Citation
The tropic times

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Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text



Gift of the Panama Canal Museum


Tropic


Vol. V. No. 44


Times


. Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Friday, Nov. 6, 1992


Joulwan releases Veterans Day message


QUARRY HEIGHTS (USSOUTH-
COM PAO) - U.S. military community
members in Panama will celebrate Vet-
erans Day Wednesday with services at
Corozal American Cemetery at 11 a.m.
Brig. Gen. David Sawyer, 24th Wing
Commander, will be the guest speaker at
this year's ceremony, which is sponsored
by Panama's veterans organizations.
The presidential proclamation will be
read by Howard Beall, deputy chief of
mission at the U.S. Embassy to Panama.
For the second year in a row, British
musicians from the Belize Defense Forces
will co-celebrate Britain's Remembrance
Day at the Corozal ceremony.
In a letter released last week, Gen.
George A. Joulwan, commander in chief
of U.S. Southern Command, praised the
service of veterans and called for serv-
icemembers to remember the sacrifices
of veterans before them.
"Today we honor veterans," Joulwan
wrote. "Americans who served their coun-
try in peace and war. Americans who
sacrificed and shed their blood in defense
of freedom. Wedo so onthe 11 th hour on
the 11th day of the 11th month because
on that day in 1918, the guns of World
War I were at last silenced after 116,000
Americans had died.
"The next year, President Woodrow
Wilson proclaimed Nov. 11 - Armi-
stice Day - as the date to honor these
Americans," he said. "Today, Veterans
Day honors all Americans, both living
and dead, from every war and time pe-
riod.
"In Southern Command, Veterans Day
is especially meaningful for those mili-
tary who helped build the canal, those
who kept it free and open through two
world wars and many crises, and those
who serve today.
"You who now serve your country in


APLaswPhoto
These are some of the items left behind at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial that now reside in the new Smithsonian
Institution exhibit entitled "Personal Legacy: the Healing of a Nation." See veterans commentary on page 6.


SOUTHCOM are worthy descendents of
those who proceeded you.
"By your courage, commitment and
sacrifice, you visibly demonstrate our
country's commitment and resolve to
Latin America.
"You also are great role models of a
military institution that prides itself on
professionalism and dedication to cer-
tain values and ideals.
"You can look around USSOUTH-,


COM today and see many living ex-
amples of the sacrifices for our country,
both during war and peace.
"Some show the weathered marks of
age on their faces. Others have the smooth
look of youth. But you all possess the
same character and courage demonstrated
by the generations of veterans serving
before you.
"The results of your efforts are evi-
dent as we have seen democracy spread


through Central and South America. This
is the fruit of your labors which have
proven the success of the 'One Team-
One Fight' concept.
"On Veterans Day 1992,1 I ask that you
pause to remember the sacrifices of those
who gave their lives, or lost their limbs,
or who are still unaccounted for or miss-
ing in action.
"I am extremely proud of.each of you
and your families."


High crime warning
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Because
of a recent increase in violent crime in Panama
City, the commander of Joint Task Force - Pan-
ama has urged U.S. citizens not to patronize bars
and discos through Nov. 16.
Officials say establishments including Bac-
chus, Patatus, Piramyde, My Place Video Club,
Back Street, Daiquiri Video Pub, Poppy's and
Magic will not be frequented by Department of
Defense personnel.
U.S. citizens traveling in the Panama City area
after dark are urged to exercise caution and to
avoid crowded places such as bars and clubs. In
addition, the JTF-Panama commanders strongly
discouraging travel after dark along the Transisth-
mian highway.

Explosives amnesty day
COROZAL (Tropic Times) - An ammunition
and explosives amnesty day will be held Nov. 19
on U.S. Army South Safety Day.
Drop-off points are Southern Command Net-
work field, Fort Clayton; Fort Davis' softball
field; Building 734, Howard AFB; and the Am-
munition Supply Point on Rodman NS. All points
are open from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.




Medical officials challenge local
servicemembers to take the Great
American Smokeout plunge.


Loh finishes first Panama visit


HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA) - Gen. John Michael
Loh, commander, Air Combat Command, made his
first visit to Howard AFB and U.S. Southern Command
headquarters Oct. 28.
During his three-day visit, the general got a first-
hand look at the missions of SOUTHCOM and the 24th
Wing.
"The 24th Wing is a very important wing in ACC,"
he said. "Their role is a little different from those of
other wings in our command and it demands a lot of its
people."
According to Loh, the main differences stem from
the range of aircraft present and the counternarcotics
mission.
He applauded the SOUTHCOM response to this
mission and innovation they have to use to produce
results.
"I'm very delighted with the morale, innovation and
can-do attitude of all the people here," Loh said. "It's an
inspiration to see how all the people have come
together in a very diverse mission and perform it very
well."
Loh said the ACC will makeSOUTHCOM priority
in the future.
"We aim to provide the best combat capability we



Albrook riding stable showdeo set
for fun day of barbecue, riding and
country dancing.


absolutely can to SOUTHCOM and that's our number
one goal...to increase and improve combat capability to
perform the mission.
"We're trying to focus more on the integrated appli-
cation of airpower, putting bombers, fighters and recon-
naissance aircraft together in composite, joint training
exercises to be more responsive to our mission around
the world."
Loh said teamwork is a big part of the success that
ACC has had in Latin America.
"I'm quite pleased with the way our team down here
in the 24th Wing has integrated with the SOUTHCOM
mission and how we're working together as one single
team to perform the mission," he said.
"This is a more difficult mission than most of the
routine missions we've had in the past, but it's an
exciting one," he said. "Exciting because we're helping
Central and South American nations grow as demo-
cratic countries and we're also trying to fight the drug
war.
Loh said he was happy with the 24th Wing's work.
"I'm very pleased with the spirit, attitude and posi-
tive response that we have down here and the capabili-
ties we're providing with air power in the Southern
Command."



*Veterans Day, page 6.
*Clinton's Latin policy, page 4.
*High school football, page 7.


>Ns.A


.- lr% -- .-lL Is-











2 Tropic Times
Nov. 6, 1992


Soldier helps El Salvadorans' orphanage
I -""- ~-., - ,==u - . .,~,-.~ , -


by MSgt. Rolf Carter
Editor
COROZAL (Tropic Times) - For four nuns and 180
children, 1989 was a good year, and they needed one.
They were living in the Hogar Del Nino Adalberto
Guirola orphanage for children in Santa Tecla, El
Salvador. Their country was locked in a civil war and
their buildings were still damaged from a 1986 earth-
quake.
In June of that year, things started changing when
SFC Heriberto Rivera-Velez, administrative supervisor
to the U.S. Military Group El Salvador, arrived for duty.
He remembered seeing so many children in the
street, that he knew there was a need. Having extra time
on his hands, he told one ofthe secretaries in his section
he wanted to get involved and help. She in turn intro-
duced Rivera to her sister, a member of the board for
Hogar Del Nino, which led to his first visit.
"I saw the overwhelming need there, hunger, clothes
and TLC (tender loving care)," said Rivera, a 16-year
Army veteran. "They needed the bare necessities that
we take for granted. I decided to jump in."
That first visit resulted in so many improvements,
that Rivera was nominated for the Secretary's (of State)
Pin For Outstanding Volunteerism. Although he didn't
receive the pin, he was honored by Assistant Secretary
of State Bernard Aronson in October.
Rivera's secretary's pin nomination letter described
conditions at the orphanage: The nuns were assisted by
several underpaid staff members who weren't trained
for the type of care the children needed; there were no
laundry facilities, clothes were washed then dried on
the ground; there was little medicine and some children
were sick as a result.
The 37-year-old NCO from San German, Puerto
Rico, started by getting other people interested in the
orphanage. He brought MILGROUP members to the or-
phanage for a cookout, which was a success. The
visitors and children got along so well MILGROUP
people started providing some of the extra help Rivera
needed, and he was soon able to get them to support his
projects. Clean-up day at the orphanage, a Christmas
party, food donations, and other activities helped around
the orphanage and provided funds to buy items the nuns
said they needed, the letter outlined. Other people


HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA) - The
Howard Education Center held its Fall
1992 Community College of the Air Force
graduation ceremony Oct. 29, honoring
44 graduates from various units.
CMSgt. Tommy A. Roberts, Air
Combat Command senior enlisted advi-
sor, and two-time CCAF graduate was
the guest speaker.
For the first time at a CCAF gradu-
ation in Panama, a distinguished gradu-


SFC Heriberto Rivera-Velez holds his plaque while Sor Luz Elena Vellega, orphanage director, and
children from the orphanage watch.


noticed the problems at Hogar Del Nino as well. The
Rotary Club president also wanted to get involved in
making some changes there. Rivera introduced the
official to representatives from the U.S. Agency for
International Development, and the three started talk-
ing. They found out USAID could donate $10 for every
$1 donated by the Rotarians. After the Rotary donated
$1,000 and USAID provided its 10 to one donation,
Rivera found out there was more money available.
That's when Chuck Brady came into the picture.
Brady ran a program called the Earthquake Recon-
struction Project which granted money to help rebuild
public buildings. Brady's program resulted in a nearly
$1 million renovation project at the orphanage. Ac-
cording to Rivera, the project is nearly complete. In
early November they will start dedicating new
facilities.The orphanage now has a bakery; a chicken


ate was awarded a $250 scholarship by
the Air Force Association's Eagle Foun-
dation. The winner was TSgt. Timothy
M. Thomas from the 24th Wing.
CCAF graduates were:
Southern Command Network: SSgt.
Kenneth C. Adams; 24th Contracting
Squadron: TSgt. John V. Aguilar, MSgt.
Archibald D. Black; 310th Airlift Squad-
ron: TSgt. John A. Bauer, SSgt. Glen C.
Hindmarsh, Sgt. John K. Wilson, MSgt.


farm, half of the chickens raised for food the other for
funds; auditorium and sewing class equipment. New
buildings to house children and the nuns are completed
but not yet inhabited, Rivera said. After learning Riv-
era couldn't receive the secretary's pin this year, be-
cause it had already been awarded in Guatemala,:
Beverly Kitson still wanted some recognition for the
sergeant. Kitson, a community relation officer at the
embassy, asked Deputy Chief of Mission, William J.
Dieterich, to present a plaque to Rivera, who in turn
asked Aronson to make the presentation. "An indirect
effect of SFC Rivera's volunteer efforts has been the
boost to the morale of this community. In anarea where
security threats are imminent and travel is restricted,
SFC Rivera has helped the community see a bigger and
brighter picture, and have the satisfaction of making a
difference," wrote Dieterich in the nomination letter.


John T. Zachariah; 24th Supply Squad-
ron: SMSgt. Charles W. Berry, MSgt.
Steven R. Letarte; 24th Maintenance
Squadron: MSgt. Archibald D. Black,
MSgt Donna M. Coleman; 24th Com-
munication Squadron: SSgt. Ernest L.
Cain 111, SSgt. Kenneth E. Carter, SSgt.
John F. Cobb, MSgt. Erick L. Estrada,
MSgt. Larry T. Johnson, Sgt. Ronson E.
Levau, SSgt. Christopher D. McNamara,
SrA. Charles L. Powers; Detatchment 2,
1st Air Support Group: MSgt. James M.
Denny; 24th Wing: TSgt. Christine K.
Flores, TSgt. Carl L. Johnson, TSgt.
Timothy M. Thomas; 24th Civil Engi-
neering Squadron: MSgt. Keith R. Har-
ris, SSgt. Cecil S. Nichols, MSgt. Martin


B. Tabor, 24th Security Police Squad-
ron: MSgt. David R. Harrison; 24th
Mission Support Squadron: SSgt. Phyl-
lis P. Johnson; 617th Airlift Support Squad-
ron: SSgt. Louis S. Longmire, MSgt.
Mark S. Spaw; 79th Test & Evaluation
Group: TSgt. Kathy L. Mathis-Ringo;
6933rd Electronic Security Squadron:
TSgt. Thomas A. Matusch, SSgt. Terry
W. Mullins, SSgt. Edwin P. Neal Jr.,
SSgt. Edward V. Negron, SSgt. Jerald J.-
Tillery; 24th Medical Group: SSgt. Kath-
leen A. Moore; 24th Transportation Squad-
ron: SSgt. Zena M. Simpson; 24th Weather
Squadron: Sgt. Richard D. Slominsky;
24th Operation Support Squadron: SMSgt.
Sam L. Weatherby.


Gorgas offers smokers classes, incentives


GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL- The
Medical Activity Community Health Nurses are spon-
soring several activities in conjunction with the 16th
Annual Great American Smokeout.
The various events are designed to make the smoke-
out an upbeat event that gives smokers an incentive to
quit foraday or permanently, said 1 stLt. Dino Murphy,
MEDDAC public affairs officer.
"Quitting is tough and smokers need to know they
can rely on friends and loved ones for support," said Lt.
Col. Mary Hoke, chief, MEDDAC community health
nursing.
With this in, mind and a belief that a few laughs can
make the task of quitting easier, the following events
have been planned, Hoke said.
Great American Smokeout booths will offer assorted
items to the public at the following locations:
*Nov. 16
Albrook Post Office, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Building 519,
Fort Clayton, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
*Nov. 17
Corozal Commissary, 1:45-4:30 p.m.
*Nov. 18
Directorate of Engineering and Housing, Building
374, Corozal, 9-11 a.m.; Burger King, Fort Kobbe,


10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
Corozal Post Exchange, 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.; Build-
ing 519, Fort Clayton, 1:30-3:30 p.m.; Altantic Non-
commissionedOfficer's Club, 8:30 a.m.-noon
*Nov. 19
Atlantic Commissary, 8:30 a.m.-noon; Atlantic Post



AMERICAN
CANCER
'SOCIETY'
GREATAMERICAN

SMOKEOUT



Exchange, 1-4 p.m.
Gorgas Army Community Hospital will give Smoke-
free Baby t-shirts to infants born at Gorgas through
Nov. 19. Gorgas will sponsor aSmokeout display in the
main lobby of the hospital Nov. 16-19, 9 .m.-noon.


There will be a Federal Women's lunch in the Fort
Clayton NCO Club, Nov. 17. The guest speaker will be
Dr. MariaBritton. Call Joyce Conway, 287-4716/3586,
forreservations.
There will be an officers' wives' luncheon at Club
Amador, 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
Spec. Gary Sampson, a Southern Command Net-
work disc jockey, will quit smoking for the day Nov. 19.
He will take calls with suggestions and progress reports
at 287-4517.
Smoking cessation classes start Nov. 19, Building
519, room 106, Fort Clayton, 2-3 p.m. Call 287-4325 to
register.
Gorgas is holding a Cold Turkey raffle at 1 p.m.,
Nov. 20. People who quit smoking for the day are
eligible for the raffle. Call 287-4327/4817 or 282-5162/
5163 between 8 and 11 a.m. to register.
Twenty-five prizes ranging from turkeys to key-
chains will be given to the winners. Maj. Gen Richard
Timmons, commander U.S. Army South, will conduct
the drawing.
The Class of 2000, now 5th graders, will take anon-
smoking pledge from Nov. 16 to 20. They will also
encourage their loved ones to quit or remain smokeless
by mailing postcards with messages on them.


Air Force Community College

holds graduation ceremony


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Tropic Times 3
Nov. 6, 1992


Saddle




'em up


Albrook stables

rounds 'pokes

up for showdeo
ALBROOK AFS (Tropic Times) -
Cowboys and girls can enjoy a fun day of
riding, eating and dancing Saturday when
Albrook stables offers Panama's first
showdeo.
Hay rides, gaming events, barrel rac-
ing, pole bending and a horse show round
out the animal handling part of the events,
but spectators can expect alot more from
a day at the corral, said Lisa Blanding,
Albrook stables.
The day starts with an old-fashioned
chicken barbecue at 4 p.m.
At 7 p.m., the horse competitions begin,
followed by a country western dance that
should last until around 1 a.m., Blanding
said.
Adults must pay $7 for admission to
the barbecue, children ages 7-12 $3 and
children under age 7 eat for free.
The price of the barbecue also pays
for admission to the dance, Blanding
said.


r ON-


- - -.~.---. ~
-- *.W..s.r
V.- *Z.


U.S. Army photo by SqL James Yocum
Deana Loudermilk, Company B, 193rd Support Battalion, takes her horse through the barrel ride.


Ch rmistm as


tree sale set
ALBROOK AFS (SOUTHCOM PAO) - The Boy
Scouts ofAmerica, Panama District, will sell Christ-
mas trees the first week of December to support
scouting programs in Panama.
The tree sales are tentatively scheduled for:

AAFES Garage on Fort Davis
Dec. 5-6, 7 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Dec. 7-9, 4 p.m. - 7 p.m.
- Albrook Post Offlce parking lot
Dec. 5-6, 7 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Dec. 7-9, 4 p.m. - 7 p.m.

Trees will be sold to authorized privilege holders
on a first-come, first-served basis. Organizations
wishing to purchase a tree for the unit must have. a
representative stand in line and present a memoran-
dum from the commanding officer or command
sergeant major to the Boy Scout sales manager.
"This is theonly equitable way wecan ensurethat
all families and organizations get afairchanceto get
a tree," said Maj. Joe Lahue, Scouting District
Commissioner.
Enough trees have been ordered to cover the an-
ticipated demand, he said. There were trees left over
last year, he said.
'Me Boy Scouts and volunteer adult leaders will
be on site to provide courteous and cheerful service
while helping customers select and load trees, ac-
cording to Brig. Gen. James L. Wilson, deputy
commander of U.S. Army South and Boy Scout
Executive Board chairman.
Each scouting unit will earn points based upon its
level of participation. The points will be used to
determine how to divide the profits, which will help
pay for camping activities, administrative salaries
and camping scholarships.
�'This provides an excellent opportunity for the
scouts to assist the community and learn about
customer service," Wilson said. "It also teaches the
scouts about individual and unit responsibility."
Trees should rangeinprice between $10 and $45,
according to Ray Under-wood, Executive Board
Treasurer.
For information, call 286-3685.


dren to take part in the lead line contest,
she said.
L Door prizes will also be offered.
For information on the showdeo or
other Albrook stable events, call 287-
3333/4411.


There is no charge for watching the Tickets will also be available at the
riding events, but the dance will cost $2, door.
she said. Experienced riders who don't have a
Showdeo tickets can be bought at the horse'in Panama can rent one to partici-
Zodiac Recreation Center on Howard pate in the show, Blanding said.
AFB or at the Albrook stables. Parents can also rent ponies for chil-


The event offered families the chance to socialize
and play games in a controlled environment, Galloway
said.
"We like tfie concept of the festival," said Sandra
Humburg, who attended with her husband and three
children. "It's a safer alternative to going door-to-door
trick or treating."
Aside from receiving a bag of candy, the children
were treated to fun stops, seven games with Christian
themes. -
Festival-goers also participated in a chili cook-off
and a cake-decorating contest during the Harvest Festi-
val.
"This is a clean, safe environment," said Kathryn
Butler, a festival-goer. "We don't have to worry about
the food or candy being tampered with. It's been fun."


by Spec. Robin Mantikoski
USARSO Public Affairs Office


FORT CLAYTON - Demons, ghosts and goblins
were nowhere in sight at one'Halloween bash.
Instead, characters such as Moses, Joseph, Mary and
shepherds ambled about.
Nearly 200 people gathered at Curundu Junior High
School Saturday for the annual Harvest Festival, spon-
sored by the Fort Clayton Chapel Sunday School.
Parents were asked to dress their children in cos-
tumes of Christian origin rather than traditional Hal-
loween costumes.
"Halloween definitely has some paganorigins. This
party offers people an opportunity for wholesome activ-
ity," said Dawn Galloway, activity coordinator.


U.S. Army photo by Spec. RoWn MantkoWd
Ginny Sleminskl tells children about the origins of the religious costumes during the Harvest Festival at
Curundu Junior High School.

Halloween bash tells Bible stories









4Tropic Times
Nov. 6,1992


* Hemisphere


Clinton may change Latin policy


WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President-
elect Bill Clinton is widely expected to
shift the focus of U.S. Latin American
policy away from trade and toward other
issues such as human rights and the envi-
ronment.
During the campaign he gave only a
reluctant support to President Bush's
proposal of a free trade pact with Mexico
and avoided all reference to the Enter-
prise for the Americas, Bush's plan to set
up a pan-American free trade zone.
Both proposals are seen by Latin na-
tions as crucial to foster economic growth
and free market policies in the area.
Yet, diplomats and analysts say, the
degree in which Clinton will move from
a trade to a political agenda will depend
to a good extent on who handles Latin
affairs for him.
"The key is in the names," said Isaac
Cohen, who heads the UN Economic
Commission for Latin America's Wash-
ington office.
Among likely candidates for key po-
sitions are several ex-members of the
Jimmy Carter administration, which has
made human rights and the defense of
democratic values a cornerstone of its
Western Hemisphere policy. But many
of them also favor vigorous free trade.
From a Democratic point of view,
"the two agendas are complementary,"
said Peter Hakim, staff director of the


Clinton
private group Inter-American Dialogue.
Latin American diplomats say they
consider the presence of former San
Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros in Clin-
ton's transition team a good sign.
Sources said Cisneros, a U.S. His-
panic leader who believes trade must be
part of the equation, could land a Cabinet
post, maybe as commerce secretary.
Among the candidates to succeed
Bernard Aronson as the top State Depart-
ment official on Latin America are:
*Robert Pastor, who handled West-
ern Hemisphere affairs in Carter's Na-
tional Security Council and now heads
the Latin American program at the Emory
University's Carter Center.


Pastor is widely perceived as a con-
servative who has distanced himself from
Carter'spolicy, whichinhistimeledhim
to cut aid to several military regimes.
*Richard Feinberg, an economist now
heading the Inter-American Dialogue and
who under Carter was a staff member of
the State and Treasury departments with
political and economic responsibilities
over Latin American affairs. The Dia-
logue promotes free trade in the area.
+Marc Schneider, a Pan-American
Health Organization official and former
aide to Patricia Derian, who is credited
with devising Carter's Latin American
human rights policy.
Over the past decade Schneider has
highlighted concerns over human rights
in the PAHO's agenda.
*Democratic sources said U.S. en-
voy to the Organization of American
States Luigi Einaudi was likely to return
to his job in the State Department's of-
fice of planning for Latin America.
His likely successor is Larry Harring-
ton, a long-time adviser to Vice-Presi-
dent-elect Al Gore, and a man who has
been active on the environment and human
rights, they added.
*Riordan Roett, an economist who
heads the Johns Hopkins University's
Latin American Studies Program, could
become a future U.S. ambassador to
Mexico, the sources said.


Salvador rebels continue weapons turn-in


GUARJILA, El Salvador (AP) - The squad leader
barked a command, and 188 Salvadoran guerrillas fell
into formation for the last time Friday, marching to a
table manned by U.N. peacekeepers to turn in their
weapons.
Across the country, some 1,500 other rebel fighters
handed over their arms under the terms of a U.N.-
brokered peace treaty that ended 12 years of civil war in
January. Both the government and the Farabundo Marti
National Liberation Front were to have complied with
all terms of the accord by Saturday.
The two sides agreed to postpone the deadline to
Dec. 15, but President Alfredo Cristiani said he would
suspend the restructuring of the armed forces until all
rebels have demobilized.
Christiani's government is obliged under the ac-
cords to cut the 60,000-member armed forces by 50
percent, demobilize counter-insurgency units and re-
move officers who have committed human rights abuses.
The FMLN accepted the new demobilization time-
table without conditions.
About 3,200 guerrillas, 40 percent of the total when
the war ended early this year, remain armed at 15 camps
spread throughout the Massachusetts-sized nation.
U.N. Undersecretary General Alvaro de Soto and
Marrack Goulding, who heads U.N. peacekeeping ef-
forts in El Salvador, arrived in the capital for meetings
aimed at fixing problems in the nine-month-old peace
process.


Calling the meetings "decisive," Goulding said he
was optimistic that the government and rebels would
"be able to rapidly advance toward solution of the
problems."
Some of the rebels who demobilized on Friday were
seasoned fighters who had spent years in the mountains.
Others were in diapers when El Salvador's political
differences erupted in war in the late 1970s.
Many of the weapons they turned in were in poor
condition, with broken muzzles and parts missing, and
seemed more threat to the shooterthan the target. U.N.
officers put the weapons in a huge shipping container,
which they locked with two keys, one for the U.N., one
for the guerrillas.
For the rebels, Friday was a time of reflection, last
slaps on the back, and last rounds of "Viva!" for fallen
comrades.
Some spent their last moments as guerrillas quietly.
One fighter with a machine gun on his shoulder and a
watermelon under his arm sought a quiet place in the
shade.
Others chatted in small groups as young boys in this
war-shattered village, 40 miles north of San Salvador,
climbed trees for a better view.
Guarjila was fought over for years, and there is
scarcely a family in the town that didn't lose five or 10
members.
A white tross atop a hill honors the hundreds, per-
haps thousands, who died in the area.


APLaswrPhoto
A guerrilla fighter stands guard at the entrance of
the rebel base near San Salvador that holds the
weapons turned in after a 12-year civil war ended in
U.N.-sponsored peace talks.


LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) - U.S.-Boliv-
ian operations against Bolivia's cocaine
trade are working so well that the cam-
paign is seen as a model, despite tensions
between the two countries and concern
that Colombians are taking over.
This year, anti-drug police and U.S.
narcotics agents have seriously disrupted
cocaine trafficking from the Chapare, a
tropical region that produces 80 percent
of the coca leaf processed into cocaine.
The operation, called Ghost Zone, has
used AWACS radar planes to detect flights
carrying coca-leaf paste from Chapare to
other regions for processing into cocaine.
Hundreds of Bolivian and U.S. anti-drug
agents have been mobilized to seize coca
leaf, labs and processing chemicals.
As a result, traffickers are moving
their landing strips out of reach of the
anti-drug forces, using armies of farmers
to carry the raw material to them.
"Coca leaf and cocaine production
have diminished and the material cannot


Bolivia drug war success

provides excellent model


be transported as easily," said Carlos
Saavedra Bruno, the interior minister,
but added that interdiction alone will not
bring victory.
"More options must be provided for
the farmer who wants to quit cultivating
coca leaf," he said.
Both the Bolivian and U.S. govern-
ments report a net reduction in cultiva-
tion as a result of voluntary eradication.
Farmers receive $2,000 for every hec-
tare, about 2 1/2 acres, of coca destroyed.
U.S. Ambassador Charles Bowers
describes Ghost Zone as the biggest, most
successful anti-drug operation in the
Americas.
"There is less coca and more govern-
ment programs in the Chapare than ever


before," he said.
Colombians have moved in because
of the crackdown and the surrender last
year of eight leading Bolivian traffickers
in response to a government pledge that
they would be tried in Colombia, not
extradited to the United States.
"The Colombian Cali cartel is run-
ning most operations in Bolivia," said
Don Ferrarone, Bolivia station chief of
the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administra-
tion.
A representative of the Cali cartel,
Celimo Andrade Quintero, was arrested
June 24 in Bolivia. Ferrarone said the
cartel is moving four tons of cocaine a
month out of this country.
Progress in fighting cocaine has been


marred by controversy surrounding U.S.
military and DEA activities in Bolivia.
The presence of 150 American soldiers
from June to September in Santa Ana, a
center of the drug trade, was widely
criticized by newspapers and opposition
politicians.
The opposition said the presence of
U.S. troops required congressional au-
thorization, but the U.S. Embassy said
military "civic action" teams have vis-
ited Bolivia for 30 years without such
approval. The press and opposition specu-
lated that the troops had come to build a
nuclear waste dump and a permanent
military base.
Interior Minister Saavedra said that
"relations between Bolivia and the United
States are at their best moment in recent
years."
Saavedra acknowledged that anti-
American sentiment had grown in recent
years, but ascribed it largely to lack of
communication.


High court

upholds Just

Cause ruling
WASHINGTON, D.C. (Reuters) -
The U.S. Supreme Court let stand the
dismissal of a lawsuit Monday by a
group of businesses in Panama seek-
ing millions of dollars in damages
from the U.S. government because
they were looted during the 1989
invasion.
The justices declined to review a
ruling by a federal appeals court in
Richmond, that the U.S. government
was protected by sovereign immunity
and could not be held liable for dam-
ages.
More than 40 private companies
sued the United States over looting
and rioting that occurred after the
U.S. military invasion on December
20, 1989, to capture Panamanian dic-
tator Manuel Noriega, who was later
convicted on drug trafficking charges.
The businesses charged that un-
controlled mobs looted their stores
because U.S. armed forces failed to
provide adequate police protection.
The lawsuit alleged that the United
States violated an international treaty
by failing to protect residents of an
occupied territory.










_#Voices


Tropic Times
Nov. 6,1992


Slow mail temporary,



system gets better


Dear Mayors' Corner,
Ever since the mailing system has
changed, I've noticed that my mail has
been coming in very slow. It's not just a
couple of days but weeks. It's been very
frustrating.
I was under the impression that our
mail would get here faster (under the
APO AA system). Why change some-
thing that was working fine?
Mail on slow boat to China.

Dear Slow boat,
The old system worked fine, but it
wouldn't have for much longer, said the
24th Wing Postal Squadron officials.
Until recently, federal postal employ-
ees were still using antiquated technol-
ogy and hand-sorting our military mail.
With the volume of mail being proc-
essed in the 1990s, the old system was
obsolete and too labor-intensive to con-
tinue.
Distinguishing the military as an APO
eliminates unnecessary handling and puts
our mail into the military system auto-
matically.
Now the federal postal system can
provide us with both the high quality of
service that it did before and the built-in
ability to improve service in the future.
So if the system works so well, why is
the mail so slow?
Growing pains.


The United States experienced the
same kind of growing pains when the
post office introduced zip codes.
Initially, the quality of service de-
clined slightly while the bugs were being
worked out. Once the system was fully
implemented, service not only returned
to its original performance level, it im-
proved.
Imagine how poor the mail service
would be today if the zip code system had
not been installed when it was. Today's
mail delivery service would be insuffer-
able.
Now project that problem to our situ-
ation. If we don't improve the system
that exists today in anticipation of the
mail load of tomorrow, those mail delays
you're experiencing while the bugs are
being worked out would be nothing by
comparison.
Editor's note: This column is pro-
vided to allow community members to
submit questions or concerns to be re-
searched and answered by the May-
oral Congress. Letters should be mailed
to: Mayors' Corner, APO AA 34004
(MPS). Anonymity will be granted
upon request. Publicity Chairperson,
Dyana Ellis.


The action line is a direct
link between Brig. Gen. David
A. Sawyer, 24th Wing com-
mander, and Howard AFB and
Albrook AFS personnel. If
you have a question or prob-
lem that you can't solve
through normal supervisory
channels, call the Action Line
at 284-5849. Callers should
leave a name, telephone num-
ber and mailing address In
case questions need to be clari-
fled. Names will be kept confl-
dential and used only to pro-
vide callers with a personal
response. Sawy

Q M Why are so many people here
in Panama so disrespectful to officers?
Today when I was walking to the base
exchange I had to correct a reserve
staff sergeant for not saluting an offi-
cer. I find it very impolite to see this
happen. I don't know if a program
should be implemented to avoid this.
Thank you.


A. I salute you for correcting an
noncommissioned officerfornotsalut-
ing an officer. I; too, find it impolite,
disrespectful and totally unacceptable
when proper saluting is not exchanged
among our military members. Saluting
is a historical tradition deeply rooted in
military customs. It serves as respectful
exchange or greeting between mem-
bers of an honorable profession and is
rendered between all enlisted and offi-
cers of the United States armed forces
and those of other nations.


rer


In all fairness, here in Panama it is
sometimes difficult to identify com-
missioned officers of our separate serv-
ices and foreign visitors because of
different variations of uniforms and
insignia. But I've used a simple rule
throughout my military career, "When
in doubt...salute." It certainly doesn't
hurt.
We must continue to educate and
correct those few who are disrespectful
and clearly ignore honoring and up-
holding this military tradition. You
have set an excellent example for other
airmen, NCOs and officers to follow. I
expect nothing less from any profes-
sional military person than to correct
violators or point out their error such as
you properly did.
Again, thanks for bringing this to my
attention. If you have further ques-
tions, feel free to contact our senior
enlisted adviser, CMSgt. Ronald
Wheelis, 284-3503.


Found property, drunk driving head up MPs' list


Property at large
Every day the military police turn in
various items of found property, ranging
from wallets to bicycles, to the Provost
Marshal Office.
The Provost Marshal Office's found
property custodian is the person to call if
you want to check to see if any of the
found property is yours.
For more information, call the Physi-
cal Security Section at 287-3261/6762.

Unauthorized escort
The Contraband Control Section ap-
prehended several people in the past week
for unauthorized escort and trespassing.
Most of the apprehensions occurred at
the mall area of Albrook Air Force Sta-
tion.
Entry into these stores is limited to
privilege card holders. If people who are
not authorized in the store are found
there, they are charged with trespassing
and the privilege card holder escorting
him is charged with unauthorized escort.
For more information, call the U.S.
Southern Command Contraband Control
Section at 286-3303.

School break in
A local Department of Defense De-
pendent School is missing some musical
instruments after thieves entered the
school's music room and took a CD


I Iro os M rsi al s C o n r


player and two autoharps.
The theft occurred last week at the
Curundu Elementary School when the
thieves entered through a hole in the
wall.
Military police are investigating the
incident.
Anyone with information about this
incident should call the Military Police
Investigations Section
at 287-5252.

Driving V
While
Intoxi-
cated
There were
several incidents
last week involv- \
ing people appre-
hended for operat-
ing a motor vehicle
while intoxicated on
a militaryinstal-
lation.
Re-
mem -
ber, if
you plan
to drink,
know


your limits and plan ahead to avoid plac-
ing yourself and others in danger.
If you have had a few drinks, do not
drive. Drinkers should call a taxi, have a
friend take them home or have a desig-
nated driver with.
For more information on drinking and
driving, call the Military Police Traffic
Section at 287-3203.


False claims
Two people were charged last week
with larceny of government property by
fraud for submitting false claims on their
travel vouchers.
One person claimed reimbursement
for both his privately owned vehicle and
a rental car at the same time.
The other claimed a lodging and car
rental expense.
An investigation revealed neither the
hotel north carrental company existed.
If you suspect fraud, waste or abusein
your unit or place of work, report it
immediately to your supervisor.

The following crime statistics are
for the week of Oct. 23 - 29.

Pacific
Fort Clayton 500 area - one house-
breaking
Fort Clayton 1000 area - two lar-
cenies of secured private property.
Curundu area - one larceny of se-
cured private property.
Fort Kobbe 400 area - two larce-
nies of secured private property
Morgan Ave. - one larceny of se-
cured private property.

Atlantic
Fort Davis - seven larcenies of se-
cured private property


Commander in Chief .......................Gen. George A. Joulwan
Director, Public Affairs......................... Col. James L. Fetig
Chief................................................. SFC Joseph Ferrare
Editor............................................. MSgt. Rolf Carter
AssistantEditor......................... Sgt. Deborah E. Williams
Sports Editor.................................................. Sgt. John Hall



Jjropic Tim


Editorial Staff....................................Sgt. Richard Puckett
Sgt. James Yocum
Rosemary Chong

U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office..................287-3007
24th Wing Public Affairs Office............................284-5459
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office..............283-5644


U.S. Army South PAO Atlantic...........................289-4312
This authorized unofficial command informationpublica-
tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is
published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information
Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision
of the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official
view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or
the U.S. Southern Command. The address is: Unit 0936 APO
AA 34002 Telephone 285-6612.


ction Line







6 Tropic Times
Nov. 6,1992


SCommentary


Political action: veterans' duty, privilege


by Charles E. Brown
Commander, Disabled American Veterans Chapter 2, Panama
Most of you probably just voted in our national
election, choosing representatives to govern us at the
local, state and federal levels. Voting is one of the
fundamental rights we enjoy in our country, a process
that has been taking place for more than two centu-
ries.
It's a simple act many may take for granted. But
it hasn't always been so. Take, for instance, the
Boston Tea Party. The Stamp Act placed taxes on
the tea our forefathers were drinking.
But the amount of the taxes was decided in
England without any say by the colonies. The
colonists protested by dumping a shipment of tea into
the Boston Harbor and, by doing so, declared that we
would no longer stand for being taxed without being
represented.
We're here today, in part, to honor those veterans
who protected and defended our right to be repre-
sented - and to freely choose those who will
represent us.
Through the years, we've not always made the
best choices.
You're probably still debating over whether the
best choice was made about those who will lead us ...
in the White House, in the Congress, in state capitals,
and in our own home towns.
Sorting through the issues and listening to the
candidates' answers was often a daunting task. But
this Veterans Day, I'm reminded that one fact
remains constant: the veterans of this country helped
make that process possible.
Now that we've completed that process, the next
step is to work with the choices we've made. It
seems to me that the best way to accomplish that is to
work together.
No matter what our backgrounds are - from
farmers who fought for America's independence to
single parents who fought in the Persian Gulf War-
every veteran can lay claim to a sense of camarade-
rie, a sense of togetherness.
Let me make mention here of a certain group of
veterans who have an even greater bond.
Most veterans were lucky enough to serve our
country well and leave military service with their
good health.
Others, however, were not so fortunate. Many
veterans who were disabled in the line of duty face
daily trials in dealing with their disabilities.
Injuries we suffer from and the diseases we cope


with are an ever-present reminder of our military
service to our country.
We are bound by the shared pain of recovery and
the joy of rehabilitation.
But no matter what fate may have dealt us, we
veterans shouldn't ignore the myriad opportunities
we have to bring our needs and concerns before the
general public and the representatives we've just
elected.
For example, over the next few years, Army units,
Navy ships, Marine battalions and military organiza-
tions of every kind will commemorate the 50th anni-
versaries of World War II events.
From Atlanta to Los Angeles,
veterans are celebrating their
unique status by reuniting and
sharing memories of the times that "The brave
brought them together. and dead,
Also, groundwork has been laid and dead,
for a memorial that will soon be here, have
built in Washington, D.C., to honor it far abo0
the service and sacrifice of Korean power to ac
War veterans. The world v
I memory of a conflict some- nor long ren
times referred to as the forgotten we say her
war, this memorial will give a voice never forge
to those who served in battle who did here."
have been silent too long. Abraham I
Wednesday also marks 10th An- The Gettys
niversary of the Vietnam Veterans
Memorial in Washington, D.C.
The black granite memorial in the nation's capital
has been a major catalyst for Americans to reconcile
more than 20 years of pain and sorrow.
Thousands of Americans who visit the memorial
each year are able to leave the past behind, recog-
nize the courage of those fallen soldiers, and look
toward the future with a renewed sense of pride in
America.
The popularity of these memorials and this
increase in veteran-related activities are evidence of a
ground swell of rediscovery sweeping this country.
Americans are again recognizing how important the
service of veterans has been in ensuring our way of
life.
Beyond the memorials and events, we also need to
make sure that our representatives recognize our
service, and that they support our continuing effort.
This is especially important in the areas of veter-
ans' health care and compensation programs.
How do we do that?
Again, it's a group effort. If we function as a


I


Cl
Ic

wi



Li


cohesive unit, we can present a united front to reach a
common goal.
Just like those early colonists who together
focused on the goal of a free and independent nation.
And just as our elected representatives so often act as
a group, so should we as veterans join together for a
common purpose.
When we served in the military, the common goal
was to preserve America's freedom. It's the spring-
board from which all of America's other objectives
are launched.
Now that we're veterans, we need to band together
with equal vigilance to defend the entitlements we've
earned and the recognition we
deserve.
Disabled veterans, more than
men, living any other group, need the programs
1o struggled and services provided by our
onsecratued government.
consecratedd Veterans have joined ranks to
, our poor accomplish as a group what we, as
1 or detract. individuals, cannot.
ill little note, Why don't we make Wednesday
ember, what - Veterans Day - the starting
), but it can point of our involvement? It's the
what they perfect time.
We have the opportunity to act
on the choices we have just made.
inon dress We've got a clean slate as far as
urg Address government is concerned.
We'll soon have a new Secretary
of Veterans Affairs.
We need to let the secretary know what we expect
of government in meeting the needs of America's
veterans.
We've got new congressional leaders to get
acquainted with. Some of the new members may not
be aware of the needs of veterans. Some others may
have forgotten. It's our responsibility to explain and
re-emphasize what those needs are.
Even the new administration has new plans in
place for the next four years.
The White House again needs to be reminded that
even while we are at peace, the price of past wars
includes the cost of caring for America's veterans
today.
This Veterans Day, let's appreciate our common
bond - the shared experience of serving America in
her Armed Forces.
We once defended this nation's right to choose its
leaders, now as veterans, we can protect those rights
we so fiercely defended.


What is your message to veterans?


a-C

t--"


"I would tell them that "To have patience with
everything they have the changes the coun-
done is well appreci- try's going to have
ated, especially the free- because of the election
dom we have." results."


Sgt. Jay Rourk Sgt. Nick Decorse
Southern Command Network 549th Military Police
Company


"That we remember
everything they did
before us for our free-
dom."



GMG2 Andy Parker
Special Boat Unit 26


"I would tell them if I
was in their place, I
would have done the
same thing. I appreci-
ate everything they did
for us."
SSgt. Michael Stoute
24th Air Postal Squadron


"I'm grateful for them,
but I think they should
get better treatment.
Some people don't
appreciate them."


Hoko Johnson
Air Force retiree family
member


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of Southern Command, The
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries - or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right
to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.


I Direct Otlotes I


101 "r-T q ff

















Sports
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Page 7


Tigers seeing ghosts after 26-7 loss


by SSgL Phillip D. Clark
USARSO PAO-Atlantic
CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL - The
Cristobal Tiger Halloween homecoming
game against the Balboa Bulldogs left
the Tigers seeing ghosts all over the
field, after a 26-7 loss, Oct. 30.
On opening kickoff, the Tigers thought
the ball was going out of bounds, but
watched in dismay as the Bulldogs fell
on it at the Tigers 18 yard line.
Two plays later, Bulldog Paolo Ameg-
lio dove over the right side of the line to
draw first blood 28 seconds into the game.
The next Balboa kickoffreally did go
out of bounds, drawing a referee's flag.
On the second try, the Dogs came back
with what looked like an on-side kick
recovered by Bulldog Ryan Underwood.
The drive went nowhere thanks to
Tiger Corey Townsend, who picked off a
tipped pass on 3rd and 9 and returned it to
the Bulldog 25.
Halloween gremlins came out in force
to strike both teams with "turnover-
monsters" that had both teams playing
like zombies.
On 3rd and 9 from the Bulldogs 24,
Tigers quarterback Ricky Alvarez stepped
back, threw a quick pass and watched as
the Bulldogs picked it off and took it to
the Tigers 33 yard line. The Bulldogs
drove to a 1st and 10 on the Tiger 16.
Gremlins struck again with 4:50 left in
the first quarter when the ball went from
Ameglio's hands into waiting Tiger paws.
On the third Tiger try, a clipping penalty
backed them to their own eight yard line,
followed by a missed snap left the Tigers
looking at 4th and 17.
A 31-yard punt and five-yard return
left the Bulldogs 34 yards from the end-
zone.
The Tigers seemed ready to ward off


,- L
,.. . .' ,_;."" - . .I,.. , . .. . ..... -
U.S. Army photo by SSgt Philip D. Cark
Balboa Bulldogs' running back Paolo Ameglio scores on a 28-yard run during
a 26-7 win over the Cristobal Tigers Oct. 30.


the Bulldog threat at theirgoal on 4th and
11, but Alex Staton caught an 18-yard
TD pass. The Dogs missed their point
after attempt, but led 13-0.
The Tigers finally woke on the kick-
off when Elmer Smith fell on the on-
sides kick. But their success was short-
lived. On 2nd and 8, Bulldogs Robert
Nieves picked off an Alvarez pass and
made his way to the Tiger's 35.
The Tigers held the Bulldogs, to a 4th
and 13, but the Bulldogs managed to turn
a fumbled punt attempt into a 1 st down at
the 21 yard line.
Ameglio helped pound his Dogs to a
first and goal at the four. A quarterback
sneak by Jerome Price put the Dogs up by
19. The Bulldogs faked a field goal to


regain their previous failed attempt, but
the Tigers pounced hard to keep them out
of the end zone.
The Tigers fumbled on their next
possession and the Bulldogs picked it up
and rumbled into the end zone for an
apparent TD, but a a clipping penalty
brought it back to the 42-yard line.
The Tigers took the ball back after a
series ofdowns, when Elmer Smith came
up with the ball on the 33-yard line.
A series of unsuccessful Tiger downs
ended the half 19-0 Bulldogs.
The only excitement of the third quar-
ter was when Bulldog running back
Ameglio made a 28-yard run and Car-
dova Hall made back-to-back long runs
on the way to the Tiger 4-yard line.


On 1st and goal, Tiger Corey Townsend
made a spectacular play to tip the ball
away from a Bulldog receiver- but to
no avail. In what looked like an instant
replay of his earlier score, Bulldogs QB
Price again snuck the ball overthe Tigers
goal for what would be their final touch-
down. The successful point after made it
26-0.
On the Tigers next possession,
Townsend was able to make it happen for
his squad with a 34-yard run at the end of
the third quarter.
The drive seemed dead when an ille-
gal motion penalty backed the Tigers up
to the Bulldog 35 and third and 14 ended
with an incompletion.
The Tigers lined up in punt formation
but had a trick up their sleeves in the form
of a faked punt. Townsend kept the drive
alive with arun around the left side to the-
Bulldog 11.
The Tigers' only touchdown came
soon after on a four-yard pass to Derek
Smith. Cox put the ball through the up-
rights.
The Tigers came right back at the
Bulldogs by recovering an onrsides kick.
The Tigers drove to the Dogs' 24-yard
line but gremlins struck again in the form
of a mishandled snap.
On 4th and 6, a quick pass to Cox
pushed the ball to the 6-yard line. An-
other mishandled ball on first and goal
pushed the Tigers back to the 9. Townsend
wrestled the ball back to the 5-yard line
where Ryan Underwood smotherd him
with a great hit.
Alvarez tried his hand but was stopped
short at the 3-yard line. On their final
attempt, the Tigers went for six instead
of the easier three-point field goal, but
the Bulldogs stopped them.
The teams traded possessions for an
anticlimactic ending and a 26-7 score.


infantry Brigade downs Aviators 22-20,30-6


by Spec. Robin A. Mantikoski
USARSO Public Affairs Office


MOTHER'S FIELD #1 - Headquarters and Head-
quarters Company, 193rd Infantry Brigade defeated
Company C, 1-228th Aviation Regiment in the semi-
final and final games 22-20, 30-6, to capture the U.S.
Army South Flag Football championship title Sunday.
After losing in overtime to Company E in the quar-
terfinals Oct. 30, HHC had to win the first game of the
series in order to advance to the finals.
"We felt good going into the series because we felt
we never should have lost to them to begin with," said
coach/quarterback Tim Mitchell.
HHC took control early in game 1 when Mitchell
connected with wide receiver Ronald Marshall, who
them flipped the ball to WR Terence Cartwright who
scored the touchdown and the conversion.
Company E rebutted with a touchdown and conver-
sion to tie the game 8-8 with 2:37 left in the first half.
Company E exploded in the third quarter when



Gus takes the helm for three weeks
as Buck is welcomed by the jungle.
He'll have fun and games.


quarterback Cornelius Washington intercepted a pass
on HHC's 18-yard line. On the next possession, WR
James Goodman caught a 10-yard pass for a touchdown
making the score 14-8.
"We felt we had control up until two minutes of the
game," said Company E coach Gralyne Davis. "We just
blew it defensively."
With 3:00 left, Marshall caught a TD pass and scored
on the conversion narrowing the gap to 20-16.
HHC's break came with an interception by free
safety Ken Miller and a follow-up touchdown by Marshall
with 1:06 left in the game.
"Miller's interception was the biggest play of the
game," Mitchell said. "It gave us the opportunity to get
the football and we took advantage of it."
After winning the first game, HHC gained its confi-
dence and Company E may have lost its.
"We (the offense) made a lot of mistakes in the first
half and that brought us down," said offensive captain
Brian Rice. "but it was the defense that brought us
back."



Magic Johnson's retirement shakes
up power balance among NBA
contenders.


'" . . -/ . .
.* * : . 1, . " .,
U.S. Army photo by Spec. Robin A. Mantikodki
Company E wide receiver Mark Fisher protects the
ball from attacking HHC wide receiver Ronald
Marshall.



Reeder hoops tourneys......page 12
NFL news...........................page 13
College roundup...................page 14


Nov. 6, 1992


>V61









Tropic Times
Nov. 6, 1992


5'8" basketball player comes up short

by Sgt. John "Gus" Hall
Tropic Times Sports Editor ,... ' 4 ,


REEDER PHYSICAL FITNESS CENTER - Leo
Mclnnis tried to play both sides of the ledger Friday
night. There were two championship basketball
games to be played. There were the "small" guys -
the 5-foot, 10-inch and under players. There were the
"big" guys - the 5-foot, 11-inch and over.
McInnis wanted to play with the "big" boys. He
said he felt the level of competition would be the
best. McInnis had one problem, he's 5'8". So
McInnis did the next best thing - he coached the
41st Area Support Group "big" guys. And he played
on the "small" guys team - We're Blessed. The
night was humid, tense and exhilarating. And most of
all for McInnis, it was bittersweet and disappointing.
Nathaniel Taylor was one of the big boys who
played for McInnis. Taylor
"towers" over his coach,
coming in at an even 6'2."
In fact, every player on the
41st ASG team "towered"
over Mclnnis. One guy was
6'5," one was 6'4," one
was 6'3 1/2," another 6'2,"
three were 6'1," and two
guys "squeaked in" at
5'11." All 10 players had
the height advantage over
Mclnnis, but they all
looked up to him as a
coach.
Taylor knows McInnis
pretty well. They've played
in several tournaments
together. Taylor appreci- M .
ates Mclnnis's coaching M. c .
techniques. Mclnnis
"Since he's not 5'11," Taylor chuckles, "He
decided to sit back and coach. He is very knowledge-
able about basketball."
Taylor likes Mclnnis' way of handling mistakes.
"Leo (Mclnnis) writes our mistakes down as we
make them. It's a motivating factor for us as players.
We see our mistakes on paper and our incentive is
not to make the same mistakes," Taylor said.
On to the games...
The sweet part of Friday night was Mclnnis' (let's
call him Leo from now on) stint as a coach. His
diagrams, motivation tools and strategy worked
smoothly. His team coasted to a 64-56 victory over
the 106th Signal Brigade. The ever-present smile on
Leo's face shined just a little brighter as his team
held off the last rally. Leo's "big" team was crowned
champs. Now it was time for the fun part, Leo got to
play basketball.
His team - We're Blessed - hadn't lost in the
double-elimination tournament. His opponent-
Guard Plus - lost once and had to come up from the
"loser's" bracket.
Guard Plus won the game early. Mostly because of
Darryl Kimble's first-half outburst. He scored 10 of
his 12 points in the first stanza. Larry Hurt's three-
point shooting didn't hurt matters either. He also had
10 first-half points. Guard Plus led 27-23 at the half.
The teams played even in the second half- a 20-20
stalemate - and Guard Plus forced an "if" game.
Five minutes later, the rematch was on. Mclnnis
was a man on a mission.
He'd nail a three-pointer, smile and race down the
court. Collisions plagued the court as did falling,


Guard Plus players join hands during a timeout.
sweaty bodies. Players were showing signs of fatigue
- slowing down the pace of the game, heavy
breathing and disgruntled faces. The humidly was a
factor. If it had been any more humid, it would have
been raining inside the gym. Neither the fatigue, nor
the humidity could break the spirit of the athletes on
the court. Nobody could touch the "small" guys. This
was their show.
Back to the game...
We're Blessed trailed for most of the first half.
They held the ball for the last shot before the
halftime buzzer. Kevin Moore got the ball. Two
seconds were on the clock. Moore let the ball fly
from three-point range. Swish! We're Blessed led 35-
34. It was double-duty time for Leo. He took on the
role of point-guard/motivator. It was working. Time
for a pep talk.
"It's a team effort," Leo said. If we keep that
concept in the second half, we'll be OK."
Leo's no poet, but he's a prophet. We're Blessed
was OK. They could have won the game in the last
few seconds, but it slipped out of their grasp. Just like
a basketball can slip out of the rim.
Guard Plus had a plan. They talked about their
opponent's tendencies. They gave each other guid-
ance. Lots of hand-clapping going on in the halftime
huddle. Then, "1-2-3, G-Plus."
The second half was in desperate need of a turning
point. Just when you thought the game was over, it
got better.
Leo stole a Guard Plus pass, went the distance of
the court, converted the layup. We're Blessed led 39-
34. It was a possible turning point.
With 14 minutes left in regulation, Guard Plus
forced We're Blessed to shoot outside shots. No easy
shots were allowed. On offense, Hurt nailed a trey.
Derrick Carter crashed the offensive boards and tied
the game 42-42 with a layup.
We're Blessed took a 46-42 lead on an ugly, but
effective layup in the paint. It forced a Guard Plus
time-out.
Leo said, "We're gonna make a run. We need to


turn it up a notch. Hands huddled. "1-2-3 We're
Blessed."
Leo began his run.
- He hit a layup, two freethrows and snagged a re-
bound. His team led 53-46.
We're Blessed turned it down a notch. Guard Plus
got blessed.
William Walden put up a shot that rolled around
the cylinder and dropped in. Terry Stewart walked in
with a layup. Guard Plus led 57-56. Four minutes left
in regulation. The teams traded small leads for the
next 3:57.
With three seconds left, Guard Plus trailed by
three. Leo hacked Stewart of Guard Plus on a
controversial play. The referees said Stewart was
fouled from behind the three-point line. That meant
he got three freethrow attempts. First one, Swish.
Second one, Swish. Third one, hit the glass, the rim
and the floor after it passed through the net.
Tie game, 63-63. We're into overtime.
Leo's teammates told him not to worry about the
foul. They said it's now a 0-0 game for We're
Blessed to win or lose.
Leo was really on a mission. He went up and
down the court. Diving for loose balls, taking nearly
every shot. The only one he didn't take was the last
one. The one that didn't fall.
Guard Plus led by one point 72-71 with five
seconds left. They made a bad pass. It was inter-
cepted by a We're Blessed player who went the
distance of the court attempted the easy layup and
missed. The ball hit the glass, the rim and the floor. It
didn't find its way to the net. Guard Plus won the
game. Leo and his crew weren't blessed.
Leo wasn't angry, just disappointed.
"It's disappointing to me because we had the game
won," Leo said. "But I can't take anything away from
them (Guard Plus) they played a great game."
As he was being interviewed, Leo glanced back as
a Guard Plus player hit two freethrows for a foul that
happened on the game's last play. Still smiling, he
shook his head and walked away.


Unit-level hoops
The 1992 U.S. Army South unit level
basketball program for the Atlantic and
Pacific communities is under way and
ends Dec. 18. The tournament will take
place Jan 4-9. Call 287-4050.

Youth sports .
The Howard and Albrook youth cen-
ters are registering boys and girls for the
1993 baseball and softball seasons. Call
284-4700/3618.

Volunteers needed
The Howard and Albrook youth cen-


ters need volunteers for the 1993 Base-
ball and Softball Committee. Cocahes
are also needed. Call 286-3618/4700.

Golf tournament
A Veterans Day golf tournament will
be held Nov. 11 at Horoko Golf Course.
The two-person, best-ball event begins
at 7:30 a.m. with a shotgun start. There
will be four flights. Handicaps are as
follows: "A" players with 0-7 handicap;
"B" players with 8-15 handicap; "C"
players with 16-22 handicap and "D"
players with 23 and above handicap.
Golfers can choose their own teams.
The team handicap will be half of the
lowest golfer's handicap. For example, if
one team member's handicap is 14 and
the others 16, the team handicap will be


7.
Entry fee is $20 and includes green
fees, polo shirt and lunch at the CPO
Club Nov. 11.
Entry forms are at the Horoko Golf
Course, Rodman Fitness Center, the MWR
main office and the Information, Tour
and Travel Office. Call 283-4454/5307
or 283-4222/4061 to register.


Youth baseball
The Pacific Little League will hold
registration Nov. 16-17 for boys and girls
6-15 years old. Call John Carlson at 252-
2622.

Intramural sports
The Howard Sports and Fitness Cen-


ter will be registering athletes in intra-
mural golf, badminton and softball. Dates
will be announced later. Call 284-3451.

Turkey shoot
Outdoor recreation is sponsoring a
Frontier Day Turkey Shoot Nov. 14, 8:30
a.m. at the Fort Clayton Pistol Range.
The event consists of five categories:
knife throwing, pistol shooting, sling shot
and bullwhip. All events must be com-
pleted in one minute. The winner re-
ceives a 12-14 pound turkey. Cost is $3
perperson. Call 287-3363/5807.

Women's hoops
Atlantic women's basketball program
registration is under way. Call 289-3108.














NFL news


Tropic Times Q
Nov. 6,1992 9


Pats will dump Saints, 13-10


Eagles' Kotite benches


slumping Cunningham


s, by Sgt. John
"Gus"Hall
Tropic Times
S-f Sports Editor



PATS AND PARITY - Like New
Orleans Saints coach Jim Mora says,
parity is alive and well in the NFL.
Nice rhyme Jim, but parity is about
to hit your team like a Lennox Lewis
uppercut. The Saints (6-2) travel to
Foxboro Stadium to battle the (0-8)
Patsies. New England will play Mora
for a patsy and finally get their first
win of the season. No way you say?
Way!
Let's take a backo-day-flasho to
the 1980 season. The (0-14) Saints
played the (4-10) Jets and got a
much-needed win. OK, so the 1992
Saints aren't the 1980 Jets, but
they're no offensive powerhouse.
Their offense averages only 17.5
points per game. On the other foot,
the Saints defense permits only 12.9
points per contest. On the other shoe,
the Patsies score 10.9 a week and
give up a whopping 24 points a
game. The Pats' D is second worst as
far as points go. Thank goodness for
Jerry "There's Elvis" Glanville. So
what does all this babble mean?
Nothing. The Patsies need a win in a
bad way. The Saints can't score and
the Bucs scored 21 on them last
week. The Pats can't stop anyone
and can't score. What a gnarly game!
Pats 13, Saints 10.

STEELERS GET BUFFALOED -
If the Pittsburgh Steelers didn't exist
I'd have a 67.3 percent winning
percentage overall. I'm 0-8 in
Steelers' games this year, so maybe
you should skim down the page to
the next pick. A glutton for punish-
ment are you? OK, let's make it
short and sweet. Buffalo (6-2) has to
win because the Fish have to repay
the Colts for an earlier loss. The
Steelers (6-2) looked awesome
against Houston, so they're due for a
letdown. Thurman "Trying Times"
Thomas is ailing. Jim "Whoa
Nellie!" Kelly is reeling. Flip a coin.
I did. Bills 24, Steelers 20.

FISH FRY? - The Colts (4-4)
have got to feel like the Bolts gave
them the kiss of death Sunday. A 26-
0 loss to a .500-team bodes not well
for Indy. Sure, the Colts spanked
Miami (6-2) in Joe Robbie Stadium
31-20 a few weeks ago. Hey Ted
Marchibroda, it's called reality,
check into it. Fish 30, Dolts 17.

BENCH CUNNINGHAM? - OK.
Let's get one thing out in the open.
Rich Kotite will never be mentioned


in the same breath as Albert Einstein,
or Alfred E. Neuman for that matter.
As Randall Cunningham said, "If he
thinks a week off will help me, he
doesn't know me as well as I thought
he knew me." Good call Randall.
Kotite probably thinks he knows
what he's doing. So did Buddy Ryan.
It's called common sense Rich, rent
some. The Eagles (5-3) entertain the
(3-5) L.A. Raiders. The Raiders'
defense can be tenacious with a
capital T. The Raiders' defense
permits only 279 yards per game.
The Eagles are little more "defen-
sive" giving up only 264 yards a
week. Here's what you'll see
Sunday. Jim McMahon gets hurt. (I
know, bold prediction) Randall
comes in and wins it in the last three
minutes. The Eagles genius owner
(The one who fired Buddy Ryan for
winning) Norman Braman will fire
Kotite and make Cunningham the
coach. Eagles 17, Raiders 13.

49ERS GROUND FALCONS,
AGAIN - This game isn't worth
discussing. Atlanta's QB Chris
Miller is out - for good. The 49ers
(6-2) just got spanked by the Phoenix
Cardinals and are hopping mad. The
Falcons (3-5) got lucky against the
Rams. So what's the call? Atlanta's
due for a letdown - and the Falcons
are a letdown. Remember last year's
playoff team? Glanville does and it
probably makes him sick. So will
Monday night's score. 49ers 34,
Falcons 13. My record is 70-42.
In other action, (this one's for all
the Houston fans at Soto Cano AB,
Honduras) Oilers 30, Brownies 7;
Cryboys 24, Lions 6; Giants 16, Pack
10; Vikes 27, Bucs 23; Jets 21,
Broncos 13; Rams 17, Cards 10;
Chiefs 10, Bolts 6; Skins 20, Hawks
7; Bears 23, Kitties 10.
The Buckster has caught jungle
fever. He leaves Monday and will be
back Nov. 18. Never fear Buckmani-
acs, the Buckster has left me his
picks for the next three weeks.
Anything can happen in the NFL,
like QBs going down for the count.
So his winning percentage (I use the
term "winning" loosely) may drop
like a thermometer at Lambeau
Field. We won't hold it against him.
After all, he's a volunteer reporter
and an infantryman. Maybe Richard
Gere (of An Officer and Gentleman
fame) could play the role of the
Buckster in a 1993 flick. NOT!
Buck says, Saints 17, Pats 3;
(wimp!) Steelers 23, Bills 20;
Dolphins 20, Colts 17; Eagles 17,
Saints 14; 49ers 38, Falcons 24;
Oilers 28, Brownies 10; Cryboys 23,
Lions 14; Giants 24, Pack 14; Vikes
23, Bucs 10; Broncos 20, Jets 12;
Cards 16, Rams 14; Chiefs 21, Bolts
20; Skins 24, Hawks 10; Bears 26,
Kitties 14. Buck's season record is
64-48.


I N F L t r i v i I .


1. True or false. The Saints have
only beaten the Patriots once.

2. True or false. The Bills have
beaten the Steelers six of the last
seven times.

3. Who leads the Raiders-Eagles
series (five games)?

4. Dan Marino has 30 career TD


passes against the Colts. What two
teams does he have more against?
ANSWERS
1. True. The Patriots hold a 5-1 advantage. The
Saints won the last meeting 28-24 in 1989 in New
England.
2. False. The Bills have won 5 of the last, including
a 52-34 pasting last season.
3. The Eagles, 3-2. The last meeting was a 10-7
Eagles' win in 1989.
4. Buffalo, 33; N.Y. Jets, 43.


PHILA-
DELPHIA
(AP) - Slump-
ing Philadel-
phia Eagles .. -
quarterback
Randall Cun- H !,
ningham has
been benched -
in favor of
backup Jim
McMahon for
Sunday's McMahon
game against
the Los Angeles Raiders.
But even as the move was announced,
it was characterized as a temporary
measure.
"I don't want you to think that this is
going to be a week-to-week deal or any-
thing like that," Eagles coach Rich Kotite
said Monday. He said McMahon will
start Sunday, but Cunningham will re-
turn when the team plays Green Bay the
following week.
He said he betiched Cunningham be-
cause "I want to back him off for a
week," adding he wants the quarterback
to "take some of the pressure off himself,
and that's why I did it."
Even if McMahon has a great game
against the Raiders, Cunningham will
return to the starting role, Kotite said.
"He's our quarterback."
Cunningham said, "If he thinks a
week off will help me, he doesn't know
me as well as I thought he knew me."
Kotite said he is not worried about
whether this week's move will ignite a
quarterback controversy among the media,
talk shows and fans.
"As far as I'm concerned, there is no
controversy," he said. "That's why
McMahon is here, to come in when called
upon."
Cunningham, who missed almost the
entire 1991 season after injuring his left
knee in the first half ofthe opener, led the
Eagles to victory in the first four games
of 1992 and was named the NFL Player
of the Month for September. He com-
pleted 74 percent of his passes, throwing
for eight TDs with no interceptions.
But the Eagles lost three of the next


four games as
C ^Cunningham
slipped to a 54
percent com-
., pletion per-
*centage and
had six passes
intercepted.
He was
sacked 17
times, many
times holding
the ball too
Cunningham long. In a 7-0
squeaker over Phoenix, Cunningham was
2 for 9 in the second half for 11 yards.
The situation came to a head Sunday
when in the first half of a 20-10 loss to
Dallas, Cunningham completed 3 of 8
for 13 yards with one interception as the
Eagles fell behind 3-0.
In the second half, Kotite started
McMahon, who rallied the Eagles to a
10-10 tie before the Cowboys surged
ahead.
Cunningham tried to hide his disap-
pointment, declaring, "Richie runs this
team. As long as he's the head coach,
he's got to do his job."
Cunningham, who this season broke
the record for career rushing yardage
gained by a quarterback, spent about an
hour Monday talking about his demotion
with teammates Keith Byars and Seth
Joyner.
"It wasn't a pep talk," *Cunningham
said. "They were just making sure I'm
allright, told me to keep my head up, that
everything is going to be cool. You don't
let it get you down. You keep going."
Might the move affect his psyche?
"Nah, you've got to bounce back,"
Cunningham said. "These things hap-
pen. If you worry about them, it starts
affecting the way you play. I know what
I have to do, and that's just to keep
concentrating.
"It's happened to me in the past and it
probably will happen again."
He referred to a playoff game in Janu-
ary 1991, when coach Buddy Ryan re-
moved him in favor of McMahon in the
third period for one series. Ryan was
fired three days later.


Mora: Parity is alive and well


NEW ORLEANS (AP) - Coach Jim
Mora believes parity is alive and well in
the NFL.
A day after New Orleans squeaked
past the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Mora
scoffed at the praise heaped on his team
by Bucs coach Sam Wyche, who called
the Saints the best team in the NFL.
"I don't believe that and I don't be-
lieve he believes it," Mora said Monday.
OK. So, halfway through the season,
how good are the Saints?
"We're good enough to have won six
games by the skin of our teeth," Mora
said.
The Saints are also good enough to be
6-2 and tied with San Francisco for the
lead in the NFC West. Despite four turn-
overs Sunday, three of which led to Tampa
Bay touchdowns, the Saints managed
their fourth straight victory, 23-21
"It shows we have a strong team when
we can make fourturnovers and still beat
people in this league," said Saints line-
backer Rickey Jackson. "I guarantee a
team won't make four turnovers against
us and still beat us. I guarantee that."
The Saints scored only 10 points in
the first half while outgaining the Bucca-
neers 214 to 15 yards. They had one
touchdown nullified by a holding pen-
alty. Another touchdown pass slid through
Quinn Early's hands in the end zone.


Morten Andersen missed a field goal
attempt.
And still the Saints won.
"The Saints are playing at the top
level of the NFL," Tampa quarterback
Steve DeBerg said. "They took almost
everything away at first."
The Saints' defense, which ranks third
in the NFC and fourth in the league, had
its best game against Tampa Bay. The
Bucs got only 154 yards overall, 70 pass-
ing. The Saints, who are second in the
league in sacks with 28, had three against
DeBerg and kept pressure on him through-
out the game.
He completed just 13 of 25 passes.
In the season's first six games, New
Orleans averaged only 11 points a game.
The offense scored two touchdowns in
only one of those games, but they won
four of the six and lost the other two by
only eight points - 15-13 to Philadel-
phia and 16-10 to San Francisco.
In the last two games, the Saints' of-
fense has scored five TDs. Quarterback
Bobby Hebert has thrown for four of
those. Running back Dalton Hilliard has
caught two of them and run for another.
The Saints' next opponent is New
England, winless so far this season. Mora
wants to be sure his team understands
that could change very quickly if the
Saints aren't careful.










1 Tropic Times
1V Nov. 6, 1992


APLaserPhoto
Pittsburgh Steelers running back Barry Foster breaks
through the Kansas City Chiefs' line during the
Steelers' victory in Arrowhead Oct. 25.


Surprising Steelers

face toughest foe -

the Steelers from the 70's
PITTSBURGH (AP) - Every week, the game gets
bigger. Every week, the pressure increases. Every week,
they mount a stronger argument they are the Pittsburgh
Steelers' best team since the 1970s.
A first-place team halfway through the NFL season,
the Steelers are arguably the NFL's unexpected success
story of 1992. Now that they've taken six of eight
opponents, and taken over first place in the AFC Cen-
tral, how are the Steelers taking it?
"We're getting real excited," linebacker Jerrol
Williams said.
"We're starting to get some respect around the NFL.
We've beaten Houston twice, beaten Kansas City."


"We sent the rest of the AFC
teams a message. We're here,
we're for real and we're not going
away."
Eric Green
Steelers tight end

"We're showing other teams we're good," tight end
Adrian Cooper said. "It shows other teams we're
capable of beating anyone."
One team they'd like to beat is Buffalo, which ham-
mered them 52-34 last season as Jim Kelly threw six
touchdown passes - four to Don Beebe - to lead a
537-yard Bills offense. They'll get that chance Sunday
in Buffalo in a matchup of AFC division leaders; the
Bills are tied with Miami for the Eastern Division lead.
Coach Bill Cowher hugged his players and cele-
brated along the sidelines afterSunday's 21-20 victory
over Houston, but he's not yet ready to assess how far
the Steelers have come - and how far they can go.
He knows they'll get a much better idea Sunday in
Rich Stadium.
"Beating Houston was our biggest win in the sense
that it's getting later in the season," he said. "It was big
for our football team because we knew what was at
stake. Now, the Buffalo game is even bigger."
And not just because it matches division leaders. The
longer the Steelers maintain at least a tie with Houston,
the more difficult it will become for the Oilers to repeat
as division champions.
Houston has now let the Steelers get away twice this
season, and it could haunt the Oilers at the end because:
Houston must win the division outright to enter the
playoffs as the AFC Central champion. A tie won't be
good enough; the Steelers already own the first tiebreak-
ing criteria: head-to-head results.
The schedule favors the Steelers in the second half.
The Oilers have only one home game in November, on
Sunday against Cleveland. The Steelers are at home for
five of their last eight, and they've still got Cincinnati
(3-5), Seattle (1-7) and Detroit (2-6) to play.
The deeper the Steelers get into their schedule, the
more they're convinced they are a legitimate, playoff-
caliber team fueled by a often-spectacular, big-play
defense and a solid 100-yard rusherin Barry Foster. He
already has six 100-yard games; the team record is
seven by Franco Harris in 1972.
"We're not the same team we were in the past,"
safety Carnell Lake said. "Coach Cowher's given us
new confidence, a new attitude and new aggressive-
ness. We're starting to believe we're a good team."
"We sent the rest ofthe AFC teams a message," tight
end Eric Green said. "We're here, we're for real and
we're not going away."


AMERICAN CONFERENCE


East
Miami
Buffalo
Indianapolis
N.Y. Jets
New England
Central
Pittsburgh
Houston
Cleveland
Cincinnati
West
Denver
Kansas City
San Diego
L.A. Raiders
Seattle

NAT
East
Dallas
Washington
Philadelphia
N.Y. Giants
Phoenix
Central
Minnesota
Chicago
Green Bay
Tampa Bay
Detroit
West
San Francisco
New Orleans
L.A. Rams
Atlanta

Sunday


WLT
620
620
440
260
080
0 8 0


.Pct
.750
.750
.500
.250
.000

.750
.625
.500
.375

.625
.500
.500
.375
.125


[IONAL CONFERENCE
WLT .Pct PF
7 1 0 .875 187
5 3 0 .625 143
5 3 0 .625 153
4 4 0 .500 174
2 6 0 .250 137


Cleveland at Houston, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.
LA. Raiders at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Miami at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at New England, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Denver, 4 p.m.
Phoenix at LA. Rams, 4 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 4 p.m.
San Diego at Kansas City, 4 p.m.
Washington at Seattle, 4 p.m.
Cincinnati at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Monday
San Francisco at Atlanta, 9 p.m.


Washington's Stanford win secures No. 1 spot


Huskies move 6 points l .
past Miami'Hurricanes, ' 1
who beat Mountaineers


NEW YORK (AP) - Washington's
impressive 41-7 victory over nationally
ranked Stanford lifted the Huskies back
to No. 1 in Sunday's Associated Press
college football poll.
The Huskies, who trailed Miami by
one point last week, moved six points
ahead of the Hurricanes after beating
then-No. 15 Stanford.
Miami easily beat unranked West Vir-
ginia 35-23 Saturday, but three late touch-
downs against the Hurricanes may have
cost them the No. 1 ranking in the media
poll.
Washington topped Miami 33 1/2 to
27 1/2 in first-place votes and 1,520 1/2
to 1,514 1/2 points.
Miami barely retained its No. 1 rank-
ing in the USA Today-CNN coaches'
poll, edging Washington by one point.
Both 8-0 teams received 30 first-place
votes from the coaches.
Last year's co-national champions have
taken turns at the top of the AP poll this
season. Miami was No. 1 forthe first five
weeks, Washington led the next three
polls and the teams tied for the top spot
the following week. Miami then took
sole possession of first for one week be-
fore falling to No. 2 Sunday.
Washington has a chance to solidify


%~ ,~1.~

a


pI~


I


Washington's Napoleon Kaufman (8)
during a Washington victory Oct. 24
its lead Saturday when it visits No. 12
Arizona (5-2-1), which lost by a point to
Miami earlier this season at the Orange
Bowl.
Alabama didn't play Saturday, but the
Crimson Tide (8-0) still managed to get
one first-place vote and move past Michi-
gan to No. 3 in the AP poll. Michigan (7-
0-1) dropped to No. 4 after struggling to
beat unranked Purdue 24-17.
Texas A&M (8-0) remained No. 5


.AP LaserPhoto
breaks past Pacific's Jason Vasconez

after beating Southern Methodist 41-7,
and Florida State (7-1) stayed No. 6 after
downing Virginia 13-3.
Nebraska (6-1) rose one notch to No.
7 after clobbering Colorado 52-7. Notre
Dame (6-1-1) moved up two spots to No.
8 following a 38-7 victory over Navy,
Boston College (7-0-1) climbed two places
to No. 9 after defeating Temple 45-6, and
Syracuse (7-1) went from No. 12 to No.
10 after beating Pittsburgh 41-10.


Arizona's 30-0 victory
over New Mexico State
lifted the Wildcats five
spots to No. 12, their
highest ranking since fin-
ishing 11 th in 1986.

Boston College is in the Top 10 for the
first time since finishing fifth in 1984.
Southern Cal is 11th, followed by Ari-
zona, Kansas, Florida, Georgia, Colo-
rado, North Carolina State, North Caro-
lina, Mississippi State, Texas, Stanford,
Ohio State, Penn State, Tennessee and
Washington State.
Arizona's 30-0 victory over New
Mexico State lifted the Wildcats five
spots to No. 12, their highest ranking
since finishing 11th in 1986.
Kansas (7-1) jumped from No. 18 to
No. 13 after beating Oklahoma State 26-
18. The Jayhawks haven't been this high
in the AP poll since rising to No. 8 in
1976.
Both Georgia (7-2) and Colorado (6-
1-1) dropped eight spots after losing on
Saturday. Georgia was beaten by Florida
26-24.
Ohio State, ranked earlier this season,
moved backinto the Top 25 after beating
Iowa 38-15. Virginia, No. 23 last week,
fell out of the rankings following its loss
to Florida State.










Tropic Times 1
Nov. 6,1992 AI



Magic's departure shuffles NBA balance


NEW YORK (AP) - Magic Johnson's surprise sec-
ond retirement will shuffle the balance of power again
in the NBA when its 47th season opens with 11 games
tonight.
With Johnson back, some believed the Los Angeles
Lakers would return to title contention, a position they
enjoyed for the entire decade of the 1980s. Others
thought they at least would have a say in who would
play in the Western Conference finals.
Without Johnson last season, the Lakers faced tight
competition in their own territory for the first time,
when the Los Angeles Clippers made the playoffs for
the first time and the Lakers barely made it on the final
day of the regular season.
That competition begins anew tonight when the
Lakers face the Clippers at the L.A. Sports Arena.
"We can't be considered in the same class we were
before," general manager Jerry West said. "We're
unsure; we don't know what we have."
"I don't think this makes us totally a rebuilding team,
but some things are obvious," rookie coach Randy
Pfund said. "When you lose a superstar and a player
that's your leader, that creates little different expecta-
tion than we started with this year."
In other openers tonight, it will be Minnesota at
Boston, New Jersey at Philadelphia, Miami at Orlando,
New York at Atlanta, Washington at Charlotte, Chi-
cago at Cleveland, Milwaukee at Detroit, Golden State
at Utah, San Antonio at Sacramento, and Seattle vs.
Houston at Tokyo.
Three teams will be at home when they play their
first games Saturday night, with Utah at Dallas, San
Antonio at Denver, Detroit at Indiana and the Clippers
at Phoenix. Portland will be the last team to make its
debut, when it entertains Denver on Sunday night.
The Lakers, who in 1991-92 had their worst season
(43-39) in 16 years, again will have to start Sedale
Threatt at point guard instead of Johnson. Tony Smith
is expected to be Threatt's backup, with Pfund also high
on rookies Duane Cooper and Anthony Peeler.
"I want to see Peeler and Cooper very soon backing
up Sedale," Pfund said. "They've been looking good at
practice."
The Lakers' older players include Byron Scott, James
Worthy and Sam Perkins, all 31, and James Edwards,
36. Other veterans include center Vlade Divac and A.C.
Green.
Another team likely to open its season without a key
player is the Charlotte Hornets, who are still hoping
holdout Alonzo Mourning, the No. 2 pick in the 1992
draft, will lead them to their first playoff berth.
"I don't have a good feel about how much he has
missed or how much that will hurt us," coach Allan
Bristow said. "Once we get him adjusted to playing
with the guys, maybe it will be a week or so before I can
have a gauge on that."


a


M' -... .... "--" ..... " " ... . - .... - - . ...... . - AP LuawPhoto
During happier times, Magic Johnson (left) and then Lakers' coach Pat Riley celebrate after beating the
Boston Celtics in the 1987 NBA Final.


Until Mourning is signed - agent David Falk
said Mourning is prepared to sit out the season until his
salary demands are met - Charlotte will start
veteran Mike Gminski at center.
But even without Mourning and his expected impact
on rebounding and shot-blocking, the Hornets nearly
made the playoffs last season behind their top draft
picks of the past two years, Kendall Gill and Larry
Johnson.
"They are two guys that we look to lead us, and we
feel with the addition ofAlonzo and the role players, we
feel good about our team," Bristow said.
Johnson, a holdout who signed just prior to the start
of last season, turned in a roolkie-of-the-year perform-


ance. He averaged 19.2 points.
"He's much more comfortable, but not in the
sense that he's going to relax," Bristow said. "I
think at the last part of last year, he felt comfortable with
his teammates and with the NBA.
"He knows what he had to work on during the
summer. I think he feels comfortable with his team-
mates and the talent level around him, and the guys are
looking up more and more to him."
Gill, who made the 1991 all-rookie team and aver-
aged 20.5 points last season, said he and Johnson have
to be the Hornets' leaders.
"We're the go-to guys," Gill said. "If we don't,
nobody else will, I don't think."


London may snag


heavyweight champ


LONDON (AP) - British fight pro-
moter Frank Maloney said Monday he
has started negotiations to bring the
world heavyweight champion to Lon-
don to fight Lennox Lewis.
Lewis earned the right to fight for
the title by knocking out Canadian Dono-
van "Razor" Ruddock inside two
rounds on Saturday and is contracted to
an April fight against the winner of the
Nov. 13 bout between champion Evan-
der Holyfield and Riddick Bowe.
Maloney accepted, however, it would
be a difficult job persuading Holyfield
or Bowe to defend the title in Britain.
"We are talking to people to find out
if we can stage the fight here," said
Maloney, who estimated some 12,000
watched the Lewis-Ruddock fight at
Earls Court in central London. "The
trouble is we have got to find some-
thing like $28 million if Evander Holy-
field is coming across the Atlantic.
And that's for Holyfield alone."
"The dream is not to fight for the
world title but to win the world title,"
Maloney said. "It would be an even
bigger dream to have that fight here."
So far Holyfield has not defended
his title outside the United States.


"But the crowd at Earls Court lifted
Lennox," Maloney said.
"When Ruddock and his people were
coming out from the dressing room he
must have been intimidated but you
could see that Lennox Lewis' chest
seemed to get bigger. Ruddock could
have had the whole of the Canadian
army in the ring that night but it wouldn't
have helped him."
London-born Lewis will be ringside
for the Holyfield-Bowe fight at Las
Vegas.
"It doesn't matter where the fight is,
I'm fully confident I can beat either
man," he said. "But I don't believe
Holyfield will take a chance to come
over here. He will be taking a big risk
if he does and I don't think the Duvas
(Lou and Dan) will take that chance.
"I am on a mission and the mission
has not stopped yet," said the unbeaten
Lewis, who won the 1988 Olympic
super-heavyweight title while fighting
as a Canadian. "The Americans have
kept the title for such a long time and
people usually have to go over there to
fight them. But when I win the title I'm
going to make them come over to
England."


Blue Jays 'bought' series


Toronto spent $49.1 m

for its 1992 players
NEW YORK (AP) - The recently
crowned kings of professional baseball
- the Toronto Blue Jays - paid big
money to win big.
The World Series champions paid their
players a record $49.1 million this sea-
son, according to documents distributed
this week to major league general man-
agers. That's a 57 percent increase from
the Blue Jays' 1991 payroll of $31.3
million.
Overall, the 772 players on Aug. 31
rosters made $807.8 million this season,
an average of $1,046,420 per player. The
total was up 21.7 percent from the $663.7
million spent on players in 1991, and up
79.1 percent from the $450.9 million in
1990.
Toronto paid its players an average of
$1,637,572, according the documents,
which were obtained Wednesday by The
Associated Press.
The Blue Jays were one of only four
clubs that didn't pay released players this
season.
The Oakland Athletics, who had the
top payroll in 1991 at $39.2 million, were
second this year at $47.5 million, includ-
ing $1.7 million in termination pay.
The New York Mets, who slumped to
fifth place in the NL East, were third at


$44 million, followed by Los Angeles at
$42.1 million. The Dodgers finished last
for the first time since 1905.
Boston, which finished last for the
first time since 1932, was fifth at $42
million.
The totals include salaries and pro-
rated shares of signing bonuses and other
guaranteed money, plus earned bonuses.
The figures, which were compiled by
management's Player Relations Com-
mittee, do not include all award bonuses,
but they shouldn't significantly alter the
data. The documents were distributed
Monday during meetings at La Quinta,
Calif.
Cleveland had the lowest payroll at
$9.3 million, the first payroll under $10
million since the 1990 Baltimore Ori-
oles. Houston was next at $14.8 million,
followed by Montreal at $16.1 million.
The only clubs whose payrolls de-
clined from 1991 were Cleveland, Mon-
treal and Kansas City.
The documents also showed players
earned about 45 percent of possible per-
formance bonuses this year, down slightly
from the 50 percent earned in 1991. Forty-
four percent were earned in 1990.
California had the highest termina-
tion pay, $6.1 million, including Don
Robinson, Von Hayes and Lance Parrish.
Pittsburgh was second at $4.3 million,
including Walt Terrell, Kirk Gibson and
Bill Landrum.





qq --.7C)



12 Tropic Times
Nov. 6, 1992


Savings plan open-season begins


Flyer, booklet offer

additional basic info
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Employees
will have a chance to enroll or change their Thrift
Savings Plan amount during the open-season that be-
gins Nov. 15 and ends Jan. 31.
According to the Benefits Branch, employees may
invest all or any portion of their TSP contributions in
any of the funds. These funds are the Government Se-
curities Investment (G) Fund, the Common Stock Index
Investment (C) Fund and the Fixed Income Index In-
vestment (F) Fund.
This is true whether employees are covered by the
Federal Employees' Retirement System or the Civil
Service Retirement System.
Money invested in the thrift funds earned interest
over the 12-month period which ended in August as
follows; C Fund, 8.13 percent; F Fund, 13.25 percent;


and G Fund, 7.51 percent.
Employees may make a TSP election if their latest
appointment to a position covered by FERS or CSRS
was made during theperiod of Jan. 1 -June30, orif they
were rehired to a position covered by FERS or CSRS
before Dec. 31 and had been eligible to participate in
the TSP during a prior open season.
If employees stopped their TSP contributions before
July 31, they may resume contributions this open sea-
son. If they stopped contributions after Aug. 1, they
may not begin contributing again until the next TSP
open season, May 15.
If employees are not making contributions, they may
still make a TSP election to invest all or any portion of
their Agency Automatic Contributions in any of the
three funds, evenifthey are not able to make an election
to contribute this open season because they stopped
contributing after Aug. 1.
If employees are making contributions, theirinvest-
ment election applies to all contributions in their TSP
account such- as employee, Agency Automatic and


Agency Matching Contributions.
Employees wishing to enroll or change their enroll-
ment must complete TSP-1, Thrift Savings Plan elec-
tion form. This form is available at the Technical
Services Division and must be completed and turned in
by Jan. 31.
If the Directorate of Civilian Personnel, Benefits
Branch, accepts an election before Jan. 9, it will be
effective Jan. 10. Paychecks dated Feb. 4 will reflect
this election. If an open season election is made after
this date, it will be effective Jan. 24.
The booklet Summary of the Thrift Savings Plan for
Federal Employees, dated September 1990, describes
the TSP in detail.
The flyer Open Season Update, Nov. 15, 1992 - Jan.
31, 1993, contains basic information about this TSP open
season.
If employees would like a copy of the Plan Sum-
mary, call the Directorate of Civilian Personnel, Tech-
nical Services Division, Benefits Branch, at 285-5745/
5941.


Turbo turkeys

readying trikes

FORT CLAYTON (Directorate of Com- W n
munity Activities) - The Fort Clayton Youth
Center is sponsoring the Turbo Turkey In-
ternational 2 to be held at the playground
next to the youth center, Nov. 21 at 11 a.m.
"This is our second year for Turbo Tur- B
key International and we expect a large
crowd," said youth center programmer, Paul -
Tommee. "The entire family is invited to
participate. It is free and prizes will be
awarded."
The event consists of various competi-
tions ranging from a big wheel race, parent/ .. -" . -
child tricycle relay, skateboard race and a ... ..
roller skate race.
"There are a lot more categories this
year, so a preregistration is needed so we ' '
can set up everything beforehand," Tom- . . .
mee said. .- ..
Registration deadline is Nov. 19. Call .. .
Tommee at the youth center, 287-6451. Youngsters battle it out during the tricycle relay at last year's Turbo Turkey International.


.,ourtesy photo


Program keeps students on their toes


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The students
at Curundu Junior High School have the opportunity to
see that experience can sometimes be the best teacher
through the Enrichment Program offered by the school.
The primary reason for the program is to provide
students who have demonstrated superior academic
achievement and motivation the opportunity to explore
outside the traditional school curriculum.
"The mini course program, which has been in exis-
tence for at least the last eight years at Curundu,
supplements the regular program," said Dr. Charles
Renno, principal of Curundu Junior High School. "The
courses, which cover a wide range of interests, extend
the regular program and provide a challenge to inter-
ested students."


Last week, Capt. Catherine With, lawyer from U.S.
Army South's Office ofthe StaffJudge Advocate at Fort
Clayton, visited four of the mini courses and taught
various law topics to the students.
"It was a pleasure working with these highly moti-
vated students," With said. "They were willing to
explore some very complicated legal concepts."
Sarah Livingston, an eighth grader in the course, said
the law class was interesting. "It was interesting be-
cause I might be a lawyer. I now know more about it,"
she said.
"The thing I like about the mini course is it gives
you something to do besides the normal studies," said
ninth grader Madeline Nealy. "It keeps you on your
toes."


Health benefits open-season set


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The 1992
Health Benefits Open Season begins Monday and runs
through Dec. 14. Eligible employees and retirees may
enroll or change plans or options.
Eligible employees are permanently employed United
States citizens and permanent non-U.S. citizens who
have been continuously employed since Sept. 30, 1979,
and do not have coverage under the Panama Social
Security System.
Temporary U.S. citizen employees who have
one year of current continuous employment may par-
ticipate in the program. Temporary employees who
have a year of continuous service after the open
season will be able to enroll within 31 days after
becoming eligible.
Eligible temporary employees who enroll in the
FEHB program will have the full premium withheld
from their pay.
The Office of Personnel Management has permitted
health plans to advertise non-FElIIB benefits such as
long term care, vision care, expanded dental benefits


and health club memberships.
If a plan offers such benefits, they will be shown on
apage clearly marked - "Non-FEHB benefits available
to plan members." Benefits shown on this page are not
part of the FEHB contract. The plan may cancel bene-
fits at any time and the costs are not included in the
FEHB premiums. These benefits are not subject to the
disputed claims procedures.
Employees must complete a Health Registration SF
2809 Form to enroll. The form, whichis available at the
Technical Services Division, Benefits Branch, mustbe
submitted before the close of business Dec. 14.
Changes should be made as early as possible in the
Open Season. Thc i.iiigc . will be effective on the first
day of the first pay period on or after Jan. 1.
Booklets and plan brochures are available from the
Technical Services Division ofthe Directorate of Civil-
ian Personnel.
Information on next year's premiums can be ob-
tained from administrative officers.
For more information, call 285-5745.


Airfare savings available
RODMAN NAVAL STATION (Navy Morale,
Welfare and Recreation) - Military members and
civilians going to the United States for the Christ-
mas holidays can save on air fares through the
Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation holiday
travel program.
Flights will leave Dec. 19 and 20 and return
Jan. 2 and 3. Space will be limited. The deadline
for signing up for the flights will be Dec. 14.
Call the Rodman Information, Tour and Travel
Office, 283-5307/4454 for final destination price
quotes and reservations.

Food drive underway
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The annual
Thanksgiving food drive, coordinated by Army
Community Services for the U.S. Army South
community, is now underway.
Units must furnish alist of families designated
to receive Thanksgiving food baskets and a
list of single soldiers being sponsored for Thanks-
giving dinner, to ACS between Tuesday and Nov.
13.
Call Maggie Coleman, project coordinator, at
285-4500/4857 for more information.

Singles group beginning
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - A new
group for single military, Panama Canal Com-
mision and embassy people over the age of 30 is
starting.
The Unified Professional Singles, will meet
monthly at the Valent Recreation Center. The first
meeting will be Nov. 15 with future meeting to be
held the third Sunday of each month.
Call 286-4235, evenings or252-7896, days for
more information.













Nv ropictivities
Nov. 6,1992 An entertainment guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page B 1





































US Army photo by SgL JamsYoum
Rick Lindvig rolls a ball down Clayton Lanes. Bowling leagues offer after-duty entertainment. See story, photos page B5.
---" 4 �3


An FBI agent's three sons use their
ninja skills to defeat evil in 3 Ninjas
at Fort Clayton.


Nissan King Cab 4X4 an attractive
import with adequate power to get
the job done.


TV .................................... ........ B3
Fishing fun.....................B9
A ds........................................ B 10











Tropic Times
B � Nov. 6, 1992




HOWARD
Today
6:30pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13)
Tom Selleck, Marlon Brando
9:10pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash
Saturday
2pmrn Freddy as F.R.O.7. (G) Animated
6:30pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13)
Tom Selleck Marlon Brando
9:10pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash
Sunday
2pm Freddy As F.R.O.7. (G) Animated
6:30pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13)
Tom Selleck, Marion Brando
9:10pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash
Monday
7pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash
9pm Whispers In The Dark (R) Annabella Sciorra,
Jamey Sheridan
Tuesday
6:30pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery )PG-13)
Tom Selleck, Marion Brando
9:10pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash
Wednesday
7pm Whispers In The Dark (R) Annabella Sciorra,
Jamey Sheridan
9pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash
. Thursday
7pmr Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash
9pm Whispers In The Dark (R) Annabella Sciorra,
Jamey Sheridan
Nov. 13
7pm The Gun In Betty Lou's Handbag (PG-13) Penelope
Miller, Eric Thai
9pm Whispers In The Dark (R) Annabella Sciorra,
Jamey Sheridan


CLAYTON
Today
7pm 3 Ninjas (PG- 13) Victor Wong, Michael Treanor
9pm Stay Tuned (PG) John Ritter, Pam Dawber
Saturday
2pm Bebe's Kids (G) Animated
7pm Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith
9pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe
Sunday
2pm Bebe's Kids (G) Animated
7pm Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith
9pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe
Monday
7pm Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith
9pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe
Tuesday "
7pm A Stranger Among Us (PG-13) Melanie Griffith,
Eric Thai
9pm Rapid fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe
Wednesday
7pm A Stranger Among Us (PG-13) Melanie Griffith,
Eric Thal
8:50pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13)
Tom Selleck, Marion Brando
Thursday
6:30 Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13)
Tom Selleck, Marlon Brando
9:10pm Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith
Nov. 13
6:30pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13)
Tom Selleck, Marlon Brando
9:10pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash



DAVIS
Today
9 7pm Boomerang (R) Eddie Murphy, Robin Givens
Saturday
2pm Little Nemo (G) Animated
7pm 3 Ninjas (PG) Victor Wong, Michael Treanor


9pm Stay Tuned (PG) John Ritter, Pam Dawber
Sunday
2pm Little Nemo (G) Animated
7pm 3 Ninjas (PG) Victor Wong, Michael Treanor
Monday
7pm Stay Tuned (PG) John Ritter, Pam Dawber
Tuesday
7pm Raising Cain (R) John Lithgow, Lolita Davidovitch
Wednesday
7pm Stay Tuned (PG) John Ritter, Pam Dawbers
Thursday
7pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe
Nov. 13
7pm 3 Ninjas (PG) Victor Wong, Michael Treanor

SHERMAN
Today
7pm Death Becomes Her (PG-13) Goldie Hawn, Bruce
Willis
Saturday
7pm Unlawful Entry (R) Kurt Russell, Madeleine Stowe
Sunday
7pm Lethal Weapon III (R) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover


AMERICA'S NEWEST HEROES



SN injas


I%


SPG~


Thursday
7pm Raising Cain (R) John Lithgow, Lolita Davido-
vitch
Nov. 13
7pm Boomerang (R) Eddie Murphy, Robin Givens



AMADOR
Today
7pm Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie
Smith
Saturday
7pm Buffy The Vampire Slayer (PG-13) Donald Suther-
land, Kirsty Swanson
Sunday
7pm Freddy As F.R.O.7. (PG) Animated
Thursday
7pm Death Becomes Her (PG-13) Goldie Hawn, Bruce
Willis
Nov.13
7pm A Stranger Among Us (PG) Melanie Griffith,
Eric Thai


3 Ninjas

Victor Wong,

Michael Treanor
While their father is
occupied with his FBI
business, his young sons
cope with his absence
by learning the ways of
the ninja from grandpa.
Their new skills are put
to the test when an arms
dealer tries to kidnap
them to keep Dad from
shutting him down. PG
(violence), 93 min.


Clayton Theater,
today. Davis Theater,
Saturday, Sunday
and Nov. 13.


Freddy As F.R.O.7
Animated
This frantic froggy fantasy follows Freddy super agent. He battles a variety of dangerous villains from his
headquarters in Paris. PG, 90 min.

Christopher Columbus: The Discovery
Tom Selleck, Marlon Brando
He believed he could sail with rivers of airinto the new world. Join the adventure as the famed explorer risks
all he has against incredible odds to chart an expedition across the sea into the unknown. PG-13 (violence,
nudity), 122 min.

Mo' Money
Damon Wayans, Stacy Dash
Johnny is a con artist trying to go straight and win the heart of a lovely lady executive at the credit card
company where he works in the mailroom. Check out the action as Damon Wayans is torn between vice and
virtue...and enjoy some fine new music from Luther Vandross, Color Me Badd, Public Enemy and Johnny Gill
as the story unspools. R (violence, language), 97 min.

Whispers In The Dark
Annabella Sciorra, Jamey Sheridan
A doctor-patient relationship involving bizarre sexual fantasies is abruptly violated when the psychiatrist
falls in love with her patient's fantasy lover. R (violence, sex, language) 102 min.


Below is the schedule for SCN AM
Radio, 780 Pacific and 1420 Atlantic,
features a mix of news on the hour and
music from Armed Forces Radio and
Television Service tapes. News blocks
from AFRTS Voice Channel air periodi-
cally throughout the day including sports,
business news, commentary, Paul Har-
vey News, Commentary, and Rest of the
Story. Also aired are National Public
Radio's Morning Edition, All Things
Considered and Car Talk on AM along
with sporting and special events.


Sunday
Midnight Sign on


12:09am
7:05am
9:05am
10:05am
12:05pm
13:30pm
1:06pm
12:17pm
3:05pm
3:llpm
3:17pm
3:25pm
4:05pm
5:05pm


Midnight
12:09am
8:05am


Music
NPR Weekend Edition
Music
Music
ABC NBC News
Music
ABC NBC News
Music
ABC News
NBC News
CBS News
ABC World of Sports
All Things Considered
Music

Saturday
Sign on
Music
NPR Weekend Edition


10:05am
1 1:05pm
12:05pm
3:12pm
3:17pm
3:30pm
4:05pm
5:05pm
5:17pm
5:21pm
5:26pm
5:30pm
6:05pm


Midnight
12:09am
5:05am
7:05am
9:30am
9:45am
10:05am
12:05pm


Car Talk
Music
ABC NBC News
Paul Harvey's Rest of the Story
Paul Harvey News and Commentary
Music
NPR All Things Considered
ABC News
CBS Down to Earth
NASA The Space Story
CBS Sports Central
UPI Roundtable
Music

Weekdays
Sign on
Music
NPR Morning Edition
Music
CBS World News Roundup
ABC/APR Sports
Music
Paul Harvey News and Commentary


12:17pm
2:35pm
2:40pm
3:05pm
3:11pm
3:17pm
3:23pm
3:25pm
3:28pm
3:30pm
4:05pm
4:08pm
5:05pm
5:08pm
5:30pm
6:05pm


Music
Paul Harvey's Rest of the Story
Music
Pentagon Newsbreak
Armed Forces Digest
Air Force Radio News
APR Business Barometer
ABC Sportscast
ABC Bill Diehl's Spotlight
Music
UPI Sportscast
NPR All Things Considered
UPI Radio Sports
NPR All Things Considered
CBS The World Tonight
Music


APR Network News airs on the hour,
every hour except midnight. All pro-
grams scheduled above are subject to
pre-emption for sports events or news
specials.


IS(A -�.Nl radio Schedule . I


I @Bum ;-.-. -. Ov-.1 -, ,











TV Schedule


Tropic Times
Nov. 6,1992 J


Channels 8 & 10

Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Nov. 13

6:30mn NBC News aSunrise 6:30m Carolina Marines 6:OnmRobert Schuller Hour of 6:30m NBC News a Suonrise 6:30n NBC News at Sunmrise 6:30amn NBC News atSunrise 6:30in NBC News a Surise 6:30am NBC News Sonriae
7:00 ABCGoodMarning 7:00 AirForcoNews Power 7:00 ABC Good Morning 7:00 ABCGood Morning 7:00 ABCGoodMorning 7:00 ABCGooeMoaing 7:00 ABCGoodMMoning
America 7:30 Navy News This Week 6:30 Thirty Good Minutes America America America Amrica Ammca
9:00 BodybyJtake 8:00 CartoonComer 7:00 Studio7 9:00 Body byJake 9:00 BodybyJake 9:00 BodybyJaie 9:00 Body byJake 9:00 BodybyJake
9:30 SessameStr 8:30 JustForKids1 7:30 The700Club 9:30 SessunSt.eet 9:30 SesmeStrecet 9:30 SesameStret 9:30 SesneSutre 9:30 SesameStret
10530 SpaceshlpEath WoodyWoodpecker 8:00 Both Sides w/Jessic 10:30 Family Double Dare 10:30 SilverSpoons 10:30 Back ToTheFuture 10:30 SilverSpoom 10.30 SpaceshipEarth
11:00 FamilyFen d Biakins Jackson 11:00 FamilyPeud 11:00 FainlyPeud 11:00 FamilyFeud 11:00 FamilyFeod 11:00 FnmilyFeud
11:30 ShowbizToday Back ToTheFuture 8:30 Wuhington Week in 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday
Non Headline News Break Widget Review Noon Headline News Break Noon Headline News Break Noa Headline News Noon HeadlineNews Break Noon HeadlineNews Break
1215 SCNMidday 10.30 HanaBarberaCartonm 9:00 CBSSundayMoming 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:30 Sports LateNight 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday
1230 SportLatenight 11:35 HeadlineNewsBreak 10:30 FaceTheNation 12:30 SponrMachine 12:30 SportLateNight 1:00 OprabWinfrey 12:30 SportsLaeght 12:30 SportsL night
1:00 OprahWinfrey Noon Why An Amy#6 11:00 HeadlineNews 1:00 OprahWinfrey 1:00 Donahue 2:00 AnotherWorld 1:00 Donahue 1:00 OprahWinfrey
2:00 AnotherWorld 12:30 CNBC Business Reviw 11:30 This Week W/David 2:00 AnotherWorld 2:00 AnotherWoadd 3:00 Price IsRight 2:00 AnxtherWorld 2:00 AnotherWold
3:00 Price Is Right 1:00 CPA Football: Boton Brinkley 3:00 Price IRight 3:00 Price Is Right 4:00 WamrnerBrothem 3:00 Price Is Right 3:00 PriceIsRight
4:00 ThinkFastl Collegew.NotreDame 12:30pmEbony/JetShowcase 4:00 Wild &CrazyKids 4:00 SquareOneTV Cartoons 4:00 FamilyDoubhleDae 4:00 ThinkFutl
4:25 GuidingLight 3:30 CFAFootball: 1:00 NFLPootball: Dolphins 4:25 GuidingLight 4:25 GuidingLight 4:25 GuidingLight 4:25 GuidingLight 4:25 GuidingLight
5:15 GmneralHspital Washingtonvs.Arizona va. Cols 5:15 GoneralHospital 5:15 GamerlHMpital 5:15 GneralHaspital 5:15 Gneral Hospital 5:15 Geral Hospital
6:00 SCNBvmingReport (JIPed) 4:00 StarTrk 6:00 SCNBvaingReport 6:00 SCNEvoingReport 6:00 ScimecekTechnology 6:00 SCNEvyingRport 6:00 SCNBvoin�gRport
6:15 HeadlineNews 6:30 HeadlineNews 5:00 HeadlineNews 6:15 HeadlineNewsBreak 6:15 HeadlineNewsBreak 6:30 WorlddNewsTonight 6:15 HeadlineNewsBreak 6:15 HealineNewsBreak
6:30 WeoldNewsTonight 7:00 PlghtBacklw/D"vid 5:30 OnStage 6:30 WorldNewsTonight 6:30 WorldNewsTonight 7:00 Jeopardyl 6:30 WmIdNewsToolght 6:30 WaldNewsToolght
7:00 Jeopardyl Horowitz 6:00 WWFWrstding 7:00 Jeopardy 7:00 Jeopardy 7:30 Wednesday NightMovie: 7:00 Jeopardyl 7:00 Jopurdyl
7:30 TallTalssandLegends 7:30 AntanC tyLimtis 7:00 Special:USMC 7:30 Anything ButLove 7:30 AnrwerLine:Topic- "StarlightOne" 7:30 HeadlineNewsBreak 7:30 TallTalesandLegends
8:30 PrimetmeLive 8:30 Special:USMC AnniversaryThe Gallnt 8:00 EveningShade OutdoorRecreadlon 9:30 CBSEvoning News 7:45 CPAPootball:Texas A 8:30 PrimetkneLve
9:30 CBS Evmong News Annmiversary he Hermm"(Pt.2of3) 8:30 USMC Anniversary The 8:30 Special: Heritage of 10:00 Entertainmnt Tonight Mvs. Houston 9:30 CBS Evoming News
10.00 EtestaiamntTonight GallantBrod(Pt.1 of3) 8:00 SundayNightMovie: GallmttHcroes" (Pt.3) Glory-ThoU.S. 10:30 LA.Law 11:00 HeadlineNew 10:00 EntertainamtTonight
10:30 St.Lsewhere 9:25 SaturdayNightMovie: "Anlnconvanint 9:30 CBS Evening News Marine CaropsStory 11:30 Filler 11:30 SCNLateEdition 1030 St. where
11:30 SCNNewsUpdate "BomlnEastL.A." Womnm"(Pt.1lof2) 10:00 EntertaimnontTonight 9:30 CBS Evening News 11:35 TonightShow 11:35 TonightShow 11:30 SCNLateBdlitm
11:35 TonightShow 11:00 HeadlineNews 9:40 HeadlineNews 10:30 Dynasty 10:00 Ent rtainmentTonight 12:35amLtmnightW/Lettena 12:35mnLatenightW/Lettmmtm 11:35 TonightShow
12:35mnLaenightW/Lettermr 11:30 SaturdayNightLive 10:00 EntertainmtThisWeek 11:30 SCNLateEdition 10:30 MikeHammer 1:35 Nightline 1:35 Nightline 12:35amLatmightW/
1:35 Nightline 1:00amriday Night Videos 11:00 InMpectorMare 11:35 TonightShow 11:30 SCNLateBditin 2:05 HeadlineNews Break 2:05 HeadlineNewsBreak Lattermn
2:05 AllNightMovis:'Cam- 2:00 AllNightMovies: MidnightLarryKingLive 12:35 Latem ightW/Lettemnnn 11:35 TonightShow 2:30 SportTonight 2:30 SportsTaight 1:35 Nightline
mando" "Charias of Fire" 1:00 Busines. WMad 1:35 Nightline 12:35amnLamtightw/Lettermm 3:00 AsanioHall 3:00 ArsenioHallShow 2:05 AllNightMovies:
3:35 AllNightMovies: 4:00 AllNightMovies: 1:30 HeadlineNews 2:05 HeadlineNew Break 1:35 Nightline - 4:00 TonightShow 4:00 TonightShow "Jumpin'JackFlash"
*Picdatol" "BominEastLA." 2:00 McGlaughlinGroup 2:30 SportLatoenight 2:05 HeadlineNews Break 5:00 LatnightW/Lleennm 5:00 LamightW/Lt-emm 3:50 AllNightMovis:
5:15 Videolinks 5:35 HeadlineNewsBreak 2:30 Spol Machine 3:00 AmenioHall 2:30 SportsLanight 6:00 HeadlincNew Break 6:00 HeadlineNews "Revnageco(TeNerd"
6:00 HeadlineNews 3:00 CNNContinues 4:00 TonightShow 3:00 AonmioHall 5:15 Videolinks
6:30 Headline News Break 4:00 HeadlineNews 5:00 LatnightW/Letterman 4:00 TonightShow 6:00 HeadlineNws
4:30 CNNWordReport 6:00 HeadlineNewsBreak 5:00 LatmightW/Lettemnn 6:30 HeadlineNews Break
6:00 Headline News Break 6:00 HeadlineNews Break



Cable Channel 14

Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Nov. 13

6:30nm NBC Newsat Sunrise 6:30am Simulcastwith 6:00am Lamb Chop 6:30an SimulcastW/8 & 10 6:30am SimulcastW/8 & 10 6:30am Smulcast W/8 & 10 6:30am Simulcast W/8 & 10 6:30n SimulcastW/8 & 10
9:00 OprahWinfreyShow Crannels 8 & 10 6:20 Gerbert 9:00 OprahWinfrey 9:00 Donahue 9:00 OprahWinfrey 9:00 Donahue 9:00 Opnh WinfreyShow
10:30 Today 10:30 FamilyTheater. Alice 6:45 TaleSpin 10:00 Today 10:00 Today 10:00 Today 10:00 Today 10:00 Today
Noon Headline News Break In Wonderland" 7:10 Darkwing Duck Noon Headline News Break Noon Headline News Noon Headline News Break Noon Headline News Break Noon Headline New Break
12:15 SCNMidday 11:45 HeadlineNewsBreak 7:35 WinnieThePooh 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:30 AllMyChildrn 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday
12:30 AllMyChildren Noon SunndayAfternoon 8:00 Superfriends 12:30 AllMyChildrm 12:30 AllMyChildrm 1:30 One Life to Live 12:30 AllMyChildrn 12:30 AllMyChildren
1:30 OneLifetoLive Movie:'The Muppets 8:25 Widget 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 OneLifetoLive 2:30 Young And TheRestless 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live
2:30 The Young And Retless TakeMmhattan" 8:45 Back ToTheFuture 2:30 Young and The Restless 2:30 The Young AndRestless 3:30 SesameStrct 2:30 The Young AndRestlss 2:30 The Young And Restless
3:30 SessmeSteet 1:35 SaturdayAftemoon 9:10 NinjaTurtles 3:30 SesameStret 3:30 SesameStreet 4:30 SchoolaticSparts 3:30 SemeSmtreet 3:30 SeaneStreet
4:30 SpaceshipEarth Movie:"ChariotsofFire" 9:30 Capt.Planet 4:30 ClarissaExplainsItAll 4:30 ThinkFutl America 4:30 LeaveItToBeaver 4:30 SpaceshipEarth
4:55 ChnnelOne 3:35 SpenserForHire 10:00 Maverick 4:55 ChannelOne 4:55 ChannelOne 5:05 AfterSchool Special 4:55 ChannelOne 4:55 ChannelOne
5:10 AfterSchoolSpecial 4:30 OnPitRoad 11:00 StarTrek 5:10 AfterSchool Special 5:10 AfterSchool Special 6:00 Pinnacle 5:10 After School Special 5:10 After School Special
6:00 SCNEvming Report 5:00 American Gladiators Noon HeadlineNews 6:00 SCN Evening Report 6:00 SCNEvoningReport 6:15 Headline News Break 6:00 SCN BvmingReport 6:00 SCNEvoningRqport
6:15 Headline News Break 6:00 HeadlineNews 12:30 Pinnacle 6:15 Headline News Break 6:15 HeadlineNews Break 6:30 NBCNightlyNews 6:15 HeadlineNewsBreak 6:15 Hedline News Break
6:30 NBCNightlyNews 6:30 StarTrek The Nnet 1:00 SundayAfternoon 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:30 NBCNightlyNews 7:00 FullHouse 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 Roc Goenration Movie: "EarthAngel" 7:00 BeverlyHills 90120 7:00 Special: USMC Birthday 7:30 Cheers 7:00 PerfectStrangen 7:00 Roc
7:30 NightCourt 7:30 Cops 2:40 MagicalWorldofDisney 8:00 MacGyver AmericamChronicles 8:00 MulderSheWrate 7:30 FamilyMatters 7:30 FreshPrice
8:00 NBABasketball-Double 8:00 TheSimpsomn 3:30 TodaysGourmet 9:00 MondayNightFootball: "ScmperFidelis" 9:00 Sisters 8:00 TheEqualizer 8:00 EveningShade
Header Game 1 Bulls vs 8:30 Anything But Love 4:00 NFLFootball: Chargers 49e= vs Falcons 7:30 HomelImprovement 10:00 ChinaBeach 9:00 KnoutLanding 8:30 Murphy Brown
Cavalirs 9:00 Roseanne vs. Chief Midnight HeadlineNews 8:00 NonthamExposure 11:00 HeadlineNews 10:00 FalconCrest 9:00 Videolinks
10-30 NBABasketball-Double 9:30 InLivingColor 7:00 HeadlineNews 12:30 SCNLareldition 9:00 TuesdayNightMovie: 11:30 InfoFiller 11:00 HeadlineNews 10:00 MiamiVice
Header.Gamc2 10:00 Videolinks 7:30 The Wonder Years 12:35 Simulcat with Channels "Tough Guys" 11:35 AeonioHall 11:30 SCNLate Edition 11:00 Headline News
Rockets vsSupersonics 11:00 Headline News 8:00 Sunday Night Movie: 8k &10 11:00 HeadlineNews 12:35amnSimulcastwith 11:35 ArsnioHall 11:30 La.cEdition
1:00am HeadlineNews 11:30 SaturdayNight Live Alims" 11:30 SCNLateEdition Channel 8&10 12:35 smSimilcastwith 11:35 ArsnioHall
1:30 SCN Late Edition 1:00amPriday Night Videos 10:30 Headline News 11:35 ArsonioHall Channels8&10 12:35amnDavidLttrman
1:35 Nightline 2:00 Firing Line 11:00 MacGruder&Loud 12:35am Simulcast with 1:35 Nightline
2:05 WaoldwideUpdate 2:30 Sports Latenight Midnight 60 Minutes Channels 8& 10 2:05 Headline News Break
2:30 SportsLatenight 3:00 EntertainmintThisWeek 1:00 Simulcastwith Channels 2:30 Sponrts Latenight
3:00 Atenio Hall 4:00 Saumrday Night Live 8&10 3:00 Arenio Hall
4:00 TonightShow 5:30 HeadlineNews 4:00 TonightShow
5:00 Lte NightW/Lttemnnan 6:00 HeadlincNews 5:00 LateNigttW/Lttemnl
6:00HeadlineNews Break 6:00 Headline New Break


Channels 8 & 10

SPORTS

Join SCN Channels 8 & 10 as we bring you NFL and
College football action!

CFA: Boston College vs. Notre Dame Saturday at 1
p.m.
CFA: Washington vs. Arizona (JIP) Saturday at 3:30 p.m.
NFL: Dolphins vs. Colts Sunday at 1 p.m.
CFA: Texas A&M vs. Houston Thursday at 7:45 p.m.
CFA: Illinois vs. Michigan Nov. 14 at noon
CFA: Teams To Be Announced Nov. 14 at 3:30 p.m.


Why An Army (Part #6)
Saturday at noon
General Carl Steiner, Commander in Chief of the U.S. Special Operations
Command, Headquartered at McDill Air Force Base in Florida is the guest on part
6 in this on-going series hosted by Peter Hatch.


Cable Channel 14


NFL Football
Chargers vs. Chiefs
Monday Night Football
49ers vs Falcons


Sunday at 4 p.m.

Monday at 9 p.m.


' American Chronicles: Semper Fidelis
Marine Corps Birthday Special
Tuesday at 7 p.m.
Long the subject of motion pictures and novels, the facts of life at the Marine
Corps Recruit Depot in San Diego, California, are every bit as dramatic and
fascinating as any fiction ever written. Producer David Lynch looks at the
M.C.R.D., where hard-boiled drill instructors makes Marines out of boys in just
12 weeks. Narrated by Richard Dreyfuss.

NEW SERIES


Anything But Love
The Gallant Breed-3 pt. series Saturdays at 8:30 p.m.
Begins Saturday at 8:30 p.m. Deals with love and relationships in the 80's and is set primarily in the offices
Each episode spotlights the sacrifices and victories of the United States Marine of the fictional Chicago Monthly magazine. In additional to exploring the
Corps. Part One is titled "The Years of Trial". Pt. 2, titled "Peleliu to Inchon" chaotic professional lives of the characters, the series also focuses on their very
Sunday at 7 p.m., and Pt. 3 titled "Chosin To Khe Sahn" Monday at 8:30 p.m. individual, often clashing lifestyles. Cast: Jamie Lee Curtis and Richard Lewis.


Answerline Topic: Outdoor Recreation
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.
Find out where to go and what to do to make the most of your stay in Panama
during your off-duty time. Got a question or a comment about Outdoor Recrea-
tion services? Give SCN a call between 7:30 and 8:30 p.m. and talk with one of
ourpanelists.


In Living Color
Saturday at 9:30 p.m.
The freshest crew of comedians to ever break a cap at convention are back on
stage and ready for another season with Homey the Clown, the Head Detective,
Men on Film, the fabulous Fly Girls and more! Cast: Keenen Ivory Wayans,
Kim Wayans, David Allen Grier, Kelly Coffield and Tommy Davidson.


-lk t--iJ


SPECIALS








B/4 Tropic Times
4 Nov. 6, 1992


NISSAN KING CAB


SE 4x4: attractive, smooth, spacious


by Zane Binder
King Features Syndicate

Need a rugged work and off-road pickup that also
offers class for nights in the city? Nissan's King Cab
4x4, updated for '93, is tough enough to conquer the
worst terrain while sporting the industry's latest aero-
dynamic styling. At just under $17,000 base, it's not
cheap or overly sophisticated, but offers reasonable
value.
Inside, the King Cab SE, the top of the line, is
attractive but plain. The nicely-padded twin cloth buck-


ets cradle even the biggest and tallest people, and the
driver's seat offers a set height adjustment as well. The
King Cab cargo area behind the seats is spacious, and
there are two child-size jump seats for short trips. The
pickup bed is double-walled and just over eight feet
long with a 1,500 pound cargo rating, slightly more than
many competitors.
Looking around the interior and toward the dash,
there is instrumentation adequate but sparse. The car-
peted cabin's fairly quiet for a pickup. Cruise control,
power steering with an adjustable column, power front
disc/rear drum brakes with antilock, and a sliding rear


window are standard. Sadly, this vehicle isn't air-bag
equipped and doesn't incorporate five mile per-hour
bumpers.
This is a heavy-duty truck despite its attractive sheet
metal. Hugetires, a sky-high ride height with 7.9 inches
of ground clearance, and acurb weight of 3,815 pounds
contribute to this vehicle's less than nimble "feel." But
its fully independent suspension helps it climb canyon
walls like a billy goat. It's fine for hauling boats up
slippery launch ramps and getting them to the water,
too, with its 3,500-pound tow capacity and "stiff' gear-
ing. But for overall toughness, you pay a high price in
handling, especially in the turning circle. It takes 46 feet
to U-turn, by far the largest distance I've encountered
since 1977. It's something you need be wary about. The
ride, too, while acceptable, needs improvement, as
some archaic porpoisingg" over large bumps is evident.
The tires are off-road types - great in the dirt, marginal
on the infamous Long Island Expressway, Chicago's
Bay Shore Drive, or L.A.'s most famous "parking lot,"
Interstate 405.
Hauling around this vehicle's bulk takes a stout
engine; unfortunately, the King Cab needs one. The
modem 153 HP 3.0 liter V6 is a fine powerplant, smooth
and quiet, but overmatched by sheer mass. Zero to 60
takes 14.6 seconds, below average for the class and
anemic when trying to keep up with traffic.
Fuel efficiency isn't anything to talk about either: 13
city and 16 highway were observed (EPA 15/19), slightly
below its many competitive siblings. A note here: lower
line models are available with a 4, considering the
performance of the 6, having two less cylinders is a fate
too ugly to contemplate.
Overall, the Nissan King Cab V6 along with most
Japanese 4x4s - offers better quality control, probably
longevity, smoothness and much more sophistication
(that's relative) than the U.S. competition. But it's a
class in which they seem to have no clear overall
technological advantage, either. Generally, their horse-
power and torque are in extremely short supply, and
most lack an airbag. The King Cab is typical of the
genre; it's a decent vehicle with fine styling that with
reasonable care will provide years of reliable service.


Fig lunchbox brownies
12- or 18-oz bag California dried figs
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup boiling water
1 cup shortening
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
13/4 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon cocoa powder


1 small package semi-sweet chocolate chips
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 to 3/4 cup coarsely chopped pecans or other nuts

Remove stems from figs and cut into bits.
Preheat over to 350 degrees. Combine figs, baking
soda and boiling water; let stand until cool. Cream
together shortening and sugar; beating eggs. Alternately
add flour, salt and cocoa; blend well. Fold in cooled fig
and water mixture, chocolate chips and vanilla; mix
well. Spray a 9x13-inch baking pan with non-stick
coating and lightly flour. Pour brownie mixture into pan
and spread evenly.
Bake 35 to 40 minutes, or until done. Top with nuts
and let cool before cutting into bars. Makes about 24
brownies.

California fig trail mix
11/2 cups California dried figs
1/2 cup toasted almonds
1/2 cup cashews


1/2 cup banana chips
1/2 cup shredded coconut
1/3 cup chocolate or carob chips
1/4 pumpkin seeds, shelled

Remove stem from figs and cut into bits.
Combine figs, almonds, cashews, banana chips,
coconut, chocolate or carob chips and pumpkin seeds.
Store in tightly covered container at room temperature
for convenient snacks or in refrigerator for longer
storage.
Eat out of hand or package in small plastic bags for
lunchbox treats. Makes about (our cups.
Helpful hint - When chopping California figs, use
clean kitchen scissors and cut figs into bits. Run
scissors under warm tap water when sticky.
The Chopping Block recipes by Philomena Cor-
radeno.

Editor's note: People Interested in sharing a rec-
ipe or household tip with Tropic Times readers, can
send recipes or tips by MPS to Tropic Times, Unit
0936, APO AA 34002. Your name and base will be
printed with your submission.


All applicants should be aware that hiring opportunities continue to be limited due to budgetary
constraints. Effective Oct. 23, U.S. Army South has been granted authority to exempt non-status locally
hired temporary appointments from the Department of the Army wide "one-for-four" hiring freeze.
Placement of current DA employees (including those on leave without pay) is an exception to the freeze.
Current permanent Panama Canal Commission, Air Force and Navy employees are subject to the
"one-for-fotur" DA hiring restriction. Current permanent NAF or AAFES employees who were appointed
before Nov. 3, 1989 may now also apply and are subject to the "one-for-four" DA hiring restriction.
Military Spouses: If available, qualified, and within the area of consideration specified, are exemptfrom
the hiring restriction and will be appointed as temporary. Specialized experience, when indicated, must be
in duties similar to those required by the vacancy.
AMENDMENT ON HOW TO APPLY: Failure to complete U. S. Army South Form 106, when required,
could hinder an applicant's chances of being referred for the vacancy. For information, visit the Civilian
Personnel Office, Building 560, Corozal.

VB# VACANCIES TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 11-06-92 CLOSE& 11-17-92
ATLANTIC:
050-93-VL-MEDICALCLERKTYPING),NM-693.TmapormyNTE31March93. USADENTAC-PanmnP tDavilDntal Clinic.
FoDani. Ow E p: 6maths. Note CASPtetrequinrd.
058-93-NC- MOTOR VEHICLE OPERATOR,MG-570-6. 41stASG, DOL, TraportaionDivim,MotPool-Alantic, FonDavis.
SpecExp: 1 yr. ofcrradicalaperaiTee. Fone 106. Note: Driver'slicsea required.
060-93-NC-MMOTORVEMICLE OPERATOR,MG-5703-7. 41mtASG,DOL,TranporttionDivisi,. Motor Pool-Allmi, Fcort Dav.
Spec BLp: 1 l/2yrs. equiv. to MO-6. Fom 106. Nota Driver's licmse rqpired.
PACIFIC:
049-93-VL - (2) CUSTODIAL WORKER, MG--66-2. Tanponrry NT 31 Moch 93. USA MBDDAC-Paxa, GACH, giics Divisin,
Service SBrdi.,HuakeepingSetim, Ancon. SpecExp: 3 moothi.Note: Applicans musthvehadthreemonthsinjanitrialcexperimce.
Positim ii itrnnila m tocail amdd to vtmm pefence. If no veterms e availible no-pr ferce candidates mqybe ci ldar.
051-93-VL - CUSTODIAL WORKER LEADER, ML-366-3. USA MEDDAC-Panam.a GACH, Logisis Division, Services Branch,


HouaekeepingSoetion,Ancon. SpecExp: l yr.ofjoumcymanequiv.toMG-3566-3. Form 106. Note: Biligual(Eoglis/Spamnlh). Limid
to MEDDAC/DENTAC-Panma employees only.
052-93-VL - SUPPLY CLERK, NM-2005-3. Temporary NTE 6 months. Directorate of Training Support Cmter, Services Divi4ion
Distribution Brmch,FontClaytoo. GenExp: months. Note: Driver's lUic required.
053-93-VL - MIDICAL CLERK (TYPING), NM-79-4. USA MEDDAC-Pmama, USA Hea Cliic, Font Oylon. Spcr Ep: 1 yr.equiv.
toNM-3. Fanrm 106.Note: Bilingual(Englisb/Spmaish). CASPst required. LmitedtoUSAMEDDAC/DENTAC-Panmau-iployea only.
054-93-VL- HEALTHSYSTEMSASSISTANT,NM-303-S. USAMEDDAC-Panan GAC, Quality IpmvenmtOMffce,.Ancon. Spec
Eap: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-4. Fam 106. Note: Limited to USA MEDDAC4DENTAC-Pasmn employees only.
055-93-OO-LIBRARYTECHNICIAN,NM-1411-5. Con sitiveTaararyPromtodonNTBl yr.USAO-Panama,CRD.LibraryBrach,
Fon Amador. Spec Bxp: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-4. Form 106.
056-93-SS - MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT (OA), NM-344-5. USAO-Pana, DEH, Administrative Section, Corozal. Spec Exp: 1 yr.
equiv. to NM-344-4. Form 106. Note: Knowledge of Spamih and qualified typi required.
057-93-LA - PERSONNEL ASSISTANT (OA), NM-203-5 DEV 6. USAG-Pmans, DCP, Tecdmical Savices Ofce, Pesonnel Sytas
Manager rt Brch, Corozal. Spec Ep: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-4. Famn 106. Note: Positionwilllbefled atNM-5lseve
059-93-VL-ADMINISTRATIVEASSISTANT,NM-303-. Sensitive. HQ,SpecialOperationsCC anmdSoulb,Albro*kAFS. SpecBp:
I yr. equiv.to NM-5. TIG: NM-S. For 106.
061-93-LA-BOATRENTALMANAGER,NM-1102-7. USAG-Pumam, DCA.CRD,Outdoor Reeotlo BradchPostclaytn. SpecBxp:
1 yr. equiv. to NM-S. TIG: NM-5. Form 106. Note: Candidaes who q pliedudrVB#: 48-92-LA neednocto nmpply.
062-93-NR-KITCHEN EQUIPMENTREPJAIRER,MO-5310-L TempormyNTE30Srp 93. USAO.Pansm.DBH.OperationsDvision.
Maintnmmace ad Sevices Branch, Carmal. Spec axp: 2 ys. in the trade. Note: Driver's license required.
063-93-NC -AUTOMOTIVEWORKER,MG-5823-9.41stASO,DOL, MaitmanceDivision,TMP,MaintanceBraneh,Coroal.Spec
Exp: 3 ysi.ofprmgressivepractcalexperi ce. Form l06. Note: Driver's license required.
064-933 - TRAINING AMMUNITION MANAGER, NM-301-9. Senitive. USAG-Paname DPTM, Training Division, PFort Claon.
Spec Exp: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-301-7. TIO: NM-7. Form 106. Note: imitled to current care/carercnditon1l anployes only.
NOTES: VB#: 012-93-00, Recration Aid, NM-189-3 is ronded to read: writt test required.
VB#: 013-93-00, Office Automtion Clerk, NM-326-3 md014-93-GG, Office Ataomation Cak, NM-326-3 are ammdal to red:
CASP test required.
VB#: 015-93-GG, Office Automation Clerk, NM-326-3is mended to carect grade d CASP test required.
VB#: 048-93-VC, Itdelligmce Specialst (OS), GS-132-12 is amended to corarn vacmcy number.
The Directore of Civili Personnel is accptlng pplicaions for Clinical Nursepositions. Call HEid Sullivu at 285-4116.


I


I







Tropic Times
Nov. 6., 1992 B


U.S. Armypholos by SqL bug.Yocumi


Bowlers keep score on overhead projectors that show totals above the lanes.


mania


When you want to go bowling, it's as easy as picking a lane and
laying the ball down, but if you want to seriously go bowling,
there's nothing better than joining a league and going for the top
prize.
Joining a league on Fort Clayton is as easy as walking in, signing up and renting the shoes. There
are three different leagues that bowl at Clayton Lanes - Monday night women's, Tuesday night
men's and Thursday night mixed.
Joining a league and paying the $5 entrance fee might sound expensive, but in the long run the
league bowlers actually save money, said Ric Lindvig, Pan American Bowling Association Secre-
tary and league organizer at Fort Clayton.
"At Fort Clayton, if you're sanctioned and currently in a league, you can bowl for 40 cents a line
when it usually costs 90 cents," he said.
Lindvig said league members may also bowl in one of several tournaments around the area
without having to pay sanction fees each time. One $5 payment is good for a year.
Another benefit of league bowling is the awards.
"You can win all the awards and patches that the American Bowling Conference and Women's
International Bowling Conference offer, as well as local association awards," he said.
Leagues usually cost $5 a week to participate
in, but most of that money is used to pay prizes
for the league winners - both individual and
team - at the end of the season. The rest of the
weekly payment is used to pay for association
tournaments, and bowling fees, Lindvig said.
The next PABA tournament will be the Curly
Bates Annual tournament Nov. 21-22 at Curundu
Lanes.
This tournament is held in honor of the late
professional bowler from Panama and will
include a handicap of 80 percent of 200. Bowlers
take the average scdre of their six games and
subract it from 200. Eighty percent of that
number is the bowlers individual handicap.
The Curly Bates tournament will cost $15 for
league-sanctioned bowlers and $20 for non-
sanctioned bowlers.
But bowling in leagues is about more than
just winning tournaments, Lindvig said.
"It's about meeting new people," he said. "We
want to be thought of as a family sport."
For information on leagues, call any military i
bowling center. A ball hits the pocket during the Monday nigi


Bowling balls are available for those who don't own one.


ht women' league.


Bowling


imp








CB6 Tropic Times
BA Nov. 6, 1992


Albrook/Howard
Licensed day care that includes field
trips, small group activities and meals is
now available at Howard AFB. Call 286-
3133.

Clayton
There are immediate openings in the
hourly programs at the Fort Clayton Child
Development Services for infants, pretod-
dlers, toddlers and preschool-age children.
Call 287-5657/6812.



Albrook/Howard
The Information, Tour and Travel Office
offers a monthly calendar of events and can
arrange special trips for groups of 10 or-
more. Call the Zodiac Recreation Center
284-6161/6109.
All tours require reservations and leave
from the Howard Theater.
Colonial Panama tour, Saturday, 9 a.m.-
3 p.m., $6.
Peacock bass fishing in Arenosa, Nov.
15, 5 a.m.-2 p.m., $25.
Snorkel and scuba Drake's Island,
Saturday, 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Fees are $16 to
snorkel and $40 to scuba dive.
Portobelo and Drake's Island, Wednes-
day, 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Fee is $15 or $12 per
person if three or more adults in family
attend.
Barro Colorado Island Smithsonian
Reserve, Thursday, 6 a.m.-3 p.m. Fee is
$65.
Sailing tour to Taboga, Nov. 13,9 a.m.-
7 p.m. The $52 fee includes snacks, dinner
and refreshments.
Beer brewery and Miraflores Locks,
Nov. 13, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Fee is $4.
Horseback riding in El Valle, Nov. 14,
7 a.m.-4 p.m. Fee is $18.
Horse track trip, Nov. 15. Transporta-
tion and entry fee included in $7 fee.
Thanksgiving in Chiriqui, Nov. 25-29.
The fees are- $383 per person for single
occupancy, $260 per person for double
occupancy and $155 for children or a third
person. The fee includes transportation, tour
guides, five days and four nights accommo-
dations, four dinners including Thankgiv-
ing dinner, four breakfasts and many tours.
Sign-up deadline is Nov. 20.
Special of the week - El Valleshopping,


Sunday, 6:30 a.m.-3 p.m., $10.
Pecora River Valley horseback day
trips, Saturday and Sunday, 7 a.m. The
$25 fee includes transportation, horse rental
and lunch. Call 287-4411 for reservations.

Clayton
Valent Recreation Center, the Outdoor
Recreation Center and the Cocoli Commu-
nity Recreation Center are offering the fol-
lowing tours. Reservations are required.
Call the Valent Recreation Center, 287-
6500/4201; the Outdoor Recreation Center,
287-3363 or the Cocoli Community Recrea-
tion Center, 287-4119.
Canal transit, Saturday, $35 for adults,
$20 for children under 12 years old.
Pacific beaches, Wednesday, 9 a.m.-
5p.m.
San Blas, Wednesday. The $110 fee in-
cludes transportation to the airport, airfare,
guided boat tour to Indian villages and lunch.
Sign-up deadline is Monday.
Sunset cruise, Thursday, 5-7:30 p.m.
Fee is $5.
Central Avenue shopping trip, Nov.
14, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., $5.
Summit Gardens tour, Nov. 14.
El Valle, Nov. 15, 6:30 a.m., $15.
Antique shops, Nov. 18, 9 a.m., $7.
Altos Cerro Azul, Nov. 21, 9 a.m., $8.
Indian Village river trip, Nov. 21, $25
adults, $15 children.
Coronado Beach, Nov. 22,8 a.m., $10.
Diving in Negril, Jamaica, Nov. 25-29,
$545.
Thanksgiving in Chiriqui highlands,
Nov. 26-29. Bambito, $250, Panamonte,
$225, Fundafores, $185.

Rodman
The Information, Tour and Travel Office
is offering the following tours. Call 283-
5307/4454.
Montego Bay, Jamaica, Sunday-Wed-
nesday. Fee includes hotel accommoda-
tions, airfare and Montego Bay transfers.
A passport is required.
Contadora day trip, Wednesday, 6 a.m.-
6:30 p.m.
"Wet, Wild, Wooly," to Contadora,
Nov. 27-29, includes transportation, two
nights hotel, deep-sea fishing, water skiing,
snorkeling and jet skiing.
Bass fishing package, includes trans-
portation to and from Gamboa, boat and
motor, gasoline, lake guide, $5 worth of
bait, bait bucket, rods and reels, tackle,
coolers and ice.


Call the Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150.



Albrook/Howard
The Howard Youth Center, 284-4700,
and Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195, are
offering the following trips and activities.
All trips pick up at Howard at the time
specified and at Albrook 30 minutes later.
Registration is ongoing through Nov.
for baseball and softball for boys and girls
from 4 to 18 years old.
The Howard/Albrook youth centers will
be closed Wednesday.
Story hour, Monday, 3 p.m. at Howard/
Albrook youth centers.
Master of disguise relay, today, 3 p.m.
No fee for members and $1 for non-mem-
bers.
Peanut butter relay,Tuesday, 3 p.m.
Arts and crafts, wood crafts, Nov. 12,
3:30 p.m., $1.
Reggae preteen dance, Nov. 13, 7:30-
10:30 p.m. at Howard Youth Center for
youths from 9 to 13 years old. Fee is $2.50,
for members and $3.50 for non members.
Transportation leaves Albrook at 7 p.m. and
returns at 11 p.m. Transportation is free but
reservations must be made in advance.

Clayton
The Fort Clayton Youth Center is offer-
ing the following activities for preteens and
junior teens. Call 287-6451.
National Achievement Week dance,
tonight, 7 p.m. for preteens and 9 p.m. for
junior teens, $1.50 fee; zoo trip, Saturday,
11 a.m.-3 p.m.; preteen scavenger hunt,
Thursday, 3 p.m.; eight ball tournament,
Nov. 13, 3 p.m.; junior teen scavenger
hunt, Nov. 14, 2 p.m.; turbo turkey inter-
national, Nov. 21, 11 a.m.
The Fort Clayton Senior Teen Center
offers the following activities. Call 287-
6451.
Senior teen council meeting, Saturday,
3 p.m.; Army Family Week events, Nov.
14,7-8 p.m.; reggae and disco dance, Nov.
14, 8 p.m.-midnight, fee is $3.

Cocoli
The Cocoli Community Recreation Center
is offering the following activities.Call 287-
4119/3010.
Videos for children, Tuesday, 3 p.m.
Coffee club, Wednesday, 11 a.m.
Cooking class, cream puffs, Wednes-


day, 1 p.m.
Arts and crafts for children, Thursday,
3 p.m.
Mixed volleyball and fish fry, Satur-
day, 2:30 p.m.



Clayton
The Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts Center
and Fort Clayton Ceramic Center offer the
following activities. Call the Arts and Crafts
Center at 287-5957 or the Ceramic Center at
287-4360.
Boat construction, begins Saturday;
pollera dress painting, Saturday.

Howard
The Howard Arts and Crafts Center has
the following events scheduled. Call 284-
6361/6345.
Clay flower class, Saturday, 11 a.m.-1
p.m.; advanced ceramic painting in Span-
ish, 5-week class begins today, 10 a.m.-
noon; free pouring in Spanish, Wednes-
day, 2-4 p.m.; stained glass, Thursday, 6:30-
8:30 p.m.; free pouring in English, Nov.
13, 6-8 p.m.; free copper luster applica-
tion demonstration, Nov. 14, 2-2:30 p.m.



Albrook/Howard
The Albrook Club has the following events
to offer. Call 286-3101.
Mini gourmet night, Wednesday;
Mexican night,Thursday, 6-8:30 p.m.;
Thanksgiving buffet, Nov. 26, reservations
required.
The Albrook club will open at 2 p.m.
Wednesday.
The Howard Enlisted Members' Club
will host a pool tournament, Nov. 14. Call
284-4189.

Rodman
The Anchorage Club will host DJ night,
tonight; "New York Rockers," a Depart-
ment of Defense USO show, Saturday.




Boss program
The Valent Recreation Center is having
an open forum for single soldiers up to the


Al


Sundial center
The Sundial Recreation Center has the following ac-
tivities to offer. Call 289-3889/3300.
Thursday are Wonderful, a program designed for
women, will feature making fried rice.
Panama Independence celebration, Saturday, 9 a.m.,
Fort Davis Community Club featuring a Latin American
craft sale.

Ocean Breeze center
The Ocean Breeze Recreation Center has the follow-
ing events scheduled.Call 289-6402.
Saturday matinee, Saturday, 2 p.m.; fashion show,
Saturday, 6:30 p.m.

Atlantic tours
Sundial Recreation Center: Wine and dine, Fridays,
4-9 p.m.; El Valle, Sunday, 5:30 a.m.-4 p.m.; museum
tours, Nov. 14; Isla Grande, Nov. 15, 8 a.m.; Panama
City shopping tour, Nov. 21. Call 289-3889/3300.
Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: Rio Mar beach
tour, Sunday; Isla Grande, Nov. 14; rain forest and bird
watching tour, Nov. 15. Call 289-6402.

Arts and crafts
Following is a list of recurring classes offered at


community arts and craft centers. Call the Fort Davis Arts
and Crafts Center, 289-5201 or the Fort Sherman Arts and
Crafts Center, 289-6313
Ceramics; painting; drawing; pottery; air brushing;
advanced and beginners oil painting from photographs.
Frame and matting workshop, Saturday; disc brake
workshop, Nov. 13. -

Youth news
The Fort Espinar Youth Center is offering the following
activities. Call 289-4605.
Preteen pool party at Espinar pool, today, 6-9 p.m.,
fee is $1; popcorn and movie night, tonight, 6-9 p.m.;
teen fun wacky pajama party, Saturday, 8-11 p.m.;
checker contest, Tuesday, 4:30-5:30 p.m.; ecology club,
Monday, 3-4 p.m. for children in grades 1-3; arts and
crafts, make a turkey costume, Thursday; ecology dub,
Thursday, 3-4 p.m. for children in grades 4-6; family pie
bake and taste contest, Nov. 14, 6-9 p.m., $1 entrance
fee; turkey trot for youths and adults, Nov. 21, 10 a.m.,
$5 per person.

Ongoing classes
Following is a list of recurring classes offered in most
communities. Call the Sundial Recreation Center, 289-
3889/3300; the Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-
6402 or the Aquativity Center, 289-4009.
Spanish; English; piano; guitar; modem dance; shoto-


kan; cake decorating; gymnastics; juggling and outboard
motor boat operation.

Scuba diving course
An open-water dive course meets the first Monday
of the month at 6 p.m. at the Fort Davis Swimming
Pool. Sign up at the Fort Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-
6104, or the Outdoor Recreation Office in Margarita,
289-4077. Course cost is $125.

New boat
A 21-foot Mako boat is now available for scuba or
snorkeling trips. Price includes gear and guide. Call John
Stromberg, 289-4009/4077; or the Fort Sherman Scuba
Shop, 289-6104.

Holiday bazaar
The Atlantic Community Women's Club is holding its
annual holiday bazaar Nov. 14 from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Fort Davis
Community Club. Call Muriel Doyle,
289-4755 or Becky Steigler,

4354.


I










notices


Tropic Times
Nov. 6, 1992 I


rank of sergeant, Thursday. The forum sub-
jects will include barracks life, quality of
life and barracks visitation policies. Call
287-6500.

Showdeo
The Albrook Stables will host Showdeo,
Saturday, 4 p.m. Barbequed chicken and
ribs will be served at 4 p.m. Riding events
begin at 6:30 p.m. The event will feature
hay rides, gaming events, barrel racing, pole
bending and country western music. Tick-
ets are $7 for adults, $3 for children from 7
to 12 years old and children under 7 years
old are free. Price includes food and dance.
The door prize is a trail ride to Veracruz
Beach. Tickets are available at the Albrook
Stables or at the Zodiac Recreation Center.
Call 287-4411.

New child care program
The Howard and Albrook youth centers
are offering a new before and after school
program. Care is available for children
from 6 to 12 years old from 6:30 to 8:15 a.m.
and from 2 to 5:30 p.m. and full-day care on
nonschool days.
Fees range from $17 to $34 per week per
child, depending on family income and
includes breakfast and an afternoon snack.
Call 284-4700/4817.

Instructors needed
The Zodiac Recreation Center needs li-
censed instructors to teach shotokan and
private pilot's ground school on a contract
basis. Call 284-6161/6109.
The Howard/Albrook youth centers need
a qualified piano instructor to teach classes
on a contract basis. Call 284-4700.
The Howard Arts and Crafts Center needs
qualified instructors to teach advanced pot-
tery wheel throwing and volunteers to dem-
onstrate various crafts. Call 284-6361.

Twin Oceans
The Twin Oceans Pro Shop, Building
155, Fort Clayton, will temporarily relocate
to Building 2060 in the Curundu area.

Trail rides
The Howard Riding Stables is offering
escorted 2 1/2 hour trail rides to Veracruz
Beach, Mondays through Fridays. Call 286-
4920.

Evening child care
The Howard Child Development Center
offers evening child care Fridays and Satur-
days from 5:30 p.m. to midnight for chil-
dren from 6 months to 11 years old. If
enough reservations have been made by
Wednesday, 4 p.m., care will be provided.
Call 284-6135 to make reservations.

Logistics support
Logistics Support on Howard AFB rents
recreational items. Call 284-6107.
The branch will be closed Wednesday.
Weekly special - Rent one rod and get
the second one for one-half price, Monday-
Nov 14.
Holiday special - Propane gas is reduced
to 50 cents per pound Wednesday.

Family support
The Howard/Albrook Family Support
Center has the following events scheduled.
Call 284-5650.
First time home buying, Monday from
6 to 9 p.m. in the Howard Chapel Annex.
Smooth move workshop, Tuesday from
1 to 3 p.m.
Job search workshop, Tuesday and Nov.
24, 2 p.m.
Checkbook maintenance workshop,
Thursday from 10 a.m. to noon.
SF-171 workshop, Nov. 17 from 8 to 9
a.m.


Ongoing classes
Following is a list of recurring classes
offered by recreation centers in most
communities. For information call the
Pacific Theatre Arts Centre, 286-3814/
3152; Valent, 287-6500/4201 or Zodiac,
284-6161/6109.
Aerobics; piano lessons; taekwondo;
cake decorating; basic sewing; advanced
tailoring; craft sewing; beginner Ger-
man; Spanish, beginner and advanced;
English, beginner and advanced.
Following is a list of recurring classes
offered by youth centers in most commu-
nities. For information call Howard Youth
Center, 284-4700; Albrook Youth Cen-
ter, 286-3195; Fort Clayton Youth or
Senior Teen Center, 287-6451.
Street/video dancing; cheerleading;
Spanish and English; aerobics; arts and
crafts; gymnastics; boys gymnastics;
modem, jazz, tap and ballet dance;
piano lessons; tennis lessons; taekwondo.
Following is a list of recurring classes
offered by arts and crafts centers in most
communities. For information call How-
ard Arts and Crafts Center, 284-6361/


6345; the Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts Center,
287-5957.
Stained glass; cross stitch; clay flower;
pottery wheel; knitting; framing; air brush-
ing; lamp assembly; leather working; mac-
rame classes; pottery; throw pottery tech-
nics; glazing; firing; hand building; sculp-
ture; wooden jewelry box construction;
acoustic guitar construction; do-it-yourself
custom framing; fabric painting; watercolor;
acrylic painting; oil painting; basic drawing
and charcoal drawing.
Weekly classes are held in car care and
maintenance, arc and gas welding, auto air
conditioning, auto transmission repair and
engine rebuilding. Call the Albrook Auto
Craft Shop, 286-3613 or Howard Auto Craft
Shop, 284-3370.
The swimming pools in most communi-
ties offer recurring classes. For information
call Howard swimming pool, 284-3569;
Albrook swimming pool, 286-3555; Fort
Clayton swimming pool, 287-6660; Rodman
swimming pool, 283-4253.
Scuba classes are available through the
Zodiac Recreation Center, 284-6161/6109.
Classes include introduction to scuba, res-
cue, dive master and specialty scuba.


An open water scuba class is set for
Monday at the Albrook Pool. The fee is
$145.
An open water scuba diving class is
set for Monday-Nov. 22. Course includes
five class and pool sessions at Rodman
Pool and open water dves at Portobelo on
the Atlantic side. The $145 fee includes
all equipment, instruction, boat trips and
certification fees.Call 283-5307/4454.
An advanced scuba diving class will
be held Nov. 21 and 22. The class in-
cludes a night dive, deep dive, naviga-
tion dive and two optional dives; a com-
puter dive, search and recovery dive
and photography dive. Call 283-5307/
4454.
Power boating and sailing classes will
be held Monday and Wednesday and
Nov. 16 and 18. Call 283-3147/3150.
Basic horsemanship classes for all
ages are offered at the Albrook Riding
Stables. The $25 fee includes theory and
practical sessions. The class covers safety,
stable etiquette, care and welfare of horses,
tack and basics of horse handling. Indi-
vidual, group and semi-private lessons
available. Call 287-4411.


Courtesy photo
PIANO MAN - Jazz pianist Danilo Enrico Perez, and his quartet, perform at the Fort Clayton NCO Club, Nov. 14. The show
starts at 8 p.m. with Perez appearing a 9 p.m. Tickets are $20 and include a cajun chicken buffet. Perez has been
entertaining since he was 4-years-old, playing with his father's band. Since those days he's played with Dizzy Gillespie,
Clark Terry, George Benson, Paquito D'Rivera, Flora Purim, and others.


I








B 8 Tropic Times
U Nov. 6,1992


Potpourri


OCS selection board
An Officer Candiate School selec-
tion board will be held Jan. 21,9 a.m. at
the Fort Clayton Education Center.
Packets are dueto the Personnel Opera-
tion Office in Building 519 by Jan. 15.
Call 287-4454.

'Hasta luego'
The deputy commander, U.S. Army
South, will host an "hasta luego" re-
ception for soldiers leaving during
January, February and March at the
Fort Clayton NCO Club, 2:45 p.m.,
Dec. 10. Family and friends may at-
tend.

Stand down day
The U.S. Army South Command
Safety Office will observe the Safety
Awareness and Aviation Stand Down
Day Nov. 19. Units and families will be
focusing on mission and home safety
issues on this day through training and
reviewing various subjects. Some sug-
gested subjects are bicycle, crosswalk,
seatbelt safety and an inspection of fire
alarms and playground equipment,
according to Command Safety Office
officials.

Skate night
The Fort Clayton Elementary School
Parent/Teacher Organization will host
a skate night Saturday, 6:30-8:30 p.m.,
at the playshelter. The event is open to
children in kindergarten through 6th
grade with a 25 cent admission fee for
those who do not attend Clayton Ele-
mentary. Permission slips must be turned
in before the event.

College club meets
The Isthmian College Club will hold
a membership meeting Tuesday, 4:30
p.m., in the Bridge Lounge, Club
Amador. There are annual dues. Call
Michelle Heltzel, 269-8804.

Cheerleaders sought
The Pacific Theatre Arts Centre is
looking for cheerleaders to perform in
the half-time entertainment during Army
Turkey Bowl '92, Nov. 25 at the Balboa
High School Stadium. Call 286-3152/
3814.

Health risk appraisal
The Army Community Health Nurs-
ing, Building 519, Room 106, reminds
units they can find out just how fit they
are by taking the health risk appraisal


through the Army community health
nurse. The appraisal can be completed
atthe unit and profile of theresult will
help target health training needs to im-
prove unit readiness. Call Paula White
or Nelly Holness, 287-4716.

Christmas bazaar
The Inter-American Women's Club
will hold its Christmas bazaar, Dec. 5,
10 a.m.-7 p.m. at the ATLAPA Con-
vention Center. Gifts, crafts and food
will be sold, and there will be activities
for children and door prizes. The pro-
ceeds will support charitable organiza-
tions. Children under 10 will be admit-
ted free. Tickets will be available at the
door or by calling, 23-1749.

Holiday briefs
Anyone interested in having a holi-
day sponsorship brief advertised in the
newspaper, can send the brief MPS to
Tropic Times, Unit 0936, Albrook, or
drop by the office, Building 405, Corozal.

Office closes
The Panama Trial Defense Service
office will be closed Nov. 16 through
20 for mandatory training. For emer-
gencies or more information, call 287-
6207.

Red Cross
The American Red Cross will hold a
mandatory training update for water
safety instructors Saturday, 8 a.m., at
the Fort Clayton swimming pool and
Nov. 14, 9a.m., at the Fort Davis swim-
ming pool. Call 287-5509.

Classes available
The Fort Clayton Education Center
is offering the following classes: Effec-
tive Army writing, Nov. 30-Dec. 18, 8
a.m.-noon and mini immersion Span-
ish, Monday-Nov. 23,8:30 a.m.-4 p.m.
Call 287-5412.

General meeting
The Enlisted Spouses' Club Decem-
ber general meeting has been resched-
uled for Nov. 30, 7 p.m., at the Fort
Clayton NCO Club. Call 287-3086.

Medical IDs
Medical identification plate holders
are reminded to ensure all information
on the card is up to date. Out-dated in-
formation can result in reports not being
posted in medical records and patients
not being contacted when needed. To


update a card, contact the Medical Rec-
ords section at Gorgas Army Commu-
nity Hospital, Fort Clayton Health Clinic
and the Coco Solo Health Clinic. Call
282-5241.

Leaders needed
The Fort Clayton Elementary School
Daisy Girl Scouts need leaders. Any-
one wishing to volunteer one hour each
week should call 287-4743.

Car rental
The Fort Clayton car rental office
telephone number has temporarily been
changed to 287-6283.

Car wash
Company A, 308th Military Intelli-
gence Battalion will sponsor a car wash
Saturday and a bake sale Nov. 14 at the
Corozal Post Exchange, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Proceeds will go to the Ciudad del
Nino Orphanage Christmas project.

AER loans
The Army Emergency Relief is now
accepting applications from family
members for student loans and scholar-
ships for college. Applications must be
submitted to AER headquarters by March
1. Call Caroline Hall, 285-4630.

Support group
The 24th Medical Group Mental
Health Clinic is now forming a group
to provide support and therapy for people
experiencing holiday-related sadness and


stress. The group will meet Fridays, 10
a.m., Nov. 13 through Dec. 18. Call
284-6410.

Graduate exam
The Howard Education Center will
offer the general graduate record ex-
amination. Interested people must be
scheduled by Nov. 16. The test will be
given Dec. 16, 8 a.m., Building 708,
Room 110. All active-duty military,
family members and Department of
Defense civilians are eligible. The test
is free for active-duty military taking it
for the first time. All others must pay
$45. Call 284-4863.

Craft bazaar
The Griffon Club is sponsoring a
craft vendors' bazaar, Nov 14,9 a.m-3
p.m. at the Albrook Club. Vendors should
call 284-3938 after 5 p.m.

Juvenalia continues
Juvenalia '92 at the ATLAPA Con-
vention Center, Paitilla, across from
the Marriott Hotel, continues until
Tuesday, 10 a.m.-10 p.m. and noon-10
p.m. Ping pong and basketball tourna-
ments will be Saturday through Tues-
day. Admission is $2.

New hours
The Mindi Veterinary Facility new
hours of operation are Monday, Wednes-
day and Thursday 7:30-11 a.m. and 1-
2:30 p.m.; Tuesday, and Friday 7:30-
11:30 a.m. Call 289-5872/5208 8 a.m.-
noon for appointments.


Q. I have already used my Environ-
mental Morale Leave (EML) to go and
come back from the United States, since
the date has not expired (its good for 90
days) can I use the same leave paper to
take another trip?
A. No, you can only use your Environ-
mental and Morale Leave paper work once,
for around trip travel to a designated EML
location. All personnel stationed in
Panama are entitled to two separate
trips twice a year.

PP: Tourist Passport
TC: Tourist Card
V: Visa
PC: Proof of Citzenship
o US: United States Passport
Holders Only
SCC: Country Clearance
RON: Remain Overnight

For additional flight infor-
mation, call 284-5758/4306.


Today
4:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN
San Jose, Costa Rica PC
San Salvador, El Salvador PP/CC/V
Howard AFB, PN
5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN
Tegucigalpa, Honduras PP
Soto Cano AB, Honduras PP
Howard AFB, PN
6:25am C141 Howard AFB, PN
La Paz, Bolivia PP/CC
Howard AFB, PN
Saturday
5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN US
Cheyenne, WY
9:45am C141 Howard AFB, PN
Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico
Charleston AFB, SC PP
Sunday
8:00am C5A Howard AFB, PN
Soto Cano AB, Honduras PP
Charleston AFB, SC RON/PP
Dover AFB, DE PP


Monday
5:10am C130 Howard AFB, PN
Managua, Nicaragua
Howard, PN
6:15am C727 Howard AFB, PN
Charleston IAP, SC


PP/CC/V

PP


Tuesday
5:10am C130 Howard AFB, PN
San Salvador, El Salvador PP/CC/V


San Jose, Costa Rica PC
Howard AFB, PN
5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN
Tegucigalpa, Honduras PP
Soto Cano AB, Honduras PP
Howard AFB, PN
5:40am C141 Howard AFB, PN
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil RONPP/CC
Asuncion, Paraguay
Montevideo, Uruguay RON
La Paz, Bolivia
Howard AFB, PN
7:50am C-5A Howard AFB, PN
Charleston AFB, SC PP
Dover AB, DEL PP
Wednesday
5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN
Belize City, Belize
Guatemala City, GuatemalaTC/V
Howard AFB, PN


Thursday
8:00am C5AHoward AFB, PN
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Charleston AFB, SC
Kelly AFB, TX


PP
RON/PP


Children's Book Week


The Howard Library would like to help celebrate National Children's Book
Week, Nov. 16-20. Every day at 9 a.m. during that week they will have stories,
movies and book browsing for children. Children could also win a prize by
guessing the number of seashells in the mystery jar. Call 284-6249.


ANIC Flight sch e dule


I







Tropic Times BD
Nov. 6,1992 1)7


The


One


Greg Sargent tries to revive the sailfish.


Courtesy photo'
(From left) Jim Straley, Ross Barker and Greg Sargent stand next to their prize catch, a sailfish caught
from a Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation boat.


Airmen take to sea for fishing adventure


T his is a story about three
airmen who took off at 6
a.m. one October day for a
day of sportfishing aboard
the Navy Morale, Welfare
and Recreation boat, Win.
After loading all the required fishing
gear, food, drinks, Jimmy Buffett tapes
and other necessities, we cast off,
bound for the happy hunting grounds
just west of the island of Pedro
Gonzalez, near Contadora.
The crew included Jim Straley - an
accomplished sailor, navigator, fisher-
man and all-round salty dog; Ross
Barker - a perchjerker turned bass
fisherman out for his first saltwater
fishing trip; and me, an ate-up fisher-
man and power boater whose gills
would probably dry up if I couldn't go
fishing at least once a week.
The day started nicely as the Win
cruised south into the Bay of Panama
with the new outboard motor purring
like a kitten.
After the wind picked up and the sea
got a little rough I eased back on the
throttle and turned off the Buffett tunes
to concentrate on piloting the boat.
After about an hour of choppy seas,
we decided to put out some bait and
troll towards the islands.
Within an hour, we'd landed two


jacks and a bonito - fun, but not much
for table fare.
Hoping for some dolphin, wahoo,
tuna, or maybe a white marlin, we kept
the boat on course for the islands. It
must have worked, because we soon
landed the first of the trip's three
dolphins. (For you land-lubbers, these
are dolphin-fish, not dolphin-mammals
like Flipper.)
As we drew closer to the islands,
Straley decided to exchange one of the
fancy and expensive topwater baits for
one he had hand-made for less than $1
earlier this summer.
Trolling along the islands, we met
with success.
"As I filleted a dolphin, the rest of
the crew was alerted to the screaming
sound of a fish stripping the line from
one of the rods," Straley said. "It was
the one with my lure and Barker im-
mediately grabbed it to fight the fish.
Simultaneously, all three of us yelled,
'It's a sailfish! It's a sailfish!' as the
fish jumped six or seven times trying to
throw the hook."
"I held on as the sailfish stripped off
a few hundred yards of line, and
Straley quickly brought the other lines
in as the boat was brought to idle,"
said Barker.
"While Sargent slowly turned the


boat around, Straley helped me to the
front of the boat to motor toward the
fish and retrieve some of the line,
since the spool shaft of the 4/0 reel was
nearly exposed."
About 10 minutes into the battle we
decided that Straley and I would swap
places since I'd pulled a sailfish in a
boat about 12 years ago...if there's a
special trick to it.
Anyway, after about 30 more
minutes of battling the fish, it was
finally time to pull it in the boat. With
one terribly ungraceful pull, I had the
fish in the boat for about three minutes
of picture taking before returning it to
fight again another day. After about
half an hour of trying to revive the
fish, it was apparent that it had given
its all in the previous fight, so we
decided that it would be better to have
smoked sailfish for a month than to
leave it to the sharks.
All this goes to show that being sta-
tioned here can be a rewarding experi-
ence, if we take the initiative to enjoy
the many sporting and recreational
activities at our disposal. Why, if an
ex-perchjerker can go saltwater fishing
for his first time and land a beautiful
sailfish like this, just think of the
adventures that are out their for the
taking. Just do it!


by SSgt. Greg Sargent
24th Communications Squadron


V


mok-











B 1 Tropic Times
1OJ Nov. 6,1992


SClassified Ads


Hamster and cage to good home $10. 286-3143.

German shepherd mixed puppies, 8 wks old $20.
268-1017.

Labrador/retriever puppies, CCP regi, avail
Nov. 26 $400. 283-3092.

Golden retriever, 5 yrs old, neutered, exc w/chil-
dren, watch dog $40. 286-3329.

Doberman, 17 mos old, male, exc w/children
$100/obo. 286-4679.

Three mixed breed small puppies, 8 wks old $30
ea. 284-4635.

Free, mixed breed dog, 20 lbs, friendly, good w/
children. 286-6279.

Free, kitten, 8 wks old, male, has first set of
shots. 284-5176 after 5pm.

Free, mixed breed dog, male, all shots. 286-
4389.

Information on sex testing for parrots. 287-3087
ask for Jer.




1989 Nissan Pulsar NX, 2dr, t/top, removable
hatchbk, ps, pb, AM-FM, 23,000 miles, buckets
seats, 5-spd, nose bira incl $9500. 286-3239.
-0
1991 Toyota Corona, fully loaded, pwr every-
thing, sr, alarm, AM-FM cass, exc cond
$13,000/neg. 269-1651.

1984 Dodge 600 coupe, 4 cyl, 5-spd, good cond,
best offer. 287-5188.

1989 Nissan p/u, ps, AM-FM cass, at, exc cond,
22,000 miles $6500., 284-4231.

1987 GMC Minivan custom, at, ac $7000/obo.
284-4391.

1992Dodge Dakota Club Cab p/u, V6, at, loaded
$16,500. 262-2990.

1986 Jaguar XJ6, exc cond, no U.S. specs, no
duty pd $16,000. 264-0118.

1977 Chevy Nova, 4dr, AM-FM cass, duty pd,
new batt, runs good, needs body work $1000/
obo. 233-5750.

1975 Ford F-100 p/u, 360 eng, ac, ps, pb, runs
good, duty pd $1500. 236-4979.

1989 Ford Escort GT, exc cond $4500. 289-
3320 Iv msg.

1986 VW Amazon, std, radio, AM-FM cass,
equal, duty pd $2500/obo. 287-4733.

1970 VW German Beetle built $1500/obo. 287-
4885.

1988 Ford p/u, camper, ac, 5-spd, U.S. specs,
duty pd, exc cond $10,200. 252-2730.

1979 Chevy Impala, eng just rebuilt, grt cond,
Pioneer cass, needs carb work $1750/obo. 283-
4227.

1979 Ford C-150 4x4 p/u, duty pd, ps, pb, 351
eng 8 cyl $2500. 220-2721.

1988 Mazda B2200 p/u, 5-spd, shortbed, w/
shell, stereo cass, low miles, very clean, U.S.
specs $5500. 287-5638.

1984 Honda Accord LX, fair cond, ac, AM-FM,
5-spd $3200. 287-5227.

1981 BMW 318i, sr, 4-spd, 2dr, not duty pd, runs
good $1500. 286-3734.

1989 Dodge Dakota p/u, 4WD, canopy, carpet,
tint glass, ac, ps, pb, exc cond, not duty pd,
18,000 miles. 2878-3441.

1990 Mitsubishi Eclipse, GS Turbo, ps, pb, ac,
CD, loaded $19,000/obo. 269-5224 6-9pm.

1979 Ford F-100 p/u, std, ac, 1/2 ton, runs grt
$2700. 282-4129.

1985 Ford Mustang LX, AM-FM cass, ac, one
owner, not duty pd, cruise, good cond, extras.
286-4685.

1986 Oldsmobile Regency, 4dr, 6 cyl, fuel injec,
loaded, duty pd $12,00. 260-7574.

1979 Monte Carlo, ps, pb, ac, Kenwood stereo,
exc cond, duty not pd $1800/obo. 284-4725.


1987 Dodge Caravan, at, ps, ac, AM-FM cass, 6
cyl, not duty pd $7950. 287-5771.

1980 Pontiac Lemans, 6 cyl, ac, new eng, trans,
brakes $3700/obo. 261-7085.

1990 Nissan Sentra, 4dr, 5-spd, ac, AM-FM
cass, duty pd. 252-2758.

1991 Camaro Coupe RS, 5-spd, ac, ps, pb, AM-
FM cass, exc cond, 17,500 miles $12,000. 260-
7621.

1987 Honda Civic, ac, 5-spd, ps, extras, low
mileage, AM-FM cass, duty pd, exc cond $5500.
232-5911.

1987 Subaru 1.8 GL, 5-spd, ac, ps, 4-dr, AM-FM
cass, not duty pd $4950. 287-4685.

1981 Hi-lux p/u, 4WD, low mileage, duty pd,
camper top $5200. 252-1143.

1987 Buick Regal, vinyl top, all extras, low
mileage, 37,000 miles, not duty pd $7200/obo.
251-1143.

1978 Volvo 244 DL sedan, exc shape, ac, stereo
$2500. 284-5388.

1985 BMW 518i, 4dr, 4 cyl, AM-FM cass, all
extras, duty pd, exc cond $8500. 252-2375.

1985 Toyota Corolla, 4dr, diesel, 5-spd, 5 new
tires, exc cond $5000. 252-2622.

1984 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme, AM-FM
cass, ac, pwr loaded, good cond $2500/obo.
287-5786.

1990 Aero Star, 5-spd, ac, AM-FM cass, exc
cond $1500/obo. 287-4568.

1987 Dodge Omni, AM-FM cass, 5-spd, exc
cond $3600/obo. 287-5652.

1987 Toyota Cressida, 4dr, 4-spd, ps, ac, AM-
FM cass, exc cond, duty pd $6300/obo. 236-
0727 eves.

1978 Buick Estate sta/wgn, at, ps, pb, pl, pw, ac,
exc cond $1495. 221-8249.

1991 Mustang 5.0 LX hatchbk, low miles, com-
pletely loaded, showrm cond $14,900. 221-
8249.

1986 Chrysler Laser 2.5 liter, 4 cyl, one owner,
new paint, 45,000 miles, loaded, exc cond
$5500. 260-4564.

1973 Super Beetle, runs grt, new brakes, clutch
$1700. 228-7924 after 5pm.

1978 Dodge Aspen sta/wgn, 4 new tires $1600.
252-2333.

1978 Dodge Aspen sta/wgn, ac, pw, ps, pb, grt
shape $1950. 285-4734.

1982 Buick Regal, V8 diesel, one owner, 64,500
miles, ac, cass, WW tires, best offer. 268-0621.

1987 Chevy Spectrum, 2dr, hatchbk $3000/obo.
283-4626.

1985 Toyota Corolla, ac, radio, exc cond, duty
not pd, new tires, batt $4000/obo. 252-5626.

1984 Toyota van, at, ac, exc cond $5700/obo.
260-5981.

1991 Chevy Blazer 4x4, loaded, exc cond,
15,000 miles, V6 $15,900. 284-3026.

1988 Jeep Comanche p/u w/cap, very good
cond, avail Dec. 1 $6000. 269-6691.

1982 Ford Granada, one owner, clean, ps, pb, ac
$3300/obo. 287-5021.

1988 Chevy Sprint, 4dr, std, radio, duty pd
$4900. 228-4061.

1990 VW Passat, 4dr sedan, fully loaded, sr, new
tires, exc cond $15,500. 230-0767 after 7pm.

1985 Toyota 4x4 p/u, Chevy 350 eng, 7-inch
suspension 38-inch tires, good cond $6000.
260-7437.

1986 Isuzu Aska sedan, needs some work, not
duty pd $2350/obo. 264-6931.

1987 Ford Tempo, 4 dr, 4 cyl, AM-FM cass, rust
treat, exc cond, duty pd $7700/obo. 268-2193.

1986 Pontiac Grand Am, ac, tilt wheel, cruise,
AM-FM cass $4200. 284-4278.

1976 Ford truck $3500. 284-4278.
1987 Custom GMC Minivan, at, ac, AM-FM


cass, tint glass, tilt steering, good cond $5000.
284-4391.

1979 Pacer, needs work, sale as is $800. 284-
5374.

1990 Honda Civic EX, U.S. specs, fully loaded,
sr, 5-spd, exc cond $10,000 firm. 285-5935.



Eng-spk honest, responsible live-out maid, M-F,
good w/children, prefers Amador, Clayton. 282-
3783.

Span-spk weekend babysitter, day or night or
weekday housekeeper. 285-4323.

Eng-spk housekeeper, 2-5 days a week, grt w/
children, refs. 286-4389.

Bilingual maid, honest, reliable, mature, W or F.
286-4346.

Eng-spk housekeeper, 5 days per week, honest,
dependable. 286-4589.

Span-spk hard worker maid, exc refs, part time,
days or nites. 230-0668.




Stratos bass boat, 150hp, electric troll motor,
fish finder, lots of storage, grt freshwater boat
$10,000/obo. 284-4596.

22' N. American offshore boat, galv trlr, 1992
Evinrude 140hp OB, 15hp kicker, will sell w/o
motor also $8900. 252-2243.

20' 1990 Bayliner Capri, 135 I/0 Mercruiser, ap-
prox 50 hrs, w/trr, bimini cover, extras $14,000.
230-0601.

17 1/2' Glastron, I/O 120hp extra eng, fish
finder, more. 252-2121.

15' 1988 Thundercraft boat, '89 Mariner 90hp,
90 hrs, comes w/skis, all safety equip $6500/
obo. 287-3192.

12m boat/inflatable, exc divers boat, w/access
$3000. 264-4817.

25hp Mercury OB motor w/motor stand, access
$2500. 264-4817.

Trailer 4x4x2, closed, removable doors, lights,
'92 plate, duty pd $400. 226-7679.




AT&T comp $900, comp desk w/printertbl $300
firm. 230-0767 after 7pm.

Amstrad word processor, hardly used, extra rib-
bon, disks, manuals $225. 284-6629.

Atari 130XE & 800 comp, 810/1050 DD, 410 re-
corder 850 interface, software, book $250. 284-
4287.

Toshiba camcorder w/batt charger, plus case,
access $600. 287-4191.

Three Nintendo games, Zelda 1942 $25ea. 287-
3028.

Montgomery Ward 19" color mute control TV,
good cond $200. 287-3028.

Tandy 1000SL 286 comp, 1MB Ram 80MB HI)D
VGA $750, colormon, books $400, laser printer
$650. 230-0668.

Sony beta cass recorder $250, stereo cab rack
$60, exc cond. 287-4284.

New 12" Amdek-ambermon $25, hayes 300 mo-
dem $25. 252-6404.

Zenith 27" color console TV $300. 260-9578.

Genesis, Super NES games, John Madden,
Wrestlemania, Super Off-load, more. 286-6398.

Component stereo sys, 120watt/ch recvr,
tumrntbl, 2 floor spkers, like new $450. 261-7845.

Nintendo w/four games 4120. 286-4474.

Nintendo, zapper $75, games sold separately,
Mega Man 1-2-3, Tmnt II, Super Mario 3, more.
286-6398.

Bose 901 spkers w/stands, good sound $650/
obo. 229-4238.
IBM PS2 model 25 $725, Meade 8" telescope,
exc optics, neg. 252-2776.


5 Sega Genesis games $20-$25ca. 260-2837.

Betamovie camera, complete $300, Humming-
bird fish finder, complete $100. 287-3620.

Commo 64 & 64C w/DD, several games $450/
obo. 285-6359.

IBM PC, 640K Ram, 60MB Rll, 5.24-3.5 flop-
pies, CGA, Okidata 84 printer $750. 282-4132.

Super Nintendo sys w/2 controllers+ 3 game car-
tridges, 3 mos old $175. 260-2778.

Zenith 386 64K cache 2MB Ram, 80MB HD,
Dos 5.0, Windows, MS mouse, VGA mon, best
offer. 287-4575.

Sony 13" color TV, VHS video recorder $200.
287-3680.

Comm Amiga 500, 1 Meg Ram, printer, mon,
software, books, like new $800. 260-1290.

Super Nintendo cass, Lemmings, Treasure Is-
land, new $40/obo. 260-9361.

Panasonic VHS movie camera w/JC Penny port
VHS plus many extras $600/obo. 260-4564.

Amiga 500, 1MB, color mon, ext DD, digital
program copier, approx 70 programs $700/obo.
223-4140.

Comp IBM clone, XT, 5 1/4-3 1/2, 20Meg HD,
mouse, joystick, Amber mon, Okiata pritner
$500. 252-2033.

Answering mach $110, Commo 64 comp (needs
repair) $50, phone console w/radio, alarm $70,
stereo dbl cass $100, photocopier $275. 284-
6881.

Carver TFM-24 pwr amp, 225 watts per chan
rms, exc cond $400. 252-1191.

19" color TV $125. 287-3295.

Packard Bell 286 comp, 40MB HD, Dos 5.0, has
mon, Epson printer, $1000. 284-3280 after4prn.

Tandy 1000SX comp, color mon, 5.25-3.5 flop-
pies, 30 Meg HD, printer, mouse, joysticks
$550. 284-5625.

Sony beta 2400, needs spare part $55. 252-6989.

Commo 64, mouse, color mon, elec keybd,
printer, software $700/obo. 287-5397.

Atari 2600 game sys, 26 games, instruct, all con-
trollers, paddles $100/obo. 286-6529.

Amiga 500, color mon, DD, mouse, joysticks,
printer, 100 programs $600/obo. 285-4734.

Amiga 500, one meg, lots of software $350/obo,
Joe Montana Talking Football $45. 284-4575.

Sony Trinitron 15" color TV, remote $200. 287-
5939.

Cobra antenna for 40ch CB $30. 260-3676.

Word processor, pwr 1000, like new $245/obo.
252-6845.

Commo 128, 1571 dr software, modems, desk,
printer stand, Sony KV1311 mon $700. 223-
4890 after Spin.




Amana radarange microwave/convec oven
"$190, metal frame swing set w/slide $99, plants.
284-6881.

3pc leather LR set, bordeaux color $600, 7-draw
desk w/brass hardware $250. 230-0767 after
7pm.

Oriental rug 10x14, turquoise/bge, exc cond
$200/obo. 269-6089.

Various sizes of carpets, four, wooden swing set.
283-3470.

Gold swivel arm chr $55, Whirlpool 15,000 btu
ac $350. 287-3297.

3pc LR, needs upholstry, sm dining set. 261-
4777.

212x15 rugs, rose color, need cleaning, pads are
free $50ea. 264-0118.

Sears Kenmore refrig/frzr, 2dr, nofrost $300/
obo. 233-5750.

Magic Chef elec stove, w/extractor, almond, like
new $380. 229-2916 after 5pm.











SClassified Ads


Tropic Times 1
Nov. 6, 1992 B11L


Whirlpool washing machine, exc cond $250.
236-0523.

DR set for 6, china cabinet, like new $1200/obo.
260-9578.

Bar w/2 stools $195, recliner $90, 3pc LR set
$450, lamps. 252-6434.

Computer desk $80. 284-6975.

4-drawer dresser $50, 6x12 silver carpet $50,
21", 3.5hp lawnmower $150, Q-sz comforter &
sheets $45. 261-7845.

Blk lacquer DR set, glass top, 4 chrs, exc cond,
1 yr old $600. 284-6239.

70 cu.ft. chest freezer $300, new window shades
$3ea. 287-4420.

Whirlpool energy saver convert dishwasher
$150, lg bge LR chr $115, both exc cond. 252-
6566.

Cosco carseat $15, Gerry babyback pack, new
$20, Gerber dec breast pump $25. 286-4135.

Wood bunk beds, pine tbl w/chrs, terracotta
lamps, man's desk w/chr, drapes, best offer.
252-2776.

Dining tbl w/smoked glass top for four, LR big
sofa, small dec oven, coffee/end tbhis, others.
264-1825 6-9pm.

Q-sz hide-a-bed $500, Zenith 25" console TV
$600, BR set $800, sewing desk. 252-2730.

3pc LR set, BR set, misc items. 282-3778.

Q-sz 6ft tall headbd w/mirror, 2 matching night
stands & frame $1200/obo. sm roll top desk,
antique $300/obo. 261-3169.

Recliner, exc cond $150. 260-7621.

Wicker-rattan LR set, sofa, square cocktail tbl,
chr, 3-round tbis. 252-6668.

Redwood patio fum $85,5pc DR set $150,2 new
BSR, 250watt spkers $250. 252-2287.

Dryer, exc cond $350. 261-6186.

Carpet w/pad, mini blinds, curtains. 282-3095.

Child's 13pc BR set, twin bed, w/extra hide-
away-bed, 3-dr chest, 2 hutch, tbl w/4 chrs, more
$1200. 252-5961.

Entertainment ctr, holds VCR, stereo, 27" TV,
pd $795, sell $550. 287-6196.

Kenmore refrig/frzr, 21 cu.ft. $600/neg, men's
10-spd bike, good shape $50. 287-6623.

Baby crib/bed w/matt $400. 286-4932.

Indoor/outdoor 15x25 bge carpet $145, port
vacuum car cleaner $4.50. 260-4429.

2 6x9 carpet $40ea, toddler activity ctr w/slide
$60, Little Tikes Playhse $180, Little Tikes
Treehse $120, lamp $30. 260-7860 after 6pm.

Natural solid pine bunk beds w/3 lg drawers
underneath, one twin matt incl $450. 252-2243.

Queen size mattress $75. 287-4175.

Super single waterbed w/heater $150/obo. 286-
6529.

3pc LR set $250, refrig $200. 252-2543 after
10am.

Bassett baby crib w/access $150, high chr $20.
252-6829.

Q-sz waterbed matt, 161b Columbia 300 bowling
ball + 161b Rhino bowling ball. 286-3173.

Two twin mattresses, good cond $40 ea. 252-
2143.

Bar made in Germany w/stools $600. 236-2365.

3pc blk lacquer wall unit $350, couch $300,
coffee/end tbls $250. 284-3578.

Whirlpool 13,000 btu ac, exc cond $500. 226-
7679.

Maytag washer and dryer set, good cond $650
set. 284-5374.

Couch & loveseat, beige, US made $500, Magic
Chef gas stove $300, GE side-by-side refrig.
260-1477.
Recliner, taupe color, in exc cond $225. 284-
6880.


Sofa, loveseat, exc cond $700, twin canopy bed
$350. 284-6883.

Hot Point washer and dryer, oak trim sofa,
loveseat, roll top desk, all good cond. 235-9245.



Men's gold wedding band w/initial M.E.F.G.
inside. Reward. 284-6350.



Panasonic 24,000 btu, 1 yr old, exc cond
$600.236-0984

5 Dunlop tires 225/70R15 ideal for small trucks,
$300/obo. 269-1651

12,000 btu ac, 3 mos old, 110 volts, great for
maids' quarters $375. 289-4464

GE washer & dryer, heavy duty, ig capacity, 3
mos old $650. 289-4464

Kenmore washer & dryer, less than 1 yr use, exc
cond $600. 287-6840 after 5pm.

Kenwood CD player, child & baby clothes, toys
men's dress suits. 287-3702

35mm Minolta 30001 extras $300, tennis racket
$35; country & classical CDs $7. 286-6226.

Army officer white dress and mess uniforms,
$20 each. 287-6297.

Bikes, his & hers 26in touring, 12-spd, exc cond
$100. 284-3820.

New lead crystal mini lamp $25; asst china,
kitchen appliances, sky diving suit. 283-6425.

Wedding dress w/train, beaded, sz 12, $350;
prom dresses $50-75. 283-6425.

Dive gear fins $20; It dacor 850, $30; knife $20;
fins, $15; surfbd soft racks, $15. Tom 283-3644.

7 Marquis diamonds total 3/4 carat diamond ring
size 6, $500/obo. 286-4475.

Stroller $50; playpen $40; high chair $20; Flex
110 exercise machine $100/obo. 284-4997.

Barbie house $20; Limoge vase $250; garb dis-
posal $195; wedding dress $195, judo suit $20,
rock&roll albums. 252-2042.

Shoes #3, pcs of leather, night dress, Toyota
repair manual, bottle warmer $8, table $20. 252-
2042.

5 new Uniroyal Tigerpaws A/S tires, P225/
75R15, less than 40 miles $60ea. 236-4354

Portable elec typewriter $100. 252-6845.


Kolocraft stroller, like new $35; carseat $25.
283-4626.

6ft 3in spectrum, tri-fin, w/board bag & leash,
nose guard, like new $325. 252-6971.

Solid pine bunk bed BR set, lawnmower, card
table, 12-spd bicycle, 3 6x9 area rugs. 286-4138.

Gerber electric breast pump, brand new $35;
Century stroller $25, carrier $25. 284-3138.

Mini blinds rust color 60x45 $20, yellow 36x36
$10. 287-6297.

Ping pong table, folding, good cond w/net $175.
287-5964.

Black Hill gold necklace with diamond, butter-
fly gold earrings. 287-3680.

2 chrome & glass coffee tables $70 both; an-
swering machine $40. 226-2640.

Rose color marble table lamps, 33in $150pr/
obo. 263-8579 after 5pm.

Jacuzzi for 4 adults, beige fiberglas & dark
brown tiles used, running best offer. 268-0621.

Nintendo w/games $75; home security alarm,
$150, carpet shampooer, $70. 287-4685.

2 medium size bird cages, one callapsable, little
tykes turtle sandbox; picnic table. 287-6443.

Wedding dress with veil & slip. 252-2080.

12-spd Huffy men's and woman's bike, like new
$60 each. 284-3280.

New standard encyclopedia set $775. 287-3382.

Sears 15cu ft freezer, 3 yrs old w/heat defrost,
light, lockable $450. 287-4113

Child's batt-oper riding vehicle $75. 228-7924.

2 ladies sz 6 dressy jumpsuits, used one. 252-
6989.

Acs 24,000 Sanyo, new $750; 18,000 Fedders,
$325; 12,000 National, $290. 252-6239.

Weider abdominal board, $40. 252-2143.

Icarat diamond cluster ring $950/trade; learat
blue ridge dia ring $950/trade; Canon w/flash.
284-6694.

Std trans for 87 Ford Escort; 86 Toyota Corolla
and 85 Caprice. 228-4061.




1985 Honda Elite Scooter, new tune up good
condition, helmet included PCSing $225. 287-
5430


Qtrs. 430A, Kobbe, Sat. 7am -7 living, dining
and bed room sets. No early sales.

Qtrs. 305A, Sherman, Sat. Sam - noon, family
crafts, clothes, toys.

Qtrs. 1023A, Clayton Sat. Audio-visual, 35mm
Minolta camera, geni organ, household, clothes.

Qtrs 609A, Howard Sat 8am - noon, maternity
clothes, car seat, children's clothes.

Qtrs. 932D, Clayton Sat. 8am. No early buyers.

Qtrs. 251A, Albrook Sat. 7:30am, multi family,
No early birds.

Qtrs. 428A, Clayton Sat. 7am-noon, TV, bike,
clothes, miscellaneous.

Qtrs. 2511D, Clayton Sat. S8am, clothes, toys,
books, waterbed, sofa, more. No early birds.

Qtrs. 953B, La Boca Sat. 8am-lpm.

Qtrs. 672B, Howard Sat. 7-10am.

Qtrs 2023B, Curundu Sat. Sam-lpm, clothes,
rugs, exer bike, tool boxes, more.

Qtrs. 440D, Kobbe Sat. 7am-noon, household,
clothes, bike, toys, more. No early birds.

Qtrs. 124A, Albrook Sat. 8am-noon.



Used movies on laser disks. 230-0668.

Male boxer to breed w/female ASAP. 287-3297.

Artist easel in good condition, reasonably
priced. 286-4684

Roll top desk, good cond, reasonable. 283-3092

Nortic trac ski machine in good cond. 286-3425
after 5pm

Good home for Eng-spk housekeeper, live-in
only, Clayton/Albrook, grt lady. 287-3620

Lawnmower, good cond, reasonable. 284-6975

Basketball backbd, rim in good cond; child's
desk. 260-7779

Eng-spk live-in babysitter for 2 yr old girl, wk
nights, wkends no housekeeping 284-5481

Bilingual, mature, dependable, honest maid, M-
F some Saturdays, refs required. 287-5680

Old Doors and U2 tapes or CDs. 287-4733.

15" rims, 4 holes for old 2-ton trlr. 225-4749.


he TROPIC TIMES Ad Form


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employees and employees of other U.S. government agencies. Ads will be accepted only for NON-COMMERCIAL
services or goods offered by the advertiser or an immediate family member. Offerings of real estate, firearms or
personal ads will not be accepted. The Tropic Times reserves the right to edit any advertisement. Questions regarding
non-publication of submitted ads may be directed to the editor at 285-6612.
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will be accepted. Patio Sale ads must indicate date and location. Submitted ads will be published only once and must
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B 2. Tropic Times
B12-- Nov. 6, 1992


ACROSS
1 Lovers'
quarrel
5 Nipa palm
9 Jose's house
13 Title for-57
Down
17 Barrel part
18 Lytton
heroine
19 TV comedy
20 Iliad and
Odyssey
22 The Little
Mermaid
23 Fulton's pride
25 Papal
vestment
26 Fitch's
invention
28 Oughtred's
1620
invention
30 German river
31 Sesame
32 Stammering
sounds
34 Look at
closely
35 "I'll - You in
My Dreams"
36 Stains
37 Marsh bird
39 "In Spain
they say -"
41 Summarizes
44 Joyous
46 Felt intu-
itively
50 Ham it up
51 Jaffe or
Wanamaker
52 Ibsen
heroine


BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker


I'LL HAVE SORRY. PO Yu KNOW Uo You 1 N ) I'M THE ONE
ANOTHER ONE 6TEAK WHO I AM! KNOW WHO COMTROL6
WHO I A?/ J KNOW }I PO' HU
5TEAK PER I'M COL. RINKIE WHO Z I THE STEAK
PERSON FROM HQ \ A_ M





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HAGAR the Horrible By Dik Browne
















Barney Google and Snuffy Smith By Fred Lasswell


BUTCH AND DOUGIE by ALEX HOWELL


"JUNK FOOD IS WHAT THEY CALL ANYTHING
THAT TASTES SOCO."


LAFF-A-DAY


"Here's a peasant from me to you.
Happy birthday!"


54 Bnng
disgrace on
55 Eat into
56 Darkens
59 Brings forth
lambs
61 Southwest
wind
62 Museum
commodity
63 Lanston's
1887
invention
65 Walton's
1860 floor
covering
67 Lincoln
Center
offering
69 One of the
Muses
71 French
painter
72 Nobel's 1866
Invention
75 Westing-
house's 1868
contribution
77 Thus far
80 Chinese and
Persian
61 Intimidates
83 Cuddle
snugly
84 - facto
85 Fails to
include
87 Western city
89 Some M.I.T.
grads
90 Cake topper
91 Soft saddles
93 Much-sought
outcome


96 Pilotless
airplanes
97 Daytime TV
tare
99 British
prisons
100 River in
Scotland
101 Political
student org.
104 Remove the
rind
106 Diminutive.
in Dundee
107 Pepper or
barley
follower
108 Slate-
trimming tool
111 Bell's 1876
invention
114 Ben
Franklin's
1780
Invention
117 The pea tree
118 Maelzel's
1816
contribution
to music
120 - Moun-
tains; a
range of the
Rockies
121 Pierre's aunt
122 Malayan
outrigger
123 Emerald Isle
124 Consumer
advocate
125 Play the lead
126 Chinese
association
127 Splinter


group
128 Mardi -
DOWN
1 Play the
guitar
2 Couples
3 Declare
to be true
4 Communica-
tions
invention of
1928
5 Bridal paths
6 Aggregate
7 Dill weed
8 Female
peacocks
9 - Calloway
10 Minor
prophet
11 Zoo favorites
12 Pranks
13 Protective
resources
14 On-
(equivalent
to)
15 Negative
quantity
16 French
school
17 Glut
21 Snicker
follower
24 Worth
27 Golf gadgets
29 Speaker's
platform
33 Short drive
36 Tropical fruit
37 Hebrew or
Arab
38 Baccha-
nalian cry


40 Breathe in comfortable
41 Singer 84 Computer-
McEntire screen
42 Moslem ruler Image
43 Eli Whitney's 86 More untidy
1793 88 Wood sorrels
invention 90 Drinker/Slaw
44 Portuguese invention of
folk tune 1928
45 01 a time 92 Tunisian
period measure
47 Hunt's 1849 94 Small jazz
invention ensemble
48 Flightless 95 Stritch and
bird May
49 Suffix 96 David
meaning skin Copperlield's
51 Elected bride
official 98 Urge into
53 Brutes action
56 - acid 100 Tour guide
57 Pianist Hess and lecturer
58 Iberian 101 RBI or ERA
country 102 French
60 Plumber's painter
tool 103 Point of view
63 Hebrew letter 105 January, to
64 French verb Juan
66 Lonely 107 Alan King. for
number? one
68 Library 108 "The
adhesives Prisoner of
70 Preoccupy -
greatly 109 Feeds the
72 Mail slot kitty
73 Arizona 110 Peter or Ivan
Indian 112 Miss Kett
74 Female 113 Harrow's
sheep rival
76 Road map 115 Goller's cry
abbr. (pl.) 116 Ananias, for
78 Serf one
79 Clothes 119 Scott Joplin
82 Warm and " opus


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PAGE 1

Gift ofhe Panama Canal Museum Tropic Times Vol. V. No. 44 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, Nov. 6, 1992 Joulwan releases Veterans Day message QUARRY HEIGHTS (USSOUTHCOM PAO) -U.S. military community members in Panama will celebrate Vet5 erans Day Wednesday with services at Corozal American Cemetery at 11 a.m. Brig. Gen. David Sawyer, 24th Wing Commander, will be the guest speaker at this year's ceremony, which is sponsored by Panama's veterans organizations. The presidential proclamation will be 7 read by Howard Beall, deputy chief of mission at the U.S. Embassy to Panama. For the second year in a row, British musicians from the Belize Defense Forces will co-celebrate Britain's Remembrance Day at the Corozal ceremony. In a letter released last week, Gen. George A. Joulwan, commander in chief of U.S. Southern Command, praised the service of veterans and called for servicemembers to remember the sacrifices of veterans before them. "Today we honor veterans," Joulwan wrote. "Americans who served their country in peace and war. Americans who sacrificed and shed their blood in defense of freedom. We do so on the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month because on that day in 1918, the guns of World War I were at last silenced after 116,000 Americans had died. AP r "The next year, President Woodrow These are some of the items left behind at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial that now reside in the new Smithsonian Wilson proclaimed Nov. 11 --hAre Institution exhibit entitled "Personal Legacy: the Healing of a Nation." See veterans commentary on page 6. stice Day -as the date to honor these Americans," he said. "Today, Veterans SOUTHCOMare worthy descendents of COM today and see many living exthrough Central and South America. This Day honors all Americans, both living those who preceeded you. amples of the sacrifices for our country, is the fruit of your labors which have and dead, from every war and time pe"By your courage, commitment and both during war and peace. proven the success of the 'One Team riod. sacrifice, you visibly demonstrate our "Some show the weathered marks of One Fight' concept. "In Southern Command, Veterans Day country's commitment and resolve to age on their faces. Others have the smooth "On Veterans Day 1992, I ask that you is especially meaningful for those miliLatin America. look of youth. But you all possess the pause to remember the sacrifices of those tary who helped build the canal, those "You also are great role models of a same character and courage demonstrated who gave their lives, or lost their limbs, who kept it free and open through two military institution that prides itself on by the generations of veterans serving or who are still unaccounted for or missworld wars and many crises, and those professionalism and dedication to cerbefore you. ing in action. who serve today. tain values and ideals. "The results of your efforts are evi"I am extremely proud of each of you "You who now serve your country in "You can look around USSOUTHdent as we have seen democracy spread and your families." High crime warning Loh finishes first Panama visit FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Because of a recent increase in violent crime in Panama HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA)Gen. John Michael absolutely can to SOUTHCOM and that's our number City, the commander of Joint Task Force -PanLoh, commander, Air Combat Command, made his one goal.to increase and improve combat capability to ama has urged U.S. citizens not to patronize bars first visit to Howard AFB and U.S. SouthernCommand perform the mission. and discos through Nov. 16. headquarters Oct. 28. "We're trying to focus more on the integrated appliOfficials say establishments including BacDuring his three-day visit, the general got a firstcation of airpower, putting bombers, fighters and reconchus, Patatus, Piramyde, My Place Video Club, hand look at the missions of SOUTHCOM and the 24th naissance aircraft together in composite, joint training Back Street, Daiquiri Video Pub, Poppy's and Wing. exercises to be more responsive to our mission around Magic will not be frequented by Department of "The 24th Wing is a very important wing in ACC," the world." De ciset pens tveling in thePanamaCity area he said. "Their role is a little different from those of Loh said teamwork is a big part of the success that after dark are urged to exercise caution and to other wings in our command and it demands a lot of its ACC has had in Latin America. avoid crowded places such as bars and clubs. In people." "I'm quite pleased with the way our team down here addition, the JTF-Panama commander is strongly According to Loh, the main differences stem from in the 24th Wing has integrated with the SOUTHCOM discouraging travel after dark along the Transisththe range of aircraft present and the counternarcotics mission and how we're working together as one single mian highway. mission. team to perform the mission," he said. He applauded the SOUTHCOM response to this "This is a more difficult mission than most of the Explosives amnesty day mission and innovation they have to use to produce routine missions we've had in the past, but it's an COROZAL (Tropic Times) -An ammunition results. exciting one," he said. "Exciting because we're helping and explosives amnesty day will be held Nov. 19 "I'm very delighted with the morale, innovation and Central and South American nations grow as demoon U.S. Army South Safety Day. can-do attitudeof allthepeople here,"Loh said. "It's an cratic countries and we're also trying to fight the drug Drop-off points are Southern Command Netinspiration to see how all the people have come war. work field, Fort Clayton; Fort Davis' softball together in a very diverse mission and perform it very Loh said he was happy with the 24th Wing's work. field; Building 734, Howard AFB; and the Amwell." "I'm very pleased with the spirit, attitude and posimunition Supply Point on Rodman NS. All points Loh said the ACC will make SOUTHCOM apriority tive response that we have down here and the capabiliare open from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in the future. ties we're providing with air power in the Southern "We aim to provide the best combat capability we Command." Medical officials challenge local Albrook riding stable showdeo set *Veterans Day, page 6. servicemembers to take the Great for fun day of barbecue, riding and *Clinton's Latin policy, page 4. American Smokeout plunge. country dancing. *High school football, page 7.

PAGE 2

2 Tropic Times Nov. 6,1992 Soldier helps El Salvadorans' orphanage by MSgt. Rolf Carter Editor COROZAL (Tropic Times) -For four nuns and 180 children, 1989 was a good year, and they needed one. They were living in the Hogar Del Nino Adalberto Guirola orphanage for children in Santa Tecla, El Salvador. Their country was locked in a civil war and their buildings were still damaged from a 1986 earthquake. In June of that year, things started changing when SFC Heriberto Rivera-Velez, administrative supervisor to the U.S. Military Group El Salvador, arrived for duty. He remembered seeing so many children in the street, that he knew there was a need. Having extra time on his hands, he told one of the secretaries in his section he wanted to get involved and help. She in turn introduced Rivera to her sister, a member of the board for Hogar Del Nino, which led to his first visit. "I saw the overwhelming need there, hunger, clothes and TLC (tender loving care)," said Rivera, a 16-year Army veteran. "They needed the bare necessities that we take for granted. I decided to jump in." That first visit resulted in so many improvements, that Rivera was nominated for the Secretary's (of State) Pin For Outstanding Volunteerism. Although he didn't rciethe pin, he was honored by Assistant Secretary ctY0 receive SFC Heriberto Rivera-Velez holds his plaque while Sor Luz Elena Vellega, orphanage director, and of State Bernard Aronson in October. children from the orphanage watch. Rivera's secretary's pin nomination letter described conditions at the orphanage: The nuns were assisted by noticed the problems at Hogar Del Nino as well. The farm, half of the chickens raised for food the other for several underpaid staff members who weren't trained. Rotary Club president also wanted to get involved in funds; auditorium and sewing class equipment. New for the type of care the children needed; there were no making some changes there. Rivera introduced the buildings to house children and the nuns are completed laundry facilities, clothes were washed then dried on official to representatives from the U.S. Agency for but not yet inhabited, Rivera said. After learning Rivthe ground; there was little medicine and some children International Development, and the three started talkera couldn't receive the secretary's pin this year, bewere sick as a result. ing. They found out USAID could donate $10 for every cause it had already been awarded in Guatemala, The 37-year-old NCO from San German, Puerto $1 donated by the Rotarians. After the Rotary donated Beverly Kitson still wanted some recognition for the Rico, started by getting other people interested in the $1,000 and USAID provided its 10 to one donation, sergeant. Kitson, a community relation officer at the orphanage. He brought MILGROUP members to the orRivera found out there was more money available. embassy, asked Deputy Chief of Mission, William J. phanage for a cookout, which was a success. The That's when Chuck Brady came into the picture. Dieterich, to present a plaque to Rivera, who in turn visitors and children got along so well MILGROUP Brady ran a program called the Earthquake Reconasked Aronson to make the presentation. "An indirect people started providing some of the extra help Rivera struction Project which granted money to help rebuild effect of SFC Rivera's volunteer efforts has been the needed, and he was soon able to get them to support his public buildings. Brady's program resulted in a nearly boost to the morale of this community. In antarea where projects. Clean-up day at the orphanage, a Christmas $1 million renovation project at the orphanage. Acsecurity threats are imminent and travel is restricted, party, food donations, and other activities helped around cording to Rivera, the project is nearly complete. In SFC Rivera has helped the community see a bigger and the orphanage and provided funds to buy items the nuns early November they will start dedicating new brighter picture, and have the satisfaction of making a said they needed, the letter outlined. Other people facilities.The orphanage now has a bakery; a chicken difference," wrote Dieterich in the nomination letter. John T. Zachariah; 24th Supply SquadB. Tabor, 24th Security Police SquadA ir Force COm miu unity C eg ~ ron: SMSgt. Charles W. Berry, MSgt. ron: MSgt. David R. Harrison; 24th Steven R. Letarte; 24th Maintenance Mission Support Squadron: SSgt. PhylSquadron: MSgt. Archibald D. Black, lis P. Johnson; 617th Airift Support Squadholds g radu ation cerem ony MSgt. Donna M. Coleman; 24th Comron: SSgt. Louis S. Longmire, MSgt. munication Squadron: SSgt. Ernest L. Mark S. Spaw; 79th Test & Evaluation HOWARD AFB (24thWG/PA)The ate was awarded a $250 scholarship by Cain III, SSgt. Kenneth E. Carter, SSgt. Group: TSgt. Kathy L. Mathis-Ringo; Howard Education Center held its Fall theAir Force Association's Eagle FounJohn F. Cobb, MSgt. Erick L. Estrada, 6933rd Electronic Security Squadron: 1992 Community College of the Air Force dation. The winner was TSgt. Timothy MSgt. Larry T. Johnson, Sgt. Ronson E. TSgt. Thomas A. Matusch, SSgt. Terry graduation cermony Oct. 29, honoring M. Thomas from the 24th Wing. Levau, SSgt. ChristopherD. McNamara, W. Mullins, SSgt. Edwin P. Neal Jr., 44 graduates from various units. CCAF graduates were: SrA. Charles L. Powers; Detatchment 2, SSgt. Edward V. Negron, SSgt. Jerald J.CMSgt. Tommy A. Roberts, Air Southern Command Network: SSgt. 1st Air Support Group: MSgt. James M. Tillery; 24th Medical Group: SSgt. KathCombat Command senior enlisted adviKenneth C. Adams; 24th Contracting Denny; 24th Wing: TSgt. Christine K. leen A. Moore; 24th Transportation Squadsor, and two-time CCAF graduate was Squadron: TSgt. John V. Aguilar, MSgt. Flores, TSgt. Carl L. Johnson, TSgt. ron: SSgt. Zena M. Simpson; 24th Weather the guest speaker. Archibald D. Black; 310th Airlift SquadTimothy M. Thomas; 24th Civil EngiSquadron: Sgt. Richard D. Slominsky; For the first time at a CCAF graduron: TSgt. John A. Bauer, SSgt. Glen C. neering Squadron: MSgt. Keith R. Har24th Operation Support Squadron: SMSgt. ation in Panama, a distinguished graduHindmarsh, Sgt. John K. Wilson, MSgt. ris, SSgt. CecilS. Nichols, MSgt. Martin Sam L. Weatherby. Gorgas offers smokers classes, incentives GORGASARMYCOMMUNITYHOSPITAL-The 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. There will be a Federal Women's lunch in the Fort Medical Activity Community Health Nurses are sponCorozal Post Exchange, 11:30 am.-3:30 p.m.; BuildClayton NCO Club, Nov. 17. The guest speaker will be soring several activities in conjunction with the 16th ing 519, Fort Clayton, 1:30-3:30 p.m.; Altantic NonDr. MariaBritton.CallJoyce Conway,287-4716/3586, Annual Great American Smokeout. commissioned Officer's Club, 8:30 a.m.-noon forreservations. Thevarious events are designed to make the smoke*Nov. 19 There will be an officers' wives' luncheon at Club out an upbeat event that gives smokers an incentive to Atlantic Commissary,8:30 a.m.-noon; AtlanticPost Amador, 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. quit foradayorpermanently, said 1st Lt. Dino Murphy, Spec. Gary Sampson, a Southern Command NetMEDDAC public affairs officer. work disc jockey, will quit smoking for the day Nov. 19. "Quitting is tough and smokers need to know they He will take calls with suggestions andprogress reports canrely on friends and loved ones for support," said Lt. ERICAN at287-4517. Col. Mary Hoke, chief, MEDDAC community health CANCER Smoking cessation classes start Nov. 19, Building nursing. SOCIE1 519, room 106, Fort Clayton, 2-3 p.m. Call 287-4325 to With this in, mind and a belief that a few laughs can GREATALME "JAN register. make the task of quitting easier, the following events Gorgas is holding a Cold Turkey raffle at 1 p.m., have been planned, Hoke said. Nov. 20. People who quit smoking for the day are Great American Smokeout booths will offer assorted eligible for the raffle. Call 287-4327/4817 or 282-5162/ items to the public at the following locations: 5163 between 8 and 11 a.m. to register. *Nov.16 Twenty-five prizes ranging from turkeys to keyAlbrook Post Office, 10 am.-i p.m.; Building 519, chains will be given to the winners. Maj. Gen Richard Fort Clayton, 1:30-3:30 p.m. Timmons, commander U.S. Army South, will conduct *Nov. 17 Exchange, 1-4 p.m. the drawing. Corozal Commissary, 1:45-4:30 p.m. Gorgas Army Community Hospital will give SmokeThe Class of 2000, now 5th graders, will take a non*Nov.18 free Baby t-shirts to infants born at Gorgas through smoking pledge from Nov. 16 to 20. They will also Directorate of Engineering and Housing, Building Nov. 19. Gorgas will sponsor aSmokeout display in the encourage their loved ones to quit orremain smokeless 374, Corozal, 9-11 am.; Burger King, Fort Kobbe, main lobby of the hospital Nov. 16-19, 9.m.-noon. by mailing postcards with messages on them.

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Tropic Times Nov. 6, 1992 Saddle Albrook stables rounds 'pokes up for showdeo ALBROOK AFS (Tropic Times) Cowboys and girls can enjoyafun day of riding, eating and dancing Saturday when Albrook stables offers Panama's first showdeo. Hay rides, gaming events, barrel racing, pole bending and a horse show round out the animal handling part of the events, but spectators can expect a lot more from a day at the corral, said Lisa Blanding, -Albrookstables. The day starts with an old-fashioned chicken barbecue at 4 p.m. At 7 p.m., the horse competitions begin, followed by a country western dance that should last until around 1 a.m., Blanding US Army pho o by SgL James Ycum said. Deana Loudermilk, Company B, 193rd Support Battalion, takes her horse through the barrel ride. Adults must pay $7 for admission to There is no charge for watching the Tickets will also be available at the dren to take part in the lead line contest, the barbecue, chidren ages 7-12 $3 and riding events, but the dance will cost $2, door. she said. children under age 7 eat for free. she said. Experienced riders who don't have a Door prizes will also be offered. The price of the barbecue also pays Showdeo tickets can be bought at the horse in Panama can rent one to particiFor information on the showdeo or for admission to the dance, Blanding Zodiac Recreation Center on Howard pate in the show, Blanding said. other Albrook stable events, call 287said. AFB or at the Albrook stables. Parents can also rent ponies for chil3333/4411. Christmas tree sale set ALBROOKAFS (SOUTHCOMPAO) -The Boy Scouts of America, Panama District, will sell Christmas trees the first week of December to support scouting programs in Panama. The tree sales are tentatively scheduled for: AAFES Garage on Fort Davis Dec. 5-6, 7 a.m. -7 p.m. Dec. 7-9, 4 p.m. -7 p.m. AIbrook Post Office parking lot Dec. 5--6, 7 a.m. -7 p.m. Dec. 7-9, 4 p.m. -7 p.m. Trees will be sold to authorized privilege holders on a first-come, first-served basis. Organizations wishing to purchase a tree for the unit must have.a -representative stand in line and present a memorandum from the commanding officer or command sergeant major to the Boy Scout sales manager. "This is theonly equitable way we can ensure that all families and organizations get a fair chance to get a tree," said Maj. Joe Lahue, Scouting District U.S. Army photo by Spec. Robn M-nikoki Commissioner. Ginny Sieminski tells children about the origins of the religious costumes during the Harvest Festival at Enough trees have been ordered to cover the anCurundu Junior High School. ticipated demand, he said. There were trees left over last year, he said. H ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ M alw nb shtlsBbe tneThBoy Scouts and volunteer adult leaders will Halloween bashtells Bible stories on site to provide courteous and cheerful service The event offered families the chance to socialize while helping customers select and load trees, acUSARpc uobi n AffMantikoski and play games in a controlled environment, Galloway cording to Brig. Gen. James L. Wilson, deputy said commander of U.S. Army South and Boy Scout Executive Board chairman. FORT CLAYTON -Demons, ghosts and goblins "We like the concept of the festival," said Sandra Each scouting unit willearn points based uponits were nowhere in sight at one Halloween bash. Humburg, who attended with her husband and three level of participation. The points will be used to Instead, characters such as Moses, Joseph, Mary and children. "It's a safer alternative to going door-to-door determine how to divide the profits, which will help shepherds ambled about. trick or treating." pay for camping activities, administrative salaries Nearly 200 people gathered at Curundu Junior High Aside from receiving a bag of candy, the children and camping scholarships. School Saturday for the annual Harvest Festival, sponwere treated to fun stops, seven games with Christian "This provides an excellent opportunity for the sored by the Fort Clayton Chapel Sunday School. themes. scouts to assist the community and learn about Parents were asked to dress their children in cosFestival-goers also participated in a chili cook-off customer service," Wilson said. "It also teaches the tumes of Christian origin rather than traditional Haland a cake-decorating contest during the Harvest Festiscouts about individual and unit responsibility." loweencostumes. val. Trees should rangein price between$10 and $45, "Halloween definitely has somepaganorigins. This "This is a clean, safe environment," said Kathryn according to Ray Underwood, Executive Board party offers people an opportunity for wholesome activButler, a festival-goer. "We don't have to worry about Treasurer. ity," said Dawn Galloway, activity coordinator. the food or candy being tampered with. It's been fun."information, call 286-3685.

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A Tropic Times 47:Ta fHemisphere Nov. 6, 1992 H m s h r Clinton may change Latin policy High court WASHINGTON (Reuters) -PresidentPastor is widely perceived as a conupholds Just elect Bill Clinton is widely expected to servative who has distanced himself from shift the focus of U.S. Latin American Carter'spolicy, whichinhistimeledhim policy away from trade and toward other to cut aid to several military regimes. C cause ruling issues such as humanrights and the envi*Richard Feinberg, an economist now ronment. heading the Inter-American Dialogue and WASHINGTON, D.C. (Reuters) During the campaign he gave only a who under Carter was a staff member of The U.S. Supreme Court let stand the reluctant support to President Bush's ; the State and Treasury departments with dismissal of a laws t Monday by a proposal of a free tradepact with Mexico political and economic responsibilities group of businesses in Panama seekand avoided all reference to the Enterover Latin American affairs. The Diaing millions of dollars in damages prise for the Americas, Bush'splanto set logue promotes free trade in the area. from the U.S government because up a pan-American free trade zone. *Marc Schneider, a Pan-American they were looted during the 1989 Both proposals are seen by Latin naHealth Organization official and former invasion. tons as crucial to foster economic growth aide to Patricia Derian, who is credited The justices declined to review a and free market policies in the area. o with devising Carter's Latin American ruling by a federal appeals court in Yet, diplomats and analysts say, the ara human rights policy. Richmond, that the U.S. government degree in which Clinton will move from Over the past decade Schneider has was protected by sovereign immunity a trade to a political agenda will depend private group Inter-American Dialogue. highlighted concerns over human rights and could not be held liable for damto a good extent on who handles Latin Latin American diplomats say they in the PAHO's agenda. ages. affairs for him. consider the presence of former San *Democratic sources said U.S. enMore than 40 private companies "The key is in the names," said Isaac Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros in Clinvoy to the Organization of American sued the United States over looting Cohen, who heads the UN Economic ton's transition team a good sign. States Luigi Einaudi was likely to return and rioting that occurred after the Commission for Latin America's WashSources said Cisneros, a U.S. Histo his job in the State Department's ofU.S. military invasion on December ington office. panic leader who believes trade must be fice of planning for Latin America. 20,1989, to capture Panamanian dicAmong likely candidates for key popart ofthe equation, couldland aCabinet His likely successoris Larry Harringtator Manuel Noriega, who was later sitions are several ex-members of the post, maybe as commerce secretary. ton, a long-time adviser to Vice-Presiconvicted on drug trafficking charges. Jimmy Carter administration, which has Among the candidates to succeed dent-elect Al Gore, and a man who has The businesses charged that unmade human rights and the defense of Bernard Aronson as the top State Departbeen active on the environment and human controlled mobs looted their stores democratic values a cornerstone of its ment official on Latin America are: rights, they added. because U.S. armed forces failed to Western Hemisphere policy. But many *Robert Pastor, who handled West*Riordan Roett, an economist who provide adequate police protection. of them also favor vigorous free trade. en Hemisphere affairs in Carter's Naheads the Johns Hopkins University's The lawsuit alleged that the United From a Democratic point of view, tonal Security Council and now heads Latin American Studies Program, could States violated an international treaty "the two agendas are complementary," the Latin American program at the Emory become a future U.S. ambassador to by failing to protect residents of an said Peter Hakim, staff director of the University's Carter Center. Mexico, the sources said. occupied territory. Salvador rebels continue weapons turn-in GUARJILA, El Salvador (AP) -The squad leader Calling the meetings "decisive," Goulding said he barked a command, and 188 Salvadoran guerrillas fell was optimistic that the government and rebels would into formation for the last time Friday, marching to a "be able to rapidly advance toward solution of the table manned by U.N. peacekeepers to turn in their problems." weapons. Some of the rebels who demobilized on Friday were Across the country, some 1,500 other rebel fighters seasoned fighters who had spent years in the mountains. handed over their arms under the terms of a U.N.Others were in diapers when El Salvador's political brokered peace treaty that ended 12 years of civil war in differences erupted in war in the late 1970s. January. BoththegovernmentandtheFarabundoMarti Many of the weapons they turned in were in poor National Liberation Front were to have complied with condition, with broken muzzles and parts missing, and all terms of the accord by Saturday. seemed more athreat to the shooterthan thetarget. U.N. The two sides agreeed to postpone the deadline to officers put the weapons in a huge shipping container, Dec. 15, but President Alfredo Cristiani said he would which they locked with two keys, one forthe U.N., one suspend the restructuring of the armed forces until all for the guerrillas. rebels have demobilized. For the rebels, Friday was a time of reflection, last Christiani's government is obliged under the acslaps on the back, and last rounds of "Viva!" for fallen cords to cut the 60,000-member armed forces by 50 comrades. percent, demobilize counter-insurgency units and reSome spent their last moments as guerrillas quietly. move officers who have committed human rights abuses. One fighter with a machine gun on his shoulder and a The FMLN accepted the new demobilization timewatermelon under his arm sought a quiet place in the table without conditions. shade. About 3,200 guerrillas, 40 percent of the total when Others chatted in small groups as young boys in this the war ended early this year, remain armed at 15 camps war-shattered village, 40 niiles north of San Salvador, spread throughout the Massachusetts-sized nation. climbed trees for a better view. APLaPhoto U.N. Undersecretary General Alvaro de Soto and Guarjila was fought over for years, and there is A guerrilla fighter stands guard at the entrance of Marrack Goulding, who heads U.N. peacekeeping efscarcely a family in the town that didn't lose five or 10 the rebel base near San Salvador that holds the forts in El Salvador, arrived in the capital for meetings members. weapons turned in after a 12-year civil war ended in aimed at fixing problems in the nine-month-old peace A white cross atop a hill honors the hundreds, perU.N.-sponsored peace talks. process. haps thousands, who died in the area. LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) -U.S.-Bolivmarred by controversy surrounding U.S. ian operations against Bolivia's cocaine B o livia d rug w ar success military and DEA activities in Bolivia. trade are working so well that the camThe presence of 150 American soldiers paign is seen as a model, depite tensions from June to September in Santa Ana, a between the two countries and concern provides excellent m odel center of the drug trade, was widely that Colombians are taking over. criticized by newspapers and opposition This year, anti-drug police and U.S. be transported as easily," said Carlos before," he said. politicians. narcotics agents have seriously disrupted Saavedra Bruno, the interior minister, Colombians have moved in because The opposition said the presence of cocaine trafficking from the Chapare, a but added that interdiction alone willnot of the crackdown and the surrender last U.S. troops required congressional autropical region that produces 80 percent bring victory. year of eight leading Bolivian traffickers thorization, but the U.S. Embassy said of the coca leaf processed into cocaine. "More options must be provided for in response to a government pledge that military "civic action" teams have visThe operation, called Ghost Zone, has the farmer who wants to quit cultivating they would be tried in Colombia, not ited Bolivia for 30 years without such used AWACS radar planes to detect flights coca leaf," he said. extradited to the United States. approval. The press and opposition specucarrying coca-leaf paste from Chapare to Both the Bolivian and U.S. govern"The Colombian Cali cartel is runlated that the troops had come to build a other regions for processing into cocaine. ments report a net reduction in cultivaning most operations in Bolivia," said nuclear waste dump and a permanent Hundreds of Bolivian and U.S. anti-drug tion as a result of voluntary eradication. Don Ferrarone, Bolivia station chief of military base. agents havebeen mobilizedto seizecoca Farmers receive $2,000 for every hecthe U.S. Drug Enforcement AdministraInterior Minister Saavedra said that leaf, labs and processing chemicals. tare, about 2 1/2 acres, of coca destroyed. tion. "relations between Bolivia and the United As a result, traffickers are moving U.S. Ambassador Charles Bowers A representative of the Cali cartel, States are at their best moment in recent their landing strips out of reach of the describes Ghost Zone as the biggest, most Celimo Andrade Quintero, was arrested years." anti-drug forces, using armies offarmers succesful anti-drug operation in the June 24 in Bolivia. Ferrarone said the Saavedra acknowledged that antito carry the raw material to them. Americas. cartel is moving four tons of cocaine a American sentiment had grown in recent "Coca leaf and cocaine production "There is less coca and more governmonth out of this country. years, but ascribed it largely to lack of have diminished and the material cannot ment programs in the Chapare than ever Progress in fighting cocaine has been communication.

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Tropic Times Voices Nov. 6,1992 ~~~~~~~ ~~~~~The action line Is a direct_____________________ Slow mail temporary, A 4 wander, and Howard AFB and Aibrook AFS personnel. If you have a question or probta o a' ov system gets better lmta o a' ov through normal supervisory Dear Mayors' Corner, M channels, call the Action Line Ever since the mailing system has at 284-5849. Callers should changed, I've noticed that my mail has leave a name, telephone numbeen coming in very slow. It's not just a The United States experienced the ber and mailing address in couple of days but weeks. It's been very same kind of growing pains when the case questions need to be clarI frustrating. post office introduced zip codes. fled. Names will be kept conflI was under the impression that our Initially, the quality of service dedential and used only to promail would get here faster (under the lined slightlywhile thebugs were being vide callers with a personal APO AA system). Why change someworked out. Once the system was fully response. Sawyer thing that was working fine? implemented, service not only returned Mail on slow boat to China. to its original performance level, it imQ .Why are so many people here In all fairness, here in Panama it is proved. in Panama so disrespectful to officers? sometimes difficult to identify comDear Slow boat, Imagine how poor the mail service Today when I was walking to the base missioned officers of our separate servThe old system worked fine, but it would be today if the zip code system had exchange I had to correct a reserve ices and foreign visitors because of wouldn't have for much longer, said the not been installed when it was. Today's staff sergeant for not saluting an offidifferent variations of uniforms and 24th Wing Postal Squadron officials. mail delivery service would be insuffercer. I find it very impolite to see this insignia. But I've used a simple rule Untilrecently,federalpostalemployable. happen. I don't know if a program throughoutmy military career,"When ees were still using antiquated technolNow project that problem to our situshould be implemented to avoid this. in doubt.salute." It certainly doesn't ogy and hand-sorting our military mail. ation. If we don't improve the system Thank you. hurt. With the volume of mail being procthat exists today in anticipation of the We must continue to educate and essed in the 1990s, the old system was mail load oftomorrow, those mail delays correct those few who are disrespectful obsolete and too labor-intensive to conyou're experiencing while the bugs are A. I salute you for correcting an and clearly ignore honoring and uptinue. being worked out would be nothing by noncommissioned officerfornot salutholding this military tradition. You Distinguishing the military as an APO comparrison. ing an officer. I; too, find it impolite, have set an excellent example for other eliminates unnecessary handling and puts disrespectful and totally unacceptable airmen, NCOs and officers to follow. I ourmailntes tnneesstary andtg auts Editor's note: This column Is prowhen proper saluting is not exchanged expect nothing less from any profesour mail into the military system autovided to allow community members to among our military members. Saluting sional military person than to correct matically. submit questions or concerns to be reis a historical tradition deeply rootedin violators or point outtheirerror such as Now the federal postal system can searched and answered by the Maymilitary customs. It serves as respectful you properly did. provide us with both the high quality of oral Congress. Letters should be mailed exchange or greeting between memAgain, thanks for bringing this to my service that it did before and the built-in to: Mayors' Corner, APO AA 34004 bers of an honorable profession and is attention. If you have further quesability to improve service in the future. (MPS). Anonymity will be granted rendered between all enlisted and offitions, feel free to contact our senior So if the system works so well, whyis upon request. Publicity Chairperson, cers of the United States armed forces enlisted adviser, CMSgt. Ronald the mail so slow? Dyana Ellis. and those of other nations. Wheelis,284-3503. Growing pains. Found property, drunk driving head up MPs'list Property at large False claims Every day the military police turn in Provost M arshal S orner Two people were charged last week various items of found property, ranging with larceny of government property by from wallets to bicycles, to the Provost player and two autoharps. your limits and plan ahead to avoid placfraud for submitting false claims on their Marshal Office. The theft occurred last week at the ing yourself and others in danger. travelvouchers. The Provost Marshal Office's found Curundu Elementary School when the If you have had a few drinks, do not One person claimed reimbursement property custodian is the person to call if thieves entered through a hole in the drive. Drinkers should call a taxi, have a for both his privately owned vehicle and you want to check to see if any of the wall. friend take them home or have a desiga rental car at the same time. found property is yours. Military police are investigating the nated driver with. The other claimed a lodging and car For more information, call the Physiincident. For more information on drinking and rental expense. cal Security Section at 287-3261/6762. Anyone with information about this driving, call the Military Police Traffic An investigation revealed neither the incident should call the Military Police Section at 287-3203. hotel northe carrental company existed. Unauthorized escort Investigations Section Ifyoususpect fraud, waste orabusein The Contraband Control Section apat287-5252. your unit or place of work, report it prehended several people in the past week D-i-in. immediately to your supervisor. for unauthorized escort and trespassing. Driving Most of the apprehensions occurred at While V -The following crime statistics are the mall area of Albrook Air Force StaIntoxifor the week of Oct. 23 -29. tion. cated Entry into these stores is limited to There were Pacific privilege card holders. Ifpeople who are several incidents Fort Clayton 500 area -one housenot authorized in the store are found last week involv-breaking there, they are charged with trespassing ing people appreFort Clayton 1000 area -two larand the privilege card holder escorting hended for operatcenies of secured private property. him is charged with unauthorized escort. ing a motor vehicle Curundu area -one larceny of seFor more information, call the U.S. while intoxicated on i cured private property. Southern Command Contraband Control amilitaryinstal-Fort Kobbe 400 area -two larceSection at 286-3303. lation. nies of secured private property R e -Morgan Ave. -one larceny of seSchool break in memcuredprivate property. A local Department of Defense Deher, if p pendent School is missing some musical you plan Atlantic instruments after thieves entered the to drink, Fort Davis -seven larcenies of seschool's music room and took a CD k n o w cured private property Commander in Chief.Gen. George A. Joulwan Editorial Staff.Sgt. Richard Puckett U.S. Army South PAO Atlantic.289-4312 Director, Public Affairs.Col. James L. Fetig Sgt. James Yocum ThisauthorizedunofficialcommandinformationpublicaChief.S Joseph Ferrare Rosemary Chong tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is AssistatEditor.Sgt. Deborah E. Williams U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office. 287-3007 published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Sports Editor.Sgt. John Hall 24th Wing Public Affairs Office.284-5459 of the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command. U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the U.S. Southern Command.The address is: Unit 0936 APO r~pic Tim es AA 34002Telephone 285-6612.

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6 Tropic Times 6 := f Commentary JNov. 6,1992C Political action: veterans' duty, privilege by Charles E. Brown with are an ever-present reminder of our military cohesive unit, we can present a united front to reach a Commander, Disabled American Veterans Chapter 2, Panama service to our country. common goal. _________________________________ We are bound by the shared pain of recovery and Just like those early colonists who together Most of you probably just voted in our national the joy of rehabilitation. focused on the goal of a free and independent nation. election choosing representatives to govern us at the But no matter what fate may have dealt us, we And just as our elected representatives so often act as local, state and federal levels. Voting is one of the veterans shouldn't ignore the myriad opportunities a group, so should we as veterans join together for a fundamental rights we enjoy in our country, a process we have to bring our needs and concerns before the common purpose. that has been taking place for more than two centugeneral public and the representatives we've just When we served in the military, the common goal ties. elected. was to preserve America's freedom. It's the springIt's a simple act many may take for granted. But For example, over the next few years, Army units, board from which all of America's other objectives it hasn't always been so. Take, for instance, the Navy ships, Marine battalions and military organizaare launched. Boston Tea Party. The Stamp Act placed taxes on tions of every kind will commemorate the 50th anniNow that we're veterans, we need to band together the tea our forefathers were drinking. versaries of World War II events. with equal vigilance to defend the entitlements we've But the amount of the taxes was decided in From Atlanta to Los Angeles, earned and the recognition we England without any say by the colonies. The veterans are celebrating their deserve. colonists protested by dumping a shipment of tea into unique status by reuniting and Disabled veterans, more than the Boston Harbor and, by doing so, declared that we sharing memories of the times that "The brave men, living any other group, need the programs would no longer stand for being taxed without being brought them together. and dead, who struggled and services provided by our represented. Also, groundwork has been laid government. We're here today, in part, to honor those veterans for a memorial that will soon be here, have consecrated Veterans have joined ranks to who protected and defended our right to be reprebuilt in Washington, D.C., to honor it far above our poor accomplish as a group what we, as sented -and to freely choose those who will the service and sacrifice of Korean power to add or detract. individuals, cannot. represent us. War veterans. The world will little note, Why don't we make Wednesday Through the years, we've not always made the I memory of a conflict somenor long remember, what -Veterans Day -the starting best choices. times referred to as the forgotten we say here, but it can point of our involvement? It's the You're probably still debating over whether the war, this memorial will give a voice ever forget whatperfect time. best choice was made about those who will lead us .to those who served in battle who dever e We have the opportunity to act in the White House, in the Congress, in state capitals, have been silent too long. on the choices we havejust made. and in our own home towns. Wednesday also marks 10th AnAbraham Lincoln We've got a clean slate as far as Sorting through the issues and listening to the niversary of the Vietnam Veterans TheGettysburgAddres government is concerned. candidates' answers was often a daunting task. But Memorial in Washington, D.C. We'll soon have a new Secretary this Veterans Day, I'm reminded that one fact The black granite memorial in the nation's capital of Veterans Affairs. remains constant: the veterans of this country helped has been a major catalyst for Americans to reconcile We need to let the secretary know what we expect make that process possible. more than 20 years of pain and sorrow. of government in meeting the needs of America's Now that we've completed that process, the next Thousands of Americans who visit the memorial veterans. step is to work with the choices we've made. It each year are able to leave the past behind, recogWe've got new congressional leaders to get seems to me that the best way to accomplish that is to nize the courage of those fallen soldiers, and look acquainted with. Some of the new members may not worktogether. toward the future with a renewed sense of pride in be aware of the needs of veterans. Some others may No matter what our backgrounds are -from America. have forgotten. It's our responsibility to explain and farmers who fought for America's independence to The popularity of these memorials and this re-emphasize what those needs are. single parents who fought in the Persian Gulf War -increase in veteran-related activities are evidence of a Even the new administration has new plans in every veteran can lay claim to a sense of camaradeground swell of rediscovery sweeping this country. place for the next four years. rie, a sense of togetherness. Americans are again recognizing how important the The White House again needs to be reminded that Let me make mention here of a certain group of service of veterans has been in ensuring our way of even while we are at peace, the price of past wars veterans who have an even greater bond. life. includes the cost of caring for America's veterans Most veterans were lucky enough to serve our Beyond the memorials and events, we also need to today. country well and leave military service with their make sure that our representatives recognize our This Veterans Day, let's appreciate our common good health. service, and that they support our continuing effort. bond -the shared experience of serving America in Others, however, were not so fortunate. Many This is especially important in the areas of veterher Armed Forces. veterans who were disabled in the line of duty face ans' health care and compensation programs. We once defended this nation's right to choose its daily trials in dealing with their disabilities. How do we do that? leaders, now as veterans, we can protect those rights Injuries we suffer from and the diseases we cope Again, it's a group effort. If we function as a we so fiercely defended. What is your message to veterans? "I would tell them that "To have patience with "That we remember "I would tell them if I "I'm grateful for them, everything they have the changes the couneverything they did was in their place, I but I think they should done is well apprecitry's going to have before us for our freewould have done the get better treatment. ated, especially the freebecause of the election dom." same thing. I appreciSome people don't dom we have." results." ate everything they did appreciate them." for us." Sgt. Jay Rourk Sgt. Nick Decorse GMG2 Andy Parker SSgt. Michael Stoute Hoko Johnson Southern Command Network 549th Military Police Special Boat Unit 26 24th Air Postal Squadron Air Force retiree family Company member The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views ofSouthern Command, The Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries -or responses to commentaries -to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

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Sports Nov. 6, 1992 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 7 Tigers seeing ghosts after 26-7 Ioss by gt7Phlli On 1st and goal, Tiger Corey Townsend bySRSg POAanhipc r made a spectacular play to tip the ball away from a Bulldog receiver -but to CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL -The ,. -no avail. In what looked like an instant Cristobal Tiger Halloween homecoming < replay of his earlier score, Bulldogs QB game against the Balboa Bulldogs left o Priceagainsnuckthe ball over the Tigers the Tigers seeing ghosts all over the goalfor what would betheir finaltouchfield, after a 26-7 loss, Oct. 30. down. The successful point after made it On opening kickoff, the Tigers thought 26-0. the ball was going out of bounds, but On the Tigers next possession, watched in dismay as the Bulldogs fell Townsend was able to make it happen for on it at the Tigers 18 yard line. his squad with a34-yardrun at the end of Two plays later, Bulldog Paolo Amegthe third quarter. lio dove over the right side of the line to The drive seemed dead when an illedraw first blood 28 seconds into the game. gal motion penalty backed the Tigers up The next Balboakickoffreally did go to the Bulldog 35 and third and 14 ended out of bounds, drawing a referee's flag. with an incompletion. On the second try, the Dogs came back The Tigers lined up in punt formation with what looked like an on-side kick but had a trick up their sleeves in the form recoveredbyBulldogRyanUnderwood. ofafakedpunt.Townsendkeptthedrive The drive went nowhere thanks to -alive with arun around the left side to theTigerCorey Townsend, whopicked offa Bulldogl1. tipped pass on 3rd and 9 and returned it to The Tigers' only touchdown came the Bulldog 25. us Amy p y s h soon after on a four-yard pass to Derek Halloween gremlins came out in force Balboa Bulldogs' running back Paolo Ameglio scores on a 28-yard run during Smith. Cox put the ball through the upto strike both teams with "turnovera 26-7 win over the Cristobal Tigers Oct. 30. rights. monsters" that had both teams playing The Tigers came right back at the like zombies. the Bulldog threat at their goal on 4th and regain their previous failed attempt, but Bulldogs by recovering an on-sides kick. On 3rd and 9 from the Bulldogs 24, 11, but Alex Staton caught an 18-yard the Tigers pounced hard to keep them out The Tigers drove to the Dogs' 24-yard Tigers quarterback Ricky Alvarez stepped TD pass. The Dogs missed their point of the end zone. line but gremlins struck againin the form back, threw a quick pass and watched as after attempt, but led 13-0. The Tigers fumbled on their next of a mishandled snap. the Bulldogs picked it off and took it to The Tigers finally woke on the kickpossession and the Bulldogs pickedit up On 4th and 6, a quick pass to Cox the Tigers 33 yard line. The Bulldogs off when Elmer Smith fell on the onand rumbled into the end zone for an pushed the ball to the 6-yard line. Androve to a 1st and 10 on the Tiger 16. sides kick. But their success was shortapparent TD, but a a clipping penalty other mishandled ball on first and goal Gremlins struck again with 4:50 left in lived. On 2nd and 8, Bulldogs Robert brought it back to the 42-yard line. pushed the Tigers back to the 9. Townsend the first quarter when the ball went from Nieves picked off an Alvarez pass and The Tigers took the ball back after a wrestled the ball back to the 5-yard line Ameglio's hands into waiting Tiger paws. made his way to the Tiger's 35. series ofdowns, whenElmer Smith came where Ryan Underwood smotherd him On the third Iiger try, a clipping penalty The Tigers held the Bulldogs, to a 4th up with the ball on the 33-yard line. with a great hit. backed them to their own eight yard line, and 13, but the Bulldogs managed to turn A series of unsuccessful Tiger downs Alvarez tried his hand but was stopped followed by a missed snap left the Tigers a fumbled punt attempt into a lst down at ended the half 19-0 Bulldogs. short at the 3-yard line. On their final looking at 4th and 17. the 21 yard line. The only excitement ofthe third quarattempt, the Tigers went for six instead A 31-yard punt and five-yard return Ameglio helped pound his Dogs to a ter was when Bulldog running back of the easier three-point field goal, but left the Bulldogs 34 yards from the endfirst and goal at the four. A quarterback Ameglio made a 28-yard run and Carthe Bulldogs stopped them. zone. sneak by Jerome Price put the Dogs up by dova Hall made back-to-back long runs The teams traded possessions for an The Tigers seemed ready to ward off 19. The Bulldogs faked a field goal to on the way to the Tiger 4-yard line. anticlimactic ending and a 26-7 score. Infantry Brigade downs Aviators 22-20, 30-6 by Spec. Robin A. Mantikoski quarterback Cornelius Washington intercepted a pass USARSO Public Affairs Office on HHC's 18-yard line. On the next possession, WR James Goodman caught a10-yard pass for atouchdown MOTHER'S FIELD #1 -Headquarters and Headmaking the score 14-8. quarters Company, 193rd Infantry Brigade defeated "We felt we had control up until two minutes of the Company C, 1-228th Aviation Regiment in the semigame," said Company E coach Gralyne Davis. "Wejust 1 N final and final games 22-20, 30-6, to capture the U.S. blew it defensively." U", Army South Flag Football championship title Sunday. With 3:00 left, Marshall caught a TD pass and scored After losing in overtime to Company E in the quaron the conversion narrowing the gap to 20-16. terfinals Oct. 30, HHC had to win the first game of the IiIC's break came with an interception by free ~ series in order to advance to the finals. safety Ken Miller and a follow-up touchdown by Marshall "We felt good going into the series because we felt with 1:06 left in the game. we never should have lost to them to begin with," said "Miller's interception was the biggest play of the coach/quarterback Tim Mitchell. game," Mitchell said. "It gave us the opportunity to get HHC took control early in game 1 when Mitchell the football and we took advantage of it." connected with wide receiver Ronald Marshall, who After winning the first game, HHC gained its confithem flipped the ball to WR Terence Cartwright who dence and Company E may have lost its. { scored the touchdown and the conversion. "We (the offense) made a lot of mistakes in the first U.S. Army photo by Spc Robin A. Manbkosid Company E rebutted with a touchdown and converhalf and that brought us down," said offensive captain Company E wide receiver Mark Fisher protects the sion to tie the game 8-8 with 2:37 left in the first half. Brian Rice. "but it was the defense that brought us ball from attacking HHC wide receiver Ronald Company E exploded in the third quarter when back." Marshall. Cn e U S pae 15. Gus takes the helm for three weeks Magic Johnson's retirement shakes Reeder hoops tourneys.page 12 as Buck is welcomed by the jungle. up power balance among NBA NFL news.page 13 He'll have fun and games. contenders. College roundup.page 14

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8 Tropic Times Nov. 6,1992 5'8" basketball player comes up short by Sgt. John "Gus" Hall Tropic Times Sports Editor REEDER PHYSICAL FITNESS CENTER -Leo McInnis tried to play both sides of the ledger Friday night. There were two championship basketball games to be played. There were the "small" guys the 5-foot, 10-inch and under players. There were the "big" guys -the 5-foot, 11-inch and over. McInnis wanted to play with the "big" boys. He said he felt the level of competition would be the best. McInnis had one problem, he's 5'8". So McInnis did the next best thing -he coached the 41st Area Support Group "big" guys. And he played on the "small" guys team -We're Blessed. The night was humid, tense and exhilarating. And most of all for McInnis, it was bittersweet and disappointing. Nathaniel Taylor was one of the big boys who played for McInnis. Taylor "towers" over his coach, coming in at an even 6'2. In fact, every player on the 41st ASG team "towered" over McInnis. One guy was 6'5," one was 6'4," one was 6'3 1/2," another 6'2," three were 6'1," and two guys "squeaked in" at 5'11. All 10 players had A mypoab 51BdRgr the'height advantage over Guard Plus players join hands during a timeout. U.S. A y pho by S gt uk P r McInnis, but they all sweaty bodies. Players were showing signs of fatigue turn it up a notch. Hands huddled. "1-2-3 We're looked up to him as a -slowing down the pace of the game, heavy Blessed." coach. breathing and disgruntled faces. The humidly was a Leo began his run. Taylor knows McInnis factor. If it had been any more humid, it would have He hit a layup, two freethrows and snagged a repretty well. They've played been raining inside the gym. Neither the fatigue, nor bound. His team led 53-46. in several tournaments the humidity could break the spirit of the athletes on We're Blessed turned it down a notch. Guard Plus together. Taylor apprecithe court. Nobody could touch the "small" guys. This got blessed. ates McInnis's coaching was their show. William Walden put up a shot that rolled around techniques. McInnis Back to the game. the cylinder and dropped in. Terry Stewart walked in "Since he's not 5'11," Taylor chuckles, "He We're Blessed trailed for most of the first half. with a layup. Guard Plus led 57-56. Four minutes left decided to sit back and coach. He is very knowledgeThey held the ball for the last shot before the in regulation. The teams traded small leads for the able about basketball." halftime buzzer. Kevin Moore got the ball. Two next 3:57. Taylor likes McInnis' way of handling mistakes. seconds were on the clock. Moore let the ball fly With three seconds left, Guard Plus trailed by "Leo (McInnis) writes our mistakes down as we from three-point range. Swish! We're Blessed led 35three. Leo hacked Stewart of Guard Plus on a make them. It's a motivating factor for us as players. 34. It was double-duty time for Leo. He took on the controversial play. The referees said Stewart was We see our mistakes on paper and our incentive is role of point-guard/motivator. It was working. Time fouled from behind the three-point line. That meant not to make the same mistakes," Taylor said. for a pep talk. he got three freethrow attempts. First one, Swish. On to the games. "It's a team effort," Leo said. If we keep that Second one, Swish. Third one, hit the glass, the rim The sweet part of Friday night was McInnis' (let's concept in the second half, we'll be OK." and the floor after it passed through the net. call him Leo from now on) stint as a coach. His Leo's no poet, but he's a prophet. We're Blessed Tie game, 63-63. We're into overtime. diagrams, motivation tools and strategy worked was OK. They could have won the game in the last Leo's teammates told him not to worry about the smoothly. His team coasted to a 64-56 victory over few seconds, but it slipped out of their grasp. Just like foul. They said it's now a 0-0 game for We're the 106th Signal Brigade. The ever-present smile on a basketball can slip out of the rim. Blessed to win or lose. Leo's face shined just a little brighter as his team Guard Plus had a plan. They talked about their Leo was really on a mission. He went up and held off the last rally. Leo's "big" team was crowned opponent's tendencies. They gave each other guiddown the court. Diving for loose balls, taking nearly champs. Now it was time for the fun part, Leo got to ance. Lots of hand-clapping going on in the halftime every shot. The only one he didn't take was the last play basketball. huddle. Then, "1-2-3, G-Plus." one. The one that didn't fall. His team -We're Blessed -hadn't lost in the The second half was in desperate need of a turning Guard Plus led by one point 72-71 with five double-elimination tournament. His opponent -point. Just when you thought the game was over, it seconds left. They made a bad pass. It was interGuard Plus -lost once and had to come up from the got better. cepted by a We're Blessed player who went the "loser's" bracket. Leo stole a Guard Plus pass, went the distance of distance of the court attempted the easy layup and Guard Plus won the game early. Mostly because of the court, converted the layup. We're Blessed led 39missed. The ball hit the glass, the rim and the floor. It Darryl Kimble's first-half outburst. He scored 10 of 34. It was a possible turning point. didn't find its way to the net. Guard Plus won the his 12 points in the first stanza. Larry Hurt's threeWith 14 minutes left in regulation, Guard Plus game. Leo and his crew weren't blessed. point shooting didn't hurt matters either. He also had forced We're Blessed to shoot outside shots. No easy Leo wasn't angry, just disappointed. 10 first-half points. Guard Plus led 27-23 at the half. shots were allowed. On offense, Hurt nailed a trey. "It's disappointing to me because we had the game The teams played even in the second halfa 20-20 Derrick Carter crashed the offensive boards and tied won," Leo said. "But I can't take anything away from stalemate -and Guard Plus forced an "if" game. the game 42-42 with a layup. them (Guard Plus) they played a great game." Five minutes later, the rematch was on. McInnis We're Blessed took a 46-42 lead on an ugly, but As he was being interviewed, Leo glanced back as was a man on a mission. effective layup in the paint. It forced a Guard Plus a Guard Plus player hit two freethrows for a foul that He'd nail a three-pointer, smile and race down the time-out. happened on the game's last play. Still smiling, he court. Collisions plagued the court as did falling, Leo said, "We're gonna make a run. We need to shook his head and walked away. ters need volunteers for the 1993 Base7. ter will be registering athletes in intraSport Shorts ball and Softball Committee. Cocahes Entry fee is $20 and includes green mural golf, badminton and softball. Dates are also needed. Call 286-3618/4700. fees, polo shirt and lunch at the CPO will be announced later. Call 284-3451. Unit-level hoops ClubNov. 11. The 1992U.S. Army South unit level Golf tournament Entry forms are at the Horoko Golf Turkey shoot basketball program for the Atlantic and Course, Rodman Fitness Center, the MWR Pacific communities is under way and A Veterans Day golftournament will main office and the Information, Tour Outdoor recreation is sponsoring a ends Dec. 18. The tournament will take be held Nov. o at Horoko Golf Course. and Travel Office. Call 283-4454/5307 Frontier Day Turkey Shoot Nov. 14, 8:30 place Jan 4-9. Call 287-4050. The two-person, best-ball event begins or 283-4222/4061 to register. a.m. at the Fort Clayton Pistol Range. at 7:30 a.m. with a shotgun start. There The event consists of five categories: will be four flights. Handicaps are as knife throwing, pistol shooting, sling shot Youth sports follows: "A" players with 0-7 handicap; Youth baseball and bullwhip. All events must be comThe Howard and Albrook youth cen"B" players with 8-15 handicap; "C" The Pacific Little League will hold pleted in one minute. The winner reters are registering boys and girls for the players with 16-22 handicap and "D" registration Nov. 16-17 for boys and girls ceives a 12-14 pound turkey. Cost is $3 1993 baseball and softball seasons. Call players with 23 and above handicap. 6-5yearsold. CallJohn Carlson at 252perperson. Call 287-3363/5807. 284-4700/3618. Golfers can choose their own teams. 2622. The team handicap will be half of the Women's hoops Volunteers needed lnetam fer's handicap oreapl d intramural sports Atlantic women's basketball program The Howard and Albrook youth centhe otheris 16, the team handicap will be The Howard Sports and Fitness Cenregistration is under way. Call 289-3108.

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Tropic Times NFL news Nov.6,1992 N0o sk d me,but. Eagles' Kotite benches Pats will dump Saints, 13-10 slumping Cunningham in the same breath as Albert Einstein, PHILAfour games as or Alfred E. Neuman for that matter. D E LP H IA Cunningham As Randall Cunningham said, "If he (AP) -Slumpslipped to a 54 thinks a week off will help me, he ing Philadelpercent comdoesn't know me as well as I thought phia Eagles V*. pletion perhe knew me." Good call Randall. quarterback centage and Kotite probably thinks he knows Randall Cunhad six passes what he's doing. So did Buddy Ryan. ningham has intercepted. It's called common sense Rich, rent been benched He was some. The Eagles (5-3) entertain the in favor of sacked 17 PATS AND PARITY -Like New (3-5) L.A. Raiders. The Raiders' backup Jim times, many Orleans Saints coach Jim Mora says, defense can be tenacious with a McMahon for times holding parity is alive and well in the NFL. capital T. The Raiders' defense S u n day' s McMahon Cunningham the ball too Nice rhyme Jim, but parity is about permits only 279 yards per game. game against long. In a 7-0 to hit your team like a Lennox Lewis The Eagles are little more "defenthe Los Angeles Raiders. squeaker over Phoenix, Cunningham was uppercut. The Saints (6-2) travel to sive" giving up only 264 yards a But even as the move was announced, 2 for 9 in the second half for 11 yards. Foxboro Stadium to battle the (0-8) week. Here's what you'll see it was characterized as a temporary The situation came to a head Sunday Patsies. New England will play Mora Sunday. Jim McMahon gets hurt. (I measure. when in the first half of a 20-10 loss to for a patsy and finally get their first know, bold prediction) Randall "I don't want you to think that this is Dallas, Cunningham completed 3 of 8 win of the season. No way you say? comes in and wins it in the last three going to be a week-to-week deal or anyfor 13 yards with one interception as the Way! minutes. The Eagles genius owner thing like that," Eagles coach Rich Kotite Eagles fell behind 3-0. Let's take a backo-day-flasho to (The one who fired Buddy Ryan for said Monday. He said McMahon will In the second half, Kotite started the 1980 season. The (0-14) Saints winning) Norman Braman will fire start Sunday, but Cunningham will reMcMahon, who rallied the Eagles to a played the (4-10) Jets and got a Kotite and make Cunningham the turn when the team plays Green Bay the 10-10 tie before the Cowboys surged much-needed win. OK, so the 1992 coach. Eagles 17, Raiders 13. following week. ahead. Saints aren't the 1980 Jets, but He said he be'iched Cunningham beCunningham tried to hide his disapthey're no offensive powerhouse. 49ERS GROUND FALCONS, cause "I want to back him off for a pointment, declaring, "Richie runs this Their offense averages only 17.5 AGAIN -This game isn't worth week," adding he wants the quarterback team. As long as he's the head coach, points per game. On the other foot, discussing. Atlanta's QB Chris to "take some of the pressure off himself, he's got to do his job." the Saints defense permits only 12.9 Miller is out -for good. The 49ers and that's why I did it." Cunningham, who this season broke points per contest. On the other shoe, (6-2) just got spanked by the Phoenix Even if McMahon has a great game the record for career rushing yardage the Patsies score 10.9 a week and Cardinals and are hopping mad. The against the Raiders, Cunningham will gained by a quarterback, spent about an give up a whopping 24 points a Falcons (3-5) got lucky against the return to the starting role, Kotite said. hour Monday talking about his demotion game. The Pats' D is second worst as Rams. So what's the call? Atlanta's "He's our quarterback." with teammates Keith Byars and Seth far as points go. Thank goodness for due for a letdown -and the Falcons Cunningham said, "If he thinks a Joyner. Jerry "There's Elvis" Glanville. So are a letdown. Remember last year's week off will help me, he doesn't know "It wasn't a pep talk," -Cunningham what does all this babble mean? playoff team? Glanville does and it me as well as I thought he knew me." said. "They were just making sure I'm Nothing. The Patsies need a win in a probably makes him sick. So will Kotite said he is not worried about allright, told me to keep my head up, that bad way. The Saints can't score and Monday night's score. 49ers 34, whether this week's move will ignite a everything is going to be cool. You don't the Bucs scored 21 on them last Falcons 13. My record is 70-42. quarterback controversy among the media, let it get you down. You keep going." week. The Pats can't stop anyone In other action, (this one's for all talk shows and fans. Might the move affect his psyche? and can't score. What a gnarly game! the Houston fans at Soto Cano AB, "As far as I'm concerned, there is no "Nah, you've got to bounce back," Pats 13, Saints 10. Honduras) Oilers 30, Brownies 7; controversy," he said. "That's why Cunningham said. "These things hapCryboys 24, Lions 6; Giants 16, Pack McMahon is here, to come in when called pen. If you worry about them, it starts STEELERS GET BUFFALOED -10; Vikes 27, Bucs 23; Jets 21, upon." affecting the way you play. I know what If the Pittsburgh Steelers didn't exist Broncos 13; Rams 17, Cards 10; Cunningham, who missed almost the I have to do, and that's just to keep I'd have a 67.3 percent winning Chiefs 10, Bolts 6; Skins 20, Hawks entire 1991 season after injuring his left concentrating. percentage overall. I'm 0-8 in 7; Bears 23, Kitties 10. knee inthe first halfofthe opener, led the "It's happened to me in the past and it Steelers' games this year, so maybe The Buckster has caught jungle Eagles to victory in the first four games probably will happen again." you should skim down the page to fever. He leaves Monday and will be of 1992 and was named the NFL Player He referred to a playoff game in Januthe next pick. A glutton for punishback Nov. 18. Never fear Buckmaniof the Month for September. He comary 1991, when coach Buddy Ryan rement are you? OK, let's make it acs, the Buckster has left me his pleted74 percent of his passes, throwing moved him in favor of McMahon in the short and sweet. Buffalo (6-2) has to picks for the next three weeks. for eight TDs with no interceptions. third period for one series. Ryan was win because the Fish have to repay Anything can happen in the NFL, But the Eagles lost three of the next fired three days later. the Colts for an earlier loss. The like QBs going down for the count. Steelers (6-2) looked awesome So his winning percentage (I use the against Houston, so they're due for a term "winning" loosely) may drop M ora: Parity is alive and w ell letdown. Thurman "Trying Times" like a thermometer at Lambeau Thomas is ailing. Jim "Whoa Field. We won't hold it against him. NEW ORLEANS (AP) -Coach Jim Morten Andersen missed a field goal Nellie!" Kelly is reeling. Flip a coin. After all, he's a volunteer reporter Mora believes parity is alive and well in attempt. I did. Bills 24, Steelers 20. and an infantryman. Maybe Richard the NFL. And still the Saints won. Gere (of An Officer and Gentleman A day after New Orleans squeaked "The Saints are playing at the top FISH FRY? -The Colts (4-4) fame) could play the role of the past the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Mora level of the NFL," Tampa quarterback have got to feel like the Bolts gave Buckster in a 1993 flick. NOT! scoffed at the praise heaped on his team Steve DeBerg said. "They took almost them the kiss of death Sunday. A 26Buck says, Saints 17, Pats 3; by Bucs coach Sam Wyche, who called everything away at first." 0 loss to a .500-team bodes not well (wimp!) Steelers 23, Bills 20; the Saints the best team in the NFL. The Saints' defense, which ranks third for Indy. Sure, the Colts spanked Dolphins 20, Colts 17; Eagles 17, "I don't believe that and I don't bein the NFC and fourth in the league, had Miami (6-2) in Joe Robbie Stadium Saints 14; 49ers 38, Falcons 24; lieve he believes it," Mora said Monday. its best game against Tampa Bay. The 31-20 a few weeks ago. Hey Ted Oilers 28, Brownies 10; Cryboys 23, OK. So, halfway through the season, Bucs gotonly 154 yards overall, 70passMarchibroda, it's called reality, Lions 14; Giants 24, Pack 14; Vikes how good are the Saints? ing. The Saints, who are second in the check into it. Fish 30, Dolts 17. 23, Bucs 10; Broncos 20, Jets 12; "We're good enough to have won six league in sacks with 28, had three against Cards 16, Rams 14; Chiefs 21, Bolts games by the skin of our teeth," Mora DeBerg and kept pressure on him throughBENCH CUNNINGHAM? -OK. 20; Skins 24, Hawks 10; Bears 26, said. out the game. Let's get one thing out in the open. Kitties 14. Buck's season record is The Saints are also good enough to be He completed just 13 of 25 passes. Rich Kotite will never be mentioned 64-48. 6-2 and tied with San Francisco for the In the season's first six games, New lead in the NFC West. Despite four turnOrleans averaged only 11 points a game. NFL trivia overs Sunday, three of which led to Tampa The offense scored two touchdowns in Bay touchdowns, the Saints managed only one of those games, but they won 1. True or false. The Saints have passes against the Colts. What two their fourth straight victory, 23-21 four of the six and lost the other two by only beaten the Patriots once. teams does he have more against? "It shows we have a strong team when only eight points -15-13 to PhiladelANSWES bwe can make four turnovers and still beat phia and 16-10 to San Francisco. 2. True or false. The Bills have I True. The Patriots hold a 5-1 advantage The people in this league," said Saints lineIn the last two games, the Saints' ofbeaten the Steelers six of the last Saints won the last meeting 28-24 in 1989 in Now backer Rickey Jackson. "I guarantee a fense has scored five TDs. Quarterback England. team won't make four turnovers against Bobby Hebert has thrown for four of seven. False. The Bills have wonof the last, including us and still beat us. I guarantee that." those. Running back Dalton Hilliard has a 52-34 pasting last season. The Saints scored only 10 points in caught two of them and run for another. 3. Who leads the Raiders-Eagles the first halfwhileoutgaining the BuccaThe Saints' next opponent is New series (five games)? 3. The Eagles, 3-2. The last meeting was a 10-7 neers 214 to 15 yards. They had one England, winless so far this season. Mora Eagles'win in 1989. touchdown nullified by a holding penwants to be sure his team understands 4. Dan Marino has 30 career TD 4. Buffalo, 33; N.Y. Jets, 43. alty. Another touchdown pass slid through that could change very quickly if the Quinn Early's hands in the end zone. Saints aren't careful.

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1O Tropic Times Nov. 6, 1992 "We sent the rest of the AFC N n teams a message. We're here, AMERICAN CONFERENCE we're for real and we're not going W L T .Pct PF PA A-, Miami 6 2 0 .750 202 151 Buffalo 6 2 0 .750 206 129 Eric Green Indianapolis 4 4 0 .500 99 158 Steelers tight end N.Y. Jets 2 6 0 .250 130 161 New England 0 8 0 .000 87 192 "We're showing other teams we're good," tight end Central Adrian Cooper said. "It shows other teams we're Pittsburgh 6 2 0 .750 159 97 capable of beating anyone." Houston 5 3 0 .625 199 141 One team they'd like to beat is Buffalo, which hamCleveland 4 4 0 .500 117 131 mered them 52-34 last season as Jim Kelly threw six Cincinnati 3 5 0 .375 139 184 touchdown passes -four to Don Beebe -to lead a West 537-yard Bills offense. They'll get that chance Sunday Denver 5 3 0 .625 121 154 in Buffalo in a matchup of AFC division leaders; the Kansas City 4 4 0 .500 153 128 Bills are tied with Miami for the Eastern Division lead. San Diego 4 4 0 .500 130 136 Coach Bill Cowher hugged his players and celeL.A. Raiders 3 5 0 .375 122 137 S brated along the sidelines afterSunday's 21-20 victory Seattle 1 7 0 .125 53 158 over Houston, but he's not yet ready to assess how far the Steelers have come -and how far they can go. NATIONAL CONFERENCE He knows they'll get a much better idea Sunday in East W L T .Pet PF PA Rich Stadium. Dallas 7 1 0 .875 187 122 "Beating Houston was our biggest win in the sense Washington 5 3 0 .625 143 129 that it's getting laterin the season," he said. "It was big Philadelphia 5 3 0 .625 153 97 AP LasrPhoto for our football team because we knew what was at N.Y. Giants 4 4 0 .500 174 168 Pittsburgh Steelers running back Barry Foster breaks stake. Now, the Buffalo game is even bigger." Phoenix 2 6 0 .250 137 191 through the Kansas City Chiefs' line during the And not just because it matches division leaders. The Central Steelers' victory in Arrowhead Oct. 25. longer the Steelers maintain at least atie with Houston, Minnesota 6 2 0 .750 211 137 the more difficult it will become for the Oilers to repeat Chicago 4 4 0 .500 179 193 as division champions. Green Bay 3 5 0 .375 117 164 Houston has now letthe Steelers get away twice this Tampa Bay 3 5 0 .375 157 175 season, and it could haunt the Oilers at the end because: Detroit 2 6 0 .250 160 162 I, Houston must win the division outright to enter the West playoffs as the AFC Central champion. A tie Won't be San Francisco 6 2 0 .750 230 149 good enough; the Steelers already own the first tiebreakNew Orleans 6 2 0 .750 140 103 Surprising Steelers ing criteria: head-to-headresults. L.A. Rams 3 5 0 .375 149 163 The schedule favors the Steelers in the second half. Atlanta 3 5 0 .286 163 207 face toughest foe -The Oilers have only one home game in November, on Sunday against Cleveland. The Steelers are at home for Sunday the Steelers from the 70's five of their last eight, and they've still got Cincinnati Cleveland at Houston, 1 p.m. (3-5), Seattle (1-7) and Detroit (2-6) to play. Dallas at Detroit, 1 p.m. PITTSBURGH (AP) -Every week, the g ame gets The deeper the Steelers get into their schedule, the Green Bay at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m. bigger. Every week, the pressure increases. Every week, more they're convinced they are a legitimate, playoffLA. Raiders at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. they mount a stronger argument they are the Pittsburgh caliber team fueled by a often-spectacular, big-play Miami at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. Steelers' best team since the 1970s. .defense and a solid 100-yard rusher in Barry Foster. He Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. A first-place team halfway through the NFL season, already has six 100-yard games; the team record is New Orleans at New England, 1 p.m. the Steelers are arguably the NFL's unexpected success seven by Franco Harris in 1972. N.Y. Jets at Denver, 4 p.m. story of 1992. Now that they've taken six of eight "We're not the same team we were in the past," Phoenix at LA. Rams,4 p.m. opponents, and taken over first place in the AFC Censafety Carnell Lake said. "Coach Cowher's given us Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 4 p.m. tral, how are the Steelers taking it? new confidence, a new attitude and new aggressiveSan Diego at Kansas City, 4 p.m. "We're getting real excited," linebacker Jerrol ness. We're starting to believe we're a good team." washington at Seattle, 4 p.m. Williams said. "We sent therest ofthe AFC tears a message," tight Cincinnati at Chicago, 8 p.m. "We're starting to get some respect around the NFL. end Eric Green said. "We're here, we're for real and Monday We've beaten Houston twice, beaten Kansas City." we're not going away." San Francisco at Atlanta, 9 p.m. Washington's Stanford win secures No. 1 spot Huskies move 6 points Arizona's 30-0 victory past Miami~Hurricanes, Wover New Mexico State who beat Mountaineers lifted the Wildcats five NEW YORK (AP) -Washington's spots to No. 12, their impressive 41-7 victory over nationally highest rankin since finranked Stanford lifted the Huskies back to No. 1 in Sunday's Associated Press .fishing 11th in 1986. college football poll. The Huskies, who trailed Miami by Boston Collegeisin theTop10 forth one point last week, moved six points first time since finishing fifth in 1984. ahead of the Hurricanes after beating Southern Cal is 11th, followed by Arithen-No. 15 Stanford. zona, Kansas, Florida, Georgia, ColoMiami easily beat unranked West Virrado, North Carolina State, North Caroginia 35-23 Saturday, but three late touchlina, Mississippi State, Texas, Stanford, downs against the Hurricanes may have Ohio State, Penn State, Tennessee and cost them the No. 1 ranking in the media Washington State. poll. Arizona's 30-0 victory over New Washington topped Miami 33 1/2 to Mexico State lifted the Wildcats five 27 1/2 in first-place votes and 1,520 1/2 spots to No. 12, their highest ranking to 1,514 1/2 points. since finishing 11th in 1986. Miami barely retained its No. 1 rankP.Ph.to Kansas (7-1) jumped from No. 18 to ing in the USA Today-CNN coaches' Washington's Napoleon Kaufman (8) breaks past Pacific's Jason vasconez No. 13 after beating Oklahoma State 26poll, edging Washington by one point. during a Washington victory Oct. 24 18. TheJayhawks haven't been this high ~ Both 8-0 teams received 30 first-place its lead Saturday when it visits No. 12 after beating Southern Methodist 41-7, in the AP poll since rising to No. 8 in votes from the coaches. Arizona (5-2-1), which lost by a point to and Florida State (7-1) stayed No.6 after 1976. Last year's co-national champions have Miami earlier this season at the Orange downing Virginia 13-3. Both Georgia (7-2) and Colorado (6taken turns at the top of the AP poll this Bowl. Nebraska (6-1) rose one notch to No. 1-1) dropped eight spots after losing on season. Miami was No. 1 forthe first five Alabama didn't play Saturday, but the 7 after clobbering Colorado 52-7. Notre Saturday. Georgia was beaten by Florida weeks, Washington led the next three Crimson Tide (8-0) still managed to get Dame (6-1-1) moved up two spots to No. 26-24. polls and the teams tied for the top spot one first-place vote and move past Michi8 following a 38-7 victory over Navy, Ohio State,ranked earlierthis season, the following week. Miami then took gan to No. 3 in theAP poll. Michigan (7Boston College (7-0-1) climbed two places moved backinto the Top 25 after beating sole possession of first for one week be0-1) dropped to No. 4 after struggling to to No.9 afterdefeating Temple 45-6, and Iowa 38-15. Virginia, No. 23 last week, fore falling to No. 2 Sunday. beat unranked Purdue 24-17. Syracuse (7-1) went from No. 12 to No. fell out ofthe rankings following its loss Washington has a chance to solidify Texas A&M (8-0) remained No. 5 10 after beating Pittsburgh 41-10. to Florida State.

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Tropic Times Nov. 6, 1992 Magic's departure shuffles NBA balance NEW YORK (AP) -Magic Johnson's surprise second retirement will shuffle the balance of power again in the NBA when its 47th season opens with 11 games tonight. With Johnson back, some believed the Los Angeles Lakers would return to title contention, a position they enjoyed for the entire decade of the 1980s. Others thought they at least would have a say in who would play in the Western Conference finals. Without Johnson last season, the Lakers faced tight competition in their own territory for the first time, when the Los Angeles Clippers made the playoffs for the first time and the Lakers barely made it on the final day of the regular season. That competition begins anew tonight when the Lakers face the Clippers at the L.A. Sports Arena. "We can't be considered in the same class we were before," general manager Jerry West said. "We're ~ unsure; we don't know what we have." "I don't think this makes us totally a rebuilding team, but some things are obvious," rookie coach Randy Pfund said. "When you lose a superstar and a player that's your leader, that creates alittle different expectation than we started with this year." In other openers tonight, it will be Minnesota at Boston, New Jersey at Philadelphia, Miami at Orlando, New York at Atlanta, Washington at Charlotte, Chicago at Cleveland, Milwaukee at Detroit, Golden State at Utah, San Antonio at Sacramento, and Seattle vs. Houston at Tokyo. Three teams will be at home when they play their first games Saturday night, with Utah at Dallas, San Antonio at Denver, Detroit at Indiana and the Clippers at Phoenix. Portland will be the last team to make its debut, when it entertains Denver on Sunday night. The Lakers, who in 1991-92 had their worst season (43-39) in 16 years, again will have to start Sedale Threatt at point guard instead of Johnson. Tony Smith is expected to be Threatt's backup, with Pfund also high AP LawPhoto on rookies Duane Cooper and Anthony Peeler. During happier times, Magic Johnson (left) and then Lakers'coach Pat Riley Celebrate after beating the "I want to see Peeler and Cooper very soon backing Durin Certis Magic Fnnl up Sedale,"Pfund said. "They've been looking good at Boston Celtics in the 1987 NBA Final. practice." Until Mourning is signed -agent David Falk ance. He averaged 19.2 points. The Lakers' older players include Byron Scott, James said Mourning is prepared to sit out the season until his "He's much more comfortable, but not in the Worthy and Sam Perkins, all 31, and James Edwards, salary demands are met -Charlotte will start sense that he's going to relax," Bristow said. "I 36. Other veterans include center Vlade Divac and A.C. veteran Mike Gminski at center. think at the last part of last year, he felt comfortable with Green. But even without Mourning and his expected impact his teammates and with the NBA. Anotherteamlikelytoopenits season without akey on rebounding and shot-blocking, the Hornets nearly "He knows what he had to work on during the player is the Charlotte Hornets, who are still hoping made the playoffs last season behind their top draft summer. I think he feels comfortable with his teamholdout Alonzo Mourning, the No. 2 pick in the 1992 picks of the past two years, Kendall Gill and Larry mates and the talent level around him, and the guys are draft, will lead them to their first playoff berth. Johnson. looking up more and more to him." "I don't have a good feel about how much he has "They are two guys that we look to lead us, and we Gill, who made the 1991 all-rookie team and avermissed or how much that will hurt us," coach Allan feel withthe addition of Alonzo and theroleplayers, we aged 20.5 points last season, said he and Johnson have Bristow said. "Once we get him adjusted to playing feel good about our team," Bristow said. to be the Hornets' leaders. with the guys, maybeit will be a weekorso before I can Johnson, a holdout who signedjust priorto the start "We're the go-to guys," Gill said. "If we don't, have a gauge on that." of last season, turned in arookie-of-the-year performnobody else will, I don't think." London may snag Blue Jays 'bought' series $44 million, followed by Los Angeles at Toronto spent $49.1 mn $42.1 million. TheDodgers finished last heavyweight cham p for its 1992 players for the first time since 1905. Boston, which finished last for the NEW YORK (AP) -The recently first time since 1932, was fifth at $42 LONDON (AP) -British fight pro"But the crowd at Earls Court lifted crowned kings of professional baseball million. moter Frank Maloney said Monday he Lennox," Maloney said. -the Toronto Blue Jays -paid big The totals include salaries and prohas started negotiations to bring the "When Ruddock and his people were money to win big. rated shares of signing bonuses and other world heavyweight champion to Loncoming out from the dressing room he The World Series champions paid their guaranteed money, plus earned bonuses. don to fight Lennox Lewis. must have been intimidated but you players a record $49.1 million this seaThe figures, which were compiled by Lewis earned the right to fight for could see that Lennox Lewis' chest son, according to documents distributed management's Player Relations Comthe title by knocking out Canadian Donoseemed to get bigger. Ruddock could this week to major league general manmittee, do not include all award bonuses, van "Razor" Ruddock inside two have had the whole of the Canadian agers. That's a 57 percent increase from but they shouldn't significantly alter the rounds on Saturday and is contracted to army in the ring that night but it wouldn't the Blue Jays' 1991 payroll of $31.3 data. The documents were distributed an April fight against the winner of the have helped him." million. Monday during meetings at La Quinta, Nov. 13 bout between champion EvanLondon-born Lewis will be ringside Overall, the 772 players on Aug. 31 Calif. der Holyfield and Riddick Bowe. for the Holyfield-Bowe fight at Las rosters made $807.8 million this season, Cleveland had the lowest payroll at Maloney accepted, however, it would Vegas. .an average of $1,046,420 per player. The $9.3 million, the first payroll under $10 be a difficultjob persuading Holyfield "It doesn't matter where the fight is, total was up 21.7 percent from the $663.7 million since the 1990 Baltimore Orior Bowe to defend the title in Britain. I'm fully confident I can beat either million spent on players in 1991, and up oles. Houston was next at $14.8 million, "We aretalking to people to find out man," he said. "But I don't believe 79.1 percent from the $450.9 million in followed by Montreal at $16.1 million. if we can stage the fight here," said Holyfield will take a chance to come 1990. The only clubs whose payrolls deMaloney, who estimated some 12,000 over here. He will be taking a big risk Toronto paid its players an average of cined from 1991 were Cleveland, Monwatched the Lewis-Ruddock fight at if he does and I don't think the Duvas $1,637,572, according the documents, treal and Kansas City. Earls Court in central London. "The (Lou and Dan) will take that chance. which were obtained Wednesday by The The documents also showed players trouble is we have got to find some"I am on a mission and the mission Associated Press. earned about 45 percent of possible perthing like $28 million if Evander Holyhas not stopped yet," said the unbeaten The Blue Jays were one of only four formance bonuses this year, down slightly field is coming across the Atlantic. Lewis, who won the 1988 Olympic clubs that didn't pay released players this from the 50 percent earned in 1991. FortyAnd that's for Holyfield alone." super-heavyweight title while fighting season. four percent were earned in 1990. "The dream is not to fight for the as a Canadian. "The Americans have The Oakland Athletics, who had the California had the highest terminaworld title but to win the world title," kept the title for such a long time and top payroll in 1991 at $39.2 million, were tion pay, $6.1 million, including Don Maloney said. "It would be an even people usually have to go overthere to second this yearat $47.5 million, includRobinson, Von Hayes and Lance Parrish. bigger dream to have that fight here." fight them. But when I win the title I'm ing $1.7 million in termination pay. Pittsburgh was second at $4.3 million, So far Holyfield has not defended going to make them come over to The New York Mets, who slumped to including Walt Terrell, Kirk Gibson and his title outside the United States. England." fifth place in the NL East, were third at Bill Landrum.

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12 Tropic Times Nov. 6,1992 Savings plan open-season begins and G Fund, 7.51 percent. Agency Matching Contributions. Flyer, booklet offer Employees may make a TSP election if their latest Employees wishing to enroll or change their enroll..*appointment to a position covered by FERS or CSRS ment must complete TSP-1, Thrift Savings Plan elecadditional basic info was made during theperiod ofJan. 1 -June30, orifthey tion form. This form is available at the Technical were rehired to a position covered by FERS or CSRS Services Division and must be completed and turned in FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Employees before Dec. 31 and had been eligible to participate in by Jan. 31. will have a chance to enroll or change their Thrift the TSP during a prior open season. If the Directorate of Civilian Personnel, Benefits Savings Plan amount during the open-season that beIfemployees stopped theirTSPcontributions before Branch, accepts an election before Jan. 9, it will be gins Nov. 15 and ends Jan. 31. July 31, they may resume contributions this open seaeffective Jan. 10. Paychecks dated Feb. 4 will reflect According to the Benefits Branch, employees may son. If they stopped contributions after Aug. 1, they this election. If an open season election is made after invest all or any portion of their TSP contributions in may not begin contributing again until the next TSP this date, it will be effective Jan. 24. any of the funds. These funds are the Government Seopen season, May 15. The booklet Summary of the Thrift Savings Plan for curities Investment (G)Fund, the Common Stock Index If employees are not making contributions, they may Federal Employees, dated September 1990, describes Investment (C) Fund and the Fixed Income Index Instill make a TSP election to invest all or any portion of the TSP in detail. vestment (F) Fund. their Agency Automatic Contributions in any of the The flyer Open Season Update, Nov. 15, 1992 -Jan. This is true whether employees are covered by the three funds,evenifthey are not ableto makeanelection 31, 1993, contains basic information about this TSP open Federal Employees' Retirement System or the Civil to contribute this open season because they stopped season. Service Retirement System. contributing after Aug. 1. If employees would like a copy of the Plan SumMoney invested in the thrift funds earned interest If employees aremaking contributions, theirinvestmary, call the Directorate of Civilian Personnel, Techover the 12-month period which ended in August as ment election applies to all contributions in their TSP nical Services Division, Benefits Branch, at 285-5745/ follows; C Fund, 8.13 percent; F Fund, 13.25 percent; account such as employee, Agency Automatic and 5941. Turbo turkeys readying trikes FORT CLAYTON (Directorate of Community Activities ) -The Fort Clayton Youth Center is sponsoring the Turbo Turkey International 2 to be held at the playground next to the youth center, Nov. 21 at 11 a.m. "This is our second year for Turbo Turkey International and we expect a large crowd," said youth center programmer, Paul Tommee. "The entire family is invited to participate. It is free and prizes will be awarded." The event consists of various competitions ranging from a big wheel race, parent/ child tricycle relay, skateboard race and a roller skate race. "There are a lot more categories this year, so a preregistration is needed so we can set up everything beforehand," Tommee said. Registration deadline is Nov. 19. Call Tommee at the youth center, 287-6451. Youngsters battle it out during the tricycle relay at last year's Turbo Turkey International. Couy PhM Airfare savings available Program keeps students on their toes RODMAN NAVAL STATION (Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation) -Military members and FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The students Last week, Capt. Catherine With, alawyerfrom U.S. civilians going to the United States fortheChristat Curundu Junior High School have the opportunity to Army South's Office ofthe StaffJudge Advocate at Fort mas holidays can save on air fares through the see that experience can sometimes be the best teacher Clayton, visited four of the mini courses and taught Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation holiday through the Enrichment Program offered by the school. various law topics to the students. travel program. The primary reason for the program is to provide "It was a pleasure working with these highly motiFRights will leave Dec. 19 and 20 and return students who have demonstrated superior academic vated students," With said. "They were willing to Jan. 2 and 3. Space will be limited. The deadline achievement and motivationthe opportunity to explore explore some very complicated legal concepts." for signing up for the flights will be Dec. 14. outside the traditional school curriculum. Sarah Livingston, an eighth grader in the course, said Call the Rodman Information, Tourand Travel "The mini course program, which has been in existhe law class was interesting. "It was interesting beOffice, 283-5307/4454 for final destination price tence for at least the last eight years at Curundu, cause I might be a lawyer. I now know more about it," quotes and reservations. supplements the regular program," said Dr. Charles she said. Renno, principal of Curundu Junior High School. "The "The thing I like about the mini course is it gives courses, which cover a wide range of interests, extend you something to do besides the normal studies," said Food drive underway the regular program and provide a challenge to interninth grader Madeline Nealy. "It keeps you on your F)RT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The annual ested students." toes." Thanksgiving food drive, coordinated by Army Community Services for the U.S. Army South Healtn benefits open-season communtity, is now underway. H at be fiso na onset Units must furnish alist of families designated FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The 1992 and health club memberships. to receive Thanksgiving food baskets and a Health Benefits Open Season begins Monday and runs If a plan offers such benefits, they will be shown on iofsing inn er oAC g sponsored forThanksthrough Dec. 14. Eligible employees and retirees may a page clearly marked -"Non-FE HB benefits av ailable giving dinner, to ACS between Tuesday and Nov. enroll or change plans or options. to plan members." Benefits shown on this page are not 13. Eligible employees are permanently employed United part of the FEHB contract. The plan may cancel beneCall Maggie Coleman, project coordinator, at States citizens and permanent non-U.S. citizens who fits at any time and the costs are not included in the 285-4500/4857 for more information. have been continuously employed since Sept. 30, 1979, FEHB premiums. These benefits are not subject to the and do not have coverage under the Panama Social disputed claims procedures. Singles group beginning Security System. Employees must complete a health Registration SF FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -A new Temporary U.S. citizen employees who have 2809Formtoenroll. The forns, whichis availableatthe group for single military, Panama Canal Comone year of current continuous employment may parTechnical Services Division, Benefits Branch, must be vision and embassy people over the age of 30 is ticipate in the program. Temporary employees who submitted before the cose of business Dec. 14. starting. have a year of continuous service ifter the open Chang 10res should be made as early as possible in the The Unified Professional Singles, will meet season will be able to enroll within 31 datys after Op 0nSiason T changes will be effective on the first monthly attheValent Recreation Center.Thefirst becoming eligible. da oI tihe first pay pinod on or after Jan. 1. meeting will be Nov. 15 with future meeting to be Eligible temporary employees who enroll in [ih BoklIes ind plAn brochures are available from the held the third Sunday of each month. FEIHIB program will have the lull premum wihhhid lii hniAi Scrvices DivisionoftheDirectorate ofCivilCall 286-4235, evenings or 252-7896, days for from their pay. il PersonfnlI more information. The Office ofPersonnel Managnit ii has pitined Inlormnation on next year's premiums can be obhealth plans to advertise non-l' 11113 bi eiits %ich as ained lrom administrative officers. long term care, vision care, expanded dicntAl binelits For more information, call 285-5745.

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N Tropictivi ies Nov. 6,1992 An entertainment guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page 4EE US. Amy photo by Sgt.JamnYocum Rick Lindvig rolls a ball down Clayton Lanes. Bowling leagues offer after-duty entertainment. See story, photos page B5. An FBI agent's three sons use their Nissan King Cab 4X4 an attractive TV .B3 ninja skills to defeat evil in 3 Ninjas import with adequate power to get Fishing fun .B9 at Fort Clayton. the job done. Ads .B10

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Tropic Times B 2 Nov. 6, 1992 9pm Stay Tuned (PG) John Ritter, Pam Dawber Thursday Sunday 7pm Raising Cain (R) John Lithgow, Lolita Davido2pm Little Nemo (G) Animated vitch 7pm 3 Ninjas (PG) Victor Wong, Michael Treanor Nov.13 H Monday 7pm Boomerang (R) Eddie Murphy, Robin Givens Today 7pm Stay Tuned (PG) John Ritter, Pam Dawber 6:30pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13) Tuesday Tom Selleck, Marlon Brando 7pm Raising Cain (R) John Lithgow, Lolita Davidovitch 9:10pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash Wednesday AMADOR Saturday 7pm Stay Tuned (PG) John Ritter, Pam DawbersToa 2pm Freddy as F.R.O.7. (0) Animated Thursday Today 6:30pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13) 7pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe 7pm Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Tom Selleck Marion Brando Nov. 13 Smith 9:10pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash 7pm 3 Ninjas (PG) Victor Wong, Michael Treanor 7pm Buffy Saturday Sunday pm BfyTeVampire Slayer (PG13) Donald Suter2pm Freddy As F.R.O.7. ()G Animated SHERMANland, Kirsty Swanson 6:30pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13) Toda 7pm Freddy As F.R.O.7. (PG) Animated Tom Selleck, Marlon Brando y 9:10pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash 7pm Death Becomes Her (PG-13) Goldie Hawn, Bruce Thursday Monday Willis 7pm Death Becomes Her(PG-13) Goldie Hawn, Bruce 7pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash Saturday Willis 9pm Whispers In The Dark (R) Annabella Sciorra, 7pm Unlawful Entry (R) Kurt Russell, Madeleine Stowe Nov.13 Jamey Sheridan Sunday 7pm A Stranger Among Us (PG) Melanie Griffith, Tuesday 7pm Lethal Weapon III (R) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover Eric Thal 6:30pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery )PG-13) Tom Selleck, Marlon Brando 9:10pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash 3 Ninjas Wednesday 7pm Whispers In The Dark (R) Annabella Sciorra, Victor Wong, Jamey Sheridan 9pmn Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash 9 Thursday AMERICA'S NEWEST HEROES Michael Treanor 7pm Mo' Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash While their father is 9pm Whispers In The Dark (R) Annabella Sciorra, Jamey Sheridan occupied with his FBI Nov. 13 business, his young sons 7pm The Gun In Betty Lou's Handbag (PG-13) Penelope h Miller, Eric Thal cope with his absence 9pm Whispers In The Dark (R) Annabella Sciorra, by learning the ways of Jamey Sheridan the ninja from grandpa. Their new skills are put CLAYTON to the test when an arms Today dealer tries to kidnap 7pm 3 Ninjas (PG-13) Victor Wong, Michael Treanor d 9pm Stay Tuned (PG) John Ritter, Pam Dawber them to keep Dad from Saturday shutting him down. PG 2pm Bebe's Kids (G) Animated 7pm Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith (Violence), 93 min. 9pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe Sunday 2pm Bebe's Kids (G) Animated Clayton Theater, 7pm Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith today. Davis Theater, 9pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe Monday Saturday, Sunday 7pm Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith VlP"and Nov. 13. 9pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe Tuesday Freddy As F.R.O.7 7pm stranger Among Us (PG-13) Melanie Griffith, Animated Eric Thai nmae 9pm Rapid fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe This frantic froggy fantasy follows Freddy super agent. He battles a variety of dangerous villains from his Wednesday headquarters in Paris. PG, 90 min. 7pm A Stranger Among Us (PG-13) Melanie Griffith, Eric Thal Christopher Columbus: The Discovery 8:50pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13) Tom Selleck, Marlon Brando Tom Seleck, Maron Brando He believed he could sail with rivers of air into the new world. Join the adventure as the famed explorer risks 6:30 Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13) all he has against incredible odds to chart an expedition across the sea into the unknown. PG-13 (violence, Tom Selleck, Marlon Brando nudity), 122 min. 9:10pm Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith Nov.13 Mo' Money 6:30pm Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (PG-13) Damon y a Tom Selleck, Marion Brando Damn ayans, Stacy Dash 9:10pm Mo'Money (R) Damon Wayans, Stacey Dash Johnny is a con artist trying to go straight and win the heart of a lovely lady executive at the credit card company where he works in the mailroom. Check out the action as Damon wayans is torn between vice and virtue.and enjoy some fine new music from Luther Vandross, Color Me Badd, Public Enemy and Johnny Gill as the story unspools. R (violence, language), 97 min. DAVIS Today Whispers In The Dark 7pm Boomerang (R) Eddie Murphy, Robin Givens Annabella Sciorra, Jamey Sheridan Saturday A doctor-patient relationship involving bizarre sexual fantasies is abruptly violated when the psychiatrist 2pm Little Nemo (G) Animated falls in love with her patient's fantasy lover. R (violence, sex, language) 102 min. 7pm 3 Ninjas (PG) Victor Wong, Michael Treanor 10:05am Car Talk 12:17pm Music 11:05pm Music 2:35pm Paul Harvey's Reat of the Story 12:05pm ABC NBC News 2:40pm Music 3:12pm Paul Harvey's Rest of the Story 3:05pm Pentagon Newsbreak Below is the schedule for SCN AM 12:09am Music 3:17pm Paul Harvey News and Commentary 3:11pm Armed Forces Digest 7780 Pacific and 1420 Atlantic 7:05am NPR Weekend Edition 3:30pm Music 3:17pm Air Force Radio News Radio, 9:05am Music 4:05pm NPR All Things Considered 3:23pm APR Business Barometer features a mix of news on the hour and 10:05am Music 5:05pm ABC News 3:25pm ABC Sportscast music from Armed Forces Radio and 12:05pm ABC NBC News 5:17pm CBS Down to Earth 3:28pm ABC Bill Diehl's Spotlight Television Service tapes. News blocks 13:30pm Music 5:21pm NASA The Space Story 3:30pm Music from AFRTS Voice Channel air periodi1:06pm ABC NBC News 5:26pm CBS Sports Central 4:05pm UPI Sportscast the day including s i2:17pm Music 5:30pm UPI Roundtable 4:08pm NPR All Things Considered cally throughout tedyicungsos,3:05pma ABC News 6:05pm Music 5:05pmn UPI Radio Sports business news, commentary, Paul Har3:11pm NBC News 5:08pm NPR All Things Considered vey News, Commentary, and Rest of the 3:17pm CBS News 5:30pm CBS The World Tonight Story. Also aired are National Public 3:25pm ABC World of Sports Weekdays 6:05pm Music Radio's Morning Edition, All Things 4:05pm All Things Considered Midnight Sign on Considered and Car Talk on AM along 5:O5pmo Music 12:09am Music with sporting and special events. 5:05am NPR Morning Edition APR Network News airs on the hour, Saturdays 9:30am CBS World News Roundup every hour except midnight. All proMidnight Sign on 9:45am ABCIAPR Sports grams scheduled above are subject to Sunday 12:09am Music 10:05am Music pre-emption for sports events or news Midnight Sign on 8:05am NPR Weekend Edition 12:05pm Paul Harvey News and Commentary specials.

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Tropic Times #TV Schedule N, B3 Channels 8 & 10 Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Nov. 13 6:30.o NBC News a Suntrise 630am CareolinaMrioes 6:00=n Rcbrn Schullor Hoarof 6:30=, NBC News at Suorise 6:30w, NBC News at Sunise 6:30-, NBC News at Sunse 6:30-, NBC News .Su.ns 6:30 NBC News at Stari 7:00 ABCGoodMfmig 700 AirForeNews Power 7:00 ABCGoodMooing 7:00 ABCGodMoriog 7:00 ABCGoodMorning 7:00 ABCGoodM -orlog 7:00 ABCGoodMmnig Amera 730 Navy New, This Week 6:30 Thirty Good Mi-utks America Amorica Amerca Anda Ameyya 9:00 Body by Jk, :00 Carnoon Coere 7:00 Studio 7 9:00 Body by Jake 9:00 Body by lake 900 Body by Jake 9:00 Body by Jake 9:00 Body by Jake 9:30 Se-ame3-rest :30 J1-tForKIlc 7:30 Th.700Club 9:30 SeswmoSlrest 9:30 SesameSt-rat 9:30 SesameStret 9:30 Seau-Sueat 9:30 SosameStrew 10:30 SpaceshipEarb Woody Woodpecker :00 Botb Skies w/Jeaai 10:30 Family DOblD=r 10:30 SilverSpoon 10:30 BackToTheFuure 10:30 SilverSpoo 10-30 Speresiplanth 11:00 FamilyFeud Biskita Jackso 11:00 FamilyProd 11:00 FoilyFetd 11:00 FamilyFeud 11:00 Familyfetal 11:00 FamilyFeud 11:30 SbowbieToday BackToThe~uoe 6:30 Waablogtoo Werkln 11:30 SbowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 SkewbioToday Noon HeadlineNews Break WidgeT Review Noon HeadlineNews Brook NoHoadline News Break Noon Headline New. Non Headline News Break Noo Headline News Break 12:13 SCNMiddoy 10:30 HeroBreraCartoons 9:00 CBSSoodayMoering 12:10 SCNMidday 12:10 SCNMidday 12:30 SpoosLateNight 12:15 SCNMidday 1115 SCNMidday 1230 Sponr Laaorght 11:35 Headline News Break 10:30 PaceTh Natio 12:30 SporaMachlco 12:30 Sporaa laht 1:00 OpeabWiofrey 12:30 SponsLanlght 12:30 Sportibs Ieh 1:00 OprabWinfroy Noo Why Ao Anoy #6 11:00 HradlinrNewa 1:00 Opab Winfrey 1:00 Doonabh 2:00 AnotberWorld 100 Donabar 1:00 OprabWinfrey 2:00 AnotberWorld 12:30 CNBC Buines Review 11:30 This Week W/Dav:d 200 AnotherWorld 2:00 Aoo'.eWord 3:00 Price Is rBight 2:00 Anor erWol 2:00 AnodherWodd 300 PRcelaight 1:00 CPA Foolball: Boston Brinkley 3:00 Poce Is Right 3:00 Price s Right 4:00 WareeBrolbors 300 PrisRrghl 300 Pr Is Rigt 4:00 ThinkFuaaI College vs. Notre Dame 12:30pmrebony/Jet1Showcau 4:00 Wild & Czy Kids 4:00 SquareOnrTV Ca0.ooo 4.00 PaoolyDoobleDar 400 ThrnkFasl 425 GidingLigbl 3:30 CFAFootban: 1:00 NFLFootball: Dolphins 4:25 GuidingLighd 4:25 GuidingLigbt 4:25 GuidiogLight 4:25 GuidiogLight 4:25 GidiogLight 5:15 General Hopital Wbiogon va. Arzoa vs Cobs ':15 Gneral Hoaspital 5:15 Goneal Hospital 5:15 GneralHosi 0:10 GeeratHospital 0:1 G1oeral Hospital 6:00 SCNEv-nlgRoport (JIPod) 4:00 StarTrk 6:00 SCNBeringReport 6:00 SCNlEveinglRepeo 6:00 Sciwco & Technology 6:00 SCNEval.ngRpon 6:00 SCN BvoingRqrort 6:15 HeadlineNews 6:30 HadlineNew. 5:00 HdlineNews 6:15 HeadlineNews Break 6:10 HeadlineNew Break 6:30 WoldNewsTonight 6:15 HeadlkieNewa Break 6:15 Headline Newa Break 6:30 WoddNewaTolght 7:00 FightBackl w/David 5:30 OnStage 6:30 WmddNewsTonlgbt 6:30 WerddNewaTonight 7:00 Jeopsodyl 6:30 WorddNewsToalgt 630 WedrdNewaTonglhl 7:00 Jeopardyl Heowllz 6:00 WWFWreetling 7:00 Jeopardy 7:00 Jepardy 7:30 WedeodayNightMovin: 7:00 Jeopardyl 7:00 Jopaodyl 7:30 TsllTal-aad Lcgeods 7:30 Aostin City Lorits 7:00 Special: USMC 7:30 Anybiog BulLove 7:30 Answe.Lin: Topic.StarfliitOne" 7:30 HeadlineNews Break 7:30 TsllTalesandLegeods6:30 P1mtmeLive 6:30. Special:USMC Annivrsary -he Gallant 6:00 EvenigShade OutdoerRecrealim 9:30 CBS Evening News 7:4 CPA Foodall: TexasA& 8:30 Primr.kneLiv 9:30 CBS 1vonlog News Aonlvervary "The Hroes" (P.2 of 3) 6:30 USMC Anniveraary The 6:30 Special: lleritagrof 10:00 Entretmon TonighL M vs. Howler 9:30 CBS Evering News 10'00 EmealronlTonight (Lai.eIBrend (P.1 of3) 8:00 SondayNlghtMovle: Galloeroes" (P1.3) Glory-ThrU.S. 10:30 L.A.Law 11:00 HeadlieNews 10:00 Eonthtaxm aTookgt 10:30 St. Eswewher 9:20 SaurdiytNgbMovio: 'An econvmiat 9:30 CBS veering News Marine Corps Story 11:30 Pille 11:30 SCNLatEdio 10:30 St. sowhere 11:30 SCNNew Upda e "Bn n Eas LA." Wonun"(Pt.l c12) 10:00 Ftiertainment Tonight 9:30 CBS Evning News 11:35 TonightShow 11:30 TonighLShw 11:30 SCNLaeEdibon 11:35 TolghteShow 11:00 HeadlineNews 9:40 HeadlineNews 10:30 Dynasty 10:00 EntrtainmertTonighLt 12:35-1, L-lrighW/Lelermun 12:35amLatcnlghtW/Lstleurm 11:35 TonightShow 12:35amLaenorlW/Loeneran 11:30 SatrdayNIghtLlve 10:00 E.nlrtainmotThlsWrak 11:30 SCNLaledition 10:30 MikeHimmer 1:35 Nigtlie 1:35 Nightlioc 12:35sralonightW/ 1:35 NigLline 1:0am Friday Night Vido. 11:00 bospecloeMoese 11:35 TonigheShw 11:30 SCN LalEdltion 2:0S Headlibe News Break 2:0 Hedline News Break 1.elermr 2:05 AllNightMovtea:"Co2:00 AllNightMovies: MidnigtLrryKingLive 12:35m LatonightW/Ltbonoan 11:35 TonightShow 2:30 SportT.nigt 2:30 SporesTunight 1.35 Nightline Chnd" "rarists of Fire" 1:00 Business Wodd 1:35 Nightline 12:35an Lantigltw/Lotterna 3:00 Araoio Hall 3:00 ArsenioHafl Show 2:05 All Night Merina: 3:35 AllNightMovier: 4:00 AliNigh' Movios: 1:30 HeadlineNew, 2:05 HedlineNews Break 1:35 Nightie 4:00 TontgbhShow 4:00 TonightShow "Jutpin'Jack Flash" "Podalor" "BoeinEaolLA." 2:00 McGlaughlinGroup 2:30 SporsLatenightL 2:05 HeadleNrws Break :00 L nighlW/Lsttoran 5:00 LaLnghtW/Lstbonu 3:50 AllNigtMovIes: 5:15 Videolnks 5:35 HeadlineNews Break 2:30 SportsMacbine 3:00 Armaon Hall 2:30 SportsLatrngt 6:00 HeadlineNews Break 600 Headline News "RevegeroTINords" 6:00 Headline News 3:00 CNN Cotinues 4:00 TonightShow 3:00 AseriolHall 5:15 Vdeolinks 6:30 HoadloeNews Break 4:00 HeadlineNews 5:00 LamnightW/Leeran 4:00 TonightShow 600 HoadlbnNew. 4.30 CNNWddRReport 6:00 RadliorNewsBreak 5:00 LatoightW/Leterman 6:30 HeadlineNews Break 6:00 HeadloteNews Break 6:00 HerdneNews Break Cable Channel 14 Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Nov. 13 6:30NBC New at Sunri 6:30amSimolcaslwit 6:00am Lab Chop 6:30 Simolcast W/8 & 10 630am Smulcan W/8 & 10 6:30am Simulcat W/ & 10 6:30am Simlcast W/ & 10 6:30am Simlcast W/8 & 10 9:00 OprahWiofreyShow Chbamels 8 & 10 6:20 Grbert 9:00 OprabWinfroy 9:00 Donahue 9:00 Oprah Winfrty 9:00 Donah.o 9:00 Oprah Winfrey Show 10:30 Today 10:30 Family'heate "Alics 6:45 TaleSpin 1000 Today 10:00 Today 10:00 Today 10:00 Today 10:00 Today Not Headline News Break InWonderlsod" 7:10 Darkwing Dck Noo Headline Newa Break Noo HeadlirrrNews Noo Headline New Break Noo Headline News Break Noo Headline News Break 12:15 SCNMidday 11:45 HeadlineNews Break 7:35 WinnieThePooh 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:30 AlMy Chldre 12:15 SCNMidday 12:15 SCNMidday 12:30 Ali My ChildrNoo Samrdiy Afteoon 8:00 Superfriends 12:30 AlMy Child-on 12:30 AD My Child-o 1:30 One Life to Live 12:30 Al My Childr12:30 AlMy Children 1:30 One Life to Live Movie: 'be Mppes 8:25 Widget 1:30 Ow Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 2:30 YomgAdTbeRetlss 1:30 e life to Live 1:30 e Life to Live 2:30 The Young And Retles. TakeManhattan" :45 Back To TheF e 2:30 Yongdan TheRemtls 2:30 TheYong Ad Reatles. 3:30 SeameSteet 2:30 The Yng And Restless 2:30 The Yong And Reatless 3:30 SesameSleet 1:35 SooedayAft-roon 9:10 NijaTorflea 3:30 SesmeSrest 330 SesameStreet 4:30 SchoolaticSprta 3:30 SesameStret 3:30 SesameStrect 4:30 SpaceabipEarh Movt "Chariots ofFire" 9:30 Capt. Plant 4:30 Clarissa xplso It All 4:30 ThinkFastl America 4:30 Leave it To Beaver 4:30 SpacebipEarh 4:55 channel De 3:35 SperserForHire 10:00 Maverick 4:55 Channel De 4:55 Chaoel Gne 5:05 AftoerShool Specil 4:05 Chaonel Doe 4:55 Ch-e Ge 5:10 AfterScboolspecial 4:30 0oPitRoad 11:00 StarTrek 5:10 AfterScboolSpecial 5:10 AfterSchool Special 6:00 Pionatle 5:10 AfterSchoolSpecial 5:10 AftSeScboolSponIsl 6:00 SCN BvoiogRqrorl 5:00 AmericonGladiaors Noo Headline News 6:00 SCNvBoing Repon 6:00 SCNEvcingRpor 6:15 Headlie News Break 6:00 SCN evening Report 6:00 SCNEvoiog port 6:15 Headline NewS Break 6:00 HeadlineNews 12:30 Pinnacle 6:15 HeadlineNews Break 6:15 Headline New Break 6:30 NBCNightlyNews 6:15 HeadlineNew Break 6:15 Headline New; Break 6:30 NBCNinhtlyNewa 6:30 StarTrkThe Net 1:00 Sunday Afineoon 6:30 NBCNightlyNews 6:30 NBCNigtlyNewa 7:00 Full Hoaur 6:30 NBC Nightily News 6:30 NBCNightlyNews 700 Ron Goneration Movie:"EartbAngel" 7:00 BeverlyHills 90120 7:00 Specil: USMCBinthday 7:30 Chrers 7:00 PerfectStrangers 7:00 Ro 7:30 NightCourt. 7:30 Cops 2:40 Magical World of Diney 8:00 MacGyver Arnerican Chronicle 6:00 MurderSheWroe 7:30 Family Maers 7:30 Fresh Princ 8:00 NBA Basktball-Dobtle 8:00 The impsons 3:30 TodayGouret 9:00 MondayNightFootball: "SemperFidelis" 9:00 Silters 800 Thequalizee 8:00 EveningShade H ter: Game 1 Buls vs 8:30 Anything But Love 4:00 NFL Football: Chres 49re vs alcos 7:30 HomeImpreveMent 10:00 ChinaBeach 9:00 Knots Landing 8:30 Murphy BrownCovatinre 9:00 R-se.ne vs. Ctiefa MidolghtlHedlin New 8 6:00 No.hemtxposure 11:00 Headline News 1000 Falcon Crest 9:00 Vidonlinka 10:30 NBABastball-Doble 9:30 loLivingColor 7:00 Headline News 12:30 SCNLateEdiion 9:00 ToeadayNightMovie: 11:30 InfoFiller 11:00 Headline New, 10:00 MimrtVice Header Gamr 2 10:00 Vidolinka 7:30 Th Wonder Years 12:35 SimutcastwithC1anola ''ough Guys" 11:35 Araerio Hll 11:30 SCN LateEdirFti 11:00 Hendline News Rocket v Supersonics 1100 Headline News 8:00 Sunday Nigh, Movie: 8 & 10 11:00 Headline News 12:35am Smulcastwith 11:35 ArseuolHall 11:30 Late Editon 1:00amHeadlineNews 11:30 SaturdayNightLive "Alie" 11:30 SCN Lat Edition Channels 8 & 10 12:35 amSimulcast with 11:35 Aertio Hall 1:30 SCNLateEdiion 1:00Friday Night Videos 10:30 HeadlineNews 11:35 Aramio Hall Chanels 6k 10 12:3mDavtdLmat 1:35 Nightline 2:00 FiringLine 11:00 MacGridre&Lokd 12:35amSimulcastwith 1:35 Nightline 2:05 WoldwideUpdate 2:30 Spors Latenigbt Midnight60Minu Chanels 8 & 10 2:05 HeadlineNews Break 2:30 SposLamnight 3:00 Euomrtainomt ThiWeak 1:00 Simulcastwilh Ch-nnel 2:30 Spol Latenigbt 300 Arsoio Hall 4:00 SaturdayNightLiv 8 & 10 3:00 Araio Hall 4:00 TonigbtSbrw 5:30 Headline News 4:00 TooigttShow 5:00 LateNightW/Lteuoerr 6:00 HeadlineNewa 5:00 La-eNiginW/Lenerzr 6:00 HeadmeliNews Break 6:00 Headline News Break Channels 8 & 10 Cable Channel 14 SPORTS SPORTS Join SCN Channels 8 & 10 as we bring you NFL and NFL Football College football action! Chargers vs. Chiefs Sunday at 4 p.m. Monday Night Football CFA: Boston College vs. Notre Dame Saturday at 1 49ers vs Falcons Monday at 9 p.m. p.m. l CFA: Washington vs. Arizona (JIP) Saturday at 3:30 p.m. SPECIALS NFL: Dolphins vs. Colts Sunday at 1 p.m. CFA: Texas A&M vs. Houston Thursday at 7:45 p.m. American Chronicles: Semper Fidelis CFA: Illinois vs. Michigan Nov. 14 at noon Marine Corps Birthday Special CFA: Teams To Be Announced Nov. 14 at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday at 7 p.m. Long the subject of motion pictures and novels, the facts of life at the Marine SPECIALS Corps Recruit Depot in San Diego, California, are every bit as dramatic and fascinating as any fiction ever written. Producer David Lynch looks at the Why An Army (Part #6) M.C.R.D., where hard-boiled drill instructors makes Marines out of boys in just Saturday at noon 12 weeks. Narrated by Richard Dreyfuss. General Carl Steiner, Commander in Chief of the U.S. Special Operations Command, Headquartered at McDill Air Force Base in Florida is the guest on part NEW SERIES 6 in this on-going series hosted by Peter Hatch. Anything But Love The Gallant Breed-3 pt. series Saturdays at 8:30 p.m. Begins Saturday at 8:30 p.m. Deals with love and relationships in the 80's and is set primarily in the offices Each episode spotlights the sacrifices and victories of the United States Marine of the fictional Chicago Monthly magazine. In additional to exploring the Corps. Part One is titled "The Years of Trial". Pt. 2, titled "Peleliu to Inchon" chaotic professional lives of the characters, the series also focuses on their very Sunday at 7 p.m., and Pt. 3 titled "Chosin To Khe Sahn" Monday at 8:30 p.m. individual, often clashing lifestyles. Cast: Jamie Lee Curtis and Richard Lewis. Answerline Topic: Outdoor Recreation In Living Color Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. Saturdays at 9f30 p.m. Find out where to go and what to do to make the most of your stay in Panama The freshest crew of comedians to ever break a cap at convention are back on during your off-duty time. Got a question or a comment about Outdoor Recreastage and ready for another season with Homey the Clown, the Head Detective, tion services? Give SCN a call between 7:30 and 8:30 p.m. and talk with one of Men on Film, the fabulous Fly Girls and more! Cast: Keenen Ivory Wayans, ourpanelists. Kim Wayans, David Allen Grier, Kelly Coffield and Tommy Davidson.

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Tropic Times Nov. 6, 1992 window are standard. Sadly, this vehicle isn't air-bag equipped and doesn't incorporate five mile per-hour X bumpers. This is a heavy-duty truck despite its attractive sheet metal. Huge tires, asky-highride height with7.9inches ofground clearance, and a curb weight of 3,815 pounds contribute to this vehicle's less than nimble "feel." But its fully independent suspension helps it climb canyon walls like a billy goat. It's fine for hauling boats up slippery launch ramps and getting them to the water, too, withits 3,500-pound tow capacity and "stiff" gearing. But for overall toughness, you pay a high price in handling, especially in the turning circle. It takes 46 feet to U-turn, by far the largest distance I've encountered since 1977. It's something you need be wary about. The ride, too, while acceptable, needs improvement, as some archaic "porpoising" over large bumps is evident. The tires are off-road types -great in the dirt, marginal on the infamous Long Island Expressway, Chicago's Bay Shore Drive, or L.A.'s most famous "parking lot," Interstate 405. Hauling around this vehicle's bulk takes a stout engine; unfortunately, the King Cab needs one. The modern 153 HP 3.0 liter V6 is a fine powerplant, smooth nd quiet, but overmatched by sheer mass. Zero to 60 takes 14.6 seconds, below average for the class and anemic when trying to keep up with traffic. N IS S A N K IN G A B anFuel efficiency isn't anythi ng to talk about either: 13 city and 16 highway were observed (EPA 15/19), slightly sm oothbelow its many competitive siblings. A note here: lower SE 4 4: attractive, smooth, spacious line models are available with a 4, considering the ets cradle even the biggest and tallest people, and the performance of the 6, having two less cylinders is a fate King Features Syndicate driver's seat offers a set height adjustment as well. The too ugly to contemplate. King Cab cargo area behind the seats is spacious, and Overall, the Nissan King Cab V6 along with most Need a rugged work and off-road pickup that also there are two child-size jump seats for short trips. The Japanese 4x4s -offers better quality control, probably offers class for nights in the city? Nissan's King Cab pickup bed is double-walled and just over eight feet longevity, smoothness and much more sophistication 4x4, updated for '93, is tough enough to conquer the long with a 1,500 pound cargo rating, slightly more than (that's relative) than the U.S. competition. But it's a worst terrain while sporting the industry's latest aeromany competitors. class in which they seem to have no clear overall dynamic styling. At just under $17,000 base, it's not Looking around the interior and toward the dash, technological advantage, either. Generally, their horsecheap or overly sophisticated, but offers reasonable there is instrumentation adequate but sparse. The carpower and torque are in extremely short supply, and value. peted cabin's fairly quiet for a pickup. Cruise control, most lack an airbag. The King Cab is typical of the Inside, the King Cab SE, the top of the line, is power steering with an adjustable column, power front genre; it's a decent vehicle with fine styling that with attractive but plain. The nicely-padded twin cloth buckdisc/rear drum brakes with antilock, and a sliding rear reasonable care will provide years of reliable service. 1/2 cup banana chips 1/2 cup shredded coconut 1/3 cup chocolate or carob chips 1 small package semi-sweet chocolate chips 1/4 pumpkin seeds, shelled 1 teaspoon vanilla Remove stem from figs and cut into bits. 1/2 to 3/4 cup coarsely chopped pecans or other nuts Combine figs, almonds, cashews, banana chips, coconut, chocolate or carob chips and pumpkin seeds. Remove stems from figs and cut into bits. Store in tightly covered container at room temperature Preheat over to 350 degrees. Combine figs, baking for convenient snacks or in refrigerator for longer soda and boiling water; let stand until cool. Cream storage. together shortening and sugar; beatin eggs. Alternately Eat out of hand or package in small plastic bags for add flour, salt and cocoa; blend well. Fold in cooled fig lunchbox treats. Makes about four cups. and water mixture, chocolate chips and vanilla; mix Helpful hint -When chopping California figs, use well. Spray a 9x13-inch baking pan with non-stick clean kitchen scissors and cut figs into bits. Run Fig Iunchbox brownies coating and lightly flour. Pour brownie mixture into pan scissors under warm tap water when sticky. 12or 18-oz bag California dried figs and spread evenly. The Chopping Block recipes by Philomena Cor1 teaspoon baking soda Bake 35 to 40 minutes, or until done. Top with nuts radeno. 1 cup boiling water and let cool beore cutting into bars. Makes about 24 1 cup shortening brownies. Editor's note: People Interested in sharing a rec1 cup sugar ipe or household tip with Tropic Times readers, can 2 eggs California fig trail mix send recipes or tips by MPS to Tropic Times, Unit 13/4 cups flour 11/2 cups California dried figs 0936, APO AA 34002. Your name and base will be 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup toasted almonds printed with your submission. 1 tablespoon cocoa powder 1/2 cup cashews Housokcpigpecting ,Anoo. SpweExp: Iyr.ofjoumoyrnaoquiv.toMG-3566-3. For 106. Nt Biliogul (Eng&ihSpsnihb). Lmtied toMDAC/DENTAC-P.aa-otployeU only. 052-93-VL -SUPPLY CLERK, NM-200S-3. Tetporuy NTB 6 mots. Di-acorale Cf Traiiog Supptat C.ter. Services Division All applicants should be aware that hiring opportunities continue to be limited due to budgetary D 'misrei SrarchFotClayeor. " GRV: 6,oShs. Note: Driver'st.c roqur& -constraints. Effective Oct. 23, U.S. Army South has been granted authority to exempt non-status locally n-93.-vL -MEicAL E5K c(TYPINO), NM-6794. USA MEDDAC-Pana USA Heath CHki, Fcat Oaytiw. Spw Exp: i yr. oquv. hired temporary appointments from the Department of the Army wide "one-for-four" hiring freeze. uoNM-3.Fers106.Note: Billngual(EnlBsh/Spaols). CASPt=ntroeird. LkoiedtoUSAMEDDACIDEN'AC-Pssnaaoployeraoly. Placement of current DA employees (including those on leave withoutpay) is an exception to the freeze. 54-93-VLHEALTH SYSTEMSASSISTANTNM-303-5. USAMEDDAC-P GACKQ-A&yk preOffeceArn. Spec Current permanent Panama Canal Commission, Air Force and Navy employees are subject to the Exp: 1yr. equlv.WoNM4. Fon 106. Note: Loimiedo USA MEDDACDEtNAC-Panma epaloye. -oly. "one-for-four" DA hiring restriction. Current permanent NAF or AAFES employees who were appointed before Nov. 3, 1989 may now also apply and are subject to the "one-for-four" DA hiring restriction. 055-93-OO-LIBRARYTECHNICANNM.1411-5. CoopatilTivTa .ry Pramod=oNTBlyr. USAO PaonsoCRD.LabsoyfBrasch, Military Sponses: If available, qualified, and within the area of consideration specified, areexemptfrom Port Amador. Sp.c Bxp: lye. apy. to NM-4. Fo-n 106. the hiring restriction and will be appointed as temporary. Specialized experience, when indicated, must be 056-93-SS -MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT (OA), NM-344-S. USAO-P-a, DEH, AroioSraive Salc, Co-.s1. Spec E.p I yr. in duties similar to those required by the vacancy. qAiv.oNM-344-4. Farm 106. N ta: Kn dgfSpanat qualesquied. 557-93-LA -PERtSONNES.ASSISTANT (oA), NM-263-s DEV 6. UJSAG-Paas DCP', Technloal Servicro Ofrate, PFnoalSyssaoa AMENDMENT ON HOW TO APPLY: Failure to complete U. S. Army South Form 106, when required, 057 93 A C .PERE ONp: ly pTly .1 NM-4. F 6 106. Note: Posinlon will be ilSd at M-level could hinder an applicant's chances of being referred for the vacancy. For information, visit the Civilian Personnel Office, Building 560, Corozal. 059-93-VL-ADMN'STRATIVEASSISTANT,NM-303-6. SO,5itiV0. HQSpcIl 5Op1rati-CO5 dSouthAib505kAFS.SpecBp: 1 ye. ecqv.I wNM-5. TIO: NM-s. For 106. VB# VACANCIES TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 11-06-92 CLOSE: 11-17-92 061-93-LA-BOATRtENTALMANAGER,NM-1102-7. USAG-PansDCACRD,OuttldeR ecrmdt.nForayt-.SpeExp: ATLANTIC: 1 yr. equv. toNM-5. TIG: NM-1. Pam, 106. N a: caMt wiho. pphodurderVB#: 483-92-LAned ottoeapply. 050-93-VL-MMICALCLERK(nr)ININM4793.T TporyNT3lMarch93.USADENTAC-PnFortDavisDroeal 062-93-NR-PUTCNE QUIPMWENTREPAREMG-5310-.TasposryNTE30Sp93.USAG.PsarosDBHOpralo-Ivvls.io, FasDais. Osp: 6nmndha. Na CASPttr. Mf c -mSearErch,Coz. Spec Exp: 2 yes. k the nrde. Note: Drives's lcens soqtorod. 058-93-NC-MOTOR VEHICLEOPERATOR,MG-573-k 41sASO,DOLTruspostaIosDlvai, MotxPaol-AllantrcPoeDavis. 063-93-Nc -AUtrOMOTIVEWORKER.M-523.9.41stASGDO. ML, MincDvisieTMPMsiot-tachCor Cal. Spec Specap: 1 yr. of1pe 1.cal rpece. Pao 106. Nate: Driver's bi-ense Exp: 3 yrs. ofproger-sive praocal eylxpe.ce. Foro 106. Naom: Drivers license nrpuied. 060-93-NC -MOTORVEHlCI OPERATOR, MG-573-7. 41stAS,DOLTreaptadioDivhlim,MterPo1-ALmticPortDavi. 064-93-SS -TRAINNGAMMUNrrIONMANAGER, NM-301-9. Secizive. USAG-Paosms, DPTM. Trdsteg ODv1o, Part Csyeec Spec Ekp: 1 1/2yrs. qdv. to-6. Pam 106. Note: Dives's WIcame O Spec &xp: l y. equiv. t NM-301-7. TIO: NM-7. Fo-s 106. Note: Limitad oouoom c carcreecadidoosl eoploye .ly. NOTES: vB#: 012-93-0.RansIonAdNM-189-3 is amenddto ead: wruutlast rr. PACIFIC: VBN: 013-93-00. Office Atmsio n Cerk, NM-326-3 -d 014-93-00, Office Atooatico Clerk, NM-326-3 ar amarded t red: D49-93-VL -(2) CUSTODIAL WORKER, MG-3566-2. Tispormry NTE 31 Mamb 93. USA MEDDAC-P aa, GACH, Legiutic Diviml, CASP te-t requird. Service rach, Hauscaeldongon. A-rta. Spc Exp: 3 otzhs. Note Applir-c sot havehd trmorths injanitaAl experlrce. VB#: 015-93-GG, Office Auetmale Clerk. NM-326-3 is aoomled t cavec grade rd CASP teatrequpre. Poalitims readc ard-darnattidlldatc voterat peerncc. If no veeerats ar available, nor-preermee elamesroy bo ceciddr VB#: 068-93-VC, lotelligoce Speclalrtc(OS). GS-132-12 is see-dtela coorrl .vceccy ouabee. 051-93-VL -CU5TODIAL WORKER LEADER, ML-3566-3. USA MDDAC-Paa, GACH, Legildus Dlvsie, Se. .H atch. The Drecore ofCIvllwat Pers.co I acceptio pplcao-s for Clk"al Nre poatile COlihoidSulllvat a1255-4116.

PAGE 17

Tropic Times Nov. 6, 1992B5 Bowlers keep score on overhead projectors that show totals above the lanes. U.S.Amyphaio.by sg.Y Bowling mania When you want to go bowling, it's as easy as picking a lane and laying the ball down, but if you want to seriously go bowling, there's nothing better than joining a league and going for the top prize. Joining a league on Fort Clayton is as easy as walking in, signing up and renting the shoes. There are three different leagues that bowl at Clayton Lanes -Monday night women's, Tuesday night men's and Thursday night mixed. Joining a league and paying the $5 entrance fee might sound expensive, but in the long run the league bowlers actually save money, said Ric Lindvig, Pan American Bowling Association Secretary and league organizer at Fort Clayton. "At Fort Clayton, if you're sanctioned and currently in a league, you can bowl for 40 cents a line when it usually costs 90 cents," he said. Lindvig said league members may also bowl in one of several tournaments around the area without having to pay sanction fees each time. One $5 payment is good for a year. Another benefit of league bowling is the awards. "You can win all the awards and patches that the American Bowling Conference and Women's International Bowling Conference offer, as well as local association awards," he said. Leagues usually cost $5 a week to participate Bowling balls are available for those who don't own one. in, but most of that money is used to pay prizes for the league winners -both individual and team -at the end of the season. The rest of the weekly payment is used to pay for association tournaments, and bowling fees, Lindvig said. The next PABA tournament will be the Curly Bates Annual tournament Nov. 21-22 at Curundu Lanes. This tournament is held in honor of the late professional bowler from Panama and will include a handicap of 80 percent of 200. Bowlers take the average score of their six games and subract it from 200. Eighty percent of that number is the bowlers individual handicap. The Curly Bates tournament will cost $15 for league-sanctioned bowlers and $20 for nonsanctioned bowlers. But bowling in leagues is about more than just winning tournaments, Lindvig said. "It's about meeting new people," he said. "We want to be thought of as a family sport." For information on leagues, call any military bowling center. A ball hits the pocket during the Monday night wornens' league.

PAGE 18

Tropic Times B 6 Nov. 6, 1992 Sunday, 6:30 a.m.-3 p.m., $10. Call the Rodman Marina, 283-3147/3150. day, 1 p.m. Child care Pecora River Valley horseback day Arts and crafts for children, Thursday, trips, Saturday and Sunday, 7 a.m. The 3 p.m. Albrook/Howard $25 fee includes transportation, horse rental south centers Mixed volleyball and fish fry, SaturLicensed day care that includes field and lunch. Call 287-4411 for reservations. Albrook/Howard day, 2:30 p.m. trips, small group activities and meals is now available at Howard AFB. Call 286The Howard Youth Center, 284-4700, 3133. Clayton and Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195, are Artsadcrafts Valent Recreation Center, the Outdoor offering the following trips and activities. Recreation Center and the Cocoli CommuAll trips pick up at Howard at the time Clay Clayton nity Recreation Center are offering the folspecified and at Albrook 30 minutes later. The Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts Center There areenmediate openings in the lowing tours. Reservations are required. Registration is ongoing through Nov. and Fort Clayton Ceramic Center offer the hourly programs at the Fort Clayton Child Call the Valent Recreation Center, 287for baseball and softball for boys and girls following activities. Call the Arts and Crafts Development Services for infants, pretod6500/4201; the Outdoor Recreation Center, from 4 to 18 years old. Center at 287-5957 or the Ceramic Center at dlers, toddlers and preschool-age children. 287-3363 or the Cocoli Community RecreaThe Howard/Albrook youth centers will 287-4360. Call 287-5657/6812. tion Center, 287-4119. be closed Wednesday. Boat construction, begins Saturday; Canal transit, Saturday, $35 for adults, Story hour, Monday, 3 p.m. at Howard/ pollera dress painting, Saturday. __$20 for children under 12 years old. Albrook youth centers. rips/tours Pacific beaches, Wednesday, 9 a.m.Master of disguise relay, today, 3 p.m. Howard 5p.m. No fee for members and $1 for non-memHoward Albrook/How ard 5San Blas, Wednesday. The $110 fee inbers. The Howard Arts and Crafts Center has The Information, Tour and Travel Office cludes transportation to the airport, airfare, Peanut butter relay,Tuesday, 3 p.m. the following events scheduled. Call 284offers a monthly calendar of events and can guided boat tour to Indian villages and lunch. Arts and crafts, wood crafts, Nov. 12, 6361/6345. arrange special trips for groups of 10 orSign-up deadline is Monday. 3:30 p.m., $1. Clay flower class, Saturday, 11 a.m.--1 more. Call the Zodiac Recreation Center Sunset cruise, Thursday, 5-7:30 p.m. Reggae preteen dance, Nov. 13, 7:30p.m.; advanced ceramic painting in Span284-6161/6109. Fee is $5. 10:30 p.m. at Howard Youth Center for ish, 5-week class begins today, 10 a.m.All tours require reservations and leave Central Avenue shopping trip, Nov. youths from 9 to 13 years old. Fee is $2.50noon; free pouring in Spanish, Wednesfrom the Howard Theater. 14, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., $5. for members and $3.50 for non members. day, 2-4 p.m.; stained glass, Thursday, 6:30Colonial Panama tour, Saturday, 9 a.m.Summit Gardens tour, Nov. 14. Transportation leaves Albrook at7 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.; free pouring in English, Nov. 3 p.m., $6. El Valle, Nov. 15, 6:30 a.m., $15. returns at 11 p.m. Transportation is free but 13, 6-8 p.m.; free copper luster applicaPeacock bass fishing in Arenosa, Nov. Antique shops, Nov. 18, 9 a.m., $7. reservations must be made in advance. tion demonstration, Nov. 14, 2-2:30 p.m. 15, 5 a.m.-2 p.m., $25. Altos Cerro Azul, Nov. 21, 9 a.m., $8. Snorkel and scuba Drake's Island, Indian Village river trip, Nov. 21, $25 Clayton Saturday, 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Fees are $16 to adults, $15 children. snorkel and $40 to scuba dive. Coronado Beach, Nov. 22, 8 a.m., $10. The Fort Clayton Youth Center is offerAlbrook/Howard Portobelo and Drake's Island, WednesDiving in Negril, Jamaica, Nov. 25-29, ing the following activities for preteens and day, 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Fee is $15 or $12 per $545. junior teens. Call 287-6451. The Albrook Club has the following events person if three or more adults in family Thanksgiving in Chiriqui highlands, National Achievement Week dance, to offer. Call 286-3101. attend. Nov. 26-29. Bambito, $250, Panamonte, tonight, 7 p.m. for preteens and 9 p.m. for Mini gourmet night, Wednesday; Barro Colorado Island Smithsonian $225, Fundafores, $185. junior teens, $1.50 fee; zoo trip, Saturday, Mexican night,Thursday, 6-8:30 p.m.; Reserve, Thursday, 6 a.m.-3 p.m. Fee is 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; preteen scavenger hunt, Thanksgiving buffet, Nov. 26, reservations $65. Thursday, 3 p.m.; eight ball tournament, required. Sailing tour to Taboga, Nov. 13,9 a.m.Rodman Nov. 13, 3 p.m.; junior teen scavenger The Albrook club will open at 2 p.m. 7 p.m. The $52 fee includes snacks, dinner The Information, Tourand Travel Office hunt, Nov. 14, 2 p.m.; turbo turkey interWednesday. and refreshments. is offering the following tours. Call 283national, Nov. 21, 11 a.m. The Howard Enlisted Members' Club Beer brewery and Miraflores Locks, 5307/4454. The Fort Clayton Senior Teen Center will host a pool tournament, Nov. 14. Call Nov. 13, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Fee is $4. Montego Bay, Jamaica, Sunday-Wedoffers the following activities. Call 287284-4189. Horseback riding in El Valle, Nov. 14, nesday. Fee includes hotel accommoda6451. 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Fee is $18. tions, airfare and Montego Bay transfers. Senior teen council meeting, Saturday, Rodman Horse track trip, Nov. 15. TransportaA passport is required. 3 p.m.; Army Family Week events, Nov. tion and entry fee included in $7 fee. Contadora day trip, Wednesday, 6 a.m.14,7-8 p.m.; reggae and disco dance, Nov. The Anchorage Club will host DJ night, Thanksgiving in Chiriqui, Nov. 25-29. 6:30 p.m. 14, 8 p.m.-midnight, fee is $3. tonight; "New York Rockers," a DepartThe fees are$383 per person for single "Wet, Wild, Wooly," to Contadora, ment of Defense USO show, Saturday. occupancy, $260 per person for double Nov. 27-29, includes transportation, two occupancy and $155 for children or a third nights hotel, deep-sea fishing, water skiing, _ _ _ person. The fee includes transportation, tour snorkeling and jet skiing. The Cocoli Community Recreation Center guides, five days and four nights accommoBass fishing package, includes transis offering thefollowing activities.Call 287dations, four dinners including Thankgivportation to and from Gamboa, boat and 4119/3010. ing dinner, four breakfasts and many tours. motor, gasoline, lake guide, $5 worth of Videos for children, Tuesday, 3 p.m. Boss program Sign-up deadline is Nov. 20. bait, bait bucket, rods and reels, tackle, Coffee club, Wednesday, 11 a.m. The Valent Recreation Center is having Special of the week -El Valle shopping, coolers and ice. Cooking class, cream puffs, Wednesan open forum for single soldiers up to the community arts and craft centers. Call the Fort Davis Arts kan; cake decorating; gymnastics; juggling and outboard Sound ial centerand Crafts Center,289-5201 or theFort Sherman Arts and motor boat operation. The Sundial Recreation Center has the following acCrafts Center, 289-6313 tivities to offer. Call 289-3889/3300. Ceramics; painting; drawing; pottery; air brushing; Scuba divin course Thursdays are Wonderful, a program designed for advanced and beginners oil painting from photographs. women, will feature making fried rice. Frame and matting workshop, Saturday; disc brake An open-water dive course meets the first Monday Panama Independence celebration, Saturday, 9 a.m., workshop, Nov. 13. -of the month at 6 p.m. at the Fort Davis Swimming Fort Davis Community Club featuring a Latin American Pool. Sign up at the Fort Sherman Scuba Shop, 289craft sale. 6104, or the Outdoor Recreation Office in Margarita, Youth news 289-4077. Course cost is $125. The Fort Espinar Youth Center is offering the following Ocean Breeze center activities. Call 289-4605. The Ocean Breeze Recreation Center has the followPreteen pool party at Espinar pool, today, 6-9 p.m., New boat ing events scheduled.Call 289-6402. fee is $1; popcorn and movie night, tonight, 6-9 p.m.; A 21-foot Mako boat is now available for scuba or Saturday matinee, Saturday, 2 p.m.; fashion show, teen fun wacky pajama party, Saturday, 8-11 p.m.; snorkeling trips. Price includes gear and guide. Call John Saturday, 6:30 p.m. checker contest, Tuesday, 4:30-5:30 p.m.; ecology club, Stromberg, 289-4009/4077; or the Fort Sherman Scuba Monday, 3-4 p.m. for children in grades 1-3; arts and Shop,289-6104. crafts, make a turkey costume, Thursday; ecology club, Atlantic tours Thursday, 3-4 p.m. for children in grades 4-6; family pie Holiday Sundial Recreation Center: Wine and dine, Fridays, bake and taste contest, Nov. 14, 6-9 p.m., $1 entrance bazaar 4-9 p.m.; El Valle, Sunday, 5:30 a.m.-4 p.m.; museum fee; turkey trot for youths and adults, Nov. 21, 10 a.m., TheAtlantic Community Women's Club is holding its tours, Nov. 14; Isla Grande, Nov. 15, 8 a.m.; Panama $5 per person. annual holiday bazaar Nov. 14 from City shopping tour, Nov. 21. Call 289-3889/3300. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Fort Davis Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: Rio Mar beach Community Club. Call Muriel Doyle, tour,Sunday; IslaGrande, Nov. 14; rain forest and bird On g ss289-4755 or Becky Steigler, watching tour, Nov. 15. Call 289-6402. Following is a list of recurring classes offered in most 2 8 9 communities. Call the Sundial Recreation Center, 2894354. 3889/3300; the Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289Arts and crafts 6402 or the Aquativity Center, 289-4009. Following is a list of recurring classes offered at Spanish; English; piano; guitar; modem dance; shoto-

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Tropic Times ofiCes Nov. 6, 1992 1 rank of sergeant, Thursday. The forum subjects will include barracks life, quality of life and barracks visitation policies. Call 287-6500. Showdeo The Albrook Stables will host Showdeo, Saturday, 4 p.m. Barbequed chicken and ribs will be served at 4 p.m. Riding events begin at 6:30 p.m. The event will feature hay rides, gaming events, barrel racing, pole bending and country westem music. Tickets are $7 for adults, $3 for children from 7 to 12 years old and children under 7 years old are free. Price includes food and dance. The door prize is a trail ride to Veracruz Beach. Tickets are available at the Albrook Stables or at the Zodiac Recreation Center. Call 287-4411. New child care program The Howard and Albrook youth centers are offering a new before and after school program. Care is available for children from6to 12years oldfrom6:30to 8:15a.m. and from 2to 5:30 p.m. and full-day care on nonschool days. Fees range from $17 to $34 per week per child, depending on family income and includes breakfast and an afternoon snack. Call 284-4700/4817. Instructors needed The Zodiac Recreation Center needs licensed instructors to teach shotokan and private pilot's ground school on a contract basis. Call 284-6161/6109. The Howard/Albrook youth centers need a qualified piano instructor to teach classes on a contract basis. Call 284-4700. The Howard Arts and Crafts Center needs qualified instructors to teach advanced pottery wheel throwing and volunteers to demonstrate various crafts. Call 284-6361. Twin Oceans The Twin Oceans Pro Shop, Building 155, Fort Clayton, will temporarily relocate to Building 2060 in the Curundu area. Trail rides The Howard Riding Stables is offering escorted 2 1/2 hour trail rides to Veracruz Beach, Mondays through Fridays. Call 2864920. Evening child care PIANO MAN -Jazz pianist Danilo Enrico Perez, and his quartet, perform atthe FortClayton NCO Club, Nov. 14. The show The Howard Child Development Center starts at 8 p.m. with Perez appearing a 9 p.m. Tickets are $20 and include a cajun chicken buffet. Perez has been offers evening child care Fridays and Saturentertaining since he was 4-years-old, playing with his father's band. Since those days he's played with Dizzy Gillespie, days from 5:30 p.m. to midnight for chilClark Terry, George Benson, Paquito D'Rivera, Flora Purim, and others. dren from 6 months to 11 years old. If enough reservations have been made by 6345; the Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, An open water scuba class is set for Wednesday, 4 p.m., care will be provided. Ongoing classes 287-5957. Monday at the Albrook Pool. The fee is Call 284-6135 to make reservations. Following is a listof recurring classes Stained glass; cross stitch; clay flower; $145. offered by recreation centers in most pottery wheel; knitting; framing; air brushAn open water scuba diving class is Logistics support communities. For information call the ing; lamp assembly; leather working; macset for Monday-Nov. 22. Course includes Pacific Theatre Arts Centre, 286-3814/ rame classes; pottery; throw pottery techfive class and pool sessions at Rodman Logistics Support on Howard AFB rents 3152; Valent,287-6500/4201 orZodiac, nics; glazing; firing; hand building; sculpPool and open water dves at Portobelo on recreational items. Call 284-6107. 284-6161/6109. ture; wooden jewelry box construction; the Atlantic side. The $145 fee includes The branch will be closed Wednesday. Aerobics; piano lessons; taekwondo; acoustic guitar construction; do-it-yourself all equipment, instruction, boat trips and Weekly special -Rent one rod and get cake decorating; basic sewing; advanced custom framing; fabric painting; watercolor; certification fees.Call 283-5307/4454. the second one for one-half price, Mondaytailoring; craft sewing; beginner Geracrylic painting; oil painting; basic drawing An advanced scuba diving class will old gs man; Spanish, beginner and advanced; and charcoal drawing. be held Nov. 21 and 22. The class into 50 cnt per p ound Weegas reduced English, beginner and advanced. Weekly classes are held in car care and cludes a night dive, deep dive, navigaFollowing is a list of recurring classes maintenance, arc and gas welding, auto air tion dive and two optional dives; a comoffered by youth centers in most commuconditioning, auto transmission repair and putter dive, search and recovery dive Family support nities. For information call Howard Youth engine rebuilding. Call the Albrook Auto and photography dive. Call 283-5307/ The Howard/Albrook Family Support Center, 284-4700; Albrook Youth CenCraft Shop, 286-3613 or Howard Auto Craft 4454. Center has the following events scheduled. ter, 286-3195; Fort Clayton Youth or Shop,284-3370. Power boating and sailing classes will Call 284-5650. Senior Teen Center, 287-6451. The swimming pools in most communibe held Monday and Wednesday and First time home buying, Monday from Street/video dancing; cheerleading; ties offer recurring classes. For information Nov. 16 and 18. Call 283-3147/3150. 6 to 9 p.m. in the Howard Chapel Annex. Spanish and English; aerobics; arts and call Howard swimming pool, 284-3569; Basic horsemanship classes for all Smoothmoveworkshop,Tuesday from crafts; gymnastics; boys gymnastics; Albrook swimming pool, 286-3555; Fort ages are offered at the Albrook Riding 1 to 3 p.m. modem, jazz, tap and ballet dance; Clayton swimming pool 28-76660; Rodman Stables. The $25 fee includes theory and Job search workshop, Tuesday and Nov. piano lessons; tennis lessons; taekwondo. swimming pool, 283-4253. practical sessions. The class covers safety, 24, 2 p.m. Following is a list of recurring classes Scuba classes are available through the stable etiquette, care and welfare of horses, Checkbook maintenance workshop, offered by arts and crafts centers in most Zodiac Recreation Center, 284-6161/6109. tack and basics of horse handling. IndiThursday from 10 a.m. to noon. communities. For information call HowClasses include introduction to scuba, resvidual, group and semi-private lessons SF-171 workshop, Nov. 17 from 8 to 9 ard Arts and Crafts Center, 284-6361/ cue, dive master and specialty scuba. available. Call 287-4411. a.m.

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B8Tropic TimesPop ur B8Nov 6,92Potpourri OCS selection board through the Army community health nurse. The appraisal can be completed An Officer Candiate School selec~ atthe u'iLhe aproffe: ees wl C h ild re n 's B o o k W ee k tion board will be held Jan. 21,9 a.m. at help target health training needs to imthe Fort Clayton Education Center. prove unit readiness. Call Paula White Packets are dueto the Personnel Operaor Nelly Holness, 287-4716. tion Office in Building 519 by Jan. 15. Call 287-4454. Christmas bazaar 'Hasta I The Inter-American Women's Club uego will hold its Christmas bazaar, Dec. 5, The deputy commander, U.S. Army 10 a.m.-7 p.m. at the ATLAPA ConSouth, will host an "hasta luego" revention Center. Gifts, crafts and food ception for soldiers leaving during will be sold, and there will be activities January, February and March at the for children and door prizes. The proFort Clayton NCO Club, 2:45 p.m., ceeds will support charitable organizaDec. 10. Family and friends may attons. Children under 10 will be admittend. ted free. Tickets will be availble at the door or by calling, 23-1749. Stand down day Stan down dayy SHoliday briefs The Howard Library would like to help celebrate National Children's Book The U.S. Army South Command Week, Nov. 16-20. Every day at 9 am. during that week they will have stories, Safety Office will observe the Safety Anyone interested in having a holimovies and book browsing for children. Children could also win a prize by Awareness and Aviation Stand Down day sponsorship brief advertised in the guessing the number of seashells in the mystery jar. Call 284-6249. Day Nov. 19. Units and families will be newspaper, can send the brief MPS to focusing on mission and home safety Tropic Times, Unit 0936, Albrook, or issues on this day through training and drop by the office, Building 405, Corozal. update a card, contact the Medical Recstress. The group will meet Fridays, 10 reviewing various subjects. Some sugwords section at Gorgas Army Commua.m., Nov. 13 through Dec. 18. Call gested subjects are bicycle, crosswalk, Office closes nity Hospital, Fort Clayton Health Clinic 284-6410. seatbelt safety and an inspection of fire and the Coco Solo Health Clinic. Call alarms and playground equipment, The Panama Trial Defense Service 282-5241. Graduate exam according to Command Safety Office office will be closed Nov. 16 through officials. 20 for mandatory training. For emerTaders needfdrhe Howard Education Center will gencies or more information, call 287Leoffer the general graduate record exSkate night 6207. The Fort Clayton Elementary School amination. Interested people must be Daisy Girl Scouts need leaders. Anyscheduled by Nov. 16. The test will be The Fort Clayton Elementary School Red Cross one wishing to volunteerone hour each given Dec. 16, 8 a.m., Building 708, Parent/Teacher Organization will host week should call 287-4743. Room 110. All active-duty military, a skate night Saturday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., The American Red Cross will hold a family members and Department of at the playshelter. The event is open to mandatory training update for water Car rena l Defense civilians are eligible. The test children in kindergarten through 6th safety instructors Saturday,.8 a.m., at is free for active-duty military taking it grade with a 25 cent admission fee for the Fort Clayton swimming pool and The Fort Clayton car rental office for the first time. All others must pay those who do not attend Clayton EleNov. 14,9a.m., attheFortDavis swimtelephone number has temporarily been $45. Call 284-4863. mentary. Permission slips must be turned ming pool. Call 287-5509. changed to 287-6283. in before the event. Craft bazaar Classes available Car wash The Griffon Club is sponsoring a College club meets The Fort Clayton Education Center Company A, 308th Military Intellicraft vendors' bazaar, Nov 14,9a.m-3 The Isthmian College Club will hold is offering the following classes: Effecgence Battalion will sponsora car wash p.m. at the Albrook Club. Vendors should a membership meeting Tuesday, 4:30 tive Army writing, Nov. 30-Dec. 18, 8 Saturday and a bake sale Nov.14 at the call 284-3938 after 5 p.m. p.m., in the Bridge Lounge, Club a.m.-noon and mini immersion SpanCorozal Post Exchange, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Amador. There are annual dues. Call ish, Monday-Nov. 23,8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Proceeds will go to the Ciudad del Juvenalia continues Michelle Heltzel, 269-8804. Call 287-5412. Nino Orphanage Christmas project. Juvenalia 2a tA AA o Juvenalia '92 at the ATL APA Convention Center, Paitilla, across from Cheerleaders sought General meeting AER loans the Marriott Hotel, continues until The Pacific Theatre Arts Centre is TheEnlistedSpouses'ClubDecemThe Army Emergency Reliefis now Tuesay, 10 a.m.-10 p.m. and noon-10 looking for cheerleaders to perform in ber general meeting has been reschedaccepting applications from family p.m. Ping pong and basketball tournathe half-time entertainment during Army uled for Nov. 30, 7 p.m., at the Fort members for student loans and scholarments will be Saturday through TuesTurkey Bowl '92, Nov. 25 at the Balboa Clayton NCO Club. Call 287-3086. ships for college. Applications must be day. Admission is $2. High School Stadium. Call 286-3152/ submitted to AER headquarters by March 3814. Medical IDs 1. Call Caroline Hall, 285-4630. New hours Medical identificationplate holders S The Mindi Veterinary Facility new are reminded to ensure all information S JpporI g ou hours of operation are Monday, WednesTheArmy Community Health Nurson the card is up to date. Out-dated inThe 24th Medical Group Mental day and Thursday 7:30-11 a.m. and 1ing, Building 519, Room 106, reminds formation can result in reports not being Health Clinic is now forming a group 2:30 p.m.; Tuesday, and Friday 7:30units they can find out just how fitthey posted in medical records and patients to provide support and therapy for people 11:30 a.m. Call 289-5872/5208 8 a.m.are by taking the health risk appraisal not being contacted when needed. To experiencing holiday-related sadness and noon for appointments. Today 4:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN San Jose, Costa Rica PC San Salvador, El Salvador PP/CC/V Q. I have already used my EnvironHoward AFB, PN mental Morale Leave (EML) to go and 5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN coeback from the United States, since Tscsla odrs P coeSoto Cano ARl, Honduras PP the date has not expired (its good for 90 Howr APR, PN San Jose, etoata Rica PC days) can I use the same leave paper to 6:25am C141 Howard AFR, 1N Howard APR, PN take another trip? La Paz, Bolivia PP/CC 5:40am C130 Howard APR, PN A. No, you can only use your EnvironHoward APR, PN Tegucigalpa, Honduras PP mental and Morale Leave paper work once, Saturday Soto Cano AB, Honduras PP foraroundtrip travel to adesignatedEML 5:40am C Howard APR, PN US How APR PN Cheyenne, WY 5:40am C141 Howard APR, PN .location. All personnel stationed in 9:45am C141 Howard AFB, PN Rio de Janeiro, Brazil RONPP/CC Panama are entitled to two separate Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico Asuncion, Paraguay trips twice a year. Charleston AFB, SC PP Montevideo, Uruguay RON La Paz, Bolivia PP: Tourist Passport 8:00am C5A HoSda FB, PN 7.50a 5 How FB, PN TC: Tourist Card Soto Cano AB, Honduras PP Charleston AFB, SC PP V Visa Charleston AFB, SC RON/PP Dover AB, DEL PP PC: Proof of Citzenship Dover Wednesday US: United States Passport Monday 5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN Holders Only 5:10am C130 Howard AFB, FN Belize City, Belize CC: C ty ClManagua, Nicaragua PP/CC/V Guatemala City, GuatemalaTCfV country earance Howard, PN Howard AFB, PN RON: Remain Overnight 6:15am C727 Howard APR, PN Charleston IAP, SC PP Thursday 8:00am CSAHoward APR, PN For additional flight inforTuesday Soto Cano AB, Honduras PP mation, call 284-5758/4306. 5:10am C130 Howard AFB, PN Charleston AFB, SC RON/PP San Salvador, El Salvador PP/CC/V Kelly AFB, TX

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Tropic Times Nov. 6,1992 The One COwtO~y ph1OLo6 (From left) Jim Straley, Ross Barker and Greg Sargent stand next to their prize catch a sailfish caught Greg Sargent tries to revive the sailfish. from a Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation boat. Airmen take to sea for fishing adventure T his is a story about three jacks and a bonito -fun, but not much boat around, Straley helped me to the airmen who took off at 6 for table fare, front of the boat to motor toward the a.m. one October day for a Hoping for some dolphin, wahoo, fish and retrieve some of the line, day of sportfishing aboard tuna, or maybe a white marlin, we kept since the spool shaft of the 4/0 reel was the Navy Morale, Welfare the boat on course for the islands. It nearly exposed." and Recreation boat, Win. must have worked, because we soon About 10 minutes into the battle we After loading all the required fishing landed the first of the trip's three decided that Straley and I would swap gear, food, drinks, Jimmy Buffett tapes dolphins. (For you land-lubbers, these places since I'd pulled a sailfish in a and other necessities, we cast off, are dolphin-fish, not dolphin-mammals boat about 12 years ago.if there's a bound for the happy hunting grounds like Flipper.) special trick to it. just west of the island of Pedro As we drew closer to the islands, Anyway, after about 30 more Gonzalez, near Contadora. Straley decided to exchange one of the minutes of battling the fish, it was The crew included Jim Straley -an fancy and expensive topwater baits for finally time to pull it in the boat. With accomplished sailor, navigator, fisherone he had hand-made for less than $1 one terribly ungraceful pull, I had the man and all-round salty dog; Ross earlier this summer. fish in the boat for about three minutes Barker -a perchjerker turned bass Trolling along the islands, we met of picture taking before returning it to fisherman out for his first saltwater with sucess. fight again another day. After about fishing trip; and me, an ate-up fisher"As I filleted a dolphin, the rest of half an hour of trying to revive the man and power boater whose gills the crew was alerted to the screaming fish, it was apparent that it had given would probably dry up if I couldn't go sound of a fish stripping the line from its all in the previous fight, so we fishing at least once a week. one of the rods," Straley said. "It was decided that it would be better to have The day started nicely as the Win the one with my lure and Barker imsmoked sailfish for a month than to cruised south into the Bay of Panama mediately grabbed it to fight the fish. leave it to the sharks, with the new outboard motor purring Simultaneously, all three of us yelled, All this goes to show that being stalike a kitten. 'It's a sailfish! It's a sailfish!' as the toned here can be a rewarding experiAfter the wind picked up and the sea fish jumped six or seven times trying to ence, if we take the initiative to enjoy got a little rough I eased back on the throw the hook." the many sporting and recreational throttle and turned off the Buffett tunes "I held on as the sailfish stripped off activities at our disposal. Why, if an to concentrate on piloting the boat. a few hundred yards of line, and ex-perchjerker can go saltwater fishing After about an hour of choppy seas, Straley quickly brought the other lines for his first time and land a beautiful we decided to put out some bait and in as the boat was brought to idle," sailfish like this, just think of the troll towards the islands. said Barker. adventures that are out their for the Within an hour, we'd landed two "While Sargent slowly turned the taking. Just do it! by SSgt. Greg Sargent 24th Communications Squadron

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Tropic Times t~ asfe B10Nov. 6,1992 Classiied Ads 1987 Dodge Caravan, at, pa, ac, AM-FM cass, 6 cass, tint glass, tilt steering, good cond $5000. 5 Sega Genesis games $20-$25ea. 260-2837. cyl, not duty pd $7950. 287-5771. 284-4391. Betamovie camera, complete $300, HummingHamster and cage to good home $10. 286-3143. 1980 Pontiac Lemans, 6 cyl, ac, new eng, trans, 1979 Pacer, needs work, sale as is $800. 284bird fish finder, complete $100. 287-3620. brakes $3700/obo. 261-7085. 5374. German shepherd mixed puppies, 8 wks old $20. Commo 64 & 64C w/DD, several games $450/ 268-1017. 1990 Nissan Sentra, 4dr, 5-spd, ac, AM-FM 1990 Honda Civic EX, U.S. specs, fully loaded, obo. 285-6359. cass, duty pd. 252-2758. sr, 5-spd, cxc cond $10,000 firm. 285-5935. Labradar/retriever puppies, CCP regi, avail IBM PC, 640K Ram, 60MB RE, 5.24-3.5 flopNov. 26 $400. 283-3092. 1991 Camarm Coupe RS, 5-spd, ac, ps, pb, AMpies, CGA, Okidats 84 printer $750. 282-4132. FM cass, exc cond, 17,500 miles $12,000. 260Golden retriever, 5 yrs old, neutered, exc w/chil7621. Super Nintendo sys w/2 controllers+ 3 game cardren, watch dog $40. 286-3329. Eng-spk honest, responsible live-outmaid, M-F, tridges, 3 mos old $175. 260-2778. 1987 Honda Civic, ac, 5-spd, ps, extras, low good w/children, prefer Amador, Clayton. 282Doberman, 17 mos old, male, exc w/children mileage,AM-FM cass, duty pd, exc cond $5500. 3783. Zenith 386 64K cache 2MB Ram, 80MB HD, $100/obo. 286-4679. 232-5911. Dos 5.0, Windows, MS mouse, VGA mon, best Span-spk weekend babysitter, day or night or offer. 287-4575. Three mixed breed small puppies, 8 wks old $30 1987 Subar 1.8 GL, 5-spd, ac, pa, 4-dr, AM-FM weekday housekeeper. 285-4323. ea. 284-4635. cass, not duty pd $4950. 287-4685. Sony 13" color TV, VHS video recorder $200. Eng-spk housekeeper, 2-5 days a week, grt w/ 287-3680. Free, mixed breed dog, 20 lbs, friendly, good w/ 1981 Hi-lx p/u, 4WD, low mileage, duty pd, children, refs. 286-4389. children. 286-6279. camper top $5200. 252-1143. Comm Amiga 500, 1 Meg Ram, printer, mon, Bilingual maid, honest, reliable, mature, W or F. software, books, like new $800. 260-1290. Free, kitten, 8 wks old, male, has first get of 1987 Buick Regal, vinyl top, all extras, low 286-4346. shots. 284-5176 after 5pm. mileage, 37,000 miles, not duty pd $7200/obo. Super Nintendo cass, Lemmings, Treasure Is251-1143. Eng-spk housekeeper, 5 days per week, honest, land, new $40/obo. 260-9361. Free, mixed breed dog, male, all shots. 286dependable. 286-4589. 4389. 1978 Volvo 244 DL sedan, exc shape, ac, stereo Panasonic VHS movie camera w/JC Penny port $2500. 284-5388. Span-spk hard worker maid, exc refs, part time, VHS plus many extras $600/obo. 260-4564. Information on sex testing for parrots. 287-3087 days or nites. 230-0668. ask for Jci1985 BMW 5181, 4dr, 4 cyl, AM-FM cass, all Amiga 500, 1MB, color mon, ext DD, digital extras, duty pd, exc cond $8500. 252-2375. ._ program copier, approx 70 programs $700/obo. 223-4140. 1985 Toyota Carolla, 4dr, diesel, 5-spd, 5 new tires, exc cond $5000. 252-2622. Stratos bass boat, 150hp, electric troll motor, Comp IBM clone, XT, 5 1/4-3 1/2, 2OMeg HD, 1989 Nissan Pulsar NX, 2dr, t/top, removable fish finder, lots of storage, grt freshwater boat mouse, joystick, Amber mon, Okiata pritner hatchbk, pa, pb, AM-FM, 23,000 miles, buckets 1984 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme, AM-FM $10,000/obo. 284-4596. $500. 252-2033. seats, 5-spd, nose bia incl $9500. 286-3239. care, ac, pwr loaded, good cond $2500/obo. 287-5786. 22' N. American offshore boat, galv trlr, 1992 Answering mach $110, Commo 64 comp (needs 1991 Toyota Corona, fully loaded, pwr everyEvinrude 140hp OB, 15hp kicker, will sell w/o repair) $50, phone console w/radio, alarm $70, thing, sr, alarm, AM-FM care, exc cond 1990 Aero Star, 5-spd, ac, AM-FM cass, exc motor also $8900. 252-2243. stereo dbl cass $100, photocopier $275. 284$13,000/neg. 269-1651. cond $1500/obo. 287-4568. 6881. 20'l990 Bayliner Capri, 1351I/0 Mercruiaer, ap1984 Dodge 600 coupe, 4 cyl, 5-spd, good cond, 1987 Dodge Omni, AM-FM cass, 5-spd, exc prox 50 hrs, w/tr1r, bimini cover, extras $14,000. Carver TFM-24 pwr amp, 225 watts per chan best offer. 287-5188. cond $3600/obo. 287-5652. 230-0601. rms, exc cond $400. 252-1191. 1989 Nissan p/u, pa, AM-FM cass, at, exc cond, 1987 Toyota Cressida, 4dr, 4-spd, pa, ac, AM17 1/2' Glastron, I/O 120hp extra eng, fish 19" color TV $125. 287-3295. 22,000 miles $6500. 284-4231. FM cass, exc cond, duty pd $6300/obo. 236finder, more. 252-2121. 0727 eves. Packard Bell 286 comp, 40MB HD, Dos 5.0, has 1987 GMC Minivan custom, at, ac $7000/obo. 15' 1988 Thunderraft boat, '89 Mariner 90hp, mon, Epson printer, $1000.284-3280 after4pm. 284-4391. 1978 Buick Estate sta/wgn, at, pa, pb, p1, pw, ac, 90 hra, comes w/skis, all safety equip $6500/ exc cond $1495. 221-8249. obo. 287-3192. Tandy 1000SX comp, color mon, 5.25-3.5 flop1992Dodge Dakota Club Cab p/u, V6, atloaded pies, 30 Meg HD, printer, mouse, joysticks $16,500. 262-2990. 1991 Mustang 5.0 LX hatchbk, low miles, com12m boat/Inflatable, exc divers boat, w/access $550. 284-5625. pletely loaded, showrm cond $14,900. 221$3000. 264-4817. 1986 Jaguar XJ6, exc cond, no U.S. specs, no 8249. Sony beta 2400, needs spare part $55.252-6989. duty pd $16,000. 264-0118. 25hp Mercury OB motor w/motor stand, access 1986 Chrysler Laser 2.5 liter, 4 cyl, one owner, $2500. 264-4817. Commo 64, mouse, color mon, elec keybd, 1977 Chevy Nova, 4dr, AM-FM cass, duty pd, new paint, 45,000 miles, loaded, exc cond printer, software $700/obo. 287-5397. new batt, runs good, needs body work $1000/ $5500. 260-4564. Trailer 4x4x2, closed, removable doors, lights, obo. 233-5750. '92 plate, duty pd $400. 226-7679. Atari 2600 game sys, 26 games, instruct, all con1973 Super Beetle, runs grt, new brakes, clutch trollers, paddles $100/obo. 286-6529. 1975 Ford F-100 p/u, 360 eng, ac, pa, pb, runs $1700. 228-7924 after 5pm. good, duty pd $1500. 236-4979. Amiga 500, color mon, DD, mouse, joysticks, 1978 Dodge Aspen sta/wgn, 4 new tires $1600. printer, 100 programs $600/obo. 285-4734. 1989 Ford Escort GT, exc cond $4500. 289252-2333. AT&T comp $900, comp desk w/printertbl$300 3320 lv msg. firm. 230-0767 after 7pm. Amiga 500, one meg, lots of software $350/obo, 1978 Dodge Aspen sta/wgn, ac, pw, pa, ph, grt Joe Montana Talking Football $45. 284-4575. 1986 VW Amazon, std, radio, AM-FM cass, shape $1950. 285-4734. Amstrad word processor, hardly used, extra ribequal, duty pd $2500/obo. 287-4733. bon, disks, manuals $225. 284-6629. Sony Trinitrmo 15" colorTV, remote $200. 2871982Buick Regal, V8 diesel, one owner, 64,500 5939. 1970 VW German Beetle built $1500/obo. 287miles, ac, cass, WW tires, best offer. 268-0621. Atari 130XE & 800 comp, 810/1050 DD, 410 re4885. corder 850 interface, software, book $250. 284Cobra antenna for 40ch CB $30. 260-3676. 1987 Chevy Spectrum, 2dr, hatchbk $3000/obo. 4287. 1988 Ford p/u, camper, ac, 5-spd, U.S. specs, 283-4626. Word processor, pwr 1000, like new $245/obo. duty pd, exc cond $10,200. 252-2730. Toshiba camcorder w/batt charger, plus case, 252-6845. 1985 Toyota Corolla, ac, radio, exc cond, duty access $600. 287-4191. 1979 Chevy Impala, eng just rebuilt, grt cond, not pd, new tires, batt $4000/obo. 252-5626. Common 128, 1571 dr software, modems, desk, Pioneer cass, needs carb work $1750/obo. 283Three Nintendo games, Zelda 1942 $25ea. 287printer stand, Sony KV1311 mon $700. 2234227. 1984 Toyota van, at, ac, exc cond $5700/obo. 3028. 4890 after 5fnm. 260-5981. 1979 Ford C-150 4x4 p/u, duty pd, pa, pb, 351 2 Montgomery Ward 19" color mute control TV, eng 8 cyl $2500. 220-2721. 1991 Chevy Blazer 4x4, loaded, exc cond, good cond $200. 287-3028. O e d 15,000 miles, V6 $15,900. 284-3026. 1988 Mazda B2200 p/u, 5-spd, shortbed, w/ Tandy 1000SL 286 comp, 1MB Ram 80MB HD Amana radarange microwave/cnvec oven &hell, stereo cass, low miles, very clean, U.S. 1988 Jeep Comanche p/u w/cap, very good VGA $750, colormon, books $400, laser printer $190, metal frame swing set w/slide $99, plants. specs $5500. 287-5638. cond, avail Dec. 1 $6000. 269-6691. $650. 230-0668. 284-6881. 1984 Honda Accord LX, fair cond, ac, AM-FM, 1982 Ford Granada, one owner, clean, pa, pb, ac Sony beta cass recorder $250, stereo cab rack 3pc leather LR set, bordesu color $600,7-draw 5-spd $3200. 287-5227. $3300/obo. 287-5021. $60, exc cond. 297-4284. desk w/brass hardware $250. 230-0767 after 1981 BMW318i, sr, 4-spd, 2dr, not duty pd, runs 1988 Chevy Sprint, 4dr, std, radio, duty pd New 12"Amdek-ambermon$25,hayes300mo7pm. good $1500. 286-3734. $4900. 228-4061. dean $25. 252-6404. Oriental rug 10x14, turquoise/bge, exc cond 1989 Dodge Dakota p/u, 4WD, canopy, carpet, 1990 VW Passat,4dr sedan, fully loaded, sr, new Zenith 27" color console TV $300. 260-9578. 2 tint glass, ac, ps, pb, exc cond, not duty pd, tires, exc cond $15,500. 230-0767 after 7pm. Various sizes of carpets, four, wooden swing set. 18,000 miles. 2878-3441. Genesis, Super NES games, John Madden, 283-3470 1985 Toyota 4x4 p/u, Chevy 350 eng, 7-inch Wrestlemania, Super Off-load, more. 286-6398. 1990 Mitsubishi Eclipse, GS Turbo, ps, pb, ac, suspension 38-inch tires, good cond $6000. Gold swivel arm chr $55, Whirlpool 15,000 btu CD, loaded $19,000/obo. 269-5224 6-9pm. 260-7437. Component stereo sys, 120watt/ch recvr, ac$350 2873297 tumtbl, 2 floor spkers, like new $450. 261-7845. a 1979 Ford F-100 p/u, std, ac, 1/2 ton, runs grL 1986 Isuzu Aska sedan, needs some work, not 3pc LR, needs upholstry, sm dining set. 261$2700. 282-4129. duty pd $2350/obo. 264-6931. Nintendo w/four games 4120. 286-4474. 4777 1985 Ford Mustang LX, AM-FM cass, ac, one 1987 Ford Tempo, 4 dr, 4 cyl, AM-FM cass, rust Nintendo, zapper $75, games sold separately, owner, not duty pd, cruise, good cond, extras, treat, exc cond, duty pd $7700/obo. 268-2193. Mega Mane-2-3,TmntI, Super Mario 3, more. 2 26x0g8secoor, need cleaningpadsare 286-4685. 1 286-6398.fre$ea26-18 1986 Pontiac Grand Am, ac, tilt wheel, cruise, 1986 Oldsmobile Regency, 4dr, 6 cyl, fuel injec, AM-FM cass $4200. 284-4278. Bose 901 spkera w/stands, good sound $650/ Sears Kenmore refrig/frzr, 2dr, nofrost $300/ loaded, duty pd $12,00. 260-7574. obo. 229-4238. obo. 233-5750. 1976 Ford truck $3500. 284-4278. 1979 Monte Carlo, pa, ph, ac, Kenwood stereo, IBM PS2 model 25 $725, Meade 8" telescope, Magic Chef elec stove, w/extractor, almond, like exc cond, duty not pd $1800/obo. 284-4725. 1987 Custom GMC Minivan, at, ac, AM-FM exc optics, neg. 252-2776. new $380. 229-2916 after 5pm.

PAGE 23

Tropic Times Classified Ads :o,, B1i Whirlpool washing machine, exc cond $250. Sofa, loveseat, exc cond $700, twin canopy bed Kolocraft stroller, like new $35; casseat $25. 236-0523. $350. 284-6883. 283-4626. 1 DR set for 6, china cabinet, like new $1200/obo. Hot Point washer and dryer, oak trim sofa, 6ft 3in spectrum, tri-fin, w/board bag & leash, Qtrs. 430A, Kobbe, Sat. 7am -7 living, dining 260-9578. loveseat, roll top desk, all good cond. 235-9245. nose guard, like new $325. 252-6971. and bed room sets. No early sales. Bar w/2 stools $195, recliner $90, 3pc LR set Solid pine bunk bed BR set, lawnmower, card Qtrs. 305A, Sherman, Sat. 8am -noon, family $450, lamps. 252-6434. j table, 12-spd bicycle, 3 6x9 arearugs. 286-4138. crafts, clothes, toys. Computer desk $80. 284-6975. Men's gold wedding band w/initial M.E.F.G. Gerber electric breast pump, brand new $35; Qtrs. 1023A, Clayton Sat. Audio-visual, 35mm inside. Reward. 284-6350. Century stroller $25, carrier $25. 284-3138. Minolta camera, geni organ, household, clothes. 4-drawer dresser $50, 6x12 silver carpet $50, 21", 3.5hp lawnmower $150, Q-sz comforter & -Mini blinds rmst color 60x45 $20, yellow 36x36 Qtrs 609A, Howard Sat 8am -noon, maternity sheets $45. 261-7845. $10. 287-6297. clothes, car seat, children's clothes. Blk lacquer DR set, glass top, 4 chrs, exc cond, Panasonic 24,000 btu, 1 yr old, exc cond Ping pong table, folding, good cond w/net $175. Qtrs. 932D, Clayton Sat. 8am. No early buyers. 1 yr old $600. 284-6239. $600.236-0984 287-5964. 70 cfL hes frt=$30, ew wndo shdesQtrs. 251A, Albrook Sat. 7:30.m, multi family, 70 cu~ft. chest freezer $300, new window shades 5 Dunlop tires 225/70R15 ideal for small trucks, Black Hill gold necklace with diamond, butterNo early birds. $3ea. 287-4420. $300/obo. 269-1651 fly gold earrings. 287-3680. Whirpoo MC1Y sv cnvet dihwaherQtrs. 428A, Clayton Sat. 7am-noon, TV, bike, Whirlpool energy saver convert dishwasher 12,000 btu ac, 3 mos old, 110 volts, great for 2 chrome & glass coffee tables $70 both; anclothes, miscellaneous. $150, lg bge LR chr $115, both exc cond. 252maids' quarters $375. 289-4464 swering machine $40. 226-2640. 6566. Qtr. 2511D, Clayton Sat. 8&m, clothes, toys, GE washer & dryer, heavy duty, Ig capacity, 3 Rose color marble table lamps, 33in $150pr/ books, waterbed, sofa, more. No early birds. Cosco carseat $15, Gerry babyback pack, new mos old $650. 289-4464 obo. 263-8579 after 5pm. $20, Gerber elec breast pump $25. 286-4135. Qtrs. 953B, La Boca Sa. 8am-lpm. Kenmore washer & dryer, less than 1 yr use, exc Jacuzzi for 4 adults, beige fiberglas & dark Wood bunk beds, pine tbl w/chrs, terracotta cond $600. 287-6840 after 5pm. brown tiles used, running best offer. 268-0621. Qtrs. 672B, Howard Sat. 7-10am. lamps, man's desk w/chr, drapes, best offer. 252-2776. Kenwood CD player, child & baby clothes, toys Nintendo w/games $75; home security alarm, Qtrs 2023B, Curundu Sat. 8am-lpm, clothes, men's dress suits. 287-3702 $150, carpet shampooer, $70. 287-4685. rugs, exer bike, tool boxes, more. Dining tbl w/smoked glass top for four, LR big sofa, small elec oven, coffee/end tbls, others. 35mm Minolta 3000i extras $300, tennis racket 2 medium size bird cages, one callapsable, little Qtrs. 440D, Kobbe Sat. 7am-noon, household, 264-1825 6-9pm. $35; country & classical CDs $7. 286-6226. tykes turtle sandbox; picnic table. 287-6443. clothes, bike, toys, more. No early birds. Q-sz hide-a-bed $500, Zenith 25" console TV Army officer white dress and mess uniforms, Wedding dress with veil & slip. 252-2080. Qtrs. 124A, Albrook Sat. 8am-noon. $600, BR set $800, sewing desk. 252-2730. $20 each. 287-6297. 12-spd Huffy men's and woman's bike,like new 3pc LR set, BR set, misc items. 282-3778. Bikes, his & hers 26in touring, 12-spd, exc cond $60 each. 284-3280. $100. 284-3820. Used movies on laser disks. 230-0668. Q-sz 6ft tall headbd w/minor, 2 matching night New standard encyclopedia set $775. 287-3382. stands & frame $1200/obo. sm roll top desk, New lead crystal mini lamp $25; asst china, Male boxer to breed w/female ASAP. 287-3297. antique $300/obo. 261-3169. kitchen appliances, sky diving suit. 283-6425. Sears 15cu ft freezer, 3 yrs old wheat defrost, light, lockable $450. 287-4113 Artist easel in good condition, reasonably Recliner, exc cond $150. 260-7621. Wedding dress w/train, beaded, sz 12, $350; priced. 286-4684 prom dresses $50-75. 283-6425. Child's batt-oper riding vehicle $75. 228-7924. Wicker-rattan LR set, sofa, square cocktail tbl, Roll top desk, good cond, reasonable. 283-3092 chr, 3-round tbls. 252-6668. Dive gear fins $20; lt dacor 850, $30; knife $20; 2 ladies sz 6 dressy jumpsuits, used one. 252fins, $15; surfbd soft racks, $15. Tom 283-3644. 6989. Notic trac ski machine in good cond. 286-3425 Redwood patio furm $85,5pc DR set $150,2 new after 5pm BSR, 250watt spkera $250. 252-2287. 7 Marquis diamonds total 3/4 carat diamond ring Acs 24,000 Sanyo, new $750; 18,000 Fedders, size 6, $500/obo. 286-4475. $325; 12,000 National, $290. 252-6239. Good home for Eng-spk housekeeper, live-in Dryer, exc cond $350. 261-6186. only, Clayton/Albrook, grt lady. 287-3620 Stroller $50; playpen $40; high chair $20; Flex Weider abdominal board, $40. 252-2143. Carpet w/pad, mini blinds, curtains. 282-3095. 110 exercise machine $100/obo. 284-4997. Lawnmower, good cond, reasonable. 284-6975 learat diamond cluster ring $950/trade; lcarat Child's 13pc BR set, twin bed, w/extra hideBarbie house $20; Limoge vase $250; garb disblue ridge dia ring $950/trade; Canon w/flash. Basketball backed, rim in good cond; child's away-bed, 3-dr chest, 2 hutch, tbl w/4 chrs, more posal $195; wedding dress $195, judo suit $20, 284-6694. desk. 260-7779 $1200. 252-5961. rock&roll albums. 252-2042. Std trans for 87 Ford Escort; 86 Toyota Corolla Eng-spk live-in babysitter for 2 yr old girl, wk Entertainment ctr, holds VCR, stereo, 27" TV, Shoes #3, pes of leather, night dress, Toyota and 85 Caprice. 228-4061. nights, wkends no housekeeping 284-5481 pd $795, sell $550. 287-6196. repair manual, bottle warmer $8, table $20. 2522042. Bilingual, mature, dependable, honest maid, MKenmore refrig/frzr, 21 cuft. $600/neg, men's lam F some Saturdays, refs required. 287-5680 10-spd bike, good shape $50. 287-6623. 5 new Uniroyal Tigerpaws A/S tires, P225/ 75R15, less than 40 miles $60ea. 236-4354 1985 Honda Elite Scooter, new tune up good Old Doors and U2 tapes or CDs. 287-4733. Baby crib/bed w/matt $400. 286-4932. condition, helmet included PCSing $225. 287Portable elec typewriter $100. 252-6845. 5430 15" rims, 4 holes for old 2-ton trlr. 225-4749. Indoor/outdoor 15x25 bge carpet $145, port vacuum car cleaner $4.50. 260-4429. 2 6x9 carpet $40ea, toddler activity ctr w/slide the TROPIC TIM ES Ad Form $60, Little Tikes Playhse $180, Little Tikes Treehse $120, lamp $30. 260-7860 after 6pm. Advertising in the Tropic Times is offered on a space available basis to U.S. military members, civilians, DoD Natural solid pine bunk beds w/3 lg drawers employees and employees ofotherU.S. government agencies. Ads will be accepted only for NON-COMMERCIAL underneath, one twin matt inel $450. 252-2243. services or goods offered by the advertiser or an immediate family member. Offerings of real estate, firearms or Queen size mattress $75. 287-4175. personal ads will not be accepted. The Tropic Times reserves the right to edit any advertisement. Questions regarding non-publication of submitted ads may be directed to the editor at 285-6612. Super single waterbed w/heater $150/obo. 286Submissions must be typed or legibly printed and limited to 15 words. Only two submissions weekly per person 6529. will be accepted. Patio Sale ads must indicate date and location. Submitted ads will be published only once and must 3pc LR set $250, refrig $200. 252-2543 after be resubmitted for further publication. Ads not run because of late receipt or lack of space need not be resubmitted; l0am. they will be run the following week unless a specific date is involved. Ads sent by Fax will not be run. Bassett baby crib w/access $150, high chr $20. Deadline for the receipt of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for Friday's edition. If Monday is an official holiday, the deadline 252-629. is 9 a.m. Tuesday. Ads may be mailed to the Tropic Times, Unit 0936, APO AA 34002 or deposited in a drop box at the Albrook Post Office. Advertisers should allow seven to 14 days for processing. Q-sz waterbed matt, 161b Columbia 300 bowling ball + 161b Rhino bowling ball. 286-3173. []ANIMALS Two twin mattresses, good cond $40 ea. 252ELECTRONICS 2143. L] AUTOMOBILES Bar made in Germany w/stools $600. 236-2365. [] AVAILABLE 0 BOATS & CAMPERS 3pc blk lacquer wall unit $350, couch $300, [] FOUND coffee/end tbs $250. 284-3578. PRICE HOME PHONE Whirlpool 13,000 btu ac, exc cond $500. 226LOST Checkonly one category per ad form. Only two ads perperson each week are 7679. El MISCELLANEOUS allowed. Each ad form is limited to 15 words. Please type or pript neatly. Maytag washer and dryer set, good cond $650 1 MOTORCYCLES Information listed below is not included in the ad, but is required for publicaset. 284-5374. El PATIO SALES tion. This information will not be released to third parties. 3 WANTED Couch & loveseat, beige, US made $500, Magic Chef gas stove $300, GE side-by-side refrig. SPONSOR'S NAME RANK/GRADE 260-1477. Recliner, taupe color, in exc cond $225. 284ORG. DUTY PHONE 6880.

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121 ) Tropic Times S Nov. 6,1992 BEETLE BAILEY ()By Mort Walker ACROSS 548 Rng 96 Pdotl.ss group 40 Breathe in comfortable I'LL HAVE 5ORRY. PO YOU KiOW DO YOU INO_, TE ON I Lovers' disgrace on airplanes 128 Mardi -41 Singer 84 ComputerANOTHER ONE STEAK WHO I AM?! KNOW j WHO Co TROL6 quarrel 55 Eat into 97 Daytine TV DOWN McEntire screen 5TEAK PER IM COL. MINK&E WHO I t THE6TEAf(, Nipa palm 56 Darkens tare 1 Play the 42 Moslem ruler Image PER5ON FROM HQ AMT 9 Jose's house 59 Bringstortth 99 British guitar 43 Eli Whitney's 86 More untidy EA 13 Title 1or-57 lambs prisons 2 Couples 1793 88 Wood sorrels Down 61 Southwest 100 River in 3 Declare invention 90 Drinker/Slaw 17 Barrel part wind Scotland to be true 44 Portuguese invention of I8 Lytnon 62 Museum 101 Political 4 Communicatolk tune 1928 heroine commodity student org. tions 45 Of a time 92 Tunisian 19 TV comedy 63 Lanston's 104 Remove the invention of period measure 20 Iliad and 1887 rind t928 47 Hunt's 1849 94 Small jazz # Odyssey invention 106 Diminutive. 5 Bridal paths invention ensemble 6 22 The Little 65 Wahonr's in Dundee 6 Aggregate 48 Flightless 95 Stritch and Mermaid 1860 floor 107 Pepper or 7 Dill weed bird May 23 Futfon's pride covering barley 8 Female 49 Suffix 96 David .HAGAR the Horrible By Dik Browne 25 Papal 67 Lincoln fotlower peacocks meaning skin Copperfelds vestment Center 108 Slate9 -Calloway 51 Elected bride 26itch' Offering trimming toot 10 Minor Ofticial 98 Urge intoV A~ k/ 7rlV I-/ A6E' in mention 69 One of the 111 Bell's 1876 prophet 53 Brutes action 28 Oughttvd's Muses invention 11 Zoo favorites 56 -acid 100 Tour guide 0/\ 1620 71 French 114 Ben 12 Pranks 57 Pianist Hess and lecturer invention painter Fanklin's 13 Protective 58 Fberan 101 RBI or ERA 30 German river 72 Nobel's 1866 1780 resources country 102 French 31 Sesame invention Invention 14 On -60 Plumber's painter 32 Stammering 75 Westing117 The pea tree (equinalent tool 103 Point ot view sounds house's t868 118 Maelzel's to) 63 Hebrew Iettr 105 January, to 34 Look at contribution 1816 15 Negative 64 French verb Juan closely 77 Thus far contribution quantity 66 Lonely 107 Alan King, for 35 i'll -You in 80 Chinese and to music 16 French number? one My Dreams" Persian 120 -Mounschool 68 Library 108 "The 36 Stains 61 IntimIdates rains, a 17 Glut adhesives Prisoner of 0 37 Marsh bird 83 Cuddle range of the 21 Snicker 70 Preoccupy 39 "In Spain snugly Rockies follower greatly 109 Feeds the 4They say -84 -Illc10 121 P irri' .nr 24 Worth 72 Mail slot kitty Barney Google and Snuffy Smith By FredL Laswel 41 Summarizes 85 Fails to 122 Malayan 27 Golf gadgets 73 Arizona 110 Peter or Ivan 44 Joyous include trigger 29 Speaker's Indian 112 Miss Kett 46 Fell inta87 Westem city 123 Emerald Isle platform 74 Female 113 Harrow's lively 89 Some MIT. 124 Consumer 33 Short drive sheep rival WHARS LUKEY MAYBE HE'S STLL I'LL HO 50 Ham Ivp grads advocate 36 Tropical fruit 76 Road map 115 Golfer's cry WITH THAT SLEEPI' OE HIM hi Julie or 90 Cake topper 125 Play the lead 37 Hebrew or vbb,. (p] ) 116 Ananias, for TWO OOLLERS PAW I A LITTLE Wenamaker 91 Soft saddles 126 Chinese Arab 78 Serf one HE OWES ME? } WAKE-(P I2 bsen 93 Much-sought associawin 38 Baccha79 Clothes 119 Scott Jopin heroine outcome 127 Splinter nalian cry 82 Warm and -opus (I 2 3 4 5 7 8 9 tO tt 12 f3 fri 15 16 17 18 1920 21-2223 242 r 278 29 RATZ by BEN SMITH 30 32 33 34 WI offf!DONTd OSEEI? Tb 40T SCR881LMG! IT'5 3 37 38 3 40 3 POST -IHPRESSIONISTIC Faiii _1 Wo-CLA,,\ciSThc 41 42 45 46 47 48 49 DALWI$ IN ITS FOJESC 57 158 60 -62 j36 6 7 68 9 71BUTCH AND DOUGIE by ALEX HOWELL 7273 77 76 79 P SU-CH, You) MEW R 6Eo D jo_ at 2 834 NEW FREkmPS, 97 92 93 19 4 1 Ito tt t02 103 904 105 106 07 0O8tO9t1O 101 10 2 105 10711 OUT ON A LIMB by GARY KOPERVAS 1194D DOS A LUTTLQ WeLL 'iM A CAMP T21 1J4 22 123 1241 M N& AT 'ePA TV. WnENLF, -AS P, 24 NsIG~jG ATV\~ SRTLC &YNSQLOPR SL ASR25 26 t 1 8 ,JIuL W AT O S J W"ilU TWeGLA4M W-ligHT LOSS MTO T CONSULTANT, SL.AS4, j 1 S 3 S OOP TART-TIMe CUThORP( I N I 3 V dH 1 N VA I \IA V3 U SALP-SMAN, SLASH LVZ NNO 0v~ 9 d I0 "I N NTHE SPATS by JEFF PICKERING 3~e 3 0 MlwrlePLC,7ily V 3 W O V Cd AN M -", up dq yoE DONEi! S ld 3 N 4V NO 9A615 oucall thatan apo o y 3 I' V H S 0 n V 9 V431 DENNIS THE MENACE RURAL FREE DELIVERY by MIKE MARLAND -~ 7LAFF-A-D AY 20 o -3AIrERThh' EXECUTE S eNIEMEN C --1REiE V4T4 CONTM. FARMERS K-VGEORGE by MARK SZORADY LAFA-A BO.IIMI JIN'o9 TVAT TASTES GRD Happy birthday *TLE