Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Southern Command news

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


Gift of the Panama Canal Museum


Tropic


Times


Vol. VI. No. 37


Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Friday, Sept 17,1993


Gen. George A. Joulwan
ceremony.


CINC receives


appreciation

proclamation
QUARRY HEIGHTS (USSOUTHCOM PAO) - Panama-
nian President Guillermo Endara presented a proclamation
of appreciation to U.S. Southern Command Commander
in Chief Gen. George Joulwan for the U.S. military's efforts
in repairing the David Airport for use during the Fuertes
Caminos and Cosecha Amistad engineering exercises in
Panama.
The proclamation, signed by President Endara and Public
Works MinisterAlfredo Arias, was presented Wednesday in the
Presidential Palace. Other Panamanian officials present in-
cluded Comptroller General Ruben Carles and Civil Aeronau-
tics Director Zosimo Guardia, to whom General Joulwan
presented the plans for the airport repairs.
Speaking in English and Spanish, Joulwan noted that the
airport in David was a center of operations for Fuertes Caminos
93 exercise which "was much more than (repairing) schools,
clinics and roads...it is a symbol of the bonds of friendship
between our two nations."
Other U.S. officials present included Deputy Chief of Mis-
sion Oliver P. Garza, U.S. Army South Deputy Commander
Brig. Gen. James Wilson, and other USSOUTHCOM and
USARSO officials.
The contract for repairs to the Enrique Malek Airport at
U.S Amy photo by Sgt. E J. Her, om David calls for resurfacing some of the runway, installing a
and Panamanian President Guillermo Endara shake hands during the: drain under the landing strip and repainting the runway
markings.


Hudnor retires after relinquishing command


by Lt. j.g. Laura C. Moore
USNAVSTAPANCANAL Public Affairs
RODMANNS- Capt. FrancisL. Hudnor
III relinquished command of the naval
station to Capt. Arthur N. Rowley III in a
ceremonyhereSept. 10.Theceremonyalso
marked the end of Hudnor's 30-year naval
career.
Former Deputy Commander in Chief
and Chief of Staff of the U.S. Southern
Command (1990-1992), RAdm. Jerome F.
Smith, Jr., spoke at the ceremony, He is
currently Commandant of the Industrial
College of the Armed Forces.
Smith stressed the importance of the
naval station's role.
"Even after departing Southern Com-
mand headquarters, I have remained fasci-
nated and interested in this part of the
world," he said. "Naval Station Panama
Canal is part of the extraordinary history
of the Panama Canal and of the history
of the United States Navy in Central
America."
Rowley said he is looking forward to the
challenges that lie ahead of him.
"Today as I assume command, words
simply cannot express how excited I am
for the opportunity to lead the United
States Navy here in Panama at this
very important time in history," Rowley
said.
In a moving farewell speech, Hud-
nor thanked the fellow aviators who have
helped him during his long career.
In his speech he also thanked his


family for staying by his side.
"I'll surely miss the excitement of
new assignments, new challenges, and
above all else the outstanding men and
women I served with," he said. "But I
have my family to get me over the rough
spots."


"You were there when I needed you
and I could always count on you," he said
to Kitty Hudnor, his wife of 34 years.
"You never once complained about the 19
or so PCS moves we made, you never
complained about the long deploy-
ments, you never complained about the


long hours. It was just part of being a
Navy wife and I shall be forever grate-
ful.
"The best way Iknow how to express my
gratitude is to simply say, 'You're the best
damn copilot I ever had,'" Hudnor con-
cluded.


H I













U.S. Navy photo by PH2 Delano J. Mays
Capt. Arthur N. Rowley III, enters the Rodman Naval Station gymnasium at the beginning of the ceremony.


214th Medical Detachment prac-
tices deck landing skills on the USS
Whidbey Island.


Powell walks away from the Penta-
gon without regrets after 35-year
military career.


*NCO academy, page 3.
*Live-fire exercise, page 8.
*High school football, page 12.


"
iiz
i �: n
\�i
1.,
I



i
~1
i ,
'b


- --









2 Tropic Times
Sept. 17,1993


Quality drives


project's quest

by SSgt. Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - The Howard and Albrook Child Develop-
ment Centers are working hard on what officials call a
"communityproject"to gettheCDCs accredited bytheNational
Association for the Education of Young Children.
"Members of the 24th Civil Engineering Squadron have put
in a lot of time working nights and weekends to help us," said
Louise Denham, chief of the youth program flight "Base
inspection people also helped the accreditation effort byprovid-
ing inputs on health, fire and safety matters. Together, we've
tried to ensure asafe and pleasant environment for ourpatrons."
Some people have wondered aloud about the accreditation;
why do the CDCs want it and what do they have to do to get it?
"Accreditation is simply a verification of quality," Denham
said. "It is tangible proof that ourCDCs offer high-quality, safe,
and professional programs within a child-oriented environ-
ment. Accreditation means our programs meet the high stan-
dards of care set by early childhood professionals."
The CDCs must meet 91 separate criteria to be accredited,
Denham said.
"The process involves a self-inspection of all areas of our
program using questionnaires completed by parents and staff
members to find out how effective they think our programs are
in meeting these criteria," Denham said.
Oncetheinformationis compiled, CDC officials will prepare
a program description and send it to the Academy of Early
Childhood Programs. The academy sends two evaluators to
observe and validate the CDC program and facilities and
question people affected by it. They return the program descrip-
tion with their findings to apanel of professionals in Washing-
ton D.C. This panel will make the final accreditation decision.
"We've finishedtheprogram description andit's going to the
Academy of Early Childhood Programs, the accrediting divi-
sion for NAEYC," Denham said. "Now we're just waiting to go
through the validation process.
"That's the test of our entire program," she concluded.
"We're really looking forward to an "A"-ccreditation."

Child development

changes fee setup
by SSgt. Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - The Howard and Albrook child develop-
ment services are making changes in the fee structure -
changes that will more evenly match fees with the parent's
ability to pay, according to CDC officials.
"Fees will be determined by a family's total income," said
Lou Denham, youth program flight chief. "This means - for
example- a single income E-3 family will pay less than a dual
income E-3 family."
Total income includes all earned income, salaries, tips, etc.,
as well asthoseitems notincludedonFederalincometaxreturns
(quarters allowance, subsistence allowance, etc.)
"The new structures may raise the cost of child care for some
of our higherincome families," Denham said, "but they actually
reduce the costs to some of our lower income families."
The Department of Defense asked bases to survey family
income levels, and the new fee structure is based on information
culled from those surveys. The categories, income levels and
fees are shown below.
Income Range Wkly-full day Wkly-part day
Category I ($0 - $23,000) $42 $21
Category II (to $34,000) $48 $24
Category III (to $44,000) $61 $31
CategoryIV (to $55,000) $73 $37
Category V ($55,001 +) $86 $43
Other changes to fheCDCprogram this school yearinclude:
*Children enrolled in the full-time, part-time and enrich-
ment programs will pay a $15 registration fee. A $10 fee is
required forhourly care, which will cost $1.80perchildperhour.
*Families enrolledinweeklyprogramsmaytakefourweeks
of vacation leave, for which 50 percent of applicable tuition is
required. Sick leave is no longer available for any program.
*Toreducecongestionatthe frontpaymentdesk,parents are
now being asked to use alternate, bi-weekly payment cycles.
*Late fees for tuition payments dropped from $5 to $2 per
day.
*Parents picking up their children late from the CDC get 10
minutes leeway gratis. There is a $5 charge for being 11 to 30
minutes late, and another $5 charge for each 15 minute
increment thereafter.
For more about the CDC fees and policies, eligible members
may call the Howard CDC at 284-3711 or the Albrook Enrich-
ment Center at 285-6882.


fl


7- - .. .


. -- %Z




^^*f^�^


�. . ", "

U.S. Army photo by Sgt Lorid Davis
A signalmen guides in a 214th Medical Detachment Blackhawk during deck landing qualifica-
tions.



Wavy days


214th Medical Detachment


brushes up deck landing skills


by Sgt Lori Davis
USARSO Public Affairs Office
U.S.S. WHIDBEY ISLAND - Pilots from the
214th Medical Detachment brushed up on their deck
landing skills offthe coast ofFort Kobbe on the U.S.S.
Whidbey Island, a landing ship dock.
Pilots must perform a deck landing every 90 days
to maintain their current status for the landing proce-
dure, explained 1st Lt. Jack Perry, a 214th Med. Det.
pilot.
In preparation for the deck landing qualification
the pilots reviewed the hand and arm signals used by
the Navy for directing helicopter landings and prac-
ticed dry deck landings at Fort Sherman, he said.


Thereis abig difference between landing on solid
ground and a ship's deck, Perry said.
"The deckis moving with thepitch and roll of the
sea," he explained.
"Every wave affects the deck."
Deck landing training is a crucial part of the
214th Med. Det. mission. They recently transported
a sailor with appendicitis from a U.S. Navy ship to
Gorgas Army Community Hospital and picked up a
sailor who needed to go home on emergency leave,
said Capt. John Vidal, flight operations officer for
the 214th Med. Det.
The unit is committed to a strong training pro-
gram because their mission is saving lives, Vidal
said.


__C_11 __ �~l~-�llbll~-�llllllI









Tropic Times 2
Sept. 17,1993


PLDC Honor graduate Spec. Tim Nystrom, HHC 92nd MP Bn, mans an M60 machine gun during the field


U.S. Army photo by Sgt Lri Davis
training exercise portion of the course.


New training program debuts at Fort Sherman


by Sgt Lori Davis
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT SHERMAN - The Noncommissioned Officers
Academy's zero-deficiency evaluation so impressed the
authors of the Primary Leadership Development Course
they selected the school to test the latest program of
instruction, said CSM Thomas J. Quinn Jr., commandant,
NCOA.
The Fort Sherman NCOA aced the Department of the
Army's requirements for instructing PLDC, the military,
leadership course for specialists and corporals in the
Noncommissioned Officers Education System. The key to
the academy's success is what academy 1st Sgt. Robert
Craig called being doctrinallyy pure."
Trouble-shooting the old program began the purifica-
tion, Craig said. He examined the school's system last
February to pinpoint areas that did not meet Army stan-
dards.
"When the new commandant (Quinn) arrived (in April)
we went strictly by the book," he said. "We (the comman-
dant, first sergeant and operations sergeant) went through
every block of instruction to make sure we met the require-
ments set by the Department of the Army."
Some schools interpret DA requirements and change
their programs, Craig said. This sometimes confused the


instructors, making them unsure of their goals.
Sticking to DA guidelines ended the confusion, he
explained. Once the instructors were positive about what
was expected, they could concentrate on teaching.
Fort Sherman NCOA instructors got a helping hand
from SSgt. StephenPearson, academy operations sergeant.
Pearson said he automated time-consuming administra-
tive work to give instructors more time with students.
"Theinstructors use the program to update records and
monitor students' progress," he explained. "They can do
thingsin 10-15 minuteswhich useto takeacoupleofdays."
Helping each other is a rule of thumb at the academy.
The academy's success can not be traced to one person
because the staff works together for the benefit of the unit
and it's students, he said.
The instructors work underthe unitphilosophyofbeing
a "selfless server," Craig said.
"Not everyone who comes here to be an instructor
stays," he said. "These people work 30 days without a day
off. It takes a lot of dedication most people can't give."
This dedication is important because the academy is
training young soldiers to be the leaders of tomorrow, said
SSgt. Chris Waltz, instructor.
"The emphasis here is not teaching soldiers tactical
skills, we are teaching them about leadership and how to
make the hard decisions," he said.


Students learn that making decisions as an NCO is not
as easy as it looks.
"I learned an NCO'sjobis a lot harder than you think;"
said Spec. Tim Nystrom, student. "You are not going to
make decisions everybody is going to like."
Getting a head start on handling theresponsibilities that
come withpromotions is whatPLDCis all about,explained
SSgt. Wilbert Whitaker, instructor.
"We can't makethem (students) NCO's in 30 days, but
we can expose them to the resources they will need as
NCO's," he said.
The new program the school is helping to fine-tune is
designed to teach students to use those resources, said SSgt.
Michael Fuentez, instructor.
"We teach them to use the manuals forresearch, and we
ask questions that put them in situations and make them
find solutions instead of memorizing facts," he explained.
"When they leave here they have the resources they
need."
"It feels good to see them (students) go on and have them
come back as sergeants and staff sergeants," Fuentez said.
"It's also good when they come back for motivational
support."
The academy doors are never closed, but are always
open to help these young NCOs after they graduate,
Fuentez said.


Specialists Elizabeth Hyde and Allison Powell, 3"


so posmlon ounng a iela training exercise.









4 Tropic Times
Sept. 17,1993


* Hemisphere


Brazil faces political crisis


Top political party nears

standoff with president
BRASILIA, Brazil (Reuters) - Brazil's biggest political
party moved closer to a possible break with President
ItamarFranco that could threaten his economic plans after
one Cabinet minister quit Monday and two others offered
to resign.
Environmental Minister Fernando Coutinho Jorge, a
member of the centrist Brazilian Democratic Movement
Party (PMDB), submitted aletterofresignation andFranco
accepted it, presidential spokesman Glaucio Veloso
said.
Transportation Secretary Alberto Goldman, SocialWel-
fare Minister Antonio Britto and Pedro Simon, the
government's leader in the Senate, "also put their jobs
at Franco's disposal," Veloso said. "He asked them to stay
and they agreed."
Coutinho Jorgeis the second of five PMDB ministers to
resign in two weeks. A replacement was not immediately
named. Franco and the PMDB, his major support in
Congress, have been under increasing strain in recent
weeks.
The party, especially itspowerful stategovernors, wants
greater influence in the government and over economic
policy, now overseen by Economy Minister Fernando
Henrique Cardoso of the Brazilian Social Democratic
Party (PSDB).
"The PMDB is really a junior party. The PSDB


seems to be running things," a Western diplomat
said.
The PMDB's backing is considered crucial for Franco
to get his programs through Congress, including plans to
reduce inflation running at 33 percent a month.
The party has 126 seats in the 584-member
Congress.
The plans include fiscal and other reforms Franco and
Cardoso want passed during the legislature's revision of
the constitution, scheduled to begin in October.
The strain between the PMDB and Franco sharpened
overtheweekend whenJornaldoBrasil newspaperquoted
the president as saying he did not need the PMDB in the
Cabinet.
Franco's comments came amid the party's national
congress. The PMDB's National Council will decide on
whether or not to keep backing Franco at a Tuesday
meeting.
Enviromentalists said Coutinho Jorge had a mixed
record since he took over the ministry in November
1992.
"He said he was going to do alot ofthings but neverdid,"
said Eduardo Martins, Brazil coordinator for the World
Wide Fund for Nature, such as restructure the ministry and
the Brazilian Environmental Institute and clear the use of
$600 million in foreign grants and loans offered for
environmental projects.
However, Coutinho Jorge was able to press through a
presidential decree helpingprotecttheremnants of Brazil's
Atlantic forest, Martins said.


Fujimori video depicts


'lucid,'
LIMA, Peru (Reuters)
capture, the once-legend
guerrilla leader Abima
shown on television Sund
courtyard of his maximum
looking pensive but in go
President Alberto Fuji
videotape of Guzman, w
Sept.12,1992,ledtheMa
a 13-year war on the sta
daily walk in the walled
navy base.
Guzman, a 58-year-o
sity professor, hadasligh
beardless and looked thi
the courtyard oftheprisor
in a television interview th
health.
Guzman, the Shining
cal and political guide kno
ers as "President Gonza
pletely lucid" and firm
Marxist thought, Fujimo
But he added: "The l
is weighing on him...He
with a sensation of pow
prison."
The jail on a navy b
Callao where Guzman i
other guerrilla leaders 1
cement walls, is surrour
wall and is mined arou
Fujimori said.
His guards wear ski n


limping Guzman
) - A year after his his food through an armored window and
lary Shining Path converses with no one, he added.
el Guzman was Fujimori said that Peru was a different
lay limping in the place with the once-elusive leader securely
n-security prison, behind bars.
lod health. "A country where every day there were
imori presented a bombs going off is now peaceful, (in) a
ho until his arrest country where there were no tourists, tour-
ioistinsurgencyin ism is flourishing and investment is flow-
te, as he took his ing in...There has been a radical change,"
I patio of a Lima he said.
Fujimori, who still enjoys a 65 percent
ld former univer- approvalratingayearafterthecapture, said
tlimp, wasalmost Guzman's life-term sentence would not
inner as he paced have been possible without anti-terrorist
n but Fujimori said legislation he decreed after declaring emer-
hat he was in good agency rule in April 1992.
Under the laws which have been used to
Path's ideologi- convict 689 guerrillas since Guzman's cap-
own to his follow- ture, the guerrilla chief will be able to
ao," was " com- receive the visit of relatives once a month.
in his doctrinary Fujimori said the arrest of Guzman was
ri said. "the fruit of intelligence work."
ife-term sentence Guzman was arrested in a middle-class
is totally solitary, neighborhood of Lima with other top lead-
'erlessness in this ers in a bloodless operation that resulted
from overtwo years of intelligence work by
ase in the port of a special group within Peru's anti-terror-
s held with seven ism police (DINCOTE).
has 16-inch-thick DINCOTE officials Sunday said they
ided by a 16-foot had arrested eight guerrillas in apoor Lima
nd the perimeter, neighborhood as they tried to hoist flags of
the Communist Party of Peru, the Shining
nasks, he receives Path's official name.


AP LaserPhoto
Shining Path guerilla leader Abimael Guzman shown during a news media
presentation just days after his arrest Sept. 12, 1992.


Tired Caraquenos awaiting next lurking catastrophe


CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) - Mudslides, bombs, po-
litical turmoil: After all the bad things that have happened,
the wary residents of Caracas wonder if something even
worse lurks around the corer.
One weekend last month, mudslides killed dozens of
people and left several thousand homeless, most ofthem in
the shantytowns that ring this sun-drenched Caribbean
capital of four million.
It was Venezuela's worst natural disaster in three
decades. Now, anxious eyes scan the skies at reports ofrain.
President Carlos Andres Perez, already suspended, was
thrown out of office by Congress. That added to thepolitical
turmoil, but at least the country has only one lame-duck
leader, interim President Ramon Velasquez, instead of
two.
A series of small explosions, and bomb threats that


forced the evacuation of several office buildings, have
increased fears of crime and spreading poverty.
"I haven't gone out at night for years. Now, there's even
less reason to," said the manager of a clothing boutique,
who would not give her name. The window ofher store was
blown out Aug. 18 by a car-bomb explosion.
At an Italian restaurant in the same shopping mall, the
120 luncheon customers fled so quickly that "some left
spaghettitwirledontheirforks," saidGuillermoFernandes,
the owner.
No one claimed responsibility for the explosion, forpipe
bombs that went off in public places or for letter bombs
mailed to the Supreme Court and the chief justice's home.
Three former policemen have been arrested, rekindling
doubts about guardians of public order in a country that
experienced two coup attempts last year.


"We don't want to live like Colombia or Peru," said
Elias Santana, who organized a car caravan to rally public
opposition to terrorism.
Caracas, nestled in a mountain valley more than 3,000
feet above sea level, was a tranquil place until soaring oil
prices brought prosperity in the 1970s. Then in recent
years, theprosperity was sweptaway by falling oil revenues
and annual inflation of 30 percent or more.
Wages have not kept pace with apartment rents, car
repair bills and other daily necessities. Public services are
decrepit except forthe subway, whichis fast, clean and air-
conditioned.
Many schools have no desks for students. Hospitals run
out of medicine. City streets have more potholes than signs
and few highways are lit at night. Riots in overcrowded
prisons are common, and are put down violently.


Clinton signs


treaty side deals
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Clinton
signed side deals to the North American Free Trade
Agreement Tuesday, aiming to protect workers and
the environment from the fallout of increased
trade.
Clinton signed the deals - which his trade team
struck with Mexico and Canada as footnotes to the
core pact - at a high-profile White House ceremony
with former presidents George Bush, Jimmy Carter
and Gerald Ford looking on.
"We will make our case as hard and as well as we
can and though the fight will be difficult, I deeply
believe we will win," Clinton said as he formally
launched his NAFTA campaign.
The agreement, which was born under the Bush
administration, would link Canada, the United States
and Mexico in one big free-trade zone by gradually
dismantling barriers to commerce.
Due to take effect next January, NAFTA requires
congressional approval, by no means a given.
Clinton had hoped - wrongly - that the side
deals would win over NAFTA's many critics by
instituting punishments for governments that fail to
protect either worker rights or the environment.
A third deal guards against sudden import surges
that could disrupt sectors of U.S. industry.


I










* Military News


Tropic Times 5
Sept. 17, 1993


Powell looks


toward future
WASHINGTON (AP) - Gen. Colin Powell says he can
walk away from his high-powered Pentagon job without
regrets but feels a responsibility to return to public life to
help America's minority youth.
"I feel, just as an American citizen, and because of the
position I have reached, I think there will be an obligation
on me to do something in public life," Powell said Sept. 9
during a 45-minute interview. "So while I am going out to
acquire something of a private life again and spend more
time with my family and get off stage for a while, I think
in due course I would like to be seen as serving the nation
in some way."
Powell, the first black chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff, retires Sept. 30 after 35 years in uniform. Born in the
Harlem section of New York City and raised in the South
Bronx by parents who immigrated from Jamaica, Powell
attended City College of New York, rose through Army
ranks and forged an extraordinary career as akey member
of Washington's decision-making circles.
But the 56-year-old Powell said that after taking some
time to write his memoirs and enjoy private life with his
family, he will be ready to re-enter the public arena.
Whilesuch amove "does notsuggestpolitics to meright
now," Powell added that he won't rule out any options for
his future.
"It suggests I should find ways to use the experience I
have... I feel an obligation to help young people," he said.
Powell became familiar to America during televised
briefings on the Panama invasion and the Persian GulfWar
and his stock as a potential political candidate is high.
The four-star general says he has no regrets about
leaving his roleas the nation's top military officer "because
I've tried everything I've wanted to get done... I would have
regretted it if there was something I should have made arun
at, but didn't."
Powell said even though he wasn't successful in every-
thing he tried to do "I learned the lesson over the years, do
as much as you can in the time you have available, with the
energy you have available and then you move on and let
others come behind you and they will build on your good
ideas."
"I always walk out. I never look back," he added.
Powell said he intends to tell his designated successor


APLaserPhoto
Gen. Colin Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, greets former President George Bush. Powell
said he has no regrets after serving since 1989 as the chairman.


as JCS chairman, Army Gen. John Shalikashvili, to "fol-
low his instincts," get a good staff, have a good time and
not worry about how Powell did the job.
Pressed to elaborate on what kind of work he might take
up, he said, "I don't know yet. I'm getting off the stage for
a while and then I'll figure it out."
Powell graduated from CCNY with a geology degree
and an ROTC Army commission. He was wounded twice
in Vietnam.
He rose quickly in the military, gaining the attention of
many in Washington.
President Reagan appointed Powell his national secu-
rity adviser in 1987, and President Bush named him
chairman of the Joint Chiefs in 1989.


The general chatted amiably with AP reporters during
the interview in his Pentagon office, relaxing with a black-
mug emblazoned with a Volvo logo. Powell is an avid
restorer of old Volvos.
At one point, the interview was interrupted by a call
from the president. When he returned, Powell quipped,
"The bombing begins in five minutes," a reference to
Reagan's famous inadvertent on-air statement.
Powell's memoirs, for which he's receiving a reported
$6 million, won't be a "kiss-and-tell," he said.
"I have had a wonderfullife. I've had great experience
in the military, and ... I want to put my side down on a
number of the issues I've been involved in over the years,"
he said.


'Celibate homosexual' raises new issue


WASHINGTON (AP) - Judges on a
federal appeals court sparred with lawyers
Monday over whether an admitted homo-
sexual who is also celibate would be dis-
charged from the military underpre-Clinton
administration rules.
The issue was raised when Justice De-
partment lawyer Anthony Steinmeyer was
explaining the difference in military policy
toward homosexuals before the Clinton
administrationadopted the"don'task,don't
tell" rule that will go into effect next month.
Steinmeyer said the military defined a
homosexual as a person whose conduct,
activities, desire and intent show that he is
gay.
"Icould use ashorthand phrase 'celibate
homosexual,' " Steinmeyer said. "That is
person who saysifI had sex, I would prefer


a person of the same sex, but I'm not going
to have sex, never had se < and never will."
Such person would not have the desire
for sex and therefore would not fall under
the military's definition of a homosexual,
Steinmeyer said. He added that the govern-
ment doesn't take action against people for
thoughts unrelated to conduct.
Judge Patricia Wald askedifanyone had
avoided discharge from the military by
making that claim.
"To my knowledge no one has made it,
so it was never accepted," the government
lawyer replied.
"Now we are dancing on the head of a
pin," commented Judge Abner Mikva.
The discussion arose in the case involv-
ing Joseph Steffan, a former midshipman
who resigned from the U.S. Naval Acad-


emy shortly before graduationin 1987 after
acknowledging to a superior that he is gay.
He was appealing a ruling by U.S. Dis-
trict Judge Oliver Gasch who in 1991 up-
held the Navy's right to expel Steffan, on
grounds that the military ban is ajustifiable
weapon against the spread of AIDS.
"Theonlything hedid was to say he was
gay," saidSteffan'slawyer, MarcWolinsky.
"Gay men have and do serve in the military.
... Now itis determined that good order and
discipline is not affected ... sexual orienta-
tion in itself does not predict misconduct."
He said the military's old policy of
dismissing gays is brought on by the as-
sumption that homosexual status can affect
a different kind of conduct and "now they
are going to argue that they can predict the
conduct of people who say they are gay."


NATO developing Bosnia peacekeeping plan


ROME (Reuters)- NATOis developing
a plan to send about 50,000 peacekeeping
troops to Bosnia, up to half of them Ameri-
cans, if agreement is reached to end the civil
war, Defense Secretary Les Aspin said
Sunday.
At a meeting in Brussels before flying
here to discuss the proposal with U.S.
military officials, he confirmed for the first
time the number involved but said Con-
gress was likelyto veto American participa-
tion unless European allies provide half the
troops.
U.S. Secretary ofState Warren Christo-
pher, asked on CBS's " Face the Nation"
Sunday about the possibility of sending
U.S. troops to a partitioned Bosnia, ex-
pressed caution in discussing troops num-
bers but added:
"Unfortunately there is not an agree-


ment yet. The degree of our commitment
will depend on the nature of the agreement
- whether it's one that we judge to have
been entered into by the parties in good
faith, what the enforcement provisions of it
are,-what our consultations on Capitol Hill
indicate. So there is quite a distance be-
tween the present time and any commit-
ment of U.S. troops."
"We have said we would beprepared to
cooperate with other countries in an effort
to implement an agreement...and that com-
mitment stands," he said.
In Rome at the end of a two-day Euro-
pean trip, Aspin held private talks with
U.S. Navy Adm. Jeremy Boorda, com-
mander of southern NATO forces.
Boorda would be likely to head the
NATO operation in case of a peace treaty
between warring Serbs, Croats and Mus-


lim-led Bosnian government forces in the
former Yugoslav republic.
"We are talking overall numbers of
around 50,000 total - that would be U.S.
and western allies," Aspin told a meeting
of the International Institute of Strategic
Studies in Brussels.
He warned, however, that Congress,
which has been given final say on the
issue by President Clinton, was unlikely
to approve large U.S. participation unless
western Europe played its part.
"I do believe that it is going to be a very,
very difficult proposition to convince the
American Congress to do that if the expec-
tation is that the allies aren't going to be at
least half of that," Aspin said in response
to questions.
"It'sgoingto bzdifficultinanycase," he
added.


Cheating scandal
rocks academy
ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - At
least 125 midshipmen have been
implicated in what may be the big-
gest cheating scandal ever at the
Naval Academy, investigators say.
Cases are being builtagainst mid-
shipmen who escaped charges ear-
lier this year after a master copy of a
final exam for one of the academy's
toughest courses turned up missing,
investigators for the Office of the
Navy Inspector General said in
Monday's The (Baltimore) Sun.
Charges reportedly range from
receiving a computer message urg-
ing midshipmen to study a particu-
lar question to actually getting a
copy of the electrical engineering
exam.

C-17 cargo plane
suffers setback
WASHINGTON (AP) - The
troubled C-17 cargo plane suffered
another blow last week when a wing
failed during ground stress tests,
said the aircraft's contractor,
McDonnell Douglas Corp.
In a statement issued over the
weekend, the company said that
during tests on the wings of a non-
flying plane in Long Beach, Calif.,
the left wing sustained damage and
the test was halted.
"The purpose of the test was to
subject the wing to stress forces that
were one and one-half times those
ever expected to be encountered by
the aircraft during its operational
life," the company said.


i



: i
.'J
: i
7











6Tropic Times
Sept. 17,1993


# Voices


Writer confused about 'revisado' sticker


Dear Mayor's Corner: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
I am still confused about what is re-
quired regarding "revisado" stickers. I
read somewhere that I would not be re- that you must have for next year, and you
quired to have one, and then a friend told can get it only by picking up your inspec-
methat it was required. Ihaven'tbeenable tion sticker for this year. If you have been
to get a straight answer. Can you help me to the vehicle registration office in Diablo
out? several times and your inspection sticker
Confused has not been ready, check with Host
Nation Liaison in the Provost Marshal's
Dear Confused: Office for additional help.
According to the Ft. Clayton Provost
Marshal's Office, you are now required to Dear Mayor's Corner:
have a"revisado" sticker. You must get the Where can you purchase or acquire the
sticker before youcanregisteryourcarnext Panamanian traffic manual that you are
year. now required to have in your vehicle ac-
There is also a new registration form cording to the new traffic law? I called the


F. Clayton vehicle registration office and
they didn't know and I was referred to the
MP traffic section and they didn't know
either. I tried the Panamanian Driver's
Licenseofficein Diablo and they don't have
it and don't know where to get it either.
Maybe you can determine where to buy it
and if it is published in English. You could
save many of us time with the Panamanian
Traffic Court for not having the manual.
J. Williams

Dear J:
I spoke with a representative from the


PMO, and they first want you to know that
the requirement you speak of is not new. It
has been required for a number of years.
Secondly, they did not know if or where it
is available and that it hasn't been available
for several years.

Editor'snote: Thiscolumn allowscom-
munity members to submit questions to
the Mayoral Congress. Letters should be
mailed to: Mayors' Corner, Publicity
Chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS).
Anonymity will be granted upon request.
The Tropic Times reserves the right to
edit letters and responses for brevity,
clarity and propriety.


Another request for movie briefs changes policy


Dear Editor:
I am writing in response to a letter
in the Sept. 3 issue of Tropic Times.
An SCN fan suggested a short synopsis
of the movies being aired during prime
time be included in your weekly T.V.
schedule. You replied that, according to
viewer surveys, SCN's audience
doesn't find this important. I would


very much like to read what the upcom-
ing movies are about. Neither the movie
titles nor the names of the actors starring
in the movies tell much about the movie
at all. I've probably missed a lot of good
movies because their ties didn't sound
appealing to me.


Dear SCN fan:
While our policy in the past has been
to remain with the current format,
because of reader requests for short
movie synopsis, we're going to start with
the Sept. 24 issue. We're still working on
the exact mechanics of how we're going
to do this, and we may have to drop the


Another SCN fan video/book review, but we'll get more


information to you about the movies
without losing our descriptions of
sporting event and specials coming up.
We always welcome input from our
readers about what they'd like to see in
their paper, and if there's enough reader
interest, we'll try our best to provide the
information requested.
Editor


Man arrested for illegal transfer of merchandise


Wrongfully transferring merchandise
A man was arrested last week for wrongfully transfer-
ring merchandise. On several occasions he bought items
from the commissary and distributed them to 11 people
who didn't have purchasing privileges.
For informationabout buying and selling merchandise,
see Southern Command Regulation 19-1 orcall 286-3117.
Off road travel
Complaints have been calledinto the MPsaboutpeople
driving on the right shoulder of Friendship Road leading
to Fort Clayton. These drivers use the shoulder to pass
traffic in order to reach the right lane by the Curundu Gas
station.
It is illegal to pass a vehicle on the right or to drive on
the shoulder of the road according to Article 79, Decree
number 160, which regulates traffic in Panama.
For more information, call 287-4300.
Soldier lends vehicle to non-privilege holder
A soldier was charged last week for wrongfully trans-
ferring duty free merchandise. He left his.privately owned
vehicle with a non-privilege holder for 90 days while he
went TDY. This allowed the individual access to all
military installations in Panama.
Forinformation, see SC Reg. 190-5, SCReg. 60-10, SC
Reg. 1-19 or call 286-3117.
Recreation Center break-in
The Cocoli Recreation Center was broken into last
week and several items were reported missing, including
a television, stereo and compact disk player. Anyone with
information about the theft, call 287-4401.
Report suspicious activity to the MPs at 287-4401.
MP dog nabs intruder
After receiving a report of an attempted break-in, MPs
pursued and arrested the suspects. During the pursuit, an
MP working dog bit one of the suspects several times.
The following crimes are for on-post housing areas


during the period Sept 3-9.
Pacific
Fort Clayton 600 area - one attempted housebreaking
Curundu Housing area - one larceny of unsecured


private property
Fort Kobbe housing area - one attempted housebreaking
Atlantic
None to report


This authorized unofficial command information pub-
lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic
Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces
InformationProgram of the Department of Defense, under
the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S.
Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the
official view of the U.S. government, the Department of
Defense or the U.S. Southern Command.
The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002. Telephone
285-6612.
Commanderin Chief...................Gen. George A. Joulwan
Director,PublicAffairs..........................Col. James L.Fetig



STropic Tim


Chief................................................SMSgt. Steve Taylor
Editor........................................SSgt. DeborahE. Williams
AssistantEditor.........................................Sgt. JohnHall
SportsEditor.......................................Sgt. RichardPuckett
EditorialStaff............................................RosemaryChong
Maureen Sampson
VolunteerAssistant...................................JosephineBean
Student Intern................................................Juan Palacio
SouthernCommandPublicAffairs Office............282-4278
DeputyDirector,PublicAffairs......Cmdr.LorriGilchrist
Command InformationOfficer ...............Patrick Milton
PublicAffairs Supevisor.................SFCMikeHoward
U.S. ArmySouthPublicAffairs Office...............287-3007
Command Information Officer..................Beth Taylor


PublicAffairs Officer..................Maj.MelanieReeder
Editor.....................................................SSgt JaneUsero
Journalists.............................................SgtE.J.Hersom
Sgt. Lori Davis
Spec. Robin A. Mantikoski
24thWing Public Affairs Office..........................284-5459
PublicAffairs Officer..................Capt. WarrenLSypher
PublicAffairs Superintendent.........MSgt.DaleMitcham
Journalists......................................SSgt.RianClawson
Sgt. James A. Rush
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.............283-5644
PublicAffairsOfficer....................Lt.j.g.LauraC. Moore
Photographers...............................PH2 Roberto Taylor
PH2DelanoJ.Mays
U.S.ArmySouthPAO-Atlantic. ............................289-4312
NCOIC............................................. SSgt. Phillip Clark


irrvos maslal- Cone


I









3Commentarv


Tropic Times 7
Sept. 17,1993


Got a gripe?


Imagine what it'd be like without all those little 'extras' we've come to expect


by SMSgt. Steve Taylor
Chief, Tropic Times
� j" general, why can't your
S people shop downtown like
Everyone else?" asks the
senator after a recent "fact-finding" tour
of military installations. "After all,
civilians go to work, get paid, and shop
in their local supermarkets, malls, and
stores. Why can't your people?"
The general took a deep breath. Here
we go again, he thought to himself.
"Senator, we've been through this
before. Those services, like commissar-
ies and exchanges, are important
retention tools for our service people -"
"Hogwash, general," the senator said,
interrupting. "You keep telling us that,
but don't most of your people shop
downtown anyway? I don't see how this
can motivate people to stay in the
service."
The general drew back and looked
the senator in the eye. "Our people are
overworked, underpaid, and many of our
junior people are living atthe poverty
level and in substandard housing. The
savings they get in commissaries and
exchanges mean the difference between a
bread-and-butter diet and a standard of
living they deserve, considering the
sacrifices -"
Again the senator interrupted.
"Sacrifices my butt, general. I just got
back from a seven-base visit, and those
places are like country clubs. Golf
courses, swimming pools, clubs, recre-
ation centers, malls, all sorts of things.
The taxpayers are getting tired of
supporting your people in luxury."
Every time a new senator is elected I
have to go through this, the general
thought to himself. "Senator, not only
are our people expected to pack and
move every couple of years, but they are


DirectQuote


expected to serve in some of the most
austere environments, not only in the
United States, but overseas as well. And
as for sacrifice, they are expected to make
the most ultimate sacrifice anyone could
make. These services are necessary.
Besides, most are self-supporting now,
thanks to Congress. If you'd like-"
"What I'd like," the senator said, "is
for reality to sink in with you military
types. I think it's time for a change in the
way we do business."
Mentally, the general rolled up his
sleeves, put the boxing gloves on, and
dug his heals in for a long fight ahead.
But he was determined to stand his
ground.
What if this time, though, the general
loses the battle? He may lose the war.
Imagine not having a commissary,
exchange, recreation services, library or
any of the other "extras" we in the
service of our country have come to take
for granted.


We tend to complain when things -
aren't just right. When the right products
aren't there, or something we really want
is temporarily out of stock.
Or how crowded the commissary can
get sometimes. Or how our exchanges
charge too much, or don't order enough
stock to serve everyone's needs. Or how
there's nothing to do. Nothing do to?
How absurd.
I've been guilty of these charges. I
sometimes cringe when thinking of a trip
to the commissary, or complain when a
roll of film is 30 cents more than it is in
downtown Panama City. It's easy to
complain, and forget what it'd be like if
I couldn't go to the commissary or
exchange or have the convenience of
travel tours and other facilities on base,
right in my backyard.
Recently, I was given a fresh, new
perspective of just how good we've got it.
My new wife - or as it says on the
command sponsorship form, my "newly


- -- COMMISSARY

*---^**L S f l


What military benefits do you take for granted the most?


"Living in the barracks,
having free housing and
things like that."


Spec. Patrick Lowe
56th Signal Battalion


"The BX. It's got just
about everything I need.
When I need it, it's there
and it's relatively
cheaper than in the
civilian community."
TSgt. Felix Schamber
310th Airlift Squadron -
Howard


"I don't take any of "Dental care. It's some-
them for granted be- thing that outside, it
cause I grew up in the costs a lot, but you still
military. I appreciate all don't always go to those
of them." appointments for check-
ups."


Capt. Linda Gould
U.S. Southern Command J-5


SFC Walter Ingram
U.S. Southern Command J-6


"The commissary, gas
station privileges here
and job security."




SSgt. Tiffany Godbey
Phoenix Oak


acquired dependent" - thinks that what
we've got is unbelievable.
The commissary was beyond her
expectations, the exchange was like a
little Dillards in Dallas...and there's the
swimming pools, clubs, recreation
centers, libraries, travel and tour services,
shoppettes, home improvement centers,
schools, dry cleaners, post offices, gas
stations, gymnasiums and fitness centers,
snack bars, bowling alleys and the list
goes on.
"It looks like you've brought America
with you," is her comment.
And life in the military goes beyond
commissaries and exchanges, according
to my fresh set of eyes.
It's how we take care of each other
with sponsorship programs and.support
groups. How the traffic management
office arranges for shipment of household
goods. How family support centers help
with employment and the fearsome Form
171. How on-base housing is half the
cost of off-base housing with sidewalks
and central air and dishwashers.
It's how units become families. And
how important families become to the
mission. The little things as well as the
big things.
"They take very good care of you," is
how it looks from the outside looking in.
So what would it be like if we lost the
extras that we've come to depend upon?
Come to expect. Almost demand.
;Next time it's time to complain, take a,
moment. There's nothing wrong with
constructive criticism and suggestions on
how to improve. But all too often I see
complaints and criticism go to the wrong
people, through the wrong channels. The
people responsible for bringing America
to us never get a chance to fix problems.
And sometimes that takes time.
So next time you feel like."services
bashing," remember what it'd be like...


.4


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries - or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit
for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.


I






Tropic Times
Sept. 17, 1993


f


6
<'r
ld ^1


Y


. .J : -'_.U -
U.S. Amy phot by Spec. Rot Ah Mw
A 5-87th soldier hangs up blank rounds after cleaning
the mud off them.


Spec. Michael Boyd, scout platoon, practices quick fire techniques during training.


Scouts learn quick fire
by Spec. Robin A. Mantikoski
USARSO Public Affair Office
FORT CLAYTON PISTOL RANGE - "Fire!"
The soldiers turn their bodies to the ready, pull their
weapons to their shoulders, fire at the silhouettes 15
meters away and the sharp cracks of their M16A2
rifles echo across the range.
This split-second action is repeated time after
time as the silhouette distance increases.
This training is notordinary marksmanship train-
ing, but quick fire techniques which the soldiers of
this unit use in their mission.
These are infantry soldiers, but their mission is
different. They are members of a scout platoon
whose main job is reconnaissance.
They also do Jobs ranging from setting up obser-
vation posts and landing zones to being forward
observers for mortar platoons.
Though the soldiers are sharpening their skillsat
quick fire, the main objective is to avoid firing their
weapons at all, said SFC Jack Wheeler, platoon
sergeant.
"Because we are forward of the battal ion, the last
thing we want is to be compromised," Wheeler said.
"Plus, if we are compromised, most of the time it
would be at dose range."
During the training, the soldiers are taught dif-
ferent techniques used for quick fire, said SSgL
Kenneth Agueda, noncommissioned officer in charge
of the training.
"Quick fire is all practice. Different stances work
better for different people," he said. "Getting a
natural point of aim is the key to it all."
The natural point of aim was evident as the
soldiers stood on line after one hour of practice and
hit the silhouette every time they fired.


.~YU''~S


.V







Tropic Times
Sept 17, 1993


Ib.


u.. . *< �t^r * ^s _ ^^



PFC James Savage, Company C, cleans his weapon after returning form last week's field training exercise.



Infantry soldiers




hone battle skills


by Spec. Robin A. Mantikoski
USARSO Publc Affairs Offce

FORT SHERMAN - Soldiers from the 5th Battalion, 87th
Infantry (Light), participated in a two-phase exercise at Fort
Sherman with the support of helicopters and a Landing Craft,
Mechanized, Aug. 27-Sept. 3.
The training included infiltration attacks and combined
arms live fire night exercises.
The week-long training began with each company per-
forming a night air assault mission into Fort Sherman and a
four-kilometer infiltration of Pavon Hill. During the infiltra-
tion, the companies were challenged by continual rain and
muddy conditions.
SAfter consolidating on Pavon Hill, the 1 st Battalion, 228th
AviationRegiment, provided a night aerial resupply mission.
"We were able to conduct tough, realistic training while
utilizing numerous assets available within U.S. Army South,"
said Capt. Mike Baker, 5th Bn., 87th Inf.,assistant operations
officer.
During the second day of the field training exercise, the
companies performed another ground infiltration into the
Rio Congo Village. Once at the village they linked up with
soldiers from the 1097th Boat Company and boarded a LCM
down the Chagres River to Chicken Landing.
The soldiers ended their operation with a tactical road
march back to the company assembly areas.The main ob-
jective throughout the exercise was to provide the platoon
leaders with a realistic environment in which to train their
soldiers. Once the company commander received the opera-
tions order, each platoon was tasked with planning, coordi-
nating and executing their assigned tasks. The training gave
the platoons an opportunity to work with their squads on
battle tasks, battle drills and jungle sustainment.
"It's myjob to ensure everybody is trained in everyjobfor
whatever mission comes up," said SFC Vem Skumatz,
Company C platoon sergeant. "Everything we do (as a
platoon) is integrated. We're all working atthe same time so
there is a constant flow."
Skumatz said his platoon did a super job throughout the
training.
"Motivation is always high in my platoon," he said.


"They're always ready to push on to the next mission."
The second phase of training was a company-level
maneuver live-fire at Firing Points 1 and 2. During the two-
day phase, companies were able to integrate 60 and 81mm
mortars into their attacks, which were conducted both day
and night. The platoons were able to conduct independent
missions within the company-level operation.
Soldiers from the 59th Engineer Company also trained
side-by-side with their infantry counterparts, providing
breaches with the use of bangalore torpedoes.
"This was multi-echelon training," Baker said. "All
levels of leadership were capable of training simulta-
neously. We received great support from the aviation,
engineer and boat units, which allowed us to train as a
combined-arms team."
The training was beneficial to everyone, but especially
to the soldiers new to the unit and to Panama, Baker noted.
Spec. Billy Ortiz, Company C, had his first experience
with the jungle during this exercise.
"(The training) was pretty hard, but I learned a lot about
the jungle," he said.
Pvt 2 Kevin Reeder, Company B, has been in the
infantry and Panama for only one month.
"I was kind of surprised by the jungle. You really have
to take it seriously," he said.
Besides learning about the jungle, Reeder leased a lot
about the infantry.
"I learned about working as a team. There are so many
different parts to it," he said. "I was kind of overwhelmed
by everything involved, butthere was a lot of team unity and
trust."
Spec. Steven DeYoung, Company B, thought the exer-
cise provided great training for the junior enlisted soldiers.
"They always teach us that we have to know everything
that's going on. Because of a few injuries (to those in
leadership positions), the privates got to experience it," he
said. "In some cases, privates may have to step into squad
leader positions."
With a large percentage of new soldiers, this experience
brought some good unit cohesion, DeYoung said.
As the exercise came to an end, the soldiers returned to
Fort Davis caked in a week's worth of mud and bone tired,
but home.









1 Tropic Times
S Sept. 17,1993


' Milestones


U.S. Army South tabs soldier, NCO of year


Crossman,

Cornilsen

help 92nd

sweep titles

FORT CLAYTON (US-
ARSO PAO) - The 92nd
Military Police Battalion
sweptthe U.S. Army South's ,
Noncommissioned Officer i
of the Year and Soldier of
the Year contests with sol-
diers from the battalion tak-
ing both titles.
Sgt. Edward Crossman,
a military policeman, is the
new NCO of the Year and
Spec. Martin Comilsen, a dul
communications specialist,
is the new Soldier of the
Year.
For theirefforts, they will
each receive a trip to Wash-
ington, D.C., with $200 for
a Association of the United
States Army conventionand
a set of dress blues donated
by the AUSA.
They will also receive a
set of dress whites, savings
bonds and Army and Air
Force Exchange System gift
certificates donated by the
Officers' Wives and En-
listed Spouses' Clubs and
AAFES.
With all they won, it Sgt. Edward Crossmai
wasn't the prizes that moti-
vated Cornilsen, he said. In fact, he didn'tknow about most
of the benefits until he won.
It was only a matter of proving he could do it, he said.
Winning was especially sweet for him because heis not an
MP and winning proved that support soldiers are
good soldiers.
Scoring high on the physical fitness test was the key to
winning the competition, which included common task
training and a formal board, both winners agreed.
The fitness test counted for up to 50 points while CTI
and the board were worth up to 30 points each.
By scoring high on their PT tests, it left the challengers
to make up points on the board and with CTT.
This was nearly impossible because all the contestants
were equally prepared, they said.


The common task testing is something every soldier
should already know, Crossman said.
"If you can't get a good PT score, you're pretty much
sunk in this competition," he said.
Crossman and Comilsen credited their success to their
battalion'scompetitionwhichis modeled afterUSARSO's.
The battalion also holds similar competitions through-
out the year. Before going up to the USARSO board,
Cornilsen had already been through 13 other boards, he
said.
Crossman, who has been in Panama since April, had a
similar experiencein Japan where he won NCO ofthe Year
in 1992. This was third straight year a 92nd MP Battalion
NCO won the USARSO award and second straight for the
soldier title.


To Staff Sergeant - Roche Knight of The-
aterEquipment and Maintenance Site, 41 st
Area Support Group.

ToSergeant- Jason Seeburger and Darren
Knight, both of Company C, 1st Battalion,
508th Infantry. Sabrina Carroll of Head-
quarters Company, 193rd Support Battal-
ion. Jorge Olmo-Novoa of Company B,
193rd Support Battalion.

To Private First Class - Hugh Traughber
III and Kevin Hrasdzira, both of Company
C, 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry.



Army Commendation Medal - SSgt. Jose
Rodriguez, SSgt. Alton Smoak III, Spec.
Jason Seeburger, Sgt. Timothy Sprunger
and Sgt. Joseph Brown, all of 1st Battalion,
508th Infantry. SFC Eugene Stanley of
Headquarters Company, 193rd Infantry


Brigade (Light). SSgt. Hector Reyes of
Headquarters Company, 193rd Support
Battalion. Sgt. Kirk Kroschel of Company
B, 193rd Support Battalion.

Army Achievement Medal - Maj. Ronnie
St.Clair, 1st Sgt. Alex Ortiz and SFC Pablo
Vazquez, all of Headquarters Company,
193rd Infantry Brigade (Light). Sgt. Darin
Pearceson, Spec. Edwin Newhart Jr., Spec.
Neil Williams and Sgt. Kenneth Core, all of
Company C, 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry.
SSgt. Douglas Lowther and Spec. John
Bittner, both of Company B, 193rd Spt
Battalion.

Senior Wings - SSgt. Alton Smoak III of
Company C, 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry.

Master Parachutist - SSgt. Samuel
Oglesby ofCompanyB, 1 st Battalion, 508th
Infantry.

Commanding General's Physical Train-
ing Streamer - Headquarters Company,
193rd Infantry Brigade (Light) won the


streamer with an average of 253.38 points.
Scoring 300 points on their PT test was 1st
Lt. Steven Cooper and SSgt. Jose Ortega.

Expert Infantryman's Badge - Spec.
Travis McCrackine, Spec. Shawn
McKinnon and 2nd Lt. Nick Schneider, all
of Co. C, 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry.

Certificate of Achievement - Capt. Juan
Ortiz-Lopez, SSgt. Wilmer Rivera, Sgt.
Ronnie Kuhl, Sgt. Donald McQueen and
Spec. Luis Suarez, all ofCompany B, 193rd
Support Battalion. SSgt. Shaun Trescott,
Sgt. Alijah Lyn Brown and Sgt. Allison
Rolands, all of Headquarters Company,
193rdSupportBattalion. Sgt.JohnRichards
Jr. and Spec. John Herrington, both of
Company A, 193rdSupportBattalion. Spec.
Darrell Bourque and Spec. Milton Leath,
both of 565th Ordnance Detachment.

Special Achievements - Sgt. Moses
Crowder of Company B, 193rd Support
Battalion was selected as the 193rd Non-
commissioned Officer of the Month.


Spec. Adrienne Johnson of Company B,
193rd Support Battalion was selectedas the
193rd Soldier of the Month.



Kayla Rae Majchszak was born Aug. 30 to
Spec. Brian and Christine Majchszak.

Brittne Nicole Shearin was born Aug. 27 to
Spec. Brian and Kelly Shearin.

Melany Johanna Lopez was born Aug. 29
to SFC Melanio and Nuria Lopez.

Stephan Gaitan Fagot was bor Aug. 25 to
Spec. Daniel and Julie Fagot.

Thomas Allen Leake Jr. was born Aug. 25
to SFC Thomas and Elvia Leake.

Donald William Gallon was born Aug. 30
to SSGt. Donn and Nancy Gallon.

Ottavia Jazmin Knox was born Aug. 30 to
SSgt. Byron and Anita Knox.


What they won
Beside for satisfaction and pride the NCO and
soldier of the year earn, they also receive indi-
vidual prizes. The following is what Spec. Martin
Cornilsen and Sgt. Edward Crossman won:
*trip to Washington, D.C., with $200 for a
Association ofthe United States Army convention,
*a set of dress blues donated by the AUSA,
*a set of dress whites,
*savings bonds, Army and Air Force Exchange
System gift certificates donated by the Officers'
Wives and Enlisted Spouses' Clubs and A AFES.


F















AF takes education,


medicineto Honduras
by Spec. Robert Melnes visited the village of Armenia Bonita in
304th PublcAffairs Detachment Honduras during Exercise Cabanas II-'93
to give the local people medication and
ARMENIA BONITA, Honduras - U.S. education to prevent diseases.
Air Force and Honduran doctors recently In Honduras, 30 percent of all children


die beforethe age of two, officials said. The
combined team of doctors hope to turn this
statisticaround through educatingthepeople
about health hazards.
Cabanas II-'93 is ajoint-combined mili-
tary exercise in Honduras. It is designed to
exercise the capabilities of U.S. special
operations forces working in conjunction
with U.S. and Honduran conventional
forces.
"The most important thing we will be
giving out today is education," said Air
Force Maj. Elizabeth Kornegay, flight sur-
geon for the 1st Special Operations Wing
based at Hurlburt Field, Fla. "All we can
takecareof (as doctors)is the here and now.


Tropic Times 1
Sept. 17,1993 5.
"Most of the problems we see here are
intestinal parasites, ear infections, colds
and lice," Koregay said. "Some of the
problems are long term. We must remem-
ber to focus on the small things, such as
washing clothes and taking care of them-
selves."
"Something as simple as a bug bite can
get bad here," said Air Force doctor Jay
Murrman. "They walk around barefoot and
scratchatthe bite. The bite getsinfected and
then bacteriagetsinit. Soon it'sin the blood
stream and can get into the heart."
When they saw the doctor, they got a
short checkup. The doctor examined their
eyes, ears, noses and throats and asked if


Theater Support Element photo by Spec. Robert Meines
Sgt. Timothy Ruiz comforts a Honduran girl as she waits for medical care.


Seeing the Ameri-
can doctors is what
brings the people
out, but what we
need to give them is
the education."
The villagers
had to go through
anoralhygieneclass
beforetheseeing the
U.S. doctors. Lidia
GandoradeBurgos,
a Honduran army
head nurse for the
4th Battalion, taught
the village families
a song to remind
them how to effec-
tively brush their
teeth.


"The most important thing
we will be giving out today is
an education. All we can
take care of (as doctors) is
the here and now. Seeing
the American doctors is
what brings the people out,
but what we need to give
them is the education."
Maj. Elizabeth Kornegay
Flight surgeon


"The song teaches with upper teeth you
brush down, with lowerteeth you brush up
and with molars you brush circular,"Burgos
said. "This will more easily help them to
remember the proper way to brush and it's
fun."
The villagers also learned about the
acquired immune deficiency syndrome vi-
rus. Outside the school room, U.S. soldiers
handedthepeoplecholerainformationcards
that listed symptoms and ways to avoid the
disease.
The families lined up outside the school
after going through the preventive courses,
to get a medical checkup.


they had any other
ailments. Thedoctors
gave them medica-
tion for other prob-
lems that could be
helped at the present
time.
The villagers
weren'ttheonlyones
getting an education.
The doctors are also
learning.
"We gain invalu-
abletraining ontropi-
cal diseases," said
Kornegay, a gradu-
ate of the University
of Tennessee Health
and Sciences. "When


you have troops in an area for a long time
you start to learn what will affect them.
"Ifthere is a sudden outbreak of malaria
in the area, we know we will eventually see
somecases in soldiers. We also may findthe
water supply could be contaminated."
Murrman compares the basic hygeine
lessons learned by the villagers to learning
math.
"You show a child a math problem. On
the first day he may not getit. On the second
day of explaining it's starting to sink in.
The third day he will probably be doing the
problem. Because of the lessons they have
learned today, we hope they will live better
lives tomorrow."


Downed pilot exercise simulates real survival scenario


by Sgt Karen Starkey
304th Public Affairs Detachment
SOTO CANO AB, Honduras - In world where theline
between a peaceful mission and armed conflict can be
crossed at any moment, strategies for surviving in a hostile
environment until rescued should be second nature.
1st Lt. Steve E. Erickson, 2nd Airlift Squadron, 23rd
Wing from Pope AFB, N.C., volunteered to be a downed
pilot in combat rescue exercise using those strategies. The
exercise was held in Honduras this summer.
Erickson, a C-130 pilot, is very aware of what an easy
target a cargo aircraft can be. Acting as adownedpilot with
a broken leg in the mountains of Honduras reminded him
that there is no substitute for field experience.
Erickson was dropped into the Honduran highlands by
helicopter with an Air Force survival instructor escort.
While communicating by radio and flashing a mirror,
Erickson searched the sky for his rescuers, the 304th
Rescue Squadron, 939th Rescue Wing, and Air Force
reserve unit from Portland, Ore.
In a real situation, every moment on the ground in-
creases the chance of being found by the wrong side or
becoming weaker from injuries.
"You need to be ready for a situation like this in wartime
and peace," Erickson said.
"More in peacetime because in wartime everyone is
thinking about it," added Air Force survival instructor
TSgt Tom B. Phillips, 1st Special Operations Wing, Air
Force Special Operations Command at HurlburtField, Fla.
Phillips offered such survival delicacies as termites to
Erickson while waiting forrescue. Heemphasized the need
to chew them well. He also pointed out a favorite plant of
fire ants and a spiny palm tree that can shred skin.
The waiting ended when the silence was shattered by the
roar of A-10 attack aircraft overhead. The A-10s would


Theater Support Element photo by Sgt Karen Starkey
TSgt. Tom Phillips (left), a survival instructor, shows 1 st Lt. Steve Erickson a survival fastfood - termites.


provide suppressive ground fire in a real rescue situation.
The 'wounded' pilot had been found. The rhythmic beat of
a Blackhawk helicopter's rotor blades announced the
approach of a 304th pararescue team.
After rappeling into the brush the team warily ap-
proached. In short order Erickson was identified, sta-
bilized and carried to the arriving Blackhawk where


intravenous fluids were infused into his forearm.
Back at Soto Cano AB, Erickson learned how he could
betteraid his own rescue from thecombatrescueteam. The
refresher course in survival procedures will help give him
confidence whenever he flies.
"They should make this (training) mandatory, once a
year," he said.


,4< -

















t 1,9Oary H R PnmPie


'" " " i". .H ^ Mg







Balboa Bulldogs' players warm up before the Sept. 10 game.


Barkin' n' Bitin'


Bulldogs win battle of 1992 co-champions


uepanr eni of u flense ph1o Dy qL .Jornn -us- Mall


by Sgt. Richard Puckett
Tropic Times Sports Editor
BALBOA -Running backAdam Beach
ran for 146 yards and quarterback Jerome
Price scored two touchdowns to lead the
Balboa Bulldogs over the Curundu Cou-
gars 35-6 Sept. 10 at Balboa Stadium.
It was the first meeting for the 1992
football league co-champions and one that
was over by halftime.
The Bulldogs put the game away in the
second quarter, ringing up 20 points to pull
to a 27-0 lead.
Price got the scoring early with a one-
yardkeeperafterleading his team on more
than eight-minute drive. Following a Beach
extra point, the Bulldogs led 7-0.
The Cougars responded with its own
extended drive. It came to an abrupt end
whenlinebackerRyanUnderwood dropped
Cougars quarterback Robbie Garcia for a
loss on 4th down and four.
A 52-yard run by Beach helped set up
Price's second score, a two-yard effort to


makeit 13-0. Theextrapoint attempt failed.
Afterthe Bulldogs stopped the Cougars
again, Underwood returned short punt 51
yards for a touchdown to give his team a
commanding 19-0 lead. Beach added the
extra point.
The punt return was the turning point in
the game said Bulldogs coach Vince
Martinez.
"Acoupleoftheirkeyplayersgothurton
the play and that score seemed to break
them," Martinez said.
The Bulldogs held the Cougars in check
and gaveits offenseanothercrackat a score
before the half.
On what appeared to be a normal run-
ning play, Beach dropped back and con-
nected with Alex Staton for a 39-yard gain
inside the Cougar's 10-yard line.
A couple plays later, Cardova Hall
finished offthe drive with an eight-yard TD
run.
Beach drilled the extra point to make it
27-0 at the half.
The Cougars managed to get on the


scoreboard early in the second half.
Donald Rivera returned the kickoff 26
yards deep into Bulldog territory setting up
a five-yard TD run by Robert Reyes.
The Bulldogs were held scoreless in the
third. But added a fourth score in the final
quarter.
Tiawuan Hopkins capped the scoring
withaone-yardruntopull ahead 34-6. Tom
Ellis ran in the two-point conversion seal-
ing the 35-6 win.
Martinez credits his offensive and de-
fensive lines with much of the credit.
"They played outstanding," he said.
"Although we had some returning veterans
and just one rookie, you never know how
they'll play until gametime. After our me-
diocre play during the jamboree, I was
concerned. But they came through. They
dominated the lines all night and it really
showed late in the game."
Martinez was still surprised by the vic-
tory, but isn't taking anything for granted.
"I felt that the Cougars were the team to
beat this season" Martinez said. "It's only the


first game though, and there's a long way to go.
It's fun to win a game like this, but we've gotto
focus on the next game."
The Panama Canal Green Devils is the
team that Martinezis most concerned about
now.
"They are definitely the fastest team in
the league," he said. "We've got to try and
contain their running game, and that will
be difficult They looked tough."
In other action Sept. 10, Tyler Quinn
and Wilbert Reese each scored three touch-
downs to spark the Panama Canal Green
Devils over the Kiwanis Kolts 44-6.
Reese also ran for 161 yards on 11
carries. The Devils poured in more than
300 yards of total offense.
On the Atlantic side, the Cristobal Ti-
gers edged the Balboa Red Machine 13-0.
Tonight, the Tigers take on the Cougars
at 5:30 p.m. The Bulldogs square off with
the Green Devils at 7 p.m. Both games are
at Balboa Stadium.
Editor's note: Statistics provided by
Bob Best.


Running paves soldier's road to
better physical fitness and interna-
tional competition.


24th Transportation edges out 536th
Engineers duringAir Force intramu-
ral basketball league play.


*Ultra-marathoner, page 13.
*Flag football, page 14.
*Sport shorts, page 15.


`%-41


Sept. 17,1993


Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Page 12









Tropic Tmes
TSWo Tunespt.17, 71993 L



Running helps soldier .r.Ni SH



put best foot forward (U' '" '


by Allen Jones
Contributing writer
FORTCLAYTON(USARSOPAO)-Whatstarted
as a way to improve his physical fitness test score has
turned into a full time profession for one U.S. Army
South soldier.
Willie Moye, a signal system maintenance tech-
nician from the 193rd Support Battalion, currently
holds fourth place in the Panama Armed Forces
Running Championship.
The 37-year-old native of Chesapeake, Va., has
been running for 15 of the 19 years he has been in the
Army.
"I started running to improve my (physical train-
ing) time," Moye said. "It has helped me because I
consistently scoremorethan300 pointsin the PTtest.
"I've raced in Korea, Germany and all around the
U.S.," he said. "I've won a few races and often place
first in my age category. My besttime for a 10Kis 34
minutes."
One of Moye's interests now is coaching the U.S.
Army South team which will run in the ninth annual
Army 10-miler in Washington, D.C., in October.
"I ran with the team in 1991 and coached last
year," he explained. "I also coached the male and
female USARSO Transisthmian relay teams to first
place in the Military Division in 1991 and 1992. The
guys won the Military Division and the ladies took
second in the Female Division last year."
Moye's training regimen for his 10-miler team
consists of a 6-8 mile run Mondays, interval training
Tuesday and Fridays, a run of at least 8 miles
Wednesday and a 6-10 mile run Thursdays.
The interval training includes four repetitions of
one mile at a 5:30 pace with a three-minute rest in
between, eight half-miles with two-minutes rest in
between or 16 quarter-miles with a one-minute rest


Balbuena holds lead
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -
Panama's Gil Balbuena maintained his lead in
the PanamaArmed Forces Running Champion-
ship as the race moves into the final three
months of competition.
Balbuena has built a 13-point lead over
second place Web Loudat. Air Force runner
Rick Roman remains in third, 10 points behind
Loudat. Racers are now looking at September
races to make their moves.
The remaining sanctioned race in September
is Dog Days of Summer", three- and five-mile
runs, 6:30 am., Sept. 25, at Reeder Physical
Fitness Center.
Top ten runners are:
1. 971 Balbuena
2.958 Web Loudat
3. 948 Rick Roman
4. 891 Willie Moye
5. 870 Richard Downie
6. 869 Aramis Mora
7. 806 Julio Mclnnis
8. 801 Miguel Campos
9.799 Edward McAleer
10. 798 Bernabe Soto

in between. These begin with a one-mile warm up
and a one-mile cool down period.
"I look forward to both the men and women's
teams placing in the top five in Washington," Moye
said.
Moye continually seeks new challenges.
"Iran the half marathon at Fort Davis in 1992 and
I'm looking forward to running my first marathon,
the Panama Marathon, Dec. 5," he said.


Courtesyphoto


Willie Moye


Ultra-marathon veteran tackles Panama race


by SSgt Jane Usero
USARSO Public Affairs Office

FORT CLAYTON - Getting from Co-
lon to Panama City took on a whole new
meaning for 18 runners Sept. 4-5 as they
took the hard path throughthejungles in an
ultra-marathon.
One runner, a veteran of the ultra-mara-
thon, finished the 50-plus miles in 10 hours,
8 minutes and was the only U.S. military
member to participate in the mega-run.
John Mumma, commander of the Mili-
tary Police Command, finished in eighth
place among the runners who came from as
faraway astheU.S.,CostaRicaand Mexico
as well as from Panama.
The run, which began Saturday night in
Colon and ended Sunday morning at the
Amador Causeway, took its toll on two
runners who dropped from the event.
Mumma, however, pushed on throughout
the night and tackled hill after hill in the
darkness of the Transisthmian Highway.
"The most difficult parts oftherun were
the hills and the last 15 miles," he ex-
plained. "No matter how well trained or
prepared youareforan ultra-marathon, you
are going to run out of gas."
A distance runner for years, Mumma
has taken part in four other ultra-mara-
thons in France while he was stationed in
Europe and says it's the personal challenge
that brings him back to the starting line.
"Many people ask me 'why?' I just
enjoyrunning and the ultra-marathonis the
ultimate personal challenge," he said. "It's
alonesomesportandittestsyourindividual
endurance and stamina, butyou do the most
and best that you can."
For the runners of the ultra-marathon,
it's not crossing the finishline first that
makes a winner, it's just crossing the


John Mumma
John Mumma


finish line, Mumma said.
"The real goal is just to finish," he said.
'To finish is to win."
Finishing took more than just indur-
ance and stamina, it took supp. i and en-
couragement of support teams following
eachrunnerevery step ofthe way, he added.


U.S. Army photo by SSgt Jane Usero


"Our support teams were absolutely vi-
tal," he said. "In other ultra-marathons,
there were check points for water, first aid
and other types of support. Here, the
runners were totally on their own and had
to be self-sufficient."
One permanent member of Mumma's


support team is his wife Ceci, who has been
there through all five races. She provides
encouragement as well as water and Band-
aids.
For Ceci and fellow support team mem-
ber Rafael Vidal, MPC sergeant major,
dealing with the early morning hours was
difficult.
"The hardest part for us was staying
awake and alert whenit got to be about four
in the morning," Ceci said. "That's a long
run, but it's also a long drive at 5-6 miles an
hour, and when you are sitting immobile all
that time it's hard to keep your eyes open."
Though the hours took a toll on the
support team and the miles and hills took a
toll on the runners, the weather cooperated
nicely, Mumma said.
"I thought I had a slight advantage by
being acclimated to the Panama heat and
humidity, but the weather was relatively
cool and with no rain the humidity was
low," he said. "It was delightful weather."
With good weather, a strong support
team, the stamina and endurance built up
over the years and the desire to finish,
Mumma crossed the finish line looking as
if he had jogged the leisurely 4-5 mile run
he does every day.
"I normally train up for one of these
ultra-marathons by running 18-20 mile
runs acoupletimes before theactualevent,"
Mumma explained. "This time, however,
I didn't do that. I just kept my normal PT
regimen of about 25 miles per week."
As for running the ultra-marathon next
Labor Day, Mumma isn't as certain about
competing as his wife.
"Now is not the best time to ask because
I am still tired and sore from the run, but if
I'm here, I might," he said.
"There's no question in my mind," Ceci
said. "If we are here, he will bright there."









1 Tropic Times
T Sept. 17, 1993


24thTrans


edges out


Engineers

by Sgt. James A. Rush
24th Wing Public Affairs

HOWARD AFB -Eleven was the magic
numberintheintramural basketball games
here Sept. 10.
The 24th Transportation Squadron had
more of them than the 536th Engineer
Battalion and came away with the win 51-
49.
Engineer Kenny Dixon got 11 points in
the first half, while teammate Mike Gray
had 11 in the second half. The engineer
stars finished with only 12 and 14 points
respectively however.
This wasn't enough to stave off the
upstart transporters who "out-elevened"
them 3-2. Transportation players Dave
Self, Kevin Hurd and Michael Drafts each
finished the game with 11 points. Tyree
Brown added four three-pointersleading to
an upset over the second place 536th.
Alexis Sotomayorand the 24th Security
PoliceSquadronBTeam were upset-minded
also when they faced off against the 310th
Airlift Support Squadron in the next game.
Sotomayor led the charge and all scorers
with 14 points.
It was the cops who went home upset
however, as the flying squadron soaredpast
them 37-32.
Tony Johnson took center stage hitting
the net for 11 points. He was supported by
teammates Patryck Buckley and Rusty
Mizaur who each had nine.
Game three saw asolid team effort from
the 24th Medical Squadron overcome the
1st Battalion 228th Aviation Company B's
one-twopunchofJosephJenkins and Timo-
thy Ladson 45-33.
Jenkins andLadsonpouredin 12and 10
points respectively. They got little help
from their supporting cast however.
Medics point guard Terence Stewart led
his team in scoring, his total equalling the
night's winning number, 11.
The second-leading scorer was Jim
Meyers who had eight. Therestoftheteam
pulled together to pick up the slack though.
In all, eight hospital players got their mark
in the scorebook.


/ .,.' ,*./" ..,�o .
,j ,9g.g.q ,..,,:. . '
AW ,,1. j


U.S. Air Force photo by TSgt Don Peak
Detachment 4's Rick Burgess passes around HHC, 1-228th Aviation's Lonnie Pearson (23) and Michael Ford (14).


Nobody got the lucky number in the
final game of the night between the 24th
Communications and Morale, Welfare,
Recreation and Services squadrons. Com-
munications broke out of a halftime tie to


top MWRSS 49-41.
The teams' stars played to a draw.
COMM's Aaron Caldwell and Wayman
Black had 16 and 13 points, but were
matched by MWRSS's Teddy Martin and


Jason Feldman. Only Gregory Moore
made any other significant contribution to
MWRSS's effort however, while several
communications players chipped in for the
win.


Reverse play nets 228th touchdown, victory

FORT CLAYTON (Tropic Times)- Co. E, 228thAvia-
tion tight end Angel Longoria caught Law Enforcement
Activity by surprise and rambled 25 yards for touchdown
providing the only score in a 6-0 defensive showdown
Monday night. ,
Longoria took the feed on a reverse during the opening
drive of the game and sliced through a shocked defense for
the TD. The score proved to be all 228th would need as it
evened its record at 1-1 in unit flag football league play. J-.
Neither offense could muster any drives until late in the
fourth quarter when LEA started to get in a groove.
With the passing game ineffective most of the game,
LEA coach DanaWalkerdecided to try therunning attack.
Michael Manion responded with a 12-yard gain into
228th territory with less than four minutes left. The drive
suddenly stalled. LEA's comeback hopes ended when
quarterback Paul Trombley's goal-line pass was dropped.
:The 228th took over and despite turning the ball over
on downs with less than a minute remaining, managed to
hold on forthe win. The win was an important one to 1991-
1992 second place finishers, said coach Michael Cameron.
"This was a big boost," Cameron said. "The first game
we came out really unprepared and although the offense
was ineffective we still managed to get the win."
Cameron credits his defense with the victory. Departmentof Defense photo by Sgt. Richard Puckett
"Theyplayedsuper,"Cameronadded. "Hopefully,now Law Enforcement Activity's Michael Manion (right) picks up blocks from teammates Kelly Feasel (19),
the offense will get in gear and we'll keep winning." Ernest Anderson (20) and Frank DeMers (69).









Tropic Times
Sept. 17, 1993 1


AF swim team coaches
The Albrook and Howard swimming teams are look-
ing for qualified coaches and youth swimmers for the
1993-94 swimming season.
All age groups and skill levels of children are wel-
come to participate. Coaches will be paid according to
the number of participants in the program.
Team workouts are approximately three days week
throughout the school year.
Anyone interested in coaching should contact Vince
Duncan at the Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195. Parents
or swimmers interested in participating should call
Duncan or Gary Hankins, 286-4571.

Tuesday night bowling
Teams and bowlers are still needed for the Tuesday
night men's bowling league at the Fort Clayton bowling
center. The season begins Tuesday at 7 p.m. Interested
bowlers should contact Rick Lindvig at 287-6339 orthe
bowling center at 287-6366.

Powerlifting competition
Registration is under way for apowerlifting compe-
tition to be held at Reeder Physical Fitness Center. For
more information, call 287-4050.

Unit level hoops
Registration for the Army unit level basketball pro-
gram continues until Oct. 23. The clinics scheduled for
Oct. 19. Forinformation call the Directorate of Commu-
nity Activities, Sports Branch, Building 154, Fort Clayton
at 287-4050.

Fishing tournament
An inter-club fishing tournament will be held in
Atlantic waters until Nov. 30.
The event is sponsored by Club Nautico Caribe, the
Panama Canal Tarpon Club and the Panama Canal
Yacht Club. The fishermen who land the largest barra-
cuda, wahoo, kingfish, jack/tuna, marlin, sailfish and
tarpon will win prizes. Prizes will be awarded for the top
three catches in each category.
The entrance fee is $20 per angler and may be paid
at the bar of any of the clubs orto Francisco Lopez, 241-
2025; Alberto Villa, 245-4379; Gabriel Kam, 241-
0675; Helio D. Alves, 243-4146; Mike Bell, 243-5207:
AlbertoAlba, 245-0733; Gerry Laatz, 243-5652; Jol.
Kirby, 241-5883; Femnin Pinel, 241-6003.

Women's basketball
Registration for the Directorate of Community Ac-
tivities women's basketball league is under way and
continues until Oct. 5. Call 287-4050 for information.

Fun run
The Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Control
Program and the Panama Chapter of the Association of the
U.S. Army will be sponsoring a fun run Sept. 25.
Registration is continues until Thursday at Room 300
in Building 127, Fort Clayton, or Building 115, Corozal.
No late registrations will be allowed.
Awards will be given for first, second and third place
in each age category.
For more information call 285-5913.

Free step aerobics
Free step aerobics classes are held 9-10:30 a.m.
Monday through Fridays at Fronius Fitness Center,
Fort Davis. Steps are not provided. Call 289-3108.

High/low impact aerobics
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center offers high
and low impact aerobics and strengthening with
dynabands and hand weights. 5-6 p.m. Monday through
Friday. Call 284-4700 for more information.

Fitness improvement
Fitness improvement classes are held 6:05-7 am.
and 2:05-3 p.m., Monday, Wednesday and Friday at the
Howard Sports and Fitness Center.
The class consists of a calisthenic super circuit
workout aimed at improving muscular endurance, the
cardiovascular system and flexibility. For more infor-
mation, call 284-3451.


Turkey Bowl coaches
The Army Directorate of Community Activities
Sports Branch is accepting resumes for Army Turkey
Bowl team coaches. Call 287-4050.
Navy Morale Welfare Recreation Sports is accepting
resumes for the Navy Turkey Bowl team coach. People
interested may call Morise Conerly at 283-4222.
The 24th Morale Welfare Recreation Services Squad-
ron is accepting resumes for an Air Force Turkey Bowl
coach. Call 284-3451.

5 &10k run
The46thAnnual AirForceAnniversary 5 and 10kruns
will be held 7 am. Saturday in front of the Howard Sports
and Fitness Center forrunners 19 and up. Trophies will be
awarded to the top two runners in men's and women's 19-
29, 30-39 and 40-and-over categories. For more informa-
tion, call 284-3451.

Golf tournament
A golf tournament for servicemembers will be held
Sept 25 and 26 at Horoko Golf Course with a 7:30 am.
shotgun start. There is a $20 entry fee that does not include
cart or greens fees. Entrants must have United States Golf
Association handicap. Flight winners will be entered in the
U.S. Military Sports Association Golf Championship to be
held in October at Fort Jackson, S.C. Deadline for registra-
tion in Thursday and can be done at Horoko. For more
information, call 284-3451.

Bowling tournament
A no tap bowlingtournament will be held p.m. Sunday
at the Albrook Bowling Center. There is a $10 entry fee.
Knock down nine pins and it counts as a strike.
Bowlers withal 20 and underaveragereceive three free
strikes per game, 121-150 average receives two strikes and
151-170 receives one strike.
Winners are eligible for the no tap championship to be
held in December.
T-shirts will be awarded for monthly champions. Call
286-4260 for more information.


Basketball standings*
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Northern Division
W L
617th ALSS 13 3
1/228th HHC 12 3
Det 49thWing 10 4
24th MS 6 8
617th SOAD 5 8
6933rd ESS 5 10


Southern Division
W L
24th SPS 14 0
24th CES "A" 7 8
24 AIS/OSS 6 8
24 AIRPS 4 11
24th SUPS "B" 3 12
1/228th A Co. 2 12


NATIONAL LEAGUE

Eastern Division
W L
24th SUPS "A" 13 1
1/536th Eng. 10 4
24th MSSQ 9 4
24th TRANS 8 6
617th ALSS "B" 4 12
24th CES "B" 2 13


Western Division
W L
24th CS 10 5
310th ALS 9 6
24th MG 8 6
1/228th B Co. 6 6
24th MWRSS 4 12
24 SPS "B" 3 11
*As of Sept. 10


Augie Augrom throws out the ceremonial first ball Saturday at the grand opening of the Howard
Bowling Center. The center has been undergoing remodeling since January.


-^-~









6 Tropic Times
U Sept. 17, 1993


U.S. Navy photo by PH2 Robrto Taylor
Lt. Harry Wingo, Special Boat Unit 26 (right) salutes the petty officer of the watch on the USS Hurricane.


Newly commissioned ship


stops, visits Rodman piers


by Lt. j.g. Laura C. Moore
USNAVSTAPANCANAL Public Affairs
RODMANNS - Hurricane season is more than month
old, but that didn'tkeep the USSHurricane, acoastalpatrol
ship, from visiting here this weekend.
The new ship, just commissioned on Sept. 2, stop-
ped at Rodman on its way from its shipbuilding site in
Louisiana to its homeport of San Diego.
The Hurricane's primary mission is coastal patrol and
interdiction, with a secondary mission of Naval Special
Warfare support.
It is expected to operate in low intensity conflict envi-
ronments. Naval Special Warfare operational missions
include long range Seal insertion and extractions, tactical
swimmer operations, intelligence collection and coastal
and riverine support.
The commanding officer, Lt. John Gelinne, explained
what makes the 170-foot ship unique.
"The mission of the ship is unlike any other Navy ship


in that we strictly provide support to special operations
forces including Navy Seals. The ship's design is based on
the fact that the Seals go in close to the coastal areas. The
ship's draft (only 7.8 feet) is such that it allows us to insert
and extract the Navy Seals in areas where larger ships
cannot go, including riverine environments."
The 28-person crew has put in many long hours to
prepare the ship for its maiden voyage.
"It'sbeenalotoflong days,"saidPettyOfficer2ndClass
Garrett Staats, an interior communications electrician.
"We've all had to make alot ofadaptations and changes that
the normal fleet sailor wouldn't have to make. It takes alot
of hard work and it's starting to pay off. We're starting to
have a good time on it now."
The Hurricane attracted many visitors while at Rod-
man. One woman wasparticularly enthusiastic about what
she saw.
"I liked everything about the ship," Lisa Zamudio said.
"Everything is very compact, orderly and neat. I was very
impressed with it."


Local EFMPsupportgroup

offers multi-service support


by SSgt. Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB -The ExceptionalFam-
ily Member Program support group here
brings togetherexceptional family member
programs from all the services to provide
support for parents.
The Department of Defense established
the groundwork for the Exceptional Family
Member program in the 1960s to help
family members with "special needs."
These special needs include a wide va-
riety of developmental and psychological
disorders, physical and learning disabili-
ties, and hearing, sight and speech impair-
ments.
"It's very important to enroll 'excep-
tional' family members in the program,"
said Maj. Cynthia Cain of the 24th Medical
Squadron. She is the Air Force EFMP
officer here.
"Many people believe enrolling in the
program will negatively affect their mili-
tary careers," Cain said. "But this is simply
not true."
It can, however, affect options available
for duty assignments, she said.
"Generally, military members will only
be sent to duty stations with access to
services required by their exceptional fam-
ily member."
For Air Force people, enrolling in the
EFMP can be a little confusing, Cain said.
Since most families receive care through


Gorgas Army Community Hospital, they
must enroll in the EFMP through Gorgas.
"However, militarymembers should also
enroll with their service-specific program,"
she said. "If our people are not enrolled in
the Air Force system, we have no way of
knowing about them and they won't be
identified for assignment and service pur-
poses."
Military officials recognize the impor-
tance of family members and stress ensur-
ing adequate medical, psychological, and
educational services for family members
with special needs, said Melody Jones, Air
Force Family Advocacy Outreach Program
manager.
"Often, these family members can cre-
ate someuniquechallenges and extrastress,"
she said. "Many military installations have
EFMP support groups which help families
meet these challenges and ease the stress.
In Panama, the Army's EFMP and the
Air Force FAOP are working together to
establish a parent support group for the
Pacific community.
"These meetings areintendedtoprovide
a support network forparents with special-
needs children,"Jones said. "Theyareopen
to military members and spouses from all
branches of service."
For information about EFMP,Air Force
members may call Cain at 284-6410/6457,
Army members Ida Haynes at 282-5339/
5607, and Marine or Navy members Chief
Randy Vanden-Bosch at 283-5104/3218.


Hispanic heritage

festival kicks off month
FORTCLAYTON(USARSOPAO)-Hispanic
Heritage Month will kick off today with a festival
11:30 am. in the lobby of Building 519, Fort
Clayton. There will be Hispanic dancing, food
tasting and souvenirs from throughout Central and
South American Latin countries. For more infor-
mation about the festival and other planned events
for the month, call Brenda Harris at 287-4260/
4268.
Navy patrol boat sinks

at Rodman piers
RODMAN NS (USNAVSTAPANCANAL
PAO) - A 68-foot Navy patrol boat sank, Aug. 29
at the Rodman piers. The vessel, belonging to
Special Boat Unit 26 at Rodman, has been raised
and is currently in drydock. The incident is under
investigation.

Girl Scout Center

hosting open house
ALBROOK AFS (USARSO PAO) - The Girl
Scout Service Center, Building 806, Albrook, will
host an open house 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday and noon-5 p.m. Wednesday.
Call 285-6867 for more information.
Navy Birthday Ball

tickets available now
RODMAN NS (USNAVSTAPANCANAL
PAO) - Tickets for the Navy Birthday Ball Oct. 16
are on sale until Oct. 1. Ticket prices are $13 for
E-1 through E-6, $18 for E-7 through E-9 and $23
for officers and civilians. The price includes three
beverages.
Call Lt. j.g. Laura Moore, 283-5641, for more
information.

DEH sets water main

flushing schedule
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The Di-
rectorate of Engineering and Housing will flush
water mains 8 am.-6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday on
Fort Clayton and Monday andTuesday on Curundu.


Grand opening U.S. Army photo by SSgt.4me Usero
Grand opening ,^
Gen. George A. Joulwan, U.S. Southern Command commander in chief,
looks ata mola pillow during the grand opening of the Canal Crafters Shop
Monday. The shop is open 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Saturday and is located
in the Curundu housing area. Call 286-6244 for more information.


I


qq-lq-


4
i


i
.i




Full Text

PAGE 1

Gift of the Panama Canal Museum Tropic Times Vol. VI. No. 37 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, Sept. 17,1993 CINC receives appreciation proclamation QUARRY HEIGHTS (USSOUTHCOM PAO) -Panamanian President Guillermo Endara presented a proclamation of appreciation to U.S. Southern Command Commander in Chief Gen. George Joulwan for the U.S. military's efforts in repairing the David Airport for use during the Fuertes Caminos and Cosecha Amistad engineering exercises in Panama. The proclamation, signed by President Endara and Public Works MinisterAlfredoArias, was presentedWednesdayinthe Presidential Palace. Other Panamanian officials present included Comptroller General Ruben Carles and Civil Aeronautics Director Zosimo Guardia, to whom General Joulwan presented the plans for the airport repairs. Speaking in English and Spanish, Joulwan noted that the airportin David was acenter of operations forFuertes Caminos 93 exercise which "was much more than (repairing) schools, clinics and roads.it is a symbol of the bonds of friendship between our two nations." Other U.S. officials present included Deputy Chief of Mission Oliver P. Garza, U.S. Army South Deputy Commander Brig. Gen. James Wilson, and other USSOUTHCOM and USARSO officials. The contract for repairs to the Enrique Malek Airport at U.S. Amy photo by Sgt. E.J. HarsonDavid calls for resurfacing some of the runway, installing a Gen. George A. Joulwan and Panamanian President Guillermo Endara shake hands during thO drain under the landing strip, and repainting the runway ceremony. markings. Hudnor retires after relinquishing command by Lt. j.g. Laura C. Moore family for staying by his side. "You were there when I needed you long hours. It was just part of being a USNAVSTAPANCANAL Public Affairs "I'll surely miss the excitement of and I could always count on you," he said Navy wife and I shall be forever gratenew assignments, new challenges, and to Kitty Hudnor, his wife of 34 years. ful. RODMANNS -Capt. FrancisL. Hudnor above all else the outstanding men and "You never once complained about the 19 "Thebest wayI know howto express my III relinquished command of the naval women I served with," he said. "But I or so PCS moves we made, you never gratitude is to simply say, 'You're the best station to Capt. Arthur N. Rowley III in a have my family to get me over the rough complained about the long deploydamn copilot I ever had,"' Hudnor conceremonyhereSept. 10.Theceremonyalso spots." ments, you never complained about the eluded. marked the end of Hudnor's 30-year naval career. Former Deputy Commander in Chief and Chief of Staff of the U.S. Southern Command (1990-1992), RAdm.JeromeF. Smith, Jr., spoke at the ceremony. He is currently Commandant of the Industrial College of the Armed Forces. Smith stressed the importance of the naval station's role. "Even after departing Southern Command headquarters, I have remained fascinated and interested in this part of the world," he said. "Naval Station Panama Canal is part of the extraordinary history of the Panama Canal and of the history of the United States Navy in Central America." Rowley said heislooking forward to the challenges that lie ahead of him. "Today as I assume command, words simply cannot express how excited I am for the opportunity to lead the United States Navy here in Panama at this very important time in history," Rowley said. In a moving farewell speech, Hudnor thanked the fellow aviators who have helped him during his long career. U.S. Navy photo by PH2 Delano J. Mays In his speech he also thanked his Capt. Arthur N. Rowley Ill, enters the Rodman Naval Station gymnasium at the beginning of the ceremony. 214th Medical Detachment pracPowell walks away from the Penta*NCO academy, page 3. tices deck landing skills on the USS gon without regrets after 35-year *Live-fire exercise, page 8. Whidbey Island. military career. *High school football, page 12.

PAGE 2

Tropic Times Sept. 17, 1993 Quality drives project's quest by SSgt. Rian Clawson 24th Wing Public Affairs HOWARD AFBThe Howardand AlbrookChild Development Centers are working hard on what officials call a "commumityproject"togettheCDCsaccredited bytheNational Association for the Education of Young Children. "Members of the 24th Civil Engineering Squadron have put in a lot of time working nights and weekends to help us," said Louise Denham, chief of the youth program flight "Base inspectionpeoplealsohelpedtheaccreditation effort byproviding inputs on health, fire and safety matters. Together, we've tried to ensure asafe andpleasant environment for ourpatrons." Some people have wondered aloud about the accreditation; why do the CDCs want it and what do they have to do to getit? "Accreditation is simply a verification of quality," Denham said. "Itis tangibleproofthat ourCDCs offerhigh-quality, safe, and professional programs within a child-oiented environment Accreditation means our programs meet the high standards of care set by early childhood professionals." The CDCs must meet 91 separate criteria to be accredited, Denham said. "The process involves a self-inspection of all areas of our program using questionnaires completed by parents and staff members to find out how effective they think our programs are in meeting these criteria," Denham said. Oncetheinformationis compiled, CDCofficials willprepare a program description and send it to the Academy of Early Childhood Programs. The academy sends two evaluators to observe and validate the CDC program and facilities and question people affected byit. They returntheprogram description with their findings to a panel of professionals in Washington D.C. This panel will make the final accreditation decision. "We'vefinishedtheprogram descriptionandit's going to the Academy of Early Childhood Programs, the accrediting division for NAEYC,"Denham said. "Now we'rejustwaitingto go through the validation process. "That's the test of our entire program," she concluded. "We're really looking forward to an "A"-ccreditation. Child development changes fee setup by SSgt. Rian Clawson 24th Wing Public Affairs HOWARD AFB -The Howard and Albrook child development services are making changes in the fee structure changes that will more evenly match fees with the parent's ability to pay, according to CDC officials. "Fees will be determined by a family's total income," said Lou Denham, youth program flight chief. "This means -for example-a singleincomeE-3 family will payless than adual income E-3 family." U.S. Army photo by gt. LOrI Davis Total income includes all earned income, salaries, tips, etc., A signalmen guides in a 214th Medical Detachment Blackhawk during deck landing qualificaaswell asthoseitemsnotincludedonFederalincometaxreturns tons. (quarters allowance, subsistence allowance, etc.) "The new structures may raise the cost of child care for some of our higherincomefamilies,"Denhamsaid,"but they actually reduce the costs to some of our lower income families." The Department of Defense asked bases to survey family income levels, and the new feestructureis based oninformation culled from those surveys. The categories, income levels and fees are shown below. Category ($0 -$23,000) $42 $21 214th Medical Detachment Category II (to $34,000) $48 $24 Category MI (to $44,000) $61 $31 ~' Category IN(t$550) brushes up deck landing ski ls Caegr V(5501) $86 $43 Otherchanges to tieCDCprogram this schoolyearinclude *Children enrolled in the full-time, part-time and enrichby Sgt. Lori Davis 'hereisabigdiffereneebetweenlandingonsolid ment programs will pay a $15 registration fee. A $10 fee is USARSO Public Affairs Office ground and a ship's deck, Perry said. required forhourly care,which will cost $1.80 perchildperhour. "The deckis moving with the pitch and roll of the *Families enrolledin weeklyprograms may take four weeks U.S.S. WHIDBEY ISLAND -Pilots from the sea," he explained. of vacation leave, for which 50 percent of applicable tuition is 214th Medical Detachment brushed up on their deck "Every wave affects the deck." required. Sick leave is no longer available for any program. landing skills offthe coast ofFort Kobbe on the U.S.S. Deck landing training is a crucial part of the *Toreduce congestionatthe front paymentdesk,parents are Whidbey Island, a landing ship dock. 214th Med. Det. mission. They recently transported now being asked to use alternate, bi-weekly payment cycles. Pilots must perform a deck landing every 90 days a sailor with appendicitis from a U.S. Navy ship to *Late fees for tuition payments dropped from $5 to $2 to maintain their current status for the landing proceGorgas Army Community Hospital and picked up a *Parentspicking up theirchildrenlatefromtheCDCget 10 dure, explained 1st Lt. Jack Perry, a 214th Med. Det. sailor who needed to go home on emergency leave, minutes leeway gratis. There is a $5 charge for being 11 to 30 pilot. said Capt. John Vidal, flight operations officer for' minutes late, and another $5 charge for each 15 minute In preparation for the deck landing qualification the 214th Med. Det. increment thereafter. the pilots reviewed the hand and arm signals used by The unit is committed to a strong training proFor more about the CDC fees and policies, eligible members the Navy for directing helicopter landings and pracgram because their mission is saving lives, Vidal may call the Howard CDC at 284-3711 or the Albrook Enrichticed dry deck landings at Fort Sherman, he said. said. ment Center at 285-6882.

PAGE 3

Tropic Times Sept. 17, 1993 US ArmyphotosbySg. LorDavis PLDC Honor graduate Spec. Tim Nystrom, HHC 92nd MP Bn, mans an M60 machine gun during the field training exercise portion of the course. New training program debuts at Fort Sherman by Sg. Ler Davis instructors, making them unsure of their goals. Students learn that making decisions as an NCO is not USARSO Public Affairs Office Sticking to DA guidelines ended the confusion, he as easy as it looks. explained. Once the instructors were positive about what "I learned an NCO'sjobis alot harder than you think," FORT SHERMAN -The Noncommissioned Officers was expected, they could concentrate on teaching. said Spec. Tim Nystrom, student. "You ame not going to Academy's zero-deficiency evaluation so impressed the Fort Sherman NCOA instructors got a helping hand make decisions everybody is going to like." authors of the Primary Leadership Development Course fromSSgt.StephenPearson, academy operations sergeant. Getting a head start on handling theresponsibilities that they selected the school to test the latest program of Pearson said he automated time-consuming administracomewithpromotionsiswhatPLDCisallabout,explained instruction, said CSM Thomas J. Quinn Jr., commandant, tive work to give instructors more time with students. SSgt. Wilbert Whitaker, instructor. NCOA. "Theinstructors usetheprogram to updaterecords and "Wecan't makethem (students) NCO'sin30 days, but The Fort Sherman NCOA aced the Department of the monitor students' progress," he explained. "They can do we can expose them to the resources they will need as Army's requirements for instructing PLDC, the military thingsin10-15minutes which useto take acoupleofdays." NCO's," he said. leadership course for specialists and corporals in the Helping each other is a rule of thumb at the academy. The new program the school is helping to fine-tune is Noncommissioned Officers Education System. Thekeyto The academy's success can not be traced to one person designedto teachstudentsto usethoseresources, saidSSgt. the academy's success is what academy 1st Sgt. Robert because the staff works together for the benefit of the unit Michael Fuentez, instructor. Craig called being "doctrinally pure." and it's students, he said. "We teach them to use the manuals for research, and we Trouble-shooting the old program began the purificaTheinstructors workundertheunitphilosophy ofbeing ask questions that put them in situations and make them tion, Craig said. He examined the school's system last a "selfless server," Craig said. find solutions instead of memorizing facts," he explained. February to pinpoint areas that did not meet Army stan"Not everyone who comes here to be an instructor "When they leave here they have the resources they dards. stays,"he said. "These people work30 days without a day need." "Whenthe new commandant (Quinn)arrived(in April) off. It takes a lot of dedication most people can't give." "It feels good to seethem(students)go on and havethem we went strictly by the book," he said. "We (the commanThis dedication is important because the academy is come back as sergeants and staff sergeants,"Fuentezsaid. dant, first sergeant and operations sergeant) went through training young soldiers to be the leaders of tomorrow, said "It's also good when they come back for motivational every block ofinstruction to make sure we met therequireSSgt. Chris Waltz, instructor. support" ments set by the Department of the Anny." "The emphasis here is not teaching soldiers tactical The academy doors are never closed, but are always Some schools interpret DA requirements and change skills, we are teaching them about leadership and how to open to help these young NCOs after they graduate, their programs, Craig said. This sometimes confused the make the hard decisions," he said. Fuentez said. Specialists Elizabeth Hyde and Allison Powell, 310th MI Bn prepare to defend a fortified position during a field training exercise.

PAGE 4

Tropic TimesHemisphere 14 Sept. 17, 1993 i m s h r Brazil faces political crisis Clinton signs Top political party nears seems to be running things," a Western diplomat standoff with president ThePMDB's backing is considered racial for Franco to get his programs through Congress, including plans to WASHINGTON (Reuters) -President Clinton BRASILIA, Brazil (Reuters) -Brazil's biggest political reduce inflation running at 33 percent a month. signed side deals to the North American Free Trade party moved closer to a possible break with President The party has 126 seats in the 584-member Agreement Tuesday, aiming to protect workers and ItamarFranco that could threaten his economicplans after Congress. the environment from the fallout of increased one Cabinet minister quit Monday and two others offered The plans include fiscal and other reforms Franco and trade. to resign. Cardoso want passed during the legislature's revision of Clinton signed the deals -which his trade team Environmental Minister Fernando Coutinho Jorge, a the constitution, scheduled to begin in October. struck with Mexico and Canada as footnotes to the member of the centrist Brazilian Democratic Movement The strain between the PMDB and Franco sharpened core pactat a high-profile White House ceremony Party(PMDB),submittedaletter ofresignation andFranco overthe weekend whenJornaldoBrasilnewspaperquoted with former presidents George Bush, Jimmy Carter accepted it, presidential spokesman Glaucio Veloso the president as saying he did not need the PMDB in the and Gerald Ford looking on. said. Cabinet. "We will make our case as hard and as well as we TransportationSecretaryAlbertoGoldman,Social WelFranco's comments came amid the party's national can and though the fight will be difficult, I deeply fare Minister Antonio Britto and Pedro Simon, the congress. The PMDB's National Council will decide on believe we will win," Clinton said as he formally government's leader in the Senate, "also put their jobs whether or not to keep backing Franco at a Tuesday launched his NAFTA campaign. at Franco's disposal," Veloso said. "He asked them to stay meeting. The agreement, which was born under the Bush and they agreed." Enviromentalists said Coutinho Jorge had a mixed administration, would link Canada, the United States CoutinhoJorgeis the second offive PMDB ministers to record since he took over the ministry in November and Mexico in one big free-trade zone by gradually resign in two weeks. A replacement was not immediately 1992. dismantling barriers to commerce. named. Franco and the PMDB, his major support in "He said he was going to do alot ofthings but neverdid," Due to take effect next January, NAFTA requires Congress, have been under increasing strain in recent said Eduardo Martins, Brazil coordinator for the World congressional approval, by no means a given. weeks. WideFund forNature, suchasrestructure theministry and Clinton had hoped -wrongly -that the side Theparty, especiallyits powerful stategovernors, wants the Brazilian Environmental Institute and clear the use of deals would win over NAFTA's many critics by greater influence in the government and over economic $600 million in foreign grants and loans offered for instituting punishments for governments that fail to policy, now overseen by Economy Minister Fernando environmental projects. protect either worker rights or the environment. Henrique Cardoso of the Brazilian Social Democratic However, Coutinho Jorge was able to press through a A third deal guards against sudden import surges Party (PSDB). presidential decree helping protect the remnants ofBrazil's that could disrupt sectors of U.S. industry. "The PMDB is really a junior party. The PSDB Atlantic forest, Martins said. Fujimori video depicts 'lucid,' limping Guzman LIMA, Peru (Reuters) -A year after his his food through an armored window and capture, the once-legendary Shining Path converses with no one, he added. guerrilla leader Abimael Guzman was Fujimori said that Peru was a different shown on television Sunday limping in the place with the once-elusive leader securely courtyard of his maximum-security prison, behind bars. looking pensive but in good health. "A country where every day there were President Alberto Fujimori presented a bombs going off is now peaceful, (in) a videotape of Guzman, who until his arrest country where there were no tourists, tourSept. 12,1992,ledthe Maoistinsurgencyin ism is flourishing and investment is flowa 13-year war on the state, as he took his ing in There has been a radical change," daily walk in the walled patio of a Lima he said. navy base. Fujimori, who still enjoys a 65 percent Guzman, a 58-year-old former univerapprovalraning ayear afterthe capture, said sityprofessor,hadaslightlimp,wasalmost Guzman's life-term sentence would not beardless and looked thinner as he paced have been possible without anti-terrorist thecourtyardoftheprison butFujimori said legislation he decreed after declaring emerin atelevision interview that he was in good gency rule in April 1992. health. Underthe laws which have been used to Guzman, the Shining Path's ideologiconvict689guerrillas sinceGuzman'scapE cal andpolitical guide known to his followture, the guerrilla chief will be able to ers as "President Gonzalo," was " comreceive the visit of relatives once a month. pletely lucid" and firm in his doctrinary Fujimori said the arrest of Guzman was Marxist thought, Fujimori said. "the fruit of intelligence work." But he added: "The life-term sentence Guzman was arrested in a middle-class is weighing on him.He is totally solitary, neighborhood of Lima with other top leadwith a sensation of powerlessness in this ers in a bloodless operation that resulted prison." from overtwo years ofintelligence work by The jail on a navy base in the port of a special group within Peru's anti-terrorCallao where Guzman is held with seven ism police (DINCOTE). other guerrilla leaders has 16-inch-thick DINCOTE officials Sunday said they cement walls, is surrounded by a 16-foot had arrested eightguerrillasin apoorLima wall and is mined around the perimeter, neighborhood as they tried to hoist flags of AP LaserPhoto Fujimori said. the Communist Party of Peru, the Shining Shining Path guerilla leader Abimael Guzman shown during a news media His guards wear ski masks, he receives Path's official name. presentation just days after his arrest Sept. 12, 1992. Tired Caraquenos awaiting next lurking catastrophe CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) -Mudslides, bombs, poforced the evacuation of several office buildings, have "We don't want to live like Colombia or Peru," said litical turmoil: After all the bad things that have happened, increased fears of crime and spreading poverty. Elias Santana, who organized a car caravan to rally public the wary residents of Caracas wonder if something even "Ihaven'tgone out at night for years. Now, there's even opposition to terrorism. worse lurks around the corner. less reason to," said the manager of a clothing boutique, Caracas, nestled in a mountain valley more than 3,000 One weekend last month, mudslides killed dozens of who would not give her name. The window ofherstorewas feet above sea level, was a tranquil place until soaring oil people andleftseveralthousandhomeless,most ofthemin blown out Aug.18 by a car-bomb explosion. prices brought prosperity in the 1970s. Then in recent the shantytowns that ring this sun-drenched Caribbean At an Italian restaurant in the same shopping mall, the years, theprosperity was sweptawayby falling oilrevenues capital of four million. 120 luncheon customers fled so quickly that "some left and annual inflation of 30 percent or more. It was Venezuela's worst natural disaster in three spaghetti twirledontheir forks," saidGuillermoFermandes, Wages have not kept pace with apartment rents, car decades. Now, anxious eyes scan the skies atreports ofrain. the owner. repair bills and other daily necessities. Public services are President Carlos Andres Perez, already suspended, was No oneclaimed responsibility forthe explosion, forpipe decrepit except forthe subway, whichis fast,clean and airthrownoutofoffice by Congress. That addedtothepolitical bombs that went off in public places or for letter bombs conditioned. turmoil, but at least the country has only one lame-duck mailed to the Supreme Court and the chief justice's home. Many schools have no desks for students. Hospitals run leader, interim President Ramon Velasquez, instead of Three former policemen have been arrested, rekindling out of medicine. City streets have more potholes than signs two. doubts about guardians of public order in a country that and few highways are lit at night. Riots in overcrowded A series of small explosions, and bomb threats that experienced two coup attempts last year. prisons are common, and are put down violently.

PAGE 5

#j~l~i~uryNewsTropic Times5 M tar News Sept. 7,19935 Powell looks toward future WASHINGTON (AP) -Gen. ColinPowell says hecan walk away from his high-powered Pentagon job without regrets but feels a responsibility to return to public life to help America's minority youth. "I feel, just as an American citizen, and because of the position I have reached, I think there will be an obligation on me to do something in public life," Powell said Sept. 9 during a 45-minute interview. "So while I am going out to acquire something of a private life again and spend more time with my family and get off stage for a while, I think in due course I would like to be seen as serving the nation in some way. Powell, the first black chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, retires Sept. 30 after 35 years in uniform. Born in the Harlem section of New York City and raised in the South Bronx by parents who immigrated from Jamaica, Powell attended City College of New York, rose through Army ranks and forged an extraordinary career as akey member of Washington's decision-making circles. But the 56-year-old Powell said that after taking some time to write his memoirs and enjoy private life with his family, he will be ready to re-enter the public arena. 4 Whilesuchamove "doesnotsuggestpolitics tomeright now," Powell added that he won't rule out any options for his future. "It suggests I should find ways to use the experience I AserPhoo have. I feel an obligation to help young people," he said. Gen. Colin Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, greets former President George Bush. Powell Powell became familiar to America during televised briefings onthePanamainvasion and thePersianGulfWar said he has no regrets after serving since 1989 as the chairman. and his stock as a potential political candidate is high. as JCS chairman, Army Gen. John Shalikashvili, to "folThe general chatted amiably with AP reporters during The four-star general says he has no regrets about low his instincts," get a good staff, have a good time and the interview in his Pentagon office, relaxing with a blackleaving his roleas the nation's top military officer "because not worry about how Powell did the job. mug emblazoned with a Volvo logo. Powell is an avid I've tried everything I've wanted to get done. I would have Pressedto elaborateon what kindofwork he might take restorer of old Volvos. regretted it ifthere was something I should have made arun up, he said, "I don't know yet. I'm getting off the stage for At one point, the interview was interrupted by a call at, but didn't." a while and then I'll figure it out." from the president. When he returned, Powell quipped, Powell said even though he wasn't successful in everyPowell graduated from CCNY with a geology degree "The bombing begins in five minutes," a reference to thing he tried to do "I learned the lesson over the years, do and an ROTC Army commission. He was wounded twice Reagan's famous inadvertent on-air statement. as much as you can in the time you have available, with the in Vietnam. Powell's memoirs, for which he's receiving a reported energy you have available and then you move on and let He rose quickly in the military, gaining the attention of $6 million, won't be a "kiss-and-tell," he said. others come behind you and they will build on your good many in Washington. "Ihavehad awonderfulife. I've had agreat experience ideas." President Reagan appointed Powell his national secuin the military, and .I want to put my side down on a "I always walk out. I never look back," he added. rity adviser in 1987, and President Bush named him numberofthe issues I've beeninvolved in overthe years," Powell said he intends to tell his designated successor chairman of the Joint Chiefs in 1989. he said. Cheating scandal 'Celibate homosexual' raises new issue rocks academy WASHINGTON (AP) -Judges on a aperson ofthe same sex, but I'm not going emyshortlybeforegraduationin1987after ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) -At federal appeals court sparred with lawyers to have sex, never had se .and never will." acknowledging to a superior that he is gay. least 125 midshipmen have been Monday over whether an admitted homoSuch aperson wouldn't have thedesire He was appealing a ruling by U.S. Disimplicated in what may be the bigsexual who is also celibate would be disfor sex and therefore would not fall under trict Judge Oliver Gasch who in 1991 upgest cheating scandal ever at the charged fromthemilitary underpre-Clinton the military's definition of a homosexual, held the Navy's right to expel Steffan, on Naval Academy, investigators say. administration rules. Steinmeyer said. He added that the governgrounds that the military ban is ajustifiable Cases are being builtagainst midThe issue was raised when Justice Dement doesn't take action against people for weapon against the spread of AIDS. shipmen who escaped charges earapartment lawyer Anthony Steinmeyer was thoughts unrelated to conduct. "Theonly thing he did was to say he was lierthis yearaftera master copy ofa explaining the difference in military policy JudgePatriciaWaldaskedifanyonehad gay," saidSteffan'slawyer,MarcWolinsky. final exam foroneoftheacademy's toward homosexuals before the Clinton avoided discharge from the military by "Gaymenhaveanddo serveinthemilitary. toughest coursesturned up missing, administrationadopted the"don'task,don't making that claim. .Now itis determined that good orderand investigators for the Office of the tell" rule that will gointo effect next month. "To my knowledge no one has made it, discipline is not affected .sexual orientaNavy Inspector General said in Steinmeyer said the military defined a so it was never accepted," the government tion in itself does not predict misconduct." Monday's The (Baltimore) Sun. homosexual as a person whose conduct, lawyer replied. He said the military's old policy of Charges reportedly range from activities, desire and intent show that he is "Now we are dancing on the head of a dismissing gays is brought on by the asreceiving a computer message urggay. pin," commented Judge Abner Mikva. sumption that homosexualstatus can affect ing midshipmen to study a particu"Icould use ashorthand phrase 'celibate The discussion arose in the case involva different kind of conduct and "now they lar question to actually getting a homosexual,' "Steinmeyer said. "That is ing Joseph Steffan, a former midshipman are going to argue that they can predict the copy of the electrical engineering aperson who saysifl had sex, I wouldprefer who resigned from the U.S. Naval Acadconduct of people who say they are gay." exam. C-17 cargo plane NATO developing Bosnia peacekeeping plan suffers setback ROME (Reuters)NATOis developing ment yet. The degree of our commitment lim-led Bosnian government forces in the WASHINGTON (AP) -The a plan to send about 50,000 peacekeeping will depend on the nature of the agreement former Yugoslav republic. troubled C-17 cargo plane suffered troops to Bosnia, up to half of them Ameri-whether it's one that we judge to have "We are talking overall numbers of anotherblow lastweekwhenawing cans, ifagreement is reached to end the civil been entered into by the parties in good around 50,000 total -that would be U.S. failed during ground stress tests, war, Defense Secretary Les Aspin said faith, whattheenforcement provisions ofit and western allies," Aspin told a meeting said the aircraft's contractor, Sunday. are, what our consultations on Capitol Hill of the International Institute of Strategic McDonnell Douglas Corp. At a meeting in Brussels before flying indicate. So there is quite a distance beStudies in Brussels. In a statement issued over the here to discuss the proposal with U.S. tween the present time and any commitHe warned, however, that Congress, weekend, the company said that military officials, he confirmed for the first ment of U.S. troops." which has been given final say on the during tests on the wings of a nontime the number involved but said Con"We have said we would beprepared to issue by President Clinton, was unlikely flying plane in Long Beach, Calif., gresswaslikelyto veto American participacooperate with other countries in an effort to approve large U.S. participation unless the left wing sustained damage and tion unless European allies provide half the to implement an agreement .and thatcomwestern Europe played its part. the test was halted, troops. mitment stands," he said. "I do believe that it is going to be avery, "The purpose of the test was to U.S. Secretary ofState Warren ChristoIn Rome at the end of a two-day Eurovery difficult proposition to convince the subject the wing to stress forces that pher, asked on CBS's " Face the Nation" pean trip, Aspin held private talks with American Congress to do that if the expecwere one and one-half times those Sunday about the possibility of sending U.S. Navy Adm. Jeremy Boorda, comtation is that the allies aren't going to be at ever expected to be encountered by U.S. troops to a partitioned Bosnia, exmander of southern NATO forces. least half of that," Aspin said in response the aircraft during its operational pressed caution in discussing troops numBoorda would be likely to head the to questions. life," the company said. bers but added: NATO operation in case of a peace treaty "It'sgoingto bdifficultinanycase," he "Unfortunately there is not an agreebetween warring Serbs, Croats and Musadded.

PAGE 6

6Tropic Times USept. 17, 1993 V i e Writer confused about 'revisado' sticker Dear Mayor's Corner: C PMO, and they first want you to know that I am still confused about what is reMayor the requirement you speak ofis not new. It quired regarding "revisado" stickers. I has been required for a number of years. read somewhere that I would not be rethat you must have for next year, and you Ft. Clayton vehicle registration office and Secondly, they did not know if or where it quired to have one, and then a friend told can get it only by picking up your inspecthey didn't know and I was referred to the is available andthatit hasn't been available me that it was required. I haven't been able tion sticker for this year. If you have been MP traffic section and they didn't know for several years. to get a straight answer. Can you help me to the vehicle registration office in Diablo either. I tried the Panamanian Driver's out? several times and your inspection sticker LicenseofficeinDiabloandtheydon'thave Editor'snote:ThiscolumnallowscomConfused has not been ready, check with Host it and don't know where to get it either. munity members to submit questions to Nation Liaison in the Provost Marshal's Maybe you can determine where to buy it the Mayoral Congress. Lettersshouldbe Dear Confused: Office for additional help. and ifit is published in English. You could mailed to: Mayors' Corner, Publicity According to the Ft. Clayton Provost savemany ofus time withthe Panamanian Chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS). Marshal's Office, you are now required to Dear Mayor's Corner: Traffic Court for not having the manual. Anonymrity wll be grantedupon request. have a "revisado" sticker. You must get the Where can you purchase or acquire the J. Williams The Tropic Times reserves the right to sticker beforeyoucanregisteryourcarnext Panamanian traffic manual that you are edit letters and responses for brevity, year. now required to have in your vehicle acDear J: clarity and propriety. There is also a new registration form cording to the new traffic law? I called the I spoke with a representative from the Another request for movie briefs changes policy Dear Editor: very much like to read what the upcomDear SCN fan: information to you about the movies I am writing in response to a letter ing movies are about. Neither the movie While our policy in the past has been without losing our descriptions of in the Sept. 3 issue of Tropic Times. titles nor the names of the actors starring to remain with the current format, sporting event and specials coming up. An SCN fan suggested a short synopsis in the movies tell much about the movie because of reader requests for short We always welcome input from our of the movies being aired during prime at all. I've probably missed a lot of good movie synopsis, we're going to start with readers about what they'd like to see in time be included in your weekly T.V. movies because their titles didn't sound the Sept. 24 issue. We're still working on their paper, and if there's enough reader schedule. You replied that, according to appealing to me. the exact mechanics of how we're going interest, we'll try our best to provide the viewer surveys, SCN's audience to do this, and we may have to drop the information requested. doesn't find this important. I would Another SCN fan video/book review, but we'll get more Editor Man arrested for illegal transfer of merchandise Wrongfully transferring merchandise A man was arrested last week for wrongfully transferProvost Marshal's Corner ring merchandise. On several occasions he bought items from the commissary and distributed them to 11 people who didn't have purchasing privileges. For informationabout buying and selling merchandise, seeSouthern CommandRegulation19-l orcall286-3117. Off road travel Complaints have beencalledinto the MPs aboutpeople driving on the right shoulder of Friendship Road leading to Fort Clayton. These drivers use the shoulder to pass trafficin order to reach the right lane by the Curundu Gas station. It is illegal to pass a vehicle on the right or to drive on the shoulder of the road according to Article 79, Decree number 160, which regulates traffic in Panama. For more information, call 287-4300. Soldier lends vehicle to non-privilege holder A soldier was charged last week for wrongfully transferring duty free merchandise. He left his privately o wned vehicle with a non-privilege holder for 90 days while he went TDY. This allowed the individual access to all military installations in Panama. Forinformation, seeSCReg. 190-5,SCReg. 60-10,SC Reg. 1-19 or call 286-3117. Recreation Center break-in The Cocoli Recreation Center was broken into last week and several items were reported missing, including a television, stereo and compact disk player. Anyone with information about the theft, call 287-4401. Report suspicious activity to the MPs at 287-4401. MP dog nabs intruder After receiving a report of an attempted break-in, MPs during the period Sept. 3-9. private property pursued and arrested the suspects. During the pursuit, an Pacific Fort Kobbe housing area -one attempted housebreaking MP working dog bit one of the suspects several times. Fort Clayton 600 area -one attempted housebreaking Atlantic The following crimes are for on-post housing areas Curundu Housing area -one larceny of unsecured None to report This authorized unofficial command information pubChief. SMSgt. Steve Taylor PublicAffairsOfficer. Maj.MelanieReeder lication is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Editor.SSgt. DeborahE. Williams Editor.SSgt.JaneUsero Times is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces AssistantEditor.Sgt. John Hall Journalists.Sgt.E.J.Hersom Information Program ofthe Department of'Defense, under SportsEditor.Sgt. Richard Puckett Sgt. Lori Davis the supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S. EditorialStaff.RosemaryChong Spec. RobinA. Mantikoski Southern Command. Maureen Sampson 24th Wing PublicAffairs Office.284-5459 Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the VolunteerAssistant.JosephineBean PublicAffairsOfficer.Capt. WarrenL.Sypher official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Student Intern.Juan Palacio PublicAffairsSuperintendent. MSgtDaleMitcham Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. Southern CommandPublicAffairs Office.282-4278 Journalists.SSgt.Rian Clawson The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002. Telephone DeputyDirectorPublicAffairs.Cmdr.LorriGilchrist Sgt James A. Rush 285-6612. CommandInformationOfficer.PatrickMilton U.S. Naval StationPublicAffairs Office.283-5644 Commanderin Chief.Gen. George A. Joulwan PublicAffairsSupervisor.SFCMikeHoward PublicAffairsOfficer.Lt.j.g.LauraC.Moore DirectorPublicAffairs.Col. James L.Fetig U.S. ArmySouth Public Affairs Office.287-3007 Photographers.P12 Roberto Taylor Command Information Officer.Beth Taylor PH2DelanoJ.Mays U.S.ArmySouthPAO-Atlantic.289-4312 NCOIC.SSgt.Phillip Clark -*ropic Times

PAGE 7

#jn mpn~.arvTropic Times P _Commen y sept.17,19937 Got a gripe? Imagine what it'd be like without all those little 'extras' we've come to expect by SMSgt. Steve Taylor acquired dependent"thinks that what Chief, Tropic Times we've got is unbelievable. Chief-Tropic Times .___The commissary was beyond her general, why can't your o expectations, the exchange was like a people shop downtown like --IT _ 7 little Dillards in Dallas.and there's the everyone else?" asks the swimming pools, clubs, recreation senator after a recent "fact-finding" tour centers, libraries, travel and tour services, of military installations. "After all, -shoppettes, home improvement centers, civilians go to work, get paid, and shop I schools, dry cleaners, post offices, gas in their local supermarkets, malls, and stations, gymnasiums and fitness centers, stores. Why can't your people?" --snack bars, bowling alleys and the list The general took a deep breath. Here 7goes on. we go again, he thought to himself. ~ "It looks like you've brought America "Senator, we've been through this -with you," is her comment. before. Those services, like commissarr -And life in the military goes beyond ies and exchanges, are important 1commissaries and exchanges, according retention tools for our service people --" -1 to my fresh set of eyes. "Hogwash, general," the senator said, It's how we take care of each other interrupting. "You keep telling us thatwith sponsorship programs and.support but don't most of your people shop -> groups. How the traffic management downtown anyway? I don't see how this office arranges for shipment of household can motivate people to stay in the goods. How family support centers help service." expected to serve in some of the most We tend to complain when things with employment and the fearsome Form The general drew back and looked austere environments, not only in the aren't just right. When the right products 171. How on-base housing is half the the senator in the eye. "Our people are United States, but overseas as well. And aren't there, or something we really want cost of off-base housing with sidewalks overworked, underpaid, and many of our as for sacrifice, they are expected to make is temporarily out of stock. and central air and dishwashers. junior people are living atthe poverty the most ultimate sacrifice anyone could Or how crowded the commissary can It's how units become families. And level and in substandard housing. The make. These services are necessary. get sometimes. Or how our exchanges how important families become to the savings they get in commissaries and Besides, most are self-supporting now, charge too much, or don't order enough mission. The little things as well as the exchanges mean the difference between a thanks to Congress. If you'd like-" stock to serve everyone's needs. Or how big things. bread-and-butter diet and a standard of "What I'd like," the senator said, "is there's nothing to do. Nothing do to? "They take very good care of you," is living they deserve, considering the for reality to sink in with you military How absurd. how it looks from the outside looking in. sacrifices-" types. I think it's time for a change in the I've been guilty of these charges. I So what would it be like if we lost the Again the senator interrupted. way we do business." sometimes cringe when thinking of a trip extras that we've come to depend upon? "Sacrifices my butt, general. I just got Mentally, the general rolled up his to the commissary, or complain when a Come to expect. Almost demand. back from a seven-base visit, and those sleeves, put the boxing gloves on, and roll of film is 30 cents more than it is in Next time it's time to complain, take a places are like country clubs. Golf dug his heals in for a long fight ahead. downtown Panama City. It's easy to moment. There's nothing wrong with courses, swimming pools, clubs, mcreBut he was determined to stand his complain, and forget what it'd be like if constructive criticism and suggestions on ation centers, malls, all sorts of things. ground. I couldn't go to the commissary or how to improve. But all too often I see The taxpayers are getting tired of What if this time, though, the general exchange or have the convenience of complaints and criticism go to the wrong supporting your people in luxury." loses the battle? He may lose the war. travel tours and other facilities on base, people, through the wrong channels. The Every time a new senator is elected I Imagine not having a commissary, right in my backyard. people responsible for bringing America have to go through this, the general exchange, recreation services, library or Recently, I was given a fresh, new to us never get a chance to fix problems. thought to himself. "Senator, not only any of the other "extras" we in the perspective of just how good we've got it. And sometimes that takes time. are our people expected to pack and service of our country have come to take My new wife -or as it says on the So next time you feel like."services move every couple of years, but they are for granted. command sponsorship form, my "newly bashing," remember what it'd be like. Direct Quotes What military benefits do you take for granted the most? "Living in the barracks, "The BX. It's got just "I don't take any of "Dental care. It's some"The commissary, gas having flee housing and about everything I need, them for granted bething that outside, it station privileges hem things like that." When I need it, it's there cause I grew up in the costs a lot, but you still and job security." and it's relatively military. I appreciate all don't always go to those cheaper than in the of them." appointments for checkcivilian community." ups." Spec. Patrick Lowe TSgt. Felix Schamber Capt. Linda Gould SFC Walter Ingram SSgt. Tiffany Godbey 56th Signal Battalion 310th Airlift Squadron -U.S. Southern Command J-5 U.S. Southern Command J-6 Phoenix Oak Howard The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries -or responses to commentaries -to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

PAGE 8

8 Topic Times Sept. 17, 1993 Scouts learnquickfire by Spec. Robin A. Mantikoski USARSO Public Affaks OffMce FORT CLAYTON PISTOL RANGE -"FIe!" Thesoldlers turn their bodies totheready, pull their 0 weapons to their shoulders, fire at the silhouettes 15 meters away and the sharp cracks of their M16A2 rifles echo across the range. This split-second action is repeated time after time as the silhouette distance Increases. Thistrainingisnotordinary marksmanship training, but quick fire techniques which the soldiers of this unit use in their mission. These are infantry soldiers, but their mission is different. They are members of a scout platoon whose main job is reconnaissance. They also dojobs ranging from setting up observation posts and landing zones to being forward observers for mortar platoons. Though the soldiers are sharpening their skillsat quick fire, the main objective is to avoid firing their weapons at all, said SFC Jack Wheeler, platoon sergeant. "Becauseweare forwardofthe battalion,thelast thing we want is to be compromised," Wheeler said. "Plus, If we are compromised, most of the time it would be at dose range." During the training, the soldiers are taught different techniques used for quick fire, said SSgt. KennethAgueda,noncommissioned officerincharge of the training. "Quick fire is allpractice.Differentstances work better for different people," he said. "Getting a natural point of aim is the key to it all." The natural point of aim was evident as the soldiers stood on line after one hour of practice and hit the silhouette every time they fired. Spoc. Milchaol Boyd, scout platoon, practices quick fire techniques during training. U.S. Army phots by Spec. Roi Mun~Iwdd A 5-87th soldier hangs up blank rounds after cleaning the mnud off them.

PAGE 9

Tropic Times SepL 17, 1993 PFC James Savage, Company C, cleans his weapon after returning form last week's field training exercise. Infantry soldiers hone battle skills "They're always ready to push on to the next mission." by Spec. Robin A. Mantikoski The second phase of training was a company-level USARSO Pubc Affairs Ofte maneuver live-fire at Firing Points 1 and 2. During the twoday phase, companies were able to integrate 60 and 81mm FORT SHERMAN -Soldiers from the 5th Battalion, 87th mortars into their attacks, which were conducted both day Infantry (Light), participated in a two-phase exercise at Fort and night. The platoons were able to.conduct independent Sherman with the support of helicopters and a Landing Craft, missions within the company-level operation. Mechanized, Aug. 27-Sept. 3. Soldiers from the 59th Engineer Company also trained The training included infiltration attacks and combined side-by-side with their infantry counterparts, providing anms live fire night exercises. breaches with the use of bangalore torpedoes. The week-long training began with each company per"This was multi-echelon training," Baker said. "All forming a night air assault mission into Fort Sherman and a levels of leadership were capable of training simultafour-kilometer infiltration of Pavon Hill. During the infiltraneously. We received great support from the aviation, tion, the companies were challenged by continual rain and engineer and boat units, which allowed us to train as a muddy conditions. combined-arms team." After consolidating onPavon Hill, the Ist Battalion, 228th The training was beneficial to everyone, but especially Aviation Regimentprovided a night aerialresupply mission. to the soldiers new to the unit and to Panama, Baker noted. "We were able to conduct tough, realistic training while Spec. Billy Ortiz, Company C, had his first experience utilizing numerous assets available within U.S. Army South," with the jungle during this exercise. said Capt. Mike Baker,5th Bn., 87th Inf.,assistantoperations "(The training) was pretty hard, but I leaked a lot about officer. the jungle," he said. During the second day of the field training exercise, the Pvt. 2 Kevin Reeder, Company B, has been in the companies performed another ground infiltration into the infantry and Panama for only one month. Rio Congo Village. Once at the village they linked up with "I was kind of surprised by the jungle. You really have -soldiers from the 1097th Boat Company and boarded aLCM to take it seriously," he said. down the Chagres River to Chicken Landing. Besides leading about the jungle, Reeder leaked a lot The soldiers ended their operation with a tactical road about the infantry. march back to the company assembly areas. The main ob"I learned about working as a team. There are so many jective throughout the exercise was to provide the platoon different parts to it," he said. "I was kind of overwhelmed leaders with a realistic environment in which to train their by everything involved, butthere was a lot of team unity and soldiers. Once the company commander received the operatrust." tions order, each platoon was tasked with planning, coordiSpec. Steven DeYoung, Company B, thought the exernating and executing their assigned tasks. The training gave cise provided great training for the junior enlisted soldiers. the platoons an opportunity to work with their squads on "They always teach us that we have to know everything battle tasks, battle drills and jungle sustainment. that's going on. Because of a few injuries (to those in "It's myjobto ensure everybody is trained in everyjobfor leadership positions), the privates got to experience it,"he whatever mission comes up," said SFC Vern Skumatz, said. "In some cases, privates may have to step into squad Company C platoon sergeant. "Everything we do (as a leader positions." platoon) is integrated. We're all working atthe same time so With a large percentage of new soldiers, this experience there is a constant flow." brought some good unit cohesion, DeYoung said. Skumatz said his platoon did a super job throughout the As the exercise came to an end, the soldiers retumed to training. Fort Davis caked in a week's worth of mud and bone tired, "Motivation is always high in my platoon," he said. but home.

PAGE 10

10 Sept17993 * Milestones U.S. Army South tabs soldier, NCO of year Crossman, Cornilsen help 92nd sweep titles FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The 92nd Military Police Battalion swepttheU.S. ArmySouth's Noncommissioned Officer of the Year and Soldier of the Year contests with soldiers from the battalion taking both titles. Sgt. Edward Crossman, a military policeman, is the new NCO of the Year and Spec. Martin Cornilsen, a communications specialist, is the new Soldier of the Year. Fortheirefforts,they will each receive a trip to Washington, D.C., with $200 for a Association of the United States Army convention and a set of dress blues donated by the AUSA. They will also receive a set of dress whites, savings bonds and Army and Air ForceExchange System gift certificates donated by the Officers' Wives and Enlisted Spouses' Clubs and AAFES. With all they won, it Sgt. Edward Crossman Spec. Martin Cornilsen US. Army photo by SgL E.J. Hersom wasn't the prizes that motivated Cornilsen, he said. In fact, he didn'tknow about most The common task testing is something every soldier of the benefits until he won. should already know, Crossman said. It was only a matter of proving he could do it, he said. "If you can't get a good PT score, you're pretty much W hat the V w o n Winning was especially sweet for him because he is not an sunk in this competition," he said. MP and winning proved that support soldiers are Crossman and Cornilsen credited their success to their Besidefor satisifaction and pride the NCO and good soldiers. battalion'scompetitionwhichis modeledafterUSARSO's. soldier of the year earn, they also receive Indi. Scoring high on the physical fitness test was the key to The battalion also holds similar competitions throughvidual prizes. The following Is what Spec. Martin winning the competition, which included common task out the year. Before going up to the USARSO board, *trip to Washington, D.C., with $200 for a training and a formal board, both winners agreed. Cornilsen had already been through 13 other boards, he AssociationoftheUnitedStates Army convention, The fitness test counted for up to 50 points while CTT said. *a set of dress blues donated by the AUSA, and the board were worth up to 30 points each. Crossman, who has been in Panama since April, had a *a set of dress whites, By scoring high on their PT tests, it left the challengers similar experiencein Japan where he won NCO ofthe Year *savings bonds,Army and AirForce Exchange to make up points on the board and with CT. in 1992. This was third straight year a 92nd MP Battalion System gift certificates donated by the Officers' This was nearly impossible because all the contestants NCO won the USARSO award and second straight forthe Wives and Enlisted Spouses' Clubs and AAFES. were equally prepared, they said. soldier title. _____ _____ Brigade (Light). SSgt. Hector Reyes of streamer with an average of 253.38 points. Spec. Adrienne Johnson of Company B, Headquarters Company, 193rd Support Scoring300 points on their PT test was 1st 193rdSupport Battalion was selected as the Battalion. Sgt. KirkKroschel of Company Lt. Steven Cooper and SSgt. Jose Ortega. 193rd Soldier of the Month. To Staff Sergeant -Roche Knight of TheB, 193rd Support Battalion. aterEquipmentandMaintenanceSite,41st Expert Infantryman's Badge -Spec. B Area Support Group. Army Achievement Medal -Maj. Ronnie Travis McCrackine, Spec. Shawn St.Clair, 1st Sgt. Alex Ortiz and SFC Pablo McKinnon and 2nd Lt. Nick Schneider, all KaylaRae Majchszak was born Aug. 30 to ToSergeant -Jason Seeburger and Darren Vazquez, all of Headquarters Company, of Co. C, 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry. Spec. Brian and Christine Majchszak. Knight, both ofCompanyC, 1st Battalion, 193rdInfantry Brigade(Light). Sgt. Darrin 508th Infantry. Sabrina Carroll of HeadPearceson,Spec.Edwin Newhart Jr., Spec. Certificate of Achievement -Capt. Juan Brittne NicoleShearin was bornAug.27 to quarters Company, 193rd Support BattalNeil Williams and Sgt. Kenneth Core, all of Ortiz-Lopez, SSgt. Wilmer Rivera, Sgt. Spec. Brian and Kelly Shearin. ion. Jorge Olmo-Novoa of Company B, Company C, 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry. Ronnie Kuhl, Sgt. Donald McQueen and 193rd Support Battalion. SSgt. Douglas Lowther and Spec. John Spec. Luis Suarez, all ofCompanyB, 193rd Melany Johanna Lopez was born Aug. 29 Bitter, both of Company B, 193rd Spt Support Battalion. SSgt. Shaun Trescott, to SFC Melanio and Nuria Lopez. To Private First Class -Hugh Traughber Battalion. Sgt. Alijah Lyn Brown and Sgt. Allison III and Kevin Hrasdzira, both of Company Rolands, all of Headquarters Company, Stephan Gaitan Fagot was born Aug. 25 to C, 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry. Senior Wings -SSgt. Alton Smoak III of 193rdSupportBatalion. Sgt.JohnRichards Spec. Daniel and Julie Fagot. Company C, 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry. Jr. and Spec. John Herrington, both of CompanyA,193rdSupportBattalion. Spec. Thomas Allen Leake Jr. was born Aug. 25 Master Parachutist -SSgt. Samuel Darrell Bourque and Spec. Milton Leath, to SFC Thomas and Elvia Leake. Army Commendation Medal -SSgt. Jose Oglesby ofCompanyB,IstBattalion,508th both of 565th Ordnance Detachment. Rodriguez, SSgt. Alton Smoak III, Spec. Infantry. Donald William Gallon was born Aug. 30 Jason Seeburger, Sgt. Timothy Sprunger Special Achievements -Sgt. Moses to SSGt. Donn and Nancy Gallon. and Sgt. Joseph Brown, all of 1st Battalion, Commanding General'sPhysical TrainCrowder of Company B, 193rd Support 508th Infantry. SFC Eugene Stanley of Ing Streamer -Headquarters Company, Battalion was selected as the 193rd NonOttavia Jazmin Knox was born Aug. 30 to Headquarters Company, 193rd Infantry 193rd Infantry Brigade (Light) won the commissioned Officer of the Month. SSgt. Byron and Anita Knox.

PAGE 11

Tropic Times Sept. 17,1993 n die before the age of two, officials said. The "Most of the problems we see here are ta k s e d u c a tio n combined team ofdoctors hope to turn this intestinal parasites, ear infections, colds i statisticaroundthrougheducatingthepeople and lice," Komegay said. "Some of the about health hazards. problems are long term. We must rememCabanasll-'93isajoint-combinedmiliber to focus on the small things, such as tary exercise in Honduras. It is designed to washing clothes and taking care of themby Spec. Robert Meines visited the village of Armenia Bonita in exercise the capabilities of U.S. special selves." 304th Public Affairs Detachment Honduras during Exercise Cabanas Il-'93 operations forces working in conjunction "Something as simple as a bug bite can to give the local people medication and with U.S. and Honduran conventional get bad here," said Air Force doctor Jay ARMENIA BONiTA, Honduras -U.S. education to prevent diseases. forces. Murrman."They walk around barefoot and Air Force and Honduran doctors recently In Honduras, 30 percent of all children "The most important thing we will be scratchat the bite. The bite getsinfected and giving out today is education," said Air thenbacteriagetsinit.Soonit'sintheblood Force Maj. Elizabeth Kornegay, flight surstream and can get into the heart." geon for the 1st Special Operations Wing When they saw the doctor, they got a based at Hurlburt Field, Fla. "All we can short checkup. The doctor examined their takecareof(as doctors)isthehereand now. eyes, ears, noses and throats and asked if Seeing the Amerithey had any other can doctors is what ailments.Thedoctors brings the people gave them medicaout, but what we "The most important thing tion for other probneed to givethemis we will be giving out today is lems that could be the education." education. All we can helped at the present The villagers time. had to go through take care of (as doctors) is The villagers anoralhygieneclass the here and now. Seeing weren'ttheonlyones beforetheseeing the sis getting an education. U.S. doctors. Lidia the American doctors is The doctors are also GandoradeBurgos, what brings the people out, learning. a Honduran army but what we need to giveeagainrinvalohead nurse for the gie able training ontropi4thBattalion,taught them is the education." cal diseases," said the village families Kornegay, a gradua song to remind Maj. Elizabeth Kornegay ate of the University them how to effecFlght surgeon of Tennessee Health tively brush their andSciences. "When teeth. you have troops in an area for a long time \ "The song teaches with upper teeth you you start to learn what will affect them. brush down, with lower teeth you brush up "Ifthereis a sudden outbreak oftmalaria andwithmolarsyoubrushcircular,"Burgos in the area, we know we will eventually see said. "This will more easily help them to somecasesin soldiers. We also may find the remember the proper way to brush and it's water supply could be contaminated." fun." Murrman compares the basic hygeine The villagers also learned about the lessons learned by the villagers to learning acquired immune deficiency syndrome vimath. rus. Outside the school room, U.S. soldiers "You show a child a math problem. On handedthepeoplecholerainformationcards theflrstdayhemaynotgetiLOnthesecond that listed symptoms and ways to avoid the day of explaining it's starting to sink in. disease. The third day he will probably be doing the The families lined up outside the school problem. Because of the lessons they have Theater SupportEement photo by Spec. Robert Maines after going through the preventive courses, learned today, we hope they will live better Sgt. Timothy Ruiz comforts a Honduran girl as she waits for medical care. to get a medical checkup. lives tomorrow." Downed pilot exercise simulates real survival scenario by Sgt. Karen Starkey 304th Public Affairs Detachment SOTOCANOAB,Honduras-Inaworld wheretheline between a peaceful mission and armed conflict can be crossed at any moment, strategies for surviving in a hostile environment until rescued should be second nature. 1st Lt. Steve E. Erickson, 2nd Airlift Squadron, 23rd Wing from Pope AFB, N.C., volunteered to be a downed pilotin acombatrescue exercise using those strategies. The exercise was held in Honduras this summer. Erickson, a C-130 pilot, is very aware of what an easy target a cargo aircraft can be. Acting as adownedpilot with a broken leg in the mountains of Honduras reminded him o that there is no substitute for field experience. Erickson was droppedinto the Honduran highlands by helicopter with an Air Force survival instructor escort. While communicating by radio and flashing a mirror, Erickson searched the sky for his rescuers, the 304th Rescue Squadron, 939th Rescue Wing, and Air Force reserve unit from Portland, Ore. In a real situation, every moment on the ground increases the chance of being found by the wrong side or becoming weaker from injuries. "You need to be ready for asituationlike thisin wartime and peace," Erickson said. "More in peacetime because in wartime everyone is thinking about it," added Air Force survival instructor Tha' (pportEleenphotobySgi Kumn Starkey TSgL Tom B. Phillips, 1st Special Operations Wig, Ai TSgt. Tom Phillips (left), a survival instructor, shows 1st Lt. Steve Erickson a survival fast food -termites. Force SpecialOperations Command at Hurlburt Field,Fla. provide suppressive ground fire in areal rescue situation. intravenous fluids were infused into his forearm. Phillips offered such survival delicacies as termites to The 'wounded'pilot had been found. The rhythmic beat of Back at Soto Cano AB, Erickson learned how he could Erickson while waiting forrescue. Heemphasizedtheneed a Blackhawk helicopter's rotor blades announced the betteraid his own rescue from thecombatrescueteam. The to chew them well. He also pointed out a favorite plant of approach of a 304th pararescue team. refresher course in survival procedures will help give him fire ants and a spiny palm tree that can shred skin. After rappeling into the brush the team warily apconfidence whenever he flies. The waiting ended whenthesilence was shattered by the proached. In short order Erickson was identified, sta'They should make this (training) mandatory, once a roar of A-10 attack aircraft overhead. The A-10s would bilized and carried to the arriving Blackhawk where year," he said.

PAGE 12

Sept. 17, 1993 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 12 Balboa Bulldogs' players warm up before the Sept. 10 game. Depaarftmentof Defense phofo by Sgt.John Gs* Hall Barkin' n' Bum ' Bulldogs win battle of 1992 co-champions by Sgt. Richard Puckett makeitl3-0.Theextrapointattemptfailed. scoreboard early in the second half. firstgameshough, andthere's along way to go. Tropic Times Sports Editor After the Bulldogs stopped the Cougars Donald Rivera returned the kickoff 26 It's fun to win agame like this, but we've gotto again, Underwood returned ashort punt 51 yards deep into Bulldog ternitory setting up focus on the next game." BALBOA -Running back Adam Beach yards for a touchdown to give his team a a five-yard TD run by Robert Reyes. The Panama Canal Green Devils is the ran for 146 yards and quarterback Jerome commanding 19-0 lead. Beach added the The Bulldogs were held scoreless in the team that Martinezis most concerned about Price scored two touchdowns to lead the extra point. third. But added a fourth score in the final now. Balboa Bulldogs over the Curundu CouThe punt return was the turning point in quarter. "Thley are definitely the fastest team in gars 35-6 Sept. 10 at Balboa Stadium. the game said Bulldogs coach Vince Tiawuan Hopkins capped the scoring the league," he said. "We've got to try and It was the first meeting for the 1992 Martinez. withaone-yardruntopullahead34-6.Tom contain their running game, and that will football league co-champions and one that "A coupleoftheirkey playersgothurton Ellis ran in the two-point conversion sealbe difficult. They looked tough." was over by halftime, the play and that score seemed to break ing the 35-6 win. In other action Sept. 10. Tyler Quinn The Bulldogs put the game away in the them," Martinez said. Martinez credits his offensive and deand Wilbert Reese each scored three touchsecond quarter,ringing up 20 points to pull The Bulldogs held the Cougars in cheek fensive lines with much of the credit, downs to spark the Panama Canal Green to a 27-0 lead. and gaveits offense another crack at ascore "They played outstanding." he said. Devils over the Kiwanis Kolts 44-6. Price got the scoring early with a onebefore the half. "Although we had some returning veterans Reese also ran for 161 yards on 11 yardkeeperafterleading his team on amore On what appeared to be a normal runand just one rookie, you never know how carries. The Devils poured in more than than eight-minute drive.Following aBeach ning play, Beach dropped back and conthey'll play until gametime. A fter our me300 yards of total offense. extra point, the Bulldogs led 7-0. nested with Alex Staton for a 39-yard gain dioere play during the jamboree, I was On the Atlantic side, the Cristobal TiThe Cougars responded with its own inside the Cougar's 10-yard line, concerned. But they came through. They gers edged the Balboa Red Machine 13-0. extended drive. It came to an abrupt end A couple plays later, Cardova Hall dominated the lines all night and it really Tonight, the Tigers take on the Cougars whenlinebackerRyan Underwood dropped finished offthe drive with an eight-yard TD showed late in the game." at 5:30 p.m. The Bulldogs square off with Cougars quarterback Robbic Garcia for a run. Martinez was still surprised by the victhe Green Devils at 7 p.m. Both games are loss on 4th down and four. Beach drilled the extra point to make it tory, but isn't taking anything for granted. at Balboa Stadium. A 52-yard run by Beach helped set up 27-0 at the half. "I felt that the Cougars were the team to Editor's note: Statistics provided hy Price's second score, a two-yard effort to The Cougars managed to get on the beat this season" Martinez said. "It's only the Bob Best. Running paves soldier's road to 24thTransportation edges out536th +Ultra-marathoner, page 13. better physical fitness and internaEngineers during Air Force intramu+Flag football, page 14. tional competition. ral basketball league play. +Sport shorts, page 15.

PAGE 13

Tropic Times Sept. 17,19931 Running helpssoldier put best foot forward by Allen Jones Contributing writer Balbuenaholds lead FORTCLAYTON(USARSOPAO)-Whatstarted FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) as a way toimprovehis physical fitness testscorehas Panama's Gil Balbuena maintained his lead in turned into a full time profession for one U.S. Army thePanamaArmed Forces Running ChampionSouth soldier. ship as the race moves into the final three Willie Moye, a signal system maintenance techmonths of competition. nician from the 193rd Support Battalion, currently Balbuena has built a 13-point lead over holds fourth place in the Panama Armed Forces second place Web Loudat. Air Force runner Running Championship. Rick Roman remains in third, 10 points behind The 37-year-old native of Chesapeake, Va., has Loudat. Racers are now looking at September been running for15ofthe 19 years he has beeninthe races to make their moves. Army. TheremainingsanctionedraceinSeptember "I started running to improve my (physical trainis Dog Days of Summer", threeand five-mile ing) time," Moye said. "It has helped me because I runs, 6:30 am., Sept. 25, at Reeder Physical consistently scoremorethan300pointsinthePTtest. Fitness Center. "I've raced in Korea, Germany and all around the Top ten runners are: U.S.,"hesaid. "I've won a few races and often place 1. 971 Balbuena firstin my age category. My best time foral0Kis 34 2.958 Web Loudat minutes." 3. 948 Rick Roman OneofMoye's interests now is coaching theU.S. 4. 891 Willie Moye Army South team which will run in the ninth annual 5. 870 Richard Downie Army 10-miler in Washington, D.C., in October. 6. 869 Aramis Mora "I ran with the team in 1991 and coached last 7. 806 Julio McInnis year," he explained. "I also coached the male and 8. 801 Miguel Campos female USARSO Transisthmian relay teams to first 9. 799 Edward McAleer placein the Military Divisionin1991 and 1992. The 10.798 Bernabe Soto guys won the Military Division and the ladies took 4 second in the Female Division last year." in between. These begin with a one-mile warm up Moye's training regimen for his 10-miler team and a one-mile cool down period. consists ofa6-8 milerun Mondays,intervaltraining "I look forward to both the men and women's Tuesdays and Fridays, a run of at least 8 miles teams placing in the top five in Washington," Moye Wednesdays and a 6-10 mile run Thursdays. said. The interval training includes four repetitions of Moye continually seeks new challenges. one mile at a 5:30 pace with a three-minute rest in "Iranthe halfmarathon at Fort Davis in 1992and between, eight half-miles with two-minutes rest in I'm looking forward to running my first marathon, between or 16 quarter-miles with a one-minute rest the Panama Marathon, Dec. 5," he said. Willie Moye Ultra-marathon veteran tackles Panama race by SSgt Jane Usero supportteamishis wifeCeci,who has been USARSO Public Affairs Office there through all five races. She provides encouragement as well as water and BandFORT CLAYTON -Getting from Coaids. lon to Panama City took on a whole new For Ceci and fellow support team memmeaning for 18 runners Sept. 4-5 as they -ber Rafael Vidal, MPC sergeant major, took the hard path throughthejunglesian dealing with the early morning hours was ultra-marathon. difficult. One runner, aveteran ofthe ultra-mara"The hardest part for us was staying thon, finished the 50-plusmilesin10 hours, awake and alert whenit got to be about four 8 minutes and was the only U.S. military in the morning," Ceci said. "That's a long member to participate in the mega-rn. run, butit's also alongdrive at 5-6 miles an John Mumma, commander of the Milihour,and when youare sittingimmobile all tary Police Command, finished in eighth that time it's hard to keep your eyes open. place among the runners who came from as Though the hours took a toll on the faraway astheU.S.,CostaRicaand Mexico support team and the miles and hills took a as well as from Panama. toll on the runners, the weather cooperated The run, which began Saturday nightin nicely, Mumma said. Colon and ended Sunday morning at the "I thought I had a slight advantage by Amador Causeway, took its toll on two being acclimated to the Panama heat and runners who dropped from the event. humidity, but the weather was relatively Mumma, however, pushed on throughout cool and with no rain the humidity was the night and tackled hill after hill in the low," he said. "It was delightful weather." darkness of the Transisthmian Highway. With good weather, a strong support "The most difficult parts ofthe run were team, the stamina and endurance built up the hills and the last 15 miles," he exover the years and the desire to finish, planned. "No matter how well trained or Mumma crossed the finish line looking as preparedyouareforanultra-marathon, you if he had jogged the leisurely 4-5 mile run are going to run out of gas." he does every day. A distance runner for years, Mumma "I normally train up for one of these has taken part in four other ultra-maraultra-marathons by running 18-20 mile thons in France while he was stationed in runs acoupletimes beforetheactualevent," Europe and says it's the personal challenge Mumma explained. "This time, however, that brings him back to the starting line. I didn't do that. I just kept my normal PT "Many people ask me 'why?' I just John Mumma u.s.Amy phoo sseJaneueo regimen of about 25 miles per week." enjoy running and the ultra-marathonisthe As for running the ultra-marathon next ultimate personal challenge," he said. "It's finish line, Mumma said. "Our support teams were absolutely viLabor Day, Mumma isn't as certain about alonesomesportandittestsyourindividual "The real goal is just to finish," he said. tal," he said. "In other ultra-marathons, competing as his wife. enduranceand stamina, but youdothe most "To finish is to win." there were check points for water, first aid "Now is not the best time to ask because and best that you can." Finishing took more than just -,durand other types of support. Here, the I am still tired and sore from the run, but if For the runners of the ultra-marathon, ance and stamina, it took sup n and enrunners were totally on their own and had I'm here, I might," he said. it's not crossing the finishline first that couragement of support teams following to be self-sufficient." "There's no questioninmymind,"Ceci makes a winner, it's just crossing the eachrunnereverystepoftheway,headded. One permanent member of Mumma's said. "fwearehere,hewillberightthere."

PAGE 14

14 Tropic Times Sept. 17,1993 24thTrans edges out Engineers by Sgt. James A. Rush 24th Wing Public Affairs HOWARDAFB-Elevenwasthemagic numbering theintramural basketball games here Sept. 10. The 24th Transportation Squadron had more of them than the 536th Engineer Battalion and came away with the win 5149. Engineer Kenny Dixon got 11 points in the first half, while teammate Mike Gray had 11 in the second half. The engineer stars finished with only 12 and 14 points respectively however. This wasn't enough to stave off the upstart transporters who "out-elevened" them 3-2. Transportation players Dave Self, Kevin Hurd and Michael Drafts each finished the game with 11 points. Tyree Brown added four three-pointersleadingto an upset over the second place 536th. Alexis Sotomayorand the 24thSecurity PoliceSquadronBTeamwereupset-minded also when they faced off against the 310th Airlift Support Squadron in the next game. Sotomayor led the charge and all scorers with 14 points. It was the cops who went home upset however,asthe flying squadron soaredpast them 37-32. Tony Johnson took center stage hitting the net for 11 points. He was supported by teammates Patryck Buckley and Rusty Mizaur who each had nine. Game threesaw asolid team effort from the 24th Medical Squadron overcome the 1st Battalion 228th Aviation Company B's one-twopunchofJosephJenkinsandTimothy Ladson 45-33. JenkinsandLadsonpouredin12and10 points respectively. They got little help from their supporting cast however. MedicspointguardTerenceStewartled his team in scoring, his total equalling the U.S. A4 Force photo by TSgL D-n Peak nihis innscring, hisutob e q g te Detachment 4's Rick Burgess passes around H HC, 1-228th Aviation's Lonnie Pearson (23) and Michael Ford (14). night's winning number, 11. The second-leading scorer was Jim Nobody got the lucky number in the top MWRSS 49-41. Jason Feldman. Only Gregory Moore Meyers who had eight. Therest ofthe team final game of the night between the 24th The teams' stars played to a draw. made any other significant contribution to pulled together topickup the slack though. Communications and Morale, Welfare, COMM's Aaron Caldwell and Wayman MWRSS's effort however, while several In all, eight hospital players got their mark Recreation and Services squadrons. ComBlack had 16 and 13 points, but were communications players chippedin for the in the scorebook munications broke out of a halftime tie to matched by MWRSS's Teddy Martin and win. Reverse play nets 228th touchdown, victory FORT CLAYTON (TropicTimes)Co. E, 228thAviation tight end Angel Longoria caught Law Enforcement Activity bysurprise andrambled25 yards foratouchdown providing the only score in a 6-0 defensive showdown Monday night. Longoria took the feed on a reverse during the opening drive ofthe game and sliced through ashockeddefense for the TD. The score proved to be all 228th would need as it evened its record at 1-1 in unit flag football league play. Neither offense could muster any drives until late in the fourth quarter when LEA started to get in a groove. With the passing game ineffective most of the game, LEA coachDanaWalker decided to try therunning attack. Michael Manion responded with a 12-yard gain into 228th territory with less than four minutes left. The drive suddenly stalled. LEA's comeback hopes ended when quarterbackPaul Trombley's goal-line pass was dropped. The 228th took over and despite turning the ball over on downs with less than a minute remaining, managed to hold on for the win. The win was an important one to 19911992 second place finishers, said coach Michael Cameron. "This was a big boost," Cameron said. "The first game we came out really unprepared and although the offense was ineffective we still managed to get the win." Cameron credits his defense with the victory. Deparmentof efenesphotobySgt. Fchard Puckett "Theyplayedsuper,"Cameronadded."Hopefully,now Law Enforcement Activity's Michael Manion (right) picks up blocks from teammates Kelly Feasel (19), the offense will get in gear and we'll keep winning." Ernest Anderson (20) and Frank DeMers (69).

PAGE 15

Tropic Times Sept. 17, 1993 AF swim team coaches The Albrook and Howard swimming teams arelooking for qualified coaches and youth swimmers for the 1993-94 swimming season. All age groups and skill levels of children are welcome to participate. Coaches will be paid according to the number of participants in the program. Team workouts are approximately three days a week throughout the school year. Anyone interested in coaching should contact Vince Duncan at theAlbrook Youth Center, 286-3195. Parents or swimmers interested in participating should call Duncan or Gary Hankins, 286-4571. Tuesday night bowling Teams and bowlers are still needed for the Tuesday night men's bowlingleague at the Fort Clayton bowling center. The season begins Tuesday at 7 p.m. Interested bowlers should contact Rick Lindvig at287-6339 orthe bowling center at 287-6366. Powerlifting competition Registration is under way for a powerlifting competition to be held at Reeder Physical Fitness Center. For more information, call 287-4050. Unit level hoops Registration for the Army unit level basketball program continues until Oct. 23. The clinicis scheduled for Oct. 19. Forinformation call the Directorate ofCommunityActivities,Sports Branch, Building 154,FortClayton at 287-4050. Fishing tournament An inter-club fishing tournament will be held in Atlantic waters until Nov. 30. The event is sponsored by Club Nautico Caribe, the Panama Canal Tarpon Club and the Panama Canal Yacht Club. The fishermen who land the largest barraUs Air Force photo by TSgt. m Peak cuda, wahoo, kingfish, jack/tuna, marlin, sailfish and First 'pitch' tarponwillwinprizes.Prizeswillbeawardedforthetop Augie Augrom throws out the ceremonial first ball Saturday at the grand opening of the Howard three catches in each category. Bowling Center. The center has been undergoing remodeling since January. The entrance fee is $20 per angler and may be paid at the bar of any of the clubs orto Francisco Lopez, 2412025; Alberto Villa, 245-4379; Gabriel Kam, 241uk yB w c a h sB sebalsa dn s 0675; Helio D. Alves, 243-4146; Mike Bell, 520 Turkey Bowl coaches Basketball standings* AlbertoAlba, 245-0733; GerryLaatz,243-5652; JoL The Army Directorate of Community Activities AMERICAN LEAGUE Kirby, 241-5883; Fermin Pinel, 241-6003. Sports Branch is accepting resumes for Army Turkey Bowl team coaches. Call 287-4050. Northern Division Navy Morale Welfare Recreation Sports is accepting W L Women's basketball resumes for the Navy Turkey Bowl team coach. People 617th ALSS 13 3 Registration for the Directorate of Community Acinterested may call Morise Conerly at 283-4222. 1/228th HHC 12 3 tivities women's basketball league is under way and The 24th Morale Welfare Recreation Services SquadDet 4 9th Wing 10 4 continues until Oct. 5. Call 287-4050 for information. ron is accepting resumes for an Air Force Turkey Bowl 24th MS 6 8 coach. Call 284-3451. 617th SOAD 5 8 Fun run 6933rd ESS 5 10 The Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Control 5 &1 Ok run Southern Division Program and thePanamaChapteroftheAssociation ofthe The46thAnnualAirForceAnniversary 5and 0kruns W L U.S. Army will be sponsoring a fun run Sept. 25. will be held 7 am. Saturday in front of the Howard Sports 24th SPS 14 0 Registration is continues until Thursday at Room 300 and Fitness Center forrunners 19 and up. Trophies will be in Building 127, Fort Clayton, or Building 115, Corozal. awarded to the top two runners in men's and women's 1924th CES "A" 7 8 No late registrations will be allowed. 29, 30-39 and 40-and-over categories. For more informa24 AIS/OSS 6 8 Awards will be given for first, second and third place tion, call 284-3451. 24 AIRPS 4 11 in each age category. 24th SUPS "B" 3 12 For more information call 285-5913. Golf tournament 1/228th A Co. 2 12 A golf tournament for servicemembers will be held NATIONAL LEAGUE Free step aerobics Sept. 25 and 26 at Horoko Golf Course with a 7:30 am. Free step aerobics classes are held 9-10:30 a.m. shotgun start. Thereis a$20 entry feethat does notinclude Eastern Division Mondays through Fridays at Fronius Fitness Center, cart or greens fees. Entrants must have United States Golf W L Fort Davis. Steps are not provided. Call 289-3108. Association handicap. Flight winners will be entered in the U.S. Military Sports Association GolfChampionship to be 24th SUPS "A" 13 1 heldin Octoberat Fort Jackson, S.C. Deadline for registra1/536th Eng. 10 4 High/low impact aerobics tion in Thursday and can be done at Horoko. For more 24th MSSQ 9 4 The Howard Sports and Fitness Center offers high information, call 284-3451. 24th TRANS 8 6 and low impact aerobics and strengthening with 617th ALSS "B" 4 12 dynabands and hand weights.5-6p.m.Mondays through Bowlin tournament 24th CES "B" 2 13 Fridays. Call 284-4700 for more information. Anotapbowlingtournament willbeheld3p.m.Sunday Western Division Fitness improvement at the Albrook Bowling Center. There is a $10 entry fee. W L Knock down nine pins and it counts as a strike. 24th CS 10 5 Fitness improvement classes are held 6:05-7 am. Bowlers witha120andunderaveragereceive threefree 24th CS 9 5 and2:05-3 p.m., Monday, Wednesday and Friday atthe strikespergame, 121-150 averagereceives two strikes and 31th ALS 9 6 Howard Sports and Fitness Center. 151-170 receives one strike. 24th MG 8 6 The class consists of a calisthenic super circuit Winners are eligible for the no tap championship to be 1/228th B Co. 6 6 workout aimed at improving muscular endurance, the held in December. 24th MWRSS 4 12 cardiovascular system and flexibility. For more inforT-shirts will be awarded for monthly champions. Call 24 SPS "B" 3 11 mation, call 284-3451. 286-4260 for more information. *As of Sept. 10

PAGE 16

16 Tropic Times Sept. 17, 1993 Hispanic heritage festival kicks off month FORTCLAYTON(USARSOPAO)-Hispanic Heritage Month will kick off today with a festival 11:30 a.m. in the lobby of Building 519, Fort Clayton. There will be Hispanic dancing, food tasting and souvenirs from throughout Central and South American Latin countries. For more information about the festival and other planned events for the month, call Brenda Harris at 287-4260/ 4268. Navy patrol boat sinks at Rodman piers RODMAN NS (USNAVSTAPANCANAL PAO) -A 68-foot Navy patrol boat sank, Aug. 29 at the Rodman piers The vessel, belonging to Special Boat Unit 26 at Rodman, has been raised and is currently in drydock. The incident is under investigation. Girl Scout Center Lt. Harry Wingo, Special Boat Unit 26 (right) salutes the petty officer of tha watch o t s Upe house ALBROOK AFS (USARSO PAO) -The Girl New l com m issioned ship Scout Service Center, Building 806, Albrook, will host an open house 10 am.-3 p.m. Tuesday and E .Thursday and noon-5 p.m. Wednesday. stop Vi its odm n pi rsCall 285-6867 for mome information. stops, visitsNavy Birthday Ball by Lt. j.g. Laura C. Moore in that we strictly provide support to special operations tickets available now USNA VSTAPANCANAL Public Affairs forces including Navy Seals. The ship's design is based on the fact that the Seals go in close to the coastal areas. The RODMAN NS (USNAVSTAPANCANAL RODMAN NSHurricaneseasonis more than amonth ship's draft (only 7.8 feet)is such that it allows us to insert PAO) -Tickets for the Navy Birthday Ball Oct. 16 old, but that didn'tkeep the USSHurricane, acoastalpatrol and extract the Navy Seals in areas where larger ships are on sale until Oct. 1. Ticket prices are $13 for ship, from visiting here this weekend. cannot go, including riverine environments." E-1 through E-6, $18 for E-7 through E-9 and $23 The new ship, just commissioned on Sept. 2, stopThe 28-person crew has put in many long hours to for officers and civilians. The price includes three ped at Rodman on its way from its shipbuilding site in prepare the ship for its maiden voyage. beverages. Louisiana to its homeport of San Diego. "It's beenalotoflong days,"said Petty Officer2nd Class Call Lt. j.g. Laura Moore, 283-5641, for mom The Hurricane's primary mission is coastal patrol and Garrett Staats, an interior communications electrician. information. interdiction, with a secondary mission of Naval Special "We'veallhadtomakealotofadaptationsandchangesthat Warfare support. the normal fleet sailor wouldn't have to make. It takes alot DEH sets water m ain It is expected to operate in low intensity conflict enviof hard work and it's starting to pay off. We're starting to ronments. Naval Special Warfare operational missions have a good time on it now." flushing schedule include long range Seal insertion and extractions, tactical The Hurricane attracted many visitors while at RodFORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The Diswimmer operations, intelligence collection and coastal man. One womanwasparticularlyenthusiasticaboutwhat rectorate of Engineering and Housing will flush and riverine support. she saw. watermains 8 am.-6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday on The commanding officer, Lt. John Gelinne, explained "I liked everything about the ship," Lisa Zamudio said. FortClaytonandMondayand Tuesday onCurundu. what makes the 170-foot ship unique. "Everything is very compact, orderly and neat. I was very "The mission of the ship is unlike any other Navy ship impressed with it." Local EFMPsupportgroup offers multi-service support, by SSgt. Rian Clawson Gorgas Army Community Hospital, they must enroll in the EFMP through Gorgas. "However,militarymembersshouldalso HOWARDAFB-TheExceptionalFamenroll withtheirservice-specificprogram," ily Member Program support group here she said. "If our people are not enrolled in brings togetherexceptional family member the Air Force system, we have no way of programs from all the services to provide knowing about them and they won't be support for parents. identified for assignment and service purThe Department of Defense established poses." the groundwork for theExceptionalFamily Military officials recognize the imporMember program in the 1960s to help tance of family members and stress ensurfamily members with "special needs." ing adequate medical, psychological, and These special needs include a wide vaeducational services for family members riety of developmental and psychological with special needs, said Melody Jones, Air disorders, physical and learning disabiliForceFamilyAdvocacyOutreachProgram ties, and hearing, sight and speech impairmanager. ments. "Often, these family members can cre"It's very important to enroll 'excepatesomeuniquechallengesandextrastress," tional' family members in the program," she said. "Many military installations have said Maj. Cynthia Cain ofthe 24th Medical EFMP support groups which help families Squadron. She is the Air Force EFMP meet these challenges and ease the stress. officer here. In Panama, the Army's EFMP and the "Many people believe enrolling in the Air Force FAOP are working together to program will negatively affect their miliestablish a parent support group for the tary careers,"Cain said. "But this is simply Pacific community. not true." "Thesemeetingsareintended to provide It can, however, affect options available a support network for parents with specialfor duty assignments, she said. needschildren,"Jones said. "Theyaropen U.S. Army photo by SSg Jane Usero be "Generally, military members will only to military members and spouses from al Grand opening sent to duty stations with access to branches of service." services required by their exceptional famForinformationaboutEFMP,AirForce Gen. George A. Joulwan, U.S. Southern Command commander in chief, ily member." members may call Cain at 284-6410/6457, looks at a mola pillow during the grand opening of th e Canal Crafters Shop For Air Force people, enrolling in the Army members Ida Haynes at 282-5339/ Monday. The shop is open 1 Oa.m.-2p.m. Monday-Saturday and is located EFMP can be a little confusing, Cain said. 5607, and Marine or Navy members Chief in the Curundu housing area. Call 286-6244 for more information. Since most families receive care through Randy Vanden-Bosch at 283-5104/3218.


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ERKT99SL1_5HF1LF INGEST_TIME 2011-07-11T20:23:19Z PACKAGE UF00098947_00123
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES