Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Southern Command news

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G ofhe Panaa Canal museum


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Rescue u.s.*Ar.y phbbySSu.u
Spec. Rodney Milner (front left) Spec. Jeffrey Boyles (front right) Cpl. Kevin Gulce (rear left) and Spec. Lavert Fudge take on mud and muck up to their
knees a"close in on the finish line of Green Hell. See story, photo. page 3.


New traffic code takes effect Saturday


FORTCLAYTON(USARSOPAO)- A new Panama-
nian Vehicle Traffic Code will go into affect Saturday,
Military Police Command officials said.
Under the new code, drivers must have a copy of their
vehicle registration certificate in the vehicle at all times
and, until they get that document and their revisado
stickers, drivers must carry acopy of their vehicle inspec-
tion ceticate, officials.said.
Also, drivers can now be fined $50 for having alcohol
on their breath.
Drivers found guilty of drunk driving, but ho aren't
involved in an accident, will receive the following punish-
S ment:.
* st offense - $100 -.$250 fine, 20 days in jail.or
community service, four months suspended license.
*2nd offense -$250- $500 fine, 40 days in jail or
community service, six months suspended license.
*3rd offense - $500 - $1,000 fine, 60 days in jail,
indefinite suspension oflicense.
.. Convicted drunk drivers who are involved in an acci-
dent will receive the following punishment:
*Ist offense - $500 - $',QOO fine, 30 days in jail or
community service, 60 days suspended license.
*2ndoffense - $1,000 - $1.500 fine, 60 days in jail or
Community service, one yearsuspended license.
*3rd offense - $1,500 - $2,000 fine, 90 days in jail,
revocation of license.
l Those caught driving drunk will also be arrested arid
Detained for not more than 12 hours until they aresober,
* " officials said. Dining that time, Panamanian officials will
perform blood, urine, beathalyzer or other physical tests
to determine how intoxicated the driver is.
In the case of atnaccident, the following will happen:
* *lie Transito traffic police will cite all drivers in-


Fidel Castro wants to develop more
joint ventures to stimulate Cuba's
suffering economy.


evolved in the accident. The citation will explain When and
whertrdriversmustappearintrafficcout.Anytimethe
police issue a citation, the drivers' license is taken and
returned after the court appearance.
*Thecourtdategivencanonlybechangedbythecomt,
and it will not be rescheduled if one or more of the drives
fails to appear.The judge wil decide tte ase based on the
evidence he has and assess the fines and damages. Drivers
should haveanyevidence, witnesses anddamage esimatea
with them when they appear at traffic court.
*Drivers fined more than $15 can appeal the judge's
decision.Toappeal,thedrivermust say,"lappeal"orhave
lawyer submit arequestin writing within 24 hours ofthe
decision. .
The new code also makes it mandatory foreveryone in
a vehicle to wear seat belts and illegal forchildren under,
5 yearsold to sit in the front seat, officials added.
Driverswhodonotwearseatbelts,orwhosepassengers
do not wearseat belts,riska fieof$25 forth first offense,
Sl00forthesecondandalicensesuspensionforthirtosix
months for additional offenses.
Another change isthat, for the first time in Panama,
every vehicle owner will be required to possess liability
insurance for each vehicle. Officials expect the Panama-
nian government to establish the minimum amount of
insurance needed at a later date..
A revised trafficfine schedule has also beenadopted. It


is:
Violation
Parking violation
Driving in opposite lane
Driving wrong way ona one-way


EPmp
$10
$2043
$43-


Continued on page 2.


Congress passes bill to give Per-
sian Gulf veterans priority hospital
treatment


Navies conduct

warfare training
by LL j.g. Laura C. Moore
USNAVSTAPANCANAL Pbic A sffa
PUERTOCASTILLA,HONDURAS-Aboutthree
hundred U.S. and foreign sailors and soldiers recently
wrapped up a Naval Special Warfare exercise after
twoweeksoftrainingin seven remote Central Ameri-
can locations.
Units from Panama and the United States partici-
pacd in King's Guard 93-JIin Honduras, Guatemala
and El Salvador. Kings Guard 93-I was a joint,
combined maritime interdition and coastal security
exercise directed by the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The
exerciseended July 28.
The Southern Command-sponsored exercise
brought together 115 U.S. military personnel and
approximately 190 of their counterparts in the three
Central American militaries.
In Puerto Castilla, Honduras, U.S. Navy Seals
trained with Honduran buzos tactics (tactical divers)
in imderwater demolition. Petty Officer 2nd Class
Mike Fullerton, a Seal from Naval Special Warfare
Unit Eight aRodran NS, explained how the training
will help the Buzos tacticos.
"We'reshowng themhowwe cancalculatediffer-
ent charges, and howthey can use this in accordance
with theirjob here" Full n said
Honduras' finest were impressed with what the
Continued on page 2.




*Helping hand, pages 8&9.
*Enchanted summer, page 10.
*Racquetball tourney, page 12.


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Petty Officer 2nd Class Mike Fullerton and Honduran tactical divers train In underwater demolition in Puerto Castilla, Honduras.


U.8. Nwy photo by LLj.g. Laa C. Moore


Warfare

Continued from page 1.
U.S. Navy had to offer.
"Thetraining has been excellent and the
Navy Seals are excellent," said Lt C. G.
Paz, the Buzos tactics' commander.
"They are in very good condition and
keep their minds dear no matter what they
are doing. It doesn't matter if they are
jumping or how far they are swimming,
they are very excellent. I have a very good
impression of them, all of them," he said.
NavySealsalsoconductedcombatswim-
mer training with their counterparts in the
rough waters of La Union, El Salvador.
"The environment is a hard one, even
for experienced divers. The currents are
really rough," said Petty Officer 3rd Class
Chris Lee, a Seal from NSWU-8.
The Salvadoran Grupo de Operaciones
Especiales - known as GOEs - were
inexperienced in combat swimming, but
they earned the Seals' respect
"They're pretty seasoned land-combat
veterans," Murphy said. "They're good,
hardguys and theyputalotofeffortinto the
training."
OthermembersofNSWU-8andSpecial
Boat Unit 26, also from Rodman NS, de-
ployedtoSipicateand SanJose, Guatemala
to participate in King's Guard 93-I.
"What we're doing is cross-training
with the Guatemalan coastal patrol," ex-


Traffic

Continued from page 1.

Passing on a hill or bridge
Driving with door open
Buses driving on routes not authorized
Failure to obey traffic signs
Failure to stop for red light
Excess passengers
Excessive speed
Lights off or broken
Failure to stop at stop sign
Unnecessary noise
Wrong license for vehicle
Alcohol on the breath
Drunk driving
Improper lane change
Passing on a curve
Disregarding emergency lights or siren
Illegal U-turn
Stopping on safety line
Vehicle in poor condition
Obstructing the roadway
No license plate


plained Petty Officer Second Class Lenny
James of SBU-26.
"The purpose is to teach navigation,
boat characteristics, familiaization fire,
and how to do insertions and exractions."
James said he benefitted fiom the train-
ing.
"Working here in a coastal environ-
ment, I've learned how to navigate in and
out ofthe surf. It'sroughand therearetides
outthere youwouldnot believe. Teyrange
from 3-foot tides to 15-foot tides," James
said.
"Incaseleverhavetocome backuphere
to teach again, I know what they have and
what they don't have, so thetraining willgo
more effectively and smoothly. I've im-
provedmySpanishskills,andlearnedabout
the customs and the environment here,
James said.
Lt. Mark Hinch, commander of one of
the task elements operating in Guatemala,
was also pleased with the training.
"The relationship between us and the
Guatemalans has been fantastic. We've
been working hand-in-hand. Everyone's
been getting their hands dirty and getting
into the training."
Lt Bill Oldmixon, commander of the
task unit which ran the exercise out of Soto
Cano Air Base, Honduras, explained the
relationship between US. and host nation
military personnel.
"We show them how we do things, they
show us how they do things, and hopefully
both sides learn from it and take something


A U.S. and Honduran Marine prepare to rappel.


away from it," Oldmixon said.
"Ther is a genuine exchange of ideas,"
explainedCmdr. RobertSchoultz,NSWU-
8 commanderand King's Guard 93-IItask
group commander.
"Also, the training reinforces and en-
hances our capability to put our people in
remote and austere environments and to


Expired license
Tailgating
Wrong license plate
No helmet
No inspection decal
Expired license plate
Damaged license
Racing
Failure to use prescription glasses
Crossing double yellow line
Passengers on bus stairs
No mudflaps
Illegal turns
No fire extinguisher
Missing "Flammable" sign
Passing in a no passing zone
Hit & run
Refusing to pick up a passenger (taxi)
Passing in a town
No muffler
Refuse to show license
No "TAX' sign
No jack
No "DANGER" sign
No escort for heavy equipment
No rear view minor


conduct training and maintain contact with
our counterparts in other countries.
"The host nations have gotten some
good operational training out of the exer-
cise which makes them a more capable
force. And, hopefully, they walkaway with
a positive impression of the U.S. and the
U.S. military," Schoultz added.


Using "demonstration" plate for more
than 48 hours
Exit vehicle with motor running
Bald tires
No spare tire
Leaving keys in car
Using illegible license plate
Passengers in truck bed without enclosed
area
Missing bumper (front or rear)
Letting unlicensed persons drive
Failure to appear in court
No seat belt (see above)
Using "Official" plate after 6 p.m.
Improper backing
Parking facing the wrong direction
Abandoning passengers without cause
Leaving vehicle in road without hazard
lights
Pulling out in front of another vehicle
Disrespect to the authorities
Failure to yield to a pedestrian
Tinted windows on public transport
Loud speakers on public transport
Defective exhaust system
Not carrying a copy of the traffic regulation


$20
$10
$20
$20
$10
$20

$30
$20
$30
$25
$25-$100
$50
$20
$10
$25

$25
$25
$20
$20
$30
$30
$30
$5


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Tropic Times 2
Aug. 6, 1993 3








4..4
















Pvt.2CoreySmithtakesadrinkofwateron break.

r "Trial run




Medicspreparefor

field badgetesting

by SSgt Jane Usero
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT SHERMAN- Medics from Headquarters Corn- .
pany, 142nd Medical Battalion, tested their mettle and
their desire to earn the ultimate peacetime medic award -
the Expert Field Medical Badge - during a field training
exerciseat the Jungle Operations Traniing Center here last
week
"Taking on the Green Hell is only one step in our
training for the actual test for the badge, which will be in
September," said 2nd Lt. Danny Hein, company executive
officer. "The actual test will consist of 11 areas with several
subjects tested under each."
The soldiers also practiced their emergency medical
treatment, physical fitness, survival and field communica-
I o tions skills and took a written ten test, he said.
i -. "'qThe EMT test alone will consist of 11 separate tasks
4" such as triage, treating an open chest wound and using an
IV (intravenous tube)," he added.
'"he actual test will also include a 12-mile road march
in full combat gear which has to be completed in three
S hours," Hein added. "Additionally, the medics will have to
u-s. MAn ht bSSt n Us.e qualify with the M16A2 rifle and negotiate day and night
Maj. Robin Bruno takes on the single rope bridge on the Green Hell obstacle course. land navigation courses."
The FIX was the highlight of two months of training
for the soldiers, Hein said. The unit will do it all again the
week before the test.
The unit designed the training to be harder than the test.
The goal is to be prepared, Hein said.
"If you give soldiers good training and good planning
to go by, they're going to be motivated. It's when it falls
apart...that's when your troops fall apart," said 2nd Lt.
Thomas Ivester as he sat cooling offafter his bout with the
beast.
Another goal is to reinforce the teamwork needed to
accomplish any mission, Hein said.
As thesoldiersnegotiated obstacle afterobstacle, this bit
of hell in the jungle did just that. From the very first high
wall, over which the four-man teams had to pull their
patient, to the steep, rocky cliff they had to neg, by
rope, it took the work of the whole team to accomplish the
mission: getting their patient safely to the end of the
course.
"The Green Hell was...challenging, but fun," Spec.
Lavert Fudge, HHC, 142nd Med. Bn., said with a smile.
"I'm looking forward to the actual test," he said. "It's a
new endeavor for me and I feel I have a strong chance of
winning the badge with practice," the former artilleryman
said of his upcoming first attempt.
"It'sadifficultmissiontoaccomplish," Hein said. "Last
year we only had a 20-25 percent success rate."
* " "We are training hard and hope to come home with a
-- -- higherrate ofsuccess this year," he said. "For those , ho do
A team of medics carry their patient across the lagoon. win, it's well worth all the hard work."


.1l


-~CI�---- *CI - -1--I~








Tropic Times
Aug. 6, 1993


~Hemisohere


APLaMihot
Cuban president Fidel Castro gestures during his speech at a ceremony marking the fifth anniversary of
the founding of the U.S.-based charity organization "Pastors for Peace' in Havana Tuesday.


Castro wants local joint ventures


CARACAS (Reutes) - Cuban President Fidel Castro
said he wants to develop more joint ventures in the
communist-ruled country and has offered preferential
treatment to those proposing profitable investment deals.
Castro, whose Caribbean island is crippled by a U.S.
trade embargo and the disappearance of billions of dollars
in aid with the collapse ofthe Soviet Union, also said Latin
American integration was critical in the face of emerging
global trading blocs.
The Cuban leader's comments, along with those of
other Latin American leaders, were solicited for a special
edition of El Nacional newspaper of Caracas, published


Aylwin wants to s


Tuesday to celebate its 50th anniversary.
"We ae willing to continue developing investment
projects through joint companies, offering preferential
treatment for our partners in Latin America that make the
investments of Latin American businessmen in Cuba
attractive and profitable," Castro wrote.
He said Cuba is prepared to share its achievements in
health care, offering nations the key to high-quality medi-
cal services at a lower cost than in the developed wodd.
He also touted Cuban biotechnology, pharmaceutical,
sugar, tourism, construction and fishing industries and
said they, too, could be attractive in larger trade pact


up human rights cases


More than 2,000 people
killed, 957 more missing
during Pinochet's rule
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) - President
Patricio Aylwin, concerned that the slow
pace of trials of officers charged with hu-
man rights abuses is causing unrest in the
military, has asked Congress to appoint
special judges for the cases.
A commission appointed by Aylwin
soonafter he tookpower determined that at
least 2,115 people were killed and 957
disappeared afterbeing arrested by security
agents during Gen. Augusto Pinochet's
rule.
Most of those incidents, however, are
covered under a 1978 amnesty declared by
Pinochet. It is likely that most of the im-
1' -,ding cases also will fall under the am-
n y - making the delay in the trials all
the more annoying to the military.
Aylwin, in a speech made in Santiago
Tuesday, said the military's complaints
were reasonable.
"I think all we Chileans want that the
trials...(to)endassoonaspossible," Aylwin
said. Aylwin consulted with Pinochet be-
fore making the proposals for speeding up
the trials.
Although Pinochet ceded leadership of
the country to Aylwin in 1990, the military
retains substantial power in Chile.
That was undedinedinMay, 1992when
commandos in combat gear were posted
across the street from the presidential pal-
ace while Aylwin was out of the country on
business.


"N.


4'
I,�


APLawPhoo
A television technician prepares Chilean president Patrido Aylwin for a radio and television address to the nation in
SantiagoTuesday. Aylwin outlined his govemments plan to expedite trials of military officers charged with human rights
abuse under the regime of military dictator Gen. Augusto Pinochet.
The official explanation was that extra civilians believed the demonstration was About 200 officers are awaiting trial for
securitywasnededforameetingofPnochet intended as a reminder of the military's human rights abuses committed during
with other generals, but many officials and strength. Pinochet's nearly 17 years of rule.


Officials deny shipping
armsvia Panama consulate
PRAGUE (Reuters) - Czech authorities said
Tuesday they had denied an export license for an
arms deal now under investigation inPanama over
allegations it involved illegal exports to Bosnia.
Panama's president Guillermo Endara named a
special government commission to investigate re-
ports of illegal arms trafficking from the Czech
Republic to Bosnia via a Panamanian consulate in
Spain Monday.
The Ca2ch foreign ministry said a request for a
license to export arms to Panama had been revoked
in May whenPrague authorities became suspicious
about the deal
These suspicions had been conveyed to the
Panamanian government, a senior official said.
Panamanian foreign ministry officials said
Monday the shipment included 25,000
submachinegnswith 100,000 magazines and 5,000
pistols with 7,000 bullets.
They did not know whether the arms actually
arrived in Bosnia, which is under a United Nations
arms embargo.

Peru approves death
penalty for terrorists
LIMA, Peru (AP) - In a bid to end a 13-year
guerrilla war, Congress approved the death penalty
forinsurgents in a vote held anonymously for fear
of rebel reprisals.
ThbecntitutionalamendmentapprovedbyCon-
gresslate Tesday must be confirmed by a majority
votein a nationwide referendum. The government
haspromisedareferendum would beheldthis year,
but no date has been set
A survey this year by the respected polling firm
Apoyo showed 62percent ofPeruvians favored the
death penalty for terrorists. Currently, the stiffest
sentence for guerrillas is life in prison.


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9 Military News


Tropic Tes ll
Aug. 6,1993 JL


APLaserPhoto
The Navy F-A-18 attack planes and A-6 bombers on board the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt, currently in the Adriatic, can drop laser-guided bombs
against Bosnian Serb weaponry should a major air campaign be mounted.



U.S.airpowerwaitsforOKin Bosnia


WASHINGTON (AP) - Should President Clinton and
the allies agree to use air power to break the siege of
Sarajevo, military officers can dust off war plans they've
shelved formonths asdiplomats haggledoverthe fateofthe
crumbling region.
Although many top military officers say they hope the
current speculation about the use of force may lead to
further progress at the negotiating table in Geneva, NATO
is standing by with a widearray of combat equipment in the
region should such talks fail.
Political leaders of the warring factions in Bosnia
reached general agreement July 30 on plan to partition the


former Yugoslav republic into three ethnic regions. Nego-
tiations are continuing on the specific boundaries and
governmental structure.
In the past, Pentagon and NATO allies assessed the
possibility of air strikes within Bosnia that could hit key
bridges, railroads and military storage areas. But if the
allies prefer a more limited strike, the first targets most
probably would include the dozens of heavy artillery
placements that have pounded the citizens of Sarajevo.
Much intelligence has been garnered by the months-
long "Deny Flight" operations that have flown over the
region since April.


The goaloftheNATO operations to suppress unautho-
rized flights in the Bosnian "no fly" zone.
Since the Bosnian Serbs have had little reason to fear
attacks, they have left much weaponry in the open and
vulnerable to precision air strikes, said military officials
who spoke on condition of anonymity.
The Navy F-A-18 attack planes and A-6 bombers on
board the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt, cur-
rently intheAdriatic, can drop laser-guided bombs against
such sites should a major air campaign be mounted.
The carrier could stage about 150 bombing runs a day,
its attack jets minutes away from Bosnian airspace.


Court exonerates
retired general
TAMPA, Fla. (Tropic Times) -
Retired Army Gen. Wallace H.
Nutting was acquitted of defense
contracting fraud charges by a fed-
eral jury in July.
Nutting,65,wasthecommander-
in-chief, U.S. Southern Command
from 1979 to 1983.
Nutting was cleared of three
charges stemming from his involve-
ment with Sooner Defense of
Florida, a now-defunct munitions
company.
Six of the eight other people on
trial were convicted on dozens of
other charges by a jury that deliber-
ated for three days.

Aspin: We'll help


Bill gives Gulf vets prioritytreatment


WASHINGTON (AP) - Persian Gulf
veterans who claim that contact with toxic
materials during thewarruinedtheirhealth
would receive priority treatment at Veteran
Affairs Department hospitals under a bill
passed by the House.
The bill, which now goes to the Senate,
waspassed411-0 Monday. Itresulted from
growing claims of deteriorating health
among veterans exposed totoxicsubstances
and environmental hazards during opera-
tions Desert Shield and Desert Storm.
Veterans groups and some doctors be-
lieve exposure to toxic materials caused
numerous ailments among returning veter-
ans, including lung and heart ailments,
gastrointestinal problems, hair loss and
unexplained bleeding.
The VA said it has found no direct links
between toxic materials and reported ail-
mw � wnahwh� . , _;.a- I---


Theater Suppo rtementphoto by SSgL EdBurk
French horn player SSgt. Roger Whitworth plays at Fort Clayton as part of
Washington, D.C. National Guard's 257th Army Band.


ments, but has set up a registry to collect
data on health problems and opened three
referral centers for unusual cases.
Rep. Joseph Kennedy, D-Mass., saidthe
registry has tracked 6,125 servicemen and
women who were exposed to petrochemi-
cals, depleted uranium from munitions,
vaccines,pesticides and parasites.
"Under this legislation Persian Gulf
veterans are given the benefit of the doubt"
about eligibility for treatment, he said.
The legislation says the VA must pro-
vide hospital and outpatient care to veter-
ans who report symptoms before Oct. 1,
1996. The VA must refund any payments
made by veterans before the billis enacted.
Rep. Lane Evans, D-IlL, chairman of
the House Veterans' Affairs subcommittee
on oversight and investigations, said about
4,000v e eI the eManne Band star
underpressure. Whitwoth reported for
first day of work, on a Monday in J
1977. Hewas fitted forhis uniformthatd
he got to practice with the band Tues
and Wednesday. Wednesday evening
played in a concert on the Capitol steps.
was excited. He thought it was unbeli
able, incredible.
He could handle it, though. Of the
who auditioned fortheposition, Whitwc
was selected as the best.
The Marine Band plays every Wedi
day evening at the Capitol in the sumn
Maybe you've visited the Capitol or b
walking down the Washington, D.C., r
and heard the music on a warm suml
head evening. Sunday nights, the Marine b
the usedtoplay attheJeffersonMemorial,n
they've changed to the Washington Mc


related to service in the gulf.
"Some veterans were denied the health
care they needed because they couldn't
prove their illnesses were service-related,"
Evans said. "These are veterans that need
our help and need it now."
The HouseMonday also votedto extend
insurance benefits to 11 Air Force fliers
who were killed in crashes hours before a
new benefits policy went into effect.
Nine of 13 airmen killed when two C-
141B jet transports crashed over Montana
on the night of Nov. 30, 1992, had signed
up for a new Servicemen's Group Life
Insurance program that from Dec. 1 in-
creased maximum benefits from $100,000
to $200,000.
The VA denied theincreased benefits to
their ,mny in is- an.f two others
ted lounge chairand threw hisleg and arm over
his the bannister - it was Jimmy Carter.
uly, Whitworth says that President Reagan
lay, was morealoofthanCarter. Yetonce, when
day Reagan was going out to his helicopter, he
he looked over at the band - Reagan hap-
He opened to lookWhitworth directly inthe eye
iev- andReagansalutedWhitworth. Whitworth
gave a snappy salute back to the com-
84 mander-in-chief. Later Whitworth got
north chewed out because he wasn't supposed to
salute the president.
nes- By 1988, Whitworth had moved up to
ner. the assistant French horn chairin the band,
een but he felt it was time to move on.
nail "I had gained a lot of valuable experi-
mer ence. But I wantedto moveforward, branch
and into other things musically."
now Whitworthnow is a free-lancemusician
>nu- in the Washington, D.C. area.


I 7


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. . .. . . . .










- Voices


- ..ow


Reader questions holiday change


Dear Mayors' Corner:
I would like to know who in Panama has the authority
tomoveanational holiday. My5-year-old,aswellasmyself
and my husband, were very disappointed to discover that
the best part of the Fourth of July was actually going to be
held July 3! Being stationed in Panama limits the military
community's holiday celebrations. How unfair it was to
move the holiday. Why didn't they hold it July 4?
Linda Agullar
Dear Linda:
We contacted Col. Jeffrey Petrucci, commander of the
U.S. Army Garrison in Panama who gave us this answer:
"You have a good point. We put a lot of thought into
making the decision to celebrate the Fourth of July on the
third. We have so few three-day weekends, and we wanted
the soldier to have the maximum amount of time off."
If the celebration had been Sunday (July 4), the three-
day weekend wouldhave been broken upandpeoplewould
have had to choose whether to come to the fair or have a
three-day weekend. Because we have so few three-day
weekends, it was thought best to celebrate early.

Dear Mayors' Corner:
Five of the last six times I've gone to the Clayton
Theater, they have not played the national anthem. I was
disappointed. Is there a reason for this? I always thought


this was an Army and Air Force Exchange Service policy.
Sandy Peterson
Dear Sandy:
Alice Rodriguez from AAFES theater operations said
the reason you have not beard national anthem played in
several of our theaters is because the anthem tapes were in
extremely poor condition. With respect to our anthem, we
felt it was degrading to continue to play them in the
condition they were in.
AAFES no longer provides national anthem tapes for
use in basetheaters. Installation commanders must replace
the tapes with local community money. Our command
already has new anthem tapes on order. You should be
hearing new anthems in your theater in the near future.

Editor's note: This column allowscommnmity mem-
bers to submit questions to the Mayoral Congress.
Lettersshouldbe mailedto: Mayors'Corner,Publcity
Chairperson, APO AA 34004 (MPS). Anonymity will
begranted uponrequest. The TropicTimesreservesthe
right to edit letters and responses for brevity, clarity
and propriety.


Brig. Gen. David A. Sawyer
The action line is a direct link between Brig.
Gen. David A. Sawyer, 24th Wing commander,
and Howard AFB and Albrook AFS personnel. If
youhaveaquestionor problemthatyou can'tsolve
through normal supervisory channels, call the
Action Line at 284-5849.
Callers should leave a name, telephone number
and mailing address in case questions need to be
clarified. Names will be kept confidential and used
only to provide callers with a personal response.
Q. WhyhastheHowardYouthCenterrestricted
its general membership to only two hours of useaday
MondaythroughFriday? Bythetime children can use
the center from 5:30-7:30 p.m., many parents are
home and want to spend some time with their chil-
dren.

A. Thank you for your letter concerning the
Howard Youth Center change in operating hours.
I am pleased to inform you the Howard and
AlbrookYouthCenters general membership freeplay
summer hours have been extended to 2-7:30 p.m.
Winterhours will be 2-7:30 p.m. also. Saturday hours
remain 1-6 p.m.
We've increased staff hours to coverthe additional
time and partitioned the large activity room so both
theSummerDayCampProgram and freeplaycanrun
simultaneously.
Through your community concern you haveibeen
instrumental in bringing to our attention the need for
more open play time. We feel the solution will
positively affect the entire base youth population.
Again, thank you for taking the time to express your
interest
Should you need any further assistance, call Lou
Denham at 284-3856 or 4817.


Thieves hit Devil's Beach, net snorkeling equipment


Thieves strike at Devil's Beach
Thieves stole a spear gun, two speaker
boxes and several pieces of snorkeling
equipment from a soldier's unlocked ve-
hicle at Fort Sherman's Devil's Beach last
week.
Vehicles - especially unlocked ve-
hicles - often don't keep thieves out, so
military police remind everyone to lock
their vehicles and not leave items of value
inside.

Vagrant receives time
Military police arrested a vagrant for
unlawfully entering Gorgas Army Com-
munity Hospital and being in the posses-
sion ofillegaldrugparaphernalia last week.
Theperson was taken to Panamanian Night
Court wkhhern&,afst oe sp sobrdaysin.
by American players who are competing Itzia
with top Panamanian stars downtown. Pup
TherearefourannualPanamanian tour- R
naments which are open to Americans, and only
some Americans are ranked nationally. P
Mike Roman, tournament director, is the rally
top ranked player in Panama. I
"We usually go to the Club Raqueta or got 9
the Sports Room to play the Panamanians S
and get together afterward for an awards putti


New programs let exercisers "climb
Mt. Everest," "row the Mississippi,"
and "ski Appalachian Trail."


Unsecured wallet
A thief stole a wallet from the women's
lockerrroom ofa gym last week. The owner
left the wallet unsecured while she took a
shower. MPs recovered the wallet and its
contents after receiving an anonymous tip.
MPs remind everyone to lock valuables
up to avoid becoming a victim of crime.

Juvenile curfew dof post
MPs remind parents that, according to c
Panamanian Law, all children under 18
years old must be off the streets of Panama
by 9 p.m. unless accompanied by an adult.
If the curfew is violated, children will be
detained by the Panamanian National Po-
lice.
i Ramos to a&c thiiKf-riakE'2Zs401.
pin in the women's championship. court, and growled at nse over eac
Ramos took a strong lead in game one, mistake.
tobecaughtbyalateblooming Puppin. In stark contrast, Becraft took acool
Puppin battled back in a last-minute low-key approach.
' to steal a 15-14 win over Ramos. Sullivan nabbed a close 15-14 win in
here was no stopping Puppin once she game one. Becraft did the same with a 15-
going. 14 win in game two. A fierce battle in the
he ran all over Ramos in game two, tie-breaker brought Sullivan an 11-10 vic-
ng her away in a resounding 15-2 tory.


Veteran scuba instructor passes on
underwater knowledge to new gen-
eration of divers.


stolen from the Curundu housing area last
week. Investigators found thieves removed
the sofa from the carport.
NotifytheMPs ifyou see any suspicious
activity.
'The following crime statistics
are for on post housing areas for
July 23-29.
b ^ Pacific
Corozal 600 area - one lar-
ceny of unsecured private
property, one larceny of se-
cured private property
Curundu housing area -
one larceny of unsecured
a' private property
Morgan Avenue housing
area - two larcenies of pri-
S S vw vateproperty

win.
After battling each other, Lorenzo and "'
RomanpaireduptofacePanama'sAgustine
Diaz and Marcos Tellez for the doubles
championship.
The top two players proved to be too
much for Diaz and Tellez as Lorenzo and
Roman spanked them 15-4,15-6 to end the
tournament


*Basketball, page 13.
*Rescue scuba, page 15.

*Sports shorts, page 15.











Commentary


Scouts don't mix with


Beavis and
Editor:
I must comment on the unprofessional journalism
and poor taste of Sgt. E.J. Hersom in writing the
article "Summer Camp" in the July 30 Tropic Times,
as well as the apparent lack of editorial oversight
exercised. After having read the article I was struck
how insensitive and shallow it was in covering an
otherwise wonderful event, the annual Boy Scouts of
America Summer Camp.
The opening paragraph, which, if I recall
correctly, is supposed to set the tone for the rest of the
story, begins with a reference to MTV's Beavis and
Butthead. The second paragraph continues by saying
the Boy Scouts were imitating the "new heroes."
Hersom, and, consequently, the reader, completely
misses the point of what Boy Scouts and scouting are
all about. The Boy Scouts of America strives to
develop in our boys a strong moral and spiritual
foundation based on their devotion to God, their
country, their families and their fellow Scouts. The
principles of leadership are instilled in these boys at
an early age, and are combined with valuable lessons
in self confidence gained from their experiences in
the great outdoors. Adult leaders dedicate much of
their personal time toward these goals, and become
role models for the younger boys. Scouting gives our
boys positive, well rounded, real life "heroes" to
model themselves after, rather than the fictional and
cartoon characters like "Butthead" as suggested in the
article.
The article then continues with comments about
how "being on a military post was a new experience
for many of the Panamanian Scouts...the bathrooms
were clean and it was cool inside." I think that with
just the slightest investigation Hersom could have
found something positive to say about the experience
of the Panamanian Boy Scouts at summer camp than
their thrill in finding dean bathrooms.
Finally, the presentation of the Silver Beaver
award by Brig. Gen. James Wilson was inadequately
covered. The award is one of the highest honors
bestowed on adult volunteers, and is recognition for a
lifetime of dedicated service to the organization and
the community. In this case it was presented to Nick
Unger, who has been a scout leader in Panama for
more than 25 years. The article didn't even mention
his name. At best, this is sloppy journalism, but at
worst represents insensitivity and lack of caring.
Then, to round off the article, Hersom throws in a
trite comment about how the "Order of the Arrow
Scouts dressed in Native American garb, but none of


Butthead
them imitated John Wayne." This comment was out
of place, because the Order of the Arrow and their
ceremony have absolutely nothing to do with the
stereotypical cowboys and Indians stories as portrayed
by John Wayne.
The sad finale to this episode is that many readers
will not get a fair picture of what scouting is about,
and what a wonderful experience summer camp can
be. The Boy Scouts of America is a magnificent
organization that deserves a more thoughtful,
professional effort on the part of the Tropic Times
than was presented in this article.
Lt Col. Gary L Hankins

t. Col. Hankins:
I'm sorry you didn't appreciate the beginning of
Hersom's article. It was intended as a light-hearted
comment on the clash of Scouting traditions and the
most current anti-heroes of popular culture, in this
case MTV's Beavis and Butthead. I didn't think the
article suggested the Scout found Butthead to be a
role model. Maybe I was mistaken, but the fact he
used Butthead's vocal mannerisms to say scouting
was cool seemed to be a testament to the power of the
Scouting tradition over the cartoon of the day. We
didn't intend to mislead our readers. In fact, right
after Hersom noted the Scouts were imitating "new
heroes" he said "...but they upheld the Scouting
tradition..." He went on to detail how they did that.
I believe you may have also misinterpreted the
comments made by the Panamanian Boy Scout The
information was used to compare this year's camp to
last year's, which was held in a swamp. To that
Scout, the clean bathrooms and air conditioning were
what was better about this year's camp. Maybe not
what you would have said, but important to that
Scout.
You are correct to point out that the name of
Silver Beaver recipient should have been in the article
- on this there can be no argument. We will make
every effort not to make this blunder again. However,
Unger's achievement did not go umecognized: it had
already been published on the Milestones page in our
July 2 edition.
In closing I would like to say that sometimes our
search for a new and unusual way to cover long-
standing events leads us to slight what some consider
traditional and well-understood. We will continue to
strive to do our best and depend on readers like
yourself to keep us honest.
Editor


mtBI


Do you think anti-hero cartoon characters harm children's development?


"I don't think some-
body who's younger
than 15 should watch
certain cartoons. *


Joy Sloan
Air Force family member


"Yes, I think children
are easily influenced,
especially by TV."


Pamela Baggett
Army family member


"Yes, because children
tend to emulate what
they see. I think it's a big
problem."


Sgt. William Carder
310th Military Intelligence
Battalion .


"Yes, I think it causes
kids to think violence is
cool"


Lisa Easthead
Army family member


"Generally, they're OK.
It depends on the sub-
ject Cartoons definitely
play a role in children's
decisions."

SFC Rene Caban
Headquarters Company, U.S.
Army Garrison


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries - or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit
for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.


A


Tropic Times 7
Aug. 6, 1993 7


Old Sarge learns things

are tough all over lesson
by SFC Joe Ferrare
Editor
I ran into the Old Sarge the other day. I thought he
was auditioning for the DJ job on the Whine and Cheese
Channel, but it turned out he was in his boss' office,
slinging excuses like dead fish in a funeral parlor. It
seems the Old Sarge's section was running behind.
"Rough session?" I asked when he crawled out.
"You don't know the half of it," he said. "He doesn't
want to hear nothing. He ain't living in the real world."
"I heard what you were saying. It was so thin and full
of holes you could see light streaming in," I said.
"It was the truth I've got people gone, short
suspense, unexpected requirements..." he said.
"Things are tough all over," I reminded him.
"You sound like Igor," he said. Igor is a successful,
hard-working, well-liked sergeant in the Sarge's office.
"Well, does Igor ever get beat up like that?" I asked.
"No! When he doesn't magically get something done
he just goes in there and says he blew it, but nothing
sticks to the Teflon sergeant," the Old Sarge moaned.
"Don't you think you could learn from that?" I asked.
"I learned to call him Igor. Like that guy? In that
movie? Following the mad scientist around going 'Yes,
master.'"
"You're missing the point. He shot down your
excuses and half-microwaved theories faster than a bird
could dive-bomb a freshly waxed car. It wouldn't have
been any worse if you'd just fessed up," I said.
"Ain't you the guy what said we have to introduce
our bosses to the hard realities of the '90s?" he asked.
"True, but the important word is 'reality.' You only
introduced him to 'hard to believe,'" I said.
"It's hard to believe what a jerk you are," the Old
Sarge said. "Things are tough all over, but they want you
to be successful like in the good old days."
"Good old days? When was that?" Iasked.
"Remember the '70s, when we had more people than
jobs? Half of them were sedated dropouts on the run
from the law, but there were lots of them. In the '80s we
didn't have quite as many guys, but we had money. I
kicked butt in those days. Now things are really hard.
We never seem to have enough people or stuff, but they
still want us to do the impossible with nothing," he said.
"Let me tell you what one of my first bosses told me,
Sarge: 'Anybody can be successful when things are easy.
The trick is being successful when things are hard.'"
"That's stupid!" the Old Sarge said.
"That's the kind of thinking that's keeping you from
getting promoted," I told him.
"It sure is, so stop thinking that way."


I., D 9r---IuoIeHI







Tropic Times
Aug. 6, 1993


Patricio Palma has been shining boots since 1984.


Grecia Moran has been working on Corozal's Directorate of Enginee
years.


LENDING A


HELPING


HAND


Driving from post to post you can see the whiteness
of buildings and houses and the green of the grass;
everything is so bright and clean. The lawns are
neatly manicured, the soft wind blows off the well-tended
flowers and shrubbery that decorate the different areas.
Many people come to take this for granted and never ask
themselves how everything stays so nice and bright, or who
does all the work it takes to keep things going smoothly.
The answer is the quiet partnership between Panamanian
workers and the Deparment of Defense community, which
probably couldn't run without its many behind-the-scenes
helpers. For them it's an everyday job, and no one seems to
say much about them. They perform their many hours of
work no matter the day, weather or time. Many work on a
contracted or personal-services basis.
These are the people we see in the comer of a parking
lot, who make sure the cars are clean; the people in the
offices who make sure the trash cans are emptied and floors
swept; and the people behind the barracks making sure the
boots are shined for the next day's formation.
These are the people without whom these things might
not get done, at least not until we found time to do these
chores ourselves.
One familiar face among these many is Patricio Palma, a
husky dark-skinned man in his late 40s started out as the
boot shiner back in 1984.
Palma was working for the Otis Elevator Co. and lost his
job. In those days, his friend Isaac was working as the shoe
shiner in Building 220, Fort Clayton. One day Palma went


to visit him and told him he needed a job. Isaac said he
could help him. Palma smiled at the memory.
"I needed the job so I didn't hesitate and accepted the
offer," he recounted.
Isaac found out the 154th Signal Co. in Building 212
needed a shoe shiner and recommended Palma. Palma
moved to the barracks and started on his own. Business was
slow at the beginning, he said. He didn't have the experi-
ence or know the language.
Time went by and business got better. Boots kept adding
up every day and he was making enough money to take
home and support his family. He felt happy then, he said.


Employment require
These Panamanian workers Defense employ
may perform quietly, and we may single member in
take them for granted, but there is pass that allows
a small industry devoted to post and do their"
supporting their presence, sponsor has to fil
Before these people can perform tion at the install
their tasks they have to find offices.
themselves sponsorship by a Then the work
service-member, Department of checked against a








Tropic Times
Aug. 6,1993 7


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ng and Housing complex for the past two


Diomedes "Pepe" Herrera, who's deaf and has trouble speaking, has washed cars at Rodman Naval Station for
2 1/2 years.


Palma started by shining 10 pairs of boots a day. That
numbers has doubled, and there are days it goes up to 30
pairs. This keeps him busy eight hours a day Monday
through Friday.
"My friend, Jimmy works in Building 213. He has been
shining boots for 40 years," Palma said. "Mr. Bush is in
Building 205."
The Fort Clayton soldiers drop their boots off every
moving and pick them up - spit shined - in the
aftemoon. Palma enjoys his work, which he as been doing
for nine years.
"GIs treat me good, they pay me $10 per person every


s proper paperwork


family group or
rder to get a
m to come on
ork. Each
ut an applica-
ions' pass

rs' names are
ist to find out


if they were delinquent or commit-
ted any crimes while on post in the
past.
, The US. sponsor then becomes
responsible for the workers
behaviour on post, and has to make
sure they are providing the services
on the post on which they are cleared
to work.


month. I am used to them, although one day I wish to find
myself a better job and make more money," he said. "I have
shined so many boots all these years, I no longer keep track
of the number of boots any more."
Palma listens to music to break up the monotony.
"Music makes my job more pleasant and time goes by
fast," he said.
Another way Palma keeps busy is doing all sorts of
different jobs, such as carpentry, construction and there
were times when he even repaired tires.
He also cuts grass once a month, which adds a little
more money to his eamings.
Talk about earnings makes him think of the future, one
without U.S. soldiers in Panama.
"I've been thinking about troops leaving Panama and
this worries me about losing this job at this point in life
when jobs are scarce and hard to find. How would I support
my family?" He smiles and adds, "I keep my fingers
crossed for this not to happen."
The necessity of taking care of a family is also what
prompted Grecia Moran to look for job. Moran, a Panama-
nian citizen, works with Calculo y Mantenimiento, S.A., a
contractor.
She belongs to a team of more than 60 janitors who
work on the Directorate of Engineering and Housing
compound in Corozal. She is in her late 20s and this is her
first job. The salary is not what she was looking for, but she
needed the money and the job.
Now she is a janior, mother and housewife, like her own
. - * - -11.-- - I . ( Y',


mother. In fact, Moran got this job through her mother, who
works with the same company.
Moran has been working for two years, cleaning four
buildings every day. She mops floors, sweeps, vacuums,
dusts desks and shelves, empties waste baskets and cleans
the bathrooms. She starts very early and goes home at about
2 p.m. every day.
Diomedes "Pepe" Herrera doesn't have regular hours like
Moran. He washes cars in the parking lot across from the
Marina area on Rodman Naval Station, and greets his
customers with a big smile.
The smile is more than good salesmanship: Herrera is
deaf and has a hard time speaking. He is in his early 30s and
communicates with his clients by signs and sounds.
Herrera has been at Rodman for 2 1/2 years. Albino
Purga, his cousin, works in the Barber Shop at Rodman and
was his sponsor on base.
Herrera started as a shoe shiner in the barber shop and
then when out on his own washing cars.
Now he washes four to six cars a day. He doesn't charge
a set fee, leaving it to the clients when it comes to paying for
his job. He normally gets from $2 to $4 a car.
When asked how business was, Herrera moaned, smiled
and gestured at the sky. It was not hard to understand.
"Things change in the rainy season."

story and photos by Rosemary Chong
Tropic Times staff


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STropic Times
0 Aug. 6, 1993

F


Department of Defen- photos by SgL Fiohard Puckett
Collon Mulford prepares to make his way out of an obstacle at the Children's Development Center playground at Building 39.


Blake Underwood takes a break to watch his friends play.





Part-day program unites learning, fun


FORT CLAYTON (Tropic Times) -
Enchanted Summer VI helped the Fort
Clayton Children's Development Services'
Part Day Program liveuptodirectorBecky
Fentress' battle cry "We're not just
babysitting service."
In six weeks, children enrolled in the
program explored Panama's culture, U.S.
culture, puppetry and the world of dino-
saurs. The program was broken down into
six different categories ranging from "Wet
and Wonderful" to "Real Life Dragons."
Things kicked off June 21 with "Silly
Summer Fun." Activities included texture
walks, bedtime stories (complete with the
children in pajamas and pillow fight,) and
a visit by a clown.
"Wet and Wonderful" drew the biggest
interest, with 65 children enrolled for the
week of water slides, swimming and a


science experiment called "ice castles."
The activities concluded July 30 with a
trip to the playground at Building 39.
It was a packed schedule that not only
entertained, it informed, Fentress said.
"We try to make the program educa-
tional as well as fun," she added.
The program was a smashing success,
Fentress said.
"We had the largest turnout we've ever
had," she said. "But more importantly, the
children were learning, smiling and having
a good time. The parents also seemed to
enjoy the program."
Next up for the Part-Day program is
registration for the 1992-93 school year.
Registration begins Monday for single
and dual military; Tuesday all other mili-
tary; and Wednesday for qualified civil-
ians. For information call 287-5507.


Edward Squire dumps a load of sand
Edward Squire dumps a load of sand.


''
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Tropic Times 1
Aug. 6, 1993 11


Guard unitgives


Ecuador region


medical boost
by Sgt Mark Bowman
366th Public Affairs Detachment
PUYO, Ecuador - Halfa world from the humanitarian-
relief efforts in Somalia, other U.S. military personnel
made another humanitarian effort.
Tucked between the Andes mountains and the edge of
the Amazon rainforest, the Ecuadorian town of Puyo was
the site of the two-week annual training for 35 members
and augmentees of the OklahomaArmy National Guard's
245th Medical Company from Oklahoma City. Their
mission was to provide medical, dental and veterinary
assistance to the people of Puyo and the surrounding area.
The exercise, which began July 12, was developed to
increase the unit's medical readiness and, like part of the
mission in Somalia, help improve the health of local
residents.
But, the environment couldn't be more different from
Somalia. Dense tropical woodlands and mountainous
terrain surround Puyo. During the rainy season, it's com-
mon for the few roads leading out oftown to be washed out
or closed by mudslides.
But the environment didn't seem to bother SSgt Larry
Davis.
"You can drop us anywhere, even in the heart of the
jungle,and we'll beset up andreadytotreatpatients inonly
two hours," said Davis, a medical specialist from Okla-
homa City.
The rapid-deployment unit was designed to treat in-
jured soldiers coming straight from combat, but aiding the
citizens around Puyo was excellent training, Davis said.
"We providetreatmentto around 300 to 400 peopleeach
day," he said. "We get people anywhere from only a few
months old to 75 or 80 years old."
The most common medical problems treated were
parasitic diseases, upperrespiratory infections and muscu-
lar pain. But the cures may have only been temporary,
according to Lt. Col. Marylin J. Muzny, commander of the
120th Medical Battalion in Oklahoma..
"Because of our limit on time, equipment and supplies,
we're not able to provide any long-term, permanent care,"
she said. "The treatment that we give them will only last a
few days oraweek,depending ontheproblem."But sooner
or later the symptoms will come back because they'll be
forced to live in the same environment, Muzny said.
It isn't easy for the Ecuadorians to change the environ-


Theatw Support Ekm nt photoby Sgt Mark Bown
Spec. Jennifer Means, a medic with the Oklahoma National Guard, prepares to examine an Ecuarorian


woman's tonsils.
ment, it is easy to adopt healthy practices.
"We had one case where a woman wasn't washing her
hands after changing diapers and then preparing a meal.
She would go straight from changing the baby to cooking
the food," Muzny said.
This preventive medicine - giving out advice on
healthy practices, how to prevent infections and how to
avoid parasites - may have a greater, long-term effect
than any direct treatment the citizens receive from the unit,
Muzny said.
"We prefer a one-on-one situation where we can thor-
oughly explain what they need to do or change to live
healthier lives," she said.
"Preventive health is the key," said Lt. Col. Steve Bird,
the National Guard's State Dental Surgeon with the State
Area Command headquarters in West Virginia. "That's
why we're all trying to teach it."
He and 14 other medical doctors and dentists from
around the country came on individual annual training
orders to help the 245th accomplish its mission.
Accomplishing the mission of the dental section meant
lots of fillings and tooth removal. Preventive health meant
passing out toothbrushes - thousands of them "We have
to instruct them on how to properly brush their teeth," Bird


said. "We're concentrating on the children."
One patient came to Bird with only fourteeth that could
chew any food, all on one side of his mouth. Also, Bird had
to remove another severely infected tooth.
"Weputhim on antibiotics," Bird said. "There was alot
ofinfection in his system from the tooth thatreally affected
his health. He was in alot of pain. But he'll feel alot better
in a few days."
One man came in here in a very weak condition," said
medic Sgt Dan Kressenberg said. "He was hunched over
and could barely walk around, and was complaining that
hat his knees and back hurt. We gave him various medica-
tions to kill the infections and parasites that caused his
condition, but the sad thing is that it will all come back to
him."
Kressenberg thinks that one of the main culprits to the
unhealthy conditions is the water. "Most of the people just
don't have access to clean water," he said. "That's where
alot oftheparasites are found. We can clean their (internal)
systems up for a few days, but they're going to keep
drinking the same water."
The medical company normally serves in wartime as a
medical clearing company, receiving injured soldiers from
the field before being sent to a hospital.


French horn player gets


taste of 'White House' fame


Theater Support ement photo by SSgt. Ed Bukhead
French horn player SSgt. Roger Whitworth plays at Fort Clayton as part of the
Washington, D.C. National Guard's 257th Army Band.


by SSgL Ed Burkhead
366th Public Affairs Detachment
FORT CLAYTON - You might have
seen Roger Whitworth on television, but
you probably didn't know it at the time. If
you watched the presidential inauguration,
or saw a news clip of a White House
reception for a foreign dignitary, the televi-
sion camera probably panned by the band.
There, playing French horn, was
Whitworth.
For 11 years, Whitworth's job brought
him inside the White House for special
events because he was a member of the
President's Own Marine Band.
His time in the Marine Band started
underpressure. Whitworth reported for his
first day of work, on a Monday in July,
1977. Hewas fittedforhis uniform that day,
he got to practice with the band Tuesday
and Wednesday. Wednesday evening he
played in a concert on the Capitol steps. He
was excited. He thought it was unbeliev-
able, incredible.
He could handle it, though. Of the 84
who auditioned forthe position, Whitworth
was selected as the best.
The Marine Band plays every Wednes-
day evening at the Capitol in the summer.
Maybe you've visited the Capitol or been
walking down the Washington, D.C., mall
and heard the music on a warm summer
evening. Sunday nights, the Marine band
usedtoplayatthe Jefferson Memorial, now
they've changed to the Washington Monu-


ment. From 1977 to 1988, Whitworth was
there.
The President's Own Marine Band
played otherplaces, too. Theyplayed every
Friday evening in the parade at the Marine
Barracks. And everyyeartheydidafalltour
in different parts of the country, playing 12
concerts a week - matinees for school
children, then longer evening concerts -
in town after town.
"Ilearned to sleep on a bus," Whitworth
said. "In fact, I can sleep on an airplane and
even a C-130 cargo plane."
Once, the band was practicing in the
White House and somebody came onto the
balcony in a T-shirt and shorts. He set up a
lounge chairand threw his leg and arm over
the bannister - it was Jimmy Carter.
Whitworth says that President Reagan
was morealoofthan Carter. Yetonce, when
Reagan was going out to his helicopter, he
looked over at the band - Reagan hap-
penedto lookWhitworth directly inthe eye
andReagansalutedWhitworth. Whitworth
gave a snappy salute back to the com-
mander-in-chief. Later Whitworth got
chewed out because he wasn't supposed to
salute the president.
By 1988, Whitworth had moved up to
the assistant French horn chairin the band,
but he felt it was time to move on.
"I had gained a lot of valuable experi-
ence. But I wanted to move forward, branch
into other things musically."
Whitworth now is a free-lance musician
in the Washington, D.C. area.
















Sports


Ouarrv Heights. Republic of Panama


34


r*


* . .* i3


II


/


Itzia Ramos waits to return the ball during warmups before the women's championship game Sunday.


U.S.-Panamanian racquetball players battle


by Sgt Lori Davis
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT CLAYTON - Top local Ameri-
can racquetball players hosted members of
the Panamanian National Racquetball
Team here last week during the Friendship
Racquetball Tournament.
The tournament at Reeder Sports and
Fitness Center was the first one sponsored
by American players who are competing
with top Panamanian stars downtown.
There are four annual Panamanian tour-
naments which are open to Americans, and
some Americans are ranked nationally.
Mike Roman, tournament director, is the
top ranked player in Panama.
"We usually go to the Club Raqueta or
the Sports Room to play the Panamanians
and get together afterward for an awards


banquet," Roman said.
"This was an opportunity to bring them
here for a tournament."
"We selected our best players to play
Against their best," he said. "We made sure
wehadanAmericanplaying aPanamanian
during the first round in the men's compe-
titions."
No American women entered the tour-
nament this year, which left top-ranked
Itzia Ramos to face third-ranked Teresa
Puppin in the women's championship.
Ramos took a strong lead in game one,
onlytobecaughtbyalateblooming Puppin.
Puppin battled back in a last-minute
rally to steal a 15-14 win over Ramos.
There was no stopping Puppin once she
got going.
She ran all over Ramos in game two,
putting her away in a resounding 15-2


defeat to capture the trophy.
The men's B competition was the scratch
and claw competition of the day.
Americans Randy Sullivan and Mike
Becraft locked horns in a battle of wills and
skills.
Sullivan started with his misleading lob
serve to the corer and followed with a
vicious attack on his returns.
Sullivan appeared ready to gnaw
through his racquet handle as he stalked the
court, and growled at himself over each
mistake.
In stark contrast, Becraft took a cool
low-key approach.
Sullivan nabbed a close 15-14 win in
game one. Becraft did the same with a 15-
14 win in game two. A fierce battle in the
tie-breaker brought Sullivan an 11-10 vic-
tory.


Americans Mike Roman and Lorenzo
Albino competed for the men's A champi-
onship.
Lorenzo came on strong with a hot
racquet and outshot Roman 15-5 in game
one.
Rallying back in game two, Roman
fought a close battle and took game two 15-
14.
Lorenzo got backin his stride for the tie-
breaker and took the trophy in an 11-7
win.
After battling each other, Lorenzo and
Roman paired up to facePanama'sAgustine
Diaz and Marcos Tellez for the doubles
championship.
The top two players proved to be too
much for Diaz and Tellez as Lorenzo and
Roman spanked them 15-4,15-6 to endthe
tournament.


New programs let exercisers "climb
Mt. Everest," "row the Mississippi,"
and "ski Appalachian Trail."


*Basketball, page 13.
*Rescue scuba, page 15.
*Sports shorts, page 15.


A no A 1Q01


Page 12


U.S. Army photoby Sgt Lai Dais


_ __~-----~~ � � �


Veteran scuba instructor passes on
underwater knowledge to new gen-
eration of divers.


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��:~~








Tropic Times 1
Aug. 6, 1993 J


U.S. Air Force photos by Sgt James A. Rush
Angela Hem, 24th Supply Squadron, works out on a cross country skiing
machine at Howard Sports and Fitness Center.


AF aerobics program


scaling new heights

Fitness facilities create athletic adventures


by SgL James A. Rush
24th Wing Public Affairs


Pedro Gonzalez, 24th Maintenance Squadron, works out on the stairmaster
machine at Howard Sports and Fitness Center.


HOWARD AFB - The lush tropical
environment ofPanamais, for many, ideal
forrunning, biking, swimming or walking.
Perhaps the only problem for athletes is
that there is too much to do, too many
choices.
The Air Force fitness facilities here and
at Albrodk AFS have made this problem a
little more difficult by offering athletes the
chance to row the Mississippi, ski the
Appalachian Trail, or climb Mount Everest.
The goal program stimulates accom-
plishments of people who use the rowing,
cross-country skiing, or stair and mountain
climbing machines, said SrA. Ramona
Spencer, Morale Welfare, Recreation and
Services specialist.
The program is self-directed and keeps
track of the distance traveled in each exer-
cise session, she said.
There are no time limits to reach the
milestones along the way and the program
is conducted on the honor system, she
added.
The rowing, climbing and skiing plans
evolved from the fitness center's run/bike
to the United States program.
This was originally for outdoorrunners
and cyclists but has also been expanded to
include the treadmills and stationary bikes,


"I thought it would be
neat to do. This gives
people an incentive. In-
stead of just running or
biking, they have other
ways of increasing their
aerobic capacity."

SrA. Ramona Spencer
MWRS specialist

she said.
The modifications permitting the ma-
chine mileage to be used stemmed from a
customer's comment made through the Air
Force Suggestion Program.
The task fell to Spencer to come up with
the new applications for using the exercise
machines.
"I thought it would be neat to do,"
Spencer said.
"This gives people an incentive. In-
stead of just running or biking, they have
other ways of increasing their aerobic
capacity."
Spencerhas since beenreassignedto the
Tradewinds Dining Facility here. The pro-
gram is now run by SrA. Michael West.
Call him at 284-3451 for more informa-
tion.


Detachment 4 shoots down 1-228th Aviation


by Sgt James A. Rush
24th Wing Public Affairs

HOWARD AFB - The three-pronged attack of Richard
Burgess, Charles Hodge and Carl Mason powered Detach-
ment 4 over Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 228th
Aviation Regiment 65-51 here July 30.
Burgess led the trident attack from within the paint by
hitting the basket for 21 points.
Guards Hodge and Mason kept pace with 19 and 18
pointsrespectively. Hodge bombed away from downtown,
guiding in four three-pointers, while Mason shredded the
defense, cutting and slashing to basket.
The three combined for 90 percent of their team's
scoring for the game.
Three HHC scores also hit in the double digits. Samuel
Watkins led his team with 16. Teammates Richard Dukes
and Corey Armstrong added 12 and 10 to the cause.


Fuo ,i.ange of pace after the high-scoring first game,
the opening period of the night's second game was a
defensive stalemate. The 24th Civil Engineering Squad-
ron and 617th Special Operations Aviation Detachment
(Airborne) held each other to 19 points.
The second half was a different story, however. Civil
engineering racked up 30 points on the way to a49-46 win.
CES's Joseph Williams led the charge, netting 12 of his
team-high 14 points in the second half.
After missing his first two free throws in the first half,
Williams was perfect in six attempts during the second.
Gerard Smart and Farrell Taylor were the supporting
cast. All eight of Smart's points came in the latter period
while Taylor spread his 10 points throughout the game.
The 617th's Curtis Thomas, Andre Little and Jimmy
Scott accounted for all27 points oftheirteam's second-half
output. Thomas finished with 18 points and Little and Scott
each ended with 11.


The next team to go home happy was the 24th Mainte-
nance Squadron after topping Company A, 1-228th.
Maintenance's pressure defense limited Co A. to 16
points in the first half, and then got better. The Army team
tallied only 11 points in the second.
The winners got more than enough scoring from Stacy
Jackson and Jorge Haynes. Jackson wore out the net for 18
points while his teammate added 12.
In the night owl game, the 617th Airlift Support
Squadron needed only the 34 points it scored in the first
half to top the 24th Supply Squadron B Team.
They kept on, however, adding another41 inthe second
half to finish with a 75-32 victory.
Everybody on Airlift Support got into the act. Each
player had at least one basket, and four hit double figures.
John Tharps led his team with 11 points. His teammates
Barry Dowell, Ken Schortgenand ByronJones each added
10 more.








Tropic Time 1
Aug. 6,1993 I


Deparbent of Defense photo. by SgL Fichard Puckett
Ian Morales takes a breath through a respirator at the Fort Clayton's Williford Pool.


Youths dive into scuba K
FORT CLAYTON -
For nearly 50 years Fred -J&
Clarkhas beensharing the i i i
world ofscubadiving with oft
students of all ages. III
This week, he opened
the eyes of 13 more.
The class kicked off
Monday with classroom
instruction and a hands-
on introduction at Fort .
Clayton's Williford Pool.
The training is part of V
the Summer Sensations'
youth program. Clark
wraps uptheclass Sunday j
withanopenwaterdiveto;4


Portobelo. - " ''''
Clark teaches scuba
classes to adults and water
safety for the military, but 6Mi- ., "
he enjoys the challenge of - .
working with youths. Instructor Fred Clark
"It's very rewarding to get a face mask fil
when you work with a kid
and see them develop into a proficient little person,"
he said. "They're not fumbling, their movements are
precise and accurate. That makes it worthwhile."
Getting to that point isn't always easy, he said.
"Some people say I'm a little tough on the kids,"
he said. "But I'm not teaching them recreational
swimming. If they don't listen, or don't learn scuba
properly, it could cost them theirlives. Idon't put up
with horseplay or fooling around. I'm a no-nonsense
guy. I talk real hard, but I really care about them.


shows Floyd Able (left) and Mike McAllister how
tted properly.
"I don't mince words. People know where they
stand with me. I tell them the facts and they know
what to expect Ithinkthe youngsters appreciate that
They know they can come to me for help."
Student Michael McAllister agrees.
"He can get a little tough at times, but he makes
youawareofwhat'sgoingon around you,"McAllister
said. "I've learned a lot and it'll help on land too.
You're more disciplined and sure of yourself. That'll
pay off in the future."


Youths diving class members practice entering the water.


by Sgt Richard Puckett
Tropic Times Sports Editor







*
4


Tropic Times 1
Aug. 6,1993 1


US.Ai
. .. .. F by J A
U.S. Air Force photo by Sgt James A. Rush


Digits' Mary Bulmer hits a shot over the net as teammates Heather Palmer (rear) and Dolly Morhaim
look on.


Football tryouts
The 1993 Department of Defense Dependents'
Schools interscholastic varsity football team tryouts
will be held 6:30 p.m. Aug. 16-18 at Balboa
Stadium.
Team coaches will conduct the player draft Aug. 18.
Athleticphysicals will be held 8 am. to 4 p.m. Aug. 18-
19 at Curundu Junior High School and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Aug. 20 and 25 at Balboa High School. Physicals will
also be conducted 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 20 at Cristobal
High School.
Students should pick up the proper forms at the
appropriate schools before the exam date. Junior high
students should pick up forms at Curundu Junior High;
Pacific community high school students at Balboa High;
college students at Panama Canal College; and Atlantic
community students at Cristobal High School.

Racquetball tournament
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center will hold an
intramural racquetball tournament beginning Aug. 23.
The deadline to register is Aug. 17. Trophies will be
awarded to the top two finishers in each category. For
more information, call 284-3451.

Fishing tourney
An interclub fishing tournament will be held in
Atlantic waters until Nov. 30.
The event is sponsored by Club Nautico Caribe, the
Panama Canal Tarpon Club and the Panama Canal


Yacht Club. The fishermen who hook the largest
barracuda, wahoo, kingfish, jack/tuna, marlin, sailfish
and tarpon will winprizes. Prizes will be awarded forthe
top three catches in each category.
The entrance fee is $20 per angler and may be paid
at the bar of any of the clubs or to Francisco Lopez, 241-
2025; Alberto Villa, 245-4379; Gabriel Kam, 241-
0675; Helio D. Alves, 243-4146; Mike Bell, 243-5207;
AlbertoAlba, 245-0733; Gerry Laatz, 243-5652; Johnny
Kirby, 241-5883; Fermin Pinel, 241-6003.

Men's basketball
Registration is continues for 5'10"-and-under and
5'11 "-and-over-basketball leagues. Deadline is Sept. 7.
The clinic will is Aug. 31 at the Directorate of Commu-
nity Activities Sports Branch, Building 154.
Call 287-4050.

Fitness improvement
Fitness improvement classes are held 6:05-7am. and
2:05-3 p.m., Monday, Wednesday and Friday at the
Howard Sports and Fitness Center.
The class consists of a calisthenic super circuit
workout aimed at improving muscular endurance, the
cardiovascular system and flexibility. Call 284-3451.

Turkey Bowl coaches
The Army Directorate of Community Activities
Sports Branch is now accepting resumes for Army
Turkey Bowl team coaches. Call 287-4050.


Football registration
Registration is under way for the Fort Clayton intra-
mural unit-level flag football league.
The deadline is Aug. 31. The clinic is scheduled for
6 p.m. Aug. 24 at the Directorate of Community Activi-
ties Sports Branch, Building 154. Call 287-4050.

3-on-3 basketball tourney
Registration for the Fronius Fitness Center's three-
on-three basketball tournament in late August contin-
ues until Thursday. An organizational meeting will be
held 5:30 p.m. Aug. 13 at Fronius. Call 289-3108.

Army 10-miler tryouts
The final tryouts for the Army 10-miler Race to be
held in Washington D.C., Oct. 10 will be held Aug. 21.
The finals begin at 6 a.m. at the Rodman Fitness
Center at Rodman Naval Station.
Eight male and eight female runners will be selected
at the finals. The best six male and female runners will
make up the U.S. Army South 10-miler team. Active-
duty Army soldiers assigned orattached to USARSO are
eligible to compete.
Coach Willie Moye holds training sessions at 6 am.
Monday through Friday at the Reeder Physical Fitness
Center. Call 287-4050 for more information.

Self-directed programs
The Howard/Albrook sports and fitness centers have
started several new self-directed aerobics programs.
"Row the Mississippi," "Ski the Appalachian Trail,"
and "Climb Mount Everest" are now available for
prospective adventurers at the centers. Call 284-3451.

Scuba classes
There will be an open water scuba class 6 p.m.
Monday at the Howard pool. The cost is $145 perperson.
An advanced open water scuba class will be held
Wednesday at the Howard pool. For information, call
the Air Force Community Activities Center, 284-6161.

Winter leagues
The Albrook Bowling Center is taking sign ups for
upcoming winter bowling leagues at Howard and Albrook
bowling centers. People interested should stop by the
center, or call 286-4260/4325.

Swimming party
The Curundu Bowling Center is hosting a "Say no to
drugs, Say yes to bowling" swimming party 6:30-9:30
p.m. Aug. 28. The event is free for youths for informa-
tion call Cindy Bates at 286-3914.

Volleyball standings*
Red league


DENTAC
92nd PSC
HHC, 154th Signal
92nd MP Co.
Co. E, 228th Aviation
HHC, LEA
209th MP.Co.
128th MP Co.
128th Avn Bde
White league

470th MI
193rd Inf Bde
Co. C, 1-508th
DCSINT (USARSO)
SOUTHCOM
HHD 470th MI
Co. A, 1-508th
HHC, 193rd Spt
214th Med Bn
Women's League

Zonians
Dig Its
Sixers
Jaguars
Volleygirls
All-American Girls
Mighty Ducks
*As of Monday


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Over the top


Over the top


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6 Tropic Times
� 6 Aug. 6, 1993


*iq J~~L A. Y~\ '
~ �~~b;aS;a~


US Army photos by th SSgmUwo
Eusebio Salazar (left) and Jose Troya evaluate- victim" Art Tippit at the site of a simulated hazardous
material spill.


'Hazmat' teams ready to answer


chemical substance control call


by SSgt Jane Usero
USARSO Public Affairs Office
COROZAL - When barrels of an unknown substance
fall offatruckorapipe bursts at apool and sprays chlorine
into the air, who ya gonna call?
The men of the Panama Canal Commission's hazard-
ous material control and emergency response team always
got those calls in the Panama Canal area, but two teams of
hazardous material - hazmat - handlers will soon take
over those duties for U.S. military communities on both
sides of the isthmus.
The teams will come in to evaluate and control any
potentially hazardous materials that leak, spill orsprayinto
the air, water or ground on U.S. militaryinstallations while
the PCC team continues to do its job, said Elias Cartin of
the Directorate of Engineering and Housing's Environ-
mental Office.
"Within six months the two teams will be fully trained,
equipped and ready to go into action," Cartin said.
Team members went through a 40-hour class last week
to learn how to evaluate situations involving hazardous
materials, clear the area and treat victims, said Dave
Marden, program coordinator from the University of
Kansas and class instructor.
The teams were also put to the test in a simulated
chemical spill with a victim, a scenario run with the help
ofexperts fromtheComprehensiveIndustrialHygieneand
Environmental Consultants of Atlanta.
"It's onething to sitin an airconditionedclassroomand
hear about it and learn the theory," Marden said. "It's
another thing to actually come out here and put this heavy
equipment on and operate under some real physical con-
straints."
Team members got afirsthandlessonin the importance
of the non-verbal communication they had learned in the
classroom once they were inside two plastic and rubber
suits with protective and oxygen masks.
"It is much more difficult to communicate in this gear
than you can understand in a classroom," said Joe Marsh,
assistant instructor from the University of Kansas.
"As well as the communication problems, they must
- understand that heat stress is also a factor to consider," he
added.


Those consider-
ations made exercise
more than a simula-
tion.
"The first time in
this equipment is a
real learning experi-
ence," Marden ex-
plained. "It gives
them a chance to ap-
ply what was learned 1J
in the classroom."
The class is only
one step in preparing
the teams for action,
Cartin said. The
teams will continue
with quarterly simu-
lations forthefirstyear Stanley Barrio checks his oxy-
to test and keep their gen mask and protective suit
knowledge fresh before entering the simulated
"Thenextstepisto hazardous spill site.
evaluatewhatequipmentwillbeneededto supplytheteams
and put into action a roster for quick communications,"
Cartin said.
The idea for the Hazmat teams came up almost a year
ago when the military, which relied on the PCC teams,
decided it needed its own teams of specialists, Catin
explained.
"The teams are made up mainly of men from DEH in
areasofexpertise such as electriciansand heavyequipment
operators," Cartin said.
"These menwerenotchosenatrandom,"hesaid. "They
were chosen because, in certain situations, the teams may
needtoknow how to turn the main power source offorhave
to move things on-site with fork lifts," he explained.
. Once fully trained, equipped and in place, the men will
be ready to take on situations such as accidental spills and
leaks, hazardous materials found during construction site
digging, chlorine leaks at pools and ammonialeaks at local
ice plants, Cartin said.
"They will be the first line of defense against hazardous
waste in the Pacific and Atlantic communities," Marden
said.


School enrollment
ALBROOK AFS (Department of Defen --
pendents Schools) - Personnel new to Par -
should begin enrolling their school-aged child
as soon as possible, school officials said.
Parents need to bring shot records, a letter '
sponsorship, permanent change of station orders
and ID cards to the school.
Kindergarten children who will be 5 years old
by Oct. 31 may be enrolled at the school closest to
their homes. Parents need to bring the previously
mentioned documents and the child's birth certifi-
cate to register their children for kindergarten.
Studentsin grades onethrough six need to bring
their lunch to school every day. A sandwich filled
with peanut butter, lunch meat or cheese, a ther-
mos of milk or juice, fruit, vegetables and a cookie
make up a nutritious lunch, school officials said.
Students in grades seven through 12 will have
access to school cafeterias.
Schools will provide folders for kindergarten
through second grade students to keep theirhome-
work in. Students in grades three through six are
provided with binders.
For information concerning enrollment, or
which school children should attend, call 286-
3867.

Athletic physical
ALBROOK AFS (Department of Defense De-
pendents Schools) - Department of Defense De-
pendents Schools - Panama will hold athletic
physical Aug. 18-25 for junior high and high
school students.-
Students who are familymembersofactiveduty
servicemembers can get physical 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
Aug. 18atCurunduJuniorHighSchooland8am.-
4 p.m. Aug. 20 at Balboa High School.
Students who are family members of civilians
cangetphysicals 8 a.m-4p.m. Aug.19 atCurundu
Jr. High, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 20 at Cristobal High
School and 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 25 at Balboa High
School
Students should pick up the forms atthe appro-
priate schools before the physical exam. Junior
high students should pick up forms'at Curundu
Junior High, high school students at Balboa High
School and college students at the Panama Canal
College.

Parent/youth meeting
HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) - The youth
center here will have a parent/youth meeting 7
p.m. Tuesday. Participants need to bring a chair to
the meeting. Call Louis Denham, 284-3856.

Post offices close
HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) - All post
offices on the Pacific side will cose at 4:30 p.m.
Aug. 27 for a special function.

Supplies needed
FORTCLAYTON(USARSOPAO)- TheU.S.
Army South Public Affairs Office, Community
Relations, is collecting items to be used to help
schools in the interior. Clothing, toys, pencils,
math workbooks, flashcards, crayons, sports equip-
ment and plastic containers are some of the items
needed. Items can be dropped off at Building 95,
FortClayton.Room 153,orcallJeannineWilderat
287-3058.

Bulletin board ads
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - People
who want toplace ads on the bulletin board in front
of the Fort Clayton Post Office must use the drop
box near the bulletin board. Ads must be on cards
or paper no larger than 5 inches by7 inches with
1-inch letters. Submissions will be posted for two
weeks. Call Jeannine Wilder at 287-3058.

24-hour hotline
FORTCLAYTON (USARSOPAO) - TheU.S.
Army South Equal Opportunity Office has a 24-
hoursexual harassmenthotlineat287-4151.Sexual
harassment questions should be taken through the
chainofcommandwhenpossible. Questions, names
and telephone numbers will be recorded, but calls
will be kept confidential.


pp-/y-~js-~j


I










Tropictivities


An. 6. 1993


An entertainment ide fr the U.S comnummmt In Panama


PameB1


Heading home O".hcr
A boat guide at Isla Mamey gets ready to shove off with a group of American tourists. Cayucos are just one of the many ways people get around in Panama.
For more unique transportation techniques, see page B3.


Audi just keeps on building better
cars as new 100CS proves, critic
says.


Balboa Dive Club divers experi-
ence the sights and sounds above
and below Isla Iguana.


*Potpourri, page B4
*Notices, pages B6-7
*Movies, page B8


i


G WA -r .... . -










2 Tropic Times
2 Aug. 6, 1993


Audi 1OOCS

Luxury/sport car packs 172 HP performance


by Zane Binder
King Features Syndicate
Audi, much maligned by spurious "unintended ac-
celeration" allegations, just keeps building better cars.
A case in point is the 100CS, a luxury/sport full-size
sedan that continues the traditions of the 5000 series. It
challenges Acura's Legend, BMW's 525 and the super-
charged Ford Thunderbird, all vehicles with fine repu-
tations.
Inside, the 100CS looks like every other Audi:
elegant but simple, perhaps even stark. That's the way
Germany builds cars - with a philosophy that implies
driving is an extension of one's business office. The
buckets were wide, comfortable leather (a $1,300 op-
tion; velour is standard) with plenty of fore-and-aft




About three-quarters of the world's people depend
on rice for nourishment. While, fortunately, some of
us do not rely on it solely, rice consumption has
dramatically increased as we find new ways to enjoy
it, new blends are developed and as we adopt and
adapt ethnic recipes.
This economical complex carbohydrate is free of
cholesterol and sodium and has only a trace of fat.
Cooked rice may be stored in the freezerready to grab
for unexpected guests or just for you.
Rice salads may account for rice's growing popu-
larity. Here's a nicely spiced one that combines veg-
etables and chicken.

Curried chicken-rice salad
3 cups hot cooked rice
1/2 cup frozen peas, thawed
2 (5-ounce) cans premium chunk white chicken,
drained
3/4 cup chopped celery
1/4 cup sliced green onions
3 or 4 teaspoons lemon Juice
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/4 teaspoon curry powder


travel in the power seats. The driver's bucket gives a fine
view of the wood-faced, fully-instrumented analog dash;
your hands will be comfortable around the leather-
wrapped steering wheel. Missing, though,is acupholder.
There's plenty of room in front for the largest driver
andin back, there's ample space for adults forlong trips.
The trunk is well-finished and spacious.
As the 100CS competes with mid-line BMW models
and American luxury iron, standard "options" abound.
Power steering, heated seats, four-wheel power anti-
lock disc brakes, a sunroof, air conditioning, trip com-
puter (useless), a driver's side airbag and much more is
included in the $33,600 base price.
The front-drive 100CS is equipped with a state-of-
the-art 2.8 liter, 172 HP single overhead cam V6 with
two valves per cylinder. It's silky-smooth with plenty of


1/4 teaspoon Tabasco sauce
Shredded romaine lettuce
2 tomatoes, cut into wedges

Combine hot rice and peas; toss lightly. Add chicken,
celery and onions in large bowl. Combine lemon juice
and oil, curry powder and Tabasco in small jar with lid;
shake. Drizzle overrice mixtures; toss lightly. Cover and


low-end torque. Knock sensors, a dual-path intake
manifold for the fuel injection and many other ad-
vanced features make it an engineering treat. Accelera-
tion from rest to 60 in this 3,400-pound sedan takes 10.4
seconds (factory claim: 9.9), adequate, but definitely
marginal for the "sport" part of its market mission. An
interesting aside: this vehicle requires high-test gas,
which is usually 91 octane.
If you can find 94 octane, through, the engine will
eke out a few more horsepower (that's not true with
almost any other car). The engine's fuel efficiency is
just average for the class: observed mileage was 17 city
and 23 highway (EPA 17/25).
The powerplant is coupled to a four-speed overdrive
automatic transmission with "power" and "economy"
settings, a useless gimmick. It shifted with commend-
able smoothness, though.
Handling is one of the 100CS' best features. Its sub
35-foot turning circle and Goodyear GA radial tires (a
compromise between handling and ride) enhance its
wet road traction and cornering. There's minimum
body roll and lots of chassis stiffness; this car is a real
pleasure and world-class handler.
The 100CS' ride is almost perfect. It's a fine combi-
nation of softness and control. It keeps its composure
even over the largest potholes and at extra-legal speeds
(its top-end is 122; the factory says 130) exudes stabil-
ity. It's great under all conditions.
The 100CS was equipped with an automatic climate
control system. It works, but isn't as good as a manual
unit.
Quality control throughout the car was flawless.
Noteworthyis the factthe 100CS comes withathree-
year, 50,000 mile warranty. It also covers 36 months of
normal maintenance, but for its mid $30,000's pricing,
it should include these niceties. Overall, it's near the
most expensive car in its class.
What's the bottom line? It's a fine car, but expen-
sive, especially considering its moderate objective per-
formance. The 100CS is extremely sophisticated and
conservative. It fairly oozes good taste and would make
a fine addition to any garage in America.


chill 30 minutes. Serve on shredded lettuce. Garnish
with tomato wedges. Makes six servings.

Curried turkey salad
6 ounces cooked turkey breast, coarsely chopped
1 cup small broccoli flowerets
1/4 cup bell pepper strips
2 tablespoons sliced green onion
1/2 cup plain low-fat yogurt
1/4 cup Kretschmer original wheat germ
1/2 teaspoon curry powder
Dash black pepper
2 pita breads, halved

Combine turkey, broccoli, bell pepper and green
onion. Mix together yogurt, wheat germ, currypowder
and black pepper. Toss into turkey mixture to coat.
Serve in pita pockets or over lettuce or fresh spinach
leaves. Makes two servings. The Chopping Block
recipes by Philomena Corradeno.
Editor's note: People interested in sharing a
recipe or household tip with Tropic Times readers,
can send recipes or tips by MPS to Tropic Times,
Unit 0936, APO AA 34002. Your name and base
will be printed with your submission.


Hiring opportunities are limited because of budgetary constraints. HOW TO
APPLY: For temporary positions submit a SF-171, DD 214 if claiming veteran
preference, a copy of college transcripts if claiming education and a copy of Clerical
Administrative Support Position notice of rating if applicable. For permanent
positions (only for current employees including leave without pay) submit a SF-
171, a copyoflatestSF-50, a copy ofcollege transcripts, a copy ofyourlast performance
appraisal and a statement addressing the job related criteria contained in the
announcement.
For more information regarding vacancy announcements (forms required, job
related criteria, etc.), visit the Directorate of Civilian Personnel, Building 560, Room
306, Corozal, or call 285-5201.
VB# Vacancies, Title and Location Open: 08-06-93 Close: 08-17-93

Atlantic:
487-93-LA (2)Telephone Mechanic, MG-2502-10

Pacific:
494-93-LA (2)Materials Handler (FO), MG-6907-5, (Intermittent. Limited to
Veteran Preference Eligibles)

495-93-KF Administrative Services Assistant (OA), NM-303-6, Sensitive, (Drivers
license required)


496-93-KF Budget Assistant, NM-561-7, Sensitive

497-93-NC Supervisory Inventory Management Specialist, NM-2010-11, Sensitive

498-93-LA Computer Specialist, NM-334-11, Sensitive

499-93-NC Training Instructor (Wood), NM-1712-7

The Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting applications on a continuous basis.
This announcement will be used to fill permanent and temporary positions:

VB# 001 General Clerical, NM-3/4**
Medical Officer, NE-12/13/14
Clinical Nurse, NM-9/10/11
Practical Nurse, NM-5
Recreation Assistant, NM-4
Secretary (Stenography), NM-5/6
Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5/6/
VB# 002 Sales Store Checker, NM-3**(Intermittent wk sch)
VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard, Requires Cert.)
**CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is required for temporary posi-
tions.
NOTES: VB# 487-93-VL Nursing Assistant, NM-621-4 developmental 5 is
cancelled. VB# 486-93-SS Educational Aide, NM 1702-4 should not read sensi-
tive.


I








Tropic Times
Aug. 6,1993 s PB


U. Army photo by SSgt PNpp 0. CAk
A father and son make their away along the Translsthmian Highway.


Courtey photoby Brenda Lane
A little girl carries her sleeping brother through the Darien Province.


Deparment of Deiens photo by Maureen Sampson
The S.A.C.A. bus is a common sight throughout Panama.


Geftin'

COROZAL (Tropic Times) - Several
local photographers contributed to the new
Tropic Times photo feature page.
This week's theme was getting around
in Panama, and local shutterbugs captured
the unique and the familiar on film. The
next feature, Playtime in Panama, will
appear in the Sept. 3 Tropic Times.
We will accept photos showing the
different facets of playtime in Panama, as
long as they're interesting, they reveal

Courtesy photo by Mwtiha K. Holley
A cyclist navigates Gorgona Beach.


around

some recreational activity unique to
Panama or the U.S. community here,
or are just fun to look at
The deadline for the next feature is
Aug. 30.
Submissions should be black and
white photographs, though color
photos are acceptable. Bring submis-
sions to the Tropic Times offices in
Building 405, Corozal, or call 285-
6612.










B4Tropic Times
B4 Aug. 6,1993


Potourri


=


Crime prevention night
NavalStationSecurityDepartmentkicks
off the fourth annual Crime Prevention
Night Out Carnival at Farfan Bohio and
Teen Center at Howard AFB 5 p.m. today.
This year's event will include static
displays from Special BoatUnit 26, Marine
Corps Security Force Company, Air Force
Peace Keepers, Mounted Security Police
with their horses, Military Working Dog
demonstrations, and more.
Some of the static displays include vid-
eos on videotaping your personal property
ortaking pictures foryourrecords. A home
inventory control computer program will
be made available. Copies can be made for
people who bring formatted disks.
Bicycles will be registered and conduct-
ing the Ident-A-Kid program will be con-
ducted.
There will be videos about drugs, youth
gangs, and public housing crimes.
The Navy Self-Help Division will an-
swer questions and issue home security
devices to families. Contraband Control
will have an information booth. Customs
agents will be on hand to help with ques-
tions concerning what can and cannot be
shipped.
The Marine Corps Exchange will be
selling car security packages, wireless su-
pervised homeprotectionsystems, window
sensors, power sirens and motion sensor
light controllers.
Otherentertainmentincludes adunking
booth, and a D.J.
There will be an uphill mountain run for
children aged 4 to 12, and an awards
ceremony for the winners. McGruff the
Crime Dog will be on hand for all of the
activities.

Offices close
Personnel Services in Building 519,
Fort Clayton, will be closed today for a
training holiday and will be at limited staff
during the morning hours Monday for a
change of command ceremony. Southern
Command forms 4 and 5 will be issued at
Building 207, Fort Clayton.
The 93rd TheaterArmy Material Man-
agement Command, Building 712,
Corozal, will be closed Aug. 13 and 16 for
automated system conversion. Only high
priority requests will be completed dur-
ing this time. The last day to submit
requests is Thursday. For more informa-
tion, call 285-6142.

Pool party
There will be a pool party for the 56th
Signal Battalion 6-10 p.m. Saturday at the
Fort ClaytonPool. Theparty, sponsored by
the 69th Signal Company Family Support
Group, is open to all 56th Sig. Bn. soldiers,
families and Department of Defense civil-
ians.
Those attending with last names begin-
ning with A-L should bring a side dish
while those from M-Z should bring a des-
sert. Forinformation, call 287-5076/5934.

Stores move
The Marine CorpsExchange has moved
its curio/furniture and hard goods stores to
thecountry andpackage storeat Building 4,
Rodman Naval Station.


College registration
FloridaState University has announced
registration dates for the fall semester.
Registration will be 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m.
today at Building 708, Howard AFB; 9
a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday at
Building 808, AlbrookAFS; and 8 a.m.-
1 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday at Build-
ing 32, Fort Davis. Late registration will
be 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Aug. 16-17 at Building
808, Albrook and 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Aug. 16-
17 at Building 32, Fort Davis. For more
information, call 285-6922.
Panama Canal College's fall semester


begins Aug. 30. Registration will be 9 am.-
noonand2-5p.m. Aug. 24-26inthecollege
auditorium. Faculty members will beavail-
able for consultation. For more informa-
tion, call 252-3304/3107.

Preschool signups
Atlantic Child Development Services
will hold preschool registration 8:30 a.m.-
1 p.m. and2-3:30p.m. Aug. 16-20.Packets
are available at the CDS office, Building
8351, MargaritaComplex.Packets must be
completed before registration. Other items
needed arethechild'sshotrecord, sponsor's
bilingual ID card and a copy of sponsor's
19921040 tax form to determine fees. Call
289-4511 for more information.

Self help store
The Directorate of Engineering and
Housing Self Help Store will open Aug. 18
with refreshments and entertainment. The
new store, Building T340 on the DEH
compound, Corozal, will serve Air Force
residents andpersonnel from AlbrookAFS
and the Army community.
The hours will be 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Tues-
day-Fridayand9a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday. For
more information, call 285-5707.

Award nominations
The International Personnel Manage-
ment Association is seeking nominations
for its all star team and the Linda Trunzo
awards. The allstarteam awards recognize
federal employees inpersonnel administra-
tionforsingle accomplishments with group
nominations being accepted. The Linda
Trunzo Humanitarian Award recognizes
individuals who have distinguished them-
selves by humanitarian acts or services that
encouraged otherstodo their best to achieve
success.
Nominees must be federal employees in
the personnel administration field or in
occupations such as health care if the indi-
vidual is assigned to thepersonnel function.
Nominations must be forwarded to the
Directorate of Civilian Personnel by Aug.
27. For more information, call 285-5611.

Overpriced items
People who suspect an Air Force pro-
cured item is overpriced can challenge the
price and earn money. Under the Zero
Overpricing Program, members can re-
ceive up to 10 percent of the total govern-
ment savings. Submit price challenges to
the 24th Supply Squadron Customer Ser-
vice Team, 284-5712.


Supply hotline
People with questions or supply related
problems should contact the 24th Supply
Customer Service Team, 284-5712. The
team, located in Howard AFB's Building
715, willhelpanswerquestionsandresolve
problems.

Overeaters' group
Overeaters' Anonymous meeting are
held6:45p.m. ThursdaysinBuilding6550,
Corozal. For more information, call 228-
0015.


Labor Day bazaar
The Canal Crafters are sponsoring a
Labor Day bazaar at Club AmadorSept. 6.
For more information, call Carla Miller at
285-4775.


Dog classes
Valent Recreation Center will hold ba-
sic dogobedienceanddog groomingclasses
Sept 1-29. The obedience class costs $60
and meets 7-8:15 p.m. Monday, Wednes-
days andFridays. Thegrooming class costs
$30 and meets 5:30-6:45 p.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Fridays. Call 287-6500.


Phone service hours
Telephone customer service hours at
Building 732, Corozal, have changed to 8
a.m.-3 p.m. For more information, call
285-4313/4354.

Radio club exam
ThePanamaCanal AmateurRadio Club
will hold an amateur radio examination 9
a.m. Saturday at the Panama Canal Train-
ing Center in Balboa. To register, or for
more information, call 252-7400.

Change of command
There will be change of command
ceremony for the 92nd Personnel Service
Company 9 a.m. Monday at the basket-
ball court near Building 207. Capt. Lucia
Heugh will assume command from Capt.
Emma Coulson.


Discipline class
A workshop to offer alternative strate-
gies and techniques for disciplining chil-
dren (ages birthtopre-teen) will begiven 5-
8 p.m. Thursday at the Rodman Naval
Station Chapel. Call283-5749 forinforma-
tion. Registration deadline is Wednesday.

Vehicle sticker
The Directorate of Land and Traffic
Transportation ofPanamahas announced
that the Revisado sticker and the vehicle
registration certificate must be obtained
by Dec. 31 because they will be required
for 1994 vehicle inspection beginning
Dec. 1.
According to Military Police Com-
mand officials, the Panamanian govern-
ment is still processing these documents.
Officials advise vehicle owners not to try
to get these documents until after Sept. 1.
Vehicle owners are also reminded to
carry a copy of their 1993 inspection
documents in their vehicles at all times.

Chapel positions
The Howard/Albrook Chapels have the
following positions open for bids:
*Protestant religious education coordi-
nator, Howard;
*Catholic religious education coordi-
nator, Howard;
*Catholic religious education coordi-
nator, Albrook;
*Gospel servicechoirdirectorAlbrook;
*English mass, Catholic choirdirector,
Albrook; and
*Catholic choir director, Howard.
Bids shouldsubmittedto thecontracting
office, Building 715, Howard AFB by 4
p.m. Aug. 20. Call Judy Young at 284-
4397/5550 for more information.

First aid course
The Fort Davis American Red Cross
will conduct a three-day community first
aid instructor certification course 8 a.m.-5
p.m. Aug. 17-19 at the Sundial Recreation
Center. Call 289-3595 for more informa-
tion.

First aid for maids
The Navy Family Service Center is of-
fering firstaid classes formaids. The course
willbetaughtinSpaisaniandisgiven bythe
AmericanRedCross. It will be held 8a.m.-
5 p.m., Aug. 28. There is a $15 registration
fee. Registration deadline is Aug. 27. Call
283-5749 for more information.

Orientation
The Navy Family Service Center will
conduct a newcomers' orientation 8 a.m.-4
p.m. Aug. 23-27 fornew military members
and their families. The Navy League will
provide a cultural presentation Aug. 27.
Call 283-5749 for more information.


PP: Tourist Passport
TC: Tourist Card
V: Visa
PC: Proof of Citizenship
US: United States Passport
Holders Only
CC: Country Clearance
RON: Remain Overnight
All flights on this schedule are
subject to cancellation. For additional
flight information, call the Passenger
ServiceSection,284-4306/3608/4857.

Saturday
5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN
Nashville, Tenn. US
5:40am C141 Howard AFB, PN
La Paz, Bolivia
Howard AFB, PN
l:55pm C5A Howard AFB, PN
Charleston AFB, SC RON
Kelly AFB, Texas
Sunday
9:55am C141 Howard AFB, PN
Charleston AFB, SC
Monday
5:10am '130 Howard AFB, PN
Managua, Nicaragua CC
Howard AFB, PN
7:30am B727 Howard AFB, PN
Charleston, SC IAP
Commercial contract
1:55pm C5A Howard AFB, PN
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Charleston AFB, SC RON
Dover AFB, Del.
Tuesday
4:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Solo Cane AB, Honduras
Howard AFB, PN
5:40am C141 Howard AFB, PN
Brasilia, Brazil RON/V
Santiago, Chile
Buenos Aires, Argentina
(RON, 2 nights)
Lima, Peru
Howard AFB, PN
5:55am C130 Howard AFB, PN
San Salvador, El Salvador CC/V
San Jose, Costa Rica
Howard AFB, PN
Wednesday
5:10am C130 Howard AFB, PN
Belieze City, Belieze
Guatemala City, Guatemala TC/V
Howard AFB, PN
6:10am C141 Howard AFB, PN
Medevac
Kelly AFB, Texas
Charleston AFB, SC
Thursday
7:55am C5A Howard AFB, PN
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Charleston AFB, SC RON
Dover AFB, Del.
Aug. 13
5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Howard AFB, PN
5:55am C130 Howard AFB, PN
San Jose, Costa Rica
San Salvador, El Salvador CC/V
Howard AFB, PN
9:55am C141 Howard AFB, PN
Bogota, Colombia CC
Howard AFB, PN


I


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_TV Schedule


Tropic Times 6
Aug. 6,1993 1B 7


*Mature Theme **Series Begins ***SeriesEnds

Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
5:30am NBCNewsatSumise 6:30am HeadlineNews 6:00am RealVideo 5:30m NBCNew atSuiane 5:30am NBCNewsatSumire 5:30nm NBCNewsatSumiS e 5:30am NBCNewsatSumise
600 ABCGoodMorning 7:00 AirPorceNws 6.30 FRa ByNight 6:00 ABCGoodMornng 6:00 ABCGoodMoning 6:00 ABCGoodMorning 600 ABCGoodMorning
America 7:30 Navy/MarinCorp 7:30 OutreachOfLove Americ Americ America America
8:00 BasicTrainingWork- News 8:00 CBS SundayMorning 800 BaacTraniingWcrt ut 8.00 Bodylhqing 8:00 BaicTraningWork- 8:00 Bodyhaping
out 8:00 NickAtcade 9:30 PaceM T Nation 8:30 Semme Steet 8:30 Seame SS et out 8:30 Seamec Street
8:30 Sesame Street 8:30 Just or Kids 1000 Headline News 930 Silver Spoon 9:30 Silwr Spoon 8:30 Some Street 9:30 Silver Spoons
9:30 SilverSpoons WarnerBrw.CartDma 1030 This Week W/David 10:00 ILoveLacy 1000 ILoveLcy 9.30 Silver Spoons 10:00 ILoveLucy
10-00 ILoveLucy 1030 Spac Age*** Brinkley 1025 GOi03Oulight* 1025 Ouidinglight* 1000 ILoveLucy 1025 Ouiding Light*
10:25 Guiding Light 1130 HeadlineNews 1130 NFLPLUeSeasn: 11:15 GentnalHopital* 11:15 Ganalospital* 10:25 GOding Light 11:15 GeneralHospital*
11:15 GeneralHospital Noon NFLPwl-Scras Amcri- AmericmaBowl from Noon HeadlineNew Brek Noon HeadlineNewsBrak 11:15 Geneal Hospital Noon HeadlineNewsBreak
Noon HeadlineNewsBreak can Bowlfrom Berlin. Londo. Englud 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday Noon Headlin NewsBreak 12:15 SCNMidday
12:15 SCNMidday Germany.BillDv.Vi- Cowboys vsLions 12:30 SporaMadchi 12:30 Spaor er 12:15 SCNMidday 1230 SportaCener
12:30 SpaortaCc r king 2:30pm SundayAftroon 1-00 AnotherWold * 100 Anotr Wodd* 1230 Spor2Cmnr 1:00 Another World
1:00 AnotherWorld 3:00 SturdayAfinmoon Movie:-bePodumtn 2:00 OprahWinfr y 2-00 Snaly JecreRhqd 1*00 Another Woadd 200 Donahuc
2:00 OprahWinfrcy Movie: "Radio Dys" 400 Sol Train ** 3.00 Prim Is Right 3.00 Prim I Right 2:00 OprahWinf-cy 3:00 Pric Is Right
3:00 Prioe IRight 430 TheBestOfThLowve 5:00 OnStage 400 Neworm 4:00 Newmoom 3.010 PRalmisRight 4:00 Newsroom
4:00 Newroom Counection 5:30 Headline News 4:15 CmoonConer 415 CartoocomCmnr 400 Newsroom 4:15 CartoonCormr
4:15 -CartoonComrr 5:00 ThisWeekInBbae l 6:00 St rSarch 4:30 NickArcade 4:30 Squ re Oe TV 415 CtamnContr 4:30 Scratch
4:30 ThinkPasat ** 5:30 Headlin~ News 7:00 BycToBycWithOmnis 5500 PFmilyPcod 5:00 FimilyPFed 430 almbQop'sPlayalmo 5:00 PamilyPeud
5:00 PamilyFeud 6:00 WWPSuperstsrsof ng 5:30 ShowbizToday 5:30 Showbi Today 5:00 P milyPFeud 5:30 Showbiz Today
5:30 Showbiz Today Wretling 8:00 Sunday ght Movie: 6:00 SCNEBving Report 6:00 SCNEBwvin Report 5:30 ShowbizToday 6:00 SCNEvwning Report
6:00 SCNEvening Report 7:00 Recuc911 OGuiltyConience"' 6:15 adlieiNews Break 6:15 HedlineNewsBleak 6:00 SCN Ewnin Report 6:15 HeadlincNewaBreak
6:15 HeadlineNewsBreak 8:00 Specdl ingPaint 9:40 Headline News Brek 6:30 WoldNews Tight 6:30 World NewsTomiht 6:15 Headlin News Beak 6:30 World NewsTonight
630 World NewsTonight WithBaibaWaltf' 10:00 EnertainmentThis 7:00 NFLPlo-Seus: 7:00 Jeopedyl 6:30 WaddNewsTonight 7:00 NFLPre-Sason:Bills
7:00 Jeoprdyl 9.00 SaturdayNightMovie: Week Browavs. Redskins 7:30 PrivaBye 7:00 Jeopady v. Chiefs
7:30 Small Wonder "ChOech&Chong's 1100 Aathahrijsti's 1000 SCNLat Edition 8:30 60 Mimtes (OTO 725 MeA*S*H 10:00 SCNLac Edition
8:00 PrimtimeLive The CouicaBroth- Poirot' 10:05 E tetainmentTonight Cham duo leppar) 7:50 WednedayNight 10:05 EntatinmentTonight
9:00 In Living Color * e"* Midnight Headline News 1035 TonightShow 9:30 CBS Evening News Movie: "LastWih" 1035 Tonight Show
9-30 CBS Evening News 1030 SantrdayNightLiv 1230 M MectThe Pre 1135 Davidlaemnea 1000 SCN Late Edition 9:30 CBS Bvening News 1135 DavidLettnman
10:00 SC NLaB Edition Midnight Videolink ** 1:30 SpotsrMachine 1235In Nightlim 10:05 IitainimenTonight 10:00 SCNI Edition 1235nm Nightline
10.05 EnertainmentToght 1:00 Priday Night Videos 2:00 ABCWorldNewsNow 1.05 HIadlineNewsBmek 1035 Toight Show 10:05 EntemtainmenTonight 1:05 HeadlineNewsBreak
10:35 Tonight Show 2:00 All Night Movie: 3:00 HeadlineNews 1:30 SportaL night 1135 DavidLanicnan 1035 TonightShow 1:30 SporteLaznight
11:35 DavidLaenman "Code of Silence"" 3:30 CNNWorld Report 200 AramioHall 12:35am NghSinc 1135 DavidLtcnann 2:00 Aranio Hall Show
12:35am Nightine 3:40 All NightMovie: 5:00 IcadlincNewsBreak 3-00 TToightShow 1.05 Hadlin NewsBroak 1235nm Nightlin 3:00 Tonight Show
1:05 Vidcolinks * "Roboco'* 4:00 DavidLeiemimm 1:30 Spoaralenight 1:05 HeadliasNewsBreak 4:00 DavidLettenan
200 All Night Movie 5:25 HeadlineNews 5:00 kHadlinc NoweBrsk 2.00 AnamioHal 1:30 SpaorILalnight 5:00 HeadlineNewsBreak
"Magnum Force"* 3.00 TonightShow 2:00 ArmioHall
3:55 All Night Movie: 4:00 DavidlAueuman 3:00 Tonight Show
"Something Wild" 5-00 Huedlin News Beak 400 DavidLAc nnan
5:45 Videolintk __ 5.00 HeadlinmeNws Bak


& * Mature Theme **Series Begins ***Series Ends

Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
5:30amSimulcast W/8 & 10 630am Simulcastw/B & 10 6:00am mbChop'sPlayalong 5:30m SimnlcastW/S & 10 5:300a SimltW/ 10 5:30m SimulcastW/8 &10 5:30am SimulcastW/8 & 10
8:00 OprahWinfcy* 1030 Thel30hoeMdScooby 6:20 StoryBarn 8:00 OnprhWimfy* 8.00 Donthm* 8:00 OprhWinfrcy* 8:00 SallyJee Raphael*
9:00 Today Doo 6:45 Te Addams Pamily 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today
11:00 StarTrek 11:00 The Mmstes 7:10 GoodToop 11:00 Startkk 11: StarTek 1100 SrtwTr k 11-00 StrTrek
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230 Young and Re * Hari" 8:45 R 230 Youg and Rea s45 m 2 Yo nd Th Rest- 230 The Young And Reat- 230 Young And The Rest- 230 YounmgndTheRetlesm*
3:30 Batman:TheAni- 3:40 SpenscrPorHire 9:10 BntmanmTheAnimatd leas* le3* le* 3:30 Disney'asitleMermaid
macd Series 4:30 OnPitRoad Series *** 3:30 TinyToonsAdvantiu 3:30 Tho AddimsPamily 330 GooTroop 4:00 PraggleRock
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6:30 NBC Nightly News 8:00 Riptide Review 6:30 NBCNighly News 6:30 NBCNighly News 6:15 HeadlineNewsBreak 7:00 Hangin'WithMr.Coo-
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7:30 IReshPinceafBelAir 9:30 Maried.w/Childrn* 2:00 SundayAfernoon 8:00 QutmnmLcp Home Vidra 7:00 FullHouse 7:30 Family Maner
8:00 Friday Night Movie: 10:00 HeadlineNews Movie: c I'llnyTomor- 9:00 Roasmea 7:30 Homelmprovemeat 7:30 Scinfield 8:00 Martin
WitnessForThe 10:30 SaturdayNightLive* row 9:30 MondayightMovic: 8:00 LA.Law 8:00 Murder.ShWrote 8:30 MurphyBrown
Prosecution"* Midnight 4:00 Special:50 Great "Risky Busines"* 9:00 Tuaday NightMovie: 9:00 Sister 9:00 Herman'sHead
10.00 TJ.Hooker Videolinka* HomeRumsinmBaeball 11:05 HadlineNewsBreak "Royal mHutOfTh 10:0 Scaecrow MrKing 9:30 Love&War
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1130 SCNLatr Edition 200 EtertainmentThis 5:00 ThisWeeknInBabarll 1135 AeamioHal 11:0 HledlinNews 1130 SCNLte Edition 1100 HeadlineNcws
1135 ArsenioHall Week 5:30 MotorWeek 12.35am Simulcastwilhchmna 1130 SCNLi Edition 11:35 AranioHal 11:30 SCNLad Edition
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2:00 AracnioHall 7:30 The Wonder Year
3:00 TonightShow 8:00 Sunday Night Movie:
4:00 LateNightW/David "Jakc & Th Patima
L terman Goodbye"*
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5:30 Headline News 10:00 Magnum P.
6:00 HeadlineNewsBreak 1100 60 Minute
Midnight Simulcatwithchmnels
8&10


Channels 8 & 10


Cable Channel 14


Sports Specials
NFLPre-Season Football 50 Greatest Home Runs In Baseball History 4 p.m.
American Bowl noon Saturday, Bills vs. Vikings from Berlin, Sunday. This special features retrospective on some ofthe
Germany most memorable home runs in baseball history.
American Bowl 11:30 am. Sunday, Cowboys vs. Lions from Movies
London, England "Witness for the Prosecution" 8 p.m. Friday. Stars Beau Bridges
Browns vs. Redskins 7 p.m. Monday and Ralph Richardson.
Bills vs. Chiefs 7 p.m. Thursday "Hatari!" 1 p.m. Saturday. Stars John Wayne, Elsa Martinelli, andRed
Specials Buttons.
"Turning Point with Barbara Walters" 8 p.m. Saturday. Barbara Walters "P'll Cry Tomorrow" 2 p.m. Sunday. Stars Susan Hayward and Richard
examines the story of a young girl switched at birth in this ABC news special. Conte.


Series Starts
Think Fast 4:30 p.m Fridays. (replaces "Make The Grade")
Soul Train 4 p.m. Sunday (replaces "The Fugitive")
Movies
"Radio Days" 3 p.m. Saturday. Stars Woody Allen and Mia Farrow.
'The Producers" 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Stars Zero Mostel and Gene Wilder.


"Jake & The Fatman: Goodbye" 8 p.m. Sunday. Stars Joe Penny and
William Conrad.
"Risky Business" 9:30 p.m Monday. Stars Tom Cruise and Rebecca
DeMornay.
"Royal Hunt Of The Sun" 9 p.m. Tuesday. Stars Robert Shaw and Nigel
Davenport.













B10 Tropic Times
B l Aug. 6,1993


# Classified Ads


Lab/retriever puppies. 286-3294.

Toy poodle, housebroken female, 1 l/2yrs.nopapers.
$90. 284-5332.

3 female German shepherds, 7 wks, dewormed. $40.
224-5355.

Paso fino horse, white, male, 5 yrs, name is Taure.
$1800. 229-2660.

Male & female guppies, $1. ea. 286-4286.

Thoroughbred mare, 3 1/2yrs, $400/obo. 269-7674.
after 6pm.

Female german shepherd C.C.P. registered, 2 1/2 yr,
good w/kids. $250/obo. 285-5827.

Doberman male puppy, 10 wks., dewormed, tail
docked, shots, $150. 255-4651.

Frenchpoodles puppies, 1 1/2mos., dewormed, tails
cut, $125. 226-0640.

Peek-a-poo wanted for stud service. 286-4489.

Good home needed for, 4 yr old, med mixed breed
hound, w/crate, all access. 282-3286.

Yellow head parrot, speaks spanish, $75; w/cage &
perch, $100.286-3823.

German shepherd puppies. $150. 236-3887.

To good home, female 6 mos,mixed lab/7. 284-4722.

Nativecolts,fillies,mares,horses,ponies, $125.-275.
225-4749.

Collie puppies. 261-3325.

AKC registered female chinese pug, 2 yrs, good w/
children, $250. 286-6138. after 5 pm.

Free 3 yr. tiger tabby cat, spayed, all shots, declawed,
access. 287-6795.

Free gray, female cat, spayed. 287-4486.

M/lg Parrot cage. see at412 A Clayton, cheap.




1985 Jeep Scrambler, 4 cyl, exc cond, dty pd.$5900.
228-4061.

1985 Chevy Impala, dty pd, diesel, ac, rebuilt, exc
cond. $3800.228-4061.

1987 Nissan p/u, 4dr, deisel, ac, am/fm/cass, tax pd.
$6500/obo. 252-6845.

1981 Honda Prelude, sr, 5-spd, am/fm/cass,will trade
for Chevy or Ford p/u, $2500. 285-5102. 8-3 m-f.

1982 Mazda 626, 5-spd, 4dr, ac, am/fm/cass, power,
exc cond, $3000. 286-4884.

1988 Dodge Daytona, ac, am/fm/cass,sunroof, at, exc
cond.$6000/obo. 284-3671.

1990 Toyota Extra-cab, ac, pb, ps, loaded, w/extras.
$13,599. 284-3738.

1987 Nissan Sentra, 5-spd, 2dr, ac. $3500. duty pd.
287-6948.

Tachometer, 7k. rpm, stewart warer, $25. 252-6831.

1993 Daewod Espero,ac, alarm, power, am/fm/cass,
tinted windows. $10500.230-1881.

1984 Datsun 300ZX, ps, pb, pw, ac, t-tops, $4500/
obo. 260-3472.

1983 Honda Accord, dty pd, ac, std, 5-spd, 2dr.
$3500. 260-3472.

1986 Ford Ranger pu, V-6, not dty pd, automatic,
$4500. 260-3472.

1988 Ford Escort, dty pd, ac, std, 5-spd, 2dr hatch-
back. $4500. 260-3472.

1980 Ford LTD-station wgn, $1200/obo. 284-5676.

1985 VW-Scirocco,std, ac, pb, ps. $4300. 260-3472.

1987 Volvo, 240 dl, 4dr, 5-spd, ac, exc cond. $7500.
226-6341.

1988 Buick Electra Park Ave., 4dr, V-6, 34.000 mi.,
fully loaded, leather interior. $9000/obo. 261-7398.

1987 Mazda 323, 5-spd, ac, $4200. 286-4622.

1981 Buick, Regal Limited, runs great, good cond,
$2500/obo. 287-3642. after 6pm.

1986 Nissan, Pulsar NX, runs great, good cond.
$3000/obo. 287-3642. after 6pm.

1986 Ford Taurus Wagon, w/new engine,looks good,
runs great. $5500/obo. 287-3424.


1988 BMW 318i, Shadow line,2dr, 5-spd, sr, ac, am/
fm/cass, not dty pd. $10,000. 261-6119.

1986 Toyota Corona, great cond, ac, am/fmn/cass,
4dr. $4000. 263-5111. (apt46)

1992 Dodge Shadow, 4dr, ps, pb, pm, pl, ac, tilt, w/
warranty, exc cond, $10,500/obo. 282-3794.

1993 NissanMaxima, paid27,500dty pd, guarantee,
loaded, ac, 6 cyl, 4dr. $25,000. 282-5494.

1989 Chevy Beretta OT, ps, pb, cruise, am/fm/cass,
5-spd, good cond. $9000/obo. 261-8103.

1986 Chevy Celebrity Eurosport, am/fmi, ac,not duty
pd, exc cond.

1985 Pontiac T-1000, must see. $1500. 284-5375.

1991 Toyota 4x4 pu, 26,000 mi, ps, pb, bed liner.
$11,000. 284-3445.

1979 Mercury Marquis, exc cond, ac, $2500. 223-
6908.

1984 Chrysler New Yorker, 4 cyl, ac, power, runs
good, 66,000 mi, $2800. 224-2597.

1984 Chrysler New Yorker, auto, ac, extras, low
mileage, good cond, not duty pd. $3500. 252-2130.

1988 Chrysler, LeBaron,4 cyl,2dr,29000mi, dty pd,
pl, good cond. $8500. 264-2342.

1979 Lincoln Continental, 1 owner, dtypd,exccond.
$3500. 286-4273.

1985 Honda Civic, dty pd, 5-spd, ac, am/fm/cass,
alarm, good cond. $4500. 252-5829.

1986 Chevy Spectrum, 5-spd, am/fi/cass, ac, 30
mpg. $3500. 284-3215.

1988 Chevy Camaro, V-8, at, t-tops, ac, ps, pb, pw/l,
tilt, cruise, am/fm/cass. $6000/obo. 284-3640.

1985 Chevy Cavalier, type 10, ac, ps, 2dr. $3500.
282-3694.

1985 Volvo 240 GL sta wgn. $5000. 286-3385.

1992 Tahoe S-10, exc cond, luxxus bed cover, 4.31,
V-6, 5-spd. $9959. 284-3977.

1991 Dodge Shadow, 4dr, auto, am/fm, 25,000 mi.
$7500. 285-5516.

1984 Dodge Charger, std, ac, exc cond, no dty pd,
$3500. 287-6777.

1989 Dodge Shadow ES, turbo, ac, ps, pb, 4dr, am/
fm/cass. $6500. 284-4430.

1972 Pontiac Ventura. $1000/obo. 287-3923.

1986 Renanlt Alliance, 4dr, ps, at, am/fm/cass, ac,
good paint, runs good. $1800. 269-8991.

1976 Ford Gran Torino,4dr, R16, $500.282-4489.

1988 Mercury Topaz, U.S. specs at, ac, 2dr hatch-
back. $5500. 286-4187.

1985 Chevy Camaro, special ground effects, cd,alarm,
ac, more, $5300/obo. 286-4189.

1982 Subaru 1800 GL Coupe, runs great, duty pd,
U.S. $3000. 282-3690.

1986 Porsche 944, 5-spd, ac, pw, am/fm/cass, duty
pd, exc cond. 252-6636.

1979 Ford Mustang,302 V8,ps,pb, am/fn/cass,runs
good. $1700/obo. 287-6881 after 5pm.

1973 Chevy Impala, new/paint, brakes, tires, batt,
starter, water pump, valve job, $1500. 287-3879.

1991 Chevy S-10Blazer4x4,tahoepkg, 2dr, loaded,
22,000 mi, red, exc cond. $14,000. 286-3574.

1987 Hyundai Excel, 4dr, 4-spd, am/fm, ac. $3700/
obo.283-3628.

1988 Mitsubishi Lancer, 4dr, at, ac, ps, pw/locks,
cass, alarm. $5500/obo. 252-2998.

1984 Cadillac Cimarron, $5900. 286-3444.

1981 Oldsmobile, ps, pb, pw, automatic, duty pd.
$2500/obo. 284-3475.

1984 Bronco II, 4x4, $4500; 1982 Nissan Maxima,
diesel, loaded, $3000/obo, avail Aug 15. 284-5478.

1988 Fiat pu, good cond, low mil, duty pd. $2800.
252-5096.

Army Jeep, M151A1, w/lots of spare parts. $2400/
obo. 252-5036.

1987 Mustang GT,ps, pb, ac, am/fm/cass, w/eq, low
mileage, alarm, exc cond. $9000. 287-6437.

1987 Mazda 626, loaded. $5000/obo. 226-7679.

Ford 302 engine for rebuild and misc parts. 286-
4004.


Daewoo Racer 1991, liftback, ac, am/fm/cass, black,
duty pd, $5200. 224-1583.

1984 Nissan Stanza,pb,ps,pw, pl, ac, am/fm/cass,sr,
tilt, trailer hitch, not duty pd. $3750/obo. 287-5680.

1985 Chevrolet Sprint hatchback, ac, am/fi/cass,
great mileage, not dty pd. $3250/obo. 287-5680.

1983 Datsun 280 Zx, ac, ps, pb, at, t-tops, duty pd.
$4000. 224-4190.

1991 Ford Ranger V6 3.0, std, 5-spd, am/fm/cass, ac,
camper shell, duty not pd. $10,000. 239-3848.

1985Audi 5000s, fuel injection,4dr,5-spd, ac,sr,ps,
pw, pb, am/fm/cass, U.S. spec, $10000. 264-2599.

1984 Dodge Omni, 4dr, 5-spd, ac. $1500/obo. 287-
3888.

1986 Nissan 300 ZX, ps, pw, ac, t-top, 5-spd, exc
cond, not duty paid. $7500. 260-2392.

1975 T-bird, pw, pl, ps, $1550/obo. 261-8405.

1989 Mazda pu, 5-spd, exc cond. $8500. 284-5306.

1986OldsmobileCoupe,power, exc cond,new tires.
$3950. 287-5025.

1984 Plymonth Horizon, 4dr, ac, am/fin/cass, exc
cond. $3500/obo. 236-0982. after 5 pm.




Bilingual maid, great w/children, refs. 287-4487.

Reliable honest maid, live in/out, english spk only,
references. 224-8697.

Bilingual maid/female housekeeper, dependable,
hardworking, great w/children, refs, M-F. 267-9289.

Mature maid avail. Mon. & Fri., cleans, babysits,
laundry, very good w/children, refs. 284-5720.

Mature live-outmaid, exp, grtw/children, pets. M-F,
refs. 287-6381.

English spk, housekeeper, live out, good w/children.
221-6897.

Eng spk maid, live in/out, dependable, honest, w/
refs. 220-3923.

Eng spk, live out maid, refs, M-F, off post. 221-5285.

Mature, honest, reliable, day maid maid avail now,
refs. 262-0284/228-7995.

Span spk, live in maid, honest, reliable, great w/
children. 286-6132.

Bilingual, honest, day maid, Fort Davis/Espinar,
Wed, Thurs. 241-8112.

Little Tyke treehouse, toys,baby clothes. 284-3396.

Exc day maid, Mon, Tues, & Thurs, hardworking,
honest, great w/kids. 285-4878.

Reliable, honest, english spk, live in maid, great w/
kids, refs, 287-5333.

Reliable, honest, english spk, live in, housekeeper,
great w/kids. 287-6348.

University student seeks full tine, day time domestic,
services position. 260-3258.

Bilingual live in maid, great w/children, good house-
keeper, would like Espinar/Davis area. 289-4534.

Live in/out, reliable, housekeeper, good w/kids. 267-
1871.

Bilingual housekeeper, very dependable, hard work-
ing, great w/chlidren, refs, M-F. 287-3495.

Eng spk maid, loyal, dependable, mature, live in/out,
exc refs. 224-8697.




Johnson motor 225 HP, 1985, $3500. 232-5979.

24, Cuddy cabin, Volvo Pentra, dual prop, 270 HP
engine, reefer, $15000/obo. 252-6124. after 6pm.

24ft, Seaport Cuddy cabin, rebuilt 350 engine, 280
Volvo Pentra outdrive.285-5486.

15 HP, Evinrude outboard motor, runs great, short
leg. $500. 252-2243.

18" Galaxy boat, ski equipmentincluded. $7500/obo.
284-3155/260-7669.

ClymerMerucry, outboard,shop manual,45-225 HP
1972-1989. $15. 287-6820.

14" alumJonBoat,trailor,25HPYamahamoter,elec
troll motor, extras. exc cond, $2000/obo. 284-5478.

16ft ski/fish boat, 60 HP Johonson trailer, life vests,
anchor, new batt. & more. $3000. 230-1117.


Packard Bell Legend 625, 486SX,$0 down $99.95
for 12 months, contactBob Osborn. 223-3976.

Sanyo Betamax with alot of movies. $160. 287-
4235.

Line printer, Genicam 4410, new. $575. 264-8147.

Video camera, 8mm, Sony cd-v8 afzoom, auto,batter-
ies, all access, hard case, manuals. $450. 226-5597.

Samsung tv 21", color like new. $195/obo 252-6845.

Port radio/cass w/removable speakers. $25. 252-
6831.

Word processing typewriter. $150. 286-3325.

Zenith, easy PC computerwaccessincluding original
owners manuals, exc cond. $400. 284-3438.

Color tv 25" Philco console, good cond, works great.
$250/obo. 286-3420.

VCR Sony 8mm digital EV-S700, for video & audio
manual. $450. 226-5597. after 9pm.

Commodore 64 pc, 4 disk drives, color printer, soft-
ware, xtras. $325/obo. 287-4633 ask for Tony.

Zenith Monochome monitor, Commodore Matrix
printer, modem, table, software. 223-3121.

CPU w/5 1/4 floppy disk & 40 meg hard drive $150;
cgate 40 meg harddrive. $20. 284-5789.

Brother word processor, w/crt display, 3 1/2 disk
drive, spell check. $300/obo. 226-7479.

Tandy 1000SL,dualdisk,IBMcompatwithMagnavox
color monitor, VCR capable. $550. 289-3437.

Sansui receiver; Pioneertimer, cd,equal,cass; HPM's-
1100 spkrs, $1200. 282-4546.

Sony mini-hifi steteo-cd, cassette, am/fm radio,
memory, alarm, remote controL $550. 286-4520.

386 IBM comp. 4 mb ram, 128 mb hd, Windows 3.1,
Dos 6.0, color mon, printer. $1000/obo. 230-0192.

Simsui 9090 DB receiver, 120 watts, inany accesso-
ries. $165. 286-6333.

60 watts Sunn amp, w/base guitar. $500. 282-3694.

Laser 386sx, VGA mon, 5 1/4 & 3 1/2 drives, turbo
& reset, books, software, $1300/obo. 287-5290.

CommodoreHD40,3drives,keyboard, VGA,mouse,
and Star NX-1000 color printer, $650.284-4298.

Atari w/25 games $50; Commodore 64 disk drive w/
games $60; headboard $45. 286-3530.

Canon F-1 w/6 lenses, flash, filters, carrying case.
$850/obo. 284-4634.

Notebook computer, $995; personal informationman-
ager software, $45. 286-3444.

Amiga 500 w/color man, 1 mg mem, mouse, video
adapter. $300. 286-6327.

Star NX 1020 color printer. $175. 286-4828.

Aiwa WX220 double cassette deck. $125; Sansui
cassette deck w/equalizer $150. 282-5586.

Sharp video Camcorder, 8-1 zoom, auto focus, much
more. $550. 286-6182.

Atari 800, 130XE computers, $400; Panasonic 1624
printer, $325; JVC 20" color tv, $285. 252-5829.

Super NES and Game Boy games, prices negotiable.
286-4596.




Bracelet in parking lot, Bldg 861 Albrook, in April.
252-6934.

Black catw/yellow eyes in Curundu military housing.
claim at Corozal Vet clinic. 285-5866.

Gold class ring 1967 Mount Olive High School, on
Fort Kobbe. 287-6492.




Waterbed q sz; antique q sz bed; 2 wall units; bikes;
adult/children clothing. 287-5773.

Dining tables; q sz br set, TV, VCR, microwave,
stereo, 1982 Mazda, recliner, barw/stools.236-2237.

Daybed set w/ two mattresses. $500. 221-3958.

Whirlpool acs, 10,000, 16,000, 18,000; Honda
Civic tire and rim. 252-6246.

Freezer. $775. Gemeinhardt Flute $200. 224-
7671.













SClassified Ads


Tropic Times B 1
Aug. 6,1993 Bi .-


Cabinet for TV, VCR and video tapes. $75. 252-
6831.

Ski, exercise mach w/ computer. $125. 252-6831.

Carpets from 3X5 to 9X12, curtains, motorcycle
loading ramp, cassette recorder. bo. 284-3738.

Dining rm. table w/ six chairs, new, $1,300. 230-
1881.

New Kenmore ac 5000 BTU. $250; green sewing
material, 12 yds. $30. 286-3643.

Upright Whirlpool freezer. 18.5 cu.ft. almost new.
$750. 224-6826.

Screen in patio for tropichousing, must help remove.
$50. 286-4286.

Whirlpool frig w/ice maker, $200. 236-0984.

Rattan dining table w/six chain, $680. 225-2197.

13"colortv,$150;hide-a-bed ,$180; double cassette
player, $75; dresser, $80. 264-9131.

Couch, $300; glass table top $50/obo 230-1412.

Q sz. bed w/frame, box spring and mattress, $350.
286-4520.

DR tbl, 4 chrs, $450 obo. 287-5339.

Q sz. box spring, matt, frame, 2 sheet sets, $200 obo.
F size comforter. $25. 287-3678.

Whirlpool 10,000 btu ac, $280; compact home
security system, $45. 287-5939.

Washer, runs good, has leak in hose. $50. 283-4227.

Upright freezer, 16 cu ft, $800/obo; china cabinet,
$2000/obo. 284-4183.

DR table w/extensions, 4 chairs. $300. 282-3286.

DR set w/4 chairs; ent. center, wicker hamper and
trash can. 287-3689.

Glass coffee and end tables; south western items;
wicker shelf; bathroom set. 287-3689.

Carpets incl padding, 12X15, $175; 9X12, $100.
282-4320.

Carpets incl padding, 6X9, $45; 6X9, $45. 282-
4320.

Dehumidifier,used 6 mos, $125. 287-6820.

Kenmore washer and dryer, heavy duty large capac-
ity, set only, $650. 287-6820.

Kg. sz semi-waveless waterbed, hb/shelf, $500/obo.
Sat/Sun anytime. M-F after 3 pm. 284-4971.

Coffee table, exc. cond. $65. 289-3437.

Super single waterbed,mattress, liner,heater,sheet, 6
drawers underneath. $350. 287-3272.

24,000 Fedders ac. $375; 18,000 Whirlpool ac.
$350; 10,000 Whirlpool AC, $225. 252-2287.

Dining table w/ four chairs. $375. 286-4596.

Dresser w/ mirror, chest, headboard. 287-4284.

Sofa, $375; end table,videorockerchair. 287-4270.

Four patio chairs w/3 side tables. $180. 269-2972.

Whirlpool freezer, 15.2 cu ft, $400. 252-2586.

Kenmorewasher/dryer. $550. 260-5607.

Qszsofa/sleeper, $400; recliner, $300; 9X12rug
w/ pad; Sony tv w/remote, $125. 284-4283.

GE 8,000 btu ac, new, $425. 252-2998.

Q-sz bedroom set, $750; Whirlpool 8,000 btu ac,
$325; 2 carpets, $50, $75. 286-3530.

Berkline recliner, $200/obo. 286-4197.

Side-by-side refrigerator/freezer w/ ice maker, 2.1 cu
ft, $625. 256-6381.

2 end tables, $50; uprightvacuum, $40; CDplayer,
$100; Commodore 16 computer, $100. 287-3835.

Maids quarters ac, $100; tropical housing blue
curtains $15/obo; port. dishwasher. 284-4283.

25" color tv, $200; loveseat/chair set, $250; dresser
w/mirror, $200; beer can collection. 252-2077.

Recliner, nightstand, curtains, 6X9, 4X6 carpets,
cabinet w/drawer, girls bike. 286-6176.

Side-by-side refrigerator/freezer, 19 cu ft ice maker,
$50/obo. 286-6182.

Sofa and chair, good cond. $400. 284-5820.

Carpet 11X12, $50; 2 end tables,$60; coffee table,
$50. 284-5937.


2 ceiling fans, new w/all fittings. $40 ea. 282-5586.

GE refrigerator, $450/obo. 284-5589.

Leather furn set, 4 pc, $800; air compresser, $1,600,
gas powered. 256-6410.

Leather recliner, needs reupholstering, $50. 287-
6127.

Freezer, $775. 224-7671.

Litton microwave, $75. 287-6820.

Hot water heater, 50 gal, $100; exercise equip, $175;
child's bed frame, $25. 289-3430.

Matching cover and love seat. $450/obo. 284-3781

GE frig, $500; dryer, $250; exercise bike, $80; video
camera w/case, $500. 286-6138. after 5pm.

BR set 5 piece, $450; dining tbl/4 chairs, $550. 284-
4430.




16" chain w/ name Vicky on it Lost in PX or
commissary. 287-6692.




Stroller, $20; high chair, $25; toys. 283-4227.

Power Wheels Jeep, boys 12" bike, vac, carrier, John-
ny Jump Up, lawnmower. 287-4727.

Baby swing, carrier, bouncer swing, teddy bearmobil,
monitor, indoor BBQ grill. 287-6422.

Parts for 1987 Escort: transmission, rack and pinion
steering. 228-4061.

D bed w/frame, $170; 4 chairs, $100. 287-4855.

Doghouse, $10/obo; maternity clothes. 287-3871.

Wedding dress w/ veil/ slip, sz 5, $200. 252-2080.

Beta tapes, over 50 original films, $200. 252-5604.

302 V-8 Ford motor overhaul kit, $450. 229-2660.

Video camera, Thomas organ, couch, vanity, clothes,
toys. 287-5378.

Set of 4 rims, factory, fit most Ford/Mercury, $35/
$120 set 285-4199.

Golfclubset, 1,3,5 wood(metal), 3 -9 irons,putter and
bag, $100. 282-3694.

Computer desk w/printer stand, $70. 284-3438.

5 stitches/auto buttonholder,$200/neg. 284-4278.

Teacsinglecassetteplayer, VHFmarine radio,smoker,
hydraulic jack, more. 230-1117.

Radio control equip., 100 amp service box. 284-
5789.

Complete windsurfing package, O'Brien board, Neil
Pryde sail, Quiver bag, $450. 284-3445.

Stinger water skis, size 6-8, unused. Paid $650 new,
$450/obo. 230-1926.

90 leaf baseball cards and rookie basketball Fleer
cards. Call Ken. 223-0217.

Woman's Free Spirit bicycle 26", $75. 287-6820.

Raleigh mens 27" bike, $100. 287-6820.

Vivitar V 2000 35mm Camera w/flash and case,
manual, good cond, $250. 223-5597.

Flex Force workout machine w/ VKR and free action
stepper, $200. 226-7479 after 1900.

Porcelain vase, $225; antique tools; garbage disposer
$195; Time-Life cookbook set, $60. 252-2042.

Desk,portabledishwasher, electric organ,baby coach,
computer desk w/hutch, pearl necklace. 286-4489.

Various VHS videos, $3 ea. 286-6333.

19" color tv, $150; 19" b/w tv, $100; 30 gal.
aquarium w/ stand, access, $200. 287-3272.

Kitchen sinks, $15 ea. 252-2287.

Exercise slant board $10. Slalom waterski $25. See
at 2350A Balboa. 252-2760.

Daybed frame, roller skates, toys,clothes. 284-4634.

Encyclopedia Brittanica/ Great books, $950. 285-
4734.

1992 Mitsubishi Lancer rims sz 13, $30 ea. 252-
2086.

AC 8000btu, $250; 16" It. truck tires, $50; wedding/
night/maternity dresses, sizes 5/6. 252-2042.


Women's 14K engagement/wedding set, sz 6, $400.
Call 283-6356 before 4pm and ask for Paula.

Headlight covers for Datsun 2802X, $50. 224-4190.

Carpets, 12X15, 9X10; end table, $10; lamp, $20;
clothes; curtains; bookshelf. 284-4722.

14K engagement/wedding set, z. 7, $400; woman's
blackhillsgold diamond,sz.7.283-4305before4pm.

Baby clothes,childrens clothes, carpet, coffeemakers.
283-3628.

GEfrig,$500; dryer, $250; exercisebike, $80; video
camera w/ case, $500. 286-6138 after 5 pm.




1985 Yamaha V-Max, 1200 CC, 5800 miles, 2 hel-
mets, cover, shaft drive, $4,300. 286-3574.

1982 Kawasaki GP2550, new chain, sprockets, reli-
able, $1,500/obo. 286-6277.




Qrts 554A Clayton Sat 7 a.m.-?, kid's toys.

Qtrs 335B Albrook furn, adult/kids clothes.

Qtrs 7274A Cardenas. Sat.

Qtrs7276BCardenas Sat7-11 am. Clothes,Nintendo
games, misc. items.

Qtrs 1109B Clayton Sat 8am.

Qtrs 406A Clayton Sat.

Qtrs683C Clayton Sat7 am. kid's clothes,toys, furn.

Qtrs 861B Clayton. Sat.

Qtrs 647A Clayton. Sat 8am-12, multi-family.

Cocoli Trailer 12, Sat, 8am, furniture, misc.

Qtrs 2312 Curundu, Sat, 7am-noon, clothes, toys,
bike, etc.

Qtrs 429B Howard, Fri and Sat, 8am-noon.

Qtrs 557B Howard, Sat, 8am-noon.

Qtrs 636B Howard, Sat, 7-1 lam.

Qtrs 1541A Howard, Sat,7am-noon, no early birds.
Toys, scooters, clothes, etc.

Qtrs 1537D Howard,Sat, 8am-11am.,no early birds.

Qtrs 144B Howard, Sat 7am-10am.




Spanish language classes $10/hour. Call Marci at
223-2164 or 233-1676.

Appts available for perms, haircuts, colors. Call Deb
Radke at 287-5551.

Decorated cakes foranyoccasion. Call formore info.
and prices. Ask for Julie. 287-6725.

Wrecker and tow services provided in the Canal areas
24 hrs by Heg. 228-4061.

Heather's decorated cakes, cakes for all occasions.
286-3325.

House and pet sitter. References avail. 261-4561.

Freshjumbo shrimp deliveratyourhome; maids from
interior,hardworkers,policerecords/refs. 252-2780.

Seamstress,comm. patterns ormakesherown. Natalia
or Maria. 224-1091.

Seamstress. Call Kim at 287-5783.


STropic Times Ad Form

ANIMALS
AUTOMOBILES
AVAILABLE
BOATS & CAMPERS
ELECTRONICS PRICE HOMI
FOUND
HOUSEHOLD Check only one category per ad
LOST week are allowed. Each ad form is I
] MISCELLANEOUS print neatly. Information listed below
] MOTORCYCLES required for publication. This infon
S PATIO SALES parties. Deadline for the receipt of
WANTED edition. Ads may be mailed to thel


SPONSOR'S NAME

ORG.


Your photo on mug, $10, orders in 2-3 wks. 287-
4799.

Quality child care $1 per hour, anytime. 284-
3049.

VCR head cleaning, minor repairs. 283-3473.

Privatenurse, experience refs, spanish-speaking, care
for sick/elderly during days 8am-4pm. 226-6242.

Repair furniture, reference. 221-3467.

Mature, bilingual, certified homecare nurse for eld-
erly. 282-3126.

3 yrs exp bartender will serve at your next party, also
havewaitress. Call Lslie. 287-5726.

Canal transit and day charter on private yacht Call
252-5428 (Jim).

Is your parrot a male or female? 287-3087 for test-
ing.

Seamstress for clothes, curtains, mola dresses, etc.
Mrs. Elsa. 267-3293.

Spanish speaking trainer for bodybuilding or power
avail, week days or weekends. Call Ted at 267-3382.

Child careby a certified family child careprovider, in
providers home on Espinar, $1.50/hr. 289-4518.

Piano lessons on Howard side of bridge. 287-5290.

Photographer, in home, family portraits, babies, by
Neicy. 286-4798.

X-servicememberclean qtrs/apt, anytime, reasonable
rate. 221-3467.


Little Mermaid tape. 287-6392 after 5 pm..

4X4 used Jeep. Make offer. 282-3779.

Reliable, honest, bilingual, live-in maid, exc. w/kids.
M-Sat., 4 and 1 yr olds, refs, $120. 287-5333.

Individual to transfer8mmmovies to video tape. 286-
3245.

Male German Shepherd of Husky puppy. Reasonable
price. 287-4219.

Lapso Apso puppy, reasonable price. 284-3396.

Eng spk, honest, mature, live-out maid, for 2 small
children, housecleaning. 285-41927 am-5pmM-F.

Honest live-ion maid, cook, clean, iron. Take care of
4-mo. baby. $140. Needs references. 252-2077

Bronco or Blazer (77-85), good cond. 286-3474.

Honest,dependable,hard working live-outmaid. 230-
1927.

Housekeeper, live-in, good w/children, experienced,
hardworking, cook M-S,$140. 252-5036.

Trailer forjohnboat. 286-3474.

Jogging stroller, reasonable in good cond. 286-
6277.

Spanish spk live-in maid, 35 yr or older, must have
references. 236-3770.

Single bed, rattan furn. suitable for patio area, some-
one to clean/polish tile floors. Call 236-3770.

2-Glasspacktypemufflers forJeep dual exhaust. 286-
4004.

Varsity cheerleading coach, aerobics/dance knowl-
edge preferred. Ask for Devon. 282-4688.

Curio cabinet, any cond, reasonably priced. 224-
3632.


E PHONE
form. Only two ads per person each
limited to 15 words. Please type or
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D














B12 Tropic Times
2A Aug. 6, 1993


BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker


ACROSS
1 Jason's ship
5 Fished for
lampreys
10 Clerical
vestment
15 Not closed
19 Give off
steam
20 Bump the
pot, in poker
21 Former Thai
coin
22 Feeling
resentment
23 Before and
after Louise
25 Before and
after Howard
27 Compass
direction
28 Confused
29"1 like-'
31 Western lily
32 Leno of
comedy
33 "Emma" or
"Germinal
35 Happening
37 Treaty org.
39 Sour ale
41 Worked the
dough
43 Scours
thoroughly
46 Sauna need
47 Time or love
follower
48 Dried up
50 Shake a leg
51 "The Last -
I Saw Paris"
52 Around:
prefix


53 Scarlett's 96 Wine's
home companion
55 German river 97 Mummy's
56 Brazilian bird tomb
57 Events protector?
59 Pays the bill 98 One of
61 Black bird greater rank
62 Gives In 100 Shooting
return from ambush
64 Consumer 102 St. George,
advocate to the dragon
66 "Gone With 103 Farm units
the Wind" 105 Cattle
locale roundup
68 Meal or cake 106 Region or
starter sphere
69 - -ac-toe 107 Ampersand
70 Urban music 109 Govt. agents
style 111 Luzon
71 Ladybugs. Negrito
for instance 112 Worker's
75 Have tools
scruples 113 Balaam's
77 Black steed
leopard 116 Before and
81 '- the King's after Leslie
Men" 119 Before and
82 Disturbed the after Martin
nocturnal 122 Singing and
quiet dancing girt
84 Isolated plant 123 Scene of the
or animal crime
spades 124 Typewrits.
86 Biblical lion type
87 Stringed 125 First-rate
Instrument 126 Kaffir
89 Stick or beat language
starter 127 Dutch
90 Pub order cheeses
91 Very small 128 Rajah's wife
quantity 129 Wear away.
92 Decorate bit by bit
94 Mod. school DOWN
subj. 1 Comedian


Johnson
2 Check or
restrain
3 Before and
after Barry
4 Russian river
5 Classroom
adjunct
6 Atelier fixture
7 Mona -
8 Canton
follower
9 Deduces or
Infers
10 Ministers to
11 Russian
community
12 Summer
desserts
13 Wine cellars,
In France
14 Funeral
orations
15 Inquire
16 Before and
alter Louis
17 Code or rug
18 Depend
24 Island city in
Quebec
26 Hal of
Hollywood
30 Large aNw
Zeala;r;
parrot
34 Curved
molding
35 Annapolis
graduate
36 Wobble
38 Constant
39 Essence of
roses
40 River to the


Bay of 80 More ready
Biscay for harvest
41 Broadway's 83 Operates
Jerome 85 Ending for
42 Perfume sap or duck
measure 88 Anagram of
44 Actor George rice
45 Country 91 Twofold
south ol 93"...the
Turkey Hotspur of
47 Hawaiian the -
garlands (Shakes.)
49 Assam 95 Long
silkworm harangues
52 Signify 96 Shelves or a
54 Fascinate or screen,
enchant sometimes
57 Business 97 - Bow; the
transactions It" girl
58 Gratified 99 Eliminate
completely 101 A concealed
59 Appear at danger
Intervals 102 U.S. Navy
60 Special point construction
of view man
63 Polka 104 Stitched
follower 106 French
65 Not clear and Income
distinct 107 Noted Greek
67 Quick to warrior
learn 108-
71 Semipre- contender
cous stone 110 Zola heroine
72 Escape 112 Acquisition
detection 114 Capital of
73 Before and Yemen
alter John 115 Small
74 Rail bird merganser
73 Require 117 Teacher's
76 Complain org.
77 Cone bearer 118 Bar offering
78 Before and 120 Highest note
after James of the gamut
79 Worn away 121 Fall behind


HENRY by DICK HODGINS


Barney Google and Snuffy Smith � By Fred Lasswell


3 N 0 n N3 0 !^31A1 31riI v







9slB mnosijoj.3 -amP NixpiIivnIa 3 0






DENNAIVS THE MENA
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A u u i3 U 3tro 3 s m Is ~1






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DENNIS11 THE3 V1N
DENNIS THE MENACEIS~~l~L


I,-'-
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Full Text

PAGE 1

Gipi qfthe Pan na CanalMus'eum Troic imes No. 31 Quarry Heights, Republic of Pinumn Friday, Aug. 6,1993 Rescue U "" Spec Rodney Milner (front left) Spec. Jeffrey Boyles (front right) Cpl. Kevin Gulce (rear left) and Spec. Lavert Fudge take on mud and muck up to their knees al'close in on the finish line of Green Hell. See story, photos peg 3. New traffic code takes effect Saturday Navies conduct FORTCAYTON(USARSOPAO)A new Panamavolved in the accident. The citation will explain when and nian Vehicle Traffic Code will go into affect Saturday, whesethedriversmustappearntrafficcout.Anytimethe Military Police Command officials said. police issue a citation, the drivers' license is taken and w t i Under the new code, drivers must have a copy of their returned after the court appearance. vehicle registration certificate in the vehicle at all times *T]ecoutdategivencanonlybechangedbythecont, by Lt j.g. Laura C. Moore and, until they get that document and their revisado andit will not be rescheduled if one or more of the drivers USNVSTAPANCANAL Pfk Afafis stickers, drivers must cary a copy oftheirvehicleinspeefails-to appear. Thejudge will decide the case based on the tion certificate, officials said. evidence he has and assess the fines a damages. Drivers PUERTOCASTILAHONDURAS-Aboutthree Also, drivers can now be fined $50 for having alcohol shouldhaveany evidence, witnessesanddamageestinates hundred U.S. and foreign sailors and soldiers recently on their breath. with them when they appear at traffic cout. wrapped up a Naval Special Warfare exercise after Drivers found guilty of drunk driving, but who aren't *Drivers fined more than $15 can appeal the judge's two weeks oftraining in seven remote Central Ameriinvolved in an accident, willreceive the following punishdecision. Toappeal,thedrivermustsay,"appeal,"orhave can locations. ment: alawyer submit arequestin writing within24 hours ofthe Units from Panama and the United States partici+lst offense -$100 -$250 fine, 20 days in jail or decision. paledin King's Guard 93-Jlin Honduras, Guatemala community service, four months suspended license The new code also makes it mandatory foreveryonein and l Salvador. King's Guard 93-H was a joint, *2nd offense -$250 -$500 fine, 40 days in jail or a vehicle to wear seat belts and illegal for children under combined maritime interdiction and coastal security community service, six months suspended license. 5 years old to sit in the front seat, officials added exercise directed by the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The +3rd offense -$500 -$1,000 fine, 60 days in jail, Driverswhodonotwearseatbeltsorwhosepassengrs excise ended July 28. indefinite suspension of license. donotwearseatbelts,riskafineof$25fortheflrstoffense, The Southern Command-sponsored exercise Convicted drunk drivers who are involved in an acci$100forthesecondandali c suspensionforthreetosix brought together 115 U.S. military personnel and dent will receive the following punishment: months for additional offenses. approximately 190 of their counterparts in the three +lst offense -$500 -$f,000 fine, 30 days in jail or Another change is that, for the first time in Panama, Central American militaries. community service, 60 days suspended license. every vehicle owner will be required to possess liability In Puerto Castilla, Honduras, U.S. Navy Seals *2nd offense -$1,000 -$1,500 fine, 60 days in jail or insurance for each vehicle. Officials expect the Panamatrained withHonduranbuzostactcos (tacticaldivers) community service, one yearsuspended license. nian government to establish the minimum amount of in underwater demolition. Petty Officer 2nd Class *3rd offense -$1,500 -$2,000 fine, 90 days in jail, inmirance needed at a later date -Mike Fullerton, a Seal from Naval Special Warfare revocation of license. Arevisedtmfficfine schedule has also been adopted. It UitEigatRodm nNS,explad how the training Those caught driving drunk will also be arrested and is: will help the Buzos tacticos. detained for not more than 12 hours until they are sober, YioIain "We'reshowingthemhow wecan calculate differofficials said. During that time, Panamanian officials will Parking violation $10 eat charges, and how they can use this in accordance perform blood, urine, breathalyzer or other physical tests Driving in opposite lane $20 with their job here," Fullerton said. to determine how intoxicated the driver is. Driving wrong way on a one-way $43 Honduras' finest were impressed with what the In the case of an accident, the following will happen: *The Transito traffic police will cite all drivers inContinued on p Continued on page 2. Fidel Castro wants to develop more Congress passes bill to give Per*Helping hand, pages 8&9. point ventures to stimulate Cuba's sian Gulf veterans priority hospital +Enchanted summer, page 10. suffering economy. treatment. *Racquetball tourney, page 12.

PAGE 2

Tropic Times Aug. 6,1993 US N-y phoo by Ljg.Laura .Moore Petty Officer 2nd Class Mike Fullerton and Honduran tactical divers train in underwater demodon In Puerto Castilla, Honduras. plained Petty Officer Second Class Lenny James ofSBU-26. "'Ihe purpose is to teach navigation,Continued from page 1. boat charactriscs, familisfi-zation fire, and how to do insertions and extractions." U.S. Navy had to offer. James said he benefitted from the train"Thetraininghasbeenexcellentandthe ing. Navy Seals are excellent," said Lt C. G. "Working here in a coastal environPaz, the Buzos tacticos' commander. ment, I've learned how to navigate in and "Tey are in very good condition and outofthesurf. It'sroughandtherearetides keep theirminds clearno matter what they outthereyouwouldnotbelieve.Theyrange are doing. It doesn't matter if they are from 3-foot tides to 15-foot tides," James jumping or how far they are swimming, said. they are very excellent. I have a very good "IncaseIeverhavetocome backuphere impression of them, all of them," he said. to teach again, I know what they have and NavySealsalsoconductedcombatswimwhattheydon'thave,sothetrainrngwillgo mer training with their counterparts in the more effectively and smoothly. I've imrough waters of La Union, El Salvador. provedmySpamshskiflsandlearnedabout "The environment is a hard one, even the customs and the environment here, for experienced divers. The currents are James said. really rough," said Petty Officer3rd Class L. Mark Hinch, commander of one of Chris Lee, a Seal from NSWL-8. the task elements operating in Guatemala, The Salvadoran Grupo de Operaciones was also pleased with the training. Especiales -known as GQEs -were "The relationship between us and the inexperienced in combat swimming, but Guatemalans has been fantastic. We've they earned the Seals' respect been working hand-in-hand. Everyone's "they're pretty seasoned land-combat been getting their hands dirty and getting A U.S. and Honduran Marine prepare to rappel. veterans," Murphy said. "They're good, into the training." hard guysandtheyputalotofeffortintothe Li Bill Oldmixon, commander of the away from it,"Oldmixon said. conduct training and maintaincontact with training." task unit which ran the exercise out ofSoto "'bereis genuine exchange of ideas," our counterparts in other countries. OthermembersofNSWU-8andSpecial Cano Air Base, Honduras, explained the explainedCmndr.RobertSchoultz,NSWU"Ihe host nations have gotten some Boat Unit 26, also from Rodman NS, derelationship between U.S. and host nation 8 commander and King's Guard 93-I1 task good operational training out of the exerployedtoSipicateandSanJose,Guatemala military personnel. group commander. cise which makes them a more capable to participate in King's Guard 93-II. "We show them how we do things, they "Also, the training reinforces and enforce. And,hopefully,they walk away with "What we're doing is cross-training show us how they do things, and hopefully hances our capability to put our people in a positive impression of the U.S. and the with the Guatemalan coastal patrol," exboth sideslearn fromit and takesomething remote and austere environments and to U.S. military," Schoultz added. Expired license $20 Using "demonstration" plate for more Tailgating $10 than 48 hours $20 Wrong license plate $50 Exit vehicle with motor running $10 Continued from page 1. No helmet $20 Bald tires $20 No inspection decal $30 No spare tire $20 Passing on a hill or bridge $30 Expired license plate $50 Leaving keys in car $10 Driving with door open $30 Damaged license $15 Using illegible license plate $20 Buses driving on routes not authorized $10 Racing $50 Passengers in truck bed without enclosed Failure to obey traffic signs $20 Failure to use prescription glasses $10 area $30 Failure to stop for red light $40 Crossing double yellow line $30 Missing bumper (front orrear) $20 Excess passengers $10 Passengers on bus stairs $20 Letting unlicensed persons drive $30 Excessive speed $50 No mud flaps $10 Failure to appear in court $25 Lights off or broken $10 Illegal tums $20 No seat belt (see above) $25-$100 Failure to stop at stop sign $40 No fire extinguisher $10 Using "Official" plate after 6 p.m. $50 Unnecessary noise $20 Missing "Flarmnable" sign $30 Improper backing $20 Wrong license for vehicle $20 Passing in a no passing zone $20 Parking facing the wrong direction $10 Alcohol on the breath $50 Hit & run $50 Abandoning passengers without cause $25 Drunk driving $75 Refusing to pick up a passenger (taxi) $20 Leaving vehicle in road without hazard Improper lane change $20 Passing in a town $20 lights $25 Passing on a curve $30 No muffler $20 Pulling out in front of another vehicle $25 Disregarding emergency lights or siren $20 Refuse to show license $20 Disrespect to the authorities $20 Illegal U-turn .$20 No "TAXP" sign $20 Failure to yield to a pedestrian $20 Stopping on safety line $15 No jack $10 Tinted windows on public transport $30 Vehicle in poor condition $20 No "DANGER" sign $10 Loudspeakers on public transport $30 Obstructing the roadway $20 No escort for heavy equipment $30 D sfective exhanu system $30 No license plate $30 No rear view mirror $10 Not carrying a copy of the traffic regulation $5

PAGE 3

Tropic Times Aug. 6, 1993 3 Pvt. 2 Corey Smith takes adrinkof wateron a break. Medics prepare for field badge testing by SSgt Jane Usero USARSO Public Aftfais Office R)RT SHERMAN -Medics from Headquarters Company, 142nd Medical Battalion, tested their mettle and theirdesireto earn the ultimate peacetime medic awardthe Expert Field Medical Badgeduring a field training exercise at the Jungle Operations Training Center here last week "Taking on the Green Hell is only one step in our training for the actual test for the badge, which will be in September,"said2nd L. Danny Hein, company executive officer. "The actual test willconsistof 11 areaswith several subjects tested under eacht." 'he soldiers also practiced their emergency medical -4 treatment, physical fitness, survival and field communications skills and took a written test, he said. "The EMT test alone will consist of 11 separate tasks such as triage, treating an open chest wound and using an IV (intravenous tube)," he added. "'Ihe actual test will also include a 12-mile road march in full combat gear which has to be completed in three hours,"Heinadded "Additionally, the medics will haveto U. Ayph--bySqgt qualify with the M16A2 rifle and negotiate day and night Maj. Robin Bruno takes on the single rope bridge on the Green Hell obstade course. land navigation courses." The FIX was the highlight of two months of training for the soldiers, Hein said. The unit will do it all again the week before the test. The unit designedthetraining to be harder than the test. The goal is to be prepared, Hein said. "If you give soldiers good training and good planning to go by, they're going to be motivated. It's when it falls apart.that's when your troops fall apart," said 2nd Lt. Thomas Ivesteras he sat cooling off after his bout with the beast Another goal is to reinforce the teamwork needed to accomplish any mission, Hein said. Asthesoldiersnegotiatedobstacleafterobstacle,this bit of hell in the jungle did just that. From the very first high wall, over which the four-man teams had to pull their patient, to the steep, rocky cliff they had to neg by rope, it tookthe work of the whole team to accomplish the mission: getting their patient safely to the end of the course. "Ihe Oreen Hell was.challenging, but fun," Spec. Lavert Fudge, HHC, 142nd Med. Bn., said with a smile. "I'm looking forward to the actual test,"he said. "It's a new endeavor for me and I feel I have a strong chance of winning the badge with practice," the former artilleryman said of his upcoming first attempt. "It's adifficult missiontoaccomplish,"Hein said."Last year we only had a 20-25 percent success rate." "We are training hard and hope to come home with a higherrate ofsuccessthisyear,"he said."For those ho do A team of medics carry their patient across the lagoon. win, it's well worth all the hard work."

PAGE 4

4 6,199 wHemisphere Officials deny shipping armsvia Panama consulate PRAGUE (Reuters) -Czech authorities said Tuesday they had denied an export license for an arms deal now under investigation in Panama over allegations it involved illegal exports to Bosnia. Panama's president Guillermo Endaranamed a special government commission to investigate reparts of illegal arms trafficking from the Czech Republic to Bosnia via aPanamanian consulate in Spain Monday. The Czech foreign ministry said arequest for a licensetoexportarmstoPanamahadbeenrevoked inMaywhenPragueauthorities became suspicious about the deal. These suspicions had been conveyed to the Panamanian government, a senior official said. Panamanian foreign ministry officials said Monday the shipment included 25,000 snhmachinegns withlOOo00magazinesand5,000 pistols with 7,000 bullets. They did not know whether the arms actually arrivedin Bosnia, whichis under aUnited Nations AWWK arms embargo. Cuban president Fidel Castro gestures during his speech at a ceremony making the fifth anniversary of Peru approves death the founding of the U.S.-based charity organization 'Pastors for Peace" in Havana Tuesday. penalty for terrorists Castrowants LIA, Peru (AP) -ha bid to end a 13-year guerrilla war, Congress approved the death penalty CARACAS (Reuters) -Cuban President Fidel Castro Tuesday to celebrate its 50th anniverutry. for insurgents in avote held anonymously for fear CARAAS Reutrs)Cuan resientof rebel reprisaL said he wants to develop more joint ventures in the "We are willing to continue developing investm'ded communist-ruled country and has offered preferential projects through joint companies, offering preferential est amto redby otreatment to those proposing profitable irvestmest deals. treatment for our partners m iLatin Anericathataktthe grewn musd becfirme govrety Castro, whose Caribbean island is crippled by a US. investments of Lan American businessmen Cuba v a ioidereferendum JIM b ernnts trade embargo and the disappearance of billions of dollars attractive and profitable," Castro wrote de has been se l in aid with the collapse ofthe Soviet Union, also said atn He said Cuba is prepared to share its achievements in A date hs yen ye p American integration was critical in the face of emerging health care, offering nations the key to high-quality mediAey sve2thisyearbythe respectedpolling firm global trading blocs. cal services at a lower cost than in the developed woldd. Apoyoshowed 62 porerentofPyuv tsfavoredthe The Cuban leader's comments, along with those of He also touted Cuban biotechnology, phamaceutiL death penalty for terroriss. Currently, the stiffest other Latin American leaders, were solicited for a special sugar, tourism, construction and fishing industries and sentence for guerri a is life in prison. edition of El Nacional newspaper of Caracas, published said they, too, could be attractive in larger trade pact. Aylwin wants to speed up human rights cases More than 2,000 people killed, 957 more missing during Pinochet 's rule SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) -President Patricio Aylwin, concerned that the slow pace of trials of officers charged with human rights abuses is causing unrest in the military, has asked Congress to appoint special judges for the cases. A commission appointed by Aylwin soonafterhetookpowerdeterminedthatat least 2,115 people were killed and 957 disappearedafterbeingarrestedbysecunty/ agents during Gen. Augusto Pinochet's rule. Most of those incidents, however, ae covered under a 1978 amnesty declared by PinocheL It is likely that most of the imp )ding cases also will fall under the amn y -making the delay in the trials all the more annoying to the military. Aylwin, in a speech made in Santiago Tuesday, said the military's complaints were reasonable. "I think all we Chileans want that the trials.(to)endassoonaspossible,"Aylwin said. Aylwin consulted with Pinochet before making the proposals for speeding up the trials. Although Pinochet ceded leadership of the country to Aylwinin 1990,the military At"ni retains substantial powerin Chile. A television technician prePre Chilean president Patricio Aylvin for a radio and television address to the nato ThatwasunderlinedinMay,1992when SantiagoTuesday. Aylwinoutlined his government's planto expeditetrials of military officers charged with human rights commandos in combat gear were posted abuse under the regime of military dictator Gen. Augusto Pinochet. across the street from the presidential palThe official explanation was that extra civilians believed the demonstration was About 200 officers are awaiting trial for ace whileAylwin wasoutofthecountryon securitywasnseddforameetingoffinochet intended as a reminder of the military human rights abuses committed during business. with other generals, but many officials and strength. Pinochet's nearly 17 years of rule.

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Tropic Times1 AMiLItary News Aug. 6,1993 AP LarPhoto The Navy F-A-18 attack planes and A-6 bombers on board the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt, currently in the Adriatic, can drop laser-guided bombs against Bosnian Serb weaponry should a major air campaign be mounted. U.S. air powerwaitsforOKin Bosnia WASHINGTON (AP) -Should President Clinton and former Yugoslav republic into three ethnic regions. NegoThe goaloftheNATOoperationis to suppress unauthothe allies agree to use air power to break the siege of tiations are continuing on the specific boundaries and rized flights in the Bosnian "no fly" zone. Sarajevo, military officers can dust off war plans they've governmental structure. Since the Bosnian Serbs have had little reason to fear shelved formonthsas diplomatshaggledoverthefateofthe In the past, Pentagon and NATO allies assessed the attacks, they have left much weaponry in the open and crumbling region. possibility of air strikes within Bosnia that could hit key vulnerable to precision air strikes, said military officials Although many top military officers say they hope the bridges, railroads and military storage areas. But if the who spoke on condition of anonymity. current speculation about the use of force may lead to allies prefer a more limited strike, the first targets most The Navy F-A-18 attack planes and A-6 bombers on furtherprogress at the negotiating table in Geneva, NATO probably would include the dozens of heavy artillery board the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt, curis standing by with awidearrayofcombatequipmentinthe placements that have pounded the ctizens of Sarajevo. rentlyinthe Adriatic, can droplaser-guided bombs against region should such talks fail. Much intelligence has been garnered by the monthssuch sites should a major air campaign be mounted. Political leaders of the warring factions in Bosnia long "Deny Flight" operations that have flown over the The carriercould stage about 150 bombing runs aday, reached generalagreementJuly30on aplantopartitionthe region since April. its attack jets minutes away from Bosnian airspace. Courtexonerates Bill gives Gulf vets prioritytreatment retired general TAMPA, Fla .(Tropic Times) -WASHINGTON (AP) -Persian Gulf ments, but has set up a registry to collect related to service in the gulf. Retired Army Gen. Wailace s veterans who claim that contact with toxic data on health problems and opened three "Some veterans were denied the health Nutting was acquitted of defense materials during the warminedtheirhealth referral centers for unusual cases. care they needed because they couldn't contracting frad charges by afedwouldreceiveprioritytreatmentatVeteran Rep.JosephKennedy,D-Mass.,saidthe prove theirillnesses were service-related," eral jury in July. Affairs Department hospitals under a bill registry has tracked 6,125 servicemen and Evans said. "These are veterans that need Nuting,65,wasthecommanderpassed by the House. women who were exposed to petrocherniour help and need it now." in ,6wU.S. Southern Command The bill, which now goes to the Senate, cals, depleted uranium from munitions, The HouseMonday also votedto extend nm-chief, U. .to waspassed 411-0 Monday. It resulted from vaccines, pesticides and parasites. insurance benefits to 11 Air Force fliers Nutting was cleared of t growing claims of deteriorating health "Under this legislation Persian Gulf who were killed in crashes hours before a charges stemming from hisinvolveamongveterans exposedtotoxicsubstances veterans are given the benefit ofthedoubt" new benefits policy went into effect. es sithSonr efense i of and environmental hazards during operaabout eligibility for treatment, he said. Nine of 13 airmen killed when two Cment with Sooner Defense of tons Desert Shield and Desert Storm. The legislation says the VA must pro141B jet transports crashed over Montana Florida, a now-defunct munitions Veterans groups and some doctors bevide hospital and outpatient care to veteron the night of Nov. 30, 1992, had signed company. lieve exposure to toxic materials caused ans who report symptoms before Oct. 1, up for a new Servicemen's Group Life Six of the eight other people on numerous ailments among returning veter1996. The VA must refund any payments Insurance program that from Dec. 1 inother charges byajurythat deli erans, including lung and heart ailments, made by veterans before the billis enacted. creased maximum benefits from $100,000 ated for three days. gastrointestinal problems, hair loss and Rep. Lane Evans, D-IlL, chairman of to $200,000. unexplained bleeding. the House Veterans' Affairs subcommittee The VA denied the increased benefits to The VA said it has found no direct links on oversight and investigations, said about their Esjp i.j .,f two others spin: We'll help between toxic materials and reported ail4,000ve er ite M'aine Band started loungechairand threw hisleg and armover underpressure.Whitworthreported forhis the bannisterit was Jimmy Carter. first day of work, on a Monday in July, Whitworth says that President Reagan 1977. Hewas fitted forhis uniformthatday, wasmorealoofthan Carter. Yetonce, when he got to practice with the band Tuesday Reagan was going out to his helicopter, he and Wednesday. Wednesday evening he looked over at the band -Reagan happlayedinaconcert ontheCapitol steps. He penedtolookWhitworthdirectlyintheeye was excited. He thought it was unbelievandReagansalutedWhitwoith. Whitworth able, incredible. gave a snappy salute back to the comHe could handle it, though. Of the 84 mander-in-chief. Later Whitworth got whoauditionedfortheposition,Whitworth chewed out because he wasn't supposed to was selected as the best. salute the president. The Marine Band plays every WednesBy 1988, Whitworth had moved up to day evening at the Capitol in the summer. the assistant French horn chairinthe band, Maybe you've visited the Capitol or been but he felt it was time to move on. walking down the Washington, D.C., mall "I had gained a lot of valuable experiand heard the music on a warm summer ence. But I wanted to move forward, branch Thea Support Bment photo by Sgt. EdBurkhead evening. Sunday nights, the Marine band into other things musically." French horn player SSgt. Roger Whitworth plays at Fort Clayton as part of the usedtoplayattheJefferson Memorial,now Whitworthnow is afree-lancemusician Washington, D.C. National Guard's 257th Army Band. they've changed to the Washington Monuin the Washington, D.C. area.

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Af~r oices '44 Brig. Gen. David A. Sawyer The action line is a direct link between Brig. Gen. David A. Sawyer, 24th Wing commander, and Howard AHI and Albrook AFS personnel. If you haveaquestionor problemthat you can'tsolve through normal supervisory channels, call the Action iUne at 284-5849. Callersshould leave a name, telephone number and mailing address in case questions need to be clarified. Names will be kept confidential and used Reader questions holiday change onytoprovidecallerswithapersonalresponse, Dear Mayors' Corner: Q. WhyhastheHowardYouth Centerrestricted I would like to know who in Panama has the authority its general membership to only two hours of use a day tomoveanational holiday. My5-year-old,aswellasmyself MondaythroughFriday? Bythetime childrencan use and my husband, were very disappointed to discover that this was an Army and Air Force Exchange Service policy. the center from 5:30-7:30 p.m., many parents are the best part of the Fourth of July was actually going to be Sandy Peterson home and want to spend some time with their chilheld July 3! Being stationed in Panama limits the military dr. community's holiday celebrations. How unfair it was to Dear Sandy: move the holiday. Why didn't they hold it July 4? Alice Rodriguez from AAFES theater operations said A. Thank you for your letter concerning the Linda Aguilar the reason you have not heard national anthem played in Howard Youth Center change in operating hours. several of our theaters is because the anthem tapes were in I am pleased to inform you the Howard and Dear Linda: extremely poor condition. With respect to our anthem, we AlbrookYouthCenters general membershipfreeplay We contacted Col. Jeffrey Petrucci, commander of the felt it was degrading to continue to play them in the summer hours have been extended to 2-7:30 p.m. U.S. Army Garrison in Panama who gave us this answer condition they were in. Winterhours will be2-7:30 p.m. also. Saturday hours "You have a good point. We put a lot of thought into AAFES no longer provides national anthem tapes for remain 1-6 p.m. making the decision to celebrate the Fourth of July on the usein basetheaters. Installationcommanders mustreplace We'veincreasedstaffhours to covertheadditional third. We have so few three-day weekends, and we wanted the tapes with local community money. Our command time and partitioned the large activity room so both the soldier to have the maximum amount of time off." already has new anthem tapes on order. You should be theSummerDayCampProgram and freeplaycanrun If the celebration had been Sunday (July 4), the threehearing new anthems in your theater in the near future. simultaneously. day weekend would have been broken upandpeople would Through your community concern you have-been have had to choose whether to come to the fair or have a Editor's note: Ibiscoluum allowsconuamty meminstrumental in bringing to our attention the need for three-day weekend. Because we have so few three-day hers to submit questions to the Mayoral Congress. more open play time. We feel the solution will weekends, it was thought best to celebrate early. Lettersshouldbemaledto: Mayors'Corner,Publicity positively affect the entire base youth population. arperson, A) AA 3M S Anonymity wil Again, thank you for taking the time to express your Dear Mayors' Corner: begranteduponrequs.Tbe TropicTimesreservesthe interest. Five of the last six times I've gone to the Clayton right to edit letters and responses for brevity, clarity Should you need any further assistance, call Lou Theater, they have not played the national anthem. I was and propriety. Denham at 284-3856 or 4817. disappointed. Is there a reason for this? I always thought Thieves hit Devil's Beach, net snorkeling equipment Thieves strike at Devil's Beach stolen from the Curundu housing area last Thieves stole a spear gun, two speaker week. Investigators found thieves removed boxes and several pieces of snorkeling Unsecured wallet the sofa from the carport. equipment from a soldier's unlocked veA thief stole a wallet from the women's NotifytheMPsifyousee any suspicious hicle at Fort Sherman's Devil's Beach last lockerroom of agymlast week. Theowner activity. week left the wallet unsecured while she took a The following crime statistics Vehicles -especially unlocked veshower. MPs recovered the wallet and its -A-are for on post housing areas for hicles -often don't keep thieves out, so contents after receiving an anonymous tip. July 23-29. military police remind everyone to lock MPs remind everyoneto lock valuables Pacific their vehicles and not leave items of value up to avoid becoming a victim of crime. Corozal 600 area -one larv cside. ceny of unsecured private Juvenile crew off post .-.property, one larceny of seVagrant receives time MPs remind parents that, according to C cured private property Military police arrested a vagrant for Panamanian Law, all children under 18 Ilk Curundu housing area unlawfully entering Gorgas Army Comyears old must be off the streets of Panama one larceny of unsecured munity Hospital and being in the possesby 9 p.m. unless accompanied by an adult. private property sion ofillegal drugparaphernalialast week. If the curfew is violated, children will be Morgan Avenue housing Thepersonwas takento Panamanian Night detained by the Panamanian National Po-area -two larcenies of priCourt w h &,f stp s-6 n''ihdlbays.i. lice. vate property toy American players who are competing Itzia Ramos to f'6 Xi2fa4Oi. with top Panamanian stars downtown. Puppin in the women's championship. court, and growled at n over eac win. There are fourannualPanamanian tourRamos took a strong lead in game one, mistake. After battling each other, Lorenzo and naments which areopentoAmericans, and onlytobecaughtbyalateblooming Puppin. In stark contrast, Becraft took a cool RomanpaireduptofacePananma'sAgustine some Americans are ranked nationally. Puppin battled back in a last-minute low-key approach. Diaz and Marcos Tellez for the doubles Mike Roman, tournament director, is the rally to steal a 15-14 win over Ramos. Sullivan nabbed a close 15-14 win in championship. top ranked player in Panama. There was no stopping Puppin once she game one. Becraft did the same with a 15The top two players proved to be too "We psually go to the Club Raqueta or got going. 14 win in game two. A fierce battle in the much for Diaz and Tellez as Lorenzo and the Sports Room to play the Panamanians She ran all over Ramos in game two, tie-breaker brought Sullivan an 11-10 vicRomanspanked them 15-4, 15-6 toendthe and get together afterward for an awards putting her away in a resounding 15-2 tory. tournament. New programs let exercisers "climb Veteran scuba instructor passes on *Basketball, page 13. Mt. Everest," "row the Mississippi," underwater knowledge to new gen*Rescue scuba, page 15. and "ski Appalachian Trail." eration of divers. *Sports shorts, page 15.

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Tropic Times COIRnenaryAug. 6,1993 Commentary 7 Scouts don't mix with OldSargelearnsthings aretough all over lesson Beavis and Butthead bySFCJoeFerrar Editor: them imitated John Wayne." '[is comment was out Edior I must comment on the unprofessional journalism of place, because the Order of the Arrow and their i r int the Old Sarge the other day. I thought he and poor taste of Sgt. E.J. Hersom in writing the ceremony have absolutely nothing to do with the was audiioning for the DJ job on the Whine and Cheese article "Summer Camp" in the July30 Tropic Times, stereotypical cowboys and Indians stories as portrayed Channel, but it turned out he was in his boss' office, as well as the apparent lack of editorial oversight by John Wayne. slinging excuses like dead fish in a funeral parlor. It exercised. After having read the article I was struck The sad finale to this episode is that many traders seems the Old Sarge's section was running behind. how insensitive and shallow it was in covering an will not get a fair picture of what scouting is about, "Rough session?" I asked when he crawled out. otherwise wonderful event, the annual Boy Scouts of and what a wonderful experience summer camp can "You don't know the half of it," he said. "He doesn't America Summer Camp. be. The Boy Scouts of America is a magnificent want to hear nothing. He ain't living in the real world." The opening paragraph, which, if I recall organization that deserves a more thoughtful, "I heard what you were saying. It was so thin and full correctly, is supposed to set the tone for the rest of the professional effort on the part of the Tropic Times of holes you could see light streaming in," I said. story, begins with a reference to MTV's Beavis and than was presented in this article. "It was the truth! I've got people gone, short Butthead. The second paragraph continues by saying LL Col. Gary L Hankins suspenses, unexpected requirements." he said. the Boy Scouts were imitating the "new heroes." "Things are tough all over," I reminded him. Hersom, and, consequently, the trader, completely Lt. Col. Hankins: "You sound like Igor," he said. Igor is a successful, misses the point of what Boy Scouts and scouting are I'm sorry you didn't appreciate the beginning of hard-working, well-liked sergeant in the Sarge's office. all about The Boy Scouts of America strives to Hersom's article. It was intended as a light-hearted 'Well, does Igor ever get beat up like that?" I asked. develop in our boys a strong moral and spiritual comment on the clash of Scouting traditions and the "No! When he doesn't magically get something done foundation based on their devotion to God, their most current anti-heroes of popular culture, in this he just goes in there and says he blew it, but nothing country, their families and their fellow Scouts. The case MTV's Beavis and Butthead. I didn't think the sticks to the Teflon sergeant," the Old Sarge moaned. principles of leadership are instilled in these boys at article suggested the Scout found Butthead to be a "Don't you think you could learn from that?" I asked. an early age, and are combined with valuable lessons role model. Maybe I was mistaken, but the fact he "I learned to call him Igor. Like that guy? In that in self confidence gained from their experiences in used Butthead's vocal mannerisms to say scouting movie? Following the mad scientist around going 'Yes, the great outdoors. Adult leaders dedicate much of was cool seemed to be a testament to the power of the master. "' their personal time toward these goals, and become Scouting tradition over the cartoon of the day. We "You're missing the point. He shot down your role models for the younger boys. Scouting gives our didn't intend to mislead our readers. In fact; right excuses and half-microwaved theories faster than a bird boys positive, well rounded, real life "heroes" to after Hersom noted the Scouts were imitating "new could dive-bomb a freshly waxed car. It wouldn't have model themselves after, rather than the fictional and heroes" he said ".but they upheld the Scouting been any worse if you'd just fessed up," I said. cartoon characters like "Butthead" as suggested in the tradition." He went on to detail how they did that. "Ain't you the guy what said we have to introdu-ce article. I believe you may have also misinterpreted the our bosses to the hard realities of the '90s?" he asked. The article then continues with comments about comments made by the Panamanian Boy Scout. The "True, but the important word is 'reality.' You only how "being on a military post was a new experience information was used to compare this year's camp to introduced him to 'hard to believe,' I said. for many of the Panamanian Scouts.the bathrooms last year's, which was held in a swamp. To that "It's hard to believe what a jerk you are," the Old were clean and it was cool inside." I think that with Scout, the clean bathrooms and air conditioning were Sarge said. "Things are tough all over, but they want you just the slightest investigation Hersom could have what was better about this year's camp. Maybe not to be successful like in the good old days." found something positive to say about the experience what you would have said, but important to that "Good.old days? When was that?" I asked. of the Panamanian Boy Scouts at summer camp than Scout. "Remember the '70s, when we had more people than their thrill in finding clean bathrooms. You are correct to point out that the name of jobs? Half of them were sedated dropouts on the run Finally, the presentation of the Silver Beaver Silver Beaver recipient should have been in the article from the law, but there were lots of them. In the '80s we award by Brig. Gen. James Wilson was inadequately -on this there can be no argument. We will make didn't have quite as many guys, but we had money. I covered. The award is one of the highest honors every effort not to make this blunder again. However, kicked butt in those days. Now things are really hard. bestowed on adult volunteers, and is recognition for a Unger's achievement did not go unrecognized: it had We never seem to have enough people or stuff, but they lifetime of dedicated service to the organization and already been published on the Milestones page in our still want us to do the impossible with nothing," he said. the community. In this case it was presented to Nick July 2 edition. "Iet me tell you what one of my first bosses told me, Unger, who has been a scout leader in Panama for In closing I would like to say that sometimes our Sarge: 'Anybody can be successful when things are easy. more than 25 years. The article didn't even mention search for a new and unusual way to cover longThe trick is being successful when things are hard.' his name. At best, this is sloppy journalism, but at standing events leads us to slight what some consider "That's stupid!" the Old Sarge said. worst represents insensitivity and lack of caring. traditional and well-understood. We will continue to "That's the kind of thinking that's keeping you from Then, to round off the article, Hersom throws in a strive to do our best and depend on readers like getting promoted," I told him. trite comment about how the "Order of the Arrow yourself to keep us honest. "It sure is, so stop thinking that way." Scouts dressed in Native American garb, but none of Editor SDirectQuotes Do you think anti-hero cartoon characters harm children's development? "I don't think some"Yes, I think children "Yes, because children "Yes, I think it causes "Generally, they're OK. body who's younger are easily influenced, tend to emulate what kids to think violence is It depends on the subthan 15 should watch especially by TV." they see. I think it's a big cool." ject Cartoons definitely certain cartoons." problem." play a role in children's decisions." Sgt. William Carder SFC Rene Caban Joy Sloan Pamela Baggett 310th Military Intelligence Lisa Easthead Headquarters Company, U.S. Air Force family member Army family member Battalion. Army family member Army Garrison The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of U.S. Southern Command, the Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries -or responses to commentaries -to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

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Tropic Times Aug. 6,1993 Ja, VPV Grecia Moran has been working on Corozal's Directorate of Enginee Patricio Palma has been shining boots since 1984. years. -D rnving from post to post you can see the whiteness to visit him and told him he needed a job. Isaac said he L E~ A of buildings and houses and the green of the grass; could help him. Palmna smiled at the memory. L ~ u v I ~ everything is so bright and clean. The lawns ate "I needed the job so I didn't hesitate and accepted the neatly manicured, the soft wind blows off the well-tended offer," he recounted. ~ flowers and shrubbery that decorate the different areas. Isaac found out the 154th Signal Co. in Building 212 Many people come to take this for granted and never ask needed a shoe shiner and recommended Palma. Paima themselves how everything stays so nice and bright, or who moved to the barracks and started on his own. Business was m E A L does all the work it takes to keep things going smoothly. slow at the beginning, he said. He didn't have the experiThe answer is the quiet partnership between Panamanian ence or know the language, workers and the Depannent of Defense community, which Time went by and business got better. Boots kep$ adding probably couldn't run without its many behind-the-scenes up every day and he was making enough money to take helpers. For them it's an everyday job, and no one seems to home and support his family. He felt happy then, he said. say much about them. They perform their many hours of "Employment require These are the people we see in the coiner of a parking lot, who make sure the cars are clean; the people in the These Panamanian workers Defense employ offices who make sure t prash cans are emptied and floors may perform quIetly, and we may single member In swept; and the people behind the barracks making sure the take them for granted, but there Is pass that allows boots are shined for the next day's formation. a small industry devoted to post and do theIr ntese are the people without whom these things might supportIng theIr presence. sponsor has to fill not get done, at least not until we found time to do these Before these people can perform ion at the install chores ourselves, theIr tasks they have to find offices. One familiar face among these many is Patricio Palma, a themselves sponsorship by a Then the work husky dark-skinned man in his late 40s started out as the service-member, Departmentof checked agaInst a boot shiner back in 1984. Paima was working for the Otis Elevator Co. and lost his job. In those days, his friend Isaac was working as the shoe shiner in Building 220, Fort Clayton. One day Palma went

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Tropic Times Aug. 6, 1993 ng and Housing complex for the past two Diomedes "Pepe" Herrera, who's deaf and has trouble speaking, has washed cars at Rodman Naval Station for 2 1/2 years. Palma started by shining 10 pairs of boots a day. That month. I am used to them, although one day I wish to find mother. In fact, Moran got this job through her mother, who numbers has doubled, and there are days it goes up to 30 myself a better job and make more money," he said. "I have works with the same company. pairs. This keeps him busy eight hours a day Monday shined so many boots all these years, I no longer keep track Moran has been working for two years, cleaning four through Friday. of the number of boots any more." buildings every day. She mops floors, sweeps, vacuums, "My friend, Jimmy works in Building 213. He has been Palma listens to music to break up the monotony. dusts desks and shelves, empties waste baskets and cleans shining boots for 40 years," Palma said. "Mr. Bush is in "Music makes my job more pleasant and time goes by the bathrooms. She starts very early and goes home at about Building 205." fast," he said. 2 p.m. every day. The Fort Clayton soldiers drop their boots off every Another way Palma keeps busy is doing all sorts of Diomedes "Pepe" Herrera doesn't have regular hours like moving and pick them up -spit shined -in the different jobs, such as carpentry, construction and there Moran. He washes cars in the parking lot across from the aftemoon. Palma enjoys his work, which he as been doing were times when he even repaired tires. Marina area on Rodman Naval Station, and greets his for nine years. He also cuts grass once a month, which adds a little customers with a big smile. "GIs treat me good, they pay me $10 per person every more money to his eamings. The smile is more than good salesmanship: Herrera is Talk about eamings makes him think of the future, one deaf and has a hard time speaking. He is in his early 30s and without U.S. soldiers in Panama. communicates with his clients by signs and sounds. s nrope r paperw o r "I've been thinking about troops leaving Panama and Herrera has been at Rodman for 2 1/2 years. Albino this worries me about losing this job at this point in life Purga, his cousin, works in the Barber Shop at Rodman and family group or if they were delinquent or commitwhen jobs are scarce and hard to find. How would I support was his sponsor on base. rder to get a ted any crimes while on post in the my family?" He smiles and adds, "I keep my fingers Herrera started as a shoe shiner in the barber shop and m to come on past. crossed for this not to happen." then when out on his own washing cars. ork. Each The US. sponsor then becomes The necessity of taking care of a family is also what Now he washes four to six cars a day. He doesn't charge ut an applicaresponsible for the workers prompted Grecia Moran to look for job. Moran, a Panamaa set fee, leaving it to the clients when it comes to paying for ions' pass behaviour on post, and has to make nian citizen, works with Calculo y Mantenimiento, S.A., a his job. He normally gets from $2 to $4 a car. sure they are providing the services contractor. When asked how business was, Herrera moaned, smiled rs' names are on the post on which they are cleared She belongs to a team of more than 60 janitors who and gestured at the sky. It was not hard to understand. ist to find out to work. work on the Directorate of Engineering and Housing "Things change in the rainy season." compound in Corozal. She is in her late 20s and this is her first job. The salary is not what she was looking for, but she story and photos by Rosemary Chong needed the money and the job. Now she is a janior, mother and housewife, like her own Tropic Times staff

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1 Tropic Times Aug. 6, 1993 Depaient of Defen photos by Sgt Riohwd Pucketi Collon Mulford prepares to make his way out of an obstacle at the Children's Development Center playground at Building 39. Blake Underwood takes a break to watch his friends play. Part-day program unites leaning, fun FORT CLAYTON (Tropic Tunes) -science experiment called "ice castles." Enchanted Summer VI helped the Fort The activities concluded July 30 with a Clayton Children's Development Services' trip to the playground at Building 39. Part Day Program liveup todirectorBecky It was a packed schedule that not only Fentress' battle cry "We're not just entertained, it informed, Fentress said. babysitting service." "We try to make the program educaIn six weeks, children enrolled in the tional as well as fun," she added. program explored Panama's culture, U.S. The program was a smashing success, culture, puppetry and the world of dinoFentress said. saurs. The program was broken down into "We had the largest turnout we've ever six different categories ranging from "Wet had," she said. "But more importantly, the and Wonderful" to "Real Life Dragons." children were learning, smiling and having Things kicked off June 21 with "Silly a good time. The parents also seemed to Summer Fun." Activities included texture enjoy the program." walks, bedtime stories (complete with the Next up for the Part-Day program s Edward Squire dumps a load of sand children in pajamas and pillow fight,) and registration for the 1992-93 school year. a visit by a clown. Registration begins Monday for single "Wet and Wonderful" drew the biggest and dual military; Tuesday all other miiiinterest, with 65 children enrolled for the tary; and Wednesday for qualified civilweek of water slides, swimming and a ians. For information call 287-5507.

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Tropic Times Aug. 6, 1993 Guardunitgives Ecuador region medical boost by SgL Mark Bowman 366th Public Affairs Detadiment PUYO, Ecuador -Halfa world from the humanitarianrelief efforts in Somalia, other U.S. military personnel made another humanitarian effort Tucked between the Andes mountains and the edge of the Amazon rainforest, the Ecuadorian town of Puyo was the site of the two-week annual training for 35 members and augmentees of the Oklahoma Army National Guard's 245th Medical Company from Oklahoma City. Their mission was to provide medical, dental and veterinary assistance to the people of Puyo and the surrounding area. The exercise, which began July 12, was developed to increase the unit's medical readiness and, like part of the mission in Somalia, help improve the health of local residents. But, the environment couldn't be more different from Somalia. Dense tropical woodlands and mountainous Th t rSupportEwmntphotby Sgt.MakBSowmn terrain surround Puyo. During the rainy season, it's comSpec. Jennifer Means, a medic with the Oklahoma National Guard, prepares to examine an Ecuarorian mon forthe fewroads leading out oftownto bewashed out woman's tonsils. or closed by mudslides. But the environment didn't seem to bother SSgt. Larry ment, it is easy to adopt healthy practices. said. "We're concentrating on the children." Davis. "We had one case where a woman wasn't washing her One patient came to Bird with only four teeth that could "You can drop us anywhere, even in the heart of the hands after changing diapers and then preparing a meal. chew any food, all on one side of his mouth. Also, Bird had jungle,and we'll beset up andreadytotreat patients in only She would go straight from changing the baby to cooking to remove another severely infected tooth. two hours," said Davis, a medical specialist from Oklathe food," Muzny said. "We put him on antibiotics,"Bird said."There was alot homa City. This preventive medicine -giving out advice on ofinfectioninhissystemfromthetooththatreallyaffected The rapid-deployment unit was designed to treat inhealthy practices, how to prevent infections and how to his health. He was in alot ofpain. But he'll feel alot better jured soldiers coming straight from combat, but aiding the avoid parasites -may have a greater, long-term effect in a few days." citizens around Puyo was excellent training, Davis said. than any direct treatment the citizens receive from the unit, One man came in here in a very weak condition," said "Weprovidetreatmentto around 300to400 peopleeach Muzny said. medic Sgt. Dan Kressenberg said. "He was hunched over day," he said. "We get people anywhere from only a few "We prefer a one-on-one situation where we can thorand could barely walk around, and was complaining that months old to 75 or 80 years old." oughly explain what they need to do or change to live hat his knees and back hurt. We gave him various medicaThe most common medical problems treated were healthier lives," she said. tons to kill the infections and parasites that caused his parasitic diseases, upperrespiratoryinfections and muscu"Preventive health is the key," said Lt. Col. Steve Bird, condition, but the sad thing is that it will all come back to lar pain. But the cures may have only been temporary, the National Guard's State Dental Surgeon with the State him." according to LL Col. Marylin J. Muzny, commanderofthe Area Command headquarters in West Virginia. "That's Kressenberg thinks that one of the main culprits to the 120th Medical Battalion in Oklahoma. why we're all trying to teach it" unhealthy conditions is the water. "Most of the peoplejust "Because of our limit on time, equipment and supplies, He and 14 other medical doctors and dentists from don't have access to clean water," he said. "That's where we're not able to provide any long-term, permanent care," around the country came on individual annual training alotoftheparasites are found. We can cleantheir(internal) she said. "The treatment that we give them will only last a orders to help the 245th accomplish its mission. systems up for a few days, but they're going to keep few days oraweek, depending ontheproblem."Butsooner Accomplishing the mission of the dental section meant drinking the same water." or later the symptoms will come back because they'll be lots of fillings and tooth removal. Preventive health meant The medical company normally serves in wartime as a forced to live in the same environment, Muzny said. passing out toothbrushes -thousands of them "We have medical clearing company, receiving injured soldiers from It isn't easy for the Ecuadorians to change the environto instruct them on how to properly brush their teeth,"Bird the field before being sent to a hospital. French horn player gets tasteof'White House'fame by SSgL Ed Burkhead ment. From 1977 to 1988, Whitworth was t366th Public Affairs Detachment there The President's Own Marine Band FORT CLAYTON -You might have played otherplaces,too. Theyplayedevery seen Roger Whitworth on television, but Friday evening in the parade at the Marine you probably didn't know it at the time. If Barracks.Andevery yeartheydid afalltour you watched the presidentialinauguration, in differentparts ofthe country, playing 12 or saw a news clip of a White House concerts a week -matinees for school reception for a foreign dignitary, thetelevichildren, then longer evening concerts sion camera probably panned by the band. in town after town. There, playing French horn, was "Ilearnedtosleeponabus,"Whitworth Whitworth. said. "In fact, Ican sleep on anairplane and For 11 years, Whitworth's job brought even a C-130 cargo plane." him inside the White House for special Once, the band was practicing in the events because he was a member of the White House and somebody came onto the President's Own Marine Band. balcony in a T-shirt and shorts. He set up a His time in the Marine Band started loungechairand threw hisleg andarm over underpressure.Whitworthreported for his the bannister -it was Jimmy Carter. first day of work, on a Monday in July, Whitworth says that President Reagan 1977. He was fitted forhis uniform that day, was morealoofthan Carter. Yetonce, when he got to practice with the band Tuesday Reagan was going out to his helicopter, he and Wednesday. Wednesday evening he looked over at the band -Reagan happlayedin a concert on the Capitol steps. He pened tolookWhitworth directly inthe eye was excited. He thought it was unbelievandReagansalutedWhitworth. Whitworth able, incredible. gave a snappy salute back to the comHe could handle it, though. Of the 84 mander-in-chief. Later Whitworth got who auditioned fortheposition,Whitworth chewed out because he wasn't supposed to was selected as the best. salute the president. The Marine Band plays every WednesBy 1988, Whitworth had moved up to day evening at the Capitol in the summer. the assistant Frenchhornchairinthe band, Maybe you've visited the Capitol or been but he felt it was time to move on. walking down the Washington, D.C., mall "I had gained a lot of valuable experiand heard the music on a warm summer ence. But I wanted to move forward, branch Th.ar Suppotl8m1photo by Sgt EdBurkh-,d evening. Sunday nights, the Marine band into other things musically." French horn player SSgt. Roger Whitworth plays at Fort Clayton as part of the used toplay at the Jefferson Memorial,now Whitworthnowis afree-lancemusician Washington, D.C. National Guard's 257th Army Band. they've changed to the Washington Monuin the Washington, D.C. area

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Sports Aug.6,1993 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 12 A Itzia Ramos waits to return the ball during warmups before the women's championship game Sunday. U.S.Army0phok.bySgtLoriDas U.S.-Panamanian racquetball players battle by Sgt. Lori Davis banquet," Roman said. defeat to capture the trophy. Americans Mike Roman and Lorenzo USARSO Public Affairs Office "This was an opportunity to bring them The men's B competitionwasthescratch Albino competed for the men's A champihere for a tournament." and claw competition of the day. onship. FORT CLAYTON -Top local Ameri"We selected our best players to play Americans Randy Sullivan and Mike Lorenzo came on strong with a hot can racquetball players hosted members of against their best,"he said. "We made sure Becraft locked horns in a battle ofwiUls and racquet and outshot Roman 15-5 in game the Panamanian National Racquetball wehadanAmericanplayingaPanamanian skills. one. Team here last week during the Friendship during the first round in the men's compeSullivan started with his misleading lob Rallying back in game two, Roman Racquetball Tournament. titions." serve to the comer and followed with a fought a close battle and took game two 15The tournament at Reeder Sports and No American women entered the tourvicious attack on his returns. 14. Fitness Center was the first one sponsored nament this year, which left top-ranked Sullivan appeared ready to gnaw Lorenzo got backin his stride forthe tieby American players who are competing Itzia Ramos to face third-ranked Teresa throughhisracquethandleashestalkedthe breaker and took the trophy in an 11-7 with top Panamanian stars downtown. Puppin in the women's championship. court, and growled at himself over each win. There are four annualPanamanian tourRamos took a strong lead in game one, mistake. After battling each other, Lorenzo and namentswhichareopentoAmericans,and onlytobecaughtbyalateblooming Puppin. In starkcontrast, Becraft tookacool RomanpaireduptofacePanama'sAgustine some Americans are ranked nationally. Puppin battled back in a last-minute low-key approach. Diaz and Marcos Tellez for the doubles Mike Roman, tournament director, is the rally to steal a 15-14 win over Ramos. Sullivan nabbed a close 15-14 win in championship. top ranked player in Panama. There was no stopping Puppin once she game one. Becraft did the same with a 15The top two players proved to be too "We psually go to the Club Raqueta or got going. 14 win in game two. A fierce battle in the much for Diaz and Tellez as Lorenzo and the Sports Room to play the Panamanians She ran all over Ramos in game two, tie-breaker brought Sullivan an 11-10 vicRoman spanked them15-4,15-6toendthe and get together afterward for an awards putting her away in a resounding 15-2 tory. tournament. New programs let exercisers "climb Veteran scuba instructor passes on *Basketball, page 13. Mt. Everest," "row the Mississippi," underwater knowledge to new gen*Rescue scuba, page 15. and "ski Appalachian Trail." eration of divers. *Sports shorts, page 15.

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Tropic Times Aug. 6,199313 U.S ArFre photo bySgLJam.A. Rush Angela Hem, 24th Supply Squadron, works out on a cross country skiing machine at Howard Sports and Fitness Center. AF aerobics program scaling new heights Fitness facilities create athletic adventures by Sgt. James A. Rush 24th Wing Public Affairs "I thought it would be neat to do. This gives HOWARD AFB -The lush tropical environmentofPanamais, formany, ideal people an incentive. Infor running, biking, swimming or walking. stead of just running or Perhaps the only problem for athletes is biking, they have other that there is too much to do, too many choices. ways of increasing their The Air Force fitness facilities hem and aerobic capacity." at Albrook AFS have made this problem a little more difficult by offering athletes the SrA. Ramona Spencer chance to row the Mississippi, ski the MWRS spedalist AppalachianTrail,orclimbMountEverest. The goal program stimulates accomshe said. plishments of people who use the rowing, The modifications permitting the macross-country skiing, or stairand mountain chine mileage to be used stemmed from a climbing machines, said SrA. Ramona customer's comment made through the Air Spencer, Morale Welfare, Recreation and Force Suggestion Program. Services specialist. The task fellto Spencerto come up with The program is self-directed and keeps the new applications for using the exercise track of the distance traveled in each exermachines. cise session, she said. "I thought it would be neat to do," There are no time limits to reach the Spencer said. milestones along the way and the program "This gives people an incentive. Inis conducted on the honor system, she stead of just running or biking, they have added. other ways of increasing their aerobic The rowing, climbing and skiing plans capacity." evolved from the fitness center's run/bike Spencerhas since beenreassignedto the to the United States program. Tradewinds Dining Facility here. The proThis wasoriginally for outdoorrunners gram is now run by SrA. Michael West. Pedro Gonzalez, 24th Maintenance Squadron, works out on the stairmaster and cyclists but has also been expanded to Call him at 284-3451 for more informamachine at Howard Sports and Fitness Center. includethe treadmillsandstationarybikes, tion. Detachment 4 shoots down 1-228th Aviation by Sgt. James A. Rush Fi dAiange of pace after the high-scoring first game, The next team to go home happy was the 24th Mainte24th Wing Public Affairs the opening period of the night's second game was a nance Squadron after topping Company A, 1-228th. defensive stalemate. The 24th Civil Engineering SquadMaintenance's pressure defense limited Co A. to 16 HOWARD AFB -The three-pronged attack of Richard ron and 617th Special Operations Aviation Detachment points in the first half, and then got better. The Army team Burgess,Charles Hodge and Carl Masonpowered Detach(Airborne) held each other to 19 points. tallied only 11 points in the second. ment 4 over Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 228th The second half was a different story, however. Civil The winners got more than enough scoring from Stacy Aviation Regiment 65-51 here July 30. engineering racked up 30 points onthe waytoa49-46 win. Jackson and Jorge Haynes. Jackson wore out the net for18 Burgess led the trident attack from within the paint by CES's Joseph Williams led the charge, netting 12of his points while his teammate added 12. hitting the basket for 21 points. team-high 14 points in the second half. In the night owl game, the 617th Airlift Support Guards Hodge and Mason kept pace with 19 and 18 After missing his first two free throws in the first half, Squadron needed only the 34 points it scored in the first pointsrespectively. Hodge bombed away from downtown, Williams was perfect in six attempts during the second. half to top the 24th Supply Squadron B Team. guiding in four three-pointers, while Mason shredded the Gerard Smart and Farrell Taylor were the supporting They kepton,however, adding another4linthesecond defense, cutting and slashing to basket. cast. All eight of Smart's points came in the latter period half to finish with a 75-32 victory. The three combined for 90 percent of their team's while Taylor spread his 10 points throughout the game. Everybody on Airlift Support got into the act. Each scoring for the game. The 617th's Curtis Thomas, Andre Little and Jimmy player had at least one basket, and four hit double figures. Three HHC scores also hit in the double digits. Samuel Scottaccounted for all27points oftheirteam's second-half John Tharps led his team with 11 points. His teammates Watkins led his team with 16. Teammates Richard Dukes output. Thomas finished with18 points and Little and Scott Barry Dowell,Ken Schortgenand Byron Jones each added and Corey Armstrong added 12 and 10 to the cause. each ended with 11. 10 more.

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Tropic Tnes1 Aug. 6,1993 lW DepartentofDefense photosby Sg Richad Pocket Ian Morales takes a breath through a respirator at the Fort Clayton's Williford Pool. Youths dive into scuba FORT CLAYTON For nearly 50 years Fred Clarkhas been sharing the worldofscubadivingwith students of all ages. This week, he opened the eyes of 13 more. The class kicked off Monday with classroom instruction and a handsp on introduction at Fort Clayton's Williford Pool. The training is part of the Summer Sensations' youth program. Clark wraps uptheclassSunday 1 with an open waterdiveto Portobelo. t Clark teaches scuba classestoadultsand water safety for the military, but he enjoys the challenge of working with youths. Instructor Fred Clark shows Floyd Able (left) and Mike McAllister how "It's very rewarding to get a face mask fitted properly. when you work with akid and see them develop into a proficient little person," "I don't mince words. People know where they he said. "They're not fumbling, their movements are stand with me. I tell them the facts and they know precise and accurate. That makes it worthwhile." whattoexpect.Ithinkthe youngsters appreciatethat. Getting to that point isn't always easy, he said. They know they can come to me for help." "Some people say I'm a little tough on the kids," Student Michael McAllister agrees. he said. "But I'm not teaching them recreational "He can get a little tough at times, but he makes swimming. If they don't listen, or don't learn scuba youawareofwhat'sgoingonaroundyou,"McAllister Youths diving class members practice entering the water. properly,it could cost them theirlives. Idon't put up said. "I've learned a lot and it'll help on land too. with horseplay or fooling around. I'm a no-nonsense You're more disciplined and sure of yourself. That'll by Sgt Richard Puckett guy. I talk real hard, but I really care about them. pay off in the future." Try c Ti. Sports Editor

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Tropic Times Aug. 6,199315 Spor-ts shor-ts Football registration Registration is under way for the Fort Clayton intramural unit-level flag football league. The deadline is Aug. 31. Theclinicis scheduled for 6 p.m. Aug. 24 at the Directorate of Community Activities Sports Branch, Building 154. Call 287-4050. 3-on-3 basketball tourney Registration for the Fronius Fitness Center's threeon-three basketball tournament in late August continues until Thursday. An organizational meeting will be held 5:30 p.m. Aug. 13 at Fronius. Call 289-3108. Army 10-miler tryouts The final tryouts for the Army 10-miler Race to be held in Washington D.C., Oct. 10 will be held Aug. 21. The finals begin at 6 a.m. at the Rodman Fitness Center at Rodman Naval Station. Eight male and eight female runners will be selected at the finals. The best six male and female runners will make up the U.S. Army South 10-miler team. ActivedutyArmy soldiers assigned orattached to USARSO are eligible to compete. Coach Willie Moye holds training sessions at 6 a.m. Monday through Friday at the Reeder Physical Fitness Center. Call 287-4050 for more information. Self-directed programs The Howard/Albrook sports and fitness centers have started several new self-directed aerobics programs. "Row the Mississippi,""Ski the Appalachian Trail," and "Climb -Mount Everest" are now available for prospective adventurers at the centers. Call 284-3451. Scuba classes There will be an open water scuba class 6 p.m. Monday at the Howard pool. The costis $145perperson. An advanced open water scuba class will be held Wednesday at the Howard pool. For information, call the Air Force Community Activities Center,284-6161. Winter leagues The Albrook Bowling Center is taking sign ups for upcoming winter bowling leagues at Howard andAlbrook bowling centers. People interested should stop by the ,4*. center, or call 286-4260/4325. Swimming party The Curundu Bowling Centeris hosting a"Say no to Over the top Udrugs, Say yes to bowling" swimming party 6:30-9:30 p.m. Aug. 28. The event is free for youths for informaDigits' Mary Bulmer hits a shot over the net as teammates Heather Palmer (rear) and Dolly Morhaim tion call Cindy Bates at 286-3914. look on. Yacht Club. The fishermen who hook the largest Volleyball standings* Football tryouts barracuda, wahoo, kingfish, jack/tuna, marlin, sailfish Red league The 1993 Department of Defense Dependents' and tarpon will winprizes. Prizes will be awarded forthe W L Schools interscholastic varsity football team tryouts top three catches in each category. DENTAC 4 0 will be held 6:30 p.m. Aug. 16-18 at Balboa The entrance fee is $20 per angler and may be paid 92nd PSC 3 0 Stadium. atthe barof any oftheclubs orto Francisco Lopez,241HHC, 154th Signal 3 1 Team coaches will conduct the player draft Aug. 18. 2025; Alberto Villa, 245-4379; Gabriel Kam, 24192nd MP Co. 2 2 Athletic physicals will be held 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 180675; Helio D. Alves, 243-4146; Mike Bell, 243-5207; Co. E, 228th Aviation 2 2 19 at Curundu Junior High School and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Alberto Alba, 245-0733; Gerry Laatz, 243-5652; Johnny HHC, LEA 1 2 Aug. 20 and 25 at Balboa High School. Physicals will Kirby, 241-5883; Fermin Pinel, 241-6003. 209th MP Co. 1 3 also be conducted 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 20 at Cristobal 128th MP Co. 1 3 HighSchool. Men's basketball 128th AvnBde 0 3 Students should pick up the proper forms at the White league appropriate schools before the exam date. Junior high Registration is continues for 5'10"-and-under and W L students should pick up forms at Curundu Junior High; 5'11"-and-over-basketballleagues. Deadlineis Sept. 7. 470th MI 3 0 Pacific community high schoolstudents atBalboafHigh; The clinic will is Aug. 31 at the Directorate of Commu193rd Inf Bde 2 0 college students at Panama Canal College; and Atlantic nity Activities Sports Branch, Building 154. Co. C, 1-508th 3 1 community students at Cristobal High School. Call 287-4050. DCSINT (USARSO) 3 1 SOUTHCOM 1 1 Racquetball tournament Fitness improvement HHD 750th M 2 The Howard Sports and Fitness Center will hold an Fitness improvement classes areheld 6:05-7am. and HHC, 193rd Spt 0 2 intramural racquetball tournament beginning Aug. 23. 2:05-3 p.m., Monday, Wednesday and Friday at the 214th Med Bn 0 5 The deadline to register is Aug. 17. Trophies will be Howard Sports and Fitness Center. Women's League awarded to the top two finishers in each category. For The class consists of a calisthenic super circuit W L more information, call 284-3451. workout aimed at improving muscular endurance, the Zonians 11 1 cardiovascular system and flexibility. Call 284-3451. Dig Its 11 1 Sixers 6 5 Fishing tourney Jaguars 4 7 An interclub fishing tournament will be held in Turkey Bowl coaches Volleygirls 4 8 Atlantic waters until Nov. 30. The Army Directorate of Community Activities All-American Girls 3 8 The event is sponsored by Club Nautico Caribe, the Sports Branch is now accepting resumes for Army Mighty Ducks 1 10 Panama Canal Tarpon Club and the Panama Canal Turkey Bowl team coaches. Call 287-4050. *As of Monday

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I6 Tropic Times Aug. 6,1993 School enrollment ALBROOK AFS (Department of DefenL pendents Schools) -Personnel new to Pan. should begn enolling their school-aged child as soon as possible, school officials said. Parents need to bring shot records, a letter L sponsorship, permanent change of station orders and ID cards to the school. Kindergarten children who will be 5 years oid by Oct. 31 may beenrolled at the school closest to their homes. Parents need to bring the previously mentioned documents and the child's birth certificate to register their children for kindergarten. Studentsingradesonethroughsixneedto bring their lunch to school every day. A sandwich filled with peanut butter, lunch meat or cheese, a thermos of milk orjuice, fruit, vegetables and a cookie makm up a nutritious lunch, school officials said Students in grades seven through 12 will have access to school cafeterias. Schools will provide folders for kindergarten through second grade students to keep their homework in. Students in grades three through six are provided with binders. For information concerning enrollment, or which school children should attend, call 2863867. Athletic physicals ALBROOK AFS (Department of Defense Dependents Schools) -Department of Defense Dependents Schools -Panama will hold athletic physical Aug. 18-25 for junior high and high school students. Students whoamfamilymembersofactiveduty servicemembers can get physicals 8 am.-4 p.m. Aug. 18atCurunduJunior HighSchooland 8a.m.4 p.m. Aug. 20 at Balboa High School. us. y phos bysgt.u n o Students who are family members of civilians Eusebio Salazar (left) and Jose Troya evaluate 'victim" Art Tippit at the site of a simulated hazardous cangetphysicals 8a.m.4p.m. Aug. 19atCurundu material spill. Jr. High, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 20 at Cristobal High School and 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 25 at Balboa High 'Htudeteam s to nntsshouldpickuptheformsattheappropriate schools before the physical exam. Junior high students should pick up forms a Curandu chemical substance control %A Junior High, high school students at Balboa High School and college students at the Panama Canal by SSgt. Jane Usero Those considerCollege. USARSO Pubikc Affairs Office tons made exerciseP rent/youth meeting more than a simulaP rn/o t e tn COROZAL -When barrels of an unknown substance tion. HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) -The youth falloffatruckor apipe bursts atapoolandsprays chlorine "The first time in center here will have a parent/youth meeting 7 into the air, who ya gonna call? this equipment is a p.m. Tuesday. Participants need to bring achairto The men of the Panama Canal Commission's hazardreal learning expenthe meeting. Call Louis Denham, 284-3856. ous material control and emergencyresponse team always ence," Marden exgot those calls in the Panama Canal area, but two teams of plained. "It gives Post offices close hazardous material-hazmat -handlers will soon take them a chance to apover those duties for U.S. military communities on both ply what was learned HOWARD AFB (24th Wing/PA) -All post sides of the isthmus. in the classroom." offices on the Pacific side will close at 4:30 p.m. The teams will come in to evaluate and control any The class is only Aug. 27 for a special function. potentially hazardousmaterialsthatleak,spillorsprayinto one step in preparing the air, wateror ground on U.S. military installations while the teams for action, Supplies n eded the PCC team continues to do its job, said Elias Cartin of Cartin said. The IORTC[AYTON(USARSOPAO)-TheU.S. the Directorate of Engineering and Housing's Environteams will continue Army South Public Affairs Office, Community mental Office. with quarterly simuRelations, is collecting items to be used to help "Within six months the two teams will be fully trained, lationsforthefirstyear Stanley Barrio checks his oxyschools in the interior. Clothing, toys, pencils, equipped and ready to go into action," Cartin said. to test and keep their gen mask and protective suit mathworkbooks,flashcards,crayons,sports equipTeam members went through a40-hour class last week knowledge fsh. before entering the simulated ment and plastic containers are some of the items to learn how to evaluate situations involving hazardous 'Thenextstepisto hazardous spill site. needed. Items can be dropped off at Building 95, materials, clear the area and treat victims, said Dave evaluatewhatequipmentwilbeneededtosupplytheteams FortClaytonRoom 153,orcallJeannineWilderat Marden, program coordinator from the University of and put into action a roster for quick communications," 287-3058. Kansas and class instructor. Cartin said. The teams were also put to the test in a simulated Theidea for the Hazmat teams came up almost a year Bulletin board ads chemical spill with a victim, a scenario run with the help ago when the military, which relied on the PCC teams, ofexperts fromtheComprehensiveIndustrialHygieneand decided it needed its own teams of specialists, Cartin FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -People Environmental Consultants of Atlanta. explained. who want toplaceads onthebulletin boardinfront "It's onething to sitinan airconditioned classroom and "'The teams are made up mainly of men from DEH in of the Fort Clayton Post Office must use the drop hear about it and learn the theory," Marden said. "It's areasofexpertisesuchaselectriciansand heavyequipment box near the bulletin board. Ads must be on cards another thing to actually come out here and put this heavy operators," Cartin said. or paper no larger than 5 inches by 7 inches with equipment on and operate under some real physical con'These men werenotchosenatrandom,"hesaid. "They 1-inch letters. Submissions will be posted for two straints." were chosen because, in certain situations, the teams may weeks. Call Jeannine Wilder at 287-3058. Teammembersgotafirsthandlessonintheimportance needtoknowhowtoturnthemainpowersourceofforhave 24-hour hotline of the non-verbal communication they had learned in the to move things on-site with fork lifts," he explained. classroom once they were inside two plastic and rubber Once fully trained, equipped and in place, the men will AORT CLAY t N(USARSOPAO)The U.S. suits with protective and oxygen masks. be ready to take on situations such as accidental spills and Army South Equal Opportunity Office has a 24"It is much more difficult to communicate in this gear leaks, hazardous materials found during construction site hoursexualharassmenthotlineat 287-4151.Sexual than you can understand in a classroom," said Joe Marsh, digging, chlorine leaks at pools and ammonialeaks at local harassment questions should be taken through the assistant instructor from the University of Kansas. ice plants, Cartin said. chainofcommand whenpossible. Questions, names "As well as the communication problems, they must "They will be the first line of defense against hazardous and telephone numbers will be recorded, but calls understand that heat stress is also a factor to consider," he waste in the Pacific and Atlantic communities," Marden will be kept confidential. added, said.

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Tropictivities Aug.6,1993 An entertainment guide for the U.S. commit In Panama Page B1 Hea in h meDepurflento1 Defensephsoto ySFC Joeph Ferraro A boat guide at isla Mamoy gets ready to shove off wfth a group of American tourists. Cayucos are just one of the many ways people get around in Panama. For more unique tranportation techniques, noe page 63. Audi just keeps on building better Balboa Dive Club divers experi*Potpourri, page B4 cars as new 1 QOCS proves, critic ence the sights and sounds above *Notices, pages B6-7 sy.and below Isla Iguana. *Movies, page B8

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Tropic Times B 2 Aug. 6, 1993 low-end torque. Knock sensors, a dual-path intake manifold for the fuel injection and many other adSvanced features make it an engineering treat. Accelera.* tion from rest to60inthis 3,400-pound sedan takes 10.4 seconds (factory claim: 9.9), adequate, but definitely marginal for the "sport" part of its market mission. An interesting aside: this vehicle requires high-test gas, which is usually 91 octane. If you can find 94 octane, through, the engine will eke out a few more horsepower (that's not true with almost any other car). The engine's fuel efficiency is ..-.....just average forth class: observed mileage was 17 city and 23 highway (EPA 17/25). The powerplantis coupled to afour-speed overdrive automatic transmission with "power" and "economy" settings, a useless gimmick. It shifted with commendable smoothness, though. Handling is one of the 100CS' best features. Its sub 35-foot turning circle and Goodyear GA radial tires (a compromise between handling and ride) enhance its wet road traction and cornering. There's minimum body roll and lots of chassis stiffness; this car is a real pleasure and world-class handler. The 100CS'ide is almost perfect. It's a fine combiLuxury/sport car packs 172 H P performance nationof softnessand control Itkeepsits composure even over the largest potholes and at extra-legal speeds b Zane Binder travelinthe powerseats. The driver's bucket gives a fine (its top-end is 122; the factory says 130) exudes stabilKing Features Syndicate view ofthe wood-faced, fully-instrumented analog dash; ity. It's great under all conditions. your hands will be comfortable around the leatherThe 100CS was equipped with an automatic climate Audi, much maligned by spurious "unintended acwrapped steering wheel. Missing, though,is acupholder. control system. It works, but isn't as good as a manual celeration" allegations, just keeps building better cars. There's plenty of room in front for the largest driver unit. A case in point is the 100CS, a luxury/sport full-size andin back, there's ample space for adults forlong trips. Quality control throughout the car was flawless. sedan that continues the traditions of the 5000 series. It The trunk is well-finished and spacious. Noteworthyis the factthe 100CS comes withathreechallenges Acura's Legend, BMW's 525 andthesuperAs the IOOCS competes with mid-line BMW models year, 50,000 mile warranty. It also covers 36 months of charged Ford Thunderbird, all vehicles with fine repuand American luxury iron, standard "options" abound. normal maintenance, but for its mid $30,000's pricing, tations. Power steering, heated seats, four-wheel power antiit should include these niceties. Overall, it's near the Inside, the 100CS looks like every other Audi: lock disc brakes, a sunroof, air conditioning, trip commost expensive car in its class. elegant but simple, perhaps even stark. That's the way puter (useless), a driver's side airbag and much more is What's the bottom line? It's a fine car, but expenGermany builds cars -with a philosophy that implies included in the $33,600 base price. sive, especially considering its moderate objective perdriving is an extension of one's business office. The The front-drive 100CS is equipped with a state-offormance. The 100CS is extremely sophisticated and buckets were wide, comfortable leather (a $1,300 opthe-art 2.8 liter, 172 HP single overhead cam V6 with conservative. It fairly oozes good taste and would make tion; velour is standard) with plenty of fore-and-aft two valves per cylinder. It's silky-smooth with plenty of a fine addition to any garage in America. with tomato'wedges. Makes six servings. About three-quarters of the world's people depend on rice for nourishment. While, fortunately, some of Curfried turkey salad us do not rely on it solely, rice consumption has 6 ounces cooked turkey breast, coarsely chopped dramatically increased as we find new ways to enjoy 1 cup small broccoli flowerets it, new blends are developed and as we adopt and 1/4 cup bell pepper strips adapt ethnic recipes. 2 tablespoons sliced green onion This economical complex carbohydrate is free of 1/2 cup plain low-fat yogurt cholesterol and sodium and has only a trace of fat. /4 cup Kretschmer original wheat germ Cooked rice may be stored in the freezer ready to grab 1/2 teaspoon curry powder for unexpected guests or just for you. Dash black pepper Rice salads may account for rice's growing popu2 pita breads, halved larity. Here's a nicely spiced one that combines vegetables and chicken. Combine turkey, broccoli, bell pepper and green onion. Mix together yogurt, wheat germ, currypowder Curried chicken-rice salad and black pepper. Toss into turkey mixture to coat. 3 cups hot cooked rice Serve in pita pockets or over lettuce or fresh spinach 1/2 cup frozen peas, thawed 1/4 teaspoon Tabasco sauce leaves. Makes two servings. The Chopping Block 2 (5-ounce) cans premium chunk white chicken, Shredded romaine lettuce recipes by Philomena Corradeno. drained 2 tomatoes, cut into wedges Editor's note: People Interested In sharing a 3/4 cup chopped celery recipe or household tip with Tropic Times readers, 1/4 cup sliced green onions Combine hot rice and peas; toss lightly. Add chicken, can send recipes or tips by MPS to Tropic Times, 3 or 4 teaspoons lemon juice celery and onions in large bowl. Combine lemon juice Unit 0936, APO AA 34002. Your name and base 2 tablespoons olive oil and oil, curry powder and Tabasco in small jar with lid; will be printed with your submission. 1/4 teaspoon curry powder shake. Drizzle overrice mixtures; toss lightly. Cover and 496-93-KF Budget Assistant, NM-561-7, Sensitive 497-93-NC Supervisory Inventory Management Specialist, NM-2010-11, Sensitive Hiring opportunities are limited because of budgetary constraints. HOW TO APPLY: For temporary positions submit a SF-171, DD 214 if claiming veteran 498-93-LA Computer Specialist, NM-334-11, Sensitive preference, a copy of college transcripts if claiming education and a copy of Clerical Administrative Support Position notice of rating if applicable. For permanent 499-93-NC Training Instructor (Wood), NM-1712-7 positions (only for current employees including leave without pay) submit a SF171,acopyoflatestSF-50,acopyofcollegetranscripts,acopyofyourlastperformance The Directorate of Civilian Personnelis accepting applications on acontinuous basis. appraisal and a statement addressing the job related criteria contained in the This announcement will be used to fill permanent and temporary positions: announcement. For more information regarding vacancy announcements (forms required, job VB# 001 General Clerical, NM-3/4** related criteria, etc.), visit the Directorate of Civilian Personnel, Building 560, Room Medical Officer, NE-12/13/14 306, Corozal, or call 285-5201. Clinical Nurse, NM-9/10/11 VB# Vacancies, Title and Location Open: 08-06-93 Close: 08-17-93 Practical Nurse, NM-5 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 Atlantic: Secretary (Stenography), NM-5/6 487-93-LA (2)Telephone Mechanic, MG-2502-10 Secretary (Typing/Office Automation), NM-5/6/ VB# 002 Sales Store Checker, NM-3**(Intermittent wk sch) Pacific: VB# 003 Recreation Assistant, NM-4 (Lifeguard, Requires Cert.) 494-93-LA (2)Materials Handler (FO), MG-6907-5, (Intermittent. Limited to **CASP Examination (CEO, notice of rating) is required for temporary posiVeteran Preference Eligibles) tions. NOTES: VB# 487-93-VL Nursing Assistant, NM-621-4 developmental 5 is 495-93-KF Administrative Services Assistant (OA), NM-303-6, Sensitive, (Drivers cancelled. VB# 486-93-SS Educational Aide, NM 1702-4 should not read sensilicense required) tive.

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Tropic Times Aug. 6,1993 B 3 US. Anny phobo by SSgL. PhbIp D. 0mbr A father and son make their away along the Transisthmian Highway. 16," Courtsay~ ~ tot"b red Ln A little girl carries her sleeping brother through the Darien Province. Oepartment of D.Ien photoby Maureen Sampson The S.A.C.A. bus is a common sight throughout Panama. Geffin' around COROZAL (Tropic Times) -Several some recreational activity unique to local photographers contributed to the new Panama or the U.S. community here, Tropic Times photo feature page. or are just fun to look at. This week's theme was getting around The deadline for the next feature is in Panama, and local shutterbugs captured Aug. 30. the unique and the familiar on film. The Submissions should be black and U.S. Army photo by SgL E. Hereom -next feature, Playtime in Panama, will white photographs, though color Acardrives through aflooded parkappear in the Sept. 3 Tropic Times. photos are acceptable. Bring submising lot at Albrook AFS during the We will accept photos showing the sions to the Tropic Times offices in recent heavy rains. different facets of playtime in Panama, as Building 405, Corozal, or call 285long as they're interesting, they reveal 6612. Courtesy photo byMerthe K. Hulsy A cyclist navigates Gorgona Beach.

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B4Tropic Times Potpourri B Aug. 6, 1993 L o________________________________ Crime prevention night beginsA.A 30ReA 2w9 -Phone service hours NavalStationSecuiityDepartmentkicks auditorium.Facultymembers willbeavailTelephone customer service hours at off the fourth annual Crime Prevention able for consultation. For more informaBuilding 732, Corozal, have changed to 8 Night Out Carnival at Farfan Bohio and tion, call 252-3304/3107. am.-3 p.m. For more information, call Teen Center at Howard AFB 5p.m. today. 285-4313/4354. his year's event will include static Preschool signups displays fromSpecial BoatUnit26, Marine Corps Security Force Company, Air Force Atlantic Child Development Servicesexam Peace Keepers, Mounted Security Police will hold preschool registration 8:30 a.m.ThePanamaCanalAmateurRadioClub with their horses, Military Working Dog lp.m.and2-3:30p.m. Aug.16-20.Packets will hold an amateur radio examination 9 demonstrations, and more. are available at the CDS office, Building am. Saturday at the Panama Canal TrainSome ofthe static displays include vid8351, MargaritaComplexPackets must be ing Center in Balboa. To register, or for eos on videotaping your personal property completed before registration. Other items more information, call 252-7400. ortakingpicturesforyourrecords. A home neededarethechild'sshotrecord,sponsor's inventory control computer program will bilingual ID card and a copy of sponsor's Change of command be made available. Copies can be made for 19921040 tax form to detem fees. C ho m people who bring formatted disks. 289-4511 for more information. There will be change of command .Bicycles will be registered and conductceremony for the 92nd Personnel Service ing the Ident-A-Kid program will be conCompany 9 am. Monday at the basketducted. ball court near Building 207. Capt. Lucia There will bevideos aboutdrugs, youth The Directorate of Engineering and Heugh will assume command from Capt. gangs, and public housing crimes. Housing Self Help Store will open Aug.18 Emma Coulson. The Navy Self-Help Division will anwith refreshments and entertainment. The PPTourist Passprt swer questions and issue home security new store, Building T340 on the DEH s class TC: Tourist Card devices to families. Contraband Control compound, Corozal, will serve Air Force Vc will have an information booth. Customs residentsandpersonnel from AlbrookAFS A workshop to offer alternative strateV : Visa agents will be on hand to help with quesand the Army community. gies and techniques for disciplining chilPC: Proof of Citizenship tions concerning what can and cannot be The hours will be 9 am.-6 p.m. Tuesdren(ages birthtopre-teen)will begiven5-Hntdes Pso shipped. day-Fridayand9am.-lp.m.Saturday.For 8 p.m. Thursday at the Rodman Naval Holders Only The Marine Corps Exchange will be more information, call 285-5707. StationChapel. Call283-5749 forinformaCC. Country Clearance selling car security packages, wireless sution. Registration deadline is Wednesday. RON, Remain Overnight Award oeroeto sseswno All flights on this schedule are pervisedhomeprotectionsystems,window A adnomin ~ Ssubject to cancellation. For additional sensors, power sirens and motion sensor Award srinations Sght incermation For assnge light controllers. The International Personnel Manage Vehicle sticker flight information, call the Passenger Otherentertainmentincludesadunking ment Association is seeking nominations The Directorate of Land and Traffic ServiceSection,284-4306/3608/4857. booth, and a D.J. for its all star team and the Linda Trunzo Transportation ofPanamahas announced There will be an uphill mountain run for awards. Theall starteam awards recognize that the Revisado sticker and the vehicle Saturday children aged 4 to 12, and an awards federalemployeesinpersonneladministraregistration certificate must be obtained 5:40am C30 Howard AFB, PN ceremony for the winners. McGruff the tionforsingleaccomplishments withgroup by Dec. 31 because they will be required 4 Nashville, TB. us Crime Dog will be on hand for all of the nominations being accepted. The Linda for 1994 vehicle inspection beginning la ,41 HowardAFN activities. Trunzo Humanitarian Award recognizes Dec. 1. Howard APB, PN individuals who have distinguished themAccording to Military Police Com1:55pm C5A Howard AFB, PN Offices close selves bylhumanitarianactsorservicesthat mand officials, the Panamanian governCharleston AFB, SC RON encouraged otherstodotheir best toachieve ment is still processing these documents. Kelly AFB, Texas Personnel Services in Building 519, success. Officials advise vehicle owners not to try Sunday Fort Clayton, will be closed today for a Nominees must be federal employees in to get these documents until after Sept. 1. 9:55am C141 Howard AFB, PN training holiday and will be at limited staff the personnel administration field or in Vehicle owners are also reminded to Charleston AFB, SC during the morning hours Monday for a occupations such as health care if theindicarry a copy of their 1993 inspection Monday change of command ceremony. Southern vidualisassignedtothepersonnelfunction. documents in their vehicles at all times. 5:M10 an 130 Howard AFB, PN Command forms 4 and 5 will be issued at Nominations must be forwarded to the Howard APIS, PN Building 207, Fort Clayton. Directorate of Civilian Personnel by Aug. Chapel positions 7:30am B727 Howard AFB, PN The 93rdTheaterArmy Material Man27. For more information, call 285-5611. Charleston, SC IAP agement Command, Building 712, Ile Howard/AlbrookChapels have the Commercial contract Corozal, will be closed Aug. 13and 16 for following positions open for bids: 1:55pm C5A Howard AFB, PN automated system conversion. Only high O items *Protestantreligious education coordiSoto Cano AB, Honduras priority requests will be completed durPeople who suspect an Air Force pronator, Howard-, Charleston AFB, SC RON ing this time. The last day to submit cured item is overpriced can challenge the *Catholic religious education coordiDover AFB, Del. requestsis Thursday. For more informaprice and earn money. Under the Zero nator, Howard, Tuesday tion, call 285-6142. Overpricing Program, members can re*Catholic religious education coord4:40 gu c al, Honduras ceive up to 10 percent of the total governnator, Albrok Soto Cano AB, Honduras -pment savings. Submit price challenges to *GospelservicechoirdirectorAlbrook; Howard AFB,PN Pool party the 24th Supply Squadron Customer Ser*English mass, Catholic choirdirector, 5:40am C141 Howard AFB, PN There will be a pool party for the 56th vice Team, 284-5712. Albrook; and Brasilia, Brazil RON/V Signal Battalion 6-10 p.m. Saturday at the *Catholic choir director, Howard. Santiago, Chile Fort Clayton Pool. Theparty, sponsored by Sup l hotline Bids shouldsubmittedto thecontracting Buemos Aires, Argentina the 69th Signal Company Family Support uppy office, Building 715, Howard AFB by 4 (RON, 2 nights) Group, is open to all 56th Sig. Bn. soldiers, People with questions or supply related p.m. Aug. 20. Call Judy Young at 284Uma, Peru families and Department of Defense civilproblems should contact the 24th Supply 4397/5550 for more information. Howard AFB, PN ians. Customer Service Team, 284-5712. The 5:55C130 Howard AFB, PN Those attending with last names beginteam, located in Howard AFB's Building Fir aid course San Salvador, El Salvador CC/V aaOe~~~m.~lae9u F st i co reSan Jose, Cosa Rica ning with A-L should bring a side dish 715, willhelpanswerquestionsandresolve Howard AFB, PN while those from M-Z should bring a desproblems. The Fort Davis American Red Cross Wednesday sert. Forinformation, call 287-5076/5934. will conduct a three-day community first 5:10am C130 Howard APB, PN s aid instructor certification course 8 am.-5 Belieze City, Belieze p.m. Aug. 17-19 at the Sundial Recreation Guatemnala City, Guatemala TC/V Stores move Overeaters' Anonymous meeting are Center. Call 289-3595 for more informaHoward AFB, PN The Marine CorpsExchangehas moved held6:45p.m.Thursdaysin Building6550, tion. 6:10am C141 Howard AFB, PN its curio/furmiture and hard goods stores to Corozal. For more information, call 228Medevac thecountryandpackagestoreatBuilding4, 0015. First aid for maids CastonAPISC Rodman Naval Station. Tis i o ad har sAyS The Navy Family Service Center is of7:55am CSA Howard AFB, PN Cabo D baz-feringfirstaidclasses formaids.Tbecourse Soto Cano AB, Honduras College registration The Canal Crafters are sponsoring a willbetaughtinSpanishandisgivenbythe Charleston AFB, SC RON FloridaStateUniversityhasannounced LaborDaybazaaratClubAmadorSept.6. AmericanRedCross.It willbeheld8am.Dover AFB, Del. registration dates for the fall semester. For more information, call Cara Miller at 5p.m., Aug. 28. Thereis a registrationn Aug 13 Registration will be 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. 285-4775. fee. Registrationdeadlineis Aug. 27. Call 5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN today at Building 708, Howard AFB; 9 283-5749 for more information. Tegucigalps, Honduras am.-5 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday at Soto Cano AB, Honduras Building 808, Albrook AFS; and 8 am.Dog classes Howard APB, PN 1 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday at BuildValent Recreation Center will hold baOrientation 5:55am C130 Howard AFB, PN ing 32, Fort Davis. Late registration will sicdogobedienceanddog groomingclasses The Navy Family Service Center will San So, S vador CCV be 10 am.-5 p.m. Aug. 16-17 at Building Sept. 1-29. The obedience class costs $60 conduct anewcomers'orientation 8 am.-4 Iowr AFB, PN 808, Albrook and 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Aug. 16and meets 7-8:15p.m. Mondays, Wednesp.m. Aug.23-27 for new military members 9:55am Cl41 Howard AFB, PN 17 at Building 32, Fort Davis. For more daysandFridays. Thegroomingclass costs and their families. The Navy League will Bogota, Colombia CC information, call 285-6922. $30 and meets 5:30-6:45 p.m. Mondays, provide a cultural presentation Aug. 27. Howard APB, PN Panama Canal College's fall semester Wednesdays and Fridays. Call 287-6500. Call 283-5749 for more information.

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Tropic Times *TV Schedule Aug. B9 Mature Theme **Series Begins ***Series Ends Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30am NBCN-wuatSunie| 6:30am Headlme News 6:00am Real Videos 5:30am NBCNewst S omie 5:30am NBC New at Smne 5:30am NBC Nw a Suamse 5:30am NBCNewvalSumrioe 6:00 ABCGoodMornimg 7:00 Air oCNews 6:30 1iByNight &00 ABCGoodMcmng 6:00 ABC~oodMouin 6:00 ABC~oodMorning 6:00 ABCCoodMoning Amoerica 7:30 Navy/MaineCorpf 7:30 OuOeSCIhO(LVoC Ario Ame Am-rca Americ 8:00 BasicTrsmtngWork News 8:00 CBS Sunday Mortntg 8:00 BeicTonmWortout 8:00 Bodyahapng 8:00 BaaicTraing Work8:00 Bodyhaping u 8:00 NickArcade 9:30 Fac'e eNaton 8:30 Seinne SOrUC 8:30 Seam. Sured mar 8:30 Sciame street 8:30 S.ame Sreet 8:30 JutForKid. 10:00 Iadine New. 9:30 Silver Spu-a. 9.30 Siler Spoons 8:30 Shatme Street 9:30 Silver Spoons 9:30 Silver Spoons WarntrBrr.Cartuaas 10:30 This Week W/Davd 10:00 ILovelacy 10:00 IlovLoUty 9:30 Silver Spoona 10:00 ILoveLuy 10:00 ILoveLucy 1030 Space Age *** Brinkley 1025 Guiding Ugt 1025 guiding ight 10:00 LoveLucy 1025 Oriding Light0 10:25 GuidingUghta 1130 HeadlNeewa 110 NFLPre-Sesaon: 11:15 Ganral Fs1 pital 11:15 ovaoqaita 10:25 Oidingbght 11:15 GeneralHoapitala 11:15 General Hospital Noon NFLP.e-SeamtcAmuiAnaurIaanBowlfran Noon HeadhineNewBrook Noon HeadlixNewBreak 11:15 Geo alHospitala Noon HeadlineNewBreak Noon HeadlineNewfBreak canBowlfeomler Lndo b anglutd 12:15 SCNMiddsy 12:15 SCN iddsy Noon HkadlineNewarfeak 12IS SCNMldday 12:15 SCNMiddJ y CkmnanyBillay-.ViCowboysva.LUns 1230 SportaMwhi" 12:30 SporwCaorer 12:15 SCNMidday 1230 SprmCner 12:30 SpotaCener khie 2.30pm StuadayAleoon l:00 AnodtheWOIld 1:00 AnodherW.ld0 1220 Sputwouor 1:00 AnotherWorlda 1:00 AnotherWorld0 3:00 SaturdayAfternoon M vie:"hePro=" 2:00 OpahWiftey* 2:00 Saly JeRahael* 1:00 Anoth aWorlda 2:00 Donahue* 2:00 OprahWinfmy a Moyie."Radio Days" 400 Sod Thain a 3:00 Price I Right 3:00 PAi. Is Right 2:00 Oprahwinfrey a 3:00 Prie I Right 3:00 Prmc Is Right 4:30 TheBestOfTheLove 5:00 O.Sa, 4:00 Newmom 4,00 1w 3:00 Pric Is Right 4:00 Newarnoom 4:00 Newsroom Conoemion 5:30 HeadlimeNews 415 CartooCorazer 415 CartoonCoretr 4:00 Newsroom 4:15 CartoonCorner 4:15 CartoonCorner 5:00 Thi.Weekinllaseall &.00 SuarSesrch 430 NickArcade 430 Square e TV 4:15 CartonCorner 4:30 Scratch 4:30 ThinkFat -5:30 HeadlineNews 7:00 ByeToByeWthCom 5:00 FamilyFmUd 5:00 Family Fond 430 Imbhotp'Playalog 5:00 Pamily Feud 5:00 FamilyFeud 6:00 WWFSuperstasof G g 5:30 ShowtizTOday 5:30 ShowbazToday 5:00 FamilyFeud 5:30 ShowbizToday 5:30 ShowbizToday Wrestling 8:00 Sunday NightMovie: 600 SCN Beiong Report 6:00 SCNlveniogReprt 5:30 ShowbizToday 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN Evening Report 7:00 Recue9ll -GuilryConacieucea&15 dlineNeBreak &15 HeadlineNew"Broak &00 SCNlveningReport 6:15 HeadliNrewalBreak 6:15 HeadlineNewsBreak 8:00 SpedaL"mningPint 9.40 HeadlineewaBteak 6:30 WocldNewTonight 6:30 WurldlewaTonight &15 HeadlineNewsBreak 6:30 WorldNewsTonight 6:30 WorldNewaTonight WithaarbaraWalter" 16:00 BntertaintenThis 7:00 NFL ~reSeaam 7:00 Jeopardy! 6:30 WoddNewsTonight 7:00 NFLPre-Seuor:Bills 7:00 Jeopardy! 9:00 SaturdayNighltMovie: Week Browava. Rdakins 7:30 PrivamEyo 7:00 Jeopardy vs. Chief. 7:30 SmallWonder "Cteech&Cong's 11:00 Agatharistie's 10:00 SCNLee dEditon 8:30 60Mi nea(OTO 7:25 M*AaS*H 10:00 SCNLjelEdition 8:00 PrimenmeLive TheCoricanBroth"lorot" 10:05 entertenmmctTonight Chaegeduabspora) 7:50 WednesdayNight 10:05 EnrtainmenlTunight 9:00 In Living Color era" Midight HeadlneNewa 10:35 Toanght Show 9:30 CBS evening News Movi:"LatWiah" 10:35 TonghShow 9:30 CBS Ev-ning News 10:0 Saturday Nightve 1230 MeetTe Pr 1135 Davidttweaman IO:O SCN Late Edition 9:30 CBS Evening News 11:35 DavidLetterman 10:00 SCNI-steldition Midnight Videolinka ** 1:30 SpotMathine 12:35am Nigludi" 10:05 enatemetTonight 10:00 SCNLsmeldition 1235am Nightline 10:05 BnartaimentTonght 1:00 FridayNightVideos 2:00 ABCWtaldNewsNow 1:05 eodlineNewsBiesk 10:35 TonightShow 10:05 BnatainmemTonight 1:05 HeadlineNewuBrak 10:35 Tonight Show 2:00 All Night Movie: 3:00 HeadlineNews 1:30 Sporiesienight 1135 Daidtaenan 1035 TonightShow 1:30 Sportatnight 11:35 DavidIeman "Code of Silence" 3:30 CNNWorld Rpit 2:00 Armeio Hall 12:35m Nightine 1135 DavidLearoman 2:00 Arnio Hall Show 12:35am Nighdine 3:40 All Night Mvi.: 5:00 leadlineNewsBteak 3.00 ToghtShow 1:05 HeadlineNewaBrak 1235am Nighdine 3:00 TonightShow 1:05 Videolinh a "Robocep"' 400 DavidLeUerman 1:30 Spewskauight 1:05 HeadlineNewaBrak 4:00 Davidlettrman 2:00 All Night Movie: 525 HeadlineNews 5:00 HeadlineNewsliesk 2:00 Artnoilall 1:30 Sporularnigt 5:00 HeadlineNewBreak "aag o r". 3:00 ToighttShow 2:00 AaioHall 3:55 All Night Movie: 4.00 DavidLoerntan 3:00 Tonight Show "SomethinWild"a 5:00 HesdlineNewsBreak 4:00 Davidittrnonan 5:45 Videolink. 5:00 HeadlineNewslleak Mature Theme **Series Begins ***Serdes Ends Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 5:30am Simulcmt W/ & 10 6:30am Simulcatw8 & 10 6:00am anbaop'sPlayalong 5:30= SimulcasW18 & 10 5:30am SimulaCIW/8 & 10 5:30am SimlcaatW/8 & 10 5:30am Simulcast W/8 & 10 8:00 OprahWinfrey* 10:30 The13OhossfS-oby 6:20 SmoyBrn 8:00 OphWinfrey* 8:00 Do.h.-5 8:00 OprahWinfey* 8:00 SallyJeeRaphael* 9:00 Today Doo 6:45 TheAddamaFamily :00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 11:00 Star Trek 11:00 The mu"ns 7:10 Goo(Troop 11:00 Startek 11:00 Star Tnk 11:00 StarThek 11:00 Star Trek Noon HeadliunNewBtak 11:30 T. Big Story 7:35 Dincy'suleMer.Noon HeadlineNewa Biak Noon HeadlineNewareak Noon HeadlineNewsBreak Noon HeadlineNew Aruk 12:15 SCNMidday Noon SportaCloseup maid 12.15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:30 All My Childten 12:30 Headline Newa 8:00 BeedJuim 12:30 Al My Cild-n* 230 All My Cbildana 1230 All My Childam 12:30 All My Childn* 1:30 OneLifeTo Live* 1:00 SatfernoonMovie: 8:25 TtnyTounsAdvetures 1:30 OwIifeTo Uve* 1:30 0telUfetoLve* 1:30 oeeUfet ive* 1:30 OneLife to live 2:30 Young and Retles* "Hlarit" 8:45 Rugrals 2.30 Yon and The Rom2:30 The Young And Rest2:30 Young And The Reat2:30 YoungandTheReatlem* 3:30 Bannan: The Ani3:40 SpenperForHie 9:10 Batman:The Animan-4 imd l. laaa 3:30 Ditey'siuole Mrmaid mard Serte 4:30 OnPitRoad Scric .3:30 TinyTotsiAdvonttaes 3:30 TheAddemamily 330 GoodrTroop 4:00 FraggleRock 4:00 Praggle Rock 5:00 BSPN'S Gatest 9:35 One Step Beyond 4:00 Fale Rock 4:00 FraggleR-ck 4:00 FIragle Rock 4:30 One Step Beyond 4:30 Beakman'sWodd EventsA& allege 10:00 Star'rek 4:30 OtiinaetitplainaItAB 4:30 ThinkFat 4:30 SdolasticSpoets 5:00 WhataHappeningNow 5:00 Who'sThellos 6:00 HeadlineNews 11:00 The Fugitive 5:00 Who'sThelosm 5:00 Whseat'apperingNow An-aica 5:30 M*A*S*H 5:30 M*A*S*H 6:30 The Simpona Noon HeadlieNews 5:30 M*AS*H 5:30 M*A*S*H 5:00 Who'sTheloB6:00 SCNvening Report 6:00 SCN Bening Report 7:00 SarTrek: Deep Spac 12:30 WallSreetJournal 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCN ven g Report 5:30 M*A*S*H 6:15 leadlineNe-woBreak 6:15 HesdlineNewsBreak Nine 1:00 WashingonWeekIn. 6:15 HeadlineNeBwslieak 6:15 HeadlineNewsBeak 6:00 SCNllettngReport 6:30 NBCNighdyNews 6:30 NBCNighdyNews 8:00 Riptide Review 6:30 NBCNightlyNewa 6:30 NBCNighdyNews 6:15 HeadlineNewaBreak 7:00 Hangin'WithMr.Co7:00 ADiffemntWorld 9:00 AmericaiDtective* 1:30 Sportaienighi 7:00 BevedyMilla,90210 7:00 Amnrica'aPwtnieat 6:30 NBCNightlyNews per 7:30 PeohPfinnMtBe1Air 9:30 Married.wChildon* 2:00 SudayfterA on 8:00 QoutttnLeap Home Videos 7:00 Full House 7:30 Family Matters 8:00 Friday NightMovie: 10:00 HeadlineNews Movie:"I'llCyTomr9:00 Roseate .7:30 Honemprovemant 7:30 Seinield 8:00 Martin "WimeasForThe 10:30 SaturdayNghtUve* tow" 9:30 Monday NightMovie: 8:00 LA.Law 8:00 Murder.SheWrote 8:30 MurphyBrown Prooeculion" Midnight 4:00 Special: 50Gmest "Risky Buaints"# 9:00 TnesdayNightMovie: 9:00 Sisets 9:00 Herman'lead 10:00 TJ.Hooker Videolinks* HomeRunainlineball 11:05 HeadlineNewsBrak "RoyalHmutOffho 10:00 Scarecrow&MraKing 9:30 Love&War 100 leadlineNews 1:00 FridayNightVideos Hiauay 1120 SCNLlldition Sun"0 WOO HeadlineNews 10:10 Hitel 11:30 SCNLIatelEdition 2:00 HoteramimentThis 5:00 ThiisWeek In Batb.O 1135 AraueoHal li:0O HeadalnaNews 11:30 SCNAI.eEdition 11l00 Headline News 11:35 ArmioHall Week 5:30 MotorWeek 12:35am Simutcawithhao"a 1150 SCN ate Edition 11:35 ArantioHall 11:30 SCNLamEdition 12:35am Nightline 3:00 SaturdayghtLive 6:00 Headlime News 8 & 10 1125 Aratioall l2:35am Simulit withhanls 11:35 Arsatio H1l 1:05 HeadlineNewlleak 4:30 HeadlineNews 6:30 WonderfulWorldof 12:35am Simulcaitwithmui. 8&10 1235amSimulcastwithdaunnels 1:30 SportwIamnight 5:00 Headline New% DaNay SAID S&ID1 2:00 Ararnio Hall 7:30 The Wonder Years 3:00 Tonight Show 8:00 Sunday Night Movie: 4:00 Late Night W/David "Jakz&TheFanan: Letetman Goodbye"* 5:00 HeadlineHews 6:40 HeadlineNewlBtak 5:30 HeadlineNews 10:00 MagnumPi. 6:00 HeadlineNewsBreak 11:00 60 Minuot Midnight Simtulatwitchamnels 8&AI Channels 8 & 10 Cable Channel 14 Sports Specials NFL Pre-Season Football 50 Greatest Home Runs In Baseball History 4 p.m. American Bowl noon Saturday, Bills vs. Vikings from Berlin, -Sundy. This special features a retrospective on some of the Germany most memorable home runs in baseball history. American Bowl 11:30 am. Sunday, Cowboys vs. Lions from Movies London, England -"Witnessfor the Prosecution"8p.m.Friday.Stars BeauBridges Browns vs. Redskins 7 p.m. Monday -and Ralph Richardson. Bills vs. Chiefs 7 p.m. Thursday "Hatarli!" 1 p.m. Saturday. Stars John Wayne, Elsa Martinelli, and Red Specials Buttons. "Turning Point with Barbara Walters" 8 p.m. Saturday. Barbara Walters "I'll Cry Tomorrow" 2 p.m. Sunday. Stars Susan Hayward and Richard examines the story of a young girl switched at birth in this ABC news special. Conte. Series Starts "Jake & The Fatman: Goodbye" 8 p.m. Sunday. Stars Joe Penny and Think Fast 4:30 p.m Fridays. (replaces "Make The Grade") William Conrad. Soul Train 4 p.m. Sundays (replaces "The Fugitive") "Risky Business" 9:30 p.m Monday. Stars Tom Cruise and Rebecca Movies DeMornay. "Radio Days" 3 p.m. Saturday. Stars Woody Allen and Mia Farrow. "Royal Hunt OfThe Sun" 9 p.m. Tuesday. Stars Robert Shaw and Nigel "The Producers" 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Stars Zero Mostel and Gene Wilder. Davenport.

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Tropic Times ~C asfe B10Aug 6,1993 Classified Ads 1988 BMW 318i, Shadow line,2dr, 5-spd, sr, ac, am/ Daewoo Racer 1991, liftback, ac, amn/fm/cass, black, _ __i_ fmn/cass, not dty pd. $10,000. 261-6119. duty pd, $5200. 224-1583. Lab/retriever puppies. 286-3294. 1986 Toyota Corona, great cond, ac, am/fm/cass, 1984NissanStanza,pb,pspw, pl,acam/fn/cass,sr, Packard Bell Legend 625, 486SX,$0 down $99.95 4dr. $4000. 263-5111. (apt46) tilt, trailer hitch, not duty pd. $3750/obo. 287-5680. for 12 months, contact Bob Osborn. 223-3976. Toy poodle,housebroken female, 1 i/2yrs.nopapers. $90. 284-5332. 1992 Dodge Shadow, 4dr, pa, pb, pm, p1, ac, tilt, w/ 1985 Chevrolet Sprint hatchback, ac, arn/fon/cass, Sanyo Betamax with alot of movies. $160. 287warranty, exc cond, $10,500/obo. 282-3794. great mileage, not dty pd. $3250/obo. 287-5680. 4235. 3 female German shepherds, 7 wks, dewormed. $40. 224-5355. 1993 Nissan Maxima, paid 27,500dty pd, guarantee, 1983 Datsun 280 Zx, ac, ps, pb, at, t-tops, duty pd. Line printer, Genicam 4410, new. $575. 264-8147. loaded, ac, 6 cyl, 4dr. $25,000. 282-5494. $4000. 224-4190. Paso fino horse, white, male, 5 yrs, name is Taure. Video camera, 8mm,Sony cd-v8afzoom,auto,bater$1800. 229-2660. 1989 Chevy Beretta GT, ps, pb, cruise, am/fm/cass, 1991 Ford Ranger V6 3.0, std,5-spd, am/fm/cass, ac, iea, all access, hard case, manuals. $450. 226-5597. 5-spd, good rood. $9000/obo. 261-8103. camper shell, duty not pd. $10,000. 239-3848. Male & female guppies, $1. ea. 286-4286. Samsung tv 21", color likenew. $195/obo 252-6845. 1986 Chevy Celebrity Eurosport, am/fm, ac,notduty 1985Audi 5000s, fuel injection,4dr,5-spd, ac, sr,ps, Thoroughbred mare, 3 1/2 yrs, $400/obo. 269-7674. pd, exc cond. pw, pb, am/fm/cass, U.S. spec, $10000. 264-2599.Port radio/cass w/removable speakers. $25. 252after 6 pm. 6831. 1985 Pontiac T1000, must see. $ 1500. 284-5375. 1984 Dodge Omni, 4dr, 5-spd, ac. $1500/obo. 287Female german shepherd C.C.P. registered, 2 1/2 yr, 3888. Word processing typewriter. $150. 286-3325. good w/kids. $250/obo. 285-5827. 1991 Toyota 4x4 pu, 26,000 mi, ps, pb, bed liner. $11,000. 284-3445. 1986 Nissan 300 ZX, ps, pw, ac, t-top, 5-spd, exc Zenith, easy PC computerwacceasincluding oringinal Doberman male puppy, 10 wks., dewormed, tail rood, not duty paid. $7500.260-2392. owners manuals, exe cond. $400.284-3438. docked, shots $150. 255-4651. 1979 Mercury Marquis, exe cond, ac, $2500. 2236908. 1975 T-bird, pw, pl, ps, $1550/obo. 261-8405. Color tv 25" Philco console, good cond, works great. Frenchpoodlespuppies,l 1/2mos., dewormed,tails $250/obo. 286-3420. cut, $125. 226-0640. 1984 Chrysler New Yorker, 4 cyl, ac, power, runs 1989 Mazda pu, 5-spd, exccond. $8500. 284-5306. good, 66,000 mi, $2800. 224-2597. VCR Sony 8mm digital EV-S700, for video & audioPeek-a-poo wanted for stud service. 286-4489. 1986OldsmobileCoupe,power, exc cond,new tires. manual. $450. 226-5597. after 9pm. 1984 Chrysler New Yorker, auto, ac, extras, low $3950. 287-5025. Good home needed for, 4 yr old, med mixed breed mileage, good cond, not duty pd. $3500. 252-2130. Commodore 64 pc, 4 disk drives, color printer, softhound, w/crate, all access. 282-3286. 1984 Plymouth Horizon, 4dr, sc, am/fm/cass, xc ware, xtra. $325/obo. 287-4633 ask for Tony. 1988 Chrysler, LeBron,4cyl,2dr,29000mi,dtypd, cond. $3500/obo. 236-0982. after 5pm. Yellow head parrot, speaks spanish, $75; w/cage & pl, good cond. $8500. 264-2342. Zenith Monochome monitor, Commodore Matrix perch, $100. 286-3823. printer,modem, table, software. 223-3121. 1979 Lincoln Continental, 1 owner, dtypd,exccond. German shepherd puppies. $150. 236-3887. $3500. 286-4273. CPU w/5 1/4 floppy disk & 40 meg hard drive $150; Bilingual maid, great w/children, refs. 287-4487. gate 40 meg harddrive. $20. 284-5789. To goodhome,female6mos,mixed lab/7.284-4722. 1985 Honda Civic, dty pd, 5-spd, ac, am/fm/cass, alarm, good cond. $4500. 252-5829. Reliable honest maid, live in/out, english spk only, Brother word processor, w/crt display, 3 1/2 disk Nativecolts,fdlies,mares,horses,ponies, $125.-275. references. 224-8697. .drive, spell check. $300/obo. 226-7479. 225-4749. 1986 Chevy Spectrum, 5-spd, am/fm/cass, ac, 30 mpg. $3500. 284-3215. Bilingual maid/female housekeeper, dependable, Tandy 000SLdoaldisk,IBMrompatwithMsgnavox Colliepuppies. 261-3325. hardworking, greatw/children,refs,M-F.267-9289. color monitor, VCR capable. $550. 289-3437. 1988 Chevy Camaro, V-8, at, t-tops, ac, ps, pb, pw/l, AKC registered female chinese pug, 2 yrs, good w/ tilt, cruise, am/fm/cass. $6000/obo. 284-3640. Mature maid avail. Mon. & Fri., cleans, babysits, SansuireceiverPioneertimer, cd, equal, cass; HPM'schildren, $250.286-6138. after 5 pm. laundry, very good w/children, ref. 284-5720. 1100 spkra, $1200. 282-4546. 1985 Chevy Cavalier, type 10, ac, ps, 2dr. $3500. Free 3 yr. tigertabby cat, spayed, allshots, declawed, 282-3694. Maturelive-outmaid, exp, grtw/children,pets. M-F, Sony mini-hifi steteo-cd, cassette, am/fm radio, access. 287-6795. refs. 287-6381. memory, alarm, remote control. $550. 286-4520. 1985 Volvo 240 GL sta wgn. $5000. 286-3385. Free gray, female cat, spayed. 287-4486. English spk, housekeeper, live out, good w/children. 386 IBM romp. 4mb ram, 128mb hd, Windows 3.1, 1992 Tahoe S-10, exc cond, luxxus bed cover, 4.31, 221-6897. Dos 6.0, color mon, printer. 81000/obo. 230-0192. M/Ig Parrot cage. see at 412 A Clayton, cheap. V-6, 5-spd. $9959. 284-3977. Eng spk maid, live in/out, dependable, honest, w/ Sansui 9090 DB receiver, 120 watts, inany arceaso1991 Dodge Shadow, 4dr, auto, am/fm, 25,000 mi. refs. 220-3923. ries. $165. 286-6333. $7500. 285-5516. Eng spk, live out maid, refs, M-F,offpost.221-5285. 60 watts Sun amp, w/base guitar. $500. 282-3694. 1985 Jeep Scrambler,4 cyl, exc cond, dty pd. $5900. 1984 Dodge Charger, std, ac, xc rood, no dty pd, 228-4061. $3500. 287-6777. Mature, honest, reliable, day maid maid avail now, Laser 386sx, VGA mon, 5 1/4 & 3 1/2 drives, turbo refs. 262-0284/228-7995. & reset, books, software, $1300/obo. 287-5290. 1985 Chevy Impala, dty pd, diesel, ac, rebuilt, exc 1989 Dodge Shadow ES, turbo, ac, ps, pb, 4dr, am/ cond. $3800.228-4061. fm/cas. $6500. 284-4430. Span spk, live in maid, honest, reliable, great w/ CommodoreHD4o,3 drives,keyboard, VGA,mouse, children.286-6132. and Star NX-1000 color printer, $650.284-4298. 1987 Nissan p/u, 4dr, deisel, ac, am/fm/cass, tax pd. 1972 Pontiac Ventura. $1000/obo. 287-3923. $6500/obo. 252-6845. Bilingual, honest, day maid, Fort Davis/Espinar, Atari w/25 games $50; Commodom 64 disk drive w/ 1986 Renanlt Alliance, 4dr, ps, at, am/fm/cans, ac, Wed, Thurs. 241-8112. games $60; headboard $45. 286-3530. 1981 Honda Prelude,sr, 5-spd,am/fm/cass,will trade good paint, runs good. $1800.269-8991. for Chevy or Ford p/u, $2500. 285-5102. 8-3 m-f. Little Tyke treehouse, toys,baby clothes. 284-3396. Canon F-I w/6 lenses, flash, filters, carrying case. 1976 Ford Gran Torino, 4dr, R1 6, $500. 282-4489. $850/obo. 284-4634. 1982 Mazda 626, 5-spd, 4dr, ac, am/fm/cass, power, Exc day maid, Mon, Tues, & Thurs, hardworking, exc cond, $3000.286-4884. 1988 Mercury Topaz, U.S. specs at, sc, 2dr hatchhonest, great w/kids. 285-4878. Notebook computer,$995; personal informationmanback. 85500. 286-4187. ager software, $45. 286-3444. 1988 Dodge Daytona, ac, am/fm/cass, sunroof, at, exc Reliable, honest, english spk, live in maid, great w/ rond. $6000/obo. 284-3671. 1985ChevyCamam,specialgroundeffects,rd,alarm, kids, refs, 287-5333. Amiga 500 w/color man, 1 mg mem, mouse, video ac, more, $5300/obo. 286-4189. adapter. $300. 286-6327. 1990 Toyota Extra-cab, ac, pb, ps, loaded, w/extras. Reliable, honest, english spk, live in, housekeeper, $13,599. 284-3738. 1982 Subarm 1800 GL Coupe, runs great, duty pd, great w/kids. 287-6348. Star NX 1020 color printer. $175.286-4828. U.S. $3000. 282-3690. 1987 Nissan Sentra, 5-spd, 2dr, ac. $3500. duty pd. University studentseeksfull tine,day timedomestic, Aiwa WX220 double cassette deck. $125; Sansui 287-6948. 1986 Porsche 944, 5-spd, ac, pw, am/fm/cas, duty services position. 260-3258. cassette deck w/equalizer $150. 282-5586. pd, cxc cond. 252-6636. Tachometer, 7k. rpm, stewart warer, $25.252-6831. Bilingual live in maid, great w/children, good houseSharp video Camcorder, 8-1 zoom, auto focus, much 1979FordMustang,302V8,ps,pb,am/fm/cass,runs keeper, would like Espinar/Davis area. 289-4534. more. $550. 286-6182. 1993 DaewodEtperoaralarmpoweram/fm/cass, good. $1700/oba. 287-6881 after 5pm. tinted windows.$10500.230-1881. Live in/out, reliable,housekeeper, good w/kids. 267Atari 800,130XE computers, $400; Panasonic 1624 1973 Chevy Impala, noew/paint, brakes, tires, ban, 1871. printer, $325; JVC 20" color tv, $285. 252-5829. 1984 Datsun 300ZX, ps, pb, pw, ac, t-tops, $4500/ starter, water pump, valve job, $1500. 287-3879. obo. 260-3472. Bilingual housekeeper, very dependable, hard workSuper NES and Game Boy games, prices negotiable. 1991 Chevy S-10 Blazer4x4,tahoepkg, 2dr, loaded, ing, great w/chlidren, refs, M-F. 287-3495. 286-4596. 1983 Honda Accord, dty pd, ac, std, 5-spd, 2dr. 22,000 mi, red, exc rood. $14,000. 286-3574. $3500. 260-3472. Eng spk maid, loyal, dependable, mature, live in/out, 1987 Hyundai Excel, 4dr, 4-spd, am/fm, ac. $3700/ exc refs. 224-8697. i d 1986 Ford Ranger pu, V-6, not dty pd, automatic, obo.283-3628. $4500. 260-3472. Bracelet in parking lot, Bldg 861 Albrook, in April. 1988 Mitsubishi Lancer, 4dr, at, ac, pa. pw/locks, .252-6934. 1988 Ford Escort, dty pd, ac, std, 5-spd, 2dr hatchcass, alarm. $5500/obo. 252-2998. back. $4500. 260-3472. Johnson motor 225 HP, 1985, $3500. 232-5979. Black catw/yellow eyes in Curundu military housing. 1984 Cadillac Cimarron, $5900. 286-3444. claim at Corozal Vet clinic. 285-5866. 1980 Ford LTD-station wgn, $1200/obo. 284-5676. 24, Cuddy cabin, Volvo Pentra, dual prop, 270 HP 1981 Oldsmobile, ps, pb, pw, automatic, duty pd. engine, reefer, $ 15000/obo. 252-6124. after 6pm. Gold class ring 1967 Mount Olive High School, on 1985 VW-Scimcro,std, ac, pb, ps. $4300.260-3472. $2500/obo. 284-3475. Fort Kobbe. 287-6492. 24ft, Seaport Cuddy cabin, rebuilt 350 engine, 280 1987 Volvo, 240 dl, 4dr, 5-spd, ac, exc cond. $7500. 1984 Bronco B, 4x4, $4500; 1982 Nissan Maxima, Volvo Pentra outdrive.285-5486. 226-6341. diesel, loaded, $3000/obo, avail Aug 15.284-5478. 15 HP, Evinrude outboard motor, runs great, short 1988 Buick Electra Park Ave., 4dr, V-6, 34.000 mi., 1988 Fiat pu, good cond, low mil, duty pd. $2800. leg. $500. 252-2243. Waterbed q sz; antique q sz bed; 2 wall units; bikes; fully loaded, leather interior. $9000/obo. 261-7398. 252-5096. adult/children clothing. 287-5773. 18"Galaxybaat,ski equipmentincluded.$7500/obo. 1987 Mazda 323, 5-spd, Sc, $4200. 286-4622. Army Jeep, M151A 1, w/lots of spare parts. $2400/ 284-3155/260-7669. Dining tables; q sz br set, TV, VCR, microwave, nba. 252-5036. stereo, 1982Mazda, recliner,bar w/stoola.236-2237. 1981 Buick, Regal Limited, runs great, good cond, ClymerMerucry, outboard,shopmanual,45-225 HP $2500/obo. 287-3642. after 6pan. 1987 Mustang GT, ps, pb, ac, am/fm/casa, w/eq, low 1972-1989. $15. 287-6820. Daybed set w/ two mattresses. $500. 221-3958. mileage, alarm, cxc rood. 89000. 287-6437. 1986 Nissan, Pulsar NX, runs great, good conond14"alumJonBoat,trailor,25HPYamahamoter,elec Whirlpool as, 10,000, 16,000, 18,000; Honda $3000/obo. 287-3642. after 6pm. 1987 Mazda 626, loaded. $5000/obo. 226-7679. troll motor, extras. exc cond, $2000/obo. 284-5478. Civic tire and rim. 252-6246. 1986 Ford Taurus Wagon,w/new enginelooks good, Ford 302 engine for rebuild and misc parts. 28616ft ski/fish boat, 60 HP Jobhnson trailer, life vests, Freezer. $775. Gemeinhardt Flute $200. 224runs great. $5500/obo. 287-3424. 4004. anchor, new bat. & more. $3000. 230-1117. 7671.

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t ~1assifiedTropic Times U Classified Ads Aug 6, 1993B1l Cabinet for TV, VCR and video tapes. $75. 2522 ceiling fans, new w/all fittings. $40 ea. 282-5586. Women's 14K engagement/wedding set, sz 6, $400. Your photo on mug, $10, orders in 2-3 wks. 2876831. Call 283-6356 before 4pm and ask for Paula. 4799. GE refrigertor, $450/obo. 284-5589. Ski, exercise mach w/ computer. $125. 252-6831. Headlight covers for Dataun 2802X, $50. 224-4190. Quality child care $1 per hour, anytime. 284Leather furn set,4 pc, $800; air compresser, $1,600, 3049. Carpets from 3X5 to 9X12, curtains, motorcycle gas powered. 256-6410. Carpets, 12X15, 9X10; end table, $10; lamp, $20; loading ramp, cassette recorder. bo. 284-3738. clothes; curtains; bookshelf. 284-4722. VCR head cleaning, minor repairs. 283-3473. Leather recliner, needs reupholstering, $50. 287Dining rm. table w/six chairs, new, $1,300. 2306127. 14K engagemeit/wedding set, sz.7,$400 woman's Privatenurse,experiencerefs,spanish-speaking,care 1881. blacklhillsgold diamond,sz.7.283-4305before4pm. for sick/elderly during days Sam-4pm. 226-6242. Freezer, $775. 224-7671. New Kennore ac 5000 BTU. $250; green sewing Babyclothes,childrensclothes,carpets,offeemakers. Repair furniture, reference. 221-3467. material, 12 yds. $30. 286-3643. Litton microwave, $75. 287-6820. 283-3628. Mature, bilinqual, certified homecare nurse for eldUpright Whirlpool freezer. 18.5 cu. ft. almost new. Hot water heater, 50 gal, $100; exercise equip, $175; GE frig,$500; dryer, $250; exercise bike, $80; video early. 282-3126. $750. 224-6826. child's bed frame, $25. 289-3430. camera w/ case, $500. 286-6138 after 5 pm. 3 yrs exp bartender will serve at yournextparty, also Screen in patiofortropic housing, musthelp remove. Matching cover and love seat. $450/obo. 284-3781 have waitress. Call Lslie. 287-5726. $50. 286-4286. GE frig, $500; dryer, $250; exercise bike, $80; video Canal transit and day charter on private yacht. Call Whirlpool frig w/ ice maker, $200. 236-0984. camera w/case, $500. 286-6138. after 5pm. 1985 Yamaha V-Max, 1200 CC, 5800 miles, 2 hel252-5428 (Jim). mets, cover, shaft drive, $4,300. 286-3574. Rattan dining table w/six chairs, $680. 225-2197. BR set 5 piece, $450; dining tbl/4 chairs, $550. 284Is your parrot a male or female? 287-3087 for test4430. 1982 Kawasaki GP2550, new chain, sprockets, raEliing. 13" colortv, $150; hide-a-bed,$180; double cassette able, $1,500/obo. 286-6277. player, $75; dresser, $80. 264-9131. -Seamstress for clothes, curtains, mola dresses, etc. Mrs. Elsa. 267-3293. Couch, $300; glass table top $50/obo 230-1412. 16" chain w/ name Vicky on it. Lost in PX or Spanish speaking trainer for bodybuilding or power Q sz. bed w/ frame, box spring and mattress, $350. commissary. 287-6692. Qrts 554A Clayton Sat7 a.m.-?, kid's toys. avail. week days or weekends. Call Ted at 267-3382. 286-4520. Qtrs 335B Albrook furn, adult/kids clothes. Child care by a certified family child care provider, in DR tbl, 4 chrs, $450 obo. 287-5339. providers home on Espinar, $1.50/hr. 289-4518. Qtrs 7274A Cardenas. Sat. Q sz. box spring,matt, frame,2sheet sets, $200obo. Stroller, $20; high chair, $25; toys. 283-4227. Piano lessons on Howard side of bridge. 287-5290. F size comforter. $25. 287-3678. Qtrs7276B Cardenas Sat7-11 am. Clothes,Nintando Power Wheels Jeep, boys 12"bike,vac,carrier, Johngames, misc. items. Photographer, in home, family portraits, babies, by Whirlpool 10,000 bt ac, $280; compact home ny Jump Up, lawnmower. 287-4727. Neicy. 286-4798. security system, $45. 287-5939. Qtrs 1109B Clayton Sat 8am. Baby swing,carrier,bouncerswing,teddy bearmobil, X-servicememberclean qtrs/apt,anytime,reasonable Washer, runs good,has leak in hose. $50. 283-4227. monitor, indoor BBQ grill. 287-6422. Qtrs 406A Clayton Sat. rate. 221-3467. Upright frezer, 16 cu ft, $800/obo; china cabinet, Parts for 1987 Escort: transmission, rack and pinion Qtrs 683CClayton Sat7 am. kid's clothes,toys, furn. $2000/obo. 284-4183. steering. 228-4061. Qtrs 861B Clayton. Sat. DR table w/extensions, 4 chairs. $300. 282-3286. D bed w/frsme, $170; 4 chairs, $100. 287-4855. Little Mermaid tape. 287-6392 after 5 pm. Qtra 647A Clayton. Sat 8am-12, multi-family. DR set w/4 chairs; nt. center, wicker hamper and Doghouse, $ 10/obo; maternity clothes. 287-3871. 4X4 used Jeep. Make offer. 282-3779. trash can. 287-3689. Cocoli Trailer 12, Sat, 8am, furniture, misc. Wedding dress w/ veil/ slip, sz 5, $200. 252-2080. Reliable, honest, bilingual, live-in maid, exc. w/kids. Glass coffee and end tables; south western items; Qtrs 2312 Curundu, Sat, 7am-noon, clothes, toys, M-Sat., 4 and 1 yr olds, refs, $120. 287-5333. wicker shelf; bathroom set. 287-3689. Beta tapes, over 50 original films, $200. 252-5604. bike, etc. Individualto transfer8mmmoviesto videotape. 286Carpets incl padding, 12X15, $175; 9X12, $100. 302 V-8 Ford motor overhaul kit, $450. 229-2660. Qtrs 429B Howard, Fri and Sat, 8am-noon. 3245. 282-4320. Video camera,Thomas organ, couch,vanity, clothes, Qtrs 557B Howard, Sat, 8am-noon. MaleGermanShepherdofHuskypuppy. Reasonable Carpets incl padding, 6X9, $45; 6X9, $45. 282toys. 287-5378. price. 287-4219. 4320. Qtrs 636B Howard, Sat, 7-11am. Set of 4 rims, factory, fit most Ford/Mercury, $35/ Lapso Apso puppy, reasonable price. 284-3396. Dehumidifier, used 6 mos, $125. 287-6820. $120 set. 285-4199. Qtrs 1541A Howard, Sat, 7am-noon, no early birds. Toys, scooters, clothes, etc. Eng spk, honest, mature, live-out maid, for 2 small Kenmore washer and dryer, heavy duty large capacGolf clubset, 1,3,5 wood (metal),3-9irons, putter and children, house cleaning. 285-41927 am-S pm M-F. ity, set only, $650. 287-6820. bag, $100. 282-3694. Qtrs 1537D Howard,Sat, 8am-1lam.,no early birds. Honestlive-ion maid, cook, clean, iron. Take care of Kg. sz semi-waveless waterbed ,hb/shelf, $500/obo. Computer desk w/ printer stand, $70. 284-3438. Qtrs 144B Howard, Sat 7am-a10m. 4-mo. baby. $140. Needs references. 252-2077 Sat/Sun anytime. M-F after 3pm. 284-4971. S stitches/auto buttonholder, $200/neg. 284-4278. Bronco or Blazer (77-85), good cond. 286-3474. Coffee table, exc. cond. $65. 289-3437. Teacsinglecassetteplayer,VHFmarineradio,smoker, Honest, dependable,hard working live-outmaid. 230Supersinglewaterbed,mattress,liner,heater,sheet,6 hydraulic jack, more. 230-1117. Spanish language classes $10/hour. Call Marci at 1927. drawers underneath. $350. 287-3272. 223-2164 or 233-1676. Radio control equip., 100 amp service box. 284Housekeeper, live-in, good w/children, experienced, 24,000 Fedders ac. $375; 18,000 Whirlpool ac. 5789. Appts available for pernis, haircuts, colors. Call Deb hardworking, cook M-S, $140. 252-5036. $350; 10,000 Whirlpool AC, $225. 252-2287. Radke at 287-5551. Complete windsurfing package, O'Brien board, Neil Trailer forjohnboat. 286-3474. Dining table w/ four chairs. $375. 286-4596. Pryde sail, Quiver bag, $450. 284-3445. Decoratedcakesforanyoccasion. Callformoreinfo. and prices. Ask for Julie. 287-6725. Jogging stroller, reasonable in good cond. 286Dresser w/ mirror, chest, headboard. 287-4284. Stinger water skis, size 6-8, unused. Paid $650 new, 6277. $450/obo. 230-1926. Wrecker and tow services provided in the Canal ares Sofa, $375; end table,video rocker chair. 287-4270. 24 hrs by Heg. 228-4061. Spanish spk live-in maid, 35 yr or older, must have 90 leaf baseball cards and rookie basketball Fleer references. 236-3770. Four patio chairs w/ 3 side tables. $180. 269-2972. cards. Call Ken. 223-0217. Heather's decorated cakes, cakes for all occasions. 286-3325. Single bed, rattan furn. suitable for patio area, someWhirlpool freezer, 15.2 cu ft, $400. 252-2586. Woman's Free Spirit bicycle 26", $75. 287-6820. one to clean/polish tile floors. Call 236-3770. House and pet sitter. References avail. 2614561. Kenmore washer/dryer. $550. 260-5607. Raleigh mens 27" bike, $100. 287-6820. 2-GlasspacktypemufflersforJenpdualexhaust. 286Freshjumbo shrimpdeliveratyourhome; maids from 4004. Qsz sofa/sleeper, $400; recliner, $300; 9X12rug Vivitar V 2000 35mm Camera w/flash and case, interior,hardworkers,policerecords/ref. 252-2780. w/ pad; Sony tv w/remote, $125. 284-4283. manual, good cond, $250. 223-5597. Varsity cheerleading coach, aerobics/dance knowlSeamstress,comm.patternsormakesherown. Natalia edge preferred. Ask for Devon. 282-4688. GE 8,000 btu ac, new, $425. 252-2998. Flex Force workout machine/ VKR and free action or Maria. 224-1091. stepper, $200. 226-7479 after 1900. Curio cabinet, any cond, reasonably priced. 224Q-sz bedroom set, $750; Whirlpool 8,000 bhu ac, Seamstress. Call Kim at 287-5783. 3632. $325; 2 carpets, $50, $75. 286-3530. Porcelainvase, $225; antique tools; garbagedisposer $195; Time-Life cookbook set, $60. 252-2042. Berklinerecliner, $200/obo. 2864197. Desk,ponabledishwasher,electricorgan,baby coach, Side-by-siderefrigerator/freezerw/ icemaker, 2.1 cu computer desk w/hutch, pearl necklace. 286-4489. TrOpiC Ad ft, $625. 256-6381. 1 y o i T me AdF r 2 endtables, $50; upright vacuum, $40; CD Various VHS vides, $3 ea. 286-6333. pyr $100; Commodore 16 computer, $100. 287-3835. 19" color tv, $150; 19" b/w tv, $100; 30 gal. AUTOMOBILES aquarium w/ stand, access, $200. 287-3272. AVAILABLE Maids quarters ac, $100; tropical housing blue BOATS & CAMPERS curtains $15/obo; port. dishwasher. 284-4283. Kitchen sinks, $15 ea. 252-2287. ELECTRONICS PRICE HOME PHONE FOUND 25" color tv, $200; loveseat/chair set, $250; dresser Exercise slant board $10. Slalom waterski $25. See HOUSEHOLD Check only one category per ad form. Only two ads per person each w/ mirror, $200; beer can collection. 252-2077. at 2350A Balboa. 252-2760. LOST week are allowed. Each ad form is limited to 15 words. Please type or MISCELLANEOUS print neatly. Information listed below is not included in the ad, but is Recliner, nightstand, curtains, 6X9, 4X6 carpets, Daybed frame,rollerskates, toys,clothes. 284-4634. MOTORCYCLES required for publication. This information will not be released to third cabinet w/drawer, girls bike. 286-6176. PATIO SALES parties. Deadline for the receipt of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for Friday's Encyclopedia Brittanica/ Great books, $950. 285WANTED edition. Ads may be mailed to theTropic Times, Unit 0936, APO AA Side-by-side refrigerator/freezer, 19 cu ft ice maker, 4734. 34002 or deposited in a drop box at the Albrook Post Office. Advertisers $50/obo. 286-6182. should allow seven to 14 days for processing. Ads sent by FAX will not 1992 Mitsubishi Lancer rims sz 13, $30 ea. 252bern. Sofa and chair, good cond. $400. 284-5820. 2086. SPONSOR'S NAME RANK/GRADE Carpet 11X12, $50; 2endtables,$60; coffeetable, AC8000btu,$250; 16" lt. truck tires, $50; wedding/ ORG. DUTY PHONE $50. 284-5937. night/maternity dresses, sizes 5/6. 252-2042.

PAGE 28

B 'Tropic Times B '~Aug. 6, 1993 SlerC i BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker ACROSS 53 Scarlett's 96 Wine's Johnson Bay of 80 More ready YOU &OTTA AnMIT THE GENERAL GEE, I PIPWN'T KNOW THEY i Jason's ship home companion 2 Check or 8isca for harvest TRIES TO OE WITH IT HE JUST MAVE THEM WITII TRAIM NG1 5 Fished for 55 German river 97 Mummy's restrain 41 Broa ay's 83 Operates OUGHT A PAIR OF ROLLERFLAPEfS WHEEL' lampreys 56 Brazian bird tomb 3 Before and Jerome 85 Ending for 10 Clerical 67 Events protector? after Barry 42 Perfume sap or duck vestment 59 Pays the bill 98 One of 4 Russian river measure 88 Anagram of 15 Not closed 61 Black bird greater rank 5 Classroom 44 Actor George rice 19 Give off 62 Gives In 100 Shooting adjunct 45 Country 91 Twofold steam return from ambush 6 Atelier fixture south of 93 '.the 20 Bump the 64 Consumer 102 St. George, 7 Mona -Turkey Hotspur of t, in poker advocate to the dragon 8 Canton 47 Hawaiian the21 ormer Thal 66 'Gone With 103 Farm units follower garlands (Shakes.) coin the Wind' 105 Cattle 9 Deduces or 49 Assam 95 Long 22 Feel ng locale roundup Infers silkworm harangues resentment 68 Meal or cake 106 Region or 10 Ministers to 52 Signify 96 Shelves or a HAGAR the Horrible By Dik Browne 23 Before and starter sphere 11 Russian 54 Fascinate or screen, after LouIse 68 --tac-toe 107 Arnpersand community enchant sometimes 25 Before and 70 Urban music 109 Govt. agents 12 Summer 57 Business 97 -Bow; the 0, tb NEA2 YB;, T. i-4 R2 /O / CA' Il* & OF after Howard style 111 Luzon desserts transactions Mit' girl AN;Zf4N TWO N #$A M t'y WI-1AT YOU AY 27 Compass 71 Ladybugs, Negrito 13 Wine cellars, 58 Gratified 9 Etimrnate TOLlpls M TArl r/M9 T y Vr4 AMOMBON direction for instance 112 Worker's In France completely 101 A concealed T15 (lT C Ag2q 'T-iB''/ ? C-l't (-28 Confused 75 Have fools 14 Funeral 59 Appear at danger 29 like -' scruples 113 Balaam's Orations Intervals 102 U.S. Navy 31 Western fily 77 Black stead 15 Inquire 60 Special point construction 32 Leowo leopard 116 Before and 16 Before and of view man comedy 91 -the King's after Leslie after Louis 63 Polka 104 Stitched 33'Emma' or Men' 119 Before and 17 Code or rug follower 106 French -Germinar 82 Disturbed the after Martin 18 Depend 65 Not clear and Income 35 Happening nocturnal 122 Singing and 24 Island city in distinct 107 Noted Greek 37 Treaty org. quiet dancing girl Quebec 67 Quick to warrior 32 Sour ale 04 Isolated plant 123 SC me of Ih a 26 Hal of oearn 10841 Worked the or animal crime Hollywood 71 Semipreconlendere 43 Scouts 6 lcal lion 124 Typewritor 3Large cous stone 1 Aqulitone Barney Google and Snuffy Smith Q By Fred Lasswell thoroughly 87 Stringed 125 irstrate parrot detection 114 Capital of 46 Sauna need instrument 126 Kaffir 34 Curved 73 Before and Yemen 47 Time or love 89 Stick or beat language moldirg after John 115 Small PAW !! THPE i H E W ANTS " GET T follower starter 127 Dutch 35 Annapolis 74 Rail bird merganser uFLATLAND T'CrISTER BUY $OME UT OF 48 Dried up 90 Pub order cheeses graduate 75 Require 117 Teacher's 'oU IN 'F O' BA')KRSOrN 5Shake aslog 91 Very small 12: Rajah's wife 36 Wobble 76 Complain ir.BGHO U 51 'The Last -quantity 129 Wear away. 38 Constant 77 Cone bearer 118 Bar offering y "1 Saw Paris' 92 Decorate bit by bit 39 Essence of 78 Before and 120 Highest note 52 Around: 94 Med. school DOWN roses after James of the gamut prefix subj. I ComedIan 40 River to the 79 Worn away 121 Fall beQnd 2 4 5 6 7 O l 11 12 3 4 15 16 17 18 19 2o E ll 22 24H2 26 6M7amfs 29 30 31 32 THE ADVENTURES OF FLASH GORDON 3 COME 8CK v~~E 3 4 9 041 42 1 44 4S 46 47 46 49 -o 52 5354 55 959 60 4 9 63 64 65 617 6869 0 61 727 4 /7 77 9s ATK~ r meN L7 83-8-DA5 9 4 0 9 101 102 TO14 15 106 1 1 1 10 1112 li 1 170MANY KOV' COME 12 117I1, I1 P1912112 223 3124 [ N V S 1 GENR by DICK 0OHAN V 0 N V -C O 4 1 U 38 A H 0 9 VonT1'EE N M E ) III &OfD my 4MOP4 IT A O 3 3 i 3 V N ThYudi kee nhi j nk the hs so -I4 _T vIg MEN xet o n itl hn V i N I I V I U1d 3 V, S 8 ;1V N I b eas epelk SRFD yMK ALN I V 9 1 1 S 6 1 0 V kHpwth gi 0WN EBT-EEMs E TA ~TN N 0 slYou dd hau niejob on like hse Nd lyO O GH .1 C31 0 t T kERASCOHSeep tt n lit hi"


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