Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text



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VoVII.VNo..6


Ouarry Heights, Rep
Quarry Heights, Rept


public of Pana mesa Friday, Feb.

public of Panama Friday, Feb. 11,1994


Senate confirms
new commander
COROZAL (Tropic Times) - Gen.
Barry R. McCaffrey was confirmed
Thursday by the U.S. Senate to be-
come commander in chief of the U.S.
Southern Command following sen-
ate hearings Wednesday, officials
said.
An assumption of command cer-
emony is scheduled for 9 a.m.
Thursday at Howard AFB, a
SOUTHCOM spokesman said.
McCaffrey was nominated by
President Bill Clinton Nov. 24 to suc-
ceed Gen. George A. Joulwan, who
became Supreme Allied Commander
Europe in October.
McCaffrey will receive his fourth
star in a ceremony at the Pentagon
next week.
He will become the senior U.S.
military commander in Latin
America, responsible for implement-
ing U.S. national security policy and
strategy in the region.
McCaffrey was the director for
Strategic Plans and Policy of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff.
McCaffrey served as the com-
mander of the 24th Infantry Division
(Mechanized) 1990-1992, which de-
ployed to Saudi Arabia in August
1990.
He led the division in combat
operations in Iraq during Operation
Desert Storm for which he was
awarded the Distinguish Service
Medal.
A graduate of the U.S. Military
Academy at West Point, N.Y., his
career also includes four combat
tours, two of them in Vietnam.
Details of the assumption of com-
mand ceremony will be aired on
Southern Command Network radio
and TV.

Home delivery
expanding today
QUARRY HEIGHTS (Tropic
Times) - Families on Fort Amador
and Curundu will have the Tropic
Times delivered to their front doors
beginning today.
The Miami Herald expanded its
service to quarters on the two in-
stallations, said Patrick Milton, com-
mand information officer, U.S.
Southern Command.
The delivery of the Tropic Times
is made possible by special arrange-
ment with the Miami Herald, which
began home delivery to Quarry
Heights and Albrook AFS Dec. 20,
1993.
The home delivery will expand
to Rodman NS and the Cocoli hous-
ing area in March, Milton said.
For information about home de-
livery of the Miami Herald or em-
ployment opportunities as a carrier,
call Jorge Gonzales at 269-3220 or
236-1522.


Carnival time



hits Panama

by Rosemary Chong
Tropic Times staff
COROZAL - Carnival time in Panama. It's a time when practi-
cally the entire population forgets everyday problems and enjoys
wholehearted merrymaking.
Carnival, as the Latins understand it, takes place each year just
three days before Ash Wednesday. However, Panamanians ex-
tend that celebration to four days.
For people residing in Panama City, carnival is not official. This.
year, the "Carnaval de Comparsas '94" is from 2 to 8 p.m. Saturday
and starts with a parade from La Cresta, Via Espana, up to Plaza
Cinco de Mayo and Avenida Justo Arosemena across from the
Toldo Tipicon. There will be diablicos, resbalosos, costumes,
comparsas (groups of dancers/singers), murgas (bands), floats
and other attractions. Music, booths with food and refreshments
will be available.
For people who can't make it to the interior, the most conve-
nient event is the Capira carnival, alongside the InterAmerican
Highway. It's only 34 miles from the city. The Taboga Island carni-
val is also nearby, just a boat ride away.
In Panama, the carnival is celebrated in three different ways. In
the capital city and in Colon, it's more of a care-free nature, with
people having fun in his or her own way, while watching the cos-
tumed comparsas dance in the streets.
Another type of celebration is the Water Carnival in Penonome.
People gather at the Mendozas swimming resort to watch the
flower-decorated floats move slowly down the Zarati river. This
parade is held Saturday afternoon.
The third version is the typical carnival in the interior, mainly in
Chitre and Las Tables. Those who prefer to be in the midst of this
type of carnival "Shbuld be prep r-d t 't.- v.ith water
"mojaderas" and smeared with.~ ,.hs...; Le..1 . e during the
morning hours and hear the loud eplhil n of fiCeir.ckers at night.-
In Las Tablas, groups of comparsas.with their murgas, known
as Calle Arriba (uptown) and Calle Abajo (downtown) sing and


,- -


Panamanian children dance in a parade during Carnival.
Carnival season runs from Saturday until Wednesday.
dance their way to the plaza and try to outdo each other.
Dancing in open-air toJdos, hotels, night clubs or at private
parties until early in the morning, puts the finishing touches to
pach day's activities. Traditic.inall. groups of revelers end the car-
nival celebration with the ceremony of the "burial of the sardine"
at the nearest beach early morning on Asl Wednesday.
But no matter what you do or where you go, carnival is here and
it runs Saturday through Tuesday.


Arraijan road project finishes


by SSgt. Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - More than two years of work is about to
finish on the InterAmerican Highway that runs from Arraijan to the
Bridge of the Americas.
"This has been an outstanding example of cooperation be-
tween the U.S. Forces and the Panamanian government," said
Nancy Trotter, Navy Panama Canal Treaty Implementation officer
said. "On the whole, things went very smoothly."
Arguably, the most complicated portion of the project was the
Howard AFB/Rodman Naval Station interchange, she said.
An American contractor hired by the Army Corps of Engineers
created the "cloverleaf" design and local contractors built it.
A memorandum of agreement also called for a construction
representative to be a liaison with the ministry of public works and
the contractor. Gustavo Rivas of the 24th Civil Engineering Squad-
ron has filled that position for the last 18 months.
"I really enjoyed the work," Rivas said, "although it was a real
challenge to learn the procedures I needed to coordinate with the
Army, Navy, Air Force and the Panama Canal Commission. The
most work came from relocating the utilities near the overpass.
Workers moved water lines, electrical lines and fuel lines, with
almost no "down time."
"There were no serious injuries associated with the construc-
tion and we only had one problem when we moved the utilities,"
Rivas said. "One of the water pipes was buried closer to the sur-
face than diagrams indicated, so when the contractor started dig-
ging, the pipe was broken."


The water line was moved and replaced without significant loss
of service to the base residents.
Several people have been using the cloverleaf wrong, Trotter
said. Coming from the Bridge of the Americas, the proper proce-
dure for entering Howard is to take the right turn immediately after
the underpass. Some people have been taking the exit before the
underpass (meant for Rodman/Cocoli traffic) and then cutting left
across two lanes of traffic to enter Howard AFB.
Not only could you earn a traffic citation for this dangerous
maneuver, Trotter said, "but it could easily cause an accident.
People need to do it properly.".
The center barrier running from the bridge to Arraijan is a safety
feature not included in the original renovation plans, Rivas said.
Some people have complained the divider takes up too much
space and causes a hazard by pushing the lanes of traffic too close
together. Actually the divider is a safety measure that only takes
up about a meter of the road surface, Rivas said.
"Since the road improvements were made, many people have
started thinking of the road to Arraijan as a high speed race track;
it's just not designed for that," he said.
The road was designed in the mid-1930s with dangerous curves
and switchbacks that are not banked, and despite its new appear-
ance, these factors are still present.
There have been several fatalities along the 10-kilometer stretch
of road, Rivas said, and the lane divider will prevent the most seri-
ous type of accidents - head-on collisions.
Military and local officials remind people using the Arraijan
Road to keep their speed down and not to exceed the posted speed
limit of 80 kph (approximately 50 mph.)


I iltay ew -g


an More


Pride days provide link between Di- Air Force experts put cycle ergo- *Demolition men, page 3.

rectorate of Engineering and Hous- metry through the test for determin- +SOUTHCOM CSM retires, page 8.
ing Self-Help and community. ing physical fitness. *Top 4 softball tourney, page 11.


News p age










2 Tropic Times
Feb. 11, 1994


* News


DEH pride days help customers


support community projects


by Gaby Capriles
DEH Public Relations
COROZAL (USARSO PAO) - The Directorate of En-
gineering and Housing self-help and pride days may be
the best way to get things done around the home or office,
DEH officials said.
The goal of the DEH is to offer the customer quality
service despite the limited available resources, said Lt.
Col. John Lovo, DEH director. The vision of DEH is to
support customers and the command mission through
excellence and teamwork.
"The DEH is readily available to offer expert technical
assistance and know-how when something beyond the
you -do-it level breaks down," Lovo said. "Unfortunately,
due to severely restricted resources, it is not always pos-
sible to respond to every service call in a timely manner.
The alternative, in most, cases is self-help."
The PACE Improvement Center in Building 340,
Corozal, and the PACE Support Center in Building 243,
Fort Davis, give customers access to thousands of self-
help items, he said.
Pride days are a result of the combined efforts of DEH
and the community.
"The purpose of this command-sponsored program is
to couple skilled DEH workmen and supplies with the
residents of each community," said Karla Beard, mayor
of the 1000 housing area of Fort Clayton.
"This combination accomplishes as much mainte-
nance, repair work and approved community enhance-
ment projects each community wishes to undertake such
as building tether courts, planting gardens or building
park benches."
The primary focus of pride days is self-help, Lovo said.
But, DEH support is also available for technical assis-
tance on jobs which are beyond self-help capabilities.
Pride days are available for just about everyone's ben-
efit, he said. There are community pride days for family
housing areas and barracks and office pride days for the
soldiers and work force. During barracks and office pride
days, the unit or organization is not charged for the sup-
plies, he said.
Pride days have been officially sanctioned by Maj.
Gen. George Crocker, USARSO commanding general,
and are encouraged for everyone to actively participate in
this team effort, Lovo said.
As part of this, civilians and soldiers who participate
in pride days remain under management control and are
considered in duty status whether in their community or
barracks.
To set up a pride day, coordinators must call DEH at
285-5061/5447 for an initial meeting. During this meet-
ing, the requester and key DEH employees will establish
the dates and scope of the work to be done, Lovo said.
For a community pride day, the requester is usually
the area mayor and in barracks pride days it is the Repair


4t


- I


I


U.S. Army photo
Victor Mendoza, Directorate of Engineering and
Housing, installs a new door during a pride day.
and Utilities noncommissioned officer.
For a successful pride day, it is essential that the re-
quester come to this meeting prepared to furnish precise
details of the work that needs to be done, he said. Before
meeting, the requester should pass out fliers to all the
residents requesting what work needs to be done.
Once the scope of work is determined, another meet-
ing will be held on-sit6with the requester to make sure
all participants know exactly what work is to be done and
what supplies are needed, Lovo said.
On each scheduled pride day, skilled DEH tradesmen
will be available to offer the required technical assistance
and supplies, he said.
If there isn't time to schedule a pride day, there is also
the expanded Self-Help Program, where DEH inspects
an office or barracks and gives advice on how to perform
the necessary repairs or jobs, Lovo said.
DEH will order the necessary supplies if not available
and issues them through the PACE Improvement Center.
It takes about two weeks to coordinate this type of mini-
pride day, he said.
For information, call 285-5447/5061.


Units help improve future phone service


HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) - The local military
community experienced a temporary break in its tele-
phone service Jan. 21, but the 15-minute disruption al-
lowed members of the 106th Signal Brigade and the 56th
Signal Battalion to integrate new equipment that will im-
prove future phone service.
"We'd warned people that they might lose the use of
their phones for as much as 15 minutes," said Lt. Col.
David Boozer, commander of the 24th Communication
Squadron. "Actually, the service was only out for about
nine minutes, which is an outstanding accomplishment.
"We are really pleased with the work the Army and
the contractor did on this project."
Boozer noted the contributions of the 56th Signal
Battalion's Dean Blakeslee and Capt. Hugh Campbell.
AT&T contractors and Army technicians swapped
switches at Howard's "Dial Central Office," replacing
an older, analog "Dimension 2000" switch with a high-
tech, digital 5-Electronic Switching System.
The 5-ESS offers higher quality sound, greater speed
and - because it's digital - direct interface with other
digital equipment, like the newv integrated services digital
network. It adds more than 2,000 subscriber lines and
increases the trunk capacity to 600 trunks.
"The old switch was basically '70s technology and it
just couldn't keep up with the '90s requirements of our
military community," said Army Maj. Joseph Rose, op-
erations officer for the 56th Signal Battalion. "This new
switch is state of the art equipment."
Installation of the new improved switch is part of an
ongoing effort to improve the military community's tele-


phone capabilities, Rose explained.
"We got a great deal of invaluable assistance from the
personnel assigned to the 24th Communications Squad-
ron," he said. "Technical Sergeant Robert Farnsworth of
job control and Master Sergeant Silas Wilson and Cap-
tain Linda Myers of customer service were some of the
integral players who made the 5-ESS cutover a success."
The 56th Signal Battalion is responsible for install-
ing, operating, and maintaining telephone and micro-
wave communication systems at all military installations
in the theater. It's also working with the AT&T contract
crew that's currently laying in a fiber optic cable to
supplement the copper cables of Howard's existing cable
infrastructure.
Operation Live Wire '94 is using Army Reserve and
National Guard resources to replace the telephone wir-
ing, connections and jacks in all of Howard's military
family housing.
This is a continuation of the work the Army started
last year at Fort Clayton and Albrook AFS during Op-
eration Live Wire '93.
"This re-wiring of the MFH is being done to ensure
every unit has the hardware needed for two desk phones
and one wall phone," Boozer explained. "We're also
planning to replace the current rotary phones in military
family housing with new touchtone telephones."
The project is currently on-going at Fort Kobbe, Rose
said, and it will begin shortly in the Navy's Farfan hous-
ing area. Work is scheduled to begin at Howard in late
February or early March and officials say they'll distrib-
ute flyers to housing residents before the work begins.


Atlantic side holds

history month events
FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO-Atlantic) -
Black History Month is now under way in the At-
lantic community with a variety of events sched-
uled to focus on African-American culture.
The Atlantic Black History Month Committee
planned events that highlight the past and explore
the future of African-Americans, said SFC Scarlett
V. Williams, committee.co-chairperson.
"We (the committee) looked at where blacks
have been in the past and what direction they're
headed in and designed events that would present
a better understanding of that to the community,"
she said.
Among the highlights of the month's events are
a Black History Contest and the annual Black His-
tory Program, Williams said.
The contest involves answering questions about
prominent figures in black history and civil rights
events.
The Black History Month Program will be 7-9
p.m. Feb. 26 at the Fort Davis Theater and will
include dancers, skits and food tasting. This year's
theme is "Empowering African-Americans
Present and Future."
Other events scheduled for the month are:
Today - Black History Contest drawing
Wednesday - Film: Minnie the Moocher, 7
p.m. Sundial Recreation Center
Feb. 18 - Luncheon, 11 a.m. at Davis Commu-
nity Club and Black History Contest drawing
Feb. 19 - Balboa, Pier 18, Boat Ride, 8 p.m.,
call 289-3960/3275
Feb. 20 - Film: Malcom X, 6 p.m. at Fort Davis
Theater
Feb. 23 - Film: Mandella, 7 p.m. at Sundial
Recreation Center
Feb. 25 - Black History Contest drawing
Feb. 26 - Black History Program, 7 p.m. at Fort
Davis Theater
Feb. 27 - Religious Service, 12:30 p.m. at Fort
Espinar Chapel.

PACE jamboree

attracts hundreds
FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO-Atlantic) -
More than 200 Atlantic community members
came out for the Panama Army Communities of
Excellence Jamboree '94 here Saturday.
The jamboree offered displays and information
on many of the services available to the Atlantic
community, said Kenneth W. Bryan Jr., chief of
Maintenance and Services Branch, Directorate of
Engineering and Housing.
Among the displays were hands-on demonstra-
tions of minor household repairs, fire safety tips,
child fingerprinting for identification, a commis-
sary nutrition display, a PACE mobile unit display
and demonstrations from the Panama Canal Com-
mission Fire Department.
Although the day's activities and.displays were
geared more toward adults, there were also train
rides, balloons and a visit by McGruff the crime
dog for the children, Bryan said.
"The train rides were a big hit for the kids, but
I noticed a few of the parents sneaking on too," he
said.
"We tried to make the day festive to attract more
people and give the community an idea of the or-
ganizations that help out by providing services to
the community," he said.

Local offices close

because of carnival
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Panama
government offices will be closed Monday through
1:30 p.m. Wednesday for Carnival in the Pacific
and Atlantic communities, officials said. Offices
such as Vehicle Exonerations, Vehicle Registra-
tion and Drivers' License Issuing Office will be
affected.









~kImffg_


Tropic Times
Feb. 11,1994


Range officer in charge, 1st Lt. C.J. Walker, 193rd Infantry Brigade S-3, walks through the wreckage at the demolition range.


A Company C, 1-508th Infantry soldier prepares a
Claymore mine.


Em


Imi


IMEON


59th Enwn h nsre
1-508th exercise 'explosive'
he 59th Engineer Company has created an odd, but
realistic training scenario for the 1 st Battalion (Air
borne), 508th Infantry Regiment.
The engineer company did this by creating enemy
command'posts using props for the infantry to attack. To
achieve this kind of scenario, the company had to sling load
bunk beds, washing machines, plywood, office equipment
and other materials onto the range, said SSgt. Richard
Lindvig, 59th Eng.-Co.
Seeing these oddities in the middle of the jungle might
appear a little overzealous for a training exercise, but the
reason the engineer company goes to so much trouble is
because Col. Louis D. Huddleston, commander, 193rd
Infantry Brigade (Light) likes the training to be as realistic as
possible for his soldiers, Lindvig said.
"A lot of hours have been put into these objectives,"
Lindvig said. "We built four objectives in two days."
"The main thing we are trying to provide is realism," said
Capt. James Skidmore, 59th Eng Co. commander. "It fires
and pumps them (the soldiers going through the EXEVAL)
up, giving them something that is tangible."
This and the demolition range will be the two biggest
operations the company does before it deactivates in April.
Skidmore said that his company has no intentions of slowing
down on training.
He-explained that the company will go through its own
EXEVAL.
Twelve soldiers will also attend the Sapper Leader Course,
a squad will go to Honduras in a platoon exchange and
another platoon will be going to the Joint Readiness Training
Center at Fort Polk, La.
story by Spec. flexander White, USARSO Pubic Affaks
photos by SSgt. Rkh Lnbdvlg, 59th Engheer Company


4
I


. 1 Ronald Bullock, 59th Engineer Company lights a fuse.
Pvt. 1 Ronald Bullock, 59th Engineer Company lights a fuse.


^










-It~1emisphere


Endara replaces 12-member cabinet


PANAMA CITY (Reuters) - Panama's
President Guillermo Endara has named a
new cabinet heavily weighted toward his
ruling Arnulfista Party, officials said Mon-
day.
Endara, who dissolved his 12-member
cabinettlast Tuesday because of a rupture
between the Arnulfista party and its main
coalition partner, the Liberal Republican
Nationalist Movement (MOLIRENA), re-
named five of his former ministers and
appointed seven new ones.
The new cabinet includes seven
Arnulfistas, three independents who sup-
port Endara, one member of the Liberal
Authentic Party, which also backs the
president, and one MOLIRENA minister.
Presidency officials said Endara re-
tained MOLIRENA's Planning and Politi-


cal Economy Minister Delia Cardenas de-
spite the split because of her crucial role
in handling Panama's foreign debt.
"The president wanted a firmer base of
support in his cabinet in general," said a
presidential spokesman, who asked not to
be identified by name. "But I imagine
Delia Cardenas has stayed so that this
would not affect the debt talks."
Endara's surprise dissolution of the
cabinet last week came after the
Amulfistas and MOLIRENA decided to
run separate presidential candidates in the
May 8 general elections.
Endara said at the time that he needed
to separate his administration from the
pre-election infighting and jockeying for
position.
But critics said it was a cynical move


intended to boost his party's flagging elec-
toral prospects by paving the way for the
appointment of a more pro-Arnulfista
cabinet.
Recent polls have shown the
Arnulfistas' presidential candidate,
Mireya Moscoso de Gruber, in fourth
place with less than a third of the support
for the current favorite, Ernesto Perez
Balladares of the center-left opposition
Revolutionary Democratic Party.
Endara, who will step down Sept. 1,
took power after the December 1989 U.S.
invasion of Panama that ousted former
dictator Manuel Antonio Noriega.
The old cabinet included five
Arnulfista and four MOLIRENA mem-
bers, two independents and one member
of the Liberal Authentic Party.


Commission's finding angers Gaviria


BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) - A politi-
cal fight over the presence of U.S. soldiers
burst wide open Wednesday when Presi-
dent Cesar Gaviria angrily rejected a
commission's finding that inviting the
troops was unconstitutional.
The normally placid Gaviria, his voice
trembling, said oo national radio he would
ignore Tuesday night's verdict by the
Council of State, Colombia's highest au-
thority on government administration,
that the approximately 250 U.S. soldiers
were in Colombia illegally.
About 130 soldiers, mostly combat en-
gineers from Fort Rucker, Ala., are in the
Pacific coastal city of Juanchaco on what
has been billed as a humanitarian mission
to build a school and clinic and improve a
road. The mission raised suspicions be-
cause it is in an area where drug-traffick-
ers and rebels operate.
Juanchaco lies 45 miles west of Cali,
home of the world's biggest cocaine car-
tel.
Other U.S. soldiers are maintaining a
U.S.-built radar system that has netted
drug-trafficking flights and are building a
base and training Colombian soldiers to
better fight drug traffickers and guerrillas.
The soldiers' presence has prompted
wide complaints that Colombia's sover-
eignty was being violated.
Gaviria said Colombia needed all the
help it could get to fight its powerful co-
caine traffickers and accused opponents of
"wrapping themselves in the Colombian
flag" and displaying false nationalism.
"Sovereignty is in greater danger when
a nation is handed over to criminals and
drug traffickers and the state does not have


, "







- . . .
AP LaserPhoto
Colombian President Cesar Gaviria and his wife, Ana wave to a crowd in 1990.
Wednesday, Gaviria angrily rejected a commission's finding that inviting U.S.
troops to Colombia was unconstitutional.


the capacity to respond," Gaviria told re-
porters at the presidential palace.
Gaviria, responding to a question, said
his statement did not imply that the mis-
sion in Juanchaco was anything more than
humanitarian.
The Council of State held that Gaviria
violated the constitution and national sov-
ereignty by inviting the troops without its
authorization or Senate permission. It has
no power to enforce its decisions.
The council forwarded its decision to a
congressional committee and the attorney
general's office for possible action.
Gaviria's Liberal Party has a majority in
Congress and he is likely to win any battle


there if one develops. Attorney General
Carlos Gustavo Arrieta told reporters he
would independently investigate the case.
Gaviria said he deduced from the
council's "vague and brief' finding that
he would have to expel every military at-
tache serving with the dozens of embas-
sies in Colombia, which he called "ab-
surd."
Gaviria ascended to the presidency af-
ter the candidate he served as campaign
manager was killed by the Medellin co-
caine cartel. He now is confronting the
Cali cartel. Security forces killed Medellin
cartel leader Pablo Escobar Dec. 2, and
that cartel is far less powerful now.


Pablo Escobar

files implicate

Castro's brother
BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) - Files
and a videotape that belonged to
slain drug lord Pablo Escobar impli-
cate the brother of Cuban leader Fidel
Castro in drug-trafficking.
The videotape, portions of which
were broadcast by the TV news pro-
gram QAP on Monday night, showed
a man identified only as David plead-
ing with Escobar to let him live after
surviving an assassination attempt.
David - whose face is electroni-
cally distorted in the hour-long tape
- sent the video to Escobar to deny
accusations that he was a traitor to
the Medellin cartel that Escobar ran.
In the video, David reminded
Escobar of the work he had done for
the cartel.
"You know I helped you with
Raul Castro on the island with re-
spect to the shipment," David says,
referring to Fidel Castro's brother,
who also is Cuba's defense minister.
It was not clear what kind of ship-
ment David was referring to. The
U.S. government has repeatedly ac-
cused Raul Castro of drug traffick-
ing.
There was no answer at the Cu-
ban Embassy in Bogota Tuesday.
when reporters called seeking com-
ment.
The video and documents shown
on the TV broadcast are authentic
and form part of the government's
investigative files on Escobar's op-
erations, said Ana Lucia Obregon,
spokeswoman for the prosecutor
general's office.
The material was found in
Escobar's prison after he escaped in
July 1992, Obregon said.
The files and the tape reveal
Escobar, who led the Medellint cartel
until he was slain by security forces
Dec. 2, had a sophisticated intelli-
gence network at his command.
Escobar's files include a docu-
ment apparently from the U.S. Drug
Enforcement Administration outlin-
ing drug-trafficking and money-
laundering activities by the Medellin
cartel's rival, the Cali cartel, QAP
said.
The videotape also implicates an
unidentified associate of former Ven-
ezuelan President Carlos Andres
Perez.


Latin America debates sexism


BOGOTA,.Colombia (AP) - Secretary Clara Ines re-
calls well the day she was fired for "incompetence."
Summoned to her boss's office in a large Bogota com-
pany, she abruptly found herself under sexual attack. "He
pushed me against the wall and began unfastening my
belt," she said. "I told him, 'Let me go,' punched him
and shoved him away."
Clara Ines had no recourse when she was dismissed.
But for her and other South American women that situa-
tion is slowly beginning to change, as countries where
"machismo" long has reigned unquestioned make their
first, tentative efforts to discourage sexual harassment.
Argentina recently outlawed sexual harassment in
government offices. Several other countries are consider-
ing action.
In Colombia, a scandal last fall involving a senior gov-
ernment official put the issue in the spotlight, much as
the Clarence Thomas-Anita Hill case did in the United
States.
A regional director of the Institute for Youth and
Sports publicly accused the head of the agency, Miguel
Bermudez, of threatening to fire her if she did not have
sex with him.
Bermudez denied it and told reporters he had no
sexual interest in the woman, Maria del Pilar Florez. She
was 35, he said, and at that age "a woman does not in-
spire such thoughts."


President Cesar Gaviria reprimanded Bermudez for
"offending the women of Colombia" with the insult.
Bermudez resigned Nov. 11, citing the scandal and accu-
sations of budget irregularities.
Discussion of the Bermudez case has publicized the
indignities Colombian women often suffer, but many
people find the subject embarrassing, particularly victims.
Clara Ines is still so ashamed of her experience she dis-
cussed it on condition she be identified only by her Chris-
tian name.
Women's liberation is a vague concept in Colombia,
where women could not vote until 1957.
A bill now in the congress would make sexual harass-
ment on the job a crime punishable by up to a year in
prison, and would prohibit the firing of an employee for
resisting sexual advances.
Sentiment appears to be growing among Colombians
for some action against what the newspaper El
Espectador denounced as the "sordid blackmail" of
women workers.
"It's as if we were property," said Rep. Yolima
Espinosa, a sponsor of the anti-harassment bill. 'The
Bermudez case made people sensitive to the problem of
sexual harassment and made them realize there's no pen-
alty for it." It also made Colombian women realize that
sexual harassment "is not normal behavior, but is an
abuse," said Melba Arias Londono, a lawyer who wrote


a book on violence against women.
Other countries also are dealing with the issue:
*Argentina enacted a law Nov. 18 that forbids sexual
harassment in government offices, but says nothing of
private businesses.
*Peru has a law against sexual harassment, but sel-
dom enforces it. In several pending cases, women are su-
ing Health Ministry officials, alleging they were fired for
rejecting sexual advances.
*A bill in the Chilean congress would outlaw sexual
harassment, and several judges in Bolivia have urged ac-
tion there.
Even without laws, not all men escape punishment.
For weeks, Ingrid's boss touched and patted her and
told her dirty jokes. Then one day when Ingrid, a news-
paper photographer, was in the photo lab, he came up
behind her and "grabbed me with his pants already
down. I slapped him and screamed and ran out."
The paper's editor, a woman, fired the man after
Ingrid and other employees complained about his con-
duct.
"My case is extremely rare, because if there's a com-
plaint it's usually the victim who's fired," Ingrid said.
Mrs. Espinosa said the habits of centuries must be bro-
ken before real change can be achieved.
"Some women are subservient to men, and by acting
that way they are reinforcing the attitude of men who feel
superior," she said.
"Women as well as men will have to change their be-
havior."


Tropic Times
Feb. 11,1994












SMilitarv News


01


Tropic Times
Feb. 11,1994


Experts debate worth of



cycle ergometry fitness


by TSgt. Valerie A. McGovern
HO ACC Public Affairs
LANGLEY AFB, Va. - Is cycle
ergometry the best way to test a
person's fitness? It's best considering
the exhaustive, dangerous and expen-
sive alternative, say ergometry's top
advocates.
Loren Myhre, research physiologist
at the Armstrong Laboratory, Brooks
AFB, Texas, and creator of the Air
Force cycle ergometry program, said
the best measure of fitness is the tread-
mill stress test.
But the treadmill test can be dan-
gerous, expensive and difficult to per-
form properly, said Myhre and Dr.
Gerald Fletcher, a member of the
Armed Forces Epidemiological
Board and chairman of the American
Heart Association's Committee on
Exercise and Cardiac Rehabilitation.
"Obviously, we would like to give
a test that is absolutely perfect, and
the treadmill' test would be that,"
Myhre said. "But you must have a
cardiologist watching the electrocar-
diogram every minute, and have a
laboratory filled with people to help in
case of an emergency."
Fletcher, a cardiologist and chair-
man of rehabilitation medicine at
Emory University School of Medicine
in Atlanta, believes cycle ergometry is
a good second choice.
"It's an easier system to deal with.
It's a small system, less expensive and
more mobile," he said. "Cycle
ergometry gives you a safe base line
to check a person's fitness level."
The point of cycle ergometry is to
safely estimate the treadmill test. This
is done by exercising someone at a
moderate workload on the cycle and
then using a mathematical equation to
convert to a maximum workload mea-
sure.
"With this safer procedure and
with the computerized program giv-
ing it quality control, we're able to set
up a testing program in a facility that
is not tied to a clinic or to physicians
in any way," Myhre said.
Lt. Col. (Dr.) Michael Parkinson,
chief of preventative medicine for the
Air Force Surgeon General's Office,
Boiling AFB, D.C., said the Air Force
is conducting studies to refine testing


U.S. Air Force photo
SrA. Ramona Spencer, Howard AFB cycle ergomerty fitness monitor,


evaluates Willie Blocker.
procedures and make the test even.
more accurate.
In one study, Myhre has pushed
people to exhaustion on the treadmill
and compared the results with their
cycle ergometry results. He's per-
formed more than 350 maximal
tests in the past year - more than
most laboratories ever do. His re-
sults continued to show a positive re-
lationship between the tests.
"We wanted to give commanders
the best evidence we could of the va-
lidity of cycle ergometry," Myhre
said. "It's a very sound test based on
good statistics."
Another study, with emphasis on
testing procedure standardization, is
being conducted by the University of
Florida College of Medicine. The
results are due before summer.
"Fitness testing is an important
issue in the Department of Defense,"
Parkinson said.


With the start of cycle ergometry
and the continued studies, Parkinson
said the Air Force has taken a
proactive, progressive approach to fit-
ness evaluation.
Fletcher agrees.
In his role as the Armed Forces
Epidemiological Board's 'Prevention,
Wellness and Exercise Person,'
Fletcher said he plans to urge the other
service branches to move to cycle
ergometry fitness testing.
"I'm meeting in San Diego next
month for a board meeting and I'm
going to make a pitch for it. Cycle
ergometry is more scientific, certainly
safer, and more controllable," Fletcher
said, comparing the cycle test with the
Air Force's previous 1-1/2 mile run
and the similar tests of the Army,
Navy and Marines.
"I think it would be good to stan-
dardize fitness testing among the
armed forces."


Window still open for troops to double life insurance


by SMSgt. Denton Lankford
Air Force News Services Features
RANDOLPH AFB, Texas - Imagine
for a moment what would happen if you
had a family and the unthinkable occurred
- you died while on active duty. Al-
though tragic that you were no longer
around to provide for your family, even
more tragic would be the thought that you
had not made financial arrangements to
help your loved ones through a period of
adjustment.
Congress wanted to ensure military
members had an opportunity to purchase
life insurance at group rates and passed
legislation to make it available.
"Although the Veterans Benefit Act of
1992 allowed Air Force members to
double their Servicemen's Group Life In-
surance coverage from $100,000 to
$200,000, we know there are those who
did not take advantage of the conversion
by the deadline," said SSgt. Keith


Lawrence of the Personal Programs
Branch of the Air Force Military Person-
nel Center here.
Unfortunately, he said, a young pilot
was recently killed in a crash. To add to
the tragedy, his wife and children will not
benefit from the higher coverage because,
for whatever reason, the captain had not
opted for the increased coverage.
Under the act, service members had
until March 31, 1993, to sign up for the
additional coverage by completing Form
SGLV-8286.
He said the SGLI monthly premium
levels for both active duty and Reservists
are 80 cents per $10,000 coverage.
"Coverage is available in $10,000 in-
crements up to a maximum of $200,000,"
he explained. The maximum premium
would be $16 per month for the full
$200,000.
Lawrence said that although the con-
version period has passed, servicemem-
bers may still increase their coverage by


completing forms SGLV-8285, request
for insurance.
Lawrence explained that the form pro-
vides a section the member must complete
to attest to insurability. Questions 11
through 14 ask members about any past
or present health problems such as im-
mune system disorders, heart conditions,
high blood pressure, diabetes, cancer or
nervous disorders. Although a member's
current state of health will be considered
before the increased amount of insurance
is approved, a physical examination is not
routinely required.
"The process does take some thought
in the areas of how much coverage and
who will be named beneficiaries of the
process," Lawrence said.
People having questions about how the
law treats beneficiaries, naming minors or
setting up trusts for children, should con-
sult the base judge advocate's office.
"People are busy with their work and
family activities, and it takes a conscious


Anyone having questions
about how the law treats
beneficiaries, naming
minors or setting up trusts
for children, should consult
the base judge advocate's
office.

effort to sit down and think about what the
family would need if dad or mom couldn't
be there anymore," Lawrence added.
This is especially true since, on the av-
erage, 300 Air Force members die while
on active duty each year. Whether or not
to purchase SGLI in any amount is a per-
sonal decision.
For more information, call customer
service at the military personnel flight,
284-3508, or your servicing personnel ad-
ministration center.


Troops may pay

more to fund

retirement homes
WASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces Infor-
mation Service) - To keep the military's two retire-
ment homes from going broke, active duty members
may have another $1.50 taken out of their monthly
pay starting next January.
Service secretaries recently approved a proposal
to increase the current 50 cents per month to $2.
Congress must approve the increase.
"There have been other proposals for alternative
funding of the homes that did not pass," said Kerri
Childress, public affairs officer for the Soldiers' and
Airmen's Home.
Last year, the Soldiers' and Airmen's Home's
budget was $43 million, but the home took in only
$35 million. The Naval Home did better, spending
$11 million and taking in about $20 million. Still,
said officials, with downsizing of the active force,
both homes will go broke by 1999 without the in-
crease.
Childress said she's been deluged with calls about
the proposed increase.
"I wish I could get them all to come to the home
and visit," Childress said. "After a visit, most ser-
vicemembers say they're happy to pay more."
Ironically, the homes have been hurt by service-
members' good behavior, since fines and forfeited
pay go to support the homes. Fewer servicemembers
pay fines or forfeit pay as a result of courts-martial
or administrative discipline these days. In 1983, a
total of $25 million in fines and forfeited pay helped
out the Soldiers' and Airmen's Home. In 1993, fines
and forfeitures netted $13 million.
Residents also pay 25 percent of their retired pay
and Social Security benefits to live in the homes.
However, many residents served during World War
II or before, and their retired pay is low.
Retired Army Col. Jeff Grider, associate director
for resource management at U.S. Soldiers' and
Airmen's Home, said servicemembers have had 50
cents taken out of their checks for the home since
1976. When the home was built in 1851, soldiers
paid 25 cents out of their monthly checks.
"Back then, a private made only $7 a month, so
it was a larger part of the check," he said.
The Soldiers' and Airmen's Home has 1,760 resi-
dents. The Naval Home, built in 1975,- has 550. In
1991, the two homes merged into the Armed Forces
Retirement Home. They have separate trust funds,
which will merge in 1995. The Naval Home trust
fund is worth $21 million, and the Soldiers' and
Airmen's Home trust fund is $139 million.
Veteran enlisted members, warrant officers and
limited duty officers are eligible to retire to either
home. They must be unable to earn a living because
of a service-connected disability or have served in a
war zone or suffer a nonservice-connected disabil-
ity. Former Coast Guard members must have served
in wartime combat zones with the Navy.


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Tropic Times
Feb.11,1994


Off-post resident has on-post housing concern


Dear Mayors' Corner:
I am writing to you for some answers
to questions I can't get from the housing
office.
Why is it many service and family
members are subjected to living off post
when some people on post are allowed to
move from one unit to another, choosing
where they want to live on post? Why do
some families get housing within a few
months while others must live on the
economy for many months? Why does it
seem that the people who complain the
most get treated better and faster than the
rest of us who are just here to do our jobs
and deal with the situation at hand?
I would never have written to you had I
not finally had my fill. We have been in
Panama for six months and have lived off
post the entire time. We never com-
plained, just worked at making the best of
things.
When I had stopped by the housing of-
fice to check our standing on the housing
list, there was a woman bragging about
being in country for a year, never having


lived off post and who was moving to a
new set of quarters for the third time.
I am only asking for answers, some sort
of explanation. Being a long-term family
member, I always believed everyone gets
a fair shake - why not with housing as
well? It is obvious I can't sign my name,
but I'm sure other people would like to see
this issue addressed somehow.
Moffed in Panama City

Dear MPC:
I submitted your letter to the U.S. Army
Garrison commander and was given the
following answer:
As your garrison commander, I am
deeply involved with the housing opera-
tions to ensure all military members get
excellent customer service and equal op-
portunity for housing. I am surprised to
hear that you can't get answers from the
housing office. I have instructed the chief
of the housing division to ensure that


when questions are asked, specific an-
swers are given.
By regulation, when a military mem-
ber is promoted to the next higher grade
category, such as junior to senior enlisted,
they are entitled to put their name at the
bottom of the waiting list and later relo-
cate at their expense. This is also true for
those who have an increase in family
members. But, at no time are people al-
lowed to choose where they want to live.
Most waiting lists for housing are about
one year, depending on when they arrived
to Panama. At times during the year,
some waiting lists move quicker than oth-
ers.
I can assure you that people who com-
plain the most don't get better or faster
service. All exceptions to policies are put
in writing and reviewed individually.
About your statement of the woman
who was bragging - I would like to know
who she is. If you would call me or the


chief of the housing division, I will inves-
tigate this situation. It isn't likely what
you were told is accurate. Relocations are
very rare and nobody relocates just to find
a better housing unit.
Housing is important to all military
members. Most of the time when you hear
of a situation that is outlandish, it is nor-
mally just that, outlandish and not true.
One of the best ways to have questions
answered is to see the chief of the housing
division.
I firmly believe it is my responsibility
to ensure all military members are treated
equally and fairly.

Editor'snote: Thiscolumnallowscom-
munity members to submit questions to
the Mayoral Congress. Letters should be
mailed to: Mayors' Corner, Publicity
Chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS).
Anonymitywill be granted upon request.
The Tropic Times reserves the right to
edit letters and responses for brevity,
clarity and propriety.


3 people charged with forgery, larceny of $8,000


Bicycles stolen
A Fort Clayton soldier had two bicycles stolen from
his quarters last week. The bikes were secured to the bars
on a window with a lock and cable.
Everyone should secure bicycles inside their quarters
or in a shed. This will lessen the chance of becoming a
victim of crime.
Report suspicious activity to the military police at 287-
4401 or 289-5133.

$8,000 in forged checks
Three people were charged with forgery and larceny
of government property last week. They allegedly stole
nine U.S. government treasury checks totaling more than
$8,000, forged and cashed them.
If a victim of crime, call 287-4401 or 289-5133.

Wrongful transfer of merchandise
A Fort Clayton soldier was apprehended last week for
wrongful transfer of duty-free merchandise and wrongful
transfer of a Department of Defense decal. The soldier
sold his vehicle with the DoD decal to a non-privilege
card holder. The non-privilege card holder was charged
with wrongful possession of the merchandise and decal.
For those planning to sell their vehicle while in
Panama, the Exonerations Office, Military Customs, Pier
18, is responsible for the transfer of all vehicles sold to
another military person or a Panamanian national.
For more information, call 287-4545.

Gotcha card update
MPs report that Gotcha cards issued Jan. 15-28 were
in the following areas:,
Fort Clayton
300 housing area - one
500 housing area - seven
600 housing area - eight
700 housing area - five
1000 housing area - one
Corozal
200 housing area - six
600 housing area - six
Curundu - 2
Cocoli - 26


This authorized unofficial command information pub-
lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic
Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces
Information Program of the Department of Defense, un-
der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S.
Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the
official view of the U.S. government, the Department of
Defense or the U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002
Telephone 285-6612.
Acting Commander in Chief.............. .......................
Maj. Gen. Walter T. Worthington



STropic Tin


I e Pr v s as hal' s C rn r


Fort Kobbe
300 housing area - 47
400 housing area - 59
800 troop area - 14
Secure all property and leave no opportunity for a thief
to strike. Report suspicious activity to the MPs at 287-
4401 or 289-5133.

Anonymous drug hotline
Anyone with information about drug smuggling
should call the Panama Jack anonymous hotline at 285-
4185.


Director, Public Affairs.....................Col. James L. Fetig
Chief.............................................. SM Sgt. Steve Taylor
Editor.................SSgt. Richard Puckett
Sports Editor......................................... Sgt. E. J. Hersom
Staff Editors............................................ Sgt. Lori Davis
Spec. John Hall
Rosemary Chong
Maureen Sampson
Volunteer Assistant...............................Josephine Beane
Student Intern...................................Juan Carlos Palacio
Southern Command Public Affairs Office..........282-4278
Command Information Officer..............Patrick Milton
U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office..............287-3007
Public Affairs Officer....................Maj. Melanie Reeder


ies


The following crimes occurred in on-post housing ar-
eas Jan. 28-Feb. 3.
Pacific
Fort Clayton 400 housing area - one larceny of secured
private property
Fort Clayton 500 housing area - one larceny of secured
private
Fort Clayton 900 housing area - one larceny of unse-
cured private property
Corozal housing area - one larceny of private property
Atlantic
None to report


Command Information Officer................Beth Taylor
Editor........... ............................... SSgt. Jane Usero
Journalists.............................Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski
Spec. Alexander C. White
24th Wing Public Affairs Office.......................284-5459
Public Affairs Officer..............Capt. Warren L. Sypher
Public Affairs Superintendent.....MSgt. Dale Mitcham
Journalists.... .........................SSgt. Rian Clawson
Sgt. James A. Rush
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.............283-5644
Public Affairs Officer.........................Diane Gonzalez
Photographers........................PH2 Roberto R. Taylor
PH2 Delano J. Mays
U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.......................289-4312
NCOIC........................................ Sgt. Richard Emert


ices










~i~ommentary


Tropic Times
Feb. 11, 1994 .


Turn signal blues



Most drivers fall into 4 user/non user groups


by Spec. John Hall
Tropic Times staff
on't you hate it when you're
waiting at a stop sign and traf-
fic coming at you can either go
straight or turn, yet no one uses a turn
signal? It's like a guessing game. You
can either take a chance and floor it,
hoping the cars turn. Or you can wait
until traffic clears while people behind
you blast their horns like nobody's
business. Or you can wait for the
unthinkable - for someone to use their
turn signal with enough warning to
serve its purpose.
Because some people don't seem to
know what a turn signal is, I thought
I'd turn to Webster for advice. Al-
though turn signal doesn't have its own
entry in the dictionary, the word "turn"
has nearly 100. The best one for
driving would probably be number 36
which states: to direct or set one's


course toward, away from, or in a
particular direction. The word "signal"
pales in comparison to "turn," netting a
mere 11 entries. Entry number one
reads: anything that serves to warn,
direct, command, or the like, as a light,
a gesture, an act.
Two of those words really stand out
- warn and gesture. Because so many
people drive with reckless abandon, the
courtesy of a warning light wouldn't
seem to be too much to ask for. It's sort
of like a "gesture."
Drivers basically fall into four "turn
signal" categories.
Type A - The old timer. This driver
simply isn't aware of turn signals.
These drivers are kind of like my
father, who is not aware of the right-
turn-on-red rule. He just looks in his
rearview mirror and says, "Why are
they beeping at me? Do I have a flat or
something?"
Type B - The occasional abuser.


This person actually tries to rationalize
his case. His excuses are: "Well, there
was no one behind me," or "they know
where I'm going." This driver also uses
the "sneak attack approach," by putting
the blinker on just before or while
turning.
Type C - The one timer. This
driver flips on his signal when he pulls
out of the driveway and never turns it
off. This makes it confusing because he
isn't telling you where he's going, but
rather where he's been.
Type D - Overkill. This driver uses
turn signals like they were tax write-
offs. You know the guy. He uses them
in empty parking lots or when there's
a bend in the road. He also uses them
too far in advance. Sometimes he'll
turn on his blinker and pass up two or
three "potential" turns. Because of type
D drivers you can't trust type C drivers
- they could be faking it.
So what's the punishment for using


turn signals incorrectly? After a call to
the Provost Marshal's traffic section,
here's what I found out. As per Army
Regulation and U.S. Southern Com-
mand Regulation 190-2, three points
are assessed for improper use of turn
signals. When a driver has accumu-
lated 12 points for moving violations or
12 points for parking violations, he can
have his driving privileges suspended
for up to a year, officials said. They
also added that military policemen
hand out approximately 15-20 tickets
weekly for improper use of turf
signals.
On average, that would come out to
70 tickets a month or more than 800
per year. Now that's a lot of tickets.
And that's just on Fort Clayton.
Maybe the military police and
security police could combine efforts to
sponsor a "Don't Forget Your Turn
Signal Month."
My dad wouldn't believe it.


Just how random is urinalysis testing?


by MSgt. Karen A. Webb
Superintendent, social actions
HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) - Urinalysis testing
plays a vital role in the Air Force's readiness capabilities
because drug abuse is not compatible with Air Force stan-
dards and will not be tolerated. Moreover, there is the
expectation for total support of the drug testing from ev-
ery Air Force member. Therefore, a drug free work envi-
ronment is everyone's responsibility.
There seems to be questions lately about the urinalysis
program. How random is it? Why do we get notified at
the last minute? Why do I have to wait so long to test?
Why am I testing for the fourth time in the last 12
months? All fair and reasonable questions - here are
some answers.
First, be assured that your selection to provide a urine
sample is totally random. Here at Howard AFB and Al-
brook AFS, social actions uses the base random urinaly-


sis testing program, an Air Force approved program to
select personnel for testing. This program uses no set
pattern for selection, such as social security number, rank
or unit. It randomly selects people by name, out of the
bases' personnel data files, to test.
Remember, the drug testing program is designed to
act as a deterrent. You can be randomly selected to pro-
vide a sample at any time, several times a year, and pos-
sibly two or three times in monthly succession. Hope-
fully this will deter some members from using illegal sub-
stances in the first place. Nonetheless, the random selec-
tion is based on probability and a statistical phenomenon
exists if a person has exceeded their perceived fair share
of sampling.
Secondly, in keeping with the deterrent philosophy,
we are currently giving people two hours of testing noti-
fication. This is to eliminate problems of test date and
time compromise. The element of surprise once again
makes the urinalysis program an effective deterrent.


Furthermore, while all personnel will be notified-the
same morning of testing, social actions will stagger its
reporting times to the testing site to prevent problems of
backlog. This should reduce the amount of time spent
away from the duty section. People not able to provide a
specimen at their unit's scheduled time will be required
to wait at the testing site until they do.
Finally, the most important part of the program-is the
actual specimen collection. All urine samples must be
collected under direct observation. Collection procedures
must withstand legal scrutiny and be able to verify that
the specimen remains identifiable from the collection
point to the testing laboratory at Brooks AFB, Texas.
Units will provide observers when tasked. Observers
will ensure that specimens are collected uncontaminated.
The social actions office can answer any additional
questions or concerns about the urinalysis program. We
are located on the second floor of Building 710 on
Howard. Call 284-5507/5309 for more information.


How much does drug testing deter use?


"Quite a bit. It sure
deters me."


SSgt. Scott Pierson
24th Operational Group
Radar


"I think a little, but not
much because of ran-
dom testing. They
should test for ste-
roids."


Spec. Erik Fulfer
Company A, 1-508th Infantry


"I think people who use
drugs know how to get
away with it if they use
them a lot. On the
whole, it probably deters
first-timers."
Sheerin Duque
Army family member


"Pretty much down to
zero percent."


Tammy Hughes
Army family member


JR!



"I believe it definitely
cuts down, but not to a
total halt."


Spec. Douglas Black
617th Special Operations
Aviation Detachment


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries - or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to
edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.


Dirc Qute










8Tropic Times
Feb. 11, 1994


L F4eatures


SOUTHCOM sergeant major ends career


by SSgt. Richard Puckett
Editor, Tropic Times
QUARRY HEIGHTS - A photograph of a gear-laden
Ranger hangs on the wall in his office. The caption reads
"What have you done for him today?" This is the ques-
tion U.S. Southern Command CSM James Williams has
asked himself every night before going home.
Williams, who retires Wednesday, has already cleaned
out most of his office. His desk nameplate, plaques and
other memorabilia acquired along the journey are gone
now, but that photograph still remains there for now. The
soldier serves as constant reminder of what the noncom-
missioned officer's role is all about - taking care of sol-
diers, sailors, Marines and airmen.
"Soldiers are our business," Williams said. "As a
leader, NCOs have to put their troops first. The old say-
ing 'You take care of them and they'll take of you' is
true. You can't accomplish your mission without their
support, so you have to support them."
As the senior NCO in USSOUTHCOM, Williams has
tried to pass that on to junior leaders here.
During his two-year-tour Williams has implemented
several programs that have brought recognition and in-
creased knowledge to leaders and servicemembers here.
NCO Call, the Commander in Chief's Recognition
Ball, and the Soldier/NCO of the Quarter/Year are now
solidly in place because of Williams.
"You have to pat people on the back for a job well
done," he said. "The Recognition Ball and the boards do
that. The NCO Call is so important to us in a joint com-
mand. It allows us to help show the NCOs the impor-
tance of each service's programs that affect their work-
ers. It helps educate us all to work better in a purple envi-
ronment."
Williams has been pleased with the success of the pro-
gram and credits the NCOs with making it happen. The
dedication of today's soldiers is a far cry from the mili-
tary of the 60s and 70s, he said.
Williams remembers his first tour in 1964 well. It was
a four-year hitch that started in his hometown of
Hawarden, Iowa, and took him to the jungles of Vietnam.
"We were all scared," he said. "I had never shot at
anything other than a rabbit."
His first tour was as a door gunner in Bien-Hoa, Viet-
ndm, where he lived in a barracks, slept in a bed and
could go to clubs. It was remarkably calm compared to
his second tour in 1966.
"I went back to Vietnam with the 25th (Infantry Divi-
sion, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii)," he said. "I expected
things to be the same - they weren't. They dropped us


CSM James Williams
off on some God-forsaken hill with nothing but bamboo
vipers. I knew it was going to be a long haul."
After coming back to the states, he became a drill in-
structor at Fort Campbell, Ken. While there he helped
trained "McNamara's 100,000." Then-Secretary of De-
fense John McNamara lowered entrance standards and
allowed 100,000 people in the Army via the draft.
After completing that tour, he got out and went home
to Iowa with his wife, Margaret. He sold insurance,
worked at a factory and tried other jobs, but he knew the
Army was his true calling. He reentered in August, 1968.
It was then he saw the NCO Corps falling apart.
"We were short of people so we were taking anyone
who could walk, talk and carry a rifle," he said. "The
'instant NCO' program didn't give us the experienced
leaders we needed and the NCOs starting losing their
dedication.
"We as NCOs let the officers., who were just as inex-
perienced, take away a whole bunch of jobs from us be-
cause it was easier for us. We became non-aggressive,
and there was low morale. With rotations coming and
going to Vietnam, we had NCOs passing through who
had just been watching people get put in plastic bags.
They were more concerned for their own welfare than
that of their soldiers."
Williams credits education as the key to turning the


NCO Corps around.
"ANCOC (Advanced Noncommissioned Officers
Course) began in the early 70s," he said. "I think some-
one there saw the light and NCOs started getting edu-
cated again, got their feet back on the ground and took
care of soldiers again."
Today's military education system is continuing that
role, Williams said.
"We have soldiers today who want to be soldiers," he
said. "That makes a difference. Standards are higher and
you have to keep up."
With the drawdown and more cutbacks on the hori-
zon, he is concerned that history could repeat itself.
"Everyone is concerned about what the future holds,"
he said. "People are getting too focused on getting good
evaluations. NCOs can't be afraid to stand up for what's
right. It's up to the senior NCOs to set that example. The
younger soldiers are looking up to that battalion sergeant
major and he buckles under everyone will."
NCOs also have a responsibility to make sure their
own families are taken care of.
"It's easy to get so wrapped up in your work and take
your family for granted, I know," he said. "You have to
put that same dedication into your family, too. They pro-
vide that support you need to be successful. Everything
good that has happened to me is because of Margaret,
everything bad is because of me."
Missing out on his children's youth is the one thing
Williams regrets.
"Time flies by so fast," he said. "One day they are ba-
bies and the next they're grown and moved out. Now I'm
going to try and make up for some lost time."
The Williams will be heading to Crestview, Fla.,
where he jokingly said he plans on reliving his lost 1960s.
"I kid my wife that I'm going to let my hair grow long,
get a pony tail and wear a Harley T-shirt," he said, smil-
ing,
He won't miss the ruck sacks, tents, and field time,
but he is sad that the days of stopping and chatting with
soldiers, gate guards and other NCOs are almost over.
"I'll miss the .camaraderie," he said. "I'll miss stop-'
ping and talking with the SPs at Howard and the MPs at
Clayton, the soldiers down range and all the sergeants
major I've become friends with."
After 30 years, he is still overwhelmed with becoming
a sergeant major and being in a position to leave a legacy.
"The Army has come a long way in the past 30 years,"
he said. "In 30 years it will be even better."
After more than 30 years of service, Williams will take
down the picture Wednesday, leave his office for the last
time and know that he did all that he could.


'Minutemen' security force trains for emergencies

by Diane Gonzalez
USNAVSTAPANCANAL PAO i


RODMAN NS- Marine Sgt. Paul Suprenant is the in-
structor of an elite group of 20-30 men called the Auxil-
iary Security Force. They are picked from the Naval Com-
mand and its tenant commands to form an organized
branch of the operations division of the security depart-
ment.
They are used for emergency situations from natural
disasters to basic law enforcement. Suprenant is respon-
sible for ensuring this force is trained and ready to re-
spond immediately, helping the team to earn its nickname
"The Minutemen."
Because the Navy complement at Rodman is small and
doesn't have the police force other military installations
have, a 1984 decision gave birth to the ASG, Suprenant
said. Navy hiearchy reasoned all Naval bases should have
permanent security forces during increased threat condi-
tions, or when directed by the host command.
The cadres, trainers of installation security forces and
the ASF, put together a team of men representing many
different military specialties. The instructors teach team
members anti-terrorist techniques, weaponry, hand-to-
hand combat, search and seizure, and other security skills.
The members are trained to handle any situation, includ-
ing domestic problems, he said.
"Importance of security on our bases is our prime con-
cern," Suprenant said. "This group works as an integral
part of our community."
"Our staff has two weeks of intense training, and I do
mean intense training," he said. "Some have never
handled a weapon in their entire career, so it's important
for them to become familiar with their weapon and be-
come confident."
The teamwork is what Suprenant likes best.
"Because each man is from a different tenant or com-
mand position, we each learn a little about each others
job and can appreciate the others responsibility," he said.


u.S. Navy pnoio
Marine Sgt. Paul Suprenant has his crew working on procedures for riot gear and control.
"We share each others joys and sorrows. It brings us cut out for the training and not everyone makes the cut.
closer together." Dedication is part of what makes this program a success.
Although the team augments security forces at the sta- "This command does everything right," he said.
tion, they are also part of the team. Each serves 18 "It provides lists of names and volunteers and it knows
months plus regular every day duty. that ASF is a priority for Naval Station Security. With-
"That's dedication," Suprenant said. "Not everyone is out that kind of support we wouldn't exist."









featureses


Tropic Times 9
Feb. 11, 1994 7


Army family member Natasha Perez makes bubbles
during the Child Development Services Part Day
Program circus.


Children's


Circus
More than 200 youths enjoy
2 days of 'just plain fun'
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Soap bubbles
fill the air and popcorn litters the ground as tiny clowns
and ballerinas with grape-juice grins run here and there
giggling with the delight only a circus could bring.
More than 200 children took part in the annual two-
day circus held by the Child Development Services Part-
day Program last week at the CDS Center.
"The circus is designed to be developmentally appro-
priate where the children use their imagination, creativ-
ity and can see and do the activities by themselves," said
Becky Fentress, director for the CDS Part-Day Program.
"We planned it to give the children the opportunity to
use their social, gross motor and language skills as well
as their imagination," she said. "The activities touched
on early childhood development.
"Plus, it was just plain fun," Fentress said.
The parents and teachers at the center get together
each year to come up with ideas for the circus and the
teachers are each responsible for coming up with and set-
ting up one activity area, she said.
Although the actual circus only lasted two days, the
entire week's activities in the center were geared toward
the circus, Fentress said.
"The entire week was built around the circus," she
said. "We spent time talking about such things as the
colors of the circus and counting various circus animals."
Although the bulk of the work for the circus done by
the center's teachers, the event would not have been pos-
sible without the help of the parent group which is the
center's version of a parent-teachers organization,
Fentress said.
"We have a very active parent group here and they
helped with everything from decorations to supervising,"
she said.
Once the decorations, booths and activities were set
up, the popcorn and peanuts set out and the sno-cone
machine cranked up, the children literally bounced out of
the center with excitement, Fentress said.
"What's better than going to the circus, let alone be-
ing a part of it," she said.


U.S. Army photos by SSgt. Jane Usero
Gary Eddy, Army family member, takes a break from being a clown by eating popcorn at the Child
Development Services Part Day Program circus.


*-


. g . "






Rachel Angel, CDS Part Day Program teacher, shows children how it's
done with the hula-hoop.


I


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-'*Milestones


To First Lieutenant - Jeffrey Wood of Headquarters
Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry.
To Sergeant First Class - Robert Parlier of Company C,
5th Battalion, 87th Infantry.
To Air Force Master Sergeant (Stripes To Exceptional
Performers) - Jose A. Ciceraro, U.S. Southern Command,
Command Surgeon Office.
To Staff Sergeant - Carlos Riveralopez of Company A,
5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Hughley Gratic of Head-
quarters Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry.
To Sergeant - Hector Aguayo of Company A, 5th Battal-
ion, 87th Infantry. Ryan Epley and Anthony Glover, both
of Company C, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Mark Minter
of Jungle Operations Training Battalion.
To Specialist - Scott Art of Company A, 5th Battalion,
87th Infantry. Melvin Harris of Company B, 5th Battal-
ion, 87th Infantry. Andrew Hampton of Company C, 5th
Battalion, 87th Infantry, Melony Baker and Sheri
Wallace, both of 92nd Personnel Service Company.
Manuel Hernandez, Natasha Joseph and Edmond Tallon,
all of Headquarters Company, 142nd Medical Battalion..
To Private First Class - Christopher Berry of Company
A, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Zaldy Macam and
Stephen Dornstadter, both of Company C, 5th Battalion,
87th Infantry. Anthony Kelly, Aaron Jacobs, Derrick
Carithers and Joseph Jenkins, all of Headquarters Com-
pany, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry, Elizabeth John-
Baptiste of 92nd Personnel Service Company. Brandi
Franklin of Headquarters Company, 142nd Medical Bat-
talion.
To Private Two - John Kerwood and Miles Perez, both
of Company A, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry.



Army Commendation Medal - Sgt. Lydia Ballantine of
Jungle Operations Training Battalion. Sgt. Corey Helton
of Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry,
Cpl. Justin Christman of Company B, 5th Battalion, 87th
Infantry.
Army Achievement Medal - Spec. Edon Burwell, Spec.
Jason Carroll, Spec. Edward Colon Jr., Sgt. Erron
Francis, SSgt. Allen Francisco, PFC Mark Fravert, Sgt.
Phillip Moon, SFC Godfry Miller, Spec. Roger Schlough,
Spec. Scotty Scott and Pvt.2 Kevin Simmons, all of Head-
quarters Company, Jungle Operations Training Battal-
ion. Spec. Simon Yracheta, PFC William Howell, PFC
Robert Richardson and PFC Robert James, all of Com-
pany B, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Spec. Ben Conley,
Sgt. Scott Annese, 1st Lt. Jeffery Wood, PFC Edwin
Rodriguez, Spec. Donnie Drissak, PFC John Barkley and
Sgt. Kennedy Blair, all of Company C, 5th Battalion, 87th
Infantry, Spec. John Ballesteros, PFC Stuart Erving and
PFC Derek Asdot, all of Company A, 5th Battalion, 87th
Infantry. SSgt. Donald Lechel and Spec. Charles Clark,
both of Company B, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. PFC
Dan Fockner of Company C, 5th Battalion, 87th Infan-
try. PFC Christopher Sanders, Spec. Ryan Isaac and
Spec. Gabriel Barkdull, all of Headquarters Company,
5th Battalion, 87th Infantry, Spec. Roderic Robinson of
U.S. Army Dental Activity - Panama.
Good Conduct Medal - Spec. Richard Earhart of Head-
quarters Company, Jungle Operations Training Battal-
ion. Sgt. Robert Massingill of Company A, Jungle Op-
erations Training Battalion.
Certificates of Achievement - PFC Thomas Barrett, PFC
Bradley Vanzant, PFC Melvin Thompson, Spec. Scott
Davis, Spec. Christopher Smith and Pvt. Brian Wilson,
all of Company C, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Sgt. Rob-
ert Hollman of Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion,
87th Infantry, PFC Jonathon Hay, PFC Austin Norris,
PFC Scott Arp, PFC Bradley Lawson, PFC Joshua Tilley,
Cpl. David Miller, Pvt. 2 Carlos Barahona and Spec. John
Tharpe, all of Company A, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry.
Sgt. Corby Coover of Company B, 5th Battalion, 87th
Infantry, Spec. Dawn Hilton-Byrd of U.S. Army Dental
Activity - Panama.



Nuclear, Biological and Chemical School - Sgt. Gre-
gory McPhee of U.S. Army Dental Activity - Panama.
Preventive Dentistry Course - Spec. Ronald Weimer Jr.
of U.S. Army Dental Activity - Panama.
Cub Scouts from Pack 29, Albrook AFS, have ob-
tained the following rank. Bear - Chris Thiele, David
Audet, Bryant Hankins,. Richard Leiva, Andrew
MacPhail, Christopher Rodie, Steven Lawlor, Mark
O'Masta and lan Hoeffler. Webelos - Paul Barber. Ar-
row of Light - Matthew Carey, Billy Groom, Jake Jacobs,
Brenden Mendez, Michael Shahan and Jacob Zachariah.


Maria Northington graduated Jan. 22 as Nova University's salutatorian.


Mother of 4 nets degree after


HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA)
- Who said it couldn't be done? Not
Maria Northington.
This wife of an Air Force master
sergeant and mother of four re-en-
tered the world of education after a
15-year gap and completed a bach-
elor degree during her husband's
three-year tour with the 24th
Weather Squadron here.
Northington graduated as Nova
University's salutatorian in a cer-
emony Jan. 22 at Panama City's
Atlapa Center. In Nova's branch sys-
tem, the salutatorian is the top un-
dergraduate student, while the vale-
dictorian is the leading graduate stu-
dent at the commencement.


Upon arrival in June 1991,
Northington made a decision not to
search for a job in the local employ-
ment market. She opted for a long-
postponed college career.
She selected Nova for its parale-
gal business degree and started to
school immediately using savings to
cover initial expenses. She made
outstanding grades in her first few
semesters and applied for local
scholarships in an effort to finance
the rest of her degree.
In 1992, she won $500 scholar-
ships from both the officer and en-
listed spouses clubs here. In 1992,
and again in 1993, she won $1,000
scholarships from the Isthmian Col-


15-year break
lege Club.
She took full-time course loads
throughout her program earning a 3.8
grade point average and membership
in the Alpha Chi Honor Society on her
way to being named this year's salu-
tatorian.
"It was time to start school when
the youngest of my children, now 13,
11, 8 and 6, entered preschool,"
Northington said. "It's been a great
experience...it can be done. Don't be
afraid to try."
She credits her family for giving
the support and tolerance that enabled
her to reach her goal.
What's next?
"Law school!" she answered.


Smith takes command of aviation unit


by Spec. Angie Morse
4th Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment
HONDURAS - During a change of command cer-
emony Lt. Col. William M. Jacobs relinquished command
of the 4th Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment to Lt. Col.
Joseph A. Smith.
The battalion is an assault helicopter battalion with
operations spanning Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala
and Belize. The unit not only provides air support for
Joint Task Force Bravo, but also assists in the Honduran
counter-drug effort, host-nation air assault support, na-
tion building and humanitarian and disaster relief.
"The 4th Battalion has trained in this unforgiving land
and in unpredictable weather and hazards," said Col.


Michael J. Vanairsdale, 128th Aviation Brigade com-
mander. "They not only met all the challenges of this
demanding assignment, but they did it safely and with an
operational readiness rate 5 to 10 percent above the De-
partment of the Army goal which was due primarily to
the good leadership in the battalion."
"The battalion has a tradition of improving each year,
and I want to continue in that tradition," Smith said. "I
want to make this assignment challenging and exciting,
as well as fun for the soldiers."
Before taking command of the 4-228th, Smith was as-
signed to the 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, N.C.;
the 101st Airborne Division, and Task Force 160, Fort
Campbell, Ky. His last assgnment was as the 160th Spe-
cial Operation Aviation Regiment operations officer.


0 f Tropic Times
.10 Feb. 11, 1994















Sports

Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Warriors tear I




Supply spirit


by Sgt. James A. Rush
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - Wilkies Warriors
struggled in the face of adversity through-
out the 24th Supply Squadron Top 4 Soft-
ball Tournament this past weekend and
came away winners.
Its opponents in the finals, the Rebels,
played only three games to earn a champi-
onship berth. Wilkies Warriors, after los-
ing in the first round, faced five more
opponents before reaching the same spot.
The well-rested Rebels lost no time in
testing the Wilkies' resolve. It sent 19
batters to the plate in the top of the first
inning.
Despite three pitching changes by
Wilkies, the Rebels rounded up 16 runs on
16 hits with eight homers.
Lead-off hitter Scott "Stretch" Carr had
a single and triple in two at bats for the
inning.
This feat was overshadowed by twin
blasts from right-center fielder Bobby
Henson and left-center fielder Joe "Ma-
chismo" Price.
Manager Herman Wilkinson coached
his players through the losers' bracket,
including games at 10 and 11 a.m. Sunday
and he wasn't about to let a 16-run hole
become his team's grave.
"That's OK! We can hit the ball too," he
shouted from the dugout.
Wilkinson's words were half encour-
agement for his players and half threat for
their opponents.
"I don't get concerned. No lead.is safe
in slow-pitch," Wilkinson said. "I know
eventually we'll come back."
"The team we beat was a very good
team, but I never give up on my team.
That's the key, and they've never let me
down."
A 16-run hole wasn't deep enough to
bury Wilkies. In the bottom half of the first
inning, it answered with seven fence-clear-
ing shots.
Each team scored three times in the
second inning, Wilkies was shut out in the
third and added one more in the fourth
bringing the score to 20-12.
The rest of the game went Wilkies
Warriors way.
With the balls pounded into mush, the
Rebels suffered a dramatic power outage.
Six of its next eight batters flied out and
Wilkies held them scoreless in the fifth and
sixth innings.
Meanwhile Wilkies, continued to flex its
muscles and erased the scoring deficit. The
end of the sixth saw a 20-20 tie.
Extra hitterMark Whampler and catcher
Tojo Cockfield led the way for Wilkies.
Each picked up their second round trip and


Department of Defense rests hope
on five National Guardsmen to win
at the Winter Olympics.


the Warriors took an 11-8 lead in the home
run derby.
Henson gave the Rebels one last shot of
adrenaline with a two-run blast in the top of
the seventh inning, but Wilkies answered
with three more in the bottom to win 23-22.
The loss left most of the Rebels stunned.
Coach Bernard Grimsley wasn't surprised
however.
Grimsley had warned his players that a
16-run lead wouldn't be enough against
Wilkies.
"Against any other team, I'd say no, but
against Wilkies, you've got to keep fight-
ing," Grimsley said.
"I knew 16 runs wasn't enough, and I
think they believe me now."
The following game paled in compari-
son. Wilkies won it, 10-6.
The champs jumped out 3-0 in the first
inning and built a 10-2 advantage by the
end the sixth.
Shortstop Jason "Bo-Flex" Rodriguez
tried to rally the Rebels in the top of the
seventh. His lead off solo shot sparked a fire
in their bats, but the Warriors extinguished
it after allowing only four runs.
"Losing took the heart out of us,"
Grimsley said.
"After that, there was no fight left in us
until the last inning; and by then, it was too
late."


U.S. Air i-orce photos by Sgt. James A. Rush
Wilkies Warriors pitcher Daryl "Dawg" Kimble serves up a gopher ball.


.*I, .,.~
~*fl
* U'
-
* *..
~


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1 - .


* -'-.

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4
* h. *--.-.





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- -


Rebels shortstop Jason "Bo Flex" Rodriguez plucks a line drive.


Howard Sports and Fitness Center
offers exercisers an aerobic altema-
tive - step aerobics.


I an Mor pa e 5. -


*Softball tourneys
*Sweetheart bowling
*SCN radio sports


Feb. 11F 1994


Page 11


* -I-

. p.r, . .


,


..... 7 ....


--" - �I Q












S2 Tropic Times
1 Feb. 11, 1993



Bicyclists pedal


ocean to ocean
FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO-Atlantic) - Bike enthu-
siasts came from as far as Panama City to take part in
Sunday's Team Panama-a50-mile bicycle trek down the
Transisthmian Highway.
Sixty-one participants pedaled from Cristobal High
-School to the Club Amador, said Wallace Teal, assistant
fire chief of the Atlantic Panama Canal Commission Fire
Department.
Team Panama's first ride took place seven years ago and
only nine cyclists showed up, said Teal, who organizes the
event each year.
The event takes place the first Sunday of February.
"Originally, I had just asked some friends if they were
interested in riding on the Transisthmian with me," he
said. "I had nine people riding that time and it's grown to
the 61 we had this year."
The riders represented the Pacific PCC and military
communities, Colon, Galeta, the Atlantic military commu-
nity and students and staff from Department of Defense
Dependents Schools. They ranged in age from 12-68, Teal
said.
All but four of the cyclists finished the trek, with the
quickest pedaler clocking in at two hours, 19 minutes, and
the last participant coming in just under five hours.


Hustlers take bite out

of Caimanes, 10-4
FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO-Atlantic) - The Hus-
tlers trampled the Caimanes, 10-4, in a recent Women's
Softball League game here.
The Caimanes knew the wrath of the Hustlers, losing in
the teams' first meeting, 5-0.
With its pitcher Gail Bumett sick and sidelined, the
Caimanes were no more optimistic in this match-up, said
Linda Bowman, shortstop.
The Caimanes started the game strong with a stand-up
double, but that runner was stranded at third when the top
of the first inning ended. The bottom of the inning was short
and quick for the Hustlers.
Consecutive walks and errors by the Caimanes gave the
Hustlers a big lead in the second inning that it would carry
through the end of the game.
The Caimanes scored three runs in the fifth inning. The
fifth became the final inning as the one-hour time limit ran
out with a final score of 10-4.
Although they have yet to lose, Caimanes' coach Al
Bowman said the Hustlers aren't perfect.
"They can be beaten," he said.
"When you play a team like that, you can't have any
errors. You have to play your best."
And errors proved to be the Caimanes downfall.
"Both times we held them off for a while, but then the
errors would start," he said.
"We beat ourselves by making those errors."


] Sports


Women's Softball League
Team W L GB
Menascehe Sports 5 1 -
Chryler 5 1 -
Nujak Swang 5 1 -
Comedy Crew 3 3 2
Lady Torpedoes 2 4 3
Kamikazes 1 5 4
All Guts No Glory 1 5 4
as of Monday

Unit Level Softball League
White League
Team W L GB
310th MI 7 1 -
HHCUSAG 6 1 1/2
142nd Med 6 2 1
SOUTHCOM 6 2 1
HHD 470th MI 5 2 1 1/2
Co. C 1-508th 4 3 21/2
Co. B 1-508th 4 3 21/2
41st ASG 4 4 3
56th Ord. Det. 4 5 3 1/2
Co. B 193rd Supt. 4 5 3 1/2
59th Eng. Det 2 4 4
DCSRM 1 7 6
HHC 193rd Inf. 1 7 6
Co. A 193rd Supt. 1 7 6
as of Monday


Red League
Team W L
56th Signal Bat. 6 2
Co. E 1-228th 6 2
MEDDAC 6 2
HHCLEA 6 3
,Co. A 154th Sig. 4 2
534th MP Co. 4 3
HHD 56th Sig. 4 5
HHC 1-228th 3 4
92nd PSC 3 4
3rd SOSC 3 5
555th MP Co. 2 5
Co. B 154th Sig 1 5
HHCUSAG/IG 2 8


GB



1/2
1
1 1/2
2 1/2
2 1/2
2 1/2
3
3 1/2
4
5


Howard Softball League
National League


Eastern Division
Team
24th AIS/OSS
617th SOAD
24th MEDS
HHC 1-508th
24th COMM #1
24th SVS
617th ALSS #2
Western Division
24th SPS#1
24th MSSQ


GB

1/2
1
2 1/2
3
4
5 1/2


24th SVS 2 4 5
HHC 1-228th 1 5 5
24th TRANS 3 6 5 1/2
24th WS 2 8 7
24th CES #2 0 7 7 1/2
American League


Southern Division
Team W
24th SUPS 7
536th ENG 8
24th CES #1 5
24 AIRPS 3
310 ALS 2
C Co. 1-228 1
Northern Division
24th MS 5
617th ALSS #1 4
Co. A 1-508 2
B Co. 1-228 3
24th SPS #2 4
24th COMM #2 0
as of Wednesday


GB


2
5
5
6


1
2
2 1/2
2 1/2
5


Howard Golf League
National League
Team Points for
24th TRANS 17.5
617th ALSS "A" 15.5
24th SPS 14.5
33rd IS 12


24th CS "B"
24th MEDS
617 ALSS "C"
24th CES "F.D."
536th Eng.


American League
Team Points
24th MS 7.5
Navy 7
24th CES "A" 7
24th AINS/OSS 6.5
24th CS "A" 5.5
24th SVS 5
Co. A 1-228th 5
617th ALSS "B" 4.5
24th WS 0
as of Tuesday
Over 30 Basketball League
Team W L GB
The Friends 9 0 -
Knights 8 1 1


The Posse
Jazz
Barcardi
Los Medios
Co. E 308th MI
MEDDAC
SOUTHCOM #2
SOUTHCOM


2
2 1/2
4
5 1/2
5 1/2
7
7 1/2
8 1/2


* '.'


Department of Defense photo by Sgt. E.J. Hersom
Strike three
Eddie Krynicki of the Albrook Pirates throws a pitch in the final inning against the Fort Clayton
Caymans Feb. 4 with the tying run on second base. Krynicki held the Clayton team as the Pirates went
on to win 8-7.










Tropic Times 1
Feb.11, 1994 13JL


- *S Port


- .


Department of Defense photo by Sgt. E.J. Hersom


You're out!
First baseman Nancy Messinger of the Kamikazes tags the bag and makes the forced out against the Lady Torpedoes. The Kamikazes won its first game
of the season Tuesday beating the Lady Torpedoes 11-10. Kamikazes coach Chuck Cogburn said, "It's about time."



National Guard biathletes go for the gold


by SFC Sieve Barnett
Armed Forces Information Service
WASHINGTON - The Department of Defense's hope
at the XVII Olympic Winter Games in Lillehammer,
Norway, rests with five Army National Guardsmen, all
competing in biathlon.
Curtis Schreiner, winner of U.S. Olympic biathlon
trials in Anchorage, Ala., heads a 10-member team that
hopes to improve its 13th-place performance in the 1992
games in Albertville, France.
The number of team members are based on 1993
Biathlon Word Cup competition. The women, by benefit of
an eighth place finish last season, get six slots at the
Olympics. The men finished 18th in World Cup competi-
tion and are limited to four positions.
Biathlon combines the strength and endurance of cross
country skiing with marksmanship. Competitors ski in
sprint, distance and relay events with a .22 caliber rifle,
stopping at ranges along the course and firing at targets.
Penalty minutes for missed targets are combined with the
skiers' time, and the skiers with the lowest totals win
medals.
For Schreiner, 26, the selection marks the third time he
has made the U.S. Olympic biathlon team. He and 1992
teammates Jon Engen and Duncan Douglas comprised
three quarters of the U.S. biathlon relay team thatcompeted
in Albertville.
Schreiner also competed at the 1988 Calgary Olympic
in Canada. A resident of Day, N.Y., Schreiner is assigned
to the New York National Guard.
Completing the four-member men's team is 26-year-
old David Jareckie. Although selected to the 1992 team,
Jareckie, assigned to the Vermont National Guard, served
as an alternate and didn't compete.
This year, he will vie in the 30-kilometer relay and
hopes to ski in both individual events. He finished third in
Anchorage and feels he can challenge Schreiner in Nor-
way.
"I'm really psyched about this year because I have a lot
to prove," said Jareckie from the U.S. biathlon training site
at Lake Placid, N.Y.
" Last winter, I picked up what seemed like an asthma
attack at (the) World Cup race (in Italy) and it affected my
whole season."
The illness ended Jareckie's season, but it also gave him
an incentive to return.
"After training and competing all year, you have a
tendency to bum out," Jareckie said. "By coming home
early, the illness actually helped me because I got enough
of a break between seasons to relax and refocus for the


AP LaserPhoto
These are gold, silver and bronze medals awarded during thel992 Winter Olympic Games in Albertville,
Franch. Curtis Schreiner of the New York National Guard will make his third medal attempt in biathlon
during the upcoming Winter Olympics in Lillehammer, Norway.


Olympics."
As for the men's chances in Lillehammer, Jareckie was
optimistic and realistic.
"Most of the people who won in France will be there this
year," he said. 'There isn't going to be the turnover that
usually happens every four years."
He said Germany, which claimed seven Olympic med-
als in Albertville, and Russia should dominate competition
again this year.
Joan Smith, who won the women's trials in Anchorage
and is one of three biathletes returning to Olympic compe-
tition, heads the six-member women's team. She's joined


by 1992 Olympic teammates Mary Ostergren and Beth
Coats, a 27-year-old member of the Colorado National
Guard.
Besides Coats, two other Army skiers made the team.
Completing her second year on the U.S. national team
is Ntala Skinner, the 1990 U.S. junior biathlon champion
at 7.5 kilometers. Skinner earned her way on the U.S. team
with two victories at the 1993 team trials in Montana.
Skinner recently enlisted in the Idaho National Guard.
Laura Tavares, 28, will cap off her initial year on the
national team with an Olympic bid. Tavares, who lives in
Lake Placid, is assigned to the Vermont National Guard.


---I











4 Tropic Times
.T Feb. 11, 1994


One


beyond d



tradm on



aerobics


S I S tep up, step left, step up, side kick, step back.
Step up, step right, step up, side kick, step
back. Now the other side, step up, step
across, step back, ..."
No, this is not the cadence call of an honor guard
drill team's routine nor the choreography for a martial
art fight sequence.
It's step aerobics instructor Therese Fox guiding
approximately 30 morning aerobics class members
through an innovative exercise routine designed to J
enhance participant's cardiovascular and muscular
fitness. Fox teaches the classes Mondays, Wednesdays
and Fridays at 8:45 a.m. and 4:45 p.m. at the Howard
Sports and Fitness Center.
"Step aerobics can be very challenging," the certified
instructor said. "It's literally a step beyond traditional
aerobics. You can't 'fake it' in here the way you could
in the old aerobics class."
In traditional aerobics classes, participants who got
tired (or confused about which foot went where) could
always go back to marching or jogging in place, Fox
explained.
"In this class, you need to concentrate a little more
on what you're doing and where you're putting your
feet," Fox said."You'll probably feel a little awkward at
first; you're just learning the steps and you can't expect
to blend in with everyone else who already knows
them."
"Then again, you get a great feeling when you really
know the steps well."
The newest member and the only man on tle sports
and fitness center's aerobic instructor team, Kevin
Fannin said people can get that same good feeling
doing any regular exercise program.
Fannin is a captain with the 24th Air Intelligence
Squadron, who got interested in aerobics while sta- "
tioned in Korea and even earned his Aerobics and
Fitness Association of America certification while there.
"The steps let us increase the intensity of the aerobic
workout," Fannin said.
"When people get bored or no longer feel challenged
by traditional aerobics classes, they can find an effective
alternative in step aerobics," he said.
Howard's head aerobics instructor, Jill Powell
agreed. She is also certified, but through the American sa
College of Sports Medicine.
"In the step class, you can get
the same cardiovascular and fat- "You can't lake
burning benefits you get from the way you could
regular aerobics," she explained, aerobics class."
"But step aerobics allows far
more muscle contraction and at Therese
the same time causes less impact step aerobics i


on your joints."
For many participants, this
means their lower bodies - specifically the quadriceps
and gluteal muscles - will get a more intense muscular
workout with step aerobics.
Class participants' fitness skill levels range from
beginner to advanced, and the instructor must allow for
this when leading the class, Fannin said. "The instruc-
tors are key to making step aerobics safe and effective,"
Fannin said.
"We want to challenge the more physically fit class
members, but we also want to accommodate those who
aren't at that level yet."


I.


-di


�.-�. _. �


otjr~


4 %A*.&4.:c~""


' .. , ....,. r.y.. . * . �
U.S. Air Force photo by SSgt. Rian Clawson
canine Peppen and other aerobic students work out during the morning step aerobics class at the Howard
ports and Fitness Center.


"Safety is our most important consideration," Fannin


it' in here
d in the old


Fox
instructor


Although she praised the virtues
of step aerobics, Powell said it was
not necessarily the "best" form of
aerobic exercise.
The best aerobic exercise, she
explained, is any one that gets
your heart rate in its "aerobic
training zone" and keeps it there.
Powell gave a simple formula to
determine maximum heart rate -


220 minus your age. The "aerobic training zone" or
target range, is 60 percent to 80 percent of your
maximum heart rate.
"Everyone's body is different and each one responds
to different exercises in different ways," she said.
"Some people can't raise their heart rates enough
when they attend a regular aerobics class, but do so very
easily with step aerobics. Other people are just the
opposite."
In other words, what's best for one person will not be
best for someone else.


"That's why people should try many different
activities until you find the ones that are right for you,"
Powell said.
"In fact, national fitness experts are now moving
away from the party line that says 'aerobics is the most
important thing,' and moving toward one that says "you
must do strength training."
All three instructors recommended cross training for
overall physical fitness.
Cross training calls for combining aerobic workouts
with strength training on weight machines or free
weights.
"Cross training lets you strengthen your muscles and
increases your cardiovascular capacity," Powell said.
"Doing both helps you achieve your highest level of
overall fitness."
For more information about step or traditional
aerobics, jazzercise, cross training, or any other aspects
of fitness conditioning, call the Howard center at 284-
3602/3451.
by SSgt. Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs


, S orts


-S


"MI Mir,










Tropic Times 15
Feb. 11,1994


L Sports Shorts


SCN AM radio airs pro,
college, olympic sports
Southern Command Network's AM 790
Pacific and 1420 Atlantic will broadcast the
following sports this weekend.
Tonight
Radio special: "Meet the NBA All-
Stars," 8 p.m.
Saturday
College basketball: Minnesota at Wis-
consin, 2 p.m.
Kansas at Kansas State, 9 p.m.
Sunday
Pre-olympic hockey: France vs. Team
USA, 1:45 p.m.
Pro basketball: NBA All-Star Game,
6:30 p.m

Fronius hosts birthday
softball tournament
The Fronius Physical Fitness Center
will holds a President's Day men's and
women's softball tournament Feb. 19-21.
An organizational meeting will be held
Thursday. The entrance fee is $50 for
women's teams and $75 for men's teams.
Call the center at 289-3108 for more infor-
mation.

AUSA sponsors running
events at Reeder gym
There will be a U.S. Army South Presi-
dents' Day fun run 7a.m. Feb. 19 at Reeder
Physical Fitness Center. The run, spon-
sored by the Association of the U.S. Army,
includes an 800-yard dash and 1- and 3-
mile runs for all ages. The 5-mile run is for
children 15-years old and up. The cost is
$6. For information, call the center at 287-
6442

Bowling centers offer
President's Day specials
The Howard and Albrook Bowling Cen-
ters will offer bowling specials in honor of
President's Day Feb. 21. Games will cost 75
cents. The monthly no-tap tournament will
be held Feb. 27. For more information, call
the Howard center at 284-4818 or the
Albrook center at 286-4260.

Rodman hosts softball
league, tournament
Registration is under way for the Open
Unit Level Softball Tournament at
Symington Field, Rodman Naval Station,
Feb. 19-20. Deadline to register is today.
Units must present a team roster signed by
the unit commander or his designated rep-
resentative. There is a $25 entry fee. The
Rodman Fitness Center will hold a coaches
meeting 5:30 p.m. Tuesday. Call 283-
4222.

DENTAC sponsors run
against tooth decay
The U.S. Army Dental Activity - Panama
will host the 10th Run From Decay fun run
8 a.m. Feb. 26 at the Albrook AFS track.
The run is open to children 5-12 years old
who have bilingual identification cards.
The children will run in age and sex catego-
ries in 200 meters and 1/4 mile races and
prizes will be awarded. Registration forms
can be picked up at Department of Defense
Dependents Schools, the Fort Clayton Den-
tal Clinic and the Gorgas Army Commu-
nity Hospital Dental Clinic. Late registra-
tion will be at the track 7-7:30 a.m. on race
day. For information, call Chris Merida at
287-3609/3904.

Society of engineers runs
for fun, Engineer Week
The Society of American Military Engi-
neers will kick off Engineer Week with an
8K fun run 7 a.m. Saturday at the entrance


to the Corozal Directorate of Engineering
and Housing compound. Registration is $7
before the race and $9 race day. The price
includes a T-shirt. For information, call
285-5707/5013.

Military Sailing Club
holds courses until June
The Military Sailing Club will hold
several four-day sailing courses through
June. Each class will be held over the last
weekend and first weekend of the month.
The cost is $75, which includes the rental
fee of the boat, instructor and a certification
card that can be used to take the intermedi-
ate sailing course at Rodman Naval Station.
Classes are limited to the first 10 students to
sign up and pay. Those who are not in the
first 10 will be scheduled for future classes.
For information, call Steve Rasmussen at
287-5968, John Stobie at 285-4634 or stop
by the Fort Clayton Boat Shop.

Howard fitness center
sets new aerobic hours
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center
will have step aerobic classes 8:45 a.m.
Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Classes
cost $1. For more information, call 284-
3451.

Fitness center accepts
Tae Kwon Do forms
Applications for the Tae Kwon Do train-
ing camp at Fort Indiantown Gap, Pa., are
available at the Howard Sports and Fitness
Center. Application deadline is Feb. 26 and
are available for active duty airmen. Call
the center at 284-3451 for more informa-
tion.

Howard Bowling Center
hosts Rock and Bowl
The HowardBowlingCenterhosts bowl-
ing to favorite oldies in its Rock and Bowl
program 9 p.m. until closing Monday
through Thursday. Call 284-4818 for more
information.

Fitness center teaches
better fitness classes
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center
holds Fitness Improvement Training
Classes 6:05-7 a.m. and 2:05-3 p.m. Mon-
day, Wednesday and Friday at the center.
The classes consists of a calisthenic super
circuit work out that is aimed at improving
muscular endurance, cardiovascular sys-
tems and flexibility. Students must be evalu-
ated on the amount of exercise they are
capable of performing in a class before the
program starts. Call the center at 284-3451.

Sports registration open
at Reeder fitness center
Registration for the following sports
events has begun at the Directorate of
Community Activities Sports Branch on
Fort Clayton: Desert Storm softball pro-
gram; unit level flag football and women's
soccer. Call 287-4050 for more informa-
tion.

Fronius Fitness Center
gives free weight training
The Fronius Fitness Center on Fort
Davis has free Nautilus machine training
sessions 3-4 p.m. Tuesday and free weight
training sessions 3-4 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Call the center at 289-3108 for
more information.

PCWBA hosts bowling
sweethearts at Curundu
The Panama Canal Women's Bowling
Association is hosting a PCWBA Sweet-


hearts Tournament at the Curundu Bowl- Club hosts tournament
ing Center 3 p.m. Sunday. The center is
asking couples to bring finger food for a at Diablo tennis courts
potluck dinner. The monthly Crossroads Tennis Club
Sign ups begin 2:30 p.m. game day. Call tournament will be Feb. 26-27 at the Diablo
the center at 286-3914 for more informa- Heights Tennis Courts with categories for
tion. men, women and children. Registration
deadline is Feb. 23 at 6 p.m.


Reeder fitness center
offers free weight lifting
Reeder Physical Fitness Center offers
body building and powerlifting classes
Tuesday and Thursdays. The cost is $20.
Students must have a their own weight
belts. Call the center at 287-3861 for more
information.

Fitness center teaches
self-directed aerobics
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center
offers self-directed aerobics programs -
"Ski the Appalachian Trail" and "Climb
Mount Everest." For more information,
call 284-3451.

Davis pool hosts swim
meet 'Fiesta Panama'
The Fort Davis Pool will host the begin-
ners swimming meet "Fiesta Panama" 10
a.m. Feb. 19. Registration deadline is Feb.
18. Categories are doggie kick, front kick,
back kick and free style. Age groups are for
4-12 year olds.
Call the Davis pool at 289-3272 for
more information.

Howard, Albrook pools
offer swimming classes
The Howard and Albrook pools invite
parents and their children to enroll in swim-
ming lessons. The pools also have water
aerobics classes available. Call the Zodiac
Recreation Center at 284-3569 or the
Albrook Pool at 286-3555 for more infor-
mation.


For registration information, call Mike
Goldstein at 264-5160 or Wally Murdoch
at 252-2969.

Atlantic center offers free
weekday step aerobics
The Fronius Physical Fitness Center
offers free step aerobics 9-10 a.m. week-
days. Participants must have their own step.
Call the center at 289-3108 for more infor-
mation.

Curundu Bowling Center
holds Green Pin Bowling
The Curundu Bowling Center holds
Green Pin Bowling Sundays. Make a strike
when the green pin is in the number one
position and that game is free. Call the
center at 285-3914 for more information.

Fitness center offers free
weekday aerobics class
The Reeder Physical Fitness Center has
free aerobics 9:15-10:15 a.m. weekdays.
Each workout has a warm up, cardiovascu-
lar workout, cool down and floorwork. Call
the center at 287-3861 for more informa-
tion.

Reeder honors president
with three-pointer contest
Reeder Physical Fitness Center will cel-
ebrate George Washington's Birthday with
a basketball three-point shot contest Feb.
21. Registration will be the day of the event.
Call the center at 287-3861 for more infor-
mation.











1 Tropic Times
Feb. 11, 1994 W S


U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski
The Zipper was one the rides at the April, 1993 Directorate of Community Activities Fair at Fort Clayton.


Davis fair begins Thursday

FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO) - The Directorate of stations throughout the week as well as folkloric, coun-
Community Activities Fair, "Fiesta Panama," will be held try line dancing and ballet groups. Other programs in-
Thursday through Feb. 21 at the ballfield here. clude the Cristobal High School Choir and cheerleaders,
There will be rides, games, sports events and touma- the Fort Davis Elementary School dancers and bands such
ments, demonstrations and a Department of Defense as the Nes y Los Sensacionales rap band, Afinque, Bahia
show throughout the week. Banda Show and the DoD rock band, "The Gatherings."
The fair will be open 5-11 p.m. Thursday, 3 p.m.- Games will include basketball toss, speed ball, dunk
midnight Feb. 18-20 and 3-11 p.m. Feb. 21. tanks and dart blackjack. Food for all tastes will be avail-
Sports events will include a 10K fun run at 4:10 p.m. able with Asian, Panamanian and American favorites as
Thursday at Fronius Fitness Center, a women's softball well as the fair traditions of popcorn and cotton candy.
tournament Feb. 18, a men's softball tournament and Carnival rides for all ages will also be on the field
children's activities Feb. 19. The children's activities are with rides for the strong at heart as well as children rides.
4 p.m. sack race, 4:30 p.m. balloon stomp, 5 p.m. egg The fair will officially open 5 p.m. Thursday with a
toss and 5:30 p.m. tug of war. ribbon cutting, a trophy presentation and a folkloric dance
There will be karate, gymnastics and aerobic demon- group from Fort Espinar Elementary School.


Joint effort helps Air Force


replenish munitions stock


by Sgt. James A. Rush
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - It took a lot of sweat and a big pair
of red tape-cutting scissors, but the munitions storage sec-
tion here is finally restocking its shelves and saving tax-
payers money in the process.
The formula seemed simple enough, according to mu-
nitions inspector SSgt. Daniel E. Kuchler. Howard AFB
had an order for ammunition from the United States and
the Army was preparing to send some of the same items
back to its depot in the states.
Why not just fill the Air Force order from the Army
stock wherever possible? Simple right? Wrong.
"The services just don't work together like that nor-
mally," Kuchler said. "We spent a lot of time coordinat-
ing this."
The Air Force request went from desk to desk seeking
approval until it was handed to CWO 2 Israel Soto at
Rodman Munitions Supply Point.
"It saves everybody a bunch of time and hassle," Soto
said. "What we're trying to do now, is anytime we come
up with excess is talk to you guys (the Air Force) and see
if we can transfer it."
With the plan approved, Howard's munitions team put


together a wish list and hurried over to the Army depot
on Rodman NS before anyone changed their minds.
"We went to Rodman to pre-inspect their stock,"
Kuchler said. "We found they had a lot more stuff that
we needed."
All told, the Air Force replenished its storage facility
with about 33,000 pounds of demolition materials, small
arms ammunitions and more. The cost to move would
have been more than $3 per pound for a one-way trip.
"It's taken us about a month to inspect everything, but
this works out much better," Kuchler said. "It only took
a couple of days of our time and it's beneficial to every-
body."
The Army recouped its munitions from Air Force de-
pots in the states. This interservice cooperation, while
seemingly logical, is unusual according to MSgt. An-
thony Davis, chief of the 24th Maintenance Squadron
Munitions Flight here.
A suggestion to approve unilateral reporting of excess
munitions between services is being forwarded to the
munitions branch at Air Combat Command.
If approved, this "would cut down the amount of req-
uisitions a lot," Davis said. "The boat that carries it (mu-
nitions) here only comes in twice a year so this cuts down
waiting too."


Elections to bring

political rallies
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - With
national elections being held in the Republic of
Panama May 8, Panamanian political parties are
expected to conduct marches and other partisan
rallies until election day, officials said.
Members of the U.S. forces, Department of
Defense civilian employees and family members
are not allowed to become involved, or even to
appear to be involved, in the internal political pro-
cess of Panama in accordance with the Panama
Canal Treaty of 1977. This includes political ral-
lies and events.
Monitor Southern Command Network and the
Tropic Times for news of traffic congestion and
areas to be avoided because of pre-election activi-
ties.

CINC's Recognition

Ball set for March 26
COROZAL (Tropic Times) - The U.S. South-
ern Command Commander in Chief's Recogni-
tion Ball will be held 6 p.m. March 26 at Club
Amador. The cost is $16 per person, which in-
cludes dinner with dessert, wine, a complimen-
tary wine glass and entertainment. The ball is
open to servicemembers of all ranks and civilian
employees.
The CINC will recognize the junior officer,
noncommissioned leader, servicemember and ci-
vilian employee of the year from each component
at the ball.
For more information, call Sgt. Deborah John-
son at 282-4905.

Reduction in force

board cancelled
COROZAL (Tropic Times) - The Department
of the Army has announced that the company
grade reduction-in-force board has been can-
celled. The. board was cancelled because there
were enough voluntary separations by eligible of-
ficers to preclude involuntary separations, officials
said.

Contractors finishing

electrical upgrades
HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) - Contrac-
tors have entered the third phase of a plan to up-
grade the electrical systems of military family
housing here.
Sixty-five units are scheduled to be renovated
this year as occupants are permanently reassigned,
according to Jason Johnson, chief of Contract
Execution at the 24th Civil Engineering Squad-
ron.
Most homes will be completed this spring, he
said. Contractors will replace all electrical wir-
ing and components. New outlets will be added
also to bring the houses up to United States build-
ing codes.
"These houses are 40 years old or more," John-
son said. "There is a significant amount of work
in each one, but they (contractors) have been
pretty good about finishing on time."
Electricians have 14 days to complete the work
on each quarters. Aside from the standard labor,
they are also installing heat detectors and outside
security lights.
In some duplex buildings, two families are run-
ning off of a single breaker box. These homes will
have their breaker panels split so each quarters
has its own.
Contractors wait until a house is vacant to
avoid inconveniencing residents with the noise
and debris, Johnson said. As it is, families in the
other side of duplexes suffer a bit from the up-
grade, but efforts are made to notify these people
in advance.
Ninety-four units have been completed to date.
When the final phase is completed, all 462 quar-
ters will be brought to standard.




Full Text

PAGE 1

.No 6 Quarry 'Igh4ts, Republic Pn, Friday,Feb.11, 1994 Senate confirms newcrmne S COR( CL-L (Tropic Times)Gen lilt/NO iv by the U.S, Seniate to bef 'l a gr p come inmHII awticr IF]ci ie: oi the U. S. 04it S Southern Command following senate hearings Wednesday, officials by Rosemary Chong said. Topic Times staff Assumptiont of command Cei COROZAL -Carnival time i Panama. Its a tIre when practi cmoony is scheduled flit 9 an. a Thrsdy atI-dod FB cally the entire population forgets everyday problems and enjoys wholehearted menymaking. Carnival, as the Latins understand it, takes place each year just PidMcC ilrey was nov.inated by ree days before Ash Wednesday. However, Panamanians exPreident Bill Clinton Nov. 24 to suctend that celebration to four days.ceed Gen. George A. Joulwan, who tedta3eerto ofu as bce SpremGee Ald omandr w For people residing in Panama City, carnival is not official. This Europe in October. year, the "Carnaval de Comparsas '94" is from 2 to 8 p.m. Saturday E capeyi willrecei. and starts with a parade from La Cresta, Via Espana, up to Plaza starMinceremy at ePentagifonh Cinco de Mayo and Avenida Justo Arosemena across from the star m a ceremony at the Pentagon Toldo Tipicon. There will be diablicos, resbalosos, costumes, He will become th senior .comparsas (groups of dancers/singers), murgas (bands), floats Hwiltry comne ine atitiU.S. and other attractions. Music, booths with food and refreshments military commander in Latin. .will be available. America, responsible for implementwl eaalbe A .S.eatia onlbseurt mplicyend For people who can't make it to the interior, the most conveing Unient event is the Capira carnival, alongside the InterAmerican strategy in the region. Matry wa egdirector. f Highway. It's only 34 miles from the city. The Taboga Island carniMcCaffrey was the director for val is also nearby, just a boat ride away. Strategic Plans and Policy of the In Panama, the carnival is celebrated in three different ways. In JointCiefsey Setvda st the capital city and in Colon, it's more of a care-free nature, with M~afre yservedas the cy sopeople having fun in his or her own way, while watching the cosmander of the 24th Infantry Division (Mechanized) 1990-1992, which detumed comparsas dance in the streets. couttesypsoto played to Saudi Arabia in August Another type of celebration is the Water Carnival in Penonome. Panamanian children dance in a parade during Carnival. People gather at the Mendozas swimming resort to watch th Carnival season runs from Saturday until Wednesday. 1 flower-decorated floats move slowly down the Zarati river. This He led the division in combat parade is held Saturday afternoon. dance their way to the plaza and try to outdo each other. operations in Iraq during Operation The third version is the typical carnival in the interior, mainly in Dancing in open-air tojdos, hotels, night clubs or at private Desert Storm for which he was awared thef Dis icish Servic Chitre and Las Tables. Those who oreer to be in the midst of this parties until early in the morning, puts the finishing touches to Medal. t ype of carnival Aosould be prepared r A ivitl water each duty's activities. Traditionally, groups of revelers end the carA graduate of the U.S. Military ojaeras and smeared with washay -a ye during the nival celebration with the ceremony of the "burial of the sardine" Academy at West Point, N.Y., his morning hours and hear the loud exposion at ierackers at night. at the nearest beach early mcsring on Ash Wednesday. career also includes four combat In Las Tablas, groups of comparsas with their murgas, known But no matter what you do or where you go, carnival is here and tours, two of them in Vietnam b as Calle Arriba (uptown) and Calle Abnjo (downtown) sing and it runs Saturday through Tuesday. mand ceremony will be aired on tils w of them ion of ornaA r Southern Command Network radioajrpr j c f n s e Arratian-% ro0ad Projct finishes and TV. o u The water line was moved and replaced without significant loss Home delivery by sSgt.of service to the base residents. 24th Wing Public Affairs Several people have been using loverleaf wrong, Trotter expanding today HOWARD AFB -More than two years of work is about to said. Coming from the Bridge of the ericass, the proper proceQUARRY HEIGHTS (Tropic finish on the InterAmerican Highway that runs from Arraijan to the dure for entering Howard is to take the riglt iun imonediately after Times) -Families on Fort Amador Bridge of the Americas. the underpass. Some people have been taking the exit before the and Curundu will have the Tropic "This has been an outstanding example of cooperation beunderpass (meant for Rodman/Cocoli traffic) and then cutting left Times delivered to their front doors tween the U.S. Forces and the Panamanian government," said across two lanes of traffic to enter Howard AFB. beginning today. Nancy Trotter, Navy Panama Canal Treaty Implementation officer Not only could you earn a traffic citation for this dangerous The Miami Herald expanded its said. "On the whole, things went very smoothly." maneuver, Trotter said, "but it could easily cause an accident. service to quarters on the two inArguably, the most complicated portion of the project was the People need to do it properly.", stallations, said Patrick Milton, comHoward AFB/Rodman Naval Station interchange, she said. The center barrier running from the bridge to Arraijan is a safety mand information officer, U.S. An American contractor hired by the Army Corps of Engineers feature not included in the original renovation plans, Rivas said. Southern Command. created the "cloverleaf' design and local contractors built it. Some people have complained the divider takes up too much The delivery of the Tropic Times A memorandum of agreement also called for a construction space and causes a hazard by pushing the lanes of traffic too close is made possible by special arrangerepresentative to be a liaison with the ministry of public works and together. Actually the divider is a safety measure that only takes ment with the Miami Herald, which the contractor. Gustavo Rivas of the 24th Civil Engineering Squadup about a meter of the road surface, Rivas said. began home delivery to Quarry ron has filled that position for the last 18 months. "Since the road improvements were made, many people have Heights and Albrook AFS Dec. 20, "1 really enjoyed the work," Rivas said, "although it was a real started thinking of the road to Arraijan as a high speed race track; 1993. challenge to learn the procedures I needed to coordinate with the it's just not designed for that," he said. The home delivery will expand Army, Navy, Air Force and the Panama Canal Commission. The The road was designed in the mid-1930s with dangerous curves to Rodman NS and the Cocoli housmost work came from relocating the utilities near the overpass. and switchbacks that are not banked, and despite its new appearing area in March, Milton said. Workers moved water lines, electrical lines and fuel lines, with ance, these factors are still present. For information about home dealmost no "down tirne." There have been several fatalities along the 10-kilometer stretch livery of the Miami Herald or em"There were no serious injuries associated with the construeof road, Rivas said, and the lane divider will prevent the most seriployment opportunities as a carrier, tion and we only had one problem when we moved the utilities," ous type of accidents -head-on collisions. call Jorge Gonzales at 269-3220 or Rivas said. "One of the water pipes was buried closer to the surMilitary and local officials remind people using the Arraijan 236-1522. face than diagrams indicated, so when the contractor started digRoad to keep their speed down and not to exceed the posted speed ging, the pipe was broken." limit of 80 kph (approximately 50 mph.) page 2 Military 0 S 0 Pride days provide link between DiAir Force experts put cycle ergo*Demolition men, page 3. rectorate of Engineering and Housmetry through the test for determin*SOUTHCOM CSM retires, page 8. ing Self-Help and community. ing physical fitness. *Top 4 softball tourney, page 11.

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2Tropic Times Feb. 11, 1994 f NIs DEH pride days help customers Atlantic side holds su~~rL ommuityprojctshistory month events support community projects FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Atlantic) Black History Month is now under way in the Atby Gaby Capriles lantic community with a variety of events schedDEH Public Relations uled to focus on African-American culture. COROZAL (USARSO PAO) -The Directorate of EnThe Atlantic Black History Month Committee gineering and Housing self-help and pride days may be planned events that highlight the past and explore the best way to get things done around the home or office, the future of African-Americans, said SFC Scarlett DEH officials said. V. Williams, committee co-chairperson. The goal of the DEH is to offer the customer quality "We (the committee) looked at where blacks service despite the limited available resources, said Lt. have been in the past and what direction they're Col. John Lovo, DEH director. The vision of DEH is to support customers and the command mission through headed in and designed events that would present excellence and teamwork. a better understanding of that to the community," "The DEH is readily available to offer expert technical she said. assistance and know-how when something beyond the Among the highlights of the month's events are you -do-it level breaks down," Lovo said. "Unfortunately, a Black History Contest and the annual Black Hisdue to severely restricted resources, it is not always posstory Program, Williams said. sible to respond to every service call in a timely manner. The contest involves answering questions about The alternative, in most, cases is self-help." prominent figures in black history and civil rights The PACE Improvement Center in Building 340, events. Corozal, and the PACE Support Center in Building 243, The Black History Month Program will be 7-9 Fort Davis, give customers access to thousands of selfp help items, he said. pm. Feb. 26 at the Fort Davis Theater and will Pride days are a result of the combined efforts of DEH include dancers, skits and food tasting. This year's and the community. theme is "Empowering African-Americans 'The purpose of this command-sponsored program is Present and Future." to couple skilled DEH workmen and supplies with the Other events scheduled for the month are: residents of each community," said Karla Beard, mayor Today -Black History Contest drawing of the 1000 housing area of Fort Clayton. Wednesday -Film: Minnie the Moocher, 7 "This combination accomplishes as much maintep.m. Sundial Recreation Center nance, repair work and approved community enhanceFeb. 18 -Luncheon, 11 a.m. at Davis Commument projects each community wishes to undertake such u.S. Army photo unity Club and Black History Contest drawing as building tether courts, planting gardens or building Victor Mendoza, Directorate of Engineering and Feb. 19 -Balboa, Pier 18, Boat Ride, 8 p.m., park benches." The primary focus of pride days is self-help, Lovo said. Housing, installs a new door during a pride day. call 289-3960/3275 But, DEH support is also available for technical assisand Utilities noncommissioned officer. Feb. 20 -Film: Malcom X, 6 p.m. at Fort Davis tance on jobs which are beyond self-help capabilities. For a successful pride day, it is essential that the reTheater Pride days are available for just about everyone's benquester come to this meeting prepared to furnish precise Feb. 23 -Film: Mandella, 7 p.m. at Sundial efit, he said. There are community pride days for family details of the work that needs to be done, he said. Before Recreation Center housing areas and barracks and office pride days for the meeting, the requester should pass out fliers to all the Feb. 25 -Black History Contest drawing soldiers and work force. During barracks and office pride residents requesting what work needs to be done. Feb. 26 -Black History Program, 7 p.m. at Fort days, the unit or organization is not charged for the supOnce the scope of work is determined, another meetDavis Theater plies, he said. ing will be held on-site;with the requester to make sure Feb. 27 -Religious Service, 12:30 p.m. at Fort Pride days have been officially sanctioned by Maj. all participants know exactly what work is to be done and Espinar Chapel. Gen. George Crocker, USARSO commanding general, what supplies are needed, Lovo said. and are encouraged for everyone to actively participate in On each scheduled pride day, skilled DEH tradesmen PACE jam boree this team effort, Lovo said. will be available to offer the required technical assistance j As part of this, civilians and soldiers who participate and supplies, he said. attracts in pride days remain under management control and are If there isn't time to schedule a pride day, there is also considered in duty status whether in their community or the expanded Self-Help Program, where DEH inspects FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO-Atlantic) barracks. an office or barracks and gives advice on how to perform More than 200 Atlantic community members To set up a pride day, coordinators must call DEH at the necessary repairs or jobs, Lovo said. came out for the Panama Army Communities of 285-5061/5447 for an initial meeting. During this meetDEH will order the necessary supplies if not available Excellence Jamboree '94 here Saturday. ing, the requester and key DEH employees will establish and issues them through the PACE Improvement Center. the dates and scope of the work to be done, Lovo said. It takes about two weeks to coordinate this type of miniTh m ore sered dilayseand infArmati For a community pride day, the requester is usually pride day, he said. on many of the services available to the Atlantic the area mayor and in barracks pride days it is the Repair For information, call 285-5447/5061. community, said Kenneth W. Bryan Jr., chief of Maintenance and Services Branch, Directorate of Engineering and Housing. Units help improve future phone service Among the displays were hands-on demonstrations of minor household repairs, fire safety tips, HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) -The local military phone capabilities, Rose explained, child fingerprinting for identification, a commiscommunity experienced a temporary break in its tele"We got a great deal of invaluable assistance from the sary nutrition display, a PACE mobile unit display phone service Jan. 21, but the 15-minute disruption alpersonnel assigned to the 24th Communications Squadand demonstrations from the Panama Canal Comlowed members of the 106th Signal Brigade and the 56th ron," he said. 'Technical Sergeant Robert Farnsworth of Signal Battalion to integrate new equipment that will imjob control and Master Sergeant Silas Wilson and Capmission Fire Department. prove future phone service. tain Linda Myers of customer service were some of the Although the day's activities and.displays were "We'd warned people that they might lose the use of integral players who made the 5-ESS cutover a success." geared more toward adults, there were also train their phones for as much as 15 minutes," said Lt. Col. The 56th Signal Battalion is responsible for installrides, balloons and a visit by McGruff the crime David Boozer, commander of the 24th Communication ing, operating, and maintaining telephone and microdog for the children, Bryan said. Squadron. "Actually, the service was only out for about wave communication systems at all military installations "The train rides were a big hit for the kids, but nine minutes, which is an outstanding accomplishment. in the theater. It's also working with the AT&T contract I noticed a few of the parents sneaking on too," he "We are really pleased with the work the Army and crew that's currently laying in a fiber optic cable to said. the contractor did on this project." supplement the copper cables of Howard's existing cable "We tried to make the day festive to attract more Boozer noted the contributions of the 56th Signal infrastructure. people and give the community an idea of the orBattalion's Dean Blakeslee and Capt. Hugh Campbell. Operation Live Wire '94 is using Army Reserve and g angiv the outy anoidea of to AT&T contractors and Army technicians swapped National Guard resources to replace the telephone wirorganizations that help out by providing services to switches at Howard's "Dial Central Office," replacing ing, connections and jacks in all of Howard's military the community, he said. an older, analog "Dimension 2000" switch with a highfamily housing. tech, digital 5-Electronic Switching System. This is a continuation of the work the Army started Local offices close The 5-ESS offers higher quality sound, greater speed last year at Fort Clayton and Albrook AFS during Opand -because it's digital -direct interface with other ration Live Wire '93. because of carnival digital equipment, like the new integrated services digital "This re-wiring of the MFH is being done to ensure FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Panama network. It adds more than 2,000 subscriber lines and every unit has the hardware needed for two desk phones government offices will be closed Monday through increases the trunk capacity to 600 trunks. and one wall phone," Boozer explained. "We're also 1:30 p.m. Wednesday for Canival in the Pacific "The old switch was basically '70s technology and it planning to replace the current rotary phones in military just couldn't keep up with the '90s requirements of our family housing with new touchtone telephones." and Atlantic communities, officials said. Offices military community," said Army Maj. Joseph Rose, opThe project is currently on-going at Fort Kobbe, Rose such as Vehicle Exonerations, Vehicle Registraerations officer for the 56th Signal Battalion. "This new said, and it will begin shortly in the Navy's Farfan houstion and Drivers' License Issuing Office will be switch is state of the art equipment." ing area. Work is scheduled to begin at Howard in late affected. Installation of the new improved switch is part of an February or early March and officials say they'll distribongoing effort to improve the military community's teleute flyers to housing residents before the work begis.

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T___i gTropic Times _ _ _ _ _Feb. 11, 1994 Range officer in charge, 1st Lt C.J. Walker, 193rd Infantry Brigade S-3, walks through the wreckage at the demolition range. A Company C, 1-508th Infantry soldier prepares a Claymore mine 59th Engwes hem, erme 1-508th exercise 'expkive' he 59th Engineer Company has created an odd, but realistic training scenario for the 1st Battalion (Air home), 508th Infantry Regiment. The engineer company did this by creating enemy command posts using props for the infantry to attack. To achieve this kind of scenario, the company had to sling load bunk beds, washing machines, plywood, office equipment and other materials onto the range, said SSgt. Richard Lindvig, 59th Eng. Co. Seeing these oddities in the middle of the jungle might appear a little overzealous for a training exercise, but the reason the engineer company goes to so much trouble is because Col. Louis D. Huddleston, commander, 193rd Infantry Brigade (Light) likes the training to be as realistic as possible for his soldiers, Lindvig said. "A lot of hours have been put into these objectives," Lindvig said. "We built four objectives in two days." "The main thing we are trying to provide is realism," said Capt. James Skidmore, 59th Eng Co. commander. "It fires and pumps them (the soldiers going through the EXEVAL) up, giving them something that is tangible." This and the demolition range will be the two biggest operations the company does before it deactivates in April. Skidmore said that his company has no intentions of slowing down on training. He-explained that the company will go through its own EXEVAL. -4 r Twelve soldiers will also attend the Sapper Leader Course, a squad will go to Honduras in a platoon exchange and another platoon will be going to the Joint Readiness Training Center at Fort Polk, La. story by Spec. Mexander Whte, CMRSO Puck fiffafrs photos by SSgt Rkhrd Lhkdvlg, 59th Engieer C yompan --Pvt. 1 Ronald Bullock, 59th Engineer Company lights a fuse.

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Tropic Times Feb. 11, 1994 Endara replaces 12-member cabinet Pablo Escobar PANAMA CITY (Reuters) -Panama's cal Economy Minister Delia Cardenas deintended to boost his party's flagging elecfiles im plicate President Guillermo Endara has named a spite the split because of her crucial role toral prospects by paving the way for the new cabinet heavily weighted toward his in handling Panama's foreign debt. appointment of a more pro-Arnulfista astro's brother ruling Arnulfista Party, officials said Mon"The president wanted a firmer base of cabinet. day. support in his cabinet in general," said a Recent polls have shown the BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) -Files Endara, who dissolved his 12-member presidential spokesman, who asked not to Arnulfistas' presidential candidate, and a videotape that belonged to cabinetlast Tuesday because of a rupture be identified by name. "But I imagine Mireya Moscoso de Gruber, in fourth slain drug lord Pablo Escobar implibetween the Arnulfista party and its main Delia Cardenas has stayed so that this place with less than a third of the support cate the brother of Cuban leader Fidel coalition partner, the Liberal Republican would not affect the debt talks." for the current favorite, Ernesto Perez Castro in drug-trafficking. Nationalist Movement (MOLIRENA), reEndara's surprise dissolution of the Balladares of the center-left opposition The videotape, portions of which named five of his former ministers and cabinet last week came after the Revolutionary Democratic Party. were broadcast by the TV news proappointed seven new ones. Arnulfistas and MOLIRENA decided to Endara, who will step down Sept. 1, gram QAP on Monday night, showed The new cabinet includes seven run separate presidential candidates in the took power after the December 1989 U.S. a man identified only as David pleadArnulfistas, three independents who supMay 8 general elections. invasion of Panama that ousted former ing with Escobar to let him live after port Endara, one member of the Liberal Endara said at the time that he needed dictator Manuel Antonio Noriega. surviving an assassination attempt. Authentic Party, which also backs the to separate his administration from the The old cabinet included five David -whose face is electronipresident, and one MOLIRENA minister. pre-election infighting and jockeying for Arnulfista and four MOLIRENA memcally distorted in the hour-long tape Presidency officials said Endara reposition. bers, two independents and one member -sent the video to Escobar to deny tained MOLIRENA's Planning and PolitiBut critics said it was a cynical move of the Liberal Authentic Party. accusations that he was a traitor to the Medellin cartel that Escobar ran. mmk~r~r'~ nci~~ i~~iri~Escobar of the work he had done for fi di g. In the video, Davidreidl Commission's finding angelrE Gavia th the cartel. BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) -A politi"You know I helped you with cal fight over the presence of U.S. soldiers burst wide open Wednesday when Presispect to the shipment," David says, dent Cesar Gaviria angrily rejected a referring to Fidel Castro's brother, commission's finding that inviting the who also is Cuba's defense minister. troos ws ineristittioal.It was not clear what kind of shiptroops was unconstitutional. hi v -ment David was referring to. The The normally placid Gaviria, his voice KU.S. government has repeatedly actrembling, said oc national radio he would cused Raul Castro of drug traffickignore Tuesday night's verdict by the Ro Council of State, Colombia's highest au$og. thority on government administration, There was no answer at the Cuthat the approximately 250 U.S. soldiers ban Embassy in Bogota Tuesday. were in Colombia illegally. when reporters called seeking comAbout 130 soldiers, mostly combat enevn gineers from Fort Rucker, Ala., are in the Pacific coastal city of Juanchaco on what on the TV broadcast are authentic has been billed as a humanitarian mission and form part of the government's to build a school and clinic and improve a investigative files on Escobar's oproad. The mission raised suspicions berations, said Ana Lucia Obregon, cause it is in an area where drug-traffickAP LaserPhota spokeswoman for the prosecutor ers and rebels operate. Colombian President Cesar Gaviria and his wife, Ana wave to a crowd in 1990. general's office. Juanchaco lies 45 miles west of Cali, Wednesday, Gaviria angrily rejected a commission's finding that inviting U.S. The material was found in home of the world's biggest cocaine cartroops to Colombia was unconstitutional. Escobar's prison after he escaped in tel. July 1992, Obregon said. Other U.S. soldiers are maintaining a the capacity to respond," Gaviria told rethere if one develops. Attorney General The files and the tape reveal U.S.-built radar system that has netted porters at the presidential palace. Carlos Gustavo Arrieta told reporters he Escobar, who led the Medellih cartel drug-trafficking flights and are building a Gaviria, responding to a question, said would independently investigate the case. until he was slain by security forces base and training Colombian soldiers to his statement did not imply that the misGaviria said he deduced from the Dec. 2, had a sophisticated itelibetter fight drug traffickers and guerrillas. sion in Juanchaco was anything more than council's "vague and brief' finding that gene network at his command. Escobar's files include a docuThe soldiers' presence has prompted humanitarian. he would have to expel every military ates wide complaints that Colombia's soverThe Council of State held that Gaviria tache serving with the dozens of embasmeant apparently from the U.S. Drug eignty was being violated. violated the constitution and national sovsies in Colombia, which he called "abEnforcement Administration outlinGaviria said Colombia needed all the ereignty by inviting the troops without its surd." ing drug-trafficking and moneyhelp it could get to fight its powerful coauthorization or Senate permission. It has Gaviria ascended to the presidency aflaundering activities by the Medellin caine traffickers and accused opponents of no power to enforce its decisions. ter the candidate he served as campaign cartel's rival, the Cai cartel, QAP "wrapping themselves in the Colombian The council forwarded its decision to a manager was killed by the Medellin cosaid. flag" and displaying false nationalism. congressional committee and the attorney caine cartel. He now is confronting the The videotape also implicates an "Sovereignty is in greater danger when general's office for possible action. Cali cartel. Security forces killed Medellin unidentified associate of former Vena nation is handed over to criminals and Gaviria's Liberal Party has a majority in cartel leader Pablo Escobar Dec. 2, and ezuelan President Carlos Andres drug traffickers and the state does not have Congress and he is likely to win any battle that cartel is far less powerful now. Perez. S "a book on violence against women. Latin America debDates seXI Other countries also are dealing with the issue: *Argentina enacted a law Nov. 18 that forbids sexual BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) -Secretary Clara Ines rePresident Cesar Gaviria reprimanded Bermudez for harassment in government offices, but says nothing of calls well the day she was fired for "incompetence." "offending the women of Colombia" with the insult. private businesses. Summoned to her boss's office in a large Bogota comBermudez resigned Nov. 11, citing the scandal and accu*Peru has a law against sexual harassment, but selpany, she abruptly found herself under sexual attack. "He sations of budget iregularities. dom enforces it. In several pending cases, women are supushed me against the wall and began unfastening my Discussion of the Bermudez case has publicized the ing Health Ministry officials, alleging they were fired for belt," she said. "I told him, 'Let me go,' punched him indignities Colombian women often suffer, but many rejecting sexual advances. and shoved him away." people find the subject embarrassing, particularly victims. *A bill in the Chilean congress would outlaw sexual Clara Ines had no recourse when she was dismissed. Clara Ines is still so ashamed of her experience she disharassment, and several judges in Bolivia have urged acBut for her and other South American women that situacussed it on condition she be identified only by her Christion there. tion is slowly beginning to change, as countries where tian name. Even without laws, not all men escape punishment. "machismo" long has reigned unquestioned make their Women's liberation is a vague concept in Colombia, For weeks, Ingrid's boss touched and patted her and first, tentative efforts to discourage sexual harassment. where women could not vote until 1957. told her dirty jokes. Then one day when Ingrid, a newsArgentina recently outlawed sexual harassment in A bill now in the congress would make sexual harasspaper photographer, was in the photo lab, he came up government offices. Several other countries are considerment on the job a crime punishable by up to a year in behind her and "grabbed me with his pants already ing action. prison, and would prohibit the firing of an employee for down. I slapped him and screamed and ran out." In Colombia, a scandal last fall involving a senior govresisting sexual advances. The paper's editor, a woman, fired the man after ernment official put the issue in the spotlight, much as Sentiment appears to be growing among Colombians Ingrid and other employees complained about his conthe Clarence Thomas-Anita Hill case did in the United for some action against what the newspaper El duct. States. Espectador denounced as the "sordid blackmail" of "My case is extremely rare, because if there's a comA regional director of the Institute for Youth and women workers. plaint it's usually the victim who's fired," Ingrid said. Sports publicly accused the head of the agency, Miguel "It's as if we were property," said Rep. Yolima Mrs. Espinosa said the habits of centuries must be broBermudez, of threatening to fire her if she did not have Espinosa, a sponsor of the anti-harassment bill. "The ken before real change can be achieved. sex with him. Bermudez case made people sensitive to the problem of "Some women are subservient to men, and by acting Bermudez denied it and told reporters he had no sexual harassment and made them realize there's no penthat way they are reinforcing the attitude of men who feel sexual interest in the woman, Maria del Pilar Florez. She alty for it." It also made Colombian women realize that superior," she said. was 35, he said, and at that age "a woman does not insexual harassment "is not normal behavior, but is an "Women as well as men will have to change their bespire such thoughts." abuse," said Melba Arias Londono, a lawyer who wrote havior."

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__ _j j Tropic Times _____ ______N ew s Feb. 11, 1994 Experts debate worth of Troops may pay cycle ergometry fitness more to fund retirement homes by TSgt. Valerie A. McGovern WASHINGTON, D.C. (American Forces InforHO ACC Public Affairs mation Service) -To keep the military's two retireLANGLEY AFB, Va. -Is cycle meant homes from going broke, active duty members ergometry the best way to test a may have another $1.50 taken out of their monthly person's fitness? It's best considering pay starting next January. the exhaustive, dangerous and expenService secretaries recently approved a proposal sive alternative, say ergometry's top to increase the current 50 cents per month to $2. advocates. Congress must approve the increase. Loren Myhre, research physiologist "There have been other proposals for alternative at the Armstrong Laboratory, Brooks funding of the homes that did not pass," said Kerni AFB, Texas, and creator of the Air Childress, public affairs officer for the Soldiers' and Force cycle ergometry program, said A s Airmen's Home. the best measure of fitness is the treadLast year, the Soldiers and Airmen's Home's mill stress test. budget was $43 million, but the home took in only But the treadmill test can be dan$35 million. The Naval Home did better, spending gerous, expensive and difficult to per$11 million and taking in about $20 million. Still, form properly, said Myhre and Dr. said officials, with downsizing of the active force, Gerald Fletcher, a member of the both homes will go broke by 1999 without the inArmed Forces Epidemiological crease. Board chairman of the American Childress said she's been deluged with calls about Heart Association's Committee on the proposed increase. Exercise and Cardiac Rehabilitation. "I wish I could get them all to come to the home "Obviously, we would like to give and visit," Childress said. "After a visit, most sera test that is absolutely perfect, and vicemembers say they're happy to pay more." the treadmill' test would be that," Ironically, the homes have been hurt by serviceMyhre said. "But you must have a members' good behavior, since fines and forfeited cardiologist watching the electrocarpay go to support the homes. Fewer servicemembers diogram every minute, and have a pay fines or forfeit pay as a result of courts-martial laboratory filled with people to help in or administrative discipline these days. In 1983, a case of an emergency." total of $25 million in fines and forfeited pay helped Fletcher, a cardiologist and chairout the Soldiers' and Airmen's Home. In 1993, fines U.S Air Force photo and forfeitures netted $13 million. man of rehabilitation medicine at SrA Ramona Spencer, Howard AFB cycle ergomerty fitness monitor, Residents also pay 25 percent of their retired pay Emory University School of Medicine r. esmnt, in Atlanta, believes cycle ergometry is evaluates Willie Blocker. and Social Security benefits to live in the homes: a good second choice. procedures and make the test even With the start of cycle ergometry However, many residents served during World War "It's an easier system to deal with. more accurate. a id the ist dce, Prkon H or before, and their retired pay is low. anid the continued studies, Parkinson R~dAm C ifG It's a small system, less expensive and In one study, Myhre has pushed said the Air Force has taken a Retired Army Col. Jeff Grider, associate director more mobile," he said. "Cycle people to exhaustion on the treadmill proactive, progressive approach to fitfor resource management at U.S. Soldiers' and ergometry gives you a safe base line and compared the results with their ness evaluation. Airmen's Home, said servicermcbers he hoead 50 to check a person's fitness level." cycle ergometry results. He's perFletcher agrees. The point of cycle ergometry is to formed more than 350 maximal In his role as the Armed Forces 1976. When the home was built in 1851, soldiers safely estimate the treadmill test. This tests in the past year -more than Epidemiological Board's 'Prevention, paid 25 cents out of their monthly checks. is done by exercising someone at a most laboratories ever do. His reWellness and Exercise Person,' ."Back then, a private made only $7 a month, so moderate workload on the cycle and sults continued to show a positive reFletcher said he plans to urge the other it was a larger part of the check," he said. -ge he oher The Soldiers' and Airmen's Home has 1,760 resithen using a mathematical equation to lationship between the tests. service branches to move to cycle dents. The Naval Home, built in 1975, has 550. In convert to a maximum workload mea"We wanted to give commanders ergometry fitness testing. 1991s the two homes merged into the Armed Forces sure. the best evidence we could of the va"I'm meeting in San Diego next "With this safer procedure and lidity of cycle ergometry," Myhre month for a board meeting and I'm Retirement Home. They have separate trust funds, with the computerized program givsaid. "It's a very sound test based on going to make a pitch for it. Cycle which will merge in 1995. The Naval Home trust ing it quality control, we're able to set good statistics." ergometry is more scientific, certainly fund is worth $21 million, and the Soldiers' and up a testing program in a facility that Another study, with emphasis on safer, and more controllable," Fletcher Airmen's Home trust fund is $139 million. is not tied to a clinic or to physicians testing procedure standardization, is said, comparing the cycle test with the Veteran enlisted members, warrant officers and in any way," Myhre said. being conducted by the University of Air Force's previous 1-1/2 mile run limited duty officers are eligible to retire to either Lt. Col. (Dr.) Michael Parkinson, Florida College of Medicine. The and the similar tests of the Army, home. They must be unable to earn a living because chief of preventative medicine for the results are due before summer. Navy and Marines. of a service-connected disability or have served i a Air Force Surgeon General's Office, "Fitness testing is an important "I think it would be good to stanwar zone or suffer a nonservice-connected disabilBolling AFB, D.C., said the Air Force issue in the Department of Defense," dardize fitness testing among the ity. Former Coast Guard members must have served is conducting studies to refine testing Parkinson said. armed forces." in wartime combat zones with the Navy. Window still open for troops to double life insurance by SMSgt. Denton Lankford Lawrence of the Personal Programs completing forms SGLV-8285, request Air Force News Services Features Branch of the Air Force Militaiy Personfor insurance. Anyone having questions ----nel Center here. Lawrence explained that the form proRANDOLPH AFB, Texas -Imagine Unfortunately, he said, a young pilot vides a section the member must complete about how the law treats for a moment what would happen if you was recently killed in a crash. To add to to attest to insurability. Questions 11 beneficiaries, naming had a family and the unthinkable occurred the tragedy, his wife and children will not through 14 ask members about any past -you died while on active duty. Albenefit from the higher coverage because, or present health problems such as imminors or setting up trusts though tragic that you were no longer for whatever reason, the captain had not mune system disorders, heart conditions, for children, should consult around to provide for your family, even opted for the increased coverage. high blood pressure, diabetes, cancer or the base judge advocate's more tragic would be the thought that you Under the act, service members had nervous disorders. Although a member's had not made financial arrangements to until March 31, 1993, to sign up for the current state of health will be considered office. help your loved ones through a period of additional coverage by completing Form before the increased amount of insurance adjustment. SGLV-8286. is approved, a physical examination is not effort to sit down and think about what the Congress wanted to ensure military He said the SGLI monthly premium routinely required. family would need if dad or mom couldn't members had an opportunity to purchase levels for both active duty and Reservists "The process does take some thought be there anymore," Lawrence added. life insurance at group rates and passed are 80 cents per $10,000 coverage. in the areas of how much coverage and This is especially true since, on the avlegislation to make it available. "Coverage is available in $10,000 inwho will be named beneficiaries of the rage, 300 Air Force members die while "Although the Veterans Benefit Act of crements up to a maximum of $200,000," process," Lawrence said. on active duty each year. Whether or not 1992 allowed Air Force members to he explained. The maximum premium People having questions about how the to purchase SGLI in any amount is a perdouble their Servicemen's Group Life Inwould be $16 per month for the full law treats beneficiaries, naming minors or sonal decision. surance coverage from $100,000 to $200,000. setting up trusts for children, should conFor more information, call customer $200,000, we know there are those who Lawrence said that although the consult the base judge advocate's office. service at the military personnel flight, did not take advantage of the conversion version period has passed, servicemem"People are busy with their work and 284-3508, or your servicing personnel adby the deadline," said SSgt. Keith bers may still increase their coverage by family activities, and it takes a conscious ministration center.

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6 Tropic Times 6 Feb. 11, 1994 Voices Off-post resident has on-post housing concern Dear Mayors' Corner: chief of the housing division, I will invesI am writing to you for some answers Mayors Corner tigate this situation. It isn't likely what to questions I can't get from the housing you were told is accurate. Relocations are office. lived off post and who was moving to a when questions are asked, specific anvery rare and nobody relocates just to find Why is it many service and family new set of quarters for the third time. swers are given. a better housing unit. members are subjected to living off post I am only asking for answers, some sort By regulation, when a military memHousing is important to all military when some people on post are allowed to of explanation. Being a long-term family ber is promoted to the next higher grade members. Most of the time when you hear move from one unit to another, choosing member, I always believed everyone gets category, such as junior to senior enlisted, of a situation that is outlandish, it is norwhere they want to live on post? Why do a fair shake -why not with housing as they are entitled to put their name at the mally just that, outlandish and not true. some families get housing within a few well? It is obvious I can't sign my name, bottom of the waiting list and later reloOne of the best ways to have questions months while others must live on the but I'm sure other people would like to see cate at their expense. This is also true for answered is to see the chief of the housing economy for many months? Why does it this issue addressed somehow. those who have an increase in family division. seem that the people who complain the Moffed in Panama City members. But, at no time are people alI firmly believe it is my responsibility most get treated better and faster than the lowed to choose where they want to live. to ensure all military members are treated rest of us who are just here to do our jobs Dear MPC: Most waiting lists for housing are about equally and fairly. and deal with the situation at hand? I submitted your letter to the U.S. Army one year, depending on when they arrived -I would never have written to you had I Garrison commander and was given the to Panama. At times during the year, Editor'snote: Thiscolumnallowscomnot finally had my fill. We have been in following answer: some waiting lists move quicker than othmunity members to submit questions to Panama for six months and have lived off As your garrison commander, I am ers. theMayoralCongress. Lettersshould be post the entire time. We never comdeeply involved with the housing operaI can assure you that people who commaled to: Mayonrs' Corner, Phblicity plained, just worked at making the best of tions to ensure all military members get plain the most don't get better or faster Chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS). things. excellent customer service and equal opservice. All exceptions to policies are put Anonymitywillbe granteduponrequest. When I had stopped by the housing ofportunity for housing. I am surprised to in writing and reviewed individually. The Tropic Times reserves the right to fice to check our standing on the housing hear that you can't get answers from the About your statement of the woman edit letters and responses for brevity, list, there was a woman bragging about housing office. I have instructed the chief who was bragging -I would like to know clarity and propriety. being in country for a year, never having of the housing division to ensure that who she is. If you would call me or the 3 people charged with forgery, larceny of $8,000 Bicycles stolen A Fort Clayton soldier had two bicycles stolen from Provost Marshal's Corner his quarters last week. The bikes were secured to the bars on a window with a lock and cable. Everyone should secure bicycles inside their quarters or in a shed. This will lessen the chance of becoming a victim of crime. Report suspicious activity to the military police at 2874401 or 289-5133. $8,000 in forged checks Three people were charged with forgery and larceny of government property last week. They allegedly stole nine U.S. government treasury checks totaling more than $8,000, forged and cashed them. If a victim of crime, call 287-4401 or 289-5133. Wrongful transfer of merchandise A Fort Clayton soldier was apprehended last week for wrongful transfer of duty-free merchandise and wrongful transfer of a Department of Defense decal. The soldier sold his vehicle with the DoD decal to a non-privilege card holder. The non-privilege card holder was charged with wrongful possession of the merchandise and decal. For those planning to sell their vehicle while in Panama, the Exonerations Office, Military Customs, Pier 18, is responsible for the transfer of all vehicles sold to another military person or a Panamanian national. For more information, call 287-4545. Gotcha card update MPs report that Gotcha cards issued Jan. 15-28 were in the following areas: Fort Kobbe The following crimes occurred in on-post housing arFort Clayton 300 housing area -47 eas Jan. 28-Feb. 3. 300 housing area -one 400 housing area -59 Pacific 500 housing area -seven 800 troop area -14 Fort Clayton 400 housing area -one larceny of secured 600 housing area -eight Secure all property and leave no opportunity for a thief private property 700 housing area -five to strike. Report suspicious activity to the MPs at 287Fort Clayton 500 housing area -one larceny of secured 1000 housing area -one 4401 or 289-5133. private Corozal Fort Clayton 900 housing area -one larceny of unse200 housing area -six Anonymous drug hotline cured private property 600 housing area -six Anyone with information about drug smuggling Corozal housing area -one larceny of private property Curundu -2 should call the Panama Jack anonymous hotline at 285Atlantic Cocoli -26 4185. None to report This authorized unofficial command information pubDirector, Public Affairs.Col. James L. Fetig Command Information Officer.Beth Taylor lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Chief. .SMSgt. Steve Taylor Editor.SSgt. Jane Usero Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Editor.SSgt. Richard Puckett Journalists.Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski Information Program of the Department of Defense, unSports Editor.Sgt. E. J. Hersom Spec. Alexander C. White der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S. Staff Editors.Sgt. Lori Davis 24th Wing Public Affairs Office.284-5459 Southern Command. Spec. John Hall Public Affairs Officer.Capt. Warren L. Sypher Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the Rosemary Chong Public Affairs Superintendent.MSgt. Dale Mitcham official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Maureen Sampson Journalists.SSgt. Rian Clawson Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. Volunteer Assistant .Josephine Beane Sgt. James A. Rush The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Student Intern.Juan Carlos Palacio U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 Telephone 285-6612. Southern Command Public Affairs Office.282-4278 Public Affairs Officer.Diane Gonzalez Acting Commander in Chief. Command Information Officer.Patrick Milton Photographers.PH2 Roberto R. Taylor Maj. Gen. Walter T. Worthington U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.287-3007 PH2 Delano J. Mays Public Affairs Officer.Maj. Melanie Reeder U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.289-4312 NCOIC.Sgt. Richard Emert _r_ C p Times

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Tropic Times P7 Comment v Feb. 11, 1994., Turn signal blues Most drivers fall Into 4 user/non user groups by Spec. John Hall course toward, away from, or in a This person actually tries to rationalize turn signals incorrectly? After a call to Tropic Times staff particular direction. The word "signal" his case. His excuses are: "Well, there the Provost Marshal's traffic section, pales in comparison to "turn," netting a was no one behind me," or "they know here's what I found out. As per Army on't you hate it when you're mere I I entries. Entry number one where I'm going." This driver also uses Regulation and U.S. Southern Comwaiting at a stop sign and trafreads: anything that serves to warn, the "sneak attack approach," by putting mand Regulation 190-2, three points fic coming at you can either go direct, command, or the like, as a light, the blinker on just before or while are assessed for improper use of turn straight or turn, yet no one uses a turn a gesture, an act. turning, signals. When a driver has accumusignal? It's like a guessing game. You Two of those words really stand out Type C -The one timer. This lated 12 points for moving violations or can either take a chance and floor it, warn and gesture. Because so many driver flips on his signal when he pulls 12 points for parking violations, he can hoping the cars turn. Or you can wait people drive with reckless abandon, the out of the driveway and never turns it have his driving privileges suspended until traffic clears while people behind courtesy of a warning light wouldn't off. This makes it confusing because he for up to a year, officials said. They you blast their horns like nobody's seem to be too much to ask for. It's sort isn't telling you where he's going, but also added that military policemen business. Or yot can wait for the of like a "gesture." rather where he's been. hand out approximately 15-20 tickets unthinkable -for someone to use their Drivers basically fall into four "turn Type D -Overkill. This driver uses weekly for improper use of turn turn signal with enough warning to signal" categories. turn signals like they were tax writesignals. serve its purpose. Type A -The old timer. This driver offs. You know the guy. He uses them On average, that would come out to Because some people don't seem to simply isn't aware of turn signals. in empty parking lots or when there's 70 tickets a month or more than 800 know what a turn signal is, I thought These drivers are kind of like my a bend in the road. He also uses them per year. Now that's a lot of tickets. I'd turn to Webster for advice. Alfather, who is not aware of the righttoo far in advance. Sometimes he'll And that's just on Fort Clayton. though turn signal doesn't have its own turn-on-red rule. He just looks in his turn on his blinker and pass up two or Maybe the military police and entry in the dictionary, the word "turn" rearview mirror and says, "Why are three "potential" turns. Because of type security police could combine efforts to has nearly 100. The best one for they beeping at me'? Do I have a flat or D drivers you can't trust type C drivers sponsor a "Don't Forget Your Turn driving would probably be number 36 something?" they could be faking it. Signal Month." which states: to direct or set one's Type B -The occasional abuser. So what's the punishment for using My dad wouldn't believe it. Ju.st hoW randorn is urinalysi's testing? by MSgt. Karen A. Webb sis testing program, an Air Force approved program to Furthermore, while all personnel will be notified-the Superintendent, social actions select personnel for testing. This program uses no set same morning of testing, social actions will stagger its pattern for selection, such as social security number, rank reporting times to the testing site to prevent problems of HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) -Urinalysis testing or unit. It randomly selects people by name, out of the backlog. This should reduce the amount of time spent plays a vital role in the Air Force's readiness capabilities bases' personnel data files, to test. away from the duty section. People not able to provide a because drug abuse is not compatible with Air Force stanRemember, the drug testing program is designed to specimen at their unit's scheduled time will be required dards and will not be tolerated. Moreover, there is the act as a deterrent. You can be randomly selected to proto wait at the testing site until they do. expectation for total support of the drug testing from evvide a sample at any time, several times a year, and posFinally, -the most important part of the program -is the ery Air Force member. Therefore, a drug free work envisibly two or three times in monthly succession. Hopeactual specimen collection. All urine samples must be ronment is everyone's responsibility. fully this will deter some members from using illegal subcollected under direct observation. Collection procedures There seems to be questions lately about the urinalysis stances in the first place. Nonetheless, the random selecmust withstand legal scrutiny and be able to verify that program. How random is it? Why do we get notified at tion is based on probability and a statistical phenomenon the specimen remains identifiable from the collection the last minute? Why do I have to wait so long to test? exists if a person has exceeded their perceived fair share point to the testing laboratory at Brooks AFB, Texas. Why am I testing for the fourth time in the last 12 of sampling. Units will provide observers when tasked. Observers months? All fair and reasonable questions -here are Secondly, in keeping with the deterrent philosophy, will ensure that specimens are collected uncontaminated. some answers. we are currently giving people two hours of testing notiThe social actions office can answer any additional First, be assured that your selection to provide a urine fication. This is to eliminate problems of test date and questions or concerns about the urinalysis program. We sample is totally random. Here at Howard AFB and Altime compromise. The element of surprise once again are located on the second floor of Building 710 on brook AFS, social actions uses the base random urinalymakes the urinalysis program an effective deterrent. Howard. Call 284-5507/5309 for more information. -i re Uotes How much does drug testing deter use? "Quite a bit. It sure "I think a little, but not "I think people who use "Pretty much down to "I believe it definitely deters me." much because of randrugs know how to get zero percent." cuts down, but not to a dom testing. They away with it if they use total halt." should test for stethem a lot. On the roids." whole, it probably deters first-timers." SSgt. Scott Pierson Spec. Erik Fulfer Sheerin Duque Tammy Hughes Spec. Douglas Black 24th Operational Group Company A, 1-508th Infantry Army family member Army family member 617th Special Operations Radar Aviation Detachment The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries -or responses to commentaries -to the Tropic Tioies. The siaff reserves the right to edit for brevity, Clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

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8Tropic Times atures Feb.11, 1994 F eat SOUTHCM sergeant major ends career by SSgt. Richard Puckett NCO Corps around. Editor, Tropic Times "ANCOC (Advanced Noncommissioned Officers Editor, Ti T s -Course) began in the early 70s," he said. "I think someQUARRY HEIGHTS -A photograph of a gear-laden one there saw the light and NCOs started getting eduRanger hangs on the wall in his office. The caption reads cated again, got their feet back on the ground and took "What have you done for him today?" This is the quescare of soldiers again." tion U.S. Southern Command CSM James Williams has Today's military education system is continuing that asked himself every night before going home. role, Williams said. Williams, who retires Wednesday, has already cleaned "We have soldiers today who want to be soldiers," he out most of his office. His desk nameplate, plaques and said. "That makes a difference. Standards are higher and other memorabilia acquired along the journey are gone you have to keep up." now, but that photograph still remains there for now. The With the drawdown and more cutbacks on the horisoldier serves as constant reminder of what the noncomzon, he is conceded that history could repeat itself. missioned officer's role is all about -taking care of sol"Everyone is concerned about what the future holds," diers, sailors, Marines and airmen. .he said. "People are getting too focused on getting good "Soldiers are our business," Williams said. "As a evaluations. NCOs can't be afraid to stand up for what's leader, NCOs have to put their troops first. The old sayright. It's up to the senior NCOs to set that example. The ing 'You take care of them and they'll take of you' is younger soldiers are looking up to that battalion sergeant true. You can't accomplish your mission without their major and he buckles under everyone will." support, so you have to support them." NCOs also have a responsibility to make sure their As the senior NCO in USSOUTHCOM, Williams has own families are taken care of. tried to pass that on to junior leaders here. "It's easy to get so wrapped up in your work and take During his two-year-tour Williams has implemented your family for granted, I know," he said. "You have to several programs that have brought recognition and input that same dedication into your family, too. They procreased knowledge to leaders and servicemembers here. CSM James Williams vide that support you need to be successful. Everything NCO Call, the Commander in Chiefs Recognition off on some God-forsaken hill with nothing but bamboo good that has happened to me is because of Margaret, Ball, and the Soldier/NCO of the Quarter/Year are now vipers. I knew it was going to be a long haul." everything bad is because of me." solidly in place because of Williams. After coming back to the states, he became a drill inMissing out on his children's youth is the one thing "You have to pat people on the back for a job well structor at Fort Campbell, Ken. While there he helped Williams regrets. done," he said. "The Recognition Ball and the boards do trained "McNamara's 100,000." Then-Secretary of De"Time flies by so fast," he said. "One day they are bathat. The NCO Call is so important to us in a joint corfense John McNamara lowered entrance standards and bies and the next they're grown and moved out. Now I'm inand. It allows us to help show the NCOs the imporallowed 100,000 people in the Army via the draft. going to try and make up for some lost time." tance of each service's programs that affect their workAfter completing that tour, he got out and went home The Williams will be heading to Crestview, Fla., ers. It helps educate us all to work better in a purple envito Iowa with his wife, Margaret. He sold insurance, where he jokingly said he plans on reliving his lost 1960s. ronment." worked at a factory and tried other jobs, but he knew the "I kid my wife that I'm going to let my hair grow long, Williams has been pleased with the success of the proArmy was his true calling. He reentered in August, 1968. get a pony tail and wear a Harley T-shirt," he said, smilgram and credits the NCOs with making it happen. The It was then he saw the NCO Corps falling apart. ing. dedication of today's soldiers is a far cry from the mili"We were short of people so we were taking anyone He won't miss the ruck sacks, tents, and field time, tary of the 60s and 70s, he said. who could walk, talk and carry a rifle," he said. "The but he is sad that the days of stopping and chatting with Williams remembers his first tour in 1964 well. It was 'instant NCO' program didn't give us the experienced soldiers, gate guards and other NCOs are almost over. a four-year hitch that started in his hometown of leaders we needed and the NCOs starting losing their "I'll miss the .camaraderie," he said. "I'll miss stopHawarden, Iowa, and took him to the jungles of Vietnam. dedication. ping and talking with the SPs at Howard and the MPs at "We were all scared," he said. "I had never shot at "We as NCOs let the officers, who were just as inexClayton, the soldiers down range and all the sergeants anything other than a rabbit." perienced, take away a whole bunch of jobs from us bemajor I've become friends with." His first tour was as a door gunner in Bien-Hoa, Vietcause it was easier for us. We became non-aggressive, After 30 years, he is still overwhelmed with becoming nAm, where he lived in a barracks, slept in a bed and and there was low morale. With rotations coming and a sergeant major and being in a position to leave a legacy. could go to clubs. It was remarkably calm compared to going to Vietnam, we had NCOs passing through who "The Army has come a long way in the past 30 years," his second tour in 1966. had just been watching people get put in plastic bags. he said. "In 30 years it will be even better." "I went back to Vietnam with the 25th (Infantry DiviThey were more concerned for their own welfare than After more than 30 years of service, Williams will take SI sion, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii)," he said. "I expected that of their soldiers." down the picture Wednesday, leave his office for the last things to be the same -they weren't. They dropped us Williams credits education as the key to turning the time and know that he did all that he could. 'Minutemen' security force trains for emergencies by Diane Gonzalez USNAVSTAPANCANAL PAO RODMAN NSMarine Sgt. Paul Suprenant is the instructor of an elite group of 20-30 men called the Auxiliary Security Force. They are picked from the Naval Command and its tenant commands to form an organized branch of the operations division of the security department. They are used for emergency situations from natural disasters to basic law enforcement. Suprenant is responsible for ensuring this force is trained and ready to respond immediately, helping the team to earn its nickname "The Minutemen." Because the Navy complement at Rodman is small and doesn't have the police force other military installations have, a 1984 decision gave birth to the ASG, Suprenant said, Navy hiearchy reasoned all Naval bases should have permanent security forces during increased threat conditions, or when directed 1y the host command. The cadres, trainers of installation security forces and the ASF, put together a team of men representing many different military specialties. The instructors teach team members anti-terrorist techniques, weaponry, hand-tohand combat, search and seizure, and other security skills. The members are trained to handle any situation, including domestic problems, he said. "Importance of security on our bases is our prime concern," Suprenant said. "'This group works as an integral part of our community.' "Our staff has two weeks of intense training, and I do mean intense training," he said. "Some have never Marine Sgt. Paul Suprenant has his crew working on procedures for riot gear and control. handled a weapon in their entire career, so it's important for them to become familiar with their weapon and be"We share each others joys and sorrows. It brings us cut out for the training and not everyone makes the cut. come confident." closer together." Dedication is part of what makes this program a success. The teamwork is what Suprenant likes best. Although the team augments security forces at the sta"This command does everything right," he said. "Because each man is from a different tenant or comtion, they are also part of the team. Each serves 18 "It provides lists of names and volunteers and it knows mand position, we each learn a little about each others months plus regular every day duty. that ASF is a priority for Naval Station Security. Withjob and can appreciate the others responsibility," he said. "That's dedication," Suprenant said. "Not everyone is out that kind of support we wouldn't exist."

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tures Tropic Times Army family member Natasha Perez makes bubbles during the Child Development Services Part Day Program circus. Children 's Circus More than 200 youths enjoy 2 days of 'just plain fun' FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAD) -Soap bubbles fill the air and popcorn litters the ground as tiny clowns and ballerinas with gape-juice grins run here and there giggling with the delight only a circus could bring. More than 200 children took part in the annual twoU.S. Army photos iy SSgt. Jane users day circus held by the Child Development Services Pa ayEdAmyfmlrtbr-tksabekfrmbigacon yetn ocona h hl day Programlast week at the CDS Center. Gry Ey "The circus is designed to be developmentally approDevelopment Services Part Day Program circus private where the children use their imagination, creativity and can see and do the activities by themselves," said Becky Fentress, director for the CDS Part-Day Program. "We planned it to give the children the opportunity to use their social, gross motor and language skills as well as their imagination," she said. "'The activities touched on early childhood development. "Plus, it was just plain fun," Fentress said. The parents and teachers at the center get together each year to come up with ideas for the circus and the teachers are each responsible for coming up with and setting up one activity area, she said. Although the actual circus only lasted two days, the entire week's activities in the center were geared toward the circus, Fentress said. "The entire week was built around the circus," she said. "We spent time talking about such things as the colors of the circus and counting various circusanimals." Although the bulk of the work for the circus done by the center's teachers, the event would not have ben possible without the help of the parent group which is the center's version of a parent-teachers organization, Fentress said. "We have a very active parent group here and they helped with everything from decorations to supervising, she said. Once the decorations, booths and activities were set up, the popcorn and peanuts set out and the sno-cone machine cranked up, the children literally bounced out of the center with excitement, Fentress said. "What's better than going t the circus, let alone e RachelAngel,CDS Part Day Programteacher showschildrenhowit's ing a part of it," she said. done with the hula-hoop

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Tropic Times A Feb. 11, 1994 To First Lieutenant -Jeffrey Wood of Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. To Sergeant First Class -Robert Parlier of Company C, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. To Air Force Master Sergeant (Stripes To Exceptional Performers) -Jose A. Ciceraro, U.S. Southern Command, Command Surgeon Office. To Staff Sergeant -Carlos Riveralopez of Company A, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Hughley Gratic of Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. To Sergeant -Hector Aguayo of Company A, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Ryan Epley and Anthony Glover, both of Company C, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Mark Minter of Jungle Operations Training Battalion. To Specialist -Scott Art of Company A, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Melvin Harms of Company B, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Andrew Hampton of Company C, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry, Melony Baker and Sheri Wallace, both of 92nd Personnel Service Company. Manuel Hernandez, Natasha Joseph and Edmond Tallon, all of Headquarters Company, 142nd Medical Battalion. To Private First Class -Christopher Berry of Company A, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Zaldy Macam and Stephen Domstadter, both of Company C, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Anthony Kelly, Aaron Jacobs, Derrick Carithers and Joseph Jenkins, all of Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry, Elizabeth JohnBaptiste of 92nd Personnel Service Company. Brandi Franklin of Headquarters Company, 142nd Medical Battalion. To Private Two -John Kerwood and Miles Perez, both of Company A, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Army Commendation Medal -Sgt. Lydia Ballantine of Jungle Operations Training Battalion. Sgt. Corey Helton of Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry, Cpl. Justin Christman of Company B, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Army Achievement Medal -Spec. Edon Burwell, Spec. Jason Carroll, Spec. Edward Colon Jr., Sgt. Erron Francis, SSgt. Allen Francisco, PFC Mark Fravert, Sgt. Phillip Moon, SFC Godfry Miller, Spec. Roger Schlough, Spec. Scotty Scott and Pvt.2 Kevin Simmons, all of Headquarters Company, Jungle Operations Training Battalion. Spec. Simon Yracheta, PFC William Howell, PFC Robert Richardson and PFC Robert James, all of Company B, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Spec. Ben Conley, Sgt. Scott Annese, 1st Lt. Jeffery Wood, PFC Edwin Rodriguez, Spec. Donnie Drissak, PFC John Barkley and .outesy ph5t. Sgt. Kennedy Blair, all of Company C, 5th Battalion, 87th Maria Northington graduated Jan. 22 as Nova University's salutatorian. infantry, Spec. John Ballesteros, PFC Stuart Erving and PFC Derek Asdot, all of Company A, 5th E 87td Mother of 4 nets degree after 15-year break Infantry. SSgt. Donald Lechel and Spec. Charles Clark, both of Company B, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. PFC HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) Upon arrival in June 1991, lege Club. Dan Fockner of Company C, 5th Battalion, 87th Infan-Who said it couldn't be done? Not Northington made a decision not to She took full-time course loads try. PFC Christopher Sanders, Spec. Ryan Isaac and Maria Northington. search for a job in the local employthroughout her program earning a 3.8 Spec. Gabriel Barkdull, all of Headquarters Company, This wife of an Air Force master ment market. She opted for a longgrade point average and membership 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry, Spec. Roderic Robinson of sergeant and mother of four re-enpostponed college career. in the Alpha Chi Honor Society on her U.S. Army Dental Activity -Panama. tered the world of education after a She selected Nova for its paraleway to being named this year's saluGood Conduct Medal -Spec. Richard Earhart of Head15-year gap and completed a bachgal business degree and started to tatorian. quarters Company, Jungle Operations Training Battalelor degree during her husband's school immediately using savings to "It was time to start school when ion. Sgt. Robert Massingill of.Company A, Jungle Opthree-year tour with the 24th cover initial expenses. She made the youngest of my children, now 13, erations Training Battalion. Weather Squadron here. outstanding grades in her first few 11, 8 and 6, entered preschool," CertificatesofAchievement-PFCThomas Barrett, PFC Northington graduated as Nova semesters and applied for local Northington said. "It's been a great Bradley Vanzant, PFC Melvin Thompson, Spec. Scott University's salutatorian in a cerscholarships in an effort to finance experience.it can be done. Don't be Davis, Spec. Christopher Smith and Pvt. Brian Wilson, emony Jan. 22 at Panama City's the rest of her degree. afraid to try." all of Company C, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Sgt. RobAtlapa Center. In Nova's branch sysIn 1992, she won $500 scholarShe credits her family for giving ert Hollman of Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion, tem, the salutatorian is the top unships from both the officer and enthe support and tolerance that enabled 87th Infantry, PFC Jonathon Hay, PFC Austin Norris, dergraduate student, while the valelisted spouses clubs here. In 1992, her to reach her goal. PFC Scott Arp, PFC Bradley Lawson, PFC Joshua Tilley, dictorian is the leading graduate sttiand again in 1993, she won $1,000 What's next? Cpl. David Miller, Pvt. 2 Carlos Barahona and Spec. John dent at the commencement. scholarships from the Isthinian Col"Law school!" she answered. Tharpe, all of Company A, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Sgt. Corby Coover of Company B, 5th Battalion, 87th ITh it Infantry, Spec. Dawn Hilton-Byrd of U.S. Army Dental S t* co m an of u Activity -Panama. by Spec. Angie Morse Michael J. Vanairsdale, 128th Aviation Brigade com4th Battalion 228th Aviation Regiment mander. "They not only met all the challenges of this Graduations/achievements demanding assignment, but they did it safely and with an HONDURAS -During a change of command ceroperational readiness rate 5 to 10 percent above the DeNuclear, Biological and Chemical School -Sgt. Greemony Lt. Col. William M. Jacobs relinquished command partment of the Army goal which was due primarily to gory McPhee of U.S. Army Dental Activity -Panama. of the 4th Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment to Lt. Col. the good leadership in the battalion." Preventive Dentistry Course -Spec. Ronald Weimer Jr. Joseph A. Smith. "The battalion has a tradition of improving each year, of U.S. Army Dental Activity -Panama. The battalion is an assault helicopter battalion with and I want to continue in that tradition," Smith said. "I Cub Scouts from Pack 29, Albrook AFS, have oboperations spanning Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala want to make this assignment challenging and exciting, tained the following rank. Bear -Chris Thiele, David aid Belize. The unit not only provides air support for as well as fun for the soldiers." Audet, Bryant Hankins,. Richard Leiva, Andrew Joint Task Force Bravo, but also assists in the Honduran Before taking command of the 4-228th, Smith was asMacPhail, Christopher Rodie, Steven Lawlor, Mark counter-diug effort, host-nation air assault support. nasigned to the 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg. N.C.; O'Masta and Ian Hoeffier. Webelos -Paul Barber. Artion building and humanitarian and disaster relief. the 101st Airborne Division, and Task Force 160, Fort row of Light -Matthew Carey. Billy Groom. Jake Jacobs, "The 4th Battalion has trained in this unforgiving land Campbell, Ky. His last as'ignmreint was as the 160th SpeBrenden Mendez, Michael Shahan and Jacob Zachariah. and in unpredictable weather and hazards," said Col. cial Operation Aviation Regiment operations officer.

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Sports Feb. 11, 1994 Quarry Heights, Repubhc of Panama Page 11 Warriors tear Supply spirit by Sgt. James A. Rush the Warriors took an 11-8 lead in the home 24th Wing Public Affairs run derby. Henson gave the Rebels one last shot of HOWARD AFB -Wilkies Warriors adrenaline with a two-run blast in the top of struggled in the face of adversity throughthe seventh inning, but Wilkies answered out the 24th Supply Squadron Top 4 Softwith three more in the bottom to win 23-22. ball Tournament this past weekend and The loss left most of the Rebels stunned. came away winners. Coach Bernard Grimsley wasn't surprised Its opponents in the finals, the Rebels, however. played only three games to earn a champiGrimsley had warned his players that a onship berth. Wilkies Warriors, after los16-run lead wouldn't be enough against ing in the first round, faced five more Wilkies. opponents before reaching the same spot. "Against any other team, I'd say no, but The well-rested Rebels lost no time in against Wilkies, you've got to keep fighttesting the Wilkies' resolve. It sent 19 ing," Grimsley said. batters to the plate in the top of the first "I knew 16 runs wasn't enough, and I inning. think they believe me now." Despite three pitching changes by The following game paled in compariWilkies, the Rebels rounded up 16 runs on son. Wilkies won it, 10-6. 16 hits with eight homers. The champs jumped out 3-0 in the first Lead-offhitterScott"Stretch"Carrhad inning and built a 10-2 advantage by the a single and triple in two at bats for the end the sixth. inning. Shortstop Jason "Bo-Flex" Rodriguez This feat was overshadowed by twin tried to rally the Rebels in the top of the blasts from right-center fielder Bobby seventh.Hisleadoffsoloshotsparkedafire Henson and left-center fielder Joe "Main their bats, but the Warriors extinguished chismo" Price. it after allowing only four runs. Manager Herman Wilkinson coached "Losing took the heart out of us," his players through the losers' bracket, Grimsley said. including games at 10 and I 1 a.m. Sunday "After that, there was no fight left in us and he wasn't about to let a 16-run hole until the last inning; and by then, it was too U.a. Air horce photos by Sgt. James A. Rush become his team's grave. late." Wilkies Warriors pitcher Daryl "Dawg" Kimble serves up a gopher ball. "That's OK! We can hit the ball too," he shouted from the dugout. Wilkinson's words were half encouragement for his players and half threat for their opponents. "I don't get concerned. No lead is safe in slow-pitch," Wilkinson said. "I know eventually we'll come back." "The team we beat was a very good team, but I never give up on my team. That's the key, and they've never let me down." A 16-run hole wasn't deep enough to bury Wilkies. In the bottom half of the first inning, it answered with seven fence-clearing shots. Each team scored three times in the second inning, Wilkies was shut out in the third and added one more in the fourth bringing the score to 20-12. The rest of the game went Wilkies Warriors way. With the balls pounded into mush, the Rebels suffered a dramatic power outage. Six of its next eight batters flied out and Wilkies held them scoreless in the fifth and sixth innings. Meanwile Wilkies, continued to flex its muscles and erased the scoring deficit. The end of the sixth saw a 20-20 tie. ExtrahitterMarkWhamplerandcatcher Tojo Cockfield led the way for Wilkies. Each pickedup their secondroundtrip and Rebels shortstop Jason "Bo Flex" Rodriguez plucks a line drive. Olympian pa 1and More page 15 Department of Defense rests hope Howard Sports and Fitness Center *Softball tourneys on five National Guardsmen to win offers exercisers an aerobic altema*Sweetheart bowling at the Winter Olympics. tive -step aerobics. *SCN radio sports

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1 Tropic Times Feb. I1, 1993 Bicyclists pedal ocean to ocean FORT DAVIS (USARSOPAO-Atlantic) -Bikeenthusiasts came from as far as Panama City to take part in Sunday's Team Panama-a 50-mile bicycle trek down the Transisthmian Highway. Sixty-one participants pedaled from Cristobal High School to the Club Amador, said Wallace Teal, assistant fire chief of the Atlantic Panama Canal Commission Fire Department. Team Panama's first ride took place seven years ago and only nine cyclists showed up, said Teal, who organizes the event each year. The event takes place the first Sunday of February. "Originally, I had just asked some friends if they were interested in riding on the Transisthmian with me," he said. "I had nine people riding that time and it's grown to the 61 we had this year." The riders represented the Pacific PCC and military communities, Colon, Galeta, the Atlantic military community and students and staff from Department of Defense Dependents Schools. They ranged in age from 12-68, Teal said. All but four of the cyclists finished the trek, with the quickest pedaler clocking in at two hours, 19 minutes, and the last participant coming in just under five hours. Hustlers take bite out of Caimanes, 10-4 FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO-Atlantic) -The Hustlers trampled the Caimanes, 10-4, in a recent Women's Softball League game here. The Caimanes knew the wrath of the Hustlers, losing in the teams' first meeting, 5-0. With its pitcher Gail Bumett sick and sidelined, the Caimanes were no more optimistic in this match-up, said Linda Bowman, shortstop. The Caimanes started the game strong with a stand-up double, but that runner was stranded at third when the top ofthe first inning ended. The bottom ofthe inning was short and quick for the Hustlers. Consecutive walks and errors by the Caimanes gave the Hustlers a big lead in the second inning that it would carry through the end of the game. The Caimanes scored three runs in the fifth inning. The fifth became the final inning as the one-hour time limit ran out with a final score of 104. Although they have yet to lose, Caimanes' coach Al Bowman said the Hustlers aren't perfect. "They can be beaten," he said. "When you play a team like that, you can't have any Strike three errors. You have to play your best." St And errors proved to be the Caimanes downfall. Eddie Krynicki of the Albrook Pirates throws a pitch in the final inning against the Fort Clayton "Both times we held them off for a while, but then the Caymans Feb. 4 with the tying run on second base. Krynicki held the Clayton team as the Pirates went errors would start," he said. "We beat ourselves by making those errors." on to win 8-7. Women's Softball League Red League 24th SVS 2 4 5 24th CS "B" 12 Team W L GB Team W L GB HHC 1-228th 1 5 5 24th MEDS 9 Menascehe Sports 5 1 -56th Signal Bat. 6 2 -24th TRANS 3 6 5 1/2 617 ALSS "C" 7 Chryler 5 1 -Co. E 1-228th 6 2 -24th WS 2 8 7 24th CES "F.D." 3.5 Nujak Swang 5 1 -MEDDAC 6 2 -24th CES #2 0 7 7 1/2 536th Eng. 3 Comedy Crew 3 3 2 HHC LEA 6 3 1/2 American League American League Lady Torpedoes 2 4 3 Co. A 154th Sig. 4 2 1 Southern Division Team Points Kamikazes 1 5 4 534th MP Co. 4 3 1 1/2 Team W L GB 24th MS 7.5 All Guts No Glory 1 5 4 HHD 56th Sig. 4 5 2 1/2 24th SUPS 7 0 -Navy 7 as of Monday HHC 1-228th 3 4 2 1/2 536th ENG 8 1 -24th CES "A" 7 92nd PSC 3 4 2 1/2 24th CES #1 5 2 2 24th AINS/OSS 6.5 Unit Level Softball League 3rd SOSC 3 5 3 24 AIRPS 3 6 5 24th CS "A" 5.5 White League 555th MP Co. 2 5 3 1/2 310 ALS 2 5 5 24th SVS 5 Team W L GB Co. B 154th Sig 1 5 4 C Co. 1-228 1 6 6 Co. A 1-228th 5 310th MI 7 1 -HHCUSAG/IG 2 8 5 Northern Division 617th ALSS "B" 4.5 HHCUSAG 6 1 1/2 Howard Softball League 24th MS 5 4 -24th WS 0 142nd Med 6 2 1 National League 617th ALSS #1 4 3 1 as of Tuesday SOUTHCOM 6 2 1 Eastern Division Co. A 1-508 2 3 2 Over 30 Basketball League HHD 470th MI 5 2 1 1/2 Team W L GB B Co. l-228 3 1 21/2 Team W L GB Co. C 1-508th 4 3 2 1/2 24th AIS/OSS 7 1 -24th SPS #2 4 4 2 1/2 The Friends 9 0 Co. B 1-508th 4 3 2 1/2 617th SOAD 7 2 1/2 24th COMM #2 0 9 5 Knights 8 1 1 41st ASG 4 4 3 24th MEDS 6 2 1 as of Wednesday The Posse 8 3 2 56th Ord. Det. 4 5 3 1/2 HHC 1-508th 3 2 2 1/2 Howard Golf League Jazz 7 3 2 1/2 Co. B 193rd Supt. 4 5 3 1/2 24th COMM #1 4 4 3 National League Barcardi 5 4 4 59th Eng. Det 2 4 4 24th SVS 2 4 4 Team Points for Los Medios 3 5 5 1/2 DCSRM 1 7 6 617th ALSS #2 1 6 5 1/2 24th TRANS 17.5 Co. E 308th MI 3 5 5 1/2 HHC 193rd Inf. 1 7 6 Western Division 617th ALSS "A" 15.5 MEDDAC 1 6 7 Co. A 193rd Supt. 1 7 6 24th SPS#1 8 0 -24th SPS 14.5 SOUTHCOM #2 2 8 7 1/2 as of Monday 24th MSSQ 7 2 1 33rd IS 12 SOUTHCOM 0 8 8 1/2

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Tropic Times Sports Feb. 11, 1994 Department of Defense photo by Sg. E.J. Harsom You're out! First baseman Nancy Messinger of the Kamikazes tags the bag and makes the forced out against the Lady Torpedoes. The Kamikazes won its first game of the season Tuesday beating the Lady Torpedoes 11-10. Kamikazes coach Chuck Cogburn said, "It's about time." National Guard biathletes go for the gold by SFC Sleve Barnett Armed Forces Information Service WASHINGTON -The Department of Defense's hope at the XVII Olympic Winter Games in Lillehammer, Norway, rests with five Army National Guardsmen, all competing in biathlon. Curtis Schreiner. winner of U.S. Olympic biathlon trials in Anchorage, Ala., heads a 10-member team that hopes to improve its 13th-place performance in the 1992 games in Albertville, France. The number of team members are based on 1993 Biathlon Word Cup competition. The women, by benefit of an eighth place finish last season, get six slots at the Olympics. The men finished 18th in World Cup competition and are limited to four positions. Biathlon combines the strength and endurance of cross country skiing with marksmanship. Competitors ski in sprint, distance and relay events with a .22 caliber rifle, stopping at ranges along the course and firing at targets. Penalty minutes for missed targets are combined with the skiers' time, and the skiers with the lowest totals win medals. For Schreiner, 26, the selection marks the third time he has made the U.S. Olympic biathlon team. He and 1992 teammates Jon Engen and Duncan Douglas comprised three quarters of the U.S. biathlon relay team thatcompeted in Albertville. Schreiner also competed at the 1988 Calgary Olympic in Canada. A resident of Day, N.Y., Schreiner is assigned to the New York National Guard. Completing the four-member men's team is 26-yearold David Jareckie. Although selected to the 1992 team, Jareckie, assigned to the Vermont National Guard, served as an alternate and didn't compete. AP L-Photo This year, he will vie in the 30-kilometer relay and These are gold, silver and bronze medals awarded during thel 992 Winter Olympic Games in Albertville, hopes to ski in both individual events. He finished third in Franch. Curtis Schreiner of the New York National Guard will make his third medal attempt in biathlon Anchorage and feels he can challenge Schreiner in Norduring the upcoming Winter Olympics in Lillehammer, Norway. way. "I'm really psyched about this year because I have a lot Olympics." by 1992 Olympic teammates Mary Ostergren and Beth to prove," said Jareckie from the U.S. biathlon training site As for the men's chances in Lillehammer, Jareckie was Coats, a 27-year-old member of the Colorado National at Lake Placid, N.Y. optimistic and realistic. Guard. Last winter, I picked up what seemed like an asthma "Most of the people who won in France will be there this Besides Coats, two qther Army skiers made the team. attack at (the) World Cup race (in Italy) and it affected my year," he said. "There isn't going to be the turnover that Completing her second year on the U.S. national team whole season." usually happens every four years." is Ntala Skinner, the 1990 U.S. junior biathlon champion The illness ended Jareckie's season, but it also gave him He said Germany, which claimed seven Olympic medat 7.5 kilometers. Skinner earned her way on the U.S. team an incentive to return. alsinAlbertville,andRussiashoulddominatecompetition with two victories at the 1993 team trials in Montana. "After training and competing all year, you have a again this year. Skinner recently enlisted in the Idaho National Guard. tendency to bun out," Jareckic said. "By coming home Joan Smith, who won the women's trials in Anchorage Laura Tavares, 28, will cap off her initial year on the early, the illness actually helped me because I got enough and is one of three biathletes returning to Olympic compenational team with an Olympic bid. Tavares, who lives in of a break between seasons to relax and refocus for the tition, heads the six-member women's team. Shc'sjoined Lake Placid, is assigned to the Vermont National Guard.

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14 Tropic Times Feb. 11, 1994 o s tp t art~ fight sequnce ste beyond ao aerob cs g tep up, step left, step up, side kick, step back. eaStep up, step right, step up, side kick, step back. Now the other side, step p, stepacross, step back,. No, this not the cadence call of a honor guard drill team's routine n e er choreography for a martial art fight sequence. It's step aerobics instructor Therese Fox guiding approximately 30 morning aerobics clsss members through an innovative exercise routine designed to enhance participant's cardiovascular and muscular fitness. Fox teaches the classes Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 8:45 a.m. and 4:45 p.m. at the Howard Sports and Fitness Center. "Step aerobics can be very challenging," the certified instructor said. "It's literally a step beyond traditional aerobics. You can't 'fake it' in here the way you could in the old aerobics class." In traditional aerobics classes, participants who got tired (or confused about which foot went nhere) could always go back to marching or jogging in place, Fox explained. "In this class, you need to concentrate a little more on what you're doing and where you're putting your feet," Fox said."You'll probably feel a little awkward at first; You're just learning the steps and you can't expect J to blend in with everyone else who already knows them." "Then again, you get a great feeling when you really know the steps well." The newest member and the only man on the sports and fitness center's aerobic instructor team, Kevin Fannin said people can get that same good feeling 9 doing any regular exercise program. Fannin is a captain with the 24th Air Intelligence Squadron, who got interested in aerobics while stationed in Korea and even earned his Aerobics and Fitness Association of America certification while there. "The steps let us increase the intensity of the aerobic workout," Fannin said. "When people get bored or no longer feel challenged J-e by -gt RGlawby traditional aerobics classes, they can find an effective anine Peppen and other aerobic students work out during the morning step aerobics class at the Howard alternative in step aerobics," he said. Sports and Fitness Center. Howard's head aerobics instructor, Jill Powell "Safety is our most important consideration," Fannin "That's why people should try many different agreed. She is also certified, but through the American said. activities until you find the ones that are right for you," College of Sports Medicine. Although she praised the virtues Powell said. "In the step class, you can get of step aerobics, Powell said it was "In fact, national fitness experts are now moving the same cardiovascular and fat"You can't 'fake it' in here not necessarily the "best" form of away from the party line that says 'aerobics is the most burning benefits you get from the way you could in the old aerobic exercise. important thing,' and moving toward one that says "you regular aerobics," she explained. aerobics class." The best aerobic exercise, she must do strength training." "But step aerobics allows far explained, is any one that gets All three instructors recommended cross training for more muscle contraction and at Therese Fox your heart rate in its "aerobic overall physical fitness. the same time causes less impact step aerobics instructor training zone" and keeps it there. Cross training calls for combining aerobic workouts on your joints." ----Powell gave a simple formula to with strength training on weight machines or free For many participants, this determine maximum heart rate -weights. means their lower bodies -specifically the quadriceps 220 minus your age. The "aerobic training zone" or "Cross training lets you strengthen your muscles and and gluteal muscles -will get a more intense muscular target range, is 60 percent to 80 percent of your increases your cardiovascular capacity," Powell said. workout with step aerobics. maximum heart rate. "Doing both helps you achieve your highest level of Class participants' fitness skill levels range from "Everyone's body is different and each one responds overall fitness." beginner to advanced, and the instructor must allow for to different exercises in different ways," she said. For more information about step or traditional this when leading the class, Fannin said. "The instruc"Some people can't raise their heart rates enough aerobics, jazzercise, cross training, or any other aspects tors are key to making step aerobics safe and effective," when they attend a regular aerobics class, but do so very of fitness conditioning, call the Howard center at 284Fannin said. easily with step aerobics. Other people are just the 3602/3451. "We want to challenge the more physically fit class opposite." by SSgt. Rian Clawson members, but we also want to accommodate those who In other words, what's best for one person will not be 24th Wing Public Affairs aren't at that level yet." best for someone else.

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Tropic Times Sports Shorts Feb. 11, 1994 -L. SCN AM radio airs pro, to the Corozal Directorate of Engineering and Housing compound. Registration is $7 college, olympic sports before the race and $9 race day. The price Southern Command Network's AM 790 includes a T-shirt. For information, call Pacific and 1420 Atlantic will broadcast the 285-5707/5013. following sports this weekend. Tonight Radio special: "Meet the NBA AllStars," 8 p.m. holds courses until June Saturday The Military Sailing Club will hold College basketball: Minnesota at Wisseveral four-day sailing courses through consin, 2 p.m. June. Each class will be held over the last Kansas at Kansas State, 9 pm. weekend and first weekend of the month. Sunday The cost is $75, which includes the rental Pre-olympic hockey: France vs. Team fee ofthe boat, instructorand acertification USA, 1:45 p.m. card that can be used to take the intermediPro basketball: NBA All-Star Game, ate sailing course at Rodman Naval Station. 6:30 p.m Classes are limited to the first 10 students to sign up and pay. Those who are not in the Fronius hosts birthday first 10 will be scheduled for future classes. softball tournament For information, call Steve Rasmussen at 287-5968, John Stobie at 285-4634 or stop The Fronius Physical Fitness Center by the Fort Clayton Boat Shop. will holds a President's Day men's and women's softball tournament Feb. 19-2 1. Howard fitness center An organizational meeting will be held Thursday. The entrance fee is $50 for sets new aerobic hours women's teams and $75 for men's teams. The Howard Sports and Fitness Center Call the center at 289-3108 for more inforwill have step aerobic classes 8:45 a.m. mation. Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Classes cost $1. For more information, call 284AUSA sponsors running 3451. events at Reeder gym Fitness center accepts There will be a U.S. Army South Presidents' Day fun run 7 a.m. Feb. 19 at Reeder Tae Kwon Do forms Physical Fitness Center. The run, sponApplications forthe Tae Kwon Do trainsored by the Association of the U.S. Army, ing camp at Fort Indiantown Gap, Pa., are includes an 800-yard dash and 1and 3available at the Howard Sports and Fitness mile runs for all ages. The 5-mile run is for Center. Application deadline is Feb. 26 and Kick start children 15-years old and up. The cost is are available for active duty airmen. Call Youth Services Atlantic needs coaches for the upcoming youth soccer $6. For information, call the center at 287the center at 284-3451 for more informa6442 tion. season. Registration forthe season is also underway. Space is limited.Sign up at the Building 219, Fort Espinar. Bowling centers offer Howard Bowling Center President s Day fsecials Hostsaro nd Bowl Chearts Tournament at the Curundu BowlClub hosts tournament President's Day specials hosts Rock and Bowl ing Center 3 p.m. Sunday. The center isTheHowardandAlbrookBowlingCenTheHowardBowlingCenterhostsbowlasking couples to bring fine he cnr a at Diablo tennis courts ters will offer bowling specials in honor of ing to favorite oldies in its Rock and Bowl potluck dinner. The monthly Crossroads Tennis Club President's Day Feb.21.Gameswillcost75 program 9 p.m. until closing Monday Sign ups begin2:30 p.m. game day. Call tournament will be Feb.26-27 atthe Diablo cents. The monthly no-tap tournament will through Thursday. Call 284-4818 for more the center at 286-3914 for more informaHeights Tennis Courts with categories for be held Feb. 27. For more information, call information. tion. men, women and children. Registration the Howard center at 284-4818 or the deadline is Feb. 23 at 6 p.m. Albrook center at 286-4260. Fitness center teaches Reeder fitness center For registration information, call Mike Goldstein at 264-5160 or Wally Murdoch Rodman hosts softball better fitness classes offers free weight lifting at 252-2969. The Howard Sports and Fitness Center Reeder Physical Fitness Center offers league, tournament holds Fitness Improvement Training body building and powerlifting classes Atlantic center offers free Registration is under way for the Open Classes 6:05-7 a.m. and 2:05-3 p.m. MonTuesdays and Thursdays. The cost is $20. Unit Level Softball Tournament at day, Wednesday and Friday at the center. Students must have a their own weight weekday step aerobics Symington Field, Rodman Naval Station, The classes consists of a calisthenic super belts. Call the center at 287-3861 for more The Fronius Physical Fitness Center Feb. 19-20. Deadline to register is today. circuit work out that is aimed at improving information. offers free step aerobics 9-10 a.m. weekUnits must present a team roster signed by muscular endurance, cardiovascular sysdays. Participants musthave theirown step. the unit commander or his designated reptems and flexibility. Students mustbeevaluFitness center teaches Call the center at 289-3108 for more inforresentative. There is a $25 entry fee. The ated on the amount of exercise they are mation. Rodman Fitness Center will hold a coaches capable of performing in a class before the self-directed aerobics meeting 5:30 p.m. Tuesday. Call 283programstarts.Callthecenterat284-3451. The Howard Sports and Fitness Center Curundu Bowling Center 4222. offers self-directed aerobics programs Sports registration open "Ski the Appalachian Trail" and "Climb holds Green Pin Bowling DENTAC sponsors run Mount Everest." For more information, The Curundu Bowling Center holds at Reeder fitness center call 284-3451. Green Pin Bowling Sundays. Makea strike against tooth decay Registration for the following sports when the green pin is in the number one TheU.S.ArmyDentalActivity-Panama events has begun at the Directorate of Davis pool hosts swim position and that game is free. Call the will host the 10th Run From Decay fun run Community Activities Sports Branch on center at 285-3914 for more information. 8 a.m. Feb. 26 at the Albrook AFS track. Fort Clayton: Desert Storm softball promeet 'Fiesta Panama' The run is open to children 5-12 years old gram; unit level flag football and women's The Fort Davis Pool will host the beginFitness center offers free who have bilingual identification cards. soccer. Call 287-4050 for more informaners swimming meet "Fiesta Panama" 10 The children will run in age and sex categotion. a.m. Feb. 19. Registration deadline is Feb. weekday aerobics class ries in 200 meters and 1/4 mile races and 18. Categories are doggie kick, front kick, The Reeder Physical Fitness Center has prizes will be awarded. Registration forms Fronius Fitness Center back kick and free style. Age groups are for free aerobics 9:15-10:15 a.m. weekdays. can be picked up at Department of Defense .4-12 year olds. Each workout has a warm up, cardiovascuDependents Schools, the Fort Clayton Dengives free weight training Call the Davis pool at 289-3272 for larworkout, cool down and floorwork. Call tal Clinic and the Gorgas Army CommuThe Fronius Fitness Center on Fort more information. the center at 287-3861 for more informanity Hospital Dental Clinic. Late registraDavis has free Nautilus machine training tion. tion will be at the track 7-7:30 a.m. on race sessions 3-4 p.m. Tuesdays and free weight Howard, Albrook pools day. For information, call Chris Merida at training sessions 3-4 p.m. Tuesdays and offer swimming classes Reeder honors president 287-3609/3904. Thursdays. Call the center at 289-3108 for with hr -contest more information. The Howard and Albrook pools invite wt t ree-pointer Society of engineers runs parents and theirchildren to enroll in swimReeder Physical Fitness Center will celfor fun, Engineers runsho ming lessons. The pools also have water ebrateGeorgeWashington'sBirthday with for fun, Engineer Week PCWBA hosts bowling aerobics classes available. Call the Zodiac a basketball three-point shot contest Feb. TheSocietyofAmericanMilitary Engisweethearts at Curundu Recreation Center at 284-3569 or the 21.Registration will bethedayoftheevent. neers will kick off Engineer Week with an The Panama Canal Women's Bowling Albrook Pool at 286-3555 for more inforCall the centerat 287-3861 for more infor8K fun run 7 a.m. Saturday at the entrance Association is hosting a PCWBA Sweetnation. mation.

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61Tropic Times Feb. 11, 1994es Elections to bring political rallies FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -With national elections being held in the Republic of Panama May 8, Panamanian political parties are expected to conduct marches and other partisan rallies until election day, officials said. Members of the U.S. forces, Department of Defense civilian employees and family members are not allowed to become involved, or even to appear to be involved, in the internal political process of Panama in accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty of 1977. This includes political rallies and events. Monitor Southern Command Network and the Tropic Times for news of traffic congestion and areas to be avoided because of pre-election activities. CINC's Recognition "N Ball set for March 26 COROZAL (Tropic Times) -The U.S. Southem Command Commander in Chief's Recognition Ball will be held 6 p.m. March 26 at Club Amador. The cost is $16 per person, which includes dinner with dessert, wine, a complimentary wine glass and entertainment. The ball is open to servicemembers of all ranks and civilian n employees. The CINC will recognize the junior officer, noncommissioned leader, servicemember and civilian employee of the year from each component 1 at the ball. For more information, call Sgt. Deborah Johni son at 282-4905. U S Army photo by Sgt. Robin A. Mantikosk Reduction in force The Zipper was one the rides at the April, 1993 Directorate of Community Activities Fair at Fort Clayton Davis fair begin Thrsday board cancelled oftCOROZAL (Tropic Times) -The Department t eof of the Army has announced that the company FORT DAVIS (USARSO PA ) -The Directorate of strations throughout the week as well as folkloric, coungrade reduction-in-force board has been canCommt unity Activities Fair, "Fiesta Panama," will be held try line dancing and ballet groups. Other programs incelled. The. board was cancelled because there Thursday through Feb. 21 at the ballfield here. clude the Cristobal High School Choir and cheerleaders, were enough voluntary separations by eligible ofThere will be rides, games, sports events and tournathe Fort Davis Elementary School dancers and bands such ficers to preclude involuntary separations, officials ments, demonstrations and a Department of Defense as the Nes y Los Sensacionales rap band, Afinque, Bahia said. show throughout the week. Banda Show and the DoD rock band, "The Gatherings." The fair will be open 5-11 p.m. Thursday, 3 p.m.Games will include basketball toss, speed ball, dunk midnight Feb. 18-20 and 3-11 p.m. Feb. 21. tanks and dart blackjack. Food for all tastes will be availSports events will include a 10K fun run at 4:10 p.m. able with Asian, Panamanian and American favorites as Thursday at Fronius Fitness Center, a women's softball well as the fair traditions of popcorn and cotton candy. tournament Feb. 18, a men's softball tournament and Carnival rides for all ages will also be on the field HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) -Contracchildren's activities Feb. 19. The children's activities are with rides for the strong at heart as well as children rides. tors have entered the third phase of a plan to up4 p.m. sack race, 4:30 p.m. balloon stomp, 5 p.m. egg The fair will officially open 5 p.m. Thursday with a grade the electrical systems of military family toss and 5:30 p.m. tug of war. ribbon cutting, a trophy presentation and a folkloric dance housing here. There will be karate, gymnastics and aerobic demongroup from Fort Espinar Elementary School. Sixty-five units are scheduled to be renovated this year as occupants are permanently reassigned, according to Jason Johnson, chief of Contract Joint effort heps Ar Force Execution at the 24th Civil Engineering Squadron. Most homes will be completed this spring, he replen ish n tions stock said. Contractors will replace all electrical rg and components. New outlets will be added also to bring the houses up to United States buildby Sgt. James A. Rush together a wish list and hurried over to the Army depot ing codes. 24th Wing Public Affairs on Rodman NS before anyone changed their minds. "These houses are 40 years old or more," John"We went to Rodman to pre-inspect their stock,' son said. "There is a significant amount of work HOWARD AFB -It took a lot of sweat and a big pair Kuchler said. "We found they had a lot more stuff that in each one, but they (contractors) have been of red tape-cutting scissors, but the munitions storage secwe needed.i ., tion here is finally restocking its shelves and saving taxAll told, the Air Force replenished its storage facility pretty good about finishing on time." payers money in the process. with about 33,000 pounds of demolition materials, small Electricians have 14 days to complete the work The formula seemed simple enough, according to muarms ammunitions and more. The cost to move would on each quarters. Aside from the standard labor, nitions inspector SSgt. Daniel E. Kuchler. Howard AFB have been more than $3 per pound for a one-way trip. they are also installing heat detectors and outside had an order for ammunition from the United States and "It's taken us about a month to inspect everything, but security lights. the Army was preparing to send some of the same items this works out much better," Kuchler said. "It only took In some duplex buildings, two families are runback to its depot in the states. a couple of days of our time and it's beneficial to everyning offof a single breaker box. These homes will Why not just fill the Air Force order from the Army body." have their breaker panels split so each quarters stock wherever possible? Simple right? Wrong. The Army recouped its munitions from Air Force dehas its own. "The services just don't work together like that norpots in the states. This interservice cooperation, while Contractors wait until a house is vacant to mally," Kuchler said. "We spent a lot of time coordinatseemingly logical, is unusual according to MSgt. Anavoid inconveniencing residents with the noise ing this." thony Davis, chief of the 24th Maintenance Squadron and debris, Johnson said. As it is, families in the The Air Force request went from desk to desk seeking Munitions Flight here. other side of duplexes suffer a bit from the upapproval until it was handed to CWO 2 Israel Soto at A suggestion to approve unilateral reporting of excess grade, but efforts are made to notify these people Rodman Munitions Supply Point. munitions between services is being forwarded to the in advance. "It saves everybody a bunch of time and hassle," Soto munitions branch at Air Combat Command. Ninety-four units have been completed to date. said. "What we're trying to do now, is anytime we come If approved, this "would cut down the amount of reqWhen the final phase is completed, all 462 quarup with excess is talk to you guys (the Air Force) and see uisitions a lot," Davis said. "The boat that carries it (muters will be brought to standard. if we can transfer it." nitions) here only comes in twice a year so this cuts down With the plan approved, Howard's munitions team put waiting too."


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