gain insights on technical advances.
The U.S. detachment got valuable field experience, officials said.
U.S. and Uruguayan war gamers also got a chance to work
together to defeat a fictional invasion in Fuerzas Unidas com-
mand post exercises held at the Army and Air Force command
and general staff colleges in mid-October.
This year, staff from 12th Air Force, the Army's 10th Moun-
tain Division, USARSO, the School of the Americas, and US-
SOUTHCOM represented the United States. Military members
from both countries played on each of the defending and invad-
ing teams. Meanwhile, Uruguayan civilians got a close up view
of the courtesy of local television-coverage.
A week later, in Montevideo during the annual UNITAS ex-
ercise, sailors and Marines from the USS Stark, John Rodgers,
and Whidbey Island provided a school for developmentally chal-
lenged children in the capital of Cerro with paint, cement, and
other supplies. The sailors cleaned, repaired, and repainted walls
inside and out. Local students, parents, and teachers also helped.
"Those of us in the neighborhood appreciate it too," an eld-
erly on-looker said.


- 4
Department of Defense photo
r of the Office of Defense Cooperation lends his hat to
en in October, 1993. Sailors from the USS Stark, John
land refurbished the children's school in Montevideo's Cerro

In February and March, ODC arranged subject matter expert
exchanges that helped Uruguayan military medical specialists
gain a better understanding of hospital logistics planning, equip-
ment maintenance, and pharmaceuticals management.
U.S. Army Maj Hank Cintron of the Deputy Army Surgeon
General's office conducted the logistics exchange, while ODC
Army representative Maj Michael Scott escorted four Uruguayan
medical officers on the pharmaceuticals exchange to Walter Reed
Army Hospital in Washington.
In September, a U.S. Army mobility training team from
Walter Reed advised doctors at Uruguay's Military Health Ser-
vices Command on pre- and post-deployment health screening
- including malaria and HIV testing. This training is key to
Uruguayan Army medical support for local deployments to UN
peace-keeping missions around the world- to which the country
is heavily committed, officials said.
In March, an exchange headed by Air Force Judge Advocate
General Brig. Gen. Nolan Sklute hosted discussions with mili-
tary officials on environmental law and jurisdiction of civilian
and military courts. Environmental law, now a leading legal is-
sue in the United States, is gaining momentum in Uruguay as
well. Refining the boundaries between civilian and military court
jurisdictions is crucial to resolving conflicts between sometimes
competing court systems, officials said.
Instructors from the Inter-American Air Force Academy pro-
vided training to helicopter mechanics at the Uruguayan Air
Force's Grupo Cinco Search and Rescue unit From June to Au-
gust. Grupo Cinco operates Bell UH-I N aircraft used extensively
for maritime rescue on the vast mouth to the Rio de la Plata. The
civilian maritime community benefits enormously from this ser-
vice, and ODC helped keep the missions flying, officials said.
The ODC will continue to provide programs that benefit the
military, but the civilian community as well, Jordan said.


Army Band

concerts set
FORT AMADOR (USARSO
PAO) - The 79th Army Band dry
season concerts are in full swing
throughout the U.S. Army South
community.
The concerts are scheduled to
begin at 6 p.m. for the following
dates and locations: Wednesday at
Fort Davis' Davis Park; Feb. 27 at
the Amador Gazebo; March 9 at
Fort Davis' Davis Park; March 13
at the Amador Gazebo; March 26
at Howard Air Force Base near the
Base Exchange; March 27 at the
Amador Gazebo; April 9 at
Howard AFB near the BX; April
10 at the Amador Gazebo; April 29
at Fort Davis' Davis Park; May 1
at the Amador Gazebo; May 13 at
Fort Davis' Davis Park; and May
15 at the Amador Gazebo.

MPs investigate

assault case
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO
PAO) - The military police appre-
hended and confined a soldier last
week for alleged attempted rape,
robbery and aggravated assault,
Provost Marshal officials said.
The U.S. Army South soldier
met the victim at the Fort Clayton
Noncommissioned Officers' Club
and followed her onto Hospital
Road.
As the victim approached the
wooded area near Cardenas
Bridge, the soldier forced her into
the woods where he began assault-
ing her and forcibly removed her
clothing.
The victim escaped when the
soldier panicked and fled the area.
The incident is under investiga-
tion by the U.S. Army Criminal
Investigations Division.
Officials advise everyone to use
caution when walking after dark
and to always use the buddy sys-
tem.

Civilian direct

deposit policy
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO
PAO) - A new direct deposit policy
for all Department of Defense em-
ployees in grades NM-9 and MG-
10 and higher has been adopted by
the Panama DoD Employees Coa-
lition and U.S. Army South, US-
ARSO officials said.
The policy requires the direct
deposit of employees' pay checks
to a financial institution of their
choice. Employees have until July
31 to submit the paperwork to fi-
nance and accounting. While U.S.
citizen employees are required to
participate, non-U.S. citizen em-
ployees who don't submit by July
31 will have paychecks sent to their
mailing address. Call 285-4863.

Lions Club

helps victims
COROZAL (Tropic Times) -
The Balboa Lions Club is solicit-
ing donations to help victims of the
recent Los Angeles earthquake.
The tax-deductible contributions
will be forwarded to the Lions Club
in Los Angeles. Checks should be
made payable to the Balboa Lions
Club Earthquake Fund and mailed
to Arthur Kerr, PSC 2 Box 2444,
APO AA 34002.


"I "%Pl




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PAGE 1

Tropic imes Vol. VIINo.7 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, Feb. 18,1994 McCaffrey takes charge SOUTHCOM the people," he told visitors in Spanish. tnend and a very comprehensive neighbor ing to successfully accomplish this historic by SMSgt. Steve Taylor McCaffrey was nominated to assume willing to cooperate. I feel deep respect for mission by 31 December 1999," McCaffrey Chief, Tropic Times command of USSOUTHCOM in November your sovereignty." said about the treaty. HOWARD AFB -Gen. Barry R. after Gen. George A. Joulwan was selected During his speech, McCaffrey outlined He also commented on the role of McCaffrey pledged continued cooperation to be Supreme Allied Commander Europe. priorities for his command. He vowed to SOUTHCOM's military people. with Latin American nations in the fight for McCaffrey was confirmed by the Senate continue an open and friendly relationship "To the service men and women of the democracy at his assumption of command Feb. 7 and promoted to general Tuesday. with Latin American military organizations, Southern Command, let me underscore ceremony here Thursday morning. McCaffrey, in a message to the people to support the U.S. ambassadors throughagain -you are the unofficial ambassadors "We can fight the drug cartels, and also of Latin America, also said in Spanish that out Latin America, and to fully implement of the United States of America," fight for democracy, and keep up our hon"As I walk into my new duty, I assure you the Panama Canal Treaty. McCaffrey said. "The self-discipline, the orable military role and the human rights of that you have a new companion and a true "We will take great pride in jointly workenergy and the talent you bring to your duties in cooperation and support in Latin America bring honor to all of us." Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, attended the ceremony. AIW Shalikashvili thanked the "men and women of Southem Command for the magnificent performance during the last two years.I know you will carry (this) into the challenges of the future." Shalikashvili also commented on opportunities for the next century. "The nations of this hemisphere will benefit from an explosion of democracy, of peace, and of shared prosperity .the achievement of our common goals rests on our ability to work hand in glove with our regional partners, defeat common threats to our security," Shalikashvili said. "This remains our central focus and it is a pur pose you're fulfilling grandly. After the ceremony, Shalikashvili told the Tropic Tines and Southern Command Network that "I just want to leave everyone with the thought that I and all the joint Department or sfense photo by Sgt. Lon Oasis chiefs deeply appreciate what you're doing Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff; Maj. Gen. George A. Crocker, commander, U.S. Army South; -to the men and womrn, to the families, to CSM Franklin D. Thomas, command sergeant major, U.S. Southern Command; and Gen. Barry L. McCaffrey, comthe civilian workforce, you're real heroes mander-in-chief, USSOUTHCOM, review the troops during McCaffrey's assumption of command Thursday. and we appreciate you greatly. Black History Month t nti 'FiWt ama'opens Atlants Fito,Paontinauo en events to continue FORT DAVIS(USARSO PAO)-The Directorate ofComnmunity well as folkloric, country line dancing and ballet groups. Other FORTCLAYTON(USARSOPAO) Activities-Atlantic "Fiesta Panama" fair kicks off today with programs include the Cristobal High School Choir and cheerlead-In recognition of Black History games, sports events and tournaments, demonstrations and a Deers, the Fort Davis Elementary School dancers and hands such as Month, the following events have partment of Defense show through Monday. the Nes y Los Sensacionales rap band, Afinque, Bahia Banda Show been planned for February: The fair is open 3 p.m.-midnight today-Sunday and 3-11 p.m. and the DoD rock band, "The Gatherings." Through Wednesday -II:3f am. Monday. Games include basketball toss, speed ball, dunk tanks and dart ethnic lunches at various dining faciliDuring the three-day event Fort Davis will be an open post, U.S. blackjack. ties. Call unit dining facilities for date. Artmy South officials said. Food for all tastes are available with Asian, Panamanian and *Today -10 a.m. wellness booth at Sports events include a women's softball tournament beginAmerican favorites as well as the fair traditions of popcorn and Corozal Main Exchange ning today and a men's softball tournament beginning Saturday. cotton candy. +7 p.m. youth skit, "African CulChildren's aCtIVItIes SatUrday include a sck race, balloon stomp, Carnival rides for all ages are also on the Field with rides for the ture Through a Child's Eyes." Fash_ egg toss and tug-of-war. strong at heart as well as kiddie Fides. ion show, Valent Recreation Centel There Lre karate, gymnastics and aerobic demonstrations s For a schedule ofevents see page 2. *Saturday -8 p.m. boat ride front Dengue fever mosquito population falling off Sti .-6 p.m. play, "Matters of the Mind," Club Amador GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL (USARSO PAO) "Occasional breeding sites are still being found in the boosing +ThUrs. -6 p.m. Junior AchieveThe population of the dengue fever moscqliito, the aedes aegypti, areas on military installations," said Maniel Correa, supervisory iment awards presentations at Valent is declining because of the dry season, officials said. biologist with the Entomology Section. "Inspections by PrevenReeaion Csent nThere were 14 doc cemented cases of lengcie fever in 1993 -all live Medicine personnel have shown that in some instances rain but one are from Santa Librada and all cases have been Panamagutters are blocked and still holding water. *Feb. 26 -6:30 am. Black History nian Nationals with no U.S. military or family members being af"We are asking quarters residents to check their rain gutters Prayer Breakfast at Gorgas Army Coin fected, said Panama Ministry of Health officials. and enscire they are not blocked and collecting water," he said. munity Hospital Recent meetings have been held with the Centers for Disease "Residents whose quarters are on the second floor where roof +2 p.m. movie, "Malcom X." at Control, the Panama Canal Commission and the Panama Ministry gutters are not easily and safely accessible, should contact their Fort Clayton Theater of Health to discuss educational and community action programs appropriate work order section and have the gutters inspected and *Feb.2712:30 p.m. Religious Serto control this mosquito, said Maj. Nelson Powers, chief of Entocleaned." vice at Fort Clayton Chapel mology, Preventive Medicine Service at Gorgas Army Community "Although the number of cases of dengue remains low, we Hospital. must not get careless," Powers said. News page 2 yMore Fort Sherman Troop Medical Clinic Adm. Frank Kelso retires early hop*Riot control, page 3. improving service with new ing Tailhook scandal finally put to *Carnival, pages 8&9. deployable system. rest. *Softball, page 12.

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2 Tropic Times Feb. 18, 1994 Fort Sherman medAcal clinic F conducts intemal survey ets new de lovable sVstem HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) Air Force members recently comFORT SHERMAN (Gorgas Army Community Hospital) -The pleted an exterior analysis of the 24th new Deployable Medical Systems at the Fort Sherman Troop Wing's environmental policies and Medical Clinic will improve medical service and the quality of procedures during an internal EnviMedial linc wll mproe mdicl srvie an th qulit ofronmental Compliance Assessment life for the Atlantic commUnity, officials said. anMnagCmpn e Assesmenu commuityand Management Program evalua"The three DEPMEDS will be used for pharmacy, radiology tion Jan. 31-Feb. 4, officials said. and laboratory services and are par of a plan to provide medical ECAMP is part of the Air Force's care at the future Fort Sherman Health Clinic," said Angela effort to improve environmental Mendez, Treaty Implementation Project officer at the U.S. Army management and compliance worldMedical Department Activity -Panama. wide. It ensures environmental probWith the upcoming turnover of the Coco Solo Health Clinic lems are addressed and that correcthis year, USA MEDDAC developed a plan for the health care of tive measures are quickly implethe Atlantic community and, with limited space and scarce dolmented, according to Capt. Greg lars, the use of DEPMEDS came about, she said. Long, 24th Wing ECAMP manager. Once the concept was researched, it was found that what the The internal audit is a precursor systems offered was ideal for the Atlantic community. to the external evaluation planned for "It was a creative solution to the problem of providing quality this fall. The Air Combat Command medical care where it is most needed," said Col. Bernard Gore team, scheduled to arrive in SeptemJr., deputy commander for administration. "The systems will ber, will review the wing's assesscompliment the health clinic while providing soldiers with the ments and conduct its own survey. best of medical equipment to handle emergencies and daily ser"The integral ECAMP is the key vices. to assessing our environmental pro"This is the first time this type of portable field equipment has gram and is a very valuable managebeen used in conjunction with a permanent building," he said. ment tool," said Col. Larry W. Black, The DEPMEDS arrived here in September from Ogden, Utah, A new Deployabe Medical System is lifted to Us Army p 24th Wing vice commander. Black and were fielded and loaded by a team of representatives from the AnwDpoal eia ytmi itdt h is lo ahae petra CM Atlantic Directorate of Engineering and Housing, U.S. Army of the Fort Sherman clinic. teams at Offutt AFB, Neb., and Langley AFB, Va. Medical Materiel Agency and USA MEDDAC, Mendez said. It she said. The systems contain state of the art equipment such as "What we need to do now is agtook the team two weeks to get the DEPMEDS up and running. microscopes, cabinetry, refrigerators, dispensers and x-ray storgressively follow-up on the findings," The systems have been used in recent wartime situations such age capabilities. Fully equipped, the DEPMEDS will provide he said. "We want to make sure we as Operation Desert Storm and are also used at Soto Cano, Honthe same, or better services now offered at the Coco Solo Health have solid, permanent fixes." duras, and on many military training sites in the United States, Clinic. Areas inspected were on Howard said Maj. Ronnie Brannon, chief of logistics at USA MEDDAC. At the same time, the Atlantic DEH is renovating the Fort and Albrook, the Defense ReutilizaThe DEPMEDS can be moved later and used in other areas Sherman TMC, Mendez said. When completed, the TMC will tion and Marketing Office at Corozal allowing tax dollars to be used for more than one mission, he be a 7,000-square-foot, full-service outpatient clinic. In addition .and the Red Tank Landfill 'managed said. to the DEPMEDS, the new Fort Sherman Health Clinic will ofby the Panama Canal Commission. "The systems will retain their capability, even after the misfer emergency services, dental care, preventive medicine, comSeven teams assessed procedures sion for this operation is completed," Brannon said. "In this case, munity and occupational health and family medicine, Mendez connected with natural and cultural the DEPMED modules are being used in place of more expensive said. resources; air emissions; hazardous commercial equipment." Installing the DEPMEDS is one phase of a three-phase plan materials; pesticides; petroleum, oil It has been estimated that using the DEPMEDS in lieu of conin the renovation of the Fort Sherman TMC, Mendez said. and lubricants; special programs; struction will save more than $250,000, Mendez said. The clinic is expected to be completed in the spring and will water quality; and solid and hazardSaving money wasn't the only reason DEPMEDS were used, be operated by the staff of USA MEDDAC. ous waste. The internal teams were very comprehensive in its evaluation of the 'Fiesta Panama' Atlantic fair events wing Each team was composed of specialists from the various environFORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -*DoD band, "The Gathering," 9:25 *Jazz Junction, 7:15 p.m. mental protocols. The schedule for the Atlantic "Fiesta p.m. *Sports and swimwear fashion show, "Overall, the team found the wing Panama" fair is as follows: *Bambulain, 10:55 p.m. 8:15 p.m. was doing an excellent job of managToday Saturday *Raki Slaki one-man show, 8:45 ing its environmental programs. *Men's and women's softball touma*Karate demonstration, 5:30 p.m. p.m. People were highly motivated and ment, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. through Monday *79th Army Band, 6 p.m. *DoD band, "The Gathering," 9:30 exceptionally environmentally con*Balloon stomp, 3 p.m. *Danzas y Proyecciones del Atlantico p.m. scious," Long said. *Sack race, 3:30 p.m. Folkloric group, 8 p.m. *Bahia Banda Show, 10:45 p.m. The initial draft ECAMP report *Egg toss, 4 p.m. *DoD band, "The Gathering," 9 p.m. Monday listing preliminary findings is due out *Tug-of-war, 5 p.m. *Afinque band, 10 p.m. *Gymnastic demonstration and Jazz in later this month. Unit command*Karate demonstration, 6 p.m. Sunday troupe, 6 p.m. ers will be given the opportunity to +Folkloric dance group, 6:40 p.m. *Cristobal High School cheerleaders, *Karate demonstration, 6:30 p.m. review and respond to each finding *Line dancing show, 7:20 p.m. 6 p.m. *Nes y Los Sensacionales rap band, 7 before a final version is completed. *Ballet show, 8 p.m. *ROTC drill team, 6:15 p.m. p.m. Once the report is final, programs *Nes y Los Sensacionales band, 8:40 *Cristobal High School choir, 6:30 *DoD band, "The Gathering," 7:30 will be developed to correct discrepp.m. p.m. and 9:30 p.m. ancy areas, officials said. Exchange, commissaries list holiday operating hours FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The hours of opAlbrook AFS Cocoli shoppette -closed eration for the Army and Air Force Exchange System -Shoppette -8 a.m.10 p.m. Balboa school cafeteria -closed Panama and commissaries for Monday in observance of Snack bar -8 a.m.-I p.m. Curundu Service Station -6 a.m.-midnight Presidents Day are as follows: Anthony's Pizza -11 a.m.-8 p.m. Corozal Frank's Franks -10 a.m.-4 p.m. Atlantic Main PX -9 a.m.-6 p.m. Video rental -9 a.m.-9 p.m. Fort Espinar Sweets Reflections -9:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Furniture store -10 a.m.-4 p.m. Shoppette -10 a.m.-4 p.m. Frank's Franks -10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Shoe store -10 a.m.-4 p.m. Fort Davis Anthony's Pizza -10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Toyland/Outdoor living -10 a.m.-4 p.m. Main PX -10 a.m.-6 p.m. Wok Works -closed Class Six -10 a.m.-6 p.m. Auto parts store -10 a.m.-2 p.m. Casa de Amigos -closed Howard AFB Gas station -8 a.m.-6 p.m. Fort Clayton Main PX -10 a.m.-5 p.m. Cafeteria -closed Shoppette (95) -closed Class Six -10 a.m.-6 p.m. Anthony's Pizza -I I a.m.-l0 p.m. Frank's Franks (95) -closed Cafeteria -7 a.m.-I p.m. Burger King -I I a.m.-9 p.m. Anthony's Pizza -I I a.m.-8 p.m. Anthony's Pizza -II a.m.-8 p.m. Clothing Sales -closed Burger King -8 a.m.-8 p.m. Clothing Sales -closed Fort Sherman Popeye's -11 a.m.-8 p.m. Service station -6:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Shoppette -noon-6 p.m. Frank's Franks (by Burger King) -closed Fort Kobbe Gas station -closed Clayton Plaza Shoppette -7 a.m.-midnight Shoppette/video rental -10 a.m.-4 p.m. Anthony's Pizza -noon-6 p.m. Shoppette (519) -m a.m.-9 p.m. Burger King -8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Auto parts store -8 a.m.-3 p.m. Miscellaneous Commissaries Clothing Sales -closed Quarry Heights shoppette -closed The Corozal and Fort Espinar commissaries will be closed Fort Amador Gorgas Hospital shoppette -closed Monday and Wednesday. The Howard commissary will be Shoppette -9 a.m-5 p.m. Curmndu School cafeteria -closed closed Tuesday.

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Tropic Times Tramii Feb. 18, 1994 40 549th MPs help keep peace in 'Barcelona' External evaluation tests riot control skills by Spec. Alexander C. White USARSO Public Affairs Office EMPIRE RANGE-Soldiersofthe549th Military Police Battalion were sent to "Barcelona" Feb. 6-11, to help the government maintain peace during a "civil unrest." Things appeared to get out of hand Feb. IOjust as the unit was preparing to go home. Protesters approached the battalion's compound demanding to speak to the commander, harassing and taunting the soldiers both verbally and physically. Atabout 5 p.m., about 40 rioters breached the compound throwing projectiles at the posted guards. This was the scenario for the 549th MP's final exercise during the battalion's external evaluation last week. The unit came here to be evaluated on its proficiency in a war-time atmosphere, said Maj. Keith Wettig, S-3 for the 549th MP Bn. The unit hoped to achieve a training standards that would keep them prepared for a hostile environment, Wettig said. "We've been here since Sunday," said Wettig. "The evaluation mission started Monday focusing on the standard military police tasks; battle field circulation control, area security, enemy prisoner of war, law and order and civil disturbance. "This is the cumulating civil disturU.S. Army photo by Sgt. Eric Hortin banceexercisethatendedthedeployment." A protestor taunts a 549th Military Police Company soldier during the external evaluation. Only part of the training is designed to prepare the 549th for a wartime mission, prisoner of war, peaceful demonstrations Task List) tasks is to conduct civil disturFor Cpl. Martin Williams, 4th platoon, Wettig said. andviolentparticipation,"saidSpec.Daniel bance(exercises)," Tuczaksaid. "Wetryto 549th MP Bn., it was definitely an eye"It's hard to do battlefield exercise conBoda, 470th Ml Bde. "The objective was to create a realistic, hard training role yet, at opening experience. trol without being in a field environment," train MPs to react in various situations. the time, be safe." "I'm new to the MP Corps. I used to be he said. This demonstration was to evaluate their This turns into a big leadership chalin artillery," he said. "I never knew they The battalion deployed 112 soldiers and reaction time to various trouble." lenge when the whole objective is to diswere so combat-oriented. I thought they recruited opposition forces from within the It is hard to create a riot and at the same burse the crowd, he said. The soldiers are were just geared toward a garrison atmobattalion and the 470th Military Intellitime control it, said 1st Lt. Ronald Tuczak, challenged in controlling an outside force. sphere." gence Brigade and the U.S. Army Garritraining officer, 92nd Military Police Bat"It's easy to train inside the unit, the Because of an exercise like this, Wilson. talion. challenge comes from the outside (where liams said that he got a lot out of it. In the There were 45 opposing forces to proThe major problem is that the soldiers unstable factors are involved)," Tuczak same manner, Spec. Jerry Bice, 1st platoon, vide the necessary support helping mainparticipating tend to get wrapped up in the said. 549th MP Bn, also got a lot of insight. tain a realistic scenario. exercise and forget it is only fantasy. SolSoldiers like Spec. Dale Foster, Head"I think this is as realistic training as I've "The OPFOR's main mission was to diers get to see how realistic this can be and quarters platoon, 549th MP Bn., learned a seen," Bice said. "The company as a whole demonstrate and irritate the MPs during train right, he said. lot of things he usually does not encounter put in a lot of hours which I think brought various missions which included enemy "One of our METL (Mission Essential in a garrison environment. it closer." Fort Drum military police expand travel itinerary Division (Mechanized), Fort Stewart, Ga.; 3rd Armor 1st Platoon, 511th Military Police Company "This is truly a company that can rapidly Division, Germany; 7th Infantry Division, Fort Ord, Cadeploy anywhere and execute any lif.; and the 3rd Infantry Division, Germany. From these FORT CLAYTON -New York, Luxembourg, Gerd units, the platoon has put together a diverse portfolio of many, England and a list of other places that could be the mission.Just a quick glance at their military knowledge. itinerary for the world tourofa rock band are only a few of right shoulders gives glimpses of experi"If you dig deep, you find among these soldiers former the stops displayed on the backs of the shirts worn by the combat infantrymen, field artillerymen, drug suppression 1st Platoon, 511th Military Police Company from Fort ences in Operation Urgent Fury, Just team members, traffic accident investigators, military Drum, N.Y. Cause, Desert Storm and Restore police investigators, special reaction team members, proIts current assignment is to provide military police Hope tective services team members and light fighters," said Sgt. support to units in the U.S. Southern Command area of Kenneth J. Wilson, 2nd squad leader, 1st platoon, 511th operation. Sgt. Kenneth K. Wilson MP Co. SSgt. Joseph Semyone, platoon sergeant, Ist Platoon, 1 st platoon, 511th Miltary Police Company 'This is truly a company that can rapidly deploy 511th MP Co., explained that to accomplish this mission anywhere and execute any mission," he said. the platoon has taken a proactive and aggressive attitude especially adeptat finding trespassers," said 2nd Lt. Robert The combat patch worn by several members of the unit when it comes to law enforcement. L. Berry, platoon leader, 1st Platoon, 511th MP Co. show their ability to move into action under any circum"Members of the platoon are manning their posts "In a recent two-day period he had apprehended one stance. outside the post exchange, the commissary and other (trespasser) on each day." "Just a quick glance at their right shoulders gives important facilities," Semyone said.'They are also providAnother mission of the first platoon is the loss-prevenglimpses of experiences in Operation Urgent Fury, Just ing a bike patrol for the Curundu housing area." tion of government property. Cause, Desert Storm and Restore Hope," Wilson said. This patrol has been aggressive in apprehending tres"Last week, while on a routine patrol of the fence lines All members of the platoon are extremely motivated passers in the Corozal and Curundu areas, said Lt. Col. PFC (Daniel) Rich discovered a cache of stolen governand dedicated to bringing maximum law enforcement Gerald Prentice, commander 92nd Military Police Battalment property," said Sgt. William Dilts, 3rd squad leader, support to the community they now serve, here in Panama, ion. 1st Platoon, 511th MP Co. Berry said. The platoon has been finding that, as the number of 'This contributed to preventing a significant loss to the "First Platoon 'combat MPs,' is adapting well to their apprehended trespassers goes up, other crimes go down, Army, " he said. new environment," Berry said. "I don't see them having he said. First platoon draws on experience from such units as the any problems completing their mission while deployed "On one account, Sergeant (Scott) Sullivan has been 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, N.C.; 24th Infantry here."

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4 Tropic Times Feb. 18,1994 Hemisphere U.S. aims drug war at Colombia Honduran mine JUANCHACO, Colombia (AP) -Colombia is now on terrorism?" the president asked. explosion kills 3 the front line of Washington's Andean drug war, despite Much of the criticism has been directed against the e protests from some Colombians denouncing U.S. milipresence of 150 U.S. soldiers in Juanchaco, a sweltering TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras (AP) -A mine tary involvement as an invasion of sovereignty. village on the Pacific coast, on what is billed as a huplanted near the border with El Salvador exploded U.S. officials believe Colombia has done more to commanitarian mission: building a school and a clinic. over the weekend, killing a peasant, his pregnant bat drug traffickers than Bolivia or Peru, whose anti-drug American combat engineers clad in jungle fatigues lay wife and their 10-year-old son, authorities said aid may be cut because they appear less eager to stem bricks, hammer nails and mix mortar in a seemingly inSunday. drug smuggling. nocent pursuit. They say they are here to conduct engiThe accident occurred Saturday in an area Coca leaves, the raw material used to make cocaine, neering exercises under difficult conditions: an intense, known as San Lorenzo, about 125 miles southare mostly grown in Bolivia and Peru. Colombia's drug tropical sun; torrential rains; poor soil; and a remote site east of Tegucigalpa, police said. cartels process the coca and smuggle it to world markets. where construction materials are hard to find. The peasant, Maximum Lainez, accidently The United States has backed the Colombian "It opens our eyes to a different culture, a different struck the mine when he was working, killing government's anti-drug efforts by giving it tens of milway of doing things," said a soldier who identified himhim, his wife, Santos Garcia, 30, and their son, lions of dollars a year in aid to fight the nation's drug self only as Capt. Clark, as he guzzled water from his Eduvines. lords, and has sent troops and other personnel. canteen to ward off heat exhaustion. At least 200 Honduran peasants have been The presence of about 250 American soldiers, in addiBut many politicians suspect there is more to the miskilled in similar mine accidents near the Salvation to U.S. drug agents and other personnel, has become sion given the proximity of the world's largest cocaine doran and Nicaraguan borders over the last dea hot issue in this year's congressional and presidential cartel in Cali, 60 miles to the east. cade. Insurgents from both El Salvador and Nicaelections. Gaviria aides say the Cali cartel -apparently nerragua commonly planted mines along the border One hundred of the soldiers are building a military vous about the U.S. troop presence in its backyard -has to prevent their enemies from following them into base in central Colombia to help Colombian forces go mounted a disinformation campaign to stir opposition to Honduran territory. after traffickers and guerrillas, maintaining U.S.-built rathe U.S. presence. An inter-American defense group commisdars that nab drug flights and training Colombian troops. Given the American tradition of nabbing drug trafsioned by the Organization of American States in The Council of State, Colombia's highest court overfickers on foreign soil -Honduran kingpin Juan Ramon 1992 has plans to remove or destroy hundreds of seeing government administration, declared on Feb. 8 the Matta Ballesteros in 1987 and Panamanian leader thousands of mines planted in Honduras and in presence of U.S. troops illegal, saying President Cesar Manuel Noriega four years ago -the Cali bosses have neighboring countries. Gaviria should have consulted Congress before inviting reason to be uneasy. .. them. But bringing the kingpins tojustice cannot be achieved 3 Colom bia oi Gaviria said he would ignore the "absurd" ruling, in a single lightning raid. pointing out that U.S. surveillance technology and miliA senior law enforcement official in Bogota said the wells dynam ited tary training helped Colombia maul the Medellin cartel task may be greater than the Clinton administration enviBOGOTA, Colombia (AP) -Leftist rebels dyand kill its leader, Pablo Escobar, last December. sions, because drug kingpins have corrupted many govBOOTA, Colombia 's L i rbl d, "Would we be more free, more sovereign and more ernment officials with their billions and because their tenthe first attack there since the field started pumpindependent living under the tyranny of Escobar's narcotacles reach throughout Colombian society. ing oil a decade ago, officials said Tuesday. The bomb attacks late Monday at the Cano Limon oil field in eastern Colombia damaged the wells' electrical systems, but did not force a suspension in production, oil industry officials said on condition of anonymity. A fourth bomb was deactivated before.it went off, one official said. The National Liberation Army, a leftist rebel group, has been attacking Colombian oil pipelines since 1986 to force authorities to stop sharing petroleum profits with foreign and private interests. But this was the first time the guerrillas attacked the oil field. It was not clear how the rebels got past tight security at the oil field, which produces 230,000 barrels of oil per day and is operated by the U.S.based company, Occidental Petroleum. The state oil company, Ecopetrol, owns half of Cano Limon's oil. The rebels blew up sections of Colombia's main oil pipeline 39 times last year and five times so far this year. Colombia signs peace accord with militias BOGOTA (Reuters) -The Colombian government signed a preliminary peace accord Tuesday with two urban militia groups in Medellin aimed at stopping their violent brand of streetjustice and AP LaserPhoto seeing them lay down their arms. Sam ba Interior Minister Fabio Villegas signed the acSamba dancers celebrate during a parade Monday in Rio de Janiero's Sambadrome Arena. cord with militia leaders representing about 400 armed youths in the country's second largest and most violent city, located 150 miles northwest of Gaviria salutes Peruvian president BOTe signing of this accord with the militias is an important process in attaining peace in BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) -Medellin and Colombia," said Villegas at the President Cesar Gaviria praised Pe signing ceremony at city hall. ruvian leader Alberto Fujimori forUnder the accord, the first of its kind in attacking terrorists and drug trafMedellin, the government and militia groups fickers and improving Peru's fragile agree to continue negotiating the eventually lay economy. down arms and return to civilian life. Colombia and Peru are beginning The militias operate as vigilante groups in poor to win the battle against "the narconeighborhoods of the city, where the state's prestrafficking, violence and terrorism enc is practically non-existent. They impose their that have so oppressed our people in own form of justice against suspected criminals the past decade," Gaviria said at a and other unwanted people. banquet Monday in Fujimori's Villegas said the militias were a product of the honor. ~violence that erupted in the late 1980s in Medellin As proof of success, Gaviria after now-deceased cocaine king Pablo Escobar pointed to Peru's 1992 arrest of and his cartel declared war against the governAbimael Guzman, leader of the ment. Shining Path guerrillas, and Other militia groups. some of them holding Colombia's killing in December of AP Lasershoo loose ties wish Marxist guerrillas, still operate. Medellin drug cartel chief Pablo Peruvian President Alberto Fu imori (right) was praised by Colombian Escobar. President Cesar Gaviria for his anti-drug efforts.

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SMilitaryiNews mes Wtgr NewsFeb. 18, 1994 %. Report: U.S. 8 F-15Es land on base in Italy bought Soviet AVIANO AIR BASE, Italy (AP) -planes at the Italian-U.S. base also are beAircraft from Aviano could be over Eight of the U.S. Air Force's most sophising readied in case NATO orders air Sarajevo in less than 45 minutes. dhticated warplanes arrived Monday at one strikes around the Bosnian capital, which The United States, Britain and France hardw are of the key staging areas for possible has been under siege from ethnic Serb have sent aircraft carriers in the Adriatic, NATO air strikes around Sarajevo. forces. and other NATO nations have dispatched WASHINGTON (AP) -CashThe group of F-15E fighter-bombers, Dozens of warplanes from other additional planes and equipment to bases poor Poland sold sophisticated Soviet dispatched from the 492nd Fighter SquadNATO nations are at Italian bases or airin Italy to prepare for possible attacks or military hardware to the United ron based in Lakenheath, England, are craft carriers in the region. bolster forces monitoring the "no-fly" States in the 1980s in a number of part of NATO plans to increase the fireThe F-15E, the strike version of the rezone. secret deals through third parties, The power and range of the air arsenal that nowned "Eagle" fighter jet, is the most The 16-nation North Atlantic Treaty Washington Post reported. could take part in attacks. sophisticated warplane in the U.S. Air Organization has given the Bosnian Serbs The U.S. military obtained top-ofThere are 45 other U.S. and British Force. It has a longer flight ige and enuntil Sunday to place their heavy weapons the-line air-defense systems, radar, planes at Aviano Air Base, about 50 miles hanced capabilities to hit ground targets around Sarajevo under U.N. surveillance. armed helicopters, torpedoes, tanks northeast of Venice, enforcing the "nousing night-scope equipment and laserNATO said it could order air strikes if arand self-propelled artillery from the fly" zone over Bosnia-Herzegovina. Warguided bombs. tillery attacks resume before the deadline. Soviet-supplied Polish arsenal with payments that went through foreign 2 intermediaries, the newspaper said in 0 years and running Tuesday's editions. The deals apparently were motin-iitr c d m y a m te vated largely by Poland's need for Vermont military academy admitted hard currency in view of its large debt and the effects of Reagan administration economic sanctions, it said. female cadets without a fuss in 1 972 The story, attributed to unidentified U.S. intelligence and other govNORTHFIELD, Vt. (AP) -At the nation's oldest private milior that don't have men in them right now, they're not doing their emnment officials, said the intermeditary college, women have been part of the cadet corps for 20 years, students any favors," Evans said. aries -arms dealers and other busiliving in the same dorms as men and barking orders to rookies of "The workforce -the world -has men and women in it and nessmen -may have paid commisboth sexes every morning. we have to learn how to deal with life and work with all of them," sions from the estimated $150 milThe possibility of such integration has polarized and enraged she said. lion to $200 million in sales to some many at The Citadel and Virginia Military Institute. Nevertheless, The Citadel and VMI, the nation's last two Polish defense 'officials who helped But at Norwich University, it's too commonplace for concern. state-financed military colleges, are fighting to keep women out make the deals work or simply There were a few awkward moments when the all-male school of their cadet corps. The schools say they want to continue offerlooked the other way. merged with all-female Vermont College in 1972, said George ing a unique educational environment. There was no direct evidence that Turner, then an English teacher at Norwich. VMI, fighting a Justice Department lawsuit claiming it disPoland's communist leader in the "Some of the little corporals yelled a little louder and spat criminates against women, has offered to set up a separate, all1980s, Gen. Wojciech Jaruzelski, tobacco juice a little more often -just to remind everybody of female military college at Mary Baldwin College, a former finwas personally involved in the deals, the differences," Turner said. "But it was really no big deal." ishing school. but given their scale and sensitivity, Fred Rodell, a 1985 Norwich graduate, said men and women At the proposed Virginia Women's Institute for Leadership, top levels of the Polish Defense Minmanaged to work together just fine. "The few women who went there would be no boot camp indoctrination, no barracks without istry must have given their tacit apthrough the military training while I was there were pretty well privacy. Women would play tennis and golf while VMI's 1300 proval, the Post said. respected for going through what we did." cadets learn boxing and karate. Jarulzelski, interviewed in WarThere are 102 women among the 941 cadets this year at Nor-At The Citadel, Shannon Faulkner is attending classes while saw, was quoted as saying he neither wich, the only private military college remaining in the country. battling to join the cadets. She cannot drill, eat or live with the knew about nor approved the arms Women first enrolled in the corps of cadets in 1974, more than 1,964-member corps. sales and calling them "almost com150 years after the school was founded in 1819. Alumni include Last month, Chief Justice William Rehnquist ordered the pletely improbable" and risky. He Army Chief of Staff Gen. Gordon Sullivan. South Carolina college to let Faulkner in while her lawsuit asksaid the Soviet Union kept a close eye Administrators want to boost the percentage of women in the ing to join the corps is pending. on weapons systems sent to Poland corps op to 15 percent from I1 percent by 2000, university Presi"We knew it was coming," freshman cadet Timothy Terese and that his government would not dent Richard Schneider said. said then. "But no matter what, we didn't lose faith and were have planned or approved such deals. Tradition drives the ritual and structure at military instituhoping the lawyers would come through for us." To give the sales plausibility, the tions. Yet by breaking its all-male tradition, Norwich was actuAt Norwich, some students say they understand why cadets Post said, export documents said the ally keeping in step with another custom: that of preparing stohave fought to keep women from classrooms and drill squads. exported arms were destined for Sodents for the world beyond the campus, said Maj. Margaret "What the other schools are afraid of is change," said sophoviet allies in the Middle East. Evans, a Norwich assistant commandant and alumna. more Tricia Angelini. "They are afraid they won't be able to do "The other schools that don't have women in them eight now, the same things anymore. Navy's top admiral to retire 2 months earlier than planned WAS1HINGTON ment, reaffirming my honor, integrity and leadership, we "It is.important that we put the bitterness of Tailhook (AP) -Adm. Frank -can finally close this difficult chapter," Kelso said. behind us. The time for healing is now," Dalton said. He Kelso II, the Navy's Kelso's announcement came a day after the admiral said the lessons of the incident are ones that the men and top uniformed officer, opened a public push to rebut a Navy judge's finding iswomen of the Navy and Marine Corps "must never forsaid Tuesday he. has sued last week that Kelso knew about sexual misdeeds at get." requested early retirethe 1991 Tailhook aviators' convention and interfered Kelso's retirement was prompted by a judicial deciment so the Navy "can with the investigation of the sex abuse scandal. sion issued last week in Norfolk by a Navy judge who finally close this diffi"I think this is the end of Tailhook," Kelso said. He faulted Kelso for interfering in the Tailhook investigacult chapter" of the said it would be up to President Clinton to choose a new tion and contended the admiral had witnessed untoward Tailhook sex abuse chief of naval operations and he said he would work with conduct at the 1991 Tailhook convention. scandal. .that person to ensure a smooth change of command. The 1991 convention of the Tailhook Association, a Kelso, at a news Pentagon officials, speaking on condition of anonymbooster organization of Navy and Marine Corps aviators, conference in his Penity, said a likely replacement would be Adm. Michael produced a scandal when dozens of women, including tagon office, said he Boorda, NATO's southern flank commander now in some female officers, alleged they were molested during will retire April 30 charge of the potential alliance bombing campaign in a night of drunken debauchery in a Las Vegas hotel halltwo months earlier Yugoslavia. way. than scheduled -beIsAnother admiral frequently mentioned as a contender Kelso authorized the Navy Monday to release written cause he believed the Kelso for the spot is Charles Larson, commander of the Pacific statements by colleagues and supporters disputing the issues associated with command. judge's findings. Tailhook were resolved and top Pentagon leaders had "I regard Admiral Kelso as a man of the highest inThe documents appear to have been hastily assembled backed his integrity and honesty. tegrity and honor," Defense Secretary William Perry said last week following a Feb. 8 assertion by the Navy judge, Kelso, speaking to a room filled with reporters and in a statement issued at the Pentagon. Capt. William T. Vest Jr., accusing Kelso of covering up television cameras, said, "As the chief of naval operaIn an apparent attempt to blunt the harsh language of his knowledge of the misconduct at the Tailhook conventions, I had a responsibility to lead the Navy through the the judge's ruling, Perry noted that the Pentagon's intion. process of changing the climate which allowed this incispector general "found no credible evidence" that Kelso Included is a memo dated Feb. I I from the senior dent to occur. Having done so it is my intention to submit had specific knowledge of the sexual misconduct at the Tailhook investigator saying that Vest failed to back up my request for retirement as of 30 April, 1994." 1991 aviators convention and found "no evidence" that his charges. Kelso said he took the step on his own and had not Kelso sought to thwart the Navy's investigation into the "We have identified several discrepancies in the been asked to resign by Defense Secretary William Perry scandal. court's opinion that call into question the factual basis for and Secretary of the Navy John Dalton. Navy Secretary John Dalton also issued a statement, the court's conclusion that Adm. Kelso had specific and "I became the lightning rod for Tailhook," Kelso said saying that even though he has "questioned the leaderdetailed knowledge of those events and the implication explaining his decision to step down early in order to put ship which permitted the excesses of Tailhook to take that he lied to federal investigators and the court," wrote the incident behind the naval service. place, I have never questioned the personal integrity and Derek J. Vander Schaaf, the Navy's deputy inspector gen"With Secretary of Defense Perry's strong endorsehonor of Frank Kelso." eral.

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6 ropic Times 'Feb. 18, 1994 voices Gas station customer suffers embarrassment Dear Mayors' Corner: American Bakery Association, it was recI was at the Curundu Gas Station late mayors Corner ommended that they stop making in the evening recently and bought some empanadas because it wasn t a vital part gas. After paying by check, I couldn't ments? Are we supposed to pay before we come to request a proof of purchase, but it of a bakery operation and they were out of leave because someone was parked in front pump, or what? will have to be hand-written. compliance with the bakery standard opof me. So I went into the shoppette to buy This was an embarrassing and infuriAAFES officials said they will do everation procedures. a few things. When I went back to my car ating situation and I feel I deserve some erything possible to prevent such a misunThe bakery is trying to find a way to and tried to pull out, one of the attendants explanation. derstanding in the future and they apoloproduce this item somewhere else but approached me and accused me of not payA Disgruntled Customer gize for the situation. hasn't been successful in finding a locaing for my gas. tion. After an embarrassing situation, I Dear Disgruntled: Dear Mayors' Corner: showed him a copy of the check I had writI submitted your letter to the Army and I can't believe that the on-post cafeteEditor'snote: Thiscolumnallowscomten. I was calm and didn't want to make a Air Force Exchange Service and they said rias no longer sell empanadas. Could you munity members to submit questions to scene and possibly get into trouble. that, on this occasion, the attendant didn't please look into this matter? I can t think the MayoralCongress. Lettersshould be I didn't want to make a big deal out of follow the procedure established by trainof any good reason to stop selling mailed to: Mayors' Corner, Publicity what I considered an isolated incident, but ing. The proper procedure is to cancel all empanadas. Chairerson, APO AA 34004 (MPS). I would like to know how I can be sure it transactions when the customer pays for Misses Empanadas Anonymitywillbegranted upon'request. doesn't happen again? If I hadn't written items. The Tropic Times reserves the right to a check, I would have been had. Are reAt this time there is no system in place Dear Misses: edit letters and responses for brevity, ceipts available upon request? What kind that can automatically generate a receipt AAFES reports that because of a recent clarity and propriety. of system is used to keep up with payfor the customer. The customer is welinspection of the Corozal Bakery by the Working dogs help MPs nab thieves in Curundu 40-day jail sentence______________________________________________ Three people cut a hole in the fence and a roof of a Provost Marshas Comer building in the Curundu area last week. They were apprehended by military police after one person tried to run and was bitten by an MP working dog. The two people were taken to night court where they were sentenced to 40 days in jail. Report suspicious activity to the MPs at 287-4401 or 289-5133. Five days community service Three people were apprehended for unlawful entry after they were seen walking along the inside of the fenceline of Corozal. They were taken to a Panamanian court where they were sentenced to five days of community service. Unsecured property stolen Officials remind residents and employees to secure their property at all times. More than $100 dollars was stolen from an purse last week while, in another incident, $150 was stolen from an unsecured desk drawer. Always secure valuables to avoid becoming a victim of crime. If a victim, call 287-4401 or 289-5133. Sentenced to six months A person was caught near the commissary with four cases of peanut butter last week. He was taken to a Panamanian court where he was sentenced to six months in jail. Anonymous drug hotline Anyone with information about drug smuggling should call the Panama Jack anonymous hotline at 2854185. The following crimes occurred in on-post housing areas Feb. 4-10. Pacific Fort Clayton 500 housing area -one larceny of unsecured private property Fort Clayton 1-26 housing area -one larceny of unseCocoli housing area -one larceny of unsecured private Pueblo Nuevo area -one larceny of secured private propcured private property property erty Curundu housing area -one larceny of unsecured priAtlantic Bethania area -two larcenies of secured private propvate property None to report erty Quarry Heights housing area -one housebreaking and The following crimes occurred to U.S. citizens in offVacamonte area -one larceny of secured private proplarceny of secured private property post housing Feb. 4-10. erty This authorized unofficial command information pubChief.SMSgt. Steve Taylor Editor. .SSgt. Jane Usero lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Editor. .SSgt. Richard Puckett Journalists.Sgt. Eric Hortin Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Sports Editor.Sgt. E. J. Hersom Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski Information Program of the Department of Defense, unStaff Editors.Sgt. Lori Davis Spec. Alexander C. White der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S. Spec. John Hall 24th Wing Public Affairs Office.284-5459 Southern Command. Rosemary Chong Public Affairs Officer.Capt. Warren L Sypher Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the Maureen Sampson Public Affairs Superintendent.MSgt. Dale Mitcham official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Volunteer Assistant.Josephine Beane Journalists.SSgt. Rian Clawson Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. Student Intern.Juan Carlos Palacio Sgt. James A. Rush The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Southern Command Public Affairs Office.282-4278 U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 Telephone 285-6612. Command Information Officer.Patrick Milton Public Affairs Officer.Diane Gonzalez Commander in Chief.Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey U.S. Army So uth Public Affairs Office.287-3007 Photographers.PH2 Roberto R. Taylor Director, Public Affairs.Col. James L. Fetig Public Affairs Officer.Maj. Melanie Reeder PH2 Delano J. Mays Command Information Officer.Beth Taylor U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.289-4312 TeNCOIC.Sgt. Richard Emert A-Tropic imes

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Tropic Times omm enty Feb. 18, 1994 I T'o skt rntt te ista h us n? by SSgt. Richard Puckett in the past several years. there seems 0d1or, T ropic Times to be more and more cases like this. -t -ou've got little league coaches shooting inally had enough. I just takeYou heledr t e om V onda evening, I each other after games, mothers trying to 'R finllajll y had c nou'h11 I JUO taike out cheerleaders to make room for couldn't take anyillole. their daughters and fans stabbing tennis EvFs erywhere I looked stars to help their own favorites get to the there it was. CNN, SCN. ESPN, all of top. the N's were hitting me with just one Well, people would like to say that the more story about Nancy Kerrigan and 1980s were a decade of greed and that Tonya Harding. Who really cares? I may be true. The 1990s are carrying on Ever since that fateful night when that tradition, but it has become a decade Kerrigan was attacked and uttered those of vengeance. [low famous words -"Why me, Why No longer do people just sit at home anyone?' the world just hasn't been the sniviling about losing the big game. Now same, they are thinking about how to "ensure" Now no evening is complete without victory next time out. the latest Harding vs. Kerrigan update. Even the Olympic flame isn't bright Be it a standard shot of Harding leaving enough to extinguish these dark practice or Kerrigan smiling at a crowd thoughts and actions. Lillehammer is in Lillehammer, Norway, these two are putting on a fantastic show and showing everywhere. off its best for the world to see, but no But when I turned on the television one is looking. Monday night and flipped to CNN, I People just want to see what happens finally snapped. Apparently the Comedy when Tonya and Nancy get into the rink Network was hosting tryouts for a together for the first time. Kerrigan and Harding skit. Skaters and So what's next? Will Jim Kelly pay non-skaters alike took to a rink in New off American Airlines to take out the York taking their own swing at stardom. NFC so that the Bills could finally win a All this at the expense of one of Super Bowl? Maybe Patrick Ewing will America's favorite sports. get Shaquille O'Neal to bump off Scottie Every four years America and the Pippen so the Knicks can get to the NBA world adopts a sweetheart from figure finals. skating to fall in love with. Dorothy When will this snowy soap opera end? Hamill, Peggy Fleming and Katarmna Maybe never. Every year the money, the Witt head a list of women who've earned stakes and the pressure go up. that spotlight. This time out though, that A gold medal could mean millions in halo has been tainted. Sure Kerrigan is marketing around the world. But assault, America's darling. But everyone loves and even murder are becoming all too the poor little victim. If this had never common prices for money and stardom. happened, we may never have heard of AP Lasrsoto It's a dangerous wide world of sports. either of these two women. Now There's no fun in it anymore, just Kerigan and Harding are forever linked, Tonya Harding celebrates her victory at the 1991 U.S. Figure Skating Chamfear. It's the fear that's driving big name What is the big deal anyway? Sure it ptonshtps in Minneapolts. Kerrigan (right) finished third. star. out of the game. The top stars are makes great entertainment. But once you the FBI will finally bring charges against No longer are the athletes sacred to the shying away from fans and becoming get past the surface, it paints a very her. Gold medal or no gold medal, this fans. They are very reachable. What's to more and more aloof. They've become disturbing picture of where our country is entire incident has given the American Stop anyone from taking out a star victims of their own success. headed. sports world a black eye. One that won't pitcher or quarterback the day before a Is this what earning that 15 minutes Whether or not Harding is guilty of go away too soon. championship game? It's even scarier to of fame is coming to? Go for the gold, knowing or not will eventually be But it's just one more chapter in the think that the competition may be but remember to wear your bullet-proof revealed. Either Tonya will admit it or continually degrading world of sports. plotting it first. vest. s Should Tonya Harding skate in the Olympics? "I don't think she "I think so. They "Well, I think she "No I don't. I think she "Yes. You're innocent should. I don't believe haven't proven anyshould until proven had a big part in it. She until proven guilty. her." thing." guilty." shouldn't represent our That's Americanjuscountry." tice." Spec. Kelly Allen SrA. Maurice Compton Tina ipock A1C Marck McMahan Cecilia Vikstrom Company A, 154th Signal 24th Communications Air Force family member 617th Airlift Support Squadron Army family member Battalion Squadron The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct 'rurote rcspond.i i -'rly' tIre'. do not reflect the siewvs 0f U.S. Southern Comrnmand, the Department of Defense or the U.S. goverinct. Readers mnay suhirit coniicntairics -r re .s (o o rcmmrctrics to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All suhmissiorts most be sigield, but raimc' Will Ie i, wihhIeld up0)111 Iriequest.

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Tropic Times Feb. 18, 1994 Cijrmuirvajul '94 celebrmates 'yearly fiesta by Rosemary Chong Tropic Times staff PENONOME -Hundreds of people visited Las Mendozas swimming resort Saturday to participate in the Penonome Water Carnival. Traditional and original decorated balsa floats cruised down the Zarati A river kicking off Carnival '94. All around Panama from Las Tablas 4 to Taboga, thousands of residents took to the streets to celebrate the annual festival. In Las Tablas elaborate displays depicting Roman and Greek mythology highlighted the five-day event. The queens were decked out in lavish costumes and handmade crowns designed by local artists. Although its not the biggest celebration, the Penonome event remains popular because of its uniqueness. The water carnival became a reality The crowd enjoys the culecos Sunday at when a group of native "Penonomenos" tried to offer the beautiful waters of the Zarati river as a touristattraction to its natives and visitors and organized the aquatic or water carnivals. In 1970, with Queen Carlota Arauz, started the second stage of the water carnival with a parade of floats slowly lazing down the river. Today, there are several princesses, some lavishly adorned and others scantily clad. They wave cheerfully under headdresses of glass beads, rhinestones and plumes, sometimes gripping their headgear in staunch rebellion to dry-season gusts. They are part of the parade and compete against each other with decorated floats made by local artists. Vielka Mendoza a 1995 Panamanian black queen candidate, dances in Penonome. This year the 1995 Black Queen candidates also participated in the water carnival. This carnival has its own personality and what makes the difference is the parade that takes place down the river. The water carnival goes back to 1921 when queen Bertilda Guardia displayed her beauty and grace in a primitive balsa float and paraded down the crystal waters of the river. Members of the U.S. military community also took part in this year's events. The various services sponsored tours to Penonome and Las Tablas. About 80 people went on the Penonome trip, Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation officials said Every year more than 40,000 people gather at the Juan D. Arosemena road for the "mojaderas" and "tunas" and dance around day and night to the music of the "murgas." Several local groups of "comparsas" (singer/dancers) compete for honors. Carnival ended Wednesday morning (Ash Wednesday) with the burial of the Ana Luisa Sayavedra Cano, 1994 Carniv sardine, to begin the first day of Lent. A float cruises down the Zarati River in Penonome Saturday, crowds during Saturday night's parade.

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Tropic Times Feb. 18, 1994 9 Photos courtesy of La Estre-a s Tablas. ? Congos de Colon perform their traditional dances during the Carnival de Comparsas parade in Panama City Tuesday. Department of Dtense photo by Sgt. E.J Hersom I Queen of Calle Arriba de Las Tablas waves to the

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1OTropic Times 10 18,1994E a Theater Support Element photo by Spec. Bran Lepley Capt. Mike Nelson takes off in his F-16 Fighting Falcon at Howard AFB. Nelson was one of 11 pilots from the 179th Fighter Squadron, 148th Fighter Wing, Minnesota Air National Guard flying counterdrug missions in Central America. Mach 2 Counterdrug mission pumps' Minnesota pilots piercing horn erupts, shattering meant Agency will make an arrest, if necthe midday calm in the small essary. suite of rooms in the Operation "I just spoke to some of oar pilots in Coronet Nighthawk hangar. Coffee is Florida. They said we must be doing a abandoned and flight manuals left behind good job down here because they haven't as two F-16 fighter jet pilots dash down a had any business." narrow hall toward the stairs. The action hadn't been all that hot and The signal was only a test, however. heavy at Howard during this fortnight eiThe Minnesota Air National Guard pilots ther, Robbins said. A; walk back to the briefing room and the te"It has been slow but it isn't surpriseV dium of their 24-hour alert status. ing," added the veteran of four trips to this But the potential of pulling nine G's at Central American duty station. "TransMach 2, 45,000 feet above the earth is porting drugs depends on a lot of things enough to stir the adrenaline of the Duluth -the growing season, flying conditions, residents. the pressure they feel from authorities. "Look at that," Capt. Mike Nelson said, "Since this is the dry season, the vispulling up the sleeve of his flight suit, reibility is much clearer. They'll be more vealing an armful of goose bumps. "Just active in the rainy season, when the skies the bell going off gets me pumped!" are overcast." Nelson and Maj. Mike Robbins of the Another reason for the lack of flights is 179th Fighter Squadron, 148th Fighter the success of the ongoing program. Group, Minnesota Air National Guard, "When we first started coming here we return to their wait. Should a suspicious flew a lot," Nelson says. airplane drift into the area of operations, "It has tapered off each year," Robbins the bell sounds for real, sending the citisaid. "They get wiser in evading us; we zen-airmen and their aircraft screatning get smarter and catch up to their tactics. into the sky. But it seems we do less flying each time Air National Guard F-15 and F-16 we come down." units staff Coronet Nighthawk during twoBut two weeks here provides training week annual training periods year-round these two University of Minnesota-Duluth at Howard. The fighter jets act as intergraduates can't get during drill weekends. ceptors, with pilots visually identifying "When we fly back home, it's practice. and monitoring aircraft suspected of Down here, we're performing a real-world smuggling drugs. mission, but not in a wartime situation," "We have landand sea-based radar Nelson said. and the jets working in unison," said "This gives us the best possible opporCMSgt. Joe White, of Howard's 24th Mistunity to fly the missions that we practice sion Support Squadron. "When the radar for all year, an air defense mission," picks something unusual up in the sky, we Robbins adds. get the call." The pilots also appreciate the challenge Most of the 11 pilots here from the of flying in the diverse climate that this 179th Squadron are veterans of drug inpart of the hemisphere offers. But above terdiction duty in Central America and and beyond the invaluable training opporTheater Suppon Element ponto by SSt Mke S Florida. This tour is Nelson's third trip to tunity Coronet Nighthawk provides for 1st Lt. Scott Verville buckles his safety gear before takeoff p Panama. He flies several missions in these pilots, they do not lose sight of the Florida each year. service they're providing their country. "We have no power to deter or arrest "The mission here is very important. by Spec. Brian Lepley these planes. Our job is to make an ID and This is one of the major threats to our 367th Public Affairs Detachment follow them within a certain area,"Nelson country (illegal drugs), so there is a rush says. "Then the pilots from Florida pick when you're actually going out and doing them up. Ultimately, the Drug Fnforcethe job instead of training," Robbins said.

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_ _ _ _ _ _ _ W arTropic Times #_World War Feb. 18, 1994 I MP Branch presence in Panama Veteran looks back dates back to pre-World War 11 on 'Old Panama' by Dolores De Mena by SSgt. Jane Usero USARSO Hstorian A notable extension of MP authority USARSO Public Affairs Office FORT CLAYTON -The U.S. War Department set up relieved field forces of the Panama FORT CLAYTON a Military Police Branch in 1917 and soon after the Mobile Forces and Security Command Elton Boyer remembers a United States entered into World War I, two companies Panama where the only were activated in the Panama Canal Department. When of many interior guard and security way to the Atlantic was the MP Branch was inactivated at the close of the war, details. One of these duties, which by train, where only the two Panama MP companies continued as organizawas temporary, brought about the jungle stood between tional units. Fort Clayton and Howard A All personnel were equipped with sidearms when the organization of a MP escort guard "Air Field," a time when companies were first activated. Company A (Department company to conduct the canal's antiQuarry Heights was big Headquarters post) stationed at Quarry Heights was auger than Panama City thorized 150 men and Company B, stationed at Fort De sabotage mission to guard interned and when cigarettes were Lesseps, was authorized 75 men. prisoners and escort them to the 6 cents a pack. Boyer Until 1940, newly assigned MPs received six weeks of The Panama this reformal instruction and training and were then given a United States. tired U.S. Army Air Corps soldier remembers is that patrol assignment with an experienced member of the of 193943 when he was stationed with the 7th Recompany. During WWII, formal training of the two comconnaissance Squadron at France Field near Fort panies continued, but greatly augmented Panama Canal centralized authority and responsibility created confusion. Davis. Department strength and occupation of defense sites adTraffic regulations strictly enforced at one post were ne"My unit was moved several times while I was jacent to interior Panamanian and other Central Ameriglected at an adjoining post. However, when the United here. Once they sent us to David and all there was can towns made heavy demands upon MP organizations. States entered into the war, authority was centralized unthere was us and a grassy field." Designations of Panama Canal Department MP units der the provost marshal. Boyer, who is visiting Panama for the first time in 1940 were the Panama Pacific Military Police ComThe provost marshal pressed for security precautions in more than 50 years, spent nine months in Peru pany and the Panama Atlantic Military Police Company. and convinced higher authorities that the MP's could not and conducted goodwill missions throughout South They were reorganized and redesignated the 20th MP effectively safeguard military property and enforce secuand Central America in B-17 and B-18 bombers. Company and the 19th MP Company respectively July rity regulations in unfenced areas. As a result, fences "Most of the places we went, the people had never 5, 1940, with an authorized strength of 257 enlisted men were placed around military installations. seen bombers before and it was a real treat for them, for each company. In 1941, the entire area became a construction camp and us," the Seal Beach, Calif., native said. Before WWII, the original MP mission was connected as the canal's defenses were modernized to meet the The unit of six aircraft was moved to Howard Air with maintenance of high standards of appearance and threat of war. The disorderly recruitment of construction Field where when World War II broke out. conduct of U.S. Army personnel while off duty in the two personnel was rectified by the creation of a Central Labor "I remember being in the barracks when I heard principal cities of Panama. As the United States entered Office under the Panama Canal. Employees were fingerthe Japanese had bombed Pearl Harbor. I reniember the war, this mission no longer covered the MP operation printed and issued identification cards. thinking, 'why would they do a thing like that?' of the command, although the mission of the 19th and For the first time in the Panama Canal Department, "We remained in the canal zone during the war 20th MP companies remained relatively unchanged. The civilians were provided with official and uniform identias a protective force," he said. "As part of our misarea mission, however, brought other MP units into the fication. Security deficiencies at the posts were corrected sion, we flew many mock bombing runs over the caPanama Canal Department to support wartime missions and control of entry to posts was well coordinated. nal from Howard Air Field." connected with the security of vital defense installations At the end of the war, the entry of privately owned Boyer worked his way from flight engineer to of both military and civilian nature. vehicles on military reservations rose sharply and by 1948 pilot and served 17 years, eight on foreign duty. A notable extension of MP authority relieved field the distribution of post automobile tags was a responsibilOf course, Panama is much different today. forces of the Panama Mobile Forces and Security Comity of the sector commanders, who in turn, relegated the "The buildings are the same as when I was here, mand of many interior guard and security details. One of responsibility to the sector provost marshals. at least on the outside," he said. "In what use to be these duties, which was temporary, brought about the orSecurity of prisoners was a well-defined PM responsimy barracks, there is a PX and all sorts of stuff. As a ganization of a MP escort guard company to conduct the bility since the arrival of Army units in the Panama thematter of fact, I ate a meal on one floor and was able canal's anti-sabotage mission guarding interned prisonater. The Panama Canal Department guardhouse origito buy a postcard where my bunk use to be." ers and escort them to the United States. nally functioned at Fort Amador until it was moved to Another difference is the buildings and people. By 1942, MP units on duty in the Panama Canal DeCorozal during WWI. However, the Corozal guardhouse "The buildings are unreal," he said. "All these partment were: 19th Military Police Company, 20th was structurally unsatisfactory and a concrete structure buses and people -it (Panama) has grown tremenMilitary Police Company, Military Police Platoon was built at Fort Clayton during WWII. dously. I can't believe all the people." (Panama Mobile Force), 760th Military Police Battalion, Before completion of the Fort Clayton building, howComing back to his old stomping grounds has 278th Military Police company, 236th Military Police ever, the guardhouse operation was temporarily transbrought back many good memories for the retired Company, 1380th Military Police Company (Aviation) ferred to Camp Empire which had been constructed in airline pilot and has impressed in his mind the vast and the 344th Military Police Escort Guard Company. 1942 to accommodate Axis and Japanese internees. Bechanges not only in Panama, but also in the military. The security mission of the MP in the Panama area fore the designation of the Fort Clayton building as the "Our old bombers pale in comparison to the types was a wartime development. Before the onset of the USACARIBE Guardhouse, two guardhouses were mainof aircraft the military has now," he said. "The miliemergency, security of posts, structures and materials was tained. Atlantic sector prisoners were confined at Fort tary of today is really something else." the responsibility of the post commander. The lack of Gulick and Pacific sector prisoners at Fort Clayton. leaders, during the present troubled World conditions." I~i ca r g ua ho ors ana offer Adm. Harry Hill's Eniwetok Expeditionary Group invdes Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands, (Operation Nicaragua honors canal officer i "= CATCHPOLE) following preliminary naval gunfire, air FORT CLAYTON -The following are significant Anastasio Somoza in recognition of his services in the bombardment, and minesweeping operations. World War II events that took place in February 1944. construction of the recently completed Pan American Feb. 21 Feb. 1 Highway in Nicaragua. Headquarters, Quarry Heights, announces Col. Troops of V Amphibious Corps open attack for main Feb. 11 Francis E. Howard, Provost Marshal of the Panama objectives at the Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands, Capt. Donovan E. Smight, director of the Coast ArCanal Department, is to be honored with a full miliSouthwest Pacific. tillery Command Training Center announces the tary parade and review marking the completion of a Initial Joint Plan, NEPTUNE (formulated by air, graduation of 67 soldier students from the Enlisted four-year tour of duty. The ceremony will be held on ground, and naval planners) for invasion of Normandy is Specialist School. Thirty-seven completed a course in the Coast Artillery Quadrangle at Fort Clayton. issued. The code name NEPTUNE is restricted than the medical field service, 26 as qualified radio operators, Feb. 24 term OVERLORD as it applies only to movement across 13 as anti-aircraft detection equipment operators, During a review, Col. Francis E. Howard, presents the channel and seizure of beachhead in Normandy. nine as anti-aircraft fire control and two in radio a $1,000 War Bond to PFC Bryce F. Eck, of the MP's Feb. 2 maintenance. who recently lost his left leg in a motorcycle accident. Roi Island in the Marshall Islands is taken by the 4th Feb. 12 Feb. 25 Marine Division and positions are secured on Namur and Combined Chiefs of Staff issue directive to Gen. A Pollera Ball at the Panama Union Club in honor Kwajalein. For the first time Allied troops set foot on Dwight D. Eisenhower on his duties as Supreme Allied of Lt. Gen. George H. Brett, presided by Queen Elisa prewar Japanese territory. Commander, Allied Expeditionary Force, that will invade Arosemena, Union Club Carnival sovereign, ends the U.S. 6th Army headquarters moves from Australia to the European continent. Target date is set as May, 1944. Bomber Fund Drive exceeding its $15,000 goal. Cape Cretin, New Guinea. Feb. 17 Feb. 29 Feb. 6 Lt. Gen. George H. Brett, Commanding General A U.S. Army force lands in Admiralty Islands, SouthTwenty-four soldiers graduate from the Enlisted of the Caribbean Defense Command and of the west Pacific. Specialist School of the Coast Artillery Command Panama Canal Department, travels to Quito, EcuaBy the end of February 1944, selective service regTraining Center in Panama. Ten completed an antidor, on a special mission and bestows the Order of the istration in the canal zone and in Panama of U.S. citiaircraft detection course, eight a wire communications Legion of Merit upon Col. Hector Salgado, Comzens 18 to 44 years old was completed. The number of course, and six a searchlight electrician's course. mander, Carabaneros, and Maj. Cornelio Izquierdo, canal zone registrants as of Dec. 1, 1943, totaled 2,744. Feb. 8 Ecuadoran Army. Maj. Joe A. McEachern, Assistant Chief of Staff, During a reception offered by Ecuadorian president, Editor's note: This timeline was compiled by Panama Canal Department is awarded the Medal of Carlos Arroyo del Rio, Brett urges "united support of conDolores De Mena, USARSO, historian, in commemoDistinction by the Republic of Nicaragua by President stituted democratic government through strong military ration of the 50th Anniversary of WWIL

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Sports Feb. 18, 1994 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 12 Race for the playoffs heats kSouth, the North Division is a king-of-thetional League's 24th Transportation SquadS uy stre tc h s tre a k hill competition with ALSS currently on ron squared off against Western Division top. rival 24th Weather Squadron. -.4Airlift support claimed the top spot by It was the most closely contested game topushing down the 24th Air Postal Squadof the night, but transportation eeked out a ron (13-5). The win pads its record to 8-4. 10-6 win thanks to a late-game scoring by Sgt. James A. Rush talion, 508th Infantry. Four other teams in the division have four surge. 24th Wing Public Affairs The victory stretches supply's win streak to six losses. Weather led for the first four innings. to 20 straight going back to the 1993 season Only the 24th Communications SquadThree times scores in the first and one in the HOWARD AFB-Defending champion and playoffs. Italsokeeps itin step with the ron Team 2 is out of the North's playoff third game gave it a 4-0 advantage. 24th Supply Squadron had little trouble National League's 24th Security Police hunt. The roof collapsed in the top of the fifth withCompanyB, lstBattalion,228thAviaSquadron (12-0). At 011, COMM 2 is the only intramuhowever. tion Brigade, polishing it off 14-2in softball This year's season is half over. Supply ral team to fail to record a win during the Transportation's bottom five batters action Feb. 11 at Weekly Field here. and the cops will not meet during the first half of the season. scored on a four-hit rally. Another run in Other winners that night were the 617th regular season setting up a potential The 1-508th won by forfeit over Comthe sixth and four more in the seventh was Airlift Support Squadron, 24th Transporundefeated showdown in the playoffs. pany C, 1-228th in the evening's opener. enough cushion to absorb Weather's last tation Squadron and Company A, 1st BatWhilesupplyownsthe AmericanLeague In the final game of the night, the Nainning rally. Cr n tDepormeni of Defense photo by St .Hro Menaseche Sports leftfielder Sharon Harday cranks it to the fence for an inside-the-park home run against All Guts No Glory Tuesday evening at Fort Clayton. Menaseche Sports dominated the game and has led the Women's Softball League most of the season. All Guts No Glory has played like its name and trails the league at (1-7). Signal soldiers find alternative to Paddlers across the isthmus pre*Black History Month softball organizational days in the form of pare for the upcoming cayuco race *Youth soccer season Silly Olympics. spectacle. +SCN radio sports_ _

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Tropic Times S ports Feb. 18, 1994 1.) Silly olympians mock organizational days by SSgt Jane Usero "Thegamesincludeseveralfunthings USA RSO Pubic Affa rs Offce such as tug-of-war, tricycle rides, secret events and watermelon pass," Lammie FORTCLAYTON -The56th Signal said. Battalion was the first U.S. Army South "But, the unit itself really comes up unit to hold the Unit "Silly" Olympics with the events and just about anything that will be held at unit organization goes." days and culminate with a USARSOThe main purpose of the Olympics is wide competition July 4. to take what some see as "mandatory "We hope to get all the units to fun" and make it really fun for everyparticipate and the winning teams goon body and brings the unit together, she to the Fourth of July competition," said said. Sgt. Patricia Lammie, Olympic coordi"We started with few volunteers, but nator for the 56th. ended up with more than enough for the The Unit "Silly"Olympics is planned teams," Lammie said. to begin at the unit and move up to Units wanting to set up a Unit "Silly" battalion and brigade levels before reachOlympics for their organization day can ing the USARSO competition, she said. call Lammie at 285-6715. U S Army photo by Sgt Mildred Navarrro U.S. Army yhto by SSgt Janes Millie Amat, an Army family member, stretches in the unit stretch competition of the Headquarters Detatchment, 56th Signal Battalion, pulls a win. Unit Silly Olympics. Women's Softball League Army Unit Level Softball League 555th MP Co. 2 6 5 HHfC 1-.508th 5 3 2 Team W L GB White League HHC USAG/IG 3 8 5 1/2 24th COMM #1 6 5 2 1/2 Menascehe Sports 8 1 -Team W L GB Co. B 154th Sig 1 7 6 24th SVS 4 7 4 Chryler 6 3 2 310th MI 8 1 -as of Monday 617th ALSS #2 1 10 7 Nujak Swing 6 2 2 1/2 HHC USAG 7 1 1/2 Western Division Comedy Crew 4 5 4 142nd Med 8 2 1/2 Green League 24th SPS#l 12 0 Kamikazes 3 6 5 SOUTHCOM 6 3 2 Team W L Gb 24th MSSQ 8 3 3 1/2 Lady Torpedoes 2 6 5 1/2 HH4D 470th MI 6 4 21/2 747th MI 5 0 -24th SVS 6 6 6 All Guts No Glory 1 7 61/2 Co. B 1-508th 6 4 21/2 TRICO 4 0 1/2 24th TRANS 6 6 6 as of Monday Co. C 1-508th 5 4 3 JOTB 3 0 1 HHC 1-228th 2 8 9 41st ASG 4 6 41/2 PCC 3 1 1 1/2 24th WS 2 10 10 Atlantic Women's Softball League 56th ORD Det. 6 6 3 1/2 549th MP Co. 2 2 2 1/2 24th CES #2 1 10 10 1/2 Team W L GB Co. B 193rd Spt. 5 5 4 HSGA 2 2 21/2 2 La Jit 6 0 -59th Eng. 2 4 41/2 3-7th SF 2 2 21/2 American League Hustlers 4 2 2 DCSRM 2 8 6 1/2 Co. A 5-87th 1 1 2 1/2 Southern Division Ladies Cammanej 2 4 4 HHC 193rd Inf. 1 8 7 Navy Gold 1 4 4 Team W L GB Panthers 0 6 6 Co. A 193rd Supt. 0 8 7 1/2 HHC 5-87th 0 2 3 1/2 24th SUPS 11 0 Co. C 5-87th 0 1 3 536th ENG 9 2 2 Reeder Over 30 Basketball League Red League 408th MI 0 2 3 1/2 24th CES #1 6 3 6 1/2 Team W L GB Team W L GB Marines 0 5 5 24 AIRPS 5 7 61/2 The Friends 11 0 -56th Signal Bat. 8 2 -Co. B 5-87th 0 0 310ALS 3 7 7 1/2 Knights 11 2 1 Co. E 1-228th 7 2 1/2 asofMonday C Co. 1-228 1 9 9 1/2 The Posse 9 4 2 HHC LEA 7 3 1 Northern Division Jazz 8 5 2 1/2 Co. A 154th Sig. 6 2 1 Howard Softball League 617th ALSS #1 8 4 Barcardi 7 5 4 534th MP Co. 5 3 1 1/2 National League 24th MS 7 5 1 Los Medios 3 8 5 1/2 MEDDAC 6 4 2 Eastern Division 24th SPS #2 6 5 1 1/2 Co. E 308th MI 6 7 5 1/2 HHD 56th Sig. 4 6 4 Team W L GB B Co. 1-228 4 4 2 MEDDAC 3 9 7 HHC 1-228th 4 6 4 24th AIS/OSS 9 3 -Co. A 1-508 3 6 3 1/2 SOUTHCOM2 2 10 7 1/2 92nd PSC 3 5 4 24th MEDS 8 3 1/2 24th COMM #2 0 11 7 1/2 SOUTHCOM I I 1 8 1/2 3rd SOSC 4 6 4 617th SOAD 8 4 1 as of Wednesday

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14 Tropic Times .L Feb. 18, 1994S t "There's nothing that can be done about that," she said. "Some of the patch boats are very fast." Race times have improvedby more than five hours since Ship-10-Gamboa left Cristobal. The following are the winning boats since the race began. Not all of the times and winners were available and although the boat may have won several times, the crews change frequently. Year Category Boat Time Unit/Ship 1993 Male Miconception unavail. Post 10 COED Spontaneous ? Combustion 6:07:28 Post 10 Female Great Expectations 6:08:48 Post 21 Patch Ultimate Most unavailable 1992 Male Misconcpetion 5:20.14 Post 10 COED the Most 6:11:09 Post 21 Female Great Expect. 6:18:10 Post 21 Patch Mister Most 5:50:35 unavail 1991 Male Misconception 5:24:49 Post 10 W COED Spontaneous C. 5:42:38 Post 10 Female BruisedReed 6:20:08 Post 10 Patch Fire 7:50:39 Ship 9 1990 Male Utmost 5:25:51 Post 21 COED Spontaneous C. 5:23:23 Post 10 Female the Most 6:42:34 Post 21 Patch Slave Galley 7:22:27 Post 21 1989 Male Utmost 5:26:51 Post 21 COED Spontaneous C. 5:23:33 Post 10 Female Bruised Reed 6:15:15 Post 10 Patch Ultimate Most 6:57:35 Post 21 1988 Male Snafu 5:31:35 Post 21 COED Rosa De America 6:36:13 Rovers Female Bruised Reed 6:27:03 Post 10 Patch Ultimate Most 6:18:35 Post 21 1987 Male NIC 5:33:24 Post 21 COED Rosa De America 6:46:02 Rovers Female Bruised Reed 6:38:34 Post 10 Patch Mister Most 5:47:23 Post 21 1986 Male Scenic Route 6:46:22 Ship 9 COED Rosa De America 6:40:37 Rovers Female Situation Hopeless 6:59:58 Post 21' Patch Almost 6:52:16 Post 21 1985 Male Due Process 5:45:37 Ship 9 COED the Most 6:26:15 Post 21 Female Bejuco 6:59:00 Post 21 Patch Bruised Reed 6:20:36 Post 21 1984 Male NIC 5:42:03 Post 21 COED Situation H. 6:30:08 Post 21 Female Bejuco 6:45:07 Post 21 Patch the Most 6:10:58 Post 21 1983 Male NIC 5:45:45 Post 21 COED Situation H. 5:41:34 Post 21 Female Relax 7:09:44 Post 21 Patch Cardiac Arrest 8:51:18 Post 21 Department of Defense photo by Sgt. E.J. Hersom 1982 Male Due Process 5:38:54 Post 21 Gamboa paddlers, Lee Gibson, Jose Gonzales, Tyler Quinn and Chris Corrigan, work out in MisconcepCOED the Most 6:00:09 Post 21 tion. The Gamboa teams have the potential to all finish in the top 10, said Lou Husted, trainer. Female Great Expectations 6:25:38 Post 21 Patch Cardiac Arre st 7:14:59 Post 21 Paddlers prepare for annual 1981 Male Due Process 5:43:05 2 Pad le s pr ~pa e or nn al COED Tequila Sunrise unavail Post 21 Female Dejuco unavail Post 21 1980 Mae .Almost unavadl Post 21 cayuco canal run spectacle 1979 Mae DuePro unavail Post 21 1978 Male Dear Dick 6:08:53 Post 21 by Sgt. E.J. Hersom in the making and will be paddled by his 14-year-old-son, 1977 Male NIC 5:35:41 Post 12 Tropic Times Sports Editor Chris, who is competing in his first cayuco race. 1976 Male NIC 5:48:02 Post 12 Deception is thesisLer boat of Misconception and raced Female El Beuco unavail Post 21 GAMBOA -The teams seen paddling the crew-compein the regatta leading up to the race in 1993, but Jay held Patch Nihon Maru unavail Post 29 tition-looking boats with canoe oars around the canal the boat out of the race for refinements. 1975 Male Due Process 5:39:36 Ship 8 recently are preparing for the 1994 Panama Canal District Deception has an innovative design like nothing the COED [a Flecha 6:52:27 Post 1 Boy Scouts of America Annual Ocean to Ocean Cayuco race has ever seen before, Llori said. Female Crimson Tide 7:38:51 Ship 8 Race set for March 25. Jay made the boat with a convex bow so that Chris and 1974 Male NIC 6:14:16 Post 21 This year's canal run is the 41st of the time-honored other young paddlers can ride on top of waves and break Female P-29-Curundu unavailable event that began in 1954 when Ship-10-Gamboa won the through the water easier, he said. 1973 Male NIC 5:46:20 Post 21 race with a time of 10 hours and 30 minutes. The design of Deception is no great secret, Jay said, but Female S-9-2 9:24:02 Post 1 The jourtyey through the canal is 50 miles of teampaddlers accross the isthmus have been sl5eculating about 1972 Male NIC 5:46:41 Post 21 powered paddling staged in three days beginning at the it. Patch Predator unavailable Panama Canal Yacht Club in Cristobal. The second day is Other speculations in the area concern Lee's, Chris' 1971 Male NIC 6:09:57 Post 21 launched the following day from the boat ramp at the south brother, third design of the cayuco race patch. 1970 Male Destiny 6:10:58 Post 1 end of Gatun Locks. The third begins at the finishing Details of the patch design are scarce and shrouded in 1969 Male Destiny 6:11:13 Post 1 beacon of the second and ends at the Diablo boat ramp. secrecy, but will include the Gamboa Bridge and have four 1968 Male NIC unavailable Squadron 15 Grueling is the word used most to describe the event. points, sources said. No other details were available about 1967 Male Bejuco unavail Post 21 The boats more than 40 teams compete in yearly are the patch except that each part of it is symbolic, Llori said. 1966 Male Bejuco 6:52:38 Post 21 hollowed trees cut from forests near lakes and rivers. Lee earned the privilege of designing the patch by 1965 Male Bejuco 6:20:58 Post 21 "It's truly the natives' mode of transportation," said winning the trophy category of the race -a feat he 1964 Male Bejuco 7:48:57 Post 21 Llori Gibson, a race committe member. accomplished three years in a row in Misconception. 1963 Male Cojeme Si Puedes unavail Ship 10 The Espave tree is the cayuco makers' choice because Only Exporer Scouts 14-21 years old can actually win 1962 Male Homer's Folly unavail Ship 10 it floats well and doesn't rot, she said. the race and receive trophies. Other contestants fall into the 1961 Male P-20 Balboa unavail Post 20 Cayuco racing has run in the Gibson family for years. patch category and by finishing the race, earn the patch. 1960 Male Cojeme Si Puedes 7:25:46 Post 3 Jay Gibson, Llori's husband, used to race, but now builds The patch contestants are mainly out for fun, but some 1959 Male Cojeme Si Puedes 7:29:37 Post 3 cayucos and trains teams. want to be up on stage with the trophy winners, Llori said. 1958 Male S-9-Cristobal unavail Ship 9 He's owned up to five boats and won in 1974 in the NIC, The race committee has looked into possibilities, but it 1957 Male P-12-Gatun unavail Post 12 whichstandsforNonIllitimusCarborundumor"Don'tLet won't happen. The race has a staggered start with the 1956 Male P-12-Gatun unavail Post 12 the Bastards Get You Down." trophy category leaving first, but the patch boats still catch 1955 Male P-12-Gatun unavail Post 12 His latest project Deception has been more than a year up, she said. 1954 Male S-10-Gamboa 10:30:00 Ship 10

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Tropic Times 1 Sports -Shorts Feb.18,19941 nity Hospital Dental Clinic. Late registraAtlantic center offers free tion will be at the track 7-7:30 a.m. on race day. For information, call Chris Merida at weekday step aerobics 287-3609/3904. The Fronius Physical Fitness Center offers free step aerobics 9-10 a.m. weekFitness center accepts days.Participantsmusthavetheirownstep. Tae Kwon Do forms Call the center at 289-3108. ApplicationsfortheTaeKwonDotrainCurundu Bowling Center ing camp at Fort Indiantown Gap, Pa., are available at the Howard Sports and Fitness holds Green Pin Bowling Center. Application deadline is Feb. 26 and The Curundu Bowling Center holds are available for active duty airmen. Call Green Pin Bowling Sundays. Make a strike the center at 284-3451 for more informawhen the green pin is in the number one tion. position and that game is free. Call the center at 285-3914 for more information. Wanted: skilled soccer Ftescne fesfe players born after '82 Fitness center offers free Internationals coach Jose Soto is lookweekday aerobics class ing for skilled soccer players born after The Reeder Physical Fitness Center has Aug. 1982 to compete in a city-wide comfree aerobics 9:15-10:15 a.m. weekdays. petition being held March 3 to April 30. Each workout has a warm up, cardiovascuTryouts will be held 5 p.m. Monday and lar workout, cool down andfloorwork. Call Tuesday at the Albrook Soccer Field. For the center at 287-3861 for more informamore information call, Jose Soto at 286tion. 4591. Reeder honors president Fitness center teaches with three-pointer contest better fitness classes ReederPhysicalFitnessCenterwillcelThe Howard Sports and Fitness Center ebrateGeorge Washington's Birthday with holds Fitness Improvement Training a basketball three-point shot contest MonClasses 6:05-7 a.m. and 2:05-3 p.m. Monday. Registration will be the day of the day, Wednesday and Friday at the center. event. Call the center at 287-3861 for more The classes consists of a calisthenic super information. circuit work out that is aimed at improving muscular endurance, cardiovascular sysMilitary Sailing Club temsandflexibility.Studentsmustbeevaluholds courses until June acted on the amount of exercise they are capable of performing in a class before the T Military Sailing Club will hold program starts. Call the center at 284-3451 several four-day sailing courses through Tennis anyone? for more information. June. Each class will be held over the last weekend and first weekend of the month. The monthly Crossroads Tennis Club tournament will be Feb. 26-27 at the The $75 cost includes the rental fee of the Diablo Heights Tennis Courts with categories for men, women and Sg n boat,instructor and a certification card that children. Registration deadline is 6 p.m. Wednesday. For registration at Reeder fitness center canbe used to take the intermediate sailing information, call Mike Goldstein at 264-5160 or Wally Murdoch at 252Registration for the following sports course at Rodman Naval Station. Classes 2969. events has begun at the Directorate of are limited to the first 10 students to sign up Community Activities Sports Branch on and pay. People who are not in the first 10 SCN AM -radio airs pro, scored by the Association ofthe U.S. Army, Fort Clayton: Desert Storm softball prowill be scheduled for future classes. The includead spr, sdy an 8 yatd dshe U 1-a gram; unit level flag football and women's winners of the Morale, Welfare and Recrecollege, olympiC sports includes an 800-yard dash and Iand 3soccer. Call 287-4050 for more informaationsailboatclassraceFeb.7were:Emmilio olee, olm picsptors mile runs for all ages. The 5-mile run is for -tion. Kourany in first, Marcelyn Downer in seeSoutherCommandNetwork'sAM790 children 15 years old and up. The costis $6. ond, Brad Hittle in third and Ron Stitts in Pacific and 1420 Atlantic will broadcast the For more information, call the center at Reeder ho hisfourth. Call Steve Rasmussen at 287-5968, following sports this weekend. 287-6442 osts story John Stobie at 285-4634 or stop by the Fort Tonight month tournament Clayton Boat Shop. Pro basketball: Seattle at Orlando, 8 Fort Clayton range hosts The Reeder Physical Fitness Center is pS.m. pistol competition hosting a Black History Month basketball Howard fitness center saturday tournament Feb.26 -Feb.28. Registration Olympic hockey: Sweden vs. Team A practical pistol competition will be andfee are requiredto enter. Call 287-3861 sets new aerobic hours U.S.A., 1:45 p.m. held March 5 at the Fort Clayton Pistol for more information. The Howard Sports and Fitness Center College basketball: UCLA at Arizona,4 Range. Registration will be 9 a.m. and the will have step aerobic classes 8:45 a.m. p.m. first shotwillbe9:30 a.m. The competition Fitness center teaches Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Classes Sunday is open to active duty members in single or cost $1. Call 284-3451 for more informaPro basketball: ChicagoatN.Y. Knicks, four-man team events. For registration, self-directed aerobics tion. 1p.m. fees or information, call 287-5647. The Howard Sports and Fitness Center Collegebasketball:Louisvillevs.Temple offers self-directed aerobics programs -Youth services seeks at Orlando, Fla., 3:45 p.m. Bowling centers offer "Ski the Appalachian Trail" and "Climb Monday P s , Mount Everest." For more information, youth soccer coaches Olympic hockey: Italy vs. Team U.S.A., PDay p eil call 284-3451. Youth Services Atlantic needs coaches 1:45 p.m. The Howard and AlbrookBowling Cenfor the upcomingyouth soccerseason. RegCollege basketball: Fla. StateatFlorida, ters will offer bowling specials in honor of Howard, Albrook pools istration for the season is also under way. 8 p.m. Presidents Day Sunday. Games willcost75 Space is limited. Sign up at the Building cents. The monthly no-tap tournament will offer swimming classes 219, Fort Espinar. Fronius hosts birthday be held Feb. 27. For more information, call The Howard and Albrook pools invite softball tournament the Howard center at 284-4818 or the parentsandtheirchildrentoenrollinswimFitness center hosts free Albrook center at 286-4260. ming lessons. The pools also have water The Fronius Physical Fitness Center aerobics classes available. Call the Zodiac play volleyball weekdays will holds a Presidents Day men's and DENTAC sponsors run Recreation Center at 284-3569 or the The Howard Sports and Fitness Center women's softball tournament Saturday Albrook Pool at 286-3555. will hold free-play volleyball 6:30-8:30 through Monday. An organizational meetagainst tooth decay p.m. weekdays. Call the center at 284-345 ingwillbeheldThursday.Theentrancefee TheU.S.ArmyDentalActivity-Panama Davis pool hosts swim for more information. is $50 for women's teams and $75 for will host the 10th Run From Decay fun run men's teams. Call the center at 289-3108 8 a.m. Feb. 26 at the Albrook AFS track. meet Fiesta Panama' for more information. The run is open to children 5-12 years old The Fort Davis Pool will host the beginRodman Fitness Center who have bilingual identification cards. ners swimming meet "Fiesta Panama" 10 rents mountain bikes AUSA sponsors running The children will run in age andsex categoa.m. Saturday. Registration deadline is toTheRodman FitnessCenterrents mounries in 200 meters and 1/4 mile races and day. Categories are doggie kick, front kick, tain bikes on a hourly, daily orweekly basis. events at Reeder gym prizes will be awarded. Registration forms back kick and free style. Age groups are for Prices are $1 per hour, $5 per day, $25 per There will be a U.S. Army South Presican be picked up at Department of Defense 4-12 year olds. week. A $25 deposit is required for rentals dents Day fun run7 a.m. Saturday at Reeder Dependents Schools, the Fort Clayton DenCall the Davis pool at 289-3272 for taken off Rodman Naval Station. Call 283Physical Fitness Center. The run, spontal Clinic and the Gorgas Army Commumore information. 4222/4061.

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9'~-/~'~ZS3 -(.2) 6 Tropic Times Feb. 18, 1994 f Ne AF recruiters scout locals Army Band concerts set by SSgt. Rian Clawson liaison TSgt. Bill Turner. Maj. James Dula, Mission Support SquadFORT AMADOR (USARSO 24th Wing PublicAffairs We'ye gotten tremendous results ron commander PAO) -The 79th Army Band dry here, much better than we expected," he Although the recruiters have returned season concerts are in full swing HOWARD AFB -Three U.S. Air said. to Patrick, they have left in place a process throughout the U.S. Army South Force recruiters from Patrick AFB's 333rd In fact, the recruiting team was so so people can pursue a personal interest in community. Recruiting Squadron recently left Florida happy with the local response that they an Air Force career. The concerts are scheduled to to visit Howard AFB and to recruit young extended their stay two days. Dula (284-3456) and MSSQ first serbegin at 6 p.m. for the following men and women interested in an Air Force The basic requirements for prospective geant MSgt. Johnny Wilford (284-3416) dates and locations: Wednesday at career. Air Force recruits are to be between the will be the local liaison for the Air Force Fort Davis' Davis Park; Feb. 27 at The group's visit follows almost six ages of 17 and 27 and be either a U.S. citirecruiters in their absence. People may the Amador Gazebo; March 9 at years of absence in the local community, zen or a resident alien of the United States. also call the recruiters directly at Defense Fort Davis' Davis Park; March 13 said recruiting operations supervisor "Many people watch the news or read Switching Network 854-4686 or commerat the Amador Gazebo; March 26 MSgt. Gerard Baker. news articles about the drawdown of the cial (305) 591-7326. at Howard Air Force Base near the "Although Army recruiters have a perarmed forces and believe the Air Force is Before the recruiters' visit, there was Base Exchange; March 27 at the manent presence in Panama," he said, no longer interested in recruiting them," no avenue for people to take when they Amador Gazebo; April 9 at "Air Force recruiters haven't been here Turner said. "This is definitely not the considered joining the U.S. Air Force, Howard AFB near the BX; April since 1988." case. People who meet our two basic reDula said. "We now have a system to en10 at the Amador Gazebo; April 29 The team sought recruits at Balboa quirements are welcome to give us a call sure everyone who wants to join has the at Fort Davis' Davis Park; May 1 High School and Panama Canal College. and explore Air Force opportunities furmeans to do so." at the Amador Gazebo; May 13 at Team members also made individual apther." The recruiting team is scheduled to reFort Davis' Davis Park; and May pointments with people who called in with A dozen local people expressed interturn here in about four months. 15 at the Amador Gazebo. inquiries. est in the Air Force and took the Armed "Since they had such an outstanding The team members were pleased with Services Vocational Aptitude Battery. response this time out, they'll be back," MPs investigate the results of their efforts here, said senior Four of those were actually sworn in, said Dula said. assault case U. ea FORT CLAYTON UAS U.S. teams help improve Uruguay's water PAO) -The military police appreQUARRY HEIGHTS (UShended and confined a soldier last SOUTHCOM PAO) -The U.S. week for alleged attempted rape, Office of Defense Cooperation robbery and aggravated assault, at the U.S. Embassy in Provost Marshal officials said. Montevideo wrapped its 1993 The U.S. Army South soldier with assistance programs. met the victim at the Fort Clayton Doctors, lawyers, engineers Noncommissioned Officers' Club and command post controllers and followed her onto Hospital headed a list of experts who ar Road. rived to participate in exercises As the victim approached the and information exchanges with wooded area near Cardenas Uruguayan civilian and military Bridge, the soldier forced bet into officials. he woods where he began assaultDoD medical supplies doing her and forcibly removed her nated to the Ministry of Public clothing. Health benefited the Uruguayan The victim escaped when the population at large, officials soldier panicked and fled the area. said. But the most visible assisThe incident is under investigatance helped provide water for tion by the U.S. Army Criinal farmers and paint for a schoolInvestigaions Iivison s house. Officials advise everyone to tise "We were very pleased to caution when walking after dark play a part in building a stronand to always use the buddy sysger sense of community with tem. these projects," said ODC Chief, Air Force colonel William A. Jordan. Department of Defense photo The United States and UrnCmdr. William McKeever of the Office of Defense Cooperation lends his hat to deposit guay ended a 2-year model Uruguayan school children in October, 1993. Sailors from the USS Stark, John FORT CLAYTON (USARSO project to develop reliable water Rodgers, and Whidbey Island refurbished the children's school in Montevideo's Cerro PAO) -A new direct deposit policy sources for some of Uruguay's neighborhood Oct 26. for all Department of Defense emsmall farmers. The 24 wells, afployees in grades NM-9 and MGfecting about 380 acres, will help producers compete in the more In February and March, ODC arranged subject matter expert 10 and higher has been adopted by competitive environment of the evolving Common Market of the exchanges that helped Uruguayan military medical specialists the Panama DoD Employees CoaSouth. It will also serve as a model for civilian drilling operagain a better understanding of hospital logistics planning, equiplition and U.S. Army South, UStions. ment maintenance, and pharmaceuticals management. ARSO officials said. In 1992, U.S. Army Engineers from the 6th Well Drilling U.S. Army Maj Hank Cintron of the Deputy Army Surgeon The policy requires the direct Detachment of the 536th Engineer Battalion, U.S. Army South General's office conducted the logistics exchange, while ODC deposit of employees' pay checks drilled 12 wells near Montevideo and 12 more near the city of Army representative Maj Michael Scott escorted four Uruguayan to a financial institution of their Salto in 1993 as part of Exercise Fuertes Caminos South. medical officers on the pharmaceuticals exchange to Walter Reed choice. Employees have until July The Uruguayan government's Ministry of Agriculture seArmy Hospital in Washington. 31 to submit the paperwork to filected the drilling sites and made arrangements with farm ownIn September, a U.S. Army mobility training team from nance and accounting. While U.S. ers. The government also brought fuel and gravel to each site, Walter Reed advised doctors at Uruguay's Military Health Sercitizen employees are required to while farmers paid for electrical hookups for IirigatiOui systems. vices Comiand on preand post-deployment health screening participate, non-U.S. citizen emUruguayan drilling companies, government engineers and stu-including malaria and HIV testing. This training is key to ployees who don't submit by July dents observed operations to gain insights on technical advances. Uruguayan Army medical support for local deployments to UN 31 will have paychecks sent to their The U.S. detachment got valuable field experience, officials said. peace-keeping missions around the worldto which the country mailing address. Call 285-4863. U.S. and Uruguayan war gamers also got a chance to work is heavily committed, officials said. together to defeat a fictional invasion in Fuerzas Unidas coinIn March, an exchange headed by Air Force Judge Advocate Lions Club mand post exercises held at the Army and Air Force command General Brig. Gen. Nolan Sklute hosted discussions with miliand general staff colleges in mid-October. tary officials on environmental law and jurisdiction of civilian This year, staff from 12th Air Force, the Army's 10th Mounand military courts. Environmental law, now a leading legal ish s tain Division, USARSO, the School of the Americas, and USsue in the United States, is gaining momentum in Uruguay as COROZAL (Tropic Times) SOUTHCOM represented the United States. Military members well. Refining the boundaries between civilian and military court The Balboa Lions Club is solicitfrom both countries played on each of the defending and invadjurisdictions is crucial to resolving conflicts between sometimes ing donations to help victims of the ing teams. Meanwhile, Uruguayan civilians got a close up view competing court systems, officials said. recent Los Angeles earthquake. of the courtesy of local television-coverage. Instructors from the Inter-American Air Force Academy proThe tax-deductible contributions A week later, in Montevideo during the annual UNITAS exvided training to helicopter mechanics at the Uruguayan Air will be forwarded to the Lions Club ercise, sailors and Marines from the USS Stark, John Rodgers, Force's Grupo Cinco Search and Rescue unit From June to Auin Los Angeles. Checks should be and Whidbey Island provided a school for developmentally chalgust. Grupo Cinco operates Bell UIHI N aircraft used extensively made payable to the Balboa Lions lenged children in the capital of Cerro with paint, cement, and for maritime rescue on the vast mouth to the Rio de fa Plata. The Club Earthquake Fund and mailed other supplies. The sailors cleaned, repaired, and repainted walls civilian maritime community benefits enormously from this serto Arthur Kerr, PSC 2 Box 2444, inside and out. Local students, parents, and teachers also helped. vice, and ODC helped keep the missions flying, officials said. APO A A 34(X)2. "Those of us in the neighborhood appreciate it too," an eldThe ODC will continue to provide programs that benefit the erly on-looker said. military, but the civilian community as well, Jordan said.