Citation
The tropic times

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Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text



Gift of the Panama Canal Museum


Vol. VI. No. 26


ropic Ti

Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Times


Friday, July 2, 1993


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~.t o ming
- .> d Soldiers from the 59th Engineer Compalpjump Irom a C-130.on their descent to the Deblios Coates drop zone behind Howard AFB during an airborne
exercise June 24. '


Air Force accepting 1994


force reduction applications
RANDOLPH AFB, TEXAS (Air Force News Ser- apply for separation or early retirement.
vice) - The Air Force began accepting applications The following rated officers, current and qualified,
Thursday for phase II of the fiscal 1994 Force Reduction are also excluded: F-15E pilots and weapon systems
Program. officers, B-lB offense/defense systems operators, F-4G
Phase II expands the eligibility criteria for officers pilots and electronic warfare officers and those in Air
and enlisted members, said Air Force Military Person- Force Spe Code 17XX, core and duty.
nel Center officials. Enlist embers eligible during phase I will remain
The initial phase of the voluntary separation incen- eligible g phase II.
tive and special separation benefit early retirement Phase II expands the eligibility to senior airmen,
programs yielded roughly half of the 1,000 officers and sergeants and staff sergeants with a total active federal
one-third of the 4,500 enlisted losses for fiscal 1994, military service date of Sept. 30, 1978, or earlier, and
officials said. technical and master sergeants with a TAFMSD of Sept.
Under phase II, officers and enlisted members who 30, 1976, and earlier unless in a specialty on the phase
were previously "eligible under phase I will remain I AFSC exclusion list (see story, this page).
eligible and may continue applying f6r separation be- People approved inphase I for the variable separation
tween Oct. 1 and Sept. 29, 1994, or retire between Oct. incentive or the special separation benefit may change
1 and Sept. 1, 1994. their selection to early retirement, or vice versa, before
For officers, phase II expands eligibility for early separation or retirement. Changes should be made 45
retirement to line majors with a date of rank of Feb. 1, days before the anticipated final out-processing date.
1990, to May 31,1993 (1979 and1980 promotion year Applications for separation or retirement will be
groups). People in these year groups do not have to be processed on a first-come, first-served basis. Personnel
deferred to apply. officials will continue to assess losses and determine
Officers in legal, chaplain and medical specialties whethertoclose orexpand the fiscal 1994 Force Reduc-
and those who were promoted below the zone may not tion Program.


Inspector General lauds the Direc-
torate of Engineering and
Housing's services.


Some specialties not

eligible for separation
RANDOLPH AFB, TEXAS (Air Force News
Service) - People in more than 100 Air Force
specialities are not eligible for the voluntary sepa-
ration incentive, special separation benefit or early
retirement under the fiscal 1994 Force Reduction
Program.
The Air Force began accepting applications
Thursday for phase I of the program, which has
now been expanded to include senior airmen, ser-
geants and staff sergeants with a total active federal
militaryservice date ofSept. 30,1978 orearlier, and
technical and master sergeants with a TAFMSD of
Sept. 30, 1976. .
However, people ii the following career fields
are not eligible;
-100X0 first sergeant.
-113XOB flight engineer specialist -helicopter.
-11 3XOC flight engineer C-130 and E-3 only,.
-11399 flight engineer.
-114XO loadmaster C-5 and C-130 only.
-115XO prarescue/recovery specialist.
-1 17XOX airborne warning command and con-
trol systems operator.
-118X0 airborne computer systems.

See separation, page 3




*Murder trial, page 4.
*General reprimanded, page 5.
*AF flag football final, page 11.


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...


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: * "*


-- . .


See special four-page 'Fourth of
July pullout in Tropictivities sec-
tion.











2 Tropic Times
July 2, 1993


New 'chillers'to help cool Air Force buildings


by SSgL Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - Things will be a
little cooler for the Air Force, thanks to an
air conditionerreplacementprogram get-
ting under way here and at Albiook AFS.
Some of the chillerss" now doing the
air conditioning are old and unreliable,
said Maj. Charles Manzione, chief of the
24th Civil Engineering Squadron's op-
erations flight.
"They were installed between 12 and
18 years ago, and they're just getting
worn out," he said.
When Air Combat Command Com-
mander Gen. John M. Loh found out
about the, problem he came up with
$500,000 to renovate orreplace the aging
equipment.
"With that money we ordered a dozen
new chillers -900 tons worth of equip-
ment - to improve service to our cus-
tomers," Manzione said.
ACC's Civil Engineering Technical
Support Office team will install the new
air conditioners in buildings 707, 708,
712, 714, 716, 717, and 238. After all
work is done on these facilities, 24th CE
members will replacethe air conditioners
and air handling units at Building 235 and
the Albrook Club. Other units will be
installed later at buildings 703 and 706 by
engineering contract.
"We got the chillers in almost a year
ago," Manzione said. "But as you may
imagine with a project this size, there
were a few glitches. Some of the auxil-
iary equipment didn't come in with the
chillers, and we had to order some pumps,
valves and piping to complete the sys-
tem."
This became a challenge for CE to
overcome.
"Often we can go into Panama City
and buy theitems we need locally, but not
in this case," said project engineer Or-
lando Calderon.
"Most of the air conditioning equip-
ment found downtown is for smaller of-
fices and private residences," he ex-
plained. "They just don't use big indus-
trial size chillers in the local businesses
here, so naturally the stores don't have
parts for them."
This meant CE would have to order
and ship almost all of the auxiliary equip-
ment from the United States.
"Going through normal channels, this
would have taken a lot of time and even
more money," Manzione said. "So, we
came up with an alternative."


U.S. Army photo by SSgL Rian Claton
SSgt. Richard Reed (left) and Miguel Nunez of the 24th Civil Engineering Squadron's Pavement and Equipment Shop
prepare a site for a concrete slab. Once poured and cured, the slab will support the new air conditioner to be installed
at Howard AFB's Building 238.


Working with the CE people at Lan-
gley AFB, Va.,24th Wing civil engineers
found sources for the auxiliary equip-
ment needed for the chillers. They coor-
dinated with Kentucky Air National
Guardsmen to bring the materials to
Panama on one of their regular rotations.
"Working with the guardsmen really
helped a lot - it was a real team effort,"
Manzione said. "They probably cut six
months to a year off the time it would
have taken to turn around this equip-
ment."
Guardsmen andreservists-and many
others-will benefit fromthequickturn-
around, because the new air conditioners
will be used to cool the Palm Tree Inn
where many are billeted, several dormi-
tories, work centers and the Trade Winds
Dining Facility.
"We've had problems with the chiller
for Building 707 and 708 for nearly two
years," Calderon said. "It would break


down, someone would call us, we'd go
out and scrounge some parts and fix it. A
few days later, it would happen again,
causing a lot of aggravation, for both us
and our customers."
The new chillers will not only be more
reliable, they'll be much more powerful
and efficient.
"The chillers tied to 707 and 708 will
be interconnected, as will those in 714
and 716,'l Manzione said. "This way, if
we have to take one chiller down, the
other can cool both buildings - the
chillers have that much reserve capac-
ity."
Half of Howard's industrial electric-
ity bill pays for cooling, the major said.
"The facilities that get these new,
more efficient chillers should be able to
trim their energy consumption by 10
percent," he noted.
Civil engineers have already poured
the cement slabs for the units and have


completed almost all the other prelimi-
nary work, Calderon said. CETSO mem-
bers are scheduled to arrive and begin
connecting the new air conditioners in
mid-July.
There will be another benefit of get-
ting the new units, Calderon added.
"Once they've finished, we'll canni-
balize usable parts from the old chillers
and combine them into two or three fully
functional units," he explained. "We'll
be able to install those wherever we may
need them, and we'll also have a lot of
spare parts on hand- we shouldn't have
to order any parts from the states for a
while."
"There will be about a week lag time
in each of the buildings when the old
chillers are disconnected and the new
ones are integrated," Manzione said.
"Temporarily, it may be a little uncom-
fortable, but I think people will agree, the
end results will be worth it."


Army moves own ammunition, saves $200,000


by Sgt. Lori Davis
USARSO Public Affairs Office
MINDI PIER - The Army kept $200,000 in the bank
while investing in innovative training for transportation
soldiers during a recent ammunition retrograde.
The Armyperforms ammunition retrogrades- send-
ing extraammunition backto the states- becauseofthe
ammunition buildup during Operation Just Cause and
the drawdown of U.S. forces in Panama, according to
193rd Support Battalion Operations OfficerCapt. Frank
Merritt.
The Army usually hires civilian contractorto move
the ammunition, but this time the cargo will be shipped
by military ocean-going vessels. A Landing Craft,
Utility 2000 will carry 21 militaryvans, and two smaller
LCU 1600s will carry five military vans each, he said.
Using LCUs has several benefits, he reported. The
ammunition movement will be an "opportunity lift,"
which is shipping cargo on a vessel scheduled to make
the trip empty. The LCUs were going back to the states
for maintenance.
"We tried to find a civilian contractor in Panama to
do cyclic maintenance forthe LCUs, but their bids were
too high. The vessels were on their way to the U.S. to get
bids from contractors in the states," Merritt said.


The unusual cargo also makes for some unusual
training for the transporters.
"This is also great training for the transportation
soldiers. They've never loaded an ammunition ship-
ment," he said.
Because the trip involved a variety of sensitive
materials, there were many safety regulations to meet.
"Usually the unit loads to vessel specifications, but
this time they are loading for cargo specifications,"
Merritt explained.
The crew had to know which military vans could be
loaded together and which ones needed to be spaced
apart or loaded onto separate vessels, said 1st Lt. Bleu
Hilburn, heavy boat platoon leader for the 1097th
Transportation Company.
"Highly explosive materials can't be shipped to-
gether, so items such as fuses and explosives were
separated and divided among the three vessels. The
LCU 2000 also has five empty milvans to store vessel
equipment during shipyard maintenance," he said.
Handling ammunition was unusual for the crew.
They primarily support task forces by transporting
heavy equipment and supplies, said SFC James Shuler,
first mate for the LCU 2018 U.S. Army Vessel Five
Forks.
"We are committed constantly, supporting


MEDRETEs (medical readiness training exercises) and
alot of the task force operations. This is the first time we
have handled this kind of cargo," he said.
Handling the cargo was a tricky procedure. The
military vans were lifted from the pier by cranes and
lowered to the deck where they were stacked two-deep.
Placing the cargo required steady hands and precision
teamwork, said SSgt. Barbara Conklin, boatswain for
the Five Forks.
"Loading this cargo was dangerous, but it was a lot
easierbecause we were supported by people in our own
unit. We have worked with the crane operators in the
past, so we are confident of their technical expertise. It
really helped us work because we know we are working
with good NCOs who are well trained," she said.
The crews were also helped by their own training.
There are no specialists on an LCU; everyone is a
generalists with training in several tasks. Because of this
cross-training, the crew communicates more easily and
fills in for each other to get the job done, Conklin
explained.
This job was a success in many ways, Merritt said.
The boat crews learned to load a new type of cargo, the
vessels performed an opportunity lift, the ammunitionis
getting back to the states and $200,000 stayed in the
bank.









Tropic Times
July 2, 1993



Inspector General lauds DEH services


COROZAL (USARSO PAO) - The Directorate of
Engineering and Housing's housing division recently
earned high ratings from the U.S. Army South Inspector
General's office, said housing officials.
The inspectors focused on off-post housing referral
services, on-post housing services and how long it took
to get quarters ready for new tenants, explained Dick
Davis, Housing Division chief.
"Systems are in place with only minor discrepan-
cies," said Lt. Col. Harold Barnett, IG team member.
"The goal of the Housing Division is to provide the
highest quality service to the soldiers, civilians and
family members as they make their home in Panama,"
Davis said. "It is great to have that service validated."
Inspectors found housing operations improved since
the division was last inspected in 1991, he added.
Ninety-two percent of the soldiers chosen at random
during the inspection were satisfied with HRO service,
Davis said.
Inspectors found only one mismatch when they
checked the accuracy of eligibility, assignment and
termination dates for on-post housing in the Atlantic and
Pacific communities, Davis said. That mismatch was



Separation
From page 1.
118X1 airborne command and control communications
equipment specialist, 118X2 airborne radar systems spe-
cialist, 11899 airborne command and control mission elec-
tronic systems specialist, 121XO survival training special-
ist, 201X0 intelligence operations specialist, 201X1 target
intelligence specialist, 20199 intelligence operations and
targeting, 202X0 signals intelligence analysis, 205X0 elec-
tronic intelligence operations specialist, 207X2 printer
systems operator, 20799 communications collection/sys-
tems, 208X2X Romance cryptologic linguist specialist,
208X4X Far East cryptologic linguist specialist, 208X5X
Mid East cryptologic linguist specialist, 20899 cryptologic
linguist, 209X0 defense C3CM specialist, 231X3 visual
information production-documentation specialist, 23199
visual information services superintendent, 242X0 disaster
preparedness specialist, 251XOX weather specialist, 272X0
air traffic control operator, 273X0 combat control operator,
274X0 command and control specialist, 276XOX aerospace
control and warning systems operator, 277X0 space sys-
tems operations specialist, 303X2 aircraftcontrol and warn-
ing radar technician, 303X3X auto tracking radar specialist,
30399 ground radar, 304X2 meteorological navigation,
304X4 ground radio specialist, 304X5 television systems
specialist, 30499 communications systems, 305X4 elec-
tronic computer and switching systems, 306X6 secure
communications systems maintenance, 309X0 space sys-
tems equipment maintenance specialist, 361X1 communi-
cations cable systems installation maintenance, 36199 an-
tenna and cable systems installation/maintenance, 362X1
telephone switching specialist, 451X4X tactical reconnais-
sance electronic sensors, 451X7 BI-B avionics test stations
and computer, 45199 avionics test stations, 452X1X F-15
avionics systems specialist, 452X2X F-16 avionics systems
specialist, 452X3X F/FB-111 avionics systems specialist,
45299 tactical aircraft, 454X4X aircraft pneudraulic sys-
tems, 45499 aircraft systems, 455XOX photo/sensors main-
tenance specialist, 455X3X weapon control systems spe-
cialist, 455X4 airborne warning and control radar, 455X5X
avionics support equipment specialist, 45599 conventional
avionics, A456X1 electronic warfare systems ("A" prefix
only), 457X1 helicopter maintenance, 457X3X Bl-B/B-2
avionics systems, 461X0 munitions systems specialist,
465X0 munitions operations specialist, 472X0 special pur-
pose vehicles and equipment mechanic, 472X4 vehicle
maintenance control and analysis, 47299 vehicle mainte-
nance, 491X2 communications/computer systems programs
specialist, 49199 communications/computer systems, 492X1
communications systems radio operator, 492X2 communi-
cations frequency management, 493X0 communications/
computer systems control specialist, 496X0 communica-
tions/computer systems program management specialist,
645X2 supply systems analysis specialist, 64599 supply
management, 651X0 contracting specialist, 674X0 finan-
cial analysis, 734XOB social actions (substance abuse SEI
475 only), 781X0 morale, welfare, recreation and services,
821X0 special investigations, 881X0 paralegal, 901X0
aeromedical specialist, 902X0 medical services specialist,
902X2X surgical services, 90299 medical services, 903X0
radiology specialist, 903X1 nuclear medicine, 90399 radi-
ology, 904X0 cardiopulmonary laboratory specialist, 905XO
pharmacy specialist, 906X0 health services management
support, 907X0 bioenvironmental engineering, 908X0 pub-
lic health specialist, 911XO aerospace physiology special-
ist, 912X5Xoptometry specialist, 91299optometry, 913X0
physical therapy specialist, 913X1 occupational therapy
specialist, 91399 biommedical, 914X medical health ser-
vices specialist, 915X0 medical materiel specialist. 918X0
biomedical equipment maintenance specialist, 919X0
orthotic specialist, 924X0 medical laboratory specialist,
924X1 histopathology specialist, 92499 medical labora-
tory, 925X0 cytotechnology specialist, 926X0 diet therapy
specialist, 981X0 dental assistant, 982X0 dental laboratory
specialist, 99103 interpreter/translator, -99104 systems
repair technician, 99105 scientific measurements techni-
cian, 99106 applied sciences technician.
More information is available from local military per-
sonnel flights by calling 284-5606.


corrected on the spot.
"The IG inspection foundno unauthorized personnel
living in quarters," he said. "It was also found that the
entitlements DoD (Department of Defense) personnel
receive were extremely accurate and families were able
to lease housing within their means."
Inspectors commended the Pacific HRO for its
support of the volunteer program. They commended the
Atlantic HRO for providing transportation to those
looking for off-post housing and for 100 percent accu-
racy in tracking quarters use, Davis added.
The final IG report did, however, express some
concern about instances of higher-ranking people pay-
ing higher prices for the same type rental property, he
said.
"Also, about 50 USARSO personnel per year have
problems getting their deposits back from the Panama-
nian Ministry of Housing or have landlords who require
assistance beyond the abilities of HRO or the Legal
Assistance Office," Davis said.
"Brig. Gen. George Crocker, USARSO commanding
general, is concerned about protecting soldiers from any
unfair business-practices," he added. "He has directed


his staff to research the feasibility of establishing tighter
rules for local rental businesses when dealing with
USARSO personnel."
Another concern was cutting down how long it takes
DEH to get quarters ready for new residents, Davis
added. The USARSO goal is 15 days between residents.
The Atlantic community engineers are meeting that goal
whilethe Pacific community engineers have been unable
to do it consistently.
'The DEH is taking measures to reduce the Pacific
time and expects immediate improvement with the start
up of a new comprehensive maintenance contract in
January 1994," Davis said.
"Ourgoalis to continue to improve the quality service
we offer our customers," said Lt. Col. John Lovo, DEH
director.
"We are happy with the improvements we've made
but are always striving to discover new and better ways
to make our customers happier.
"We want to eliminate any obstacles that may be
causing undue hardships on our military and civilian
communities and do our part to make Panama the best
place to live and work in the Army," Lovo said.


Equipment is staged in the marshalling area around the ship.


Port command marshall forces


to move Rushmore's equipment


PIER 9, CRISTOBAL (USARSO PAO-Atlantic) -
The 1322nd Medium Port Command recently pulled
together a variety of people and tools to send Task
Force Rushmore's equipment sailing home.
The unit used computer technology, Task Force
Rushmore soldiers and "borrowed" soldiers to get the
task force's equipment on board the U.S. Naval Ship
Algol aday early. The 1322nd is still widely known by
its former designation, the Military Traffic Manage-
ment Command, Panama.
"The good news story is Task Force Rushmore,"
said Lt Col. Scott Larrabee, 1322nd commander.
"The move they had to make from David was a
monumental move.
"The kinds of things we see in MTMC - Team
Spirit or REFORGER - don't rival it. They had a
good deal ofdeadlined equipment. Getting it all ready
- they did an outstanding job," he said.
One of the 1322nd's advantages was the use of Pier
9.
"Pier 9 is great port," Larrabee said. "Pier9 moves
about 6,000 containers a month supporting Panama
and the Free Zone. They blocked it and the marshal-
ling area off for us to use for this exercise."
"You couldn't bring this vessel into any other port
in Panama for this quick of loading. By having this
facility it also allowed us to get this vessel from
(Military) Sea Lift Command.
Once the 1322nd got use ofthe pier, MSgt. Ricardo
Alvarado, the noncommissioned officer in charge,
took over the job of staging the equipment.
"(He) had been instrumental in working with the
task force and personally staged the equipment in the


proper areas for quick and proper loading," he said.
Alvarado used a new computer system to help stage
the equipment. Each piece of equipment has a bar code
that tells the computer what the equipment is, its dimen-
sions and weight. These codes are loaded into a com-
puter that combines them with the ship's layout and
prints out a design showing where each piece of equip-
ment should go.
With Pier 9's facilities and computer planning,
MTMC was ableto load containers in one end ofthe ship,
deadline vehicles on the top and other vehicles in the
lower levels of the ship, Larrabee said.
Doing a lot of things at once - safely - is how the
MTMC soldiers work, Larrabee said.
"The key to good ship loading is to have simultaneous
things going on. The most important thing is safety. We
changed slings three times because they didn't meet the
standards. All you need is one slip up and it will hold up
the entire operation," he said.
At the same time MTMC was getting ready for the
Task Force Rushmore redeployment, the command was
in Guatemala doing a redeployment, Larrabee said.
Covering two operations prompted Larrabee to take
the unusual step of contacting his higher headquarters in
Bayonne, N.J. He was able to "borrow" people from New
Orleans to help.
The 1322nd used a lot of people and tools to load the
task force's equipment, but it could not have happened
if the task force had failed to get all its vehicles from
David to the pier, Larrabee said.
Automation helped with the loading, he noted, but
"nothing beats blood sweat and tears to make it work. It's
only as good as the people who use it."









4Tropic Times
July 2,1993


* Hemisphere


Former local official's murder trial begins Tuesday


SPANAMA CITY, Panama (AP) - Hugo Spadafora
had a most unusual career: he was a doctor, a rebel, a
fighter of rebels, a government official, a crusader
against government corruption.
His end was just as spectacular- a headless corpse
in a mail sack in the jungle.
After eight years, the trial of his accused killers,
including former Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega, is to
begin Tuesday. Noriega, serving a 40-year sentence in
the United States for drug trafficking, will be tried in
absentia.
The trial promises to resurrect some of the more
controversial moments of Panama's painful past.
Spadafora was an outspoken enemy of Noriega,
whom he accused of trafficking in weapons and drugs,
of planning a dictatorship and of plotting the death in a
plane crash of the populist dictator Gen. Omar Torrijos
in 1981.
He had been quoted as saying he hoped his next fight
would be against the Panamanian military.
Attempts to investigate Spadafora's 1985 death re-
sulted in the military, then headed by Noriega, forcing
the resignation that year of President Nicolas Ardito
Barletta.
Noriega took over the military and, in effect, the
government, in 1983. His seven-year regime led to a


strangling American trade embargo, international scorn
and eventually a humiliating American invasion in 1989
in which he was captured and brought to the United
States.
The trial over Spadafora's murder starts Tuesday in
the city of David in Chiriqui province near the Costa
Rican border.
Spadafora graduated from medical school in Italy in
1964 and was a volunteer doctor for rebels in indepen-
dence movements in Africa for the next two years.
Later, in Panama, he tended wounded rebels in the
urban fights that arose after the military kicked out
popular president Amulfo Arias in 1968.
The same military named him vice-minister of health
in the late 1970s, but in 1978 he organized the volunteer
Victoriano Lorenzo Brigadeto fight theleftist Sandinistas
inNicaragua's revolution that toppled dictatorAnastasio
Somoza a year later.
In 1985, he returned to Nicaragua to fight the
Sandinistas, who lost power in elections in 1990.
According to court papers, Spadafora, then 43, was
returning from Nicaragua by bus Sept. 13, 1985, cross-
ing into Panama from Costa Rica.
Witnesses said he was taken from the bus by Panama-
nian soldiers. His body was found the next day on the
Costa Rican side of the border.


Initially, 23 military men were accused, but only 10
will go on trial next month, facing the possibility of
Panama's maximum sentence, 20 years inprison, Carlos
Augusto Herrera, who is prosecuting the case, told The
Associated Press.
"For us the start of the trial signifies the last phase in
the long and painfulroad that began Sept. 13,1985, with
the vile and cowardly assassination of Hugo," said
Winston Spadafora, Hugo's brother, a lawyer who is
Noriega's formal accuser.
Noriega has asked both the United States and Panama
to return him to his homeland to take part in the trial but
predicted it would not happen because "the government
of President Guillermo Endara is afraid of the truth."
Noriegaclaims he was in France when Spadaforawas
killed.
Noriega refused to order an investigation despite
requests.
Winston Spadafora said when Barletta tried to form
such a commission the military ousted him two weeks
after the body was found. Barletta was one of a string of
Panamanian presidents who were installed and dumped
by Noriega.
After the invasion the Endara government appointed
commission to investigate the case and named a special
prosecutor to handle it.


~g~


Standing guard
A security guard for ousted Guatemalan President Jorge Serrano keeps watch outside the Torre La Cresta apartment
complex in Panama City. Serrano, who's in exile in Panama, moved from the Marriott Hotel into the apartment complex
about two weeks ago.



Crew-less, damaged tanker carrying


Fidel Castro

says Clinton

less hostile
HAVANA (Reuters) - Cuban
president Fidel Castro, in the clearest
indication yet of less tense relations
with theUnitedStates, has said Presi-
dent Bill Clinton shows less hostility
toward Cuba than previous U.S presi-
dents.
"This new administration does
not show the same level of hostility
and aggressiveness as its predeces-
sors," the Cuban leader told a ses-
sion of Cuba's National Assembly,
the nation's parliament Monday. His
remarks were reported by Cuba's
official media Prensa Latina and
Granma Tuesday.
However, Castro kept up his at-
tack on the U.S. trade embargo, again
Cuba saying nine out of 10 foreign
firms that want to do business with
Cuba are scared off by the embargo.
"Without the embargo, we cannot
even estimate how much we would
have advanced in many fields," he
said.
"If it weren't for the embargo,"
Castro said, "our country wouldn't
have as many.enterprises shut down
because of raw material shortages
and it would have made considerably
moreprogress in prospecting foroil."
The National Assembly devoted
most of its session to the energy crisis
in Cuba.
In 1989, the Soviet Union sup-
plied Cuba with 13 million tons of
oil. Oil imports this yearare expected
to be below six million tons. The
island expects to produce about one
millions tons of domestic oil in 1993.
The Cuban leader charged that
"the United States exercises great
pressures on countries, enterprises
and individuals who want to carry on
commercial operations with our na-
tion."
Castro said because of pressure
brought by U.S officials overseas and
"by the ambassadors themselves,"
only the most "valiant" foreign en-
terprises carry on business with Cuba.
The 31-year-old economic em-
bargo on trade with Cuba was inten-
sified shortly before the U.S presi-
dential election last year when Presi-
dent Bush signed the so-called
Torricelli Bill into law.
The law prohibits U.S subsidiar-


floats adrift
beaches after Tuesday's accident, and the
navy was warning passing ships away
from the Playa Azul area, about 50 miles
north of the popular Pacific coastal re-
sorts of Zihuatenejo and Ixtapa.
The ship docked at the port of Lazaro
Cardenas last week and unloaded about
5,000 tons of sulfuric acid before its crew
evacuated and it was towed out to sea
early Tuesday because of damage to its
pumping mechanism, the news release
said.
Some acid spilled in the harbor and the
Betula was removed to a safer area to
prevent greater damage. But the tanker
started listing 10 degrees to starboard
when the tow cable snapped.
The news release said some gas was
released into the air in the harbor when
the acid reacted with sea water, but no one
was injured.
Sulfuric acid, also known as hydrogen
sulfate or battery acid, is a highly corro-
sive, oily liquid that when mixed with
water can cause a spattering of small


in Mexico

Sulfuric acid, also known
as hydrogen sulfate or
battery acid, is a highly
corrosive, oily liquid that
when mixed with water can
cause a spattering of small
explosions.

explosions. The liquid can burn skin and
its fumes can cause asphyxiation.
Dr. Federico Garcia, a researcher with
the National University's Chemical Insti-
tute, said that if even a small amount of
the chemical begins leaking out of the
ship, its corrosive qualities could bur
holes in the ship, causing it to leak even
more.
Once in the water, the chemical could
then spread quickly, causing an extensive
spill that could be hard to contain, he said.
The acid also could kill fish and other
marine life in the area.


sulfuric acid
MEXICO CITY (AP) - A damaged
tanker carrying 4,000 tons of highly cor-
rosive sulfuric acid and 300 tons of crude
oil broke away from a tugboat and was
adrift Wednesday without a crew near
several of Mexico's west coast resorts.
By late Tuesday, the Norwegian ship,
the Betula, had drifted less than a mile
west of the coast of Playa Azul, a Pacific
coast beach resort in the western state of
Michoacan, said Red Cross spokesman
Carlos Sanchez.
Heavyrains and waves that had pushed
the tanker earlier in the evening had
subsided and it was no longer moving
toward the coast, he said.
According to a government news re-
lease Tuesday, officials were planning to
remove the cargo from the damaged Nor-
wegian ship, the Betula, and transfer it to
another vessel.
But the Red Cross said Wednesday
morning that heavy rains overnight had
delayed the removal of the acid.
Government troops had cleared nearby


" '-~f.���.
~;~�1�I~? �"










SMilitary News


Tropic Times
July 2,1993 5


AF general retires after


remarks about Clinton


WASHINGTON (Air Force News Service) - An Air
Force general forfeited nearly $7,000 in pay and retired
Thursday for remarks he made about the president at a
military awards banquet.
Air Force officials concluded that Maj. Gen. Harold
N. Campbell violated Article 88 of the Uniform Code
of Military Justice by making disparaging remarks
about President Clinton at Soesterberg AB, the Nether-
lands, May 24.
Campbell had been the deputy chiefof staff forplans
and programs at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. Gen.
Ronald W. Yates, Air Force Materiel Command com-
mander, imposed non-judicial punishment on Campbell,
which included a letter of reprimand, to become a part
of his permanent record, and forfeiture of one-half
month's basic pay for two months.
"He (Campbell) agreed he made a mistake and we
applied the appropriate penalties," Gen. Merrill A.
McPeak, Air Force chief of staff told reporters at a June
18 press conference.
While citing Campbell's 32 years of honorable ser-
vice, McPeak said, "I am saddened by this event.


S.


A.'


,.6



---..


C h eco"'n


Checkpoint


APLaswPhoto


A Somali boy with his hands up passes through a U.S. Army checkpoint in Mogadishu, Somalia
Wednesday. Soldiers sealed off an area around the airport searching for weapons. After several incidents
with Somali gunmen this week, security measures were increased and the search for weapons was
intensified.


Sailors claim chemical weapons


injured them in Persian Gulf War


since some are seriously ill
The subcommittee planned to use Wednesday's in-
quiry instead to question the Pentagon medical officials
about the possibility that some American troops may
have been exposed to chemical weapons during the war.
'We owe it to America's Desert Storm veterans to
provide an honest appraisal of the cause of their medical
problems," Shelby said. "But more than that, we owe
them proper diagnosis and treatment."
According to the account, the chemical attack came
about 3:30 am., several hours after Scud missile alerts
had ended and the seabees were asleep in their tents
Larry Perry of Gold Hill, N.C., a former chief petty
officer who retired because of health problems, told the
newspaper an explosion sent the seabees scrambling
with gas masks to nearby bomb shelters.
After the all-clear sounded, Perry said, the seabees
emerged from the shelters and about a dozen of them
gathered near a latrine, where they first realized they
were surrounded by a mist.
"All of my exposed skin was like it was on fire," Roy
Butler, one of those near the latrine, told the newspaper.
"It was burning like crazy. I couldn't breathe. I had to
take my mask off and clear my nose. I immediately
thought we got...gassed."


WASHINGTON (AP) - A Senate subcommittee is
investigating claims by Navy veterans that they were
injured by chemical weapons during the Persian Gulf
War and ordered to keep quiet about it.
The Senate Armed Services subcommittee on force
requirements and personnel called three military sur-
geon generals and the Pentagon's top civilian health
official to testify Wednesday about the alleged chemical
weapons attack, which was disclosed Sunday by The
Birmingham News.
Sen. Richard Shelby, D-Ala., chairman of the panel,
promised that Wednesday's hearing would be "the first
step toward getting to the bottom of what happened on
the night of Jan. 20, 1991."
Veterans of a Navy Reserve seabee unit told the
newspaper they believe they were hit by chemical weap-
ons that night while stationed near an air strip south of
the port of Al Jubayl on the Persian Gulf.
They said they were told not to talk about the incident
but decided to break their silence because they have been
unable to obtain government medical care for health
problems they believe stem directly from the attack.
None of the alleged victims were scheduled to testify
Wednesday. A Shelby aide said there wasn't sufficient
time for them to make travel arrangements, particularly


However, general Campbell's conduct was wrong and
cannot be tolerated."
McPeak, speaking for the entire Air Force, said, "We
understand the absolute requirement for respect up and
down the chain of command.
"As we conclude this unfortunate incident there
should be no doubt about the lesson learned. The
military leadership of this country not only believes in
and supports, but insists on, the integrity of the chain of
command."
In a memorandum to Defense Secretary Les Aspin,
McPeak thanked the secretary and the president for
letting the Air Force handle the situation.
"I feel very strongly that you and the president have
every right to expect that your Air Force will be the
world's most professional and most disciplined -
meant in the very best sense these words convey.
"With your support, we have worked our way through
to a solution that is appropriate in every way," McPeak
said. "That is, we will both protect the rights of the
officerinvolved and will sustain integrity and respect for
the chain of command."


Tailhook

Scandal prompts Navy

to discipline 41 officers
WASHINGTON (AP) - In the Navy's days of
yore, sailors who fell asleep on watch, brawled or
defied orders were summoned to the tallest mast to
be clapped in irons or a dozen lashes.
The whips are gone, but the Navy is using the
"captain's mast" proceedings to discipline officers
for what it deems minor offenses in the Tailhook
sexual assault scandal.
Vice Admiral J. Paul Reason has conducted a
series of "admiral's masts" at Atlantic Fleet head-
quarters in Norfolk, Va., to discipline officers for
such Tailhook offenses as indecent exposure.
Forty-one officers have been disciplined thus far
- given letters of reprimand or fined $1,000 - for
indecent exposure at the 1991 convention of the
Tailhook Association, a Navy aviator's booster
organization.
In today's down-sizing Navy, such reprimand
letters usually spell the end of an officer's career,
halting their promotion in the military's "up-or-
out" system, Pentagon officials say.
An investigation by the Pentagon's inspector
general determined that more than two dozen women
were pinched, groped or disrobed when forced to
run a gauntlet of drunken Navy and Marine Corps
aviators at the Las Vegas Hilton Hotel.
The investigation found that an "atmosphere of
debauchery" prevailed at the three-day convention.
Strippers performed in hospitality suites and, in
some instances, engaged in public, consensual sex
with officers.
The Pentagon's inspector general referred 120
cases of alleged misconduct to the Navy and another
20 to the Marine Corps.
Under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, any
officer or enlisted sailor summoned to a captain's
mast may opt to be court-martialed, which would
entitle them to public hearing and the opportunity
to cross-examine witnesses.
Reason, the vice admiral, has referred accusa-
tions of more serious wrongdoing by three officers
for possible courts martial, which could result in
criminal convictions in the Navy's judicial system.
One of the officers, a commander, is accused of
assault and lying under oath.
Four Marine Corps officers have also been disci-
plined for "conduct unbecoming an officer and a
gentleman" at "office hours," the equivalent
proceeding being conducted by Lt. Gen. Charles C.
Krulak at Quantico, Va.
Krulak referred a fifth officer for possible court
martial.
Court martial convictions carry the possibility of
prison; those convicted have criminal records.
In the original captain's masts, a sailor found
guilty of drunkenness, profanity or "any other
scandalous conduct tending to the destruction of
public morals" could be clapped in irons or flogged
no more than 12 lashes.
-Flogging was abolished in 1850 and irons have
given way to less drastic punishments such as
confinement to ship, base or quarters.
But ship commanders conducting "captain's
mast" proceedings can still put sailors on three-day
diets of bread and water for minor infractions such
as fighting, contempt for orders or indifference to
duty.
Non-judicial punishments include restrictions to
base or ship of not more than 60 days and extra
duties for 45 days or confinement of up to 30 days.
Officers don't have to suffer the indignity of
bread and water. But they can be demoted in grade,
rank or seniority or have their pay docked.
Anyone called toa "captain's mast" hastheright
to hear the charges and present a defense.
Courts-martial and so-called non-judicial pun-
ishments have their origins in the British navy. In
1775, the Continental Congress incorporated these
practices in the "Rules and Regulations of the Navy
of the United Colonies."
In 1800, Congress codified the "Rules and
Regulations for the Government of the United States
Navy," which gave ship captains discretion to
punish offenders for minor violations.
The Navy regulations for non-judicial punish-
ments have been recodified by Congress several
times since, most recently in 1962.


----- �-- __
L %
'**^<> ""

^QF


1










6Tropic Times
July 2, 1993


*Voices


Motorist questions ID card check policy


Dear Mayors' Corner,
Why is it that Howard AFB security
police are still checkingidentification cards
24 hours a day? This is getting ridiculous
Tired of being hassled by SPs

Dear Tired,
The 24-hour check was implemented
by the 24th Wing commander because of
the amount of people violating the visita-
tion policy and the increase of criminal
activity at Howard. It is the general's
responsibility to Air Force members and
the Air Force to provide an environment
that keeps these incidents from happen-
ing.
SSince these policies have been imple-
mented, criminal activity, along with viola-
tions of the visitation policy, have de-
creased dramatically. Therefore, this policy
will remain in effect until further notice.

Dear Mayors' Corner,
Why is it that so many civilian em-


ployees are still occupying housing units
on Fort Clayton?
I was told that those civilians who had
moved onto post before Just Cause would
be asked to return to housing downtown
after the war in order to accommodate the
large number of active duty families wait-
ing.
I personally know of several civilians,
some of whom are single, who have a
complete unit to themselves.
In addition, they are not required to
pay for these units, unlike the rest of the
military community. Is this true?
Please respond to these questions and
clarify this housing situation in detail.
Tired of mediocrity

Dear Tired,
On June 11 we covered the issue of
civilian employees in government quar-


ters and will not cover their eligibility again
here.
Regarding civilians who moved onto
post before Just Cause, Dick Davis, chief
of Family Housing for Directorate of En-
gineering and Housing, said the situation
was evaluated at that time and it was
decided that there was adequate govern-
ment housing for both civilian employ-
ees and military people. After Just Cause,
civilian employees were given an option to
return to the local economy but it was not
a forced issue.
At this time, the housing division is not
aware of any single civilian employees
residing in Army controlled housing by
themselves.
If you are aware of this kind of situation,
Davis asks that you notify the housing
division so it can investigate.
It is not true that civilians "are not
required to pay for these units." Davis said
when civilians are assigned housing, they
forfeit their Living Quarters Allowance the


same as military people forfeit their Basic
Housing Allowance and Overseas Hous-
ing Allowance.
The civilian employee has the same
needs, wants and work schedules of most
military personnel, Davis said. Policies
and procedures are reviewed continuously
to make sure that changes to the needs of
all personnel are met.
An example of those changes is the
June23,1992, policy ammendmentwhereby
civilian employees are no longer given
transportation agreements to live in gov-
ernment housing in Panama.
Editor's note: This column allows
community members to submit ques-
tions to the Mayoral Congress. Letters
should be mailed to: Mayors' Corner,
Publicity Chairperson,APO AA 34004
(MPS). Anonymity will be granted upon
request The Tropic Times reserves the
right to edit letters and responses for
brevity, clarity and propriety.


Commander in Chief......................Gen. George A. Joulwan
Director,PublicAffairs..............................Col. JamesL.Fetig
Chief......... ...............................................SMSgtSteveTaylor
Editor............................................. SFCJoseph Ferrare
Assistant Editor........................SSgt Deborah E. Williams
Sports Editor.........................................Sgt Richard Puckett
EditorialStaff....................................................Sgt. John Hall
Rosemary Chong
Maureen Sampson


Military police patrol nabs



drunk driver on Fort Davis


Soldier charged with drunk,
reckless driving
A Fort Davis soldier was charged with reckless and
drunk driving last week after he passed an MP patrol in
a no-passing zone.
Drunk driving is a dangerous act that will not be
tolerated. For those who have had too much to drink, let
a friend drive or call a taxi.

Youth center robbed
Military police are investigating the theft of an inflat-
able ball valued at $60 from the Fort Clayton Youth
Center. Thieves entered the building by breaking a
window.
Anyone having more information that may help
identify those responsible for the theft and damage
should call the Military Police Investigations Section at
287-5252.

Panama National Police
arrest thief near Gorgas
Panama National Police arrested a Panama City man
near Gorgas Army Community Hospital last week when
they saw him carrying a television. An investigation
revealed the man stole the television from a car parked
in a lot near the hospital. The PNP released the stolen
property to the MPs.
Experienced thieves can break into most vehicles
quickly. MPs recommend not leaving high value items
in automobiles.

Reservist arrested for
taking midnight swim
A U.S. Army Reserve soldier was arrested when MPs
found him in the Fort Espinar swimming pool after
hours. The soldier fled the area but was later found at his
barracks. An unidentified female who was also seen in
the pool escaped.
Entering the pool after hours is trespassing. Those
who want to visit the pool must do so during normal
operating hours.


Student editorial staff....................................Frank Pigeon Jr.
Shevone Ward
Southern CommandPublicAffairsOffice...................................
JohnSell .........................82-4278
U.S. Army SouthPublic AffairsOffice......................................
SSgt.JaneUsero.............287-3007
24thWing Public Affairs Office...............................................
MSgt Dale Mitcham......284-5459
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.................................
DebbieErhart...............283-5644


ic Times


Mail boxes damaged
Post office officials have reported a number of at-
tempted larcenies at installation post offices here.re-
cently. It appears someone has attempted to pry open
various mail boxes, presumably to steal mail.
The military police recommend that people check
mail boxes daily and not allow mail to remain in the box
overnight.

The following crimes are for on post housing areas for
June 18-24.

Pacific

Fort Clayton 300 area - one larceny of unsecured
private property, one larceny of unsecured government
property
Fort Clayton 600 area - one larceny of secured
private property, one larceny of unsecured private prop-
erty
Fort Clayton 900 area - one larceny of unsecured
private property
Curundu housing area - two larcenies of secured
private property
Fort Amador - one larceny of secured government
property, one larceny of secured private property, one
larceny of unsecured private property, one housebreak-
ing
Herrick Heights - one larceny of unsecured private
property
Fort Kobbe 300 area - one larceny of secured private
property, one larceny of unsecured private property
Fort Kobbe 400 area - one housebreaking

Atlantic
Fort Espinar - one larceny of unsecured private
property


U.S. Army South PAO-Atlantic............................ ................
SSgLPhillipClark...........289-4312
This authorized unofficial command information publica-
tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is
published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information
Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervi-
sion of the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official
view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or
the U.S. Southern Command. The address is: Unit 0936 APO
AA 34002 Telephone 285-6612.


USARSO releases

courts martial list
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - U.S. Army
South Officials released the following courts martial
results for the month of June:
PFC Mark Lagrone, Company B, 5th Battalion,
87th Infantry Regiment, was convicted of absence
without leave, failure to repair, missing movement
and wrongful use of cocaine. He was sentenced to
reduction to private one, forfeiture of all pay and
allowances, confinement for 10 months and a bad
conduct discharge.
SSgt. Valerie Hunter, Headquarters Company,
U.S. Army Garrison-Panama, was convicted of lar-
ceny. She was sentenced to reduction to private one,
forfeiture of $537 per month for three months,
confinement for 30 days ::. a bad conduct dis-
charge.
PFC Ciriaco Cuenco, Company A, 5th Battalion,
87th Infantry Regiment, was convicted of con-
spiracy, making a false official statement and wrong-
ful introduction, importation and distribution of
cocaine. He was sentenced to reduction to private
one, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, confine-
ment for 15 months and a bad conduct discharge.
Spec. Richard Dean Jr., Company A, 1st Battal-
ion, 228th Aviation Regiment, was convicted of
drunk driving. He was sentenced to a reprimand,
forfeiture of $400 pay per month for four months and
restriction for 15 days.






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Missing
or
Unavailable






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Missing
or
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Missing
or
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or
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Security police cuff football title

Running back's pre-game speech

motivates battle-weary teammates


SQports
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


by SgL James A. Rush
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD APB - Two mounted secu-
rity policemen showed their team the
way to victory by riding their horses to
the intramural football championship
game here Monday night. The 24th Secu-
rity Police Squadron team took the cue
and saddled up running back Donnell
"D.R.W." Wallace who carried them to a
7-0 win over the Navy.
The security police won the winner's
bracket of the double elimination play-
offs, but lost the first game of the night
13-0 to theregular season runner-up Navy
team.
Wallace used up much of the 30-
minute intermission giving an inspira-


tional speech.
"What I said to the
team was, 'We came
here together and
we're going out
together...on top! '"
Wallace said. "As
long as we played to-
gether, nobody was
going to beat us. We
played too hard all
year long to lose.
"If one person
breaks down, then
whole team breaks
down. I stressed that.
We didn't have all
the best athletes on
the team but we


"What Ih
team was, '
here togeth(
going out to
top!' As Ion(
played toge
was going t(
We played t
year long to
Wallac
Security P


played together. The line blocked, the
receivers caught the ball and the defense
played defense."
The halfback backed up his words on
the field when the police took the second-
half kickoff at their own 30. Wallace got
the call on the first threeplays and carried
the ball to the Navy 36. A pushing call
against the Navy defense put the ball on
the Navy 23.
Left guard Richard Buck sucked in a
short pass and turned it into a big gain by
lumbering to the two-yard line. Quarter-
back Frank Ashley followed a big surge
by his offensive line into the end zone on
the next play.
Wallace slashed through the middle of
the line for the point after and the last
score of the game.
The security police continued to move
the ball throughout the game, with
Wallace carrying it 11 more times. The
Navy defense kept them from scoring
again, but couldn't keep them from eat-
ing up precious time.
After allowing the touchdown, the
Navy launched a counteroffensive start-
ing from its own 31-yard line.
Stephan Jones took the hand-off and


sped around his right tackle to the secu-
rity police 25. An encroachment call
tacked on five more yards on the follow-
ing down, giving the Navy first and goal.
The elusive running back dashed to-
ward the end zone again, but was stopped
on the seven by security police defensive
back Kevin "Knee High" Costa. A sec-
ond down play-action pass nearly put
Nance into the end zone, but Wallace,
playing defensive back, pulled Nance's
flag just inches from the goal line.
The Navy seemed ready to score, but
when the Navy runner tried to burst into
the end zone, he was called for inten-
tional aggressive running, a penalty that
pushed them back to the 15. In flag
football, runners must try to avoid con-
tact with defensive players.
Quarterback
Aaron Jones' last
said to the ditch pass attempt
We came was thwarted by
linebacker Fiafia
er and we're Seau and lineman
gether...on David Houtz. The
two blitzed in and
g as we threw up a wall of
their, nobody arms to swat away
o beat us. the fourth down
pass.
oo hard all The security
lose.n police defense al-
lowed the Navy
e only eight plays in
two more posses-
olice running back sions.
Things got
even tougher for the Navy in the second
half. It was three plays and punt for the
team's first two possessions. Security
police defensive end William "Taco"
Limtiaco was the rally killer. He caught
up to Jones twice, sacking him in con-
secutive series.
The sailor's defense shut down the
police to keep the game within reach, but
their offense wasn't able to capitalize.
On one fourth. down play, security
police punter Peter Tabury sent the ball
nearly 30 yards. Unfortunately, it was
straight up.
The return put the ball on the Navy 30
with two minutes left. It looked like the
break the sailors needed.
S. Jones scrambled to his 39-yard line
on first down. Instead of going after the
easy first down at mid-field, the Navy
tried to catch the security police defen-
sive backs off guard.
A. Jones faded back to pass, looked to
his left and fired toward the sideline
where cornerback Derek "A.K.A."
Haywood was lurking. Haywood swooped
in front ofthe receiver to pick offthe toss.
The security police were unable to
gain a yard but managed to run the clock


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U.S. Air Force photo by SSgL Ronald Kimberlain
Navy quarterback Aaron Jones looks downfield for an open receiver as
teammate Stephan Jones and Security Police defender Robert Jones looks on.


down to 48 seconds. Tabury made the
most of his second chance, lifting a high
punt that Eric Brown fielded on the one-
yard line.
Brown managed to slip out to the 15 on
the play, giving his offense some breath-
ing room. The Navy fell back on its new
gimmick play, a wide-out pass.
The wide-out fared no better than the
quarterbackthough. Once again Haywood
moved in to steal the ball away, this time
clinching the game.
"I felt we were just as fast as their
receivers. He couldn't have beat me ei-
ther long or short," said Haywood. "We
were forcing them to throw the ball and
they didn't come to my side all game.
"I wasn't thinking about it being the
game, I was just playing my man, giving
110 percent every down. It looked like it
was going out but I managed to stay in
with it."
Staying with it was what Navy coach
Matt Hert knew his team would have to
do to pull off an upset.
"We came into the last two games to
win bothof them," said Navy head coach
Matt Hert. "I thought I had the personnel
to do it with, however, the SPS team
basically made the big plays."
In the first game earlier that night, it
was the Navy who controlled the game.
They dominated offensively and their
defense came up strong when it needed to
stop the police from scoring. SPS failed
to reach the end zone despite three drives
inside the Navy 20.


Army family member gives new
exercise program a high-spirited
boost.


The sailors' first scorecame latein the
first half. Starting near midfield, they
covered ground quickly. Tight end
Leondray Nance caught two passes push-
ing the ball to the seven-yard line.
A. Jones lost his flags while scram-
bling on the next play, taking the Navy
back to the 17-yard line and bringing up
third down. The quarterback recovered
though. On the next play, he drilled the
ball into the hands of Patrick Isom for the
touchdown.
Security police linebacker Wayne
"Saint" St. Clair batted away the pass on
the point after attempt.
The Navy's second score came on
their first possession in the second half. S.
Jones caught a screen pass and wove his
way to thetwo-yard line. Hetook a hand-
off two plays later and ran in for six
points. The back also surged up the middle
for the point after.
Winning easily in the first game and
being so close in the second was a big
accomplishment for the Navy team that
lost to the security police in their first
game of the season 18-0.
"I'm not disappointed. This is best
football team the naval station has ever
had," Hert said. "Now we're looking
forward to bigger challenges such as the
Fourth of July Bowl and Turkey Bowl.
"Our goal was to gel together and
become a unit and we did that. In that last
game, even though they were up 7-0 the
whole time, it could have gone either
way. My hat's off to SPS."


July 2,1993


U.S. Army Garrison soccer team
takes show on road with match
against Panamanian team.


*AF tennis star, page 12
*Summer Sensations, page 14
*Atlantic basketball, page 15


Page 11


.A.









12 Tropic Times
1 2rJuly 2, 1993


Tennis star


serves up


tourney title

by SSgt Rian Clawson
24th Wing Public Affairs
HOWARD AFB - After winning three straight
matches, and forfeiting fourth because of a scheduling
dispute, Kazuo Townsend came back to beat Gabriel
Lacayo in the semi-finals match 7-6,4-6,6-1 and again
in the finals match 6-4,6-2 for Howard's '93 Intramural
Singles Tennis Championship.
Thirty-one players entered the double elimination
tournament when it began June 7.
Townsend, a35-year-old AirForce majorassigned to
the 24th Communications Squadron, attributed his suc-
cess to his ability to consistently keep the ball in play
and "practice, practice, practice!"
One aspect of the match that made it tough for the
players was the fact that they're both left-handed.
"It's a lot different playing another lefty," Lacayo
said.
The 22-year-old senior airman, assigned to the 24th
Weather Squadron, has been playing tennis since high
school.
"I'm used to playing right handed players - the ball
spins the opposite way when a lefty hits it," he ex-
plained. "To compensate I had to hit it straight and put
a topspin on it and I'm not used to hitting that way. As
a result, I made mistakes. Townsend just took advan-
tage of them."
"It was tough match," Townsend admitted. "Lacayo
has a powerful stroke and he put a lot of top spin on the
ball. Trying to return the ball the same way was tough."
So tough, in fact, that Townsend broke a string on two
different rackets during their matches.
"I was on my third racket when I finally beat him,"
Townsend added with a grin. Lacayo also broke a string
in his racket while warming up and he had to finish the
match with a borrowed racket.
Earlier in the tournament, Lacayo also defeated
Amett Farley, technical sergeant who placed third and
works for Townsend in the 24th Communication Squad-
ron.
"I was beginning to think it would be 'the Battle of
Comm,"' Townsend said. "Farley was doing well
enough that I though it could be him and me in the final
match." Then Farley injured his back moving furniture
and was subsequently unable to move fast enough to
avoid defeat at Lacayo's hands.
The comeback victory - from the loser's bracket-
didn't surprise Townsend, "but I'll take it," he said.


/
/ -*r,


U.S. Ar Force photo by SSgL Ran Clawson
KazuoTownsend returns a shot during a practice match. Townsend won the Howard AFB 1993 Intramural
Singles Tennis title June 23.


Although he said he really enjoys competing,
Townsend said his main reason for playing tennis is the
exercise. "I've always enjoyed playing football and
basketball, but I think I'm getting too old for those
'contact' sports," he added, smiling.
The only "contact" he gets from tennis is when he
slips and hits the ground, or when he works with his 6-


year-old son Abram, who's learning how to play the
game.
"That kind of contact, I can handle," Townsend said.
Apparently, he can also handle the kind of contact
found when a tennis racket slams a tennis ballin a hard,
cross-court smash...otherwise, he wouldn't be the
champ.


U.S. Army Garrison takes on local soccer team


by Sgt. E.J. Hersom
USARSO Public Affairs Office
ALBROOK AFS - Enrique Monteza
of the Panama Ministry of Government
and Justice soccer team scored a tie-
breaking goal in the last minute of
Sunday's match against U.S. Army Gar-
rison to give his team a 2-1 victory.
The idea for the unusual match-up
came from Cesar and Abdiel Gutierrez,
brothers who found themselves on two
winning soccer squads and saw it as an
opportunity for Panamanian - U.S. inter-
action.
The game was the first of what orga-
nizers hopes a series of games involving
Army teams and those from Panama's
Government League.
The underdog USAG team shocked
the crowd in the first minutes of the game
when it set up Miguel Ortiz for the game's
first goal.
The ministry came back later in the
first half when Manuel Dormoi nailed a
shot into the USAG goal to tie the game.
The second half started slowly as both
defenses kept the other team's offenses in
check. By the middle of the second half,
the ministry showed off its team play by
keeping the action near the USAG goal
with crisp, accurate passing.


As the ministry players began to pick
apart the USAG defense, Monteza beat
USAG's goalie to the ball and trickled a
shot into the net.
"We all wanted the best team to win,"
said the ministry's team captain Cesar
Gutierrez. "I guess we are the best team
because we won, butthe soldiers put up
a big challenge for us and they are defi-
nitely an excellent team."
USAG team captain Abdiel Gutierrez
said the ministry team was very orga-
nized and had played together a long
time, which was a big factorin the game.
The USAG team went undefeated
during the U.S. Army South soccerleague
while the ministry team is holding second
place in Panama's Government League.
The Gutierrez brothers came up with
the idea to play each others' teams when
they talked about how well the teams
were doing. They decided to do it during
Panama's Family Week and invite the
families and chains of command from
each side.
"I have no word to express my emo-
tion to experience tll. Jay," said Yolanda
de Gutierrez, mother of the Gutierrez
brothers.
"It is wonderful to see my two sons
playing this friendly game and to see
Panamanian families and American fami-


maraderie and fun."
Those attending the
game included Vice
Minister Luis Carlos
Raul Trujillo Sagel, "l
Aracelis Morales, chief a
of Panama's Marketing 1
and Budget Department,
Lic Avaro Varela, chief
of the legal department,
Col. M. Jeffry Petrucci, E
U.S. Army Garrison-
Panama commander and
Capt. Hugh McNeely,
commander of Head-
quarters Company,
USAG-Panama.
"We are not doing this
as often as we should,
McNeely said. "It is an
honorto havethis friend-
ship game."
It was an honor for
t was an hor fr U.S. Army photoby Sg EJ. Hersom
the players s well, said U.S. Army Garrison's Miguel Ortiz triesto getthe ball
the ministry's Roberto past Panama Ministry of Government defenders.
Dean.
"Withthisget-togetherwefeel a stron- The ministry invited USAG for a
ger friendship with the soldiers. We con- rematch on their field at a date to be
sider them our friends and enjoy sharing determined, Abdiel Gutierrez said.
our sports interests with them," Dean USAG's next game will be with the
added. Panamanian National Police, he added.


~iaurdli$QII


Ip�lss;~








Tropic Times
July 2, 1993 L


Jazzercise instructor Dradine Lee gets class fired up during Monday's session.




All that Jazzercize


Instructor

keeps class

on its toes
ALBROOK AFS - Dradine Lee's
Jazzercize class is just a month old, but
she feels like it's been running for years.
"I've only been teaching this class for
a short time and we've already got excel-
lentinstructor-studentrelationship work-
ing," she said. "That makes the class alot
:of fun."
Lee is the only instructor in Panama
who teachesthe unique workout program
called Jazzercise.
Every Monday, Wednesday and Fri-
day from 5-6 p.m. Lee and 10 to 15
students step into the Albrook AFS Sports
and Fitness Center for a high-stepping,
foot-stomping, sweat-filled 60 minutes.
Unlike aerobics, which varies from
instructor to instructor, Jazzercize is a
franchised operation based onjazz dance
step techniques.


*. " "-,, " 2 H. H l
Bernadette Fraser and Monica Parker get into the groove during Jazzercise
class.
That's where the fun comes in, Lee pop and country. The variety is a change
said. of pace from normal aerobics."
"We aren't locked into a certain type Each exercise is a total body workout
of music," Lee said. "We use R&B, rap, made up of of aerobic exercise and non-


complicated professional dance moves,
she said.
All of the dance programs have been
tested by experts and are labeled by dif-
ficulty level.
As the instructor, Lee takes the multi-
tude of possible routines and plans a
workout tailored to the student's fitness
level.
Each student must fill out a health
screening form, then Lee works closely
with the students to avoid injury.
"A lot of times you walk into an
aerobics class and never talk to the in-
structor," she said. "With the forms I
know immediately about my students.
There's a lot more feedback."
Lee, who arrived in Panamain March,
has been teaching Jazzercize since 1989.
The 30-year-old soldier's wife and
mother of two instructs for her health
"I love dancing and this is a great way
of combining it with exercise," she said.
"I plan on doing this for a long time.
They're going to wheel me off the floor."
For information or to sign up for the
class, call the Albrook SFC at 286- 3307,
or Lee at 287-4099.









4 Tropic Times
14, July 2, 1993


I- I


-





Coach Horst "Lemmy" Lemley shows Vincent
Holman and Caroline Walters proper dribbling
techniques.


summer

ensations

Sports program

keeps youths

going and going...


S. :. ", * .. ,. , *� : -, * *
. . "; :,".;: ".
.'~':' . .-:: :.., : . :, .=,. :,
gf p.: 'I . , .I-
10,


Charlie Weber returns a shot during the tennis clinic.

"That's cheaper than
any babysitter I know, and
it gives the kids a chance
to learn tennis. I would
have killed to have some-
thing like this when I was a
kid."
Corey Gray
Youth Services tennis coach


4. r~



'C*.



~;(


Kate Merritt takes a breather du
clinic June 25 on Jarman Field at


by Sgt. E.J. Hersom
"' USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT CLAYTON - Charlie Weber uses both
hands to bat a tennis ballover the net on centercourt.
.: The 8-year-old's tongue sticks out with the effort, and
his eyes are closed in mid-swing.
Weber was taking lessons during the Youth
Services Summer Sensation's two-week tennis
clinic.
Coach Corey Gray said Weber and the other
S12 students made excellent progress in the first
week.
. Gray and coach BruceBeckran the clinictwo hours
each weekday morning for $5 per student, racket and
balls included.
"That's cheaper than any babysitter I know, and it
l' gives the kids a chance to learn tennis," Gray said. "I
hto. by Sgt EJ. Hermn would have killed to have something like this when I
was a kid."
Weber said he likes tennis because "it's real chal-
lenging and helps you with your baseball."
S' Weber, who also likes golf, took lessons at a golf
Clinic also offered by Youth Services on the Fort
Clayton Driving Range in the early afternoons.
Weber said he practiced "Monday, Wednesday and
Friday before going out on the real course at
Amador.
S "It (the practice) helps you when you play in the
tournaments and win big money," Weber added.
S While Weber chose golf for a second summer sport,
John Daily chose Youth Services' soccer clinic.
Daily, aveteranofcoach Jim E. Snyder's champion
Sharksinthe YouthServices SoccerLeague,attended
S '""' the clinic because he gets bored sitting around the
house all day and it gives him something to do. The
clinic's coach did a good job, he said.
, � .Youth Services is offering many more sports clin-
ics and lessons in July andAugustincluding,rapelling,
scuba diving and swimming.
Parents can register their children for the activities
S '.,. at Youth Services or call 287-3817 for more informa-
.L tion.
S Weber is looking forward to more tennis lessons
* and maybe some kayaking or rapelling, he said while
ring the soccer sticking the grip of his tennis racket between the clubs
Fort Clayton. in his golf bag.
He was reported later to be at the Youth Services
Basketball Clinic.


U.S. Army pi









Tropic Times
July 2, 1993


Holiday bowling
The Albrook AFS Bowling Center is sponsoring a
special for bowlers Sunday. All games will be 50 cents
during open bowling. For information, call 286-4260.

Bench press contest
The Rodman Fitness Centeris hosting a bench press
contest 8:30 a.m. July 10. Weigh-in time is 7 a.m. The
entry fee is $10 and there are categories for men and
women.
The deadline to enter is Tuesday. The tournament is
open to military, Department of Defense civilians and
DoD family members. Call 283-4222/4061.

Official recruitment
The Panama Armed Forces Officials Association is
recruiting officials on both sides of the isthmus. Meet-
ings are held 1 p.m. every second Saturday of the month
at the Valent Recreation Center, Fort Clayton. Military,
civilians and family members can join. Forinformation,
call 287-5572 or 247-0511 after 9 p.m.
The Howard/Albrook Officials Association is also
looking for new officials. The association offers profes-
sional training, clinics and a pay check.
The meetings are 7:30 p.m. every third Thursday of
the month at the Howard Youth Center. Interested
individuals must be fluent in English. For information,
call 284-5371.

Cleaning closure
The Rodman Fitness Center basketball court and
showers are closed for cleaning 7:30-11 am. Wednes-
days. Call 283-4222.

Reeder aerobics
Free aerobics classes are offered atthe ReederPhysi-
cal Fitness Center. Classes are held 9:15-10:15 a.m.
Monday-Friday, and 5:45-6:45 p.m. Monday-Thurs-
day.
Early sign-ups are not required. Forinformation, call
287-3861.

Prices increase
Bowling prices have increased at Clayton, Espinar
and Curundu bowling centers.
The new prices are: League bowling $1 per game,
adult bowling $1, youth 75 cents and shoe rentals are 50
cents a pair. For more information, call 286-3914.

Army 10-Miler tryouts
Semi-final tryouts for the Army 10-Milc r Race to be
held in Washington D.C., Oct. 10 will be held July 24.
The tryouts begin at 6 a.m. at the Rodman Fitness
Center at Rodman Naval Station. The final tryouts/team
selections will be held Aug. 21.
Eight male and female runners will be selected at the
finals. The best six runners of each category will make
up the U.S. Army South 10-Miler team.
The remaining team members will be alternates.
Active-duty Army personnel assigned or attached to a
USARSO unit are eligible to compete.
Call 287-4050 or stop by the Directorate of Commu-
nity Activities Sports Branch, Building 154, Fort
Clayton.

ID card check
Identificationcards are required to use the facilities
at the Howard and Albrook sports and fitness
centers. Children under the age of 14 must be accompa-
nied by an adult. Call 284-3451 or 286-3307.

Jazzercise classes
Jazzercise classes will be held 5-6 p.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Fridays. The fee is $2.50 per class or
$25 for 12 classes. For more information call the
Albrookor Howard SFCs at 286-3307 or284-3451. See
related story, page 13.

Summer punch out
The Albrook Bowling Center kicks off the Air Force
wide Summer Punch Out Bowling Program in July and
runs through September.
Bowlers can win prizes such as cash awards, televi-
sions, and the grand prize is a Disneyworld vacation
package. For information, call the center at 286-4360..


Shooting it out
Dustin Elliott shoots the ball over the outstretched hands of Patrick Bolchoz Monday at Fort Davis.
Registration for the Atlantic community's youth basketball program is under way.There will be a
basketball clinic at the Fort Davis playshelter, 9-11 a.m. July 10 for 12-18-year-olds and 1 p.m. for
PeeWees. For information call Skip Berger at 289-4605.


New equipment
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center has new
equipment to help people to stay in shape. Treadmills,
rotary torso machine, stairmasters and back extension
are all available now. Call 284-3541.

Fitness improvement
Fitness improvement classes are held 6:05-7a.m. and
2:05-3 p.m., Monday, Wednesday and Friday at the
Howard Sports and Fitness Center.
The class consists of a calisthenic super circuit
workout aimed at improving muscular endurance, the
cardiovascular system and flexibility. Call the center at
284-3451 forinformation.


Aerobics
The Howard Sports and Fitness Centeroffers aerobics
5-6 p.m. Monday and Fridays. Call 284-3451 forinfor-
mation.
The Howard Youth Center holds aerobics class 9-10
a.m. Monday-Friday.
Thecost all classes is $1 persession. Forinformation,
call 284-4700.

Scuba classes
A new open water scuba class kicks off Tuesday at
the Howard AFB pool. The cost is $145 per person.
Introduction to Scuba class is available on request. For
information, call 284-6161/6109.


15







~7i i/-~l Ci)
*371


6 Tropic Times
1 July 2, 1993


Commissary

holiday hours
COROZAL (Tropic Times) -
The Corozal and Fort Espinarcom-
missaries will be closed Monday
and Wednesday in observance of
the Independence Day weekend.
The commissary at Howard AFB
will be closed Sunday and Tues-
day.

Air Force Ball

set for Sept. 18
HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA)
- The 24th Operations Group will
sponsor the 1993 Air Force Ball
Sept. 18 attheAlbrookOpen Mess.
Project officers announced the date
of the ball early so interested mem-
bers may makeplans to attend. The
menu and itinerary details are still
being worked out, but the date and
entertainment - a live band play-
ing 50s and 60s music- are firm.
For more information, call
MSgt. Daniel Lopez at 284-6312/
6111.

Family support

center events
HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA)
- The Howard/Al brookFamily Sup-
port Center is located in Building
707 here and has a variety ofevents
scheduled for July. The center is
open 7:30 a.m.-4:30p.m., Monday
through Friday.
*Job search assistance is of-
fered 10 a.m. every Tuesday. The
program provides spouses with in-
formation on the techniques to ef-
fectively search forajobinPanama.
* An SF-171 workshop will be
offered 5:30-7:30 a.m. July 22 to
show how to complete the federal
application.
*A citizenship preparation se-
ries will be offered 9:30-11 am.
Tuesday, Thursday, July 13, and
15 in the education center, Build-
ing 708, Room 110. The series
will help prepare for naturaliza-
tion testing.
*The smooth move workshop
is offered 2:30-4 p.m. Thursday.
The workshop will answer ques-
tions about moving. Finance, fam-
ily services, housing, military per-
sonnel, traffic management, legal
and the medical group will all
have representatives present.
*The next transition assistance
seminar will be held 8 am.-4 p.m.
July 14 and 15. The two-day pro-
gram is designed to assist separat-
ing members and their families
transition to a civilian career. The
workshops offer a systematic ap-
proach that includes skills analy-
sis, career exploration, employ-
ment research, resume preparation,
interview skills, benefits, and fi-
nancial management. The uni-
form is civilian clothing. Atten-
dance both days is recommended.
*Transition assistance counsel-
ing is available by appointment
from 7:30 am.-4:30 p.m. Call
284-3865/4347 for information.
*A checkbook maintenance
course will be held 9-11 a.m. July
21 to teach how to accurately use
and balance a checking account.
*Budget counseling is avail-
able by appointment 4:30 a.m.-
7:30 p.m. Call 284-5010.
Volunteers are needed to help
with the loan closet, base brochure
library and layette program. Free
child care is provided for volun-
teers. Call 284-5860.


ab� �~~.-. �
S� ` 1- '
L-


-( - �~


Pvt. 2 Richard Coller of Headquarters Company, 536th Engineer Battalion (Combat)
during quarrying near the Howard Air Force Base back gate.


A- F1,i~��


U.S. Army photo by Sgt E.J. Hersom
(Heavy) navigates a bulldozer


Soldiers trade construction for crushing


by Sgt. E.J. Hersom
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT KOBBE -A company of engineers here picked up an
unusual mission when it was asked to stop building roads and
make big rocks into little rocks.
The soldiers of Headquarters Company, 536th Engineer
Battalion (Combat) (Heavy), picked up the rock crushing
project when the Theater Equipment And Maintenance Site
motor pool fell behind schedule and Task Force Rushmore's
quarrying detachment left.
The soldiers still needed 21,000 cubic yards ofcrushedrock
and a reserve of 10,000 more when the detachment left, said
SSgt. ClydeLydic, projectnoncommissioned officerin charge.
There is always a big need for crushed rock with all the
engineering projects in U.S. Army South, Lydic said.
The engineers are getting a shale-like rock from a quarry


near the back gate of Howard Air Force Base.
They crush the rocks into three-inch pieces using a rock
crusher on loan from TaskForce Rushmore. The rockthentravels
along a conveyer belt to a point where it can be loaded into trucks
and shipped to the TEAMS construction area.
Soldiers cut costs in half by quarrying the rock themselves,
including the expense of contracting a civilian company, which
blasts the rock loose from the quarry walls weekly, Lydic said.
Working with the crusher is a hard, dirty job, Lydic said.
By the end of a shift, dust from the bursting rocks coats the
soldiers from head to toe.
"Its worse than working in a coal mine," said Sgt George
Vaughan, shift leader.
Quarrying is different than their usual road-building duties,
the soldiers are catching on quickly.
"Basically, we're turning big rocks into little rocks," Sgt. Ted
Sargent said with a grin.


Medical officers exchange ideas at


second Latin American conference


by Sgt. John Hall
Tropic Times staff
QUARRY HEIGHTS - Medical rep-
resentatives from 16 Central and South
American countries exchangedideas here
this week during the second U.S. South-
ern Command Latin American Senior
Medical Officers' Conference.
The representatives gavepresentations
ranging from the role of military medi-
cine in national development to how
medical care is delivered in rural areas.
Having active dialogue follow each
presentation was one the conference's
goals, said SOUTHCOM Command Sur-
geon Col. Ernest L. Sutton.
- "The real responses have come in the
question and answerperiod,"Sutton said.
"Each country approaches situations dif-
ferently and because they're asking so
many questions and sharing ideas, I think
we're really getting into the spirit of the
conference."
Sutton said he thinks it's important to
approach the conference from a regional


standpoint because many of the ideas
being shared are not limited to any one
single country.
"It's a very common denominator. The
more we have a chance to exchange ideas
and also to participate in mutual medical
training exercises and Southern Com-
mand subject matter expert exchanges
really enhances that feeling of coopera-
tion," Sutton said.
SOUTHCOM will get that opportu-
nity as it will be participating in nearly
every Latin American country in
MEDRETEs and subject matter expert
exchanges during the next year, accord-
ing to Sutton.
One of the senior officers planning to
take back new ideas to his country is Lt.
Col. Oscar Hamilton of the Guyana De-
fense Forces. Hamilton said the confer-
ence is important because medical offic-
ers get to know much better how their
counterparts are operating in different
regions.
"The result is to be able to adopt some
of these measures to improve our own


conditions," Hamilton said.
At the request of officers who attended
last year's conference, this year's group
was given a practical demonstration on
ground and air evacuation procedures by
members of the 142nd Medical Battalion
andthe 214th Medical Detachment Thurs-
day.
"One ofthepurposes ofthe evacuation
program was to show how to prepare non-
medical vehicles for mass casualty evacu-
ation," Sutton said. "Many countries in
the region have faced significant disas-
ters, particularly Bolivia and Ecuador
which have had substantial mud slides,"
he added.
The officers also visited the locks of
the canal which Sutton likened to a "ter-
rain walk for the infantry.
"It's like a terrain walk because the
terrain that they're walking on was where
a lot of battles with disease were fought.
Conquering problems of disease was a
major medical triumph that has a lot of
personal significance for the physicians
attending the conference," Sutton said.


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Gift of the Panama Canal Museum Tropic Times Vol. VI. No. 26 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, July 2, 1993 Income ing US. Armyphoto by Sgt EH.rH. m Soldiers from the 59th Engineer Company jump from a C-i30,on their descent to the Deblios Coates drop zone behind Howard AFB during an airborne exercise June 24. Air Force accepting 1994 Some specialties not eligible for separation force reduction applications RANDOLPH AFB, TEXAS (Air Force News Service) -People in more than 100 Air Force RANDOLPH AFB, TEXAS (Air Force News Serapply for separation or early retirement. specialities are not eligible for the voluntary sepavice) -The Air Force began accepting applications The following rated officers, current and qualified, ration incentive, special separation benefit or early Thursday forphasell ofthe fiscal 1994 Force Reduction are also excluded: F-15E pilots and weapon systems retirement under the fiscal 1994 Force Reduction Program. officers, B-lB offense/defense systems operators, F4G Program. Phase II expands the eligibility criteria for officers pilots and electronic warfare officers and those in Air The Air Force began accepting applications and enlisted members, said Air Force Military PersonForce Speciaty Code 17XX, core and duty. Thursday for phase II of the program, which has nel Center officials. Enlist embers eligible during phase I will remain now been expanded to include senior airmen, serThe initial phase of the voluntary separation inceneligible 'ring phase II. geants and staff sergeants with atotal active federal tive and special separation benefit early retirement Phase II expands the eligibility to senior airmen, military service dateofSept. 30,1978 orearlier, and programs yielded roughly half of the 1,000 officers and sergeants and staff sergeants with a total active federal technical and master sergeants with a TAFMSD of one-third of the 4,500 enlisted losses for fiscal 1994, military service date of Sept. 30, 1978, or earlier, and Sept. 30, 1976. 1 officials said. technicaland mastersergeants withaTAFMSDofSept. However, people in the following career fields Under phase II, officers and enlisted members who 30, 1976, and earlier unless in a specialty on the phase are not eligible: were previously eligible under phase I will remain II AFSC exclusion list (see story, this page). -OOXO first sergeant. -1l13XOB flight engineer specialist -helicopter. eligible and may continue applying for separation bePeopleapprovedinphaseIforthevariableseparation 11XC gh engineer spe anE nly. tween Oct. 1 and Sept. 29,1994, orretire between Oct. incentive or the special separation benefit may change -11399 flight engineer. 1 and Sept. 1, 1994. their selection to early retirement, or vice versa, before -1 14XO loadmaster C-5 and C-130 only. For officers, phase II expands eligibility for early separation or retirement. Changes should be made 45 _115XO pararescue/recovery specialist. retirement to line majors with a date of rank of Feb. 1, days before the anticipated final out-processing date. -l 17XOX airborne warning command and con1990, to May 31,1993 (1979 and 1980 promotion year Applications for separation or retirement will be trol systems operator. groups). People in these year groups do not have to be processed on a first-come, first-served basis. Personnel -118X0 airborne computer systems. deferred to apply. officials will continue to assess losses and determine Officers in legal, chaplain and medical specialties whetherto close orexpand the fiscal 1994 Force ReducSee separation, page 3 and those who were promoted below the zone may not tion Program. Seeseparation,_page_3 Inspector General lauds the DirecSee special four-page Fourth of *Murder trial, page 4. torate of Engineering and July pullout in Tropictivities sec*General reprimanded, page 5. Housing's services. tion. *AF flag football final, page 11.

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2 Tropic Times July2, 1993 New'chillers'to help cool Air Force buildings by SSgt Rian Clawson 24th Wing Public Affairs HOWARD AFB -Things will be a little cooler forthe AirForce,thanks toan air conditionerreplacementprogram getting underway here and at Albrook AFS. Some of the "chillers" now doing the air conditioning are old and unreliable, said Maj. Charles Manzione, chiefofthe 24th Civil Engineering Squadron's operations flight. "They were installed between 12 and 18 years ago, and they're just getting worn out," he said. When Air Combat Command Commander Gen. John M. Loh found out about the problem he came up with $500,000 to renovate orreplace the aging equipment. "With that money we ordered a dozen new chillers -900 tons worth of equipment -to improve service to our customers," Manzione said. ACC's Civil Engineering Technical Support Office team will install the new air conditioners in buildings 707, 708, 712, 714, 716, 717, and 238. After all 4 work is done on these facilities, 24th CE members will replacethe airconditioners and air handling units at Building 235and the Albrook Club. Other units will be installed later at buildings 703 and 706 by engineering contract. "We got the chillers in almost a years myp otoy sgtian Law ago," Manzione said. "But as you may SSgt. Richard Reed (left) and Miguel Nunez of the 24th Civil Engineering Squadron's Pavement and Equipment Shop imagine with a project this size, there prepare a site for a concrete slab. Once poured and cured, the slab will support the new air conditioner to be installed were a few glitches. Some of the auxilat Howard AFB's Building 238. iary equipment didn't come in with the chillers, and wehad to ordersomepumps, Working with the CE people at Landown, someone would call us, we'd go completed almost all the other prelimivalves and piping to complete the sysgley AFB, Va.,24th Wing civil engineers out and scrounge some parts and fix it. A nary work, Calderon said. CETSO memtem." found sources for the auxiliary equipfew days later, it would happen again, bers are scheduled to arrive and begin This became a challenge for CE to ment needed for the chillers. They coorcausing a lot of aggravation, for both us connecting the new air conditioners in overcome. dinated with Kentucky Air National and our customers." mid-July. "Often we can go into Panama City Guardsmen to bring the materials to The new chillers will not only be more There will be another benefit of getand buytheitems weneedlocally, but not Panamaon one oftheir regular rotations. reliable, they'll be much more powerful ting the new units, Calderon added. in this case," said project engineer Or"Working with the guardsmen really and efficient. "Once they've finished, we'll cannilando Calderon. helped a lot-it was a real team effort," "The chillers tied to 707 and 708 will balize usable parts from the old chillers "Most of the air conditioning equipManzione said. "They probably cut six be interconnected, as will those in 714 and combine them into two or three fully ment found downtown is for smaller ofmonths to a year off the time it would and 716,' Manzione said. "This way, if functional units," he explained. "We'll fices and private residences," he exhave taken to turn around this equipwe have to take one chiller down, the be able to install those wherever we may planned. "They just don't use big indusment." other can cool both buildings -the need them, and we'll also have a lot of trial size chillers in the local businesses Guardsmenandreservists-andmany chillers have that much reserve capacspareparts on handwe shouldn'thave here, so naturally the stores don't have others-will benefit fromthequickturnity." to order any parts from the states for a parts for them." around, because the new air conditioners Half of Howard's industrial electricwhile." This meant CE would have to order will be used to cool the Palm Tree Inn ity bill pays for cooling, the major said. "There will be about a week lag time and ship almost all ofthe auxiliary equipwhere many are billeted, several dormi"The facilities that get these new, in each of the buildings when the old ment from the United States. tories, work centers and the Trade Winds more efficient chillers should be able to chillers are disconnected and the new "Going through normal channels, this Dining Facility. trim their energy consumption by 10 ones are integrated," Manzione said. would have taken a lot of time and even "We've had problems with the chiller percent," he noted. "Temporarily, it may be a little uncommore money," Manzione said. "So, we for Building 707 and 708 for nearly two Civil engineers have already poured fortable, but I thinkpeople will agree, the came up with an alternative." years," Calderon said. "It would break the cement slabs for the units and have end results will be worth it." Army moves own ammunition, saves $200,000 by Sgt. Ler Davis The unusual cargo also makes for some unusual MEDRETEs (medical readiness training exercises) and USARSO Public Affairs Offkc training for the transporters. alot of the task force operations. This is the first time we "This is also great training for the transportation have handled this kind of cargo," he said. MINDI PIER -The Army kept $200,000 in the bank soldiers. They've never loaded an ammunition shipHandling the cargo was a tricky procedure. The whileinvesting in innovativetraining fortransportation ment," he said. military vans were lifted from the pier by cranes and soldiers during a recent ammunition retrograde. Because the trip involved a variety of sensitive lowered to the deck where they were stacked two-deep. The Army performs ammunitionretrogrades-sendmaterials, there were many safety regulations to meet. Placing the cargo required steady hands and precision ing extraammunition backto the statesbecause ofthe "Usually the unit loads to vessel specifications, but teamwork, said SSgt. Barbara Conklin, boatswain for ammunition buildup during Operation Just Cause and this time they are loading for cargo specifications," the Five Forks. the drawdown of U.S. forces in Panama, according to Merritt explained. "Loading this cargo was dangerous, but it was a lot 193rd Support Battalion Operations OfficerCapt.Frank The crew had to know which military vans could be easier because we were supported bypeople in our own Merritt. loaded together and which ones needed to be spaced unit. We have worked with the crane operators in the The Army usually hires acivilian contractor to move apart or loaded onto separate vessels, said 1st Lt. Bleu past, so we are confident of their technical expertise. It the ammunition, but this time the cargo will be shipped Hilburn, heavy boat platoon leader for the 1097th really helped us work because we know we are working by military ocean-going vessels. A Landing Craft, Transportation Company. with good NCOs who are well trained," she said. Utility 2000 willcarry21 militaryvans, and two smaller "Highly explosive materials can't be shipped toThe crews were also helped by their own training. LCU 1600s will carry five military vans each, he said. gether, so items such as fuses and explosives were There are no specialists on an LCU; everyone is a Using LCUs has several benefits, he reported. The separated and divided among the three vessels. The generalists withtraining in several tasks. Because ofthis ammunition movement will be an "opportunity lift," LCU 2000 also has five empty milvans to store vessel cross-training, the crew communicates more easily and which is shipping cargo on a vessel scheduled to make equipment during shipyard maintenance," he said. fills in for each other to get the job done, Conklin the trip empty. The LCUs were going back to the states Handling ammunition was unusual for the crew. explained. for maintenance. They primarily support task forces by transporting This job was a success in many ways, Merritt said. "We tried to find a civilian contractor in Panama to heavy equipment and supplies, said SFC James Shuler, The boat crews learned to load a new type of cargo, the do cyclic maintenance forthe LCUs, but theirbids were first mate for the LCU 2018 U.S. Army Vessel Five vessels performed an opportunity lift, the ammunition is too high. Thevessels were ontheir way to theU.S. to get Forks. getting back to the states and $200,000 stayed in the bids from contractors in the states," Merritt said. "We are committed constantly, supporting bank.

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Tropic Times July 2, 1993 inspector General lauds DEH services COROZAL (USARSO PAO) -The Directorate of corrected on the spot. his staff to research the feasibility of establishing tighter Engineering and Housing's housing division recently "The IG inspection found no unauthorized personnel rules for local rental businesses when dealing with earned high ratings from the U.S. Army South Inspector living in quarters," he said. "It was also found that the USARSO personnel." General's office, said housing officials. entitlements DoD (Department of Defense) personnel Another concern was cutting down how long it takes The inspectors focused on off-post housing referral receive were extremely accurate and families were able DEH to get quarters ready for new residents, Davis services, on-post housing services and how long it took to lease housing within their means." added. The USARSO goal is 15 days between residents. to get quarters ready for new tenants, explained Dick Inspectors commended the Pacific HRO for its The Atlantic community engineers are meeting that goal Davis, Housing Division chief. support of the volunteer program. They commended the whilethe Pacific community engineers have been unable "Systems are in place with only minor discrepanAtlantic HRO for providing transportation to those to do it consistently. cies," said Lt. Col. Harold Barnett, IG team member. looking for off-post housing and for 100 percent accu"The DEH is taking measures to reduce the Pacific "The goal of the Housing Division is to provide the racy in tracking quarters use, Davis added. time and expects immediate improvement with the start highest quality service to the soldiers, civilians and The final IG report did, however, express some up of a new comprehensive maintenance contract in family members as they make their home in Panama," concern about instances of higher-ranking people payJanuary 1994," Davis said. Davis said. "It is great to have that service validated." ing higher prices for the same type rental property, he "Ourgoalis to continuctoimprove the quality service Inspectors found housing operations improved since said. we offer our customers," said Lt. Col. John Lovo, DEH the division was last inspected in 1991, he added. "Also, about 50 USARSO personnel per year have director. Ninety-two percent of the soldiers chosen at random problems getting their deposits back from the Panama"We are happy with the improvements we've made during the inspection were satisfied with IRO service, nian Ministry of Housing or have landlords who require but are always striving to discover new and better ways Davis said. assistance beyond the abilities of HRO or the Legal to make our customers happier. Inspectors found only one mismatch when they Assistance Office," Davis said. "We want to eliminate any obstacles that may be checked the accuracy of eligibility, assignment and "Brig. Gen. George Crocker, USARSO commanding causing undue hardships on our military and civilian termination dates for on-post housing in the Atlantic and general, is concerned about protecting soldiers from any communities and do our part to make Panama the best Pacific communities, Davis said. That mismatch was unfair business practices," he added. "He has directed place to live and work in the Army," Lovo said. Separation From page 1. 11 8X1 airbome command and control communications equipment specialist, 118X2 airborne radar systems specialist, 11899 airbome command and control mission electronic systems specialist, 121XO survival training specialIst, 201X0 intelligence operations specialist, 201 X1 target intelligence specialist, 210199 intelligence operations and targeting, 202X0 signals intelligence analysis, 205X0 electronic intelligence operations specialist, 207X2 printer systems operator, 20799 communications collection/systems, 208X2X Romance cryptologic linguist specialist, 208X4X Far East cryptologic linguist specialist, 208X5X Mid East cryptologic linguist specialist, 20899 cryptologic linguist, 209X0 defense C3CM specialist, 231X3 visual information production-documentation specialist, 23199 visual information services superintendent, 242X0 disaster preparedness specialist, 251XOX weather specialist, 272X0 air traffic control operator, 273X0 combat control operator, 274X0 command and control specialist, 276X0X aerospace control and warning systems operator, 277X0 space systems operations specialist, 303X2 aircraft control and warning radar technician, 303X3X auto tracking radar specialist, 30399 ground radar, 304X2 meteorological navigation, 304X4 ground radio specialist, 304X5 television systems specialist, 30499 communications systems, 305X4 electronic computer and switching systems, 306X6 secure communications systems maintenance, 309X0 space sysU.S. Army photo by ssgL. Phillip 0. Cark tems equipment maintenance specialist, 361X1 communiEquipment is staged in the marshalling area around the ship. cations cable systems installation maintenance, 36199 antenna and cable systems installationm'aintenance, 362X1 telephone switching specialist, 451X4X tactical reconnaissance electronic sensors, 451X7 B1-B avionics test stations o rt o and computer, 45199 avionics test stations, 452X1X F-15 avionics systems s alist, 452X2X F-16 avionics systems specialist, 452X3 F/FB-111 avionics systems specialist, 45299 tactical aircraft, 454X4X aircraft pneudraulic syso m o teams, 45499 aircraft systems, 455X0X photo/sensors maintenance specialist, 455X3X weapon control systems spePIER 9, CRISTOBAL (USARSO PAO-Atlantic) -proper areas for quick and proper loading," he said. cialist, 455X4airborne warming and control radar, 455X5X The 1322nd Medium Port Command recently pulled Alvarado used a new computer system to help stage avionics support equipment specialist, 45599 conventional avionics, A456XI electronic warfare systems ("A" refix together a variety of people and tools to send Task the equipment. Each piece of equipment has a bar code only), 457X1 helicopter maintenance, 457X3X B1-/B-2 Force Rushmore's equipment sailing home. that tells the computer what the equipment is, its dimenavionics systems, 461X0 munitions systems specialist, The unit used computer technology, Task Force sions and weight. These codes are loaded into a com465X0 munitions operations specialist 472X0 special ptKRushmore soldiers and "borrowed" soldiers to get the puter that combines them with the ship's layout and pose vehicles and equipment mechanic, 472X(4 vehicle maintenance control and analysis, 47299 vehicle mainte. task force's equipment on board the U.S. Naval Ship prints out a design showing where each piece of equipnance, 491X2 conrmunications/computer systems programs Algol a day early. The I322nd is still widely known by ment should go. specialist,49199 communications/computer systems, 492X11 its former designation, the Military Traffic ManageWith Pier 9's facilities and computer planning, caos furucations systems rano operator 4922 nitUo ment Command, Panama. MTMC was ableto load containersin oneend oftheship, computer systems control specialist, 496X0 comnmunica"The good news story is Task Force Rushmore," deadlined vehicles on the top and other vehicles in the tions/computer systems program mana ement pialist, said LL Col. Scott Larrabee, 1322nd commander. lower levels of the ship, Larrabee said. 645X2 supply stems analysis speci 64 pply "The move they had to make from David was a Doing a lot of things at once -safely -is how the management, 65 1X0 contracting specialist, 674X0 financial analysis, 734X0B social actions (substance abuse SEI monumental move. MTMC soldiers work, Larrabee said. 475 only), 781XO morale, welfare, recreation and services, "The kinds of things we see in MTMC -Team "The key to good ship loading is to have simultaneous 821X0 special investigations, 881X0 paralegal, 901X0 Spirit or REFORGER -don't rival it. They had a things going on. The most important thing is safety. We aefrmedical specialist, 902XO medical services specialist, 902X2X surgical services, 90299 medical services, 903XO good deal of deadlined equipment. Getting it all ready changed slings three times because they didn't meet the radiology specialist, 903X1 nuclear medicine, 90399 radi-they did an outstanding job," he said. standards. All you need is one slip up and it will hold up ology, 904X0cardiopulmonary laboratory specialist, 905X0 One of the 1322nd's advantages was the useof Pier the entire operation," he said. pharmacy specialist, 906X0 health services management 9. At the same time MTMC was getting ready for the support, 907XO bioenvironmental engineering, 908XOpubA ., t lie health specialist, 911X0 aerospace physiology special"Pier9is agreat port," Larrabee said. "Pier9 moves Task Force Rushmore redeployment, the command was ist, 912X5Xoptometry specialist,91299optometry,913X0 about 6,000 containers a month supporting Panama in Guatemala doing a redeployment, Larrabee said. physical therapy specialist, 913X1 occupational therapy and the Free Zone. They blocked it and the marshalCovering two operations prompted Larrabee to take e specialist, 91 medical mat iel a 918 ling area off for us to use for this exercise." the unusual step of contacting his higher headquarters in biomedical equipment maintenance specialist, 919X0 "You couldn't bring this vessel into any other port Bayonne, N.J. He was ableto "borrow" people front New orthotic specialist, 924X0 medical laboratory specialist, in Panama for this quick of loading. By having this Orleans to help. 924X1 histopathology specialist, 92499 medical laborafacility it also allowed us to get this vessel from The 1322nd used a lot of people and tools to load the tory, 925X0 cytotechnology specialist, 926X0 diet therapy ( iy)SaLft specialist, 981X0 dental assistant, 982X0 dental laboratory (M ry Command. task force's equipment, but it could not have happened specialist, 99103 interpreterAranslator, -99104 systems Oncethe1322ndgot useofthepier, MSgt.Ricardo if the task force had failed to get all its vehicles from repair technician, 99105 scientific measurements techniAlvarado, the noncommissioned officer in charge, David to the pier, Larrabee said. cian, 9106 appe aie s technician, took over the job of staging the equipment. Automation helped with the loading, he noted, but so reel flights by calling 284-5606. "(He) had been instrumental in working with the "nothing beats blood sweat and tears to make it work. It's task force and personally staged the equipment in the only as good as the people who use it."

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4ropi Tie Hemisphere July 2, 1993#H m ph r Former local official's murder trial begins Tuesday PANAMA CITY, Panama (AP) -Hugo Spadafora strangling American trade embargo, international scorn Initially, 23 military men were accused, but only 10 had a most unusual career: he was a doctor, a rebel, a andeventually ahumiliating American invasion in 1989 will go on trial next month, facing the possibility of fighter of rebels, a government official, a crusader in which he was captured and brought to the United Panama's maximum sentence, 20 yearsinprison, Carlos against government corruption. States. Augusto Herrera, who is prosecuting the case, told The His end was just as spectacular -a headless corpse The trial over Spadafora's murder starts Tuesday in Associated Press. in a mail sack in the jungle. the city of David in Chiriqui province near the Costa "Forus the start of the trial signifies the last phasein After eight years, the trial of his accused killers, Rican border. thelong and painfulroadthat began Sept. 13,1985, with including former Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega, is to Spadafora graduated from medical school in Italy in the vile and cowardly assassination of Hugo," said begin Tuesday. Noriega, serving a 40-year sentence in 1964 and was a volunteer doctor for rebels in indepenWinston Spadafora, Hugo's brother, a lawyer who is the United States for drug trafficking, will be tried in dence movements in Africa for the next two years. Noriega's formal accuser. absentia. Later, in Panama, he tended wounded rebels in the Noriegahas asked both the United States andPanama The trial promises to resurrect some of the more urban fights that arose after the military kicked out to return him to his homeland to take part in the trial but controversial moments of Panama's painful past. popular president Arnulfo Arias in 1968. predictedit would not happen because "the government Spadafora was an outspoken enemy of Noriega, The same military named him vice-minister of health of President Guillermo Endara is afraid of the truth." whom he accused of trafficking in weapons and drugs, in the late 1970s, but in 1978 he organized the volunteer Noriegaclaims he wasinFrance when Spadaforawas of planning a dictatorship and of plotting the death in a Victoriano Lorenzo Brigadeto fight theleftistSandinistas killed. plane crash of the populist dictator Gen. Omar Torrijos in Nicaragua's revolution thattoppled dictatorAnastasio Noriega refused to order an investigation despite in 1981. Somoza a year later. requests. He had been quoted as saying he hoped his next fight In 1985, he returned to Nicaragua to fight the Winston Spadafora said when Barletta tried to form would be against the Panamanian military. Sandinistas, who lost power in elections in 1990. such a commission the military ousted him two weeks Attempts to investigate Spadafora's 1985 death reAccording to court papers, Spadafora, then 43, was afterthe body was found. Barletta was one ofa string of suited in the military, then headed by Noriega, forcing returning from Nicaragua by bus Sept. 13, 1985, crossPanamanian presidents who were installed and dumped the resignation that year of President Nicolas Ardito ing into Panama from Costa Rica. by Noriega. Barletta. Witnesses saidhe was taken from the bus by PanamaAfter the invasion the Endara government appointed Noriega took over the military and, in effect, the nian soldiers. His body was found the next day on the acommission toinvestigate the case and named aspecial government, in 1983. His seven-year regime led to a Costa Rican side of the border. pr9secutor to handle it. Fidel Castro says Clinton less hostile HAVANA (Reuters) -Cuban president Fidel Castro, in the clearest indication yet of less tense relations with theUnitedStates, has said President Bill Clinton shows less hostility toward Cubathanprevious U.S presidents. "This new administration does not show the same level of hostility and aggressiveness as its predecessors," the Cuban leader told a session of Cuba's National Assembly, the nation's parliament Monday. His remarks were reported by Cuba's official media Prensa Latina and Granma Tuesday. However, Castro kept up his attack ontheU.S.tradeembargo, again Cuba saying nine out of 10 foreign firms that want to do business with Cuba are scared off by the embargo. S a i g "Without the embargo, we cannot even estimate how much we would A security guard for ousted Guatemalan President Jorge Serrano keeps watch outside the Torre La Cresta apartment have advanced in many fields," he complex in Panama City. Serrano, who's in exile in Panama, moved from th e Marriott Hotel into the apartment complex said. about two weeks ago. "If it weren't for the embargo," Castro said, "our country wouldn' t have as many enterprises shut down ba io have maderia coraby Crew-less, damaged tanker carrying andit would have made considerably moreprogress in prospecting foroil." The National Assembly devoted sulfuric acid floats adrift in Mexico mostofitssessiontotheenergycrisis MEXICO CITY (AP) -A damaged beachesafterTuesday'saccident,andthe In 1989, the Soviet Union suptanker carrying 4,000 tons of highly cornavy was warning passing ships away Sulfuric acid, also known plied Cuba with 13 million tons of rosive sulfuric acid and300 tons of crude from the Playa Azul area, about 50 miles as hydrogen sulfate or oil. Oil imports this yearareexpected oil broke away from a tugboat and was north of the popular Pacific coastal reto be below six million tons. The adrift Wednesday without a crew near sorts of Zihuatenejo and Ixtapa. battery acid, is a highly island expects to produce about one several of Mexico's west coast resorts. The ship docked at the port of Lazaro corrosive, oily liquid that millions tons ofdomestic oilin 1993. By late Tuesday, the Norwegian ship, Cardenas last week and unloaded about when mixed with water can The Cuban leader charged that the Betula, had drifted less than a mile 5,000 tons of sulfuricacid beforeits crew "the United States exercises great west of the coast ofPlaya Azul, a Pacific evacuated and it was towed out to sea cause a spattering of small pressures on countries, enterprises coast beach resort in the western state of early Tuesday because of damage to its explosions. andindividuals who want to carry on Michoacan, said Red Cross spokesman pumping mechanism, the news release commercial operations with our naCarlos Sanchez. said. explosions. The liquid can burn skin and tion." Heavyrainsand waves thathadpushed Some acid spilledinthe harbor and the its fumes can cause asphyxiation. Castro said because of pressures the tanker earlier in the evening had Betula was removed to a safer area to Dr. Federico Garcia, aresearcher with brought by U.S officials overseas and subsided and it was no longer moving prevent greater damage. But the tanker the National University's Chemical Insti"by the ambassadors themselves," toward the coast, he said. started listing 10 degrees to starboard tute, said that if even a small amount of only the most "valiant" foreign enAccording to a government news rewhen the tow cable snapped. the chemical begins leaking out of the terprises carry on business with Cuba. lease Tuesday, officials were planning to The news release said some gas was ship, its corrosive qualities could burn The 31 -year-old economic emremove the cargo from the damaged Norreleased into the air in the harbor when holes in the ship, causing it to leak even sified shortly before the U.S presiwegian ship, the Betula, and transfer it to the acid reacted with sea water, but no one more. denial election last year when Presianother vessel. was injured. Once in the water, the chemical could dent Bush signed the so-called But the Red Cross said Wednesday Sulfuric acid, also known as hydrogen then spread quickly, causing an extensive Torricelli Bill into law. morning that heavy rains overnight had sulfate or battery acid, is a highly corrospill that could be hard to contain, he said. The law prohibits U.S subsidiardelayed the removal of the acid. sive, oily liquid that when mixed with The acid also could kill fish and other Government troops had cleared nearby water can cause a spattering of small marine life in the area.

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Tropic TimesC Military News Jly29 AF general retires after Tailhook remarks about Clinton Scandal prompts Navy WAS HINGTON (Air Force News Service) -An Air However, general Campbell's conduct was wrong and to discipline 41 officers Force general forfeited nearly $7,000 in pay and retired cannot be tolerated." WASHINGTON (AP) -In the Navy's days of Thursday for remarks he made about the president at a McPeak, speaking for the entire Air Force, said, "We yore, sailors who fell asleep on watch, brawled or military awards banquet. understand the absolute requirement for respect up and defied orders were summoned to the tallest mast to Air Force officials concluded that Maj. Gen. Harold down the chain of command. be clapped in irons or a dozen lashes. N. Campbell violated Article 88 of the Uniform Code "As we conclude this unfortunate incident there The whips are gone, but the Navy is using the of Military Justice by making disparaging remarks should be no doubt about the lesson learned. The "captain's mast" proceedings to discipline officers about President Clinton at Soesterberg AB, the Nethermilitary leadership of this country not only believes in for what it deems minor offenses in the Tailhook lands, May 24. and supports, but insists on, the integrity of the chain of sexual assault scandal. Campbell had been the deputy chiefof staff forplans command." Vice Admiral J. Paul Reason has conducted a and programs at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. Gen. In a memorandum to Defense Secretary Les Aspin, series of "admiral's masts" at Atlantic Fleet headRonald W. Yates, Air Force Materiel Command comMcPeak thanked the secretary and the president for quarters in Norfolk, Va., to discipline officers for mander, imposed non-judicial punishmenton Campbell, letting the Air Force handle the situation, such Tailhook offenses as indecent exposure. which included a letter of reprimand, to become a part "I feel very strongly that you and the president have Forty-one officers have been disciplined thus far of his permanent record, and forfeiture of one-half every right to expect that your Air Force will be the -given letters ofreprimand or fined $1,000 -for month's basic pay for two months. world's most professional and most disciplined -indecent exposure at the 1991 convention of the "He (Campbell) agreed he made a mistake and we meant in the very best sense these words convey. Tailhook Association, a Navy aviator's booster applied the appropriate penalties," Gen. Merrill A. "Withyoursupport,wehave workedourwaythrough organization. McPeak, Air Force chiefofstaff told reporters at a June to a solution that is appropriate in every way," McPeak In today's down-sizing Navy, such reprimand 18 press conference. said. "That is, we will both protect the rights of the letters usually spell the end of an officer's career, While citing Campbell's 32 years of honorable serofficerinvolvedandwillsustainintegrityandrespectfor halting their promotion in the military's "up-orvice, McPeak said, "I am saddened by this event. the chain of command." out" system, Pentagon officials say. An investigation by the Pentagon's inspector general determined that morethan two dozen women were pinched, groped or disrobed when forced to run a gauntlet of drunken Navy and Marine Corps aviators at the Las Vegas Hilton Hotel. The investigation found that an "atmosphere of debauchery" prevailed at the three-day convention. Strippers performed in hospitality suites and, in some instances, engaged in public, consensual sex with officers. The Pentagon's inspector general referred 120 cases of alleged misconduct to the Navy and another 20 to the Marine Corps. Under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, any officer or enlisted sailor summoned to a captain's mast may opt to be court-martialed, which would % entitle them to apublic hearing and the opportunity to cross-examine witnesses. Reason, the vice admiral, has referred accusations of more serious wrongdoing by three officers for possible courts martial, which could result in criminal convictions in the Navy's judicial system. One of the officers, a commander, is accused of assault and lying under oath. Four Marine Corps officers have also been disciplined for "conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman" at "office hours," the equivalent APLCe p oto proceeding being conducted by Lt. Gen. Charles C. Krulak at Quantico, Va. A Somali boy with his hands up passes through a U.S. Army checkpoint in Mogadishu, Somalia Krulak referred a fifth officer for possible court Wednesday. Soldiers sealed off an area around the airport searching for weapons. After several incidents martial. with Somali gunmen this week, security measures were increased and the search for weapons was Court martial convictions carry the possibility of intensified. prison; those convicted have criminal records. In the original captain's masts, a sailor found guilty of drunkenness, profanity or "any other scandalous conduct tending to the destruction of Sailors claim chemical weapons pubcn 1 les. no more than 12 lashes. Hging was abolished in 1850 and irons have injured them in Persian Gulf W ar given way to less drastic punishments such as confinement to ship, base or quarters. But ship commanders conducting "captain's WASHINGTON (AP) -A Senate subcommittee is since some are seriously ilL mast" proceedings can still put sailors on three-day investigating claims by Navy veterans that they were The subcommittee planned to use Wednesday's indiets of bread and water for minor infractions such injured by chemical weapons during the Persian Gulf quiry instead to question the Pentagon medical officials as fighting, contempt for orders or indifference to War and ordered to keep quiet about it. about the possibility that some American troops may duty. The Senate Armed Services subcommittee on force have been exposed to chemical weapons during the war. Non-judicial punishments include restrictions to requirements and personnel called three military sur"We owe it to America's Desert Storm veterans to base or ship of not more than 60 days and extra geon generals and the Pentagon's top civilian health provide an honest appraisal of the cause of their medical official to testify Wednesday about the alleged chemical problems," Shelby said. "But more than that, we owe Officers don't have to suffer the indignity of weapons attack, which was disclosed Sunday by The them proper diagnosis and treatment." bread and water. But they can be demoted in grade, Birmingham News. According to the account, the chemical attack came rank or seniority or have their pay docked. Sen. Richard Shelby, D-Ala., chairman of the panel, about 3:30 a.m., several hours after Scud missile alerts Anyone called to a "captain's mast" has theriht promised that Wednesday's hearing would be "the first had ended and the seabees were asleep in their tents to hear the charges and present a defense. step toward getting to the bottom of what happened on Larry Perry of Gold Hill, N.C., a former chief petty Courts-martial and so-cled non-judicial punthe nght of Jan. 20, 1991. officer who retired because of health problems, told the ishments have their origins in the British navy. In Veterans of a Navy Reserve seabee unit told the newspaper an explosion sent the seabees scrambling 1775, the Continental Congress incorporated these newspaper they believe they were hit by chemical weapwith gas masks to nearby bomb shelters. practices in the "Rules and Regulations ofthe Navy ons that night while stationed near an air strip south of After the all-clear sounded, Perry said, the seabees of the United ColonistN" the port of Al Jubayl on the Persian Gulf. emerged from the shelters and about a dozen of them In 1800, Congress codified te "Rules and They said they were told not to talk about the incident gathered near a latrine, where they first realized they but decided to break their silence because they have been were surrounded by a mist. Regulations for theGovemeit ofthe United States unable to obtain government medical care for health "All ofmy exposed skin was like it was on fire," Roy Navy, which gave ship captains discretion to problems they believe stem directly from the attack. Butler, one ofthose near the latrine, told the newspaper. punish ofNenders for minor violations. None of the alleged victims were scheduled to testify "It was burning like crazy. I couldn't breathe. I had to nih Navy regulations for non-judicial punishWednesday. A Shelby aide said there wasn't sufficient take my mask off and clear my nose. I immediately imens have ben recodified by Congress several time for them to make travel arrangements, particularly thought we got.gassed." times since, most recently m 1962.

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Tropic Times Voices July 2, 1993 V i e Motorist questions ID card check policy Dear Mayors' Corner, ters and willnot cover their eligibility again same as military people forfeit their Basic Why is it that Howard AFB security here. Housing Allowance and Overseas Houspolice sicheckingidentificationcards Regarding civilians who moved onto ing Allowance. 24 hours a day? This is getting ridiculous I ployees are still occupying housing units post before Just Cause, Dick Davis, chief The civilian employee has the same Tired of being hassled by SPs on Fort Clayton? of Family Housing for Directorate of Enneeds, wants and work schedules of most I was told that those civilians who had gineering and Housing, said the situation military personnel, Davis said. Policies Dear Tired, moved onto post before Just Cause would was evaluated at that time and it was and procedures are reviewed continuously The 24-hour check was implemented be asked to return to housing downtown decided that there was adequate govemto make sure that changes to the needs of by the 24th Wing commander because of after the war in order to accommodate the ment housing for both civilian employall personnel are met. the amount of people violating the visitalarge number of active duty families waitees and military people. After Just Cause, An example of those changes is the tion policy and the increase of criminal ing. civilian employees were given an option to June23,1992, policy ammendmentwhereby activity at Howard. It is the general's I personally know of several civilians, return to the local economy but it was not civilian employees are no longer given responsibility to Air Force members and some of whom are single, who have a a forced issue. transportation agreements to live in govthe Air Force to provide an environment complete unit to themselves. At this time, the housing division is not emient housing in Panama. that keeps these incidents from happenIn addition, they are not required to aware of any single civilian employees ing. pay for these units, unlike the rest of the residing in Army controlled housing by Editor's note: This col tumi allows Since these policies have been implemilitary community. Is this true? themselves. community members to submit quesmented, criminal activity, along with violaPlease respond to these questions and If you are aware of this kind of situation, tions to the Mayoral Congress. Letters tions of the visitation policy, have declarify this housing situation in detail. Davis asks that you notify the housing should be malted to: Mayors'A 3400 creaseddramatically.Therefore,thispolicy Tired of mediocrity division so it can investigate. (MPS). Anonymity will begranted upon will remain in effect until further notice. It is not tree that civilians "are not request The Tropic Times reserves the Dear Tired, required to pay for these units." Davis said right et letters and responses for Dear Mayors' Corner, On June 11 we covered the issue of when civilians are assigned housing, they brevity, clarity and propriety. Why is it that so many civilian emcivilian employees in government quarforfeit their Living Quarters Allowance the Military police patrol nabs drunk driver on Fort Davis Soldier charged with drunk, reckless driving P o o tM rh lsC r e A Fort Davis soldier was charged with reckless and drunk driving last week after he passed an MP patrol in a no-passing zone. Mail boxesdamaged Drunk driving is a dangerous act that will not be Post office officials have reported a number of attolerated. For those who have had too much to drink, let tempted larcenies at installation post offices here rea friend drive or call a taxi. cently. It appears someone has attempted to pry open various mail boxes, presumably to steal mail. Youth center robbed The military police recommend that people check U SA R SO releases Military police are investigating the theft of an inflatmail boxes daily and not allow mail to remain in the box able ball valued at $60 from the Fort Clayton Youth overnight. courts m partial list Center. Thieves entered the building by breaking a window. The following crimes are for on post housing areas for FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -U.S. Army Anyone having more information that may help June 18-24. South Officials released the following courts martial identify those responsible for the theft and damage results for the month of June: should call the Military Police Investigations Section at Pacific PFC Mark Lagrone, Company B, 5th Battalion, 287-5252. 87th Infantry Regiment, was convicted of absence Fort Clayton 300 area -one larceny of unsecured without leave, failure to repair, missing movement Panama National Police private property, one larceny of unsecured government and wrongful use of cocaine. He was sentenced to arrest thief near Gorgas property reduction to private one, forfeiture of all pay and Panama National Police arrested a Panama City man Fort Clayton 600 area -one larceny of secured allowances, confinement for 10 months and a bad waescondut iae near Gorgas Army Community Hospital last week when private property, one larceny of unsecured private propSSgt. Valerie Hunter, Headquarters Company, they saw him carrying a television. An investigation erty US. Army Garrison-Panama, was convicted of larrevealed the man stole the television from a car parked Fort Clayton 900 area -one larceny of unsecured ceny. She was sentenced to reduction to private one, in a lot near the hospital. The PNP released the stolen private property forfeiture of $537 per month for three months, property to the MPs. Curundu housing area -two larcenies of secured confinement for 30 days A a bad conduct disExperienced thieves can break into most vehicles private property charge. quickly. MPs recommend not leaving high value items Fort Amador -one larceny of secured government PFC Ciriaco Cuenco, Company A, 5th Battalion, in automobiles. property, one larceny of secured private property, one 87th Infantry Regiment, was convicted of conlarceny of unsecured private property, one housebreakspiracy, making a false official statement and wrongReservist arrested for ing ful introduction, importation and distribution of taking midnight swim Herrick Heights -one larceny of unsecured private cocaine. He was sentenced to reduction to private A U.S. Army Reserve soldier was arrested when MPs property one, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, confinefound him in the Fort Espinar swimming pool after Fort Kobbe 300 area -one larceny of secured private ment for 15 months and a bad conduct discharge. hours. The soldier fled the area but was later found at his property, one larceny of unsecured private property Spec. Richard Dean Jr., Company A, 1st Battalbarracks. An unidentified female who was also seen in Fort Kobbe 400 area -one housebreaking ion, 228th Aviation Regiment, was convicted of the pool escaped. drunk driving. He was sentenced to a reprimand, Entering the pool after hours is trespassing. Those Atlantic forfeiture of $400 pay per month for four months and who want to visit the pool must do so during normal Fort Espinar -one larceny of unsecured private restriction for 15 days. operating hours. property Commander in Chief.Gen. George A. Joulwan Student editorial staff.Frank Pigeon Jr. U.S. Army SouthPAO-Atlantic. Director, Public Affairs.Col. James L.Fetig Shevone Ward SSgt.PhillipClark.289-4312 Chief.SMSgt. SteveTaylor Southern Command PublicAffairsOffice. This authorized unofficial command information publicaEditor.SFC Joseph Ferrare JohnSell.282-4278 tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is Assistant Editor.SSgL Deborah E. Williams U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office. published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Sports Editor.Sgt. Richard Puckett SSgt.JaneUsero.287-3007 Program of the Department of Defense, under the superviEditorial Staff.Sgt. John Hall 24th Wing Public Affairs Office. sion of the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command. Rosemary Chong MSgL Dale Mitcham.284-5459 Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official Maureen Sampson U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office. view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or DebbiclErhart.283-5644 the U.S. Southern Command. The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Telephone 285-6612. -#Tropic Times

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Sports Page 11 Quarry Heights, Republic of'Panama July 2,1993 Security police cuff football title Running back's pre-game speech motivates battle-weary teammates by Sgt James A. Rush sped around his right tackle to the secu24th Wing Public Affairs rity police 25. An encroachment call tacked on five more yards on the followHOWARD APB-Two mounted secuing down, giving the Navy first and goal. rity policemen showed their team the The elusive running back dashed toway to victory by riding their horses to ward the end zone again, but was stopped the intramural football championship onthesevenbysecuritypolice defensive game here Monday night. The 24th Secuback Kevin "Knee High" Costa. A secrity Police Squadron team took the cue ond down play-action pass nearly put and saddled up running back Donnell Nance into the end zone, but Wallace, "D.R.W." Wallace who carried them to a playing defensive back, pulled Nance's 7-0 win over the Navy. flag just inches from the goal line. The security police won the winner's The Navy seemed ready to score, but N bracket of the double elimination playwhen the Navy runner tried to burst into offs, but lost the first game of the night the end zone, he was called for inten13-0 to theregular seasonrunner-up Navy tional aggressive running, a penalty that team. pushed them back to the 15. In flag Wallace used up much of the 30football, runners must try to avoid conminute intermission giving an inspiratact with defensive players. tional speech. I_______________ Quarterback "What saidtothe Aaron Jones' last team was, 'We came "What I said to the ditch pass attempt here together and team was, 'We came was thwarted by we're going out linebacker Fiafia together.on top! here together and we're Seau and lineman Wallace said. "As going out together. .on David Houtz. The long as we played totwo blitzed in and gether, nobody was top!' As long as we threw up a wall of usFoce photo by SSg. Ronad Kuimbrlain going to beat us. We played together, nobody arms to swat away Navy quarterback Aaron Jones looks downfield for an open receiver as played too hard all was going to beat us. the fourth down teammate Stephan Jones and Security Police defender Robert Joneslooks on. year long to lose. pass. down to 48 seconds. Tabury made the Thesailors'first scorecamelateinthe "If one person We played too hard all The security most of his second chance,lifting ahigh first half. Starting near midfield, they breaks down, then year long to lose." police defense alpunt that Eric Brown fielded on the onecovered ground quickly. Tight end whole team breaks lowed the Navy yard line. LeondrayNancecaughttwopassespushdown. Istressed that. Wallace only eight plays in Brown managed to slip out to the 15 on ing the ball to the seven-yard line. We didn't have all two more possesthe play, giving his offense some breathA. Jones lost his flags while scramthe best athletes on Securty Police running back sions. ing room. The Navy fell back on its new bling on the next play, taking the Navy the team but we Things got gimmick play, a wide-out pass. back to the 17-yard line and bringing up played together. The line blocked, the even tougher for the Navy in the second The wide-out fared no better than the third down. The quarterback recovered receivers caught the ball and the defense half. It was three plays and punt for the quarterbackthough. Onceagain Haywood though. On the next play, he drilled the played defense." team's first two possessions. Security moved in to steal the ball away, this time ball into the hands of Patrick Isom for the The halfback backed up his words on police defensive end William "Taco" clinching the game. touchdown. thefield when thepolicetookthe secondLimtiaco was the rally killer. He caught "I felt we were just as fast as their Security police linebacker Wayne halfkickoff at their own 30. Wallace got up to Jones twice, sacking him in conreceivers. He couldn't have beat me ei"Saint" St. Clair batted away the pass on thecallon the first threeplays and carried secutive series. ther long or short," said Haywood. "We the point after attempt. the ball to the Navy 36. A pushing call The sailor's defense shut down the were forcing them to throw the ball and The Navy's second score came on against the Navy defense put the ball on policeto keep the game within reach, but they didn't come to my side all game. their first possessionin thesecond half. S. the Navy 23. their offense wasn't able to capitalize. "I wasn't thinking about it being the Jones caught a screen pass and wove his Left guard Richard Buck sucked in a On one fourth. down play, security game, I was just playing my man, giving way to the two-yard line. Hetookahandshort pass and turned it into a big gain by police punter Peter Tabury sent the ball 110 percent every down. It looked like it off two plays later and ran in for six lumbering to the two-yard line. Quarternearly 30 yards. Unfortunately, it was was going out but I managed to stay in points. The back also surged up the middle back Frank Ashley followed a big surge straight up. with it." for the point after. by his offensive line into the end zone on The return put the ball on the Navy 30 Staying with it was what Navy coach Winning easily in the first game and the next play. with two minutes left. It looked like the Matt Hert knew his team would have to being so close in the second was a big Wallace slashed throughthe middle of break the sailors needed. do to pull off an upset. accomplishment for the Navy team that the line for the point after and the last S.Jones scrambled to his 39-yard line "We came into the last two games to lost to the security police in their first score of the game. on first down. Instead of going after the win both ofthem," said Navy head coach game of the season 18-0. The securitypolice continuedto move easy first down at mid-field, the Navy Matt Hert. "I thought I had the personnel "I'm not disappointed. This is best the ball throughout the game, with tried to catch the security police defento do it with, however, the SPS team football team the naval station has ever Wallace carrying it 11 more times. The sive backs off guard. basically made the big plays." had," Hert said. "Now we're looking Navy defense kept them from scoring A. Jones faded backto pass, looked to In the first game earlier that night, it forward to bigger challenges such as the again, but couldn't keep them from eathis left and fired toward the sideline was the Navy who controlled the game. Fourth of July Bowl and Turkey Bowl. ing up precious time. where cornerback Derek "A.K.A." They dominated offensively and their "Our goal was to gel together and After allowing the touchdown, the Haywoodwaslurking.Haywoodswooped defensecameupstrong whenitneededto becomeaunitand wedidthat. Inthatlast Navy launched a counteroffensive startin front ofthe receiver to pick offthe toss. stop the police from scoring. SPS failed game, even though they were up 7-0 the ing from its own 31-yard line. The security police were unable to toreachthe end zone despite threedrives whole time, it could have gone either Stephan Jones took the hand-off and gain a yard but managed to run the clock inside the Navy 20. way. My hat's off to SPS." U.S. Army Garrison soccer team Army family member gives new *AF tennis star, page 12 takes show on road with match exercise program a high-spirited *Summer Sensations, page 14 against Panamanian team. boost. *Atlantic basketball, page 15

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12 Tropic Times 1July 2, 1993 Tennis star serves up tourney title by SSgt. Rian Clawson 24th Wing Public Affairs HOWARD AFB -After winning three straight matches, and forfeiting a fourth because of a scheduling dispute, Kazuo Townsend came back to beat Gabriel Lacayo in the semi-finals match 7-6,4-6,6-1 and again in the finals match 6-4,6-2 forHoward's '93 Intramural Singles Tennis Championship. Thirty-one players entered the double elimination tournament when it began June 7. Townsend, a35-year-old AirForce-major assigned to the 24th Communications Squadron, attributed his success to his ability to consistently keep the ball in play and "practice, practice, practice!" One aspect of the match that made it tough for the players was the fact that they're both left-handed. "It's a lot different playing another lefty," Lacayo said. The 22-year-old senior airman, assigned to the 24th Weather Squadron, has been playing tennis since high school. "I'm used toplaying right handed players-the ball spins the opposite way when a lefty hits it," he explained. "To compensate I had to hit it straight and put a topspin on it and I'm not used to hitting that way. As a result, I made mistakes. Townsend just took advantage of them." "It was a tough match," Townsend admitted. "Lacayo has a powerful stroke and he put a lot of top spin on the ball. Trying to return the ball the same way was tough." So tough, in fact, that Townsend broke a string on two different rackets during their matches. "I was on my third racket when I finally beat him," Townsend added with a grin. Lacayo also broke a string in his racket while warming up and he had to finish the match with a borrowed racket. Earlier in the tournament, Lacayo also defeated Amett Farley, a technical sergeant who placed third and U.S. A, Force photo by SSgt. Ri-n CAwson works for Townsend in the 24th Communication SquadKazuo Townsend returns a shot during a practice match. Townsend won the Howard AFB 1993 Intramural ron.SngsTnnstteJn2. "I was beginning to think it would be 'the Battle of Singles Tennis title June 23. Comm,"' Townsend said. "Farley was doing well Although he said he really enjoys competing, year-old son Abram, who's learning how to play the enough that I though it could be him and me in the final Townsend said his main reason for playing tennis is the game. match." Then Farley injured his back moving furniture exercise. "I've always enjoyed playing football and "That kind ofcontact, I can handle," Townsend said. and was subsequently unable to move fast enough to basketball, but I think I'm getting too old for those Apparently, he can also handle the kind of contact avoid defeat at Lacayo's hands. 'contact' sports," he added, smiling. found when atennis racket slams a tennis ballin a hard, The comebackvictory-from theloser's bracketThe only "contact" he gets from tennis is when he cross-court smash.otherwise, he wouldn't be the didn't surprise Townsend, "but I'll take it," he said. slips and hits the ground, or when he works with his 6champ. U.S. Army Garrison takes on local soccer team As the ministry players began to pick lies sharing so much caby Sgt. E.J. Hersom apart the USAG defense, Monteza beat maraderie and fun." USAR____Pub____A ___________c__ USAG's goalie to the ball and trickled a Those attending the ALBROOK AFS -Enrique Monteza shot into the net. game included Vice of the Panama Ministry of Government "We all wanted the best team to win," Minister Luis Carlos and Justice soccer team scored a tiesaid the ministry's team captain Cesar Raul Trujillo Sagel, breaking goal in the last minute of Gutierrez. "I guess we are the best team Aracelis Morales, chief 4r Sunday's match against U.S. Army Garbecause we won, but-the soldiers put up of Panama's Marketing rison to give his team a 2-1 victory. a big challenge for us and they are defiand Budget Department, The idea for the unusual match-up nitely an excellent team." Lic Avaro Varela, chief came from Cesar and A bdiel Gutierrez, USAG team captain Abdiel Gutierrez of the legal department, brothers who found themselves on two said the ministry team was very orgaCol. M. Jeffry Petrucci, winning soccer squads and saw it as an nized and had played together a long U.S. Army Garrisonopportunity for Panamanian -U.S. intertime, which was a big factorin the game. Panama commander and action. The USAG team went undefeated Capt. Hugh McNeely, The game was the first of what orgaduring the U.S. Army South soccerleague commander of Headnizers hope is a series ofgames involving while the ministry team is holding second quarters Company, Army teams and those from Panama's place in Panama's Government League. USAG-Panama. Government League. The Gutierrez brothers came up with "Wearenot doing this The underdog USAG team shocked the idea to play each others' teams when as often as we should, thecrowdin the firstminutes ofthe game they talked about how well the teams McNeely said. "It is an when it set up Miguel Ortiz forthe game's were doing. They decided to do it during honor to havethis friendfirst goal. Panama's Family Week and invite the ship game." The ministry came back later in the families and chains of command from It was an honor for us Army photo by L .J Hersom first half when Manuel Dormoi nailed a each side. the players as well, said US Army Garrison's Miguel Ortiz triesto get the ball shot into the USAG goal to tie the game. "I have no word to express my emothe ministry's Roberto p Anma Mi gu O rnment dee bas. Thesecond half started slowly as both tionto experience ti Jay,"said Yolanda Dean. past Panama Ministry of Government defenders. defenseskepttheotherteam'soffensesin de Gutierrez, mother of the Gutierrez "Withthisget-togetherwefeelastronThe ministry invited USAG for a check. By the middle of the second half, brothers. ger friendship with the soldiers. We conrematch on their field at a date to be the ministry showed off its team play by "It is wonderful to see my two sons siderthem our friends and enjoy sharing determined, Abdiel Gutierrez said. keeping the action near the USAG goal playing this friendly game and to see our sports interests with them," Dean USAG's next game will be with the with crisp, accurate passing. Panamanian families and American famiadded. Panamanian National Police, he added.

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Tropic Times 1 July 2, 1993 13 U.S. Army photo, by gt. Richard Puckett Jazzercise instructor Dradine Lee gets class fired up during Monday's session. Instucto All tha Jazzercize ~complicated professional dance moves, Ins tructor she said. All of the dance programs have been tested by experts and are labeled by difkeeps classficulty level. As the instructor, Lee takes the multion its toes tude of possible routines and plans a workout tailored to the student's fitness ALBROOK AFS -Dradine Lee'slevel. Jazzercize class is just a month old, but Each student must fill out a health she feels likeit's been running for years. screening form, then Lee works closely "I've only been teaching this class for with the students to avoid injury. ashort time and we've already gotexcel"A lot of times you walk into an lentinstructor-studentrelationship workaerobics class and never talk to the ining,"she said."That makes the class alot structor," she said. "With the forms I of fun." know immediately about my students. Lee is the only intructor in Panama There's alot more feedback." who teaches the unique workout program Lee, who arrived in Panamain March, called Jazzercise. has been teaching Jazzercize since 1989. Every Monday, Wednesday and FriThe 30-year-old soldier's wife and day from 5-6 p.m. Lee and 10 to 15 mother of two instructs for her health students step intothe Albrook AFS Sports "I love dancing and this is agreat way and Fitness Center for a high-stepping, Bernadette Fraser and Monica Parker get into the groove during Jazzercise of combining it with exercise," she said. foot-stomping, sweat-filled 60 minutes. class. "I plan on doing this for a long time. Unlike aerobics, which varies from That's where the fun comes in, Lee pop and country. The variety is achange They're going to wheel meoffthe floor." instructor to instructor, Jazzercize is a said. of pace from normal aerobics." For information or to sign up for the franchised operation based on jazz dance "We aren't locked into a certain type Each exercise is a total body workout class, call the Albrook SFC at 286-3307, step techniques. of music," Lee said. "We use R&B, rap, made up of of aerobic exercise and nonor Lee at 287-4099.

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14 Tropic Times July 2, 1993 Coach Horst "Lemmy" Lemley shows Vincent Holman and Caroline Walters proper dribbling techniques. summer ensations Sports program keeps youths going and going. by Sgt. E.J. Hersom USARSO Public Affairs Office FORT CLAYTON -Charlie Weber uses both hands to bat a tennis ballover the net on center court. The 8-year-old's tongue sticks out with the effort, and his eyes are closed in mid-swing. Weber was taking lessons during the Youth Services Summer Sensation's two-week tennis clinic. Coach Corey Gray said Weber and the other 12 students made excellent progress in the first week. GrayandcoachBruceBeckranthecdhictwohours each weekday morning for $5 per student, racket and balls included. "That's cheaper than any babysitter I know, and it gives the kids a chance to learn tennis," Gray said. "I U.S Amy photo. by sgt. E.J H-rom would have killed to have something like this when I Charlie Weber returns a shot during the tennis clinic. was a kid." Weber said he likes tennis because "it's real challenging and helps you with your baseball." "That's cheaper than Weber, who also likes golf, took lessons at a golf any babysitter I know, and clinic also offered by Youth Services on the Fort it gives the kids a chance Clayton Driving Range in the early afternoons. Webersaidhepracticed"Monday,Wednesdayand to learn tennis. I would Friday before going out on the real course at have killed to have someAmador. thing like this when I was a "It (the practice) helps you when you play in the kid." tournaments and win big money," Weber added. While Weber chosegolffor a second summer sport, Corey Gray John Daily chose Youth Services' soccer clinic. Youth Services tennis coach Daily, aveteranofcoach JimE. Snyder's champion Y_______ rvices___nns_____h _Sharks inthe Youth Services Soccer League, attended the clinic because he gets bored sitting around the house all day and it gives him something to do. The clinic's coach did a good job, he said. Youth Services is offering many more sports clinics and lessons in July and Augustincluding,rapelling, scuba diving and swimming. Parents can register their children for the activities at Youth Services or call 287-3817 for more information. Weber is looking forward to more tennis lessons and maybe some kayaking or rapelling, he said while Kate Merritt takes a breather during the soccer sticking the grip of his tennis racket between the clubs clinic June 25 on Jarman Field at Fort Clayton. in his golf bag. He was reported later to be at the Youth Services Basketball Clinic.

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Tropic Times July 2,1993 Sports Shorts Holiday bowling The Albrook AFS Bowling Center is sponsoring a special for bowlers Sunday. All games will be 50 cents f during open bowling. For information, call 286-4260. Bench press contest The Rodman Fitness Centeris hosting a bench press contest 8:30 a.m. July 10. Weigh-in time is 7 a.m. The entry fee is $10 and there are categories for men and women. The deadline to enteris Tuesday. Tetournant is open to military, Department of Defense civilians and _ DoD family members. Call 283-4222/4061. Official recruitment The Panama Armed Forces Officials Association is recruiting officials on both sides of the isthmus. Meetings are held 1 p.m. every second Saturday ofthe month at the Valent Recreation Center, Fort Clayton. Military, civilians and family members canjoin. Forinformation, call 287-5572 or 247-0511 after 9 p.m. The Howard/Albrook Officials Association is also looking for new officials. The association offers professional training, clinics and a pay check. The meetings are 7:30 p.m. every third Thursday of the month at the Howard Youth Center. Interested individuals must be fluent in English. For information, call 284-5371. Cleaning closure The Rodman Fitness Center basketball court and showers are closed for cleaning 7:30-11 am. Wednesdays. Call 283-4222. Reeder aerobics Free aerobics classes are offered at the ReederPhysical Fitness Center. Classes are held 9:15-10:15 a.m. Monday-Friday, and 5:45-6:45 p.m. Monday-Thursday. Early sign-ups are not required. Forinformation, call 287-3861. Prices increase Bowling prices have increased at Clayton, Espinar and Curundu bowling centers. The new prices are: League bowling $1 per game, adult bowling $1, youth 75 cents and shoe rentals are 50 cents a pair. For more information, call 286-3914. Army 10-Miler tryouts Semi-final tryouts for the Army 10-Mier Race to be held in Washington D.C., Oct. 10 will be held July 24. The tryouts begin at 6 a.m. at the Rodman Fitness Center at Rodman Naval Station. The final tryouts/team selections will be held Aug. 21. Eight male and female runners will be selected at the finals. The best six runners of each category will make up the U.S. Army South l0-Miler team. The remaining team members will be alternates. Active-duty Army personnel assigned or attached to a USARSO unit are eligible to compete. Call 287-4050 orstop by the Directorate ofCommunity Activities Sports Branch, Building 154, Fort Clayton. U.S. Army photo by SSgL Philip D Cak Shooting it out ID card check Dustin Elliott shoots the ball over the outstretched hands of Patrick Bolchoz Monday at Fort Davis. Identification cards arerequired to use the facilities Registration for the Atlantic community's youth basketball program is under way.There will be a at the Howard and Albrook sports and fitness basketball clinic at the Fort Davis playshelter, 9-11 a.m. July 10 for 12-18-year-olds and 1 p.m. for centers. Childrenundertheage ofl4 must be accompaPeeWees. For information call Skip Berger at 289-4605. nied by an adult. Call 284-3451 or 286-3307. Jazzercise classes New equipment Aerobics Jazzercise classes will be held 5-6 p.m. Mondays, The Howard Sports and Fitness Center has new The Howard Sports and Fitness Center offers aerobics Wednesdays and Fridays. The fee is $2.50 per class or equipment to help people to stay in shape. Treadmills, 5-6 p.m. Monday and Fridays. Call 284-3451 forinfor$25 for 12 classes. For more information call the rotary torso machine, stairmasters and back extension mation. Albrookor Howard SFCs at 286-3307 or284-3451. See are all available now. Call 284-3541. The Howard Youth Center holds aerobics class 9-10 related story, page 13. a.m. Monday-Friday. Fitness im pnecost all classesis $1 persession. Forinformation, Summer punch out improvement Ca1284-4700. Fitnessimprovement classes areheld 6:05-7am. and The AlbrookBowling Centerkicks offthe AirForce 2:05-3 p.m., Monday, Wednesday and Friday at the wide Summer Punch Out Bowling Program in July and Howard Sports and Fitness Center. runs through September. The class consists of a calisthenic super circuit A new open water scuba class kicks off Tuesday at Bowlers can win prizes such as cash awards, televiworkout aimed at improving muscular endurance, the the Howard AFB pool. The cost is $145 per person. sions, and the grand prize is a Disneyworld vacation cardiovascular system and flexibility. Call the center at Introduction to Scuba class is available on request. For package. For information, call the center at 286-4360. 284-3451 forinformation. information, call 284-6161/6109.

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16 Tropic Times July 2, 1993 Commissary holiday hours COROZAL (Tropic Times) TheCorozalandFortEspinarcommissaries will be closed Monday and Wednesday in observance of the Independence Day weekend. The commissary at Howard AFB will be closed Sunday and Tues' day. Air Force Ball set for Sept. 18 HOWARDAFB(24thWG/PA) -The 24th Operations Group will sponsor the 1993 Air Force Ball Sept. 18atthe AlbrookOpen Mess. Project officers announced the date of the ball early so interested membersmaymakeplanstoattend.The menu and itinerary details are still being worked out, but the date and entertainment -a live band playing 50s and 60s musicare firm. For more information, call MSgt. Daniel Lopez at 284-6312/ 6111. Family support center events Ir HOWARDAFB (24thWG/PA) -TheHoward/AlbrookFamilySupport Center is located in Building 707 here and has avariety ofevents scheduled for July. The center is open 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Monday U.S. Army photo by Sgt. E.J. Hrsom through Friday. Pvt. 2 Richard Coller of Headquarters Company, 536th Engineer Battalion (Combat) (Heavy) navigates a bulldozer *Job search assistance is ofduring quarrying near the Howard Air Force Base back gate. fered 10 a.m. every Tuesday. The program provides spouses with information on the techniques to efSoldiers trade construction for crushing fectively search forajob in Panama. ertebc aeo Hwr i oc ae An SF-171 workshop will be by Sgt. E.J. Hersom near the back gate of Howard Air Force Base. offered 5:30-7:30 a.m. July 22 to USARSO Public Affairs Office They crush the rocks into three-inch pieces using a rock show how to complete the federal crusher onloan from TaskForce Rushmore. The rock then travels application. FORT KOBBE -A company of engineers here picked up an along a conveyer belt to a point where it can be loaded into trucks *A citizenship preparation seunusual mission when it was asked to stop building roads and and shipped to the TEAMS construction area. ries will be offered 9:30-11 am. make big rocks into little rocks. Soldiers cut costs in half by quarrying the rock themselves, Tuesday, Thursday, July 13, and The soldiers of Headquarters Company, 536th Engineer including the expense of contracting a civilian company, which 15 in the education center, BuildBattalion (Combat) (Heavy), picked up the rock crushing blasts the rock loose from the quarry walls weekly, Lydic said. ing 708, Room 110. The series project when the Theater Equipment And Maintenance Site Working with the crusher is a hard, dirty job, Lydic said. will help prepare for naturalizamotor pool fell behind schedule and Task Force Rushmore's By the end of a shift, dust from the bursting rocks coats the tion testing. quarrying detachment left. soldiers from head to toe. *The smooth move workshop Thesoldiersstillneeded21,000 cubicyardsoferushedrock "Its worse than working in a coal mine," said Sgt. George is offered 2:30-4 p.m. Thursday. and a reserve of 10,000 more when the detachment left, said Vaughan, shift leader. The workshop will answer quesSSgL ClydeLydic,projectnoncommissioned officerin charge. Quarrying is different than their usual road-building duties, tions about moving. Finance, famThere is always a big need for crushed rock with all the the soldiers are catching on quickly. ily services, housing, military perengineering projects in U.S. Army South, Lydic said. "Basically, we're turning big rocks into little rocks," Sgt. Ted sonnel, traffic management, legal The engineers are getting a shale-like rock from a quarry Sargent said with a grin. and the medical group will all have representatives present. Thae= ntMedical officers exchange ideas at seminar will be held 8 am n -4 p m. July 14 and 15. The two-day program is designed to assist separating members and their families second Latin American conference transition to a civilian career. The standpoint because many of the ideas conditions," Hamilton said. workshops offer a systematic apby Sgt. John Hall being shared are not limited to any one Attherequest ofofficers whoattended proach that includes skills analyTropic Times staff single country. last year's conference, this year's group sis, career exploration, employQUARRY HEIGHTS -Medical rep"It'savery commondenominator. The was given a practical demonstration on ment research,resume preparation, resentatives from 16 Central and South morewe have a chance to exchange ideas ground and air evacuation procedures by interview skills, benefits, and fiAmerican countries exchangedideas here and also to participate in mutual medical members of the 142nd Medical Battalion nancial management. The unithis week during the second U.S. Southtraining exercises and Southern Comandthe2l4th Medical DetachmentThursform is civilian clothing. Attenen Command Latin American Senior mand subject matter expert exchanges day. dance both days is recommended. Medical Officers' Conference. really enhances that feeling of coopera"One ofthe purposes oftheevacuation *TransitionassistancecounselTherepresentativesgavepresentations tion," Sutton said. program was to show how toprepare noning is available by appointment ranging from the role of military mediSOUTHCOM will get that opportumedicalvehicles formasscasualtyevacufrom 7:30 am.-4:30 p.m. Call cine in national development to how nity as it will be participating in nearly ation," Sutton said. "Many countries in 284-3865/4347 for information. medical care is delivered in rural areas. every Latin American country in the region have faced significant disas*A checkbook maintenance Having active dialogue follow each MEDRETEs and subject matter expert ters, particularly Bolivia and Ecuador course will be held 9-11 a.m. July presentation was one the conference's exchanges during the next year, accordwhich have had substantial mud slides," 21 to teach how to accurately use goals, said SOUTHCOMCommand Suring to Sutton. he added. and balance a checking account. geon Col. Ernest L. Sutton. One of the senior officers planning to The officers also visited the locks of *Budget counseling is avail-"The real responses have come in the take back new ideas to his country is Lt. the canal which Sutton likened to a "terable by appointment 4:30 a.m.question and answerperiod,"Sutton said. Col. Oscar Hamilton of the Guyana Derain walk for the infantry. 7:30 p.m. Call 284-5010. "Each country approaches situations diffense Forces. Hamilton said the confer"It's like a terrain walk because the Volunteers are needed to help ferently and because they're asking so ence is important because medical officterrain that they're walking on was where with the loan closet, base brochure many questions and sharing ideas, I think ers get to know much better how their a lot of battles with disease were fought. i and layette progr re we're really getting into the spirit of the counterparts are operating in different Conquering problems of disease was a child care is provided for volunconference." regions. major medical triumph that has a lot of teers. Call 284-5860. Sutton said he thinks it's important to "The result is to be able to adopt some personal significance for the physicians approach the conference from a regional of these measures to improve our own attending the conference," Sutton said.