Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text




Gift of the Panama Canal Museum

--AkIi .,


Tropic


Times


Ouarrv Heights, Republic of Panlamla


Vol. VU.IN. 1~J zu"A-a-j-- 'r -- - - -


Friday, Jan. 21,1994


Poor HIV tests


prompt added


medical action
GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL
(USARSO PAO) - Reports of poor human immunodefi-
ciency virus testing of blood donated in Europe is worry-
ing many former European Command personnel, Gorgas
officials said.
The HIV causes Acquired Immune Deficiency Syn-
drome, or AIDS.
This has led to the recent development of a special
world-wide medical program, said Maj. Catherine W.
Bonnefil, chief of Army Community Health Nursing at
Gorgas.
"Current and former beneficiaries assigned to
EUCOM from 1985 to Nov. 1, 1993, who received blood
transfusions from German civilian medical treatment fa-
cilities, may have been exposed to HIV-contaminated
blood products," she said.
"Although the risks to U.S. citizens is believed to be
extremely low, those potentially at risk should see a health
care provider for evaluations and possible testing."
Eligibility for this program has been granted to any
previously eligible beneficiary who was stationed or
worked in Germany and is potentially at risk, hospital
officials said.
This includes former servicemembers, current and
former Department of Defense employees and family
xgrmbers who received transfused blood or blood prod-
ucts in a civilian medical treatment facility in Germany
since 1985 and can prove prior eligibility for medical


kk


U.S. Army photo by SSgL Jane Usero
Gorgas Army Community Hospital officials are offering blood tests for anyone concerned about being
infected with the H IV after receiving a blood transfusion in Germany.


treatment, officials said.
Medical benefits are limited to the evaluation, testing
and associated counseling for HIV.
"Evaluation, testing and counseling will be provided
at no charge to those eligible at any Army medical treat-


ment facility worldwide which is equipped to provide this
level of medical service," Bonnefil said.
Treatment eligibility ends Nov. 19.
Those wanting information about getting an HIV
blood test can call 282-5419/5162.


1994 vehicle inspections underway


Revisado stickers available;
registration through March 31
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The 1994
Revisado stickers for vehicle registration are now available
and can be picked up through March 31, officials said.
The Revisado sticker is issued to vehicles passing the an-
nual inspection, by the Panamanian government. All pri-
vately owned vehicles are subject to this inspection, said
Melissa Flynn, Military Police Command Host Nation Liai-
son officer.
U.S. government employees and their family members
can have their vehicles inspected at the Panama Canal Com-
mission motor pools in Ancon or Cristobal, she said.
The inspection costs $10 and a 1993 vehicle registration
or vehicle inspection document, proof of insurance and a
bilingual identification card are needed.
In the Pacific community, vehicles can be inspected 10
a.m.-3 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m.-l p.m. Saturday. Enter
the inspection site through the back gate on Curundu week-
days and through the main gate on Gaillard Highway on
Saturday, Lynn said.
In the Atlantic community, vehicles can be inspected 9
a.m.-1 p.m. Monday-Saturday.
Enter Cristobal back gate only by turning off Bolivar
Highway onto Barbados Street and follow the posted signs
to Saint Kitts Street.
Once the vehicle passes inspection the driver must get a
Revisado sticker and a Vehicle Registration Certificate. To
get these items, the vehicle owner must take a copy of the
inspection document and their bilingual ID card to the Li-
cense Plate Section.
For the Pacific, the office is in El Diablo near the 24-
Horas store and is open 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 1:30 -3 p.m.


Newly shipped auto process
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - People who are new to
Panama or have recently had a vehicle shipped here need to geta
Panamanian driver's license and register their vehicle through
Panama's government, officials said.
To pick up and register privately owned vehicles, the follow-
Ing must be done:
*To pick up a vehicle, call 282-4642 or stop by the 1322nd
Medium Port in Building 1501, Balboa. For a recording of ve-
hicles that have arrived, call 282-4241.
*The paperwork vehicle owners get when they pick up their
vehicle must be taken to the Panama Exonerations Office at the
Port Captain's Building in the Pier 18 area, Balboa.
* Exoneration documents Issued at the Panama Exonerations
Office must be taken back to the 1322nd Medium Port and the
vehicle will then be released.
*The vehicle must then be taken to be inspected with all docu-
ments. Vehicles entering Panama before March31 must pass the
Inspection at the Panama Canal Commission motor pools in An-
con and Cristobal. Vehicles entering the country after this date
can be inspected at Army and Air Force Exchange Service ga-
rages at Fort Clayton or Fort Davis.
*Once Inspected, the driver must obtain a Revisado sticker
and a Vehicle Registration Certificate. This is done by taking a
copy of the inspection document and their bilingual identification
card to the License Section next to the 24 Horas store in El Diablo
in the Pacific Community 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 1:30-3 p.m. and
Building 7024 in Mount Hope in the Atlantic.
*The 1994 license plates can then be bought in the Diablo of-
fice in the Pacific and the Colon Municipal Building between 12th
and Santa Isabel Avenues near the Colon Stadium in the Atlantic.
Panama only issues one license plate to be displayed at the rear of
the vehicle.
Once the vehicle has been registered with the Panamanian gov-
ernment, vehicle owners must also register with their respective
pass and ID office.
In the Atlantic, the office is in Building 7024 at Mount Hope.
Once all these steps are finished, the 1994 license plate
can be bought.
For more information, call 287-3376.


Local Reserve Component officials
expect bigger impacton U.S. South-
ern Command mission in 1994.


Secretary of Defense nominee Bobby
Ray Inman removes his name be-
fore confirmation process begins.


*Potpourri, page 3.
*Atlantic scouts, pages 9.
*Climbing, page 13.


CPO assisting
family members
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Mili-
tary family members in Panama are reassured
that jobs are available and that an average of
20 family members are hired each month, said
Directorate of Civilian Personnel officials.
"Most of these new hires have taken advan-
tage of the specialized services this office
(DCP) provides for family members," said
Harry Remshard, chief of Recruitment and
Placement Division of DCP.
Some services available are picking up and
reviewing the Special Family Member Appli-
cation Packet, job information seminars and
one-on-one counseling at the Job Information
Center, he said.
"There are employment opportunities avail-
able for well-qualified family members,"
Remshard said. "As is the case throughout the
Defense Department, however, these opportu-
nities are limited and attract large numbers of
high-quality applicants."
The number of family members seeking
employment significantly outnumber the avail-
able positions so those in Panama must be pre-
pared to put their best foot forward and face
stiff competition, he said.
Remshard points out one way for applicants
to help themselves is by attending one of the
job information seminars offered through the
DCP. The next seminar will be Jan. 25 at Fort
Davis and Jan. 27 at Fort Clayton.
For information about seeking employment
or about the seminars, call 285-5201.


7 1 ,rmI MNa 2


Ado











Tropic Times
Jan. 21, 1994


Army marksmen target competition


by Sgt Robin Mantikoski
USARSO Public Affairs Office
EMPIRE RANGE - For the past couple
months, soldiers from U.S. Army South
infantry units have been honing their
marksmanship skills in preparation for the
upcoming marksmanship competitions.
Two teams from 1st Battalion (Air-
borne), 508th Infantry and the 5th Battal-
ion, 87th Infantry (Light) spent last week
feeling out the competition before going
head-to-head during the 193rd Infantry
Brigade Challenge Cup Matches this week
on Empire Range.
Though the competition is meant for
193rd Inf. Bde marksmen, soldiers from
other units will also compete. Regardless
of the outcome, both units will compete in
the U.S. Army South Marksmanship
Competition in February, said Sgt. Steven
Armstrong, 1st Bn., 508th Inf. marksman-
ship team coach.
The road to the competition has not
been easy for the teams, which have M-16
rifle, M60 machine gun, M24 sniper rifle,
M249 Squad Automatic Weapon and
9mm pistol competitors. The teams have
had to start at square one with the new
marksman and each have used different
strategies to accomplish their goal, he said.
Armstrong began recruiting soldiers in
October and came up with 16 soldiers, in-
cluding two who made it to the All-Anrmy
level last year.
"A majority of the (noncommissioned
officers) with experience have leadership
positions that they couldn't give up,"
Armstrong said. "But we have a new crop
of soldiers that show promise."
The 5-87th coach, SFC Luis Pichardo,
had a task that was quite different.
He went from unit to unit selecting the
top five-10 marksmen in each company
according to their qualification scores.
Once he chose these soldiers, each had to
try out for the team. Of the 40 who tried
out, only 24 made the team.
"The soldiers are basically all new,"
Pichardo said. "We're learning as we
go."


I6m


q


. :. , , ,


2'


U.S. Army photo by Sgt Robin Manikoski
Spec. Ray Hammer, Company B, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry
Division practices alongside members of the 5-87th Inf. (Light) M-16 rifleteam.
Once Pichardo selected the teams, the fundamentals," he said. "Most people will
coaches went to work honing skills. blow off the fundamentals when they're
Armstrong's first task was to work at just out there qualifying. We try to make
fitting the soldiers to weapons systems these soldiers understand the importance
they were comfortable with and showed of them."
potential in. Once the soldiers claimed Pichardo also worked on the funda-
their weapons, the real training began. mental, but said practice and experience
"We started by working on the basic were the key. Practice is so important that


both teams have spent five days a week for
the the past two months out on the ranges.
"The soldier has to be good, but prac-
ticing the techniques all the time makes
him better," he said.
The coaches agree that the physical as-
pects of marksmanship are important, but
both said that the marksmen's mental
readiness is most important.
"Shooting is probably 30 percent physi-
cal and 70 percent mental," Pichardo said.
"They have to be totally relaxed and in
complete control."
Armstrong said that after practicing so
long, some soldiers become dependent on
physical skills and no longer improve. It's
his goal to get these soldiers past that.
"It's a mental acceptance. If they can
make that mental switch, there is no limit
to how good they can be," he said.
Spec. Larry Shupperd, an M-16 marks-
man on the 1st Bn., 508th Inf. team, is
one marksman who has made that mental
acceptance. Though he grew up shooting
weapons, he said he has learned a lot about
the mental side of shooting.
"The key is to totally relax before I go
on the line," he said. "And before I take
my first shot, I get a mental picture of the
target and go through everything in my
head."
The same is true for those on the sniper
team, said Spec. Edward Pitts, 5th Bn.,
87th Inf., sniper team coach.
"Firing the sniper weapon takes a lot of
patience and practice," he said. "There's
more to being a sniper because it's one
shot, one kill."
With nearly two months left until the
first competition, the teams are confident.
"I have some soldiers whose shooting
performances now are equal to what we
were doing at the USARSO competition,"
Armstrong said.
Shupperd has a chance to go far,
Armstrong said. Pitt also feels confident.
"Our sniper team is the best. We will
win," Pitt said.
The Februarycompetition will be the
judge of that. Until then, the teams will
continue training.


Reserve components set busy 1994 agenda


by SSgt Eric Wedeking
Theater Support Element
FORT CLAYTON, Panama - Despite recently an-
nounced troop reductions for Reserve Component forces,
U.S. Army and Air National Guard and Army Reserve
personnel are still slated to be a primary contributor to
missions throughout U.S. Southern Command.
Guard and Reserve officials noted that more citizen-
soldiers and airmen are slated in 1994 to deploy to Cen-
tral and South America than in previous training years.
The presence of the National Guard and Reserve is
expected to remain steady or may even grow as active
military troop levels in U.S. Southern Command continue
to shrink, officials said.
"As far as U.S. Southern Command is concerned, they
couldn't operate without the National Guard and Re-
serve," said SGM Jerome Mattakat, senior enlisted advi-
sor for the U.S. National Guard at Fort Clayton.
"They've said that more than once and we continue to
deliver by providing them with support through overseas
deployment training missions."
Reserve Components are slated during the 1994 train-
ing year to send more than 22,000 troops to train through-
out Latin America. The Army and Air National Guard
will supply about 14,000 citizen-soldiers and airmen
while the Army Reserve is scheduled to deploy 8,000 per-
sonnel.
Those numbers do not reflect the number of people
being deployed to Latin America by the U.S. Air Force
Reserve, Navy Reserve, or Marine Reserve.
"We continue to be the number one training area for
the Guard in the world and we're still growing," added
Mattakat. "This is still the only real-world training area
there is. I don't see any draw downs in the near future."
Guard and Reserve officials said their missions con-
tinue to be wide-ranging and include units like military
police, engineer, medical, public affairs, postal, military
intelligence, infantry, artillery, aviation, transportation,


dental, maintenance, linguistics, special operations, civil
affairs, logistical and music bands.
In Latin America, Reserve Component troops receive
training opportunities impossible to replicate back in the
United States, said Col. Raymond Moss, director of the
U.S. Army Reserve Advisor's Office at Fort Clayton.
"The effort to help democracies seems to work," Moss
said. "We're helping the governments and they're help-
ing their people.
"And we continue to provide a great deal of manpower
in U.S. Southern Command," he added. "The Army Re-
serve experienced a 310-percent increase in overseas de-
ployment training in 1992 and held the line in 1993. U.S.
Southern Command cannot undertake all our various
missions without the Reserve Components and it's great
training for us to step in and do it."
Moss also optimistically looked ahead toward future
training exercises throughout the region by outlining ini-
tiatives for future Army Reserve training in the command,
including:
*Increased overseas deployments for more U.S. Army
Reserve units.
*Stepped-up efforts to aid democratic governments
like Venezuela, Honduras, Argentina, Guatemala and El
Salvador to create Reserve Component programs mod-
eled after those in the U.S. military.
*Better coordination of long-range overseas deploy-
ments for Army Reserve forces with active U.S. forces.
Looking ahead into the 1994 training year, thousands
of citizen-soldiers and airmen will continue various na-
tion-assistance exercises in Belize, Guatemala, Hondu-
ras, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, Ecua-
dor, Bolivia, Chili and Paraguay.
One of the biggest nation-assistance projects will be
in Guatemala where thousands of Army National
Guard engineers will build a farm-to-market road, repair
bridges, construct several schools and a clinic, and drill
fresh-water wells as part of an exercise called "Fuertes
Caminos-North," officials said.


Army Reserve engineers are also expected to take part
in a similar but smaller project in El Salvador pegged
"Fuertes Caminos Americas" in which a medical clinic
and several schools will be constructed.
"Fuertes caminos" is a Spanish phrase meaning
"strong roads."
Continuing the ongoing exercise called "Cosecha
Amistad" throughout Panama, thousands of Army and
Air Guard, and Army and Air Force Reserve engineers
will be performing a varied mix of construction projects
planned throughout the country. "Cosecha amistad" is a
Spanish phrase meaning "harvest friendship."
Reserve Component air assets will also play a critical
role ensuring successful SOUTHCOM's logistical mis-
sions with the continuation of "Coronet Oak." Air Na-
tional Guard and Reserve units use C-130 "Hercules"
transport aircraft to ferry people, equipment and supplies
in support of U.S. military and diplomatic efforts through-
out South and Central America.
Flyers and support airmen will also continue scram-
bling high-tech jet aircraft during ongoing counter-drug
missions based at Howard AFB, Panama, as part of
"Coronet Nighthawk."
This training year will also mark further road-build-
ing, school and medical clinic building projects planned
during "Caminos de la Paz" along with joint-military
training exercises involving various stateside units in
Chile, Bolivia and Ecuador as part of "Fuerzas Unidas."
"Caminos de la paz" and "fuerzas unidas" are Span-
ish phrases respectively meaning "roads of peace" and
"united forces."
Reserve Component officials said that even though
budgetary cutbacks have forced them to do "more with
less," their presence in SOUTHCOM will continue to be
strong through the near foreseeable future.
"We're performing many important missions through-
out U.S. Southern Command," Moss added.
"We'll look back on this time as the high-water
mark."


jAa-











Tropic Times 3
Jan. 21, 1994


1P-otDOUMr


Home businesses
Residents of the Atlantic community must register
their home-based business with the Office of the Garri-
son Commander - Atlantic. Those not registered may be
subject to administrative disciplinary action. For infor-
mation, call 289-5181.

Radio licensing
There will be an amateur radio licensing clasq Feb.
15-April 14. Classes will be given 7-9 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. The cost is $30 which includes books and
materials. Anyone interested should register by Jan. 23
by calling 287-5668/4974.



Hiring opportunities are limited became of budgetary con-
straints. How to apply: For temporary poitions submit a SF-
171, DD 214 if claiming veteran preference, a copy of college
transcriptsifclaimingeducationandacopyofClericalAdministra-
tive Support Position notice of rating if applicable. For perma-
Dent positions (only for current employees ielluding leave
without pay) submit a SF-171, a copy of latest SF-50, a copy of
college transcripts, a copy of your last performance appraisal and
a statement addressing the job related criteria contained in the
announcement.
Formrreinformation regmdingvacancyannouncements(fomns
required,job related criteria, etc.), visit the Directorate of Civilian
Personnel, Building 560, Room 102, Corozal, or call 285-5201.
*Note: One-on-one employment counseling should be the first
stepin the job search.

VB# VACANCIES TILE AND LOCATION OPEN: 1-21-
94 CLOSE: 2-01-94
127-94-LA Computer Engineer, NM-854-12. Sensitive. (Top
Secret)
128-94-VC Intelligence Assistant (OA), GS-134-7. Sensitive.
(Top Secret)
129-94-ELSystems Administrator, NM-301-7, DEV NM-9.
130-94-NC Supervisory Arts & Crafts Specialist, NM-1056-
9.
131-94-NC Supply Technician (OA), NM-2005-S. Limited to
permanent employees only. Driver's license is required. Qualified
typist
132-94-NC Housing Referral Officer, NM-301-9. Limited to
permanent employees only. Bilingual. Driver's license is required.
133-94-NC Budget Ananlyst, NM-560-11. Limited to perma-
nent employees only.
134-94-ES Clerk, NM-303-1. TEMP NTE: 1 year. Part-times.
135-94-ES Medical Clerk, NM-679-5. Limited to
MEDDACNDENTAC Panama permanent employees.
136-94-ES Clinical Nurse, NM-610-10. TEMP NTE: 31
March 94. US license is required.
137-94-ES Army Community Health Nurse, NM-610-10.
TEMP NET: 30 Sept 94.
138-94-NC Engineering Technician, NM-802-9.
139-94-JHCiassifcadon Specialist, NM-221-S/7/9/11.
140-94-SS Procurement Technician, NM-1106-5/6f7.
Limited to permanent employees only. Driver's license is re-
quired*
US-ARMY NAF Closing Date: 28 January 1994 See NAP
Announcement Number 94-01
COMMERCIAL SPONSORSHIP SPECIALIST, NM-1101-
7. $10.89 per hr, Reg Full-time Appointment (Limited Tenure, if
not filled by current permanent US Army NAP employee), Direc-
torate of Commimunity Activities, USAO-Panama, Bidg 519, PL
Clayton.
HOW TO APPLY: Fill out DA From 3433 (Application for US
Army Non-Appropriated Fund Employment) which may be picked
up and turned in at the One-Stop Information Center, Bldg 560,
Room 102, Corozal
Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting applications on a
continuous basis for the following positions. These announcements
are used to establish registers for future vacancies.
VB# 001 * General Clerical, NM-3 (Used to fill most clerical
positions)
VB# 001A * General Clerical, NM-4 (Used to fill most clerical
positions)
VB# 002 *Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Intermittentwk sch)
VB# 003 Recreation Assistant,NM-4 (Lifeguard) Requires Celt
+ 6 mos recreation exp.
VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (req 6 mos of recreation
exp.)
VB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5
VB# 005A Secretary (Stenography), NM-6
VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5
VB# 006A Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-6
VB# 007 Medical Officer, NE-12/13/14,(Perm\Temp Full-
times, Part-time, Intermittent)
VB# 008 Clinical Nurse (RN license required), NM-9/10/11,
(Permn\Temp Full-times, Part-time, Intermittent)
VB# 009 Practical Nurse (LPN license required), NM-5,
(Perm\Temp Full-times, Part-time, Intermittent)
VB# 010 Manual Positions,MG-2 (Veteran preference eligibles
only)
VB# 011 Manual Positions,MG-3 (Veteran preference eligibles
only)
VB# 012 Manual Positions,MG-4 (Veteran preference eligibles
only)
VB# 013 Manual Positions, MG-5 (Veteran preference eligibles
only)
VB# 014 Motor Vehicle Operator MG-6 (Veteran preference eli-
gibles only)
VB#015 Motor Vehicle OperatorMO-78(Veteran preferenceeli-
gibles only)
VB# 016 MotorVehicle Operator M-8 (Veteran preference eli-
gibles only)
* CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is required.


Summit Gardens trip
The Fort Clayton Protestant Women of the Chapel
are hosting a trip to Summit Gardens 9 a.m. Thursday
Anyone interested should bring a sack lunch and be at
Valent Recreation Center, Fort Clayton, by 9 am. For
information, call 287-3270.

Play/fashion show
A play and fashion show will be held 7 p.m. Feb. 18
at the Fort Clayton Valent Recreation Center in celebra-
tion of Black History Month. Students interested in be-
coming involved in the play may call 287-3706/4955.
Rehearsals begin Jan. 28.

Breakfast celebration
The 106th Signal Brigade will host a U.S. Army
South breakfast 7 a.m. Feb. 1 at the Fort Clayton Non-
commissioned Officers' Club. The breakfast will kick
off USARSO's Black History Month celebration with
guest speaker CoL Raymond Moss, Deputy Chief of Staff
Reserve Affairs. For tickets or information, call 287-
6951.

Egg-stravaganza
The Officers' and Civilians' Wives' Club-Pacific
spring bazaar Egg-stravaganza is scheduled for April
30. Those wanting to sign up for tables can do so at the
following times and locations: 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Feb. 7 at
Valent Recreation Center for identification card holders
only, and 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Feb. 24-25 at Club Amador for
open registration.
Tables will not be sold before these dates and all ven-
dors must sign up and pay in full on one of the registra-
tion dates. The price is $7 per linear foot for table space.
For more information, call 287-5120/3415.

Prayer breakfast
The National Prayer Breakfast will be 6:30 am. Feb.
10 at Club Amador. The guest speaker will be CoL Wil-
liam Reeder Jr., Deputy Chief of Staff, Southern Com-
mand. For information, call 287-5859/6201.

High school celebration
A 20th anniversary celebration for the Paraiso Junior
and Senior High School class of 1974 will be 7 p.m.-2
a.m. Feb. 11 at the Seaside View HalL The celebration
will honor Professor Cecilio Williams. The cost is $20
per person. For tickets or more information, call 224-
8105 or 233-1076.

Sweetheart banquet
The Fort Clayton Protest Women of the Chapel will
host a sweetheart banquet 6:30 p.m. Feb. 11 at the Al-
brook Officers' Club. Tickets are $7 donation per per-
son. For tickets or information, call 287-4178.

Language instructors
Ocean Breeze Recreation Center is looking for quali-
fied Spanish and beginner's English instructors. Instruc-
tors for guitar, piano and gymnastics are also needed.
For information, call 289-6699/6402.

Canine classes
Club Canino de Panama will hold its next dog obedi-



Saturday
7:40 a.m. C-130 Howard AFB
Charleston, WV (US)
4:55 p.m. C-5A Howard AFB
Charleston AFB, SC (0)
Dover AFB, DE
Howard AFB
Sunday
No scheduled departures
Monday
7:40 a.m. C-130 Howard AFB
Tegucigalpa, Honduras (CC)
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Howard AFB
9:30 W .m. B757 Howard AFB
Charleston IAP, SC (C)
Tuesday
No scheduled departures
Wednesday
7:55 a.m. C-130 Howard AFB


ence course beginning Tuesday for adult dogs and Feb. 1
for puppies aged 3-6 months. The adult classes meet 7-8
p.m. Tuesday and 6-7 p.m. Tuesday for puppies at the
Balboa High School Stadium parking lot. People interested
should arrive 30 minutes before class starts. For more in-
formation, call Bridget Groome at 286-4896 or Diane Ellis
at 256-6606.

St. Andrew's dinner
The St. Andrew's Society of Panama is holding a
Burns' Night Dinner 7 p.m Saturday at the Executive Golf
Club. There will be a piper, fiddler and the traditional
toasts to the Lassies, Laddies and Haggis. Call Lorri
Gilchrist at 260-2882 or Jeannie Hickman at 252-6425.

Clayton power outage
There will be an electrical power outage 6-10 am. Sat-
urday on all of Fort Clayton. The power outage is needed
to allow contractors to perform electrical distribution sys-
tem upgrading, said Directorate of Engineering and Hous-
ing officials.

Office closure
The Rodman Ammunition Supply Point will be closed
Monday through Jan. 28 for inventory. Call 283-5806.

Canal crafters
The Canal Crafters Shoppe will be closed through Jan.
30 and will reopen in its new location Jan. 31. The new
store will be in Building 804, Albrook AFS. People want-
ing to consign items during the closure can leave a mes-
sage at 286-6244 or call Sherry Lasater at 284-5782.

Isthmian club
The Isthmian College Club will hold a slide presenta-
tion by Tony Rajer on the renovation of the murals in the
Rotunda of the Panama Canal Commission Administra-
tion Building and other Panama art. The presentation will
take place 4:30 p.m. Tuesday in the administration
building's cafeteria. For more information, call Ellen Ma-
jor at 264-2528 or Edna Rigby at 252-2439.

New hospital billing
Gorgas Army Community Hospital will begin a mul-
tiple rate in-patient billing system Feb. 1. The new system
is for civilian pay patients such as self pay federal employ-
ees and civilian emergencies. For information, call 282-
5213/5134.

Vehicle/supplies rule
Only government vehicles can be used to pick up sup-
plies at the Self Service Supply Centers at Corozal and
Fort Davis. Units without government vehicles can use pri-
vately owned vehicles only with written authorization from
the commander or director of the unit. For information,
call 285-5146 or 289-3668.

College registration
Panama Canal College will hold spring semester regis-
tration 9 a.m.-noon and 2-5 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday at the
La Boca campus. People who want military tuition assis-
tance should contact their education office before registra-
tion. Only money orders or checks made out to the "U.S.
Treasurer," are acceptable for tuition payment. For more
information, call 252-3304/3107.


San Salvador, El Saviador (V, CC)
Managua, Nicaragua (CC)
Howard AFB
9-40 a.m. C-141 Howard AFB
Kelly AFB, TX (M)
Charleston AFB, SC
Thursday
11 05 a.m. C-5AHoward AFB
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
Charleston AFB, SC (0)
Dover AFB, DE
Friday
7-40 a.m. C-130 Howard AFB
Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC)
San Jose, Costa Rica
Howard AFB
Key


US-U.S. passports
0-Overnight
C-Commercial


V-Visa
M-Medevac
CC-Country Clearance











4Tropic Times
Jan.21,1994


*HemisDhere


Truck crash kills 1, injures


4 missionaries in Honduras


SOTO CANO AB, Honduras (United States Informa-
tion Service) - Thirty-four American missionaries were
involved in a vehicle accident Wednesday in the Hondu-
ran city of Tela that killed one person and seriously in-
jured four. Another 14 sustained minor injuries.
The seriously injured victims were evacuated by a U.S.
military hospital to San Pedro Sula. One victim was de-
clared dead at the scene of the accident The names of the
dead an injured are not yet available, according to Ameri-
can Embassy official Paul Koselka.
The 34 Baptist missionaries, many from Mississippi,
were in Honduras providing medical and dental care.
They were travelling in two stake-bed open trailers that
gave them a ride after their bus broke down. The ve-


hicles hit a large crevice in the road and overturned near
the beach village of Tela, approximately 90 miles from
San Pedro Sula, Koselka said.
A medical crew from the U.S. Army's Medical Ele-
ment, consisting of two doctors, a nurse and an Army
medic were flown from Soto Cano AB to the crash site in
a UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter operated by the 4-228th
Aviation Regiment
The medical trauma team treated injuries at the scene
and then airlifted the seriously injured victims to a Hon-
duran military base in San Pedro Sula, for further trans-
portation to a local Honduran hospital.
The other missionaries were transported from Tela to
San Pedro Sula by ground.


Panama customs fights drugs


PANAMA CITY (Reu-
ters) - Panama's customs ser-
vice said Jan. 14 it seized
more than $31.1 million of
illegal drugs, mainly cocaine
from South America, in
1993.
Last year's haul at air-
ports, docks and border posts r "
throughout the tiny Central
American nation was a 28.5
percent decrease on the
$43.5 million of drugs cap- -
tured in 1992, customs offi- Endara
cials said.
Panama's customs service has seized more than $147
million in drugs since the December 1989 U.S. invasion
that ousted former military dictator and convicted drug
trafficker General Manuel Antonio Noriega.
President Guillermo Endara's government cites such


Rebels kidnap

BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) - Rebels have spoken with
more violence in Colombia: A remote-controlled bomb
just missed killing the finance minister, two American
missionaries have been kidnapped, and another oil pipe-
line has been sabotaged.
Finance Minister Rudolf Hommes was driving in his
armored car when a bomb
placed at the base of a down-
town Bogota streetlight went
off Monday. Hommes was "The guerrilla,
unhurt, but a bodyguard was were taking ou
wounded.
The bomb shattered win- make a staterr
dows for 100 yards, flung a Colombian go\
light pole across a street and how they will b
damaged a bus. Leftist rebels
claimed responsibility. make a staterm
The bombing was further that statement
indication that the death of drug know.
lord Pablo Escobar did not
mean an end to political vio- Mel Wy
lence in Colombia. Escobar, Missionary,
who was slain by security forces
Dec. 2, had waged a war of
bombings and assassinations
that killed hundreds of people.
In the jungle-covered plains east of Bogota, guerrillas
kidnapped Stephen Welsh of North Platte, Neb., and
Timothy Van Dyke of Towanda, Pa., Sunday, said Mel
Wyma of New Tribes Mission, the Sanford, Fla.-based
missionary group the pair work for.
About 15 guerrillas walked into a school for children
of missionaries near Villavicencio, 50 miles east of
Bogota, ransacked the school and took the two men,
Wyma said in a telephone interview from New Tribes'
headquarters in Florida.
Local police reports said the guerrillas took the Ameri-
cans to protest the presence of some 250 American sol-
diers who are building a milit:c , Kise in the region, train-


statistics as evidence of a successful crackdown on drug
trafficking through Panama since the 1989 U.S. inva-
sion.
But critics say the figures prove Panama is just as big
a drug route now as under Noriega, who is serving a 40-
year jail sentence in the United States for trafficking
crimes.
Last year's haul included 1,784 pounds (809 kg) of
cocaine, with an estimated value of $15,900 per pound
($35,000 per kg) in the international market, and smaller
amounts of heroin, speed and lactose - an element of
milk that is used in medication.
The drugs came primarily from South America and
were bound for the United States, Europe and the Carib-
bean, the officials said.
Some 69 people were arrested in Panama on drug traf-
ficking charges in 1993 - 18 Colombians, 17 Jamai-
cans, 12 Panamanians, 10 Americans, four Haitians,
three Spaniards, two Nicaraguans, a Bolivian, a Costa
Rican and a Guatemalan.


2 missionaries

ing Colombian troops and doing humanitarian work
around the country.
"The guerrillas said they were taking our people to
make a statement to the Colombian government, but how
they will be used to make a statement and what that state-
ment is, I don't know," Wyma said.
Van Dyke is the acting prin-
cipal of the school; Welsh is a
groundskeeper.
s said they Police said the rebels were
r people to members of the Revolutionary
Armed Forces of Colombia, an
ient to the organization loosely linked to
vemment, but the National Liberation Army,
e used to known as ELN for its Spanish
initials.
lent and what The ELN, meanwhile, dyna-
is, I don't mited the Cano-Limon-Covenas
oil pipeline in northern Colom-
bia Sunday night, spilling 5,000
rma barrels of oil, the state oil com-
New Tribes Mission pany Ecopetrol said.
The pipeline is a frequent tar-
get of rebels opposed to the pres-
ence of foreign oil companies.
The National Liberation Army told RCN radio that it
attacked Hommes because of unemployment in Colom-
bia. The official unemployment rate is about 9 percent,
but underemployment, for which no figures are available,
is much higher.
Hommes has been criticized by rebels for supporting
the privatization of state companies, free trade and less
government regulation. He also angered trade unions by
approving a new minimum wage without consulting
them.
The would-be assassins triggered the bomb as
Hommes drove past in his armored BMW en route to
work. The blast wounded a policeman on a motorcycle
who was escorting Hommes.


Honduran army

denounces plot
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras (Reuters) - The
Honduran armed forces Sunday denounced what
it said was a plot aimed at pitting the military
against the government of liberal Carlos Roberto
Reina, who takes office later this month.
In a televised editorial, top military officials
said charges linking Armed Forces Chief Luis
Discua to dozens of "disappearances" in the
1980s were part of a plot to sow division between
the incoming government and the military.
A private human rights group here has de-
manded the ouster of Discua, saying he once
headed a "death squad," but the Superior Coun-
cil of the Armed Forces (COSUFFAA), a military
parliament made up of 60 officials, has given him
a vote of confidence.
"There is a plot against the military institution
to cause internal division and bring it into con-
flict with the new government," the military said
in its editorial.
The Committee of Families of the Detained
and Missing in Honduras (COFADEH) petitioned
Congress for the temporary removal of Discua
from the head of the armed forces while an inves-
tigation is made into 184 cases of missing people,
most of them leftists, during the 1980s.
In a report released last month, the National
Human Rights Protection agency blamed civil and
military authorities for the disappearances.
The agency called for the investigation of sev-
eral officials, including Discua, who in 1984 was
the head of Batallion 3/16, cited in the report as a
"death squad."
Discua has denied the charges.
Reina, 67, a lawyer and a liberal political vet-
eran, has said he is in favour of having courts in-
vestigate the claims by the human rights commis-
sion.

Banana exporters

drop trade complaint
BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Four Latin American
banana exporters have dropped their complaint to
the GATT world trade body over the European
Union's import quota system, a European Com-
mission spokesman said Tuesday.
"The Commission has received information
from four Latin American countries that they will
withdraw their complaint, leaving only Guate-
mala to continue," the spokesman said.
He added that Farm Commissioner Rene
Steichen had written to the governments of Costa
Rica, Venezuela, Honduras and Nicaragua saying
that the Commission would therefore maintain its
offer to raise the two million ton import quota by
10 percent
The Commission threatened last week that it
would withdraw its offer to raise the quota, which
was set last July, to 2.1 million this year and 2.2
million in 1995 if the countries did not withdraw
their complaint before the special General Agree-
ment on Tariffs and Trade panel made its rul-
ing.
Commission sources said Monday that the
panel was due to publish its findings on Tuesday,
and that they were expected to go against the Eu-
ropean Union.
The five countries had complained that the
quotas discriminated against cheap Latin Ameri-
can bananas in favor of more expensive growers
in Europe and its former colonies.
Included in the increased offer is a scheme to
require both export and import licences which
would give Latin American governments, instead
of multinational companies, greater control over
quota shipments.
The Commission spokesman said the distribu-
tion of the quota would be a matter for discussion
between the countries themselves and the Com-
mission.
It was not immediately clear whether the com-
plaints panel would still publish its findings.


t i












* Military News


Inman turns down defense post


WASHINGTON (AP) - Bobby Ray Inman, a Texas
businessman who held top national security jobs in both
Republican and Democratic administrations, today
stepped aside as President Clinton's nominee for defense
secretary. He cited "modem McCarthyism" in criticism
of his record, character and reputation.
Inman's withdrawal - which caught Washington by
surprise - was accepted by Clinton. And it sent the
president searching anew for a successor to Defense Sec-
retary Les Aspin, who was forced to resign.
"This is not a decision I reached easily but it is one I
have thought through and felt comfortable with," Inman
told a news conference in Austin, Texas. Inman said
"there is no daylight" between him and Clinton on de-
fense policy but that he became discouraged after early
favorable reviews of his selection "began to shift pretty
fast"
Inman told reporters he suspected, but could not prove,
that Senate Republican Leader Bob Dole of Kansas "had
asked that a more partisan look be taken at my record"
and had encouraged negative media reports about Inman.
Again, without offering proof, Inman said he was told
that The New York Times columnist William Safire had
agreed to take aim at Inman's nomination if Dole agreed
to increase Republican criticism of Clinton's investment
in a controversial Arkansas land development.
On Dec. 23, 1993, Safire criticized Inman, calling him
Clinton's "worst Cabinet nomination."
Inman said his disagreements with Safire dated back
to his Reagan administration work as deputy director of
central intelligence, when he decided to limit Israel's ac-
cess to U.S. spy satellite photographs.
In a sometimes rambling explanation of his decision,


Inman said his nomination was covered fairly by the daily
newspaper and television journalists.
But he said he was concerned in "this new era of mod-
em McCarthyism...with the columnist who is afforded
the pages of the newspaper and the syndication and the
talks shows to carry on attacks with no one responding."
But Inman said he himself had decided not to respond to
many of the criticisms.
"I've already given 30 years of service to my country,"
Inman said. "I am simply not prepared to pay the current
cost of public service in distortion of my record."
Yet Inman said he was confident he would have been
easily confirmed, possibly by a unanimous vote. Inman
said he wrote his resignation letter on Jan. 8 but did not
deliver it to the White House until last Friday.
Inman said that "my family was not enthusiastic
about my return to public service." Inman said his wife
had specifically asked him to promise that a former do-
mestic worker not be embarrassed because the Inmans
had not paid required Social Security taxes, an issue that
came to light shortly after Clinton announced the nomi-
nation.
"Now she's afraid she might lose her house," Inman
said of his former housekeeper. He said he recently paid
back Social Security taxes even though he believed he
was not required by law to do so and planned to hire a
lawyer to help the former employee resolve any outstand-
ing tax issues.
During a question and answer session, Inman said he
has refused pressure that he withdraw from the all-male
Bohemian Club because he did not want his membership
to become a "litmus test on my support for women or
women's issues."


Army scientists identify U.S.

remains from Korean War


WASHINGTON (AP) - Army scien-
tists have made the first identifications of
newly returned American remains from
the Korean War in an investigatory break-
through that could unravel some lingering
mysteries of the conflict that cost more
than 33,000 U.S. lives.
Although the Army hasn't officially re-
leased the names, three were provided to
the co-founder of the Korean-Cold War
Family Association of the Missing and
were confirmed to The Associated Press
by officials speaking on condition of ano-
nymity.,
The remains are
believed to be those
of the pilot and three The four
crewmen of an Air
Force strategic mains are
bomber shot down sets that N(
near the Chinese bor-
der in April 1951, has returnme
said U.S. defense of- past three j
ficials.
The investigation ing 148 har
into their fate raises late last ye
questions about
North Korea's treat- communist
mient of crew mem- privately to
bers who apparently
survived shootdown, officials wa
and Soviet involve- imprOVe rel
ment in the three-
year battle for control
of the Korean penin-
sula.
Pat Dunton, whose father was a crew
member on the B-29 but has not been
found, said in an interview that Army of-
ficials told her three of the four names on
the dog tags returned with the remains.
They are Lt. George Aaron, of New
York City, who was the pilot; 2nd Lt.
Elmer T. Bullock, of Penacook, N.H., the
plane's radar observer, and MSgt. Robert
Wilson Jones, of Dekalb, Texas, the flight
engineer.
Dunton said the Army gave her the
names in hopes her group could help it
s',arch for surviving relatives. So far, she
a nd the Army have been unsuccessful.
The AP reached Jones' widow,


ai
fo

9c


P

'm
?a


Geraldine, who now lives in Bakersfield,
Calif., and Bullock's older brother,
Harold, of Bradford, N.H.
"I've been shocked," Jones' widow
said in a quavering voice when told by a
reporter that the Army had made a pre-
liminary identification of her husband's
remains. "I'm going to be sitting on pins
and needles until they can tell me some-
thing official."
She said Jones had been serving in Ko-
rea only three weeks when his plane went
down. She said the Air Force told her at
the time that he and Aaron, the pilot, were
the last to escape
the plane, which
sets of re- apparently ex-
ploded in the sky.
mong 194 Harold Bul-
wrth Korea lock said he
wasn't surprised
d over the his brother's re-
fears, includ- mains had been
identified, "but I
ded over don't know what
\r in what the took them so
long." He said he
government hasn't been told
cdAmerican anything offi-
cially by the
s a gesture to Army, but was
nations. contacted by The
__ Union Leader of
Manchester,
N.H., Sunday
night.
The preliminary identifications of the
four crew members were made at the
Army's Central Identification Laboratory
in Hawaii. They must be reviewed and
confirmed by Army leaders before a posi-
tive identification is declared.
"We do not consider remains identified
until the process is complete," said Ma-
rine Corps Maj. Steve Little of the
Pentagon's public affairs staff.
The four sets of remains are among 194
sets that North Korea has returned over
the past three years, including 148 handed
over late last year in what the communist
government privately told American offi-
cials was a gesture to improve relations.


Tropic Times 5
Jan.21, 1994


Judge clears way

for Citadel female
WASHINGTON (AP) - Chief Justice William H.
Rehnquist cleared the way Tuesday for Shannon
Faulkner to become the first female to attend day
classes with cadets at The Citadel, a 151-year-old
military college.
Rehnquist, without comment, set aside a tempo-
rary stay he had imposed Jan. 12, a day before
Faulkner was to have begun her academic career at
the Charleston, S.C., school.
The lawsuit challenging the college's males-only
admission policy has never been taken to trial.
A federal judge and the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals ordered The Citadel to let Faulkner take day
classes while the legal case continues. The school
has not been ordered to let Faulkner join the Corps
of Cadets or live in the college's barracks.
In the school's request, lawyers for The Citadel
said it was being forced to abandon a "justified
single-gender admissions policy that has defined its
institutional mission and persona since its founding."
They said Faulkner's attendance at daytime
classes would cause irreparable harm because a
males-only environment "is essential to The
Citadel's holistic educational mission."
Lawyers for Faulkner said the school's request
"is based on emotion, not fact or law."
"Faced with the complete absence of any evidence
that one woman will destroy its cadet students, The
Citadel at heart seeks merely to preserve its
longstanding tradition of excluding qualified women
based solely on their gender," the lawyers said.


Armed forces center
The Armed Forces Recreation Center's "Shades of Green" resort hotel,
which opens Feb. 1, on the grounds of Walt Disney World in Orlando, Fla.,
is situated between two 18-hole golf courses. It's the first armed forces
recreation center in the continental United States.


I


I










6Tropic Times
Jan.21. 1994


# Voices


On-post resident wants reimbursement for filter


Dear Mayors' Corner:
As reported by the Tropic Times re-
cently, many of our base houses have
drinking water that is contaminated with
lead. I have two young children and I am
worried about their exposure to this lead.
A very good solution to my worries is
the purchase of a water filter specifically
designed to remove metallic and chemical
impurities from water. I feel strongly that
the $200 spent on this type of filter should
be reimbursable by the government be-
cause it shouldn't be necessary for me to
have to make such a purchase to provide
for my family's safety.
The government would also probably
rather install these filters in every on post
house than the time and expense of
repiping our homes. So, if I buy a filter,


will the government pay me back?
Getting the lead out

Dear Getting:
According to Richard Davis, chief of
Housing Division, Directorate of Engi-
neering and Housing, the quality of watei
in your quarters is a concern for this corn
mand. Water is tested on a regular bas,
to be sure it meets U.S. quality standards.
When residents have specific concerns
about the water quality, samples are also
taken. At this time, the water on all gov-
ernment installations meets U.S. water
purification standards.
The idea of an additional purification


filter system is an excellent idea for con-
cerned residents, but the government can't
reimburse residents for this expense.

Dear Mayors' Corner:
I would like to know why the commis-
sary is unable to keep Copenhagen chew-
ing tobacco in stock? I understand the
.rmy and Air Force Exchange Service has
a different supply system, but why is it
they can get Copenhagen and the commis-
sary can't?
The reasonI ask is that at the commis-
sary a roll is $11.90 and at AAFES it is
$20. This is a big price difference.
Why no supply


Dear Why:
I spoke with the people at the commis-
sary and they now have plenty of
Copenhagen on the shelf in all their com-
missaries.
They will be doing their best to keep it
that way. They also pass along their
apologies for the inconvenience you ex-
perienced.
Editor'snote: This column allowscom-
munity members to submit questions to
the Mayoral Congress. Letters should be
mailed to: Mayors' Corner, Publicity
Chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS).
Anonymity will be granted upon request.
The Tropic Times reserves the right to
edit letters and responses for brevity,
clarity and propriety.


Vehicles must be inspected by end of March


License plate update
The Directorate of Land Transportation has an-
nounced that all privately owned vehicles must be in-
spected by March 31 and have 1994 license plates by
April 17.
The cost of the inspection is $10 and should be done at
a Panama Canal Commission motor pool, officials said.
The inspection must be done before getting the license
plates. License plates will cost $27-47 depending on the
vehicle capacity.
For more information, call 287-3376.
Post vehicle registration
Once vehicle owners have received 1994 license
plates, the Military Vehicle Registration Office must be
notified of any changes in the license plate number, dates,
address change or new insurance information.
If newly assigned to Panama, be sure to visit the Ve-
hicle Registration Office to get a temporary Department
of Defense registration card. Bilingual identification
card, proof of ownership and proof of insurance must be
presented when applying.
For temporary registration of a motorcycle, the driver
must be on the waiting list to attend a Motorcycle Safety
Class.
For a permanent Department of Defense registration
sticker, drivers must bring their Panamanian drivers li-
cense, Bilingual ID card, Panama Safety Inspection
Sticker, registration certificate and license plate, proof of
ownership and proof of insurance for the vehicle. Motor-
cycle owners must also bring their defensive driving card.
The Exonerations Office, Military Customs, Pier 18,
is responsible for the transfer of all vehicles sold to an-
other military person or a Panamanian national. Anyone
planning to sell their vehicle while in Panama must con-
tact that office.
Southern Command Regulation 190-5 requires that at
the time of the transfer, the post vehicle registration
sticker must be removed and turned in to the Exonera-
tions Office before the transaction is completed.
For more information about vehicle registration or
selling a vehicle in Panama, call 287-4545.
Larceny in the locker room
Two soldiers became victims of larceny in separate in-
cidents last week at the Fort Clayton pool locker room.
An unsecured gym bag was stolen from one soldier while
$500 in cash was taken from a soldier's pants pocket that
had also been left unsecured.
MPs remind everyone to lock up personal property and
carry small amounts of cash. If a victim of crime, call
287-4401 or 289-5133.


Proos.MrshlsCone


Fingerprint schedule announced
Fingerprinting is available at the Office of the Provost
Marshal in Building 131, Fort Clayton, 9-11 a.m. Tues-
day and 1-3 p.m. Thursday. Identification cards are
needed to get fingerprints.
The following crimes occurred Jan. 7-13.
Pacific
Fort Clayton 300 housing area - one larceny of secured
private property
Fort Clayton 500 housing area - one larceny of unse-
cured private
Fort Clayton 1000 housing area - one larceny of secured
private property


Fort Clayton 1100 housing area - one larceny of secured
private property
Cocoll housing area - one larceny of unsecured private
property
Corozal housing area - one larceny of unsecured private
property
Quarry Heights housing area - two larcenies of secured
private property
Fort Kobbe housing area - one larceny of secured pri-
vate property
Atlantic

None to report


This authorized unofficial command information pub-
lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic
Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces
Information Program of the Department of Defense, un-
der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S.
Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the
official view of the U.S. government, the Department of
Defense or the U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002
Telephone 285-6612.
Acting Commander in Chief.........................................
Maj. Gen, Walter T. Worthington



E Tropic Tim


Director, Public Affairs.....................CoL James L Fetig
Chief................................................SMSgt. Steve Taylor
Editor............................................SSgt Richard Puckett
Sports Editor........................................Sgt. E. J. Hersom
Staff Editors............................................Spec. John Hall
Rosemary Chong
Maureen Sampson
Volunteer Assistant..............................Josephine Beane
Student Intern...................................Juan Carlos Palacio
Southern Command Public Affairs Office..........282-4278
Command Information Officer..............Patrick Milton
U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.............287-3007
Public Affairs Officer.................Maj. Melanie Reeder
Command Information Officer................Beth Taylor


Editor...............................................SSgt. Jane Usero
Journalists...........................................Sgt. Lori Davis
Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski
Spec. Alexander C. White
24th Wing Public Affairs Office.......................284-5459
Public Affairs Officer..............Capt. Warren L. Sypher
Public Affairs Superintendent.....MSgt. Dale Mitcham
Journalists...................................SSgt. Rian Clawson
Sgt. James A. Rush
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.............283-5644
Public Affairs Officer............................Diane Gonzalez
Photographers........................PH2 Roberto R. Taylor
PH2 Delano J. Mays
U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.......................289-4312
NCOIC.........................................Sgt. Richard Emert











*Commentary


Tropic Times 7
Jan.21,1994


Must we always wait for a catastrophe


before reaching out to others v%


by SMSgt Steve Taylor
Chief, Tropic Times
We, as a military community, tend
to take pride in our sense of
"sticking it out together." But in
the normal day-to-day routine, when
things are going smoothly, are we really
a community of people who look out for
each other?
When someone's in real trouble, do
we help, or do we do the modem thing:
turn our backs, shrug it off, can't be
bothered?
Modem sociologists have commented
on the fact that modem "communities"
are structured more around where we
work, rather than where we live. The
workplace has become the place where
we define ourselves and our ties with
other people, rather than neighborhoods.
The people of Los Angeles just
received a lesson about this.
Amid the fires, streets flooded from
broken water mains, collapsed buildings
and highways - and the 46 deaths -
there's going to be some good to arise out
of the aftermath of Monday's earthquake
in Los Angeles.
Like the tale of the Phoenix that arose
from the ashes, to be reborn again, so
again will Los Angeles.
So much has happened to southern
California recently - riots, mud slides,
wild fires, and now a major earthquake
- it's hard to believe that anyone still
wants to live there, let alone be in a
semblance of a good mood.
And yet that's what I saw on televi-
sion this week.
A man stands in front of the burned-
out rubble that was once his home and
states that, while he lost everything, he
and his family are still alive and healthy.
Here's a man who has his priorities
straight The question is: Did the
catastrophe of earthquake force him to

Direct Qote


reorganize his priorities, or were they
already there.
This man will probably work long and
hard to help his neighbors. Chances are
he might not know his neighbors well, if
at all.
A seismologist, interviewed just hours
after the quake, thought all would go
well, because people always work well
under adversity, after disasters, and an
earthquake is no exception.
People who don't even know each
other, people who last Sunday may not
have even liked each other, are working
together. All of a sudden, distrust, hatred,
and apathy withers away in the face of a
common foe.
History is full of such instances where,
staring survival in the face, people band
together.
It's a casting away of selfishness for
unselfishness.


In the movie Born Yesterday, the
message is repeated. Billy, played by
Melanie Griffith, learns people are
basically selfish or unselfish. Paul, played
by Don Johnson, who is Billy's tutor,
explains that "history is a story of the
unselfish vs. the selfish."
We are at our best when things are
worst.
Another line from another movie, but
one that is apt to be true.
Some historians think civilization
itself arose because of the challenge of
adversity. If life was too easy, people
remained in a undeveloped, nomadic way
of life. Only the very struggle for survival
caused the rise of spectacular civiliza-
tions.
What's the lesson? Only when people
band together, form communities, when
unselfishness prevails over selfishness,
does a society flourish.


ith help?
When apathy strikes, when the "me
first" syndrome, the "get all you can over
your neighbor" philosophy reigns
supreme, societies atrophy and wither
away. Sometimes violently.
For a military community, the lesson
is here. Maybe we've got it too good.
There are people here who need help,
and they're not getting it, with tragic
results. There are things to be done, and
they're not all getting done.
I can hear the "boohooers" now. What
do you mean? Who,'s not getting help?
What's not being done?
I could give specific examples, but
they would only serve to embarrass and
continue the pain of tragic events. That's
not to say that people aren't getting help,
things are not getting done. But there's
more that needs to be done, more people
who aren't getting help when they need
it.
Don't join in the "but what can I do?"
crowd.
Help a kid. Give some blood. Form a
neighborhood watch. Be a big brother or
sister. Join a church. Be a volunteer.
Learn a new skill. Then pass it on. Help
prevent spouse or child abuse by report-
ing what you think might be wrong.
Watch your neighbor's house. Better
yet, get to know your neighbors. Tutor a
student Donate to charity. Work for
charity. Clean something up or paint
something. Learn CPR or first aid.
Recycle paper. Recycle plastic or
glass. No recycling around? Start a
service. Save some energy today. And
then tomorrow...
Just get up off the couch and do
something else. Turn the TV off. Go for
a walk- it's a start.
Let's not wait for a catastrophe, or a
disaster, or more tragedy, to increase our
sense of community. Let's do something
different
Let's do it now.


What should people do to help their community?


q ^.


h'~i


"Do more projects as in
building schools and
cleaning the street
sides."


SK2 Brad Pauley
Special Bout Unit 26


"People should help
other people and try to
have respect for their
neighbors."


SSgt. Isaac Anderson
24th Wing Command
Section


"Anything they can do
as far as making the
world a better place to
live."



Maj. Terry Breitenstein
109th Evacuation Hospital
Birmingham, Ala.


"Get involved in activi-
ties with your Children."





Cordis Storms
Navy family member


and supportive to the
people who help us and
are not in the military."



PFC Yvonne Dubose
92nd Personell Company


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries - or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to
edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.


d


al-









Tropic Times
Jan. 21, 1994


Shalikashvili addresses worldwide interests


Editor's note: The following is part of a news brief-
Ing given at the Pentagon Dec. 13, 1993 by Gen. John
M. Shalikasvilli, Chariman, Joint Chiefs of Staff.

North Korea challenge
Q. General Shalikashvili, certainly one of the highest
profiled challenges that face you now is North Korea, the
problem of North Korea. You have a study under way, I
know, with the South Korean military, of changes that
might be needed to beef up the military there. Have you
any preliminary results from that study? Do you think
that forces need to be beefed up - U.S. and South Ko-
rean forces? And are you confident that the force that's
there now could stop any North Korean thrust before it
reached Seoul?
A. First, as far as the ongoing effort to determine
whether their structure is right or whether their capabili-
ties are in place and what it is that we, in a reinforcing
role, ought to be doing, I think it's much too early to be
talking about specifics, other than you need to view that
it's an ongoing process and not something that has all of
a sudden been brought about by what we've been reading
in the headlines, and that is the nuclear issue. I am satis-
fied, having gone to Korea about a month ago and meet-
ing there with my counterpart, that that's going well.
As far as our confidence to
stop a North Korean attack into
the South, I am very, very confi-
dent. I think even the more pessi- "...there must
mistic studies that you sometimes
write about have no question that conditions bef
we will stop, that the South Kore- States forces
ans, together with our reinforce-
ments, will stop North Korean at- any kind of op
tack far short of their reaching whether that's
their war objectives. I would not Nations or not
want to stand here before you and Nations or not
speculate where that in relation- operations un,
ship to Seoul is. Suffice it to say Nations, there
that I am very comfortable that no
one has yet suggested that we some very stri
would not be able to stop the tons.
North Koreans.
Q. How would you be able to
stop them? In 1950 the Chinese Gen. John
came in on behalf of North Ko- Chairman, Joint (
rea, and it became a very bloody,
long war, and we know the out-
come. What is your assessment of Red China today?
Will they remain neutral? Do you think they'd come in if
North Korea attacks?
A. I think the conditions are totally different. I cer-
tainly would not envision right now that we would be
facing the Chinese government and the Chinese troops
if, in fact, North Korea were foolish enough to attack the
South.
Q. Given the North Koreans' vast numerical superi-
ority, how is it that the South Korean forces reinforced by
the U.S. would be able to repel an invasion?
A. First of all, there is more to a warfighting capabil-
ity than the number of soldiers or airmen or Marines that
one side or the other has. It has to do with the quality of
the force. It has to do with the quality of the armaments.
It has to do with terrain, and also it has to do with whether
you're the attacker or the defender. I am not alone in this
military judgment, that the Republic of Korea forces, re-
inforced by the United States, as it's now envisioned,
would be able to stop any attack.
But let me say, I don't want to leave it with the im-
pression that something has changed in the last month or
two or three that somehow makes it more likely that North
Korea is engaged in some kind of preparation for an at-
tack. I don't want to leave that impression at all. What I
am saying is something that has been true for some time,
and I think it's going to remain true for some time to
come, without giving you all the impression that
we...sense that the North Koreans are in some kind of
preparatory phase prior to attack.

North Korea's objectives
Q. Another question having to do with Korea. Your
own assessment of the likelihood of a North Korean at-
tack? And secondly, you mentioned in orne of your an-
swers, to a question on Korea, that you were confident
that the combined United States/South Korea could stop
a North Korean attack short of North Korea's war objec-
tives?
A. I will tell you that none of us read their war plans,
and I wouldn't want to pretend otherwise. I think logic
would lead you to the conclusion that they probably would
wish to reunify the country through force, and I think our
friends in the Republic of Korea, together with us, have
the capability of stopping him short of that.


m

IC



fo



pi


Q. And the likelihood?
A. I think we have all heard enough about the
unpredictability of Kim 1 Sung and Kim Sung's regime,
so I think it is very dangerous to speculate one with the
other. All I would say is that I don't see anything differ-
ent today than I did a few months ago when I came to this
job, and people who have been here in this building and
watching this part of the world longer than I have don't
see anything that has particularly happened that would
increase or decrease the likelihood between now and, let's
say, six months ago.
Q. Just getting back to your idea of what their war
objectives are, American analysts have assessed that one
of the objectives would be to surround and possibly over-
run Seoul. Do you believe that ROK forces reinforced by
American forces could stop a North Korean invasion
short of Seoul?
A. It's certainly a possibility, and our hope that we
can do so.
Russian reform
Q. You mentioned Russia. The parliament there,
they're electing a parliament, the Nationalist Group, that
has opposed many of (President Boris) Yelsin's policies
on denuclearization, on switching to defense conversion.
What are your thoughts about that, and how would it
change any U.S. military policy?
A. The first thing I would
tell you is that it's useful to re-
be very solid member, as a start point, that
there's an awful lot to be satisfied
)re United about in the sense that we've had
participate in the first free democratic elections
since, I guess, 1917 probably and
oration, that we do have a new constitu-
under United tion that guarantees an awful lot
of the rights to the citizens of
Certainly for Russia. So I think there's an aw-
ler the United ful lot to be very thankful about.
ought to be As far as the outcome be-
tween the reformers and those
-t condi- who would slow down the re-
forms or reorient reforms, I think
I would like to reserve judgment
, until we see better, really, how
Shalikashvill that came out. Certainly, you
hiefs of Staff could speculate that we hope that
after all the votes are counted that
the reformists will have the nec-
essary majority to be able to get programs through the
Parliament and through the Duma that would speed up
reforms.
I think, unless you know more than I right now, I think
it's a little bit too early to tell what the final vote tally will
be.
Q. The latest is that Vice President (Albert) Gore, in
Moscow, is now saying it may not be as optimistic as they
had originally thought. What about your own personal
opinion of (Vladimir) Zhirinovsky? He had been quoted
as saying that he believes that Germany and Russia
should get together and divide up Poland as well as he
would not hesitate to use nuclear weapons, and he thinks
Alaska should be annexed. What are your...
A. I was going to say, I must be careful not to make
any comments about someone who thinks that it's realis-
tic to view Alaska returning to...I don't know enough
about him, other than what I have read in the newspa-
pers. Again, I think it's useful to find out the difference
between election rhetoric and appealing to emotionalism
during this very heated election process they had and what
the man is going to be like when he assumes responsibil-
ity as a member of the Duma.
Q. Does it give you any concerns about U.S. military
policy? Are you beginning to have strategy looking at...
A. No.


Somalia operation
Q. A two-part question about Somalia. Did you see
that video of the Oct. 3 battle in Mogadishu? And two,
would you give us your evaluation of the performance of
(Army Maj.) Gen. (William) Garrison, (commander,
joint) special operations?
A. Yes, I saw it several times. In my judgment the
military personnel involved in that operation performed
with extraordinary courage in an extremely difficult situ-
ation and I think, from a military point of view, did an
absolutely sterling job. I think General Garrison had gone
through all the proper planning and precautionary steps
that one would expect a leader in that kind of an opera-
tion and led those troops with great distinction.
Q. When are we going to get that video?
A. I don't know. We'll look into it.
Q. Is there any security material in there?
A. There might be. There might be methods they


Department of Defense photo
Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, Chairman, Joint Chiefs
of Staff, addressed the North Korea issue, Russian
reform and Somalia operations during a press
conference held at the Pentagon Dec. 14, 1993.
used on the video that I just simply am not prepared to
answer for you now. But those of you who have known
me for more than a day or so know that if there is away to
make this available to you, I certainly won't stand in the
way.
Q. On the issue of peace operations, considering the
problems in Somalia, do you have reservations, and
should there be solid conditions before U.S. forces are
placed under United Nations command?
A. I have always maintained, even long before the 3-
4 October fight in Mogadishu, that there must be very
solid condition before United States forces participate in
any kind of operation, whether that's under United Na-
tions or not. Certainly for operations under the United
Nations, there ought to be some very strict conditions.
In addition to those that we would consider for an op-
eration were it, for instance, under the command and con-
trol of NATO or unilaterally under the United States, is
the issue of the robustness of the chain of command un-
der the U.N., the specific rules of engagement and
whether they not only allow for the self-protection of the
force, but also are robust enough to allow you to get the
job done.
I think we ought to make sure that we judge those
doings on a case-by-case basis, but I can well imagine
that there will be United Nations operations in the future
where we can all, with a great deal of confidence, say that
the command/control arrangement is robust enough, the
rules of engagement are proper, and then for me to rec-
ommend to my boss that it would make sense to partici-
pate. There are other cases where I would obviously have
to say no. Let us agree, I think, to judge each one of them
on a case-by-case basis.

Military options
Q. Let me get your judgment on two military matters.
First of all, on Korea. Does this country have military
options in the event diplomacy fails that, in your judg-
ment, are preferable to permitting the North Koreans to
develop a nuclear weapons capability? No. 2, do you sup-
port extending the borders of NATO eastward over the
next several years with no particular military infrastruc-
ture in place to defend this new territory, and at a time of
shrinking defense budgets and real deep questions about
the national will, to take on additional commitments?
A. On the first question, I know that you do not seri-
ously want me to discuss any planning that we do on this
or any other operation. I would hope that this building
does not get caught short if we are ever asked to do some-
thing, and I feel confident that we won't be. But that's all
I would really want to say on that matter.
As far as the issue of extending security guarantees to
the East, I think for the longest time we were talking about
whether security guarantees are to be extended or whether
NATO membership ought to be extended.
It is, I think, becoming clearer and clearer that there is
a consensus forming in the alliance that people would
like to think, on that issue, that the question is no longer
whether, but when and how.







Tropic Times 9
Jan. 21, 1994


The big



sleepover


Atlantic girls get a

dose of the field
by Sgt. Rick Emert
USARSO Public Affairs Office - Atlantic
FORT SHERMAN - Fort Sherman is a gold mine for
training military units on water and jungle terrain, but it
recently hosted troops of a much different kind.
More than 60 Atlantic Girl Scouts from Brownies to
Cadettes, Pacific Cadettes and parents got a small dose of
"going to the field" during a campout here Jan. 7-9.
They immediately found the vastness of the nearby
jungle and oceanintimidating, saidPeggy Barrett, Atlantic
Girl Scouts chairwoman.
"The girls were little intimidated at first, but then they
lookedatit as anew adventure," she said. "By Friday night,
it was more like a big sleepover."
The campout gave the 6-14-year-old girls the opportu-
nity to see a bit of Panama they may not see normally.
"I think it's important for them to experience nature-
especially in Panama," Barrett said. "There are a lot of
things here like different weather, animals and plants that
they aren't used to seeing."
The campout also left the scouts with an appreciation for
the environment.
"We stressed cleaning up toward the end of the campout
and the girls ended up cleaning even areas that we weren't
in," she said.
The girls were also exposed to Fort Sherman's shoreline
and obstacle course during a one-hour hike.
"We all had a great time out by the ocean," she said. "It
was so much better than just being at home or at a meeting.
The girls got to climb the rope at the obstacle course and
were thrilled about that."
Although they enjoyed the nature hikes the most, there
were other learning experiences, Barrett said.
"The girls gathered just about anything they could find
and we made things like picture frames with them."
They also got a class about first aid from Rhonda
Pittman of the Coco Solo Army Health Clinic.
After a weekend of roughing it with the bugs and the
jungle's unusual sounds, the girls were reluctant to return
to civilization, Barrett said.
"They were anxious to return to their beds, but other
than that, just about everyone wanted to stay out a little
longer," she said.


Parent Yvette Parker helps Girl Scouts-make frames out of leaves.


Boy Scout Troop 8 'brown-bag'it for Kunas
FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO-Atlan-
tic) - Boy Scout Troop 8 recently spread a
)I1bit of good will to the Kuna community of
- Cativa near Colon.
The Scouts passed out 400 brown bags
.. to the Atlantic community and asked com-
-. munity members to fill them with any
" "donations. About 250 of the bags were
returned along with a large box of clothes
, ' and toys from the Coco Solo Army Health
--Clinic.
. .The Noncommissioned Officers Asso-
- ciation also supported the drive, said MSgt.
Pete Moosey, Troop 8 scoutmaster.
The Scouts delivered the donated items
to Cativa and gave them to local officials
and pastors there, he said.
"Normallywetakethemtoacommunity
ononeoftheislands, butwecouldn'tdothat
this year," he said.
But the change in plans benefitted the
scouts.
"It worked outbetterbecause someofthe
scouts gotto go with us and seethe commu-
nity this time," he said. "This is the third
year in the scouts for some of them and it's
the first time they've seen aKuna commu-
nity."
The donated items were well receivedin
Cativa, said SgtL Chris Mulhall, assistant
scoutmaster.
"We went to a place that both (Moosey)
U.S. Army photo by MSgL Pete Moosey and I have been to before," he said. 'The
Troop 8 Boy Scouts unload packages at the Kuna village of Cativa near Colon, people there really needed these items."









STropic Times
1 OJan. 21,1994


*Milestones


Colonel - Bernard Harvey, and Donald Higgins Jr.,
both of U. S. Southern Command.

To Lieutenant Colonel - Stephen Awe of U.S. Army
Dental Activity - Panama, David Boozer, 24th Com-
munications Squadron, Colton McKethan, U.S.
SOUTHCOM.

To Captain - George Fink, 310th Airlift Squadron.

To First Lieutenant - John Spencer and Robert
Griego, both of Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion,
87th Infantry.

To Master Sergeant - Charles Momon of 4th Battal-
ion, 228th Aviation.

To Senior Master Sergeant - William Kennedy, 310th
Airlift Squadron, Thomas Edwards and Nartin Tabor,
both of 24th Civil Engineering Squadron.

To Master Sergeant - Yolanda Coulter, 24th Wing
Group, Kevin Holden, 310th Airlift Support Squadron,
Shelia Washburn, 24th Communications Squadron,
Anthony Edwards, USSOUTHCOM, Ray Gata, 617th
Airlift Support Squadron, Jeff Guay, 24th Air Intelli-
gence Squadron, Robert Richardson, 630th Air Opera-
tions Squadron, Patton Kern, 24th Civil Engineering
Squadron, John Bienia and Pedro Nieves, both of 24th
Operations Support Squadron.

To Staff Sergeant - Joseph Lasalle of 1st Battalion,
228th Aviation.

To Sergeant - Terry Florence of U.S. Army Dental Ac-
tivity - Panama.

To Specialist - Lamanns Fingers of 4th Battalion,
228th Aviation. Adam Sanders and Jesus Salazar, both
of 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation. William Jones,
Eliezer Orellana, Christopher McLaughlin, Waymon
Tipton and Brent Ludlow, all of Headquarters Com-
pany, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Barrett Coller, Jody
Colvin, Yvonne Frieson and Michael O'Connor, all of
549th Military Police Company.

To Private First Class - Jose Torres of U.S. Army
Dental Activity - Panama. David Demons of 4th Bat-
talion, 228th Aviation. Dennis Kyle Jr., Corey
Armstrong and Merlita Parker, all of 1st Battalion,
228th Aviation. Mark DeSantis and Kenneth Ward,
both of 549th Military Police Company. Ricky King
and William Reeder, both of Company B, 5th Battal-
ion, 87th Infantry. Matthew Boardman of Company
C, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Jeremy Bishop of
Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry.

To Private Two - Shawn Johnson of U.S. Army Den-
tal Activity - Panama. Kendall Green of 214th Medi-
cal Detachment William Hernandez Jr. of Company
B, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Zaldy Macam and
Stephen Dornstadter, both of Company C, 5th Battal-
ion, 87th Infantry. Garrett Fogleson of Headquarters
Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry.




Legion of Merit - MSgt. Julius Harden of U.S. Army
Dental Activity - Panama.

Meritorious Service Medal - Capt. Keith Kranhold
and Capt. James Cassella, both of Headquarters Com-
pany, 128th Aviation Brigade.

Navy Commendation Medal - CT1C Ellen Miranda,
HMC Maria Moore.

Air Force Commendation Medal - CTMC Rog
Myrant

Army Commendation Medal - SgL Darlene Taylor
and Spec. Matthew Bland, both of U.S. Army Dental
Activity - Panama. Capt. Douglas Ziemer, CWO2
Brett Westcott, Sgt. George Custer, SgL Tracy Harris


24


The Lucas family prepares for the holidays. U."." "".. or*

Air Force honors 'family of the quarter'


HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) - The 24th Wing is
recognizing the accomplishments of its smallest compo-
nent, the family. It has developed a quarterly award pro-
gram to highlight outstanding achievements of military
members, their spouses and children.
The first recipient is the Lucas family, TSgt. James
M., Veeoletta V., Sydney S. and Whitney L., from the
24th Supply Squadron. The Lucas' were selected for the
final quarter of last year.
James is the noncommissioned officer in charge of the
fuels storage section here and is responsible for receiv-
ing, storing, and transferring more than 36 million gal-
lons of aviation fuel annually. This is in support of more
than 1,600 aircraft each month involved in airlift and
counter-drug missions.
Despite the many demands his job places upon him,

and Spec. John Holgerson, all of 4th Battalion, 228th
Aviation. SSgt. Charles Jay, Sgt. Pamela Hancock,
SgL Shawn Nelson, CWO2 Jerry Caffee and 1st Lt. Ri-
chard Watson, all of 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation.
Sgt Catherine Cisco and Sgt. Patrick Robello, both of
Headquarters Company, 128th Aviation Brigade.

Joint Service Achievement Medal - CTR2 Paul Win-
ter.

Navy Achievement Medal - CTRC Vernon Davison,
CTI1 (SS) Richard Fewkes Jr.

Army Achievement Medal - Sgt. Terry Florence and
Spec. Stephen Jackson, both of U.S. Army Dental Ac-
tivity - Panama. Spec. Michael Dolan and PFC Donald
Gocha, both of 4th Battalion, 228th Aviation. Spec.
Jerome Vann, Spec. Todd Bell, Spec. Larson Parker
and Sgt. Terry Baughn, all of 1 st Battalion, 228th Avia-
tion. MSgt. Gilberto Wolmers of Headquarters Com-
pany, 128th Aviation Brigade. Spec. Kevin Brickman
of Company B, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Spec.
Galen Lindsey of Company C, 5th Battalion, 87th In-
fantry. SSgt. Thomas Engel, Spec. Michael Sovey and
Spec. Paul Dudas, all of Headquarters Company, 5th
Battalion, 87th Infantry.

Good Conduct Medal - SgL Jaime Caro, Sgt. James
Edwards, Sgt. Gregory McPhee, Sgt Henry Mitchell
and SgL Vernon Young Jr., all of U.S. Army Dental
Activity - Panama. Sgt. Byron Lane, Spec. Christo-
pher Glatz and Spec. Kenneth Swarts, all of 214th
Medical Detachment, CTM3 Terry King.

Letter of Appreciation - Spec. Rex Horner of 1st Bat-


the NCO won't let his family suffer.
"He comes to all the special things that go on and it
makes my girls know him better outside his capacity as a
military member," said Veeoletta. "When they see him
off duty, is makes them realize that he's also their dad,
not just a working guy."
Veeoletta is a key member of the base Spouse Enrich-
ment Quality Improvement Team which is designed to
help military spouses adjust to life in Panama.
Veeoletta and James have been married for 10 years.
Together they work to raise Sydney, age 9, and Whitney,
age 7, in the somewhat hectic military lifestyle.
"We've always been this way, it keeps us close," James
said. "We keep doing different things and keep involved
with other people also. Work is busy, but somehow you
find the time."

talion, 228th Aviation.



Battalion Catamount Certificate - SSgt. James Popp
of Jungle Operations Training Battalion.

Frocked to Petty Officer First Class - CTR1 Darrell
Williamson.

Frocked to Petty Officer Second Class - CTI2 (SS)
David Anderson, CTI2 Steven Espinosa, CTM2
Donald Fisher, CTL2 (AW) Marilyn Garcia-Pacheco,
CTR2 Paul Winter, CTM2 Timothy Lanham.

Frocked to Petty Officer Third Class - CTR3 Jeffrey
Frost, CTI3 Paul Gary, CTO3 David Himmelman, J03
Sean Hughes, CTO3 Rhonda Remling, CTI3 Susana
Viereck, CTO3 John Whiting.



Field Sanitation Course - Spec. Jerry Bice Jr. and PFC
Stephen Patruno, both of 549th Military Police Com-
pany.

Military Police Investigations School - Sgt. Jose
Gazman and Sgt. Marlene Dameron, both of 549th
Military Police Company.




Vanessa Marie Cosme was born Jan. 6 to 1 st Lt. Juan
and Clarisse Cosme.










Sports


Jan.21,1994


Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Going up?
Eric Miller rappels a rock after securing a rope to climb it. (See story and photos on page 13)


Balboa High School hosts and wins
second interscholastic league track
meet.


Pa2ell


Department of Defer" phioto by SgL Ei. Herson


Basketball page 12
MEDDAC takes on Jazz in Over 30
basketball season opener at Reeder
Physical Fitness Center.


and More page 15
*Air Force wrestling team
*Balboa Relays
+SCN A.M. radio sports


Page 11









STropic Times
12Jan. 21,1994



Old dogs learn new tricks

.- f.. , by Sgt Lori Davis
. , ^ a .USARSO Public Affairs Office______, .


U.S. Army Photo bySgL Lori Davis
Jazz's Danny Hardeytakes to the air on afast break while Kenneth Claud of MEDDAC watches from below.


FORT CLAYTON - Some old dogs learned new tricks
for hanging in the Over-30 basketball league opener at
Reeder Physical Fitness Center Tuesday.
MEDDAC learned they can't play Jazz man-to-man
and Jazz learned Nathaniel Taylor kicks butt.
Taylor romped all over MEDDAC's defense, chalking
up six buckets in the first half. His hot shooting got Jazz off
to an early lead, leaving MEDDAC in the dust, 51-43.
When the dust cleared after the first, MEDDAC's
offensive leaders were far behind. Kenneth Claud sank two
hoops and put in a foul shot to lead MEDDAC in scoring.
Alphonso Banks put in two baskets and Terry Diggs,
Michael Truitt and Dewayne Stubbelfield scored a bucket
each.
The poor showing in the first half wasn't because
MEDDAC couldn't go to the inside. They all went to the
inside, at once.
Things were flowing fineforJazz earlyon. RonaldPetty
boosted the score with three hoops and Daniel Harley put
into. RodneyMayo,EddieFrazierandBernardGrimsley
went to the board to put them ahead 30-17 in the first half.
After being dominated in the first, MEDDAC changed
its game plan and went to ahalf-court defense to shut down
Jazz's fast breaks. The switch paid off as they stayed
between Taylor and the goal and prevented his hard-
charges to the net.
Taylorwas held to only sixpointsinthesecondandPetty
scored two.
MEDDAC also found its offensive groove in the
second. Arthur Hillard put in two baskets and a three-
pointer as did Claud and Banks. Stubbelfield and Diggs.
sank one each.
With a strong lead to cushion them, Jazz slowed down
toward the end of the second. The fast-break offense gave
way to ball control and passing. The frustrated MEDDAC
players tried to force turnovers, but ended up with 11 fouls
in the second half compared to four from the first half.
MEDDAC out-scored Jazz in the second 26-21, but it
wasn't enough to make up for the 13 point deficit from the
first half. Jazz put MEDDAC away 51-43.
"We came out and got the lead and had good defense
along the way," said Jazz coach Anthony Todd.
"We've got a well-rounded team and they know how to
play together. They're strong on rebounding, fast breaks
and the inside plays," he said.
Not knowing how to play together was a weak point for
several MEDDAC players who are playing together forthe
first time. They got off to arocky start, but this loss taught
them what to work on, Dyer said.
"We have to improve on our fundamentals like passing.
We were clogging the lane too much, but that's what
happens when you get tired," said Diggs.
"We have been getting ready forthe Transisthmian Run
and we haven't been practicing, but after the run this
weekend, we'll be ready, he said.


SPs slaughter Airlift in 'Dirty Dozen'


Tournament champions


become league favorites


by SgL James A. Rush
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - By winning the pre-
season "Dirty Dozen" Softball Tourna-
ment Jan. 7-9, the 24th Security Police
Squadron has established itself as the team
to beat.
Their first opponent, the 617th Airlift
Support Squadron Team 2, fell far short of
the task as the cops mugged them 18-7 Jan.
13 at Weekly Field.
Security police batters totalled 18 hits
and scoredinevery inning. Airliftsupport's
defense helped outwitherrorsin each ofthe
first five innings.
Third baseman Paris Fant already had
two singles, but his sixth inning home run
was the game's final insult. After he and
right-center fielder Bob Henson trotted


home, the umpires mercifully called the
game. If a team leads by 10 or more runs
after five innings, the game is ended under
the "Slaughter Rule."
Right fielder Mark Delesky chipped in
three singles, and three others had a pair of
hits. Catcher Dan "Cookie" Cook was the
biggestofthesewithafirstinning homerun
and a single.
Airlift support's offense produced a re-
spectable 12 hits, three by left fielder David
Ames. They benefited from only a single
error, which led to their first run in the fifth
inning.
The rest of the scores came in the top of
the fifth inning, and were enough to prevent
the game from ending at 13-1.
Last year's "Dirty Dozen" champs, the
24th Supply Squadron, went on to take the
1993 base championship as well. This sea-


son, the military police are poised to follow
the same trend.
They were 5-0 in the "Dirty Dozen."
Only the 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation
Regiment, Bravo Company came close.
The military police edged them 11-8. The
"Slaughter Rule" came into play in the rest
of their games including a 13-3 slap in the
face to Supply.
The season is in its infancy, but already
the security police have taken the roleofbig
kid on the block. It's a role coach Norm
Poppell relishes.
"We're looking forward to it," he said.
"We've got a lot to make up for from last
year."
"We were one of the best team's out
there, and everyone knew it, but we just fell
apart at the end of the season."
"This year, we're looking forward to
meeting Supply in finals at the end. I don't
knowifthey'relooking forward toit, butwe
are."
That the security police will be in the
playoffs is taken for granted by most. The
base's best teams are separated into two


leagues and four divisions.
Supply and the 617th Airlift Support
Squadron Team 1, both playoffteams from
last year are in the American League and
will not face the security police during the
regular season.
The 24th Maintenance Squadron, al-
ready with a win over ALSS 1, has high
aspirations this season and the 536th Engi-
neer Battalion, the "Dirty Dozen" runners
up, look to be there at the end also.
Within the National League, the secu-
rity police faces roadblocks against the 1 st
Battalion, 508th Infantry, Headquarters
Company and the combined team from the
24th Operations Support Squadron. Both
are 2-0 so far.
The 24th Communications Squadron
Team 1 and 24th Medical Squadron, play-
off contenders fromlast season, are waiting
also.
If the security police emerge unscathed
after the regular season, four opponents
from the American League will be lurking
in the playoffs and three others from the
National League will be seeking revenge.









Tropic Times 13
Jan. 21, 1994 D


Jeremy Middleton makes it to the top of the rock.




giving on





the Edge
the Edge


In the '90s, a sport labeled
alternative or extreme, such
as skysurfing and downhill
mountain biking, creates an
instant craze. It seems the only
prerequisite for the label is a
willingness to risk one's neck,
but there is an exception -
rock climbing. It has been
around long before anyone
dreamed of a mountain bike or
slipping into a pair of bindings
and its extremely safe with a
belay.
Climb-
ing with a
belay "It was first
involves me as a cor
two chess, ball
people, a s
climber weightlifting
attached
to one end Eric
SRock C
of a rope


ex
mbi
t a
."99
Mi
limb


and a
belayer at the other end with the
rope strung though a snaplink
or 'cariabiner' ring at the
precipice of a mountain.
The climber is free to try
moves he normally wouldn't
dare without a rope, said Eric
Miller, who has been climbing
for nearly ten years.
Miller said he has never seen
anyone injured beyond cuts and
scrapes, although he could
picture a broken limb in a worst
case scenario.
"It was first explained to me
as a combination of chess, ballet
and weightlifting."
Although it takes strength to
make it up the mountain,
balance and coordination are
more important factors, Steve


Barnes said. It's knowing when to
use strength and when to conserve
it that counts.
The average soldier is in good
enough shape to start climbing,
Barnes said.
Barnes has been climbing with
Miller for nearly a year.
When climbing a tricky rock,
it's important to be able to trust
you're belay man, Barnes said.
Taking safety procedures is also
very important.
"When people start joking
around and
not taking it
plained to seriously, is
nation of when people
nd can get hurt,"
Barnes said.
Miller and
er Barnes took
Dler Jeremy
er Middleton
and two other
new climbers to the abandoned
quarry near Fort Clayton for their
first crack at a rock Monday.
"There was no fear factor,"
Middleton said. "You know the
guy with the rope is going to stop
you from falling."
Middleton and the others took a
couple falls, but made it to the
precipice.
"It gives you a sense of accom-
plishment," Middleton said after
his successful first climb.
Miller and Barnes are into
climbing with a '90s attitude.
"It's less unadulterated than
mainstream sports," they said.
And it's a little more timeless
than the other adrenaline junkie
sports that will be gone tommorow,
Miller said.


Steve Barnes climbs using his fingertips.


Steve Barnes tightens the anchor line for the belay line.


story and photos by Sgt. E.J. Hersom
Tropic Times Sports Edtorc


'lop V4,










S4 Tropic Times
1"T Jan. 21, 1993




Balboa hosts, wins meet


by Jim Sweeney
Tropic Times contributor, Green Devils Coach
BALBOA-TheBalboaBulldog Varsity
track team won the second interscholastic
league trackmeet with decisive 11 points
to remain number one in team competition
in the Department of Defense Dependents
School's varsity track league.
The Red Machine edged out the Green
Devils for second with 77.5 points to 70.5.
The Cougars had 31 and Chame school
6.
In junior varsity competition, the Red
Machine captured first place with 68 points
followed by Chame with 52 points, Green
Devils with 44 points, Bulldogs with 24
points and Cougars with 11 points.
In overall varsity league competition for
the season the Bulldogs have 225 points
and look like sure champs with only one
meet remaining.
The Red Machine and the Green Devils
are neck-and-neck for second in the league
with the Red Machine at 160.5 points and
the Green- Devils at 159.5 points. The
Cougars have 66 and Chame has 13.
The final league track meet will be 5:30
p.m. tonight at Balboa High School track.
The following are varsity results:
Girls
Long Jump: 1, Nolte, Bulldogs, 12' 61/
2"; 2, Singleton, Bulldogs, 12' 5 1/2"; 3,
Barnett, Bulldogs, 12' 3 3/4"; 4, Wilson,
Green Devils 12' 3" 5, Jones, Green Devils,
12' 2 1/2"
Shot put: 1, Singleton, Bulldogs, 29' 8
1/2"; 2, Higley, Bulldogs, 26' 1"; 3, Banks,
Bulldogs, 25' 4"; 4, Cooper, Red Machine,
23' 3"; 5, Short, Green Devils, 22' 3"
HighJump: 1, Cooper, Red Machine, 4'
4"; 2, Banks, Bulldogs, 4' 4"; 3, Higley,
Bulldogs, 4' 4"; 4, McLean, Bulldogs, 4' 1";
5, Rosales, Green Devils, 4'
55 meter low hurdles: 1, Singleton,
Bulldogs, 9.5 2, Epperson, Green Devils,
10.44 3, Anckle, Red Machine, 10.53 4,
Stargen, Green Devils, 10.77 5, McLean,
Bulldogs, 10.79
100 meter dash: Barnett, Bulldogs,
23.21; 2, Short, Green Devils, 14; 3, Jones,
Green Devils, 14.02; 4, Daniel, Bulldogs,
14.05; 5, Cedeno, Green Devils, 14.18
400 meter dash: 1, Singleton, Bull-
dogs, 1:08.24; 2, Epperson, Green Devils,
1:13.82; 3, Choocherd, Red Machine,
1:18.58; 4, Wallace, Red Machine, 1:20.6;
5, Pitts, Bulldogs, 1:25.08
800 meter run: 1, Schwan, Chame,


2:49.97 2, Wilson, Green Devils, 3:05.66 4,
Valdilles,GreenDevils,3:12.815,Rosales,
Green Devils, 3:25.94
200 meter dash: 1, Barnett, Bulldogs,
30.24; 2, Jones, Green Devils, 30.8; 3,
Epperson, Green Devils, 31.67; 4, Short,
Green Devils, 34.28
400 meter relay: 1, Bulldogs, Banks,
Daniels, Nolte, Barnett, 1:00.36
Boys
Longjump: 1, Chastain, Red Machine,
18' 9 3/4"; 2, Christopherson, Bulldogs, 16'
1/4"; 3, Klasovsky, Bulldogs, 16' 1/4"; 4,
Delgado,Red Machine, 15'9"; 5,Soto,Red
Machine, 15' 3 1/4"
Shot put: 1, Gutierrez, Bulldogs, 37' 5";
2, Gonzalez, Green Devils,35' 5";3,Abrego,
Red Machine, 32' 2"; 4, Hernadez, Red
Machine, 31'3"; 5, Trim, Red Machine, 27'
7"
Discus: 1, Gonzalez, Green Devils, 92'
2"; 2, Abrego, Red Machine, 90' 1 1/2"; 3,
Guttierrez, Bulldogs, 85' 7"; 4, Stokes,
Bulldogs, 77' 6 1/2"; 5, Hernandez, Red
Machine, 76' 2"
Highjump: 1, Novotny, Bulldogs, 5'7";
2, Ortiz, Cougars, 5' 2"; 3, Martinelli, Red
Machine, 5'; 4, Klasvosky, Bulldogs, 5'
Pole vault: 1, Watanbe, Green Devils,
9'; 2, Avery, Bulldogs, 8' 6"
110 meter high hurdles: 1, Soto, Red
Machine, 19.82; 2,Goodno,Bulldogs,22.79
100 meter dash: 1, Chastain, Red Ma-
chine, 11; 2, Guttierez, Bulldogs, 11.02; 3,
Olivares,Green Devils, 11.73; 3,Martinelli,
Red Machine, 11.73, tie
400 meter dash: 1, Ortiz, Cougars 55.84;
2, Guttierrez, Bulldogs, 57.56; 3, Chastain,
Red Machine, 57.64; 4, Abrego, Red Ma-
chine, 59.76; 5, Wallace, Cougars, 5:28.61
1600 meter run: 1, E. Davis, Green
Devils, 4:50.45, record; 2, H. Davis, Cou-
gars, 4:53; 3,Lee, Red Machine, 5:22.59; 4,
Galvez, Cougars, 5:28.09; 5, Sweeney,
Green Devils 5:28.61
800 meter run: 1, H. Davis, Cougars,
2:12.72; 2,E. Davis, GreenDevils,2:12.88;
3, Ortiz, Cougars, 2:23.86; 4, Lee, Red
Machine, 2:27.92; 5, Galvez, Cougars,
2:29.69
200 meter dash: 1, Chastain, Red Ma-
chine, 24.42; 2, Martinelli, Red Machine,
24.92; 3, Olivares, Green Devils, 26.27; 4,
Brown, Green Devils, 28.27; 5, Goodno,
Bulldogs, 28.41
400 meter relay: 1, Red Machine,
Abrego, DelGado,Lovejoy, Trim, 52.11; 2,
Cougars, Wallace, Tremblay, Ortiz, Davis,
52.7; 3, Green Devils, Gonzalez, Sweeney,
Brown, Olivares, 53.19


Evan Davis makes a pole vault attempt.


." ' " " ' - - " - .












"'. *'- .**-- .'.f . ' " ,-_111.,"1-,1- ."'-"""":1"1"
I;.
flf










r.4y-.... . -"


.. ,,-, 8 . .
�7.Y











S afe Departmentof Defense photo by SSgt. Richard indvig

Gregory Glen of the 59th Engineer Company slides into home against the Marine team in a softball tournament Navy Station won this past weekend.









Tropic Times
Jan. 21, 1994 1


Balboa Relays
The 43rd running of the Balboa Relays will held at Balboa High School Jan. 28-29. Events include
sprints, hurdles, distance, relays, shot, discus, long jump, high jump and pole vault. Participants must
be on a team to compete. For more information call Cleve Oliver at the Balboa gym at 252-5704.
Soldiers interested in running the relays may call Willie Moye at 287-6411 or Sue Bozgoz at 287-3445
or 260-1128.


3-on-3 basketball
Deadline to sign up for the 3-on-3 Rodman Fitness
Center Intramural Basketball Tournament is Feb. 9. Call
283-4222/4061 for more information or to sign up.

Wrestling camp
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center is looking for
active duty airmen to submit applications for the AirForce
team wresting camp from March 1 through 29 at Peterson
AFB, Colo. Call MSgtL Al Beck at 284-3451 for more
information.

Rodman 5K Fun Run
Runners are neededfortheRodman 5KFunRun, which
will be held 6:30 a.m. Jan. 28. There is no entry fee.
Deadline to register is Wednesday. Run is open to all
military and civilian personnel. Units with most runners
and first and second place receive awards. Call 283-4222/
4061 to sign up.


Beginner swim meet
The Fort Davis Pool will host a beginners swimming
meet 'Fiesta Panama' 10 a.m. Feb. 19. Registration dead-
line is Feb. 18. Categories are doggie kick, front kick, back
kick and free style. Age groups are for 4-12 year olds. For
more information, call Armando Jimenez at 289-3272.

Body building contest
The body building contest scheduled for Jan. 29 at the
Howard Base Theater has been cancelled.

Free weight training
The Fronius Fitness Center has free weight training
sessions and Nautilus machine training sessions 3-4 p.m.
Tuesday. Call 289-3108 for more information

Transisthmian relay
The Transisthmian Relay Race will be held Sunday.
Categories are U.S. military, female, open and open over
40. Teams consist of 10 runners and two alternatives. Call
287-4050.


I


Swim meet
The Howard Pool and Zodiac Community Recreation
Cener will host the Howard Tarpon Swim Meet 8a.m. Jan.
29. Teams from Howard AFB, Fort Clayton, Rodman
Naval Station and Fort Davis will participate. For more
information, call Lisa Nofi at 284-3569 or the recreation
center at 284-6161.

SCN radio sports
The Southern Command Network's AM 790 Pacific
and 1420 Atlantic will broadcast the following sports this
weekend.
Tonight
Pro basketball: Seattle at Dallas at 8:30 p.m.
Saturday
College football: Senior Bowl from Mobile, Ala.
Residents who live off post may listen to live simul-
casts of the following games In English as they air on
local television stations in Spanish.
Sunday
Pro football: AFC championship game; Kansas City
Chiefs at Buffalo Bills at 12:30 p.m.
NFC championship game; San Francisco 49ers at
Dallas Cowboys at 4 p.m.

Swimming classes
The Howard and Albrookpools invite parents and their
children to enroll in swimming lessons. Diving classes and
ladies water exercise classes are available at the Albrook
Pool. For more information, call the Zodiac Community
Activities Center at the Howard Pool at 284-3569 or the
Albrook Pool at 286-3555.

Pan-Am Dive Club
The Pan American Dive Club is welcoming new mden-
bers. The club is located in Building 214, Fort Espinar and
is open 6-8 p.m. Friday. Dues are $6 per month or $25 for
six months. Rentals available. Call Gary Garay at 289-
3428 or 289-4447 or Tom Bell at 289-3762 or 289-3538.

Shark, bottom fishing
The Rodman Marina hosts shark and bottom fishing 6-
11 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday nights on the Black
Stallion and Vargas boats. Tickets must be purchased the
day before the trip. Fishing charters to Pina Bay for marlin
fishing are also available. Call theRodman Marina at 283-
3147/3150.

Rock and Bowl
The Howard Bowling Center hosts bowl to favorite
oldies in its Rock and Bowl program 9 p.m. until closing
Monday through Thursday. For more information, call the
center at 284-4818.

Sports equipment
The Howard Sports and Recreational Center has the
sporting equipment for weekend outings, camping, beach
combing, golfing and more. Boogie boards and board
games are available for children. Items are available for
daily, weekly or weekend rates. Several specials are being
run throughout January. For more information, call 284-
6107.

Fishing charters
Trophy deep-sea and Sunskiff bottom fishing charters
are available at the Rodman Marina. Charters include
captain, fishing gear, cooler and ice. Call the marina at
283-3147 or 283-3150 for more information.

Free aerobics
The Reeder Physical Fitness Center has free aerobics
given by Teresa Consterdine 9:15 a.m.- 10:15 am. week-
days. Each workout has a warm-up, cardiovascular work-
out, cool down and floorwork. Call 287-3861 for more
information.

Amador golf
Golfers who wish to participate in tournaments should
have an established handicap. Those who are not members
of Fort Amador Golf Course will be expected to pay green
fees.
The Amador Golf Club is also using pre-scheduled
starting times forteeing offon weekends and U.S. holidays.
Only groups of three or four may reserve tee times before
10 a.m. Reservations may be called in beginning Wednes-
day prior to the weekend. Call 292-4511 for more informa-
tion.




oil-9~ .~


16 Tropic Times
1i6 Jan. 21, 1994



New unit


activates
COROZAL - The United States Army
Reserve Held Medical Training Site was
officially activated Jan. 12 here.
It was established as aUnited States Army
South unit Oct. 4, 1993.
It has been operational since 1991, but was
not authorized to act as an independent unit,
said Maj. Justino L. Sosa, FMTS commander.
"The FMTS concept has been around
since 1991, but for various reasons it was not
implemented until now,"Sosasaid. "Up until
recently the Medretes (medicalreadiness train-
ing exercises) have been supported by various
National Guard and Reserve units."
Its mission is to conduct humanitarian
medical, dental and veterinary exercise sup-
port for USAR units deploying to the U.S.
Southern Command areas of operation. The
FMTS is staffed with seven USAR-active
Guard and Reserve officers and noncommis-
sioned officers.
"The Medrete's objective is to conduct
humanitarian medical, dental, veterinary and
civic actions," Sosa said. "We support host
nation health care and enhance the U.S
military's image in Latin America."


Cooperative


Singing praise U.S. Ary poto by Spc. Alexander C. White
The Fort Clayton Chapel choir sings 1960s' music during the Martin Luther King Jr. commerative ceremony Jan.
13.



efforts save injured diver's life


by SSgL Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - The cooperative efforts of an Air
Force reserve major, a Panamanian boat captain, and an
American civilian were instrumental in preventing a
recent diving incident from turning tragic.
A small group of divers were enjoying a dive around
Drake Island near Portobelo when the incident occurred.
Majors John Regan and Billy Sloan had just come up
from a "real good dive" and when they broke the surface
they found the wind had kicked up and turned the ocean
really rough, Sloan said.
The two also discovered that they'd surfaced more
than 100 yards from the dive boat, so they struck out
against the pounding waves to close the distance.
"We'd been down about 40 minutes, so we were
already tired," Sloan explained. "By the time we finally
got to the side of the boat, we were both just about
exhausted."
Judy Raymond, another diver who had finished her
dive early, was already on board with boat captain


Chespiro Zapata when the two men came alongside the
dive boat.
"I could see they were really tired, so I tried to help
Chespiro take their equipment when they started to hand
it up," Raymond said.
After Regan had handed up his weight belt and
buoyancy control device, Sloan said, a wave slammed his
friend and diving partner against the boat and he slipped
"several times" below the surface.
"I pulled John up and kept his head above the surface
and then tried to get him over to the ladder," Sloan said.
"He wasn't able to help himself much and he was
disoriented and flailing about He clocked me a good one
with his elbow, but I did manage to get him over to the
ladder."
Raymond said she saw Regan was having difficulty
getting aboard, so she leaned down over the side of the
boat and grabbed hold of the back of his shirt.
"I didn't have enough strength to pull him out of the
water," she said, "but at least I could prevent him from
banging into the side of the boat."
Finally, they managed to drag Regan aboard the boat.


They then did what they could to make him comfortable
and keep him warm, determine his condition and help
him regain his orientation.
Shortly thereafter, the rest of the dive group came to
the surface and boarded the boat. Javier Freiburghaus,
an experienced dive instructor and the owner of the
diving resort that scheduled the dive came alongside in
another boat and lent his expertise to control the situ-'
ation. The boat containing Regan then returned to the
shore.
Sloan and another diver, U.S. Navy Reserve Petty
Officer Angela Hart, helped Regan into a car while
Freiburghaus phoned ahead to the Army clinic at Coco
Solo that they were coming in with the victim of a diving
incident.
"When we got there the doctors classified it as a near
drowning and they treated John for that," Sloan said.
"Then they called in a chopper to medevac him to
Gorgas.
"It was a scary situation for everyone involved," Sloan
said. "We're all just glad it ended the way it did and he's
all right."


TopAir Force NCO discusses issues


LUKE AFB, Ariz (Air Force News Service) - Chief
MasterSergeantoftheAirForce Gary Pfingstonsees job
security, promotion stability and fewer overseas moves
as constants for the future of the enlisted force.
The 10th chief master sergeant of the Air Force
discussedenlisted matters here
recently during his annual west-
em regional tour.
Pfingstonexpectsthefuture "I see making a
Air Force to be made up of effortto decide
more than 80 percent enlisted
people working in a high-qual- expected of us
ity, dynamic force. job is."
"Whatever the Air Force of i
the future has in store, there
will be a large percentage of CSMgt. Gar
enlisted, so jobs are going to be Chief Master Serg
very secure," he said.
Pfingston considers the
force to bein good shape, despite his previous concerns
about enlisted force cuts and the effect on mission
capabilities.
"I'm more comfortable with our projected base force
than when I first heard of the proposed cuts, he said."
He credits the bottom-up review with defining roles
and missions, and designing a force structure for the
future.
The review defined the Air Force structure, gearing
it toward participating in and winning two major re-
gional conflicts nearly simultaneously.
Regardless of the force drawdown, Pfingston fore-
casts promotion stability.
"I think promotions, as we know them today, are


S(
V


8


going to stay basically the same forthe next yearortwo,"
he said, but added that he see chances for promotion
increasing in five or 10 years.
Budget cuts have also limited the availability of
overseas assignments by lengthening those tours.
"Any time we move fewer
people,it's cheaper. TheAirForce
position has been to allow people
consciOUS overseas to stay longer because it
what is saves money," he said.
Pfingstonsaidstatesidemoves
and what our probablywon'tchangemuchfrom
what they've been forthe last five
years.
"There will continue to be
Pfingston mission requirements and man-
ant of the Air Force datory training, but we aren't go-
ing to move people just for the
sake of moving them, he said."
To meet future needs, the Air Force will be built on
a more diversified enlisted force, said Pfingston.
For example, the new Air Force specialty codes are
designed to create more diversity in enlisted skills.
He said the new codes will help manage the enlisted
force smarter as a result of being less specialized.
Whileenlisted members will accomplishmorethrough
their diversified skills, the chief believes the force will
work smarter, not necessarily harder.
"I see making a conscious effort to decide what is
expected of us and what ourjobis. Then we need a force
sized to do that. Does that mean people are going to be
working 12-hour days, six days a week? I don't think
en "1


Marine injured at Sherman
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO)- AU.S. Marine
was injured Jan. 12 at approximately 9:30 a.m. during a
training exercise at Fort Sherman.
Cpl. Kevin Powers, Company F, 2nd Battalion, 9th
Marines, Camp Pendleton, Calif., injured his neck while
attempting to dive under a wire on an obstacle course.
Powers was transported to Coco Solo Clinic and later
flown to Gorgas Army Community Hospital where he
was treated for one day.
Powers was then medically evacuated to Brooke
Army Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas.
Circumstances surrounding the incident are still un-
der investigation by U.S. Army South authorities.

AAFES closes for inventories
COROZAL (Tropic Times) - The Army and Air
Force Exchange Service will conduct its annual inven-
tory Sunday and Monday.
AAFES announces the following schedule:
Closed Sunday
Fort Clayton Shoppette Building 95, MCSS; Howard
AFBMCSS; GorgasHospitalShoppette; Quarry Heights
Shoppette; Fort Espinar Shoppette
Closed Monday
Corozal Main Store; Fort Clayton - Auto Parts, Building
135 Plaza Shoppette, Building 519 Shoppette; Howard
AFB -Main Store, Service Station, ClassSix; FortKobbe
Shoppette; Albrook AFS - Toyland, Shoe Store, Furni-
ture Store, Shoppette, Video Rental, Class Six; Cocoli -
Shoppette; Curundu - Shoppete/Gas; Fort Davis Retail,
Service Station, MCSS; Fort Sherman Retail.




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Vol. VTI. No. 3 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, Jan. 21, 1994 Poor Hl IV tests p~rompt added\ medical action GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL (USARSO PAO) -Reports of poor human immunodeficiency virus testing of blood donated in Europe is worrying many former European Command personnel, Gorgas officials said. The IIV causes Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, or AIDS. This has led to the recent development of a special world-wide medical program, said Maj. Catherine W. Bonnefil, chief of Army Community Health Nursing at Gorgas. "Current and former beneficiaries assigned to EUCOM from 1985 to Nov. 1, 1993, who received blood transfusions from German civilian medical treatment facilities, may have been exposed to HIV-contaminated blood products," she said. "Although the risks to U.S. citizens is believed to be extremelylow, those potentially at risk should see ahealth care provider for evaluations and possible testing." Eligibility for this program has been granted to any u.s. Army photo by SSgt Jane Usaro previously eligible beneficiary who was stationed or Gorgas Army Community Hospital officials are offering blood tests for anyone concerned about being worked in Germany and is potentially at risk, hospital infected with the HIV after receiving a blood transfusion in Germany. officials said. This includes former servicemembers, current and treatment, officials said. ment facility worldwide which is equipped to provide this former Department of Defense employees and family Medical benefits are limited to the evaluation, testing level of medical service," Bonnefil said. tr':mbers who received transfused blood or blood prodand associated counsciing for HIV. Treatment eligibility ends Nov. 19. ucts in a civilian meIcal treatment facility in Germany "Evaluation, testing and counseling will be provided Those wanting information about getting an HIV since 1985 and can prove prior eligibility for medical at no charge to those eligible at any Army medical treatblood test can call 282-5419/5162. CPO assisting 1994 vehicleinspections underway family members Revisado stickers available; Newly shipped auto process FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Miliregistration through March 31 FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -People who are new to tary family members in Panama are reassured Panama or have recently had a vehicle shipped here need to get a that jobs are available and that an average of FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The 1994 Panamanian driver's cense and register their vehicle through 20 family members are hired each month, said Revisado stickers for vehicle registration are now available Panama's government, officials said. Directorate of Civilian Personnel officials. and can be picked up through March 31, officials said. To pick up and register privately owned vehicles, the folow"Most of these new hires have taken advanThe Revisado sticker is issued to vehicles passing the anIng must be done: stage of the specialized services this office nual inspection. by the Panamanian government. All pri*To pick up a vehicle, call 2 F2442 or stop by the 1322nd tage ~Medium Port In Building 1501, Balboa. For a recording of ye(DCP) provides for family members," said vately owned vehicles are subject to this inspection, said hices that have arrived, call 282-4241. Harry Remshard, chief of Recruitment and Melissa Flynn, Military Police Command Host Nation Liai*The paperwork vehicle owners get when they pick up their Placement Division of DCP. son officer. vehicle must be taken to the Panama Exonerations Office at the Some services available are picking up and UPort Captain's Building in the Pier 18 area, Balboa. US. government employees and their family members Exoneration documents Issued at the Panama Exonerations reviewing the Special Family Member Applican have their vehicles inspected at the Panama Canal ComOffice must be taken back to the 1322nd Medium Port and the cation Packet, job information seminars and mission motor pools in Ancon or Cristobal, she said. vehicle win then be released. one-on-one counseling at the Job Information The inspection costs $10 and a 1993 vehicle registration e vehicle must then be taken to be inspected with ali docucounelin regstraion menIs. Vehicles entering Panama before March 31 must pas the Center, he said. or vehicle inspection document, proof of insurance and a inspection at the Panama Canal Commission motor pools in An"There are employment opportunities availbilingual identification card are needed. con and Cristobal. Vehicles entering the country after this date able for well-qualified family members," In the Pacific community, vehicles can be inspected 10 can be inspected at Army and Air Force Exchange Service gaRemshard said. "As is the case throughout the rages at Fort Clayton or Fort Davis. Defense Department, however, these opportuam.-3 p.m. weekdays and 9 a*m.-I p.m. Saturday. Enter +Once Inspected, the driver must obtain a Revisado sticker cities are limited and attract large numbers of the inspection site through the back gate on Curundu weekand a Vehicle Registration Certificate. This is done by taking a high-quality applicants." days and through the main gate on Gaillard Highway on copy of the inspection document and their bilingualIdentification ighequ beroy ap famcard to the License Section next to the 24 Horas store in El Diablo The number of family members seeking Saturday, Lynn said. in the Pacific Community 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 1:30-3 p.m. and employment significantly outnumber the availIn the Atlantic community, vehicles can be inspected 9 Building 7024 in Mount Hope In the Atlantic. able positions so those in Panama must be pream.-l p.m. Monday-Saturday. *The 1994 license plates can then be bought In the Diablo ofpared to put their best foot forward and face Enter Cristobal back gate only by turning off Bolivar fice in the Pacific and the Colon Municipal Building between 12th stiff competition, he said. Highway onto Barbados Street and follow the posted signs Panama only Issues one license plate to be displayed at the rear of Remshard points out one way for applicants to Saint Kitts Street. the vehicle. to help themselves is by attending one of the Once the vehicle passes inspection the driver must get a Once the vehicle has been registered with the Panamanian gov job information seminars offered through the Revisado sticker and a Vehicle Registration Certificate. To ernment, vehicle owners must also register with their respective DCP. The next seminar will be Jan. 25 at Fort get these items, the vehicle owner must take a copy of the pass and ID office. Davis and Jan. 27 at Fort Clayton. inspection document and their bilingual ID card to the LiIn the Atlantic, the office is in Building 7024 at Mount Hope. For information about seeking employment cense Plate Section. Once all these steps are finished, the 1994 license plate or about the seminars, call 285-5201. For the Pacific, the office is in El Diablo near the 24can be bought. Horas store and is open 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 1:30 -3 p.m. For more information, call 287-3376. Local Reserve Component officials Secretary of Defense nominee Bobby *Potpourri, page 3. expect bigger impact on U.S. SouthRay Inman removes his name be*Atlantic scouts, pages 9. ern Command mission in 1994. fore confirmation process begins. eClimbing, page 13.

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2 Tropic Times Jan. 21, 1994 Army marksmen target competition by SgL Robin Mantikoski both teams have spent five days a week for the the past two months out on the ranges. USARSO Pubfic Affairs Office 'The soldier has to be good, but pracEMPIRE RANGE -Forthe past couple ticing the techniques all the time makes months, soldiers from U.S. Army South him better," he said. infantry units have been honing their The coaches agree that the physical asmarksmanship skills in preparation for the pects of marksmanship are important, but upcoming marksmanship competitions. both said that the marksmen's mental Two teams from 1st Battalion (Airreadiness is most important. borne), 508th Infantry and the 5th Battal"Shooting is probably 30 percent physiion, 87th Infantry (Light) spent last week cal and 70 percent mental," Pichardo said. feeling out the competition before going "They have to be totally relaxed and in head-to-head during the 193rd Infantry complete control." Brigade Challenge Cup Matches this week Armstrong said that after practicing so on Empire Range. eIAeWA -long, some soldiers become dependent on Though the competition is meant for physical skills and no longer improve. It's 193rd Inf. Bde marksmen, soldiers from his goal to get these soldiers past that. other units will also compete. Regardless "It's a mental acceptance. If they can of the outcome, both units will compete in make that mental switch, there is no limit the U.S. Army South Marksmanship to how good they can be," he said. Competition in February, said Sgt. Steven Spec. Larry Shupperd, an M-16 marksArmstrong, Ist Bn., 508th Inf. marksmanman on the 1st Bn., 508th Inf. team, is ship team coach. one marksman who has made that mental The road to the competition has not acceptance. Though he grew up shooting been easy for the teams, which have M-16 weapons, he said he has learned alot about rifle, M60 machine gun, M24 sniper rifle, the mental side of shooting. M249 Squad Automatic Weapon and "The key is to totally relax before I go 9mm pistol competitors. The teams have on the line," he said. "And before I take had to start at square one with the new my first shot, I get a mental picture of the marksman and each have used different target and go through everything in my strategies to accomplish their goal, he said. head." Armstrong began recruiting soldiers in The same is true for those on the sniper October and came up with 16 soldiers, inteam, said Spec. Edward Pitts, 5th Bn., eluding two who made it to the All-Arny 87th Inf., sniper team coach. level last year. "Firing the sniper weapon takes alot of "A majority of the (noncommissioned patience and practice," he said. "There's officers) with experience have leadership more to being a sniper because it's one positions that they couldn't give up," shot, one kill." Armstrong said. "But we have a new crop With nearly two months left until the of soldiers that show promise." U.S. Army photo by Sg. Robin M' niko first competition, the teams are confident. The 5-87th coach, SFC Luis Pichardo, Spec. Ray Hammer, Company B, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry "I have some soldiers whose shooting had a task that was quite different. DiviSion practices alongside e members of th a 5-87th Inf. (Light) M-16 rifle team. performances now are equal to what we He went from unit to unit selecting the were doing at the USARSO competition," top five-10 marksmen in each company Once Pichardo selected the teams, the fundamentals," he said. "Most people will Armstrong said. according to their qualification scores. coaches went to work honing skills. blow off the fundamentals when they're Shupperd has a chance to go far, Once he chose these soldiers, each had to Armstrong's first task was to work at just out there qualifying. We try to make Armstrong said. Pitt also feels confident. try out for the team. Of the 40 who tried fitting the soldiers to weapons systems these soldiers understand the importance "Our sniper team is the best. We will out, only 24 made the team. they were comfortable with and showed of them." win," Pitt said. "The soldiers are basically all new," potential in. Once the soldiers claimed Pichardo also worked on the fundaThe Februarycompetition will be the Pichardo said. "We're learning as we their weapons, the real training began. mentals, but said practice and experience judge of that. Until then, the teams will go." "We started by working on the basic were the key. Practice is so important that continue training. Reserve components set busy 1994 agenda by SSgt Eric Wedeking dental, maintenance, linguistics, special operations, civil Army Reserve engineers are also expected to take part TheaterSuppr Element affairs, logistical and music bands. in a similar but smaller project in El Salvador pegged In Latin America, Reserve Component troops receive "Fuertes Caminos Americas" in which a medical clinic FORT CLAYTON, Panama -Despite recently antraining opportunities impossible to replicate back in the and several schools will be constructed. nounced troop reductions for Reserve Component forces, United States, said Col. Raymond Moss, director of the "Fuertes caminos" is a Spanish phrase meaning U.S. Army and Air National Guard and Army Reserve U.S. Army Reserve Advisor's Office at Fort Clayton. "strong roads." personnel are still slated to be a primary contributor to "The effort to help democracies seems to work," Moss Continuing the ongoing exercise called "Cosecha missions throughout U.S. Southern Command. said. "We're helping the governments and they're helpAmistad" throughout Panama, thousands of Army and Guard and Reserve officials noted that more citizening their people. Air Guard, and Army and Air Force Reserve engineers soldiers and airmen are slated in 1994 to deploy to Cen"And we continue to provide agreat deal of manpower will be performing a varied mix of construction projects tral and South America than in previous training years. in U.S. Southern Command," he added. "The Army Replanned throughout the country. "Cosecha amistad" is a The presence of the National Guard and Reserve is serve experienced a 310-percent increase in overseas deSpanish phrase meaning "harvest friendship." expected to remain steady or may even grow as active ployment training in 1992 and held the line in 1993. U.S. Reserve Component air assets will also play a critical military troop levels in U.S. Southern Command continue Southern Command cannot undertake all our various role ensuring successful SOUTHCOM's logistical misto shrink, officials said. missions without the Reserve Components and it's great sions with the continuation of "Coronet Oak." Air Na"As far as U.S. Southern Command is concerned, they training for us to step in and do it." tonal Guard and Reserve units use C-130 "Hercules" couldn't operate without the National Guard and ReMoss also optimistically looked ahead toward future transport aircraft to ferry people, equipment and supplies serve," said SGM Jerome Mattakat, senior enlisted advitraining exercises throughout the region by outlining iniin support of U.S. military and diplomatic efforts throughsor for the U.S. National Guard at Fort Clayton. tiatives for future Army Reserve training in the command, out South and Central America. "They've said that more than once and we continue to including: Flyers and support airmen will also continue scramdeliver by providing them with support through overseas *Increased overseas deployments for more U.S. Army bling high-tech jet aircraft during ongoing counter-drug deployment training missions." Reserve units. missions based at Howard AFB, Panama, as part of -Reserve Components are slated during the 1994 train*Stepped-up efforts to aid democratic governments "Coronet Nighthawk." ing year to send more than 22,000 troops to train throughlike Venezuela, Honduras, Argentina, Guatemala and El This training year will also mark further road-buildout Latin America. The Army and Air National Guard Salvador to create Reserve Component programs moding, school and medical clinic building projects planned will supply about 14,000 citizen-soldiers and airmen eled after those in the U.S. military. during "Caminos de la Paz" along with joint-military while the Army Reserve is scheduled to deploy 8,000 per*Better coordination of long-range overseas deploytraining exercises involving various stateside units in sonnel. ments for Army Reserve forces with active U.S. forces. Chile, Bolivia and Ecuador as part of "Fuerzas Unidas." Those numbers do not reflect tfie number of people Looking ahead into the 1994 training year, thousands "Caminos de la paz" and "fuerzas unidas" are Spanbeing deployed to Latin America by the U.S. Air Force of citizen-soldiers and airmen will continue various naish phrases respectively meaning "roads of peace" and Reserve, Navy Reserve, or Marine Reserve. tion-assistance exercises in Belize, Guatemala, Hondu"united forces." "We continue to be the number one training area for ras, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, EcuaReserve Component officials said that even though the Guard in the world and we're still growing," added dor, Bolivia, Chili and Paraguay. budgetary cutbacks have forced them to do "more with Mattakat. "This is still the only real-world training area One of the biggest nation-assistance projects will be less," their presence in SOUTHCOM will continue to be there is. I don't see any draw downs in the near future." in Guatemala where thousands of Army National strong through the near foreseeable future. Guard and Reserve officials said their missions conGuard engineers will build a farm-to-market road, repair "We're performing many important missions throughtinue to be wide-ranging and include units like military bridges, construct several schools and a clinic, and drill out U.S. Southern Command," Moss added. police, engineer, medical, public affairs, postal, military fresh-water wells as part of an exercise called "Fuertes "We'll look back on this time as the high-water intelligence, infantry, artillery, aviation, transportation, Caminos-North," officials said. mark."

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Tropic Times Jan. 21, 19943 ooum ence course beginning Tuesday for adult dogs and Feb. 1 Home businesses Summit Gardens trip for puppies aged 3-6 months. The adult classes meet 7-8 Residents of the Atlantic community must register The Fort Clayton Protestant Women of the Chapel p.m. Tuesdays and 6-7 p.m. Tuesdays for puppies at the their home-based business with the Office of the Garriare hosting a trip to Summit Gardens 9 am. Thursday Balboa High School Stadium parking lot. People interested son Commander -Atlantic. Those not registered may be Anyone interested should bring a sack lunch and be at should arrive 30 minutes before class starts. For more in-. subject to administrative disciplinary action. For inforValent Recreation Center, Fort Clayton, by 9 a&m. For formation, call Bridget Groome at 286-4896 or Diane Ellis mation, call 289-5181. information, call 287-3270. at 256-6606. Radio licensing Play/fashion show St. Andrew's dinner There will be an amateur radio licensing class Feb. A play and fashion show will be held 7 p.m. Feb. 18 The St. Andrew's Society of Panama is holding a 15-April 14. Classes will be given 7-9 p.m. Tuesday and at the Fort Clayton Valent Recreation Center in celebraBurns' Night Dinner 7 p.m Saturday at the Executive Golf Thursday. The cost is $30 which includes books and tion of Black History Month. Students interested in beClub. There will be a piper, fiddler and the traditional materials. Anyone interested should register by Jan. 23 coming involved in the play may call 287-3706/4955. toasts to the Lassies, Laddies and Haggis. Call Lorri by calling 287-5668/4974. Rehearsals begin Jan. 28. Gilchrist at 260-2882 or Jeannie Hickman at 252-6425. E m Breakfast celebration Clayton power outage Hiring opportumities mr limited bocis of budgti conThe 106th Signal Brigade will host a U.S. Army There will be an electrical power outage 6-10 am. Satstraints. How to apply: For temporary positions suit a S South breakfast 7 am. Feb. 1 at the Fort Clayton Nonurday on all of Fort Clayton. The power outage is needed 171. DD 214 if claiming veteran preference, a copy of college commissioned Officers' Club. The breakfast will kick to allow contractors to perform electrical distribution systranscripts if claimingedationandacopyofClericalAdministraoff USARSO's Black History Month celebration with tem upgrading, said Directorate of Engineering and Houslive Support Position notice of rating if applicable. For permsguest speaker Col. Raymond Moss, Deputy Chief of Staff ing officials. neat positions (only for current employees including leave Reserve Affairs. For tickets or information, call 287without pay) submits SF-171, a copy of latest SF-50,a copy of R college transcripts, a copy of your last performance appraisal and 6951. a statement addressing the job related criteria contained in the announconent. The Rodman Ammunition Supply Point will be closed Formoreinformatnreg gvacancy ~me ts(fomn Egg-stravaganza Monday through Jan. 28 for inventory. Call 283-5806. required,job related criteria,etc.), visitthe DirectorateofCivilian The Officers' and Civilians' Wives' Club-Pacific Personnel, Building 560, Room 102, Corozal, or call 285-5201. *Note: o-on-oneemployment counseling should bte first png bazaar Egg-stravaganza is scheduled for A stepinthejobsearcit. 30. Those wanting to sign up for tables can do so at the n l c a tr following times and locations: 11 am.-2 p.m. Feb. 7 at The Canal Crafters Shoppe will be closed through Jan. Valent Recreation Center for identification card holders 30 and will reopen in its new location Jan. 31. The new VB# VACANCIES ITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 1-21only; and 11 am.-2 p.m. Feb. 24-25 at Club Amador for store will be in Building 804, Albrook AFS. People want94 CLOSE: 2-01-94 ol 127-94-LA Computer Engineer, NM-54-12. Sensitive. (Top open registration. ing to consign items during the closure can leave a mesSecret) Tables will not be sold before these dates and all vensage at 286-6244 or call Sherry Lasater at 284-5782. 128-94-VC Intelligence Assistant (OA), GS-134-7. Sensitive. dors must sign up and pay in full on one of the registra(Top Secret) tion dates. The price is $7 per linear foot for table space. 129-94-ELSystems Administrator, NM-301-7, DEY NM-9. Is hm a cluboo H 130-94-NC Supervisory Arts & Crafts Specialist, NM-105For more information, call 287-5120/3415. 9. The Isthmian College Club will hold a slide presenta131-94-NC Supply Technician (OA), NM-2005-5. Limited to p tion by Tony Rajer on the renovation of the murals in the permanentemployers only. Driver's licese is required. Qualified .b a Rotunda of the Panama Canal Commission Administra13294-NC Housing Referral Officer, N -Lime The National Prayer Breakfast will be 6:30 am. Feb. tion Building and other Panama art. The presentation will permsnentemployces only. Bilingual. Driver's license is required. 10 at Club Amador. The guest speaker will be Col. Wiltake place 4:30 p.m. Tuesday in the administration 133-94-NC Budget Ananlyst, NM-560-11. Limited to permaliam Reeder Jr., Deputy Chief of Staff, Southern Combuilding's cafeteria. For more information, call Ellen Manentemployees only. mand. For information, call 287-5859/6201. jor at 264-2528 or Edna Rigby at 252-2439. 134-94-ES Clerk, NM-303-1. TEMP NTE: 1 year. Part-times. 135-94-ES Medical Clerk, NM-679-5. Limited to MEDDACDENTACPanama permanent employees. High school celebration New hospital billing 136-94-ES Clinical Nurse, NM-610-10. TEMP NTH: 31 March 94. US license is required. A 20th anniversary celebration for the Paraiso Junior Gorgas Army Community Hospital will begin a mul137-94-ES Army Community Health Nurse, NM-610-10. and Senior High School class of 1974 will be 7 p.m.-2 tiple rate in-patient billing system Feb. 1. The new system TEMP NET: 30 Sept 94. 138-94-NC Engineering Technician, NM-M2-9. am. Feb. 11 at the Seaside View Hall. The celebration is for civilian pay patients such as self pay federal employ139-94-JBClassflication Specialist, NM-221-5fl/9/11. will honor Professor Cecilio Williams. The cost is $20 ees and civilian emergencies. For information, call 282140-94-SS Procurement Technician, NM-1106-5/617. per person. For tickets or more information, call 2245213/5134. Limited to permanent employees only. Driver's license is re8105 or233-1076. qVih / p sr US-ARMY NAF Closing Date: 28 January 1994 See NAF Sweetheart banquet Vehicle/supplies rule Announcement Number: 94-01 Only government vehicles can be used to pick up supCOMMERCIAL SPONSORSHIP SPECIALIST, NM-1101The Fort Clayton Protest Women of the Chapel will plies at the Self Service Supply Centers at Corozal and 7. $10.89 per hr, Reg Full-time Appointment (limited Tenure, if host a sweetheart banquet 6:30 p.m. Feb. 11 at the AlFort Davis. Units without government vehicles can use prinot tIlled by cuntp anent US Army NAF employee .ldg brook Officers' Club. Tickets are $7 donation per pervately owned vehicles only with written authorization from Clayton. son. For tickets or information, call 287-4178. the commander or director of the unit. For information, call 285-5146 or 289-3668. HOW TO APPLY: Fill out DA From 3433 (Application for US Army Non-Appropriated Fund Employment) which may be icked Language instructors up and tured in at the One-Stop Information Center, Bldg 560, ca reeerain"'--Cohe geI regitionii Room02, orozar Ocean Breeze Recreation Center is looking for qualiDirectorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting applications on a fled Spanish and beginner's English instructors. InstrucPanama Canal College will hold spring semester regiscontinuous basis for the following positions. Theseannounceents tors for guitar, piano and gymnastics are also needed. tration 9 am.-noon and 2-5 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday at the are used to establish registers for future vacancies. For information, call 289-6699/6402. La Boca campus. People who want military tuition assisVII# 001 -General Clerical, NM-3 (Used to fill most clerical Positions) tance should contact their education office before registraVB# 001A General Cleical, NM-4 (Used to fl most clerical tion. Only money orders or checks made out to the "U.S. positions) Canine Treasurer," are acceptable for tuition payment. For more VB# 002 *SlesStoreCheckerNM-3 (Intermittetwksch) Club Canino de Panama will hold its next dog obediinformation, call 252-3304/3107. VB# 003 Recaion Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) Requires Cart + 6 mms recreation cap. Vl# 004 Re tion Assistant, NM-4 (req 6 mo, of recreation P.) San Salvador, El Savlador (V, CC) VB# 005 Secretary (Stenograriby), NM-S VB# 005A Secretary (Stenography), NM-6 Saturday Managua, Nicaragus (CC) VB# 006 Secretary (ryping/Office Automation), NM-5 7:40 am. C-130 Howard AFB Howard AFB VB# 006A Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-6 Charleston, WV (US) 9:40 am. C-141 Howard AFB VB# 007 Medical Officer, NB-12/13/14,(Perm\Temp Full4:55 p.m. C-5A Howard AFB Kelly AFB, TX (M) times, Part-time, Intermintent) VB#008 Clinical Nurse (RN license required), NM-9110/11, Charleston AF, SC (0) Charleston AFB, SC (Perm\Temp Full-times, Part-time, Intermittet) Dover AFB, DE Thursday VB# 009 Practical Nurse (LPN license required), NM-5, Howard AFB 11:05 a.m. C-5AHoward AFB (Perm\TempFull-times, Part-time, Intermittent) Sunday Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) VB# 010 ManualPnsitions,MG-2(Veteranpreferenceeligiblas No scheduled departures Charleston AFB, SC (0) only) Monday Dover AFB, DE VB# 011 ManualPosition,MCO-3 (Veteranprefereceeligbles 74 m -3 oadABFia only) 74 m -3 oadABFia VB# 012 ManualPusitions,MG-4(Veteranpreferenceeligibles Tegucigalpa, Honduras (CC) 7:40 a.m. C-130 Howard AFB only) Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) Soto Cano AB, Honduras (CC) VB# 013 ManualPusitions,MG-5(Veteranpreferenceeligibles Howard AFB San Jose, Costa Rica only) 9:30 n.m. B757 Howard AFB Howard AFB VB#014 MotorVehicleOperatorMG-6(VeteranpreferenceeiCharlestonlAP,SC(C) gibles only) Ch uresd APSy C #015 Motor Vehicle OperatorMG-7 (Vetcran preference eliTuesday Ks gibles only) No scheduled departurs US-U.S. passports V-Visa VB# 016 Motor Vehicle OperatorMG-8 (Veteran preference eliWednesday O-Overnlght M-Medevac gibles only) 7:55 a.m. C-130 Howard AFB C-Commercial CC-Country Clearance a CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is required.

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4 Tropic Tunes i e i p e e_ _ _ _ an. 21, 1994Hemishere Truck crash kills 1, injures Honduran army Hodenounces plot TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras (Reuters) -The 4 m missionaries in onduras Honduran armed forces Sunday denounced what it said was a plot aimed at pitting the military SOTO CANO AB, Honduras (United States Informahicles hit a large crevice in the road and overturned near against the government of liberal Cars Roberto tion Service) -Thirty-four American missionaries were the beach village of Tela, approximately 90 miles from Reina, who takes office later this month. involved in a vehicle accident Wednesday in the HonduSan Pedro Sula, Koselka said. In a televised editorial, top military officials ran city of Tela that killed one person and seriously inA medical crew from the U.S. Army's Medical Resaid charges linking Armed Forces Chief Luis jured four. Another 14 sustained minor injuries. ment, consisting of two doctors, a nurse and an Army Discua to dozens of "disappearances" in the The seriously injured victims were evacuated by aU.S. medic were flown from Soto Cano AB to the crash site in 1980s were part ofaplot to sow division between military hospital to San Pedro Sula. One victim was dea UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter operated by the 4-228th the incoming government and the military. clared dead at the sceneofthe accident. The names ofthe Aviation Regiment. A private human rights group here has dedead an injured are not yet available, according to AmeriThe medical trauma team treated injuries at the scene manded the ouster of Discua, saying he once can Embassy official Paul Koselka. and then airlifted the seriously injured victims to a Honheaded a "death squad," but the Superior CounThe 34 Baptist missionaries, many from Mississippi, duran military base in San Pedro Sula, for further transcil of the Armed Forces (COSUFFAA), a military were in Honduras providing medical and dental care. portation to a local Honduran hospital. parliament made up of 60 officials, has given him They were travelling in two stake-bed open trailers that The other missionaries were transported from Tela to a voeofonfidence. gave them a ride after their bus broke down. The veSan Pedro Sula by ground. ere is a plot against the military institution to cause internal division and bring it into conffict with the new government," the military said Panama customers fights drugs init eitr-l Pm cThe Committee of Families of the Detained PANAMA CITY (Reustatistics as evidence of a successful crackdown on drug and Missing in Honduras (COFADEH) petitioned ters)-Panama's customs sertrafficking through Panama since the 1989 U.S. invaCongress for the temporary removal of Discua vice said Jan. 14 it seized sion. from the head of the armed forces while an invesmore than $31.1 million of But critics say the figures prove Panama is just as big tigation is made into 184 cases of missing people, illegal drugs, mainly cocaine a drug route now as under Noriega, who is serving a 40most of them leftists, during the 1980s. from South America, in year jail sentence in the United States for trafficking In a report released last month, the National 1993. crimes. Human Rights Protection agency blamed civil and Last year's haul at airLast year's haul included 1,784 pounds (809 kg) of military authorities for the disappearances. ports, docks and border posts cocaine, with an estimated value of $15,900 per pound The agency called for the investigation of sevthroughout the tiny Central ($35,000 per kg) in the international market, and smaller eral officials, including Discua, who in 1984 was American nation was a 28.5 amounts of heroin, speed and lactose -an element of the head ofBatallion 3/16, cited in the report as a percent decrease on the milk that is used in medication. "death squad." $43.5 million of drugs capThe drugs came primarily from South America and Discua has denied the charges. tured in 1992, customs offiEndara were bound for the United States, Europe and the CaribReina, 67, a lawyer and a liberal political vetcials said. bean, the officials said. eran, has said he is in favour of having courts inPanama's customs service has seized more than $147 Some 69 people were arrested in Panama on drug trafvestigate the claims by the human rights commismillion in drugs since the December 1989 U.S. invasion ficking charges in 1993 -18 Colombians, 17 Jamaision. that ousted former military dictator and convicted drug cans, 12 Panamanians, 10 Americans, four Haitians, trafficker General Manuel Antonio Noriega. three Spaniards, two Nicaraguans, a Bolivian, a Costa banana exporters President Guillermo Endara's government cites such Rican and a Guatemalan. drop trade complaint BRUSSELS (Reuters) -Four Latin American Rebels kidnap 2 missionaries banana exporters have dropped their complaint to the GAT[ world trade body over the European BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) -Rebels have spoken with ing Colombian troops and doing humanitarian work Union's import quota system, a European Commore violence in Colombia A remote-controlled bomb around the country. mission spokesman said Tuesday. just missed killing the finance minister, two American "The guerrillas said they were taking our people to "The Commission has received information missionaries have been kidnapped, and another oil pipemake a statement to the Colombian government, but how from four Latin American countries that they will line has been sabotaged. they will be used to make a statement and what that stewithdraw their complaint, leaving only GuateFinance Minister Rudolf Hommes was driving in his ment is, I don't know," Wyma said. mala to continue," the spokesman said. armored car when a bomb Van Dyke is the acting prinHe added that Farm Commissioner Rene placed at the base of a downcipal of the school; Welsh is a Steichen had written to the governments of Costa town Bogota streetlight went groundskeeper. Rica, Venezuela, Honduras and Nicaragua saying off Monday. Hommes was "The guerrillas said they Police said the rebels were that the Commission would therefore maintain its unhurt, but a bodyguard was were taking our people to members of the Revolutionary offer to raise the two million ton import quota by wounded. make a statement to the Armed Forces of Colombia, an 10 percent. The bomb shattered winorganization loosely linked to The Commission threatened last week that it dows for 100 yards, flung a Colombian government, but the National Liberation Army, would withdraw its offer to raise the quota, which light pole across a street and how they will be used to known as ELN for its Spanish was set last July, to 2.1 million this year and 2.2 damaged a bus. Leftist rebels initials. million in 1995 if the countries did not withdraw claimed responsibility. make a statement and what Ihe ELN, meanwhile, dynatheir complaint before the special General AgreeThe bombing was further that statement is, I don't mited the Cano-Limon-Covenas ment on Tariffs and Trade panel made its rulindication that the death ofdrug knw." oil pipeline in northern Colomings lord Pablo Escobar did not bia Sunday night, spilling 5,000 Commission sources said Monday that the mean an end to political vioMel Wyma barrels of oil, the state oil companel was due to publish its findings on Tuesday, lence in Colombia. Escobar, Missionary, New Tribes Mission pany Ecopetrol said. and that they were expected to go against the Euwho was slain by security forces The pipeline is a frequent tarropean Union. Dec. 2, had waged a war of get of rebels opposed to thepresThe five countries had complained that the bombings and assassinations ence of foreign oil companies. quotas discriminated against cheap Latin Amerithat killed hundreds of people. The National Liberation Army told RCN radio that it can bananas in favor of more expensive growers In the jungle-covered plains east of Bogota, guerrillas attacked Hommes because of unemployment in Colomin Europe and its former colonies. kidnapped Stephen Welsh of North Platte, Neb., and bia. The official unemployment rate is about 9 percent, Included in the increased offer is a scheme to Timothy Van Dyke of Towanda, Pa., Sunday, said Mel but underemployment, for which no figures are available, require both export and import licences which Wyma of New Tribes Mission, the Sanford, Fla-based is much higher. would give Latin American governments, instead missionary group the pair work for. Hommes has been criticized by rebels for supporting of multinational companies, greater control over About 15 guerrillas walked into a school for children the privatization of state companies, free trade and less quota shipments. of missionaries near Villavicencio, 50 miles east of government regulation. He also angered trade unions by The Commission spokesman said the distribuBogota, ransacked the school and took the two men, approving a new minimum wage without consulting tion ofthe quota would be a matter for discussion Wyma said in a telephone interview from New Tribes' them. between the countries themselves and the Comheadquarters in Florida. The would-be assassins triggered the bomb as mission. Local police reports said the guerrillas took the AmeriHommes drove past in his armored BMW en route to It was not immediately clear whether the comcans to protest the presence of some 250 American solwork. The blast wounded a policeman on a motorcycle plaints panel would still publish its findings. diers who are building a milit' KLse in the region, trainwho was escorting Hommes.

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e e Tropc Times Nhhtary News Jan.21195 Inman turns down defense post Judge clears way WASHINGTON (AP) -Bobby Ray Inman, a Texas Inman said his nomination was covered fairly by the daily f C i a fem a businessman who held top national security jobs in both newspaper and television journalists. for itadel fem ale Republican and Democratic administrations, today But he said he was concerned in "this new era of modstepped aside as President Clinton's nominee for defense em McCarthyism.with the columnist who is afforded WASReh[NGTON (AP) -Chief Justice William H. secretary. He cited "modem McCarthyism" in criticism the pages of the newspaper and the syndication and the Rehnquist cleared the way Tuesday for Shannon of his record, character and reputation. talks shows to carry on attacks with no one responding. classes with cadets at The Citadel, a 151-year-old Inman's withdrawal -which caught Washington by But Inman said he himself had decided not to respond to cl it college. surprise -was accepted by Clinton. And it sent the many of the criticisms. ,, Relinquist, without comment, set aside a tempopresident searching anew for a successor to Defense Sec"I've already given 30 years of service to my country, rary stay he had imposed Jan. 12, a day before retary Les Aspin, who was forced to resign. Inman said. "I am simply not prepared to pay the current Faulkner was to have begun her academic career at "This is not a decision I reached easily but it is one I cost of public service in distortion of my record." the Charleston, S.C., school. have thought through and felt comfortable with," Inman Yet Inman said he was confident he would have been The lawsuit challenging the college's males-only told a news conference in Austin, Texas. Inman said easily confirmed, possibly by a unanimous vote. Inman admission policy has never been taken to trial. "there is no daylight" between him and Clinton on desaid he wrote his resignation letter on Jan. 8 but did not A federal judge and the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of fense policy but that he became discouraged after early deliver it to the White House until last Friday. Appeals ordered The Citadel to let Faulkner take day favorable reviews of his selection "began to shift pretty Inman said that "my family was not enthusiastic classes while the legal case continues. The school fast." about my return to public service." Inman said his wife has not been ordered to let Faulkner join the Corps Inman told reporters he suspected, but could not prove, had specifically asked him to promise that a former doof Cadets or live in the college's barracks. that Senate Republican Leader Bob Dole of Kansas "had mestic worker not be embarrassed because the Inmans In the school's request, lawyers for The Citadel asked that a more partisan look be taken at my record" had not paid required Social Security taxes, an issue that said it was being forced to abandon a "justified and had encouraged negative media reports about Inman. came to light shortly after Clinton announced the nomisingle-gender admissions policy that has defined its Again, without offering proof, Inman said he was told nation. institutional mission and persona since its founding." that The New York Times columnist William Safire had "Now she's afraid she might lose her house," Inman They said Faulkner's attendance at daytime agreed to take aim at Inman's nomination if Dole agreed said of his former housekeeper. He said he recently paid classes would cause irreparable harm because a to increase Republican criticism of Clinton's investment back Social Security taxes even though he believed he mles-only environment "is essential to The in a controversial Arkansas land development. was not required by law to do so and planned to hire a Citadel's holistic educational mission." On Dec. 23, 1993, Safire criticized Inman, calling him lawyer to help the former employee resolve any outstandLawyers for Faulkner said the school's request Clinton's "worst Cabinet nomination." ing tax issues. "is based on emotion, niot fact or law." Inman said his disagreements with Safire dated back During a question and answer session, Inman said he "Faced with the complete absence of any evidence Insun sid is dsageemntsthat one woman will destroy its cadet students, The to his Reagan administration work as deputy director of has refused pressure that he withdraw from the all-male Citadel at heart seeks merely to preserve its central intelligence, when he decided to limit Israel's acBohemian Club because he did not want his membership longstanding tradition of excluding qualified women cess to U.S. spy satellite photographs. to become a "litmus test on my support for women or based solely on their gender," the lawyers said. In a sometimes rambling explanation of his decision, women's issues." Army scientists identify U.S. remains from Korean War WASHINGTON (AP) -Army scienGeraldine, who now lives in Bakersfield, uists have made the first identifications of Calif., and Bullock's older brother, newly returned American remains from Harold, of Bradford, N.H. the Korean War in an investigatory break"I've been shocked," Jones' widow through that could unravel some lingering said in a quavering voice when told by a mysteries of the conflict that cost more reporter that the Army had made a prethan 33,000 U.S. lives. liminary identification of her husband's Although the Army hasn't officially reremains. "I'm going to be sitting on pins leased the names, three were provided to and needles until they can tell me somethe co-founder of the Korean-Cold War thing official." Family Association of the Missing and She said Jones had been serving in Kowere confirmed to The Associated Press rea only three weeks when his plane went by officials speaking on condition of anodown. She said the Air Force told her at nymity the time that he and Aaron, the pilot, were The remains are the last to escape believed to be those the plane, which of the pilot and three The four sets of reapparently excrewmen of an Air ploded in the sky. Force strategic mains are among 194 Harold Bulbomber shot down sets that North Korea lock said he near the Chinese borwasn't surprised der in April 1951, has returned over the his brother's resaid U.S. defense ofpast three years, includmains had been ficials. identified, "but I The investigation ing 148 handed over don't know what into their fate raises late last year in what the took them so q uestions about long." He said he North Korea's treatcommunist government hasn't been told ent of crew memprivately toldAmerican anything offibers who apparently cially by the J survived shootdown, officials was a gesture to Army, but was and Soviet involveimprove relations. contacted by The 5 ment in the threeUnion Leader of year battle for control Manchester, of the Korean peninN.H., Sunday sula. night. Pat Dunton, whose father was a crew The preliminary identifications of the member on the B-29 but has not been four crew members were made at the found, said in an interview that Army ofArmy's Central Identification Laboratory ficials told her three of the four names on in Hawaii. They must be reviewed and the dog tags returned with the remains. confirmed by Army leaders before a posiThey are Lt. George Aaron, of New tive identification is declared. v York City, who was the pilot; 2nd Lt. "Wedo not considerremains identified Elmer T. Bullock, of Penacook, N.H., the until the process is complete," said MaWah Diaey Co. photo plane's radar observer, and MSgt. Robert rine Corps Maj. Steve Little of the Arm ed forces center Wilson Jones, of Dekalb, Texas, the flight Pentagon's public affairs staff. engineer. The four sets of remains are among 194 The Armed Forces Recreation Center's "Shades of Green" resort hotel, Dunton said the Army gave her the sets that North Korea has returned over which opens Feb. 1, on the grounds of Walt Disney World in Orlando, Fla., names in hopes her group could help it the past three years, including 148 handed is situated between two 18-hole golf courses. It's the first armed forces sarch for surviving relatives. So far, she over late last year in what the communist recreation center in the contintental United States. vnd the Army have been unsuccessful. government privately told American offiThe AP reached Jones' widow, cials was a gesture to improve relations.

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6 Tropic Times A Jan. 21,1994 voices On-post resident wants reimbursement for filter Dear Mayors' Corner: Dear Why: As reported by the Tropic Times reI spoke with the people at the commiscently, many of our base houses have sary and they now have plenty of drinking water that is contaminated with will the government pay me back? filter system is an excellent idea for conCopenhagen on the shelf in all their comlead. I have two young children and I am Getting the lead out cerned residents, but the government can't missaries. worried about their exposure to this lead. reimburse residents for this expense. They will be doing their best to keep it A very good solution to my worries is Dear Getting: that way. They also pass along their the purchase of a water filter specifically According to Richard Davis, chief o Dear Mayors'Corner: apologies for the inconvenience you exdesigned to remove metallic and chemical Housing Division, Directorate of EngiI would like to know why the commisperienced. impurities from water. I feel strongly that nearing and Housing, the quality of watei sary is unable to keep Copenhagen chewthe $200 spent on this type of filter should in your quarters is a concem for tis com ng tobacco in stock? I understand the SIMbto sumn qustosto be reimbursable by the government bemand. Water is tested on a regular basrmy and Air Force Exchange Service has unity m members to submit questions to cause it shouldn't be necessary for me to to be sure it meets U.S. quality standards. a different supply system, but why is it the Mayoral Congress. Letters shoulder have to make such a purchase to provide When residents have specific concerns they can get Copenhagen and the commismiled to: Mayors' Corner, Publicity for my family's safety. about the water quality, samples are also sary can't? Charprson, APO AA 34004 (MPS). The government would also probably taken. At this time, the water on all govThe reason I ask is that at the commisAnonymity will be granted upon request. rather install these filters in every on post ernment installations meets U.S. water sary a roll is $11.90 and at AAFES it is The Tropic Times reserves the right to house than the time and expense of purification standards. $20. This is a big price difference. edit letters and responses for brevity, repiping our homes. So, if I buy a filter, The idea of an additional purification Why no supply clarity and propriety. Vehicles must be inspected by end of March Licenseplateupdate Vrs 'n The Directorate of Land Transportation has announced that all privately owned vehicles must be inspected by March 31 and have 1994 license plates by April 17. The cost of the inspection is $10 and should be done at a Panama Canal Commission motor pool, officials said. The inspection must be done before getting the license plates. License plates will cost $27-47 depending on the vehicle capacity. For more infonnation, call 287-3376. Post vehicle regstration Once vehicle owners have received 1994 license plates, the Military Veicle Registration Office must be notified of any changes ii the license plate number, dates, address change or new insurance information. If newly assigned to Panama, be sure to visit the Vehicle Registration Office to get a temporary Department of Defense registration card. Bilingual identification card, proof of ownership and proof of insurance must be presented when applying. For temporary registration of a motorcycle, the driver must be on the waiting list to attend a Motorcycle Safety Class. For a permanent Department of Defense registration sticker, drivers must bring their Panamanian drivers license, Bilingual ID card, Panama Safety Inspection Sticker, registration certificate and license plate, proof of ownership and proof of insurance for the vehicle. Motorcycle owners must also bring their defensive driving card. The Exonerations Office, Military Customs, Pier 18, is responsible for the transfer of all vehicles sold to another military person or a Panamanian national. Anyone planning to sell their vehicle while in Panama must contact that office. Southern Command Regulation 190-5 requires that at the time of the transfer, the post vehicle registration sticker must be removed and turned in to the ExoneraFIngerprint schedule announced Fort Clayton 1100 housing area -one larceny of secured tions Office before the transaction is completed. Fingerprinting is available at the Office of the Provost private property For more information about vehicle registration or Marshal in Building 131, Fort Clayton, 9-11 am. TuesCocoli housing area -one larceny of unsecured private selling a vehicle in Panama, call 287-4545. day and 1-3 p.m. Thursday. Identification cards are property Larceny In the locker room needed to get fingerprints. Corozal housing area -one larceny of unsecured private Two soldiers became victims of larceny in separate inThe following crimes occurred Jan. 7-13. property cidents last week at the Fort Clayton pool locker room. Pacific Quarry Heights housing area -two larcenies of secured An unsecured gym bag was stolen from one soldier while Fort Clayton 300 housing area -one larceny of secured private property $500 in cash was taken from a soldier's pants pocket that private property Fort Kobbe housing area -one larceny of secured prihad also been left unsecured. Fort Clayton 500 housing area -one larceny of unsevate property MPs remind everyone to lock up personal property and cured private Atlantic carry small amounts of cash. If a victim of crime, call Fort Clayton 1000 housing area -one larceny of secured 287-4401 or 289-5133. private property None to report This authorized unofficial command information pubDirector, Public Affairs.CoL James L. Fetig Editor.SSgt. Jane Usero lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Chief.SMSgt. Steve Taylor Journalists.Sgt. Lori Davis Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Editor.SSgt. Richard Puckett Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski Information Program of the Department of Defense, unSports Editor.Sgt. E. J. Hersom Spec. Alexander C. White der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S. Staff Editors.Spec. John Hall 24th Wing Public Affairs Office.284-5459 Southern Command. Rosemary Chong Public Affairs Officer.Capt. Warren L. Sypher Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the Maureen Sampson Public Affairs Superintendent.MSgt. Dale Mitcham official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Volunteer Assistant.Josephine Beane Journalists.SSgt. Rian Clawson Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. Student Intern.Juan Carlos Palacio Sgt. James A. Rush The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Southern Command Public Affairs Office.282-4278 U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 Telephone 285-6612. Command Information Officer.Patrick Milton Public Affairs Officer.Diane Gonzalez Acting Commander in Chief. U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.287-3007 Photographers.PH2 Roberto R. Taylor Maj. Gen. Walter T. Worthington Public Affairs Officer.Maj. Melanie Reeder PH2 Delano J. Mays Command Information Officer. .Beth Taylor U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.289-4312 p TeNCOIC.Sgt. Richard Emert 1ropic Times

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#t~omm niaryTropic Thmes P Jan. 21,1994I ___ Commentary --cTie Must we always wait for a catastrophe before reaching out to others with help? When apathy strikes, when the "me by SMSgt Steve Taylor first" syndrome, the "get all you can over Chief, Tropic Times your neighbor" philosophy reigns W e, as a military community, tend supreme, societies atrophy and wither to take pride in our sense of away. Sometimes violently. "sticking it out together." But in For a military community, the lesson the normal day-to-day routine, when is here. Maybe we've got it too good. things are going smoothly, are we really There are people here who need help, a community of people who look out for and they're not getting it, with tragic each other? results. There are things to be done, and When someone's in real trouble, do they're not all getting done. we help, or do we do the modem thing: I can hear the "boohooers" now. What turn our backs, shrug it off, can't be do you mean? Who,'s not getting help? bothered? What's not being done? Modern sociologists have commented I could give specific examples, but on the fact that modem "communities" they would only serve to embarrass and are structured more around where we continue the pain of tragic events. That's work, rather than where we live. The not to say that people aren't getting help, workplace has become the place where things are not getting done. But there's we define ourselves and our ties with more that needs to be done, more people other people, rather than neighborhoods. -who aren't getting help when they need The people of Los Angeles just it. received a lesson about this. Don't join in the "bet what can I do?" Amid the fires, streets flooded from crowd. broken water mains, collapsed buildings Help a kid. Give some blood. Form a and highways -and the 46 deaths -reorganize his priorities, or were they In the movie Born Yesterday, the neighborhood watch. Be a big brother or there's going to be some good to arise out already there. message is repeated. Billy, played by sister. Join a church. Be a volunteer. of the aftermath of Monday's earthquake This man will probably work long and Melanie Griffith, learns people are Learn a new skill. Then pass it on. Help in Los Angeles. hard to help his neighbors. Chances are basically selfish or unselfish. Paul, played prevent spouse or child abuse by reportLike the tale of the Phoenix that arose he might not know his neighbors well, if by Don Johnson, who is Billy's tutor, ing what you think might be wrong. from the ashes, to be reborn again, so at all. explains that "history is a story of the Watch your neighbor's house. Better again will Los Angeles. A seismologist, interviewed just hours unselfish vs. the selfish." yet, get to know your neighbors. Tutor a So much has happened to southern after the quake, thought all would go We are at our best when things are student. Donate to charity. Work for California recently -riots, mud slides, well, because people always work well worst. charity. Clean something up or paint wild fires, and now a major earthquake under adversity, after disasters, and an Another line from another movie, but something. Learn CPR or first aid. -it's hard to believe that anyone still earthquake is no exception. one that is apt to be true. Recycle paper. Recycle plastic or wants to live there, let alone be in a People who don't even know each Some historians think civilization glass. No recycling around? Start a semblance of a good mood. other, people who last Sunday may not itself arose because of the challenge of service. Save some energy today. And And yet that's what I saw on televihave even liked each other, are working adversity. If life was too easy, people then tomorrow. sion this week. together. All of a sudden, distrust, hatred, remained in a undeveloped, nomadic way Just get up off the couch and do A man stands in front of the burnedand apathy withers away in the face of a of life. Only the very struggle for survival something else. Turn the TV off. Go for out rubble that was once his home and common foe. caused the rise of spectacular civilizaa walk -it's a start. states that, while he lost everything, he History is full of such instances where, tions. Let's not wait for a catastrophe, or a and his family are still alive and healthy. staring survival in the face, people band What's the lesson? Only when people disaster, or more tragedy, to increase our Here's a man who has his priorities together. band together, form communities, when sense of community. Let's do something straight. The question is: Did the It's a casting away of selfishness for unselfishness prevails over selfishness, different. catastrophe of earthquake force him to unselfishness. does a society flourish. Let's do it now. Direct Quotes What should people do to help their community? "Do more projects as in "People should help "Anything they can do "Get involved in activi"We should be thankful building schools and other people and try to as far as making the ties with your children." and supportive to the cleaning the street have respect for their world a better place to people who help us and sides." neighbors." live." are not in the military." SK2 Brad Pauley SSgt. Isaac Anderson Maj. Terry Breitenstein Cordis Storms PFC Yvonne Dubose Special Bout Unit 26 24th Wing Command 109th Evacuation Hospital Navy family member 92nd Personell Company Section Birmingham, Ala. The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries -or responses to commentaries -to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

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8 Tropic Times Jan. 21, 1994 Shal ikashvi i addresses worldwide interests Editor's note: The following is part ofa news briefQ. And the likelihood? Ing given at the Pentagon Dec. 13, 1993 by Gen. John A. I think we have all heard enough about the M. Shalikasvili, Chariman, Joint Chiefs of Staff. unpredictability of Kim I Sung and Kim Sung's regime, so I think it is very dangerous to speculate one with the other. All I would say is that I don't see anything different today than I did a few months ago when I came to this Q. General Shalikashvili, certainly one of the highest job, and people who have been here in this building and profiled challenges that face you now is North Korea, the watching this part of the world longer than I have don't problem of North Korea. You have a study under way, I see anything that has particularly happened that would know, with the South Koran military, of changes that increase or decrease the likelihood between now and, let's might be needed to beef up the military there. Have you say, six months ago. any preliminary results from that study? Do you think Q. Just getting back to your idea of what their war that forces need to be beefed up -U.S. and South Koobjectives are, American analysts have assessed that one rean forces? And are you confident that the force that's of the objectives would be to surround and possibly overthere now could stop any North Korean thrust before it run Seoul. Do you believe that ROK forces reinforced by reached Seoul? American forces could stop a North Korean invasion -A. First, as far as the ongoing effort to determine short ofSeoul? whether their structure is right or whether their capabiliA. It's certainly a possibility, and our hope that we ties are in place and what it is that we, in a reinforcing can do so. role, ought to be doing, I think it's much too early to be talking about specifics, other than you need to view that it's an ongoing process and not something that has all of Q. You mentioned Russia. The parliament there, a sudden been brought about by what we've been reading they're electing a parliament, the Nationalist Group, that in the headlines, and that is the nuclear issue. I am satishas opposed many of (President Boris) Yelsin's policies fied, having gone to Korea about a month ago and meeton denuclearization, on switching to defense conversion. ing there with my counterpart, that that's going well. What are your thoughts about that, and how would it As far as our confidence to change any U.S, military policy? stop a North Korean attack into A. The first thing I would the South, I am very, very confitell you is that it's useful to redent. Ithink even the more pessi".there must be very solid member, as a start point, that Deparmentofoeftnsphoto nistic studies that you sometimes there's an awful lot to be satisfied Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, Chairman, Joint Chiefs write about have no question that conditions before United about in the sense that we've had of Staff, addressed the North Korea issue, Russian we will stop, that the South KoreStates forces participate in the first free democratic elections reform and Somalia operations during a press ans, together with our reinforcean kind of operation since, I guess, 1917 probably and conference held at the Pentagon Dec. 14, 1993. ments, will stop North Korean aty k that we do have a new constitutack far short of their reaching whether that's under United tion that guarantees an awful lot used on the video that I just simply am not prepared to their war objectives. I would not of the rights to the citizens of answer for you now. But those of you who have known want to stand here before you and Nations or not. Certainly for Russia. So I think there's an awme for more than a day or so know that if there is a way to speculate where that in relationoperations under the United ful lot to be very thankful about. make this available to you, I certainly won't stand in the ship to Seoul is. Suffice it to say there to be As far as the outcome beway. that I am very comfortable that no Nations, ought tween the reformers and those Q. On the issue of peace operations, considering the one has yet suggested that we some very strict condiwho would slow down the reproblems in Somalia, do you have reservations, and would not be able to stop the tonss" forms or reorient reforms, I think should there be solid conditions before U.S. forces are North Koreans. I would like to reserve judgment placed under United Nations command? Q. How would you be able to until we see better, really, how A. I have always maintained, even long before the 3stop them? In 1950 the Chinese Gen. John Shalikashvili that came out. Certainly, you 4 October fight in Mogadishu, that there must be very came in on behalf of North KoChairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff could speculate that we hope that solid condition before United States forces participate in rea, and it became a very bloody, after all the votes are counted that any kind of operation, whether that's under United Nalong war, and we know the outthe reformists will have the nections or not. Certainly for operations under the United come. What is your assessment of Red China today? essary majority to be able to get programs through the Nations, there ought to be some very strict conditions. Will they remain neutral? Do you think they'd come in if Parliament and through the Duma that would speed up In addition to those that we would consider for an opNorth Korea attacks? reforms. eration were it, for instance, under the command and conA. I think the conditions are totally different. I cerI think, unless you know more than I right now, I think trol of NATO or unilaterally under the United States, is tainly would not envision right now that we would be it's a little bit too early to tell what the final vote tally will the issue of the robustness of the chain of command unfacing the Chinese government and the Chinese troops be. der the U.N., the specific rules of engagement and if, in fact, North Korea were foolish enough to attack the Q. The latest is that Vice President (Albert) Gore, in whether they not only allow for the self-protection of the South. Moscow, is now saying it may not be as optimistic as they force, but also are robust enough to allow you to get the Q. Given the North Koreans' vast numerical superihad originally thought. What about your own personal job done. ority, how is it that the South Korean forces reinforced by opinion of (Vladimir) Zhirinovsky? He had been quoted I think we ought to make sure that we judge those the U.S. would be able to repel an invasion? as saying that he believes that Germany and Russia doings on a case-by-case basis, but I can well imagine A. First of all, there is more to a warfighting capabilshould get together and divide up Poland as well as he that there will be United Nations operations in the future ity than the number of soldiers or airmen or Marines that would not hesitate to use nuclear weapons, and he thinks where we can all, with a great deal of confidence, say that one side or the other has. It has to do with the quality of Alaska should be annexed. What are your. the command/control arrangement is robust enough, the the force. It has to do with the quality of the armaments. A. I was going to say, I must be careful not to make rules of engagement are proper, and then for me to recIt has to do with terrain, and also it has to do with whether any comments about someone who thinks that it's realisommend to my boss that it would make sense to particiyou're the attacker or the defender. I am not alone in this tic to view Alaska returning to.I don't know enough pate. There are other cases where I would obviously have military judgment, that the Republic of Korea forces, reabout him, other than what I have read in the newspato say no. Let us agree, I think, to judge each one of them inforced by the United States, as it's now envisioned, pers. Again, I think it's useful to find out the difference on a case-by-case basis. would be able to stop any attack. between election rhetoric and appealing to emotionalism But let me say, I don't want to leave it with the imduring this very heated election process they had and what M military options pression that something has' changed in the last month or the man is going to be like when he assumes responsibiltwo or three that somehow makes it more likely that North ity as a member of the Duma. Q. Let me get your judgment on two military matters. Korea is engaged in some kind of preparation for an atQ. Does it give you any concerns about U.S. military First of all, on Korea. Does this country have military tack. I don't want to leave that impression at all. What I policy? Am you beginning to have strategy looking at. options in the event diplomacy fails that, in your judgam saying is something that has been true for some time, A. No. ment, are preferable to permitting the North Koreans to and I think it's going to remain true for some time to develop a nuclear weapons capability? No.2, do you supcome, without giving you all the impression that port extending the borders of NATO eastward over the we.sense that the North Koreans are in some kind of Som alia operation next several years with no particular military infrastrucpreparatory phase prior to attack. Q. A two-part question about Somalia. Did you see ture in place to defend this new territory, and at a time of that video of the Oct. 3 battle in Mogadishu? And two, shrinking defense budgets and real deep questions about North Korea's objectives would you give us your evaluation of the performance of the national will, to take on additional commitments? (Army Maj.) Gen. (William) Garrison, (commander, A. On the first question, I know that you do not seriQ. Another question having to do with Korea. Your joint) special operations? ously want me to discuss any planning that we do on this own assessment of the likelihood of a North Korean atA. Yes, I saw it several times. In my judgment the or any other operation. I would hope that this building tack? And secondly, you mentioned in odie of your anmilitary personnel involved in that operation performed does not get caught short if we are ever asked to do someswers, to a question on Korea, that you were confident with extraordinary courage in an extremely difficult situthing, and I feel confident that we won't be. But that's all that the combined United States/South Korea could stop action and I think, from a military point of view, did an I would really want to say on that matter. a North Korean attack short of North Korea's war objecabsolutely sterling job. I think General Garrison had gone As far as the issue of extending security guarantees to tives? through all the proper planning and precautionary steps the East, I think for the longest time we were talking about A. I will tell you that none of us read their war plans, that one would expect a leader in that kind of an operawhether security guarantees are to be extended or whether and I wouldn't want to pretend otherwise. I think logic tion and led those troops with great distinction. NATO membership ought to be extended. would lead you to the conclusion that they probably would Q. When are we going to get that video? It is, I think, becoming clearer and clearer that therm is wish to reunify the country through force, and I think our A. I don't know. We'll look into it. a consensus forming in the alliance that people would friends in the Republic of Korea, together with us, have Q. Is there any security material in there? like to think, on that issue, that the question is no longer the capability of stopping him short of that. A. There might be. There might be methods they whether, but when and how.

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Tropic Times Jan. 21,1994 The big sleepover Atlantic girls get a dose of the field by Sgt. Rick Emert USARSO Public Affairs Office -Aliantic FORT SHERMAN -Fort Sherman is a gold mine for training military units on water and jungle terrain, but it recently hosted troops of a much different kind. More than 60 Atlantic Girl Scouts from Brownies to Cadettes, Pacific Cadettes and parents got a small dose of "going to the field" during a campout here Jan. 7-9. They immediately found the vastness of the nearby jungle andoceanintimidating, said Peggy Barrett, Atlantic Girl Scouts chairwoman. "The girls were alittleintimidated at first, but then they looked atit as anew adventure,"shesaid. "ByFriday night, it was more like a big sleepover." The campout gave the 6-14-year-old girls the opportunity to see a bit of Panama they may not see normally. "I think it's important for them to experience nature especially in Panama," Barrett said. "There are a lot of things here like different weather, animals and plants that they aren't used to seeing." Thecampoutalsoleftthe scouts withan appreciation for the environment. "We stressed cleaning uptoward the end ofthe campout and the girls ended up cleaning even areas that we weren't in," she said. The girls were also exposedto FortSherman's shoreline and obstacle course during a one-hour hike. "We all had a great time out by the ocean,"she said. "It was so much betterthan just being at home or at a meeting. The girls got to climb the rope at the obstacle course and were thrilled about that." Although they enjoyed the nature hikes the most, there were other learning experiences, Barrett said. "The girls gathered just about anything they could find and we made things like picture frames with them." They also got a class about first aid from Rhonda Pittman of the Coco Solo Army Health Clinic. After a weekend of roughing it with the bugs and the jungle's unusual sounds, the girls were reluctant to return to civilization, Barrett said. "They were anxious to return to their beds, but other t than that, just about everyone wanted to stay out a little U.S. Army photo by gtL Rda.rd Emert longer," she said. Parent Yvette Parker helps Girl Scoutsmake frames out of leaves. Boy Scout Troop 8'brown-bag"it for Kunas FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO-Atlantic) -Boy Scout Troop 8 recently spread a bit of good will to the Kuna community of Cativa near Colon. The Scouts passed out 400 brown bags to the Atlantic community and asked community members to fill them with any donations. About 250 of the bags were returned along with a large box of clothes and toys from the Coco Solo Army Health 4 Clinic. The Noncommissioned Officers Associationalso supported the drive, said MSgt. Pete Moosey, Troop 8 scoutmaster. toThe Scouts delivered the donated items to Cativa and gave them to local officials and pastors there, he said. "Normallywetakethemto acommunity ononeoftheislands, but wecouldn'tdothat this year," he said. But the change in plans benefitted the scouts. "It worked outbetterbecausesomeofthe scouts gotto go with us and seethe community this time," he said. "This is the third year in the scouts for some of them and it's the first time they've seen a Kuna commuThe donated items were well receivedin Cativa, said Sgt. Chris Mulhall, assistant scoutmaster. We went to aplace that both (Moosey) U.S. Army Photo by MSgt Pete Moosy and I have been to before," he said. "The Troop 8 Boy Scouts unload packages at the Kuna village of Cativa near Colon. people there really needed these items."

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1OTropic Times#1 iJu L Ir 10Jan. 21,1994 M stones Promotions Colonel -Bernard Harvey, and Donald Higgins Jr., both of U. S. Southern Command. To Lieutenant Colonel -Stephen Awe of U.S. Army Dental Activity -Panama, David Boozer, 24th Communications Squadron, Colton McKethan, U.S. SOUTHCOM. To Captain -George Fink, 310th Airlift Squadron. To First Lieutenant -John Spencer and Robert Griego, both of Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. To Master Sergeant -Charles Momon of 4th Battalion, 228th Aviation. To Senior Master Sergeant -William Kennedy, 310th Airlift Squadron, Thomas Edwards and Nartin Tabor, both of 24th Civil Engineering Squadron. To Master Sergeant -Yolanda Coulter, 24th Wing Group, Kevin Holden, 310th Airlift Support Squadron, Shelia Washburn, 24th Communications Squadron, Anthony Edwards, USSOUTHCOM, Ray Gata, 617th Airlift Support Squadron, Jeff Guay, 24th Air Intellig gence Squadron, Robert Richardson, 630th Air Openttions Squadron, Patton Kern, 24th Civil Engineering Squadron, John Bienia and Pedro Nieves, both of 24th Operations Support Squadron. The Lucas family prepares for the holidays. U.S.ArForcehoto To Staff Sergeant -Joseph Lasalle of 1sat Battalion,. 228th Aviation. Air Force honors family of the quarter To Sergeant -Terry Florence of U.S. Army Dental AcHOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) -The 24th Wing is the NCO won't let his family suffer. Panama recognizing the accomplishments of its smallest compo"He comes to all the special things that go on and it tivity -nent, the family. It has developed a quarterly award promakes my giris know him better outside his capacity as a gram to highlight outstanding achievements of military military member," said Veeoletta. "When they see him To Specialist -Lamanns Fingers of 4th Battalion, members, their spouses and children. off duty, is makes them realize that he's also their dad, 228th Aviation. Adam Sanders and Jesus Salazar, both The first recipient is the Lucas family, TSgt. James not just a working guy." of 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation. William Jones, M., Veeoletta V., Sydney S. and Whitney L., from the Veeoletta is akey member of the base Spouse EnrichEliezer Orellana, Christopher McLaughlin, Waymon 24th Supply Squadron. The Lucas' were selected for the meant Quality Improvement Team which is designed to Tipton and Brent Ludlow, all of Headquarters Comfinal quarter of last year. help military spouses adjust to life in Panama. pany, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Barrett Coller, Jody James is the noncommissioned officer in charge of the Veeoletta and James have been married for 10 years. Colvin, Yvonne Frieson and Michael O'Connor, all of fuels storage section here and is responsible for receivTogether they work to raise Sydney, age 9, and Whitney, 549th Military Police Company. ing, staring, and transferring more than 36 million galage 7, in the somewhat hecic military lifestyle. lons of aviation fuel annually. This is in support of more "We've always been this way, it keeps us close," James To Private First Class -Jose Torres of U.S. Army than 1,600 aircraft each month involved in airlift and said. "We keep doing different things and keep involved cunter-drug missions. with other people also. Work is busy, but somehow you Dental Activity -Panama. David Demons of 4th BatcoDespite the many demands his job places upon him, find the time." talion, 228th Aviation. Dennis Kyle Jr., Corey Armstrong and Merlita Parker, all of 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation. Mark DeSantis and Kenneth Ward, and Spec. John Holgerson, all of 4th Battalion, 228th talion, 228th Aviation. both of 549th Military Police Company. Ricky King Aviation. SSgt. Charles Jay, Sgt. Pamela Hancock, and William Reeder, both of Company B, 5th BattalSgt. Shawn Nelson, CWO2 Jerry Caffee and lst Lt. Riion, 87th Infantry. Matthew Boardman of Company chard Watson, all of 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation. C, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Jeremy Bishop of Sgt. Catherine Cisco and Sgt. Patrick Robello, both of Battalion Catamount Certificate -SSgt. James Popp Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Headquarters Company, 128th Aviation Brigade. of Jungle Operations Training Battalion. To Private Two -Shawn Johnson of U.S. Army DenJoint Service Achievement Medal -CTR2 Paul WinFrocked to Petty Officer First Class -CTR1 Darrell tal Activity -Panama. Kendall Green of 214th Mediter. Williamson. cal Detachment William Hernandez Jr. of Company B, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Zaldy Macam and Navy Achievement Medal -CTRC Vernon Davison, Frocked to Petty Officer Second Class -CT12 (SS) Stephen Dornstadter, both of Company C, 5th BattalCT1 (SS) Richard Fewkes Jr. David Anderson, CTI2 Steven Espinosa, CTM2 ion, 87th Infantry. Garrett Fogleson of Headquarters Donald Fisher, CI2 (AW) Marilyn Garcia-Pacheco, Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Army Achievement Medal -Sgt. Terry Florence and CTR2 Paul Winter, CTM2 Timothy Lanham. Spec. Stephen Jackson, both of U.S. Army Dental Activity -Panama. Spec. Michael Dolan and PFC Donald Frocked to Petty Offlcer Third Class -CTR3 Jeffrey S a Gocha, both of 4th Battalion, 228th Aviation. Spec. Frost, CTI3 Paul Gary, CTO3 David Himmelman, J03 Jeromie Vann, Spec. Todd Bell, Spec. Larson Parker Sean Hughes, CT03 Rhonda Remling, CTI3 Susana Legion of Merit -MSgt. Julius Harden of U.S. Army and Sgt. Terry Baughn, all of 1st Battalion, 228th AviaVicreck, CT03 John Whiting. Dental Activity -Panama. tion. MSgt. Gilberto Wolmers of Headquarters Company, 128th Aviation Brigade. Spec. Kevin Brickman S 6tio s Meritorious Service Medal -Capt. Keith Kranhold of Company B, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Spec. and Capt. James Cassella, both of Headquarters ComGalen Lindsey of Company C, 5th Battalion, 87th InField Sanitation Course -Spec. Jerry Bice Jr. and PFC pany, 128th Aviation Brigade. fantry. SSgt. Thomas Engel, Spec. Michael Sovey and Stephen Patruno, both of 549th Military Police ComSpec. Paul Dudas, all of Headquarters Company, 5th pany. Navy Commendation Medal -CT1C Ellen Miranda, Battalion, 87th Infantry. HMC Maria Moore. Military Police Investigations School -Sgt. Jose Good Conduct Medal -Sgt. Jaime Caro, SgL James Guzman and Sgt. Marlene Dameron, both of 549th Air Force Commendation Medal -CTMC Rog Edwards, Sgt. Gregory McPhee, Sgt. Henry Mitchell military Police Company. Myrant and Sgt. Vernon Young Jr., all of U.S. Army Dental Activity -Panama. Sgt. Byron Lane, Spec. ChristoArmy Commendation Medal -Sgt. Darlene Taylor pher Glatz and Spec. Kenneth Swarts, all of 214th BIrtIsP and Spec. Matthew Bland, both of U.S. Army Dental Medical Detachment, CTM3 Terry King. Activity -Panama. Capt. Douglas Ziemer, CWO2 Vanessa Marie Cosme was born Jan. 6 to 1st Lt. Juan Brett Westcott, Sgt. George Custer, SgL Tracy Harris Letter of Appreciation -Spec. Rex Horner of 1st Batand Clarisse Cosine.

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Sports Jan. 21, 1994 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 11 xV.; Going up? DoDi.o Hm Eric Miller rappels a rock after securing a rope to climb it. (See story and photos on page 13) MEDDAC takes on Jazz in Over 30 Balboa High School hosts and wins *Air Force wrestling team basketball season opener at Reeder second interscholastic league track +Balboa Relays Physical Fitness Center. meet. *SCN A.M. radio sports

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12 Tropic Times Jan. 21, 1994 Old dogs learn new tricks by Sgt Lori Davis USARSO Public Affairs Office FORT CLAYTON -Some old dogs learned new tricks for hanging in the Over-30 basketball league opener at Reeder Physical Fitness Center Tuesday. MEDDAC learned they can't play Jazz man-to-man and Jazz learned Nathaniel Taylor kicks butt. Taylor romped all over MEDDAC's defense, chalking up six buckets inthe first half. His hot shooting got Jazz off to an early lead, leaving MEDDAC in the dust, 51-43. When the dust cleared after the first, MEDDAC's offensive leaders were farbehind.Kenneth Claudsanktwo hoops and put in a foul shot to lead MEDDAC in scoring. Alphonso Banks put in two baskets and Terry Diggs, Michael Truitt and Dewayne Stubbelfield scored a bucket each. The poor showing in the first half wasn't because MEDDAC couldn't go to the inside. They all went to the inside, at once. Things were flowing fineforJazzeadiyon.RonaldPetty boosted the score with three hoops and Daniel Harley put intwo.Rodney Mayo,EddieFrazierandBernardGrimsley went to the board to put them ahead 30-17in the first half. After being dominated in the first, MEDDAC changed its gameplan and went to ahalf-court defense to shut down Jazz's fast breaks. The switch paid off as they stayed between Taylor and the goal and prevented his hardcharges to the net. Taylorwasheldtoonly sixpointsinthesecondandPetty scored two. MEDDAC also found its offensive groove in the second. Arthur Hillard put in two baskets and a threepointer as did Claud and Banks. Stubbelfield and Diggs, sank one each. With a strong lead to cushion them, Jazz slowed down toward the end of the second. The fast-break offense gave way to ball control and passing. The frustrated MEDDAC players tried to forceturnovers, but ended up with 11 fouls in the second half compared to four from the first half. MEDDAC out-scored Jazz in the second 26-21, but it wasn't enough to make up for the 13 point deficit from the first half. Jazz put MEDDAC away 51-43. "We came out and got the lead and had good defense along the way," said Jazz coach Anthony Todd. "We've got a well-rounded team and they know how to play together. They're strong on rebounding, fast breaks and the inside plays," he said. Not knowing how to play together was a weakpoint for several MEDDACplayers who areplaying together forthe first time. They got off to a rocky start, but this loss taught them what to work on, Dyer said. "We have to improve on ourfundamentals like passing. We were clogging the lane too much, but that's what happens when you get tired," said Diggs. "We have been getting ready for the Transisthmian Run U.S. Army Photo by Sgt Loi Davs and we haven't been practicing, but after the run this Jazz's Danny Harley takesto the air on afast break vWhile Kenneth Claud of MEDDAC watches from below. weekend, we'll be ready, he said. SPs slaughter Airlift in'Dirty Dozen' son, the military police are poised to follow leagues and four divisions. Tournament charm pions the same trend. Supply and the 617th Airlift Support They were 5-0 in the "Dirty Dozwn." Squadron Team 1, bothplayoff teams from become lea u e favorites Rmt8th Aviation last yearare in the American Lgand The military police edged them 11-8. The regular season. by Sgt James A. Rush home, the umpires mercifully called the "SlaughterRule" cameinto playintherest The 24th Maintenance Squadron, al24th Wing Public Affairs game. If a team leads by 10 or more runs of their games including a 13-3 slap in the ready with a win over ALSS 1, has high after five innings, the game is ended under face to Supply. aspirations this season and the 536th EngiHOWARD AFB -By winning the prethe "Slaughter Rule." The season is in its infancy, but already neer Battalion, the "Dirty Dozen" runners season "Dirty Dozen" Softball TournaRight fielder Mark Delesky chipped in the security police have taken therole of big up, look to be there at the end also. ment Jan. 7-9, the 24th Security Police three singles, and three others had a pair of kid on the block. It's a role coach Norm Within the National League, the secuSquadron has established itself as the team hits. Catcher Dan "Cookie" Cook was the Poppell relishes. rity police faces roadblocks against the 1st to beat. biggestofthesewithafirstinninghomerun "We're looking forward to it," he said. Battalion, 508th Infantry, Headquarters Their first opponent, the 617th Airlift and a single. "We've got a lot to make up for from last Company and the combined team from the Support Squadron Team 2, fell far short of Airlift support's offense produced a reyear." 24th Operations Support Squadron. Both the task as the cops mugged them 18-7 Jan. spectable 12hits, three by left fielder David "We were one of the best team's out are 2-0 so far. 13 at Weekly Field. Ames. They benefited from only a single there, and everyone knew it, but wejust fell The 24th Communications Squadron Security police batters totalled 18 hits error, which led to their first run in the fifth apart at the end of the season." Team 1 and 24th Medical Squadron, playandscoredineveryinning. Airliftsupport's inning. "This year, we're looking forward to offcontendersfromlastseason,arewaiting defense helped outwith errorsin each of the The rest of the scores came in the top of meeting Supply in finals at the end. I don't also. first five innings. the fifthinning, and wereenoughtoprevent knowifthey'relooking forwardtoit, butwe If the security police emerge unscathed Third baseman Paris Fant already had the game from ending at 13-1. are." after the regular season, four opponents two singles, but his sixth inning home run Last year's "Dirty Dozen" champs, the That the security police will be in the from the American League will be lurking was the game's final insult. After he and 24th Supply Squadron, went on to take the playoffs is taken for granted by most. The in the playoffs and three others from the right-center fielder Bob Henson trotted 1993 base championship as well. This seabase's best teams are separated into two National League will be seeking revenge.

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Tropic Times Jan. 21, 1994 Jeremy Middleton makes it to the top of the rock Living on the Edgel n the '90s, a sport labeled Barnes said. It's knowing when to alternative or extreme, such use strength and when to conserve as skysurfing and downhill it that counts. mountain biking, creates an The average soldier is in good instant craze. It seems the only enough shape to start climbing, prerequisite for the label is a Barnes said. willingness to risk one's neck, Barnes has been climbing with but there is an exception -Miller for nearly a year. rock climbing. It has been When climbing a tricky rock, around long before anyone it's important to be able to trust dreamed of a mountain bike or you're belay man, Barnes said. slipping into a pair of bindings Taking safety procedures is also and its extremely safe with a very important. belay. "When people start joking Climbaround and ing with a not taking it belay "It was first explained to seriously, is involves me as a combination of when people two chess, ballet and can get hurt," people, a Barnes said. climber weightlifting." Miller and attached Bares took to one end Eric Miller Breso of arope Rock Climber and a and two other belayer at the other end with the new climbers to the abandoned rope strung though a snaplink quarry near Fort Clayton for their or 'cariabiner' ring at the first crack at a rock Monday. precipice of a mountain. "There was no fear factor," Steve Bames climbs using his fingertips. The climber is free to try Middleton said. "You know the moves he normally wouldn't guy with the rope is going to stop dare without a rope, said Eric you from falling." Miller, who has been climbing Middleton and the others took a for nearly ten years. couple falls, but made it to the Miller said he has never seen precipice. anyone injured beyond cuts and "It gives you a sense of accomscrapes, although he could plishment," Middleton said after picture a broken limb in a worst his successful first climb. case scenario. Miller and Barnes are into "It was first explained to me climbing with a '90s attitude. as a combination of chess, ballet "It's less unadulterated than and weightlifting." mainstream sports," they said. Although it takes strength to And it's a little more timeless make it up the mountain, than the other adrenaline junkie balance and coonination are sports that will be gone tommorow, more important factors, Steve Miller said. story and photos by Sgt. E.J. Hersom Tropc Tirnes Spors Edtor6 Steve Barnes tightens the anchor line for the belay line.

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14 Tropic Times Jan. 21, 1993 Balboa hosts, wins meet 2:49.972,Wilson,GreenDevils,3:05.664, by Jim Sweeney Valdilles,GreenDevils,3:12.815,Rosales, Tropic Times contributor, Green Devils Coach Green Devils, 3:25.94 BALBOA -TheBalboaBulldogVarsity 200 meter dash: 1, Barnett, Bulldogs, track team won the second interscholastic 30.24; 2, Jones, Green Devils, 30.8; 3, leaguetrackmeet withadecisive118points Epperson, Green Devils, 31.67; 4, Short, to remain number one in team competition Green Devils, 34.28 in the Department of Defense Dependents 400 meter relay: 1, Bulldogs, Banks, School's varsity track league. Daniels, Nolte, Barnett, 1:00.36 The Red Machine edged out the Green Boys Devils for second with 77.5 points to 70.5. Longjump: 1, Chastain,Red Machine, The Cougars had 31 and Chame school 18'93/4"; 2, Christopherson, Bulldogs, 16' 6. 1/4"; 3, Klasovsky, Bulldogs, 16'1/4"; 4, In junior varsity competition, the Red Delgado,Red Machine, 15'9"; 5,Soto,Red Machine captured first place with68points Machine, 15'3 1/4" followed by Chame with 52 points, Green Shot put: 1,Gutierrez, Bulldogs,37'5"; Devils with 44 points, Bulldogs with 24 2,Gonzalez,GreenDevils,355';3,Abrego, Red Machine, 32' 2"; 4, Hernadez, Red points and Cougars with 11 points. Machine,31'3";5, Trim, Red Machine,27' In overall varsity league competition for 7 the season the Bulldogs have 225 points Discus: 1, Gonzalez, Green Devils, 92' and look like sure champs with only one 2"; 2, Abrego, Red Machine, 90'l 1/2"; 3, meet remaining. Guttierrez, Bulldogs, 85' 7"; 4, Stokes, The Red Machine and the Green Devils Bulldogs, 77' 6 1/2"; 5, Hernandez, Red areneck-and-neck for second in the league Machine, 76' 2" with the Red Machine at 160.5 points and HIghjump: 1,Novotny, Bulldogs, 57"; the GreerDevils at 159.5 points. The 2, Ortiz, Cougars, 52"; 3, Martinelli, Red Cougars have 66 and Chame has 13. Machine, 5'; 4, Klasvosky, Bulldogs, 5' The finalleague track meet will be 5:30 Pole vault: 1, Watanbe, Green Devils, p.m. tonight at Balboa High School track. 9'; 2, Avery, Bulldogs, 8' 6" The following are varsity results: 110 meter high hurdles: 1, Soto, Red Girls Machine,19.82;2,Goodno,Bulldogs,22.79 LongJump: 1, Nolte, Bulldogs, 12'61/ 100 meter dash: 1, Chastain, Red Ma2"; 2, Singleton, Bulldogs, 12' 5 1/2"; 3, chine, 11; 2, Guttierez, Bulldogs, 11.02; 3, Barnett, Bulldogs, 12' 33/4"; 4, Wilson, Olivares,GreenDevils,11.73;3,Martinelli, Green Devils 1235, Jones, Green Devils, Red Machine, 11.73, tie 12'2 1/2" 400meterdash: 1,Ortiz,Cougars55.84; Shot put: 1, Singleton, Bulldogs, 29'8 2, Guttierrez, Bulldogs, 57.56; 3, Chastain, 1/2"; 2, Higley, Bulldogs, 26'1"; 3, Banks, Red Machine, 57.64; 4, Abrego, Red MaBulldogs, 25'4"; 4, Cooper, Red Machine, chine, 59.76; 5, Wallace, Cougars, 5:28.61 233"; 5, Short, Green Devils, 22' 3" 1600 meter run: 1, E. Davis, Green Hlghjump: 1,Cooper, Red Machine,4' Devils, 4:50.45, record; 2, H. Davis, Cou4"; 2, Banks, Bulldogs, 4' 4"; 3, Higley, gars,4:53;3,Lee,Red Machine,5:22.59;4, Bulldogs,4'4"; 4, McLean, Bulldogs, 4'l"; Galvez, Cougars, 5:28.09; 5, Sweeney, 5, Rosales, Green Devils, 4' Green Devils 5:28.61 55 meter low hurdles: 1, Singleton, 800 meter run: 1, H. Davis, Cougars, Bulldogs, 9.5 2, Epperson, Green Devils, 2:12.72;2,E. Davis,GreenDevils,2:12.88; 10.44 3, Anckle, Red Machine, 10.53 4, 3, Ortiz, Cougars, 2:23.86; 4, Lee, Red Stargen, Green Devils, 10.77 5, McLean, Machine, 2:27.92; 5, Galvez, Cougars, Bulldogs, 10.79 2:29.69 100 meter dash: Barnett, Bulldogs, 200 meter dash: 1, Chastain, Red Ma23.21; 2, Short, Green Devils, 14; 3, Jones, chine, 24.42; 2, Martinelli, Red Machine, Green Devils, 14.02; 4, Daniel, Bulldogs, 24.92; 3, Olivares, Green Devils, 26.27; 4, 14.05; 5, Cedeno, Green Devils, 14.18 Brown, Green Devils, 28.27; 5, Goodno, 400 meter dash: 1, Singleton, BullBulldogs, 28.41 dogs, 1:08.24; 2, Epperson, Green Devils, 400 meter relay: 1, Red Machine, 1:13.82; 3, Choocherd, Red Machine, Abrego,DelGado,Lovejoy,Trim,52.11;2, 1:18.58; 4, Wallace, Red Machine, 1:20.6; Cougars, Wallace, Tremblay, Ortiz, Davis, 5, Pitts, Bulldogs, 1:25.08 527; 3, Green Devils, Gonzalez, Sweeney, D 1pam.nt ofDeensephoto by SgL EJ Hesom 800 meter run: 1, Schwan, Chame, Brown, Olivares, 53.19 Evan Davis makes a pole vault attempt. Safe Deparmentof Defense photo bySSgt.RichardUndvig Gregory Glen of the 59th Engineer Company slides into home against the Marine team in a softball tournament Navy Station won this past weekend.

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Tropic Times Jan. 21,199415 Swim meet The Howard Pool and Zodiac Community Recreation Cener willhost the Howard Tarpon Swim Meet 8am. Jan. 29. Teams from Howard AFB, Fort Clayton, Rodman Naval Station and Fort Davis will participate. For more information, call Lisa Nofi at 284-3569 or the recreation center at 284-6161. SCN radio sports The Southern Command Network's AM 790 Pacific and 1420 Atlantic will broadcast the following sports this weekend. Tonight Pro basketball: Seattle at Dallas at 8:30 p.m. -Saturday College football: Senior Bowl from Mobile, Ala. Residents who live off post may listen to live simulcasts of the following games in English as they air on local television stations in Spanish. Sunday Pro football: AFC championship game; Kansas City Chiefs at Buffalo Bills at 12:30 p.m. NFC championship game; San Francisco 49ers at Dallas Cowboys at 4 p.m. Swimming classes The Howard and Albrookpoolsinviteparents and their children to enroll in swimming lessons. Diving classes and ladies water exercise classes are available at the Albrook Pool. For more information, call the Zodiac Community Activities Center at the Howard Pool at 284-3569 or the Albrook Pool at 286-3555. Pan-Am Dive Club The Pan American Dive Club is welcoming new mdrnbers. The clubis locatedin Building 214,Fort Espinar and is open6-8 p.m. Fridays. Dues are $6 per month or $25for six months. Rentals available. Call Gary Garay at 2893428 or 289-4447 or Tom Bell at 289-3762 or 289-3538. Shark, bottom fishing The Rodman Marina hosts shark and bottom fishing 611 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday nights on the Black Stallion and Vargas boats. Tickets must bepurchasedthe day before the trip. Fishing charters to Pina Bay for marlin fishing are also available. Call theRodmanMarinaat2833147/3150. Rock and Bowl The Howard Bowling Center hosts bowl to favorite oldies in its Rock and Bowl program 9 p.m. until closing Mondaythrough Thursday. Formoreinformation, call the center at 284-4818. Sports equipment The Howard Sports and Recreational Center has the sporting equipment for weekend outings, camping, beach Balboa Relays combing, golfing and more. Boogie boards and board The 43rd running of the Balboa Relays will held at Balboa High School Jan. 28-29. Events include games are available for children. Items are available for sprints, hurdles, distance, relays, shot, discus, long jump, high jump and pole vault. Participants must daily, weekly or weekend rates. Several specials are being be on a team to compete. For more information call Cleve Oliver at the Balboa gym at 252-5704. run throughout January. For more information, call 284Soldiers interested in running the relays may call Willie Moye at 287-6411 or Sue Bozgoz at 287-3445 6 or 260-1128. Fishing charters _1%___ --n Trophy deep-sea and Sunskiff bottom fishing charters Sports shorts Beginner swim m eet ae available at the Rodman Marina Charters include The Fort Davis Pool will host a beginners swimming captain, fishing gear, cooler and ice. Call the marina at 3-on-3 basketball meet 'Fiesta Panama' 10 am. Feb. 19. Registration dead283-3147 or 283-3150 for more information. 3-onbask tballline is Feb. 18. Categories are doggie kick, front kick, back Deadline to sign up for the 3-on-3 Rodman Fitness kick and free style. Age groups are for 4-12 year olds. For Free aerobics Center Intramural Basketball Tournament is Feb. 9. Call more information, call Armando Jimenez at 289-3272. a 283-4222/4061 for more information or to sign up. The Reeder Physical Fitness Center has free aerobics Body building contest given by Teresa Consterdine 9:15 am.10:15 a.m. weekdays. Each workout has a warm-up, cardiovascular workW resting cam p The body building contest scheduled for Jan. 29 at the out, cool down and floorwork. Call 287-3861 for more The Howard Sports and Fitness Center is looking for Howard Base Theater has been cancelled. information. active duty airmento submit applications for the AirForce team wresting camp from March 1 through 29 at Peterson AFB, Col. Call MSgt. Al Beck at 284-3451 for more Free weight training Am ador golf information. The Fronius Fitness Center has free weight training Golfers who wish to participate in tournaments should sessions and Nautilus machine training sessions 3-4 p.m. havean established handicap. Those who am not members Rodm an 5K Fun Run Tuesdays. Call 289-3108 for more information ofFortAmadorGolfCoursewillbeexpeetedtopaygreen RunnersareneededfortheRodman5KFunRun, which The Amador Golf Club is also using pre-scheduled will be held 6:30 am. Jan. 28. There is no entry fee. T starting times forteeing offon weekends and U.S. holidays. Deadline to register is Wednesday. Run is open to all The Trainsisthmian Relay Race will be held Sunday. Only groups of three or four may reserve tee times before military and civilian personnel. Units with most runners Categories are U.S. military, female, open and open over 10 am. Reservations may be called in beginning Wednesand first and second place receive awards. Call 283-4222/ 40. Teams consist of 10 runners and two alternatives. Call day prior to the weekend. Call292-4511 formoreinforma4061 to sign up. 287-4050. tion.

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16 Tropic Times Jan. 21, 1994 New unit : activates COROZAL -The United States Army Reserve Field Medical Training Site was oficially activated Jan. 12 here. It was established as aUnitedStates Army South unit Oct. 4, 1993. It has been operational since 1991, but was not authorized to act as an independent unit, saidMaj.JustinoL.SosaFMTScommander. "The FMTS concept has been around since 1991, but forvarious reasons it was not implemented untilnow,"Sosasaid. "Up until recentlytheMedretes(medicalreadinesstrainingexercises)havebeensupported byvarious National Guard and Reserve units." Its mission is to conduct humanitarian medical, dental and veterinary exercise support for USAR units deploying to the U.S. Southern Command areas of operation. The FMTS is staffed with seven USAR-active Guard and Reserve officers and noncommissioned officers. "The Medrete's objective is to conduct U.S. Army photo by Spnc. Aexand.r c. White humanitarian medical, dental, veterinary and civic actions," Sosa said. "We support host The Fort Clayton Chapel choir sings 1 960s' music during the Martin Luther King Jr. commerative ceremony Jan. nation health care and enhance the U.S 13. military's image in Latin America." Cooperative efforts save injured diver's life by SSgt. Rian Clawson Chespiro Zapata when the two men came alongside the They then did what they could to make him comfortable 241h Wing Public Affairs dive boat. and keep him warm, determine his condition mnd help "I could see they were really tired, so I tried to help him regain his orientation. HOWARD AFB -The cooperative efforts of an Air Chespiro take their equipment when they started to hand Shortly thereafter, the rest of the dive group came to Force reserve major, a Panamanian boat captain, and an it up," Raymond said. the surface and boarded the boat. Javier Freiburghaus, American civilian were instrumental in preventing a After Regan had handed up his weight belt and an experienced dive instructor and the owner 'of the recent diving incident from turning tragic. buoyancy control device, Sloan said, a wave slammed his diving resort that scheduled the dive came alongside in A small group of divers were enjoying a dive around friend and diving partner against the boat and he slipped another boat and lent his expertise to control the situDrake Island near Portobelo when the incident occurred. "several times" below the surface. ation. The boat containing Regan then returned to the Majors John Regan and Billy Sloan had just come up "I pulled John up and kept his head above the surface shore. from a "real good dive" and when they broke the surface and then tried to get him over to the ladder," Sloan said. Sloan and another diver, U.S. Navy Reserve Petty they found the wind had kicked up and turned the ocean "He wasn't able to help himself much and he was Officer Angela Hart, helped Regan into a car while really rough, Sloan said. disoriented and flailing about. He clocked me a good one Freiburghaus phoned ahead to the Army clinic at Coco The two also discovered that they'd surfaced more with his elbow, but I did manage to get him over to the Solo that they were coming in with the victim of a diving than 100 yards from the dive boat, so they struck out ladder." incident. against the pounding waves to close the distance. Raymond said she saw Regan was having difficulty "When we got there the doctors classified it as a near "We'd been down about 40 minutes, so we were getting aboard, so she leaned down over the side of the drowning and they treated John for that," Sloan said. already tired," Sloan explained. "By the time we finally boat and grabbed hold of the back of his shirt. "Then they called in a chopper to medevac him to got to the side of the boat, we were both just about "I didn't have enough strength to pull him out of the Gorgas. exhausted." water," she said, "but at least I could prevent him from "It was a scary situation for everyone involved," Sloan Judy Raymond, another diver who had finished her banging into the side of the boat." said. "We're all just glad it ended the way it did and he's dive early, was already on board with boat captain Finally, they managed to drag Regan aboard the boat. all right." Marine injured at Sherman TopAir Force NCO discusses issues FORTCLAYTON(USARSOPAO)-AU.S. Marine LUKE AFB, Ariz (AirForce News Service) -Chief goingto stay basicallythesameforthenextyearortwo," was injured Jan. 12 at approximately 9:30 am. dunng a MasterSergeantoftheAirForceGaryPfingstonseesjob he said, but added that he see chances for promotion training exercise at Fort Sherman. security, promotion stability and fewer overseas moves increasing in five or 10 years. Cpl. Kevin Powers, Company F, 2nd Battalion, 9th as constants for the future of the enlisted force. Budget cuts have also limited the availability of Marines, Camp Pendleton, Calif.,injured his neckwhile The 10th chief master sergeant of the Air Force overseas assignments by lengthening those tours. attempting to dive under a wire on an obstacle course. discussedenlisted matters here "Any time we move fewer Powers was transported to Coco Solo Clinic and later recently during hisannualwestpeople,it's cheaper. The AirForce flown to Gorgas Army Community Hospital where he position has been to allow people was treated for one day. ern regional tour.poionhsbetoalwepe Powers was then medically evacuated to Brooke Pfingstonexpects the future "I see making a COnSCiOUS overseas to stay longer because it Army Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas. Air Force to be made up of effort to decide what is saves money," he said. Circumstances surrounding the incident are still unmore than 80 percent enlisted Pfingstonsaid statesidemoves der investigation by U.S. Army South authorities, people workingin a high-qualexpected of us and what our probablywon't change muchfrom Wity, dynamic force. job is." what they've been forthelast five "Whatever the Air Force of 'years. AAFES closes for inventories the future has in store, there "There will continue to be COROZAL (Tropic Times) -The Army and Ar will be a large percentage of CSMgt. Gary Pfingston mission requirements and manForce Exchange Service will conduct its annual invenenlisted, so jobs are going to be Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force datory training, but we aren't gotory Sunday and Monday. very secure," he said. ing to move people just for the AAFES announces the following schedule: Pfingston considers the sake of moving them, he said." Closed Sunday force to be in good shape, despite his previous concerns To meet future needs, the Air Force will be built on Fort Clayton Shoppette Building 95, MCSS; Howard about enlisted force cuts and the effect on mission a more diversified enlisted force, said Pfingston. AFB MCSS;Gorgas HospitalShoppette; QuarryHeights capabilities. For example, the new Air Force specialty codes are Shoppette; Fort Espinar Shoppette "I'm more comfortable with our projected base force designed to create more diversity in enlisted skills. ClosedMonday than when I first heard of the proposed cuts, he said." He said the new codes will help manage the enlisted Corozal Main Store; Fort Clayton -Auto Parts, Building He credits the bottom-up review with defining roles force smarter as a result of being less specialized. 135 Plaza Shoppette, Building 519 Shoppette; Howard and missions, and designing a force structure for the Whileenlistedmemberswillaccomplishmorethrough AFB -Main Store, Service Station, Class Six; Fort Kobbe future. their diversified skills, the chief believes the force will Shoppette; Albrook AFS -Toyland, Shoe Store, FurniThe review defined the Air Force structure, gearing work smarter, not necessarily harder. ture Store, Shoppette, Video Rental, Class Six; Cocoli -it toward participating in and winning two major re"I see making a conscious effort to decide what is Shoppette; Curundu -Shoppete/Gas; Fort Davis Retail, gional conflicts nearly simultaneously. expected of us and what ourjobis. Then we needaforce Service Station, MCSS; Fort Sherman Retail. Regardless of the force drawdown, Pfingston foresized to do that. Does that mean people are going to be casts promotion stability. working 12-hour days, six days a week? I don't think "I think promotions, as we know them today, are so."