Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text


Gift of the Panama Canal Museum


Tropic


Times


Vnl VI Mn 10


Ouarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Friday, Oct. 1, 1993


CPO opens new
1-stop info center
COROZAL (USARSO PAO) - People wanting
employment information from all agencies in the
U.S. military community can now get it in one stop
at the new One-stop Job Information Center at the
Directorate of Civilian Personnel, Building 560 in
Corozal.
The new center is set up so job applicants will
no longer have to go to several places for informa-
tion, everything is now available in one place, said
Harry Remshard, Recruitmnent and Placement Di-
vision chief
The center has a full time counselor to help with
things such as application review, career coun-
seling, job availability and employment eligibility
on a walk-in basis as well as theone-on-one coun-
seling services for those making appointments.
The center is also planning to include informa-
tion from the Air Force, Army and Air Force Ex-
change Service, the Panama Canal Commission
and world-wide vacancy announcements,
Remshard said.
"All of these changes had one primary objec-
tive," said Jack Penkoske, Director of Civilian Per-
sonnel. "We want to ensure our customers are pro-
vided all the information and assistance they need
in as pleasant an atmosphere as possible."
The center is open 7:15 a.m.-4:15 p.m. Mon-
day-Friday. The telephone number is 285-5201.

Local officials clarify
traffic mahuallissue
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - In the
Sept. 17 issue of the Tropic Times, the Mayors'
Corer referred to getting and carrying the new
Panamanian traffic manual. This manual is now
being amended and will not be published until the
amendments have been completed, said Panama-
nian government officials.
The new law requiring drivers to carry this
manual will not be enforced until it has been ap-
proved by the government of Panama, officials
said. Anyone receiving a traffic ticket from
Panama National Police should call the Military
Police Host Nation Liaison Officer at 287-3376.
Navy Birthday Ball
tickets available now
RODMAN NS (USNAVSTAPANCANAL
PAO) - Tickets for the Navy Birthday Ball Oct. 16
at the El Panama Hotel are now on sale. Tickets are
$13 for E-1-E-6, $18 for E-7-E-9 and $23 for
officers and civilians. The price includes three
beverages. Call Lt. j.g. Laura Moore, 283-5641, for
more information.

DEH sets water main
flushing, AC shutoff
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The Di-
rectorate of Engineering and Housing will flush
water mains 8 a.m.-6 p.m. through Sunday. Water
pressure in the Quarry Heights housing area will be
low for no longer than one hour in each area, DEH
officials said.
There will also be an air conditioning shutdown
on Fort Clayton 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday for mainte-
nance. Affected buildings will be 49, 64, 95, 101,
127,128,130-132,200-205,207,208,210-215 and
217-220.


N w**as

War-time scenarios test medical
soldiers vying for Expert Field Medi-
cal Badge.


-w


Down 'n dirty U.S. Air Force photo by SMSgt Boyd Belcher
Down 'n dirty
1 st Lt. Drew McCall, C Company, 1 st Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry Regiment, stows his gear after
jumping from a C-27 Spartan. See story and photos on pages 8 and 9.


Inspection yields CDS top honors


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The U.S. Army
South Child Development Services received top honors
during a surprise inspection by the Army Child Care Edu-
cation Team from Washington, D.C., recently.
The CDS's performance earned the certification with
commendation and will be used as an example for other
CDS programs throughout the Army, said Jill Petrucci,
Child Development Services Coordinator.
"The success of the program is a team effort on the
part of each member of our CDS staff," she said. "All are
professionals and take pride in their positions and are
committed to providing quality child care for all our pa-
trons."
The Department of the Army team inspects the entire
CDS program, Petrucci said. Some of the areas include
facility requirements, programming, food services, par-
ent participation and health and sanitation.
"The team looks at the total program," she said. "They
talk to everyone and look at everything."



U.S. Defense secretary orders first
wave of 600-soldier deployment
into Haiti.


Petrucci attributes the success of the program to the
staffs dedication and enthusiasm.
"We've come a long way," she said. "Four years ago
we received several deficiencies that we had to correct.
Since then everyone has pitched in and done their part."
She also credits the community for the success.
The team not only looked at the CDS itself, but also
the organizations which support the programs, such as
parents, safety, Community Health and Preventive Medi-
cine.
"It is also a true team effort on the part of many others
in the community," Petrucci said. "The team also com-
mended the amount of parent participation in the pro-
gram. They (parents) have been very supportive."
Petrucci said the fact the certification inspections are
not announced, shows that efforts are continuous.
"We are very proud of what we, the community, have
accomplished and look forward to maintaining quality
services. We will continue 'doing the best for the best.'"



*Contraband control, page 2.
*C-27 drop, pages 8 & 9.
*Air Force basketball, page 11.


. . .07


r-
~- ----~--~e~p, .:_,










2 Tropic Times
Oct. 1, 1993


Center



offers



October



classes
HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PA) - The
Howard/Albrook Family Support Center,
in Building 707 here, has a variety ofevents
scheduled for October. The center is open
7:30 am.-4:30 p.m., Monday through Fri-
day. Reservations arerequired forall work-
shops. For more information and/or reser-
vations call 284-5650.
*Atwo-daycitizenshippreparationclass
will be offered from 1-4 p.m. Monday and
Wednesday. This workshop will help you
prepare for the naturalization test.
*JobSearchis offered every Tuesday at
10 am. to provide spouses with informa-
tion on the techniques to effectively search
for a job in Panama.
*A Smooth Move Workshop will be
offered 8:30-10 am. Wednesday. This
workshop will have representatives from
finance, family services, housing, military
personnel, the traffic management office,
legal, and 24th Medical Squadron to brief
and answer questions about moving.
+Volunteer management training,
sponsored by the Family Support Center,
will beoffered from 9-11 am. Oct. 18inthe
wing conference room, Building 703,


Howard AFB. This training session is for
people who supervise volunteers, or who
want to explore the option of enhancing
their workplace with volunteers. Partici-
pants will be guided through a step by step
process to identify and define their volun-
teer needs and how to manage volunteers.
*An SF-171 workshop is offered 8:30-
10:30 am. Oct. 14 to inform people about
the federal hiring procedures, and how to
complete the SF-171 application form.
*A transition assistance seminar will
beheld8a.m.-4p.m. Oct. 20and21. This
two-day training program is designed to
help separating military members and their
families transition from a military career to
a civilian career. The workshops offer a


systematic approach which includes skills
analysis, career exploration, employment
research, resume preparation, interview
skills, benefits, and financial management.
Each module builds on the previous one, so
attendance for both days is recommended.
Students should wear civilian attire.
*Welcome to Panama-will be held 8
a.m. Oct. 21 at Club Amador. It's held qy
Army Community Service. The tour bus.-s
depart from the Family Support Center,
Howard AFB at 7:30 am. and the Valent
Recreation Center, Fort Clayton at 7:45
a.m. Theorientation is for military person-
nel, DoD civilians and their family mem-
bers. It will include information tables,
Panamanian dancers, tours ofPanama City


and Miraflores Locks. For reservations
and free child care, call the FSC.
*Checkbook maintenance is taught 9-
11:30 a.m. Oct. 28. Learn how to accu-
rately use and balance a checkbook.
*Transition assistance counseling is
available by appointment, at the FSC, 7:30
a.m. - 4:30 p.m. by calling 284-3865/4347.
*Budget counseling is available by ap-
pointment, at theFSC, 7:30 am.- 4:30 p.m.
by calling 284-5010.
Volunteers are needed in family ser-
vices to assist with the loan closet, base
brochure library, and layette program.
Family servicesis open 10a.m-3p.m. Free
child care is available to all volunteers.
Come in or call 284-5860.


Officials update controlled items limitations


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - U.S. citizens
who shop in theArmy and AirForce ExchangeSystem and
commissary facilities in Panama must follow certain rules
when buying controlled items, said Lt. CoL James Parry,
Military Police Command deputy commander.
The limitations have been imposed to comply with the
Panama Canal Treaty and to make sure everyone has a
chance to buy what they need, he said. These limitations
are outlined in Southern Command Regulation 1-19.
According to the regulation, the following are food and
beverage limitations:
*beer - 10 cases per month per household
+liquor - eight bottles or 50 miniatures per month per
household
*cigarettes - 12 cartons per month or three cartons per
week per person
*chicken - eight packages per week per household
*ham - one packaged or canned per week per house-
hold
*turkey- onewholeand six packages ofparts perweek
per household
*bacon - four pounds per month per person
*canned milk - eight large or 20 small cans per month
per person
+cornish hens - eight per month per person


*disposable diapers - 120 diapers per week per child
*hot dogs - four pounds per month per person
*laundry soap - 20 pounds per month per person
*sandwich meat - 80 ounces per month per person
*shampoo - 64 ounces per month per person
*soup - 16 cans per month per person
*cooking oil - five gallons per month per person
+pork shoulder - one per week per person
When buying more than one case of beer, two bottles of
liquor or 16 miniatures in one day, customers must fill out
SC form 55-A, Parry said. This includes purchases made
at more than one facility during that day.
There are alsolimitations on majorpurchaseitems such
as washers and refrigerators, he added. Whenever a major
purchase is made, the buyer must fill out SC form 55. The
following items and limits are per household per tour
which is considered 36 months.
*air conditioner - four
*clothes dryer - one
*dishwasher - one
*electric typewriter - two
*freezer - one
*golf club sets - two
*microwaves - one
*pianos or organs - one


*lawn mower - one
*tape deck, tape recorderor compact disc players - two
*tuner, amplifier or receiver - two
*bicycle - one per household member
*car radio or tape player - one per registered vehicle
+cameras - two of more than $100
*computers - two
*CPU, keyboards, printers or single drives - four
*living and dining room sets - one
*bedroom sets - three
*cribs - one per child
*silverware - two complete sets of more than $50
*ranges - one
*refrigerators - one
*sewing machines - one
*stereo sets - two
*televisions - three
*vacuum cleaners - two
*video cameras - one
*video recorders - two
*washing machine - one
Some items not listed may be temporarily regulated by
theexchangeor commissary facilities becauseof availabil-
ity, Parry explained.
For more information, call 286-3117/3303.


Air Force makes weight, fitness program changes


WAS INGTON (Air Force News Ser-
vice)- Changes in the AirForce Weight and
Fitness Program will require members to
lose less body fat per month and give
women more time after pregnancy to meet
standards.
The changes also will affect Air Force
Reserve members.
Women in the weight management pro-
gram now need onlylose 1 percent body fat
orthree pounds per month to be considered
making "satisfactory progress," said Air
Force personnel officials here.
Men need lose only 1 percent body fator
five pounds per month, officials said.
The change means people in the weight
managementprogram now haveto fail both
the body fat and weight loss standards to be
considered making unsatisfactory progress,


officials said.
Additionally, women won'thaveto meet
weight and fitness standards until sixmonths
after their pregnancy.
Women who were withinthis six-month
window when enrolled in the weight pro-
gram will be disenrolled and any adminis-
trative actions taken against them will be
deleted from their records.
However,administrtiveactions against
women who were at or beyond the six-
month mark are still valid, officials said.
The Air Force Reserve starts its new
weight management program today. Al-
though AFRES will scale back how often it
measures people with excess body fat, it
won't reduce the penalty for those who
don't meet the standards.
"Wecunrentlycheckpeopleintheweight


management program every month to en-
sure they are making satisfactoryprogress,"
said TSgt. Mark Williamson of the Head-
quarters AFRES Personnel Actions Branch
at Robins AFB, Ga.
"Under the new system, we are going
strictly with bodyfatmeasurements. People
will have a prescribed amount of time to
meet standards. If they don't, they will be
transferred to the Air Reserve Personnel
Center's Non-affiliated Reserve Section,"
Williamson said.
Under the new program:
People already in the weight manage-
ment program will be converted to the new
program today or during their first unit
training assembly.
Reservists who are at or below their
maximum body fatstandard will enter 12-


monthprobationperiod,regardless of when
they started the weight management pro-
gram.
These people will still be subject to
measurement when directed by the unit
commanderorunder certain circumstances,
such as an obvious increase in body fat.
People above their maximum body fat
will have four months to lose the excess.
If reservists don't reach or drop below
their body fat standard in the allotted time,
the unit commander will transfer them to
NARS. People can applyto rejoin theirunit
after they meet recruitment standards.
Thenew allowances forpregnant women
also apply to the Reserve program.
The new Air Force Reserve supplement
to Air Force Regulation 35411 gives more
details about the new program.


) I~




























































US Army photoby Sg Lon Dams
Capt. Latanya Lee-(left) and Sgt. Jerold Patton help SSgt. Antonio Flores during the litter obstacle portion
of Expert Field Medical Badge testing.


142nd Medical Bn. soldiers


stive for expert field badge


by Sgt. Lori Davis
USARSO Public Affairs Office

EMPIRE RANGE - Soldiers put their combat medical
skills to the test in the jungle at Empire Range recently,
striving to earn the Expert Field Medical Badge.
Only about one-third of the 89 soldiers who started the
test were successful, said SFC Raymond James, noncom-
missioned officerin charge of the EFMB site forthe 142nd
Medical Battalion.
The week-long testing began with a written examina-
tion of soldier skills such as map reading, field sanitation
and medical skills such as evacuations and emergency
medical treatment, he said.
The written test eliminated more soldiers than anything
else, James added.
The next four days included hands-on tests such as the
litter obstacle course, emergency medical techniques and
combat survival skills. Theweekended with a 12-mileroad
march, James said.
Medical soldiers start to learn these skills in basic
training and advanced individual training, but to qualify
for the expert badge they must go further. Units begin
intensive training six-to-nine months before the EFMB
qualification test, he said.
Soldiers volunteer to be tested for the badge. Any
medical soldier fromtheprivateintherecords section to the
general who administrates the hospital can attempt to earn
the EFMB, James said.
A soldier who earns the EFMB joins an elite group of
combat medics. Only seven percent of the people who try
to earn the badge Army-wide make it to graduation day,
James said.
"The point (of EFMB) is to develop esprit de corps,


"A lot of times when we think of
medics we think of people in white
suits who work in hospitals, work 9 to 5
and go home and don't really get
muddy and do anything in the field."

Dr.( Capt) Latanya Lee
Medical Activity

professional pride and to drill the medical personnel in
their war-time mission," he said.
The 142nd created testing conditions to simulate war-
time missions to test the soldiers abilities under strenuous
circumstances and to prepare them forreal conflict, James
explained.
"This focus on the field and the war-time mission is
designed to make sure we are ready for war," James
explained.
Dr. (Capt) Latanya Lee, Medical Activity, said she
decided to try forthe badge because she works inanoffice,
but wanted to learn about the combat side of medicine.
"It looked like good challenge," she said. "It gives you
a new perspective of Army medicine."
A lot of times when we think of medics we think of
peoplein white suits who working hospitals, work to 5 and
go home and don'treally get muddy and do anything in the
field," she said.
"That images somewhat correct, but not totally correct.
Everywhere soldiers are going, whether they are jumping
out of planes or they're on boats, there are medics along
with them," she said.


Tropic Times 3
Oct. 1, 1993

Customer Services now
open during lunchtime
FORT CLAYTON - People who use customer
service offices in Building 519, here, can now do
business during the lunch hour, said Lt. Col. Alvin
Phillips, Adjutant General.
"Wehavechangedourpolicyandputourpeople
on staggered (lunch) hours from 11 am. to 1 p.m.
so we can better serve our customers," he said.
This newlunch-timepolicyisn't theonly change
customers will soon see when they visit the offices
at Building 519, Phillips added.
"We are trying to find ways to better serve our
customers and to be user friendly," he said. "Our
goal is to continue to give first class customer
service from the identification card desk to the
passport and visa office to the officer and enlisted
records sections and everything in between."
Working withthe staff he has now,Phillips said
he feels this goal is within easy reach, he said.
"I have some of the best workers in Panama and
ourimprovements will be coming from the bottom
up,"Phillips added. "Each person from the private
on up will be rethinking and relooking at how we
are doing our jobs."
As each worker looks at his area for changes,
Phillips' looks at the entire picture. His highest
priority is taking care of the customer, he said.
"If we don't take care of everyone, even that
private or family member who comes in for one
small piece of information, we aren't doing our
job," Phillips explained.
Sometimes people tend to explain why they
can't do something by using and quoting regula-
tions but regulations are only guidelines and if
something falls into a gray area, we need to lean in
favor of the soldier, Phillips said.
Another way Phillips plans to improve cus-
tomer service is by not giving AG-wide training
holidays during the work week unless it is a
training holiday for the rest of the USARSO.
"Why should all of our sections be closed on a
day when our customers may need to use our
facilities?" he explained."Giving AG workers time
off is not a problem and ensuring my people get
adequate time off can be done without shutting
down the entire operation."
Working smarter, notharder seems to bethe key
to Phillips' philosophy as he wanders from office
to office and chats with customers as well as
workers to see how the AG services are doing.
"As Ialwaystell mypeople,'it's not how it can't
be done, but how it can be done.'"

USARSO council says
no support services cut
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - There
will be no cutbacksin services during the upcoming
fiscal year said U.S. Army South support services
leaders at the USARSO Pacific Town Council
meeting Tuesday.
More than 20 military and civilian support
services representatives gathered at the Fort Clay-
ton Noncommissioned Officers' Club and talked
about the concerns of the military community.
"In the coming year, there will be no degrada-
tion of services and quality of life," said Col. M.
Jeffry Petrucci, U.S. Army Garrison-Panama com-
mander.
The new Self-Help store is a service leaders
expect to help keep quality of life high in the
community. Directorate of Engineering and Hous-
ing set up the store for the Pacific community.
"We'll run it (the store) like a business. If the
need is there, we'll provide it," said Lt. Col. John
Lovo, DEH director.
Serving the community with a high quality of
life is also a concern for Lt. Col. Sam Johnson, U.S.
Army Dental Activity.
Budget cutbacks have not affected the number
of dentists, he said. DENTAC will continue to
meet the basic needs of family members with
cleaning, fillings and pain stopping, he added.
"Access for (family member) dental care will
continue to be challenging and we will manage it
well," he said.
Petrucci expressed gratitude for the communi-
ties' involvement in taking second in the Army
Communities of Excellence competition.
Also,USARSO Deputy CommanderBrig. Gen.
James Wilson stressed the value of suth meetings
by pointing out that many of the questions
received on the USARSO commander's hotline
could have been answered at the meeting.









4 Tropic Times
Oct 1,1993


SeHemisphere


Haitian leader resists resigning

Policechief blamed
for wave of terror
vows to die in Haiti --
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti, '
(Reuters) - The police chief of
Port-au-Prince, who diplomats
accuse of being behind the wave
ofterror blocking Haiti's returnto f".
democracy, is resisting interna-
tional pressure to resign and vow-
ing "to die here."
As eight U.S. Congressmen
arrived here Sept. 24 to assess the
chances ofousted President Jean-
Bertrand Aristidereturning home
by Oct. 30, Police Chief Michel.
Francois gave a defiant interview _ .
to a local newspaper, saying, " "
will die here. I am Haitian." . i t Pe p
Francois, the man widely be- APasr photo
lived to have led the coup that U.N. Envoy Dante Capute arrives in Port-Au-Prince to meet with General
overthrew President Jean- RaoulCedras.
Bertrand Aristide almost two years ago, said he would unnoticed," Rangel said. "The violence is inconsistent
resist pressure to resign and hinted he had the strong with the agreement"
backing of his 1,500-member force. After meeting with Malval, Rangel indicated he would
When asked by the daily newspaperLe Nouvelliste, like to see forceused against Cedras ifthe violence did not
if his men would let him go, he replied: "That is the stop.
question." "He should take a look at Panama and Grenada,"
However, Francois said he mightleaveiftheorder came Rangel said.
from his boss, army leader Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras. That Tuesday, U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-
would only happen, though, if the decision was "taken American Affairs, Alexander Watson, said using military
without external influence," he added. might against Haiti the Western Hemisphere's poorest
Francois also said allegations by U.N. special envoy nation, would be a "terrible idea."
Dante Caputo that he or his supporters were involved in Rangel and his colleagues presented Malval with a
more than 100 killings since July 1 were unfounded. letter of support from President Clinton. They are sched-
"They dare to accuse me without proof," he said. "A uled to meet with political and business leaders, human
diplomat should weigh his words." rights activists and diplomats during the two-day visit,
HumanrightsgroupsanddiplomatsblameFrancoisfor after which they will present their findings to the
the violence that has threatened to scuttle a U.N. peace president.
plan that allows for Aristide's return on Oct. 30. An aide said they hope to arrange a meeting with
Under the plan, signed on Governors Island in New military leaders, including Cedras and Francois.
YorkJuly3,Aristideistoreassumethepresidency,Cedras Human rights groups say that dozens of people have
is to resign and Francois is to be reassigned to a new post. been killed in recent weeks by opponents ofAristide and
Although the plan is, according to one Western diplo- Aristide this week called for the resumption of U.N.
mat,ina "deeplyprecarious"state,Francoissaidhewould sanctions to force the "killers" who head the country's
not blockits completion. "Theproblems won't come from army and police to halt widespread violence.
Michel Francois," he said. "Cedras is a killer, Francois is killerr" he said, adding,
A group of U.S. congressmen arrived in Haiti Friday to "Remove the killers immediately."
assess the chances of Aristide's return and to lend support Among those killed recently was Antoine Izmery, akey
to Prime Minister Robert Malval, the businessman chosen backer of Aristide who was dragged out of a memorial
by Aristide to pave the way for his return. service in a church last week and shot dead by gunmen
New York Democratic Congressman Charles Rangel, believed to belong to an auxiliary police force known as
the delegation's leader, said he believed the transition was "attaches."
"going great" but added that he was worried about the A group of about 100 attaches a week ago disrupted a
human rights abuses. swearing-in ceremony for the new foreign minister, shout-
"We are concerned about the loss oflife that is going by ing insults at Malval and his ministers.

Honduran military men concerned


about selling the country's air force


TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras (AP) - An increasingly
popular proposal to sell off Central America's only fleet
of jet fighters has this country's military men aghast.
"I can't imagine what would happen to national secu-
rity if Honduras decides to sell the 13 F-5Ejets," said the
armed forces chief, Gen. Luis Alonso Discua.
"The Honduran state would beleft defenseless because
with the fighters, Honduras maintains air supremacy in
Central America," he added in an interview with The
Associated Press.
The proposal has surfaced before, but is getting more
attention as Nov. 28 presidential election approaches.
After all, its proponents note, two civil wars that raged
on Honduras' borders in El Salvador and Nicaragua for
most of the past decade have ended. The country itself
hasn't fought a war since a brief scrap with El Salvador 24
years ago, and none of its neighbors have comparable
weapons.
Somepoliticians are looking at thelarge military budget
as a source of savings they could use for health, education
and crime prevention.
It costs the country $3.2 million in fuel alone to operate
the jets, which were donated by the United States in 1987
to replace 13 Frenchjets from the 1950s and help it defend


against the leftist Sandinistas to the south.
Honduras' military ran the country until 1982 but still
maintains tremendous influence and runs much of the
economy.
Carlos Roberto Reina, presidential candidate of the
LiberalParty-aleading opposition force andthe second-
largest party - said he would sell the jets immediately if
elected.
Last year, Liberal Party congressman Jose Martinez
Benitez proposed a study of selling the F-5Es, but the
measure failed.
President Rafael Leonardo Callejas, who by law cannot
seek reelection, has been ambiguous on the proposal.
He calls the idea of selling thejets "an ideal... because
maintaining the equipment is onerous." But he also says
proceeds from any sale would go to the United States and
that Honduras "would have to acquire other, similar
equipment for national defense."
Union leaders have other plans for the money.
"It's not justified to have sophisticated warplanes
while the people lack medicines, hospitals and other basic
necessities," said Rafael Alegria, secretary-general of the
100,000-member National Center of Farm Workers in
Honduras.


Natural gas explosion
kills dozens in Venezuela
CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) - A natural gas
pipeline exploded beneath a busy highway during
the morning rush hour, engulfing a bus and cars in
flames. The state news agency said about 50 people
died.
Many of the victims had been riding in a bus. At
least nine other vehicles caught fire.
The state news agency, Venpres, said 50 or more
people were killed.
Firefighter Rodolfo Guilarte, citing interviews
with rescue workers at the scene, told The Associ-
ated Press at least 51 people died.
"The people were destroyed...They are putting
the remains in bags with numbers, and will try to
identify them at the morgue. Everybody was com-
pletely burned," said AP photographer Diego
Giudice.
The pipeline apparently was ruptured by a state
telephone company excavation crew that was dig-
ging to lay fiber optic cables to impro ve telephone
lines, according to regional civil defense director
HomeroRauseo and Marcos Dietrich, a spokesman
for the state gas company.
The force of the explosion flipped over a phone
company truck. The driver survived.
The explosion occurred shortly before 8 a.m. on
the Central Regional Highway that links Caracas
with cities to the south and west. Initial reports said
a collision between a bus and a car set off the blast.
The highway was closed in both directions near
the town of La Victoria, 30 miles southwest of
Caracas.

Lunar eclipse will be visible
in Central America Nov. 28
SAN JOSE, COSTA RICA (Reuters) - Resi-
dents ofCostaRica and Mexico in Central America
will have the best view of the most striking lunar
eclipse of the decade, a science group official said
Sept 24.
"Itll be one of the most agreeable eclipses
because we don't have clouds that time of year and
no preparation is necessary," the Foundation for
Science and Space Education executive director
Ricardo Valverde told Reuters.
The eclipse-caused by earth's shadow on the
moon as earth slips between the sun and moon -
is expected to begin at 12:45 am. EDT on the night
of Nov. 28 and last for 40 minutes.
Unlike solareclipses, which should not be viewed
directly, eclipses of the moon may be observed
without special protective equipment.
"We'll have good view ofthe best lunar eclipse
of this decade," Valverde said.
He said total lunar eclipses occur about every
three years, and only when the moon is full as it will
be on the night of Nov. 28.

El Salvador Marxists
adopt new ideology
SANSALVADOR,El Salvador(AP)- A major
Marxist faction from El Salvador's civil war an-
nounced it was adopting a new ideology Tuesday
to accompany its new, peacetime name.
The Renovating Expression of the People -
formerlythePeople's Revolutionary Army-called
news conference to sayit was dumping Marxism-
Leninism, moving toward the center and "social
democracy."
"The extremes don't have much political force,"
said the group's secretary-general, Joaquin
Villalobos, who was considered one of the most
radical rebel commanders in El Salvador's 12-year
civil war, which ended in January 1992.
The five guerrilla factions of the Farabundo
Marti National Liberation, which fought a succes-
sion of U.S.-backed governments, are becoming
political parties to run in the March 1994 presiden-
tial election.
Villalobos said his party had to shift its politics
or risk becoming "a leftist orphan" in the wake of
the collapse of the European Marxist governments
that long backed the FMLN.










* Military News


Aspin orders 600

troops to Haiti
WASHINGTON (AP) - Defense Secretary Les Aspin
has ordered the first deployment of some 600 U.S. military
engineers, medical and civil affairs specialists to Haiti as
part of aUnited Nations mission, the Pentagon announced
Tuesday.
The U.S. forces are going to Haiti apart of aU.N. plan
approved last week. The goal is to help restore democracy
to the island nation and help rebuild its infrastructure.
The six-month mission is supposed to help profession-
alize the Caribbean nation's police and army, monitor
police actions in terms of human rights and undertake
major public works projects.
President Jean-Bertrand Aristide is to return from exile
next month. He was ousted in a bloody coupin September
1991.
An advance team of 25 American military officers will
arriveWednesday and prepare forthe 600-membergroup,
which is expected to begin arriving Oct. 11, said a state-
ment released at the Pentagon.
The U.S. deployment will include 140 members of an
engineer team, 100 military trainers and 350 logistics and
other support personnel, the statement said.
They will participate in renovating medical facilities
and roads, and construct military barracks and training
sites, the statement said.
The U.S. forces will be in a"non-confrontational role,"
the statement added.
The U.S. commander of the force will be Army CoL
James Pulley, who will report to the U.N. envoy to Haiti,
Dante Caputo, the Pentagon said.


K: P
f f


APLaserPhoto
Jean-Bertrand Aristide casts his ballot in Port-au-Prince during the Haiti national elections in 1990.
Bertrand will return to Haiti from exile this month.
The forces are expected to operate in and around Port- effort, the Pentagon statement said.
au-Prince. Although there has been an escalation in the political
The U.N. Security Council has approved the deploy- violence in Haiti, the U.N. mission is not designed to be a
ment of some 1,600 members of its mission. Besides the traditional peacekeeping mission that would help restore
United States, Canada and Argentina will also support the law and order.


CIA director orders covert case releases


WASHINGTON (AP) - The details of
11 covert operations conducted by the CIA
during the Cold War may soon be made
public as part of the spy agency's effort to
widen access to U.S. intelligence.
CIA Director James Woolsey told the
House IntelligenceCommitteeTuesday that
he had ordered the declassification review
of several covert operations that were un-
dertaken by the CIA 30 years ago or more.
These included U.S. activities to block
communism in France and Italy; support
for Indonesian rebels in 1958; support to
Tibetan guerrillas in the 1950s and early
60s; operations against North Koreaduring
the Korean war, and operations in Laos in
the 1960s.
Woolsey said the intelligence-sharing
effort includes such projects as providing
spy satellite data for Midwest flood relief
efforts.
The CIA gave the U.S. Geological Sur-
vey computerized drawings, based on satel-
lite imagery, showing the areas affected by
the recent flooding. Last year the CIA
shared its highly sensitive satellite infor-
mation with disaster relief operations after
Hurricane Andrew.
The agency doesn'tprovideraw footage
in orderto protect the exact capability of its
satellites, and also because the images are
harder to interpret, said an agency official


who spoke on condition of anonymity.
Still, thespy satellitesprovidefar sharper
imagery than that available to the govern-
ment from commercial or weather satel-
lites.
The voluminous satellite archives could
soon have another civilian use.
A joint commission of scientists, CIA
and Pentagon officials is about to complete
report recommending ways in which spy
satellite data can be made available for
environmental research. The report is due
in a few weeks.
But most of the CIA's planned secrets
sharing relates to the past Still, several
lawmakers expressed concern that releas-
ing records of 30-year-old covert opera-
tions could strain relations with foreign
nations.
But Woolseyassuredthe committee that
theadministrationwouldtakeforeign-policy
implications into consideration before re-
leasing such records.
David Gries, the director of the review
process, told the panel that the operations
have all been written about, sometimes by
former agency officials.
The governments involved as well as
the State Department knew the documents
were planned for release, he said.
The review is likely to take at least two
years, said an agency official, because of a


backlogofotherhistorical documentsslated
for declassification.
Work was only recently started on the
declassification ordered by Woolsey's pre-
decessor, Robert Gates, of records pertain-
ing to CIA support for coups in Guatemala
and Iran in the 1950s, as well as on the Bay
of Pigs and other agency operations in the
Dominican Republic and the Congo.
In addition, the agency is in the process
of releasing almost 300 intelligence esti-
mates aboutthe Soviet Union, written from
1947to 1983. Anditis reviewing some350
other estimates, 30 years or older, on such
subjects as the 1947 Greek-Turkish crisis,
the Korean War and U.S. involvement in
Vietnam.
Woolsey said work on these estimates is
likely to take less time because he had
ordered a "block review" of these records
rather than the line-by-line process used to
review documents of less analytical and
more operational nature.
The declassification projects have been
made possible by the end of the Cold War,
and they are expected to be of great help to
historians writing the annals of that period.
"When the protection of certain infor-
mation is no longer required," Woolsey
said, "then we owe it to our citizens to work
hardto disclose as much ofthat information
as we can...warts and all."


Congress plans alternative to gay issue


Accidents


claim 1,000


annually
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Every year
hundreds of U.S. soldiers are killed,
their bodies sent home in coffins to
family members who can dolittle more
than grieve.
Peace is hell.
As recent spate of fatal helicopter
crashes shows, preparing.for war is
often deadlier than war itself.
Non-combat accidents ranging
from helicopter crashes to electrocu-
tions have killed U.S. soldiers at arate
of nearly 1,000 a year - 4,666 in the
last five years. The deaths include
those that occur off-duty.
In contrast, 170 soldiers have died
in combat since 1988, including 121
during Operation Desert Storm and
Desert Shield, the Pentagon says.
"One death is too many," said Eu-
gene Carroll, a retired admiral and
director of the private Center for De-
fense Information.
"But we fly too many millions of
hours, we fire too many guns, we sail
too many miles - going all the time,
day night. Peoplearejust going to die."
For people like Joseph Connors,
whose son drowned whilein the Navy,
the accident rate is just too high.
Connors is head of Concerned Ameri-
cans for Military Improvement, a
Florida group pushing for bettertrain-
ing and other steps to improve safety.
The Pentagon notes that the num-
bers includenon-job-related accidents,
including auto accidents when a sol-
dier is on his or her own time. The
military doesn't differentiate because
"a soldier is a soldier 24 hours a day,"
'said Pentagon spokesmanLt. Col. Doug
Hart.
For instance, a soldier can die in a
car accident while driving home after
an all-night training exercise. Whether
the crash was the fault of the soldier's
fatigue or another driver, it's still
counted as a military accident.


homosexuals in the military, with the House Tuesday embracing the
legislation that discourages gay enlistment. The vote was 301-134.
Conferees fromthe House and Senate areexpectedto meetduring
the next month to reconcile their two bills, with the language on gays
in the military already resolved.
Final congressional approval of the budget and Clinton's ex-
pected signature will make the congressional policy on gays law,
superseding the president's own directive.
Eager to see the issue disappear, the Clinton administration has
expressed no opposition to the congressional policy, describing it as
consistent with the president's.
Clinton announced a compromise plan July 19 that ended the
practice of questioning recruits and servicemembers about their
sexual orientation, but allowed the military to continue to discharge
homosexuals.
Earlier this month, the Senate, and then the House Tuesday,
adopted a policy crafted by Sen. Sam Nunn, D-Ga., the Armed
Services chairman who fought the president's initial attempts to lift
the ban outright


Tropic Times
Oct. 1, 1993


WASHINGTON (AP) - The Pentagon may delay enforcing
President Clinton's policy on homosexuals in uniform while
Congress completes an alternative approach that discourages
gays from serving in the armed forces.
The president's policy of"don't ask, don't tell, don't pursue"
is to go into effect today, and the Pentagon has drawn up three
regulations for military commanders dealing with recruitment,
separation from the service and investigations of suspected
homosexuals.
Pentagon sources, who spoke on condition of anonymity
Tuesday, said the Clinton administration may allow the interim
plan to continue as the Defense Department deals with court
challenges and pending House and Senate action on the defense
budget.
"We probably will not issue them Friday (today)," a senior
Pentagon official said of the directives.
The Senate has completed its version of the fiscal 1994
spending plan; the House is expected to approve its bill today.
BoththeSenateand Househaveadoptedidenticalpolicies on


A










6Tropic Times
Oct. 1, 1993


SVoices


Reader concerned about local weather reports


Dear Mayors' Corner,
I am writing to you to ask about the
weather reporting on SCN. I don't under-
stand why it is so bad. I have been in
Panama for three years and the weather
report is the same thing every night. Noth-
ing is ever said about coming or passing
storms or what to be prepared for.
Never have I ever viewed one quite so
bad. I'm sureitcould bebetterthanitis. We
all know what will be said by heart, we
laugh as we repeat it every evening.
Please try to improve it.

Thank You Kindly
Robert Cubite

Dear Mr. Cubite,
I submitted your concerns to Lt. Col.
Jerry R. White at Southern Command Net-
work and I received the following informa-
tion.
White said that reporting Panama
weather on SCN was initiated about ten
months ago as a result of viewer interest in
high and low temperatures and tide data.
Expanding the weather segment is a top
priority with SCN. They are currently
discussing the issue with the commander,
24th Weather Squadron.


Theproblemwithexpanding theweather
and providing more information is one of
manning, notalackofdesiretoget the word
out to the public. Unfortunately, neither
SCN nor the 24th Weather Squadron are
manned to provide a forecaster and so far,
weather information you see is a result of
personal initiative by SSgt. Rich Slominsky.
Without his efforts and the support of the
weather squadron commander, we would
not have a weather segment at all.
SCN wants to expand the weather seg-
ment to include information on AMC's
primary destinations in CONUS and Latin
America. Theyare also lookinginto means
for acquiring satellite photo loops of Cen-
tral America so that information can be
provided on fronts or changing weather
patterns. However, itgets backto manning,
who will provide the information, and how
it will get to SCN.
White saidthat SCN looks fornew ways
to serve the community and they are work-
ing hard to provide the information re-
quired in all areas, including the weather.
If people have future questions, White
encourages them to contact him directly at


Southern Command Network. Chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS).
Editor'snote:Thlscolunm allowscon- Anonymity will be granted upon request.
munity members to submit questions to The Tropic Times reserves the right to
the Mayoral Congress. Letters shouldbe edit letters and responses for brevity,
mailed to: Mayors' Corner, Publicity clarity and propriety.


MPs arrest man forwriting $2,500 in bad checks


Worthless checks
A man was arrested by military police last week after
he wrote nine bad checks worth more than $2,500.
Writing bed checks is an offense under the Uniform
Code of Military Justice. Be sure to keep accurate records
of checks at all times.
Anyone wanting help with checkbook management
may call the Army Community Services Office at 285-
6517.

Soldier fined for disrespect to PNP
A Fort Kobbe soldier was charged with disrespect to-
ward a Panamanian National Policeman after a verbal
altercation while at a PNP sub-station. The soldier was
taken to night court and fined $30.
For more information about Panamanian laws, call
287-4300.

Illegal discharge of weapon
A soldier was arrested last week for illegally discharg-
ing a weapon in Panama City. After a verbal altercation
about a traffic accident, he pulled out a pistol and shot a
round into the air.
For more information about privately owned weapons,
see U.S. Army South Regulation 190-28.

Anonymous drug hotline
Anyone with information about drug smuggling
should call the Panama Jack anonymous hotline at 285-
4185.

Found property
Several items have been turned in to the MPs. To
claim any of the items, call the Found Property Custodian
at 287-4401, give a description of the property and the
item number listed below:
Item Description Item number
Bike Mitch 0773 159-93


I mP ov st arhals orn r


Item Description Item number The following crimes are for on-post housing areas
Key ring five keys 161-93 Sept 17-23.
Key ring four keys 163-93 Pacific
Lantern electric 164-93 Fort Clayton 500 area - one housebreaking, larceny of
Cooler Coleman 166-93 secured private property
Bike Murray 169-93 Curundu housing area - one housebreaking
Tricycle green 170-93 Fort Kobbe housing area - one housebreaking, larceny
Bank card Interstate 172-93 of secured private property
Charge card MoneyMinder 173-93 Atlantic
Charge card J.C. Penny 174-93 None to report


This authorized unofficial command information pub-
lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic
Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces
InformationProgram of the Department of Defense, under
the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S.
Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the
official view of the U.S. government, the Department of
Defense or the U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Telephone
285-6612.
Commander in Chief...................Gen. George A. Joulwan
Director, PublicAffairs..........................Col. James L.Fetig



TIrooic Tim


Chief...............................................SMSgt. Steve Taylor
Editor........................................SSgDeborahE.Williams
AssistantEditor..............................................Sg JohnHall
SportsEditor.........................................Sgt.RichardPuckett
Editorial Staff............................................RosemaryChong
Maureen Sampson
VolunteerAssistant. ...................................JosephineBeane
Student Intern...............................................Juan Palacio
Southern CommandPublicAffairs Office............282-4278
DeputyDirector,PublicAffairs......Cmdr.LorniGilchrist
Command InformationOfficer.................Patrick Milton
PublicAffairsSupervisor.................SFC Mike Howard
U.S. ArmySouthPublicAffairs Office................287-3007
PublicAffairs Officer............... Maj. MelanieReeder


Command Information Officer.......................Beth Taylor
Editor....................................................SSgt. Jane Usero
Journalists.............................................Sgt. E.J. Hersom
Sgt. Lori Davis
Spec. Robin A. Mantikoski
24th Wing PublicAffairs Office.........................284-5459
PublicAffairsOfficer..................Capt. WarrenL.Sypher
PublicAffairsSuperintendent.........MSgt.DaleMitcham
Journalists........................................SSgt.RianClawson
Sgt. James A. Rush
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office............283-5644
PublicAffairsOfficer................... j.g. LauraC. Moore
Photographers..............................PH2 Roberto Taylor
PH2 Delano J. Mays
U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic............Call USARSO
Public Affairs)


I


A






Page
Missing
or
Unavailable






Page
Missing
or
Unavailable






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Missing
or
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Missing
or
Unavailable
















Sports


Quarry Heights. Republic of Panama


keys hoop


victories
by Sgt. James A. Rush
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - The 24th Mission
Support Squadron tripped up the 617th
Airlift Support Squadron with a high/low
tackle and won 48-38 in intramural bas-
ketball here Sept. 24.
Nearly half of mission support guard
Brian Lindsey's points came from a trio
of high-arcing three-pointers. He finished
with a game high 19 points.
Widebody teammate Anthony "Hitch"
Mitchell lowered the boom on ALSS
storming the key for 10 points.
Beryl Burke and Skip Wilder tried to
keep the game respectable for airlift sup-
port.
Burke led his team with 12 points while
Wilder added 10 more.
Game two between 24th Supply Squad-
ron A and 24th Civil Engineering Squad-
ron B was a forfeit.
The third game, between Company B,
1st Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment
and 24th Security Police Squadron B,
served as a showcase for Co. B star Jo-
seph Jenkins.
Jenkins had 14 points in the first half
before putting his game on cruise con-
trol.
He finished with 18, double what the
security police's highest scorer had.
While their star was busy wearing out
the net, the other Co. B players were busy
wearing down the cops with defense.
Co. B allowed only 12 points in the
first half and frustrated its opponents into
committing unsportsmanlike conduct
fouls.
The main event matchup pitted the
310th Airlift Squadron against the 24th
Medical Squadron.
A win by the medics would have re-
sulted in a three way tie for first place with
the 310th, and 24th Communications
Squadron.


U.S. Air Force photo byTSgt Don Peek


Det 4's Carl Mason lines up for a free throw shot during a recent game.
Det 4's Carl Mason lines up for a free throw shot during a recent game.


It didn't happen. The flying squadron
posted a four-point advantage in each half
on the way to a 37-29 win.
Rusty Mizauer championed a winning


effort with seven points in each half. No
other 310th player was allowed into double
figures.
His counterpart with the medical


squadron, Terrence Stewart, nearly
matched him with 13 of his own, but the
rest of the medics couldn't pick up the
slack.


Balboa Bulldogs blow out Kiwanis
Kolts, take sole possession of first
place.


Fort Clayton unit level andwomen's
basketball league registration con-
tinues.


*Racquetball, page 14
*Curly Bates tourney, page 15.
*Sport shorts, page 15.


Oct 1, 1993


Big


Pane 11


V.�
AeMLe
J�-SI,-
N4u








2 Tropic Times
12 Oct. 1, 1993


Balboa Red Machine running back Joe Gutierrez listens to coach Rick Dahlstrom give him a play.
WII


24


Curundu Cougars Robert Reyes makes a move on the Red Machine's Efrain
Sanchez.


Bulldogs ride by


Kolts, snag first


by Sgt. Richard Puckett
Tropic Times Sports Editor
BALBOA - The Balboa Bulldogs' re-
lentless defense proved to be too much for
the Kiwanis' Kolts, crushing them 21-0
Sept. 24 at Balboa Stadium here.
The stingy linebacker core and big front
line held the Kolts to just 38 yards of total
offense and five first downs. The Bulldogs'
defense also snagged three interceptions
and caused two fumbles.
Meanwhile the offense took advantage,
relying on a big night from quarterback
Jerome Price. Price hit Gary Foster in the


first half for a 65-yard touchdown. Price
alsoranintwoTDs. Ellisaddedatwo-point
conversion and an extra point, accounting
for the rest of the 21-0 victory.
The win gave the Bulldogs sole posses-
sion of first after the Cristobal Tigers fell to
the Panama Canal Green Devils 20-0 in
Atlantic-side action.
In what was billed as the matchup ofthe
season's two best runners - Tigers Corey
Townsend and Green Devils' WilberReese
- turned into a one man show. After only
three running attempts, Townsend was
injured on a kickoff following the Green
Devils' initial score.


Bulldogs Gary Foster waits to lay a hit on Kolts' Caetano Goldini.


Reesetookadvantageand won the battle
rushing for 105 yards and one touchdown.
QuarterbackTylerQuinn added two touch-
downs to cap off the scoring.
In the early game at Balboa, the Cougars
got one in the win column, rolling past a
struggling Balboa Red Machine squad 17-
7.
Injured quarterback Robert Garcia led
the charge, passing for 84 yards and scor-
ing a touchdown. But it was his leadership
that mattered the most, said Cougars coach
Fred Bales.
"Injuries have really hurt us this year so


far, and having Garciaback wasabig help,"
Bales said. "He showed alot of courage out
there. He firedtheguys up and played well."
Garcia wasjust glad to beplaying again.
"My ankle is still sore, but it felt good to
be out there," he said. "I didn't even feel it
during the game, I was just really too
pumped up to notice."
Tonight the Cougars (1-2) go for two in
a row against the Kolts (0-3) at 7 p.m. at
Balboa The 5:30p.m. game pits the Green
Devils against the Red Machine. The Ti-
gers (2-1) play host to the Bulldogs (3-0) at
5:30 p.m, at Cristobal.









Tropic Times
Oct. 1, 1993


I N


7.

ar


. . .' . .. g , , - * . , ,* ," . ; T
, w', - .'. .. : , . . .

Red Machine's Efrain Sanchez takes a shot from Cougars linebacker Cameron Benson.


Individual statistical races heat up


The followingarethe statistical lead-
ersfor the 1993 Panama Area Depart-
ment ofDefense Dependent's School's
football season through the first three
games. Team statistics as well as indi-
vidual player numbers are included.

Team offense, rushing
I. 631 Green Devils
2.591 Tigers
3.587 Bulldogs
4.315 Cougars
5. 293 Red Machine
6. 85 Kolts

Team offense, passing
1. 221 Bulldogs
2. 197 Kolts
3. 169 Tigers
4.143 Cougars
5.81 Red Machine
6.76 Green Devils

Team defense, rushing allowed
1. 324 Red Machine
2.351 Green Devils
3.394 Tigers
4.434 Bulldogs
5.581 Kolts
6.603 Cougars

Team defense, passing allowed
1.59 Bulldogs
2.77 Tigers
3.105 Green Devils
4.111 Cougars


5. 228 Kolts
6. 266 Red Machine

Total points
1.73 Bulldogs
2.71 Green Devils
3.40 Tigers
4.37 Cougars
5. 22 Red Machine
6.12 Kolts

Total points, allowed
1. 6 Green Devils
1.6 Bulldogs
3.34 Tigers
4. 36 Red Machine
5.59 Tigers
6. 80 Kolts

Scoring
1.30 Price, Bulldogs; Quinn, Green
3.24 Townsend, Tigers
4. 18 Ortiz, Tigers; Reese, Green
5.12 Shaha, Cougars; Reyes, Bulldogs
7. 11 Rivera, Cougars
11 are tied with 6

Touchdowns
1.5 Price, Quinn
3.4 Townsend
4. 3 Reese
5.2 Shaha, Reyes; Acosta, Tigers
12 tied with 1

Rushing yardage
1. 368 Reese


2.319 Townsend
3. 232 Beach
4. 163 Shaha
5. 155 Ortiz
6. 152 Price

Rushing average (min 21 carries)
1.7.5 Townsend
2.7.4 Beach
3. 6.8 Reese
4, 5.0 Sanchez
5.4.7 Price

Passing yardage leaders
QB Com Att TD Int
Alvarez 13 28 2 0
Ford 6 27 1 2
Price 4 11 0 0
Corrigan6 33 2 2
Quinn 7 17 0 4

Receiving leaders
1.149 Staton, Bulldogs
2.97 Chanis, Kolts
3. 96 Reyes
4.90 Acosta, Tigers
5.69 Sanchez, Red

Kickoff return leaders (min 3)
1.20.9 Acosta
2.20.3 Banda, Red
3.17.6 Rivera, Cougars
3. 17.6 Chastain, Green
5.17 Reyes, Cougars
6.14 Chanis,
7.8.2 Stanziola, Kolts


Department of Defense photos by Sgt. Richard Puckett









14 A Tropic Times
"T Oct. 1, 1993











b.y~. Sgt. J

















R AF M Fore t han 40 sigl payes com

Which ra from Aug. 30 - Sept. 11 at the Howard Sports





F Anoe r ciil eier p er, Jarett Bro , won the
men's B division. Cliff ordan, a family member, took


















second.hampions
by e C division winner was Pedro Marquez from the
24th Maing Publitenance Squadron. He bested Barry Dowsll
which ran fr om Aug.en's classes we ate d into a single












Category.
and Fitness Center hmbere. Diane Bowman reigned su-
bas p r eme in the competition. Air Force family member
Hannelee Oakley fiDanishel Clements from the 24th Civil Engi-nd.
x Another civil engineed for thplayer, Jarrett Brown, won thee.
emen's B division. Clifford Jthe scordan, a fabit with the singles cham-took

24th Maint w en e ance Squadrown topple bested Waugh and Reggie






ArmAy family member ane Bowman reigned su-Diane Bowman stretches on a shot. Bowman







won the Howard AFB women's racquetball title.
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won the Howard AFB women's racquetball title.












Tropic Times 15
Oct. 1, 1993 A


New (fiscal) year fun run
The American Society of Military Comptrollers is
sponsoring a New (fiscal) Year 10K and 5K Fun Run 7
a.m. Saturday starting at Building 210, Fort Clayton.
Race day registration begins at 6:15 a.m. The event
is sanctioned by the Panama Armed Forces Running
Association.


Curly Bates tourney
The annual Curly Bates Memorial Mixed Bowling
Tournament will be held Oct. 16 and 17 at the Curundu
Bowling Center.
Registration is $15. Shifts are set for 1 and 4 p.m. on
both days. Bowlers will both three games each day on
the shift they sign up for. For information, call 286-
3914.


SCN AM radio sports
The Southern Command Network's AM 790 Pacific
and 1420 Atlantic will broadcast the following sports
this weekend.
Tonight - 6:15 p.m. WBC Heavyweight fight -
Lennox Lewis vs Frank Bruno; 9:30 p.m., San Francisco
Giants at Los Angeles Dodgers.
Saturday - 2 p.m., Colorado Rockies at Atlanta
Braves or Giants at Dodgers (if necessary); 2:30 p.m.,
Notre Dame Fighting Irish at Stanford Cardinal; Toronto
Blue Jays at Baltimore Orioles.
Sunday - noon, Rockies at Braves or Green Bay
Packers at Dallas Cowboys; 3 p.m. Giants at Dodgers or
Indianapolis Colts at Denver Broncos; 7 p.m., New
York Giants at Buffalo Bills.
Monday - 8 p.m., Washington Redskins at Miami
Dolphins.


Columbus tourneys
A Columbus Day Biathlon will be held Saturday at
7:30 a.m. starting at the Fort Davis pool. Entry fee is
$3.
A double elimination flag football tournament is
scheduled for Oct. 9-11. An organizational meeting is
scheduled for 5 p.m. Thursday at the Fronius Fitness
Center. Entry fee is $75. A water basketball tournament
is scheduled for 9 a.m. Oct. 16. Registration deadline is
Oct. 15. For information, call 289-3272.
On the Pacific side, a basketball tournament will be
held Wednesday through Oct. 11 at the Reeder Physical
Fitness Center. It is open to the first 12 teams to register.
Coaches must turn in rosters by Monday.
A men and women's racquetball tournament will
also be held. For information, call 287-4050.


National Trapshooting Day
The Amateur Trapshooting Association and the
Isthmian Clay Bird Association will sponsor a National
Trapshooting Day at the Rodman Gun Club Range,
Rodman Naval Station 9 am. Saturday.
It will include four handicap events of 25 rounds pi;r
event, for a total of 100 rounds. For information, call
Robert Fearon at 256-6308 after 7 p.m. or Robert Stuart
at 284-4985.


Turkey Bowl coaches
The Army Directorate of Community Activities
Sports Branch is accepting resumes for Army Turkey
Bowl team coaches. Call 287-4050.
Navy Morale Welfare Recreation Sports is accepting
resumes for the Navy Turkey Bowl team coach. People
interested may call Morise Conerly at 283-4222.
The 24th Morale Welfare Recreation Services Squad-
ron is accepting resumes for an Air Force Turkey Bowl
coach. Call 284-3451.


Rodman intramural volleyball
Sign up now for unit level volleyball. Deadline for
letter of intent is Oct. 8. Pre-season tournament will be
Oct. 16-17.
Letters of intent are available at the Rodman Sports
office. Call 283-4061 for more information.


Atlantic-side

football standings


JOTB
549th MP
Marines


HHC, 5-87th 5
Navy 4
Co. B, 5-87th 2
USAG/69th Sig 2
1097th Boat 2
408th MI 1


Army basketball

5'11" and above


Who's Who
Having Fun
Jazz
X-Clan
MEDDAC
194th MP Co.
SOUTHCOM


5'10" and under


Da Boyz
Express
Pirates
2 Tough
Just Us
Southern Boyz
Jazz
Dogg Pound
Guards Plus
Mudd Puppies
PSC Posse


W L
3 0
2 0
2 1


AF Basketball standings*
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Northern Division
W L
HHC,1-228th 17 3
617thALSS 15 4
Det 49thWing 13 5
24th MS 8 11
6933rd ESS 7 13
Southern Division
W L
24th SPS 20 0
24th CES A 9 10
24 AIS/OSS 9 9
Co. A, 1-228th 3 14
24th SUPS B 3 15


Eastern Divisi


NATI
on
W


24th SUPS A 18
536th Engr 12
24th MSSQ .11
24th TRANS 11
617th ALSS B 4
24th CES B 3
Western Division


W
24th CS 12
310thALS 14
24th MG 12
Co. B, 1-228th 8
24th MWRSS 4
24 SPS B 3
As of Sept. 24.


[ONAL LEAGUE

L
1
7


6
8
9
15
17


ueparbnent of Defense photo by Sgt. Richard Puckett
Basketball registration
Robert Kittle, 41st Area Support Group, and Fredrick Cooley, 142nd Medical Battalion fight for a
rebound during the 1992 unit level basketball season. Registration for Army unit level basketball at
Fort Clayton continues until Oct. 23 and women's basketball ends Tuesday. Call 287-4050.


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16 Tropic Times
Oct. 1, 1993


, .4

-. .
U.S. Navy photo by PH Deono J. Mays
UTCN Larry Harvey works on a sewer drain at the
Lacona housing project.


-.News


Navy


Lacor

by Ltj.g. Laura C. Moo
USNAVSTAPANCANAL Public
RODMAN NS - After
work, more than 60 inches C
than 15,000 cubic yards ofg
ofpipe, the Lacona housingI
The $4.5 million project
cutting ceremony.
Lacona will house avia
support Southern Commani
are currently housed in sub
ditionary Shelters.
Capt ArthurN. Rowley,
naval station, said the project
be useful in the future.
"As we draw down from
that our demand for tempor
personnel is going to increa
what's going to support tha
The facility can support
single occupancy officer un
listed units, eight fully equi
recreational units.


helps finish $4.5m


ia housing project

re Each 10-foot-by-20-foot living unit includes a bath-
SAffairs room, shower, television with cable, VCR, phone, micro-
wave, refrigerator and furniture. Each 30-foot-by-30 foot
nine months of construction recreation unithas alounge, wet bar, ice machineand game
of rain, and the laying of more tables. The project will also receive daily maid services.
ravel and morethan 4,500 feet The units were built by Allenhurst Industries, and
project here is officially open. construction forces from Naval Mobile Construction Bat-
opened Monday in a ribbon- talion Four and NMCB Five built concrete pads and
installed theelectrical, water and sewerlines to support the
ition squadrons deployed to project.
d's counter-drug mission, that t. Tom DeSantis, officer in charge of NMCB-5 detail
standard Marine Corps Expe- Panama,said histroops'deploymentherehas been fruitful.
"We learned a lot of lessons working on Lacona. It's
II, commanding officerofthe very satisfying to work on a project of this scope and to
t, which can be expanded, will actually see our work, and to see it get put to use."
Naval Mobile Construction Battalions, such as NMCB-
Panama, what I can expect is 4 and NMCB-5 deploy around the world to train and to
ary quarters for TDY or TAD build.
ase and this type of facility is NMCB-5 is nearing the end of its seven-month deploy-
t." ment to Panama.
t 225 people and includes 74 "Itfeels good to know that we'releaving heresoontobe
nits, 75 double occupancy en- with our families again, and it feels good that we can leave
pped laundry units, and three here knowing our project has been a success," said Petty
S Officer 1st Class Jeff McDonald.


24th Wing holds safety day


HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PA)- AirForce members
here got an ounce of prevention Monday at the wing's
annual safety day.
Brig. Gen. David A. Sawyer, 24th Wing commander,
gotthings started atthebasetheaterin the morning. Several
briefings followed his introduction including speeches on
the human factors in accidents, poisonous plants and
animals, fire prevention and wartime souvenirs.
Presentations bythe firedepartment,securitypoliceand
explosive ordinance disposal at the parade field were
supposed to follow, however they were rained out
The rain let up in time to allow the final event of the day,
a"FOD walk"totakeplace. Hundredsofmilitary members
took to the flightline to pick up bits of safety wire, washers,
stones, or any other foreign object on the line that could be
sucked into an aircraft engine and cause damage.
Safety Dayis an Air Combat Command-directed event
(a hold-over from Tactical Air Command). Monday was
selected to be a no-fly day set aside to reflect on the safety


performance of 1993, reevaluate goals and look forward to
improving on performance in fiscal 1994.
The24thWing has perfect weapons safetyrecord, and
its ground safety record shows two developing trends, said
Lt Col. Mark W. Fry, chief of safety, 24th Wing.
Last year's off-duty incidents continued a decline that
has been characteristic of recent years, Fry said. On-duty
incidents reported saw an increase, such as accidents
involving government vehicles and strained backs.
"Ithinkit's becauseofthe operational tempo,"Fry said.
"Mainly, people need to step back and think about the risk,
then get some additional help."
The safety officeplans to reemphasize on-duty hazards
during supervisor safety training. One specific area of
concern is awareness of local trafficproblems native to the
local area.
In the air, the 24th Wing was "fairly successful," Fry
said. The base had no mishaps involving loss of life or
major (more than $200,000) damage to an aircraft


System automates information


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - U.S. Army
South is putting the information community members
need right at the tips of their fingers with the Touch for
Information, Products and Services system.
This computer system was developed to be an auto-
mated, simple, user-friendly source of self-service infor-
mation which first appeared at the USARSO Replacement
Detachment office herein 1991. It has since expanded to
the Main Exchange, Corozal Commissary and the Valent
Recreation Center.
TIPS users touch a color graphic on the screen to get
information on topics ranging from housing availability to
community activities. The terminals all have general
community data but specialize in information geared
toward the customers of the facility in which it's housed.
Adventure seekers can touch a box for information


about a river rafting tour in Costa Rica at the TIPS in the
Valent Recreation Center, while the TIPS in Building 520
can tell a soldier how to pick up his car when it arrives in
Panama, said SSgt. Rafeal Torres of the Replacement
Detachment. This information can also be printed at the
touch of a button so customers can take it with them.
The system answers manyofthequestions soldiers have
about their new assignment here, he said.
"The informationis updated and accurate,"Tores said.
Brenda O'Neil, a family member, uses the TIPS at the
Valent Recreation Center because it already has the news
of the latest tours, trips and events, even before the printed
calendars, she said.
TIPS is a new source of self-service information in an
agewhenaccess toinformationisbecominginstantaneous,
Torres said.


Veteran's group offers $200k coverage


RANDOLPH AFB, Texas (Air Force News Service) -
The Veterans' Group Life Insurance program now offers
coverage up to $200,000 and term policies that are renew-
able for life.
The changes resulted from the recent enactment of the
Veterans' Benefits Act of 1992, according to Air Force
personnel officials here.
The new lifetime coverage may result in increased or
decreased premiums for some people, depending on their
ages, to reflect the true cost of the insurance, personnel
officials said.
The newpremiums tookeffect Sept.1; however, policy-
holders may not notice a change until their current five-
year term expires.
Retirees and people who have separated from the


military can choose one of four options when renewing
VGLI coverage:
*cancel the coverage.
*convert the coverage to a commercial insurance
policy, with no physical exam required, at the rates set by
the commercial company.
*convert the coverage to a level premium plan with a
decreasing amount of insurance (for people ages 60-64).
*continue coverage at the same level, but at the new
premium rate.
VGLI offers premium discounts for people being re-
leased from active duty who pay on an annual rather than
monthly basis, officials said.
Formore information, people can contact thepersonnel
flight customer service section, 284-3508.


Week focuses in

on fire prevention

tips, measures
HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PA) - The timing of
Fire Prevention Week has a unique relevance for
Americans and service members even in Panama,
wheretheonsetoffalldoesn't signal the start ofhome
heating season.
FirePrevention Week begins Oct. 9, adaterecom-
mended by the Fire Marshal's Association of North
Americato coincide with the anniversary of the Great
Chicago Fire which devastated that city Oct. 8,1871.
Twenty-two statesresponded with officialprocla-
mations. During World War I President Woodrow
Wilson urged the country to adopt fire prevention to
save war materials, food and clothing from needless
destruction.
In response to mounting fire destruction, Presi-
dent Wilson later issued a proclamation designating
the week of Oct 9 as Fire Prevention Week in 1920.
This year'sslogan, "Get Out! Stay Out! Your Fire
Safe Response" means for housing occupants to
immediately evacuate their homes when fire and/or
smokeis detected. It also stresses the need to stay out
once you're outside of a burning building.
"The majorreason people give for reentering is to
get loved ones, pets or personal items left in the
building. But once you're out, you don't know how
farthe fire has travelled," said SSgt. Robert Appling.
"Once you're backin, you may walk into an inferno.
Believe it or not, most fatalities in home fires happen
when people reenter their home."
The fire department here plans to take advantage
of the week to drive home its own fire safety lessons.
The department is hosting the following events
through the week:
*Saturday, basketball tournament at base gym,
proceeds fund Fire Prevention Week activities.
*Sunday,PanamaCanal Commission, fire crash
and Panama Bomberos (firefighters) parade. The
parade will travel through the Cardenas housing
area, Fort Clayton, Albrook, Balboa, Rodman, Co-
coli, Kobbeand Howard. A post-parade cookout and
games will be sponsored by PCC at the Curundu
softball field behind Curundu Junior High School.
*Monday-Wednesday, fire station tours for Al-
brook Preschool, Howard Childcare and Howard
Elementary School (grades K-3).
*Thursday, home cooking firedemonstrations in
front of Howard Exchange and fire trucks on static
display.
*Oct.8,postercontestawardspresentedatHoward
Elementary School and Firefighter's Ball to be held
at Amador Officers' Club at 7 p.m.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Gift of the Panama canal Museum ropic Times Vol. VI. No. 39 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, Oct. 1, 1993 CPO opens new 1-stop info center COROZAL (USARSO PAO) -People wanting employment information from all agencies in the U.S. military community can now get it in one stop at the new One-stop Job Information Center at the Directorate of Civilian Personnel, Building 560 in Corozal. The new center is set up so job applicants will no longer have to go to several places for information, everything is now available in one place, said Harry Remshard, Recruitnient and Placement Division chief The center has a full time counselor to help with things such as application review, career counseling, job availability and employment eligibility on a walk-in basis as well as theone-on-one counseling services for those making appointments. The center is also planning to include information from the Air Force, Army and Air Force Exchange Service, the Panama Canal Commission and world-wide vacancy announcements, Remshard said. "All of these changes had one primary objective," said Jack Penkoske, Director of Civilian Personnel. "We want to ensure our customers are provided al1 the information and assistance they need in as pleasant an atmosphere as possible." The center is open 7:15 a.m.-4:15 p.m. Monday-Friday. The telephone number is 285-5201. Local officials clarify traffic manualissue FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -In the Sept. 17 issue of the Tropic Times, the Mayors' Corner referred to getting and carrying the new Panamanian traffic manual. This manual is now being amended and will not be published until the amendments have been completed, said Panamanian government officials. The new law requiring drivers to carry this manual will not be enforced until it has been approved by the government of Panama, officials said. Anyone receiving a traffic ticket from Panama National Police should call the Military Police Host Nation Liaison Officer at 287-3376. Navy Birthday Ball Do n 'yU.S. Air Force photo by SMSgt. Boyd Belcher NavyBirtday all Down n dirty tickets available now 1st Lt. Drew McCall, C Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 508th Infantry Regiment, stows his gear after RODMAN NS (USNAVSTAPANCANAL Jumping from a C-27 Spartan. See story and photos on pages 8 and 9. PAO) -Tickets for the Navy Birthday Ball Oct. 16 at the El Panama Hotel are now on sale. Tickets are $13 for E-1-E 6, $18 for E-7-E-9 and $23 forI officers and civilians he price includes three Inspection yields CDS top honors beverages. Call Lt. j.g. Laura Moore, 283-5641, for more information. FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The U.S. Army Petrucci attributes the success of the program to the South Child Development Services received top honors staff's dedication and enthusiasm. during a surprise inspection by the Army Child Care Edu"We've come a long way," she said. "Four years ago DEH sets water m ain cation Team from Washington, D.C., recently. we received several deficiencies that we had to correct. The CDS's performance earned the certification with Since then everyone has pitched in and done their part." flushing, AC shutoff commendation and will be used as an example for other She also credits the community for the success. CDS programs throughout the Army, said Jill Petrucci, The team not only looked at the CDS itself, but also FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The Di Child Development Services Coordinator. the organizations which support the programs, such as rectorate of Engineering and Housing will flush "The success of the program is a team effort on the parents, safety, Community Health and Preventive Mediwater mains 8 arm.-6 p.m. through Sunday. Water part of each member of our CDS staff," she said. "All are cine. pressure in the Quarry eights housing area will be professionals and take pride in their positions and are "It is also a true team effort on the part of many others low for no longer than one hour i each area, DEH committed to providing quality child care for all our pain the community," Petrucci said. "The team also comTheewiials o sao trons." mended the amount of parent participation in the proThe Department of the Army team inspects the entire gram. They (parents) have been very supportive." on Fort Clayton 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday for mainteCDS program, Petrucci said. Some of the areas include Petrucci said the fact the certification inspections are 17,128, 32 0-20520720821-25and' *facility requirements, programming, food services, parnot announced, shows that efforts are continuous. ent participation and health and sanitation. "We are very proud of what we, the community, have 217-220. "The team looks at the total program," she said. "They accomplished and look forward to maintaining quality talk to everyone and look at everything." services. We will continue 'doing the best for the best."' News pe S P 5 War-time scenarios test medical U.S. Defense secretary orders first *Contraband control, page 2. soldiers vying for Expert Field Mediwave of 600-soldier deployment *C-27 drop, pages 8 & 9. cal Badge. into Haiti. *Air Force basketball, page 11.

PAGE 2

2 Tropic Times Oct. 1, 1993 Center offers October classes A HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PA)The Howard/Albrook Family Support Center, in Building 707 here, has avarietyofevents scheduled for October. The centeris open 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Reservations arerequired forall workshops. For more information and/or reservations call 284-5650. *Atwo-daydctizenshippreparationclassI will be offered from 1-4 p.m. Monday and Wednesday. This workshop will help you Howard AFB. This training session is for systematic approach which includes skills and Miraflores Locks. For reservations prepare for the naturalization test. people who supervise volunteers, or who analysis, career exploration, employment and free child care, call the FSC. *JobSearchisofferedevery Tuesday at want to explore the option of enhancing research, resume preparation, interview *Checkbook maintenance is taught 910 am. to provide spouses with informatheir workplace with volunteers. Particiskills, benefits, and financial management. 11:30 am. Oct. 28. Learn how to accution on the techniques to effectively search pants will be guided through a step by step Each module builds on the previous one, so rarely use and balance a checkbook. for a job in Panama. process to identify and define their volunattendance for both days is recommended. *Transition assistance counseling is *A Smooth Move Workshop will be teer needs and how to manage volunteers. Students should wear civilian attire. available by appointment, at the FSC, 7:30 offered 8:30-10 am. Wednesday. This *An SF-171 workshop is offered 8:30*Welcome to Panamawill be held 8 am. -4:30 p.m. by calling 284-3865/4347. workshop will have representatives from 10:30 am. Oct.14 to inform people about am. Oct. 21 at Club Amador. It's held iy *Budget counseling is available by apfinance, family services, housing, military the federal hiring procedures, and how to Army Community Service. he tour busts pointment,attheFSC,7:30am.-4:30p.m. personnel, the traffic management office, complete the SF-171 application form. depart from the Family Support Center, by calling 284-5010. legal, and 24th Medical Squadron to brief *A transition assistance seminar will Howard AFB at 7:30 am. and the Valent Volunteers are needed in family serand answer questions about moving. be held 8 am.-4 p.m. Oct. 20 and 21. This Recreation Center, Fort Clayton at 7:45 vices to assist with the loan closet, base *Volunteer management training, two-day training program is designed to am. The orientation is for military personbrochure library, and layette program. sponsored by the Family Support Center, helpseparating military members andtheir nel, DoD civilians and their family memFamily services is open 10am-3p.m. Free will beoffered from 9-11 a.m. Oct. 18inthe families transition from a military career to bers. It will include information tables, child care is available to all volunteers. wing conference room, Building 703, a civilian career. The workshops offer a Panamaniandancers,tours ofPanamaCity Come in or call 284-5860. Officials update controlled items limitations FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -U.S. citizens *disposable diapers -120 diapers per week per child *lawn mower -one whoshopintheArmyandAirForceExchangeSystemand *hot dogs -fourpounds per month perperson *tapedeck,taperecorderorcompactdiscplayers-two commissary facilities in Panama must follow certain rules *laundry soap -20 pounds per month per person *tuner, amplifier or receiver -two when buying controlled items, said Lt. Col. James Parry, *sandwich meat -80 ounces per month per person *bicycle -one per household member Military Police Command deputy commander. *shampoo -64 ounces per month per person *car radio or tape player -one per registered vehicle The limitations have been imposed to comply with the *soup -16 cans per month per person +cameras -two of more than $100 Panama Canal Treaty and to make sure everyone has a *cooking oil -five gallons per month per person *computers -two chance to buy what they need, he said. These limitations +pork shoulder -one per week per person *CPU, keyboards, printers or single drives -four are outlined in Southern Command Regulation 1-19. When buying morethan onecase of beer, two bottles of *living and dining room sets -one According to the regulation, the following are food and liquor or 16 miniatures in one day, customers must fill out *bedroom sets -three beverage limitations: SC form 55-A, Parry said. This includes purchases made *cribs -one per child *beer -10 cases per month per household at more than one facility during that day. *silverware -two complete sets of more than $50 *liquor -eight bottles or 50 miniatures per month per Thereare also limitations on majorpurchaseitems such *ranges -one household as washers and refrigerators, he added. Whenever amajor +refrigerators -one *cigarettes -12 cartons per month or three cartons per purchase is made, the buyer must fill out SC form 55. The *sewing machines -one week per person following items and limits are per household per tour *stereo sets -two *chicken -eight packages per week per household which is considered 36 months. *televisions -three *ham -one packaged or canned per week per house*air conditioner -four *vacuum cleaners -two hold *clothes dryer -one *video cameras -one *turkeyone whole and six packages ofparts perweek *dishwasher -one *video recorders -two perhousehold *electric typewriter -two *washing machine -one *bacon -four pounds per month per person *freezer -one Some items not listed may be temporarily regulated by *canned milk -eight large or 20 small cans per month *golf club sets -two theexchange or commissary facilities because ofavailabilper person *microwaves -one ity, Parry explained. +cornish hens -eight per month per person +pianos or organs -one For more information, call 286-3117/3303. Air Force makes weight, fitness program changes WASHINGTON (Air Force News Serofficials said. management program every month to enmonthprobationperiod,regadllessofwhen vice)-Changesinthe AirForceWeightand Additionally, womenwon'thavetomeet surethey aremakingsatisfactoryprogress," they started the weight management proFitness Program will require members to weightandfitnessstandardsuntilsixmonths said TSgt. Mark Williamson of the Headgram. lose less body fat per month and give after their pregnancy. quartersAFRESPersonnelActions Branch These people will still be subject to women more time after pregnancy to meet Women who were withinthis six-month at Robins AFB, Ga. measurement when directed by the unit standards. window when enrolled in the weight pro"Under the new system, we are going commanderorunder certaincircumstances, The changes also will affect Air Force gram will be disenrolled and any adminisstrictly with body fat measurements.People such as an obvious increase in body fat. Reserve members. trative actions taken against them will be will have a prescribed amount of time to People above their maximum body fat Womenin the weight management prodeleted from their records. meet standards. If they don't, they will be will have four months to lose the excess. gramnowneedonlylosel percent body fat However,administrativeactionsagainst transferred to the Air Reserve Personnel If reservists don't reach or drop below or three pounds per month to be considered women who were at or beyond the sixCenter's Non-affiliated Reserve Section," their body fat standard in the allotted time, making "satisfactory progress," said Air month mark are still valid, officials said. Williamson said. the unit commander will transfer them to Force personnel officials here. The Air Force Reserve starts its new Under the new program: NARS. Peoplecan applyto rejoin their unit Menneedloseonly l percent body fator weight management program today. AlPeople already in the weight manageafter they meet recruitment standards. five pounds per month, officials said. though AFRES will scale back how often it ment program will be converted to the new Thenew allowances forpregnant women The change means people in the weight measures people with excess body fat, it program today or during their first unit also apply to the Reserve program. managementprogram now havetofail both won't reduce the penalty for those who training assembly. The new AirForce Reserve supplement thebodyfatand weightloss standards to be don't meet the standards. Reservists who are at or below their to Air Force Regulation 35411 gives more consideredmaking unsatisfactory progress, "Wecurrentlycheckpeopleinthe weight maximum body fat standard will enter a 12details about the new program.

PAGE 3

Tropic Times Oct. 1, 19933 Customer Services now open during lunchtime FDRT CLAYTON -People who use customer service offices in Building 519, here, can now do business during the lunch hour, said Lt. Col. Alvin Phillips, Adjutant General. "Wehavechangedourpolicyandputourpeople on staggered (lunch) hours from 11 am. to 1 p.m. so we can better serve our customers," he said. Thisnewlunch-timepolicyisn'ttheonly change customers will soon see when they visit the offices at Building 519, Phillips added. "We are trying to find ways to better serve our customers and to be user friendly," he said. "Our goal is to continue to give first class customer service from the identification card desk to the passport and visa office to the officer and enlisted records sections and everything in between." Working withthestaffhehas now,Phillips said he feels this goal is within easy reach, he said. "I have someofthe best workers in Panama and our improvements will be coming from the bottom up,"Phillips added. "Eachperson from theprivale on up will be rethinking and relooking at how we are doing our jobs." As each worker looks at his area for changes, Phillips' looks at the entire picture. His highest priority is taking care of the customer, he said. 741 "If we don't take came of everyone, even that private or family member who comes in for one small piece of information, we aren't doing our job," Phillips explained. Sometimes people tend to explain why they can't do something by using and quoting regulations but regulations are only guidelines and if something falls into agray area, we need to lean in favor of the soldier, Phillips said. Another way Phillips plans to improve customer service is by not giving AG-wide training holidays during the work week unless it is a training holiday for the rest of the USARSO. "Why should all of our sections be closed on a day when our customers may need to use our facilities?" heexplained."Giving AG workers time off is not a problem and ensuring my people get adequate time off can be done without shutting down the entire operation." Working smarter,not harderseems to bethekey 4 u to Phillips' philosophy as he wanders from office U.S.Army phftby sgL Ln D-vi to office and chats with customers as well as Capt. Latanya Lee-(left) and Sgt. Jerold Patton help SSgt. Antonio Flores during the litter obstacle portion workers to see how the AG services are doing. of Expert Field Medical Badge testing. "Aslalwaystellmypeople,'it'snot howit can't be done, but how it can be done.' 142nd MedBca Bn. soldiers USARSO council says no support services cut stive for expert field badge FORT willbenocutbacksinservicesduring the upcoming fiscal year said U.S. Army South support services by Sgt. Lori Davis leaders at the USARSO Pacific Town Council USARSO Public Affairs Office "A lot of times when we think of me g Teay. medics we think of people in white More than 20 military and civilian support EMPIRE RANGE -Soldiers put their combat medical suits who work in hospitals work 9 to 5 services representatives gathered at the Fort Clayskills to the test in the jungle at Empire Range recently, ton Noncommissioned Officers' Club and talked striving to earn the Expert Field Medical Badge. and go home and don't really get about the concerns of the military community. Only about one-third of the 89 soldiers who started the muddy and do anything in the field." "In the conng year, there will be no degradatest were successful, said SFC Raymond James, noncomtion of services and quality of life," said Col. M. missioned officerin charge ofthe EFMIB site forthe142nd JeffryPetrucci, U.S. Army Garrison-Panama comMedical Battalion. Dr.( Capt) Latanya Lee mander. The week-long testing began with a written examinaMedicaJ Activity The new Self-Help store is a service leaders tion of soldier skills such as map reading, field sanitation expect to help keep quality of life high in the and medical skills such as evacuations and emergency professional pride and to drill the medical personnel in ingmst DTe forth ecing anmm us medical treatment, he said. their war-time mission," he said. "We'll run it (the store ) like a business. If the The writtentest eliminated more soldiers than anything The 142nd created testing conditions to simulate warneed is there, we'll provide it," said Lt. Col. John else, James added. time missions to test the soldiers abilities under strenuous Lovo, DEH director. The next four days included hands-on tests such as the circumstances and to prepare them for real conflict, James Serving the community with a high quality of litter obstacle course, emergency medical techniques and explained. lifeis also aconeren for Lt. Col. Sam Johnson, U.S. combatsurvivalskills. Theweekended witha12-mileroad "Tlhis focus on the field and the war-time mission is Army Dental Activity. march, James said. designed to make sure we are ready for war," James Budget cutbacks have not affected the number Medical soldiers start to learn these skills in basic explained. of dentists, he said. DENTAC will continue to training and advanced individual training, but to qualify Dr. (CapL) Latanya Lee, Medical Activity, said she meet the basic needs of family members with for the expert badge they must go further. Units begin decidedtotryforthebadge becausesheworks inanoffice, cleaning, fillings and pain stopping, he added. befoe te bu wated o aoutthe ideof mdicne. "Access for (family member) dental care will intensive training six-to-nine months before the EFMB but wanted to learn about the combat side of medicine. continue to be challenging and we will manage it qualification test, he said. "Itlooked like agood challenge," she said. "It gives you well," he said. Soldiers volunteer to be tested for the badge. Any a new perspective of Army medicine." Petrucci expressed gratitude for the communimedicalsoldierfromtheptivateintherecordssectiontothe A lot of times when we think of medics we think of ties' involvement in taking second in the Army general who admiistates the hospital can attempt to earn peopleinwhite suits who workin hospitals, work9to 5and Communities of Excellence competition. the EFMB, James said. go home and don'treallyget muddy and do anything in the Also,USARSO DeputyCommanderBrig.Gen. A soldier who earns the EFMB joins an elite group of field," she said. James Wilson stressed the value of such meetings combat medics. Only seven percent of the people who try "Thatimageis somewhatcorrect, but nottotallycorrect. by pointing out that many of the questions to earn the badge Army-wide make it to graduation day, Everywhere soldiers are going, whether they are jumping received on the USARSO commander's hotline James said, out of planes or they're on boats, there are medics along could have been answered at the meeting. "The point (of EFMB) is to develop esprit de corps, with them," she said.

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TrO1 1993 A Hemisphere Haitian leader resists resigning Natural gas explosion kills dozens in Venezuela Police chief blamed CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) -A natural gas for wave of terror pipeline exploded beneath a busy highway during ithe morning rush hour, engulfing a bus and cars in vows to die in Hait flames.Thestatenewsagency said about 50people PORTAU-RINC, Hiti -----died. PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti, Many of the victims had beenridingina bus. At (Reuters) -The police chief of least nine other vehicles caught fire. Port-au-P ce, wh diom Thestatenews agency,Venpres, said 50 ormore accuse of being behind the wavepelewekied oftrrorblocking Haiti'sreturto Firefighter Rodolfo Guilarte, citing interviews democracy, is resistig internawith rescue workers at the scene, told The Associionaip"tssue re."signandVOW ated Press at least 51 people died. sg "to die here." "The people were destroyed.They are putting As eight U.S. Congressmen the remains in bags with numbers, and will try to arrived hereSept.24 to assess the identify them at the morgue. Everybody was comBertrandAristidereturning home pletely burned," said AP photographer Diego by Oct. 30, Police Chief Michel Giudice. byanct. 3gaPve hefnt inteThe pipeline apparently was ruptured by a state to a local newspaper, saying,I telephone company excavation crew that was digwill die here. I am Haitian." going to lay fiber optic cables to improve Alephone Fianois, the man widely beAt .lines, according to regional civil defense director lived to have led the coup that U.N. Envoy Dante Capute arrives in Port-Au-Prince to meet with nera HomeroRauseoand Marcos Dietrich, aspokesman overthrew President JeanRaoul Cedras. for the state gas company. Bertrand Aristide almost two years ago, said he would unnoticed," Rangel said. "The violence is inconsistent omThe foe of the ex osion liped over a phone resist pressure to resign and hinted he had the strong with the agreement." com pany trc h riv survive. backing of his 1,500-member force. After meeting with Malval, Rangel indicated he would The CexplRiona Highway before 8 a.m. on the Central Regional Highway that links Caracas When asked by the daily newspaperLe Nouvelliste, liketo see force used against Cedras ifthe violence didnot withcitiestothesouthandwest. Initial reports said if his men would let him go, he replied: 'That is the stop. collision between a bus and acar set off the blast. question." "He should take a look at Panama and Gsena," The highway was closed in both directions near However,Francoissaidhemightleaveiftheordercame Rangel said. the town of La Victoria, 30 miles southwest of from his boss, army leader Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras. That Tuesday, U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for InterCaracas. would only happen, though, if the decision was "taken American Affairs, Alexander Watson, said using military without external influence," he added. might against Haiti, the Western Hemisphere's poorest Francois also said allegations by U.N. special envoy nation, would be a "terrible idea" Lunar eclipse wilI bevisible Dante Caputo that he or his supporters were involved in Rangel and his colleagues presented Malval with a in Central America Nov. 28 more than 100 killings since July 1 were unfounded. letter of support from President Clinton. They are sched"They dare to accuse me without proof," he said. "A ruled to meet with political and business leaders, human SAN JOSE, COSTA RICA (Reuters) -Residiplomat should weigh his words." rights activists and diplomats during the two-day visit, dents ofCostaRicaand Mexicoin Central America Humanrightsgroupsanddiplomats blameFrancois for after which they will present their findings to the will have the best view of the most striking lunar the violence that has threatened to scuttle a U.N. peace president. eclipse of the decade, a science group official said plan that allows for Aristide's return on Oct. 30. An aide said they hope to arrange a meeting with Sept. 24. Under the plan, signed on Governors Island in New military leaders, including Cedras and Francois. "It'll be one of the most agreeable eclipses YorkJuly3, Aristideistoreassumethepresidency,Cedras Human rights groups say that dozens of people have because wedon't haveclouds that timeofyear and is to resign and Francois is to be reassigned to a new post. been killed in recent weeks by opponents of Aristide and no preparation is necessary," the Foundation for Although the plan is, according to one Western diploAristide this week called for the resumption of U.N. Science and Space Education executive director mat,in a "deeply precarious" state,Francoissaidhewould sanctions to force the "killers" who head the country's Ricardo Valverde told Reuters. not blockits completion. "The problems won't come from army and police to halt widespread violence. The eclipse -caused by earth's shadow on the Michel Francois," he said. "Cedras is a killer,Francois is akiller," hesaidadding, moon as earth slips between the sun and moonA group of'U.S. congressmen arrived in Haiti Friday to "Remove the killers immediately." is expected to begin at 12:45 a.m. EDT on the night assess the chances of Aristide's return and to lend support Among those killed recently was Antoine Izmery, akey of Nov. 28 and last for 40 minutes. to Prime MinisterRobert Malval, the businessman chosen backer of Aristide who was dragged out of a memorial Unlikesolareclipses,which should not be viewed by Aristide to pave the way for his return. service in a church last week and shot dead by gunmen directly, eclipses of the moon may be observed New York Democratic Congressman Charles Rangel, believed to belong to an auxiliary police force known as without special protective equipment. thedelegation's leader, said he believedthetransition was "attaches." "We'll have agood view ofthe bestlunar eclipse "going great" but added that he was worried about the A group of about 100 attaches a weekago disrupted a of this decade," Valverde said. human rights abuses. swearing-in ceremony for thenew foreign minister, shoutHe said total lunar eclipses occur about every "We are concerned about the loss oflife thatis going by ing insults at Malval and his ministers. threeyears, and only when the moon is fullasit will be o h ih fNv 8 Honduran military men concerned El Salvador Marxists about selling the country's air force adopt newideology TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras (AP) -An increasingly against the leftist Sandinistas to the south. Marxist faction fom El Salvador's civil war anpopular proposal to sell off Central America's only fleet Honduras' military ran the country until 1982 but still nounced it was adopting a new ideology Tuesday of jet fighters has this country's military men aghast. maintains tremendous influence and runs much of the to accompany its new, peacetime name. "I can't imagine what would happen to national secueconomy. The Renovating Expression of the People rity if Honduras decides to sell the 13 F-5E jets," said the Carlos Roberto Reina, presidential candidate of the formerlythePeople'sRevolutionaryArmy-called armed forces chief, Gen. Luis Alonso Discua. LiberalParty-aleading opposition force andthe secondanews conference to sayit was dumping Marxism"The Honduran state would beleft defenseless because largest party -said he would sell the jets immediately if Leninism, moving toward the center and "social with the fighters, Honduras maintains air supremacy in elected. democracy", Central America," he added in an interview with The Last year, Liberal Party congressman Jose Martinez "Theextremes don'thavemuchpolitical force," Associated Press. Benitez proposed a study of selling the F-5Es, but the said the group's secretary-general, Joaquin The proposal has surfaced before, but is getting more measure failed, Villalobos, who was considered one of the most attention as Nov. 28 presidential election approaches. PresidentRafae Leonardo Callejas,who bylaw cannot radical rebel commanders in El Salvador's 12-year After all, its proponents note, two civil wars that raged seek reelection, has been ambiguous on the proposal. civil war, which ended in January 1992. on Honduras' borders in El Salvador and Nicaragua for He calls the idea ofselling thejets "anideal. because The five guerrilla factions of the Farabundo most of the past decade have ended. The country itself maintaining the equipment is onerous." But he also says Marti National Liberation, which fought a succeshasn't foughtawar sinceabrief scrap withElSalvador24 proceeds from any sale would go to the United States and sion of U.S.-backed governments, are becoming years ago, and none of its neighbors have comparable that Honduras "would have to acquire other, similar politicalpartiestoruninthe March1994 presidenweapons. equipment for national defense." tial election. Some politicians are looking at the large military budget Union leaders have other plans for the money. Villalobos said his party had to shift its politics as a source of savings they could use for health, education "It's not justified to have sophisticated warplanes or risk becoming "a leftist orphan" in the wake of and crime prevention while thepeople lack medicines, hospitals and other basic the collapse of the European Marxist governments It costs the country $3.2 million in fuel alone to operate necessities ," said Rafael Alegria, secretary-general ofthe that long backed the FMLN. the jets, which were donated by the United States in 1987 100,000-member National Center of Farm Workers in toreplace 13 Frenchjets fromthe 1950sand helpitdefend Honduras.

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ilitaryTropic Times News Oct. 1, 19935 Aspin orders 600 troops to Haiti WASHINGTON (AP) -Defense Secretary Les Aspin has ordered the first deployment ofsome600 U.S. military engineers, medical and civil affairs specialists to Haiti as part ofaUnited Nations mission, the Pentagon announced Tuesday. The U.S. forces are going to Haiti as part ofaU.N. plan approved last week. The goal is to help restore democracy to the island nation and help rebuild its infrastructure. The six-month mission is supposed to help professionalize the Caribbean nation's police and army, monitor police actions in terms of human rights and undertake major public works projects. President Jean-Bertrand Aristideis toretrn from exile next month. He was ousted in a bloody coupin September 1991. An advance team of25 American military officers will arive Wednesday and prepare forthe600-membergroup, which is expected to begin arriving Oct. 11, said a statement released at the Pentagon. The U.S. deployment will include 140 members of an engineer team, 100 military trainers and 350 logistics and other support personnel, the statement said. AP LaserPho They will participate in renovating medical frailties Jean-Bertrand Aristide casts his ballot in Port-au-Prince during the Haiti national elections in 1990. and roads, and construct military barracks and training Bertrand will return to Haiti from exile this month. sites, the statement said. The U.S. forces will be in a"non-confrontational role," The forces are expected to operate in and around Porteffort, the Pentagon statement said. the statement added. au-Prince. Although there has been an escalation in the political The U.S. commander of the force will be Army CoL Ihe U.N. Security Council has approved the deployviolence in Haiti, the U.N. mission is not designed to be a James Pulley, who will report to the U.N. envoy to Haiti, ment of some 1,600 members of its mission. Besides the traditional peacekeeping mission that would help restore Dante Caputo, the Pentagon said. United States, Canada and Argentina will also support the law and order. Accidents CIA director orders covert case releases WASHINGTON (AP) -Ihe details of who spoke on condition of anonymity. backlogofotherhistorical documentsslated OOO111 covert operations conducted by the CIA Stillthespy satellitesprovidefarsharper for declassification. c a im during the Cold War may soon be made imagery than that available to the governWork was only recently started on the public as part of the spy agency's effort to ment from commercial or weather sateldeclassification ordered by Woolsey's prewiden access to U.S. intelligence. lies. decessor, Robert Gates, of records pertainCIA Director James Woolsey told the The voluminous satellite archives could ing to CIA support for coups in Guatemala HouselintelligenceCommittee Tuesday that soon have another civilian use. and Iran in the 1950s, as well as on the Bay LOS ANGELES (AP) -Every year he had ordered the declassification review A joint commission of scientists, CIA of Pigs and other agency operations in the hundreds of U.S. soldiers are killed, of several covert operations that were unand Pentagon officials is aboutto complete Dominican Republic and the Congo. their bodies sent home in coffins to dertaken by the CIA 30 years ago or more. areport recommending ways in which spy In addition, the agency is in the process familymemberswhocandolittlemom These included U.S. activities to block satellite data can be made available for of releasing almost 300 intelligence estithan grieve. communism in France and Italy; support environmental research. The report is due mates aboutthe Soviet Union, written from Peace is hell. for Indonesian rebels in 1958; support to in a few weeks. 1947to1983. Anditis reviewing some350 As arecent spate of fatal helicopter Tibetan guerrillas in the 1950s and early But most of the CIA's planned secrets other estimates, 30 years or older, on such crashes shows, preparing. for war is 60s;operationsagainstNorthKoreaduring sharing relates to the past. Still, several subjects as the 1947 Greek-Turkish crisis, often deadlier than war itself. the Korean war, and operations in Laos in lawmakers expressed concern that releasthe Korean War and U.S. involvement in Non-combat accidents ranging the 1960s. ing records of 30-year-old covert operaVietnam. from helicopter crashes to electrocuWoolsey said the intelligence-sharing tions could strain relations with foreign Woolseysaid workontheseestimatesis tions have killed U.S. soldiers at arate effort includes such projects as providing nations. likely to take less time because he had of nearly 1,000 ayear-4,666inthe spy satellite data for Midwest flood relief But Woolseyassured thecommittee that ordered a "block review" of these records last five years. The deaths include efforts. theadministrationwouldtakeforeign-policy rather than the line-by-line process used to those that occur off-duty. The CIA gave the U.S. Geological Surimplications into consideration before rereview documents of less analytical and In contrast, 170 soldiers have died vey computerized drawings, based onsatelleasing such records. more operational nature. in combat since 1988, including 121 lite imagery, showing the areas affected by David Gries, the director of the review The declassification projects have been during Operation Desert Storm and the recent flooding. Last year the CIA process, told the panel that the operations made possible by the end of the Cold War, Desert Shield, the Pentagon says. shared its highly sensitive satellite inforhave all been written about, sometimes by and they are expected to be of great help to "One death is too many," said Eumation with disaster relief operations after former agency officials. historians writing the annals ofthatpeniod. gene Carroll, a retired admiral and Hurricane Andrew. The governments involved as well as "When the protection of certain infordirector of the private Center for DeTheagencydoesn'tprovideraw footage the State Department knew the documents mation is no longer required," Woolsey fense Information. in orderto protect the exact capability ofits were planned for release, he said. said, "then we owe it to our citizens to work "But we fly too many millions of satellites, and also because the images are The review is likely to take at least two hardto disclose as muchofthatinformation hours, we fire too many guns, we sail harder to interpret, said an agency official years, said an agency official, because of a as we can.warts and all." too many miles -going all the time, day night. Peoplearejust going todcie." P% woesore iei te navy, Congress plans alternative to gay issue whose sondrowned whileinthe Navy, the accident rate is just too high. WASHINGTON (AP) -The Pentagon may delay enforcing homosexualsin the military, with theHouseTuesday embracing the Connors is head of Concerned AneriPresident Clinton's policy on homosexuals in uniform while legislation that discourages gay enlistment. The vote was 301-134. cans for Military Improvement, a Congress completes an alternative approach that discourages Conferees from the House andSenate areexpectedto meetduring Florida group pushing for bettertraingays from serving in the armed forces. the next month to reconcile their two bills, with the language on gays ing and other steps to improve safety. The president's policy of "don't ask, don't tell, don't pursue" in the military already resolved. The Pentagon notes that the numis to go into effect today, and the Pentagon has drawn up three Final congressional approval of the budget and Clinton's exbersincludenon-job-related accidents, regulations for military commanders dealing with recruitment, pected signature will make the congressional policy on gays law, including auto accidents when a solseparation from the service and investigations of suspected superseding the president's own directive. dier is on his or her own time. The homosexuals. Eager to see the issue disappear, the Clinton administration ha military doesn't differentiate because Pentagon sources, who spoke on condition of anonymity expressed no opposition to the congressional policy, describing it as "a soldieris asoldier24 hours a day," Tuesday, said the Clinton administration may allow the interim consistent with the president's. saidPentagonspokesmanLt. Col. Doug plan to continue as the Defense Department deals with court Clinton announced a compromise plan July 19 that ended the Hart. challenges and pending House and Senate action on the defense practice of questioning recruits and servicemembers about their For instance, a soldier can die in a budget. sexual orientation, but allowed the military to continue to discharge car accident while driving home after "We probably will not issue them Friday (today)," a senior homosexuals. anall-nighttrainingexercise. Whether Pentagon official said of the directives. Earlier this month, the Senate, and then the House Tuesday, the crash was the fault ofthe soldier's The Senate has completed its version of the fiscal 1994 adopted a policy crafted by Sen. Sam Nunn, D-Ga., the Armed fatigue or another driver, it's still spending plan; the House is expected to approve its bill today. Services chairman who fought the president's initial attempts to lift counted as a military accident. BoththeSenate and Househave adoptedidenticalpolicies on the ban outright

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6 Tropic Times Oct. 1, 1993* V ie Reader concerned about local weather reports Dear Mayors' Corner, I am writing to you to ask about the M C r r weather reporting on SCN. I don't understand why it is so bad. I have been in Theproblemwithexpandingtheweather Panama for three years and the weather and providing more information is one of report is the same thing every night. Nothmanning,not alackofdesiretogetthe word ing is ever said about coming or passing out to the public. Unfortunately, neither storms or what to be prepared for. SCN nor the 24th Weather Squadron are Never have I ever viewed one quite so manned to provide a forecaster and so far, bad. I'm sureitcould bebetterthan itis. We weather information you see is a result of all know what will be said by heart, we personalinitiativebySSgt.RichSlominsky. laugh as we repeat it every evening. Without his efforts and the support of the Please try to improve it. weather squadron commander, we would not have a weather segment at all. Thank You Kindly SCN wants to expand the weather segRobert Cubite ment to include information on AMC's primary destinations in CONUS and Latin Dear Mr. Cubite, America. They are also lookinginto means I submitted your concerns to Lt. Col. for acquiring satellite photo loops of CenJerry R. White at Southern Command Nettral America so that information can be work and Ireceived the following informaprovided on fronts or changing weather : tion. patterns. Howeveritgets backtomanning, --h White said that reporting Panama who will provide the information, and how -7 weather on SCN was initiated about ten it will get to SCN. months ago as aresult of viewer interest in WhitesaidthatSCNlooks fornew ways high and low temperatures and tide data. to serve the community and they are workSouthern Command Network. Chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS). Expanding the weather segment is a top ing hard to provide the information reEditor'snote: TiscolumnallowscomAnonymity willbegranteduponrequest priority with SCN. They are currently quired in all areas, including the weather. unity members to submit questions to The Tropic Times reserves the right to discussing the issue with the commander, If people have future questions, White the Mayoral Congress. Letters should be edit letters and responses for brevity, 24th Weather Squadron. encourages them to contact him directly at mailed to: Mayors' Corner, Publicity clarity and propriety. MPs arrest man forwriting $2,500 in bad checks Worthlesschecks ** A man was arrested by military police last week after Provost Marshal's Corner he wrote nine bad checks worth more than $2,500. Writing bed checks is an offense under the Uniform Code of Military Justice. Be sure to keep accurate records of checks at all times. Anyone wanting help with checkbook management may call the Army Community Services Office at 2856517. Soldier fined for disrespect to PNP A Fort Kobbe soldier was charged with disrespect toward a Panamanian National Policeman after a verbal altercation while at a PNP sub-station. The soldier was taken to night court and fined $30. For more information about Panamanian laws, call 287-4300. Illegal discharge of weapon A soldier was arrested last week for illegally discharging a weapon in Panama City. After a verbal altercation about a traffic accident, he pulled out a pistol and shot a round into the air. For more information about privately owned weapons, see U.S. Army South Regulation 190-28. Anonymous drug hotline Anyone with information about drug smuggling should call the Panama Jack anonymous hotline at 285Item Description Item number The following crimes are for on-post housing areas 4185. Key ring fivekeys 161-93 Sept. 17-23. Key ring four keys 163-93 Pacific Found property Lantern electric 164-93 Fort Clayton 500 area -one housebreaking, larceny of Several items have been turned in to the MPs. To Cooler Coleman 166-93 secured private property claim any of the items, call the Found Property Custodian Bike Murray 169-93 Curundu housing area -one housebreaking at 287-4401, give a description of the property and the Tricycle green 170-93 Fort Kobbe housing area -one housebreaking, larceny item number listed below: Bank card Interstate 172-93 of secured private property Item Description Item number Charge card Moncytinder 173-93 Atlantic Bike Mitch 0773 159-93 Charge card J.C. Penny 174-93 None to report This authorized unofficial command information pubChief.SMSgL Steve Taylor Command Information Officer.Beth Taylor lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Editor.SSgt DeborahE. Williams Editor.SSgt. Jane Usero Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces AssistantEditor.Sgt JohnHall Journalists.Sgt. E.J. Hersom Information Program ofthe Department of Defense, under SportsEditor .SgtRichardPuckett Sgt. Lori Davis the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S. EditorialStaff .RosemaryChong Spec. Robin A. Mantikoski Southern Command. Maureen Sampson 24th Wing PublicAffairsOffice.284-5459 Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the VolunteerAssistant.JosephineBeane PublicAffairsOfficer.Capt. Wanen L. Sypher official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Student Intern.Juan Palacio PublicAffairsSuperintendent. MSgt. DaleMitcham Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. SouthernCommandPublicAffairs Office.282-4278 Journalists.SSgt. Rian Clawson The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Telephone DeputyDirectorPublicAffairs.Cmdr.LorriGilchrist Sgt. James A. Rush 285-6612. CommandInformationOfficer.Patrickilton U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 Commanderin Chief.Gen. George A. Joulwan PublicAffairsSupervisor.SFCMikeHoward PublicAffairsOfficer.Lt.j.g.LauraC. Moore Director,PublicAffairs.Col. James L.Fetig U.S. ArmySouthPublic Affairs Office.287-3007 Photographers.PH2 Roberto Taylor PublicAffairsOfficer .Maj.MelanieReeder PH2 Delano J.Mays U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.Call USARSO Tropic Times PublicAffairs)

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Sports Oct. 1, 1993 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 11 Big keyshoop victories by Sgt. James A. Rush 24th Wing Public Affairs HOWARD AFB -The 24th Mission Support Squadron tripped up the 617th Airlift Support Squadron with a high/low tackle and won 48-38 in intramural basketball here Sept. 24. Nearly half of mission support guard Brian Lindsey's points came from a trio of high-arcing three-pointers. He finished with a game high 19 points. Widebody teammate Anthony "Hitch" Mitchell lowered the boom on ALSS storming the key for 10 points. Beryl Burke and Skip Wilder tried to keep the game respectable for airlift support. Burke led his team with 12 points while Wilder added 10 more. Game two between 24th Supply Squadron A and 24th Civil Engineering Squadron B was a forfeit. The third game, between Company B, 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment and 24th Security Police Squadron B, served as a showcase for Co. B star Joseph Jenkins. Jenkins had 14 points in the first half before putting his game on cruise control. He finished with 18, double what the security police's highest scorer had. While their star was busy wearing out the net, the other Co. B players were busy wearing down the cops with defense. Co. B allowed only 12 points in the first half and frustrated its opponents into committing unsportsmanlike conduct fouls. The main event matchup pitted the U.S. Air Force photo by TSgt. DO Peek 310th Airlift Squadron against the 24th Det 4's Carl Mason lines up for a free throw shot during a recent game. Medical Squadron. A win by the medics would have reIt didn't happen. The flying squadron effort with seven points in each half. No squadron, Terrence Stewart, nearly suited in a three way tie for first place with posted a four-point advantage in each half other 310th player was allowed into double matched him with 13 of his own, but the the 310th, and 24th Communications on the way to a 37-29 win. figures. rest of the medics couldn't pick up the Squadron. Rusty Mizauer championed a winning His counterpart with the medical slack. Balboa Bulldogs blow out Kiwanis Fort Clayton unit level and women's *Racquetball, page 14 Kolts, take sole possession of first basketball league registration con*Curly Bates tourney, page 15. place. tinues. *Sport shorts, page 15.

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1 2 Tropic Times Oct. 1, 1993 Balboa Red Machine running back Joe Gutierrez listens to coach Rick Dahlstrom give him a play. Curundu Cougars Robert Reyes makes a move on the Red Machine's Efrain Sanchez. Bulldogs ride by Kolts, snag first by St. ichrd ucktt irs hal fo a 5-yrd oucdow. ~ Bulldogs Gary Foster waits to lay a hit on Kolts' Caetano Goldini. TyeS po.RicsardiPtor also ran in two TDs. Ellis added atwo-point Reesetookadvantageand wonthebattle far, andhavingGarciaback wasabig help," Tropic Tce prt dtronversion and an extra point, accounting rushing for 105 yards and one touchdown. Bales said. "He showed alot of courage out BA LBOA -The Balboa Bulldogs' refor the rest of the 21-0 victory. Quarterback TylerQuinn added two touchthere. He firedtheguys up andplayed well." lentless defense proved to be too much for The win gave the Bulldogs sole possesdowns to cap off the scoring. Garcia was just glad to beplaying again. the Kiwanis' Kolts, crushing them 21-0 sion of first after the Cristobal Tigers fell to In the early game atBalboa,the Cougars "My ankle is still sore, butit felt good to Sept. 24 at Bal boa Stadium here. the Panama Canal Green Devils 20-0 in got one in the win column, rolling past a be out there," he said. "I didn't even feel it The stingy linebacker core and big front Atlantic-side action, struggling Balboa Red Machine squad 17during the game, I was just really too line held the Kolts to just 38 yards of total In what was billed as the matchup of the 7. pumped up to notice." offense and five first downs. The Bulldogs' season's two best runners-Tigers Corey Injured quarterback Robert Garcia led Tonight the Cougars (1-2) go for two in defense also snagged three interceptions Townsend and Green Devils'WilberReese the charge, passing for 84 yards and scora row ag ainst the Kolts (0-3) at 7 p.m. at and caused two fumbles. -turned into a one man show. A fter only ing a touchdown. But it was his leadership Balboa. The 5:30 p.m. game pits the Green Meanwhile the offense took advantage, three running attempts, Townsend was that mattered the most, said Cougars coach Devils against the Red Machine. The Tirelying on a big night from quarterback injured on a kickoff following the Green Fred Bales. gers(2-1)playhosttotheBulldogs(3-0)at Jerome Price. Price hit Gary Foster in the Devils' initial score. "Injuries have really hurt us this year so 5:30 p.m, at Cristobal.

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Tropic Times Oct. 1, 1993 1.) Red Machine's Efrain Sanchez takes a shot from Cougars linebacker Cameron Benson. Department of D aenscephotos by Sgt. Rchard Puckett Individual statistical races heat up Thbefollowing arethestAtisticalllead5. 228 Kolts 2. 319 Townsend ers for the 1993 Panama Area Depart6. 266 Red Machine 3. 232 Beach ment of Defense Dependent's School's 4.163 Shaba football season through the first three Total points 5. 155 Ortiz games. Team statistics as well as indi1. 73 Bulldogs 6. 152 Price vidual player numbers are included. 2. 71 Green Devils 3. 40 Tigers Rushing average (midn 21 carries) Team offense, rushing 4. 37 Cougars 1. 7.5 Townsend 1. 631 Green Devils 5. 22 Red Machine 2.7.4 Beach 2.591 Tigers 6.12 Kolts 3. 6.8 Reese 3.587 Bulidogs 4, 5.0 Sanchez 4.315 Cougars Total points, allowed 5. 4.7 Price 5.,293 Red Machine 1. 6 Green Devils 6. 85 Kolts 1. 6 Bulldogs Passing yardage leaders 3.34 Tigers QB Com Att 'ID Int Yd Team offense, passing 4. 36 Red Machine Alvarez 13 28 2 0 169 1.* 221 Bulldogs 5. 59 Tigers Ford 6 27 1 2 175 2. 197 Kolts 6.80 Kolts Price 4 11 0 0 182 3. 169 Tigers Corrigan 6 33 2 2 81 4.143 Cougars Scoring Quinn 7 17 0 4 76 5.81 Red Machine 1. 30 Price, Bulldogs; Quinn, Green 6. 76 Green Devils 3.24 Townsend, Tigers Receiving leaders 4. 18 Ortiz, Tigers; Reese, Green 1. 149 Staton, Bulldogs Team defense, rushing allowed 5.12 Shaha, Cougars; Reyes, Bulldogs 2. 97 Chanis, Kolts 1. 324 Red Machine 7. 11 Rivera, Cougars 3. 96 Reyes 2. 351 Green Devils 11 are tied with 6 4. 90 Acosta, Tigers 3. 394 Tigers 5. 69 Sanchez, Red 4.434 Bulldogs Touchdowns 5.581 Kolts 1. 5 Price, Quinn Kickoff return leaders (min 3) 6.603 Cougars 3.4 Townsend 1. 20.9 Acosta 4. 3 Reese 2. 20.3 Banda, Red Team defense, passing allowed 5.2 Shaba, Reyes; Acosta, Tigers 3.17.6 Rivera, Cougars 1. 59 Bulldogs 12 tied with 1 3.17.6 Chastain, Green 2. 77 Tigers 5.17 Reyes, Cougars 3. 105 Green Devils Rushing yardage 6. 14 Chanis, 4. 111 Cougars 1. 368 Reese 7. 8.2 Stanziola, Kolts

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14 Tropic Times Oct. 1, 1993 U.S. Air Force photos by Sgt. James A. Rush Daniel Clements serves a shot as doubles partner Jarret Brown looks on. Howard tabs racquetball champions by Sgt. James A. Rush 24th Wing Public Affairs HOWARD AFB -More than 40 singles players competed in this year's intramural racquetball tournament which ran from Aug. 30 -Sept. II at the Howard Sports and Fitness Center here. Phillip Waugh of the 24th Supply Squadron is the base's best after winning the men's A category. He topped Daniel Clements from the 24th Civil Engineering Squadron. Another civil engineer player, Jarrett Brown, won the men's B division. Clifford Jordan, a family member, took second. The C division winner was Pedro Marquez from the 24th Maintenance Squadron. He bested Barry Dowell from the 617th Airlift Support Squadron. The women's classes were consolidated into a single category. Army family member Diane Bowman reigned supreme in the competition. Air Force family member Hannelee Oakley finished second. Six teams battled for the doubles title. Clements evened the score a bit with the singles champion when he and Brown topped Waugh and Reggie Hicks. Armyfamily member Diane Bowman stretches on a shot. Bowman won the Howard AFB women's racquetball title.

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Tropic Times Oct. 1, 1993 15 Sports shorts New (fiscal) year fun run The American Society of Military Comptrollers is sponsoring a New (fiscal) Year 10K and 5K Fun Run 7 a.m. Saturday starting at Building 210, Fort Clayton. Race day registration begins at 6:15 a.m. The event is sanctioned by the Panama Armed Forces Running Association. Curly Bates tourney The annual Curly Bates Memorial Mixed Bowling Tournament will be held Oct. 16 and 17 at the Curundu Bowling Center. Registration is $15. Shifts are set for I and 4 p.m. on both days. Bowlers will both three games each day on the shift they sign up for. For information, call 2863914. SCN AM radio sports The Southern Command Network's AM 790 Pacific and 1420 Atlantic will broadcast the following sports this weekend. Tonight -6:15 p.m. WBC Heavyweight fight Lennox Lewis vs Frank Bruno; 9:30p.m., San Francisco Giants at Los Angeles Dodgers. Saturday -2 p.m., Colorado Rockies at Atlanta Braves or Giants at Dodgers (if necessary); 2:30 p.m., Notre DameFighting Irish at Stanford Cardinal; Toronto Blue Jays at Baltimore Orioles. Sunday -noon, Rockies at Braves or Green Bay Packers at Dallas Cowboys; 3 p.m. Giants at Dodgers or Indianapolis Colts at Denver Broncos; 7 p.m., New York Giants at Buffalo Bills. Monday -8 p.m., Washington Redskins at Miami Dolphins. Columbus tourneys A Columbus Day Biathlon will be held Saturday at 7:30 a.m. starting at the Fort Davis pool. Entry fee is $3. A double elimination flag football tournament is scheduled for Oct. 9-11. An organizational meeting is scheduled for 5 p.m. Thursday at the Fronius Fitness Center. Entry fee is $75. A water basketball tournament is scheduled for 9 a.m. Oct. 16. Registration deadline is Oct. 15. For information, call 289-3272. On the Pacific side, a basketball tournament will be held Wednesday through Oct. 11 at the Reeder Physical Fitness Center. It is open to the first 12 teams to register. DepaLmentof Detence phto by Sgt. Elchard Puckett Coaches must turn in rosters by Monday. registration A men and women's racquetball tournament will Basketball registration also be held. For information, call 287-4050. Robert Kittle, 41st Area Support Group, and Fredrick Cooley, 142nd Medical Battalion fight for a rebound during the 1992 unit level basketball season. Registration for Army unit level basketball at National Trapshooting Day Fort Clayton continues until Oct. 23 and women's basketball ends Tuesday. Call 287-4050. The Amateur Trapshooting Association and the Isthmian Clay Bird Association will sponsor a National HHC, 5-87th 5 standings* Trapshooting Day at the Rodman Gun Club Range, Navy 4 3 AF Basketball Rodman Naval Station 9 am. Saturday. Co. B, 5-87th 2 3 AMERICAN LEAGUE It will include four handicap events of 25 rounds p,.r USAG/69th Sig 2 4 Northern Division event, for a total of 100 rounds. For information, call 1097th Boat 2 6 W L Robert Fearon at 256-6308 after 7 p.m. or Robert Stuart 408th MI 1 4 HHC, 1-228th 17 3 at 284-4985. 617th ALSS 15 4 Det 49th Wing 13 5 Turkey Bowl coaches Army basketball 24th MS 8 11 ~' ~6933rd ESS 7 13 The Army Directorate of Community Activities 611 and above Southern Division Sports Branch is accepting resumes for Army Turkey W L Bowl team coaches. Call 287-4050. W L 24th SPS 20 0 Navy Morale Welfare Recreation Sports is accepting Who's Who 2 0 24th CES A 9 10 resumes for the Navy Turkey Bowl team coach. People Having Fun 2 0 24 AIS/OSS 9 9 interested may call Morise Conerly at 283-4222. Jazz 3 1 Co. A, 1-228th 3 14 The 24th Morale Welfare Recreation Services SquadX-Clan 2 2 24th SUPS B 3 15 ron is accepting resumes for an Air Force Turkey Bowl MEDDAC 0 1 coach. Call 284-3451. 194th MP Co. 0 2 NATIONAL LEAGUE SOUTHCOM 0 3 Eastern Division Rodman intramural volleyball W L Sign up now for unit level volleyball. Deadline for 5'10" and under 536th Engr 12 7 letter ofintent is Oct. 8. Pre-season tournament will be 24th MSSQ 11 7 Oct. 16-17. W L 24th TRANS 11 8 Letters of intent are available at the Rodman Sports Da Boyz 3 0 617th ALSS B 4 15 office. Call 283-4061 for more information. Express 2 0 24th CES B 3 17 Pirates 2 1 Western Division 2Tough 2 1 W L JustUs I I 24th CS 12 7 football standing SouthernBoyz 1 1 31OthALS 14 6 Jazz 1 1 24th MG 12 8 W L Dogg Pound 1 2 Co. B, 1-228th 8 9 JOTB 6 0 GuardsPlus 0 1 24th MWRSS 4 15 549th MP 5 1 Mudd Puppies 0 2 24 SPS B 3 17 Marines 5 2 PSC Posse 0 3 As of Sept. 24.

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16Tropic Times 16 ct. 1,1993 ews Navy helps finish $4.5m Lacona housing project by LLJ.g. Laura C. Moore Each 10-foot-by-20-foot living unit includes a bath-USNAVSTAPANCANAL Public Afs room, shower, television with cable, VCR, phone, microwave, refrigerator and furniture. Each 30-foot-by-30 foot RODMAN NS -After nine months of construction recreationunithasalounge,wetbar,icemachineandgame work, more than 60 inches of rain, and the laying of more tables. The project will also receive daily maid services. than 15,000cubicyardsofgravelandmorethan4,500feet The units were built by Allenhurst Industries, and ofpipe, the Laconahousing project here is officially open. construction forces from Naval Mobile Construction BatThe $4.5 million project opened Monday in a ribbontalion Four and NMCB Five built concrete pads and cutting ceremony. installed the electrical, water and sewerlines to support the Lacona will house aviation squadrons deployed to project. support Southern Command's counter-drug mission, that Lt Tom DeSantis, officer in charge of NMCB-5 detail are currently housed in substandard Marine Corps ExpePanama, said histroops'deploymenthere has been fruitful. ditionary Shelters. "We learned a lot of lessons working on Lacona. It's Capt. ArthurN. Rowley, III, commanding officerofthe very satisfying to work on a project of this scope and to naval station, said theproject, which can beexpanded, will actually see our work, and to see it get put to use." be useful in the future. NavalMobileConstruction Battalions, such as NMCB"As we draw down from Panama, what I can expect is 4 and NMCB-5 deploy around the world to train and to that our demand for temporary quarters for TDY or TAD build. personnel is going to increase and this type of facility is NMCB-5is nearing the end ofits seven-month deploywhat's going to support that" ment to Panama. The facility can support 225 people and includes 74 "It feels good to know that we'releaving here soon to be U.S. Navy photo by PH2 DeLano J. mays single occupancy officer units, 75 double occupancy enwith our families again, and it feels good that we can leave UTCN Larry Harvey works on a sewer drain at the listed units, eight fully equipped laundry units, and three here knowing our project has been a success," said Petty Lacona housing project. recreational units. Officer 1st Class Jeff McDonald. 24th Wing holds safety day Week focuses in HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PA)AirForce members performance of1993,reevaluate goals and look forward to here got an ounce of prevention Monday at the wing's improving on performance in fiscal 1994. on fire prevention annual safety day. The24thWing hasaperfect weaponssafetyrecord,and Brig. Gen. David A. Sawyer, 24th Wing commander, its ground safety record shows two developing trends, said got things started at the base theaterinhie moing. Several Ut.Col. Mark W. Fry, chief of safety, 24th Wing. tp ,m a u e briefings followed his introduction including speeches on Last year's off-duty incidents continued a decline that HOWAR AFB (th Wing PA) -The timing of the human factors in accidents, poisonous plants and has been characteristic of recent years, Fry said. On-duty Fre Prevention Week has a unique relevance for animals, fire prevention and wartime souvenirs. incidents reported saw an increase, such as accidents Presentations bythefiredepartment,securitypoliceand involving government vehicles and strained backs. Americans and service members even in Panama, explosive ordinance disposal at the parade field were "Ithinkit'sbecauseoftheoperationaltempo,"Frysaid. wheretheonsetoffalldoesn'tsignalthestartofhome supposed to follow, however they were rained out "Mainly, people need to step back and think about the risk, heating season. The rainlet up in time to allow the finalevent ofthe day, then get some additional help." FirePreventionWeek begins Oct. 9,adaterecoma"FODwalk"totakeplace.Hundredsofmilitarymembers The safety officeplans to reemphasizeon-duty hazards mended by the Fire Marshal's Association ofNorth took to the flightline to pick up bits of safety wire, washers, during supervisor safety training. One specific area of Americatocoincide with the anniversary ofthe Great stones, or any other foreign object on the line that could be concernis awareness oflocal traffic problems native to the Chicago Fire which devastated that city Oct. 8, 1871. sucked into an aircraft engine and cause damage. local area. Twenty-two statesresponded with officialproclaSafety Dayis an AirCombat Command-directed event In the air, the 24th Wing was "fairly successful," Fry mations. During World War I President Woodrow (a hold-over from Tactical Air Command). Monday was said. The base had no mishaps involving loss of life or Wilson urged the country to adopt fire prevention to selected to be a no-fly day set aside to reflect on the safety major (more than $200,000) damage to an aircraft save war materials, food and clothing from needless destruction. In response to mounting fire destruction, PresiSystem automatesinformation dent Wilson laterissud aproclaation designating Syst m auomats inormaion the week of Oct 9 as Fire Prevention Week in 1920. FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -U.S. Army about a river rafting tour in Costa Rica at the TIPS in the This year's slogan, "Get Out! Stay Out! YourFire South is putting the information community members Valent Recreation Center, while the TIPS in Building 520 Safe Response" means for housing occupants to need right at the tips of their fingers with the Touch for can tell a soldier how to pick up his car when it arrives in immediately evacuate their homes when fire and/or Information, Products and Services system. Panama, said SSgt Rafeal Torres of the Replacement smokeisdetected. It also stresses the need to stay out This computer system was developed to be an autoDetachment. This information can also be printed at the once you're outside of a burning building. mated, simple, user-friendly source of self-service infortouch of a button so customers can take it with them. "Me majorreason people give for reentering is to mation which first appeared attheUSARSOReplacement Thesystemanswersmanyofthequestionssoldiershave get loved ones, pets or personal items left in the Detachment office here in 1991. It has since expanded to about their new assignment here, he said. building. But once you're out, you don't know how the Main Exchange, Corozal Commissary and the Valent "Theinformationis updatedandaccurate,"Torres said. farthe fir has travelled," said SSgt. Robert Appling. Recreation Center. Brenda O'Neil, a family member, uses the TIPS at the "Once you're backin, you may walk into an inferno. TIPS users touch a color graphic on the screen to get Valent Recreation Center because it already has the news Believe it or not, most fatalities in home fires happen information on topics ranging from housing availability to of the latest tours, trips and events, even before theprinted when people reenter their home." community activities. The terminals all have general calendars, she said. The fire department here plans to take advantage community data but specialize in information geared TIPS is a new source of self-service information in an of the week to drive home its own fire safety lessons. toward the customers of the facility in which it's housed. agewhenaccess toinformationis becominginstantaneous, The department is hosting the following events Adventure seekers can touch a box for information Torres said. through the week: *Saurday, basketball tournament at base gym, proceeds fund Fire Prevention Week activities. Veteran's group offers $200k coverage *dPammio crash RANDOLPH AFB, Texas (Air Force News Service) -military can choose one of four options when renewing and Panama Bomberos (firefighters) parade. The The Veterans' Group Life Insurance program now offers VGLI coverage: parade will travel through the Cardenas housing coverage up to $200,000 and term policies that are renew*cancel the coverage. area, Fort Clayton, Albrook, Balboa, Rodman, Coable for life. *convert the coverage to a commercial insurance coli,KobbeandHoward. Apost-paradecookoutand The changes resulted from the recent enactment ofthe policy, with no physical exam required, at the rates set by games will be sponsored by PCC at the Curindu Veterans' Benefits Act of 1992, according to Air Force the commercial company. softball field behind Curundu Junior High School. personnel officials here. *convert the coverage to a level premium plan with a +Monday-Wednesday, fire station tours for AlThe new lifetime coverage may result in increased or decreasing amount of insurance (forpeople ages 60-64). brook Preschool, Howard Childcare and Howard decreased premiums for some people, depending on their *continue coverage at the same level, but at the new Elementary School (grades K-3). ages, to reflect the true cost of the insurance, personnel premium rate. *Tursday,home cooking fire dferonstrtionsin officials said. VGLI offers premium discounts for people being refront of Howard Exchange and fire trucks on static ThenewpremiumstookeffectSept. 1;howeverpolicyleased from active duty who pay on an annual rather than display. holders may not notice a change until their current fivemonthly basis, officials said. *Oct.8,postercontestawardspresentedat Howard year term expires. Formoreinformation, people cancontact thepersonnel Elementary School and Firefighter's Ball to be held Retirees and people who have separated from the flight customer service section, 284-3508. at Amador Officers' Club at 7 p.m.


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