Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text


Gift of the Panama Canal Museum


!Tropic
jHK * ,


Times


Vol. VL No.46


Quarry Heights, Repubic of Panama


Friday, Nov. 19,1993


DARE program teaches


children to say no to drugs


by SSgL Jane Usero
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT CLAYTON - Military children attending De-
partment of Defense Dependents Schools are now learn-
ing more than reading, writing and arithmetic. They are
learning how to fight and win the war against drugs
through the Drug Abuse Resistance Education program.
DARE is designed not only to teach sixth graders to
say no to drugs, but also the skills needed to say no, said
kSSgt. Lynn Olavarria, DARE coordinator.
The program is in its second year in Panama and is a
A coordinated effort between military police from Head-
quarters Company, Law Enforcement Activity, the
schools, high school students and parents, she said.
Instructors are MP volunteers who attend an 80-hour
training program taught through the Los Angeles Police
Department. They musthave at least two years experi-
ence in the police force, Olavarria explained.
"The seven DARE instructors we have here teach in
every sixth grade class in both the Pacific and Atlantic
Communities for one hour each week for 17 weeks," she
said. "Because it takes more than saying 'say no,' we
teach subjects ranging from what drugs will do to them
(students), to ways to say no, to building self esteem."
Depar nntof DefensphobhbySgt John HO DARE targets the sixth graders primarily to get to
In remembrance them before they get to junior high, Olavania explained.
Members of the Balboa High School ROTC "With the problems of drug abuse starting so young
present colors during the Veterans Day cer- now, we want to get to them before drugs do," she said.
"We are planning a mini DARE program for the younger
emony held Nov. 11 at the Corozal Cemetery. students so we can get our foot in the door sooner."


Local campaign focuses on keeping

holiday spirits in the heart, not bottle


COROZAL (USARSO PAO) - The U.S. Army South
community will take part in a holiday season alcohol and
drug prevention campaign Saturday through Jan. 2.
"Care and Share, Don't Impair" will be the theme
and the campaign will focus on the need to care for
and share a safe, healthy and drug-free spirit with
everyone in the USARSO community, said Alcohol
and Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Program offi-
cials.
The time-frame was chosen to support the Red Ribbon
Campaign, which runs Nov. 29-Dec. 4 honoring Emique
Camarena, the Drug Enforcement Agency agent who was
murdered in Mexico in 1985, officials said.
The Red Ribbon now symbolizes the desire to clean
up the drug problems in the U.S. and has been adopted
worldwide.
One purpose of the campaign is to keep the holiday
spirits in the hearts, not the bottle, officials said.
For some, alcohol is a favorite way of celebrating and
it becomes easy to lose sight of how much is actually be-
ing consumed, officials explained.
It is also stressed through the campaign that everyone
support the designated driver program and plan activities
before beginning to drink.
ADAPCP officials encourage all community members
to show support by tying red bows on car antennas, dis-
playing them on doors at home and work and wearing
them throughout the holidays.
Events planned for the campaign are:
*142nd Family Support Group Run Against Drugs -
7 am. Saturday at the Fort Amador Causeway, - 8 a.m. -
Youth Service Turbo Turkey;



Soldiers from 41st Area Support
Group bring hundreds of beds to
Panamanian children.


*Care and Share Don't Impair pool tournament -
Thursday;
*Red Ribbon Week kick-off - 11:30 a.m. Nov. 29
at the Fort Clayton Noncommissioned Officers'
Club,
*"I'm Sick and Tired of It," Fort Clayton's first talk
show - 11"30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. at the Fort Clayton Non-
commissioned Officers' Qub;
*Red Ribbon Fashion Extravaganza - 2 p.m. Dec.
4 at the Fort Clayton Noncommissioned Officers'
Club;
*Golf tournament - 7:30 am. Dec. 18 at the Amador
Golf Club;
*Atlantic community 10K run - Dec. 18;
Care and Sharepool tournaments - Dec. 25-Jan. 1 at
the Valent Recreation Center, Fort Clayton.
There will also be various guest speakers appearing
throughout the community at the following times and lo-
cations:
Bret Eastbur and Leo Mudd speak 8:40-11:20 a.m.
at Balboa High School and 1:30-4 p.m. at Curundu
Junior High School Dec. 1; 8:40-9:30 a.m. at Cristo-
bal Junior High School, 9:35-10:25 a.m. at Cristobal Se-
nior High School, 1-2 p.m. at the Fort Davis theater and
3-4 p.m. at the Jungle Operations Training Battalion Dec.
2.
William Essex will speak 9-10 a.m. at the Howard
Theater, 11 am.-noon at Gorgas Army Community Hos-
pital, 1:15-2:30 p.m. at the Fort Clayton Theater and
3-4 p.m. at Curundu Junior High School Dec. 1; 8-10
a.m. at Curundu Elementary School, 1:15-2:30 p.m. and
2:45-4 p.m. at the Fort Clayton Theater.

Miiar ew ag


Lawmakers suggest
covering up reasons
veterans' illnesses.


Pentagon is
for Gulf War


DARE also teaches self esteem, assertiveness, respect
for themselves and others and peer pressure resistance.
"The classes help you resist against pressure from
other people to do drugs and smoke cigarettes," said
Angelo Williams, Clayton Elementary School student.
"People try to force you to do things you don't want to do
and DARE helps us with ways to say no to them."
DARE instructors get the students involved through
role-playing, Olavania explained.
"They learn more and it stays with them longer if they
become involved in the lessons," she said. "We also get
their attention by getting high school students in.2xved
as role models. They come and talk to the students in a
way an adult in uniform can't - as a cool high schooler."
"I'm getting more out ofthisthan just the normal com-
mercials and stuff," said Stephanie Shearman, Clayton
Elementary School student. "I think more kids won't do
drugs because of DARE."
The program also offers students someone who they
can trust to talk to, Olavarria explained.
"We (instructors) hang around during lunch and re-
cess so the students can talk to us one-on-one where some
may feel more comfortable," she said. "And they can
talk to us about anything, not just drug-related subjects."
Being a DARE instructor means being able to com-
municate with the students, no matter the subject,
Olavarria explained.
"Teaching this course takes motivation, enthusiasm
and the desire to help in any way," Olavarria said. "I
like children so if I can wake just one of them up and
keep them drug-fne, it's worth every ounce of effort."

Holiday Tropic Times
COROZAL (Tropic Times) - The next issue of
the Tropic Times will be distributed Wednesday.
The edition will include the Southern Command
Network television schedule for the week of Nov.
29 to Dec. 2.
The Tropic Times will print the last edition of
the year Dec. 17. and resume printing Jan. 7,1994.
People having articles or announcements for
the final edition should check with their servicing
public affairs office for the submission deadline.
CID offers reward
FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Atlantic) - The
Criminal Investigations Command is offering a
$1,000 reward for information leading to the iden-
tity of the person who stole an M203 grenade
launcher. The grenade launcher was stolen from
Building 244, Fort Davis. Information given will
be confidential. Call 289-361 in the Atlantic com-
munity or 285-4314 in the Pacific community.
Sailor nearly drowns
RODMAN NS (USNAVSTAPANCANAL
PAO)- A sailorstationed here nearly drowned after
saving other swimmers from drowning Sunday at
CoronaBeach. ChiefPettyOfficerJesus Gilmoreof
the U.S, Naval Small Craft Instruction and Techni-
cal Training School is listed in critical condition at
GorgasArmyCommunity Hospital. Theincidentis
under investigation.

Christmas tree sale set
ALBROOK AFS (Tropic Times) - This year's
Christmas tree sale is scheduled for 7 am. Dec. 4
on Albrook AFS. Call 285-6548 for information.




*USO show, page 3.
*Joint Task Force Builder, page 8.
*Homecoming games, page 12.


-


I






-C-- - ,,..l ~ ..�


Tropic Times
Nov.19,1993


US. Any photo by ina Lmvy-Ourmn
Spec. Andre Mitchell (left) and Spec. Wilfredo Mojica count bed frames before
distributing them in El Valle.


Local soldiers help


children sleep better


by Liliana Levy-Dutram
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT CLAYTON - Soldiers from the
41st Area Support Group helped the
Sleeping Children Around the World
Foundation bring hundreds of beds to
Panamanian children.
The Canada-based volunteer founda-


tion joined efforts with the Kiwanis Club -
Panama and Metropolitan and various
Panamanian corporations to bring 3,000
beds to needy families throughout the
country.
Each child who received a bed had a
sponsor who donated $30, said Claire
Newton, SCAW volunteer.
Each donation included a bed frame,


mattress, pillow, pillow case and pajamas.
The Ministries of Health, Housing and
Labor sent social workers to evaluate fami-
lies so that only those with the most need
received a bed said Raul Hernandez, presi-
dent of the Kiwanis Club - Panama.
"Unfotunately we can't help everyone,
so they may only receive one bed per fam-
ily. We hope to increase the number to
10,000 or more in upcoming years," he
said.
While SCAW donated $70,000 to the
project, transporting the beds was the job
of the 41st ASG.
"I feel like we're
doing aserviceto the *If it's for the
community," said for a good ca
Spec. Andre
MtchelL "We send all for it...I fee
out humanitarian it.
groups and build
schools in El Salva- Spec. W
dor and other 41st AreaS
places...there's al-
ways a mission go-
ing on somewhere to help someone," he
said.
Helping children is what motivated
Spec. Wilfredo Mojica.
"Whatever it takes...if it takes until
midnight, then well crank until then," he
said. "Ifit's forthe kids and it's for a good
cause, then I'm all for it..I feel good about
it."
The Army's help in moving the beds
made a big difference, said Salustio Diaz,
Kiwanis Club - Metropolitan president.
"We are very grateful for the support
we've received from the Army," he said.
"The trucks we previously had were able
to mobilize only 130 frames at one time.
In the Army trucks, we're able to mobilize


k


lu


up to 320 frames per truck. This makes
things more efficient and faster."
Isabel Batista's family was one of those
who benefitted from the program and the
support from the 41st ASG. Her son,
Rigoberto, suffers from cerebral palsy.
"He was diagnosed with cerebral palsy
when he was about 4 months old, now he's
6," she said.
Rigoberto is the youngest of eight chil-
dren in the Batista home.
"I feel very happy that we were able to
get a bed for him. Because of his illness,
he needs a place to
sleep by himself,
(ids and it's but I never had the
ise, then I'm means with which
to get him one,"
good about Batista said.
Fernanda de
Burker's family
Ifredo Mojica also benefitted
pport Group from the program.
Raul London, her
4-year-old grand-
son, received a bed. Raul is the oldest of


Fernanda's three grandchildren and they
live together in the Curundu area.
"He started crying because when we
got here they told us he wouldn't be able
to get a bed. I'm glad they were able to
give him one after all," Fernanda said.
SCAW has carried out similar projects
in other countries such as Bangladesh,
Honduras and Colombia.
Miguel Clare, of the Kiwanis Club,
was responsible for bringing this program
to Panama.
"We seek to get these children up off
the floor so they can stop sleeping on old
pieces of cardboard and feel a greater
sense of self-worth and dignity," he said.


Military police training to handle


situations with levels of force


by Sgt Lori Davis
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT CLAYTON - A civilian employee pulled a gun
on the military police when he was caught with duty-free
goods during a spot check at the pedestrian gate here a
few months ago, said SSgt Eddie Wise, U.S. Army South
force protection noncommissioned officer.
The MP searched a bag the civilian was carrying and
found the goods. The MP began to search the person and
told him he would be apprehended, but during the search
the civilian pulled a gun from his waistband, Wise said.
The MP told the civilian to put the gun on the ground.
The civilian did put down his weapon, but then he began
to argue with the MP, so he was placed in hand irons and
taken to the MP station, Wise explained.
The MP controlled the situation by using the lowest
level of force, "inter-personal skills." Military police of-
ficers are trained to handle situations by starting with the
lowest level of force and increasing force only when nec-
essary, explained MP SSgt. John Williamson, 534th MP
Co.
The six levels of force are:
*Inter-personal skills - talking to the person.
*Show of force - the presence of more MPs ora dog.
*Unarmed self defense techniques - subduing an in-
dividual by hand.
+MP club - striking with the club on legal areas, such
as the shin.
*Canine - commanding the dog to subdue the indi-
vidual
*Deadly force - drawing a 9mm pistol or other
weapon as a last resort.
MPs are trained to use as little force as possible and
only use more force after they fail to resolve the problem
at lower levels, Williamson explained.
Establishing levels of force also makes it easier for
MPs to control situations, he said.
"The first thing you do is try to verbally persuade the
individual Once you try that and it doesn't work, you
know what to do next," Williamson said.
Knowing what to do next is very helpful in unpredict-
able situations. MPs often find themselves in difficult situ-
ations with unruly people, Wise said.
"Three months ago a young soldier who was in
Panama TDY (temporary duty) attempted to leave the in-
stallation during curfew without proper authorization,"
Wise said. "'Te MP told him he couldn't leave several
times, but when he started to walk off anyway the MPs
attempted to physically restrain him.


us. AS y photo by Sg LL D&vi
Cpl. Cynthia Gardener demonstrates unarmed self
defense techniques on Pvt. 2 Isaac Smith
"The soldier struck an MP and tried to flee. A second
MP got involved and the soldier was finally restrained
and put in hand irons," he said.
The soldier continued to fight the MPs by kicking and
biting after he was in hand irons, Wise said.
"At the station he continued to fight," he sad. "It took
four MPs to carry him out of the car and two MPs had to
restrain him. He continued his violent behavior inside the
station, where he yelled profanities and spit on the MP
duty officer."
The soldier struck an MP and resisted arrest, but the
MPs used only unarmed self defense techniques. The sol-
dier was very drunk and unpredictable, but the MPs con-
trolled him with the least amount of force necessary to
prevent him from hurting himself or others, Wise ex-
plained.
Having control of the situation and knowing how to
handle the unexpected are very important parts of serv-
ing and protecting the community, Williamson said. The
534th MP Co. reviews the levels of force with each shift
going on patrol.


U.S. Army South

dining facilities list

holiday meal hours
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Thanks-
giving Day meals will be served In U.S. Army
South dining facilities at no cost to meal card
holders Thursday. For non-meal card holders the
price will be $1.50 for family members less than
12 years old; $3 for enlisted, officers, family mem-
bers and dining facility attendants; $5.55 for
guests less than 12 years old; and $11.10 for sol-
diers on per diem, guests and Department of De-
fense civilians.
The hours for Thanksgiving Day dinner at
US. Army South dining facilities are:

Headquarters Company, U.S. Army Garrison
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. - single soldiers, 12:30-
2 p.m. - soldiers with family, guests

92nd Personnel Service Command
11:30 a.m-2 p.m. - everyone

193rd Support Battalion
noon-3 p.m. -everyone

Company E, 228th Aviation
noon-2 p.m. - everyone

Ist Battalion, Infantry 508th (Airborne)
1130 a.m.-12.30 p.m. - single soldiers
12:30-2:30 p.m. - soldiers with family, guests

1st Battalion, 228th Aviation
11:30 am.12:30 p.m. single soldiers
12:30-2 p.m. - soldiers with family, guests

1097th Boat Company
11:30 a.m-12:30 p.m. - single soldiers
12:45-2:30 p.m. - soldiers with family, guests

5th Battalion, 87th Infantry
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. - single soldiers
1-2:30 p.m. - soldiers with family, guests

Jungle Operations Training Battalion
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. - single soldiers
1-2:30 p.m. - soldiers with family, guests


I









Tropic Times 3
Nov. 19, 1993


Winfield performs at the Joint Task Force Builder basecamp in Miraflores, El Salvador. , . . "p .

g k U


SJungle rock


S/iRI USO tour band jams


iEl Salvador basecamp


Spec. Michael Sheperdson enjoys the USO show.


by Capt Greg Yesko
Theater Support Element
MIRAFLORES, El Salvador - A band came
all the way from Denver, Colo. to rock the
basecamp of Join Task Force Builder.
U.S. soldiers in El Salvador got a taste of
classic American rock'n'roll when the USO
brought in the group "Winfield" for a show Nov.
7.
More than 200 soldiers found a spot in the
shade andkicked backto enjoythe concert. Some
braved the heat and strutted their stuff on the
plywood dance floor.
The band was motivated to deliver a high-
energy performance.
"When we landed in Soto Cano and they told
us we were coming here, we were allvery excited,
said Debi Goforth, a singer and keyboard played
with the band. "It seems like an adventurous
place to go - another spot in the world to see."
Winfield performed five other
USO tours in the past two years, but
the performance at the basecamp
broke new ground.
"This tent city is a new experi-
ence," Goforth said. "This is more
like what I expected the Army to be
S like and also what I expected our
performance to be like. A lot of
Times weperformin clubs on bases."
. l'1 The band's energy was met with
t an equally enthusiastic audience.
"It's really a great band," said
S Spec.Michael Shepardson, anequip-
ment operator with Company B,
536th Engineer Battalion. "I'm re-
ally enjoying the rock'n'roll - it
brings me back to the states."
Shepardson said the concert pro-
vided a nice break from the daily
routine. His positive feelings about
the band seemed to be shared by


some of his colleagues.
"I really enjoy the USO shows," said Spec.
Robert W. Brehm, a generator mechanic with
HSC, 536th. "We had three showsin Honduras
while we were there and it really made the time
go by. It takes the monotony away from the
work."
Formanyofthe soldiers who have beeninEl
Salvador since August, the impact on the mo-
rale was electric.
"I thinkit definitely has positive impact on
the troops," said Sgt. Maj. Cleveland A. Floyd,
command sergeant major of the task force.
"Activities such as these will always keep
morale atits peak. High moraleleads to positive
performance," Floyd said.
Floyd said the task force checked into the
possibility of getting a show to come to the
basecamp Theyrequested to have ashow when-
ever one was available.
It seemsto have arrived atjusttheright time.
"We have 25 days left," Floyd explained.
"This provides a last good weekend of fun and
relaxation before we move into the final phase
of the exercise - sort of a second wind. We
want to ensure everything is done to standard
and done safely."
The soldiers applauded the band and the
band applauded the soldiers.
"I think they're doing a great job for being
roasting hot on a Sunday morning with no
beer," Goforth said, describing the audience.
The niusic wasn't the only reminder of
North American culture. Vendors sold pizza,
cheeseburgers and ice cream as well as various
souvenirs, T-shirts and leather goods.
As Join Task Force Builder nears comple-
tion of its mission in El Salvador, the soldiers
got an extra burst of motivation from the day's
activities.
"I love it," Brehm said. "I'm more into
country music, but the early rock'n'roll I really
love."


Winfield guitarists Steve Thomas and Stuart Noble belt out a song.


.5 Aat~kI~.. S ,....''..(~)













4Tropic Times
Nov. 19,1993


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Mixed feelings over NAFTA


Haitian immigrants

caught near Miami

MIAMI (Reuters) - Four dozen illegal Haitian
immigrants were caught wading ashore on islands
off Miami early Monday, the latest in a growing
influx of Haitians believed to have been smuggled
to Florida from the Bahamas.
The Haitians arrived in two groups, U.S. Bor-
der Patrol spokesman Herbert Jefferson said.
Eight were caught on Virginia Key shortly af-
ter midnight and 40 others were apprehended on
neighboring Key Biscayne about 5:30 a.m.,
Jefferson said.
"There's no telling how many there actually
were. There's a good chance there were many
more who got away," Jefferson said.
All the Haitians were taken to a U.S. immigra-
tion holding center pending deportation proceed-
ings.
Investigators think the Haitians were dropped
off by vessels sailing from the Bahamas, where
Bahamian immigration officials recently estimated
40,000 Haitians are living illegally.
As conditions in Haiti deteriorate, growing
numbers have given up hope of returning to their
homeland and have paid smugglers as much as
$3,000 to bring them to Florida, investigators said.
Fuel has been in short supply in Haiti since the
U.N. imposed a trade embargo on the country one
month ago to punish army leaders for failing to
hand over power to democratically elected Presi-
dent Jean-Bertrand Aristide.
Tens of thousands of Haitians tried unsuccess-
fully to sail small fishing boats to Florida follow-
ing the 1991 military coup that deposed Aristide.
A Coast Guard team searched a Bahamian-reg-
istered ship that was in the area Monday, but found
no evidence it was involved in smuggling, a Coast
Guard spokesman said.


Chinese president

to meet with Cuba
BEIJING (Reuters) - The visit of China's Presi-
dent Jiang Zemin to Cuba next week, the first by a
Chinese leader, is primarily aimed at appeasing
conservatives within China's own Communist hi-
erarchy and at asserting the independence of
China's foreign policy, diplomats in Beijing say.
The official Xinhua news agency announced
the long-expected visit Wednesday as Jiang left for
Seattle to attend the Asia Pacific Economic Coop-
eration forum and to hold his first meetings with
President Clinton.
Most political analysts believed Jiang's Cuba
visit was essentially a gesture aimed at the United
States: repeating China's commitment to an inde-
pendent foreign policy despite its market reforms
and diplomatic gestures to Washington.
"They want to avoid too much of a feeling of
triumphalism in the West," one diplomat said.
"If you are going to hurtle down the bob-sled run
to capitalism, you might as well fly the red flag
while you are doing it."
Chinese conservatives, diplomats also reason,
may be unsettled by Beijing's attempts to achieve
rapprochement with Washington, and by Beijing's
own recently-announced moves for faster market-
style reform.
"Balance is important, and that is why he
(Jiang) must visit Cuba," said one Western diplo-
mat in Beijing. "There can't be many other rea-
sons - Cuba itself doesn't have much to offer
China at the moment."
Though Cuba was closely allied with the So-
viet Union during China's bitter ideological rivalry
with Moscow, Beijing has maintained cordial dip-
lomatic and trade ties with Havana.
Cuba's Prensa Latina said Jiang's visit would
take place Sunday and Monday and that he would
meet Cuban leader Fidel Castro.
Cuba, suffering under a U.S. trade embargo
and hit hard by the collapse of Soviet economic
support, has been reaching out to the few remain-
ing communist nations for help.
Some diplomats say they expect Jiang to carry
Beijing's message that market reforms are a way
to ensure continued Communist Party rule to
Castro's Cuba, which itself has already embarked
on a program of change.


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MEXICO CITY (AP)
- Mexican businessman
cheered U.S. lawmakers'
vote for free trade like it
was a football game, a
mariachi band member
hoped it would bring him
a better guitar, but others
feared Mexico got a bum
deal
The North American
Free Trade Agreement
won approval in the
House late Wednesday in
an event closely followed
by those Mexicans whose
livelihoods will likely
change with creation of
the world's largest trade
zone.
Enrique Zambrano,
president of the
Monterrey Chamber of
Industry and Manufactur-
ing, was happy, saying:
"We think reason pre-
vailed over fear."
There also was gloat-


ing. owners in Washington i
"Where is that sucking American Free Trade Agi
sound now? It's just the
empty wind in Ross Perot's head," said Roberto Madri-
gal, a Mexican businessman who watched the vote on a
large-screen TV at the U.S. Trade Center here. Perot
claimed that passage would mean a giant "sucking noise"
from jobs leaving America for Mexico.
President Carlos Salinas de Gortari hailed the vote in
a televised address.
"This action was a rejection of the protectionist vi-
sion," calling the treaty a "good instrument, one more
instrument for building a better future for Mexico,"
Gortari said.
The president reassured Mexicans that they would
have time to prepare for competition with the economic
powerhouses north of the border by suggesting the
treaty's full impact would not be felt for years.
But it wasn't just politicians and businessmen talking.
Here's a sampling of Mexican voices from other walks of
life:


APLaserPhoto
peaks to small business
n support of the North
reement.


Reynaldo Estrada, a mu-
sician in a gray sombrero
who can be found most
nights in the mariachi
hangout of Garibaldi Plaza,
said he hoped NAFTA
would land him a new gui-
tar.
"I think the treaty will
bring down prices and
maybe even help me get a
good guitar from the United
States," he said as he
plucked a well-worn guitar
loaned from a partner.
He couldn't afford the
$125 price to buy his own.
Mariachi trumpeter
Enrique Gutierrez, 74, said
he was too old to follow
such news. "I don't know
anything about that trade
treaty. But I'm here every
night, just 20 pesos (about
$6.50) a song," said
Gutierrez, in black cowboy
outfit with silver buckles.
Alejandra Lozada, owner
of a 72-year-old ice cream
parlor in Mexico City, said
NAFTA would mean more


American ice cream heading here. But that doesn't worry,
her. She still has the edge.
"We make our own ice cream fresh every day, no arti-
ficial ingredients," said Lozada, who churns out vanilla
walnut ice cream each day in a tub turned by an old-fash-
ioned hand crank.
"No, I'm not afraid of competition at all, my custom-
ers are loyal," Lozada said.
Novelist Homero Aidjis said the treaty promises to
modernize Mexico, but may help erode its uniquely Latin
culture.
"I guess we will have to put up a sign all along our
2,000-mile border saying 'Welcome to USA-Mexico,' "
he said.
"We are entering into a new relationship with a great
superpower, and it's going to be a very harsh transition
for many Mexican businesses that simply will not be able
to compete," said Aridjis.


Shell breaks Haitian embargo


PORT-AU-PRINCE (Reuters) - Desperate Haitian
motorists Tuesday formed huge lines and emptied gaso-
line pumps after the Shell Co. Ltd. resumed sales despite
aU.N. oil embargo aimed at punishing the country's mili-
tary rulers.
Chaos ensued as scores of drivers rushed to buy the
first gasoline delivered to stations since the oil blockade
on the Caribbean nation took effect four weeks ago.
Stations in the capital that received deliveries sold out
their consignments by Tuesday afternoon.
"I've been waiting here since last night because I re-
ally need gas," said one man. "I've had no gas for a
month."
An army-backed court ruling last week ordered Shell,
along with Exxon Corp's Esso unit and Texaco Inc, to
sell whatever gasoline remained in their huge storage
tanks in Haiti.
The two other companies were expected to follow
Shell's lead, which diplomats said would help the army
continue holding on to power for at least several more
weeks.
"How can the embargo work if the stations are selling
gas? This will just prolong the crisis," said one frustrated
aide to Prime Minister Robert MalvaL
Malval is member of the pro-democracy government
of ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Aristide's
U.N.-brokered return to Haiti last month was blocked by
the military when Lieutenant General Raoul Cedras re-
fused to step down.
The oil companies had previously said they would not
comply with the distribution order because it would vio-
late the U.N. oil embargo.
But Haiti's National Association of Gasoline Distribu-
tors threatened to use police force, and arrest oil company
officials if they continued to withhold the gasoline stocks.
Meanwhile, the neo-Duvalierist Front for Advance-
ment and Progress of Haiti called for the dissolution of


parliament
At a news conference, spokesman Louis Jodel
Chamblain also proposed an alternative Cabinet contain-
ing several anti-Aristide figures as well as some mem-
bers of the pro-democracy movement that backs the
ousted leader.
Although FRAPH has been at the forefront of moves
to prevent Aristide's return, diplomats refuse to recog-
nize the legitimacy of the group, calling it a group of
"armed thugs."
The decision by Shell to release the gas ended a week-
long standoff between the company and the petroleum
distributors.
Already the Western Hemisphere's poorest nation,
Haiti has been hit hard by the U.N. embargo to force the
army to abide by the international plan for Aristide's re-
turn. Diplomats said the army was behind the release of
the gasoline.
"A particular sector of society is trying to buy time,"
said U.N. spokesman Eric Falt. "If they buy a few days
that's all they will get. They can't change the basic
premise - that the international community wants to
force everybody to the negotiating table."
In an interview published Tuesday by the French
newspaper Le Figaro, Cedras dismissed President
Clinton's administration as irresponsible.
"The army in the United States is very responsible.
The executive isn't," Cedras said.
Asked whether he feared a U.S. invasion, which
Clinton has refused to rule out, Cedras answered: "A
landing would be a pity for us and for Clinton. What
would he get out of it?"
"I can assure you it would be a complete failure. And
Haiti would suffer even more," Cedras said.
U.N. Security Council said Monday that it might
toughen the economic sanctions against Haiti to further
punish the army.


President Bill Clinton sp


1









~iMii4


ary News


Tropic Times
Nov. 19,1993


Aidid search ends
The United Nation Security Council voted unanimouslyTuesday nightto call off the search for Somali warlord Mohamed
Farrah Aidid and launch a new inquiry into the attacks on U.N. peacekeepers in Somalia. Aidid has been blamed for
many of those attacks, butthe Security Council is backing off its condemnation of him in hopes of including him in efforts
to find a political solution for Somalia.


No answers for sick Gulf veterans


WASHINGTON (AP) - Lawmakers
are growing impatient with the Defense
Department's response to mysterious ill-
nesses among Gulf War veterans, with
some suggesting the Pentagon is more
concerned with a cover-up than working
with the Veterans Affairs Department to
find the cause of the ailments.
"Despite repeated calls by Congress,
the Department of Defense's investigation
has been cursory," Rep. Joseph P.
Kennedy II, D-Mass., said in House Vet-
erans' Affairs Committee hearings.
In hearings on both sides of Capitol
Hill Tuesday, criticism centered on the
Pentagon.
Senators pointed to the testimony of a
Marine chemicals expert that traces of
Lewisite blister vapors were detected on
the battlefield, apparently contradicting
Pentagon assertions that it had found no
evidence of Iraqi chemical weapons use
during the 1991 war.
Defense Secretary Les Aspin altered
that stance somewhat last week when he
acknowledged the validity of Czech mili-
tary findings of traces of nerve gas and
blister agents in the Persian Gulf region.


But Aspin said the levels were not enough
to cause the symptoms that have come to
be known as Persian Gulf syndrome.
Thousands are sick, said Sen. Don
Riegle, D-Mich., who has researched pos-
sible chemical contamination during the
war. "We're not getting straight answers
and they deserve straight answers."
And Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va,
chairman of the Senate Veterans Affairs
Committee, said that "many Gulf veter-
ans believe the Department of Defense is
more concerned about covering up pos-
sible exposures to chemical or biological
warfare than determining exactly what
happened."
Maj. Gen. Ronald Blanck, commander
of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center,
said that among the contaminants being
studied for links to the illnesses are Ku-
waiti oil fires, parasites, petrochemicals,
depleted uranium used in munitions and
chemical agents. He said that while the
cause of illnesses "has been elusive, we
will continueto care forthese veterans and
do our utmost to root out the reason for
their lingering health problems."
VA Secretary Jesse Brown said more


than 10,000 Persian Gulf veterans have
been examined under a VA program and
the VA has also set up a pilot program to
examine those who believe they were sick-
ened by chemical agents.
But he said that of 1,472 decisions on
claims for disability due to environmental
hazards, only 79 have received service-
connected benefits.
The difficulty, he said, is that the VA
has no mechanism to establish a service
connection for multiple chemical sensitiv-
ity and Persian Gulf syndrome "because
they are not widely acknowledged in the
medical community as disabilities."
Brown expressed support for a bill, al-
ready passed by the House and awaiting
Senate action, that would provide Persian
Gulf veterans with health problems spe-
cial eligibility for care.
Chief Warrant Officer Joseph P.
Cottrell a nuclear, biological and chemi-
cal defense officer, told the Senate com-
mittee that his detection vehicle twice reg-
istered low levels of blister agents during
combat operations. He said he reported the
findings to superiors, but the computer
tape was subsequently lost.


Gay sailor receives commission
NEW YORK (AP) - For Joseph Steffan, lying about men friends that he is gay.
his homosexuality would have been "a denial of all that I Rumors spread. Navy investigators looked into them,
had learned." and Steffan eventually acknowledged he is gay to the
Telling the truth proved difficult, too. commandant. He never was accused of engaging in ho-
Steffan was forced to resign from the U.S. Naval Acad- mosexual acts.
emy in 1987 after admitting to the commandant he is A review panel recommended his discharge for "in-
gay. He left just six weeks before graduation. sufficient aptitude for commissioned service," and he re-
But Tuesday, a federal appeals court ordered the Navy signed.
to give him his diploma and commission him as an offi- A three-judge panel of the U.S. Circuit Court of Ap-
cer. peals in Washington ruled, however, that Navy rules re-
Steffan, now 29, said he does not regret telling the quiring Steffan's expulsion for his acknowledged homo-
truth, sexuality "are not rationally related to any legitimate
"Today, I have the opportunity to have both retained goal."
my honor as an individual and as a midshipman, and to Gay-rights advocates said they hoped the ruling would
have my diploma," he said at the headquarters of the persuade President Clinton to stick to his promise to lift
Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund, a gay-rights the ban on gays in the military.
organization that represented him. The Pentagon said it would abide by the ruling but
"I have no bitterness toward the military," he said. "I hadn't decided whether to appeal.
think they are compassionate, dedicated, trustworthy Steffan, who is in his third year of law school at the
people. I think the institution is flawed, however. It's University of Connecticut in Hartford, said he isn't sure
flawed by deep bigotry. It's flawed by a deep ignorance." whether he will finish his studies there but will definitely
Steffan had compiled an impressive record during his rejoin the Navy.
years at the academy. He was one of 10 students named Once he's back, Steffan said, he would like to help
battalion commanders in his senior year. He twice sang educate the military about homosexuality.
the national anthem at Army-Navy football games. He "If I could pick my dream job, I think it would be work-
was cited for "constant dedication to superior perfor- ing with the administration and the Department of De-
mance." fense to set up programs and policies to help implement a
His troubles began when he confided to two midship- policy of nondiscrimination in the military," he said.


Aspin favors

new assistant
WASHINGTON (AP) - Defense
Secretary Les Aspin lauded Morton
Halperin Tuesday as an "individual of
the highest qualifications and integ-
rity," offering a boost to the nominee
before his confirmation hearing.
The Senate Armed Services Com-
mittee is scheduled to hold a hearing
today on Halperin's stalled nomina-
tion as assistant secretary of defense
for democracy and peacekeeping.
In a letter to Committee Chairman
Sen. Sam Nunn, D-Ga., released at
the Pentagon, Aspin wrote of his
"strong and unambiguous support"
for the nominee, as well as President
Clinton's "confidence...in Mort's
abilities."
Clinton announced his intention in
March to name Halperin to the de-
fense post, but the nomination was
not forwarded to the Senate until Au-
gust
Conservative members of Con-
gress have expressed opposition to
Halperin's nomination, contending
he has an over-arching concern for
individual liberties that could conflict
with national security interests.
In his letter, Aspin said Halperin
has attempted "to reconcile the need
for intelligence gathering and coun-
terintelligence efforts with individual
civil liberties.
"He has helped fashion legislation
that criminalized the disclosure of
classified information, but also makes
U.S. intelligence collection adhere to
the constitutional rights of individu-
als. This work has won him praise
from both civil rights groups and the
intelligence community."
"He's an individual of the highest
qualifications and integrity for this
important position," Aspin said.
Halperin was Washington director
of the American Civil Liberties
Union. He was a member of the Na-
tional Security Council staff under
President Nixon before quitting in
dispute over Vietnam War policy.
Several Senate Republicans had
blocked passage of the intelligence
bill to pressure the Clinton adminis-
tration for more information on
Halperin. The senators lifted the hold
after receiving assurances that their
requests would be met.


Marine officer denies

Tailhook misconduct

QUANTICO, Va. (AP) - A Marine Corps officer
accused of blocking the Tailhook investigation de-
nied any misconduct Tuesday and said he is confi-
dent he will be cleared.
Lt. Col. Cass D. Howell, the highest-ranking Ma-
rine charged in Tailhook, said he tried to help iden-
tify the people who assaulted women during the in-
famous gathering of military aviators.
"I did not partake in any of those activities for
which Tailhook has become synonymous," Howell
said after a two-day Article 32 hearing at the
Quantico Marine Corps Base.
"I answered all questions put to me truthfully and
I never refused to answer a question," he said.
Howell, a 44-year-old ROTC instructor, is
charged with lying, obstructing justice, assault and
conduct unbecoming an officer for spending the
night with a woman at the Las Vegas gathering. He
is not accused of abusing women.
Based on the hearing's testimony, a militaryjudge
will recommend within three weeks whether to court-
martial Howell. He faces expulsion from the Marine
Corps and up to 16 years and six months in a mili-
tary prison if convicted of all charges.










6 Tropic Tunes
Nov. 19,1993


*!Voices


Resident concerned about electrical repairs


Dear Mayors' Corner:
The waiting time for repairs to govern-
ment housing has become longer each
timeIcall. Nowit'stotheridiculouspoint
of 17 weeks for a minor electrical repair.
I see building going on (new construc-
tion) which is a waste since we are soon
leaving. The money would be better spent
doing repairs and hiring qualified work-
ers.
What do your sources say about this
situation?
Anonymous

Dear Anonymous:
Dick Davis, Chief of Family Housing
for Directorate of Engineering and Hous-
ing said your concern about waiting time
for repairs is well founded.
"DEH has been working very hard to
decrease the waiting times for repairs to
quarters but with a decrease in manpower,
timely responses for routine repairs is not
always possible," Davis said.
Lt CoL John Lovo, Director of Engi-
neering and Housing, explained that Con-
gress appropriates two kinds of monies to
run the installations. Unfortunately, said


Lovo, they are not interchangeable.
One kind is called OM&A (operations
and maintenance Army) which is money
used to take care of everything except fam-
ily housing. These monies are designated
to maintain and improve the quality of life
for US forces that live and work on our
installations. The majority of the on-going
construction on post right now is from fis-
cal year 1992 OM&A money. These
projects were approved by a board of offic-
ers and the Commanding General.
The other kind of money is P1900
money which is specifically for family
housing repair and maintenance. Even
though the DEH may have money for ex-
ecuting housing repairs, DoD-wide hiring
limitations do not allow DEH to hire the
necessary craftsmen to accomplish that
task.
Accordingly, DEH has assembled a
multi-million dollar housing maintenance
contract that they expect to award in late
1993 that will make up for the craftsmen/
manpower short fall.


In the meantime, DEH is rapidly ex-
panding its Self-Help program and will
open a new Self-Help center in July.
Training will begin in August for such di-
verse areas as water heater replacement,
electrical and plumbing repairs, and nu-
merous other household maintenance re-
quirements.
Lovo said the training is available for
all US Army military and civilian mem-
bers and their families and will provide
them with skills they can use for a life
time.

Dear Mayors' Corner:
Aren't those sheds on Kobbe covered
by the Army in case of theft? We tried to
submit a claim but were told the buildings
weren't secure because some don't have
roofs. If they aren't secure, why did the
Army put them up for our use?
Ripped off twice

Dear Ripped:
Residents cannot assume that because


the sheds were built by the U.S. Army they
are authorized secured storage, said Capt.
Dan Cowhig, chief, U.S. Army South
Claims Service.
Those sheds were originally designed
to be enclosed clothes-line areas, not stor-
age sheds, said Directorate of Engineer-
ing and Housing Operations Officer Capt.
Larry PowelL Powell said DEH had a con-
tract to replace the roofs on those sheds
and believed the contract was complete.
After our call, Powell said he will investi-
gate the "missing roof' allegations and see
if the previous contract can be reopened to
include any sheds left out.
The Provost Marshal recommends resi-
dents store all high value items indoors.

Editor'snote:This column allows com-
munity members to submit questions to
the Mayoral Congress. Letters shouldbe
called to: Mayors' Corner, Publicity
Chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS).
Anonymity will be granted upon request.
The Tropic Times reserves the right to
edit letters and responses for brevity,
clarity and propriety.


Soldier writes 14 bad checks worth $2,300


$2,300 in bad checks
A Fort Davis soldier was arrested for writing 14 bad
checks totalling $2,300 at Atlantic and Pacific commu-
nity Army and Air Force Exchange Services. Writing
bad checks is punishable under the Uniform Code of Mili-
tary Justice. Financial management classes are available
at Army Community Services.

Robbed in Colon
A Fort Davis soldier was robbed and stabbed in the leg
last week in downtown Colon. Military police remind
people when travelling downtown to use the buddy sys-
tem and never carry large amounts of cash. If a victim of
crime, call the MPs at 287-4401 in the Pacific commu-
nity or 289-5133 in the Atlantic community.

Wrongful transfer of merchandise
A Fort Clayton soldier was charged with exceeding
the established limitation by buying two cribs in one tour.
The soldier was also charged with wrongful transfer of
merchandise when he gave one crib to a non-privilege
card holder. It is a violation of Southern Command Regu-
lation 1-19 to transfer merchandise to a non-privilege
card holder. For more information, call 286-3303.

Anonymous drug hotline
Anyone with drug smuggling information should call
the Panama Jack anonymous hotline at 285-4185.

Found property
The following items are lost and found inventory. Call
287-4401 with the description and listed claim number.


Item
wallet
purse
golf club
key chain
bicycle
wallet
helmet


Description
with identification
with identification;
Spalding
Discovery toys ta
Redline
with identification
kevlar


Claim number
n 196-93
a 195-93
194-93
g 193-93
192-93
n 189-93
188-93


Provost M h al 0 s orner


protective mask
boots
credit card
credit card
bank card
ID card holder
bicycle
lantern
key ing
bicycle
glasses
wallet
handle talkie
lawn mower
crowbar
bicycle


M17A2 licydes two BMX 216-93
jungle type watch women's 212-93
JC Penny 174-93 bolt cutters 144-93
Money Minder 173-93 keys with alarm remote 143-93
First Interstate 172-93 circular saw 134-93
with identification 171-93
Murray 169-93 The following crimes occurred in on-post h


green
with four keys
Mitch
with case
camouflage
Motorola
push type

Huffy


164-93
163-93
159-93
232-93
225-93
224-93
223-93
222-93
217-93


housing


areas Nov. 2-11.

Pacific
Fort Clayton 800 housing area - one larceny of secured
private property
Curundu housing area - two larcenies of unsecured pri-
vate property, one larceny of secured private property
Atlantic
None to report


This authorized unofficial command information pub-
lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic
Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces
Information Program of the Department of Defense, un-
der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S.
Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the
official view of the U.S. government, the Department of
Defense or the U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002
Telephone 285-6612.
Acting Commander in Chief.............................................
Maj. Gen. Walter T. Worthington



kiTropic Tim


Director, Public Affairs.......................CoL James L Fetig
Chief................................................SMSgt. Steve Taylor
Editor....................................SSgt. Deborah E. Williams
Assistant Editor...........................................Sgt. John Hall
Sports Editor.....................................Sgt. Richard Puckett
Editorial Staff.........................................Sgt. EJ. Hersom
Rosemary Chong
Maureen Sampson
Volunteer Assistant................................Josephine Beane
Student Intern.....................................Juan Carlos Palacio
Southern Command Public Affairs Office..........282-4278
Command Information Officer..............Patrick Milton
U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office................287-3007
Public Affairs Officer...................Maj. Melanie Reeder
Command Information Officer..................Beth Taylor


Editor................................................SSgt. Jane Usero
Journalists.............................................Sg Lori Davis
Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski
24th Wing Public Affairs Office.........................284-5459
Public Affairs Officer..............Capt. Warren L. Sypher
Public Affairs Superintendent.....MSgt. Dale Mitcham
Journalists.................................SSg. Rian Clawson
Sgt James A. Rush
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.............283-5644
Public Affairs Officer................Lt.j.g. Laura C. Moore
Assistant PAO.....................................Diane Gonzalez
Photographers.........................PH2 Roberto R. Taylor
PH2 Delano J. Mays
U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.........................289-4312
NCOIC.....................................Sgt. Richard Emert









_Commentary


Tropic Times 7
Nov.19,1993 I


Cough, cough


Long-time smoker makes attempt to quit the need


by SMSgt Steve Taylor
Chief, Tropic Times
yesterday, if it passed you by unnoticed, was
the Great American Smokeout. So how
many of you who still smoke tried giving it
up for a day?
It hardly seems possible an entire year has passed,
and the blitz is on again to get smokers to quit the habit.
As a smoker, I know that all the hoopla doesn't
really work. Smokers will only quit when they're ready,
and I'm one of them.
But this year I beat them. I quit early. And I hope
when this issue hits the streets, I'll still be among the
ranks of former smokers.
But, it's tough. As the article on page B5 explains, as
my doctor explained last year during my 40-year
physical, to quit smoking is as tough as overcoming
alcohol, cocaine, or heroin addiction.
I pooh hoohed that a year ago, but I'm not anymore.
Though I've quit before - what smoker hasn't tried
or at least thought about it - it's still tough.
Even with the "patch" it's hard. But I'm giving
it a try, and even if I don't succeed long-term,
the short-term will be worth it. I hope.
It just doesn't seem to be worth smoking
anymore. I couldn't smoke at work, had to
ask for smoking areas in restaurants, the


flight here from South Carolina was four hours of
agony, and I choose not to smoke at home out of
consideration of my non-smoking significant other. So
what was left?
Not much. I got tired of standing out in the sticky
heat every hour for five minutes to suck down some
smoke. I got tired of standing out on the porch at home,
mostly in the dark, to get some more. I got tired of ashes
and butts all over my car, not to mention the smell. I got
tired of being out of breath walking up two flights of
stairs. I got tired of doctors giving me lectures every
time I went to see them.
And I got tired of the price increases. Last time I
bought a pack in the states, the clerk quoted me
something like $2.60 and I literally choked.


So I had a lot to give up, and something to gain. No
more standing outside, a cleaner and nicer smelling car
and maybe my lungs will like me better.
So I'm trying to quit. It's not easy and during the last
week or so I've cheated a couple of times. But I'm not
giving up yet. I'm not going to let a cigarette run my
life.
I'm not trying to preach, or even encourage smokers
to quit, because I know it won't work.
You won't quit either until you are ready. And even
if you do decide to and fail, try again. There's no shame
in trying over and over and over.
Smokers shouldn't get too anxious, especially around
the time of the Great American Smokeout. If you're
ready to quit, there's help available if you can't do it
alone - and not many people can.
And if you're not ready to
quit, then don't. I didn't There will
b be a time for you. But the longer
you put it off, the harder it will be.
) As a smoker for 25 years, I know
this.
In the meantime, don't let
anyone make you feel guilty,
unless that's what it takes to get
you to quit now.
Now, where did I put those
cigarettes? Cough,cough.


Quality

by Capt Bob Marasc
24th Services Squadron
Since I came onbc
teach quality imr
backing 1991, I c
we are better off today. I
years since we jumped on
train and haven't looked
Here's a couple of exai
units are implementing q
service in the 24th Wing.
Imagine standing in a


I Diec Qots


program hinges on serving customer needs
Howard Post Office, it didn't matter you had to run the bridge gauntlet for a takes is for supervisors to take time to
o whether or not you're there to mail four simple 30 minute household goods listen to their customers or better yet, pi
Christmas packages or pick up one of briefing at Fort Clayton. their shoes on and look at how things
your own, you had to wait. The folks at the traffic management operate from the customers' perspective
board to help The Howard Post Office staff, after office tackled the HHG problem and and then be proactive. Either way, as
provement, way receiving intense quality improvement came up with the idea to have the long as you're trying to improve, I thinly
an honestly say training, teamed with unit quality briefing right here at Howard. Thanks everyone will benefit.
t's been two advisors and brainstormed the problem. for saving us from the rigors of the mad These are only a few examples of
.the quality The result? Now you can get mom's dash to Fort Clayton. improved customer service that you, ou
back. care package or send your Panama How did these ideas come to life? "Partners in Quality" have made in
mples of how sailboat to your cousin in Iowa and still Units simply listened to their customers Panama. Only you can make it happen.
quality customer have plenty of time for lunch. and workerbees. You can do this too. After all, change is inevitable. So let's
Or how about when permanent Chances are, they already know how to make it a positive event. This is quality
long line at the change of station time came around and fix a problem or improve service. All it customer service!


ut


k

r


What advice would you give someone trying to quit smoking?


I wanted to stop smok-
ing now, I'd try to get
the patch."


YN1 James Adams
Special Boat Unit 26


"Bribes. I bought my
husband a stereo and
he's quit so far."


Pvt. 2 Elizabeth Schuhardt
478th Military Intelligence
Headquarters Detachment


"No matter what it
takes, do it. It's worth
it."




Mike Bell
Army family member


"There are military "Think about the cost.


classes you can go to
and get patches. That
and just will power."



Sgt. Stephen Botts
536th Engineer Battalion


Try something else - a
different habit."




SSgt. John Lner
310th Airlift Squadron


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries - or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to
edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.







8 Tropic Times
Nov. 19, 1993


* .


TSE photo by Maj. Debbie Haston-Hilger
SrA. Kelly Izer of the 43rd Civil Engineer Squadron helps construct office space at the JTF-
Builder base camp.


,', '




A 536th Engineer Battalion soldier gives a rigger bl



Task F


U


.S.


engineers


P1 .



362nd PAD photo by Spec. Douglas Heaton
PFC Shannon Eaton, 536th Engineer Battalion, stacks cinder blocks with the help of local El Salvador Luis
Morales and his wife in a joint effort to build a school as part of JTF-Builder.


by Capt. John Leggett and SgL Lori Davis
USARSO Public Affairs Office
EL SALVADOR - Three months of working side-by-
side and sharing nation-building skills paid off in com-
munity improvements and greater understanding between
El Salvadorans and U.S. soldiers participating in Joint
Task Force Builder.
JTF Builder was a nation building project supported
by more than 400 engineers from the U.S. Army, Air
Force and Navy and the El Salvador Aimed Forces. The
project helped the people here recover from a 12-year civil
war by building a community center, 13 schools, drilling
six wells and laying six foundations, said Lt. Col. James
H. McCoy, commander of the 536th Eng. Bn. and JTF
Builder.
Soldiers from the 536th Engineer Battalion (Heavy)
also helped train soldiers of the recently established ESAF








Tropic Times l
Nov. 19, 1993 7


II� - �-~


to one of the El Salvadoran helpers.




rce Builder


.. .eater Sup- Bmentphoto by Ma. Debbie Haston-ge
Theater Support Bement photo by Maj. Debble Haston-H ger


join Salvadorans in nation-building effort


Engineer Corps. Most ESAF soldiers served in infantry
or artillery units during the war, but now the military is
developing other units to support the nation.
"We've been able to establish
positive relationships with the
people and the military in a short "We we con
amount of time and train the mili- but the best
tary in skills that will endear them
to their people," McCoy explained. when the Fh
The project served as a learning off a protest
opportunity on a personal level as
well. came. It's ha
"I thought all U.S. soldiers were school for kic
tall and white," said Juan Carlos, a
Cojutepeque High School student Lt. Col. Ja
who visited many of the work sites. JTF Builder co
"Although there is a big differ-


ir




a
d

)m


and people in your army. You also smile a lot and are
very social and open-minded.
"More importantly, this exchange contributes to our
economic, intellectual and social
development," he said. "We lost 12
earned at first, years as a result of the civil war. We
dictation w want to rebuild and renew."
indication was
U.S. soldiers also learned about
LN tried to pull El Salvador's culture and its people.
ind nobody "Salvadorans are very honest,
very religious and old-fashioned
rd to protest a and families are very close," ex-
S." plained Spec. Jose Soto, supply
clerk with the 536th Eng. Bn.
mes H. McCoy The Salvadorans are also close
imander as a community, said Pvt. Mario
Encamacion, a plumber with the


ence between us physically, I have seen different races 536 Eng. Bn. Everyone in the village pitched in to help


the soldiers by painting, carrying supplies or doing what-
ever they could do, he said.
"(JTF Builder) has shown them what the U.S. is all
about They get to see us as we really are," Soto added.
When U.S. soldiers arrived, here many were unsure
about their reception in a country that hadn't known
peace for more than a decade. That question faded as U.S.
soldiers drove convoys of equipment through local vil-
lages and were greeted by smiling and waving Salvador-
ans.
"We were conceded at first, but the best indication
(of acceptance) was when the FMLN (Farabundo Marti
Liberacion Nacional, a political organization) tried to pull
off a protest (against JTF Builder) and nobody came. It's
hard to protest schools for kids," McCoy said.
The smiles on Salvadoran and U.S. faces when schools
were built told McCoy how his soldiers and the people
here felt about each other and the project, he said.








1 0Tropic Times
S Nov. 19.1993


S Milestones


To Specialist - Charles Hinson m ofU.S.
Army Dental Activity - Panama

To Private First Class - Travis Latham
and Juan Nunez, both of Company C, 1st
Battalion, 508th Infantry.

To Senior Airman - Sharon D.
Chrismer, Audreia R. Erby, Allen L.
Gilmore, Robert L. Jones, Edward L.
Kincade, Kureen K. Paige, Israel B.
Parker, Darran IL Patterson, Davy L.
Roderique, Michael R Rumley, Marty D.
Schumacher, Michael L Scott and Andre
P. Vaughan.


To Airman First
Cummings.


Class - Godfrey L.


US. Army Ranger School - Spec. Trevor
Wicks of Company C, 1st Battalion, 508th
Infantry.

Nuclear, Biological and Chemical
School - Sgt Jaime Caro of U.S. Army
Dental Activity - Panama.

Preventive Dentistry Specialist Course
- Sgt Vernon Young Jr. of U.S. Army
Dental Activity - Panama.

Primary Leadership Development
Course - Distinguished Honor Graduate:
Spec. James Easton of 747th Mlitary In-
telligence Battalion. Honor Graduate:
Spec. Lyman Ross of Company A, 310th
Military Intelligence Battalion
Commandant's Inspection: Spec. Derek
Jamison of Headquarters Company, U.S.
Army Garrison. Physical Training: Spec.
James Easton of 747th Military Intelli-
gence Battalion. Leadership Award: Spec.
Danny Cook of Company C, 1st Battal-
ion, 228th Aviation. Spec. Joseph
Singerhouse of Headquarters Company,
1st Battalion, 508th Infantry. Spec.
Demetrica Bell of 489th Transportation.
Cpl. Christopher Watson of 194th Mili-
tary Police Company. Commandant's
List: Spec. Lee Baynard of U.S. Army
Medical Activity - Panama. Spec. Robert
Beane, Spec. Jorman Royer, both of Com-
pany E, 228th Aviation. Spec. Danny
Cook of Company C, 1st Battalion, 228th
Aviation. Spec. Derek Jamison of Head-
quarters Company, U.S. Army Garrison.
Spec. Christopher Pucci of Headquarters
Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry.
Spec. Melissa Storey of Company B,
154th Signal Battalion. Spec. Dawn Tran
of Headquarters Company, 193rd Support
Battalion. Cpl. Christopher Watson of
194th Military Police Company. Spec.
Mark Wysocki of 108th Military Police
Company. Graduates: Spec. Hector
Aguayo-Venegas of Company A, 5th Bat-
talion, 87th Infantry. Spec. Robert Aus-
tin, Spec. Carol Coley, Spec. Matthew
Hughes, Spec. Geoffrey Staples and Spec.
Bruce Welch, all of 1097th Transportation
Company. Spec. Leonard Baughman and
Spec. Martin Lawson, both of Company
B, 310th Military Intelligence Battalion.
Spec. Lee Baynard and Spec. Shallee
Graves, both of U.S. Army Medical Ac-
tivity - Panama. Spec. Robert Beane and
Spec. Jorma Royer, both of Company E,
228th Aviation. Spec. Demetdca Bell of
489th Transportation. Spec. Shawn Clut-
ter of Company A, 154th Signal Battal-
ion. Spec. Danny Cook of Company C,
1st Battalion, 228th Aviation. Spec. Cathy
Cooper of Headquarters Company, 41st
Area Support Group. Spec. Douglas


Davis of Headquarters Company, 536th
Engineer Battalion. Spec. Melton Dou-
glas II and Spec. Thomas Lucas, both of
Headquarters Detachment, 470th Military
Intelligence Brigade. Spec. James Easton
of 747th Military Intelligence Battalion.
Spec. Darrell Faulkner of Company B,
193rd Support Battalion. Spec. Rodney
Fillmore of Company B, 536th Engineer
Battalion. Spec. James Fletcher m of
617th SOAD. Spec. Patrick Gaddie of
Company A, 1st Battalion, 508th Infan-
try. Spec. Scott Ganley, Spec. Rodney
McConaha and CpL Christopher Watson,
all of 194th Military Police Company.
Spec. Sean Griggs and Spec. Mark
Wysocki, both of 108th Military Police
Company. Spec. John Harrington of
Company A, 193rd Support Battalion.
Spec. Quinn Haynes of 3rd Special Op-
erations Command. Spec. Sean Held,
Spec. Christopher Pucci and Spec. Luis
Vargas, all of Headquarters Company, 5th
Battalion, 87th Infantry. Spec. Robin
Mantikoski and Spec. Derek Jamison,
both of Headquarters Company, U.S.
Army Garrison. Spec. Joseph Jenkins and
Spec. Steven Jones, both of Company B,
1st Battalion, 228th Aviation. CpL Jeffery
Laffoon and Spec. Melissa Lehman, both
of Company A, Jungle Operations Train-
ing Battalion. Spec. Dennis Lamberton of
Headquarters Company, Law Enforce-
ment Activity. Spec.Phillip Lee Jr. of 4th
Battalion, 228th Aviation. Spec. Leon
Lewis of 470th Military Intelligence Bri-
gade. Spec. Jesus Lopez-Febo of Com-
pany E, 142nd Medical Battalion. Spec.
Terence Lovett and Spec. Elvin Nuells,
both of Southern Command Network.
Spec. Peter Metz of Headquarters Com-
pany, 193rd Infantry. Spec. Glenn
Perkins and Spec. Dawne Tran, both of
Headquarters Company, 193rd Support
Battalion. CpL Michael Myrick of 308th
Military Intelligence Battalion. Spec.
Raimundo Perez of Headquarters Com-
pany, 128th Aviation. Spec. Luis Reyes-
Recnos and Spec. Joseph Singerhouse,
both of Headquarters Company, 1st Bat-
talion, 508th Infantry. Spec. Lyman Ross
of Company A, 310th Military Intelli-
gence Battalion. Spec. Melissa Storey of
Company B, 154th Signal Battalion.
Spec. Larry Truax of 69th Signal Com-
pany. Spec. Juan VilarealJr.of Company
A, 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation. Spec.
Daniel Wilkinson of Headquarters De-
tachment, 106th Signal Brigade. Spec.
Paul Wilson of Company A, 536th Engi-
neer Battalion.



Spec. Katrina James of Headquarters
Company, 536th Engineer Battalion, was
selected as Chef of the Year by the Instal-
lation Food Service Office

Sgt David Draper of 4th Battalion, 228th
Aviation, was selected Noncommissioned
Officer of the Quarter for 128th Aviation
Brigade.

Spec. Rodney Ferguson of Company E,
228th Aviation, was selected Soldierof the
Quarter for 128th Aviation Brigade.

The Air Force Outstanding Unit Award
and Air Force Organizational Excellence
Award have been approved for the 24th
Operations Group. The awards were
earned for the time period of Feb. 11,
1992, through July 31, 1993.



Nathan Paul Sullano was born Oct. 16 to
Betsy and Philip Suano.


1**-~~~~


New chief
Col. Dennis Carpenter, U.S. Southem Command Air Force Element com-
mander, promotes Irshad Ali to chief master sergeant with help from All's wife,
Paula. All is currently the deputy chief, Automated Systems Division.


Change of command U.S.ArmyphotobysgLoi Davi
Lt. Col. Gregory G. Reniker speaks during a change of command ceremony
Oct. 31 at Soldiers' Field. Reniker assumed command of U.S. Army Garrison
- Pacific from Maj. Randy Nielson. Reniker's assignments include platoon
leader, tactical director and battery commander in Improved Hawk air defense
units inthe United States and Germany. Hewasthe adjutant of the 101 st Corps
Support Group. His awards include the Defense Meritorius Service Medal,
Meritorius Service Medal (two oak leaf dusters), Army Commendation Medal,
(two oak leaf dusters), Army Achievement Medal and Airborne and Air Assault
badges.


I


I






Page
Missing
or
Unavailable






Page
Missing
or
Unavailable









Tropic Times 1
Nov. 19,1993 1.


Cougars tailback Lance VonHollen stumbles from a hit and continues running.


DoDDS football ends with neck-and-neck statistics race finish

W L T Pct. PF PA

Balboa Bulldogs 7 3 0 .700 180 46

PCC Green Devils 7 3 0 .700 227 103

Cristobal Tigers 7 3 0 .700 155 121

Balboa Red Machine 6 4 0 .600 129 125

Curundu Cougars 4 6 0 .400 155 184

Kiwanis Kolts 0 10 0 .000 47 263
Team Statistics

RUSHING -- Green Devils, 2,107; Tigers, 1,835; Bulldogs,1,785; Red Machine, 930; Cougars, 838; Kolts, 733.
PASSING -- Cougars, 964; Red Machine, 514; Kolts, 516; Bulldogs, 465; Green Devils, 430; Tigers 418
DEFENSE (Rushing) -- Bulldogs, 688; Red Machine, 1163; Tigers, 1197; Green Devils,1271; Kolts, 1842; Cougars, 2074.
DEFENSE (Passing) -- Cougars, 380; Bulldogs, 435; Tigers, 576; Red Machine, 579; Kolts, 647; Green Devils, 729.
Individual Statistics

POINTS SCORED -- Green Devils, Reese, 74; Green Devils, Quinn, 66; Bulldogs, Price, 54; Tigers, Townsend, 42; Cougars, VonHollen, 42; Tigers
Acosta, N, 36; Cougars, Rivera, 32; Bulldogs, Beach, 31; Red Machine Sanchez, 30;
TOUCHDOWNS - Green Devils, Reese, 12; Green Devils Quinn, 11; Bulldogs, Price, 9; Tigers, Townsend, 7; Cougars, VonHollen, 7; Tigers, Acosta,
N.,6; Red Machine, Sanchez, 5; Red Machine, Hovan, 4.
RUSHING -- Green Devils, Reese, 1,092; Bulldogs, Beach, 824; Tigers, Evans, 792; Green Devils, Ortiz 729; Tigers, Townsend, 597; Bulldogs, Price,
364; Cougars; Tigers, Acosta, N., 340; VonHollen, 337; Red Machine, Twohy, 318; Cougars, Shaha, 272.
YARDS PER CARRY -- Green Devils, Ortiz, 9.8; Green Devils, Reese, 6.74; Tigers, Evans, 6.71; Red Machine, Sanchez 6.2; Tigers, Acosta, N., 6.05;
Bulldogs, Beach, 6.05; Tigers, Townsend, 5.1; Cougars, VonHollen, 4.81.
RECEIVING -- Cougars, Reyes, 429; Red Machine, Sanchez, 426; Cougars, Rivera, 287; Bulldogs, Staton, 284; Tigers, Acosta, N., 154; Green Devils,
Pohl 141; Kolts, Chanis, 106.
KICKOFF RETURN -- Kolts, Escula, 24.2; Cougars, Reyes, 20; Tigers, Acosta, B., 18.5; Cougars, Rivera, 16.7.
Passing Leaders
Comm Att Pct TD - Int Yards
Alvarez (Tigers) 44 82 53.6 7 3 418
Garcia (Cougars) 69 157 43.94 4 8 909
Quinn (Green Devils) 29 66 43.93 1 8 345
Price (Bulldogs) 16 44 36.3 4 1 416
Corrigan (Red Machine) 37 115 32.1 10 8 543









4 Tropic Times
T Nov. 19, 1993


Curundu Cougars cheerleaders Amanda Grass and Sarah Livingston toss confetti during the homecoming parade.




Show's T



over


Festivities end


football season


BALBOA (Tropic Times) - Students of
Balboa Iigh School celebrated their home-
coming football game with a homecoming
pep rally, dance and parade Nov. 12 and
Saturday.
The festivities began during seventh
period classes Nov. 12 whenthe high school
administration let the students out to attend
the pep rally.
The cheerleaders of each Department of
Defense Dependents Schools football team
on the Pacific side put on routines they had
been practicing for nearly a month.
The crowd seemed to enjoy the Red
Machine's routine the most as the cheer-
leaders performed to the rap group "Tag
Team's" "Whoomp There It Is."
"The Red Machine Cheerleaders really
grooved it," said Maylinn Steinbarger. "It
was better than the last one."
The students returned to the stadium
later that evening to watch their football
teams duke it out. The parade began be-
tween games at Balboa High School Sta-
dium.
Each class atBalboa,sophomorethrough
senior, participated in a float competition.


The junior class won the competition
with its float depicting a casino complete
with a slot machine and a poker game.
The sophomore class came in third with
their float portraying a king and his junior
and senior slaves being whipped.
The seniors built a float entitled " We
Arethe Champions" thatportrayed senior
warrior beating underclassmen in pugil
stick battles. When the underclassman lost,
he would hide and the senior warrior threw
a dummy of the underclassman into the
crowd.
The cheerleaders also put together floats
such as the Red Machine golf cart deco-
rated in Red Machine traditional black and
red.
The Bulldogs,Cougars and Green Dev-
ils cheerleaders decorated trucks in their
traditional colors and Bulldogs brought
their mascot - a live bulldog that rode
shotgun.
The homecoming dance ended the fes-
tivities Saturday.
Billy Wing and Nyda Nieves were
crowned homecoming king and queen and
danced the night's final dance.


Departmentof defense photo by Juan Carlos Palacio


Department of Defense photo by Juan Carlos Palacio
Homecoming King Billy Wing escorts his Queen Nyda Nieves.


Departmentof Defense photo by Stephani Holzwarth
The homecoming court, Nyda Nieves and Miggy Castro, arrives at the parade.










Tropic Times
Nov. 19, 1993 1.5


SCN AM radio sports
The Southern Command Network's
AM 790 Pacific and 1420 Atlantic will
broadcast the following sports this week-
end.

Saturday
College football: Boston Col-
lege at Notre Dame at 1:30 p.m.
Alabama at Auburn at 4:30 p.m.
Sunday
Pro football: Detroit at Green
Bay at 1 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia at 4
p.m.
Minnesota at Tampa Bay at 8
p.m.
Monday
New Orleans at SanFrancisco at
9p.m

Youth baseball
Registration for the youth softball and
baseball seasons continues today through
Nov. 30 at the Albrook Youth Center.
Volunteer coaches are also needed. Call
Vince Duncan at the Albrook Youth Cen-
ter at 286-3195 or 284-4700.

Pacific Little League
Registration for the Pacific Little
League is open to family members sta-
tioned on U.S. military installations on
the Pacific side, including Howard AFB,
Rodman NS and Fort Kobbe.
Registration and tryouts end today at
the Pacific Little League baseball field
complex located between the Pier 18 area
of Balboa and the south end of Albrook
Field at the intersection ofPierStreet and
Gaillard Highway.
Registration forms will be available
through Department of Defense Depen-
dents Schools and at the field. There are
four leagues forages 6 through 15. Man-
agers and coaches are needed. For infor-
mation, call Mark Dillon at 252-6371or
John Carlson at 252-6371 evenings.

Run Against Drugs
The 142nd Medical Battalion will kick
off Sober Week by sponsoring the Run
Against Drugs - an event with five
running and walking events. Events will
be a 1OK individual run, 5-member team
run with guidon, 10K fast walk, 2-mile
fun run and an 800-yard dash for chil-
dren.
Military registration is today and
Saturday at Building 207, Fort Clayton.
The run begins at7 a.m. Saturday at Club
Amador. Participants will receive a T-
shirt.
Fees range from $3-$25. Prizes in-
clude cash, baby strollerrunner, trophies,
medallions, running shoes and sports
equipment. For more information call
287-6448.

Christmas angels
The Panama Canal women and mens
bowling associations are sponsoring sev-
eral fund-raising events forthe Hogar De
La Infancia- a house with 42 impover-
ished children. Trees are set up at the
bowling centers onFortClayton, Albrook
AFS, Howard AFB, Fort Espinar and
Curundu with angels containing infor-
mation about a child, which will change
weekly.
Pickan angel and fulfill the wishlist of
its child by bringing wrapped presents
with the name of the child on the front to
a bowl-a-thon that will be held 9:30 p.m.
Dec. 10 until 9:30 p.m. Dec. 11 at the
Curundu Bowling Center. Entry fee is
$15 without a T-shirt and $10 with a T-
shirt purchase. A "Thanks for Being an
Angel" dinner will be held Dec. 14.


No fee swimming
There will be no entry fees at Director-
ate of Community Activities swimming
pools and Shimmey Beach Nov. 26.

Rental sale
The Directorate of Community Ac-
tivities is featuring 25 percent off family
boat rentals. The Fort Clayton Boat Shop
also has 50 percent off on bass fishing
charters as part of Family Week obser-
vance.

Body building contest
The Howard Sports and Fitness Cen-
ter will host a body building champion-
ship in January. For more information,
call the center at 284-3451.

Drag Racing
The Ruedas Calientes (Hotweels
Sports Group) will hold a day of drag
racing with cars and motorcycles at the
Albrook Field Track at noon Sunday.
Participation is open to all with a driver's
license and fee. Spectators are also wel-
come. The entrance fee is $3. This race
will be the first in Panama using a 'Port-
a-Tree' Christmas tree that dials elapsed
time, top speed and reaction time.
For more information, call 224-7032.

Coed baseball
Youth officials, coaches and assistant
coaches are needed for the 1993-94 coed
baseball and softball programs.The sea-
son runs Decemberthrough March. Inter-
ested males or females ages 18 and older
can contact Rory Egger at 287-4540 for
more information.

Golf
The Amador Golf Club is sponsoring
a Thanksgiving turkey shoot tournament
- two person, best ball - 7:30 a.m.
Saturday. The entrance fee is $8. Prizes
will be turkeys. For more information,
call 292-4511.

Bowling tournament
The Howard Bowling Center and
Panama Canal Bowling Association are
sponsoring the 23rd Pepe Damian Bowl-
ing Tournament Saturday and Sunday at
the center.
Qualificationrounds will be held Sat-
urday with sixgames in two shifts at 1 and
6 p.m. Round robin match play will be
held Sunday. The tournament is open to
all members of the PCWA and PCWBA.
For more information, call 284-4814.

Scuba sale
The Twin Oceans Pro Shop will hold
a sporting goods and scuba sale from
noon-7 p.m. today and 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Saturday. The sale will be held in a tent
in the parking lot adjacent to Building
2057, Curundu. People interested in sell-
ing equipment can call 286-3915 fortable
registrations.

Turkey Bowl shuttles
The Directorate of Community Ac-
tivities will be providing shuttles to the
Turkey Bowlplayoffs and championship
game. Reporting time for the playoff
game is 4 p.m. Saturday at the Valent
Recreation Center and the Cocoli Com-
munity Center. Both shuttles depart at
4:30 p.m. and return on an hourly basis.
The Atlantic community can catch a
shuttle from the Fronius Fitness Center
on Fort Davis. The reporting time is 3
p.m. Saturday and is scheduled to return
a9:30 p.m. The same schedules apply for
the championship game Wednesday. For
more information, call 287-5618.


nII IIIIII Mil Bll ... ..
Departmentol Delensepholo by StephanleHolzwarh
"Lean, mean Red Machine!"
Henry Twohy cheers his favorite Department of Defense Schools football
team. Fans reported that Twohy has not missed a game in years.


Free step aerobics Softball tourney


The Fronius Fitness Center, Building
86, Fort Davis, is offering free step
aerobics classes. Step is not included.
Call the Fronius Finess Center at 289-
3108 for more information.

Free Nautilus training
The Fronius Fitness Center on Fort
Davis is offering free Nautilus machine
training sessions from 3-4 p.m. Tues-
days. Call 289-3108 or visit the Fronius
Fitness Center for more information.

DCA fun 10K trot
Registration for the Family Turkey
Trot are now under way at the Fronius
Fitness Center on Fort Davis. The run
begins Saturday. categories include 1 OK,
men and women over 40, junior for chil-
dren 13-17 years old, 5K family fun walk
and one-mile course for children 12 years
old and under. For moreinformation, call
the fitness center at 289-3108.

No tap at Curundu
The Curundu Bowling Center will
hold ano tap tournament 7 p.m. Saturday.
Call the center at 287-6366 for more
information.

Free aerobics
Teresa Consterdine's aerobics classes
are free and held 9:15-10:15 a.m. week-
days at the Reeder Physical Fitness Cen-
ter. Each workout has a warm-up, cardio-
vascular workout, cool down and
floorwork. Call 287-3861.

Sober fun run-walk
The SoberAwarenessFamilyFunRun-
walk will be held Dec. 18. Event catego-
ries are men and women open 1OK, men
and women over 40 10K, juniors open
10K, family fun walk 5K and one-mile
children open. Registration is ongoing
at the Fronius Fitness Center on Fort
Davis. For the entrance fee of $2, a T-
shirt and certificate are included. Call
289-3108.


Registration for a holidays softball
tournament is underway at the Fronius
Fitness Center. An organizational meet-
ing is scheduled at 5 p.m. Dec. 15. The
tournament begins Dec. 18. The entrance
fee is $50 per team. Call 289-3108.

Volleyball tournament
An open volleyball tournament is set
for Nov. 27 and 28 at the Rodman Fitness
Center. An entry fee of $50 is required
and there is a limit of eight teams. Dead-
line to register for the tournament is
today. Coaches meeting is scheduled for
5 p.m. Nov. 23. Call 283-4222/4061.

Intramural 5K fun run
The Rodman Fitness Center is spon-
soring a 5K fun run 6:30 a.m. Nov. 30.
Deadline to register for the events today.
There is no entry fee and the run is open
to all civilian and military personnel.
Units with most runners will receive team
award. Call 283-4222/4061 for more in-
formation.

Pacific softball
The PacificSoftball League will open
its 1994 slow pitch league Jan. 3 in the
league's park near pear street, Balboa.
Games start 5:30 p.m. weekdays. The
season runs until May 1. Everybody is
eligible. Interested players can contact
Ruben Jimenez or Roy Johnson at the
park or call 236-2952, 252-7541, 252-
2990 or 252-2361.

Advisory meeting
The Howard and Albrook Sports Ad-
visory Committee will hold a meeting for
its members today at the Howard En-
listed Members Club at 2 p.Z. For infor-
mation, call 284-3451.

Intramural badminton
Coaches forintramural badminton will
have a meeting at the Howard Sports and
Fitness Center at 2 p.m. Nov. 30. Call
284-3451 for more information.






qq '3


1 � Tropic Times
AU Nov. 19,1993


U.S. Navy photo by PH2 RobwtoTaylor
Ecuadorian vessel Don Pepefloats on Panamanian waters after being rescued by U.S. Navy and Coast
Guard vessels.


Navy, Coast Guard rescue


Ecuadorian cargo vessel


by Ltj.g. Laura C. Moore
USNAVSTAPANCANAL PAO
RODMAN NS - After a near-death experience and a
rescue at sea by the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard, seven
Ecuadorian sailors made their way back to Ecuador after
emergency repairs to their ship in Panama.
U.S. Navy and Coast Guard men and women saved the
Ecuadorian sailors by providing food, water, communica-
tion equipment and by towing their vessel to safety.
The Ecuadorian cargo vessel Don Pepe was adrift 160
miles northwest of Malaga, Colombia after a hole in the
engine room caused water damage to the engine.
The USS Copeland, a fast frigate homeported in San
Diego, was conducting counter-drug operationsinthe area
when it encountered the Don Pepe late afternoon Oct. 28.
The commanding officerof the Copeland, Cmdr. Vern
Wing, said what his ship found was unexpected.
"It was really kind of strange for us. We were not
expecting to find what we found. The crew made the
transition swiftly and smoothly to a rescue mission. All of
our people were involved," Wing said.
"It's courtesy ofthe sea to go by avessel which might
be drifting to check on them and see if they have any
problems. If we had not come across them, we don'tknow
how long it might have been before somebody else found
them. So it was fortunate we were there," said Operations
Officer LL Joseph Carlson.
The Copeland provided the Ecuadorian sailors food,
water and a hand-held radio. Because of other pressing
commitments, the Copeland was relieved by the USNS
Capable Oct. 29. The USCGC Diligence, a Coast Guard
cutter based in Wilmington, N.C. commanded by Cmdr.
Andrew Cascardi, relieved the Capable Oct. 31 and sent a
boarding team to the Don Pepe to assess the feasibility of
a tow.
Lt.j.g.RichardPineiro, firstlieutenantoftheDiligence,
said "We went over and found the vessel was towable and


structurally sound. We moved some cargo around to
stabilize her. We rigged the bridle and basically did what
hundreds of units in the coast guard do every day - we
towed her."
"Every Coast Guard unit, no matter if the primary
mission is buoy tender, ice breaker, or law enforcement
cutter, does towing. We all do search and rescue," Peneiro
said.
Petty Officer 3rd Class Tim Brammer, a gunner's mate
on the Diligence, said "That's what we're out here for-
to aid people who get themselves into that predicament."
"We don't lookto get our costs back, that's not one of
our concerns," Pineiro said, "We're always ready to
provide assistance and it actually benefits us by providing
training to someof our newer people. It keeps us confident
and proficient in towing so we can stay ready for some of
the more dangerous evolutions we do," he said.
The Don Pepe sailors handled their predicament well,
according to Pinero.
"They're professional sailors. They had no electronic
equipment on board except for a radio. They navigated
using a sextant and the tried and true method of celestial
navigation. So they're very professional, they just don't
have the resources we do," he said.
Bremmersaidthecrew was gratefulto be helped. "They
were in lots of trouble and they couldn't fix their engine.
They were really happy to see us," he said.
Sergio Sanchez, Don Pepe's captain, said "The men
were scared becausethey didn't know ifthey were going to
ever see their homes and families again. The only thing we
were drinking was rain water. When we get home we will
kiss our families and hold them tight because we have had
a close call. Then we will celebrate our homecoming."
Pineiro said "The people we assist look at Americans,
the Navy and the Coast Guard as messengers of God
because we're always ready to provide assistance without
asking for anything in return. It's very satisfying for the
crew to be involved in the rescues we do."


Marines celebrate 218th birthday


by Sgt. Rick Emert
USARSO PAO-Atlantic

FORT DAVIS - With glistening swords, formal attire
and two centuries of tradition, Marines here celebrated
their 218th birthday at the Fort Davis Community Club.
More than 130 Marines, spouses, soldiers and seamen
attended thelMarine Corps Birthday Ball - including one
Marine whocamealltheway from Norfolk, Va.,saidCapt.
Donna Bergstrom, commander of Company D, Marine
Support Battalion.
The ball kicked offat 7p.m. with the traditional march-
on of the cordon - six Marines with polished swords -
followed by the posting of the colors.
Eight uniforms from the Marine Corps' past were
displayed to add a touch of history to the evening.


"This was something we wanted to add to give the
audience a flavor of Marine Corps history," Bergstrom
said.
The biggest and most ceremonious event, was the cake-
cutting. Traditionally, the cake is cut by the guest of honor.
The first piece goes to the oldest Marine present who turns
it over to the youngest signifying the passing of tradition
and honor from old to young.
The oldest Marine present at the ball, Gunnery Sgt.
Ernesto Bent, Company D, passed that tradition and honor
on to Lance CpL Christopher Stewary, Marine Corps
Security Force Company.
The ceremony portion of the ball ended with guest
speaker CoL William H. Keller II, director of the Director-
ate of Production, Atlantic Intelligence Command, Nor-
folk, Va.


New Atlantic bank

open for business
FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO-Atlantic) - At-
lantic community members no longer have to drive
the Transisthmian forcertain banking needs since
the full service Community Bank opened for busi-
ness Nov. 9.
The bank, a renovated mobile van, offers ser-
vices that were only available in the Pacific com-
munity, said Norma Swanson, Community Bank
regional manager, Panama.
"The Atlantic community needs more than just
customer service," she said. "Like anyone else,
they need full-service banking. The new bank
provides the services that were lacking.
"Most of the complaints I've had from here are
thatpeoplehadto gosuch along waytocashthings
like savings bonds that the old bank wouldn't
cash," Swanson explained. "The community has
been waiting for this for a long time, and I'm sure
everyone's excited about it."
The bank's opening marks the first time the
Atlantic community has had a full-service bank in
more than six years. In 1991, Swanson started
working on a new bank.
Afterayearofcoordination, the ball was finally
rolling, she said.
"I had returned here from Germany and I knew
that there were a lot of mobile vans over there. I
suggested we try to get one of them over here."
About a year later, the Department of Defense
paid to ship one of the mobile vans to Fort Davis.
The Atlantic command funded renovations to the
van that included a new paint job, Swanson said.
The new bank doesn't accommodate many com-
munity members at a time, butit's mobility has an
advantage.
"If an emergency should come up - such as a
big field problem where the soldiers require bank
services, the van could possibly be taken to the
field," Swanson said.
While parked in front of Building 32 on Fort
Davis, the bank's two tellers cater to not only
community members' banking needs, but also
those oforganizationsliketheArmy andAirForce
Exchange Service.
"Well have to set a time limit on the organiza-
tional deposits because there are only two tellers,"
she said. "Atlantic organizations can now deposit
checks they receive daily as opposed to weekly."
Thebankwill beopen 10 am. - 5 p.m. Tuesday
through Friday and 9 am. - 2 p.m. Saturday and is
open forallpaydays. Ifapayday falls onaMonday,
the bank will be open Monday and closed the
following Saturday. The bank will be closed Nov.
28 in observance of Panama's independence from
Spain but does not close for U.S. federal holidays.
Call 289-3364/3438 for more information.

Atlantic families

get food baskets
FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO-Atlantic) - At-
lantic Army Community Services and U. S. Army
South are giving nearly 150 families something to
be thankful for this Thanksgiving.
Atlantic ACS and USARSO funded 150 holi-
day baskets that will benefit 131 Atlantic-commu-
nity families, said Gabriella Soto, chief of ACS-
Atlantic.
The units determined how many baskets would
be needed and gave ACS lists of families who
needed holiday assistance, Soto said.
Atthatpoint,ACS began buyingtheitemsto fill
thebaskets. Each basket contains items on atypical
Thanksgiving menu, such as ham or turkey, rolls,
piecrust and filling, stuffing mix and other staples.
Vehicle support to transport the basket supplies
was provided by Transportation Motor Pool-At-
lantic and soldiers from Company D, U. S. Army
Garrison helped load and unload the items.
All 150 baskets were packed by Luz M.
Ballesteros, Financial Program coordinator, and
four volunteers. Ballesteros put a holiday greeting
in each basket for the families, Soto said.
The units picked up the baskets from ACS and
will distribute them to the families before Thanks-
giving day, she said.
The holiday basket program is not a new one,
but it is vital to the community, Soto said.
"It ensures that all families who need assistance
during the holidays get it."











Tropictivities


Nov. 19.1993


A quality of life guide for the U.S. community In Panama


Agnes of God Dpartment of Defense photo by Maureen Sampson
Agnes of God
Caroline Hall and Kirsten Anne Traughber rehearse a scene from the play "Agnes of God," which opens tonight at the Ancon Theatre Guild. (See story and
photos page B3)


Curundu Junior High School
drama students perform "Red
House Mystery."


The Great American Smokeout
tries to get people to kick the ciga-
rette habit.


*TV, page B8
*Movies, page B9
*Comics, page B12


Page B1


---









B2 Tropic Times
0 Nov. 19, 1993


L a

Clayton
*Youth Center:
Swim team coaches needed, certi-
fied adult water safety instructors.
Library trip 3-6 p.m. today.
Third Annual Turbo Turkey Inter-
national 8 am.-1 p.m. Saturday. Fea-
tures events for the entire family and
displays.
Creative crafts holiday decorations
3 p.m. Monday.
Preteen disco dance Nov. 26, 7-9
p.m. for preteens, 9-11:30p.m. forjunior
teens. $1.50 admission covers games and
refreshments.
Teens vs. military police ping pong
tournament 1 p.m. Nov. 27.
Performing children's troupe seeks
youths who like to sing, dance and per-
form. They meet 4-6 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday.
American Stars gymnastics meet
Tuesday and Thursdays; ages 3-5, 2-3
p.m.; ages 6-8,3-4 p.m. ages nine and up
and advanced, 4-5 p.m. $20.
Taekwondo 5:30-7:30 p.m. and 6-7
p.m. Wednesday and Fridays forages 5-
18,$25.
Piano lessons 1-4:30 p.m. Tuesday
and Thursdays. $30 includes four half-
hour lessons a month. Instructoris Laura
Deray.
Gymnastics for ages five and older
2:30-3:30 p.m. and 3:30-4:30 p.m. Mon-
days and Wednesdays, $24.
*Senior Teen Center:
Triathlon tournament 4 p.m. every
Friday. Compete in pool, football and
ping-pong.
Volleyball 3:30-5:30 p.m. every Sun-
day.
Outdoor funfest 2-6 p.m. Nov. 27 for
ages 15-18. $1 fee includes volleyball,
softball, refreshments, Electro Disco un-
der the big bohio.
Celebrate birthdays of the month 7
p.m. Nov. 30.
*Child Development Center:
Openings in a Family Child Care
home are available. Call 278-3301.
Full day and hourly care available
for children ages 6 weeks to 12 years.
Albrook/Howard
*Youth Centers:
Preteen dance 7:30-10:30 p.m. to-
night at Albrook.
Family game day 5-7:30 p.m. Mon-
day in honor of Military Family Week.
Children can challenge parents to a vari-
ety of games.
Shimmey Beach trip 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
Nov. 26.
Family trip to El Valle 6 a.m.-4 p.m.
Nov. 28.
Closed Thanksgiving Day
Taekwondo ongoing classes at
Howard Monday and Wednesday and at
Albrook Tuesday and Thursday. Tots,
$15 a month; adults and youths, $25 a
month.
Arts and crafts 3 p.m. every Thurs-
day, $1.
* Hideout Teen Center:
Wet-n-Wild Pool Party 6-9:45 p.m.
at the Howardpoolforages 13-19, $2.50.
Transportation from and to Albrook pro-
vided.
Atlantic
*Espinar Youth Center:
Turkey Tumble teen dance today,
$2.
Family Fun Fair all day Saturday at
the Davis Community Club.
Cooking class 4-6 p.m. every Mon-
day, $1.
Study with a buddy and tutoring 4-
6 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays.
Pre-teen birthdaypoolpartyNov. 26,
$2.


F Youth news



Drama opening atCurundu


Drama club

performs in

English play

CURUNDU (Department of
Defense Dependents Schools) -
The Curundu Junior High Drama
Club's performance of "The Red
HouseMystery"will represented
7 p.m. Dec. 2-3.
The play was originally sched-
uled forThursday and tonight, but
the school's unexpected closure
this past week pushed the perfor-
mance days back.
Drama sponsor Claudia St.
Clair said this is a new and chal-
lenging experience for the drama
club.
The play begins on a drowsy
summerweekend. Thesuddenvio-
lence of murder erupts at an En-
glish houseparty. It's just another
case of sibling rivalry - or is it?
There are others beside his
brother who hold grudges against
the murdered man. As the plot
expands, several complex twists
keep the audience enthralled in an
evening of mystery and romance.


Courtesyphoto
Young thespians Cody Christopherson argues with Liz Franklin while Amy Black
and J.P. McNulty watch during rehearsal of "The Red House Mystery," an English
mystery by A.A. Milne which will be performed Dec 2-3 at Curundu Junior High
School.


Courtesyphoto


Curundu Junior High School Students of the Month pose with their certificates.


Students of the Month awarded


CURUNDU (Department of Defense Dependents Schools) -
Curundu Junior High School recognized its first Students of the
Month Oct. 28.
The purpose of the program is to allow teachers to recognize
students who strive to improve many aspects of their lives
academically as well as socially, thus allowing themselves to
become positive role models.
The students who were selected are all involved in some
school or community activity, possess a wholesome attitude


Courtesyphoto
Isabel Altamiano presents checks to Katie Williams,
Cheryl Castro, Bryan Larrabee and Patrick Mans.


toward learning, show respect for their peers and teachers,
and are willing to help others.
Theprogram also recognizes those students who takepride
in themselves and their country.
October Students of the Month include junior high stu-
dents Lizelle West, Carmela Austin, Heather Hanson, Frank
Hinek, Jason Kacmarski, Katie McAleer, Tiffany Walters,
Michael Kingery, Holly Holmes, John Medina and Camina
Stevenson.


Los Rios students

win poster contest

LOS RIOS (Department of Defense Dependents Schools)
- Fourth graders from Los Rios Elementary School won cash
prizes for their environmental ideas in a local art contest.
The art contest was sponsored by the local floral society
Circulo Floral de Panama. The contest theme was "Save the
Earth." Students from DoDDS and Panamanian schools
competed for cash prizes.
Bryan Larrabee took third place. Cheryl Castro, Katie
Williams and Patrick Mans earned honorable mentions.
They were presented with the checks by Isabel Altimiano
a Los Rios Elemetary employee and member of the floral
society.
The works of art were displayed in October at a floral show
at the Marriott Hotel.






Page
Missing
or
Unavailable






Page
Missing
or
Unavailable









Health & Fitness


Tropc TimesB5
Nov. 19,1993 5


Tobacco addictive as cocaine,



but quitting is still a possibility


by Capt. Steven G. Richardson
24th Medical Squadron

HOWARD AFB - In an effort to create a smaller, but
more efficient fighting force, preventive health issues have
recently received a renewed emphasis. Plans for a"smoke
free" Air Force have already resulted in the banning of
smoking in many work areas, and other areas have been
slated to become smoke-free over the next several years.
Other services have instituted their own plans.
The goal is to reduce the number of active duty smok-
ers to four percent by the year 1998. In order to accom-
plish these goals, smoking cessation programs have been
instituted at Gorgas Army Community Hospital and the
Howard Clinic. The Rodman medical clinic is also plan-
ning on forming their own program to serve Navy person-
nel on Rodman. There has never been a bettertime to quit
than now.
Columbus discovered tobacco, as wells the new wodd,
when he came to the Americas; however, smoking to-
bacco did not become wide spread until the 1880s when
the automatic cigarette-rolling machine came onto the
scene.
From there, the number of cigarettes smoked steadily
increased to a peak in 1963 of 4,345 cigarettes for every
man, woman and child in the United States. Although
this number and the percentage of smokers has decreased,
there are still approximately 46 million smokers in the
Unites States, 76 percent of whom reportedly say that they
would like to quit.
It is estimated that approximately 350,000 deaths per
year in the United States can be attributed to smoking.
Each year some 17 million people attempt to quit smok-
ing; of these, only 1.3 million succeed.
What is it that accounts for so many failures when the
data linking tobacco use to everything from lung cancer to
heart disease has become impossible to refute?
Researchers have discovered that smoking is a three-
fold addiction sometimes referred to as the Smoker's Tri-
angle. This triangle includes a physical addiction to nico-
tine, a behavioral or habitual component and apsychosocial
dependence. Any program that has as its goal the cessa-
tion of smoking must treat each of these three areas.
Nicotine has been found to be as addictive as alcohol,
cocaine or heroin. This addiction to nicotine often mani-
fests itself as withdrawal symptoms that may include a


What's the key to

quitting smoking?

Kicking the habit can be tough, especially if
you've smoked for years. Anytime is a good time
to try to quit, but be prepared.
After you make it through the first 24 hours,
set a goal of not smoking for two weeks. Most
people give up during the first two weeks because
they are the hardest.
After that, you'll know you can live without
cigarettes - If you take it one day at a time.
Anytime you need help, there are a number of
sources, such as your local military medical
facility or the American Cancer Society.
Support groups are beneficial, because most
people can't quit alone. But it can be done,
because millions have quit

A few quit tips

* Get rid of your cigarettes, ashtrays, lighters
and matches. You won't need them anymore.
* Change your smoking routine. Leave the
dinner table right away; don't sit in your "smok-
ing chair;" avoid the smoking areas at work.
* Drink lots of liquids, except coffee and
alcohol. They can trigger the desire to smoke.
* When the urge hits, take a deep breath,
hold it and slowly release it. The urge will pass.


powerful craving, irritability, and nervousness.
These symptoms do not occur in everyone so research-
ers have created nicotine dependency questionnaires that
aid physicians to predict who will suffer from withdrawal
symptoms. Characteristics that may indicate a nicotine
dependence include smoking a cigarette in the first 30
minutes after awakening in the morning, difficulty re-
fraining from smoking in non-smoking areas even for
relatively short periods of time, and "enjoying" the first
cigarette of the day more than any other.
Aids to overcome this nicotine dependence include
nicotine gum and the transdermal nicotine patch. These
treatments help those people who demonstrate a nicotine
dependence by allowing a gradual weaning of blood nico-
tine levels so that the withdrawal symptoms can be avoided.
It is important to realize that the nicotine patch is not
the complete answer, because the behavioral and
psychosocial aspects of tobacco dependence must still be
addressed. This is why every study performed to date
shows that success rates for quitting go up with a smoking
cessation program in addition to the nicotine patch.
The behavioral component oftobacco dependence can
be summed up as "habit." Behavioral cues can include a
ringing phone, driving a car, having a cup of coffee, or
any number of other activities that become associated
with smoking a cigarette.
Fortunately, identifying these unwanted cues allows a
potential non-smoker to avoid the situation completely or
at least provide a substitute for the cigarette during those
high risk times. A smoking diary and group discussion
often are helpful in identifying these habitual cigarettes.
The third leg of the triad is the psychosocial depen-
dence on cigarettes. Many people feel energized and smoke
more on the job or when they feel a need to be more
creative. Others use smoking as a stress reducer to handle
period of tension.
By substituting an exercise program and employing
stress reduction techniques these potential hurdles can
also be overcome allowing a smoker to free himself from
this damaging coping mechanism.
Smoking cessation programs include four to eight one-
hour sessions which are held once a week. These courses
provide support group discussion, instruction in stress
reduction techniques, diet and exercise instruction to pre-
vent significant weight gain, continuing follow-up, and
physician supervised use of nicotine gum or patches to
deal with each aspect of tobacco dependency if indicated.


Quit rates at one year range from 20 to 40 percent.
Studies also indicate an increased chance of success with
each additional attempt to quit smoking, so even a failure
can still be regarded as a step in the right direction.
For more information regarding available smoking
cessation programs call, the Howard AFB Clinic, 284-
3014, or Gorgas Hospital, 282-5419.


Dipping


Chewing tobacco more addictive,


more likely to cause mouth cancer


by CMSgt Tommy A. Roberts
Senior Enlisted Advisor, Air Combat Command

LANGLEY AFB, Va.- As Andy Rooney frequently
remarks, "You know what makes me sick?..."
In my case, one thing high on the list is smokeless
tobacco use.
It always amazes me that normal, healthy, active
young men willingly putawadof tobacco in their mouths
with the argument that it's better than smoking! That's
like saying it's better to get hitby acar than abus. They
both kill you just as dead.
In one Air Force study, 48.7 percent of Air Force
people who used smokeless tobacco had some type of
sores in their mouth from the product These sores are
often early warning signs of mouth cancer. On average,
there are 30,000 cases nationwide. One third of them
are fatal And these sores don't come after years and
years of use. More than 50 percent of dippers develop
problems within 33 years of habitual use.
Of course death doesn'talways happen when you get
a mouth cancer. You may only need minor surgery to
remove thesore-nobigdeal Butyou mightalso have
part of your tongue or throat removed! Cancer of the


throat is 50 times higher in dippers.
There are other little irritations that go along with
dipping: gum recession, tooth decay, teeth stains, and
just plain bad breath. And by the way guys, girls find
oral tobacco use a really big "tur-off." Why do you
think virtually no women dip?
Don't kid yourself into thinking you can quit when-
ever you want Dipping is highly addictive. As a mat-
ter of fact, many smokeless tobacco users say itis even
harder to quit than cigarettes because nicotine levels in
the blood stream rise quicker and can be twice as high
as cigarettes.
Holding an average size dip or chew in your mouth
for 30minutes gives you as much nicotineas smoking
four cigarettes. A two-can a week snuff dipper gets as
much nicotine as a 1 1/2-pack-a-day smoker.
The bottom line is that dipping is not a safe substi-
tute for smoking. If you are already a user, see your
health promotion office for help in quitting. If you
haven'tstarted yet, don't!
There are other great ways to get the mental boost
found in dipping. Exercise, relaxation techniques and
eating right are just a few.
You'll look better, smell better, feel better, and
more importantly, it's the smart thing to do.


I


FMNL











B6 Tropic Times
B Nov. 19, 1993


3Notices


ri~iEB u3 11^ H-7---- --------- ----

Sday. Call 289-6402 for details, noon-6 p.m. Fun fair featuring a raffle Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. Monday
Atlantic tours El Valle 5:30 a.m. Sunday. for a free trip. Wednesday and Friday.
*Sundial Recreation Center: Panama City shopping 8 a.m. Nov. 5:15p.m.-USOshow featuring50sand Beginners English 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Wine and dine 4-9 p.m. Friday. 28. 60s rock-n-roll music by the Mar Dels. Monday and Wednesday.
Panama City shopping Saturday. Fun fair Rec center news Jazz dance 4:30-5:30 p.m. Monday
El Valle 5:30 a.m. Sunday.un and Wednesday.
Montego Bay, Jamaica Thursday YouthServices Anniversary celebra- *Sundial Recreation Center: Piano 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday.
through Nov. 28. tion features activities all day Saturday at Horse shoe tournament, Saturday. Gymnastics and ballet 4:30-5:30
Panama City historical tour Nov.27. the Davis Community Club: Pool tournament, Saturday. p.m. Wednesday.
Isla Grande Nov. 28. 7:30 a.m.-Family turkey trot and fun Thursdays are Wonderful,aprogram Karate 7-8:30 p.m. Tuesday and
*Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: run, w winners receive turkeys. for women, every Thursday. Thursday.
Nombre de Dios, Viento Frio Satur- 9 a.m.-noon-Games for children. *Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: Guitar 5-9:30 p.m. Thursday.


Clayton
*NCO Club:
Puerto Rico Day celebration 9 p.m.
tonight features live music.
Scrumptious Sunday buffet 4:30-
8p.m. Sunday. Adults, $5.75,children
from 5 to 12 years old, $3 and children
under 5 eat free.
Country and western dance les-
sons 7-9 p.m. every Sunday and Mon-
day in the Corral Lounge.
Albrook/Howard
*Albrook Club:
Friday night specials every week.
Steak and seafood special 6-9 p.m.
every Friday evening.
Seafood feast even' Saturday
e\ ening, features combination seafood
platter.
Mongolian barbecue Monday
nights.
Monday night football, draft beer
and chili dog specials.
Mexican night every Thursday.
Thanksgiving buffet Thursday.
Reservations are open to club mem-
bers and required. Call during business
hours.
*Howard Enlisted Members' Club:
All night discoto celebrate military
family week 8 pm. Nov. 26 -5 a.m.
Nov. 27. Breakfast served at 2 a.m.
Country and Western night Fri-
days in the Casual Cove.
Family night 7-9 p.m. Monday.
All-you-can-eat-buffet.
Monday night football on the big
screen TV, features food, prizes.
Rock 'n' Roll music Thursdays in
the Casual Cove.


Nightly specials 5-9 p.m. Tuesday
through Saturday.
+Howard Officers' Club:
Prime rib specials 6-9 p.m. every
Friday and Saturday.
Disco in the lounge every Friday
evening.
Tuesday night specials 6-9 p.m.
every week.
Children's menu available 6-9
p.m. Monday-Saturday.
Italian night Thursday.
Rodman
*Anchorage Club:
A la Carte dining 6-9 p.m., to-
night.
Salsa Night6-9 p.m. Saturday,typi-
cal Panamanian dinner, free dance
lessons, DJ music.
Pasta Night 6-9 p.m. Monday.
Family Night 6-9 p.m. Tuesday.
Mongolian Stir Fry, $5.95.
Country & Western Night, free
dance lessons. 6-9 p.m. Wednesday.
All hands Thanksgiving Buffet at
the Rodman O'Club Thursday. Call
283-4332/3040/5475 forreservations.
*Chief Petty Officers' Club:
A la carte dining 6-9 p.m. Tues-
day-Saturday.
All-you-can-eat buffet lunch I 1
a.m.- 1:30 p.m. Monday-Friday.
Quarry Heights
*Officers' Club:
Closed for dinner Dec. 4.
Amador
+Club Amador:
Sundaychampagnebrunch 10:30
a.m.- 1:30 p.m.


00- 010


Clayton
+Valent Recreation Center:
Portobello historical tour Saturday.
El Valle Sunday.
Chiriqui highland tour Thursday through Nov. 28.
Corona Beach Nov. 27.
Contadora Nov. 27-28.
Shimmey beach Nov. 28.
Gorgona beach cabin reservations are available
through the center.
*Outdoor Recreation Center:
Indian Village snorkel trip Nov. 27. $25 for adults,
$15 for children under 13. Includes transportation, cayuco
ride, Chocoe Indian Village tour, optional inner tube
float down river.
Chiriqui white rafting trip Nov. 26-28. $75 per
person includes transportation, lodging, equipment,
guided tours and more.
Thefollowingtours canbe set up at Building 154,Fort
Clayton for a minimum of four people:
Snorkel/dive, canoeing/kayaking, hiking, Indian vil-
lage, fishing.
Albrook/Howard
*Zodiac Community Activities Center:
Chitre pottery shopping 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, $20.


Brewery and locks tour 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesday, $4.
Thanksgiving Chiriqui Highlands trip Wednesday
through Nov. 28. Includes airfare, hotel, Thanksgiving
dinner, tours and meals. Sign up by Tuesday.
*Outdoor recreation:
Peacock bass fishing in Arenosa 5 a.m.-2 p.m.
Sunday, $25.
Horseback riding in El Valle Nov. 27, $24. Riding
experience not necessary.
White water rafting in Costa Rica Wednesday
through Nov. 28. Ride the rapids and tourSan Jose. $475
includes airfare, transportation, tours, shopping, white
water rafting and food. Registration deadline is today.
Rodman
*Information. Tour and Travel:
Barro Colorado Island Saturday, $65. Visit the
Smithsonian research island.
El Valle shopping/tour Sunday, $12. Shop at the
market, visit waterfall,nature garden, lunch atCoronado.
Chiriqui Highland tour Wednesday through Nov.
27. Starts at $185, includes transportation, hotel, meals
and tours. Registration deadline is today.
Scuba Drake Island Dec. 2, 9, 23, $50. Includes
transportation, equipment, dive instructors, lunch.
PanamaCity Shopping Dec. 4, $8. Shop Via Espana
for Christmas presents.


............. ................ ..... ........�.. .............�..�.... ....
�:�:�:�: �........ ... ............ ................ .. .............I���.�
....... ... . ..... ............... �.' � '��' �����. ���
.................... ........... ..........."' �' �


*Valent Recreation Center:


Gloria's bazaar noon-9 p.m. today. Features
Christmas art and crafts.
Puerto Rico Day celebration today-Sunday
features live entertainment 6:30 p.m. today.
Martial arts demonstration by Sensei Carlos
Perez 3 p.m. Saturday.
Dollys collection display case noon Tuesday
through Nov. 28. Craft sale 2 p.m. Thursday.
Christmas Village 5-9 p.m. Dec. 2-3 and 1-9
p.m. Dec. 4-5. Features entertainment, photos with
Santa, vendors, refreshments, free admission.
Vendor registration is under way. Call the Pacific
Theatre Arts Centre at 286-3152 for more informa-
tion.
*Zodiac Community Activities Center:
Instructor needed to teach sewing, ground
school and Spanish class in the morning.
*Cocoli Community Recreation Center:
Arts and crafts for children 3:30 p.m. every
Tuesday and Thursday.
Thanksgiving pool tournament 6 p.m. Satur-
day.
Birthday of the month celebration 4 p.m.
Nov. 26. Features cake, ice cream, kool-aid.
Family barbecue 2 p.m. Nov. 27 in honor of
military family week. Bring a side dish.


Counesy p roo
The Fabulous Mar Dels
The Fabulous Mar Dels and their high impact energy show will highlight the
Directorate of Community Activities Fun Fair being held Saturday at the Davis
Community Club. The group will perform at 5:15 p.m. The group has been shaking
up the party scene for nearly a decade performing for a variety of people from the
Young Presidents Organization to the President of the United States. The group
is lead by Doug Allen. The band combines rhythm and blues, soul, and music of
the '50s and '60s with humor, dancing, costumes and harmonious songs by two
female vocalists. The Mar Dels have appeared with top names such as the Beach
Boys, Rare Earth and Neil Sedaka. They have appeared at special events like
Super Bowls XXI and XXII. The Mar Dels were awarded Entertainers of the Year
in 1984 and 1986, and Best Vintage Rock Band in 1984 and 1985.


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GOft of the Paamwa Canal M1seum Tropic Times Vol. VL No. 46 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, Nov. 19,1993 DARE program teaches children to say no to drugs by SSg. Jane Usero DARE also teaches self esteem, assertiveness, respect USSPublic Anar Ofl for themselves and others and peer pressure resistance. "The classes help you resist against pressure from FORT CLAYTON -Military children attending Deother people to do drugs and smoke cigarettes," said partment of Defense Dependents Schools are now learnAngelo Williams, Clayton Elementary School student. ing more than reading, writing and arithmetic. They are "People try to force you to do things you don't want to do learning how to fight and win the war against drugs and DARE helps us with ways to say no to them." through the Drug Abuse Resistance Education program. DARE instructors get the students involved through DARE is designed not only to teach sixth graders to role-playing, Olavarria explained. say no to drugs, but also the skills needed to say no, said "They learn more and it stays with them longer if they SSgt Lynn Olavarria, DARE coordinator. become involved in the lessons," she said. "We also get The program is in its second year in Panama and is a their attention by getting high school students invd!ved coordinated effort between military police from Headas role models. They come and talk to the students in a quarters Company, Law Enforcement Activity, the way an adultin uniform can't -as a cool high schooler." schools, high school students and parents, she said. "I'm getting more out ofthis than just the normal comInstructors are MP volunteers who attend an 80-hour mercials and stuff," said Stephanie Shearman, Clayton training program taught through the Los Angeles Police Elementary School student. "I think more kids won't do Department. They must have at least two years experidrugs because of DARE." erce in the police force, Olavarria explained. The program also offers students someone who they "The seven DARE instructors we have here teach in can trust to talk to, Olavarria explained. d every sixth grade class in both the Pacific and Atlantic "We (instructors) hang around during lunch and recommunities for one hour each week for 17 weeks," she cess so the students can talk to us one-on-one where some said. "Because it takes more than saying 'say no,' we may feel more comfortable," she said. "And they can teach subjects ranging from what drugs will do to them talk to us about anything, not just drug-related subjects." (students), to ways to say no, to building self esteem." Being a DARE instructor means being able to comto).ISephoSg .lon Hail DARE targets the sixth graders primarily to get to municate with the students, no matter the subject, in remembrance them before they get to junior high, Olavarria explained. Olavarria explained. Members of the Balboa High School ROTC 'With the problems of drug abuse starting so young "Teaching this course takes motivation, enthusiasm present colors during the Veterans Day cer now, we want to get to them before drugs do," she said. and the desire to help in any way," Olavarria said. "I "We are planning a mini DARE program for the younger like children so if I can wake just one of them up and eony held Nov.11 at the Corozal Cemetery. students so we can get our foot in the door sooner." keep them drug-free, it's worth every ounce of effort." Local campaign focuses on keeping Holiday Tropic rimes spir ts t e 'not ***COROZAL CTropic Times) -The next issue of holiday spirits in the heart, notb tle The edition will include the Southern Command Network television schedule for the week of Nov. COROZAL (USARSO PAO) -The U.S. Army South *Care and Share Don't Impair pool tournament -29 to Dec. 2. community will take part in a holiday season alcohol and Thursday; The Tropic Times will print the last edition of drug prevention campaign Saturday through Jan. 2. *Red Ribbon Week kick-off -11:30 a.m. Nov. 29 the year Dec. 17. and resume printing Jan. 7,1994. "Care and Share, Don't Impair" will be the theme at the Fort Clayton Noncommissioned Officers' People having articles or announcements for and the campaign will focus on the need to care for Club; the final edition should cheek with their servicing and share a safe, healthy and drug-free spirit with *"I'm Sick and Tired of It," Fort Clayton's first talk public affairs office for the submission deadline. everyone in the USARSO community, said Alcohol show -11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. at the Fort Clayton NonCID offers reward and Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Program officommissioned Officers' Club; cials. *Red Ribbon Fashion Extravaganza -2 p.m. Dec. FRT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Atlantic) -The The time-frame was chosen to support the Red Ribbon 4 at the Fort Clayton Noncommissioned Officers' Criminal Investigations Command is offering a Campaign, which runs Nov. 29-Dec. 4 honoring Enrique Club; $1,000 reward for information leading to the idenCamarena, the Drug Enforcement Agency agent who was *Golf tournament -7:30 a.m. Dec. 18 at the Amador tity of the person who stole an M203 grenade murdered in Mexico in 1985, officials said. Golf Club; launcher. The grenade launcher was stolen from The Red Ribbon now symbolizes the desire to clean *Atlantic community 10K run -Dec. 18; Building 244, Fort Davis. Information given will up the drug problems in the U.S. and has been adopted *Care and Share pool tournaments -Dec. 25-Jan. 1 at be confidential. Call 289-361 in the Atlantic comworldwide. the Valent Recreation Center, Fort Clayton. unity or 285-4314 in the Pacific community. One purpose of the campaign is to keep the holiday There will also be various guest speakers appearing Sailor nearly drow ns spirits in the hearts, not the bottle, officials said. throughout the community at the following times and loFor some, alcohol is a favorite way of celebrating and cations: RODMAN NS (USNAVSTAPANCANAL it becomes easy to lose sight of how much is actually beBret Eastburn and Leo Mudd speak 8:40-11:20 &m. PAO)Asailorstationedherenearly drowned after ing consumed, officials explained. at Balboa High School and 1:30-4 p.m. at Curundu saving other swimmers from drowning Sunday at It is also stressed through the campaign that everyone Junior High School Dec. 1; 8:40-9:30 am. at CristoCoronaBeach.ChiefPetty OfficerJesus Gilmoreof support the designated driver program and plan activities bal Junior High School, 9:35-10:25 a.m. at Cristobal SetheU.S, NavalSmall Craft Instruction and Technibefore beginning to drink. nior High School, 1-2 p.m. at the Fort Davis theater and cal Training School is listed in critical condition at ADAPCP officials encourage all community members 3-4 p.m. at the Jungle Operations Training Battalion Der. GorgasArmyCommunityHospital.Theincidentis to show support by tying red bows on car antennas, dis2. under investigation. playing them on doors at home and work and wearing William Essex will speak 9-10 am. at the Howard them throughout the holidays. Theater, 11 a.m.-noon at Gorgas Army Community HosEvents planned for the campaign are: pital, 1:15-2:30 p.m. at the Fort Clayton Theater and ALBROOK AFS (Tropic Times) -This year's +142nd Family Support Group Run Against Drugs -3-4 p.m. at Curundu Junior High School Dec. 1; 8-10 Christmas tree sale is scheduled for 7 am. Dec. 4 7 am. Saturday at the Fort Amador Causeway-, -8 am. -am. at Curundu Elementary School, 1:15-2:30 p.m. and on Albrook AFS. Cl1 285-6548 for information. Youth Service Turbo Turkey; 2:45-4 p.m. at the Fort Clayton Theater. Soldiers from 41St Area Support Lawmakers suggest Pentagon is *USO show, page 3. Group bring hundreds of beds to covering up reasons for Gulf War *Joint Task Force Builder, page 8. Panamanian children. veterans' illnesses. *Homecoming games, page 12.

PAGE 2

2 Tropic Times Nov. 19,1993 mattress, pillow, pillow case and pajamas. up to 320 frames per truck. This makes The Ministries of He Housing and things more efficient and faster." Laborsent social workers to evaluate farmIsabel Batista's family was one of those lies so that only those with the most need who benefitted from the program and the received a bed said Raul Hernandez,presisupport from the 41st ASG. Her son, dent of the Kiwanis Club -Panama. Rigoberto, suffers from cerebral palsy. "Unfortunately we can't help everyone, "He was diagnosed with cerebral palsy so they may only receive one bed per famwhen he was about 4 months old, now he's ily. We hope to increase the number to 6," she said. 10,000 or more in upcoming years," he Rigoberto is the youngest of eight chilsaid. dren in the Batista home. While SCAW donated $70,000 to the "I feel very happy that we were able to project, transporting the beds was the job get a bed for him. Because of his illness, ofthe4lstASG. he needs a place to "I fee like we're sleep by himself, doing aservicetothe "If it's for the kids and it's but I never had the community," said for a good Cause, then I'm means with which Spec. Andre fo good to get him one," Mitchell. "We send all for R .I feel good about Batistasaid. out humanitarian it." Fernanda de groups and build Burker's family yschools in El SalvaSpW .Wilfredo MojCa also benefitted dor and other 41st Area Support Group from the program. Spec. Andre Mitchell (left) and Spec. Wilfredo Mojicacount bedframes before places.there's alRaul London, her distributing them in El Valle. ways a mission go4-year-old granding on somewhere to help someone," he son, received a bed. Raul is the oldest of dp1Ssaid. Fernanda's three grandchildren and they Helping children is what motivated live together in the Curundu area. Spec. Wilfredo Mojica. "He started crying because when we h "hatever it takes .if it takes until got here they told us he wouldn't be able midnight, then we'll crank until then," he to get a bed. I'm glad they were able to said. "Ifit'sforthekids and it's for agood give him one after all," Femanda said. cause, then I'm all for it.I feel good about SCAW has carried out similar projects by Liliana Levy-Dutram tion joined efforts with the Kiwanis Clubit." in other countries such as Bangladesh, USARSO PublicAffairs t Panama and Metropolitan and various The Army's help in moving the beds Honduras and Colombia. USAR__P ____A _________ Panamanian corporations to bring 3,000 made a big difference, said Salustio Diaz, Miguel Clare, of the Kiwanis Club, FORT CLAYTON -Soldiers from the beds to needy families throughout the Kiwanis Club -Metropolitan president. was responsible for bringing this program 41st Area Support Group helped the country. "We are very grateful for the support to Panama. Sleeping Children Around the World Each child who received a bed had a we've received from the Army," he said. "We seek to get these children up off Foundation bring hundreds of beds to sponsor who donated $30, said Claire "The trucks we previously bad were able the floor so they can stop sleeping on old Panamanian children. Newton, SCAW volunteer. to mobilize only 130 frames at one time. pieces of cardboard and feel a greater The Canada-based volunteer foundaEach donation included a bed frame, In the Army trucks, we're able to mobilize sense of self-worth and dignity," he said. Military police training to handle U.S. Army South situations with levels of force dining facilities list by Sgt. Lori Davis holiday meal hours USARSO Public Affairs Office FORTCLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -ThanksFORT CLAYTON -A civilian employee pulled a gun I giving Day meals will be served In U.S. Army on the military police when he was caught with duty-free South dining facilities at no cost to meal card goods during a spot check at the pedestrian gate here a holders'Ihursday. For non-meal card holders the few months ago, said SSgt. Eddie Wise, US. Army South price will be $1.50 for family members less than force protection nonconissioned officer. 12years old; $3 for enlisted, officers, family memThe MP searched a bag the civilian was carrying and bers and dining facility attendants; $5.55 for found the goods. The MP began to search the person and guests less than 12 years old; and $11.10 for soltold him he would be apprehended, but during the search diers on per diem, guests and Department of Dethe civilian pulled a gun from his waistband, Wise said. fenue civilians. The MP told the civilian to put the gun on the ground. The hours for Thanksgiving Day dinner at The civilian did put down his weapon, but then he began U.e A ry foThnkgivins ae to argue with the MP, so he was placed in hand irons and U. Army South dining facilities are: taken to the MP station, Wise explained. The MP controlled the situation by using the lowest Headquarters Company, US. Army Garrison level of force, "inter-personal skills." Military police of11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. -single soldiers, 12:30ficers are trained to handle situations by starting with the 2 p.m. -soldiers with family, guests lowest level of force and increasing force only when necessary, explained MP SSgt. John Williamson, 534th UP 92nd Personnel Service Command Co. 11:30 a.m-2 p.m. -everyone The six levels of force are: *Inter-personal skills -talking to the person. 193rdSupport Battalion *Show of force -the presence of more NPs or a dog. noon-3 p.m. -everyone *Unarmed self defense techniques -subduing an inus." 0"' y sse .m D"" dividual by hand. Cpl. Cynthia Gardener demonstrates unarmed self Company F, 228th Aviation *MP club -striking with the club on legal areas, such defense techniques on Pvt. 2 Isaac Smith noon-2 p.m. -everyone as the shin. +Canine -commanding the dog to subdue the indi"'The soldier struck an MIP and tried to flee. A second 1st Battaiion, Infantry 508th (Airborne) vidual NIP got involved and the soldier was finally restrained 11:30 am.-12:30 p.m -single soldiers *Deadly force -drawing a 9mm pistol or other and put in hand irons," he said. 12:30-2:30 pm. -soldiers with family, guests weapon as alast resort The soldier continued to fight the MPs by kicking and MPs are trained to use as little force as possible and biting after he was in hand irons, Wise said. 1stB~atton,228th Aviation only use more force after they fail to resolve the problem "At the station he continued to fight," he sid. "It took 11:30 a.m42:30 p.m. -ingle soldiers at lower levels, Williamson explained. four MPs to carry him out of the car and two MPs had to Establishing levels of force also makes it easier for restrain him. He continued his violent behavior inside the 12:30-2 p.m. -soldiers with family, guests MPs to control situations, he said. station, where he yelled profanities and spit on the MIP "The first thing you do is try to verbally persuade the duty officer." 1097th Boat Company individuaL Once you try that and it doesn't work, you The soldier struck an NIP and resisted anest, but the 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. -single soldiers know what to do next," Williamson said. NPs used only unarmed self defense techniques. The sol12:45-2:30 p.m. -soldiers with family, guests Knowing what to do next is very helpful in unpredictdier was very drunk and unpredictable, but the NIPs conable situations. MPs often find themselves in difficult situtrolled him with the least amount of force necessary to 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry ations with unruly people, Wise said. prevent him from hurting himself or others, Wise ex11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. -single soldiers "Three months ago a young soldier who was in planned. 1-2:30 p.m. -soldiers with family, guests Panama TDY (temporary duty) attempted to leave the inHaving control of the situation and knowing how to stallation during curfew without proper authorization," handle the unexpected are very important parts of servJungle Operations Training Battalion Wise said. "The MP told him he couldn't leave several ing and protecting the community, Williamson said. The 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m -single soldiers times, but when he started to walk off anyway the MPs 534th NP Co. reviews the levels of force with each shift 1-2:30 p.m. -soldiers with family, guests attempted to physically restrain him. going on patrol.

PAGE 3

Tropic Times Nov. 19, 19933 Win field performs at the Jont Task Force Bider basecarmp in Miraflores, El Salvador. Teait suportElomentphotosby Capt.Greg Yesko USO tour band jams El Salvador basecamp by Capt. Greg Yesko som~e of his cleues. os"ai p EOCTheater Support Emn Robert W. Brehm, a generator mechanic with MIRAFLORES, El Salvador -A band came HSC,536th. "Wehad three showsinlHonduras e all the way from Denver, Colo. to rock the while we were there and it really made the time basecamp of Join Task Force Builder. go by. It takes the monotony away from the U.S. soldiers in El Salvador got a taste of work" %%classic American rock'n'roll when the USO FormanyofthesoldierswhohavebeeninEl brought inthe group "Winfield" for ashow Nov. Salvador since August, the impact on the mo7. rale was electric. More than 200 soldiers found a spot in the "Ithinkit definitely has apositiveimpact on shade and kicked backto enjoy the concert.Some the troops," said Sgt. Maj. Cleveland A. Floyd, braved the heat and strutted their stuff on the command sergeant major of the task force. plywood dance floor. "Activities such as these will always keep The band was motivated to deliver a highmoraleatitspeak.Highmoraleleadstopositive energy performance. performance," Floyd said. "When we landed in Soto Cano and they told Floyd said the task force checked into the uswewerecominghere,we wereallveryexcited, possibility of getting a show to come to the said Debi Goforth, asinger and keyboard played basecamp They requested tohaveashow whenwith the band. "It seems like an adventurous ever one was available. Spec. Michael Sheperdson enjoys the USO show. place to go -another spot in the world to see." It seems to have arrived atjust theright time. Winfield performed five other "We have 25 days left," Floyd explained. USO tours inthe past two years, but "This provides a last good weekend of fun and the performance at the basecamp relaxation before we move into the final phase -broke new ground. of the exercise -sort of a second wind. We 'This tent city is a new experiwant to ensure everything is done to standard enee," Goforth said. "This is more and done safely." like what I expected the Army to be The soldiers applauded the band and the like and also what I expected our band applauded the soldiers. performance to be like. A lot of "I think they're doing a great job for being times weperforminclubsonbases." roasting hot on a Sunday morning with no 1i The band's energy was met with beer," Goforth said, describing the audience. an equally enthusiastic audience. The niusic wasn't the only reminder of -"It's really a great band," said North American culture. Vendors sold pizza, Spec.MichaelShepardson,anequipcheeseburgers and ice cream as well as various 6 ment operator with Company B, souvenirs, T-shirts and leather goods. 536th Engineer Battalion. "I'm reAs Join Task Force Builder nears compleally enjoying the rock'n'roll -it tion of its mission in El Salvador, the soldiers Springs me hack to the states." got an extra burst of motivation from the day's Shepardson said the conceit proactivities. vided a nice break from the daily "I love it," Brehmn said. "I'm more into routine. His positive feelings about country music, but the early rock'n 'roll I really the band seemed to be shared by love." Winfield guitarists Steve Thomas and Stuart Noble belt out a song.

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4 Troc TiHemisphere Nov. 19, 1993 He vh r Haitian immigrants Mixed feelings over NAFTA caught near M iam i MEXICO CITY (AP) Reynaldo Estrada, a muMIAMI (Reuters) -Four dozen illegal Haitian -Mexican businessman sician in a gray sombrero immigrants were caught wading ashore on islands cheered U.S. lawmakers' who can be found most off Miami early Monday, the latest in a growing vote for free trade like it nights in the mariachi influx of Haitians believed to have been smuggled was a football game, a hangout of Garibaldi Plaza, to Florida from the Bahamas. mariachi band member said he hoped NAFTA The Haitians arrived in two groups, U.S. Borhoped it would bring him would land him a new guider Patrol spokesman Herbert Jefferson said. a better guitar, but others tar. Eight were caught on Virginia Key shortly af. feared Mexico got a bum "I think the treaty will ter midnight and 40 others were apprehended on deal. bring down prices and neighboring Key Biscayne about 5:30 a.m., The North American maybe even help me get a Jefferson said. Free Trade Agreement good guitar from the United "There's no telling how many there actually won approval in the States," he said as he were. There's a good chance there were many House late Wednesday in plucked a well-worn guitar more who got away," Jefferson said. an event closely followed loaned from a partner. All the Haitians were taken to a U.S. immigraby those Mexicans whose He couldn't afford the tion holding center pending deportation proceedlivelihoods will likely $125 price to buy his own. ings. change with creation of Mariachi trumpeter Investigators think the Haitians were dropped the world's largest trade Enrique Gutierrez, 74, said off by vessels sailing from the Bahamas, where zone. he was too old to follow Bahamianimmigration officials recently estimated Enrique Zambrano, such news. "I don't know 40,000 Haitians are living illegally. president of the anything about that trade As conditions in Haiti deteriorate, growing Monterrey Chamber of 4 treaty. But I'm here every numbers have given up hope of returning to thi Industry and Manufacturnight, just 20 pesos (about homeland and have paid smugglers as much as ing, was happy, saying: $6.50) a song," said $3,000 to bring them to Florida, investigators said. "We think reason preGutierrez, in black cowboy Fuel has been in short supply in Haiti since the vailed over fear." APLasmPhoto outfit with silver buckles. U.N. imposed a trade embargo on the country one There also was gloatPresident Bill Clinton speaks to small business Alejandra Lozada, owner month ago to punish army leaders for failing to ing. owners in Washington in support of the North of a 72-year-old ice cream hand over power to democratically elected Presi"Whereis that sucking American Free Trade Agreement. parlor in Mexico City, said dent Jean-Bertrand Aristide. sound now? It's just the NAFTA would mean more Tens of thousands of Haitians tried unsuccessempty wind in Ross Perot's head," said Roberto MadriAmerican ice cream heading here. But that doesn't worry, fully to sail small fishing boats to Horida followgal, a Mexican businessman who watched the vote on a her. She still has the edge. ing the 1991 military coup that deposed Aristide. large-screen TV at the U.S. Trade Center here. Perot "We make our own ice cream fresh every day, no artiA Coast Guard team searched a Bahamian-regclaimed that passage would mean a giant "sucking noise" ficial ingredients," said Lozada, who chums out vanilla istered ship that was in the area Monday, but found from jobs leaving America for Mexico. walnut ice cream each day in a tub turned by an old-fashno evidence it was involved in smuggling, a Coast President Carlos Salinas de Gortari hailed the vote in ioned hand crank. Guard spokesman said. a televised address. "No, I'm not afraid of competition at all, my custom"This action was a rejection of the protectionist viers are loyal," Lozada said. sion," calling the treaty a "good instrument, one more Novelist Homero Aridjis said the treaty promises to Chinese president instrument for building a better future for Mexico," modernize Mexico, but may help erode its uniquely Latin Gortari said. culture. to m eet with Cuba The president reassured Mexicans that they would "I guess we will have to put up a sign all along our have time to prepare for competition with the economic 2,000-mile border saying 'Welcome to USA-Mexico,' BEIJING (Reuters)The visit of China's Presipowerhouses north of the border by suggesting the he said. dent Jiang Zemin to Cuba next week, the first by a treaty's full impact would not be felt for years. "We are entering into a new relationship with a great Chinese leader, is primarily aimed at appeasing But it wasn't just politicians and businessmen talking. superpower, and it's going to be a very harsh transition conservatives within China's own Communist hiHere's a sampling of Mexican voices from other walks of for many Mexican businesses that simply will not be able erarchy and at asserting the independence of life: to compete," said Aridjis. China's foreign policy, diplomats in Beijing say. The official Xinhua news agency announced thelong-expectedvisitWednesdayasJiangleftfor Sh l Dreaks Haitian embargo Seattle to attend the Asia Pacific Econonrc Cooperaton f and to hold his first meetings with PORT-AU-PRINCE (Reuters) -Desperate Haitian pariament President Clinton. Most political analysts believed ag's Cb motorists Tuesday formed huge lines and emptied gasoAt a news conference, spokesman Louis Jodel visit was essentially a gesture aimed atthe United line pumps after the Shell Co. Ltd. resumed sales despite Chamblain also proposed an alternative Cabinet containStates: repeating China's commitment to an idaU.N. oil embargo aimed at punishing the country's miliing several anti-Aristide figures as well as some mempendent foreign policy despite its market reforms tary rulers. bers of the pro-democracy movement that backs the and diplomatic gestures to Washington. Chaos ensued as scores of drivers nished to buy the ousted leader. "They want to avoid too much of a feeling of first gasoline delivered to stations since the oil blockade Although FRAPH has been at the forefront of moves triumphalism in the West," one diplomat said. on the Caribbean nation took effect four weeks ago. to prevent Aristide's return, diplomats refuse to recog"If you are going to hurtle down the bob-sled run Stations in the capital that received deliveries sold out nize the legitimacy of the group, calling it a group of to capitalism, you might as well fly the red flag their consignments by Tuesday afternoon. "armed thugs." while you are doing it." "I've been waiting here since last night because I reThe decision by Shell to release the gas ended a weekChinese conservatives, diplomats also reason, ally need gas," said one man. "I've had no gas for a long standoff between the company and the petroleum may be unsettled by Beijing's attempts to achieve month." distributors. rapprochement with Washington, and by Beijing's An army-backed court ruling last week ordered Shell, Already the Western Hemisphere's poorest nation, own recently-announced moves for faster marketalong with Exxon Corp's Esso unit and Texaco Inc, to Haiti has been hit hard by the U.N. embargo to force the style reform. sell whatever gasoline remained in their huge storage army to abide by the international plan for Aristide's re"Balance is important, and that is why he tanks in Haiti. tum. Diplomats said the army was behind the release of (Jiang) must visit Cuba," said one Western diploThe two other companies were expected to follow the gasoline. mat in Beijing. "There can't be many other reaShell's lead, which diplomats said would help the army "A particular sector of society is trying to buy time," sons -Cuba itself doesn't have much to offer continue holding on to power for at least several more said U.N. spokesman Eric Falt. "If they buy a few days China at the moment." weeks. that's all they will get. They can't change the basic Though Cuba was closely allied with the So"How can the embargo work if the stations are selling premise -that the international community wants to viet Union during China's bitterideological rivalry with Moscow, Beijing h gas? This will just prolong the crisis," said one frustrated force everybody to the negotiating table." lomatic and trade with Havana. aide to Prime Minister Robert Malval. In an interview published Tuesday by the French Cuba's Prensa Latina said Jiang's visit would Malvalis amember of thepro-democracy government newspaper Le Figaro, Cedras dismissed President take place Sunday and Monday and that he would of ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Aristide's Clinton's administration as irresponsible. meet Cuban leader Fidel Castro. U.N.-brokered return to Haiti last month was blocked by "The army in the United States is very responsible. Cuba, suffering under a U.S. trade embargo the military when Lieutenant General Raoul Cedras reThe executive isn't," Cedras said. and hit hard by the collapse of Soviet economic fused to step down. Asked whether he feared a U.S. invasion, which support, has been reaching out to the few remainThe oil companies had previously said they would not Clinton has refused to rule out, Cedras answered: "A ing communist nations for help. comply with the distribution order because it would violanding would be a pity for us and for Clinton. What Some diplomats say they expect Jiang to carry late the U.N. oil embargo. would he get out of it?" Beijing's message that market reforms are a way But Haiti's National Association of Gasoline Distribu"I can assure you it would be a complete failure. And to ensure continued Communist Party rule to tors threatened to use police force, and arrest oil company Haiti would suffer even more," Cedras said. Castro's Cuba, which itself has already embarked officials if they continued to withhold the gasoline stocks. U.N. Security Council said Monday that it might on a program of change. Meanwhile, the neo-Duvalierist Front for Advancetoughen the economic sanctions against Haiti to further -_ment and Progress of Haiti called for the dissolution of punish the army.

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#Atuuu NewsT Tropic Times yNayNov. 19,19935 Aspin favors new assistant WASHINGTON (AP) -Defense Secretary Les Aspin lauded Morton 0 Halperin Tuesday as an "individual of W J the highest qualifications and integrity, offering a boost to the nominee A -t before his confirmation hearing. The Senate Armed Services Committee is scheduled to hold a hearing today on Halperin's stalled nomination as assistant secretary of defense for democracy and peacekeeping. In a letter to Committee Chairman Sen. Sam Nurn, D-Ga., released at the Pentagon, Aspin wrote of his "strong and unambiguous support" for the nominee, as well as President Clinton's "confidence. .in Mort's abilities." Clinton announced his intention in ON March to name Halperin to the deA d r h nd fense post, but the nomination was Sse rch e ds not forwarded to the Senate until AuThe United Nation Security Council voted unanimouslyTuesday nightto calloff the search for Somali warlord Mohamed gust. Farrah Aidid and launch a new inquiry into the attacks on U.N. peacekeepers in Somalia. Aidid has been blamed for Conservative members of Conmany of those attacks, butthe Security Council is backing off itscondemnation of him in hopes of including himin efforts gress have expressed opposition to to find a political solution for Somalia. Halperin's nomination, contending he has an over-arching concern for individual liberties that could conflict No answers for sick Gulf veterans Inhilte=risidHerin has attempted "to reconcile the need WASHINGTON (AP) -Lawmakers But Aspin said the levels were not enough than 10,000 Persian Gulf veterans have for intelligence gathering and counare growing impatient with the Defense to cause the symptoms that have come to been examined under a VA program and terintelligence efforts with individual Department's response to mysterious illbe known as Persian Gulf syndrome. the VA has also set up a pilot program to civil liberties. nesses among Gulf War veterans, with Thousands are sick, said Sen. Don examine those who believe they were sick"He has helped fashion legislation some suggesting the Pentagon is more Riegle, D-Mich., who has researched posened by chemical agents. that criminalized the disclosure of concerned with a cover-up than working sible chemical contamination during the But he said that of 1,472 decisions on classified information, but also makes with the Veterans Affairs Department to war. "We're not getting straight answers claims for disability due to environmental U.S. intelligence collection adhere to find the cause of the ailments. and they deserve straight answers." hazards, only 79 have received servicethe constitutional rights of individu"Despite repeated calls by Congress, And Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va, connected benefits. als. This work has won him praise the Department of Defense's investigation chairman of the Senate Veterans Affairs The difficulty, he said, is that the VA from both civil rights groups and the has been cursory," Rep. Joseph P. Committee, said that "many Gulf veterhas no mechanism to establish a service intelligence community." Kennedy 11, D-Mass., said in House Vetans believe the Department of Defense is connection for multiple chemical sensitiv"He's an individual of the highest erans' Affairs Committee hearings. more concerned about covering up posity and Persian Gulf syndrome "because qualifications and integrity for this In hearings on both sides of Capitol sible exposures to chemical or biological they are not widely acknowledged in the important position," Aspin said. Hill Tuesday, criticism centered on the warfare than determining exactly what medical community as disabilities." Halperin was Washington director Pentagon. happened." Brown expressed support for a bill, alof the American Civil Liberties Senators pointed to the testimony of a Maj. Gen. Ronald Blanck, commander ready passed by the House and awaiting Union. He was a member of the NaMarine chemicals expert that traces of of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Senate action, that would provide Persian tional Security Council staff under Lewisite blister vapors were detected on said that among the contaminants being Gulf veterans with health problems spePresident Nixon before quitting in the battlefield, apparently contradicting studied for links to the illnesses are Kucial eligibility for care. dispute over Vietnam War policy. Pentagon assertions that it had found no waiti oil fires, parasites, petrochemicals, Chief Warrant Officer Joseph P. Several Senate Republicans had evidence of Iraqi chemical weapons use depleted uranium used in munitions and Cottrell, a nuclear, biological and chemiblocked passage of the intelligence during the 1991 war. chemical agents. He said that while the cal defense officer, told the Senate combill to pressure the Clinton adminisDefense Secretary Les Aspin altered cause of illnesses "has been elusive, we mittee that his detection vehicle twice regtration for more information on that stance somewhat last week when he will continue.to care for these veterans and istered low levels of blister agents during Halperin. The senators lifted the hold acknowledged the validity of Czech milido our utmost to root out the reason for combat operations. He said he reported the after receiving assurances that their tary findings of traces of nerve gas and their lingering health problems." findings to superiors, but the computer requests would be met. blister agents in the Persian Gulf region. VA Secretary Jesse Brown said more tape was subsequentlylost. Marine officer denies Gay sailor receives commission NEW YORK (AP) -For Joseph Steffan, lying about men friends that he is gay. Tailhook m isconduct his homosexuality would have been "a denial of all that I Rumors spread. Navy investigators looked into them, had learned." and Steffan eventually acknowledged he is gay to the QUANTICO, Va. (AP) -A Marine Corps officer Telling the truth proved difficult, too. commandant. He never was accused of engaging in hoaccused of blocking the Tailhook investigation deSteffan was forced to resign from the U.S. Naval Acadmosexual acts. nied any misconduct Tuesday and said he is confiemy in 1987 after admitting to the commandant he is A review panel recommended his discharge for "Indent he will be cleared. gay. He left just six weeks before graduation. sufficient aptitude for commissioned service," and he reLt. Col. Cass D. Howell, the highest-ranking MaBut Tuesday, a federal appeals court ordered the Navy signed. rine charged in Tailhook, said he tried to help idento give him his diploma and commission him as an offiA three-judge panel of the U.S. Circuit Court of Aptify the people who assaulted women during the incer. peals in Washington ruled, however, that Navy rules refamous gathering of military aviators. Steffan, now 29, said he does not regret telling the quiring Steffan's expulsion for his acknowledged homo"I did not partake in any of those activities for truth. sexuality "are not rationally related to any legitimate which Tailhook has become synonymous," Howell "Today, I have the opportunity to have both retained goal." said after a two-day Article 32 hearing at the my honor as an individual and as a midshipman, and to Gay-rights advocates said they hoped the ruling would Quantico Marine Corps Base. have my diploma," he said at the headquarters of the persuade President Clinton to stick to his promise to lift "I answered all questions put to me truthfully and Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund, a gay-rights the ban on gays in the military. I never refused to answer a question," he said. organization that represented him. The Pentagon said it would abide by the ruling but Howell, a 44-year-old ROTC instructor, is "I have no bitterness toward the military," he said. "I hadn't decided whether to appeal. charged with lying, obstructing justice, assault and think they are compassionate, dedicated, trustworthy Steffan, who is in his third year of law school at the conduct unbecoming an officer for spending the people. I think the institution is flawed, however. It's University of Connecticut in Hartford, said he isn't sure night with a woman at the Las Vegas gathering. He flawed by adeep bigotry. It's flawed by adeep ignorance." whether he will finish his studies there but will definitely is not accused of abusing women. Steffan had compiled an impressive record during his rejoin the Navy. Based on the hearing's testimony, a militaryjudge years at the academy. He was one of 10 students named Once he's back, Steffan said, he would like to help will recommend withinthree weeks whether to courtbattalion commanders in his senior year. He twice sang educate the military about homosexuality. martial Howell. He faces expulsion from the Marine the national anthem at Army-Navy football games. He "If I could pick my dream job, I think it would be workCorps and up to 16 years and six months in a miliwas cited for "constant dedication to superior perforing with the administration and the Department of Detary prison if convicted of all charges. mance." fense to set up programs and policies to help implement a His troubles began when he confided to two midshippolicy of nondiscrimination in the military," he said.

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Tropic Times C ov. 19, 1993 v ie Resident concerned about electrical repairs Dear Mayors' Corner: the sheds were built by the U.S. Army they The waiting time for repairs to governMayors Cor er are authorized secured storage, said Capt. ment housing has become longer each Dan Cowhig, chief, U.S. Army South time I call. Now it's to the ridiculous point Lovo, they are not interchangeable. In the meantime, DEH is rapidly exClaims Service. of 17 weeks for a minor electrical repair. One kind is called OM&A (operations panding its Self-Help program and will Those sheds were originally designed I see building going on (new construcand maintenance Army) which is money open a new Self-Help center in July. to be enclosed clothes-line areas, not stortion) which is a waste since we are soon used to take care of everything except fainTraining will begin in August for such diage sheds, said Directorate of Engineerleaving. The money would be better spent ily housing. These monies are designated verse areas as water heater replacement, ing and Housing Operations Officer Capt. doing repairs and hiring qualified workto maintain and improve the quality of life electrical and plumbing repairs, and nuLarry Powell. Powellsaid DEH had a coners. for US forces that live and work on our merous other household maintenance retract to replace the roofs on those sheds What do your sources say about this installations. The majority of the on-going quirements. and believed the contract was complete. situation? construction on post right now is from fisLovo said the training is available for After our call, Powell said he will investiAnonymous cal year 1992 OM&A money. These all US Army military and civilian memgate the "missing roof'allegations and see projects were approved by a board ofofficbers and their families and will provide if the previous contract can be reopened to Dear Anonymous: ers and the Commanding General. them with skills they can use for a life include any sheds left out. Dick Davis, Chief of Family Housing The other kind of money is P1900 time. TheProvost Marshal recommends resifor Directorate of Engineering and Housmoney which is specifically for family dents store all high value items indoors. ing said your concern about waiting time housing repair and maintenance. Even Dear Mayors'Corner: for repairs is well founded. though the DEH may have money for exAren't those sheds on Kobbe covered Editor'snote:'Thlscolumnalowscom"DEH has been working very hard to ecuting housing repairs, DoD-wide hiring by the Army in case of theft? We tried to unity members to submit questions to decrease the waiting times for repairs to limitations do not allow DEH to hire the submit a claim but were told the buildings the Mayoral Congress. Letters should be quarters but with a decrease in manpower, necessary craftsmen to accomplish that weren't secure because some don't have mailed to: Mayors' Corner, Publicity timely responses for routine repairs is not task. roofs. If they aren't secure, why did the Chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS). always possible," Davis said. Accordingly, DEH has assembled a Army put them up for our use? Anonymitywill be grantedupon request. Lt Col. John Lovo, Director of Engimulti-million dollar housing maintenance Ripped off twice The Tropic Times reserves the right to neering and Housing, explained that Concontract that they expect to award in late edit letters and responses for brevity, gress appropriates two kinds of monies to 1993 that will make up for the craftsmen/ Dear Ripped: clarity and propriety. run the installations. Unfortunately, said manpower short fall. Residents cannot assume that because Soldier writes 14 bad checks worth $2,300 1 $2,300 In bad checks P o o tM rh lsC re A Fort Davis soldier was arrested for writing 14 bad V checks totalling $2,300 at Atlantic and Pacific community Army and Air Force Exchange Services. Writing bad checks is punishable under the Uniform Code of Military Justice. Financial management classes are available at Army Community Services. Robbed in Colon A Fort Davis soldier was robbed and stabbed inthe leg last week in downtown Colon. Military police remind people when travelling downtown to use the buddy system and never carry large amounts of cash. If a victim of time, call the MPs at 287-4401 in the Pacific community or 289-5133 in the Atlantic community. Wrongful transfer of merchandise A Fort Clayton soldier was charged with exceeding the established limitation by buying two cribs in one tour. The soldier was also charged with wrongful transfer of merchandise when he gave one crib to a non-privilege card holder. Itis aviolation of Southern CommandRegulation 1-19 to transfer merchandise to a non-privilege card holder. For more information, call 286-3303. Anonymous drug hotline protective mask M17A2 bicycles two BMX 216-93 Anyone with drug smuggling information should call boots jungle type watch women's 212-93 the Panama Jack anonymous hotline at 285-4185. credit card JC Penny 174-93 bolt cutters 144-93 credit card MoneyMinder 173-93 keys with alarm remote 143-93 Found property bankcard First Interstate 172-93 circular saw 134-93 The following items are lost and found inventory. Call ID card holder with identification 171-93 287-4401 with the description and listed claim number. bicycle Murray 169-93 The following crimes occurred in on-post housing lantern green 164-93 areas Nov. 2-11. Item Description Claim number key ring with four keys 163-93 wallet with identification 196-93 bicycle Mitch 159-93 Pacific purse with identification 195-93 glasses with case 232-93 Fort Clayton 800 housing area -one larceny of secured golf club Spalding 194-93 wallet camouflage 225-93 private property key chain Discovery toys tag 193-93 handle talkie Motorola 224-93 Curundu housing area -two larcenies of unsecured pribicycle Redline 192-93 lawn mower push type 223-93 vate property, one larceny of secured private property wallet with identification 189-93 crowbar 222-93 Atlantic helmet kevlar 188-93 bicycle Huffy 217-93 None to report This authorized unofficial command information pubDirector, Public Affairs.Col. James L Fetig Editor.SSgt. Jane Usero lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Chief.SMSgt Steve Taylor Journalists.Sgt. Lori Davis Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Editor.SSgt DeborahE. Williams Sgt. Robin A. Mantikoski Information Program of the Department of Defense, unAssistant Editor.SgL John Hall 24th Wing Public Affairs Office.284-5459 der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S. Sports Editor.Sgt. Richard Puckett Public Affairs Officer.Capt. Warren L. Sypher Southern Command. Editorial Staff.Sgt. E.J. Hersom Public Affairs Superintendent.MSgt. Dale Mitcham Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the Rosemary Chong Journalists.SSgt. Rian Clawson official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Maureen Sampson Sgt. James A. Rush Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. VolunteerAssistant.Josephine Beane U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Student Intern.Juan Carlos Palacio Public Affairs Officer.Lt.j.g. Laura C. Moore Telephone 285-6612. Southern Command Public Affairs Office.282-4278 Assistant PAO.Diane Gonzalez Acting Commander in Chief. Command Information Officer.Patrick Milton Photographers.PH2 Roberto R. Taylor Maj. Gen. Walter T. Worthington U.S. ArmySouth Public Affairs Office.287-3007 PH2 Delano J. Mays Public Affairs Officer.Maj. Melanie Reeder U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.289-4312 T-1111711 Command Information Officer.Beth Taylor NCOIC.Sgt. Richard Emert iropic Times

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Tropic Times A commentaryy Nov.19,19937 Cough, cough Long-time smoker makes attempt to quit the need flight here from South Carolina was four hours of So I had a lot to give up, and something to gain. No by SMSgt Steve Taylor agony, and I choose not to smoke at home out of more standing outside, a cleaner and nicer smelling car Chief, Tropic Times consideration of my non-smoking significant other. So and maybe my lungs will like me better. esterday, if it passed you by unnoticed, was what was left? So I'm trying to quit. It's not easy and during the last the Great American Smokeout. So how Not much. I got tired of standing out in the sticky week or so I've cheated a couple of times. But I'm not many of you who still smoke tried giving it heat every hour for five minutes to suck down some giving up yet. I'm not going to let a cigarette run my up for a day? smoke. I got tired of standing out on the porch at home, life. It hardly seems possible an entire year has passed, mostly in the dark, to get some more. I got tired of ashes I'm not trying to preach, or even encourage smokers and the blitz is on again to get smokers to quit the habit. and butts all over my car, not to mention the smell. I got to quit, because I know it won't work. As a smoker, I know that all the hoopla doesn't tired of being out of breath walking up two flights of You won't quit either until you are ready. And even really work. Smokers will only quit when they're ready, stairs. I got tired of doctors giving me lectures every if you do decide to and fail, try again. There's no shame and I'm one of them. time I went to see them. in trying over and over and over. But this year I beat them. I quit early. And I hope And I got tired of the price increases. Last time I Smokers shouldn't get too anxious, especially around when this issue hits the streets, I'll still be among the bought a pack in the states, the clerk quoted me the time of the Great American Smokeout. If you're ranks of former smokers. something like $2.60 and I literally choked. ready to quit, there's help available if you can't do it But, it's tough. As the article on page B5 explains, as alone -and not many people can. my doctor explained last year during my 40-year And if you're not ready to physical, to quit smoking is as tough as overcoming quit, then don't. I didn't. There will alcohol, cocaine, or heroin addiction. be a time for you. But the longer I pooh hoohed that a year ago, but I'm not anymore. you put it off, the harder it will be. Though I've quit before -what smoker hasn't tried As a smoker for 25 years, I know or at least thought about it -it's still tough. this. Even with the "patch" it's hard. But I'm giving In the meantime, don't let it a try, and even if I don't succeed long-term, anyone make you feel guilty, the short-term will be worth it. I hope. unless that's what it takes to get It just doesn't seem to be worth smoking you to quit now. anymore. I couldn't smoke at work, had to Now, where did I put those ask for smoking areas in restaurants, the cigarettes? Coughcough. Quality program hinges on serving customer needs Howard Post Office, it didn't matter you had to run the bridge gauntlet for a takes is for supervisors to take time to by Capt. Bob Marasco whether or not you're there to mail four simple 30 minute household goods listen to their customers or better yet, put 24th Services Squadron Christmas packages or pick up one of briefing at Fort Clayton. their shoes on and look at how things your own, you had to wait. The folks at the traffic management operate from the customers' perspective since I came onboard to help The Howard Post Office staff, after office tackled the HHG problem and and then be proactive. Either way, as teach quality improvement, way receiving intense quality improvement came up with the idea to have the long as you're trying to improve, I think back in 1991, 1 can honestly say training, teamed with unit quality briefing right here at Howard. Thanks everyone will benefit. we are better off today. It's been two advisors and brainstormed the problem. for saving us from the rigors of the mad These are only a few examples of years since we jumped on the quality The result? Now you can get mom's dash to Fort Clayton. improved customer service that you, our train and haven't looked backcare package or send your Panama How did these ideas come to life? "Partners in Quality" have made in Here's a couple of examples of how sailboat to your cousin in Iowa and still Units simply listened to their customers Panama. Only you can make it happen. units are implementing quality customer have plenty of time for lunch. and workerbees. You can do this too. After all, change is inevitable. So let's service in the 24th Wing. Or how about when permanent Chances are, they already know how to make it a positive event. This is quality Imagine standing in a long line at the change of station time came around and fix a problem or improve service. All it customer service! Direct Quotes What advice would you give someone trying to quit smoking? "I smoke like a fiend. If "Bribes. I bought my "No matter what it "There are military "Think about the cost. I wanted to stop smokhusband a stereo and takes, do it. It's worth classes you can go to Try something else -a ing now, I'd try to get he's quit so far." it." and get patches. That different habit." the patch." and just will power." YN1 James Adams Pvt. 2 Elizabeth Schuhardt Mike Bell Sgt. Stephen Botts SSgt. John Liner Special Boat Unit 26 478th Military Intelligence Army family member 536th Engineer Battalion 310th Airlift Squadron Headquarters Detachment The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries -or responses to commentaries -to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

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Q Tropic Times Nov. 19, 1993 ThE phto by MMj. Debble Hasion-Huger SrA. Kelly Izer of the 43rd Civil Engineer Squadron helps construct office space at the JTFBuilder base camp. ~ A 536th Engineer Battalion soldier gives a rigger bI a U.S. engineers by Capt. John Leggett and Sgt. Lern Davis ~< ~i US ARSO Public Affairs Office EL SALVADOR -Three months of working side-byside and sharing nation-building skills paid off in cornN munity improvements and greater understanding between El Salvadorans and U.S. soldiers participating in Joint Task Force Builder. JTF Builder was a nation building project supported by more than 400 engineers from the U.S. Army, Air SForce and Navy aqid the El Salvador Armed Forces. 'Ihe ,project helped the people here recover from a 12-year civil n -war by building a community center, 13 schools, drilling 302nd PA D photo by Spec. Douglas H eaton six wells and laying six foundations, said Lt. Col. James PFC Shannon Eaton, 538th Engineer Battalion, stacks cinder blocks with the help of local El Salvador Luis H cocmadro h 3t n.B n T Morales and his wife in a joint effort to build a school as part of JTF-BuildnrBuilder. Soldiers from the 536th Engineer Battalion (Heavy) also helped train soldiers of the recently established ESAF

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Tropic Times Nov. 19, 1993 to one of the El Salvadoran helpers. Theater Support Eiemenrphoto by Maj Debbie Hasron-Htgr rce Builder join Salvadorans in nation-building effort Engineer Corps. Most ESAF soldiers served in infantry and people in your army. You also smile a lot and are the soldiers by painting, carrying supplies or doing whator artillery units during the war, but now the military is very social and open-minded ever they could do, he said. developing other units to support the nation. "More importantly, this exchange contributes to our "(JTF Builder) has shown them what the U.S. is all "We've been able to establish economic, intellectual and social about. They get to see us as we really are," Soto added. positive relationships with the development," he said. "We lost 12 When U.S. soldiers arrived, here many were unsure people and the military in a short "We we concerned at first, years as a result of the civil war. We about their reception in a country that hadn't known amount of time and train the mi-i but the best indication was want to rebuild and renew." peace for more than a decade. That question faded as U.S. tasy in skills that will endear them U.S. soldiers also leamed about soldiers drove convoys of equipment through local vilto their people," McCoy explained. when the FMLN tried to pull El Salvador's culture and its people. lages and were greeted by smiling and waving SalvadorThe project served as a leaming off a protest and nobody "Salvadorans are very honest, ans. opportunity on a personal level as ,very religious and old-fashioned "We were concemed at first, but the best indication well. came. It s hard to protest a and families are very close," ex(of acceptance) was when the FMLN (Farabundo Marti "I thought all U.S. soldiers were school for kids." plained Spec. Jose Soto, supply Liberacion Nacional, a political organization) tried to pull tall and white," said Juan Carlos, a clerk with the 536th Eng. Bn. off a protest (against JTF Builder) and nobody came. It's Cojutepeque High School student Lt. Cal. James H. McCoy The Salvadorans are also close hard to protest schools for kids," McCoy said. who visited many of the work sites. JTF Builder commander as a community, said Pvt. Mario The smiles on Salvadoran and U.S. faces when schools "Although there is a big differEncarnacion, a plumber with the were built told McCoy how his soldiers and the people ence between us physically, I have seen different races 536 Eng. Bo. Everyone in the village pitched in to help here felt about each other and the project, he said.

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Tropic Times M lestones 10 Nov. 19.,1993 4 A ~ AJI .Davis of Headquarters Company, 536th Promotions Engineer Battalion. Spec. Melton Douglas II and Spec. Thomas Lucas, both of To Specialist -Charles Hinson III of U.S. Headquarters Detachment, 470th Military Army Dental Activity -Panama. Intelligence Brigade. Spec. James Easton of 747th Military Intelligence Battalion. To Private First Class -Travis Latham Spec. Darrell Faulkner of Company B, and Juan Nunez, both of Company C, 1st 193rd Support Battalion. Spec. Rodney Battalion, 508th Infantry. Fillmore of Company B, 536th Engineer Battalion. Spec. James Fletcher III of To Senior Airman -Sharon D. 617th SOAD. Spec. Patrick Gaddie of Chrismer, Audreia R. Erby, Allen L. Company A, 1st Battalion, 508th InfanGilmore, Robert L. Jones, Edward L. try. Spec. Scott Ganley, Spec. Rodney Kincade, Kureen K. Paige, Israel B. McConaha and CpL Christopher Watson, Parker, Darran H. Patterson, Davy L. all of 194th Military Police Company. Roderique, Michael R. Rumley, Marty D. Spec. Sean Griggs and Spec. Mark Schumacher, Michael L Scott and Andre Wysocki, both of 108th Military Police P. Vaughan. Company. Spec. John Harrington of Company A, 193rd Support Battalion. To Airman First Class -Godfrey L. Spec. Quinn Haynes of 3rd Special OpCummings. erations Command. Spec. Sean Held, Spec. Christopher Pucci and Spec. Luis Graduations Vargas, all of Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Spec. Robin U.S. Army Ranger School -Spec. Trevor Mantikoski and Spec. Derek Jamison, Wicks of Company C, 1st Battalion, 508th both of Headquarters Company, U.S. Infantry. Army Garrison. Spec. Joseph Jenkins and Spec. Steven Jones, both of Company B, Nuclear, Biological and Chemical 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation. Cpl. Jeffery U.S.AiF photo School -Sgt Jaime Camn of U.S. Army Laffoon and Spec. Melissa Lehman, both New chief Dental Activity -Panama. of Company A, Jungle Operations TrainCol. Dennis Carpenter, U.S. Southern Command Air Force Element coming Battalion. Spec. Dennis Lamberton of mander, promotes Irshad Ali to chief master sergeant with help from Ali's wife, Preventive Dentistry Specialist Course Headquarters Company, Law EnforcePaula. All Is currently the deputy chief, Automated Systems Division. -SgL Vernon Young Jr. of U.S. Army ment Activity. Spec. Phillip Le Jr. of 4th Dental Activity -Panama. Battalion, 228th Aviation. Spec. Leon Lewis of 470th Military Intelligence Briw Primary Leadership Development gade. Spec. Jesus Lopez-Febo of ComCourse -Distinguished Honor Graduate: pany E, 142nd Medical Battalion. Spec. Spec. James Easton of 747th Military InTerrence Lovett and Spec. Elvin Nuells, telligence Battalion. Honor Graduate: both of Southern Command Network. Spec. Lyman Ross of Company A, 310th Spec. Peter Metz of Headquarters ComMilitary Intelligence Battalion pany, 193rd Infantry. Spec. Glenn Commandant's Inspection: Spec. Derek Perkins and Spec. Dawne Tran, both of Jamison of Headquarters Company, U.S. Headquarters Company, 193rd Support Army Garrison. Physical Training: Spec. Battalion. CpL Michael Myrick of 308th James Easton of 747th Military IntelliMilitary Intelligence Battalion. Spec. gence Battalion. Leadership Award. Spec. Raimundo Perez of Headquarters ComDanny Cook of Company C, 1st Battalpany, 128th Aviation. Spec. Luis Reyesion, 228th Aviation. Spec. Joseph Recinos and Spec. Joseph Singerhouse, Singerhouse of Headquarters Company, both of Headquarters Company, 1st Bat1st Battalion, 508th Infantry. Spec. talion, 508th Infantry. Spec. Lyman Ross Demetrica Bell of 489th Transportation. of Company A, 310th Military IntelliCpl. Christopher Watson of 194th Miligence Battalion. Spec. Melissa Storey of tary Police Company. Commandant's Company B, 154th Signal Battalion. List: Spec. Lee Baynard of U.S. Army Spec. Larry Truax of 69th Signal ComMedical Activity -Panama. Spec. Robert pany. Spec. Juan Villareal Jr. ofCompany Beane, Spec. Jorman Royer, both of ComA, 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation. Spec. pany E, 228th Aviation. Spec. Danny Daniel Wilkinson of Headquarters DeCook of Company C, 1st Battalion, 228th tachment, 106th Signal Brigade. Spec. Aviation. Spec. Derek Jamison of HeadPaul Wilsbn of Company A, 536th Engiquarters Company, U.S. Army Garrison. neer Battalion. Spec. Christopher Pucci of Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry. Special acts Spec. Melissa Storey of Company B, 154th Signal Battalion. Spec. Dawn Tran Spec. Katrina James of Headquarters of Headquarters Company, 193rd Support Company, 536th Engineer Battalion, was Battalion. Cpl. Christopher Watson of selected as Chef of the Year by the Instal194th Military Police Company. Spec. lation Food Service Office Mark Wysocki of 108th Military Police Company. Graduates: Spec. Hector Sgt. David Draper of 4th Battalion, 228th Aguayo-Venegas of Company A, 5th BatAviation, was selected Noncommissioned talion, 87th Infantry. Spec. Robert AusOfficer of the Quarter for 128th Aviation tin, Spec. Carol Coley, Spec. Matthew Brigade. Hughes, Spec. Geoffrey Staples and Spec. Bruce Welch, all of 1097th Transportation Spec. Rodney Ferguson of Company E, Company. Spec. Leonard Baughman and 228th Aviation, was selected Soldierofthe Spec. Martin Lawson, both of Company Quarter for 128th Aviation Brigade. B, 310th Military Intelligence Battalion. Spec. Lee Baynard and Spec. Shallee The Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Change of command "^" A Graves, both of U.S. Army Medical Acand Air Force Organizational Excellence Lt. Col. Gregory G. Reniker speaks during a change of command ceremony tivity -Panama. Spec. Robert Beane and Award have been approved for the 24th Oct. 31 at Soldiers' Field. Reniker assumed command of U.S. Army Garrison Spec. Jorma Royer, both of Company E, Operations Group. The awards were -Pacific from Mal. Randy Nielson. Renikers assignments Include platoon 228th Aviation. Spec. Demetrica Bell of earned for the time period of Feb. 11, 489th Transportation. Spec. Shawn Clut1992, through July 31, 1993. leader, tactica directorand battery commander in Improved Hawk air defense ter of Company A, 154th Signal Battalunits inthe United States and Germany. Hewasthe adjutant of the 101 st Corps ion. Spec. Danny Cook of Company C, r sSupport Group. His awards include the Defense Meritornus Service Medal, 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation. Spec. Cathy Meritorlus Service Medal (two oak leaf clusters), Army CommendatIon Medal, Cooper of Headquarters Company, 41st Nathan Paul Sullano was born Oct. 16 to (two oak leaf clusters), Army Achievement Medal and Airborne and Air Assault Area Support Group. Spec. Douglas Betsy and Phillip Sullano. badges.

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Tropic Times Nov. 19, 1993 13 Cougars tailback Lance VonHollen stumbles from a hit and continues running. DoDDS football ends with neck-and-neck statistics race finish W L T Pct. PF PA Balboa Bulldogs 7 3 0 .700 180 46 PCC Green Devils 7 3 0 .700 227 103 Cristobal Tigers 7 3 0 .700 155 121 Balboa Red Machine 6 4 0 .600 129 125 Curundu Cougars 4 6 0 .400 155 184 Kiwanis Kolts 0 10 0 .000 47 263 Team Statistics RUSHING -Green Devils, 2,107; Tigers, 1,835; Bulldogs,1,785; Red Machine, 930; Cougars, 838; Kolts, 733. PASSING -Cougars, 964; Red Machine, 514; Kolts, 516; Bulldogs, 465; Green Devils, 430; Tigers 418 DEFENSE (Rushing) -Bulldogs, 688; Red Machine, 1163; Tigers, 1197; Green Devils,1271; Kolts, 1842; Cougars, 2074. DEFENSE (Passing)'Cougars, 380; Bulldogs, 435; Tigers, 576; Red Machine, 579; Kolts, 647; Green Devils, 729. Individual Statistics POINTS SCORED -Green Devils, Reese, 74; Green Devils, Quinn, 66; Bulldogs, Price, 54; Tigers, Townsend, 42; Cougars, Vonollen, 42; Tigers Acosta, N, 36; Cougars, Rivera, 32; Bulldogs, Beach, 31; Red Machine Sanchez, 30; TOUCHDOWNS -Green Devils, Reese, 12; Green Devils Quinn, 11; Bulldogs, Price, 9; Tigers, Townsend, 7; Cougars, Vonollen, 7; Tigers, Acosta, N.,6; Red Machine, Sanchez, 5; Red Machine, Hovan, 4. RUSHING -Green Devils, Reese, 1,092; Bulldogs, Beach, 824; Tigers, Evans, 792; Green Devils, Ortiz 729; Tigers, Townsend, 597; Bulldogs, Price, 364; Cougars; Tigers, Acosta, N., 340; Vonrollen, 337; Red Machine, Twohy, 318; Cougars, Shaha, 272. YARDS PER CARRY -Green Devils, Ortiz, 9.8; Green Devils, Reese, 6.74; Tigers, Evans, 6.71; Red Machine, Sanchez 6.2; Tigers, Acosta, N., 6.05; Bulldogs, Beach, 6.05; Tigers, Townsend, 5.1; Cougars, VonHollen, 4.81. RECEiVING -Cougars, Reyes, 429; Red Machine, Sanchez, 426; Cougars, Rivera, 287; Bulldogs, Staton, 284; Tigers, Acosta, N., 154; Green Devils, Pohl 141; Kolts, Chanis, 106. KICKOFF RETURN -Kolts, Escula, 24.2; Cougars, Reyes, 20; Tigers, Acosta, B., 18.5; Cougars, Rivera, 16.7. Passing Leaders Comm Att Pct TD Int Yards Alvarez (Tigers) 44 82 53.6 7 3 418 Garcia (Cougars) 69 157 43.94 4 8 909 Quinn (Green Devils) 29 66 43.93 1 8 345 Price (Bulldogs) 16 44 36.3 4 1 416 Corrigan (Red Machine) 37 115 32.1 54310 8

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14 Tropic Times Nov. 19, 1993 Departmentof defense photo by Juan Carlos Palacio Curundu Cougars cheerleaders Amanda Grass and Sarah Livingston toss confetti during the homecoming parade. over Festivities end football season BALBOA (Tropic Times)-Students of The junior class won the competition BalboalhIghSchoolcelebrated their homewith its float depicting a casino complete coming football game with a homecoming with a slot machine and a poker game. pep rally, dance and parade Nov. 12 and The sophomoreclass camein third with Saturday. their float portraying a king and his junior The festivities began during seventh and senior slaves being whipped. periodclasses Nov. 12whenthehighschool The seniors built a float entitled We administration let the students out to attend AretheChampions"thatportrayed asenior the pep rally. warrior beating underclassmen in pugil The cheerleaders ofeach Department of stickbattles. When the underclassmanlost, Defense Dependents Schools football team he would hide and the senior warrior threw on the Pacific side put on routines they had a dummy of the underclassman into the been practicing for nearly a month. crowd. The crowd seemed to enjoy the Red Thecheerleaders also puttogetherfloats Machine's routine the most as the cheersuch as the Red Machine golf cart decoleaders performed to the rap group "Tag rated in Red Machine traditional black and DeparhmentofDefeneephotobyJuan CarlosPalcin Team's" "Whoomp There It Is." red. Homecoming King Billy Wing escorts his Queen Nyda Nieves. "The Red Machine Cheerleaders really The Bulldogs,Cougars and Green Devgrooved it," said Maylinn Steinbarger. "It ils cheerleaders decorated trucks in their was better than the last one." traditional colors and Bulldogs brought The students returned to the stadium their mascot -a live bulldog that rode later thaL evening to watch their football shotgun. teams d:ke it out. The parade began beThe homecoming dance ended the festween games at Balboa High School Stativities Saturday. dium. Billy Wing and Nyda Nieves were Each classatBalboa,sophomorethrough crowned homecoming king and queen and senior, participated in a float competition. danced the night's final dance. Depart ent f Defense photo byStephani Holzwat The homecoming court, Nyda Nieves and Miggy Castro, arrives at the parade.

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Tropic Times Nov. 19, 1993 Sports shorts No fee swimming There will be no entry fees at Director-ate of Community Activities swimming TCN Am r ad s orks pools and Shimmey Beach Nov. 26. The Southern Command Network's AM 790 Pacific and 1420 Atlantic will Rental sale broadcast the following sports this weekend. The Directorate of Community Activities is featuring 25 percent off family Saturday boat rentals. The Fort Clayton Boat Shop College football: Boston Colalso has 50 percent off on bass fishing lege at Notre Dame at 1:30 p.m. charters as part of Family Week obserAlabamaatAuburnat 4:30 p.m. vance. Sunday Pro football: Detroit at Green Body building contest Bay at I1p.m. B d b idn o ts N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia at 4 The Howard Sports and Fitness Cenp.m. ter will host a body building championMinnesota at Tampa Bay at 8 ship in January. For more information, p.m. call the center at 284-3451. Monday New Orleans atSanFranciscoat Drag Racing The Ruedas Calientes (Hotweels Youth baseball Sports Group) will hold a day of drag racing with cars and motorcycles at the Registration forthe youth softball and Albrook Field Track at noon Sunday. baseball seasons continues today through Particpation is open to all with a driver's Nov. 30 at the Albrook Youth Center. license and fee. Spectators are also welVolunteer coaches are also needed. Call come. The entrance fee is $3. This race Vince Duncan at the Albrook Youth Cenwill be the first in Panama using a'Portter at 286-3195 or 284-4700. a-Tree' Christmas tree that dials elapsed time, top speed and reaction time. Pacific Little League For more information, call 224-7032. DepartmentofDefensephotobytephaniIolzWerh Registration for the Pacific Little (og baseball "Lean, mean Red Machine!" toague is Uen oil tary inslatios Youthofficials, coaches andassistant Henry Twohy cheers his favorite Department of Defense Schools football thePacificside,including Howard AFB, coaches are needed for the1993-94 coed team. Fans reported that Twohy has not missed a game in years. Rodman NS and Fort Kobbe. baseball and softball programs.The seaRegistration and tryouts end today at son runs Decemberthrough Mareh. Interstep the Pacific Little League baseball field ested males or females ages 18 and older Free aerobics Softball tourney complexlocated between the Pier18 area can contact Rory Egger at 287-4540 for The Fronius Fitness Center, Building Registration for a holidays softball of Balboa and the south end of Albrook more information. 86, Fort Davis, is offering free step tournament is underway at the Fronius Field at the intersection ofPier Street and aerobics classes. Step is not included. Fitness Center. An organizational meetGaillard Highway. Call the Fronius Finess Center at 289ing is scheduled at 5 p.m. Dec. 15. The Registration forms will be available Golf 3108 for more information. tournament begins Dec. 18. The entrance through Department of Defense DepenThe Amador Golf Clubis sponsoring fee is $50 per team. Call 289-3108. dents Schools and at the field. There are aThanksgiving turkey shoottournament Free Nautilus training fourleagues forages 6through 15. Man-two person, best ball -7:30 a.m. F VoNlebu tournament agers and coaches are needed. For inforSaturday. The entrance fee is $8. Prizes The Fronius Fitness Center on Fort ybaui mation, call Mark Dillon at 252-6371 or will be turkeys. For more information, Davis is offering free Nautilus machine An open volleyball tournament is set John Carlson at 252-6371 evenings. call 292-4511. training sessions from 3-4 p.m. TuesforNov. 27 and 28attheRodmanFitness days. Call 289-3108 or visit the Fronius Center. An entry fee of $50 is required Run Against Drugs Bowling tournament Fitness Center for more information. and there is a limit of eight teams. Deadline to register for the tournament is The 142ndMedical Battalionwill kick The Howard Bowling Center and DCA fun 1OK trot today. Coaches meeting is scheduled for off Sober Week by sponsoring the Run Panama Canal Bowling Association are 5 p.m. Nov. 23. Call 283-4222/4061. Against Drugs -an event with five sponsoring the 23rd Pepe Damian BowlRegistration for the Family Turkey running and walking events. Events will ing Tournament Saturday and Sunday at Trot are now under way at the Fronius Intramural 5K fun run be a 10Kindividual run, 5-memberteam the center. Fitness Center on Fort Davis. The run run with guidon, 10K fast walk, 2-mile Qualificationrounds will be held Satbegins Saturday. categories include 10K, The Rodman Fitness Center is sponfun run and an 800-yard dash for chilurday with six games in two shifts at I and men and women over 40, junior for chilsoring a 5K fun run 6:30 am. Nov. 30. dren. 6 p.m. Round robin match play will be dren 13-17 years old,5K family fun walk Deadline to register for the eventis today. Military registration is today and held Sunday. The tournament is open to and one-milecourse forchildren 12 years There is no entry fee and the run is open Saturday at Building 207, Fort Clayton. all members ofthePCWA and PCWBA. old and under. Formoreinformation, call to all civilian and military personnel. The run begins at 7 a.m. Saturday at Club For more information, call 284-4814. the fitness center at 289-3108. Units with most runners will receive team Amador. Participants will receive a Taward. Call 283-4222/4061 for more inshi s range from $3-$25. Prizes inScuba sale No tap at Curundu formaton. cludecash, babystrollerrunner, trophies, The Twin Oceans Pro Shop will hold The Curundu Bowling Center will Pacific softball medallions, running shoes and sports a sporting goods and scuba sale from holdanotaptournament7p.m. Saturday. equipment. For more information call noon-7 p.m. today and 11 a.m.-3:30p.m. Call the center at 287-6366 for more The PacificSoftball League will open 287-6448. Saturday. The sale will be held in a tent information. its 1994 slow pitch league Jan. 3 in the in the parking lot adjacent to Building league's park near pear street, Balboa. Christmas angels 2057,Curnmdu.PeopleinterestedinsellFree aerobics Games start 5:30 p.m. weekdays. The ingequipmentcancall286-3915fortable season runs until May 1. Everybody is The Panama Canal womens and mens registrations. Teresa Consterdine's aerobics classes eligible. Interested players can contact bowling associations are sponsoring sevare free and held 9:15-10:15 a.m. weekRuben Jimenez or Roy Johnson at the eral fund-raising events for the Hogar-De days at the Reeder Physical Fitness Cenpark or call 236-2952, 252-7541, 252LaInfanciaa house with42impoverTurkey Bowl shuttles ter. Eachworkouthasawarm-up,cardio2990or252-2361. ished children. Trees are set up at the The Directorate of Community Acvascular workout, cool down and bowling centersonFortClaytonAlbrook tivities will be providing shuttles to the floorwork. Call 287-3861. AFS, Howard AFB, Fort Espinar and TurkeyBowlplayoffsandchampionship Curundu with angels containing inforgame. Reporting time for the playoff The Howard and Albrook Sports Admation about a child, which will change game is 4 p.m. Saturday at the Valent visory Committee will hold ameeting for weekly. Recreation Center and the Cocoli ComTheSoberAwarenessFamilyFunRunits members today at the Howard EnPickan angel and fulfilllthe wishlist of munity Center. Both shuttles depart at walk will be held Dec. 18. Event categolisted Members Club at 2p.q]. Forinforits child by bringing wrapped presents 4:30 p.m. and return on an hourly basis. ries are men and womens open 10K, men mation, call 284-3451. with the name of the child on the front to The Atlantic community can catch a and womens over 40 10K, juniors open a bowl-a-thon that will be held 9:30 p.m. shuttle from the Fronius Fitness Center 10K, family fun walk 5K and one-mile Dec. 10 until 9:30 p.m. Dec. 11 at the on Fort Davis. The reporting time is 3 childrens open. Registration is ongoing Intramural badminton Curundu Bowling Center. Entry fee is p.m. Saturday andis scheduled toreturn at the Fronius Fitness Center on Fort Coaches forintramural badmintonwill $15 without a T-shirt and $10 with a Ta9:30p.m. Thesame schedules applyfor Davis. For the entrance fee of $2, a Thave a meeting atthe Howard Sports and shirt purchase. A "Thanks for Being an the championship game Wednesday. For shirt and certificate are included. Call Fitness Center at 2 p.m. Nov. 30. Call Angel" dinner will be held Dec. 14. more information, call 287-5618. 289-3108. 284-3451 for more information.

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16 Tropic Times Nov. 19,1993 New Atlantic bank open for business FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO-Atlantic) -Atlanticcommunitymembers nolongerhaveto drive the Transisthmian for certain banking needs since the full service Community Bank opened for business Nov. 9. The bank, a renovated mobile van, offers services that were only available in the Pacific community, said Norma Swanson, Community Bank regional manager, Panama. "The Atlantic community needs more than just customer service," she said. "Like anyone else, they need full-service banking. The new bank provides the services that were lacking. "Most of the complaints I've had from here are thatpeoplehadtogosuchalong waytocashthings Eke savings bonds that the old bank wouldn't cash," Swanson explained. "The community has been waiting forthis for along time, and I'm sure everyone's excited about it." The bank's opening marks the first time the Atlantic community has had a full-service bankin more than six years. In 1991, Swanson started US Nsvyphoto by PH2 RoberTaylor working on a new bank. Ecuadorian vessel Don Pepefloats on Panamanian waters after being rescued by U.S. Navy and Coast ie aye aofcoordnation,theballwasfinally Guard vessels. "Ihadreturned here from Germany and Iknew that there were a lot of mobile vans over there. I suggested we try to get one of them over here." About a year later, the Department of Defense paid to ship one of the mobile vans to Fort Davis. The Atlantic command funded renovations to the van that included a new paint job, Swanson said. Ecuadorian cargo vessel A atemny community members at atime, but it's mobility has an by Ltj.g. Laura C. Moore structurally sound. We moved some cargo around to advantage. USNAVSTAPANCANAL PAO stabilize her. We rigged the bridle and basically did what "If an emergency should come up -such as a hundreds of units in the coast guard do every day -we big field problem where the soldiers require bank RODMAN NS -After a near-death experience and a towed he." services, the van could possibly be taken to the rescue at sea by the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard, seven "Every Coast Guard unit, no matter if the primary field," Swanson said. Ecuadorian sailors made their way back to Ecuador after mission is buoy tender, ice breaker, or law enforcement While parked in front of Building 32 on Fort emergency repairs to their ship in Panama. cutter, does towing. We all do search and rescue,"Peneiro Davis, the bank's two tellers cater to not only U.S. Navy and Coast Guard men and women saved the said. community members' banking needs, but also Ecuadorian sailors by providing food, water, communicaPetty Officer3rdClass Tim Brammer, agunner's mate those oforganizationsliketheArmyandAirForce tion equipment and by towing their vessel to safety. on the Diligence, said "that's what we're out here forExchange Service. The Ecuadorian cargo vessel Don Pepe was adrift 160 to aid people who get themselves into that predicament" "We'll have to set atime limit on the organizamiles northwest of Malaga, Colombia after a hole in the "We don't look to get our costs back, that's not one of tional deposits because there are only two tellers," engine room caused water damage to the engine. our concerns," Pineiro said, "We're always ready to she said. "Atlantic organizations can now deposit The USS Copeland, a fast frigate homeported in San provide assistance and it actually benefits us by providing checks they receive daily as opposed to weekly." Diego,wasconductingcounter-drugoperationsinthearea trainingtosomeofournewerpeople.Itkeepsusconfident Thebankwillbeopen 10am.-5p.m.Tuesday when it encountered the Don Pepe late afternoon Oct. 28. and proficient in towing so we can stay ready for some of through Friday and 9 a.m. -2p.m. Saturday and is The commanding officerofthe Copeland,Cmdr. Vera the more dangerous evolutions we do," he said. openforallpaydays.IfapaydayfallsonaMonday, Wing, said what his ship found was unexpected. The Don Pepe sailors handled their predicament well, the bank will be open Monday and closed the "It was really kind of strange for us. We were not according to Pinero. following Saturday. The bank will be closed Nov. expecting to find what we found. The crew made the "They're professional sailors. They had no electronic 28inobservanceofPanama'sindependence from transition swiftly and smoothly to a rescue mission. All of equipment on board except for a radio. They navigated Spain but does not close for U.S. federal holidays. our people were involved," Wing said. using a sextant and the tried and true method of celestial Call 289-3364/3438 for more information. "It's a courtesy ofthe seato go by avessel which might navigation. So they're very professional, they just don't be drifting to check on them and see if they have any have the resources we do,"he said. Atlantic fam i problems. If we had not come across them, we don't know Brermersaidthecrew wasgratefulto behelped."They how long it might have been before somebody else found were in lots of trouble and they couldn't fix their engine. them. So it was fortunate we were there," said Operations They were really happy to see us," he said. ge food Officer Lt. Joseph Carlson. Sergio Sanchez, Don Pepe's captain, said "The men FORTDAVIS (USARSOPAO-Atlantic)AtThe Copeland provided the Ecuadorian sailors food, were scared becausethey didn't know ifthey were going to lantic Army Community Services and U. S. Army water and a hand-held radio. Because of other pressing ever see their homes and families again. The only thing we South are giving nearly 150 families something to commitments, the Copeland was relieved by the USNS were drinking was rain water. When we get home we will be thankful for this Thanksgiving. Capable Oct. 29. The USCGC Diligence, a Coast Guard kiss our families and hold them tight because we have had Atlantic ACS and USARSO funded 150 hollcutter based in Wilmington, N.C. commanded by Cmdr. a close call. Then we will celebrate our homecoming." day baskets that will benefit 131 Atlantic-commuAndrew Cascardi, relieved the Capable Oct.31 and sent a Pineiro said "The people we assist look at Americans, nity families, said Gabriella Soto, chief of ACSboarding team to the Don Pepe to assess the feasibility of the Navy and the Coast Guard as messengers of God Atlantic. atow. because we're always ready to provide assistance without The units determinedhow many baskets would Ltj.g.RichardPineiro, firstlieutenantoftheDiligence, asking for anything in return. It's very satisfying for the be needed and gave ACS lists of families who said "We went over and found the vessel was towable and crew to be involved in the rescues we do." needed holiday assistance, Soto said. Atthatpoint,ACSbeganbuyingtheitemstofill Marines celebrate 218th birthday Tsmuh=r piecrustandfilling, stuffing mix and otherstaples. Vehiclesupportto transport the basket supplies by Sgt. Rick Emert "This was something we wanted to add to give the was provided by Transportation Motor Pool-AtUSARSO PAO-Atlanfc audience a flavor of Marine Corps history," Bergstrom lantic and soldiers from Company D, U. S. Army FOTDVS-Wt lseigsodfra tie said. Garrison helped load and unload the items. FORT DAVIS -With glistening swords, formal attire The biggestand most ceremonious event, was the cakeAll 150 baskets were packed by Luz M. and two centuries of tradition, Marines here celebrated cutting. Traditionally,the cakeis cut by the guest of honorBallesteros, Financial Program coordinator, and their 218th birthday at the Fort Davis Community Club. The first piece goes to the oldest Marmnepresent who turns fourvolunteers. Ballesterosput a holiday greeting More than 130 Marines, spouses, soldiers and seamen it over to the youngest signifying the passing of tradition in each basket for the families Soto said attended the&'arine Corps Birthday Ball -including one and honor from old to young. The units picked up the basliets from ACS and Marine whocamealltheway from NorfolkVa.,saidCapt. The oldest Marine present at the ball, Gunnery g will distribute them to the families before ThanksDonna Bergstrom, commander of Company D, Marine Ernesto Bent,CompanyD,passed thattraditionandhonor giving day, she said. Support Battalion. on to Lance CpL Christopher Stewary, Marine Corps Theballkickedoffat7p.m. with the traditionalmarchSecurity Force Company. bte holiday basket program is not a new one, on of the cordon -six Marines with polished swordsThe ceremony portion of the ball ended with guest but it is vital to the community, Soto said. followed by the posting of the colors. speakerCol. William H. Keller III, directoroftthe DirectordItensures that all families who need assistance Eight uniforms from the Marine Corps' past were ate of Production, Atlantic Intelligence Command, Norduring the holidays get it. displayed to add a touch of history to the evening. folk, Va.

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ropictivities Nov.19,1993 A quality of life guide for the U.S. community In Panama PageBi Agnes of God Deparmentof Defense pto by Maureen Sampson Caroline Hall and Kirsten Anne Traughber rehearse a scene from the play "Agnes of God," which opens tonight at the Ancon Theatre Guild. (See story and photos page B3) Yot -Pae B2 Health Page B5 Curundu Junior High School The Great American Smokeout *TV, page B8 drama students perform "Red tries to get people to kick the ciga*Movies, page B9 House Mystery." rette habit. *Comics, page B12

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B2 Tropic Times news Nov. 19, 1993 youth atcivii Dramaopen ing at Curundu Clayton +Youth Center: Drama club Swim team coaches needed, ce D afied adult water safety instructors. Library trip 3-6 p.m. today. Third Annual Turbo Turkey International 8 am.-l p.m. Saturday. FeaEnglish play tures events for the entire family and displays. CURUNDU (Department of Creative craftsholidaydecorations Defense Dependents Schools) 3 p.m. Monday. The Curundu Junior High Drama Preteen disco dance Nov. 26, 7-9 Club's performance of "The Red p.m. for preteens, 9-11:30 p.m. forjunior HouseMystery"will bepresented teens. $1.50 admission covers games and 7 p.m. Dec. 2-3. refreshments. Theplay was originally schedTeens vs. military police ping pong uled forThursday and tonight, but tournament 1 p.m. Nov. 27. the school's unexpected closure Performing children's troupe seeks this past week pushed the perforyouths who like to sing, dance and permance days back. form. They meet 4-6 p.m. Tuesdays and Drama sponsor Claudia St. Thursdays. Clair said this is a new and chalAmerican Stars gymnastics meet lenging experience for the drama Tuesdays and Thursdays; ages 3-5, 2-3 club. p.m.; ages 6-8,3-4 p.m. ages nine and up The play begins on a drowsy and advanced, 4-5 p.m. $20. summerweekend.ThesuddenvioTaekwondo 5:30-7:30 p.m. and 6-7 lence of murder erupts at an Enp.m. Wednesdays andFridays forages 5glishhouseparty. It'sjustanother 18,$25. case of sibling rivalry -or is it? Piano lessons 1-4:30 p.m. Tuesdays There are others beside his and Thursdays. $30 includes four halfbrother who hold grudges against courtesyrphoto hourlessons a month. Instructoris Laura the murdered man. As the plot Young thespians Cody Christopherson argues with Liz Franklin while Amy Black Deray. expands, several complex twists and J.P. McNulty watch during rehearsal of "The Red House Mystery,"an English Gymnastics for ages five and older keeptheaudienceenthralledinan mystery by A.A. Milne which will be performed Dec 2-3 at Curundu Junior High 2:30-3:30p.m. and3:30-4:30p.m. Monevening ofmystery and romance. School. days and Wednesdays, $24. *Senior Teen Center: Triathlon tournament 4 p.m. every Friday. Compete in pool, foosball and ping-pong. Volleyball3:30-5:30 p.m. every Sunday. Outdoor funfest2-6 p.m. Nov.27 for ages 15-18. $1 fee includes volleyball, softball, refreshments, Electro Disco under the big bohio. Celebrate birthdays of the month 7 p.m. Nov. 30. *Child Development Center; Openings in a Family Child Care home are available. Call 278-3301. Full day and hourly care available for children ages 6 weeks to 12 years. Albrook/Howard *Youth Centers: Preteen dance 7:30-10:30 p.m. tonight at Albrook. courtesyphoto Family game day 5-7:30 p.m. MonCurundu Junior High School Students of the Month pose with their certificates. day in honor of Military Family Week. Children can challenge parents to a variShimmey Beach trip 8 am.-4 p.m. Nov. 26. CURUNDU (Department of Defense Dependents Schools) -toward learning, show respect for their peers and teachers, Family trip to El Valle 6 am.-4 p.m. Curundu Junior High School recognized its first Students of the and are willing to help others. Nov.28. Month Oct. 28. Theprogramalsorecognizesthosestudentswhotakepride Closed Thanksgiving Day The purpose of the program is to allow teachers to recognize in themselves and their country. Taekwondo ongoing classes at students who strive to improve many aspects of their lives October Students of the Month include junior high stuHoward Monday and Wednesday and at academically as well as socially, thus allowing themselves to dents Lizelle West, Carmela Austin, Heather Hanson, Frank Albrook Tuesday and Thursday. Tots, become positive role models. Hinek, Jason Kacmarski, Katie McAleer, Tiffany Walters, $15 a month; adults and youths, $25 a The students who were selected are all involved in some Michael Kingery, Holly Holmes, John Medina and Camina mo and crafts 3 p.m. every Thursschool or community activity, possess a wholesome attitude Stevenson. aideout Teen Center Los Rios students Wet-n-Wild Pool Party 6-9:45 p.m. at theHowardpoolforages 13-19, $2.50. Transportation from and to Albrookprowin poster contest vided. Atlantic ,-LOS RIOS (Department of Defense Dependents Schools) *Espinar Youth Center: Fourth graders from Los Rios Elementary School won cash Turkey Tumble teen dance today prizes for their environmental ideas in a local art contest. $2. The art contest was sponsored by the local floral society Family Fun Fair all day Saturday at Circulo Floral de Panama. The contest theme was "Save the the Davis Community Club. 4Earth." Students from DoDDS and Panamanian schools Cooking class 4-6 p.m. every Moncompeted for cash prizes. day,$1.Bryan Larrabee, took third place. Cheryl Castro, Katie tudy with a buddy and tutoring 4Williams and Patrick Mans earned honorable mentions. 6 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays. They were presented with the checks by Isabel Altimiano Pre-teen birthdaypooipartyNov. 26, a Los Rios Elemetary employee and member of the floral $2. cortey oto society. Isabel Altamiano presents checks to Katie Williams, TheworksofartweredisplayedinOctoberatafloralshow Cheryl Castro, Bryan Larrabee and Patrick Mans. at the Marriott Hotel.

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~1HIiLU FitessTropic Times BD5 A ~ealth & FNov. 19,1993 Tobacco addictive as cocaine, but quitting is still a possibility powerful craving, irritability, and nervousness. by Capt. Steven G. Richardson Thesesymptoms donotoccurineveryonesoresearch24th Medical Squadon ers have created nicotine dependency questionnaires that aid physicians to predict who will suffer from withdrawal HOWARD AFB -In an effort to create a smaller, but symptoms. Characteristics that may indicate a nicotine moreefficient fighting force,preventivehealthissues have dependence include smoking a cigarette in the first 30 recently received arenewed emphasis. Plans for a"smoke minutes after awakening in the morning, difficulty refree" Air Force have already resulted in the banning of fraiming from smoking in non-smoking areas even for smoking in many work areas, and other areas have been relatively short periods of time, and "enjoying" the first slated to become smoke-free over the next several years. cigarette of the day more than any other. Other services have instituted their own plans. Aids to overcome this nicotine dependence include The goal is to reduce the number of active duty smoknicotine gum and the transdermal nicotine patch. These ers to four percent by the year 1998. In order to accomtreatments help those people who demonstrate a nicotine plish these goals, smoking cessation programs have been dependence by allowing agradual weaning of blood nicoinstituted at Gorgas Army Community Hospital and the tinelevels sothatthe withdrawalsymptoms can be avoided. Howard Clinic. The Rodman medical clinic is also planIt is important to realize that the nicotine patch is not ning on forming their own program to serve Navy personthe complete answer, because the behavioral and nel on Rodman. There has never been a bettertime to quit psychosocial aspects of tobacco dependence must still be than now. addressed. This is why every study performed to date Columbus discoveredtobacco, as wellas thenew world, shows that success rates forquitting go up withasmoking when he came to the Americas; however, smoking tocessation program in addition to the nicotine patch. bacco did not become wide spread until the 1880s when The behavioral component oftobacco dependence can the automatic cigarette-rolling machine came onto the be summed up as "habit." Behavioral cues can include a scene. ringing phone, driving a car, having a cup of coffee, or From there, the number of cigarettes smoked steadily any number of other activities that become associated increased to a peak in 1963 of 4,345 cigarettes for every with smoking a cigarette. man, woman and child in the United States. Although Fortunately, identifying these unwanted cues allows a this number and the percentage of smokers has decreased, potential non-smoker to avoid the situation completely or there are still approximately 46 million smokers in the at least provide a substitute for the cigarette during those Unites States, 76 percent of whom reportedly say that they high risk times. A smoking diary and group discussion would like to quit often are helpfulin identifying these habitual cigarettes. It is estimated that approximately 350,000 deaths per The third leg of the triad is the psychosocial depenyear in the United States can be attributed to smoking. denceon cigarettes.Manypeoplefeelenergized and smoke Each year some 17 million people attempt to quit smokmore on the job or when they feel a need to be more ing, of these, only 1.3 million succeed. creative. Others use smoking as a stores reducer to handle What is it that accounts for so many failures when the period of tension. data linking tobacco use to everything from lung cancerto By substituting an exercise program and employing heart disease has become impossible to refute? stress reduction techniques these potential hurdles can Researchers have discovered that smoking is a threealso be overcome allowing a smoker to free himself from fold addiction sometimes referred to as the Smoker's Trithis damaging coping mechanism. angle. This triangle includes a physical addiction to nicoSmoking cessation programs include four to eight oneQuit rates at one year range from 20 to 40 percent. tine, abehavioralorhabitual component and apsychosocial hour sessions which are held once a week. These courses Studies also indicate an increased chance of success with dependence. Any program that has as its goal the cessaprovide support group discussion, instruction in stress each additional attempt to quit smoking, so even a failure tion of smoking must treat each of these three areas. reduction techniques, diet and exercise instruction to precan still be regarded as a step in the right direction. Nicotine has been found to be as additive as alcohol, vent significant weight gain, continuing follow-up, and For more information regarding available smoking cocaine or heroin. This addiction to nicotine often maniphysician supervised use of nicotine gum or patches to cessation programs call, the Howard AFB Clinc, 284fests itself as withdrawal symptoms that may include a deal with each aspect of tobacco dependency ifindicated. 3014, or Gorgas Hospital, 282-5419. What's the key to Dipping quitting smoking? Kicking Chewing tobacco more addictive, you've smoked for years. Anytime Is a good time ew n to a c m re d itv to try to quit, but be prepared. After you make it through the first 2.4 hours, set ga o otsol : frtw ees-Ms more likely to cause mouth cancer people give up during the first two weeks because ehlik lyis c u t h can cer they are the hardest. by CMSgt. Tommy A. Roberts thrat is 50 times higher in dippers. After that, you'll know you can lve without Senior Enlsted Adwsor, Air Combat Command There are other little irritations that go along with cigarettes -If you take It one day at a time. dipping: gum recession, tooth decay, teeth stain, and Anytime you need help, there are a number of justplain bad breath. And by the way guys, girls ind sources, such as your local military medical LANGLEY AFB, Va.As Andy Rooney frequently oral tobacco use a really big "turn-off." Why do you facility or the American Cancer Society. remarks, "You know what makes me sick?." thinkvirtuallynowomendip? Support groups are beneficial, because most In my case, one thing high on the list is smokeless Don't kid yourself into thinking you can quit whenpeople can't quit alone. But it can be done, tobacco use. ever you want. Dipping is highly addictive. As amatbecause millions have quit. It always amazes me that normal, healthy, active ter of fact, many smokeless tobacco users say itis even young menwilinglyputawadof tobaccointheirmouths harder to quitthancigarettes because nicotine levels in A few quit tips with the argument that it's better than smoking! That's thebloodstream rise quicker and can be twice as high like saying it's better to get hit by acar than abus. They as cigarettes. both kill you just as dead. Holding anaveragesize dip or chewinyour mouth a Get rid of your garettes, ashtrays,lIghters In one Air Force study, 48.7 percent of Air Force for 30minutes gives youas much nicotine as smoking aM notches. You won't need them anymore. people who used smokeless tobacco had some type of four cigarettes. A two-can a week snuff dipper gets as Change your smoking routine. Leave the sores in their mouth from the product. These sores are much nicotine as a 1 1/2-pack-a-day smoker. dinner table right away; don't sit in your imokoften early warning signs of mouth cancer. On average, ie bottom line is that dipping is not a safe substiIng chair;" avoid the smoking areas at work. there are 30,000 cases nationwide. One third of them bite for smoking. If you are already a user, see your are fatal. And these sores don't come after years and health promotion office for help in quitting. If you Drink lots of liquids, except coffee and years of use. More than 50 percent of dippers develop haven't started ye, don't! alcohol. They can trigger the desire to smoke. problems within 33 years of habitual use. There are other great ways to get the mental boost Of course death doesn't always happen when you get found in dipping. Exercise, relaxation techniques and + When the urge hits, take a deep breath, a mouth cancer. You may only need minor surgery to eating right are just a few. hold It and slowly release it. The urge will pass. remove thesore-nobig deal. Butyou mightalso have You'll look better, smell better, feel better, and part of your tongue or throat removed! Cancer of the more importantly, it's the smart thing to do.

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B 6 Tropic Times e U Nov. 19, 1993 day. Call 289-6402 for details. noon-6 p.m. Fun fair featuring a raffle Aerobics 9:30-10:30 a.m. Monday Atlantic tours El Valle 5:30 a.m. Sunday. for a free trip. Wednesday and Friday. *Sundial Recreation Center: Panama City shopping 8 a.m. Nov. 5:15p.m.-USOshow featuring 50s and Beginners English 6:30-7:30 p.m. Wine and dine 4-9 p.m. Friday. 28. 60s rock-n-roll music by the Mar Dels. Monday and Wednesday. Panama City shopping Saturday. Jaz dance 4:30-5:30 p.m. Monday ElVale5:0 ~m Sndy.Fun fair Rec center news and Wednesday. Montego Bay, Jamaica Thursday Youth Services Anniversary celebra+Sundial Recreation Center; Piano 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. through Nov. 28. tion features activities all day Saturday at Horse shoe tournament, Saturday. Gymnastics and ballet 4:30-5:30 Panama City historical tour Nov. 27. the Davis Comnunity Club: Pool tournament, Saturday. p.m. Wednesday. Isla Grande Nov. 28. 7:30 a.m.-Family turkey trot and fun ThursdaysareWonderful,aprogram Karate 7-8:30 p.m. Tuesday and *Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: run, winners receive turkeys. for women, every Thursday. Thursday. Nombre de Dios, Viento Frio Satur9 a.m.-noon-Games for children. *Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: Guitar 5-9:30 p.m. Thursday. from t1 oNightly specials 5-9p.m. Tuesday Clytnthrough Saturday.A *NCO Club: *Howard Officers' Club: Puerto Rico Day celebration 9 p.m. Prime rib specials 6-9 p.m. every tonight features live music. Friday and Saturday. Scrumptious Sunday buffet 4:30Disco in the lunge every Friday 8 p.m. Sunday. Adults, $5.75, children evening. from to 12years old, $3 and children Tuesday night specials 6-9 p.m. under 5 eat free. every week. Country and western dance les Children's menu available 6-9 sons 7-9 p.m. every Sunday and Monp.m. Monday-Saturday. day in the Corral Lounge. Italian night Thursday. reedan Albrook/Howard Rodman *Albrook Club: *Anchoragze Club;:. Friday night specials every week. A la Carte dining 6-9 p.m., toSteak and seafood special 6-9 p.m. night. every Friday evening. Salsa Night6-9 p.m. Saturday,typi-~ XSeafood feast every Saturday cal Panamanian dinner, free dance evening, features combination seafood lessons, DJ music. platter. Pasta Night 6-9 p.m. Monday. Mongolian barbecue Monday Family Night 6-9 p.m. Tuesday. nights. Mongolian Stir Fry, $5.95. Monday night football, draft beer Country & Western Night, free and chili dog specials. dance lessons, 6-9 p.m. Wednesday. Mexican night every Thursday. All hands Thanksgiving Buffet at Thanksgiving buffet Thursday. the Rodman O'Club Thursday. Call Reservations are open to club mem283-4332/3040/5475forreservations. bers and required. Call during business *Chief Petty Officers' Club: courtesy photo hours. A la carte dining 6-9 p.m. TuesThe Mar D *Howard Enlisted Members' Club: day-Saturday. Allnightdiscotocelebratemilitary All-you-can-eat buffet lunch 11 The Fabulous Mar Dels and their high impact energy show will highlight the family week 8 p.m. Nov. 26 -5 a.m. a.m.-1:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. Directorate of Community Activities Fun Fair being held Saturday at the Davis Nov. 27. Breakfast served at 2 a.m. ei hts Community Club. The groupwill perform at 5:15 p.m. The group has been shaking Country and Western night Friup the party scene for nearly a decade performing for a variety of people from the days in the Casual Cove. *Officers' Club: Young Presidents Organization to the President of the United States. The group Family night 7-9 p.m. Monday. Closed for dinner Dec. 4. is lead by Doug Allen. The band combines rhythm and blues, soul, and music of X. All-you-can-eat-buffet. M-onaynigtbfootball on t Amador the '50s and '60s with humor, dancing, costumes and harmonious songs by two screndTfatu food, prizeb female vocalists. The Mar Dels have appeared with top names such as the Beach sRk n' Rol mic Thsdays in Sunday campagnebrunch 10:30 Boys, Rare Earth and Neil Sedaka. They have appeared at special events like the Casual Cove. a.m.-1:30 p.m. Super Bowls XXI and XXII. The Mar Dels were awarded Entertainers of the Year in 1984 and 1986, and Best Vintage Rock Band in 1984 and 1985. Brewery and locks tour 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesday, $4. *Valent Recreation Center: C ytnThanksgiving Chiriqui Highlands trip Wednesday Gloria's bazaar noon-9 p.m. today. Features *Valent Recreation Center: through Nov. 28. Includes airfare, hotel, Thanksgiving Christmas art and crafts. Portobeilo historical tour Saturday. dinner, tours and meals. Sign up by Tuesday. Puerto Rico Day celebration today-Sunday El Vaile Sunday. +Outdoor recreation: features live entertainment 6:30 p.m. today. Chiriqul highland tour Thursday through Nov. 28. Peacock bass fishing in Arenosa S a.m.-2 pm. Martial arts demonstration by Sensei Carlos' Corona Beach Nov. 27. Sunday, $25. Perez 3 p.m. Saturday. Contadora Nov. 27-28. Horseback riding in El Valle Nov. 27, $24. Riding Dollys collection display case noon Tuesday Shimmey beach Nov. 28. experience not neccessary. through Nov. 28. Craft sale 2 p.m. Thursday. Gorgona beach cabin reservations are available White water rafting in Costa Rica Wednesday Christmas Village 5-9 p.m. Dec. 2-3 and 1-9 through the center. through Nov. 28.Ride the rapids and tour San Jose.$475 p.m. Dec. 4-5. Features entertainment, photos with *Outdoor Recreation Center: includes airfare, transportation, tours, shopping, white Santa, vendors, refreshments, free admission. Indian Village snorkel trip Nov. 27. $25 for adults, water rafting and food. Registration deadline is today. Vendor registration is under way. Call the Pacific $15 for children under 13. Includes transportation, cayuco Ro ma Theatre Arts Centre at286-3 152 for more informaride, Chocoe Indian Village tour, optional inner tube tion. float down river. *Information. Tour atid Travel: *Zodiac Community Activities Cente: Chiriqut white rafting trip Nov. 26-28. $75 per Barro Colorado Island Saturday, $65. Visit the Instructor needed to teach sewing, ground person includes transportation, lodging, equipment, Smithsonian research island. school and Spanish class in the moming. guided tours and more. El Valle shopping/tour Sunday, $12. Shop at the *. *Cocoli Community Recreation Cente: The following tours can be set up at Building 154,Fort market,visit waterfall,natute garden, lunch at Coronado. Arts and crafts for children 3:30 p.m. every. Clayton for a minimum of four people: Chiriqul Highland tour Wednesday through Nov. Tuesday and Thursday. Snorkel/dive, canoeing/kay aking, hiking, Indian vii27. Starts at $185, includes transportation, hotel, meals Thanksgiving pool tournament 6 p.m. Saturlage, fishing, and tours. Registration deadline is today. day. Scuba Drake Island Dec. 2, 9, 23, $50. Includes Birthday of the month celebration 4 pm. Alro/oautransportation, equipment, dive instructors, lunch. Nov. 26. Features cake, ice cream, kool-aid. +Zodiac Community Activities Center: Panama City Shopping Dec. 4, $8. Shop Viaspana Family barbecue 2 p.m. Nov. 27 in honor of Chitre pottery shopping7a.m.-Sp.m. Saturday, $20. for Christmas presents. military family week. Bring a side dish.