Citation
The tropic times

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Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text



Gift of the Panama Canal Muscum


Tropic


Times


Vol. VI. No. 50


Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Friday, Dec. 17, 1993


Curfew lifts Jan. 1
FORT CLAYTON (Joint Task Force Panama PAO) - U.S.
military officials will lift the 2-5 a.m. curfew Jan. 1 through March
31.
Officials cited improved political and social conditions in Panama
and said the purpose of the three-month period is to determine
whether to lift the curfew permanently.
Joint Task Force - Panama Commander Maj. Gen. G. A. Crocker
tasked unit commanders across the isthmus to watch the effect on
U.S. personnel and units. He asked commanders to discuss the
change with enlisted leaders, soldiers and family members. Crocker
will meet with his senior commanders monthly during the trial to find
out how the change affects morale and unit readiness.
During the trial period, the Military Police Command will focus
part of its data gathering efforts on spotting any crime trends that may
result from the change, especially crimes committed against U.S.
personnel during the hours of the current curfew. Crocker will use
the information commanders and staff gather to decide whether to
reinstate the curfew, modify it or lift it permanently.
Crockeralso told commanderstoU.S. community members ofthe
need for continued personal safety measures. He stressed that
Personal Movement Limitation Bravo - commonly referred to as
PML Bravo - will still be in effect; people should avoid off-limits
establishments and the high-risk areas as noted on the command grid
map.
Officials also noted that people should notconfusetheU.S. curfew
with the 9 p.m. - 5 a-m. curfew the governor of Panama Province
imposes on minors 17 and under. That curfew is still in effect.


Panama confirms


8 dengue cases
GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL (USARSOPAO)
- Panama's Ministry of Health has confirmed eight cases of dengue
fever among Panamanian nationals who live in Panama City,
medical officials said.
"Panama is very serious about this situation-to the point where
they are considering closing the Panamanian schools so that students
can participate in community clean-up programs," said Maj. Nelson
Powers, Entomology Branch chief at Gorgas Army Community
Hospital.
"Dengue fever, like other viruses, causes flu-like symptoms of
fever, severe headache, pain behind the eyes, muscle and joint aches
and pains, and an occasional rash," Powers said. "Though not fatal,
it is recommended that a physician be seen."
The following are tips to help fight this disease:
*Check quarters, inside and outside, forcontainers with standing
water such as old tires, cans and pet dishes.
*Ensure windows and screens are tight fitting because this
mosquito will come indoors if given the chance.
*Keep car windows rolled up when traveling off post
"This mosquito likes to hitchhike," Powers said. "Dengue is not
a laughing matter, though. Because of the biology of the mosquito,
the useofsprayinsecticides have given satisfactoryresults. However,
such applications are only temporary and have no lasting effect. The
best control is removal of the breeding site."
For more information, call Preventive Medicine at 282-5269.


Uepaitment of uetense photo bySMSgt. Steven Taylor
Traffic backs up during afternoon rush hour at Albrook's back gate. Construction here is
expected to cause further delays to commuters.

Albrookgate repairs affect traffic
ALBROOK AFS (24th Wing PA) - Traffic traffic may be slowed considerably and drivers are
through the gates here will be affected by an advised to consider alternate routes, said Johnson.
upgrade project that began Monday. The delays will last about six weeks. During the
The first phase of the project involves building final week of construction, in approximately mid-
aguardhouseatthebackgatenearFortClaytonand January, the gate will again be closed to inbound
Curundu. The new building will be built back from traffic from 8 a.m.-3:45 p.m.
the current structure to make entry to the base When the new guard house at the Curundu
easier, said Jason Johnson, chief of construction entrance is finished, front gate work will begin.
with the 24th Civil Engineering Squadron. Contractors will build awallin front ofthe existing
"Basically we're going to upgrade the gates and guard house and make improvements to lighting.
providemoresecunityandprotectionfortheguards," "This will give them more protection against,
Johnson said. for instance, a drunk driver." Johnson said. "We'd


Inbound traffic was prevented from using the
gate at times this week, but two-way flow will be
restored Monday. Because of the construction,


rather they run into a concrete wall than our cops."
This project's second phase is scheduled to
finish in March.


Local Scouts donate unsold Christmas trees to hospital


by Maureen Sampson
Tropic Times staff writer
COROZAL - In Panama, life for un-
bought Christmas trees is pretty bleak.
They are forced out of the comfort of their
air-conditioned truck. They sit in the hot
sun until their needles fall off. Then they're
hauled away with the rest of the garbage.
This year, the Boy Scouts and Cub
Scouts decided to change all that. They
donated nearly 50 pine trees left over from


their Christmas tree sale to local hospitals.
"We looked for hospitals that might not
have the funds to purchase theirown trees,"
said Ray Underwood, treasurer for the
Panama Canal District of Direct Service
Council.
"We thought it would be a good way to
lighten the lives of people in need."
Helping people in need is nothing new
to the Scouts. Underwood said for the past
few years they have been donating trees to
Army Community Service, the chaplains


group and other charitable organizations.
"It makes me feel good that we're doing
something for someone else," said Mat-
thew Carey of Cub Scout Pack 29.
Besides serving the community, the
Scouts earn various privileges by partici-
pating in these service projects. Nolan
Glidewell from Boy Scout Troop 29 saidthe
Scouts can get a renewed membership in
exchange for service hours.
Donatingtrees also gives Scoutsachance
to spread Christmas cheer to people they


normally don't come in contact with, said
Kim- Carey, Cub Scout volunteer.
"It's an opportunity foraU.S. organiza-
tion to give to the community we work with
and show good will at Christmas," Carey
said.
Because of the Scouts, hospitals like St.
Thomas, the Children's Hospital, and the
Cancer Hospital in Panama City will have
a Christmas tree on every floor.
And the left over trees will have a home
for Christmas.


Army and Air Force Exchange Ser-
vice and local commissaries set holi-
day hours.


Air Force Space Command to track
Santa Claus' annual globe-trotting
trek.


*Military police rappeling, page 3.
*Christmas in Panama, pages 8&9.
*Basketbrawling, page 12.


- I











2 Tropic Times
Dec. 17,1993


Volunteers help mail flow smoother

by Spec. Alexander C. White
USARSO Public Affairs Office .


FORT CLAYTON - Every year during the holiday
season a phenomenon takes place in the post offices
around the world. Postal employees are responsible for
an onslaught of letters and gifts and with this added bur-
den, they must ensure that each piece of parcel makes it
to its destination.
In order to combat this onslaught, military post offices
look to volunteers for help. The 24th Air Postal Squadron
is no exception, since Thanksgiving they have requested
help from both the Army and Air Force. Because of a
lack of response, the post office had to rely on its volun-
teers.
"This Christmas we requested augmentee from the
Army and Air Force to help relieve us of some of the
work load. Unfortunately, neither complied," said TSgt.
Marcia J. Bonnick, military post office supervisor, 24th
Air Postal Squadron.
"That is why the volunteers are very vital to our orga-
nization. We depend on them as if they were paid em-
ployees," she said. "Without them it would be difficult to
complete our mission."
The post office has about 25 active volunteers spread
out among the seven post office locations. Their duties
involve sorting mail and other various tasks. During the
holiday season, mail is quadrupled in load, receiving
more than 10 tons daily.
"What they do doesn't take much supervision," said
SSgt. Michael Stout, post office official, 24th Air Postal
Squadron. "This helps us because they can accomplish
those tasks without someone looking over their shoulder.
"In return we can concentrate on other jobs without
having to worry whether we'll get all the tasks com-
pleted," he said.
Bonnick said because of the increase in volume, her
volunteers are a valuable asset. Especially this time of
year when her office goes from receiving one truckloadof
mail a day to up to three trucks a day.
"Rush, rush, rush," said Elaine Martin, postal volun-
teer. "We are trying to get everything out for everybody.
It's real hectic. This is when we all have to pull together."
Because of the holidays there was an increase of vol-
unteers, but Stout said the post office can always use them.
He explained volunteers receive practical experience
that would look good on resumes. They receive compen-
sation for their efforts by getting free hours of child care.


U.S. Army photo by Spec. Mandwr C. White
Elaine Martin, a volunteer at the Fort Clayton Post
Office, helps sort mail during the busy holiday
season.
Finally, he said volunteers get satisfaction in knowing
that they helping their community by ensuring that ev-
eryone receives mail from their loved ones.
"A volunteer receives a lot of knowledge by working
here," Stout said. "It has been my experience that em-
ployers will hire someone who has been willing to volun-
teer their time in a field that they plan to go into because
it shows that they care about the job."
"I like to interact with people. By working here I can
talk with customers and joke with the employees," said
Vicki Harrell, postal volunteer. "Not only that, what I do
is for a good cause because it helps alleviate some of the
work-load from the postal people."
Members of the 24th Air Postal Squadron encourage
anyone interested to come and volunteer their services.
"We were rated number one in customer satisfaction,"
Stout said. "But, we could never have achieved that level
of excellence if it were not for the dedication of the volun-
teers."


AAFES lists holiday operating hours


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The hours of opera-
tion for the Army and Air Force Exchange System - Panama
for Christmas Eve and Christmas Day are as follows:
Pacific
Corozal
Main PX - Eve: 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Day: closed
Sweets 'N Things - Eve: 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Day: closed
Frank's Franks - Eve: 10:30 a.mn.-2p.m. Day: closed
Bakery - Eve: 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Day: closed
Anthony's Pizza - Eve: 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Day: closed
Wok Works - Eve: 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Day: closed
Casa de Amigos - Eve: 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Day: closed
Fort Clayton
Shoppette (95) - Eve: 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Day: closed
Frank's Franks (95) - Eve: 7 a.m.-1 p.m. Day: closed
Anthony's Pizza - Eve: 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Day: closed
Burger King - Eve: 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Day: closed
Popeye's - Eve: 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Day: closed
Frank's Franks (by Burger King) - Eve: closed Day: closed
Clayton Plaza Shoppette - Eve: 7 a.m.-midnight Day: 7 a.m.-
midnight
Shoppette (519) - Eve: 8 amn.-9 p.m. Day: closed
Auto parts store - Eve: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Day: closed
Clothing Sales - Eve: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Day: closed
Fort Amador
Shoppette - Eve: 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Day: 8 amn.-2 p.m.
Albrook AFS
Shoppette - Eve: 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Day: closed
Snack bar - Eve: 6:30 a.mn.- p.mn. Day: closed
Anthony's Pizza - Eve: 11 a.m.-4 p.mn. Day: closed
Frank's Franks - Eve: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Day: closed
Video rental - Eve: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Day: closed
Furniture store - Eve: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Day: closed
Shoe store - Eve: 10 a.m.-4 pan. Day: closed
Toyland/Outdoor living - Eve: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Day: closed
Class Six - Eve: 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Day: closed
Howard AFB
Main PX - Eve: 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Day: closed
Class Six - Eve: 10 a.m.-8 pmn. Day: closed
Cafeteria - Eve: 6:30 an.m.-2 pmL. Day: closed
Anthony's Pizza - Eve: 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Day: closed
Clothing Sales - Eve: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Day: closed
Service station - Eve: 6:30 a.m.-8 p.m. Day: 10 amn.-6 p.m.


Fort Kobbe
Shoppette/video rental - Eve: 10 amn.-8 p.m. Day: closed
Burger King - Eve: 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Day: closed
Miscellaneous
Quarry Heights shoppette - Eve: 9 a.m.-5 pmn. Day: closed
Gorgas Hospital shoppette - Eve: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Day: closed
Curundu School cafeteria - Eve: closed Day: closed
Cocoli shoppette - Eve: noon-8 p.m. Day: 10 a.m.-4 pmn.
Balboa school cafeteria - Eve: closed Day: closed
Curundu Service Station - Eve: 6 a.m.-midnight Day: 6
a.m.-midnight
Atlantic
FortEspinar
Shoppette - Eve: 10 amn.-4 p.mn. Day: closed
Fort Davis
Main PX - Eve: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Day: closed
Auto parts store - Eve: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Day: closed
Gas station - Eve: 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Day: 10 a.m.-4 p.mn.
Cafeteria - Eve: 7 a.m.-2 pmn. Day: closed
Anthony's Pizza - Eve: 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Day: closed
Burger King - Eve: 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Day: closed
Clothing Sales - Eve: 9 aan.-6 pmn. Eve: closed
Fort Sherman
Shoppette- Eve: 10 a.m.-4pmn. Day: closed
Gas station - Eve: closed Day: closed
Anthony's Pizza- Eve: 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Day: closed

The hours of operation for military commissaries for the
Christmas and New Year holidays are:
Corozal - 8 a.m.-7 pan., Dec. 21-22
8 a.m.-8 pan., Dec. 23
8 a.m.-2 p.m., Dec. 24
closed Dec. 25 and Jan. 1
Howard AFB - 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Dec. 20
9 a.m.-7 p.m., Dec. 21
10 a.m.-7 pan., Dec. 22
9 a.m.-6 pnm., Dec. 23
9 a.m.-2 p.m., Dec. 24
closed Dec. 25 and Jan. 1
Fort Espinar - 9 a.m.-6 p.mn., Dec. 21-22
9 a.m.-7 pn., Dec. 23
9 a.m.-2 p m., Dec. 24
clo. ,u ,...5 and Jan. 1


Navy names local
honorary ombudsmen
RODMAN NS - Twenty volunteers recently
wrapped up an intense week of Navy training here
with graduation aboard the USS Longbeach and a
transit through the canal.
Naval Station commanding officer Capt.
Arthur Rowley II1 congratulated the graduates and
presented them with what they had worked so
many long hours for- honorary ombudsman cer-
tificates.
The Longbeach allowed the students to com-
plete their training in one of the vessels classroom,
baked them a graduation cake and gave them the
"Order of the Locks" to commemorate their tran-
sit through the canal.
Ombudsman Linda Nichols and Tommy Pro-
vost, who work at the Family Service Center in
Charleston, S.C., administered the five-day course
that began Nov. 30 and wrapped up Dec. 3.
The students were taught "to be a person fami-
lies can depend on, any time, any place, any-
where."
"It's the love of that you have to remember,"
said Millie Rowley, wife of commanding officer,
Capt. Arthur Rowley 1i. "Ombudsmen are so busy
helping everyone else that they sometimes forget
their own family."
The Navy Ombudsmen take care of everything
from referrals to pre-deployment briefs and poten-
tial suicide threats, Navy officials said.
The program began in 1970 by Adm. Elmo
Zumwalt as "a necessary link between the com-
mand and the families." The program was tested
once against during operations Desert Shield/
Storm.
The ombudsmen were armed with a "critical
roster" so detailed that a serviceman on leave
could be found within minutes. If a serviceman
was rumored to be missing in action the rumor
could be confirmed or denied in a matter of sec-
onds with the up-to-date list provided by the com-
manding officer of each unit.
U.S. Army South releases
holiday dining hours
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The
hours for Christmas dinner in the following din-
ing facilities are:
Fort Clayton - noon-2 p.m., Dec. 24, 193rd
Support Battalion, Building 201
Corozal - noon-1 p.m., Dec. 24, Company E,
228th Aviation, Building 9
Fort Kobbe - 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Dec. 25, 1st
Battalion, 508th Infantry, Building 805
Fort Davis -11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Dec. 25,5th
Battalion, 87th Infantry, Building 19
The price for the meal is $1.50 for family mem-
bers under 12 years old; $3 for enlisted soldiers,
officers, family members and dining facility at-
tendants; $5.55 for guests under 12 years old; and
$11.10 for soldiers on per diem, guests and De-
partment of Defense civilians.

Officials remind troops of
local uniform policy
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Officials
remind U.S. forces that they are not allowed to
wear military uniforms off post for personal busi-
ness or on commercial transportation outside the
canal area.
Uniforms are allowed on defense sites, mili-
tary areas of coordination and special facilities,
Panama Canal Commission areas, U.S. or foreign
government offices, while picking up privately
owned vehicles, essential business to get a driver's.
license, vehicle inspection and registration and
when visiting eating establishments within the
area 11 a.m.-2 p.m. For more information, call
287-3376.

Howard CPO installs
job information line
HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PA) -The Howard
Civilian Personnel Office has installed a job in-
formation line, ?84-6449, that may be called 24
hours a day. The recording lists job title, pay plan,
grade, salary, closing date of the announcement
and instruction on how and where to apply. Per-
manent and temporary employment positions are
announced.










Tropic Times 3
Dec. 17, 1993


Air assault

MPs hang on for training
by Sgt Lori Davis
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT CLAYTON - The 194th Military Police Com-
pany (air assault) from Fort Campbell, Ky., soldiers are
cops on the ropes.
These "air assault" MPs rappel from helicopters,
slingload equipment and run from the back of CH-47 Chi-
nooks when they have time off from protecting and de- ,i
fending the community.
The air assault MPs are training for their combat sup-
port mission, an additional part of their MP duties. The
194th MP Co. provides support for the 101st Airborne
Division (Air Assault), explained SFC Evan Caldwell,
operations sergeant, 194th MP Co.
There are several types of MP units, Caldwell ex-
plained. Garrison MP units specialize in law enforce-
ment, physical security units guard critical facilities, es-
cort units handle convoys and combat support units pro-
vide area security and circulation control on the battle-
field.
MP support on the battlefield includes such things as
set up rear security areas, guarding against enemy infil-
tration and handling refugees and soldiers separated from
their units, Caldwell said.
"Being an air assault unit is important because we are
able to quickly move people and equipment," he said.
MPs on the battlefield make sure supplies get from the
rear support areas to soldiers on the front lines. By being
air assault, the 194th MP Co. can get to critical areas,
drop off soldiers and equipment, and keep the supply line
going, he said.
Combat support MPs provide security by working as
three-member teams. In the 194th MP Co. there are 40-
three-member teams with High Mobility, Multi-Purpose
Wheeled Vehicles stocked with as much firepower as an
infantry squad, Caldwell said.
"Each member of the team has a 9-mm pistol," he
said. "The driver has a SAW (Squad Attack Weapon),
the team leader has an M203 grenade launcher and the
turret gunner has a Mark 19 (automatic grenade
launcher."
This heavy cache of weapons may sound like a lot, but
when three people are patrolling a hostile area to protect
friendly forces each team has to be ready for conflict. The
MPs not only provide security, they must also be prepared
to temporarily augment infantry units if the situation calls
for more firepower, Caldwell said.
Providing more firepower could mean slingloading
their rolling arsenals into a landing zone and running out
from the back of a CH-47 Chinook or rappeling in from a
hovering helicopter to secure an area on foot, he said.
"It's imperative security is established because heli-
copters are sitting ducks when they land or hover, as you
could see in Somalia," he said. Apaches clear the area,. - "
before other helicopters come in to a hot landing zone, or - . .
pathfinders go in on foot to secure it, he said.WIwa
Making sure there is security on the ground before an " .
MP rappels in is imperative too, because if the enemy is US. Army photo by Sgt. Lori Davis
waiting for them when they rappel from the bird, there's Soldiers from the 194th Military Police Company practice rappelling from a UH-60 Blackhawk at Albrook
no hope on the end of their rope. AFS.






P,
















1st Lt. Alan Faulk holds on tight and waits for the rappel master to give
him the sign to go.

Spec. Kenneth Thomas does a safety check on a "Swiss
seat," a rappeling guiderope.









4Tropic Times
Dec. 17, 1993


* HemisDhere


t





9


. * 7


APLaswrPhot
Masked men with assault rifles killed six peasants in El Salvador Saturday night. El Salvadoran President
Alfredo Cristiani has named a commission to probe possible re-emergence of rightist death squads.


Gunmen kill 6 in El Salvador
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador (AP) - Masked men Meanwhile, a commission appointed to probe the pos-
with assault rifles killed six peasants in western El Salva- sible re-emergence of rightist death squads published ad-
dor, and police said Monday they had arrested three vertisements in newspapers asking people to come for-
people who confessed. ward with information.
Police said the slaying occurred Saturday night in the The commission was named by President Alfredo
village of Copinolito, 40 miles west of the capital. Cristiani because of an increase in death squad-style mur-
The killings had the earmarks of the rightist death ders.
squads that have plagued El Salvador for years. The six Victims have included former guerrilla leaders, and
peasants were dragged from their homes into the street many fear the peace process could be blocked if the kill-
where four were shot to death and two had their throats ings continue. Soldiers and former soldiers also have been
cut. slain, apparently in retaliation.
Police arrested three people. A police spokesman said A peace treaty signed in January 1992 ended 12 years
the three admitted the killings and said the victims were of civil war between leftists and U.S.-backed governments
members of youth gangs. that killed more than 75,000.


Frei wins in Chilean landslide


SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) - Eduardo Frei, the candi-
date for the governing center-left coalition, won a land-
slide victory in Saturday's presidential election and vowed
"to work to continue to consolidate democracy in Chile."
The race appeared closer in the vote for congress,
which was held simultaneously.
According to official returns covering 94.5 percent of
the estimated 8 million votes cast, Frei received 57.96
percent. Arturo Alessandri, the candidate for the right-
wing opposition, received 24.32 percent
The four other presidential candidates - one rightist
and three leftists - received between 1.1 percent and 6.2
percent each.
A victory for Frei, the son of the late President Eduardo
Frei who governed from 1964 to 1970, could further dis-
tance the government from Chile's past military rulers.
Frei has promised to amend the constitution, which
bars the president from firing former dictator. Gen.
Augusto Pinochet and other top military commanders.
Alessandri opposes changing the constitution.
Alessandri, in an emotional speech to supporters, con-
ceded defeat.
"A majority of the country has chosen a proposal dif-
ferent to ours," he said. "As democrats, we accept the


Argentina frees 2
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) - Twenty-one
members of a religious cult, including seven Americans,
were freed three months after a court ordered them held
on kidnapping and other charges.
Sixteen men and five women belonging to The Fam-
ily were released late Monday after the Chamber of Ap-
peals in San Martin, just north of the capital, ruled a fed-
eral court doesn't have jurisdiction in the matter, said cult
spokesman Alberto Jurin.
A spokesman for the appeals court said the ruling re-
voked the federal court decision ordering the cult mem-
bers held.
The appeals court said Buenos Aires province has ju-
risdiction over the case, but it was not immediately known
if provincial authorities would prosecute cult members.
The cultists, including seven Americans and two Ca-


people's verdict, and wish the next government the great-
est success, because Chile deserves that."
Frei, 51, will succeed President Patrido Aylwin, who
is barred from running for a second consecutive term.
Aylwin took office in 1990, ending Pinochet's 16 1/2-
year rule. He had seized power in a bloody 1973 coup.
Speaking to hundreds of enthusiastic supporters gath-
ered in front of a downtown hotel, Frai made an appeal to
national unity.
The result's in the congressional election were com-
ing in slower. With 32 percent of the vote counted, the
government estimated the coalition backing Frei ap-
peared slightly widening its current majority in the lower
house to 73-47.
But the right was assured to continue to control the
Senate, 25-21, including eight senators appointed by
Pinochet before he relinquished power. Frei wants to
eliminate those seats.
The virtually unchanged make-up of congress posed
an obstacle to Frei's plans to change the constitution writ-
ten by the Pinochet regime, including a clause that al-
lowed the 78-year-old general to remain army com-
mander and prevents the president from firing him and
other top military chiefs.


1 cult members
nadians, were arrested in police raids Sept 1 on Buenos
Aires-area homes belonging to the Argentina-based
group, an offshoot of the Children of God cult founded in
California in 1969.
Also taken into custody were 138 children of group
members, most of whom remained in government insti-
tutions late Monday. Jurin said the children were to be
released to the religious community late Monday and
Tuesday.
The 21 adults also had been held on charges of the
corruption of minors and religious and racial discrimina-
tion.
The Family appealed the charges, arguing that Fed-
eral Judge Roberto Marquevich did not have jurisdiction
in the case. Marquevich had ordered cult members held
three months ago.


A


Survey says Panamanians
want U.S. troops to stay
PANAMA CITY (Reuters) - An overwhelming
majority of Panamanians want U.S. troops to re-
main here beyond a Dec. 31, 1999 deadline for
withdrawal, according to a poll published Satur-
day.
The CID/Gallup survey in the daily El Panama
America found that 72 percent of 1,200 Panama-
nians interviewed favor a continued U.S. military
presence.
Under the 1977 Panama Canal Treaties, the
United States must withdraw its 10,000 troops and
hand over control of the Panama Canal to the local
government by the turn of the century.
Only 20 percent of Panamanians want the U.S.
military to leave, while 8 percent have no opinion,
according to the poll. No margin of error was
given.
Many Panamanians are worried about the eco-
nomic impact from the shutdown of U.S. bases,
which provide some 13,000 direct and indirect jobs
for Panamanians and inject an estimated $600 mil-
lion annually into the local economy.
President Guillermo Endara has rejected calls
for a referendum on the issue, saying this is up to
his successor who will be elected in Panama's May
1994 general election.
The United States has maintained troops in
Panama since 1904, with numbers peaking at
65,000 during World War H - when U.S. war-
ships were passing through the canal - and at
27,000 during the 1989 invasion that ousted
former dictator Manuel Antonio Noriega.

Thousands homeless
after Panama floods
PANAMA CITY (Reuters) - Floods ravaged a
remote region of western Panama, leaving two
people missing and 2,100 homeless, authorities
said Monday.
Torrential rain battered the Caribbean coastal
province of Bocas Del Toro all weekend but sub-
sided early Monday, Panamanian emergency ser-
vices said.
Emergency aid was being flown Monday from
Panama City to the stricken region, said Aquilino
Ortega, a spokesman for the government's disas-
ter coordination unit.
Ortega said the two missing men were fishing
from a boat in the sea when the storm broke Satur-
day.
Bocas Del Toro, a poor, isolated and sparsely
populated banana and coffee-growing region, has
suffered a series of natural disasters in recent years.
A 1991 earthquake killed 32 and left 17,000
homeless, while flooding later in the same year
drove another 20,000 from their homes.

U.S. troops deploying to
Colombia for construction
BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) - U.S. Army sol-
diers will be sent this month to help build a road, a
school and a hospital near Cali, headquarters of
the world's largest cocaii. cartel and a region rife
with leftist guerrillas.
The troops will be joined by Colombian sol-
diers, who will participate in the construction
projects about 45 miles northwest of Cali, a U.S.
Embassy statement said Wednesday.
The American soldiers are to leave in Febru-
ary, the statement said.
The Cali region is awash in drug-processing
laboratories, smugglers and gunmen. Rebels of the
Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia also op-
erate in the region, attacking security forces, kid-
napping landowners and rustling cattle.
Local news media said about 150 U.S. troops
will be posted near Malaga Bay on the Pacific
coast. The soldiers belong to the 46th Engineer
Battalion, from Fort Rucker, Ala., a U.S. Embassy
source said.
A U.S. military specialist said the American
troops were on a "civic action project" and would
not fight drug traffickers or rebels. He did not
know if the soldiers would carry weapons.
Both sources spoke on condition of anonymity.
The announcement comes as the Clinton ad-
ministration is calling on Colombia to battle the
Cali cartel.












Military News


Space Command tracks Santa
THE NORTH POLE (Air Force Space Command) - telephone call to the command post of the then-Conti-
On Christmas Eve, the eyes and ears of the men and nental Air Defense Command.
women assigned to the North American Aerospace De- One December morning, now-retired Col. Harry
fense Command will watch and listen for an unidentified Shoup, combat operations director, answered the "hot"
object coming over the North Pole. This object will have line that connected him directly with the commander in
a trajectory different from those of hostile bombers, bal- chief. He was amazed when a voice said, "Is this one of
listic missiles or space satellites. United States Space Santa's helpers?" At first, the colonel thought someone
Command's satellites, ground-based air defense radars, was playing a not-so-funny joke but, after talking for a
Ballistic Missile Early Warning Systems and space sur- few moments, he realized the youngster was sincere, so
veillance sensors will locate Santa Claus in his well-laden he went along with the tike, asking him if he had been
sleigh.. They send the data via one of the world's most good all year and what he wanted for Christmas.
sophisticated computer systems to the underground The calls came through on the supposedly unlisted
Cheyenne Mountain Complex near Colorado Springs. number until Shoup had to assign a duty officer to handle
The first indication in the simulated scenario that what was by then being called the "Santa Line."
Santa Claus is airborne will probably come from the The colonel soon discovered a local department store
early warning satellites orbiting more than 3,000 miles had advertised a telephone number for children to use
above the Earth. The satellites, operating on the thermal when calling directly to Santa Claus with their Christ-
spectrum, will detect the heat emanating from Rudolph's mas list - there had been a one-digit misprint in the ad.
red nose as he guides the other eight tiny reindeer pull- About a week before Christmas Eve, Shoup made an
ing Santa through the North American skies. unannounced visit to the command post and glanced at
Followed by the satellite contact, the BMEWS at the huge tracking screens that showed the North Ameri-
Thule AB, Greenland will pick up its signature. The can continent, its seaward approaches and the North
computers funnel this information in real-time simulta- Pole. It had been a slow night so one of the crew, full of
neously to the Missile Warning Center, the Space Sur- the Christmas spirit after answering many calls on the
veillance Center, the Air Defense Operations Center and "Santa Line," had drawn Santa Claus in his sleigh pulled
the NORAD Command Post, where crews monitor the by nine reindeer on the world map that normally showed
special tracking operation. the trajectory of ballistic missile and bomber routes.
To identify the "unknown object," NORAD scrambles That's how tracking Santa began. The NORAD Santa
fighter interceptors from bases in Canada and the United tracking program has become as much of a Christmas
States where they stand on constant alert status. Once ritual as decorating the tree. This year children will be
the fighter pilots have the "unknown" in sight, they verify able to get bi-hourly updates on Santa's progress by call-
the airborne object is not a threat to national security but ing four Colorado Springs-based telephone numbers. The
is indeed the jovial man in the red suit. numbers vary according to time zone and service is sched-
NORAD then relays the tracking information to ruled to begin at 4 p.m. in each respected area of the con-
4,000-plus radio and television stations worldwide so tinental United States:
youngsters everywhere can be sure to be fast asleep be- *Eastern Standard Time - (719) 554-2647;
fore the whiskered St. Nick arrives. *Central Standard Time - (719) 554-2649;
NORAD tracking Santa has become an annual tradi- *Mountain Standard Time - (719) 554-3095;
tion - one that began back in 1955 with an accidental *Pacific Standard Time - (719) 554-3213.


Tropic Times 5
Dec. 17,1993


YEARS OF SERVICE
PAY
GRADE <2 2 3 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS

0-10 6801.60 7040.70 7040.70 7040.70 7040.70 7311.00 7311.00 7716.00 7716.00 8267.70 8267.70 8821.50 8821.50 8821.50 9371.10
0-9 6027.90 6185.70 6317.40 6317.40 6317.40 6478.20 6478.20 6747.60 6747.60 7311.00 7311.00 7716.00 7716.00 7716.00 8267.70
0-8 5459.70 5623.50 5756.70 5756.70 5756.70 6185.70 6185.70 6478.20 6478.20 6747.60 7040.70 7311.00 7491.30 7491.30 7491.30
0-7 4536.60 4845.00 4845.00 4845.00 5062.20 5062.20 5355.60 5355.60 5623.50 6185.70 6611.10 6611.10 6611.10 6611.10 6611.10
0-6 3362.40 3694.20 3936.30 3936.30 3936.30 3936.30 3936.30 3936.30 4070.10 4713.60 4954.20 5062.20 5355.60 5536.80 5808.60
0-5 2689.20 3157.50 3375.90 3375.90 3375.90 3375.90 3478.20 3665.40 3911.10 4203.90 4444.50 4579.50 4739.40 4739.40 4739.40
0-4 2266.80 2760.30 2944.50 2944.50 2999.10 3131.40 3345.00 3533.10 3694.20 3856.50 3962.70 3962.70 3962.70 3962.70 3962.70
0-3 2106.30 2355.30 2517.90 2785.80 2919.00 3023.70 3187.50 3345.00 3427.20 3427.20 3427.20 3427.20 3427.20 3427.20 3427.20
0-2 1836.90 2005.80 2410.20 2491.20 2542.80 2542.80 2542.80 2542.80 2542.80 2542.80 2542.80 2542.80 2542.80 2542.80 2542.80
0-1 1594.80 1659.90 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS WITH OVER FOUR YEARS ACTIVE DUTY SERVICE
AS AN ENLISTED MEMBER OR WARRANT OFFICER

O-3E 0.00 0.00 0.00 2785.80 2919.00 3023.70 3187.50 3345.00 3478.20 3478.20 3478.20 3478.20 3478.20 3478.20 3478.20
O-2E 0.00 0.00 0.00 2491.20 2542.80 2623.50 2760.30 2866.20 2944.50 2944.50 2944.50 2944.50 2944.50 2944.50 2944.50
O-1E 0.00 0.00 0.00 2005.80 2143.20 2222.10 2302.50 2382.60 2491.20 2491.20 2491.20 2491.20 2491.20 2491.20 2491.20
WARRANT OFFICERS

W-5 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3662.70 3801.60 3911.40 4076.10
W-4 2146.20 2302.50 2302.50 2355.30 2462.40 2570.70 2678.70 2866.20 2999.10 3104.40 3187.50 3290.40 3400.50 3506.40 3665.40
W-3 1950.60 2115.90 2115.90 2143.20 2168.10 2326.80 2462.40 2542.80 2623.50 2701.80 2785.80 2894.40 2999.10 2999.10 3104.40
W-2 1708.50 1848.30 1848.30 1902.00 2005.80 2115.90 2196.30 2276.70 2355.30 2438.10 2517.90 2597.10 2701.80 2701.80 2701.80
W-1 1423.20 1632.00 1632.00 1768.20 1848.30 1927.50 2005.80 2088.90 2168.10 2248.80 2326.80 2410.20 2410.20 2410.20 2410.20
ENLISTED MEMBERS

E-9 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2496.90 2552.70 2610.60 2670.60 2730.30 2783.40 2929.20 3043.20 3214.20
E-8 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2093.70 2153.70 2210.40 2267.70 2327.70 2381.10 2439.60 2582.70 2697.90 2870.40
E-7 1461.60 1578.00 1636.20 1693.80 1751.40 1807.20 1865.10 1923.30 2010.30 2067.30 2124.60 2152.20 2296.80 2411.10 2582.70
E-6 1257.60 1370.70 1427.70 1488.60 1544.40 1599.90 1658.70 1744.20 1798.80 1857.00 1885.20 1885.20 1885.20 1885.20 1885.20
E-5 1103.40 1201.20 1259.70 1314.30 1401.00 1458.00 1515.60 1571.40 1599.90 1599.90 1599.90 1599.90 1599.90 1599.90 1599.90
E-4 1029.30 1087.20 1151.10 1239.90 1288.80 1288.80 1288.80 1288.80 1288.80 1288.80 1288.80 1288.80 1288.80 1288.80 1288.80
E-3 969.90 1023.00 1063.80 1105.80 1105.80 1105.80 1105.80 1105.80 1105.80 1105.80 1105.80 1105.80 1105.80 1105.80 1105.80
E-2 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30
E-1 >4 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80
E-1 <4 770.10 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

Fiscal 1994, 2.2% Pay Raise Increase
NOTE-BASIC PAY IS LIMITED TO $9,016.80 Service Academy Cadet Pay is $543.90, effective on Jan. 1, 1990, as
BY LEVEL V OF THE EXECUTIVE SCHEDULE per section 203(c)(1) of Title 37, United States Code.


Retired admiral

to succeed Aspin
WASHINGTON (AP) - Administration officials
say President Clinton has selected retired Adm.
Bobby Inman to replace Defense Secretary Les As-
pin, whose bombshell resignation ended a turbulent
year of budget battles, regional conflicts and contro-
versy over gays in the military.
The announcement of Inman, a former deputy di-
rector of the CIA and ex-director of the National Se-
curity Agency, could come as early as Thursday, said
two White House officials, speaking late Wednesday
on condition they not be otherwise identified.
In an announcement that seemed to catch all of
Washington by surprise, Aspin said Wednesday,
"It's time for me to take a break." Standing with
Aspin in the Oval Office, Clinton accepted "with real
sadness" the former Wisconsin congressman's re-
quest to leave Jan. 20.
Aspin is the first to leave the Clinton Cabinet,
and his one-year tenure will mark the shortest for a
defense secretary in two decades. Just last Sunday he
told a TV interviewer, "I don't think there's any
problem" that would cut short his tenure as Penta-
gon chief.
But White House spokesman Mark Gearan said
the resignation had been discussed for several weeks.
Clinton made no mention of a possible replace-
ment, although one aide said one was expected soon.
Others mentioned on Capitol Hill to succeed As-
pin included CIA Director R. James Woolsey, Sen.
Sam Nunn, D-Ga., Deputy Defense Secretary Wil-
liam Perry and Norman Augustine, head of the giant
defense contractor, Martin Marietta Corp.
Aspin, 55, who had a heart pacemaker implanted
last winter after being hospitalized with breathing
difficulties, cited personal reasons for his decision to
quit. He did, not elaborate.












6 Tropic Times
. Dec. 17. 1993


*Voices


Parent has discrepancy


Dear Mayors' Corner:
I am writing to express my discontent
over the theater policies at Fort Clayton.
Last weekend "Jurassic Park" was playing
and I let my children go by themselves.
My daughter, 12, called me to tell me they
couldn't get in because they were not 13
or with an adult. I went to the theater and
asked, telling the manager they had been
to PG-13 movies by themselves numerous
times before-- what happened?
He told me there was a crackdown on
age limits and from now on, an adult had
to be with them to watch all PG-13 mov-
ies. I was very angry because I am very
picky when it comes to movies and I feel
like I should decide what they can or can't
see by themselves.
If there is any question at all, I will say
"no" or go to see it first, then make a deci-
sion. I also feel like there needs to be a
sign on the door so the parents will be


aware and not be surprised like I was. I'm
glad I was at home when she called be-
cause we usually go out to eat when they
go to the movies!
I would like to make a couple of points
about this. The theater was so crowded,
we didn't sit together so if they had gotten
scared or sick, I would have never known
anyway. Also, if "13" is the magic num-
ber, why does my 12 year old have to pay
the adult price? I consider it unfair if she
has to pay the adult price, I have to go sit
with her. If she pays the adult price, then
she should be treated as an adult and be
able to attend the movie by herself.
My main question is, why is there all
of a sudden a "say-so" over PG-13 age
limits, especially when it overrules a
parent's decision - or, if it has to be en-


over PG-13 movie ruling
-movie with your children. But, because of
several complaints of children being loud
and disturbing other patrons, we ask par-
forced, why is there not a sign on the front ents to talk to children about behavior be-
door as there is on R-rated movies? Also, fore leaving them at the theater. Whether
why pay an adult price for a 12-year-old parents accompany children or not, they
when an adult still has to come and stay are still responsible for their behavior.
for the movie? We do reserve the right to ask anyone
Stuck at the movies to leave if they are not behaving properly.
Again, we apologize for the inconvenience
Dear Stuck, and hope to see you at the movies soon.


I submitted your letter to the Army and
Air Force Exchange Service and got the
following response:
Because of the content of this film, we
were advised to be cautious when letting
children in by themselves. This is the rea-
son for requiring parents to attend the
movie with their younger children.
We apologize for any inconvenience
you may have experienced. You will no
longer be required to attend a PG-13


Editor's note: This column allows com-
munity members to submit questions to
the Mayoral Congress. Letters should be
mailed to: Mayors' Corner, Publicity
Chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS).
Anonymity will be granted upon request,
The Tropic Times reserves the right to
edit letters and responses for brevity,
clarity and propriety.


House watch program helps lower crime stats


House watch program
Crime has decreased steadily during the last several
months. To continue this downward trend during the
holidays, the military police encourage everyone to en-
roll in the House Watch Program before going on tempo-
rary duty or leave.
The program provides security checks of quarters
while residents are away. The MPs will need to know if
anyone will have access to the quarters and if there will
be animals on the premises. Residents should also con-
sider having a friend or unit representative check the
quarters periodically.
To enroll in the program, call 287-4401 in the Pacific
community or 289-5133 in the Atlantic community. Re-
port suspicious activity to the MPs.

Secure bikes inside
Chaining bicycles outside to a fixed object doesn't
keep thieves away. Bike owners should lock their bikes
inside a secure building to help prevent theft. This crime
prevention method will decrease the chance of crime.
Report suspicious activity to the MPs at 287-4401 or
289-5133.

Wrongful transfer of merchandise
U.S. Southern Command Contraband Control officials
arrested a person for wrongful transfer of merchandise
last week. The person admitted to buying diapers, baby
food and other items for a non-privilege card holder.
A gift may be bought for a bonafide holiday or special
occasion as long as it does not exceed $10 and is not on
the limited item list.
For more information, see U.S. Southern Command
Regulation 1-19 or call 286-3303.

Five days community service
MPs saw a person who had been barred from all mili-
tary installations attempting to enter the main gate of Fort
Clayton last week. He was taken to Panamanian Court
where he was sentenced to five days community service.
Report suspicious activity to the MPs at 287-4401 or
289-5133.

Anonymous drug hotline
Anyone with information about drug smuggling
should call the Panama Jack anonymous hotline at 285-
4185.


I ro os. M rs als or er-0


The following crimes occurred in on-post housing ar-
eas Dec. 3-9.
Pacific
Fort Clayton 800 housing area - one larceny of secured
private property
Fort Kobbe 300 housing area - one larceny of secured


private property
Quarry Heights housing area - one larceny of secured
private property
Atlantic
Fort Espinar housing area - one larceny of unsecured
private property


This authorized unofficial command information pub-
lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic
Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces
Information Program of the Department of Defense, un-
der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S.
Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the
official view of the U.S. government, the Department of
Defense or the U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002
Telephone 285-6612.
Acting Commander in Chief.............................................
Maj. Gen. Walter T. Worthington



JITropic Tim


Director, Public Affairs.....................Col. James L Fetig
Chief............................................... vtSgt. Steve Taylor
Senior Editor.........................SSgt. ,cborah E. Williams
Editor............................................SSgt. Richard Puckett
Assistant Editor...........................................Sgt. John Hall
Sports Editor.........................................Sgt. E. J. Hersom
Staff Editors.........................................Rosemary Chong
Maureen Sampson
Volunteer Assistant.............................Josephine Beane
Student Intern..................................Juan Carlos Palacio
Southern Command Public Affairs Office..........282-4278
Command Information Officer..............Patrick Milton
U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.............287-3007
Public Affairs Officer.................Maj. Melanie Reeder
Command Information Officer................Beth Taylor


Editor...............................................SSgt. Jane Usero
Journalists...........................................Sgt. Lori Davis
Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski
Spec. Alexander C. White
24th Wing Public Affairs Office.......................284-5459
Public Affairs Officer..............Capt. Warren L. Sypher
Public Affairs Superintendent.....MSgt. Dale Mitcham
Journalists...................................SSgt. Rian Clawson
Sgt. James A. Rush
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.............283-5644
Public Affairs Officer................Lt.j.g. Laura C. Moore
Assistant PAO...................................Diane Gonzalez
Photographers........................PH2 Roberto R. Taylor
PH2 Delano J. Mays
U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.......................289-4312
NCOIC.........................................Sgt. Richard Emert








LCommentary


Tropic Times 7
Dec. 17,19937


Christmas not a day, but an attitude


by Col. Dave Goodwillie
USARSO command chaplain
Traditionally, Christmas scenes depict a happy
family united around a brightly decorated tree
amidst a pile of gifts. It's a joyous scene,
relaxed, festive and warm.
But for a single soldier, or married servicemember a
long way from home, this can be an intensely lonely, if
not downright disastrous, time of year.
Even those of us with our families are not so immune
to this idealized concept of Christmas that a batch of
burned Christmas cookies, a cold or a squabble with an
over-excited child can't make us feel deflated or
disappointed.
"Christmas just isn't the same," we say.
This Christmas syndrome is a feeling of being on the
outside looking in, watching others have the perfect
kind of Christmas we feel we should have. It's a lonely


feeling, and sometimes even an angry one.
It's caused, in part, by our own expectations. As
children, Christmas comes to us as a marvelous mixture
of presents, grandparents, rich smells and holiday
excitement. Others, usually our parents, arrange much
of this seasonal magic for us. As adults, however, the
things we expect to happen at Christmas don't always
happen unless we make them happen.
In the Christmas Story, the gospels describe the Magi,
the wise men who were basically on an intelligence mis-
sion for King Herod, following a bright star to Bethlehem.
Here they encounter the babe in the manger and are so
moved that they offer precious gifts and find their lives
radically changed.
We continue this tradition of giving at Christmas time
by putting an enormous amount of our money and energy
into giving presents.
I love 0. Henry's marvelous story, "Gifts of the Magi."
He writes about a terribly poor young couple living in


Children 's eyes tell a Chri


by MSgt. Mike Howard
SOUTHCOM Public Affairs

I can't forget the eyes.
The eyes of a little girl who speaks English, a
little girl who speaks Spanish, and a little boy
with a chicken.
The first spoke.
The second only stared.
The story of the third is the story of Christmas.
Last Friday I went to Valent Recreation Center to
watch the Clayton Elementary School children present
their school Christmas play. I stood in the lobby
waiting to see my daughter come in when a little girl
tugged on my shirt.
She put words to her questioning eyes.
"Excuse me mister, are you in special forces?"
"No, are you?" I automatically responded.
"Do you know my dad? He's special forces, and he
said he has a meeting today so maybe he won't be here,"
she said. "I thought maybe if you knew who he is, you
could tell me if he's gonna come. I sure hope he's
gonna."
"I bet he hopes he can come, too," I reassured her.
"I know, I just hope he's here."


She wiped her eyes.
The next day, I met the little girl who speaks
Spanish. Her eyes looked up at me bold, proud and
unashamed. She, one of 170 children at a needy
elementary school about an hour from Panama City,
would not look away.
She had followed me from classroom to classroom as
I took photographs of the excited children who were
waiting for their Christmas party to begin. Bags of
Christmas presents had been delivered to each class-
room. Somebody was barbecuing hot dogs, and the
children were expecting Santa Claus to show up later.
She had watched as I photographed the little boy
who had brought a chicken to give to the Christmas
party hosts.
And now, as I sat in one of the school's battered
desks, curiosity overtook her. She sat down directly in
front of me with her little arms crossed on the back of
the teacher's chair. Her feet shuffled on the concrete
floor to the classroom.
She didn't smile, only looked directly into my lens.
I went back to the boy holding the chicken. He still
stood against the wall next to a big table filled with
fruits - other gifts to be given to the hosts.
He stood there, holding his chicken, as the others
piled oranges, grapefruit, sugar cane, coconut and the


New York in the gaslight era who both sacrificed their
most cherished possession to be able to buy each other a
Christmas present. She cuts off her beautiful, long hair
and sells it to a wigmaker in order to buy a watch chain
for his prized pocket watch while he sells his watch to
buy her a set of hair combs that she always wanted.
A comedy of errors? Sure, but at the tale is its truth.
"Of all wise men and women, these two were the wisest
- their gifts were the Gifts of the Magi."
Our gifts, gifts of love, caring and sharing, can be just
that - gifts that make Christmas memorable and mean-
ingful for others as well as for ourselves.
It's not just a day, but rather an outlook, an attitude.
It's a peaceful, caring, giving and loving season - and
you can make it happen.
So, this Christmas, follow the star, be a Magi.. Bear a
gift and keep in mind that the greatest gift we can give is
always the gift of ourselves.
Merry Christmas!



stmas story
like. The children played. The boy looked at me. He
looked away and back again. He held the chicken up,
and then dropped it again to arms length. Through all,
the boy stayed planted.
Finally, a teacher came to tell the boy it was time.
Reluctantly, he gave the chicken to another boy who
carried it across the yard up to where the hosts wer6
preparing for the party. The chicken was presented to
the leader of the hosts and I took photographs.
In the background, I noticed the little boy who
owned the chicken. He stood off in the distance
watching. When the chicken was given away, he turned
away. He turned back again, looking down and wiping
the tears from his eyes.
The chicken, his pet, wasn't his anymore.
After the hot dogs and Santa Claus, I saw the little
girl who spoke Spanish. She had gotten her present -
it was a big doll. Her smile beamed.
I didn't see the little boy again. I know he, as did all
the children, received gifts.
And so, when I close my own eyes at night now, it's
hard to escape the looks in the faces of the three. And
that makes it seem like Christmas - even though it's
the tropics and you can't see the steam when you breath
outdoors.
I hope I don't forget their eyes.


What is your favorite thing about Christmas this year?


"We will be going to
bed early, then our
parents will wake us up
about midnight to open
our presents and then go
back to bed. *
Stephanie Shearman


"My favorite thing is
that we usually go out of
town to visit relatives
either in the states or


Robert Watkins


"I just like being able to
spend time with my
family. "


Denise Wolfe


"I like giving gifts and
getting gifts. But, I like
giving better because it's
fun to watch them open
it."


Aaron Kinghom


"Spending time with
my family is my favorite
thing about Christmas."


Jamar Butler


I DietQoe-


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries - or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to
edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.










8 Tropic Times
Dec. 17, 1993












4,iMAA lIUioutj:




n many ways, Christmas in
Panama is much like
Christmas in the United
States. People exchange
gifts and greetings, children n
play with their new toys, adults drink
toasts to better health and better days,
and the traditional Christmas tree is
decorated with ornaments and lights.
Many households display the
"nacimiento," a representation of the
nativity brought to the continent by the
conquering Spaniards, that has since
become a traditional Latin AmericanT
form of identification with the spirit .
surrounding the birth of Jesus Christ.
The "nacimiento," which is the
Spanish tenn for the nativity scene, is
ordinarily a straw hut simulating a.
manger, in which figures of the Three
Wise Kings, sheep, camels crossing the I
desert, little houses to simulate the town IF
and other livestock are placed. There is .
also the Star of Bethlehem and the
Virgin Mary. Tradition has it that these
nativity scenes should grow in size year
after year.
Despite the energy crisis, on the
outside of many houses (it's customary
also in the canal area), brilliant red and
green lights, the traditional yuletide
colors, give the sensation of a huge lit
Christmas tree. On lawns and porches,
enormous sleds and other Christmas
motifs indicate that Santa Claus is the .
King of the World to old and young
alike.
In Panama City, the residents of 85th _
street, in the San Francisco area, have for
the last 30 years decorated the entire
mroute with Christmas displays, thus
making Calle Belen, "Bethlehem Street,"I
the most visited area during the Christ- P& A.
mas season.
Another highlight of the Latin way of
celebrating is the Chlristmas Eveip
Midnight Mass, which is followed by a Balboa Elementary School first graders sing a song during their Christmas concert. DepartmentofDefensephoobyMaureenSampson
family reunion for a midnight dinner of
tamales, rice with gongo peas, salad,
fried chicken or turkey, ham, roast pork
and fruits. This family get-together is .......
similar to Thanksgiving Day in the
United States.
Also on Christmas Eve, children dress - . - --.*---
as shepherds and walk the streets from. ...
house to house singing Christmas carols.
From there on, Christmas day, it's the - "
noisemaking of the younger ones with
their gifts, which lasts until the last toy is '
no longer useful. In many low-income
neighborhoods, people block-off the
streets in order to let children ride their .,
bikes, or use skateboards and
rollerskates.
But that's not the case for teenagers
and grown-ups. On the following
Saturday night after the sixth of January,
Epiphany day (Wise Kings Day), beaches
are practically invaded for parties
highlighted by a bonfire of Christmas
trees and roasting of weenies.
All in all, Christmas in Panama is
much like Christmas everywhere.
,.. ,..1 Aou'.


These are some of the many decorations displayed in the Villa Lucre suburbs.


Department of Defense photo by Rosemary Chong









Tropic Times
Dec. 17, 1993


ILA


.Ie ,-w


I
'K


Department of Defense photo by MSgt I
Rosita Rodriguez, 6, smiles after her chat with Santa Claus, Art Merkel, from the U.S. Southern Command Public Affairs Office.


e Howard


U.S. Air Force photo by Sgt James Rush
Children reenact the nativity scene during the tree lighting ceremony at Albrook AFS Monday.


rfl







0 TropicTimes
S Dec. 17,1993


SMilestones


To Lieutenant Colonel - George Crawford and John
Jansen, both of U.S. Army Medical Activity - Panama.

To Sergeant First Class - Willie Whittaker and Diane
Anderson, both of U.S. Army Medical Activity -
Panama. Carl Pierce and Larry Whalon, both of 142nd
Medical Battalion.

To Staff Sergeant - Cecilio Herrera, Michael Roberts,
Ethenia Torres and Patricia Tudor, of U.S. Army Medi-
cal Activity - Panama. Gregory Walker and Joseph
Higgins, both of Headquarters Company, 5th Battal-
ion, 87th Infantry. Mark Davis and Michael Gurney,
both of Company C, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry.
Jimmie Smith of Company B, 5th Battalion, 87th Inf.
To Sergeant - Timothy Foster of U.S. Army Medical
Activity - Panama. Rhonda Adams and Derek Lawson,
both of 142nd Medical Battalion. Wallace Carmichael
and Tearance Stewart, both of 3rd Special Operations
Support Command (Airborne). Javier Rodriguez of
Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry.

To Specialist - Ruth Cosme of 142nd Medical Battal-
ion. Richard Sweat of 3rd Special Operation Com-
mand (Airborne).



Army Commendation Medal - SFC Bryan Ford of 3rd
Special Operations Command (Airborne). SFC Timo-
thy Hamilton of Headquarters Company, 193rd Sup-
port Battalion. Sgt. Mario Bragg, Spec. James
Garringer and Spec. Emmett Street, all of Company B,
193rd Support Battalion. Capt. Thomas C. Soriano,
SFC Wayne L. Schier, SSgt. Michael Gurney, SSgt.
Charles 0. Raines, Sgt. Edward Dominguez Jr., Sgt.
Lloyd E. Purswell, Spec. Hector Aguayovenegas and
Spec. Joel Gilbert, all of 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry.

Army Achievement Medal - SFC Gary Mitchell,
SSgt. Danny Jackson, SSgt. Jeffery Frey and SSgt.
Karen Cook, all of 3rd Special Operations Command
(Airborne). Sgt. Alex Richardson of Headquarters
Company, 193rd Support Battalion. 1st Lt. Laney
Miller, SSgt. Dennis E. Abbott, SSgt. Patrick Bourne,
SSgt. Luis D. Concepcion, SSgt. William Martin, SSgt.
Dariel H. Turley, SSgt. Jerald L. Droddy, Sgt. Ricardo
Anzaldua, Sgt. John N. Baker, Sgt Jose L. Cadena Jr.,
Sgt. Robert H. Demian, Sgt. Edward Dominguez, Sgt.
Charles M. Fish, Sgt. Antonio Flores, Sgt. Shawn Fos-
ter, Sgt. Richard Gregg Jr., Sgt. Jon C. Harris, Sgt.
Bathon Keing, Sgt. Robert Morgan, Sgt. Thomas
Nachtwey, Sgt. Darcy Rambali, Sgt. Christopher
Rodriguez, Sgt. Michael Smith, Sgt. Eric Troxler, Sgt.
Thomas Wrighton, Cpl. John Florence, Cpl. Paul
Ziegler, Cpl. John M. Norman, Spec. Michael Connor,
Spec. Leslie Flemming, Spec. Joel Gilbert, Spec. John
Haley, Spec. Bobby R. Henderson, Spec. Donald
Purnell, Spec. Jimmy Richie, Spec. Alex Stewart, Spec.
Ethan J. Miller, Spec. Arthur J. Terry, Spec. Eric C.
Askew, PFC Juan Granados, PFC Jeremiah Hester,
PFC Christopher McLaughlin, PFC Lazaro
Herreraanton, PFC Robert T. Holland, Pvt. Matthew
Boardman, Pvt. Joseph Jenkins, Pvt. Ricky A. King,
Pvt. Damion M. Orris and Pvt. Tyson S. Silva.

Certificate of Achievement - Sgt. Alijah Lyn Brown
and Spec. Veinell Baker, both of Headquarters Com-
pany, 193rd Support Battalion. Spec. Norman Rob-
erts, SFC Ralph Tanner, Sgt. Moses Crowder Jr., Sgt.
Steven Alexander, Sgt. Joseph Burkes, Spec. Sequana
Sims, SSgt. Dwight Giles, Spec. Robert Taylor and
Spec. Darien Anderson, all of Company B, 193rd Sup-
port Battalion.



Jumpmaster School - Sgt. Leon Borders of 3rd Spe-
cial Operations Command (Airborne).

Primary Leadership Development Course - Distin-
guished Honor Graduate: Spec. Louis Melancon of
Headquarters Company, Law Enforcement Activity.
Honor Graduate: Spec. Allen Zobian of Company B,
Military Intelligence Battalion. Commandant's List:


Spec. David Eastman of Company A, 747th Military
Intelligence Battalion. Spec. Christopher Graf of Com-
pany A, Military Intelligence Battalion. Spec. James
Lovell of 408th Military Intelligence Company. Spec.
Ian Macklin of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion,
508th Infantry. Spec. Jeffrey Mauro of 194th Military
Police Company. Spec. Paul McNiel of Company A,
747th Military Intelligence Battalion. Spec. Jeff Milos
of Company A, 310th Military Intelligence Battalion.
Spec. Clinton Thompson of Headquarters Company,
308th Military Intelligence Battalion. Spec. Jimmy
VanGossen of Company A, 308th Military Intelligence
Battalion. Spec. Shannon Wilson of U.S. Army Den-
tal Activity - Panama. Leadership Award: Spec.
Vincent Bowles of Company C, 1st Battalion, 508th
Infantry. Spec. Martin Comilsen of 534th Military
Police Company. Spec. Ian Marklin of Headquarters
Company, 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry. Spec. Jeffery
Purvis of Headquarters, U.S. Southern Command.
Physical Fitness Award: Cpl. Bishop Freesh of Com-
pany B, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Commandant's
Inspection Award: Spec. William Carrigan of Com-
pany A, 308th Military Intelligence Battalion. Gradu-
ates: Spec. Norma Alderete of Headquarters Company,
536th Engineer Battalion. Spec. Wifred Ashby Jr. of
536th Engineer Battalion. Spec. Rose Bizarrt of 69th
Signal Company. Spec. Patrick Bowman of Headquar-
ters Detachment, 106th Signal Brigade. Spec. David.
Bricman of Company B, 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry.
Spec. Clint Brown of Company C, 5th Battalion, 87th
Infantry. Spec. Felicia Brown of 69th Signal Company.
Spec. James Cannon of Headquarters Company, 1st
Battalion, 508th Infantry. Spec. John Chaplin of
1097th Transportation Company. Spec. Duane
Clemons of Company E, 228th Aviation. Spec. John
Connell of Company B, 4th Battalion, 228th Aviation.
Spec. Katherine Connolly of Company A, 4th Battal-
ion, 228th Aviation Spec. Jerry Crutch of Company D,
4th Battalion, 228th Aviation. Cpl. Santiago Cruz of
Company D, 4th Battalion, 228th Aviation. Spec.
Edgar Cuebas of 193rd Infantry Brigade. Spec. Clinton
Davis of Company E, 228th Aviation. Spec. George
Delmoral of Company B, 536th Engineer Battalion.
Spec. Lawrence Dukes of Company B, 4th Battalion,
228th Aviation. Spec. Evelio Duque of Company B,
154th Signal Battalion. Spec. Michael Fletcher of
Headquarters Detachment, 92nd Military Police Bat-
talion. Spec. Monte Greenlee of 59th Engineer Com-


pany. Spec. Damien James of U.S. Army Medical Ac-
tivity - Panama. Spec. Sherry Jeffries of Company D,
U.S. Army Garrison. Spec. Larry Kidd of Company A,
5th battalion, 87th Infantry. Spec. Kenneth Lanoue of
408th Military Intelligence Company. Spec. James
Madden of Company A, 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation.
Spec. Raymond Madden Jr. of Headquarters Company,
193rd Infantry. Spec. Martin McIntyre of Company B,
154th Signal Battalion. Spec. Jeff Moore of Company
C, 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation. Spec. Angela Pigg of
Headquarters Detachment, 92nd Military Police Bat-
talion. Spec. John Raymond of Company B, 1st Bat-
talion, 508th Infantry. Spec. Brian Reynolds of Head-
quarters Company, Law Enforcement Activity. Spec.
Steven Samartino of Company B, 536th Engineer Bat-
talion. Spec. Chad Sandoe of 128th Aviation Brigade.
Spec. Scotty Scott of Headquarters Company, Jungle
Operation Training Brigade. Spec. Ronald Stancil of
Headquarters Detachment, 470th Military Intelligence
Brigade. Spec. Michael Thomas of Company C, 1st
Battalion, 228th Aviation. Spec. Robert Vose of Com-
pany A, 308th Military Intelligence Battalion. Spec.
Brian White of 7th Dive Detachment. Spec. Kristen
Wilkins of 408th Military Intelligence Company.



Cpl. Kurtis Nygaard of 565th Ordnance Detachment
was selected Noncommissioned Officer of the Month
for the 193rd Support Battalion.

Spec. Lee Gallegos of Headquarters Company was se-
lected Soldier of the Month for 193rd Support Battal-
ion.



Dec. 1 - Sarah Elizabeth Bandel to Nancy J. and CWO
3 Robert F. Bandel.

Dec. 2 - Kimberly Ellen Atkins toSpec. Cheri L. and
SSgt. Mark C. Atkins.

Dec. 5 - Danny Lee Moore Jr. to SrA. Carmenlita A.
and TSgt. Danny Lee Moore Sr.

Dec. 7 - Charlie William Davenport to Vicki L. and
Spec. Charlie W. Davenport.


Free tickets Department of Defense photo by SMSgt. Steve Taylor
Tom Goodloe, Corozal Main Exchange Manager, and Sgt. Brian Coutch, 536th Engineer Battalion,
just after Coutch won a free airline ticket to the United States. The Army and Air Force Exchange
Service, Coca Cola and United Airlines are holding the drawing that will give away six tickets through
December.


A















































A-37B Dragonfly aircraft of the 24th Composite Wing fly over the Miraflores Locks in 1970. u.s. Ar ForcOphto


24th Wing celebrates anniversary


HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/
Historian's Office) -The 24th Wing here
marks its 51st anniversary Christmas
Day. Other than its Christmas activation
as the 24th Composite Wing (Special) in
1942 at Reykjavik, Iceland, the wing's his-
tory has been unique in several respects.
Its entire period of service has been at
overseas installations. It provided air de-
fense for U.S. forces on Iceland with P-38,
P-39, and P-40 fighters until it was inac-
tivated June 15, 1944.
The unit returned to active service as
the 24th Composite Wing at Boriquen
Field (later Ramey AFB) Puerto Rico,
Aug. 25, 1946 and remained active until
July 28, 1948.
From its headquarters at Boriquen, the
wing managed six major and numerous


minor installations in the Antilles area,
stretching from Puerto Rico to British
Guiana. As the mission was concerned,
the wing conducted a range of operations
from general administration, training and
aerial transportation to photomapping and
reconnaissance. It even grew its own veg-
etables in hydroponic gardens throughout
the command. In 1947, the wing deliv-
ered 235,000 pounds of vegetables
throughout the Caribbean Air Command.
After its 1948 inactivation, the wing
was dormant for more than 19 years. It
returned to service Nov. 8, 1967 at Al-
brookAFS and was redesignated the 24th
Air Commando Wing March 15, 1968.
By that time, it had two flying squadrons.
The 605th Air Commando Squadron flew
A-26 and T-28 special operations aircraft,


and the 24th Air Transportation Squad-
ron operated fixed-wing transport and he-
licopter aircraft. The wing's tactical mis-
sion included paramilitary actions, air
transport, civic actions, search and res-
cue, aeromedical evacuation and support
of Army Special Forces.
The wing was redesignated the 24th
Special Operations Wing July 15, 1968.
Six months earlier it had moved to
Howard AFB. By the end of 1969, it had
grown to three flying squadrons with the
addition of the 24th Special Operations
Squadron and had added the A-037 air-
craft to its inventory.
Downsizing began in April, 1971 with
the inactivation of the 24th Air Transport
Squadron and continued until Jun 30,
1972 when the wing was redesignated a


J� A i


Mumma's grandfather makes news in December, 1943


Local provost marshal's relative
inspects Guatemalan shipment
FORT CLAYTON - The following are significant
World War II events that took place in December 1943:

Dec. 1
Chief Health Officer of the Panama Canal,
Morrison C. Stayer, is promoted to major general.
Stayer has been in Panama since Aug. 8,1939.

Dec. 2
Maj. Gen. William E. Shedd, Deputy Commander
of the Panama Canal Department and artillery expert
arrives in Puerto Rico to assume command ofthe stra-
tegic Antilles Department.
Six officers with the Caribbean Defense Command
are promoted. They are Maj. Roger Lyons, Maj.
Herbert Harris, Capt. Walter Van Porn, Capt.
Roynold Winters, Capt. Charles Fabing, and 1st 11.
Herbert Littlejohn.
Following several days of diversionary attacks, FilAh
Army opens a new assault on the Winter Line in Italy.

Dec. 3
In the European Theater, Operation Crossbow (air op-
erations against German V-weapons sites) is given top
priority for Allied tactical air forces.

Dec. 16
Brig. Gen. George G. Lundberg, a veteran Army
officer with 26 years of service as a member of the Air


Corps, arrives in Panama to assume command of the
Sixth Air Force Service Command for the Caribbean
area.
Col. Harlan L. Mumma, Quartermaster of the
Panama Canal Department, (and grandfather of the
present U.S. Army South Provost Marshal, Col. John
Mumma) Inspects the first trial shipment of beef to
arrive in the Canal Zone from Guatemala for con-
sumption by the armed forces.
The 142nd Infantry completes the capture of Monte
Lungo in Italy. As a result, the Germans began a
withdrawal along the VI Corps front.

Dec. 17
A bill repealing the Chinese Exclusion Acts and set-
ting an annual immigration quota of 105 Chinese is
signed by President Roosevelt. The next day, in Chicago,
Edward Bin Kan filed an application for citizenship. On
Jan.18, 1944, he became the first Chinese to be natural-
ized under the new law.

Dec. 19
Army troops occupy five Western Electric company
plants in Baltimore, following a week-long strike by
workers demanding segregated restrooms.

Dec. 20
The Mediterranean Allied Air Forces is activated in
accordance with Combined Chiefs of Staff directive. All
Allied air units in the Mediterranean are placed under it.

Dec. 24
Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower is named Supreme Com-


mander of Allied forces for Operation Overlord - the
invasion of Europe.
President Roosevelt announces that there are
3,800,000 American servicemen overseas.

Dec.25
Three officers and 10 enlisted men are awarded the
Legion of Merit for exceptional meritorious service.
However, only three of the honored are still serving in
on the Isthmus. They are: MSgt Walter Dzubella and
TSgt. Bud W. Klontz of the Sixth Air Force, and 1st
Sgt. John A. McElroy of the Coast Artillery Com-
mand.

Dec. 27
The Army seizes control of the nation's railroads be-
cause of plans by several rail workers' unions to strike,
beginning Dec. 30.
Submarine activity increases in the Caribbean with
a Colombian schooner and two U.S. vessels sunk and
an overdue Panamanian vessel presumed lost.
Only one shipment of Christmas trees appeared on
the Isthmus and it was snapped up before it had been
on the market five hours.
The Canal Zone tire quota is cut by two-thirds and
the possibility of obtaining new tires is considered re-
mote.


Editor's note: This time line was compiled by Dolores
De Mena, USARSO historian, in commemoration of
the 50th Anniversary of WWII.


Tropic Times
Dec. 17,1993 -5

"Please convey my
congratulations to the men
and women of the 24th
Wing on the occasion of
your 51st anniversary.
Since being activated on 25
December 1942 at
Reykjavik, Iceland, you
have made significant
contributions to the nation,
the Air Force, and our way
of life. Your commitment to
quality assures that you
will meet the challenges of
the future as successfully
as you met those of the
past. Best wishes and
happy anniversary."
Gen. John M. Loh
Commander, Air Combat Command

group. It remained in group status until
Jan. 1, 1976 when it was again
redesignated the 24th Composite Wing.
In recent years, the wing underwent a
series of activations and inactivations be-
tween Jan. 31, 1987 and Feb. 15, 1992.
With its reactivation in 1992, the 24th
Wing became the senior Air Force unit in
Panama.
The wing has earned six Air Force
Outstanding Unit Awards and the Armed
. Forces Expeditionary Medal. The latter
and one of the unit awards resulted from
its performance in Operation Just Cause.
Wing personnel also supported Opera-
tions Desert Shield and Desert Storm.
On June 1, 1992, the wing became the
only Air Force unit equipped with the C-
27 Spartan aircraft. That uniqueness par-
allels its distinguished 51-year history.
From the frozen wastelands of Iceland to
the vast expanse of the Caribbean to the
steamy jungles of Panama, the wing has
served proudly.
Today the wing mans the front lines in
the war against drugs. While future mis-
sions can only be speculation, it's likely
that where the wing is involved, the job
will be unique.

















Sports


flpg'17,1QQ'3


Ouarrv Heights, Republic of Panama


PCC Devils

win track, field

season opener
BALBOA - The Panama Canal
College Green Devils took first place
in the Department of Defense Depen-
dents Schools preseason track meet
Dec. 10 here.
The Green Devils scored 108 points
followed by the Red Machine with 88
points, the Bulldogs with 78 points
and the Cougars with 25.
Evan Davis was the Green Devils
leading scorer winning the 400, 800
and 1600 meterdashes foratotalof 18
points. The Green Devils Amy
Epperson scored highest in the girls'
squad bringing in 14 1/2 points.
TheRedMachine's Bruce Chastain
was the outstanding performer of the
night withthreefirsts andathird for 21
points. Bulldogs' Andrea Barnett was
the top female competitor with 19
points.
The Bulldogs won the junior var-
sity division with 47 points followed by
the Green Devils with 43, Red Ma-
chine with 41 and Cougars with 31.
The following are varsity results of
the preseason tournament.
Boys Varsity
110 meter high hurdles - 1, J Soto, Red 19:59
2, T Mirand, Devils 22:00
100 ineter dash - 1, B Chastain, Red 11:67 2,
M. Considine, Cougars 11:85
200 meter dash - 1, B Chastain, Red 23.08 2,
M Considine, Cougars 23.84
400 meter dash - 1, E Davis, Devils 59 2, J
Christopherson, Red 60.7
800 meter run - 1, Davis, Devils 2:20.98 2,
Lee, Red 2:26.41
1600 meter run - 1, E Davis, Devils 5:02 2, S
Lee, Red 5:28
400 meter relay - 1, Red, Soto, J Evans, P
Lovejoy, J Trim 50.85 2, Devils, A Aird, R
Sweeney, R Watanabe, V Brown 53.78
High jump - 1, Novothy, Bulldogs 5' 1" 2, D
Ortiz, Cougas 4' 11"
Longjump- 1,B Chastain, Red 18'41/2"2,C
Martinelli, Red, 17' 7 1/2"
Discus -Ryan Underwood, Red 97' 31/2" 2, L
Gonzalez, Devils 92' 5"
Shot put - 1, L Gonzalez, Devils 36' 1" R
Ballisteros, Bulldogs 35' 7 1/2"
Pole vault - 1, R Watanabe, Devils 8' 6"
Girls Varsity
55meterlowhurdles- 1,TSingleton,Bulldogs
10.17 2, A Barnett, Bulldogs 10.92
100meterdash- 1,ABarnett,Bulldogs 13.43,
2, L Armstrong, Red 14.21
200 meter dash - 1, K Jones, Devils 29.13,2, T
Singleton, Bulldogs 29.44
400 meter dash - 1, Epperson, Devils 70.9, 2,
A Barnett, Bulldogs 71
800 meter run - 1, K Cooper, Red 3:20.58,2,
A Valdilles, Devils 3:31.8
400 meter relay - 1, Red, C Ward, K Cooper, J
Moreno LArmstrongl:01.07,2,Devils,CShort,
K Cedeno, M Rosales, K Jones 1:01.53
Long jump - 1, A Barnett, Bullodgs 14' 2", 2,
K Nakagawa, Bulldogs 10' 10 1/4"
Shot put - 1, T Bunch, Cougars 24', 2, C
Stanford 23'5"


Fight stops Davis game


Officials postpone game

for team 'basketbrawling'

by Sgt. Rick Emert
USARSO Public Affairs - Atlantic
FORT DAVIS - Naval Security Group Activity and the 408th Military
Intelligence Company came together Dec. 9 in a hard-played game that
came to an abrupt end less than nine minutes into the second half.
The NSGA hoopsters built aquick 10-pointlead before the 408th made
it start working for the points two minutes into the first half.
From there, it was aggressive hard playing that would later stop the
game prematurely.
Aaron Brown of the Navy easily slipped through 408th's defensive wall
several times and helped hike his team's lead to 12 points at the end of the
half with a score of 37-25.
The game seemed to be turning in favor of the 408th as it sunk three
quick ones less than a minute into the second half, but the scoring burst
fizzled and NSGA.soared to a 49-31 lead.
With 15 minutes left in the half, the 408th, thanks to layup king Thomas
Thompson, found its second wind cutting the NSGA lead to 10 points.
With 11:30 left in what could have been anyone's game, the name of
the game changed to "basketbrawl" and the hard playing turned to hard
fighting.
The pushing, slugging and wrestling ended when the referees called the
game.
Originally, the officials declared the game a double forfeit but later
decided it would be played out Wednesday from the point where it stopped
-minus the fourplayers who started the fight, said Emil Generillo, NSGA
coach.
Coaches Generillo, NSGA, and Fred Nunley agreed that overly
aggressive playing was the game's downfall, but each blamed the other's
team for that aggression.
"This isn't usually how we play," Nunley said. "It's the first time this
has happened.
The refs did the best they could, but I don't think they (players) agreed
with a lot of their calls."


A


U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Rick Emert
Fabian Richardson of Naval Security Group lays up
two points in the ill-fated game Dec. 9.


Wilkies win benefit tourney


by Sgt. James A. Rush
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - Six hits and eight
runs in the first inning were plenty, but
Wilkies racked up a 20-4 advantage over
Strike Force in the final game of the Opera-
tion Warmheart Softball Tournament Dec.
5 at Weekly Field here.
Wilkies shortstop John Kraemer was
thetournament's mostvaluableplayerwhile
his StrikeForce counterpart, Sirgo Esquivel,
earned the gold glove award.
Between the tournament, concessions
and a crafts bazaar, more than $2,000 was
raised for the base chapel's Operation
Warmheart. The operation provides sup-
port, such as turkey and other food for
Christmas dinners, for Air Force families
during the holiday season.
The 617th Airlift Support Squadron
hosted the three-day event.
This was the third time the unit has held
the tournament and raised the most money
to date, said John H. Brindley who co-
directed the tournament with James Lester.


"As one of the biggest units on base, we
feel we should provide our share," Brindley
said.
"This was an all-out effort. We were
quite excited to help the base and our own
people."
On the field, Wilkies put together four
other multiple-run rallies after the first
inning scoring three in the second, five in
the fourth and two in the each of the final
two innings.
Third baseman Ron Aerts led the
champs' at the plate going 5-for-5 in the
title game. Aerts double and four singles
plated four. He went on to score three times
as well.
Left centerfielder Johnny Lamb (double
and two singles) and right centerfielder
Tom Hartman (three singles) each added a
trio of hits to Wilkies' attack.
The championship game was the third
time these teams met in the tournament.
Strike Force won the first showdown
putting it in the winners' bracket finals.
Afterlosing,Wilkies dropped to facethe
24thSecurity PoliceSquadron in the losers'


bracket finals where the police team was
unable to arrest the progress, despite two
late-inning rallies.
Down by two in the top of the seventh
inning, the security police connected a
string of hits to tie the score at nine. SPS
added one morein the ninthto take thelead.
Wilkies wouldn't be denied, however.
Kenneth Whampler led off the bottom of
the ninth with a walk.
This gave birth to a two-run rally for an
11-10 Wilkies win.
The second game with Strike Force was
also decided by a two-run rally in the ninth
inning. Six lead changes and four ties over
seven innings provided excitement as each
team ended regulation with 10 runs.
Ironically,itwas anerrorbythetourney's
best defender that led to Strike Force's
demise.
Esquivel misplayed Wilkies' second
baseman Ismael Rios' hit allowing him to
reach base safely.
Doubles by pitcher Mike Pupel and left
fielder Lonnie Pearson amounted to two
runs and a 12-10 win.


U.S. Army Medical Activity Panama
raises nearly $4,000 for underprivi-
leged children.


*Davis basketball standings
*Holiday tourneys
*SCN radio sports


Page 12


Bowling page 14

Bowlers earn their wings during 24-
hour tournaments of angels at
Curunclu.


A


I I









Tropic Times 13
Dec. 17, 1993 1



Bridge run raises nearly $4,000


GORGASARMYCOMMUNITYHOSPITAL (GACH
PAO) - Simon Alvarado of Panama crossed the finish line
here at 33:09 ahead of 350 runners during the U.S. Army
Medical Activity Panama Bridge of Americas 10K Race.
Sue Bozgozof the 142nd Medical Battalion was the top
female racer at 42:50. The top three military teams were
Headquarters Company, 193rd Support Battalion, Com-
pany B, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry Brigade,
and Marine Corps Security Detatchment.
USA MEDDAC sponsored the event and raised ap-
proximately $4,000 for the Casa Esperanza - a halfway
house for street children - under U.S. Army South's
Christmas Sponsorship Program, said Luz Fernandez,
chairwoman of U.S.A. MEDDAC's Christmas Sponsor-
ship Program.
The following are the top three winners of each category
of the race.
Males uner 21- 1, Jose Santana 2, Alvin Rentsch 3,
Nobel Mosquera 4, Roman Avila 5,Ronald Gonzales
Males 21-26 - 1, Eduardo Vega 2, Juan Jaen 3, Nelson
Ruiz 4, Nicolas Novak 5, Darryl Richardson
Males 27-32 - 1, Simon Alvarado 2, David Vergara 3,
Ricky Roman 4, Miguel Campos 5, Rene Guerra
Males 33-39-1, Oriel Chanis 2, Ralph Gaines 3, Richard
Downie 4, Julio Pizarro 5, Severo Martinez
Males 40-49 - 1, Clint Davis 2, Jose Sousa 3, Edmundo
Andrion 4, Web Loudat 5, Wilfrido Castillo
Males 50 and up - 1, Luis Lax 2, Ricardo Aguilar 3,
Lionel Jimenez 4, Miguel Franco 5, Rodrigo D'Angelo
Females under 21 - 1, Alexadra Motto 2, Melissa Motto
3, Crystal Holden 4, NicoleRichley 5, Maylinn Steinbarger
Females 21-26-1, MilitzaWalles 2, Michelle Digruttolo
3, Mary Bulmer 4, Judy Gonzales 5, Pamela Schneider
Females 27-32- 1, SueBozgoz2, DebraWesloh 3, Karen
Berrily 4, Elida Alcedo 5, Sonja Cantu
Females 33-39 - 1, Danita Guerra, 2, Jan Brockman 3,


U.S. Army photo by Capt Latanya Lee
Company A, 470th Military Intelligence Battalion runs down the Bridge of Americas.


Kellie Trombitas 4, Isabel Sirera 5, Valerie Sorro
Females 40-49- 1, MarielaSagei 2, Marjoie Lee 3, Sara


de Gobea 4, Jan Loudat 5, Judith Torar
Females 50 and up - 1, Nina Miller 2, Carol McConnell


Signal wolves snare


LEA in Red League


U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Loi
69th's Eric Brown tries to block the shot of Daniel Flenord from LEA.


by Sgt. Lori Davis
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT CLAYTON-Red League's 69th
Signal Company hounded its competition
like apackofdogs on arabbit, finally killing
it before it got away at the Reeder Physical
Fitness Center here Sunday.
Headquarters and Headquarters Com-
pany, Law Enforcement Activity nearly
escaped the 69th 45-44, but got eaten be-
cause of a combination of poor foul shoot-
ing and defense.
The 69th came out of the gate hard,
pressing LEA on everyplay. CedrickTucker
drove into the lane like a freight train,
sinking three buckets to lead his team in
the first half.
When Tucker wasn't hammering the
lane, John Hunter was putting the ball up
from the outside, making two three-point-
ers. Fredrick Frost chipped in with a basket
and a three-pointer.
The 69th racked up points on offense,
but they did the same on defense. They sent
LEA shooters to the foul line five times for
six points.
Michael Frazier supplied LEA's juice
with one of those foul shots, three baskets
and a three-pointer.
With Rick Grelk's two three-pointers,
LEA managed two stay on the heels of the
69th 24-23 at the half.
In the second half LEA hit the court like
a different team, but not a better team. The
usually cool, controlled MPs went ballistic
on defense and matched the rough and
tumble 69th on fouls.
Part of the new LEA strategy worked as
they held Tucker to two points from the foul
line and shut down Frost all together. The
69th managed to keep up with a basket and
three-pointer from Eric Brown and two
baskets from Kevin Slayton.
ri Davis The shutdown mode was in effect from
the 69th defense as well. The once-hot


Frazier nailed only one basketin the second
and Grelk didn't get a point.
LEA was saved on offense by Anthony
Boyd and Daniel Flenord, who had been
virtually silent in the first half. From out of
nowhere Boyd slammed the 69th defense
with four baskets and two foul shots and
Flenord sunk four baskets.
Their rescue efforts weren't enough to
salvage the LEA team. Usually a tough
team atthe foulline, they shotadismal9 for
17.
Echoing last week's victory over Triple
Nickel, LEA had an opportunity to pull
ahead at the end of the game.
Down 44-43, Michael Frazier went to
the freethrow line and shot one-for-two to
tie the score with 35 seconds remaining in
the game.
The LEA defense played the 69th close
to hold the game into overtime, but another
uncharacteristic foul sent Signal player
John Hunter to the foul line.
Hunter also sank one of two to put his
team up by one, but LEA got the ball back
with 30 seconds left.
LEA called a time out and tried to plot
another last-second victory like its recent
victory over Triple Nickel.
LEA tried to work the ball inside and go
for the shot, but the 69th defense snagged
the shot and swiped the ball and the game.
The victory over LEA extended the
league-leading record of the 69th to 7-1.
69th's Steve Eberhart attributes the team's
success to speed and aggression.
"We have alot of fast breaks and quick
rebounding," he said.
The 69th won its other games by more
than 10 points, but the team was a little off
because of a long lay off, Eberhart said.
The 4-3 LEA team played solid offense,
but weak defense lost it.
"Our defense was slack," Grelk said.
"They played alot more aggressivethan we
do, but we just weren't on it today."


AIL










1 Tropic Times
4 Dec. 17, 1993


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Tom Celluci gets under way during a sailing club regatta Sunday. Dep -nt mtofDefense photobySgt E.J.


U.S. Military Sailing Club unfurls sails


PEDRO MIGUEL (Tropic Times) - Jim Laing won the
U.S. Military Sailing Club'sregattaSunday with an overall
time of 1 hour, eight minutes and three seconds.
Laing won the opening race at 37:33 - more than four
minutes ahead of his closest competitor Michael O'Toole.
Laing was so far ahead of the pack in the first race that he
was finishing the second of four legs when the rest of the
pack were rounding the first buoy.
O'Toole totaled the most points in the regatta with 16


from two second place finishes and a fifth.
Laing followed with 15 points because of a ninth place
finish in the second race, but came back in the third with
another win.
With the coming dry season, the club has begun another
year of recreational sailing and racing for the military
community.
"This year, the club is prepared with more than 30 boats
available in the entire Panama Canal Operating Area,"


said Stephen Rasmussen, vice commodore USMSC.
Classes, races and other activities are avialable through
the club, Rasmussen said.
"It's a great opportunity for people who have been
interested in sailing, but never had the chance to enjoy
Panama's year-'round summer," Rasmussen said.
Sign-up rosters are available at the Fort Clayton Boat
House. The club holds the classes the first and last week-
ends of the month. Regattas are held monthly.


Bowlers earn their wings at Tournament of Angels


CURUNDU - For 24 hours this weekend, 31 bowlers
earned their wings during the Tournament of Angels here.
Besides forgetting blisters, sore arms and little sleepy,
the bowlers helped raise nearly $700 for local orphanage,
said Diane Gonzalez, project coordinator.
Although the 31 participants didn't pack the house,
Gonzalez said their spirit more than made up for their


numbers.
"The response from the community wasn't what we
thought it would be, but those who stayed were dedicated
and they stayed," she said. "The community really gets hit
hard during the holidays and that makes it difficult to
choose where to give."
The marathon event wasn't just straight bowling. A













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JT


Department of Defense photo by SSgt. Richard Puckett
Kelli Thompson, 9, catches some z's late into the 24-hour tournament.


king of the hill, no tap, snake-eyes (splits count as strikes)
and between the legs were just some of the ways the
organizers used to keep the bowlers going, Gonzalez said.
Giving away lots of prizes was another way, Gonzalez
said. Local sponsors donated trips to Coronado, Gorgona
as well as food and drinks.
Panama Canal Women's Bowling Association orga-
nized the event to raise money for Hogar de la Infancia, an
orphanage in Panama City. They used the money to buy
appliances such as a microwave and a washing machine.
The Fort Espinar Bowling Center donated a video cassette
recorder.
The association also set up angel trees at Espinar,
Howard, Albrook, Clayton and Curundu Nov. 1 to help the
orphans, she said.
About 125 peopleaccross the isthmus picked up angels
hung on the treees and purchased gifts for the children,
Gonzalez said.
Each child received about 17 gifts, ranging from uni-
forms to toys to personal hygiene items.
Naval MobileConstructionBattalion-7 membersplayed
a major role in helping the school, she said.
The reserve unit from Gulfport, Miss., is volunteering
off-duty time to work at the school. It will be refurbishing
showers and conducting electrical, plumbing and wall
construction repairs.
"These guys have been super," she said. They have
dedicated their off-time, what little they have, to helping
the school, she said.
Despite all the effort, the Christmas party for the
children has been postponed until early next year, Gonzalez
said.
"It's disappointing that we found out after all the work
that the kids won't be able to receive the gifts, because they
are being sent off to foster parents," she said.
"It'll just be a late Christmas."


, . ',,.. -..


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SCN radio sports
The Southern Command Network's AM 790 Pacific
and 1420 Atlantic will broadcast the following sports this
weekend.
Tonitght
Pro basketball: New York Knicks at Chicago at 8 p.m.
Saturday
Pro football: Denver at Chicago at 12:30 p.m.
Dallas at N.Y. Jets at 4 p.m.
Sunday
Pro football: Philadelphia at Indianapolis at 8 p.m.
Monday
Pro football: N.Y. Giants at New Orleans

Pan-Am Dive Club
The Pan American Dive Club is welcoming new mem-
bers. The club is located in Building 214, Fort Espinar and
is open 6-8 p.m. Friday. Dues are $6 per month or $25 for
six months. Rentals available. Call Gary Garay at 289-
3428 or 289-4447 or Tom Bell at 289-3762 or 289-3538.

Dirty dozen softball
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center will host the
Dirty Dozen Softball Tournament Jan. 7-9. The first 12
teams to signup are eligible. There is a $50 entry fee.
Trophies will be awarded for first and second place teams.
A coaches meeting will be held Jan. 5 at the Howard Sports
and Fitness Center. For more information, call 284-3451.

Intramural golf season
Golf season at the Horoko Golf Course begins Jan. 14
with registration open until Jan. 6. Squadrons will field a
four-person team each week that will compete head-to-
head with anotherteam. Players should have an established
handicap. If players do not have a Horoko handicap,
scorecards may be turned into the Howard Sports and
Fitness Center where a handicap will be established.
Intramural handicaps will be adjusted weekly by the
center's staff once the season begins. Players without
handicaps will play scratch. The Zodiac Community Ac-
tivities Center will host coaches meeting 2p.m. Jan. 6. For
more information, call 284-3451.

Jingle Bell 5K Run/Walk
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center will hold the 5th
Annual Jingle Bell 5K Run/Walk 7 a.m. Saturday starting
in front of the center. Sign-ups are under way and are open
until 6:15 am. the day of the event. First and second place


trophies will be awarded for men and women in three age
categories. Call the 284-3451 for more information.

Swimming classes
The Howard and Albrook pools invite parents and their
children to enroll in swimming lessons. Diving classes
and ladies water exercise classes are available at the
Albrook Pool. For more information, call the Zodiac
Community Activities Center at the Howard Pool at 284-
3569 or the Albrook Pool at 286-3555.

No tap bowling
All the monthly winners of the no-tap tournament
during the past year will compete for the title of '93 no-tap
champion Sunday at the Albrook Bowling Center. The
winner will receive several prizes including a deluxe
weekend for two at the Marriott Hotel in Panama City.
Several other prizes will be awarded. Call 286-4260.

Sports rentals
The 24th Services Squadron Sports and Recreational
Rental Center on Howard AFB has specials for the month
of December that include a free rental of a dive bag with
paid rental of fins. Beach chairs are $1 a day or $2 a
weekend from Monday until Saturday. All indoor games
are 50 cents off Monday through Dec. 23. A six-foot table
with eight chairs are $5 a day Dec. 27-30. The center will
be closed Dec. 24, 25 and 31 and Jan. 1.

Sober fun run/walk
The Sober Awareness Family Fun Run/Walk will be
held Saturday on the Atlantic side. Event categories are
men and women's open 1 OK, family fun walk 5K and one-
mile children's open. Registration is ongoing at the Fronius
Fitness Center on Fort Davis. A T-shirt and certificate are
included with the entrance fee of $2. Call 289-3108 for
more information.

Balboa Relays
The BalboaRelays will held at Balboa High School Jan.
28-29. Practices are scheduled for 7 am. weekends at
Balboa HighSchool, 6-7:15 am. and 5-7p.m. attheReeder
Physical Fitness Center. Military personnel interested in
running the relays call Willie Moye at 287-6411 or Sue
Bozgoz at 287-6448, 287-3445 or 260-1128.


Run for the Oasis 10K
The Run for the Oasis 10K run will be held 7 a.m.
Saturday at the Amador Causeway. The run is sponsored


I


Hey, batter batter
Registration for the Unit Level Softball Program is under way at the Directorate of Community
Activities Sports Division, Building 154, Fort Clayton, and ends Jan. 7. Call 287-4050.


Tropic Times 1
Dec. 17,1993 1
by the Abou Saad TempleShriners andis sanctioned by the
Panama Armed Forces Running Association. For more
information, call 287-3937.

Pacific softball
The Pacific Softball League will open its 1994 slow
pitch league Jan. 3 in the league's park near Pier Street,
Balboa. Games start 5:30 p.m. weekdays. The season runs
until May 1. Everybody is eligible. People interested in
playing can contact Ruben Jimenez or Roy Johnson at the
park or call 236-2952, 252-7541, 2990 or 2361 for more
information.

Transisthmian relay
Registration for the Transisthmian Relay Race contin-
ues until Jan. 7 at the Directorate of Community Activities
Sports Division.
A briefing for team coaches and representatives will be
Held 1 p.m. Jan 13 at the Valent Recreation Center on Fort
Clayton. For more information, call the DCA Sports Office
at 287-4050.

USARSO relay team
Time trials for the U.S. Army South Transisthmian
Team run until Monday. The team will be selected Mon-
day. For more information, call Willie Moye at 287-6411
or Sue Bozgoz at 287-6448 or 260-1128.

Fishing charters
Trophy deep-sea and Sunskiff bottom fishing charters
are available at the Rodman Marina. Charters include
captain, fishing gear, cooler and ice. Call 283-3147 or 283-
3150 for more information.

Black Stallion charters
The 61-foot Black Stallion is available for charter
through the Rodman Marina for cruising or fishing. Call
the Rodman Marina at 283-3147/3150 for more informa-
tion.

Basketball tourney
A holiday basketball tournament will be held Dec. 26-
,31 for major subordinate command level basketball teams.
The deadline to register is Monday.
A coaches clinic will be held in the Sports Conference
Room in Building 154, Fort Clayton, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday.
For more information, call the DCA Sports Office at 287-
4050.

Intramural softball
People interested in playing softball can contact the
Howard Sports and Fitness Center until Jan. 12 when the
season begins. The games will be played weekdays with
hourly starts beginning at 6:05 p.m. A coaches' meeting is
scheduled for 2 p.m. Jan. 4 at the Zodiac Community
Activities Center. Call 284-3451 for more information.

Over 30 basketball
Registration for the over 30 basketball program has
begun at the Reeder Physical Fitness Center on Fort
Clayton. A basketball clinic is scheduled for 6 p.m. Jan. 4.
Call 287-3861.

Youth officials
Youth officials, coaches and assistant coaches are
needed forthe 1993-94 CoedBaseball/SoftballProgram.For
more information, call Rory Egger at 287-4540.

Rugby players wanted
The opening game of the 1994 rugby season will be
noon Saturday at the softball field near the Air Mobility
Command terminal on Howard AFB. Anyone interested in
playing rugby may call 287-3663.

Free aerobics
Free aerobic classes given by Teresa Consterdine are
available 9:15-10:15 a.m. weekdays attheReederPhysical
Fitness Center. Each workout has a warm-up, cardiovas-
cular workout, cool down and floorwork. Call 287-3861.

Body building
The Howard Base Theater will host a body building
championship Jan. 29. The deadline to register is Jan. 15.
A $15 registration fee is required. Call the Howard Sports
and Fitness Center at 284-3451 for more infonration.











16 Tropic Times
-11� Dec. 17,1993


Airmen fight DWIs
HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PA) -Airmen from
the 24th Mission Support Squadron here are joining
the fight against drunk driving in Panama by hold-
ing a Blue Ribbon Day Saturday.
Junior enlisted members from the unit will set up
a table in front of the post office here from 10 a.m.
until 2 p.m. People can pick up blue ribbons to tie to
their car anntenaes
"In past years, the rate of drunk driving here has
been high," said SrA. Willard D. Smith, a repro-
graphics specialist who is heading the effort. "We
want people to see this and say to themselves, 'This
is real, and I could become a statistic.'"
To bring home their point, the airmen will have
a computer set up with a program that calculates
blood alcohol levels.
Information about a drinker's size and habits
(such as the type and number of drinks) is keyed in
and the predicted BAC is given.
The airmen are working with the base social
actions office to getleafletsandotherinformationon
the hazards of DWI and DUI.
They will also be mixing and serving non-
alcoholic drinks and beer.

Slow traffic expected
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Officials
caution drivers to expect slow traffic and to allow
more time to reach their destination Dec. 30 be-
cause of multiple units participating in payday ac-
tivity runs.
The heaviest congestion will be along Clayton-
Curundu road leading to the back gate and along
Hospital Road.
Drivers are reminded to drive 10 miles per hour
while passing troops and to follow the directions
of road guards.
The battalion and brigade runs are part of the
new end-of-month pay day activities initiated by
Maj. Gen. George A. Crocker, U.S. Army South
commanding general.
Units will also participate in uniform and unit
inspections, company and battalion formations and
release of personnel for payday activities in the af-
ternoon.

Panama reflects
. COROZAL (Tropic Times) - The government
of Panama has designed Monday as a "Day of Re-
flection." Panamanian government workers will be
released from work and office building will be
closed, according to a government new release.
Monday will be the fourth anniversary since
Operation Just Cause, the military action that took
place here during the Noriega regime, the release
said.

Delivery expands
QUARRY HEIGHTS (Tropic Times) - The Mi-
ami Herald announced an expanded schedule for
daily home delivery of its newspaper and Friday
delivery of the Tropic Times.
The delivery of the Tropic Times is made pos-
sible by special arrangement with the Miami Her-
ald, which will begin home delivery of its paper on
Quarry Heights and Albrook AFS Monday.
The delivery of the Tropic Times on Albrook
and Quarry Heights started Dec. 3 for athree-week
test period, said Patrick Milton, command infor-
mation officer at the U.S. Southern Command
headquarters.
Delivery of the Tropic Times for testing periods
in other areas will tentatively start:
*Fort Clayton and Corozal - Jan. 7.
*Fort Amador and Rodman NS - Jan. 28.
*Howard AFB and Fort Kobbe - Feb. 28.
During the test peiods, residents will be offered
the opportunity to subscribe for home delivery of
the Miami Herald. If enough interest is show, then
home delivery of both papers will continue, Milton
said.
Delivery of the Miami Herald is planned to be-
gin as follows:
*Quarry Heights and Albrook - Dec. 20.
*Fort Clayton and Corozal -Jan. 24.
*Fort Amador and Rodman NS - Feb. 21.
*Howard AFB and Fort Kobbe - March 28.
The Miami Herald is also currently seeking
carriers for its delivery routes, Milton said.
For information about the Miami Herald home
delivery service, or employment, call 269-3220.


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U.S. Navy photo by PH2 Roberto Taylor
Crew members of the Ecuadorian vessel BAEHualcopo carry supplies onto their vessel at Rodman NS.


Rodman sailors battle blaze


by Lt.j.g. Laura C. Moore
USNAVSTAPANCANAL PAO
RODMAN NS - Rodman Naval Station sailors put
their fire-fighting training to the test recently when they
helped the crew of the Ecuadorian ship BAE Hualcopo
battle a blaze aboard the vessel.
Several Ecuadorian sailors suffered smoke-inhalation
injuries, but were quickly treated and returned to duty the
same day, Navy officials said.
The ship, in port to purchase goods from the Free Zone
to transport back to military exchanges in Ecuador, lost
most ofits electronic supplies such as appliances and tele-
vision sets.
The Nov. 26 fire started in a very unfortunate place,
that made it difficult to extinguish it, said Lt. Paul
Campbell, Rodman Operations Department.
"The fire quickly gutted the ship's damage control
central, which the centralized area from which they would
have fought the fire."
Naval station personnel were called in to assist because
of their experience.
Petty Officer First Class Manuel Fontanez and three
others helped de-water spaces within the ship.
"The location of the fire was uncertain, so we had to


find the fire by feeling and checking compartments," he
said. "I will never ever complain about having too much
training about the ship, that's for sure. I guess all the Navy
training really pays off."
Once the fire was extinguished, the station provided
meals and sleeping quarters for the exhausted Ecuador-
ian sailors. The sailors remained in the quarters until Dec.
1, when the Hualcopo departed under tow.
Many of the Hualcopo sailors said all they had left:
were the clothes on their backs.
"The help rendered to us by the naval station was very
important," said Cmdr. Adiaga Franco, Hualcopo execu-
tive officer.
"We never thought we were going to receive so much
help. We are really thankful. We will always keep Rod-
man in our memories."
The fire provided the naval station an invaluable ex-
perience, said CapL Arthur N. Rowley III.
"We have learned an awful lot," Rowley said. "Al-
though we responded very well, there's always something
we can learn to do better, should something like this oc-
cur again. And the only thing that's for certain is that
something will occur again. As long was we learn from
every experience and get better, we enhance our capabil-
ity to take care of disasters."


National Guard celebrates birthday


by SSgt Eric Wedeking
TheaterSupport Element
FORT CLAYTON - For some people who believe in
superstition, the number 13 brings with it unlucky tid-
ings.
But for Army and Air National Guard men and
women, the 13th of December was a time to celebrate
because Monday marked the 357th anniversary of the Na-
tional Guard's birth as a colonial militia in 1636.
A former Alabama Army National Guardsman and
now deputy support commander for U.S. Army-South,
Col. Jimmy Simpkins commended citizen-soldiers and
airmen for their "hometown"-style support they offer the
rest of the U.S. military as part of the "Total Force."
"After 357 years, the National Guard has evolved from
a colonial militia to a viable, modem-day fighting force,"
Simpkins said. "When you people go on a mission, no
one can go about doing that mission like the National
Guard.
"We could not do our mission here in Panama if it
were not for the National Guard."
Reserve Component and active military personnel at-
tending the Guard birthday bash reflected on the origins
of the National Guard, which can traced back more than
three centuries- decades before the nation created a full-
time military force.
Four Massachusetts Army National Guard units are
still the oldest military groups in either the National
Guard itself or the U.S. Army. Those units include the
181st and 182nd Infantry, 101st Field Artillery and the
101st Engineer Battalion.
Earlier referred to as "militia," the term "National
Guard" was first used in the United States by a New York
military unit in 1824 in honor of Revolutionary War-hero


Marquis de LaFayette's Paris-based militia unit called
"Guarde Nationale." Troops with the 2nd Battalion, 11th
Artillery Regiment voted themselves the monicur "Bat-
talion of National Guard."
During World War I, the federally enacted National
Defense Act of 1916 resulted in the term "National
Guard" become mandatorily used by each state.
In a recently released posture statement, National
Guard officials said both the Army and Air National
Guard will continue to be a part of the Total Force while
also assuming responsibility for state missions.
Officials said the increasing National Guard partici-
pation is also expected affect the U.S. Southern Com-
mand theater as more active military units are inactivated
or redeployed elsewhere with drawdowns and Panama
Canal Treaty implementation.
"We anticipate that the Guard and (U.S. Army) Re-
serve will be asked to take on more of a support role here,"
said Col. Mike Nevin, the command's senior National
Guard advisor.
With a backdrop featuring 54 state and territorial flags
representing the National Guard's complete representa-
tion throughout the nation, Guard members again fol-
lowed tradition by naming their youngest citizen-soldier
and airmen deployed to Panama to use swords to cut
Army and Air National Guard cakes with the assistance
of senior military officials
Maj. Gen. Felix Santorii of the U.S. Army Reserve in
Puerto Rico and U.S. Southern Command' deputy chief
for mobilization and Reserve affairs, joined Nevin and
Simpkins for the celebration. They assisted honored cake
cutters PFC Lorenzo Butler, from the Alabama Army Na-
tional Guard's Selma-based 1135th Supply Company;
and SSgt Elisabeth McManus, from the Montana Air
National Guard's Great Falls-based 120th Fighter Group.


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Gift of the Panama Caral M Tropic imes Vol. VI. No. 50 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, Dec. 17, 1993 Curfew lifts Jan.1 FORT CLAYTON (Joint Task Force Panama PAO) -U.S. military officials will lift the 2-5 a-m. curfew Jan. 1 through March 31. Officials cited improved political andsocialconditionsinPanama and said the purpose of the three-month period is to determine whether to lift the curfew permanently. Joint Task Force -Panama Commander Maj. Gen. G. A. Crocker tasked unit commanders across the isthmus to watch the effect on U.S. personnel and units. He asked commanders to discuss the change with enlisted leaders, soldiers and family members. Crocker will meet with his senior commanders monthly during thetrialtofind out how the change affects morale and unit readiness. During the trial period, the Military Police Command will focus partofits datagathering effortson spotting any crimetrendsthatmay result from the change, especially crimes committed against U.S. personnel during the hours of the current curfew. Crocker will use the information commanders and staff gather to decide whether to reinstate the curfew, modify it or lift it permanently. Crockeralsotold commanderstoU.S.communitymembers ofthe need for continued personal safety measures. He stressed that Personal Movement Limitation Bravo -commonly referred to as PML Bravo -will still be in effect; people should avoid off-limits establishments andthe high-riskareas as notedonthecommand grid map. Officials also noted thatpeopleshouldnotconfusetheU.S. curfew with the 9 p.m. -5 am. curfew the governor of Panama Province imposes on minors 17 and under. That curfew is still in effect. Panamaconfirms 8dengue cases GORGASARMYCOMMUNITYHOSPITAL(USARSOPAO) -Panama's Ministry of Health has confirmed eight cases of dengue I fever among Panamanian nationals who live in Panama City, DpWment oDefense photo bySM5gt. Steven-Taylor medical officials said. Traffic backs up during afternoon rush hour at Albrook's back gate. Construction here is "Panamaisvery serious about this situation-tothepoint where expected to cause further delays to commuters. they are considering closing thePanamanianschools sothatstudents can participate in community ciean-up programs," said Maj. NelsonAk Powers, Entomology Branch chief at Gorgas Army Community Albrook gate repairs affect traffic Hospital. "Dengue fever, like other viruses, causes flu-like symptoms of ALBROOK AFS (24th Wing PA) -Traffic traffic may be slowed considerably and drivers are fever, severe headache, pain behind the eyes, muscle andjoint aches through the gates here will be affected by an advised to consider alternate routes, said Johnson. and pains, and an occasional rash," Powers said. "Though not fatal, upgrade project that began Monday. The delays willlast about six weeks. During the it is recommended that a physician be seen." The first phase of the project involves building final week of construction, in approximately midThe following are tips to help fight this disease: aguardhouseatthebackgatenearFort Claytonand January, the gate will again be closed to inbound *Checkquarters,inside and outside, forcontainers with standing Curundu. The new building will be built back from traffic from 8 am.-3:45 p.m. water such as old tires, cans and pet dishes. the current structure to make entry to the base When the new guard house at the Curundu *Ensure windows and screens are tight fitting because this easier, said Jason Johnson, chief of construction entrance is finished, front gate work will begin. mosquito will come indoors if given the chance. with the 24th Civil Engineering Squadron. Contractors will build a wallin front ofthe existing *Keep car windows rolled up when traveling off post. "Basically we're going to upgrade the gates and guard house and make improvements to lighting. "This mosquito likes to hitchhike," Powers said. "Dengue is not providemoresecurityandprotectionfortheguards," "Ibis will give them more protection against, a laughing matter, though. Because of the biology of the mosquito, Johnson said. forinstance, a drunk driver," Johnson said. "We'd theuseofsprayinsecticideshavegivensatisfactoryresults. However, Inbound traffic was prevented from using the rathertheyrunintoaconcrete wall than ourcops." such applications are only temporary and have nolasting effect. The gate at times this week, but two-way flow will be This project's second phase is scheduled to best control is removal of the breeding site." restored Monday. Because of the construction, finish in March. For more information, call Preventive Medicine at 282-5269. Local Scoutsdonate unsold Christmas trees to hospital by Maureen Sampson their Christmas tree sale to local hospitals. group and other charitable organizations. normally don't come in contact with, said Tropic Times staff writer "We looked for hospitals that might not "It makes me feel good that we're doing KimCarey, Cub Scout volunteer. have the funds to purchase theirown trees," something for someone else," said Mat"It's an opportunity for a U.S. organizaCOROZAL -In Panama, life for unsaid Ray Underwood, treasurer for the thew Carey of Cub Scout Pack 29. tionto give to the community we workwith bought Christmas trees is pretty bleak. Panama Canal District of Direct Service Besides serving the community, the and show good will at Christmas," Carey They are forced out of the comfort of their Council. Scouts earn various privileges by particisaid. air-conditioned truck. They sit in the hot "We thought it would be a good way to pating in these service projects. Nolan Because of the Scouts, hospitals like St. sun until their needles fall off. Then they're lighten the lives ofpeople in need." GlidewellfronBoyScoutTroop29saidthe Thomas, the Children's Hospital, and the hauled away with the rest of the garbage. Helping people in need is nothing new Scouts can get a renewed membership in Cancer Hospital in Panama City will have This year, the Boy Scouts and Cub to the Scouts. Underwood said for the past exchange for service hours. a Christmas tree on every floor. Scouts decided to change all that They few years they have been donating trees to DonatingtreesalsogivesScoutsachance And the left over trees will have a home donated nearly 50 pine trees left over from Army Community Service, the chaplains to spread Christmas cheer to people they for Christmas. w e Military News page 5 Army and Air Force Exchange SerAir Force Space Command to track *Military police rappeling, page 3. vice and local commissaries set holiSanta Claus' annual globe-trotting *Christmas in Panama, pages 8&9. day hours. trek. *Basketbrawling, page 12.

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Tropic Times -Dec. 17,1993 Volunteers help mail flow smoother Navy nameslocal honorary ombudsmen by Spec. Alexander C. White USARSO Public Affairs Office RODMAN NS -Twenty volunteers recently wrapped up an intense week of Navy training here FORT CLAYTON -Every year during the holiday with graduation aboard the USS Longbeach and a season a phenomenon takes place in the post offices transit through the canal. around the world. Postal employees are responsible for Naval Station commanding officer Capt. an onslaught of letters and gifts and with this added burArthurRowley 1II congratulated the graduates and den, they must ensure that each piece of parcel makes it presented them with what they had worked so to its destination. many long hours for--honorary ombudsman cerIn order to combat this onslaught, military post offices tilicates look to volunteers for help. The 24th Air Postal Squadron The Longbeach allowed the students to comis no exception, since Thanksgiving they have requested plete their training in one of the vessels classroom, help from both the Army and Air Force. Because of a baked them a graduation cake and gave them the lack of response, the post office had to rely on its volun"Order of the Locks" to commemorate their tranteers. sit through the canal. "This Christmas we requested augmentee from the Ombudsman Linda Nichols and Tommy ProArmy and Air Force to help relieve us of some of the vost, who work at the Family Service Center in work load. Unfortunately, neither complied," said TSg. Charleston, S.C., administered the five-day course Marcia J. Bonnick, military post office supervisor, 24th that began Nov.30 and wrapped up Dec. 3. Air Postal Squadron. The students were taught "to be a person fami"That is why the volunteers are very vital to our orgalies can depend on, any time, any place, anynization. We depend on them as if they were paid emwhere." ployees," she said. "Without them it would be difficult to "It's the love of that you have to remember," complete our mission." said Millie Rowley, wife of commanding officer, The post office has about 25 active volunteers spread usAny phoraby spec minwe c. wia. Capt. ArthurRowley III. "Ombudsmenare so busy out among the seven post office locations. Their duties Elaine Martin, a volunteer at the Fort Clayton Post helping everyone else that they sometimes forget involve sorting mail and other various tasks. During the Office, helps sort mail during the busy holiday their own family." holiday season, mail is quadrupled in load, receiving The Navy Ombodsmen take care of everything more than 10 tons daily. season.from referrals to pre-deployment briefs and poten"What they do doesn't take much supervision," said Finally, he said volunteers get satisfaction in knowing tal suicide threats, Navy officials said. SSgt. Michael Stout, post office official, 24th Air Postal that they helping their community by ensuring that evThe program began in 1970 by Adm. Elmo Squadron. "This helps us because they can accomplish eryone receives mail from their loved ones. Zumwalt as "a necessary link between the comthose tasks without someone looking over their shoulder. "A volunteer receives a lot of knowledge by working mand and the families." The program was tested "In return we can concentrate on other jobs without here," Stout said. "It has been my experience that emonce against during operations Desert Shield/ having to worry whether we'll get all the tasks comployers will hire someone who has been willing to volunStorm. pleted," he said. teer their time in a field that they plan to go into because The ombudsmen were armed with a "critical Bonnick said because of the increase in volume, her it shows that they care about the job." roster" so detailed that a serviceman on leave volunteers are a valuable asset. Especially this time of "I like to interact with people. By working here I can could be found within minutes. If a serviceman year when her office goes from receiving one truckloadof talk with customers and joke with the employees," said was rumored to be missing in action the rumor mail a day to up to three trucks a day. Vicki Harrell, postal volunteer. "Not only that, what I do could be confirmed or denied in a matter of sec"Rush, rush, rush," said Elaine Martin, postal volunis for a good cause because it helps alleviate some of the onds with the up-to-date list provided by the comteer. "We are trying to get everything out for everybody. work-load from the postal people." manding officer of each unit. It's real hectic. This is when we all have to pull together." Members of the 24th Air Postal Squadron encourage Because of the holidays there was an increase of volanyone interested to come and volunteer their services. U.S. Army South releases unteers, but Stout said the post office can always use them. "We were rated number one in customer satisfaction," holiday dining hours He explained volunteers receive practical experience Stout said. "But, we could never have achieved that level that would look good on resumes. They receive compenofexcellenceifit were not for the dedication ofthe volunFORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The station for their efforts by getting free hours of child care. teers." hours for Christmas dinner in the following dining facilities are: list holday ours Fort Clayton -noon-2 p.m., Dec. 24, 193rd AA FES lists holiday operating hours Supor attaio, Duidi .24013r Corozal -noon-I p.m., Dec. 24, Company E, FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Te hours of operaFort Kobbe 228th Aviation, Building 9 tion for the Army and Air Force Exchange System -Panama Shoppete/video rental -Eve: 10 am-8 pm. Day: closed Fort Kobbe -11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Dec. 25, 1st for Christmas Eve and Christmas Day are as follows: Burger King -Eve: 8 a.m-2 pm. Day: closed Battalion, 508th Infantry, Building 805 Pacific Miscellaneous Fort Davis -11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Dec. 25, 5th Corozal Quarry Heights shoppette -Eve: 9 am-5 pim. Day: closed Battalion, 87th Infantry, Building 19 Main PX -Eve: 8 a.m-6 p.m. Day: closed Gorgas Hospital shoppee -Eve: 9 a.m.-4 pm. Day: closed he price for the meal is $1.50 for family memSweets 'N 'Things -Eve: 10:30 am.-2 pim. Day: closed Curundu School cafeteria -Eve: closed Day: closed bers under 12 years old; $3 for enlisted soldiers, Frank's Franks -Eve: 10:30 am.-2 pm Day: closed Cocoli shoppene -Eve: noon-8 p.m. Day: 10 a.m.-4p.m. officers, family members and dining facility atBakery -Eve: 8 am.-4 p.m Day: closed Balboa school cafeteria -Eve: closed Day: closed tendants; $5.55 for guests under 12 years old; and Anthony's Pizza -Eve: 10:30 am.-2pm. Day: closed Curundu Service Station -Eve: 6 a.m.-midnight Day: 6 $11.10 for soldiers on per diem, guests and DeWok Works -Eve: 10:30 a.m.-2 p. Day: closed a.m.-midnight partment of Defense civilians. Casa de Amigos -Eve: 10:30 anm-2 p.m. Day: closed Atlantic Fort Clayton Fort spin Officials remind of Shoppette (95) -Eve: 9 a.m.-l p.m. Day: closed Shoppette -Eve: 10 am.-4 pm Day: closed Frank's Franks (95) -Eve: 7 anm-I pm. Day: closed Fort Davis local uniform policy Anthony's Pizza -Eve: 11 am.-2 p.m. Day: closed Main PX -Eve: 9 a.m.-6 pm. Day: closed FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Officials Burger King -Eve: 8 aim.-2 p.m. Day: closed Auto parts store -Eve: 10 am.-4 p.m. Day: closed remind U.S. forces that they are not allowed to Popeye's -Eve: 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Day: closed Gas station -Eve: 7 am-5 p.m. Day: 10 am-4 pnwear military uniforms off post for personal busiFrank's Franks (by Burger King) -Eve: closed Day: closed Cafeteria -Eve: 7 am.-2 pm. Day: closed ness or on commercial transportation outside the Clayton Plaza Shoppeue -Eve: 7 am.-midnight Day: 7 a.m.Anthony's Pizza -Eve: 11 am.-6 pmn. Day: closed canal area. midnight Burger King -Eve: 11 am.-4 p.m. Day: closed Uniforms are allowed on defense sites, miShoppette (519) -Eve: 8 am.-9 pm. Day: closed Clothing Sales -Eve: 9 a.m-6 p.m. Eve: closed tary areas of coordination and special facilities, Auto parts store -Eve: 9 a.m-4 pm. Day: closed Fort Sherman Panama Canal Commission areas, U.S. or foreign' Clothing Sales -Eve: 10 am.-5 p.m. Day: closed Shoppette -Eve: 10 ami-4 p.m. Day: closed government offices, while picking up privately Fort Amador Gas station -Eve: closed Day: closed owned vehicles, essential business to get a driver's Shoppetre -Eve: 7 am.-7 p.m. Day: 8 aim.-2 p.m. Anthony's Pizza -Eve: 11 am.-4 pm Day: closed license, vehicle inspection and registration and Albrook AFS when visiting eating establishments within the Shoppette -Eve: 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Day: closed The hours of operation for military commissaries for the area 11 am.-2 p.m. For more information, call Snack bar -Eve: 6:30 a.m.-t p.m. Day: closed Christmas and New Year holidays are: 287-3376. Anthony's Pizza -Eve: 11 am.-4 pn. Day: closed Corozal -8 arm.-7 p., Dec. 21-22 Frank's Franks -Eve: 10 a.m.-4 pm. Day: closed 8 am.-8 pim., Dec. 23 Video rental -Eve: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Day: closed 9 am.-2 pm., Dec. 24 Howard CPO installs Furniture store -Eve: 10 a-m.-4 pin. Day: closed closed Dec. 25 and Jan. 1 job information line Shoe store -Eve: 10 amnt-4pm. Day: closed Howard AFB -9 am.-6 pm., Dec. 20 H Toyland/Outdour living -Eve: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Day: closed 9 arm.-7 pm., Dec. 21 HOWARD AFB f (24th Wing A) -The Howard Class Six -Eve: 10 am-9 p.m. Day: closed 10 am.-7 pm., Dec. 22 Civilian Personnel Office has installed a job inHoward AFB 9 a.m.-6 pm., Dec. 23 formation line, 184-6449, that may be called 24 Main PX -Eve: 8 a.rn,-6 pm. Day: closed 9 a.m.-2 pm., Dec. 24 hours a day. Th, recording lists job title, pay plan, Class Six -Eve: 10 a.rn-8 pJm Day: closed closed Dec. 25 and Jan. 1 grade, salary, clu ing date of the announcement Cafeteria -Eve: 6:30 a.m.-2 im. Day: closed Fort Espinar -9 a.m.-6 p.m., Dec. 21-22 and instruction on how and where to apply. PerAnthony's Pizza -Eve: II am-4 p.m. Day: close] 9 a.m.-7 p.m., Dec. 23 manent and temporary employment positions are Clothing Sales -Eve: 10 am.-5 ptm Day: closed 9 am.-2 pun Dec. 24 announced. Service station -Eve: 6:30 a.m.-8 p.m. Day: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. clo'. _. 5 anyi Jan. 1

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Tropic Times Dec. 17,1993 Air assault MPs hang on for training by Sgt. Lori Davis USARSO Public Affairs Office FORT CLAYTON -The 194th Military Police Company (air assault) from Fort Campbell, Ky., soldiers are cops on the ropes. These "air assault" MPs rappel from helicopters, slingload equipment and ran from the back of CH-47 Chinooks when they have time off from protecting and defending the community. The air assault MPs are training for their combat support mission, an additional part of their MP duties. The 194th WP Co. provides support for the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), explained SFC Evan Caldwell, operations sergeant, 194th MP Co. There are several types of MP units, Caldwell explained. Garrison MP units specialize in law enforcement, physical security units guard critical facilities, escort units handle convoys and combat support units provide area security and circulation control on the battlefield. MP support on the battlefield includes such things as set up rear security areas, guarding against enemy infiltration and handling refugees and soldiers separated from their units, Caldwell said. "Being an air assault unit is important because we are able to quickly move people and equipment," he said. MPs on the battlefield make sure supplies get from the rear support areas to soldiers on the front lines. By being air assault, the 194th M Co. can get to critical areas, drop off soldiers and equipment, and keep the supply line going, he said. Combat support MPs provide security by working as three-member teams. In the 194th MP Co. there are 40three-member teams with High Mobility, Multi-Purpose Wheeled Vehicles stocked with as much firepower as an infantry squad, Caldwell said. "Each member of the team has a 9-mm pistol." he said. "The driver has a SAW (Squad Attack Weapon), the team leader has an M203 grenade launcher and the turret gunner has a Mark 19 (automatic grenade launcher." This heavy cache of weapons may sound like alot, but when three people are patrolling a hostile area to protect friendly forces each team has to be ready for conflict. The MPs not only provide security, they must also be prepared to temporarily augment infantry units if the situation calls for more firepower, Caldwell said. Providing more firepower could mean slingloading their rolling arsenals into a landing zone and running out from the back of a CH-47 Chinook orrappeling in from a hovering helicopter to secure an area on foot, he said. "It's imperative security is established because helicopters are sitting ducks when they land or hover, as you could see in Somalia," he said. Apaches clear the area before other helicopters come in to a hot landing zone, or pathfinders go in on foot to secure it, he said. Making sure there is security on the ground before an MP rappers in is imperative too, because if the enemy is U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Loi Davs waiting for them when they rappel from the bird, there's Soldiers from the 194th Military Police Company practice rappeling from a UH-60 Blackhawk at Albrook no hope on the end of their rope. AFS. 1st Lt. Alan Faulk holds on tight and waits for the rappel master to give him the sign to go. Spec. Kenneth Thomas does a safety check on a 'Swiss seat," a rappeling guiderope.

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e 1Hemisphere Survey says Panamanians want U.S. troops to stay PANAMA CITY (Reuters) -An overwhelming majority of Panamanians want U.S. troops to remain here beyond a Dec. 31, 1999 deadline for withdrawal, according to a poll published Saturday. The CID/Gallup survey in the daily El Panama America found that 72 percent of 1,200 Panamanians interviewed favor a continued U.S. military presence. Under the 1977 Panama Canal Treaties, the United States must withdraw its 10,000 troops and hand over control of the Panama Canal to the local government by the turn of the century. Only 20 percent of Panamanians want the U.S. military to leave, while 8 percent have no opinion, according to the poll. No margin of error was given. Many Panamanians are worried aliout the economic impact from the shutdown of U.S. bases, whichprovide some 13,000 direct and indirect jobs forPanamanians and inject an estimated $600 million annually into the local economy. President Guillermo Endara has rejected calls APL*SMPok for a referendum on the issue, saying this is up to Masked men with assault rifles killed six peasants in El Salvador Saturday night. El Salvadoran President his successor who will be elected in Panama's May Alfredo Cristiani has named a commission to probe possible re-emergence of rightist death squads. 1994 general election. The United States has maintained troops in Panama since 1904, with numbers peaking at Un en KI O I a V8 0r 65,'000 during World War If -when U.S. warships were passing through the canal -and at SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador (AP) -Masked men Meanwhile, a commission appointed to probe the pos27,000 during the 1989 invasion that ousted with assault rifles killed six peasants in western El Salvasible re-emergence of rightist death squads published adformer dictator Manuel Antonio Noriega. dor, and police said Monday they had arrested three vertisements in newspapers asking people to come forpeople who confessed. ward with information. Police said the slayings occurred Saturday night in the The commission was named by President Alfredo Thousands homeless village of Copinolito, 40 miles west of the capital. Cristiani because ofan increasein death squad-style murafter Panama floods The killings had the earmarks of the rightist death ders. PANAMA CTY (Reuters) -Floods ravaged a squads that have plagued El Salvador for years. The six Victims have included former guerrilla leaders, and remote region of western Panama, leaving two peasants were dragged from their homes into the street many fear the peace process could be blocked if the killpeople missing and 2,100 homeless, authorities where four were shot to death and two had their throats ings continue. Soldiers and former soldiers also have been said Monda ns cut. slain, apparently in retaliation,.adMody Torrential rain battered the Caribbean coastal Police arrested three people. A police spokesman said A peace treaty signed in January 1992 ended 12 years the three admitted the killings and said the victims were ofcivil war betweenleftists and U.S.-backed governments pided early Monday, PanaDealiTan emergency sermembers of youth gangs. that killed more than 75,000. vsds earPg Emergency aid was being flown Monday from Panama City to the stricken region, said Aquilino Ortega, a spokesman for the government's disaster coordination unit. SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) -Eduardo Frei, the candipeople's verdict, and wish the next government the gaOrtega said the two missing men were fishing date for the governing center-left coalition, won a landest success, because Chile deserves that." from a boat in the sea when the storm broke Saturslide victory in Saturday's presidential election and vowed FreL, 51, will succeed President Patrido Aylwin, who day. "to work to continue to consolidate democracy in Chile." is barred from running for a second consecutive term. Bocas Del Toro, a poor, isolated and sparsely The race appeared closer in the vote for congress, Aylwin took office in 1990, ending Pinochet's 16 1/2populated banana and coffee-growing region, has which was held simultaneously. year rule. He had seized power in a bloody 1973 coup. suffered asesies of natural disasters in recent years. According to official returns covering 94.5 percent of Speaking to hundreds of enthusiastic supporters gathA 1991 earthquake killed 32 and left 17,000 the estimated 8 million votes cast, Frei received 57.96 ered in front of a downtown hotel, Frai made an appeal to homeless, while flooding later in the same year percent. Arturo Alessandri, the candidate for the rightnational unity. drove another 20,000 from their homes. wing opposition, received 24.32 percent The result's in the congressional election were comThe four other presidential candidates -one rightist ing in slower. With 32 percent of the vote counted, the and three leftists -received between 1.1 percent and 6.2 government estimated the coalition backing Frei apU.S. troops deploying to percent each. peared slightly widening its current majority in the lower Colombia for COnstrucion A victory for Frei, the son ofthe late President Eduardo house to 73-47. Frei who governed from 1964 to 1970, could further disBut the right was assured to continue to control the BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) -U.S. Army soltance the government from Chile's past military rulers. Senate, 25-21, including eight senators appointed by diers will be sent this month to help build a road, a Frei has promised to amend the constitution, which Pinochet before he relinquished power. Frei wants to school and a hospital near Cali, headquarters of bars the president from firing former dictator. Gen. eliminate those seats. the world's largest cocaiicartel and a region rife Augusto Pinochet and other top military commanders. The virtually unchanged make-up of congress posed with leftist guerrillas. Alessandri opposes changing the constitution. an obstacle to Frei's plans to change the constitution writThe troops will be joined by Colombian solAlessandri, in an emotional speech to supporters, conten by the Pinochet regime, including a clause that aldiers, who will participate in the construction ceded defeat. lowed the 78-year-old general to remain army comprojects about 45 miles northwest of Cali, a U.S. "A majority of the country has chosen a proposal difmander and prevents the president from firing him and Embassy statement said Wednesday. ferent to ours," he said. "As democrats, we accept the other top military chiefs. The American soldiers are to leave in February, the statement said. The Cali region is awash in drug-processing Argentina frees 21 cult membersRebelsofthe Arge tinafre s 21cul mem ersRevolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia also opBUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) -Twenty-one nadians, were arrested in police raids Sept. 1 on Buenos erate in the region, attacking security forces, kidmembers of a religious cult, including seven Americans, Aires-area homes belonging to the Argentina-based napping landowners and rustling cattle. were freed three months after a court ordered them held group, an offshoot of the Children of God cult founded in Local news media said about 150 U.S. troops on kidnapping and other charges. California in 1969. will be posted near Malaga Bay on the Pacific Sixteen men and five women belonging to The FamAlso taken into custody were 138 children of group coast. The soldiers belong to the 46th Engineer ily were released late Monday after the Chamber of Apmembers, most of whom remained in government insti-. Battalion, from Fort Rucker, Ala., a U.S. Embassy peals in San Martin, just north of the capital, ruled a fedtutions late Monday. Jurin said the children were to be source said. eral court doesn't havejurisdiction in the matter, said cult released to the religious community late Monday and A U.S. military specialist said the American spokesman Alberto Jurin. Tuesday. troops were on a "civic action project" and would A spokesman for the appeals court said the ruling reThe 21 adults also had been held on charges of the not fight drug traffickers or rebels. He did not evoked the federal court decision ordering the cult memcorruption of minors and religious and racial discriminaknow if the soldiers would carry weapons. bers held. tion. Both sources spoke on condition of anonymity. The appeals court said Buenos Aires province has juThe Family appealed the charges, arguing that FedThe announcement comes as the Clinton adrisdiction over the case, but it was not immediately known eral Judge Roberto Marquevich did not have jurisdiction ministration is calling on Colombia to battle the if provincial authorities would prosecute cult members. in the case. Marquevich had ordered cult members held Cali cartel. The cultists, including seven Americans and two Cathree months ago.

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#iuuwiy NewsTropic Times5 M itary eDec. 17,1993 Space Command tracks Santa Retired admiral THE NORTH POLE (Air Force Space Command) -telephone call to the command post of the then-ContiOn Christmas Eve, the eyes and ears of the men and nental Air Defense Command. to succeed A spin women assigned to the North American Aerospace DeOne December morning, now-retired Col. r WASHINGTON (AP) -Administration officials fense Command will watch and listen for an unidentified Shoup, combat operations director, answered the "hot" SrINT C Adstrtin als object coming over the North Pole. This object will have line that connected him directly with the commander in say President Clinton has selected retired Adm. a trajectory different from those of hostile bombers, balchief. He was amazed when a voice said, "Is this one of Bobby Inman to replace Defense Secretary Les Aslistic missiles or space satellites. United States Space Santa's helpers?" At first, the colonel thought someone pin, whose bombshell resignation ended a turbulent Command's satellites, ground-based air defense radars, was playing a not-so-funny joke but, after talking for a year of budget battles, regional conflicts and controBallistic Missile Early Warning Systems and space surfew moments, he realized the youngster was sincere, so versy over gays in the military. veillance sensors will locate Santa Claus in his well-laden he went along with the tike, asking him if he had been The announcement of Inman, a former deputy disleigh. They send the data via one of the world's most good all year and what he wanted for Christmas. rector of the CIA and ex-director of the National Sesophisticated computer systems to the underground The calls came through on the supposedly unlisted curity Agency, could come as early as Thursday, said Cheyenne Mountain Complex near Colorado Springs. number until Shoup had to assign a duty officer to handle two White House officials, speaking late Wednesday The first indication in the simulated scenario that what was by then being called the "Santa Lin." on condition they not be otherwise identified. Santa Claus is airborne will probably come from the The colonel soon discovered a local department store In an announcement that seemed to catch all of early warning satellites orbiting more than 3,000 miles had advertised a telephone number for children to use Washington by surprise, Aspin said Wednesday, above the Earth. The satellites, operating on the thermal when calling directly to Santa Claus with their Christ"It's time for me to take a break." Standing with spectrum, will detect the heat emanating from Rudolph's mas list -there had been a one-digit misprint in the ad. Aspin in the Oval Office, Clinton accepted "with real red nose as he guides the other eight tiny reindeer pullAbout a week before Christmas Eve, Shoup made an sadness the former Wisconsin congressman s reing Santa through the North American skies. unannounced visit to the command post and glanced at quest to leave Jan. 20. Followed by the satellite contact, the BMEWS at the huge tracking screens that showed the North AmeriAspin is the first to leave the Clinton Cabinet, Thule AB, Greenland will pick up its signature. The can continent, its seaward approaches and the North and his one-year tenure will mark the shortest for a computers funnel this information in real-time simultaPole. It had been a slow night so one of the crew, full of defense secretary in two decades. Just last Sunday he neously to the Missile Warning Center, the Space Surthe Christmas spirit after answering many calls on the told a TV interviewer, "I don't think there's any veillance Center, the Air Defense Operations Center and "Santa Line," had drawn Santa Claus in his sleigh pulled problem" that would cut short his tenure as Pentathe NORAD Command Post, where crews monitor the by nine reindeer on the world map that normally showed gon chief. special tracking operation. the trajectory of ballistic missile and bomber routes. But White House spokesman Mark Gearan said To identify the "unknown object," NORAD scrambles That's how tracking Santa began. The NORAD Santa the resignation had been discussed for several weeks. fighter interceptors from bases in Canada and the United tracking program has become as much of a Christmas Clinton made no mention of a possible replaceStates where they stand on constant alert status. Once ritual as decorating the tree. This year children will be ment, although one aide said one was expected soon. the fighter pilots have the "unknown"in sight, they verify able to get bi-hourly updates on Santa's progress by callOthers mentioned on Capitol Hill to succeed Asthe airborne object is not a threat to national security but ing four Colorado Springs-based telephone numbers. The pin included CIA Director R. James Woolsey, Sen. is indeed the jovial man in the red suit. numbers vary according to time zone and service is schedSam Nunn, D1-Ga., Deputy Defense Secretary WilNORAD then relays the tracking information to uled to begin at 4 p.m. in each respected area of the conham Perry and Norman Augustine, head of the giant 4,000-plus radio and television stations worldwide so tinental United States: defense contractor, Martin Marietta Corp. youngsters everywhere can be sure to be fast asleep be*Eastern Standard Time -(719) 554-2647; Aspin, 55, who had a heart pacemaker implanted fore the whiskered St. Nick anives. +Central Standard Time -(719) 554-2649; List winter after being hospitalized with breathing NORAD tracking Santa has become an annual tradi*Mountain Standard Time -(719) 554-3095; difficulties, cited personal reasons for his decision to tion -one that began back in 1955 with an accidental *Pacific Standard Time -(719) 554-3213. quit. He didn't elaborate. YEARS OF SERVICE PAY GRADE <2 2 3 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 COMMISSIONED OFFICERS 0-10 6801.60 7040.70 7040.70 7040.70 7040.70 7311.00 7311.00 7716.00 7716.00 8267.70 8267.70 8821.50 8821.50 8821.50 9371.10 0-9 6027.90 6185.70 6317.40 6317.40 6317.40 6478.20 6478.20 6747.60 6747.60 7311.00 7311.00 7716.00 7716.00 7716.00 8267.70 0-8 5459.70 5623.50 5756.70 5756.70 5756.70 6185.70 6185.70 6478.20 6478.20 6747.60 7040.70 7311.00 7491.30 7491.30 7491.30 0-7 4536.60 4845.00 4845.00 4845.00 5062.20 5062.20 5355.60 5355.60 5623.50 6185.70 6611.10 6611.10 6611.10 6611.10 6611.10 0-6 3362.40 3694.20 3936.30 3936.30 3936.30 3936.30 3936.30 3936.30 4070.10 4713.60 4954.20 5062.20 5355.60 5536.80 5808.60 0-5 2689.20 3157.50 3375.90 3375.90 3375.90 3375.90 3478.20 3665.40 3911.10 4203.90 4444.50 4579.50 4739.40 4739.40 4739.40 0-4 2266.80 2760.30 2944.50 2944.50 2999.10 3131.40 3345.00 3533.10 3694.20 3856.50 3962.70 3962.70 3962.70 3962.70 3962.70 0-3 2106.30 2355.30 2517.90 2785.80 2919.00 3023.70 3187.50 3345.00 3427.20 3427.20 3427.20 3427.20 3427.20 3427.20 3427.20 0-2 1836.90 2005.80 2410.20 2491.20 2542.80 2542.80 2542.80 2542.80 2542.80 2542.80 2542.80 2542.80 2542.80 2542.80 2542.80 0-1 1594.80 1659.90 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80 2005.80 COMMISSIONED OFFICERS WITH OVER FOUR YEARS ACTIVE DUTY SERVICE AS AN ENLISTED MEMBER OR WARRANT OFFICER O-3E 0.00 0.00 0.00 2785.80 2919.00 3023.70 3187.50 3345.00 3478.20 3478.20 3478.20 3478.20 3478.20 3478.20 3478.20 O-2E 0.00 0.00 0.00 2491.20 2542.80 2623.50 2760.30 2866.20 2944.50 2944.50 2944.50 2944.50 2944.50 2944.50 2944.50 0-1E 0.00 0.00 0.00 2005.80 2143.20 2222.10 2302.50 2382.60 2491.20 2491.20 2491.20 2491.20 2491.20 2491.20 2491.20 WARRANT OFFICERS W-5 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3662.70 3801.60 3911.40 4076.10 W-4 2146.20 2302.50 2302.50 2355.30 2462.40 2570.70 2678.70 2866.20 2999.10 3104.40 3187.50 3290.40 3400.50 3506.40 3665.40 W-3 1950.60 2115.90 2115.90 2143.20 2168.10 2326.80 2462.40 2542.80 2623.50 2701.80 2785.80 2894.40 2999.10 2999.10 3104.40 W-2 1708.50 1848.30 1848.30 1902.00 2005.80 2115.90 2196.30 2276.70 2355.30 2438.10 2517.90 2597.10 2701.80 2701.80 2701.80 W-1 1423.20 1632.00 1632.00 1768.20 1848.30 1927.50 2005.80 2088.90 2168.10 2248.80 2326.80 2410.20 2410.20 2410.20 2410.20 ENLISTED MEMBERS E-9 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2496.90 2552.70 2610.60 2670.60 2730.30 2783.40 2929.20 3043.20 3214.20 E-8 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2093.70 2153.70 2210.40 2267.70 2327.70 2381.10 2439.60 2582.70 2697.90 2870.40 E-7 1461.60 1578.00 1636.20 1693.80 1751.40 1807.20 1865.10 1923.30 2010.30 2067.30 2124.60 2152.20 2296.80 2411.10 2582.70 E-6 1257.60 1370.70 1427.70 1488.60 1544.40 1599.90 1658.70 1744.20 1798.80 1857.00 1885.20 1885.20 1885.20 1885.20 1885.20 E-5 1103.40 1201.20 1259.70 1314.30 1401.00 1458.00 1515.60 1571.40 1599.90 1599.90 1599.90 1599.90 1599.90 1599.90 1599.90 E-4 1029.30 1087.20 1151.10 1239.90 1288.80 1288.80 1288.80 1288.80 1288.80 1288.80 1288.80 1288.80 1288.80 1288.80 1288.80 E-3 969.90 1023.00 1063.80 1105.80 1105.80 1105.80 1105.80 1105.80 1105.80 1105.80 1105.80 1105.80 1105.80 1105.80 1105.80 E-2 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 933.30 E-1 >4 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 832.80 E-1 <4 770.10 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Fiscal 1994, 2.2% Pay Raise Increase NOTE-BASIC PAY IS LIMITED TO $9,016.80 Service Academy Cadet Pay is $543.90, effective on Jan. 1, 1990, as BY LEVEL V OF THE EXECUTIVE SCHEDULE per section 203(c)(1) of Title 37, United States Code.

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6 Tropic Times Dec. 17, 1993 V i e Parent has discrepancy over PG-13 movie ruling Dear Mayors' Corner: movie with your children. But, because of I am writing to express my discontent Mayo rs Corner several complaints of children being loud over the theater policies at Fort Clayton. and disturbing other patrons, we ask parLast weekend "Jurassic Park" was playing aware and not be surprised like I was. I'm forced, why is there not a sign on the front ents to talk to children about behavior beand I let my children go by themselves. glad I was at home when she called bedoor as there is on R-rated movies? Also, fore leaving them at the theater. Whether My daughter, 12, called me to tell me they cause we usually go out to eat when they why pay an adult price for a 12-year-old parents accompany children or not, they couldn't get in because they were not 13 go to the movies! when an adult still has to come and stay are still responsible for their behavior. or with an adult. I went to the theater and I would like to make a couple of points for the movie? We do reserve the right to ask anyone asked, telling the manager they had been about this. The theater was so crowded, Stuck at the movies to leave if they are not behaving properly. to PG-13 movies by themselves numerous we didn't sit together so if they had gotten Again, we apologize for the inconvenience times before -what happened? scared or sick, I would have never known Dear Stuck, and hope to see you at the movies soon. He told me there was a crackdown on anyway. Also, if "13" is the magic numI submitted your letter to the Army and age limits and from now on, an adult had ber, why does my 12 year old have to pay Air Force Exchange Service and got the Et'snote: Ihiscolumn allowscomto be with them to watch all PG-13 movthe adult price? I consider it unfair if she following response: unity members to submit questions to ies. I was very angry because I am very has to pay the adult price, I have to go sit Because of the content of this film, we the Mayoral Congress. Lettersshould be picky when it comes to movies and I feel with her. If she pays the adult price, then were advised to be cautious when letting mailed to: Mayors' Corner Publicity like I should decide what they can or can't she should be treated as an adult and be children in by themselves. This is the reaCairero, ao AA P ). see by themselves. able to attend the movie by herself. son for requiring parents to attend the Chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS). If there is any question at all, I will say My main question is, why is there all movie with their younger Children. ,Ihe Tropic Times reserves the right to "no" or go to see it first, then make a deciof a sudden a "say-so" over PG-13 age We apologize for any inconvenience r sion. I also feel like there needs to be a limits, especially when it overrules a you may have experienced. You will no edit letters and responses for brevity, sign on the door so the parents will be parent's decision -or, if it has to be enlonger be required to attend a PG-13 clarity and propriety. House watch program helps lower crime stats House watch program ________________________________________ Crime has decreased steadily during the last several Provost Marshal's Corner months. To continue this downward trend during the holidays, the military police encourage everyone to enroll in the House Watch Program before going on temporary duty or leave. The program provides security checks of quarters while residents are away. The MPs will need to know if anyone will have access to the quarters and if there will be animals on the premises. Residents should also consider having a friend or unit representative check the quarters periodically. To enroll in the program, call 287-4401 in the Pacific community or 289-5133 in the Atlantic community. Report suspicious activity to the MPs. Secure bikes Inside Chaining bicycles outside to a fixed object doesn't keep thieves away. Bike owners should lock their bikes inside a secure building to help prevent theft. This crime prevention method will decrease the chance of crime. Report suspicious activity to the MPs at 287-4401 or 289-5133. Wrongful transfer of merchandise U.S. Southern Command Contraband Control officials arrested a person for wrongful transfer of merchandise last week. The person admitted to buying diapers, baby food and other items for a non-privilege card holder. A gift may be bought for a bonafide holiday or special occasion as long as it does not exceed $10 and is not on the limited item list. For more information, see U.S. Southern Command Regulation 1-19 or call 286-3303. ive days community service MPs saw a person who had been barred from all military installations attempting to enter the main gate of Fort Clayton last week. He was taken to Panamanian Court where he was sentenced to five days community service. Report suspicious activity to the MPs at 287-4401 or 289-5133. The following crimes occurred in on-post housing arprivate property eas Dec. 3-9. Quarry Heights housing area -one larceny of secured Anonymous drug hotline Pacific private property Anyone with information about drug smuggling Fort Clayton 800 housing area -one larceny of secured Atlantic should call the Panama Jack anonymous hotline at 285private property Fort Espinar housing area -one larceny of unsecured 4185. Fort Kobbe 300 housing area -one larceny of secured private property This authorized unofficial command information pubDirector, Public Affairs.Col. James L Fetig Editor.SSgt. Jane Usero lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Chief. 'vtSgt. Steve Taylor Journalists.Sgt. Lori Davis Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces SeniorEditor.SSgt. keborah E. Williams Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski Information Program of the Department of Defense, unEditor.SSgt. Richard Puckett Spec. Alexander C. White der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S. Assistant Editor.Sgt. John Hall 24th Wing Public Affairs Office.284-5459 Southern Command. Sports Editor.Sgt E. J. Hersom Public Affairs Officer.Capt. Warren L. Sypher Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the Staff Editors.Rosemary Chong Public Affairs Superintendent.MSgt. Dale Mitcham official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Maureen Sampson Journalists.SSgt. Rian Clawson Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. Volunteer AssistanL.Josephine Beane Sgt. James A. Rush The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Student Intern.Juan Carlos Palacio U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 Telephone 285-6612. Southern Command Public Affairs Office.282-4278 Public Affairs Officer.Lt.j.g. Laura C. Moore Acting Commander in Chief. Command Information Officer.Patrick Milton Assistant PAO.Diane Gonzalez Maj. Gen. Walter T. Worthington U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.287-3007 Photographers.P12 Roberto R. Taylor Public Affairs Officer.Maj. Melanie Reeder P112 Delano J. Mays Command Information Officer.Beth Taylor U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.289-4312 NCOIC.Sgt. Richard Emert *ropic Times

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A Commentary Trpc Times Christmas not a day, but an attitude by Col. Dave Goodwillie feeling, and sometimes even an angry one. New York in the gaslight era who both sacrificed their USARSO command chaplain It's caused, in part, by our own expectations. As most cherished possession to be able to buy each other a children, Christmas comes to us as a marvelous mixture Christmas present. She cuts off her beautiful, long hair raditionally, Christmas scenes depict a happy of presents, grandparents, rich smells and holiday and sells it to a wigmaker in order to buy a watch chain family united around a brightly decorated tree excitement Others, usually our parents, arrange much for his prized pocket watch while he sells his watch to amidst a pile of gifts. It's ajoyous scene, of this seasonal magic for us. As adults, however, the buy her a set of hair combs that she always wanted. relaxed, festive and warm. things we expect to happen at Christmas don't always A comedy of errors? Sure, but at the tale is its truth. But for a single soldier, or married servicemember a happen unless we make them happen. "Of all wise men and women, these two were the wisest long way from home, this can be an intensely lonely, if In the Christmas Story, the gospels describe the Magi, -their gifts were the Gifts of the Magi." not downright disastrous, time of year. the wise men who were basically on an intelligence misOur gifts, gifts of love, caring and sharing, can be just Even those of us with our families are not so immune sion for King Herod, following a bright star to Bethlehem. that -gifts that make Christmas memorable and meanto this idealized concept of Christmas that a batch of Here they encounter the babe in the manger and are so ingful for others as well as for ourselves. burned Christmas cookies, a cold or a squabble with an moved that they offer precious gifts and find their lives It's not just a day, but rather an outlook, an attitude. over-excited child can't make us feel deflated or radically changed. It's a peaceful, caring, giving and loving season -and disappointed. We continue this tradition of giving at Christmas time you can make it happen. "Christmas just isn't the same," we say. by putting an enormous amount of our money and energy So, this Christmas, follow the star, be a Magi. Bear a This Christmas syndrome is a feeling of being on the into giving presents. gift and keep in mind that the greatest gift we can give is outside looking in, watching others have the perfect I love 0. Henry's marvelous story, "Gifts of the Magi." always the gift of ourselves. kind of Christmas we feel we should have. It's a lonely He writes about a terribly poor young couple living in Merry Christmas! Children's eyes tell a Christmas story She wiped her eyes. like. The children played. The boy looked at me. He by MSgt. Mike Howard The next day, I met the little girl who speaks looked away and back again. He held the chicken up, SOUTHCOM Public Affairs Spanish. Her eyes looked up at me bold, proud and and then dropped it again to arms length. Through all, unashamed. She, one of 170 children at a needy the boy stayed planted. can't forget the eyes. elementary school about an hour from Panama City, Finally, a teacher came to tell the boy it was time. The eyes of a little girl who speaks English, a would not look away. Reluctantly, he gave the chicken to another boy who little girl who speaks Spanish, and a little boy She had followed me from classroom to classroom as carried it across the yard up to where the hosts wer& with a chicken. I took photographs of the excited children who were preparing for the party. The chicken was presented to The first spoke. waiting for their Christmas party to begin. Bags of the leader of the hosts and I took photographs. The second only stared. Christmas presents had been delivered to each classIn the background, I noticed the little boy who The story of the third is the story of Christmas. room. Somebody was barbecuing hot dogs, and the owned the chicken. He stood off in the distance Last Friday I went to Valent Recreation Center to children were expecting Santa Claus to show up later. watching. When the chicken was given away, he turned watch the Clayton Elementary School children present She had watched as I photographed the little boy away. He turned back again, looking down and wiping their school Christmas play. I stood in the lobby who had brought a chicken to give to the Christmas the tears from his eyes. waiting to see my daughter come in when a little girl party hosts. The chicken, his pet, wasn't his anymore. tugged on my shirt. And now, as I sat in one of the school's battered After the hot dogs and Santa Claus, I saw the little She put words to her questioning eyes. desks, curiosity overtook her. She sat down directly in girl who spoke Spanish. She had gotten her present"Excuse me mister, are you in special forces?" front of me with her little arms crossed on the back of it was a big doll. Her smile beamed. "No, are you?" I automatically responded. the teacher's chair. Her feet shuffled on the concrete I didn't see the little boy again. I know he, as did all "Do you know my dad? He's special forces, and he floor to the classroom, the children, received gifts. said he has a meeting today so maybe he won't be here," She didn't smile, only looked directly into my lens. And so, when I close my own eyes at night now, it's she said. "I thought maybe if you knew who he is, you I went back to the boy holding the chicken. He still hard to escape the looks in the faces of the three. And could tell me if he's gonna come. I sure hope he's stood against the wall next to a big table filled with that makes it seem like Christmas -even though it's gonna." fruits -other gifts to be given to the hosts. the tropics and you can't see the steam when you breath "I bet he hopes he can come, too," I reassured her. He stood there, holding his chicken, as the others outdoors. "I know, I just hope he's here." piled oranges, grapefruit, sugar cane, coconut and the I hope I don't forget their eyes. Direct Quotes What is your favorite thing about Christmas this year? "We wiHl be going to "My favorite thing is "I just like being able to "I like giving gifts and "Spending time with bed early, then our that we usually go out of spend time with my getting gifts. But, I like my family is my favorite parents will wake us up town to visit relatives family." giving better because it's thing about Christmas." about midnight to open either in the states or fun to watch them open our presents and then go here." it." back to bed. Stephanie Shearman Robert Watkins Denise Wolfe Aaron Kinghom Jamar Butler The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the Department of Defense or the U.S. government Readers may submit commentaries -or responses to commentaries -to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

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8 Tropic Times Dec. 17, 1993 n many ways, Christmas in Panama is much like Christmas in the United States. People exchange gifts and greetings, children play with their new toys, adults drink toasts to better health and better days, and the traditional Christmas tree is decorated with ornaments and lights. Many households display the "nacimiento," a representation of the nativity brought to the continent by the conquering Spaniards, that has since become a traditional Latin American form of identification with the spirit surrounding the birth of Jesus Christ. The "nacimiento," which is the Spanish tern for the nativity scene, is ordinarily a straw hut simulating a manger, in which figures of the Three Wise Kings, sheep, camels crossing the desert, little houses to simulate the town and other livestock are placed. There is also the Star of Bethlehem and the Virgin Mary. Tradition has it that these nativity scenes should grow in size year after year. Despite the energy crisis, on the outside of many houses (it's customary also in the canal area), brilliant md and green lights, the traditional yuletide colors, give the sensation of a huge lit Christmas tree. On lawns and porches, enormous sleds and other Christmas motifs indicate that Santa Claus is the King of the World to old and young alike. In Panama City, the residents of 85th street, in the San Francisco area, have for the last 30 years decorated the entire route with Christmas displays, thus making Calle Belen, "Bethlehem Street," the most visited area during the Christmas season. Another highlight of the Latin way of celebrating is the Christmas Eve DepmMI of Defee pi a by Mureen Sapson Midnight Mass, which is followed by a Balboa Elementary School first graders sing a song during their ChrIstmas concert. family reunion for a midnight dinner of tamales, rice with gongo peas, salad, fried chicken or turkey, ham, roast pork and fruits. This family get-together is similar to Thanksgiving Day in the United States. Also on Christmas Eve, children dress as shepherds and walk the streets from house to house singing Christmas carols. From them on, Christmas day, it's the noisemaking of the younger ones with their gifts, which lasts until the last toy is no longer useful. In many low-income neighborhoods, people block-off the streets in order to let children ride their bikes, or use skateboards and rollerskates. But that's not the case for teenagers and grown-ups. On the following Saturday night after the sixth of January, 4 Epiphany day (Wise Kings Day), beaches are practically invaded for parties highlighted by a bonfire of Christmas trees and roasting of weenies. All in all, Christmas in Panama is much like Christmas everywhere. These are some of the many decoratIons displayed in the Villa Lucre suburbs. Depatmenrtof Deense photo by Rosemary Chong

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Tropic Times Dec. 17, 1993 A-A Depsnanntof Defese photo by MSgt Mike Howard Rosita Rodriguez, 6, smiles after her chat with Santa Claus, Art Merkel, from the U.S. Southern Command Public Affairs Office. U.S A Force photobySgtJamesRush Children reenact the nativity scene during the tree lighting ceremony at Albrook AFS Monday.

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10 Tropic Times Dec. 17,1993 Promotions To Lieutenant Colonel -George Crawford and John Jansen, both of U.S. Army Medical Activity -Panama. To Sergeant First Class -Willie Whittaker and Diane Anderson, both of U.S. Army Medical Activity Panama Carl Pierce and Larry Whalon, both of 142nd Medical Battalion. To Staff Sergeant -Cecilio Herrera, Michael Roberts, Ethenia Torres and Patricia Tudor, of U.S. Army Medical Activity -Panama. Gregory Walker and Joseph Higgins, both of Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Mark Davis and Michael Gurney, both of Company C, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Jimmie Smith of Company B, 5th Battalion, 87th Inf. To Sergeant -Timothy Foster of U.S. Army Medical Activity -Panama. Rhonda Adams and Derek Lawson, both of 142nd Medical Battalion. Wallace Carmichael and Tearance Stewart, both of 3rd Special Operations Support Command (Airborne). Javier Rodriguez of Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. To Specialist -Ruth Cosme of 142nd Medical Battalion. Richard Sweat of 3rd Special Operation Command (Airborne). Military awards Army Commendation Medal -SFC Bryan Ford of 3rd Special Operations Command (Airborne). SFC Timothy Hamilton of Headquarters Company, 193rd SupDearfentatDefene oto Mgevea port Battalion. Sgt. Mario Bragg, Spec. James Fr tickets Garringer and Spec. Emmett Street, all of Company B, Tom Goodloe, Corozal Main Exchange Manager, and Sgt. Brian Coutch, 536th Engineer Battalion, 193rd Support Battalion. Capt. Thomas C. Soriano, just after Coutch won a free airline ticket to the United States. The Army and Air Force Exchange SFC Wayne L. Schier, SSgt. Michael Gurney, SSgt. Service, Coca Cola and United Airlines are holding the drawing that will give away six tickets through Charles 0. Raines, Sgt. Edward Dominguez Jr., Sgt. December. Lloyd E. Purswell, Spec. Hector Aguayovenegas and Spec. Joel Gilbert, all of 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Spec. David Eastman of Company A, 747th Military pany. Spec. Damien James of U.S. Army Medical AcIntelligence Battalion. Spec. Christopher Graf of Comtivity -Panama. Spec. Sherry Jeffries of Company D, Army Achievement Medal -SFC Gary Mitchell, pany A, Military Intelligence Battalion. Spec. James U.S. Army Garrison. Spec. Larry Kidd of Company A, SSgt. Danny Jackson, SSgt. Jeffery Frey and SSgt. Lovell of 408th Military Intelligence Company. Spec. 5th battalion, 87th Infantry. Spec. Kenneth Lanoue of Karen Cook, all of 3rd Special Operations Command Ian Macklin of Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 408th Military Intelligence Company. Spec. James (Airborne). Sgt. Alex Richardson of Headquarters 508th Infantry. Spec. Jeffrey Mauro of 194th Military Madden of Company A, 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation. Company, 193rd Support Battalion. 1st Lt. Laney Police Company. Spec. Paul McNiel of Company A, Spec. Raymond Madden Jr. of Headquarters Company, Miller, SSgt. Dennis E. Abbott, SSgt. Patrick Bourne, 747th Military Intelligence Battalion. Spec. Jeff Milos 193rd Infantry. Spec. Martin McIntyre of Company B, SSgt. Luis D. Concepcion, SSgt. William Martin, SSgt. of Company A, 310th Military Intelligence Battalion. 154th Signal Battalion. Spec. Jeff Moore of Company Dariel H. Turley, SSgt. Jerald L. Droddy, Sgt. Ricardo Spec. Clinton Thompson of Headquarters Company, C, 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation. Spec. Angela Pigg of Anzaldua, Sgt. John N. Baker, Sgt. Jose L. Cadena Jr., 308th Military Intelligence Battalion. Spec. Jimmy Headquarters Detachment, 92nd Military Police BatSgt. Robert H. Demian, Sgt. Edward Dominguez, Sgt. VanGossen of Company A, 308th Military Intelligence talion. Spec. John Raymond of Company B, 1st BatCharles M. Fish, Sgt. Antonio Flores, Sgt. Shawn FosBattalion. Spec. Shannon Wilson of U.S. Army Dentalion, 508th Infantry. Spec. Brian Reynolds of leadter, Sgt. Richard Gregg Jr., Sgt. Jon C. Harris, Sgt. tal Activity -Panama. Leadership Award: Spec. quarters Company, Law Enforcement Activity. Spec. Bathon Keing, Sgt. Robert Morgan, Sgt. Thomas Vincent Bowles of Company C, 1st Battalion, 508th Steven Samartino of Company B, 536th Engineer BatNachtwey, Sgt. Darcy Rambali, Sgt. Christopher Infantry. Spec. Martin Cornilsen of 534th Military talion. Spec. Chad Sandoe of 128th Aviation Brigade. Rodriguez, Sgt. Michael Smith, Sgt. Eric Troxler, Sgt Police Company. Spec. Ian Marklin of Headquarters Spec. Scotty Scott of Headquarters Company, Jungle Thomas Wrighton, Cpl. John Florence, Cpl. Paul Company, 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry. Spec. Jeffery Operation Training Brigade. Spec. Ronald Stancil of Ziegler, Cpl. John M. Norman, Spec. Michael Connor, Purvis of Headquarters, U.S. Southern Command. Headquarters Detachment, 470th Military Intelligence Spec. Leslie Flemming, Spec. Joel Gilbert, Spec. John Physical Fitness Award: Cpl. Bishop Freesh of ComBrigade. Spec. Michael Thomas of Company C, 1st Haley, Spec. Bobby R. Henderson, Spec. Donald pany B, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Commandant's Battalion, 228th Aviation. Spec. Robert Vose of ComPurnell, Spec. Jimmy Richie, Spec. Alex Stewart, Spec. Inspection Award: Spec. William Carrigan of Company A, 308th Military Intelligence Battalion. Spec. Ethan J. Miller, Spec. Arthur J. Terry, Spec. Eric C. pany A, 308th Military Intelligence Battalion. GraduBrian White of 7th Dive Detachment. Spec. Kristen Askew, PFC Juan Granados, PFC Jeremiah Hester, ates: Spec. Norma Alderete of Headquarters Company, Wilkins of 408th Military Intelligence Company. PFC Christopher McLaughlin, PFC Lazaro 536th Engineer Battalion. Spec. Wifred Ashby Jr. of Herreraanton, PFC Robert T. Holland, Pvt. Matthew 536th Engineer Battalion. Spec. Rose Bizarrt of 69th Special events Boardman, Pvt. Joseph Jenkins, Pvt. Ricky A. King, Signal Company. Spec. Patrick Bowman of HeadquarPvt. Damion M. Orris and Pvt. Tyson S. Silva. ters Detachment, 106th Signal Brigade. Spec. David. Cpl. Kurtis Nygaard of 565th Ordnance Detachment Bricman of Company B, 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry. was selected Noncommissioned Officer of the Month Certificate of Achievement -Sgt. Alijah Lyn Brown Spec. Clint Brown of Company C, 5th Battalion, 87th for the 193rd Support Battalion. and Spec. Vernell Baker, both of Headquarters ComInfantry. Spec. Felicia Brown of69th Signal Company. pany, 193rd Support Battalion. Spec. Norman RobSpec. James Cannon of Headquarters Company, 1st Spec. Lee Gallegos of Headquarters Company was seerts, SFC Ralph Tanner, Sgt. Moses Crowder Jr., Sgt. Battalion, 508th Infantry. Spec. John Chaplin of lected Soldier of the Month for 193rd Support BattalSteven Alexander, Sgt. Joseph Burkes, Spec. Sequana 1097th Transportation Company. Spec. Duane ion. Sims, SSgt. Dwight Giles, Spec. Robert Taylor and Clemons of Company E, 228th Aviation. Spec. John Spec. Darien Anderson, all of Company B, 193rd SupConnell of Company B, 4th Battalion, 228th Aviation. B port Battalion. Spec. Katherine Connolly of Company A, 4th Battalion, 228th Aviation Spec. Jerry Crutch of Company D, Dec. 1 -Sarah Elizabeth Bandel to Nancy J. and CWO Graduations 4th Battalion, 228th Aviation. Cpl. Santiago Cruz of 3 Robert F. Bandel. Company D, 4th Battalion, 228th Aviation. Spec. Jumpmaster School -Sgt. Leon Borders of 3rd SpeEdgar Cuebas of 193rd Infantry Brigade. Spec. Clinton Dec. 2 -Kimberly Ellen Atkins toSpec. Cheri L. and cial Operations Command (Airborne). Davis of Company E, 228th Aviation. Spec. George SSgt. Mark C. Atkins. Delmoral of Company B, 536th Engineer Battalion. Primary Leadership Development Course -DistinSpec. Lawrence Dukes of Company B, 4th Battalion, Dec. 5 -Danny Lee Moore Jr. to SrA. Carmenlita A. guished Honor Graduate: Spec. Louis Melancon of 228th Aviation. Spec. Evelio Duque of Company B, and TSgt. Danny Lee Moore Sr. Headquarters Company, Law Enforcement Activity. 154th Signal Battalion. Spec. Michael Fletcher of Honor Graduate: Spec. Allen Zobian of Company B, Headquarters Detachment, 92nd Military Police BatDec. 7 -Charlie William Davenport to Vicki L. and Military Intelligence Battalion. Commandant's List: talion. Spec. Monte Greenlee of 59th Engineer ComSpec. Charlie W. Davenport.

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Tropic Times Dec. 17,1993 "Please convey my congratulations to the men and women of the 24th --Wing on the occasion of your 51 st anniversary. Since being activated on 25 December 1942 at Reykjavik, Iceland, you have made significant contributions to the nation, the Air Force, and our way of life. Your commitment to quality assures that you will meet the challenges of the future as successfully as you met those of the past. Best wishes and happy anniversary." Gen. John M. Loh Commander, Air Combat Command group. It remained in group status until Jan. 1, 1976 when it was again redesignated the 24th Composite Wing. In recent years, the wing underwent a series of activations and inactivations beA-37B Dragonfly aircraft of the 24th Composite Wing fly over the Mirafiores Locks in 1970. U.S.AirForcephoto tween Jan. 31, 1987 and Feb. 15, 1992. With its reactivation in 1992, the 24th 24th Wing celebrates anniversary became the senior Air Force unit in The wing has earned six Air Force HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/ minor installations in the Antilles area, and the 24th Air Transportation SquadOutstanding Unit Awards and the Armed Historian's Office) -The 24th Wing here stretching from Puerto Rico to British ron operated fixed-wing transport and heForces Expeditionary Medal. The latter marks its 51st anniversary Christmas Guiana. As the mission was concerned, licopter aircraft The wing's tactical misand one of the unit awards resulted from Day. Other than its Christmas activation the wing conducted a range of operations sion included paramilitary actions, air its performance in Operation Just Cause. as the 24th Composite Wing (Special) in from general administration, training and transport, civic actions, search and resWing personnel also supported Opera1942 at Reykjavik, Iceland, the wing's hisaerial transportation to photomapping and cue, aeromedical evacuation and support tions Desert Shield and Desert Storm. tory has been unique in several respects. reconnaissance. It even grew its own vegof Army Special Forces. On June 1, 1992, the wing became the Its entire period of service has been at etables in hydroponic gardens throughout The wing was redesignated the 24th only Air Force unit equipped with the Coverseas installations. It provided air dethe command. In 1947, the wing delivSpecial Operations Wing July 15, 1968. 27 Spartan aircraft. That uniqueness parfense for U.S. forces on Iceland with P-38, ered 235,000 pounds of vegetables Six months earlier it had moved to allels its distinguished 51-year history. P-39, and P-40 fighters until it was inacthroughout the Caribbean Air Command. Howard AFB. By the end of 1969, it had From the frozen wastelands of Iceland to tivated June 15, 1944. After its 1948 inactivation, the wing grown to three flying squadrons with the the vast expanse of the Caribbean to the The unit returned to active service as was dormant for more than 19 years. It addition of the 24th Special Operations steamy jungles of Panama, the wing has the 24th Composite Wing at Boriquen returned to service Nov. 8, 1967 at AlSquadron and had added the A-037 airserved proudly. Field (later Ramey AFB) Puerto Rico, brook AFS and was redesignated the 24th craft to its inventory. Today the wing mans the front lines in Aug. 25, 1946 and remained active until Air Commando Wing March 15, 1968. Downsizing began in April, 1971 with the war against drugs. While future misJuly 28, 1948. By that time, it had two flying squadrons. the inactivation of the 24th Air Transport sions can only be speculation, it's likely From its headquarters at Boriquen, the The 605th Air Commando Squadron flew Squadron and continued until Jun 30, that where the wing is involved, the job wing managed six major and numerous A-26 and T-28 special operations aircraft, 1972 when the wing was redesignated a will be unique. Mumma's grandfather makes news in December, 1943 Local provost marshal's relative Curps, rrv In Panama to assume command of the mander of Allied forces for Operation Overlord -the Sixth Air Force Service Command for the Caribbean invasion of Europe. inspects Guatemalan shipment area. President Roosevelt announces that there are Col. Harlan L. Mumma, Quartermaster of the 3,800,000 American servicemen overseas. FORT CLAYTON -The following are significant Panama Canal Department, (and grandfather of the World War II events that took place in December 1943: present US. Army South Provost Marshal, Col. John Dec. 25 Mumma) Inspects the first trial shipment of beef to Three officers and 10 enlisted men are awarded the Dec. 1 arrive in the Canal Zone from Guatemala for conLegion of Merit for exceptional meritorious service. Chief Health Officer of the Panama Canal, sumption by the armed forces. However, only three of the honored are still serving in Morrison C. Stayer, is promoted to major general. The 142nd Infantry completes the capture of Monte on the Isthmus. They are: MSgt. Walter Dzubella and Stayer has been in Panama since Aug. 8, 1939. Lungo in Italy. As a result, the Germans began a TSgt. Bud W. Klontz of the Sixth Air Force, and 1st withdrawl along the VI Corps front. Sgt. John A. McElroy of the Coast Artillery ComDec. 2 mand. Maj. Gen. William E. Shedd, Deputy Commander Dec.17 ofthe Panama Canal Department and artillery expert A bill repealing the Chinese Exclusion Acts and setDec. 27 arrives in Puerto Rico to assume command ofthe strating an annual immigration quota of 105 Chinese is The Army seizes control of the nation's railroads betegic Antilles Department. signed by President Roosevelt. The next day, in Chicago, cause of plans by several rail workers' unions to strike, Six officers with the Caribbean Defense Command Edward Bin Kan filed an application for citizenship. On beginning Dec. 30. are promoted. They are Maj. Roger Lyons, Maj. Jan.18, 1944, he became the first Chinese to be naturalSubmarine activity increases in the Caribbean with Herbert Harris, Capt. Walter Van Porn, Capt. ized under the new law. a Colombian schooner and two U.S. vessels sunk and Roynold Winters, Capt. Charles Fabing, and 1st Lt. an overdue Panamanian vessel presumed lost Herbert Littlejohn. Dec. 19 Only one shipment of Christmas trees appeared on Following several days of diversionary attacks, Fith Army troops occupy five Western Electric company the isthmus and it was snapped up before it had been Army opens a new assault on the Winter Line in Italy. plants in Baltimore, following a week-long strike by on the market five hours. workers demanding segregated restrooms. The Canal Zone tire quota is cut by two-thirds and Dec. 3 the possibility of obtaining new tires is considered reIn the European Theater, Operation Crossbow (air opDec. 20 mote. erations against German V-weapons sites) is given top The Mediterranean Allied Air Forces is activated in priority for Allied tactical air forces. accordance with Combined Chiefs of Staff directive. All Allied air units in the Mediterranean are placed under it. Editor's note: This time line was compiled by Dolores Dec. 16 De Mena, USARSO historian, in commemoration of Brig. Gen. George G. Lundberg, a veteran Army Dec. 24 the 50th Anniversary of WWII. officer with 26 years of service as a member of the Air Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower is named Supreme Com-

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Sports Dec. 17,1993 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 12 PCC Devils Fght stopsDavisgame win track, field season opener Officials postpone game BALBOA -The Panama Canal or team bsketb w ng College Green Devils took first place fo te m b s t ra in in the Department of Defense Dependents Schools preseason track meet by Sgt. Rick Emert -Dec. 10 here. USARSO Public Affairs -Atlantic TheGreenDevils scored 108points followed by the Red Machine with 88 FORT DAVIS -Naval Security Group Activity and the 408th Military points, the Bulldogs with 78 points Intelligence Company came together Dec. 9 in a hard-played game that and the Cougars with 25. came to an abrupt end less than nine minutes into the second half. Evan Davis was the Green Devils TheNSGA hoopsters built aquick I0-pointlead beforethe408th made leading scorer winning the 400, 800 it start working for the points two minutes into the first half. and 1600 meterdashes foratotalofl18 From there, it was aggressive hard playing that would later stop the points. The Green Devils Amy game prematurely. Epperson scored highest in the girls' Aaron BrownoftheNavy easilyslipped through408th's defensive wall squad bringing in 14 1/2 points. several times and helped hike his team's lead to 12 points at the end ofthe TheRedMachine'sBruce Chastain half with a score of 37-25. was the outstanding performer of the The game seemed to be turning in favor of the 408th as it sunk three night withthree firsts and athird for2l quick ones less than a minute into the second half, but the scoring burst points. Bulldogs' Andrea Barnett was fizzled and NSGA.soared to a 49-31 lead. the top female competitor with 19 With15minutesleftinthehalf,the408th,thankstolayupkingThomas points. Thompson, found its second wind cutting the NSGA lead to 10 points. The Bulldogs won the junior varWith 11:30 left in what could have been anyone's game, the name of tydivsonwth7intsfoow y the game changed to "basketbrawl" and the hard playing turned to hard the Green Devils with 43, Red Machine with 41 and Cougars with 3 1. fihng The following arevarsity results of Thepushing, slugging and wrestling ended when the referees called the the preseason tournament. game. Boys Varsity Originally, the officials declared the game a double forfeit but later 10 meter high hurdles-i, J Soto, Red 19:59 decidedit would be played out Wednesday from the point whereit stopped 2, T Mirand, Devils 22:00 -minus the fourplayers who started the fight,said EmilGenerillo, NSGA 100 fteter dash -1, B Chastain, Red 11:672, coach. M. Considine, Cougars 11:85 Coaches Generillo, NSGA, and Fred Nunley agreed that overly 200 meter dash -1, B Chastain, Red 23.08 2, aggressive playing was the game's downfall, but each blamed the other's M Considine, Cougars 23.84 team for that aggression. 400 meter dash -1, E Davis, Devils 59 2, J "This isn't usually how we play," Nunley said. "It's the first time this Christopherson, Red 60.7 has happened. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Rik Emert 800 meter run -1, Davis, Devils 2:20.98 2, The refs did the best they could, but I don't think they (players) agreed Fabian Richardson of Naval Security Group lays up Lee, Red 2:26.41 with a lot of their calls." two points in the ill-fated game Dec. 9. 1600 meter run -1, E Davis, Devils 5:02 2, S Lee, Red 5:28 .m E. 400 meter relay -1, Red, Soto, J Evans, P Leovejoy, J Trim 50.85 2, Devils, A Aird, R WiI kies win benefit tourney Sweeney, R Watanabe, V Brown 53.78 High jump -1, Novothy, Bulldogs 5' 1" 2, D Ortiz, Cougas 4' 11" by Sgt. James A. Rush "As oneof the biggest units on base, we bracket finals where the police team was Longjump1,B ChastainRed 18'4 1/2"2,C 24th Wing Public Affairs feel weshouldprovide ourshare," Brindley unable to arrest the progress, despite two Martinelli, Red, 17 7 1/2" said. late-inning rallies. Discus-RyanUnderwoodRed97'31/2"2,L HOWARD AFB -Six hits and eight "This was an all-out effort. We were Down by two in the top of the seventh Gonzalez, Devils 92' 5" runs in the first inning were plenty, but quite excited to help the base and our own inning, the security police connected a Shot put -1, L Gonzalez, Devils 36' 1" R Wilkies racked up a 20-4 advantage over people." string of hits to tie the score at nine. SPS Ballisteros, Bulldogs 35' 7 1/2" Strike Forcein the final game ofthe OperaOn the field, Wilkies put together four added one morein the ninthto take the lead. Pole vault -1, R Watanabe, Devils 8' 6" tion Warmheart Softball Tournament Dec other multiple-run rallies after the first Wilkies wouldn't be denied, however. Girls Varsity 5 at Weekly Field here. inning scoring three in the second, five in Kenneth Whampler led off the bottom of 55meterlowhurdles1, TSingleton,Bulldogs Wilkies shortstop John Kraemer was the fourth and two in the each of the final the ninth with a walk. 10.17 2, A Barnett, Bulldogs 10.92 the tournament's mostvaluableplayerwhile two innings. This gave birth to a two-run rally for an 100meterdash1,ABarnett,Bulldogs 13.43, hisStrikeForcecounterpart,SirgoEsquivel, Third baseman Ron Aerts led the 11-10 Wilkies win. 2 L Armstrong, Red 14.21 earned the gold glove award. champs' at the plate going 5-for-5 in the The second game with Strike Force was Singletdh-1,iongsDe 2 24Between the tournament, concessions title game. Aerts double and four singles also decided by a two-run rally in the mnth Sn gleton, Bashd 1 Epperson, Devils 70.9,2, and a crafts bazaar, more than $2,000 was plated four. He went on to score three times inning. Six lead changes and four ties over A Barnett, Bulldogs 71 raised for the base chapel's Operation as well. seven innings provided excitement as each 800 meter run -1, K Cooper, Red 3:20.58,2, Warmheart. The operation provides supLeft centerfielderJohnnyLamb (double team ended regulation with 10 runs. A Valdilles, Devils 3:31.8 port, such as turkey and other food for and two singles) and right centerfielder Ironically,itwasanerrorbythetourney's 400 meter relay -1, Red, C Ward, K Cooper, J Christmas dinners, for Air Force families Tom Hartman (three singles) each added a best defender that led to Strike Force's Moreno LArmstrong 1:01.07,2,Devils,CShon, during the holiday season. trio of hits to Wilkies' attack. demise. K Cedeno, M Rosales, K Jones 1:01.53 The 617th Airlift Support Squadron The championship game was the third Esquivel misplayed Wlkies' second t.ng jump -1, A Barnett, Bullodgs 14'2", 2, hosted the three-day event. time these teams met in the tournament. baseman Ismael Rios' hit allowing him to K Nakagawa, Bulldogs 10' 10 1/4" This was the third time the unit has held Strike Force won the first showdown reach base safely. Shot put -1, T Bunch, Cougars 24', 2, C the tournament and raised the most money putting it in the winners' bracket finals. Doubles by pitcher Mike Pupel and left Stanford 23'5" to date, said John H. Brindley who coAfterlosing,Wilkiesdroppedtofacethe fielder Lonnie Pearson amounted to two directed thetournament with James Lester. 24thSecurityPoliceSquadroninthelosers' runs and a 12-10 win. U.S. Army Medical Activity Panama Bowlers earn their wings during 24*Davis basketball standings raises nearly $4,000 for underprivihour tournament of angels at *Holiday tourneys leged children. Curundu. *SCN radio sports

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Tropic Times Dec. 17,199313 Bridge run raises nearly $4,000 GORGASARMYCOMMUNiTYHOSPITAL (GACH PAO) -Simon Alvarado of Panama crossed the finish line here at 33:09 ahead of 350 runners during the U.S. Army Medical Activity Panama Bridge of Americas 10K Race. Sue Bozgozofthe 142nd Medical Battalion was the top female racer at 42:50. The top three military teams were Headquarters Company, 193rd Support Battalion, Company B, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry Brigade, and Marine Corps Security Detatchment. USA MEDDAC sponsored the event and raised approximately $4,000 for the Casa Esperanza -a halfway house for street children -under U.S. Army South's Christmas Sponsorship Program, said Luz Fernandez, chairwoman of U.S.A. MEDDAC's Christmas Sponsorship Program. The following are the top three winners ofeach category of the race. Males uner 211, Jose Santana 2, Alvin Rentsch 3, Nobel Mosquera 4, Roman Avila 5,Ronald Gonzales Males 21-26 -1, Eduardo Vega 2, Juan Jaen 3, Nelson Ruiz 4, Nicolas Novak 5, Darryl Richardson Males 27-32 -1, Simon Alvarado 2, David Vergara 3, Ricky Roman 4, Miguel Campos 5, Rene Guerra Males33-39--1,Oriel Chanis2, Ralph Gaines 3,Richard Downie 4, Julio Pizarro 5, Severo Martinez Males 40-49-1, Clint Davis 2, Jose Sousa 3, Edmundo Andrion 4, Web Loudat 5, Wilfrido Castillo Males 50 and up -1, Luis Lax 2, Ricardo Aguilar 3, Lionel Jimenez 4, Miguel Franco 5, Rodrigo D'Angelo Females under 21-1, Alexadra Motto 2, Melissa Motto 3,CrystalHolden4,NicoleRichley5,MaylinnSteinbarger Females21-26-1, MilitzaWalles 2, Michelle Digruttolo .S. Army photo by capt La.ya Lee 3, Mary Bulmer 4, Judy Gonzales 5, Pamela Schneider Company A, 470th Military Intelligence Battalion runs down the Bridge of Amerisas. Females 27-32-1,SueBozgoz2,DebraWesloh 3,Karen Berrily 4, Elida Alcedo 5, Sonja Cantu Kellie Trombitas 4, Isabel Sirera 5, Valerie Sorro de Gobea 4, Jan Loudat 5, Judith Torar Females 33-39 -1, Danita Guerra, 2, Jan Brockman 3, Females 40-49-1, Mariela Sagei 2, Marjoie Lee 3, Sara Females50 and up-1, NinaMiller2, Carol McConnell Signal wolves snare LEA in Red League by Sgt. Lori Davis Fraziernailed only one basketinthe second USARSO Pubic Affairs Office and Grelk didn't get a point. LEA was saved on offense by Anthony FORTCLAYTON-RedLeague's69th Boyd and Daniel Flenord, who had been Signal Company hounded its competition virtually silent in the first half. From out of likeapackofdogs onarabbit, finally killing nowhere Boyd slammed the 69th defense it before it got away at the ReederPhysical with four baskets and two foul shots and Fitness Center here Sunday. Flenord sunk four baskets. Headquarters and Headquarters ComTheir rescue efforts weren't enough to pany, Law Enforcement Activity nearly salvage the LEA team. Usually a tough escaped the 69th 45-44, but got eaten beteam atthe foulline,they shot adismal9 for cause of a combination of poor foul shoot17. ing and defense. Echoing last week's victory over Triple The 69th came out of the gate hard, Nickel, LEA had an opportunity to pull pressing LEA oneveryplay. CedrickTucker ahead at the end of the game. drove into the lane like a freight train, Down 44-43, Michael Frazier went to sinking three buckets to lead his team in the freethrow line and shot one-for-two to the first half. tie the score with 35 seconds remaining in When Tucker wasn't hammering the the game. lane, John Hunter was putting the ball up The LEA defense played the 69th close from the outside, making two three-pointto hold the game into overtime, but another ers. FredrickFrost chipped in with a basket uncharacteristic foul sent Signal player 4$ N and a three-pointer. John Hunter to the foul line. The 69th racked up points on offense, Hunter also sank one of two to put his butthey did the same on defense. They sent team up by one, but LEA got the ball back LEA shooters to the foul line five times for with 30 seconds left. six points. LEA called a time out and tried to plot Michael Frazier supplied LEA's juice another last-second victory like its recent with one of those foul shots, three baskets victory over Triple Nickel. and a three-pointer. LEA tried to work the ball inside and go With Rick Grelk's two three-pointers, for the shot, but the 69th defense snagged LEA managed two stay on the heels of the the shot and swiped the ball and the game. 69th 24-23 at the half. The victory over LEA extended the In the second half LEA hit the court like league-leading record of the 69th to 7-1. a different team, but not a better team. The 69th's Steve Eberhart attributes the team's usually cool, controlled MPs went ballistic success to speed and aggression. on defense and matched the rough and "We have a lot of fast breaks and quick tumble 69th on fouls,. rebounding," he said. Part ofthe new LEA strategy worked as The 69th won its other games by more they held Tuckertotwo points from the foul than 10 points, but the team was a little off line and shut down Frost all together. The because of a long lay off, Eberhart said. 69th managed to keep up with a basket and The 4-3 LEA team played solid offense, three-pointer from Eric Brown and two but weak defense lost it. baskets from Kevin Slayton. "Our defense was slack," Grelk said. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Lori Davs The shutdown mode was in effect from "They played alot more aggressive than we 69th's Eric Brown tries to block the shot of Daniel Flenord from LEA. the 69th defense as well. The once-hot do, but we just weren't on it today."

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14 Tropic Times Dec. 17, 1993 41 A Tom Celluci gets under way during a sailing club regatta Sunday. Deparmmnt of Defense photo by Sg. E.J. Horsom U.S. Military Sailing Club unfurls sails PEDRO IGUEL (Tropic Times)-Jim Laing won the from two second place finishes and a fifth. said Stephen Rasmussen, vice commodore USMSC. U.S. Military Sailing Club's regattaSunday with an overall Laing followed with 15 points because of a ninth place Classes, races and other activities are avialable through time of 1 hour, eight minutes and three seconds. finish in the second race, but came back in the third with the club, Rasmussen said. Laing won the opening race at 37:33-more than four another win. "It's a great opportunity for people who have been minutes ahead of his closest competitor Michael O'Toole. With the coming dry season, the club has begun another interested in sailing, but never had the chance to enjoy Laing was so far ahead of the pack in the first race that he year of recreational sailing and racing for the military Panama's year-round summer," Rasmussen said. was finishing the second of four legs when the rest of the community. Sign-up rosters are available at the Fort Clayton Boat pack were rounding the first buoy. "This year, the clubisprepared with morethan 30 boats House. The club holds the classes the first and last weekO'Toole totaled the most points in the regatta with 16 available in the entire Panama Canal Operating Area," ends of the month. Regattas are held monthly. Bowlers earn their wings at Tournament of Angels CURUNDU -For 24 hours this weekend, 31 bowlers numbers. king of the hill, no tap, snake-eyes (splits count as strikes) earned their wings during the Tournament of Angels here. "The response from the community wasn't what we and between the legs were just some of the ways the Besides forgetting blisters, sore arms and alittle sleepy, thought it would be, but those who stayed were dedicated organizers used to keep the bowlers going, Gonzalez said. the bowlers helped raisenearly $700 for alocal orphanage, and they stayed," she said. "The community really gets hit Giving away lots of prizes was another way, Gonzalez said Diane Gonzalez, project coordinator. hard during the holidays and that makes it difficult to said. Local sponsors donated trips to Coronado, Gorgona Although the 31 participants didn't pack the house, choose where to give." as well as food and drinks. Gonzalez said their spirit more than made up for their The marathon event wasn't just straight bowling. A Panama Canal Women's Bowling Association organized the event to raise money for Hogar de la Infancia, an orphanage in Panama City. They used the money to buy appliances such as a microwave and a washing machine. The Fort Espinar Bowling Center donated a video cassette recorder. The association also set up angel trees at Espinar, Howard, Albrook, Clayton andCurundu Nov.1 to help the orphans, she said. About 125peopleaccross the isthmus picked up angels hung on the trees and purchased gifts for the children, Gonzalez said. Each child received about 17 gifts, ranging from uniforms to toys to personal hygiene items. Naval MobileConstructionBattalion-7 members played a major role in helping the school, she said. The reserve unit from Gulfport, Miss., is volunteering off-duty time to work at the school. It will be refurbishing showers and conducting electrical, plumbing and wall construction repairs. "These guys have been super," she said. They have dedicated their off-time, what little they have, to helping the school, she said. Despite all the effort, the Christmas party for the childrenhasbeenpostponeduntilearlynextyear,Gonzalez "It's disappointing that we found out after all the work that the kids won't be able to receive the gifts, because they RWN bSthardPktt are being sent off to foster parents," she said. DeparTmentofoctes eplen tby5tua t "It'll just be a late Christmas." Kelli Thompson, 9, catches some z's late into the 24-hour tournament."I'ljtbeaaeCrtms

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Tropic Times Dec. 17,1993 15 by the AbouSaad TempleShriners andis sanctioned by the Panama Armed Forces Running Association. For more information, call 287-3937. Pacific softball --The Pacific Softball League will open its 1994 slow pitch league Jan. 3 in the league's park near Pier Street, --f Balboa. Games start 5:30 p.m. weekdays. The season runs until May 1. Everybody is eligible. People interested in playing can contact Ruben Jimenez or Roy Johnson at the park or call 236-2952, 252-7541, 2990 or 2361 for more information. Transisthmian relay Registration for the Transisthmian Relay Race continues until Jan. 7 at the Directorate of Community Activities Sports Division. A briefing for team coaches and representatives will be held 1 p.m. Jan 13 at the Valent Recreation Center on Fort Clayton. For more information, call the DCA Sports Office at 287-4050. USARSO relay team Time trials for the U.S. Army South Transisthmian Team run until Monday. The team will be selected Monday. For more information, call Willie Moye at 287-6411 .,W or Sue Bozgoz at 287-6448 or 260-1128. Fishing charters -. -..-. -r -. : Trophy deep-sea and Sunskiff bottom fishing charters are available at the Rodman Marina. Charters include captain, fishing gear, coolerandice. Call 283-3147or283Hey, batter batter 3150 for more information. Registration for the Unit Level Softball Program is under way at the Directorate of Community Activities Sports Division, Building 154, Fort Clayton, and ends Jan. 7. Call 287-4050. Black Stallion charters The 61-foot Black Stallion is available for charter Sport ShortE' trophies will be awarded for men and women in three age through the Rodman Marina for cruising or fishing. Call categories. Call the 284-3451 for more information. the Rodman Marina at 283-3147/3150 for more information. SCN radio sports Swimming classes The Southern Command Network's AM 790 Pacific The Howard and Albrook poolsinviteparents and their Basketball tourney and 1420 Atlantic will broadcast the following sports this children to enroll in swimming lessons. Diving classes A holiday basketball tournament will be held Dec. 26weekend. and ladies water exercise classes are available at the 31 for major subordinate command level basketballteams. Tonitght Albrook Pool. For more information, call the Zodiac The deadline to register is Monday. Pro basketball: New York Knicks at Chicago at 8 p.m. Community Activities Center at the Howard Pool at 284A coaches clinic will be held in the Sports Conference Saturday 3569 or the Albrook Pool at 286-3555. Room in Building 154, Fort Clayton, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. Pro football: Denver at Chicago at 12:30 p.m. For more information, call the DCA Sports Office at 287Dallas at N.Y. Jets at 4 p.m. No tap bowling 4050. Sunday N a o ln Pro football: Philadelphia at Indianapolis at 8 p.m. All the monthly winners of the no-tap tournament Monday during the past year will compete for the title of '93 no-tap I s Pro football: N.Y. Giants at New Orleans champion Sunday at the Albrook Bowling Center. The People interested in playing softball can contact the winner will receive several prizes including a deluxe Howard Sports and Fitness Center until Jan. 12 when the Pan-Am Dive Club weekend for two at the Marriott Hotel in Panama City. season begins. The games will be played weekdays with Several other prizes will be awarded. Call 286-4260. hourly starts beginning at 6:05 p.m. A coaches' meeting is The Pan American Dive Club is welcoming new memscheduled for 2 p.m. Jan. 4 at the Zodiac Community bears. The club is located in Building 214, Fort Espinar and S tActivities Center. Call 284-3451 for more information. is open 6-8 p.m. Fridays. Dues are $6 per month or $25 for Sentals six months. Rentals available. Call Gary Garay at 289The 24th Services Squadron Sports and Recreational Over3 ba sketbaII 3428 or 289-4447 or Tom Bell at 289-3762 or 289-3538. Rental Center on Howard AFB has specials for the month of December that include a free rental of a dive bag with Registration for the over 30 basketball program has Dirty dozen softball paid rental of fins. Beach chairs are $1 a day or $2 a begun at the Reeder Physical Fitness Center on Fort weekend from Monday until Saturday. All indoor games Clayton. A basketball clinic is scheduled for6 p.m. Jan. 4. The Howard Sports and Fitness Center will host the are 50 cents off Monday through Dec. 23. A six-foot table Call 287-3861. Dirty Dozen Softball Tournament Jan. 7-9. The first 12 with eight chairs are $5 a day Dec. 27-30. The center will teams to signup are eligible. There is a $50 entry fee. be closed Dec. 24, 25 and 31 and Jan. 1. Youth officials Trophies will be awarded for first and second place teams. Acoachesmeetingwill beheld Jan. 5 atthelHoward Sports e fu run/walk Youth officials, coaches and assistant coaches are and Fitness Center. For more information, call 284-3451. S fun needed forthe1993-94CoedBaseball/SoftballProgram.For The Sober Awareness Family Fun Run/Walk will be more information, call Rory Egger at 287-4540. Intram rural golf season held Saturday on the Atlantic side. Event categories are sas at t golf sea s n. men and women's open 10K, family fun walk 5Kand oneyed Golf season at the Horoko Golf Course begins Jan. 14 milechildon's open. Registrationis ongoing a the Fronius R with registration open until Jan. 6. Squadrons will field a Fitness Center on Fort Davis. A T-shirt and certificate are The opening game of the 1994 rugby season will be four-person team each week that will compete head-toincluded with the entrance fee of $2. Call 289-3108 for noon Saturday at the softball field near the Air Mobility head with anotherteam. Players should have anestablished more information. Command terminal on Howard AFB. Anyoneinterested in handicap. If players do not have a Horoko handicap, playing rugby may call 287-3663. scorecards may be turned into the Howard Sports and Fitness Center where a handicap will be established. Relays Intramural handicaps will be adjusted weekly by the TheBalboaRelays will heldatBalboaHighSchoolJan. Free aerobics center's staff once the season begins. Players without 28-29. Practices are scheduled for 7 a.m. weekends at Free aerobic classes given by Teresa Consterdine are handicaps will play scratch. The Zodiac Community AcBalboaHighSchool,6-7:15am.and 5-7p.m.attheReeder available9:15-10:1Sam. weekdaysat theReederPhysical tivities Centerwillhost acoaches meeting 2p.m. Jan. 6. For Physical Fitness Center. Military personnel interested in Fitness Center. Each workout has a warm-up, cardiovasmore information, call 284-3451. running the relays call Willie Moye at 287-6411 or Sue cular workout, cool down and floorwork. Call 287-3861. Bozgoz at 287-6448, 287-3445 or 260-1128. Jingle Bell 5K Run/Walk Body building TheHowardSports andFitness Center will hold the 5th R TH__oward Base Theater will host a body building Annual Jingle Bell 5K Run/Walk 7 am. Saturday starting un for the Oasis 10K championship Jan. 29. The deadline to register is Jan. 15. in front of the center. Sign-ups are under way and are open The Run for the Oasis 10K run will be held 7 a.m. A $15 registration fee is required. Call the Howard Sports until 6:15 a-m. the day of the event. First and second place Saturday at the Amador Causeway. The run is sponsored and Fitness Center at 284-3451 for more information.

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6 TropicTimes Dec.17,1993 Airmen fight DWIs HOWARD AFB (24thWingPA)-Airmen from the24thMissionSupportSquadronherearejoining the fight against drunk driving in Panama by holding a Blue Ribbon Day Saturday. Juniorenlisted members from the unit will set up a table in front of the post office here from 10 am. until2p.m. People can pickup blue ribbons to tie to their car anntenacs "In past years, the rate of drunk driving here has been high," said SrA. Willard D. Smith, a repr>graphics specialist who is heading the effort. "We want people to see this and say to themselves, 'This is real, and I could become a statistic."' To bring home their point, the airmen will have a computer set up with a program that calculates 14 I blood alcohol levels. Information about a drinker's size and habits (such as the type and number of drinks) is keyed in and the predicted BAC is given. The airmen are working with the base social actions officeto getleafletsandotherinformationon the hazards of DWI and DUI. They will also be mixing and serving nonalcoholic drinks and beer. Slow traffic exp cted u.S Navy photo by PH2 RobertoTaylor Crew members of the Ecuadorian vessel BAE Hualcopo carry supplies onto their vessel at Rodman N S. FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Officials caution drivers to expect slow traffic and to allow more time to reach their destination Dec. 30Ruuman sailors battle blaze cause of multiple units participating sn payday activity runs. The heaviest congestion will be along Claytonby Lt.j.g. Laura C. Moore find the fire by feeling and checking compartments," he Curundu road leading to the back gate and along USNAVSTAPANCANAL PAO said. "I will never ever complain about having too much Hospital Road. training about the ship, that's for sure. I guess all the Navy Drivers are reminded to drive 10 miles per hour RODMAN NS -Rodman Naval Station sailors put training really pays off." while passing troops and to follow the directions their fire-fighting training to the test recently when they Once the fire was extinguished, the station provided ofroad guards. helped the crew of the Ecuadorian ship BAE Hualcopo meals and sleeping quarters for the exhausted EcuadorThe battalion and brigade runs are part of the battle a blaze aboard the vessel. ian sailors. The sailors remained in the quarters until Dec. new end-of-month pay day activities initiated by .Several Ecuadorian sailors suffered smoke-inhalation 1, when the Hzalcopo departed under tow. Maj. Gen. George A. Crocker, U.S. Army South injuries, but were quickly treated and returried to duty the Many of the Hualcopo sailors said all they had left. commanding general. same day, Navy officials said. were the clothes on their backs. Units will also participate in uniform and unit The ship, in port to purchase gods from the Free Zone "Te help rendered to us by the naval station was very inspections, company and battalion formations and to transport back to military exchanges in Ecuador, lost important," said Cmdr. A diagaFranco, Huolcopo execurelease of personnel for payday activities in the afmost ofits electronic supplies such as appliances and teletive officer. ternoon. vision sets. "We never thought we were going to receive so much The Nov. 26 fire started in a very unfortunate place, help. We are really thankful. We will always keep Rodthat made it difficult to extinguish it, said Lt. Paul man in our memories." Panam a reflects Campbell, Rodman Operations Department. The fire provided the naval station an invaluable ex.COROZAL (Tropic Times) -The government "The fire quickly gutted the ship's damage control perience, said Capt Arthur N. Rowley IHI. of Panama has designed Monday as a "Day of Recentral, which the centralized area from which they would "We have learned an awful lot," Rowley said. "Alflection." Panamanian government workers will be have fought the fire." though we responded very well, there's always something released from work and office building will be Naval station personnel were called in to assist because we can learn to do better, should something like this occlosed, according to a government new release. of their experience. cur again. And the only thing that's for certain is that Monday will be the fourth anniversary since Petty Officer First Class Manuel Fontanez and three something will occur again. As long was we learn from Operation Just Cause, the military action that took others helped de-water spaces within the ship. every experience and get better, we enhance our capabilplace here during the Noriega regime, the release "The location of the fire was uncertain, so we had to ity to take care of disasters." said. National Guard celebrates birthday Delivery expands QUARRY HEIGHTS (ropic Times)TheMiby SSgt. Eric Wedeking Marquis de LaFayette's Paris-based militia unit called ami Herald announced an expanded schedule for TheaterSupport Element "Guarde Nationale." Troops with the 2nd Battalion, 11th daily home delivery of its newspaper and Friday Artillery Regiment voted themselves the monicur "Batdelivery of the Tropic Times. FORT CLAYTON -For some people who believe in talon of National Guard." The delivery of the Tropic Times is made possuperstition, the number 13 brings with it unlucky tidDuring World War I, the federally enacted National sible by special arrangment with the Miami Herings. Defense Act of 1916 resulted in the term "National ald, which will begin home delivery of its paper on But for Army and Air National Guard men and Guard" become mandatorily used by each state. Quarry Heights and Albrook AFS Monday. women, the 13th of December was a time to celebrate In a recently released posture statement, National The delivery of the Tropic Times on Albrook because Monday marked the 357th anniversary ofthe NaGuard officials said both the Army and Air National and Quarry Heights started Dec. 3 for a three-week tonal Guard's birth as a colonial militia in 1636. Guard will continue to be a part of the Total Force while test period, said Patrick Milton, command inforA former Alabama Army National Guardsman and also assuming responsibility for state missions. mation officer at the U.S. Southern Command now deputy support commander for U.S. Army-South, Officials said the increasing National Guard particiheadquarters. Col. Jimmy Simpkins commended citizen-soldiers and pation is also expected affect the U.S. Southern ComDelivery of the Tropic Times for testing periods airmen for their "hometown"-style support they offer the mand theater as more active military units are inactivated in other areas will tentatively start: rest of the U.S. military as part of the "Total Force." or redeployed elsewhere with drawdowns and Panama *Fort Clayton and Corozal -Jan. 7. "After357 years, the National Guard has evolved from Canal Treaty implementation. *Fort Amador and Rodman NS -Jan. 28. a colonial militia to a viable, modern-day fighting force," "We anticipate that the Guard and (U.S. Army) Re*Howard AFB and Fort Kobbe -Feb. 28. Simpkins said. "When you people go on a mission, no serve will be asked to take on more of a support role here," During the test peiods, residents will be offered one can go about doing that mission like the National said Col. Mike Nevin, the command's senior National the opportunity to subscribe for home delivery of Guard. Guard advisor. the Miami Herald. If enough interest is show, then "We could not do our mission here in Panama if it With a backdrop featuring 54 state and territorial flags home delivery of both papers will continue, Milton were not for the National Guard." representing the National Guard's complete representasaid. Reserve Component and active military personnel attion throughout the nation, Guard members again folDelivery of the Miami Herald is planned to betending the Guard birthday bash reflected on the origins lowed tradition by naming their youngest citizen-soldier gin as follows: of the National Guard, which can traced back more than and airmen deployed to Panama to use swords to cut *Quarry Heights and Albrook -Dec. 20. three centuries-decades before the nation created a fullArmy and Air National Guard cakes with the assistance *Fort Clayton and Corozal -Jan. 24. time military force. of senior military officials *Fort Amador and Rodman NS -Feb. 21. Four Massachusetts Army National Guard units are Maj. Gen. Felix Santorii of the U.S. Army Reserve in *Howard AFB and Fort Kobbe -March 28. still the oldest military groups in either the National Puerto Rico and U.S. Southern Command' deputy chief The Miami Herald is also currently seeking Guard itself or the U.S. Army. Those units include the for mobilization and Reserve affairs, joined Nevin and carriers for its delivery routes, Milton said. 181st and 182nd Infantry, 101st Field Artillery and the Simpkins for the celebration. They assisted honored cake For information about the Miami Herald home 101st Engineer Battalion. cutters PFC [orenzo Butler, from the Alabama Army Nadelivery service, or employment, call 269-3220. Earlier referred to as "militia," the term "National tional Guard's Selma-based 1135th Supply Company; Guard" was first used in the United States by a New York and SSgt Elisabeth McManus, from the Montana Air military unitin 1824 in honor of Revolutionary War-hero National Guard's Great Falls-based 120th Fighter Group.