Citation
The tropic times

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Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text




Gift of the Panama Canal Museum


.Tropic


Times


Vol. V. No. 45


Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Friday, Nov. 13, 1992


Weekend restriction starts
Panama bans guns, liquor
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The
consumption of alcoholic beverages by Depart-
ment of Defense personnel must be confined to
U.S. installations from noon Saturday until noon
Monday during a referendum on constitutional
reforms. Personnel in possession of alcoholic bev-
erages outside DoD installations, to include beaches,
the islands and other public areas are subject to
criminal prosecution under Panamanian laws.
The Panamanian National Police will monitor
the closure of all discoteques, bars and other
drinking establishments during this time and will
ensure compliance with these prohibitions, said
U.S. Army South officials. Additionally, the car-
rying of firearms, including those with current
permits, is prohibited during this period. Only
Panamanian government officials are allowed to
carry firearms during the 48 hours. All other
permits are temporarily suspended. These meas-
ures apply to all U.S. personnel.
The deputy commander of ground forces,
USARSO, said servicemembers should respect
the host nation at all times, but courtesy is even
more important during the referendum vote.

Aviation soldier dies,
falls from roof
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - A sol-
dier assigned to the 228th Aviation Battalion died
from a fall from the third story of his barracks
Nov. 6.
Pvt. 2 Scott Allen Veith, an avionic flight
systems repairer with Company E, in Corozal,
reportedly locked himself out of his room, went to
another soldier's room, stepped out on the roof to
gain access through his window and slipped.
According to Gorgas Army Community Hos-
pital officials, the Edwardsville, Il., native suf-
fered severe head injuries and later died when
surgeons were unable to revive him. The official
cause of death is listed as "cerebral contusion and
secondary brain death."
Officials report that Veith had been drinking
with friends before he slipped off the roof.
Army officials notified Richard and Margaret
Veith, also of Edwardsville, of their son's death.
Veith had been with his unit- his first assign-
ment - only eight days.

Gas station mishap
fire injures one worker
CURUNDU (USARSO PAO) - A gasoline
explosion in a tank at the Curundu Gas Station
injured one contract worker Tuesday.
Louis Neivez, a laborer with the Kunkel Wiese
Contracting Company, suffered second degree
burns on both arms. A fellow worker took him to
Sante Fe hospital before paramedics could arrive.
Workers have been replacing the gas tanks at
the station since September. The explosion was
sparked by a metal reinforcement bar on an old
tank that came loose and struck another. The spark
lit fumes from pocket of gasoline inside the tank.
Only Nievez was in the area of the fire, said Col.
Jeffrey Petrucci, U.S. Army Garrison commander.
Nievez and the other contract workers were not
working on the tank when it flashed, said Jimmy
Wiese, owner and supervisor of the company.
Because the project involved gasoline, the Pan-
ama Canal Commission Fire Department was on
stand-by at Corozol. They responded to the fire
and extinguished it quickly, Petrucci said.

Nespg


Southern


Command


Network


unleashes Diamond FM format
change.


Military honors U.S. veterans


COROZAL (Tropic Times) - Approximately 100
people braved the rain to observe the Veterans Day
program at Corozal American Cemetery, according to
U.S. Southern Command officials.
In addition to honoring America's veterans, Wednes-
day's ceremony at Corozal also honored the veterans
and fallen of the United States strongest ally during both
World Wars - the United Kingdom.
Wednesday's Corozal ceremony began with the joint
color guard, made up of members of the Army, Air
Force, Navy, Marine Corps and Balboa High School
ROTC, posting the colors.
The 79th Army Band, led by CW3 Jeanne Pace,
played the national anthems of Panama, the United
States and the United Kingdom. The band also provided
the buglers to play Taps.
The 1st Royal Highland Fuselears, British Forces,
Belize, also provided a bugler as well as a bagpiper for
the ceremony. The Honorable David Beall, deputy
chief of mission, American Embassy delivered the
Presidential Proclamation and Brig. Gen. David A.
Sawyer, 24th Wing commander, delivered the Vet-
eran's Day address.
H. E. Thomas H. Malcomson, ambassador to the
United Kingdom delivered a Veterans Day prayer along
with representatives from the Veterans of Foreign Wars,
the American Legion, the Disabled American Veterans
and the Legion of Honor.
The U.S. Marine Corps Security Force Company
firing detail were also part of this year's ceremony.
The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Colin
L. Powell also joined the celebration through his Veter-
ans Day message.
"We, as a people, have set aside today as a national
day of recognition and special tribute to all veterans -
past and present - for their dedication, sacrifice and
exceptional service to their country.
"We commemorate this legacy of strength, compas-
sion and achievement as displayed by America's veter-
ans. You have created and upheld a tradition of excel-
lence. Your selfless devotion to service has not gone


~.


U.S. Army photo by Sgt Deborah E. Willims
Spec. Marc Prevost, 79th Army Band, plays Taps at
the end of the Veterans Day ceremony.
unnoticed. Today's free world stands as testimony to
your commitment to independence and democracy.
"Your diligence and devotion have safeguarded this
nation through war and in peace. We remember you,
and we thank you."Geieral Powell concluded his mes-
sage on behalf of the members of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff, "I salute all veterans who have served this great
nation. I am particularly proud of our Armed Forces
today - of the spirit and fortitude, of the strength and
discipline, of the men and women who dedicate them-
selves each day to the preservation of security and
freedom."


Clayton salutes military families


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - A special two-
week salute to military families begins Monday with a
variety of programs, parties and special events, accord-
ing to the Directorate of Community Activities.
The following is a list of events:
Children attending the Atlantic Child Development
Service Monday will create their family tree.
School age children will work on special crafts for
their parents Monday at Building 156 on Fort Clayton.
A puppet show about families will be held Wednes-
day, 3 p.m., in Building 39, Fort Clayton. Parents are
invited.
The CDS Part-day Program, Building 156, Fort
Clayton, will feature a visitation day Nov. 20 with
topics like families, home environment and favorite
foods.
The topic will be families, home environment and
favorite foods.
Turbo Turkey International, a parent and child
competition sponsored by Youth Services on Fort Clay-
ton, 11 a.m., Nov. 21, at Youth Services playground
area.
Army Community Service and USARSO will dis-
tribute Thanksgiving food baskets Thursday.
Recreation Centers will offer families special tours
to enjoy local sites.
Valent Recreation Center: Coronado Beach, Nov.
22; the Chiriqui highlands, Nov. 26-29; Contadora
Island, Nov. 28-29.
Sundial Center: Portobelo and Isla Grande, Nov. 28.
Ocean Breeze Center: Historical and shopping tour,
Milestone page 10


Panama


military community


members celebrate special life
events.


Nov. 29.
Outdoor Recreation: River rafting in Costa Rica,
Nov. 27-30.
The Fort Davis Community Club will host a Thanks-
giving brunch, 10:30 a.m. - 2 p.m., Nov. 26.
A special buffet will be held at Club Amador, 4 - 7
p.m., Nov. 26.
Valent Recreation Center will host Thanksgiving
Day activities like a family movie marathon, chess and
pool tournaments, refreshments and a rock and roll
concert.
There will be a pottery demonstration, Nov. 28, 10
a.m. - noon, at the Clayton Arts & Crafts Center. There
will also be a week-long military art exhibit at Valent.
In addition to the various activities, the DCA an-
nounces many discounts in celebration of military families.
Free ice cream and cake for children 12 years and
under at the Fort Clayton Noncommissioned Officers'
Club family night or the Fort Davis Community Club
dinner, Nov. 25.
Free bowling, with shoes, for children 12 years and
under accompanied by parent, Fort Clayton Bowling
Center, Nov. 26.
Free admission at the Fort Clayton, Amador, Fort
Espinar and Fort Davis pools and Shimmey Beach,
Nov. 27.
Half price green fees for families at the Amador Golf
Course, Nov. 27.
Free bowling, with shoes, for children 12 years and
under accompanied by parent, Curundu Bowling Cen-
ter, Nov. 27.



*Gay sailor back in Navy, page 5.
*Smokeout, page 7.
*Homecoming, page 11.











Tropic Times
Nov. 13, 1992


'Music ambassadors' tour El Salvador


by Sgt. Joseph J. Johnson
USARSO Public Affairs Office
SAN SALVADOR, EL SALVADOR
- Hundreds waved miniature American
flags and watched red, white and blue
balloons float around the room while
listening to Salvadoran and American
commentators report the results of the
1992 U.S. presidential election on televi-
sion sets throughout the hall.
And the band played on.
Thirty-two members of U.S. Army
South's 79th Army Band opened their
nine-day visit here at an election night
concert hosted by the U.S. Embassy in
the Hotel El Salvador ballroom.
Convention-like festivities are spon-
sored world-wide by U.S. embassies in
presidential election years to share the
American democratic process with the
host countries, said Sonja Sweek, press
attache at the embassy and event or-
gnizer.
Three specialty bands entertained the
crowd of more than 1,000 with tradi-


tional American march music, Latin and
contemporary selections.
The audience, made up mostly of
U.S. citizens living in El Salvador,
waved their fingers like batons, tapped
their feet to the beat and danced the night
away.
During their nine-day tour, the band
also played for Salvadorans in the U.S.
Pavilion at the International Trade Show
in San Salvador Nov. 4.
The annual show recently resumed
after a 12-year civil war that ended in
January with the signing of a peace ac-
cord between the government and
theF.M.L.N., a coalition of five groups
fighting against the Salvadoran military.
"I've been impressed with the band
and its virtuosity," said Susan Elbow,
cultural affairs officer. "This has been a
great show of support for the bigger
mission of the embassy."
Elbow originally requested the band
in the spring to play at the trade show, but
was pleasantly surprised when the band's
visit coincided with the presidential elec-


tion and the embassy's Marine Ball held
Nov. 6.
Elbow is especially proud the band
will play at the Permanent Festival of the
Arts in the town of Suchitoto, just south
of San Salvador.
"Suchitoto is an area where there was
heavy fighting during the war. Before
the war the population was around 25,000,
now it is about 5,000," Elbow said.
Despite the years of war, the town's
people put on a cultural festival each
month. Some festivals feature a single
artist.
"The area still has a high concentra-
tion of F.M.L.N. soldiers in the process
of being demobilized," said Elbow.
In order for the band to be allowed in
the area, F.M.L.N. leaders had to be
informed of the visit by United Nation
peace observers. Members of the F.M.LN.
are expected to attend the concert at the
outdoor theater.
"We are the music embassadors for
the United States of America Army for
this part of the world - Central and


Latin America," said Sgt. Henry Thomas
III, tuba player and bass guitarist.
"Hopefully we can strengthen the ties
between El Salvador and the United States,
promote democracy and basically show
the people that the Army is not just a
military force," said band member SFC
William Dorsey.
"This will be like the icing on the
cake, because I've already had my main
course in the two years that I've been (in
Panama). I've enjoyed every type of
culture that Latin America has to offer,"
said Dorsey who retires in December
after 23 years in Army bands.
"I hope (these concerts) bring away
pride in the U.S. Pride that I am part of
the new society for El Salvador," said
saxophonist SSgt. Gary Meeks. "Ten
years from now I can look back and say
I was there within the first year of the
peace accords and now it's a full demo-
cratic country and I helped promote that,"
he said.
The band was scheduled to return to
Panama on Veterans Day.


Engineers using


skills at home


by 1 Lt. Dennis W. Pinckard
536th Engineer Battalion, Combat (Heavy)


FORT KOBBE (USARSO PAO) - Soldiers in 1 st Platoon,
Bravo Company, 536th Engineer Combat Battalion are help-
ing their unit by rebuilding the offices and storage areas of
their maintenance section.
Originally, "there was one large area where the motor
sergeant, the shop foreman, the maintenance clerks and sec-
tion supervisors worked together. The building is being reno-
vated to provide separate offices, a break area, a parts storage
room and a welding shop.
"Now each of my leaders in the maintenance platoon have
their own workspace to better organize their work," said ILt.
Michael Corson, Company B's motor officer.
When the platoon started construction almost a year ago,
they discovered a foot of unused space between the block
exterior wall and the interior sheathing.
"By stripping the sheathing out, we got back almost 90
sqare feet of additional space," said SSgt. Joe Constante, a
squad leader in 1 st platoon.
The soldiers are using the skills they normally practice
throughout Central and South America to provide a better
work environment for the maintenance section.
By working on this project company officials say the com-
pany profits threefold. The platoon gets construction training
for the soldiers, management training for the leaders and a new
workplace for the maintenance section.


Officials: nicotine addictive as heroin


HOWARD AFB (24TH WG/PA) -
That first cigarette may give some people
a scorching sensation down the throat, or
even been accompanied by a hacking
cough from an angry pair of lungs.
But, despite warning signals from their
bodies, these people embrace the habit
and start a life-long partnership with
tobacco, according to Maj. (Dr.) Grover
K. Yamane, a Howard AFB anit-smok-
ing program officer.
"Cigarette smoke is a potent irritant,
as acrimonious as the pollution from any
industrial furnace," he said. "There are
many powerful factors (some not so ob-
vious) that trick people into this slow,
pitiful self-destruction. To have the best
opportunity to quit permanently, the
smoker must understand why he chooses
to smoke, and why he retains this un-
healthy relationship."
Only then can the smoker plan the
most effective way to quit, he said.
"Nicotine dependence might be the
most obvious factor that promotes smok-
ing. This chemical is absorbed quickly
by the lungs, and can affect the brain


within 10 seconds after a puff from a and becomes addicted. Without this en-
cigarette," Yamane said. "Nicotine is couragement, few people will want to in-
physically addicting, like heroin, cocaine, hale more than a couple puffs of this
and alcohol. Like these other drugs, nico- irritating soot.
tine, when the supply is cut, will leave "For many, smoking is a crutch that
fitful and uncomfortable withdrawal symp- gives support for the rough times in the
toms. day," he said. "When work or family life
"The craving for nicotine may boils with stress, the ritual of lighting and
be particularly strong after sev- inhaling a cigarette is a cooling
eral hours of abstinence, such IAMERICAN influence. Smoking, like a hobby,
as in the morning and at the CANCER helps relieve frustration. Un-
end of the work day," tSOCIETY' like most past-
he said. "For ig ht .G R AT " A EIJ CA l times, how-
smokers, the with- Ril ever, smoking
drawal may be Is EIEE�5, in the end,
mild. Heavier WVi3JCk W lJU destructive and
smokers _ punishing on
may need . ' the body.".
help from Smoking is a physical
nicotine gum to avoid giving in. But, habit, Yamane explained. It takes persis-
nicotine addiction is not the only story." tence and desire to start smoking. But,
There are also strong psychological once started, smoking becomes an auto-
forces that encourage smoking. matic behavior. Many smokers will light
"Many young people start the habit up, like pre-set machines, under certain
because of peer pressure. Under the conditions. Meals, driving, or watching
strain to fit in with friends, the victim aTVprogram, forexample, canbetheon
caves in, endures the scalding smoke, signal.


"The average smoker uses 10-30 ciga-
rettes each day. Hiding behind every
cigarette was a specific reason that led
the smoker to smoke.
"Some cigarettes are smoked to stave
off the jitters from withdrawal. Others
are smoked because of specific social or
work settings. Still others are smoked out
of automatic and subconscious habit -
not to smooth over any particular physi-
cal or emotional needs."
Each smoker is enslaved by a differ-
ent set of factors, Yamane said.
"Only when they understand their own
weak spots and why they surrender to the
cigarette, can smokers plan individual
battle strategies. They can change their
routine at work or home, and avoid these
pitfalls.
"Smoking is a complex behavior,
launched for complex reasons. Knowing
your own weaknesses is your best source
of strength, and your best first step
towards kicking the habit," he said.
For more information on the smoking
habit, contact the 24th Medical Group
Health Promotion Program at 284-3014.


U.S. Army photo by Spec. Robin A. Mantikoski
Brig. Gen. James L. Wilson, U.S. Army South deputy commanding general, tells Fort Clayton
scouts how important soldiers are to defending the Constitution. The scouts, from Boy Scout
Troop 128, toured USARSO headquarters to help them earn their Citizenship in the Nation merit
badge.










Tropic Times 3
Nov. 13, 1992



Radio format changing


U.S. Army photo by Sgto Jam Yocum
Air Force SSgt. Randy Lutke, a Southern Command
Network broadcaster, does a little clowning during his
Veterans Day show Wednesday.


Southern Command Network
alters programming and schedule
to meet survey's demands

FORT CLAYTON - Southern Command Net-
work radio gets a new name and a new sound Monday
with the birth of the Diamond FM.
SCN officials changed the format of the radio
station to appeal to more listeners after completing a
listener survey last year, said Capt. Dennis E. Tice,
deputy commander and radio program director for
SCN.
"We've instituted some of the music changes -
we've lightened up quite a bit," he said. "We're now
playing more hits and solid gold."
Under the new format, the station will play more
adult contemporary, oldies and Top 40 music during
prime listening hours.
The survey was conducted by Professional Market
Group in Chicago, Il., and showed that the current
programming wasn't reaching as large an audience
as SCN officials wanted, Tice said.
"We want to connect with the largest audience
possible," he said.
The emphasis will be on adult contemporary dur-
ing the day, with oldies and country mixed in, but the
locally produced Rock Block (Van Halen, ZZ Top,
etc.) and Armed Forces Radio and Television urban
contemporary shows will continue to play during the


evenings, he said.
Tice also said the adult contemporary be more ag-
gressive than many stations in the states play.
"When we say adult contemporary, we don't
mean Peabo Bryson and Barbara Streisand all the
time - although we may play them. We're talking
AC with an edge," Tice said. This includes groups
like Bryan Adams, Billy Ocean, John Mellencamp,
Genesis, Bobby Brown and Annie Lennox.
For those who want heavier sounds, Classic Rock
with Laurie Allen will play from 6-7 p.m. weekdays,
Don Tracy and LaRita Shelby will have back-to-back
urban contemporary hours.
The urban contemporary shows start at 7 and 8
p.m., the local rock block will play from 9-11 p.m.
and UNISTAR adult rock will take over from 11 p.m.
to 5 a.m. weeknights.
News will continue to be carried on the hour
and movie schedules will be announced every two
hours.
"We're trying to play more music, while staying
faithful to providing command information," Tice
.said. "CI doesn't go anywhere unless people are
listening. We want to hook them."
Tice also said they will be having more listener
interaction, as was seen recently when the station
conducted a phone survey to decide if the comedy
skit Chicken Man should remain on the air.
There will also be more call-in request shows for
rock, country and solid gold fans, Tice said.


Signal soldiers keep communications on-line


by Spec. E.J. Hersom .
USARSO Public Affairs Office , - .


EMPIRE RANGE, PANAMA - Sol-
diers of the 154th Signal Battalion -
U.S. Army South's version of MaBell-
prepared to reach out and touch people
during a week-long training exercise here
in October.
The exercise gave those soldiers of
the an opportunity to test their communi-
cations equipment for their upcoming
deployments throughout Central and South
America, said PFC Carl Cochrane, a
Company B multichannel communica-
tions system operator.
Cochrane and his team set up relay
stations on hilltops allowing radio opera-
tors to communicate with each other
over long distances.
"We are basically the middleman,"
Cochrane said.
Cochrane has worked on hilltops from
Guyana to Guatemala, where he worked
with their soldiers providing communi-
cations for engineers during Fuertas
Caminos exercises, a catch-all title for
joint U.S. - host nation exercises to re-
build underdeveloped countries' roads
and bridges.
The Guatemalan soldiers envied the
American soldiers, Cochrane said. "They
thought we had better uniforms. They
kept wanting to trade hats and boots.
They thought our MRE (meals ready to
eat) food was better than their cooking."
Spec. Dominic Corsetti of Company
A operates a tactical satellite system,
which emits microwaves. "It can cook a
hot dog, if you hang it there long enough,"
he said. Not that he ever tried it, but he
does say his cooking skills aren't bad.
Corsetti works with Spec. Charlie
Jackson and their team chief, Sgt. Ernest
O'Conner.
"We can get this baby working in 30
minutes as long as Murphy's Law doesn't
kick us in the teeth," Corsetti said,
"It really cheeses on (impresses) the com-
manders when they see it go up that
fast."


U.S. Army photos by spec. E.. Hersom


Soldiers from the General Purpose platoon, Company B, take down their equipment.


With the satellite, the team can talk
and exchange typed or facsimile infor-
mation with others anywhere in the world,
Jackson said.
It makes Corsetti angry when some-
one accuses him of sitting in an air-
conditioned box all day. "We are out-of-
country six to eight months out of a year,
but I laugh at them once in a while
because I'm cozy and they're not," he
said.
Cozy is something Cochrane was not
during a medical readiness exercise in
Guyana. MEDRETEs provide medical
and dental aid to the citizens of remote,
impoverished areas in South and Central
America.
"When I was in Guyana, we got to
bathe in brown water. It wasn't water you
could drink," he said Guyana is an under-
developed country that has a low stan-


dard of living, Cochrane said.
"They have their natural resources,
but don't have the technology to strengthen
the country."
Cochrane provided communications
between a base camp and medical teams
travelling throughout Guyana. Without
communication between them, USARSO
would have to limit or cancel the exer-
cise because emergency help would be
unreachable if someone got hurt.
Sgt. Paul Mills and Sgt. Andrew Bias,
multichannel radio operators of Com-
pany A, send the radio messages that
Cochrane relays.
Mills, Blas and their teammates take
turns working in a small, cramped box
brimming with communication equip-
ment on the back of a high mobility
multipurpose wheeled vehicle.
"Our main purpose is radio-to-radio


communications," Mills said. Units can
also connect telephone lines through the
multichannel vans into a switchboard
that enables them to talk with other units.
Without the vans the telephones system
can't operate, Mills said.
Blas has worked in the U.S. Embassy
in San Salvador as part of the Military
Group El Salvador. Military Gropus are
cells of military service members as-
signed to each embassy.
Blas trained there for six months on
several types of communications equip-
ment. With them, the group covered an
entire country, he said.
"Out here in the field everything is
separated - satellites, multichannels,
everything,"Blas said. "In El Salvadorit
was just four people. A lieutenant in
charge and four people doing every-
thing."










4Tropic Times
Nov.13,1992


SHemisphere


Press caught between


rebels, government


LIMA, Peru (AP) - Journalists are caught in
the crossfire between Maoist rebels and the
military-backed government of President Al-
berto Fujimori.
Some say the president uses the judiciary to
pressure reporters.
On the other hand, news accounts of Shining
Path rebel chief Abimael Guzman's capture
praised the police and strongly attacked Guzman,
angering his followers and raising the possibil-
ity of stepped up rebel attacks on the press.
"There is definitely a campaign under way
by both sides, the Shining Path and the govern-
ment," said analyst Fernando Rospigliosi of
the Institute for Peruvian Studies. "The idea is
to restrict the press' capacity to inform."
Police arrested two journalists specializing
in the Shining Path in August and a third left for
the United States to escape government harass-
ment and rebel death threats.
In addition, one journalist accused of rebel
ties has been missing for three months.
The government has shown its tolerance for
criticism to be thin.
In one example, a judge fined Enrique Zil-
eri, the director of Peru's leading news magazine,
Caretas, $7,500 for defaming a presidential
adviser accused of drug-trafficking ties.
The August finding was announced just
after Caretas published a cover depicting
Fujimori's head hovering over toilet, with the
caption, "Flush." Zileri called the timing "an
extraordinary coincidencee"
He termed the ruling a warning that the gov-
ernment would crack down on critics and said
the judge owed her position to the adviser he


criticized. "There are so many ways of putting
the pressure on. The more stupid way is to close
down publications. One of the other ways is to
give increasing judicial problems to publica-
tions," Zileri said.
Since the Shining Path insurgency began in
1980, more than 30 journalists have been
killed. Most worked in outlying provinces. At
least half died at the hands of paramilitary
forces.
When Guzman was presented to the press
after his September capture, Peruvian reporters
shouted him down, sang the national hymn,
demanded he answer for Shining Path vio-
lence. That drew a harsh response from the
rebels.
"Choose your trench," read one pamphlet.
"And the war is to the death." The rebels have
zeroed in so far on Peruvian reporters rather
than foreign correspondents.
Rebels threatened journalists in Lima in
flyers and graffiti. A car bomb destroyed a TV
station in June, killing a producer and two
guards.
The heat began building up after Fujimori
closed Congress on April 5 and imposed one-
man rule.
Newspapers and broadcasters were censored.
Magazines were closed briefly.
Security forces held Gustavo Gorriti, author
of a book on the Shining Path, for three days in
April and demanded access codes to his per-
sonal computer.
Gorriti took his family to Washington in
July, saying he feared the government would
keep him from finishing a second book.


APLawPhoto
When Shining Path guerrilla leader Abimael Guzman was pre-
sented to the press in September, Peruvian reporters demanded he
answer for Shining Path violence. This angered his followers and
the rebels have threatened journalists in Lima in flyers and graffiti.
So far the rebels have targeted only Peruvian reporters rather than
foreign correspondents.


Indian tribe


releases 81


hostages


after talks


RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil (AP) - An
Indian tribe in northern Brazil agreed to
free 81 hostages after the government
promised to remove a squatters' village
from their Amazonian reserve, news
reports said Tuesday.
The TV Globo network said the ac-
cord was negotiated between Guajajara
tribal leaders and Justice Minister Mau-
ricio Correa, who announced it after three
hours of talks.
Several Guajajara chiefs signed a docu-
ment with Correa and Sydney Possuelo,
president of the National Indian Founda-
tion, agreeing to release the hostages


immediately, the independent radio Jor-
nal do Brasil reported.
Until the settlers are evacuated, the
Indians will keep eight buses they seized,
the radio said.
The hostages, many suffering from
heat and dehydration, have been held
since Nov. 2 along a jungle highway
about 1,400 miles northwest of Rio in
Maranhao state.
The Guajajara have long demanded
that the government remove some 6,000
residents from Sao Pedro dos Cacetes, a
village illegally settled 50 years ago in
the middle of their 350,000-acre Cana-


S


bravareservation.
The current dispute began nine days
ago when three hired gunmen mur-
dered a Guajajara chief's son.
The next day, scores of Indians with
shotguns,rifles andpistols stopped the
eight buses and five passenger vehicles
on a highway near the reservation's
outskirts, taking about 150 people
hostage. Reports conflicted as to the
total number taken.
The tribe later released 39 children,
10 women and three men who had
medical problems. Twelve other hos-
tages escaped Sunday night.


Police arrest Escobar's lawyers


BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) - Police operating under
a state of emergency have arrested Pablo Escobar's
lawyers, who they say were using a mobile phone
to keep in touch with the fugitive cocaine kingpin.
Escobar's aunt and cousin and the brother of one of
his top hired guns also were arrested Monday in a sweep
in Medellin, police said.
The government announced the state of emergency
Sunday in response to mounting attacks by leftist guer-
rillas and drug terrorists.
The crackdown includes stiff restrictions on journal-
ists.
Police in Medellin said lawyers Santiago Uribe and
Feisal Humberto Buitrago were in possession of an
unlicensed radio telephone that had been used to com-
municate with Escobar.
The drug boss and nine associates escaped from a
luxury prison near Medellin on July 22.
Escobar's aunt, Alba Gaviria, and his cousin, Leonor
Gaviria, were charged with paying for the telephone,
Attorney General Gustavo de Greiff said.
Police also captured alleged drug terrorist Romel
Munoz Mosquera and another man in a car full of
dynamite.
Munoz Mosquera is the brother of Brances Munoz
Mosquera, Escobar's security chief, who was killed last
month in a shoot-out with police, and of Dandenis
Munoz Mosquera, formerly a leading Medellin cartel
assassin.
Dandenis Munoz is serving a 7-year sentence in New


York for lying to federal law officers. U.S. officials
accuse him of ordering the 1989 bombing of a Colom-
bian airliner in which 107 people were killed.
The cartel has retaliated for Brances Munoz' death
by ordering a campaign of police assassinations that has
left 24 officers dead since Oct. 28. Six officers were
wounded on Tuesday.
The country has also been plagued by guerrilla
violence.
Over the weekend, leftist rebels killed 26 police
officers in an attack on a remote southern outpost and
detonated some 30 bombs across the country, wounding
about 60 people.
As part of the government crackdown, Communica-
tions Minister William Jaramillo announced Tuesday
that the press would no longer be able to publish state-
ments from or interviews with guerrillas or drug traf-
fickers.
Violators face fines of up to $85,000 or, for radio and
television stations, up to six months' suspension.
Another stiff new measure announced Tuesday re-
quires state officials who have contact with guerrillas or
drug traffickers to report the meetings to authorities or
face 30-day suspensions or firing.
In Washington on Tuesday, the Organization of
American States pledged its "solidarity and full sup-
port" to President Cesar Gaviria's crackdown.
The OAS said in a statement that Gaviria's declara-
tion of a state of emergency was in response to "a sad
and very difficult situation."


Bomb explodes in Panama
PANAMA CITY, Panama (Reuters) - A bomb
tore through a parking lot at Panama's attorney
general's office Friday, injuring six security offi-
cials, police said.
The explosion, which hit at about 8:40 a.m.,
toppled a carport separating the attorney general's
office from another federal justice building.
National Police Chief Oswaldo Fernandez said
at least six security guards were hospitalized after
the attack, which shattered windows and sent hun-
dreds of curious Panamanians into the streets.
No group had claimed responsibility for the
bombing.

Peruvians rescue Cubans
PANAMA CITY, Panama (Reuters) - Thirty-
five Cubans who apparently took over a lobster
boat to flee the communist-ruled island were res-
cued at sea and brought to Panama, authorities
said Saturday.
A Peruvian-registered ship rescued the Cubans
late Friday after the boat's captain and 34 passen-
gers plotted to tie up four crew members and take
the boat to Miami, said Antonio Dominguez, Pan-
ama's immigration director.
All 39 Cubans were brought to Cristobal where
they were interviewed and medically examined.
Dominguez said the four crew members have
asked to be returned to Cuba while the others have
requested asylum in the United States.








*Military News


Tropic Times
Nov.13,1992


U.S. medical unit


Yugoslav-bound
WIESBADEN, Germany (AP) - A U.S. Army mo-
bile hospital was loaded up Nov. 6 for a train trip to
Croatia, and 330 American soldiers prepared to join
U.N. peacekeeping forces in the former Yugoslavia.
The 212th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital will pro-
vide medical care for U.N. peacekeepers who are main-
taining a truce that ended six months of ethnic fighting
following Croatia's secession last year.
The Americans will not serve in neighboring Bo-
snia-Herzegovina, which has been wracked by ethnic
war since it left the Yugoslav federation early this year.
The mobile hospital's medical equipment and sup-
plies were loaded onto train cars at Wiesbaden Air
Base, 25 miles west of Frankfurt.
"It was enough to fill 71 containers," said Connie
Sommer, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Army's V Corps.
The shipment also included 51 trucks and other ve-
hicles, she said.
Two trainloads of equipment had departed by Friday
and a third was to leave for Zagreb, Croatia's capital,
over the weekend, she said.
The unit's 300 personnel are to begin flying to
Zagreb on Tuesday. It is the first Army unit to join the
U.N. peacekeeping operation, which has about 15,000
soldiers in former Yugoslav republics.
Military officials have named the U.S. mission
Operation Provide Promise. The troops are expected to
remain in Croatia about six months.


Pentagon reii

SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) - Sailor Keith lesbians...thi
Meinhold returned to his Navy job Thurs- meaningful N
day after winning a victory over the Meinhold's
Pentagon and its ban on homosexuals in Wednesday.
the military. Meinholi
The 30-year-old petty officer, dis- his dismissal
charged in August after disclosing on protection.2
national television that he is gay, was Navy veteran
reinstated under court order as a sonar discharge a
crew instructor at Moffett Naval Air Station computer sa
in Mountain View. The govw
"I don't expect any negative response," hold's reins
Meinhold said as he walked through the Monday.
base's main gate. But he recommended The reir
that other gays orlesbians in the military overturnthe
wait until the ban on homosexuals is was a likelil
lifted before coming forward. that the pol
Last week, U.S. District Judge Terry that the Nav
J. Hatter Jr. of Los Angeles ordered the its discharge
Navy to take Meinhold back pending "This is a
resolution of his lawsuit challenging the said Robert
ban. On Tuesday, the Pentagon, rebuked Washington
by the judge for initially defying his LesbianTas
order, said it would comply. hunts will st
"To Keith and to alot of gay men and Presideni


AkI.


I



b


V


~jq


AP La rPhoto
Two Muslim leaders pray at a grave in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina. An Army MASH unit is providing
medical support for neighboring Croatia, but are not expected to enter war-torn Sarajevo.


states gay sailor


is makes it probably the most
Veterans Day that's occurred,"
lawyer, John McGuire, said

d sued in October, claiming
al violated his right to equal
A petty officer and 12-year
in, he received an honorable
nd has been working as a
lesman.
ernment will contest Mein-
statement during a hearing

statement order does not
e ban, but the judge said there
hood Meinhold could prove
icy is unconstitutional and
y violated regulations during
e proceedings.
absolutely a watershed event,"
t Bray, spokesman for the
L-based National Gay and
k Force. "The anti-gay witch
top."
t-elect Clinton pledged dur-


ing his campaign to lift the ban on homo-
sexuals. On Wednesday, he reiterated his
belief that homosexuality "in the ab-
sence of some destructive behavior" should
not disqualify people from serving. But
he gave little indication of how or when
he will change the policy.
Revoking the ban, which could be
done by executive order, would be one of
the most far-reaching social changes
imposed on the armed services since
President Truman ordered racial integra-
tion of the military in 1948.
Two of the Pentagon's most senior
officers Gen. Colin Powell, chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Gen. Gor-
don Sullivan, Army chief of staff have
repeatedly declared their opposition to
changing the policy. Both are expected
to continue serving under Clinton.
According to a study released in June
by the General Accounting Office, Con-
gress' investigative arm, the military
discharged an average of 1,500 people a
year for being gay from 1980 to 1990.


U.S. soldier questioned over woman's death


SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - A U.S.
soldier based in South Korea was interro-
gated by police Nov. 6 in connection
with the brutal torture and murder of a
bar hostess, police said.
The violent nature of the crime and
the implication that an American soldier
might be involved has inflamed citizens
in Uijongbu, which is adjaecent to the
2nd Infantry Division headquarters.
U.S. military officials said the soldier
questioned was stationed with the 2nd
Infantry Division at Uijongbu, 12 miles
north of Seoul.
The soldier was interrogated in con-
nection with the death ofYun Kum-i, 26,
on Oct. 28, police said. Yun was raped,
stabbed and tortured before her death,
police said.
Citizens groups charged Korean po-
lice with being lax in their investigation
and handed out anti-American leaflets.
Taxi drivers in the city launched a cam-
paign to boycott American customers as


a protest.
About 36,000
U.S. troops are
stationed in
South Korea -
under a mutual
defense agree-
ment and about
14,000 of them
are stationed in
the area near
Uijongbu.
South Korean . �
prosecutors said
they will decide k
whethertopress President George Bu
charges next drawdown in Korea
week when re- arming in North Kore
sults of investi-
gations are complete.
Relations between Koreans and U.S.
soldiers have been strained in past be-
cause of anti-American sentiment that
has grown here, fanned by dissidents and


S' ' student cam-
S.. paigns.
The South
Korean and Japa-
nese heads of
-.",..governments on
Sunday ex-
* pressed hope for
Unchanged Far
East policies
under President-
* elect Bill Clin-
ton.
This came
during South
APLaserPhoto Korean Presi-
sh stopped the military dent Roh Tae-
after reports of nuclear woo's unofficial
a.unofficial
one-day visit for
talks with Japan's Prime Minister Kiichi
Miyazawa.
The U.S. military commitment in Asia
includes separate defense pacts with Japan
and South Korea.


Both countries have expressed unease
about the possibility of policy changes
under Clinton.
There has been speculation that Clin-
ton might reduce the U.S. military pres-
ence in South Korea and Japan.
Under President Bush, a planned
American troop reduction in South Ko-
rea was put on hold until communist
North Korea resolved the world's wor-
ries that it is making nuclear weapons.
The two also agreed that North Korea
must dispel international worries about
its nuclear program by submitting to more
thorough inter-Korea nuclear inspections.
North Korea says its nuclear program
is for peaceful purposes, and has allowed
limited inspections of its nuclear sites by
the International Atomic Energy Agency.
Japan, the only nation ever attacked
by nuclear weapons, has backed the South's
position, saying it cannot establish diplo-
matic relations with North Korea while
nuclear worries persist.


AF navigation

satellite can't

get off ground
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) -
An Air Force rocket launch was aborted
at the last second Nov. 6 after an
auxiliary engine had just ignited,
creating an orange flash, but the main
engine had not yet fired, officials said.
No one was injured and nothing
was damaged, officials said. The Delta
rocket never got off the pad with the
$65 million navigation satellite.
The Navstar Global Positioning
System satellite aboard the rocket is
the 16th in a series of advanced navi-
gation satellites capable of guiding
war ships, bombers and tanks with an
accuracy of 50 feet or better.
The launch was aborted when the
countdown hit zero at 7:54 p.m., Air
Force spokeswoman Terri Bracher said.
The cause of the problem wasn't
immediately known.


a


|
E








Tropic Times
Nov.13,1992


1#Voices


Post coin-operated laundry plans set


Dear Mayors' Corner,
We really need a coin operated laun-
dry facility on post. Many soldiers and
their families live off-post and, because
they expected to move onto post soon,
didn't bring their washers and dryers be-
cause housing [officials] advised us not
to.
Add to that no laundry facilities on
post and most of us are in a dilemma.
This is just plain unacceptable.
A lot of us are the same boat. We need
someone with clout to get involved, who
do we talk to?
Dirty drawers

Dear Drawers,
How about the commanding general,
U.S. Army South? He's got clout and has
already gotten involved, said garrison
command officials.
In fact, the assistant director, commu-
nity activities said, plans are well under-
way to open a coin operated laundry
facility on Fort Clayton during the early
months of 1993.
The coin-op will be across from the
Burger King, and will include 16 wash-
ing machines and 10 industrial-size driers.
Plans are that the laundromat will
open seven days a week, from 7 a.m. to
10p.m.
The facility will offer same-day laun-
dry service for a nominal fee, in addition
to normal laundromat services.


The facility will also have a retail
outlet offering beverages, light snacks,
laundry items, etc.
Sound too good to be true? Wonder
how it happened?
The commanding general became
aware of the need to service soldiers and
families who did not have ready access to
laundromat services.
The inspector general's complaint
system investigated the laundry list of
problems, which included no accessible
laundromats on-post, a shortage of wash-
ers and driers off-post, and the water and
electricity shortage during the last dry
season.
Complaints surfaced that many fami-
lies and single soldiers living downtown
were bringing their laundry to wash in
the barracks and guest house.
The result, the assistant DCA said, is
a Morale, Welfare and Recreation spon-
sored fully-operational coin-op in place
before any water problems start next
year.
Watch for details on a "Name that
Laundromat" contest in the near future,
too.

Dear Mayors' Corner,
What is the age limit to ride the SACA
buses? I was told that up to 12 years old


ride free, is that true? Also what is the
fee?
Concerned citizen

Dear Concerned,
The terminal manager for Servicios
de Autobuses del Corregimiento de Ancon
(SACA) buses said fees vary from 20
cents to 65 cents depending on distance
traveled and age of the rider.
For specifics, check with the SACA
bus driver for alist of stops and charges.
The only ones allowed to ride the
buses for free are the Panamanian Na-
tional Police and infants, but children 2
to 10 can ride for half price.
There is no minimum age to ride SACA
buses, according to the terminal man-
ager.
Children as young as 2 years old can
ride without a guardian, but the terminal
manager suggests parents let the bus driver
know where to let the child off, and that
a responsible adult be at the destination
to greet the child.
For more information about fees and
procedures, call the SACA terminal at
262-7333.

Dear Mayors' Corner,
The holidays are coming and I antici-
pate a problem getting those special


Mayors' Corner


Sponsors responsible for signed-on guests


Escort violation
Every week, the military police apprehend and charge
Panamanians for not being with their sponsors once
they have been signed on post. Sponsors who sign in
guests are responsible for making sure the people they
signed in stay with them at all times and they are off the
installation by 1 a.m.
For more information about the guest policy, contact
the military police desk.

Bicycle theft
There were a number of bicycles stolen from under
carports at Fort Davis and Fort Clayton. Most of the
bicycles were locked to the security bars or carport
poles with a lock and chain. The thieves used a cutting
device to cut off the chain.
To reduce the chances of becoming a victim, use a
heavy duty lock and chain, ensure that the area where
the bicycle is parked is well lit and the bicycle is
registered with the Provost Marshal.
For more information, call the Crime Prevention
Section at 287-3261/6762.

Wrongful transfer of merchandise
Several people were charged last week with the
wrongful transfer of duty-free commissary merchan-
dise. Items bought at the commissary are for privilege
card holders and their family members only. These
items can not be traded, given or sold to any person not
authorized post privileges.
For more information, call the U.S. Southern Com-
mand Contraband Section at 286-3303.

False pretense
Last week, two people were charged with attempting
to enter Fort Clayton under falsepretenses. One person
tried to get on base by using a bilingual ID card that
belonged to someone else. Another tried to get on post


by falsifying a one day vehicle pass.
Immediately report lost or stolen identification
cards to the military police at 287-4401 or 4402. If you
have any information or suspect someone of entering a
military base using forged or stolen documents,
report it immediately.

Forced entry
Unknown thieves burglarized a Fort Clayton resi-
dence by prying apart the security bars on a kitchen
window. Once inside, the thieves took a Sony VCR, a
JVC portable stereo, an Oster blender and a purse con-
taining some cash, several credit cards and various
forms of identification.
If you have any information on this break-
in, contact the Military Police Investi-
gation Section at 287-5252.

The following crime sta-
tistics are for the week of JIM
Oct. 30 - Nov. 5.
Pacific
Fort Clayton 300 area -
three larcenies of secured
private property
Fort Clayton 300 area -
one larceny of unsecured
privateproperty ---"
Fort Clayton 1100 area -
one burglary
Curundu 500 area - one lar-
ceny of unsecured private prop- 1
erty
Fort Amador 400 area - one lar-
ceny of secured private property
Fort Kobbe 300 area - one larceny
of secured private property
Fort Kobbe400 area- twolarcenies of


unsecured private property
Atlantic
Fort Espinar 100 area - one larceny of unsecured
private property
Fort Davis 500 area - one larceny of unsecured private
property
Fort Davis 200 area - one larceny of secured private
property


Commander in Chief........................ Gen. George A. Joulwan
Director, Public Affairs........................ Col. James L. Fetig
Chief................................................ SFC Joseph Ferrare
Editor.....................................................M Sgt. Rolf Carter
Assistant Editor..............................Sgt. Deborah E. Williams
Sports Editor................................................. Sgt. John Hall



ft ropic Tir
.IffP


Editorial Staff....................................Sgt. Richard Puckett
Sgt. James Yocum
Rosemary Chong

U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office...............287-3007
24th Wing Public Affairs Office.........................284-5459
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office..............283-5644


U.S. Army South PAO Atlantic...........................289-4312
This authorized unofficial command informationpublica-
tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is
published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information
Programof the Department of Defense, under the supervision
of the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official
view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or
the U.S. Southern Command. The address is: Unit 0936 APO
AA 34002 Telephone 285-6612.


holiday foods again.
Last year you couldn't find [canned]
pumpkin and when you did, there wasn't
any evaporated milk.
Is the commissary going to do any
[pre-] planning to prevent those short-
ages this year? The official policy is not
to horde but shortages make it impos-
sible.
Watching the shelves

Dear Watching,
According to the deputy district
director, the commissary has already
taken steps to ensure customers' needs
are met. Orders were placed months ago
to fill anticipated seasonal needs. Those
shipments have already arrived, the shelves
are fully stocked and the warehouses are
full.
Selected holiday items are on perma-
nent display at aisle ends throughout all
three commissaries, the deputy district
director said.

Editor's note: This column is pro-
vided to allow community members to
submit questions or concerns to be re-
searched and answered by the May-
oral Congress. Letters should be mailed
to: Mayors' Corner, APO AA 34004
(MPS). Anonymity will be granted
upon request. Publicity Chairperson,
Dyana Ellis.









Commentar


Tropic Times
Nov.13,1992 /


Quitting no laughing or coughing matter


by MSgt. Rolf Carter
Editor
Thursday is the Great American
Smokeout, which has long been a joke
for me - at least up until two months
ago.
I always found the Smokeout a
laugh because I couldn't see why
anyone else would care if
I smoked for one day or
not. One day without a
cigarette isn't going to
correct the damage of 15 "You
or 20 years of serious people aE
smoking. And, it certainly peope a
won't break one's addic- will go, nl
tion to nicotine. Also I yOU WOUlI
never bought into the belief to gO."
that smoke from my ciga- Jeannet
rette would cause some- U.S. p
one else lung cancer, more
so than auto exhaust, in-
dustrial pollution or toxic waste dumps.
But every year legions of non- and
former smokers preach to puffers about
the benefits of quitting. Deep inside I
felt these people really didn't care


I

c


d

te
rti


about my health so I would laugh
instead of cry.
Between the chuckles I thought of
some things I thought were bad for
people or helped cause premature
death. We could have some very
interesting "out" days. Just imagine -
the Great American Eat Pork and Red
Meatout; the Great American Mess
With Me Todayout;
the Great American
Play In Trafficout; the
Great American Jogout
,an take (remember Jim Fixx?);
far as they the Great American
ar as they Driveby Shootout; the
t as far as Great American
like them Taking Unneeded
Prescription Drugout.
The list is endless we
e Rankin could easily use up a
cian year and have some
outs left over. More
importantly, we would get truly tired of
people telling us what they think is
good for us and on what given day.
But like I said, the joke ended two
months ago when I abandoned my no-


less-than one pack a day habit. I
decided I wasn't going to smoke any
more because I didn't want to. I just
really felt I had spent enough of my
life as a smoker. Since I've stopped
smoking I've put a few things into a
new perspective (you can do that when
not under the influence of a drug).
Here are some of those thoughts:
When you are ready to quit you can
and you will. The strength to do so
comes from the mind, and I play some
head games with myself to help me
continue as a nonsmoker. First of all, I
quit cold turkey and daily I live in fear
that I might start again and never be
able to quit. That fear gives me some
strength.
Another of my gimmicks is to chal-
lenge myself to do things as a non-
smoker that I don't remember doing
before I started smoking. For instance,
this is my chance to run two miles as a
nonsmoker and see how it feels.
Also as a nonsmoker I want to play
racquetball, drive across the country,
take a long walk in the snow, fly in a
plane, ride a bicycle, eat a Thanksgiv-


ing dinner, stay up all night, eat a
serious helping of Aunt Norma's pinto
beans and biscuits - and the list
grows.
I also challenge myself not to do
some things and to do other things
because I'm disciplined (based on my
ability to quit smoking). This has a lot
of benefits and definitely helps me get
things done around the house.
So, smokers shouldn't let the Great
American Smokeout cause unneeded
anxiety. If you're not ready to quit,
don't. I didn't, and you shouldn't, play
with yourself like that. Self esteem
isn't the easiest thing for people to get,
keep or maintain so don't beat yours up
by trying to stop smoking for one day
and possibly failing. Especially if you
believe there's nothing to gain by
quitting for one day.
If anything, use the wealth of infor-
mation distributed during the Smoke-
out to help you find a reason to quit,
and when you're ready you'll have
some things to fall back on and help
you stay off cigarettes. (See related
story on page 2.)


Environmental strategy needs. everyone's support


Think globally, act locally one
key to saving the environment

by Omar Ching
Engineering Technician, DEH
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - One of this
decade's major concerns is the environment we live
in. "Save the Earth" is the theme of the '90's.
People are concerned about air and water pollu-
tion, hazardous chemicals and waste, and global
warming. We are concerned about our forests, lakes
and beaches. But how can we maintain our standard
of living and protect our environment?
According to Daniel Muschett, chief, Directorate
of Engineering and Housing Environmental Energy
Conservation Branch, we have to begin by realizing
that any steps we take to protect the environment
now may not affect us immediately, but will have
positive results in the long run.
For example, If you have five cans, three glass


bottles, two plastic containers, and two newspapers to
throw away, you may wonder if you should recycle
them or simply throw them in the trash. "I'm proba-
bly going to get only loose change for this," you
think, "and these few things are insignificant and will
not harm the environment."
So you throw the stuff in the trash.
Sound familiar? Is this your point of view? Let's
look at the total picture.
The Department of Defense community here has
about 25,000 people. The cans, bottles, plastic
containers and newspapers for all of us amount to
about 96 tons - or 192,000 pounds - of garbage.
This has a definite impact on our environment. To
protect our environment, we have to think in a
broader manner - we have to think and act as a
group and not as individuals.
Aside from recycling, what else can you do to
protect the environment? Well, you can conserve
energy. You may ask how does conserving energy
protect the environment?
Muschett emphasizes that by conserving energy


you reduce the demand on the power plants. This in
turn reduces the amount of coal, natural gas or oil,
burned, which in turn, reduces air pollution.
Second, coal, natural gas, and oil are considered
"dirty fuels" that require extensive mining, and hurt
the environment. This means every gallon of gas, or
kilowatt of electricity you conserve will reduce the
demand for these "dirty" resources. By reducing
pollution, you would be protecting the environment.
What is involved in conserving energy? The
bottom line is avoiding waste.
You don't have to be uncomfortable to conserve
energy. It is just a matter of awareness and following
a simple guideline: if it's not being used, turn it off.
Most of you have seen the science fiction movies
of a future filled with dead forests, polluted lakes,
and acid rain falling on barren, trash-filled streets.
Interesting when seen as a movie, tragic if this is the
legacy we leave to future generations.
Remember, you are a significant player in deter-
mining just how successfully we protect our environ-
ment and conserve energy. Everyone's efforts count!


What can you tell children about conservation?


"I tell them to turn the
electricity off when
they're not using it."


Tony Nunez
56th Signal Battalion


"They should make
sure all the lights are
off and to turn the TV
off when not watching
it."


Phaedra Ave-Lallemant
Department of Defense De-
pendent Schools student


"When out of the room,
shut the lights out."


SW1 Terry Knapp
Naval Security Group Activity
- Galeta Island


"I would tell them to
respect energy because
there's not much left."


SSgt. Robert Bowers
24th Maintenance Squadron


-V

(. _ I,


"I would tell them the
basics - recycle."


1st Sgt. Danny Shepherd
79th Army Band


IDietOoe=


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of Southern Command, The
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries - or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right
to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.


Como%

r







8Tropic Times
Nov. 13, 1992


Army plans safety stand down


by Spec. Robin Mantikowski
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT CLAYTON - In the last 10 years, the Army
has turned its sights to refining the practice of safety in
every aspect of Army life and training, and Daprtment
of the Army figures show it's working. Army accidents
went down 37 percent in fiscal year 1992.
In this continuing effort to eliminate safety prob-
lems, U.S. Army South will concentrate on safety, risk
management, accident prevention and loss reduction on
Safety Awareness/Safety Stand Down Day, Thursday
In the 1992 Safety Awareness memorandum, Maj.
Gen. Richard F. Timmons, commanding general, said,
"Reassignments due to drawdown may place people in


different jobs with new and unfamiliar hazards, thereby
increasing the potential for an accident...The training
you conduct on Safety Awareness/Safety Stand Down
Day can eliminate needless suffering, reduce costs and
increase readiness."
Though safety is an everyday concern, Safety Day
gives the Army a chance to stand down, and command-
ers a chance to put safety into their mission, said Staff
Sgt. Ronnie Byrd, noncommissioned officer-in-charge
of Command Safety Office.
Army units across Panama will participate in activi-
ties ranging from classes on hearing conservation and
proper lifting techniques to vehicle inspections.
"It is everyone's responsibility to make sure safety
happens everyday for every mission," Byrd said.


COROZAL (Tropic Times) - The 36th Explosive
Ordnance Detachment will hold an Ammunition and
Explosives Amnesty Day Thursday in conjunction with
U.S. Army South Safety Awareness/ Safety Stand Down
Day.
Between 7:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m., EOD soldiers will
accept ordnance at several points in Panama, said 1st Lt.
Fred Tejan, 36th EOD commander.
The points will accept all ordnance that arrives there,
but there are certain items that servicemembers should
not try to bring in.
Tejan said most small-arms ammunition is safe to
transport, but that heavier e(rnance should be reported
40 MILLIMETER GRE-
NADES - The 40mm
grenade projectiles
come in four basic
types: high explosive,
smoke, illumination and
signalling. They are
usually 2 inches in
diameter and 4-6
inches long. Normally, a
the grenades are sil-
ver and the nose-tip is .
gold. Unless the gre-
nades are in the origi-
nal shipping contain- :
ers, they should be left .
in place.


BLASTING CLAPS -
Blasting caps come in
two major types: elec-
tric and non-electric.
Electric caps have col-
ored wires attached to
them, while non-elec-
trics don't. They range
in size from 2-1/2 to 5-
inches long and are
usually silver. Blasting
caps are extremely
sensitive and shouldn't
be moved.




HAND GRENADES -
Hand grenades come
in three basic types:
fragmentation, sig-
nalling and riot control.
There are many differ-
ent shapes and sizes
of grenades. Grenades
made by countries other
than the United States
have been found in
Panama. Colors vary,
but grenades are usu-
ally olive drab. Unless
the grenades are in the
original shipping con-
tainers, they should be
left in place.


to the military police for EOD specialists to pick-up.
Pictured below are some types of ordnance that can
be found in Panama. This is just a sample of the types of
explosive devices that are used in training.
Anything that servicemembers are not sure is safe
should be left for EOD to pick up, he said. During
Amnesty Day, no questions will be asked about the
origin of the explosives.
Pick-up points will be found at the Southern Com-
mand Network field on Fort Clayton; Fort Davis' soft-
ball field; 36th EOD, Building 533 Corozal; Air Force
EOD, Building 734 Howard AFB; and the Ammunition
Supply Point on Rodman Naval Station.


I ~ 2


Ordnance detachment holds Amnesty

Day, accepting ammunition, explosives


Wreck crushes

family, hurt lingers

by SFC Tony Nauroth
USARSO Public Affairs Office
It's been more than a month since my nephew
Jason died in his car. He was 16. My sister Barbara
is lost, devastated, in a state of denial. I was unable
to attend the funeral - the school sent the entire
junior class of Wallenpaupack Area High School in
a fleet of yellow buses to the Queen of Peace Roman
Catholic Church in Hawley, Pa. And all our family
was there. It hurts.
Jason was driving. Barb and her husband Dennis
had bought Jason's new Honda just a week before the
accident. They feared that his original rust bucket
would get him in an accident. In the writing business
that's known as bitter irony.
There were three people in the car. Two died.
Tony Sibulsky, the front seat passenger, survived
and walked to a nearby home to get help. He had his
seatbelt on. Jason and a third friend died instantly,
according to the coroner's report. Pennsylvania State
Police attributed the accident to high speed. Sib-
ulsky said Jason was going between 60 and 70 miles
an hour. That hurts too.
The car apparently hit some wet leaves, didn't
make a turn and slammed into a large tree. The
Honda became half a Honda in the twinkling of an
eye. And Jason was gone.
Jason Gumble was a good kid. Smart. Very
smart. A computer whiz. Loved by all the family,
his quiet nature gave him an air of calm confidence.
He wasn't prone to doing stupid things.
The three boys - yes, they were mere boys, not
yet legal age for military service - were returning
from a video arcade in Honesdale. It was 11 p.m.
Friday, September 25. Maybe theywere burningoff
young teenage steam. Who knows? Maybe it was
the speed, or the road. It's interesting that a report
just released by an international association of truck-
ers voted Pennsylvania's roads the worst in the
country for the second year in a row. Still, no back
road in any state is safe at 60 miles per hour.
My sister wrote an account of that night - the
first call, her husband's anger at Jason's carelessness
(before they knew he was dead), neighbors holding
her back as police told Dennis the news, her disbelief
and bereavement. She wrote it in the third person, as
if it happened to someone else. That hurts too.
There's an emptiness where Jason was. It's as if
a huge space was carved out between Barb's oldest
son Eric, and her younger daughter, Brenda. A whole
life and future...gone. A whole line of Gumbles
never given the gift of life. That hurts unbearably.
Barbara sent me the article printed in the Wayne
County News Eagle. It's accurate. One bright spot
jumped out at me right away in the form of a
subhead: "No Alcohol Indicated." I've thought about
this one point long and hard. In all the terrible
sadness, I wonder how much more difficult and
terrible - even to the point of horror- would it be
if these young men had been drinking. How much
damage would that have done to Barb, and all of us?
The timing here is coincidental with some tragic
news within U.S. Army South, where noncommis-
sioned officers are being picked up in record num-
bers for DWI and DUI offenses. These soldiers,
some decades older than Jason was, are presumably
mature men and women. At least 43 out of 3,000
NCOs were picked up between January and April,
said Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program officials, and
USARSO Commander Maj. Gen. Richard F. Tim-
mons is fed up with it. As a result, NCOs are now
required to sit through a Substance Abuse Leaders'
Training class where they learn the dangers of alco-
hol abuse, signs of alcoholism, and consequences of
DUI and DWI charges on their careers. Offenders
who escape death, but are caught by military police,
find their careers are history in this age of drawdown.
When I attended the SALT class last week, all I
could think about was how fortunate it was that Jason
wasn't drinking. Small comfort when death comes
so close. We saw a video in which the total loss of
life in America was dramatically illustrated in a
scene where the 250,000 residents of Rochester,
N.Y. disappear. That's how many die in wrecks each
decade. In the year 2000, when the next list of lost
souls gets tallied up, I'll recognize one- Jason R.
Gumble. My nephew. But at least our family will be
able to say, "Thank God he wasn't drinking."
For that would have been the worst hurt of all.







Tropic Times 9
Nov. 13, 1992 9



Deployment reunites soldier with father


by Capt. Michael Nichols
122nd Public Affairs Detachment
FORT CLAYTON (Theater Support Element) - To
meet the father she never knew, Oklahoma Army Na-
tional Guard Spec. Renee Cook gladly deployed from
Tehlequah, Okla., to the Republic of Panama for annual
training.
Cook was two years old and living in Panama at the
time her parents separated. She moved back to the
United States with her mother. All she remembered
about Panama was how it constantly rained and how hot
it was.
As she grew up, Cook only had periodic contact with
her father, and did not have an opportunity to get to
know him.
"The last time I saw my father was when I was about
14 years old," said the supply clerk for the 445th
Military Police Company in McAlester, Okla. "I grew
up never fully knowing who my father was."
Now as a National Guard soldier deployed to her
former home, she has a chance to find out.
Her father, James E. Cook, retired from the Army as
a sergeant majorin 1972 and returned to Panama after
two years in Florida working for the Federal Aviation
Administration.
Cook said he realized how much he missed living in
Panama and moved back, netting a job as a communi-
cation chief for U.S. Army South.
The younger Cook had no idea what adventures she
would experience when she first joined the Oklahoma
National Guard four years ago.


NA -


Theater Support Elementphoto by Sgt. Michael Kirchmann
Spec. Renee Cook stands with her father James E.
Cook after their first meeting since she was 14.
During Operation Desert Storm, the 445th mobilized
and spent six months in the middle east protecting
supply routes into Kuwait for allied troops.
When she learned the 445th would be assisting
active duty military police units in U.S. Southern
Command, she was overjoyed.
"It was about a month ago when I learned of the
Panama deployment," she said. "That's when I started
putting my reunion plans together."
After several tries at reaching her father by phone,
her older brother, SFC James Cook Jr., stationed at Fort
Benning, Ga., was able to contact him while the elder
cook was on a business trip to Washington, D.C.
"As soon as I learned of Renee's trip to Panama, I
made arrangements to cut my business short and return
from Washingtonin orderto meet my daughter," Cook


said. "It was hard to describe my excitement and nerv-
ousness."
The reunion took place on the first day the 445th
arrived ini Panama.
"I was unpacking my clothes when a soldier came to
my room and told me my father was here," Cook said.
"I was so excited I don't even recall who spoke first. I
recognized him right away, even though he looked
older than I remembered."
As a bonus, Cook also met her 17-year-old brother
Chris Cook for the first time.
When she found out her new brother was having
trouble with his math homework, she jumped right in to
help him.
Cook is currently a third-year math major at North-
eastern State University in Tahlequah. She plans to
make a career as a junior high math teacher.
Cook says she is grateful for the opportunity to
contact her father and also for the challenging training
in Panama.
Working as a supply clerk in a different part of the
world has provided her with the challenge of dealing
with people who speak a different language.
The training in Panama is also unique for the unit
because it offers them achanceto provide base security
operations like bicycle patrols through residential areas
- something they've never done before.
Cook summed up her feelings about the reunion by
saying, "I was so young when my dad left, I did not
understand a lot of things regarding the separation. This
has given me an opportunity to get answers I never had
before."


Guardsmen build Camitillo school, enjoy stay


by SSgt. Bill Kuhns
122nd Public Affairs Detachment

CAMITILLO, Panama (Theater Support Element) -
The sounds of hammers, saws and heavy equipment
disrupt the usual jungle sounds of Panama's tropical
interior as soldiers of the Maine Army National Guard's
240th Engineer Group help build Panama's educational
structure and forge international memories for a life-
time.
Dubbed Team 240, the soldiers are here for their
two-week annual training period to rebuild the school at
Camitillo.
The team members come from companies of the
133rd Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy), from Port-
land, Maine, and the 262nd Engineer Battalion (Com-
bat Light), from Bangor, Maine.
The 240th jumped at the chance to do the Camitillo
project, after they were given a list of proposed humani-
tarian construction projects by the Panama govern-
ment.
Camitillo is located about two hours from Panama
City. The last six miles are accessible only on foot or
horseback.
The Camitillo school serves about 60 children who
were driven from their original building by a storm that
collapsed the roof. Classes were transferred to a tent
provided by the U.S. Army.
Weekdays, students walk or ride horses, arriving in
brilliant white shirts and crisp blue skirts or trousers.
They attend class from 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Blanca DeFranco and Rosa Reyes, the two teachers
at the school, also arrive each morning on horseback.
DeFranco stays in a nearby village during the week,
living in Panama City on the weekends.
The remote area and lack of roads into the village
meant supplies had to be delivered by helicopter.
"Choppers coming in at 1100 hours today," said
SSgt. Robert L. Caron, communications chief for Team
240. "They're delivering a water buffalo and some
more cinder blocks."
The helicopter is the lifeline from Camp Rousseau,
Panama, for the soldiers at Camitillo.
Food, mail, clothing, fuel, water, building supplies
- everything needed to complete the mission - are
airlifted to the engineers.
The work is hard manual labor with the sun shining
one minute and the rains pouring the next. Despite these
hardships, the soldiers' spirits couldn't be higher.
"I'm not leaving until they make me go," said SSgt.
Daniel Petit. "Everyone else I know feels the same way.
Nobody wants to go back to the base camp. They feel


great about what they are doing."
Rebuilding the school not only provides the team
members with a unique logistical challenge, but also
brings a sense of pride for the crew and connects them
emotionally to the villagers.
"We work side-by-side with the villagers of Camit-
illo," said Sgt. Roscoe Presley, president ofJonesboro,
Maine. "It's been great. These people are the most
honest and hard-working people I've ever seen."
The entire village turns out to assist the engineers by
carrying cinder blocks, mixing cement and doing what-
ever tasks need to be done.
"They're grateful for everything that is done," said
SFC Richard Commaeu, from Old Town, Maine. "They
know it's for their future and for their kids."
"I would like the citizens of Maine to know that I am
extremely pleased with the efforts of the Maine Army
National Guard in completing our school," said Joaguin
Martinez, mayor of Camitillo. "Education is the key for
success of my people and this will allow our children to
continue their education."
"We are using our military skills to help people who
are truly grateful for the help," said 1st Lt. Jeffrey
Morton, 240th project team leader. "We get more
results for the dollar spent than on any project we have
ever seen."


I


II





S.---r7


Theaer Support Element photos by SSgt William Kuhns
Blanca DeFranco teaches students inside a tent
supplied by the U.S. Army.


r - ' - ',-"- ,' -,



r- -^ ZI '1 " r-


-- '.;




. ..- . - .w


Soldiers work alongside Camitillo residents to build the new school.


l-^


!








10 Tropic Times
1 Nov. 13,1992


SMilestones


Capt. Todd A Wang took command of Co. A, 536th
Engineer Battalion from Capt. David A. Dougherty
Oct. 23.
Capt. Bryan C. Tempio recently took command of
Headquarters and Support Command, 536th Engi-
neer Battalion from Capt. Miyako Y. Newell.



Legion of Merit - CSM Dennis D. Starkey, 106th
Signal Brigade
Meritorious Service Medal - SFC Ted W. Clark,
536th Engineer Battalion (OLC); MSgt. Alan J.
Temple, 106th Signal Brigade; SFC James A. Miley,
106th Signal Brigade; Sgt. Carol E. Sonetrompf,
106th Signal Brigade
Army Commendation Medal - SSgt. Ramon L.
Santiago, 106th Signal Brigade; Sgt. Jamie
Ashcraft, 106th Signal Brigade; Sgt. Larry R. Blare,
106th Signal Brigade; Spec. James Manhal, 106th
Signal Brigade

Army Achievement Medal - Sgt. Kevin L.
Bolton, 106th Signal Brigade (30LC); Sgt. Stevie
Green, 106th Signal Brigade (30LC); Spec. Johnnie
Buchanan, 106th Signal Brigade (20LC); Spec. Pa-
tricia A. Williams, 106th Signal Brigade (20LC);
Sgt. Aida L Ponce De Leon, 106th Signal Brigade
(1OLC); Sgt. Eric Powell, 106th Signal Brigade
(1OLC); Spec. Noemi H. Aziz, 106th Signal Bri-
gade (10LC); Spec. Christopher D. Causs, 106th
Signal Brigade; Spec. Darby James, 106th Signal
Brigade; Capt. PhillipParker, 106th SignalBrigade;
SFC Rene Caban, 106th Signal Brigade; SFC
JohnnieMurry, 106th SignalBrigade; SSgt. Freddie
Calarza, 106th Signal Brigade; SSgt Yvette
Meredith, 106th Signal Brigade; Sgt Michael
Mullins, 106th Signal Brigade; Sgt. James P. Proc-
tor, 106th Signal Brigade; Sgt. Ronald Schmoldt,
106th Signal Brigade; Spec. Cyrano Byrd, 106th
Signal Brigade; PFC Ronald Hilberg, 106th Signal
Brigade; PFC David Barbieri 106th Signal Brigade



To Staff Sergeant - Lee Newman, 106th Signal
Brigade
To Sergeant-Mildred Navarro, 106th Signal Bri-
gade; Gregory Minor, 106th Signal Brigade; Darby
James, 106th Signal Brigade; Robert Fuller, 106th
Signal Brigade; Marvin Parrish, 106th Signal Bri-
gade


To Colonel - John A. Breed, U.S. Southern Com-
mand; Richard Coleman, 24th Security Police
Squadron
To Lieutenant Colonel - Ruth A. Sykes, U.S.
Southern Command
To Captain - Douglas A. Johnson, 24th Wing
To Master Sergeant - Mary J. Bradley, 24th
Supply Squadron; Gilbert Centeno, U.S. Southern
Command; Eileen V. Durham, 24th SUPS; Dale
Mitcham,24th Wing; Jimmie E. Monette, 24th Civil
Engineering Squadron; Larry R. Wauson, 24th SPS



106th Signal Brigade:
Spec. Christopher D. Gauss, soldier of the year
Sgt. James P. Proctor, noncommissioned officer of
the year
U.S. Army Medical Activity:
Spec. J-R. Dowdy, soldier of the year
U.S. Southern Command:
Air Force Sgt David W. Brocato, servicemember of
the quarter



Superior Performance Awards:
Ricardo Ara, 106th Signal Brigade
Rolando Duran, 106th Signal Brigade
Michael N. Friend, 106th Signal Brigade
Connie M. Hemm, 106th Signal Brigade
Cleveland James, 106th Signal Brigade
Juan 0. Lu, 106th Signal Brigade
Alberto E. Mendoza, 106th Signal Brigade
Jimmy D. Moses, 106th Signal Brigade
Rolland L. Gleichman, 106th Signal Brigade
Plutarco Olivardia, 106th Signal Brigade
Frank S. Pigeon, 106th Signal Brigade
Raymundo R. Richards, 106th Signal Brigade
Winnie Roberts, 106th Signal Brigade
Roberto A. Stevenson, 106th Signal Brigade
Yvonne B. Walters, 106th Signal Brigade
Joyce Watkins, 106th Signal Brigade
Nixia C. Morales, 106th Signal Brigade
Ernest W. Peschl, 106th Signal Brigade



106th Signal Brigade:
Orlando Delvasto, 106th Signal Brigade
Fran Leves, 106th Signal Brigade
Marjorie A. Smith, 106th Signal Brigade
Janis D. Sanchez, 106th Signal Brigade
Raymundo R. Richards, 106th Signal Brigade


U.S. Air Force photo by SMSgt Boyd Belcher
TSgt. Pedro A. Serrano, antenna maintenance squadron, performs a corrosion
control inspection. Serrano was recently promoted through the STEP program.


earn


stripes


through STEP program


HOWARD AFB (24thWG/PA)- Two
Howard Air Force members were re-
cently rewarded for doing an excep-
tional job through the Stripes for Excep-
tional Performers program when MSgt.
Bernadette Holloway and TSgt. Pedro
Serrano, were promoted to their present
rank.
Holloway is chief of the 6933rd Elec-
tronic Security Squadron orderly room.
As such she handles, leaves, personnel
actions, weight management, officer and
enlisted performance reports, awards and
decorations and more.
It's her achievements beyond her
normal duties that got her STEP pro-
moted though, said her supervisors. She
has been recognized by the Headquarters
Air Force Intelligence Command inspec-
tor general as a Professional Performer
and has been honored throughout her
career as a quarterly winner in her pres-
ent and previous units.
Her promotion comes on the heels of
a second place finish in the AFIC Prism
competition. This competition tests AFIC
members in their respective career fields,
in Holloway's case, that was the person-
nel area.
Before arriving at Howard in 1990,
Holloway was assigned at Headquarters
Air Training Command, Randolph AFB,
Texas, where supervisors said she was


one of the most efficient EPR processors
in the Air Force.
A native of Panama, the 15-year Air
Force veteran is a graduate of the Com-
munity College of the Air Force, with an
associates degree in human resources
management.
Serrano, the other STEP promote, is
also working toward a CCAF degree in
electronics systems technology. As
noncommissioned officer in charge an-
tenna maintenance, he routinely goes on
temporary duty.
"It's something I enjoy. The job stays
essentially...the same, but I get to travel
to different to places and experience
other cultures, and that's a plus."
The Puerto Rico native has deployed
to Fort Sherman, Latin American em-
bassies, Mexico City, Mexico and Alaska
during his seven-year tour of duty here.
Serrano's awards range from being
named maintainer of the quarter and
year, to outstanding Hispanic and Air
Forces Panama's Outstanding NCO of
the Year.
Holloway and Serrano are both active
in the community. Holloway is closely
involved with the Special Olympics as
organizer and coach, while Serrano is a
volunteer Military Affiliated Radio Sys-
tem operator and active in his local
church.


Airmen


U.S. Air Force photo by SrA. Jackie Ambrose
SUGGESTION SHOOTS STRAIGHT-The Howard Suggestion Program's
first winner of fiscal year 1993 is SrA. Rebecca Kraus of the 24th Medical
Group. She received a cash award of $156 for submitting a suggestion to
change the schedule for yellow fever vaccinations from weekly to monthly.
This modification reduces yellow fever vaccine waste and resulted in a
tangible saving to the Air Force of $1,560 a year. Contact unit suggestion
program monitors for information.














Sports


Q.,uarr~yrHeights, iRepublic ir~anauma


A


.~4.


j


Kate Wilder (left) and Janelle McGuinness, Balboa High School sophomore class princesses share
homecoming ceremony at Balboa Stadium Nov. 6.


-'~-~'~ ~
F/ ~.
,-~4.., 4
~I,.
.J~ JW~.


A Balboa Bulldogs paye., r and a Balboa Red Machine player miss the ball.
A Balboa Bulldogs player and a Balboa Red Machine player miss the ball.


Gus weathers the storm while Buck
battles the rain and mud in the
jungle. Buck closes the gap.


Few believe Evander Holyfield can
beat Riddick Bowe in tonight's
heavyweight bout.


i, - d
U.S. Army photos by Spec. E.J. Hwrsom
a happy moment during a


Balboa High School 11th-grade students enjoy their
homecoming float.
Cougars, Bulldogs
share football title
BALBOA STADIUM - The Curundu Cougars de-
feated the Panama Canal Commission Green Devils 37-
27 and the Balboa Bulldogs beat the Balboa Red Ma-
chine 33-0 here Nov. 6.
The win secured first place for the Bulldogs and the
Cougars in the Department of Defense Dependent Schools
- Panama football league
The Bulldogs and Cougars finished in a 6-1 deadlock
for first place. The Red Machine finished at 3-4, the
Green Devils were 2-5 and the Tigers were 1-7.


Tennis player wins............page 12
NFL news..........................page 13
College roundup................page 14


Nov. 13,1992,


Page 11


%16


Z4 �lz* Nm;lwk
,"*7








12 Tropic Times
A Nov. 13, 1992


Local tennis player


falls in love with game


* t. . . -.


*. . .


I . I " 1

U.S. Army photo by Spe. EJ. Hersom
Spec. Daniel Nenninger sharpens his skills at Fort Clayton.


by Spec. E.J. Hersom
USARSO PAO
Spec. Daniel Nenninger strides onto a
tennis court almost sluggishly. He warms
up to a game with a heavy dose of high-
test sunscreen to protect his fair, sun-
burned skin. Sweat instantly drips from
his red hair and lip whiskers.
An unsuspecting opponent might not
consider Nenninger's sleek frame and
slow entrance threatening, but it's his
way of camouflaging his attack.
Stalking his prey like a tiger, Nennin-
ger even growls when he serves, then
wears opponents down with a consistent
game.
Southern Command's top tennis ani-
mal never took a tennis lesson in his life
- that he didn't want to.
The Blackhawk helicopter mechanic
from Company A, 1st Battalion, 228th
Aviation, won his first tennis game near
his home in St. Louis with a $4 racket
when he was 14. "I fell in love with the
game right then," he said.
Now, 32, he plays bigger rackets win-
ning two of Panama's Class B open tour-
naments and placing second in an open
Class A tournament.
He also finished first in his age group
in the All Army tryouts in September at
Fort Eustis, Va., then captured second at
the Armed Forces Championship at
Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala.
Television is responsible for many
parts of Nenninger's game. "I learned a
lot from the pros on TV," he said. "I got
my two-handed backhand from Connors."
Though he hasn'tplayed in enough of
Panama's tournaments to be seeded,
Nenningeris a good tennis player. If you
don't believe it, ask him.


"My game is a lot like Michael Chang's
- or Andre Agassi's since people know
him better - but he hits the ball much
harder than I do."
Nenninger attacks vehemently. He
pounces on the canary-yellow ball strik-
ing it powerfully and accurately. His
racket serves as claws. His sharp blue
eyes alert him of his prey's weakness. He
moves in for a kill.
"Most of the Panamanian players have
a slice on their backhand so I come into
the net to beat them. If they have a big
serve then I try to hit a big shot from
that," he said.
Though it's not his strong point,
Nenninger plays the net to beat some of
his better opponents, he said, but when
they use net play against him, it doesn't
work.
A local Army tennis partner tells why.
"It's very difficult to play a net game
against him because he's either going to
go around you with a passing shot or lob
it over you," said Maj. Kurt Andrews,
commander of Company E, 228th Avia-
tion. Andrews is a former All-Army ten-
nis player who volleys with Nenninger
on weekends.
As far as attitude goes, Andrews said
Nenninger is not like John McEnroe.
He's fair about calls and doesn't get
emotional over them. "He's a pretty nice,
pretty quiet guy," he added.
Andrews agrees that Nenninger's style
is similar to Chang's. "They beat people
by staying on the base line and wearing
people down by making them run."
Nenninger said he lets his opponents
make the mistakes and even if he is
talking big about his game, he does it in
a soft voice, like a big cat. licking his
paws and purring after a satisfying kill.


Turkey Bowl playoffs tickets go on sale


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Tickets are
now available for the Nov. 21 TURKEY BOWL '92
play-off games. The winners of the play-off games will
vie for the championship TURKEY BOWL Nov. 25 at
the Balboa Stadium.
Admission tickets may be purchased at the following
locations:
Valent Recreation Center, Building 53, Fort Clay-
ton, 287-6500/4201; U.S. Naval Station Panama Ca-
nal, Rodman, Building 65, 283-5307; Howard
Sports & Fitness Center (Gym), Building 248,
284-3451; Sundial Recreation Center, Build-
ing 42, Fort Davis, 289-3300; Tickets
may also be purchased at the STRAC
Club, 1-2-3 Club, Clayton NCO Club
and Club Amador.
Tickets purchased for the
play-off games will be recognized
for the TURKEY BOWL'92
championship game. Monies
derived from gate receipts will
be divided equally among the
services' Morale, Welfare and
Recreation programs.
In support of the TURKEY
BOWL, the Army cheerlead-
ers - the TROPIC TER-
MINATORS - will
have a pep rally Nov.
20. It begins at
* 5 p.m. at Fort
,Clayton's Main
,.- Bohio. A disc
jockey will be
there until 7 p.m.
Souvenirs and T-
shirts will be sold. Call
theU.S.ArmySouth
Public Affairs Of-
fice 287-3007/
4109/5459.


Youth baseball/softball
season registration
Registration for the the 1993 Baseball and Softball
program for boys and girls 4-18 years old is under way
and ends Nov. 30.
Registration is being conducted at the Howard Youth
Center, Building 696 and the Albrook Youth Center,
Building 850. A current physical examination is needed
for each child before registration.
A coaches' meeting will be held Nov. 24 at Albrook
Youth Center from 6-9 p.m. It's mandatory for all
volunteers who wish to coach a team. A skills evalu-
ation will be held Nov. 28. Opening ceremonies will be
held Jan. 9 at Albrook Little League Field. The season
ends March 27.
Call Vince Duncan at 286-3195 or 284-4700.

Youth baseball
The Pacific Little League will hold registration Nov.
16-17 for boys and girls 6-15 years old. Call John
Carlson at 252-2622.

Intramural sports
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center will be regis-
tering athletes in intramural golf, badminton and soft-
ball. Call 284-3451.


I Sport sliorts I










NFL news


Tropic Times 1
Nov.13,1992-1- J


N a


Look out, it's Friday the 13th
[ Bono or Young - the mice will
follow the pied piper. 49ers 24,
,...=., ,^ Saints 16.


It's Friday the 13th. That's a bad
day to predict the future, especially
when you have to worry about
what's happening today. Anyway,
making a long story longer, let's
attack the five toughest games head
on.

LION TAMER - The NFL has re-
alized that the Detroit Lions (2-7) are
nothing but a 1992 fraud. Last season
the Lions were 12-4 and nearly went
to the Super Bowl. They beat a
Buffalo Bills team, 17-14, which had
decided it needed a rest in week 16.
The Bills rested their ailing stars and
did go to the Super Bowl. The
bottom line is the Lions were never a
leader even though they were kings
of the NFC Central jungle. The
Steelers are just the opposite. In
1991, they knew they had some
talent and just needed time to
squeeze out a diamond. This year the
Steelers are 6-3 and one of the best
teams in the AFC. The Steelers have
homefield advantage, so Pittsburgh
will make its seventh win the hard
way - they'll earn it. Steelers 30,
Lions 24.

NIGHT AND DAY - The Saints
and 49ers have been so opposite
during the past couple years, they
wouldn't recognize each other if they
were twins. What does that mean?
Well, the Saints (7-2) play great
defense and score enough points to
win most of the time. The 49ers (7-2)
can score anytime they want,
especially if you make six turnovers
in one game. (No offense to Atlanta
Falcons fans.) No matter who plays
the leader for the 49ers - Steve





S ' .,


uy iMgt.I Ion
"Gus"Hall
Tropic ETm
Sports Editor


APLao Photo
The Rams made the Cardinals Johnny Johson mad last Sunday. The Car-
dinals won 20-14.


1. What two NFL teams came into
the league in 1976?

2. Where will this season's Super
Bowl be played? Bonus: Which big
networks) will televise it?

3. How does the NFL passer rating
system work? Just kidding. Which
active NFL coach has the most wins?

4. If Buffalo beats Miami Monday
night, which coach will get his 100th


win?

5. Name the only two black head
coaches in the NFL today.

ANSWERS
1. Tampa Bay and Seattle.
2. Rose Bowl, Pasadena, Calif. NBC
and SCN.
3. Don Shula, Miami Dolphins.
4. Mary Levy, Buffalo Bills
5. The Raiders Art Shell and the
Vikings Dennis Green.


_ - . ..;- ..,Ar." C. --...,*:. , - '... "
APLaserPhoto
Houston Oilers wide receiver Haywood Jettries (84) makes a leaping catch in
front of Cleveland Browns cornerback Randy Hillard during a Dec. 15, 1991
game in Cleveland.


Jeffries not happy


BATTLE OF THE BANDS - The
Chiefs (5-4) and Redskins (6-3) wage
war at Arrowhead. The game's not
about first place, last place or
anything in between. Both teams are
underachievers with some personnel
problems, but they're still good
football teams. KC QB Dave Krieg is
erratic and Mark Rypien could be his
counselor. Chiefs 16, Skins 10.

DAVID AND GOLIATH - The
perennial overachieving N.Y. Giants
travel to Mile High Stadium to face
the NFL's version of Goliath
Sunday. The Giants (5-4) proved
they could defeat Denver QB John
Elway on neutral ground in Super
Bowl XXI, 39-20. But can the Giants
enter Elway's castle and win? Sure.
And Sinead O'Connor will be the
next Pope. Broncos 23, Giants 16.

MONDAY NIGHT MADNESS -
Buffalo and Miami are the Abbott
and Costello of 1992. Abbott slapped
in Costello's castle, now it's Ab-
bott's turn. Never make Dan Marino
angry, you wouldn't like him when
he's angry. Fish 30, Bills 27.

In other Sunday action, Jets 24,
Kitties 10; Vikes 29, Oilers 26;
Patsies (finally) 13, Colts 6; Eagles
17, Packers 13; Cards 20, Falcons
10; Brownies 13, Bolts 0; Cowgirls
27, Rams 21; Bucs 28, Bears 17;
Raiders 17, Hawks 3.
The Buckster, on a mission from
the infantry, says: Bears 23, Bucs 20;
Jets 20, Kitties 17; Steelers 17, Lions
7; Vikes 14; Oilers 13; Cowpokes
21; Rams 17; Colts 13, Pats 3; 49ers
22, Saints 19; Eagles 17, Pack 10;
Cards 20, Falcons 13; Bolts 19,
Brownies 13; Raiders 19, Hawks 7;
Chiefs 21, Redskins 20. Buck's
narrowed the gap to four. He has a
75-51 record. He's behind me, but
he hasn't give up yet.




,P '
.'A


long contain himself during Sunday's
24-14 loss to Cleveland, the Oilers' third
in four games. He slammed his helmet to
the turf in disgust, trying to light a spark
in his teammates. But nothing worked.
"I wanted to get some excitement
back in our team," Jeffires said. "I'll be
damned if one guy can have enough
emotion for 10 or 30 others. But there's
no way this team is not going to be
emotional Sunday if I have something to
say about it.


Cunningham says:


No more nice guy


PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Randall Cun-
ningham says if he learned anything from
being benched for a weekit's that he has
to shed his "Mr. Nice Guy" image.
Cunningham watched Sunday as
backup quarterback Jim McMahon led
the Philadelphia Eagles to a 31-10 vic-
tory over the Los Angeles Raiders. Coach
Rich Kotite had set Cunningham down
for ineffectiveness as the Eagles lost three
of the previous four games.
As promised by Kotite when he an-
nounced Cunningham would sit out the
Raiders game, the quarterback will re-
turn as the starter Sunday when the Eagles
(6-3) go to Milwaukee to play the Green
Bay Packers (3-6).
Cunningham said he has rarely, if
ever, ripped a player for making a mis-
take that caused a sack or busted a play.
- 1 - " , :


APLawerPhoto
Philadelphia's Herschel Walker (34)
runs through the grasp of Raider free
safety Eddie Anderson (33) Sunday.


"I didn't jump on a guy's back,"
Cunningham said. "But now it's going to
get like that. I'll tell you right now that
I've been Mr. Nice Guy and I'm not
going to have all this put on my job. This
is my job and I saw what happens when I
don't stand up and be verbal and tell
guys, 'You better do yourjob. Because it
all falls on me.' I'm not going to curse,
but I'll tell 'em."
Cunningham said, "Jim's not going
to allow that to happen to him. So, if I did
learn anything (Sunday), that's what I
learned."
Cunningham confirmed that his new
attitude was prompted by an outspoken
teammate and close friend, linebacker
Seth Joyner.
Joyner said he told Cunningham, "As
the quarterback you have to be in control
ofthings out there. It's the quarterback's
team.... Look at (Jim) Kelly and (Dan)
Marino and (Warren) Moon. I've seen
'em all curse guys off the field for not
getting the job done."
"Randall is so afraid he's going to rub
somebody the wrong way. And it's not
about that. It's about winning. And if a
guy makes a mistake and he can't take
constructive criticism then he doesn't
want to get better," Joyner said.
Kotite agreed with Joyner.
"If I was a quarterback and someone
just annihilated me (because of a mis-
take), I'm going to let that person know
how I feel. Or tell him, 'Why don't you
be quarterback and I'll go where you are
and I'll show you what I mean.' There's
nothing wrong with that," Kotite said.
Kotite said he wasn't aware of Cun-
ningham's personality in the huddle. Asked
if Cunningham shows enough authority
on the field, he said, "I don't know. It's
hard for me to say."


HOUSTON (AP) - Haywood Jef-
fires isn't satisfied leading the NFL inre-
ceiving. He wants to be the Houston
Oilers' motivational coach too.
His first piece of advice is to get
crazy, show plenty of emotion during
games and play with the same gusto.
"A lot of guys question me about the
way I am," Jeffires said. "But they
should look inside themselves and real-
ize it's OK to be a little crazy."
Jeffires kept control until he could no










1 Tropic Times
A Nov. 13, 1992


Cowboys helped Jimmy



succeed his own way


IRVING, Texas (AP) - Not unlike Frank Sinatra,
Jimmy Johnson does it his way.
And Johnson's "way" from coaching a national
championship at the University of Miami to turning
around the Dallas Cowboys from worst to first is a strict
regimen of workouts, meetings, and psychological
indoctrination.
If anything, Johnson is finding that handling pros is
less ulcer provoking than dealing with college players,
their parents and alumni.
"I had less control of my players at Miami than I do
at Valley Ranch," Johnson said. "The players were
going to class and trying to get an education. And there
were a lot of distractions from girlfriends to alumni."
Johnson can run a much tauter ship at Valley Ranch.
"I can't control the players when they are away from
Valley Ranch but I've got their attention all day, every
day," he said. "I try to keep an even keel approach.
"Our preparation is the same every week. We try to
put the previous game behind us on Monday. At 3:30
p.m, we started talking about the Los Angeles Rams.
They have Tuesday off. Then we get back to work on
Wednesday."
Like in college Johnson sometimes has trouble con-
trolling the focus of his teams.
"In the professional ranks I keep telling my players
they need to evaluate their commitment when they
leave the training facility," he said. "I tell them they
have to be more focused if they want to be successful."
At Miami, Johnson said he had a sweeter deal
because "at Miami we were significantly better than
most every team we played. There were only three or

"We worked out constantly
against their schemes and that's
why we were so prepared when we
played them. In the NFL you don't
have that luxury. And the talent
level from the worst to the best is


You are tested every


Johnson
Dallas Cowboys head coach


L=7


i


APLaerPhoto
Players like Emmitt Smith (22) have helped make
. the Dallas Cowboys one of the NFL's best teams.
four teams we played who were close to us."
Johnson said the Hurricanes were so good that the
team spent most of their spring training and weekly
workout timepreparing for just three or four teams, like
Notre Dame, Florida, and Florida State.
"We worked out constantly against their schemes
and that's why we were so prepared when we played
them," Johnson said. "In the NFL you don't have that
luxury. And the talent level from the worst to the best is
very small. You are tested every Sunday. "
Johnson himself is a much more relaxed coach in his
third professional season.
He admitted after the Cowboys got into the playoffs
last year "for the first time I'm totally relaxed with my
job. I don't have to answer to the critics anymore."


L T Pct.
2 0 .778
2 0 .778
5 0 .444
7 0 .222
9 0 .000


.667
.556
.556
.444

.667
.556
.444
.333
.111


East
Buffalo Bills
Miami Dolphins
Indianapolis Colts
N.Y. Jets
New England Patriots
Central
Pittsburgh Steelers
Cleveland Browns
Houston Oilers
Cincinnati Bengals
West
Denver Broncos
Kansas City Chiefs
San Diego Chargers
LA Raiders Raiders
Seattle Seahawks

NATIONAL


Ct.
9
7
7
6
3


AMERICAN CONFERENCE


CONFERENCE


East W L T P(
Dallas Cowboys 8 1 0 .889
Philadelphia Eagles 6 3 0 .66'
Washington Redskins 6 3 0 .66'
N.Y. Giants 5 4 0 .55(
Phoenix Cardinals 3 6 0 .333
Central
MinnesotaVikings 7 2 0 .771
Chicago Bears 4 5 0 .44'
Green Bay Packers 3 6 0 .33:
Tampa Bay Buccaneers 3 6 0 .33:
Detroit Lions. 2 7 0 .222
West
San Francisco 49ers 7 2 0 .778
New Orleans Saints 7 2 0 .778
Atlanta Falcons 3 6 0 .333
L.A. Rams 3 6 0 .333
Sunday
Cincinnati at New York Jets, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Houston at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
New England at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia vs. Green Bay, at Milwaukee, 1 p.m.
Phoenix at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Washington at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Los Angeles Rams at Dallas, 4 p.m.
Chicago at Tampa Bay, 4 p.m.
New Orleans at San Francisco, 4 p.m.
Seattle at Los Angeles Raiders, 4 p.m.
New York Giants at Denver, 8 p.m.
Monday
Buffalo at Miami, 9 p.m.


8
4
3
3
2

8
8
3
3


Hurricanes regain No.1


NEW YORK (AP) - Miami, which
has lost the No. 1 ranking twice this
season, regained the top spot again in
Sunday's Associated Press college foot-
ball poll.
The Hurricanes had the weekend
off, but moved up a notch after then-
No. 1 Washington lost to Arizona 16-3
Saturday.
Miami is only the fourth team to be
No. 1 three different times in one sea-
son. The others were Notre Dame (1947),
Tennessee (1951) and Alabama (1962).
Miami (8-0) received 61 first-place
votes and 1,549 points from a nation-
widepanel of sports writers and broad-
casters. The other first-place vote went
to Alabama (9-0), which rose one spot
to No. 2 after beating LSU 31-11.
If Miami and Alabama remain un-
defeated and 1-2 in the rankings, they
will meet in the Sugar Bowl. Miami is
trying to become the first team to win
consecutive championships since Ala-
bamain 1978-79.
"I feel pretty good, but the season
isn't over yet," Miami receiver Horace
Copeland said. "We still have to play
Syracuse and San Diego State. I'm not
too happy yet."
Miami lost its No. 1 ranking for the
first time after struggling to beat Ari-
zona 8-7 in late September. But Ari-
zona helped the Hurricanes Saturday
by ending Washington's 22-game win-
ning streak.
"It makes our one-point victory over


Arizona look real good," Miami de-
fensive tackle Mark Caesar said. "There
should be no doubt who's No. 1."
Michigan (8-0-1) climbed one place
to No. 3 after beating Northwestern
40-7, and Texas A&M(9-0) moved up
a notch to No. 4 with a 40-18 victory
over Louisville.
Florida State (8-1) rose one spot to
No. 5 after routing Maryland 69-21,
and Washington (8-1) fell to No. 6.
Nebraska (7-1) remained No. 7 after
overpowering Kansas 49-7, and Notre
Dame (7-1-1) remained No. 8 after
handing Boston College its first loss,
54-7.
Arizona (6-2-1) jumped three places
to No. 9, the Wildcats' highest ranking
since 1983, and Syracuse (8-1) stayed
No. 10 after downing Virginia Tech
28-9.
Florida was 11th, followed by Geor-
gia, Colorado, North Carolina State,
Stanford, Mississippi State, Boston
College, Southern Cal, Ohio State,
Kansas, Washington State, Penn State,
Tennessee, Hawaii and North Caro-
lina.
Hawaii (7-1), which defeated Colo-
rado State 24-13, was last ranked in
1989, when it peaked at No. 23.
Boston College (7-1-1) plunged eight
notches, while Southern Cal (5-2-1),
Kansas (7-2) and North Carolina (7-3)
each fell seven spots. Southern Cal
lost 23-9 to Stanford, and North Caro-
lina was beaten 40-7 by Clemson.


very small.
Sunday. "


-.9

























UP FOR GRABS - Kansas City Chief defensive back Kevin Ross (31) breaks.
up a pass play intended for San Diego Charger receiver Nate Lewis during
Sunday's game.









Tropic Times 1
Nov. 13, 19921



What heavyweight champ?


Bowe looking

past Holyfield
LAS VEGAS (AP) - Riddick Bowe
sees his challenge to heavyweight cham-
pion Evander Holyfield "as just another
fight."
Not likely, says Holyfield.
"I realize he hasn't been tested men-
tally for what is about to come," the
champion said Tuesday. "When Ilook at
him, I look at a guy who doesn't really
know all about it yet. Every fight has to
give you that, but Bowe hasn't proved
that yet."
Holyfield has been criticized for not
fighting better opposition since he's been
champion. His defenses have been against
George Foreman and Larry Holmes, both
past their 40th birthdays, and against
Bert Cooper, a substitute for a substitute.
He also has been dismissed by some
as a manufactured heavyweight.
The 30-year-old champion, however,
is praised for his tenacity.
"I think Bowe can get lucky, but not
out-fight Holyfield," said George Ben-
ton, the champion's trainer. "Evander is
a dog in a dogfight."
Bowe also has been called a dog, but
in his case the description is anything but
a compliment.
Some people in boxing doubt Bowe's
heart despite his 31-0 record, with 27
knockouts. The doubts spring from Bowe's
loss to LennoX Lewis in the 1988 Olym-
pic super heavyweight final. Some think
he quit in the second round.
"I've watched the tape countless times,"
Bowe said. "I'm still trying to figure out
how, after four or five years (of preparing
for a goal), a referee could stop a match
like that. I worked so hard to make the
team."


AP Lae lPhoto
Despite boxing fans lack of faith in Evander Holyfield, the world's heavyweight champ will give it his best tonight.


The tape shows that the East German
referee acted hastily and provides no
evidence that Bowe quit.
Bowe won the first round when he
landed several stiff jabs and jolted Lewis
with three right uppercuts.
Early in the second round, Lewis landed
a short left hook to the head and followed
with four punches, none of which ap-
peared to land cleanly.
The referee stopped the action for a
standing 8-count, during which Bowe
held up his hands and talked to his cor-


ner.
When the bout resumed, the two had a
brief exchange, during which Bowe was
warned for ducking. Lewis then landed a
right to the side of the head and a short
left to the face.
The referee grabbed Bowe and began
another standing 8. Bowe held his arms
up and bounced on his toes, but when the
count ended, the referee stopped the fight.
Bowe shook his head "No, no," but
didn't complain to the referee. He said
U.S. coach Ken Adams told him to be


quiet.
"I'm going to knock Evander Holy-
field out, then, hopefully, I'll fight Len-
nox Lewis," Bowe said.
The unbeaten Lewis stopped Razor
Ruddock in the second round Oct. 31 in
London and is supposed to fight the winner
of tonight's match.
Editor's note: The Evander Holyfield-
Riddick Bowe fight is scheduled to be
televised on aPanamanian TV station to-
night.


Bird would play with Magic


NEW YORK (AP) - Larry Bird would have "no
problem" playing against Magic Johnson because of
the AIDS virus and said "professional jealousy" is a
factor in other players' opinions, the New York Post
reported Wednesday.
"I see it as a bad case of professional jealousy," said
the former Boston Celtics star, who was in Palm Beach,
Fla., on Tuesday for a celebrity golf tournament organ-
ized by Greg Norman. 'As far as playing against (Johnson),
I'd have no problem whatsoever."
Johnson announced his second retirement from the
Los Angeles Lakers on Nov. 2 after Utah star Karl
Malone and other players expressed fears about playing
against Johnson.
Bird and Malone spent two months during the sum-
mer practicing against Johnson as teammates on the


U.S. Olympic team.
"When you have a Magic Johnson or a Michael
Jordan and there are other superstars not getting the
press they are, the others sort of resent that," the now-
retired Bird said.
"The same kind of thing happens in everyday life. I
thinkthat's what's happening to Magic now. He's been
on top for so long, that everybody is taking a shot at him,
to cut him down a little bit. They've been waiting so
many years to do it and now they're getting the oppor-
tunity to do it. It's sad.
"There's a lot of attention being focused on Magic
because he's the first athlete to come out and try to play
with the AIDS virus.
"I feel very sorry for him, but there's nothing you can
do now."


Earvin "Magic" Johnson (left) and A.C. Green celebrate.


Atlanta gets stadium
ATLANTA (AP) - Olympics organizers can
prepare to build an 85,000-seat stadium now that
the design, financing and construction plans have
been approved by a government oversight panel.
The Metropolitan Atlanta Olympic Games Au-
thority approved the plans for the $207 million
brick facility at its board meeting Tuesday.
The Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games
expects to begin construction next fall, and have
the stadium built by late 1995. Some aspects of the
stadium plan, including parking, mass transit access
and entrance-exit plazas, still must be completed.
"We're looking now to ACOG to get it done,"
authority chairman George Berry said.
Approval of the design and financial plan,
which includes guarantees to protect taxpayers
from having to rescue the project if the Games are
a financial failure, was unanimous. Mayor Mayn-
ard Jackson, an authority member, cast a lone
"no" vote for the construction strategy.
Jackson wants all stadium construction work-
ers to be paid the prevailing union wage. ACOG,
which has vowed not to exploit workers, wants to
study the wage issue.

Penguins getting votes?
TORONTO (AP) - Mario Lemieux and two
Pittsburgh Penguins teammates are among the
Wales Conference leaders in early fan balloting
for the NHL All-Star Game on Feb. 6 in Montreal.
Lemieux, in results made public Tuesday, led
all conference centers with 49,327 votes to 23,426
for rookie Eric Lindros of Philadelphia.
The leading Wales Conference vote-getter was
wing the Penguins' Jaromir Jagr with 58,712.
Teammate Kevin Stevens was second among wings
with 38,798 votes.
The leading goaltender was Patrick Roy of
Montreal with 40,259 votes, while Ray Borque of
Boston (52,682) and Brian Leetch of the New
York Rangers (42,811) were the leading defense-
men.






T~


16 Tropic Times
1A6 Nov. 13, 1992


AIDS awareness soon
ANCON (GORGAS PAO) - U.S. Army Medi-
cal Army Community Health Nursing Depart-
ment is planning activities throughout the com-
munity from Dec. 1 to 5, designated by the World
Health Organization as World AIDS Day/Aware-
ness Week.
According to Lt. Col. Mary Hoke, chief Army
Community Health Nursing, the purpose of the
week long activities is to reach the community and
raise awareness on HIVas a real threat to the com-
munity. It is essential to make adults aware of the
importance of taking early actions toward the
prevention of HIV infection. Army Community
Health Nurses have worked primarily at the unit
level teaching HIV/AIDS prevention classes.
"This time we want to involve the whole family
as it is at home where education for the prevention
of HIV infection begins," said Hoke.
World AIDS Day/Awareness Week will close
with a "fun walk, run or stroll" for AIDS Aware-
ness at the Amador Causeway on Dec 5. Prizes
will be awarded for the best decorated tricycles,
bicycles, or wagons with this year's theme: "AIDS:
A Community Commitment." For information,
or to volunteer to help with activities, contact E.
Icaza, 287-4327.


Campaign ends Monday

QUARRY HEIGHTS (USSOUTHCOM PAO)
- With just more than a week to go, the U.S.
Southern Command has collected two thirds of its
1992 Combined Federal Campaign goal of
$350,000.
As of Nov. 6, the command raised $234,075 or
67 percent of the total goal. The campaign ends on
Monday.
Leading the way thus far is Headquarters, U.S.
SOUTHCOM which has already attained 161
percent of its goal, while the Air Force has col-
lected 95 percent of its goal.


Amador paving soon

COROZAL (Tropic Times) - Riding around
Fort Amador could soon be smoother when work-
ers under contract to the Directorate of Housing
and Engineering finish repaving the roads.
Preliminary work should begin Monday and
the actual repaving starting a week later, said
Gabrielle Capriles, spokeswoman for DEH.
The road being repaved runs from the vicinity
of the golf course clubhouse, past the Army Air
Force Exchange Service Filling Station, to the
area in front of Club Amador.
DEH officials feel this project will greatly
benefit not only theU.S. personnel who utilize the
community facilities there, but also the host na-
tion neighbors who use the Causeway facilities for
recreation.
"Every effort will be made to expedite comple-
tion of the project and minimize disruption to the
people who live and travel on this thoroughfare,"
Capriles said.


AF early release program

WASHINGTON (Armed Forces News Serv-
ice) - Air Force people due to leave the Air Force
on or after Dec. 9 but before Jan. 8, can participate
in the annual Christmas early release program.
Officers and enlisted members stationed in the
Continental United States and overseas who have
a date of separation within the program's window
can ask to leave on an earlier date within the same
time period.
Exclusions to the program are listed in Air
Force regulations 36-12, officers, and 39-10, en-
listed. They include:
-people being processed forinvoluntary sepa-
ration.
-those awaiting trial or the result of a trial by
court-martial or appellate review of court-martial
conviction.
-anyone under investigation or on interna-
tional hold.
-people in probation and rehabilitation pro-
grams.
Applications are made at the Consolidated
Base Personnel Office separations unit.


Nation-building projects set


Timmons, Endara discuss plans for 1993 joint ventures


PANAMA CITY, (USARSO PAO) - The Palace of
the Herons with its majestic colonial architecture and
indoor Spanish patios served as the backdrop to discus-
sions between Panamanian President Guillermo Endara
Galimany and U.S. Army South Commander Maj. Gen.
Richard F. Timmons.
The two discussed the projected nation assistance
programs, Cosecha Amistad '93 and Fuertes Caminos
'93 Panama. Endara was accompanied by Minister of
Public Works Alfredo Arias.
U.S. Army South Engineer Keith York briefed Endara
on the details of the up-coming projects.
"Under CS-93 and FC-93, U.S. soldiers are working
with the Ministries ofPublic Works, Education, Health
and the Water Works Institute in repairing 27.5 kilome-
ters ofroad, seven bridges, 38 schools and seven health
clinics.
"Drillers will join plumbers and electricians from
the Panamanian Water Works Institute to drill 98 wells
and install pumps," York added.
"The wells upgrade will increase agricultural pro-
ductivity in most of the interior of Panama," said
Deputy Chief of Staff for Civil Military Operations,
Col. Lee Merchen.
Merchen also noted that the new wells will help
maintain water pressure, decrease the number of hours
with no water, and drastically reduce maintenance
time. The pumps will serve growing towns and cities of
Panama Province and decrease the potential threat of
cholera.
While drillers and engineers work on wells, roads
and otherconstruction projects, medical personnel will
be providing health care to thousands of Panamanians.
Veteranarians also keep busy caring for domestic ani-
mals in remote areas of the isthmus, York said.
When workers finish the CS-93 Phase II projects,
they will have completed a total of 266 schools, 91
clinics, 60 roads, and 365 wells since 1990. Thirty-one
MEDRETEs will have also provided health care to
nearly 150,000 Panamanians and thousands of animals.
The FC-93 soldiers will be working primarily in the
western region of Chiriqui, but the government of Pan-
ama strives to distribute project sites to benefit people
in all its provinces.
As in previous CS and FC programs, the cost of these
projects will be shared by the Panamanian and U.S.


governments. CS-93 Phase I began in October and will
be completed in December at a total cost of $202,394
for construction materials. FC-93 projects will beginin
January and will be completed in June at a total cost of
$19 million. CS-93 Phase II will begin in July and will
be completed in September at a total cost of another
$422,394 for construction materials.
Timmons also used the meeting to convey his appre-
ciation to Endara and the people of Panama for the
warm hospitality extended to his soldiers.
"We are happy to be a part of this nation assistance
process for the future of Panama," he said. "Results ard
of benefit to both nations. Soldiers have the opportunity
to practice their skills, and they appreciate the opportu-
nity to visit a foreign country and experience the culture
and understand its people.
"The cooperation and effective assistance of the
Panamanian ministers, other government officials and
the people of Panama are very instrumental in making
these programs come to life," he added.
Timmons also expressed appreciation to the Pana-
manian business community for the welcome and fare-
well picnics it held for visiting soldiers last year.
Endara also applauded the joint ventures.
"These are constructed without selfishness for the
benefit of the people who are in need of medical care,
water and transportation. The people of Panama will be
glad to see the soldiers in their communities," Endara
said.
About 5,000 soldiers and 250 pieces of heavy con-
struction equipment will be deployed from the states to
participate in the FC-93 Program. Every two weeks a
new group of 450 soldiers will arrive in Panama. Sol-
diers are assigned to the Army and Navy Reserve, Army
National Guard and Air National Guard. They will
complete their last rotation in June.
Support throughout the exercise is provided by the
U.S. Army South, 41st Area Support Group, 536th
Engineer Battalion, the 142nd Medical Battalion, 154th
Signal Battalion, and 128th Aviation Brigade.
The programs' principal objectives are to demon-
strate continued U.S. support for strengthening democ-
racy in Panama, help the people of Panama, provide
meaningful training for soldiers, and strengthen the
bonds of friendship between the people of Panama and
the United States.


U.S. Army soldier shot near Colon


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The military
police reported that between Oct. 31 and Nov. 6, U.S.
citizens were the victims of six crimes including an
assault that left a soldier from the 1097th Transporta-
tion Company injured.
The soldier was driving with a friend in the only high
crime area in the town of Sabinitas during the early
evening of Nov. 1. The soldier exited the car and
approached an unidentified male subject who shot the
soldier in the groin. Coco Solo Health Clinic treated the
soldier and air transported him to Gorgas Army Com-
munity Hospital where he is still being treated.
A 92nd Military Police Battalion soldier was in the
parking lot of the local bar Patatus while shopping Oct.
31. A robber and an accomplice approached him from
behind, placed an unknown object against his back, and
stole $300 from the soldier's pocket.
A soldier from Headquarters Company, Law En-


forcement Agency, reported a box had been stolen
from his shipment of household goods Nov. 6. The box
contained a Taurus 9mm pistol, holster and cleaning
kit.
Burglars broke into the home of a 92nd Personnel
Support Company soldier in Las Cumbres and stole a
VCR, cashbox, jewelry box and several Nintendo
games.
The burglars bent the metal bars and removed the
screen from a window to gain entry.
Thieves broke the window of a Special Operations
Support Command soldier's car in Bethania. During the
late of evening Nov 1., the thieves broke the rear
passenger side window and stole four video tapes and
three pairs of glasses.
A soldier from the 59th Engineer Company parked
his car in the parking lot of his apartment in Bethania the
evening of Nov. 4. When he returned in the morning, he
discovered that thieves had stolen the four hubcaps off
his car.


THE JOY OF GIV-
' ING - Thel1stBat-
1 talion, 2281h Aviation
Regiment trans-
ported these gifts to
. the Cerro Miguel de
!Costa Abajo, Pan-

of one the many
W."Christmas projects
sponsored by military
personnel, family
members and DoD
civilians employees.
The U.S. Southern
Command Christ-
.mas sponship pro-
gram is now under-
U S Army pnotoby Sgt Jrc. op - .Johr.son













ropictivities
An entertainment guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page B 1


.... - -", . . : .."~^ .44


.'I


:~


~<~'


Family member Ricardo Lachman takes a shot on the pool table at the Fort Clayton Youth Center. See story, photos page B5.


U.S. Army photo by Sgt James Yocum


New roommate Jennifer Jason
Leigh terrorizes Bridget Fonda in
Single White Female.


Mercury Capri XR2 convertible
turbo offers better performance than
Mazda Miata for under $20,000.


TV ............................................ B3
Crossword....................................... B12
Ads ................... ................... B9


Nov. 13, 1992









DB2 Tropic Times
2 Nov. 13, 1992




HOWARD
Today
7pm The Gun In Betty Lou's Handbag (PG-13) Pene-
lope Miller, Eric Thai
9pm Whispers In The Dark (R) Annabella Sciorra, Jamey
Sheridan
Saturday
NO MOVIE - Base Chapel function
Sunday
2pm Little Nemo (G) Animated
7pm The Gun In Betty Lou's Handbag (PG-13) Pene-
lope Miller, Eric Thai
9pm Single White Female (R) Bridget Fonda, Jennifer
Jason Leigh
Monday
7pm The Gun In Betty Lou's Handbag (PG-13) Pene-
lope Miller, Eric Thai
9pm Single White Female (R) Bridget Fonda, Jennifer
Jason Leigh
Tuesday
7pm Diggstown (R) James Woods, Louis Gossett Jr.
9pm Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (R) David Lynch,
Kimberly Gore
Wednesday
7pm The Gun In Betty Lou's Handbag (PG-13) Pene-
lope Miller, Eric Thai
9pm Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (R) David Lynch,
Kimberly Gore
Thursday
7pm Diggstown (R) James Woods, Louis Gossett Jr.
9pm Single White Female (R) Bridget Fonda, Jennifer
Jason Leigh
Nov. 20
7pm Out On A Limb (PG) Matthew Broderick, Heidi
Kling
9pm Sneakers (PG-13) Robert Redford, Dan Aykroyd


CLAYTON
Today
6:30pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13)
Tom Selleck, Marion Brando
9:10pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash
Saturday
2pm Freddy as F.R.O.7. (G) Animated
6:30pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13)
Tom Selleck Marion Brando
9:10pm - Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash
Sunday
2pm Freddy As F.R.O.7. (G) Animated
6:30pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13)
Tom Selleck, Marion Brando
9:10pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash
Monday
7pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash
9pm Whispers In The Dark (R) Annabella Sciorra,
Jamey Sheridan
Tuesday
6:10pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13)
Tom Selleck, Marion Brando
9:10pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash
Wednesday
7pm Whispers In The Dark (R) Annabella Sciorra,
Jamey Sheridan
9pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash
Thursday
7pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash
9pm Whispers In The Dark (R) Annabella Sciorra,
Jamey Sheridan
Nov. 20
7pm The Gun In Betty Lou's Handbag (PG-13) Pene-
lope Miller, Eric Thai


9pm Single White Female (R) Bridget Fonda, Jennifer
Jason Leigh

DAVIS
Today
7pm 3 Ninjas (PG-13) Victor Wong, Michael Treanor
Saturday
7pm Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith
9pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe
Sunday
7pm Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith
9pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe
Monday
7pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe
Tuesday
7pm Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith
Wednesday
7pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Booth
Thursday
7pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13)
Tom Selleck, Marion Brando
Nov.20
7pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash

SHERMAN


7pm


Today
Boomerang (R) Eddie Murphy, Robin Givens


Saturday
7pm 3 Ninjas (PG) Victor Wong, Michael Treanor
Sunday
7pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe
Thursday
7pm Stay Tuned (PG) John Ritter, Pam Dawber
Nov.20
7pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe




AMADOR
Today
7pm A Stranger Among Us (PG) Melanie Griffith,
Eric Thai
Saturday
7pm Whispers In The Dark (R) Annabella Sciorra,
Jamey Sheridan
Sunday
7pm Raising Cain (R) John Lithgow, Lolita Davido-
vitch
Thursday
7pm Boomerang (R) Eddie Murphy, Robin Givens
Nov. 20
7pm Raising Cain (R) John Lithgow, Lolita Davido-
vitch


Club Amador
Lunch: Tues.-Fri., 11:30am-lpm. La Concha Res-
taurant Tues.-Sat., 6-10pm; Bridge Lounge: Tues-
Thurs., 5-10pm; Fri., social hour, 5pm-midnight;
Sat., 6pm-midnight; punch brunch for children, first
Sun. each month, 10:30am-1:30pm. Champagne
brunch, Sun., 10:30am-1:30pm. Beef & burgundy,
Tues., 6-10pm; pasta pizazz, Wed., 6-9pm; Mongo-
lian BBQ, Thurs., 6-9pmn. Bingo: Tues.&Wed.,
7pm. Reservations: 282-4025/3837/3534.
Howard Enlisted Members' Club
Cashier's cage: Sun.-Thur., 9am-9pm; FrL.&Sat.,
9am-Ilipm; holidays, 4-9pm. Dining: Casual Cove/
Tropical Breezeway, Mon.-Fri., 6-30-9am, llam-
11pm, Fri.&Sat., until lam. Dining room closed for
renovation, members may dine at Howard O'Club
Mon.-Sat. Ballroom: variety disco Sun., Tues.,
Thurs., Fri., Sat. 8pm-midnight. Casual Cove: vari-
ety disco Wed., 8pm-midnight, country&western
Tues.&Fri. 8pm-midnight, rock&roll, 8pm-lam.
Main lounge: Fri.&Sat, 5:30pm-midnight, Wed.,
5:30-10pm. Social hour. Mon., Wed.&Fri., reduced
price drinks. Bingo: Sun., 2pm; Wed., 7pm; bar
bingo, Mon.-Fri., 5-6:30;m 284-4189, Building
710.
Howard O'Club
Cashier's cage: Mon.-Fri., lOam-lpm. Dining:
Lunch,Mon.-Fri., 1 lam-1pm. Full menu Tues., Fri.,
Sat., and mini-menu Mon., Wed., Thurs., 6-9pm.


Thurs., tacos. Fri.&Sat., prime rib/seafood. Dining
open to Enlisted Club Memebers while enlisted
Dining Room under renovation. Disco: Fri., 7pm-
midnight. Lounge: Mon.-Thurs., 4-9pm, Fri., 4pm-
midnight, Sat., 6-9pm. Social hour: Fri. 5-6pm.
Bingo: Wed., 6pm. Closed Sun.,&holidays. 284-
3089, Building 707
Top Three Lounge
Open: Mon.-Thurs., 4-10 pm, Fri., 4pm-lam, Sat,
5-11pm, Sun.&holidays, closed. Social hour:
Mon.&Fri., 4:30-6pm. 284-3089, Building 707.
Albrook Club
Cashier's cage: Mon.-Fri., llam-1:30pm. Mon.,
Thurs., Fri., 2-4:30pm, Wed., 2:30-4:30pm. Din-
ing: Lunch, llam-lpm. Dinner. Mon., Wed.,
Thurs., 6-8:30pm, Fri.-Sat., 6-9pm. Sun., cham-
pagne brunck, 10am- 1pm. Mon., Mongolian BBQ.
Thurs., Mexican. Fri., prime rib/seafood. Sat.,
steak. Italian 2nd/4th Wed. each month; mini-gour-
met, lst/3rd Wed. each month. Tues., dining room
closed, bar menu available in lounge. Disco, Fri.,
8pm-lam. Lounge open: Mon.-Thurs., 4:30-10pm;
Fri., 4:30pm-lam; Sat, 5:30pm-midnight. Social
hour-. Fri., 4-6pm. Closed 1st Tues. each month at
2pm. Flea market 1st Sun. each month, 9am-4pm.
Texas BBQ last Sat each month 6:30-9pm,
country&western dancing until lam. 286-4128/
3547, Building 13.
STRAC Club
Mon.-Wed., 4:30-10pm. Thurs., 4:30-midnight,
oldies and classic rock. Fri., TGIF, 4:30pm-lam.


Sat., 4:30pm-midnight, variety music, free pizza.
286-3511.
Quarry Heights O'Club
Breakfast Mon.-Fri., 6:30-8:30am, Sat., 8-10am.
Lunch: Mon.-Fri., 11:30am-lpm. Dinner. Tues.-
Thurs. 6-9pm; Fri.-Sat. 8- 10pm. Bar lounge: Tues.-
Fri., 4-10pm; Sat. 6-lOpm; Fri, social hour, 4-7pm.
282-4380/3439.
CPO Club
Open to E-7 through E-9, civilians NM-6 and above,
and family members. Lunch: Mon.-Fri., 1 lam-lpm,
all-you-can-eat buffet; Sat., grill open, noon-4pm.
Dinner. Fri.&Sat., 6-9pm. Social hour Wed.&Fri,
4pm, complimentary snacks. 283-5475.
Anchorage Club
Open to all ranks. Breakfast Mon.-Fri., 6:30-
9:30am Sat., 8-10:30am. Lunch: Mon.-Fri, lam-
1:30pm. Dinner: Mon.-Fri., 6-9pm, a la carte dining.
Grill: Mon.-SaL, 11-1:30pm; Sun.&hol., 3:30-
9:30pm. Pizza&fried chicken to go, 5-9pm daily.
Bingo, Mon., 5:30pm, special menu. Family night,
Tues., 5:30-9pm. Social hour, Wed., 4-6pm.
country&western night, steak dinner, Wed., 6-9pm.
All-you-can-eat taco night, Thurs. Bar hours: Tues.-
Fri., 4-11pm; Fri.&Sat, 4pm-midnight; Sun.&hol.,
3:30-10pm. 283-4332/3040.
Rodman Officers' Club
Open to officers, warrant officers, civilians grade
NM-7 and above, and family members. Lunch:
Mon.-Fri., llam-1:30pm. Dinner: Sun.-Thurs., 6-


8:30pm.; Fri.&SatL, 6-9:30pm. Dining room bar
open, 4-9pm. Laguna Lounge open Mon., Wed. and
Fri., 4-10pm, complimentary snacks. Pool bar:
Mon.-Thurs., noon-6pm; Fri., noon-8pm;
Sat&Sun., 10am-6pm. Thurs: steak-by-the-ounce;
Fri.&Sat, prime rib. 283-4498.
A:ey-Deucey Club
Open to E-5 through E-6 Mon., Wed.&Fri., 5-10pm
only. Call 283-4332.
Clayton NCO Club
Main corral: Mon.-Thurs., 7-llpm; Fri.-Sat., 7pm-
2am; Sun., 1-1 l1:30pm. Forum: Tues., steak night, 5-
9pm; Wed., international buffet, 5-9pm; Thurs.,
ladies night, 5-9pm; Fri.-Sat., fine dining, 4:30-
10pm; entertainment, 9pm-2am. Bingo: Sun., 2-
5pm; Tues., 6-10pm. The Underground: Mon.-
Thurs., 4:30-11pm; Fri., 5pm-2am; Sat., lpm-2am.
Midnight buffet: Wed., Fri., Sat., 10pm-l1:30am.
Casa Maria, Mon.-Sun., 5-l0pm. 287-4343/4716.
Davis Community Club
Lunch: Mon.-Fri., 11:30am-lpm. Dinner:
Wed.&Thurs., 6-9pm; Fri.&Sat, 6-10pm. Brunch:
Sun., 10:30am-1:30pm. Bingo: Sun., 3-6pm. 289-
3289/5160.
Red Door Club
Mon., progressive music, 7-10pm. Tues., special
night,7-11llpm. Wed., oldies, 7-11lpm. Thurs., ladies
night, 7-O1pm. Fri., social hour, progressive music,
7pm-midnight. Sat., rock 'n roll, 7pm-midnight.
287-4343.


Single White Female
Bridget Fonda, Jennifer Jason Leigh
Bridget Fonda stars in a psychological thriller about a young lady who, after breaking up with her boyfriend,
agrees to share a room with a woman she hardly knows. The comfort of the new roommate soon turns to terror
as her real motives are revealed. R (sex, violence, language), 108 min.

The Gun In Betty Lou's Handbag
Penelope Miller, Eric Thai
Ignored by her policeman husband and bored with her job at the library, pretty but shy Betty Lou seems
resigned to her fate. But when she stumbles across a murder weapon an idea is born - Betty Lou confesses to
the crime. PG-13 (language, violence), 90 min.

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me
David Lynch, Kimberly Cole
David Lynch returns to the Pacific Northwest for this telling of the mysterious events leading up to high
school queen Laura Palmers' untimely death. R (strong violence, sex, drug content, language), 134 min.

Diggstown
James Woods, Louis Gossett, Jr.
James Woods is an ex-con man who teams up with a former fighter in order to rescue Diggstown from the
corrupt clutches of Bruce Dern. All Louis Gossett has to do is beat 10 fighters... in a row. R (language), 98 min.










*TV Schedule


Tropic Times ID 13
Nov. 13,1992 1.0


Channels 8 & 10

Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Nov. 20

6:30m NBC News at Sunrise 6:30m Carolina Marines 6:00am Robert Schuller Hour of 6:30am NBC News a Sunis 6:30am NBC News at Sumise 6:30am NBC News at Suntse 6:30am NBC News at Smise 6:30am NBC News at Sunrie
7:00 ABCGoodMorning 7:00 AirForceNews Power 7:00 ABCGood Morning 7:00 ABCOoodMorning 7:00 ABCGoodMorning 7:00 ABC GoodMorning 7:00 ABC oodMorning
America 7:30 Navy News This Week 6:30 Thirty Good Minutes America Amedca America America America
9:00 BodybyJake 8:00 Catoon Comer 7:00 Studio7 9:00 BodybyJake 9:00 Body by Jake 9:00 Body by Jake 9:00 Body by Jake 9:00 BodybyJake
9:30 SesameStmre 8:30 JutPForKidsl 7:30 The700Club 9:30 SesmeStrea 9:30 SesameSuect 9:30 SusameSlret 9:30 SemmStnreet 9:30 SesameStreet
10:30 SpaceshpEanh WoodyWoodpecker 8:00 Bth Sidesw/Jssile 10:30 FamilyDoubleDare 10:30 SilverSpoons 10:30 BackToThe Fuure 10:30 SilverSpoons 10:30 SpaceshipEarth
11:00 FxmilyFeud WamerBroa.Cartoon Jackson 11:00 FamilyFeud 11:00 FamilyFeud 11:00 FamilyFeud 11:00 FamilyFeud 11:00 FamilyFeud
11:30 ShowbizToday WammrBro. Cartoon 8:30 Washington Week in 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday
Noom Headline News Break Bskitt Review noon Headline News Break noon Headline New Break noon Headline News Break no Headline Newsbreak noon Headline News Break
12:15 SCNMidday BackTo ThFuture 9:00 CBS SundayMoring 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday
12:30 Sports Laenight Widget 10:30 FaceTheNtion 12:30 SporsMachine 12:30 Sport alteNight 12:30 Sports LaNight 12:30 SporisLaterght 12:30 SpotsLatenight
1:00 OprahWinfrey 10:30 HannaBarbaaCartoons 11:00 HeadlineNews 1:00 OprahWinfrey 1:00 Donahue 1:00 OprahWinfrey 1:00 Donahue 1:00 OprshWinfrey
2:00 AnothorWord 11:35 Headline News Break 11:30 ThisWeek W/David 2:00 AnotherWodrd 2:00 AnotherWodd 2:00 AnotherWord 2:00 AnotherWodd 2:00 AnotherWoidd
3:00 Pricoe Is Right noon CPA Football: Illinois vs. Brinkley 3:00 Prco Is Right 3:00 Pric Is Right 3:00 Price Is Right 3:00 PriceIsRight 3:00 PricoIsRight
4:00 ThinkFutl Michigan 12:30pm Ebony/JetShowcase 4:00 Wild &Crazy Kids 4:00 SquareOnoTV 4:00 WamerBrothers 4:00 Family DoubleDare 4:00 ThinkFutl
4:25 GuidingLight 3:00 HeadlineNews 1:00 NFLFootbal Oilers vs. 4:25 GuidingLight 4:25 OuldingLight Cartoons 4:25 GuidingLight 4:25 GuidingLight
5:15 OmenralHopital 3:30 CFAFootbll:Arizona Vikings 5:15 Gmorl Hospital 5:15 GmneralHospIaI 4:25 OuidingLight 5:15 GmeralHospital 5:15 GmneralHopital
6:00 SCNEvmingRepon vs.TUSC 4:00 StarTrek 6:00 SCNBvmingRepon 6:00 SCNBvmingRepon 5:15 Omral Hospital 6:00 SCNEvaningRepon 6:00 SCNEveningRepot
6:15 HeadlineNewsBreak 6:30 HeadlineNews 5:00 HeadlineNews 6:15 CNNHeadline News 6:15 HeadlineNewsBreak 6:00 SCN EvmingReport 6:15 HeadlineNewsBreak 6:15 CNNHedlineNews
6:30 Wadd NowsTonight 7:00 FightBacki w/David 5:30 OnStoag Break 6:30 WoddNewsTonight 6:15 HeadlineNewsBreak 6:30 WoddNewsTonight Break
7:00 Jeopardyl Harowitz 6:00 WWFSuperstarsof 6:30 WoridNewsTonight 7:00 ClassicConcentration 6:30 WoddNewmTonight 7:00 ClassicCononorationl 6:30 WoridNewsTonight
7:30 TallTalesandLegcods 7:30 CFA:Alsbamavs. Wretling 7:00 ClassicConcetraton 7:30 TheFPalGuy 7:00 ClassicConcentiraonl 7:25 Movie:"TheMuppet 7:00 ClassicConcentrainal
8:30 PlimedemLlve Mississppi St. 7:00 StretStodes 7:30 Anything ButLove 8:30 48Hours 7:30 WednesdayNightMovie: TakeManhattan" 7:30 TallTalesndLegends:
9:30 CBSBveningNews 10:30 HeadlleNews 8:00 Sunday Night Movie: 8:00 BveningShade 9:30 CBS Bvming News "OperationPetuicoat 9:00 SPECIAL: Beyond The 8:30 PrimetkcLive
10:00 Entaeimodmn Tonight 11:00 Videolinka "InconvedentWoman" 8:30 60 Minutes 10:00 EntertsinmatTonight 9:30 CBS EvemingNews Glass Calling 9:30 CBSEveningNews
10:30 St.Elsewhem 11:30 SaturdayNightLive 9:40 HeadlineNews Break 9:30 CBSEvening News 10:30 MikoHanmer 10:00 Enteutainmea Tonight 9:30 CBS EveningNews 10:00 EntertainmentTonight
11:30 SCNLa EdAition 1:00amPriday Night Videos 10:00 EntertainmntThisWeek 10:00 Enetaunmmnt Tonight 11:30 SCNLLae Edition 10:30 LA.Law 10:00 EnetainmrentTonight 10:30 St.Elsewhire
11:35 TonightShow 2:00 AllNightMovies: 11:00 zlopectorMane 10:30 Dynasty 11:35 TonightSbow 11:30 SCNLatEdition 10:30 MagnumP.L 11:30 SCNLateBdition
12:35amLatenightW/ "GoikyPark" midnightLarry King Live 11:30 SCNLareEdilion 12:35ppmLamightw/David 11:35 TonightSbow 11:00 HeadlineNews 11:35 TonightShow
Lttelnom 4:10 AllNightMovies: 1:00 Buiness Worldd 11:35 TonightShow Laoeomm 12:35amLarnligitW/David 11:30 SCN Lae Editim 12:35amLzstightW/
1:35 Nightlino "RvengeofTheNeordIU: Nerds 1:30 HeadlineNews 12:35pmLaalnightW/ILeteUmm 1:35 Nightline Leatman 11:35 TonightShow Leattem
2:05 AllNightMovies: inParadise" 2:00 McOlaughlinOrGop 1:35 Nightline 2:05 Headline NewsBreak 1:35 Nightline 12:35amLSmightW/Ltarmam 1:35 Nightline
"Jumpin' JackFlash" 5:30 HeadlineNewsBreak 2:30 SponsMachine 2:05 Headline News Break 2:30 Sports Latenight 2:05 Headline News Break 1:35 Nightline 2:05 AllNightMovies:
3:50 AllNightMovies: 3:00 CNNCoanties 2:30 SportsLaenight 3:00 ArsenioHall 2:30 SportsTonight 2:05 HeadlineNewsBreak "AlieNtation"
"RevengeofThe Nemd" 4:00 HeadlineNews 3:00 AmamioHall 4:00 TonlghtShow 3:00 AnenioHall 2:30 SponsTanight 3:30 AllNightMovies:
5:15 Videolinks 4:30 CNNWorldReport 4:00 TonightShow 5:00 LatnightW/Lettemmm 4:00 TonightShow 3:00 AnsenioHalShow "OperaionPeicoat"
6:00 HeadlineNews 6:00 HeadliNows Break 5:00 LatmightW/Lettserm 6:00 HeadlineNewsBreak 5:00 LamtightW/Laternm 4:00 TonightShow 5:30 HeadlineNews
6:30 HeadlineNewsBreak 6:00 HeadlineNewsbreak 6:00 HeadlincNewsbeamk 5:00 LstmightW/Latetmm 6:00 HeadlineNewsBreak
6:00 HeadlineNews



Cable Channel 14

Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Nov. 20

6:30am SimulcastW/8 & 10 6:30amSimulcast w8 & 10 6:00am Lamb Chop 6:30am Simulcast W/8 & 10 6:30amSimulcast W/8 & 10 6:30am Simulcast W/8 & 10 6:30am Simulct W/8 & 10 6:30amSimulcast W/8 & 10
9:00 Oprah Winfrey Show 10:30 FamilyTheater 6:20 Gerhbert 9:00 OprahWinfrey 9:00 Donahue 9:00 OprahWinftey 9:00 Donahue 9:00 OprahWinfteyShow
10:00 Today "Treasurlsland" 6:45 TaleSpin 10:00 Today 10:00 Today 10:00 Today 10:00 Today 10:00 Today
noon Headline Newsbreak noon Headline News 7:10 Darkwing Duck noon Headline News Break noon Headline News noon Headline Newsbreak noon HeadlineNewsbreak noon HeadlineNewabreak
12:15 SCNMidday 12:30 SalmdnayMovie: The 7:35 WinnieThe Pooh 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday
12:30 AllMyChildrn ShaggyD.A." 8:00 Supefrdends 12:30 AllMyChildren 12:30 AllMyChildren 12:30 AllMyChildon 12:30 AllMyChildren 12:30 AllMyChildrs
1:30 One Life toU Lve 2:05 Saturday Movie: "Emest 8:25 Widget 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 OneLifetoLive 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 OneLifetoULive 1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 The Young And Restless OoeToJtil" 8:45 BackToTheFuture 2:30 Young andThe Restles 2:30 The Young AndRestless 2:30 Young And The Retless 2:30 The Young And Restless 2:30 The Young AndRestless
3:30 SesameStreet 3:30 SponerForHire 9:10 NinjaTurtles 3:30 SesameStreet 3:30 SesameStreet 3:30 SessmeaSteet 3:30 SesumeStreet 3:30 SesameSreet
4:30 SpaceshipEarth 4:30 OnPitRoad 9:30 Capt.Planet 4:30 ClarissaBxplainsItAll 4:30 ThinkFast 4:30 SchooloaticSpors 4:30 LeaveltToBeaver 4:30 SpaceshipEarth
4:55 ChannelOne 5:00 Amedrican Gladiators 10:00 StarTrek 4:55 ChannelOne 4:55 Channel One America 4:55 Channel One 4:55 Channel One
5:10 AfterSchoolSpecial 6:00 HeadlineNews 11:00 Combal 5:10 AfterSchoolSpecial 5:10 AfterSchoolSpecial 5:05 AfterSchoolSpecial 5:10 AfterSchoolSpecial 5:10 AfterSchoolSpecial
6:00 SCN EveningRepon 6:30 StarTrekThe Next noon HeadlineNews 6:00 SCNEveningRepon 6:00 SCNBveningRepon 6:00 SCNEvening Rport 6:00 SCN EveningRepon 6:00 SCNEveningReponrt
6:15 Headline NewsBreak OGeneration 12:30 Today'sOGaomet 6:15 Headline NewsBreak 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 HeadlineNewsBreak
6:30 NBCNightlyNews 7:30 Cops 1:00 Sunday Movie: 6:30 NBCNightlyNews 6:30 NBCNightlyNews 6:30 NBCNightlyNews 6:30 NBCNightlyNews 6:30 NBCNightlyNews
7:00 Roc 8:00 TheSimpsons "OperationPc licoat" 7:00 Beverly Hills 90210 7:00 America'sFunniest 7:00 FullHouse 7:00 PerfecStrangen 7:00 Roc
7:30 Freh Prince 8:30 AnythingButLove 3:05 MagicalWorldofDisney 8:10 MacGyver HomeVideos 7:30 Cheers 7:30 FamilyMatters 7:30 FreshPrince
8:00 FridayNightMovie: 9:00 Roseanne Pan2of2 9:00 MondayNightFootball: 7:30 Homelmprovement 8:00 MurderShoeWrte 8:00 EveningSha 8:00 NBA:Gamel-
"Ladyhawke" 9:30 InLiving Color 3:30 HeadlineNews Bills vs Dolphins (JIP) 8:00 NorthemExposune 9:00 Sisters 10:00 Videolinks TrailblazernvsKings
10:00 MiamiVice 10:00 Videolinks 4:00 NFLPootball:New midnigulaHeadlineNews 8:55 TuesdayNighl Movie: 10:00 ChinaBeach 11:00 HeadlineNews 10:30 NBA:Game2-
11:00 HeadlineNews 11:00 HeadlineNews Orleans vs SanFrancisco 12:30 SCNLaeEdition "DieHard" 11:00 HeadlineNews 11:30 SaturdayNightLive Bulls vs Lakes
11:30 SCNLate Editimon 11:30 SaturdayNightLive 7:00 HeadlineNews 12:35 Simulcastwithchannel 8 11:00 HeadlineNews 11:30 SCNLateEdifion 1:00amFridayNightVideas 1:00amHeadlineNews
11:35 AramioHall 1:00am Friday Night Videcs 7:30 The Wonder Years & 10 11:30 SCNLaot Edition 11:35 ArsenioHall 2:00 Firing Line 1:30 SCNLatei edition
12:35amDavidLeneaunan 2:00 FiringLino 8:00 SundayNightMovie: . 11:35 AnnioHall 12:35amSimulcast with 2:30 SportsLatenight 1:35 Nightline
1:35 Nightlinc 2:30 SportsLaenight "Splash" 12:35amSimulcastwith Channels 8& 10 3:00 EntertainmotThis Week 2:05 HeadlineNews Break
2:05 HeadlineNews Break 3:00 EntertainmcntThisWeek 10:30 HeadlineNews channels8&10 4:00 SaturdayNightLive 2:30 SportLamenight
2:30 SportnLatenight 4:00 SaturdayNightLive 11:00 MacGruder&Loud 5:30 HeadlineNews 3:00 ArsenioHall
3:00 ArsenioHall 5:30 HeadlineNews midnight 60Minutes 6:00 HeadlineNews 4:00 TonightShow
4:00 TonightShow 6:00 HeadlineNews 1:00 Simulcast withchannels8 5:00 Lae NightW/David
5:00 LateNight W/David & 10 Leofetman
IA.crmiar 6:00 Headline Newsbreak
6:00 Headline Newsbreak


Channels 8 & 10

SPORTS

College football:


Cable Channel 14

SPORTS

/ NFL Football:


CFA: Illinois vs. Michigan
CFA: Arizona vs. USC
CFA: Alabama vs. Mississippi St.
CFA: Michigan vs. Ohio State

SPECIALS

Beyond The Glass Ceiling
Nov. 19 at 9 p.m.


Nov. 14 at noon /
Nov. 14 at 3:30 p.m.
Nov. 14 at 7:30 p.m.
Nov. 21 at noon


Produced by the Cable News Network, this special takes an up close look at
women in the workplace.

NEW SERIES

Classic Concentration
Weekdays at 7 p.m.

Alex Trebek concentrates on another game with this American classic where
contestants try to solve the riddle of a hidden rebus puzzle by matching numbered
squares on a huge game board.


Magnum P.I.
Thursday at 10:30 p.m.


New Orleans vs San Francisco
Bills vs Dolphins


Sunday at 4 p.m.
Monday at 9 p.m.


r Combat!
Sunday at 11 a.m.

On October 2, 1962, open warfare broke out in the living rooms of America as a
platoon of hard-bitten U.S. infantrymen took the Nielsen ratings by frontal
assault. Cast: Jack Hogan, Rick Jason, Warren Stevens, and Dick Peabody.

Evening Shade
Thursday at 8 p.m.

When Wood (Burt Reynolds) agrees to help a friend by delivering his mobile
home, his entire family and some close friends end up going along. Cast: Marilu
Henner, Elizabeth Ashley, Ossie Davis, and Charles Durning.

MOVIES

Ladyhawke
Tonight at 8 p.m.


A youthful pickpocket (Matthew Broderick) escapes a midieval prison only to
Tom Selleck stars as Thomas Sullivan Magnum, a Vietnam vet and former Navy find himself caught up in a dangerous quest with a savage, brooding knight
officer, who lives and works in Hawaii as a freelance private investigator. Cast: (Rutger Hauer) and a beautiful, watchful hawk (Michelle Pfeiffer). Cast: Ken
John Hillerman, Roger E. Mosley. Hutchinsin, John Wood and Alfred Molina.







B 4 Tropic Times
JTNov. 13, 1992


Mercury




Capri XR2


Turbo with sporty look

by Zane Binder
King Features Syndicate
Convertibles - perhaps the ultimate statement in
sportiness - just keep gaining popularity. Realizing
this, Ford Motor Company not long ago introduced a
turbocharged version of its Capri roadster, a swoopy
Australian-built 2-plus-2 guaranteed to turn heads. At
about $20,000, it's a direct competitor to Mazda's
Miata, but offers more performance.
The Capri-a name Ford's used through the years on
numerous vehicles - is designed more for looks than
functionality. Inside, it's attractive, with twin front
cloth buckets of good quality. The cockpit has enough
overall room for even large people, but knee room may
be at a premium.
The rear bench, useless for humans with legs, folds
down and has a pass-through to the small but nicely-
shaped trunk. Between the two areas, there's more than
enough room for the cheapie "doughnut" spare and
luggage for trips.
The convertible top, perhaps the car's main attrac-
tion, is fairly well designed. Raising and lowering it
takes about 60 seconds, and learning to do it takes only
about five minutes. Sadly this, like the last Capri tested,
had numerous air leaks and the folding plastic rear
window was already beginning to cloud. Remember,


too, with a convertible you add "blind spots," sacrifice
body rigidity and handling, add weight, and accept
considerably higher interior noise. They're not criti-
cisms, just facts common to all convertibles.
Turning to instrumentation, it's analog and there's a
reasonable number of gauges. Other standard items on
the top-line XR2 model are power steering, four-wheel
power disc brakes, air conditioning, a driver's side air
bag, and cruise control.
As mentioned, the test XR2 was equipped with the
turbocharged, intercooled version of the standard 1.6
liter engine. Forced induction raises the four-valve-per-
cylinder, fuel-injected, in-line four horsepower by 32 to
132, and makes a tremendous difference in feel. Though
hot performance really isn't the Capri's forte, 0-60
times in this 2,440-pound ragtop were observed at 8.2
seconds.
Fuel economy on the 268-mile test loop was meas-
ured at 18 and 27 (EPA 23/28) far below par for the
weight and power level. The acceleration figure is
deceiving, too, as turbo "lag" is severe, and part-throttle
torque is lacking. The engine and muffler are noisy, and
the powerplant needs a dose of "civilizing."
The drivetrain was coupled to decent five-speed and
light clutch. Though nothing special, you won't com-
plain, either.
Handling rates high. The performance-tuned four-


wheel independent suspension does a decent job, and
the Michelin XRV2 tires do their best, holding the
road despite the body's lack of rigidity. The 33-foot
turning circle is excellent and clearly indicates the
car's nimbleness.
Ride, the other side of the equation, is acceptable,
but not nearly up to the level of its non-turbocharged
sibling. In making the suspension suitable (read heav-
ier) to handle the XR2's extra power, the non-turbo
Capri's fineride-best in the small car class -has been
lost.
Climate control definitely needs work. The air
conditioner is barely adequate in all respects, and the
heater takes time to warm the vehicle.
The standard (free) sound system is an AM-FM
radio with tape player. It needs uprated power to
overcome wind and engine noise and better quality for
enhanced reception and clarity.
Quality control throughout the vehicle was near
adequate but didn't approach Japanese or German
levels.
Overall, the turbocharged Capri is a vehicle to be
seen in at the country club rather than taken on long
trips. The non-turbo is thousands cheaper and, despite
its lack of power, provides an almost comparable
driving experience. If you want to turn heads, the
Capri is a perfect choice.


Wisconsin cheese packets
2 to 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 package active dry yeast
1 teaspoon dried sage, crushed
1/2 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup warm water (115 to 120 degrees)
2 tablespoons cooking oil
1 1/2 cups (6 ozs.) shredded Wisconsin mozza-
rella cheese
6 ozs. salami, chopped
1 small tomato, peeled, seeded, and chopped
1/3 cup grated Wisconsin parmesan cheese
1 egg
1 teaspoon water

In large mixer bowl, combine one cup ofthe flour,


the yeast, sage and salt. Add warm water and oil. Beat
with an electric mixer on low speed for 30 seconds. Beat
on high speed for three minutes. Stir in as much of
remaining flour as you can.
On a floured surface, knead in enough remaining
flour to make a moderately stiff dough that is smooth
and elastic (six to eight minutes total). Place dough in a
greased bowl; turn once.
Cover, let rise in a warm place until double (45 to 55
minutes).
Meanwhile, make filling. In a small mixing bowl,
combine mozzarella cheese, salami, tomato and Parme-
san cheese. Toss until well mixed; set aside.
Punch dough down; divide into six pieces. Cover, let
dough rest 20 minutes. Roll each piece of dough into a
seven-inch circle. Spoon 1/2 cup filling onto half of
each circle. Combine egg and water, brush over outer
edges of dough to moisten. Fold circle in half; use tines
of a fork to seal edges. Place on a greased baking sheet.
Prick tops; brush with egg mixture.
Bake in a 375 degree oven for 25 to 30 minutes, or
until golden. Remove from baking sheet; cool on wire
rack. Makes six servings.


Tabouleh-cheese salad
2 cups warm water
1 cup bulgur wheat
1 10-oz. package frozen peas, thawed
4 ozs. Feta cheese, crumbled
3 ozs. Swiss or brick cheese, cut intojullenne strips
1/4 cup salad oil
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon dried dillweed
14 teaspoons salt
Lettuce leavesand 1 tomato, cut into thin wedges
Pour warm water over bulgur in bowl. Let stand for
one hour. Drain bulgar well, pressing out excess
water. Stir in thawed peas, Feta and Swiss cheese.
Combine salad oil, lemon juice, dillweed and salt;
shake well and pour dressing over bulgur mixture.
Cover, chill at least one hour. The Chopping Block
recipes by Philomena Corradeno.

Editor's note: People interested in sharing a rec-
ipe or household tip with Tropic Times readers, can
send recipes or tips by MPS to Tropic Times, Unit
0936, APO AA 34002. Your name and base will be
printed with your submission.


All applicants should be aware that hiring opportunities continue to be limited due to
budgetary constraints. Effective Oct. 23, U.S. Army South has been granted authority to
exempt non-status locally hired temporary appointments from the Department of the Army
wide "one-for-four" hiring freeze. Placement of current DA employees (including those on
leave without pay) is an exception to the freeze.
Current permanent Panama Canal Commission, Air Force and Navy employees are
subject to the "one-for-four" DA hiring restriction. Current permanent NAF or AAFES em-
ployees who were appointed before Nov. 3, 1989 may now also apply and are subject to the
"one-for-four" DA hiring restriction.
Military Spouses: If available, qualified, and within the area of consideration specified,
are exempt from the hiring restriction and will be appointed as temporary. Specialized
experience, when indicated, must be in duties similar to those required by the vacancy.
AMENDMENT ON HOW TO APPLY: Failure to complete U. S. Army South Form 106,
when required, could hinder an applicant's chances of being referred for the vacancy. For
information, visit the Civilian Personnel Office, Building 560, Corozal.
VB# VACANCIES TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 11-13-92 CLOSE: 11-24-92
ATLANTIC:
065-93-NR - OFFICE AUTOMATION CLERK, NM-326-4. USA FORSCOM, JOTB, S-3 Section, Fort
Sherman. Gen Exp: 1 yr. Form 106. Note: Written CASP test and qualified typist required.
066-93-SS - PLUMBING WORKER, MG-4206-7. USAG-Panama, DEH-ATL Operations, Fort Davis.
Spec Exp: 1 1/2yrs. in the trade. Form 106. Note: Driver's license required. Limited to DA Career-Career
Conditional employees only.
072-93-ES - INTERDISCIPLINARY, NM-11 (185/Social Worker - 180/Clinkal Psychologist or
Counseling Psychologist). Temporary NTE 3-31-93. USA MEDDAC-Panama, Coco Solo Health Clinic,
Coco Solo. Gen Exp: MS in Social Work, Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology,MS in Counseling Psychology plus
1 yr. equiv. to NM-7. Note: Candidates must show experience which is directly related to the duties
described.


PACIFIC:
067-93-MW - SECRETARY (OFFICE AUTOMATION), N1M-318-7. Sensitive. USARSO, DCS,
ReserveAffairs-NO,FortClayton. SpecExp: lyr.equiv.toNM-5. TIG: NM-5. Form 106. Note: Limited
to DA permanent employees only.
068-93-EL - INTELLIGENCE SPECIALIST (OPERATIONS), GS-132-7 DEVELOPMENTAL 9.
Sensitive (Top Secret). 470th MI Brigade, CorozaL Spec Exp: 1 yr. equiv. to GS-5. Form 106. Note:
Position is in the excepted service.
069-93-ES - INTERDISCIPLINARY, NM-185/180/101-9. Temporary NTE 3-31-93. Bilingual. USA
MEDDAC-Panama, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Program, Corozal. Gen Exp: MS in
Social Work, BA in Psychology plus 1 yr. equiv. to NM-7, MS in Social Science or 1 yr. equiv. to NM-7.
Note: Candidates must show experience directly related to the duties described. Position requires travel to
the Atlantic community at least once per week.
070-93-NR - CARPENTER, MG-4607-9. Temporary NTE 9-30-93. USAG-Panama, DEH, Operations
Division, Corozal. Spec Exp: 3 yrs. in the trade. Note: Driver's license required.
071-93-ES - OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST, NM-631-1L Temporary Part-Time NTE 3-31-93.
Bilingual. USA MEDDAC-Panama, GACH, Department of Surgery, Occupational Therapy Clinic, Ancon.
Gen Exp: BS in Occupational Therapy. Spec Exp: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-9. Note: Candidates must have
completed successfully the clinical affiliation requirements.
073-93-VC - INTELLIGENCE SPECIALIST (STAFF MANAGEMENT), GS-132-12. Sensitive. HQ
USSOUTHCOM, SCJ2-Counternarcotic, Quarry Heights. Spec Exp: 1 yr. equiv. to OS-11. Form 106.
Note: Position is in the excepted service.
074-93-LA - (2) EDUCATION TECHNICIAN, NM-1702-5. USAO-Panama, DCA, FSD, Child Devel-
opment Services, Fort Clayton. Spec Exp: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-4. Form 106. Note: Selectee will be required
to undergo satisfactory background investigation.
NOTES: Effective immediately we are no longer accepting applications under VB#:. 240-92-VC. We
have a sufficient supply of candidates for the following jobs, thus we no longer are accepting applications
for. OS-132-9/11/12/13; GS-080-9/11/12; GS-134-5/6/7. Applications already on file will be considered
for vacancies through 12-31-93. The Directorate of Civilian Personnel is accepting applications for Clinical
Nurse positions. For information call Enid Sullivan at 285-4116.






Tropic Times fDC
Nov. 13, 1992 10&


C,


p


Youth.



of


Today


David Irby serves the ball during a table tennis match at the Fort Clayton Youth Center.


Center offers safe r Tl.1


after-school fun
Hanging out in front of the television and munching
on junk food, aren't the only things military latch-key
kids are doing after school. Many of them have tapped
into a treasure-trove of fun at their local military youth
centers.
C AME B0 [ Open to children
ages 6-18, the
Fort Clayton
Youth Center
-- meets the recrea-
. tion needs of
- ....- children after
. . their school day
_." - is done, said Paul
Tommee, center
director.
.-- j "Right now,
-- r j we're targeting
pre-teens and
'- kt I junior teens (6-
_ _ '* 14 years) because
I the senior teens
(age 15 and
The center has three Game Boy above) are cur-
machines. rently renovating
the senior teen center at Mothers End (on Fort Clay-
ton)," he said.
The facility has two pool tables, two ping-pong
tables, a football table, three Nintendo Game Boy
machines, refreshments and much more. Playing games
and having tournaments (like the one scheduled this
month against the military police) is fun, but the center
has much more to offer, Tommee said.
"We do a lot of field trips to beaches, factories,


SMuy (ft) and ffy Hins tak a tun on th foosa tble.
Jermelle Murry (left) and Jeffrey Hines take a turn on the foosball table.


hiking areas and mini-impact camps," he said.
Mini-impact camps are week-long outings that teach
the children knot tying, how to make a fire, tent set-up,
canoeing and otheroutdoorskills, Tommee said. Forty-
five children attended the last one.
The center also offers a children's Welcome to
Panamatourthat differs from the adult tour given by the
Army Community Services.
Instead of taking the children by the commissary,
Post Exchange and other areas that adults find impor-
tant, the Youth Center tour shows the children the other
youth centers in Panama, and areas downtown they will
find interesting - like fast-food restaurant, Tommee
said.
Story and photos by Sgt. James Yocum
Tropic Times staff


After the tour, the children return to the Youth
Center and are treated to a food tasting seminar that
features Panamanian foods.
The center also teaches children arts and crafts,
cooking classes and other interesting skills, Tommee
said.
All a child needs to visit the youth center is a
bilingual identification card. There is no fee for using
the center, but children are asked to sign a register and
fill out a membership card.
The center is open Monday through Thursday from
2:30 to 6 p.m. for pre-teens and until 7 p.m. forjuniors.
Friday, they stay open until 8 p.m. forjunior teens, and
Saturday they are open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. for pre-
teens and until 8 p.m. for juniors. The center is closed on
Sunday.
For information, call the local youth center.








Tropic Times
Nov. 13, 1992


Albrook/Howard
Licensed day care, which includes field
trips, small group activities and meals, is
now available at Howard AFB. Call 286-
3133.

Clayton
Fort Clayton Child Development Serv-
ices is open Mondays, Wednesdays and Fri-
days from 5:30 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. and Tues-
days and Thursdays from 6:30 a.m. to 5:45
p.m.
There are immediate openings in the
hourly programs at the Fort Clayton Child
Development Services for infants, pretod-
dlers, toddlers and preschool-age children.
Call 287-5657/6812.



Albrook/Howard
The Information, Tour and Travel Office
offers a monthly calendar of events and can
arrange special trips for groups of 10 or
more. Call the Zodiac Recreation Center
284-6161/6109.
All tours require reservations and leave
from the Howard Theater.
Sailing tour to Taboga, today, 9 a.m.-7
p.m. The $52 fee includes snacks, dinner
and refreshments.
Beer brewery and Miraflores Locks,
today, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Fee is $4.
Horseback riding in El Valle, Saturday,
7 a.m.-4 p.m. Fee is $18.
Horse track trip, Sunday. Transporta-
tion and entry fee included in $7 fee.
Peacock bass fishing in Arenosa, Sun-
day, 5 a.m.-2 p.m. Fee is $25.
Factory outlet shopping, Thursday, 9
a.m.-3 p.m. Fee is $4.
Panama Bay sailing tour, Nov. 20,6-11
p.m. The $40 fee includes snacks,dinner
and refreshments.
Beer brewery, Pepsi and Pascval Cookie
factory, Nov. 20,9 a.m.-3 p.m. Fee is $5.
Canoeing and barbeque on the Chagres
River, Nov. 21, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Fee is $18.
Shopping in Penonome, Nov. 21, 8 a.m.-
8 p.m. Fee is $14.
Thanksgiving in Chiriqui, Nov. 25-29.
The fees are $383 per person for single
occupancy, $260 per person for double
occupancy and $155 for children or a third
person. The fee includes transportation, tour
guides, five days and fournights accommo-


dations, four dinners including Thankgiv-
ing dinner, four breakfasts and many tours.
Sign-up deadline is Nov. 20.
Scuba diving trip to Roatan Island,
Dec. 15-19. Divers package fee is $590 and
nondivers package fee is $485. Both pack-
ages based on double occupancy. Price in-
cludes transportation to and from Tocumen
Airport, round trip airfare from Panama to
Roatan, Honduras, transfers, four nights and
five days hotel, all meals while in Roatan,
three days of two dives per day. Dives
include boat dive, beach dive, night dive
and weights and tanks. Deadline to make
reservations is Nov. 30.
Specials of the week - Free Zone
shopping, Monday, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., $10;
gold panning in Las Cumbres, Tuesday, 8
a.m.-3 p.m, $10.
Pecora River Valley horseback day
trips, Saturday and Sunday, 7 a.m. The
$25 fee includes transportation, horse rental
and lunch. Call 287-4411 for reservations.

Clayton
Valent Recreation Center, the Outdoor
Recreation Center and the Cocoli Commu-
nity Recreation Center are offering the fol-
lowing tours. Reservations are required.
Call the Valent Recreation Center, 287-
6500/4201; the OutdoorRecreation Center,
287-3363 or the Cocoli Community Recrea-
tion Center, 287-4119.
Central Avenue shopping trip, Satur-
day, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., $5.
Summit Gardens tour, Saturday.
El Valle, Sunday, 6:30 a.m., $15.
Antique shops, Wednesday, 9 a.m., $7.
Altos Cerro Azul, Nov. 21, 9 a.m., $8.
Indian Village river trip, Nov. 21, $25
adults, $15 children.
Canal transit, Nov. 21, adults $35, chil-
dren, $20.
Coronado Beach, Nov. 22, 8 a.m., $10.
Diving in Negril, Jamaica, Nov. 25-29,
$545.
Thanksgiving in Chiriqui highlands,
Nov. 26-29. Bambito, $250, Panamonte,
$225, Fundafores, $185.

Rodman
The Information, Tour and Travel Office
is offering the following tours. Call 283-
5307/4454.
Panama City tour, Nov. 20.
Barro Colorado Island jungle hike,
Nov. 21.
"Wet, Wild, Wooly," to Contadora,
Nov. 27-29, includes transportation, two


nights hotel, deep-sea fishing, water skiing,
snorkeling and jet skiing.
Bass fishing package, includes trans-
portation to and from Gamboa, boat and
motor, gasoline, lake guide, $5 worth of
bait, bait bucket, rods and reels, tackle,
coolers and ice. Call the Rodman Marina,
283-3147/3150.



Albrook/Howard
The Howard Youth Center, 284-4700,
and Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195, are
offering the following trips and activities.
All trips pick up at Howard at the time
specified and at Albrook 30 minutes later.
Registration is ongoing through Nov.
for baseball and softball for boys and girls
from 4 to 18 years old.
The Howard/Albrook youth centers will
be closed Wednesday.
Water balloon toss,Tuesday, 3 p.m.
Hidden treasure hunt, Wednesday, 3
p.m.
Reggae preteen dance, tonight, 7:30-
10:30 p.m. at Howard Youth Center for
youths from 9 to 13 years old. Fee is $2.50
for members and $3.50 for non members.
Transportation leaves Albrook at 7 p.m. and
retums at 11 p.m. Transportation is free but
reservations must be made in advance.
Pony party, Thursday, 3 p.m., Howard
Riding Stables, $2. Transportation leaves
Albrook Youth Center at 2:30 p.m. and
returns at 5:30 p.m. All children must sign
up in advance and have a preprinted permis-
sion slip signed by parents. Call 284-4700.
Camino Las Cruces jungle adventure,
Nov. 21. Call 284-4700.

Clayton
The Fort Clayton Youth Center is offer-
ing the following activities for preteens and
junior teens. Call 287-6451.
Eight ball tournament, today, 3 p.m.;
junior teen scavenger hunt, Saturday, 2
p.m.; junior teen council meeting, Thurs-
day, 3 p.m.; turbo turkey international,
Nov. 21, 11 a.m.; Parque Natural Metro-
politano photo field trip, Nov. 23, 3 p.m.;
birthday celebration, Nov. 24, 3 p.m.;
softball and baseball registration, through
Nov. 30.
The Fort Clayton Senior Teen Center
offers the following activities. Call 287-
6451.
Army Family Week events, Saturday,
7-8 p.m.; reggae and disco dance, Satur-


day, 8 p.m.-midnight, fee is $3; cards tour-
nament, Tuesday, 5 p.m.; dining out in
Panama City, Thursday, 5-8 p.m.

Cocoli
The Cocoli Community Recreation Center
is offering the following activities.Call 287-
4119/3010.
Cooking class, apple pie, Thursday.
Pot luck, Nov. 20.
Basketball dribble contest, Nov. 21.
Cooking class, turkey stuffing, Nov.
25.
Birthday of the month, Nov. 27.



Clayton
The Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts Center
and Fort Clayton Ceramic Center offer the
following activities. Call the Arts and Crafts
Center at 287-5957; the Albrook Auto Shop
at 286-3613 or the Ceramic Center at 287-
4360.
Metal lathe workshop, Monday; boat
construction, through Nov. 28; sculpture,
through Nov. 26.

Howard
The Howard Arts and Crafts Center has
the following events scheduled. Call 284-
6361/6345.
Free pouring in English, tonight, 6-8
p.m.; clay flower class, Saturday, 11 a.m.-
1 p.m.; free copper luster application
demonstration, Saturday, 2-2:30 p.m.; T-
shirt painting, Tuesday; stained glass,
Thursday; free mother-of-pearl applica-
tion demonstration, Nov. 21, 2-2:30 p.m.;
Christmas bazaar, Nov. 28.



Albrook/Howard
The Albrook Club has the following events
to offer. Call 286-3101.
Italian specialty night, Wednesday; steak
night, Saturday, 6-8:30 p.m.; karaoke night,
Thursday, mini gourmet night, Nov. 25.
Thanksgiving buffet, Nov. 26, 11 a.m.-
2 p.m., adults $9.95, children 5-12 years
old, $4 and children under 5 years old, free.
Reservations are required.
The Howard Enlisted Members' Club
has the following events to offer. Call 284-
4189.
Pool tournament, Saturday, 11 a.m.;


A I I


Sundial center
The Sundial Recreation Center has the following ac-
tivities to offer. Call 289-3889/3300.
Thursday are Wonderful, a program designed for
women, will feature making pickled pigs feet.

Ocean Breeze center
The Ocean Breeze Recreation Center has the follow-
ing events scheduled.Call 289-6402.
Saturday matinee, Saturday, 2 p.m.; fashion show,
Saturday, 6:30 p.m.

Atlantic tours
Sundial Recreation Center: Wine and dine, Fridays,
4-9 p.m.; El Valle, Sunday, 5:30 a.m.-4 p.m.; museum
tours, Saturday; Isla Grande, Sunday, 8 a.m.; Panama
City shopping tour, Nov. 21; Cancun, Mexico, Nov. 26-
29. The $558.80 fee includes round trip airfare, transfer
from airport to hotel, double room hotel and Thanksgiv-
ing dinner. Call 289-3889/3300.
Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: Rio Mar beach
tour, Sunday; Isla Grande, Saturday; rain forest and
bird watching tour, Sunday. Call 289-6402.

Arts and crafts
Following is a list of recurring classes offered at


community arts and craft centers. Call the Fort Davis Arts
and Crafts Center, 289-5201 or the Fort Sherman Arts and
Crafts Center, 289-6313
Disc brake workshop, today.

Youth news
The Fort Espinar Youth Center is offering the following
activities. Call 289-4605.
Preteen pool party at Espinar pool, today, 6-9 p.m.,
fee is $1; four-square contest, Tuesday, 4:30-5:30 p.m.;
family pie bake and taste contest, Saturday, 6-9 p.m., $1
entrance fee; turkey trot for youths and adults, Nov. 21,
10 a.m., $5 per person.
The youth center will be closed for organizational day,
Nov. 23.

Ongoing classes
Following is a list of recurring classes offered in most
communities. Call the Sundial Recreation Center, 289-
3889/3300; the Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-
6402 or the Aquativity Center, 289-4009.
Spanish; English; piano; guitar; modem dance; shoto-
kan; cake decorating; gymnastics; juggling and outboard
motor boat operation.

Scuba diving course
An open-water dive course meets the first Monday


of the month at 6 p.m. at the Fort Davis Swimming
Pool. Sign up at the Fort Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-
6104, or the Outdoor Recreation Office in Margarita,
289-4077. Course cost is $125.

New boat
A 21-foot Mako boat is now available for scuba or
snorkeling trips. Price includes gear and guide. Call John
Stromberg, 289-4009/4077; or the Fort Sherman Scuba
Shop, 289-6104.

Holiday bazaar
The Atlantic Community Women's Club is holding its
annual holiday bazaar Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at
the Fort Davis Community Club. Call Muriel Doyle, 289-
4755 or Becky Steigler, 289-4354.


___j









tices


Tropic Times B 7
Nov. 13, 1992 U


karaoke night, tonight.
The Howard Officers' Club has the fol-
lowing events to offer. Call 284-3718.
Karaoke night, Nov. 21; taco night,
Thursday.

Rodman
The Anchorage Club will host "New
York Rockers," a Department of Defense
USO show, tonight; DJ night, Saturday.



Valent events
The Valent Recreation Center at Fort
Clayton will host the following activities.
Call 287-6500.
Puppet sale, Thursday; fishing equip-
ment exhibit, Nov. 23-25; U.S. in Panama
pictoral story art exhibit, Nov. 24-30.

New child care program
The Howard and Albrook youth centers
are offering a new before and after school
program. Care is available for children
from 6 to 12 years old from 6:30 to 8:15 a.m.
and from 2 to 5:30 p.m. and full-day care on
nonschool days. Fees range from $17 to $34
per week per child, depending on family
income and includes breakfast and an after-
noon snack. Call 284-4700/4817.

Instructors needed
The Zodiac Recreation Center needs li-
censed instructors to teach shotokan and
private pilot's ground school on a contract
basis. Call 284-6161/6109.
The Howard/Albrook youth centers need
a qualified piano instructor to teach classes
on a contract basis. Call 284-4700.
The Howard Arts and Crafts Center needs
qualified instructors to teach advanced pot-
tefy wheel throwing and volunteers to dem-
onstrate various crafts. Call 284-6361.

Twin Oceans
The Twin Oceans Pro Shop, Building
155,Fort Clayton, will temporarily relocate
to Building 2060 in the Curundu area. The
new telephone number is 286-6514.

Trail rides
The Howard Riding Stables are offering
escorted 2 1/2 hour trail rides to Veracruz
Beach, Mondays through Fridays. Call 286-
4920.

Evening child care
The Howard Child Development Center
offers evening child care Fridays and Satur-
days from 5:30 p.m. to midnight for chil-
dren from 6 months to 11 years old. If
enough reservations have been made by
Wednesday, 4 p.m., care will be provided.
Call 284-6135 to make reservations.

Logistics support
Logistics Support on Howard AFB rents
recreational items. Call 284-6107.
The branch will be closed Wednesday.
Weekly special - Rent an electric type-
writer for $10 per week, Monday- Nov 21.
Holiday special - For Thanksgiving, table
and chair rentals on a first come, first served
basis.
Friday the 13th special - Bring in a
cooler and fill it up for free.

Family support
The Howard/Albrook Family Support
Center, has various events scheduled. Call
284-5650.
SF-171 workshop, Tuesday from 8 to 9
a.m.
Transition assistance program semi-
nar, Wednesday-Nov. 20, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. at
the Howard Officer's Club.
Job search workshop, Nov. 24, 2 p.m.


Men's issues group
The Howard mental health clinic is inter-
ested in forming a group centered on the
changing roles of men in our society today.
Issues to be discussed would center on the
needs of the group: intimacy, communica-
tion, parenting, work, divorce and separa-
tion. Call 284-6410.

Speech instructor
Central Texas College needs a qualified
speech instructor for an upcoming class at
the Fort Kobbe Education Center. A mas-
ter's degree from an accredited U.S. college
or university and 18 hours of graduate study
in speech are required. Call 287-3773.

Sunday school
The Fort Clayton Chapel offers three
adult Sunday school classes in bible discus-
sion, marriage enrichment and the respon-
sibility of Christians as citizens. Registration
is required and there is no fee. Volunteers
are welcome to help in the program. Call
Chap. (Lt. Col.) Mark Fentress, 287-5859.

Learning center
The Fort Clayton Leaming Resource
Center is offering general technical score
improvement classes, College Level Ex-
amination Program tests, audio/video courses,
American College Test, Scholastic Apti-
tude Test Booklets and English as a second
language materials, Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-
4 p.m. Call Mrs. Ayala-Rosa, 287-5412 or
stop by Building 129.

Thrift shop open
The Howard and Albrook Officers' Wives'
Club Thrift Shop is now open in Building
809, Albrook AFS, Mondays and Thursdays
and every third Saturday of each month,
9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. The shop also opens for
consignments Mondays and Thursdays, 9:30
a.m.-noon.

CCAF deadline
The deadline for the spring Community
College of the Air Force April graduation
is Feb. 23. All candidate packages with of-
ficial transcripts and test score reports at-
tached must be received and date-stamped
at the Community College of the Air Force
by the close of business Feb. 23. For more
information, call 284-4863.

New numbers
The Disabled American Veterans of-
fice in Building 812, Albrook has changed
phones numbers from 286-4349 to 285-
6359.

SOS students
Students enrolled in Section 2 of Squad-
ron Officer School should make the fol-
lowing changes in 23D:
Vol. 4, pg. 3, delete Lesson 22
Vol. 5, pg. 3, delete Lesson 26 and read-
ings A-D, pg. 5-41
SOS non-resident program is undergo-
ing revision. All test questions are based
on the course materials.Call Linda Anto-
ine, 284-3263 or stop by the Howard Edu-
cation Center, Building 708, Room 109.

Aggie club
Graduates of Texas A&M University
interested in forming an Aggie Club, call
287-4690 or 261-7121.

Scout leader needed
Cub Scout Pack 31 is looking for new
leadership. Pack 31 includes Los Rios Ele-
mentary School and Cardenas and Curundu
housing areas. Training is available to
anyone interested. Call Kim Carey at 286-
3685.


CCAF advisor
Counselor Esilda De Casal is available
to Community College of the Air Force
members, 2:30 to 6:30 p.m., Tuesdays and
Thursday by appointment only. For ap-
pointments call, 284-3263 orstop by Build-
ing 708, Room 109.

Cable payments
People with Cable TV service may now
pay their bill at the Corozal Main Exchange.
The Panama Army Communities of Ex-
cellence committee has placed a payment
box inside the exchange for customer use.

Investment club
The Howard Library is interested in
forming a Canal Area Investment Club.
The club would meet regularly to discuss
different investment opportunities. Inter-
ested people can Call 284-6249.

Child care
The Fort Clayton Child Development
Services is looking for family child care
providers. Those interested will receive
free training and instructions in child
care standards and techniques. Call 287-
3301.

BOSS program
The Better Opportunities for Single Sol-
diers program offers recreational activities
for single soldiers and geographical bache-
lors. Call Anne Kelly at the Valent Recrea-
tion Center, 287-6500, to volunteer.

Atlantic Cub Scouts
The Atlantic Cub Scouts Pack 3, is
looking for boys, ages 6-10, to join its
program. Adult leaders for Cub Scouts
and Webelos are also needed. Call Phillip
Clark, 289-4956.

Scuba classes
An advanced open water scuba class is
set for Wednesday at the Howard Pool. The
fee is $105.
An advanced scuba diving class will be
held Nov. 21 and 22. The class includes a
night dive, deep dive, navigation dive and
two optional dives; a computer dive, search
and recovery dive and photography dive.
Call 283-5307/4454.



Following is a list of recurring classes


offered by recreation centers in most com-
munities. For information call the Pacific
Theatre Arts Centre, 286-3814/3152; Valent,
287-6500/4201 orZodiac, 284-6161/6109.
Aerobics; piano lessons; taekwondo; cake
decorating; basic sewing; advanced tailor-
ing; craft sewing; beginner German; Span-
ish, beginner and advanced; English, begin-
ner and advanced.
Following is a listof recurring classes of-
fered by youth centers in most communi-
ties. For information call Howard Youth
Center, 284-4700; Albrook Youth Center,
286-3195; Fort Clayton Youth or Senior
Teen Center, 287-6451.
Street/video dancing; cheerleading;
Spanish and English; aerobics; arts and crafts;
gymnastics; boys gymnastics; modem, jazz,
tap and ballet dance; piano lessons; tennis
lessons; taekwondo.
Following is a list of recurring classes
offered by arts and crafts centers in most
communities. For information call Howard
Arts and Crafts Center, 284-6361/6345; the
Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-
5957.
Classes offered include stained glass;
cross stitch; clay flower; pottery wheel;
knitting; framing; air brushing; lamp as-
sembly; leather working; macrame classes;
pottery; throw pottery technics; glazing;
firing; hand building; sculpture; wooden
jewelry box construction; acoustic guitar
construction; do-it-yourself custom fram-
ing; fabric painting; watercolor; acrylic
painting; oil painting; basic drawing and
charcoal drawing.
Weekly classes are held in car care and
maintenance, arc and gas welding, auto air
conditioning, auto transmission repair and
engine rebuilding. Call the Albrook Auto
Craft Shop, 286-3613 or Howard Auto Craft
Shop, 284-3370.
The swimming pools in most communi-
ties offer recurring classes. For information
call Howard swimming pool, 284-3569;
Albrook swimming pool, 286-3555; Fort
Clayton swimming pool, 287-6660; Rodman
swimming pool, 283-4253.
Scuba classes are available through the
Zodiac Recreation Center, 284-6161/6109.
Classes include introduction to scuba, res-
cue, dive master and specialty scuba.
Power boating and sailing classes will be
held Monday and Wednesday. Call 283-
3147/3150.
Basic horsemanship classes for all ages
are offered at the Albrook Riding Stables.
The $25 fee includes theory and practical
sessions.
The class covers safety, stable etiquette,
care and welfare of horses, tack and basics
of horse handling. Individual, group and
semi-private lessons available. Call 287-
4411.


F 1


Courtesyphoto
TH E COMFORTS OF HOME - Joyce Udell gives a building block to 2-year-old
Austin, while Megan, 19 months old, and 3-year-old Bradley, go in search of
something different. Udell's home is just one of the many which are now
available on Howard AFB for licensed family daycare. The providers offer field
trips, small group and meals in a home environment. Call the family home
daycare coordinator at 286-3133 for more information.









B 8Tropic Times
O Nov. 13,1992


Potpourri


Scholarship program
Aplications for the USO/Budweiser
Scholarship Program for the 1993/1994
academic year are available at the Howard
Education Center, Building 708, Room
109. The program provide financial as-
sistance to family members of active-
duty military personnel.
Forinformation on applications, con-
tact the local USO or the USO World
Headquarters Scholarship Program, 601
IndianaAvenue, N.W., Washington, DC
20004, (202) 783-8121. Call Linda An-
toine, 284-3263.

Retiree center
A Volunteer Retiree Advisory Serv-
ice Center opened Oct. 28 at the Direc-
torate of Civilian Personnel Job Info-
ramtion Center. The center is located in
the stationary van next to Building 560,
Corozal. The center is Wednesdays,
7:15 a.m.-4:15 p.m.
, The center will provide assistance and
guidance to retired federal employees and
their families. Current federal employees
are not eligible for the VRASC services.
Call 285-4325.

Clayton Chapel
Evangelist Luis Palau, an international
Christian spokesman and leader, will hold
services at the Howard Theater, Satur-
day, 7 p.m.; at the Fort Clayton Chapel's
Protestant worship service, Sunday , 9
a.m. and at 6 p.m. at the Balboa Theater.
There is no fee or reservations needed to
attend. Call 287-6201.

BOSS program
The Better Opportunities for Single
Soldiers program will sponsor a single
soldiers' activity day at the Valent Rec-
reation Center on Thanksgiving Day, 1-
10 p.m. Games, tournaments, movies,
refreshments and gifts will be available.
BOSS is program geared for the special
needs of bachelors and geographical
bachelors. Call 287-6500/4201.

Retirement briefing
The Headquartets U.S. Army South
Retirement Services Office will beoffer-
ing a pre-retirement orientation for all
personnel assigned to the Panama Canal
Area, at 8:30 p.m., Dec. 4, in the Confer-
ence Room in Building 520. Call Hum-
berto L. Gonzalez, 287-6417.

Office closed
The 193d Support Battalion Office,
on Jarman Field, Fort Clayton, will be


closed Dec. 4, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. for organi-
zation day. It will be open only for emer-
gencies. Call 287-5661.

Holiday travel
The Navy Morale, Welfare and Rec-
reation holiday travel program is offering
an air fare savings to military and civil-
ian members going to the United States
for the Christmas holidays. .
Flights will leave Dec. 19 and 20 and
return Jan. 2 and 3. Space will be limited
and the deadline for signing up will be
Dec. 14. For details and reservations call
283-5307/4454.

Breakfast with Santa
The Howard/Albrook Enlisted Spouses'
Club will host a base-wide children's
breakfast with Santa, Dec. 12,9:30 a.m.-
1 p.m. at the Albrook Club. The break-
fast is open to all Air Force family
members. Reservations are required by
Nov. 30. There will be a puppet show, a
chance to visit with Santa and other sur-
prises. For reservations and details call
284-4625/4786.

AWC changes
The Air War College is currently chang-
ing from a two-volume correspondence
and seminar course to a three-volume
course. The last date to sign up for the
current version is Nov. 30. Call Linda
Antoine, 284-4863.

Craft bazaar
The Griffon Club is sponsoring a
craft vendors' bazaar, Saturday, 9 a.m-
3 p.m. at the Albrook Club. Vendors
should call 284-3938 after 5 p.m.

Stand down day
The U.S. Army South Command
Safety Office will observe the Safety
Awareness and Aviation Stand Down
Day Thursday. Units and families will
be focusing on mission and home safety
issues on this day through training and
reviewing various subjects. Some sug-
gested subjects are bicycle, crosswalk,
seatbelt safety and an inspection of fire
alarms and playground equipment, ac-
cording to Command Safety Office of-
ficials.

Cheerleaders wanted
The Pacific Theatre Arts Centre is
looking for cheerleaders to perform in
the entertainment during Army Turkey
Bowl '92, Nov. 25 at the Balboa High
School Stadium. Call 286-3152/3814.


Christmas bazaar
The Inter-American Women's Club
will hold its Christmas bazaar, Dec. 5, 10
a.m.-7 p.m. at the ATLAPA Convention
Center. Gifts, crafts and food will be
sold, and there will be activities for chil-
dren and door prizes. The proceeds will
support charitable organizations. Admis-
sion is $3. Children under 10 will be ad-
mitted free. Tickets will be available at
the door or by calling, 23-1749.

Holiday briefs
Anyone interested in having a holiday
sponsorship brief advertised in the
newspaper, can send the brief MPS to
Tropic Times, Unit 0936, Albrook, or
drop by the office, Building 405, Corozal.

Parents meeting
The second School Advisory Com-
mittee meeting for parents of Curundu
Junior High School students will be Mon-
day, 4 p.m. in the school library. The
principal, Dr. Charles Renno will give an
orientation. Parents attending the met-
ing will have an opportunity to address
school concerns from the floor.

Special dinner
The International Order of the Rain-
bow for Girls and International Order of
De Moley will have a Johnny Mossetti
dinnerat the AbouSaad Shrine Building,
Gaillard Highway, Balboa, Nov. 21, 5-7
p.m. There will be a $5 donation and
tickets will be available at the door.

Donations
The 142d Medical Battalion is taking
donations of artificial Christmas trees
and ornaments for an underprivileged


school to help sponsor their Christmas
project. Call Maj. R.T. Bruno, 286-4775.

Children's book week
The Howard Library would like to
join in the celebration of National Chil-
dren's Book Week, Monday through Fri-
day. There will be stories, movies and
book browsing for children. Children
can also win a prize by guessing the
number of seashells in the mystery jar.
Call 284-6249.

Expectant parents
Army Community Health Nursing will
be sponsoring free expectant parent classes,
Thursday and Dec. 3, 4:30-6;30 pm, at
Gorgas Army Community Hospital, Sec-
tion B, first floor. Call 282-5418.

Support group
The 24th Medical Group Mental Health
Clinic is now forming a group to provide
support and therapy for people experi-
encing holiday-related sadness and stress.
The group will meet Fridays, 10 a.m.,
today through Dec. 18. Call 284-6410.

General meeting
The Enlisted Spouses' Club Decem-
ber general meeting has been resched-
uled for Nov. 30,7 p.m., at the Fort Clay-
ton NCO Club. Call 287-3086

New hours
The Mindi Veterinary Facility new
hours of operation are Monday, Wednes-
day and Thursday 7:30-11 a.m. and 1-
2:30 p.m.; Tuesday, Friday 7:30-11:30
a.m. Animals will seen on an appoint-
ment basis. Call 289-5872/5208 8 a.m.-
noon.


AM flgtsceu


Q. To what countries may I travel using the Environmental and Morale Leave
EML)?
A. Effective Sept. 22, U.S. Southern Command has designated these EML sites for
personnel stationed in Panama:
Continental United States,
Puerto Rico, Costa Rica and
Ecuador.
PP: Tourist Passport
TC: Tourist Card
V: Visa
PC: Proof of Citzenship
US: United States Pass-
port Holders Only
CC: Country Clearance
RON: Remain Overnight

For additional flight in-
formation, call 284-5758/
4306.


Today
4:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN
San Jose, Costa Rica PC
San Salvador, El Salvador PP/CC/V
Howard AFB, PN
5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN
Tegucigalpa, Honduras PP
Soto Cano AB, Honduras PP
Howard AFB, PN
9:05am C141 Howard AFB, PN
Bogota, Colombia PP
Howard AFB, PN
Saturday
5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN US
Atlanta, OA
7:10am C141 Howard AFB, PN
Charleston AFB, SC PP
Sunday
8:00am C5A Howard AFB, PN
Soto Cano AB, Honduras PP
Charleston AFB, SC RON/PP
Dover AFB, DE PP
Monday
5:10am C130 Howard AFB, PN
Managua, Nicaragua CC/V
Howard, PN
6:15am C727 Howard AFB, PN
Charleston IAP, SC
Tuesday
5:10am C130 Howard AFB, PN
San Salvador, El Salvador PP/CC/V
San Jose, Costa Rica PC


Howard AFB, PN
5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Howard AFB, PN
5:40am C141 Howard AFB, PN
Lima, Peru
Santiago, Chile
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Brasilia, Brazil
Howard AFB, PN
7:50am C-5A Howard AFB, PN
Charleston AFB, SC
Dover AB, DEL
Wednesday
1:50am C130 Howard AFB, PN
Kelly AFB, TX
Charleston AFB, SC
Thursday
5:10am C130 Howard AFB, PN
Quito, Ecuador
Howard AFB, PN
7:10am C5AHoward AFB, PN
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Charleston AFB, SC


Sponsorship programs

The holidays are fast approaching and, with them, the holiday spirit of giving,
of helping those less fortunate and of lending a supporting hand through the U.S.
Army South Soldier and Family Holiday SupportProgram, public affairs officials
said.
This year's program is under way with toy and food drives and the U.S. Military
Sponsorship and Family Sponsorship Programs.
The toy and food drives at units and duty sections are targeted to help military
families who are having financial problems during the holiday season.
The U.S. Military Sponsorship Program is set up to offer single and geographi-
cal bachelor soldiers the opportunity to spend the holidays with a family while the
Family Sponsorship Program offers military and civilian families the opportunity
to share the holidays with other families.
Anyone wishing to donate food, toys, money or become a sponsor or those who
are in need of receiving food baskets or wanting to be sponsored should contact
their units by Dec. 9 to be enrolled. Enrollment in any of the programs is strictly
confidential.


RON
RON


PP
PP


RON/PP





PP
RON/PP


1�









Tropic Times
Nov. 13,1992 J


'Oklahoma'


opens today

ALBROOKAIRFORCE STATION
(DoDDS PAO) - The Balboa High
School Drama Department is present-
ing the classic family musical "Okla-
homa" in the Balboa High School Au-
ditorium today, Saturday, Nov. 20 and
21. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. with
additional performances on Saturday at
2:30 p.m.
"Oklahoma" is a rousing musical
by Rodgers and Hammerstein that de-
picts a slice of life in the Oklahoma
territory around the turn of the century.
This production stars Panama Canal
College and Balboa High school stu-
dents. Curly is played by Robert Lut-
trell, Laurey by Rebecca Heard, Will
Parker by Douglas Marquardt, and Ado
Annie by Erin Hatchett.
oThe show is directed by JoAnne
Mitchell and student director Kate Sears,
with support and assistance from Melanie
Bales, musical director, Linda
Dahlstrom, choreographer, Jerry Brecs,
technical director, and Fran Banasick.
courtesy photo by Chelsea Coffey For more information call 252-5176.


* Classified Ads


Rottweiler puppies, AKC/CCP, champion blood-
line, avail Dec. 15 $500. 252-9211, call collect.

Mini-toy French poodle puppies, 5 wks old, de-
wormed, tail docked, parents weight 51bs $225.
226-5395.

Cocker spaniel puppies, 5 wks old, females, good
Xmas gift $150. 286-3230.

Labrador puppies, CCP reg, born Oct. 9, avail Nov.
24. 283-3092.

Collie/sheltie mixed male, 17 mos old, all shots, all
access incl, dog carrier $150/obo. 286-4293.

German shepherd male ready for stud service, large,
CCP reg. 286-4731.

Parakeets, two each $12. 286-4932.

Two hamsters $10 ea. 262-1029.

Rabbit $12. 252-7400.

Chihuahua puppies, 2 females $125 ea; free, adult
male chihuahua. 268-0161.

Pit bull pups, 8 mos old, male, female, ears docked,
w/paper, trained $500. 226-7176.

Golden retriever puppies, female, CCP/AKC,
champion sire. 252-5397.

Weimaraner pups, good for hunting, watch, com-
panion dog, good Xmas gift, good w/children. 252-
6747.

Free, young female mixed breed, spayed. 223-8289
eves.




1989 Chevy S-lOp/u, 23.6k miles, stereo/cass, step,
camper shell $7500. 287-4522.

1991 Chevy Z72 4x4, loaded, 6/60 warranty,
$17,500/obo. 223-3976 ask for Bob Osborn.

1983 GMC Jimmy 4x4, ac, pb, ps, radio cass, alarm,
duty pd, 5-spd, 2.8L, good cond $6300. 261-6830.

1991 Toyota X-Cab 4x4 p/u, 11,600 miles, cab/
bedliner, extras, exc cond, not duty pd $16,500.
287-4084.

1990 Jeep Cherokee, Pioneer w/options $17,500/
obo. 233-5224.

1987 Suzuki, 5-spd, ac, 4WD, alarm, AM-FM, bike
rack, w/boat trir, 30mpg $9500. 264-8417.

1986 Nissan Sunny sta/wgn, at, ac, AM-FM cass
$3500. 242-4925.

1985 BMW 323i, exc shape, dealer maintained in
Germany, not duty pd $6600. 61-8405.

1991 Firebird, V8, at,fully loaded, alarm $13,500 or
pay $1500 and take over payments/neg. 284-4733
after 1pm.


1987 Oldmobile Cutlass Ciera S, loaded, exc cond
$4500. 221-6968.

1986 Ford T-bird, ac, cc, pwrdrs/win, AM-FM cass,
good cond $4500/obo. 284-3635.

1990 Chevy sta/wgn, 8 pass, V6,3.1 L eng, AM-FM
cass, ac, new tires, shocks, loaded. 284-6836.

1986 Dodge Lancer, ac, pb, ps, AM-FM cass, 4dr
$4000/obo. 283-5325.

1986 Pontiac 6000LE, 2.5L, 4 cyl, ps, pb, pwr win/
locks, tilt steering $5200/obo. 284-5538.

1978 Ford Econoline van, V8, ps, pb, good cond,
duty pd $2500. 289-3323.

1982 Honda Accord, fair cond, ac, AM-FM, 5-spd,
runs grt $2600. 260-3472.

1982 Oldsmobile Firenza, at, radio, ac, 4dr, duty pd
$2990. 221-2076.

1988 Jeep Comanche p/u w/cap, exc cond, no ac,
58,000 miles, avail Dec. 1 $5000/obo. 269-6691.

1979 Oldsmobile Delta 88, 4 new tires, body &
interior exc cond, needs eng repair, best offer. 287-
4421.

1988 Nissan Terrano, 5-spd, Alpine stereo, duty pd,
ac, 4WD. $11,000/obo. 232-4561.

1988 Dodge Caravan, low miles, exc cond $9000/
obo. 260-6280 eves.

1983 Ford Mustang GT, V8, ac, AM-FM cass, new
paint, tires, exc cond $6000/obo. 260-5815.

1977 Chevy Nova, 4dr, at, AM-FM cass, duty pd,
needs work $950. 233-5750.

1985 Mazda 626LX, 5-spd, ac, low miles, new tires,
exc cond $4500. 282-5280.

1989 Nissan van, ac, AM-FM tint glass, 42,000
miles, duty pd $7900. 243-5269.

1967 Chevy Bel Air, eng in good cond $1000. 284-
5136.

1989 Nissan truck, at, ps, ac, AM-FM cass, exc
cond, 21,000 miles $6500. 284-4231.

1983 Jeep CJS,4.2L, 6 cyl, 59,000miles, notdutypd
$5800/obo. 236-2372.

1979 VW Rabbit, new trans, runs grt $1200/obo.
289-4351.

1989 Ford Bronco H XLT4x4, ac, pb, ps, AM-FM
cass, 30,000 miles, exc cond $12,950. 286-3125.

1979 Monte Carlo, 6 cyl, eng grt run cond, ac, tint
glass $1900. 283-6590.

1975 Chevy sta/wgn, exc running cond, needs
minor cosmetics $650/obo. 287-4038.

1989 Nissan Sentra, 2dr, one owner, ac, alarm, AM-
FM cass, U.S. specs $7500.287-4686.

1979 Ford 150 Econoline van, customized, in good
shape $900. 286-4975.


1986 Oldsmobile 98, 4dr, 6 cyl, fuel injec, loaded,
duty pd $8000. 260-7574.

1988 Buick Electra, 30,000 miles, leather int, all
extras, V6, exc cond $12,000/obo. 261-7398 after
6:30pm.

1981 Ford LTD sta/wgn, ps, at, AM-FM cass $1500/
obo. 284-3689.

1988 Chrysler Lebaron coupe, ac, ps, pw, pl, not
duty pd $8500. 262-1855.

1985 Montero 4x4, 5dr, stereo, ps, pb, ac, pw/drs,
gas, duty not pd, exc cond $7000. 252-6026.

1987 Nissan King Cab 4x4 p/u, 5-spd, fully loaded,
extras $10,000. 261-3314.

1979 Cutlass Supreme, 2dr, needs work, sale as is
$1000. 284-4392.

1981 Mercedes, 2WD, diesel, exc cond $4500/obo.
264-8244.

1984 T-bird, V6, at, ps, pb, ac, pw, 85k miles, good
cond, not duty pd $4400. 260-3533.

1984 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera, 4dr,4 cyl, ac, ps, pb
$3000. 286-4972 after 6pm.

1985 Ford Escort, 2dr hatchbk, ac, 4-spd, exc cond
$3000/neg. 286-6282 after 6pm.

1977 Plymouth Volare, 6cyl, at, ac, AM-FM cass,
new tires, brakes,runs good, duty pd$950/obo. 282-
4185.

1988 Mazda B2200 p/u, 5-spd, short bed, w/shell,
stereo cass, low miles, very clean, U.S. specs $5100.
287-5638.

1990 Isuzu Trooper, 28,000 miles, ac, V6,4WD, at,
tint glass, cruise, extras $15,000. 284-5622.

1988 Suzuki Samuri, gold/tan cov top, exc cond
$5500. 284-5833.

1987 Subaru, 1.8GL, 5-spd, ac, ps, 4dr, AM-FM
cass, not duty pd $4950. 287-4685.

1979 Chevy Impala, eng just rebuilt, grt cond, Pio-
neer stereo cass, needs carb work $1750//obo. 283-
4227.

1986 Renault Alliance, AM-FM radio, ac $2500/
obo. 286-3295.

1981 Toyota Cressida diesel, 4dr, 87,000km, body
rough, mech exc, good tires $3000 firm. 269-1443.

1987 Honda Civic, ac, 5-spd, ps, extras, low mile-
age, AM-FM cass, duty pd, exc cond $5500. 232-
5911.

1980 Jeep CJ7, ac,AM-FM cass, hard/soft tops, runs
grt $4500. 260-9982.

1979 Pontiac Trans Am, t-tops, 4-spd, runs good,
pw, classic $2000. 287-3391.

1987 Buick Skylark, 4dr, at, ac, tilt wheel, cruise,
AM-FM, exc cond $5500. 221-5801.

1991 Chevy Camaro RS coupe, 5-spd, ac, ps, pb,


AM-FM cass, exc cond, 57,300 miles $12,000.260-
7621.

1981 Plymouth Reliant sta/wgn, 4 new tires, needs
work;sale as is $500. 232-4447.

1972 Mercedes Benz 220D, 4-spd, exc cond $3995.
225-8159.

1986 Pontiac 6000, 4dr, fuel inject, ac, pw/dr, AM-
FM cass, good cond $4500/obo. 286-4129.

1982 CJ7, 6 cyl, ac, ps, pb, soft/hard tops, low miles
$6000/obo. 223-0252.

1988 Plymouth Voyager, V6, AM-FM cass, alarm,
at, ac, ps, pb, exc cond $10,500. 223-4210.

1991 Hyundai Excel, aa, AM-FM radio cass, tint
glass, like new, duty pd $6500. 220-2421.

1983 Ford Escort, 2dr, radio, runs good, not duty pd
$3000/neg. 220-2421.

1987 Nissan p/u, U.S. specs, needs paint, custom-
ized $000/obo. 287-4499.

1984 Buick Century Custom, 6 cyl, ps, pb, not duty
pd, good cond $2000. 283-6230.

1986 Toyota Corolla XL, sr, ac, 5-spd, stereo/cass
$4000 w/duty, $3500 w/o. 268-2973.

1991 Chevy Blazer 4x4, at, loaded, 4.3L, like new
$15,000. 284-3026.

1976 Dodge Aspen sta/wgn, ac, pw, ps, pb, grt
shape. 285-4734.

1981 Ford extcab F150 XLT p/u, w/shell, 302 V8,
all extras, capt chrs $3000. 252-2648.

1973 Super Beetle, runs grt, new brakes, clutch
$1700/obo. 228-7924 after 5pm.

1980 AMC Concord, 4dr, at, good cond $1500/obo.
286-4939.

1981 Jeep CJ7, ac, ht, ps, AM-FM cass, exc cond,
duty pd $5000/obo. 287-6312.

1984 Honda Civic, at, ac, 4dr, exc cond, not duty pd
$3500/obo. 260-9613.

1982 Nissan Cedric280cc sedan, ac, pw, ps, 96,000
miles, tilt wheel $3750. 260-5378.

1977 Plymouth Volare sta/wgn, needs work $650.
286-4736 after 5pm.

1989 Ford Mustang LX sedan, 5-spd, ac, pw, pd,
pm, pt, AM-FM cass, 35,000 miles $6500. 284-
3378.

1982 Mazda 323,4dr, ac, new tires, duty pd, minor
work required $1800. 236-4393.

1990 Mitsubishi Lancer GL, ac, radio/cass, 5-spd,
not duty pd $6700. 252-1213.

1980 VW Rabbit, 5-spd std,4dr, sr, exc cond $1250.
225-7464.

1991 Daihatsu Charade 1-3, ac, AM-FM cass, 5-
spd, 4dr $7200. 261-3537.


S -


,'Wm










tB1 Ov Tropic Times
1O Nov. 13,1992


SClassified Ads


1991 Lada 1600, 500kms, like new $3800. 285-
5919.

1990 Mitsubishi Elcipse, ac, ps, pb, pull out stereo,
one owner $6000/obo. 286-4274.

1978 Fiat 124 convert $1200. 284-5025.

1984 Toyota Corolla LE, good cond $3500. 286-
3874.



Bilingual experienced, honest, reliable maid, M-W-
F, refs, care for home, child. 287-6887.

Will clean any home, M-F, 8am-5pm, child care
inclu, dependent wives. 287-4379.

Bilingual live-in maid, honest, good w/children,
refs. 287-5832 after 10am.

Bilingual live-out maid, honest, reliable, days work,
mature. 221-5423.

Eng-spk maid, babysit, M-F, a:30am-12:30pm,
Sat.-Sun, refs, $1.25hr. 221-7883.

Eng-spk day maid, 1-2 days per week, refs. 224-
7521.

Bilingual part time, babysitting in my home, grt w/
children, mil dep. 284-4232 ask for Jesse.

Lady in her 30s to clean, iron, babysit, good refs.
284-4997.

Eng-spk housekeeper, 5 days per week, honest,
mature, babysit at night. 224-7765.

Eng-spk mature, dependable housekeeper, M-F
some Sats, good w/children, live-out. 282-3690
eves,.

Span-spk honest responsible live-in maid, good w/
children. 252-5552.

Bilingual honest maid, 1 day per week, exc refs.
286-4272.

Span-spk maid, hardworking, reliable, honest, good
w/children, refs, $125mo. 225-4136.

Bilingual maid, honest loving, reliable M-W-F,
loves children. 287-6887.

Bilingual babysitter/housekeeper, honest, mature,
reliable, grt refs. 266-1804.

Span-spk day maid, good worker, honest, M-F-Sat.
221-1840 ask for Reina.

Eng-spk live-in maid, honest, refs, good w/children
avail Nov. 30. 261-8025.




31' steel hull cutter, sleeps 4, galley, head, teak int,
extra sails, w/ground tackle, paid $12,000, will
consider offer. 287-3933.

1991 Bayliner center console 20'2" off shore hull
120hp motor, trir, extras $11,500. 260-6787.

20' Sportscraft, 225hp OMC OB (ea drive), exc
cond, trim tabs, galv trir, extras $7900/obo. 252-
6162.

16' Orlando Clipper, 2/60hp Yamaha, fish finder,
bimini top, extras $4300. 261-5261.

16' Hobie Cat sailboat, very good cond, extras, trlr
$1800. 252-6096.

Stratos bass boat, 150hp electroll motor, fish finder,
livewells, grt boat $10,000/obo. 284-4596.

Johnson 6hp OB motor w/gas tank, low usage,
needs reconditioning $175. 252-5381 after 7pm.

4x8 trailer $150. 286-4736 after Spnm.

4x4x2 closed trailer, removable doors, lights, duty
paid $400/obo. 226-7679.




21" color TV $150, super NES w/super scope $200,
Genesis, Nintendo tapes $20-$35. 287-4928.

27" JVC TV color $500, stereo sys w/VHS $1000.
233-5224.

Hondo, elec guitar & Matrix amp $385. 243-5366.

Pioneer receiver with two spkers, 200 watts $300.
287-3778.

Casio MA- 120 electronic keybd, like new, manuals
inclu $50. 223-8314.

Packard Bell 286, 40MB HD, dual floppy, color
- - mon, mouse, Dos 5.0, Epson printer $1000. 284-
3280 after 5pm.


Sansui VCR, exc cond $150, Panasonic, video cam,
batt w/charger, case, key coaxils for TV connect
$400. 236-1473 Iv msg

Amstrad word processor, hardly used, manuals,
extra ribbon, disks $225. 284-6629.

VCR Sony Beta S1500, needs repair $45.260-9731.

Sony stereo sys w/Sony 5 discs CD player $500.
228-4630.

Comp w/DD, games, books, joystick, exc cond
$125. 287-3189.

Nintendo sys w/31 games, carrying case, 3 controls/
control exten turbo controller incl $360. 287-4684.

Tandy 1400LT, IBM compat, 768K, 3.5 DR, sup-
ports printer, graphics, mouse, port, free software
$500. 285-4532.

Casio electronic keybd, model CT636, w/stand,
new cond $260. 284-5784.

Nintendo NES action set, NES advan joystick,
Mario Bros, Duck Hunt, Bases Loaded & Top Gun
n $140. 287-4734.

RCA 25" color console TV, remote, swivel base,
stereo, cable ready, more $300. 287-4734.

Brother electric typewriter $80. 223-3739.

Kenwood 125W amp, exc cond $150 firm. 284-
3156.

Kenwood multi-CD player, 6 disk cartridge, rela-
tively new $125. 286-6281.

386-25Mhz 60MB HD, VGA mini tower $1150,
Tandy 1000SL 40MB HD VGA $650, new
Panasonic laser printer $650. 230-0668.

Amiga 500 deluxe comp, IMB, color mon, 7-color
printer, desk,joystick, mouse, documentation $700.
287-4679.

Zenith 27" color console TV, 1 yr old $395. 225-
8159.

386-25Mhz clone, 4MB mem, 84Meg HD, NEC
multi sync mon $1500. 286-6333.

Pioneer GV-055 stereo, dbl cass, timer, turntbl, 100
watt spkers, Canon AE1 program camera. 286-
4673.

Comp Packard Bell 386SX 130MBD, 2FD, mon,
lots of software $1800. 264-8941.

Peavey bass amp 150watts $175, RCA VHS
camcorder $550/neg. 252-5333 ask for John.

Acoustic guitar, 6 strings, add strings & picks inclu
$150/obo. 282-3082.

Hitachi 19" color TV, remote $3000/obo. 282-3082.

Pioneer CS-903 stereo spkers $250pr. 287-4335.

Tandy 3000HL, 5.25-3.5 DR, software, $800/obo,
Pioneer 6 pack car CD $300.286-3698.

Atari comp, DD, printer, mon, good cond, best offer.
252-6703.

Sony Watchman $150, Betamax w/tapes, neg. 223-
4290 eves.

8mm Sony video camera $600, Canon AE1 pro-
gram camera $350, Casio CA-100 elec keybd $120.
287-4933.

Comp V20, 49MB HD, 3.5-5.25FD, 2 Meg EMS,
RGB mon $600/obo. 284-6594.

Atari 130XE comp w/2 DD, interface, software,
books. 284-4287.

Nat'l 28" TV multi sys, cable $600, Hitachi VHS,
VCR multi sys, remote $300, both $800. 260-3533.

Panasonic stereo music sys $115. 252-2314.

Electronics HD 130 MG Seagate $350, 1MG Ram
80WS $45, Canon T60 50mm, 28mm lens $300.
224-5170.

JVC 20" TV, cable, like new $325, SC mem type-
writer $175, Panasonic 1624 printer, wide.car $300.
252-5829.

2 VHS VCRs, Sanyo, Technics, good cond $150ea
firm. 260-3890.

Packard Bell 286, VGA mon, color printer, mouse,
joystick, game card $1200. 287-5638.

Answer mach $110, Commo 64 comp, needs repair
$50, phone console, radio, alarm $70, dbl cass $100.
284-6881.

Panasonic car stereo $80, RCA video player w/8
disks $100, Packard Bell 386SX 130MG HD, 2MB
RAM VGA mon, mouse $1400. 282-4225.

2BSR 250watt, 5-way spkers, Swedish walnut case,
new $250. 252-6239.


Audio/video master control amp, Pioneer, like new
$250. 284-3281.

Kenwood stereo w/cass, spkers $200, 13" color TV
$75, new dot matrix color printer $150. 223-0252.

8088 IBM 2DD comp, w/color printer, mon $500.
287-5785.

Sony Beta 2400, needs spare part $55. 252-6989.

Amiga 500, color mon, DD, mouse, 2 joysticks,
printer, 100 programs, more $600/obo. 285-4734.

Full size VHS camcorder w/extra micro, 2 batts, 2
lenses $500. 284-3622.

Cable TV sys, down converter, antenna, power
supply $400. 264-8941.

25" console color TV, works perfect $250. 286-
6138.

IBM compat 386XZ-25, 106MB HD, 14" SVGA
mon, 5.25-3.5 floppies, software $1400/obo. 260-
1290.

Zenith 27" color TV console, 3 mos old, $700.260-
1290.

35mm SLR camera, auto wing, exposure, LCD data
panel, w/lens, flash $275. 284-3939.




Green parakeet in Diablo Heights, owner please call
252-2285.




Q-sz sleeper couch, loveseat, microwave, Q-sz bed
w/matt, swing set, recliner. 284-4322.

Sofa, loveseat set, charcoal gray Ig pillows on
wooden frames $300. 287-4928.

Magic Chef stove, 4 burners, brand new $300. 260-
7728.

GE hvy duty dryer $220, Kenmore refrig/frzr, no
frost, w/ice maker $400. 286-3933.

2 9xl2rose rugs w/pads $65ea, 12x15 blue rug $90.
286-3874.

Sturdy microwave cart w/oak trim $125, Weber bbq
grill $45, Sears vacuum w/carpet head $75. 261-
7845.

Side-by-side 21cu.ft. refrig $800, auto gas range
$500, washer & dryer $275, Ig microwave $150.
261-7845.

Kenmore hvy duty washer & dryer $650, 1 antique
twin beds. 286-3335.

Taupe sect L-shape sofa/Q-sz sleeper, seats 7 $950,
draperies, short, yellow $35. 287-4280.

Blue couch, loveseat $600, used weed eater $35,
manual lawnmower $70. 286-4084.

1988 GE washer/dryer $500. 283-5325.

Sofa sleeper, loveseat, TV, crib, rug, full bed set,
twin bed, much more. 284-5538.

2 rattan rockers w/cushions, matching table, 18 mos
old $300. 282-3881.

3 ginger jar lamps, white base & shades $25 ea. 282-
3881.

Green/bge floral overstuffed sofa, loveseat $500
firm. 284-3393.

Admiral upright 16.7 frzr, like new $525, Cal K-sz
bed & frame $425. 243-5366.

Solid wood Queen-Ann DR set, 6 chairs, like new,
recliner $300. 260-1847.

3pc LR set w/tables, exc cond $1500, lawnmower
$65, sewing machine $125, stereo rack $60. 287-
4181.

Sears Kenmore 15 cu.ft. refrig/frzr, no frost, 2dr
$300. 233-5750.

Glass top kitchen tbl, w/4 chrs, as new $400. 284-
5784.

3pc LR & DR set, w/6 seats $450-$250, washer,
refrig, TV $150 ea, wedding dress $300. 252-2543.

Rattan sofa w/2 chrs, footstool $650, daybed $350.
284-4949 after duty hrs.

12x20 burgandy carpet plus piece for hall, fits 2BR
Kobbe flats $250 firm. 284-6880.

Mini blinds, 7 sets $200. 289-4639.

Carpets, 9x12 peach $40,4x6 brown $15, 4x6 rose
$15. 282-3686.

Formal DR set $2500, sofa $30, 25" RCA color


console TV $250. 286-3125.

Daybed w/matt $400, 2 3/4 beds w/matts in blue
$245 ea., girl's clothes. 224-0656.

Recliner, good shape $200/obo, carpet deep mauve
12x20, exc cond $225. 284-6880.

White rattan LR w/2 hanging baskets (reversible
cushions), blk DR set, seats 6. 287-4895.

Two 8,000 btu acs $275ea, vacuum cleaner, micro-
wave, kitchen access. 286-4975.

Side-by-side GE refrig/frzr, Magic Chef stove $425,
both like new. 282-5535.

2 12,000 btu acs $400 ea, Ig cap Kenmore washer &
dryer $1000, more. 282-5535.

Blk dining tbl, 6 chrs, tinted glass top $500, bge
9x12 rug $70. 283-4684.

Q-sz hide-away couch, match chr $475. 252-6934.

LR w/coffee/end tables $200 all, glass/chrome wood
tbl, 4 chrs $300, brass headbd $25, ceiling lamp $30,
wicker chr $40. 269-5224.

Couch, 2 recliners, DR tbl, 4 chrs, Canon typewriter.
286-4531.

Mini blinds, two 6ft, one 3ft all 5ft tall, bge $100.
282-3686.

Whirlpool refrig w/ice maker $450, air compressor,
$1600, industrial exhaust fan 24" $60. 256-6410.

Cherrywood crib, matt, exc cond, sheet, comf,
bumper $370, newborn car seat $20. 261-3678.

Antique china cab w/glass $700, hand painted Chi-
nese hall chest w/mirrors $1025. 223-4290.

Q-sz matt, box spring $100. 287-3676.

Sofa, loveseat, gray, exc cond, US made $500.284-
3300.

Q-sz sofa sleeper $500. 287-6336.

Chrome/glass coffee/end tbls $60-$40, b/w Ebl $30,
chrome/glass bar $60, entertainment ctr $100. 226-
2640.

DR tbl $75, Samsung microwave $100, Ig;dehu-
midifier $120, 10-spd men's bike $60. 287-4933.

K-sz waterbed, lOcu.ft. frzr, 12x15 carpet w/pad,
rocker-recliner, misc pwr tools. 287-6499.

Bookcase, Q-sz bed, sofa, loveseat, curtains, more.
260-9613.

3pc entermnt ctr w/glass drs, bar & TV set swivel
stand, VCR compart, with cab lights, new $985.
252-5961.

Sears dryer, like new $350, upright frzr $350. 230-
0668.

Two wall units $150, round tbl, 5 chrs $250. 284-
5388.

Curtains $10pr. 286-6284.

Wood dining tbl, 6 leather chrs $250,2pr Sears self-
lined draperies 96x84 $50 ea. 252-2343.

Sharp Carousel microwave, good cond $100 firm.
260-3890.

Baby crib/bed, matt, 3 sheets $400. 286-4932.

LR sofa, curtains, box springs, frame, lawnmower,
Atari games, access $85. 230-1927.

Sofa $225, dishwasher top loading $50. 252-7400.

Child's 13pc BR set, twin bed, w/extra hide-away-
bed, 3-dr chest, 2 hutch, tbl, 4 chairs, more $1000.
252-5961.

Sofa sleeper, loveseat, bmr $500. 286-3295.

Hotpoint dryer, exc cond $250. 261-6186.

Magic Chef gas stove, bge, apart size, like new
$275. 287-6693.

LR set, twin stroller, 2 9x12 rugs, rose & gray,
French Prov canopy dbl bed. 252-1257.

Teak BR set, dresser, Q-sz bed, 2 night stands, men's
dresser, headbd $1500. 236-0978.

9x12 blue rug $85, slalom $45, children's classic
books $2. 252-2760.

Recliner, exc cond $150. 260-7621.

Brass tbl lamp attach, glass top/tbl, 2 ti. ed wooden
cart on wheels $30ea. 236-3924.

Two rattan swivel chairs w/match round tbl, glass
top $150, rattan phone tbl w/cushion 430. 236-
3924.

Nat'1 10,000 btu ac, 220 volts $175, 12x15 gold













* Classified Ads


Tropic Times : 11
Nov. 13,1992 AJLP1


carpet, 9x12 royal blue $30. 252-1032.

Baliblinds,gold$75,coffeepot$18,Sony 17" color
TV, remote $175. 252-5792.

4pc LR set, very good cond $600, coffee/2 end tbls
$500. 286-6124.

Gibson 16 cu.ft. frzr$800/obo, Baldwin organ $400
both grt cond. 286-3373.

K-sz waterbed, good cond $300. 286-3397.

Full length LR drapes $10pr, 3 carpets, blue, rose,
brn $40, $60, $40. 286-4430.

Upright frzr $425. 252-6164.

Whirlpool port dishwasher, butcher top $270. 284-
4275.

Blue loveseat, sofa, fair cond $375. 230-0371.

Panasonic 24,000-btu ac, 1 yr old, like new $575.
236-0984.

Scotch pine 6ft Xmas tree, easy to assemble, ever-
green $20. 282-3629.

Acs, Frigidaire 7,500 btu, Whirlpool 10,000 btu,
Whirlpool 20,000 btu. 252-6246.

K-sz waterbed w/padded rails, headbd w/sheets
$400, comforter, 2 night stands $150/obo. 287-
4244.

Whirlpool 13,000 btu ac, like new $500/obo. 226-
7679.




:'echnics stereo system, $400; 2 Huffy 20" bikes,
i50 each; scooter, $35. 287-3478.

Little tykes junior gym yard set and airplane seesaw.
252-1257.

Used furniture and appliances. 243-5269.

One way plane ticket to Phoenix, Ariz. valid between
Thursday and Saturday, $250. 283-4629.

BBQ gas grill, $175; vaporizer, $20, bird Cagemed,
$40, collapsable med bird cage, $25. 287-6196.

2 baby beds, $100 and $60; high chair, $25, table
high chair, $15. 2854-3035.

Yamaha motorcycle parts, brake system, w/discs,
chrome pipes, 90X18 rear tire, tach, ign, neogoti-
able. 286-3929 after 5 pm.

VHS tapes cartoons, $5 and $8.252-2680 after 5pm.

Old records in Englilsh at .50 cents long plays. 252-
2680 after 5:30pm.

Assortment of comics, price negotiable. 287-6331.

Trailer $900. 228-4630.

Three wheel motorcycle $800. 228-4630.

Blk formal dress w/short cape worn once Size 9/10
$90. 286-4285.

Blue Kolercraft stroller, like new $35, car seat, $25.
283-4626.

Little tykes boat, $15; Fisher Price rocking horse,
$10; baby stroller, $20; some toddler jumpsuits $5
each. 284-5484.

5 Dunlop grand trek 225/70R15 tires ideal for small
trucks $300/obo. 269-1651.

New Kamei spoiler for 1979-1986 Mustang or
Capri, $450. 284-5224.

Moutain bike for men $100. 223-3739 after 5pm.

VW 4 rims chrome spoke, 14X5 w/caps, lugs, never
used $350. 260-1847.

Stamp collection (US) singles, blocks, coils, book-
lets accumulations, mint condition, $3,600. 236-
0417.

Trains and lots of accessories, tracks, houses, elec.
turnouts $500. 236-0417.

Front and back bucket seats for 70s GM, green and
black reupholstered vinyl $60. 286-4475.

Inside Christmas lights, Wearever popcorn popper,
sheets for twin beds, towels. 252-2646.

2singlebeds,mattrress,spring and frame,best offer.
252-6845.

Miscellaneous baby items, walker, tub, clothes,
swing/jump and more. 282-3082.

14K gold marquise diamond engagement ring, with
trillion accents..56ct, less than 1 yr $950. 260-3049.

Weight bench, never used, Weider with attach-
ments, $100. 286-3698.


GM turbohydromatic 350 transmission, good con-
di.,ii, $250. 286-4475.

3 .-n Minolta 3000, $250 obo, CDs $7; Wilson
tennis racket, $35. 286-6226.

4 Firestone radial ATX tires and rims for 4X4, size
P205-75R15, $250 obo. 287-3676.

White wrought iron bird cage on stand, exc. condi-
tion, $50. 252-2370.

Men's 16 speed bike, $65; women's 10 speed, $45.
287-6336.

Baseball and basketball cards, star singles, insert
cards, rookies, some baseball sets. 260-5522.

Steel security door, washer dryer, rattan table seats
six. 260-5605 after 6pm.

Folding ping pong table with net, excellent condi-
tion. $175. 252-1052.

Two ladies size 6 dressy jumpsuits, used once,
beautiful. 252-6989.

Swingomatic, used once, $20; opal and diamond
ring $65. 264-6625.

4.2 cu. ft. compact refig, $75; 2 Dacor 71.5 scuba
tanks w/back packs, hydro just complete, $150.
286-6282 after 6pm.

Woman's 12 speed bicycle, red/black 26 in., $75.
252-2314.

Little tyke octopus merry-go-round never used $90.
252-6829.

Metal frame swing set with slide $99; Canon per-
sonal photocopier PC-10, like new needs ink car-
tridge, $275, plants for sale. 284-6881.

Black and Decker coffee maker, undercounter, $25.
286-4286.

19 in., Crown color TV, $200, credenza, 3 small
executive chairs, $75, Ig sofa for an office, 2 small
TV carts, $20 and $10, usused Brazilian shoes 51/2,
$20. 269-5224.

Wedding dress w/veil, $300. 236-1740.

Nintendo games $20-25; carpet shampooer, $70;
home security alarm system, $150. 287-4685.

Battery operated Barbie Corvette, great condition
$150 firm; lipstick rechargable weedeater, $35.
287-3738.

Darkroom equipment never used; 35mm camera,
10-speed bike, BBQ, rugs, coffee table, clothes,
baby items, cradle. 286-4282.

Nutramigen formula 7 32oz RTF and 5 13 oz con-
centrated, $25. 264-6474.

Car seat, $25. 286-4272.

Microwave, $200, Bodytone 300 rowing machine/
home gym, $100; 6-foot book cases, $175. 285-
4734.

2 mountain bikes, $50. 286-4971 after 4pm.

Formal wedding dress with veil and slip, $300.252-
2080.-

Smith-Corona portable electric typewriter, like
new, $110. 252-2143.

Western hat, Stetson, Marlboro, silver, size 6 7/8
new, $65. 252-2143.

Golf clubs, ping, red, 3-sw, 6 mos old, ping putter,
$475. 287-3631.

Old new jazz music tapes, CDs and albums, $200.
261-4616.

Black dust ruffle, black\ivory stripe comfoter, pil-
low sham, matching round table cover, $70/obo.
260-9058.

Chrysler, 1970s unused automobile parts, generator
$55 complete master brake cylinder $40. 252-5381
after 7pm.

New ping pong table. 286-4531.after 4:30pm.

Coin gold dredge 6", complete $1400. 284-5478.

Crown 1-3-5 graphite golf clubs $125. 287-4293.

Extra large dog kennel, never used $59.2878-4293.

Girl's 24" 10-spd bike $50, boy's 20" Raleigh bike
$60,2 15" GMC/Chevy van wheels/tires, misc car-
pets. 287-4571.




1981 Kawasaki 750 LTD 13,000 miles, new tires
chain and sprockets. $1,100. 289-4042.

1991 Honda C8R 1000F, mint condition serious
inquiries only, $6,000. 282-3429.


1986 Honda Moped Spree exe. condition, $600.
285-5935.

1985 Honda VF750 alarm system, very low mile-
age, needs battery $1600. 286-6333.

1990 Yamaha 175DT good cond $1100. 252-6708.

1983 Yamaha Maxim 750 w/two helmets and bike
cover, must see to appreciate, $2500. 260-9982.




Qtrs 1134B Clayton, Sat, 9am - 2pm.

Qtrs 313 Morgan Ave, Sat 8am - noon, 2 houses.

Qtrs 4B Clayton, Sat, 8am - noon, toys playpen,
baby items, household, tires and clothes.

Qtrs 366B Clayton, Sat, 8am-noon multi family,
clothes, toys, shoes, misc.

Qtrs 383, Clayton, Sat, multi-family.

Qtrs 476A Clayton, Sat, 8am - noon, lawnmower,
clothes, blinds, TVs, CDs, bike, toys.

Qtrs 685A Clayton, Sat, 7 - 11am, PCS move,
furniture, clothes, rugs, ceramics, crafts, no early
birds.

Qtrs 935A Clayton, Sat, 8am - noon.

Qtrs 1057B Clayton, Sat, 8am, furniture, baby
items, clothes, shoes, toys, kitchen items.

Qtrs 2386B Cocoli, Sat, 8am - noon, 2 families,
bikes, shelves, clothes, toys, misc, no early sales.

Qtrs 2530A/B/C/D Cocoli, Sat, 7am - noon, men's
and women's clothes, household, car stereo speaker
box, 19-in color TV, no early birds.

Qtrs 54A Albrook, Sat, 8am - until, rugs, coffee
table, BBQ, 10 sp bike, clothes, shoes, baby items,
cradle and more.

Qtrs 273A Albrook, Sat, 7am-noon.

Qtrs 84B Howard, Sat, 8am - noon, furniture, dish-
washer, clothes.

Qtrs 1575B Howard, Sat, 7 am, living room furni-
ture, BDUs, TV, clothes, baby swing, blues and
boots.

Qtrs 592B Howard, Sat, 7am - noon.

Qtrs 1515B Howard, Sat, multi family.

Qtrs 1527C Howard Gateway, Sat, clothes, books,
stereo equipment, household items and more.

Qtrs 1550A Howard, Sat, 8am - noon.

Qtrs 1552D Howard, Sat, 7:30 - 11:30am, No early
sales, toys clothes, tires, bikes.

Qtrs 1561A Howard, Sat, 8am - noon.

Qtrs 818B Farfan, Sat, 8am - until, tires, rims, furni-
ture, curtains, clothes.

Qtrs 823A Farfan, Sat, 8am - noon, multi family.

Qtrs 837A Farfan, Sat, 8am - noon, 3 families,
maternity, baby items, misc.

Qtrs 308B Kobbe, Sat, 8am - 2pm, baby items, bike,
clothes, toys, table.

Qtrs 309B Kobbe, Sat, 7am-? Baby items, stereo,
camera. No early birds.

Qtrs 3024 Marine Barracks, Sat, 7-11am, multi-
family, misc items. No early birds.

Qtrs 403A Kobbe, Sat, 8am - 1pm.

Qtrs 450 Kobbe, Sat, 8am - noon, No early birds,
clothes, dishes, and more.

Qtrs 261B Corozal (commissary area), Sat.


j ANIMALS
El AUTOMOBILES
0 AVAILABLE
D BOATS & CAME
0 FOUND
[ ELECTRONICS
OE HOUSEHOLD
O LOST
El MISCELLANEOUS
I- MOTORCYCLES
C PATIO SALES
0 WANTED

SPONSOR'S NAME
ORG __


Qtrs 6580A Corozal, Sat.

Qtrs 2028B Curundu, Sat, 7am - noon, No early
birds, household, clothes, more.

Qtrs 2302 Curundu, Sat, 8am-noon.

Qtrs 131A Espinar, Sat and Sun, 9am both days.

Qtrs 157 Gamboa, Sat, 7am - 4 pm, tires, TV, misc.
items.

Qtrs 580B Balboa Heights, Sat and Sun, S8am, Living
room and dining room sets, TVs, wedding dresses.

Qtrs 2350 Balboa, Sat, 7-11am, clothes, household
goods, misc.

Qtrs 2300A Balboa, Sat, 7-10am.

Qtrs 213B Ancon, Sat, 8am - noon.

Qtrs 925 La Boca, Sat, 7am - noon, clothes and
kitchen articles, crystal.

Qtrs 430A Kobbe, Sat, 7-11am, furniture, clothes,
toys, misc

Qtkr 220A Ancon, Sat.

Qtrs 927 La Boca, Sat, 7am - 1pm, household,
clothes, hardware items.

Qtrs 953B La Boca, Sat, 8am - 1pm.

Qtrs 972B La Boca, Sat, 7am-noon, tables, sewing
machine, misc.




Tap shoes ladies, sz 6 - 6 1/2 and 8 - 8 1/2,252-1257.

Mature couple wishes to housesit in Jan - Feb. 286-
6480.

Purebred male bassett hound to breed with female
same. 286-6489.

Small and medium pet carrier. 287-4771.

To meet other mothers of twins or more to form
support group; expectant moms welcome. 287-
3824.

Eng-spk maid M - Sat 30 to 45 years old clean,
references, live-in negotiable, $90. 289-4534.

Like to trade low mile exc. cond. VW Golf for 8
cylinder car or truck of equal value, $4000 to
$5,000. 260-5389.

A clown for birthday party, call today. 287-4032.

Full time, live-in bilingual maid/cook, no children.
282-4288.

Babysitter in Curundu for occasional evenings.
286-6333

Seamstress w/references. 286-6333.

Crib in good condition. 252-2900.

Span-spk live-in main, reliable, mature, general
housework, cook, iron, babysit, references a must,
$120. 286-3792.

Laser disks, Santana, Rush, M.Rush, BOC, UFO,
Priest, Maiden, Leppard, Trower, P. Green, ZZ Top.
252-2566.

Bunk beds w/matress and one single mattress size.
287-3827.

Coffee and tea service set silver only. 252-6989.

Extra large dog kennel in good condition. 287-4935.

Upright piano in very good condition for reasonable
price. 286-3373.

Carpets w/pads 12x15 and 9x12. 260-7779.

U2 or Doors tapes. 287-4733.


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B12


Tropic Times
Nov. 13, 1992


ACROSS
- "- My Way"
6 Canter and
trot
11 Punctuation
marks
16 Spanish-
speaking
district
17 Range of
activity
18 Cylindrical
and tapered
20 "Norma"
composer
21 Instrument
for Casals
22 Largest living
bird
24 Auk genus
25 Handled
27 Small.
sudden
explosions
29 Fencing
sword
30 - polloi
31 Down to the
- (to the
very end)
32 Start of the
play
33 Greek letter
34 Japanese
aborigine
36 River
sediment
37 Sings like
Bing
39 Boxer and
caliph
40 " - show


you" 72 Biblical name
42 Meal or work 73 Greek
lead-in physician
43 "...thou hast 74 Intoxicating
a name that plant juice
thou -" 75 Congrega-
(Rev. 3.1) tion's head
45 Narrow slat 78 Young male
46 Herd horses
47 The south of 79 Reduce lens
France aperture
48 John Jacob 83 River islands
and Mary 84 Degrees in
51 Impure type development
of sodium 86 "Lady Be -"
carbonate (old movie)
52 Railroad 87 Wild ox
handcars 88 Altar phrase
56 Schemes 89 Summer
57 Owlish refreshers
sounds 90 Ram down
58 Dove 91 High, craggy
shelters hill
59 Tourist's 92 Palm leaf
need used in
60 Confessed to thatching
a crime 94 Anagram for
61 Acts servilely time
62 Philippine 95 Most arid
Moslems 97 Lean-to
63 Frog genus 98 Etch designs
64 Chang's on
brother 100 City on the
65 Rescued Po
66 Pan or break 102 Legal
off evictions
67 Aged beer 104 Stupid or silly
68 Night's fellow
pause on a 105 Related on
journey mom's side
70 Appraised 106 Opens
71 Branching 107 Steno groups


108 Stormed
109 Italian epic
poet
DOWN
1 Chafing
2 Band on a
shield
3 Head of
Benjamin's
clan
4 Ship of 1492
5 Share
expenses
6 Recreation
vehicle
7 Sharp
mountain
crest
8 Gull or leg
follower
9 Sesame
10 Regulating
valve
11 Drop by
12 Hardy
heroine
13 Table scrap
14 Pierre's
father
15 Fleck
16 Wisconsin
city
19 Successful
plant
relocation
20 Believer in a
modern
religion
23 Robbery
26 Rural
structure
28 Indian


[super


DENNIS THE MENACE


THATT WAS A GREAT SUNSET. TANKS
FOR LETTING MESTAYAWAKE LONG
ENOLUCG TO SEE IT. '


YOU
Dr04'i

845AiNGOP
PHuMBLE
6FEF AND
NEVER


32 Betel palm lead-in
35 Dark 69 Dogs and
Chinese tea cats, often
36 Fast planes 70 Chest
37 Plant shoots sounds
38 Base- 71 Cross
stealing 73 Aggressive
maneuvers person
39 Tel - 74 Stays away
41 Antony's loan from home all
request? night
42 Conspiracies 75 American
44 Caesar's patriot/author
fatal date 76 Giving
46 Fern leaf assistance
47 Bus or boat 77 Tempbrary
lead-in substitute
48 Church parts 78 Moslem
49 Point of view magistrate
50 Graceful 79 "- Like It
dance Hot"
51 London 80 In constant
fortress motion
52 Pierced with 81 Suitors
horns 82 Asiatic plants
53 Adult insect 85 Circus
stage workers
54 Bowling 86 Increased
alleys 90 Hackneyed
55 Scanty 93 River in Italy
57 Sheltered 94 - Knievel
anchorage 95 Rope or line
58 Gathering of lead-in
witches 96 Salad fish
61 Small 97 Fr. holy
souvenirs women
62 Apportions 99 - Annie, of
63 Spanish "Oklahoma!"
arbor 101 Merkel of
65 Choir plum movies
66 Old mariners 103 Childless:
67 Light or post plural abbr.


BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker

ALL THE B 0 5ACK ANP I KNOW BUT AT THIS POINT
HOME THINK I EVERYONE !AY5 I I'P BE WILLING TO
HAVE ITMAPE! THE P06 15 MAW9 TURN THE JOB
BEST FRIEND OVERTOA CAT

a




9-q o


HAGAR the Horrible By DikBrowne


BMOM ALr AYG oog5 0andSnff S &mit- By Fred La 6s-
SvvN wV ,^ w //a 6Hr ?AV1 6/ A yo4YO &AVM A J A












Barney Google and Snuffy Smith � By Fred LassweU




Full Text

PAGE 1

Gift of the Panama Canal Museum Tropic Times Vol. V. No. 45 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, Nov. 13, 1992 Weekend restriction starts Military honors U.S. veterans Panama bans guns, liquor FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The COROZAL (Tropic Times) -Approximately 100 consumption of alcoholic beverages by Departpeople braved the rain to observe the Veterans Day ment of Defense personnel must be confined to program at Corozal American Cemetery, according to U.S. installations from noon Saturday until noon U.S. Southern Command officials. Monday during a referendum on constitutional In addition to honoring America's veterans, Wednesreforms. Personnel in posession of alcoholic bevday's ceremony at Corozal also honored the veterans erages outside DoD installations, to include beaches, and fallen of the United States strongest ally during both the islands and other public areas are subject to Word t U ceremony began with thejoint criminal prosecution under Panamanian Wnsa'sCralweeoybeasih.h on The Panamanian National Police ~aw s mntr color guard, made up of members of the Army, Air the closure of all discoteques, bars and other Force, Navy, Marine Corps and Balboa High School drinking establishments during this time and will ROTC, posting the colors. ensure compliance with these prohibitions, said The 79th Army Band, led by CW3 Jeanne Pace, U.S. Army South officials. Additionally, the carplayed the national anthems of Panama, the United trying of firearms, including those with current States and the United Kingdom. The band also provided permits, is prohibited during this period. Only the buglers to play Taps. Panamanian government officials are allowed to The 1st Royal Highland Fuselears, British Forces, carry firearms during the 48 hours. All other Belize, also provided a bugler as well as a bagpiper for permits are temporarily suspended. These measthe ceremony. The Honorable David Beall, deputy urts apl t oarl s. pene. Chief of mission, American Embassy delivered the ures apply to all U.S. personnel. Presidential Proclamation and Brig. Gen. David A. The deputy commander of ground forces, Swyr24hW gcmadrdierdheVUSARSO, said servicemembers should respect Sawyer, 24th Wing commander, delivered the Veithe host nation at all times, but courtesy is even eran's Day address. more important during the referendum vote. H. E. Thomas H. Malcomson, ambassador to the United Kingdom delivered a Veterans Day prayer along with representatives from the Veterans of Foreign Wars, U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Deborah E. Wia Aviation soldier dies, the American Legion, the Disabled American Veterans Spec. Marc Prevost, 79th Army Band, plays Taps at and the Legion of Honor. the end of the Veterans Day ceremony. fals from roof The U.S. Marine Corps Security Force Company FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -A solfiring detail were also part of this year's ceremony. unnoticed. Today's free world stands as testimony to dierassigned to the 228th Aviation Battalion died The Chairman ofthe Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Colin your commitment to independence and democracy. from a fall from the third story of his barracks L. Powell also joined the celebration through his Veter"Your diligence and devotion have safeguarded this Nov. 6. ans Day message. nation through war and in peace. We remember you, Pvt. 2 Scott Allen Veith, an avionic flight "We, as a people, have set aside today as a national and we thank you."General Powell concluded his messystems repairer with Company E, in Corozal, day ofrecognition and special tribute to all veterans -sage on behalf of the members of the Joint Chiefs of reportedly locked himself out ofhis room, went to past and present -for their dedication, sacrifice and Staff, "I salute all veterans who have served this great another soldier's room, stepped out on the roof to exceptional service to their country. nation. I am particularly proud of our Armed Forces gain access through his window and slipped. "We commemorate this legacy of strength, compastoday -of the spirit and fortitude, of the strength and According to Gorgas Army Community Hossion and achievement as displayed by America's veterdiscipline, of the men and women who dedicate thempital officials, the Edwardsville, Ill., native sufans. You have created and upheld a tradition of excelselves each day to the preservation of security and feared severe head injuries and later died when lence. Your selfless devotion to service has not gone freedom." surgeons were unable to revive him. The official cause of death is listed as "cerebral contusion and secondary brain death."I~ T Ofical e ta eth had been dikng Clayton salutes military families with friends before he slipped off the roof. Army officials notified Richard and Margaret FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -A special twoNov. 29. Veith, also of Edwardsville, of their son's death. week salute to military families begins Monday with a Outdoor Recreation: River rafting in Costa Rica, Veith had been with his unithis first assignvariety ofprograms, parties and special events, accordNov. 27-30. ment -only eight days. ing to the Directorate of Community Activities. The Fort Davis Community Club will host aThanksThe following is a list of events: giving brunch, 10:30 a.m. -2 p.m., Nov. 26. Children attending the Atlantic Child Development A special buffet will be held at Club Amador, 4 -7 Gas station mishap Service Monday will create their family tree. p.m., Nov. 26. fire injures one worker School age children will work on special crafts for Valent Recreation Center will host Thanksgiving theirparents Monday at Building 156 on Fort Clayton. Day activities like a family movie marathon, chess and CURUNDU (USA RSO PAO) -A gasoline A puppet show about families will be held Wednespool tournaments, refreshments and a rock and roll explosion in a tank at the Curundu Gas Station day, 3 p.m., in Building 39, Fort Clayton. Parents are concert. injured one contract worker Tuesday. invited. There will be a pottery demonstration, Nov. 28, 10 Louis Neivez, alaborer with the Kunkel Wiese The CDS Part-day Program, Building 156, Fort a.m. -noon, at the Clayton Arts & Crafts Center. There Contracting Company, suffered second degree Clayton, will feature a visitation day Nov. 20 with will also be a week-long military art exhibit at Valent. burns on both arms. A fellow worker took him to topics like families, home environment and favorite In addition to the various activities, the DCA anSante Fe hospital before paramedics could arrive. foods. nounces many discounts in celebration of military families. Workers have been replacing the gas tanks at The topic will be families, home environment and Free ice cream and cake for children 12 years and the station since September. The explosion was favorite foods. under at the Fort Clayton Noncommissioned Officers' sparked by a metal reinforcement bar on an old Turbo Turkey International, a parent and child Club family night or the Fort Davis Community Club tank that came loose and struck another. The spark competition sponsored by Youth Services on Fort Claydinner, Nov. 25. lit fumes from pocket of gasoline inside the tank. ton, 11 a.m., Nov. 21, at Youth Services playground Free bowling, with shoes, for children 12 years and Only Nievez was in the area of the fire, said Col. area. under accompanied by parent, Fort Clayton Bowling Jeffrey Petrucci, U.S. Army Garrison commander. Army Community Service and USARSO will disCenter, Nov. 26. Nievez and the other contract workers were not tribute Thanksgiving food baskets Thursday. Free admission at the Fort Clayton, Amador, Fort working on the tank when it flashed, said Jimmy Recreation Centers will offer families special tours Espinar and Fort Davis pools and Shimmey Beach, Wiese, owner and supervisor of the company. to enjoy local sites. Nov. 27. Because the project involved gasoline, the PanValent Recreation Center: Coronado Beach, Nov. Halfprice green fees for families at theAmadorGolf ama Canal Commission Fire Department was on 22; the Chiriqui highlands, Nov. 26-29; Contadora Course, Nov. 27. stand-by at Corozol. They responded to the fire Island, Nov. 28-29. Free bowling, with shoes, for children 12 years and and extinguished it quickly, Petrucci said. Sundial Center: Portobelo and Isla Grande, Nov. 28. under accompanied by parent, Curundu Bowling CenOcean Breeze Center: Historical and shopping tour, ter, Nov. 27. Southern Command Network Panama military community *Gay sailor back in Navy, page 5. unleashes Diamond FM format members celebrate special life +Smokeout, page 7. change. events. *Homecoming, page 11.

PAGE 2

Tropic Times Nov. 13, 1992 'Music ambassadors' tour El Salvador tional American march music, Latin and tion and the embassy's Marine Ball held Latin America," said Sgt. Henry Thomas by Sgt. Joseph J. Johnson contemporary selections. Nov. 6. III, tuba player and bass guitarist. USARSO Public Affairs Office The audience, made up mostly of Elbow is especially proud the band "Hopefully we can strengthen the ties SAN SALVADOR, EL SALVADOR U.S. citizens living in El Salvador, will play at the Permanent Festival of the between El Salvador and the United States, -Hundreds waved miniature American waved their fingers like batons, tapped Arts in the town of Suchitoto, just south promote democracy and basically show flags and watched red, white and blue theirfeettothe beatand dancedthe night of San Salvador. the people that the Army is not just a balloons float around the room while away. "Suchitoto is an area where there was military force," said band memeber SFC listening to Salvadoran and American During their nine-day tour, the band heavy fighting during the war. Before William Dorsey. commentators report the results of the also played for Salvadorans in the U.S. the war the population was around 25,000, "This will be like the icing on the 1992 U.S. presidential election on telrviPavilion at the International Trade Show now it is about 5,000," Elbow said. cake, because I've already had my main sion sets throughout the hall. in San Salvador Nov. 4. Despite the years of war, the town's course in the two years that I've been (in And the band played on. The annual show recently resumed people put on a cultural festival each Panama). I've enjoyed every type of Thirty-two members of U.S. Army after a 12-year civil war that ended in month. Some festivals feature a single culture that Latin America has to offer," South's 79th Army Band opened their January with the signing of a peace acartist. said Dorsey who retires in December nine-day visit here at an election night cord between the government and "The area still has a high concentraafter 23 years in Army bands. concert hosted by the U.S. Embassy in theF.M.L.N., a coalition of five groups tion of F.M.L.N. soldiers in the process "I hope (these concerts) bring away the Hotel El Salvador ballroom. fighting against the Salvadoran military. of being demobilized," said Elbow. pride in the U.S. Pride that I am part of Convention-like festivities are spon"I've been impressed with the band In order for the band to be allowed in the new society for El Salvador," said sored world-wide by U.S. embassies in and its virtuosity," said Susan Elbow, the area, F.M.L.N. leaders had to be saxophonist SSgt. Gary Meeks. "Ten presidential election years to share the cultural affairs officer. "This has been a informed of the visit by United Nation years from now I can look back and say American democratic process with the great show of support for the bigger peace observers. Members of the F.ML.N. I was there within the first year of the host countries, said Sonja Sweek, press mission of the embassy." are expected to attend the concert at the peace accords and now it's a full demoattache at the embassy and event orElbow originally requested the band outdoortheater. cratic country and I helped promote that," gnizer. inthe spring to play atthetrade show, but "We are the music embassadors for he said. Three specialty bands entertained the was pleasantly surprised when the band's the United States of America Army for The band was scheduled to return to crowd of more than 1,000 with tradivisit coincided with the presidential electhis part of the world -Central and Panama on Veterans Day. Engineers using skills at home by ILt. Dennis W. Pinckard 536th Engineer Battalion, Combat (Heavy) FORT KOBBE (USARSO PAO) -Soldiers in 1st Platoon, Bravo Company, 536th Engineer Combat Battalion are help4 .ing their unit by rebuilding the offices and storage areas of their maintenance section. Originally, 'there was one large area where the motor sergeant, the shop foreman, the maintenance clerks and section supervisors worked together. The building is being renovated to provide separate offices, a break area, aparts storage room and a welding shop. "Now each of my leaders in the maintenance platoon have their own workspace to better organize their work," said 1Lt. Michael Corson, Company B's motor officer. When the platoon started construction almost a year ago, they discovered a foot of unused space between the block exterior wall and the interior sheathing. "By stripping the sheathing out, we got back almost 90 sqare feet of additional space," said SSgt. Joe Constante, a squad leader in 1st platoon. The soldiers are using the skills they normally practice U.S. Army photo by Spec, Robn A, Mantikoski throughout Central and South America to provide a better Brig. Gen. James L. Wilson, U.S. Army South deputy commanding general, tells Fort Clayton work enviroment for the maintenance section. scouts how important soldiers are to defending the Constitution. The scouts, from Boy Scout By working onthis project company officials say the comTroop 128, toured USARSO headquarters to help them earn their Citizenship in the Nation merit pany profits threefold. Theplatoon gets construction training badge.for the soldiers, management training for the leaders and a new badge workplace for the maintenance section. Officials: nicotine addictive as heroin HOWARD AFB (24TH WG/PA) -within 10 seconds after a puff from a and becomes addicted. Without this en"The average smoker uses 10-30 cigaThat first cigarette may give some people cigarette," Yamane said. "Nicotine is couragement, few people will want to inrettes each day. Hiding behind every a scorching sensation down the throat, or physically addicting, like heroin, cocaine, hale more than a couple puffs of this cigarette was a specific reason that led even been accompanied by a hacking and alcohol. Like these other drugs, nicoirritating soot. the smoker to smoke. cough from an angry pair of lungs. tine, when the supply is cut, will leave "For many, smoking is a crutch that "Some cigarettes are smoked to stave But, despite warning signals from their fitful and uncomfortable withdrawal sympgives support for the rough times in the off the jitters from withdrawal. Others bodies, these people embrace the habit toms. day," he said. "When work or family life are smoked because of specific social or and start a life-long partnership with "The craving for nicotine may boils with stress, the ritual of lighting and work settings. Still others are smoked out tobacco, according to Maj. (Dr.) Grover particularly strong aftersevinhaling a cigarette is a cooling of automatic and subconscious habit K. Yamane, a Howard AFB anit-smokeral hours of abstinence, such AMERICAN influence. Smoking, like a hobby, not to smooth over any particular physiing program officer. as in the morning and at the WCANCER helps relieve frustration. Uncal or emotional needs." "Cigarette smoke is a potent irritant, end of the work day," SOCIETY' like most pastEach smoker is enslaved by a differas acrimonious as the pollution from any he said. "For light GREAT41LAIER CA N times, howent set of factors, Yamane said. industrial furnace," he said. "There are smokers, the withever, smoking "Only when they understand their own many powerful factors (some not so obdrawal may be Is in the end, weak spots and why they surrender to the vious) that trick people into this slow, mild. Heavier destructive and cigarette, can smokers plan individual pitiful self-destruction. To have the best s m o k e r s punishing on battle strategies. They can change their opportunity to quit permanently, the may need i' the body." .routine at work or home, and avoid these smoker must understand why he chooses help from Smoking is a physical pitfalls. to smoke, and why he retains this unnicotine gum to avoid giving in. But, habit, Yamane explained. It takes persis"Smoking is a complex behavior, healthy relationship." nicotine addiction is not the only story." tence and desire to start smoking. But, launched for complex reasons. Knowing Only then can the smoker plan the There are also strong psychological once started, smoking becomes an autoyour own weaknesses is yourbest source most effective way to quit, he sal. forces that encourage smoking. matic behavior. Many smokers will light of strength, and your best first step "Nicotine dependence might he the "Many young people start the habit up, like pre-set machines, under certain towards kicking the habit," he said. most obvious factor that promotes smokbecause of peer pressure. Under the conditions. Meals, driving, or watching For more information on the smoking ing. This chemical is absorbed quickly strain to fit in with friends, the victim aTVprogram,forexample, canbetheon habit, contact the 24th Medical Group by the lungs, and can affect the brain caves in, endures the scalding smoke, signal. llealthPromotion Program at284-3014.

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Tropic Times Nov. 13, 19923 Radio format changing Southern Command Network evenings, he said. lters programming and schedule Tice also said the adult contemporary be more aga aggressive than many stations in the states play. to meet survey's demands "When we say adult contemporary, we don't mean Peabo Bryson and Barbara Streisand all the FORT CLAYTON -Southern Command Nettime -although we may play them. We're talking work radio gets a new name and a new sound Monday AC with an edge," Tice said. This includes groups with the birth of the Diamond FM. like Bryan Adams, Billy Ocean, John Mellencamp, SCN officials changed the format of the radio Genesis, Bobby Brown and Annie Lennox. station to appeal to more listeners after completing a For those who want heavier sounds, Classic Rock listener survey last year, said Capt. Dennis E. Tice, with Laurie Allen willplay from 6-7 p.m. weekdays, deputy commander and radio program director for Don Tracy and LaRita Shelby will have back-to-back SCN. urban contemporary hours. "We've instituted some of the music changes -The urban contemporary shows start at 7 and 8 we've lightened up quite a bit," he said. "We're now p.m., the local rock block will play from 9-11 p.m. playing more hits and solid gold." and UNISTAR adult rock will take overfrom 11-p.m. Under the new format, the station will play more to 5 a.m. weeknights. adult contemporary, oldies and Top 40 music during News will continue to be carried on the hour prime listening hours. and movie schedules will be announced every two The survey was conducted by Professional Market hours. Group in Chicago, Ill., and showed that the current "We're trying to play more music, while staying programming wasn't reaching as large an audience faithful to providing command information," Tice as SCN officials wanted, Tice said. said. "CI doesn't go anywhere unless people are "We want to connect with the largest audience listening. We want to hook them." possible," he said. Tice also said they will be having more listener The emphasis will be on adult contemporary durinteraction, as was seen recently when the station U.S.Amy phow by sg. Jam.Voosm ing the day, with oldies and country mixed in, but the conducted a phone survey to decide if the comedy Air Force SSgt. Randy Lutke, a Southern Command locally produced Rock Block (Van Halen, ZZ Top, skit Chicken Man should remain on the air. Network broadcaster, does a little clowning during his etc.) and Armed Forces Radio and Television urban There will also be more call-in request shows for Veterans Day show Wednesday. contemporary shows will continue to play during the rock, country and solid gold fans, Tice said. Signal soldiers keep communications on-line by Spec. E.J. Hersom USARSO Public Affairs Office EMPIRE RANGE, PANAMA -Soldiers of the 154th Signal Battalion U.S. Army South's version of Ma Bellprepared to reach out and touch people during a week-long training exercise here in October. The exercise gave those soldiers of thean opportunityto test theircommunications equipment for their upcoming deployments throughout Central and South America, said PFC Carl Cochrane, a Company B multichannel communications system operator. Cochrane and his team set up relay stations on hilltops allowing radio operators to communicate with each other over long distances. "We are basically the middleman," Cochrane said. Cochrane has worked on hilltops from Guyana to Guatemala, where he worked with their soldiers providing communications for engineers during Fuertas Caminos exercises, a catch-all title for joint U.S. -host nation exercises to reU.S. Army photos by Spe E.J. Hrsom build underdeveloped countries' roads Soldiers from the General Purpose platoon, Company B, take down their equipment. and bridges. The Guatemalan soldiers envied the With the satellite, the team can talk dard of living, Cochrane said. communications," Mills said. Units can American soldiers, Cochrane said. "They and exchange typed or facsimile infor"They have their natural resources, also connect telephone lines through the thought we had better uniforms. They nation with others anywhere in the world, but don't have the technology to strengthen multichannel vans into a switchboard kept wanting to trade hats and boots. Jackson said. the country." thatenables them to talk with other units. They thought our MRE (meals ready to It makes Corsetti angry when someCochrane provided communications Without the vans the telephones system eat) food was better than their cooking." one accuses him of sitting in an airbetween a base camp and medical teams can't operate, Mills said. Spec. Dominic Corsetti of Company conditioned box all day. "We are out-oftravelling throughout Guyana. Without Blas has worked in the U.S. Embassy A operates a tactical satellite system, country six to eight months out of ayear, communication between them, USARSO in San Salvador as part of the Military which emits microwaves. "It can cook a but I laugh at them once in a while would have to limit or cancel the exerGroup El Salvador. Military Gropus are hot dog, if you hang it there long enough," because I'm cozy and they're not," he cise because emergency help would be cells of military service members ashe said. Not that he ever tried it, but he said. unreachable if someone got hurt. signed to each embassy. does say his cooking skills aren't bad. Cozy is something Cochrane was not Sgt. Paul Mills and Sgt. Andrew Blas, Blas trained there for six months on Corsetti works with Spec. Charlie during a medical readiness exercise in multichannel radio operators of Comseveral types of communications equipJackson and theirteam chief, Sgt. Ernest Guyana. MEDRETEs provide medical pany A, send the radio messages that ment. With them, the group covered an O'Conner. and dental aid to the citizens of remote, Cochrane relays. entire country, he said. "We can get this baby working in 30 impoverished areas in South andCentral Mills, Blas and their teammates take "Out here in the field everything is minutes as long as Murphy's Law doesn't America. turns working in a small, cramped box separated -satellites, multichannels; kick us in the teeth," Corsetti said, "When I was in Guyana, we got to brimming with communication equipeverything,"Blas said. "In El Salvador it "It really cheeses on (impresses) the combathe in brown water. It wasn't water you ment on the back of a high mobility was just four people. A lieutenant in manders when they see it go up that could drink," he said Guyana is an undermultipurpose wheeled vehicle. charge and four people doing everyfast." developed country that has a low stan"Our main purpose is radio-to-radio thing."

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Nov.13,1992 Hemisphere Press caught between rebels, government LIMA, Peru (AP) -Journalists are caughtin criticized. "There are so many ways of putting the crossfire between Maoist rebels and the the pressure on. The more stupid way is to close military-backed government of President Aldown publications. One of the other ways is to berto Fujimori. give increasing judicial problems to publicaSome say the president uses thejudiciary to tions," Zileri said. pressure reporters. Since the Shining Path insurgency began in On the other hand, news accounts of Shining 1980, more than 30 journalists have been Path rebel chief Abimael Guzman's capture killed. Most worked in outlying provinces. At praised the police and strongly attacked Guzman, least half died at the hands of paramilitary angering his followers and raising the possibilforces. ity of stepped up rebel attacks on the press. When Guzman was presented to the press "There is definitely a campaign under way after his September capture, Peruvian reporters by both sides, the Shining Path and the governshouted him down, sang the national hymn, ment," said analyst Fernando Rospigliosi of demanded he answer for Shining Path viothe Institute for Peruvian Studies. "The idea is lence. That drew a harsh response from the to restrict the press' capacity to inform." rebels. Police arrested two journalists specializing "Choose your trench," read one pamphlet. inthe Shining PathinAugustandathirdleft for "And the war is to the death." Therebels have the United States to escape government harasszeroed in so far on Peruvian reporters rather ment and rebel death threats. than foreign correspondents. In addition, one journalist accused of rebel Rebels threatened journalists in Lima in ties has been missing for three months. flyers and graffiti. A car bomb destroyed a TV The government has shownits tolerance for station in June, killing a producer and two criticism to be thin. guards. In one example, a judge fined Enrique ZilThe heat began building up after Fujimori eri, the director of Peru's leading news magazine, closed Congress on April 5 and imposed oneCaretas, $7,500 for defaming a presidential man rule. adviser accused of drug-trafficking ties. Newspapers and broadcasters were censored. The August finding was announced just Magazines were closed briefly. after Caretas published a cover depicting Security forces held Gustavo Gorriti, author When Shining Path guerrilla leader Abimael Guzman was preFujimori's head hovering overatoilet, withthe of a book on the Shining Path, for three days in scented to the press in September, Peruvian reporters demanded h caption, "Flush." Zileri called the timing "an April and demanded access codes to his perser to thnin ptebe. Tersvangert ers a h extraordinary coincidence." sonal computer. answer for Shining Path violence. This angered his followers and Hetermedtheruling awarning that thegovGorriti took his family to Washington in the rebels have threatened journalists in Lima in flyers and graffiti. ernment would crack down on critics and said July, saying he feared the government would So far the rebels have targeted only Peruvian reporters rather than the judge owed her position to the adviser he keep him from finishing a second book. foreign correspondents. RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil (AP) -An immediately, the independent radio Jorbravareservation. Indian tribe in northern Brazil agreed to nal do Brasil reported. The current dispute began nine days free 81 hostages after the government Until the settlers are evacuated, the ago when three hired gunmen murpromised to remove a squatters' village Indians will keep eight buses they seized, dered a Guajajara chief's son. from their Amazonian reserve, news the radio said. The next day, scores oflndians with a "1 reports said Tuesday. The hostages, many suffering from shotguns, rifles andpistols stopped the The TV Globo network said the acheat and dehydration, have been held eight buses and five passenger vehicles cord was negotiated between Guajajara since Nov. 2 along a jungle highway on a highway near the reservation's h o stag e s tribal leaders and Justice Minister Mauabout 1,400 miles northwest of Rio in outskirts, taking about 150 people ricio Correa, who announced it after three Maranhao state. hostage. Reports conflicted as to the hours of talks. The Guajajara have long demanded total number taken. afte r ta lks Several Guajajara chiefs signed a docuthat the government remove some 6,000 The tribe later released 39 children, ment with Correa and Sydney Possuelo, residents from Sao Pedro dos Cacetes, a 10 women and three men who had president ofthe National Indian Foundavillage illegally settled 50 years ago in medical problems. Twelve other hostion, agreeing to release the hostages the middle of their 350,000-acre Canatages escaped Sunday night. Bombexplodesin Panama Police arrest Escobar's lawyers PANAMA CITY, Panama (Reuters) -A bomb tore through a parking lot at Panama's attorney BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) -Police operating under York for lying to federal law officers. U.S. officials general's office Friday, injuring six security offia state of emergency have arrested Pablo Escobar's accuse him of ordering the 1989 bombing of a Colomcials, police said. lawyers, who they say were using a mobile phone bian airliner in which 107 people were killed. The explosion, which hit at about 8:40 a.m., to keep in touch with the fugitive cocaine kingpin. The cartel has retaliated for Brances Munoz' death toppled a carport separating the attorney general's Escobar's aunt and cousin and the brother of one of by ordering a campaign of police assassinations that has office from another federal justice building. his top hired guns also were arrested Monday in a sweep left 24 officers dead since Oct. 28. Six officers were NationalPolice ChiefOswaldo Fernandez said in Medellin, police said. wounded on Tuesday. at least six security guards were hospitalized after The government announced the state of emergency The country has also been plagued by guerrilla the attack, which shattered windows and sent hunSunday in response to mounting attacks by leftist guerviolence. dreds of curious Panamanians into the streets. rillas and drug terrorists. Over the weekend, leftist rebels killed 26 police No group had claimed responsibility for the The crackdown includes stiff restrictions on journalofficers in an attack on a remote southern outpost and bombing. ists. detonated some 30 bombs across the country, wounding Police in Medellin said lawyers Santiago Uribe and about 60 people. Peruvians rescue Cubans Feisal Humberto Buitrago were in possession of an Aspart ofthegovernmentcrackdown,CommunicaPANAMA CITY, Panama (Reuters) -Thirtyunlicensed radio telephone that had been used to comtions Minister William Jaramillo announced Tuesday five Cubans who apparently took over a lobster municate with Escobar. that the press would no longer be able to publish stateboat to flee the communist-ruled island were resThe drug boss and nine associates escaped from a ments from or interviews with guerrillas or drug trafcued at sea and brought to Panama, authorities luxury prison near Medellin on July 22. fickers. said Saturday. Escobar's aunt, Alba Gaviria, and his cousin, Leonor Violators face fines of up to $85,000 or, for radio and APeruvian-registered ship rescued the Cubans Gaviria, were charged with paying for the telephone, television stations, up to six months' suspension. late Friday after the boat's captain and 34 passenAttorney General Gustavo de Greiff said. Another stiff new measure announced Tuesday regers plotted to tie up four crew members and take Police also captured alleged drug terrorist Romel quires state officials who have contact with guerrillas or the boat to Miami, said Antonio Dominguez, PanMunoz Mosquera and another man in a car full of drug traffickers to report the meetings to authorities or ama's immigration director. dynamite. face 30-day suspensions or firing. All 39 Cubans were brought to Cristobal where Munoz Mosquera is the brother of Brances Munoz In Washington on Tuesday, the Organization of they were interviewed and medically examined. Mosquera, Escobar's security chief, who was killed last American States pledged its "solidarity and full supDominguez said the four crew members have month in a shoot-out with police, and of Dandenis port" to President Cesar Gaviria's crackdown. asked to be returned to Cuba while the others have Munoz Mosquera, formerly a leading Medellin cartel The OAS said in a statement that Gaviria's declararequested asylum in the United States. assassin. tion of a state of emergency was in response to "a sad Dandenis Munoz is serving a 7-year sentence in New and very difficult situation."

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Tropic Times Military News 5 U.S. medical unit Yugoslav-bound WIESBADEN, Germany (AP) -A U.S. Army mobile hospital was loaded up Nov. 6 for a train trip to Croatia, and 330 American soldiers prepared to join U.N. peacekeeping forces in the former Yugoslavia. The 212th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital will provide medical care for U.N. peacekeepers who are maintaining a truce that ended six months of ethnic fighting following Croatia's secession last year. The Americans will not serve in neighboring Bosnia-Herzegovina, which has been wracked by ethnic war since it left the Yugoslav federation early this year. The mobile hospital's medical equipment and supplies were loaded onto train cars at Wiesbaden Air Base, 25 miles west of Frankfurt. "It was enough to fill 71 containers," said Connie Sommer, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Army's V Corps. The shipment also included 51 trucks and other vehicles, she said. Two trainloads of equipment had departed byFriday and a third was to leave for Zagreb, Croatia's capital, over the weekend, she said. The unit's 300 personnel are to begin flying to Zagreb on Tuesday. It is the first Army unit to join the U.N. peacekeeping operation, which has about 15,000 soldiers in former Yugoslav republics. Military officials have named the U.S. mission APLasPhotw Operation Provide Promise. The troops are expected to Two Muslim leaders pray at a grave in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina. An Army MASH unit is providing remain in Croatia about six months. medical support for neighboring Croatia, but are not expected to enter war-torn Sarajevo. Pentagon reinstates gay sailor AF navigation SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) -Sailor Keith lesbians.this makes it probably the most ing his campaign to lift the ban on homosatellite can't Meinhold returned to his Navy job Thursmeaningful Veterans Day that's occurred," sexuals. On Wednesday, he reiterated his day after winning a victory over the Meinhold's lawyer, John McGuire, said belief that homosexuality "in the abget off ground Pentagon and its ban on homosexuals in Wednesday. sence of some destructive behavior" should the military. Meinhold sued in October, claiming not disqualify people from serving. But CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) The 30-year-old petty officer, dishis dismissal violated his right to equal he gave little indication of how or when An Air Force rocket launch was aborted charged in August after disclosing on protection. A petty officer and 12-year he will change the policy. at the last second Nov. 6 after an national television that he is gay, was Navy veteran, he received an honorable Revoking the ban, which could be auxiliary engine had just ignited, reinstated under court order as a sonar discharge and has been working as a done by executive order, would be one of creating an orange flash, but the main crew instructor at Moffett Naval Air Station computer salesman. the most far-reaching social changes engine had not yet fired, officials said. in Mountain View. The government will contest Meinimposed on the armed services since No one was injured and nothing "I don't expect any negative response," hold's reinstatement during a hearing President Truman ordered racial integrawas damaged, officials said. The Delta Meinhold said as he walked through the Monday. tion of the military in 1948. rocket never got off the pad with the base's main gate. But he recommended The reinstatement order does not Two of the Pentagon's most senior $65 million navigation satellite. that other gays orlesbians in the military overturn the ban, but thejudge said there officers Gen. Colin Powell, chairman of The Navstar Global Positioning wait until the ban on homosexuals is was a likelihood Meinhold could prove the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Gen. GorSystem satellite aboard the rocket is lifted before coming forward. that the policy is unconstitutional and don Sullivan, Army chief of staff have the 16th in a series of advanced naviLast week, U.S. District Judge Terry that the Navy violated regulations during repeatedly declared their opposition to gation satellites capable of guiding J. Hatter Jr. of Los Angeles ordered the its discharge proceedings. changing the policy. Both are expected war ships, bombers and tanks with an Navy to take Meinhold back pending "This is absolutely a watershed event," to continue serving under Clinton. accuracy of 50 feet or better. resolution of his lawsuit challenging the said Robert Bray, spokesman for the According to a study released in June The launch was aborted when the ban. On Tuesday, the Pentagon, rebuked Washington-based National Gay and by the General Accounting Office, Concountdown hit zero at 7:54 p.m., Air by the judge for initially defying his Lesbian Task Force. "The anti-gay witch gress' investigative arm, the military Force spokeswoman Teri Bracher said. order, said it would comply. hunts will stop." discharged an average of 1,500 people a The cause of the problem wasn't "To Keith and to alot of gay men and President-elect Clinton pledged duryear for being gay from 1980 to 1990. immediately known. U.S. soldier questioned over woman's death SEOUL, South Korea (AP) -A U.S. a protest. 7 student camBoth countries have expressed unease soldier based in South Korea was interroAbout 36,000 N paigns. about the possibility of policy changes gated by police Nov. 6 in connection U.S. troops are The South under Clinton. with the brutal torture and murder of a stationed in Korean and JapaThere has been speculation that Clinbar hostess, police said. South Korea nese heads of ton might reduce the U.S. military presThe violent nature of the crime and under a mutual governments on ence in South Korea and Japan. the implication that an American soldier defense agreeSunday exUnder President Bush, a planned might be involved has inflamed citizens ment and about pressed hope for American troop reduction in South Koin Uijongbu, which is adjaecent to the 14,000 of them unchanged Far rea was put on hold until communist 2nd Infantry Division headquarters. are stationed in East policies North Korea resolved the world's worU.S. military officials said the soldier the area near under Presidentries that it is making nuclear weapons. questioned was stationed with the 2nd Uijongbu. elect Bill ClinThe two also agreed that North Korea Infantry Division at Uijongbu, 12 miles South Korean ton. must dispel international worries about north of Seoul. prosecutors said This came its nuclear program by submitting to more The soldier was interrogated in conthey will decide during South thorough inter-Korea nuclear inspections. nection with the death ofYun Kum-i, 26, whether to press AP LaserPhoto Korean PresiNorth Korea says its nuclear program on Oct. 28, police said. Yun was raped, charges next President George Bush stopped the military dent Roh Taeis for peaceful purposes, and has allowed stabbed and tortured before her death, week when rearming in North Korea. woo's unofficial limited inspections of its nuclearsites by police said. sults of investione-day visit for the International Atomic Energy Agency. Citizens groups charged Korean pogations are complete. talks with Japan's Prime Minister Kiichi Japan, the only nation ever attacked lice with being lax in their investigation Relations between Koreans and U.S. Miyazawa. by nuclear weapons, has backed the South's and handed out anti-American leaflets. soldiers have been strained in past beThe U.S. military commitment in Asia position, saying it cannot establish diploTaxi drivers in the city launched a camcause of anti-American sentiment that includes separate defense pacts with Japan matic relations with North Korea while paign to boycott American customers as has grown here, fanned by dissidents and and South Korea. nuclear worries persist.

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6 Tropic Timesoices *.1Nov. 13,1992* V ie Post coin-operated laundry plans set Dear Mayors' Corner, ________________________________ holiday foods again. We really need a coin operated launLast year you couldn't find [canned] dry facility on post. Many soldiers and pumpkin and when you did, there wasn't their families live off-post and, because The facility will also have a retail ride free, is that true? Also what is the any evaporated milk. they expected to move onto post soon, outlet offering beverages, light snacks, fee? Is the commissary going to do any didn't bring their washers and dryers belaundry items, etc. Concerned citizen [pre-] planning to prevent those shortcause housing [officials] advised us not Sound too good to be true? Wonder ages this year? The official policy is not to. how it happened? Dear Concerned, to horde but shortages make it imposAdd to that no laundry facilities on The commanding general became The terminal manager for Servicios sible. post and most of us are in a dilemma. aware of the need to service soldiers and de Autobuses del Corregimiento de Ancon Watching the shelves This is just plain unacceptable. families who did not have ready access to (SACA) buses said fees vary from 20 A lot of us are the same boat. We need laundromat services. cents to 65 cents depending on distance Dear Watching, someone with clout to getinvolved, who The inspector general's complaint traveled and age of the rider. According to the deputy district do we talk to? system investigated the laundry list of For specifics, check with the SACA director, the commissary has already Dirty drawers problems, which included no accessible bus driver for a list of stops and charges. taken steps to ensure customers' needs laundromats on-post, a shortage of washThe only ones allowed to ride the are met. Orders were placed months ago Dear Drawers, ers and driers off-post, and the water and buses for free are the Panamanian Nato fill anticipated seasonal needs. Those How about the commanding general, electricity shortage during the last dry tional Police and infants, but children 2 shipments have already arrived, the shelves U.S. ArmySouth? He's got clout and has season. to 10 can ride for half price. are fully stocked and the warehouses are already gotten involved, said garrison Complaints surfaced that many famiThere is no minimum age to ride SACA full. command officials. lies and single soldiers living downtown buses, according to the terminal manSelected holiday items are on permaIn fact, the assistant director, commuwere bringing their laundry to wash in ager. nent display at aisle ends throughout all nity activities said, plans are well underthe barracks and guest house. Children as young as 2 years old can three commissaries, the deputy district way to open a coin operated laundry The result, the assistant DCA said, is ride without a guardian, but the terminal director said. facility on Fort Clayton during the early a Morale, Welfare and Recreation sponmanager suggests parents let the bus driver months of 1993. sored fully-operational coin-op in place know where to let the child off, and that Editor's note: This column is proThe coin-op will be across from the before any water problems start next a responsible adult be at the destination vided to allow community members to Burger King, and will include 16 washyear. to greet the child. submit questions or concerns to be reing machines and 10 industrial-size driers. Watch for details on a "Name that For more information about fees and searched and answered by the MayPlans are that the laundromat will Laundromat" contest in the near future, procedures, call the SACA terminal at oral Congress. Letters should be mailed open seven days a week, from 7 a.m. to too. 262-7333. to: Mayors' Corner, APO AA 34004 10 p.m. (MPS). Anonymity will be granted The facility will offer same-day launDear Mayors' Corner, Dear Mayors' Corner, upon request. Publicity Chairperson, dry service fora nominal fee, in addition Whatis the agelimit toridetheSACA The holidays are coming and I anticiDyana Ellis. to normal laundromat services. buses? I was told that up to 12 years old pate a problem getting those special Sponsors responsible for signed-on guests Escort violation by falsifying a one day vehicle pass. Every week, the military police apprehend and charge Immediately report lost or stolen identification Provost-Marshal's_ Corner Panamanians for not being with their sponsors once cards to the military police at 287-4401 or 4402. If you they have been signed on post. Sponsors who sign in have any information or suspect someone ofentering a unsecured private property guests are responsible for making sure the people they military base using forged or stolen documents, Atlantic signed in stay with them at all times and they are off the report it immediately. Fort Espinar 100 area -one larceny of unsecured installation by 1 a.m. private property For more information about the guest policy, contact Forced entry FortDavis 500 area -onelarceny of unsecured private the military police desk. Unknown thieves burglarized a Fort Clayton resiproperty dence by prying apart the security bars on a kitchen Fort Davis 200 area -one larceny of secured private Bicycle theft window. Once inside, the thieves took a Sony VCR, a property There were a number of bicycles stolen from under JVC portable stereo, an Oster blender and a purse concarports at Fort Davis and Fort Clayton. Most of the taining some cash, several credit cards and various bicycles were locked to the security bars or carport forms ofidentification. poles with a lock and chain. The thieves used a cutting If you have any information on this breakdevice to cut off the chain. in, contact the Military Police InvestiTo reduce the chances of becoming a victim, use a gation Section at 287-5252. heavy duty lock and chain, ensure that the area where the bicycle is parked is well lit and the bicycle is The following crime staregistered with the Provost Marshal. tistics are for the week of For more information, call the Crime Prevention Oct. 30 -Nov. 5. Sectionat 287-3261/6762.Pacific Fort Clayton 300 area Wrongful transfer of merchandise three larcenies of secured Several people were charged last week with the privateproperty wrongful transfer of duty-free commissary merchanFort Clayton 300 area dise. Items bought at the commissary are for privilege one larceny of unsecured card holders and their family members only. These privateproperty items can not be traded, given or sold to any person not Fort Clayton 1100 area authorized post privileges. one burglary For more information, call the U.S. Southern ComCurundu 500 area -one larmand Contraband Section at 286-3303. ceny of unsecured private property False pretense Fort Amador 400 area -one larLast week, two people were charged with attempting ceny of secured private property to enter Fort Clayton under false pretenses. One person Fort Kobbe 300 area -one larceny tried to get on base by using a bilingual ID card that of secured private property belonged to someone else. Another tried to get on post Fort Kobbe 400 area -two larcenies of Commander in Chief.Gen. George A. Joulwan Editorial Staff.Sgt. Richard Puckett U.S. Army South PAO Atlantic.289-4312 Director, Public Affairs.Col. James L. Fetig Sgt. James Yocum This authorizedunofficial command information publicaChief.SFC Joseph Ferrare Rosemary Chong tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is Editor.M Sgt. Rolf Carter Assistant Editor.Sgt. Deborah E. Williams U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.287-3007 published inconjunction withthe ArmedForces Information Sports Editor .Sgt. John Hall 24th Wing Public Affairs Office .284-5459 Po her croft D prbmen affair se, US. S thesr isom n. U.S. NaEditortatio.i.airsL.Office .283-5a44 of the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command. U.S. Naval Station Public Afairs Office. 283-5644 Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. The address is: Unit 0936 APO o i im es AA 34002 Telephone 285-6612.

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Tropic Times Commentary a 7 CommentaryNov. 13, 1992 Quitting no laughing or coughing matter by MSgt. Rolf Carter about my health so I would laugh less-than one pack a day habit. I ing dinner, stay up all night, eat a Edbor instead of cry. decided I wasn't going to smoke any serious helping of Aunt Norma's pinto Edi_ _ Between the chuckles I thought of more because I didn't want to. I just beans and biscuits -and the list Thursday is the Great American some things I thought were bad for really felt I had spent enough of my grows. Smokeout, which has long been ajoke people or helped cause premature life as a smoker. Since I've stopped I also challenge myself not to do for me -at least up until two months death. We could have some very smoking I've put a few things into a some things and to do other things ago. interesting "out" days. Just imagine -new perspective (you can do that when because I'm disciplined (based on my I always found the Smokeout a the Great American Eat Pork and Red not under the influence of a drug). ability to quit smoking). This has a lot laugh because I couldn't see why Meatout; the Great American Mess Here are some of those thoughts:. of benefits and definitely helps me get anyone else would care if With Me Todayout; When you are ready to quit you can things done around the house. I smoked for one day or the Great American and you will. The strength to do so So, smokers shouldn't let the Great not. One day without a Play In Trafficout; the comes from the mind, and I play some American Smokeout cause unneeded cigarette isn't going to Great American Jogout head games with myself to help me anxiety. If you're not ready to quit, correct the damage of 15 "You can take (remember Jim Fixx?); continue as a nonsmoker. First of all, I don't. I didn't, and you shouldn't, play or 20 years of serious as far as they the Great American quit cold turkey and daily I live in fear with yourself like that. Self esteem smoking. And, it certainly p ple Driveby Shootout; the that I might start again and never be isn't the easiest thing for people to get, won't break one's addicwill go, not as far as Great American able to quit. That fear gives me some keep or maintain so don't beat yours up tion to nicotine. Also I you would like them Taking Unneeded strength. by trying to stop smoking for one day never bought into the belief to go." Prescription Drugout. Another of my gimmicks is to chaland possibly failing. Especially if you that smoke from my cigaThe list is endless we lenge myself to do things as a nonbelieve there's nothing to gain by rette would cause someJeannette Rankin could easily use up a smoker that I don't remember doing quitting for one day. one else lung cancer, more politician year and have some before I started smoking. For instance, If anything, use the wealth of inforso than auto exhaust, inouts left over. More this is my chance to run two miles as a mation distributed during the Smokedustrial pollution or toxic waste dumps. importantly, we would get truly tired of nonsmoker and see how it feels. out to help you find a reason to quit, But every year legions of nonand people telling us what they think is Also as a nonsmoker I want to play and when you're ready you'll have former smokers preach to puffers about good for us and on what given day. racquetball, drive across the country, some things to fall back on and help the benefits of quitting. Deep inside I But like I said, the joke ended two take a long walk in the snow, fly in a you stay off cigarettes. (See related felt these people really didn't care months ago when I abandoned my noplane, ride a bicycle, eat a Thanksgivstory on page 2.) Environmental strategy needs everyone's support Think globally, act locally one bottles, two plastic containers, and two newspapers to you reduce the demand on the power plants. This in throw away, you may wonder if you should recycle turn reduces the amount of coal, natural gas or oil, key to saving the environment them or simply throw them in the trash. "I'm probaburned, which in turn, reduces air pollution. bly going to get only loose change for this," you Second, coal, natural gas, and oil are considered by Omar Ching think, "and these few things are insignificant and will "dirty fuels" that require extensive mining, and hurt Engineering Techniian, DEH not harm the environment." the environment. This means every gallon of gas, or Eng____rngT__hn_____,_DEH_ So you throw the stuff in the trash .kilowatt of electricity you conserve will reduce the FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -One of this Sound familiar? Is this your point of view? Let's demand for these "dirty" resources. By reducing decade's major concerns is the environment we live look at the total picture. pollution, you would be protecting the environment. in. "Save the Earth" is the theme of the '90's. The Department of Defense community here has What is involved in conserving energy? The People are concerned about air and water polluabout 25,000 people. The cans, bottles, plastic bottom line is avoiding waste. tion, hazardous chemicals and waste, and global containers and newspapers for all of us amount to You don't have to be uncomfortable to conserve warming. We are concerned about our forests, lakes about 96 tons -or 192,000 pounds -of garbage. energy. It is just a matter of awareness and following and beaches. But how can we maintain our standard This has a definite impact on our environment. To a simple guideline: if it's not being used, turn it off. of living and protect our environment? protect our environment, we have to think in a Most of you have seen the science fiction movies According to Daniel Muschett, chief, Directorate broader manner -we have to think and act as a of a future filled with dead forests, polluted lakes, of Engineering and Housing Environmental Energy group and not as individuals. and acid rain falling on barren, trash-filled streets. Conservation Branch, we have to begin by realizing Aside from recycling, what else can you do to Interesting when seen as a movie, tragic if this is the that any steps we take to protect the environment protect the environment? Well, you can conserve legacy we leave to future generations. now may not affect us immediately, but will have energy. You may ask how does conserving energy Remember, you are a significant player in deterpositive results in the long run. protect the environment? mining just how successfully we protect our environFor example, If you have five cans, three glass Muschett emphasizes that by conserving energy ment and conserve energy. Everyone's efforts count! Dir-ect Qiotes What can you tell children about conservation? "I tell them to turn the "They should make "When out of the room, "I would tell them to "I would tell them the electricity off when sure all the lights are shut the lights out," respect energy because basics -recycle." they're not using it." off and to turn the TV there's not much left." off when not watching it." Tony Nunez Phaedra Ave-Lallemant SW1 Terry Knapp SSgt. Robert Bowers 1st Sgt. Danny Shepherd 56th Signal Battalion Department of Defense DeNaval Security Group Activity 24th Maintenance Squadron 79th Army Band pendent Schools student -Galeta Island The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views ofSouthern Command, The Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries -or responses to commentaries -to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

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Tropic Times Nov.13,1992 Army plans safety stand down Commet by Spec. Robin Mantikowski different jobs withnew and unfamiliar hazards,thereby W r eck c r us h es USARSO Public Affairs Office increasing the potential for an accident.The training UFRTO PbLi AYTONs OInhe last 10yearstheArmy you conduct on Safety Awareness/Safety Stand Down fam ily hurt Iin ers FORT CLA YTON -In the last 10 years, the Army Day can eliminate needless suffering, reduce costs and f has turned its sights to refining the practice of safety in increase readiness." every aspect of Army life and training, and Daprtment Though safety is an everyday concern, Safety Day by SFC Tony Nauroth of the Army figures show it's working. Army accidents gives the Army a chance to stand down, and commandUSARSO Public Affairs Office went down 37 percent in fiscal year 1992. ers a chance to put safety into their mission, said Staff It's been more than a month since my nephew In this continuing effort to eliminate safety probSgt. Ronnie Byrd, noncommissioned officer-in-charge Jason died in his car. He was 16. My sister Barbara lems, U.S. Army South will concentrate on safety, risk of Command Safety Office. is lost, devastated, in a state of denial. I was unable management, accident prevention and loss reduction on Army units across Panama will participate in activito attend the funeral -the school sent the entire Safety Awareness/Safety Stand Down Day, Thursday ties ranging from classes on hearing conservation and junior class of Wallenpaupack Area High School in In the 1992 Safety Awareness memorandum, Maj. proper lifting techniques to vehicle inspections. a fleet ofyellow buses to the Queen ofPeace Roman Gen. Richard F. Timmons, commanding general, said, "It is everyone's responsibility to make sure safety Catholic Church in Hawley, Pa. And all our family "Reassignments due to drawdown may place people in happens everyday for every mission," Byrd said. was there. It hurts. Jason was driving. Barb and her husband Dennis had bought Jason's new Honda just a week before the Ordnance detachment holds Amnesty accident. They feared that his original rust bucket would get him in an accident. In the writing business Day,~AAJLIng ~exposies hat's known as bitter irony. Day, accepting ammunition, explosives I her weetrepol ntecr wid Tony Sibulsky, the front seat passenger, survived COROZAL (Tropic Times) -The 36th Explosive to the military police for EOD specialists to pick-up. and walked to a nearby home to get help. He had his Ordnance Detachment will hold an Ammunition and Pictured below are some types of ordnance that can seatbelt on. Jason and a third friend died instantly, Explosives Amnesty Day Thursday in conjunction with be found in Panama. This is just a sample ofthe types of according to the coroner's report. Pennsylvania State U.S. Army South Safety Awareness/ Safety Stand Down explosive devices that are used in training. Police attributed the accident to high speed. SibDay. Anything that servicemembers are not sure is safe ulsky said Jason was going between 60 and 70 miles Between 7:30 am. and 3:30 p.m., EOD soldiers will should be left for EOD to pick up, he said. During an hour. That hurts too. accept ordnance at several points in Panama, said 1st Lt. Amnesty Day, no questions will be asked about the The car apparently hit some wet leaves, didn't Fred Tejan, 36th EOD commander. origin of the explosives. make a turn and slammed into a large tree. The The points will accept all ordnance that arrives there, Pick-up points will be found at the Southern ComHonda became half a Honda in the twinkling of an but there are certain items that servicemembers should mand Network field on Fort Clayton; Fort Davis' softeye. And Jason was gone. not try to bring in. ball field; 36th EOD, Building 533 Corozal; Air Force Jason Gumble was a good kid. Smart. Very Tejan said most small-arms ammunition is safe to EOD, Building 734 Howard AFB; and theAmmunition smart. A computer whiz. Loved by all the family, transport, but that heavier c-A4ance should bereported Supply Point on Rodman Naval Station. his quiet nature gave him an air of calm confidence. He wasn't prone to doing stupid things. 40 MILLIMETER GREThe three boys -yes, they were mere boys, not NADES -The 40mm yet legal age for military service -were returning grenade projectiles from a video arcade in Honesdale. It was 11 p.m. come in four basic Friday,September25. Maybethey were burning off types: high explosive, young teenage steam. Who knows? Maybe it was smoke, illumination and the speed, or the road. It's interesting that a report signalling. They are just released by an international association of truckusually 2 inches in ers voted Pennsylvania's roads the worst in the diameter and 4-6 country for the second year in a row. Still, no back inches long. Normally, road in any state is safe at 60 miles per hour. the grenades are silMy sister wrote an account of that night -the first call, her husband's anger at Jason's carelessness ver and the nose-tip is (before they knew he was dead), neighbors holding gold. Unless the greher back as police told Dennis the news, her disbelief nades are in the origiand bereavement. She wrote it in the third person, as nal shipping containif it happened to someone else. That hurts too. ers, they should be left There's an emptiness where Jason was. It's as if in place. a huge space was carved out between Barb's oldest son Eric, and her younger daughter, Brenda. A whole BLASTING CLAPS -life and future.gone. A whole line of Gumbles Blasting caps come in never given the gift of life. That hurts unbearably. two major types: elecBarbara sent me the article printed in the Wayne tric annn-al~trI. County News Eagle. It's accurate. One bright spot trand no-lcrc jumped out at me right away in the form of a Electric caps have colsubhead: "No Alcohol Indicated." I've thought about ored wires attached to this one point long and hard. In all the terrible them, while non-elecsadness, I wonder how much more difficult and trics don't. They range terribleeven to the point of horror -would it be in size from 2-1/2 to 5if these young men had been drinking. How much inches long and are damage would that have done to Barb, and all of us? usually silver. Blasting The timing here is coincidental with some tragic caps are extremely news within U.S. Army South, where noncommissensitive and shouldn't sioned officers are being picked up in record numbe moved. bers for DWI and DUI offenses. These soldiers, some decades older than Jason was, are presumably mature men and women. At least 43 out of 3,000 NCOs were picked up between January and April, said Alcohol and Drug AbuseProgram officials, and HAND GRENADES -USARSO Commander Maj. Gen. Richard F. TimHand A enades GR ENmons is fed up with it. As a result, NCOs are now Hand grenades come required to sit through a Substance Abuse Leaders' in three basic types: Training class where they learn the dangers of alcofragmentation, sighol abuse, signs of alcoholism, and consequences of nailing and riot control. DUI and DWI charges on their careers. Offenders There are many differwho escape death, but are caught by military police, ent shapes and sizes find their careers are history in this age of drawdown. of grenades. Grenades When I attended the SALT class last week, all I made by countries other could think about was how fortunate it was that Jason wasn t drinking. Small comfort when death comes so close. We saw a video in which the total loss of have been found in life in America was dramatically illustrated in a Panama. Colors vary, scene where the 250,000 residents of Rochester, but g grenades are usuN.Y. disappear. That's how many die in wrecks each ally olive drab. Unless decade. In the year 2000, when the next list of lost the grenades are in the souls gets tallied up, I'll recognize oneJason R. original shipping conGumble. My nephew. But at least our family will be tainers, they should be able to say, "Thank God he wasn't drinking." left in place. For that would have been the worst hurt of all.

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Tropic Times 0 Nov. 13, 1992 Deployment reunites soldier with father by Capt. Michael Nichols said. "It was hard to describe my excitement and nerv122nd Public Affairs Detachment N, uns. FORT P LAYTON Theaer SupportElement)-ToThe reunion took place on the first day the 445th FORT CLAYTON (Theater Support Element) -To ~arrived in Panama. meet the father she never knew, Oklahoma Army Na"I was unpacking my clothes when a soldier came to tional Guard Spec. Renee Cook gladly deployed from my room and told me my father was here," Cook said. Tehlequah, Okla., to the Republic ofPanama for annual "I was so excited I don't even recall who spoke first. I training. recognized him right away, even though he looked Cook was two years old and living in Panama at the older than I remembered." time her parents separated. She moved back to the As a bonus, Cook also met her 17-year-old brother United States with her mother. All she remembered Chris Cook for the first time. about Panama was how it constantly rained and how hot When she found out her new brother was having it was. trouble with his math homework, shejumped rightin to As she grew up, Cook only had periodic contact with Theater Support Eementphoto by Sgt Michael Kirchmann help him. her father, and did not have an opportunity to get to Spec. Renee Cook stands with her father James E. Cook is currently a third-year math major at Northknow him. Cook after their first meeting since she was 14. eastern State University in Tahlequah. She plans to "The last time I saw my father was when I was about During Operation Desert Storm, the 445th mobilized make a career as a junior high math teacher. 14 years old," said the supply clerk for the 445th and spent six months in the middle east protecting Cook says she is grateful for the opportunity to Military Police Company in McAlester, Okla. "I grew supply routes into Kuwait for allied troops. contact her father and also for the challenging training up never fully knowing who my father was." When she learned the 445th would be assisting in Panama. Now as a National Guard soldier deployed to her active duty military police units in U.S. Southern Working as a supply clerk in a different part of the former home, she has a chance to find out. Command, she was overjoyed. world has provided her with the challenge of dealing Her father, James E. Cook, retired from the Army as "It was about a month ago when I learned of the with people who speak a different language. a sergeant major in 1972 and returned to Panama after Panama deployment," she said. "That's when I started The training in Panama is also unique for the unit two years in Florida working for the Federal Aviation putting my reunion plans together." because it offers them achanceto provide base security Administration. After several tries at reaching her father by phone, operations like bicycle patrols through residential areas Cook said he realized how much he missed living in her older brother, SFC James Cook Jr., stationed at Fort -something they've never done before. Panama and moved back, netting a job as a communiBenning, Ga., was able to contact him while the elder Cook summed up her feelings about the reunion by cation chief for U.S. Army South. cook was on a business trip to Washington, D.C. saying, "I was so young when my dad left, I did not The younger Cook had no idea what adventures she "As soon as I learned of Renee's trip to Panama, I understand a lot of things regarding the separation. This would experience when she first joined the Oklahoma made arrangements to cut my business short and return has given me an opportunity to get answers I never had National Guard four years ago. from Washington in orderto meet my daughter," Cook before." Guardsmen build Camitillo school, enjoy stay by SSgt. Bill Kuhns great about what they are doing." 122nd Public Affairs Detachment Rebuilding the school not only provides the team -members with a unique logistical challenge, but also CAMITILLO, Panama (Theater Support Element) brings a sense of pride for the crew and connects them The sounds of hammers, saws and heavy equipment emotionally to the villagers. disrupt the usual jungle sounds of Panama's tropical "We work side-by-side with the villagers of Camitinterior as soldiers of the Maine Army National Guard's illo," said Sgt. Roscoe Presley, a resident of Jonesboro, 240th Engineer Group help build Panama's educational Maine. "It's been great. These people are the most structure and forge international memories for a lifehonest and hard-working people I've ever seen. time. The entire village turns out to assist the engineers by Dubbed Team 240, the soldiers are here for their carrying cinder blocks, mixing cement and doing whattwo-week annual training period to rebuild the school at ever tasks need to be done. Camitillo. "They're grateful for everything that is done," said The team members come from companies of the SFC Richard Commaeu, from Old Town, Maine. "They 133rd Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy), from Portknow it's for their future and for their kids." land, Maine, and the 262nd Engineer Battalion (Com"I would like the citizens of Maine to know that I am bat Light), from Bangor, Maine. extremely pleased with the efforts of the Maine Army The 240th jumped at the chance to do the Camitillo National Guard in completing our school," said Joaguin project, after they were given a list of proposed humaiMartinez, mayor of Camitillo. "Education is the key for tarian construction projects by the Panama governsuccess of my people and this will allow our children to ment. continue their education." Camitillo is located about two hours from Panama "We are using our military skills to help people who City. The last six miles are accessible only on foot or are truly grateful for the help," said 1st Lt. Jeffrey horseback. Morton, 240th project team leader. "We get more TheatwSupportEementphotobySSgLWliam Kuhns The Camitillo school serves about 60 children who results for the dollar spent than on any project we have Blanca DeFranco teaches students inside a tent were driven from their original building by a storm that ever seen." supplied by the U.S. Army. collapsed the roof. Classes were transferred to a tent provided by the U.S. Army. Weekdays, students walk or ride horses, arriving in brilliant white shirts and crisp blue skirts or trousers. They attend class from 8 am. to 1:30 p.m. --Blanca DeFranco and Rosa Reyes, the two teachers at the school, also arrive each morning on horseback. DeFranco stays in a nearby village during the week, living in Panama City on the weekends. The remote area and lack of roads into the village meant supplies had to be delivered by helicopter. "Choppers coming in at 1100 hours today," said SSgt. RobertL. Caron, communications chief for Team 240. "They're delivering a water buffalo and some more cinder blocks." VThe helicopter is the lifeline from Camp Rousseau, Panama, for the soldiers at Camitillo. Food, mail, clothing, fuel, water, building supplies -everything needed to complete the mission -are airlifted to the engineers. The work is hard manual labor with the sun shining one minute and the rains pouring the next. Despite these hardships, the soldiers' spirits couldn't be higher. "I'm not leaving until they make me go," said SSgt. Soldiers work alongside Camitillo residents to build the new school. Daniel Petit. "Everyone else Iknow feels the same way. Nobody wants to go back to the base camp. They feel

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1OTropic Times M lso e 10 Io 3T7,2Milestones 10Nov. 13,11992 New commanders Capt. Todd A Wang took command of Co. A, 536th To Colonel -John A. Breed, U.S. Southern ComEngineer Battalion from Capt. David A. Dougherty matd; Richard Coleman, 24th Security Police Oct. 23. Squadron To Lieutenant Colonel -Ruth A. Sykes, U.S. Capt. Bryan C. Tempio recently took command of Southern Command Headquarters and Support Command, 536th EngiTo Captain -Douglas A. Johnson, 24th Wing neer Battalion from Capt. Miyako Y. Newell. To Master Sergeant -Mary J. Bradley, 24th Supply Squadron; Gilbert Centeno, U.S. Southern Command; Eileen V. Durham, 24th SUPS; Dale Military awards Mitcham, 24thWing; Jimmie E. Monette, 24th Civil Engineering Squadron; Larry R. Wauson, 24th SPS Legion of Merit -CSM Dennis D. Starkey, 106th Signal Brigade Meritorious Service Medal -SFC Ted W. Clark, 536th Engineer Battalion (OLC); MSgt. Alan J. 106th Signal Brigade: Temple, 106th Signal Brigade; SFC James A. Miley, Spec. Christopher D. Gauss, soldier of the year 106th Signal Brigade; Sgt. Carol E. Sonetrompf, Sgt. James P. Proctor, noncommissioned officer of 106th Signal Brigade the year U.S. Army Medical Activity: Army Commendation Medal -SSg. Ramon L. Spec. J-R. Dowdy, soldier of the year Santiago, 106th Signal Brigade; Sgt. Jamie U.S. Southern Command: Ashcraft, 106th Signal Brigade; Sgt. Larry R. Blare, Air Force Sgt. David W. Brocato, servicemember of 106th Signal Brigade; Spec. James Manhal, 106th the quarter Signal Brigade Army Achievement Medal -Sgt. Kevin L. s Bolton, 106th Signal Brigade (30LC); Sgt. Stevie Green,106th SignalBrigade(30LC);Spec.Johnnie Superior Performance Awards: Buchanan, 106th Signal Brigade (2OLC); Spec. PaRicardo Ara, 106th Signal Brigade tricia A. Williams, 106th Signal Brigade (2OLC); Rolando Duran, 106th Signal Brigade Sgt. Aida L Ponce DO Leon, 106th Signal Brigade Michael N. Friend, 106th Signal Brigade (10LC); Sgt. Eric Powell, 106th Signal Brigade Connie M. Hemm, 106th Signal Brigade (10LC); Spec. Noemi H. Aziz, 106th Signal BriCleveland James, 106th Signal Brigade gade (10LC); Spec. Christopher D. Causs, 106th Juan 0. Lu, 106th Signal Brigade Signal Brigade; Spec. Darby James, 106th Signal Alberto E. Mendoza, 106th Signal Brigade Brigade; Capt. Phillip Parker, 106th Signal Brigade; Jimmy D. Moses, 106th Signal Brigade SFC Rene Caban, 106th Signal Brigade; SFC Rolland L. Gleichman, 106th Signal Brigade Johnnie Murry, 106th SignalBrigade; SSgt. Freddie Plutarco Olivardia, 106th Signal Brigade Calarza, 106th Signal Brigade; SSgt. Yvette Frank S. Pigeon, 106th Signal Brigade Meredith, 106th Signal Brigade; Sgi. Michael Raymundo R. Richards, 106th Signal Brigade Mullins, 106th Signal Brigade; Sgt. James P. PicWinnie Roberts, 106th Signal Brigade tor, 106th Signal Brigade; Sgt. Ronald Schmoldt, Roberto A. Stevenson, 106th Signal Brigade 106th Signal Brigade; Spec. Cyrano Byrd, 106th Yvonne B. Walters, 106th Signal Brigade Signal Brigade; PFC Ronald Hilberg, 106th Signal Joyce Watkins, 106th Signal Brigade Brigade; PFC David Barbieri 106th Signal Brigade Nixia C. Morales, 106th Signal Brigade Ernest W. Peschl, 106th Signal Brigade Army promotions. Civilian promotions To Staff Sergeant -Lee Newman, 106th Signal Brigade 106th Signal Brigade: To Sergeant-Mildred Navarro, 106th Signal BriOrlando Delvasto, 106th Signal Brigade gade; Gregory Minor, 106th Signal Brigade; Darby Fran Loves, 106th Signal Brigade James, 106th Signal Brigade; Robert Fuller, 106th Marjorie A. Smith, 106th Signal Brigade Signal Brigade; Marvin Parrish, 106th Signal BriJanis D. Sanchez, 106th Signal Brigade gade Raymundo R. Richards, 106th Signal Brigade U.S. Air Force photo by SMSgt Boyd Blecher TSgt. Pedro A. Serrano, antenna maintenance squadron, performs a corrosion control inspection. Serrano was recently promoted through the STEP program. Airmen earn stripes P" through STEP program HOWARDAFB (24thWG/PA)Two one ofthe most efficient EPR processors Howard Air Force members were rein the Air Force. cently rewarded for doing an excepA native of Panama, the 15-year Air tional job through the Stripes for ExcepForce veteran is a graduate of the Comtional Performers program when MSgt. munity College of the Air Force, with an Bernadette Holloway and TSgt. Pedro associates degree in human resources Serrano, were promoted to their present management. rank. Serrano, the other STEP promotee, is Hollowayis chief of the 6933rd Elecalso working toward a CCAF degree in tronic Security Squadron orderly room. electronics systems technology. As As such she handles, leaves, personnel noncommissioned officer in charge anactions, weight management, officer and tenna maintenance, he routinely goes on enlisted performance reports, awards and temporary duty. decorations and more. "It's something I enjoy. Thejob stays It's her achievements beyond her essentially.the same, but I get to travel normal duties that got her STEP proto different to places and experience moted though, said her supervisors. She other cultures, and that's a plus." has been recognized by the Headquarters The Puerto Rico native has deployed Air Force Intelligence Command inspecto Fort Sherman, Latin American emtor general as a Professional Performer bassies, Mexico City, Mexico and Alaska and has been honored throughout her during his seven-year tour of duty here. career as a quarterly winner in her presSerrano's awards range from being ent and previous units. named maintainer of the quarter and Her promotion comes on the heels of year, to outstanding Hispanic and Air US. Air Force photo by SrA. Jackie Ambrose a second place finish in the AFIC Prism Forces Panama's Outstanding NCO of SUGGESTION SHOOTS STRAIGHT -The Howard Suggestion Program's competition. This competition tests AFIC the Year. first winner of fiscal year 1993 is SrA. Rebecca Kraus of the 24th Medical members in their respective career fields, Holloway and Serrano are both active Group. She received a cash award of $156 for submitting a suggestion to in Holloway's case, that was thepersonin the community. Holloway is closely change the schedule for yellow fever vaccinations from weekly to monthly. nel area. involved with the Special Olympics as This modification reduces yellow fever vaccine waste and resulted in a Before arriving at Howard in 1990, organizer and coach, while Serrano is a tangible saving to the Air Force of $1,560 a year. Contact unit suggestion Holloway was assigned at Headquarters volunteer Military Affiliated Radio Sysprogram monitors for information. AirTraining Command, Randolph AFB, tem operator and active in his local Texas, where supervisors said she was church.

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Nov. 13, 1992 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 11 U.S Almy photos by Spc. EJ Hsom Kate Wilder (left) and Janelle McGuinness, Balboa High School sophmore cass princesses share a happy moment during a homecoming ceremony at Balboa Stadium Nov. 6. Balboa High School 11th-grade students enjoy their homecoming float. Cougars, Bulldogs share football title BALBOA STADIUM -The Curundu Cougars deJ featedthePanamaCanal Commission Green Devils 3727 and the Balboa Bulldogs beat the Balboa Red Machine 33-0 here Nov. 6. The win secured first place for the Bulldogs and the Cougars in the Department of Defense Dependent Schools -Panama football league The Bulldogs and Cougars finished in a 6-1 deadlock for first place. The Red Machine finished at 3-4, the A Balboa Bulldogs player and a Balboa Red Machine player miss the ball. Green Devils were 2-5 and the Tigers were 1-7. Gus weathers the storm while Buck Few believe Evander Holyfield can Tennis player wins.page 12 battles the rain and mud in the beat Riddick Bowe in tonight's NFL news.page 13 jungle. Buck closes the gap. heavyweight bout. College roundup.page 14

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12 Tropic Times Nov. 13, 1992 Local tennis player falls in love with game by Spec. E.J. Hersom "My game is a lot like Michael Chang's A AO -or Andre Agassi's since people know him better -but he hits the ball much Spec. Daniel Nenminger strides onto a harder than I do." tennis court almost sluggishly. He warms Nenninger attacks vehemently. He up to a game with a heavy dose of highpounces on the canary-yellow ball striktest sunscreen to protect his fair, suning it powerfully and accurately. His burned skin. Sweat instantly drips from racket serves as claws. His sharp blue his red hair and lip whiskers. eyes alert him of his prey's weakness. He An unsuspecting opponent might not moves in for a kill. consider Nenninger's sleek frame and "Most of the Panamanian players have slow entrance threatening, but it's his a slice on their backhand so I come into way of camouflaging his attack. the net to beat them. If they have a big Stalking his preylike atiger, Nenninserve then I try to hit a big shot from ger even growls when he serves, then that," he said. wears opponents down with a consistent Though it's not his strong point, game. Nenninger plays the net to beat some of Southern Command's top tennis anihis better opponents, he said, but when mal never took a tennis lesson in his life they use net play against him, it doesn't that he didn't want to. work. The Blackhawk helicopter mechanic A local Army tennis partnertells why. from Company A, 1st Battalion, 228th "It's very difficult to play a net game Aviation, won his first tennis game near against him because he's either going to his home in St. Louis with a $4 racket go around you with a passing shot or lob when he was 14. "I fell in love with the it over you," said Maj. Kurt Andrews, game right then," he said. commander of Company E, 228th AviaNow, 32, he plays biggerrackets wintion. Andrews is a former All-Army tenning two ofPanama's Class B open tournis player who volleys with Nenninger naments and placing second in an open on weekends. Class A tournament. As far as attitude goes, Andrews said He also finished first in his age group Nenninger is not like John McEnroe. in the All Army tryouts in September at He's fair about calls and doesn't get Fort Eustis, Va., then captured second at emotional over them. "He's a pretty nice, the Armed Forces Championship at pretty quiet guy," he added. Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala. Andrews agrees that Nenninger's style Television is responsible for many is similar to Chang's. "They beat people parts of Nenninger's game. "I learned a by staying on the base line and wearing lot from the pros on TV," he said. "I got people down by making them run." my two-handed backhand from Connors." Nenninger said he lets his opponents Thoughhehasn'tplayedinenoughof make the mistakes and even if he is Panama's tournaments to be seeded, talking big about his game, he does it in us. Armyphoto by Spc EJ. Hom Nenningeris agood tennis player. If you a soft voice, like a big cat. licking his Spec. Daniel Nenninger sharpens his skills at Fort Clayton. don't believe it, ask him. paws and purring after a satisfying kill. Turkey Bowl playoffs tickets go on sale FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Tickets are Sport shorts now available for the Nov. 21 TURKEY BOWL '92 play-off games. The winners oftheplay-offgames will vie for the championship TURKEY BOWL Nov. 25 at the Balboa Stadium. Admission tickets may be purchased at the following locations:* Valent Recreation Center, Building 53, Fort Clayton, 287-6500/4201; U.S. Naval Station Panama Canal, Rodman, Building 65, 283-5307; Howard Sports & Fitness Center (Gym), Building 248, 284-3451; Sundial Recreation Center, Building 42, Fort Davis, 289-3300; Tickets may also be purchased at the STRAC Club, 1-2-3 Club, Clayton NCO Club adClub Amador. Tickets purchased for the Youth baseball/softball play-off games will be recognized for the TURKEY BOWL'92 season registration championship game. Monies Registration for the the 1993 Baseball and Softball beived e receipts program for boys and girls 4-18 years old is under way be divided equally among the ~g services' Morale, Welfare and anedsNv30 Recreation programs. Registration is being conducted at the Howard Youth In support of the TURKEY Center, Building 696 and the Albrook Youth Center, BOWL, the Army cheerleadBuilding 850. A current physical examination is needed ers -the TROPIC TERfor each child before registration. MINATORS -will A coaches' meeting will be held Nov. 24 at Albrook have a pep rally Nov. Youth Center from 6-9 p.m. It's mandatory for all 20. It begins at volunteers who wish to coach a team. A skills evalu5 P.M. at Fort ation will be held Nov. 28. Opening ceremonies will be Clayton's Main held Jan. 9 at Albrook Little League Field. The season Bohio. A disc ends March 27. jockey will be Call Vince Duncan at 286-3195 or 284-4700. there until 7 p.m. Souvenirs and TYouth baseball h w e sod m ao The Pacific Little League will hold registration Nov. theUSArmySouth 16-17 for boys and girls 6-15 years old. Call John Public Affairs OfCarlson at 252-2622. fice 287-3007/ 4109/5459. Intramural sports The Howard Sports and Fitness Center will be registering athletes in intramural golf, badminton and softball. Call 284-3451.

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NFL Tropic Times NFL news Nov. 13,1992_ Look out, it's Friday the 13th Bono or Young -the mice will follow the pied piper. 49ers 24, Saints 16. BATTLE OF THE BANDS -The apYdfEdftbt Chiefs (5-4) and Redskins (6-3) wage war at Arrowhead. The game's not about first place, last place or anything in between. Both teams are underachievers with some personnel It's Friday the 13th. That's a bad problems, but they're still good day to predict the future, especially football teams. KC QB Dave Krieg is when you have to worry about erratic and Mark Rypien could be his what's happening today. Anyway, counselor. Chiefs 16, Skins 10. making a long story longer, let's attack the five toughest games head DAVID AND GOLIATH -The on. perennial overachieving N.Y. Giants travel to Mile High Stadium to face LION TAMER -The NFL has rethe NFL's version of Goliath alized that the Detroit Lions (2-7) are Sunday. The Giants (5-4) proved AP LaserPhoto nothing but a 1992 fraud. Last season they could defeat Denver QB John Houston Oilers wide receiver Haywood Jelines (84) makes a leaping catch in the Lions were 12-4 and nearly went Elway on neutral ground in Super front of Cleveland Browns cornerback Randy Hillard during a Dec. 15, 1991 to the Super Bowl. They beat a Bowl XXI, 39-20. But can the Giants game in Cleveland. Buffalo Bills team, 17-14, which had enter Elway's castle and win? Sure. 4 decided it needed a rest in week 16. And Sinead O'Connor will be the The Bills rested their ailing stars and next Pope. Broncos 2, Giants 16. J did go to the Super Bowl. The bottom line is the Lions were never a MONDAY NIGHT MADNESS -HOUSTON (AP) -Haywood Jeflong contain himself during Sunday's leader even though they were kings Buffalo and Miami are the Abbott fires isn't satisfied leading the NFL in re24-14 loss to Cleveland, the Oilers' third of the NFC Central jungle. The and Costello of 1992. Abbott slapped ceiving. He wants to be the Houston in four games. He slammed his helmet to Steelers are just the opposite. In in Costello's castle, now it's AbOilers' motivational coach too. the turf in disgust, trying to light a spark 1991, they knew they had some bott's turn. Never make Dan Marino His first piece of advice is to get in his teammates. But nothing worked. talent and just needed time to angry, you wouldn't like him when crazy, show plenty of emotion during "I wanted to get some excitement squeeze out a diamond. This year the he's angry. FIsh 30, Bills 27. games and play with the same gusto. back in our team," Jeffires said. "I'll be Steelers are 6-3 and one of the best "A lot of guys question me about the damned if one guy can have enough teams in the AFC. The Steelers have In other Sunday action, Jets 24, way I am," Jeffires said. "But they emotion for 10 or 30 others. But there's homefield advantage, so Pittsburgh Kitties 10; Vikes 29, Oilers 26; should look inside themselves and realno way this team is not going to be will make its seventh win the hard Patsies (finally) 13, Colts 6; Eagles ize it's OK to be a little crazy." emotional Sunday if I have something to way -they'll earn it. Steelers 30, 17, Packers 13; Cards 20, Falcons Jeffires kept control until he could no say about it. Lions 24. 10; Brownies 13, Bolts 0; Cowgirls 27, Rams 21; Bucs 28, Bears 17; NIGHT AND DAY -The Saints Raiders 17, Hawks 3. and 49ers have been so opposite The Buckster, on a mission from during the past couple years, they the infantry, says: Bears 23, Bucs 20; wouldn't recognize each other if they Jets 20, Kitties 17; Steelers 17, Lions were twins. What does that mean? 7; Vikes 14; Oilers 13; Cowpokes Well, the Saints (7-2) play great 21; Rams 17; Colts 13, Pats 3; 49ers defense and score enough points to 22, Saints 19; Eagles 17, Pack 10; win most of the time. The 49ers (7-2) Cards 20, Falcons 13; Bolts 19, PHILADELPHIA (AP) -Randall Cun"I didn't jump on a guy's back," can score anytime they want, Brownies 13; Raiders 19, Hawks 7; ningham says if he learned anything from Cunningham said. "But now it's going to especially if you make six turnovers Chiefs 21, Redskins 20. Buck's being benched for a weekit's that he has get like that. I'll tell you right now that in one game. (No offense to Atlanta narrowed the gap to four. He has a to shed his "Mr. Nice Guy" image. I've been Mr. Nice Guy and I'm not Falcons fans.) No matter who plays 75-51 record. He's behind me, but Cunningham watched Sunday as going to have all this put on my job. This the leader for the 49ers -Steve he hasn't give up yet. backup quarterback Jim McMahon led is my job and I saw what happens when I the Philadelphia Eagles to a 31-10 vicdon't stand up and be verbal and tell tory over the Los Angeles Raiders. Coach guys, 'You better do yourjob. Because it Rich Kotite had set Cunningham down all falls on me.' I'm not going to curse, for ineffectiveness as the Eagles lost three but I'll tell 'em." of the previous four games. Cunningham said, "Jim's not going As promised by Kotite when he anto allow that to happen to him. So,if I did nounced Cunningham would sit out the learn anything (Sunday), that's what I Raiders game, the quarterback will relearned." turn as the starter Sunday when the Eagles Cunningham confirmed that his new (6-3) go to Milwaukee to play the Green attitude was prompted by an outspoken Bay Packers (3-6). teammate and close friend, linebacker Cunningham said he has rarely, if Seth Joyner. ever, ripped a player for making a misJoyner said he told Cunningham, "As take that caused a sack or busted a play. the quarterback you have to be in control ofthings out there. It's thequarterback's team. .Look at (Jim) Kelly and (Dan) Marino and (Warren) Moon. I've seen APLasmrPhoto 'em all curse guys off the field for not The Rams made the Cardinals Johnny Johson mad last Sunday. The Cargetting the job done." dinals won 20-14. "Randall is so afraid he's going to rub somebody the wrong way. And it's not :NFL trivia about that. It's about winning. And if a guy makes a mistake and he can't take 1. What two NFL teams came into win? constructive criticism then he doesn't the league in 1976? want to get better," Joyner said. 5. Name the only two black head Kotite agreed with Joyner. 2. Where will this season's Super coaches in the NFL today. If I was a quarterback and someone B2w. bhe p l Bhis sons: S r b e i.just annihilated me (because of a misBowl be played? Bonus: Which big take), I'm going to let that person know network(s) will televise it? ANSWERS how I feel. Or tell him, 'Why don't you 1. Tampa Bay and Seattle. be quarterback and I'll go whereyouare 3. How does the NFL passer rating 2. Rose Bowl,Pasadena, Calif. NBC and I'll show you what I mean.' There's system work? Just kidding. Which and SCN. nothing wrong with that," Kotite said. active NFL coach has the most wins? 3. Don Shula, Miami Dolphins. .Kotite said he wasn't aware of Cun4. Marv Levy, Buffalo Bills APLserPhotO ningham's personality in the huddle. Asked 4. If Buffalo beats Miami Monday 5. The Raiders Art Shell and Philadelphia's Herschel Walker (34) if Cunningham shows enough authority night, which coach will get his 100th Vikings Dennis Green. the runs through the grasp of Raider free on the field, he said, "I don't know. It's safety Eddie Anderson (33) Sunday. hard for me to say."

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Tropic Times Nov. 13, 1992 Cowboys helped Jimmy .ww __ AMERICAN CONFERENCE succeedBuffalo Bills 7 2 0 .778 dMiami Dolphins 7 2 0 .778 IRVING, Texas (AP) -Not unlike Frank Sinatra, Indianapolis Colts 4 5 0 .444 NY. Jets 2 7 0 .222 Jimmy Johnson does it his way. New England Patriots 0 9 0 .000 And Johnson's "way" from coaching a national Central championship at the University of Miami to turning PittsburghSteelers 6 3 0 .667 around the Dallas Cowboys from worstto firstisastrict -Cleveland Browns 5 4 0 .556 regimen of workouts, meetings, and psychological HoustonOilers 5 4 0 .556 indoctrination. Cincinnati Bengals 4 5 0 .444 If anything, Johnson is finding that handling pros is West less ulcer provoking than dealing with college players, Denver Broncos 6 3 0 .667 their parents and alumni. Kansas City Chiefs 5 4 0 .556 "I had less control of my players at Miami than I do San Diego Chargers 4 5 0 .444 at Valley Ranch," Johnson said. "The players were LA Raiders Raiders 3 6 0 .333 going to class and trying to get an education. And there Seattle Seahawks 1 8 0 .111 were a lot of distractions from girlfriends to alumni." Johnson can run a much tauter ship at Valley Ranch. NATIONAL CONFERENCE "Ican'tcontroltheplayerswhentheyareawayfrom W L T Pct. Valley Ranch but I've got their attention all day, every Dallas Cowboys 8 1 0 .889 day," he said. "I try to keep an even keel approach. Philadelphia Eagles 6 3 0 .667 "Our preparation is the same every week. We try to Washington Redskins 6 3 0 .667 put the previous game behind us on Monday. At 3:30 N.Y. Giants 5 4 0 .556 p.m, we started talking about the Los Angeles Rams. Phoenix Cardinals 3 6 0 .333 They have Tuesday off. Then we get back to work on Central Wednesday." MinnesotaVikings 7 2 0 .778 Like in college Johnson sometimes has trouble conChicago Bears 4 5 0 .444 trolling the focus of his teams. Green Bay Packers 3 6 0 .333 "In the professional ranks I keep telling my players Tampa Bay Buccaneers 3 6 0 .333 they need to evaluate their commitment when they apDetroit Lions e 2 7 0 .222 leave the training facility," he said. "I tell them they West have to be more focused if they want to be successful." San Francisco 49ers 7 2 0 .778 At Miami, Johnson said he had a sweeter deal New Orleans Saints 7 2 0 .778 because "at Miami we were significantly better than APlasPrPhoto Atlanta Falcons 3 6 0 .333 most every team we played. There were only three or Players like Emmitt Smith (22) have helped make L.A. Rams 3 6 0 .333 the Dallas Cowboys one of the NFL's best teams. Sunday "We worked out constantly four teams we played who were close to us." Cincinnati at New York Jets, 1 p.m. against their schemes and that's Johnson said the Hurricanes were so good that the Detroit at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. team spent most of their spring training and weekly Houston at Minnesota, 1 p.m. why we were so prepared when we workout time preparing forjust three or four teams, like New England at Ilndianapolis, I p.m. played them. In the NFL you don't Notre Dame, Florida, and Florida State. Philadelphia vs. Green Bay, at Milwaukee, 1 p.m. "We worked out constantly against their schemes Phoenix at Atlanta, 1 p.m. have that luxury. And the talent and that's why we were so prepared when we played San Diego at Cleveland, 1 p.m. level from the worst to the best is them," Johnson said. "In the NFL you don't have that Washington at Kansas City, I p.m. luxury. And the talent level from the worst to the best is Los Angeles Rams at Dallas, 4 p.m. very small. You are tested every very small. You are tested every Sunday. Chicago at Tampa Bay, 4 p.m. Sunday ~Johnson himselfis a much morerelaxed coach in his New Orleans at San Francisco, 4 p.m. Sunday. third professional season. Seattle at Los Angeles Raiders, 4 p.m. Johnson He admitted after the Cowboys got into the playoffs New York Giants at Denver, 8 p.m. Dallas Cowboys head coach last year "for the first time I'm totally relaxed with my Monday job. I don't have to answer to the critics anymore." Buffalo atMiami,9 p.m. Hurricanes regain No.1 NEW YORK (AP) -Miami, which Arizona look real good," Miami dehas lost the No. 1 ranking twice this fensive tackle Mark Caesar said. "There season, regained the top spot again in should be no doubt who's No. L." Sunday's Associated Press college footMichigan (8-0-1) climbed one place ball poll. to No. 3 after beating Northwestern The Hurricanes had the weekend 40-7, and Texas A&M (9-0) moved up off, but moved up a notch after thena notch to No. 4 with a 40-18 victory No.1WashingtonlosttoArizona16-3 overLouisville. Saturday. Florida State (8-1) rose one spot to Miami is only the fourth team to be No. 5 after routing Maryland 69-21, No. 1 three different times in one seaand Washington (8-1) fell to No. 6. son. The others were Notre Dame (1947), Nebraska (7-1) remained No. 7 after Tennessee (1951) and Alabama (1962). overpowering Kansas 49-7, and Notre Miami (8-0) received 61 first-place Dame (7-1-1) remained No. 8 after votes and 1,549 points from a nationhanding Boston College its first loss, widepanel ofsports writers and broad54-7. casters. The other first-place vote went Arizona (6-2-1) jumped three places to Alabama (9-0), which rose one spot to No. 9, the Wildcats' highest ranking to No. 2 after beating LSU 31-11. since 1983, andSyracuse (8-1) stayed If Miami and Alabama remain unNo. 10 after downing Virginia Tech defeated and 1-2 in the rankings, they 28-9. will meet in the Sugar Bowl. Miami is Florida was 11th, followed by Geortrying to become the first team to win gia, Colorado, North Carolina State, consecutive championships since AlaStanford, Mississippi State, Boston bama in 1978-79. College, Southern Cal, Ohio State, "I feel pretty good, but the season Kansas, Washington State, Penn State, isn't over yet," Miami receiver Horace Tennessee, Hawaii and North CaroCopeland said. "We still have to play lina. Syracuse and San Diego State. I'm not Hawaii (7-1), which defeated Colotoo happy yet." rado State 24-13, was last ranked in Miami lost its No. 1 ranking for the 1989, when it peaked at No. 23. first time after struggling to beat AriBoston College (7-1-1) plunged eight AFL-w-. zona 8-7 in late September. But Arinotches, while Southern Cal (5-2-1), UP FOR GRABS -Kansas City Chief defensive back Kevin Ross (31) breaks. zona helped the Hurricanes Saturday Kansas (7-2)and North Carolina(7-3) up a pass play intended for San Diego Charger receiver Nate Lewis during by ending Washington's 22-game wineach fell seven spots. Southern Cal Sunday's game. ning streak. lost 23-9 to Stanford, and North Caro"It makes our one-point victory over lina was beaten 40-7 by Clemson.

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Tropic Times Nov. 13, 199215 What heavyweight champ? Bowe looking past Holyfield LAS VEGAS (AP) -Riddick Bowe sees his challenge to heavyweight champion Evander Holyfield "as just another fight." Not likely, says Holyfield. "I realize he hasn't been tested mentally for what is about to come," the champion said Tuesday. "When Ilook at him, I look at a guy who doesn't really W know all about it yet. Every fight has to give you that, but Bowe hasn't proved a e that yet." Holyfield has been criticized for not fighting better opposition since he's been champion. His defenses have been against George Foreman and Larry Holmes, both past their 40th birthdays, and against Bert Cooper, asubstitute for asubstitute. He also has been dismissed by some as a manufactured heavyweight. The 30-year-old champion, however, is praised for his tenacity. "I think Bowe can get lucky, but not out-fight Holyfield," said George Benton, the champion's trainer. "Evander is a dog in a dogfight." Bowe also has been called a dog, but AP LasePhoto in his casethe description is anything but Despite boxing fans lack of faith in Evander Holyfield, the world's heavyweight champ will give it his best tonight. a compliment. The tape shows that the East German ner. quiet. Some people in boxing doubt Bowe's referee acted hastily and provides no When the bout resumed, the two had a "I'm going to knock Evander Holyheart despite his 31-0 record, with 27 evidence that Bowe quit. brief exchange, during which Bowe was field out, then, hopefully, I'll fight Lenknockouts. The doubts spring from Bowe's Bowe won the first round when he warned for ducking. Lewis then landed a nox Lewis," Bowe said. loss to LennoX Lewis in the 1988 Olymlanded several stiffjabs andjolted Lewis right to the side of the head and a short The unbeaten Lewis stopped Razor pic super heavyweight final. Some think with three right uppercuts. left to the face. Ruddock in the second round Oct. 31 in he quit in the second round. Early in the second round, Lewis landed The referee grabbed Bowe and began London and is supposed to fight the winner "I've watched the tape countless times," ashort left hook to the head and followed another standing 8. Bowe held his arms of tonight's match. Bowe said. "I'm still trying to figure out with four punches, none of which apup and bounced on his toes, but when the Editor's note: The Evander Holyfieldhow, after four or five years (of preparing peared to land cleanly. count ended, the referee stopped the fight Riddick Bowe fight is scheduled to be for a goal), a referee could stop a match The referee stopped the action for a Bowe shook his head "No, no," but televised on a Panamanian TV station tolike that. I worked so hard to make the standing 8-count, during which Bowe didn't complain to the referee. He said night. team." held up his hands and talked to his corU.S. coach Ken Adams told him to be At"a"ta gets stapdsg Bird would play with Magic ATLANTA (AP) -Olympics organizers can prepare to build an 85,000-seat stadium now that the design, financing and construction plans have NEW YORK (AP) -Larry Bird would have "no U.S. Olympic team. been approved by a government oversight panel. problem" playing against Magic Johnson because of "When you have a Magic Johnson or a Michael The MetropolitanAt]antaOlympicGames Authe AIDS virus and said "professional jealousy" is a Jordan and there are other superstars not getting the thority approved the plans for the $207 million factor in other players' opinions, the New York Post press they are, the others sort of resent that," the nowbrick facility at its board meeting Tuesday. reported Wednesday. retired Bird said. The Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games "I see it as a bad case ofprofessional jealousy," said "The same kind of thing happens in everyday life. I expects to begin construction next fall, and have the former Boston Celtics star, who was in Palm Beach, think that's what's happening to Magic now. He's been the stadium built by late 1995. Some aspects ofthe Ha., on Tuesday for a celebrity golf tournament organon top for so long, that everybody is taking a shot at him, stadium plan, including parking, mass transit accss ized by Greg Norman. 'As far as playing against (Johnson), to cut him down a little bit. They've been waiting so and entrance-exit plazas, still must be completed. I'd have no problem whatsoever." many years to do it and now they're getting the oppor"We're looking now to ACOG to get it done," Johnson announced his second retirement from the tunity to do it. It's sad. authority chairman George Berry said. Los Angeles Lakers on Nov. 2 after Utah star Karl "There's a lot of attention being focused on Magic Approval of the design and financial plan, Malone and other players expressed fears about playing because he's the first athlete to come out and try to play which includes guarantees to protect taxpayers against Johnson. with the AIDS virus. from having to rescue the project if the Games are Bird and Malone spent two months during the sum"I feel very sorry for him, but there's nothing you can a financial failure, was unanimous. Mayor Maynmer practicing against Johnson as teammates on the do now." ard Jackson, an authority member, cast a lone "no" vote for the construction strategy. Jackson wants all stadium construction workers to be paid the prevailing union wage. ACOG, which has vowed not to exploit workers, wants to study the wage issue. Penguins getting votes? TORONTO (AP) -Mario Lemieux and two Pittsburgh Penguins teammates are among the Wales Conference leaders in early fan balloting for the NHLAI-StarGaneonFeb.6in Montreal. Lemieux, in results made public Tuesday, led all conference centers with 49,327 votes to 23,426 for rookie Eric Lindros of Philadelphia. The leading Wales Conference vote-getter was wing the Penguins' Jaromir Jagr with 58,712. Teammate Kevin Stevens was second among wings with 38,798 votes. The leading goaltender was Patrick Roy of Montreal with 40,259 votes, while Ray Borque of Boston (52,682) and Brian Leetch of the New York Rangers (42,811) were the leading defensemen. Earvin "Magic" Johnson (left) and A.C. Green celebrate. ^P -P"4

PAGE 16

Tropic Times Nov. 13, 1992 AIDS awareness soon Nation-building projects set ANCON (GORGAS PAO)--U.S. Army Medical Army Community Health Nursing DepartTimmons Endara discuss p 1 993 n ventures ment is planning activities throughout the comimmons, Lndaa di u plans jintv nue munity from Dec. I to 5, designated by the World PANAMA CITY, (USARSO PAO) -The Palace of governments. CS-93 Phase I began in Octoberand will Health Organization as World AIDS Day/Awarethe Herons with its majestic colonial architecture and be completed in December at a total cost of $202,394 ness Week. indoor Spanish patios served as the backdrop to discusforconstruction materials. FC-93 projects will begin in According to Lt. Col. Mary Hoke, chief Army sions between Panamanian President Guillermo Endara January and will be completed in June at a total cost of Community Health Nursing, the purpose of the Galimany and U.S. Army South Commander Maj. Gen. $19 million. CS-93 Phase II will begin in July and will week long activities is to reach the community and Richard F. Timmons. be completed in September at a total cost of another raise awareness on HIVas areal threat to the comThe two discussed the projected nation assistance $422,394 for construction materials. munity. It is essential to make adults aware of the programs, Cosecha Amistad '93 and Fuertes Caminos Timmons also used the meeting to convey his appreimportance of taking early actions toward the '93 Panama. Endara was accompanied by Minister of ciation to Endara and the people of Panama for the prevention of HIV infection. Army Commumty Public Works Alfredo Arias. warm hospitality extended to his soldiers. Health Nurses have worked primarily at the unit U.S. Army South Engineer Keith York biefed Endara "We are happy to be a part of this nation assistance level teaching HIV/AIDS prevention classes. on the details of the up-coming projects. process forthe futureof Panama," he said. "Results are "This time we want to involvethe whole family "Under CS-93 and FC-93, U.S. soldiers are working of benefit to both nations. Soldiers have the opportunity as it is at home where education for the prevention with the Ministries of Public Works, Education, Health to practice theirskills, and they appreciatethe opportuof HIV infection begins," said Hoke. and the Water Works Institutein repairing 27.5 kilomenity to visit a foreign country and experience the culture World AIDS Day/Awareness Week will close ters ofroad, seven bridges, 38 schools and seven health and understand its people. with a "fun walk, run or stroll" for AIDS Awareclinics. "The cooperation and effective assistance of the ness at the Amador Causeway on Dec 5. Prizes "Drillers will join plumbers and electricians from Panamanian ministers, other government officials and will be awarded for the best decorated tricycles, the Panamanian Water Works Institute to drill 98 wells the people of Panama are very instrumental in making bicycles, or wagons with this year's theme: "AIDS: and install pumps," York added. these programs come to life," he added. A Community Commitment." For information, "The wells upgrade will increase agricultural proTimmons also expressed appreciation to the Panaor to volunteer to help with activities, contact E. ductivity in most of the interior of Panama," said manian business community for the welcome and fareIcaza, 287-4327. Deputy Chief of Staff for Civil Military Operations, well picnics it held for visiting soldiers last year. Col. Lee Merchen. Endara also applauded the joint ventures. Merchen also noted that the new wells will help "These are constructed without selfishness for the Campaign ends Monday maintain waterpressure, decrease the number of hours benefit of the people who are in need of medical care, with no water, and drastically reduce maintenance water and transportation. The people of Panama will be QUARRY HEIGHTS (USSOUTHCOM PAO) time. Thepumps will servegrowing towns and cities of glad to see the soldiers in their communities," Endara -With just more than a week to go, the U.S. Panama Province and decrease the potential threat of said. Southern Command has collected two thirds of its cholera. About 5,000 soldiers and 250 pieces of heavy con1992 Combined Federal Campaign goal of While drillers and engineers work on wells, roads struction equipment will be deployed from the states to $350,000. and other constructionprojects, medicalpersonnel will participate in the FC-93 Program. Every two weeks a As of Nov. 6, the command raised $234,075 or be providing health care to thousands of Panamanians. new group of 450 soldiers will arrive in Panama. Sol67 percent of the total goal. The campaign ends on Veteranarians also keep busy caring for domestic anidiers are assigned to the Army and Navy Reserve, Army Monday. mals in remote areas of the isthmus, York said. National Guard and Air National Guard. They will Leading the way thus far is Headquarters, U.S. When workers finish the CS-93 Phase II projects, complete their last rotation in June. SOUTHCOM which has already attained 161 they will have completed a total of 266 schools, 91 Support throughout the exercise is provided by the percent of its goal, while the Air Force has colclinics, 60 roads, and 365 wells since 1990. Thirty-one U.S. Army South, 41st Area Support Group, 536th lected 95 percent of its goal. MEDRETEs will have also provided health care to Engineer Battalion, the 142nd Medical Batalion, 154th nearly 150,000 Panamanians and thousands of animals. Signal Battalion, and 128th Aviation Brigade. The FC-93 soldiers will be working primarily in the The programs' principal objectives are to demonAmador paving soon western region of Chiriqui, but the government of Panstrate continued U.S. support for strengthening democama strives to distribute project sites to benefit people racy in Panama, help the people of Panama, provide COROZAL (Tropic Times) -Riding around in all its provinces. meaningful training for soldiers, and strengthen the Fort Amador could soon be smoother when workAs in previous CS and FC programs, the cost of these bonds of friendship between the people of Panama and ers under contract to the Directorate of Housing projects will be shared by the Panamanian and U.S. the United States. and Engineering finish repaving the roads. Preliminary work should begin Monday and u the actual repaving starting a week later, said Gabrielle Capriles, spokeswoman for DEH. U.S.Army soiaier shot near Colon The road being repaved runs from the vicinity forcement Agency, reported a box had been stolen of the golf course clubhouse, past the Army Air Crime Sc from his shipment of household goods Nov. 6. The box Force Exchange Service Filling Station, to the contained a Taurus 9mm pistol, holster and cleaning area in front of Club Amador. FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The military kit. DEH officials feel this project will greatly police reported that between Oct. 31 and Nov. 6, U.S. Burglars broke into the home of a 92nd Personnel benefit not only the U.S. personnel who utilize the citizens were the victims of six crimes including an Support Company soldier in Las Cumbres and stole a community facilities there, but also the host naassault that left a soldier from the 1097th TransportaVCR, cashbox, jewelry box and several Nintendo tion neighbors who use the Causeway facilities for tion Company injured. recreation. Tesliradrvnwihafinintolyhigh games. "Every effort will bemadeto expeditecompleoldierwasdrivingwithafriendintheonly g The burglars bent the metal bars and removed the tion of the project and minimize disruptionme crime area in the town of Sabinitas during the early screen from a window to gain entry. people who live and travel on this thoroughfare" evening of Nov. 1. The soldier exited the car and siees ro a wind w o a entry. Capriles said. approached an unidentified male subject who shot the Thieves broke the window of a Special Operations soldier in the groin. Coco Solo HealthClinic treated the Support Command soldier's caring Bethania During the soldier and air transported him to Gorgas Army Comlate of evening Nov 1., the thieves broke the rear AF early release program munity Hospital where he is still being treated. passenger side window and stole four video tapes and A 92nd Military Police Battalion soldier was in the three pairs of glasses. WASHINGTON (Armed Forces News Servparking lot of the local bar Patatus while shopping Oct. A soldier from the 59th Engineer Company parked ice) -Air Force people due to leave the AirForce 31. A robber and an accomplice approached him from his car in the parking lot of his apartment in Bethania the o) -r aftr Fee pebpbefore Jan. 8, can participate behind, placed an unknown object against his back, and evening of Nov. 4. When he returned in the morning, he on or after Dec. 9 but elrea, para. stole $300 from the soldier's pocket. discovered that thieves had stolen the four hubcaps off in the annual Christmas early release program. A soldier from Headquarters Company, Law Enhis car. Officers and enlisted members stationed in the Continental United States and overseas who have NG JO sFGa a date of separation within the program's window can ask to leave on an earlier date within the same IN, Th Avattime period. taion, 228th Aviation Exclusions to the program are listed in Air Regiment transForce regulations 36-12, officers, and 39-10, enported these gifts to listed. They include: the Cerro Miguel de -people being processed forinvoluntary sepaCosta Abajo, Panration. m asyeaspr -those awaiting trial or the result of a trial by of one the many court-martial or appellate review of court-martial Christmas projects conviction. %sponsored by military -anyone under investigation or on internapersonnel, family tional hold. members and DoD -people in probation and rehabilitation procivilians employees. grams. The U.S. Southern Applications are made at the Consolidated Command ChristBase Personnel Office separations unit. mas sponship program is now underU.S. Ary phow by gt Jo-phono ay

PAGE 17

Tropictivities Nov. 13, 1992 An entertainment guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page B 1 U.S. Army photo by Sg. James Yocum Family member Ricardo Lachman takes a shot on the pool table at the Fort Clayton Youth Center. See story, photos page B5. New roommate Jennifer Jason Mercury Capri XR2 convertible TV. B3 Leigh terrorizes Bridget Fonda in turbo offers better performance than Crossword.B12 Single White Female. Mazda Miata for under $20,000. Ads.B9

PAGE 18

Tropic Times 9pm Single White Female (R) Bridget Fonda, Jennifer Saturday Jason Leigh 7pm 3 Ninjas (PG) Victor Wong, Michael Treanor Sunday 7pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe HOWARD DAVIS Thursday Today Today 7pm Stay Tuned (PG) John Ritter, Pam Dawber 7pm The Gun In Betty Lou's Handbag (PG-13) Pene7pm 3 Ninjas (PG-13) Victor Wong, Michael Treanor Nov. 20 lope Miller, Eric Thal Saturday 7pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe 9pm Whispers In The Dark (R) Annabella Sciorra, Jamey 7pm Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith Sheridan 9pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe Saturday Sunday NOMVI SaseuChape funtio Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie SmilthAMAD R NO MOVIE -Base Chapel function 79 Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe AMADOR Suday Monday *2pm Little Nemo (0) Animated Tonday 7pm The Gun In Betty Lou's Handbag (PG-13) Pene7pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe oUay lop Mllr, ri TaITuesday 7pm A Stranger Among Us (P0) Melanie Griffith, 9pm Single White Female (R) Bridget Fonda, Jennifer 7pm Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith Eric Thad *Jason Leigh Wednesday Saturday Monday 7pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Booth 7pm Whispers In The Dark (R) Annabella Sciorra, 7pm The Gun In Betty Lou's Handbag (PG-13) PeneThursday Jamey Sheridan lope Miller, Eric Thal 7pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13) Sunday 9pm Single White Female (R) Bridget Fonda, Jennifer Tom Selleck, Marlon Brando 7pm Raising Cain (R) John Lithgow, Lolita DavidoJason Leigh Nov.20 vitch Tuesday 7pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash Thursday 7pm Diggstown (R) James Woods, Louis Gossett Jr. 7pm Boomerang (R) Eddie Murphy, Robin Givens 9pm Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (R) David Lynch, SHERM AN Nov.20 Kimberly Gore Wednesday Today 7pm Raising Cain (R) John Lithgow, Lolita Davido7pm The Gun In Betty Lou's Handbag (PG-13) Pene7pm Boomerang (R) Eddie Murphy, Robin Givens vitch lope Miller, Eric Thal 9pm Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (R) David Lynch, Kimberly Gore Thursday 7pm Diggstown (R) James Woods, Louis Gossett Jr. 9pm Single White Female (R) Bridget Fonda, Jennifer Jason Leigh Nov.20 7pm Out On A Limb (PG) Matthew Broderick, Heidi Kling 9pm Sneakers (P0-13) Robert Redford, Dan Aykroyd CLAYTON Today INGLE WHITE FEMALE 6:30pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13) Tom Selleck, Marlon Brando w en d T e, a 9:10pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash Saturday .ti h 2pm Freddy as F.R.O.7. (G) Animated 6:30pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13) Tom Selleck Marlon Brando Single White Female 9:10pm -Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash Bridget Fonda, Jennifer Jason Leigh Sunday 2pm Freddy As F.R.O.7. (G) Animated Bridget Fonda stars in apsychologicalthriller about ayoung lady who, after breaking up with her boyfriend, 6:30pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13) agrees to share a room with a woman she hardly knows. The comfort of the new roommate soon turns to terror Tom Selleck, Marlon Brando as her real motives are revealed. R (sex, violence, language), 108 min. 9:10pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash Monday The Gun In Betty Lou's Handbag 7pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash T G n B e r Eru' Han 9pm Whispers In The Dark (R) Annabella Sciorra, Penelope Miller, Eric ThaI Jamey Sheridan Ignored by her policeman husband and bored with her job at the library, pretty but shy Betty Lou seems Tuesday resigned to her fate. But when she stumbles across a murder weapon an idea is born -Betty Lou confesses to 6:10pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13) the crime. PG-13 (language, violence), 90 min. Tom Selleck, Marlon Brando 9:10pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me Wednesday 7pm Whispers In The Dark (R) Annabella Sciorra, David Lynch, Kimberly Cole Jamey Sheridan David Lynch returns to the Pacific Northwest for this telling of the mysterious events leading up to high 9pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash school queen Laura Palmers' untimely death. R (strong violence, sex, drug content, language), 134 min. Thursday 7pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash 9pm Whispers In The Dark (R) Annabella Sciorra, Jamey Sheridan James Woods, Louis Gossett, Jr. Nov.20 James Woods is an ex-con man who teams up with a former fighter in order to rescue Diggstown from the 7pm The Gun In Betty Lou's Handbag (PG-13) Penecorrupt clutches ofBruce Dern. All Louis Gossett has to do is beat 10 fighters. in a row. R (language), 98 min. lope Miller, Eric Thal II Thurs., tacos. Fri.&SsL, prime rib/seafood. Dining Sat., 4:30pm-midnight, variety music, free pizza. 8:30pm.; Fri.&Sat., 6-9:30pm. Dining room bar Club open to Enlisted Club Memebers while enlisted 286-3511. open, 4-9pm. Laguna Lounge open Mon., Wed. and Dining Room under renovation. Disco: Fri., 7pmFri., 4-10pm, complimentary snacks. Pool bar: Club Amador midnight Lounge:Mon.-Thurs.,4-9pm, Fri.,4pmQuarry Heights O'Club Mon.-Thurs., noon-6pm; Fri., noon-8pm; Lunch: Tues.-Fri., 11:30am-ipm. La Concha Reamidnight, SaL, 6-9pm. Social hour: Fri. 5-6pm. Breakfast Mon.-Fri., 6:30-8:30am, Sat., 8-10am. Sat.&Sun., 10am-6pm. Thurs: steak-by-the-ounce; taurant: Tue.-Sat., 6-10pm; Bridge Lounge: TuesBingo: Wed., 6pm. Closed Sun.,&holidays. 284Lunch: Mon.-Fri., 11:30am-tpm. Dinner: Tues.Fri.&Sat., prime rib. 283-4498. Thurs., 5-10pm; Fri., social hour, 5pm-midnight; 3089, Building 707 Thurs. 6-9pm; Fr.-Sat. 8-10pm. Bar lounge Tues.Sat., 6pm-midnight; punchbrunchforchildren, first Fri., 4-10pm; Sat. 6-10pm; Fri., social hour, 4-7pm. Acey-Deucey Club Sun. each month, 10:30am-1:30pm. Champagne Top Three Lounge 282-4380/3439. Open to E-5 through &-6 Mon., Wed.&Fri., 5-10pm brunch, Sun., 10:3Dam-1:30pm. Beef & burgundy, Open: Mon.-Thurs., 4-10 pm, Fri., 4pm-lam, Sat., CPO Club only. Cal 283-4332. Tues., 6-lOpm; pasta pizszz,Wed., 6-9pm;Mongo5-llpm, Sun.&holidays, closed. Social hour. ian BBQ, Thurs., 6-9pm. Bingo: Tue.&Wed., Mon.&Fri., 4:30-6pm. 284-3089, Building 707. Open to -7 through F-9, civilians NM-6 and above, Clayton NCO Club 7pm. Reservations: 282-4025/3837/3534. andfamilymembers. Lunch: Mon.-Fri., iam-ipm, Main corral: Mon.-Thurs., 7-llpm; Fri.-Sat., 7pmAlbrook Club all-you-can-eat buffet; Sat, grill open, noon-4pm. 2am; Sun., 1-1 1:30pm. Forum: Tues., steak night, 5Howard Enlisted Members' Club Cashier's cage: Mon.-Fri., lam-1:30pm. Mon., Dinner: Fri.&Sat., 6-9pm. Social hour Wed.&Fri, 9pm; Wed., international buffet, 5-9pm; Thurs., Cashier's cage: Sun.-Thurs., 9am-9pm; Fri.&Sat, Thurs., Fri., 2-4:30pm, Wed., 2:304:30pm. Din4pm, complimentary snacks. 283-5475. ladies night, 5-9pm; Fri.-Sat., fine dining, 4:309am-1 1pm; holidays,4-9pm. Dining: Casual Cove/ ing: Lunch, l1am-lpm. Dinner. Mon., Wed., 10pm; entertainment, 9pm-2am. Bingo: Sun., 2Tropical Breezeway, Mon.-FrL, 6-30-9am, 11amThurs., 6-8:30pm, Fri-Sat., 6-9pm. Sun., chamAnchorage Club Spm; Tues., 6-l0pm. The Underground: Mon.11pm, Fri.&Sat.,until lam. Dining room closed for page brunck, 10am-lpm. Mon., Mongolian BBQ. Open to all ranks. Breakfast Mon.-Fri., 6:30Thurs., 4:30-1 1pm; Fri., 5pm-2am; Sat., lpm-2am. renovation, members may dine at Howard O'Club Thur., Mexican. Fri., prime rib/seafood. Sat, 9:30am Sat, 8-10:30am. Lunch: Mon.-FrL, 11amMidnight buffet: Wed., Fri., Sat., lopm-1:30am. Mon.-Sat. Ballroom: variety disco Sun., Tues., steak. Italian 2nd/4th Wed. each month; mini-gour1:30pm. Dinner:Mon.-Fri.,6-9pm, a la carte dining. Casa Maria, Mon.-Sun., 5-lOpm. 287-4343/4716. Thurs., Fri., Sat. 8pm-midnight. Casual Cove: varimet, Ist/3rd Wed. each month. Tues., dining roum Grill: Mon.-Sat., 11-1:30pm; Sun.&hol., 3:30ety disco Wed., 8pm-midnight, country&wetern closed, bar menu available in lounge. Disco, Fri., 9:30pm. Pizza&fried chicken to go, 5-9pm daily. Davis Community Club Tues.&Fri. 8pm-midnight, rock&roll, 8pm-lam. 8pm-lam. Lounge open: Mon.-Thurs., 4:30-lopm; Bingo, Mon., 5:30pm, special menu. Family night, Lunch: Mon.-Fri., 11:30am-lpm. Dinner: Main lounge: Fri.&Sat., 5:30pm-midnight, Wed., Fri., 4:30pm-1am; Sat., 5:30pm-midnight. Social Tues., 5:30-9pm. Social hour, Wed., 4-6pm. Wed.&Thurs., 6-9pm; Fri.&Sat., 6-lOpm. Brunch: 5:30-lOpm. Social hour. Mon., Wed.&Fri., reduced hour. Fri., 4-6pm. Closed Ist Tues. each month at country&western night, steak dinner, Wed., 6-9pm. Sun., 10:30am-1:30pm. Bingo: Sun., 3-6pm. 289price drinks. Bingo: Sun., 2pm; Wed., 7pm; bar 2pm. Flea market lst Sun. each month, 9am-4pm. All-you-can-eat aco night,Thurs.Barhours: Tues.3289/5160. bingo, Mon.-Fri., 5-6:30;m 284-4189, Building Texas BBQ last Sat. each month 6:30-9pm, Fri., 4-1 lpm; Fri.&Sat., 4pm-midnight; Sun.&hol., 710. country&westem dancing until lam. 286-4128/ 3:30-10pm. 283-4332/3040. Red Door Club 3547, Building 13. Mon., progressive music, 7-10pm. Tes., special Howard O'Club Rodman Officers' Club night,7-Ilpm. Wed., oldies,7-1lpm. Turs., ladies Cashier's cage: Mon-Fri., (am-Ipm. Dining: STRAC Club Open to officers, warrant officer., civilians grade night,7-10pm. Fri., social hour, progressive music, Lunch,Mon.-Fri., 11am-lpm.FullmenuTues.,Fri., Mon.-Wed., 4:30-10pm. Thurs., 4:30-midnight, NM-7 and above, and family members. Lunch: 7pm-midnight. Sat., rock 'n roll, 7pem-midnight. Sat., and mini-menu Mon., Wed., Thur., 6-9pm. oldies and classic rock. Fri., TGI, 4:30pm-lam. Mon.-Fri., 11m-1:30pm. Dinner Sun-Thur., 62874343.

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Tropic Times _TV Schedule Nov B3 Channels 8 & 10 Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Nov. 20 6:30-m NBC News ar Sorise 6:30am CatolkniMarines 6:00jm Robert Sculler Hor of 6:30m NBC News Sundlse 6:30am NBC News at Sunrlse 6:30am NBCNews a Sunria 6:30am NBC News a Suns 6:3a= NBCNews alSInriu 7:00 ABC3oodMwning 7:00 AirFeorNews Power 7:00 ABCGoodMolng 7:00 ABCOoodMorning 7:00 ABCGoodMorning 7:00 ABCGoodMoming 7:00 ABCeoOdM-rning Amedca 7:30 Navy News This Week 6:30 Thirty Good Minuts Ameria A.wi. AmeIa America Amer a 9:00 Body by Jake :00 Canoon Coer 7:00 Studio 7 9:00 Body by Jake 9:00 Body by Jake 9:00 Body by Jake 9:00 Body by Jake 9:00 Body by Jake 9:30 SesameStee 0:30 JuatForKidal 7:30 The700Club 9:30 SeaameSereet 9:30 SeameSree 9:30 SraameSuee 9:30 SeaeSree 9:30 SeameStreet 10:30 SpaceablpBarth Woody Woodpecker 8:00 Both Sides w/Jaie 10:30 FamrilyDoublelhre 10:30 SilverSpoons 10:30 Back ToThe F.-e 10:30 SilverSpoons 10:30 Spacresbipsts 11:00 FunilyFead WamerfBos.Carto-o Jackso: 11:00 Faly11:00 FamilyFe 11:00 FamilyFeud 10:00 FamilyFeod 100 FilyFedl 11:30 ShowbizToday WamerBen Cartoo 8:30 WashiogtonWeekin 11:30 SkowbizToday 11:30 Showbi.Today 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday 11.30 ShowbiToday Noon Headlbre News Break Biakios Review non. Headline News Break non Headline News Beeak noon Headln News Break noe Headline Newsbeak noon Headline News Break 12:15 SCNMiddy BackTomeFuture 9:00 CBSSundayMoming 12:15 SCNMIdday 12:15 SCNMIdday 12:15 SCNMIdday 12:15 SCNMldday 12:15 SCNMiddoy 1230 Sports Latenigi Widget 10:30 Face Th Nation 12:30 SporwsMachine 12:30 Sports aWeNight 12:30 SpntasIeNighL 12:30 SporsLalenlght 12:30 Sports Latrigt 1:00 OpreslWinfey 1030 H-naBatbaraCanoons 11:00 HeadlkarNews 1:00 OpeshWinfrey 1:00 Donahue 1:00 Opra Winfrey 1:00 Donahue 1:00 OpeahWinfrey 2:00 An.threrWord 11:35 HeadlineNews Break 11:30 ThIs Week W/David 2:00 AnotherWordd 2:00 AnotherWorild 2:00 AnotherWorld 2:00 AnotherWorld 2:00 AnaberWold 3:00 Pdce Is Right noon CPAFootbsO: Mineos s. Brinkley 3:00 Fece ls Right 3:00 Price Is Right 3:00 Pce Is Right 3:00 Pece Is Right 3:00 P&ce 1. Right 4:00 ThinkFaetl Michig12:30pmlbony/JetShowcue 4:00 Wild&Crazylds 4:00 SquareOneTV 4:00 WamerBeolher 4:00 FamilyDoubleDare 4:00 ThiokFatlI 4:20 OuldingLighi 3:00 HeadlneNews 1:00 NFLFooLba. Oilersvs. 4:25 OudingLight 4:25 GadingLiht Cartoons 4:25 uoidingLight 4:25 GuidingLIgt :15 GeneralHoapiLal 3:30 CFAFootball:Arizona VIkings 5:15 GeneralHospital 0:15 GeneralHospital 4:25 GuidingLight 5:15 amerslHospial 0:15 GoneralHopital 6:00 SCNlivoingReport s. USC 4:00 Slr Tek 6:00 SCNEYoningReport 6:00 SCNeBvmngRrpon 5:15 .ooeral Hrpital 6:00 SCNIvnolngRqpopt 6:00 SCNBvningRepot 6:15 HeadlineNews Break 6:30 HeadlineNews 0:00 HeadlbieNews 6:15 CNNHeadlineNews 6:15 HeadlineNews Break 6:00 SCNEveningReport 6:1 HeadlineNews Break 6:15 CNNHeadlieNews 6:30 WaddNewsTonight 7:00 FightBack] w/David 5:30 Onstage Break 6:30 WeddNewaTonight 6:15 HeadlineNews Break 6:30 WoddNewsTonight Break 7:00 Jenprdyl Honowit. 6:00 WWFSupeooarsof 6:30 WaddNewaTonlght 7:00 ClassinConcentration 6:30 WdLdNewsTonlghr 7:00 ClassinConerasicol 6:30 WoddNewTonight 7:30 TallTasra dLegods 7:30 CFA: Albamavs. Wratling 7:00 Classic Conanceaton 7:30 TheFailGay 7:00 ClssicConeutranioni 7:25 MovI:-beMuppets 7:00 CLasiConcerieontl 8:30 PdmedrneLive MlssuIpplSt. 7:00 SreaeStoaer 7:30 AnyfllngBuaLove 8:30 48 Hourse 7:30 WedneadayNightMov: Takeonhartrtan" 7:30 TsU]T.IsaodLgends 9:30 CBS BIvenLgNews 10:30 HeadlineNews 8:00 SondayNightMovie: 8:00 B-EnlogShade 9:30 CBSBv-ingNew 'OperationPetcoat" 9:00 SPCIAL:BeyondThe 8:30 PriedineLive 10:00 EnerairneraTonghrt 11:00 Vidoodink "nconvrnbonlWomsn" 8:30 60 Mirnrue 10:00 EnlernaivenaTonighLt 9:30 CBS Evening News Glass Cing 9:30 CBS Eveing News 1030 St. Elewhee 11:30 SatudayNight Live 9:40 Headline News Break 9:30 CBSBvering News 10:30 MikeH m er 1000 BneertalenerntTonIght 9:30 CBS ening News 10:00 Ereertaimenr Trnight 11:30 SCNLaieBdion 1:CO-sFiday Night Videos 10:00 ErateeainernaThisWeek 10:00 urertelerseotTfnlght 11:30 SCNLa=eBdii.o 10:30 LALaw 10:00 BnotleronmedTonight 1&.30 St. Ewlewer 11:35 TnnigLShow 2:00 AlINigirtMovies: 11:00 Inspecerdrce. 10:30 Dynasty 11:35 TonightShow 1130 SCNLateEdrio 10:30 MgnuP.IL 11:30 SCNLaeBdIion 12:35amLau.[ghtW/ "OnekyPiak" WdmdghtLayKrngLive 11:30 SCNLateBdiion 12:35p es1 iglow/Davd 1135 TonightShw 11:00 HeadlineNews 11:35 ToulghtShow Iteoneene 4:10 AS&NighrMevis: 1:00 Business Wodd 11:35 TonlghLShow Leonern 1235am 7abrmgha W/Davd 11:30 SCNLaMeBditin 12:35am LarightW/ 1:35 Nighline "Rvnge f'be Nerdu I: Nerds 1:30 HeadlIneNews 12:35pmLaenightWletoeronm 1:35 NIghtline Lcer 11:35 TonightShow Lononnan 2:05 AliNightMovlis: inPardise" 2:00 McGlaughlinGroup 1:35 Nighlline 2:05 HndlineNews Sek 1:35 Nightline 12:35ammruLarnhtW/ILcmeran 1:35 Nightline Jumping JnckFlashR" 5:30 HeadlineNew Breslk 2:30 SposMachdne 2:05 Headline News Break 2:30 Spods Laenlght 2:00 Hondline News Break 1:35 Nightline 2:05 AllNIghtMovies: 3:50 AI1NightMovies: 3:00 CNN Couner 2:30 SportsLaenIght 3:00 Arsenio Hall 2:30 SportoTonight 2:05 Headline News Break "Alien Nstion" 'R.v.ogeof The Nerds" 4:00 HradlireNews 3:00 Areson Hall 4:00 TonighltShow 3:00 Arvori Hall 2:30 SposTaoight 3:30 AlNight Movrs: 5:15 Videolinks 4:30 CNNWrldReport 4:00 TonightShow 0:00 LabnightW/Lanermarn 4:00 TonightShow 3:00 AreeninHalShow 'OperallonPelwcna" 6:00 HeadlineNews 600 HondlnrNewsBreak 5:00 1LarolgahW/Lrtmnn 6:00 HeadlineNewsBreak 5:00 sronightW/Ltteeran 4:00 Tonigh[Show 0:30 HeadlieNews 6:30 Headline News Break 6:00 Headline Newbeak 6:00 Hseline Newbreak 5:00 LaenightW/Leulern. 6:00 Headline News Break 6:00 HoealeNews Cable Channel 14 Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Nov. 20 6:30am Smlcast W/8&10 6:30am Soiulca w/8 & 10 6:00am LambChp 6:3amSolcas W/8 & 10 6:30amSiulastW/&10 6:30am Siulcaet W/8 & 10 6:30a SinulcastW/8&10 6:30am Sinlcast W/8 & 10 9:00 OprahWinfreyShbw 10:30 FroilyTheatrr 6:20 Gerbert 9:00 OprahWiofery 9:00 Donahue 9:00 Opre.hWifrey 9:00 Donae 9:00 OprahlifreyShow10:00 Today Treasurelslaed" 6:45 TaleSpin 10:00 Today 10:00 Today 10:00 Today 1.00 Today 10:00 Today noo Headline Newsbreak noon Headline News 7:10 Darwing Dck noo Headline News Break noon Headline News noo Headline Newsbreak noo Headline Newsbreak noo Headline Newabreak 1210 SCNMidday 12:30 SatundayMvie "The 7:35 WinnieThePooh 12:10 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMldday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMIdday 12:30 AliMy Cildrn ShIsggyDA." 8:00 Sopetfrlends 12:30 AllMy Children 12:30 AlIMy Cildrn 12:30 AllMy Childrn 12:30 AllMyChilde 12:30 AllMy Chfidre 1:30 One Life to Live 2:05 SatundayMovie:"ernesl 8:25 Widget 1:30 On Life o Live 1:30 OnrLfetoLve 1:30 One Life o Ive 1:30 One LfetoL 1:30 OneLiflo Live 2:30 The Young AndkRerloss Goes To Jil' 8:45 BackToTheFoowe 2:30 YoungalThRsestlRess 2:30 The Young And Raeles 2:30 YoungAndhrI Rrstles 2:30 The Young And Realess 2:30 The Young And Resleas 3:30 OnsameStree 3:30 SposerForHire 9:10 NinjaTmtles 3:30 nsameeStrer 3:30 SesameSreet 3:30 Sesame~reet 3:30 SesameStreet 3:30 SesameStreet 4:30 spsceshipllarh 4:30 OnPitRoad 9:30 Capt.Plner 4:30 Clari.aBplainahIAll 4:30 ThinkFaad 4:30 ShoolastiSportos 4:30 LeavelToBeaver 4:30 Spacehiplaith 4:00 Chaonel One 5:00 American Mladiaor 10:00 SuarTrek 4:55 Chaonel One 4:00 Channel One America 4:55 Channel One 4:55 Chamel One 5:10 AftorSchoolopcil 6:00 HelwineNews 11:00 Combail 5:10 AfrorSchoolSpecial 5:10 AfrerSchoolspecial 5:05 AftercboolSpecial 5:10 Afler-cboalSpecial 5:10 AfterSchoolSpeial 6:00 SCNlveningReport 6:30 StarTrTkIheNont noonHeadlineNews 6:00 SCNivuIngRpon 6:00 SCNEveningRporn 6:00 SCN.ionlogReport 6:00 SCNlvmningRcpon 6:00 SCNB-iningRqptot 6:15 HeadlineNewa Break Generatio 12:30 Today'sournmet 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 Healher News Break 6:15 Headline Nws Break 6:15 HmrdineNws Break 6:30 NBCNighilyNews 7:30 Cops 1:00 Sunday Movi: 6:30 NBCNighilyNews 6:30 NBCNighblyNews 6:30 NBCNigbLlyNews 6:30 NBCNighrlyNews 6:30 NBCNightrlyNews 7:00 Ron 8:00 Thesipsons "OperaliooPelicoar" 7:00 BrverlyHlls90210 7:00 AmoricasFunnieat 7:00 FullHouse 7:00 PerfeStrangera 7:00 Ron 7:30 FreshPrince 8:30 AnythingButLove 3:05 MagicaWorldofDisney 8:10 MacGyver HameVidens 7:30 Cheem 7:30 FamilyMaster 7:30 FreshPrinc 8:00 FridayNighrMovie: 9:00 Roseanno Part2.f2 9:00 MondayNightFootball: 7:30 Hamemprrovmont 8:00 MurderShWroe 8:00 BveringShe 8:00 NBA:Gamel"Ladyhawke" 9:30 In Living Coo 3:30 Headline News Bils vs Delphins (JIP) 8:00 Nortnlinpooure 9:00 Siner 10:00 Videolinka Trailblzer vsa King. 10:00 MiamiVice 10:00 Videohnks 4:00 NFLFeoball:New midigihtHeadlineNews 8:55 Teaday Night Movie: 10:00 China Beach 11:00 Headline News 10:30 NBA :Gane211:00 HeadlineNews 11:00 Heardline News Orleans va San Fracsco 12:30 SCNLatelEdiLio "Dir Hard" 11:00 Headline News 11:30 S.udoyNigtILve Bulls vs Lakeer 11:30 SCNLalEditi 11:30 SarurdayNightLivr 7:00 HrodlmeNews 12:35 Simulcast with channels 9 11:00 HeadlineNews 11:30 SCNLaleEdion 1:00am FRiday Night Vide.s 1 00amHeadinrNews 11:35 Ar-ont Hall 1:00omn Friday Night Video 7:30 Te Wonder Years O&10 11:30 SCN Lae Edition 11:35 Amono Hall 2:00 Fiing Line 1:30 SCNLateEdition 12:35amDavid Le"e'r 2:00 Firing Line 8:00 SundayNightMovie: 11:35 Anroamo Hall 12:35amSimulcastwith 2:30 SposLaenght 1:35 Nighrrine 1:35 Nighilinr 2:30 Spo-sLarenight "Splash" 12:35m Simcaawith Channels 8 & 10 3:00 ErnterinmonlThisWeek 2:05 HeadlireNes Break 2:05 Headline Nws Break 3:00 enoertarmono Thia Week 10:30 Hcadlinr News channels 8 & 10 4:00 SaturdayNighrLve 2:30 Sports Lseonight 2:30 SportsLatenight 4:00 SaturdayNigtlive 11:00 MucGrnder&Loud 5:30 HeadinaNews 3:00 ArsenioHall 3:00 AmeonioHall :30 HeadlineNews mldoight60Mbinues 6:00 HeadlineNews 4:00 TonightShow 4:00 Tmighthow 6:00 Headle News 1:00 Olmulcastwih chanonls 8 5:00 Late Night W/David 5:00 LateNigrtW/Dnvid &10 It.erMnn Ie~renon 6:00 Headline Newsbreak 6:00 Headline Newsbreak Channels 8 & 10 Cable Channel 14 SPORTS SPORTS College football: NFL Football: CFA: Illinois vs. Michigan Nov. 14 at noon New Orleans vs San Francisco Sunday at 4 p.m. CFA: Arizona vs. USC Nov. 14 at 3:30 p.m. Bills vs Dolphins Monday at 9 p.m. CFA: Alabama vs. Mississippi St. Nov. 14 at 7:30 p.m. CFA: Michigan vs. Ohio State Nov. 21 at noon SPECIALS SPECIALS Combat! Sundays at 11 a.m. Beyond The Glass Ceiling Nov. 19 at 9 p.m. On October 2,1962, open warfare broke out in the living rooms of America as a platoon of hard-bitten U.S. infantrymen took the Nielsen ratings by frontal Produced by the Cable News Network, this special takes an up close look at assault. Cast: Jack Hogan, Rick Jason, Warren Stevens, and Dick Peabody. women in the workplace. Evening Shade NEW SERIES Thursdays at 8 p.m. Classic Concentration When Wood (Burt Reynolds) agrees to help a friend by delivering his mobile Weekdays at 7 p.m. home, his entire family and some close friends end up going along. Cast: Marilu Henner, Elizabeth Ashley, Ossie Davis, and Charles Durning. Alex Trebek concentrates on another game with this American classic where contestants try to solve the riddle of a hidden rebus puzzle by matching numbered MOVIES squares on a huge game board. Ladyhawke Magnum P.I. Tonight at 8 p.m. Thursdays at 10:30 p.m. A youthful pickpocket (Matthew Broderick) escapes a midieval prison only to Tom Selleck stars as Thomas Sullivan Magnum, a Vietnam vet and former Navy find himself caught up in a dangerous quest with a savage, brooding knight officer, who lives and works in Hawaii as a freelance private investigator. Cast: (Rutger Hauer) and a beautiful, watchful hawk (Michelle Pfeiffer). Cast: Ken John Hillerman, Roger E. Mosley. Hutchinsin, John Wood and Alfred Molina.

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Tropic Times Nov.13, 1992 Merc ury Turbo with sporty look too, with a convertible you add "blind spots," sacrifice wheel independent suspension does a decent job, and by Zane Binder body rigidity and handling, add weight, and accept the Michelin XRV2 tires do their best, holding the King Features Syndicate considerably higher interior noise. They're not critiroad despite the body's lack of rigidity. The 33-foot Convertibles -perhaps the ultimate statement in cisms, just facts common to all convertibles. turning circle is excellent and clearly indicates the sportiness -just keep gaining popularity. Realizing Turning to instrumentation, it's analog and there's a car's nimbleness. this, Ford Motor Company not long ago introduced a reasonable number of gauges. Other standard items on Ride, the other side of the equation, is acceptable, turbocharged version of its Capri roadster, a swoopy the top-line XR2 model are power steering, four-wheel but not nearly up to the level of its non-turbocharged Australian-built 2-plus-2 guaranteed to turn heads. At power disc brakes, air conditioning, a driver's side air sibling. In making the suspension suitable (read heavabout $20,000, it's a direct competitor to Mazda's bag, and cruise control. ier) to handle the XR2's extra power, the non-turbo Miata, but offers more performance. As mentioned, the test XR2 was equipped with the Capri's fine ride-bestin the small car class -has been The Capri -a name Ford's used through the years on turbocharged, intercooled version of the standard 1.6 lost. numerous vehicles -is designed more for looks than liter engine. Forced induction raises the four-valve-perClimate control definitely needs work. The air functionality. Inside, it's attractive, with. twin front cylinder, fuel-injected, in-line four horsepower by 32 to conditioner is barely adequate in all respects, and the cloth buckets of good quality. The cockpit has enough 132, and makes a tremendous difference in feel. Though heater takes time to warm the vehicle. overall room for even large people, but knee room may hot performance really isn't the Capri's forte, 0-60 The standard (free) sound system is an AM-FM be at a premium. times in this 2,440-pound ragtop were observed at 8.2 radio with tape player. It needs uprated power to The rear bench, useless for humans with legs, folds seconds. overcome wind and engine noise and better quality for down and has a pass-through to the small but nicelyFuel economy on the 268-mile test loop was measenhanced reception and clarity. shaped trunk. Between the two areas, there's more than ured at 18 and 27 (EPA 23/28) far below par for the Quality control throughout the vehicle was near enough room for the cheapie "doughnut" spare and weight and power level. The acceleration figure is adequate but didn't approach Japanese or German luggage for trips. deceiving, too, as turbo "lag"is severe, and part-throttle levels. The convertible top, perhaps the car's main attractorque is lacking. The engine and muffler are noisy, and Overall, the turbocharged Capri is a vehicle to be tion, is fairly well designed. Raising and lowering it the powerplant needs a dose of "civilizing." seen in at the country club rather than taken on long takes about 60 seconds, and learning to do it takes only The drivetrain was coupled to decent five-speed and trips. The non-turbo is thousands cheaperand, despite about five minutes. Sadlythis, like thelast Capri tested, light clutch. Though nothing special, you won't comits lack of power, provides an almost comparable had numerous air leaks and the folding plastic rear plain, either. driving experience. If you want to turn heads, the window was already beginning to cloud. Remember, Handling rates high. The performance-tuned fourCapri is a perfect choice. Tabouleh-cheese salad 2 cups warm water 1 cup bulgur wheat the yeast, sage and salt. Add wann water and oil. Beat 1 10-oz. package frozen peas, thawed with an electric mixer on low speed for 30 seconds. Beat 4 ozs. Feta cheese, crumbled on high speed for three minutes. Stir in as much of 3 ozs. Swiss or brick cheese, cut intojulienne strips remaining flour as you can. 1/4 cup salad oil On a floured surface, knead in enough remaining 2 tablespoons lemon juice flour to make a moderately stiff dough that is smooth 1/2 teaspoon dried dillweed and elastic (six to eight minutes total).Place doughin a 14teaspoonssalt Wisconsin cheese packets greased bowl; turn once. Lettuce leavesand 1 tomato, cut into thin wedges 2 to 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour Cover, let risein a warm place until double (45 to 55 1 package active dry yeast minutes). Pourwarm wateroverbulgur in bowl. Let standfor 1 teaspoon dried sage, crushed Meanwhile, make filling. In a small mixing bowl, one hour. Drain bulgar well, pressing out excess 1/2 teaspoon salt combine mozzarella cheese, salami, tomato and Parmewater. Stir in thawed peas, Feta and Swiss cheese. 3/4 cup warm water (115 to 120 degrees) san cheese. Toss until well mixed; set aside. Combine salad oil, lemon juice, dillweed and salt; 2 tablespoons cooking oil Punch dough down; divide into six pieces. Cover; let shake well and pour dressing over bulgur mixture. 1 1/2 cups (6 ozs.) shredded Wisconsin mozzadough rest 20 minutes. Roll each piece of dough into a Cover, chill at least one hour. The Chopping Block rella cheese seven-inch circle. Spoon 1/2 cup filling onto half of recipes by Philomena Corradeno. 6 ozs. salami, chopped each circle. Combine egg and water, brush over outer 1 small tomato, peeled, seeded, and chopped edges of dough to moisten. Fold circle in half; use tines Editor's note: People Interested in sharing a rec1/3 cup grated Wisconsin parmesan cheese ofa fork to seal edges. Place on agreased baking sheet. Ipe or householdtip with Tropic Times readers, can I egg Prick tops; brush with egg mixture. send recipes or tips by MPS to Tropic Times, Unit 1 teaspoon water Bake in a 375 degree oven for 25 to 30 minutes, or 0936, APO AA 34002. Your name and base will be until golden. Remove from baking sheet; cool on wire printed with your submission. In alarge mixer bowl, combine one cup ofthe flour, rack. Makes six servings. PACIFIC: 067-93-MW -SECRETARY (OFFICE AUTOMATION), NM-318-7. Sensitive. USARSO, DCS, ReserveAffairs-NG, Fort Clayton. SpecExp: lyr.equiv.to NM-5. TIO: NM-5. Form 106. Note: Limited All applicants should be aware that hiring opportunities continue to be limited due to to DA permanent employees only. budgetary constraints. Effective Oct. 23, U.S. Army South has been granted authority to 068-93-EL -INTELLIGENCE SPECIALIST (OPERATIONS), GS-132-7 DEVELOPMENTAL 9. exempt non-status locally hired temporary appointments from the Department of the Army Sensitive (Top Secret). 470th MI Brigade, Coroza. Spec Exp: 1 yr. equiv. to GS-5. Form 106. Note: wide "one-for-four hiring freeze. Placement of current DA employees (including those on Position is in the excepted service. leave without pay) is an exception to the freeze. Current permanent Panama Canal Commission, Air Force and Navy employees are 069-93-ES -INTERDISCIPLINARY, NM-1551180/101-9. Temporary NTE 3-31-93. Bilingual. USA subject to the "one-for-four" DA hiring restriction. Current permanent NAF or AAFES emMEDDAC-Panama, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Program, Corozal. Gen Exp: MS in ployees who were appointed before Nov. 3, 1989 may now also apply and are subject to the Social Work, BA in Psychology plus 1 yr. equiv. to NM-7, MS in Social Science or 1 yr. equiv. to NM-7. "one-for-four" DA hiring restriction. Note: Candidates must show experience directly related to the duties described. Position requires travel to Military Spouses: If available, qualified, and within the area of consideration specified, the Atlantic community at least once per week. are exempt from the hiring restriction and will be appointed as temporary. Specialized 070-93-NR -CARPENTER, MG-4607-9. Temporary NTB 9-30-93. USAG-Paiuma, DEH, Operations experience, when indicated, must be in duties similar to those required by the vacancy. Division, Corozal. Spec Exp: 3 yrs. in the trade. Note: Driver's license required. AMENDMENT ON HOWTO APPLY: Failure to complete U. S. Army South Form 106, whenrequired, could hinder an applicant's chances of being referred for thevacancy. For 071-93-ES -OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST, NM-631-IL Temporary Part-Time NTE 3-31-93. information, visit the Civilian Personnel Office, Building 560, Corozal. Bilingual. USA MEDDAC-Psoama, GACH, Department of Surgery, Occupational Therapy Clinic, Ancon. Gen ExpBS in Occupational Therapy. Spec Exp: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-9. Note: Candidates must have VB# VACANCIES TILE AND LOCATION OPEN: 11-13-92 CLOSE: 11-24-92 completed successfully the clinical affiliation requirements. ATLANTIC: 065-93-NR -OFFICE AUTOMATION CLERK, NM-326-4. USA FORSCOM, JOTB, S-3 Section, Fort 073-93-VC -INTELLIGENCE SPECIALIST (STAFF MANAGEMENT), GS-132-12. Sensitive. HQ Sherman. Gen Exp: 1 yr. Form 106. Note: Written CASP test and qualified typist required. USSOUTHCOM, SCJ2-Counternarcotic, Quarry Heights. Spec Exp: 1 yr. equiv. to OS-11. Form 106. Noe: Position is in the excepted service. 066-93-SS -PLUMBING WORKER, MG-4206-7. USAG-Panama, DEH-ATL Operations, Fort Davis. Spec Exp: 1 1/2yrs. in the trade. Form 106. Note: Driver's licenserequired. Limited to DA Career-Career 074-93-LA -(2) EDUCATION TECHNICIAN, NM-1702-5. USAG-Panama, DCA, FSD, Child DevelConditional employees only. opment Services, Fort Clayton. Spec Exp: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-4. Form 106. Note: Selecteewill berequired to undergo satisfactory background investigation. 072-93-ES -INTERDISCIPLINARY, NM-11 (185/Social Worker -180/Clincal Psychologist or NOTES: Effective immediately we are no longer accepting applications under VB#: 240-92-VC. We Counseling Psychologist). Temporary NTH 3-31-93. USA MEDDAC-Panama, Coco Solo Health Clinic, have a sufficient supply of candidates for the following jobs, thus we no longer are accepting applications Coo Solo. Gen Exp: MS in Social Work, Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology, MS in Counseling Psychology plus for: OS-132-9/11/12/13; GS-080-9/11/12; GS-134-5/6f7. Applications already on file will be considered 1 yr. equiv. to NM-7. Note: Candidates must show experience which is directly related to the duties forvacancies through 12-31-93. The DirectorateofCivilianPersonnelig acceptingapplications forClinical described. Nurse positions. For information call Enid Sullivan at 285-4116.

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Tropic Times Nov. 13, 1992 Youth of ody David Irby serves the ball during a table tennis match at the Fort Clayton Youth Center. Center offers safe after-school fun Hanging out in front of the television and munching on junk food, aren't the only things military latch-key kids are doing after school. Many of them have tapped into a treasure-trove of fun at their local military youth centers. ME O Open to children ages 6-18, the Fort Clayton Youth Center meets the recreation needs of chilidren after their school day is done, said Paul Tommee, center director. "Right now, Jermelle Murry (left) and Jeffrey Hines take a turn on the foosball table. we're targeting hiking areas and mini-impact camps," he said. After the tour, the children return to the Youth pre-teens and Mini-impact camps are week-long outings that teach Center and are treated to a food tasting seminar that junior teens (6the children knot tying, how to make a fire, tent set-up, features Panamanian foods. 14 years) because canoeing and otheroutdoorskills, Tommee said. FortyThe center also teaches children arts and crafts, the senior teens five children attended the last one. cooking classes and other interesting skills, Tommee Th nr s hr Gm B (age 15 and The center also offers a children's Welcome to said. The center has three Game Boy above) are curPanamatourthatdiffersfromtheadulttourgivenbythe All a child needs to visit the youth center is a machines. rently renovating Army Community Services. bilingual identification card. There is no fee for using the senior teen center at Mothers End (on Fort ClayInstead of taking the children by the commissary, the center, but children are asked to sign a register and ton)," he said. Post Exchange and other areas that adults find imporfill out a membership card. The facility has two pool tables, two ping-pong tant, the Youth Centertour shows the children the other The center is open Monday through Thursday from tables, a foosball table, three Nintendo Game Boy youth centers in Panama, and areas downtown they will 2:30 to 6 p.m. for pre-teens and until 7 p.m. for juniors. machines, refreshments and much more. Playing games find interesting -like fast-food restaurant, Tommee Fridays, they stay open until8 p.m. forjunior teens, and and having tournaments (like the one scheduled this said. Saturdays they are open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. for premonth against the military police) is fun, but the center teens and until 8 p.m. for juniors. The center is closed on has much more to offer, Tommee said. Story and photos by Sgt. James Yocum Sundays. "We do a lot of field trips to beaches, factories, Tropic Times staff For information, call the local youth center.

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B 6 Tropic Time B6Nov. 13, 1l992~ # -_ _ _ _ dations, four dinners including Thankgivnights hotel, deep-sea fishing, water skiing, day, 8 p.m.-midnight, fee is $3; cards touring dinner, four breakfasts and many tours. snorkeling and jet skiing. nament, Tuesday, 5 p.m.; dining out in Sign-up deadline is Nov. 20. Bass fishing package, includes transPanama City, Thursday, 5-8 p.m. Albrook/Howard Scuba diving trip to Roatan Island, portation to and from Gamboa, boat and Licensed day care, which includes field Dec. 15-19. Divers package fee is $590 and motor, gasoline, lake guide, $5 worth of trips, small group activities and meals, is nondivers package fee is $485. Both packbait, bait bucket, rods and reels, tackle, now available at Howard AFB. Call 286ages based on double occupancy. Price incoolers and ice. Call the Rodman Marina, The Cocoli Community Recreation Center 3133. cludes transportation to and from Tocumen 283-3147/3150. is offering the following activities.Call 287Airport, round trip airfare from Panama to 4119/3010. Roatan, Honduras, transfers, four nights and Cooking class, apple pie, Thursday. Clayton five days hotel, all meals while in Roatan, southh centers Pot luck, Nov. 20. Fort Clayton Child Development Servthree days of two dives per day. Dives Albrook/Howard Basketball dribble contest, Nov. 21. icesisopen Mondays,Wednesdays andFriinclude boat dive, beach dive, night dive Cooking class, turkey stuffing, Nov. days from 5:30 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. and Tuesand weights and tanks. Deadline to make The Howard Youth Center, 284-4700, 25. days and Thursdays from 6:30 a.m. to 5:45 reservations is Nov. 30. and Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195, are Birthday of the month, Nov. 27. p.m. Specials of the week -Free Zone offering the following trips and activities. There are immediate openings in the shopping, Monday, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., $10; All trips pick up at Howard at the time hourly programs at the Fort Clayton Child gold panning in Las Cumbres, Tuesday, 8 specified and at Albrook 30 minutes later. Development Services for infants, pretoda.m.-3 p.m, $10. Registration is ongoing through Nov. Clayton diers, toddlers and preschool-age children. Pecora River Valley horseback day for baseball and softball for boys and girls Call 287-5657/6812. trips, Saturday and Sunday, 7 a.m. The from 4 to 18 years old. The Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts Center $25 fee includes transportation, horse rental The Howard/Albrook youth centers will and Fort Clayton Ceramic Center offer the and lunch. Call 287-4411 for reservations. be closed Wednesday. following activities. Call the Arts and Crafts J an Water balloon toss,Tuesday, 3 p.m. Centerat 287-5957; the Albrook Auto Shop Hidden treasure hunt, Wednesday, 3 at 286-3613 or the Ceramic Center at 287Aibrook/Howard Clayton pm 30 p.m. 4360. The Information, Tourand Travel Office Valent Recreation Center, the Outdoor Reggae preteen dance, tonight, 7:30Metal lathe workshop, Monday; boat offers a monthly calendar of events and can Recreation Center and the Cocoli Commu10:30 p.m. at Howard Youth Center for construction, through Nov. 28; sculpture, arrange special trips for groups of 10 or nity Recreation Center are offering the folyouths from 9 to 13 years old. Fee is $2.50 through Nov. 26. more. Call the Zodiac Recreation Center lowing tours. Reservations are required. for members and $3.50 for non members. 284-6161/6109. Call the Valent Recreation Center, 287Transportationleaves Albrookat7p.m. and Howard All tours require reservations and leave 6500/4201; the Outdoor Recreation Center, returns at 11 p.m. Transportation is free but from the Howard Theater. 287-3363 or the Cocoli Community Recreareservations must be made in advance. The Howard Arts and Crafts Center has Sailing tour to Taboga, today, 9 a.m.-7 tion Center, 287-4119. Pony party, Thursday, 3 p.m., Howard the following events scheduled. Call 284p.m. The $52 fee includes snacks, dinner Central Avenue shopping trip, SaturRiding Stables, $2. Transportation leaves 6361/6345. and refreshments. day, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., $5. Albrook Youth Center at 2:30 p.m. and Free pouring in English, tonight, 6-8 Beer brewery and Miraflores Locks, Summit Gardens tour, Saturday. returns at 5:30 p.m. All children must sign p.m.; clay flower class, Saturday, 11 a.m.today, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Fee is $4. El Valle, Sunday, 6:30 a.m., $15. up in advance and have a preprinted pemis1 p.m.; free copper luster application Horseback riding in El Valle, Saturday, Antique shops, Wednesday, 9 a.m., $7. sion slip signed by parents. Call 284-4700. demonstration, Saturday, 2-2:30 p.m.; T7 a.m.-4 p.m. Fee is $18. Altos Cerro Azul, Nov. 21, 9 a.m., $8. Camino Las Crucesjungle adventure, shirt painting, Tuesday; stained glass, Horse track trip, Sunday. TransportaIndian Village river trip, Nov. 21, $25 Nov. 21. Call 284-4700. Thursday; free mother-of-pearl application and entry fee included in $7 fee. adults, $15 children. tion demonstration, Nov. 21, 2-2:30 p.m.; Peacock bass fishing in Arenosa, SunCanal transit, Nov. 21, adults $35, chilChristmas bazaar, Nov. 28. day, 5 a.m.-2 p.m. Fee is $25. dren, $20. Factory outlet shopping, Thursday, 9 Coronado Beach, Nov. 22, 8 a.m., $10. The Fort Clayton Youth Center is offera.m.-3 p.m. Fee is $4. Diving in Negril, Jamaica, Nov. 25-29, ing the following activities for preteens and PanamaBay sailingtour, Nov. 20,6-11 $545. junior teens. Call 287-6451. p.m. The $40 fee includes snacks,dinner Thanksgiving in Chiriqui highlands, Eight ball tournament, today, 3 p.m.; Albrook/Howard and refreshments. Nov. 26-29. Bambito, $250, Panamonte, junior teen scavenger hunt, Saturday, 2 The Albrook Clubhas the following events Beer brewery, Pepsi and Paseval Cookie $225, Fundafores, $185. p.m.; junior teen council meeting, Thursto offer. Call 286-3101. factory, Nov. 20,9 a.m.-3 p.m. Fee is $5. day, 3 p.m.; turbo turkey international, Italian specialty night, Wednesday; steak Canoeing and barbeque on the Chagres Rodman Nov. 21, 11 a.m.; Parque Natural Metronight, Saturday, 6-8:30 p.m.; karaoke night, River, Nov. 21, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Fee is $18. R politano photo field trip, Nov. 23, 3 p.m.; Thursday, mini gourmet night, Nov. 25. Shopping in Penonome, Nov. 21, 8 a.m.The Information, Tour and Travel Office birthday celebration, Nov. 24, 3 p.m.; Thanksgiving buffet, Nov. 26, 11 a.m.8 p.m. Fee is $14. is offering the following tours. Call 283softball and baseball registration, through 2 p.m., adults $9.95, children 5-12 years Thanksgiving in Chiriqui, Nov. 25-29. 5307/4454. Nov. 30. old, $4 and children under 5 years old, free. The fees are $383 per person for single Panama City tour, Nov. 20. The Fort Clayton Senior Teen Center Reservations are required. occupancy, $260 per person for double Barro Colorado Island jungle hike, offers the following activities. Call 287The Howard Enlisted Members' Club occupancy and $155 for children or a third Nov. 21. 6451. has the following events to offer. Call 284person. The fee includes transportation, tour "Wet, Wild, Wooly," to Contadora, Army Family Week events, Saturday, 4189. guides,fivedays andfournights accommoNov. 27-29, includes transportation, two 7-8 p.m.; reggae and disco dance, SaturPool tournament, Saturday, 11 a.m.; A community arts and craftcenters. Call the FortDavis Arts of the month at 6 p.m. at the Fort Davis Swimming Sundial center and Crafts Center,289-5201 or the Fort Sherman Arts and Pool. Sign up at the Fort Sherman Scuba Shop, 289The Sundial Recreation Center has the following acCrafts Center, 289-6313 6104, or the Outdoor Recreation Office in Margarita, tivities to offer. Call 289-3889/3300. Disc brake workshop, today. 289-4077. Course cost is $125. Thursdays are Wonderful, a program designed for women, will feature making pickled pigs feet. Youth news New boat The Fort Espinar Youth Center is offering the following A 21-foot Mako boat is now available for scuba or Ocean Breeze center activities. Call 289-4605. snorkeling trips. Price includes gearand guide. Call John The Ocean Breeze Recreation Center has the followPreteen pool party at Espinar pool, today, 6-9 p.m., Stromberg, 289-4009/4077; or the Fort Sherman Scuba ing events scheduled.Call 289-6402. fee is $1; four-square contest, Tuesday, 4:30-5:30 p.m.; Shop,289-6104. Saturday matinee, Saturday, 2 p.m.; fashion show, family pie bake and taste contest, Saturday, 6-9 p.m., $1 Saturday, 6:30 p.m. entrance fee; turkey trot for youths and adults, Nov. 21, 10 a.m., $5 per person. -The youth center will be closed for organizational day, The Atlantic Community Women's Club is holding its Atlantic tours Nov. 23. annual holiday bazaar Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Sundial Recreation Center: Wine and dine, Fridays, the Fort Davis Community Club. Call Muriel Doyle,2894-9 p.m.; El Valle, Sunday, 5:30 a.m.-4 p.m.; museum classes 4755 or Becky Steigler, 289-4354. tours, Saturday; Isla Grande, Sunday, 8 a.m.; Panama c City shopping tour, Nov.21; Cancun, Mexico, Nov.26Following is a list of recurring classes offered in most 29. The $558.80 fee includes round trip airfare, transfer cominunities. Call the Sundial Recreation Center, 289from airport to hotel, double room hotel and Thanksgiv3889/3300; the Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289ing dinner. Call 289-3889/3300. 6402 or the Aquativity Center, 289-4009. Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: Rio Mar beach Spanish; English; piano; guitar; modem dance; shototour, Sunday; Isla Grande, Saturday; rain forest and kan; cake decorating; gymnastics; juggling and outboard bird watching tour, Sunday. Call 289-6402. motor boat operation. Arts and crafts Scuba diving course Following is a list of recurring classes offered at An open-watei dive course meets the first Monday

PAGE 23

Tropic Times i tices Nov. 13, 1992B7 karaoke night, tonight. s The Howard Officers' Club has the following events to offer. Call 284-3718. The Howard mental healthclinic is interKaraoke night, Nov. 21; taco night, ested in forming a group centered on the Thursday. changing roles of men in our society today. Issues to be discussed would center on the Rodman needs of the group: intimacy, communication, parenting, work, divorce and separaThe Anchorage Club will host "New tion. Call 284-6410. York Rockers," a Department of Defense USO show, tonight; DJ night, Saturday. Speech instructor Misce___ane ____ Central Texas College needs a qualified speech instructor for an upcoming class at the Fort Kobbe Education Center. A masValent events ter's degree from an accredited U.S. college The Valent Recreation Center at Fort oruniversity and 18 hours ofgraduate study Clayton will host the following activities. in speech are required. Call 287-3773. Call 287-6500. Puppet sale, Thursday; fishing equipSunday school ment exhibit, Nov. 23-25; U.S. in Panama pictoral story art exhibit, Nov. 24-30. The Fort Clayton Chapel offers three adult Sunday school classes in bible discuscare program sion, marriage enrichment and the responcourtesyphoto New childsibility of Christians as citizens. Registration THE COMFORTS OF HOME -Joyce Udell gives a building block to 2-year-old The Howard and Albrook youth centers is required and there is no fee. Volunteers Austin, while Megan, 19 months old, and 3-year-old Bradley, go in search of are offering a new before and after school are welcome to help in the program. Call something different. Udell's home is just one of the many which are now program. Care is available for children Chap. (Lt. Col.) Mark Fentress, 287-5859. available on Howard AFB for licensed family daycare. The providers offer field from6to 12years oldfrom6:30to 8:15 a.m. trips, small group and meals in a home environment. Call the family home andfrom 2to 5:30p.m. andfull-day care on Learnin center daycare coordinator at 286-3133 for more information. nonschool days. Fees range from $17 to $34 per week per child, depending on family The Fort Clayton Learning Resource income and includes breakfast and an afterCenter is offering general technical score offered by recreation centers in most comnoon snack. Call 284-4700/4817. improvement classes, College Level ExCCAF advisor munities. For information call the Pacific amination Program tests, audio/video courses, Counselor Esilda De Casal is available Theatre Arts Centre, 286-3814/3152; Valent, American College Test, Scholastic Aptito Community College of the Air Force 287-6500/4201 orZodiac,284-6161/6109. Instructors needed tude Test Booklets and English as a second members, 2:30 to 6:30 p.m., Tuesdays and Aerobics; piano lessons; taekwondo; cake The Zodiac Recreation Center needs lilanguage materials, Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.Thursdays by appointment only. For apdecorating; basic sewing; advanced tailorcensed instructors to teach shotokan and 4 p.m. Call Mrs. Ayala-Rosa, 287-5412 or pointments call, 284-3263 orstop by Building; craft sewing; beginner German; Spanprivate pilot's ground school on a contract stop by Building 129. ing 708, Room 109. ish, beginner and advanced; English, beginbasis. Call 284-6161/6109. ner and advanced. The Howard/Albrook youth centers need Thrift sho open Cable payments Following is alistof recurring classes ofa qualified piano instructor to teach classes p p fered by youth centers in most communion a contract basis. Call 284-4700. The Howard and Albrook Officers' Wives' People with Cable TV service may now ties. For information call Howard Youth The Howard Arts and Crafts Center needs Club Thrift Shop is now open in Building pay their bill at the Corozal Main Exchange. Center, 284-4700; Albrook Youth Center, qualified instructors to teach advanced pot809, Albrook AFS, Mondays and Thursdays The Panama Army Communities of Ex286-3195; Fort Clayton Youth or Senior tery wheel throwing and volunteers to demand every third Saturday of each month, cellence committee has placed a payment Teen Center, 287-6451. onstrate various crafts. Call 284-6361. 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. The shop also opens for box inside the exchange for customer use. Street/video dancing; cheerleading; consignments Mondays and Thursdays, 9:30 Spanish and English; aerobics; arts and crafts; T a.m.-noon. gymnastics; boys gymnastics; modem, jazz, Twin Oceans ^Investment club tap and ballet dance; piano lessons; tennis The Twin Oceans Pro Shop, Building CCAF deadline The Howard Library is interested in lessons; taekwondo. 155,Fort Clayton, will temporarily relocate Ii forming a Canal Area Investment Club. Following is a list of recurring classes to Building 2060 in the Curundu area. The The deadline for the spring Community The club would meet regularly to discuss offered by arts and crafts centers in most new telephone number is 286-6514. College of the Air Force April graduation different investment opportunities. Intercommunities. For information call Howard is Feb. 23. All candidate packages with ofested people can Call 284-6249. Arts and Crafts Center, 284-6361/6345; the T i rficial transcripts and test score reports atFort Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287Trail rides tached must be received and date-stamped 5957. The Howard Riding Stables are offering at the Community College of the Air Force Classes offered include stained glass; escorted 2 1/2 hour trail rides to Veracruz by the close of business Feb. 23. For more The Fort Clayton Child Development cross stitch; clay flower; pottery wheel; Beach, Mondays through Fridays. Call 286information, call 284-4863. Services is looking for family child care knitting; framing; air brushing; lamp as4920. providers. Those interested will receive sembly; leather working; macrame classes; free training and instructions in child pottery; throw pottery technics; glazing; New numbers care standards and techniques. Call 287firing; hand building; sculpture; wooden Evening child care The Disabled American Veterans of3301. jewelry box construction; acoustic guitar The Howard Child Development Center fice in Building 812, Albrook has changed construction; do-it-yourself custom framoffers evening child care Fridays and Saturphones numbers from 286-4349 to 285program ing; fabric painting; watercolor; acrylic days from 5:30 p.m. to midnight for chil6359. BOSS painting; oil painting; basic drawing and dren from 6 months to 11 years old. If The Better Opportunities for Single Solcharcoal drawing. enough reservations have been made by diers program offers recreational activities Weekly classes are held in car care and Wednesday, 4 p.m., care will be provided. SOS students for single soldiers and geographical bachemaintenance, arc and gas welding, auto air Call 284-6135 to make reservations. Students enrolled in Section 2 of Squadlors. Call Anne Kelly at the Valent Recreaconditioning, auto transmission repair and ron Officer School should make the foltion Center, 287-6500, to volunteer. engine rebuilding. Call the Albrook Auto -lowing changes in 23D: Craft Shop, 286-3613 or Howard Auto Craft Logistics Support Vol. 4, pg. 3, delete Lesson 22 Atlantic Cub Scouts Shop,284-3370. Logistics Support on Howard AFB rents Vol. 5, pg. 3, delete Lesson 26 and readThe swimming pools in most communirecreational items. Call 284-6107. ings A-D, pg. 5-41 The Atlantic Cub Scouts Pack 3, is ties offerrecurring classes. For information The branch will be closed Wednesday. SOS non-residentprogram is undergolooking for boys, ages 6-10, to join its call Howard swimming pool, 284-3569; Weekly special -Rent an electric typeing revision. All test questions are based program. Adult leaders for Cub Scouts Albrook swimming pool, 286-3555; Fort writer for $10 per week, MondayNov 21. on the course materials.Call Linda Antoand Webelos are also needed. Call Phillip Clayton swimming pool, 287-6660; Rodman Holiday special -For Thanksgiving, table ine, 284-3263 or stop by the Howard EduClark, 289-4956. swimming pool, 283-4253. and chair rentals on a first come, first served cation Center, Building 708, Room 109. Scuba classes are available through the basis. Scub a ZodiacRecreation Center, 284-6161/6109. Friday the 13th special -Bring in a classes Classes include introduction to scuba, rescooler and fill it up for free. Aggte club An advanced open water scuba class is cue, dive master and specialty scuba. Graduates of Texas A&M University set for Wednesday at the Howard Pool. The Power boating and sailing classes will be Family support interested in forming an Aggie Club, call fee is $105. held Monday and Wednesday. Call 283287-4690 or261-7121. An advanced scuba diving class will be 3147/3150. The Howard/Albrook Family Support held Nov. 21 and 22. The class includes a Basic horsemanship classes for all ages Center, has various events scheduled. Call night dive, deep dive, navigation dive and are offered at the Albrook Riding Stables. 284-5650. Scout leader needed two optional dives; a computer dive, search The $25 fee includes theory and practical SF-171 workshop, Tuesday from 8 to 9 Cub Scout Pack 31 is looking for new and recovery dive and photography dive. sessions. a.m. leadership. Pack 31 includes Los Rios EleCall 283-5307/4454. The class covers safety, stable etiquette, Transition assistance program semimentary School and Cardenas and Curundu care and welfare of horses, tack and basics nar, Wednesday-Nov. 20, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. at housing areas. Training is available to of horse handling. Individual, group and the Howard Officer's Club. anyone interested. Call Kim Carey at 286 semi-private lessons available. Call 287Job search workshop, Nov. 24, 2 p.m. 3685. Following is a list of recurring classes 4411.

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B8v13,1992 Potpourri Scholarship program closed Dec. 4, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. for organization day. It will be open only forpemerAplications for the USO/Budweiser gencies. Call 287-5661. S p o n so Scholarship Program for the 1993/1994 academic year are available at the Howard The holidays are fast approaching and, with them, the holiday spirit of giving, Education Center, Building 708, Room Holiday travel of helping those less fortunate and of lending a supporting hand through the U.S. 109. The program providea financial asThe Navy Morale, Welfare and RecArmy South Soldier and Family Holiday Support Program, public affairs officials sistance to family members of activereation hoiday travel program is offering said. duty military personnel. an air fare savings to military and civilThis year's program is under way with toy and food drives and the U.S. Military Forinformation on applications, conian members going to the United States Sponsorship and Family Sponsorship Programs. tact the local USO or the USO World for the Christmas holidays, .The toy and food drives at units and duty sections are targeted to help military Headquarters Scholarship Program, 601 Flights will leave Dec. 19 and 20 and families who are having financial problems during the holiday season. IndianaAvenue, N.W., Washington, DC return Jan. 2 and 3. Space will be limited The U.S. Military Sponsorship Program is set up to offer single and geographi20004, (202) 783-8121. Call Linda Anand the deadline for signing up will be cal bachelor soldiers the opportunity to spend the holidays witha familywhilethe toine,284-3263. Dec. 14. For details and reservations call Family Sponsorship Program offers military and civilian families theopportunity 283-5307/4454. to share the holidays with other families. Retiree center Anyone wishing to donate food, toys, money or become asponsor or those who A Volunteer Retiree Advisory ServBreakfast with Santa are in need of receiving food baskets or wanting to be sponsored should contact their units by Dec. 9 to be enrolled. Enrollment in any of the programs is strictly ice Center opened Oct. 28 at the DirecThe Howard/Albrook Enlisted Spouses' confidential. torate of Civilian Personnel Job InfoClub will host a base-wide children's ration Center. The center is located in breakfast with Santa, Dec. 12,9:30 school to help sponsor their Christmas the stationary van next to Building 560, 1 p.m. at the Albrook Club. The breakChristmas bazaar project. Call Maj.R.T. Bruno, 286-4775. Corozal. The center is Wednesdays, fast is open to all Air Force family The Inter-American Women's Club 7:15 a.m.-4:15 p.m. members. Reservations are required by will holdits Christmas bazaar, Dec. 5, 10 The center will provide assistance and Nov. 30. There will be a puppet show, a a.m.-7 p.m. at the ATLAPA Convention guidance to retired fedeal employees and chance to visit with Santa and other surCenter. Gifts, crafts and food will be The Howard Library would like to their familes. Current federal employees prises. For reservations and details call sold, and there will be activities for chiljoin in the celebration of National Chilare not eligible for the VRASC services. 284-4625/4786. dren and door prizes. The proceeds will dren's Book Week, Monday through FriCall 285-4325. support charitable organizations. Admisday. There will be stories, movies and AWC changes sion is $3. Children under 10 will be adbook browsing for children. Children Clayton Chapel mitted free. Tickets will be availble at can also win a prize by guessing the The Air War College is currently changthe door or by calling, 23-1749. number of seashells in the mystery jar. Evangelist Luis Palau, an international ing from a two-volume correspondence Call 284-6249. Christian spokesman and leader, will hold and seminar course to a three-volume services at the Howard Theater, Saturcourse. The last date to sign up for the Ex ectantbrien day, 7 p.m.; at the Fort Clayton Chapel's current version is Nov. 30. Call Linda Anyone interested in having a holiday parents Protestant worship service, Sunday 9 Antoine, 284-4863. sponsorship brief advertised in the Army Community Health Nursing will a.m. and at 6 p.m. at the Balboa Theater. newspaper, can send the brief MPS to be sponsoring flee expectant parent classes, Thereis no fee orreservations needed to Tropic Times, Unit 0936, Albrook, or Thursday and Dec. 3, 4:30-6;30 pm, at attend. Call 287-6201. drop by the office, Building 405, Corozal. Gorgas Army Community Hospital, SecThe Griffon Club is sponsoring a tion B, first floor. Call 282-5418. BOSS program craft vendors' bazaar, Saturday, 9 a.mParents meeting TheS BetrOpogrum frSnl 3 p.m. at the Albrook Club. Vendors Support merouing The Better Opportunities for Single should call 284-3938 after 5 p.m. The second School Advisory ComSupport group Soldiers program will sponsor a single mittee meeting for parents of Curundu The 24th Medical Group Mental Health soldiers' activity day at the Valent RecStand down day Junior High School students will be MonClinic is now forming agroup to provide reation Center on Thanksgiving Day, 1day, 4 p.m. in the school library. The support and therapy for people experi10 p.m. Games, tournaments, movies, The U.S. Army South Command principal, Dr. Charles Renno will give an encing holiday-related sadness and stress. refreshments and gifts will be available. Safety Office will observe the Safety oritentation. Parents attending the metThe group will meet Fridays, 10 a.m., BOSS is aprogram geared forthe special Awareness and Aviation Stand Down ing will have an opportunity to address today through Dec. 18. Call 284-6410. needs of bachelors and geographical Day Thursday. Units and families will school concerns from the floor. bachelors. Call 287-6500/4201. be focusing on mission and home safety issues on this day through training and -reviewing various subjects. Some sugSpecial dinner The Enlisted Spouses' Club D'ecemRetirement briefing gested subjects are bicycle, crosswalk, The International Order of the Rainber general meeting has been reschedThe Headquartets U.S. Army South seatbelt safety and an inspection of fire bow for Girls and International Order of uled for Nov. 30,7 p.m., at the Fort ClayRetirement Services Office will beofferalalns and playground equipment, acDe Moley will have a Johnny Mossetti ton NCO Club. Call 287-3086 ing a pre-retirement orientation for all cording to Command Safety Office ofdinnerattheAbou Saad Shrine Building, personnel assigned to the Panama Canal ficials. Gaillard Highway, Balboa, Nov. 21, 5-7 New hours Area, at 8:30 p.m., Dec. 4, in the Conferp.m. There will be a $5 donation and fence Room in Building 520. Call HumCheerleaders wanted tickets will be available at the door. The Mind Veterinary Facility new berto L. Gonzalez, 287-6417. hours of operation are Monday, WednesThe Pacific Theatre Arts Centre is day and Thursday 7:30-11 a.m. and 1looking for cheerleaders to perform in nations 2:30 p.m.; Tuesday, Friday 7:30-11:30 Office closed the entertainment during Army Turkey The 142d Medical Battalion is taking a.m. Animals will seen on an appointThe 193d Support Battalion Office, Bowl '92, Nov. 25 at the Balboa High donations of artificial Christmas trees ment basis. Call 289-5872/5208 8 a.m.on Jarman Field, Fort Clayton, will be School Stadium. Call 286-3152/3814. and ornaments for an underprivileged noon. 0 4 Today 4:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN Q. To what countries may I travel using the Environmental and Morale Leave San Jose, Costa Rima PC San Salvador, El Salvador PPICC[V 'ML)? Howard AFB, PN A. Effective Sept. 22, U.S. Southern Command has designated these EML sites for 5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN personnel stationed in Panama: Tegucigalpa, Honduras PP Continental United States, Soto Cano AB, Honduras PP Howard AFB, PN Puerto Rico, Costa Rica and 9:05am C141 Howard AFB, PN Howard AFB, PN Ecuador. Bogota, Colombia pp 5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN Howard AFB, PN Tegucigalpa, Honduras PP Soto Cano AB, Honduras PP TC: Tourist Card Saturday Howard AFB, PN V: Visa 5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN US 5:40am C141 Howard AFB, PN PC: Proof of Citzenship Atlanta, GA Lima, Peru US: United States pass 7:10am C141 Howard AFB, PN Santiago, Chile RON Charleston AFB, SC PP Buenos Aires, Argentina RON port Holders Only Brasilia, Brazil CC: Country Clearance Sunday Howard APR, PN RON: Remain Overnight 8:00am C5A Howard AFB, PN 7:50am C-SA Howard AFB, PN Soto Cano AB, Honduras PP Charleston AFB, SC PP Charleston AFB, SC RON/PP Dover AB, DEL PP For additional flight inDover AFB, DE PP Wednesday formation, call 284-5758/ Monday 1:50am C130 Howard APR, PN 4306. 5:10am C130 Howard AFB, PN Kelly AFB, TX RON/PP Managua, Nicaragua CC/V Charleston AFB, SC Howard, PN 6:15am C727 Howard AFB, FN Thursday Charleston 1AP, SC 5:10am C130 Howard APR, PN Quito, Ecuador Tuesday Howard AFB, RN 5:10am C130 Howard AFB, PN 7:10am CSA Howard AFB, PN San Salvador, El Salvador PP/CC/V Soto Cano AB, Honduras PP San Jose, Costa Rica PC Charleston AFB, SC RON/PP

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Tropic Times Nov. 13, 1992 "Oklahoma' ALBROOKAIRFORCESTATION (DoDDS PAO) -The Balboa High School Drama Department is presenting the classic family musical "Oklahoma" in the Balboa High School Auditorium today, Saturday, Nov. 20 and 21. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. with additional performances on Saturday at 2:30 p.m. "Oklahoma" is a rousing musical by Rodgers and Hammerstein that depicts a slice of life in the Oklahoma territory around the turn of the century. This production stars Panama Canal College and Balboa High school students. Curly is played by Robert Luttrell, Laurey by Rebecca Heard, Will Parker by Douglas Marquardt, and Ado Annie by Erin Hatchett. The show is directed by JoAnne Mitchell and student director Kate Sears, with support and assistance from Melanie Bales, musical director, Linda Dahlstrom, choreographer, Jerry Brecs, technical director, and Fran Banasick. Courtesy phsooby Chelsea oofey For more information call 252-5176. ,jClassified Ads 1987 Odmobi e Cutlass Ciera S, loaded, exc cond 1986 Oldsmobile 98 4dr, 6 cyl, fuel injec, loaded, AM-FM cass, exc ond, 57,300 miles $12,000. 260$4500. 22i-6968, duty pd $8000. 260-7574. 7621. Rottweiler puppies, AKC/CCP, champion biood1986 Ford T-bird, ac, cc, pwr drs/win, AM-FM cass, 1988 Buick Electra, 30,000 miles, leather int, all 1981 Plymouth Reliant sta/wgn, 4 new tires, needs line, avail Dec. 15 $500. 252-9211, call mllect. good od $4500/obo. 284-3635. extras, V6, exc cond $12,000/obo. 261-7398 after work,sale as is $500. 232-4447. 6:30pm. Mini-toy French poodle puppies, 5 wks old, d,1990Chevy sta/wgn,8 pass, V6,3.1 Leng, AM-FM 1972 Mercedes Benz 220D, 4-spd, exc cond $3995. wormed, tail docked, parents weight 5ibs $225. cass, ac, new tires, shocks, loaded. 284-6836. 1981FordLTDsta/wgn,ps,at,AM-FM cass$1500/ 225-8159. 226-5395. obo. 284-3689. 1986 Dodge Lancer, ac, pb, ps, AM-FM cass, 4dr 1986 Pontiac 6000, 4dr, fuel injec, ac, pw/dr, AMCocker spaniel puppies, 5 wks old, females, good $4000/obo. 283-5325. 1988 Chrysler Lebaron coupe, ac, ps, pw, pl, not FM cass, good mnd $4500/obo. 286-4129. Xmas gift $150. 286-3230. duty pd $8500. 262-1855. 1986 Pontiac 6000LE, 2.5L, 4 cyl, ps, pb, pwr win/ 1982 CJ7, 6 cyl, ac, ps, pb, soft/hard tops, low miles Labrador puppies, CCP reg, born Oct. 9, avail Nov. locks, tilt steering $5200/obo. 284-5538. 1985 Montero 4x4, 5dr, stereo, ps, pb, ac, pw/drs, $6000/obo. 223-0252. 24. 283-3092. gas, duty not pd, exc mnd $7000. 252-6026. 1978 Ford Emnoline van, V8, ps, ph, good od, 1988 Plymouth Voyager, V6, AM-FM cass, alarm, Collie/sheltie mixed male, 17 mos old, all shots, all duty pd $2500. 289-3323. 1987 Nissan King Cab 4x4 p/u, 5-spd, fully loaded, at, ac, ps, pb, exc cond $10,500. 223-4210. acees ici, og arrir $50/oo. 86-493.extras $10,000. 261-3314. access ine, dog carrier $150/obo. 286-4293. 1982 Honda Accord, fair cond, ac, AM-FM, 5-spd, 1991 Hyundai Excel, aa, AM-FM radio cass, tint German shepherd maleready for stud service, large, runs grt $2600. 260-3472. 1979 Cutlass Supreme, 2dr, needs work, sale as is glass, like new, duty pd $6500. 220-2421. CCP rag. 286-4731. $1000. 284-4392. 1982 Oldsmobile Firenza, at, radio, ac, 4dr, duty pd 1983 Ford Escort, 2dr, radio, runs good, not duty pd Parakeets, two each $12. 286-4932. $2990. 221-2076. 1981 Mercedes, 2WD, diesel, exc od $4500/obo. $3000/neg. 220-2421. 264-8244. Two hamsters $10 e. 262-1029. 1988 Jeep Comanche p/u w/cap, exc cond, no ac, 1987 Nissan p/u, U.S. specs, needs paint, custom58,000 miles, avail Dec. 1 $5000/obo. 269-6691. 1984 T-bird, V6, at, ps, pb, ac, pw, 85k miles, good ized $000/obo. 287-4499. Rabbit $12. 252-740. cond, not duty pd $4400. 260-3533. 1979 Oldsmobile Delta 88, 4 new tires, body & 1984 Buick Century Custom,6 cyl,ps, pb,notduty Chihuahua puppies, 2 females $125 ca; free, adult interior exc cond, needs eng repair, best offer. 2871984 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera, 4dr,4 cyl, ac,ps, pb pd, good cond $2000. 283-6230. male chihuahua. 268-0161. 4421. $3000. 286-4972 after 6pm. 1986 Toyota Corolla XL, sr, ac, 5-spd, stereo/cass Pit bull pups, 8 mos old, male, female, eara docked, 1988 Nissan Terrano, 5-spd, Alpine stereo, duty pd, 1985 Ford Escort, 2dr hatchbk, ac, 4-spd, exc mod $4000 w/duty, $3500 w/o. 268-2973. w/paper, trained $500. 226-7176. ac, 4WD. $11,000/obo. 232-4561. $3000/neg. 286-6282 after 6pm. 1991 Chevy Blazer 4x4, at, loaded, 4.3L, like new Golden retriever puppies, female, CCP/AKC, 1988 Dodge Caravan, low miles, exc cond $9000/ 1977 Plymouth Volare, 6cyl, at, ac, AM-FM cass, $15,000. 284-3026. champion sire. 252-5397. obo. 260-6280 eves. newtires, brakes,runs good, duty pd$950/obo.2824185. 1976 Dodge Aspen sta/wgn, ac, pw, ps, pb, grt Weimaraner pups, good for hunting, watch, m1983 Ford Mustang GT, V8, ac, AM-FM cass, new shape. 285-4734. panion dog, good Xmas gift, good w/children. 252paint, tires, exe cond $6000/obo. 260-5815. 1988 Mazda B2200 p/u, 5-spd, short bed, w/shell, 6747. stereo cass, low miles, very clean, U.S. specs $5100. 1981 Ford extcab F150 XLT p/u, w/shell, 302 V8, 1977 Chevy Nova, 4dr, at, AM-FM cass, duty pd, 287-5638. all extras, capt chrs $3000. 252-2648. Free, youngfemale mixed breed, spayed. 223-8289 needs work $950. 233-5750. 1990suzu Troper,28,000 miles, ac, V6,4WD, at, 1973 Super Beetle, runs grt, new brakes, clutch 1985 Mazda 626LX, 5-spd, ac, low miles, new tires, tint glass, cruise, extras $15,000. 284-5622. $1700/obo. 228-7924 after 5pm. exc ond $4500. 282-5280. 1988 Suzuki Samuri, gold/tan mv top, exe cond 1980 AMC Concord,4dr,at, good cond$1500/obo. 1989 Nissan van, ac, AM-FM tint glass, 42,000 $5500. 284-5833. 286-4939. 1989 Chevy S-10 p/u, 23.6k miles, stereo/rass, step, miles, duty pd $7900. 243-5269. caper shell $7500. 287-4522. 1987 Subaru, 1.8GL, 5-spd, ac, ps, 4dr, AM-FM 1981 Jeep CJ7, ac, ht, ps, AM-FM cass, exc cmnd, 1967 Chevy Bel Air, eng in good ond $1000. 284cass, not duty pd $4950. 287-4685. duty pd $5000/obo. 287-6312. 1991 Chevy Z72 4x4, loaded, 6/60 warranty, 5136. $17,500/obo. 223-3976 ask for Bob Osborn. 1979 Chevy Impala, eng just rebuilt, grt cond, Pio1984 Honda Civic, at, ac, 4dr, exc cond, not duty pd 1989 Nissan truck, at, ps, ac, AM-FM cass, ex neer stereo cass,needs carb work $1750//obo. 283$3500/obo. 260-9613. 1983 GMC Jimmy 4x4, ac, pb, ps,radio cass, alarm, cond, 21,000 miles $6500. 284-4231. 4227. duty pd, 5-spd, 2.8L, good cond $6300. 261-6830. 1982Nissan Cedric280cc sedan, ac,pw, ps, 96,000 1983 Jeep CJ5,4.2L,6ryl,59,000miles,notdutypd 1986 Renault Alliance, AM-FM radio, ac $2500/ miles, tilt wheel $3750.260-5378. 1991 Toyota X-Cab 4x4 p/u, 11,600 miles, cab/ $5800/obo. 236-2372. obo. 286-3295. bedliner, extras, axc cond, not duty pd $16,500. 1977 Plymouth Volare sta/wgn, needs work $650. 287-4084. 1979 VW Rabbit, new trans, runs grt $1200/obo. 1981 Toyota Cressida diesel, 4dr, 87,000km, body 286-4736 after 5pm. 289-4351. rough, mech exe, good tires $3000 firm. 269-1443. 1990 Jeep Cherokee, Pioneer w/options $17,500/ 1989 Ford Mustang LX sedan, 5-spd, ac, pw, pd, obo. 233-5224. 1989 Ford Bronco II XLT4x4, ac, ph, ps, AM-FM 1987 Honda Civic, ac, 5-spd, ps, extras, low milepm, pt, AM-FM cass, 35,000 miles $6500. 284cass, 30,000 miles, axc ond $12,950. 286-3125. age, AM-FM cass, duty pd, ext cod $5500. 2323378. 1987 Suzuki, 5-spd, ac, 4WD, alarm, AM-FM, bike 5911. rack, w/boat trlr, 30mpg $9500. 264-8417. 1979 Monte Carlo, 6 cyl, eng grt run cond, ac, tint 1982 Mazda 323, 4dr, ac, new tires, duty pd, minor glass $1900. 283-6590. 1980 JeepCJ7, ac,AM-FM cass, hard/softtops,runs work required $1800. 236-4393. 1986 Nissan Sunny sta/wgn, at, at, AM-FM cass grt $4500. 260-9982. $3500. 242-4925. 1975 Chevy sta/wgn, exc running cond, needs 1990 Mitsubishi Lancer GL, ac, radio/cass, 5-spd, minor cosmetics $650/obo. 287-4038. 1979 Pontiac Trans Am, t-tops, 4-spd, runs good, not duty pd $6700. 252-1213. 1985 BMW 323i, ext shape, dealer maintained in pw, classic $2000. 287-3391. Germany, not duty pd $6600. 61-8405. 1989 Nissan Sentra, 2dr, one owner, at, alarm, AM1980 VW Rabbit,5-spd std, 4dr, sr, ex cond $1250. FM cass, U.S. specs $7500. 287-4686. 1987 Buick Skylark, 4dr, at, ac, tilt wheel, cruise, 225-7464. 1991 Firebird, V8, at, fully loaded, alarm $13,500 or AM-FM, ext cond $5500. 221-5801. pay $1500 and take over payments/neg. 284-4733 1979 Ford 150 Emnoline van, customized, in good 1991 Daihatsu Charade 1-3, ac, AM-FM cass, 5after 1pm. shape $900. 286-4975. 1991 Chevy Camaro RS coupe, 5-spd, ac, ps, ph, spd, 4dr $7200. 261-3537.

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B Tropic Classified Ads Sansui VCR, exc roed $150, Panasonic, video cam, Audio/video master control amp, Pioneer, like new console TV $250. 286-3125. batt w/charger, case, key coaxils for TV connect $250. 284-3281. $400. 236-1473 l msg Daybed w/matt $400, 2 3/4 beds w/matts in blue 1991 Lada 1600, 500kms, like new $3800. 285Kenwood stereo w/cass, spkers $200, 13" color TV $245 ea., girl's clothes. 224-0656. 5919. Amstrad word processor, hardly used, manuals, $75, new dot matrix color printer $150. 223-0252. extra ribbon, disks $225. 284-6629. Recliner, good shape $200/obo, carpet deep mauve 1990 Mitsubishi Elcipse, ac, ps, pb, pull out stereo, 8088 IBM 2DD comp, w/color printer, mon $500. 12x20, exc cond $225. 284-6880. one owner $6000/obo. 286-4274. VCR S ony Beta S1500, needs repair $45.260-9731. 287-5785. White rattan LR w/2 hanging baskets (reversible 1978 Fiat 124 convert $1200. 284-5025. Sony stereo sys w/Sony 5 discs CD player $500. Sony Beta 2400, needs spare part $55. 252-6989. cushions), blk DR set, seats 6. 287-4895. 228-4630. 1984 Toyota Corolla LE, good cond $3500. 286Amiga 500, color mon, DD, mouse, 2 joysticks, Two 8,000 btu ac $275ea, vacuum cleaner, micro3874. Comp w/DD, games, books, joystick, exr cond printer, 100 programs, more $600/obo. 285-4734. wave, kitchen access. 286-4975. $125. 287-3189. Full size VHS camcorder w/extra micro, 2 batts, 2 Side-by-sideGE refrig/frzr,Magic Chefstove$425, Nintendo sys w/31 games, carrying case, 3 controls/ lenses $500. 284-3622. both like new. 282-5535. Bilingual experienced, honest, reliable maid, M-Wcontrol exten turbo controller mcl $360. 287-4684. F, refs, care for home, child. 287-6887. Cable TV sys, down converter, antenna, power 2 12,000 btu am $400 ea, Ig cap Kenmore washer & Tandy 1400LT, IBM compat, 768K, 3.5 DR, supsupply $400. 264-8941. dryer $1000, more. 282-5535. Will clean any home, M-F, 8am-Spm, child care ports printer, graphics, mouse, port, free software inclu, dependent wives. 287-4379. $500. 285-4532. 25" console color TV, works pefect $250. 286Blk dining tbl, 6 chrs, tinted glass top $500, bge 6138. 9x12 rug $70. 283-4684. Bilingual live-in maid, honest, good w/children, Casio electronic keybd, model CT636, w/stand, refs. 287-5832 after 10am. new cond $260. 284-5784. IBM compat 386XZ-25, 106MB HD, 14" SVGA Q-sz hide-away couch, match chr $475. 252-6934. mon, 5.25-3.5 floppies, software $1400/obo. 260Bilingual live-outmaid,bonest, reliable, days work, Nintendo NES action set, NES advan joystick, 1290. LRw/coffee/end tbles $200 all, glass/chrome wood mature. 221-5423. Mario Bros, Duck Hunt, Bases Loaded & Top Gun .tbl,4chrs $300,brass headbd$25,celing lamp$30, 11 $140. 287-4734. Zenith 27" color TV console, 3 mos old, $700.260wicker chr $40. 269-5224. Eng-spk maid, babysit, M-F, 8;3uam-12:30pm, 1290. Sat.-Sun, refs, $1.25hr. 221-7883. RCA 25" color console TV, remote, swivel base, Couch,2recliners, DR tbl,4 chrs, Canon typewriter. stereo, cable ready, more $300. 287-4734. 35mm SLR camera, auto wing, exposure, LCD data 286-4531. Eng-spk day maid, 1-2 days per week, refs. 224panel, w/lens, flash $275. 284-3939. 7521. Brother electric typewriter $80. 223-3739. Mini blinds, two 6ft, one 3ft all 5ft tall, bge $100. 282-3686. Bilingual part time, babysitting in my home, grt w/ Kenwood 125W amp, exc cond $150 firm. 284children, mil dep. 284-4232 ask for Jesse. 3156. Whirlpool refrig w/ice maker $450, air compressor, Green parakeet in Diablo Heights, owner please call $1600, industrial exhaust fan 24" $60. 256-6410. Lady in her 30s to clean, iron, babysit, good refs. Kenwood multi-CD player, 6 disk cartridge, rela252-2285. 284-4997. tively new $125. 286-6281. Cherrywood crib, matt, exr cond, sheet, comf, -bumper $370, newborn car seat $20. 261-3678. Eng-spk housekeeper, 5 days per week, honest, 386-25Mhz 60MB HD, VGA mini tower $1150, Household mature, babysit at night. 224-7765. Tandy 1000SL 40MB HD VGA $650, new Antique china cab w/glass $700, hand painted ChiPanasonic laser printer $650. 230-0668. Q-sz sleeper couch, loveseat, microwave, Q-sz bed nese hall chest w/mirrors $1025. 223-4290. Eng-spk mature, dependable housekeeper, M-F w/matt, swing set, recliner. 284-4322. some Sats, good w/children, live-out. 282-3690 Amiga 500 deluxe comp, IMB, color mon, 7-color Q-sz matt, box spring $100. 287-3676. eves. printer, desk,joystick,mouse, documentation$700. Sofa, loveseat set, charcoal gray Ig pillows on 287-4679. wooden frames $300. 287-4928. Sofa, loveseat, gray, exc cond, US made $500. 284Span-spk honest responsible live-in maia, good w/ 3300. children. 252-5552. Zenith 27" color console TV, 1 yr old $395. 225Magic Chef stove, 4 burners, brand new $300. 2608159. 7728. Q-sz sofa sleeper $500. 287-6336. Bilingual honest maid, 1 day per week, exr refs. 286-4272. 386-25Mhz clone, 4MB mem, 84Meg HD, NEC GE hvy duty dryer $220, Kenmore refrig/frzr, no Chrome/glass coffee/end tbls $60-$40, b/w tbl $30, multi sync mon $1500. 286-6333. frost, w/ice maker $400. 286-3933. chrome/glass bar $60, entertainment ctr $100. 226Span-spk maid, hardworking, reliable, honest, good 2640. w/children, refs, $125mo. 225-4136. Pioneer GV-055 stereo, dbl cass, timer, tumtbl, 100 2 9x12 rose rugs w/pads $65e, 12x15 blue rug $90. watt spkes, Canon AE1 program cantera. 286286-3874. DR thl $75, Samsung microwave $100, Ig -dehuBilingual maid, honest loving, reliable M-W-F, 4673. midifier $120, 10-spd men's bike $60. 287-4933. loves children. 287-6887. Sturdy microwave cart w/oak trim $125, Weber bbq Comp Packard Bell 386SX 130MBD, 2FD, mon, grill $45, Sears vacuum w/carpet head $75. 261K-sz waterbed,. 10cuft. frzr, 12x15 carpet w/pad, Bilingual babysitter/housekeeper, honest, mature, lots of software $1800. 264-8941. 7845. rocker-recliner, misc pwr tools. 287-6499. reliable, grt refs. 266-1804. Peavey bass amp 150watts $175, RCA VHS Side-by-side 21cu.ft. refrig $800, auto gas range Bookcase, Q-sz bed, sofa, loveseat, curtains, more. Span-spk day maid, good worker, honest, M-F-Sat. camcorder $550/neg. 252-5333 ask for John. $500, washer & dryer $275, Ig microwave $150. 260-9613. 221-1840 ask for Reina. 261-7845. Acoustic guitar, 6 strings, add strings & picks inclu 3pc entermnt ctr w/glass drs, bar & TV set swivel Eng-spk live-in maid, honest, refs, good w/children $150/obo. 282-3082. Kenmore hvy duty washer & dryer $650, 1 antique stand, VCR compart, with cab lights, new $985. avail Nov. 30.261-8025. twin beds. 286-3335. 252-5961. Hitachi 19" color TV, remote $3000/obo. 282-3082. Taupe sect L-shape sofa/Q-sz sleeper, seats 7 $950, Seas dryer, like new $350, upright ftzr $350. 230Boats and Campers Pioneer CS-903 stereo spkers $250pr. 287-4335. draperies, short, yellow $35. 287-4280. .0668. 31' steel hull cutter, sleeps 4, galley, head, teak int, Tandy 3000HL, 5.25-3.5 DR, software, $800/obo, Blue couch, loveseat $600, used weed eater $35, Two wall units $150, round tbl, 5 chrs $250. 284extra sails, w/ground tackle, paid $12,000, will Pioneer 6 pack car CD $300.286-3698. manual lawnmower $70. 286-4084. 5388. consider offer. 287-3933. Ataricomp, DD, printer,mon, good cond, best offer. 1988 GE washer/dryer $500. 283-5325. Curtains $10pr. 286-6284. 1991 Bayliner center console 20'2" off shore hull 252-6703. 120hp motor, trlr, extras $11,500. 260-6787. Sofa sleeper, loveseat, TV, crib, rug, full bed set, Wood dining tbl, 6 leather chrs $250, 2pr Sears selfSony Watchman $150, Betamax w/tapes, neg. 223twin bed, much more. 284-5538. lined draperies 96x84 $50 ea. 252-2343, 20' Sportscraft, 225hp OMC OB (eas drive), ex 4290 eves. cond, trim tabs, galv trIr, extras $7900/obo. 2522rattan rockers w/cushions, matching table, 18 mos Sharp CarmuselU microwave, good cond $100 firm. 6162. 8mm Sony video camera $600, Canon AE1 proold $300. 282-3881. 260-3890. gram camera $350, Casio CA-100 elec keybd $120. 16' Orlando Clipper, 2/60hp Yamaha, fish finder, 287-4933. 3 gingerjar lamps, white base & shades $25 ea.282Baby crib/bed, matt, 3 sheets $400. 286-4932. bimini top, extras $4300. 261-5261. 3881. Comp V20, 49MB HD, 3.5-5.25FD, 2 Meg EMS, 3LR sofa, curtains, box springs, frame, lawnmower, 16' Hobie Cat sailboat, very good cond, extras, trlr RGB mon $600/obo. 284-6594. Green/bge floral overstuffed sofa, loveseat $500 Atari games, access $85. 230-1927. $1800. 252-6096. firm. 284-3393. Atari 130XE comp w/2 DD, interface, software, Sofa $225, dishwasher top loading $50. 252-7400. Stratos bass boat, 150hp elec troll motor,fish finder, books. 284-4287. Admiral upright 16.7 frzr, like new $525, Cal K-sz livewells, grt boat $10,000/obo. 284-4596. bed & frame $425. 243-5366. Child's 13pc BR set, twin bed, w/extra hide-awayNat'l 28" TV multi sys, cable $600, Hitachi VHS, bed, 3-dr chest, 2 hutch, tbl, 4 chairs, more $1000. Johnson 6hp OB motor w/gas tank, low usage, VCR multi sys,remote $300, both $800.260-3533. Solid wood Queen-Ann DR set, 6 chairs, like new, 252-5961. needs reconditioning $175. 252-5381 after 7pm. recliner $300. 260-1847. Panasonic stereo music sys $115. 252-2314. Sofa sleeper, lovesest, bra $500. 286-3295. 4x8 trailer $150. 286-4736 after 5p. 3pc LR set w/tables, exr cond $1500, lawnmower Electronics HD 130 MG Seagate $350, 1MG Ram $65, sewing machine $125, stereo rack $60. 287Hotpoint dryer, exe cond $250. 261-6186. 4x4x2 closed trailer, removable doom, lights, duty 80WS $45, Canon T60 50mm, 28mm lens $300. 4181. paid $400/obo .226-7679. 224-5170. Magic Chef gas stove, bge, apart size, like new Sears Kenmore 15 cu.ft. refrig/frzr, no frost, 2dr $275. 287-6693. JVC 20" TV, cable, like new $325, SC mem type$300. 233-5750. Electronics writer$175, Panasonic 1624 printer, wide.car $300. LR set, twin stroller, 2 9x12 rugs, rose & gray, 252-5829. Glass top kitchen tbl, w/4 chrs, as new $400. 284French Prov canopy dbl bed. 252-1257. 21" color TV $150, super NES w/super scope $200, 5784. Genesis, Nintendo tapes $20-$35. 287-4928. 2 VHS VCRs, Sanyo, Technics, good cond $150ea Teak BR set, dresser, Q-sz bed,2night stands, men's firm. 260-3890. 3pc LR & DR set, w/6 seats $450-$250, washer, dresser, headbd $1500. 236-0978. 27" JVC TV color $500, stereo sys w/VHS $1000. refrig, TV $150 ea, wedding dress $300. 252-2543. 233-5224. Packard Bell 286, VGA mon, color printer, mouse, 9x12 blue rug $85, slalom $45, children's classic joystick, game card $1200. 287-5638. Rattan sofa w/2 chin, footstool $650, daybed $350. books $2. 252-2760. Hondo, elec guitar & Matrix amp $385. 243-5366. 284-4949 after duty hra. Answer mach $110, Commo 64 comp, needs repair Recliner, exc cond $150. 260-7621. Pioneer receiver with two spkers, 200 watts $300. $50, phone console, radio, alarm $70, dbl cass $100. 12x2O burgundy carpet plus piece for hall, fits 2BR 287-3778. 284-6881. Kobbe flats $250 firm. 284-6880. Brass tbl lamp attach, glass top/tbl,2 ti ed wooden cart on wheels $30ea. 236-3924. Casio MA-120 electronic keybd, likenew, manuals Panasonic car stereo $80, RCA video player w/8 Mini blinds, 7 sets $200. 289-4639. inclu $50. 223-8314. disks $100, Packard Bell 386SX 130MG HD, 2MB Two rattan swivel chairs w/match round tbl, glass RAM VGA mon, mouse $1400. 282-4225. Carpets, 9x12 peach $40, 4x6 brown $15,4x6 rose top $150, rattan phone Ib w/cushion 430. 236Packard Bell 286, 40MB HD, dual floppy, color $15. 282-3686. 3924. -man, mouse, Dos 5.0, Epson printer $1000. 2842BSR250watt,5-way spkers,Swedish walnutcase, 3280 after Spin. new $250. 252-6239. Formal DR set $2500, sofa $30, 25" RCA color Nat'l 10,000 btu ac, 220 volts $175, 12x15 gold

PAGE 27

Ads Tropic Times R Classified Ads 13,1992 1 carpet, 9x12 royal blue $30. 252-1032. GM turbohydromatic 350 transmission, good con1986 Honda Moped Spree exe. condition, $600. Qtrs 6580A Corozal, Sat. diin, $250. 286-4475. 285-5935. Baliblinds,gold$75, coffeepot$18, Sony 17" color Qtrs 2028B Curundu, Sat, 7am -noon, No early TV, remote $175. 252-5792. .in Minolta 3000, $250 obo, CDs $7; Wilson 1985 Honda VF750 alarm system, very low milebirds, household, clothes, more. tenis racket, $35. 286-6226. age, needs battery $1600. 286-6333. 4pc LR set, very good cond $600, coffee/2 end tbls Qtrs 2302 Curandu, Sat, 8am-noon. $500. 286-6124. 4 Firestone radial ATX tires and rims for 4X4, size 1990 Yamaha 175DT good cond $1100. 252-6708. P205-75R15, $250 obo. 287-3676. Qtrs 131A Espinar, Sat and Sun, 9am both days. Gibson 16 cu.ft. frzr$800/obo, Baldwin organ $400 1983 Yamaha Maxim 750 w/two helmets and bike both grt cond. 286-3373. White wrought iron bird cage on stand, ec. condicover, must see to appreciate, $2500. 260-9982. QtrS 157 Gamboa, Sat, 7am -4 pm, tires, TV, misc. tion, $50. 252-2370. items. K-sz waterbed, good cond $300. 286-3397. Men's 16 speed bike, $65; women's 10 speed, $45. Qrs 580B Balboa Heights, Sat and Sun, 8am, Living Full length LR drapes $10pr, 3 carpets, blue, rose, 287-6336. room and dining room sets, TVs, wedding dresses. bro $40, $60, $40. 286-4430. .Qtrs 1 134B Clayton, Sat, 9am -2pm. Baseball and basketball cards. star singles, insert Qtrs 2350 Balboa, Sat, 7-1 1am, clothes, household Upright fszr $425. 252-6164. cards, rookies, some baseball sets. 260-5522. Qtrs 313 Morgan Ave, Sat 8am -noon, 2 houses. goods, misc. Whirlpool port dishwasher, butcher top $270. 284Steel security door, washer dryer, rattan table seats Qtrs 4B Clayton, Sat, Sam -noon, toys playpen, Qtrs 2300A Balboa, Sat, 7-10am. 4275. six. 260-5605 after 6pm. baby items, household, tires and clothes. Qtrs 213B Ancon, Sat, 8am -noon. Blue loveseat, sofa, fair cond $375. 230-0371. Folding ping pong table with net, excellent condiQtrs 366B Clayton, Sat, Sam-noon multi family, tion. $175. 252-1052. clothes, toys, shoes, misc. Qtra 925 La Boca, Sat, 7am -noon, clothes and Panasonic 24,000 btu ac, 1 yr old, like new $575. kitchen articles, crystal. 236-0984. Two ladies size 6 dressy jumpsuits, used once, Qtrs 383, Clayton, Sat, multi-family. beautiful. 252-6989. Qtrs 430A Kobbe, Sat, 7-1lam, furniture, clothes, Scotch pine 6ft Xmas tree, easy to assemble, everQtrs 476A Clayton, Sat, 8am -noon, lawnmower, toys, misc green $20. 282-3629. Swingomatic, used once, $20; opal and diamond clothes, blinds, TVs, CDs, bike, toys. ring $65. 264-6625. Qtrs 220A Ancon, Sat. Acs, Frigidaire 7,500 btu, Whirlpool 10,000 btu, Qtrs 685A Clayton, Sat, 7 -11am, PCS move, Whirlpool 20,000 btu. 252-6246. 4.2 cu. ft. compact refig, $75; 2 Dacor 71.5 scuba furniture, clothes, rugs, ceramics, crafts, no early Qtrs 927 La Boca, Sat, 7am -1pm, household, tanks w/back packs, hydro just complete, $150. birds. clothes, hardware items. K-sz waterbed w/padded rails, headed w/sheets 286-6282 after 6pm. $400, comforter, 2 night stands $150/obo. 287Qtrs 935A Clayton, Sat, Sam -noon. Qtrs 953B La Boca, Sat, 8am -1pm. 4244. Woman's 12 speed bicycle, red/black 26 in., $75. 252-2314. Qts 1057B Clayton, Sat, 8am, furniture, baby Qtrs 972B La Boca, Sat, 7am-noon, tables, sewing Whirlpool 13,000 btu ac, like new $500/obo. 226items, clothes, shoes, toys, kitchen items. machine, misc. 7679. Little tyke octopus merry-go-round never used $90. 252-6829. Qtrs 2386B Cocoli, Sat, 8am -noon, 2 families, ILIM__etal______singsetithslid_$9;_Caonerbikes, shelves, clothes, toys, misc, no early sales. MISC'||Nn~llSMetal frame swing set with slide $99; Canon personal photocopier PC-10, like new needs ink carQtrs 2530A/B/C/D Cocoli, Sat, 7am -noon, men's Tapshoes ladies,sz6-61/2and8 -8 1/2,252-1257. tchnics stereo system, $400; 2 Huffy 20" bikes, tridge, $275, plants for sale. 284-6881. and women's clothes,household, car stereo speaker 50 each; scooter, $35. 287-3478. box, 19-in color TV, no early birds. Mature couple wishes to housesit in Jan -Feb. 286Black and Decker coffee maker, undercounter, $25. 6480. Littletykesjuniorgymyardsetand airplaneseesaw. 286-4286. Qtrn 54A Albrook, Sat, 8am -until, rags, coffee 252-1257. table, BBQ, 10 sp bike, clothes, shoes, baby items, Purebred male bassett hound to breed with female 19 in., Crown color TV, $200, credenza, 3 small cradle and more. same. 286-6489. Used furniture and appliances. 243-5269. executive chairs, $75, Ig sofa for an office, 2 small TV carts, $20 and $10, usused Brazilian shoes 51/2, Qtrs 273A Albrook, Sat, 7am-noon. Small and medium pet carrier. 287-4771. One way plane ticket to Phoenix, Ariz. valid betwee $20. 269-5224. Thursday and Saturday, $250. 283-4629. Qtrs 84B Howard, Sat, Sam -noon, furniture, dishTo meet other mothers of twins or more to form Wedding dress w/veil, $300. 236-1740. washer, clothes. support group; expectant moms welcome. 287BBQ gas grill, $175; vaporizer,$20,bird Cagemed, 3824. $40, collapsable med bird cage, $25. 287-6196. Nintendo games $20-25; carpet shampooer, $70; Qtrs 1575B Howard, Sat, 7 am, living room furnihome security alarm system, $150. 287-4685. ture, BDUs, TV, clothes, baby swing, blues and Eng-spk maid M -Sat 30 to 45 years old clean, 2 baby beds, $100 and $60; high chair, $25, table boots. references, live-in negotiable, $90. 289-4534. high chair, $15. 284-3035. Battery operated Barbie Corvette, great condition $150 firm; lipstick rechargable weedeater, $35. Qtrs 592B Howard, Sat, 7am -noon. Like to trade low mile exc. cond. VW Golf for 8 Yamaha motorcycle parts, brake system, w/discs, 287-3738. cylinder car or truck of equal value, $4000 to chrome pipes, 90X18 rear tire, tach, ign, neogotiQtrs 1515B Howard, Sat, multi family. $5,000. 260-5389. able. 286-3929 after 5 pm. Darkroom equipment never used; 35mm camera, 10-speed bike, BBQ, rugs, coffee table, clothes, Qtrs 1527C Howard Gateway, Sat, clothes, books, A clown for birthday party, call today. 287-4032. VHS tapes cartoons, $5 and $8. 252-2680 after 5pm. baby items, cradle. 286-4282. stereo equipment, household items and more. Full time, live-in bilingual maid/cook, no children. Old records in Englilsh at .50 cents long plays. 252Nutramigen formula 7 32oz RTF and 5 13 oz conQtrs 1550A Howard, Sat, 8am -noon. 282-4288. 2680 after 5:30pm. contrated, $25. 264-6474. Qtrs 1552D Howard, Sat, 7:30 -11:30am, No early Babysitter in Curandu for occasional evenings. Assortment of comics, price negotiable. 287-6331. Car seat, $25. 286-4272. sales, toys clothes, tires, bikes. 286-6333 Trailer $900. 228-4630. Microwave, $200, Bodytone 300 rowing machine/ Qtrs 1561A Howard, Sat, 8am -noon. Seamstress w/references. 286-6333. home gym, $100; 6-foot book cases, $175. 285Three wheel motorcycle $800. 228-4630. 4734. Qtrs 818B Farfan, Sat,8am -until, tires, rims, furniCrib in good condition. 252-2900. Lure, curtains, clothes. Blk formal dress w/short cape worn once Size 9/10 2 mountain bikes, $50. 286-4971 after 4pm. Span-spk live-in main, reliable, mature, general $90. 286-4285. Qtra 823A Farfan, Sat, Sam -noon, multi family. housework, cook, iron, babysit, references a must, Formal wedding dress with veil and slip, $300.252$120. 286-3792. Blue Kolercraft stroller, like new $35, carseat, $25. 2080. Qtrs 837A Farfan, Sat, 8am -noon, 3 families, 283-4626. maternity, baby items, misc. Laser disks, Santana, Rush, M.Rush, BOC, UFO, Smith-Corona portable electric typewriter, like Priest, Maiden, Leppard, Trower, P. Green, ZZ Top. Little tykes boat, $15; Fisher Price rocking horse, new, $110. 252-2143. Qtrs 308B Kobbe, Sat, Sam -2pm, baby items, bike, 252-2566. $10; baby stroller, $20; some toddler jumpsuits $5 clothes, toys, table. each. 284-5484. Western hat, Stetson, Marlboro, silver, size 6 7/8 Bunk beds w/matress and one single mattress size. new, $65. 252-2143. Qtrs 309B Kobbe, Sat, 7am-? Baby items, stereo, 287-3827. 5 Dunlop grand trek 225/70R15 tires ideal for small camera. No early birds. trucks $300/obo. 269-1651. Golf clubs, ping, red, 3-sw, 6 mos old, ping putter, Coffee and tea service set silver only. 252-6989. $475. 287-3631. Qtrs 3024 Marine Barracks, Sat, 7-11am, multiNew Kamei spoiler for 1979-1986 Mustang or family, misc items. No early birds. Extra largedogkennel in good condition. 287-4935. Capri, $450. 284-5224. Old new jazz music tapes, CDs and albums, $200. 261-4616. Qtrs 403A Kobbe, Sat, 8am -1pm. Uprightpiano in very good condition for reasonable Moutain bike for men $100. 223-3739 after 5pm. price. 286-3373. Black dust ruffle, black\ivory stripe comfoter, pilQtrs 450 Kobbe, Sat, Sam -noon, No early birds, VW 4 rims chrome spoke, 14X5 w/caps, lugs, never low sham, matching round table cover, $70/obo. clothes, dishes, and more. Carpets w/pads 12x15 and 9x12. 260-7779. used $350. 260-1847. 260-9058. Qtrs 261B Corozal (commissary area), Sat. U2 or Doors tapes. 287-4733. Stamp collection (US) singles, blocks, coils, bookChrysler, 1970s unused automobileparts, generator lets accumulations, mint condition, $3,600. 236$55 complete master brake cylinder $40. 252-5381 0417. after 7pm. _* the TROPIC TIMES Ad Form Trains and lots of accessories, tracks, houses, elec. New ping pong table. 286-4531,after 4:30pm. turnouts $500. 236-0417. Coin gold dredge 6", complete $1400. 284-5478. ] ANIMA "-Front and back bucket seats for 70s GM, green and El AUTOMOBILES black reupholstered vinyl $60. 286-4475. Crown 1-3-5 graphite golf clubs $125. 287-4293. M AVAILABLE ---0 BOATS & CAMPERS --Inside Christmas lights, Wearever popcorn popper, Extra large dog kennel, never used $59. 2878-4293. C FOUND sheets for twin beds, towels. 252-2646. PRICE HOME PHONE__ Girls 24" 10-spd bike $50, boy's 20" Raleigh bike 0 ELECTRONICS PRICE HOME PHONE 2singlebeds,mattrress,spring and frame, bestoffer. $60.2 15" GMC/Chevy van wheels/tires, misc car]HOUSEH-OLD Check only one category per ad form. Only two 252-6845. pets. 287-4571. ] LOST ads per person each week are allowed. Each ad form E MISCELLANEOUS is limited to 15 words, Please type or print neatly. Miscellaneous baby items, walker, tub, clothes, 0 MOTORCYCLES Information listed below is not included in the ad, swing/jump and more. 282-3082. 0 PATIO SALES but is required for publication. This information will 14K gold marquise diamond engagementring, with 1981 Kawasaki 750 LTD 13,000 miles, new tirs C WANTED not be released to third parties. trillion accents.56ct, less than 1 yr$950.260-3049. chain and sprockets. $1,100. 2894042. SPONSOR'S NAME RANK/GRADE Weight bench, never used, Weider with attach1991 Honda C8R 1000F, mint condition serious ORG -__DUTYPHONEments, $100. 286-3698. inquiries only, $6,000. 282-3429.

PAGE 28

12 Tropic Times B 2 Nov. 13, 1992 BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker ACROSS you' 72 Biblical name 108 Stormed 32 Betel palm lead-In ALL THE PG5 BACK AN I KNOW I UTAT THIS POINT My Way' 42 Meal or work 73 Greek 109 Italian epic 35 Dadk 69 Dogs and HOME THINK I EVERYONE AYS I 1'17 BE WILING TO 6 Canter and lead-in physician poet Chinese tea cats, often HAVE ITMAL'E! THE E70G 15 MAN'S TURN THE JOB ttir 43 nto ast 74 Intoxicating DOWN 36 Fast plan-s 70 Ches, BEST FRI-NIP OVER TO A CA 1 Punctuation a name that plant juice 1 Chafing 37 Plant shoots sounds marks thou -" 75 Congrega2 Band on a 36 Base 71 Cross 16 Spanish(Rcv 3:1) fions head shield stealing 73 Aggressive speaking 45 Narrow slat 78 Young male 3 Head of maneuvers person district 46 Herd horses Benjamin's 39 Tel -74 Stays away 17 Range of 47 The south of 79 Reduce lens clan 41 Antony's loan from home all activity France epetuae 4 Ship of 1492 request? night 18 Cylindrical 48 John Jacob 83 River islands 5 Share 42 Conspiracies 75 American and tapered and Mary 84 Degrees in epenses 44 Caesar's patriot/author 20 "Norma 51 Impure type development 6 Recreation fatal date 76 Giving composer of sodium 86 "Lady Be -vehicle 46 Fer leaf assistance 21 Instrument carbonate (aid mavie) 7 Sharp 47 Bus or beat 77 Tempirary HAGAR the Horrible By Dik Browne for Casals 52 Railroad 87 Wild ox mountain lead-ic substitute 22 Largest living handears 88 Altar phrase crest 48 Church pads 78 Moslem bird 56 Schemes 89 Summer 8 Gull or leg 49 Point of view magistrae 9 7-/ -P i 6-24 Auk genus 57 Owlish refreshers follower 50 Graceful 79 -Like it I'X 'YA'O &'A 25 Handled sounds 90 Ram down 9 Sesame dance Hot a 27 Small. 58 Dane 91 High. ctaggy 10 Regulating 51 Londo 80 In constant sudden shelters hill valve fortress motion eepldsions 59 Tourist's 92 Palm leaf 11 Drop by 52 Pierced with 81 Suitors 29 Fenning need used in 12 Hardy horns 62 Asiatic plants sword 60 Confessed to thatching heroine 53 Adult insect 85 Citcus 30poll a cnme 94 Anagram for 13 Table scrap stage workers 31 Down to the 61 Acts servilely time 14 Prertt's 54 Bowling 86 Increased -(to the 62 Philippine 95 Most arid father alleys 90 Hackneyed very end) Moslems 97 Lean-tv 1 Fleck 55 Scanty 93 River in Italy 32 Start of the 63 Prog genus 98 Etch designs 16 Wisconsin 57 Shellered 94 -Knievel play 64 Chang's on city anchorage 95 Rope or line 33 Gteek letter brother 100 City on the 19 Successlvl 58 Gathering ot lead-in 34 Japese 6 Rescubreak 102 l atn wtches 9 Salad fish Barney Google and Snuffy Smith By Fred Lasswell 36 River off evictions 20 Beliener in a souvenirs women sediment 67 Aged beer 104 Stupid or silly modern 62 Apportions 99 -Annie, of 37 Sings like G8 Night's fellow religion 63 Spanish ,Oklahoma!" PAW WON'T WHA R'S YORE WHAR HE Bing pause on a 105 Related on 23 Robbery arbor 101 Merkel .1 NEVER FIND MY HIDEY PLACE? NEVER 39 Boxet and journey mom's sioe 26 Rural 65 Choir plum movies BINGO WINNIN'St!! LOOKS caliph 70 Appraised 106 Opens structure 66 Old mariners 103 Childless 40 -show 71 Branching 107 Steno groups 28 Indian 67 Light or post plural abbr 1 3 4 5 6b 7 8 19 110 N 1 12 13 4 1 16 .r17 18 19 20 21 2212 -~~~ 6 Loe fa4xWt. RATZ by BEN SMITH 30 J2 33 ILLY, PiEASE GO um, OA MARIA, PLSE AR/GlT, ONE Oc YO0 wI E S'AW orrJ To 11tI MOARD A0 WORK NUtMaER SIr ON kTLE FREAKS RAO HAl REAP 43 39 WOJ6 I3UHSER SEL L) E7TER ANSWER 1E11 4641 42 444 45 46 47 948 49 50o 51 52 53 54 55 543 57 58 5 6061 62 63-4BUTCH AND DOLI GIE by ALEX HOWELL OR &tsTORAO? ~O R, 701~ 68T 69 70 71 0 rA FORTRAT S 7273 74 A VOR ,AL-l 75. 76 77 78 79 110 11 112 OT ~84 85 B6 8 88 89 90 9 92 937 5 6 9 9899 10" 110,11 110 OUT ON A LIMB by GARY KOPERVAS i0 15T71 COF e, -rA 1PFI ORAI GATRRAA SOI O S N NAO O S Y THE SPATS by JEFF P CERING S Vl 0 3 N n V NR 3 A {0 ED V Vj OO IN O VIRDT YB it L gs g -P' H2IUR i Fyl B0cc FR d~f 59 S3100 S O ONH SN Y ld '.~ OFRSWTN H g p LErjj5$ NCERS ThE SaVEll CBQG 3Eb 1E 0N/~ n 1111111 HO -LS O 01190 I f 1 9 It WOn WOrk. I I v99 J II 140 O BNVO getting up atA5 A1." V a 001 S 3, V I S I I V DENNIS THE MENACE Q AINCY by TED SHEARER 0~~~~~r vAK no VIfNb3ME 0 ri-ii S2 -6 ~ q 4iI~I Sy V EL .-M 3 V2 S a Q hR:BC ---PROFESSOR HUMBLE by -11L YATES 3 NVER -W LL f 04.al TKA WevesEA S AT.TNDK FOR LETINMESTAYAWAKE LONG 9N i Vto SE" t hardware department."


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