Citation
The tropic times

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Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
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Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text


Gift of the Panama Canal Museum


Tropic


Times


Vol. VI. No. 41


Ouarrv Heights. Republic of Panama


Friday. Oct. 15. 1993


1*
i~L *.~. .


A'

'T. ~ �b


A'


Taking aim U.S. Army photo bySgltLoriDDi
Soldiers from the 193rd Infantry Brigade assault an objective during a live-fire exercise Oct. 8. See story and photos on page 3.


USARSO soldier shot
in Panama City club
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - A U.S.
Army South soldier was shot in Panama City Sat-
urday.
The soldier, SFC Hernando White, assigned to
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, U.S.
Army Garrison, was shot while in a club in
Panama City. A preliminary investigation indi-
cated that shooting had erupted in the club and
White was hit in the back while trying to reach
the front door.
He was driven to Gorgas Army Community
Hospital by a friend, where he underwent surgery
to remove the bullet. The soldier is in stable con-
dition, according to Gorgas officials.
The incident is under investigation.

AAFES auto store
manager shoots self
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Jeffrey
Weatherbee, manager of the Fort Clayton Auto-
motive Store, Army and Air Force Exchange Ser-
vice died Saturday as a result of a self-inflicted
gunshot wound.
The incident is under investigation.




Army's 193rd Infantry Brigade leads
more than a thousand soldiers into
the field for a training exercise.


Joulwan recaps progress,

SOUTHCOM's challenges


QUARRY HEIGHTS
(Tropic Times) - Gen.
George A. Joulwan, com- 71
mander in chief, U.S.
Southern Command,
leaves Panama today to as-
sume duties as Supreme
Allied Commander Eu- 1
rope and Commander,
U.S. Forces Europe.
Wednesday, during an
interview with the Tropic
Times and Southern Com-
mand Network, he pro- .
vided his thoughts about
the past three years and the Gen. George A. Joulwan
progress made by the command in the vital areas of na-
tion-building and counterdrug efforts.
"We set out some clear goals three years ago; we have
met or exceeded all of those goals," Joulwan said during
the interview. "What has impressed me the most is the
troops. They have taken some of the most difficult mis-
sions that I have ever seen in my 33 years in the mili-
tary."
The general assumed command of SOUTHCOM
Nov. 21, 1990, less than a year after the completion of
Operation Just Cause.



Presidential special envoy arrives in
Ethiopia to discuss conditions of
possible cease-fire in Somalia.


Now, for the first time in decades, all of Central and
South America are governed by democratic governments.
And with the end of the war in El Salvador, peace is be-
coming more and more common.
That was one of his first priorities upon taking com-
mand - bringing about a resolution to the 12-year-old
civil war in that country. It proved a success story very
quickly, and then Joulwan instituted other initiatives that
have brought SOUTHCOM and the region to where it is
today.
Joulwan will be honored at 9 a.m. today at a farewell
ceremony at Howard AFB. A replacement has not yet
been named.
What follows are his comments during a 20-minute
interview at Quarry Heights, the location of SOUTHCOM
headquarters.
You came to Panama at a critical time. What were
your views at the time about what needed to be done in
the Southern Command?
I think it's very important that as I look back three
years ago that it was one year after Operation Just
Cause...one of the first things I did upon arriving here
was to make an assessment. That assessment was sort of
accelerated by the fact that within the first 10 days of my
Continued on page 8.



*Domestic violence, page 2.
*Milestones, page 10.
*Navy basketball, page 12.


Mday, Oct. 15, 1993










2 Tropic Times
Oct. 15, 1993



. -2-2


Bible school teaches


children 'no fighting'


by Lt.j.g. Laura C. Moore
USNAVSTAPANCANAL PAO
RODMAN NS - Children at the Naval
Station Chapel recently learned about ap-
1 plying Biblical concepts to today's world.
Almost 50 children and 20 parent vol-
unteers of all denominations from the Rod-
man community participated in a four-
week, all-denomination Bible school pro-
gram, "Living in God's creation."
"The kids know
about the rain forest
x here and they know "It's a nice wE
about the pollution three years in
/problem," said Sue three years in
Robbins, the pro- see so many
gram's musical di- much fun and
, rector. "So, even
thoughitwassolong important thin
agoandinadifferent and creation
place, the creation
S story is relevant to Christ.
dayhereinPanama." Lt. William
Participantsinthe Ltaio
! ' Naval Station chE
Bible school also
. , : learned about how to
"�:treat other people.
S... ..."We learned about fighting. No fight-
....... , ing!!" said Samantha Cooke, age three.
-Her mother, Lt. Andrea George, said
V that even at such a young age, children
. learned a great deal from the Bible school
S program.
U.S. Navy photo by PH2 Roberto Taylor "Even at the age or three of four I think
Lt. William Wildhack, his son Evan (right) and Paul Eberenz play games during that they really internalized alot of what
Bible school. was going on," George said. "After learn-

Studies show domestic violence Sign


can be more than just physical year
hbv Mari-


by SSgt Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs

HOWARD AFB - October has been designated as Do-
mestic Violence Prevention Month, said Melody Jones,
family advocacy outreach manager for Howard's 24th
Medical Squadron.
A major study of more than 900 children at shelters
for battered women found that nearly half of the children
were victims of physical or sexual abuse.
The study showed that, usually, the man who battered
the woman also abused the child. In about a quarter of
the cases, both parents abused the child, while, in a few
isolated incidents, the mother was solely responsible for
the abuse.
"We need to make people aware of the dangers of do-
mestic violence, and let them know there are ways to deal
with it," Jones said. "We want everybody to be able to
recognize it and realize that violence does not have to be
a part of a relationship."
Domestic violence in the home can be directed at any-
one, man, woman or child, although it's usually the
women and children who suffer the most, she said.
"Domestic violence in any form is terrible, but it is
especially devastating when it affects the children," Jones
said.
Countless studies have shown that child abuse and
neglect are strongly linked to domestic violence, she
added. Battered women are eight times more likely to
abuse their children than women who are not exposed to
violence.
Children in homes where domestic violence occurs
can receive direct or indirect injuries, both physical and
emotional in nature.
"The children can receive physical injuries when
household items are thrown or when weapons are used or
when one parent strikes or pushes the other and the
abused spouse falls against the child," Jones said. "Older
children are often injured when they try to protect the
abused spouse.".
Other injuries can be on the psychological, rather
than the physical level. Maj. Cynthia Cain, family advo-
cacy officer for Howard, quoted studies that describe
some of the emotional effects domestic violence has
on children.


These include fear of abandonment, constant anxiety
(that another attack will happen), feelings of responsibil-
ity for the abuse and feelings of guilt at being unable to
stop it.
"Many of these children develop hearing or speech
problems as a result of the abuse," Cain said. "They often
get stress-related physical ailments like headaches, ulcers
and rashes.
"Also, studies have shown that children who grow
up witnessing domestic violence are more likely to con-
tinue the cycle as adults," she added. "Both grow up be-
lieving that violence is an acceptable part of relation-
ships."
The Family Advocacy program has information avail-
able for people who have domestic violence in their
homes, and for those who suspect it is present in a
neighbor's or a friend's home.
Often people don't want to get involved, Jones said,
"but that is a dangerous attitude to have. It's not only our
right to report suspected domestic violence, but it is our
responsibility - to ensure our community is a safer place
to live."
For more information about domestic violence, call the
Air Force's family advocacy program at 284-6410. For
information about Army programs, call 282-5139, and
for Navy programs, 283-4671.


aF

ki
1
g
ar



pap


ing a scene about fighting, Samantha rede-
scribed the entire incident to us without any
prompting and told us that fighting wasn't
nice."
Lt. William Wildhack, the Naval
Station's chaplain, said the program was a
success.
"The continuing theme, 'Livingin God's
creation,' was about taking care ofthe earth
and taking care of each other and learning
about relationships with each other,"
Wildhack said.
"Kids came away
y to finish out with a better idea
Panama to about the earth,
where it came from,
ids having so where they came
earning from, about their
place in God's cre-
Is about life ation and about the
nd God and beauty of the
Creator's world."
This Bible school
Wildhack program was the
plain sixthinthepast year.
plain Wildhack, who is
transferring next
month to an aircraft carrier, said he'll miss
the family environment at the Rodman
chapel.
"It's a nice way to finish out three years
in Panama to see so many kids having so
much fun and learning important things
aboutlife andcreation and God andChrist,"
Wildhack said. "I'm gonna miss the sense
of family that the Bible school helped create
here."


al soldiers continue

-round Christmas
7a PeAarce


USARSO Public Affairs Office
LAS DELICIAS, PENONOME - Christmas has
become a year-round-holiday for the soldiers as-
signed to the 154th Signal Battalion (Light).
The soldiers and family members frequently visit
with Las Delicias school children to assess their
needs and help them meet some of their most press-
ing necessities.
The year-long Christmas project turned out to
be a family project for both the U.S. and Panamani-
ans.
"For the soldiers, their family members and Las
Delicias townspeople, it means developing friend-
ship and exchanging gifts," CWO2 Fernando Perez
said. "The people of Las Delicias will not allow us to
come home empty handed. Bags of home-grown
vegetables and fruits await the soldiers."
The arrival of Santa's helpers means games, gifts
and refreshments for the parents and children of Las
Delicias and their guests.
This year the visiting soldiers replaced the
school's small, old refrigerator, put in a new roof
and ceiling and hung a new door on the dining
room. All the trips included bags of candy and
school supplies for the children.
"The courtesy and generosity we have been
blessed with is greatly appreciated," said Lelia
Lombardo, school director. "The ceiling reduces the
heat considerably and lowers the rain drop noise dur-
ing the rainy season."
"The greatest gifts, as far as the children are con-
cerned, are the radio/tape recorder and music and
English lesson tapes," Lombardo said.
During lunch time the children gather in the
school dining room and listen to music from the
United States and Latin America. They have learn-
ed to identify the music of different countries. The
children and teachers are learning to speak English
from the tapes.
"The majority of the 30 school children come
from families whose income is generated from sub-
sistence farming," Lombardo said. "The school sup-
plies, clothes and Christmas gifts come in handy for
a family of three or more children."
Lombardo and Perez agree that the joint year-
long Christmas program is a total success.











Tropic Times 3
Oct. 15, 1993


193rd Infantry leads way on field exercise

by MSgt. Joe Ferrare o- .
USARSO Public Affairs Office ,, "


EMPIRE RANGE - Soldiers here are getting a rare
opportunity to flex their combat muscle during a Field
Training Exercise that has more than 1,500 soldiers from
several different units spread out over more than 100
square kilometers of blooming pampa grass, muddy roads
and tangled jungle.
The 193rd Infantry Brigadeis leading the FTX, withthe
1st Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment and the 142nd
Medical Battalion playing major supporting roles. Other
Panama-based units supporting the 193rd Inf. Bde. include
the 154th Signal Battalion and the 549th Military Police
Company. Two stateside units are also taking part in the
exercise. Soldiers from the 108th MP Co. (Air Assault),
Fort Bragg, N.C., and the 408th Military Intelligence
Company say they are getting a feel for operating in
Panama while on temporary duty here.
Driving this force is a detailed exercise scenario that
includes attacking insurgents and otherthreats to the canal.
But many units are taking advantage of the field time to
accomplish other missions. The 154th is testing the new
Mobile Subscriber Equipment radios, while the 1-228th is
undergoing an Army Training and Evaluation Program
evaluation under the scrutiny of the 128th Aviation Bri-
gade. Almost all the units are training at the squad, platoon
or company level to show recently arrived soldiers how
local units operate or test new mission strategies.
Some of the training is only possible in a large exercise
like this, said 193rd Inf. Bde. officials, and everyone agreed
training many units together makes it more realistic.
"We are exercising pretty much all our battlefield
operating systems, with the exception of (Air Defense
Artillery) and field artillery," said Capt. Tom Moxley,
Assistant Operations Officer, 193rd Inf. Bde.
"This is where we take all the pieces and put them
together," he added.
That means more than units putting together the differ-
ent parts of their missions, said Capt. Edward Davis, 5th
Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment. It also means putting
together people from different units.
"You get all the support agencies to interact with each
other. Everybody gets to know each other and interact with
the person theywould interact within thereal world, so you
get to practice before the real thing, and that's important,"
Davis noted.
The infantry soldiers got to practice the real thing
several ways. Exercise planners put slightly different spin
on even mundane tasks, such as getting to the training area.
Some soldiers used the 1097th Boat Company landing
craft during their move while others flew in with 1-228th
aviators. Even some of those who came in vehicles took an
unusual route, convoying across the rarely used
Miraflores Bridge, the swing bridge in front of Fort
Clayton.
Once on the ground, the units spread out and began
tackling theirtraining missions. These too, were mixed up,
so units would train as a squad one day, and a platoon or
company the next. Soldiers cycled through the range's
objectives, which are areas supposedly held by enemy
soldiers. Sometimes the soldiers assaulted theobjectives by
air, sometimes on foot, shooting blanks against MP enemy
soldiers on one mission, shooting live rounds the next.
Such diversity can lead to good training or confusion.
Davis said skillful planning is what makes the difference.
"Weplan on what we're going to do before we come out
here, so we have a game plan," he said. "This is not the first
time for a lot of us, so most of us know what to expect, and
we know where we're going to be pulled to the wire and
where we're going to have lulls in the action, so there are
very few surprises once we get out here."
Making sure there are at least a few surprises is the
province of brigade IntelligenceOfficer Capt. Roy Worrall.
Worrall himself is rarely surprised by what happens next,
however: he's working for both sides.
"We're trying to play the full game as far as intelligence
is concerned," he explained. "Our job here (in the brigade
intelligence section) is to drive the intelligence scenario.
We do that by issuing out messages at certain points in
time.
"On top of that, not only do we drive the intelligence
picture, but Icontrolthe OPFOR, so I'mkindof dual-hatted
here, for this particular exercise," Worrall said.
Worrall, with the help of 1st Lt. Susan Pena and other
members of the 408th MI Company, is keeping everyone
busy.
"Objective Bayonet is where we actually have the MPs
playing the insurgents' role. They are also going out and
doing things such as ambushing convoys and probing
different (Tactical Operations Centers).
TheMPs'harassmentis anotherproblem for the 193rd's
infantrymen, who must already cope with the rigors of
going to the field in Panamaduring the rainy season. Water


Spec. Jodi Herrera drives on to the rarely used Miraflores Bridge.


U.S. Army photo by SSgt. Jane Usero
Sgt. Jaime Tudor (left), Headquarters Company, 142nd Medical Battalion, reassures his "patient" Spec.
Darren Heard, as fellow medic, Spec. Gregorio Quintero helps him to a field ambulance.


-in the form of rain, sweat and heavy canteens -is the
infantrymen's biggest concern, but far from their only one.
Bugs, skin problems such as prickly heat, and vegetation
like the thick pampa grass and sharp black palm all plague
infantrymen who are routinely pushed to the limit to
practice their wartime mission.
"You could be a world class athlete and get ti "x out
there," said PFC William Schuler, B Company, 5- 7th.
Some of the reasons are bad footing in muddy ten..in,


alack of sleep and the heat, which exacts a double penalty,
said Spec. Paul Ham, a team leader with B Co. 5-87th.
"We start out with 11 quarts of water, (and) it's pretty
heavy," Ham reported. "We carry enough to make it until
theyresupply us. Ifwe wereto gopastthatwe'vegot (water)
purification tablets.
"We're very safety oriented - drink the water, drink
the water - but you can only drink so much water per
hour," Ham said.










4 Tropic Times
Oct. 15,1993


aHemisphere


Ruben


Blades:-

Ross Perot

of Panama?
PANAMA CITY (Reuters) -
Salsa star-turned-politician
Ruben Blades, Panama's suave
answer to Texas billionaire Ross
Perot, hopes a wave of disen- 1
chantment with Panama's tradi-
tional politics will carry him
straight to his country's presi-
dency.
Blades, 45, a singer-actor who
lived in the United States for the '
last 20 years, has led every seri-
ous opinion poll this year on who
Panamanians would vote for in
the 1994 presidential elections. 4
And the Papa Egoro move- ..
ment he founded and named after
a Panamanian Embera Indian
term for Mother Earth is virtually '
certain to nominate him as their
presidential candidate next
month. ' 4
"I am going to be nominated '
most likely in November. I am
going to accept the nomination,"
Blades told Reuters in an inter-
view Thursday. "We (Papa :-
Egoro) exist because people said - '
'we're going to give you life be-
cause we believe that you can
come up with something different
from these dinosaurs over here."
Most of the polls have given
Blades about 20 percent support
to win the presidency - double Ruben Blades, Par
his closest rivals, who are all from
Panama's traditional oligarchies.
"The Blades vote is undoubtedly a negative vote, a vote
against the elite, but it's there all right and I think it could
take him to the presidency," said political analyst Marco
Gandasegui.
Panama's May 1994 elections are intended to seal its
transition to democracy after the December 1989 U.S. in-
vasion that ousted former dictator Manuel Noriega and
installed the current government of President Guillermo
Endara.
If Blades does not make any alliances, his main oppo-
sition is likely to come from the Democratic Revolution-
ary Party which backed Noriega's regime and the current
ruling coalition.
Should he win, Blades would take office in the
president's Palace of the Herons in the same poor neigh-
borhood of Panama City where he grew up. But he has no
romantic illusions about the job.
"I'm sorry to tell you that it's not as if, like, coming
out of the ghetto I dreamt of the day that I would be walk-
ing and my footsteps would echo in the halls of the Pal-"
ace of the Herons," said Blades, who left Panama City


namanian presidential candidate. Courtey photo
for New York "with $100 in my pocket" in 1975.
He is buoyed by the opinion polls, but worried about
raising expectations before mobilizing the funds and
manpower needed for a successful election campaign.
"It's great to be on top," he said "(but) I don't want
to elevate people's expectations and then drop them and
then have somebody tell you that I'm a publicity seeker."
Blades said Papa Egoro had prepared a draft mani-
festo for the 1994 elections based on months of grassroots
consultations with Panamanians. "I believe in consen-
sus. I don't want to be sounding off my mouth like 'I
think you should do this' and 'I think you should do that',
I don't believe in that," he said.
On Panama's most controversial policy issues, Blades
said he wanted less emphasis on repaying the nation's $6
billion foreign debt and dismissed speculation of renego-
tiating the withdrawal of 10,000 U.S. troops by 1999 be-
cause "they are going to leave, they have been very clear
about that."
He said Panama's priorities were to overhaul outdated
and inadequate health, education, judicial and infrastruc-
ture systems.


Colombians investigate bombing


BOGOTA, Colombia (Reuters) - Police and army au-
thorities started an investigation Oct. 9 into three bomb
attacks in Bogota overnight that killed two policemen,
injured 27 others and damaged buildings.
Commanders put security forces throughout this city
of six million on maximum alert and reinforced patrols
checking for suspicious objects or movements.
The most serious attack was in the residential
Chapinero district, where three men in a parked car deto-
nated a bomb by remote control Thursday night as a bus
drove by carrying more than 30 policemen to a change of
guard.
The blast wrecked the bus, killed two of the police trav-
eling inside, injured another 27 officers and caused panic
among nearby residents, a city police spokesman said Fri-
day. On Thursday night, police had said three officers
were killed in the blast.
Just over an hour later, bombers struck again in two
different areas of the city. An explosion shook an empty
registry office building near the center while in the


Teusaquillo district men in a passing car threw a bomb at
an office used by the campaign of leading Liberal Party
presidential candidate Ernesto Samper.
The later two blasts shattered windows in a wide area
and alarmed residents of nearby buildings but did not hurt
anyone seriously, police said.
Gen. Octavio Vargas Silva, deputy head of the national
police, told reporters after the attacks that it was too soon
to speculate about who might have planted the bombs. He
added, however, that the evidence pointed to "organized
crime," which local media interpreted as meaning either
Marxist guerrillas or drug traffickers.
Medellin police Wednesday night shot dead Alfonso
Leon Puerta, a close collaborator of cocaine king Pablo
Escobar.
Local media speculated that Thursday night's bomb-
ings might have been ordered by Escobar in retaliation
but police said that although not impossible, it was un-
likely the Medellin cartel boss would have had sufficient
time to organize the attacks.


Honduras seeks doctors
to break medical strike
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras (AP) - The Hon-
duran government said Oct. 8 it is seeking doc-
tors from Cuba, Guatemala, Nicaragua and
Panama to break an 8-day-old strike by 2,200 pub-
lic health physicians.
Public Health Minister Ramon Pereira said he
had spoken by telephone with officials in nearby
countries "to substitute professionals from those
countries, at the opportune moment, for the strik-
ing doctors."
There was no word on the response he re-
ceived.
The strike began Oct. 1 and has paralyzed work
at the 26 government hospitals.
The doctors average about $6,800 a year and
are demanding a 55 percent increase. The govern-
ment has offered 25 percent.

Melon-sized dinosaur egg
found in northern Mexico
MEXICO CITY (AP) - A melon-sized dino-
saur egg 75 million years old has been discovered
near the northern state capital of Chihuahua, the
daily Excelsior reported Friday.
Paleontologist Rodolfo Fierro Chavarria said
the egg belonged to a critosaur, an amphibious di-
nosaur that once thrived in the region.
The egg went on display Friday in the Paleon-
tological Musuem of Chihuahua.

Ecuador government uses
jungle for oil exploration
QUITO, Ecuador (AP) - The government will
put up about 6 million acres ofjungle and offshore
territory for oil exploration starting Jan. 24, En-
ergy Minister Francisco Acosta said Friday.
The tender is part of a plan to attract private
investment in the oil industry to boost Ecuador's
declining crude reserves.
Acosta told reporters the deadline for bids
would be April 25, and that the contracts would
be signed by next October.
Included are eight blocks comprising just un-
der 4 million acres in the Lago Agrio jungle re-
gion, 110 miles northeast of Quito.
Four offshore blocks on Ecuador's Pacific
Coast will also be tendered.

Honduran officials request
U.S. aid for flooded region
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras (Reuters) - Hon-
duras Sunday requested logistical aid from the
United States to transport food and medicine to
the remote Mosquitia region, which has been dev-
astated by floods.
"We have asked for, and it is almost certain it
will be given, aid from the U.S. Embassy to trans-
port emergency food supplies to Mosquitia," Hon-
duran Vice President Roberto Martinez told re-
porters.
"We need helicopters to send the food supplies
to areas that have lost their harvests due to heavy
rains caused by Tropical Storm Bret and Tropical
Depression Gert, which have affected the region
in the past two months," he said.
Press Minister Olman Serrano said the airlifts
would also carry agricultural tools and seed to re-
plenish lands affected by the flooding.
Serrano said a ship with 100 tons of food and
medicine donated by CARE International would
arrive this week in Mosquitia, but that helicopters
were needed elsewhere to distribute the supplies
to the towns.
The jungle region of Mosquitia is inhabited by
indigenous Misquitos and Sumos who live in re-
mote areas accessible only by air because of treach-
erous mountain and river passes.
Since 1983, the United States has maintained
some 1,200 soldiers equipped with helicopters and
planes at the Palmerola base in the central depart-
ment of Comayagua.











t Military News


Tropic Times 5
Oct. 15, 1993 5


&r n. rwrotO
President Bill Clinton talks with Secretary of State Warren Christopher and Vice President Al Gore.


Special envoy in Ethiopia may


arrange Somalia cease-fire


ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia (Reuters) - President
Clinton's special envoy to Somalia arrived in Ethiopia Oct.
9 to push attempts to arrange a cease-fire with fugitive
Somali warlord Mohamed Farah Aideed.
Diplomats said Robert Oakley was carrying a message
from Clinton for Ethiopian President Meles Zenawi re-
questing he take an active role in trying to mediate an end
to the crisis in his Horn of Africa neighbor.
U.S. diplomats said Oakley was trying to negotiate a
cease-fire in exchange for a U.S. commitment to suspend
efforts to capture Aideed.
"There are discussions under way but it would be
incorrect to say that any deal has been struck," one U.S.
official told Reuters, adding: "I doubt if anything is likely
on this before tomorrow (Saturday).
"There would be a cease-fire and the United States
would agree to suspend its efforts to apprehend Aideed,"
said the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity.
In a sharp reversal of policy, Oakley is expected to push
Meles to set up an international inquiry into violence in
Mogadishu blamed on Aideed.
The U.S. and U.N. have until now insisted Aideed be
brought to justice to answer charges he organized the June
5 killing of 24 Pakistani peacekeepers.
Meles, who has already chaired several attempts to
promote a peace accord between warring Somali factions,
was mandated by the Organization of African Unity last
May with trying to mediate a long-term solution to the
country's crisis.
Last month, other Horn of African states urged him to
step up his efforts and try to defuse growing tensions
between U.N. forces and Aideed's gunmen.
Fighting between Aideed's militia and U.N. forces


effectively stalled aplanagreedto inAddisAbabain March
to try and set up a transitional council with representatives
of the 15 main Somali factions.
Oct. 7 Clinton announced that he was sending an
additional 5,300 U.S. troops and nine warships, including
the aircraft carrier Abraham Lincoln, to Somalia under a
get-tough plan to suppress guerrillas in Mogadishu while
pressing for a political settlement.
He stressed a move away from violent confrontations
with Aideed, whose guerrillas are blamed for most of the
violence against U.N. forces first sent to Somalia last
December to assure relief reached hundreds of thousands
of starving Somalis.
Clinton instructed Oakley, who led diplomatic efforts
for apolitical solution in Somalia earlier this year, to return
to Mogadishu to resume his drive.
A Pentagon spokesman said the U.S. troops and war-
ships heading for Somalia might be used to try to rescue a
captured helicopter pilot "if the opportunity presents
itself."
Elite U.S. Army Rangers might be used to try to rescue
pilot Michael Durant, captured last Sunday in a battle with
Aideed supporters that killed 15 U.S. troops and wounded
more than 50.
The Pentagon official, who asked not to be identified,
said U.S. troops would not try to start battles with Aideed's
forces. But he refused to rule out the use of force, including
bombing by Navy planes, if the Somalis picked a fight.
U.S. forces also knew where Aideed arms caches were
locatedinotherareas ofSomalia. Thesecould bedestroyed
by laser-guided bombs - there were about 250 on the
Abraham Lincoln - ifAideed's followers started trouble,
the official added.


Court rejects


gay legislation
SANFRANCISCO(Reuters)- An appealscourt
dealt a blow to the Clinton administration's policy
on homosexuals In the military Friday, letting
stand a lower court order barring discrimination
against gays in uniform.
A three-Judge panel of the US. 9th Circuit
Appeals Court rejected a series of motions filed by
the government in an attempt to block or overturn
a far-reaching order by U.S. District Judge Terry
Hatter barring discrimination against gays in the
military.
The decision means that, unless the govern ment
takes further legal steps, Hatter's order will re-
main In effect at least until a full appeal of the case
Is heard by the 9th Circuit Appeals Court in
December.
John McGuire, an attorney for a gay sailor at
the center of the legal dispute, said that, for now,
the Clinton's administration's new "don't ask,
don't tell" policy on gays in the military is not in
operation.
Clinton's policy, which says that no action will
be taken against gays in the military provided they
say nothing about their sexual orientation, was
reached after months of debate.
"'Finally, the DepartmentofDefense will now be
given an opportunity tolmplementapoicyof non-
discriminationandseethat it works fine," McGuire
told Reuters.
McGuire said he had spoken to Petty Officer
Keith Meinhold, the gay sailor who challenged the
government's ban, and said that both he and
Meinhold were very happy at the court's decision.
Thousands pf service members have beendis-
charged over the last 50 years for homosexuality.
Hatter ruled In Los Angeles last week that the
military cannot discriminate against gay or les-
bian service members or recruits and threatened
Pentagon officials with flnesof up to$10,000 a day
if they violated his order. Hatter had earlier de-
clared the ban on gays unconstitutional.
The government quickly asked the appeals
court for an Immediate stay of Hatter's order and
for its scope to be limited to Meinhold and not
applied to all service members.
The government said Hatter'sorder would bar
implementation of Clinton's policy and seriously
interfere with management of day-to-day military
affairs.
But the appeals court threw out all of the
government motions in a one-page order which
gave no reasons for Its decision. "The motions for
an immediate stay and for summary reversal .. are
denied," the court said.
The Clinton administration has said it will
comply with Hatter's order, pending appeal. It
ordered the Pentagon last week not to take "based
solely on a service member's homosexual orienta-
tion or statements of homosexuality."
It did not exclude action on the grounds of
homosexual conduct However, Hatter's order
permits action by the government only in the case
of sexual conduct that is proven to interfere with
the military mission, McGuire said.
That conflicts with the "don't ask, don't tell"
policy, which states that gays and lesbians in the
military may be dismissed for saying openly they
are gay.


Clinton faced with tricky foreign policy problem in Haiti


WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Already facing severe
difficulties in Somalia, President Clinton is now grappling
with another tricky foreign policy problem in Haiti.
A painfully negotiated political accord to restore de-
posed President Jean-Betrand Aristide to power by the end
of this month seemed in trouble Monday after Aristide's
enemies staged a violent demonstration which prevented
200 U.S.military trainers from disembarking.
Clinton reacted by delaying the troops' landing, unwill-
ing to plunge American soldiers into another unpredictable
Third World conflict. The similarities to Somalia seemed
all too obvious with the anti-American demonstrators
themselves drawing the comparison in their chants.
Secretary of State Warren Christopher quickly warned
Haiti's military leaders, who are due to leave the Caribbean
country within days to allow Aristide's return, they could
facerenewedUnited Nations sanctions unless they're able


to put the peace plan back on track.
"We believe that the current situation does not justify
docking the ship at this time," he said. "We insist that the
Haitian military and police authorities create a permissive
environment andpermit the peaceful entry into Haiti of the
military engineers, trainers and support staff that are there
to help the people of Haiti."
Sanctions including an oil, financial and arms embargo
were suspended Aug. 27 with the proviso they could be
reinstated if the Haitian military failed to live up to an
accord it signed on Governor's Island, New York, on July
3.
The plan always looked somewhat shaky since it essen-
tially depends on Haiti's current leaders voluntarily giving
up power and leaving the country.
Aristide was Haiti's first elected president in 1991.
However, several months after his election, he was


deposed and forced into exile.
Clinton's political opponents were quick to seize on the
issue as another weapon to hurt the president.
"This is a repeat of Somalia. We send in a very small
force of very lightly armed Americans who may get shot
at," said former assistant secretary of state Elliott Abrams.
"Are we sending in our soldiers to do nation building
again? It will take 50 years ... Reconciliation is the answer
to this, not American troops."
But Rep. Charles Rangel (D-NY) said Clinton had to
stickthe course. He said the majority of Haitians supported
the restoration of Aristide and the opposition consisted
only of a few score thugs.
"We're the leader of the free world, it's the poorest
country of the hemisphere and we have a moral obligation.
We have an obligation to the United Nations," Rangel
said.


.4
* 'I









6Tropic Times
Oct. 15,1993


* Voices


Annoyed snack bar patron protests noise


Dear Mayors' Corner:
The video games in the snack bar at
Albrook are extremely loud, repetitive and
annoying. They preclude conversation or
a nice enjoyable snack.
Why can't they either be moved to the
outside porch area, or at least have the vol-
ume turned down.
This is another example of business es-
tablishments allowing a few (the video pa-
trons) to dominate and infringe on the
rights of everyone else.
Our family has stopped patronizing
this snack bar because of this situation.
Disgusted former customer

Dear Disgusted:
Stanley G. Johnson of the Army and
Air Force Exchange Service reports that
the volume on the video games in the


I Myos'Cone


snack bar at Albrook AFS have been
turned down as you requested.
Taking this a step further, they have
decided that the video games will not be
turned on before 9:30 a.m. in order that
customers can enjoy a quiet time to have
breakfast.
Johnson also said that they apologize
for any inconvenience you may have ex-
perienced.
If you have further concerns please feel
free to contact their office at 286-3640/
3857.

Dear Mayors' Corner:
The Albrook package store requires me
to sign for purchases of O'Doul's "non -


alcoholic brew" and charges it against my
beverage entitlement as standard beer.
I have protested to the manage-
ment and been told that regulations so re-
quire.
This procedure flies in the face of the
DoD policy which encourages use of non-
intoxicating beverages.
I resent, as a matter of principle, that
my purchase of non-intoxicant is recorded
as though I were purchasing an alcoholic
beverage.
I strongly recommend that the Albrook
procedure be promptly modified to con-
form to DoD policy and common sense.
Respectfully,
C. Paul Ake


Dear Mr. Ake:
Viola C. Rodriquez, retail manager
Albrook Class Six, reported that you
should not be required to sign for "non-
alcoholic brew." The supervisor in charge
has been informed of Department of De-
fense policy and appropriate changes have
been made. Rodriguez apologized for any
inconvenience you may have experienced
and hopes this will not happen again.
Editor'snote: Thiscolumn allowscom-
munity members to submit questions to
the Mayoral Congress. Letters should be
mailed to: Mayors' Corner, Publicity
Chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS).
Anonymity will be granted upon request.
The Tropic Times reserves the right to
edit letters and responses for brevity,
clarity and propriety.


Thief nets $120 from unsecured briefcase


Thief steals $120
One-hundred-twenty dollars was stolen from a
soldier's unsecured briefcase last week. Military police
recommend securing all valuables. If a victim of crime,
call the MPs at 287-4401.

Vagrant given 30 days in jail
A vagrant got 30 days in jail by a Panamanian judge
for unlawfully entering the Balboa High School stadium.
An investigation revealed the vagrant had been barred
from all military installations. Report suspicious activi-
ties to the MPs at 287-4401.

Soldier writes bad checks
A Fort Davis soldier was arrested last week for writ-
ing 14 bad checks totalling more than $2,200. The checks
were written at an Army and Air Force Exchange Service
facility. Writing bad checks is an offense punishable un-
der the Uniform Code of Military Justice. Call the Army
Community Services Office at 285-6517 for checkbook
management help.

Halloween safety
Halloween trick-or-treating will be observed 5-8 p.m.
Oct. 30. Officials recommend carrying flashlights, wear
reflective clothing and take an adult along for the fun.
For those wearing masks, be sure vision isn't hampered
and have an adult check candy before eating it.

Unauthorized phone calls
More than $700 in long distance telephone calls were
made illegally using a soldier's calling card number. Re-
port the loss of any credit card immediately.

Anonymous drug hotline
Call the Panama Jack Anonymous Hotline at 285-
4185 with any information about drug smuggling.

The following crime statistics are for on-post hous-
ing areas Oct. 1-7.
Pacific
Corozol housing area - one larceny of secured private
property
Cocoli housing area - one housebreaking and larceny of
secured private property
Curundu housing area - one larceny of secured private
property


I . Pro os M rs al' 0C rn r


Atlantic
None to report


This authorized unofficial command information pub-
lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic
Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces
Information Program of the Department of Defense, un-
der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S.
Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the
official view of the U.S. government, the Department of
Defense or the U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Telephone
285-6612.
Commander in Chief..............Gen. George A. Joulwan
Director, Public Affairs................... Col. James L Fetig



STropic Tim


Chief................................................SMSgL Steve Taylor
Editor....................................SSgt Deborah E. Williams
Assistant Editor...........................................SgL John Hall
Sports Editor...................................Sgt. Richard Puckett
Editorial Staff..........................................Sgt E.J. Hersom
Rosemary Chong
Maureen Sampson
Volunteer Assistant..................................Josephine Beane
Student Intern...................................Juan Carlos Palacio
Southern Command Public Affairs Office..........282-4278
Deputy Director, Public Affairs...Cmdr. Lorri Gilchrist
Command Information Officer..............Patrick Milton
Public Affairs Supervisor.............MSgt Mike Howard
U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.............287-3007


Public Affairs Officer....................Maj. Melanie Reeder
Command Information Officer.................... Beth Taylor
Editor..................................................SSgt. Jane Usero
Journalists...............................................Sgt. Lori Davis
Spec. Robin A. Mantikoski
24th Wing Public Affairs Office.......................284-5459
Public Affairs Officer..............Capt. Warren L. Sypher
Public Affairs Superintendent.....MSgt. Dale Mitcham
Journalists...................................SSgt. Rian Clawson
Sgt. James A. Rush
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.............283-5644
Public Affairs Officer................Lt.j.g. Laura C. Moore
Photographers...............................PH2 Roberto Taylor
PH2 Delano J. Mays
U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic...........Call USARSO
Public Affairs










'Commentary


Tropic Times 7
Oct. 15, 1993


Field shows how the other side hoochess'


by MSgt Joe Ferrare
USARSO Public Affairs Office

As a public service, I'd like to give
everyone a little something to think
about the next time they're standing
next to the Old Sarge in front of the
main exchange, waiting for the rain to stop so
they can dash the 50 yards to their cars.
There's no theme here, no moral and
certainly no message (this ain't Western
Union). Just a slice of somebody else's life
that's food for thought:
Spec. Paul Ham isn't a big guy. Trim and spare, he
has sharp features and a small moustache obscured by
sweat-streaked face camouflage and helmet-matted
hair.
Ham and the other infantrymen in his squad are
sitting under a building's overhanging roof. The
overhang offers a thin line of relief from the
afternoon's blazing sun, but scant hope of shelter
from the rain that's turning the approaching clouds
that heavy, inevitable blue so familiar late in the rainy
season.
Not that Ham and the others are worried about
getting wet: they're still soaked from a live-fire
assault they've just finished. Sweat and slick mud
fight over every inch of their uniforms and exposed
skin. The gear that sits in little piles around them is
as filthy and ragged as they are, and after they clean
and refit the next mission will get them and their gear
filthy and ragged again.
These are not guys whose biggest uniform worries
are holes burnt around their buttons at the cleaners.
These guys are why the Army has a Tropic Test Site,
why it spends millions on uniform design and testing.
I'm at Empire Range talking to Ham and the
others about their day, trying to get a few colorful
words for the article on page three. I've been out to
(and, importantly, back from) the field a couple of
times to cover the exercise, and what I've gotten in
addition to some photos and pithy quotes is a sharp
jog to the memory: this field duty is even tougher
than I remember it.
But I've pretty much gotten over the memory jog,
and I'm starting to take it for granted again. I ask the
obligatory training questions and get the obligatory
great-training answers. These guys appreciate the
need for tough training, and they treat it matter-of-
factly. To get to the objective of their live-fire exercise
they had to go through what Ham calls "a couple of
obstacles."


Those couple of obstacles are two different
concertina wire barriers and a bunker. I'd seen other
infantrymen cutting through concertina wire the day
before, and it's a grueling, dangerous couple of
minutes even when there aren't live rounds flying.
Concertina wire, in case you don't know, is little
razor blades strung along hoops of twisting wire like
the devil's very own Christmas wreath. One soldier
cuts his way through it with wire cutters while his
buddies cover him.
Ham tells me how they cut through the strands and
cleaned out the bunker, but he might as well have
been talking about shoveling out the driveway before
running to the store for milk and eggs. But by now
I've gotten used to how they talk about what they do. A
long string of events involving ankle-
deep mud,acloudofbugs,impassable
pampa grass, live ammunition, split-
second teamwork, limb-threatening "The test
maneuvers and more sweat and Thtest
physical exertion than a whole of the dri
company of soldiers would put out
during an hour of physical training -Lo
becomes a phrase these Afterthc
infantrymen toss off casually: "We
just stayed in our lanes, cleared the barriers and took
the objective."
I take all that in and, just to get something other
than good-training quotes, I ask Ham about the living
accommodations.
"So what have they got you sleeping in, tents?"
They all chuckle. The 193rd Infantry Brigade is a
light infantry unit, and for Ham and the rest that
means no tents on field training exercises like these.
"We put up poncho hooches," Ham explains.
"Hooch" is slang for any ramshackle dwelling, but for
people familiar with a poncho, using one for more
than a sun shower is a stroll down misery lane.
A poncho is essentially a big waterproof sheet
with a hood and drawstrings, and a soldier wearing
one looks like the ghost of dryness past, hovering
like a mottled lump in the daily downpour. What
ponchos lack in actual ability to keep the rain off
they make up for by being aggravating and
cumbersome.
And these guys string them up in the middle of the
trees and blooming pampa grass so they can sleep in
relative dryness after a long day of assaulting
obstacles and marching up and down hills.
This too, Ham and the others toss off matter-of-
factly: "We put up poncho hooches."
"Don't they give you guys shelter-halves?" I ask.


I
�f
u
g
OPU


"Sure, we get all that stuff, but we don't use it,"
Ham says.
I'm sure it's nice to get up in the morning and roll
your shelter into something the size of your forearm,
but I don't know if I could stretch a poncho to cover
all my hopes of a good night's sleep.
All this kind of takes my by surprise, because,
while I've been around the infantry before, I've never
been around light fighters. I've been around the
mechanized infantry, with their Bradley fighting
vehicles, and the infantry in Berlin, where they
concentrated (naturally enough) on in-city fighting.
But in Panama they fight light. I'd visited the
brigade's tactical operations center earlier in the day,
and was struck with how small it was. Two yuppie
couples on a weekend
camping trip would take
up more space than the
193rd's staff was using
a vocation is the love to control the
dgery it involves." movements of more
than a thousand people.
lan Pearsall Smith Among those people
ghts are Ham and his fellow
squad members, who
break out their Meals, Ready to Eat while we're
talking. They go through them as methodically as
they do everything else, trading seemingly identical
brown packages and spreading mystery condiments
on crackers. They're in the middle of their meal when
they get the call to head for the After-Action Review.
They don't complain or hesitate, because after the
AAR they'll get their much coveted down time. As
soon as they stand up it starts to rain. No one seems to
notice much except me.
I catch a ride back to the base camp with the
captain who's been taking me around and it's raining
all the way back.
Driving away from the base camp, which is
between the Pizza Hut at Rodman Naval Station and
the Veterans of Foreign Wars post in Cocoli, the rain
peters out and stops just down the road from where
another soldier is getting wet standing guard. Behind
me it's still raining, and clouds and pelting rain
obscure the hills farther off, about where Ham and the
others are.
Just ahead the sun is shining on Rodman NS and
Howard AFB and I remember what my drill sergeant
told us when we asked why soldiers can't use
umbrellas.
"It doesn't rain in the Army," he explained. "It
rains on the Army."


Do people appreciate the hardships military people suffer?


- /


"Yes, they undergo a
lot of trouble for our
community and the
American people."



Sabine Thompson
Army family member


"Not as much any-
more. They take a lot
of things for granted
and are quick to react
to (the opinions of)
television."
Pvt.2 Jarrett Logan
Army military policeman
194th MP Company


"I think so, people see
they do the best they
can do. Those guys
work hard."



Orlando Del Vasto
Civilian employee
106th Signal Brigade


"They take for granted
what we do. They have the
idea that we will always be
there."



Air Force SSgt. Kevin Brown
Electronic engineer
Southern Command Network


"No. They would
rather have you in the
field than in their
house."



Sgt. Eric Troxier
Army Infantryman
Company A, 5/87th


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries - or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit
for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.


Dil�ect Quotes












Tropic Times
Oct. 15, 1993


Joulwan: Troops, families most



important to SOUTHCOM mission


Continued from page 1.
arrival here in Panama, throughout the
theater, we had three coups, an insurrec-
tion and a war occur.
This forced a re-evaluation of what our
mission was all about. How do we go
about assessing that mission? And what
sort if strategy can we come up with to
use the assets that we do have to the
best advantage? And so, as we look-
ed around the area, the 19 countries of
the Southern Command, not only here in
Panama, but from Guatemala to Chile,
what I came up with was that there were
some clear priorities that we had to ad-
just.
We had an on-going war in El Salva-
dor that had been going on for 12 years,
killing tens of thousands of El Salvador-
ans. How do we address that war? What
is it that we're looking for? Is it a negoti-
ated settlement? (If) so, how can we bring
that about? How can we assist other agen-
cies that are involved?
I was very concerned in this assess-
ment with the Treaty Implementation
Plan for Panama. Really, not much had
been done since the treaties were signed
and during those 12 years we had not
made much progress in coming up with a
plan to implement the treaty. So that was
part of that assessment.
Equally important to me was the
counterdrug effort. We had many, many
agencies involved from our government,
and host nation involvement. I really
didn't see an operational plan on our part
on how we can best support those agen-
cies in what I considered to be this vital
mission.
As I came into Panama three years ago
these were the sort of challenges that faced
us - that I thought needed to be ad-
dressed.


What sort of progress has been made
since then?
What we ended up doing immediately
was confront the war in El Salvador, the
escalation by the communist insurgents of
the fight there. They introduced very so-
phisticated surface-to-air missiles, SA-
14s, and shot down three or four El Salva-
doran helicopters and planes. This was a
clear escalation of the fight, so we had to
make some early-on decisions on how do
we demonstrate the United States' com-
mitment and resolve in El Salvador?
The command got directly involved in
that. Trainers from the 24th Wing and
from our other components provided as-
sistance to the El Salvadoran armed forces
and President Cristiani. We surged some
logistical equipment, some planes and he-
licopters, into El Salvador in January of
'91, even with the large flow of equipment
going into Desert Shield. So the realiza-
tion by Washington that this was an im-
portant mission for us was very clear.
This was the tuning point in that war.
It was a clear sign of our commitment -
we were not going to abandon El Salva-
dor. That led to very real successes on the
battlefield for the El Salvandoran armed
forces, to the human rights arena, and to a
peace accord with the FLNM. Since then,
there's been compliance with the peace
accords and we've watched El Salvador
and the El Salvadoran armed forces tran-
sition from war to peace.
I'm very pleased with that. It's been a
great accomplishment for, I think,
SOUTHCOM, the United States, but par-
ticularly the El Salvadoran people.
There seems to be an increased inter-
est in mutual cooperation between
SOUTHCOM and other militaries from
the region? Why is that?
Part of this assessment I talk about said:
How can we engage with the militaries of


Central and South American in a way that
can assist in strengthening democratic in-
stitutions? How can we work with them
as partners and allies, as members of a
profession that has the goal of supporting
democracy. And as I said so often, our
role is not just equipment and training, but
to impart ideals and values. What is the
role of a military in a democratic political
institution?
We are subservient to civilian control.
We respect human rights. And I think we
need to have that professional dialog with
the militaries of Central and South
America - and we have.
I think that dialog has been welcome
by the military professionals and we have
seen a substantial change in the relation-
ship between the militaries and the civil-
ian leadership in Central and South
America.
Counterdrug efforts have become a big
priority at SOUTHCOM. Why and what
progress has been made in stopping the
illicit flow of drugs?
We need to understand the dimensions
of this threat. And I call it a threat be-
cause perhaps we confuse the drug dealers
on the streets of New York or Washington
or San Francisco as the drug threat. It's
really much more than that. This is a huge
criminal network that has its roots in our
region down here, in the Andean region
and particularly in Columbia. And they
are pumping out hundreds of metric tons
of a chemical called cocaine that is inflict-
ing casualties on the United States, coun-
tries in this hemisphere, and indeed, if not
the world.
Last year alone, we had in the United
States 10,000 killed as a result of cocaine.
Not Somalians, not Bosnians, but Ameri-
cans. In the last three years, some 900,000
crack babies were born in the United
States. Drug dependent at birth. We're not


From Gen. Colin L. Powell, from Gen. George


A. Joulwan, to the people of SOUTHCOM...


really sure how they're going to develop,
what problems this chemical dependency
will cause them.
As a result of all that, the health care
and other associated costs with illegal
drugs, in the United States, according to
Health and Human Services, was $168 bil-
lion last year.
We're taking casualties. So I really
made that a top priority because of the
threat it has to our citizens, and also the
threat it poses to the fragile democracies
of Central and South America. It's like a
cancer that's eating at these fragile de-
mocracies we're trying to strengthen. So
the host nations have got to realize that
it's their sovereignty that's being violated,
it's their police and military and judges
being corrupted, it's their children that are
being addicted, and it's their democracy
that's being threatened.
What I've tried to do is work with them
in defending their sovereignty, their de-
mocracy, and I've asked for their demon-
stration of national will against this narco-
trafficker.
And I think one of the things that's
pleased me over the past three years is that
we have seen this national will emerging,
and not just from one country, but from
the entire region, from the political lead-
ership, from the military, from the police,
from the people themselves who now un-
derstand the threat the narco-trafficker
poses to their counties, to their citizens,
and to their children.
Another initiative of yours was the
Treaty Implementation Plan. What's the
status of that plan?
Let me be very clear. My instructions
are to implement the Panama Canal
Treaty. That treaty calls for us to have all
the military out of Panama by noon of 31
December 1999. We have developed a
plan to do that, and it has already started.
We will drawdown gradually...we are
working very closely with the Panamani-
ans in order to ensure success. We want
them to be successful and we are working
very hard in doing that.
I'm very optimistic that the Panama-
nian side will be successful. That's a very
importanrtpart of the plan. But we need to
be very clear about what my instructions
are. There's been some talk about a pres-
ence after the year 2000. That is between
the government of Panama and the gov-
ernment of the United States. Not with the
CINC (commander in chief). And it's at
those levels that those discussion have to
take place.
But I owe it to the command here that
we're not going to knee-jerk out of
Panama. We're going to have an orderly
transition out and we have a plan to do
that, and my successor will inherit that
plan and will continue on with that imple-
mentation.
Looking toward the future, what do you
think are the most important challenges?
As we look to the future, the
counterdrug effort needs to be regional-
ized. We need to develop this mutual trust
and confidence between all the nations of
the region. We are seeing that, by the way,
between the Andean countries of Colum-
bia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia. They are now
working together, sharing information.
They have found out they have much more
in common than differences. What they do
have in common is a clear threat to their
people and their sovereignty from the
narco trafficker. The regionalism, I think,
needs to be developed and we see that de-
veloping in the Andean region. We also
see that happening in Central America.
. The challenge is how can we help these
democracies to continue to transition in
a way that provides freedom and justice
and prosperity for their people and creates
the conditions for stability without re-


open Letter to the Troops and their Families:
I would like to share with you a letter from our
most recent chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. It
is addressed to me, but it is meant for every man and
woman in the BOUTHCOM family. I join a great soldier
and leader, General Colin L. Powell, in saying thanks
to you by expressing how grateful I am for your
service to our country.
I am sharing this letter with you because it is
about you. It is you who've done all the hard work,
contributing so much of your energy and intellect to
help further the goals of the United States in this
vital part of the world.
As I leave the United States southern command and
the great people who serve here, I want to say thank
you for the countless sacrifices all of you have made
for your country. I thank you for the hard work,
numerous and long deployments, and family separations
you have endured in making all this a reality.
Each of you -- military, civilian and your
families -- gave equally to make our efforts
fruitful. Mrs. Joulwan and I wish the best for every
member of the SOUTHCOM team. Thanks troops!
ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!
Sincerely,

u vwan
/ GenetaLU.S. Army
Commander in chief


*I.WASHINGTON., D-C.2O3"..99
30 September 1993


General George A. Joulwan. USA
Commander in Chief
US Southern Command
Quarry Heights, Panama
APO AA 34003
Dear George,
As I depart the chairmanship and retire from our beloved
Army, I want to let you know how much I have appreciated your
support and counsel over the almost 3 years you have been the
CINCSOUTH. He could not have managed without you.
These have been truly historic times. We have seen the
Berlin Hall come down, East Europe freed, and the Soviet Union
fade into the history books. There has been a war in the Gulf
and our men and women In uniform have been asked to respond to
some 27 crises around the globe. In the meantime, the most
fundamental restructuring and downsizing of our Armed Forces
since World War II was begun.
Less heralded, but equally dramatic and historic have been
the happenings in Latin America -- so many.democracies formed;
so many hopeful beginnings. Most important, however, were the
thwarted attempts at derailing democracy. However fragile, we
still have elected civilian leaders In countries where it was
somewhat doubtful that civilian leadership could survive. You
and the great men and women of the US Southern Command have
played a major role in this success story, as well as In a host
of other accomplishments In the region. I am very grateful,
George, for all you've done.
Please pass on my deepest thanks to everyone in your
command--military and civilian. Alma and I wish you and Karen
all the best in the days ahead.
Hith warmest regards,
Sincerely,


COLIN L. POWELL
Chairman
of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff










Tropic Times
Oct. 15, 1993 7


I nearer suppon imenipnoi oy spec. oerfl Meines
Sgt. Timothy Ruiz comforts a Honduran girl as she awaits medical care during Exercise Cabanas II - '93. Humanitarian and nation-building missions were a
top priority for SOUTHCOM components while under the command of Gen. George A. Joulwan.


averting back to the old regimes.
The challenge is that the military,
which in many cases is the strongest insti-
tution in the nation, feels a part of that pro-
cess, that it's an institution within a de-
mocracy. And I must tell you that in my
conversations with the leadership with
most of the militaries in Central and South
America that they want to play that role,
that what they need to do is support demo-
cratically elected presidents. We're see-
ing that.
I'm optimistic that this trend will con-
tinue.
You will soon be Supreme Allied Com-
mander Europe. What sort of challenges
do you see for yourself.
Again, as I've told my staff here, I can
only have my head in one game at a time.
I am totally commiued to the command of
SOUTHCOM till the' day I ilea, which


will be Friday (Oct. 15). After that, I'll
start thinking about duties as Supreme Al-
lied Commander Europe.
What we are doing here is so very, very
important. It's a new way of looking at the
use of the military in supporting and
strengthening democratic institutions. It's
working with ambassadors, with other
agencies of government, in working with
the United Nations. I think we need to in-
stitutionalize that here. I'll look to my du-
ties as Supreme Allied Commander Eu-
rope after Friday.
On a personal note, how do you feel
about your job here, your tour here ?
I must tell you that the last three years
have exceeded all my expectations. We set
some clear goals three years ago; we have
met or exceeded all of those goals. What
has impressed me the most is the troops.
They have taken some of the most diffi:


cult missions that I have ever seen in my
33 years in the military. They've taken
these difficult missions and have per-
formed them superbly. We have forces
deployed in just about every country in
Central and South America today in some
of the most difficult terrain, under some of
the most difficult circumstances. These
troops, Army, Air Force, Navy, Marines
and dedicated civilians are doing those
missions extremely well and representing
our country extremely well.
The really important people in this
command - that's the troops and their
families. I'd just like to say to them how
very much I've appreciated their support,
their loyalty, their commitment, and their
dedication to our mission here.
I particularly want to single out the
families, the family members and the
spouses, whose husband or wife or father


or mother deploys all over this theater in
small groups many times each year. There
are separations involved with this, but the
quality of life that we try to provide here
in Panama is, to me, very important.
I just want to say to those families and
family members how very much I appre-
ciate their commitment and their support.
And I also want to speak about the re-
lationship between the American commu-
nity and the Panamanian community. It
is very important. I would hope that the
members of the military who are here or
who will come here will reach out to our
Panamanian friends and get to know them
and work with them. We're all Ameri-
cans - North, Central and South. We
share the same hemisphere.
There's no more important place to be
right now in building and strengthening
democracy than here in Panama.










1 Tropic Times
10 Oct. 15, 1993


'*Milestones


To Major - Maria Rivera, U.S. Army Medical Activity -
Panama.

To Captain - John Cuellar, U.S. Army Medical Activity -
Panama.

To Master Sergeant- Leroy Cantrell, U.S. Army Medical
Activity - Panama

To Sergeant First Class - Alphonso Banks of U.S. Army
Medical Activity - Panama. John Bertschy of Company A,
193rd Support Battalion.

To Sergeant - Chris Merida of U.S. Army Dental Activity
- Panama. Reginald Johnson of Headquarters Company,
193rd Support Battalion. Thomas Stimac of Company A,
193rd Support Battalion.

To Private First Class - Christopher Glomboski of U.S.
Army Dental Activity - Panama.




Legion of Merit Medal - Sgt. Maj. AnthonyFord of 106th
Signal Brigade.

Army Meritorious Service Medal - Spec. Walter Bell,
U.S. Army Medical Activity - Panama.

Joint Service Commendation Medal - STM3 Donald R.
Fisher of U.S. Navy Security Group Activity - Panama.

Army Commendation Medal - Spec. Charles Mims of
U.S. Army Medical Activity - Panama. Sgt. Jack Bevel of
Company'C, 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry. SSgt. Jeffery
Hatzenbuhler of Company A, 193rd Support Battalion.

Navy Commendation Medal - CTACM Franklin E.
Henry of U.S. Navy Security Group Activity - Panama.

JointService Achievement Medal-CTI2RobertB. West
of U.S. Navy Security Group Activity - Panama.

Army Achievement Medal - Spec. Fred Lucas, Spec.
Stanley Ryel and Spec. Quinn Haynes, all of 3rd Special
Operations Support Command (Airborne). SFC Robert
Barnett, SFC Keith Braxton, SSgt. Dwight Giles, Sgt.
Kevin Ray and Spec. Keith Felts, all of Company B, 193rd
Support Battalion. SSgt. Larry Dixon, Spec. Darrell
Bourque, Spec. Thomas Irvin, Spec. David Parsons and
Spec. Seth Vanover, all of 565th Ordnance Detachment,
193rd Support Battalion.

Navy Achievement Medal - GMN1 (SW) William S.
Nichols of U.S. Navy Security Group Activity - Panama.

Employee of the Quarter - Maj. Carlos Parrado, Capt.
Danny Devier, SFC Willie Cosby, SSgt. Washington
Cevallos, Spec. Aron Partsafas of U.S. Army Medical
Activity - Panama.

Army Good Conduct Medal - SFC Michael Czupryn,
Sgt. Christopher Doucet, Sgt. David Cansler, SSgt.
Frederick Watson, Spec. William Harris, Sgt. Darrin
Pearceson, Spec. Trevor Wicks and Spec. Hector
Gonzalez, all of Company C, 1st Battalion, 508th
Infantry.

Navy Good Conduct Medal - CTRC Vernon A. Davison,
LN1(AW) Krystal A. Jackson, CTM2 Noel E. Crowley,
CTM2 Samantha D. Baldwin, CTM3 Steven R. Graham,
CTM3 Timothy W. Lanham, all of U.S. Navy Security
Group Activity - Panama.

Certificate of Achievement- SSgt. Richard Cardin, SSgt.
Kourtney Lee, Sgt. Angel Burgos, Sgt. Andrew Brooks,
Sgt. Ronald Hardman, Spec. Edwin Brown, Spec. Michael
Frank, Spec. Richard Thomas, PFC Jose Diaz, PFC James
Pierre, Pvt. 2 Andres Arredondo and Pvt. 2 Kenneth
Diprete, all of Headquarters Company, 193rd Support
Battalion. Spec. Scott Belson, Spec. Henry Dinapolis,Pvt.
2 Anette Houston and Spec. John Hooten, all of Company
A, 193rd Support Battalion. Spec. Adrienne Johnson, SFC
Christopher Hall, Sgt. Ronnie Kuhl, Sgt. Paul Lance, Sgt.
Angela Richardson, Spec. Jean Bedquet, Spec. Russell
Dilley, Spec. James Leep, Spec. Argelis Melendez, PFC
Robert Baltz and PFC Jeffrey Welk, all of Company B,
193rd Support Battalion. Spec. Daniel Fagot, SSgt. Wil-
liam Kirkman, Sgt. James Brown, Spec. Christopher
Bishop, Spec. Jeffrey Brown, Spec. Frank Valdez, PFC
Jennifer Schalk, Spec. Everett Graham and PFC Christo-
pher Rudy, all of 565th Ordnance Detachment, 193rd
Support Battalion.


Primary Leadership Development Course Graduation
Spec. Timothy Singo of 3rd Special Operations Support
Command (Airborne).

Sgt. Alijah Brown of Headquarters Company was selected
193rd Support Battalion Noncommissioned Officer of
the Quarter. Spec. Adrienne Johnson of Company B was
selected 193rd Support Battalion Soldier of the Quarter.



Performance Award - Cynthia Speed, Grace Waters,
Vincent Tapia, Sara Busquets, Rosario Gil, Victgoria
Navarro, Angela Saez, Evelia Hinda, Elna Dawkins, R.
Dias Jr., Elvira James of U.S. Medical Activity - Panama.

Length of Service - 25 years: Ruby Varcacia, Albert
Nation. 20 years: Rafael Ipina, Elizabeth Goldstein. 15
years: Franklin Almengor. 10 years: Arian Garcia. 5 years:
Julia Barnabas, Fernando Guerra, Gina Cuesta, Luis Mo-
rales of U.S. Army Medical Activity - Panama.

Promotions- DahliaMinott,ElsaBermudez,JudithPerkins
of U.S. Army Medical Activity - Panama.

Employees of the Quarter - Barbara Yeider, Arana
Guiliermo, Susan Omlin, Eustace Matthews, Aracely
Aguilera of U.S. Army Medical Activity - Panama.

Quality Step Increase - Cristina Beech, W. Kieswetter,
Stella Unger, Niccole Erickson, Priscilla Alderete, M.
Ave-Ballemant of U.S. Army Medical Activity - Panama.


DanielleAndrea, toLt. CoL David andAdrianaGruenbaum
Sept. 7.
Sean Matthew, to SFC Paul and SSgt. Kim Danek Sept 7.
Louis Abraham mII, to Capt Louis and Linda Wootton
Sept. 9.
Dustin Robert, to PFC Gerald and Erynn Ditzenberger
Sept. 10.
James Daniel, to Spec. Scott and Lisa Renaud Sept. 12.
Trevor James Jr., to SSgt. Trevor and Kathy Kearns Sept.
13.
Beau Nathaniel, to SgL Byron and Nicole Lane Sept 14.
Brittany Dawn, to SSgt. Robert and Rosangela Fox Sept.
14.
Israel Orlando, to Jeffrey and Lia Farnham Sept 14.
Eduardo Samuel, to SSgt. Jose and Consuelo Concepcion
Sept. 14.
Keegan Michael, to Christopher and Misty Nelson Sept.
14.
Kendra Tiante', to Sgt. Joseph and Gwendolyn Ramos,
Jr. Sept. 19.
Stephen Earl, to Spec. Stephen and Yandra Jackson Sept.
22.
Dylan Michael, to Sgt. Michael and Holly Reams Sept 22.
AnnaLillian, to SSgt Brian and Valerie Francois Sept. 25.
Amber Dawn, to Spec. Terry and Velkis Boss Sept. 26.
Timothy Ryan, to SSgt Tim and Sherry Brown Sept. 26.
Brittney Fay, toEN2Anthony and SylvanneSims Sept 28.
Brennan Lee, to Spec. Brennan and Isabel Fox Sept. 28.
Katherine Carrnela, to TSgt William and Judith Ann
Brasham Sept. 28.
Dmitri Joseph, to Spec. Frank and Antoinette Gatto Oct.
1.
Ariana Marie, Oct. 5 to Spec. Norman andRobin Johnson.


New Sergeants Major use teamwork


COROZAL (USARSO PAO) - One is the head of
operations and intelligence office, the other heads logistics
operations for the 41st Area Support Group. One wears a
drill sergeant's badge, the other Airborne wings. One
seems quiet spoken and more reserved, the other has been
labeled "the clown of the office."
These differences palein comparison to what these new
sergeants major have in common.
From sharing the same promotion date of Oct. 1, 1993,
to closingin faston 20 years service each, to the hyphenated
last names, to sitting a stone's throw away from each other,
Sergeants Major Maria Allsopp-Hansel and Mary Angelo-
Roberts work together like a well-oiled machine.
With a playful punch in the shoulder, Roberts pulls her
chairuptoAllsopp'sdeskto compare stories ofthepastand
plans for the future.
"From the very beginning of my career, I have always
said I wanted to be Sergeant Major of the Army," Roberts
said.
In total agreement, Allsopp added that they would not
only bethefirstwomenbutalso the firstco-Sergeants Major
of the Army.
"When we make it, we'll make it as a team," Roberts
added with a smile.
It was this typeofenthusiasm that has carried bothtothis


point in their careers. Though they took different paths,
the drive was the same.
"Ifyoudon'tcutyourselfshort, neverthink you'llnever
make it and take advantage of the options now open to you,
you will make it," Allsopp said. "You have to accept the
challenges. How are you going to move forward if you
don't accept the challenges?" she added.
Roberts agreed 100 percent.
"There are so many more options available today," she
said. "You have to take the initiative, go to the schools and
don't be afraid totalkto those people youaspireto belike."
With the options now open in today's military, espe-
cially those for women, Roberts and Allsopp feel today's
soldier has an advantage and should take it
"Back in the early '70s when we came in, it was a
constant fight against many barriers and stereotypes,"
Allsopp said.
Becoming airborne qualified was one such barrier
Allsopp broke early in her career. Though she broke the
barrier, no woman has broken herrecord of nearly 20 years,
three of which were with the Golden Knights, close to
1,000 static line and 1,500 free fall jumps.
"It was difficult for men back then to accept a woman
for her accomplishments," she said. "There was always
some other reason other than you were good at your job."











Rtotpourri


Tropic Times 1
Oct. 15, 1993


Office closures
The Ammunition Supply Point One at
Rodman Naval Station will be closed for
inventory next week.
The Optometry Clinic at Howard AFB
will be closedWednesday and Oct. 27 and
Nov. 1. Clinic personnel will be doing vi-
sion screenings at Diablo Elementary
School.

Navy Ball buses
Two shuttle buses will be providing
rides to the Navy Ball at the El Panama
Hotel, Saturday. Buses will leave the Ma-
rine Exchange parking lot 5 and 5:30 p.m.
Buses will return from the El Panama Ho-
tel at 9, 10, 11 p.m., midnight and 1 a.m.
For those living in housing, the bus will
drop people off at their home.


Fall bazaar
The Albrook Officers'-Spouses' Club
fall bazaar will be at Albrook Club Satur-
day 10 am.-3 p.m. Local wares, Christ-
mas goods and other items of interest from
all over the world will be offered. There
will be park and ride shuttle service from
the Albrook post office to the club.

IG Office
The U.S. Army South Inspector Gen-
eral Office - Atlantic is located in Build-
ing 32, Room 1, Fort Davis. The hours
are 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday and 9 a.m.-3
p.m. Tuesday if Monday is a holiday. The
telephone number is 289-3966/3975.

Alcohol/drug course
An alcohol and drug coordinators'
course will be held Monday-Friday. This
course certifies active duty soldiers as
ADCs for their units and prepares them to
help commanders with the Alcohol and
Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Pro-
gram. For more information, call 285-
5419/5913.


Red Cross courses
The American Red Cross will hold the
following courses: community first aid
and safety course 6-8:30 p.m. Tuesday-
Thursday and Nov. 16-18; and community
first aid and safety course for instructors
6-10 p.m. Oct. 25-28. To register or for
more information, call 287-6306.


Chapel lecture
The Fort Clayton Protestant Women of
the Chapel will sponsor a lecture series 9
a.m. the last Thursday of each month at the
Fort Clayton Chapel sanctuary. There will
be a country crafts fair and pie tasting.
Bible study is also offered for women
andchildren9a.m. eachThursdayin Build-
ing 156, Fort Clayton.


Bilingual seminar
The quarterly bilingual marriage
preparation seminar, sponsored by the
Family Life Chaplain, will be held 9 a.m.-
3:30 p.m. Saturday in Building 156, Fort
Clayton. To register, call 287-5877/3497.

Skate night
The Fort Clayton Elementary School
will host a skate night 6:30-8:30 p.m. Sat-
urday in the school's playshelter. Permis-
sion slips are required. Admission is free
for Fort Clayton Elementary students and
.25 cents for all others.

Shoppette hours
The Army and Air Force Exchange
Service shoppette in Building 519, Fort
Clayton, is now open ' a.m.-10 p.m.
daily. The shoppettes at Fort Clayton
Plaza and the Curundu gas station are
open until midnight daily.

Consumers Week
Army Community Services will cel-
ebrate National Consumers Week, Oct
24-30. A seminar will take place 9-11:30
a.m. Oct. 27 at Directorate of Civilian Per-
sonnel Training Center, Building 6523,
Corozal. There will be a special display at
Fort Clayton Library, Oct. 24-30 and an
Essay Contest at Balboa High School. A
free drawing at the Corozal Main Ex-
change will be held 3-4 p.m. Oct. 29. Win
a trip to Miami for two, local weekend
trips and more. For more information, call
285-5556.

Orientation tour
There will be a "Welcome to Panama"
orientation tour 7:45 a.m.-2:30 p.m.
Thursday at Club Amador. The tour in-
cludes briefings, information tables set up
at the club and a tour of Panama City. A
bus will provide transportation from
Valent Recreation Center, Fort Clayton.
To register or for more information, call
285-6518.


OCS board
There will be an Officers' Candidate
School board for Adjutant General Opera-
tions Branch 9 a.m. Oct. 22 in Building
128. Applications must be at AG Person-
nel, Room 51, Building 519, Fort Clayton,
by today. For more information, call 287-
6313.


Book sale
The Howard Library will hold a fall
book sale 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday on the
landing outside the library. Proceeds will
contributeto thepurchase of audio compact
discs to add to the library collection. For
more information, call 284-6249.


Hiring opportunities are limited because of budgetary constraints. How to apply:
For temporary positions submit a SF-171, DD214 if claiming veteran preference,
a copy of college transcripts if claiming education and a copy of Clerical Adminis-
trative Support Position notice of rating if applicable. For permanent positions
(only for current employees including leave without pay) submit a SF-171, a
copy of latest S F-50, a copy of college transcripts, a copy of your last performance
appraisal and a statement addressing the job related criteria contained in the
announcement.
For more information regarding vacancy announcements (forms required, job
related criteria, etc.), visit the Directorate of CivilianPersonnel, Building 560, Room
306, Corozal, or call 285-5201.
VB# VACANCIES TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 10-15-94 CLOSE. 10-
26-94
Pacific
001-94-JH Administrative Services Assisant (OA), NM-303-6. Sensitive. Per-
manent employees only
002-94-KF Budget Assistant (OA), NM-561-5.
003-94-NC Social Service Representative, NM-187-8. Selectee will be required
to complete satisfactory background investigation.
004-94-VL Library Technician, NM-1411-6. Temp Nte: 3-31-94. Limited to


Dog show
The Club Canino de Panama will hold
an International and National Dog Show
noon - 9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the
ATLAPA Convention Center. Admission
fee is $2.50.

Weight management
A weight management class will be
conducted 2-3 p.m. Tuesday at the
Howard Education Center. Some of the
class topics will be exercise, supermarket
savvy, nutrition and dieting myths. For
information, call Donna Giroux, 284-
3014/6157.

Cholesterol class
The monthly cholesterol reduction
class will be held 8-9 a.m. Wednesday at
the Howard Clinic. To register, or for
more information, call Donna Giroux,
284-3014/6157.

Free MARS grams
Free MARS grams are offered by the
Howard Military Affiliated Radio Station.
Messages may be sent 7 a.m.-4:30 p.m.,
Monday through Friday, to family and
friends in the continental United States or
U.S. territories. For more information,
call 284-5164/5264.


EFMP meeting
An Exceptional Family Member Pro-
gram parent support group meeting will
be held 7-8:30 p.m.Thursday at the
Howard Enlisted Club. For reservations
and more inforamtion, call 284-6410/
6457.

Equipment rental
The Howard Morale Welfare and Rec-
reations Services Sports and Recreation
Rental Centeris offering weekend specials
that include: two board games and afrisbee
for$3;rent2 or 3 gallonsofwater/beverage
cooler, the center will provide the ice. For
information, call 284-6107.


Job opportunity
The U.S. Army Garrison Safety Office
is looking for a part-time contract motor-
cycle safety instructor. Candidates must be
qualified by the U.S. Motorcycle Safety
Foundation. For more information, call
287-4051.


Sacred Heart Chapel
The Sacred Heart Chapel is offering
Sunday massesinthree different languages:
English 7:30 a.m.; Chinese 11:30 a.m. and
Spanish 5:30 p.m. The chapel is located in
Ancon. For more
information, call 262-3076.


MEDDAC/DENTAC temporary/permanent employees and all veteran eligible
candidates.
518A-93-LA Legal Clerk (OA), NM-986-5. Anyone who applied under VB#:
518-93-LA need not re-apply.
Atlantic
005-94-SS Guidance Counselor, NM-1704-9. Selectee must complete a satis-
factory background investigation.
Note: VB# 592-93-JH, Employee Relations Specialist, NM-230-7/9/11, is not
limited to permanent employees only.
The Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting applications on a continu-
ous basis for the following positions. These announcements are used to establish
registers for future vacancies.
VB# 001 * General Clerical, NM-3/4 (Used to fill most clerical positions)
VB# 002 * Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Itennittet wk sdi)
VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) Requires Cert + 6 mths
recreation exp.
VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (req 6 mths of recreation exp.)
VB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5/6
VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5/6
VB# 007 Medical Officer, NE-12/13/14
VB# 008 Clinical Nurse (RN license required), NM-9/10/11
VB# 009 Practical Nurse (LPN license required), NM-5
* CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is required.


Flgtscheul


Q. Why is there a$16 fee for space
available passengers on the Freedom
Bird?
A. Stations overseas must collect a
$16 Federal Inspection Fee from all
originating international space avail-
able passengers on Category B mis-
sions.

PP: Tourist Passport
TC: Tourist Card
V: Visa
PC: Proof of Citizenship
US: United States Passport
Holders Only
CC: Country Clearance
RON: Remain Overnight
All flights on this schedule are
subject to cancellation. For addi-
tional flight information, call the Pas-
senger Service Section, 284-4306/
3608/4857.


Saturday
1:55pm C5A Howard AFB, PN
Charleston AFB, SC
Dover AFB, Del.
Sunday
No scheduled departures
Monday
7:30am B727 Howard AFB, PN
Charleston, SCIAP
Commercial contract
1:55pm CSA Howard AFB, PN
Charleston AFB, SC
Dover AFB, Del.
Tuesday
4:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Howard AFB, PN
5:40am C141 Howard AFB, PN
Lima, Peru
Santiago, Chile
La Paz, Bolivia
Howard AFB, PN
Wednesday
5:40am C141 Howrad AFB, PN
Brasilia, Brazil
Montevideo,Uruguay
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Brasilia, Brazil
Howard AFB, PN


RON


RON




V

RON/V


6:45am C141 Howard AFB, PN Medevac
Kelly AFB, Texas
Charleston AFB, SC


Thursday
7:55am C5A Howard AFB, PN
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Charleston AFB, SC
Kelly AFB, Texas
9:55am C141 Howard AFB, PN
San Jose, Costa Rica
Guatemala City, Guatemal
Belize City, Belize
Howard AFB, PN
OcL 22
4:55pm C141 Howard AFB, PN
Charleston AFB, SC


RON



RON


A


I















Sports


Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


M 24th SPS spotless in playoffs


U.S. Ar Force photo by Sgt. James A. Rush
Patrick Bukley of the 310th Airlift
Squadron shoots over the 617th Airlift
Support Squadron's Ken Schortgen.

Roadrunners


By Sgt. James A. Rush
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - After three days of
playoffs, the top two intramural basketball
teams fought their way to the winners'
bracket finals.
The 24th Security Police and Supply
squadrons faced offOct. 12at the gym here.
The security police have two post-sea-
son wins under their belt to extend their
spotless record to 23-0.
TheAmericanLeague's bestteam didn't
play the National League's Supply during
the regular season.
Their first playoff win came at the ex-
pense of the 24th Communications Squad-
ron Oct. 6, but it was far from an easy one.
Mike Owens led the security police with
22 points and teammate Juniour Davis was
half as good with 11.
Communications got a big boost from
one of its big guys, Bill Evans. Rather than
taking it into the key where Owens lay
waiting, Evans launched shots from the
perimeter. He finished with 18 points, half
of these coming in bursts of three.
A strong defensive effort kept commu-
nications in the game. Halftime saw the
cops holding onto aslim 17-16lead. Owens
proved to be too much of a tiger to hold by
the tail as he came alive for 15 points in the
second period to boost the final score to 40-
35.
Game two for the cops failed to provide
the same excitement. The 1/536th Engi-
neering Battalion couldn't contain thepow-
erful SPS offense. Once again, Owens led
the way, this time with 21 points. Bernard
Hodges added 12 more and Dale Carnell
and Carlos O'Key each contributed 11.
The engineers tried a gameplan unchar-
acteristic for the Army. Instead of battling
in the trenches down low, they simply
bombed Air Force style from three-point
range.
Unfortunately for the soldiers, only
Darrin Hardiman was on target.

win - U


Intramural League,

will play interservice

by Lt.j.g. Laura C. Moore
USNAVSTPANCANAL Public Affairs

RODMAN NS - The Roadrunners bested seven other
teams to win the Intramural League Championship at
Rodman Oct 6. The team will represent the Navy in the
Interservice Basketball Tournament this month.
The Roadrunners came from behind to beat the Naval
Operations Center Shockers 62-56 in the final game, an
exciting finale to the two-month season.
Coach Ken Simmons of the Military Sealift Command
said, "Even though we were down by twelve points, I never
lost faith in the team. I told the guys to keep their heads up,
tighten up the defense and turn up the offense a notch, so
then we can get back in the game.
"The second half started off with the Roadrunners
causing turnovers andscoring easy baskets, which allowed
the Roadrunners to get backinto the game. The whole team
deserves credit for their hard work and good hustle to win
the best record in the League," said Simmons.



Bulldogs nearly lose their half of
first place by squeaking past the
Red Machine.


Five of his six treys hit in the second half
and he finished with 18.
Supply finished its regular season sched-
ule only one game worse than the security
police at 20-1.
It was the hot hand of Darryl "Dawg"
Kimble that kept them from realizing their
secondloss ofthe season as they opened the
playoffs against the 24th Air Intelligence/
Operations Support squadrons' team.
The "Dawg" was rabid in the second
half scoring all 12 of his team-high 12
points in the period leading his team to the
52-49 win.
Despite Kimble's hard work, AIS/OSS
still outscored Supply in the period 35-26.
Johnny Taylor scored only three points
in the opening 20 minutes, but he made up
for lost time in the second. Taylor added 22
more to give supply a scare. J.B. Bryant
added 10 more for the loser's.
Supply narrowly escaped their second
playoff game as well. They were pitted
against the National League's other divi-
sional champ, the 310th Airlift Squadron
led by Pat Piche.
Piche led all scorers with 16 points and
played a big part in keeping the flying
squadron within five as the halftime score
reached 29-24.
Piche's teammate Rusty Mizour was
another first-half hero earning 10 of his 13
points in the period.
Dan Boughton picked up the slack for
the 310th in the second half pouring in 11
of his 12 points.
His team, however, could make up only
one point on the Supply team resulting in a
55-51 loss.
Supply got by on a balanced attack. Its
leading scorer, guard Paul Roby, had only
10 points.
The final score might have been in the
310th's favorhadit not been forthe second-
half charge of Will Walden. Shut out in the
first period, the guard came alive after
halftime.
He hit from outside, inside and the free


throw line for nine points in the final 20
minutes.
Alive, but struggling for breath in the
loser's bracket are communications and the
617th Airlift Support Squadron. The teams
played Oct. 12 for the right to face the
supply/security police game loser.
Communications has had an easy road
after facing the cops in the first round. The
second game, against the 1/228th Head-
quarters Company was won by forfeit. The
Army team had to withdraw for field ma-
neuvers.
Thedeploymentfairyblessedthem again
foragame against the310th. Halfthe flying
squadron team, most notably Piche, was
gone.
Forward Bill Evans led communica-
tions past the shorthanded 310th with 11
points. Patryck Buckley totalled 14 in a
valiant effort to keep the airlift squadron
going.
The 617threcovered fromits first-round
loss to taketwoclosegames from, firstAIS/
OSS, then the 1/536th.
Ken "Shotgun" Schortgen and Barry
Dowell led the way for a 59-56 ALSS win
over AIS/OSS. Their 16 and 12 points
respectively placed them on the path to
victory.
Once again, it was Taylor who kept the ,
game close. The spirit of recently retired
Michael Jordantookpossessionoftheplayer
who matched ALSS'stop scorerspoint-for-
point. Taylor scored 21 of his 38 points in
the second half.
Schortgen rammed home nine of his 11
points in the first halfagainstthe 1/536th as
ALSS shot out to a 32-25 led. Most of his
team followed his second half fade how-
ever; with airlift support faltering, the
engineer's George Dudley and Vincent
James poured on the heat racking up 16and
10 points.
ALSS's Nathaniel Gagum came to the
rescue though. With eight of his 14 points
coming in the final period, Gagum ensured
his team finished on top 48-47.


Manual Pinillo shoots a foul shot during the championship finals.


Team captain Leondray Nance credited the team's
performance to Coach Simmons. "He did a great job
coaching us. It wasn't easy. It was the best season we had.
We had to play each team like they could beat us. That's
what got us to where we are."
Roadrunners team members included Leondray Nance,
Eric Brown, Deron Pullins, and Julian Sanders of Naval
Station Security Department, Jay Kelleher and Mark



Tigers' Evans rushes for more
than 200 yards and bumps com-
petitors from the charts.


Clegg ofMarineCorps Security Force Company, Sherman
Ward of the Naval Station Chapel, Rawle Barnwell of
Naval MobileConstructionBattalionFive, PatriciaWallace
of the Branch Dental Clinic at Rodman, Chris Watkins of
the Medical Administrative Support Detachment at Rod-
man; Manuel Pinillo of Ocean Representative, and Oscar
Reyes of Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical
Training School.



*Shriner Bowl coming.
*Wanted: Cheerleaders.
*Boxing tournament


Oct. 15, 1993


Page 12


"IN4









Tropic Times 13
Oct. 15,1993 1


Shrine bowl
The Shriners of the Abou Saad Temple will be
hosting the annual Shrine Bowl at the Balboa High
School Stadium Oct. 30.
The Junior All Stars will play at 4 p.m.. followed by the
Senior All Stars at 9 p.m.
Donations of $3 for adults and $1.50 forchildren will
benefit crippled and burned children. For more informa-
tion call Darryl Steiner at 252-5602.

Fishing tourney
The Shriners of the Abou Saad Temple will host a
Peacock Bass Fishing Tournament Nov. 3 with several
categories and three prizes for each category. All pro-
ceeds will be used for the Transportation Fund, which
pays for the transportation of crippled and burned
children the the Shriners Hospital in the United States.
Call Terry Zittle at 261-8018 for more information.

Basketball tourneys
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center is hosting a
Basketball tournament Oct. 23 & 24 that is open to the
first 10 teams to sign up. Ages 19 and older are welcome
to participate. For more information Call 284-3451.
Registration for unit level basketball is underway at
the Fronius Fitness Center on Fort Davis. An organiza-
tional meeting is scheduled at noon Nov. 6 at the Sundial
Recreation Center. Call 289-3108.
The registration deadline for the Pacific unit level
competitionOct. 26. A clinics scheduled forThursday
at the Director of Community Activities Sports Branch.
Call 287-4050.

Youth Swim team
Howard/Albrook Youth Swim Team registration is
underway for children ages 8-17. Meetings and prac-
tices are held at the Howard Pool Mondays, Wednes-
days, Thursdays and Fridays at 4:30 p.m. and at the
Albrook Pool Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and
Friday at 4:30 p.m. Monthly fees are $25 withoutapool
pass and $20 with apool pass. For more information call
the Zodiac Community Activities Center at 284-6109 or
Lisa Nofi at 284-3569.

Curly Bates tourney
The annual Curly Bates Memorial Mixed Bowling
Tournament will be held Saturday and Sunday at the
Curundu Bowling Center.
Registration is $15. Shifts are set for 1 and 4 p.m. on
both days. Bowlers will bowl three games each day on
the shift they sign up for. For information, call 286-
3914.

SCN AM radio sports
The Southern Command Network's AM 790 Pacific
and 1420 Atlantic will broadcast the following sports
this weekend.
Saturday
College football: Virginiaat Fla. State at 3 p.m.
World Series Game 1 at 7 p.m.
Sunday
Pro football: Philadelphia at N. Y. Giants at
noon. San Francisco at Dallas at 3 p.m.
World Series Game 2 at 7 p.m.

Columbus tourneys
A Columbus Day water basketball tournament is
scheduled for 9 a.m. Saturday. Registration deadline is
today. For information, call 289-3272.

Turkey Bowl
The Army Directorate of Community Activities
Sports Branch is accepting resumes for Army Turkey
Bowl team coaches. Call 287-4050.
Cheerleaders are needed for U.S. Army Turkey Bowl
team. Participants must be between the ages of 17 and
25. Call Heidi Ratliffat 287-5021 or Daphne McWhorter
at 287-4297.Cheerleaders are also needed for the Air
Force Turkey Bowl team. Volunteers can be male or
female, but must be at least 19 years old. Call MSgt.
Donna Coleman at 284-3665.

No tap tournament
The Curundu Bowling Center will host its monthly
no tap tournament 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Registration
taken at the door. For information call 286-3194.


Tee times
The Amador Golf Course is now using scheduled
starting times for tee-off times on weekends and U.S.
holidays.
Only groups of three or-four may reserve tee times
before 10 a.m.
Reservations are accepted beginningthe Wednesday
before the weekend. For reservations or more informa-
tion call 282-4511.
Navy Turkey Bowl team
Anyone interested in joining the Navy Turkey Bowl
team should contact Morise Conerly at 283-4061 or
Matthew Hert at 283-4412. Practice is held Monday and
Wednesday at 5 p.m. and Saturday at 10 a.m. at the
Rodman soccer field.

Rodman boxing night
Rodman Naval Station is hosting a boxing night
invitational 6 p.m. Nov. 6. It is open to all active duty
military novice and sub-novice boxers.
For more information contact Navy, Michael Hogan,
284-5653 or George Foley, 283-6355; Air Force, Joe
Epperson, 284-3811; Army, Directorate of Community
Activities Sports Branch, 287-4050 or the Rodman
Fitness Center, 283-4222/4061.
All participants must wear 16 oz. gloves, in accor-
dance with Navy regulations.

Rugby tourney
The U.S. Southern Command Rugby Team will be
playing in a tournament Oct. 30 in Quito, Ecuador. Any
players interested in competing should contact Hank
Cook at 289-4642. Leave name, unit and phone num-
ber.

Self-directed programs
The Howard/Albrook sports and fitness centers have
started several new self-directed aerobics programs.
"Row the Mississippi," "Ski the Appalachian Trail,"
and "Climb Mount Everest" are now available for
prospective adventurers at the centers. For more infor-
mation, call 284-3451.

Officials recruitment
The Panama Armed Forces Officials Association is
recruiting officials on both sides of the isthmus.
Meetings are held 1 p.m. every second Saturday of
the month at the Valent Recreation Center, Fort Clayton.
Military, civilians and family members may join. Call
287-5572 or 247-0511 after 9 p.m.
The Howard/Albrook Officials Association is also
looking for new officials. The association offers profes-
sional training, clinics and a pay check.
The meetings are 7:30 p.m. every third Thursday of
the month at the Howard Youth Center.
Interested people must be fluent in English. Call 284-
5371.

Bike Rentals
The Rodman Fitness Centerrents bikes at hourly ($1)
and weekly ($25) rates. Bicycles taken off Rodman
require a-$25 deposit. Call 283-4222/4061 for more
information.


AF swim team coaches
The Albrookand Howard swimming teams arelook-
ing for qualified coaches and youth swimmers for the
1993-94 swimming season.
All age groups and skill levels of children are wel-
come to participate.
Coaches will be paid according to the number of
participants in the program.
Team workouts are approximately three days a week
throughout the school year.
Anyone interested in coaching should contact Vince
Duncan at the Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195. Parents
or swimmers interested should call Duncan or Gary
Hankins, 286-4571.

Rodman Youth Swim Team
Registration for Rodman Youth Swim Team at the
Rodman Pool is open. Swim practices are held Mon-
days and Wednesdays at 4 p.m. at the Rodman Pool.
New members are welcome. Monthly fees are $20
without a pool pass and $15 with a pool pass and
includes a T-shirt. Call 283-4222.

Free weight training
Free weight training sessions and Nautilus training
sessions are held at the Fronius Fitness Center, Fort
Davis.
The weight training classes are held 3-4 p.m. Tues-
days and Thursdays.
The Nautilus sessions are held 3-4 p.m. Tuesday.
Registration is required. Call 289-3108 for more infor-
mation.

Fitness, weightlifting classes
Registration for six-week fitness and weightlifting
classes at the Rodman Fitness Center is under way.
Classes are held every Monday, Wednesday and Friday
from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Call 283-4222/4061.

Fishing tournament
An inter-club fishing tournament will be held in
Atlantic waters until Nov. 30.
The event is sponsored by Club Nautico Caribe, the
Panama Canal Tarpon Club and the Panama Canal
Yacht Club.
The fishermen who land the largest barracuda, wa-
hoo, kingfish, jack/tuna, marlin, sailfish and tarpon will
win prizes. Prizes will be awarded for the top three
catches in each category.
The entrance fee is $20 per angler and may be paid
at the bar ofany of the clubs or to Francisco Lopez, 241-
2025; Alberto Villa, 245-4379; Gabriel Kam, 241-
0675; Helio D. Alves, 243-4146; Mike Bell, 243-5207;
Alberto Alba, 245-0733; Gerry Laatz, 243-5652; Johnny
Kirby, 241-5883; Fermin Pinel, 241-6003.

Swimming lessons
Registration for beginner and advanced swimming
lessons at the Rodman and Farfan pool is underway.
Classes are held Tuesday, Wednesday and Thurs-
days from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. There
is a $20 fee for the six week course. For more informa-
tion call 283-4222/4061.


. 4 I







service Squardron photo by Cheryl Mathison .
Kiiaah!
Manual Hernanadez breaks a board held by Kenneth Larue and Tae Kwon Do instructor Mark
Henderson during Hernandez's promotion test at the Zodiac Recreation Center Oct. 1.








1 Tropic Times
- Oct. 15, 1993


. . . . _M1 5 �., i + '
Green Devils' linebacker Lee Gibson tackles the Cougars' Joe Shaha by the legs.



Muddye




Friday


Bulldogs, Tigers

tied with 4 wins I


by Sgt. E.J. Hersom
Tropic Times Staff
BALBOA - The Cristobal Tigers and the Balboa Bull-
dogs remain tied for first in week five with 4 wins and 1 loss
each.
The Bulldogs edged by the Red Machine (1-4) 7-2 Oct.
8 at Balboa High School Stadium here.
The Bulldog's Taiwuan Hopkins scored the game's
only touchdown with a 14 yard rush in the first quarter.
The Red Machine's special teams accounted for the
team's two points when they nailed Bulldog quarterback
Jerome Price in his end zone for a safety.
The remainder of the game was scoreless, but only
because a 70-plus yard punt return for a touchdown by the
Red Machine's Joe Gutierez was called back in what could
be the most unusual play of the season thus far.
The officials called the Red Machine touchdown back
because they said the punt could not be advanced after it had
bounced off the unaware and unknowing head of the
Bulldog's Brent Smiley.
The officials made matters worse for the Red Machine
by not calling the touchdown back before the extra point
and kick off giving them the false hope of holding a 9-2
lead.
The league rules state they have three plays to make up
their minds.
Bulldog coach Tom Ellis predicted correctly that the
aftemoon's rain would give him an advantage with the
running game.
The Bulldog's Adam Beach, Hopkins and Price rushed


Cougars' Lance VonHollen cools off with a splash of water.


for more than 50 yards each while the Red Machine picked
up 19 yards total rushing.
The Tiger's Marcus Evans rushed for 217 yards that
same evening on the Atlantic side of the isthmus as the
Tigers went on to crush the Kiwanis Koltz (0-5) 16-0.
Evans has carried the ball 49 times this season for a total
of 408 yards giving him an 8.3 yard rushing average.
Tiger quarterback Ricky Alverez completed three of
seven for 29 yards during the evening and is the only
quarterback in the league yet to throw an interception.
Rob Bemhardt kicked a field goal in the first quarter
putting the Tigers up 3-0 only to be followed with touch-
downs by Alverez and Evans to cinch the game.
The Koltz.. the Koltz... 0-5.
The Green Devil's Wilbert Reese - Tyler Quinn - Dan
Ortiz scoring trio continued to take names and numbers in


the late game at Balboa Stadium as the Green Devils (3-2)
beat the Curundu Cougars (2-3) 27 - 13.
Reese scored two touchdowns on the night and rushed
for 142 yards with 21 carries. Ortiz scored one touchdown
and rushed for 126 with only nine carries while Quinn
rushed for 50 yards with nine carries.
Carlos Lampas ran for a 34 - yard touchdown, his first
of the season, and kicked three extra points for the Green
Devils.
But the Cougars didn't take the game lying down.
Cougars' quarterback Robert Garcia completed 9 of 18
for 150 yards on the evening and snuck in a touchdown for
Donald Riviera to kick an extra point.
Robert Reyes was set back 12 yards during the evening
by the Green Devils' defense, but nonetheless managed to
pick up a nine-yard touchdown run.









Tropic Times
Oct. 15, 1993 1


Departnentol Delense photo by Sgt. E.J. Hersom.
Cougars' quarterback Robert Garcia fades back for a passing attempt. Garcia threw for 150 yards Oct.8.



Evans'first chart appearance takes second in rushing


The followingare thestatisticallead-
ers forthe 1993 Panama Area Depart-
ment of Defense Dependent'sSchool's
football season through the first five
games. Team statistics as well as indi-
vidual player numbers are included.

Team offense, rushing
1.1308 Green Devils
2. 935 Tigers
3.904 Bulldogs
4.540 Cougars
5.455 Red Machine
6.256 Kolts

Team offense, passing
1.458 Cougars
2.259Tigers
3.248 Kolts
4.229 Bulldogs
5. 183 Red Machine
6.86 Green Devils

Team defense, rushing allowed
1.377 Bulldogs
2.577 Green Devils
3.639 Tigers
4.822 Red Machine
5. 959 Kolts
6.1024Cougars


Team defense, passing allowed
1. 116 Tigers
2. 126 Cougars
3.190 Bulldogs
4. 281 Red Machine
5.357 Green Devils
6.422 Kolts

Total points
1. 126 Green Devils
2.90 Cougars
3.87 Bulldogs
4.66 Tigers
5.46 Red Machine
6.18 Kolts

Total points, allowed
1.14 Bulldogs
2.41 Green Devils
3.41 Tigers
4.71 Red Machine
5.92 Cougars
6. 136 Kolts

Scoring
1.50 Reese, Green Devils
2.42 Quinn, Green Devils
3.36 Price, Bulldogs
4.24 Townsend, Tigers; VonHollen,
Cougars; Reyes, Cougars


5. 18 Acosta, Tigers
6.15 Rivera, Cougars
7. 13 Lampas,Green Devils
8. 12 Shaha, Cougars; Sanchez, Red;
Hovan, Red, Garcia Cougars, Ortiz,
9.7 Bernhardt, Tigers

Touchdowns
1.8 Reese
2.7 Quinn
3.6 Price
4. 4 Townsend, VonHollen, and Reyes
5.3 Acosta
6.2 Hovan, Sanchez, Shaha
10 tied with one

Individual rushing yardage
1. 685 Reese
2. 408 Evans, Tigers
3.407 Ortiz, Green Devils
4. 358 Beach, Bulldogs
5.357 Townsend
6. 265 Shaha
7.261 Price
8. 189 VonHollen

Indv. rushing average (min 28 carries)
1. 13.1 Ortiz
2.8.3 Evans
3 7.2 Reese


4. 6.2 Beach
5. 5.6 Townsend
6. 5.43 Sanchez
7. 52 Goldini,Kiwanis
8. 4.8 Price
9. 4.6 Acosta

Passing yardage leaders
QB Com Att TD Int
Garcia 24 47 3 4
Alvarez 22 47 3 0
Corrigan 13 48 4 3
Price 5 21 1 1
Ford 6 30 1 2
Quinn 10 24 0 5

Individual receiving leaders
1.184 Sanchez
2. 182 Rivera, Cougars
3. 154 Reyes
4. 149 Staton, Bulldogs
5. 116 Acosta
6.106 Chanis, Kolts

Kickoff return leaders (min 4)
1. 20.5 Twohy, Red Machine
2. 18.2 Acosta
3. 17.75 Reyes
4.17.6 Rivera
5.12.5 Castillero, KolLt









16^ Tropic Times
1 6Oct. 15,1993


Local sailors help with Project Handclasp

by Lt. j.g. Laura C. Moore
USNAVSTAPANCANAL PAO


RODMAN NS - Members of Rodman Naval Station
banded together last week to bring much needed clothing
and supplies to Teen Challenge, an organization in
Panama which helps over 300 recovering drug and alco-
hol addicts.
Rodman sailors delivered four pallets of clothing, hy-
gienic supplies, school books, and a sewing machine kit
to the Teen Challenge Center on Via Espana. The sew-
ing machine kit will help the people Teen Challenge
serves learn a marketable skill.
Donated materials came from the Project Handclasp
warehouse at Rodman. U.S. companies donate goods,
which go to one of the three Project Handclasp ware-
houses worldwide.
The warehouse at Rodman holds goods for distribu-
tion here in Panama, or for deployed Navy ships to dis-
tribute in the region.
"I'm very happy that the Navy came here to help us. I
don't feel alone in this work and I feel that someone else
cares about the people here," said Pastor Luis C. Neito,
who is the president and director of all 11 Teen Chal-
lenge centers in Panama.
The purpose of the centers is to teach former addicts
skills so that they may support themselves and stay away
from drugs, said Jose Fierro, who is in charge of the Teen
Challenge center at Via Espana and who is a former drug
addict himself. Fierro said the centers also teach former
addicts to help others.


COROZAL (USARSO PAO) - Pacific and Atlantic
U.S. military community shoppers now have new Stars
and Stripes Bookstores to browse through in the Corozal
Mall and at Fort Davis.
In keeping with the command's emphasis on quality
of life, the new bookstores have opened their doors in
time for the 1993 Christmas shopping season.
The presence of the Stars and Stripes Bookstores, a
separate and independent organization from the Army
and Air Force Exchange Service, represents another mile-
stone of Army excellence, said Jerry Carrillo, regional
manager for Stars and Stripes.
"The Directorate of Engineering and Housing under-
took the bookstores project as a Panama Army Commu-
nities of Excellence initiative with the intent of providing
excellent quality services combined with world class fa-
cilities," said Lt. Col. John Lovo, DEH director. "The new
Stars and Stripes Bookstores emerged as paragons of ex-
cellence that will serve to enhance the quality of life for
the military community in Panama."
This enhanced quality of life has already been
put to the test as the Corozal store opened its doors
Oct. 2 and has seen an endless stream of custom-

Howard's new teen

by SSgt. Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs
Howard AFB - Work on the long-awaited Howard
Hideout Teen Center is now complete and officials will
celebrate by holding ateen dance from 7:30 to 11:30 p.m.
Saturday, said Chris Mclntire, teen center director.
The center is inviting all teenagers (13-19 years old)
from military families in the area to the dance. Snacks
will be available and a disc jockey will provide music.
The Howard Hideout is located on Farfan, next to the
pool in Building 6302 - the old Don Lee restaurant.
The 24th Civil Engineering Squardron, civilian con-
tractors and youth volunteers began its remodeling in
July.
"This project was a consolidated effort by people from
many separate organizations, especially budget, finance
and contracting. CE worked really hard, moving walls,
filling in doorways, and building a dance floor with risers
and hand rails around it," Mclntire said.
"They also built a computer center where we have
three 386- computers with all the bells and whistles on
which our teens can do homework, write a letter to a
friend or play computer games."
Other additions include a sports bar where teens can
get non-alcolic drinks, hot dogs, popcorn, nachos and
other food items.
There's also a wide-screen TV and a stereo VCR so
teens can watch sports, movies and more.


U.S. Navy photo by PH2 Delano J. Mays
Constructionman Robert E. Krause, Naval Station Seabee Division, hands a box of supplies to Jose


Fierro, a Teen Challenge counselor.
"People in Teen Challenge know how it feels to be
addicted, so they know how to approach people who are
trying to get over addiction,"Fierro said.
A Navy civilian who helped deliver the donated goods
said she enjoyed the experience.
"I got the feeling that we were helping people in a


difficult time for them. Most of them are fighting addic-
tion to drugs or alcohol," said Ilya Carrera, Facilities Sup-
port Contracts Director at Rodman. "As a Panamanian,
it's amazing to me that companies in the U.S. care
enough to donate these things to needy people here in
Panama."


Postal officials offer

express mail service
HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PA) - Local mili-
tary post offices offer Express Mail Military Ser-
vice for people don't want their family in the
states to wait for gifts, said 24th Air Postal Squad-
ron officials.
Express Mail is given priority over all other
classes of mail, officials said. Fees are $9.95 for
the first eight ounces and $13.95 for up to two
pounds. An average of $2 is added for each addi-
tional pound.
Delivery normally takes two or three days
from the time mail clears customs in Miami. Ser-
vice includes insurance against loss, damage or
rifling at no additional cost. Claims must be filed
within 90 days of mailing. The girth plus the
length of packages may not exceed 108 inches
and they may not weigh more than 70 pounds.
For more information, visit or call your local
military post office.

DCP benefits branch

changes locations
COROZAL (USARSO PAO) - Directorate of
Civilian Personnel Benefits Branch customers
will find a new location and many improvements
when they visit the office now in room 101 of
Building 560, Corozal, DCP officials said.
The Benefits Branch only moved about 20 feet
but it will mean a world of difference for the cus-
tomers they serve, said Berta Lord, Benefits
Branch chief.
The employees made the move on their own
by coordinating the work needed with the Direc-
torate of Engineering and Housing and person-
ally doing much of the design, set up and interior
decorating, she said.
"The end result of the Benefits Branch move
was the creation of an appealing and customer-
friendly office to better serve our employees,"
Lord said. "An office area was also set up for the
NARFE Volunteer Retiree Assistance Center
within the new Benefits Branch."
Those -needing information or help with re-
tirement, health and life insurance, Thrift Sav-
ings Plan, Panama Social Security, Living Quar-
ters Allowance or Workers' Compensation ben-
efits may call the Benefits Branch at 285-5745/
5941/5284.
The office is open 7:15 a.m.-4:15 p.m. while
the National Association of Retired Federal Em-
ployees Volunteer Retiree Assistance Center is
open 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Wednesday only. For in-
formation call 285-4325.


ers, said the bookstore manager Virginia Beach.
"We have seen many of our regular customers but
there have been many new faces since we opened here,"
she said.
The store includes more than $250,000 worth of books
in a wide variety of topics for all ages, Beach added. The
stores also have magazines, newspapers, video cassettes
and educational audio cassettes.
In addition to the top ten best sellers, shoppers can
find books on such topics as languages, cooking, sports,
medicine, parenting and computers, she said.
There are also books for coloring, crossword puzzles,
comics, music, home improvements, cars, fashions and
hairstyling. Though the stores are new and the merchan-
dise expanded, customer service remains.
"The customer is first, second and third," Carillo said.
"We believe a good inventory is important, but a happy,
satisfied customer is even more so."
The Corozal store is open 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-
Saturday and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday and will have their
grand opening 10:30 am. Oct. 22. The Fort Davis store
will open Oct. 23 with a grand opening to be held later in
the month.

center opens doors
"We're still waiting for some wall decorations and a
few more pieces of furniture to arrive," Mclntire said. "It
should get here by the end of the month. When it does,
we're going to have a grand opening extravaganza that
will knock your socks off."
There have been several efforts in the past to get a
center going for Howard's teen community, but they
weren't very successful, he said.
"This time it's going to be different," he said.
Money is the main reason this time will be different,
McIntire said.
"We got a $50,000 grant from the Air Force Aid Soci-
ety that enabled us to provide all these amenities. If not
for the AFA, the Howard Hideout would not exist."
Another bonushas been the teen council's participa-
tion, primarily Alex Staton, Lance VonHollen, Nick Rob-
erts and Paul Edwards.
"Our teen council has been involved in the center
project since the beginning," Mclntire said. "They helped
select the design of the floor plans, the color schemes,
even the carpeting and wall decorations."
"I liked the idea of teenagers having a say in what was
going into the center," Staton said. "I figure we should be
the ones to decide what kinds of things the center should
have, since we're the ones who will be using it."
"I'm confident the Howard Hideout will see a lot of
use by our teenagers," Mclntire said. "We've all put a lot
of time and effort into it, and I think they're really going
to enjoy it."


New Stars and Stripes bookstores


keep quality of life emphasis going




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Gift of the Panama Canal Miuseum Tropic Times Vol. VL No. 41 Quarry Heights, Republic of'Panama Friday, Oct. 15, 1993 7 Nf NZ NA 'Ik Taking aim U.S. Army photo by Sg. Lori Davs Soldiers from the 193rd Infantry Brigade assault an objective during a live-fire exercise Oct. 8. See story and photos on page 3. USARSO soldier shot Jou wan recaps progress, in Panama City club-" FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -A U.S. S s chalenges Army South soldier was shot in Panama City Saturday. QUARRY HEIGHTS Now, for the first time in decades, all of Central and The soldier, SFC Hernando White, assigned to (Tropic Times) -Gen. South America are governed by democratic governments. Headquarters and Headquarters Company, U.S. George A. Joulwan, comAnd with the end of the war in El Salvador, peace is beArmy Garrison, was shot while in a club in mander in chief, U.S. coming more and more common. Panama City. A preliminary investigation indiSouthern Command, That was one of his first priorities upon taking comcated that shooting had erupted in the club and leaves Panama today to asmand -bringing about a resolution to the 12-year-old White was hit in the back while trying to rach sume duties as Supreme civil war in that country. It proved a success story very the front door. Allied Commander Euquickly, and then Joulwan instituted other initiatives that He was driven to Gorgas Army Communi rope and Commander, have brought SOUTHCOM and the region to where it is H esa wa friend, thrg Ary Csury U.S. Forces Europe. today. Hospital by a friend, where he underwent surgery Wednesday, during an Joulwan will be honored at 9 am. today at a farewell to remove the bullet. The soldier is in stable coninterview with the Tropic ceremony at Howard AFB. A replacement has not yet dition, according to Gorgas officials. Times and Southern Combeen named. The incident is under investigation. mand Network, he proWhat follows are his comments during a 20-minute vided his thoughts about interview at Quarry Heights, the location of SOUTHCOM AAFES auto store the past three years and the Gen. George A. Joulwan headquarters. progress made by the command in the vital areas of nam manager shoots self tion-building and counterdrug efforts. You came to Panama at a critical time. What were "We set out some clear goals three years ago; we have your views at the time about what needed to be done in FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Jeffrey met or exceeded all of those goals," Joulwan said during the Southern Command? Weatherbee, manager of the Fort Clayton Autothe interview. "What has impressed me the most is the I think it's very important that as I look back three motive Store, Army and Air Force Exchange Sertroops. They have taken some of the most difficult misyears ago that it was one year after Operation Just vice died Saturday as a result of a self-inflicted sions that I have ever seen in my 33 years in the miliCause.one of the first things I did upon arriving here gunshot wound. tary." was to make an assessment. That assessment was sort of The incident is under investigation. The general assumed command of SOUTHCOM accelerated by the fact that within the first 10 days of my Nov. 21, 1990, less than a year after the completion of Operation Just Cause. Continued on page 8. -ew page 3 M Army's 193rd Infantry Brigade leads Presidential special envoy arrives in *Domesticviolence, page 2. more than a thousand soldiers into Ethiopia to discuss conditions of *Milestones, page 10. the field for a training exercise. possible cease-fire in Somalia. *Navy basketball, page 12.

PAGE 2

2 Tropic Times Oct. 15, 1993 Bible school teaches children 'no fighting' by Lt.j.g. Laura C. Moore ing a scene about fighting, Samantha redeUSNAVSTAPANCANAL PAO scribed the entiremincident to us without any prompting and told us that fighting wasn't RODMAN NS -Children at the Naval nice." Station Chapel recently learned about apLt. William Wildhack, the Naval plying Biblical concepts to today's world. Station's chaplain, said the program was a Almost 50 children and 20 parent volsuccess. unteers of all denominations from the Rod'The continuing theme, 'LivinginGod's man community participated in a fourcreation,' was about takingcareoftheearth week, all-denomination Bible school proand taking care of each other and learning gram, "Living in God's creation." about relationships with each other," "The kids know Wildhack said. about the rain forest "Kids came away here and they know "It's a nice way to finish out with a better idea about the pollution three years in Panama to about the earth, problem," said Sue where it came from, Robbins, the prosee so many kids having so where they came gram's musical di much fun and from, about their rector. "So, even learning place in God's crethoughitwassolong important things about life action and about the agoandinadifferent and creation and God and beauty of the place, the creation Creator's world." story is relevant toChrist." This Bible school dayhereinPanama." Lt. William Wildhack program was the Participants inthe Naa tto hpansixthinthepast year. Bible school also Wildhack, who is learnedabouthowto transferring next teat other people. month to an aircraft carrier, said he'll miss "We learned about fighting. No fightthe family environment at the Rodman ing!!" said Samantha Cooke, age three. chapel. Her mother, Lt. Andrea George, said "It's anice way to finish out three years that even at such a young age, children in Panama to see so many kids having so learned a great deal from the Bible school much fun and leading important things program. aboutlifeandcreationandGodandChrist," US. Navy photo by PH2 Roberto Taylor "Even at the age or three of four I think Wildhack said. "I'm gonna miss the sense Lt. William Wild hack, his son Evan (rig ht) and Paul Eberenz play games during that they really internalized alot of what offamily that the Bibleschoolhelpedcreate Bible school. was going on," George said. "After learnhere." Studies show domestic violence Signal soldiers continue can be more than just physical year-round Christmas by Maritza Pearce by SSgt Rian Clawson -USARSO Public Affairs Office 24th Wing Public Affairs LAS DELICIAS, PENONOME -Christmas has become a year-round-holiday for the soldiers asHOWARD AFB -October has been designated as Dosigned to the 154th Signal Battalion (Light). mestic Violence Prevention Month, said Melody Jones, The soldiers and family members frequently visit family advocacy outreach manager for Howard's 24th with Las Delicias school children to assess their Medical Squadron. needs and help them meet some of their most pressA major study of more than 900 children at shelters ing necessities. for battered women found that nearly half of the children The year-long Christmas project turned out to were victims of physical or sexual abuse. be a family project for both the U.S. and PanamaniTestudy showed that, usually, the man who battered as the woman also abused the child. In about a quarter of "For the soldiers, their family members and Las the cases, both parents abused the child, while, in a few Delicias townspeople, it means developing friendisolated incidents, the mother was solely responsible for ship and exchanging gifts," CWO2 Fernando Perez the abuse. said. "The people of Las Deicias will not allow us to "We need to make people aware of the dangers of docome home empty handed. Bags of home-grown mestic violence, and let them know there are ways to deal vegetabrval o f tsaait hes e games, gifts with it," Jones said. "We want everybody to be able to he an alofsants heprs ans gaes fts recognize it and realize that violence does not have to be 000cW and refreshments for theparents andchidrn ofLas g .Delicias and their guests. a part of a relationship." These include fear of abandonment, constant anxiety This year the visiting soldiers replaced the Domestic violence in the home can be directed at any(that another attack will happen), feelings of responsibilschool's small, old refrigerator, put in a new roof one, man, woman or child, although it's usually the ity for the abuse and feelings of guilt at being unable to and ceiling and hung a new door on the dining women and children who suffer the most, she said. Stop it. room. All the trips included bags of candy and "Domestic violence in any form is terrible, but it is "Many of these children develop hearing or speech school supplies for the children. especially devastating when it affects the children," Jones problems as aresult of the abuse," Cain said. "They often "The courtesy and generosity we have been said. get strss-related physical ailments like headaches, ulcers blessed with is greatly appreciated," said Lelia Countless studies have shown that child abuse and and rashes. Lombardo, schooldirector. "The ceiling reduces the neglect are strongly linked to domestic violence, she "Also, studies have shown that children who grow heat considerably and lowers the rain drop noise duradded. Battered women are eight times more likely to up witnessing domestic violence are more likely to coning the rainy season." abuse their children than women who are not exposed to tinue the cycle as adults," she added. "Both grow up be"The greatest gifts, as far as the children are conviolence. lieving that violence is an acceptable part of relationcerned, are the radio/tape recorder and music and Children in homes where domestic violence occurs ships." English lesson tapes," Lombardo said. can receive direct or indirect injuries, both physical and The Family Advocacy program has information availDuring lunch time the children gather in the emotional in nature. able for people who have domestic violence in their school dining room and listen to music from the "The children can receive physical injuries when homes, and for those who suspect it is present in a United States and Latin America. They have learnhousehold items are thrown or when weapons are used or neighbor's or a friend's home. ed to identify the music of different countries. The when one parent strikes or pushes the other and the Often people don't want to get involved, Jones said, children and teachers are learning to speak English abused spouse falls against the child," Jones said. "Older "but that is a dangerous attitude to have. It's not only our from the tapes. children are often injured when they try to protect the right to report suspected domestic violence, but it is our "The majority of the 30 school children come abused spouse." responsibility -to ensure our community is a safer place from families whose income is generated from subOther injuries can be on the psychological, rather to live." sistence farming," Lombardo said. "The school supOthe inurie ca beon te pychlogialrater tlie."plies, clothes and Christmas gifts come in handy for than the physical level. Maj. Cynthia Cain, family advoFor more information about domestic violence, call the a family of three or more children." cacy officer for Howard, quoted studies that describe Air Force's family advocacy program at 284-6410. For Lombardo and Perez agree that the joint yearsome of the emotional effects domestic violence has information about Army programs, call 282-5139, and long Christmas program is a total success. on children. for Navy programs, 283-4671.

PAGE 3

Tropic Times 3 Oct. 15, 1993) 193rd Infantry leads way on field exercise by MSgt. Joe Ferrare USARSO Public Affairs Office EMPIRE RANGE -Soldiers here are getting a rare opportunity to flex their combat muscle during a Field Training Exercise that has more than 1,500 soldiers from several different units spread out over more than 100 square kilometers of blooming pampa grass, muddy roads and tangled jungle. TheI93rdlInfantry Brigadeisleading theFTX, withthe 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment and the 142nd Medical Battalion playing major supporting roles. Other Panama-basedunits supporting the193rdInf. Bde. include the 154th Signal Battalion and the 549th Military Police Company. Two stateside units are also taking part in the exercise. Soldiers from the 108th MP Co. (Air Assault), Fort Bragg, N.C., and the 408th Military Intelligence Company say they are getting a feel for operating in Panama while on temporary duty here. Driving this force is a detailed exercise scenario that includes attacking insurgents and otherthreats to the canal. -s y pa y s SA FrrrIr But many units am taking advantage of the field time to Spec Jodi Herrera drives on to the rarely used Miraflores Bridge. accomplish other missions. The 154th is testing the new Mobile Subscriber Equipment radios, while the 1-228th is undergoing an Army Training and Evaluation Program evaluation under the scrutiny of the 128th Aviation Brigade. Almostall the units aretraining atthe squad, platoon or company level to show recently arrived soldiers how local units operate or test new mission strategies. Some of the training is only possible in a large exercise like this, said193rd Inf. Bde.officials, and everyone agreed training many units together makes it more realistic. "We am exercising pretty much all our battlefield operating systems, with the exception of (Air Defense Artillery) and field artillery," said Capt. Tom Moxley, Assistant Operations Officer, 193rd Inf. Bde. 'This is where we take all the pieces and put them together," he added. That means more than units putting together the different parts of their missions, said Capt. Edward Davis, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment. It also means putting together people from different units. "You get all the support agencies to interact with each other. Everybody gets to know each other and interact with thepersontheywould interact withinthereal world, so you get to practice before the real thing, and that's important," Davis noted. The infantry soldiers got to practice the real thing several ways. Exerciseplanners put slightly different spin on even mundane tasks, such as getting to thetraining area. Some soldiers used the 1097th Boat Company landing craft during their move while others flew in with 1-228th aviators. Even some of those who came in vehicles took an unusual route, convoying across the rarely used Miraflores Bridge, the swing bridge in front of Fort Clayton. Once on the ground, the units spread out and began tackling their training missions. These too, were mixed up, so units would train as a squad one day, and a platoon or company the next. Soldiers cycled through the range's objectives, which are areas supposedly held by enemy soldiers. Sometimes thesoldiersassaultedtheobjectives by air, sometimes on foot, shooting blanks against MP enemy soldiers on one mission, shooting live rounds the next. Such diversity can lead to good training or confusion. Davis said skillful planning is what makes the difference. "Weplanonwhat we'regoing to do before wecomeout a here, so we have a game plan," he said. "This is not the first time for alot of us, so most of us know what to expect, and we know where we're going to be pulled to the wire and where we're going to have lulls in the action, so there are very few surprises once we get out here." Making sure there are at least a few surprises is the province of brigadeIntelligenceOfficer Capt. Roy Worrall. Worrall himself is rarely surprised by what happens next, however: he's working for both sides. "We're trying to play the full game as far as intelligence is concerned," he explained. "Ourjob here (in the brigade 7 intelligence section) is to drive the intelligence scenario. We do that by issuing out messages at certain points in time., "On top of that, not only do we drive the intelligence picture, but Icontrolthe OPFOR, so I'mkind ofdual-hatted U.S. Army photo by ssgi Jane User here, for this particular exercise," Worrall said. Sgt. Jaime Tudor (left), Headquarters Company, 142nd Medical Battalion, reassures his "patient" Spec. Worrall, with the help of 1st Lt. Susan Pena and other Darren Heard, as fellow medic, Spec. Gregorio Quintero helps him to a field ambulance. members of the 408th MI Company, is keeping everyone --in the form of rain, sweat and heavy canteens -is the alack of sleep and the heat, which exacts adouble penalty, busy. infantrymen's biggest concern, but far from theironly one. said Spec. Paul Ham, a team leader with B Co. 5-87th. "Objective Bayonet is where we actually have the MPs Bugs, skin problems such as prickly heat, and vegetation "We start out with 11 quarts of water, (and) it's pretty playing the insurgents' role. They are also going out and like the thick pampa grass and sharp black palm all plague heavy," Ham reported. "We carry enough to make it until doing things such as ambushing convoys and probing infantrymen who are routinely pushed to the limit to theyresupplyus.Ifweweretogopastthatwe'vegot(water) different (Tactical Operations Centers). practice their wartime mission. purification tablets. The MPs'harassmentis anotherproblem forthe 193rd's "You could be a world class athlete and get ti d out "We're very safety oriented -drink the water, drink infantrymen, who must already cope with the rigors of there," said PFC William Schuler, B Company, 57th. the water -but you can only drink so much water per going to the field in Panamaduring the rainy season. Water Some of the reasons are bad footing in muddy te-ijn, hour," Ham said.

PAGE 4

41 Tropic Times Oct. 15,1993 hemisphere Ruben Honduras seeks doctors to break medical strike TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras (AP) -The Honduran government said Oct. 8 it is seeking doctors from Cuba, Guatemala, Nicaragua and Panamato break an 8-day-old strike by 2,200 pubR oss"tlic health physicians. R oss Pe t Public Health Minister Ramon Pereira said he had spoken by telephone with officials in nearby 01 Panam a ? countries "to substitute professionals from those countries, at the opportune moment, for the strikPANAMA CITY (Reuters) -ing doctors." Salsa star-turned-politician There was no word on the response he reRuben Blades, Panama's suave ceived. answer to Texas billionaire Ross The strike began Oct. 1 and has paralyzed work Perot, hopes a wave of disenat the 26 government hospitals. chantment with Panama's tradi The doctors average about $6,800 a year and tional politics will carry him are demanding a 55 percent increase. The governstraight to his country's presiment has offered 25 percent. dency. Blades, 45, a singer-actor who Melon-sized dinosaur egg lived in the United States for the last 20 years, has led every serifound in northern Mexico ous opinion poll this year on who Panamanians would vote for in ~MEXICO CITY (AP) -A melon-sized dinothe 1994 presidential elections. saur egg 75 million years old has been discovered And the Papa Egoro movenear the northern state capital of Chihuahua, the ment he founded and named after daily Excelsior reported Friday. a Panamanian Embera Indian Paleontologist Rodolfo Fierro Chavarria said term for Mother Earth is virtually the egg belonged to a critosaur, an amphibious dicertain to nominate him as their nosaur that once thrived in the region. presidential candidate next The egg went on display Friday in the Paleonmonth. tological Musuem of Chihuahua. "I am going to be nominated most likely in November. I am Ecuador government uses going to accept the nomination," Blades told Reuters in an interjungle for oil exploration view Thursday. "We (Papa QUMr T n Egoro) exist because people said U Ecuador (AP) -The government will 'we're going to give you life beput up about 6 million acres ofjungle and offshore cause we believe that you can territory for oil exploration starting Jan. 24, Encome up with something different ergy Minister Francisco Acosta said Friday. from these dinosaurs over here." The tender is part of a plan to attract private Most of the polls have given investment in the oil industry to boost Ecuador's Blades about 20 percent support declining crude reserves. to win the presidency -double Ruben Blades Panamanian presidential candidate. cowesy photo Acosta told reporters the deadline for bids his closest rivals, who are all from would be April 25, and that the contracts would Panama's traditional oligarchies. for New York "with $100 in my pocket" in 1975. be signed by next October. "The Blades voteis undoubtedly a negative vote, avote He is buoyed by the opinion polls, but worried about Included are eight blocks comprising just unagainst the elite, but it's there all right and I think it could raising expectations before mobilizing the funds and der 4 million acres in the [ago Agrio jungle retake him to the presidency," said political analyst Marco manpower needed for a successful election campaign. gion, 110 miles northeast of Quito. Gandasegui. "It's great to be on top," he said "(but) I don't want Four offshore blocks on Ecuador's Pacific Panama's May 1994 elections are intended to seal its to elevate people's expectations and then drop them and Coast will also be tendered. transition to democracy after the December 1989 U.S. inthen have somebody tell you that I'm a publicity seeker." vasion that ousted former dictator Manuel Noriega and Blades said Papa Egoro had prepared a draft maniHonduran officials request installed the current government of President Guillermo festo for the 1994 elections based on months of grassroots Endara. consultations with Panamanians. "I believe in consenU.S. aid for flooded region If Blades does not make any alliances, his main opposus. I don't want to be sounding off my mouth like 'I sition is likely to come from the Democratic Revolutionthink you should do this' and 'I think you should do that', TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras (Reuters) -Honary Party which backed Noriega's regime and the current I don't believe in that," he said. duras Sunday requested logistical aid from the ruling coalition. On Panama's most controversial policy issues, Blades United States to transport food and medicine to Should he win, Blades would take office in the said he wanted less emphasis on repaying the nation's $6 the remote Mosquitia region, which has been devpresident's Palace of the Herons in the same poor neighbillion foreign debt and dismissed speculation of renegoastated by floods. borhood of Panama City where he grew up. But he has no tiating the withdrawal of i0,000 U.S. troops by 1999 be"We have asked for, and it is almost certain it romantic illusions about the job. cause "they are going to leave, they have been very clear will be given, aid from the U.S. Embassy to trans"I'm sorry to tell you that it's not as if, like, coming about that." port emergency food supplies to Mosquitia," Honout of the ghetto I dreamt of the day that I would be walkHe said Panama's priorities were to overhaul outdated port emer en t spbesto Maqtia," oning and my footsteps would echo in the halls of the Paland inadequate health, education, judicial and infrastrucduran Vice President Roberto Martinez told reace of the Herons," said Blades, who left Panama City ture systems. porters. "We need helicopters to send the food supplies to areas that have lost their harvests due to heavy rains caused by Tropical Storm Bret and Tropical Cab Depression Gert, which have affected the region BOGOTA, Colombia (Reuters) -Police and army auTeusaquillo district men in a passing car threw a bomb at in the past two months," he said. thorities started an investigation Oct. 9 into three bomb an office used by the campaign of leading Liberal Party Press Minister Olman Serrano said the airlifts attacks in Bogota overnight that killed two policemen, presidential candidate Ernesto Samper. would also carry agricultural toots and seed to reinjured 27 others and damaged buildings. The later two blasts shattered windows in a wide area plenish lands affected by the flooding. Commanders put security forces throughout this city and alarmed residents of nearby buildings but did not hurt Serrano said a ship with 100 tons of food and of six million on maximum alert and reinforced patrols anyone seriously, police said. medicine donated by CARE International would checking for suspicious objects or movements. Gen. Octavio Vargas Silva, deputy head of the national arrive this week in Mosquitia, but that helicopters The most serious attack was in the residential police, told reporters after the attacks that it was too soon were needed elsewhere to distribute the supplies Chapinero district, where three men in a parked car detoto speculate about who might have planted the bombs. He to the towns. nated a bomb by remote control Thursday night as a bus added, however, that the evidence pointed to "organized The jungle region of Mosquitia is inhabited by drove by carrying more than 30 policemen to a change of crime," which local media interpreted as meaning either indigenous Misquitos and Sumos who live in reguard. Marxist guerrillas or drug traffickers. The blast wrecked the bus, killed two of the police travMedellin police Wednesday night shot dead Alfonso mote areas accessible oniy by airbecauseoftreaeheling inside, injured another 27 officers and caused panic Leon Puerta, a close collaborator of cocaine king Pablo erous mountain and river passes. among nearby residents, a city police spokesman said FriEscobar. Since 1983, the United States has maintained day. On Thursday night, police had said three officers Local media speculated that Thursday night's bombsome 1,200 soldiers equiped with helicopters and were killed in the blast. ings might have been ordered by Escobar in retaliation planes at the Palmerola base in the central departJust over an hour later, bombers struck again in two but police said that although not impossible, it was unment of Comayagua. different areas of the city. An explosion shook an empty likely the Medellin cartel boss would have had sufficient registry office building near the center while in the time to organize the attacks.

PAGE 5

~t1V~iitaryTropic Times __iitar News Oct. 15,19935 Court rejects gay legislation SANFRANCISCO(Reuters)-Anappealscourt dealt a blowtothe Clinton adminlstration'spolicy on homosexuals in the military Friday, letting stand a lower court order barring discrimination against gays in uniform. A three-Judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Appeals Court rejected aseries of motions fied by the government In an attempt to block or overturn a far-reaching order by U.S. District Judge Terry Hatter barring discrimination against gays in the military. Te decision meansthat, unlessthe government takes further legal steps, Hatter's order will remain In effect at least until a flil appeal ofthe case is heard by the 9th Circuit Appeals Court In December. John McGuire, an attorney for a gay sailor at the center of the legal dispute, said that, for now, the Clinton's administration's new "don't ask, don't tell" policy on gays in the military Is not in operation. Clinton's policy, which says that no action will betaken against gaysin the military provided they say nothing about their sexual orientation, was reached after months of debate. Tnally,theDepartmentofDefense willnow be President Bill Clinton talks with Secretary of State Warren Christopher and Vice President Al Gore. given an opportunity to iplemet police ofnondiscri rrnadon andseethatt works fine," McGuire tod Reuters. fq V cGuire said he had spok~en to Petty Officer Special envoy in Ethiopia may Kisahda sben government's ban, and said that both he ard 011 eMihold were very happy at the court's decision. '"Thousands of service members have been disa rra n g charged over the last50 years for homosexuality. Hatter ruled In Los Angeles last week that the ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia (Reuters) -President effectivelystalledaplanagreedtoinAddisAbabainMarch military cannot discriminate against gay or lesClinton's special envoy to Somalia arrived in EthiopiaOct. to try and set up a transitional council with representatives bian service members or r-cruits and threatened 9 to push attempts to arrange a cease-fire with fugitive of the 15 main Somali factions. Pentagon offIcials with fnesofupto$10,000aday Somali warlord Mohamed Farah Aideed. Oct. 7 Clinton announced that he was sending an if they violated his order. Hatter had earlier deDiplomats said Robert Oakley was carrying a message additional 5,300 U.S. troops and nine warships, including cared the ban on gays unconstitutional. from Clinton for Ethiopian President Meles Zenawi rethe aircraft carrier Abraham Lincoln, to Somalia under a The government quickly asked the appeals questing he take an active role in trying to mediate an end get-tough plan to suppress guerrillas in Mogadishu while court for an immediate stay of Hatter's order and to the crisis in his Horn of Africa neighbor. pressing for apolitical settlement. for its scope to be limited to Meinhold and not U.S. diplomats said Oakley was trying to negotiate a He stressed a move away from violent confrontations applied to all service members. cease-fire in exchange for a U.S. commitment to suspend with Aideed, whose guerrillas are blamed for most of the The government said Hatter's order would bar efforts to capture Aideed. violence against U.N. forces first sent to Somalia last implementation of Clinton's policy and seriously "There are discussions under way but it would be December to assure relief reached hundreds of thousands interfere with management ofday-to-day military incorrect to say that any deal has been struck," one U.S. of starving Somalis. affairs. official told Reuters, adding: "I doubt if anything is likely Clinton instructed Oakley, who led diplomatic efforts But the appeals court threw out all of the on this before tomorrow (Saturday). forapolitical solutioninSomaliaearlierthis year, to return government motions in a one-page order which "There would be a cease-fire and the United States to Mogadishu to resume his drive. gave no reasons for its decision. "The motions for would agree to suspend its efforts to apprehend Aideed," A Pentagon spokesman said the U.S. troops and waran Immediate stayandfor summary reversal.are said the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity. ships heading for Somalia might be used to try to rescue a denied," the court said. Inasharpreversalofpolicy,Oakleyisexpectedtopush captured helicopter pilot "if the opportunity presents The Clinton administration has said it will Meles to set up an international inquiry into violence in itself." comply with Hatter's order, pending appeal. It Mogadishu blamed on Aideed. Elite U.S. Army Rangers might be used to try to rescue ordered the Pentagon lastweeknottotake "based The U.S. and U.N. have until now insisted Aideed be pilot Michael Durant, captured last Sundayin a battle with solely on a service member's homosexual orientabrought to justice to answer charges he organized the June Aideed supporters that killed 15 U.S. troops and wounded tion or statements of homosexualIty." 5 killing of 24 Pakistani peacekeepers. more than 50. It did not exclude action on the grounds of Meles, who has already chaired several attempts to The Pentagon official, who asked not to be identified, homosexual conduct. However, Hatter's order promote a peace accord between warring Somali factions, said U.S. troops would not try to start battles with Aideed's permits action by the government only in the case was mandated by the Organization of African Unity last forces. But he refused to rule out the use of force, incuding of sexual conduct that is proven to interfere with May with trying to mediate a long-term solution to the bombing by Navy planes, if the Somalis picked a fight. the military mission, McGuire said. country's crisis. U.S. forces also knew where Aideed arms caches were That conflicts with the "don't ask, don't tell" Last month, other Horn of African states urged him to locatedinotherareas ofSomalia. These could be destroyed policy, which states that gays and lesbians in the step up his efforts and try to defuse growing tensions by laser-guided bombs -there were about 250 on the military may be dismissed for saying openly they between U.N. forces and Aideed's gunmen. Abraham Lincoln -if Aideed's followers started trouble, are gay. Fighting between Aideed's militia and U.N. forces the official added. Clinton faced with tricky foreign policy problem in Haiti WASHINGTON (Reuters) -Already facing severe to put the peace plan back on track. deposed and forced into exile. difficulties in Somalia, President Clinton is now grappling "We believe that the current situation does not justify Clinton's political opponents were quick to seize on the with another tricky foreign policy problem in Haiti. docking the ship at this time," he said. "We insist that the issue as another weapon to hurt the president. A painfully negotiated political accord to restore deHaitian military and police authorities create a permissive "This is a repeat of Somalia. We send in a very small posedPresident.Jean-Betrand Aristide topowerby the end environment andpermit the peaceful entryinto Haiti ofthe force of very lightly armed Americans who may get shot of this month seemed in trouble Monday after Aristide's military engineers, trainers and support staff that are there at," said former assistant secretary of state Elliott Abrams. enemies staged a violent demonstration which prevented to help the people of Haiti." "Are we sending in our soldiers to do nation building 200 U.S.military trainers from disembarking. Sanctions including an oil, financial and arms embargo again? It will take 50 years .Reconciliation is the answer Clintonreacted by delaying thetroops'landing, unwillwere suspended Aug. 27 with the proviso they could be to this, not American troops." ing toplunge Americansoldiersinto anotherunpredictable reinstated if the Haitian military failed to live up to an But Rep. Charles Rangel (D-NY) said Clinton had to Third World conflict. The similarities to Somalia seemed accord it signed on Governor's Island, New York, on July stickthecourse. He said the majority ofHaitians supported all too obvious with the anti-American demonstrators 3. the restoration of Aristide and the opposition consisted themselves drawing the comparison in their chants. Theplan always looked somewhat shaky sinceit essenonly of a few score thugs. Secretary of State Warren Christopher quickly warned tially depends on Haiti's current leaders voluntarily giving "We're the leader of the free world, it's the poorest Haiti's military leaders, who are due to leave the Caribbean up power and leaving the country. country ofthe hemisphere and we have a moral obligation. country within days to allow Aristide's return, they could Aristide was Haiti's first elected president in 1991. We have an obligation to the United Nations," Rangel facerenewedUnitedNationssanctions unless theyareable However, several months after his election, he was said.

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Tropic Tues U Oct. 15, 1993 i e Annoyed snack bar patron protests noise Dear Mayors' Corner: Dear Mr. Ake: The video games in the snack bar at Mayors' Corner Viola C. Rodriquez, retail manager Albrookare extremely loud, repetitive and Albrook Class Six, reported that you annoying. They preclude conversation or snack bar at Albrook AFS have been alcoholic brew" and charges it against my should not be required to sign for "nona nice enjoyable snack. turned down as you requested. beverage entitlement as standard beer. alcoholic brew." The supervisor in charge Why can't they either be moved to the Taking this a step further, they have I have protested to the managehas been informed of Department of Deoutside porch area, or at least have the voldecided that the video games will not be meant and been told that regulations so refense policy and appropriate changes have ume turned down. turned on before 9:30 am. in order that quire. been made. Rodriguez apologized for any This is another example of business escustomers can enjoy a quiet time to have This procedure flies in the face of the inconvenience you may have experienced tablishments allowing a few (the video pabreakfast. DoD policy which encourages use of nonand hopes this will not happen again. trons) to dominate and infringe on the Johnson also said that they apologize intoxicating beverages. rights of everyone else. for any inconvenience you may have exI resent, as a matter of principle, that Editor'snote: iscolumnallowscorOur family has stopped patronizing perienced. my purchase ofnon-intoxicant is recorded munity members to submit questions to this snack bar because of this situation. If you have further concerns please feel as though I were purchasing an alcoholic the Mayoral Congress. Letters should be Disgusted former customer free to contact their office at 286-3640/ beverage. Caied toMay rner, Pu it 3857. I strongly recommend that the Albrook a i person, APO AA 34004 (MPS). Dear Disgusted: procedure be promptly modified to conThe Tropic Times reserves the right to Stanley G. Johnson of the Army and Dear Mayors' Corner: form to DoD policy and common sense. edit letters and responses for brevity, Air Force Exchange Service reports that The Albrook package store requires me Respectftully, clarity and propriety. the volume on the video games in the to sign for purchases of O'Doul's "non -C. Paul Ake Thief nets $120 from unsecured briefcase Thief steals $124) One-hundred-twenty dollars was stolen from a Provost Marshals Corner soldier's unsecured briefcase last week. Military police recommend securing all valuables. If a victim of crime, call the MPs at 287-4401. Vagrant given 30 days In Jail A vagrant got 30 days in jail by a Panamanian judge for unlawfully entering the Balboa High School stadium. An investigation revealed the vagrant had been barred from all military installations. Report suspicious activities to the MPs at 287-4401 Soldier writes bad checks A Fort Davis soldier was arrested last week for writing 14 bad checks totalling more than $2,200. The checks were written at an Army and Air Force Exchange Service facility. Writing bad checks is an offense punishable under the Uniform Code of Military Justice. Call the Army Community Services Office at 285-6517 for checkbook management help. Halloween safety Halloween trick-or-treating will be observed 5-8 p.m. Oct. 30. Officials recommend carrying flashlights, wear reflective clothing and take an adult along for the fun. For those wearing masks, be sure vision isn't hampered and have an adult check candy before eating it. Unauthorized phone calls More than $700 in long distance telephone calls were made illegally using a soldier's calling card number. Report the loss of any credit card immediately. Anonymous drug hotline Call the Panama Jack Anonymous Hotline at 2854185 with any information about drug smuggling. The following crime statistics are for on-post housing areas Oct. 1-7. Pacific Corozol housing area -one larceny of secured private property Cocoli housing area -one housebreaking and larceny of secured private property Curundu housing area -one larceny of secured private property Atlantic None to report This authorized unofficial command information pubChief.SMSgt. Steve Taylor Public Affairs Officer.Maj. Melanie Reeder lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Editor .SSgt. Deborah E. Williams Command Information Officer.Beth Taylor Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Assistant Editor .Sg. John Hall Editor.SSgt. Jane Usero Information Program of the Department of Defense, unSports Editor .Sgt. Richard Puckett Journalists.Sgt. Lori Davis der the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S. Editorial Staff .Sgt. E.J. Hersom Spec. Robin A. Mantikoski Southern Command. Rosemary Chong 24th Wing Public Affairs Office.284-5459 Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the Maureen Sampson Public Affairs Officer.Capt. Warren L. Sypher official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Volunteer Assistant.Josephine Beane Public Affairs Superintendent.MSgt. Dale Mitcham Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. Student Intern .Juan Carlos Palacio Journalists.SSgt. Rian Clawson The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Telephone Southern Command Public Affairs Office.282-4278 Sgt. James A. Rush 285-6612. Deputy Director, Public Affairs.Cmdr. Lorri Gilchrist U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 Commander in Chief.Gen. George A. Joulwan Command Information Officer.Patrick Milton Public Affairs Officer.Lt.j.g. Laura C. Moore Director, Public Affairs.Col. James L Fetig Public Affairs Supervisor.MSgt. Mike Howard Photographers.PH2 Roberto Taylor U.S. Army SouthPublicAffairsOffice. 287-3007 PH2 Delano J. Mays U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.Call USARSO rubpic Affais Tor essrysuhPulcAfisOfc.

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Tropic Times Commentary O. Field shows how the other side 'hooches' by MSgt. Joe Ferrare Those couple of obstacles are two different "Sure, we get all that stuff, but we don't use it," USARSO Public Affairs Office concertina wire barriers and a bunker. I'd seen other Ham says. infantrymen cutting through concertina wire the day I'm sure it's nice to get up in the morning and roll A s a public service, I'd like to give before, and it's a grueling, dangerous couple of your shelter into something the size of your forearm, everyone a little something to think minutes even when there aren't live rounds flying. but 1 don't know if I could stretch a poncho to cover about the next time they're standing Concertina wire, in case you don't know, is little all my hopes of a good night's sleep. next to the Old Sarge in front of the razor blades strung along hoops of twisting wire like All this kind of takes my by surprise, because, main exchange, waiting for the rain to stop so the devil's very own Christmas wreath. One soldier while I've been around the infantry before, I've never they can dash the 50 yards to their cars. cuts his way through it with wire cutters while his been around light fighters. I've been around the There's no theme here, no moral and buddies cover him. mechanized infantry, with their Bradley fighting certainly no message (this ain't Western Ham tells me how they cut through the strands and vehicles, and the infantry in Berlin, where they Union). Just a slice of somebody else's life cleaned out the bunker, but he might as well have concentrated (naturally enough) on in-city fighting. that's food for thought: been talking about shoveling out the driveway before But in Panama they fight light. I'd visited the Spec. Paul Ham isn't a big guy. Trim and spare, he running to the store for milk and eggs. But by now brigade's tactical operations center earlier in the day, has sharp features and a small moustache obscured by I've gotten used to how they talk about what they do. A and was struck with how small it was. Two yuppie sweat-streaked face camouflage and helmet-matted long string of events involving anklecouples on a weekend hair. deep mud,_acloud ofbugs,_impassable camping trip would take Ham and the other infantrymen in his squad are pampa grass, live ammunition, splitup more space than the sitting under a building's overhanging roof. The second teamwork, limb-threatening e 193rd's staff was using overhang offers a thin line of relief from the maneuvers and more sweat and "The test of a vocation is the love to control the afternoon's blazing sun, but scant hope of shelter physical exertion than a whole of the drudgery it involves." movements of more from the rain that's turning the approaching clouds company of soldiers would put out than a thousand people. that heavy, inevitable blue so familiar late in the rainy during an hour of physical training -Logan Pearsall Smith Among those people season. becomes a phrase these Afterhoughts are Ham and his fellow Not that Ham and the others are worried about infantrymen toss off casually: "We squad members, who getting wet: they're still soaked from a live-fire just stayed in our lanes, cleared the barriers and took break out their Meals, Ready to Eat while we're assault they've just finished. Sweat and slick mud the objective." talking. They go through them as methodically as fight over every inch of their uniforms and exposed I take all that in and, just to get something other they do everything else, trading seemingly identical skin. The gear that sits in little piles around them is than good-training quotes, I ask Ham about the living brown packages and spreading mystery condiments as filthy and ragged as they are, and after they clean accommodations. on crackers. They're in the middle of their meal when and refit the next mission will get them and their gear "So what have they got you sleeping in, tents?" they get the call to head for the After-Action Review. filthy and ragged again. They all chuckle. The 193rd Infantry Brigade is a They don't complain or hesitate, because after the These are not guys whose biggest uniform worries light infantry unit, and for Ham and the rest that AAR they'll get their much coveted down time. As are holes burnt around their buttons at the cleaners. means no tents on field training exercises like these. soon as they stand up it starts to rain. No one seems to These guys are why the Army has a Tropic Test Site, "We put up poncho hooches," Ham explains. notice much except me. why it spends millions on uniform design and testing. "Hooch" is slang for any ramshackle dwelling, but for I catch a ride back to the base camp with the I'm at Empire Range talking to Ham and the people familiar with a poncho, using one for more captain who's been taking me around and it's raining others about their day, trying to get a few colorful than a sun shower is a stroll down misery lane. all the way back. words for the article on page three. I've been out to A poncho is essentially a big waterproof sheet Driving away from the base camp, which is (and, importantly, back from) the field a couple of with a hood and drawstrings, and a soldier wearing between the Pizza Hut at Rodman Naval Station and times to cover the exercise, and what I've gotten in one looks like the ghost of dryness past, hovering the Veterans of Foreign Wars post in Cocoli, the rain addition to some photos and pithy quotes is a sharp like a mottled lump in the daily downpour. What peters out and stops just down the road from where jog to the memory: this field duty is even tougher ponchos lack in actual ability to keep the rain off another soldier is getting wet standing guard. Behind than I remember it. they make up for by being aggravating and me it's still raining, and clouds and pelting rain But I've pretty much gotten over the memory jog, cumbersome. obscure the hills farther off, about where Ham and the and I'm starting to take it for granted again. I ask the And these guys string them up in the middle of the others are. obligatory training questions and get the obligatory trees and blooming pampa grass so they can sleep in Just ahead the sun is shining on Rodman NS and great-training answers. These guys appreciate the relative dryness after a long day of assaulting Howard AFB and I remember what my drill sergeant need for tough training, and they treat it matter-ofobstacles and marching up and down hills. told us when we asked why soldiers can't use factly. To get to the objective of their live-fire exercise This too, Ham and the others toss off matter-ofumbrellas. they had to go through what Ham calls "a couple of factly: "We put up poncho hooches." "It doesn't rain in the Army," he explained. "It obstacles." "Don't they give you guys shelter-halves?" I ask. rains on the Army." Direct _ _otes Do people appreciate the hardships military people suffer? -r-7 "Yes, they undergo a "Not as much any"I think so, people see "They take for granted "No. They would lot of trouble for our more. They take a lot they do the best they what we do. They have the rather have you in the community and the of things for granted can do. Those guys idea that we will always be field than in their American people." and are quick to react work hard." there." house." to (the opinions of) television." Sabine Thompson Pvt.2 Jarrett Logan Orlando Del Vasto Air Force SSgt. Kevin Brown Sgt. Eric Troxler Army family member Army military policeman Civilian employee Electronic engineer Army Infantryman 194th MP Company 106th Signal Brigade Southern Command Network Company A, 5/87th The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries -or responses to commentaries -to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

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8 Tropic Times Oct. 15, 1993 Joulwan: Troops, families most important to SOUTHCOM mission What sort of progress has been made Central and South American in a way that really sure how they're going to develop, Continued from page 1. since then? can assist in strengthening democratic inwhat problems this chemical dependency arrival here in Panama, throughout the What we ended up doing immediately stitutions? How can we work with them will cause them. theater, we had three coups, an insurrecwas confront the war in El Salvador, the as partners and allies, as members of a As a result of all that, the health care tion and a war occur. escalation by the communist insurgents of profession that has the goal of supporting and other associated costs with illegal This forced a re-evaluation of what our the fight there. They introduced very sodemocracy. And as I said so often, our dugs, in the United States, according to mission was all about. How do we go phisticated surface-to-air missiles, SArole is not just equipment and training, but Health and Human Services, was $168 bilabout assessing that mission? And what 14s, and shot down three or four El Salvato impart ideals and values. What is the lion last year. sort if strategy can we come up with to doran helicopters and planes. This was a role of a military in a democratic political We're taking casualties. So I really use the assets that we do have to the clear escalation of the fight, so we had to institution? made that a top priority because of the best advantage? And so, as we lookmake some early-on decisions on how do We are subservient to civilian control. threat it has to our citizens, and also the ed around the area, the 19 countries of we demonstrate the United States' comWe respect human rights. And I think we threat it poses to the fragile democracies the Southem Command, not only here in mitment and resolve in El Salvador? need to have that professional dialog with of Central and South America. It's like a Panama, but from Guatemala to Chile, The command got directly involved in the militaries of Central and South cancer that's eating at these fragile dewhat I came up with was that there were that. Trainers from the 24th Wing and America -and we have. mocracies we're trying to strengthen. So some clear priorities that we had to adfrom our other components provided asI think that dialog has been welcome the host nations have got to realize that just. sistance to the El Salvadoran armed forces by the military professionals and we have it's their sovereignty that's being violated, We had an on-going war in El Salvaand President Cristiani. We surged some seen a substantial change in the relationit's their police and military and judges dor that had been going on for 12 years, logistical equipment, some planes and heship between the militaries and the civilbeing corrupted, it's their children that are killing tens of thousands of El Salvadorlicopters, into El Salvador in January of ian leadership in Central and South being addicted, and it's their democracy ans. How do we address that war? What '91, even with the large flow of equipment America. that's being threatened. is it that we're looking for? Is it a negotigoing into Desert Shield. So the realizaCounterdrug efforts have become a big What I've tried to do is work with them ated settlement? (If) so, how can we bring tion by Washington that this was an impriority at SOUTHCOM. Why and what in defending their sovereignty, their dethat about? How can we assist other agenportant mission for us was very clear. progress has been made in stopping the mocracy, and I've asked for their demoncies that are involved? This was the tuming point in that war. illicitflow ofdrugs? stration of national will against this narcoI was very concerned in this assessIt was a clear sign of our commitment -We need to understand the dimensions trafficker. ment with the Treaty Implementation we were not going to abandon El Salvaof this threat. And I call it a threat beAnd I think one of the things that's Plan for Panama. Really, not much had dor. That led to very real successes on the cause perhaps we confuse the drug dealers pleased me over the past three years is that been done since the treaties were signed battlefield for the El Salvandoran armed on the streets of New York or Washington we have seen this national will emerging, and during those 12 years we had not forces, to the human rights arena, and to a or San Francisco as the dug threat. It's and not just from one country, but from made much progress in coming up with a peace accord with the FLNM. Since then, really much more than that. This is a huge the entire region, from the political leadplan to implement the treaty. So that was there's been compliance with the peace criminal network that has its roots in our ership, from the military, from the police, part of that assessment. accords and we've watched El Salvador region down here, in the Andean region from the people themselves who now unEqually important to me was the and the El Salvadoran armed forces tranand particularly in Columbia. And they derstand the threat the narco-trafficker counterdrug effort. We had many, many sition from war to peace. are pumping out hundreds of metric tons poses to theiy counties, to their citizens, agencies involved from our government, I'm very pleased with that. It's been a of a chemical called cocaine that is inflictand to their children. and host nation involvement. I really great accomplishment for, I think, ing casualties on the United States, counAnother initiative of yours was the didn't see an operational plan on our part SOUTHCOM, the United States, but partries in this hemisphere, and indeed, if not Treaty Implementation Plan. What's the on how we can best support those agenticularly the El Salvadoran people. the world. status ofthat plan? cies in what I considered to be this vital There seems to be an increased interLast year alone, we had in the United Let me be very clear. My instructions mission. est in mutual cooperation between States 10,000 killed as a result of cocaine. are to implement the Panama Canal As I came into Panama three years ago SOUTHCOM and other militaries from Not Somalians, not Bosnians, but AmeriTreaty. That treaty calls for us to have all these were the sort of challenges that faced the region? Why is that? cans. In the last three years, some 900,000 the military out of Panama by noon of 31 us -that I thought needed to be adPart of this assessment I talk about said: crack babies were bom in the United December 1999. We have developed a dressed. How can we engage with the militaries of States. Drug dependent at birth. We're not plan to do that, and it has already started. We will drawdown gradually.we are working very closely with the Panamanians in order to ensure success. We want From Gen. Colin L. Powell, from Gen. George then successfulandweareworing I'm very optimistic that the PanamaA. Joulwan, to the people of SOUTHCOM. cce"'B v be very clear about what my instructions are. There's been some talk about a presence after the year 2000. That is between the government of Panama and the gov.C.A.MN Femrnent of the United States. Not with the 0Spe 1CINC (commander in chief). And it's at those levels that those discussion have to take place. General Gerte Aoun. USA But I owe it to the command here that u Southern we're not going to knee-jerk out of open Letter to the Troops and their Fmilies: APO AA 34001, Panma Panama. We're going to have an orderly I would like to ehers ,aoth you letter free our mthbll recentCheornn of the Joint Chief, of Steff. It Deer George, transition out and we have a plan to do in oeddrn toe bUT i joinea reet soldind As I depart the chairmanship and retire fr, our beaoned that, and my successor will inherit that woa nteSUHO anl.Iji ra Ary, Ioartttolet yuknoh AlhuePrcaed your to you by expressi hew grteful I ey. for yu port and counsel o kr the almost 3 yeor, you hae b d plan and will continue on with that implenervi to our country. ICICSOUTA. He could not have managed without you. mentation. Im sharing thin letter ith yo becus it in Thes hon See tr.y hitoi tie. .h .o senthe U"'i I about you. It is you whove done eG th e herd wo, SBerln al c omen ast tuhrpe ree and the SI olon king towardtthefture, what do you .otributing no Ouch of your energy end intellect to fade into the history hooks, There has hee a oar In the Glf tikr h n motn hlegs In Ir te en a mth m ohvhseakwatoepndt think are the most important challenges? help further the goals of the United States I thin, and ournendwoe in ufoohobenakdto repndt vital part of arod the !irhe d ss n the nantil the s As we look to the future, the fudnto ettint and downsizing of our Arced ForcesAsw lokt th furete As I leave the United Staten Southern Conoand and sinre Aerid Oar II was begun. counterdrug effort needs to be regionalthe great People whod srehere, I want to nay thnk you for the cIuntless rfies all of you have made Less heralded, but equally dramatic and historic have been ized. We need to develop this mutual trust fo your country. Iahnbolo h hr ok h apelo nLtnAerc -s oy e'ce formed; numero and ron dIploymht an fhmily eparrtions so many hopenfl beg nn Mc o t s wer and confidence between all the nations of you have endured in making all this a reality. thoarted attets the region. We are seeing that, by the way, Each of military, civilian ~~still have elected cioilian leaders In countries .her' ite wasn eaeeigtaytewy ah of you iitary ,ivili and yur set u thet dI leaders c so roe between the Andean countries of Columfemiles -gav egully t nat ouroffets tn thegree nenand wooo of the tS Southern Comnand h ae tvei "ftf"r r oh .e pashmets i t .r y wo uery aute lost bia, Ecuador,Pe r,Bolivia. They arenow nenber of the SOOTOCOPS team. Thanks troops! plydam 1 hS l11,,nr ,wl si ONE TEAM -ONE FIGHT! George, for all you'ue done. working together, sharing information. Soinerely, Please pass on my deepest thanks ro everyone in your They have found out they have much more cosand-nllltuny and cio011n. Al, and I wish you and Iare all the bestin the days ahea. in common than differences. What they do W th warmest rgaqrds, have in common is a clear threat to their Gone U. nn Chy people and their sovereignty from the Commander in Chief narco trafficker. The regionalism, I think, needs to be developed and we see that deChN LE veloping in the Andean region. We also joint Chielo of Stoff see that happening in Central America. The challenge is how can we help these democracies to continue to transition in a way that provides freedom and justice and prosperity for their people and creates the conditions for stability without re-

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Tropic Times Oct. 15, 1993 Theater Supiport Etementphoo by Spec. Robert Menes Sgt. Timothy Ruiz comforts a Honduran girl as she awaits medical care during Exercise Cabanas II -'93. Humanitarian and nation-building missions were a top priority for SOUTHCOM components while under the command of Gen. George A. Joulwan. verting back to the old regimes. will be Friday (Oct. 15). After that, I'll cult missions that I have ever seen in my or mother deploys all over this theater in The challenge is that the military, start thinking about duties as Supreme Al33 years in the military. They've taken small groups many times each year. Therm which in many cases is the strongest instilied Commander Europe. these difficult missions and have perare separations involved with this, but the tution in the nation, feels a part of that proWhat we are doing heme is so very, very formed them superbly. We have forces quality of life that we try to provide heme cess, that it's an institution within a deimportant. It's a new way of looking at the deployed in just about every country in in Panama is, to me, very important. mocracy. And I must tell you that in my use of the military in supporting and Central and South America today in some I just want to say to those families and conversations with the leadership with strengthening democratic institutions. It's of the most difficult terrain, under some of family members how very much I appmemost of the militaries in Central and South working with ambassadors, with other the most difficult circumstances. These ciate their commitment and their support. America that they want to play that role, agencies of govemment, in working with troops, Army, Air Force, Navy, Marines And I also want to speak about the rethat what they need to do is support demothe United Nations. I think we need to inand dedicated civilians are doing those lationship between the American commucratically elected presidents. We're seestitutionalize that here. I'll look to my dumissions extremely well and representing nity and the Panamanian community. It ing that. ties as Supreme Allied Commander Euour country extremely well. is very important. I would hope that the I'm optimistic that this trend will conrope after Friday. The really important people in this members of the military who are heme or trnue. On a personal note, how do you feel command -that's the troops and their who will come here will reach out to our You will soon be Supreme Allied Cornabout your job here, your tour here ? families. I'd just like to say to them how Panamanian friends and get to know them mander Europe. What sort of challenges I must tell you that the last three years very much I've appreciated their support, and work with them. We're all Amerido you see for yourself. have exceeded all my expectations. We set their loyalty, their commitment, and their cans -North, Central and South. We Again, as I've told my staff here, I can some clear goals three years ago; we have dedication to our mission here. share the same hemisphere. only have my head in one game at a time. met or exceeded all of those goals. What I particularly want to single out the There's no more important place to be I am totally commined to the command of has impressed me the most is the troops. families, the family members and the right now in building and strengthening SOUTHCOM till the day I leave, which They have taken some of the most diffispouses, whose husband or wife or father democracy than here in Panama.

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Tropic Times !M eso s 10 5 1993lestones Promotions To Major -Maria Rivera, U.S. Army Medical Activity Panama. To Captain -John Cuellar, U.S. Army Medical Activity Panama. To Master Sergeant-Leroy Cantrell, U.S. Army Medical Activity -Panama To Sergeant First Class -Alphonso Banks ofU.S. Army MedicalActivity -Panama. John Bertschy of CompanyA, 193rd Support Battalion. To Sergeant -Chris Merida ofU.S. Army Dental Activity -Panama. Reginald Johnson of Headquarters Company, 193rd Support Battalion. Thomas Stimac of Company A, 193rd Support Battalion. To Private First Class -Christopher Glomboski of U.S. Army Dental Activity -Panama. Military awards Legion ofMerit Medal -Sgt. Maj.AnthonyFordofl06th Legion of Merit US Army photo by Sgt Lod Davs Signal Brigade. Col. Steven R. Sawdey pins the Legion of Merit Medal on the chest of Lt. Col. Charles Lucia, 106th Army Meritorious Service Medal -Spec. Walter Bell, Signal Brigade Deputy Commander. U.S. Army Medical Activity -Panama. Joint Service Commendation Medal -STM3 Donald R. Spec a i m B ir s Fisher of U.S. Navy Security Group Activity -Panama. PrimaryLeadershipDevelopmentCourseGraduation DanielleAndrea, toLt.Col.DavidandAdrianaGruenbaum Army Commendation Medal -Spec. Charles Mims of Spec. Timothy Singo of 3rd Special Operations Support Sept. 7. U.S. Army Medical Activity -Panama. Sgt. Jack Bevel of Command (Airborne). Sean Matthew, to SFC Paul and SSgt. Kim Danek Sept. 7. Company'C, 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry. SSgt. Jeffery Louis Abraham III, to Capt. Louis and Linda Wootton Hatzenbuhler of Company A, 193rd Support Battalion. Sgt. AlijahBrownof Headquarters Company was selected Sept. 9. 193rd Support Battalion Noncommissioned Officer of Dustin Robert, to PFC Gerald and Erynn Ditzenberger Navy Commendation Medal -CTACM Franklin E. the Quarter. Spec. Adrienne Johnson ofCompany B was Sept. 10. Henry of U.S. Navy Security Group Activity -Panama. selected 193rd Support Battalion Soldier ofthe Quarter. James Daniel, to Spec. Scott and Lisa Renaud Sept. 12. Trevor James Jr., to SSgt. Trevor and Kathy Kearns Sept. JointService AchievementMedal -CTI2RobertB. West Civilian awards 13. of U.S. Navy Security Group Activity -Panama. Beau Nathaniel, to Sgt. Byron and Nicole Lane Sept. 14. Performance Award -Cynthia Speed, Grace Waters, Brittany Dawn, to SSgt. Robert and Rosangela Fox Sept. Army Achievement Medal -Spec. Fred Lucas, Spec. Vincent Tapia, Sara Busquets, Rosario Gil, Victgoria 14. Stanley Ryel and Spec. Quinn Haynes, all of 3rd Special Navarro, Angela Saez, Evelia Hinda, Elna Dawkins, R. Israel Orlando, to Jeffrey and Lia Farnham Sept. 14. Operations Support Command (Airborne). SFC Robert Dias Jr., Elvira James of U.S. Medical Activity -Panama. Eduardo Samuel, to SSgt. Jose and Consuelo Concepcion Barnett, SFC Keith Braxton, SSgt. Dwight Giles, Sgt. Sept. 14. Kevin Ray and Spec. KeithFelts, all of Company B, 193rd Length of Service -25 years: Ruby Varcacia, Albert Keegan Michael, to Christopher and Misty Nelson Sept. Support Battalion. SSgt. Larry Dixon, Spec. Darrell Nation. 20 years: Rafael Ipina, Elizabeth Goldstein. 15 14. Bourque, Spec. Thomas Irvin, Spec. David Parsons and years:Franlin Almengor.10years: ArianGarcia.5 years: Kendra Tiante', to Sgt. Joseph and Gwendolyn Ramos, Spec. Seth Vanover, all of 565th Ordnance Detachment' Julia Barnabas, Fernando Guerra, Gina Cuesta, Luis MoJr. Sept. 19. 193rd Support Battalion. Medical Activity -Panama Stephen Earl, to Spec. Stephenand Yandra Jackson Sept. rales of U.S. Army M22. Navy Achievement Medal -GMN1 (SW) William S. Dylan Michael, to Sgt. Michael and Holly Reams Sept. 22. Nichols of U.S. Navy Security Group Activity -Panama. Promotions-DahliaMinott, ElsaBermudez,JudithPerkins AnnaLillian, to SSgt. Brian and ValerieFrancois Sept. 25. of U.S. Army Medical Activity -Panama. Amber Dawn, to Spec. Terry and Velkis Boss Sept. 26. Employee of the Quarter -Maj. Carlos Parrado, Capt. Timothy Ryan, to SSgt Tim and Sherry Brown Sept. 26. Danny Devier, SFC Willie Cosby, SSgt. Washington Employees of the Quarter -Barbara Yeider, Arana BrittneyFay,toEN2AnthonyandSylvanneSimsSept. 28. Cevallos, Spec. Aron Partsafas of U.S. Army Medical Guiliermo, Susan Omlin, Eustace Matthews, Aracely Brennan Lee to Spec. Brennan and Isabel Fox Sept. 28. Activity -Panama. Aguilera of U.S. Army Medical Activity -Panama. Katherine Carmela, to TSgt William and Judith Ann Brasham Sept. 28. Army Good Conduct Medal -SFC Michael Czupryn, Quality Step Increase -Cristina Beech, W. Kieswetter, Dmitri Joseph, to Spec. Frank and Antoinette Gatto Oct. Sgt. Christopher Doucet, Sgt. David Cansler, SSgt. Stella Unger, Niccole Erickson, Priscilla Alderete, M. 1. Frederick Watson, Spec. William Harris, Sgt. Darrin Ave-Ballemant of U.S. Army Medical Activity -Panama. ArianaMarie, Oct.5 to Spec. Norman andRobin Johnson. Pearceson, Spec. Trevor Wicks and Spec. Hector nzalez, all of Company C, 1st Battalion, 508th S erg eants Navy Good Conduct MedalCTRC Vernon A. Davison, COROZAL (USARSO PAO) -One is the head of point in their careers. Though they took different paths, LN1(AW) Krystal A. Jackson, CTM2 Noel E. Crowley, operations and intelligence office, the other heads logistics the drive was the same. CTM2 Samantha D. Baldwin, CTM3 Steven R. Graham, operations for the 41st Area Support Group. One wears a "Ifyou don't cut yourselfshort,neverthink you'llnever CTM3 Timothy W. Lanham, all of U.S. Navy Security drill sergeant's badge, the other Airborne wings. One makeitandtake advantageofthe options now opentoyou, Group Activity -Panama. seems quiet spoken and more reserved, the other has been you will make it," Allsopp said. "You have to accept the labeled "the clown of the office." challenges. How are you going to move forward if you Certificate ofAchievement-SSgt. Richard Cardin, SSgt. These differences palein comparisonto whatthese new don't accept the challenges?" she added. Kourtney Lee, Sgt. Angel Burgos, Sgt. Andrew Brooks, sergeants major have in common. Roberts agreed 100 percent. Sgt. Ronald Hardman, Spec. Edwin Brown, Spec. Michael From sharing the same promotion date of Oct. 1, 1993, "There are so many more options available today," she Frank, Spec. Richard Thomas, PFC Jose Diaz, PFC James to closingin fast on20 years service each, tothe hyphenated said. "You have to take the initiative, go to the schools and Pierre, Pvt. 2 Andres Arredondo and Pvt. 2 Kenneth lastnames,tositting astone'sthrow away from eachother, don'tbeafraidtotalktothosepeopleyouaspiretobelike." Diprete, all of Headquarters Company, 193rd Support Sergeants MajorMariaAllsopp-Hansel and Mary AngeloWith the options now open in today's military, espeBattalion. Spec. Scott Belson, Spec. Henry Dinapolis,Pvt. Roberts work together like a well-oiled machine. cially those for women, Roberts and Allsopp feel today's 2 Anette Houston and Spec. John Hooten, all of Company With aplayful punch in the shoulder, Roberts pulls her soldier has an advantage and should take it. A, 193rdSupport Battalion. Spec. AdrienneJohnson,SFC chairuptoAllsopp'sdesktocomparestoriesofthepastand "Back in the early '70s when we came in, it was a Christopher Hall, Sgt. Ronnie Kuhl, Sgt. Paul Lance, Sgt. plans for the future. constant fight against many barriers and stereotypes," Angela Richardson, Spec. Jean Bedquet, Spec. Russell "From the very beginning of my career, I have always Allsopp said. Dilley, Spec. James Leep, Spec. Argelis Melendez, PFC said I wanted to be Sergeant Major of the Army," Roberts Becoming airborne qualified was one such barrier Robert Baltz and PFC Jeffrey Welk, all of Company B, said. Allsopp broke early in her career. Though she broke the 193rd Support Battalion. Spec. Daniel Fagot, SSgt. WilIn total agreement, Allsopp added that they would not barrierno woman has broken herrecord ofnearly 20years, liam Kirkman, Sgt. James Brown, Spec. Christopher only bethefirst women butalsothe firstco-Sergeants Major three of which were with the Golden Knights, close to Bishop, Spec. Jeffrey Brown, Spec. Frank Valdez, PFC of the Army. 1,000 static line and 1,500 free fall jumps. Jennifer Schalk, Spec. Everett Graham and PFC Christo"When we make it, we'll make it as a team," Roberts "It was difficult for men back then to accept a woman pher Rudy, all of 565th Ordnance Detachment, 193rd added with a smile. for her accomplishments," she said. "There was always Support Battalion. It was thistypeofenthusiasm that hascarried bothtothis some other reason other than you were good at yourjob."

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Tropic Times1 otpourri Oct 15, 1993 Li Office closures Bilingual seminar Dog show F The Ammunition Supply Point One at The quarterly bilingual marriage The Club Canino de Panama will hold Rodman Naval Station will be closed for preparation seminar, sponsored by the an International and National Dog Show inventory next week. Family Life Chaplain, will be held 9 am.noon -9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the The Optometry Clinic at Howard AFB 3:30 p.m. Saturday in Building 156, Fort ATLAPA Convention Center. Admission will be closedWednesday and Oct. 27 and Clayton. To register, call 287-5877/3497. fee is $2.50. Nov. 1. Clinic personnel will be doing vision screenings at Diablo Elementary Skate night W eight management School. SaengtW ih aae et. The Fort Clayton Elementary School A weight management class will be will host a skate night 6:30-8:30 p.m. Satconducted 2-3 p.m. Tuesday at the Navy Ball buses urday in the school's playshelter. PermisHoward Education Center. Some of the Two shuttle buses will be providing sion slips are required. Admission is free class topics will be exercise, supermarket rides to the Navy Ball at the El Panama for Fort Clayton Elementary students and savvy, nutrition and dieting myths. For Hotel, Saturday. Buses will leave the Ma.25 cents for all others. information, call Donna Giroux, 284rine Exchange parking lot 5and 5:30p.m. 3014/6157. Buses will return from the El Panama Hoe hours tel at 9, 10, 11 p.m., midnight and I a.m. Shoppetteg hours h i hrea1 fefr pc For those living in housing, the bus will The Army and Air Force Exchange C available passengers on the Freedorm drop people off at their home. Service shoppette in Building 519, Fort The monthly cholesterol reduction Bird? Clayton, is now open '' a.m.-10 p.m. class will be held 8-9 am. Wednesday at A. Stations overseas must collect a Fall bazaar daily. The shoppettes at Fort Clayton the Howard Clinic. To register, or for $16 Federal Inspection Fee from all Plaza and the Curundu gas station are more information, call Donna Giroux, originating international space availThe Albrook Officers'-Spouses' Club open until midnight daily. 284-3014/6157. able passengers on Category B misfall bazaar will be at Albrook Club Satursions. day 10 am.-3 p.m. Local wares, ChristC n u esW e reM R rm mas goods and otheritems oimterstm Consumers Week Free MARS grams all over the world will be offered. There Army Community Services will celFree MARS grams are offered by the PP: Tourist Passport will be apark and ride shuttle service from ebrate National Consumers Week, Oct. Howard Military Affiliated Radio Station. TC: Tourist Card the Albrook post office to the club. 24-30. A seminar will take place 9-11:30 Messages may be sent 7 am.-4:30 p.m., V: Visa a.m. Oct. 27 at Directorate ofCivilian PerMonday through Friday, to family and PC: Proof of Citizenship sonnel Training Center, Building 6523, friends in the continental United States or US: United States Passport IG OfficeCorozal. There will be a special display at U.S. territories. For more information, Holders Only The U.S. Army South Inspector GenFort Clayton Library, Oct. 24-30 and an call 284-5164/5264. CC: Country Clearance eral Office -Atlantic is located in BuildEssay Contest at Balboa High School. A RON: Remain Overnight ing 32, Room 1, Fort Davis. The hours free drawing at the Corozal Main ExAll flights on this schedule are are 9 am.-3 p.m. Monday and 9 am.-3 change will be held 3-4 p.m. Oct. 29. Win EFMP meeting subject to cancellation. For addip.m. Tuesday if Monday is a holiday. The a trip to Miami for two, local weekend An Exceptional Family Member Protional flight information, call the Pastelephone number is 289-3966/3975. trips and more. For more information, call gram parent support group meeting will senger Service Section, 284-4306/ 285-5556. be held 7-8:30 p.m.Thursday at the 3608/4857. Alcohol/drug course Howard Enlisted Club. For reservations Saturday and more inforamtion, call 284-6410/ 1:55p. C5A Howard AFB, PN An alcohol and drug coordinators' -6457. Charleston AFB, SC RON course will be held Monday-Friday. This There will be a "Welcome to Panama" Dover AFB, Del. course certifies active duty soldiers as orientation tour 7:45 am.-2:30 p.m. E ADCs for their units and prepares them to Thursday at Club Amador. The tour inNo scheduled departures help commanders with the Alcohol and cludes briefings, information tables set up The Howard Morale Welfare and RecDrug Abuse Prevention and Control Proat the club and a tour of Panama City. A reations Services Sports and Recreation Monday gram. For more information, call 285bus will provide transportation from Rental Centeris offering weekend specials 7:30am B727 Howard AFB, PN 5419/5913. Valent Recreation Center, Fort Clayton. that include: two board games and afrisbee Charleston,SCIAP To register or for more information, call for$3;rent2 or 3 gallonsofwater/beverage Commercil contract Red Cross courses 285-6518. cooler, the center will provide the ice. For 1:55pm CSA Howard AFB, PN Red ros cousesinformation, call 284-6107. Charleston AFB3, SC RON The American Red Cross will hold the O Dover AFB, Del. following courses: community first aid -CS board and safety course 6-8:30 p.m. TuesdayThere will be an Officers' Candidate -o '-4:40am Ci3poHowaiTuesd Thursday and Nov. 16-18; and community School board for Adjutant General OperaThe U.S. Army Garrison Safety Office Tegucigalpa, Honduras first aid and safety course for instructors tions Branch 9 am. Oct. 22 in Building is looking for a part-time contract motorSoo Cano AB, Honduras 6-10 p.m. Oct. 25-28. To register or for 128. Applications must be at AG Personcycle safetyinstructor. Candidates must be Howard AFB, PN more information, call 287-6306. nel, Room 51, Building 519, Fort Clayton, qualified by the U.S. Motorcycle Safety 5:40am C141 Howard AFB, PN by today. For more information, call 287Foundation. For more information, call uma, Peru 6313. 287-4051. Santiago, Chile RON Chapel lecture La Paz, Bolivia The Fort Clayton Protestant Women of Book sale Sacred Heart Cha l Howard AFB, PN the Chapel will sponsor a lecture series 9 Book Wednesday a.m. the last Thursday ofeach month atthe The Howard Library will hold a fall The Sacred Heart Chapel is offering 5:40am C141 Howrad AFB, PN Fort Clayton Chapel sanctuary. There will book sale 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday on the Sunday massesinthreedifferentlanguages: BrasiliaBrazil V be a country crafts fair and pie tasting. landing outside the library. Proceeds will English 7:30 am.; Chinese 11:30 am. and Montevideo,Uruguay Bible study is also offered for women contributetothepurchaseofaudiocompact Spanish 5:30 p.m. The chapelislocated in BsisArgentina RON/V andchildren 9am. each Thursdayin Builddiscs to add to the library collection. For Ancon. For more Howard AFB, PN ing 156, Fort Clayton. more information, call 284-6249. information, call 262-3076. 6:45am C141 Howard AFB, PN Medevac Kelly AFB, Texas -----Charlesion APB, SC E pn MEDDAC/DENTAC temporary/permanent employees and all veteran eligible Employment candidates. Tusa Thursday Hiring opportunities arelimited because ofbudgetary constraints. Howto apply: 518A-93-LA Legal Clerk (OA), NM-986-5. Anyone who applied under VB#: 7:55am C5A Howard AFB, PN For temporary positions submit SF-171, DD214ifclaiming veteran preference, 518-93-LA need not re-apply. SoTo Cano AB, Honduras a copy of college transcripts if claiming education and a copy of Clerical AdminisCharleston AFB, SC RON trative Support Position notice of rating if applicable. For permanent positions Atlantic Kelly AFB, Texas (only for current employees including leave without pay) submit a SF-171, a 005-94-SS Guidance Counselor, NM-1704-9. Selecteemust complete a satiscopy of latest S F-50, a copy of college transcripts, a copy of your last performance factory background investigation. 9:55am C141 Howard AFB, PN appraisal and a statement addressing the job related criteria contained in the San Jose, Costa Rica announcement. Note: VB# 592-93-JH, Employee Relations Specialist, NM-230-719/l l, is not Guatemala City, Guatemal RON For more information regarding vacancy announcements (forms required, job limited to permanent employees only. Belize City, Belize related criteria,etc.), visitlheDirectorate of Civ ilian Personnel,Building 560, Room Howard AFB PN 306, Corozal, or call 285-5201. The Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting applications on a continuouns basis for the following positions. 'hese announcements amused to establish VB# VACANCIES TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 10-15-94 CLOSE: 10registers forfuture vacancies. Ot4:55pm C242 Ho A, N VB# 001 General Clerical, NM-3/4 (Used to fill most clerical positions) Charleston AFB, SC VB# 002 a Sales Store Checker, NM-3 (Intermitient wk sdi) Pacific VB# 003 Recreation Assiatant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) Requires Cecrt + 6 mtbfs 001-94-JH Administrative Services Assistant (OA), NM-303-6. Sensitive. PerBAea#o reap. manent employees only VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (req 6 mth, of recreation cxp.) 002-94-KF Budget Assistant (OA), NM-561-5. VB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5/6 VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5/6 VB# 007 Medical Officer, NE-12113/14 003p94-NC Social Service Representative, NM-197.S. Selectewl be required VB# 008 Clinical Nurse (RN license required), NM-9/10/11 in complete satisfactory background investigation. VBt 009 Practical Nurse (LPN license required), NM-5 004-94-VL Library Technician, NM-1411-6. Temp Nte: 3-31-94. Limited to CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is required.

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Sports Oct. 15,1993 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 12 24th SPS spotless in playoffs By Sgt. James A. Rush Five ofhissix treys hitinthe second half throw line for nine points in the final 20 2 and he finished with 18. minutes. 24th Wing Public Affairs Supply finisheditsregularseasonschedAlive, but struggling for breath in the HOWARD AFB -After three days of ule only one game worse than the security loser's bracketarecommunications and the playoffs, the top two intramural basketball police at 20-1. 617thAirlift Support Squadron. Theteams teams fought their way to the winners' It was the hot hand of Darryl "Dawg" played Oct. 12 for the right to face the bracket finals. Kimble that kept them from realizing their supply/security police game loser. The 24th Security Police and Supply secondloss oftheseason as theyopenedthe Communications has had an easy road squadrons facedoffOct. 12atthegymhere. playoffs against the 24th Air Intelligence/ after facing the cops in the first round. The The security police have two post-seaOperations Support squadrons' team. second game, against the 1/228th Headson wins under their belt to extend their The "Dawg" was rabid in the second quarters Company was won by forfeit. The spotless record to 23-0. half scoring all 12 of his team-high 12 Army team had to withdraw for field maTheAmericanLeague's bestteamdidn't points in the period leading his team to the neuvers. play the National League's Supply during 52-49 win. Thedeployment fairy blessedthem again the regular season. Despite Kimble's hard work, AIS/OSS foragameagainst the 310th. Halftheflying Their first playoff win came at the exstill outscored Supply in the period 35-26. squadron team, most notably Piche, was penseof the 24th Communications SquadJohnny Taylor scored only three points gone. ron Oct. 6, but it was far from an easy one. in the opening 20 minutes, but he made up Forward Bill Evans led communicaMikeOwens led the securitypolice with for lost time in the second. Taylor added 22 tons past the shorthanded 3 10th with 11 22points and teammate Juniour Davis was more to give supply a scare. J.B. Bryant points. Patryck Buckley totalled 14 in a half as good with 11. added 10 more for the loser's. valiant effort to keep the airlift squadron Communications got a big boost from Supply narrowly escaped their second going. one ofits big guys, Bill Evans. Rather than playoff game as well. They were pitted The6l7threcoveredfromits first-round taking it into the key where Owens lay against the National League's other divilosstotaketwoclosegames from, firstAIS/ waiting, Evans launched shots from the sional champ, the 310th Airlift Squadron OSS, then the 1/536th. perimeter. He finished with 18 points, half led by Pat Piche. Ken "Shotgun" Schortgen and Barry of these coming in bursts of three. Piche led all scorers with 16 points and Dowell led the way for a 59-56 ALSS win A strong defensive effort kept commuplayed a big part in keeping the flying over AIS/OSS. Their 16 and 12 points nications in the game. Halftime saw the squadron within five as the halftime score respectively placed them on the path to cops holding ontoaslim 17-16lead. Owens reached 29-24. victory. proved to be too much of a tiger to hold by Piche's teammate Rusty Mizour was Once again, it was Taylor whQ kept the OEM the tail as he came alive for 15 points in the another first-half hero earning 10 of his 13 game close. The spirit of recently retired second period to boost the final score to 40points in the period. MichaelJordantookpossessionoftheplayer 35. Dan Boughton picked up the slack for whomatchedALSS'stop scorerspoint-forGame two for the cops failed to provide the 310th in the second half pouring in 11 point. Taylor scored 21 of his 38 points in the same excitement. The 1/536th Engiof his 12 points. the second half. nearing Battalion couldn'tcontainthepowHis team, however, could make up only Schortgen rammed home nine of his 11 erful SPS offense. Once again, Owens led one point on the Supply team resulting in a points in the first halfagainst the1/536th as the way, this time with 21 points. Bernard 55-51 loss. ALSS shot out to a 32-25 led. Most of his Hodges added 12 more and Dale Camell Supply got by on a balanced attack. Its team followed his second half fade howand Carlos O'Key each contributed 11. leading scorer, guard Paul Roby, had only ever; with airlift support faltering, the Theengineerstriedagameplan unchar10 points. engineer's George Dudley and Vincent acteristic for the Army. Instead of battling The final score might have been in the James poured onthe heat racking up 16and in the trenches down low, they simply 310th'sfavorhaditnotbeenforthesecond10 points. U.S. Ar Foc. photo by Sgt. James A Rush bombed Air Force style from three-point half charge of Will Walden. Shut out in the ALSS's Nathaniel Gagum came to the Patrick Bukley of the 310th Airlift range. first period, the guard came alive after rescue though. With eight of his 14 points Squadron shoots over the 61 7th Airlift Unfortunately for the soldiers, only halftime. coming in the final period, Gagum ensured Support Squadron's Ken Schortgen. Darrin Hardiman was on target. He hit from outside, inside and the free his team finished on top 48-47. Roadrunners win Intramural League, will play interservice by Lt.j.g. Laura C. Moore USNAVSTPANCANAL Public Affairs RODMAN NS -The Roadrunners bested seven other teams to win the Intramural League Championship at Rodman Oct 6. The team will represent the Navy in the Interservice Basketball Tournament this month. The Roadrunners came from behind to beat the Naval Operations Center Shockers 62-56 in the final game, an 3 exciting finale to the two-month season. Coach Ken Simmons of the Military Sealift Command U.S. Navy photo by PH2 Rober to Taylor said, "Even though we weredown by twelve points, I never Manual Pinillo shoots a foul shot during the championship finals. lost faith in the team. I told the guys to keep their heads up, Team captain Leondray Nance credited the team's Clegg ofMarineCorps SecurityForce Company,Sherman tighten up the defense and turn up the offense a notch, so performance to Coach Simmons. "He did a great job Ward of the Naval Station Chapel, Rawle Barnwell of then we can get back in the game. coaching us. It wasn't easy. It was the best season we had. Naval MobileConstructionBattalionFive, PatriciaWallace "The second half started off with the Roadrunners We had to play each team like they could beat us. That's of the Branch Dental Clinic at Rodman, Chris Watkins of causingturnovers andscoringeasy baskets, which allowed what got us to where we are." the Medical Administrative Support Detachment at RodtheRoadrunners to get backinto the game. The wholeteam Roadrunners team members included Leondray Nance, man; Manuel Pinillo of Ocean Representative, and Oscar deserves crdit for their hard work and good hustle to win Eric Brown, Deron Pullins, and Julian Sanders of Naval Reyes of Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical the best record in the League," said Simmons. Station Security Department, Jay Kelleher and Mark Training School. Bulldogs nearly lose their half of Tigers' Evans rushes for more *Shriner Bowl coming. first place by squeaking past the than 200 yards and bumps com*Wanted: Cheerleaders. Red Machine. petitors from the charts. *Boxing tournament

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Tropic Times Oct. 15,1993 Sports shorts .0 Shrine bowl The Shriners of the Abou Saad Temple will be hosting the annual Shrine Bowl at the Balboa High School Stadium Oct. 30. The Junior All Stars will play at 4 p.m. followed by the Senior All Stars at 9 p.m. Donations of $3 for adults and $1.50 for children will benefitcrippled and burned children. Formoreinformation call Darryl Steiner at 252-5602. Fishing tourney The Shriners of the Abou Saad Temple will host a Peacock Bass Fishing Tournament Nov. 3 with several categories and three prizes for each category. All proceeds will be used for the Transportation Fund, which pays for the transportation of crippled and burned children the the Shriners Hospital in the United States. Call Terry Zittle at 261-8018 for more information. serleesq uardron Po.-by chryl Mahson Kiiaah! Basketball tourneys Manual Hernanadez breaks a board held by Kenneth Larue and Tae Kwon Do instructor Mark The Howard Sports and Fitness Center is hosting a Henderson during Hernandez's promotion test at the Zodiac Recreation Center Oct. 1. Basketball tournament Oct. 23 & 24 that is open to the first 10 teams to sign up. Ages 19 and older are welcome to participate. For more information Call 284-3451. Tee times AF swim team coaches Registration for unit level basketball is underway at The Amador Golf Course is now using scheduled TheAlbrookand Howard swimming teams are-lookthe Fronius Fitness Centeron Fort Davis. An organizastarting times for tee-off times on weekends and U.S. ing for qualified coaches and youth swimmers for the tional meetingis scheduledatnoonNov. 6attheSundial holidays. 1993-94 swimming season. Recreation Center. Call 289-3108. Only groups of three or-four may reserve tee times All age groups and skill levels of children are welThe registration deadline for the Pacific unit level before 10 a.m. come to participate. competition Oct. 26. A clinicis scheduled forThursday Reservations are accepted beginning the Wednesday Coaches will be paid according to the number of at the Director ofCommunity Activities Sports Branch. before the weekend. For reservations or more informaparticipants in the program. Call 287-4050. tion call 282-4511. Team workouts are approximately three days a week NavyTurey B wl eamthroughout the school year. Navy Turkey Bowl team Anyone interested in coaching should contact Vince Youth Swim team Anyone interested in joining the Navy Turkey Bowl Duncan at the Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195. Parents Howard/Albrook Youth Swim Team registration is team should contact Morise Conerly at 283-4061 or or swimmers interested should call Duncan or Gary underway for children ages 8-17. Meetings and pracMatthew Hertat283-4412. Practices held Monday and Hankins,286-4571. tices are held at the Howard Pool Mondays, WednesWednesday at 5 p.m. and Saturday at 10 a.m. at the days, Thursdays and Fridays at 4:30 p.m. and at the Rodman soccer field. Rodman Youth Swim Team Albrook Pool Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at4:30p.m. Monthlyfees are $25 withoutapool Rodman boxing night Registration for Rodman Youth Swim Team at the pass and $20 with apool pass. Formore information call Rodman Pool is open. Swim practices are held MontheZodiacCommunity Activities Centerat284-6109or Rodman Naval Station is hosting a boxing night days and Wednesdays at 4 p.m. at the Rodman Pool. Lisa Nofi at 284-3569. invitational 6 p.m. Nov. 6. It is open to all active duty New members are welcome. Monthly fees are $20 military novice and sub-novice boxers. without a pool pass and $15 with a pool pass and Formore information contact Navy, Michael Hogan, includes a T-shirt. Call 283-4222. Curly Bates tourney 284-5653 or George Foley, 283-6355; Air Force, Joe The annual Curly Bates Memorial Mixed Bowling Epperson, 284-3811; Army, Directorate of Community Tournament will be held Saturday and Sunday at the Activities Sports Branch, 287-4050 or the Rodman Free weight training Curundu Bowling Center. Fitness Center, 283-4222/4061. Free weight training sessions and Nautilus training Registration is $15. Shifts are set for I and 4 p.m. on All participants must wear 16 oz. gloves, in accorsessions are held at the Fronius Fitness Center, Fort both days. Bowlers will bowl three games each day on dance with Navy regulations. Davis. the shift they sign up for. For information, call 286The weight training classes are held 3-4 p.m. Tues3914. R g days and Thursdays. tourney The Nautilus sessions are held 3-4 p.m. Tuesdays. The U.S. Southern Command Rugby Team will be Registration is required. Call 289-3108 for more inforSCN AM radio sports playingin atournamentOct. 30in Quito,Ecuador. Any mation. The Southern Command Network's AM 790 Pacific players interested in competing should contact Hank and 1420 Atlantic will broadcast the following sports Cook at 289-4642. Leave name, unit and phone numFitness, weightlifting classes this weekend. ber. Fte s eg titn ls e Saturday Registration for six-week fitness and weightlifting College football: VirginiaatFla. Stateat3p.m. classes at the Rodman Fitness Center is under way. World Series Game 1 at 7 p.m. S ldr t program Classes are held every Monday, Wednesday and Friday Sunday The Howard/Albrook sports and fitness centers have from 4:30 to 6p.m. Call 283-4222/4061. Pro football: Philadelphia at N. Y. Giants at started several new self-directed aerobics programs. noon. San Francisco at Dallas at 3 p.m. "Row the Mississippi," "Ski the Appalachian Trail," World Series Game 2 at 7 p.m. and "Climb Mount Everest" are now available for Fishing tournament prospective adventurers at the centers. For more inforAn inter-club fishing tournament will be held in mation, call 284-3451. Atlantic waters until Nov. 30. Columbus tourneys The event is sponsored by Club Nautico Caribe, the A Columbus Day water basketball tournament is Panama Canal Tarpon Club and the Panama Canal scheduled for 9 a.m. Saturday. Registration deadline is Officials recruitment Yacht Club. today. For information, call 289-3272. The Panama Armed Forces Officials Association is The fishermen who land the largest barracuda, warecruiting officials on both sides of the isthmus. hoo, kingfish,jack/tuna, marlin, sailfish and tarpon will ukey BMeetings are held 1 p.m. every second Saturday of win prizes. Prizes will be awarded for the top three urkey ow themonthattheValentRecreationCenter,Fort Clayton. catches in each category. The Army Directorate of Community Activities Military, civilians and family members may join. Call The entrance fee is $20 per angler and may be paid Sports Branch is accepting resumes for Army Turkey 287-5572 or 247-0511 after 9 p.m. at the bar ofany ofthe clubs or to Francisco Lopez, 241Bowl team coaches. Call 287-4050. The Howard/Albrook Officials Association is also 2025; Alberto Villa, 245-4379; Gabriel Kam, 241Cheerleaders are needed forU.S. Army Turkey Bowl looking for new officials. The association offers profes0675; Helio D. Alves,243-4146; Mike Bell, 243-5207; team. Participants must be between the ages of 17 and sional training, clinics and a pay check. Alberto Alba, 245-0733; Gerry Laatz, 243-5652; Johnny 25. Call Heidi Ratliffat 287-5021 or Daphne McWhorter The meetings are 7:30 p.m. every third Thursday of Kirby, 241-5883; Fermin Pinel, 241-6003. at 287-4297.Cheerleaders are also needed for the Air the month at the Howard Youth Center. Force Turkey Bowl team. Volunteers can be male or Interestedpeoplemust be fluentinEnglish. Call284female, but must be at least 19 years old. Call MSgt. 5371. Swimming lessons Donna Coleman at 284-3665. Registration for beginner and advanced swimming Bike Rentals lessons at the Rodman and Farfan pool is underway. No tap Classes are held Tuesday, Wednesday and Thurstournament The Rodman Fitness Centerrents bikes at hourly ($1) days from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. There The Curundu Bowling Center will host its monthly and weekly ($25) rates. Bicycles taken off Rodman is a $20 fee for the six week course. For more informano tap tournament 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Registration require a $25 deposit. Call 283-4222/4061 for more tion call 283-4222/4061. taken at the door. For information call 286-3194. information.

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14Topic Times 1Oct. 15, 1993 Departnient of Defense photo by Sgi. E J Hersom Green Devils' linebacker Lee Gibson tackles the Cougars Joe Shaha by the legs. Muddy Frmidy Bulldogs, Tigers tied with 4 wins by Sgt. E.J. Hersom Tropic Times Staff BALBOA -The Cristobal Tigers and the Balboa Bulldogs remain tied for first in week five with 4 wins and 1 loss each. The Bulldogs edged by the Red Machine (1-4)7 2 Oct. 8 at Balboa High School Stadium here. The Bulldog's Taiwuan Hopkins scored the game's only touchdown with a 14 yard rush in the first quarter. The Red Machine's special teams accounted for the team's two points when they nailed Bulldog quarterback Jerome Price in his end zone for a safety. The remainder of the game was scoreless, but only Cougars' Lance VonHollen cools off with a splash of water. because a 70-plus yard punt return for a touchdown by the Red Machine's Joe Gutierez was called back in what could for more than 50 yards each while the Red Machine picked the late game at Balboa Stadium as the Green Devils (3-2) be the most unusual play of the season thus far. up 19 yards total rushing. beat the Curundu Cougars (2-3) 27 -13. The officials called the Red Machine touchdown back The Tiger's Marcus Evans rushed for 217 yards that Reese scored two touchdowns on the night and rushed becausethey said the punt could not be advanced after it had same evening on the Atlantic side of the isthmus as the for 142 yards with 21 carries. Ortiz scored one touchdown bounced off the unaware and unknowing head of the Tigers went on to crush the Kiwanis Koltz (0-5) 16-0. and rushed' for 126 with only nine carries while Quinn Bulldog's Brent Smiley. Evans has carried the ball 49 times this season for a total rushed for 50 yards with nine carries. The officials made matters worse for the Red Machine of 408 yards giving him an 8.3 yard rushing average. Carlos Lampas ran for a 34 -yard touchdown, his first by not calling the touchdown back before the extra point Tiger quarterback Ricky Alverez completed three of of the season, and kicked three extra points for the Green and kick off giving them the false hope of holding a 9-2 seven for 29 yards during the evening and is the only Devils. lead. quarterback in the league yet to throw an interception. But the Cougars didn't take the game lying down. The league rules state they have three plays to make up Rob Bernhardt kicked a field goal in the first quarter Cougars' quarterback Robert Garcia completed 9 of 18 their minds. putting the Tigers up 3-0 only to be followed with touchfor 150 yards on the evening and snuck in a touchdown for Bulldog coach Tom Ellis predicted correctly that the downs by Alverez and Evans to cinch the game. Donald Riviera to kick an extra point. aftemoon's rain would give him an advantage with the The Koltz. the Koltz. 0-5. Robert Reyes was set back 12 yards during the evening running game. The Green Devil's Wilbert Reese -Tyler Quinn -Dan by the Green Devils' defense, but nonetheless managed to The Bulldog's Adam Beach, Hopkins and Price rushed Oniz scoring trio continued to take names and numbers in pick up a nine-yard touchdown run.

PAGE 15

Tropic Times Oct. 15, 199315 Depannt oDefnse phos>by Sgt. E.J. Hersom. Cougars' quarterback Robert Garcia fades back for a passing attempt. Garcia threw for 150 yards Oct.8. Evans'first chart appearance takes second in rushing TheffolowingarethestatisticalleadTeam defense, passing allowed 5. 18 Acosta, Tigers 4. 6.2 Beach ers for the 1993 Panama Area Depart1. 116 Tigers 6.15 Rivera, Cougars 5.5.6 Townsend mentof Defense Dependent'sSchool's 2.126 Cougars 7.13 LampasGreen Devils 6. 5.43 Sanchez football season through the first five 3.190 Bulldogs 8. 12 Shaha, Cougars; Sanchez, Red; 7. 5.2 GoldiniKiwanis games. Team statistics as well as indi4.281 Red Machine Hovan, Red, Garcia Cougars, Ortiz, 8. 4.8 Price vidual player numbers are included. 5.357 Green Devils 9. 7 Bernhardt Tigers 9. 4.6 Acosta 6. 422 Kolts Team offense, rushing Touchdowns Passing yardage leaders 1.1308 Green Devils Total points 1.8 Reese QB Corn Att TD Int Yd 2. 935 Tigers 1.126 Green Devils 2.7 Quinn Garcia 24 47 3 4 403 3.904 Bulldogs 2.90 Cougars 3.6 Price Alvarez 22 47 3 0 259 4.540 Cougars 3.87 Bulldogs 4.4 Townsend, VonHollen, and Reyes Corrigan 13 48 4 3 212 5.455 Red Machine 4.66Tigers 5.3 Acosta Price 5 21 1 1 190 6.256 Kolts 5.46 Red Machine 6.2 Hovan, Sanchez, Shaha Ford 6 30 1 2 175 6.18 Kolts 10 tied with one Quinn 10 24 0 5 86 Team offense, passing 1. 458 Cougars Total points, allowed Individual rushing yardage Individual receiving leaders 2.259TIgers 1. 14 Bulldogs 1. 685 Reese 1.184 Sanchez 3.248 Kolts 2.41 Green Devils 2.408 Evans, Tigers 2.182 Rivera, Cougars 4.229 Bulldogs 3.41 Tigers 3. 407 Ortiz, Green Devils 3.154 Reyes 5. 183 Red Machine 4.71 Red Machine 4.358 Beach, Bulldogs 4.149 Staton, Bulldogs 6.86 Green Devils 5.92 Cougars 5.357 Townsend 5.116 Acosta 6.136 Kolts 6.265 Shaha 6.106 Chanis, Kolts Team defense, rushing allowed 7.261 Price 1.377 Bulldogs Scoring 8.189 VonHollen Kickoff return leaders (min 4) 2.577 Green Devils 1. 50 Reese, Green Devils 1. 20.5 Twohy, Red Machine 3.639 Tigers 2.42 Quinn, Green Devils Indv. rushing average (min 28 carries) 2. 18.2 A costa 4.822 Red Machine 3.36 Price, Bulldogs 1. 13.1 Ortiz 3. 17.75 Reyes 5. 959 Kolts 4.24 Townsend, Tigers; VonHollen, 2.8.3 Evans 4. 17.6 Rivera 6.1024Cougars Cougars; Reyes, Cougars 3 7.2 Reese 5.12.5 Castillero, Kolts

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Tropic Times LUOct. 15, 1993 Local sailors help with Project Handclasp by Lt. j.g. Laura C. Moore USNAVSTAPANCANAL PAO RODMAN NS -Members of Rodman Naval Station banded together last week to bring much needed clothing and supplies to Teen Challenge, an organization in Panama which helps over 300 recovering drug and alcohol addicts. Rodman sailors delivered four pallets of clothing, hygienic supplies, school books, and a sewing machine kit to the Teen Challenge Center on Via Espana. The sewing machine kit will help the people Teen Challenge serves learn a marketable skill. Donated materials came from the Project Handclasp warehouse at Rodman. U.S. companies donate goods, which go to one of the three Project Handclasp warehouses worldwide. The warehouse at Rodman holds goods for distribution here in Panama, or for deployed Navy ships to distribute in the region. "I'm very happy that the Navy came here to help us. I don't feel alone in this work and I feel that someone else cares about the people hem," said Pastor Luis C. Neito, US. Navy photo by PH2 Delano J. May& who is the president and director of all 11 Teen ChalConstructionman Robert E. Krause, Naval Station Seabee Division, hands a box of supplies to Jose lenge centers in Panama. Fierro, a Teen Challenge counselor. The purpose of the centers is to teach former addicts "People in Teen Challenge know how it feels to be difficult time for them. Most of them are fighting addicskills so that they may support themselves and stay away addicted, so they know how to approach people who are don to drugs or alcohol," said Ilya Carrera, Facilities Supfrom drugs, said Jose Fierro, who is in charge of the Teen trying to get over addiction,"Fierro said. port Contracts Director at Rodman. "As a Panamanian, Challenge center at Via Espana and who is a former drug A Navy civilian who helped deliver the donated goods it's amazing to me that companies in the U.S. care addict himself. Fierro said the centers also teach former said she enjoyed the experience. enough to donate these things to needy people here in addicts to help others. "I got the feeling that we were helping people in a Panama." New Stars and Stripes bookstores Postal officials offer keep quality of life emphasis going express mailservice HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PA) -Local miliCOROZAL (USARSO PAO) -Pacific and Atlantic ers, said the bookstore manager Virginia Beach. tary post offices offer Express Mail Military SerU.S. military community shoppers now have new Stars "We have seen many of our regular customers but vice for people don't want their family in the and Stripes Bookstores to browse through in the Corozal there have been many new faces since we opened here," states to wait for gifts, said 24th Air Postal SquadMall and at Fort Davis. she said. ron officials. In keeping with the command's emphasis on quality The store includes more than $250,000 worth of books Express Mail is given priority over all other of life, the new bookstores have opened their doors in in a wide variety of topics for all ages, Beach added. The classes of mail, officials said. Fees are $9.95 for time for the 1993 Christmas shopping season. stores also have magazines, newspapers, video cassettes the first eight ounces and $13.95 for up to two The presence of the Stars and Stripes Bookstores, a and educational audio cassettes. pounds. An average of $2 is added for each addiseparate and independent organization from the Army In addition to the top ten best sellers, shoppers can tonal pound. and Air Force Exchange Service, represents another milefind books on such topics as languages, cooking, sports, Delivery normally takes two or three days stone of Army excellence, said Jerry Carrillo, regional medicine, parenting and computers, she said. from the time mail clears customs in Miami. Sermanager for Stars and Stripes. There are also books for coloring, crossword puzzles, vice includes insurance against loss, damage or "The Directorate of Engineering and Housing undercomics, music, home improvements, cars, fashions and rifling at no additional cost. Claims must be filed took the bookstores project as a Panama Army Commuhairstyling. Though the stores are new and the merchanwithin 90 days of mailing. The girth plus the nities of Excellence initiative with the intent of providing dise expanded, customer service remains. length of packages may not exceed 108 inches excellent quality services combined with world class fa"The customer is first, second and third," Carillo said. and they may not weigh more than 70 pounds. cilitics," said Lt. Col. John Lovo, DEH director. "The new "We believe a good inventory is important, but a happy, For more information, visit or call your local Stars and Stripes Bookstores emerged as paragons of exsatisfied customer is even more so." military post office. cellence that will serve to enhance the quality of life for The Corozal store is open 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Mondaythe military community in Panama." Saturday and 10 am.-5 p.m. Sunday and will have their DCP benefits branch This enhanced quality of life has already been grand opening 10:30 am. Oct. 22. The Fort Davis store put to the test as the Corozal store opened its doors will open Oct. 23 with a grand opening to be held later in changes locations Oct. 2 and has seen an endless stream of customthe month. COROZAL (USARSO PAO) -Directorate of Howard's new teen center opens doors PesonentB customers Howad's ew een ente op nsd ors whefnd the viitew lofice anow ian imrome101to by SSgt. Rian Clawson "We're still waiting for some wall decorations and a when they visit the office now in room 101 of by1h Wing. Pbicn Cfas n few more pieces of furniture to arrive," McIntire said "It Building 560, Corozal, DCP officials said. should get here by the end of the month. When it does, The Benefits Branch only moved about 20 feet 24h ig ubi Afar soldge er b heen f h mnt.Whn tdos but it will mean a world of difference for the cusHoward AFB -Work on the long-awaited Howard we're going to have a grand opening extravaganza that tomers they serve, said Berta Lord, Benefits Hideout Teen Center is now complete and officials will will knock your socks off." Branch chief. celebrate by holding a teen dance from 7:30 to 11:30p.m. There have been several efforts in the past to get a The employees made the move on their own Saturday, said Chris McIntire, teen center director. center going for Howard's teen community, but they by coordinating the work needed with the DirecThe center is inviting all teenagers (13-19 years old) weren't very successful, he said. ,, or niner nd itg thd pemofrom military families in the area to the dance. Snacks "This time it's going to be different," he said. torate of Engineering and Housing and personwill be available and a disc jockey will provide music. Money is the main mason this time will be different, ally doing much ofthe design, set up and interior The Howard Hideout is located on Farfan, next to the McIntire said. 'decorating, she said. pool in Building 6302-the old Don Lee restaurant. "We got a $50,000 grant from the Air Force Aid SociwThe eret of aheappeitg an soe The 24th Civil Engineerng Squadron, civilian conety that enabled us to provide all these amenities. If not was the creation of an appealing and customertractors and youth volunteers began its remodeling in for the AFA, the Howard Hideout would not exist. Lord said. "An office area was also set up for the July. Another bonus has been the teen council's participaNARFE Volunteer Retiree Assistance Center "This project was a consolidated effort by people from tion, primarily Alex Staton, Lance Vonollen, Nick Robwithin the new Benefits Branch." many separate organizations, especially budget, finance erts and Paul Edwards. .Those needing information or help with rand contracting. CE worked mally hard, moving walls, "Our teen council has been involved in the center tment health and life insurance, Thrift Sayfilling in doorways, and building a dance floor with risers project since the beginning," McIntire said. "They helped ings Plan, Panama Social Security, Living Quarand hand rails around it," McIntire said. select the design of the floor plans, the color schemes, ters Allowance or Workers' Compensation ben"They also built a computer center where we have even the carpeting and wall decorations. efits may call the Benefits Branch at 285-5745/ three 386computers with all the bells and whistles on "I liked the idea of teenagers having a say in what was e94t/5284 which our teens can do homework, write a letter to a going into the center," Staton said. "I figure we should be 5941/5284. friend or play computer games." the ones to decide what kinds of things the center should 'Me office is open 7:15 am.-4:15 p.m. while Other additions include a sports bar where teens can have, since we're the ones who will be using it." the National Association ofRetired Federal Emget non-alcolic drinks, hot dogs, popcorn, nachos and "I'm confident the Howard Ilideout will see a lot of ployees Volunteer Retiree Assistance Center is other food items. use by our teenagers," McIntire said. "We've all put a lot open 8:30 am.-4 p.m. Wednesday only. FormThere's also a wide-screen TV and a stereo VCR so of time and effort into it, and I think they're really going formation a] 295-4325. teens can watch sports, movies and more. to enjoy it."