Citation
The tropic times

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Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text


Gift ofthe Panama Canal Museumn


Tropic T
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


times


Friday, Sept 24,1993


All tied up U.. Army pnoto oy Spec. on A. Mankok
All tied up
Specialists Scott Brigman and Pascal Blake tighten the rope during the bridge competition. See story and
photos on page 3.


Boat company ships ammo,


savesArmy morethan $200k


by Sgt. Lori Davis
USARSO Public Affairs Office
MINDI PIER - The 193rd Support Battalion saved the
Army more than $200,000 by moving ammunition back
to the states themselves.
Soldier-sailors from the 1097th Boat Company re-
cently shipped 60,000 pounds of ammunition from Mindi
Pier to Sunny Point, N.C., in the Landing Craft, Utility
Five Forks, said SSgt. Shawn Trescott, transportation
noncommissioned officer for the 193rd Spt. Bn.
The mission was an opportunity lift, which is ship-
ping cargo on an empty vessel heading in the same
direction, he said.


The Army usually pays private contractors to ship
ammunition, but the LCUs have done the job much
cheaper, he said. A study of the first LCU ammunition
shipment in June showed a savings of more than $700,000.
Finding affordable ways to ship materials back to the
states is an important part of supporting the Treaty Imple-
mentation Plan, 1st Lt. Philip Patterson, planning and
transportation officer for the 193rd Spt. Bn., said.
"Reducing the amount of ammunition in Panama ex-
pedites the closure of the Ammunition Transfer Point at
Fort Espinar," Patterson said. "It also reduces the amount
of ammunition stored at the Rodman Ammunition Sup-
ply Point and the number of people needed to operate and
guard it."


Air Force ball delights hundreds


by SSgt. Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - Nearly 300 people attended the
annual Air Force Ball Saturday. Brig. Gen. David A.
Sawyer was host for the evening, and joined other event
officials who landed the turnout and proclaimed the ball
a "great success."
Army Maj. Gen. George A. Crocker, U.S. Army South
commander, Joint Task Force Panama, was the special
guest of the evening. Other distinguished guests included
Brig. Gen. John Smith, U.S. Southern Command J-2
director and CSM James C. Williams, SOUTHCOM
command sergeant major. Col. Craig A. Bernhard, vice
wing commander, was master of ceremonies.
The 79th Army Band's show band, a 14-piece seg-



Air Force debuts new mobile Air-
man Leadership School at Howard
AFB.


ment of the larger group, provided the evening's enter-
tainment, a mixture of 50s and 60s rock 'n' roll and
current salsa hits.
"The band was great, especially the horn and key-
board sections," said SMSgt. Mark C. Stevenson, who
was in charge of the entertainment.
An evening highlight was when Sawyer led a 100-
troop conga chain through the grand hall while the band
played "Heard it Through the Grape Vine."
"Only the sour grapes remained in their seats,"
Stevenson added.
"We had a great turnout and everyone seemed to be
having a good time," said MSgt. Dave Bright, another
member of the A.F. Ball committee who attended the
event. "I heard a lot of people saying they were really
looking forward to next year's bash."



Senate's vote sets the stage to
close or reduce 175 U.S. military
installations


Air Force schedules
mandatory flu shots
HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PA) - Mandatory
flu shots for active duty Air Force members will be
given at the theater here 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct. 4-8.
Shot records are not required to receive the
vaccination.
Flu shots will be offered to family members in
high risk categories depending on the vaccine's
availability. This includes people age 65 or older
and adults and children with chronic disorders of
thepulmonary (including children with asthma) or
cardiovascular systems.
Following is the schedule for unit vaccinations:
*Oct. 4 - 24th Civil Engineering Squadron,
24th Logistics Squadron, 24th Air Postal Squad-
ron, Phoenix Oak, and the Air Force Element of
Southern Command.
*Oct. 5 - 24th Security Police Squadron, 24th
Wing, 24th Communications Group, and Air Res-
cue and Recovery.
*Oct. 6 - 24th Morale, Welfare, Recreation and
Services Squadron, 24th Mission Support Squad-
ron, 24th Transportation Squadron, 310th Airlift
Squadron, and 24th Contracting Squadron.
*Oct. 7 - 24th Operations Support Squadron,
24th Air Intelligence Squadron, 24th Comptroller
Squadron, and 24th Weather Squadron.
*Oct. 8-617th Airlift Support Squadronandall
units not named. This is also the makeup day forAir
Force members who have not received a shot.
For more information call 284-6157.

DEH to flush water
at Quarry Heights
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The Di-
rectorate of Engineering and Housing will flush
water mains 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday through Oct. 3.
on Quarry Heights.
Water pressure will be low for no longer than
one hour, DEH officials said.

Howard legal office
starts unit program
HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PA)- The Howard
AFB Legal Office is initiating a squadron lawyer
program for the benefit of all units here and at
Albrook AFS.
Under the plan, every squadron and tenant
unit attached to the 24th Wing will have the
opportunity to have a judge advocate assigned to
their particular unit.
Maj. Margaret McCord, staff judge advocate,
will match each of the other judge advocates on
her staff with those units that logically fall within
each lawyer's area of expertise.
The objective of the program is for the legal
professionals to become sufficiently well recog-
nized on base so that every customer will feel
comfortable coming in for legal assistance. To
accomplish this, lawyers will make themselves
available for briefings at commanders calls and
visits to their units.
The squadron lawyer will also become a re-
source so each unit has a point of contact in the
legal office for any mission-related issue which
might arise.
Commanders of the various squadrons and ten-
ant units here and at Albrook interested in the
program should sign their units up by calling the
legal office, 284-4002.


aII

*Boy Scout Olympics, page 8.
*Task Force Builder, page 10.
*High school football, page 11.


Vol VI Nn 38


V tn V. .









Tropic Times
Sept. 24,1993


4
4i


U.S. Air-force phot9 by SSL. Riar g m
Sgt. Sean Barrett, 24th Maintenance Squadron, watches TSgt. Deb Barker explain the importance ot non-veras n
the communication process.

New mobile Airman Leadership


School premiers at Howard AFB


by SSgt. Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs


HOWARD AFB - Professional Military
Education Instructors from four different
state-side bases recently traveled here to do
something that's never been done before in
Air Combat Command. Their six-week
temporary duty assignment was to teach a
"mobile" Airman Leadership School to 36
members of the Howard community.


The motivation behind this novel ap-
proachto ALS wasprimarily financial, said
MSgt. Clint Camac, commandant.
"It takes a lot less money for the Air
Force to bring four military members here
than it would to send 36 members back to
the states."
ALS students were selected from all
units here, with first priority going to staff
sergeant selectees who had no PME.
"Changes in Air Force regulations now
require staff sergeant selectees to graduate


from ALS prior to sewing on their fourth
stripe," said CMSgt. Ernest DalleMolle,
manpower office chief. "That's why we
gave them priority for attending this class."
"Our admission requirements were the
same as any 'normal' ALS," Camac said.
"Attendees must meet Air Force weight
standards and must have a 5-skill level -
if it's available in their Air Force Specialty
Code."
ALS students also must not be on a
control roster, under investigation or


11~1111


American Indian

heritage celebrated
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - History tells of a
mysterious and often misunderstood people who were the
first to walk the mountains, plains, arctic tundras and rain
forests of the Americas.
BythetimethefirstEuropeanssetfootinthenew world,
the cultures, traditions and ways of life of the Native
American Indians were strong with family values, religion
and a deep-rooted respect for each other and the natural
surroundings.
Thesevalues were aconstantthroughout North, Central
and South American Indians as were many forms of art,
dress and folklore.
These are only some of what the American Indian
Heritage celebration will cover Monday-Oct. 1 at Valent
Recreation Center, Fort Clayton, said Maria Rios, program
coordinator.
"During the week-long observance, there will be many
artifacts, displays and activities for visitors to learn the
history of the Indian people," Rios said. "The center will
have a museum-type atmosphere where learning will be
the number one priority."
The museum will be broken down
into North, Central and South American "There wa
cultures, she said. The displays will name of C<
include donated artifacts, informative
displays, crafts and modelsofsuchthings from acros
asatipi,pyramidandotherIndiandwell- ocean and
ings and religious structures, Rios ex- the country
plained.
"The North American Indian section man...I sto0
willcover as many ofthe different Indian Columbus
nations as possible with items from the
Sioux, Navaho, Apache and others," Chil
said SSgt. Jane Usero, volunteer for the a CreE
North American portion.
"It is impossible to cover all of the
nations throughout North, Central and South America, but
our goal is to give the visitor a well-rounded idea of the rich
culture of the American Indian and dispel many of the
stereotypes," she added.


The program will also introduce visitors to some of the
many things Native Americans have contributed to the
modern society of the Americas, Rios said.
"Many things we have today have been handed down
from the NativeAmerican Indian and we don't even realize


s a man by the
olumbus came
s the great
he discovered
Sfor the white
od here first and
discovered me."
tto Harjo
ek Indian


,it,"sheadded. "Many ofthe fruits
and vegetables we enjoy came to
us from the Indian people. Some
of these will be available during
the opening night celebration."
The opening night celebra-
tion will also feature guest speak-
ers John Mann and Col. William
Reeder, Indian music and dance,
foodtasting, games, souvenirgive-
aways and a special 7:30 p.m.
showing of Last of the Mohicans.
Opening night activities be-
gin 6 p.m. Monday and the mu-
seum will be open 2-8 p.m. Tues-
day-Fridayforvisitors. Lastofthe


Mohicans will be presented 7:30 p.m. Monday and 6:30
p.m. Tuesday-Thursday and Dances With Wolves 6:30
p.m. Friday in the center's Screening Room. For more
information, call Valent Recreation Center at 287-6500.


Joint effort evaluates

Chagres River Bridge
CHAGRES RIVER (USARSO PAO) - Joint
government of Panama and U.S. Army South nation
assistanceprojectsinvolve morethanFuertesCaminos
and Cosecha Amistad.
The Ministry of Public Works engineers and U.S.
Army South divers recently joined efforts for an
underwater evaluation of the Chagres River Bridge
supporting structures at Boyd-Roosevelt Highway.
"MOP does not have the specializedpersonnel and
equipment necessary to conduct underwater opera-
tions," said Guillermo Oro, MOP Maintenance Divi-
sion chief. "As with all previous requests for assis-
tance, the 536th Engineer Battalion (Heavy Equip-
ment), 7th Engineer Detachment (Diving Team)
helped us to complete our task.
"Both the river and the bridge are of vital impor-
tance to the canal and the cities of Colon and Panama.
The river is essential for canal and navigational
operations of vessels transiting the canal," Oro said.
"The bridge links the multi-million dollar Free Zone
and the provinces of Colon and Panama."
"This particular bridge requires close monitoring
for two reasons. The uncontrolled extractions of
material from the river cause the river basin to reach
dangerously low levels,"Oro said. "Italso may cause
the bridge supporting structures to separate, resulting
in the entire structure being lifted or shifted from its
original position."
"Secondly, the dam prevents theriver from renew-
ing and filling its basin with gravel, sand and other
sediments as rivers without damming operations
normally renew their basins."
After several diving operations, the USARSO
divers reported the structure safe, said SSgt. Gordon
Alberti, noncommissioned officer in charge of the
diving mission.
The supporting structures are not separated from
oneanotherandtheentire structures securelyembed-
ded into ground, he explained.


~r~,nr~u�~il*rrraS~i"
�~si�$~i~l~(B~B~i~RI"~I~


i3


charged with an offense underthe Uniform
Code of Military Justice.
The ALS instructors' goal is to teach
students to accept the greater responsibili-
ties that come with being supervisors and
raters. The curriculum demonstrates how
enlisted members support ahd contribute to
the fulfillment of the Air Force mission.
"We have classes on effective writing,
.public speaking, counseling, drill and cer-
emony, military citizenship and more,"
explained TSgt Deb Barker Galaxy Flight
instructor. "We focus on standards, disci-
pline, policies and programs."
Another part of the ALS curriculum is
physical conditioning. The class practices
several days a week honing their volleyball
(and teamwork) skills, inpreparation foran
Oct. 13 challenge match with the first
sergeants and chiefs groups at the Big Tree
Bohio.
Preparing for the mobile ALS was not a
simple task, DalleMolle said. "A lot of
people put a great deal of time and effort
into this project," he said, "especially our
ALS liaison, Tech Sergeant Annette
Henry."
Henry was responsible for coordinating
the base support, setting up the school
facilities, smoothing out any last minute
details, and greeting the ALS team upon its
arrival, the chief explained.
"For nearly a year, Henry was the entire
staffof Howard's former NCOpreparatory
course," he added. "Her in-depth knowl-
edge of PME and the unique needs of an
ALS made her the logical choice for the
job."
The ALS class graduation is scheduled
for Oct. 14 at the Albrook Club. The guest
speaker will be CMSgL Tommy Roberts,
ACC senior enlisted advisor.
During the night's activities ALS offi-
cials will recognize the graduates and an-
nounce the John Levitow award ivinner, as
well as distinguished graduates and the
winner of the military citizenship award.
"This is a great opportunity for us to set
the standards for future traveling ALS
teams," Camac said."The success we have
with this class will lay the groundwork for
all future ALS teams ACC sends out."








Tropic Times
Sept. 24,1993


Hooah! I

Infantrysoldiers

work, play hard

during training

by Spec. Robin A. Mantikoski
USARSO Public Affairs Office


FORTSHERMAN-Soldiers from Com-
panyB, 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry (Light),
worked and played hard during a day of
company training on Fort Sherman last
week when they rappelled, constructed
single-rope bridges and made poncho rafts
for water crossings.
The soldiers did more than train how-
ever-they got to test their newly learned
skills against each other in squad competi-
tions.
"This type of training breaks up the
typical battle drill training," said 1st Sgt.
Billy Hines. "It builds esprit de corps, mo-
tivation and gives (the soldiers) the confi-
dencethat they can worktogether as ateam.
It was hooah training."
During the rope bridge competition, the
soldiers were splitinto squads to learn how
to build the bridge and to cross it.
"Wedo alotofwatersurvivaltrainingin
Panama," Hines said. "Soldiers have to
know how to build these bridges because
it's quicker to cross a river than to walk."
The squads were timed from when the
squadleaderpickedup theropeto whenthe
last squad members was pulled across the
lagoon on the end of the rope.
"(This training) teaches them how to
encounter any obstacle they meet and how
to work together as a team," said SFC
RobertZayas, rope bridgeinstructor. "This
teaches them that they can'tlet any obstacle
hold them down."
The seven members from 1 st squad, 2nd
platoon, won by setting a new rope-bridge
building record: three minutes and 13 sec-
onds.
In another competition, two soldiers had
to wrap their ruck sacks, weapons and
helmets in their ponchos and swim with it
for about 75 meters.


.- - .
PFC Lewis Drake and Pvt. 2 Skipper T. Bowles carry their raft.
"The poncho raft is the ultimate," said
Hines. "You wouldn't imagine it would
float, but it does."
Pvt 2KevinReederand Spec.Lawrence
Davis won bycompleting theeventin 5:13.
The soldiers liked the training because it
was a break from the day-to-day grind and
though they had learned these skills before,
it was fun, said Sgt. Benjamin Duiker,
squad leader.
"It was a nice, relaxed atmosphere, and
it wasn't so much learning (the skills), it
was doing it."


; Ip, '"'~ + . -"'. ' " " ''



Squad leader Sgt. Jimmy Smith looks on as Pvt. 2 Andrew Shedd and Pvt. 2
Lonny Schablin lower their poncho raft into the Fort Sherman Lagoon.


Squad leader Sgt. Benjamin Duiker waits for his squad members to reach the
embankment.










4Tropic Times
Sept. 24,1993


SHemisnhere


Kunas achieve rare level


of hierarchy,
ISLA TIGRE, Panama (Reuters) - Kuna headman
Ramon Alvarado holds court from ceremonial hammock
at the center of his tiny island-kingdom in the Caribbean
Sea.
Smoke rises from his pipe as hundreds of intense Indian
faces watch and wait from the shadows of tropical night.
A nod. A word. His ruling is given: alcohol may be
drunkat an upcoming festival, but only until midnight. The
people leave without a murmur.
Elected headman or "primer sahila" for his wisdom
and seniority, Alvaradois the undisputed final authority for
1,000 Panamanian Kuna Indians living on Isla Tigre,
Spanish for Tiger Island.
Such rigid hierarchy is repeated along hundreds of
semi-autonomous islands offPanama's northeastern coast
that are home to some 40,000 Kunas.
It is the backbone of their success in achieving a level
of self-rule rare on a continent infamous for the mistreat-
ment and marginalization of its native peoples.
"Despite having atiny population compared with other
groups, the Kunas are better organized and more truly
autonomous than any otherindigenouspopulationinLatin
America," said Jose IsaacAcosta, aPanamanian academic
specializing in Indian issues.
The Kunas are easily recognizable bytheir high-boned,
sculpted features, short black hair, stocky figures and
bright costumes bedecked with "mola" weavings that
depict legends and nature. Women wear gold ringsintheir
noses and bead decorations bound to their limbs in child-
hood.
Their islands, bordered with bone-white sand and
covered in palm trees, vary from densely packed, bamboo-
hut villages to the tiniest plots.
The whole archipelago - known as San Bias in
Spanish and Kuna Yalain their native language-is aself-
governing region with minimal interference from Panama
City authorities.
Exempt from paying taxes to the central government,
the Kunas have their own laws and authorities, often with
subtle and complicated variations from island to island.
This autonomy, enshrined in a 1953 law, was won after
a long and bitter struggle with Panamanian authorities for
the first half of the century. The Kunas regard a 1925
uprising in which 27 soldiers and Indians died as the
"revolution" which secured their semi-independence.
They also fought off various incursions by the Spanish
conquistadores after their migration from South America
in the 16th century.
The Kunas' world is not, however, the unblemished
paradise it may seem at first sight.
Drug abuse is on the rise thanks to the abundance of
illegal shipments sent through San Bias from Colombia to
Central America.
Crime has gone up in recent years as more Kunas spend
time in Panama City, only to return with the capital's bad
habits.
And malnutrition caused by a fixed, unbalanced diet of
rice, coconuts and seafood affects 70percent ofschoolchil-
dren, according to Acosta, while illiteracy is 50 percent


autonomy
- - .' 4 ' *,, � '
. .. , ' . , * , - .
'~� ' 8' �a


Photo court of Mrtha K. Hlley
Kuna women carries a dinner crab on the beach.
among men and almost 80 percent among women.
"We are happy here, but life is not perfect," said Kuna
fisherman Alfonso Stocel.
The internal Kunaeconomyis a socialist model without
the ideology.
Goods are swapped more often than purchased - a
dozen coconuts forareed basket,alobsterforashark-tooth
necklace. Some fertile islands are rotated among families
on a monthly basis. Communal laboris obligatory in some
villages.
Contact with the outside world is limited to a thriving
business with Colombian merchants sailing through their
waters and tourists allowed to visit a few more westernized
islands.
The Kunas' existence as astate-within-a-state has been
a catalyst for the growing activism this year of Panama's
approximately 8 percent indigenous population.
Guaymi,Emberaandothertribeshavebeen pressing for
similar autonomy to the Kunas with a protest campaign
that has included closing the PanAmerican Highway and
kidnapping a provincial governor.
The Kunas are also winning increased attention from
other Latin American tribes striving for similar conditions
and from international forums studying indigenous issues.
"We are a model for the continent," said Kuna activist
Atencio Lopez on a brief stopoverin Panama City between
a U.N. conference in Vienna and a university forum in San
Francisco.


International committee recommends


building new Panama Canal
PANAMA CITY (Reuters) - An international commit- Quijano, who is also Panam
tee has recommended building anew $7 billion setoflocks the locks option was chosen b
at the Panama Canal to cope with more and bigger ships in effective and less damaging to
the 21st century, Panama said Sept. 17. second canal.
Panamanian, Japanese and U.S. officials on the tri- The plan will remain on the
partite Panama Canal Alternative Study Commission if funding cannot be found or
chose the locks option over a rival plan for a second winners of Panama's May 1994
waterway 11 miles west of the existing canal. Quijano said the canal's big
The proposed new locks would take 10 years to build, States and Japan - would ha\
create 14,000 jobs and accommodate boats up to 150,000 funding. Tariffs might be raise
tons, Panama's chief representative on the commission, defray costs, he said.
Guillermo Quijano, told a news conference. The locks would be built para
The existing locks, which lift ships from the Atlantic four points along the waterway
and Pacific seas to a raised, fresh-water channel across Panama, which has never m
Panama, cannot cope with boats over 65,000 tons. opening, is due to take over conl
Thelong-awaitedrecommendationbythecommission, Dec. 31, 1999 under the 19771
which has been studying the problem for 31/2 years, was Cargo passage is projected to
outlinedbyQuijanoaheadofaformalannouncementbyall up to 2000, then 2 percent an
three countries scheduled for Monday. 12,500 ships pass through the c


locks
a's housing minister, said
because it was more cost-
the environment than a

drawing board, however,
it is not supported by the
4 general election.
ggest users - the United
ve to provide most of the
d by up to 100 percent to

allel to the existing locks at

managed the canal since its
trol from the United States
Panama Canal Treaties.
grow 1.5 percent annually
nually until 2010. About
anal every year.


Central American police
step up drug trafficking war
MANAGUA, Nicaragua (Reuters) - Central
American police chiefs agreed Sunday to step up
regional cooperation in the fight against drug
trafficking.
They said aregionalcommission would be set up
and headed by top anti-narcotics officials from each
country to map out a program to hit back at drug
traffickers and improve the exchange of informa-
tion between the area's police forces.
More than 300 tons of cocaine was pushed
through Central America to the United States last
year, according to official statistics. Most of it
comes from Colombia and passes from Central
America through Mexico.
"We arecooperating more and more because the
systems used by the traffickers are in some cases
very sophisticated," Col. Mario Hung, commander
of Honduras' public security forces, told Reuters at
the end of a three-day meeting of senior Central
American police chiefs in Nicaragua.
The meeting also focused on how to tackle a
growing trade in stolen cars.
It brought together officials from Costa Rica, El
Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama. Del-
egates from Guatemala and Mexico were also
invited but officials said bad weather canceled their
flights into Nicaragua.

Exiled Aristide wants
Haiti's violence stopped
WASHINGTON (Reuters)- Haiti's exiled Presi-
dent Jean-Bertrand Aristide Tuesday said he wants
the resumption ofUnited Nations sanctions to force
the "killers" who head the country's army and
police to halt widespread violence.
Although stopping short of calling on the United
Nations to resume recent arms and trade embargo
on Haiti, he said the U.N.-brokered Governors
Island accords to return him to power Oct. 30
stipulate that sanctions should be restored if vio-
lence was not stopped.
"I respect the Governors Island accords and
therefore I am in favor of resuming sanctions," he
told a news conference.
"Cedras is killer, Francois is a killer," he said
of army chief Gen. Raoul Cedras and police chief
Col. Michel Francois. "Remove the killers imme-
diately."
Bullet-riddled corpses are turning up on a daily
basis in Port-au-Prince, the capital of Haiti, in what
human rights activists call the worst violence since
the September 1991 coup that toppled Aristide.
Under the U.N. plan Aristide - now living in
exile in Washington - is to be restored in the
presidency and Cedras, one of the leaders of the
coup, must step down.

Fujimori pushes for new
constitution in Peru
LIMA, Peru (AP) - President Alberto Fujimori
hassetOct.31 asthedateforareferendum on anew
constitution that would authorize the death penalty
for guerrilla leaders and allow presidents to seek
consecutive terms.
Fujimori, speaking in a late-night television
interview Sunday, said he would campaign for
approval of the new constitution.
If approved, it would replace the 1979 constitu-
tion that Fujimori suspended in April 1992 when he
closed Congress. Fujimori had alleged that corrup-
tion in Congress was blocking his efforts to fight
terrorism and drug trafficking.
Theoldconstitutionlimited the maximum prison
terms for guerrillas and drug traffickers to 25 years,
although the stiffest penalty was rarely imposed.
The 1979 constitution also would require
Fujioori to sit out a five-year term before running
for president again. Fujimori's term expires in
1995.
The proposed new constitution would allow life
sentences fordrug traffickers and the death penalty
for guerrilla leaders.
It would also roll back protection for workers'
jobrights,andlimitstateinvolvementin the economy
to providing such basic services as health, educa-
tion and defense.


1










_ Military News


Tropic Times
Sept. 24,1993


Senate approves closing, reduction list


WASHINGTON(Reuters)-TheSenate
cleared the way Monday for the post-Cold
War closing or reduction of 175 U.S. mili-
tary installations at a cost of more than
150,000jobs.
It rejected by an 83-12 vote, proposed
congressional veto of a presidential
commission's plan to dose 35 major mili-
tary bases and 95 small ones, and scale back
45 others.
The Senate vote completed Congress's
action because the veto needed approval of
both the House and Senate.
The vote will close three Air Force
bases, one Army base and 30 Navy bases
including the Charleston, S.C., and Mare
Island, Calif., shipyards and naval training
centers at San Diego, Calif., and Orlando,
Hla.
The veto was proposed by Sen. Dianne
Feinstein, D-Calif., who said the base cuts
will cost 100,000 civilian jobs in Califor-
nia, 70,000 of them in the San Francisco
bay area.
She told the Senate the cuts will cost
California's economy $4 billion and said
the commission makes such base cuts with-
out regard to economic pain.
"It is almost like a doomsday machine,"
she said. "It goes on and on and on
regardless of what happens."
Sen. Strom Thurmond, R-S.C., said
shutdown of both the Charleston naval
shipyard and naval base will put 50,000
civilians out of work.
But Senate Armed Services Committee
Chairman Sam Nunn, D-Ga., said the new
cutsplus twoearlierbasecommissionplans
to cut 250 bases will save an estimated $49
billion over 20 years.
If Congress refused to cut the bases
because of hometown pain, he said, those


Military base closings and changes recommendations
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Here is a list of the military base closings and Oakland Naval Hospital
changes cleared by the Senate Monday. It rejected 83-12 a proposed veto of Public Works Center, San Francisco, Calif.
the recommendations by the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commis- Naval Supply Center, Pensacola, Fla.
sion Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory, Port Hueneme, Calif.
Major buses recommended closed: Naval Electronic Security System Engineering Center, Washington, D.C.
Army Naval Electronic Systems Engineering Center, Portsmouth, Va.
Vint Hill Farms, Va., intelligence base. Naval Air Warfare Center, Airaft Division, Trenton, N.J.
Air Force Others
Platsburgh Air Force Base, N.Y. Defense Clothing Factory, Philadelphia, Pa.
KI. Sawyer Air Force Base, Mich. Defense Electronics Supply Center, Dayton, Ohio.
Newark Air Force Base, Ohio. Defense Personnel SupportCenter, Philadelphia, Pa.
O Hare Intenational Airport Air Force Reserve Station, IL Minor base closings recommended:
Navy and Marine Corps Army
Charleston Naval Shipyard, S.C. None
Charleston Naval Air Station, S.C. Air Force
Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Calif. Gentile Air Force Station, Ohio
Alameda Naval Air Station. Calif. Air Force Military Personnel Center, Randolph Air Force Base, Texas.


Mobile Naval Air Station, Ala.
Statn Island Naval Station, N.Y.
Treasure Island Naval Air Station, Calif.
Cecil Naval Air Station, Fla.
El Toro Marine Air Station, Calif.
Barbers Point Naval Air Station, Hawaii
Agana Naval Air Station, Guam.
Alameda Naval Aviation Depot, Calif.
Pensacola Naval Aviation Depot, Fla.
Norfolk Naval Aviation Depot, Va.
Olenview Naval Air Station, Il.
Dallas Naval Air Station, Texas.
Detroit Naval Air Facility, Mich. -
San Diego Naval Training Center
Orlando Naval Training Center
Orlando Naval Hospital


savings would have to becut out ofmilitary
readiness.
Thecuts weremadebytheDefenseBase
Closure and Realignment Commission,
subject to the president's and Congress's
veto, because members of Congress had
been unwilling to make base cuts hurting
constituents.
Defense Secretary Les AspintoldaSen-
ate subcommittee last week that another


Navy
Martinsburg Naval Air Station, W.Va.
Midway Iland Naval Air Facility.
Department of Defense Family Housing Office, Niagara Falls, N.Y.
Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Western Engineering Field Divi-
sion, San Bruno, Calif.
Navy Radio Transmission Facility, Annapolis, Md.
Navy Radio Transmission Facility, Driver, Va
Planning, Estimating, Repair and Alterations, Bremerton, Wash.
Planning, Estimating, Repair and Alte{rations, Atlantic, Norfolk, Va.
Planning, Estimating,Repairand Alterations, Atlantic, headquarters, Phila-
delphia, Pa.
Planning, Estimating, Repair and Alterations, Pacific, San Francisco, Calif.
Sea Automated Data Systems Activity, Indian Head, Md.
Submarine Maintenance, Engineering, Planning and Procurement, Ports-
mouth, N.H.


intelligence base in Virginia.
In additiontothe shipyards and training
centers, the Navy will lose major air sta-
tions at Alameda, Calif., Cecil Field, Fla.,
Agana at Guam, and Midway Island and
naval bases at Mobile, Ala., Staten Island,
N.Y., New London, Conn., and Treasure
Island at San Franciso.
The MarineCorpswillloseit air station,
at El Toro, Calif.


round of base cuts in 1995 will almost
certainly be even deeper.
Aspinhadproposedthat31majorbases
be closed and 134 others be reduced this
year but the commission recommended
additional cuts or reductions on its own.
The Air Force will lose its Plattsburgh,
N.Y., Newark, Ohio, and KI. Sawyer,
Mich., air bases.
The Army will lose its Vint Hill Farms


*P -s;


AP LaserPhoto
Former Defense Secretary Dick Cheney will be testifying for the government in a $1.6 billion lawsuit by
McDonnell Douglas and General Dynamics, who blame the Navy for cost overruns in the A-12 program.


Cheney tesifying in A-12 lawsuit


WASHINGTON(AP) The price tag on the Navy'sA-
12 attackjet soared and the delivery date kept slipping, but
the $3 billion question remains: Why was the plane
canceled?
McDonnell Douglas and General Dynamics say that
then-Defense Secretary Dick Cheney scrapped the A-12
program in 1991 to help the Bush administration deliver
its touted peace dividend and that Cheney pressured the
Navy rear admiral overseeing the program to find the
companies in default.
But the government denies it, saying it canceled the
program because the contractors couldn't deliver a good
airplane.
Cost estimates had reached $14 billion - $9 billion
above the contract price - by the time the plane was
canceled, Justice Department lawyer Anthony Anikeeff
said at the start of a trial in the U.S. Court of Claims.


Theplanewastoo heavy andtheprogram way behind
schedule, Anikeeff added.
But the companies - who have sued the govern-
ment for $1.6 billion - say the Navy was responsible
for the delays and the price increases. The government
says thecompanies mustrefund $1.4 billion becausethey
defaulted on their contract.
The A-12, canceled Jan. 7,1991, was to have been
the centerpiece for the Navy's aircraft carriers through
the turn of the century.
The Pentagon "mortgaged the futureofNavy aviation
ontheA-12," but Cheney was underpressure to reduce
the budget and canceling the A-12 would help solve the
problem, said David Churchill, a lawyer representing
McDonnell Douglas and General Dynamics.
Cheneyis among the scheduled witnesses in thecase
before Judge Robert Hodges.


Citadel, women


claim court win
CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) - The Citadel has
won a round in its fight to keep women out of its all-
male day classes, but women who sued the state-
supported military college see a partial victory in a
judge's ruling.
U.S. District Judge C. Weston Houck on Monday
dismissed a lawsuit brought by three women Navy
veterans. He said it was moot because the college had
closed the program the women wanted to enter.
The state-supported military college had allowed
male veterans to attend regular day classes with
cadets, butitabolishedthatprogram when the women
sued to attend those classes in June 1992.
The Citadel does allow women to attendits evening
college program, but while it offers 17 majors during
the day there are only three at night And it also takes
longer to earn an evening degree.
Houck did not order the day classes reopened to
veterans, but he told The Citadel to help the women
pursue degrees equivalent to its day-program degrees
through the evening program and courses at other
colleges.
The school will provide the same help it gave male
veterans after the day program was closed to them,
Citadel spokesman Rick Mill said Tuesday.
The school promised the men it would do "what-
everwas necessary" to make suretheycouldcomplete
the coursework in the normal time expected for the
day program. That included such things as making it
easier to transfer credits from other area colleges, Mill
said.
"If it meant even scheduling aprofessorone on one
with a student to complete acoursethe student needs,
we'd do that," Mill said.
Houck said he wantedto hear any complaints ifthe
women weren't given help earning their degrees.
"Now we have the rights and benefits ofattending
the day classes," said one of the plaintiffs, Angela
Chapman.
But Valorie Vojdick, an attorney for the plaintiffs,
said an appeal was planned anyway. "We don't
believe they can close the program to all veteran
students for the purpose of not admitting women,"
she said.










Tropic Times
Sept. 24,1993


SVoices


Confusion arises over contractor privileges


Dear Mayors' Corner,
I'm a contractor working at Howard
AFB on a two-year contract the Air Force
has with my employer. My wife and I will
be here for another nine months. We each
have a bilingual yellow card with CON-
TRACTOR stamped on it. We are able to
belong to all officers' clubs, use the ex-
change cafeterias, Stars and Stripes book-
store, recreation facilities, movie theaters,
Burger King and Popeyes, and the APO
postal service.
Recently I was told that I could no
longer rent videos at the Albrook Video
Store and was given telephone numbers to
call for information. My first call was to
Contraband Control. The person there said
that I could rent videos, but needed a
privilege card. When I tried to get this,
(after running into much confusion) I was
told that I couldn't get one.
I would like to know 1) may I use the
video store on Albrook? 2) What kind of


I NlAv CreI


pass do I need? and 3) Where do I get this
pass?
Confused contractor

Dear Confused,
I submitted your question to the Army
and Air Force Exchange Service and I
talked to Sgt. Rafael Torres in the Contra-
band Control Office in order to get the
information you needed.
It seems that you were given the wrong
information when you first contacted the
Contraband Office. You should have been
told that you can indeed rent videos, and all
you need is your contractor's ID. Even
though you have access to video rental, you
may not purchase anything in the store.
Contraband Control and AAFES hope
this helps to clear up any misunderstand-
ings that have arisen. They also pass along


their apologies for any confusion.

Dear Mayors' Corner,
When I came to Panama in December
1991, my window blinds in housing were
very used, but operable. Now, I have a few
thatneedtobereplaced. Iwastoldthatearly
last year the Pacific side got replacement
blinds when needed. I was also told the
Atlantic side community didn't have
enough. I need new blinds.
Atlantic Needs a View

Dear Atlantic,
"The Atlantic DEH (Directorate of En-
gineering and Housing) regrets that you
were misinformed," said Frank Bru, chief,
contracting division, Atlantic DEH. It's not
that the Atlantic side doesn't have enough
blinds, but new blinds will not be installed


in all cases because of projected base clo-
sures.
"However,"continues Bru,"Ifyourhome
does have venetian blinds which require
repairs, you need to call in service order at
289-3388 or289-3270. Ifthe blinds cannot
be repaired and need to be replaced, the
Atlantic DEH will submit a work order for
replacement of the blinds by contract."
Bru also adds, "Ifthe blinds are found to
be damaged due to customer abuse or mis-
use, the resident may be held liable for the
cost of replacement."
Editor'snote: This column allowscom-
munity members to submit questions to
the Mayoral Congress. Letters should be
mailed to: Mayors' Corner, Publicity
Chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS).
Anonymity will be granted upon request.
The Tropic Times reserves the right to
edit letters and responses for brevity,
clarity and propriety.


Off-post burglaries up


Military police give anti-theft tips, crime assistance


Off-post break-ins increase
Incidents of home break-ins off post have increased in
thepast fourmonths, said military police officials. Families
living offpost should useprecautions such as locking doors
and windows, keeping shrubbery cut below window level
and entrances and yards well lit at night Keeping the entire
neighborhood in good shape also helps keep crime down
because dark alleys, litter and run-down areas may attract
crime.
If a victim of a crime, call 287-4401.
Curfew violation
A soldier was arrested for curfew violation last week
when MPs saw him jump a fence onto Fort Clayton. There
is a curfew for all U.S. Southern Command military,
Department of Defense employees and family members
from 2 to 5 am. daily. Personnel must be indoors or on a
military installation during these hours. The only excep-
tions are medical emergencies, unit alerts or shift workers
who must have a letter of explanation.
For more information, call 287-4300.

Wrongful transfer of merchandise
A woman was charged with wrongful transfer of duty
free merchandise last week when she bought groceries at
the commissary and gave them to a non-privilege card
holder outside the front gate of Corozal.
For more information, see Southern Command Regula-
tion 60-10 or call 286-3117.

Family member nabs vagrant
A family member stopped a man near Morgan Avenue
carrying two flower pots. The MPs arrived on the scene,
arrested the man and took him to a Panamanian court
where he received a sentence of 50 days in jail for larceny
and unlawful entry.
MPs advise caution when encountering a thief and to
report suspicious activity by calling 287-4401.


Shoplifter arrested
A person was arrested last week for shoplifting more
than $100 worth of merchandise from the Army and Air
Force Exchange System main exchange on Corozal.
Report suspected shoplifters to the exchange manager.

Anonymous drug hotline
Anyone with information about drug smuggling should
call the Panama Jack anonymous hotline at 285-4185.

The following statistics are for crimes in military
housing areas Sept 10-16:


Pacific
Fort Clayton 600 area - two larcenies of secured private
property
Fort Clayton 300 area - one larceny of secured private
property
Amador housing area - one larceny of unsecured private
property
Morgan Avenue housing area- onelarceny of unsecured
private property


None to report


Atlantic


This authorized unofficial command information pub-
lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic
Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces
Information Program of the Department of Defense, under
the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S.
Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the
official view of the U.S. government, the Department of
Defense or the U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Telephone
285-6612.
CommanderinChief..................Gen. GeorgeA. Joulwan
Director,PublicAffairs;,...............,..Col. JamesL.Fetig



TIropic Tin


Chief...............................................SMSgt. Steve Taylor
Editor.......................................SSgt.DeborahE. Williams
AssistantEditor...................................... Sg JohnHall
SportsEditor........................................Sgt.RichardPuckett
Editorial Staff..........................................RosemaryChong
Maureen Sampson
VolunteerAssistant....................................JosephineBeane
Student Intern.................... ............. Juan Palacio
SouthernCommandPublicAffairs Office............282-4278
DeputyDirector,PublicAffairs......Cmdr.LoriGilchrist
Command InformationOfficer................PatrickMilton
PublicAffairsSupervisor................... SFCMikeHoward
U.S:Ai ySouthPublicAffairs Offce..............287-3007
Command Information Officer..................Beth Taylor


PublicAffairs Officer......................Maj.MelanieReeder
Editor.....................................................SSgt.JaneUsero
Journalists.......................................... Sgt.E.J. Hersom
Sgt. Lori Davis
Spec. Robin A. Mantikoski
24th Wing Public Affairs Office...........................284-5459
PublicAffairsOfficer.................Capt. WarrenL Sypher
PublicAffairsSuperintendent........MSgt.DaleMitcham
Journalists......................................SSgt.RianClawson
Sgt. James A. Rush
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.............283-5644
PublicAffairsOfficer.....................t.j.g.LauraC.Moore
Photographers..............................PH2 Roberto Taylor
PH2 Delano J. Mays
U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic............Call USARSO
Public Affairs)


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Sports


q
y rrau Hel hts Re u a


Balboa Red Machine split end/defensive back Chad Graham signals to the crowd before the second half kickoff.


Red Machine saddle


winless Kolts, 15-6


by Sgt. Richard Puckett
Tropic Times Sports Editor
BALBOA - The Balboa Red Machine
jumped to an early lead and then held on
during a bumpy second half edging the
Kiwanis Kolts 15-6 Sept. 16 at Balboa
Stadium.
The win was the first for the Red Ma-
chine who lost to the Cristobal Tigers in
week one. A 38-yard touchdown pass from
quarterback Chris Corrigan to Efrain
Sanchez on the opening drive put the Red
Machine up 6-0.
Corrigan drilled Sanchez on an inside
postpatter. Sanchez fought offadefender,
bobbled the ball, regained control and
sprinted into the end zone for the score.
On the point after attempt, Chad Gra-
ham snatched up a mishandled snap and
ran it in for a two-point conversion.
The next score came in the second quar-
ter on an H.B. Twohy two-yard run. Mike
Bleichwehl added theextrapointtogivethe
Red Machine a 15-0 lead.
A fumble and what Red Machine coach
Rick Dahlstrom called "too many mental
mistakes"turnedthetide in the second half.
. I


A game-ending injury to the game's lead-
ing rusher Joe Gutierrez (55 yards on 9
carries in the first half) didn't help either.
"We controlled the game in the first
half," Dahlstrom said. "We missed oppor-
tunities and had touchdowns called back. It
could've been 30-0 at the half. The K,.,,
dominated us in the second half, though. "
One mistake was a fumble on a punt
return by Sanchez. The Kolts took over
deep in Red Machine territory. New quar-
terbackRaul Ford got the Kolts down to the
15, but afumble on fourth down turned over
the ball early in the fourth quarter.
The Kolts made up foritmidwaythrough
thequarter. Following afumblebyCorigan,
the Kolts got going.
Fordopened uptheairassault witha34-
yard touchdown to Raul Chanis. Chanis
beat the coverage and ran in the end zone
nearly untouched.
The two-point conversion failed, leav-
ing the Kolts down 15-6 with 6:43 left.
After stopping the Red Machine on the
next possession, the Kolts drove again.
Fordhit Ricardo Zarakon a29-yardertoput
the Kolts into Bulldog tenitory again.
The Red Machine defense stepped up.


Kiwanis Kolts' cheerleaders Ana Melissa Ramos and Anisabel Poveda cheer
the team following Raul Chanis' touchdown in the fourth quarter.


On second down, Ford went deep just
overthrowing Chanis in the end zone. The
Kolts wouldn't get close to scoring again.
The Kolts impressed Dahlstom.
"You have to give them of credit,"
Dahlstrom said. "They had a lot to prove
tonight they got beat badly in their first
game and made it really hard on us."
In action Sept 17, the Cristobal Tigers
(2-0) beat the Curundu Cougars (0-2) 27-
14. Running back Corey Townsend ran for
two TDs for 170 yards on 22 carries. The


BalboaBulldogs (2-0)wona7-0battleover
the Panama Canal Green Devils (1-1).
Price broke up a scoreless battle on a 65-
yard second-quarter touchdown.
Tonight the Tigers play host to the
Green Devils at 5:30p.m. TheCougars will
be looking for win one against the Red
Machine at 5:30 p.m. tonight at Balboa
Stadium. The late game pits the Balboa
Bulldogs against the Kolts at 7 p.m.
Editor's note: Statistics provided by
Bob Best.


High school girls' basketball begins
- Cougars, Red Machine and
Green Devils are early favorites.


Fort Clayton youth flag football pre-
season camp gives players, cheer-
leaders running start.


*Basketball, page 12
*Flag football, page 14.
*Sport shorts, page 15.


eont 24 1990


Page 11


ueparmenot ouerenme pnotosDoy SgtL Hcard Puckett


aupt. 44, 1770 Um a pxsgam" X-F. .., - .








12 Tropic Times
1A Sept. 24, 1993


Competition fueling


girls' hoops season


by Sgt Richard Puckett
Tropic Times Sports Editor
BALBOA - Every week as the boys'
football teams wage war on the gridiron,
inside the gyms of Balboa, Curundu and
Cristobal another battle is going on.
A battle for respect.
Wednesday night the battle began anew
as the girls' basketball season tipped off.
And although the fans aren't packing
the stands and the cheerleaders aren't mo-
tivating the stars, the games go on.
This season the games could be some of
the most competitive in several years, say
the coaches of the five girls' teams.
The coaches are giving early high marks
to the Balboa Red Machine, Panama Canal
Green Devils and the Curundu Cougars.
But the defending champion Balboa Bull-
dogs and 1992 second place Cristobal Ti-
gers aren't out of the running. There's alot
of basketball to be played.
The teams got achancetotesteach other
out Sept. 17 during the Jamboree. Al-
though the games were just exhibition
matchups, it gave the coaches a chance to
evaulate strengths and weaknesses.
One of the things all the teams are
lacking is veteran starters. The Green Dev-
ils may have an edge in that department.
Three regulars will be returning for coach
Paul Schulte. Audry Ernest, Michelle
Womble and Camina Stephenson are ex-
pected to take a leadership role for the
Devils, Schulte said.
"I expect to win the title," he said. "I'm
optimistic. We have quite a few girls who
haven't played before, but there is also a
stable base with my top three."
The Green Devils will be starting the
season with a controlled, slow-paced of-
fense, but that could change, Schulte said.
"There are a couple teams that like to go
at a fast pace," he said. "We have to control
the boards to control the tempo of the game.
I'm concerned about our lack of height.
Hopefully, our experience and balance will
be good enough to carry us through."


Another team with veteran players re-
turning istheCougars. Coach Dave Moffett
is expecting good things from his three
returners forwardAbbyHiggleyandguards
Jill Hauser and Jessica Penkoske.
"I was really happy with what I saw at
theJamboree," Moffett said. "They showed
a lot of teamwork and hustle. We got a lot
of second and third shots thanks to offen-
sive boards."
Moffett said controlling the boards will
be a big factor for his team.
"Ourdefense needs work, so ouroffense
will have to be strong, especially on re-
bounding," he said. "We're strong down
low and I think that will help out a lot."
The other big gun is the Red Machine.
Coach Cecil Williams is expecting a suc-
cessful season from his squad. The Red
Machine lost to the Bulldogs in the season-
ending tournament final in 1992. Williams
is shooting for bigger things this time
around.
Williams doesn't have a deep pool of
talent, but thinks his team has the edge in
competiveness.
"We don't have alot of height or one or
two stars," Williams said. "We play well
together and have a strong defense. That
will be our best area."
Williams likes his team's shooting, but
credits the team speed and heart as key.
"We can play a transition game at any-
time," he said. "We're sticking to the fun-
damentals of the game and try to amplify
our strong points."
The defending champion Bulldogs are
looking for some strong points. Afterlosing
most of his 1992 team, Coach Cleve Oliver
is viewing 1993 as a rebuilding year. Hav-
ing one of his top players (Beth Larrabee)
out for several weeks doesn't help matters.
"We have one of the least experienced
teams in the league," Oliver said. "We did
surprisingly well during the Jamboree and
hopefully we can build on that."
A lack of size and quickness hurts the
Bulldogs, but Oliver thinks the team can
make it up with aggressiveness and good


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Deprlmsnt of Dene photo by Sgt. Richard PuckeR
Bulldogs' Kristine Nolte shoots over Tigers' Tiffany Cox during the Jamboree.


by Sgt. Lori Davis
USAROS Public Affairs Office
FORT CLAYTON - Da Boyz started off the 5'10" and
under basketball season by cutting 2 Tough down to size.
Two Tough's troubles started before the game was even
under way. The team barely made it to Reeder Physical
Fitness Center in time after playing a game in a separate
league at Howard AFB.
The team stood its ground at the start of the first half,
holding Da Boys to an 8-6 lead for the first 10 minutes.
Darryl Kimble and Paul Roby stuck to their team's
name, defying Da Boyz defense again and again. Kimble
found the hoop for nine points and Roby tacked on six.
Dugue Kerry and Kelly Dumas chipped in two points
each, but 2 Tough was essentially a two-man team of
Kimble and Roby at the hoop.
Da Boyz shared the wealth on the scoreboard. Jeffrey
Moses lead the way with six points, Reco Calhoun nailed
five and Bernard Grimsley sank two shots for four points.
Arnold Pickney, Phil Mickles and Patrick Jones each
contributed a basket and Roy Allen sank a free throw to put
Da Boyz up 22-19 at the half.
2 Tough ran out of juice early in the second half. Da
Boyz strong defense shut down Kimble, blocking every
shot, allowing just one free throw.
Da Boyz' David Burston tookoveron offense, dropping
two three-pointers and ashot from the free-throw line. Hot-
handed Calhoun backed him up with four points.
Da Boyz took off in the second half with a 10-2 run, to
jump out to a 32-21 lead and leave 2 Tough in the dust.
When the dust settled, DaBoyz sent 2Tough home with
a 41-31 defeat.
"The key to our success was ball control, good coaching
and slowing down the game," Moses said.
Da Boyz also capitalized on another factor, the lack of
toughness in the 2 Tough team.


defense. Oliverisoptimisticabout histeam's
chances.
"Wecan beat anybodyin theleague," he
said. "We just have to play hard, hustle and
come in with a positive attitude."
Tigers coach Gayle Rankin is coming
into the season with a positive attitude,
despite only having two starters returning.
"We're shorter on talent than we ex-
pected," she said. "I lost eight players,
including three key seniors, but I think
we'll be competitive."
Rankin is starting her team with the
basics and is looking to build on that from
game to game.


"We're going to get better as the season
progresses," Rankin said. "They are going
to learn and build up a sense of teamwork
and family."
Conditioning will be an important part
of the building process.
"We have to be able to stay in control
during a game," she said. "There were
several teams that ran a lot of fast breaks
during the Jamboree. If thatkeeps up, we'll
have to be up to it. I'm looking forward to
the season. It should be a close race."
Today theCougars faceRed Machine at
4:30 p.m. at Balboa Gym. The Devils meet
the Tigers at Cristobal at 5:30 p.m.


U.S. Army photo by Sgt Lori Davis
Two Tough's Paul Roby (center) fights off Da Boyz's Jeffrey Moses (left) and Reco Calhoun.
"They were weak on arguing amongst each other," "They beat us because we missed a lot of shots," Roby
Moses explained. "They cluttered up the middle, relied on said.
one person to score and they weren't patient." "We just finished a game at Howard," he explained.
Da Boyz picked on these weaknr ,es and moved in for "We'll come back and beat them later in the season."
the kill, Moses said. For now 2 Tough is 0-1.


Da Boyz cut 2 Tough down to size, 41-31











Tropic Times 1
Sept. 24,1993 1


Crystal Collier, 6, practices a cteer.


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Coach Larry Vidinhaworks on a play with bantam league
players.


Flagging dowi


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.:David Foster nails a punt during kicking practice Monday. .fD.b
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by SgL Richard Puckett
Tropic Times Sports Editor
FORT CLAYTON - The Fort Clayton
youth flag football kicks offits season with
opening ceremonies and games starting at
10 am. Saturday at Jarman Field.
Although the first exhibition games take
place Saturday, the seasonreally began two
weeks ago for the more than 50 children
takingpartintheprogram, saidRoryEgger,
youth sports director.
A preseason football camp that started
Sept. 13 and will wrap up tonight at Jarman
Field. Coaches worked with the players on
agility drills, receiving, passing, kicking
and offensive and defensive plays.
Watching the players improve has been
one of the highlights of the camp, said
volunteer coach Denisa Robinson.
"It's been a real blast," she said. "Not
only are you teaching the basics to kids
who've never played before, but also help-
ing those who know how to play get even
better."
Along with the learning process,
Robinson likes the entire philosophy of the
football program.
"The most important part of the pro-


gram is for the kids to have fun," she said.
"As long as they have a good time then it's
all worthwhile."
Football wasn't the only thing being
learned at the camp. Coaches like Margie
Krynicki also taught cheerleading basics.
About 40 girls signed up for the
cheerleading program. Teaching them
cheers, jumps and teamwork has been a
task, Krynicki said.
" The girls are learning it really quick,"
Krynicki said. "It is hard for the younger
ones to get the cheers right away, but with
repetition they can pick it up."
Starting this weekend all the football
teams will have a cheerleading squad root-
ing for them on the sidelines. It's part of the
game many people tend to overlook,
Krynicki said.
"These girls are outthere working really
hard to get the spirit going for their teams,"
she said. "It takes a lot of effort and enthu-
siasm to be out there."
Both the cheerleading andfootball teams
will bein action starting Saturday morning.
Although the teams are filled, coaches
are still needed, Egger said.
Forinformation about being volunteer
coach call 287-6451


Two-year-old Sarah Weber helps out by keeping
track of a football during the preseason camp
Monday.


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4 Tropic Times
-T Sept. 24,1993


106th Signal Brigade nips 108th Military Police


First quarter TD keys 7-0 victory


by Sgt. E.J. Hersom
USARSO Public Affairs Office

FORT CLAYTON - The 106th Signal
Brigade showed no mercy Monday beat-
ing the visiting 108th Military Police
Company from Fort Bragg, N.C., in intra-
mural flag football 7-0 here at Jarman
Field.
Signal quarterback Darrell Moore hit
David Williams for a 35-yard touchdown
pass in the first quarter, giving his team the
early lead.
Signal converted the extra point and
held its lead while the remainder of the
game remained scoreless.
A couple of close calls almost set Signal
back, but the defense came through in the
clutch with Antonio Bryan picking off
quarterback Anthony Bowers in the final
seconds of the game.
Penalties kept Signal scoreless for the
last three quarters.
Officials called back a 45-yard gain for
a touchdown because of a clipping call
against Signal.
The signal team's massive offensive
line kept the MPs hopes of sacking Moore
at bay and left him with more than enough
time to choose his recievers.
"There's nothing more I could do," said
MP coach George Winnfield. "I sent all the
beefI had out there and we still couldn't get
through to him."


Army

flag football
Atlantic side
Green League standings

W L
JOTB 2 0
HHC, 5-87th 4 1
549th MPCo. 4 1
Co. B, 5-87th 2 1
Marines 3 2
Navy 1 2
408th MI 1 2
USAG 1 3
Co. C, 5-87th 0 2
1097th Boat Co. 0 4
As of Wednesday

Though the loss dropped the MPs to a
.500 record, the defense kept the signal
team within its own 20-yard-line for nearly
all the second half proving it is among the
best in the league.
"Our heads weren't in it," said 106th
Signal coach Kenneth Hunter,
downplaying the win that brought his team
to 2-0 with an additional forfeit in its
favor.
Hunter said he was not happy with the
penalty calls and the flaring tempers of
players when penalty flags flew.
"We'll be ready for them next time,"
Hunter said.


Det. turns off


Maintenance

Mason leads team with 22

by Sgt. James A. Rush
24th Wing Public Affairs

HOWARDAFB - Detachment 4 needed 22points Sept.
17 from Carl Mason to hold off the 24th Maintenance
Squadron 50-46 here.
Maintenance fell behind by four in the first half and
could do no better than match its opponents in the second.


Michael"Yak"Yakowenkoand
Brian Ackerman led the charge
with 13 and 11 points respec-
tively.
Mason, meanwhile, topped
all scorers with his first half
output alone. He rung up 14 in
the opening period and finished
with 22 overall. Teammate
James Moore contributed 11
more points to the team's total.
The combined team of the
24th Air Intelligence and Op-
erations Support squadrons
gave a scare to the base's only
undefeated intramural team in
the next game.
After 20 minutes of play,
AIS/OSS led the 24th Security
Police Squadron Team A by
eight points.
Security police star Michael
Owens had been limited to six
points.
This set off an alarm that the
cops responded to in the second
half. Four security police play-
ers hit for double figures in the
second half.
Theperiodsaw Norris Davis
and Dale Carnell slam home


". -.







,..--..' ".-em-"
U.S. Army photoby Sgt EJ. Hersom
108th Military Police's L.D. Dixon tries to avoid 106th Signal's Antonio Wright.
ro v.


U.S. Air Force photos by SgL James A. Rush
24th CES B's Michael Lloyd tries to get a pass off around Airlift Support Squadron's Gregg Hendricks
(right) and Charles Hopkins.


Airlift Support Squad-
ron's John Brindley
pops a shot.


two-thirds of their 21 and 15 points while Bernard Hodges
racked up all 10 of his in the same timeframe.


Making the biggest contribution, of course, was Owens
whopoundedinsideforl7ofhis23pointsinthelatter half.
The underdogs had three players make double figures
as well. Dave Dixon led the team with 17. Johnny Taylor
added 17 and Charles Hamilton had 10 more.
Game three saw another potential upset shot down by a
second-hl f rally.
The 24th Transportation Squadron enjoyed a 10-point
advantage at halftime after holding the 310th Airlift
Squadron to nine points.
The flying squadron would zoom back to win 39-37,
with Pat Piche piloting the comeback.
Piche deliveredinside and outside hitting shortjumpers
andlayups while stretching hisrange out beyond thethree-
point line.
He finished with 16 points forthe game, 12inthesecond


half. Teammate Dan Broughton was the co-pilot on this
flight with 11 points.
Tyree Brown got most of his 11 points in the opening
period to lead the losing cause.
The final game of the night saw the 24th Communica-
tions Squadron squeak past the Co. B, 1-228th Aviation
Battalion's 45-40.
Communications needed the win to keep ahead of the
pack in its division.
Wayman Black and Aaron Caldwell answered the call
for the winners, Black had 16 points and Caldwell put 13
more. Theireffortled to a five-point Communications lead
at halftime.
Joseph Jenkins had 17 and Michael Gordon added 10
moreto lead Company B, but they failed to gain any ground
in the second half.


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Tropic Times 15
Sept. 24, 1993 5


Radio schedule
The Southern Command Network's AM 790 Pacific
and 1420 Atlantic will broadcast the following sports
this weekend.
Tonight - 7 p.m., Texas Rangers at Chicago White
Sox
Saturday - 12:30 p.m., New York Yankees at
Toronto Blue Jays; 3:30 p.m., (Dual coverage) Texas
Rangers at Chicago White Sox, Atlanta Braves at
PhiladephiaPhillies; 6 p.m., Detroit Tigers at Baltimore
Orioles.
Sunday - noon, Green Bay Packers at Minnesota
Vikings; 3p.m., San Diego Padres at San Francisco
Giants; 7 p.m., New England Patriots at N.Y. Jets.
Monday - 8 p.m., Pittsburgh at Atlanta Falcons.

AF swim team coaches
The Albrook and Howard swimming teams are look-
ing for qualified coaches and youth swimmers for the
1993-94 swimming season.
All age groups and skill levels of children are wel-
come to participate. Coaches will be paid according to
the number of participants in the program.
Team workouts are approximately three days a week
throughout the school year.
Anyone interested in coaching should contact Vince
Duncan at the Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195. Parents
or swimmers interested in participating should call
Duncan or Gary Hankins, 286-4571.

Powerlifting competition
Registration is under way for apowerlifting compe-
tition to be held at Reeder Physical Fitness Center. For
more information, call 287-4050.

Unit level hoops
Registration for the Army unit level basketball pro-
gram continues until Oct. 23. The clinics scheduled for
Oct. 19. Forinformation call the Directorate of Commu-
nity Activities, Sports Branch, Building 154,Fort Clayton
at 287-4050.

Fishing tournament
An inter-club fishing tournament will be held in
Atlantic waters until Nov. 30.
The event is sponsored by Club Nautico Caribe, the
Panama Canal Tarpon Club and the Panama Canal
Yacht Club. The fishermen who land the largest barra-
cuda, wahoo, kingfish, jack/tuna, marlin, sailfish and
tarpon will win prizes. Prizes will be awarded for the top
three catches in each category.
The entrance fee is $20 per angler and may be paid
at the bar of any of the clubs or to Francisco Lopez, 241 -
2025; Alberto Villa, 245-4379; Gabriel Kam, 241-
0675; Helio D. Alves, 243-4146; Mike Bell, 243-5207;
Alberto Alba, 245-0733; Gerry Laatz, 243-5652; Johnny
Kirby, 241-5883; Fermin Pinel, 241-6003.

Women's basketball
Registration for the Directorate of Community Ac-
tivities women's basketball league is under way and
continues until Oct. 5. Call 287-4050 for information.

National Trapshooting Day
The Amateur Trapshooting Association and the
Isthmian Clay Bird Association will sponsor a National
Trapshooting Day at the Rodman Gun Club Range,
Rodman Naval Station 9 am. Oct. 2. It will include four
handicap events of25 rounds per event, for total of 100
rounds. For more information, call Robert Fearon at
256-6308 after 7pm or Robert Stuart at 284-4985.

Turkey Bowl coaches
The Army Directorate of Community Activities
Sports Branch is accepting resumes for Army Turkey
Bowl team coaches. Call 287-4050.
Navy Morale Welfare Recreation Sports is accepting
resumes for the Navy Turkey Bowl team coach. People
interested may call Morise Conerly at 283-4222.
The 24th Morale Welfare Recreation Services Squad-
ron is accepting resumes for an Air Force Turkey Bowl
coach. Call 284-3451.

Self-directed programs
The Howard/Albrook sports and fitness centers have
started several new self-directed aerobics programs.


"Row the Mississippi," "Ski the Appalachian Trail,"
and "Climb Mount Everest" are now available for
prospective adventurers at the centers. Call 284-3451.

Golf tournament
A golf tournament for servicemembers will be held
Saturday and Sunday at Horoko Golf Course with a 7:30
a.m. shotgun start. There is a $20 entry fee that does not
include cart or greens fees. Entrants must have United
States Golf Association handicap.
Flight winners will be entered in the U.S. Military
Sports Association Golf Championship to be held in
October at Fort Jackson, S.C. For more information, call
284-3451.

Official recruitment
The Panama Armed Forces Officials Association is
recruiting officials on both sides of the isthmus.
Meetings are held 1 p.m. every second Saturday of
the month at the Valent Recreation Center, Fort Clayton.
Military, civilians and family members may join. Call
287-5572 or 247-0511 after 9 p.m.
The Howard/Albrook Officials Association is also
looking for new officials. The association offers profes-
sional training, clinics and a pay check.
The meetings are 7:30 p.m. every third Thursday of
the month at the Howard Youth Center. Interested
people must be fluent in English. Call 284-5371.

Boating safety course
The Rodman Marina boating safety course will be
held 6-9 p.m. Monday and Wednesday at Building. 65,
Training Center (Old Video Club), Rodman.
Payment and registration for course can be done at
the first class. This course is a pre-requisite for rental of
boats from Navy MWR. Call 283-3147.

Rodman intramural volleyball
Sign up now for unit level volleyball. Deadline for
letter of intent is Oct. 8. Pre-season tournament will be
Oct. 16-17. Letters ofintent are available at the Rodman
Sports office. Call 283-4061 for more information.


Basketball standings*
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Northern Division
W L
617th ALSS 15 3
HHC1-228th 14 3
Det 49thWing 11 5
24th MS 8 9
6933rd ESS 6 12
Southern Division
W L
24th SPS 18 0
24th CES "A" 9 9
24 AIS/OSS 8 9
24 AIRPS 4 13
24th SUPS "B" 3 14
Co. A 1-228th 2 13
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Eastern Division
W L
24th SUPS "A" 16 1
536th Eng. 12 5
24th MSSQ 9 6
24th TRANS 9 8
617th ALSS "B" 4 13
24th CES "B" 2 15
Western Division
W L
24th CS 12 6
310thALS 11 6
24th MG 10 6
Co. B 1-228th 6 7
24th MWRSS 4 13
24 SPS "B" 3 13

Rodman Intramural Bask'
W L
Road Runners 10 1
Civilians 11 3
Navy Ops 9 5
PSD 8 5
SCIATTS 5 8
IANTN 3 7
*All standings are of Sept. 17


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Opening ki s I U.S. Army photo by SSgt. OBuck ogers
Opening kicks .... r m
Cobras' Chris Thielle tries to ward off Panthers' Michelle Lueia during the 1992 fall soccer season.
The 1993 season kicks off Saturday at 8:15 a.m. at Howard Parade Field.


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16 Tropic Times
Sept. 24, 1993


N NeWS


Postal officials advise


early holiday mailing


HOWARD AFB (24 Wing/PA) - As
holiday season nears, it's time to start
making holiday mailing plans, according
to 24th Air Postal Squadron officials.
"Our customers are very concerned
with safe, speedy delivery of their mail,
especially at this time of the year," said
Capt. Karen Cordle Jordan, postal squad-
ron commander.
"By labeling and packaging their gifts
correctly, and observing the holiday mail-
early dates, people can help us ensure
friends and family back home and around
the world have their presents in time for
the holidays," Jordan said.
Post offices in Panama have copies of
the U.S. Postal Service pamphlet, Pack-
agingfor Mailing. It gives instructions for
loading and marking packages properly.
Most Santa-by-mail gifts leave
Panama in boxes, say postal statistics;
therefore, much of the pamphlet is dedi-
cated to these packages, The following
information is drawn from the pamphlet.
*Make sure the box is large enough
to hold the item(s) with enough space for
cushioning material. Boxes that are too
small don't have enough room for cush-
ioning and may come apart.
*Used boxes may be used; however,
they must be rigid with all flaps intact.
Boxes without flaps may be used with an-


other box of the same dimensions as a lid.
*Wrapping paper isn't necessary in
most cases, but when used, the paper
should be equivalent to regular large gro-
cery bags. Shipping or strapping tape (not
masking or cellophane varieties) are
needed for closing and reinforcing the box.
*To prevent damage while in transit,
properly cushion boxed items. This ab-
sorbs and distributes forces caused by
shock and vibration.
*When several items are shipped
within the same package, take care to pre-
vent contact between them and external
forces. Don't package heavy items with
fragile ones unless extreme care is taken.
*The final step is the easiest, but most
important: proper marking. All writing
should be done with a waterproof marker
that won't rub off or smear. Words must
be readable from 30 inches away.
*Include both the names and addresses
of the sender and receiver inside the pack-
age in case the exterior is defaced, and be
sure to complete the customs form.
*All mail leaves Panama by air, so
space available mail service is as reliable
as priority mail to the southern and eastern
states and is less costly.
For information on what items are or
aren't eligible for shipping via mail, con-
tact your local military post office.


Post office gives mail-by dates
HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) - The United States Postal Service headquarters
has provided the following Christmas mailing dates for 1993. All dates are tentative.
The following abbreviations apply: AIR (air letters and cards), PRI (priority), PAL
(parcel airlift), SAM (space available), and SURF (surface).
MILITARY MAIL AIR PRI PAL SAM SURF
(addressed to:)
APO/FPO/AE zips 090-097 Dec. 1 Dec. 1 Nov. 22 Nov. 10 Nov. 1
APO/FPO/ AE zips 098 Nov. 24 Nov. 17 Nov. 10 Nov. 2 Oct. 25
APO/FPO/ AA zips 340 Dec. 6 Dec. 1 Nov. 22 Nov. 10 Nov. 1
APO/FPO/ AA zips 962-966 Dec. 1 Dec. 1 Nov. 22 Nov. 10 Nov. 1
U.S. domestic zips Dec. 9 Dec. 2 - Dec. 2 Nov. 1
Africa Dec. 1 Dec. 1 Oct 1
Australia Dec. 6 Dec. 6 Nov. 1
Caribbean Dec. 6 Dec. 6 Nov. 1
Europe Dec. 1 Dec. 1 Nov. 1
Far East Dec. 1 Dec. 1 Nov. 1
Greenland Dec. 1 Dec. 1
Middle East Dec. 1 Nov. 15 Oct. 1
Southeast Asia Dec. 1 Dec. 1 Nov. 1
Central/South America Dec. 6 Dec. 1 Oct. 1


. . ,"
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U.S. Army photo by Sgt Lori Davis
CWO2 Dwight Williams prepares for a flight by putting on his Kevlar vest
during afield training exercise last week. The 1 st Battalion, 228th Aviation
Regiment, conducted the exercise to test the units ability to defend the
canal in preparation for an upcoming external inspection.


Aviation battalion


targets inspection


Neighborly visit . U.S. Army photo by S EJ.Hon
Neighborly visit
Brig. Gen. James Wilson, U.S. Army South Deputy Commander, presents
Isaura Rosa Perez, mayor of Colon, a memento. Wilson met with Perez
Saturday to discuss the affect of the Department of Defense drawdown on
civilian employees who are residents of Colon.


by Sgt. Lori Davis
USARSO Public Affairs


DUBOIS COATS FIELD - Soldiers
from the 1st Battalion,.228th Aviation
Regiment, counted on the old saying
"practice makes perfect" as they trained
last week for an external evaluation in
October.
"This field problem is gearing us up
for that evaluation," said Maj. Thomas
Comodeca, battalion operations officer.
"The battalion intelligence officers
wrote the field problem to mirror an im-
portant unit mission: defense of the ca-
nal," he said.
"The scenario is basically that we
have some armed individuals gaining
control of the Gatun Dam, and person-
nel and property in that area."
The unit's mission was to fly infan-
try soldiers to the dam and help take it
back from the enemy, he said.
No infantry soldiers took part in the
exercise so the aviators could concen-
trate on planning and executing the
mission.
"We get a fragmentary order from
our battalion staff for an upcoming mis-


sion, then we receive the air mission
brief, which prepares us for the whole
mission," explained Capt. Marc
Moquin, Co. A commander.
"We come back to the company area
and hash out the company internal
things we are going to do."
Security and fighting positions for
the flight crew are examples of internal
things.
They were also an important part of
the exercise, he said.
"Within an aviation unit we can fly,
no problem," he said.
"The things we need to work on are
soldier skills."
The unit is concentrating on prepar-
ing the staff officers for the field, but
the side benefit was the motivation it
gave the soldiers, Moquin said.
"It's important to do well not only
for the soldier's training, but also to let
the soldiers know we are in fact pre-
pared for a real-world mission," he
said.
"A soldier will fight better and train
harder when he knows there is meaning
to it, and it could keep him alive in a
battle."






Page
Missing
or
Unavailable






Page
Missing
or
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Tropic Times B 3
Sept. 24,1993 AUJ


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Soldiers of Headquarters Company, U.S. Army Garrison visit the remains of Fort San Lorenzo.



Fort San Lorenzo


Ancient fortress conjurs images of pirates, buccaneers


cally important Fort San Lorenzo brings back
images of English and Spanish galleons sail
ing past. The salty sea breeze carries whispers of
times past when buccaneers and Spaniards battled to control
the fort and the surrounding waterways.
Tourists can now wander freely throughout the Atlantic
coast fort as Panamanian government workers continue to
restore the 16th century structure.
The fort's history began in the 16th century with the new
power obtained by the Spanish Empire through its conquests
of Hispanola, Haiti, Santa Catalina, Mexico, Panama,
Cartagena, Maracaibo and Peru. Untold wealth poured into
the Spanish crown and doubled the world's known gold
reserve.
Spain's bullion, jewels and silver shipments were trans-
ported across the isthmus by the Camino Real and the
Chagres River and financed the Spanish armies and the
Armada in 1587. As a result, the British realized they must
strangle the sea lanes and disrupt the flow of Spanish wealth.
The isthmus became a focal point of this conflict.
With only one train route to transport the gold, the
Chagres River became an option for an additional route.
Because of growing threats from the British, Spain
fortifiedkeyports and builtFort San Lorenzoin 1597 by order
of King Philip II.
Around 1650, a boy appeared in the port of Bristol and
signed onto the vessel Saucy Nell. After being sold into
slavery in Barbados, Henry Morgan became an overseer of
the slave gangs and later joined a gang of buccaneers. They
hunted cattlein the West Indies and dryed the meatinto strips
to be blackmarketed to ships returning to the Old World.
Because of the buccaneers' success, the Spanish sup-
pressed the business and forced the buccaneers onto the small
island of Tortuga. There the band exacted their revenge by
capturing a small Spanish coastal trader laden with goods
and sailed it to Port Royal. This was the start of Morgan's
pirateering.
In 1668, he succeeded in capturing the port ofPortobello
and considered taking all of Panama. Soon after, he captured
Santa Catalina and dispatched Col. Joseph Bradley to take
Fort San Lorenzo.
After landing near Brujas Island, the men marched
toward the fort and attacked from the Northeast, but failed to
cross the moat. During the attack, a buccaneer became so


Monique Chisolm stands next to an old Spanish cannon.


enraged that when he was struck by a arrow he pulled it
from his side, tied apiece of his shirt to it, lit it on fire and
and fired it from his musket into the fort.
The blaze kindled and as night fell, a roof caught on
fire and collapsed onto large supply of gunpowder. The
explosion scattered debris all over the fort and weakened
the Spanish defense.
After killing many of the sentries during the night, the
buccaneers swarmed the fort and defeated the Spanish.
When Morgan arrived at the fort he began reinforcing
it to protect the rear during his campaign across the
isthmus.
After returning to Fort Royal with the booty from his
victory he was in trouble with the British Crown. He was
then taken to England and imprisoned in the Tower of
London. Morgan managed to bribe his way out, received
his knighthood in 1674 and was appointed lieutenant
governor of Jamaica where he lived the remainder of his
life.
Fort San Lorenzo again saw action in 1739 when
Adm. Edward Vernon bombarded the fort for two days.


The Spaniards, who again occupied the fort, surrendered.
In March 1740, Vernon had the fort blown up.
In 1751, the fort was rebuilt by Don Ignacio de Sala,
then Governor General Cartegena.
In the late 1700s, the fort was again attacked by three
British ships, but the Spaniards repulsed the attack.
Eventually, the fort declined along with the rest of the
Spanish fortunes. By 1849, it was underthe sovereignty of
the Republic of Columbia and was in a state of general
disrepair.
The last time the old fort was used was during World
War II when the U.S. Army Coastal Artillery units posted
a searchlight and gun mount there to prevent German
submarines from sending raiding parties up the Chagres
toward Gatun dam.
Though the fortis no longer a battlesite, itis asitewhere
tourists can get a glimpse of the past.
story and photos
by Spec. Robin A. Mantikolki
USARSO Public Affairs










B4 Tropic Times
SSept. 24,1993


PotDourri


Office closures
The SelfServiceSupplyCentersinBuild-
ings 711,Corozal, and 244, Fort Davis, will
be closed for inventory through Thursday.

Radio license exam
The Panama Canal Amateur Radio
Association will hold amateurradio license
examinations 9 am. Oct. 2 at the Panama
Canal Commission Training Center,
Balboa. To register or for more informa-
tion, call 252-7400.

Monthly meeting
TheBalboaHighSchoolAdvisoryCom-
mittee monthly meeting will be held 3:30
p.m. Oct. 4 in Room 109 of the school.
SACis away parents, students and faculty
can express ideas and concerns. For more
information, call 252-7896.

Adult classes
TheFortClaytonChapelSundaySchool
now offers several classes for adults: a
Spanish study of the book of Genesis, a
short course in basics of and Christianity, a
study of the bookof Isaiah, coping with the
traumas of family life, church history. The
video series Living Proof is planned for
10:30-11:30 Sundays. Toregister,call252-
7400.

Improvement classes
The Fort Clayton Learning Resource
Center, Building 128, offers general tech-
nical improvement classes, general educa-
tion study and college level examination
program materials to help prepare forests.
Call 287-4892.

Education center
The Army Education Center will hold
defense activity for non-traditional educa-
tion support and college level examination
program 7:30 am.-noon and 1-4:30 p.m.
Monday, WednesdayandFriday atthe Fort
ClaytonEducation, Building 128.Call287-
5856.

Hospital services
Some services at Gorgas Army Com-
munity Hospital will change beginning
Oct. 1. Children's immunizations will be
given at the Pediatric Clinic on a walk-in
basis 1-3:30 p.m. Monday, Wednesdayand
Friday. Newborn infant's two-week ap-
pointments will be done at the Pediatric
Clinic Wednesday mornings. The Army
Community Health Nursing in Section B
will continue to provide adult immuniza-
tions on a walk-in basis 1-3:30 p.m. Mon-


day, Wednesday and Friday. For more
information, call 282-5171.

Chapel lecture
The Fort Clayton Protestant Women of
the Chapel will sponsor a lecture series 9
a.m. the last Thursday of each month at the
Fort Clayton Chapel sanctuary.
Bible study is also offered for women
andchildren 9 a.m.each Thursday inBuild-
ing 156, Fort Clayton.

Financial classes
The Army Community Service Con-
sumer Affairs and Financial Assistance
program will offer the following classes:
*Checkbook management - in Span-
ish - 9-11:30 am. Monday.
*Personal financial management -in
Spanish - 8-11 am. Thursday.
For registration or more information,
call 285-5556/6518.

Clayton Burger King
The Fort Clayton Burger King has
extended its weekend hours to midnight
Friday and Saturday. With the increase in
hours, Burger King offers a midnight
munchies special of a 99 cents cheesebur-
ger 10 p.m.-midnight.

Holiday sponsorship
The 1993 Joint Task Force - Panama
Christmas Sponsorship Program is under
way. Units or community groups wanting
to participate this year should call public
affairs offices at the following numbers:
24th Wing, 284-5459; U.S. Army South,
287-5459; U.S. Naval Station, 283-5641;
and U.S. Southern Command, 282-4278.

Screening room
The Valent Recreation Center Screen-
ingRoomis now backinfull swing offering
visitors a unique movie experience with
digital Dolby surround sound and a big
screen television. A new addition to the
screeningroom program isa24-hourmovie
line. The new movie line number is 287-
4367.

Corozal cemetery
TheAmericanBattle Monuments Com-
mission announces that effective Oct. 1 the
Corozal American Cemetery will be closed
to vehicular traffic 4-6 p.m. weekdays and
6 am.-6 p.m. weekends and holidays. It
willremainopentothepublic6 am.-6p.m.
daily. Thecemeteryofficeis located behind
the chapel and is open 7 am.-3:30 p.m.
weekdays. For more information call, 285-
5016.


Hiring opportunities are limited because of budgetary con-
straints. How to apply: For temporary positions submit a SF-
171, DD 214 if claiming veteran preference, a copy of college
transcripts if claiming education and a copy of Clerical Admin-
istrative Support Position notice of rating if applicable. For
permanent positions (only for current employees including
leave without pay) submit a SF-171, acopy oflatestSF-50, acopy
of college transcripts, a copy of your last performance appraisal
and a statement addressing the job related criteria contained in
the announcement.
For more information regarding vacancy announcements
(forms required, job related criteria, etc.), visit the Directorate of
Civilian Personnel, Building 560, Room 306, Corozal, or call
285-5201.

VB# VACANCIES TITLEAND LOCATION OPEN: 09-24-93
CLOSE: 10-05-93
Pacific
565-93-SS Librarian, NM-1410-9. Temp Nte: 1 yr.

566-93-NC Laundry & Dry Clean Equipment Repairer, MG-
5317-8.
Atlantic
567-93-SS Engineering Technician, NM-802-8/9. Note: This


Dog show
The Club Canino de Panama will hold
an International and National Dog Show
Oct. 16 -17 at the ATLAPA Convention
Center. Show classes will be offered at the
Balboa High School stadium parking lot 9
a.m. Oct. 2-9, forjuniorhandlers and6p.m.
Oct 6-13 for adult handlers. For informa-
tion call Diane Ellis, 256-6606 evenings or
Bridget Groome, 286-4896 duty hours.

Square dancing
The Panama Square Ups hold square
dancing for all basic and mainstream danc-
ers 6-10 p.m. each Friday at the Curundu
Elementary School play shelter. An open
house and new classes begin in October.
For information, call 287-4426.

Christmas bazaar
TheOfficers'and Civilians'WivesClub
- Pacific will hold a Christmas bazaar Nov.
13. Vendors wanting to participate can.
Sign up noon-2 p.m. Tuesday and Wednes-
day at Club Amador.

Enlisted spouses' club
TheHoward/AlbrookEnlisted Spouses'
Club will sponsor its annual Christmas
bazaar at the Albrook Club 10 am.-3 p.m.
Oct. 2. Tables for vendors will be sold
noon-3 p.m Tuesday in the upstairs lounge
of the Howard Enlisted Club. Call 284-
3132 for information.

Vendors' bazaar
The Army and Air Force Exchange
Service will hold the second annual ven-
dors' bazaar 10 am.-5p.m. Oct. 1 and 10
a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 2 in front of Building 32,
Fort Davis. Many national and Free Zone
vendors will participate.

Job opportunity
The Howard/Albrook Youth Centers
are seeking instructors for personnel con-
tract positions in the following: dance,
aerobics, piano, Spanish, gymnastics, ten-
nis and martial arts. Submit bids and re-
sumes to the Director, Howard Youth Cen-
ter, Building 696, Howard AFB. For
information,call 284-5615.

Library news
The Howard library has new books on
familymember caretohelpyouinchildand
elder care. Stop by and check them out
10a.m.-9 p.m. Monday and Thursday;
10a.m.-6 p.m. Friday and Saturday and
noon-6 p.m. Sunday. For more informa-
tion, call 284-6249.


position may be filled at the NM-8 or NM-9 level. Driver's
license required.

Note: VB# 473-93-SS, Supervisory Education Technician,
NM-1702-6 is hereby cancelled.
Note: VB# 521-93-NC, Engineering Technician, NM-802-
8 is hereby cancelled.

The Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting applica-
tions on a continuous basis for the following positions. These
announcements are used to establish registers for future vacan-
cies.
VB# 001 * General Clerical, NM-3/4
VB#002* Sales StoreChecker,NM-3 (Intennittent wksch)
VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard) Requires
Cert + 6 mths recreation exp.
VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (req 6 mths of recre-
ation exp.)
VB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5/6
VB# 006 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5/6
VB# 007 Medical Officer, NE-12/13/14
VB# 008 Clinical Nurse (RN license required), NM-9/10/
11
VB# 009 Practical Nurse (LPN license required), NM-5

* CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is required.


Ifighrrtse fllla I


Shipment of pets on Category B
flights, "FreedomBird."
Effective Oct 1, pet(s) plus the
container weighing 100 pounds or
more will not be accepted for ship-
ment on Category B flights.
Pet(s) plus container with acom-
binedweightupto70poundswillbe
charged as one piece, $60.
Pet(s) plus container with acom-
bined weight from 71-99 pounds
willbe charged as twopieces, $120.
Shipments of pets onCategoryB
flgihts are for dogs and cats only.
They can only be shipped when
accompanied by the sponsor when
in -a permanent change of station
status and are limited two (2) pets
per family.
For further information contact
your Transportation Management
Office.

PP: Tourist Passport
TC: Tourist Card
V: Visa
PC: Proof of Citizenship
US: United States Passport
Holders Only
CC: Country Clearance
RON: Remain Overnight

All flights on this schedule are
subject to cancellation. For addi-
tional flight information, call the Pas-
senger Service Section, 284-4306/
3608/4857.
Saturday
5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN
Peterson AFB, CO US
Sunday
No scheduled departures
Monday
7:30am B727 Howard AFB, PN
Charleston, SC IAP
Commercial contract
1:55pm C5A Howard AFB, PN
Charleston AFB, SC RON
Dover AFB, Del.
Tuesday
4:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Howard AFB, PN


5:55am C130 Howard AFB, PN
San Salvador,
El Salvador
San Jose, Costa Rica
Howard AFB, PN


CC/v


Wednesday
Noscheduled departures
Thursday
7:55am C5A Howard AFB, PN
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Charleston AFB, SC RON
Dover AFB, TX


- - -


A






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#TV Schedule


Tropic Times
Sept. 24,1993 97


C&* MatureTheme **SeriesBegins ***SeriesEnds

Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
5:30am NBC News at Sunrise 6:30am Headline News 6:00am Real Videos 5:30am NBCNews at Sumise 5:30am NBC News at Sunrise 5:30am NBC News at Sunrise 5:30am NBCNews at Sunrise
6:00 Good Morning America 7:00 AmericanForcesPers- 6:30 OutreachofLove 6:00 GoodMorning America 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 GoodMorning America 6:00 Good Morning America
8:00 BasicTrainingWorkout pective 7:00 Fire By Night 8:00 BasicTrainingWorkout 8:00 Bodyshaping 8:00 BasicTrainingWorkout 8:00 Bodyshaping
8:30 Sesame Street 7:30 Navy/MarineCorps 8:00 CBS Sunday Morning 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street
9:30 Silver Spoons News 9:30 Face The Nation 9:30 Silver Spoons 9:30 Silver Spoons 9:30 Silver Spoons 9:30 Silver Spoons
10:00 ILovcLucy 8:00 NickArcade 10:00 HcadlincNews 10:00 ILoveLucy 10:00 ILoveLucy 10:00 ILovcLucy 10:00 ILoveLucy
10:25 Guiding Light* 8:30 Just ForKids 10:30 ThisWeekw/David 10:25 Guiding Light 10:25 Guiding Light* 10:25 GuidingLight *10:25 Guiding Light*
11:15 General Hospital* WarnerBros.Cartoons Brinkley 11:15 GeneralHospital* 11:15 GeneralHospital* 11:15 GeneralHospital* 11:15 OeneralHospital*
Noon HeadlineNewsBreak 10:30 Nova 11:30 WashingtonWeekInRe- Noon HeadlineNewsBreak Noon HeadlineNewsBreak Noon HeadlineNewsBreak Noon HeadlineNewsBreak
12:15 SCNMidday 11:30 CFA: Wiconsin vs view 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday
12:30 SportsCenter Indiana Noon HeadlincNews 12:30 SportsMachine 12:30 SporsCenter 12:30 SportsCenter 12:30 SportsCentr
1:00 Another World * 2:30pmCFA:Miamivs.Colorado 12:30 SCNOnTour 1:00 AnotherWorld * 1:00 AnotherWorld * 1:00 AnotherWorld * 1:00 AnotherWorld
2:00 OprahWinfrey * 5:30 Headline News 12:55 Movie: "Madame 2:00 OprahWinfrey * 200 Sally Jesse Raphael 2.00 OprahWinfrey* 2:00 Donahue
3:00 Price IsRight 6:00 WWFSuperstarsOf Sousatzka" 3:00 Price IsRight 3:00 Price Is Right 3:00 Price Is Right 3:00 Price Is Right
4:00 Channel One Wrestling 3:00 The Best of The Love 4:00 Channel One 4:00 Channel One 4:00 Channel One 4:00 Channel One
4:15 Newsroom 7:00 Rescu 911 Connection 4:15 Newsroom 4:15 Newsroom 4:15 Newsroom 4:15 Newsroom
4:30 ThinkFastl 8:00 Movie: "Silence OfThe 3:30 EbonyJetShowcase 4:30 NickArcade 4:30 Square One TV 4:30 LambChop'sPlayalong 4:30 Scratch
5:00 Family Feud Lambs"* 4:00 Soul Train 5:00 Family Feud 5:00 Family Feud 5:00 Family Feud 5:00 Family Feud
5:30 ShowbizToday 10:00 Headline News 5:00 OnStage 5:30 ShowbizToday 5:30 ShowbizToday 5:30 ShowbizToday 5:30 ShowbizToday
6:00 SCNEvening Report 10:30 SaturdayNightLive 5:30 HeadlineNews 6:00 SCNEvening Report 6:00 SCNEvening Report 6:00 SCNEvening Report 6:00 SCNEvening Report
6:15 HeadlineNewsBreak Midnight Videolinks* 6:00 AustinCityLimits 6:15 HeadlineNews Break 6:15 Headline NewsBreak 6:15 Headline NewsBreak 6:15 HeadlineNewsBreak
6:30 World News Tonight 1:00 Firday Night Videos 7:00 Eye To Eye w/Connie 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight 6:30 World News Tonight
7:00 Jeopardy 2:00 Movie: "The Return Of Chung 7:00 Jeopardy! 7:00 Jeopardy! 7:00 Special: 27thAnnual 7:00 Jeopardyl
7:30 SmallWonder A Man Called Horse"* 8:00 Movie: "TheLastTo Go" 7:30 DearJohn 7:30 PrivateEye Country MusicAssocia- 7:30 OutOfThisWorld
8:00 ABCNewsSpecial: 4:00 Movie:"LongRiders"* 9:40 HeadlineNews Break 8:00 Hooperman 8:30 Special:WhatEveryWo- tionAwards 7:50 Movie:"2000Malibu
Town Meeting: "The 5:40 HeadlineNews Break 10:00 EntcrtainmentThisWeek 8:30 60Minutes manNeedsToKnow 10:05 EntertainmentTonight Road" *Conclusion
ClintonPrescription" 11:00 InspctorMors** 9:30 CBS Evening News About Breast Cancer 10:35 TonightShow 9:30 CBS Evening News
9:00 InLivingColor MidnightHeadlineNews 10:00 SCNLateEdition 9:30 CBSEveningNews 11:35 DavidLetterman 10:00 SCNLateEdition
9:30 CBS Evening News 12:30 MeetThe Press 10:05 EntertainmentTonight 10:00 SCN Late Edition 12:35am Nightline 10:05 EntertainmentTonight
10:00 SCNLateEdition 1:30 SportsMachine 10:35 TonightShow 10:05 EntertainmentTonight 1:05 HeadlineNewsBreak 10:35 TonightShow
10:05 EntertainmentTonight 2:00 ABCWorldNewsNow 11:35 DavidLctterman 10:35 TonightShow 1:30 SportsLatnight 11:35 DavidLetterman
10:35 Tonight Show 3:00 HeadlineNews 12:35am Nightline 11:35 DavidLetterman. 2:00 ArsenioHall 12:35am Nightline
11:35 DavidLetterman 3:30 CNNWorld Report 1:05 HeadlineNewsBreak 12:35am Nightline 3:00 HeadlineNews 1:05 HeadlineNewsBreak
12:35amNighfline 5:00 HeadlineNewsBreak 1:30 SportsLatenight 1:05 HeadlineNews Break 3:30 TonightShow 1:30 SportsLatenight
1:05 Videolinks* 2:00 ArscnioHall 1:30 SportsLatenight 4.30 HeadlineNews 200 ArsenioHall
2:00 Movie: "The Lion in 3:00 HeadlineNews 2:00 Arsenio Hall 5:00 1-eadlineNews Break 3:00 HeadlineNews
Winter"* 3:30 TonightShow 3:00 HeadlineNews 3:30 TonightShow
4:15 Movie "A Fistful of 4:30 Headline News 3:30 TonightShow 4:30 Headline News
Dollars"* 5:00 Headline News Break 4:30 Headline News 5:00 Headline News Break
6:00 HeadlineNews 5:00 HeadlineNewsBreak



C* Mature Theme **Series Begins ***Series Ends

Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
5:30am Simulcast w/8 & 10 6:30am Simulcast w/8 & 10 6:00am LambChop'sPlayalong 5:30am Simulcast w/8 & 10 5:30am Simulcast w/8 & 10 5:30am Simulcast w/8 & 10 5:30am Simulcast w/8 & 10
8:00 OprahWinfrey* 10:30 The 13 Ghosts ofScooby 6:25 The SunshineFactory 8:00 OprahWinfrey* 8:00 Donahue* 8:00 OprahWinfrey* 8:00 Sally Jesse Raphael*
9:00 Today Doo 6:55 The Addams Family 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today
11:00 StarTrek 11:00 TheMunsters 7:15 GoofTroop 11:00 StarTrek 11:00 StarTrek 11:00 StarTrek 11:00 StarTrek
Noon HeadlineNewsBreak 11:30 Real News For Kids 7:40 Disney'sLittleMermaid Noon HeadlincNewsBreak Noon HeadlineNewsBreak Noon HeadlineNewsBreak Noon HeadlincNewsBreak
12:15 SCNMidday Noon HeadlineNews 8:05 CapL Planet &The 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday
12:30 All My Children * 12:30 This Week In Baseball Planeters 12:30 All My Children * 12:30 All My Children * 12:30 All My Children * 12:30 All My Children *
1:30 One Life To Live* 1:00 MovicSpecial:"Captain 8:25 Taz-Mania 1:30 One Life To Live * 1:30 One Life to Live * 1:30 One Life to Live * 1:30 One Life to Live *
2:30 Young and Restless * From Castillo" 8:50 Doug 2:30 Young and Restless * 2:30 Young And Restless * 230 Young And Restless * 2:30 Young andResdess *
3:30 Teenage MutantNinja 3:30 MikeHammer 9:10 Teenage MutantNinja 3:30 Taz-Mania 3:30 The Addams Family*** 3:30 GoofTroop 3:30 Disney'sLittlMermaid
Turtles 4:30 OnPitRoad Turtles 4:00 FraggleRock 4:00 PraggleRock 4:00 FragglcRock 4:00 FraggleRock
4:00 Fraggle Rock 5:00 Special: World Cup 9:35 Mr. Ed 4:30 Clarissa Explains It All 4:30 ThinkFast 4:30 Guts 4:30 Mr.Ed
4:30 Beakman'sWorld FreestyleReview 10:05 WonderfulWorldOf 5:00 Who'sTheBoss 5:00 What'sHappeningNow 5:00 Who'sTheBoss 5:00 What'sHappeningNow
5:00 Who'sTheBoss 6:00 HeadlineNews Disney 5:30 M*A*S*H 5:30 M*A*S*H 5:30 M*A*S*H 5:30 M*A*S*H
5:30 M*A*S*H 6:30 The Simpsons 11:00 Inside The NFL 6:00 SCNEvening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCNEvening Report
6:00 SCN Evening Report 7:00 Star Trek: Deep Space Noon NFL Football: Dolphins 6:15 HeadlineNews Break 6:15 HeadlineNews Break 6:15 HeadlincNews Break 6:15 HeadlineNews Break
6:15 HeadlineNews Break Nine vs. Bills 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:30 NBC Nighty News 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:30 NBC Nightly News
6:30 NBC Nightly News 8:00 QuantumLeap 3:00 NFL Football: 49crs vs. 7:00 Beverly Hills, 90210 7:00 Amcrica'sFunniestHome 7:00 Pull House 7:00 Hangin' WithMr. Coo-
7:00 Roc 9:00 American Detective* Saints 8:00 Monday NightFootball: Videos 7:30 Cheers per
7:30 Fresh Prince of Bel Air 9:30 Married...WithChil- 6:00 HeadlineNews Steelers vs. Falcons 7:30 HomeImprovement 8:00 Murder, She Wrote 7:30 Family Matters
8:00 Movie: "Young Guns dren * 6:30 The Wonder Years 11:00 HeadlineNews 8:00 NorthemExposure 9:00 Sisters 8:00 Martin
II"* 10:00 HeadlineNews 7:00 NFLFootball:Patriots 11:30 SCNLateEdition 9:00 Roseanne 10:00 RemingtonSteele 8:30 MurphyBrown
10:00 TJ.Hooker 10:30 SaturdayNightLive* vs.Jets 11:35 ArsenioHall 9:30 Movie: "Matlock: The 11:00 HeadlineNews 9:00 Herman'sHead
11:00 Headline News Midnight Videolinks 10:00 Magnum PJ. 12:35am Simulcast with channels Witness Killings" 11:30 SCN Late Edition 9:30 LoveAndWar
11:30 SCN Late Edition 1:00 FridayNight Videos 11:00 60Minutes 8& 10 11:10 HeadlineNewsBreak 11:35 ArsenioHall 10:00 Riptide
11:35 ArsenioHall 2:00 EntertainmentThisWeek MidnightSimulcastwithchannels 11:30 SCNLateEdition 12:35amSimulcastwithChannels 11:00 HeadlincNews
12:35am Nightline 3:00 HeadlineNews 8 & 10 11:35 ArsenioHall 8& 10 11:30 SCNLateEdition
1:05 HeadlineNews Break 3:30 Saturday NightLive 12:35am Simulcast with channels 11:35 AracnioHall
1:30 SportsLatenight 5:00 HeadlineNews 8 & 10 12:35am Simulcast with channels
2:00 ArsenioHall 5:30 HeadlineNews Break 8 & 10
3:00 Headline News
3:30 TonightShow
4:30 LateNightw/Letterman
5:30 Headline News
6:00 HeadlineNewsBreak






Channels 8 &10 Cable Channel 14
Sports
CFA College Football Sports
Wisconsin vs. Indiana, 11:30. a.m. Saturday NFLFootball
Miami (Fla.) vs. Colorado, 2:30 p.m. Saturday Dolphins vs. Bills, noon Sunday
Specials 49ers vs. Saints, 3 p.m. Sunday
ABC News Special: Town Meeting: The Clinton Prescription, 8 p.m. __Patriots vs. Jets, 7 p.m. Sunday
today. Ted Koppel, Peter Jennings and the ABC News Team analyze and '1.- Monday Night Football
comment on the Presidents address to congress. Steelers vs. Falcons, 8 p.m. Monday
ABC News Special: The Other Epidemic - What Every Woman Needs To Know Specials
About Breast Cancer, 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. Linda Ellerbee, herself a breast cancer Captain From Castillel p.m. Saturday. Hispanic Heritage MonthSpecial.
survivor, follows two women through their experiences with the disease. Am a e m a d New Worl dring the
Prime time movies An officer from Spain seeks fame and fortune in the New World during the
"Silence of the Lambs," 8 p.m. Saturday. Stars Jodi Foster and Anthony Hopkins. In this Inquisition and the conquest of Mexico. Stars Tyrone Power and Jean Peters.
genuinely scary adaptation of the Thomas Hart best-seller, a determined young female FBI agent is World Cup Freestyle ReviewS p.m. Saturday. Peter Graves and Jeff Chumas
assigned to the search for a gruesome serial killer known only as "Buffalo Bill." host the World Cup Freestyle ski competition from Tignes, France, featuring
"TheLastTo Go," 8 p.m.Sunday. Stars TyneDaly and Terry O'Quinn. The evolution of a troubled women's and men's ballet and the always exciting mogul runs.
family is followed in this tale of a doctor who moves his wife and children into a large house in a New Primetime Movies
England town where they are beset with domestic problems leading to alienation and eventual divorce. "Young Guns II," 8 p.m. today. This exciting sequel to the 1988 smash hit
"2000 Malibu Road," 7:50 p.m. Thursday. Stars LisaHartmanand Drew Barrymore. Jadehides out "Young Guns" finds William "Billy The Kid" Bonney (Emilio Estevez) and his
in a motel and tries to get a new passport so she can jet to safety. Lindsay asks Jade for advice on safe gang heading towards Old Mexico with a band of government law men led by
sex and condoms as her love affair with Eric heats up. Sheriff Pat Garrett (William Peterson) in hot pursuit. Also stars Keifer Sutherland
Movies and Lou Diamond Phillips.
"Madame Sousatzka," 12:55 p.m. Sunday. Stars Shirley MacLaine and Navin Chowdhry. "Matlock: The Witness Killings," 9:30 p.m. Tuesday. It's a made-for-TV
All Night Movies mystery when wily Southern attorney Matlock (Andy Griffith) gets the cold
"The Lion In Winter," 2 a.m. Friday. Stars Katharine Hepburn and Peter O'Toole. shoulder from his home-town folks...the same cold shoulder that was received by
"A Fistful Of Dollars," 4:15 a.m. Friday. Stars Clint Eastwood and Gian Maria. a writer (Steven Flynn) who was slain while investigating a killing he witnessed
"Return Of A Man Called Horse, 2 a.m. Saturday. Stars Richard Harris and Geoffrey Lewis. with two friends 15 years before. Also stars Nancy Stafford and Clarence Gilyard
"Long Riders," 4 a.m. Saturday. Stars Stacy & James Keach and David & Keith Carradine. Jr.








B10 Tropic Times
IOJ Sept. 24, 1993


SClassified Ads


Dalmatian dogs, 3 males, 3
females. 289-5349 after 5pm.
Thoroughbred mare, 8 yr old,
trainedEng. and western, very
quiet, perfect youth horse,
$400. 286-3392.
Poodle puppies, 4 males, 1
female, 6 wks old, 2 beige, 3
blk, $90. 287-6494.
Blue parakeet w/cage, $15.
287-3184.
Female German shepherd, 5
mos, housebroken, dew-
ormed, $160. 282-3778 after
4pm.
Mixed breed 4 yr old female
dog, has shots, $20.252-6968.
Mixed female pitbull, 1 yr
old, good w/children, has
shots, $60. 224-2890.
Free to good home, mixed
breed med-sz dog, grt watch
dog, fixed w/all shots. 287-
3534.
Purebred labrador puppies,
avail Sept. 30, $150. 286-
6190.
Shi-tzu puppies, 2 males, 1
CCPreg, $400. Shi-tzu AKC-
CCPreg, for stud service. 226-
7176.
Male AKC reg golden re-
triever for stud service. 282-
4235.
Free, 3 female kittens, 1 fe-
male cat, litter box trained.
284-5589 after 5pm.



Dune buggy, dty pd, $2,000
firm. 260-4643.
1979 Oldsmobile Cutlass,
2dr, V8, at, runs grt, $1,200/
obo; 1975 Ford T-Bird, at,
2dr,runs grt, $900.229-3686.
1980 Honda Prelude, good
transportation, $1,800/obo.
286-4127.
1990 Grand Am, ac, am/fm,
rims, tint, $8,500. 287-6517
Wilson after 5m.
1986 Isuzu Gemini, 4 dr se-
dan, std, dty pd, $4,600; 1987
Subaru wgn, 4WD, turbo, at,
dty pd, $7,000. 261-0763.
1986 Nissan Bluebird, at, ac,
ps, new tires, exc. cond,
$4,600/obo. 221-2619.
1984 Honda Accord, 5 spd,
2dr, ps, pb, cruise, alpine ste-
reo, exc cond, no ac, $3,800.
286-4422.
1985 Nissan 300ZX, deluxe,
5 spd, digital dash, low mi,
remarkable cond, $8,000.
282-3727.
1991 RS Camaro, V8, ac,
am/fm cass, cd changer, 15k,
like new, $9,000. 263-5733.
1981 Plymouth Reliant, U.S.
specs, at, needs eng and body
work, $500.252-2209.
1984 Chevy S-10 p/u, ps, new


tires, am/fm cass, runs/looks
grt, not dty pd, $5,000. 285-
5640 eves/wkends.
1984 Toyota Van LE, at, dual
ac, sr, ps, pb, pw, am/fm, exc
cond, $6,500. 284-4635.
1990 Chevy Corsica, 4 cyl, 5
spd, am/fm cass, ac, ps, 4dr,
good cond, $8,600/obo. 224-
0656.
1989 Chevy conversion van,
high top, TV, bed, extra fea-
tures, $17,000; 1990 Chevy
Cavalier, ac, 5 spd, am/fm
cass, 35k mi, $6,900. 287-
5529 after 5 pm.
1987 Ford Mustang GT 5.0,
ac,ps, pb,tiltcruise, exccond,
must see, $8,000, 287-6437.
1987 Volvo, 240 DI, 4 dr, 5
spd, ac, exc cond, am/fm cass,
$6,500.226-6341.
1988 BMW 318i Shadow
Line, 2dr, 5 spd, am/fm cass,
not dty pd, $10,000. 261-
6119.
1988 Pontiac 6000, ac, am/
fm stereo, super clean,
$4,750.260-5955.
1983 Lincoln Town Car,
loaded, leather, dty pd,
$7,000/obo. 252-2010.
1989 Mustang GT convert w/
alarm, tinted glass, 5 spd, wht/
ble top, very good cond,
$10,900.287-4895.
1989 Eagle Premier ES, V6,
at, fully loaded, low mi, key-
less entry, exc cond, $9,000/
obo.287-4742.
1990 Chevy Blazer 4x4
Silverado 350, V8, 5.7L,fully
loaded, new tires, brakes,
30,000 mi, $16,000. 287-
5689.
1986Toyota Hilux diesel 4x4,
dty pd, $5,700; 1987 Toyota
p/u 4x4 gas, $5,200. 252-
5428.
1979 280ZX, 5 spd, ac,
$1,500. 252-2251.
1989 Mercury Cougar, low
mi, exc cond, at, ac, stereo,
pb, extras, $9,200.252-6943.
1986 Chevy Blazer S-10,red,
4 spd at, am/fm, exc cond,
$5,900.252-2287.
1987 Dodge Daytona, new
drive axle and other parts,
very nice cond, turbo, V6,
$4,500. 286-3835.
1992 Dodge Shadow ES, V6,
4dr, ps, pb, tilt, ac, 7/20 w/
extended warranty (overseas),
stereo, 4 spkrs, $10,200/obo.
282-3794 must sell.
1988 Ford Aerostar, camper
beds, rear ac, many extras,
exc cond, low mi, not dty pd,
$11,900.287-3295.
1991 Geo Metro, low mi, grt
gas mileage, new tires,
$5,800/obo. 260-1476.
1989 Mercury Topaz, 4dr, ac,
at, power everything, cruise,
new brakes, tires, struts,
alarm, $5,000/obo. 284-5234.
1991 Chevy S-10, 5 spd, V6,


am/fm cass, ac, exc cond, not
dty pd, $8,700. 264-7619.
1982 Ford Escort GL, at, ac,
ps, pb, grtongas, superb cond,
$2,150/obo. 287-3189.
1993 Dodge Shadow ES, V6/
3.0L, $10,700, $2,000 down,
$281 monthly, 48 mos. 260-
2334 after 6pm.
1986 Chevy Cavalier sta/wgn,
pb,px, ac,radio/cass, $4,300.
223-6548.
1989 Nissan Sentra, 5 spd,
exc cond, ac, am/fm cass, 2dr,
$6,100/neg. 229-0302.
1985 Dodge Daytona, ac,
57,000 mi, am/fm cass, at,
dtypd,$4,500/obo. 284-6191.
1987 Suzuki Samurai 4x4,
hdtop, ac, cruise control, new
tires, brakes, exc cond, avail
mid-Oct, $4,500/obo. 286-
4693.
1988 Nissan Sentra, pw, pb,
ac, am/fm cass, not dty pd,
$4,000.260-7828.
1991 Mustang 5.0 LX
hatchbk, 5 spd, loaded, sr,
tinted glass, exc cond, not dty
pd, $9,950. 287-4885.
1979 Lincoln Contl, 1 owner,
52,000 orig. mi, dty pd, exc
cond, $3,500. 286-4273.
Jeep CJ-7, diesel, dty pd,
many extras, good cond,
$5,800.236-2647.
1988 Ford F250 3/4 ton p/u,
V8, 5 spd, ac, ps, pb, dual
tanks, bed liner, low mi, exc
mechanical cond, $9,000.
284-5530 after 5pm.
1987 Suzuki Samurai, hdtop,
$4,500.284-3529.
1979 Chevy p/u, new tires,
carb, brakes, many extras,
$2,300. 286-3835.
1988 Dodge Daytona, 4 cyl,
at, ac, am/fm cass, sr, tinted
glass, exc cond, $5,500.284-
3671.
1992 Ford Tempo, 2 yrs, re-
main on Colpan warranty,
best offer. 262-1720.
1988 Buick Electra Park Ave,
V6, 34,000 mi, 4dr sedan, all
extras,$8,500/obo.261-7398.
1988 Honda Accord LX, 4dr,
ps, pw, ac, am/fm cass,
$9,000/obo. 286-4835.
1984 VW Vanagon, 89K, ac,
tinted glass, runs good, int
exc cond, $4,600/obo. 287-
4927.
1983 Chrysler E-Class,
loaded, good cond, runs
smooth, $3,500. 283-6793.
1988 Isuzu p/u, camper shell,
gas, 4cyl, not dty pd, $7,000.
286-3137.
1984 Chevy Chevette, 4 cyl,
4dr, new tires, at, good cond,
not dtypd, $1,400.289-4662.
1991 FordEscortLX,4dr,ps,
pb, p/locks, ac, cass, sr,
18,700mi,$8,995.287-3485.
1987 Chevy S-10 Blazer 4x4,
4 new tires, $7,500; 1987


Duty-free merchandise
FORT CLAYTON (Contraband Control Office)- As a reminder, in
accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern Com-
mand regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used, cannot
be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege holders. Viola-
tions to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecution under
both, Military and Panamanian Laws. It is sometimes permissible to sell
an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid. Before such a sale, it is
strongly recommended that the seller contact the Contraband Control
Section for advice at 286-3117.


Dodge Caravan, ps, pb, ac, at,
$6,000/obo. 289-4968.
1991 Pontiac Firebird, V8,
ps, pb, pw, ac, am/fm cass,
alarm, $9,000. 284-4733.
1992 Rodeo-Isuzu 4x4, red,
ps, pb, abs, tinted glass, 5
spd, 16,000mi,$16,000.284-
5197.
1989 Dodge Ram 250 custom
van, high top, fully loaded,
$18,000/obo. 260-8936.
1987 Ford Tempo GL, new
tires, ac, ps, pb, am/fm cass,
nice car, dependable, $4,000.
284-5078.
1988 Ford Ranger XLT p/u,
X-cab, 5 spd, 6 cyl, fuel inj,
bed liner, roll bars, ps, pb,
cruise, tilt, $7,000/obo. 284-
3398.
1990 Geo Storm Coupe, exc
cond, low mi, many extras,
nose cover, custom paint,
tinted glass, $7,500. 285-
5929.
1990 Nissan Axxess Minivan,
5 pass, ac, cass, ps, pb, exc
cond,$10,000/obo. 287-4475.
1990 Chevy S-10 Tahoe,
loaded, ps, pb, ac, at, more,
$9,500/obo. 283-6145.
1990 Ford Aerostar XL,
31,265 mi, new cond, not dty
pd, Spanish-speaking,
$18,000. 264-8086/1053.
1971 Ford LTD, exc cond,
400 CID, edelbrock4bl carb,
must see, chrome eng, $4,000/
obo. 289-4195.
1979 Mustang, 6 cyl, at, trans-
parts for sale, incl engAran,
drs, glass, etc. 284-3938.
1990 Dodge Daytonap/u, V6,
ac, convert, bedliner, tonneau
cover, alum. directional rims,
tinted glass, $8,500. 289-
4320.
1988 Ford Escort GI 1.9L, 5
spd, ps, pb, ac, 3dr, tinted
glass, $3,500. 284-4130.
1991 Mercury Tracer LTS,
fully loaded, $11,000 firm.
260-3553 after 5pm.
1988 Dodge Ram 50 p/u, w/
camper top, sport wheels, low
mi, exc cond, $7,000. 287-
4338.
1985 BMW 528e,.5 spd, sr,
pw/locks, stereo ac, U.S.
specs, dty free, runs grt,
$4,800/obo; 1988 Honda Ac-
cord, sedan, at, ac, elec. win-
dows and p/lock, stereo,
alarm, exc cond, $9,000/obo.
226-7450 after 5pm.




Reliable Eng-spk maid, avail
M-F. 220-3923.
Mature, honest, dependable,
hardworking, Span-spk live-
in housekeeper, grt w/kids,
M-F, w/refs. 260-2695.
Atlantic-side day maid, M-F,
clean, iron, grt w/kids, full-
time, refs avail.. 289-4394
Mrs. Egger 8-5 p.m.
Honest bilingual live-inmaid,
good w/children, refs. 286-
3393.
Honest, dependable, 17-yr-old
babysitter, work nights and
wkends. 230-1927.
Span-spk live-out maid, hon-
est, reliable, mature, good w/
children, good housekeeper.
224-3408.
Honest, reliable, good w/chil-
dren, Span-spk maid. 238-
1376.


Dependable, honest maid, 3
days a week, spks some Eng.
286-4593.
Eng-spk maid/babysitter,
avail after 2:30 pm, exc refs.
282-5586.
Eng-spk housekeeper, Iday
a week, honest, hardworking,
dependable, cleans, irons,
babysits. 260-3235.
Span-spk live-outmaid, hon-
est, mature, reliable, M-F or
3 day a week, good house-
keeper, exc w/children. 267-
3405.
Child care, my home, Ameri-
can dependent, Espinar,
wkends, eves as well as days.
289-4292.
Eng-spk maid, good w/kids,
live-in/out, day work. 221-
5285.
Eng-spklive-out, orday work
housekeeper, grt w/kids.
228-1624.
Eng-spk maid, good w/kids,
live-in. 221-6897.
Exc day maid, M-Th, cleans,
cooks, good w/kids,refs. 284-
4170 Fridays.
Bilingual live-in maid, good
w/children, wash, cook,
clean, iron, refs. 287-5878.




12kw Onan marine gen,
7,000 hrs, can be rebuilt or
used for parts, $1,500. 286-
3981.
16' deep V-hull, 60hp John-
son, very nicefinancing avail,
$2,800. 230-1117.
19' Mako boat, 80hp, Mer-
cury, trailer, dty pd, $7,500/
obo. 261-0763.
14' fiberglass fishing boat,
25hp Evinrude w/trailer, exc
cond, $2,995. 228-6027.
21' Open Fisherman, 225 hp
Evinrude, fathometer, bart
well, like new, $14,200/obo.
252-2029.
Camper shell: blk sliding
tinted windows, 60x90, int
It, all mounting hardware,
exc cond, $500. 284-5430.
15 1/2' bass boat, 30hp, fully
loaded, trolling motor, fish
finder, many extras, $2,500/
obo. 289-6843 after 5pm.
Cayuco The Most," trophy
winner, best offer. 260-3115.




Nintendo games, $30 ea,
Apple IIC computer w/
printer, monitor, extra disk
drive, software and books,
$650/obo. 260-4393.
19" Magnavox color TV,
$150; 13" color TV, remote,
cable ready, $175; 60 chan-
nel marine VHF radio, $150.
230-1117.
Computer programs, Dbase
IV ver 1.5, $200; Harvard
Graphic 3.0, $300; Norton
Desktop DOS, $80. 287-
3486.
Zenith 19" color TV, good
cond, $130. 256-6830.
Sansui stereo 9990Z, Teac
cass, Technics turntbl,
Sansui, 8700/7700 spkrs, all
$750; VHS camera, $500;
bike, $50.287-6392.
RCA proedit VHS
camcorder, 8:1 zoom, video/
audio dub, mic mixing, ani-
mation/time lapse recording,


exc cond, $600. 284-5772.
27" color Fisher TV, cable
ready w/remote, $325; VCR
cabinet, holds 120tapes, $50.
286-4347.
Assted Game Gear games,$20
ea;2-4M6Simmschips,$300;
short wave radio, $125/obo.
252-2657.
RCA VHS recorderplus RCA
video camera w/extras, good
cond, $800. 287-5689.
Sony 19"portTV, cableready,
sleep timer w/remote control,
$275.225-1217.
Minolta606Cminicamcorder
w/all accessories, tripod, hard
case, $500. 252-7582.
Color TV, RCAX1100 13",
$160.252-6929.
Tandy 1000TL/2, drives and
hard drive, monitor, prog, exc
cond, $500. 252-2175.
Sega Genesis w/6 games,
$175/obo; Super Nintendo w/
5games,$175/obo. 284-3831.
Sony camcorder, 8mm com-
pact w/accessories, $699.260-
2334 after 6:00 p.m.
Sansui cass deck w/built in
graphic equalizer, auto-re-
verse and remote control,
$150.282-5586.
SNES Street Fighter II, $50;
Super Mario Kart, $45; Clue,
$45; Fighting N-Star 6, $40.
286-4286.
Kenwood KRC-640 pullout
stereo w/JBL 5 1/4" spkrs, car
stereo, $300/obo. 236-2467.
NES, 4 controllers, Four Score
Zapper, MAX and 2 games,
all for $75. 286-3630 after
7:30p.m.
Sega Genesis and CD Games.
260-7685.
Sega Genesis, like new,
Sonics I and II, Genestick,
$130. 284-4389.
Carver 1.5 Power Amp 350
w/channel, $425; Carver CT6
pre-amp, rem. control, new,
$350.; GE 27" floor model
TV, exc. cond, $325. 285-
4538, Room 201 after 6pm.
IBM compatible notebook
computer 386/25, 60mbhd,
3.5" fd, mouse, modem, win-
dows 3.1, MS Dos 6.0, more,
$1,300/obo. 286-6481.
Panasonic video camera, M7,
2 yrs old, perfect cond, full
size VHS, $600. 264-8586.
25" floor model color TV,
$300/obo. 287-6331.
Nintendo System, grt cond,
16 games and Game Genie,
$200.260-7082.
Carver am/fm tuner, exc cond,
$200; Yamaha integrated
amp, exc cond, $225. 284-
3194. -
27" Grundig Multi-System
color TV w/remote, 4 yrs old,
exc cond, works anywhere in
the world, $500. 264-6313.
Onkyo "Integra" power amp
and preamp, both in exc cond,
$250/$200.284-3194.




Super single waterbed w/hdbd
bkcase, Orthomatt50% wave-
less, 12 drws, heater, $475;
BR set, twin sz, hdbd, dwrs,
chest, night tbl, matt, $450.
260-4393 after 6:00 p.m.
Carpet 12x15 and 9x12 w/
padding, exc cond, drapes,






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Full Text

PAGE 1

Gift ofthe Panama Canal Museum Tropic Times Vol. VI. No. 38 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, Sept. 24,1993 Air Force schedules mandatory flu shots HOWARD AFB (24th Wing PA) -Mandatory flu shots for active duty AirForce members will be given at the theater here 8 am.-2 p.m. Oct. 4-8. Shot records are not required to receive the f vaccination. Flu shots will be offered to family members in high risk categories depending on the vaccine's availability. This includes people age 65 or older and adults and children with chronic disorders of thepulmonary (including children with asthma) or cardiovascular systems. Following is the schedule for unit vaccinations: *Oct. 4 -24th Civil Engineering Squadron, 24th Logistics Squadron, 24th Air Postal Squadron, Phoenix Oak, and the Air Force Element of Southern Command. *Oct. 5 -24th Security Police Squadron, 24th Wing, 24th Communications Group, and Air Rescue and Recovery. *Oct. 6-24th Morale, Welfare, Recreation and -" Services Squadron, 24th Mission Support Squadron, 24th Transportation Squadron, 310th Airlift Squadron, and 24th Contracting Squadron. *Oct. 7 -24th Operations Support Squadron, 24th Air Intelligence Squadron, 24th Comptroller Squadron, and 24th Weather Squadron. +Oct. 8-617thAirliftSupportSquadronandall U.S. Army photo by Spec. Robin A. M-nikoski units not named. Thisis also themakeup day forAir Force members who have not received a shot. All tied up For more information call 284-6157. Specialists Scott Brigman and Pascal Blake tighten the rope during the bridge competition. See story and photos on page 3. DEH to flush water at Quarry Heights Boa c m a s s mm FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -TheDiBoat company ships ammo-s rectorate of Engineering and Housing will flush s av s A r.mwater malns 8 am.-6p m Sunday through Oct. 3. ~i~v~5.ri~v m rein n %I M 1K on Quarry Heights. WavewnJy more than $200k Water pressure will be low for no longer than one hour, DEH officials said. by Sgt Lori Davis The Army usually pays private contractors to ship USARSO PubLic Aars Off co ammunition, but the LCUs have done the job much How ard le cheaper, he said. A study of the first LCU ammunition gal office MINDI PIER -The 193rd Support Battalion saved the shipment in June showed a savings of more than $700,000. Army more than $200,000 by moving ammunition back Finding affordable ways to ship materials back to the starts unit program to the states themselves. states is an important part of supporting the Treaty ImpleHOWARD AFB (24th Wing PA)-The Howard Soldier-sailors from the 1097th Boat Company rementation Plan, 1st Lt. Philip Patterson, planning and AFB Legal Office is initiating a squadron lawyer cently shipped 60,000 pounds of ammunition from Mindi transportation officer for the 193rd Spt. Bn., said. program for the benefit of all units here and at Pier to Sunny Point, N.C., in the Landing Craft, Utility "Reducing the amount of ammunition in Panama exAlbrook AFS. Five Forks, said SSgt. Shawn Trescott, transportation pedites the closure of the Ammunition Transfer Point at Under the plan, every squadron and tenant noncommissioned officer for the 193rd Spt. Bn. Fort Espinar," Patterson said. "It also reduces the amount unit attached to the 24th Wing will have the The mission was an opportunity lift, which is shipof ammunition stored at the Rodman Ammunition Supopportunity to have a judge advocate assigned to ping cargo on an empty vessel heading in the same ply Point and the number of people needed to operate and their particular unit. direction, he said. guard it." Maj. Margaret McCord, staff judge advocate, will match each of the other judge advocates on S her staff with those units that logically fall within Air Force ball delights hundreds eclayrsraofxpti. each lawyer's area of expertise. The objective of the program is for the legal by SSgt Rian Clawson ment of the larger group, provided the evening's enterprofessionals to become sufficiently well recog24th Wing Public Af/airs tainment, a mixture of 50s and 60s rock 'n' roll and nized on base so that every customer will feel currnt slsa its.comfortable coming in for legal assistance. To HOWARD AFB -Nearly 300 people attended the "The band was great, especially the horn and keyaccomplish this, lawyers will make themselves annual Air Force Ball Saturday. Brig. Gen. David A. board sections," said SMSgt. Mark C. Stevenson, who available for briefings at commanders calls and Sawyer was host for the evening, and joined other event was in charge of the entertainment. visits to their units. officials who lauded the turnout and proclaimed the ball An evening highlight was when Sawyer led a 100The squadron lawyer will also become a rea "great success." troop conga chain through the grand hall while the band Army Maj. Gen. George A. Crocker, U.S. Army South played "Heard it Through the Grape Vine." source so each un has io contact in the commander, Joint Task Force Panama, was the special "Only the sour grapes remained in their seats," legal office for any mission-related issue which guest of the evening. Other distinguished guests included Stevenson added. might arise. Brig. Gen. John Smith, U.S. Southern Command J-2 "We had a great turnout and everyone seemed to be Commanders of thevarious squadrons and tendirector and CSM James C. Williams, SOUTHCOM having a good time," said MSgt. Dave Bright, another ant units here and at Albrook interested in the command sergeant major. Col. Craig A. Bernhard, vice member of the A.F. Ball committee who attended the program should sign their units up by calling the wing commander, was master of ceremonies. event. "I heard a lot of people saying they were really legal office, 284-4002. The 79th Army Band's show band, a 14-piece seglooking forward to next year's bash." Air Force debuts new mobile AirSenate's vote sets the stage to *Boy Scout Olympics, page 8. man Leadership School at Howard close or reduce 175 U.S. military *Task Force Builder, page 10. AFB. installations *High school football, page 11.

PAGE 2

Tropic Times Sept. 24, 1993 charged with anoffense undertheUniform Code of Military Justice. The ALS instructors' goal is to teach students to accept the greater responsibilities that come with being supervisors and raters. The curriculum demonstrates how enlisted members supportahd contributeto the fulfillment of the Air Force mission. "We have classes on effective writing, 'public speaking, counseling, drill and ceremony, military citizenship and more," explained TSgt. Deb Barker Galaxy Flight instructor. "We focus on standards, discipline, policies and programs." Another part of the ALS curriculum is physical conditioning. The class practices several days a week honing their volleyball (andteamwork)skills,inpreparationforan Oct. 13 challenge match with the first sergeants and chiefs groups at the Big Tree Bohio. Preparing for the mobile ALS was not a simple task, DalleMolle said. "A lot of people put a great deal of time and effort into this project," he said, "especially our ALS liaison, Tech Sergeant Annette Henry." Henry was responsible forcoordinating the base support, setting up the school facilities, smoothing out any last minute U. Ar -FoC. pho tby SSgt. a cw, details, and greeting the ALS team upon its Sgt. Sean Barrett, 24th Maintenance Squadron, watches TSgt. Deb Barker explain the importance of non-verbals in arrival, the chief explained. the communication process. "Fornearly a year, Henry was the entire rd~IAIcoure," he added. "Her in-depth knowlNewmobile Aima eadersnip H New mo il A rmran Le d rhp edge of PME and the unique needs of an ALS made her the logical choice for the School premiers at Howard AFB AesadALS class graduation is scheduled I for Oct. 14 at the Albrook Club. The guest The motivation behind this novel apfrom ALS prior to sewing on their fourth speaker will be CMSgt. Tommy Roberts, by SSgt. Rian Clawson proachtoALS wasprimarily financial,said stripe," said CMSgt. Ernest DalleMolle, ACC senior enlisted advisor. 24th Wing Public Affairs MSgt. Clint Camac, commandant. manpower office chief. 'That's why we During the night's activities ALS offi"It takes a lot less money for the Air gave them priority forattending this class." cials will recognize the graduates and anHOWARDAFB-Professional Military Force to bring four military members here "Our admission requirements were the ounce the John Levitow award winner, as Education Instructors from four different than it would to send 36 members back to same as any 'normal' ALS," Camac said. well as distinguished graduates and the state-side bases recently traveled here to do the states." "Attendees must meet Air Force weight winner of the military citizenship award. something that's never been done before in ALS students were selected from all standards and must have a 5-skill level -"This is a great opportunity for us to set Air Combat Command. Their six-week units here, with first priority going to staff if it's available in their Air Force Specialty the standards for future traveling ALS temporary duty assignment was to teach a sergeant selectees who had no PME. Code." teams," Camac said.'The success we have "mobile" Airman Leadership School to 36 "Changes in Air Force regulations now ALS students also must not be on a with this class will lay the groundwork for members of the Howard community. require staff sergeant selectees to graduate control roster, under investigation or all future ALS teams ACC sends out." American Indian Joint effort evaluates heritage celebrated Chagres River Bridge FORTCLAYTON(USARSOPAO)Historytellsofa / CHARGES RIVER (USARSO PAO) -Joint mysterious and often misunderstood people who were the government of Panama and U.S. Army South nation first to walk the mountains, plains, arctic tundras and rain assistanceprojectsinvolve morethanFuestesCaminos forests of the Americas. and Cosecha Amistad. Bythetimethe firstEuropeans set footinthenew world, The Ministryofublic Works engineers andUS. the cultures, traditions and ways of life of the Native A South divers recently joined efforts for an American Indians were strong with familyvalues, religion u underwater evaluation of the Chagres River Bridge and a deep-rooted respect for each other and the natural supporting structures at Boyd-Roosevelt Highway. surroundings. "MOPdoes nothavethespecializedpersonneland Thesevalues wereaconstantthroughout North,Central eqmpment necessary to conduct underwater operaand South American Indians as were many forms of art, tions," said Guillermo Oro, MOP Maintenance Dividress and folklore. sion chief. "As with all previous requests for assisThese are only some of what the American Indian stance, the 536th Engineer Battalion (Heavy EquipHeritage celebration will cover Monday-Oct. 1 at Valent _ment), 7th Engineer Detachment (Diving Team) Recreation Center, Fort Clayton,said MariaRios,program helped us to complete our task. coordinator. The program will also introduce visitors to some of the "Both the river and the bridge are of vital impor"During the week-long observance, there will be many many things Native Americans have contributed to the tance to the canal and the cities of Colon and Panama. artifacts, displays and activities for visitors to learn the modern society of the Americas, Rios said. The river is essential for canal and navigational history of the Indian people," Rios said. "The center will "Many things we have today have been handed down operations of vessels transiting the canal," Oro said. have a museum-type atmosphere where learning will be fromtheNativeAmericanIndianand wedon't evenrealize "Te bridge links the multi-million dollarFreeZone the number one priority." it,"sheadded. "Many ofthefruits and the provinces of Colon and Panama." The museum will be broken down and vegetables we enjoy came to "This particular bridge requires close monitoring into North, Central and South American "There was a man by the us from the Indian people. Some for two reasons. The uncontrolled extractions of cultures, she said. The displays will name of Columbus came of these will be available during material from the river cause the river basin to reach include donated artifacts, informative the opening night celebration." dangerously low levels,"Oro said. "It also may cause ndisplays,craftsandmodelsofsuchthings from across the great the opening night celebrathe bridgesupporting structurestoseparate,resulting as atipi, pyramid andother Indian dwellocean and he discovered tion will also feature guest speakin the entire structure being lifted or shifted from its wings and religious structures, Rios cxers John Mann and Col. William original position." pained. the country forReeder, Indian music and dance, "Secondly, thedam prevents theriver fromrenew"The North American Indian section man.l stood here first and foodtasting,games,souvenirgiveing and filling its basin with gravel, sand and other wilicoverasmanyofthedifferentIndlian ColUmbUS discovered me." aways and a special 7:30 p.m. sediments as rivers without damming operations nations as possible with items from the showing of Last ofthe Mohicans. normally renew their basins. Sioux, Navaho, Apache and others," Chitto Harjo Opening night activities beAfter several diving operations, the USARSO said SSgt. Jane Usero, volunteer for the a Creek Indian gin 6 p.m. Monday and the mudivers reported the structure safe, said SSgt. Gordon North American portion. _seum will be open 2-8 p.m. TuesAlberti, noncommissioned officer in charge of the "It is impossible to cover all of the day-Fridayforvisitors. Lastofthe diving mission. nations throughout North, Centraland South America, but Mohicans will be presented 7:30 p.m. Monday and 6:30 The supporting structures are not separated from our goal is to give the visitor a well-rounded ideaof the rich p.m. Tuesday-Thursday and Dances With Wolves 6:30 oneanotherand theentire structureis securelyembedculture of the American Indian and dispel many of the p.m. Friday in the center's Screening Room. For more ded into ground, he explained. stereotypes," she added. information, call Valent Recreation Center at 287-6500.

PAGE 3

Tropic Times Sept.24, 1993 Infantry soldiers work, play hard during training by Spec. Robin A. Mantikoski USARSO Public Affairs Office FORTSHERMAN SoldiersrfmCompanyB BthBattalion,87thlnfantry(Light), worked and played hard during a day of company trainng on Fort Sherman last week when they rappelled, constructed single-rope bridges and madeponchorafts for water crossings. The soldiers did more than train however-they got to test their newly learned skills against each otherin squad competitions. "This type of training breaks up the typical battle drill training," said 1st Sgt. Billy Hines. "It builds esprit de corps, motivation and gives (the soldiers) the confidencethatthey can worktogetheras ateam. It was hooah training." Duringthe ropebridge competition,the soldiers were splitnito squads to learn how e to build the bridge and to cross it. "Wedoalotofwatersurvivaltrainingin Panama," Hines said. "Soldiers have to know how to build these bridges because -it's quicker to cross a river than to walk." The squads were timed from when the squadleaderpicked uptheropeto when the last squad members was pulled across the lagoon on the end of the rope. PFC Lewis Drake and Pvt. 2 Skipper T. Bowles carry their raft US. Arm hotos by Spc Robu A. Mant kosk "(This training) teaches them how to encounter any obstacle they meet and how "The poncho raft is the ultimate," said to work together as a team, said SFC Hines. "You wouldn't imagine it would RobertZayas, rope bridgeinstructor."This float, but it does." teachesthemthattheycan'tletanyobstacle Pvt.2KevinReederandSpec.Lawrence hold them down." Davis won bycompleting theeventin5:13. Thesevenmembers from stsquad,2nd Tesoldierslikedthetrainingbecauseit platoon, won by setting a new rope-bridge was a break from the day-to-day grind and building record: three minutes and 13 secthoughthey hadlearnedtheseskills before, onds. it was fun, said Sgt. Benjamin Duiker, Inanothercompetition,twosoldiers had squad leader. to wrap their rck sacks, weapons and "It was a nice, relaxed atmosphere, and helmets in their ponchos and swim with it it wasn't so much learning (the skills) it for about 75 meters. was doing it." Squad leader Sgt. Jimmy Smith looks on as Pvt. 2 Andrew Shedd and Pvt. 2 Lonny Schablin lower their poncho raft into the Fort Sherman Lagoon. Squad leader Sgt. Benjamin Duiker waits for his squad members to reach the embankment.

PAGE 4

4 Tropic Times Tt 4ept c2,99 Hems here Kunas achieve rare level Centra American ce step up drug trafficking war MANAGUA, Nicaragua (Reuters) -Central of h ierarchy, autonom y Americanpolicechiefs agreed Sundayto step up regional cooperation in the fight against drug ISLA TIGRE, Panama (Reuters) -Kuna headman trafficking. Ramon Alvarado holds court from ceremonial hammock Theysaidaregionalcommissionwouldbesetup at the center of his tiny island-kingdom in the Caribbean 0 andheaded bytopanti-narcotics officials from each country to map out a program to hit back at drug Smoke rises from hispipeas hundredsofintense Indian traffickers and improve the exchange of informa1 4 I-T ion between the area's police forces. faces watch and wait from the shadows of atropical night. A nod. A word. His ruling is given: alcohol may be More than 300 tons of cocaine was pushed through Central America to the United States last drunkatan upcoming festival, butonly until midnight. The t o offica ttistUcse Mo st peopleyear, according to official statistics. Most of it peopl leaed hamu"rmur saacomes from Colombia and passes from Central Eleted headman or "primersahila" forpiswisdom America through Mexico. and seniority,Alvarado is theundisputed linal authorityfor Wearecooperating moreandmore becausethe 1,000 Panamanian Kuna Indians living on Isla Tigre. systems used by the traffickers are in some cases Spanish for Tiger Island. very sophisticated," Col.Mario Hung, commander Such rigid hierarchy is repeated along hundreds of ohis'ic C rio Hun, ommaner semi-autonomous islands offPanamna's northeastern coast of Honduras' public security forces, told Reuters at that arc home to some 40,000 Kunas. s the end of a three-day meeting of senior Central American police chiefs in Nicaragua. It is the backbone of their success in achieving a level The meeting also focused on how to tackle a of self-rule rare on a continent infamous for the mstreatgrowing trade in stolen cars ment and marginalization of its native peoples. It brought together officials from Costa Rica, El "Despite having a tiny population compared with other Stl ugd othurasitr m Caa. El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama Delgroups, the Kunas are better organized and more truly egates from Guatemala and Mexico were also autonomous than any otherindigenous populationinLatin d America," said Jose Isaac Acosta,aPanamanianacademic flights into Nicaragua. specializing in Indian issues. TheKunasareeasilyrecognizable bytheirhigh-boned, Exiled Aristide wants sculpted features, short black hair, stocky figures and bright costumes bedecked with "mola" weavings that Haiti's violence stopped depict legends and nature. Women wear gold rings in their WASHINGTON(Reuters)Haiti'sexiledPresinoses and bead decorations bound to their limbs in childdent Jean-Bertrand AristideTuesday said he wants hood. Phot~outeyf Mffh.K Holley th eupinfntdain acint oc Their islands, bordered with bone-white sand and Kuna women carries a dinner crab on the beach. t resume ionof ted Nations sanctions m foan covered in palm trees, vary from densely packed, bambooamong men and almost 80 percent among women. police to halt widespread violence. hut villages to the tiniest plots. "We are happy here, but lifeis not perfect," said Kuna ltoh wspgre voflnd The whole archipelago -known as San Blas in fisherman Alfonso Stocel. Although stopping shortof callingon the United SpanishandKunaYalaintheirnativelanguage-isaselfTheinternalKunaeconomyisasocialistmodelwithout Natisoesa re dadergo goenn einwith minimal interference from Panama the idoogy on Haiti, he said the U.N.-brokered Governors governing region wlOg. Island accords to return him to power Oct. 30 City authorities. Goods are swapped more often than purchased -a ulate that-sanctions should be restored if vioExempt from paying taxes to the central government, dozencoconutsforareedbasket,alobsterforashark-tooth stip the Kunas have their own laws and authorities, often with necklace. Some fertile islands are rotated among families lence was not stopped. subtle and complicated variations from island to island. onamonthly basis. Communal labors obligatoryin some I respect the Governors [sland accords and This autonomy, enshrined in a 1953law, was won after villages. therefore I am in favor of resuming sanctions," he along and bitter struggle with Panamanian authorities for Contact with the outside world is limited to a thriving told a news conference. the first half of the century. The Kunas regard a 1925 business with Colombian merchants sailing through their uprising in which 27 soldiers and Indians died as the waters and tourists allowed to visit a few more westernized of army chief Gen. Raoul Cedras and police chief "revolution" which secured their semi-independence. islands. Col. Michel Francois. "Remove the killers immeThey also fought off variousincursions by the Spanish TheKunas'existenceasastate-within-a-statehas been diately." conquistadors after their migration from South America a catalyst for the growing activism this year of Panama's Bullet-riddled corpses are turning up on a daily in the 16th century. approximately 8 percent indigenous population. basis i Port-au-Prince, the capital of Haiti, n what The Kunas' world is not, however, the unblemished Guaymi,Emberaandothertribes havebeenpressing for human rights activists call the worst violence si ce paradise it may seem at first sight. similar autonomy to the Kunas with a protest campaign the September 1991 coup that toppled Aristide. Drug abuse is on the rise thanks to the abundance of that has included closing the PanAmerican Highway and Under the U.N. plan Aristide -now living in illegal shipments sent through San Blas from Colombiato kidnapping a provincial governor. exile i Washington -is to be restored i the Central America. The Kunas are also winning increased attention from presidency and Cedras, one of the leaders of the Crime has gone upin recent years as moreKunas spend other Latin American tribes striving for similar conditions coup,muststepdown. time in Panama City, only to return with the capital's bad and from international forums studyingindigenous issues. Fujimori uses for new habits. "We are a model for the continent," said Kuna activist i And malnutritioncausedbyafixed,unbalanceddietof Atencio LopezonabriefstopoverinPanamaCitybetween constitution in Peru rice, coconuts and seafood affects70percentofschoolchila U.N. conferencein Vienna and a university fonm in San .. dren, according to Acosta, while illiteracy is 50 percent Francisco. LIMA, Peru (AP) -President Alberto Fumon has set Oct. 31 as the date forareferendumn on anew constitution that would authorize the death penalty for guerrilla leaders and allow presidents to seek International committee recommends cosctvetrs Fujimori, speaking in a late-night television builing ana a Ca al lcksinterview Sunday, said he would campaign for building new Panama Canal locks oalhew constitution. If approved, it would replace the 1979 constituPANAMA CITY (Reuters) -An international commitQuijano, who is also Panama's housing minister, said tion that Fujimori suspendedinApril 1992 when he tee has recommended building anew $7 billion setoflocks the locks option was chosen because it was mom costclosed Congress. Fujimori had alleged that corrupat the Panama Canal to cope with more and bigger ships in effective and less damaging to the environment than a tion in Congress was blocking his efforts to fight the 21st century, Panama said Sept. 17. second canal. terrorism and drug trafficking. Panamanian, Japanese and U.S. officials on the triThe plan will remain on the drawing board, however, Theoldconstitutionlimitedthemaximumprison partite Panama Canal Alternative Study Commission if funding cannot be found or it is not supported by the terms forguerrillas and drug traffickersto 25 years, chose the locks option over a rival plan for a second winners of Panama's May 1994 general election. although the stiffest penalty was rarely imposed. waterway 11 miles west of the existing canal. Quijano said the canal's biggest users -the United The 1979 constitution also would require The proposed new locks would take 10 years to build, States and Japan -would have to provide most of the Fujiriori to sit out a five-year term before running create 14,000 jobs and accommodate boats up to 150,000 funding. Tariffs might be raised by up to 100 percent to for president again. Fujimori's term expires in tons, Panama's chief representative on the commission, defray costs, he said. 1995. Guillermo Quijano, told a news conference. The locks would be built parallelto the existing locks at The proposed new constitution would allow life The existing locks, which lift ships from the Atlantic four points along the waterway. sentences fordrug traffickers and the death penalty and Pacific seas to a raised, fresh-water channel across Panama, which has never managed the canal since its for guerrilla leaders. Panama, cannot cope with boats over 65,000 tons. opening, is due to take over control from the United States It would also roll back protection for workers' Thelong-awaitedrecommendation by the commission, Dec. 31, 1999 under the 1977 Panama Canal Treaties. jobrights,andlimitstateinvolvementintheeconomy which has been studying the problem for 31/2 years, was Cargo passage is projected to grow 1.5 percent annually to providing such basic services as health, educaoutlined byQuijanoaheadofaformalannouncement byall up to 2000, then 2 percent annually until 2010. About tion and defense. three countries scheduled for Monday. 12,500 ships pass through the canal every year.

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Military News sropic Time 5 Senate approves closing, reduction list WASHINGTON(Reuters)-TheSenate cleared the way Monday for the post-Cold Military base closings changes recommendatio War closing or reduction of 175 U.S. military installations at a cost of more than WASHINGTON (Reuters) -Here is a list of the military base closings and Oakland Naval Hospital 150,000jobs. changes cleared by the Senate Monday. It rejected 83-12 aproposed veto of Public Works Center, San Francisco, Calif. It rejected by an 83-12 vote, a proposed the recommendations by the Defense Base Closure and Realignment ContetsNaval Supply Center, Pensacola, Fla. Sie. Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory, Port Hueneme, Calif. congressional veto of a presidential Major bases recommeadd loc: Naval Electronic Security System Engineering Center, Washington, D.C. commission's plan to close 35 major miliA rmy Naval Electronic Systems Engineering Center, Portsmouth, Va. tary bases and 95 smallones, and scaleback Vint Hill Farms, Va., intelligence base. Naval Air Warfare Center, Aircraft Division, Trenton, N.J. 45 others. Air Force Othera 4Thes. Aneoe mr Plaburgh Air Force Base, N.Y. Defense Clothing Factory, Philadelphia, Pa. The Senate vote completed Congress's K.L Sawyer Air Force Base, Mich. Defense Electronics Supply Center, Dayton, Ohio. action because the veto needed approval of Newark Air Force Base, Ohio. Defense Personnel SupportCenter, Philadelphia, Pa. both the House and Senate. 0 Hare International Airport Air Force Reserve Station, Il. Minor base closings recommended: The vote will close three Air Force Navy and Marine Corps Army bases, one Army base and 30 Navy bases Charleston Naval Shipyard, S.C. None inldn h hretn .n ac Charleston Naval Air Station, S.C. Air Force including the Charleston, S.C., and Mare Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Calif. Gentile Air Force Station, Ohio Island, Calif., shipyards and naval training Alameda Naval Air Station, Calif. Air Force Military Personnel Center, Randolph Air Force Base, Texas. centers at San Diego, Calif., and Orlando, Mobile Naval Air Station, Ala. Navy Fla. Staten Island Naval Station, N.Y. Martinsburg Naval Air Station, W.Va. Treasure Island Naval Air Station, Calif. Midway Island Naval Air Facility. The veto was proposed by Sen. Dianne Cecil Naval Air Station, Fla. Department of Defense Family Housing Office, Niagara Falls, N.Y. Feinstein, D-Calif., who said the base cuts El Tomo Marine Air Station, Calif. Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Western Engineering Field Dviwill cost 100,000 civilian jobs in CaliforBarbas Point Naval Air Station, Hawaii. Sion, San Bruno, Calif. nia, 70,000 of them in the San Francisco Agana Naval Air Station, Gum. Navy Radio Transmission Facility, Annapolis, Md. bay area. Alameda Naval Aviation Depot, Calif. Navy Radio Transmission Facility, Driver, Va. t n. Pensacola Naval Aviation Depot, Fla. Planning, Estimating, Repair and Alterations, Bremerton, Wash. She told the Senate the cuts will cost Norfolk Naval Aviation Depot, Va. Planning, Estimating, Repair and Alte{rations, Atlantic, Norfolk, Va. California's economy $4 billion and said Glenview Naval Air Station, IlL Planning, Estimating,Repairand Alterations,Atlantic,headquarters, Philathecommission makessuch base cuts withDallas Naval Air Station, Texas. delphia, Pa. out regard to economic pain. Detroit Naval Air Facility, Mich. Planning, Estimating,Repairand Alterations, Pacific, San Francisco, Calif. k a d a m San Diego Naval Training Center Sea Automated Data Systems Activity, Indian Head, Md. It is almost like a doomsday machine, Orlando Naval 'raining Center Submarine Maintenance, Engineering, Planning and Procurement, Portsshe said. "It goes on and on and on Orlando Naval Hospital mouth, N.H. regardless of what happens." Sen. Strom Thurmond, R-S.C., said shutdown of both the Charleston naval savings would haveto becutoutofmilitary round of base cuts in 1995 will almost intelligence base in Virginia. shipyard and naval base will put 50,000 readiness. certainly be even deeper. In additionto the shipyards and training civilians out of work. Thecuts were madebytheDefenseBase Aspinhadproposedthat3l majorbases centers, the Navy will lose major air staBut Senate Armed Services Committee Closure and Realignment Commission, be closed and 134 others be reduced this tions at Alameda, Calif., Cecil Field, Fla., Chairman Sam Nunn, D-Ga., said the new subject to the president's and Congress's year but the commission recommended Agana at Guam, and Midway Island and cutsplus twoearlierbasecommissionplans veto, because members of Congress had additional cuts or reductions on its own. naval bases at Mobile, Ala., Staten Island, to cut 250 bases will save an estimated $49 been unwilling to make base cuts hurting The Air Force willloseits Plattsburgh, N.Y., New London, Conn., and Treasure billion over 20 years. constituents. N.Y., Newark, Ohio, and K.I. Sawyer, Island at San Franciso. If Congress refused to cut the bases DefenseSecretaryLesAspintoldaSenMich., air bases. TheMarineCorpswillloseitsairstation. because of hometown pain, he said, those ate subcommittee last week that another The Army will lose its Vint Hill Farms at El Toro, Calif. Citadel, women claim court win CHARLESTON, S.C' (AP) -The Citadel has won a round in its fight to keep women out of its allmale day classes, but women who sued the statesupported military college see a partial victory in a judge's ruling. U.S. District Judge C. Weston Houck on Monday dismissed a lawsuit brought by three women Navy veterans. He said it was moot because the college had closed the program the women wanted to enter. The state-supported military college had allowed male veterans to attend regular day classes with cadets, butitabolishedthatprogram whenthe women sued to attend those classes in June 1992. TheCitadeldoes allow womentoattenditsevening college program, but while it offers 17 majors during the day there are only three at night. Anditalsotakes longer to earn an evening degree. Houck did not order the day classes reopened to veterans, but he told The Citadel to help the women pursue degrees equivalent toits day-programdegrees through the evening program and courses at other collges.AP Lasrhoto colleges. Former Defense Secretary Dick Cheney will be testifying for the government in a $1.6 billion lawsuit by Theschool willprovidethesame helpitgave male McDonnell Douglas and General Dynamics, who blame the Navy for cost overruns in the A-12 program. veterans after the day program was closed to them, Citadel spokesman Rick Mill said Tuesday. Thesclioolpromisedthemenitwoulddo "whateney t sif ing -awsui everwas necessary" tomakesuretheycouldcomplete the coursewo. Tat include oma tie e forg it WASHINGTON(AP) Thepricetagon the Navy'sATheplanewastooheavyandtheprogram way behind easierto transfercreditsfromotherareacolleges, Mill 12 attackjetsoared andthedelivery datekept slipping, but schedule, Anikeeff added. said. the $3 billion question remains: Why was the plane But the companies -who have sued the govern"Ifit meanteven scheduling aprofessorone on one canceled? ment for $1.6 billion -say the Navy was responsible with astudent to complete a coursethestudentneeds, McDonnell Douglas and General Dynamics say that for the delays and the price increases. The government we'd do that," Mill said. then-Defense Secretary Dick Cheney scrapped the A-12 saysthecompanies mustrefund $1.4 billion becausethey Houcksaid he wantedto hearany complaintsifthe program in 1991 to help the Bush administration deliver defaulted on their contract. women weren't given help earring their degrees. its touted peace dividend and that Cheney pressured the The A-12, canceled Jan. 7,1991, was to have been "Now we have therights and benefits ofattending Navy rear admiral overseeing the program to find the the centerpiece for the Navy's aircraft carriers through the day classes," said one of the plaintiffs, Angela companies in default. the turn of the century. Chapman. But the government denies it, saying it canceled the ThePentagon"mortgagedthefutureofNavy aviation But Valorie Vojdick, an attorney forthe plaintiffs, program because the contractors couldn't deliver a good on the A-12," but Cheney was underpressure to reduce said an appeal was planned anyway. "We don't airplane. the budget and canceling the A-12 would help solve the believe they can close the program to all veteran Cost estimates had reached $14 billion -$9 billion problem, said David Churchill, a lawyer representing students for the purpose of not admitting women," above the contract price -by the time the plane was McDonnell Douglas and General Dynamics. she said. canceled, Justice Department lawyer Anthony Anikeeff Cheneyisamong thescheduled witnesses inthecase said at the start of a trial in the U.S. Court of Claims. before Judge Robert Hodges.

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Tropic Times 6'Sept. 24, 1993 Voices Confusion arises over contractor privileges Dear Mayors' Corner, in all cases because of projected base cloI'm a contractor working at Howard sures. AFB on a two-year contract the Air Force "However,"continues Bru,"Ifyourhome has with my employer. My wife and I will pass do I need? and 3) Where do I get this their apologies for any confusion. does have venetian blinds which require be here for another nine months. We each pass? repairs, you need to call in a service order at have a bilingual yellow card with CONConfiisedcontractor Dear Mayors' Corner, 289-3388or289-3270. Iftheblinds cannot TRACTOR stamped on it. We are able to When I came to Panama in December be repaired and need to be replaced, the belong to all officers' clubs, use the exDear Confused, 1991, my window blinds in housing were Atlantic DEH will submit a work order for change cafeterias, Stars and Stripes bookI submitted your question to the Army very used, but operable. Now, I have a few replacement of the blinds by contract." store, recreation facilities, movietheaters, and Air Force Exchange Service and I thatneedtobereplaced. Iwastoldthatearly Brualsoadds,"Iftheblindsarefoundto Burger King and Popeyes, and the APO talked to Sgt. Rafael Torres in the Contralast year the Pacific side got replacement be damaged due to customer abuse or mispostal service. band Control Office in order to get the blinds when needed. I was also told the use, the resident may be held liable for the Recently I was told that I could no information you needed. Atlantic side community didn't have cost of replacement." longer rent videos at the Albrook Video It seems that you were given the wrong enough. I need new blinds. Editor'snnte:ThiscolumnauowscomStore and was given telephone numbers to information when you first contacted the Atlantic Needs a View unity members to submit questions to call for information. My first call was to Contraband Office. You should have been the MayoralCongress. Lettersshould be Contraband Control.The person there said told that you can indeed rent videos, and all Dear Atlantic, ale Mayor s Corner, Puby that I could rent videos, but needed a you need is your contractor's ID. Even "The Atlantic DEH (Directorate of Enled to: Mayors' Corner, Publicity privilege card. When I tried to get this, though youhaveaccess tovideorental, you gineering and Housing) regrets that you Anonymity will be granted upon request. (after running into much confusion) I was may not purchase anything in the store. were misinformed," said Frank Bru, chief, The Tropic Times reserves the right to told that I couldn't get one. Contraband Control and AAFES hope contracting division, Atlantic DEI. It's not oiT mes reserves the rity, I would like to know 1) may I use the this helps to clear up any misunderstandthat the Atlantic side doesn't have enough edit letters and responses for brevity, video store on Albrook? 2) What kind of ings that have arisen. They also pass along blinds, but new blinds will not be installed clarity and propriety. Off-post burglaries up Military police give anti-theft tips, crime assistance Off-post break-ins increase Incidents of home break-ins off post have increased in thepast four months, said military policeofficials. Families living offpost should useprecautions suchaslocking doors and windows, keeping shrubbery cut below window level and entrances and yards welllit at nighL. Keeping the entire neighborhood in good shape also helps keep crime down because dcrk alleys, litter and run-down areas may attract crime. If a victim of a crime, call 287-4401. Curfew violation A soldier was arrested for curfew violation last week when MPs saw him jump a fence onto Fort Clayton. There is a curfew for all U.S. Southern Command military, Department of Defense employees and family members from 2 to 5 am. daily. Personnel must be indoors or on a military installation during these hours. The only exceptions are medical emergencies, unit alerts or shift workers who must have a letter of explanation. For more information, call 287-4300. Wrongful transfer of merchandise A woman was charged with wrongful transfer of duty free merchandise last week when she bought groceries at the commissary and gave them to a non-privilege card holder outside the front gate of Corozal. Shoplifter arrested Pacific For more information, see Southern CommandRegulaA person was arrested last week for shoplifting more Fort Clayton 600 area -two larcenies of secured private tion 60-10 or call 286-3117. than $100 worth of merchandise from the Army and Air property Force Exchange System main exchange on Corozal. Fort Clayton 300 area -one larceny of secured private Family member nabs vagrant Report suspected shoplifters to the exchange manager. property A family member stopped a man near Morgan Avenue Amador housing area -one larceny of unsecured private carrying two flower pots. The MPs arrived on the scene, Anonymous drug hotline property arrested the man and took him to a Panamanian court Anyonewithinformation aboutdrug smuggling should Morgan Avenue housing area -onelarceny ofunsecured where he received a sentence of 50 days in jail for larceny call the Panama Jack anonymous hotline at 285-4185. private property and unlawful entry. MPs advise caution when encountering a thief and to The following statistics are for crimes In military Atlantic report suspicious activity by calling 287-4401. housing areas Sept. 10-16: None to report This authorized unofficial command information pubChief.SMSgt Steve Taylor PublicAffairsOfficer.Maj.MelanieReeder lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Editor.SSgt. DeborahE. Williams Editor.SSgt.JaneUsero Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces AssistantEditor.Sgt. John Hall Journalists.Sgt.E.J.Hersom Information Program ofthe Department of Defense, under SportsEditor.Sgt.RichardPuckett Sgt. Lori Davis the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S. EditorialStaff .RosemaryChong Spec. Robin A. Mantikoski Southern Command. Maureen Sampson 24thWingPublicAffairsOffice.284-5459 Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the VolunteerAssistant.JosephineBeane PublicAffairsOfficer.Capt.WannL.Sypher official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Student Intern .Juan Palacio PublicAffairsSuperintendent. MSgt.DaleMitcham Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. SouthernCommandPublicAffairs Office.282-4278 Journalists.SSgt.Rian Clawson The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Telephone DeputyDirectorPublicAffairs.Cmdr.LorriGilchrist Sgt. James A.Rush 285-6612. CommandInformationOfficer.PatrickMilton U.S. NavalStationPublicAffairs Office.283-5644 Commanderin Chief.Gen. George A. Joulwan PublicAffairsSupervisor.SFCMikeHoward PublicAffairsOfficer.Lt.j.g. LauraC. Moore Director,PublicAffairs.Col. James L.Fetig U.S. ArmySouthPublicAffairsOffice.287-3007 Photographers.P112 Roberto Taylor Command Information Officer.Beth Taylor PH2Delano J.Mays U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic.Call USARSO Public Affairs) ITropic Times

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Sports Sept. 24,1993 Quarry Heights,Republic ofPanama Page 11 Balboa Red Machine split end/defensive back Chad Graham signals to the crowd before the second half kickoff Darneoofnaeotn ~ L c afdu Red Machine saddle winless Kolts, 15-6 by Sgt. Richard Puckett A game-ending injury to the game's leadTropic Times Sports Ed for ing rusher Joe Gutierrez (55 yards on 9 carries in the first half) didn't help either. BALBOA -The Balboa Red Machine "We controlled the game in the first jumped to an early lead and then held on half," Dahistrom said. "We missed oppordurnng a bumpy second half edging the tunitiesand hadtouchdowns called back.It Kiwanis Kolts 15-6 Sept. 16 at Balboa could've been 30-0 at the half. The K Stadium. dominated us in the second half, though. The win was the first for the Red MaOne mistake was a fumble on a punt/ chine who lost to the Cristobal Tigers in return by Sanchez. The Kolts took over week one. A 38-yard touchdown pass from deep in Red Machine territory. New quarquarterback Chris Corrigan to Efrain terbackRaulFordgottheKoltsdownto the Sanchez on the opening drive put the Red 15,butafumbleon fourthdownturned over Machine up 6-0. the ball early in the fourth quarter. Kiwanis Kolts' cheerleaders Ana Melissa Ramos and Anisabel Poveda cheer Corrigan drilled Sanchez on an inside TheKolts madeup foritmidwaythsvugh the team following Raul Chanis' touchdown in the fourth quarter. postpattern.Sanchezfoughtoffadefender, thequarter. FollowingafumblebyCorrigan, bobbled the ball, regained control and the Kolts got going. On second down, Ford went deep just BalboaBulldogs (2-0) wona7-Obattleover sprinted into the end zone for the score. Ford opened up the air assault with a34overthrowing Chanis in the end zone. The the Panama Canal Green Devils (1-1). On the point after attempt, Chad Grayard touchdown to Raul Chains. Chains Kolts wouldn't get close to scoring again. Price broke up a scoreless battle on a 65ham snatched up a mishandled snap and beat the coverage and ran in the end zone The Kolts impressed Dalstom. yard second-quarter touchdown. ran it in for a two-point conversion, nearly untouched. "You have to give them of credit," Tonight the Tigers play host to the The next score came inthe second quarThe two-point conversion failed, leavDahlstrom said. "They had a lot to prove Green Devils at 5:30 p.m. The Cougars will ter on an H-.B. Twohy two-yard run. Mike ing the Kolts down 15-6 with 6:43 left. tonight. they got beat badly in their first be looking for win one against the Red Bleichwehladded theextrapoint togivethe After stopping the Red Machine on the game and made it really hard on us." Machine at 5:30 p.m. tonight at Balboa Red Machine a 15-0 lead. next possession, the Kolts drove again. In action Sept. 17, the Cristobal Tigers Stadium. The late game pits the Balboa A fumble and what Red Machine coach Fordhit RicardoZarakon a29-yarderto put (2-0) beat the Curunduougars (0-2) 27Bulldogs against the Kolts at 7 p.m. Rick Dahistrom called "too many mental the Kolts into Bulldog territory again. 14. Running back Corey Townsend ran for Editor's note: Statistics provided by mistakes"turned the tideinthe second half. The Red Machine defense stepped up. two TDs for 170 yards on 22 carries. The Bob Best. High school girls' basketball begins Fort Clayton youth flag football pre*Basketball, page 12 -Cougars, Red Machine and season camp gives players, cheer+Flag football, page 14. Green Devils are early favorites. leaders running start. *Sport shorts, page s15.-

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12 Tropic Times Sept.24,1993 Competition fueling girls' hoops season by Sgt. Richard Puckett Another team with veteran players reTropic Timos Sports Editor turning istheCougars. Coach DaveMoffett is expecting good things from his three BALBOA -Every week as the boys' returners forwardAbbyHiggleyandguards football teams wage war on the gridimn, Jill Hauser and Jessica Penkoske. inside the gyms of Balboa, Curundu and "I was really happy with what I saw at Cristobal another battle is going on. theJamboree,"Moffettsaid."Theyshowed A battle for respect. a lot of teamwork and hustle. We got alot Wednesday night the battle began anew of second and third shots thanks to offenas the girls' basketball season tipped off. siveboards." And although the fans aren't packing Moffett said controlling the boards will the stands and the cheerleaders aren't mobe a big factor for his team. tivating the stars, the games go on. "Ourdefenseneeds work,soouroffense This season the games could be some of will have to be strong, especially on rethe most competitive in several years, say bounding," he said. "We're strong down the coaches of the five girls' teams. low and I think that will help out a lot." The coaches are giving early high marks The other big gun is the Red Machine. to the Balboa Red Machine,Panama Canal Coach Cecil Williams is expecting a sucGreen Devils and the Curundu Cougars. cessful season from his squad. The Red But the defending champion Balboa BullMachine lost to the Bulldogs in the seasondogs and 1992 second place Cristobal Tiending tournament finalin 1992. Williams gers aren't out ofthe running. There's alot is shooting for bigger things this time of basketball to be played. around. The teamsgotachancetotesteachother Williams doesn't have a deep pool of out Sept. 17 during the Jamboree. Altalent, but thinks his team has the edge in though the games were just exhibition competiveness. matchups, it gave the coaches a chance to "We don't have a lot of height or one or evaulate strengths and weaknesses. two stars," Williams said. "We play well One of the things all the teams are together and have a strong defense. That lacking is veteran starters. The Green Devwill be our best area." ils may have an edge in that department. Williams likes his team's shooting, but Three regulars will be returning for coach credits the team speed and heart as key. Paul Schulte. Audry Ernest, Michelle "We can play a transition game at anyB Kser iref e pho by Sgt Vthe d Puckeft Womble and Camina Stephenson are extime," he said. "We're sticking to the funBulldogs' Kristine Nolte shoots over Tigers'Tiffany Cox during the Jamboree. pected to take a leadership role for the damentals of the game and try to amplify defense.Oliverisoptimisticabouthisteam's "We're going to get better as the season Devils, Schulte said. our strong points." chances. progresses," Rankin said. "They are going "I expect to win the title," he said. "I'm The defending champion Bulldogs are "Wecan beat anybodyintheleague,"he to learn and build up a sense of teamwork optimistic. We have quite a few girls who looking forsomestrong points. Afterlosing said. "Wejust havetoplayhard, hustle and and family." haven't played before, but there is also a most of his 1992 team, Coach Cleve Oliver come in with a positive attitude." Conditioning will be an important part stable base with my top three." is viewing 1993 as a rebuilding year. HavTigers coach Gayle Rankin is coming of the building process. The Green Devils will be starting the ing one of his top players (Beth Larrabee) into the season with a positive attitude, "We have to be able to stay in control season with a controlled, slow-paced ofout for several weeks doesn't help matters. despite only having two starters returning. during a game," she said. "There were fense, but that could change, Schulte said. "We have one of the least experienced "We're shorter on talent than we exseveral teams that ran a lot of fast breaks "There are a couple teams that liketo go teams in the league," Oliver said. "We did pected," she said. "I lost eight players, during theJamboree. If thatkeeps up, we'll at a fast pace," he said. "We haveto control surprisingly well during the Jamboree and including three key seniors, but I think have to be up to it. I'm looking forward to the boards to control the tempo ofthe game. hopefully we can build on that." we'll be competitive." the season. It should be a close race." I'm concerned about our lack of height. A lack of size and quickness hurts the Rankin is starting her team with the TodaytheCougarsfaceRedMachineat Hopefully, our experience and balance will Bulldogs, but Oliver thinks the team can basics and is looking to build on that from 4:30 p.m. at Balboa Gym. The Devils meet be good enough to carry us through." make it up with agressiveness and good game to game. the Tigers at Cristobal at 5:30 p.m. Da Boyz cut 2 Tough down to size, 41-31 by Sgt. Lori Davis USAROS Public Affairs Office FORT CLAYTON -Da Boyz started off the 5'10" and under basketball season by cutting 2 Tough down to size. Two Tough'stroubles started before the game waseven under way. The team barely made it to Reeder Physical Fitness Center in time after playing a game in a separate league at Iloward AFB. The team stood its ground at the start of the first half, holding Da Boys to an 8-6 lead for the first 10 minutes. Darryl Kimble and Paul Roby stuck to their team's name, defying Da Boyz defense again and again. Kimble found the hoop for nine points and Roby tacked on six. Dugue Kerry and Kelly Dumas chipped in two points each, but 2 Tough was essentially a two-man team of Kimble and Roby at the hoop. Da Boyz shared the wealth on the scoreboard. Jeffrey Moses lead the way with six points, Reco Calhoun nailed five and Bernard Grimsley sank two shots for fourpoints. Arnold Pickney, Phil Mickles and Patrick Jones each contributed a basket andRoy Allen sank a free throw to put Da Boyz up 22-19 at the half. 2 Tough ran out of juice early in the second half. Da Boyz strong defense shut down Kimble, blocking every shot, allowing just one free throw. DaBoyz'DavidBurstontookoveron offense,dropping two three-pointers and ashot from the free-throw line. Hothanded Calhoun backed him up with four points. Da Boyz took off in the second half with a 10-2 run, to U.S. Army photo by Sg. Lo Davi jump out to a 32-21 lead and leave 2 Tough in the dust. Two Tough's Paul Roby (center) fights off Da Boyz's Jeffrey Moses (left) and Reco Calhoun. Whenthedust settled, DaBoyz sent2Tough home with a 41-31 defeat. "They were weak on arguing amongst each other," "They beat us because we missed a lot of shots," Roby "The key to our success was ball control, good coaching Moses explained "They cluttered up the middle, relied on said. and slowing down the game," Moses said. one person to score and they weren' patient." "We just finished a game at Howard," he explained. Da Boyz also capitalized on another factor, the lack of Da Boyz picked on these weaknr ces and moved in for "We'll come back and beat them later in the season." toughness in the 2 Tough team. the kill, Moses said. For now 2 Tough is 0-1.

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Tropic Times Sept. 24,1993 Crystal Collier 6 practices a cheer. Coach Larry Vidinha works on a piay with bantam league players. David Foster nails a punt during kicking practice Monday. DepartmentofDefsephotOsbySgt.RChardPuCkett Flaggingdownfun by Sgt. Richard Puckett gram is for the kids to have fun," she said. Tropic Times Sports Editor "As long as they have a good time then it's all worthwhile." FORT CLAYTON -The Fort Clayton Football wasn't the only thing being youth flag football kicks offits season with learned at the camp. Coaches like Margie opening ceremonies and games starting at Krynicki also taught cheerleading basics. 10 am. Saturday at Jarman Field. About 40 girls signed up for the Althoughthefirstexhibitiongames take cheerleading program. Teaching them placeSaturday,theseasonreally begantwo cheers, jumps and teamwork has been a weeks ago for the more than 50 children task, Krynicki said. takingpartintheprogramsaidRoryEgger, "The girls are learning it really quick," youth sports director. Krynicki said. "It is hard for the younger A preseason football camp that started ones to get the cheers right away, but with Sept.13 and will wrap up tonight atJarman repetition they can pick it up." Field. Coaches worked with the players on Starting this weekend all the football agility drills, receiving, passing, kicking teams will have a cheerleading squad rootand offensive and defensive plays. ing for them on the sidelines. It's part ofthe Watching theplayers improve has been game many people tend to overlook, one of the highlights of the camp, said Krynicki said. volunteer coach Denisa Robinson. "These girls areoutthere working really "It's been a real blast," she said. "Not hardto get the spirit going for their teams," only are you teaching the basics to kids she said. "It takes a lot of effort and enthuwho've never played before, but also helpsiasm to be out there." ing those who know how to play get even Boththecheerleading and footballteams better." will bein action starting Saturday morning. Along with the learning process, Although the teams are filled, coaches Robinson likes the entire philosphy of the are still needed, Egger said. Two-year-old Sarah Weber helps out by keeping football program. Forinformationaboutbeingavolunteer track of a football during the preseason camp "The most important part of the procoach call 287-6451 Monday.

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14 Tropic Times Sept. 24,1993 106th Signal Brigade nips 108th Military Police First quarter TD keys 7-0 victory by Sgt. E.J. Hersom USARSO Public Affairs Office FORT CLAYTON -The 106th Signal flag football Brigade showed no mercy Monday beatAtlantic side ing the visiting 108th Military Police Green League standings Company from Fort Bragg, N.C., in intramural flag football 7-0 here at Jarman W L Field. JOTB 2 0 Signal quarterback Darrell Moore hit HHC, 5-87th 4 1 David Williams for a 35-yard touchdown 549th MP Co. 4 1 pass in the first quarter, giving his team the Co. B, 5-87th 2 1 Marines 3 2 early lead.1 2 Signal converted the extra point and 40ty 1 2 held its lead while the remainder of the USAG 1 3 game remained scoreless. Co. C, 5-87th 0 2 A couple ofclose calls almost set Signal 1097th Boat Co. 0 4 back, but the defense came through in the As of Wednesday clutch with Antonio Bryan picking off quarterback Anthony Bowers in the final Though the loss dropped the MPs to a seconds of the game. .500 record, the defense kept the signal Penalties kept Signal scoreless for the team within its own 20-yard-line fornearly last three quarters. all the second half proving it is among the Officials called back a 45-yard gain for best in the league. a touchdown because of a clipping call "Our heads weren't in it," said 106th against Signal. Signal coach Kenneth Hunter, The signal team's massive offensive downplaying the win that brought his team line kept the MPs hopes of sacking Moore to 2-0 with an additional forfeit in its at bay and left him with more than enough favor. time to choose his relievers. Hunter said he was not happy with the "There's nothing more Icould do," said penalty calls and the flaring tempers of MP coach George Winnfield. "I sent all the players when penalty flags flew. beefl had out there and we still couldn't get "We'll be ready for them next time," U.s. Armyo y sg E.J. Hem through to him." Hunter said. 108th Military Police s LD. Dixon tries to avoid 106th Signal's Antonio Wright. Det.4turnsoff Maintenance Mason leads team with 22 by Sgt. James A. Rush 24th Wing Public Affairs HOWARDAFB-Detachment 4needed 22pointsSept. 17 from Carl Mason to hold off the 24th Maintenance Squadron 50-46 here. Maintenance fell behind by four in the first half and could do no better than match its opponents in the second. Michael"Yak"Yakowenkoand Brian Ackermanled the charge with 13 and 11 points respectively. Mason, meanwhile, topped all scorers with his first half output alone. He rung up 14 in the opening period and finished with 22 overall. Teammate James Moore contributed 11 more points to the team's total. The combined team of the 24th Air Intelligence and Operations Support squadrons Ab gadefa the base's only 24th CES B's Michael Lloyd tries to get a pass off around Airlift Support squadron's Gregg Hendricks undefeated intramural team in (right) and Charles Hopkins. the next game. After 20 minutes of play, Making the biggest contribution, ofcourse, was Owens half. Teammate Dan Broughton was the co-pilot on this AIS/OSS led the 24th Security whopoundedinside for17ofhis 23 points inthelatter half. flight with 11 points. Police Squadron Team A by The underdogs had three players make double figures Tyree Brown got most of his 11 points in the opening eight points. as well. Dave Dixon led the team with 17. Johnny Taylor period to lead the losing cause. Securitypolice star Michael added 17 and Charles Hamilton had 10 more. The final game of the night saw the 24th CommunicaOwens had been limited to six Game [hree saw another potential upset shot down by a tions Squadron squeak past the Co. B, 1-228th Aviation points. second-h ,if rally. Battalion's 45-40. This setoffanalarmthatthe The24th TransportationSquadron enjoyed a 10-point Communications needed the win to keep ahead of the copsrespondedtointhesecond advantage at halftime after holding the 310th Airlift pack in its division. half. Four security police playSquadron to nine points. Wayman Black and Aaron Caldwell answered the call ers hit for double figures in the The flying squadron would zoom back to win 39-37, for the winners, Black had 16 points and Caldwell put 13 second half.Airlift Support Squadwith Pat Piche piloting the comeback. more. Theireffortledto a five-pointCommunicationslead TheperiodsawNorrisDavis ron's John Bindley Pichedeliveredinsideandoutsidehittingshortjumpers at halftime. and Dale Carnell slam home pops a shot. andlayups while stretching his range out beyond the threeJoseph Jenkins had 17 and Michael Gordon added 10 two-thirds of their21 and 15points while Bernard Hodges point line. more to lead Company B, but they failed to gain any ground racked up all 10 of his in the same timeframe. He finished with16points forthe game, 12inthe second in the second half.

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Tropic TimesIQ Sept. 24, 1993 -L, Radio schedule The Southern Command Network's AM 790 Pacific and 1420 Atlantic will broadcast the following sports this weekend. Tonight -7 p.m., Texas Rangers at Chicago White Sox Saturday -12:30 p.m., New York Yankees at Toronto Blue Jays; 3:30 p.m., (Dual coverage) Texas PA A Rangers at Chicago White Sox, Atlanta Braves at PhiladephiaPhillies;6p.m., Detroit Tigers at Baltimore Orioles. Sunday -noon, Green Bay Packers at Minnesota Vikings; 3p.m., San Diego Padres at San Francisco Giants; 7 p.m., New England Patriots at N.Y. Jets. Monday -8 p.m., Pittsburgh at Atlanta Falcons. AF swim team coaches TheAlbrookand Howardswimmingteamsarelooking for qualified coaches and youth swimmers for the 1993-94 swimming season. All age groups and skill levels of children are welcome to participate. Coaches will be paid according to the number of participants in the program. Team workouts are approximately three days a week throughout the school year. Anyone interestedin coaching should contact Vince Duncan atthe Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195. Parents or swimmers interested in participating should call Duncan or Gary Hankins, 286-4571. Powerlifting competition Registrationis underway for apowerlifting competition to be held at Reeder Physical Fitness Center. For more information, call 287-4050. Unit level hoops Registration for the Army unit level basketball program continues until Oct.23.The clinicis scheduled for Oct. 19.Forinformationcallthe[DirectorateofCommu\ nity Activities, Sports Branch, Building 154,Fort Clayton u.s. Army photo by Sst. 6us Rogers at287-4050. Opening kicks Cobras' Chris Thielle tries to ward off Panthers' Michelle Lueia during the 1992 fall soccer season. Fishing tournament The 1993 season kicks off Saturday at 8:15 a.m. at Howard Parade Field. An inter-club fishing tournament will be held in Atlantic waters until Nov. 30. "Row the Mississippi," "Ski the Appalachian Trail," B The event is sponsored by ClubNauticoCaribe, the and "Climb Mount Everest" are now available for Basketball standings Panama Canal Tarpon Club and the Panama Canal prospective adventurers at the centers. Call284-3451. AMERICAN LEAGUE Yacht Club. The fishermen who land the largest barraNorthern Division cuda, wahoo, kingfish, jack/tuna, marlin, sailfish and Gortnenn W L tarpon will win prizes. Prizes will be awarded for the top Golf tournament 617thALSS 15 3 three catches in each category. A golf tournament for servicemembers will be held HHC1-228th 14 3 The entrance fee is $20 per angler and may be paid Saturday and Sunday at Horoko Golf Course with a 7:30 Det 4 9th Wing 11 5 atthe barofany oftheclubs orto FranciscoLopez, 241am. shotgun start. There is a $20 entry fee that does not 24th MS 8 9 2025; Alberto Villa, 245-4379; Gabriel Kam, 241include cart or greens fees. Entrants must have United 6933rd ESS 6 12 0675; Helio D. Alves, 243-4146; Mike Bell, 243-5207; States Golf Association handicap. Southern Division AlbertoAlba,245-0733;GerryLaatz,243-5652;Johnny Flight winners will be entered in the U.S. Military W L Kirby, 241-5883; Fermin Pinel, 241-6003. Sports Association Golf Championship to be held in 24thSPS 18 0 October at Fort Jackson, S.C. For more information, call 24th CES "A" 9 9 Women's basketball 284-3451. 24 AIS/OSS 8 9 24 AIRPS 4 13 Registration for the Directorate of Community AcOfficial recruitment 24th SUPS "B" 3 14 tivities women's basketball league is under way and continues until Oct. 5. Call 287-4050 for information. The Panama Armed Forces Officials Association is Co. A 1-228th 2 13 recruiting officials on both sides of the isthmus. Eastern Division National Tra shooting Day Meetings are held 1 p.m. every second Saturday of W L themonthattheValentRecreationCenter,Fort Clayton. 24thSUPS "A" 16 1 The Amateur Trapshooting Association and the Military, civilians and family members may join. Call 536th Eng. 12 5 Isthmian Clay Bird Association will sponsor a National 287-5572 or 247-0511 after 9 p.m. 24th MSSQ 9 6 Trapshooting Day at the Rodman Gun Club Range, The Howard/Albrook Officials Association is also 24th TRANS 9 8 Rodman Naval Station 9 am. Oct. 2. It will include four looking fornew officials. The association offersprofes617th ALSS "B" 4 13 handicap events of25 roundsperevent, foratotal ofl00 sional training, clinics and a pay check. 24th CES "B" 2 15 rounds. For more information, call Robert Fearon at The meetings are 7:30 p.m. every third Thursday of WesternDivision 256-6308 after 7pm or Robert Stuart at 284-4985. the month at the Howard Youth Center. Interested W L people must be fluent in English. Call 284-5371. 24th CS 12 6 Turkey Bowl coaches 310th ALS 11 6 The Army Directorate of Community Activities Boating safety course 24th MG 10 6 Co. B 1-228th 6 7 Sports Branch is accepting resumes for Army Turkey The Rodman Marina boating safety course will be 24th MWRSS 4 13 Bowl team coaches. Call 287-4050. held 6-9 p.m. Monday and Wednesday at Building. 65, 24 SPS "B" 3 13 Navy Morale Welfare Recreation Sports is accepting Training Center (Old Video Club), Rodman. resumes for the Navy Turkey Bowl team coach. People Payment and registration for course can be done at interested may call Morise Conerly at 283-4222. the first class. This course is a pre-requisite for rental of Rodman Intramural Bask( The 24th Morale Welfare Recreation Services Squadboats from Navy MWR. Call 283-3147. W L ron is accepting resumes for an Air Force Turkey Bowl Road Runners 10 1 coach. Call 284-3451. Civilians 11 3 Rodman intramural volleyball NavyOps 9 5 Sign up now for unit level volleyball. Deadline for PSD 8 5 Self-directed programs letterofintentis Oct. 8. Pre-seasontournamentwillbe SCIATTS 5 8 The Howard/Albrook sports and fitness centers have Oct. 16-17. Letters ofintent are available at the Rodman IANTN 3 7 started several new self-directed aerobics programs. Sports office. Call 283-4061 for more information. *All standings are of Sept. 17

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1 Tropic Times 16 Sept. 24, 1993 ews Postal officials advise early holiday mailing HOWARD AFB (24 Wing/PA) -As other box of the same dimensions as a lid. holiday season nears, it's time to start *Wrapping paper isn't necessary in making holiday mailing plans, according most cases, but when used, the paper to 24th Air Postal Squadron officials. should be equivalent to regular large gro"Our customers are very concerned cery bags. Shipping or strapping tape (not with safe, speedy delivery of their mail, masking or cellophane varieties) are especially at this time of the year," said needed for closing and reinforcing the box. Capt. Karen Cordle Jordan, postal squad*To prevent damage while in transit, ron commander. properly cushion boxed items. This ab"By labeling and packaging their gifts sorbs and distributes forces caused by correctly, and observing the holiday mailshock and vibration. early dates, people can help us ensure *When several items are shipped friends and family back home and around within the same package, take care to prethe world have their presents in time for vent contact between them and external the holidays," Jordan said. forces. Don't package heavy items with Post offices in Panama have copies of fragile ones unless extreme care is taken. the U.S. Postal Service pamphlet, Pack*The final step is the easiest, but most aging for Mailing. It gives instructions for important: proper marking. All writing loading and marking packages properly. should be done with a waterproof marker Most Santa-by-mail gifts leave that won't rub off or smear. Words must Panama in boxes, say postal statistics; be readable from 30 inches away. therefore, much of the pamphlet is dedi*Include both the names and addresses cated to these packages. The following of the sender and receiver inside the packinformation is drawn from the pamphlet. age in case the exterior is defaced, and be *Make sure the box is large enough sure to complete the customs form. to hold the item(s) with enough space for *All mail leaves Panama by air, so cushioning material. Boxes that are too space available mail service is as reliable small don't have enough room for cushas priority mail to the southern and eastern ioning and may come apart. states and is less costly. *Used boxes may be used; however, For information on what items are or they must be rigid with all flaps intact. aren't eligible for shipping via mail, conBoxes without flaps may be used with antact your local military post office. Post office gives mail-by dates HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) -The United States Postal Service headquarters has provided the following Christmas mailing dates for 1993. All dates are tentative. The following abbreviations apply: AIR (air letters and cards), PRI (priority), PAL (parcel airlift), SAM (space available), and SURF (surface). MILITARY MAIL AIR PRI PAL SAM SURF (addressed to:) APO/FPO/AEzips 090-097 Dec. 1 Dec. 1 Nov.22 Nov.10 Nov. 1 APO/FPO/ AE zips 098 Nov.24 Nov. 17 Nov. 10 Nov. 2 Oct. 25 APO/FPO/ AA zips 340 Dec. 6 Dec. I Nov.22 Nov. 10 Nov. I, -APO/FPO/ AA zips 962-966 Dec. 1 Dec. 1 Nov.22 Nov. 10 Nov. 1 U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Loi Davis U.S. domestic zips Dec. 9 Dec. 2 Dec. 2 Nov. 1 CWO2 Dwight Williams prepares for a flight by putting on his Kevlar vest Africa Dec. 1 Dec. 1 Oct. 1 during afield training exercise lastweek. The 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation Australia Dec. 6 Dec. 6 Nov. 1 Regiment, conducted the exercise to test the unit's ability to defend the Caribbean Dec. 6 Dec. 6 Nov. 1 canal in preparation for an upcoming external inspection. Europe Dec. I Dec. I Nov. 1 Far East Dec. I Dec. I Nov. I Middle East Dec. 1 Nov.15 Oct. 1 Aviation battalion Southeast Asia Dec. 1 Dec. 1 Nov. 1 Central/South America Dec. 6 Dec. 1 Oct. 1 targets inspection by Sgt. Lori Davis sion, then we receive the air mission USARSO Public Affairs brief, which prepares us for the whole mission," explained Capt. Marc DUBOIS COATS FELD -Soldiers Moquin, Co. A commander. from the 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation "We come back to the company area Regiment, counted on the old saying and hash out the company internal "practice makes perfect"as they trained things we are going to do." last week for an external evaluation in Security and fighting positions for October. the flight crew are examples of internal "This field problem is gearing us up things. for that evaluation," said Maj. Thomas They were also an important part of Comodeca, battalion operations officer. the exercise, he said. "The battalion intelligence officers "Within an aviation unit we can fly, wrote the field problem to mirror an imno problem," he said. portant unit mission: defense of the ca"The things we need to work on are nal," he said. soldier skills." "The scenario is basically that we The unit is concentrating on preparhave some armed individuals gaining ing the staff officers for the field, but control of the Gatun Dam, and personthe side benefit was the motivation it nel and property in that area." gave the soldiers, Moquin said. The unit's mission was to fly infan"It's important to do well not only try soldiers to the dam and help take it for the soldier's training, but also to let back from the enemy, he said. the soldiers know we are in fact preu.s Army photobySgtE.J.He-son No infantry soldiers took part in the pared for a real-world mission," he Neighboriy visit exercise so the aviators could concensaid. trate on planning and executing the "A soldier will fight better and train Brig. Gen. James Wilson, U.S. Army South Deputy Commander, presents mission. harder when he knows thereis meaning Isaura Rosa Perez, mayor of Colon, a memento. Wilson met with Perez "We get a fragmentary order from to it, and it could keep him alive in a Saturday to discuss the affect of the Department of Defense drawdown on our battalion stafffor an upcoming misbattle." civilian employees who are residents of Colon.

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Tropic Times Sept.24,1993 "4 Soldiers of Headquarters Company, U.S. Army Garrison visit the remains of Fort San Lorenzo. Fort San orenzo Ancient fortress conjurs images of pirates, buccaneers tanding on the decaying walls of the once st regegically important Fort San Lorenzo brings back images of English and Spanish galleons sail .ie ing past. The salty sea breeze carries whispers of times past when buccaneers and Spaniards battled to control the fort and the surrounding waterways. Tourists can now wander freely throughout the Atlantic 4 coast fort as Panamanian government workers continue to restore the 16th century structure. The fort's history began in the 16th century with the new power obtained by the Spanish Empire through its conquests of Hispanola, Haiti, Santa Catalina, Mexico, Panama, Cartagena, Maracaibo and Peru. Untold wealth poured into the Spanish crown and doubled the world's known gold reserve. Spain's bullion, jewels and silver shipments were transported across the isthmus by the Camino Real and the Chagres River and financed the Spanish armies and the Armada in 1587. As a result, the British realized they must strangle the sea lanes and disrupt the flow of Spanish wealth. The isthmus became a focal point of this conflict. With only one train route to transport the gold, the Chagres River became an option for an additional route. Monique Chisolm stands next to an old Spanish cannon. Because of growing threats from the British, Spain fortified keyports and built Fort San Lorenzo in 1597 byorder enraged that when he was struck by a arrow he pulled it The Spaniards, who again occupied the fort, surrendered. of King Philip II. from his side, tied apieceof his shirttoit, litit on fire and In March 1740, Vernon had the fort blown up. Around 1650, a boy appeared in the port of Bristol and and fired it from his musket into the fort. In 1751, the fort was rebuilt by Don Ignacio de Sala, signed onto the vessel Saucy Nell. After being sold into The blaze kindled and as night fell, a roof caught on then Governor General Cartegena. slavery in Barbados, Henry Morgan became an overseer of fire and collapsed onto alarge supply of gunpowder. The In the late 1700s, the fort was again attacked by three the slave gangs and later joined a gang of buccaneers. They explosion scattered debris all over the fort and weakened British ships, but the Spaniards repulsed the attack. hunted cattleinthe West Indies and dryed the mealinto strips the Spanish defense. Eventually, the fort declined along with the rest of the to be blackmarketed to ships returning to the Old World. After killing many of the sentries during the night, the Spanish fortunes. By 1849,it was under the sovereignty of Because of the buccaneers' success, the Spanish supbuccaneers swarmed the fort and defeated the Spanish. the Republic of Columbia and was in a state of general pressed the business and forced the buccaneers onto the small When Morgan arrived at the fort he began reinforcing disrepair. island of Tortuga. There the band exacted their revenge by it to protect the rear during his campaign across the The last time the old fort was used was during World capturing a small Spanish coastal trader laden with goods isthmus. War II when the U.S. Army Coastal Artillery units posted and sailed it to Port Royal. This was the start of Morgan's After returning to Fort Royal with the booty from his a searchlight and gun mount there to prevent German pirateering. victory he was in trouble with the British Crown. He was submarines from sending raiding parties up the Chagres In 1668, he succeeded in capturing the port of Portobello then taken to England and imprisoned in the Tower of toward Gatun dam. and considered taking all of Panama. Soon after, he captured London. Morgan managed to bribe his way out, received Though the fortis nolongerabattlesite,itis asitewhere Santa Catalina and dispatched Col. Joseph Bradley to take his knighthood in 1674 and was appointed lieutenant tourists can get a glimpse of the past. Fort San Lorenzo. governor of Jamaica where he lived the remainder of his After landing near Brujas Island, the men marched life. story aMt photos toward the fort and attacked from the Northeast, but failed to Fort San Lorenzo again saw action in 1739 when by Spec. Robin A. Mantikoski cross the moat. During the attack, a buccaneer became so Adm. Edward Vernon bombarded the fort for two days. USARSO Public Affairs

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Tropic Times B4 Set.,1993rri day, Wednesday and Friday. For more D show Office closures information, call282-5171. Fir sDoghshul TheSelfServiceSupplyCentersinBuildThe Club Canino de Panama will hold ings711, Corozal,and244,Fort Davis,wi Ch lecture an International and National Dog Show be closed for inventory through Thursday. Oct. 16 -17 at the ATLAPA Convention The Fort Clayton Protestant Women of Center. Show classes will be offered at the the Chapel will sponsor a lecture series 9 Balboa High School stadium parking lot 9 Radio license exam a.m.thelast Thursdayofeachmonth atthe a.m.Oct.2-9,forjuniorhandlersand6p.m. The Panama Canal Amateur Radio Fort Clayton Chapel sanctuary. Oct. 6-13 for adult handlers. For informaAssociation will hold amateurradiolicense Bible study is also offered for women tion call Diane Ellis, 256-6606 evenings or examinations 9 am. Oct. 2 at the Panama andchildren9am.eachThursdayin BuildBridget Groome, 286-4896 duty hours. Canal Commission Training Center, ing 156, Fort Clayton. Balboa. To register or for more information, call 252-7400. Square dancing Financial classes The Panama Square Ups hold square The Army Community Service Condancing forall basic and mainstream dancsumer Affairs and Financial Assistance ers 6-10 p.m. each Friday at the Curundu TheBalboaHighSchoolAdvisoryComprogram will offer the following classes: Elementary School play shelter. An open mittee monthly meeting will be held 3:30 #Checkbook management-in Spanhouse and new classes begin in October. Shipment of pets on Category B p.m. Oct. 4 in Room 109 of the school. ish -9-11:30 am. Monday. For information, call 287-4426. flights, "FreedomB ird. SACis a way parents, students and faculty *Personal financial management -in Effective Oct 1, pet(s) plus the can express ideas and concerns. For more Spanish -8-11 am. Thursday. Christm s b aa.r container weighing 100 pounds or information, call 252-7896. For registration or more information, co r wgin g be 0 pond or call 285-5556/6518. TheOfficers'andCivilians'WivesClub more will not be accepted for ship-Pacific will hold a Christmas bazaar Nov. ment on Category B flights. Adult classes g 13. Vendors wanting to participate can Pet(s)plus containerwith acomTheFortClaytonChapelSundaySchooI Clayton Burger Kin signupnoon-2p.m.Tuesday andWednesbinedweightupto70poundswillbe now offers several classes for adults: a The Fort Clayton Burger King has day at Club Amador. charged as one piece, $60. Spanish study of the book of Genesis, a extended its weekend hours to midnight Pet(s)plus container withacomshort course in basics of and Christianity, a FridiyandSaturday. With theincreasein Enlisted spouses'club bined weight from 71-99 pounds studyofthe bookof Isaiah, coping withthe hours, Burger King offers a midnight willbechargedastwopieces,$120. traumas of family life, church history. The munchies special of a 99 cents cheeseburTheHoward/AlbrookEnlistedSpouses' Shipmentsof pets onCategory B video series Living Proof is planned for ger 10 p.m.-midnight. Club will sponsor its annual Christmas flgihts are for dogs and cats only. 10:30-11:30 Sundays. Toregister, call252bazaarat the Albrook Club10 am.-3 p.m. They can only be shipped when 7400. Holiday sponsorship Ot2. Tables for vendors will be sold accompanied by the sponsor when The 1993 Joint Task Force -Panama of the Howard Enlisted Clu. Call24i a permanent change of station Improvement classes Christmas Sponsorship Program is under 3132 for information. status and are limited two (2) pets The Fort Clayton Leaning Resource way. Units or community groups wanting per family. Center, Building 128, offers general techto participate this year should call public Vendors'bazaar For further information contact nical improvement classes, general educaaffairs offices at the following numbers: your Transportation Management tion study and college level examination 24th Wing, 284-5459; U.S. Army South, The Army and Air Force Exchange Office. program materials to help prepare for tests. 287-5459; U.S. Naval Station, 283-5641; Service will hold the second annual venCall 287-4892. and U.S. Southern Command, 282-4278. dors' bazaar 10 am.-5 p.m. Oct. 1 and 10 PI: Tourist Passport am.-4 p.m. Oct. 2in front of Building 32, TC: Tourist Card Fort Davis. Many national and Free Zone V: Visa Education center Screening room vendors will participate. PC: Proof of Citizenship The Army Education Center will hold The Valent Receation Center ScreenUS: United States Passport defense activity for non-traditional educaingRoomis now backin full swing offering Holders Only tion support and college level examination visitors a unique movie experience with opportunity CC: Country Clearance program 7:30 am.-noon and 1-4:30 p.m. digital Dolby surround sound and a big The Howard/Albrook Youth Centers RON: Remain Overnight Monday, WednesdayandFriday attheFort screen television. A new addition to the are seeking instructors for personnel conClaytonEducation,Building128.Cal1287screeningroomprogramisa24-hourmovie tract positions in the following: dance, All flights on this schedule are 5856. line. The new movie line number is 287aerobics, piano, Spanish, gymnastics, tensubject to cancellation. For addi4367. nis and martial arts. Submit bids and retional flightinformation, call the Pasa -sumes to the Director, Howard Youth Censenger Service Section, 284-4306/ o p S l ter, Building 696, Howard AFB. For 3608/4857. Some services at Gorgas Army ComCorozal cemetery informationcall 284-5615. Saturday munity Hospital will change beginning TheAmerican Battle Monuments Com5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN Oct. 1. Children's immunizations will be missionannouncesthateffectiveOct.1the Library news Peisn %FB,CO US given at the Pediatric Clinic on a walk-in Corozal American Cemetery will be closed basis 1-3:30 p.m. Monday, Wednesdayand to vehicular traffic 4-6 p.m. weekdays and The Howard library has new books on Sunday Friday. Newborn infant's two-week ap6 am.-6 p.m. weekends and holidays. It familymember caretohelpyouinchildand No scheduled departures pointments will be done at the Pediatric willremainopentothepublic6 am.-6p.m. elder care. Stop by and check them out Monday Clinic Wednesday mornings. The Army daily. Thecemetery officeislocated behind 10am.-9 p.m. Monday and Thursday; 7:30am B727 Howard AFB, PN Community Health Nursing in Section B the chapel and is open 7 am.-3:30 p.m. 10am.-6 p.m. Friday and Saturday and Charleston, SC IAP will continue to provide adult immunizaweekdays. For more information call, 285noon-6 p.m. Sundays. For more informaConmmercial contract tions on a walk-in basis 1-3:30 p.m. Mon5016. tion, call 284-6249. 1:55pm C5A Howard AFB, PN Charleston AFB, SC RON Dover AFB, Del. position may be filled at the NM-8 or NM-9 level. Driver's Tuesday license required. 4:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN Tegucigalpa, Honduras Hiring opportunities are limited because of budgetary conNote: VB#473-93-SS, Supervisory Education Technician, Soto Cano AB, Honduras straints. How to apply: For temporary positions submit a SFNM-1702-6 is hereby cancelled. Howard AFB, PN 171, DD 214 if claiming veteran preference, a copy of college Note: VB#521-93-NC,Engineering Technician, NM-8025:55am C130 Howard AFB, PN transcripts if claiming education and a copy of Clerical Admin8 is hereby cancelled. San Salvador, istrative Support Position notice of rating if applicable. For El Salvador CC/V permnen poitins onl fo curentempoyes IcluingSan Jose, Cona Rica permanent positions (only for current employees including The Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting applicaHoward AFB, PN leave without pay)submit aSF-171, acopy oflatestSF-50, acopy tions on a continuous basis for the following positions. These of college transcripts, a copy of your last performance appraisal announcements are used to establish registers for future vacanWednesday and a statement addressing the job related criteria contained in cies. Noscheduled departures the announcement. For more information regarding vacancy announcements VB# 001 General Clerical, NM-3/4 Thursday (forms required, job related criteria, etc.), visit the Directorate of VB#002* Sales StoreChecker, NM-3 (Intermittentwksch) 7:55am C5A Howard AFB, PN (formsa reurse, Buidn 6,Ro 0,Crzl rcl Soto Cano AB, Honduras Civilian Personnel, Building 560, Room 306, Corozal, or call VB#003RecreationAssistant,NM-4(Lifeguard)Requires CharlestonAFBSC RON 285-5201. Cert + 6 mths recreation exp. Dover AFB, TX VB# 004 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (req6 mths of recreVB# VACANCIES TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 09-24-93 ation exp.) CLOSE: 10-05-93 VB# 005 Secretary (Stenography), NM-5/6 Pacific VB# 006 Secretary Cyping/Office Automation), NM-5/6 565-93-SS Librarian, NM-1410-9. Temp Nte: 1 yr. VB# 007 Medical Officer, NE-12/13/14 VB# 008 Clinical Nurse (RN license required), NM-9/10/ 566-93-NC Laundry & Dry Clean Equipment Repairer, MG11 5317-8. VB# 009 Practical Nurse (LPN license required), NM-5 Atlantic 567-93-SS Engineering Technician, NM-802-8/9. Note: This CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is required.

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Tropic Times'D" TV Schedule ept. 24,1993 C a n l* MatureTheme **SeriesBegins ***SeriesEnds Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30am NBC News at Sunuise 6:30am Headlie News 6:00am Real Videos 5:30am NBC News at Sunroise 5:30am NBC News at Sunrise 5:30am NBC News at Sunrise 5:30am NBC News at Sunrise 6:00 Good1ornigAmerira 7:00 AmericanFormsPers6:30 OutrearhofLove 6:00 GoodMoringAmenea 6:00 GoodMomingAmerira 6:00 GoodMorningAmerica 6:00 GoodMoringAmerim 8:00 BasicTraining Workout peirve 7:00 Fre By igh1 8:00 BasicTrainingWorkoUt 8:00 Bodyshapieg 8:00 BasicTrainingWorkout 8:00 Bodyalaping 8:30 Sesame Street 7:30 Navy/MarieeCops 8:00 CBS Sunday Morning 8 :30 Sesame Stree 8:30 Sesame Sreet 8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Sesame Street 9:30 Silver Spoon.s News 9:30 Far The Nation 930 Silver Spoons 9:30 Silver Spoons 9:30 Silver Spoons 9:30 Silver Spoons 10:00 ILoveLucy 8:00 NickArcad.e 10:00 Headline News 10:00 ILov Lucy 10:00 ILoveLucy 10:00 ILovLury 10:00 ILoveLuy 10:25 Guiding ight 8:30 JutForKids 10:30 This Week w/David 10.25 Guiding agh* 10.25 Guiding Light* 10:25 Guiding Ught* 10:25 Guiding LghtI 11:15 Genera Hospi WarnerBros.Cartoon Brinkley 11:1 5 Gee alHospital 11:15 General Hospital a 11:15 General Hospital 11:15 General Hospital Noon HeadlineNewsBreak 10:30 Nova 11:30 WasingtonWeekInReNoon HeadlincNewsBreak Noon HeadilineNewBreak Noon HleadlineNewBreak Noon Headlin-NewsBreak 12:15 SCNMidday 11:30 CFA:Wiconiovs view t2:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:30 SportsaCeer Indiana Noon HeadlineNews 12:30 Sports Machine 12:30 SportsCenter 12:30 SportsCenier 12:30 SportsCenter 1:00 Another World 2:30pm CFA:Miamivs.Colorado 12:30 SCN o Tour 1:00 Another World 1:00 Another World 0 1:00 Another World 1:00 Another World 2:00 OprahoWinfrey 5:30 Headline News 12:55 Movie: 'Madame 2:00 OprahWinfrey' 2.00 Sally Jesse Raphael 2:00 Oprah Winfrey* 2:00 Donahue 3:00 Fri. Is Right 6:00 WWFSuperstarsOf Souaatzka" 3:00 Prio 1s Right 3:00 Prie Is Right 3:00 Pri. Is Right 3:00 Prir 1. Right 4:00 Channel One Wrestling 3:00 The Bet of The Love 4:00 ChannelOne 4:00 Channel One 4:00 Channel One 4:00 Chtnnel ne 4:15 Newsroom 7:00 Resrun9tl Connection 4:15 Newsroom 4:15 Newsroom 4:15 Newsroom 4:15 Newsroom 4:30 ThinkFast! 8:00 Movie:"SilenrcOfThe 3:30 EbonyJetShowrase 4:30 NickArcade 4:30 Square OnTV 4:30 LambChop'slayalong 4:30 Smalch 5:00 FamilyFeud Lanhb"* 4:00 Soul Train 5:00 FamilyFeud 5:00 FamilyFeud 5:00 FamilyFeud 5:00 FamilyFeud 5:30 Showbiz Today 10:00 Headline News 5:00 OnStage 5:30 ShowbizToday 5:30 Showbiz Today 5:30 ShowbizToday 5:30 ShowbizToday 6:00 SCNlEvening Report 10:30 SaturdayNightLive 5:30 HeadlinNew 6:00 SCNEvening Report 6:00 SCNovening Report 6:00 SCNEvening Report 6:00 SCNEvening Report 6:15 HealineNewsBreak Midnight Vidolinks* 6:00 AustinityLimits 6:15 HeadlineNewsBreak 6:15 HeadlineNewaBreak 6:15 HeadlineNewsBreak 6:15 HeadlineNewBreak 6:30 World NewsTonight 1:00 Firday Night Videos 7:00 Bye To Bye w/Connie 6:30 World NewsTonight 6:30 World NewsTonight 6:30 World NewsTonight 6:30 World New Tonight 7:00 Jeopardy 2:00 Movie: "The RorOf Chung 7:00 Jeopardy! 7:00 Jeopardy! 7:00 Special: 27thAnnual 7:00 Jeopsrdyl 7:30 Small Wonder A Man Calld Horsa "* 8:00 Movie: "The LastTo Go" 7:30 DearJoh 7:30 PrivateEye CountrylMusir Assoin7:30 Out Of This World 8:00 ABCNewsSpecial: 4:00 Movie:"LongRiders"* 9:40 HeadlineNewsBreak 8:00 Hooperman 8:30 Sperial:WhatEveryWotionAwards 7:50 Movi:"2000Malibu Town Meetig: "The 5:40 HeadlineNewsBreak 10:00 EntertainmentTisWeek 8:30 60 Minutes manNeedsToKnow 10:05 EntertainmentTonight Road"* Conclusion Clnanureorription" 11:00 InspectrMors* 9:30 CBS Evening News About Breast Canrer 10:35 Tonight Show 9:30 CBS Evening News 9:00 In Living Color MidightHadlineNews 10:00 SCN Late Edition 9:30 CBS Evening News 11:35 DavidItterman 10:00 SCN Late Edition 9:30 CBS Evening News 12:30 MeetThe Pres 10:05 Entertainmentonight 10:00 SCN Late Edition 12:35am Nighthoo 10:05 EntertainmentTonight 10:00 SCNLateEdition 1:30 SportsMachine 10:35 TonightShow 10:05 EntertainmentTonight 1:05 HeadlineNewsBreak 10:35 TonightShow 10:05 ntertainreenrTonight 2:00 ABCWorldNewsNow 11:35 David sttereean 10:35 TonightShow 1:30 Sportsatenight 11:35 DavidL-cuerman 10:35 Tonight Show 3:00 Headline News 12:35am Nightline 11:35 Davidl.aeran. 2:00 Arsenio Hall 12:35am Nightline 11:35 Davidleran 3:30 CNN World Report 1:05 HalineNewBreak 12:35am Nighdin. 3:00 HeadlineNews 1:05 HeadlineNewsBreak 12:35amNightline 5:00 HeadlineNewsBreak 1:30 Sporslatenight 1:05 HeadlineNewsBreak 3:30 TonightShow 1:30 Sporsatenight 1:05 Videolinks* 2:00 ArsentoHall 1:30 SportsItenight 4:30 HeadlineNews 2:00 ArsenioHall 2:00 Movie: "The Lion in 3:00 HeadlineNews 2:00 ArsenioHall 5:00 IeadlineNewsBreak 3:00 HeadlineNews Winter"* 3:30 Tonight Show 3:00 Headline News 3:30 Tonight Show 4:15 Movie "AFistfulof 4:30 Headline News 3:30 TonightShow i 4:30 HeadlineNews Don'"* 5:00 HeadlineNews Break 4:30 HeadlineNows 5:00 HeadlineNewsBreak 6:00 HeadlineNews 5:00 HeadlineNewsBreak l c* Mature Theme **Series Begins ***Series Ends Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30am Simulcast w/s & 10 6:30am Simulcastw/8 & 10 6:00am LombChop'sPlayalong 5:30am Simulcst w/8 & 10 5:30am Simlrast w/8 & 10 5:30am Simulcast w/8 & 10 5:30am Simulcast w/8 & 10 8:00 OpralhWinfrey 10:30 The 13 Ghosts of Srooby 6:25 TheSunahineFactory 8:00 Oprah Winfrey 8:00 Donahue 0 8:00 Opreh Winfrey 8:00 Sally Jesse Rsphel* 9:00 Today Doo 6:55 TheAddamsFamily 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 11:00 Star Trek 11:00 The Mns 7:15 GoofTroop 11:00 StarTrek 11:00 StarTrek 11:00 StarTrek 11:00 Star Trek Noon HeadlineewsBreak 11:30 Real NewsForKids 7:40 Disney'sLittileMrMaid Noon HeadlinNewBreak Noon HeadlineewBreak Noon HeadlineNewsBreak Noon HeadlineNwsBreak 12:15 SCNMiLday Noon HeadlineNews 8:05 Capt. Planet &The 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:15 SCN Midday 12:30 All My Children 12:30 This Week In Baseball Planetees 12:30 All My Children 1 12:30 All My Children' 12:30 All My Children 12:30 All My Children 1:30 One Life To Live 1:00 MovieSperial:"Captain 8:25 Taz-Maria 1:30 One Life To Live 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Lve 1:30 One Life to 1ve' 2:30 Young red Reslna" From Castille" 8:50 Doug 2:30 Young and Retleo 2:30 Young And Roes2:30 Young And Restless* 2:30 Young and Resless' 3:30 TeenageMutantNinja 3:30 Mike Hammer 9:10 Teenage MutantNinja 3:30 Taz-Mania 3:30 The Addams Family". 3:30 GoofTroop 3:30 Disney'sLicileMermaid Tur1les 4:30 o Pit Road Turtles 4:00 Fraggle Rook 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 Fraggle Rock 4:00 FraggleRock 5:00 Special:WorldCup 9:35 Mr.Ed 4:30 ClarissaExplainsItAll 4:30 ThinkFast 4:30 Gts 4:30 Mr.Ed 4:30 Beakmin'sWorld FrestyleReview 10:05 WonderfulWorldOf 5:00 Who'sTh.Boss 5:00 What'sHappeningNow 5:00 Who'sTheBoss 5:00 What'sHppeningNow 5:00 Who'.ThBoss 6:00 HedineNews Disney 5:30 M*A*S*H 5:30 M'A*S*H 5:30 M*A*S*H 5:30 M*AnS*H 5:30 M'A*S*H 6:30 The Sinpsons 11:00 Inside The NFL 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCNEveningReport 7:00 StarTrek:DeepSpae Noon NFLFootball:Dolphins 6:15 HeadlineNwsBreak 6:15 HeadlieeNewsBreak 6:15 HeadlineewuBreak 6:15 HeadlineNewsBreak 6:15 HedlineNewsBreak Nine vs. Bills 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:30 NBC ighily News 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:30 NBCNighdy News 6:30 NBCNightlyNeows 8:00 Quannumneap 3:00 NFLFootball:49ersvs. 7:00 BevedyHis.,90210 7:00 America'sPunniestHome 7:00 FullHouse 7:00 Hangin'WithMr.Coo7:00 Ro 9:00 AmericanDetective* Sains 8:00 MondayNightFootball: Videos 7:30 Cheers per 7:30 Fresh Prine of Bel Air 9:30 Married.WithChil6:00 HeadlineNews Steelers vs. Falcons 7:30 Homeboprovement 8:00 Murder, She Wrote 7:30 Family Maters 8:00 Movie: "Young Guns dren 6:30 The Wonder Years 11:00 Headlie News 8:00 NorthernExpoare 9:00 SiteM 8:00 Martin I" 10:00 HeadlineNews 7:00 NFLFootball: Pa0iom 11:30 SCNLateEdition 9:00 Roseanne 10:00 Remingo Steele 8:30 MurphyBrown 10:00 TJ.Hooker 10:30 SaturdayNightLive* vs.Jets 11:35 ArseniolHall 9:30 Movie:"Mailock:The 11:00 HeadlineNews 9:00 Herman'suead 11:00 Headline News Midnight Videolinks 10:00 Magnm P.I. 12:35am Simulcast with channels Witness Killings" 11:30 SCN Late Edition 9:30 LoveAndWar 1t:30 SCN Late Edition 1:00 Friday Night Videos 11:00 604inutes 8 & 10 11:10 Headline News Break 11:35 Arsenio Hall 10:00 Riptide 11:35 ArsenioHall 2:00 EntertaintentThisWeek MidnightSimulcastwithcharnels 11:30 SCNLateEdition 12:35amSimulcastwithChannels 11:00 HeadlineNews 12:35am Nightlire 3:00 Headline News 8 & 10 11:35 Arsenio Hall 8 & 10 11:30 SCN Lae Edition 1:05 HeadlineNewBreak 3:30 SaturdayNightLive 12:35am Simulcastwithchannels 11:35 ArsenioHall 1:30 Sportsatenight 5:00 Headline News 8& 10 12:35am Simulcastowith channels 2:00 Arsenio-Hall 5:30 HeadlineNewBreak 8 & 10 3:00 Headline News 3:30 TonightShow 4:30 LatNighw/ottermun 5:30 Headline News 6:00 Headlin.N.wsBreaki Channels 8 & 10 Cable Channel 14 CFA College Football Sports Sot Wisconsin vs. Indiana, 11:30,a.m. Saturday NFL Football Miami (Fla.) vs. Colorado, 2:30 p.m. Saturday Dolphins vs. Bills, noon Sunday Specials 49ers vs. Saints, 3 p.m. Sunday ABC News Special: Town Meeting: The Clinton Prescription, 8 p.m. Patriots vs. Jets, 7 p.m. Sunday today. Ted Koppel, Peter Jennings and the ABC News Team analyze and Monday Night Football comment on the Presidents address to congress. eelers vs. Falcons, 8 p.m. Monday ABC News Special: The Other Epidemic -What Every Woman Needs To Know Specials About Breast Cancer, 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. Linda Ellerbee, herself a breast cancer Captain FromCastille p.m.Saturday.Hispanic HeritageMonthSpecial. survivor, follows two women through their experiences with the disease. A e rom Cas eks p m atd Hisanic HerNe onth special Prime time movies An officer from Spain seeks fame and fortune in the New World during the "Silence of the Lambs," 8 p.m. Saturday. Stars Jodi Foster and Anthony Hopkins. In this Inquisition and the conquest of Mexico. Stars Tyrone Power and Jean Peters. genuinely scary adaptation of the Thomas Hart best-seller, a determined young female FBI agent is World Cup Freestyle ReviewS p.m. Saturday. Peter Graves and Jeff Chumas assigned to the search for a gruesome aerial killer known only as "Buffalo Bill." host the World Cup Freestyle ski competition from Tignes, France, featuring "The Last To Go,"8 p.m.Sunday.StarsTyne Daly and Terry O'Quinn. The evolution of a troubled women's and men's ballet and the always exciting mogul runs. family is followed in this tale of a doctor who moves his wife and children into a large house in a New Primetime Movies Englandtown where they are beset withdomestic problems leading to alienation and eventual divorce. "Young Guns If," 8 p.m. today. This exciting sequel to the 1988 smash hit "2000 Malibu Road,"7:50 p.m. Thursday.Stars Lisa Hartman and Drew Barrymore. Jade hides out "Young Guns" finds William "Billy The Kid" Bonney (Emilio Estevez) and his in a motel and tries to get a new passport so she can jet to safety. Lindsay asks Jade for advice on safe gang heading towards Old Mexico with a band of government law men led by sex and condoms as her love affair with Eric heats up. Sheriff Pat Garrett (William Peterson) in hot pursuit. Also stars Keifer Sutherland Movies and Lou Diamond Phillips. "Madame Sousatzka," 12:55 p.m. Sunday. Stars Shirley MacLaine and Navin Chowdhry. "Matlock: The Witness Killings," 9:30 p.m. Tuesday. It's a made-for-TV All Night Movies mystery when wily Southern attorney Matlock (Andy Griffith) gets the cold "The Liort In Winter," 2 a.m. Friday. Stars Katharine Hepburn and Peter O'Toole. shoulder from his home-town folks.the same cold shoulder that was received by "A Fistful Of Dollars," 4:15 a.m. Friday. Stars Clint Eastwood and Gian Maria. a writer (Steven Flynn) who was slain while investigating a killing he witnessed "Return Of A Man Called Horse, 2 a.m. Saturday. Stars Richard Harris and Geoffrey Lewis. with two friends 15 years before. Also stars Nancy Stafford and Clarence Gilyard, "Long Riders," 4 a.m. Saturday. Stars Stacy & James Keach and David & Keith Carradine. Jr.

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Tropic Times C asfe Ad B10 Sept. 24, 1993Classiied Ads Dodge Caravan, ps, pb, ac, at, Dependable, honest maid, 3 exc cond, $600. 284-5772. Duty-free m erchandise $6,000/obo. 289-4968. days a week, spks some Eng. 27" color Fisher TV, cable 1991 Pontiac Firebird, V8, 286-4593. ready w/remote, $325; VCR FORT CLAYTON(Contraband ControlOffice)-As areminder,in ps, pb, pw, ac, am/fm cass, Eng-spk maid/babysitter, cabinet,holds 120tapes,$50. accordance with the Panama Canal Treaty and U.S. Southern Comalarm, $9,000. 284-4733. avail after 2:30 pm, exc refs. 286-4347. mand regulations, duty free merchandise, whether new or used, cannot 1992 Rodeo-Isuzu 4x4, red, 282-5586. AsstedGameGeargames,$20 be given, transferred or generally sold to non-privilege holders. Violaps, pb, abs, tinted glass, 5 Eng-spk housekeeper, lday ea;2-4M6Sinschips,$300; tons to these dispositions may subject violators to prosecution under spd, 16,000mi,$16,000.284a week,honest,hardworking, short wave radio, $125/obo. both, Military and Panamanian Laws. It is sometimes permissible tosell 5197. dependable, cleans, irons, 252-2657. an item, but only if Panamanian taxes are paid. Before such a sale, it is 1989 Dodge Ram 250 custom babysits. 260-3235. RCA VHSrecorderplusRCA strongly recommended that the seller contact the Contraband Control van, high top, fully loaded, Span-spk live-out maid, honvideo camera w/extras, good Section for advice at 286-3117. $18,000/obo.260-8936. est, mature, reliable, M-F or cond, $800. 287-5689. ______________________________________________________3 day a week, good house1987 Ford Tempo GL, new keeper, exc w/children. 267Sony 19"portTV,cableready, tires, am/fm cass, runs/looks am/fm cass, ac, exc cond, not tires, ac, ps, pb, am/fin cass, 3405 sleep timer w/remote control, grt, not dty pd, $5,000. 285dty pd, $8,700. 264-7619. nice car, dependable, $4,000. -$275. 225-1217. 5640 eves/wkends. 1982 Ford Escort GL, at, a 284-5078. Child care, my home, AmerMinolta606Cmini camcorder Dalmatian dogs, 3 males, 3 1984Toyota VanLE, at, dual ps,pb,grtongas, superbcond, 1988 Ford Ranger XLT p/u, wkends, evesas well as days w/all accessories,tripod,hard females. 289-5349 after 5pm. ac, sr, ps, pb, pw, am/fm, exc $2,150/obo. 287-3189. X-cab, 5 spd, 6 cyl, fuel inj, 289-4292. case, $500. 252-7582. Thoroughbred mare, 8 yr old, cond, $6,500. 284-4635. 1993 DdehowEV/bdLiner, roll bars, ps, ph, Tredgbndrsedme yd, Corsica, 6 84c35. 1993Dodge2Shadow S,V6/ cruise, tilt, $7,000/obo. 284Eng-spk maid, good w/kids, Color TV, RCAX1100 13", trainedEng.and western, very 1990 Chevy Corsica,4cyl,5 3.OL,$10,700,$2,000down, 3398. live-in/out, day work. 221$160.252-6929. quiet, perfect youth horse, spd, am/fm cass, ac, ps, 4dr, $281 monthly, 48 mos. 2605285. Tand T/2dri d $400. 286-3392. good cond, $8,600/obo. 2242334 after 6pm. 1990 Geo Storm Coupe, exc ady I L2, ves an S0656 cond, low mi, many extras, Eng-spk live-out, orday work harddrive,monitor, prog, exc Poodle puppies, 4 males, 1 -. 1986 Chevy Cavalier sa/wgn, nose cover, custom paint, housekeeper, grt w/kids. cond, $500. 252-2175. female, 6 wks old, 2 beige, 3 1989 Chevy conversion van, pb, px, ac,radio/cass, $4,300. tinted glass, $7,500. 285228-1624. Sega Genesis w/6 games blk, $90. 287-6494high top, TV, bed, extra fea223-6548. 5929. $175/obo; SuperNintendo w/ Blue parakeet w/cage, $15. tures, $17,000; 1990 Chevy 1989 Nissan Sentra, 5 spd, l990NissanAxxessMinivan, le 2 1-6 97.od wkids' 5games,$175/obo.284-3831. 2738.Cavalier, ac, 5 spdl, am/fm 199_Nisan______invanlie-i._21_697 cass, 35k mi, $6,900. 287exc cond, ac, am/fm cass, 2dr, 5 pass, ac, cass, ps, ph exc Sony camcorder, 8mm cumFemale German shepherd, 5 5529 after 5 pm. $6,100/neg. 2290302cond,$10,000/obo.287-4475. Cooks good d res pact w/accessories, $6 99.260mos, housebroken, dewcooks god/isrf.24 atcesries0p.m. formed, $160. 282-3778 after 1987 Ford Mustang GT 5.0, 1985 Dodge Daytona, ac, 1990 Chevy S-10 Tahoe, 4170 Fridays. 2334 after 6:00 p.m. ac,pspb,tiltcruise, exccond 57,000 mi, am/fm cass, at, loaded, ps, pb, ac, at, more, ...Sansui cass deck w/buit in must see, $8,000, 287-6437. dtypd,$4,500/obo.284-6191. $9,500/obo.283-6145. Bilingalive-naid, coo graphic equalizer, auto-reMixedbed4hyro2 d f2mae 1987 Volvo 240 Dl 4 dr, 1987 Suzuki Samurai 4x4, 1990 Ford Aerostar XL, clean, iron, refs. 287-5878. verse and remote control, spd, a, cexc cond, amimcass, hdtop, ac, cruise control, new 31,265 mi, new cond, not dty $150. 282-5586. Mixed female pitbull, 1 yr $6,500. 226-6341. tires, brakes, exc cond, avail pd, Spanish-speaking, SNES Street Fighter II, $50; old, good w/children, has mid-Oct, $4,500/obo. 286$18,000. 264-8086/1053. Super Mario Kart, $45; Clue, shots, $60. 224-2890. 1988 BMW 318i Shadow 4693. $45; Fighting N-Star 6, $40. Line, 2dr, 5 spd, am/fm cass, 1971 Ford LTD, exc cond, 12kw Onan marine gen, 286-4286. Free to good home, mixed not dty pd, $10,000. 2611988 Nissan Sentra, pw, pb, 400CID,edelbrock4blcarb, 7,000 hrs, can be rebuilt or breed med-sz dog, grt watch 6119. ac, am/fm cass, not dty pd, must see, chrome eng, $4,000/ used for parts, $1,500. 286Kenwood KRC-640 pullout dog, fixed w/all shots. 287$4,000. 260-7828. obo.289-4195. 3981. stereo w/JBL5 1/4"spkrs,car 3534. 1988Pontia6000, acs te 1991 Mustang 5.0 LX 1979Mustang,6cylat,trans16' deepV-hull,6hpJo$300/obo.236-2467. -fnseesuper halehn k 56de spdl loade sr fooslene Purebred labrador puppies, $4,750. 260-5955. hatchbk, 5 spd, loaded, sr, parts for sale, incl eng/ran, sonverynicefinancingavail, NES,4controllers,FourScore avail Sept. 30, $150. 286tinted glass, exc cond, not dty drs, glass, etc. 284-3938. $2,800. 230-1117 Zapper, MAX and 2 games, 6190. 1983 Lincoln Town Car, pd, $9,950. 287-4885. 1 Dodg00atonp 6 M b all for $75. 286-3630 after loaded, leather, dty 1990 Dodge Daytonap/nea i9erk dty p, Mer7:3p.m Shi-tzu puppies, 2 males, 1 $7,000/obo.252-2010. 9, onvert, bedliner, tonneau cury, trailer, acty pd, $7,500 CCPreg,$400.Shi-tzu i AKC52,000 orig. mi, dty pd, exc cover, alum. directional rims, obo.261-0763. Sega Genesis and CD Games. CCPreg,for stud service.2261989 Mustang GT convert w/ cond, $3,500. 286-4273. tinted glass, $8,500. 289260-7685. 7176. alarm, tinted glass, 5 spd, wht/ 4320. 14' fiberglass fishing boat, ble top, very good cond, Jeep CJ-7, diesel, dty pd, 254p0 vinrudewrailer,ex Sega Genesis, like new, Male AKC reg golden re$10,900. 287-4895. many extras, good cond, 1988 Ford Escort GI 1.9L, 5 cond, $2,995.228-6027. Sonics I and II, Genestick, triever for stud service. 282$5,800.236-2647. spd, ps, pb, ac, 3dr, tinted $130.284-4389. 4235. 1989 Eagle Premier ES, V61 glass, $3,500. 284-4130. 21' Open Fisherman, 225 hp at, fully loaded, low mi, key1988 Ford 250 3/4 ton p/u, Evinrude, fathometer, bart Carver 1.5 Power Amp 350 Free, 3 female kittens, 1 feless entry, exc cond, $9,000/ V8, 5 spd, ac, ps, pb, dual 1991 Mercury Tracer LTS, well likenew, $14,200/obo. w/channel, $425; Carver CT6 male cat, litter box trained. obo.287-4742. tanks, bed liner, low mi, exc fully loaded, $11,000 firm. 252-2029. pre-amp, rem. control, new, 284-5589 after 5pm. mechanical cond, $9,000. 260-3553 after 5pm. $350.; GE 27" floor model 1990 Chevy Blazer 4x4 284-5530 after 5pm. 1 Camper shell: blk sliding TV, exc. cond, $325. 285Silverado350, V8,5.7L,fully 1988 Dodge Ram 50 P/U, w/ tinted windows, 60x90, int 4538, Room 201 after 6pm. loaded, new tires brakes, 1987 Suzuki Samurai, hdtop, camper top, sport wheels, low It all mounting hardware 30,000 mi, $16,060. 287$4,500.284-3529. mi, exc cond, $7,000. 287exc cond, $500. 284-5430.' IBM compatible notebook Dune buggy, dty pd, $2,000 5689. 1979 Chevy p/u, new tires, 43381 computer 386/25, 60mbhd, firm. 260-4643. 9 Hrb br3e, any extras, 1985 BMW 528e, 5 spd, sr, lo a ss otpfuily 3.5" fd, mouse, modem, win-l986Toyota~liluxdiesel4x4 cab rks ayeta,18 M 2e pl r odd rligmtr ih dows 3. 1, MS Dos 6.0, more, 1979 Oldsmobile Cutlass, dty pd, $5,700; 1987 Toyota S2,300.2863835. pw/locks, stereo ac, U.S. finder, many extras, $2,500/ $1,300/obo.286-6481. 2dr, V8, at, runs grt, $1,200/ p/u 4x4 gas, $5,200. 2521988 Dodge Daytona, 4 cyl specs, dty free, runs grt, obo. 289-6843 after 5pm. obo; 1975 Ford T-Bird, at, 5428. at, ac, a/fm cass, sr, 'inted $4,800/obo; 1988 Honda AcPanasonic videocamera, M7, 2dr, runs grt, $900.229-3686. 1979 280ZX, 5 spd, ac, glass, exc cond, $5,500. 284cord, sedan, at, ac, elec. winCayuco 'The Most," trophy 2 yrs old, perfect cond, full 3671. dows and p/lock, stereo, winnerbestoffer. 260-3115. size VHS, $600. 264-8586. 1980 Honda Prelude, good $1,500. 252-2251. alarm, exc cond, $9,000/obo. transportation, $1,800/obo. 1992 Ford Tempo, 2 yrs, re226-7450 after 5pm.TV, 286-4127.1989 Mercury Cougar, low 199 ran E-2675afe5p $300/obo.287-6331. mi, exc cond, at, ac, stereo ma arranty, Eletrnis'-_______8763_1 1990 Grand Am, ac, am/fm, pb,extras,$9,200.252-6943. best offer. 262-1720. Nintendo System, grt cond, rims, tint, $8,500. 287-6517 N1988BuickElectraPark Ave, IIC computer 16 games and Game Genie, Wilson after Sm. ~ 1986 Chevy Blazer S-l10O red 198BiketaakvApple II optrW/ $200. 260-7082. s 4 spd at, am/fm, exc cond' V6, 34,000 mi, 4dr sedan, all Reliable Eng-spk maid, avail printer, monitor, extra disk 21986 Isuzu Gemini, 4 dr se$5,900. 252-2287. extras,$8,500/obo.261-7398. M-F. 220-3923. drive, software and books, Carver am/fmtuner, exccond, dan, std, dty pd, $4,600; 1987 1988 H onda Accord LX, 4dr $650/obo. 260-4393. $200; Yamaha intergrated Subaru wgn, 4WD, turbo, at, 1987 Dodge Daytona, new Mature, honest, dependable amp, exc cond, $225. 284drive axle and other parts pa, pw, ac, am/f cass, hardworking, Span-spk live19" Magnavox color TV, 3 x94. dty pe, $7,000. 261-0763. nice cond, turbo, V6 $9,000/obo.286-4835. in housekeeper, grt wikids, $150; 13" colorTV,remote, 1986 Nissan Bluebird, at, ac, $4,500. 286-3835. 1984 VW Vanagon, 89K, ac, M-F, w/refs. 260-2695. cable ready, $175; 60 chan27" Grundig Multi-System ps, new tires, exc. cond' tinted glass, runs good, int nelmarine VHFradio, $150. color TV w/remote, 4 yrs old, $4,600/obo. 221-2619. 992 Dodge Shadow ES, V6, 'Atlantic-side day maid, M-F, 230-1117. exc cond, works anywhere in 4dr, ps, pb, tilt, ac, 7/20 w/ cxc condo, $4,600/obo. 287clean, iron, grt w/kids, fullthe world, $500. 264-6313. 1984 Honda Accord, 5 spd, extended warranty (overseas), 4927. time, refs avail. 289-4394 Computer programs, Dbase 2dr, ps, pb, cruise, alpine stestereo, 4 spkrs, $10,200/obo. 1983 Chrysler E-Class, Mrs. Egger 8-5 p.m. IV ver 1.5, $200; Harvard Onkyo "Integra" power amp reo, cxc cond,no ac, $3,800. 282-3794 must sell. loaded, good cond, runs Graphic 3.0, $300; Norton andpreamp,bothinexccond, 286-4422. 1988 Ford7 Aerstar camper $35ded,_ .283-6793ru s Ionestbilinguallive-inmaid, Desktop DOS, $80. 287$250/$200. 284-3194. 1_1988Ford_____ _campe smooth, $3,500. 283-6793. good w/children, refs. 2863486 1985 Nissan 300ZX, deluxe, beds, rear ac, many extras, 1988 Isuzu p/u, camper shell, 3393. 5 spd, digital dash, low mi, exc cond, low mi, not dty pd, gas, 4cyl,not dty pd, $7,000. Hones dependable 17-yr-old Zenith 19" color TV, good remarkable cond, $8,000. $11,900.287-3295. 286-3137. babysitter, work nights and cond, $130. 256-6830. 282-3727. 1991 Geo Metro, low mi, grt 1984 Chevy Chevette, 4 cyl, wkends. 230-1927. Sansui stereo 9990Z, Teac Super single waterbedw/hdbd 1991 RS Camaro, V8, ac, gas mileage, new tires, 4dr new tires, at, good cond, live-out maid honcass, Technics turntbl, bkcase, Ortho matt50% waveam/fin cass, cd changer, 15k, $5,800/obo. 260-1476. not dtypd, $1,400.289-4662. Span-spk lie ma, o -Sansui, 8700/7700 spkrs, all less 12 drws, heater, $475; like new, $9,000. 263-5733. estreliablemature, good/ $750; VHS camera, $500; 1989 Mercury Topaz, 4dr, ac, 1991 FordEscortLX.4dr,ps, children, good housekeeper. bike, $50. 287-6392. BR set, twin sz, hdbd, dwrs, 1981 Plymouth Reliant, U.S. at, power everything, cruise, pb, p/locks, ac, cass, sr, 224-3408. chest, night thl, matt, $450. specs, at, needs eng and body new brakes, tires, struts, 18,700 mi, $8,995.287-3485. RCA proedit VHS 260-4393 after 6:00 p.m. work, $500. 252-2209. alarm,$5,000/obo. 284-5234. Honest, reliable, good w/chilcamcorder, 8:1 zoom, video/ 1987 Chevy S-10 Blazer 4x4, dren, Span-spk maid. 238audio dub, mic mixing, aniCarpet 12x15 and 9x12 w/ 1984ChevyS-10p/u,ps,new 1991 Chevy S-10, 5 spd, V6, 4 new tires, $7,500; 1987 1376. mation/time lapse recording, padding, exc cond, drapes,

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