Citation
The tropic times

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Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text




ift of the Panama Canal Museum


Tropic

Quarry Heights, Rep


Times

public of Panama Friday, Jan. 14,1994


Local soldiers rescue Russian sailor


by Sgt. Lori Davis
USARSO Public Affairs Office
ALBROOK AFS - Medevac soldiers from the 214th
Medical Detachment rescued a Russian sailor injured in
a fire on the Greek ship Grain Trader Jan. 5.
Valery Lukjanov suffered third degree bums to his
face and hands and second degree burns to his chest from
an electrical fire, said SSgt. Robert Rojas, 214th Med.
Det. medic.
A rescue crew in a UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter re-
sponded to the emergency at 3 p.m. and flew 120 miles
north of Colon in the Caribbean Sea to meet the ship.
The helicopter and ship did not have matching radio fre-
quencies, so they communicated with each other through
a third radio operator, said pilot CWO 2 Arthur Johnson.
Because they could not communicate directly, the air
crew sent directions to the ship to turn into the wind when
the helicopter approached. This not only assured the pi-
lots they found the right ship, it also made it easier to
lower the medic to pick up the injured sailor, he said.
Military ships usually have large decks where helicop-
ters can land. However, this ship did not have a deck for a


helicopter landing so the medic was lowered by cable,
said pilot 1 st Lt. Jack Parry.
As the helicopter hovered 90 feet above the deck, the
crew chief lowered the medic on the jungle penetrator, a
small cone-shaped device with three folding seats used to
retrieve people from obstructed areas, Johnson said..
Macias had to lower Rojas through a network of pipes
on the ship's deck, guiding him into an opening 10 feet
wide by 20 feet long. The ship's movement, the wing and
the jungle penetrator's tendency to spin made the effort
even more difficult, Macias said.
"The crew chief has a special technique to reverse the
spin so he can maintain control on the drop. There is
nobody I trust more to send me down than Macias," Rojas
said.
Rojas made it safely to the deck and was met by the
Greek sailors helping the bum victim. They helped him
straddle one of the folding seats and then hooked the strap
around his back. He gripped the padded cone and Rojas
held on to him for the trip up, Rojas said.
"I noticed that everyone on the ship was very con-
cerned about helping us. Since I've been here I've done a
lot, but this was different. No matter who you are or where


you are from we take care of you like you are our own,"
Rojas said.
"He (Lukjanov) seemed very impressed by our mili-
tary because we took such good care of him. He smiled
the whole time," he said.
Lukjanov kept that smile in spite of extreme pain.
When the two men were on their way up to the heli-
copter the blisters from his bums broke and soaked
Rojas's uniform and the inside of the helicopter, Rojas
said.
"His bums were really bad. We bandaged them and
kept them moist to prevent the bandage from sticking
to the wound and gave him 3,000 CC's of saline. That's
a lot of fluid for a bum victim," Rojas said.
The medevac crew flew Lukjanov to Gorgas Army
Community Hospital and he was transferred to Paitilla
Hospital, Parry said.
"One thing about this mission I will never forget
was when a crewmember on the ship brought out his
(Lukjanov's) luggage," Rojas said. "They handed me a
plastic bag holding a toothbrush and an apple. We've
got everything and we complain, and all he had was an
apple and a toothbrush."


Help sought

in baby's death

investigation
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -
The Panama Criminal Investigation Of-
fice is now investigating the homicide of
Baby Doe and is offering a reward for in-
formation.
A newborn baby was found in a trash
bin at Valent Recreation Center May 13,
1993 with his skull fractured.
Witnesses described a suspect seen at
the center between 4-10 p.m. May 12 as a
light completed black female in her early
20s.
She was 5 feet, 9 inches tall and
weighed about 160 pounds. The suspect
had shoulder-length hair which was curled
at the ends.
It was further reported the suspect was
wearing a dark blue or purple tunic top
and pants and was carrying a black can-
vass bag with a white handkerchief with
blue trim laid over the top.
She was standing near the area of the
large screen television in the center and
appeared to be upset.
The suspect used the public telephones
several times becoming more upset and
hanging up each time.
The suspect was seen carrying the bag
into the ladies room of the center where
the baby was found.
A reward of $2,500 is being offered by
CID for information leading to the iden-
tity and arrest of the person or people re-
sponsible for the murder of Baby Doe.
Anyone having information should call
Special Agent Daniel Carton at 285-4314/
6011 or the Fort Clayton Military Police
at 287-4401.
All information received will be
handled in the strictest confidence.
Without help, the death of a child may
go unresolved, CID officials said.


Air Force drawdown plan focuses on
voluntary lossesthrough early retire-
ment, separation programs.


Around the world in 89 days DepartmentofDefensephotobySMSgt.SteveTaylor
The Queen Elizabeth 2glides underneath the Bridge of the Americas Monday afternoon after completing its transit
through the Panama Canal. The QE2, in day 10 of its 89-day trek around the world, paid a $128,955.71 toll enroute
to Acapulco, Mexico. The vessel attracted larger than normal crowds at the Miraflores Locks. On an average day
700-800 people go to the locks, Monday more than 3,000 visited.


Aviation soldier kills wife, self after domestic dispute


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - turned the gun on himself after a domestic
A U.S. Army South soldier and his wife dispute.
died Saturday as a result of an apparent One of the couple's three children, a
murder-suicide at their off-post quarters. 17-month-old girl, was slightly injured
Spec. Ray Jerkins of Headquarters during the incident and is being held at
Company, 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation Gorgas Army Community Hospital for
Regiment, shot his wife, Nicolle, and observation.


Secretary of Defense approves new
policy opening more jobs forwomen
in ground combat units.


'I


The 5- and 3-year-old sons have been
placed in foster homes until the next of kin
take custody.
The incident is under investigation by
the Panama National Police and U.S.
Army South Criminal Investigations offi-
cials.


*Bike rodeo, page 3.
*Local plays win awards, page. 8.
*Basketball title, page 11.


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Tropic Times
Jan. 14, 1994


Navy civilians help chart Panama waterways


by Ltjg. Laura C. Moore
USNAVSTAPANCANAL


LA PALMA, Darien, Panama - Safe
navigation is now possible in previously
uncharted rivers of the Darien Province.
A three-year project to chart all of the
region's waterways ended last month.
U.S. Hydrographic Cooperation Pro-
gram, Latin American Region located at
Fort Amador, provided the equipment
and dollars, and Panama's National
Geographic Institute provided manpower,
local knowledge, and technical expertise.
The two organizations, which have
been working together since 1975, used
the latest technology to make a product
which will benefit the region, the coun-
try, and the United States in many re-
spects.
A group of six NGI employees, headed
by Carlos Moreno, surveyed the area using
the Global Positioning System, 386 Ultra
computers with specialized hydrographic
software, and an electronic ecosounder.
The group took soundings from the
survey boat, "HYCOOP II," using the
Global Positioning System to determine
their location with an accuracy of better
than 20 meters. Survey lines were 200
meters apart, and soundings were taken
every 10 to 15 meters.
"The specialized software processes the
data and contours the soundings to deter-
mine the areas of danger and the areas of
navigation and these final soundings are
then used by the nautical cartographers to
produce an updated chart of the area or
to update the existing chart when one
exists," said Jim Page, officer-in-charge
of HYCOOPLAR.


U.S. Navy photo by PH2 Delano Mays
Jim Page and VictorTorrero discuss navigation plots during a charting mission
in the Darien Province.


"Sometimes we can combine the data
with aerial photography and satellite pic-
tures to produce an even more accurate
chart," Page said.
By making these rivers more navigable
with charting, they will be more acces-
sible to the Panamanian government to
exercise their sovereignty, Page said.
"This area is on the frontier with Co-
lombia and it's an area where there could
be movement of any type of contraband
between countries and areas where there
may be some plantations of illegal sub-


stances," Page said. "Who knows. But
without adequate charts, the government
would not be able to come out here and
try to counter these threats."
"The principle navigators here are
Panamanian supply boats that come from
Panama City into these smaller towns
here. There may be many reasons in the
future where Panamanian patrol boats or
U.S. assets might wish to navigate in
these rivers for nation-building projects,"
he added.
The former governor of the Darien


Province, Lesbia Alarcon, said the new
charts will help the province to expand
economically.
"The province has a lot of problems
with the highway to Panama City, which
at any moment may become impassable,"
Alarcon said. "The province depends on
these waterways for exporting its goods."
"The rivers are a much more depend-
able means of access to the province, but
some people in the province say the rivers
are deep, some say they're shallow,"
Alarcon said. "It will be a great help to
expand the exports of the agricultural
products from the province. Better de-
fined waterways will fielp commerce in
the region in the Darien."
One of the areas that could see an
economic improvement is the tourism
industry, Alcaron said.
"In the last couple of years there have
been tourists on ships that have come up
here, but they've been nervous about going
up the rivers much farther because they
don't know the channel and a big ship
could get stuck for a long time. They
come as far as La Palma, but with new
charts and better-defined channels there's
a possibility to expand the tourism of the
province," Alcaron said.
Eric Reina, one of the NGI employees
working on the Darien project, which is
HYCOOPLAR's last project, said that the
knowledge gained from the Darien survey
will also benefit the United States.
"It's not just a one-way street, informa-
tion flows both ways," Reina said. "We
know a lot about this country and have
insight into this area, and working to-
gether gives us all the opportunity to
interchange ideas and experiences."


Air Force 1995 drawdown plans target


early retirement, separation programs


by TSgt. Sarah Hood
Air Force News Service
WASHINGTON - Maximizing voluntary losses
where it can afford to lose people is still the Air Force's
priority as the fiscal 1995 drawdown game plan is
implemented, said personnel officials here.
The Air Force must trim its ranks by an additional
2,300 officers and 17,000 enlisted members to help meet
fiscal 1995 end strength requirements. The additional
losses called for are above those that would normally be
achieved through attrition.
The latest plan expands the
eligibility criteria for the tempo-
rary early retirement, voluntary The Air Force
separation incentive and special ranks by an ac
separation benefit programs.
Officials said the Air Force 2,300 officers
will also hold officer selective enlisted memt
early retirement boards and a fiscal 1995 en
possible first-ever senior NCO
SERB, if needed, to help meet requirements.
those requirements.
In addition to the SERBs, the
Air Force will stop selective
continuation of majors twice deferred for promotion.
Instead, these officers will be offered early retirement in
lieu of separation.
Officials expect to meet end-strength goals with a
phased program beginning Feb. 1.
Should a second phase be necessary, the Air Force
will further expand the VSI/SSB eligibility for officers
and enlisted members.
Early retirement/VSI/SSB applications will be ac-
cepted on a first-come, first-served basis starting Feb. 1
for separations and retirements to occur effective Oct. 1,
1994, through July 1, 1995.
The Air Force will determine if the program needs
to be expanded into a second phase, based on the number
of applications received.
Phase I eligibility criteria:
*Early retirement/VSI/SSB for senior master ser-
geants and below who will have 15 years of service by
their requested retirement date (total active federal mili-
tary service date of June 30, 1980, or earlier.) Some
specialty code exemptions apply.


di
a


d


*VSI/SSB for staff sergeants and below with 10 years
of service by their separation date (TAFMSD of June
30, 1985, or earlier). Some specialty code exemptions
apply.
*Early retirement/VSI/SSB for eligible line majors
and lieutenant colonels (including deferred majors and
lieutenant colonels) with 15 years of service by their
retirement date. Officers in selected weapons systems are
ineligible.
*VSI/SSB for majors in the 1980 and 1981 year
groups. Pilots and navigators with less than 15 years of
service are ineligible.
*Early retirement/VSI/SSB
for line non-deferred captains in
mnust trim its the 1983-1987 year groups with
ditional 15 years of service by their retire-
ment date. Pilots and navigators
and 17,000 are not eligible.
ers to meet *VSI/SSB for captains in the
Strength 1983-1985 year groups. Below-
strength the-promotion zone officers, pilots
and navigators, and deferred cap-
tains are still ineligible to apply.
The 1982 year group is also ex-
cluded from participation. Cap-
tains in the 1983 year group must apply for separation
or retirement no later than Aug. 19, 1994, with separa-
tion or retirement to occur between Oct. 1, 1994, and
Nov. 21, 1994.
*Early retirement/VSI/SSB for deferred majors and
lieutenant colonels in judge advocate general, chaplain,
biomedical science corps, medical science corps and
nurse corps. Only twice or more deferred chaplains are
eligible. Nurse anesthetists are ineligible.
*Line and non-line deferred captains and all below-
the-promotion zone officers are ineligible for early retire-
ment/VSI/SSB.
Approximately 400 military members here are eli-
gible under the new guidelines, according to TSgt. Art
Clark of the Military Personnel Flight.
These people will receive notice soon and should
contact their orderly room to start both separation and
retirement actions.
People who feel they are eligible, but have not been
contacted, should check with their orderly room as well,
Clark said.


Rodman hosts holiday party
RODMAN NS (USNAVSTAPANCANAL) -
Volunteers here welcomed more than 460 stu-
dents from Escuela de los Estados Unidos when
they arrived here recently aboard the Fantasia del
Mar for the annual Christmas Picnic.
The children were greeted by Rodman NS
commanding officer Capt. Arthur Rowley III,
executive officer Cmdr. Richard Smith and U.S.
Ambassador to Panama Dean Hinton at Pier One
North.
From there, the children were escorted by
Army Capt. Linda Fischer, 92nd Military Police
Battalion, and station volunteers to the Rodman
Fitness Center for the festivities.
The children also saw a 25-foot patrol boat
used for Riverine operations. The 92nd MP vol-
unteers gave the children a complete camouflage
makeover and put on a dog handlers demonstra-
tion.
Inter-American Naval Telecommunications
Network volunteers provided raspados (snow
cones).
After lunch, a bilingual Santa Claus arrived
aboard a Panama Canal Commission fire truck
and passed out gifts.

Housing office expands
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - To in-
crease the quality of life for its customers, the
Furniture Management and Customer Service
Offices has moved from Albrook Air Force Sta-
tion to the Housing Division Office in Building
519 on Fort Clayton.
Servicemembers are now able to handle both
housing and furnishing needs in one location
during in and out-processing, said Dick Davis,
Housing Division chief, Department of Engineer-
ing and Housing.
The move was made because transportation to
Albrook AFS was difficult for newly arrived
people and those leaving who shipped or sold
their vehicles, he said.
Servicemembers living both on and off post
may apply for 90-day furniture loans through
the Customer Service Office upon arrival in
Panama and within 90 days of departure, Davis
said.










Tropic Times 3
Jan. 14, 1994


qwl-o-


SSouthern


Exposure


Fort Drum military police


enjoy sunny welcome


U.S. Army photo by Spec. Alexander C. V
Spec. Kerl Parris, 511th Military Police Company, Fort Drum, N.Y., takes part in r
control training at Fort Clayton.


by Spec. Alexander C. White
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORTCLAYTON - The511th Mili-
tary Police Company experienced adra-
matic change in climate when they de-
ployed from Fort Drum, N.Y., to Panama
recently to augment the 92nd Military
Police Battalion in law enforcement.
When the 511th MP Co. left upstate
New York Jan. 3, snow had piled up
and temperatures had reached record
lows of 21 degrees below zero, said
S1st Sgt. William Fassinger, 511th MP
Co.
"Bythetimewegot here, (to Panama)
. we had gone through a 110 degrees in a
day," he said.
"The Christmas holidays were nasty.
When we got down here we heard that
they (Fort Drum) had been blasted with
a snow storm that had left six to eight
inches to be followed with 16 more
inches."
One hundred thirty-three soldiers de-
ployed here to complete a four-month
vhite mission.
riot Besides performing its main objec-
tive of law enforcement, the 511th MPs


are also responsible for the quick reac-
tion force.
"We are looking to reduce, if not
eliminate, crime in our area of opera-
tion," Fassinger said.
"The 511th is no stranger to the
Panamanian environment. This should
help the soldiers perform their jobs
easier."
The unit has pulled at least four tours
here.
Besides duty in Central America, the
company spent last Christmas and New
Years in Somalia where it provided
escorts for food convoys and helped
with the break up of Somali thugs
known as technicals and confiscated
weapons.
"While we were in Somalia, our
mission was strictly combat-oriented,"
Fassinger said. "Here, we are pulling
more of a peacetime mission.
"I think we are the only MOS (mili-
tary occupational specialty) with a de-
fined wartime and peacetime mission."
He explained that the mission in
Somalia and now the time spent here
has given the unit the opportunity to
perform all aspects of their job.


Howard security police host weekend 'bike rodeo'


by SSgt. Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - More than 30 youths
saddled up forthe competitive speed slalom
competition at 24th Security Police
Squadron's bike rodeo here Saturday.
Having the fastest times in several age
categories earned some of the young bikers
Army and Air Force Exchange Service gift
certificates and free movie and bowling
coupons, or McGruff the Crime Dog
frisbees, hats, key chains and pencils sport-
ing the slogan, "take a bite out of crime."
SPS officials processed 25 new registra-
tions during the most recent rodeo, com-
pared to 65 during the last one. The pro-
gram averaged 100 registrations per event.
Since the 24th SPS began keeping track of
the numbers in 1990, it has registered 1,432
bicycles formilitary, DoD and family mem-
bers.
"Last yearthere were 104 bicycles stolen
from military members living on Howard
or Albrook or from their family members,"
said Sgt. Jacqueline White, 24th Security
Police Squadron crime prevention moni-
tor. "Of that number, less than half were
registered on base and of those we've recov-
ered 13."
There have been occasions when the
Panamanian National Police have recov-
ered bicycles and notified 24th SPS offi-
cials, but the bikes could not be released
because they had no registration stickers or
otherpermanentidentifying marks onthem.
"If thieves have enough time they can
scrape off stickers, file off identifying num-
bers, repaint the bike and even trade out
parts from other stolen bikes," White ex-
plained. "In order to do this, though, the
thief must get the bike off base. Having the
bikes registered helps keep them from ever
leaving the base. If the security police at the
gate see a non-base resident try to leave the
base with a registered bike, they can and
will stop them."


U.S. Air Force photo by SSgt. Rian Clawson
SSgt. Delbert Champ, 24th Security Police Squadron, tests the chain on a
bicycle during the bicycle rodeo at Howard AFB Saturday.


"People usually lose their bikes in one of
two ways,"thesecurity spe ialist said. 'They
either leave them either t ,tally unsecured
or they secure them inau.:quately where
they are easily seen (like ( a carport.)
"When that happens, ...., fof opportu-
nity can just walk by, see the bike and take
it," she added.
"In these situations, having the bikes
registered and engraved with your name,


social security number or other identifying
marks will help in their recovery."
"The best way to ensure your bike will
still be yours in the morning is to take it
indoors and secure it inside a secure area if
possible." White said.
For more information about the bike
registration program or any other aspect of
crime prevention, call the security police at
284-4755.


Bike safety tips
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO
PAO) -With the new year, beginning
and experienced bicycles need to re-
view the rules of the road and learn
a few safety tips to help get where
they're going safely, said Don
Patterson, U.S. Army Garrison
Safety Office specialist.
"Riding through FortClayton this
past weekend, you couldn't help but
notice all the new bicycles and prob-
ably new bike riders as well," he said.
Some of the rules of the road are:
*When riding, keep to the right.
*Obey all traffic rules, lights,
stop signs, and no U-turn signs.
*Use appropriate hand signals.
*Always ride single - an extra
person makes it harder to balance.
*Avoid crowded and high-speed
roads and use paths when available.
+Never hitch a ride with a truck,
car or motorcycle.
*Look out for pedestrians be-
cause they have the right-of-way,
especially at crosswalks.
*Keep hands on the handlebars,
except to signal.
*Travelsinglefile when in group
and don't pass unless it's safe.
*Walk your bike across curbs
and busy intersections if necessary.
*Drive in a straight line. Cutting
in and out of traffic is dangerous.
*Always wear a bicycle helmet
and light-colored clothing.
*Use lights, reflectors and a bi-
cycle flag.
*Riding during daylight hours is
safer.











4Tropic Times
Jan.14,1994


*HemisDhere


AP LaserPhoto
U.S. soldiers stand outside the gate of the Papal
Nuncio where former Panamanian dictator Manuel
Noriega sought refuge during the 1989 invasion. A
federal drug agent who arrested Noriega in 1989
pleaded guilty to trying to pocket $700,000 from
money launderers.


U.S. drug agent

pleads guilty in

laundering case
MIAMI (Reuters) - A federal drug agent who arrested
Panamanian dictator Manuel Antonio Noreiga pleaded
guilty to trying to pocket $700,000 that money launderers
gave him during an undercover investigation.
Drug Enforcement Administration agent Rene De la
Cova, an 11-year veteran of the agency, was one of the
U.S. agents who arrested Noriega and escorted him to the
United States four years ago after the U.S. invasion of
Panama. Noriega was later tried and convicted on fed-
eral drug charges and is serving a 40-year prison term.
Federal prosecutors said De la Cova pleaded guilty to
charges of stealing $700,000 that money launderers
handed him last July while he was posing as a launderer.
They said he obeyed procedures and handed to his su-
periors money the launderers gave him on three other
occasions. But on July 17, 1993, he met secretly with the
launderers and kept the cash.
De la Cova, who worked for the DEA in Florida,
Panama and Colombia, will be sentenced in March. Pros-
ecutors are seeking a two-year sentence with no parole.
Under a plea bargain, he also has to pay back the
money to the government.


Mexican envoy, church leaders


negotiating to end rebel uprising
MEXICO CITY (AP) - A government envoy met with Party, which has ruled Mexico since 1929 through a blend
church leaders in his first attempts to negotiate an end to of populism, repression and election fraud.
a rebel uprising in southern Mexico. Soldiers, meanwhile, Camacho said his first goal was to establish "a truce
advanced on the insurgent's positions near the Guatema- and then seek a dialogue that will bring peace and recon-
lan border. ciliation." He told a news conference Tuesday that he
In the poor southern state of Chiapas, troops were re- would travel to Chiapas "soon."
portedly moving toward Guadalupe Tepeyac, a small The rebellion is already adding to the pain of the
town just north of the border where up to 500 rebels are people whose poverty and hardship it is intended to solve,
entrenched. although the rebels enjoy support.
Journalists who traveled Tuesday from the towns of The rebels have blocked the narrow dirt roads to its
Nuevo Momom to Las Margaritas, both in Chiapas, said strongholds with ditches and fallen trees. The army, too,
the army was advancing in that border region. Refugees is setting up roadblocks to help chase down the insur-
bucked the tide of incoming troops, trying to escape a gents.
possible clash. That means poor Mexican farmers in the region can-
The rebels of the Zapatista National Liberation Army not sell what little they raise or buy what little they can
said they would negotiate with the government if the mill- afford.
tary stopped bombing, withdrew its soldiers and recog- "What are we going to do? When our corn is gone, we
nized their movement, won't have anything to live on," said Jose Antonio Perez,
Otherwise, they threatened to carry the war to Mexico standing before the concrete water trough in Cruz del
City, where bombings linked to the uprising that began Rosario, where men washed coffee beans and women
New Year's Day have put the government on alert and cleaned clothes.
residents on edge. The village of 400 Mayan Indians, enclosed in a steep
The uprising began in Chiapas, 390 miles southeast of jungle valley, is already suffering from low coffee prices,
the capital. Rebels occupied towns for days, saying they bad roads and a lack of running water. That poverty cre-
were fighting for better living conditions and an end to ates sympathy for the rebels based a few miles away, de-
the exploitation of Mexico's native Indians. spite the hardship caused by the conflict.
They pulled back into hideouts in remote areas when The rebels "are fighting for the same causes, for our
the army started to move in. Officials said 107 people- people," said Gerardo Jimenez, standing nearby.
have died in the fighting. A rebel captain up the road gave a more ideological
In the capital, newly appointed peace commissioner defense.
Manuel Camacho Solis met with Roman Catholic lead- "The enemy is the state, the oligarchy, monopolies,"
ers from southern Mexico, including Bishop Samuel Ruiz said the rebel who called himself Capt Noe, a young
of San Cristobal de las Casas, an outspoken defender of farmer with two red stars on his brown shirt and an old
indigenous rights. AK-47 rifle in his hands.
"It's necessary to rebuild the political process in the The rich, he says, "have always raised their level,
region," said Camacho, who stepped down as foreign while the people are treated like garbage."
minister to take the job. "We'll have to find a dignified Except for sporadic skirmishes and the troop move-
political exit for all." ments, the region has been quiet since the weekend.
The soft-spoken Camacho gained a reputation as a About 14,000 government soldiers are now stationed in
savvy negotiator while mayor of Mexico City. He is seen the state, far outnumbering the estimated 1,000 to 2,000
as a progressive within the Institutional Revolutionary rebels.


Prison director fired
CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) - The national prison di-
rector was fired Tuesday, a week after 109 people died in
the bloodiest jail riot in Venezuela's history.
Justice Minister Fermin Marmol Leon did not com-
ment on why he dismissed Dora Bracho Barreto, 56, a
former criminal lawyer who became director of the 32-
prison system last year.
Bracho Barreto told The Associated Press by phone
the minister was angry over comments she made while
testifying before Congress earlier Tuesday about the riot
.a Maracaibo National Jail.


after bloody jail riot
"He was displeased because I told the truth, that he
wasn't informed about the Venezuelan penitentiary sys-
tem," she said.
Authorities in Maracaibo, 440 miles west of Caracas,
Venezuela, said the Jan. 3 riot was started by native
Guajiro Indian inmates angered by inmates - white and
black.
On Jan. 4, national guardsmen shot and killed 11 of
40 prisoners escaping through a tunnel from Aragua
Penitentiary Center in Maracay, 6SC ..les west of the capi-
tal.


Demonstrators burn
effigy of U.S. soldier
PANAMA CITY (Reuters) - About 400 Pana-
manians burned an effigy of a U.S. soldier and
chanted anti-American slogans on the 30th anni-
versary Sunday of nationalist riots in which 22
Panamanians were killed and 500 injured.
Shouting "Panama Yes, Yankees No" and
waving Panamanian flags, the protesters set fire to
the life-sized doll in front of U.S. soldiers guard-
ing the Quarry Heights military base, next to the
Panama Canal.
They later staged a noisy rally at a shrine to the
22 students who, Panamanian historians say, were
shot by U.S. security forces in the so-called flag
riots of Jan. 9, 1964.
The riots, one of the worst flashpoints in
Panama's often-tense relationship with the United
States this century, started after U.S. residents of
the Panama Canal zone prevented Panamanian
students from hoisting their flag there.
There was no violence at Sunday's demonstra-
tion. U.S. officials estimated about 150 people
demonstrated peacefully outside the Quarry
Heights back gate Sunday.

Bomb explodes near
opposition office
PANAMA CITY (Reuters) - A small bomb ex-
ploded Tuesday at an office of Panama's main op-
position party, but there were no injuries and only
minor damage, police and party officials said.
The homemade explosive was detonated in the
early hours outside the empty Revolutionary
Democratic Party (PRD) office in the Juan Diaz
district of Panama City, waking nearby residents
and damaging a wall, PRD official Alberto
Alvarado told Reuters.
The PRD, which was the political arm of former
strongman General Manuel Antonio Noriega's
military regime, is currently leading polls ahead of
May general elections here.
Police spokesman Marcos Fernandez said it was
not known who placed the bomb and rejected
rumours circulating in the capital of an imminent
wave of political violence before the May 8 vote.
The election is intended to seal Panama's tran-
sition from dictatorship to democracy following
the December 1989 U.S. invasion that ousted
Noriega and brought the current government of
President Guillermo Endara to power.

Colombian soldiers
find 65 skeletons
BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) - Soldiers found the
bullet-riddled skeletons of 65 people in a cave in a
jungled mountain region of Colombia, the army
said Tuesday.
The bodies were buried at least two years ago,
Gen. Alfonso Ortega said. His soldiers found them
in separate graves Monday near Landazuri village,
105 miles north of Bogota.
Workers put the bones into plastic bags to be
taken to a pathology lab, Deysi Agudelo, an offi-
cial from nearby Cimitarra, told a local radio re-
porter. The region, home to , tcels from the Revo-
lutionary Armed Forces of Columbia, is one of the
most dangerous in Colombia. The rebels conduct
periodic purges of suspected traitors and infor-
mants in their ranks.
Drug traffickers and right-wing death squads
also operate in the area.

Prisoner burned

in Brazilian riot
SAO PAULO, Brazil (AP) - Inmates in an over-
crowded prison rioted Monday and burned a fel-
low prisoner to death, accusing him of collaborat-
ing with authorities, officials said. At least 54 in-
mates were injured.
Riot police with batons and attack dogs quelled
the uprising at the Cadeia Publica do Hipodromo
prison in Sao Paulo's eastern outskirts.
"Some 20 men were injured due to police bru-
tality and dog bites," said Antonio Pereira, the
Sao Paulo deputy state secretary for penitentiary
administration. The remaining 34 suffered minor
injuries.












* Military News


Tropic Times
Jan. 14,1994


Aspin supports women-in-combat policy
* ^a ,ig


WASHINGTON (AP) - Defense Sec-
retary Les Aspin has approved a new ver-
sion of a policy designed to help open
more jobs for women in ground combat
units, a Pentagon spokeswoman said
Tuesday.
"We expect to be putting out the newly
revised ... ground combat definition, prob-
ably later this week. Certainly before Sec-
retary Aspin leaves office, but probably
later this week," Pentagon spokeswoman
Kathleen deLaski said at a Pentagon brief-
ing.
The step would be Aspin's last dur-
ing a year-long tenure that has been
marked by his efforts to expand opportu-
nities for women. Last April, he moved to
help open combat aviation jobs and war-
ship assignments to females.
The most lethal specialities and units
in the Army and the Marine Corps that
are used to search and destroy the enemy
- such as infantry and armor units -
will not be affected by Aspin's new an-
nouncement, deLaski said.
DeLaski declined to outline the exact
changes Aspin is expected to announce.
But deLaski said Aspin is supportive of the
new version because it had removed cer-
tain "ambiguities" in a draft policy that
he ordered reviewed last week.
Pentagon sources speaking on condi-
tion of anonymity said agreement has been
reached with the services to more narrowly
define the term "direct combat" in the
new version.
A previous draft had cast the definition
in terms that could have been used by the
services to exclude women even from
some job categories they now hold, as well
as potentially keeping them from jobs As-
pin had attempted to open to them, one
Pentagon source said.
"That was just stopped cold," the
source said.
But Aspin also has not been able to
achieve everything he had hoped to, which


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APLaserPhoto
U.S. soldiers stand in an honor guard with a Saudi soldier in a ceremony in Saudi Arabia during the Persian Gulf War.
Defense Secretary Les Aspin has approved a version of a new policy that would open up more jobs for women in ground
combat units.


was to have had the services define exactly
which jobs will be open to women, a sec-
ond source said.
"He wanted to nail it down. He just
didn't have the time," the source said.
DeLaski noted that the services will
now have several months to study exactly
which jobs will be affected by the new
combat definition, something that will be


accomplished after Aspin leaves office.
"When you see this new definition, you
won't be able to say for certain which
kinds of billets (jobs) will be opening which
areas. It's something that services will
have to take and then interpret. And that
is why we have to put this out," deLaski
said.
But the change could open more slots


for women in areas that are considered on
the fringes of direct combat, such as engi-
neering jobs or air defense artillery units.
While women would not be in an engi-
neering unit that bulldoze through front
line berms and defensive trenches, it's
possible they could serve in units used to
clear mines in occupied areas or to pre-
pare defensive positions in advance.


Tailhook scandal

Navy flier can't avoid
WASHINGTON (AP) - A Navy flier charged with in- testimony n
decent assault on a woman in the Tailhook scandal lost nity grant w
an attempt Tuesday to avoid court martial, although mili- Samples
tary judges found the Navy "careless and amateurish" in debating wl
the case it brought against him. grounds it a
"The assembly-line technique in this case that merged to make the
and blurred investigative and justice procedures is Samples
troublesome," said the U.S. Court of Military Appeals, reached for
the military's highest tribunal. The five
Still, the court ruled that Lt. David Samples has failed sessment of
to establish that he was given full immunity for his ac- As Sam
tions at the rowdy 1991 aviators convention. Samples was tion to ano
granted a more limited "testimonial" immunity by Vice about his le
Adm. J. Paul Reason in a letter, which constituted a prom- "At each
ise that he could not be prosecuted based on what he had without eitl
told investigators, his side," ti
Samples' court martial at the Norfolk, Va., naval base, ted such a s
the first stemming from the Tailhook convention, was At best,
stopped in October after the trial judge turned down the careless an
immunity claim and Samples filed his appeaL case by exp
The appeals court ruled that "as a matter of law, "At woi
(Samples) is not entitled to invoke transactional immu- respecting 1
nity as a bar to his pending court-martial" and his own criminal in'


court martial
makes clear he full understood that the immu-
'as limited to use of his statements.
' lawyer, Lt. David P. Sheldon, said he was
whether to ask the court for reconsideration on
applied an incorrect standards. He has 10 days
appeal.
s was on duty in Washington state and was not
comment.
-member appeals court was scathing in its as-
f how the Navy handled the case.
ples was passed from one level of investiga-
ther, no official was particularly concerned
;gal rights, the ruling said.
h point along this route, petitioner stood alone,
her his military or civilian defense counsel at
he court ruled. "Why defense counsel permit-
ituation is unexplained in the record."
said the court "it reflects a most curiously
d amateurish approach to a very high profile
perienced military lawyers and investigators.
st, it raises the possibility of a shadiness in
the rights of military members caught up in a
vestigation that cannot be condoned."


Pregnant Somali killing raises questions
MOGADISHU, Somalia (AP) - Two days after U.S. rectly on Sunday's shooting.
Marines apparently killed a pregnant Somali with a .50- But he said Pakistani snipers use only smaller-caliber
caliber rifle, a senior Pakistani peacekeeper questioned rifles in Mogadishu because of the danger that larger
the use of heavy weaponry in a zone crowded with civil- weapons present to any ciVilians close to the target.
ians. "The problem is once you use a heavy-caliber weapon
Also Tuesday, the U.S. military command in Mogad- there's a possibility of the bullet going through and hit-
ishu completed its informal inquiry into the shooting and ting someone else," Tariq said.
concluded the Marines were not negligent and did not U.N. combat rules state that U.N. troops may fire at
exceed the U.N. rules for peacekeepers in Somalia. any Somali carrying a machine gun or other heavy
Col. Tariq Salim Malik, who is Pakistan's longest- weapon, but may only shoot someone carrying an assault
serving commander in Somalia, declined to comment di- rifle or other small arm if they feel directly threatened.


Filephoto
Last survivor of famous

war photo dies at 70
ANTIGO, Wis. (AP) - John Bradley, the last sur-
vivor among the servicemen shown raising the U.S.
flag on Iwo Jima in a famous World War II photo-
graph, died Tuesday of a stroke. He was 70.
Bradley, who served in the Navy as a pharmacist
mate second class, helped five Marines raise the flag
on Mount Suribachi on Feb. 23,1945. It was the first
time an American flag had flown over Japanese ter-
ritory.
Associated Press photographer Joe Rosenthal
took the Pulitzer Prize-winning picture. It became
the model for the Iwo Ji'na Memorial near Arling-
ton National Cemetery in Virginia.


I











S Voices


Flood ditch causes concern


Dear Mayors' Corner:
The entire time I have been in the military I have been
preached to about safety and I believe in it to the maxi-
mum. I can't see how anyone who is suppose to believe
in safety as much as those in the military do can overlook
one of the biggest safety hazards on Fort Clayton.
The safety hazard I am talking about is the flood ditch
that runs through the 600 housing area. This housing
area has a vast amount of children living and playing in
it, so why isn't there a fence along this ditch?
Every time it rains, this ditch floods with very deep
and fast moving water. Let's not wait for an accident to
happen with one of these children before doing some-
thing about this safety hazard. It's like they always say
when an accident happens, it could have been prevented.
So let's not wait until this can be said about this ditch.
I don't live on post, but this ditch scares me every
time I cross the bridge that runs over it I tell my wife
that one day we will read in the newspaper about a child
who was hurt in this ditch if there isn't a fence put up
soon. Please check with your sources and find out what
they say about this safety hazard.
A Concerned Citizen

Dear Concerned:
I submitted your letter to Richard Davis who is the
chief of the Housing Division, Directorate of Engineer-
ing and Housing. He wants you to know that your con-
cern about safety is also a concern of the command.
As you travel through the 600 housing area on Fort
Clayton, you will find fencing separating the drainage
ditches from the housing yards. Also, there is fencing by
the foot bridge. It has been determined that along part of
the stream away from the houses, fencing is not prudent.
Thank you for writing; it is always helpful to review
safety concerns.

Dear Mayors' Corner:
I'm not the type of person who complains when the
commissary runs out of cream cheese or if the Post Ex-


change doesn't carry my favorite color of eye shadow.
Something has happened recently that I feel I should
complain about though.
I have been trying to buy an infant car seat from the
furniture store on Albrook AFS for about one month. For
a while they had car seats for small babies under 20
pounds, but now they don't even have those. They
haven't had seats for toddlers for at least one month. Ev-
ery time I check, they tell me to come back next week
There isn't one infant car seat for sale anywhere on post
that I am aware of.
Infant car seats should be priority. They are not only
required by law, but are a necessity for the safety of ba-
bies and toddlers. I'm a little upset and I want a car seat.

Priority One

Dear Priority One:
I checked with the Army and Air Force Exchange Ser-
vice and found that the warehouse was out of stock on
various styles of infant car seats for almost three weeks.
During this time, this merchandise was being ordered
consistently.
A shipment of containing all styles of car seats has
arrived and is now being sold at the Main Exchange on
Corozal. AAFES regrets the inconvenience this may
have caused you and hopes that by now, you have been
able to buy your car seat

Editor's note: This column allows community mem-
bers to submit questions to the Mayoral Congress.
Lettersshould be mailed to: Mayors' Corner, Publicity
Chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS). Anonymity will
be granted upon request. The TropicTimes reservesthe
right to edit letters and responses for brevity, clarity
and propriety.


Gun-wielding robber nets $450, more


Robbed at gunpoint
A soldier visiting Panama from Honduras was robbed
at gunpoint while he sat in his rental car at El Dorado
Mall at about 7 p.m. this weekend. The thief took $450
in cash, credit cards and the rental vehicle. Though El
Dorado Mall is usually not considered a high crime area
to most people, military police advise those visiting the
mall to use caution.
To help avoid becoming a victim of crime when shop-
ping in the El Dorado Mall area, carry as little cash as
possible, leave credit cards at home and take a bus or
taxi instead of driving.
If a victim of crime, call 287-4401 or 289-5133.
Exceeding established limitations
Several arrests have been made recently for exceed-
ing established limitations of controlled items. The U.S.
Southern Command Contraband Control Section has re-
ported that some of the more commonly abused items
are beer, liquor and large appliances.
Each household is allowed 10 cases of beer and eight
bottles of hard liquor each month. Large appliances such
as refrigerators, stoves and microwave ovens are re-
stricted to one of each item per 36 months.
For more information, see U.S. Southern Command
Regulation 1-19 or call 286-3303 or 289-3701.
Secure bikes inside
Many bikes have been stolen from housing areas re-
cently. Most of the stolen bikes were left outside either
chained to a fixed object or left unsecured. MPs report
that chaining bikes doesn't always keep thieves away.


Bike owners are encouraged to secure their property in-
side at night to avoid becoming a victim of crime.
Report suspicious activities to the MPs at 287-4401 or
289-5133.
Unauthorized telephone calls
A person placed more than $700 in unauthorized long
distance telephone calls using a soldier's calling card
number. Make sure telephone and credit cards are kept
safe at all times and report the loss of these items imme-
diately. Thieves can charge large sums of money to these
accounts very quickly.
Devil's Beach
Three people had more than $500 worth of unsecured
personal property stolen while on Devil's Beach last
weekend. This is considered a high crime area. If a vic-
tim of crime, call 287-4401 or 289-5133.
The following crimes occurred in on-post housing ar-
eas Dec. 31-Jan. 6.
Pacific
Fort Clayton 300 housing area - one larceny of secured
private property
Fort Clayton 800 housing area - one larceny of unse-
cured private property
Fort Clayton 1100 housing area - two larcenies of se-
cured private property
Cocoli housing area - four larcenies of secured private
property


AcinLn


B Pmmaa.-- _ WI
Brig. Gen. David A. Sawyer


Officials


address


janitor fees

The Action Line is a direct link between Brig.
Gen. David A. Sawyer, 24th Wing Commander,
and Howard AFB and Albrook AFS personnel.
If you have a question or problem that you
can't solve through normal supervisory channels,
call the Action Line at 284-5849. Callers should
leave a name, telephone number and mailing ad-
dress in case the question needs to be qualified.
Names will be kept confidential and used only to
provide callers with a response.

Q. We've heard from the housing office that they
plan to increase the janitorial fees - dorm dues -
at the unaccompanied senior NCO and officer's
dormitories (Buildings 19 and 21 on Albrook.) I've
talked with several other residents there and we all
agreed that we're already paying plenty for the ser-
vices we receive.
Is there any way to ensure we don't have to pay
increased dues for someone to hose down sidewalks,
replace a few light bulbs, and dump a small amount
of trash?

A. Good news for the residents of Aibrook's
Buildings 19 and 21 - there will be no increase in
janitorial fees for either building. Because you said
your information came from the housing office, we
also went back and provided them with the correct
information.
Billeting operates the janitorial service on a non-
profit basis and reviews the rate each year to ensure
fairness. "Dorm dues" go toward paying the
janitor's wages, as well as the employer's share of
Panamanian social security taxes, sick and annual
leave, and workman's compensation. This proce-
dure is in accordance with Panamanian and U.S.
code.


This authorized unofficial command information pub-
lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic
Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces
Information Program of the Department of Defense, un-
der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S.
Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the
official view of the U.S. government, the Department of
Defense or the U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002
Telephone 285-6612.
Acting Commander in Chief............................................
Maj. Gen. Walter T. Worthington



STropic Tim


Director, Public Affairs.....................CoL James L Fetig
Chief................................................SMSgt. Steve Taylor
Editor............................................SSgt. Richard Puckett
Sports Editor...........................................Sgt E. J. Hersom
Staff Editors............................................Spec. John Hall
Rosemary Chong
Maureen Sampson
Volunteer Assistant..............................Josephine Beane
Student Intern.....................................Juan Carlos Palacio
Southern Command Public Affairs Office..........282-4278
Command Information Officer..............Patrick Milton
U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.............287-3007
Public Affairs Officer.................Maj. Melanie Reeder
Command Information Officer................Beth Taylor
Editor...............................................SSgt. Jane Usero


Journalists........................................... Sgt. Lori Davis
Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski
Spec. Alexander C. White
24th Wing Public Affairs Office.......................284-5459
Public Affairs Officer..............Capt. Warren L. Sypher
Public Affairs Superintendent.....MSgt. Dale Mitcham
Journalists...................................SSgt. Rian Clawson
Sgt. James A. Rush
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.............283-5644
Public Affairs Officer..............................Diane Gonzalez
Photographers........................PH2 Roberto R. Taylor
PH2 Delano J. Mays
U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.......................289-4312
NCOIC.........................................Sgt. Richard Emert


Tropic Times
Jan. 14, 1994


I








Tropic Times 7
Jan. 14,1994 I


Martin Luther King's dream still rings true today


by Janine Crowder
USSOUTHCOM Public Affairs
T he stories that my grandmother
used to tell me were so vivid to
my young mind, yearning for
knowledge, it would almost feel like I
was there with her. Some of the most
stirring were the ones about the writings
and speeches of Dr. Martin Luther King
Jr.
One of those stories was about Martin
when he was in a Birmingham jail for
orchestrating sit ins at restaurants and
not complying with the Laws of Jim
Crow. He wrote, "We have waited for
more than 340 years for our constitu-
tional and God-given rights...but we still
creep at horse-and-buggy pace toward
gaining a cup of coffee at a lunch
counter. Perhaps it is easy for those who
have never felt the stinging darts of
segregation to say, 'wait', but when you
have seen vicious mobs lynch your
mothers and fathers at will and drown
your sisters and brothers at whim; when
you have seen hate-filled policemen
curse, kick, brutalize and even kill your
black brothers and sisters with impunity;
when you see the vast majority of your
twenty million Negro brothers smother-
ing in an air-tight cage of poverty in the
midst of an affluent society; when you
suddenly find your tongue twisted and
your speech stammering as you seek to
explain to your six-year-old daughter
why she can't go to the public amuse-
ment park that has just been advertised
on television, and see tears welling in her
little eyes when she is told that Funtown
is closed to colored children, and see the
depressing clouds of inferiority begin to
form in her little mental sky, and see her
begin to distort her little personality by
unconsciously developing a bitterness
toward white people; when you have to
concoct an answer for a five-year-old son
asking in agonizing pathos: 'Daddy,
why do white people treat colored people
so mean?'; when you take a cross-
country drive and find it necessary to

DirectQoe


sleep night after night in the uncomfort-
able comers of your automobile because
no motel will accept you; when you are
humiliated day in and day out by nagging
signs reading "white" and "colored";
when your first name becomes "nigger"
and your middle name becomes "boy"
(however old you are) and your last name
becomes "John," and when your wife and
mother are never given the respected title
"Mrs."; when you are harried by day and
haunted by night by the fact that you are
a Negro, living constantly at a tip-toe
stance, never quite knowing what to
expect next, and plagued with inner fears
and outer resentments; when you are
forever fighting a degenerating sense of
'nobodiness'; then you will understand
why we find it difficult to wait."
Grandma said when they went to
church that Sunday, the preacher said,
"Dr. King is a great man, he stands up
for our people. We all must lift our
voices and stand proud."
At the time Grandma was a domestic
worker for a very prominent women in
Little Rock, Ark. She explained that she
didn't want to continue working for her,
but she was trying to raise a daughter on
her own. She would cry at night
wondering how she could help.
Later on in the years to come she told
me about the speech Martin gave to a
congregation that lifted the hopes of all
concerned. The speech was his very
famous "I Have A Dream." Many of the
words still ring true today.
"...I say to you today, my friends, so
even though we face the difficulties of
today and tomorrow, I still have a dream.
It is a dream deeply rooted in the
American dream.
"I have a dream one day this nation
will rise up and live out the true meaning
of its creed: 'We hold these truths to be
self-evident; that all men are created
equal.'
"I have a dream that one day, on the
red hills of Georgia, sons of former
slaves and the sons of former slave
owners will be able to sit down together


at the table of brotherhood.
"I have a dream that one day even the
state of Mississippi, a state sweltering
with the heat of injustice, sweltering with
the heat of oppression, will be trans-
formed into an oasis of freedom and
justice.
"I have a dream that my four little
children will one day live in a nation
where they will not be judged by the
color of their skin but by the content of
their character.
"I have a dream today.
"I have a dream that one day, down in
Alabama, with its vicious racist, with its
governor having his lips dripping with
the words of innerposition and nullifica-
tion, one day right there in Alabama,
little black boys and black girls will be
able to join hands with little white boys
and white girls and walk together as
sisters and brothers.
"I have a dream today.
"I have a dream that one day "every
valley shall be exalted, every hill and
mountain shall be made low, the tough
places will be made plain, and the
crooked places will be made straight, and
the glory of the Lord shall be revealed,
and all flesh shall see it together.
"This is our hope. This is the faith
that I go back to the South with. With
this faith we will be able to hew out the
mountain of despair and a trace of hope.
With this faith we will be able to
transform the jangling discords of our
nation into a beautiful symphony of
brotherhood. With this faith we will be
able to work together, to pray together, to
struggle together, to stand up for freedom
together, knowing that we will be free
one day...
"Let freedom ring from every hill and
molehill of Mississippi. From every
mountainside let freedom ring.
"And when this happens, and when
we allow freedom to ring, when we let it
ring from every village and every hamlet,
from every state and every city, we will
be able to speed up that day when all of
God's children, black men and white


men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and
Catholics, will be able to join hands and
sing in the words of that old Negro
spiritual, 'Free at Last! Free at last!'
"Thank God almighty, we are free at
last!"
Grandma said when she heard the
speech, she knew there was hope for
everyone.
One of the last things she told me
about Martin, was in the last days of his
life, before the fatal shot rang out, she
said he had a premonition of his death,
when he wrote the speech "I've been to
the Mountain Top."
His voice filled with sadness, he
began by saying, "Ralph Abernathy is my
best friend."
Later in the speech he said, "Now, it
doesn't matter, it really doesn't matter
what happens now." He described the
bomb threats, about what would happen
to him "...from some of our sick white
brothers. Well," he said, "I don't know
what will happen now. We've got some
difficult days ahead. But it really doesn't
matter with me now, because I've been to
the mountain top. Like anybody I would
like to live a long life. Longevity has its
place. But I'm not concerned about that
now. I just want to do God's will. And
He's allowed me to go up to the moun-
tain. And I've looked over. And I've
seen the Promised Land.
"And I may not get there with you,
but I want you to know tonight that we as
a people will get to the Promised Land.
So I'm happy tonight. I'm not worried
about anything. I'm not fearing any
man. Mine eyes have seen the glory of
the coming of the Lord. I have a dream
this afternoon that the brotherhood-of
man will become a reality. With this
faith, I will go out and carve a tunnel of
hope from a mountain of despair. With
faith we will be able to achieve this new
day..."
For an innocent man gunned down in
his prime, the name Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. still holds a lot of weight in my
life and the lives of many other people.


If Martin Luther King Jr. was alive today what would he fight for?


A:?


"Against prejudice."


SrA. Beth Yaskub
24th Operational Support
Squadron


J610
.:,< '. ..1


"(Against) Fighting
between white and
black people - it's still
around."


Ricardo Torres
Department of Defense
civilian


"He would fight for
blacks to stick to-
gether."


Sgt. Eric Jackson
167th Combat Support
Command (Forward)


"I guess he would fight
for all people to be equal
- the same as the
'60s."


Stacie Cumberbatch
Navy family member


"More for civil rights
than anything else."


SSgt. Jose Concepcion
Company A, 154th Signal
Battalion


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries - or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to
edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.


Commentary


4A


ANA


* /









8 Tropic Times
Jan. 14,1994


Local talent


applauded


Theaters and Valent

awarded for excellence

by Maureen Sampson
Tropic Times staff
FORT CLAYTON - For the fifth year in a row, local
performers were recognized as the best in the Army dur-
ing the 1993 Forces Command Festival of the Perform-
ing Arts and Recreation Center Competition.
United States Army South garnered 19 awards for en-
tries by Valent Recreation Center, Pacific Theatre Arts
Centre and Music and Theater-Atlantic.
The annual competition judges 21 Army installations
that compete in several categories in recreation center
programming and the performing arts, according to Jerry
Brees, USARSO Chief of Entertainment.
Experts in music, theater and recreation visit each in-
stallation and judge the recreation center and music and
theater programs, Brees said. This year's judges were
Mary Alice Hodges and Philip Wayne, both former Army
Entertainment and Recreation directors with years of ex-
perience in the performing arts and recreation.
The judges rate the productions on originality, quality
of acting, musical talent, direction, lighting, sets, creativ-
ity and choreography. Individual cast members are evalu-
ated on talent, stage presence, singing/dancing/acting
ability, appearance, stage movement and enthusiasm,
Brees said.
The Pacific Theatre Arts Centre's performance of the
musical "Pippin" won 15 awards. Music and Theatre-
Atlantic's production of "The Sound of Music" won
three awards.
Of the awards given, USARSO received four in the
top category "Best of Festival":
*Top Recreation Center Programming-Valent Rec-
reation Center for the cultural program "Panama at a
Glance."
*Best Musical Direction-Melanie Bales, "Pippin"
*Best Choreography-Barbra Berger, "Pippin"
*Best Costume Design-Barbra Berger, "Pippin"
In the "Award of Excellence" category winners were:
*Publicity and Promotion-Pacific Theatre Arts Cen-
tre, "Pippin"
*Installation Award-Pacific Theatre Arts Centre,
"Pippin"
*Best Musical Production-"Pippin"
*Best Direction of a Musical-JoAnne Mitchell and
Jerry Brees, "Pippin"
*Best Set Design-Jerry Brees, "Pippin"
*Best Lighting-Jerry Brees, "Pippin"
*Best Leading Actress in a Musical-Heather Ander-
son as Catherine in "Pippin"
*Best Supporting Actress in a Musical-JoAnne
Mitchell as Berthe in "Pippin"
*Best Leading Actor in a Musical-Robert Luttrell as
Pippin in "Pippin"
"Honorable Mentions" were awarded to:
*Best Leading Actor in a Musical-Fred Bales as the
Leading Player in "Pippin"
*Best Supporting Actress in a Musical-Adrienne
Miller as Fastrada in "Pippin"
*Best Lighting Design-Steve Parker and Lee Thomp-
son, "The Sound of Music"
A "Special Citation" was awarded for the Ensemble
Vocal Opening category to the cast of nuns in "The Sound
of Music."
Brees attributes the success of the USARSO theater
programs to the abundance of local talent.
"It's unusual being in a foreign country and having
such a melting pot of talent," Brees said. "It's amazing
that such a diverse group of people can come together in
Central America with this type of experience-from sing-
ing, dancing and acting to set design."
The winners will rec,, , -ques andi certificates as
well as command recognition at an awards ceremony 4:30
p.m Jan. 26 at Valent Recreation Center. Maj. Gen. G. A.
Crocker will present the awards. A social hour with re-
freshments will follow the ceremony. The event is free
and open to the public.
The local theaters are already planning their 1994
competition entries. Music and Theater-Atlantic will per-
form the musical "Annie." Auditons for the show will be
held at the Fort Davis Elementary School in late Febru-
ary. Pacific Theatre Arts Centre will perform the comedy
"Opera Comique." Auditions will be held 7:30 p.m.
March 15 and 16 at the theater in Curundu. Both shows
will be performed for the public in May.


Department of Defense photo by Maureen Sampson
Ken Millard and Robert Luttrell perform a scene from "Pippin," a show that received 15 awards in the
1993 Forces Command Festival of the Performing Arts and Recreation Center Programming Competi-
tion.


Cast members perform a musical number from "The Sound of Music."


U.S. Army photo by SSgt. Philip D. Clark








Tropic Tmunes 0
Jan. 14, 1994


Clayton


Hospital


advanced


medicine


by Dolores De Mena
USARSO Historian
FORT CLAYTON - Until the Clayton
Hospital was constructed during World
War II, hospital requirements of the armed
forces were met by using the Panama Ca-
nal Company-operated Margarita Hospi-
tal on the Atlantic side and Gorgas Hospi-
tal on the Pacific side.
The Fort Clayton Hospital represented
a significant stage in the advancement of
military medicine in the Panama Canal
Zone. It also represented a significant
stage in the separation of military and ci-
vilian hospitalization services, centralized
during canal construction days and until
World War II as a responsibility of the
Canal Zone government. Until its con-
struction, military personnel were forced
to rely upon civil authorities for hospital
space and treatment.
Army officers were satisfied with this
arrangement during canal construction
and early post-construction days. How-
ever, dissatisfaction rose with a situation
under which a major Army command was
dependent upon civilian facilities for
medical and surgical service. Intermittent
informal discussions of Army hospital re-
quirements differing from those of the ca-
nal had been taking place since 1922. The
hospitalization of military personnel was
not free. The cost of maintaining soldiers
in civilian hospitals was charged to the
Army. By 1939 the cost to treat personnel
at Gorgas had risen to $233,391.
A significant factor in the support of
the Army's desire to have its own hospi-


P,'O w


Photo courtesy of the USARSO History Office
The Fort Clayton Hospital officially opened Sept. 6, 1943 with a staff of 31 officers, 55 nurses, one warrant officer and
278 enlisted men.


tals was a strongly felt understanding that
the Canal Zone hospital system could not
fill the requirements of both civil and mili-
tary establishments under the pre-World
War II troop augmentation program.
In 1939, the United States Congress ap-
proved appropriations to finance construc-
tion in support of canal defenses, to in-
clude the construction of three hospitals:
a 528-bed hospital in the Curundu area
(Fort Clayton), a 401-bed hospital at Fort
Gulick (now Espinar) and a 60-bed hospi-
tal on the west bank of the Pacific at Bruja
Point (Fort Kobbe).
The order to go ahead with construc-
tion of the Army hospitals was issued three


years before the United States entered into
war. More than a year elapsed between
authorization and action, mainly because
of requests for increased bed capacity.
The hospitals were located on hills
where they would have free circulation of
air from all directions. (They didn't have
air-conditioning). The Fort Clayton Hos-
pital opened in 1943 with a normal capac-
ity of 700 beds, 100 emergency beds and a
potential expansion of an 200 more beds.
The peak year for Canal Zone military
hospitals was 1944, both in number of pa-
tients and size of staffs. After the defeat of
Germany, soldiers were redeployed from
Europe to the Pacific.


Army hospitals in the Canal Zone ad-
mitted several hundred patients for treat-
ment taken off Army transports transiting
the Panama Canal enroute to the Pacific
theater of war.
The rapid demobilization of the Army
in late 1945 and early 1946 drastically re-
duced the military hospital census.. In
early 1946, Fort Clayton Hospital was op-
erating at a 25-bed capacity and Fort
Gulick at 15 beds.
The Fort Clayton Hospital (Building
519) is now reduced to a clinic and office
building and Gorgas Hospital became an
Army-run establishment on Treaty Day,
Oct. 1, 1979.


Mobile Force soldiers celebrate Panama Day


FORT CLAYTON - The following are significant
World War II events that took place in January 1944:

Jan. 2
The 126th Infantry and elements of the 32nd Infantry
Division make a successful amphibious landing at Saidor,
New Guinea.

Jan. 5
Three Panama Canal Department captains are
promoted to the rank of major. The officers are:
Charles W. Anthony, stationed at Quarry Heights,
Alfred L. Harrigton, stationed at Corozal and
Frederick W. Walsmith, previously stationed at Fort
Clayton and now at Quarry Heights.
A group of Brazilian airmen, bound for active duty on
the European fighting front arrive at Orlando, Fla., for
final training with the U.S. Army.

Jan. 6
President Franklin D. Roosevelt tells Congress that the
United States has contributed $18,608,000,000 to the Al-
lies through Lend-Lease programs.

Jan.10
The Caribbean Defense Command announces the
promotion of five captains of the Sixth Air Force
Fighter Command to major. They are: Max Weiner,
Edgar M. Ewing, Walter A. Hammannn, Jr, Jim C.
Lagos, and William P. Maynard.

Jan.12 -
U.S. Army authorities announce that two infantry
soldiers (Jesus Rivera and Enrique Calderon-
Franquis of Puerto Rico) stationed at Corozal died as
a result of gunshot wounds during a quarrel in the vi-
cinity of Camp Paraiso.

Jan. 14
Panama Canal Department, Headquarters Quarry


Heights announces the promotion of 41 captains and
lieutenants.

Jan. 16
Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower assumes duties as Su-
preme Commander, Allied Expeditionary Force.

Jan. 17
Former newspaper staffer, Col. Charles D. Carle,
succeeds Col. Thos B. Woodburn, as Adjutant Gen-
eral of the Caribbean Defense Command. Caries
served duty with the 33rd Infantry at Fort Clayton
between 1931 and 1934.

Jan. 20
The War Department announces that total Army ca-
sualties in the war to date are 106,320. Of that number
17,018 are killed, 39,658 wounded, 24,229 missing and
25,415 taken prisoner.

Jan. 22
The Allies achieve complete surprise in an amphibi-
ous assault along the beaches near Anzio, Italy, in a move
to outflank the German defensive positions across central
Italy.

Jan. 25
Mobile Force headquarters announces that Pana-
manian President Adolfo de la Guardia will review
seven provisional battalions of Mobile Force troops at
a special ceremony as the climax of "Panama Day."
The review, the largest of its kind held on the Isthmus
in the last few months, will be held on the morrow at
Miller Field (now Jarman Field), Fort Clayton.

Jan. 26
"Panama Day" - the most elaborate Army pro-
gram ever put on locally for a civilian audience - was
celebrated by soldiers of the Mobile Force. The Presi-
dential party was greeted at Albrook Field and flown


across the isthmus aboard two Sixth Air Force trans-
port planes. De la Guardia and his party are the first
administrative officials of any Latin American govern-
ment to view jungle training demonstrations. Back
on the Pacific side the party observed various displays
of all types of Infantry and artillery weapons at a
range, presided a review and attended a reception at
the Fort Clayton Officers' Club.

Jan.29
The Coast Artillery Command announces the ad-
vancement in grade of three sergeants, one staff sergeant,
and 10 new enlisted to noncommissioned grades.

Jan. 30
Panama Canal Company Governor Maj. Gen.
Glen E. Edgerton, President of the Canal Zone Chap-
ter of the American Red Cross, presents service rib-
bon bar awards to volunteer workers.

Jan. 31
U.S. forces land on Carter, Cecil, Carlson and
Carlos Islands in the Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Is-
lands, (secured Feb. 7).
Because of the decreasing civilian population, plans
are under way to close Canal Zone commissaries at
noon.
The road from Tivoli Crossing in Ancon to Corozo
Street in Balboa is completed and designated
Roosevelt Avenue.
The Air Terminal building at Albrook Field is com-
pleted. The new terminal is one of the first air condi-
tioned buildings on the isthmus.
The Canal Zone starts a campaign to raise
$2,000,000 as part of the Fourth War Bond Loan.

Editor's note: This time line was compiled by
Dolores De Mena, USARSO historian, in commemo-
ration of the 50th Anniversary of WWII.








10 Tropic TimesM iletones
Jan. 14, 1994


To Chief Warrant Officer Two - Rafael Colon of
310th Military Intelligence Battalion.

To Sergeant First Class - Rhett Neilson, Dean
lavocone and Anthony Scott, all of 310th Military In-
telligence Battalion. Matthew Malanowski of Com-
pany D, Military Intelligence Battalion (Light).

To Staff Sergeant - Jason Dore and Gary Goldsberry,
both of 308th Military Intelligence Battalion. Orlando
Baez of 31 Oth Military Intelligence Battalion. Richard
Johnson, Jose Gonzales, William Palenik, Jude Rabago
and Preston Scull, all of Company D, Military Intelli-
gence Battalion (Light).

To Sergeant - Adrienne Johnson of Company B, 193rd
Support Battalion. Lancelot Ottley of 3rd Special Op-
erations Support Command (Airborne). John Pool of
308th Military Intelligence Battalion. Kenneth Lanoue
of 408th Military Intelligence Company. Jeffrey Milos
of 310th Military Intelligence Battalion. Travis
Bridges of 747th Military Intelligence Battalion.

To Corporal - Demetrius Robinson of 308th Military
Intelligence Battalion.

To Specialist - Tara Nix, Kenneth Holcomb and Sara
Rosenfield, all of 308th Military Intelligence Battal-
ion. Mykal Duffy of 408th Military Intelligence Com-
pany. Dexter Washer and Melvin Coates, both of
310th Military Intelligence Battalion. Stephen
Barrieault and Joseph Moroschak, both of Company D,
Military Intelligence Battalion (Light).



Meritorious Service Medal - Lt. Col. Nancy
Woolnough of U.S. Army Medical Activity - Panama.
Capt. Phillip Miller of Headquarters Company, 470th
Military Intelligence Brigade. Capt. Janice Stone and
CWO2 Linda Davies, SSgt. Lorenzo Albino, all of
747th Military Intelligence Battalion. CWO 4 James
Chalk and SSgt. William Santiago, both of Company
D, Military Intelligence Battalion (Light).

Army Commendation Medal - 1 st Lt. William Wolf
and Spec. Manuel Lopez, both of Headquarters Detach-
ment, 470th Military Intelligence Brigade. SSgt.
James Dolen, SSgt. Jeffrey Neal and Spec. David
Eastman, all of 747th Military Intelligence Battalion.
SSgt. Brian Miers of 408th Military Intelligence Com-
pany. Sgt. David Fritts and Spec. Daniel Kemp, both
of Company D, Military Intelligence Battalion (Light).
Sgt. Arthur Hare, Sgt. Mark Ness, SgL Lyman Ross
and Spec. Shae Rook, all of 310th Military Intelligence
Battalion.

Army Achievement Medal - SSgt. Enrique Gordon,
Sgt. Reginald Johnson, Sgt. Cheryl Lyles and Sgt.
Rodney Mayo, all of Headquarters Company, 193rd
Support Battalion. PFC Robert Schonfelder of Com-
pany B, 193rd Support Battalion. Capt. Lynne Roy of
U.S. Army Medical Activity - Panama. SSgt. Kevin
Hanson of Headquarters Detachment, 470th Military
Intelligence Brigade. CWO2 Jerry Hoffman, SSgt.
Michael Hessler, SSgt. Stephen Kleppe and SSgL Jose
Mendez, all of 310th Military Intelligence Battalion.
Spec. Mykal Duffy and Spec. Anthony Giambruno,
both of 408th Military Intelligence Company.

Certificate of Achievement - 1st Lt. Karl Konzelman
of Headquarters Company, 193rd Support Battalion.
SSgt. Mervin Jones, Sgt. Lee King, Spec. Josh Spen-
cer, PFC Carl Emerson and PFC Wade Morgan, all of
Company A, 193rd Support Battalion. SSgt. James
Barthelemy, Sgt. Donald McQueen, Spec. Eddy
Gillespie, Spec. Thomas Moore and Spec. Mark Utrata,
all of Company B, 193rd Support Battalion. Spec.
David Eastman of 747th Military Intelligence Battal-
ion. Spec. Jeffery Powers, Spec. Angel Newhart and
Spec. Sonya Sheffler, all of Headquarters Detachment,
Military Intelligence Battalion (Light).


First Sergeant Course - SFC Beatrice Perkins of
308th Military Intelligence Battalion.

Advance Noncommissioned Officers Course - SSgL
Ernest Lott of 308th Military Intelligence Battalion.
SFC Chester Brown of 310th Military Intelligence Bat-
talion.

Basic Noncommissioned Officers Course - SSgL Ja-
son Dore and Sgt. Scott Finley, both of 308th Military
Intelligence Battalion. SSgt. Orlando Baez of 310th
Military Intelligence Battalion.

Spanish Immersion - SSgL David Lenning of 310th
Military Intelligence Battalion.

Florida State University - SFC Craig Linghor and
SSgt. Francis Hernandez, both of 310th Military Intel-
ligence Battalion.



Headquarters Company, U.S. Army South, earned the
Commanding General's Physical Training Streamer
last month with an average score of 260.69. Scoring
the maximum PT score of 300 points were Maj. Gen.
George Crocker, Col. David Goodwillie, CoL Donald
Holzwarth, Lt. Col. Howard Humble, Lt. Col. Donald
Evans, Maj. Vern Abdoo, Maj. Dennis Harms, Maj.
Carlos Vega, 2nd Lt. Matthew Ingram, SFC Pablo
Miranda and SSgt. Fernando Vasquez.

Military Intelligence Battalion (Light) Vigilant Hunter
Award - Sgt. David Boyd of Company D, Military In-


telligence Battalion (Light).


Sgt Alex Richardson of Headquarters Company, 193rd
Support Battalion, was selected Noncommissioned Of-
ficer of the Month and Spec. Michael Brazeel of 1097th
Transportation Company, 193rd Support Battalion,
was selected Soldier of the Month for the battalion.



Years of Service - 30 years: Edward Jones of U.S.
Army Medical Activity - Panama. 25 years: Norma
Cohen of U.S. Army Medical Activity - Panama. 20
years: Hildebrando Luna, Ninfa Muir and Dalys Wong,
all of U.S. Army Medical Activity - Panama. 10 years:
Peregrina Gonzalez and Felipe Nino, both U.S. Army
Medical Activity - Panama. 5 years: Marga Rodriguez
and Nike Nightingale, both of U.S. Army Medical Ac-
tivity - Panama.

Sustained Superior Performance Award - Sonia
Britton, Dalcy Cubilla, Shiela Duarte, Alexander
Egudin, Gloria Foster, Ana Gonzalez, Manuel Guerra,
Elisa Icaza, Marie Melara, Cecilia Negron, Yolanda
Parfait, Jorge Rivera, Ruth Testa, Dolores Urena and
Patricia Walters, all of MEDDAC - Panama.

Promotion - Dalvis Urriola, Amulfo Davidson, Ebba
Rossan and Ines Delgado, all of U.S. Army Medical
Activity - Panama.

Retired - Juan Michineau of U.S. Army Medical Ac-
tivity - Panama.

Quality Step Increase - Sue Crespo, Vicente Sanger,
Lilibeth Langoni and Cecilia Song, all of U.S. Army
Medical Activity - Panama.













Sports

Jan. 14, 1994 Quarry Heights, Republic of P


Atlantic MPs


win tourney
FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Atlantic) - The 549th
Military Police Company fired its way to the top spot in
company-level basketball play here Sunday.
After downing the 69th Signal Company 61-51, the
Atlantic community's 549th MP Company stood as the
company level champions in U.S. Army South.
The MPs were confident going into the first game
against Fort Clayton's 69th Signal Co. They lost, but it
couldn't sway that confidence.
"I wasn't worked going into the second geme, because
I knew we hadn't played the first one the way we should ]
have,"saidAubey A. Taylor, point guard for the 549th MP F
Co. "Weknew what we had to do to win the second game."
The69th SignalCo. isonlythesecondteamto defeatthe
549th MP Co.
"We had played them in the playoffs and thought we
knew what to expect," Taylor said.
"But in the first game Sunday, we played a whole
different team. They hit us with things they didn't seem to
have before," Taylor said.
But inthelast halfofthe second game, it was energy and
will powerthat steeredthechampionship toward the 549th.
"We started to key in on their best shooter and just run
them down," Taylor said.
"They were fatigued with half of the last game left," he
said.
The MPs credit team work for their victory in the
championship.
"We work real well together and play as a team," said
Abner Jackson, also a point guard for the 549th MP Co.
"We've got a lot of good players and the team is
balanced," Jackson said.

Army teams sight

transisthmian win
FORTCLAYTON(TropicTimes)-"Idon'tthinkwe'll
win this year's tranisthmian female category, I know we
will win," said Sue Bozgoz, coach of the female Army
Transisthmian team U.S. Army South Ladies.
There are six females returning from the past year's 10-
milerteam and fournew members Lisa Hudon, GloriaLee,
Michelle Digruttolo and Ethenia Torres grace the team.
"All are capable of running under a 6 minute 45 second
mile pace," Bozgoz said.
The other teammembers are Debbie Wesloh, Norma
Alderete, Mary Booth, Laura Landers, Ethenia Torres,
Genoveva Ifill, Torrey Spearman and Linda Fischer.
The USARSO Ladies came in second in 1993 to the
Panamanian team the Road Run Hers. "This year, we have
more talent, dedication and motivation. There's no doubt
in my mind we'll win," Bozgoz said.
In the men's division, the USARSO Striders is the team
to beat, said Striders' coach Willie Moye.
The Striders have outdistanced the Air Force team two
years in a row, Moye said. ...,.,..
"We have conditioned our bodies with hard training.
The distance speed and hill workouts will pay off," Moye ii
said confidently.
There are four 10-miler team members returning to the
Striders this year and the team is well disciplined. "We
knowwhat'sneedtosucceedandwe'reready,"Moyesaid. Easy kill
The Striders are Robert Czech, Hurchel Williams,
Douglas Davis, Jose Haro, Enrique Gordon, William William Robinson, 24th Mission Squ
Segars,RalphGaines,ScottDigruttolo,CoreySmallwood, during playoffs at Howard AFB. ThE
Nelson Marcano and Robert Neske.


Albrook Little League season opens
doors to World Series possibilities
for its all stars.


The Air Force's KimberyTyler makes
the finals on USA Network's Ameri-
can Gladiators.


I and3 Moe ag 1


*Intramural golf
*Transisthmian Relay set
*SCN radio sports


anama


Page 11










12 Tropic Times
d Jan. 14, 1994



Albrook Little League starts


ALBROOK (Tropic Times) - Little
League started Saturday here with 27 teams
and 378 children competing for a chance to
go all the way to Williamsport, Va., for the
Little League World Series.
This year, the Little League falls under
a Panamanian district, which gives the
little leaguers their chance, said Vince
Duncan, sports director at the Albrook and
Howard Youth Centers.
"Above all, our program is to teach our
kids how to play baseball and how to have
fun," Duncan said.
Coaches are already starting to pick the
children who will represent the Albrook
league in the Panama Province playoffs.
The winner of the province will play
against otherprovince winners forthecoun-
try title. From there, the winner goes to the
Latin American championships in Puerto
Rico, Duncan said.
Each of the provinces have around 30
teams that will be competing. The road will
be tough, he said.
Theleaguedoesn'tkeep win-lossrecords
for the teams, but the competition is still
there, he said.
"The kids will find a way to be competi-
tive. Every kid in uniform gets to play.
"Competition in the program is part of
life but our coaching staff is dedicated to
teaching sportsmanship first," he said.
Ed Mcllvaine, the Braves coach, said
he's coaching at Albrook this year because
he was impressed with the soccer league
here.


* %~WY11
*1�


#11
V.


I toot


ii
, }


~- I


Aw FE,




lam,*


Joey Priestly takes a swing for the Phillies.


"My son was involved in the soccer
league and it was a very good program.
When I got the chance to coach here, I went


for it," Mcllvaine said.
Mothers are also involved in Albrook
little league, Duncan said.


Department of Defense photo by SgL E.J. Herson

Each team has a team Mom.
"They're the backbone of each team,"
he said.


. ;.. ... . -. ..-. � .

S . . . . -- . .. . - - ... - !.. . -. , - - . ..



SDeparment of Defense -photo by SSg.L Rchard Puckett
Coming soon
The El Caiman passes Miraflores Locks during the Panama Canal District Boys Scouts of America's Explorer Ocean to Ocean Cayuco Race in 1993. For
this year's race registration information, call 252-6376,252-5733 or attend a meeting 7:15 p.m. Jan. 27 at the Panana Canal Commission Training Center.


i











Tropic Times 13
Jan. 14, 1994 1


- ~ ~s -Owl


ENE


Rol


A


Deparbvient of Deetnrephow by Sgt E.J. Hersoni


Adrian Klasovsky clears 5 feet in the high jump.


Bulldogs win track opener


BALBOA (BalboaHighSchool) -Coach CleveOliver's
Balboa Bulldogs varsity trackteam won the first interscho-
lastic league track meet at the Balboa High School track
here Jan. 7.
Bulldog female competitorTracy Singleton led the way
for the winners, bringing in three firsts and a second for 22
of the Bulldogs' 107 points.
Panama Canal College Green Devils earned 89 points
and second place with Amy Epperson, Evan Davis and
Luis Gonzales each contributing 14 points.
The Red Machine came in third with 83 points. Bruce
Chastain brought in 20 points forthe squad with three firsts
and a fourth. The Curundu Cougars took fourth with 35
points. Daniel Ortiz brought in 15 of those points.
Chame school made their first appearance at a meetthis
year and earned 7 points - all by Karly Schwan, who took
first in the girls 800 meter run.
Performances that bested last year'srecords were Bruce
Chastain's long jump of 19 feet 5 1/2inches, Evan Davis'
fourminute 56 second 1600 meterrunandAndreaBarnett's
13.2 seconds 100 meter dash breaking her own record.
In thejuniorvarsity category, the Green Devils took first
with 61 points followed by Chame school with 47 points,
the Red Machine with 36 points, the Cougars with 22
points and the Bulldogs with 16 points.
Tonight, Curundu will host the second league meet at
the Balboa track. Field events will begin at 5:30 p.m.
Spectators and volunteer officials are welcome to attend,
officials said.
The following are the individual varsity results from
Jan.. 7:
Girls high jump - 1, Cooper, Red Machine, 4; 2" 2,
Singleton, Bulldogs, height unavailable 3, McLean, Bulldogs, 4'
4, Rosales, Green Devils, 3' 8"
Boys high jump - 1, Novotny, Bulldogs 5' 6" 2, Ortiz,
Cougars 5' 5" 3, Klasovsky, Bulldogs 5' 2" 4, Martinelli, Red
Machine 5' 2" 5, Erdman, Green Devils, 4' 10"
Girls long jump- 1, Singleton, Bulldogs, 13' 1 1/2" 2, Ward,
Red Machine, 12' 5" 3, Barnett, Bulldogs 12' 1/2" 4, Bunch,
Cougars, 11' 5, Schwan, Chame, 10' 11"
Boys longjump- 1, Chastain, Red Machine, new record 19'
5' 1/2" 2, Martinelli, Red Machine, 17'7" 3, Petitiford, Cougars


16' 91/2" 4,Ortiz,Cougarsl6' 41/2"5, Novotny,Bulldogs 15' 9"
Girls shot put - 1, Singleton, Bulldogs, 27 3 1/2", 2, Bunch,
Cougars 26' 7 3/4" 3, Stanford, cougars 24' 1/4" 4, Cooper, Red
Machine 23'4 1/4" 5, Valdilles, Green Devils, 22' 5 3/4"
Boys shot put - 1, Guttierrez, Bulldogs, 36' 5" 2, Gonzales,
Green Devils, 34' 3 1/2" 3, Stanford, Red Machine 32' 3" 4,
Hemandez, Red Mahcine, 31' 2" 5, Abrego, Red Machine 28' 5
1/2"
BoysDiscus- 1,Gozales, GreenDevils, 100' 1" 2,Yoshimoto,
Bulldogs 92' 4" 3, Guttierrez, Bulldogs, 91' 8 1/2" 4, Stanford,
Red Machine, 87 7" 5 Abrgo, Red Machine 84' 11"
Boys pole vault - 1, Watanabe, Green Devils, 9' 6" 2, Austin,
Bulldogs, 8' 3, Novotny, Bulldogs, 7 6" 4, Davis, Green Devils,
7
Girls 55 meter low hurdles - 1, Singleton, Bulldogs, 9.75
2, Epperson, Green Devils, 10.68 3, Petitiford, Bulldogs, 14.27
4, Stargen, Green Devils, 14.57 5, Daniel, Bulldogs, 14.4
Boys 110 meter high hurdles - 1, Yoshimoto, Bulldogs,
19.22 2, Soto, Red Machine, 19.71 3, Perez, Red Machine,
21.36 4, Goodno, Bulldogs, 21.94
Girls 100 meter dash - 1, Barnett, Bulldogs, new record
13.2 2, Cedeno, Green Devils, time unavailable 3, Daniel,
Bulldogs, 13.63 4, Atherly, Cougars, 14.03 5, Epperson, Green
Devils, 14.1
Boys 100 meter dash - 1, Chastain, Red Machine 11 2,
Martinelli, Red Machine, 11.76 3, Olivares, Green Devils,
11.93 4, Petitford, Cougars, 12.6 5, Trim, Red Machine 12.63
Boys 1600 meter run - 1, Davis, Green Devils, new record
4:56 2, Lee, Red Machine, 5:25.88 3, Sweeney, Green Devils,
5:30.97 4, Galvez, Cougars, 5:34.6 5, First, Bulldogs, 5:49.56
Girls 400 meter dash - 1, Epperson, Green Devils, 1:11.62
2, Mclean 1:18.25 3, Barnett, Bulldogs, 1:22.11 4, Cedeno,
Green Devils, 1:22.38 5, Bunch, Cougars, 1:27.24
Boys400meterdash -1, Ortiz, Cougars, 55.56 2,Yoshimoto,
Bulldogs, 56.19,3, Guttierrez, Bulldogs, 58.024, Chastain, Red
Machine, 58.29 5, Abrego, Red Machine, 59.84
Girls 800 meter run - 1, Schwan, Chame, 2-56.34 2,
Mclean, Bulldogs, 3:06.46 3, Wilson, Green Devils, 3:08.8 4,
Valdilles, Green Devils, 3:08.8 5, Davis, Green Devils, 3.31.32
Boys 800 meter run - 1, Davis, Green Devils, 2:19.75 2,
Ortiz, Cougars, 2:23.963, Lee,Red Machine, 2:26.66 4,Sweeney,
Green Devils, 2:29.03 5, Stanford, Red Machine, 2-31.55
Girls 200 meter dash - 1, Barnett, Bulldogs, 30.75 2, Short,
Green Devils, 31.45 3, Epperson, Green Devils, 31.97 4,
Choocherd, Red Machine, 36.46
Boys 200 meter dash - 1, Chastain, Red Machine 2,
Martinelli, Red Machine 3, Olivares, Green Devils 4, Watanabe,


Green Devils 5, Trim, Red Machine. Tunes unavailable
Girls 400 meter relay - 1, Green Devils, Cedeno, Stargen,
Rosales, Short, 1:02.922,Red Machine, Ward, Cooper, Moreno,
Armstrong, 1:02.97 3, Bulldogs, Daniel,Washington, Petitiford,
McLean, 1:04.26
Boys 400 meter relay - 1, Red Machine, Soto, Lovejoy,
Delgado, Trim, 51.72 2, Green Devils, Gozales, Sweeney,
Olivares, Watanabe, 53.47 3, Bulldogs, Klasvosky, Novotny,
Guttierrez, 53.88

The following are the individual junior varsity results
from Jan. 7:
Girls long jump - 1, Wilson, Green Devils 11' 4 1/2" 2,
Valdilles, Green Devils, 9' 6 1/2" 3, Yelverton, Green Devils, 9'
4" 4, Jordan, Chamne, 8' 9" 5, Hefft, Chame, 6' 5 1/2"
Boys long jump -1, Lovejoy, Red Machine, 15' 2, Schwan,
Chame, 13' 8 1/2" 3, Erdman, Green Devils, 13'9" 4, Tremblay,
Cougars, 8 1/2" 5, Robertson, Red Machine, 11'
Discus - 1, Goodman, Chame, 71' 7" 2, Alexander, Cougars,
51' 2 1/2" 3, Robertson, Red Machine, 49' 11"
Girls shot put - 1, Cedeno, Green Devils, 19' 5" 2, Wilson,
Green Devils, 17 1 3/4" 3, Chapman, Chame, 16' 5 1/2"
Boys shot put - 1, Goodman, Chame, 35' 3" 2, Alexander,
Cougars, 24' 9" 3, Robertson, Red Machine 23' 5"
Boys 55 meter low hurdles - 1, Schwan, Chame, 9.61 2,
Tremblay, Cougars, 9.9 3, Erdman, Green Devils, 10.19 4,
Deleon, Green Devils, 11.67
Girls 100 meter dash - 1, Short, Green Devils, 14.2 2,
Washington, Bulldogs, 14.62 3, Moreno, Red Machine, 15.014,
Jordan, Chame, 15.55 5, Yelverton, Green Devils, time unavail-
able
Boys 100 meter dash - 1, Perez, Red Machine, 12.07 2,
Lovejoy, Red Machine, 12.15 3, Tremblay, Cougars, time
unavailable
Boys 800 meter run - 1, Schwan, Chame, 2:46.28 2, Deleon,
Green Devils, 3:37.52
Girls 400 meter dash - 1, Turk, Bulldogs, 1:19.22, Stargen,
Green Devils, 1:22.61 3, Valdilles, Green Devils, 1:24 4, Hefft,
Chame, 1:41.36 5, Stanford, Cougars, 1:45.86
Boys 400 meter dash - 1, Goodman, Chame, 1:05.18 2,
Erdman, Green Devils, 1:14.533,Deleon, Green Devils, 1:26.94
Girls 200 meter dash - 1, Washington, Bulldogs, 32.66 2,
Moreno, Red Machine, 35.15 3, Jordan, Chame, 36.26 4,
Yelverton, Green Devils, 37.91
Boys 200 meter dash - 1, Perez, Red Machine, 28.2
2, Tremblay, Cougars, 29.55 3, Deleon, Green Devils, 35.25










S4 Tropic Times
t Jan.14,1994


An American Gladiator in Panama


by Sgt. E.J. Hersom
Tropic Times Sports Editor
K imberly Tyler was a cut-the-grass-with-a-wheels-
that-spin-the-mower-blades-type tomboy who
chased her dog endlessly around a pond.
The youngest of six in a nowhere town's only black
family, Tyler graduated from Northmoore High School
in Bellville, Ohio, a four-time state track champion on
full scholarship to Ohio State. She left college in her
third year as a Big Ten champion in the triple jump and
joined the Air Force.
She left college because of its limitations, she said.
She was used to being involved in student government
and winning in all types of track events and the Ohio
State coaching staff had limited her to triple jump and
long jump. Being "Super Kim" like she was in high
school was what she wanted more of, she said.
Tyler proved herself super again when she made it to
the finals on USA Network's American Gladiators
where she put her 5' 7" 140-pound frame against the
toughest women the TV network could find.
Her commander at the 9th Medical Group at Beale
AFB, Calif., granted her the excess leave she needed to
try out, compete and keep the prize money.
Tyler met a familiar face during the tryouts for the
show, Peggy Odita, a Nigerian born athlete who roamed
the same track competitions back in Ohio, she said.
Odita and Tyler had never competed in the same


events, but met for the show's finals, which has already
been taped.
Tyler was in Panama on temporary duty when her
half of regular season aired in November.
She is here again TDY working at Howard AFB as
an aerospace physiologist, but will be back at Beale
when the championship airs Feb. 26.
The following are excerpts from a Tropic Times
interview with Tyler.
Tropic Times: Who was the toughest gladiator you
faced?
Tyler: They have a new one. Her name is Jazz.
She's very tough and very determined.I guess because
she's new and wants to make a name for herself. And
Siren, the one that's deaf. She goes all out. She'll run,
pull you, yank you right off the platform. Both of them
are very competitive and they hate to lose. Especially
Siren. I kicked her butt in the pyramid. She got me back
real good though.
Tropic Times: Some of the events get very physical,
what was your best?
Tyler: Slingshot. It has this long pole suspended
from the ceiling with all these little nerf balls velcroed
all along. They have red, blue and yellow each worth
different points depending on how high you get. So
we're on platforms with gladiators on the corners
forming an X. We bungee down to the floor and jump
up and try and get these little things and suspended in
the air, we try and get back to our platforms. Meanwhile


Kimberly Tyler, a finalist on USA Network's American Gladiators, strikes a pose.


Department of Defens


the gladiators are jumping with us - smacking us,
kicking us, doing all kinds of stuff. Fortunately, we were
allowed to defend ourselves during the games
Tropic Times: Every once and while, there's a new
event that pops up on the American Gladiators. Are the
games getting harder?
Tyler: This new season they have made it tougher
they say, and I can say that because I can feel it.
Tropic Times: What was the hardest new event?
Tyler: They have a new event called the Whiplash.
You have two triangles put together at the vertex.
Basically, you try to yank the gladiator out of a circum-
ference. At the same time they're trying to stay in. As
big as they are... you can imagine. They yanked us
around like rag dolls. I had Siren at one point and I
yanked her right out, but not right away of course.
Tropic Times: Do you think that the producers knew
that you and Odita would make it to the finals?
Tyler: I think they had a pretty good idea. Our
shows were taped next to each other's. They edited a lot.
They never showed a shot where Peggy and I were
together. Peggy and I were going into the champion-
ships rounds and when I was done with the eliminator,
Peggy's round was right after mine. I got my interview
done, put my regular clothes on, dried off, jumped into
the front row of the audience and I was standing there
clapping like I hadn't done anything the whole day. I
guess on TV they'll say 'Here's Kim Tyler, she won her
final round for the first half last week.' Now when I
watch the show and I see some
guy or girl clapping for another
contestant, I can laugh.
Tropic Times: Were the
gladiators fun to hang around
with?
11 Tyler: They were friendly.
. The show put us up at the
, Sportsmans Lodge Hotel down-
S- town. Most of the gladiators were
there too because, believe it or
: not, their homes are not in L.A.
The hotel had an Olympic-size
pool and we would go out there
and play around the pool. Not all
, the time, because they also have
fraternization rules. They get paid
by how many wins they get. Plus
they're supposed to be mean to us
on the show so they don't want to
i show favoritism. I was the same
way when I was competing. I was
like, 'Hey every man for himself
If your going to hit me in the
head with that stick, look out.'
A ' Tropic Times: Did any of it
scare you?
Tyler: I was never intimidated
by the gladiators. That was never
a problem because I was used to
competing. I was small compared
to them and I was just as strong
as they were. They were shocked.
I was undefeated in a lot of events
- the joust, the big Q tip. I kicked
butt in that. The Sky Track was
my biggest fear. Hanging upside
down. I mean, when they took the
.~ platform from underneath us, the
only thing keeping us from
hitting the ground was a little
cable that we were suspended on.
That was pretty scary, but I had to
get used to it. Looking up there, it
doesn't look that high. But when
, you get up there and your just
dangling like a little spider, you
. . ....think 'Is this going to hold me.'
:. 'V .. Tropic Times: What drives you
10' ^to do these physical things?
"- Tyler: In the back of my mind,
there's a thought. Is it still there?
Is there still another accomplish-
ment that I could do? Somewhere
. 4, within, I feel like there's some-
thing else. Even if I wasn't
running track for the Air Force,
I'd still stay in shape. Even before
the gladiators, I was still working
out. Just in case something comes
_ t along, I'll be ready. That's how I
* am. I still feel like there's more
and I'm just waiting for it to fall
L in my lap.
ephoto bySgt. EJ. Hersom Things just kind of happen by
me and I just kind of grab 'em.








Tropic Times
Jan. 14,1994 1


SCN radio sports
The Southern Command Network's AM 790 Pacific
and 1420 Atlantic will broadcast the following sports this
weekend. SCN will be broadcasting English simulcasts of
pro football games that will be aired on local TV channels
this weekend for people without SCN cable channel 14.
Tonight
Pro basketball: Utah Jazz at Chicago Bulls at 8:30 p.m.
Saturday
Pro football: AFC division playoff game; L.A. Raiders
at Buffalo Bills at 12:30 p.m.
NFC division playoff game; N.Y. Giants at San Fran-
cisco 49ers at 4p.m.
Sunday
Pro football: NFC Division playoff game; Green Bay
Packers at Dallas Cowboys at 12:30 p.m.
AFC division playoff game; Kansas City Chiefs at
Houston Oilers at 4 p.m.

Transisthmian set
The Transisthmian Relay Race will be held Saturday.
Categories are U.S. military, female, open and open over
40. Teams consist of 10 runners and two alternatives. Call
287-4050.

MLK softball tourney
The Fronius Fitness Center is holding a Martin Luther
King Jr. Softball Tournament Saturday through Monday.
The entrance fee is $75 per team. Company level and


women's softball tournaments are upcoming. Call 289-
3108 for more information

Balboa Relays
The 43rd running of the Balboa Relays will held at
Balboa High School Jan. 28-29. Events include sprints,
hurdles, distance, relays, shot, discus, long jump, high
jump and pole vault. Participants must be on a team to
compete. For more information call Cleve Oliver at the
Balboa gym at 252-5704. Army personnel interested in
running the relays call Willie Moye at 287-6411 or Sue
Bozgoz at 287-3445 or 260-1128.

Rodman 5K Fun Run
Runners areneededfortheRodman 5KFunRun, which
will be held 6:30 a.m. on Jan. 28. There is no entry fee.
Deadline to register is Jan. 26. Run is open to all military
and civilian personnel. Units with most runners and first
and second place receive awards. Call 283-4222/4061 to
sign up.

Free step aerobics
The Fronius Fitness Center has free step aerobics
classes 9-10 a.m. weekdays. Call 289-4111 for more
information.

Sports equipment
The Howard Sports and Recreational Center has the
sporting equipment for weekend outings, camping, beach
combing, golfing and more. Boogie boards and board
games are available for children. Items are available for


daily, weekly or weekend rates. Several specials are being
ranthroughout January. The centerwill be closed Tuesday.
For more information, call 284-6107.

Fishing charters
Trophy deep-sea and Sunskiff bottom fishing charters
are available at the Rodman Marina. Charters include
captain, fishing gear, cooler and ice. Call the marina at
283-3147 or 283 3150 for more information.

Free aerobics
The Reeder Physical Fitness Center has free aerobics
given by Teresa Consterdine 9:15a.m.- 10:15a.m. week-
days. Each workout has a warm-up, cardiovascular work-
out, cool down and floorwork. Call 287-3861.

No-tap bowling
The monthly no-tap bowling tournament begins 7:30
p.m. Saturday at the Curundu Bowling Center. Call 286-
3914 for more information.

Baseball camp
The Directorateof Community Activities Sports Branch
will hold a baseball camp 4:30-6 p.m. weekdays starting
Monday until Jan. 28 at the Fort Davis Youth Field. Call
287-4540 for more information.

Amador golf
Golfers who wish to participate in tournaments should
have an established handicap. Those who are not members
of Fort Amador Golf Course will be expected to pay green
fees.
The Amador Golf Club is also using pre-scheduled
starting times forteeing offon weekends and U.S. holidays.
Only groups of three or four may reserve tee times before
10 a.m. Reservations may be called in beginning Wednes-
dayprior to the weekend. Call 292-4511 for more informa-
tion.

Body building contest
The Howard Theater will host a body building contest
Jan. 29. Deadline to register is today. The entrance fee is
$15 per person. Call the Howard Sports and Fitness Center
at 284-3451 for more information.

MLK day special
Prices at the Curundu Bowling Center will be reduced
in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day Sundayin addition
to the regular green pin bowling. Open bowling is from 1 -
9 p.m. Call 286-3914.

Swimming classes
The Howard and Albrook pools invite parents and their
children to enroll in swimming lessons. Diving classes and
ladies water exercise classes are available at the Albrook
Pool. For more information, call the Zodiac Community
Activities Center at the Howard Pool at 284-3569 or the
Albrook Pool at 286-3555.

Pan-Am Dive Club
The Pan American Dive Club is welcoming new mem-
bers. The club is located in Building 214, Fort Espinar and
is open 6-8 p.m. Friday. Dues are $6 per month or $25 for
six months. Rentals available. Call Gary Garay at 289-
3428 or 289-4447 or Tom Bell at 289-3762 or 289-3538.

Free weight training
The Fronius Fitness Center has free weight training
sessions and Nautilus machine training sessions 3-4 p.m.
Tuesday. Call the center at 289-3108 for more informa-
tion

Shark, bottom fishing
The Rodman Marina hosts shark and bottom fishing 6-
11 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday nights on the Black
Stallion and Vargas boats. Tickets must be purchased the
day before the trip. Fishing charters to Pina Bay for Marlin
fishing are also available. Call the marina at 283-3147.

Water exercises
The Howard and Albrookpools haveladies water
exercises for adults and children. Call 284-616.


�
^-"^









16 Tropic Times
1U Jan. 7, 1994


Home delivery


test continues

by Maureen Sampson
Tropic Times staff
COROZAL - For the first time since 1987, people sta-
tioned in Panama can get a stateside newspaper delivered
to their homes.
Subscribers will soon be receiving the Miami Herald-
International seven days a week and the Tropic Times
every Friday.
The new delivery routes are being worked out by news-
paper carriers delivering the Tropic Times. Test routes on
Albrook AFS have been successful so far, according to
Jorge Gonzales, National and International Circulation
Manager for the Miami Herald. Routes are currently be-
ing tested on Corozal, Fort Clayton, Albrook AFS and
Quarry Heights.
The next phase will be delivery on Fort Amador, then
Rodman NS and Cocoli, then Howard AFB,Fort Kobbe
and Farfan.
"We'll continue implementing a base or two every four
weeks," Gonzales said, "That will give us time to prepare
ourselves, split up the residential areas and learn how
many carriers we need."
Before starting the delivery service on the Atlantic
side, Gonzales said someone must be hired as a distribu-
tion coordinator at one of the Atlantic bases.
Besides giving readers the luxury of home-delivered
papers, the paper routes provide employment opportuni-
ties for family members living on base, Gonzales said.
"It's a perfect opportunity for me to do something
down here since there is so little opportunity for employ-
ment," said Wendy McDermott, an Air Force family
member who delivers papers on Albrook.
"I like the whole idea of being able to administer this
knowledge so people can be informed of what's going on
in the states," McDermott said.
McDermott, who has 13 years experience delivering
newspapers, said the hours are perfect for her two small
children. She delivers the papers 4-6 a.m., before her hus-
band leaves for work in the morning.


K-


.-,i , ,,- _*-


_-. --. .


Department of Defense photo by Maureen Sampson
The new home delivery program has provided family members like Wendy McDermott a chance to work.


The carriers are guaranteed $5 an hour, with commis-
sion for each subscription sold. The positions were adver-
tised through fliers in the Miami Herald. Gonzales said
the response has been tremendous.
"We've had an excellent response from dependents,"
Gonzales said, "We have more than we can use at the
present time, but we are still creating new routes which
means more people will be involved."
The program's success depends on the amount of Mi-
ami Herald subscriptions sold. Gonzales said non-sub-
scribers will still get a Tropic Times delivered Fridays,
but to offer that service, the Herald must at least break
even. Subscriptions cost $20 a month. Anyone interested
in subscribing or applying for a delivery or coordinator
position can call Gonzales at 269-3220 or 236-1522.


Gonzales has been working with the Southern Com-
mand Public Affairs Office for more than a year to get the
program running. The command supports the home de-
livery because of its potential to contribute to the quality
of life of people stationed in Panama, said Patrick Milton,
USSOUTHCOM Public Affairs Office command infor-
mation officer.
"One of the benefits of the international edition is lo-
cal advertisers list their products and services in English,
for those of us who are not bilingual," Milton said.
"I hope we get enough subscribers so this whole project
will be a 'go'," McDermott said. "I think this program
will be beneficial for a long time - not just for getting
information to the' people, but for creating jobs that we
really need down here."


TopU


S..


Army South volunteer earns Orlando trip


by SgL LM1-Da's"
USARSO Public Aftairs Office


FORT
CLAYTON.-
For giving
her time and
caring to the
Panamanian
military com-
munity, Anita
Scarim has
been selected
to represent
Army volun-
teers at the


:,
Ant S-c. r
Anita Scarim


grand open-
ing of the Armed Forces Recreation Cen-
ter - Orlando in February.
Sergeant Major of the Army, Richard
A. Kidd, requested a worldwide search for
a volunteer who is the spouse of an en-
listed active duty soldier to attend the
opening with their family.
Similar volunteers were selected to rep-
resent the other services.
"Her nomination (to represent the


Army) was based on the scope of her vol- families here by teaching classes for the
unteer activities through the Famil Sup- Enlisted Spouse Survival Course and or-
port CnGroup, chu ph s zing fund-raisers.
organizations and th rtnli'SledSp~ ' She also helped stuff Christmas stock-I
Club," said Maggie Coleman, installation ings for soldiers in Honduras with the 4th
volunteer coordinator. Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment, she
Scarim also stood out because she took said.
on even more projects after breaking her "S.uzy.Vanairsdale, Col. (Michael J.)
leg in August. - Vanairsdale's'(128ih Aviation Regiment
She never let her injury get her down, commander) wife, wanted the 250
she would prop her leg up at meetings and' unaccompanied soldiers in Honduras to
make jokes about the cast, she said. know we were thinking about them. She
Shewasregisteredinthevolunteerpro- came to the Family Support Group for
gram and had turned in her 1,539 hours green Army socks and stuffers. We also
for 1993, which made her eligible for the sent cookies to them," she said.
nomination, Coleman added. Back here in Panama, the soldiers of
Scarim spent these hours as the presi- Co. C, 1-228th are always thanking
dent of Heart, which helps fund child care Roger for everything his wife does, Roger
for volunteers throughout USARSO, par- said. . . .


liamentarian of the Enlisted Spouses Club
and the enlisted representative in the 1st
Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment Fam-
ily Support Group.
"I'm proud of my wife, she supports me
and she supports others," her husband,
Roger said.
She has supported soldiers and their


She has even managed to get him in-
volved in projects, as well as the rest of the
family, he said.
"Before I started this, I talked about
volunteering with my family and told
them I wouldn't be home as much as be-
fore. They understand that because Mom
is helping others and they help me with


my projects and with chores at home,"
Anita said.
,"I couldn't do any of this without my
family. My mom helps out at home with
the kids and she volufiteers in the commu-
nity and gets involved in projects.too," she
said. "
Her mother, Marge Fricke, sewed hew
curtains for the soldiers living in the Com-
pany C barracks, she said.
The whole family got involved this
Christmas with the Angel Tree project.
They spent many evenings making r
angels and wrapping presents, Roger .�'
said.
They give much of their time to their
community, but the Scarims make sure
they have time for each other as well. Sun-
day is family day at their house, and ev-
eryone understands that she dedicates that
day to her husband, children and mother,
Anita said.
"She brings a quiet determination, en-
thusiasm of course, and a can-do or will-
do attitude to everything she does. I don't
think the word 'no' is in.her vocabulary,"
Coleman said.


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO
PAO) - The hours of operation for
the Army and Air Force Exchange
System - Panama for Monday'in ob-
servance of Martin Luther King Jr.
Day are as follows:
PACIFIC
COROZAL
Main PX- 9 a.m.-9 p.m.
Sweets Reflections - 7 a.m.-8
p.m.
Frank's Franks - 10:30 a.m.-6
p.m.
Bakery - closed
* Anthony's Pizza - 10:30 am.-6
p.m.
Wok Works - 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
Casa de Amigos - 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
FORT CLAYTON
Shoppene (95) - closed


Martin Luther King Jr. holiday hours


Frank's Franks (95) - closed
Anthony's Pizza - 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
Burger King - 6:30 a.m.-10 p.m.
Popeye's - 6 a.m.-10 p.m.
Frank's Franks (by Burger King)
- closed
Clayton Plaza Shoppette - 7 am.-
midnight
Shoppette (519) - 8 a.m.-10 p.m.
Auto parts store - 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Clothing Sales - closed
AMADOR
Shoppette - 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
ALBROOK
Shoppette- 8 a.m.-l0 p.m.
Snack bar - 8 a.m.-2 p.m.


Anthony's Pizza - 11 a.m.-9 p.m.
Frank's Franks - 10 a.m.-7 p.m.
Video rental - 9 a.m.-9 pm.
Furniture store - 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Shoe store - 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Toyland/Outdoor living - 10
a.m.-6 p.m.
Class Six - 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
HOWARD
Main PX -10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Class Six-- 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Cafeteria - 7 a.m.-2 p.m.
Anthony's Pizza- 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
Clothing Sales - closed
Service station - 6:30 a.m.-6:30
p.m.


FORT KOBBE
Shoppeute/video ren"al- 10a.m.-
4 p.m.
Burger King - 10:30 a.m.-5:30
p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
Quarry Height shoppette - closed
Gorgas Hospital shoppette -
closed
Curundu School cafeteria -
closed
Cocoli shoppette - 10 a.m.-6 p.mn.
Balboa school cafeteria - closed
Curundu Service Station - 6
a.m.-midnight
ATLANTIC


: FORTESPINAR
Shoppette - closed
FORTDAVIS
Main PX - 10 a-m.-6 pma
Auto parts store - 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Gas station - 8 a.m.-6 p.m.
Cafeteria - 8 am.-1 p.m.
Anthony's -11 I a.m.-10 p.m.
Burger King - 11 a.m.-9 p.m.
,Clothing Sales - closed
FORT SHERMAN
Shoppette - noon-6 p.m.
Gas station - closed
Anthony's Pizza - noon-4 pmn.
COMMISSARIES
The military commissaries on
Corozal, Fort Espinar and Howard
Air Force Base will be closed Mon-
day and Wednesday in observance
of Martin Luther King Jr. Day.


:i
'Ar.





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Full Text

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r p tmmes Vol. VI No. 2 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, Jan.14, 1994 Local soldiers rescue Russian sailor ySgt. Lori Davis helicopter landing so the medic was lowered by cable, you are from we take care of you like you are our own," byVSgt. lic Dais said pilot 1st Lt. Jack Parry. Rojas said. USARSO Public Affairs Office As the helicopter hovered 90 feet above the deck, the "He (Lukjanov) seemed very impressed by our miliALBROOK AFS -Medevac soldiers from the 214th crew chief lowered the medic on the jungle penetrator, a tay beca':c we took such good care of him. He smiled Medical Detachment rescued a Russian sailor injured in small cone-shaped device with three folding eets used to the whole time," he said. a fire on the Greek ship Grain Trader Jan. 5. retrieve people fm obsarustod arcas, Johnson said. Lukjanov kept that smile in spite of extreme pain. Valery Lukjanov suffered third degree burns to his Maias had to iower Rojas through a network of pipes When the two men were on their way up to the heliface and hands and second degree burns to his chest from on the ship's deck, guiding him into an opening 10 feet copter the blisters from his burns broke and soaked an electrical fire, said SSgt. Robert Rojas, 214th Med. wide by 20 feet long. The ship's movement, the wing and Rojas's uniform and the inside of the helicopter, Rojas Det. medic. the jungle penetrator's tendency to spin made the effort said. A rescue crew in a UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter reeven more difficult, Macias said. "His burns were really bad. We bandaged them and sponded to the emergency at 3 p.m. and flew 120 miles "The crew chief has a special technique to reverse the kept them moist to prevent the bandage from sticking north of Colon in the Caribbean Sea to meet the ship. spin so he can maintain control on the drop. There is to the wound and gave him 3,000 CC's of saline. That's The helicopter and ship did not have matching radio frenobody I trust more to send me down than Macias," Rojas a lot of fluid for a bum victim," Rojas said. quencies, so they communicated with each other through said. The medevac crew flew Lukjanov to Gorgas Army a third radio operator, said pilot CWO 2 Arthur Johnson. Rojas made it safely to the deck and was met by the Community Hospital and he was transferred to Paitilla Because they could not communicate directly, the air Greek sailors helping the bum victim. They helped him Hospital, Parry said. crew sent directions to the ship to turn into the wind when straddle one of the folding seats and then hooked the strap "One thing about this mission I will never forget the helicopter approached. This not only assured the piaround his back. He gripped the padded cone and Rojas was when a crewmember on the ship brought out his lots they found the right ship, it also made it easier to held on to him for the trip up, Rojas said. (Lukjanov's) luggage," Rojas said. "They handed me a lower the medic to pick up the injured sailor, he said. "I noticed that everyone on the ship was very conplastic bag holding a toothbrush and an apple. We've Military ships usually have large decks where helicopcerned about helping us. Since I've been here I've done a got everything and we complain, and all he had was an tears can land. However, this ship did not have a deck for a lot, but this was different. No matter who you are or where apple and a toothbrush." Help sought in baby's death investigation FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) The Panama Criminal Investigation Office is now investigating the homicide of Baby Doe and is offering a reward for information. A newborn baby was found in a trash bin at Valent Recreation Center May 13, 1993 with his skull fractured. Witnesses described a suspect seen at the center between 4-10 p.m. May 12 as a light complected black female in her early 20s. She was 5 feet, 9 inches tall and weighed about 160 pounds. The suspect had shoulder-length hair which was curled at the ends. It was further reported the suspect was wearing a dark blue or purple tunic top and pants and was carrying a black canvass bag with a white handkerchief with blue trim laid over the top. She was standing near the area of the large screen television in the center and aperdto be upset. d y The suspect used the public telephones Around h world d Departentof DefephotobySMSgt.Steve Teybo several times becoming more upset and the in 8 d hanging up each time. The Queen Elizabeth 2glides underneath the Bridge of the Americas Monday afternoon after completing its transit The suspect was seen carrying the bag through the Panama Canal. The QE2, in day 10 of its 89-day trek around the world, paid a $128,955.71 toll enroute into the ladies room of the center where to Acapulco, Mexico. The vessel attracted larger than normal crowds at the Miraflores Locks. On an average day the baby was found. 700-800 people go to the locks, Monday more than 3,000 visited. A reward of $2,500 is being offered by CID for information leading to the identity and arrest of the person or people reA ,it so d ew f ,a t rd sp e responsible for the be Aviation soldier kills wife, self after domestic dispute Anyone having information should call FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -turned the gun on himself after a domestic The 5and 3-year-old sons have been Specir Agen Danel Caton at 25-4 A U.S. Army South soldier and his wife dispute. placed in foster homes until the next of kin at 287-4401. died Saturday as a result of an apparent One of the couple's three children, a take custody. All information received will be murder-suicide at their off-post quarters. 17-month-old girl, was slightly injured The incident is under investigation by handled in the strictest confidence. Spec. Ray Jerkins of Headquarters during the incident and is being held at the Panama National Police and U.S. Without help, the death of a child may Company, 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation Gorgas Army Community Hospital for Army South Criminal Investigations offigo urnesolved, CID officials said. Regiment, shot his wife, Nicolle, and observation. cials. e pae 2 Air Force drawdown plan focuses on Secretary of Defense approves new +Bike rodeo, page 3. voluntary lossesthrough early retirepolicy opening more jobs to. women *Local plays win awards, page 8. ment, separation programs. in ground combat units. +Basketball title, page 11.

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Tropic Times Jan. 14, 1994 Navy civiians heip chart Panamawaterways by Ltjg. Laura C. Moore Province, Lesbia Alarcon, said the new USNAVSTAPANCANAL charts will help the province to expand economically. LA PALMA, Darien, Panama -Safe "The province has a lot of problems navigation is now possible in previously with the highway to Panama City, which uncharted rivers of the Darien Province, at any moment may become impassable," A three-year project to chart all of the Alarcon said. "The province depends on region's waterways ended last month. these waterways for exporting its goods." U.S. Hydrographic Cooperation Pro"The rivers are a much more dependgram, Latin American Region located at able means of access to the province, but Fort Amador, provided the equipment some people in the province say the rivers and dollars, and Panama's National are deep, some say they're shallow," Geographic Institute provided manpower, Alarcon said. "It will be a great help to local knowledge, and technical expertise. expand the exports of the agricultural The two organizations, which have products from the province. Better debeen working together since 1975, used fined waterways will Aelp commerce in the latest technology to make a product the region in the Darien." which will benefit the region, the counJ One of the areas that could see an try, and the United States in many reeconomic improvement is the tourism spects. industry, Alcaron said. A group of six NGI employees, headed "In the last couple of years there have by Carlos Moreno, surveyed the area using been tourists on ships that have come up the Global Positioning System, 386 Ultra here, but they've been nervous about going computers with specialized hydrographic up the rivers much farther because they software, and an electronic ecosounder. U.S. Navy photo by PH2 Delano My. don't know the channel and a big ship The group took soundings from the Jim Page and VictorTorrero discuss navigation plots during a charting mission could get stuck for a long time. They survey boat, "HYCOOP II," using the in the Darien Province. come as far as La Palma, but with new Global Positioning System to determine charts and better-defined channels there's their location with an accuracy of better "Sometimes we can combine the data stances," Page said. "Who knows. But a possibility to expand the tourism of the than 20 meters. Survey lines were 200 with aerial photography and satellite piewithout adequate charts, the government province," Alcaron said. meters apart, and soundings were taken tures to produce an even more accurate would not be able to come out here and Eric Reina, one of the NGI employees every 10 to 15 meters. chart," Page said. try to counter these threats." working on the Darien project, which is "The specialized software processes the By making these rivers more navigable "The principle navigators here are HYCOOPLAR's last project, said that the data and contours the soundings to deterwith charting, they will be more accesPanamanian supply boats that come from knowledge gained from the Darien survey mine the areas of danger and the areas of sible to the Panamanian government to Panama City into these smaller towns will also benefit the United States. navigation and these final soundings are exercise their sovereignty, Page said. here. There may be many reasons in the "It's not just aone-way street, informathen used by the nautical cartographers to "This area is on the frontier with Cofuture where Panamanian patrol boats or tion flows both ways," Reina said. "We produce an updated chart of the area or lombia and it's an area where there could U.S. assets might wish to navigate in know a lot about this country and have to update the existing chart when one be movement of any type of contraband these rivers for nation-building projects," insight into this area, and working toexists," said Jim Page, officer-in-charge between countries and areas where there he added. gether gives us all the opportunity to of HYCOOPLAR. may be some plantations of illegal subThe former governor of the Darien interchange ideas and experiences." Rodman hosts holiday party Air Force 1995 drawdown plans target RODMAN NS (USNAVSTAPANCANAL)-Q Volunteers here welcomed more than 460 stuearly retirement, separation programs ~~~dents from Escuela de los Estados Unidos when r tr e t e a a i np o r m they arrived here recently aboard the Fantasia del +VSI/SSB for staff sergeants and below with 10 years Mar for the annual Christmas Picnic. by TSgt. Sarah Hood of service by their separation date (TAFMSD of June The children were greeted by Rodman NS Air Force News Service 30, 1985, or earlier). Some specialty code exemptions commanding officer Capt. Arthur Rowley III, WASHINGTON -Maximizing voluntary losses apply. executive officer Cmdr. Richard Smith and U.S. where it can afford to lose people is still the Air Force's *Early retirement/VSI/SSB for eligible line majors Ambassador to Panama Dean Hinton at Pier One priority as the fiscal 1995 drawdown game plan is and lieutenant colonels (including deferred majors and North. implemented, said personnel officials here. lieutenant colonels) with 15 years of service by their From there, the children were escorted by The Air Force must trim its ranks by an additional retirement date. Officers in selected weapons systems are Army Capt. Linda Fischer, 92nd Military Police 2,300 officers and 17,000 enlisted members to help meet ineligible. Battalion, and station volunteers to the Rodman fiscal 1995 end strength requirements. The additional +VSI/SSB for majors in the 1980 and 1981 year Fitness Center for the festivities, losses called for are above those that would normally be groups. Pilots and navigators with less than 15 years of The children also saw a 25-foot patrol boat achieved through attrition. service are ineligible. used for Riverine operations. The 92nd MP volThe latest plan expands the *Early retirement/VSI/SSB unteers gave the children a complete camouflage for line non-deferred captains in eligibility criteria for the tempo-frln o makeover and put on a dog handlers demonstrarary early retirement, voluntary The Air Force must trim its the 1983-1987 year groups with Inter-American Naval Telecommunications separation incentive and special ranks by an additional 15 years of service by their retirenetork-voluteerscan prvidle p aos separation benefit programs. ment date. Pilots and navigators Network volunteers provided raspados (snow Officials said the Air Force 2,300 officers and 17,000 are not eligible. cones). will also hold officer selective enlisted members to meet *VSI/SSB for captains in the After lunch, a bilingual Santa Claus arrived early retirement boards and a .1983-1985 year groups. Belowaboard a Panama Canal Commission fire truck fscal 1995 end strengthou elo andase lucablngoatlus aifved earlybl reirse eentor aNdCO icl195edsrnt the-promotion zone officers, pilots and passed out gifts. SERB, if needed, to help meet requirements. and navigators, and deferred capthose requirements. tains are still ineligible to apply. Housing office expands In addition to the SERBs, the The 1982 year group is also exFORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -To inAir Force will stop selective eluded from participation. Capcontinuation of majors twice deferred for promotion. tains in the 1983 year group must apply for separation creasite quality of life for its customers, the Instead, these officers will be offered early retirement in or retirement no later than Aug. 19, 1994, with separafrie ha moved from stbrookmAir Force t lieu of separation. tion or retirement to occur between Oct. 1, 1994, and fioneso the Housin Divsion A Obr ic Ain Builg -Officials expect to meet end-strength goals with a Nov. 21, 1994. 519 on Fort Clayton. phased program beginning Feb. 1. *Early retirement/VSI/SSB for deferred majors and SServicemembers are now able to handle both Should a second phase be necessary, the Air Force lieutenant colonels in judge advocate general, chaplain, housing and furnishing needs in one location will further expand the VSI/SSB eligibility for officers biomedical science corps, medical science corps and during in and out-processing, said Dick Davis, and enlisted members. nurse corps. Only twice or more deferred chaplains are Housing Division chief, Department of EngineerEarly retirement/VSI/SSB applications will be aceligible. Nurse anesthetists are ineligible. ing and Housing. cepted on a first-come, first-served basis starting Feb. 1 *Line and non-line deferred captains and all belowe ndmovea made because transportation to for separations and retirements to occur effective Oct. 1, the-promotion zone officers are ineligible for early retireA hbroveAFS was madefficuetranswotarivd t 1994, through July 1, 1995. ment/VSI/SSB. Abrook AFS was difficult for newly arrived The Air Force will determine if the program needs Approximately 400 military members here are elipeople and those leaving who shipped or sold to be expanded into a second phase, based on the number gible under the new guidelines, according to TSgt. Art Servicemembers living both on and off post of applications received. Clark of the Military Personnel Flight. may apply for 90-day furniture loans through Phase I eligibility criteria: These people will receive notice soon and should the Customer Service Office upon arrival in *Early retirement/VSI/SSB for senior master sercontact their orderly room to start both separation and Panama and within 90 days of departure, Davis geants and below who will have 15 years of service by retirement actions. said their requested retirement date (total active federal milPeople who feel they are eligible, but have not been tary service date of June 30, 1980, or earlier.) Some contacted, should check with their orderly room as well, specialty code exemptions apply. Clark said.

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Tropic Times Jan. 14, 1994 Southern Exposure Fort Drum military police enjoy sunny welcome by Spec Alexander C. White are also responsible for the quick reacUSARSO Pub!ic Affairs Office lo oc USAR___Pub____A____rs_____c___ o "We are looking to reduce, if not FORTCLAYTON -The51 lthMilieliminate, crime in our area of operatary Police Company experienced a dra tion," Fassinger said. matic change in climate when they de"The 511th is no stranger to the ployed from FortDrum, N.Y., toPanama Panamanian environment. This should recently to augment the 92nd Military help the soldiers perform their jobs Police Battalion in law enforcement. easier." When the 511th MP Co. left upstate The unit has pulled at least four tours New York Jan. 3, snow had piled up here. and temperatures had reached record Besides duty in Central America, the lows of 21 degrees below zero, said company spent last Christmas and New 1st Sgt. William Fassinger, 511th MP Years in Somalia where it provided %Co. escorts for food convoys and helped "Bythetimewegothere,(toPanama) with the break up of Somali thugs J we had gone through a1lO degrees in a known as technicals and confiscated day," he said. weapons. "The Christmas holidays werenasty. "While we were in Somalia, our When we got down here we heard that mission was strictly combat-oriented," they (Fort Drum) had been blasted with Fassinger said. "IHere, we are pulling a snow storm that had left six to eight more of a peacetime mission. inches to be followed with 16 more "I think we are the only MOS (miliinches." Lary occupational specialty) with a deOne hundred thirty-three soldiers defined wartime and peacetime mission." ployed here to complete a four-month He explained that the mission in U.S. Army photo by Spec. Alexander C. White mission. Somalia and now the time spent here Spec. Kerl Parris, 511th Military Police Company, Fort Drum, N.Y., takes part in riot Besides performing its main objechas given the unit the opportunity to control training at Fort Clayton. tive of law enforcement, the 511th MPs perform all aspects of their job. Howard security police host weekend'bike rodeo' by SSgt. Rian Clawson tips 24th Wing Public Affairs Bike safety HOWARD AFB -More than 30 youths FORT CLAYTON (USARSO saddled up forthecompetitivespeedslalom PAO)-Withthenewyear,beginning competition at 24th Security Police 7r* and experienced bicycles need to reSquadron's bike rodeo hem Saturday. view the rules of the road and learn Having the fastest times in several age a few safety tips to help get where categoriesearned someoftheyoung bikers they're going safely, said Don Army and Air Force Exchange Service gift Patterson, U.S. Army Garrison certificates and free movie and bowling atSafety Office specialist. coupons, or McGruff the Crime Dog "RidingthroughFortClaytonthis frisbees, hats,key chains and pencils sportpast weekend, you couldn't help but ing the slogan, "take a bite out of crime." natiweakenw yclsnd prbSPS officials processed 25 new registranotice all the new bicycles and probtions during the most recent rodeo, comablynew bike riders as well," he said. pared to 65 during the last one. The proSome of the rules of the road are: gram averaged 100 registrations per event. *When riding, keep to the right. Since the 24th SPS began keeping track of *Obey all traffic rules, lights, the numbers in 1990,it has registered 1,432 stop signs, and no U-turn signs. bicycles formilitary, DoDand family mem*Use appropriate hand signals. bers. *Alwavs ride single -an extra "Lastyearthcrewere 104 bicyclesstolen "omlstyary memweres4iiyonssowardperson makes it harder to balance. from miliay members living on Howard *Avoid crowded and high-speed orAlbrook or from their family members," r od and hh-abe. said Sgt. Jacqueline White, 24th Security roads and use paths when available. Police Squadron crime prevention moni*Never hitch a ride with a truck, tor. "Of that number, less than half were car or e registered on base and of those we'verecov*Look out for pedestrians beered 13." cause they have the right-of-way, There have been occasions when the especially at crosswalks. Panamanian National Police have recovKeep hands on the handlebars, ered bicycles and notified 24th SPS offi+e hands except to signal. cials, but the bikes could not be released Ues Air Forcepotoby5gt. RianCawson *Travelsinglefilewheninagroup because they had no registration stickers orJSAiF. htbySg a CTvesnlflewningru otherpermanentidentfyingmarksonthemr SSgt. Delbert Champ, 24th Security Police Squadron, tests the chain on a and don't pass unless it's safe. "If thieves have enough time they m bicycle during the bicycle rodeo at Howard AFB Saturday. +Walk your bike across curbs scrape off stickers, file offidentifying num"People usually lose their bikes in one of social security number or other identifying and busy intersections if necessary. bers, repaint the bike and even trade out two ways,"thesecurity spec. ialistsaid."They marks will help in their recovery." *Drive in a straight line. Cutting parts from other stolen bikes," White exeither leave them either t ally unsecured "The best way to ensure your bike will in and out of traffic is dangerous. plained. "In order to do this, though, the or they secure them inau.quately where still be yours in the morning is to take it *Always wear a bicycle helmet thief must get the bike off base. Having the they are easily seen (likcarportt) indoors and secure it inside a secure areaif and light-colored clothing. bikes registered helps keep them from ever "When that happens, --.f of opportupossible." White said. *Use lights, reflectors and a bileaving the base. If the security police at the nity can just walk by, see the bike and take For more information about the bike cycle flag. gate see anon-base resident try to leave the it," she added. registration program or any other aspect of *Riding during daylight hours is base with a registered bike, they can and "In these situations, having the bikes crime prevention, call the security police at safer. will stop them." registered and engraved with your nane, 284-4755.

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4 Tropic Timesemisp re ~Jan. 14, 1994 e u r r agent Demonstrators burn effigy of U.S. soldier leads u lt in PANAMA CITY (Reuters) -About 400 Panamamians burned an effigy of a U.S. soldier and chanted anti-American slogans on the 30th anniversary Sunday of nationalist riots in which 22 Iauneigcs c Panamanians were killed and 500 injured. MIAMI (Reuters) -A federal drug agent who arrested Shouting "Panama Yes, Yankees No" and Panamanian dictator Manuel Antonio Noreiga pleaded waving Panamanian flags, the protesters set fire to guilty to trying to pocket $700,000 that money launderers the life-sized doll in front of U.S. soldiers guardgave him during an underover investigation. ing the Quarry Heights military base, next to the Drug Enforcement Administration agent Rene De Panama Canal. Cova, an 11-year veteran of the agency, was one of the They later staged a noisy rally at a shrine to the U., aens wh1 -arvetedn Nofre agn, asoe io the 22 students who, Panamanian historians say, were ~~U.S. agents who armsted Noniegaarm] escorted him to the shot by U.S. security forces in the so-called flag United States four years ago after the U.S. invasion of sot of Jan. s y1964. riots of Jan. 9, 1964. Panama. Noriega was later tried and convicted on fedThe riots, one of the worst flashpoints in end drug charges and is serving a 40-year prison term. Panama's often-tense relationship with the United Federal prosecutors said De la Cova pleaded guilty to States this century, started after U.S. residents of charges of stealing $700,000 that money launderers the Panama Canal zone prevented Panamanian handed him last July while he was posing as a launderer. students from hoisting their flag there. They said he obeyed procedures and handed to his suThere was no violence at Sunday's demonstraperiors money the launderers gave him on three other tion. U.S. officials estimated about 150 people -AP LaPhwoo occasions. But on July 17,1993, he met secretly with the demonstrated peacefully outside the Quarry U.S. soldiers stand outside the gate of the Papal launderers and kept the cash. Heights bak gate Sunday. Nuncio where former Panamanian dictator Manuel De la Cova, who worked for the DEA in Florida, Noriega sought refuge during the 1989 invasion. A Panama and Colombia, will be sentenced in March. ProsBom b explodes near federal drug agent who arrested Noriega in 1989 ecutors are seeking a two-year sentence with no parole. pleaded guilty to trying to pocket $700,000 from Under a plea bargain, he also has to pay back the opposition office money launderers. money to the government. PANAMA CITY (Reuters) -A small bomb exploded Tuesday at an office of Panama's main opposition party, but there were no injuries and only The homemade explosive was detonated in the to '~ '~ eb e uu'r~~i~ ii early hours outside the empty Revolutionary negotiating to end rebel uprising residents MEXICO CITY (AP) -A government envoy met with Party, which has ruled Mexico since 1929 through a blend Ad margin a wall, PRD official Alberto church leaders in his first attempts to negotiate an end to of populism, repression and election fraud. a rebel uprising in southern Mexico. Soldiers, meanwhile, Camacho said his first goal was to establish "a truce tne PRD, which was the political arm of former advanced on the insurgent's positions near the Guatemaand then seek a dialogue that will bring peace and reconstrongman General Manuel Antonio Noriega's lan border. ciliation." He told a news conference Tuesday that he may e e esctio ntly leading polls ahead of In the poor southern state of Chiapas, Uoops were rewould travel to Chiapas "soon." Police spokesman Marcos Fernandez said it was portedly moving toward Guadalupe Tepeyac, a small The rebellion is already adding to the pain of the not known who placed the bomb and rejected town just north of the border where up to 500 rebels are people whose poverty and hardship it is intended to solve, rumours circulating in the capital of an imminent entrenched. although the rebels enjoy support. wave of political violence before the May 8 vote. Journalists who traveled Tuesday from the towns of The rebels have blocked the narrow dirt roads to its The election is intended to seal Panama's tranNuevo Momom to Las Margaritas, both in Chiapas, said strongholds with ditches and fallen trees. The army, too, sition from dictatorship to democracy following the army was advancing in that border region. Refugees is setting up roadblocks to help chase down the insurthe December 1989 U.S. invasion that ousted bucked the tide of incoming troops, trying to escape a gents. Noriega and brought the current government of possible clash. That means poor Mexican farmers in the region canNriend bro e t oern The rebels of the Zapatista National Liberation Army not sell what little they raise or buy what little they can said they would negotiate with the government if the miliafford. Colom bian tary stopped bombing, withdrew its soldiers and recog"What are we going to do? When our con is gone, we soldiers nied their movemenL won't have anything to live on," said Jose Antonio Pere d65 ske etons Otherwise, they threatened to carry the war to Mexico standing before the concrete water trough in Cruz del fin City, where bombings linked to the uprising that began Rosario, where men washed coffee beans and women BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) -Soldiers found the New Year's Day have put the government on alert and cleaned clothes. bullet-riddled skeletons of 65 people in a cave in a residents on edge. The village of 400 Mayan Indians, enclosed in a steep jungled mountain region of Colombia, the army The uprising began in Chiapas, 390 miles southeast of jungle valley, is already suffering from low coffee prices, said Tuesday. the capital. Rebels occupied towns for days, saying they bad roads and a lack of running water. That poverty creThe bodies were buried at least two years ago, were fighting for better living conditions and an end to ates sympathy for the rebels based a few miles away, deGen. Alfonso Ortega said. His soldiers found them the exploitation of Mexico's native Indians. spite the hardship caused by the conflict. in separate graves Monday near Landazuri village, They pulled back into hideouts in remote areas when The rebels "are fighting for the same causes, for our 105 miles north of Bogota. the army started to move in. Officials said 107 people people," said Gerardo Jimenez, standing nearby. Workers put the bones into plastic bags to be have died in the fighting. A rebel captain up the road gave a more ideological taken to a pathology lab, Deysi Agudelo, an offiIn the capital, newly appointed peace commissioner defense. cial from nearby Cimitarra. told a local radio reManuel Camacho Solis met with Roman Catholic lead"The enemy is the state, the oligarchy, monopolies," porter. The region, home to t xls from the Revoers from southern Mexico, including Bishop Samuel Ruiz said the rebel who called himself Capt. Noe, a young lutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, is one of the of San Cristobal de las Casas, an outspoken defender of farmer with two red stars on his brown shirt and an old most dangerous in Colombia. The rebels conduct indigenous rights. AK-47 rifle in his hands. periodic purges of suspected traitors and infor"It's necessary to rebuild the political process in the The rich, he says, "have always raised their level, mants in their ranks. region," said Camacho, who stepped down as foreign while the people are treated like garbage." Drug traffickers and right-wing death squads minister to take the job. "We'll have to find a dignified Except for sporadic skirmishes and the troop movealso operate in the area. political exit for all." ments, the region has been quiet since the weekend. The soft-spoken Camacho gained a reputation as a About 14,000 government soldiers are now stationed in Prisoner burned savvy negotiator while mayor of Mexico City. He is seen the state, far outnumbering the estimated 1,000 to 2,000 as a progressive within the Institutional Revolutionary rebels. in Brazilian riot SAO PAULO, Brazil (AP) -Inmates in an overP rtocrowded prison rioted Monday and burned a felPrison director fired after bloody jaiI ri low prisoner to death, accusing him of ollaboratCARACAS, Venezuela (AP) -The national prison di"He was displeased because I told the truth, that he ing with authorities, officials said. At least 54 inrector was fired Tuesday, a week after 109 people died in wasn't informed about the Venezuelan penitentiary sys makes wer injured. the bloodiest jail riot in Venezuela's history. tem," she said. Riot police with batons and attack dogs quelled Justice Minister Fermin Marmol Leon did not comAuthorities in Maracaibo, 440 miles west of Caracas, the uprising at the Cadeia Publica do Hipodromo ment on why he dismissed Dora Bracho Barreto, 56, a Venezuela, said the Jan. 3 riot was started by native prison in Sao Paulo's eastern outskirts. former criminal lawyer who became director of the 32Guajiro Indian inmates angerd by inmates -white and "Some 20 men were injured due to police bruprison system last year. blak. tality and dog bites," said Antonio Pereira, the Bracho Barreto told The Associated Press by phone On Jan. 4, national guardsmen shot and killed 11 of Sao Paulo deputy state secretary for penitentiary the minister was angry over comments she made while 40 prisoners escaping through a tunnel from Aragua ad ministration. The remaining 34 suffered minor testifying before Congress earlier Tuesday about the riot enitenti Center in Mray, eswest of the iap injuries. SMaacabo National Jail. ta.

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# li t yTropic Times Mihtay News Jan.14,1994 5 Aspin supports women-in-combat policy WASHINGTON (AP) -Defense Secretary Les Aspin has approved a new version of a policy designed to help open more jobs for women in ground combat units, a Pentagon spokeswoman said Tuesday. "We expect to be putting out the newly revised .ground combat definition, probably later this week. Certainly before Secretary Aspin leaves office, but probably later this week," Pentagon spokeswoman A Kathleen deLaski said at a Pentagon briefing. The step would be Aspin's last during a year-long tenure that has been marked by his efforts to expand opportunities for women. Last April, he moved to help open combat aviation jobs and warship assignments to females. The most lethal specialities and units in the Army and the Marine Corps that are used to search and destroy the enemy -such as infantry and armor units will not be affected by Aspin's new announcement, deLaski said. DeLaski declined to outline the exact changes Aspin is expected to announce. N1 But deLaski said Aspinis supportive ofthe new version because it had removed certain "ambiguities" in a draft policy that he ordered reviewed last week. Pentagon sources speaking on condition of anonymity said agreement has been reached with the services to more narrowly APtaserPhoto define the term "direct combat" in the U.S. soldiers stand in an honor guard with a Saudi soldier in a ceremony in Saudi Arabia during the Persian Gulf War. new version Defense Secretary Les Aspin has approved a version of a new policythat would open up more jobs for women in ground A previous draft had cast the definition combat units. in terms that could have been used by the services to exclude women even from was to have had the services define exactly accomplished after Aspin leaves office. for women in areas that are considered on some job categories they now hold, as well which jobs will be open to women, a sec"When you see this new definition, you the fringes of direct combat, such as engias potentially keeping them from jobs Asond source said. won't be able to say for certain which nearing jobs or air defense artillery units. pin had attempted to open to them, one "He wanted to nail it down. He just kinds of billets (jobs) will be open in which While women would not be in an engiPentagon source said. didn't have the time," the source said. areas. It's something that services will nearing unit that bulldoze through front "That was just stopped cold," the DeLaski noted that the services will have to take and then interpret. And that line berms and defensive trenches, it's source said. now have several months to study exactly is why we have to put this out," deLaski possible they could serve in units used to But Aspin also has not been able to which jobs will be affected by the new said. clear mines in occupied areas or to preachieve everything he had hoped to, which combat definition, something that will be But the change could open more slots pare defensive positions in advance. Tailhook scandal Navy flier can't avoid court martial WASHINGTON (AP) -A Navy flier charged with intestimony makes clear he full understood that the immudecent assault on a woman in the Tailhook scandal lost nity grant was limited to use of his statements. an attempt Tuesday to avoid court martial, although miliSamples' lawyer, Lt. David P. Sheldon, said he was tary judges found the Navy "careless and amateurish" in debating whether to ask the court for reconsideration on the case it brought against him. grounds it applied an incorrect standards. He has 10 days "'he assembly-line technique in this case that merged to make the appeal. and blurred investigative and justice procedures is Samples was on duty in Washington state and was not troublesome," said the U.S. Court of Military Appeals, reached for comment. the military's highest tribunal. The five-member appeals court was scathing in its asStill, the court ruled that Lt. David Samples has failed sessment of how the Navy handled the case. to establish that he was given full immunity for his acAs Samples was passed from one level of investigations at the rowdy 1991 aviators convention. Samples was tion to another, no official was particularly concerned granted a more limited "testimonial" immunity by Vice about his legal rights, the ruling said. Adm. J. Paul Reason in aletter, which constituted a prom"At each point along this route, petitioner stood alone, ise that he could not be prosecuted based on what he had without either his military or civilian defense counsel at told investigators. his side," the court ruled. "Why defense counsel permitSamples' court martial at the Norfolk, Va., naval base, ted such a situation is unexplained in the record." S 'the first stemming from the Tailhook convention, was At best, said the court "it reflects a most curiously stopped in October after the trial judge turned down the careless and amateurish approach to a very high profile s" immunity claim and Samples filed his appeal. case by experienced military lawyers and investigators. Last survivor of fam ous The appeals court ruled that "as a matter of law, "At worst, it raises the possibility of a shadiness in (Samples) is not entitled to invoke transactional immurespecting the rights of military members caught up in a war photo dies at 70 nity as a bar to his pending court-martial" and his own criminal investigation that cannot be condoned." ANTIGO, Wis. (AP) -John Bradley, the last survivor among the servicemen shown raising the U.S. Pregnant Somali killing raises questions flag on Iwo Jima in a famous World War II photograph, died Tuesday of a stroke. He was 70. MOGADISHU, Somalia (AP) -Two days after U.S. rectly on Sunday's shooting. Bradley, who served in the Navy as a pharmacist Marines apparently killed a pregnant Somali with a .50But he said Pakistani snipers use only smaller-caliber mate second class, helped five Marines raise the flag caliber rifle, a senior Pakistani peacekeeper questioned rifles in Mogadishu because of the danger that larger on Mount Suribachi on Feb. 23,1945. It was the first the use of heavy weaponry in a zone crowded with civilweapons present to any civilians close to the target. time an American flag had flown over Japanese terians. "The problem is once you use a heavy-caliber weapon ritory. Also Tuesday, the U.S. military command in Mogadthere's a possibility of the bullet going through and hitAssociated Press photographer Joe Rosenthal ishu completed its informal inquiry into the shooting and ting someone else," Tariq said. took the Pulitzer Prize-winning picture. It became concluded the Marines were not negligent and did not U.N. combat rules state that U.N. troops may fire at the model for the Iwo Jimra Memorial near Arlingexceed the U.N. rules for peacekeepers in Somalia. any Somali carrying a machine gun or other heavy ton National Cemetery in Virginia. Col. Tariq Salim Malik, who is Pakistan's longestweapon, but may only shoot someone carrying an assault serving commander in Somalia, declined to comment dirifle or other small arm if they feel directly thuatened.

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Tropic Times Jan. 14,1994 Voices Flood ditch causes concern Dear Mayors' Corner: The entire time I have been in the military I have been M y preached to about safety and I believe in it to the maximum. I can't see how anyone who is suppose to believe change doesn't carry my favorite color of eye shadow. in safety as much as those in the military do can overlook Something has happened recently that I feel I should one of the biggest safety hazards on Fort Clayton. complain about though. The safety hazard I am talking about is the flood ditch I have been trying to buy an infant car seat from the that runs through the 600 housing area. This housing furniture store on Albrook AFS for about one month. For area has a vast amount of children living and playing in a while they had car seats for small babies under 20 it, so why isn't there a fence along this ditch? pounds, but now they don't even have those. They Every time it rains, this ditch floods with very deep haven't had seats for toddlers for at least one month. Evand fast moving water. Lt's not wait for an accident to ery time I check, they tell me to come back next week. happen with one of these children before doing someThere isn't one infant car seat for sale anywhere on post thing about this safety hazard. It's like they always say that I am aware of. when an accident happens, it could have been prevented. Infant car seats should be a priority. They are not only So let's not wait until this can be said about this ditch. required by law, but are a necessity for the safety of baI don't live on post, but this ditch scares me every bies and toddlers. I'm a little upset and I want a car seat. time I cross the bridge that runs over it. I tell my wife that one day we will read in the newspaper about a child Priority One who was hurt in this ditch if there isn't a fence put up soon. Please check with your sources and find out what Dear Priority One: Brig. Gen. David A. Sawyer they say about this safety hazard. I checked with the Army and AirForce Exchange SerA Concerned Citizen vice and found that the warehouse was out of stock on various styles of infant car seats for almost three weeks. Dear Concerned: During this time, this merchandise was being ordered I submitted your letter to Richard Davis who is the consistently. chief of the Housing Division, Directorate of EngineerA shipment of containing all styles of car seats has ing and Housing. He wants you to know that your conarrived and is now being sold at the Main Exchange on cem about safety is also a concern of the command. Corozal. AAFES regrets the inconvenience this may As you travel through the 600 housing area on Fort have caused you and hopes that by now, you have been U Clayton, you will find fencing separating the drainage able to buy your car seat. ditches from the housing yards. Also, there is fencing by the foot bridge. It has been determined that along part of Editor's note:bis column allows community memthe stream away from the houses, fencing is not prudent. bers to submit questions to the Mayoral Congress. The Action Line is a direct link between Brig. Thank you for writing; it is always helpful to review Lettersshouldbemalledto: Mayors' Corner,Publicity Gen. David A. Sawyer, 24th Wing Commander, safety concerns. Chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS). Anonymity will and Howard AFB and Albrook AFS personnel. be granted upon request.The Tropic Times reservesthe If you have a question or problem that you Dear Mayors' Corner: right to edit letters and responses for brevity, clarity can't solve through normal supervisory channels, m n e te of p nho c ins en te and propriety. call the Action Line at 284-5849. Callers should commissary runs out of cream cheese or if the Post Ex -an _________________ leave a name, telephone number and mailing adess in case the question needs to be qualified. Gunwiedig rbb r n ts 45 m re Names will be kept confidential and used only to Gun-wielding robber nets $450, more d provide callers with a response. Robbed at gunpoint A soldier visiting Panama from Honduras was robbed S -Q. We've heard from the housing office that they at gunpoint while he sat in his rental car at El Dorado plant increase the janitorial feesdorm duesMall at about 7 p.m. this weekend. The thief took $450 Bike owners are encouraged to secure their property mat the unaccompanied senior NCO and officer's in cash, credit cards and the rental vehicle. Though El side at night to avoid becoming a victim of crme. Dorado Mall is usually not considered a high crime area Report suspicious activities to the MPs at 287-4401 or dormitories (Buildings 19 and 21 on Albrook.) I've to most people, military police advise those visiting the 289-5133. talked with several other residents there and we all mall to use caution. Unauthorized telephone calls agreed that we're already paying plenty for the serTo help avoid becoming avictim of erime when shopA person placed more than $700 in unauthorized long vices we receive. ping in the El Dorado Mall area, carry as little cash as distance telephone calls using a soldier's calling card Is there any way to ensure we don't have to pay possible, leave credit cards at home and take a bus or number. Make sure telephone and credit cards are kept increased dues for someone to hose down sidewalks, taxi instead of driving. safe at all times and report the loss of these items immereplace a few light bulbs, and dump a small amount If a victim of crime, call 287-4401 or 289-5133. diately. Thieves can charge large sums of money to these of trash? Exceeding established limitations accounts very quickly. Several arrests have been made recently for exceedDevil's Beach ing established limitations of controlled items. The U.S. Three people had more than $500 worth of unsecured Southern Command Contraband Control Section has repersonal property stolen while on Devil's Beach last Buildings 19 and 21 -there will be no increase in ported that some of the more commonly abused items weekend. This is considered a high crime area. If a viejantonal fees for either building. Because you said are beer, liquor and large appliances. tim of crime, call 287-4401 or 289-5133. your information came from the housing office, we Each household is allowed 10 cases of beer and eight The following crimes occurred in on-post housing aralso went back and provided them with the correct bottles of hard liquor each month. Large appliances such eas Dec. 31-Jan. 6. information. as refrigerators, stoves and microwave ovens are rePacific Billeting operates the janitorial service on a nonstricted to one of each item per 36 months. Fort Clayton 300 housing area -one larceny of secured profit basis and reviews the rate each year to ensure For more information, see U.S. Southern Command private property fairness. "Dorm dues" go toward paying the Regulation 1-19 or call 286-3303 or 289-3701. Fort Clayton 800 housing area -one larceny of unsejanitor's wages, as well as the employer's share of Secure bikes inside cured private property Panamanian social security taxes, sick and annual Many bikes have been stolen from housing areas reFort Clayton 1100 housing area -two larcenies of seleave, and workman's comnpensation. This procecently. Most of the stolen bikes were left outside either cured private property .. chained to a fixed object or left unsecured. MPs report Cocoli housing area -four larcenies of secured private dure is i accordance with Panamanian and U.S. that chaining bikes doesn't always keep thieves away. property code. This authorized unofficial command information pubDirector, Public Affairs.CoL James L Fetig Journalists.Sgt. Lori Davis lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Chief.SMSgt. Steve Taylor Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Editor.SSgt. Richard Puckett Spec. Alexander C. White Information Program of the Department of Defense, unSports Editor.Sgt E. J. Hersom 24th Wing Public Affairs Office.284-5459 der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S. Staff Editors.Spec. John Hall Public Affairs Officer.Capt. Warren L. Sypher Southern Command. Rosemary Chong Public Affairs Superintendent.MSgt. Dale Mitcham Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the Maureen Sampson Journalists.SSgt. Rian Clawson official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Volunteer Assistant.Josephine Beane Sgt. James A. Rush Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. Student Intern.Juan Carlos Palacio U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Southern Command Public Affairs Office.282-4278 Public Affairs Officer.Diane Gonzalez Telephone 285-6612. Command information Officer.Patrick Milton Photographers.PH2 Roberto R. Taylor Acting Commander in Chief. U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.287-3007 PH2 Delano J. Mays Maj. Gen. Walter T. Worthington Public Affairs Officer.Maj. Melanie Reeder U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.289-4312 Command Information Officer.Beth Taylor NCOIC.Sgt. Richard Emert Editor. SSgt. Jane Usero 1ropic limes

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Tropic Times 7 an. 14, 1994 7 Martin Luther King's dreary still rings true today by Janine Crowder sleep night after night in the uncomfortat the table of brotherhood. men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and USSOUTHCOM Public Affairs able corners of your automobile because "I have a dream that one day even the Catholics, will be able to join hands and no motel will accept you; when you are state of Mississippi, a state sweltering sing in the words of that old Negro the stories that my grandmother humiliated day in and day out by nagging with the heat of injustice, sweltering with spiritual, 'Free at Last! Free at last!' used to tell me were so vivid to signs reading "white" and "colored"; the heat of oppression, will be trans"Thank God almighty, we are free at my young mind, yearning for when your first name becomes "nigger" formed into an oasis of freedom and last!" knowledge, it would almost feel like I and your middle name becomes "boy" justice. Grandma said when she heard the was there with her. Some of the most (however old you are) and your last name "I have a dream that my four little speech, she knew there was hope for stirring were the ones about the writings becomes "John," and when your wife and children will one day live in a nation everyone. and speeches of Dr. Martin Luther King mother are never given the respected title where they will not be judged by the One of the last things she told me Jr. "Mrs."; when you are harried by day and color of their skin but by the content of about Martin, was in the last days of his One of those stories was about Martin haunted by night by the fact that you are their character. life, before the fatal shot rang out, she when he was in a Birmingham jail for a Negro, living constantly at a tip-toe "I have a dream today. said he had a premonition of his death, orchestrating sit ins at restaurants and stance, never quite knowing what to "I have a dream that one day, down in when he wrote the speech "I've been to not complying with the Laws of Jim expect next, and plagued with inner fears Alabama, with its vicious racist, with its the Mountain Top." Crow. He wrote, "We have waited for and outer resentments; when you are governor having his lips dripping with His voice filled with sadness, he more than 340 years for our constituforever fighting a degenerating sense of the words of innerposition and nullificabegan by saying, "Ralph Abernathy is my tional and God-given rights.but we still 'nobodiness'; then you will understand tion, one day right there in Alabama, best friend." creep at horse-and-buggy pace toward why we find it difficult to wait." little black boys and black girls will be Later in the speech he said, "Now, it gaining a cup of coffee at a lunch Grandma said when they went to able to join hands with little white boys doesn't matter, it really doesn't matter counter. Perhaps it is easy for those who church that Sunday, the preacher said, and white girls and walk together as what happens now." He described the have never felt the stinging darts of "Dr. King is a great man, he stands up sisters and brothers. bomb threats, about what would happen segregation to say, 'wait', but when you for our people. We all must lift our "I have a dream today. to him ".from some of our sick white have seen vicious mobs lynch your voices and stand proud." "I have a dream that one day "every brothers. Well," he said, "I don't know mothers and fathers at will and drown At the time Grandma was a domestic valley shall be exalted, every hill and what will happen now. We've got some your sisters and brothers at whim; when worker for a very prominent women in mountain shall be made low, the tough difficult days ahead. But it really doesn't you have seen hate-filled policemen Little Rock, Ark. She explained that she places will be made plain, and the matter with me now, because I've been to curse, kick, brutalize and even kill your didn't want to continue working for her, crooked places will be made straight, and the mountain top. Like anybody I would black brothers and sisters with impunity; but she was trying to raise a daughter on the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, like to live a long life. Longevity has its when you see the vast majority of your her own. She would cry at night and all flesh shall see it together. place. But I'm not concerned about that twenty million Negro brothers smotherwondering how she could help. "This is our hope. This is the faith now. I just want to do God's will. And ing in an air-tight cage of poverty in the Later on in the years to come she told that I go back to the South with. With He's allowed me to go up to the mounmidst of an affluent society; when you me about the speech Martin gave to a this faith we will be able to hew out the tain. And I've looked over. And I've suddenly find your tongue twisted and congregation that lifted the hopes of all mountain of despair and a trace of hope. seen the Promised Land. your speech stammering as you seek to concerned. The speech was his very With this faith we will be able to "And I may not get there with you, explain to your six-year-old daughter famous "I Have A Dream." Many of the transform the jangling discords of our but I want you to know tonight that we as why she can't go to the public amusewords still ring true today. nation into a beautiful symphony of a people will get to the Promised Land. ment park that has just been advertised ".I say to you today, my friends, so brotherhood. With this faith we will be So I'm happy tonight. I'm not worried on television, and see tears welling in her even though we face the difficulties of able to work together, to pray together, to about anything. I'm not fearing any little eyes when she is told that Funtown today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. struggle together, to stand up for freedom man. Mine eyes have seen the glory of is closed to colored children, and see the It is a dream deeply rooted in the together, knowing that we will be fire the coming of the Lord. I have a dream depressing clouds of inferiority begin to American dream. one day. this afternoon that the brotherhood-of form in her little mental sky, and see her "I have a dream one day this nation "Let freedom ring from every hill and man will become a reality. With this begin to distort her little personality by will rise up and live out the true meaning molehill of Mississippi. From every faith, I will go out and carve a tunnel of unconsciously developing a bitterness of its creed: 'We hold these truths to be mountainside let freedom ring. hope from a mountain of despair. With toward white people; when you have to self-evident; that all men are created "And when this happens, and when faith we will be able to achieve this new concoct an answer for a five-year-old son equal.' we allow freedom to ring, when we let it day." asking in agonizing pathos: 'Daddy, "I have a dream that one day, on the ring from every village and every hamlet, For an innocent man gunned down in why do white people treat colored people red hills of Georgia, sons of former from every state and every city, we will his prime, the name Dr. Martin Luther so mean?'; when you take a crossslaves and the sons of former slave be able to speed up that day when all of King Jr. still holds a lot of weight in my country drive and find it necessary to owners will be able to sit down together God's children, black men and white life and the lives of many other people. Direct Quotes If Martin Luther King Jr. was alive today what would he fight for? "Against prejudice." "(Against) Fighting "He would fight for "I guess he would fight "More for civil lights between white and blacks to stick tofor all people to be equal than anything else." black people -it's still gether." -the same as the around." '60s." SrA. Beth Yaskub Ricardo Torres Sgt. Eric Jackson Stacie Cumberbatch SSgt. Jose Concepcion 24th Operational Support Department of Defense 167th Combat Support Navy family member Company A, 154th Signal Squadron civilian Command (Forward) Battalion The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries -or responses to commentaries -to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

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8 Tropic Times Jan. 14, 1994 Local talent N applauded Theaters and Valent awarded for excellence by Maureen Sampson Tropic Times staff FORT CLAYTON -For the fifth year in a row, local performers were recognized as the best in the Army during the 1993 Forces Command Festival of the Performing Arts and Recreation Center Competition. United States Army South garnered 19 awards for entries by Valent Recreation Center, Pacific Theatre Arts Centre and Music and Theater-Atlantic. The annual competition judges 21 Army installations that compete in several categories in recreation center programming and the performing arts, according to Jerry Brees, USARSO Chief of Entertainment. Experts in music, theater and recreation visit each installation and judge the recreation center and music and theater programs, Brees said. This year's judges were Mary Alice Hodges and Philip Wayne, both former Army Entertainment and Recreation directors with years of experience in the performing arts and recreation. The judges rate the productions on originality, quality of acting, musical talent, direction, lighting, sets, creativity and choreography. Individual cast members are evaluated on talent, stage presence, singing/dancing/acting ability, appearance, stage movement and enthusiasm, Brees said. The Pacific Theatre Arts Centre's performance of the musical "Pippin" won 15 awards. Music and TheatreAtlantic's production of "The Sound of Music" won three awards. Of the awards given, USARSO received four in the top category "Best of Festival": *Top Recreation Center Programming-Valent Recreation Center for the cultural program "Panama at a Glance." *Best Musical Direction-Melanie Bales, "Pippin" *Best Choreography-Barbra Berger, "Pippin" *Best Costume Design-Barbra Berger, "Pippin" In the "Award of Excellence" category winners were: *Publicity and Promotion-Pacific Theatre Arts Cen* tre, "Pippin" *Installation Award-Pacific Theatre Arts Centre, "Pippin" *Best Musical Production-"Pippin" *Best Direction of a Musical-JoAnne Mitchell and DeparmeiioiDefensephotobyMaureenSampson Jerry Brees, "Pippin" Ken Millard and Robert Luttrell perform a scene from "Pippin," a show that received 15 awards in the *Best SetDesign-Jerry Brees, "Pippin" 1993 Forces Command Festival of the Performing Arts and Recreation Center Programming Competi*Best Lighting-Jerry Brees, "Pippin" tion *Best Leading Actress in a Musical-Heather Anderson as Catherine in "Pippin" *Best Supporting Actress in a Musical-JoAnne Mitchell as Berthe in "Pippin" *Best Leading Actor in a Musical-Robert Luttrell as Pippin in "Pippin" "Honorable Mentions" were awarded to: *Best Leading Actor in a Musical-Fred Bales as the Leading Player in "Pippin" *Best Supporting Actress in a Musical-Adrienne Miller as Fastrada in "Pippin" *Best Lighting Design-Steve Parker and Lee Thompson, "The Sound of Music" A "Special Citation" was awarded for the Ensemble Vocal Opening category to the cast of nuns in "The Sound of Music." Brecs attributes the success of the USARSO theater programs to the abundance of local talent. "It's unusual being in a foreign country and having such a melting pot of talent," Brecs said. "It's amazing that such a diverse group of people can come together in Central America with this type of experience-from singing, dancing and acting to set design." The winners will rec-, -ues ant certificates as well as command recognition at an awards ceremony 4:30 p.m Jan. 26 at Valent Recreation Center. Maj. Gen. G. A. Crocker will present the awards. A social hour with refreshments will follow the ceremony. The event is free and open to the public. The local theaters are already planning their 1994 competition entries. Music and Theater-Atlantic will perform the musical "Annie." Auditons for the show will be held at the Fort Davis Elementary School in late February. Pacific Theatre Arts Centre will perform the comedy "Opera Comique." Auditions will be held 7:30 p.m. March 15 and 16 at the theater in Curundu. Both shows lbeperformedforthepublicinMay. Cast members perform a musical number from "The Sound of Music."

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Tropic Times 0 Jan. 14,1994 Clayton Hospital advanced medicine by Dolores Do Mena USARSO Histonian FORT CLAYTON -Until the Clayton Hospital was constructed during World War II, hospital requirements ofthe armed forces were met by using the Panama Canal Company-operated Margarita Hospital on the Atlantic side and Gorgas Hospital on the Pacific side. The Fort Clayton Hospital represented a significant stage in the advancement of military medicine in the Panama Canal Zone. It also represented a significant stage in the separation of military and civilian hospitalization services, centralized during canal construction days and until World War II as a responsibility of the Canal Zone government. Until its construction, military personnel were forced Photo courtesy of the USA RSO History Office to rely upon civil authorities for hospital The Fort Clayton Hospital officially opened Sept. 6, 1943 with a staff of 31 officers, 55 nurses, one warrant officer and space and treatment. 278 enlisted men. Army officers were satisfied with this arrangement during canal construction tals was a strongly felt understanding that years before the United States entered into Army hospitals in the Canal Zone adand early post-construction days. Howthe Canal Zone hospital system could not war. More than a year elapsed between emitted several hundred patients for treatever, dissatisfaction rose with a situation fill the requirements of both civil and miliauthorization and action, mainly because ment taken off Army transports transiting under which a major Army command was tary establishments under the pre-World of requests for increased bed capacity. the Panama Canal enroute to the Pacific dependent upon civilian facilities for War 11 troop augmentation program. The hospitals were located on hills theater of war. medical and surgical service. Intermittent In 1939, the United States Congress apwhere they would have free circulation of The rapid demobilization of the Army informal discussions of Army hospital reproved appropriations to finance construeair from all directions. (They didn't have in late 1945 and early 1946 drastically requirements differing from those of the cation in support of canal defenses, to inair-conditioning). The Fort Clayton Hosduced the military hospital census. In nal had been taking place since 1922 The clude the construction of three hospitals: pital opened in 1943 with a normal capaearly 1946, Fort Clayton Hospital was ophospitalization of military personnel was a 528-bed hospital in the Curundu area ity of 700 beds, 100 emergency beds and a erating at a 25-bed capacity and Fort not free. The cost of maintaining soldiers (Fort Clayton), a 401-bed hospital at Fort potential expansion of an 200 more beds. Gulick at 15 beds. in civilian hospitals was charged to the Gulick (now Espinar) and a 60-bed hospiThe peak year for Canal Zone military The Fort Clayton Hospital (Building Army. By 1939 the cost to treat personnel tal on the west bank of the Pacific at Bruja hospitals was 1944, both in number ofpa519) is now reduced to a clinic and office at Gorgas had risen to $233,391. Point (Fort Kobbe). tients and size of staffs. After the defeat of building and Gorgas Hospital became an A significant factor in the support of The order to go ahead with construeGermany, soldiers were redeployed from Army-ran establishment on Treaty Day, the Army's desire to have its own hospition ofthe Army hospitals was issued three Europe to the Pacific. Oct. 1, 1979. Mobile Force soldiers celebrate Panama Day FORT CLAYTON -The following are significant Heights announces the promotion of 41 captains and across the isthmus aboard two Sixth Air Force transWorld War l events that took place in January 1944: lieutenants. port planes. De la Guardia and his party are the first administrative officials of any Latin American governJan. 2 Jan. 16 ment to view jungle training demonstrations. Back The 126th Infantry and elements of the 32nd Infantry Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower assumes duties as Suon the Pacific side the party observed various displays Division make a successful amphibious landing at Saidor, preme Commander, Allied Expeditionary Force. of all types of infantry and artillery weapons at a New Guinea. range, presided a review and attended a reception at Jan. 17 the Fort Clayton Officers' Club. Jan.5 Former newspaper staffer, Col. Charles D. Carle, Three Panama Canal Department captains are succeeds Col. Thos B. Woodburn, as Adjutant GenJan. 29 promoted to the rank of major. The officers are: eral of the Caribbean Defense Command. Carries The Coast Artillery Command announces the adCharles W. Anthony, stationed at Quarry Heights, served duty with the 33rd Infantry at Fort Clayton vancement in grade ofthree sergeants, one staff sergeant, Alfred L. Harrigton, stationed at Corozal and between 1931 and 1934. and 10 new enlisted to noncommissioned grades. Frederick W. Walsmith, previously stationed at Fort Clayton and now at Quarry Heights. Jan. 20 Jan. 30 A group of Brazilian airmen, bound for active duty on The War Department announces that total Army caPanama Canal Company Governor Maj. Gen. the European fighting front arrive at Orlando, Fla., for sualties in the war to date are 106,320. Of that number Glen E. Edgerton, President of the Canal Zone Chapfinal training with the U.S. Army. 17,018 are killed, 39,658 wounded, 24,229 missing and ter of the American Red Cross, presents service rib25,415 taken prisoner. bon bar awards to volunteer workers. Jan. 6 President Franklin D. Roosevelt tells Congress that the Jan. 22 Jan. 31 United States has contributed $18,608,000,000 to the AlThe Allies achieve complete surprise in an amphibiU.S. forces land on Carter, Cecil, Carlson and lies through Lend-Lease programs. ous assault along the beaches near Anzio, Italy, in a move Carlos Islands in the Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Isto outflank the German defensive positions across central lands, (secured Feb. 7). Jan. 10 Italy. Because of the decreasing civilian population, plans The Caribbean Defense Command announces the are under way to close Canal Zone commissaries at promotion of five captains of the Sixth Air Force Jan.25 noon. Fighter Command to major. They are: Max Weiner, Mobile Force headquarters announces that PanaThe road from Tivoli Crossing in Ancon to Corozo Edgar M. Ewing, Walter A. Hammannn, Jr., Jim C. manian President Adolfo de la Guardia will review Street in Balboa is completed and designated Lagos, and William P. Maynard. seven provisional battalions of Mobile Force troops at Roosevelt Avenue. a special ceremony as the climax of "Panama Day." The Air Terminal building at Albrook Field is comJan. 12 -The review, the largest of its kind held on the isthmus pleted. The new terminal is one of the first air condiU.S. Army authorities announce that two infantry in the last few months, will be held on the morrow at tioned buildings on the isthmus. soldiers (Jesus Rivera and Enrique CalderonMiller Meld(nowJarmanField),FortClayton. The Canal Zone starts a campaign to raise Franquis of Puerto Rico) stationed at Corozal died as $2,000,000 as part of the Fourth War Bond Loan. a result of gunshot wounds during a quarrel in the viJan. 26 cinity of Camp Paraiso. "Panama Day" -the most elaborate Army proEditor's note: This time line was compiled by gram ever put on locally for a civilian audience -was Dolores De Mena, USARSO historian, in commemoJan. 14 celebrated by soldiers of the Mobile Force. Te PresiPanama Canal Department, Headquarters Quarry dential party was greeted at Albrook Field and flown ration ofthe 50th Anniversary ofWWI.

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IO T'cprc T'imes 10 n 14,1994Mlestones To Chief Warrant Officer Two -Rafael Colon of 310th Military Intelligence Battalion. To Sergeant First Class -Rhett Neilson, Dean lavocone and Anthony Scott, all of 310th Military Intelligence Battalion. Matthew Malanowski of Company D, Military Intelligence Battalion (Light). P To Staff Sergeant -Jason Dore and Gary Goldsberry, both of 308th Military Intelligence Battalion. Orlando Baez of3lOth Military Intelligence Battalion. Richard Johnson, Jose Gonzales, William Palenik, Jude Rabago and Preston Scull, all of Company D, Military Intelligence Battalion (Light). To Sergeant -Adrienne Johnson of Company B, 193rd Support Battalion. Lancelot Ottley of 3rd Special Operations Support Command (Airborne). John Pool of 308th Military Intelligence Battalion. Kenneth Lanoue of 408th Military Intelligence Company. Jeffrey Milos of 310th Military Intelligence Battalion. Travis Bridges of 747th Military Intelligence Battalion. To Corporal -Demetrius Robinson of 308th Military Intelligence Battalion. To Specialist -Tara Nix, Kenneth Holcomb and Sara Rosenfield, all of 308th Military Intelligence Banalion. Mykal Duffy of 408th Military Intelligence Company. Dexter Washer and Melvin Coates, both of 310th Military Intelligence Battalion. Stephen A Barrieault and Joseph Moroschak, both of Company D, Military Intelligence Battalion (Light). Military awards Meritorious Service Medal -Lt. Col. Nancy Woolnough of U.S. Army Medical Activity -Panama. Capt. Phillip Miller of Headquarters Company, 470th Military Intelligence Brigade. Capt. Janice Stone and sr yr CW 2 Linda Davies, SSgt. Lorenzo Albino, all of U Ay by gt. J U 747th Military Intelligence Battalion. CWO 4 James Chalk and SSgt. William Santiago, both of Company Sgt. Alex Richardson was selected as the Noncommissioned Officer of the Month for the 193rd D, Military Intelligence Battalion (Light). Support Battalion for December. Army Commendation Medal -1st Lt. William Wolf 0 telligence Battalion (Light). and Spec. Manuel Lopez, both of Headquarters Detachment, 470th Military Intelligence Brigade. SSgt. Sgt. Alex Richardson of Headquarters Company, 193rd James Dolen, SSgt. Jeffrey Neal and Spec. David First Sergeant Course -SFC Beatrice Perkins of Support Battalion, was selected Noncommissioned OfEastman, all of 747th Military Intelligence Battalion. 308th Military Intelligence Battalion. ficer of the Month and Spec. Michael Brazeel of 1097th SSgt. Brian Miers of 408th Military Intelligence ComTransportation Company, 193rd Support Battalion, pany. Sgt. David Fritts and Spec. Daniel Kemp, both Advance Noncommissioned Officers Course -SSgt. was selected Soldier of the Month for the battalion. of Company D, Military Intelligence Battalion (Light). Ernest Lott of 308th Military Intelligence Battalion. Sgt. Arthur Hare, Sgt. Mark Ness, Sgt. Lyman Ross SFC Chester Brown of 310th Military Intelligence BatCivilian awards and Spec. Shae Rook, all of3l0th Military Intelligence talion. Battalion. Years of Service -30 years: Edward Jones of U.S. Basic Noncommissioned Officers Course -SSgt. JaArmy Medical Activity -Panama. 25 years: Norma Army Achievement Medal -SSgt. Enrique Gordon, son Dore and Sgt. Scott Finley, both of 308th Military Cohen of U.S. Army Medical Activity -Panama. 20 Sgt. Reginald Johnson, Sgt. Cheryl Lyles and Sgt. Intelligence Battalion. SSgt. Orlando Baez of 310th years: Hildebrando Luna, Ninfa Muir and Dalys Wong, Rodney Mayo, all of Headquarters Company, 193rd Military Intelligence Battalion. all of U.S. Army Medical Activity -Panama. 10 years: Support Battalion. PFC Robert Schonfelder of ComPeregrina Gonzalez and Felipe Nino, both U.S. Army pany B, 193rd Support Battalion. Capt. Lynne Roy of Spanish Immersion -SSgt. David Lenning of 310th Medical Activity -Panama. 5 years: Marga Rodriguez U.S. Army Medical Activity -Panama. SSgL Kevin Military Intelligence Battalion. and Nike Nightingale, both of U.S. Army Medical AcHanson of Headquarters Detachment, 470th Military tivity -Panama. Intelligence Brigade. CWO2 Jerry Hoffman, SSgt. Florida State University -SFC Craig Linghor and Michael Hessler, SSgt. Stephen Kleppe and SSgL Jose SSgt. Francis Hernandez, both of 310th Military IntelSustained Superior Performance Award -Sonia Mendez, all of 310th Military Intelligence Battalion. ligence Battalion. Britton, Dalcy Cubilla, Shiela Duarte, Alexaader Spec. Mykal Duffy and Spec. Anthony Giambruno, Egudin, Gloria Foster, Ana Gonzalez, Manuel Guerra, both of 408th Military Intelligence Company. Special events Elisa Icaza, Marie Melara, Cecilia Negron, Yolanda Parfait, Jorge Rivera, Ruth Testa, Dolores Urena and Certificate of Achievement -1st Lt. Karl Konzelman Headquarters Company, U.S. Army South, earned the Patricia Walters, all of MEDDAC -Panama. of Headquarters Company, 193rd Support Battalion. Commanding General's Physical Training Streamer SSgt. Mervin Jones, SgL Lee King, Spec. Josh Spenlast month with an average score of 260.69. Scoring Promotion -Dalvis Urriola, Arnulfo Davidson, Ebba cer, PFC Carl Emerson and PFC Wade Morgan, all of the maximum PT score of 300 points were Maj. Gen. Rossan and Ines Delgado, all of U.S. Army Medical Company A, 193rd Support Battalion. SSgt. James George Crocker, Col. David Goodwillie, Col. Donald Activity -Panama. Barthelemy, Sgt. Donald McQueen, Spec. Eddy Holzwarth, Lt. Col. Howard Humble, Lt. Col. Donald Gillespie, Spec. Thomas Moore and Spec. Mark Utrata, Evans, Maj. Vern Abdoo, Maj. Dennis Harms, Maj. Retired -Juan Michineau of U.S. Army Medical Acall of Company B, 193rd Support Battalion. Spec. Carlos Vega, 2nd Lt. Matthew Ingram, SFC Pablo tivity -Panama. David Eastman of 747th Military Intelligence BanalMiranda and SSgt. Fernando Vasquez. ion. Spec. Jeffery Powers, Spec. Angel Newhart and Quality Step Increase -Sue Crespo, Vicente Sanger, Spec. Sonya Sheffler, all of Headquarters Detachment, Military Intelligence Battalion (Light) Vigilant Hunter Lilibeth Langoni and Cecilia Song, all of U.S. Army Military Intelligence Battalion (Light). Award -Sgt. David Boyd of Company D, Military InMedical Activity -Panama.

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Sports Jan.14, 1994 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 11 Atlantic MPs win tourney FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Atlantic) -The 549th Military Police Company fired its way to the top spot in I company-level basketball play here Sunday. After downing the 69th Signal Company 61-51, the Atlantic community's 549th MP Company stood as the company level champions in U.S. Army South. The MPs were confident going into the first game against Fort Clayton's 69th Signal Co. They lost, but it couldn't sway that confidence. "I wasn't worried going into the second geme, because I knew we hadn't played the first one the way we should have,"saidAubeyA. Taylor, pointguard forthe 549thMP Co. "Weknew what we had to do to win the second game." The69thSignalCo.isonlythesecondteamtodefeatthe 549th MP Co. "We had played them in the playoffs and thought we knew what to expect," Taylor said. "But in the first game Sunday, we played a whole different team. They hit us with things they didn't seem to have before," Taylor said. Butinthelasthalfofthesecondgame,itwasenergyand willpowerthat steeredthechampionship toward the 549th. "We started to key in on their best shooter andjust run them down," Taylor said. "They were fatigued with half of the last game left," he said. The MPs credit team work for their victory in the championship. "We work real well together and play as a team," said Abner Jackson, also a point guard for the 549th MP Co. "We've got a lot of good players and the team is balanced," Jackson said. Army teams sight transisthmian win FORTCLAYTON(TropicTunes)-"Idon'tthnkwe' l win this year's tranisthnian female category, I know we will win," said Sue Bozgoz, coach of the female Army Transisthian team U.S. Army South Ladies. There are six females returning from the past year's 10miler team and fournew members Lisa Hudon, GloriaLee, Michelle Digruttolo and Ethenia Tores grace the team. "All are capable of running under a 6 minute 45 second mile pace," Bozgoz said. The other teammembers are Debbie Wesloh, Norma Alderete, Mary Booth, Laura Landers, Ethenia Torms, Genoveva Ifill, Torrey Spearman and Linda Fischer. The USARSO Ladies came in second in 1993 to the Panamanianteam the Road Run Hers. "This year, we have more talent, dedication and motivation. There's no doubt in my mind we'll win," Bozgoz said. In the men's division, the USARSO Striders is theteam to beat, said Striders' coach Willie Moye. The Striders have outdistanced the Air Force team two years in a row, Moye said. "We have conditioned our bodies with hard training. The distance speed and hill workouts will pay off," Moye said confidently. There are four 10-miler team members returning to the Striders this year and the team is well disciplined. "We U.s. AM Force Photo knowwhat'sneedtosucceedandwe'reready,"Moyesaid. Easy kill The Striders are Robert Czech, Hurchel Williams, Douglas Davis, Jose Haro, Enrique Gordon, William William Robinson, 24th Mission Squadron, ducks a24th Medical Squadron's Steve Richardson spike Segars,RalphGaines,ScottDigruttolo,Corey Smallwood, during playoffs at Howard AFB. The 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry, is league champion. Nelson Marcano and Robert Neske. Albrook Little League season opens The Air Force's KimberyTyler makes *Intramural golf doors to World Series possibilities the finals on USA Network's Ameri*Transisthmian Relay set for its all stars. can Gladiators. +SCN radio sports

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Tropic Times 12Jan. 14,1994 Albrook Little League starts ALBROOK (Tropic Times) -Little LeaguestartedSaturdayherewith27teams and 378 children competing fora chance to go all the way to Williamsport, Va., for the Little League World Series. This year, the Little League falls under a Panamanian district, which gives the little leaguers their chance, said Vince Duncan, sports director at the Albrook and Howard Youth Centers. "Above all, our program is to teach our kids how to play baseball and how to have fun," Duncan said. Coaches are already starting to pick the children who will represent the Albrook league in the Panama Province playoffs. The winner of the province will play againstotherprovince winners forthecountry title. From there, the winner goes to the Latin American championships in Puerto Rico, Duncan said. Each of the provinces have around 30 teams that will be competing. The road will be tough, he said. Theleaguedoesn'tkeepwin-lossrecords for the teams, but the competition is still there, he said. "The kids will find a way to be competitive. Every kid in uniform gets to play. "Competition in the program is part of life but our coaching staff is dedicated to teaching sportsmanship first," he said. .Deparnwt of Defense photo by Sgt. E.J. Hersom Ed McIlvaine, the Braves coach, said Joey Pestly takes a swing for the Philes he's coaching at Albrook this year because "My son was involved in the soccer for it," McIlvaine said. Each team has a team Mom. he was impressed with the soccer league league and it was a very good program. Mothers are also involved in Albrook "They're the backbone of each team," here. When I gotthechanceto coach here, I went little league, Duncan said. he said. rL Coming soon The El Caiman passes Miraflores Locks during the Panama Canal District Boys Scouts of America's Explorer Ocean to Ocean Cayuco Race in 1993. For this year's race registration information, call 252-6376, 252-5733 or attend a meeting 7:15 p.m. Jan. 27 at the Panana Canal Commission Training Center.

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Tropic Times Jan. 14,H19941 Adrian Klasovsky clears 5 feet in the high jump. eparnmtofDafese photo bySgt E.J. Hrsm Bulldogs win track opener BALBOA (Balboa HighSchool)-Coach CleveOliver's 16'9 1/2" 4,OrtizCougarsl6'41/2"5, Novosny,Bulldogs 15'9" Green Devils 5, Trim, Red Machine. Times unavailable Balboa Bulldogs varsity track team wonthefirstinterschoGirls shot put -1,Singleton, Bulldogs, 273 1/2",2, Bunch, Girls 400 meter relay -1, Green Devils, Cedeno, Stargen, plastic league track mee at the Balboa igh School tck Cougars 26 7 3/4" 3, Stanford, cougars 24' 1/4" 4, Cooper, Red Rosales, Short, 1:02.922,RedMachine, Ward, Cooper, Moreno, he Jag 7 hMachine 23'4 1/4" 5, Valdilles, Green Devils, 22' 5 3/4" Armstrong, 1:02.973, Bulldogs, Daniel, Washington,Petitiford, here Jan. 7. Boys shot put -1, Guttierrez, Bulldogs, 36'5" 2, Gonzales, McLean, 1:04.26 Bulldog female competitorTracy Singleton led the way Green Devils, 34' 3 1/2" 3, Stanford, Red Machine 32' 3" 4, Boys 400 meter relay -1, Red Machine, Soto, Lovejoy, for the winners, bringing in three firsts and a second for 22 Hemandez, Red Mahcine, 31'2" 5, Abrego, Red Machine 28' 5 Delgado, Trim, 51.72 2, Green Devils, Gozales, Sweeney, of the Bulldogs' 107 points. 1/2" Olivares, Watanabe, 53.47 3, Bulldogs, Klasvosky, Novotny, Panama Canal College Green Devils earned 89 points BoysDiscus-1, Gozales, GreenDevils, lOG 1"2,Yoshimowo, Guttierrez, 53.88 and second place with Amy Epperson, Evan Davis and Bulldogs 92' 4" 3, Guttierrez, Bulldogs, 91' 8 1/2" 4, Stanford, Luis Gonzales each contributing 14 points. Red Machine, 87 7" 5 Abrgo, Red Machine 84' 11 Boys polevault -1,Watanabe, Green Devils, 9'6" 2, Austin, The following are the individual junior varsity rests The Red Machine came in third with 83 points. Bruce Bulldogs, 8'3, Novotny, Bulldogs, 7 6" 4, Davis, Green Devils, from Jan. 7: Chastain broughtin20points forthe squad withthreefirsts 7 Girls long jump -1, Wilson, Green Devils 11' 4 1/2" 2, and a fourth. The Curundu Cougars took fourth with 35 Girls 55 meter low hurdles -1, Singleton, Bulldogs, 9.75 Valdilles, Green Devils, 9'6 1/2" 3, Yelverton, Green Devils, 9' points. Daniel Ortiz brought in 15 of those points. 2, Epperson, Green Devils, 10.68 3, Petitiford, Bulldogs, 14.27 4" 4, Jordan, Chame, 8' 9" 5, Hefft, Chame, 6' 5 1/2" Chame school made their first appearance atameetthis 4, Stargen, Green Devils, 14.57 5, Daniel, Bulldogs, 14.4 Boys longjump -1, Lovejoy, Red Machine, 152, Schwan, yearandeamed7points-allbyKarlySchwan, whotook Boys 110 meter high hurdles -1, Yoshismoto, Bulldogs, Chame, 13'8 1/2" 3, Erdman, Green Devils, 13'9" 4, Tremblay, ir ind teae 7 19.22 2, Soto, Red Machine, 19.71 3, Perez, Red Machine, Cougars, 8 1/2" 5, Robertson, Red Machine, 11' first i the girls 800 meter run. 21.36 4, Goodno, Bulldogs, 21.94 Discus -1, Goodman, Chame, 717" 2, Alexander, Cougars, Performances that bestedlast year'srecords wereBnsce Girls 100 meter dash -1, Bamett, Bulldogs, new record 51' 2 1/2" 3, Robertson, Red Machine, 49' 11" Chastain's long jump of 19 feet 5 1/2inches, Evan Davis' 13.2 2, Cedeno, Green Devils, time unavailable 3, Daniel, Girls shot put -1, Cedeno, Green Devils, 19' 5" 2, Wilson, fourminute 56 second1600 meterrun andAndreaBarnett's Bulldogs, 13.63 4, Atherly, Cougars, 14.03 5, Epperson, Green Green Devils, 17 1 3/4" 3, Chapman, Chame, 16' 5 1/2" 13.2 seconds 100 meter dash breaking her own record. Devils, 14.1 Boys shot put -1, Goodman, Chame, 35 3" 2, Alexander, Inthejuniorvarsitycegoy,theGreenDevilstookfirst Boys 100 meter dash -1, Chastain, Red Machine 11 2, Cougars, 24'9" 3, Robertson, Red Machine 23' 5" withejpntrrsifollowed by Chame school with 47 points, Martinelli, Red Machine, 11.76 3, Olivares, Green Devils, Boys 55 meter low hurdles -1, Schwan, Chame, 9.61 2, with 61 points 11.93 4, Petitford, Cougars, 12.6 5, Trim, Red Machine 12.63 Tremblay, Cougars, 9.9 3, Erdman, Green Devils, 10.19 4, the Red Machine with 36 points, the Cougars with 22 Boys 1600 meter run -1, Davis, Green Devils, new record Deleon, Green Devils, 11.67 points and the Bulldogs with 16 points. 4:56 2, Lee, Red Machine, 5:25.88 3, Sweeney, Green Devils, Girls 100 meter dash -1, Short, Green Devils, 14.2 2, Tonight, Curundu will host the second league meet at 5:30.97 4, Galvez, Cougars, 5:34.6 5, First, Bulldogs, 5:49.56 Washington, Bulldogs, 14.623, Moreno, Red Machine, 15.014, the Balboa track. Field events will begin at 5:30 p.m. Girls 400 meter dash -1, Epperson, Green Devils, 1:11.62 Jordan, Chane, 15.55 5, Yelverton, Green Devils, time unavailSpectators and volunteer officials are welcome to attend, 2, Mclean 1:18.25 3, Bamett, Bulldogs, 1:22.11 4, Cedeno, able officials said. Green Devils, 1:22.38 5, Bunch, Cougars, 1:27.24 Boys 100 meter dash -1, Perez, Red Machine, 12.07 2, Theolloing m i dBoys400meterdash1,Ortiz,Cougars,55.562,Yoshimoto, Lovejoy, Red Machine, 12.15 3, Tremblay, Cougars, time The following am the individual varsity results from Bulldogs, 56.19,3,Guttierre, Bulldogs, 58.024, Chastain, Red unavailable Jan. 7: Machine, 58.29 5, Abrego, Red Machine, 59.84 Boys 800 meter run -1,SchwanChame,2:46.282,Deleon, Girls high jump -1, Cooper, Red Machine, 4; 2" 2, Girls 800 meter run -1, Schwan, Chame, 256.34 2, Green Devils, 3:37.52 Singleton, Bulldogs, height unavailable 3, McLean, Bulldogs, 4' Mclean, Bulldogs, 3:06.46 3, Wilson, Green Devils, 3:08.8 4, Girls 400 meter dash -I,Turk, Bulldogs, 1:19.22, Stargen, 4, Rosales, Green Devils, 38" Valdilles, Green Devils, 3:08.8 5, Davis, Green Devils, 3.31.32 Green Devils, 1:22.61 3, Valdilles, Green Devils, 1:24 4, lefft, Boys high jump -1, Novotny, Bulldogs 5' 6" 2, Ortiz, Boys 800 meter run -1, Davis, Green Devils, 2:19.75 2, Chame, 1:41.36 5, Stanford, Cougars, 1:45.86 Cougars 5 5" 3, Klasovsky, Bulldogs 5 2" 4, Martinelli, Red Ortiz,Cougars,223.963,1Lee,Red Machine,2:26.664,Sweeney, Boys 400 meter dash -1, Goodman, Chame, 1:05.18 2, Machine 5 2" 5, Erdman, Green Devils, 4' 10" Green Devils, 2:29.03 5, Stanford, Red Machine, 2:31.55 Erdman,GreenDevils, 1:14.533, Deleon, GreenDevils, 1:26.94 Girlslongjump-1,Singleton,Bulldogs, 131 1/2"2,Ward, Girls209 meters ash1, Barnett, Bulldogs, 30.752, Short, Girls 200 meter dash -1, Washington, Bulldogs, 32.66 2, Red Machine, 12' 5" 3, Barnett, Bulldogs 12' 1/2" 4, Bunch, Green Dcvils, 31.45 3, Eppcrson, Green Devils, 31.97 4, Moreno, Red Machine, 35.15 3, Jordan, Chame, 36.26 4, Cougars, 11'5, Schwan, Chame, 10' 11" Choocherd, Red Machine, 36-46 Yelverton, Green Devils, 37.91 Boyslongjump1,Chastain,Red Machine, new record 19' Boys 200 meter dash -1, Chastain, Red Machine 2, Boys 200 meter dash -1, Perez, Red Machine, 2.2 5 1/2"2, Martinelli, Red Machine, 17'7"3,Petihiford, Cougars Martinlli,R Machine3,OlivacesGcccnDcvils3,Wasnabe, 2, Tremoblay, Cougars, 29.55 3, Deleon, GCrcc.e Devs, 35.25

PAGE 14

14 Tropic Times lYJan. 14, 1994 An American Gladiator in Panama by Sgt. E-J. Hersorn events, but met for the show's finals, which has already the gladiators are jumping with us -smacking us, Tropic Times Sports Editor been taped. kicking us, doing all kinds of stuff. Fortunately, we were Tyler was in Panama on temporary duty when her allowed to defend ourselves during the games K imberly Tyler was a cut-the-grass-with-a-wheelshalf of regular season aired in November. Tropic Times: Every once and while, there's a new that-spin-the-mower-blades-type tomboy who She is here again TDY working at Howard AFB as event that pops up on the American Gladiators. Are the chased her dog endlessly around a pond. an aerospace physiologist, but will be back at Beale games getting harder? The youngest of six in a nowhere town's only black when the championship airs Feb. 26. Tyler: This new season they have made it tougher family, Tyler graduated from Northmoore High School The following are excerpts from a Tropic Times they say, and I can say that because I can feel it. in Bellville, Ohio, a four-time state track champion on interview with Tyler. Tropic Times: What was the hardest new event? full scholarship to Ohio State. She left college in her Tropic Times: Who was the toughest gladiator you Tyler: They have a new event called the Whiplash. third year as a Big Ten champion in the triple jump and faced? You have two triangles put together at the vertex. joined the Air Force. Tyler: They have a new one. Her name is Jazz. Basically, you try to yank the gladiator out of a circumShe left college because of its limitations, she said. She's very tough and very determined.I guess because ference. At the same time they're trying to stay in. As She was used to being involved in student government she's new and wants to make a name for herself. And big as they are. you can imagine. They yanked us and winning in all types of track events and the Ohio Siren, the one that's deaf. She goes all out. She'll run, around like rag dolls. I had Siren at one point and I State coaching staff had limited her to triple jump and pull you, yank you right off the platform. Both of them yanked her right out, but not right away of course. long jump. Being "Super Kim" like she was in high are very competitive and they hate to lose. Especially Tropic Times: Do you think that the producers knew school was what she wanted more of, she said. Siren. I kicked her butt in the pyramid. She got me back that you and Odita would make it to the finals? Tyler proved herself super again when she made it to real good though. Tyler: I think they had a pretty good idea. Our the finals on USA Network's American Gladiators Tropic Times: Some of the events get very physical, shows were taped next to each other's. They edited a lot. where she put her 5' 7" 140-pound frame against the what was your best? They never showed a shot where Peggy and I were toughest women the TV network could find. Tyler: Slingshot. It has this long pole suspended together. Peggy and I were going into the championHer commander at the 9th Medical Group at Beale from the ceiling with all these little nerf balls velcroed ships rounds and when I was done with the eliminator, AFB, Calif., granted her the excess leave she needed to all along. They have red, blue and yellow each worth Peggy's round was right after mine. I got my interview try out, compete and keep the prize money. different points depending on how high you get. So done, put my regular clothes on, dried off, jumped into Tyler met a familiar face during the tryouts for the we're on platforms with gladiators on the corners the front row of the audience and I was standing there show, Peggy Odita, a Nigerian born athlete who roamed forming an X. We bungee down to the floor and jump clapping like I hadn't done anything the whole day. I the same track competitions back in Ohio, she said. up and try and get these little things and suspended in guess on TV they'll say 'Here's Kim Tyler, she won her Odita and Tyler had never competed in the same the air, we try and get back to our platforms. Meanwhile final round for the first half last week.' Now when I watch the show and I see some guy or girl clapping for another contestant, I can laugh. Tropic Times: Were the Fr gladiators fun to hang around with? Tyler: They were friendly. The show put us up at the Sportsmans Lodge Hotel downtown. Most of the gladiators were there too because, believe it or not, their homes are not in LA. The hotel had an Olympic-size pool and we would go out there and play around the pool. Not all the time, because they also have fraternization rules. They get paid by how many wins they get. Plus they're supposed to be mean to us on the show so they don't want to show favoritism. I was the same way when I was competing. I was like, 'Iley every man for himself. If your going to hit me in the head with that stick, look out.' Tropic Times: Did any of it scare you? Tyler: I was never intimidated by the gladiators. That was never a problem because I was used to competing. I was small compared to them and I was just as strong AV as they were. They were shocked. I was undefeated in a lot of events -the joust, the big Q tip. I kicked butt in that. The Sky Track was -my biggest fear. Hanging upside down. I mean, when they took the platform from underneath us, the only thing keeping us from hitting the ground was a little SHcable that we were suspended on. That was pretty scary, but I had to 33 get used to it. Looking up there, it doesn't look that high. But when you get up them and your just dangling like a little spider, you think 'Is this going to hold me.' Tropic Times: What drives you to do these physical things? Tyler: In the back of my mind, there's a thought. Is it still there? Is there still another accomplishment that I could do? Somewhere within, I feel like there's something else. Even if I wasn't running track for the Air Force, I'd still stay in shape. Even before the gladiators, I was still working out. Just in case something comes along, I'll be ready. That's how I am. I still feel like there's more and I'm just waiting for it to fall in my lap. Depar5t-tfDfense otoby~qgFt H-~om 'I lings just kind tof happen by Kimberly Tyler, a finalist on USA Network s American Gladiators, strikes a pose pp and I just kind of grah 'em.

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Tropic Times 1 Jan. 14, 1994 Im daily, weekly or weekend rates. Several specials are being ranthroughout January. Thecenterwill beclosed Tuesday. For more information, call 284-6107. Fishing charters Trophy deep-sea and Sunskiff bottom fishing charters are available at the Rodman Marina. Charters include captain, fishing gear, cooler and ice. Call the marina at 283-3147 or 283 3150 for more information. Free aerobics The Reeder Physical Fitness Center has free aerobics given by Teresa Consterdine 9:15 am.10:15 am. weekdays. Each workout has a warm-up, cardiovascular workout, cool down and floorwork. Call 287-3861. No-tap bowling The monthly no-tap bowling tournament begins 7:30 p.m. Saturday at the Curundu Bowling Center. Call 2863914 for more information. Baseball camp TheDirectorateof Community ActivitiesSports Branch will hold a baseball camp 4:30-6 p.m. weekdays starting f, --Monday until Jan. 28 at the Fort Davis Youth Field. Call 287-4540 for more information. N Amador golf Golfers who wish to participate in tournaments should havean established handicap. Those who are not members of Fort Amador Golf Course will be expected to pay green The Amador Golf Club is also using pre-scheduled starting times forteeing offon weekends and U.S.holidays. Only groups of three or four may reserve tee times before 10 am. Reservations may be called in beginning Wednesday prior to the weekend. Call 292-4511 formoreinformation. Body building contest The Howard Theater will host a body building contest Jan. 29. Deadline to register is today. The entrance fee is $15perperson. Call the Howard Sports andFitness Center at 284-3451 for more information. Four play Intramural golf season begins today at Horoko Golf Course. Squadrons will host a four-person team MLK day special each week that will compete head to head. Players should have an established handicap. If players do not have a Horoko handicap, scorecards may be turned into Howard Sports and Fitness Center Prices at the Curundu Bowling Center will be reduced for evaluation. Handicaps will be adjusted weekly by the center as the season progresses. Players inhonorofMartin LutherKingJr. Day Sundayinaddition without handicaps will play scratch. For more information, call the sports and fitness center at 284to the regular green pin bowling. Open bowling is from 13451. 9 p.m. Call 286-3914. women's softball tournaments are upcoming. Call 289Swim m ing classes Sports shorts 3108 for more information TheHowardandAlbrookpoolsinviteparentsandtheir children to enroll in swimming lessons. Diving classes and SCN radio sports Balboa Relays ladies water exercise classes are available at the Abrook Pool. For more information, call the Zodiac Community The Southern Command Network's AM 790 Pacific The 43rd running of the Balboa Relays will held at Activities Center at the Howard Pool at 284-3569 or the and 1420 Atlantic will broadcast the following sports this Balboa High School Jan. 28-29. Events include sprints, Albrook Pool at 286-3555. weekend. SCN will be broadcasting English simulcasts of hurdles, distance, relays, shot, discus, long jump, high pro football games that will be aired on local TV channels jump and pole vault. Participants must be on a team to Pan-Am D ve lu b this weekend for people without SCN cable channel 14. compete. For more information call Cleve Oliver at the Tonight Balboa gym at 252-5704. Army personnel interested in The Pan American Dive Club is welcoming new memPro basketball: Utah Jazz at Chicago Bulls at 8:30p.m. running the relays call Willie Moye at 287-6411 or Sue bers. The clubislocatedin Building 214,Fort Espinarand Saturday Bozgoz at 287-3445 or 260-1128. is open6-8 p.m. Fridays. Dues are $6 perimonthor$25 for Pro football: AFC division playoff game; L.A. Raiders six months. Rentals available. Call Gary Garay at 289at Buffalo Bills at 12:30 p.m. d 5K Fun 3428 or 289-4447 orTom Bell at 289-3762 or 289-3538. NFC division playoff game; N.Y. Giants at San FranR 5 Run cisco 49ers at 4p.m. Runners areneeded fortheRodman5KFun Run, which Free weight training Sunday will be held 6:30 a-m. on Jan. 28. There is no entry fee. Pro football: NFC Division playoff game; Green Bay Deadline to register is Jan. 26. Run is open to all military The Fronius Fitness Center has free weight training Packers at Dallas Cowboys at 12:30 p.m. and civilian personnel. Units with most runners and first sessions and Nautilus machine training sessions 3-4 p.m. AFC division playoff game; Kansas City Chiefs at and second place receive awards. Call 283-4222/4061 to Tuesdays. Call the center at 289-3108 for more informaHouston Oilers at 4 p.m. sign up. tion Transisthmian set Free step aerobics Shark, bottom fishing The Transisthmian Relay Race will be held Saturday. The Fronius Fitness Center has free step aerobics TheRodman Marina hosts sharkand bottom fishing 6Categories are U.S. military, female, open and open over classes 9-10 am. weekdays. Call 289-4111 for more 11 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday nights on the Black 40. Teams consist of 10 runners and two alternatives. Call information. Stallion and Vargas boats. Tickets must be purchased the 287-4050. day before the trip. Fishing charters to Pina Bay for Marlin Sports equipm ent fishing are also available. Call the marina at 283-3147. MLK softball tourney The Howard Sports and Recreational Center has the W ater exercises The Fronius Fitness Center is holding a Martin Luther sporting equipment for weekend outings, camping, beach King Jr. Softball Tournament Saturday through Monday. combing, golfing and more. Boogie boards and board The Howard and Albrookpools haveladieswater The entrance fee is $75 per team. Company level and games are available for children. Items are available for exercises for adults and children. Call 284-616.

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cq --6)2 Tropic Times Jan. 7, 1994 Home delivery test continues by Maureen Sampson Tropic Times staff COROZAL -For the first time since 1987, people stationed in Panama can get a stateside newspaper delivered to their homes. Subscribers will soon be receiving the Miami HeraldInternational seven days a week and the Tropic Times every Friday. The new delivery routes are being worked out by newspaper carriers delivering the Tropic Times. Test routes on Albrook AFS have been successful so far, according to Jorge Gonzales, National and International Circulation Manager for the Miami Herald. Routes are currently being tested on Corozal, Fort Clayton, Albrook AFS and Quarry Heights. The next phase will be delivery on Fort Amador, then Rodman NS and Cocoli, then Howard AFBFort Kobbe and Farfan. "We'll continue implementing a base or two every four weeks," Gonzales said, "That will give us time to prepare ourselves, split up the residential areas and learn how many carriers we need." Department of Defense photo by Maureen Sampatm Before starting the delivery service on the Atlantic The new home delivery program has provided family members like Wendy McDermott a chance to work. side, Gonzales said someone must be hired as a distribution coordinator at one of the Atlantic bases. The carriers are guaranteed $5 an hour, with commisGonzales has been working with the Southern ComBesides giving readers the luxury of home-delivered sion for each subscription sold. The positions were advermand Public Affairs Office for more than a year to get the papers, the paper routes provide employment opportunitised through fliers in the Miami Herald. Gonzales said program running. The command supports the home deties for family members living on base, Gonzales said. the response has been tremendous. livery because of its potential to contribute to the quality "It's a perfect opportunity for me to do something "We've had an excellent response from dependents," of life of people stationed in Panama, said Patrick Milton, down here since there is so little opportunity for employGonzales said, "We have more than we can use at the USSOUTHCOM Public Affairs Office command informent," said Wendy McDermott, an Air Force family present time, but we are still creating new routes which mation officer. member who delivers papers on Albrook. means more people will be involved." "One of the benefits of the international edition is lo"I like the whole idea of being able to administer this The program's success depends on the amount of Mical advertisers list their products and services in English, knowledge so people can be informed of what's going on ami Herald subscriptions sold. Gonzales said non-subfor those of us who are not bilingual," Milton said. in the states," McDermott said. scribers will still get a Tropic Times delivered Fridays, "I hope we get enough subscribers so this whole project McDermott, who has 13 years experience delivering but to offer that service, the Herald must at least break will be a 'go'," McDermott said. "I think this program newspapers, said the hours are perfect for her two small even. Subscriptions cost $20 a month. Anyone interested will be beneficial for a long time -not just for getting children. She delivers the papers 4-6 am., before her husin subscribing or applying for a delivery or coordinator information to the people, but for creating jobs that we band leaves for work in the morning. position can call Gonzales at 269-3220 or 236-1522. really need down here." Top U.S. Army South volunteer earns Orlando trip by Sgt. L DaV Army) was based on the scope of her volfamilies here by teaching classes for the my projects and with chores at home," USARSO Public Affairs unteer activities through the Family SupEnlisted Spouse Survival Course and orAnita said. port Gioup, church 1 00p,; rzing fund-raisers. "I couldn't do any of this without my F 0 R T organizations and tLhielisteS Sps She also helped stuff Christmas stockfamily. My mom helps out at home with CLAYTON -Club," said Maggie Coleman, installation ings for soldiers in Honduras with the 4th the kids and she volunteers in the commuFor giving volunteer coordinator. Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment, she nity and gets involved in projects too," she her time and Scarim also stood out because she took said. said. caring to the on even more projects after breaking her "Suzy Vanairsdale, Col. (Michael J.) Her mother, Marge Fricke, sewed new Panamanian leg in August. Vanairsdale's (128th Aviation Regiment curtains for the soldiers living in the Commilitary comShe never let her injury get her down, commander) wife, wanted the 250 pany C barracks, she said. munity, Anita she would prop her leg up at meetings and unaccompanied soldiers in Honduras to The whole family got involved this Scarim has make jokes about the cast, she said. know we were thinking about them. She Christmas with the Angel Tree project. been selected She was registered in the volunteerprocame to the Family Support Group for They spent many evenings making to represent gram and had turned in her 1,539 hours green Army socks and stuffers. We also angels and wrapping presents, Roger Army volunfor 1993, which made her eligible for the sent cookies to them," she said. said. teers at the Anita Scarim nomination, Coleman added. Back here in Panama, the soldiers of They give much of their time to their grand openScarim spent these hours as the presiCo. C, 1-228th are always thanking community, but the Scarims make sure ing of the Armed Forces Recreation Cendent of Heart, which helps fund child care Roger for everything his wife does, Roger they have time for each other as well. Sunter -Orlando in February. for volunteers throughout USARSO, parsaid. ..day is family day at their house, and evSergeant Major of the Army, Richard liamentarian of the Enlisted Spouses Club She has even managed to get him ineryone understands that she dedicates that A. Kidd, requested a worldwide search for and the enlisted representative in the 1st volved in projects, as well as the rest of the day to her husband, children and mother, a volunteer who is the spouse of an enBattalion, 228th Aviation Regiment Famfamily, he said. Anita said. listed active duty soldier to attend the ily Support Group. "Before I started this, I talked about "She brings a quiet determination, enopening with their family. "I'm proud of my wife, shesupports me volunteering with my family and told thusiasm of course, and a can-do or willSimilar volunteers were selected to repand she supports others," her husband, them I wouldn't be home as much as bedo attitude to everything she does. I don't resent the other services. Roger said. fore. They understand that because Mom think the word 'no' is in her vocabulary," "Her nomination (to represent the She has supported soldiers and their is helping others and they help me with Coleman said. FORT CLAYTON (USARSO FORT ESPINAR PAO) -The hours of operation for M a LIi L t r InJ .I iday ours Shoppette -closed the Army and Air Force Exchange 9 FORT DAVIS System -Panama for Mondayin obMain PX -10 a.m.-6 pm. servance of Martin Luther King Jr. Frank's Franks (95) -closed Anthony's Pizza -11 am.-9 p.m. FORT KOBBE Auto parts store -10 a.m.-2 p.m. Day are as follows: Anthony's Pizza -11 a.m.-8 pm. Frank's Franks -10 am.-7 p.m. Shoppette/video rental -10 a.m.Gas station -8 a.m.-6 pm. PACIFIC Burger King -6:30 a.m.-10 p.m. Video rental -9 a.m.-9 p.m. 4 p.m. Cafeteria -8 am.-1 pm. COROZAL Popeye's -6 a&m.-10 p.m. Furniture store -10 a.m.-6 p.m. Burger King -10:30 am.-5:30 Anthony's -11 ami.-10 p.m. Main PX -9 am.-9 p.m. Frank's Franks (by Burger King) Shoe store -10 a.m.-6 pm. p.m. Burger King -11 am-9 pm. Sweets Reflections -7 a.m.-8 -closed Toyland/Outdoor living -10 MISCELLANEOUS Clothing Sales -closed p.m. Clayton Plaza Shoppette -7 am.am.-6 p.m. Quarry Height shoppette -closed FORT SHERMAN Frank's Franks -10:30 a.m.-6 midnight Class Six -10 a.m.-6 pim. Gorgas Hospital shoppette -Shoppette -noon-6 pm. p.m. Shoppette (519) -8 a.m.-10 p.m. HOWARD closed Gas station -closed Bakery -closed Auto parts store -9 a.m.-4 p.m. Main PX -10 a.m.-6 p.m. Curundu School cafeteria -Anthony's Pizza -noon-4 pm. Anthony's Pizza -10:30 a.m.-6 Clothing Sales -closed Class Six -10 a.m.-6 p.m. closed COMMISSARIES p.m. AMADOR Cafeteria -7 a.m.-2 p.m. Cocoli shoppette -10 a.m.-6 p.m. The military commissaries on Wok Works -11 a.m.-6 p.m. Shoppette -9 am.-5 pm. Anthony's Pizza -11 a.m-8 p.m. Balboa school cafeteria -closed Corozal, Fort Espinar and Howard Casa de Amigos -11 a.m.-6 p.m. ALBROOK Clothing Sales -closed Curundu Service Station -6 Air Force Base will be closed MonFORT CLAYTON Shoppette -8 arm.-10 pm. Service station -6:30 am.-6:30 a.m.-midnight day and Wednesday in observance Shoppene (95) -closed Snack bar -8 am.-2 p.m. p.m. ATLANTIC of Martin Luther King Jr. Day.


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