Citation
The tropic times

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Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text


Gift other Panama Canal Museum
h )Adoi-_


Vol. V. No. 42


Tropic
iL -Quarry Heights


Times


s, Republic of Panama


Friday, Oct. 23, 1992


New tuition


assistance


rules begin
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Soldiers are
facing tuition assistance rules that began Oct. 1 for
fiscal year '93.
The Department of the Army set new limits on credit
hours tuition assistance will cover.
Soldiers seeking graduate degrees are allowed tui-
tion assistance for 12 credit hours per year. Soldiers
seeking undergraduate degrees are allowed tuition as-
sistance for 15 credit hours per year. Most college
courses are worth three credit hours.
Soldiers can apply for an exception to credit-hour
limits to meet residency requirements or if they are
nearing completion of a degree, said Charles Fritts,
Army director of education in Panama.
If the money runs out, tuition assistance availability
will be based on priority groups set up by DA.
According to DA, recipients of tuition assistance are
grouped with the level of education they are seeking.
The first priority group includes officers and warrant
officers who do not have an undergraduate degree,
enlisted soldiers who have an associate's studying for a
bachelor's degree and enlisted soldiers studying for an
associate's degree.
The second priority group includes commissioned
officers seeking a graduate degree, enlisted soldiers and
warrant officers seeking a bachelor's degree who do not
have an associate's degree and all soldiers seeking
alternative education for teaching certification. En-
listed soldiers who started work on a bachelor's degree
in fiscal year '92 are the exception and are considered
in the first priority group, Fritts said. The third priority
group includes enlisted soldiers and warrant officers
seeking a graduate degree.
"It looks right now that we have enough money for
everybody," Fritts said.
Soldiers with questions about tuition assistance can
contact their local education center.


Stateside clocks turn back
COROZAL (Tropic Times) - People in the
United States will be turning their clocks back one
hour Sunday from Daylight Savings to Standard
Time.
Check the TV schedule on page B3 for program-
ming changes. Remember the time change when call-
ing backto the states. Panama does not change times.

1993 inspections starting
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The 1993
vehicle inspection program in the Republic of Pan-
ama begins in November and runs through March 31,
1993.
All privately owned vehicles must be inspected
before registration.
U.S. government employees and their family
members are eligible to have their vehicles inspected
at the Panama Canal Commission Transportation
Division facilities on each side of the isthmus. The
inspection fee is $6.
The starting date for inspections will be published
when notification is received from Panama.




Air Force Thunderbirds roar into
Panama for Saturday perform-
ance.


u s Army pnoto by Lpl Oanel Bean
NIGHT FUN - Chainsaw-wielding Paul Tilley waits for victims at Fort Espinar's Haunted House last
year. Halloween is just around the corner and Panama military communities have set trick-or-treat
hours for the Oct. 31 event. See the Mayor's Corner on page 6 for more information.


i 'Road Dawgs' team with Rangers


by Capt. David Dougherty
Company A 536th Engineer Battalion
FORT KOBBE (USARSO PAO) - The "Road
Dawgs" of Company A, 536th Engineer Combat
Battalion (Heavy), recently completed a support
exercise at the Jungle Operations Training Center
with the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment.
The company's second platoon, led by SFC Robert
Reisinger, provided engineer support and enhanced
the the realism of the training.
The platoon constructed two suspend-wire cable
systems that were used for moving silhouettes through
the air on two live-fire ranges.
It provided the Rangers with opportunities to en-
gage moving targets under tough conditions, Reisin-
ger said.
The platoon also constructed three mock build-
ings that were used on three assault missions by the
Rangers.
The platoon intensified the scenarios with con-
struction efforts including disabling a radio station
with explosives, destroying an enemy tactical opera-



Rodman Naval Station Port Serv-
ices lend visiting vessels a "help-
ing hand."


"Working with the Rangers
gives us the chance to see an-
other part of the Army we don't
often see as engineers here in
Panama. "
PFC Ollie Cole
Co. A, 536th Engineer Battalion
tions center and raiding a drug manufacturing site.
Reisinger called upon Sgt. Ricky Nails and Pvt. 1
David Tonderski during the live-fire phase of the
exercise to correct a misfire of military dynamite.
The soldiers of second platoon enjoyed the oppor-
tunity to work with the Rangers, Reisinger said. They
also supported movements of troops and materials in
the various scenarios.
"Thisis something we have never done before,"
PFC Ollie Cole said. "Working with the Rangers
gives us the chance to see another part of the Army
we don't often see as engineers here in Panama."



*Banana band trip, page 7.
*Military survey, page 5.
*High school football, page 11.













Tropic Times
Oct. 23, 1992


Thunderbirds


show


professional expertise


I
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4


HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA) - The
Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron,
Thunderbirds, will present an air show
over the Bay of Panama Saturday at
noon.
The show will be adjacent to the At-
lapa Convention Center. Buses will be
taking military personnel to the show
from Howard AFB Theater at 10 am.
and Albrook at 10:30 am. Buses in the
Atlantic community will leave Fort Davis
Swimming Pool parking lot at 9 a.m.
Buses will also be available at 10 a.m. at
the Cocoli Community Center, Fort Clay-
ton Burger King and the Fort Kobbe
Burger King. The buses will return to
their pick-up points following the show.
The Thunderbirds plan and present
aerial maneuvers to exhibit the capabili-
ties of modem high-performance aircraft
and the high degree of professional skill
required to operate the aircraft demon-
strations.
Objectives of the squadron are:
* to demonstrate to the public the pro-
fessional competence of the Air Force;
* to support U.S. Air Force community
relations and people-to-people programs;
* to support U.S. Air Force recruiting
and retention programs;
* to strengthen morale and esprit de
corps among Air Force personnel.

The Team
The Thunderbirds squadron is an Air
Combat Command unit made up of eight
pilots (six of which are demonstration
pilots), three support officers, and more
than 130 enlisted people performing in
33 different career fields.
The demonstration season lasts from
March to November, with the winter
.months used for training new members.
Officers serve atwo-year tour, and about
half the team is new each year.
Since the team's inception in 1953,
more than 254 million people in all 50
states and 56 foreign countries have at-
tended 3,131 official demonstrations. The
team has never canceled a performance
",.,� .


MSgt. Gary McCue (left) and SSgt. Jeff Simpson time a maneuver.


because of maintenance problems.
The Thunderbirds are part of the combat
force. If required, team members and
aircraft can be a tactical fighter unit
within 72 hours.
To keep their combat skills polished,
team pilots fly periodic weapons training
missions in addition to demonstration
flights. Maintenance personnel are also
ready to perform their combat role.

History
The Thunderbirds were officially ac-
tivated June 1, 1953, as the 3600th Air
Demonstration Team at Luke Air Force
Base, Ariz.
The first aircraft was the straight-
winged F-84G Thunderjet, a combat-
proven fighter-bomber that had seen
extensive action in Korea. Early in 1955,
the Thunderbirds transitioned to the swept-
wing F-84F Thunderstreak. In their first
three years with the F-84, the team
performed for more than nine million
spectators in 222 shows that included
tours of Central and South America.
In June 1956, the team moved to its
current home at Nellis Air Force Base,
Nev. At the same time, the Thunderbirds
traded the veteran F-84 for the U.S. Air
Force's first supersonic fighter, the F-
100 Super Sabre - the aerial platform
that would serve the Thunderbirds for 13
years. The F-100 years were memorable.
More than 1,000 demonstrations were
flown in the "C" and "D" models of the
aircraft, thrilling spectators from the Far
East to North Africa. In the middle of the
F-100 era, the team changed briefly to
theF-105 Thunderchief. After six shows
in 1964, the Thunderbirds returned to the
F-100 for maintenance reasons.
From 1969 to 1973, the Thunderbirds
flew the Air Force's front-line fighter of
the time, the F-4E Phantom. In five sea-
sons the team performed more than 500
demonstrations while traveling to 30 of
the 50 states, Canada, Central America
and Europe.
In 1974, the Thunderbirds converted


USS Princeton continuing ocean counter-drug war


RODMAN NS (USNAVSTAPANCA-
NAL PAO) - The USS Princeton (CG-
59), a Ticonderoga class cruiser, is cur-
rently conducting drug trafficking inter-
diction operations in the equatorial wa-
ters off of South America, said CWO3
Chris Walker, Navy spokesman.
During the second day at sea, Prince-
ton crewmembers conducted their first
boarding.
The vessel boarded was engaged in
legal activity and the crew was very
courteous and cooperative, Walker said.
ThePrinceton's chief corpsman gave
medical aid to one of the crewmen and
the boarding was completed, Walker said.


The Princeton, under the command of
Capt. J. Cutler Dawson Jr., is home-
ported at Long Beach, Calif.
This tasking came hot upon the heels
of RIMPAC 1992, a multinational exer-
cise involving five Pacific contiguous
nations conducted in July, a major train-
ing evolution in which Princeton played
a significant role, Walker said.
The crew of the Princeton was aug-
mented by a weather detachment from
the Naval Oceanography Facility in San
Diego, Calif.
Another major addition to the capa-
bilities of the cruiser were two helicop-
ters from HLS-43 stationed at North Is-


land Naval Air Station, near San Diego,
with their Officer-in-Charge, LCDR John
O'Conner.
A five member Coast Guard Law En-
forcement Detachment, under the lead-
ership of LT(jg) Dale Garvin, formed the
nucleus around which at-sea operations
centered, Walker said.
The Law Enforcement Detachment is
a cadre of hand-picked high-caliber per-
sonnel who have received extensive train-
ing in rules of evidence, self-defense,
and search and seizure procedures, Walker
said.
The Princeton's task is straightfor-
ward; locate, interview and evaluate sur-


face vessels encountered in Pacific Ocean
in the ongoing war on drugs, Walker
said.
If vessels appear suspicious and proper
authority has been given, the law en-
forcement team will board and search, he
said.
Princeton's crew maneuvers the 567
foot long 9,600 ton warship alongside the
vessel while the Coast Guard boarding
team travels in a small boat, called a
Ridged Hull Inflatable Boat to board the
vessel and conduct a search for contra-
band, Walker said.
The Princeton continues on patrol in
waters of Central America, Walker said.


The Thunderbirds in action.
to the T-38 Talon, the world's first super-
sonic trainer. The team flew nearly 600
demonstrations during eight seasons with
the Talon.
Early in 1983, the Thunderbiids moved
to the F-16 Fighting Falcon.
In 1986, the Thunderbirds participated
in the rededication fly-by of the Statue of
Liberty, which was nationally televised.
The next year, the largest crowd to
see a performance was at Coney Island,
N.Y., July 4, 1987, when more than 2.25
million people viewed the demonstra-
tion.
Also in 1987, the Thunderbirds per-
formed the firstU.S. military demonstra-
tion in a communist country - China.
In 1989, the Thunderbirds held 79
demonstrations in 37 states. In 1990, the
team toppled the 600 demonstration mark
in theF-16, as the Thunderbirds gave 63
performances in 31 states.
In 1991, the team traveled to Europe
for the first time performed in eight
countries, including first-time visits to
Switzerland, Poland and Hungary.

1992: Year of Transition
In 1992, the Thunderbirds transitioned
to the F-16C for their aerial demonstra-
tions. Since 1983, the team employed the
A-model of the Fighting Falcon and was
the last active-duty unit to convert to the
upgraded model. The conversion took
place simply because the team represents
the rest of the Air Force and every front-
line F-16 squadron employs the F-16C.
The switch also made sense for logistical
and combat-conversion reasons.


F-16C Statistics
Speed: Mach 2+
Range: More than 550 nautical-mile
combat range, and more than 2,000
nautical-mile ferry range with exter-
nal tanks.
Altitude: More than 50,000 feet
Rate of climb: More than 30,000 feet
per minute; or 500 feet per second.
Length: 49 feet, 3 inches (including
pilot tube)
Wingspan: 31 feet (without missiles)
Height: 16 feet, 7 inches
Weight: 18,240 pounds (including
pilot,koil, two missiles and full load of
20mm ammunition);25,000 pounds
(maximum gross load); 37,500 pounds
(maximum gross weight)
Propulsion system: One Pratt and
Whitney F-100 PW-220 afterburning
turbofan engine in the 25,000-pound
thrust class.
Cockpit: Zero altitude rocket-type pilot
ejection system; high-visibility can-
opy; seat inclined at a 30-degree angle;
control stick mounted on right con-
sole; heads-up display.
Flight Control system: Computer-
controlled "fly-by-wire" system
Armament: Include a fuselage-
mounted multi-barrel 20 mm cannon,
and an air-to-air missile mounted on
each wingtip. Up to 11,000 pounds of
additional weapons, and fuel tanks
can be carried on pylons mounted
under the wings and on the fuselage
centerline.


t
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F


















































SSgt. David Montoya, shift supervisor for the 24th Communication Group global station, replaces recording reels on part of the communication system.


Albrook group offers global communication


by SrA. Jackie Ambrose
24th Wing Group Public Affairs Office
HOWARD AFB (24TH WG/PA) - For many mili-
tary members, the words "phone patch" bring to mind
one-on-one conversations with loved ones back home.
These words mean something entirely different for
members of the Albrook Global Station.
The Albrook Global Station is one of 15 strategically
located throughout the world. Its 14 radio operators and
maintenance technicians belong to the 24th Communi-
cations Squadron.
"We're part of a little known system that performs a
very important mission," MSgt. Erick Estrada, non-
commissioned officer in charge, Global User Support
Station, said. "We deal with the communication for all
Department of Defense aircraft in an eight-million
square mile Latin American theater." In providing non-
secure, high frequency air/ground/air and point to
point voice communications, the Global Station relays
vital aircraft movement information for air rescue and
recovery service, air weather service, distinguished
visitor support, and worldwide command and control
for DOD aircraft.


Air Force flu

shots scheduled
Howard AFB (24th WG/PA) - Annual flu
shots for active duty Air Force members will
be given at the Howard AFB theater Tuesday
and Wednesday from 8 am. to 4 p.m. and
Thursday from 8 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Annual flu shots are a mandatory require-
ment for all active duty Air Force members.
Shot records are necessary to receive the vac-
cination.
Flu shots will also be available for military
family members Nov. 2 at the Howard AFB
theater from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Children who have a history of asthma or
who have had recent illnesses should also have
the flu shots because they stand a higher risk of
contracting the flu, said SrA. Becky Kraus,
Howard AFB allergy immunization techni-
cian.
For information, call the Howard AFB
immunization clinic at 284-6157.


"These offices are staffed 24 hours a day with
someone constantly monitoring the radio speakers in
case help is needed," SSgt. Daniel Montoya, shift
supervisor, said. "If the command post calls us, we can
locatethepositions of aircraft and transmit information
to them."
The Global station was on special alert when Presi-
dent Bush visited Panama, Estrada said.
"Visiting heads of state and other dignitaries in our
area of responsibility is just one case warranting this
status," he said.
"If there is an incident involving a downed aircraft or
rescue mission, we act as liaisons between the search
coordination and rescue aircraft," he said.
"Our communication capabilities on high
power,3KWoutput, high frequency radios is what aids
the search and rescue process."
"We've also helped other Latin American military
aircraft, but our primary responsibility remains DOD
aircraft," Estrada said.
Global stations throughout the world were consoli-
dated from previously known Global Command and
Control, Giant Talk, Mystic Star, and Command Escort
Systems.


SrA. Becky Kraus gives a flu shot to TSgt. Frederique Dunham.


U.S. Air Force photo by SrA. Jacke Amoro
SSgt. David Montoya and MSgt. Erick Estrada
check circuits during a phone patch.


U.S. Air Force photos by SrA. Jacie Ambro*


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4 Tropic Times
Oct. 23,1992


SHemisphere


U.S. officials forecast Castro's downfall


WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Thirty
years after the world almost lurched into
nuclear war during the Cuba missile cri-
sis, U.S. policymakers say the days of
communism on the Caribbean island are
numbered and fear that its end may be
bloody.
According to officials and private
analysts, the question is no longer whether
Cuban President Fidel Castro's govern-
ment will eventually collapse under the
weight of an inexorable economic de-
cline. The question is when and how it
falls.
"It seems inevitable that change in
Cuba will come in a relatively short
time," said one State Department offi-
cial.
"It may not be days or weeks or months
but it is coming. And we are really con-
cerned about the prospect of a violent


end which would be in nobody's interest
and could create serious regional prob-
lems," he said.
From the moment of his takeover in
1958, Castro was seen by Washington as
a dagger only 90 miles from the coast of
Florida aimed at the heart of the United
States.
In October 1962 when he discovered
that the Soviet Union had moved nuclear
missiles to Cuba, President John Ken-
nedy went to the brinkof nuclear war to
force their withdrawal.
During much of the 1970s and 1980s,
Cuba was still seen as a deadly threat to
U.S. interests, stirring up revolt in Latin
America, supporting Sandinista Marx-
ists in Nicaragaua and leftist rebels in El
Salvador and sending thousands of troops
to far-off Angola to help implant Marx-
ism in Africa.


But the collapse of the Soviet Union
deprived Castro of an estimated $3.5
billion of annual aid. Cuba has lost trad-
ing partners and markets in the former
Communist bloc in Eastern Europe and
officials say around 70 percent of its
international income has evaporated.
Washington has maintained its 30-
year trade embargo on Cuba and Con-
gress recently passed a bill to tighten it.
The Cuban Democracy Act of 1992,
which still awaits President Bush's sig-
nature, would ban foreign subsidiaries of
U.S. firms from doing business with Cuba
and bar ships trading with the island from
U.S. ports for six months.
Despite protestations from the Euro-
pean Community, Canada and Mexico
that the so-called "Torricelli bill" was a
crude U.S. device to dictate the trading
patterns of other countries, Democratic


candidate Bill Clinton has endorsed it,
increasing the pressure on Bush to sign
it.
"One cannot see on the horizon any
good news for Castro, only continued
economic deterioration and unrelieved
bleakness," said Larry Bims of the Council
on Hemispheric Affairs, a Washington
think-tank.
"He has nothing to hope for from
Clinton. There is a growing danger of
riots, rising violence- you are going to
have a Gotterdammerung," he said, re-
ferring to the Wagner opera 'The Twi-
light of the Gods' which climaxes amid
trumpet fanfares with the violent deaths
of its main protagonists.
The State Department official said the
daily food intake forpoorpeople in some
parts of Cuba was falling to subsistence
levels.


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Boston


orchestra



launches


Latin tour


SAO PAULO, Brazil (Reuters) - The
Boston Symphony Orchestra launched
its first tour of Latin America Monday to
what organizers said was a sellout crowd
in Brazil's largest city.;
Led by music director Seiji Ozawa,
the orchestra plans a three-city tour, going
on after Sao Paulo to the Argentine capi-
tal, Buenos Aires, and Caracas, capital of
Venezuela.
All eight performances sold out al-
most immediately, said BSO spokeswoman
Caroline Smedvig.
The orchestra has performed across
Europe and in Japan and China but has
never before performed in Latin Amer-
ica.
"This is a tour that is long overdue,"


said Kenneth Haas, Managing Direc-
tor.
"We have heard a great deal about the
sophistication and enthusiasm of audi-
ences in Sao Paulo."
Haas said the overwhelming demand
for tickets in Sao Paulo led organizers to
try a technological first for the BSO and
Sao Paulo's Teatro Municipal.
During the second performance on
Tuesday night the concert was re-
transmitted live to four huge video screens
in the large Vale de Anhangabau
square.
Six sets of speakers mounted with the
video screens relayed the music being
performed inside the theatre to a dis-
tance of nearly three miles.


The square is capable of accommo-
dating tens of thousands of people and
was recently the site of massive protest
marches calling for the ouster of Presi-
dent Fernando Collor, who was im-
peached last month.
"The reception has been very good.
We are all sold out. It was this demand
that led to organizing the screen and
live transmission for the first time,"
Haas said.
Ozawa, now in his 18th year as
music director, said he learned only on
his arrival that Sao Paulo is home to
more than a million Brazilians of Japa-
nese descent, the largest single com-
munity of Japanese anywhere outside
of Japan.


Leaders embrace


'92 Nobel awardee

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Most Latin Americans were
elated to see Guatemalan Indian Rigoberta Menchu win the
Nobel Peace Prize for 1992, but her triumph and the spotlight
it has turned on Central America disconcerted others.
The Guatemalan government, which had ignored
Menchu's nomination for the award, extended cordial con-
gratulations to the 33-year-old Mayan who has been accused
by security forces of being a member of the leftist guerrilla
front.
"With this distinction, Menchu will be able to apply the
moral authority conferred on her by the prize to seek peace-
ful solutions to existing and future discords in Latin America
and especially Guatemala," the government said in a state-
ment.
Menchu dedicated her life to indigenous rights after her
father, mother and 16-year-old brother were killed by Gua-
temalan security forces during the 1980s.
Nobel laureate Oscar Arias, former president of Costa
Rica who won the peace prize in 1987, said Menchu's award
would" bring to light the ... neglect, oppression and persecu-
tion suffered by the indigenous peoples of all the Americas,
north, central and south."
Argentine Nobel laureate Adolfo Perez Esquivel, who
won the peace prize in 1980, was more blunt.
"Although the policy of extermination against the indige-
nous and peasant people of Guatemala continues, this prize
constitutes support for the struggle for life and democratiza-
tion in that country," he said.
The government of Carlos Salinas de Gortari, the presi-
dent of Mexico where Menchu has spent her years in exile,
released copies of a letter he sent Menchu.
"The distinction she has received makes us'proud in.
Mexico where we admire her," it said.
Argentine President Carlos Menem called Menchu his
"Latin American sister" and exclaimed: "I feel as if I'd won
myself."
El Salvador's right-wing government congratulated the
Guatemalan government but avoided any mention of
Menchu.
"We are happy, and we have congratulated the Guate-
malan government for the distinguished and honorable
mention that a Guatemalan citizen has been given," said
Oscar Santamaria, chief of staff to President Alfredo Cris-
tiani.


Menchu


I









* Military News


Tropic Times
Oct. 23,19925


Vietnam expanding


POW-MIA assistance


BANGKOK, Thailand (AP) - Viet-
nam will expand its help in determining
the fate of Americans missing from the
Vietnam War by letting U.S. experts
study military archives, the official Viet-
namese News Agency said Monday.
Members of the Pentagon's task force
searching for missing servicemen previ-
ously described the lack of access to the
archives as a serious hindrance to their
work.
The U.S. group conducts joint searches
and excavations with the Vietnamese,
looking for the remains of missing
Americans.
The agreement was announced at the
conclusion of a three-day visit to Hanoi
by aU.S. delegation led by retired Army
Gen. John Vessey Jr.
He was accompanied by Sen. John
McCain, a former prisoner of war in
Vietnam, and other U.S. officials.
A joint U.S.-Vietnamese statement
transmitted by the Vietnam News Agency
said the agreement was "an important
new step which should accelerate results
on the POW-MIA issue."


Prime Minister Vo Van Kiet said he
believed the agreement would promote
better relations with the United States,
the agency reported.
The United States has not had diplo-
matic relations with Vietnam since the
Communist takeover of the South in 1975
and has maintained an economic em-
bargo against Hanoi. U.S. officials have
said relations will not be normalized
until Hanoi provides a satisfactory ac-
counting of missing Americans.
In Washington, the State Department
spokesman, Richard Boucher, said pre-
liminary reports of the Vessey mission
were encouraging.
State Department officials, however,
cautioned that while Vessey had made
"important progress," that progress did
not meet the criteria that the United States
has set for normalizing relations.
There are 2,266 American service-
men who are still unaccounted for from
the Vietnam War, which ended 17 years
ago. Some 1,658 were lost in Vietnam,
while the others were lost in the neigh-
boring countries of Cambodia and Laos.


The letters "USA" and "K" show below the USA, etched into a Laotian rice
paddy only four years ago could be distress signals from American POWs,
according to Senate testimony recently on Capitol Hill.


Military survey discovers healthy new trends


WASHINGTON (American Forces Information Serv-
ice)- The newest Department of Defense survey shows
substance abuse in almost all categories is down.
DoD released some results of the 1992 Worldwide
Survey of Substance Abuse and Health Behaviors on
Sept. 21. Some 16,395 randomly selected soldiers,
sailors, airmen and Marines completed the anonymous
self-report questionnaires.
The survey's drug statistics reflected the greatest
success for DoD, said U.S. Public Health Service Dr.
(RADM) Edward D. Martin, head of the Professional
Affairs and Quality Assurance office in DoD Health
Affairs. Drug use declined dramatically - from 27.8
percent of service members reporting nonmedical drug
use in 30 days prior to the first survey in 1980 down to
3.8 percent in 1992. Those who use drugs tend to be
younger, single and in lower pay grades.
Further, Martin said, they reported no significant
negative effects of drug use, indicating they are casual,
not dependent, drug users. "However," he emphasized,
"we consider any nonmedical use of drugs to be drug
abuse."
Smoking shows a slower, but still steady, decline. In
1992, 35.9 percent considered themselves smokers,
compared with 40.9 percent in 1988 and 51 percent in
1980. Martin said that while military people were still
more likely to smoke than their civilian counterparts,
service members are kicking the habit at a rapid rate.
For comparison, only 28 percent of the general popula-
tion smoked in 1988, according to the American Cancer
Society.
For the first time, the survey tracked smokeless
tobacco use. Some seven percent.of service members
dipped snuff or chewed - tobacco five or more days a
week. Eight percent used smokeless tobacco less than
once a week. Health officials will watch this figure in
future surveys, because they suspect smokeless tobacco
use may be increasing.
Martin said fewer servicemembers abuse alcohol
overall. A significant number use alcohol heavily,
however, and are negatively impacted personally and m
edically, he said.
In 1980, there were 20.8 percent"of service member-
swhowereheavydrinkers. Heavy alcohol use by service
members declined from 17 percent overall in 1988 to
15.2 percent in 1992. Heavy use is defined as five or
more drinks on one occasi on at least once a week.
More service members are saying no to alcohol -
some 20.4 percent abstain. Only 13.5 percent abstained
in 1980. Loss of productivity due to alcohol is also
down, from a high of more than 30 percent of drinkers
reporting problems in 1982to fewerthan 20, percent in
1992.
This is the fifth such worldwide survey DoD has
conducted, Martin said. He said DoD has been doing the
surveys since 1980 to track the progress of substance
abuse prevention " programs and to identify subjects
that may need more emphasis.


A closer look...
The 1992 DoD Worldwide Survey of Substance
Abuse asked service members more questions on
more subjects than any of the previous four sur-
veys. DoD Health Affairs has commissioned the
periodic surveys since 1980. A contractor, Re-
search Triangle Institute, Raleigh-Durham, N.C.,
conducted the survey.
Here are some details:
Gambling
The survey shows fewer service members have a
gambling problem than DoD officials had feared
was the case.
Only 2 percent had three symptoms of compul-
sive gamblers.
People who have three or more of the following
list of symptoms are urged to seek help:
*Increased preoccupation with gambling;
*Need to gamble increased amounts of money
to achieve desired level of excitement;
*Restless or irritable when unable to gamble;
*Gambling to escape from problems;
*Going back to try to recoup losses;
*Lying about extent of gambling;
*Needing someone to provide money to relieve
financial problems caused by gambling; and
*Jeopardizing or losing important relationships,
or job or career opportunities due to gambling.

Condom Use and AIDS
The survey tracked condom use for the first


"These surveys give us ideas on how to confront
problem areas ,and how to approach groups at risk,"
said Martin.
In the beginning, he said, the surveys focused on
drug and alcohol abuse, but every survey has adddd
new questions. New areas include smokeless tobacco,
gambling and condom use. The survey also asked new
questions concerning AIDS and modified others.
Service members' knowledge about AIDS trans-
mission and prevention continues to increase. Martin
said service members' level of knowledge compares
favorably with that of the general population. Most
know, for example, that AIDS can damage the body's
immunity, that it is caused by a virus and that it can be
passed by sharing needles and by unprotected sexual
t contact. More than 93 percent know an infected preg-
rant women can pass the virus to her unborn child.
More than 92 percent know a person can be
infected - with HIV, the virus' that causes AIDS, and
still look healthy.
But some still have misconcceptions. Fourty-two
point five percent believe both natural-membrane
(lambskin) and latex condoms are equally effective


time. It also asked more questions about AIDS and
transmission of the AIDS virus. Results include:
*Slightly more than half of unmarried service-
members (50.2 percent) reported using a condom
during their last sexual encounter.
*Younger service members were more likely to
have used a condom than were older ones.
*More than 53 percent of single sgrvicemem-
bers under 20 used a condom, compared with 43.2
percent of those over 35.
*Single enlisted personnel were more likely to
use condoms than were officers: 50.6 percent com-
pared with 46.8 percent for the officers.
*Single servicewomen were less likely to insist
that partners use condoms than single servicemen
were to use them. Only43.7 percent ofthe women's
partners had used condoms; 51.8 percent of serv-
icemen had used them.

Smoking
More military people are former smokers than
ever before. In 1980,51 percent smoked. Now, 35.9
percent smoke.
Of those who smoked in 1992, some 18 percent
said they smoked a pack or more ofcigarettesa day
- lioD's definition of heavy smoking. In 1988, 22.7
percent said they were heavy smokers compared to
34.2 percent in 1980.

Steroids
The survey also quizzed servicemembers on
steroid use. Only .2 percent had used steroids in the
month before the survey.


against AIDS. Latex condoms can help prevent AIDS,
but natural condoms are more porous and the virus can
pass through them. Health educators also recommend
using a nonpetroleum lubricant containing nonoxynol-
9, which inactivates the virus.
Also, about one-fourth incorrectly believe it can be
transmitted by sharing eating utensils or eating in a
dining hall where the cook has the AIDS virus. More
than 27 percent believe insects spread it. Scientists say
insects do not spread the AIDS virus.
"The knowledge of our young personnel compares
favorably with the general population's," said Martin.
"But given the consequences of contracting AIDS, it' s
far short of what we'd like. It's absolutely mandatory
for every service person to understand all the risk
behaviors by which they can contract AIDS and the
protections - including avoidance of misbehavior - they
can take to prevent contracting what is ultimately a fatal
disease."
Service members already meet the "Healthy People
2000" goal of at least 50 percent of unmarried persons
using condoms, said Martin. "But we would like to do
better than that," he said.









6 Trpic Times
Oct. 23,1992


Voices


Mayors answer Halloween questions


Dear Mayors' Corner,
Do you know anything about the sched-
ule for Halloween yet? Where are the
kids allowed to go, during what times,
and up to what ages? And is it going to be
on the 31st?
No nightmares, please

Dear Nightmares,
Yes, trick-or-treating will be held Oct.
31 this year. Air Force, Army and Navy
installations on the Pacific side
say children younger
than 13 years of age
are invited to trick-
or-treat between 6
and 8 p.m. Older
children are encour-
aged to participate
in other Directorate
of Community Ac-
tivities events.
Pacific side com-
mands are also al-
lowing valid instal-
lation pass holders
to invite up to five
immediate fam-
ily members to
the festivities.
Please check with
individual com-
mandsformorein-
formation.
Army Atlantic
trick-or-treat hours.
are the same as the
Pacific community.
Children through the
12th grade may par-
ticipate but the post will be open to valid
installation pass holders only.

Dear Mayors' Corner,
Who dreamed up the curfew? What is
the purpose of having such a long-term
curfew? And can the curfew be modified
to allow servicemembers to participate
in and attend concerts off-post?
SFC Davidson

Dear SFC Davidson,
Believe it or not, "curfew" was dreamed
up in medieval Europe as an hour in the


evening to extinguish fires, says Web-
sters Encyclopedic Unabridged Diction-
ary, (c) 1983. Today it is a time period
when certain regulations apply, such as
restricting movement after dark.
The "long-term curfew," established
in 1989, was originally a temporary cur-
few resulting from high crime lev-
els in the city, says
the Latin American
Adviser to U.S.
Army South.
According to
the Office of the
Deputy Chief of
Staff for Opera-
tions and Plans,
USARSO, Joint
Task Force -
Panama has
evaluated the
curfew several
o times since
1989. High
Crime rates ne-
cessitate keeping
a curfew.
According to
Garrison Com-
mand, curfew
exceptions are
limited to indi-
viduals on official
- business, such as
airport runs, mili-
tary escorts, and
military police
patrols.
The newest curfew, according to the
Latin American Adviser for U.S. Army
South, is a juvenile curfew that was re-
cently established by the Govenor of the
Province of Panama for people 18 years
and younger. Like its predecessor, this
curfew is an attempt to reduce high levels
of crime and delinquency.

Dear Mayors' Corner,
Please help me with. this dispute, I
need some information. My neighbor
says the soldiers who do police calls are


supposed to pick up his yard, too. I say he
should pick it up himself. He says he
doesn't make the mess near the road.
Maybe not, but I still say he is respon-
sible for his area Who's right?
Pity the poor police call

Dear Pity,
You are. U.S. Army Garrison says
your neighbor isn't alone in his opinion
but that he and the others like him are in
for a rude awakening.
The Standard Operating Procedure is
United States Army Garrison Regula-
tion 210-2 which says residents of gov-
ernment quarters must maintain the
grounds around their residence up to
halfway to the adjacent quarters or 50
feet, which ever is greater, whether they
"made the mess" or not.
It's privilege and a responsibility to
live in government owned quarters, and
Community Activity patrols are going to
be out looking for residents who don't
maintain them.
Violators will be awarded "Pink Slips,"
says the Garrison noncommissioned of-
ficer in charge.
Violators will have 72 hours to make
repairs after the first notice. A second
notice for the same violation goes to the
sponsoring unit commander.
After a third notice, the violator will
be required to report to the Commander
USAG-PAC for counseling and possible
eviction.
Lest ye think the Army is hard-nosed,
be advised, the Air Force and Navy have
the same policy and implement it the
same way.

Dear Mayors' Corner,
Is it at all possible for the Howard
AFB Sports and Fitness Center to open
an hour earlier (5 a.m.) Monday through
Friday? Not only could more people use
it before work and still get to work on
time, it would also ease up the peak
hours from 6 to 7 a.m. when many Army
personnel are there.
Because of limited manning, it is not


always possible to use the gym at
lunchtime. Evenings are another option
but there are those of us taking classes
and trying to keep up with family and
other responsibilities.
Opening at 5 a.m. would enable those
of us who seriously want to use the gym
to do so and not interfere with our duty
time.
Any help on this issue would be greatly
appreciated!
SSgt. Mary E. Young
United States Air Force

Dear SSgt Young,
According to the facility noncommis-
sioned-officer-in-charge, the Fitness Cen-
ter is open from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., during
which time center personnel do regular
hourly head counts to track its usage. At
6 a.m. there are seldom more than six or
seven people waiting to get in. In fact,
says the NCOIC, it's often a ghost town.
By the end of the first hour, there are
rarely have more than 25-30 users and
many of those are using the gym only to
shower after running.
Unfortunately, says the NCOIC, with
manpower shortages hitting everyone,
those kinds of numbers don't validate the
need for an earlier opening.
Occasionally, one machine or another
is in high demand and if you are having
difficulty getting on one of those, the
Fitness Center NCOIC recommends that
you come in early and complete your
workout before others arrive for the day.

Yards of the Month
Fort Espinar Quarters 35A
WO 1 and Mrs. Guy La Brecque
Fort Davis Quarters 203B
SSgt. and Mr. Amelia McFarlane

Editor's note: This column is pro-
vided to allow community members to
submit questions or concerns to be re-
searched and answered by the May-
oral Congress. Letters should be mailed
to: Mayors' Corner, APO AA 34004
(MPS). Anonymity will be granted
upon request. Publicity Chairperson,
Dyana Ellis.


'Screen plays' allowing thieves quarters' access


Thieves coming through screens
Military police received three complaints of larceny
from Fort Kobbe residents last week. Reports indicate
that thieves cut screens above storage room doors,
stealing bicycles, clothing and other items.
Screens simply do not afford adequate protection.
The military police recommend that you not store high
value items in areas safeguarded by screens. Anyone
with information on the thefts can call 287-4401.
Soldier uses government car to shop
Military police charged a Fort Davis soldier with
wrongful appropriation of a government vehicle last
week. A witness reported the offense to the military
police. The soldier apparently used the vehicle to go to
Burger King and the shoppette.
Do not allow this to happen to you. Remember that
government vehicles are to be used only for official
business. For more information, contact your chain of
command.
Pranksters ruin washer/dryer
A Fort Amador resident was the victim of criminal
mischief last week. She reported to the military police


that someone put motor oil inside her washing machine
and dryer. The prank ruined her clothing and resulted
in damage to the washer and dryer as well. The military
police are investigating the incident.
Anyone with information should call the Military
Police Investigations Section at 287-5252.
Sports fan loses wallet
A Fort Clayton soldier is missing two baseball gloves,
his wallet and $75 after he left them unsecured during
a softball game last week. The incident occurred at
Mothers Field on Fort Clayton.
Valuables should be secured at all times - even on
the ballfield.
Unauthorized escort
The Contraband Control Section apprehended
numerous people in the last few weeks for unauthor-
ized escort and trespassing.
The investigators caught individuals without pur-
chasing privileges shopping inside the mall area of Al-
brook Air Force Station.
When a person who does not possess purchasing
privileges is found inside a Department of Defense


shopping area, they are normally charged with trespass-
ing.
If they are being escorted by privilege holder, he or
she is also charged.
For more information, contact the U.S. Southern
Command Contraband Control Section at 286-3303.

The following crime statistics are for the week of
Oct. 9 to Oct. 15.
Pacific
Curundu area - 1 larceny of secured private property,
1 larceny of secured government property, 1 house-
breaking
Fort Kobbe 300 area - 3 larcenies of secured private
property
Cocoli housing area - 2 larcenies of secured private
property
Atlantic
None reported.


Commander in Chief......................Ge. George A. Joulwan
Director, Public Affairs.............................Col. James L. Fetig
Chief.....................................................SFC Joseph Ferrare
Editor.....................................................MSgt. Rolf Carter
Assistant Editor.............................Sgt. Deborah E. Williams
Sports Editor......................................................Sgt. John Hall




-Trropic Tim


Editorial Staff...................................Sgt. Richard Puckett
Sgt. James Yocum
Rosemary Chong

U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.................287-3007
24th Wing Public Affairs Office............................284-5459
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office..............283-5644


U.S. Army South PAO Atlantic.............................289-4312
This authorized unofficial command information publica-
tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is
published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information
Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision
of the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official
view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or
the U.S. Southern Command. The address is: Unit 0936 APO
AA 34002 Telephone 285-6612.


--








j Commentary


Tropic Times
Oct. 23,1992


Band members make bad trip better


by Sgt Jane Usero
USARSO Public Affairs Office
Now sit right back and you'll hear a
tale, a tale of a fateful trip.
That started from Howard Air Base,
aboard this big Chinook.
The crew were mighty flying men,
the pilots brave and sure.
Sixteen passengers flew that day for
an eight hour flight, an eight hour
flight.
The weather started
getting rough, the big
bird had to land.
If notfor the courage "The p
of the fearless crew, the optimisrr
Chinook would be lost, ishes is 1
the Chinook would be asylum."
lost. Havelo
The bird set ground The Da
in the field of this
uncharted jungle
village, with Chief
Jones, Lt. Johnston too, the photogra-
pher and his boss, the band first
sergeant, the bass guitarist and the
band, here in Rambala Village.

For those who wish to be a 79th
Army Band groupie, remember these
words. Behind the scenes of a tour
with this band leads to many more
adventures than meets the eye.
When an hour and a half concert
turns into a 36 hour trip, the fun begins.
We left early Saturday morning to


I
)la

thi
ch
ck
nc


fly to Bocas del Toro so the 79th Army
Band's Show Band could perform at
the Sea Fair. We arrived, the band
played and we left. Simple enough.
But, the trip home was anything but
simple.
With sixteen passengers, five crew
members, a large gas tank, boxes of
instruments and equipment and nine
cases of bananas from the people of the
village, we took off and headed home.
Bocas del Toro airport
said clear weather, so
we kicked back to
enjoy the ride and eat
ice where some bananas.
most flour- This enjoyment was
e lunatic to be very short-lived,
however, as the pilots
SEllis got word that the
e of Life "clear" weather wasn't
quite so clear. Hop-
ping from one spot to
another trying to


outsmart the weather, we ended up in
Rambala village for, what we thought,
a short wait for the weather to clear
and eat some bananas. That's what we
get for thinking.
As word came down we would have-
to spend the night in this metropolis,
excitement ran through the group and
we ate some bananas. "Let's build a
bonfire," one person yelled. "Yah, and
we can roast...bananas," another
exclaimed. Being with 14 members of
the band, singing around the camp fire


came up several times.
With the fact that rain and bonfires
don't mix, we had to come up with
another plan of action. So we flicked a
Bic and stood around telling jokes and
eating bananas. This lasted until the
pilots returned with word there was a
small restaurant nearby. Off we
trudged through the mud and stones
with the thought of food other than
bananas running through our heads.
We made our assault on the restau-
rant in a frenzy trying to figure out
what they had, how much it would cost
and, most importantly, where the
bathrooms were. Luckily there was a
Spanish-speaking person among us,
and with 20 people pulling him in all
directions for translations, we finally
got everything in order.
With dinner finished, the bathrooms
found and just about all the talk talked
out of us, it was time to call it a night.
But call it a night to where? Sleeping
21 people in the belly of a fully-loaded
Chinook made for an interesting
situation. There were people every-
where. On top of equipment, on the
floor, hanging out the back door and
even on the floor of-the restaurant. But
sleep came, after we ate some bananas.
When morning came we ate some
bananas and again made an assault on
the little restaurant for breakfast and to
begin the vigil of the breaking weather.
Morning came and went. Noon came
and went. As we felt sure the afternoon


would come and go, we got the word.
It was time to fly.
Leaving the restaurant and little
store sold out, we hurried to the bird,
said our goodbyes, ate some bananas
and were on our way - we thought.
Again weather grounded us, only
this time not in such luxurious sur-
roundings as before. No restaurant, no
bathroom, no store and not even a river
to skip stones on. Just a row of thatch
huts, a mud trail and dozens of chick-
ens. So we ate some bananas and tried
to make the best of it. Three hours, a
refueling from another Chinook and a
downpour later, it was again time to
leave. We left six of the nine crates of
bananas there, boarded the bird, ate
some bananas and were on our way.
Tired, grubby and hungry for
something other than bananas, we
finally landed at Howard Air Force
Base 36 hours after we had left.
Running out to kiss the ground did
cross my mind but I ate a banana and
went home.
To make a serious point to all this,
though, our escapade would not have
been one of light-heartedness if the
Chinook crew had not gone above and
beyond to ensure our needs were taken
care of. Credit is also due to the team-
work and high morale of the members
of the 79th Army Band's Show Band.
The combination made this potentially
miserable trip actually fun.
Bananas anyone?


by Brig. Gen. David A. Sawyer
24th Wing commander
HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA) - This article shares
the concepts and principles of AirCombat Command
quality improvement. Gen. John Michael Loh, ACC
commander, defines quality as "meeting customer
expectations in products and services" and he places
full responsibility on unit leadership to make quality
happen.
To achieve this, ACC is fostering a leadership style
that promotes and creates a working climate of trust,
teamwork and continuous improvement. ACC quality
is a look at process and is not a new program. Pro-
grams come and go, but a process becomes a way of


Quality service tops

Air Force priority list
life. What it means to you and me is a new way of life,
a "culture" of quality.
As we learn the quality process we'll understand the
basics of a long term effort to forever eliminate waste
and rework.
Howard and Albrook are already great places to live
and work, but they could become much better by
applying the quality improvement process.
Changing a culture is not a matter of teaching new
techniques, or replacing behavior patterns with new


ones. It is a matter of everyone learning and talking
a common language of "quality" and understanding
individual roles in making quality improvement. This
may very well mean an attitude change for some.
Changing a culture is not quick or easy. It will take
time and effort to learn. The effort, however, is well
worth the energy expended. Industries and societies
have had proven success.
We have already enj oyed quality improvement and
successes in the 24th Wing and the Panama commu-
nity. It's time to build on those successes and turn up
the tempo to improve our performance even more. I'm
counting on everyone to "get smart" on ACC quality
and apply quality principles in every aspect of our
operations.


What quality improvements would you suggest?


DirectQuote



1,il



4 : g�


"The PX should make
it easier for spouses to
make DPP inquiries
while their spouses are
TDY."


Cpl. Michael Rougier
Company A, 154th Signal


"Outprocessing forms
for the Air Force should
have building numbers
and phone numbers on
them."


SSgt. Charles Fopma
24th Security Police
Squadron


"AAFES needs to get
rid of expired food prod-
ucts rather than sell
them."


Dee Marin
Army family member


"I'm pretty satisfied.
Although Navy MWR
should expand trips
downtown on the week-
ends."


DPC Emelda Bowdry
SOUTHCOM J-6


"Exchange outlets need
more variety of prod-
ucts and prices should
be consistent."


Sgt. Tad Steckler
59th Engineers


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of Southern Command, The
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries - or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right
to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.








Tropic Times
Oct. 23,1992


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The USS Hawkes sits in dock at Rodman NS during its stay Oct. 2-3.
The USS Hawkes sits in dock at Rodman NS during its stay Oct. 2-3.


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U.S. Navy photos by PH3 Bob Wdght


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11

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. .


Machinist Mate P03 Al Ondreka inspects the port, with the David StarrJordan,
a National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Association research vessel in the
background.


Port services lends


ships 'helping hand'


by Sgt. John "Gus" Hall
Tropic Times Sports Editor
RODMAN NS (Tropic Tunimes) - When
U.S. Navy vessels pull into U.S. Naval
Station Panama Canal needing things
from supplies to passage through the
Panama Canal, 12 sailors from port serv-
ices division lend a collective helping
hand.
The division taps its know-how of
eight military occupational skills to make
port calls easier. The all-male crew handles
docking procedures and logistical needs
to help newly-arrived ships prepare for
futurevoyages.
When a ship docks at Rodman, it
takes six of the division's 12 men to help
it to dock or travel through the canal.
Technically, the division could form two
six-man teams, but that rarely happens
Division Chief Arlis Wise said.
"If one of our men is out for any
reason it wouldn't be possible. Right
now, we're averaging a 60-hour work
week for everyone. Our E-4s and below
are working seven days a week," Wise
said.
Those 60-hour work weeks have, in
part, come from the increasing number
of U.S. Navy ships traveling to Panama
for counterdrug efforts, Wise said.
The number of ships the division has
aided has steadily increased over the
years; 127 docked in 1989, 147 in 1990
and 231 in 1991. Wise said it's been a
dramatic increase considering the divi-
sion saw an average of 40-50 annually in
the mid 80s.
Headed by Wise, one of three boat-
swains mates, the division has one elec-
tronics technician, two electricians, two
machinist mates, a hull maintenance
technician, a storekeeper and two non-
rated seamen. The crew ranges from 18-
year-old Seaman Recruit James Hopper
to 39-year-old P02 Hesiquio Torres.
Chiefs Wise and Mark Wiscow and
Petty Officer 1 st Class Manuel Fontanez
check radio messages from ships at sea


requesting to dock here. The messages
give the port services crew a chance to
prepare for a ship's needs. Once a ship
arrives, one of the two chiefs, board the
vessel and gives the crew a security
briefing, telling them what to expect
during their stay.
Machinist Mates P03 Al Ondreka and
P03 Douglas Alston are the boat engi-
neers. They perform maintenance on
engines, auxiliary equipment and fuel
pumps.
The division's "man of steel" is Petty
Officer Second Class Carlos Casares.
The hull maintenance technician does all
welding and makes and fixes things made
of steel.
Electrical repairs are done by the
division technicians Petty Officer First
Class Larry Zschiedrich and Petty Offi-
cer Second Class Henry Metral. As new
sailors, Hopper and Seaman Recruit
Nathaniel Hampton handle such duties
as paint-chipping and general cleaning.
Besides handling his storekeeping
duties, Petty Officer 2nd Class Kurt
Busjahn joins Fontanez, Zschiedrich and
Torres as a dock master. They are a
popular group becausepart oftheirjob is
to connect Defense Switching Network
telephone lines to the ships so incoming
sailors can call friends and loved ones.
With so many ships traveling here,
there's hardly a dull moment. In 1991,
Wise saw a ship carrying 5,000 pounds of
seized cocaine. He's also seen four de-
commissioned nuclear submarines travel
through the canal which he considers a
"major evolution."
Despite the division's long work week,
there's still time for fun. Before the 1991
UNITAS exercise, two Japanese destroy-
ers docked in Panama and played mem-
bers of the division in sporting events.
"Although we couldn't communicate
with the Japanese sailors, we were able
to play softball games with them. We
also saw how foreign sailors of our rank
act. It really bonds us together," Andreka
said.


'4


110#


'Lit


9�


r��~







Tropic Times 9
Oct. 23, 1992

�l N


;. - " .*
" " '"'"... , , -'i:''." ' . %:


Frank Brown u.S. Army pnoto oy James Ycum

A7 ' Th & i
... .. .. ..Xiir ~:


Teacher puts

three decades

of fun to work
by Sgt. James Yocum
Tropic Times staff

FORT CLAYTON (Tropic Times) -
The piano teacher wasn't upset that one
of his students missed a class - even
though she didn't call to cancel. As he
waited for his next student, he ran his
fingers along the piano that's been his
trademark for the last 30 years.
Wearing the brown hat that most stu-
dents have never seen leave his head,
even during their recitals, Frank Brown
moved into a melody that matched his
words.
"What you really have to do with
music is to get where it comes from," he
said, playing a slow, western version of
Home on the Range.
"If it's Argentine, play it like some-
one from Argentina would like, say for


instance..." he said as he lapsed into a
quick, upbeat tango. "What I try to do is
get the real rhythm of the place it comes
from."
Brown didn't always teach music. He
started out playing part time for churches
in Colon and later moved to Panama
City, where he began teaching.
He learned to play at a conservatory.
He had to travel from the Atlantic port
town to Panama City several times a
week to take 15-minute classes with the
instructor. It was during one of those
classes that the instructor asked him if he
wanted to come on the weekends for
more in-depth classes.
Brown took him up on the offer and
became a better pianist for it. As he ma-
tured and got better at the piano, more
and more opportunities opened up for
Brown.
"I've had offers from hotels to play
for them, but I say no," Brown said,
playing a haunting version of Amazing
Grace.
"But, I'll stay with the church," he
said, moving into an slightly faster ver-
sion of Just a Closer Walk With Thee. "I


"Music tells us how we're living. It tells what era the
composer lived in, what was going on at the time it
was written."
Frank Brown
Piano instructor


love this music."
Brown credits his wife - a faithful
Sevent-Day Adventist - for keeping
him with the church. He said he likes re-
ligious music because it's so emotional.
"I like my music to have heart - real
emotion," he said. "Music.tells us how
we're living. It tells what era the com-
poser lived in, what was going on at the
time it was written."
Brown took the job of teaching at
Valent Recreation Center on Fort Clay-
ton to help fill his free time and satisfy his
love of teaching and helping children.
"I used to get off work and not have
anywhere to go," the visual information
specialist for the Panama Canal Com-
mission said. "Then they offered me this."
Brown said he jumped at the offer.
"Most of my free time is devoted to


helping kids. I teach calculus, math,
anything. I like to get deep into the stu-
dents and find out what they have in their
minds."
Brown said it's painful sometimes
when he has to see his students leave
because their parents move back to the
states.
"I've got some bright students that
after one year, they play beautifully," he
said. "It hurts me that after they begin to
get better, they quit."
"I like for my students to learn to play
the musicright, then improvise," he said,
tapping out his version of I Did it My
Way. "When they can do that, they're
ready to play anything."
Brown said he always accepts new
students, but current students have prior-
ity. For information, call 287-6500.


LL~98reO~r~t~,,~


AN61







10 Tropic Times
10 Oct. 23, 1992


Aircrews



share plane

by Spec. Jeffrey von Beltz
363rd Public Affairs Detachment
HOWARD AFB (Theater Support Element) -
Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units
recently took a break from airlift support through-
out Central and South America to escort more
than two dozen pre-schoolers from Howard AFB
and Albrook AFS through C-130 Hercules cargo
planes.
One group of children from the bases' Child Devel-
opment Center's Enrichment Program giggled and
squealed as they climbed up into the plane's cockpit, sat
in the pilots' and navigator's seats and tentatively
reached for the controls of the aircraft.
Another wandered into the cargo area and
bounced on the red nylon web seats where "sticks" of
paratroopers sit before "hooking up and shuffling to the
door."
Still) another group walked up to the rear cargo door
and slid their small feet over the steel rollers used to off-
loadcargo.
When they have the time and are not too busy, the
aircrews enjoy taking people through their aircraft, ac-
cording to TSgt. Richard Kennedy, a U.S. Marshal in
Atlanta from Douglasville, Ga., and member of the
Georgia Air National Guard's 165th Air Group, head-
quartered in Savannah.
But when the crews are busy, it's a whirlwind of
activity known as Volant Oak.
Volant Oak began in 1977, when the Military Airlift
Command was tasked with providing aircraft and crews
to support operations being conducted throughout the
Southern Command is area of responsibility, which is
Central and South America.
Operating from Panama, the Volant Oak mission is
an on-going task, which includes logistic, counter-drug
and disaster relief airlifts and contingency support to
embassies, active duty, Reserve and Guard units oper-
ating throughout Latin America.
In order to accomplish the mission, the Military
Airlift Command obtained operational control over 19
-Air National Guard and 14 Air Force Reserve compo-
nents from across the United States, which are sent to
Panama in overlapping deployments.
While supporting Volant Oak during two weeks of
annual training, Sept. 5-19, three C-130 crews from the


.H...' . - ,- .. .-;


Theater Support Element photo by MSgL Mark Yehling
TSgt. Richard Kennedy helps Jaleesa Greogry down the steps from a C-130 Hercules, while Krayton
Polka covers his ears to quiet the noise from the take-off of another plane.
118th Air Wing, Air National Guard in Nashville, retired from the Tennessee Air National Guard at the
Tenn., logged more than 130 flight hours, carried 279 close of business Sept. 19 after more than 24 years of
tons of cargo and safely delivered nearly 400 passenger service."
in the area of operations. "Our tours down here are a lot of work," said Hill, a
"And that's the norm for a two-week tour," accord- 727 pilot with American Airlines and resident of Char-
ing to Lt. Col. Luke Hill, mission commander, who lotte, N.C., "but we're trained up for it."


Reserve military policemen walk Panama beat


by Spec. Jeffrey von Beltz
363rd Public Affairs Detachment

FORT CLAYTON (Theater Support
Element) - It was 9:35 p.m. on Sept. 16
when six military police patrol vehicles
responded to a domestic disturbance in
Fort Clayton's housing area.
By 10:45 p.m., the disturbance had
been quelled and the military policemen,
including elements of the Missouri Na-
tional Guard's 3175th Military Police
Company, Warrenton, Mo., were back
on the beat.
"This is real life," said SSgt. Richard
Raskovich, a 3175th squad leader and
part-time deputy fortheFranklin County
Sheriff's Office.
"Ikeep telling the kids, this is forreal.
We're out there ticketing people, taking
prisoners and placing them in custody,"
he said.
The 200-member 3175th Military
Police Company, consists of Guardsmen
from St. Clair, West Plains, Cape Gi-
rardeau and Warrenton.
The unit is the largest physical secu-
rity force in the state.
This year, the 3175th is conducting
two-week annual training in Panama in
three, 40-person continuous deploy-
ments where it gains the type of experi-


-' 1







Theater Support Elementphoto by Spec. Jeffrey von Beltz
SSgt. Frank Thrower (left) directs a HMMWV driver to the next drop off point
for the night beat of the 3175th Military Police Battalion as fellow military
policemen unload the vehicle.


ence which proved invaluable when the
unit was most recently activated for Op-
erations, Desert Shield and Desert
Storm.
"When I first became involved in the
annual training in Panama, I thought it
was just a hokey job, just practice, but
it's not," said Raskovich.


One of the military policemen's tasks
while in Panama is animal control, the
capture of stray dogs and cats that are
taken to the veterinarians and held until
claimed or adopted.
The Missouri Guardsmen also trap
wild animals, such as snakes and alliga-
tors, which they try to return to their


"When I first became in-
volved in the annual train-
ing in Panama, I thought it
was just a hokey job, just
practice, but it's not."

Raskovich
3175th squad leader

natural habitats or place in zoo facilities.
The 3175th soldiers are also involved
in routine vehicle and foot patrols, gate-
guard duty, traffic law enforcement, U.S.
mail security, and the control of prison-
ers in custody.
Several unit members voiced concerns
about whether the company will be
back in Panama for future annual train-
ing tours.
Members of the company will be at-
tending various military schools in the
United States next year, and will not be
training overseas.
"We'll be standing down for training
next year," said Raskovich. "We don't
know what's going to happen after next
year."
"We probably won't be back," said
Raskovich.


















Sports

Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama


Page 11


Curundu Cougars blank Balboa Bulldogs 18-0


by Sgt. John "Gus" Hall
Tropic Times Sports Editor
BALBOA STADIUM (Tropic Times)
- Turnovers. It's been the only thing that
has kept the Curundu Cougars and Balboa
Bulldogs from having unbeaten football
seasons this year. The dreaded turnover
affected Curundu Sept. 25 and caught up
with Balboa Friday night.
The Cougars (5-1) atoned for last
month's 22-12 loss to the Bulldogs (5-1)
with a 18-0 win and a share of first place
in the Department of Defense Dependent
Schools - Panama Interscholastic Foot-
ball League.
In the first matchup, the Bulldogs
turned two early Cougars turnovers into
two quick touchdowns. Friday night, the
Cougars were aided by seven Bulldogs
turnovers, and the coaches were the first
to admit that it was the key to victory.
"The Bulldogs are always prepared
and motivated," Cougars head coach Fred
Bales said. "We made some mistakes in
the first game that helped them win and
they did the same Friday night."
Bulldogs coach Vince Martinez said
two things were key in game two.
"They capitalized on our mistakes,
but their tough, swarming defense shut
us down," Martinez said.
Although not known for their passing
game, the Cougars came out firing on
their first possession. Knowing the Bull-
dogs had a strong run defense - espe-
cially in the secondary - coach Bales
wanted to keep them on their toes.
"We wanted the Bulldogs to concen-
trate on stopping the pass so we could run
the ball better," Bales said. "We weren't
even concerned about completing the
passes."
One of the early plays through the air
worked - a 10-yard toss from quarter-
back Robbie Garcia to tight end Rick


Szymanski. The Cougars completed only
one other pass on the night, but rumbled
for 199 yards on the ground.
The first big play of the game came
from the Cougars defense. Cornerback
Rudy Waller stepped in front of the in-
tended receiver, intercepted the pass and
returned it to midfield. The Cougars didn't
score on the next drive, but it helped
them win the field position battle as they
pinned the Bulldogs at their own end.
The Cougars defense also chalked up
the game's second big play.
Defensive end Mike Morgan recov-
ered a fumble deep in Cougars territory
that stopped a Bulldog drive.
The Cougars offense capitalized on
that turnover with a two-play, 71-yard
scoring drive. Szymanski caught a 25-
yard pass over the middle, followed by a
46-yard run off tackle by tailback Rey
Williams that gave the Cougars a 6-0
lead.
The team traded stalled drives for the
rest of the first half.
In the second half, some of coach
Bales' homework paid off. He called a
play that was designed by former Duke
coach Steve Spurrier. It's counter offa
sweep action, and Williams madeitlook
easy.
With the ball on the Bulldogs 19-yard
line, Williams tookthepitch from Garcia
and faked right, then turned left and
picked up 18 yards. Garcia scored on the
next play on a keeper and the Cougars led
12-0.
An interception and hard inside run-
ning by linebacker/fullback Raphael
George helped set up the Cougars final
touchdown. He rumbled for nine- and
10-yard runs to the Bulldogs one-yard
line. Garcia scored his second TD on a
keeper to close out the scoring 18-0.
Even though the turnovers and big
plays were most noticeable, Bales said


Photo oy BO u eean
Curundu Cougars quarterback Robbie Garda hands off to fullback Raphael
George.
his linemen won this game. Left guard/ on 16 carries.
nose guard Joseph Lopez, right tackle/
defensive end Mike Morgan, right guard/ Cougars 18, Bulldogs 0
defensive end Bryan Smith and center/ Bulldogs
Cougars Bulldogs
noseguard Steven Wheeler played the First downs 11 4
whole game and accomplished their Rushes-yards 42-199 21-45
mission - to stop Bulldog linebacker Passing yards 35 31
RyanUnderwood. Comp-att-int 2-7-0 2-9-3
"If we didn't block Underwood, we Return yards 50 129
weren't going to win the game," Bales Fumbles lost 2 4
said. "In our only loss he must have had Penalties-yards 5-45 5-50
15 or20 tackles against us. Thanks to the Individual stats
great game plan coach Al Grade imple- RUSHING - Cougars, Williams 16-113, George
mented, we we're able to stop him." 9-36, Von Hollen 5-26, Szymanski 3-15, Fish-
Stopping Bulldogs star running backs bough 1-5, Garcia 7-1, Waller 1 (minus 7). Bull-
Paolo Ameglio and Jerome Price didn't dogs, Ameglio 10-30, Price 6-10, Nieves 2-6,
hurt the Cougars chances either. The Howard 2-1, Oliver 1(minus 2)
PASSING -Cougars, Garcia 2-7-0 35. Bulldogs,
Ameglio-Price tandem have been known Beattle 2-7-2 31, Ameglio 0-1-0 0, Price 0-1-1 0.
to surpass the 100-yard mark often this RECEIVING - Cougars, Szymanski 2-35. Bull-
season. The Cougars held it to 40 yards dogs, Ameglio 1-27, Price 1-4.


US. Army photoby SL John MuMa Hal
Curundu Cougars head coach Fred Bales gives his team a pep talk before the game.


Redskins-Vikings,


Raiders-Cow-


boys, Dolphins-Colts games high-
light Sunday's action.


Magic Johnson considers playing
some back-to-back games with the
L.A. Lakers.


U.S. Army photo by Sgt. John 'Gus' Hall
Bulldogs split end Jerome Price was held to 10
yards on six carries and one reception for four
yards.



Army 10-milers..................page 12
Sports shorts.....................page 13
Rodman triathlon................page 13


Oct. 23, 1992


CommeIII iitar p, tg, 1








2 Tropic Times
Bullct. 23, 1992


Bulldog-Cougar series holds rich history


by Sgt. John "Gus" Hall
Tropic Times Sports Editor
Some football coaches consider their sport a war.
Some call it just a game. Fred Bales and Vince
Martinez have weathered a war and love their game.
Bales, the Curundu Cougars coach, and Martinez
the Balboa Bulldogs head man, have battled on the
gridiron since 1986, but their history goes back much
further.
Before becoming head coaches, Bales and
Martinez were assistants with the Balboa Red
Machine. After a 48-0 loss in 1978, they spent what
seemed like hours just staring at the scoreboard.
Bales remembers that night well.
"We both said that we knew too much about
football to lose by that many points. I decided that I
was going to learn more about the game, or I was
going to get out of the business."
Martinez felt similarly.
"I felt that as coaches we
needed to keep the score closer,
for the kids' sake."
For Bales and Martinez, the
scores got closer and they .
became great coaches.
Bales took over the Cougars
in 1983 and Martinez became
Bulldogs coach in 1986. In
1985, Bales' team was co-
champions with the Bulldogs.
In 1986, Martinez's team went Bales
undefeated and claimed the
title.
Three years later, Bales and Martinez faced each
other and uncertainty. The year was 1989. It was a
turbulent time. The game was moved from Balboa
Stadium to Jarman Field for security reasons.
"When the national anthem played, I thought
maybe it was for the last time," Martinez said.
"Coach Bales and I thought the football program
would be cancelled." Bales and the Cougars won the


Bulldogs-Cougars hec
Below is a list of the Bulldogs-Cougars results
since the Cougars inaugural 1983 season. The
Cougars hold a 11-9 advantage.

1983 - Cougars 15, Bulldogs 8; Bulldogs 29,
Cougars 14.
1984 - Cougars 13, Bulldogs 8; Cougars 20,
Bulldogs 0.
1985 - Cougars 20, Bulldogs 17; Bulldogs 20,
Cougars 15.
1986 - Bulldogs 14, Cougars 7; Bulldogs 29,
Cougars 0.

game and championship 18-7 in what Bales called
"calf-high mud."
The Cougars won champi-
onships in 1990 and '91 and are
battling the Bulldogs for this
season's title.
Bales says he owes a lot of
his success to the current
principal of Balboa High
School, Ernie Holland.
"He was and is an outstand- '
ing football coach," Bales said.
"He coached the Bulldogs for ,
15 years and brought a quality
of football here thatthis league Martinez
had never seen. He helped all
the coaches he has worked with improve their game,"
Bales said.
Martinez was influenced early in his life by a leg-
endary coach. Martinez was apolio-stricken boy
scout in the 40s. As part of a troop for handicapped
scouts, Martinez saw College Football Hall of Fame
coach Bud Wilkinson on the sidelines - literally.
The scouts were allowed to view Oklahoma Sooners
games on the sidelines, right behind the players and


ad-to-head matchups
1987 - Bulldogs 21, Cougars 7; Bulldogs 19,
Cougars 0.
1988 - Bulldogs 35, Cougars 0; Bulldogs 14,
Cougars 6.
1989 - Cougars 21, Bulldogs 0; Cougars 18,
Bulldogs 7.
1990 - Cougars 18, Bulldogs 0; Cougars 16.
Bulldogs 0.
1991 - Cougars 14, Bulldogs 0; Cougars 22,
Bulldogs 0.
1992 - Bulldogs 22, Cougars 12; Cougars 18,
Bulldogs 0.

coaches. Martinez considers himself to be one of the
lucky scouts at the game.
"I was able to walk, so I pushed other scouts in
wheelchairs around to watch the games in 1950 and
'51."
As a teenager, Martinez attended the University of
Oklahoma. Students were allowed to watch the
Sooners practice twice a week. Martinez's timing
was a little unlucky. As a freshman, Martinez saw
Wilkinson's 47-game winning streak halted by Notre
Dame in 1957. Martinez's luck improved, as he met
the famous Sooners coach twice.
Bales wasn't in Oklahoma to see that incredible
streak, but has received a lot of advice from top
college coaches. He's received books and informa-
tion from Lou Holtz, who was coaching at Arkansas
at the time, and current Washington Huskies coach
Don James and others.
"I'm surprised at how much coaches care about
each other," Bales said. "I just sent out form letters to
coaches all over the United States asking for advice.
So many have sent me so much good information."
The reason could be that football coaches all over
the world have a common bond - a love for the
game.


Photo court of ihe USARSO Any 10-mikr Ium
The U.S. Army South 1 0-miler team had a chance to meet the sergeant major
of the Army while in Washington D.C. for Army 10-miler. From left are: Front
row: Brian Coutch, Co. B, 536th Engineers; Deborah Weslow, MEDDAC; Mary
Fetter, HSC, 142nd Med.; SMA Richard A. Kidd, Linda Wozniak, Co. A, 193
Spt.; Reuben Tull, Co. A, 154th Signal; and Kenneth Riggsbee, 59th Engi-
neers. Second row: Norma Alderete (kneeling), HSC, 536th Engineers; Willie
Moye, Co. B, 193rd Spt.; Henry Sepulveda, Co. D, 142nd Med.; Millie Daniels,
HHC, 154th Signal; Eva Foster, CRD Special Sports Director; Corey Small-
wood, HHC, 5/87th Inf.; EjnorAllen, Co. A, 154th Signal; and Deidre Campbell,
HSC, 747th MI.


Army 10-milers excel


by Sgt. John "Gus" Hall
Tropic Times Sports Editor
WASHINGTON D.C. (Tropic Times)
- Murphy's Law tried to wreak havoc on
the 1992 U.S. Army South 10-miler team
and failed miserably. The six-man, six-
woman team battled nagging injuries,
endured months of tough training and
answered the call in the nation's capital
Oct.11.
Because of a computer breakdown,
only individual times were identified
immediately for the estimated 5,000
runners. Some of the approximately 500
team times were computed shortly after.
Officially, the USARSO men's team had


the third best military team average time
at 55:215, only 10 seconds slower than
1991. The USARSO women had a 70:01
average time and unofficially came in
fourth. The average times were deter-
mined by taking the four best times from
each team. In 1991, the USARSO men's
team came in fourth overall. The women
set the course record for female military
teams in 1991 with a 69:34 time. Henry
Sepulveda came in second in his age
group and 24th overall at 53:47.
The top men's military team was the
Military District of Washington with a
55:02 time. The first female military

Story continues on page 13.


U S Army photo oy agL James Yocum
HALFTIME REST - Cristobal Tigers guard/defensive tackle Jay Laatz rests
during halftime of the Tigers' game against the Red Machine.


Red Machine 17, Tigers 0


First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing yards
Comp-att-int
Return yards
Fumbles lost
Punts-avg.
Penalties-yards


Machine
10
31-217
17
2-6-1
28
3
4-35.2
16-150


Tigers
12
40-138
45
4-8-2
45
3
4-25.2
3-35


Individual stats
RUSHING - Red Machine, Thompson 16-144,
Gutierrez 4-44, Olton 2-29, Corrigan 8-1,
Cisneros 1 (minus 1). Tigers, Townsed 16-
125, N. Acosta 9-28, B. Acosta 5-11,
McDonald 1-2, Alvarez 9-28.
PASSING - Red Machine, Corrigan 2-6-1 17.
Tigers, 4-8-2 45.
RECEIVING - Red Machine, Hovan 1-12, Gra-
ham 1-6. Tigers, Cox 1-32, N. Acosta 2-18,
Alvarez 1 (minus 5).


I





Tropic Times
Oct. 23,1992 J


26 triathletes attack



Rodman triple threat


by Monique Chere
Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation
RODMAN NAVAL STATION (Navy Morale,
Welfare and Recreation) - Slicing through water, whiz-
zing around curves, then propelling themselves down-
hill for the last stretch, 26 competitors finished the Navy
MWR-sponsored Rodman Naval Station triathlon here
Sunday.
They took to the water (500 yards of it at Rodman
Pool), took to the road (16 kilometers of it towards
Empire Range) and took to the streets (5 kilometers of
it on a looping back road to Building 4 near the front
gate) and returned to the Officers' Club.
Three services were represented and one civilian
from the Department of Defense Dependents' School
competed. Naval Special Warfare Unit Eight had the
best representation with 12 competitors.
The participants were divided into two waves. First-
timers and father/son teams were in the first group. The
second group was more experienced. Some like Thom
Maholic - who had three triathlons to his credit- and
others like Mike Sonney who was fresh off a stateside
triathlon.
With even strokes, the second wave outdistanced the
first group. They pulled themselves out of the water,
dripped over their shoelaces and strapped on their hel-
mets.
Swimmers became bikers.
Because of the small number of participants, athletes
were spread out. Hands snatched at water spot cups.
They leaned overthe handlebars on the way back home.
Bikers became runners.
Wobbly legs gathered speed and headed up the road,
Through the gate by-the housing area, back towards
Building 4, and down the main road to return to the club
- for the last time.


Spectators cheered as a flash of red appeared from
around the corner. In a short time, runners stretched
under the banner with increasing frequency.
Gathering breath, the competitors crowded around
the parking lot to listen to the winning names and times.
Many already knew their fate.
Winning teams, age group victors then overall cham-
pions were announced.
The two boys that participated, Bradley Schoultz,
12, (1:12:41) and Ian Bernard, 11, (1:16:00) were en-
thusiastically cheered for their winning performances.
Maholic, 16-29 age group winner, and second over-
all, said it was his fourth triathlon this year.
"On my last triathlon, I wiped out my bike. I was in
Gorgas (hospital) for about a week. But I enjoy doing
this!" he said.
One of the triathlon coordinators, Hank Baltar, usu-
ally a participant in the events, said he was satisfied
with the race but he "would have liked to see women
and more teams competing."
"We had good weather, good support, and most of
all, it was a safe event."
After the race, bikes were placed atop vans and wet
clothing was wrung out. One athlete mumbled some-
thing about a huge breakfast, as he cranked up his pick-
up stereo, sat on the ground and stretched his cramping
muscles.

Overall winners were:
Mike Sonney, 310th Airlift Squadron, 53:11; Jesus
Carrera, 6933rd Electronic Security Squadron, 55:29;
Thom Maholic, 1st Battalion, (Airborne) 508th Infan-
try, 56:16
16-29
Thom Maholic, 1-508th Infantry, 56:16
Robert Lueken, NSWU-8, 56:41; Gordon Asher, VAW
123,1:02:55


W-Y.


Photo by Monique Chore
William Fix crosses the finish line during the triath-
Ion held on Rodman Naval Station Sunday. Fix's
bike had a flat tire during the 16-kilometer bike ride,
so had to run while pushing his bike to finish that part
of the race.
30-39
MikeSonney,310thALS,53:11; Jesus Carrera, 6933rd
Electronic Security Squadron, 55:29; Dan Boughton,
Detachment 10, 79th Test and Evaluation Group, 59:50
40 and above
WebLoudat, DoDDS, 56:43; MikePeck,U.S. Southern
Command, 1:02:03; Carlos Lampas, SOUTHCOM,
1:02:55
Teams
NSWU-8, 55:06, Alex Moore, Mark Kasel, Steve
Renly,

NSWU-8, 55:18, David Casale, Christopher Carbery,
Leslie Bleamaster.


Golf tournament
A Veterans Day golf tournament sponsored by
AT&T will be held Nov. 11 at Horoko Golf Course.
The two-person, best-ball event begins at 7:30 am.
with a shotgun start. There will be four flights. Handi-
caps are as follows: "A"players with 0-7 handicap; "B"
players with 8-15 handicap; "C" players with 16-22
handicap and "D" players with 23 and above handicap.
Teams can be chosen by golfers. The team handicap
will be 50 percent of the lowest golfer's handicap. For
example, if one team member's handicap is 14 and the
other is 16, the team handicap will be 7.
Entry fee is $20 and includes green fees, polo shirt
and lunch at the CPO Club Nov. 11.
Entry forms are at the Horoko Golf Course, Rodman
Fitness Center, the MWR main office (Building 65) and
the Information, Tour and Travel Office (Building 24
next to Pizza Hut).
Call 283-4454/5307 or 283-4222/4061.

Bowling tournament
The Albrook Bowling Center and the Panama Canal
Bowling Association are sponsoring the Pepe Damian
Tournament Saturday and Sunday. There is a $15 entry
fee. Entries are limited and prizes will be awarded. Call
284-4818.

Isthmian Roadrunners
The Isthmian Roadrunners are sponsoring to upcom-
ing races. A 10-kilometer run will be begin 7 a.m.
Sunday at the Kentucky Fried Chicken in El Dorado. A
21-kilometer run will begin 6:30 am. at the Summit


Gardens entrance. Call Ed McAleer at 252-2464.

Atlantic volunteer reporters
The Tropic Times needs more Atlantic side volun-
teer reporters/photographers for stories. Call the sports
editorat 285-6612/4666.

Basketball registration
Registration is under way for the 1992 U.S. Army
South unit level basketball program for the Atlantic and
Pacific communities. Leagues will run from Nov. 4 to
Dec. 21. The tournament will take place Jan 4-11.
A team coaches clinic will be held Tuesday at 6 p.m.
at the Community Recreation Division Sports Branch,
Building 154 forPacific teams. Atlantic team represen-
tatives will meet Nov. 31,at noon at theSundialRecrea-
tion Center. Call the Sports Branch at 287-4050.

Intramural volleyball
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center is accepting
intramural volleyball registration. Call 284-3451.

Holiday tournaments
Veterans Day sporting events registration is under
way until Wednesday. Open events for racquetball,
volleyball, and table tennis will be held at Reeder
Physical Fitness Center and Valent Recreation Center
Nov. 7-11. Call 287-3861.

Morning aerobics
The Howard Youth Center offers dance aerobics
Monday and Fridays and interval sets workouts on
Wednesday. Thereis a $1 feeperclass. Call 284-4700.


Turkey Bowl tryouts
Tryouts for the 1992 Turkey Bowl football tourna-
ment will be held Saturday at 9 a.m., at Jarman Field,
Fort Clayton. Call Eva Foster at 287-4050.

Body building championship
The Hickam Sports and Fitness Center in Honolulu
is sponsoring a body building contest Nov. 13. All
active duty members, their family members, Depart-
ment of Defense and Non-Appropriated Funds employ-
ees 18 or older are eligible. The registration deadline is
Tuesday. Call the Howard Sports and Fitness Center at
284-3451.

Intramural volleyball
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center will register
volleyball players for intramural leagues later this month.
Call 284-3451.

4X4 Club run
The Backcountry 4X4 Club is sponsoring a free
Halloween Fun Run Saturday. The run will be followed
by an overnight beach trip. Call 268-0061.

Men's hoops registration
Atlantic unit-level men's basketball registration ends
Nov. 4. Call the Fronius Physical Fitness Center at 289-
3108.

Women's hoops registration
Atlantic women's basketball program registration is
under way. Call 289-3108.


Story continued from page 12.

team was the U.S. Army Personnel
Command which finished with a 69:03
average time.
Some of the team members had to
deal with injury going into the race.
Others suffered problems on race day.
Deborah Wesloh was cut off by another
runner after the 9-mile marker. She fell,
bruised and scraped her side, hands, knee
and elbow. Coach Willie Moye said that


probably added a minute to her time.
Reuben Tull went into the race with a
pulled hamstring, but still averaged a
5:36-mile pace.
Linda Wozniak suffered severe cramps
and dehydration after crossing the finish
line. She was taken to local hospital and
was released in satisfactory condition
two hours later.
Coach Moye, a member of the 1991
USARSO team, attributes USARSO's
good showing to several things.


"We did a lot of interval training this
year. Weran distance, rested fora short
while, then ran the same distance again,"
Moye said. "The team also put in months
of hard work, concentrated on a good diet
and got proper rest."
The team's top finisher, Sepulveda,
said the training program helped him im-
prove from 64th overall in 1991 to 24th
this year.
"Coach Moye's program really
worked,"Sepulveda said. "Theintervals


and distance running were a good train-
ing combination."
Running 10-milers was something new
to Norma Alderete. That didn't stop her
from keeping a 7-minute-per-mile pace.
"I've only ran 10 miles twice now -
once at the local tryouts and in Washing-
ton," Alderete said. "I shaved more than
seven minutes off my tryout time and I
was so excited. I got so carried away with
finally being there I didn't even notice
my time," Alderete said.


MJj -
tir L









4Tropic Times
14 Oct. 23,1992


* NFL news


Favorites will love week 8 W


Let's take a backo-day-flasho to
week 8 of the 1991 NFL season. The
Washington Redskins and New
Orleans Saints were 7-0. The Buffalo
Bills were 7-1, the Miami Dolphins
and Minnesota Vikings were 3-5 and
the San Francisco 49ers were 3-4.
What a difference a year makes.
BEARS SEND GREEN BAY
PACKING - The Bears blanked the
Packers 10-0 on a Thursday night in
week 8 last season. Chicago's defense
was very rude to Green Bay quarter-
back Don Majkowski, who was
returning to the lineup after an injury.
The "Majik Man" forgot his hocus
pocus because he completed a dismal
3 of 16 passes for 32 yards in a 10-0
loss. How ironic the timing of this
game is. Majkowski could return to
lineup this week, but his replacement
Brett Favre is doing just fine. This
year's game should be a little higher
scoring than last year's shutout, but
the result should be the same. Unless
the Bears (3-3) go on a massive
winning streak, they can forget the
playoffs. The records never mean
anything in this series because the
rivalry is so great.
The question won't be who wins
the game, but what will this week's
Mike Ditka soap opera be about.
Maybe he'll nail Jim Har -augh with
his clipboard. Maybe Iron Mike will
choke on three packs of gum and
Harbaugh will save him. Maybe
Harbaugh won't. Bears 20, Pack 16.
SKINS HALT VIKINGS - The
Minnesota Vikings (5-1) have got to
wake up and smell the coffee. They're
a good team, but who have they
beaten? Green Bay, Tampa Bay,
Cincinnati, Detroit and Chicago,
that's who. The Vikes had to come
from behind to beat the Bears and
Bucs. The Redskins (4-2) did lose to
Phoenix, but also lost to a good Dallas
team and beat the Eagles, Broncos,
and OK, the putrid Falcons and Lions.
The Skins are back on track and the
Vikes are going to get derailed.
Quarterback Mark Rypien is starting
to show what he can do if he gets
good pass protection. As long as Lhe
Skins avoid giving up the big play and
get a few of their own, they should
have no problem winning in the
Metrodome. Skins 24, Vikes 17.
WHAT UNDEFEATED SEASON?
- Miami (6-0) is under a lot of
pressure to stay unbeaten. After all, it
was a Don Shula-coached team that
went 17-0 in 1972. The Colts (3-3)
don't have any pressure on them. In
fact, Indianapolis has already tripled
its 1991 win total. Miami is looking
past this game, the following one


1. True or Fafse. The Bears have
won 13 of the last 14 games vs. the
Packers?

2. Which NFL team was the first to
score 400 points in one season.

3. Which team averaged 1.2 points
per game offensively in 1934?


against the Jets and another vs. the
Colts. Why? The Dolphins play
Buffalo on Monday night, Nov. 16.
After the Bills bury them, the fish
face Houston, New Orleans, San
Francisco and the L.A. Raiders in
succession. Miami can forget about
1992 perfection, but Danny Boy will
light up the Colts defense Sunday.
Marino could hit the 300-yard mark
if the Colts rookie defensive gems
fail under pressure. Fish 30, Dolts
17.
COWER POWER - Pittsburgh
Steelers coach Bill Cower, a Pitts-
burgh native, returns "home" to
Kansas City where he was an
assistant under Marty Schotten-
heimer. Confused? Don't worry, the
Steelers (4-2) will look very disori-
ented in the Sunday night matchup.
Cower may know the Chiefs'
schemes, but Schotty knows Cower's
dreams - a win over the (4-3)
Chiefs. Keep dreaming Bill. The
Steelers, like the Vikes, have beaten
no one of circumstance. The opening-
day victory over the Oilers was a
fluke. The Steelers got five Warren
Moon interceptions, but only won 34-
29. Pittsburgh has beaten the lowly
Jets, Chargers and Bengals and lost to
the lowly Browns and Packers.
Chiefs 20, Steelers 6.
CRYBOYS, RAIDERS, OH MY!
- Three weeks ago, this looked like a
mismatch and it basically still is. The
Raiders (3-4) beat an average Giants
team, caught the Bills napping and
blanked the Hawks. Not very impres-
sive. The Cryboys - you know
somebody asked me why I called
them that - are impressive. Being a
Pittsburgh native, I had to listen to
Cowboys players like Hollywood
Henderson whine every time the
Steelers beat them in the Super Bowl.
I didn't think anybody even read this
column. Making along story longer,
the COWboys (5-1) will romp the
overmatched Raiders. Why? Because
the Cowpokes have too many
offensive threats for the aging
Raiders to keep up with. Emmitt
Smith, Troy Aikmar and Michael
Irvin could have a field day. COW-
boys 26, Raiders 10.
Rounding out the league, Oilers
30, Kitties 17; Brownies 18, Patsies
13; Broncos 20, Chargers 19, Bucs
33, Lions 20; Eagles 24, Cards 16;
Giants 23, Hawks 6; Bills 38, Jets 16.
My season record is 55-33.
The Buckster says: Packers 23,
Bears 17; Vikings 24, Skins 21;
Dolphins 24, Colts 13; Chiefs 24,
Steelers 17; Cowboys 23, Raiders 17;
Oilers 26, Bengals 10; Browns 24,
Patriots 7; Broncos 17, Chargers 14;
Bucs 17, Lions 10; Eagles 20, Cards
12; Giants 14, Hawks 10; Bills 31,
Jets 14. Buck's season record is 53-
35.
Buck will back for the divine
week nine, he'll be on time, he won't
whine, get picks better than mine,
and with me that's just fine.


4. Which quarterback had the high-
est rookie effiency in history in 1983?

ANSWERS
1. False. The Bears have won 12 of the last 14.
2. The 1950 LA. Rams, 466.
3. The Cincinnati Reds scored 10 points in 8 games.
4. Dan Marino, 96.0.


-- *E. ..-"





AP LaserPhoto
Dallas Cowboys running back Emmitt Smith is wrapped up after a short gain
against Philadelphia Oct. 5. The 31-7 loss to the Eagles is the Cowboys' only
loss of the season.


First-place Cowboys


silencing most critics
DALLAS (AP) - Three years ago, in backSteveBeuerlein, whosavedDallas'
the midst of what was to be a l-15 season, 1991 season, for a fourth-rounder, and
Jerry Jones, rookie owner of the Dallas Seifert (for some of those excess draft
Cowboys, sat down with a group of writ- picks) dealt the out-of-favor Charles Haley
ers and brashly predicted his team would from the San Francisco 49ers to the
soon contend for an NFL title. Cowboys.
"Chuckle," went the writers en masse, In fact, Seifert, who could see Haley
humoring the obviously overenthusiastic again in the NFC title game, had good
Arkansan, who at that point was known reasons for disposing of him and had a
best as the man who had fired Tom ready replacement in Tim Harris. But if
Landry. there's one reason the Cowboys are 5-1
Three years later, the Dallas Cow- and atop the NFL's toughest division
boys, the NFL's youngest team, is ... right now, it's Charles Haley.
Contending for an NFL title. "He's the reason our defense is what it
In fact, Jones and Jimmy Johnson is,' says Jim Jeffcoat, the 10-year veteran
have outsmarted the league that chuck- who serves as the team's elder states-
led (like the aforementioned writers) when man, designated pass rusher and desig-
they took over a declining America's nated spokesman from the Landry era.
Team in 1989. They are not country "He may not have the numbers, but
bumpkins and Johnson is not a college he's the reason we have the pass rush we
coach out of his element among the pros. do. He creates havoc and the rest of the
In fact, he and Jones, using players guys get to the passer."
and draft choices obtained in overwhelm- Indeed, Haley's number is "one," if
ingly favorable deals with such pros as numbers are counted by actual sacks
Mike Lynn, Al Davis, Jim Finks and recorded. But the Cowboys' team num-
George Seifert, have built a team that beris 18 after six games, compared to 23
approaching midseason is one of the three for all of last season - and that speaks
orfourlegitimate contenders in the 1992 volumes - particularly with a still-shaky
NFL. secondary.


Lynn was the major victim, having
given up a dozen players and draft choices
for Herschel Walker, who never did lead
the Vikings to the Super Bowl.
But Finks gave up a No. 1, 2 and 3 for
Steve Walsh, currently New Orleans'
third-stringer, Davis gave away quarter-


Example: On Sunday, Haley charged
inside of Kansas City's John Alt, a Pro
Bowl-caliber tackle, and flushed Dave
Krieg from the pocket. Krieg stumbled
down at the 2-yard-line where he was
fallen on by Leon Lett, who got credit for
his first career sack.


Barry is top rusher-


Barry Foster that is


PITTSBURGH (AP) - The NFL's
leading rusher is named Barry - and
his last name isn't Sanders. The AFC
Central Division leader is named Hous-
ton - and it's also named Pittsburgh.
Six weeks into the NFL season, 10
weeks to go, and what's going on around
here? The Steelers don't score a touch-
down for nearly a month, they barely
manage one TD in three quarters against
the NFL's worst defense and they're in
first place?
And they have the NFL's top rusher?
Holy Franco Harris!
"We feel good about where we're at,
but it's still real early," Barry Foster, the
NFL's top rusher, said. "You can't get
too excited because it's so early in the
season, but if we get past these next three
(games)..."
The Steelers face an AFC murderers'
row of Kansas City (4-3), Houston (4-2)
and Buffalo (4-2) the next three weeks,
but coach Bill Cowher wouldn't down-


grade Monday's victory just because it
came over so inept an opponent.
The Steelers' 4-2 start ties them with
Houston for the AFC Central Division
lead and is their best since they also were
4-2 in the 1987 strike season. The last
time they were 4-2 in a non-strike season
was 1983, when they opened 9-2 before
finishing 10-6.
"It's a great challenge," Cowher said
Tuesday. "I don't think we'll be compla-
cent."
Cowher was as defensive as his Steel-
ers were Monday when it was suggested
the Bengals might be the NFL's worst
team.
"I don't necessarily agree with that
perception of the Bengals," Cower said.
"Any time you get a win over a team in
NFL, you should take it in stride. You
shouldn't relish it if it's over Cincinnati
or the San Francisco 49ers. We know
what's ahead of us the next three weeks,"
he said.


NFL trivia


'














Jays Key was


Game 4 hero
TORONTO (AP) - Four starters instead of three, that
was the key. As in Jimmy.
Blue Jays manager Cito Gaston looks like a genius,
and Jimmy Key is the reason. Toronto had a 3-1 lead
against Atlanta in the World Series with Jack Morris,
David Cone and Juan Guzman ready to pitch on full
rest.
"Coming into the World Series, I thought our guys
pitched a lot of innings," Gaston said. "And I thought
Jimmy deserved a chance to pitch. He did agreatjob for
us tonight (Wednesday)."
It would have been easy to come back with Morris on
three days'rest. After all, Morris was MVP for Minne-
sotalast year, throwing tremendouslyin Games 1,4 and
7 against the Braves.
But Key got the call, and the left-out left-hander was
ready. Key allowed one run and five hits in 7 2-3 innings
Wednesday night, leading Toronto to a 2-1 victory in
Game 4.
"I really did have doubts about whether I would pitch
in the Series," Key said. "I didn't see any action in the
playoffs because Cito thought the right-handers would
be better against Oakland. I was concerned about the
layoff, and the club knows I'm not as effective a pitcher
when I do have a long layoff. I'm just glad I was able to
finish strong."
"Key" means important. "Key" means significant.
He was both against the Braves.
"He pitched the game of his life," closer Tom Henke
said.
While some might have disagreed with the decision
before, all were in accord afterward.
"It was a good idea," Guzman said of the decision.
Morris, who might have been miffed with the man-
ager, decided the decision struck the right note.
Atlanta's Tom Glavine was less happy with the


Tropic Times
Oct. 23,19921-







:. .
or - 1

N. ^p


AP LaserPhoto
Jimmy Key allowed one run and five hits in 7 2/3 innings Wednesday night, leading Toronto to a 2-1 victory
in Game 4.


numerology. After winning Game 1, he hoped to bring
the Braves to even, not the brink. He followed his
opening four-hitter with a six-hitter, but Pat Borders'
homer and Devon White's single were too much to
overcome.


John Smoltz, who would have won Game 2 until Ed
Sprague's heroic homer, followed Glavine Thursday
night as the middle man in the trio. He went up against
Morris twice in last year's Series, but didn't get a
decision.


Alabama Crimson Tide thinking about No. 1


TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) - Alabama
coach Gene Stallings said Monday it's
,too early to be thinking about a national
championship, but he realizes his players
have their minds on No. 1.
The fourth-ranked Crimson Tide (7-
0) solidified its status as a contender with
a 17-10 victory at Tennessee this week-
end. Alabama has won 17 in a row, the
third-longest winning streakin the coun-
try.
Stallings said it's premature to be
worrying about the rankings with four
games left in the season. But the Tide has
only one game remaining against a Top
25 team and appears to have alock on the
Southeastern Conference Western Divi-
sion title.
"I know in the back of their minds that
somewhere along the line they are think-
ing that they've worked themselves into
position of having some national recog-
nition, and I have no problem with
that at all," Stallings said.
With its victory over Tennessee, Ala-
bama improved to 4-0 in the SEC and
built a two-game division lead when
Mississippi State was upset by South
Carolina.


f?�.
WS^.


Alabama's Derrick Lassie leaps into the end zone for a touchdown in Saturday's win over Tennessee.


Magic eyes

consecutive

NBA games


INGLEWOOD, Calif. (AP) - Magic
Johnson, eager to rejoin the Los Angeles
Lakers after a one-season absence, says
he will probably play several back-to-
back games.
Johnson, who stunned the nation last
November by announcing he had the
virus that causes AIDS and was retiring,
said last month he was feeling fine and
was returning to the Lakers.
He originally planned to play in 50 to
60 games in the 82-game season after
doctors urged him to avoid playing on
consecutive nights. But on Monday,
Johnson said he could easily play back-
to-back games in Pacific or mountain
time zones.
"Some of those I'll play. I can play in
Phoenix and come home and play, Sacra-
mento and come home. Those aren't


hard trips. Those ones I can make,"
Johnson told the New York Times.
"There's a chance to play more than I
originally said. I never said there was no
chance. It's just something we've always
said, 'Let's see how I feel.'
"I can't tell you how many I'll play,
but I've already added one exhibition
game, and there'll probably be some I
add again. Once the war of the season
starts, we'll see what happens. Yeah, I
am an HIV guinea pig. Idon't mind that.
If people want to use me as an experi-
ment, fine. As long as I'm a basketball
experiment and nothing else."
Johnson emerged healthy after a gru-
eling 10-day training camp in Hawaii.
As for Johnson playing more games,
teammate Byron Scott said: "Good. Make
it 70 now. The more the better."


Johnson APLaserPhoto


AP LaserPhoto


I-










1 6r Tropic Times
1 Oct. 23,1992


Soldiers enjoy


return training

by Gregory Thomas
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Mid-Septem-
ber marked the first trip to Panama for some "Show Me
State" Guardsmen, but for others it was a chance to see
how much the country had changed since they were last
here.
That last time for most members of the Missouri
National Guard was a similar two-week training rota-
tion with the military police of U.S. Army South.
During the last year, more than 500 members of the
Missouri Guard trained with their U.S. Army South
counterparts in Panama. According to 1st. t. Douglas
Gifford, commander, 3175th Military Police Detach-
ment, Mo. National Guard, they deploy to Panama
yearly in groups of 40 to 50 to augment the active Army
soldiers at installations on both the Atlantic and Pacific
sides of the canal to gain on-the-job experience not
available during weekend drills back home."
"We're a heavy security MP unit," said Gifford, a
Winfield, Mo. postal service worker. "On the week-
ends we train on things like soldiering skills and convoy
escorts. Whenever we deploy to Panama, our troops go
through the same process as when you mobilize for
war."
For ROTC cadet Paul Smith, this deployment was
especially interesting.
"The last time I was in Panama was during the first
week of January in 1990," Smith said. "It was near the


3f4�


.4


U.S. Army photo by
ROTC cadet Paul Smith checks out items in a car trunk during a routine vehicle inspection.


end of Operation Just Cause and things were a mess.
Since then, the country has made many improvements.
It's quite a visible difference."
A native of Louisiana, Mo., Smith is a senior at
Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville.
This was also Sgt. Ernie Ellermann's second trip to
Panama.
"We were busy, but we did have a chance to get out
and see the country, the islands and the canal," the
Dixon, Mo. soldier said.
"This deployment during the rainy season was also


egory nomas


very different from my first trip here," Ellermann said.
"Having thunder showers at the same time every day
was quite a change from the clear blue skies I saw here
during the dry season."
The youngest member of the Show-Me State rota-
tion, Pvt.2 Steve Dodson, was making memories rather
than recalling them.
"It was avery enlightening experience," said the 18-
year-old student from St. Louis. "Besides the work, I
was shown beaches and ocean for the first time. I never
dreamed I would see the Panama Canal."


Local Girl Scouts start calendar sale campaign


U.S. Army photo by Sgt Richard Puckett
Brig. Gen. David Sawyer, commander 24th Wing, talks with Junior Scout
Naomi Groom and Brownie Rachel Baxter aboutthe Girl Scout calendar.


HOWARD AFB (US SOUTHCOM PAO)
- When the topic of Girl Scouts comes up.
most people think of cookies.
In Panama, the Girl Scouts of America
want people to think calendars, not cookies,
because that is what they sell.
The annual calendar sales began on
Oct. 15 and will continue through Nov.
15 according to Aurora Toth, service
committee chairman for the Girl Scouts.
This year the calendars are available
in both pocket and full size models, she
said. The calendars reach a wider audience
because everybody can use them and there
are no health or diet problems related to
them, Toth said.
Also, with the tropical climate of Pan-
ama, large shipments of cookies would be a
storage problem, while no such problem
exists with calendars, Toth said.
The money raised through the calendar
sales will be used for troop activities to


include trips to the Panamanian National
Girl Scout camp site in Penonome, local
campouts, day camps, hikes and other ac-
tivities, Toth said.
In addition to raising money to support
activities, the process of selling helps the
scouts learn about business and sales tech-
niques, Toth said.
In Panama, there are four lone troops
which operate individually, cover all ages
within their area and report directly to Na-
tional Girl Scout headquarters.
The Sunshine Lone Troop encompasses
the Los Rios area, the Tropical Lone Troop
is made up of Howard/Fort Kobbe scouts,
the Clayton Lone Troop is made up of Fort
Clayton girls and the Atlantic Lone Troop
encompasses all scouts in the Atlantic
community.
Each lone troop has calendars for sale,
with the profits earned being used in their
community, Toth said.


Postal officials offer holiday tips


HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA) - The following
Christmas mailing dates and tips are recommended by
the 24th Air Postal Squadron to ensure cards, letters
and packages reach their destination by Christmas
Day.

Military mall addressed to:
APO/FPO AE zips 090-097...air letters/cards - Dec.
2; priority - Dec. 2; PAL- Nov. 22; SAM- Nov. 11; sur-
face- Nov. 1.
APO/FPO AE zips 098...air letters/cards - Nov. 25;
priority - Nov. 18; PAL - Nov. 2; SAM - Nov. 2; surface
-Oct. 26.
APO/FPO AA zips 340...air letters/cards - Dec. 6;
priority - Dec. 2; PAL - Nov. 22; SAM - Nov. 11;
surface - Nov. 1.
APO/FPO AP zips 962-966, 987...air letters/cards -
Dec. 2; priority- Dec. 2; PAL- Nov. 22; SAM- Nov. 11;
surface- Nov. 1.
U.S. domestic zip codes...air letters/cards - Dec. 9;
priority - Dec. 2; PAL - no service; SAM - Dec. 2; sur-
face- Nov. 1.

International mail addressed to:
Africa...air letters/cards - Dec. 2; air parcel postage
- Nov. 18; surface - Oct. 1.
Australia..air letters/cards -Dec. 2; air parcel postage
- Dec. 2; surface - Nov. 2.
Caribbean...air letters/cards - Dec. 7; air parcel


postage - Dec. 7; surface - Nov. 2.
Europe...air letters/cards - Dec. 2; air parcel postage
- Dec. 2; surface - Nov. 2.
Far East...air letters/cards - Dec. 2; air parcel postage
- Dec. 2; surface - Nov. 2.
Greenland...air letters/cards - Dec. 2; air parcel postage
- Nov. 15; surface - no service.
Middle East...air letters/cards - Nov. 25; air parcel
postage - Nov. 15; surface - Oct. 1.
Southeast Asia...air letters/cards - Dec. 2; air parcel
postage - Dec. 2; surface - Nov. 1.
Central & South America...air letters/cards - Dec. 7;
air parcel postage - Dec. 2; surface - Oct. 1.

Some Christmas mailing tips include:
*Mail early.
*Pack at least two inches of cushioning material on
all sides of item. Foamed plastics are excellent packing
material.
*Use a container that will withstand the weight of
the item enclosed.
*Seal with filament tape.
*Don't wrap a box in paper if thereis enough space
to write in the address.
*Address with indelible ink.
*Enclose a copy of the address in the parcel before
sealing.
*Don't forget the zip code.
*PAL= parcel airlift, SAM= surface airmail


Crash kills 1, injures 5
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Two sol-
diers, three Panama Canal Commission employ-
ees, and a Panamanian were involved in a
three-car accident, Oct. 16, on the Bridge of
Americas.
A Panamanian taxi driver was pronounced
dead at the scene and three others were
injured.
The accident occurred about 1:50 p.m., when a
soldier's car was following a Panamanian taxi
driver eastbound on the bridge.
A car with PCC employees was coming west-
bound when it crossed into eastbound traffic and
collided with the taxi.
The soldier's vehicle following ahead collided
into the taxi and the PCC vehicle.
The three vehicles were totalled in the acci-
dent.
An investigation into the accident continues by
Panamanian and military officials.

Atlantic DCA office moves
FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO-ATLANTIC) -
The Directorate of Community Activities - Atlan-
tic administrative branch has relocated its office
from the Margarita Complex to Building 232, Fort
Davis, in the garrison commanders office. The
phone number is 289-5075.














Z i ro


Oct. 23,1992


An entertainment


activities


Page Bl


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54


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1


U.S. Army photo by Sgt Dborah E. William
Dasi Garrido gets her camera ready to take pictures of the scenery in El Valle. See story, photos page B5.


Brandon Lee, Bruce Lee's son, stars
in the action thriller, Rapid Fire, at
the Howard theater.


Metro Convertible is cute, extremely
economical and low priced; maxi-
mum fun for minimum bucks.


TV ............ ..................................B3
Theater review......................... B9
Ads......................................B.. 10


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B02 Tropic Times
D Oct. 23,1992




HOWARD
Today
7pm Bebe's Kids (PG-13) Animated
9pm Death Becomes Her (PG-13) Goldie Hawn, Bruce
Willis, Meryl Streep
Saturday
2pm Little Nemo (G) Animated
6:30pm 3 Ninja Kids (PG) VictorWong, Michael Treanor
9pm Stay Tuned (PG) John Ritter, Pam Dawber
Sunday
2pm Little Nemo (G) Animated
6:30pm 3 Ninja Kids (PG) Victor Wong, Michel Treanor
9pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe
Monday
7pm 3 Ninja Kids (PG) Victor Wong, Michael Treanor
9pm Stay Tuned (PG) John Ritter, Pam Dawber
Tuesday
7pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe
9pm 3 Ninja Kids (PG) Victor Wong, Michael Treanor
Wednesday
7pm Stay Tuned (PG) John Ritter, Pam Dawber
9pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe
Thursday
7pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe
9pm Stay Tuned (PG) John Ritter, Pam Dawber
Oct. 30
7pm 3 Ninja Kids (PG) Victor Wong, Michael Treanor
9pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe


CLAYTON
Today
7pm Prelude To A Kiss (PG-13) Meg Ryan, Alec Bald-
win
9pm Raising Cain (R) John Lithgow, Lolita Davidovitch
Saturday
2pm Bebe's Kids (PG-13) Animated
7pm Death Becomes Her (PG-13) Goldie Hawn, Bruce
Willis, Meryl Streep
9pm Lethal Weapon III(R) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover
Sunday
2pm Bebe's Kids (PG-13) Animated
7pm Death Becomes Her (PG-13) Goldie Hawn, Bruce
Willis, Meryl Streep
9pm Lethal Weapon III(R) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover
Monday
7pm Lethal Weapon III (R) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover
9pm Death Becomes Her (PG-13) Goldie Hawn, Bruce
Willis, Meryl Streep
Tuesday
7pm Death Becomes Her (PG-13) Goldie Hawn, Bruce
Willis, Meryl Streep
9pm Lethal Weapon III(R) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover
Wednesday
7pm Bebe's Kids (PG-13) Animated
9pm Lethal Weapon III(R) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover
Thursday
7pm Lethal Weapon III (PG-13) Mel Gibson, Danny
Glover
9pm Death BecomesHer (PG-13) Goldie Hawn,Bruce
Willis, Meryl Streep
Oct. 30
7pm Bebe's Kids (PG-13) Animated
9pm Death Becomes Her (PG-13) Goldie Hawn, Bruce
Willis, Meryl Streep


DAVIS
Today
7pm UnlawfulEntry (R) KurtRussell, MadeleineStowe


Saturday
7pm Prelude To A Kiss (PG-13) Meg Ryan, Alec Bald-
win
9pm Raising Cain (R) John Lithgow, Lolita Davidovitch
Sunday
7pm Prelude To A Kiss (PG-13) Meg Ryan, Alec Bald-
win


7pm


7pm

7pm


7pm


7pm


Monday
Buffy The Vampire Slayer (PG-13) Donald Suther-
land, Kirsty Swanson
Tuesday
Raising Cain (R) John Lithgow, Lolita Davidovitch
Wednesday
Prelude To A Kiss (PG-13) Meg Ryan, Alec Bald-
win
Thursday
Buffy The Vampire Slayer (PG-13) Donald Suther-
land, Kirsty Swanson
Oct. 30
Raising Cain (R) John Lithgow, Lolita Davidovitch


SHERMAN
Today
7pm Batman Returns (PG-13) Michael Keaton, Danny
DeVito
Saturday
7pm Unlawful Entry (R) Kurt Russell, Madeleine Stowe


"'RAISING CAIN' IS ONE OF THE MOST CINEMATICALLY
SATISFYING MOVIES OF THE SUMMER!
It's Brian De Palma's return to the Hitchcockian genre:'
-Lawrence Frascella. US MAGAZINE
"A BRILLIANT PSYCHO-THRILLER WITH JUST THE
RIGHT AMOUNT OF LAUGHS!
'Raising Cain' is visual magic...A Brian De Palma classic"
-J.ff Crial, SIXTY SECOND PREVIEW


clayton Theater, today. Davis Theater,
Saturday, Tuesday and Oct. 30.


Sunday
7pm Unlawful Entry (R) Kurt Russell, Madeleine Stowe
Monday
7pm A Stranger Among Us (PG-13) Melanie Griffith,
Eric Thai
Thursday
7pm Unlawful Entry (R) Kurt Russell, Madeleine
Stowe
Oct. 30
7pm A Stranger Among Us (PG-13) Melanie Griffith,
Eric Thal


AMADOR
Today
7pm Cool World (PG-13) Kim Basinger, Gabriel Byme
Saturday
7pm Batman Returns (PG-13) Michael Keaton, Danny
DeVito
Sunday
7pm Man Trouble (PG-13) Jack Nicholson, Ellen Barkin
Tuesday
7pm Unlawful Entry (R) Kurt Russell, Madeleine Stowe
Thursday
7pm Universal Soldier (R) Jean Claude Van Damme,
Dolph Lundgren
Oct. 30
7pm NO MOVIE


3 Ninja Kids
Victor Wong, Michael Treanor
While their father is occupied with his FBI
business, his young sons cope with the absence
by learning the ways of the ninja from grandpa.
Their new skills are put to the test when an arms
dealer tries to kidnap them to keep Dad from
shutting him down. Special added attraction:
"Pedal To The Metal" kicks the show off. PG
(violence), 93 min.

Stay Tuned
John Ritter, Pam Dawber
John Ritter is a couch potato who ends up
participating in the actual adventure series and
game shows he watches on a Satanic television
channel. PG, 88 min.

Rapid Fire
Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe
This action thriller stars Brandon Lee, Bruce
Lee's son, as an uncooperative witness who sees
a drug lord/Mafia dispute and then becomes a
hero as he helps a veteran cop solve a major
heroin case. R (violence, language, sex), 95 min.

Little Nemo: Adventures In
Slumberland
Voices of Mickey Rooney, Gabriel Damon.
The King of Slumberland summons Little Nemo
to assume the scepter of power. Excitement and
action starts when a monster from Nightmare
Land kidnaps the King and Little Nemo is off to
the rescue. G, 85 min.


Club Amador
Lunch: Tues.-Fri., 11:30am-lpm. La Concha Res-
taurant: Tues.-Sat., 6-10pm; Bridge Lounge: Tues-
Thurs., 5-10pm; Fri., social hour, Spm-midnight;
Sat., 6pm-midnight; prhch brunch for children, first
Sun. each month, 10:30am-1:30pm. Champagne
brunch, Sun., 10:30am-1:30pm. Beef & burgundy,
Tues., 6-10pm; pasta pizazz, Wed., 6-9pm; Mongo-
lian BBQ, Thurs., 6-9pm. Bingo: Tues.&Wed.,
7pm. Reservations: 282-4025/3837/3534.
Howard Enlisted Members' Club
Cashier's cage: Sun.-Thurs., 9am-9pm; Fri&Sat.,
9am-l 1pm; holidays, 4-9pm. Dining: Casual Cove/
Tropical Breezeway, Mon.-Fri., 6-30-9am, 1 lam-
11pm, Fri.&Sat., until lam. Dining room closed for
renovation, members may dine at Howard O'Club
Mon.-Sat. Ballroom: variety disco Sun., Tues.,
Thurs., Fri, Sat. 8pm-midnight Casual Cove: vari-
ety disco Wed., 8pm-midnight, country&wester
Tues.&Fri. 8pm-midnight, rock&roll, 8pm-lam.
Main lounge: Fri.&Sat., 5:30pm-midnight, Wed.,
5:30-10pm. Social hour: Mon., Wed.&Fri., reduced
price drinks. Bingo: Sun., 2pm; Wed., 7pm; bar
bingo, Mon.-Fri., 5-6:30;m 284-4189, Building
710.
Howard O'Club
Cashier's cage: Mon.-Fri., 10am-lpm. Dining:
Lunch,Mon.-Fri., 1 lam-lpm. Full menu Tues., Fri.,
Sat., and mini-mmu Mon., Wed., Thurs., 6-9pm.


Thurs., tacos. Fri.&Sat, prime rib/seafood. Dining
open to Enlisted Club Memebers while enlisted
Dining Room under renovation. Disco: Fri., 7pm-
midnight. Lounge: Mon.-Thurs., 4-9pm, Fri., 4pm-
midnight, Sat, 6-9pm. Social hour: Fri. 5-6pm.
Bingo: Wed., 6pm. Closed Sun.,&holidays. 284-
3089, Building 707
Top Three Lounge
Open: Mon.-Thurs., 4-10 pm, Fri., 4pm-lam, Sat.,
5-11pm, Sun.&holidays, closed. Social hour:
Mon.&Fri., 4:30-6pm. 284-3089, Building 707.
Albrook Club
Cashier's cage: Mon.-Fri., llam-l:30pm. Mon.,
Thurs., Fri., 2-4:30pm, Wed., 2:30-4:30pm. Din-
ing: Lunch, llam-lpm. Dinner. Mon., Wed.,
Thurs., 6-8:30pm, Fri.-Sat., 6-9pm. Sun., cham-
pagne brunck, 10am-1pm. Mon., Mongolian BBQ.
Thurs., Mexican. Fri., prime rib/seafood. Sat.,
steak. Italian 2nd/4th Wed. each month; mini-gour-
met, 1st/3rd Wed. each month. Tues., dining room
closed, bar menu available in lounge. Disco, Fri.,
8pm-lam. Lounge open: Mon.-Thurs., 4:30-10pm;
Fri., 4:30pm-lam; Sat., 5:30pm-midnight Social
hour- Fri., 4-6pm. Closed 1st Tues. each month at
2pm. Flea market 1st Sun. each month, 9am-4pm.
Texas BBQ last Sat. each month 6:30-9pm,
country&western dancing until lam. 286-4128/
3547, Building 13.
STRAC Club
Mon.-Wed., 4:30-10pm. Thurs., 4:30-midnight,
oldies and classic rock. Fri., TGIF, 4:30pm-lam.


Sat., 4:30pm-midnight, variety music, free pizza.
286-3511.
Quarry Heights O'Club
Breakfast Mon.-Fri., 6:30-8:30am, Sat., 8-10am.
Lunch: Mon.-Fri., 11:30am-lpm. Dinner: Tues.-
Thurs. 6-9pm; Fri.-Sat. 8-10pm. Bar lounge: Tues.-
Fri., 4-10pm; Sat. 6-10pm; FrL, social hour, 4-7pm.
282-4380/3439.
CPO Club
Open to E-7 through E-9, civilians NM-6 and above,
and family members. Lunch: Monm-Fri., 1 lam-lpm,
all-you-can-eat buffet; Sat., grill open, noon-4pm.
Dinner: Fri.&Sat., 6-9pm. Social hour: Wed.&Fri,
4pm, complimentary snacks. 283-5475.
Anchorage Club
Open to all ranks. Breakfast Mon.-Fri., 6:30-
9:30am Sat., 8-10:30am. Lunch: Mon.-Fri, 11am-
1:30pm. Dinner: Mon.-Fri., 6-9pm, a la cartedining.
Grill: Mon.-Sat, 11-1:30pm; Sun.&hol., 3:30-
9:30pm. Pizza&fried chicken to go, 5-9pm daily.
Bingo, Mon., 5:30pm, special menu. Family night,
Tues., 5:30-9pm. Social hour, Wed., 4-6pm.
country&western night, steak dinner, Wed., 6-9pm.
All-you-can-eattaco night, Thurs. Bar hours: Tues.-
Fri., 4-11pm; Fri.&Sat., 4pm-midnight; Sun.&hol.,
3:30-10pm. 283-4332/3040.
Rodman Officers' Club
Open to officers, warrant officers, civilians grade
NM-7 and above, and family members. Lunch:
Mon.-Fri., lam-1:30pm. Dinner Sun.-Thurs., 6-


8:30pm.; Fri.&Sat, 6-9:30pm. Dining room bar.
open, 4-9pm. Laguna Lounge open Mon., Wed. and
Fri., 4-10pm, complimentary snacks. Pool bar:
Mon.-Thurs., noon-6pm; Fri., noon-8pm;
Sat.&Sun., 10am-6pm. Thurs: steak-by-the-ounce;
Fri.&Sat., prime rib. 283-4498.
Acey-)eucey Club
Open to E-5 through E-6 Mon., Wed.&Fri., 5-10pm
only. Call 283-4332.
Clayton NCO Club
Main corral: Mon.-Thurs., 7-11pm; Fri.-Sat., 7pm-
2am; Sun., 1-11:30pm. Forum: Tues., steak night, 5-
9pm; Wed., international buffet, 5-9pm; Thurs.,
ladies night, 5-9pm; Fri.-Sat., fine dining, 4:30-
10pm; entertainment, 9pm-2am. Bingo: Sun., 2-
5pm; Tues., 6-10pm. The Underground: Mon.-
Thurs., 4:30-11pm; Fri., 5pm-2am; Sat, lpm-2am.
Midnight buffet: Wed., Fri., Sat, 10pm-1:30am.
Casa Maria, Mon.-Sun., 5-10pm. 287-4343/4716.
Davis Community Club
Breakfast Mon.-Fri., 6:30-9am. Lunch: Mon.-Fri.,
11:30am-lpm. Dinner: Wed.&Thurs., 6-9pm;
Fri.&Sat., 6-10pm. Brunch: Sun., 10:30am-1:30pm.
Bingo: Sun., 3-6pm. 289-3289/5160.
Red Door Club
Mon., progressive music, 7-lOpm. Tues., special
night, 7-11pm.Wed., oldies, 7-1lpm. Thurs., ladies
night, 7-lOpm. Fri.,social hour, progressive music,
7pm-midnight. Sat., rock 'n roll, 7pm-midnight.
287-4343.












#TV Schedule


Tropic TimesB3
Oct. 23,1992B


Channels 8 & 10

Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Oct. 30

5:30n NBC Newt at Smrise 6:30am Headline News 6:00am RobentSchuller.Hour of 6:30am NBCNews at Sunrise 6:30am NBCNcws at Surie 6:30am NBC New at Sumrie 6:30am NBC News a Sumise 6:30am NBC News at Sune
6:00 ABCGoodMoming 7:00 CarolinaMarine Powe 7:00 ABCGoodMorning 7:00 ABCGoodMoning 7:00 ABCGoodMoming 7:00 ABCGoodMoring 7:00 ABCOoodMoming
America 7:30 NavyNewsThis Week 6:30 ThirtyGoodMinute Amric America America America Ameca
8:00 BodybyJake 8:00 CatoonCorner 7:00 Studio7 9:00 Bodyby Jake 9:00 Bodyby Jake 9:00 BodybyJake 9:00 Bodybyliake 9:00 BodybyJake
8:30 SessmeStret 8:30 JustPorKidls 7:30 The700Club 9:30 SessmeStre 9:30 SesameStret 9:30 SessameStret 9:30 SesmeStret 9:30 SeiameStra
9:30 Kid'sIncorporaed Widget 8:00 BothSidesw/Jesie 10:30 Family DoubleDar 10:30 SilverSpoons 10:30 BackToTheFuture 10:30 SilverSpoon 10:30 SpacehipEarth
10:00 CNNNewsroom WoodyWoodpecker Jackson 11:00 FamilyFud 11:00 FamilyPeud 11:00 FamilyFeud 11:00 FamilyFeud 11:00 PamilyFeud
10:15 CannelOne Biskitts 8:30 Washington Week in 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday
10:30 ILovcLucy Back To The Future Review Noon HeadlineNewsBreak Norm HeadlineNews Break Noon HeadlineNews Break Noon HeadlineNew Break Noon HeadlineNews Break
11:00 WheelofForune 10:30 PaericTaleThlter 9:00 CBSSundayMoming 12:20 SCNMiddayReport 12:20 SCN MiddayRepot 12:20 SCNMidday Repot 12:20 SCNMiddayReport 12:20 SCNMidday Rqo
11:30 ShowbizToday 11:15 HeadlineNewa Break 10:30 Face TheNation 12:30 SportMachine 12:30 SportsLatcNight 12:30 SportsLatcNight 12:30 SpotLatenight 12:30 Spo Latenight
Noon HeadlineNewsBreak 11:30 CFAFootball:TBA 11:00 HeadlincNew 1:00 OprahWinfrey 1:00 Donahue 1:00 OprahWinrey 1:00 Donahue 1:00 OprhWinfrey
12:20 SCNMiddayRqport 2:30pm CFA Football: TBA 11:30 This Week W/David 2:00 AnotherWordd 2:00 AnotherWordd 2:00 AnotherWorld 2:00 AnotherWoid 2:00 AntherWordd
12:30 SponrtLatenight 5:30 SoulTrain Brinkley 3:00 Price IsRight 3:00 PriceIs Right 3:00 PriceI Right 3:00 PriceIsRight 3:00 Price IRight
1:00 AnotherWorld 6:30 HeadlineNews 12:30pmEbony/JetShowcaae 4:00 Wild& CrazyKlds 4:00 SquareOneTV 4:00 WamerBrother 4:00 FamilyDouble Dare 4:00 ThinkFastl
2:00 OprahWinfey 7:00 Special:'IhbNation's 1:00 NFLFootball:TBAor 4:25 GuidingLight 4:25 GuidingLight Cartoons 4:25 GuidingLight 4:25 GuidingLight
3:00 ThinkPautl Agend"Pat3 of 3 the followingSchedule 5:15 GmeeralHopital 5:15 GmeralHopital 4:25 GuidlngLlght 5:15 GmneralHopiLal 5:15 GOeneralHopital
3:25 PriceIsRight 8:00 SaturdayNightMovie: 1:00 Movie:OnThinlce 6:00 SCNEvening Repot 6:00 SCNBvningReport 5:15 GneralHospital 6:00 SCNEvningReport 6:00 SCNBEvringReport
4:25 GuidingLight "EyeoftheNeedlel 2:40 Movie:Lassie:Adve- 6:30 WorldNewsTonight 6:30 WorddNewsTonight 6:00 SCNEveningReport 6:30 WaddNewsTonight 6:30 WoddNewsTonight
5:15 GmeralHospital 10:00 HeadlineNews turesofNecka 7:00 Jeopardy 7:00 Jeopadyl 6:30 WoldNewsTonight 7:00 Jeopadyl 7:00 Jeoprdyl
6:00 SCNEveningReport 10:30 SatmdayNightLive 4:00 StarTrek 7:30 TheFallGuy 7:30 Anything ButLove 7:00 Jeopardyl 7:30 Chadi&Company 7:30 TallTale andLegends
6:30 Word NewsTonight Ifgame6oftheWorldSe 5:00 HeadlineNews 8:30 60Minuta 8:00 EveningShade 7:30 Special: TheMiuile 8:00 CFAFootball:Southem 8:30 Specisl: TheBea
7:00 Jeopadyl e i not necessary, the 5:30 OnStage'92 9:30 CBS Eveing New 8:30 Specil:Frontline-"The of October" MissisippiE. Carolina Capaign Money Can
7:30 TallTaleandLegendr followingachedulcwillbe 6:00 SupernarsofWretling 10:00 EntertainmentTonight PoliticsofPower" 9:30 CBSEvening New 11:00 SCNNewUpdate Buy"
8:30 PrimeTimcLive inaffect: 7:00 MoveOver 'Womenand 10:30 Dynasty 9:30 CBSEvemingNews 10:00 EntertainmentTonight 11:05 HeadlineNews 9:30 CBSEveningNews
9:30 CBS Evening New 5:30 Special: "TheNation's the'92 Campaign" 11:30 SCN NewUpdate 10:00 EnterailnmrotTonight 10:30 L.A.Law 11:35 TonightShow 10:00 EnertainmneTonight
10:00 EntertainmentTonight Agmda"Part3of3 8:00 Movie:"BabyM"Patl 11:35 TonightShow 10:30 MikeHmmer 11:30 SCNNewsUpdate 12:35amLatmightW/LAtemi 10:30 St.IElewhere
10:30 SCN NewsUpdate 6:30 CFA:AirPorcevs. 9:40 HeadlineNews Break 12:35am LatmightW/Letemnnm 11:30 SCN New Update 11:35 TonightShow 1:35 Nightline 11:30 SCNNewsUpdate
1035 TonightShow SouthDakoaState 10:00 EntertainmertWeek 1:35 Nightline 11:35 TonightShow 12:35amLaunightW/David 2:05 InsidePolitic'92 11:35 TonightShow
11:35 LatmightW/LatezP m 9:30 SoulTrain 11:00 ShelockHolme 2:05 InsidePolitics'92 12:35mamLaenight W/Ltterm m Leeramn 2:30 SporTanight 12:35 LatenightwihDavid
12:35amNightline MidnightFridayNightVidea Midnight60Minutes 2:30 SponrLatenight 1:35 Nightline 1:35 Nightline 3:00. AnenioHallShow Le timmn
1:05 AllNightMovie: 1:00 AllNightMovie: '/X" 1:00 BusinessWodd 3:00 AenioHall 2:05 InsidePolitics'92 2:05 nsidePolitics'92 4:00 TonightShow 1:35 Nightline
"SuddmImpact" 3:00 AllNightMovie: 1:30 HeadlineNews 4:00 TonightShow 2:35 SpotsTonight 2:30 SportsToight 5:00 LatnightW/Latennm 2:05 AllNightMovies:'al-
3:00 AllNightMoviea: "Ladyhawke" 2:00 McGlaughlinGmup 5:00 LatloightW/Ltermman 3:00 ArnnioHall 3:00 AenioUHll 6:00 HeadlinNews loweenI1"
"ViolationofTnut" 5:00 HeadlineNews 2:30 SporuMachine 6:00 HeadlineNewsBreak 4:00 TonightShow 4:00 TonightShow 3:45 AUNightMovie:"Bad
4:40 Vldeolinks 5:30 HeadlinNewsBreak 3:00 CNNConinues 5:00 LarmightW/Lettrmn 5:00 LatmightW/Letterma DIream
5:30 HeadlineNews 4:00 Headline News 6:00 HeadlineNewsBreak 6:00 HeadlineNews Break 5:10 Videolinks
6:00 HeadlineNewsBreak 4:30 CNNWorddReport 6:00 HeadlleNews
6:00 Headline New Break



Cable Channel 14

Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Oct. 30

530am NBC News at Sunrisc 6:30am Same uChannels 8 & 10 6:00am Lamb Chop 6:30am NBC News at Sunrie 6:30nNBC New at Sunrise 6:30amNBC News t Sunise 6:30am NBC News at Sunrie 6:30nm NBC New at Sunrise
6:00 GoodMomingAmerica 10:30 FamilyTheater'OnThin 6:30 TaloSpin 9:00 OprahWinfrey 9:00 Donahue 9:00 OprahWinfey 9:00 Donahue 9:00 OprahWinfreyShow
8:00 TaleSpin Ice." 7:00 DakwingDuck 10:00 Today 10:00 Today 10:00 Today 10:00 Today 10:00 Today
8:30 Lamb Chop's Play 12:05am Headline New Break 7:25 Winnie thePooh Noon Headline New Break Noon Headline News Noon Headline New Break Non HeadlineNews Break Noon Headline Newbreak
Along 12:30 AftmoooMovie:'How 7:50 SuperPriamd 12:20 SCNMiddayRqon 12:20 SCNMiddayRespon 12:20 SCNMiddayReport 12:20 SCNMiddayRepot 12:20 SCNMiddayReport
9:00 Today ThecWcetWaWon" 8:15 Widget 12:30 AllMy Childre 12:30 AllMyChildrm 12:30 AllMyChildren 12:30 AllMyChildrm 12:30 AlMyOChildr
11:00 OprahWinfreyShow 3:00 SpmserForHire 8:40 BacktotheFuture 1:30 OneLifeto Live 1:30 OneLifetoLive 1:30 OneLife to Live 1:30 OneLifetoLive 1:30 OneLifetoLive
Noo HeadlineNews Break 4:00 AmericanGladiators 9:05 NinjaTurtle 2:30 Young andThe Restles 2:30 The Young AndRestless 2:30 YoungAnd TheRestlies 2:30 The YoungAndRestless 2:30 The Young AndRestlss
12:20 SCNMiddayReport 5:00 StarTrekNextGeneration 9:30 Capt.Planet 3:30 SesameStree 3:30 SesameStret 3:30 SesameStreet 3:30 SeameStreet 3:30 SesameStreet
12:30 AllMyChildren 6:00 HeadlineNew 10:00 Maverick 4:30 ClarisaEBxplainsItAll 4:30 ThinkFatl 4:30 SchoolasticSportn 4:30 LeaveItToBeaver 4:30 SpaceshipEath
1:30 OnLifetoLive 6:30 TheSimpson. 11:00 StarTrek 4:55 ChannelOne 4:55 ChannelOne America 4:55 ChanelOne 4:55 ChannelOne
2:30 TheYoungAndRestless 7:00 WorldSeries Game6.If Nowo HeadlineNews 5:10 AfterSchoolSpecial 5:10 After SchoolSpecial 5:05 AfterSchoolSpecial 5:10 AfterSchoolSpecial 5:10 AfterSchoolSpecial
3:30 SeameStreet nogame, the following 12:30 SundayAftemoonMovie: 6:00 SCNEvening Report 6:00 SCN EveningReport 6:00 SCNEveningReport 6:00 SCNEveingRepito 6:00 SCNEvening Repon
4:30 SpaceshipEarth chedulewillbeineffect. "Missilesof October 6:30 NBCNightlyNews 6:30 NBC Nightly New 6:30 NBCNightlyNews 6:30 NBCNightlyNews 6:30 NBCNightlyNews
4:55 ChannlOne 5:00 MotorWeek 3:15 HeadlineNew Break 7:00 BeverlyHills90120 7:00 America' FunnictHome 7:00 FullHouse 7:00 PerfectStranger 7:00 Roc
5:10 AfterSchoolSpecial 5:30 OnPitRoad 3:30 TodayaGourmet 8:00 MacGyver Videoa 7:30 Cheers 7:30 FamilyMatter 7:30 PreshPrinceOfBelAir
6:00 SCNEveningRepon 6:00 HeadlineNews 4:00 NFLFootball:Dallasvs 9:00 MondayNightFooball: 7:30 Homelmprovement 8:00 MmderSheWrte 8:00 TheEqulizer 8:00 MurphyBrown
6:30 NBCNightlyNews 6:30 TheSimpsone LA.Raiders Billvs Jets 8:00 L.A.Law 9:00 Sisters 9:00 KnotsLanding 8:30 NightCout
7:00 EmptyNest 7:00 StarTrekNextGeneration 7:00 Rescue911 MidnightHeadlineNews 9:00 ABCNewsSpecial The 10:00 ChinaBeach 10:00 FalconCrest 9:00 Videolinks
7:30 FreshPrinceOfBelAir 8:00 Married...WilhChildrc 8:00 WorldSeriesGame7.Ifno 12:30 SCNNewsUpdate Miuileaof October" 11:00 HeadlineNews 11:00 HeadlineNews 10:00 MiamiVice
8:00 MurphyBrown 8:30 Roseanne game,thefollowing 12:35 Simulcastwith Channels 11:00 HeadlineNew 11:30 SCNLateNiteUpdate 11:30 SCNLateNileUpdate 11:00 HeadlineNew
8:30 NightCourt 9:00 Cops schedule will be in effect: 8&10 11:30 SCNLateNite Update 11:35 AraenioHall 11:35 AnanioHall 11:30 SCN NewUpdate
9:00 MacGyver 9:30 Videolinks 7:00 HeadlineNews 11:35 AnlmioHall 12:35amDavidLetrman 12:35amDavidLattenna 11:35 ArenioHall
10:00 CNNHeadlineNews 10:30 SatudayNightLive 7:30 NFLFootball:Pitsburgh 12:35amDavidLcuLttman 1:35 SimulcautwithChannel 1:35 SimulcastwithChannels 12:35amDavidLettenma
10:30 SCNNewsUpdate MidnightScience & Technology vsKansa City 1:35 SimulcastwithChannels 8&10 8&10 1:35 Nightline
10:35 ArenioHall 12:30 HeadlineNews 10:30 HeadlineNew 8&10 2:05 WorldwideUpdate
11:35 DavidLetterman 1:00 McGlaughlinGroup 11:00 MagnumP.I. 2:30 Sports Latenight
12:35amNightline 1:30 SportsLatenight Midnight60Minutes 3:00 AneniollIll
1:05 InsidePolitic 2:00 EntertainmentThisWeek 1:00 SimulcastwithChnnels8 4:00 TonightShow
1:30 SpolrsLatenight 3:00 SaturdayNightLive &10 5:00 LateNightW/David
2:00 AncmioHall 4:30 HeadlineNcws Letermm
3:00 TonightShow 5:00 Headline New 6:00 Headlne New Break
4:00 LateNightW/Leterman 5:30 HeadlineNew
5:00 Videolinks
6:00 Headline News Break


Channels 8 & 10

DAYLIGHT SAVINGS
Daylight savings time goes into effect in the United States
Sunday.
Since SCN receives some of it's programming via
stateside satellite the start time of the following pro-
grams will be affected.

"NBC News at Sunrise" moves from 5:30 to 6:30 a.m. weekdays.

"Good Morning America" moves from 6 to 7 a.m. weekdays.


"Oprah Winfrey" and "Phil Donahue" move from 2 to 1 p.m., weekdays.

"Another World" moves from 1 to 2 p.m., weekdays.

"The Tonight Show" moves from 10:35 to 11:35 p.m., weekdays.

"Latenight W/David Letterman" moves from 11:35 to 12:35 p.m., weekdays.

College Football on Saturdays moves from a start time of 11 or 11:30 a.m. to noon
or 12:30 p.m. forthe early game, and from 2 or 2:30 p.m. to 3 or 3:30 p.m. for the late
game.

NFL Football moves from a start time of noon Sunday to 1 p.m.

SPECIALS

The Nation's Agenda part 3
Saturday at 7 p.m.
The conclusion of this three part series is titled "Government For The People." This
year less than one-half the Americans eligible to vote will cast their ballots. Why do
so many people feel disconnected from our government, and why don't they use their
vote to do something about it?


Cable Channel 14

DAYLIGHT SAVINGS

These programs will be changing times beginning Sunday
because of Daylight Savings in the United States.

S "NBC News at Sunrise" moves from 5:30 to 6:30 a.m. weekdays.

"Good Morning America" moves from 6 to 7 a.m. weekdays.

"Oprah Winfrey" and "Phil Donahue" moves from 11 to 9 a.m. weekdays.

"Arsenio Hall" moves from 10:35 to 11:35 p.m. weeknights.

"Latenight with David Letterman" moves from 11:35 p.m. to 12:35 weeknights.

"MacGyver" moves from 9 p.m. Friday to 8 p.m. Monday.

NFL Football 3 p.m. games will move to 4 p.m. and the 8 p.m. game will move to 9
p.m. Sunday. The Monday Night Football game will move from 8 to 9 p.m.

SPECIALS

The Missiles of October
Tuesday at 9 p.m.
A two-hour special anchored by Peter Jennings commemorates the 30th anniver-
sary of the Cuban missile crisis. Vewers will be told the story of the pivotal event of
the nuclear age from the perspective of all three countries involved.


Roc
Friday at 7 p.m.
Replaces "Empty Nest"


A






A(
A









B Tropic Times
B 4 Oct. 23,1992


Chevy/Geo Metro



Economic, attractive convertible available


by Zane Binder
King Features Syndicate

You'veprobably never thought ofthe various Metro
models from Chevrolet/Geo as one of America's most
distinctive lineups. Consider, though, its three basic
vehicles including the XFI, the nation's most economi-
cal car (53 city/58 highway), and the Metro Convert-
ible, the lowest priced ragtop. With summer approach-
ing, it's appropriate to look at what's available in top-
down fun. The Metro Convertible is a "top" choice.
Inside, the Geo offers twin cloth front buckets with
Scotchgard fabric protectant standard. The seats are
wide and comfortable with plenty of legroom; neither
the driver nor passenger is cramped despite the car's
small external dimensions. There's no rear bench, the


manually-operated convertible top occupying that area,
but there's a small trunk and a carpeted storage com-
partment behind the front buckets.
The Metro's dash is plain but thankfully contains a
cupholder, though it's flimsy. There's also a surprising
number of hand-and-dial gauges. The steering wheel is
padded and its hub includes an airbag - the only Metro
model to employ one. The steering is manual, and
except when parking, requires acceptably low effect.
The bumpers on this front-drive, Suzuki-built vehicle
are 2.5 mile per hour certified, and the brake system
consists of power front discs and rear drums. Sadly, the
anti-lock isn't available.
Turning to the convertible top, it appeared well-
made and fit snugly, with the inevitable air leaks
minimal in number. The rear window, of course being
plastic, was wavy and already starting to cloud. Body


integrity and stiffness, always suspect on a convertible
as the roof can't be used as a stressed structural member,
wins no praise.
The top isn't difficult to raise or lower, but does take
time, practice, and a thorough reading of the owner's
manual.
The Metro Convertible's engine is a 1.0 liter (62
cubic inch) two valves per piston three-cylinder (that's
right, a"3") with fuel-injection and 52 horsepower. It's
not particularly smooth or quiet, and leaves much to be
desired in this 1,753-pound car. Zero to 60 takes 13.5
seconds, adequate but barely. At highway speeds, climb-
ing moderate hills or passing requires at least two
downshifts. Fuel economy is a bright spot, though: 35
city and 42 highway (EPA 41/46) were observed on the
268-mile test loop.
The Metro's tiny engine was mated to a rubbery-
feeling five-speed manual transmission and light clutch.
It wasn't anything to brag about, but seldom annoyed,
either.
Talk about ride, and you inevitably hit a sore spot.
It's by far the car's worst feature. Large potholes are
actually painful, and even smooth freeways won't bring
a smile to your lips. The suspension feels loose and
flaccid, and definitely needs substantial upgrading.
Handling, similarly, needs a boost. Though the
convertible's 13-inch wheels and tires help (other
Metros use 12-inchers), the all-season radial leaves lots
to be desired. Going around covers produces tremen-
dous body lean, and the slow ratio, non-power steering
take a toll too. The turning circle, at just under 31 feet,
is among the smallest in the auto industry. Subjectively,
though, the convertible doesn't feel that nimble. Han-
dling needs work.
Quality control, as in all Japanese-made vehicles,
was excellent. Some Metro trim pieces, though, looked
and felt flimsy.
The bottom line on the Metro Convertible is that it's
cute, extremely economical and low-priced. It could
also, in ways detailed earlier, stand improvement. But
for the wind-in-your-hair feeling during those sunny
days ahead, it offers maximum fun for minimum
bucks.


Anyone who lives alone knows how trying it is to
cook appetizing meals for only oneself, especially
after a day's work. It's so much easier to slap together
a sandwich, or pick up a pizza or a burger. But that
makes eating a routine instead of a pleasure.
Thanks to the microwave oven, getting a single-


serving meal together is a cinch. In this meal-in-one
packet, you have a fully-balanced dinner with a nicely
seasoned variety ofveggies, meat and potato.


Meal-in-one potato packet
1 medium potato, unpeeled
3 ounces thinly sliced lean ham
1/2 medium zucchini, sliced 1/4 inch thick
1/2 medium yellow squash, sliced 1/4 inch thick
1/2 medium red bell pepper, cut in 1-inch squares
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon dried basil
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
Salt and pepper to taste

Cut a 15-inch square of kitchen parchment. Place
ham in center, top ham with overlapping potato slices,
alternating with zucchini, squash and bell pepper. Sprinkle
with lemon juice, basil, red pepper flakes, salt and


pepper. Fold two sides of parchment over ham and
vegetables, in atwo-fold letter fashion. Grasp the two
shorterends and pull up to meet. Double over and fold
down open ends to seal.
Microwave on high power for five minutes. Let
stand three minutes. Carefully cut open. Caution:
When cutting packet open, be sure to cut first on the
far side, away from yourself, to avoid the escaping
steam. Makes one serving.
To make two servings: Double all ingredients.
Divide equally between two pieces of parchment.
Arrange each packet as directed above.
Microwave on highpower for six minutes. Rotates
packets one-half turn. Microwave on high for six more
minutes. Let stand three minutes. Cut open carefully
and serve.
The Chopping Block recipe by Philomena Corrad-
eno.

Editor's note: People interested in sharing a rec-
ipe or household tip with Tropic Times readers, can
send recipes or tips by MPS to Tropic Times, Unit
0936, APO AA 34002. Your name and base will be
printed with your submission.


All applicants should be aware that hiring is severely restricted because of the Department
of Defense worldwide hiring freeze. Beginning April 6, the freeze allowed one new hire from
outside Department of Army for every four losses to DoD. Placement of current DA
employees (including those on leave without pay) is an exception to the freeze. Current
temporary employees may now apply against permanent vacancies unless otherwise noted.
Specialized experience, when indicated, must be in duties similar to those required by the
vacancy.
Military Spouses: If available, qualified, and within the area of consideration specified
for the vacancy, may be considered subject to the "one-for-four" DA hiring restriction.
Panama Canal Commission employees: U.S. and non-U.S. current permanent employ-
ees may apply for permanent employment subject to the "one-for-four" DA hiring restriction.
Current permanent NAF or AAFES employees who were appointed before Nov. 3,1989 may
now also apply.
AMENDMENT ON HOW TO APPLY: Failure to complete U. S. Army South Form 106,
when required, could hinder an applicant's chances of being referred for the vacancy. For
information, visit the Civilian Personnel Office, Building 560, Corozal.
VB# VACANCIBTSTITEAND LOCATION OPEN: 10-23-92 COSB 11-04-92
ATLANTIC:
015-93-00 - OFFICEAUTOMATIONCLEKNM-3M.4 USA, DCAPSD.CDS-ATL7 Mararit. OG Dp: 6moths. Form 106.
Note: Muit be Ible to drive addriverl ica ireuiied.
020-93-NR- OFFICEAUTOMATIONCLERK,NM-3264. TemporayNBE28Dec 92. USAO,DEH-ATL OPNS , Anin.Sectran PFa
Davis. Om Eap: 1 yr. Note: Writm CASPtatnrequieral
024-93-NR - (3)MOTOR VEHICLEOPERATOR,MG-7036. USAO. DH-ATL OPNS,Roadsa dGrond.Section, FortDavls. Spec
Exp: 1 yr. in tb trad. Form 106. Note: Driver's licse reqrpedi.
r02-93-NR - N GINUMNG TECHNICIAN, NM4-02-9. USAG, DEI-ATL OPNS, Catct Magantn Sectiar, Prt Davi. Spec Bp:
1 yr. equiv. to NM-8. TIG: NM-8. F0om 106. Note: Driver' 1icm.n required.
028-93-NR - KITCHENEQUIPMENT MECHANIC, MG-S310-10. USAGE, DEH-ATL OPNS., Maimarice d Sevico Section, Fot


Davit. SpecExp: 4 yl. the trade. Form 106. Note: Knowledge of English ad driver's ilacs required.
PACIFIC:
012-93-00 - RECREATION AID, NM-189-3. USAO, DCA, CRD, Sport Brach PFot Catyto. Gm Exp: 6 manths. Form 106.
013-93-00 - OFFICE AUTOMATION CLERK, NM-326-3 USAG. DCA, FSD, ACS, Camzal. Ge BnEp: 6momth. Form 106.
014-9300-o OFFICEAUTOMATIONCLERK,NM-32-3. USAO,DCA CRD,LUbiryBranch, Fot Clayt . OGmrp: 6mmths. Fam
106.
016-93-NC - SUPPLY CLERK (0/A), NM-206-3. T porary N TB1 yr. Defaen Cmann ary Agaecy, Managemt Suppor Cet,
Corozal. O nBxp: 6moth.. Nm: Written CASP ta d qullfed typlt rquir&d.
017-93-KF - SUPERVISORY TELEPHONE OPERATOR, NM-382-4. 106 hSignal Brigade, TelepmeSySlcem Brnch. Ponr Cyton.
m Vap: 1 yr. FPam 106. Note: LU.tid to 1060t Signal Brdigde cployes only.
018-93-00-RECREATIONASSISTANT,NM-1.9-4. TemprazyNTB1 Yr. USAO,DCA,CRD,FartAmador. OnExp: 6mnzrb. Form
106. Note: Muatpouaea adlCam WlerSafetyhistnaaratificea.
019-93-00 - EDUCATIONALAID,NM-1702-4. USAO. DCA, PSD. DS, F n Cayton. Gen xp: 1 yr. Form 06. Note: Applicat
a lec.tdt t complete salfactory balkgrourd nvtigaction ad may be require to work a weekeo and during pefic pmngs of the
021-93-NC - MOTORVEHILEDISPATCHER,NM-21S14. 41 ASO, DOL, TramqatpaonDivina, MoalrPo IPai c.CmaL Gm
Exp: 1 yr. FPam 106.
022-93-VL - SECURITY ASSISTANT (O/A),GS-086-. Smaitive. HQ, USSOUTHCOM, CMDR IN CH, S IntellilueDirecta ,
SocuityDiviion, Quarry Higu. Spec xp: 1 yr.eqdv. to OS-5. TIG: GS-5. Form 106. Note: LimitdtoSOUTJHCOM employee nly.
023-93-SS -HOUSINGREFERRAL ASSISTANT(O/A),NM.30-5/6. USAG, DEHHoiDilvilal,Fon tCahyto. Specap forNM-
5: lyr.equiv.toNM-3034. Spcc pfcrNM-6: I yr. aquiv.toNM-33-5. TIG: NM-S. Fam 106. Note: KnowledgeofSpnuih ddiver's
lica required. Poidtl my be tled at the NM-5 orNM-6 level Sdwctlon NM-S wllealdto fa-conpaetivc pmr tia n to NM-6.
025-93-NR - ELECTRICAL WORKER, MG-2805 Tueporary NTB 30 SEP 93. USAG, DE, Operations Diviialn, Maintmace and
Sorvia Bmrd, Pa Clayto. Spec 9 ap: 2 ye. th th nrde.
026-92-NC - AUTOMOTIVEWORKERMG-5823 4l 4stASODOL, MaintraaeDiviMsio. Shap Operadtm Brm TARP, Cozal.
Spec Exp: 2yp. Parm 106.
029-93-SS-MATERIALSHANDLERMG-6907.. USAG,DEHStuply mdStrangDivisonCorual. SpecBap: 6manthrtin trade.
Form 106. Diver'e liceme required. OPEN UNTL PILLED. Applicats who qplied udr VB# 486-92-NR need notreapply.
0B-93-LA - EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANT (TYPING), NM-203-5/7. USAO, DCP, Trains and Devaapma DivisiD.
Carozal.SpecBp farNM-S: 1yr. quiv.toNM-4. SpecExp forNM-6: 1 yr. quv.toNM-5,TIG: NM-5. SpecExpfarNM-7: lyr.equiv.
to NM-6, TIG: NM-6. Form 106. Note: Qualified typist , quired.
NOTE: VBI: 006-93-VL, Biological Spim Caolectr, I ms d to read: MG-5001-. VBi: 007-93-LA, Social Service
RqIcperscave, NM-I87-S Dev. 8,i. tmenadtoread: Spec Exp: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-4.
ThbeDiruc atc df Cvilim Personnel Office l accplng ipicalo l far Qinal Nuac. PFr infoarnuarmt ll M. EdlSulivm at 2S-
4116.







Tropic Times
Oct. 23,1992 B


One of the many watertails in the El Valle area.


U.S. Army photo by SL Deborah E. Witam
Donald Baker takes a leisurely pace at the beginning of the horseback riding
trip.


*--rW 4a~S
-~* -, -~ - a .-




- ~-~ --A~ t~~c - . r- -


- ~~~ ~ C -. -.;' *-J I I^^



,,~ ~ -- .* ---?/ * flg 1^ ? ^-


Debra Emery and her daughter, Stephanie, take a break beside a fast-moving creek after about two hours of riding horses.



City cowboys conquer E


Valle


Shen someone mentions El Valle,
shopping for fruits, vegetables, plants
and handicrafts comes to mind. But the
group of 15 people who took a Zodiac
Recreation Center sponsored El Valle trip Saturday
will probably think of something else, like horses and
beautiful scenery.
The group went to El Valle on an Air Force
Morale Welfare and Recreation Center sponsored
horseback riding trip.
The trip was $18 as a "special of the week,"
however the usual price is $22, said Javier Veliz,
MWR Outdoor Recreation manager.
"The trip is for anyone who wants to get out and
see the beautiful scenery in the El Valle area," Veliz
said. "You don't have to have experience riding
horses, there are people to help."
Since most of the people in the group had never


ridden a horse before, the riders had plenty of time to
get used to the feel of being on a horse. The riders
practiced walking, turning and stopping the horses.
Most of the horses were docile but a few of them
were spirited enough for the experienced riders in the
group.
"If you wanted to have an adventure, you could
have been on a horse like the one I had," Veliz said.
"He was jumping and kicking all around. It was a lot
of fun."
The horses got a chance to rest when the riders
dismounted by a stream after about two hours of vig-
orous riding. Some people stayed by the stream but
most of the group wanted to see the some of the spec-
tacular waterfalls El Valle is famous for.
The hike to the waterfalls was tricky at times. But
the scenery at the falls was worth the 30 minutes of
negotiating slippery banks and 6-inch wide trails.


"The trip was definitely worth it. The scenery in
the area is beautiful," said Bobby White, one of the
people on the tour. "I really enjoyed myself. I would
love to go again."
People who would like to experience horseback
riding again, or for the first time, have several
options.
The Zodiac Recreation Center sponsors horseback
riding in El Valle trips once a month. Zodiac also has
shopping trips to El Valle but special trips can be
arranged for groups of 10 or more, Veliz said. Call
284-6161/6109, for reservations.
The Howard Riding Stables offer escorted trail
rides to Veracruz Beach during the week. Call 286-
4920 for information or reservations.
Horseback day trips to Pecora River Valley are
available Saturdays and Sundays through the Albrook
Riding Stables. Call 287-4411 for reservations.


'"~r5b~








No


B 6 Tropic Times
Oct. 23, 1992


Albrook/Howard
The Albrook Early Childhood Enrich-
ment Center has openings for 4-year-olds.
Hourly care reservations can be made up to
two weeks in advance for 3-year-olds through
kindergarten-age children. Call 286-3133
to make reservations.
The Howard Preschool and Child Devel-
opment Center has openings for 3-and 4-
year olds. Call 284-3711.

Clayton
The Fort Clayton Child Development
Services is open Mondays, Wednesdays and
Friday from 5:30 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. and
Tuesday and Thursdays from 6:30 a.m. to
5:45 p.m.
There are immediate openings in the
hourly programs for infants, pretoddlers,
toddlers and preschool-age children. Call
287-5657/6812.



Albrook/Howard
The Information, Tour and Travel Office
offers a monthly calendar of events and can
arrange special trips for groups of 10 or
more. Call the Zodiac Recreation Center
284-6161/6109.
All tours require reservations and leave
from the Howard Theater.
Factory outlet shopping, today, 9 a.m.-
2 p.m., $4.
Portobelo and Langosta Beach, Satur-
day, 6:30 a.m.-5 p.m., $12.
El Valle shopping, Sunday, 6:30 a.m.-2
p.m., $12.
Peacock bass fishing in Arenosa, Sun-
day, 5 a.m.-2 p.m., $25.
Free Zone shopping, Oct. 30, 8 a.m.-4
p.m., $12.
Overnight snorkeling in Isla Grande,
Oct. 30 and 31. The $45 fee includes accom-
modations.
Specials of the week - Barro Colorado
Island Smithsonian Reserve, Wednesday,
6 a.m.-3 p.m., fee is $60.
Panamanian dancers and dining, Pait-
ilia Plaza Inn, Wednesday, 6-11 p.m., fee
is $2 for transportation.
Horseback day trips to Pecora River
Valley, Saturday and Sunday, 7 a.m.
The $25 fee includes transportation, horse
rental and lunch. Call 287-4411 for reserva-
tions.


Clayton
Valent Recreation Center and the Out-
door Recreation Center are offering the fol-
lowing tours, for which reservations are
required. Call Valent, 287-6500/4201 or
Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363.
Contadora weekend trip, Saturday and
Sunday. The fees, $160 per couple and $109
per single, include transportation to Paitilla
Airport.
Bass fishing trip for youths 10-18 years
old, Saturday. The $10 fee includes trans-
portation, boats, tackle, bait and guide.
Volunteer parents go free.
Sunset cruise, Thursday, 5-7:30 p.m.,
Pier 17, $5 fee includes beverage.
Chiriqui trip, Oct. 31-Nov. 3.
Chocoe Indian Village trip, Oct. 31,
The fee is $25 for adults and $15 for chil-
dren.
Chiriqui white water rafting, Oct. 31-
Nov. 3. Cost, to be announced, will include
transportation, cabins and equipment.
City tour, Nov. 7, 9 a.m. The fees are
adults $10 and children $6.
San Bias, Nov. 11. The $110 fee in-
cludes transportation to the airport, airfare,
guided boat tour to Indian villages and lunch.
Sign-up deadline is Nov. 2.

Rodman
The Information, Tour and Travel Office
is offering the following tours. Call 283-
5307/4454.
Bay of Panama moonlight cruise, to-
night and Oct. 30, from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m.,
complimentary snacks.
Panama City tour, Wednesday.
Barro Colorado Island, Saturday, in-
cludes transportation, bilingual guide, lunch,
binoculars and poncho.
San Jose, Costa Rica, Oct. 31-Nov. 3,
includes round trip airfare, three nights hotel
accommodations, city tour and airport trans-
fers, passport required.
Montego Bay, Jamaica, Nov. 8-11.
Fee includes hotel accommodations, airfare
and Montego Bay transfers, passport re-
quired.
"Wet, Wild, Wooly," to Contadora,
Nov. 27-29, includes transportation, two
nights hotel, deep-sea fishing, water skiing,
snorkeling and jet skiing.
Bass fishing package, includes trans-
portation to and from Gamboa, boat and
motor, gasoline, lake guide, $5 worth of
bait, bait bucket, rods and reels, tackle,
coolers and ice. Call the Rodman Marina,
283-3147/3150.


Albrook/Howard
The Howard Youth Center, 284-4700,
and Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195, are
offering the following trips and activities.
All trips pick up at Howard at the time
specified and at Albrook 30 minutes later.
Halloween preteen costume dance -
tonight, 7:30-11 p.m., for youth ages 8-12.
The fee is $2.50 for members and $3.50 for
nonmembers. Prizes awarded for best cos-
tumes. Free transportation leaves Albrook
at 7 p.m. Reservations required for transpor-
tation.
Afternoon movie and pizza, Monday,
3:30 p.m. at Howard, Tuesday, 3:30 p.m. at
Albrook. The fee is $2.50.
Free Halloween party, Thursday, 4 p.m.
Transportation leaves Albrook at 3:30p.m.,
and returns at 6:30 p.m.
Haunted house, Oct. 30 and 31 at Al-
brook. Entry fee is $1. Transportation to and
from Howard will be available..

Clayton
The Fort Clayton Youth Center is offer-
ing the following activities for preteens.
Call 287-6451.
Creative crafts mask making, Monday,
3 p.m.
Pumpkin pie cooking, Wednesday, 3
p.m.
Birthday celebrations, Thursday, 3 p.m.
Haunted halloween dance, Oct. 30,7-9
p.m. for preteens and 9 p.m.- midnight for
junior teens.
The Fort Clayton Senior Teen Center
offers the following activities. Call 287-
6451.
Deep sea fishing trip, Saturday, 7 a.m.
Halloween dance and teen DJ contest,
Oct. 31,7 p.m.-midnight, $3 admission.

Cocoli
The Cocoli Community Recreation Center
is offering the following activities.Call 287-
4119/3010.
Arts and crafts for children, Wednes-
day, 3 p.m.
Children's Halloween costume party,
Saturday, 3 p.m.



Clayton
The Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts Center


has the following activities. Call 287-5957.
Jewelry box construction, Saturday.

Howard
The Howard Arts and Crafts Center has
the following events slated. Call 284-6361/
6345.
Free gold application demonstration,
Saturday, 1:30-2 p.m.; beginners ceramic
painting in Spanish, 5-week class begins
Tuesday, 2-4 p.m.; beginners ceramic paint-
ing in English, 5-week class begins Wed-
nesday, 6-8 p.m.; advanced ceramic paint-
ing in English, 5-week class begins Thurs-
day, 6-8 p.m.; advanced ceramic painting
in Spanish, 5-week class begins Oct. 30, 10
a.m.-noon.



Albrook/Howard
The Howard Enlisted Members' Club
will host DJ "G", from KOOL 105.5 FM in
Denver, Colo., in the Casual Cove Satur-
days at 8 p.m. Call 284-4189.
There will be a Karaoke night, Oct. 30 in
the Main Lounge and Thursday, in the Casual
Cove.

Amador
Mexican food by Chef Ortiz, Wednes-
day, 6-9 p.m. Adults $7.95 and children
under 10years old 1/2 price. Call 282-3837.
Curundu
Fright Night II at the STRAC Club. Prizes
for best costume. Admission is free if wear-
ing a costume or $5 without a costume.
Rodman
The Anchorage Club will host the Labor
Day Extravaganza Battle of the Bands first-
place winner, "Tempest", tonight.



New child care program
The Howard and Albrook youth centers
are offering a new before and after school
program. Care is available for children
from 6 to 12 years old from 6:30-8:15 a.m.
and from 2-5:30 p.m, and full-day care on
nonschool days.
Fees range from $17 to $34 per week per
child, depending on family income and
includes breakfast and an afternoon snack.
Call 284-4700/4817.


Sundial center
The Sundial Recreation Center's Thursdays are Won-
derful program is a program designed for women and will
feature Halloween masks. Call 289-3889/3300.

Atlantic tours
Sundial Recreation Center: Wine and dine, Fridays, 4-
9 p.m.; Panama City tour, Saturday, 8 a.m.; El Valle,
Sunday, 8 a.m.; Colon shopping tour, Wednesday.
Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: Portobelo, Satur-
day. Call 289-6402.
Aquativity Center: Chagres River canoe trip/picnic,
Nov. 3, 8 a.m. Fee includes transportation. Call 289-4009/
4077.

Arts and crafts
Following is a list of recurring classes offered at
community arts and craft centers. Call Fort Davis Arts and
Crafts Center, 289-5201 or Fort Sherman Arts and Crafts
Center,289-6313
Ceramics; painting; drawing; pottery; air brushing;
advanced and beginners oil painting from photographs.

Youth news
The Fort Espinar Youth Center is offering the follow-
ing activities. Call 289-4605.
Teen costume/bowling party, Oct. 24, 8 p.m.-mid-


night, $2; haunted house, Thursday-Oct. 31.

Ongoing classes
Following is a list of recurring classes offered in most
communities. Call Sundial, 289-3889/3300; Ocean Breeze,
289-6402 or Aquativities Center, 289-6104.
Spanish; English; piano; guitar; modem dance; shoto-
kan; cake decorating; gymnastics; juggling and outboard
motor boat operation.

Instructors needed
The Directorate of Community Activities Family Support
Division needs instructors for modem dance, piano and
beginner ballet. Call Rory Egger, 289-6104.

Dinner/show presentation
The Atlantic Music and Theatre is presenting "The
Nerd." The production will take place at the Fort Davis
Community Center, Sunday- Tuesday. Dinner will be
served at 6 p.m. and the show will begin at 7:30 p.m.
Tickets for the dinner/show will cost $10. Show only
tickets will be $6 for adults and $3 for children. Call
Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402.

Scuba diving course
An open-water dive course meets the first Saturday
of the month at 6 p.m. at the Fort Davis Swimming


Pool beginning Nov. 2. Sign up at the Fort Sherman
Scuba Shop, 289-6104, or the Outdoor Recreation
Office in Margarita, 289-4077. Course cost is $125.

Holiday bazaar
The Atlantic Community Women's Club is holding its
annual holiday bazaar Nov. 14 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at
the Fort Davis Community Club. Call Muriel Doyle, 289-
4755 or Becky Steigler, 289-4354.

New boat
A 21' Mako boat is now available for scuba or snorkel-
ing trips. Price includes gear and guide. Call John
Stromberg, 289-4409/4077; or the Fort Sherman Scuba
shop, 289-6104.

Costume party
The Fort Davis Com-
munity Club will host a
Halloween costume party,
Oct. 31, 8 p.m., in the Es-
merelda Ball Room. There
will be games, door prizes,
fun and prizes for the three
best costumes. Cost is
$5 per person. Call 289-
5160/3298 forreserva-
tions.


I


I Irr







Tices ropic Times
Ices Oct. 23, 1992B7


Swim team tryouts
The Howard and Albrook swim teams
are holding try-outs for youths from 6-18
years old. The Howard Stingray s practice at
the Howard Pool Tuesdays, Wednesdays
and Thursdays from 4-5:30 p.m. The Al-
brook Tiger Sharks practice at the Albrook
pool Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and
Friday from 3:30-5 p.m. V

Instructors needed
The Zodiac Recreation Center needs li-
censed instructors to teach shotokan and
private pilot's ground school on a contract
basis. Call 284-6161/6109.
The Howard/Albrook youth centers need
a qualified piano instructor to teach classes
on a contract basis. Call 284-4700.
The Howard Arts and Crafts Center needs
qualified instructors to teach advanced pot-
tery wheel throwing and volunteers to dem-
onstrate various crafts. Call 284-6361.

Haunted house
Valent Recreation Center will host its
annual haunted house Thursday -Oct. 31
from 7 to 9 p.m. Admission is $2 for adults
and $1 for children under 12 years old .

Twin Oceans
The Twin Oceans Pro Shop, Building
-155, Fort Clayton, will temporarily relocate
to Building 2060 in the Curundu area.

Trail rides
The Howard Riding Stables are offering
escorted 2 1/2 hour trail rides to Veracruz
Beach, Mondays through Fridays. Call 286-
4920.

Evening child care
The Howard Child Development Center
offers evening child care Fridays and Satur-
days from 5:30 p.m. to midnight for chil-
dren from 6 months to 11 years old. If
enough reservations have been made by ,
Wednesday, 4 p.m., care will be provided. .
Call 284-6135 to make reservations.


Theatre Arts Centre
The Pacific Theatre Arts Centre is offer-
ing a Halloween costume rental. The $7
rental fee covers Friday-Monday. A 100
percent deposit is required. Call 286-3814/
3152.
'The Musical Comedy Murders of
1940" is playing Thursdays, Fridays and
Saturday through Oct. 31. Tickets are $8
for all performances. Tickets are available
at the center.
Auditions for the "Nutcracker," Sun-
day and Monday, 7:30 p.m. There are parts
for four adults, five young adults and 15
children age 8 and up. Scripts can be
obtained through the center.

Logistics support
Logistics Support on Howard AFB rents
recreational items. Call 284-6107.
New item - Sewing machines are avail-
able, at daily or weekend rates.

Family support
The Howard/Albrook Family Support
Center, has various events scheduled for
this week. Call 284-5650.
Family Services needs volunteers to as-
sist with the loan closet, base brochure li-
brary, layette program and airmen's attic.
Call 284-5860.

BOSS program
The Better Opportunities for Single Sol-
diers program offers recreational activities
for single soldiers and geographical bache-
lors. Call Anne Kelly at the Valent Recrea-
tion Center, 287-6500, to volunteer.


u.S. Anmy pnomo by grg. cnaro Pucette
STREEEETCH- Whitney Rodaniche stretches during a creative dance class at the Pacific Theatre Arts
Centre. During the creative dance class students learn the basics of dance and rhythm. Creative dance for
youths is one of many dance classes offered at the center in Curundu. The center also offers ballet, tap,
salsa, merengue, folkloric, modern dance and belly dancing classes on a recurring basis. The classes are
available for all ages at various skill levels. Call the center at 286-3814/3152 for information or reservations.
The youth centers in most communities also offer various dance classes for youths such as modern, jazz, tap,
ballet and street/video dancing. For information on the classes available at the various youth centers call Howard
Youth Center, 284-4700; Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195; Fort Clayton Youth Center, 287-6451; Fort Clayton
Senior Teen Center; or the Fort Espinar Youth Center.


Ongoing classes
Following is a list of recurring classes
offered by recreation centers in most
communities. For information call the
Pacific Theatre Arts Centre, 286-3814/
3152; Valent, 287-6500/4201 orZodiac,
284-6161/6109.
Aerobics; piano lessons; taekwondo;
cake decorating; beginner German; Span-
ish, beginner and advanced; English, be-
ginner and advanced.
Following is a list of recurring classes
offered by youth centers in most commu-
nities. For information call Howard Youth
Center, 284-4700; Albrook Youth Cen-
ter, 286-3195; Fort Clayton Youth or
Senior Teen Center, 287-6451.
Street/video dancing; cheerleading;
Spanish and English; aerobics; arts and
crafts; gymnastics; boys gymnastics;
modem, jazz, tap and ballet dance;
piano lessons; tennis lessons; taek wondo.
Following is a list of recurring classes


offered by arts and crafts centers in most
communities. For information call Howard
Arts and Crafts Center, 284-6361/6345; the
Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287-
5957.
Stained glass; cross stitch; clay flower;
pottery wheel; knitting; framing; air brush-
ing; lamp assembly; leather working; mac-
rame classes; pottery; throw pottery tech-
nics; glazing; firing; hand building; sculp-
ture; wooden jewelry box construction;
acoustic guitar construction; do-it-yourself
custom framing; fabric painting; watercolor,
acrylic painting; oil painting; basic drawing
and charcoal drawing.
Weekly classes are held in car care and
maintenance, arc and gas welding, auto air
conditioning, auto transmission repair and
engine rebuilding. Call the Albrook Auto
Craft Shop, 286-3613 or Howard Auto Craft
Shop, 284-3370.
The swimming pools in most communi-
ties offer recurring classes. For information
call Howard swimming pool, 284-3569;


Albrook swimming pool, 286-3555; Fort
Clayton swimming pool, 287-6660;
Rodman swimming pool, 283-4253.
Scuba classes are available through
the Zodiac Recreation Center, 284-6161/
6109. Classes include intro to scuba, res-
cue, dive master and specialty scuba.
An advanced scuba diving class is set
forOct. 31 and Nov. 1 at Portobelo on the
Atlantic side. The $100 fee includes a
night dive, deep dive, navigation dive
and two optional dives; a computer dive,
search and recovery dive and photogra-
phy dive. Call 283-5307/4454.
Basic horsemanship classes for all
ages are offered at the Albrook Riding
Stables. The next class will be Saturday
from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The $25 fee in-
cludes theory and practical sessions. The
class covers safety, stable etiquette, care
and welfare of horses, tack and basics of
horse handling. Individual, group and
semi-private lessons are available. Call
287-4411 for reservations.








8 Tropic Times
0 Oct. 23,1992


j Potpourri


Savings Bonds
Soldiers requesting information about
their U.S. Savings Bonds in safekeep-
ing at the Defense Finance and Ac-
counting Service, Indianapolis, Ind.,
may write to: DFAS-IN, Military Pay
Operations, Dept. 22, Attn.: Bonds in
Safekeeping, Indianapolis, IN 46249-
0833. Include full name, social security
number, return address, daytime phone
number, and signature.
Allow four to six weeks to receive
the bonds or bond information. Call Fi-
nance Services, 287-4208/4400.

Consumers' Week
Army Community Services is spon-
soring Operation Wise Buy and Con-
sumers'Week Sunday through Oct. 31.
The Corozal Post Exchange will be
offering free drawings, the commissar-
ies will have sales and free samples and
the Army and Air Force Exchange Serv-
ice will feature discounts at their res-
taurants during this week. Call 285-
5556.

Football teams
The Department of Defense Schools
football teams kick off games at Balboa
High School Stadium, Saturday, 4 p.m.
Shriners will parade after the first game.

Holidays hours
The Defense Commissary Agency
holidays hours of operation.
The Corozal Commissary will be
open Nov. 2, 10 am-3 pm and closed
Nov. 3. Will open Nov. 4 on normal
hours..
The Howard AFB and the Fort Espi-
nar Commissaries will be closed Nov. 2
and will open Nov. 3, Panama Inde-
pendence Day, 10 am - 3 pm.
All commissaries will be closed Nov.
11, Veterans Day and Nov. 26, Thanks-
giving Day. Call 285-4440/4017.

Bank closes
Merchants National Bank and Trust
Company at Corozal will be closed
Nov. 3, Panama Independence Day and
Nov. 10.

New numbers
The Disabled American Veterans
office in Building 812, Albrook has
changed phones numbers from 286-
4349 to 285-6359.

Expectant parents
Army Community Health Nursing


will be sponsoring free expectant par-
ent classes, Nov. 5, 12, 19, and Dec. 3,
4:30-6;30 pm, at Gorgas Army Com-
munity Hospital, Section B, first floor.
Call 282-5418.

SOS students
Students enrolled in Section 2 of
Squadron Officer School should make
the following changes in 23D:
Vol. 4, pg. 3, delete Lesson 22
Vol. 5, pg. 3, delete Lesson 26 and
readings A-D, pg. 5-41
SOS non-resident program is under-
going revision. All test questions are
based on the course materials.Call Linda
Antoine, 284-3263 or stop by the How-
ard Education Center, Building 708,
Room 109.

Education news
The Howard Education Center will
offer the College Level English Pro-
gram General English Composition with
essay exam Dec. 9, in Building 708,
Room 110. All active-duty military,
family members, and Department of
Defense civilians are eligible. Military
members may test on an unfunded ba-
sis. All others must pay $38. Those
interested must be scheduled by Wed-
nesday. Call284-4863.

Jobs opportunity
The Howard/Albrook chaplains has
openings for the followinggpositions:
Howard Air Force Base - Protestant
religious education coordinator, Catho-
lic choir director and 11 o'clock mass
organist/choir accompanist.
Albrook Air Force Station - Catholic


religious education coordinator, Eng-
lish mass choir director and English
mass organist/choir accompanist.
Applications should be submitted to
the Howard Contracting Office, Build-
ing 715, Wednesday by 4 p.m. Jobs
start Nov. 1. Call Andy Gonzales, 284-
5550/6203.

Breast-feeding class
Breast-feeding class, Tuesday, 2:30
pm, at Gorgas Army Community Hos-
pital, Section B, first floor. Sponsored
by Army Community Health Nursing,
282-5418.

Maranatha Church
The Maranatha Baptist church is spon-
soring Awanas, a program for children
to teach the word of God through sto-
ries, games and activities Sunday after-
noons at the YMCA Building, Balboa.
The church also will hold Mens'
Bible Study, Thursday, 7pm. Call 252-
6543.

Aggie club
Graduates of Texas A&M Univer-
sity interested in forming an Aggie Club,
call 287-4690 or 261-7121.

Kobbe courses
Central Texas College is offering an
organization and management course,
Nov. 2-20,8:15 am-12:15pm,Monday
- Friday. General Testing improvement
classes and other courses are available
at the Fort Kobbe Education Center.
Call 284-6310/3150 or stop by Build-
ing 801, 2nd floor.


I


Q. May I call bases for flight informa-
tion?
A. You are encouraged to call the
passenger terminal you plan ontraveling
through 30 to 60 days before travel.
.:: . : .: i iii They may then give the most current
schedule, Space-A backlog restrictions,
etc.


PP: Tourist Passport
TC: Tourist Card
V: Visa
PC: Proof of Citzen-
ship
US: United States
Passport Holders Only
CC: Country Clear-
ance
RON: Remain Overnight

For additional flight in-
formation, call 284-5758/
4306.


Today
4:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN
San Jose, Costa Rica PC
San Salvador, El Salvador PP/CC/V
Howard AFB, PN


5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Howard AFB, PN
5:40am C141 Howard AFB, PN
Bogota, Colombia
Howard AFB, PN
Saturday
5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN
Schenectady, NY


6:40am C141 Howard AFB, PN
Roosevelt Road, Puerto Rico PP
Charleston, SC PP
McGuire AFB, NJ PP
Sunday
8:00am C5A Howard AFB, PN
Soto Cano AB, Honduras PP
Charleston AFB, SC RON/PP
Dover AFB, DE PP
Monday
6:15am C727 Howard AFB, PN
Charleston IAP, SC PP
Tuesday
5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN
Tegucigalpa, Honduras PP
Soto Cano AB, Honduras PP


Howard AFB, PN
PP/CC 5:10am C130 Howard AFB, PN
San Salvador, El Salvador PP/CC/V
San Jose, Costa Rica PC
Howard AFB, PN


5:40am C141 Howard AFB, PN
La Paz, Bolivia PP
Montevideo, Uruguay RON/PP
Asuncion, Paraguay PP
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil PP/V
Howard AFB, PN
7:50am C-5A Howard AFB, PN
Charleston AFB, SC PP
Dover AB, DEL
Wednesday
5:10pm C130 Howard AFB, PN
Guatemala City, Guatemala PP/V


Thursday
8:00am C5AHoward AFB, PN
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Charleston AFB, SC


RON


cotesy photo
"TEMPEST' - Evan Rodaniche lead guitarist and vocalist and Walter
Crouch, bass guitarist play at Rodman Naval Station's Labor Day Extava-
ganza. The Battle of the Bands winner, "Tempest," will play at the Anchor-
age Club, Rodman, Friday, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.


_ I __


Workshop
The Army Community Services is
holding a consumers' week workshop
in English and Spanish, Wednesday at
the Margarita Complex. It is open to all
military, family members and Depart-
ment of Defense personnel.
The Atlantic community service is
having a drawing for several prizes in-
cluding local tours, hams and more.
People can get a ticket by donating a
canned good to ACS's holiday food
basket drive. Call Luz M Ballesteros,
289-4010.

CCAF graduation
The Howard Education Center will
hold the fall Community Collegeofthe
Air Force graduation ceremony Thurs-
day, 3 p.m. at the Howard Enlisted
Members' Club ballroom. Graduates
are reminded to return their DD Form
2266 to the education office after the
graduation ceremony. Call 284-4863.

Juvenalia '92
Juvenalia'92 start Oct. 31 through
Nov. 10, at the ATLAPA Convention
Center, is an activity to benefit children
with cerebral palsy. Itis the biggest and
most dynamic event dedicated to chil-
dren and youth in Panama. There will
be recreation, cultural and sports ac-
tivities for all ages.

CFC goal
The U.S. Southern Command has
gotten off to a solid start in pursuit of its
1992 Combined Federal Campaign goal
of $350,000.
In the first two weeks, ending Oct.
16, the command raised $113, 558 or
almost one third of the total goal. The
campaign ends on Nov. 16.
Leading the way thus far is Head-
quarters, USSOUTHCOM which has
already reached 101 percent of its goal,
while the Air Force has already col-
lected 77 percent of its goal.

SAC meeting
The Balboa Elementary School is
holding its School Advisory Council
meeting, Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. SAC in-
vites interested parents to attend.

Halloween party
The Curundu community will hold a
Halloween party for children 4th grade
and younger, Oct. 30, 1-3 p.m. at the
Curundu Community Room, Bowling
Alley Building. Call Margo Lewis, 286-
6236.


--








Tropic Times
Oct. 23, 1992
RPT


S 4w


jjJC~


I


Richard Koechlien finishes off Rueben Cantu while Barbara Klein and Ron Leggiere toast the show.


Cast dies laughing, Musical Comedy kills


by Maureen Sampson
Tropic Times theater critic
CURUNDU (Tropic Times) - Half-naked, dead
bodies falling from closets...revolving book-cases
leading to secret tunnels...a German maid and a Nazi
spy duelling with a meat cleaver and straight-
razor...10 zany characters stuck in a blizzard at the
estate of a batty theater backer...two hours of non-
stop laughter.
These are familiar sights in Pacific
Theatre Arts Centre's production of
"The Musical Comedy Murders of
1940" written by John Bishop and
directed by JoAnne Mitchell and Jerry
Brees. The same directing team cap-
tured several honors in this year's
Forces Command Festival of the
Performing Arts for their work on the
play "Chicago." '
The show has all the elements of a
great theatrical production - a talented
cast, an amazing set, good direction,
realistic technical effects, authentic cos-
tumes and a competent behind-the-
scenes crew to make it all run smoothly.
Each performer in the play brings
many nuances to his or her role, making
them all larger-than-life spoofs of those
corny characters found in many 1940's g
thrillers.
Traci K. Ferguson plays Helsa, a
German maid who is four different
people. Rachel Cunningham is Elsa Von
Grossenknueten, a hysterically flighty,
yet wealthy, theater patron. Michael W.
Beale plays Michael Kelly, a detective


assigned to the case of the "Stage Door Slasher."
Greg Calhoun (who occasionally is seen or heard on
Southern Command Network newscasts) portrays
Patrick O'Reilly, an Irish tenor/Nazi. Richard
Koechlien is Ken De La Maize, the bombastic
director. Rueben Cantu plays Eddie McCuen, the
struggling, yet lovable, comedian who is full of one-
liners. Maureen Sampson portrays Nikki Crandall, a
chorus-girl turned naval intelligence officer. Kim-


berly Deane Morse is "simply divoon" as Marjorie
Baverstock, a flamboyant producer. Ron Leggiere
gets a lot of laughs as Roger Hopewell, a flaming
composer. Barbara Klein completes the cast list as
Bernice Roth, an alcoholic lyricist.
This colorful group of characters is at the Von
Grossenknueten mansion for a backers' audition
which turns out to be a set-up to catch the "Stage
Door Slasher." As the plot unwinds, bodies drop like
flies and much laughter ensues.
The action takes place in the Von
Grossenknueten library. This set is
fabulous. The builders paid much
attention to detail, including cobwebs in
the secret passages. There are three
bookcases which either slide or revolve,
which serve as entrances to the tunnels.
The set also has many levels, making it
even more interesting. Not often in com-
munity theater does one see a set as
intricate as this.
Many technical effects, such as
snow flying in when the doors open and
total black-outs, add much believability
to the production. The technical crew,
which is often overlooked during a play,
did an outstanding job. Bob Apold,
David Verdi, Heather Anderson, D.L.
Sima, Robert Mitchell, Lourdes Bottin
and Ken Pierzina all deserve mentioning
as being major contributors to the
success of the show.
"The Musical Comedy Murders of
1940" runs Thursday through Oct. 31 at
Building 2060, Curundu. All shows start
at 8 p.m. For reservations, call the
sae Theatre Arts Centre at 286-3152.


/. ~~~ ~ -_ -*.

Cowtesy photos
Michael Beale prepares to stab Kimberly Deane Morse during rehearsals.


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B 1 Tropic Times
BO Oct. 23,1992


Classified Ads


Weimaraner puppies, declawed, dewormed, tails
docked. 252-6747, M-F, days.

Rottweiler, male pups, CCP/AKC, champion blood-
line $600. 289-6243.

Chihuahua pups, born Aug. 28,2 males, 2 females
$100. 252-2353.

German shepherd, shots, spayed $180. 289-3141.

German shepherd puppies, males & females $175/
obo. 261-7909.

German shepherd mix puppies, 6 wks old 420. 252-
2110.

German shepherd, female, good w/children, 1 yr old
$175. 287-4293.

American pit bull, 8 mos old, male/females, papers,
all shots $400/obo. 220-1095.

Stud services for German shepherd dogs w/pedi-
gree. 252-6910.

Free, kitten, 2 mos old, looking for good home. 261-
8136.

Free, kittens, 8 wks old. 284-6263.

Free, puppy, 7 mos old, all shots, good for watch
dog. 284-4681.

Free, cat, has shots, litter box, food dish, food, kitty
condo, litter incl. 283-4227.

Free, male cat & female kittens, all shots, very lov-
able. 287-4244.




1983 GMC Jimmy 4x4, ac, pb, ps, cass, alarm, duty
pd, 5-spd, 2.8L, good cond $6000. 261-6830.

1990 Geo Storm, 5-spd, ac, AM-FM cass, tint glass,
low miles $7000 firm. 284-3783.

1981 FiatX19 convert, 5-spd, ac, runs good $1000;
1985 Renault Alliance, at, ac, new parts runs grt
$3,000/neg. 269-8926.

Daihatsu Rocky 4x4, gas, 5-spd, ac, cass, exc cond,
ps, duty pd $8000/neg. 260-4296.

1977 Chevy Nova, 4dr, AM-FM cass, duty pd,
needs work $1000/obo. 233-5750.

1989 Pontiac Grand Prix, all computerized, ac, elec
win, many extras $10,000 223-4766 after 5pm.

1981 Subaru GLF, runs good, body rough $975/
obo. 284-4530.

1978 Camaro, rebuilt eng, mint cond, new tires,
AM-FM cass $1800. 223-4903.

1981 CJ-7 Jeep 4x4, ps, good cond, runs grt, new
tires, batt $3500/obo. 286-6181.

1980 Honda Accord, ps, exc cond, runs grt, Jensen
stereo sys $2500/obo. 286-6181.

1978'Honda Civic, needs work $700. 252-2884.

1979 Ford van, good cond $3000/neg. 286-4975.

1991 Mustang 5.0 LX hb, showrm cond, low miles,
completely loaded $15,900/obo. 221-8249.

1975 Volvo 245DL sta/wgn, ac, AM-FM, good
cond, new paint $2400/obo. 260-4046.

1991 Hyundai Excel, at, duty pd $7100. 223-4103.

1973 Ford 4x4 p/u, 390, 4-spd, runs good, body
sound, needs work $3000/obo. 284-5968.

1975 VW Beetle, fair cond $1500/obo. 223-7340.

1986 Chevy Cavalier RS, pw/locks, ac, ps, pb,
$4400/obo. 282-3095.

1982 Buick Regal, V8 diesel, 64,500 miles, like
new, ac, cass, one owner, best offer. 268-0621.

1985 Toyota Corolla, 4dr, diesel, 5-spd, ac, new
tires, exc cond, not duty pd $5100. 252-2622.

1986 Oldsmobile Regency, 4dr, 6 cyl, fuel injec,
loaded, duty pd $12,000. 260-7574.

1990 Hyundai Stellar, at, ac, AM-FM stereo cass,
32,000 miles, not duty pd $6000. 260-3183.

1991 Chevy Camaro RS coupe, 5-spd, ac, ps, pb,
AM-FM cass, 7,300 miles, exc cond $12,000. 260-
7621.

1987 Nissan Sentra, ps, pb, at, ac, tint glass, new
tires, chrome rims, alarm $5700. 286-4731.

1988 VW Fox, 4dr, 25,000 miles, ac, 4-spd, AM-FM
cass, 4 spkers, like showrm cond $5500. 261-7845.


1979 Chevy Impala, engjustrebuilt, Pioneer stereo/
cass, grt cond, needs carb work $1950/obo. 283-
4227.

1984OldsmobileCutlass Ciera, 4dr,4cyl, ac, ps,pb,
needs work $3000/neg. 286-4972 after 6pm.

1989 Dodge Dakota, 4WD, canopy, carpet, ac, ps,
pb, exc cond, not duty pd, 18,000 miles $14,000.
287-3441.

1982 Toyota Corolla, 2dr hb, 5-spd, ac, AM-FM
deck, runs good $2000/obo. 283-4684.

1987 Montero 4x4, 5dr, 5-spd, stereo, ac, tilt wheel,
tint glass, gas, low miles, exc cond $9750. 286-
6378.

1987 Chevy S-10 p/u, V6, at, ps, pb, tint glass,
chrome wheels, looks grt, exc cond $7000. 264-
6926.

1987 Chrysler Minivan, 4 cyl, AM-FM cass, at, ps,
pb, good cond $7200. 261-6037.

1988 Pontiac Grand Am, 2.5 liter, ac, pw, 2dr, tilt
wheel, exc cond $6200. 284-4389.

1977 Honda Accord, 2dr, 5-spd $1200. 284-4430.

1982 Ford Bronco U, ac, ps, pb, 33's, bushwhacker
flares, like new, duty pd $9250/obo. 226-7176.

1979 Dodge van, at, extra parts, not duty pd $2500
firm. 284-4799 after 5pm.

1988 Pontiac Fiero, 5-spd, exc cond $5000. 226-
5446.

1982 Plymouth Reliant, new paint job, ac, 4dr, grt
gas mileage $2500/obo. 287-6583.

1978 Dodge Aspen sta/wgn, special edition $1950.
252-2333.

1988 Buick Electra, leather int, all extras, V6, exc
cond, 7 pwr features $12,000. 261-7398 after 6pm.

1985 Ford van XLT, low mileage $10,000. 243-
5366.

1983 Chrysler Imperial, 7,500 miles, mint cond,
fully loaded $9000. 261-5535.

1987 Nissan Sunny, ac, tint glass, stereo, 5-spd, not
duty pd $3800. 260-8165.

1990 Nissan Sentra, 5-spd, alarm, w/all extras,
15,000 kms, duty pd, perfect cond $6800. 260-
6932.

1983 Ford Escort, runs good, exc uphols, not duty
pd $3300/neg. 220-2421.

1991 Toyota Corona, fully loaded, pwr everything,
sr, alarm, AM-FM cass, exccond $13,000/neg. 269-
1651.

1981 GMCJimmy,std, 6 cyl,gas,winch$3800/obo.
223-7459.

1987 Chevy Spectrum, 2dr hb $3000/obo. 283-
4626.

1978 Oldsmobile Delta 88, needs work, new tires,
brakes $600. 285-4532.

1989 Sunbird SE Turbo, ps, AM-FM cass, sr, 5-spd,
exc cond, 23,000 miles, $500 down/take over
paymts. 227-2970.

1981 GMC Convert van, exc cond $5500. 287-
4284.

1992 Lada Samara, 4dr hb, 5-spd, duty pd, AM-FM
cass, alarm $6300. 261-3486.

1981 CJ-7 Jeep, AM-FM cass, ht, duty pd, exc cond,
rebuilt $5200/obo. 287-6312.

1982 Datsun K-cab p/u, 4 cyl, 5-spd, canopy, new
parts, excmech cond, minorbody work $2500.287-
5384.

1970 VW Bug, good body, needs paint $1500. 287-
6842.

1991 Mitsubishi Lancer, at, radio cass, 4dr, low
mileage, exc cond $7500. 268-3960.

1977 Toyota Liftback, 4 cyl, duty pd, looks &
runs good, needs somebody work $750/obo. 287-
6229.

1977 Chevy Malibu, boat hitch, new master cyl,
runs grt, $900. 287-3620.

1985 Toyota Landcruiser, 4WD, ac, std, exc cond,
not duty pd $10,000. 252-6990.

1981 Honda Civic, 5-spd, ac AM-FM cass, clean
$2000. 286-3327 Iv msg.

1970 Morris Minor 1000, 2dr, rebuilt eng, parts.
256-6436 after 7pm.

1990 Honda Civic EX, fully loaded, $10,000. 285-
5935.


1985 Ford Escort, 5-spd,4 cyl, new trans eng, brake,
tires, int good, no ac $2200/obo. 223-9426.




Span-spk maid, part/full time, live-in/out, honest,
refs, good w/children, hsekeeper, ironing. 285-
4323.

Eng-spk honest, mature, hsekeeper, five days a
week. 286-4589.

Eng-spk maid, babysitter, good w/children. 221-
6897.

Bilingual good honest live-in maid, good w/chil-
dren, refs. 287-3282.

Span-spk honest, mature, reliable maid. 228-6061.

Bilingual day maid, mature, honest, reliable, refs,
M-F, good w/children. 287-4685 after 5pm.

Eng-spk, responsible, live-in/out day maid, good w/
children, refs, Clayton only. 287-5696.

Carpenter/yard worker, honest, reliable, hard work-
ing, refs. 226-6848.

Licensed home day care provider, lots of experi-
ence. 284-5726 ask for Joyce Udell.

Bilingual day maid, mature, honest, reliable, hse-
keeper, ironing, weekends any hours. 238-5574 aks
for Bebe.

Maid/babysitter, cleans to U.S. standards, honest,
reliable, days only, Sat, $10 a day. 287-4137.

Bilingual day maid, 2-3 days a week, mature, hon-
est, good w/kids, refs. 224-2367..

Eng-spk honest, reliable, live-in hsekeeper, grt w/
children, refs. 286-4489.

Bilingual maid, mature,honest, reliable, live-in, M-
F, exc w/children. 286-3397.

Eng-spk day maid, mature, honest, hard working,
M-W-F, good w/childrem. 287-4824.

Bilingual day/night maid, honest, mature, hse-
keeper, any hours,weekends, iron. 231-7360 ask for
Aida.

Upholstery, furn construction, maintenance, repair.
224-6821.

Housekeeping maid, live-out. 260-4668.

Bilingual maid, good w/children, animals. 287-
3338 after 5pm, M-F.

Day maid, part time, exc w/children, has been in my
home for 2 yrs. 287-4745.

Eng-spk, honest, responsible, live-out maid, M-F,
good w/children. 284-4534.




25'9" 1991 boat w/1992 225hp Johnson OB motor,
VHF, video, fish finder, loaded, duty pd $59,500.
252-2333.

22' North American Offshore boat hull (no OB
motor) w/tandem galv trlr $5500. 252-2243.

20' Mako, 200hp Johnson, alum dbl axle trlr, depth
finder, hydrlic trim tabs, 15hp kicker, bimini top,
marine radio, 55 prop $13,000. 287-5833.

18' Stratos bassboat, 150hp Suzuki, elec trolling
motor, depth finder, extras, grt cond $10,000. 284-
4596.

17 1/2' Glaston I/O 4 cyl Chevy, super economical,
exc cond, extra eng, many extras $5000. 252-2121.

16 1/2' Fl king fish bassboat, no motor, new equip
$700/obo. 287-3038.

16" Orlando Clipper w/60hp Yamaha, fish finder,
extras $4500. 261-5231.

12" Achilles, 1992 Zodiac, alum floor w/1992 25hp
Mercury, used 5 times w/access, trlr $7950. 264-
4817.

Zodiac Pro 420 inflat boat, poly hull, cap of 50hp
motor, new in box $3000/obo. 284-4012.

2 new 5-hole rims for boat trier $15 ea. 287-3572.

Trailer 4x3x2, closed, removable doors, lights '92
plate, duty pd $400. 226-7679.




Gameboy + 5 games $150, Nintendo NES, pwr pad,
run $80, 12 games $25-$40. 260-4046.

Answer machine $110, phone console w/radio,
alarm $70, dbl cass $100, Commo 1541 DD $70,
photocopier $275. 284-6881.


19" color TV $130,25" color TV $300, stereo amp
$150, tape deck $85, VCR $100, more. 264-4104.

Yamaha PSR-12 49 key elec keybd, 48 voices,
rythms, 120V, wall adap incl $100. 236-4366.

Tandy 1400LT IBM compat 768K, 2 built-in 3 1/2
dr, supports mouse, printer, graphics, software, port
$600. 285-4532.

Teac VCR, exc cond $175. 260-3890.

Sony Trinitron 15" TV, remote $250. 287-5939.

Pioneer Indash CD player, DEH760 w/detach face
plate $250, Rockford Fosgate 8" subs $150. 287-
3622.

2 RCA 20" color TVs $145-$95/obo. 260-5682.

Zenith VHS VCR $175, Sony Betamax VCR $200.
284-4441.

Nintendo $75, misc games, assort prices. 287-4685.

Sony handycam pro 8mm video camera. 286-4674.

Okimate color printer $150, Sony 10" TV, remote
$300, Panasonic 1.1CF microwave $175. 286-
6378.

25" color console TV, needs work $175/obo. 284-
4834.

New fast data 386-40mhz, 170MB HD, 4MB Ram,
5 1/4-3 1/2DD, VGA color mon, fax, modem, more
$2000 firm. 269-6208.

Swivel mon base w/pwr control surge, spike protec-
tion for compu $50, Atari 2600 games $Sea. 282-
4390.

Miranda 35mm camera, wide lens, soligar telephoto
lens, Sony super Betamax. 252-2581.

Elec typewriter $150, Little Tyke car. 282-4234.

Nintendo cass, Treasure Island, Lemnings $45ea.
260-9361.

386 compu IBM compat, 16mhz, modem, super
VGA, 40 Meg HD, programs. 286-4489.

Tandy 1400HD Laptop compu, 40MB HD w/drdos
6.0, case, pwr adap, books $575, car phone, bag,
bat, 3watts $250. 230-0668 after 6pm.

Commo colt, IBM compat, 20MB HD, mouse, color
mon. 286-4489.

Yamaha organ, upright $800, Spiderman game for
Game Gear, new $35. 252-5221.

Bose 901 teak special edition series 6 spkers, equal
$760. 261-5378.

Brother typewriter, elec, good cond $100. 223-3739
after 5pm.

Amstrad word processor, hardly used, ribbon, disk,
manuals $225/obo. 284-6629.

IBM compat 386/16mhz, turbo, SVGA, 130MG
HD, loaded $1500. 287-6820 after 6pm.

Various Nintendo games $20-$25ea. 286-3239.

Montgomery Ward 19", color TV, remote $200,
Nintendo w/gun, 5 games, good cond $100. 287-
3028.

IBM comp, 286, 40MB 3 1/2, 1.44 extend mem,
VGA mon comes factory, loaded programs $900/
obo. 287-5977.

Sega Genesis sys w/5 games, or games sold sepa-
rately. 284-4636.




I.D. bracelet at Howard soccer field, says "Jenny."
284-6633.




L-shaped bunk set w/chest of drawers, desk $150,
new twin matt $75. 284-3926.

Solid walnut hutch, DR tbl, magnificent $3250, K-
sz bed, frame $425, Admiral 16.7 cu.ft. fzr $530.
243-5366.

Hotpointhvy duty dryer, 9/10 mos used $260. 264-
2233. -

Sears microwave, digital control, pad, programmed
defrost, manual, temp probe $175. 284-4389.

Ottoman, footstool, ltbge$50, chair off-white, good
cond $75. 284-4389 after 4pm.

Two Hotpoint 12,000 btu acs, exc cond $350ea.
269-1651.

Nisato gas stove, four burners, oven $80, National
refrig, 14 cu.ft $325. 226-6271.


_















SClassified Ads


Tropic Times
Oct. 23,1992 .. LJL


Kenmore 15 cu.ft. refrig/frzr,nofrost,2dr $350/obo.
233-5750.

Whirlpool dishwasher, roll around, exc cond $150.
284-3898 after 4pm.

Sofa sleeper $400, dinette set, 4 chn $400, custom
made curtains for LR, Dr, BR, dusty rose $300.284-
3573.

Kitchen curtain/rod $10, microwave-convection
oven $150. 284-3573.

Sofa, good cond $200, Q-sz matt,box spring, frame,
good cond $100. 284-3779.

Whirlpool 13,000 btu ac, good cond $500. 226-
7679.

Dehumid $150, 4 fans, ac cage $40, steering whl
lock club, sm $30, Ig $35/ 287-5393.

2 bug zappers $25ea, 2pr soccer shoes sz 1 1/2 $12
ea. 287-5393.

GE refrig, side-by-side, 24 cu.ft., 2 1/2 yrs $900, 1
8,000 btu ac $300, 10,000 btu $400, misc appli-
ances. 286-4975.

Newborn port crib/changing tbl, matt, circus mobil
incl $100. 286-4184.

Day bed w/cover, 2 pillows $50. 236-0811.

LR set, sofa, chr, sq cocktail tbl, 3 round tbls, exc
cond. 252-6668.

Amana microwave oven $200, boy's 16" bike $90.
260-7025.

Recliner, good shape $275, bassinet w/dress $50.
286-3390.

Bali mini blinds 72x36 $75, coffee-mate percolator
$18.252-5792.

Recliner, brn wall-away, plastic bins/stackers,
blinds, assort sizes. 252-5985.

3pc LR set, floral print, blue/rose, good cond $650.
283-3092.

LR couch, loveseat, chr, ottoman, coffee/end this,
exc cond $1000/obo. 287-4244.

Loveseat, overstuffed, blue $250. 252-5568.

K-sz waterbed, mirror/bookcase, headbd, 5-drawer
pedestal, waveless matt, padded rails $500. 287-
4685 after 5pm.

Whirlpool washer, top of line $400, GE refrig $600,
TV wall unit divider $200. 284-5388.

Several kitchen cabinets, exc cond $60-up. 284-
3930.

Sofa $225, top loading dishwasher $50. 252-7400.

JC Penney sewing mach, built-in designer cams,
woodgrain 3-drawer cab, works grt $270. 287-
3676.

Sealy twin matt, very good cond $125, walnut day
bed, no trundle $200, gas dryer, hvy duty cap $150.
286-3778.

Cherry roll top desk, chair $650, VGA Packard Bell
mon $275, compu mouse. 284-5726.

Recliner, exc cond $150. 260-7621.

12x15 blue carpet w/pad, exc cond $130. 284-5030.

Montgomery Ward microwave/convec oven,
books, access, grt cond $350/obo. MW stereo w/
spkers $100. 285-4734.

Gibson 16cu.ft.frzr, verygood cond $900/obo. 286-
3373.

Friedrich 16,000 ac $150 & 8,000 $100; Whirlpool
8,000$200& 10,000 $150; Fedders 12,000 $175.
262-1650.

LR,DR,household items, children items. 284-4795.

Oak dinette set, china cab, coffee tbl, rattan rocker,
microwave, sewing machine coffee maker. 284-
6321.

E 24 cu.ft. refrig/frzr, 2 dr, 1 yrold, like new $950.
252-2229.

5pc Q-sz cherrywood BR set, good cond, 3 yrs old
$1500.284-4581 after 5pm.

Acs, 18,000 split $775, 18,000 Fedders $325,
12,000 OE ac $225. 252-2287.

Custom seat covers for Honda Civic Suttle, acs
8,000,. 10,000, 18,000. 252-6246.

Kenmore high-efficiency upright frzr, w/lock, key
5.5 cu.ft., grt cond $1000. 284-4183,

Children tbl, chair $25, Ig oil painting $70, 284-
5538,


Recliner $140, Ig 3-oval mirror $180, Ig rec mirror
$30, high chair $60. 284-5538.

Wooden rocking chair, bought in front of Howard
$50. 263-5111 apt 32.

Whirlpool 15.1 cuft. upright frzr, looks & runs like
new $300.284-5784.

Q-sz matt, box springs, frame, bedspread, matt
cover, pillow shams, dust ruffle, rocker/recliner.
236-4809.

GE 18 cuAt. refrig, 2 vertical dn $400. 261-8136.

K-sz bed, box spring, white rattan, semi-orthopedic
matt $375. 261-5795..




Girl's 24" bike $90, baby stroller $35, high chair
$25, car booster seat $10. 284-3926.

Buick Regal parts for 350J eng/trans $700, bump-
ers, other parts still good. 286-4688 eves.

5 Dunlop grand trek tires 225/70R15 $300/obo.
269-1651.

Sega video games, Altered Beast, Super Volleyball,
David Robinson basketball $25-$35. 2874733.

Graco stroll-a-bed carriage/stroller, grt cond $45.
287-4734.

Stove extractor $30, four iron twin bed headbds
$35ea, two iron night tbls $10ea. 226-6271.

VW4 rims, chrome spoke, 14x5 w/caps, lugs,never
used, dune buggy style $350. 236-3253.

Gold swivel armchr $60, Smith Corona elec type-
writer, case $75, Whirlpool 15,000 btu ac $350.
287-3297.

Acoustic guitar, strap, case, free lessons for a mo
$275. 284-4021.

Baby stroller, good cond $45, tricycle, exc cond
$15.284-5229.

Graco baby swing, new cond $70. 260-3890.

Armoire, dresser w/mirror $250 set, Kenmore re-
frig, 3 yrs $600, ladies & men's 10-spd bikes $50ea.
287-5780.

Triathlon 18-spd 26" bike, hardly used, some access
incl $400. 283-5036.

Misc mech accessories, Sony reel-to-reel w/tapes
(pre & blank). 284-5693.

Ladies scuba gear, BC, boots, fins, snorkel $130.
236-0811.

E-cel exer bike $100, set of orbatron weights $50.
226-0730.

Triathletes, profile aero bars $50, profile swift shift
$30, Aerospoke composite racing wheel $300. 284-
3028 after 5pm.

Fred Bear compound bow model, white tail hunter
pull: 651b draw, 30" $80. 282-5630.

Kirby vacuum, attach, shampooer, sander, extra
belts, bags $250 firm. 282-3183:

Sears Craftsman 10-inch radial arm saw w/stand,
extra blade $375/obo. 252-2243.

Army off mess white, dress white unifs, coat 46R,
waist 40, can be altered $20ea/obo. 287-6297.

Sofa $250, chr & ottoman $100, carpets 12x10
$150, 6x12 $75, all like new cond. 261-7845.

1987 IROC-Z wheel $500, tires 245/50R16, new
$250 set 287-5786 after 6pm.

Trlr w/13' wheels, 1/2 ton cap, Sony component sys.
252-5985.

Plants, many sizes, colors $1 and 50 cents, Jeep wa-
terpump fits 258-inch eng $25. 286-3871.

2pr boys rollerskates, new szs 3 & 4 $30ea. 287-
3827.

Baseball cards for sale or trade. 260-5522.

9x12 It gm rug $75, floor length drapes, gr $75,
recliner chr $150. 252-5887.

2 batt oper Barbie cars, like new $150ea, clip style
weed eater, elec $35.287-3738.

VW running boards $35, Gameboy, 6 games, light,
cleaning kit $135. 287-3738.

K-sz waterbed, hvy wood headbd, footbd, incl extra
new matt $280. 287-3676.

Girl's BMX bike, bbq, exhaust fan, meat & cheese
slicer, Miranda 35mm camera, super lctamax. 252-
2581,


Whirlpool 6 cu.ft, likenew, elec stove, GE 14' color
TV. 229-1848.

Murray 12-spd ladies bike $60, Sanyo Betamax
VCR $125/obo. 287-3197.

Evenflo crib w/matt $115, Evenflo play yard $55,
Oraco Disney walker $3o. 283-6590.

Elec stove, 24x4 big foot pwr wheels, toys, clothes.
260-2580.

DR glass tbl w/willow base, 6 chri, buffet $350,
bunk beds w/matt $120, Ig disk w/trunks $150.252-
5093.

Voit sit-up bench $35. 236-3336.

Limoge vase $250, garb disp $95, radio parts,
wedding dress $195, R/R LPs, judo suit $20. 252-
2042.

New pcs of leather screen printing craft kit, paints,
Toyota repair manual, night dress. 252-2042.

Dive gear, fins,med $20, It $40, knife $30, spear gun
$20, churchill fins, Ig $15, surf, soft racks $20.283-
3644 ask for Tom.

Armchr, ottoman $125, wood toybox $25, chest of
drawers $75, vacuum cleaner $40. 286-3645.

DR tbl for 8, glass top, Whirlpool acs 18,000 btu
$300, 16,000 btu $250, carpets 12x15, 9x12, more.
252-6990.

10-spd bikes, Conlmo 64 compu, curtains, couch
cover, hampster cage. 287-6675.

Lawnmower, 22-inch, 5hp, hvy duty, exc cond
$175/obo. 252-5872.

9x11 grn carpet w/pad $80, Nintendo games, exer
bench, new $175, vacuum $90, oval rugs $27ea,
baby horse $35, 2 tbls $60-$70. 260-5771.

Bike $120, dinette, 2 chrs $130, stroller $45, infant
clothes, skatebd $110, deep fryer $12. 260-5771.

Sofa-sleeper, BR furn, dishwasher, coffee/end tbls,
microwave, patio furn, more. 286-4536.

Itoh 27" blue, 10-spd, bike, center-pull brakes,
Suntour OT derailleur, good cond $140. 284-4183.

Set of 5 radial all weather tires, Goodyear 195-
75R15, 3 mos used $180. 287-3844.

Prom dress, pink satin, lace, worn once $60. 287-
5934.

Dryer $360, strolee car seat 0-4 yrs. 284-3720.

Electronic Bible, exc cond $75, works on batt or
adap, not inclu, Rainbow vacuum sys, all attach.
287-4745.

Crown 1-3-5 graphite golf clubs, new $175. 287-
4293.

Solid wood triple dresser $350/obo, JVC 13" color
TV $220, 10-spd bike $85. 287-4189.

12x14 bge carpet $135, 9x12 rose $65 or 175 both.
287-4293.

Men's Dunlop golf clubs, w-3 irons, 1, 3, 5 woods,
putter, bag, new $140. 287-5483.

Kenmore washer/dryer, exc cond $450, '91 Wards
pwr lawnmower $100. 286-6227 after 6pm.

24' ladies 10-spd $50, 20: Raleigh freestyle $60,
tires & wheels for Chevy OMC van. 287-4571.

New BCA mountain bike, reg price $276, will sell
very reasonable. 284-4636.

21" Nashbar mountain bike, 18-spd, good cond
$300, wedding dress, veil, slip $300. 252-2080.

Metal desk $60, handy chr $20, microwave $150,
Ouster kitch ctr $100, file cab $80, blender $30.252-
6814.




1984 Honda Nighthawk 700cc, 9,000 orig miles,
exc cond, matching helmet $2500. 284-3685.

1983 Suzuki FZ50 moped, needs work, will not
start, check it out, make offer. 287-3991.

1983 Yamaha Virago 500, good shape, less than
10,000 orig miles $2000. 287-4070 ask for Joe.

1981 Montesa 349, 1990 ilonda B01500, 1988
Honda TLR 250, all like new, extras. 261 -1,6.

1982 Honda NX moped, duty ip'l. ( can md $350,
285-5935.


Qtrs 687B, Clayton, Sat 8am-2pm. Misc items.

Qtrs 1140B, Clayton, Sat Sam. Washer, dryer.

Crossroads Bible Church, Sat Corozal 7-10am.
Dishwasher, fence, stereo.

Qtn 43, Albrook, Sat 8-11lam.

Qtrs 74, Albrook, Sat 7am. Multi-family.

Qtrs 98B, Albrook, Sat Sam-noon.

Qtrs 241B, Albrook, Sat only 8-11am.

Qtn 12B, Howard, Sat 7am-noon. Toy box w/
shelves, many toys, hsehold items.

Qts 80A, Howard, Sat 8am. TV, sewing mach,
Nintendo, curtains, misc.

Qtn 86A, Howard, Sat Sam-noon.

Qtrs 129B, Howard, Sat 7am. Clothes, baby items,
electronics.

Qtrs 634A, Howard. Sat 8am-7 LR, misc items.

Qtrs 651B, Howard, Sat Sam-noon. Two-family.

Qtrs 1516A, Howard, Sat 8am-7

Qtrs 1527D, Howard, Sat 8am-noon, Port CD play-
ers, clothes, books, cass racks, misc.

Qtrs 2037B, Curundu, Sat 7:30am-noon.

Qtrs 2030, Curundu, Sat 8am-noon. Multi-family,
clothes, toys.




Immediately, full time housekeeper, M-F, 10am-
6pm, one baby, some weekends, refs required. 284-
4484.

AKC male collie for stud service for future breeding
to AKC collie female. 252-1041.

Would like to meet mothers of twins ormore to form
support group, expecting moms welcome, too. 287-
3824.

Piano in good cond. 243-5269.

Miniature dachshund would prefer. puppy. 260-
6482.

Ride needed, Balboa to Howard & return, approx
7am-4:30pm, M-F. 282-3883.

Air conditioner for parts. 252-2287.

Used clothes, shoes, all sizes. 289-5159.

Clown for kids, B-Day party. 283-3690.

Chinese Shar-pei puppy, male/female or contact
with anyone planning to breed same soon. 284-
4636.

4 rims, 6 holes for all terrain tires, good cond. 230-
0932.

25-30-hp OB motor, reasonably priced or Jon boat
w/trlr. 286-6439.

Parts for 1983 Chevy Celebrity, door lock, spare
tire, rear spkers, chrome molding. 269-6208.

Responsible live-in maid, must speak Eng, full time
only. 287-5985 ask for Gina after 6pm.

Exra large dog travel cage,reasonably priced. 287-
5934.

Reasonably priced freezer to buy for the old folks in
Pilon. 289-4050.

Mature, honest, hsekeeper to clean, 2 hir, 3 days a
week, preferred U.S. dependent, $20 a wk, 287-
6841.

Italian tutor, 2 to 3 hours per week. 284-4720.

Responsiblelo tcager (14 or older) for occasional
babysitting nightotwkonds, Kobbe/loward area.
284-5137,

Rattan ofa, whittean, reasonably priced, will con-
ider a iet. t,282181.

Ieavy metal guitar teachor for Metallica and
Miegadtih ongs, 287.4733.

W,,uhli like to get in contact with AAPIS mechanic
unable to fin 88 Colt Vista, leaky seals. 287-3737
after 6pmo,


Editor's note: Iltrn rc 1 i ,n ir ir o(f sndts ( it Tropic Times received this week, there
was no room for ad forem. To submit 1an ad for next week, type or write on a plain
white paper the following legibly : Spornsor't nlame, unit, duty phone, home phone,
rank, organui unai I ilintl thie tiontient- of ite ad to 5 words. Do not fax ads.












2 Tropic Times
B A A Oct. 23,1992


Super Crosswordrs


ACROSS
1 Lyre player
o mythology
6 Defrost the
frozen food
10 Herbert
Hoovers
state
14 Chess and
checkers
19 "Fiddler on
the Roof' star
20 Where to find
the Coos-
seum
21 Isles off
Ireland
22 Spanish
province
23 Oike
antelope
24 Arrow poison
28 Donated
26 Orderly
arrange-
ments
27 Pinnacle of
glacier ice
28 Dad's
hideaway
29 Siy blunder
30 The
Afsluitdijk
and others
31 Texas
emblem
34 Garden tool
36 Proud -
peacock
39 Spring
season
40 Duct
42 Hill In
Jerusalem:


var. display
43 Marsh 87 Sea nymph
46 Ethan Allen's 89 Heart of
state Dixie
48 Slow, In 91 Actor Marion
music 92 Placed on
50 Predetermine the record
52 Soft, white 94 Patti LuPone
fur role on
53 Where to find Broadway
Helena 95 Toscani., for
55 Gazes rudely one
56 Very poor 96 Recite
57 Chinese 97 Days before
secret holidays
society 99 Japan
58 Poet's pond follower
60 Turn away 100 Hardy
61 Egyptian cabbage
skink 101 Sippery one
62 Strong 102 Sacred
twilled songs
fabric 104 E. Power
63 Popular Biggs was
hedge shrub one
65 Distress call 107 Founder of a
68 Spanish French
missionary In dynasty
America 110 Dakota
68 Torrid and Indian
frigid 112 Aardvark's
70 Psychic's gift snack
73 Prodigy or 113 Card used In
miracle fortuneteling
76 Ladder rung 117 Brazilian
78 Elec. units macaw
82 Sell tickets at 118 Palm leaves
a profit: 119Being
colloq. 120 Love, Italian
84 Land o style
shamrocks 121 Dormouse
85 Debussy's 122 Miss Chase
'Clair de - 123 Gem stone
88 Parade 124 Baron or earl


125 Down East'
State
126 Fabric
worker
127 "The
Untouch-
ables'
protagonist
128 Actress
Burstyn
DOWN
1 Summers on
the Seine
2 Actor's quest
30n-
3 On --
(equivalent
to)
4 Like some
music
5Massachu-
setts
6 Poseldon's
scepter
7 Frank and
open
8 Catkin
9 Very early
10 Othello villain
11 Praying
figure
12 Becomes
unsteady
13 Not using
liquid
14 New Jersey
15 Effective use
16 Valuable fur
17 Actress
Sommer
18 Impudent talk
29 Small wild
goose
32 waiian
goose


33 Get.even game
with 80 San Diego
35 Sorrows player
36 Genus of 81 "Cheers"
grasses seat
37 Biblcal name 83 Actress
38 Fortified Remick
41 Official seal 86 Maryland
43 Discharges 88 Hindu god
44 January. in 90 Buffalo or
Malaga wisent
45 Snug abodes 91 Island east of
47 He had a gilt Java
complex? 93 Triangular
48 Huey or 95 Fireplace
Howie shelves
49 Unique 98 Having an
person unpleasant
51 Hebrew letter odor
53 Region of 100 DDE's
Czechoslova- birthplace
kla 102 Last name of
54 Where to see 94 Across
the London 103 Vampire-
Bridge killing
57 - Haute weapon
59 Elcit 105 Quebec
62 Span. matron peninsula
64 Compass 106 - Nadu
reading (formerly
67 New York Madras)
69 Spanish halls 107 Unruffled
70 Feudal 108 Code or rug
servants 109 Equal: comb.
71 Opera form
division 111 Glacial sand
72 "It's My -- ridges
(song) 114 Moslem
74 Perry's weight unit
creator 115 Heraldic
75 Permission bearing
76 Roof worker 116 H.S. student
77 Cougar 119 Ending for
79 Gambling lunch or pig


BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker

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Barney GOogle and Snuffy Smith ByFredLasswell


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LAFF-A-DAY




Full Text

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Gift o the Panama Canal Museum Tropic Times Vol. V. No. 42 array Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, Oct. 23, 1992 ew tuition assistance rules begin FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Soldiers are facing tuition assistance rules that began Oct. 1 for fiscal year '93. The Department of the Army set new limits on credit hours tuition assistance will cover. Soldiers seeking graduate degrees are allowed tuition assistance for 12 credit hours per year. Soldiers seeking undergraduate degrees are allowed tuition assistance for 15 credit hours per year. Most college courses are worth three credit hours. Soldiers can apply for an exception to credit-hour limits to meet residency requirements or if they are nearing completion of a degree, said Charles Fritts, Army director of education in Panama. If the money runs out, tuition assistance availability will be based on priority groups set up by DA. According to DA, recipients oftuition assistance are grouped with the level of education they are seeking. The first priority group includes officers and warrant officers who do not have an undergraduate degree, enlisted soldiers who have an associate's studying for a bachelor's degree and enlisted soldiers studying for an associate's degree. The second priority group includes commissioned officers seeking a graduate degree, enlisted soldiers and warrant officers seeking a bachelor's degree who do not have an associate's degree and all soldiers seeking alternative education for teaching certification. Enlisted soldiers who started work on a bachelor's degree in fiscal year '92 are the exception and are considered in the first priority group, Fritts said. The third priority group includes enlisted soldiers and warrant officers seeking a graduate degree. "It looks right now that we have enough money for u^^""ry "*'* by(44 "ael""a everybody,"Fritts said. NIGHT FUN -Chainsaw-wielding Paul Tilley waits for victims at Fort Espinar's Haunted House last Soldiers with questions about tuition assistance can year. Halloween is just around the corner and Panama military communities have set trick-or-treat contact their local education center. hours for the Oct. 31 event. See the Mayor's Corner on page 6 for more information. Stateside clocks turn back 'Road Dawgs' team with Rangers COROZAL (Tropic Times) -People in the United States will be turning their clocks back one by Capt. David Dougherty hour Sunday from Daylight Savings to Standard Company A 536th Engineer Battalion Working with the Rangers Time. Check the TV schedule on page B3 for programFORT KOBBE (USARSO PAO) -The "Road gives us the chance to see anming changes. Remember the time change when callDawgs" of Company A, 536th Engineer Combat other part of the Army we don't ing back to the states. Panama does not change times. Battalion (Heavy), recently completed a support often see as engineers here in exercise at the Jungle Operations Training Center 1993 inspections starting with the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment. Panama. The company's second platoon, led by SFC Robert PFC Ollie Cole FOR T CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The 1993 Reisinger, provided engineer support and enhanced Co. A, 536th Engineer Battalion vehicle inspection program in the Republic of Panthe the realism of the training. ama begins in November and runs through March 31, The platoon constructed two suspend-wire cable tions center and raiding a drug manufacturing site. 1993. systems that were used for moving silhouettes through Reisinger called upon Sgt. Ricky Nails and Pvt. 1 All privately owned vehicles must be inspected the air on two live-fire ranges. David Tonderski during the live-fire phase of the before registration. It provided the Rangers with opportunities to enexercise to correct a misfire of military dynamite. U.S. government employees and their family gage moving targets under tough conditions, ReisinThe soldiers of second platoon enjoyed the oppormembers are eligible to have their vehicles inspected ger said. tunity to work with the Rangers, Reisinger said. They at the Panama Canal Commission Transportation The platoon also constructed three mock buildalso supported movements oftroops and materials in Division facilities on each side of the isthmus. The ings that were used on three assault missions by the the various scenarios. inspection fee is $6. Rangers. "This is something we have never done before," The starting date for inspections will be published The platoon intensified the scenarios with conPFC Ollie Cole said. "Working with the Rangers when notification is received from Panama. struction efforts including disabling a radio station gives us the chance to see another part of the Army with explosives, destroying an enemy tactical operawe don't often see as engineers here in Panama." Air Force Thunderbirds roar into Rodman Naval Station Port Serv*Banana band trip, page 7. Panama for Saturday performices lend visiting vessels a "help*Military survey, page 5. ance. ing hand." *High school football, page 11.

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Tropic Times Oct. 23,1992 Thunderbirds show professional expertise HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA) -The because of maintenance problems. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron, The Thunderbirds are part of the combat Thunderbirds, will present an air show force. If required, team members and over the Bay of Panama Saturday at aircraft can be a tactical fighter unit noon. within 72 hours. The show will be adjacent to the AtTo keep their combat skills polished, lapa Convention Center. Buses will be team pilots fly periodic weapons training taking military personnel to the show missions in addition to demonstration from Howard AFB Theater at 10 am. flights. Maintenance personnel are also and Albrook at 10:30 am. Buses in the ready to perform their combat role. Atlantic community will leave Fort Davis Swimming Pool parking lot at 9 a.m. History Buses will also be available at 10 a.m. at The Thunderbirds were officially acthe Cocoli Community Center, Fort Claytivated June 1, 1953, as the 3600th Air ton Burger King and the Fort Kobbe Demonstration Team at Luke Air Force Burger King. The buses will return to Base, Ariz. their pick-up points following the show. The first aircraft was the straightThe Thunderbirds plan and present winged F-84G Thunderjet, a combataerial maneuvers to exhibit the capabiliproven fighter-bomber that had seen ties of modem high-performance aircraft extensive action in Korea. Early in 1955, and the high degree of professional skill the Thunderbirds transitioned to the sweptrequired to operate the aircraft demonwing F-84F Thunderstreak. In their first strations. three years with the F-84, the team Objectives of the squadron are: performed for more than nine million to demonstrate to the public the prospectators in 222 shows that included fessional competence of the Air Force; tours of Central and South America. to support U.S. Air Force community In June 1956, the team moved to its relations and people-to-people programs; current home at Nellis Air Force Base, to support U.S. Air Force recruiting Nev. At the same time, the Thunderbirds The Thunderbirds in action. U.S. Force photos and retention programs; traded the veteran F-84 for the U.S. Air to strengthen morale and esprit de Force's first supersonic fighter, the Fto the T-38 Talon, the world's first supercorps among Air Force personnel. 100 Super Sabre -the aerial platform sonic trainer. The team flew nearly 600 F-16C Statistics that would serve the Thunderbirds for 13 demonstrations during eight seasons with Speed: Mach 2+ The Team years. The F-100 years were memorable. the Talon. Range: More than 550 nautical-mile The Thunderbirds squadron is an Air More than 1,000 demonstrations were Early in 1983, the Thunderbiids moved combat range, and more than 2,000 Combat Command unit made up of eight flown in the "C" and "D" models of the to the F-16 Fighting Falcon. nata ge ange th eter pilots (six of which are demonstration aircraft, thrilling spectators from the Far In 1986, the Thunderbirds participated nal tanks. pilots), three support officers, and more East to North Africa. In the middle of the in the rededication fly-by of the Statue of Attitude: More than 50,000 feet than 130 enlisted people performing in F-100 era, the team changed briefly to Liberty, which was nationally televised. Rateofclimb: More than 30,000 feet 33 different career fields. theF-105 Thunderchief. After six shows The next year, the largest crowd to per minute; or 500 feet per second. The demonstration season lasts from in 1964, the Thunderbirds returned to the see a performance was at Coney Island, Lengh 4 eet, 3 inhs nd. March to November, with the winter F-100 for maintenance reasons. N.Y., July4, 1987, whenmore than2.25 .months used for training new members. From 1969 to 1973, the Thunderbirds million people viewed the demonstrapilot tube) Wingspan: 31 feet (without missiles) Officers serve atwo-year tour, and about flew the AirForce's front-line fighter of tion. Height: 16 feet, 7 inches half the team is new each year. the time, the F-4E Phantom. In five seaAlso in 1987, the Thunderbirds perWeight: 18,240 pounds (including Since the team's inception in 1953, sons the team performed more than 500 formed the firstU.S. military demonstrapilot, oil, two missiles and full load of more than 254 million people in all 50 demonstrations while traveling to 30 of tion in a communist country -China. 20mm ammunition);25,000 pounds states and 56 foreign countries have atthe 50 states, Canada, Central America In 1989, the Thunderbirds held 79 (maximum gross load); 37,500 pounds tended 3,131 official demonstrations. The and Europe. demonstrations in 37 states. In 1990, the (maximum gross load) team has never canceled a performance In 1974, the Thunderbirds converted teani toppled the 600 demonstration mark Popusin system: Oe Pratt and in the F16, as the Thunderbirds gave 63 Ppinystem: One attnd performances in 31 states. Whitney F-l100 PW220 afterburni ng turbofan engine in the 25,000-pound In 1991, the team traveled to Europe thrust class. for the first time performed in eight Cockpit: Zero altitude rocket-type pilot countries, including first-time visits to ejection system; high-visibility canSwitzerland, Poland and Hungary. opy; seat inclined at a 30-degree angle; 1992: Year of Transition control stick mounted on right conIn 1992, the Thunderbirds transitioned sole; heads-up display. to the F-16C for their aerial demonstraFlight Control system: Computercontrolled "fly-by-wire" system tions. Since 1983, the team employed the Armament: Include a fuselageb A-model of the Fighting Falcon and was munt: ult e 2 cagn the last active-duty unit to convert to the .mand upgraded model. The conversion took an air-to-air missile mounted on place simply because the team represents each wingtip. Up to 11,000 pounds of therest oftheAir Force eandevery frontadditional weapons, and fuel tanks te-16 squadron employs the F-16C. can be carried on pylons mounted line F-1 sudoemlythF-C. under the wings and on the fuselage The switch also made sense for logistical unterlin MSgt. Gary McCue (left) and SSgt. Jeff Simpson time a maneuver. and combat-conversionreasons. centerline. USS Princeton continuing ocean counter-drug war RODMAN NS (USNAVSTAPANCAThe Princeton, under the command of land Naval Air Station, near San Diego, face vessels encountered in Pacific Ocean NAL PAO) -The USS Princeton (CGCapt. J. Cutler Dawson Jr., is homewith their Officer-in-Charge, LCDR John in the ongoing war on drugs, Walker 59), a Ticonderoga class cruiser, is curported at Long Beach, Calif. O'Conner. said. rently conducting drug trafficking interThis tasking came hot upon the heels A five member Coast Guard Law EnIf vessels appear suspicious and proper diction operations in the equatorial waof RIMPAC 1992, a multinational exerforcement Detachment, under the leadauthority has been given, the law enters off of South America, said CWO3 cise involving five Pacific contiguous ership ofLT(jg)Dale Garvin, formed the forcement team will board and search, he Chris Walker, Navy spokesman. nations conducted in July, a major trainnucleus around which at-sea operations said. During the second day at sea, Princeing evolution in which Princeton played centered, Walker said. Princeton's crew maneuvers the 567 ton crewmembers conducted their first a significant role, Walker said. The Law Enforcement Detachment is foot long 9,600 ton warship alongside the boarding. The crew of the Princeton was auga cadre ofhand-picked high-caliber pervessel while the Coast Guard boarding The vessel boarded was engaged in mented by a weather detachment from sonnel who have received extensive trainteam travels in a small boat, called a legal activity and the crew was very the Naval Oceanography Facility in San ing in rules of evidence, self-defense, Ridged Hull Inflatable Boat to board the courteous and cooperative, Walker said. Diego, Calif. and search and seizure procedures, Walker vessel and conduct a search for contraThePrinceton's chiefcorpsman gave Another major addition to the capasaid. band, Walker said. medical aid to one of the crewmen and bilities of the cruiser were two helicopThe Princeton's task is straightforThe Princeton continues on patrol in the boarding was completed, Walker said. ters from HLS-43 stationed at North Isward; locate, interview and evaluate surwaters of Central America, Walker said.

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Tropic Times Oct. 23,19923 SSgt. David Montoya, shift supervisor for the 24th Communication Group global station, replaces recording reels on part of the communication system. Albrook group offers global communication by SrA. Jackie Ambrese "These offices are staffed 24 hours a day with 24th Wing Group Public Affairs Office someone constantly monitoring the radio speakers in case help is needed," SSgt. Daniel Montoya, shift HOWARD AFB (24TH WG/PA) -For many milisupervisor, said. "If the command post calls us, we can tary members, the words "phone patch" bring to mind locate the positions ofaircraft and transmit information one-on-one conversations with loved ones back home. to them." These words mean something entirely different for The Global station was on special alert when Presimembers of the Albrook Global Station. dent Bush visited Panama, Estrada said. The Albrook Global Station is one of 15 strategically "Visiting heads of state and other dignitaries in our located throughout the world. Its 14 radio operators and area of responsibility is just one case warranting this maintenance technicians belong to the 24th Communistatus," he said. cations Squadron. "If there is an incident involving a downed aircraft or "We're part of a little known system that performs a rescue mission, we act as liaisons between the search very important mission," MSgt. Erick Estrada, noncoordination and rescue aircraft," he said. commissioned officer in charge, Global User Support "Our communication capabilities on high Station, said. "We deal with the communication for all power,3KWoutput, high frequency radios is what aids Department of Defense aircraft in an eight-million the search and rescue process." square mile LatinAmerican theater." In providing non"We've also helped other Latin American military secure, high frequency air/ground/air and point to aircraft, but our primary responsibility remains DOD point voice communications, the Global Station relays aircraft," Estrada said. vital aircraft movement information for air rescue and Global stations throughout the world were consolirecovery service, air weather service, distinguished dated from previously known Global Command and U.S. Air Force phto bySrA.JeciueAmbws. visitor support, and worldwide command and control Control, Giant Talk, Mystic Star, and Command Escort SSgt. David Montoya and MSgt. Erick Estrada for DOD aircraft. Systems. check circuits during a phone patch. Air Force flu shots scheduled Howard AFB (24th WG/PA) -Annual flu shots for active duty Air Force members will be given at the Howard AFB theater Tuesday and Wednesday from 8 am. to 4 p.m. and Thursday from 8 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Annual flu shots are a mandatory requirement for all active duty Air Force members. Shot records are necessary to receive the vaccination. Flu shots will also be available for military family members Nov. 2 at the Howard AFB theater from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Children who have a history of asthma or who have had recent illnesses should also have the flu shots because they stand a higher risk of contracting the flu, said SrA. Becky Kraus, Howard AFB allergy immunization technician. For information, call the Howard AFB immunization clinic at 284-6157. SrA. Becky Kraus gives a flu shot to TSgt. Frederique Dunham. US. Air Force photos by SA. JackiAmbo.-

PAGE 4

4Tropic Times -H m s h r 4 s THemisphere Oct. 23, 1992 U.S. officials forecast Castro's downfall WASHINGTON (Reuters) -Thirty end which would be in nobody's interest But the collapse of the Soviet Union candidate Bill Clinton has endorsed it, years afterthe world almost lurched into and could create serious regional probdeprived Castro of an estimated $3.5 increasing the pressure on Bush to sign nuclear war during the Cuba missile cri-, lems," he said. billion of annual aid. Cuba has lost tradit. sis, U.S. policymakers say the days of From the moment of his takeover in ing partners and markets in the former "One cannot see on the horizon any communism on the Caribbean island are 1958, Castro was seen by Washington as Communist bloc in Eastern Europe and good news for Castro, only continued numbered and fear that its end may be a dagger only 90 miles from the coast of officials say around 70 percent of its economic deterioration and unrelieved bloody. Florida aimed at the heart of the United international income has evaporated. bleakness," said Larry Birs of the Council According to officials and private States. Washington has maintained its 30on Hemispheric Affairs, a Washington analysts, the question is no longer whether In October 1962 when he discovered year trade embargo on Cuba and Conthink-tank. Cuban President Fidel Castro's governthat the Soviet Union had moved nuclear gress recently passed a bill to tighten it. "He has nothing to hope for from ment will eventually collapse under the missiles to Cuba, President John KenThe Cuban Democracy Act of 1992, Clinton. There is a growing danger of weight of an inexorable economic denedy went to the brink ofanuclear war to which still awaits President Bush's sigriots, rising violence-you are going to cline. The question is when and how it force their withdrawal. nature, would ban foreign subsidiaries of have a Gotterdammerung," he said, refalls. During much of the 1970s and 1980s, U.S. firms from doing business with Cuba ferring to the Wagner opera 'The Twi"It seems inevitable that change in Cuba was still seen as a deadly threat to and bar ships trading with the island from light of the Gods' which climaxes amid Cuba will come in a relatively short U.S. interests, stirring up revolt in Latin U.S. ports for six months. trumpet fanfares with the violent deaths time," said one State Department offiAmerica, supporting Sandinista MarxDespite protestations from the Euroof its main protagonists. cial. ists in Nicaragaua and leftist rebels in El pean Community, Canada and Mexico The State Department official said the "It may not be days or weeks or months Salvador and sending thousands of troops that the so-called "Torricelli bill" was a daily food intake for poorpeople in some but it is coming. And we are really conto far-off Angola to help implant Marxcrude U.S. device to dictate the trading parts of Cuba was falling to subsistence corned about the prospect of a violent ism in Africa. patterns of other countries, Democratic levels. Leaders embrace '92 Nobel awardee MEXICO CITY (Reuters) -Most Latin Americans were elated to see Guatemalan Indian Rigoberta Menchu win the Nobel Peace Prize for 1992, but her triumph and the spotlight it has turned on Central America disconcerted others. The Guatemalan government, which had ignored Menchu's nomination for the award, extended cordial congratulations to the 33-year-old Mayan who .has been accused by security forces of being a member of the leftist guerrilla front. "With this distinction, Menchu will be able to apply the moral authority conferred on her by the prize to seek peaceful solutions to existing and future discords in Latin America and especially Guatemala," the government said in a statement. Menchu dedicated her life to indigenous rights after her father, mother and 16-year-old brother were killed by Guatemalan security forces during the 1980s. Nobel laureate Oscar Arias, former president of Costa Rica who won the peace prize in 1987, said Menchu's award would" bring tolightthe .neglect, oppression and persecution suffered by the indigenous peoples of all the Americas, north, central and south." Argentine Nobel laureate Adolfo Perez Esquivel, who won the peace prize in 1980, was more blunt. "Although the policy of extermination against the indigenous and peasant people of Guatemala continues, this prize constitutes support for the struggle for life and democratization in that country," he said. The government of Carlos Salinas de Gortari, the president of Mexico where Menchu has spent her years in exile, released copies of a letter he sent Menchu. "The distinction she has received makes us-proud in Mexico where we admire her," it said. Argentine President Carlos Menem called Menchu his "LatinAmerican sister" andexclaimed: "I feelasifI'd won myself." El Salvador's right-wing government congratulated the Guatemalan government but avoided any mention of 7 Menchu. "We are happy, and we have congratulated the Guatemalan government for the distinguished and honorable mention that a Guatemalan citizen has been given," said AP Oscar Santamaria, chief of staff to President Alfredo CrisMenchu tiani. SAO PAULO, Brazil (Reuters) -The said Kenneth Haas, Managing DirecThe square is capable of accommon Boston Symphony Orchestra launched tor. dating tens of thousands of people and its first tour of Latin America Monday to "We have heard a great deal about the was recently the site of massive protest what organizers said was a sellout crowd sophistication and enthusiasm of audimarches calling for the ouster of Presiin Brazil's largest city.; ences in Sao Paulo." dent Fernando Collor, who was imo rc h e s tr a Led by music director Seiji Ozawa, Haas said the overwhelming demand peached last month. the orchestra plans a three-city tour, going fortickets in Sao Paulo led organizers to "The reception has been very good. on after Sao Paulo to the Argentine capitry a technological first for the BSO and We are all sold out. It was this demand tal,Buenos Aires, andCaracas, capital of Sao Paulo's Teatro Municipal. that led to organizing the screen and la u n c h e s Venezuela. During the second performance on live transmission for the first time," All eight performances sold out alTuesday night the concert was reHaas said. most immediately, said BSO spokeswoman transmitted live to four huge video screens Ozawa, now in his 18th year as Caroline Smedvig. in the large Vale d Anhangabau music director, said he learned only on SThe orchestra has performed across square. his arrival that Sao Paulo is home to Europe and in Japan and China but has Six sets of speakers mounted with the more than a million Brazilians of Japanever before performed in Latin Amervideo screens relayed the music being nese descent, the largest single comica. performed inside the theatre to a dismunity of Japanese anywhere outside "This is a tour that is long overdue," tance of nearly three miles. of Japan.

PAGE 5

Tropic Time Military News t 5 Vietnam expanding POW-MIA assistance BANGKOK, Thailand (AP) -VietPrime Minister Vo Van Kiet said he narn will expand its help in determining believed the agreement would promote the fate of Americans missing from the better relations with the United States, Vietnam War by letting U.S. experts the agency reported. study military archives, the official VietThe United States has not had diplonamese News Agency said Monday. matic relations with Vietnam since the Members ofthe Pentagon's task force Communist takeover of the South in 1975 searching for missing servicemen previand has maintained an economic emously described the lack of access to the bargo against Hanoi. U.S. officials have archives as a serious hindrance to their said relations will not be normalized work. until Hanoi provides a satisfactory acThe U.S. group conducts joint searches counting of missing Americans. and excavations with the Vietnamese, In Washington, the State Department looking for the remains of missing spokesman, Richard Boucher, said preAmericans. liminary reports of the Vessey mission The agreement was announced at the were encouraging. conclusion of a three-day visit to Hanoi State Department officials, however, by a U.S. delegation led by retired Army cautioned that while Vessey had made Gen. John Vessey Jr. "important progress," that progress did He was accompanied by Sen. John, not meet the criteria that the United States McCain, a former prisoner of war in has set for normalizing relations. Vietnam, and other U.S. officials. There are 2,266 American serviceA joint U.S.-Vietnamese statement men who are still unaccounted for from transmitted by the Vietnam News Agency the Vietnam War, which ended 17 years ^P"-'**t said the agreement was "an important ago. Some 1,658 were lost in Vietnam, The letters "USA" and "K" show below the USA, etched into a Laotian rice new step whichshould accelerateresults while the others were lost in the neighpaddy only four years ago could be distress signals from American POWs, on the POW-MIA issue." boring countries of Cambodiaand Laos. according to Senate testimony recently on Capitol Hill. Military survey discovers healthy new trends WASHINGTON (American Forces Information Servtime. It also asked more questionsabout AIDS and ice) -The newest Department ofDefense survey shows transmission o e ques utS nd substance abuse in almost all categories is down. A c lo se r lo o k ., timitsyors thae AID ultarind eDoD released some results of the 1992 Worldwide *Slightly more than half of unmarried service. Sur e d ofSubsce rus d Hth Behaviors on The 1992 DoD Worldwide Survey of Substance members (50.2 percent) reported using a condom Survey of Substance Abuse and Health Behairs, Abuse asked service members more questions on during their last sexual encounter. Sept. 21. Some 16,395 randomly selected soldiers, more subjects than any of the previous four sur*Younger service members were more likely to sailors, airmen and Marines completed the anonymous veys. DoD Health Affairs has commissioned the have used a condom than were older ones. self-report questionnaires. periodic surveys since 1980. A contractor, Re*More than 53 percent of single servlcememThe survey's drug statistics reflected the greatest search Triangle Institute, Raleigh-Durham, N.C., hers under 20 used a condom, compared with 43.2 success for DoD, said U.S. Public Health Service Dr. cndtdthsrvypeet fhsevr3. (RD)Ewr .Mrihead of the Professional conducted the survey. percent of those over 35. (RADM) Edward D. Martin,he office Profeal Here are some details: *Single enlisted personnel were more likely to Affairs and Quality Assurance office n DoD Health Gambling use condoms than were officers: 50.6 percent corpercent service members reporting nonmedical drug The survey shows fewer service members have a pared with 46.8 percent for the officers. peint 30 dasriorto heberst rve in 19 a dn t gambling problem than DoD officials had feared *Single servicewomen were less likely to insist 3.8 percent in 1992. Those who use drugs tend to be was the case. that partners use condoms than single servicemen younger, single and in lower pay grades. t Only 2 percent had three symptoms of compulwere to use them. Only 43.7 percent ofthe women's Further, Martin said, they reported no significant sive gamblers. partners had used condoms; 51.8 percent of servnegative effects ofdrug use, indicating they are casual, People who have three or more of the following icemen had used them. negtiv efect ofdru us, ndiatig tey re asul, list of symptoms are urged to seek help: not dependent, drug users. "However," he emphasized, lioseas precupato sekhgl ;k "we consider any nonmedical use of drugs to be drug *Increased preoccupation with gambling; Smoking abuse." *Need to gamble increased amounts of money More military people are former smokers than Smoking shows a slower, but still steady, decline. In to achieve desired level of excitement; ever before. In 1980,51 percent smoked. Now, 35.9 1992, 35.9 percent considered themselves smokers, *Restless or irritable when unable to gamble; percent smoke. compared with 40.9 percent in 1988 and 51 percent in *Gambling to escape from problems; Of those who smoked in 1992, some 18 percent 1980. Martin said that while military people were still *Going back to try to recoup losses; said they smoked a pack or more ofcigarettes a day more likely to smoke than their civilian counterparts, *Lying about extent of gambling; -IioD's definition of heavy smoking. In 1988, 22.7 serie mikembe arsmke kin the hat atarprarte *Needing someone to provide money to relieve percent said they were heavy smokers compared to service members are kicking the habit at a rapid rate. financial problems caused by gambling; and 34.2 percent in 1980. For comparison, only 28 percent of the general popula+epriigo oigipratrltosis tion smoked in 1988, according to the American Cancer *Jeopardizing or losing Important relationships, ti ed or job or career opportunities due to gambling. Steroids Society. The survey also quizzed servicemembers on For the first time, the survey tracked smokeless Condom Use and AIDS steroid use. Only.2 percent had used steroids In the tobacco use. Some seven percent.of service members The survey tracked condom use for the first month before the survey. dipped snuff or chewed -tobacco five or more days a week. Eight percent used smokeless tobacco less than once a week. Health officials will watch this figure in "These surveys give us ideas on how to confront against AIDS. Latex condoms can help prevent AIDS, future surveys, because they suspect smokeless tobacco problem areas and how to approach groups at risk," but natural condoms are more porous and the virus can use may be increasing. said Martin. pass through them. Health educators also recommend Martin said fewer servicemembers abuse alcohol In the beginning, he said, the surveys focused on using a nonpetroleumlubricant containing nonoxynoloverall. A significant number use alcohol heavily, drug and alcohol abuse, but every survey has addid 9, which inactivates the virus. however, and are negatively impacted personally and m new questions. New areas include smokeless tobacco, Also, about one-fourth incorrectly believe it can be edically, he said. gambling and condom use. The survey also asked new transmitted by sharing eating utensils or eating in a In 1980, there were 20.8 percent"of service memberquestions concerning AIDS and modified others. dining hall where the cook has the AIDS virus. More swhowereheavydrinkers. Heavy alcohol use by service Service members' knowledge about AIDS transthan 27 percent believe insects spread it. Scientists say members declined from 17 percent overall in 1988 to mission and prevention continues to increase. Martin insects do not spread the AIDS virus. 15.2 percent in 1992. Heavy use is defined as five or said service members' level of knowledge compares "The knowledge of our young personnel compares more drinks on one occasi on at least once a week: favorably with that of the general population. Most favorably with the general population's," said Martin. More service members are saying no to alcohol -know, for example, that AIDS can damage the body's "But given the consequences ofcontracting AIDS, it' s some 20.4 percent abstain. Only 13.5 percent abstained immunity, that it is caused by a virus and that it can be far short of what we'd like. It's absolutely mandatory in 1980. Loss of productivity due to alcohol is also passed by sharing needles and by unprotected sexual for every service person to understand all the risk down, from a high of more than 30 percent of drinkers contact. More than 93 percent know an infected pregbehaviors by which they can contract AIDS and the reporting problems in 1982to fewerthan 20, percent in rant women can pass the virus to her unborn child. protections -including avoidance of misbehavior -they 1992. More than 92 percent know a person can be can take to prevent contracting what is ultimately a fatal This is the fifth such worldwide survey DoD has infected -with HIIV, the virus that causes AIDS, and disease." conducted, Martin said. He said DoD has been doing the still look healthy. Service members already meet the "Healthy People surveys since 1980 to track the progress of substance But some still have misconceptions. Fourty-two 2000" goal of at least 50 percent of unmarried persons abuse prevention programs and to identify subjects point five percent believe both natural-membrane using condoms, said Martin. "But we would like to do that may need more emphasis. (lambskin) and latex condoms are equally effective better than that," he said.

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Tropic Times Oct. 23, 1992 oices Mayors answer Halloween questions r Dear Mayors' Corner, always possible to use the gym at Do you know anything about the schedM yors orne lunchtime. Evenings are another option ule for Halloween yet? Where are the but there are those of us taking classes kids allowed to go, during what times, evening to extinguish fires, says Websupposed to pick up his yard, too. I say he and trying to keep up with family and anduptowhatages? Andisit going to be sters Encyclopedic Unabridged Dictionshould pick it up himself. He says he other responsibilities. on the 31st? ary, (c) 1983. Today it is a time period doesn't make the mess near the road. Opening at 5 a.m. would enable those No nightmares, please when certain regulations apply, such as Maybe not, but I still say he is responof us who seriously want to use the gym restricting movement after dark. sible for his area. Who's right? to do so and not interfere with our duty Dear Nightmares, The "long-term curfew," established Pity the poor police call time. Yes, trick-or-treating will be held Oct. in 1989, was originally a temporary curAny help on this issue would be greatly 31 this year. Air Force, Army and Navy few resulting from high crime levDear Pity, appreciated! installations on the Pacific side els in the city, says You are. U.S. Army Garrison says SSgt. Mary E. Young say children younger the Latin American your neighbor isn't alone in his opinion United States Air Force than3 yearsofage ". Adviser to U.S. but that he and the others like him are in are invited to trickArmy South. for a rude awakening. Dear SSgt. Young, or-treat between 6 According to The Standard Operating Procedure is According to the facility noncommisand 8 p.m. Older the Office of the United States Army Garrison Regulasioned-officer-in-charge, the Fitness Cenchildren am encourDeputy Chief of tion 210-2 which says residents of govter is open from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., during aged to participate Staff for Operaernment quarters must maintain the which time center personnel do regular in other Directorate .tions and Plans, grounds around their residence up to hourly head counts to track its usage. At of Community AcUSARSO, Joint halfway to the adjacent quarters or 50 6 a.m. there are seldom more than six or tivities events. Task Force -feet, which ever is greater, whether they seven people waiting to get in. In fact, Pacific side comPanama has "made the mess" or not. says the NCOIC, it's often a ghost town. mands are also alevaluated the It's a privilege and a responsibility to By the end of the first hour, there are lowing valid instalcurfew several live in government owned quarters, and rarely have more than 25-30 users and lation pass holders times since Community Activity patrols are going to many of those are using the gym only to to invite up to five 1989. High be out looking for residents who don't shower after running. immediate famI crime rates nemaintain them. -.Unfortunately, says the NCOIC, with ily members to cessitate keeping Violators will be awarded "Pink Slips," manpower shortages hitting everyone, the festivities. ? a curfew. says the Garrison noncommissioned ofthose kinds of numbers don't validate the Please check with According to ficer in charge. need for an earlier opening. individual comGarrison ComViolators will have 72 hours to make Occasionally, one machine or another mandsformoreinmand, curfew repairs after the first notice. A second is in high demand and if you are having formation. exceptions are notice for the same violation goes to the difficulty getting on one of those, the Army Atlantic limited to indisponsoring unit commander. Fitness CenterNCOIC recommends that trick-or-treat hours viduals on official After a third notice, the violator will you come in early and complete your are the same as the business, such as be required to report to the Commander workout before others arrive for the day. Pacific community. airport runs, miliUSAG-PAC for counseling and possible Children through the "" tary escorts, and eviction. Yards of the Month 12th grade may parmilitary police Lest ye think the Army is hard-nosed, Fort Espinar Quarters 35A ticipate but the post will be open to valid patrols. be advised, the Air Force and Navy have WO 1 and Mrs. Guy La Brecque installation pass holders only. The newest curfew, according to the the same policy and implement it the Fort Davis Quarters 203B Latin American Adviser for U.S. Army same way. SSgt. and Mr. Amelia McFarlane Dear Mayors' Corner, South, is a juvenile curfew that was reWho dreamed up thecurfew? Whatis cently established by the Govenor ofthe Dear Mayors' Corner, Editor's note: This column Is prothe purpose of having such a long-term Province of Panama for people 18 years Is it at all possible for the Howard vided to allow community members to curfew? And canthe curfew be modified and younger. Like its predecessor, this AFB Sports and Fitness Center to open submit questions or concerns to be reto allow servicemembers to participate curfew is an attempt to reduce high levels an hour earlier (5 a.m.) Monday through searched and answered by the Mayin and attend concerts off-post? of crime and delinquency. Friday? Not only could more people use oral Congress. Letters should be mailed SFC Davidson it before work and still get to work on to: Mayors' Corner, APO AA 34004 Dear Mayors' Corner, time, it would also ease up the peak (MPS). Anonymity will be granted Dear SFC Davidson, Please help me with. this dispute, I hours from 6 to 7 a.m. when many Army upon request Publicity Chairperson, Believe it or not, "curfew" was dreamed need some information. My neighbor personnel are there. Dpon Ells. up in medieval Europe as an hour in the says the soldiers who do police calls are Because of limited manning, it is not Dyana Ells 'Screen plays' allowing thieves quarters' access Thieves coming through screens that someoneput motoroil inside her washing machine Military police received threecomplaints oflarceny and dryer. The prank ruined her clothing and resulted Provost Ma shal's Corner, from Fort Kobbe residents last week. Reports indicate in damage to the washer and dryer as well. The military that thieves cut screens above storage room doors, police are investigating the incident. shopping area, they are normally charged with trespassstealing bicycles, clothing and other items. Anyone with information should call the Military ing. Screens simply do not afford adequate protection. Police Investigations Section at 287-5252. If they are being escorted by aprivilege holder, he or The military police recommend that you not store high Sports fan loses wallet she is also charged. value items in areas safeguarded by screens. Anyone A Fort Clayton soldier is missing two baseball gloves, For more information, contact the U.S. Southern with information on the thefts can call 287-4401. his wallet and $75 after he left them unsecured during Command Contraband Control Section at 286-3303. Soldier uses government car to shop a softball game last week. The incident occurred at Military police charged a Fort Davis soldier with Mothers Field on Fort Clayton. The following crime statistics are for the week of wrongful appropriation of a government vehicle last Valuables should be secured at all times -even on Oct. 9 to Oct. 15. week. A witness reported the offense to the military the ballfield. Pacific police. The soldier apparently used the vehicle to go to Unauthorized escort Curundu area -1 larceny of secured private property, Burger King and the shoppette. The Contraband Control Section apprehended I larceny of secured government property, 1 houseDo not allow this to happen to you. Remember that numerous people in the last few weeks for unauthorbreaking government vehicles are to be used only for official ized escort and trespassing. Fort Kobbe 300 area -3 larcenies of secured private business. For more information, contact your chain of The investigators caught individuals without purproperty command. chasing privileges shoppinginside the mall areaof AlCocoli housing area -2 larcenies of secured private Pranksters ruin washer/dryer brook Air Force Station. property A Fort Amador resident was the victim of criminal When a person who does not possess purchasing Atlantic mischief last week. She reported to the military police privileges is found inside a Department of Defense Nonereported. Commander in Chief.Gen. George A. Joulwan Editorial Staff.Sgt. Richard Puckett U.S. Army South PAO Atlantic.289-4312 Director, Public Affairs.Col. James L. Fetig Sgt. James Yocum .. Chief.SFC Joseph Ferrare Rosemary Chong This authorized unofficial command information publicaEditor.MSgt. Rolf Carter tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is AssistantlEditor.Sgt. Deborah E. Williams U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.287-3007 published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Sports Editor.Sgt. John Hall 24th Wing Public Affairs Office.284-5459 Programof the Departnentiof Defense, under the supervision U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 of the director of public affairs, U.S. South Command. Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Telephone 285-6612.

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Tropic Time Commentary Ot 7 Band members make bad trip better by SgL Jane Usero fly to Bocas del Toro so the 79th Army came up several times. would come and go, we got the word. USARSO Public Affars Office Band's Show Band could perform at With the fact that rain and bonfires It was time to fly. the Sea Fair. We arrived, the band don't mix, we had to come up with Leaving the restaurant and little Now sit right back and you'll hear a played and we left. Simple enough. another plan of action. So we flicked a store sold out, we hurried to the bird, tale, a tale of afateful trip. But, the trip home was anything but Bic and stood around telling jokes and said our goodbyes, ate some bananas That startedfrom Howard Air Base, simple. eating bananas. This lasted until the and were on our way -we thought. aboard this big Chinook. With sixteen passengers, five crew pilots returned with word there was a Again weather grounded us, only The crew were mighty flying men, members, a large gas tank, boxes of small restaurant nearby. Off we this time not in such luxurious surthe pilots brave and sure. instruments and equipment and nine trudged through the mud and stones roundings as before. No restaurant, no Sixteen passengersflew that dayfor cases of bananas from the people of the with the thought of food other than bathroom, no store and not even a river an eight hourflight, an eight hour village, we took off and headed home. bananas running through our heads. to skip stones on. Just a row of thatch flight. Bocas del Toro airport We made our assault on the restauhuts, a mud trail and dozens of chickThe weather started I said clear weather, so rant in a frenzy trying to figure out ens. So we ate some bananas and tried getting rough, the big we kicked back to what they had, how much it would cost to make the best of it. Three hours, a bird had to land. enjoy the ride and eat and, most importantly, where the refueling from another Chinook and a If notfor the courage "The place where some bananas. bathrooms were. Luckily there was a downpour later, it was again time to of the fearless crew, the optimism most flourThis enjoyment was Spanish-speaking person among us, leave. We left six of the nine crates of Chinook would be lost, ishes is the lunatic to be very short-lived, and with 20 people pulling him in all bananas there, boarded the bird, ate the Chinook would be asylum." however, as the pilots directions for translations, we finally some bananas and were on our way. lost. Havelock Ellis got word that the got everything in order. Tired, grubby and hungry for The bird set ground The Dance of Life "clear" weather wasn't With dinner finished, the bathrooms something other than bananas, we in the field of this quite so clear. Hopfound and just about all the talk talked finally landed at Howard Air Force uncharted jungle ping from one spot to out of us, it was time to call it a night. Base 36 hours after we had left. village, with Chief another trying to But call it a night to where? Sleeping Running out to kiss the ground did Jones, Lt. Johnston too, the photograoutsmart the weather, we ended up in 21 people in the belly of a fully-loaded cross my mind but I ate a banana and pher and his boss, the bandfirst Rambala village for, what we thought, Chinook made for an interesting went home. sergeant, the bass guitarist and the a short wait for the weather to clear situation. There were people everyTo make a serious point to all this, band, here in Rambala Village. and eat some bananas. That's what we where. On top of equipment, on the though, our escapade would not have get for thinking. floor, hanging out the back door and been one of light-heartedness if the For those who wish to be a 79th As word came down we would have, even on the floor ofthe restaurant. But Chinook crew had not gone above and Army Band groupie, remember these to spend the night in this metropolis, sleep came, after we ate some bananas. beyond to ensure our needs were taken words. Behind the scenes of a tour excitement ran through the group and When morning came we ate some care of. Credit is also due to the teamwith this band leads to many more we ate some bananas. "Let's build a bananas and again made an assault on work and high morale of the members adventures than meets the eye. bonfire," one person yelled. "Yah, and the little restaurant for breakfast and to of the 79th Army Band's Show Band. When an hour and a half concert we can roast. bananas," another begin the vigil of the breaking weather. The combination made this potentially turns into a 36 hour trip, the fun begins. exclaimed. Being with 14 members of Morning came and went. Noon came miserable trip actually fun. We left early Saturday morning to the band, singing around the camp fire and went. As we felt sure the afternoon Bananas anyone? by Brig. Gen. David A. Sawyer ones. It is a matter of everyone learning and talking 24th Wing commander Q quality service tops acommonlanguage of"quality" and understanding P individual roles in making quality improvement. This HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA) -This article shares Air Force priority list may very well mean an attitude change for some. the concepts and principles of AirCombat Command Changing a culture is not quick or easy. It will take quality improvement. Gen. John Michael Loh, ACC life. What it means to you and me is a new way of life, time and effort to learn. The effort, however, is well commander, defines quality as "meeting customer a "culture" of quality. worth the energy expended. Industries and societies expectations in products and services" and he places As we learn the quality process we'll understand the have had proven success. full responsibility on unit leadership to make quality basics of a long term effort to forever eliminate waste We have already enjoyed quality improvement and happen. and rework. successes in the 24th Wing and the Panama commuTo achieve this, ACC is fostering a leadership style Howard and Albrook are already great places to live nity. It's time to build on those successes and turn up that promotes and creates a working climate of trust, and work, but they could become much better by the tempo to improve our performance even more. I'm teamwork and continuous improvement. ACC quality applying the quality improvement process. counting on everyone to "get smart" on ACC quality is a look at process and is not a new program. ProChanging a culture is not a matter of teaching new and apply quality principles in every aspect of our grams come and go, but a process becomes a way of techniques, or replacing behavior patterns with new operations. Direct Quotes What quality improvements would you suggest? "The PX should make "Outprocessing forms "AAFES needs to get "I'm pretty satisfied. "Exchange outlets need it easier for spouses to for the Air Force should rid of expired food prodAlthough Navy MWR more variety of prodmake DPP inquiries have building numbers ucts rather than sell should expand trips ucts and prices should while their spouses are and phone numbers on them." downtown on the weekbe consistent." TDY" them." ends." Cpl. Michael Rougier SSgt. Charles Fopma Dee Marin DPC Emelda Bowdry Sgt. Tad Steckler Company A, 154th Signal 24th Security Police Army family member SOUTHCOM J-6 59th Engineers Squadron The opinions expressed on this page are those of the COMMe muary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of Southern Command, The Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers maty submit commentaries -or responses to commentaries:to the Tropic Timies. The staff reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

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Tropic Times Oct. 23,1992 The USS Hawkes sits in dock at Rodman NS during its stay Oct. 2-3.U.NvyposbyH3BbWgh Port services lends by Sgt. John "Gus" Hall requesting to dock here. The messages STropic Times Sports Editor give the port services crew a chance to prepare for a ship's needs. Once a ship RODMAN NS (Tropic Tlumes) -When arrives, one of the two chiefs, board the a U.S. Navy vessels pull into U.S. Naval vessel and gives the crew a security '5 Station Panama Canal needing things briefing, telling them what to expect from supplies to passage through the during their stay. PanamaCanal, 12 sailors fromportservMachinist Mates P03 Al Ondrekaand I ices division lend a collective helping P03 Douglas Alston are the boat engihand. neers. They perform maintenance on The division taps its know-how of engines, auxiliary equipment and fuel eight military occupational skills to make pumps. post calls easier. The all-male crew handles The division's "man of steel" is Petty docking procedures and logistical needs Officer Second Class Carlos Casares. to help newly-arrived ships prepare for The hull maintenance technician does all future voyages. -welding and makes and fixes things made When a ship docks at Rodman, it of steel. takes six of the division's l2men to help Electrical repairs are done by the it to dock or travel through the canal. division technicians Petty Officer First ~-~Technicaily, the division could form two Class Larry Zschiedrich and Petty Offisix-man teams, but that rarely happens cer Second Class Henry Metral. As new Division Chief Arlis Wise said. sailors, Hopper and Seaman Recruit "If one of our men is out for any Nathaniel Hampton handle such duties reason it wouldn't be possible. Right as paint-chipping and general cleaning. now, we're averaging a 60-hour work Besides handling his storekeeping i week for everyone. Our E-4s and below duties, Petty Officer 2nd Class Kurt are working seven days a week," Wise Busjahn joins Fontanez, Zschiedrich and said. Torres as a dock master. Tlhey are a Those 60-hour work weeks have, in populargroup becausepart oftheirjobis part, come from the increasing number to connect Defense Switching Network of U.S. Navy ships traveling to Panama telephone lines to the ships so incoming Sfor counterdrug efforts, Wise sald. sailors can call friends and loved ones. The number of ships the division has With so many ships traveling here, alded has steadily increased over the there's hardly a dull moment. In 1991, years; 127 docked in 1989, 147 in 1990 Wise saw aship carrying 5,000 pounds of Machnis at PO AlOndekainsectthe ort wih te Dvidtar Jodan and 231 in 1991. Wise said it's been a seized cocaine. He's also seen four deMachnis Mae P3 A Onrek inpecs th pot, iththeDavd SarrJorandramatic increase considering the divicommissioned nuclear submarines travel a National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Association research vessel in the sion saw an average of 40-50 annually in through the canal which he considers a background. the mid 80s. "major evolution." Headed by Wise, one of three boatDespite the division's long work week, swains mates, the division has one electhere's still time for fun. Before the 1991 tronics technician, two electricians, two UJNITAS exercise, two Japanese destroymachinist mates, a hull maintenance ers docked in Panama and played memtechnician, a storekeeper and two nonhers of the division in sporting events. rated seamen. The crew ranges from 18"Although we couldn't communicate year-old Seaman Recruit James Hopper with the Japanese sailors, we were able to 39-year-old P02 Hesiquio Torres. to play softball games with them. We Chiefs Wise and Mark Wiscow and also saw how foreign sailors of our rank Petty Officer 1st Class Manuel Fontanez act. It really bonds us together," Andreka check radio messages from ships at sea said.

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Tropic Times Oct. 23,1992 Frank Brown U.S. Amy poto by Sgt. Jam.Vocum Thinstance." he said as he lapsed into a Te acne r pu s quick, upbeat tango. "What I try to do is "Music tells us how we're living. It tells what era the get the real rhythm of the place it comes composer lived in, what was going on at the time it three decades from" itt Brown didn't always teach music. He was w -en. started out playing part time for churches Frank Brown nin Colon and later moved to Panama Piano instructor by Sgt. James Yocum City, where he began teaching. Tropic Times staff He learned to play at a conservatory. love this music." helping kids. I teach calculus, math, He had to travel from the Atlantic port Brown credits his wife -a faithful anything. I like to get deep into the stuFORT CLAYTON (Tropic Times) -town to Panama City several times a Sevent-Day Adventist -for keeping dents and find out what they haveintheir The piano teacher wasn't upset that one week to take 15-minute classes with the him with the church. He said he likes reminds." of his students missed a class -even instructor. It was during one of those ligious music because it's so emotional. Brown said it's painful sometimes though she didn't call to cancel. As he classes that theinstructor asked himifhe "I like my music to have heart-real when he has to see his students leave waited for his next student, he ran his wanted to come on the weekends for emotion," he said. "Music tells us how because their parents move back to the fingers along the piano that's been his more in-depth classes. we're living. It tells what era the comstates. trademark for the last 30 years. Brown took him up on the offer and poser lived in, what was going on at the "I've got some bright students that Wearing the brown hat that most stubecame a better pianist for it. As he matime it was written." after one year, they play beautifully," he dents have never seen leave his head, tured and got better at the piano, more Brown took the job of teaching at said. "It hurts me that after they begin to even during their recitals, Frank Brown and more opportunities opened up for Valent Recreation Center on Fort Clayget better, they quit." moved into a melody that matched his Brown. ton to help fill his free time and satisfy his "I like for my students to learn to play words. "I've had offers from hotels to play love of teaching and helping children. the musicright, thenimprovise," he said, "What you really have to do with for them, but I say no," Brown said, "I used to get off work and not have tapping out his version of I Did it My music is to get where it comes from," he playing a haunting version of Amazing anywhere to go," the visual information Way. "When they can do that, they're said, playing a slow, western version of Grace. specialist for the Panama Canal Comready to play anything." Home on the Range. "But, I'll stay with the church," he mission said. "Then they offered me this." Brown said he always accepts new "If it's Argentine, play it like somesaid, moving into an slightly faster verBrown said he jumped at the offer. students, but current students have priorone from Argentina would like, say for sion of Just a Closer Walk With Thee. "I "Most of my free time is devoted to ity. For information, call 287-6500.

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lO Tropic Times Oct. 23, 1992 Aircrews share plane by Spec. Jeffrey von Beltz 363rd Public Affairs Detachment HOWARD AFB (Theater Support Element) Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units recently took a break from airlift support throughout Central and South America to escort more than two dozen pre-schoolers from Howard AFB and Albrook AFS through C-130 Hercules cargo planes. One group of children from the bases' Child Development Center's Enrichment Program giggled and squealed as they climbed up into the plane's cockpit, sat in the pilots' and navigator's seats and tentatively reached for the controls of the aircraft. Another wandered into the cargo area and bounced on the red nylon web seats where "sticks" of paratroopers sit before "hooking up and shuffling to the door." Stillanother group walked up to the rear cargo door and slid their small feet over the steel rollers used to offloadcargo. When they have the time and are not too busy, the aircrews enjoy taking people through their aircraft, according to TSgt. Richard Kennedy, a U.S. Marshal in Atlanta from Douglasville, Ga., and member of the Georgia Air National Guard's 165th Air Group, headquartered in Savannah. But when the crews are busy, it's a whirlwind of activity known as Volant Oak. Volant Oak began in 1977, when the Military Airlift Command was tasked with providing aircraft and crews to support operations being conducted throughout the Southern Command is area of responsibility, which is Central and South America. Operating from Panama, the Volant Oak mission is an on-going task, which includes logistic, counter-drug and disaster relief airlifts and contingency support to embassiesThato activer dutythot beev n ur nt pr y MsL Mark Yahling embassies, active duty, Reserve and Guard units operTSgt. Richard Kennedy helps Jaleesa Greogry down the steps from a C-130 Hercules, while Krayton In order to accomplish the mission, the Miit Polka covers his ears to quiet the noise from the take-off of another plane. Airlift Command obtained operational control over 19 118th Air Wing, Air National Guard in Nashville, retired from the Tennessee Air National Guard at the -Air National Guard and 14 Air Force Reserve compoTenn., logged more than 130 flight hours, carried 279 close of business Sept. 19 after more than 24 years of nents from across the United States, which are sent to tons of cargo and safely delivered nearly 400 passenger service." Panama in overlapping deployments. in the area of operations. "Our tours down here are a lot of work," said Hill, a While supporting Volant Oak during two weeks of "And that's the norm for a two-week tour," accord727 pilot with American Airlines and resident of Charannualtraining, Sept. 5-19, three C-130 crews fromthe ing to Lt. Col. Luke Hill, mission commander, who lotte, N.C., "but we're trained up for it." Reserve military policemen walk Panama beat by Spec. Jeffrey von Beltz "When / first became in363rd Public Affairs Detachment volved in the annual trainFORT CLAYTON (Theater Support Element) -It was 9:35 p.m. on Sept. 16 ing in Panama, I thought it when six military police patrol vehicles was just a hokey job just responded to a domestic disturbance in w js a Fort Clayton's housing area. practice, but it's not. By 10:45 p.m., the disturbance had Raskovich been quelled and the military policemen, I IIIt 37hsqa ecf including elements of the Missouri Na-375hsudedr tonal Guard's 3175th Military Police I Company, Warrenton, Mo., were back natural habitats or place in zoo facilities. on the beat. The 3175th soldiers are also involved "This is real life," said SSgt. Richard in routine vehicle and foot patrols, gateRaskovich, a 3175th squad leader and guard duty, traffic law enforcement, U.S. part-time deputy for the Franklin County mail security, and the control of prisonSheriff's Office. ers in custody. "Ikeep tellingthe kids, thisis forreal. IN' Several unit members voiced concerns We're out there ticketing people, taking I .1 about whether the company will be prisoners and placing them in custody," SSgt. Frsanrt Thrwe photo by Sp. Jefrey vM d rt back in Panama for future annual trainprses and paigte t Frank Thrower (left) directs a HMMWV driver to the next drop off point igtus he said. for the night beat of the 3175th Military Police Battalion as fellow military ing tours. The 200-member 3175th Military picmnnldthvhce.Members of the company will be atPoliceCompany, consists ofGuardsmen policemen unload the vehice. tending various military schools in the from St. Clair, West Plains, Cape Gience which proved invaluable when the One ofthe military policemen's tasks United States next year, and will not be rardeau and Warrenton. unit was mostrecently activated for Opwhile in Panama is animal control, the training overseas. The unit is the largest physical secuerations, Desert Shield and Desert capture of stray dogs and cats that are "We'll be standing down for training rity force in the state. Storm. .taken to the veterinarians and held until next year," said Raskovich. "We don't This year, the 3175th is conducting "When I first became involved in the claimed or adopted. know what's going to happen after next two-week annual training in Panama in annual training in Panama, I thought it The Missouri Guardsmen also trap year." three, 40-person continuous deploywas just a hokey job, just practice, but wild animals, such as snakes and alliga"We probably won't be back," said ments where it gains the type of experiit's not," said Raskovich. tors, which they try to return to their Raskovich.

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Sports Oct. 23,1992 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 11 Curundu Cougars blank Balboa Bulldogs 18-0 by Sgt. John "Gus" Hall Szymanski. The Cougars completed only Tropic Times Sports Editor one otherpass on the night, but rumbled for 199 yards on the ground. BALBOA STADIUM (Tropic Times) The first big play of the game came -Turnovers. It's been the only thing that from the Cougars defense. Cornerback has kept the Curundu Cougars and Balboa Rudy Waller stepped in front of the inBulldogs from having unbeaten football tendedreceiver, interceptedthepass and seasons this year. The dreaded turnover returned it to midfield. The Cougars didn't affected Curundu Sept.25 and caught up score on the next drive, but it helped with Balboa Friday night. them win the field position battle as they The Cougars (5-1) atoned for last pinned the Bulldogs at their own end. month's 22-12loss to the Bulldogs (5-1) The Cougars defense also chalked up with a 18-0 win and a share of first place the game's second big play. in the Department of Defense Dependent Defensive end Mike Morgan recovSchools -Panama Interscholastic Footered a fumble deep in Cougars territory ball League. that stopped a Bulldog drive. In the first matchup, the Bulldogs The Cougars offense capitalized on turned two early Cougars turnovers into that turnover with a two-play, 71-yard two quick touchdowns. Friday night, the scoring drive. Szymanski caught a 25Cougars were aided by seven Bulldogs yard pass over the middle, followed by a turnovers, and the coaches were the first 46-yard run off tackle by tailback Rey to admit that it was the key to victory. Williams that gave the Cougars a 6-0 "The Bulldogs are always prepared lead. and motivated," Cougars head coach Fred The team traded stalled drives for the Photo Bales said. "We made some mistakes in rest of the first half. Curundu Cougars quarterback Robbie Garcia hands off to fullback Raphael the first game that helped them win and In the second half, some of coach George. they did the same Friday night." Bales' homework paid off. He called a his linemen won this game. Left guard/ on 16 cares. Bulldogs coach Vince Martinez said play that was designed by former Duke nose guard Joseph Lopez, right tackle/ two things were key in game two. coach Steve Spurrier. It's acounteroffa defensive end Mike Morgan, right guard Cougars 18, Bulldogs 0 "They capitalized on our mistakes, sweep action, and Williams madeitlook defensive end Bryan Smith and center/ Cougars Bulldogs but their tough, swarming defense shut easy. noseguard Steven Wheeler played the First downs 11 4 us down," Martinez said. With the ball on the Bulldogs 19-yard whole game and accomplished their Rushes-yards 42-199 21-45 Although notknown fortheirpassing line, Williamstookthepitchfrom Garcia mission -to stop Bulldog linebacker Passing yards 35 31 game, the Cougars came out firing on and faked right, then turned left and RyanUnderwood. Comp-att-int 2-7-0 2-9-3 their first possession. Knowing the Bullpicked up 18 yards. Garcia scored on the "If we didn't block Underwood, we Return yards 50 129 dogs had a strong run defense -espenext play on a keeper and the Cougars led weren't going to win the game," Bales Fumbles lost 2 4 cialyinth scoday -cochBaes120.Punts-avg. 4-32.7 4-30.5 cially in the secondary -coach Bales 12-0. said. "In our only loss he must have had Penalties-yards 5-45 5-50 wanted to keep them on their toes. An interception and hard inside run15 or20 tackles against us. Thanks to the Individual stats "We wanted the Bulldogs to concenning by linebacker/fullback Raphael great game plan coach Al Grade impleRUSHING -Cougars, Williams 16-113, George trate on stopping the pass so we could run George helped set up the Cougars final mented, we we're able to stop him." 9-36, Von Hollen 5-26, Szymanski 3-15, Fishthe ball better," Bales said. "We weren't touchdown. He rumbled for nineand Stopping Bulldogs star running backs bough 1-5, Garcia 7-1, Waller 1 (minus 7). Bulleven concerned about completing the 10-yard runs to the Bulldogs one-yard Paolo Ameglio and Jerome Price didn't dogs, Ameglio 10-30, Price 6-10, Nieves 2-6, passes." line. Garcia scored his second TD on a hurt the Cougars chances either. The Howard 2-1, Oliver 7 (minus 2) PASSING -Cougars, Garcia 2-7-0 35. Bulldogs, One of the early plays through the air keeper to close out the scoring 18-0. Ameglio-Price tandem have been known Beattie 2-7-2 31, Ameglio 0-1 -0 0, Price 0-1 -1 0. worked -a 10-yard toss from quarterEven though the turnovers and big to surpass the 100-yard mark often this RECEIVING -Cougars, Szymanski 2-35. Bullback Robbie Garcia to tight end Rick plays were most noticeable, Bales said season. The Cougars held it to 40 yards dogs, Ameglo 1-27, Price 1-4. uS. Army photo by Sgt John "Gu Hal Bulldogs split end Jerome Price was held to 10 u.s.kmyyphotsgt imks.-H yards on six carries and one reception for four Curundu Cougars head coach Fred Bales gives his team a pep talk before the game. yards. Redskins-Vikings, Raiders-CowMagic Johnson considers playing Army 10-milers.page 12 boys, Dolphins-Colts games highsome back-to-back games with the Sportsshorts.page 13 light Sunday's action. L.A. Lakers. Rodman triathlon.page 13

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Tropic Times 12Oct. 23, 1992 Bulldog-Cougar series holds rich history by Sgt. John "Gus" Hall TropcTiesorts Hdi Bulldogs-Cougars head-to-head matchups Some football coaches consider their sport a war. Below is a list of the Bulldogs-Cougars results 1987 -Bulldogs 21, Cougars 7; Bulldogs 19, Some call it just a game. Fred Bales and Vince since the Cougars inaugural 1983 season. The Cougars 0. Martinez have weathered a war and love their game. Cougars hold a 11-9 advantage. 1988 -Bulldogs 35, Cougars 0; Bulldogs 14, Bales, the Curundu Cougars coach, and Martinez Cougars 6. the Balboa Bulldogs head man, have battled on the 1983 -Cougars 15, Bulldogs 8; Bulldogs 29, 1989 -Cougars 21, Bulldogs 0; Cougars 18, gridiron since 1986, but their history goes back much Cougars 14. Bulldogs 7. Befre becoming head coaches, Bales and 1984 -Cougars 13, Bulldogs 8; Cougars 20, 1990 -Cougars 18, Bulldogs 0; Cougars 16. Martinez were assistants with the Balboa Red Bulldogs 0. Bulldogs 0. Machine. After a 48-0 loss in 1978, they spent what 1985 -Cougars 20, Bulldogs 17; Bulldogs 20, 1991 -Cougars 14, Bulldogs 0; Cougars 22, seemed like hours just staring at the scoreboard. Cougars 15. Bulldogs 0. Bales remembers that night well. 1986 -Bulldogs 14, Cougars 7; Bulldogs 29, 1992 -Bulldogs 22, Cougars 12; Cougars 18, "We both said that we knew too much about Cougars 0. Bulldogs 0. football to lose by that many points. I decided that I was going to learn more about the game, or I was game and championship 18-7 in what Bales called coaches. Martinez considers himself to be one of the going to get out of the business." "calf-high mud." lucky scouts at the game. Martinez felt similarly. The Cougars won champi"I was able to walk, so I pushed other scouts in "I felt that as coaches we onships in 1990 and '91 and are wheelchairs around to watch the games in 1950 and needed to keep the score closer, battling the Bulldogs for this '51." for the kids' sake." season's title. As a teenager, Martinez attended the University of For Bales and Martinez, the Bales says he owes a lot of Oklahoma. Students were allowed to watch the scores got closer and they -his success to the current Sooners practice twice a week. Martinez's timing became great coaches. principal of Balboa High was a little unlucky. As a freshman, Martinez saw Bales took over the Cougars School, Ernie Holland. Wilkinson's 47-game winning streak halted by Notre in 1983 and Martinez became "He was and is an outstandDame in 1957. Martinez's luck improved, as he met Bulldogs coach in 1986. In ing football coach," Bales said. the famous Sooners coach twice. 1985, Bales' team was co"He coached the Bulldogs for Bales wasn't in Oklahoma to see that incredible champions with the Bulldogs. 15 years and brought a quality streak, but has received a lot of advice from top In 1986, Martinez's team went Bales of football here that this league Martinez college coaches. He's received books and informaundefeated and claimed the had never seen. He helped all tion from Lou Holtz, who was coaching at Arkansas title. the coaches he has worked with improve their game," at the time, and current Washington Huskies coach Three years later, Bales and Martinez faced each Bales said. Don James and others. other and uncertainty. The year was 1989. It was a Martinez was influenced early in his life by a leg"I'm surprised at how much coaches care about turbulent time. The game was moved from Balboa endary coach. Martinez was a polio-stricken boy each other," Bales said. "I just sent out form letters to Stadium to Jarman Field for security reasons. scout in the 40s. As part of a troop for handicapped coaches all over the United States asking for advice. "When the national anthem played, I thought scouts, Martinez saw College Football Hall of Fame So many have sent me so much good information." maybe it was for the last time," Martinez said. coach Bud Wilkinson on the sidelines -literally. The reason could be that football coaches all over "Coach Bales and I thought the football program The scouts were allowed to view Oklahoma Sooners the world have a common bond -a love for the would be cancelled." Bales and the Cougars won the games on the sidelines, right behind the players and game. Photocouflsy of the U&A5sAsmy 10.mlw hi. The U.S. Army South 1 0-miler team had a chance to meet the sergeant major of the Army while in Washington D.C. for Army 10-miler. From left are: Front row: Brian Coutch, Co. B, 536th Engineers; Deborah Weslow, MEDDAC; Mary Fetter, HSC, 142nd Med.; SMA Richard A. Kidd, Linda Wozniak, Co. A, 193 Spt.; Reuben Tull, Co. A, 154th Signal; and Kenneth Riggsbee, 59th Engineers. Second row: Norma Alderete (kneeling), HSC, 536th Engineers; Willie Moye, Co. B, 193rd Spt.; Henry Sepulveda, Co. D, 142nd Med.; Millie Daniels, HALFTiME REST -Cristobal Tigers guard/defensivetackle Jay Laatz rests HHC, 154th Signal; Eva Foster, CRD Special Sports Director; Corey Smallduring halftime of the Tigers' game against the Red Machine. wood, HHC, 5/87th Inf.; EjnorAllen, Co. A, 154th Signal;and Deidre Campbell, HSC, 747th Mi. Army 10-mi ers excel by Sgt. John "Gus" Hall the third best military team average time Tropic Times Sports Editor at 55:215, only 10 seconds slower than 1991. The USARSO women had a70:01 WASHINGTON D.C. (Tropic Times) average time and unofficially came in -Murphy's Law tried to wreak havoc on fourth. The average times were deterthe 1992U.S. Army South 10-milerteam mined by taking the four best times from and failed miserably. The six-man, sixeach team. In 1991, the USARSO men's individual stats woman team battled naggig ijures, teamcameinfourth overall. Thewomen RUSHING -Red Machine, Thompson 16-144, endured months of tough training and set the course record for female military Machine Tigers Gutierrez 4-44, Olton 2-29, Corrigan 8-1, answered the call in the nation's capital teams in 1991 with a 69:34 time. Henry First downs 10 12 Cisneros 1 (minus 1). Tigers, Townsed 16Oct.11. Sepulveda came in second in his age Rushes-yards 31-217 40-138 125, N. Acosta 9-28, B. Acosta 5-11, Because of a computer breakdown, group and 24th overall at 53:47. Passing yards 17 45 McDonald 1-2, Alvarez 9-28. only individual times were identified The top men's military team was the Comp-att-int 2-6-1 4-8-2 PASSING -Red Machine, Corrigan 2-6-1 17. e Return yards 28 45 Tigers, 4-8-2 45. immediately for the estimated 5,000 Military District of Washington with a Fumbess 3 3 RECEIvINGRed Machine, Hovan 1-12, Grarunners. Some of the approximately 500 55:02 time. The first female military Punts-avg. 4-35.2 4-25.2 harm 1-6. Tigers, Cox 1-32, N. Acosta 2-18, team times were computed shortly after. Penalties-yards 16-150 3-35 Alvarez 1 (minus 5). Officially, theUSARSO men's team had Story continues on page 13.

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Tropic Times 1' Oct. 23, 1992JX 26 triathletes attack Rodman triple threat by Monique Chere Spectators cheered as a flash of red appeared from Nav Mo ar an Recrem around the corner. In a short time, runners stretched under the banner with increasing frequency. RODMAN NAVAL STATION (Navy Morale, Gathering breath, the competitors crowded around Welfare and Recreation) -Slicing through water, whizthe parking lot tolistento th6 winning names and times. zing around curves, then propelling themselves downMany already knew their fate. hill for the last stretch, 26 competitors finished the Navy Winning teams, age group victors then overall chamMWR-sponsored Rodman Naval Station triathlon here pions were announced. Sunday. The two boys that participated, Bradley Schoultz, They took to the water (500 yards of it at Rodman 12, (1:12:41) and Ian Bernard, 11, (1:16:00) were enPool), took to the road (16 kilometers of it towards thusiastically cheered for their winning performances. Empire Range) and took to the streets (5 kilometers of Maholic, 16-29 age group winner, and second overit on a looping back road to Building 4 near the front all, said it was his fourth triathlon this year. gate) and returned to the Officers' Club. "On my last triathlon, I wiped out my bike. I was in Three services were represented and one civilian Gorgas (hospital) for about a week. But I enjoy doing from the Department of Defense Dependents' School this!" he said. competed. Naval Special Warfare Unit Eight had the One of the triathlon coordinators, Hank Baltar, usuPhoto by Monique Che best represenation with 12 competitors. ally a participant in the events, said he was satisfied William Fix crosses the finish line during the triathThe participants were divided into two waves. Firstwith the race but he "would have liked to see women Ion held on Rodman Naval Station Sunday. Fix's timers and father/son teams werein the first group. The and more teams competing." second group was more experienced. Some like Thom "We had good weather, good support, and most of bike had a flat tire during the 16-kilometer bike ride, Maholic -who had threetriathlons to his credit--and all, it was a safe event." so had to run while pushing his bike to finish that part others like Mike Sonney who was fresh off a stateside After the race, bikes were placed atop vans and wet of the race. triathlon. clothing was wrung out. One athlete mumbled some30-39 With even strokes, the second wave outdistanced the thing about a huge breakfast, as he cranked up his pickMike Sonney,31Oth ALS,53:11; Jesus Carrera,6933td first group. They pulled themselves out of the water, up stereo, sat on the ground and stretched his cramping Electronic Security Squadron, 55:29; Dan Boughton, dripped over their shoelaces and strapped on their helmuscles. Detachment 10, 79th Test and Evaluation Group, 59:50 mets. 40 and above Swimmers became bikers. Overall winners were: WebLoudat, DoDDS, 56:43; MikePeck, U.S.Southern Because of the small number of participants, athletes Mike Sonney, 310th Airlift Squadron. 53:11; Jesus Command, 1:02:03; Carlos Lampas, SOUTHCOM, were spread out. Hands snatched at water spot cups. Carrera, 6933rd Electronic Security Squadron, 55:29; 1:02:55 Theyleaned overthe handlebars on the way back home. Thom Maholic, 1st Battalion, (Airborne) 508th InfanTeams Bikers became runners. try, 56:16 NSWU-8, 55:06, Alex Moore, Mark Kasel, Steve Wobblylegs gathered speed andheaded up theroad, 16-29 Renly, through the gate bythe housing area, back towards Thom Maholic, 1-508th Infantry, 56:16 Building 4, and down the main roadto return to the club Robert Lueken, NSWU-8, 56:41; Gordon Asher, VAW NSWU-8, 55:18, David Casale, Christopher Carbery, -for the last time. 123,1:02:55 Leslie Bleamaster. Sport Shorts Gardens entrance. Call Ed McAleer at 252-2464. Turkey Bowl tryouts Gl vTryouts for the 1992 Turkey Bowl football tournaGolf tournament Atlantic volunteer reporters ment will be held Saturday at 9 a.m., at Jarman Field, A Veterans Day golf tournament sponsored by The Tropic Times needs more Atlantic side volunFort Clayton. Call Eva Foster at 287-4050. AT&T will be held Nov. 11 at Horoko Golf Course. teerreporters/photographers forstories. Call the sports The two-person, best-ball event begins at 7:30 a.m. editor at 285-6612/4666. Body building championship with a shotgun start. There will be four flights. HandiThe Hickam Sports and Fitness Center in Honolulu capsareasfollows:"A"playerswith0-7handicap;"B" Basketball registration is sponsoring a body building contest Nov. 13. All players with 8-15 handicap; "C" players with 16-22 Registration is under way for the 1992 U.S. Army active duty members, their family members, Departhandicap and "D"players with 23 and above handicap. South unit level basketballprogram forthe Atlantic and ment of Defense and Non-Appropriated Funds employTeams can be chosen by golfers. The team handicap Pacific communities. Leagues will run from Nov. 4 to ees 18 or older are eligible. The registration deadline is will be 50 percent of the lowest golfer's handicap. For Dec. 21. The tournament will take place Jan 4-11. Tuesday. Call the Howard Sports and Fitness Center at example, if one team member's handicap is 14 and the A team coaches clinic will be held Tuesday at 6 p.m. 284-3451. other is 16, the team handicap will be 7. at the Community Recreation Division Sports Branch, Entry fee is $20 and includes green fees, polo shirt Building 154 forPacific teams. Atlanticteam represenIntramural volleyball and lunch at the CPO Club Nov. 11. tatives will meet Nov.31, atnoon at theSundialRecreaEntry forms are at the Horoko GolfCourse, Rodman tion Center. Call the Sports Branch at 287-4050. The Howard Sports and Fitness Center will register Fitness Center, the MWR mainoffice (Building 65) and volleyball players for intramural leagues later this month. the Information, Tour and Travel Office (Building 24 volleyball Call 284-3451. next to Pizza Hut). Intramural v le b l Call283-4454/5307or283-4222/4061. The Howard Sports and Fitness Centeris accepting 4X4 Club run intramural volleyball registration. Call 284-3451. Bowln turna entThe Backcountry 4X4 Club is sponsoring a free Holi y t Halloween Fun Run Saturday. The run will be followed The Albrook Bowling Center and thePanama Canal oliday tournaments by an overnight beach trip. Call 268-0061. Bowling Association are sponsoring the Pepe Damian Veterans Day sporting events registration is under TournamentSaturday andSunday. Thereis a$15entry way until Wednesday. Open events for racquetball, Men's hoops registration fee. Entries are limited and prizes will be awarded. Call volleyball, and table tennis will be held at Reeder 284-4818. Physical Fitness Center and Valent Recreation Center Atlantic unit-level men's basketball registration ends Nov. 7-11. Call 287-3861. Nov. 4. Call theFronius Physical Fitness Center at 289Isthmian Roadrunners 3108. The Isthmian Roadrunners are sponsoring to upcomMorning aerobics ing races. A 10-kilometer run will be begin 7 am. The Howard Youth Center offers dance aerobics Women's hoops registration Sunday at the Kentucky Fried Chickenin El Dorado. A Mondays and Fridays and interval sets workouts on Atlantic women's basketball program registration is 21-kilometer run will begin 6:30 am. at the Summit Wednesdays. Thereis a$1 feeper class. Call284-4700. underway. Call 289-3108. Story continued from page 12. probably added a minute to her time. "We did a lot of interval training this and distance running were a good trainReuben Tull went into the race with a year. Weran adistance, rested forashort ing combination." team was the U.S. Army Personnel pulled hamstring, but still averaged a while, thenran thesamedistanceagain," Running 10-milers was something new Command which finished with a 69:03 5:36-mile pace. Moye said. "Thetean alsoputin months to Norma Alderete. That didn't stop her average time. Linda Wozniak suffered severe cramps of hard work, concentrated on a good diet from keeping a 7-minute-per-mile pace. Some of the team members had to and dehydration after crossing the finish and got proper rest." "I've only ran 10 miles twice now deal with injury going into the race. line. She was takento alocalhospitaland The team's top finisher, Sepulveda, once at the local tryouts and in WashingOthers suffered problems on race day. was released in satisfactory condition saidthetrainingprogram helped him imton," Alderete said. "I shaved more than Deborah Wesloh was cut off by another two hours later. prove from 64th overall in 1991 to 24th seven minutes off my tryout time and I runner after the 9-mile marker. She fell, Coach Moye, a member of the 1991 this year. was so excited. I got so carried away with bruised and scraped her side, hands, knee USARSO team, attributes USARSO's "Coach Moye's program really finally being there I didn't even notice and elbow. Coach Willie Moye said that good showing to several things. worked,"Sepulveda said. "The intervals my time," Alderete said.

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14 Tropic Times news Oct. 23,1992 NFL Favorites will love week 8 against the Jets and another vs. the Colts. Why? The Dolphins play by Sgt John Buffalo on Monday night, Nov. 16. "Gus"Hall After the Bills bury them, the fish Tropic 77m" face Houston, New Orleans, San Spats#EdAt Francisco and the L.A. Raiders in e succession. Miami can forget about 1992 perfection, but Danny Boy will light up the Colts defense Sunday. Let's take a backo-day-flasho to Marino could hit the 300-yard mark week 8 of the 1991 NFL season The if the Colts rookie defensive gems Washington Redskins and New fail under pressure. Fish 30, Dolts Orlcans Saints were 7-0. The Buffalo 17. Dallas Cowboys running back Emmitt Smith is wrapped up after a short gain Bills were 7-1, the Miami Dolphins COWER POWER -Pittsburgh against Philadelphia Oct. 5. The 31-7 loss to the Eagles is the Cowboys' only and Minnesota Vikings were 3-5 and Steelers coach Bill Cower, a Pittsloss of the season. the San Francisco 49ers were 3-4. burgh native, returns "home" to What a difference a year makes. Kansas City where he was an BEARS SEND GREEN BAY assistant under Marty Schotten[' PACKING -The Bears blanked the heimer. Confused? Don't worry, the Packers 10-0 on a Thursday night in Steelers (4-2) will look very disoriweek 8 last season. Chicago's defense ented in the Sunday night matchup. n was very rude to Green Bay quarterCower may know the Chiefs' LUI back Don Majkowski, who was schemes, but Schotty knows Cower's returning to the lineup after an injury. dreams -a win over the (4-3) DALLAS (AP) -Three years ago, in backSteve Beuerlein, who saved Dallas' The "Majik Man" forgot his hocus Chiefs. Keep dreaming Bill. The the midst of what was to be a 1-15 season, 1991 season, for a fourth-rounder, and pocus because he completed a dismal Steelers, like the Vikes, have beaten Jerry Jones, rookie owner of the Dallas Seifert (for some of those excess draft 3 of 16 passes for 32 yards in a 10-0 no one of circumstance. The openingCowboys, sat down with a group of writpicks) dealt the out-of-favor Charles Haley loss. How ironic the timing of this day victory over the Oilers was a ers and brashly predicted his team would from the San Francisco 49ers to the game is. Majkowski could return to fluke. The Steelers got five Warren soon contend for an NFL title. Cowboys. lineup this week, but his replacement Moon interceptions, but only won 34"Chuckle," went the writers en masse, In fact, Seifert, who could see Haley Brett Favre is doing just fine. This 29. Pittsburgh has beaten the lowly humoring the obviously overenthusiastic again in the NFC title game, had good year's game should be a little higher Jets, Chargers and Bengals and lost to Arkansan, who at that point was known reasons for disposing of him and had a scoring than last year's shutout, but the lowly Browns and Packers. best as the man who had fired Tom ready replacement in Tim Harris. But if the result should be the same. Unless Chiefs 20, Steelers 6. Landry. there's one reason the Cowboys are 5-1 the Bears (3-3) go on a massive CRYBOYS, RAIDERS, OH MY! Three years later, the Dallas Cowand atop the NFL's toughest division winning streak, they can forget the -Three weeks ago, this looked like a boys, the NFL's youngest team, is .right now, it's Charles Haley. playoffs. The records never mean mismatch and it basically still is. The Contending for an NFL title. "He's the reason our defense is what it anything in this series because the Raiders (3-4) beat an average Giants In fact, Jones and Jimmy Johnson is,' says Jim Jeffcoat, the 10-year veteranrivalry is so great. team, caught the Bills napping and have outsmarted the league that chuckwho serves as the team's elder statesThe question won't be who wins blanked the Hawks. Not very impresled (like the aforementioned writers) when man, designated pass rusher and desigthe game, but what will this week's sive. The Cryboys -you know they took over a declining America's nated spokesman from the Landry era. Mike Ditka soap opera be about. somebody asked me why I called Team in 1989. They are not country "He may not have the numbers, but Maybe he'll nail Jim Ha-augh with them that -are impressive. Being a bumpkins and Johnson is not a college he's the reason we have the pass rush we his clipboard. Maybe Iron Mike will Pittsburgh native, I had to listen to coach out of his element among thepros. do. He creates havoc and the rest of the choke on three packs of gum and Cowboys players like Hollywood In fact, he and Jones, using players guys get to the passer." Harbaugh will save him. Maybe Henderson whine every time the and draft choices obtained in overwhelmIndeed, Haley's number is "one," if Harbaugh won't. Bears 20, Pack 16. Steelers beat them in the Super Bowl. ingly favorable deals with such pros as numbers are counted by actual sacks SKINS HALT VIKINGS -The I didn't think anybody even read this Mike Lynn, Al Davis, Jim Finks and recorded. But the Cowboys' team numMinnesota Vikings (5-1) have got to column. Making a long story longer, George Seifert, have built a team that beris 18 after six games, compared to 23 wake up and smell the coffee. They're the COWboys (5-1) will romp the approaching midseason is one of the three for all of last season -and that speaks a good team, but who have they overmatched Raiders. Why? Because or fourlegitimate contenders in the 1992 volumes -particularly with a still-shaky beaten? Green Bay, Tampa Bay, the Cowpokes have too many NFL. secondary. Cincinnati, Detroit and Chicago, offensive threats for the aging Lynn was the major victim, having Example: On Sunday, Haley charged that's who. The Vikes had to come Raiders to keep up with. Emmitt given up a dozen players and draft choices inside of Kansas City's John Alt, a Pro from behind to beat the Bears and Smith, Troy Aikman and Michael for Herschel Walker, who never did lead Bowl-caliber tackle, and flushed Dave Bucs. The Redskins (4-2) did lose to Irvin could have a field day. COWthe Vikings to the Super Bowl. Krieg from the pocket. Krieg stumbled Phoenix, but also lost to a good Dallas boys 26, Raiders 10. But Finks gave up a No. 1, 2and 3 for down at the 2-yard-line where he was team and beat the Eagles, Broncos, Rounding out the league, Oilers Steve Walsh, currently New Orleans' fallen on by Leon Lett, who got credit for and OK, the putrid Falcons and Lions. 30, Kitties 17; Brownies 18, Patsies third-stringer; Davis gave away quarterhis first career sack. The Skins are back on track and the 13; Broncos 20, Chargers 19, Bucs Vikes are going to get derailed. 33, Lions 20; Eagles 24, Cards 16; Quarterback Mark Rypien is starting Giants 23, Hawk is 3 a rry is to p ru s h erto show what he can do if he gets My season record is 55-33. good pass protection. As long as Lhe The Buckster says: Packers 23, Skins avoid giving up the big play and Bears 17; Vikings 24, Skins 21; get a few of their own, they should Dolphins 24, Colts 13; Chiefs 24, B a rry F o ste r th a t is have no problem winning in the Steelers 17; Cowboys 23, Raiders 17; Metrodome. Skins 24, Vikes 17. Oilers 26, Bengals 10; Browns 24, PITTSBURGH (AP) -The NFL's grade Monday's victory just because it WHAT UNDEFEATED SEASON? Patriots 7; Broncos 17, Chargers 14; leading rusher is named Barry -and came over so inept an opponent. -Miami (6-0) is under a lot of Bucs 17, Lions 10; Eagles 20, Cards his last name isn't Sanders. The AFC The Steelers' 4-2 start ties them with pressure to stay unbeaten. After all, it 12; Giants 14, Hawks 10; Bills 31, Central Division leader is named HousHouston for the AFC Central Division was a Don Shula-coached team that Jets 14. Buck's season record is 53ton -and it's also named Pittsburgh. lead and is their best since they also were went 17-0 in 1972. The Colts (3-3) 35. Six weeks into the NFL season, 10 4-2 in the 1987 strike season. The last don't have any pressure on them. In Buck will back for the divine weeks to go, and what's going on around timethey were 4-2 in a non-strike season fact, Indianapolis has already tripled week nine, he'll be on time, he won't here? The Steelers don't score a touchwas 1983, when they opened 9-2 before its 1991 win total. Miami is looking whine, get picks better than mine, down for nearly a month, they barely finishing 10-6. past this game, the following one and with me that's just fine. manage one TD in three quarters against "It's a great challenge," Cowher said the NFL's worst defense and they're in Tuesday. "I don't think we'll be complafirst place? cent." And they have the NFL's top rusher? Cowher was as defensive as his Steel1. True or False. The Bears have 4. Which quarterback had the highHoly Franco Harris! ers were Monday when it was suggested "We feel good about where we're at, the Bengals might be the NFL's worst won 13 of the last 14 games vs. the est rookie effiency in history in 1983? but it's still real early," Barry Foster, the team. Packers? NFL's top rusher, said. "You can't get "I don't necessarily agree with that ANSWERS too excited because it's so early in the perception of the Bengals," Cower said. 2. Which NFL team was the first to 1. Faise. The Bears have won 12 of the last 14. season, but ifwe getpast these next three "Any time you get a win over a team in score 400 points in one season. 2. The 1950 LA Rams, 466. (games) ." NFL, you should take it in stride. You The Steelers face an AFC murderers' shouldn't relish it if it's over Cincinnati 3. Which team averaged 1.2 points 3. TheCincinnatiRedsscorad10pointsin8games row of Kansas City (4-3), Houston (4-2) or the San Francisco 49crs. We know per game offensively in 1934? 4. Dan Marino, 90. and Buffalo (4-2) the next three weeks, what's ahead of us the next three weeks," I but coach Bill Cowher wouldn't downhe said.

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Tropic Times Oct. 23, 1992 Jays Key was Game 4 hero TORONTO (AP) -Fourstartersinstead ofthree,that was the key. As in Jimmy. Blue Jays manager Cito Gaston looks like a genius, and Jimmy K-ey is the reason. Toronto had a 3-1 lead against Atlanta in the World Series with Jack Morris, David Cone and Juan Guzman ready to pitch on full rest. "Coming into the World Series, I thought our guys pitched a lot ofinnings," Gaston said. "And I thought Jimmy deserved a chance to pitch. He did agreatjob for us tonight (Wednesday)." It would have been easy to come back with Morms on three days' rest. After all, Morris was MVP for Minnesotalast year, throwing tremendously in Games 1, 4 and 7 against the Braves. But Key got the call, and the left-out left-hander was ready. Key allowed one run and five hits in 7 2-3 innings Wednesday night, leading Toronto to a 2-1 victory in Game 4. "I really did have doubts about whether I would pitch in the Series," Key said. "I didn't see any action in the playoffs because Cito thought the right-handers would be better against Oakland. I was concerned about the layoff, and the club knows I'm not as effective a pitcher when I do have along layoff. I'm just glad I was able to finishstrong." "Key" means important. "Key" means significant. le was both against the Braves. s"Hepitchedthegameofhislife," closerTom Henke Jimmy Key allowed one run and five hits in 7 2/3 innings Wednesday night, leading Toronto to a 2 1 victory While some might have disagreed with the decision in Game 4. before, all were in accord afterward. numerology. After winning Game 1, he hoped to bring John Smoltz, who would have won Game 2 until Ed "It was a good idea," Guzman said of the decision. the Braves to even, not the brink. He followed his Sprague's heroic homer, followed Glavine Thursday Morris, who might have been miffed with the manopening four-hitter with a six-hitter, but Pat Borders' night as the middle man in the trio. He went up against ager, decided the decision struck the right note. homer and Devon White's single were too much to Morris twice in last year's Series, but didn't get a Atlanta's Tom Glavine was less happy with the overcome. decision Alabama Crimson Tide thinking about No. 1 TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) -Alabama coach Gene Stallings said Monday it's .too early to be thinking about a national championship, but he realizes his players have their minds on No. 1. The fourth-ranked Crimson Tide (70) solidifiedits status as a contender with a 17-10 victory at Tennessee this weekend. Alabama has won 17 in a row, the third-longest winning streakin the country. Stallings said it's premature to be worrying about the rankings with four games left in the season. But the Tide has only one game remaining against a Top 25 team and appears to have alockon the Southeastern Conference Western Division title. "I know in the back of their minds that somewhere along the line they are thinking that they've worked themselves into position of having some national recognition, and I have no problem with that at all," Stallings said. With its victory over Tennessee, Alabama improved to 4-0 in the SEC and built a two-game division lead when Mississippi State was upset by South APLaserPhoto Carolina. Alabama's Derrick Lassic leaps into the end zone for a touchdown in Saturday's win over Tennessee. MS INGLEWOOD, Calif. (AP) -Magic hard trips. Those ones I can make," ag ic eye s Johnson, eagerto rejoin the Los Angeles Johnson told the New York Times. Lakers after a one-season absence, says "There's a chance to play more than I ctCiv e V he will probably play several back-tooriginally said. I never said there was no back games. chance. It's just something we've always Johnson, who stunned the nation last said, 'Let's see how I feel.' eBSmNovember by announcing he had the "I can't tell you how many I'll play, N B A' gam e s virus that causes AIDS and was retiring, but I've already added one exhibition said last month he was feeling fine and game, and there'll probably be some I was returning to the Lakers. add again. Once the war of the season He originally planned to play in 50 to starts, we'll see what happens. Yeah, I 60 games in the 82-game season after am an HIV guinea pig. I don't mind that. doctors urged him to avoid playing on If people want to use me as an expericonsecutive nights. But on Monday, ment, fine. As long as I'm a basketball Johnson said he could easily play backexperiment and nothing else." to-back games in Pacific or mountain Johnson emerged healthy after a grutime zones. eling 10-day training camp in Hawaii. "Some of thos( I'll play. I can play in As for Johnson playing more games, Phoenix and come home and play, Sacrateammate Byron Scott said: "Good. Make mento and come home. Those aren't it 70 now. The more the better." Johnson APLasPhoto

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16 Tropic Times Oct. 23, 1992 Soldiers enjoy return training by Gregory Thomas USARSO Public Affairs Office FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Mid-September marked the first trip to Panama for some "Show Me State" Guardsmen, but for others it was a chance to see how much the country had changed since they were last here. That last time for most members of the Missouri National Guard was a similar two-week training rotation with the military police of U.S. Army South. During the last year, more than 500 members of the Missouri Guard trained with their U.S. Army South counterparts in Panama. According to lst. Lt. Douglas Gifford, commander, 3175th Military Police Detachment, Mo. National Guard, they deploy to Panama yearly in groups of 40 to 50 to augment the active Army soldiers U.S, Army photo by GregoryThomas soldiers at installations on both the Atlantic and Pacific ROTC cadet Paul Smith checks out items in a car trunk during a routine vehicle inspection. sides of the canal to gain on-the-job experience not available during weekend drills back home." end of Operation Just Cause and things were a mess. very different from my first trip here," Ellermann said. "We're a heavy security NIP unit," said Gifford, a Since then, the country has made many improvements. "Having thunder showers at the same time every day Winfield, Mo. postal service worker. "On the weekIt's quite a visible difference." was quite a change from the clear blue skies I saw here ends we train on things like soldiering skills and convoy A native of Louisiana, Mo., Smith is a senior at during the dry season." escorts. Whenever we deploy to Panama, our troops go Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville. The youngest member of the Show-Me State rotathrough the same process as when you mobilize for This was also Sgt. Ernie Ellermann's second trip to tion, Pvt.2 Steve Dodson, was making memories rather war." Panama. than recalling them. For ROTC cadet Paul Smith, this deployment was "We were busy, but we did have a chance to get out "It was a very enlightening experience," said the 18especially interesting. and see the country, the islands and the canal," the year-old student from St. Louis. "Besides the work, I "The last time I was in Panama was during the first Dixon, Mo. soldier said. was shown beaches and ocean for the first time. I never week of January in 1990," Smith said. "It was near the "This deployment during the rainy season was also dreamed I would see the Panama Canal." Local Girl Scouts start calendar sale campaign HOWARD AFB (US SOUTHCOMPAO) include trips to the Panamanian National -When the topic of Girl Scouts comes up. Girl Scout camp site in Penonome, local most people think of cookies. campouts, day camps, hikes and other acIn Panama, the Girl Scouts of America tivities, Toth said. want people to think calendars,not cookies, In addition to raising money to support because that is what they sell. activities, the process of selling helps the The annual calendar sales began on scouts learn about business and sales techOct. 15 and will continue through Nov. niques, Toth said. 15 according to Aurora Toth, service In Panama, there are four lone troops committee chairman for the Girl Scouts. which operate individually, cover all ages This year the calendars are available within their area and report directly to Nain both pocket and full size models, she tional Girl Scout headquarters. said. The calendars reach a wider audience The Sunshine Lone Troop encompasses because everybody can use them and there the Los Rios area, the Tropical Lone Troop are no health or diet problems related to is made up of Howard/Fort Kobbe scouts, them, Toth said. the Clayton Lone Troop is made up of Fort Also, with the tropical climate of PanClayton girls and the Atlantic Lone Troop ama, large shipments of cookies would be a encompasses all scouts in the Atlantic storage problem, while no such problem community. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Fhard Pukett exists with calendars, Toth said. Each lone troop has calendars for sale, Brig. Gen. David Sawyer, commander 24th Wing, talks with Junior Scout The money raised through the calendar with the profits earned being used in their Naomi Groom and Brownie Rachel Baxter aboutthe Girl Scout calendar. sales will be used for troop activities to community, Toth said. Crash kills 1, injures 5 Postal officials offer holiday tips FORToCLAYTON(USARSOPAO)-Two soldiers, three Panama Canal Commission employHOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA) -The following postage -Dec. 7; surface -Nov. 2. ees, and a Panamanian were involved in a Christmas mailing dates and tips are recommended by Europe .airletters/cards -Dec. 2; airparcel postage three-car accident, Oct. 16, on the Bridge of the 24th Air Postal Squadron to ensure cards, letters -Dec. 2; surface -Nov. 2. Americas. and packages reach their destination by Christmas Far Last .air letters/cards -Dec. 2; air parcel postage A Panamanian taxi driver was pronounced Day. -Dec. 2; surface -Nov. 2. dead at the scene and three others were Greenland.air letters/cards -Dec. 2; air parcel postage injured. Military mail addressed to: -Nov. 15; surface -no service. The accident occurred about 1:50p.m., when a APO/FPO AE zips 090-097.air letters/cards -Dec. Middle East.air letters/cards -Nov. 25; air parcel soldier's car was following a Panamanian taxi 2; priority -Dec. 2; PALNov. 22; SAMNov. 11; surpostage -Nov. 15; surface -Oct. 1. driver eastbound on the bridge. face -Nov. 1. Southeast Asia.air letters/cards -Dec. 2; air parcel A car with PCC employees was cormng westAPO/FPO AE zips 098.air letters/cards -Nov. 25; postage -Dec. 2; surface -Nov. 1. bound when it crossed into eastbound traffic and priority -Nov.18; PAL -Nov. 2; SAM -Nov. 2; surface Central & South America. .air letters/cards -Dec. 7; collided with the taxi. -Oct. 26. air parcel postage -Dec. 2; surface -Oct. 1. The soldier's vehicle following ahead collided APO/FPO AA zips 340.air letters/cards -Dec. 6; into the taxi and the PCC vehicle. priority -Dec. 2; PAL -Nov. 22; SAM -Nov. 11; Some Christmas mailing tips include: The three vehicles were totalled in the accisurface -Nov. 1. *Mail early. dent. .cAPO/FPO AP zips 962-966, 987.air letters/cards -*Pack at least two inches of cushioning material on An investigation into the accident continues by Dec. 2; priority -Dec. 2; PAL -Nov. 22; SAM -Nov. 11; all sides of item. Foamed plastics are excellent packing Panamanian and military officials. surface -Nov. 1. material. U.S. domestic zip codes.air letters/cards -Dec. 9; *Use a container that will withstand the weight of Atlantic DCA office moves priority -Dec. 2; PAL -no service; SAM -Dec. 2; surthe item enclosed. FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO-ATLANTIC) -face -Nov. 1. *Seal with filament tape. The Directorate ofCommunity Activities -Atlan*Don't wrap a box in paperif thereis enough space tic administrative branch has relocated its office International mail addressed to: to write in the address. fromtheMargaritaComplextoBuilding232,Fort Africa.airletters/cards -Dec. 2; airparcel postage *Address with indelible ink. Davis, in the garrison commanders office. The -Nov. 18; surface -Oct. 1. *Enclose a copy of the address in the parcel before phone numberis 289-5075. Australia.air letters/cards -Dec. 2; air parcel postage sealing. -Dec. 2; surface -Nov. 2. *Don't forget the zip code. Caribbean.air letters/cards -Dec. 7; air parcel *PAL= parcel airlift, SAM= surface airmail

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Tropictivities Oct. 23, 1992 An entertainment guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page BI U.S. Army photo by SgL. Deborah E. WIiwia Dasi Garrido gets her camera ready to take pictures of the scenery in El Valie. See story, photos page B5. Brandon Lee, Bruce Lee's son, stars Metro Convertible is cute, extremely 1 TV.B in the action thriller, Rapid Fire, at economical and low priced; maxiTheater review.B9 the Howard theater. mum fun for minimum bucks. Ads.B1 0

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Tropic Times B2 Oct. 23, 1992 Saturday Sunday 3 S 7pm Prelude To A Kiss (PG-13) Meg Ryan, Alec Bald7pm Unlawful Entry (R) Kurt Russell, Madeleine Stowe win Monday 9pm Raising Cain (R) John Lithgow, Lolita Davidovitch 7pm A Stranger Among Us (PG-13) Melanie Griffith, HOWARD Sunday Eric Thal Today 7pm Prelude To A Kiss (PG-13) Meg Ryan, Alec BaldThursday 7pm Bebe's Kids (PG-13) ted win 7pm Unlawful Entry (R) Kurt Russell, Madeleine ~9pmi Death Becomes Her (PG-13) Goldie Hawn, Bruce Monday Stowe Willis, Myl Bec eep 7pm Buffy The Vampire Slayer (PG-13) Donald SutherOct. 30 Saturday land, Kirsty Swanson 7pm A Stranger Among Us (PG-13) Melanie Griffith, 2pm Little Nemo (G) Animated Tuesday Eric Thal 6:30pm 3 Ninja Kids (PG) Victor Wong, Michael Treanor 7pm Raising Cain (R) John Lithgow, Lolita Davidovitch 9pm Stay Tuned (PG) John Ritter, Pam Dawber .Wednesday Sunday 7pm Prelude To A Kiss (PG13) Meg Ryan, Alec BaldAM A DO R 2pm Little Nemo (G) Animated w Today 6:3Opm 3 Ninja Kids (PG) Victor Wong, Michel Treanor Thursday 6:9pm Rapidj Fid () ran o Lee we he nr 7pm Buffy The Vampire Slayer (PG-13) Donald Suther7pm Cool World (PG-13) Kim Basinger, Gabriel Byme 9pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe land, Kirsty Swanson Saturday Monday Ot 30 7pm BatmanRetums (PG-13) Michael Keaton, Danny 7pm 3 Ninja Kids (PG) Victor Wong, Michael Treanor O t DeVito 9pm Stay Tuned (PG) John Ritter, Pam Dawber pm Raising Cain (R) John Lithgow, Lolita Davidovitch Sunday Tuesday 7pm Man Trouble (PG-13) Jack Nicholson, Ellen Barkin 7pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe Tuesday 9pm 3 Ninja Kids (PG) Victor Wong, Michael Treanor SH E RM AN 7pm Unlawful Entry (R) Kurt Russell, Madeleine Stowe Wednesday 7pmn Stay Tuned (PG) John Ritter, Pam Dawber Today Thursday 9pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe 7pm Batman Returns (PG13) Michael Keaton, Danny 7pm Universal Soldier (R) Jean Claude Van Damme, Thursday DeVito Dolph Lundgren 7pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe Saturday Oct. 30 9pm Stay Tuned (PG) John Ritter, Pam Dawber 7pm Unlawful Entry (R) Kurt Russell, Madeleine Stowe 7pm NO MOVIE Oct.30 7pm 3 Ninja Kids (PG) Victor Wong, Michael Treanor 3 Nn Kids 9pm Rapid Fire (R) Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe Now show gij Victor Wong, Michael Treanor "'RAISING CAIN' IS ONE OF THE MOST CINEMATICALLY While their father is occupied with his FBI CLAYTONSATISFYING MOVIES OF THE SUMMER! CLAYTO N It's Brian De Palma's return to the Hitchockian genre business, his young sons cope with the absence Today U MAGAZINE by learning the ways of the ninja from grandpa. 7pm Prelude To A Kiss (PG-13) Meg Ryan, Alec Bald"A BRILANT PSYCHO-THRILLER WITH JUST THE Their new skills are put to the test when an arms winRI AMOUNT OF GHS dealer tries to kidnap them to keep Dad from 9p wRing an()Jh ihoLlt aioic 'Raising Cain' is Visual magic.A Brian De Palma classic" 9pm Raising Cain (R) John Lithgow, Lolita Davidovitch -shutting him down. Special added attraction: Saturday 2pm Bebe's Kids (PG-1) Animated a -"Pedal To The Metal" kicks the show off. PG 7pm Death Becomes Her (PG-13) Goldie Hawn, Bruce (violence), 93 mm. Willis, Meryl Streep 9pm Lethal Weapon III (R) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover Stay Tuned Sunday 2pm Bebe's Kids (PG-13) Animated John Ritter, Pam Dawber 7pm Death Becomes Her (PG-13) Goldie Hawn, Bruce John Ritter is a couch potato who ends up Willis, Meryl Streep participating in the actual adventure series and 9pm Lethal Weapon III (R) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover ame shows he watches on a Satanic television Monday 7pm Lethal Weapon III(R) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover channel. PG, 88 min. 9pm Death Becomes Her (PG-13) Goldie Hawn, Bruce Willis, Meryl Streep Rapid Fire Tuesday 7pm Death Becomes Her (PG-13) Goldie Hawn, Bruce Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe Willis, Meryl Streep This action thriller stars Brandon Lee, Bruce 9pm Lethal Weapon III (R) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover Lee's son, as an uncooperative witness who sees Wednesday a drug lord/Mafia dispute and then becomes a 9pm Lethal Weapon II1(R) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover hero as he helps a veteran cop solve a major Thursday heroin case. R (violence, language, sex), 95 min. 7pm Lethal Weapon III (PG-13) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover Little Nemo: Adventures In 9pm Death BecomesHer (PG-13) Goldie HawnBruce Willis, Meryl Streep Slumberland Oct. 30 A Voices of Mickey Rooney, Gabriel Damon. 7pm Bebe's Kids (PG-13) Animated The King of Slumberland summons Little Nemo 9pm Death Becomes Her (PG-13) Goldie Hawn, Bruce Willis, Meryl Streep to assume the scepter of power. Excitement and action starts when a monster from Nightmare Land kidnaps the King and Little Nemo is off to DAVIS Clayton Theater, today. Davis Theater, the rescue. G, 85 min. Today Saturday, Tuesday and Oct. 30. 7pm UnlawfulEntry(R)KurtRussell,MadeleineStowe S Thurs., tacos. Fri.&Sat., prime rib/seafood. Dining Sat., 4:30pm-midnight, variety music, free pizza. 8:30pm.; Fri.&Sat., 6-9:30pm. Dining room bar. Club calendar open to Enlisted Club Memebers while enlisted 286-3511. open, 4-9pm. Laguna Lounge open Mon., Wed. and Dining Room under renovation. Disco: Fri., 7pmFri., 4-10pin, complimentary snacks. Pool bar: Club Amador midnight. Lounge: Mon.-Thurs.,4-9pm, Fri.,4pmQuarry Heights O'Club Mon.-Thurs., noon-6pm; Fri., noon-Spm; Lunch: Tues.-Fri., 11:30am-lpm. La Concha Reamidnight, Sat., 6-9pm. Social hour: Fri. 5-6pm. Breakfast Mon.-Fri., 6:30-8:30am, Sat., 8-10am. Sat.&Sun., 10am-6pm. Thun: steak-by-the-ounce; taurant: Tues.-Sat., 6-lopm; Bridge Lounge: TuesBingo: Wed., 6pm. Closed Sun.,&holidays. 284Lunch: Mon.-Fri., 11:30am-lpm. Dinner: Tuea.Fri.&Sat., prime rib. 283-4498. Thurs., 5-10pm; Fri., social hour, 5pm-midnight; 3089, Building 707 Thurs. 6-9pm; Fri-Sat. 810pm. Bar lounge: Thea.Sat., 6pm-midnight; punch brunchforchildren,first Fri., 4-10pm; Sat. 6-10pm; Fri., social hour, 4-7pm. Acey-l)eucey Club Sun. each month, 10:30am-1:30pm. Champagne Top Three Lounge 282-4380/3439. Open to E-5 through E-6 Mon., Wed.&Fri., 5-10pm brunch, Sun., 10:30am-1:30pm. Beef & burgundy, Open: Mon.-Thurs., 4-10 pm, Fri., 4pm-lam, Sat., only. Call 283-4332. Tues.,6-10pm;pastapizazz,Wed., 6-9pm;Mongo5-1lpm, Sun.&holidays, closed. Social hour: CPO Club lian BBQ, Thurs., 6-9pm. Bingo: Tues.&Wed., Mon.&Fri.,4:30-6pm. 284-3089, Building 707. Opento E-7throughE-9,civiliansNM-6and above, Clayton NCO Club 7pm. Reservations: 282-4025/3837/3534. and family members. Lunch: Mom-Fri., Ilam-lpm, Main corral: Mon-Thurs., 7-llpm; Fri.-Sat., 7pmAlbrook Club all-you-can-eat buffet; Sat., grill open, noon-4pm. 2am;Sun., 1-11:30pm. Form: Tue.,steaknight,5Howard Enlisted Members' Club Cashier's cage: Mon.-Fri., Ilam-1:30pm. Mon., Dinner: Fri.&Sat., 6-9pm. Social hour: Wed.&Fri, 9pm; Wed., international buffet, 5-9pm; Thum., Cashier's cage: Sun-Thurs., 9=m-9pm; Fri.&Sat., Thurs., Fri., 2-4:30pm, Wed., 2:30-4:30pm. Din4pm, complimentary snacks. 283-5475. ladiea night, 5-9pm; Fri.-Sat., fine dining, 4:309am-1 1pm; holidays, 4-9pm. Dining: Casual Cove/ ing: Lunch, llam-lpm. Dinner: Mon., Wed., 10pm; entertainment, 9pm-2am. Bingo: Sun., 2Tropical Breezeway, Mon-Fri., 6-30-9am, 11amThurs., 6-8:30pm, Fri.-Sat., 6-9pm. Sun., chamAnchorage Club 5pm; Tues., 6-10pm. The Underground: Mon.11pm, Fri.&Sat., until lam. Dining room closed for pagne brunck, l0am-1pm. Mon., Mongolian BBQ. Open to all ranks. Breakfast: Mon.-Fri., 6:30Thurs., 4:30-1 1pm; Fri., 5pni-2am; Sat., lpm-2am. renovation, members may dine at Howard O'Club hurs., Mexican. Fri., prime rib/seafood. Sat., 9:30am Sat., 8-10:30am. Lunch: Mon.-Fri., 11amMidnight buffet: Wed., Fri., Sat., lOpm-1:30am. Mon.-Sat. Ballroom: variety disco Sun., Thea., steak.Italian2nd/4thWed.eachmonth;mini-gour1:30pm.Dinner:Mon.-Fri.,6-9pm,alacartedining. Casa Maria, Mon.-Sun., 5-10pm. 287-4343/4716. Thum., Fri., Sat. Spm-midnight. Casual Cove: varimet, lst/3rd Wed. each month. Tues., dining room Grill: Mon.-Sat., 11-1:30pm; Sun.&hol., 3:30ety disco Wed., 8pm-midnight, country&western closed, bar menu available in lounge. Disco, Fri., 9:30pm. Pizza&fried chicken to go, 5-9pm daily. Davis Community Club Tues.&Fri. Spim-midnight, rock&roll, 8pm-lam. 8pm-lam. Lounge open: Mon.-Thurs., 4:30-10pm; Bingo, Mon., 5:30pm, special menu. Family night, Breakfast: Mon.-Fri., 6:30-9am. Lunch: Mon.-Fri., Main lounge: Fri.&Sat., 5:30pm-midnight, Wed., Fri., 4:30pm-lam; Sat., 5:30pm-midnight. Social Tues., 5:30-9pm. Social hour, Wed., 4-6pm. 11:30am-lpm. Dinner: Wed.&Thurs., 6-9pm; 5:30-10pm. Social hour: Mon., Wed.&Fri., reduced hour: Fri., 4-6pm. Closed lst Tues. each month at country&wetem night, steak dinner, Wed.,6-9pm. Fri.&Sat.,6-l0pm.Brunch: Sun., 10:30am-1:30pm. price drinks. Bingo: Sun., 2pm; Wed., 7pm; bar 2pm. Flea market 1st Sun. each month, 9am-4pm. All-you-can-eattaco night, Thurs. Bar hours: Tues.Bingo: Sun., 3-6pm. 289-3289/5160. bingo, Mon.-Fri., 5-6:30;m 284-4189, Building Texas BBQ last Sat. each month 6:30-9pm, Fri., 4-1lpm; Fri.&Sat., 4pm-midnight; Sun.&hol., 710. country&westem dancing until lam. 286-4128/ 3:30-10pm. 283-4332/3040. Red Door Club 3547, Building 13. Mon., progressive music, 7-10pm. Tees., special Howard O'Club Rodman Officers' Club night,7-11pm.Wed.,oldic,7-1lpm.nurs.,adiem Cashier's cage: Mon.-Fri., 10am-ipm. Dining: STRAC Club Open to officers, warrant officers, civilians grade night,7-lOpm. Fri.,social hour, progressive music, Lunch,Mon.-Fri., Ilam-lpm.FullmenuTues., Fri., Mon.-Wed., 4:30-10pm. ThMu., 4:30-midnight, NM-7 and above, and family members. Lunch: 7pm-midnight. Sat., rock 'n roll, 7pm-midnight. Sat., and mini-mass Mon., Wed., Thum., 6-9pm. oldies and classic rock. Fri., TGIF, 4:30pm-lam. Mon.-Fri., llam-1:30pm. Dinner: Sun.-Thum., 6287-4343.

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Tropic TimesBfl TVSchedule B -* TVScheuleOct. 23, 1992 Channels 8 & 10 Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Oct. 30 5:30am NBC News at Sunrise 630am Hdline News 6:00am Roben Schuller: Hour of 6:30am NBC News at Sunise 6:30am NBC News t Sunrise 6 30am NBC News 9 Sunrie 6:30am NBC News a Star. 6:30am NBC News at Sunrise 600 ABC Good Moning 7:00 CarolinaMarines Powe 7:00 ABC Go"d Mrinog 7:00 ABC Good Moing 7:00 ABC GoodlMdnlg 7:00 ABCGoodlMmdng 7:00 ABC GoadM.nnog Amoeia 7:30 Navy News This Week 6:30 ThirlyGood Miudes Americ America Amneina America Ar&ca 8:00 Body by Jake 8:00 Cartoon Coner 7:00 Srodio7 9:00 Body by Jake 9:00 Bodyby ske 9 :00 Body by ake y ke 9.00 Body by lake 8:30 OamSurrt 0 JstForKidsl 7:30 The700Club 9:30 SesameSteet 9:30 Ses-orSlrest 9:30 SeasmeSeee 9:30 OesameStrt 9:30 SesameStret 9:30 Kid'slncorporntd Widget 8:00 Both Side w/Jessie 10:30 FamilyDoubleDate 10:30 SilverSpoons 10:30 Back ToTheF.t.re 10:30 SilverSpoons 10:30 Spawuhip rhi10:00 CNNNewsoom Woody Woodpecker Jarkiu 11:00 FailyFeod 11:00 FamilyF.rd 11:00 FamilyFed 11:00 FamilyFetdI 11:00 FamilyFeud 115 ChaunelOr BiSkiots 8:30 Washingror Weekin 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 SbowbizToday 11:30 SbowbizTodoy 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday 10:30 ILove Lcy BackToTheFtuore Review Noun Headline News Break Nou Headline News Break Noun HedIne New Break Note Headline News Break Nou Headline News Break 11:00 Wheel ofForotoe 10:30 FarrieTaleTbeoer 9:00 CBSSunodayMoyipg 12:20 :CN MiddyR o 2 dday or 12:20 SCNMiddayRqpot 12:20 SCNMiddayRqpon 1220 SCNMiddayRepn 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:15 HeadlineNews Break 10:30 FacoTheNatiu 12:30 SporrsMachine 12:30 SpoflLaloNight 12:30 SposLlrNight 12:30 Spore Latenlghlt 12:30 Spos Lsloright Noun HeadlineNewsBreak 11:30 CFAFoctbaO:TBA 11:00 HeadlineNews 1:00 OpeahrWinfrey 1:00 Donhor 1:00 OpeahWinfrey 1:00 Donshun 1:00 OpehWinfrey 12:20 SCNMiddayRepoo 2:30poCFAFootball:TBA 11:30 This Week W/avid 2:00 AnooterWorld 2:00 AnotherWorld 2:00 AotherWorld 2:00 AokterWorki 2:00 AothcerWold 12:30 Spoon Lenigut 5:30 SoulTrain Brinkley 3:00 Price Is Right 3:00 Price 1. Right 3:00 Price Is Right 3:00 Price I Right 3:00 Price Is Righ 1:00 AoherWorld 6:30 HeadlineNews 12:30pmEbony/JetSowcsse 4:00 Wild&CrsoyKids 4:00 Square~neTV 4:00 Wamfrerer 4:00 Family Doublefam 4:00 ThinkFasl 200 OprshWinfrey 7:00 Special: -nheNation's 1:00 NFLFuntball:TBAor 4:25 GuidingLight 4:25 GridiogLight Cartoons 4:25 GoidiogLight 4:25 GoidingLight 3:00 ThinkFa AgeaO" Pan 3 of 3 hefolowingSchdole 5:15 GnesAlHnspiral 5:15 Gersl Hospital 4:25 GuidingLight 5:15 Ge-ealHospital 5:15 Geral Hopital 3:25 Price Is Right 8:00 Saurday Night Movie: 1:00 Movie: OnThinIce 6:00 SCN Evening Rpope 6:00 SCNEvuing Report 5:15 Goeral Heapital 6:00 SCNEvuningRcpon 6:00 SCNEvuingRqpon 425 GidingLight "ByeofrkrNendle" 2:40 Movie: Larie: Adv -6:30 WordNewoTonight 6:30 WorldNews Tonglt 6:00 SCN vying Rqpon 6:30 WmtdNews Tonigt 6:30 WodNews Tonight 5:15 GnerlaHcapilal 10:00 HeadlineNews notresofNecka 7:00 Jepardy 7:00 Jeopsodyl 6:30 Wodd onnighLt 7:00 Jeopardyl 7:00 Jeopalyl 6:00 SCN YmingRepon 10:30 SalordayNightLive 4:00 STarTrek 7:30 Th Fall Guy 7:30 AnythingButLove 7:00 Jeopardyl 7:30 Chadie & Company 7:30 TsllTaless ad Logonda 8:30 WoddNewsToniglht Ifgame6ofLheWoldSe 5:00 Headline News 8:30 60 Miouos 8:00 EveningbShde 7:30 Sprcisl: "TheMisailos 8:00 CFAFodbsll:Souhebo 8:30 SportalIke Best 7:00 Jeopardyl rieo is not neceaary. the 5:30 On Stage '92 9:30 CBS Evoiog News 8:30 Special:Frondine-'The of October" Mississippi/H Carelina Canparg Money Can 7:30 TallTlss and Legends foonwiogscrhdolewillbe 6:00 Supoer arsofWresrling 10:00 Entertainma Tonight PoItics of Powr" 9:30 CBS Eving News 11:00 SCN New Update Buy" 8:30 PrireTine Live iaffct: 7:00 Moe Ovr "Womon and 10:30 Dynasty 9:30 CBS BEing News 10:00 EntertamaTonight 11:05 Hesdlsn News 9:30 CBS Bving News 9:30 CBS Evening News 5:30 Special: "The Nation's the '92 Cor-paigo" 11:30 SCN News Updalo 10:00 EntertalrnamTonight 10:30 L.A.Law 11:35 TonnghtilShow 10:00 EaernarenamTonttit 1000 Eerrainmonl Tonight Aglend"Pan3 of3 0:00 Mooi:"Baby M"Pr1 11:35 TonIghtSkew 10:30 MikeHanoer 1130 SCN News Updso 12:35OuLalighLtW/Lterman 10:30 St. lsewlhere 10:30 SCN News Update 6:30 CFA: AirFore vs. 9:40 Headline News Break 12:3m Latenight W/Leoerman 11:30 SCN News Update 11:35 TonigtShow 1:35 NrgliOno 11:30 SCS News Update 10:35 TonighrtSkw SUtnhDakolaSaoo 10:00 EntertainmeotWeek 1:35 Nightdlio 11:35 TolgtShow 12:35amrIegW/David 2:05 IsidePoliics'92 11:35 TonightShow 11:35 LsightW/Letllrmun 9:30 SoulTrain 11:00 SherlockHolus 2:05 InsidePolitics'92 12:35amLanightW/Letennn Lenooninr 2:30 Sportaunigl 12:35 LoenghrtwithDavd 2:35 Nightline MidnightoFiday NiglVideos Midnight60lMinuols 2:30 Spos Lalenight 1:35 Nightline 1:35 Nigtline 3:00. Asnio Hall Show Lee 1:05 AlNIghrlMovies: 1:00 AnlNight Movie: "FIX" 1:00 Bouinees Wodd 3:00 ArsrioHall 2:05 Inside Poliics'92 2:05 Insidepolics 92 4:00 TonlghrShow 1:35 Nightline "Sauddn Iorct" 3:00 Ai1NighLMovie: 1:30 HeadlineNews 4:00 TodghtShow 2:35 SporsTuIght 2:30 SpotsTunight 5:00 LaonghtW/Leueamun 2:05 A1lNIghoMovbs:"Hal3:00 AllNighMovies: Ladlyhcwke" 2:00 McGlaughlinO G.p 5:00 LatenightrW/Letterran 3:00 A.srniolHall 3:00 Aneio Hall 6:00 Headline News Ioon IT' "ViolationofTroat" 5:00 HeadlineNews 2:30 SponsMachine 6:00 HeadlineNewa Break 4:00 ToightSlow 4:00 TooightShow 3:45 AlONigtMovies:"B.d 440 Vidrolrnks 5:30 HeadlineNews Break 3:00 CNNContinues 5:00 LatmigloW/Letterman 5:00 LatenightW/Lettemnn Dream" 5:30 HeadimeNews 4:00 Headline News 6:00 Headline Nws Break 6:00 HeadliesNews Break 5:10 VideOnks 6:00 HeadlineNews Break 4:30 CNNWoddReport 6:00 HeadllreNews 600 Headline News Break Cable Channel 14 Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Oct. 30 530am NBC News at Sunrise 6:30am Same asChrnnela 8 & 10 6:01am Lamb Chop 6:30am NBC News at Sunrise 6:3OamNBC News at Sunrise 6:30amNBC News at Sunrise 6:30am NBC News at Suaise 6:30am NBC News at Sunrise 6:00 Good Moring America 10:30 Family Theater "On Thin 6:30 Tale Spin 9:00 Ope Winftey 9:00 Donahue 9:00 OpeabWinfery 9:00 Dooshu 9:00 Oprsk Wunfmy Sow 8:00 TabSpin ko." 7:00 DarkwingDuck 10:00 Today 10:00 Today 10:00 Todoy 10:00 Today 10:00 Today 8:30 LambCkop's Play 12:00am Headline News Break 7:25 Winnie Ike Pooh Noun Headline News Break Noun Headline News Noun Headline News Break Non Headline News Break Noun Headline Newsbreak Along 12:30 AlneounMovin:"How 7:50 SuperFriends 12:20 SCN'Midday Rport 12:20 SCNMiddayRepon 12:20 SCNMiddoyaqort 12:20 SCNMiddayRIqon 12:20 SCNMiddayRqpont 9:00 Today Thr We. Wa Won" 8:15 Widget 12:30 AiMy Child-on 12:30 AllMy Cildoon 12:30 Al My Child-u 12:30 AlMy Childor 12:30 AlMy Chldor 11:00 DprahWinfreyShw 3:00 SpnereForeHire 8:40 Back to the F.u 1:30 OeLlfetoLive 1:30 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Live 130 One Life to Live 1:30 One Life to Lie Nou Headline N.w Break 4:00 Aericun GladIators 9:05 Ninja Tules 2:30 Youngaod The Retes 2:30 The Young And Restless 2:30 YoungAodTheRrlss 2:30 The YungAndResless 2:30 The Young And Rustls 12:20 SCNMiddayReporl 5:00 StarTokNxlGenetiun 9:30 Cspt.Plarst 3:30 SesameStrom 3:30 SesamoScrest 3:30 SesameStrom 3:30 SesameStrom 3:30 Sesameoreat 12:30 AliMy Child6:00 HeadlineNews 10:00 Maverick 4:30 ClarissaExplains IAt 4:30 ThinkFasti 4:30 Sc4:laticSpora 4.30 LeaveIToBravee 4:30 SpachkpEarh 1:30 On Life to Live 6:30 The Simprons 11:00 SlorTrek 4:55 Channel One 4:55 Channel One America 4:55 Channel ne 4:55 Channel One 2:30 TheYoungAndReatles. 7:00 WordSerieaGame6.If Noun HeadlineNews 5:10 AfterSchoolSpecial 5:10 AlerScholSpecial 5:05 AfterSchoolSpatial 5:10 AfterSckodlSpocisl 5:10 AllerSchoolSpatial 3:30 SesameSlreet nogamethefollewing 12:30 SundayAflemonMovie: 6:00 SCNSvooingReport 6:00 SCN'EvningRepot 6:00 SCNEveingRepn 6:00 SCNE-vmingRqaom 6:00 SCNEvuningRqpot 4:30 SpaceshipEth schdnlewill begin effect. "MissilesOctobee" 6:30 NBCNightlyNews 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:30 NBCNigilyNews 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:30 NBC Nightly News 4:55 CanelOne 5:00 MororWeek 3:15 HeadlineNewsBreak 7:00 B-eerly Hills 90120 7:00 Ameica'sFunniestHome 7:00 FullHouse 7:00 PeefoclStrangers 7:00 Run 5:10 AfnerSchoolSpecial 5:30 OnPitRoad 3:30 TodayrGcunmec 8:00 MacGyver Vides 7:30 ChI 7:30 FamilyManes 7:30 FreshkPinceOfBelAir 6:00 SCNEveningRepont 6:00 HeadlineNews 4:00 NFLFootball:DWl.svs 9:00 MondayNighlFotuball: 7:30 Hamelnprovem o 8:00 MurderSkeWrote 8:00 TheEqoalirer 8:00 MutphyBown 6:30 NBCNightlyNews 6:30 TheSimpeon LA.Riders Bi. vsSees 8:00 L.A.Law 9:00 Sisers 9:00 KnotsLanding 8:30 NigktCol 7:00 EmTy Nest 7:00 StarTrkNextGenerstic 7:00 Rracun 911 MidnighlHeadlineNews 9:00 ABC News Special "The 10:00 ChinaBeark 10:00 FalconCrat 9:00 Videolioks 7:30 Fres Prince Of Bel Air 8:00 Maoid.With Childr 8:00 WorldSeresGame7.Ifno 12:30 SCN News Update Missiles of ctobeo" 11:00 Headline News 11:00 Headline News 10:00 Miami Vice 8:00 MurphyBrown 8:30 R-eunne gamethefollowing 12:35 Sioulcastwith Channels 11:00 HeadlineNews 11:30 SCN Late Nie Update 11:30 SCNLateNiteUpdate 11:00 HeadlineNews 8:30 Night Court 9:00 Cops acbedulelwibeineffect: 8 10 11:30 SCN'LatrNieUpdato 11:35 AmenioHall 11:35 AreesioHall 11:30 SCN NewsUpdate 9:00 MacGyver 9:30 Videoliks 700 HeadlineNews 11:35 Arsnio Hall 12:35amDavidLeeman 12:35amDavidLetteruan 11:35 AsniohHsll 10:00 CNN Headline News 10:30 S-rdayNigkeLive 7:30 NFLFootbaIl:Pihorgh 12:35amDavidLeeenan 1:35 SiunlcssewilhiChannels 1:35 SimudcsstwitkhChnnls 12:35amDavidLeterman 10:30 SCN News Update MidnightScience & Technology vs Knas City 1:35 Simulcst wit Channels 8 & 10 8 & 10 1:35 Nghtline 10:35 Ar.unioHall 12:30 Headline News 10:30 HeadlineNews 8 & 10 2:05 WotldwideUpdhate 11:35 DavIdLootoeman 1:00 McGlaughlinGooop 11:00 MagnmP.I. 2:30 SporLsteedgbt 12:35am Nghtline 1:30 Spor Latenight Midnightl60 Miote 3:01 AresnioHall 1:05 InidPolitica 2:00 EntreaiamtThisWeek 1:00 SimulcsstwithChannels8 4:00 TonightSkow 1:30 SpoorLatenight 3 :0 SaturdayNightLive & 10 5:00 LateNIghtW/David 2:00 ArnoiHall 4:30 HeadlineNews aononu 3:00 To.ihtSbow 5:00 HeadlineNews 6:00 Headline News Break 4:00 LateNightW/Leetermun 5:30 HeadlineNews 5:00 Videolinks 6:00 Headline News Break Channels 8 & 10 Cable Channel 14 DAYLIGHT SAVINGS DAYLIGHT SAVINGS Daylight savings time goes into effect in the United States Sunday. These programs will be changing times beginning Sunday Since SCN receives some of it's programming via because of Daylight Savings in the United States. stateside satellite the start time of the following programs will be affected. "NBC News at Sunrise" moves from 5:30 to 6:30 a.m. weekdays. "NBC News at Sunrise" moves from 5:30 to 6:30 a.m. weekdays. "Good Morning America" moves from 6 to 7 a.m. weekdays. "Good Morning America" moves from 6 to 7 a.m. weekdays. "Oprah Winfrey" and "Phil Donahue" moves from 11 to 9 a.m. weekdays. "Oprah Winfrey" and "Phil Donahue" move from 2 to 1 p.m., weekdays. "Arsenio Hall" moves from 10:35 to 11:35 p.m. weeknights. "Another World" moves from 1 to 2 p.m., weekdays. "Latenight with David Letterman" moves from 11:35 p.m. to 12:35 weeknights. "The Tonight Show" moves from 10:35 to 11:35 p.m., weekdays. "MacGyver" moves from 9 p.m. Fridays to 8 p.m. Mondays. "Latenight W/David Letterman" moves from 11:35 to 12:35 p.m., weekdays. NFL Football 3 p.m. games will move to 4 p.m. and the 8 p.m. game will move to 9 p.m. Sundays. The Monday Night Football game will move from 8 to 9 p.m. College Football on Saturdays moves from a start time of 11 or 11:30 a.m. to noon or 12:30 p.m. forthe early game, and from 2or 2:30 p.m. to 3 or3:30 p.m. for thelate SPECIALS game. The Missiles of October NFL Football moves from a start time of noon Sunday to 1 p.m. Tuesday at 9 p.m. A two-hour special anchored by Peter Jennings commemorates the 30th anniverSPECIALS sary of the Cuban missile crisis. Vewers will be told the story of the pivotal event of the nuclear age from the perspective of all three countries involved. The Nation's Agenda part 3 Saturday at 7 p.m. NEW SERIES The conclusion of this three part series is titled "Government For The People." This year less than one-half the Americans eligible to vote will cast their ballots. Why do Roc so many people feel disconnected from our government, and why don't they use their Fridays at 7 p.m. vote to do something about it? Replaces "Empty Nest"

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Tropic Times Oct. 23,1992 ~. .~.~ integrity and stiffness, always suspect on a convertible as the roof can't be used as a stressed structural member, wins no praise. .The top isn't difficult to raise or lower, but does take time, practice, and a thorough reading of the owner's manual. The Metro Convertible's engine is a 1.0 liter (62 / cubicinch) two valves perpiston three-cylinder (that's right, a"3") with fuel-injection and 52 horsepower. It's not particularly smooth or quiet, and leaves much to be desired in this 1,753-pound car. Zero to 60 takes 13.5 seconds, adequate but barely. At highway speeds, climbing moderate hills or passing requires at least two downshifts. Fuel economy is a bright spot, though: 35 city and 42 highway (EPA 41/46) were observed on the 268-mile test loop. The Metro's tiny engine was mated to a rubberyfeeling five-speed manual transmission and light clutch. O It wasn't anything to brag about, but seldom annoyed, either. Talk about ride, and you inevitably hit a sore spot. It's by far the car's worst feature. Large potholes are actually painful, and even smooth freeways won't bring a smile to your lips. The suspension feels loose and Economic, attractive convertible available flaccid, and definitely needs substantial upgrading. Handling, similarly, needs a boost. Though the by Zane Binder manually-operated convertible top occupying that area, convertible's 13-inch wheels and tires help (other King Feauros Syndicate but there's a small trunk and a carpeted storage comMetros use 12-inchers),the all-season radialleaveslots partment behind the front buckets, to be desired. Going around corners produces tremenThe Metro's dash is plain but thankfully contains a dous body lean, and the slow ratio, non-power steering You'veprobably never thought ofthevarious Metro cupholder, though it's flimsy. There's also a surprising take a toll too. The turning circle, at just under 31 feet, models from Chevrolet/Geo as one of America's most numberof hand-and-dial gauges. The steering wheel is is among the smallest in the auto industry. Subjectively, distinctive lineups. Consider, though, its three basic padded and its hub includes an airbag -the only Metro though, the convertible doesn't feel that nimble. Hanvehicles including the XFI, the nation's most economimodel to employ one. The steering is manual, and dling needs work. cal car (53 city/58 highway), and the Metro Convertexcept when parking, requires acceptably low effect. Quality control, as in all Japanese-made vehicles, bible, the lowest priced ragtop. With summer approachThe bumpers on this front-drive, Suzuki-built vehicle was excellent. Some Metro trim pieces, though, looked ing, it's appropriate to look at what's available in topare 2.5 mile per hour certified, and the brake system and felt flimsy. down fun. The Metro Convertible is a "top" choice. consists ofpower front discs and reardrums. Sadly, the The bottom line on the Metro Convertible is that it's Inside, the Geo offers twin cloth front buckets with anti-lock isn't available. cute, extremely economical and low-priced. It could Scotchgard fabric protectant standard. The seats are Turning to the convertible top, it appeared wellalso, in ways detailed earlier, stand improvement. But wide and comfortable with plenty of legroom; neither made and fit snugly, with the inevitable air leaks for the wind-in-your-hair feeling during those sunny the driver nor passenger is cramped despite the car's minimal in number. The rear window, of course being days ahead, it offers maximum fun for minimum small external dimensions. There's no rear bench, the plastic, was wavy and already starting to cloud. Body bucks. ____ ___I __ ___ ___ ___ pepper. Fold two sides of parchment over ham and vegetables, in a two-fold letter fashion. Grasp the two shorterends and pull up to meet. Double over and fold serving meal together is a cinch. In this meal-in-one down open ends to seal. J packet, you have a fully-balanced dinner with a nicely Microwave on high power for five minutes. Let seasoned variety of veggies, meat and potato. stand three minutes. Carefully cut open. Caution: When cutting packet open, be sure to cut first on the far side, away from yourself, to avoid the escaping Meal-in-one potato packet steam. Makes one serving. To make two servings: Double all ingredients. -1 medium potato, unpeeled Divide equally between two pieces of parchment. 3 ounces thinly sliced lean ham Arrange each packet as directed above. 1/2 medium zucchini, sliced 1/4 inch thick Microwave on highpower for six minutes. Rotates -7 1/2 medium yellow squash, sliced 1/4 inch thick packets one-half turn. Microwave on high for six more 112 medium red bell pepper, cut in 1-inch squares minutes. Let stand three minutes. Cut open carefully 1 tablespoon lemon juice and serve. 1/2 teaspoon dried basil The ChoppingBlock recipe byPhilomenaCorrad1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes eno. Anyone who lives alone knows how trying it is to Salt and pepper to taste Editor's note: People interested in sharing a reccook appetizing meals for only oneself, especially ipe or household tip with Tropic Times readers, can after a day's work. It's so much easier to slap together Cut a 15-inch square of kitchen parchment. Place send recipes or tips by MPS to Tropic Times, Unit a sandwich, or pick up a pizza or a burger. But that ham in center, top ham with overlapping potato slices, 0936, APO AA 34002. Your name and base will be makes eating a routine instead of a pleasure. alternating with zucchini, squash and bell pepper. Sprinkle printed with your submission. Thanks to the microwave oven, getting a singlewith lemon juice, basil, red pepper flakes, salt and printedwithyoursubmission. Davis. Speckap: 4yxs. A Iteborde. Fan 106. Nan: Knowtdg-ofEghaddivr'ieerrqlred. PACIFIC: 012-93-G0 -RECREATION AID, NM189-3. USAG, DCA, CED, Spants Brurh., FoClay. Gn Hp: 6 -th. Pa-r 106. All applicants should be aware that hiring is severely restricted because of the Department 013-93-G -OPIICEAUTOMATION CLERK, NM-326-3. USAG, DCA, FSD, ACS, C=an. Ge Hxp: 6 monsf. Fan 106. of Defense worldwidehiring freeze. Beginning April 6, the freeze allowed onenew hire from 014-93-00-OFFICEAUrOMATIONCLERK,NM326-3. USAG,DCACRD, ILaryBranchPFatClaytn. Osip: 6ieots, PI-e outside Department of Army for every four losses to DoD. Placement of current DA 106. employees (including those on leave without pay) is an exception to the freeze. Current 0I&9-NC -SUPPLY CLCK ( A%) NM-ZOO-d Tpary NTH 1 yr Dear Caisaay Agoocy, Mwaae Spod C-, C-Adsa. OM EbTp: 6nintsl~. N=ar WximooCASPW1 mqualfldt*IAN mqak,& temporary employees may now apply against permanent vacancies unless otherwise noted. 017-93-K] -SUPERVISORYTELEPHONEOPER.ATO,NM-352-4. 106,Signal Balgade.TlephtsSy,,rams BrnecPanFCoyts,. Specialized experience, when indicated, must be in duties similar to those required by the O. Rap: 1 yr. P-s 106. Now: Llpdtnd to 106h Signal Brigade employee o. vacancy. 019-93-OGRECREATIONASSIrANT,NM-1894.T0PwryNr1 Yr. USAO,DCACRDotAmador Oixp: 6manths. P=ns Military Spouses: If available, qualified, and within the area of consideration specified 106. Now: Mustpaawa aRed Crus WaeSafty lan oartuncam. for the vacancy, may be considered subject to the "one-for-four" DA hiring restriction. 019-93-00 -EDUCATIONAL AiNM-17024. USAG. DCA, PSD, CDS.PoCaytn,. Gweexp: 1 yr. Fan 106. Note: Appi=ant Panama Canal Commission employees: U.S. and non-U.S. current permanent employsslect.amlpaCto sdidfry bckgensmd nvusgation mdmay be rquiam t waok on wrekans and doing paelfc ampiagi ofLlhe ees may apply for permanent employment subject to the "one-for-four" DA hiring restriction. Current permanent NAF or AAFES employees who were appointed before Nov. 3, 1989 may Hap: 1-y. P HCH 106. now also apply. a22-93-VL -SECURTY ASSISTANT (O/A), GS-08.6Snelzlv,. HQ, USSOUTHCOM, CMDR IN CH, C/S InwefllIg-caDiecsrime AMENDMENT ON HOW TO APPLY: Failure to complete U. S. Army South Form 106, SsecUr1yDivedaoo.QUarryHdigh. Spac xp: 1 yr. sqid. o OS-5. TIG: GS-. Pnn 106. Nosa: L d t SOXUTHCOMcemp.y-s ny. when required, could hinder an applicant's chances of being referred for the vacancy. For 023-93-ss-HOUSINGREFERRALASSTANr(o/A),NM-33-t/6. USAG.DP5H,H-salngDivisL.FnrClayla. Sp.cExpforNM. information, visit the Civilian Personnel Office, Building 560, Corozal. 5: lyr.nqiv.IaNM-303-4. Sp-ecapfarNM-6: lyr.epquv.NM-303-S. TIG: NM-5. Fen106. Nate:Kn-wledgraf~panishabddiver' Il rcsa nqulrad. Potin may be fIled at beNM-5 arNM-6lavrL Salectise .NM-Swil1ead tfimn-cnspaclztve a w NM-6. val vACANCIES TITLE AND LOCATION OPWN: 10-23-92 CLOSW11-04-92 025-93-NR -ELECTRICAL WORKER, MG-2805-. Tspoary NH30 SEP 93. WAG, DH, Opertins Divisin, Malnlsaa, and ATLANTIC Seivia Brad, Poat -Cayts,. Sp.c Ep: 2 y.i. is trade. 015-93-00 -OFFICE AUTOMATION CLERK, NM-3264. USAG, DCA, PSD, CoS-ATL, Margaifa. Gm -hp: 6 -ba. Pain 106. --NC -AUTOMOTIVE WORERMG-23-. 4st ASG, DOL, Maa D on, Sbop Oprdw Bradc, TARP, CN-a.: Maitbe abla toddrva aidrvee', Hennsqzred. Sp. 2 y 1 1. 029-93-SS -MATERIALSHANDLER,MG-697-S. URAG,DH.Supply mdSmreag Dvialen Corozal. SprExp: 6Moiibe, motrade, 020 93-NE-OPCEAUrOMATIONCIER K, NM-4. TaporaryNTH28D92. USAG.D.H-ATLOPNSAdmin.SetiF_ Pa 106. DrIv' cene quied. OPEN UNdIL P ILLJD. Applicnts who Appliod undr VB# 486-92-NR ncd nateqpply. Dais. oo ET: 1 yr. Nom: WSium CASP ttlred 030-93-LA -EMPLOYPE DEVELOPMENOT ASSISTANT CrYPING), NM-203-0/6/. USAG, DCP, Trang i rDvelqnPni Dists, 02493-NR -(3)MOTOR VEHICLEOPERATOR,MG-5703-6. USAG,DEH-ATLOPNS. Roads MdGms.&SwinFanrPDaa.M __= Crrl.SpcHxpforNM-5: 1yr.aquiv.toNM-4.SprcEpforNM-6: 1yr.uideteNM-5,T1G: NM-5. SpecEpfrNM-7: lyrrqiv. Mp: 1 yr. in t rade. Psor 106. Nn: hDtes lken,. rqa d qI NM-6, TIG: NM-6. Penn 106. Nte: Qualifiod Iypiatrquirld. 027-93-NR -ENGINEERNGTECHNICIAN,NM-8029. USAG, DLH-ATL OPNS, Can-rt FWasaSeclaPFtDavis. p&V Rp NOtE. vB: 06-.93-Vt, Bigical Speiena Calheca, is p me=dld at read.MG.5061 S. vB. 007-93LA, SatinS invite 1 yr. eqv. t NM-S. TIG: NM-S. onn 106. Nan: Drier's a : niivrNM-17-5Dae. Sis amended trmd: Spec ip: 1 yr. ei tNM-4 Te Dicate CiiiPan ne1Officrisaceg applicaiiaeafinkcalNuse. FsinmaaiaoacaflM. EldSulivwm ate25028-93-NR KITCHEN EQUU'ENTMECHANIC, MG-53iS-iS. WSAO. 00-ALOPNS. Mslaeaic an Scaato, Pai 4116.

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Tropic Times Oct. 23, 1992 B5 4C U.S. Army photos by Sgt Deborah E. Wirms Donald Baker takes aleisurely pace at the beginning of the horseback riding One of the many watertalls in the El Valle area. trip. Debra Emery and her daughter, Stephanie, take a break beside a fast-moving creek after about two hours of riding horses. City cowboys conquer El Valle hen someone mentions El Valle, ridden a horse before, the riders had plenty of time to "The trip was definitely worth it. The scenery in shopping for fruits, vegetables, plants get used to the feel of being on a horse. The riders the area is beautiful," said Bobby White, one of the and handicrafts comes to mind. But the practiced walking, turning and stopping the horses. people on the tour. "I really enjoyed myself. I would group of 15 people who took a Zodiac Most of the horses were docile but a few of them love to go again." Recreation Center sponsored El Valle trip Saturday were spirited enough for the experienced riders in the People who would like to experience horseback will probably think of something else, like horses and group. riding again, or for the first time, have several beautiful scenery. "If you wanted to have an adventure, you could options. The group went to El Valle on an Air Force have been on a horse like the one I had," Veliz said. The Zodiac Recreation Center sponsors horseback Morale Welfare and Recreation Center sponsored "He was jumping and kicking all around. It was a lot riding in El Valle trips once a month. Zodiac also has horseback riding trip. of fun." shopping trips to El Valle but special trips can be The trip was $18 as a "special of the week," The horses got a chance to rest when the riders arranged for groups of 10 or more, Veliz said. Call however the usual price is $22, said Javier Veliz, dismounted by a stream after about two hours of vig284-6161/6109, for reservations. MWR Outdoor Recreation manager. orous riding. Some people stayed by the stream but The Howard Riding Stables offer escorted trail "The trip is for anyone who wants to get out and most of the group wanted to see the some of the specrides to Veracruz Beach during the week. Call 286see the beautiful scenery in the El Valle area," Veliz tacular waterfalls El Valle is famous for. 4920 for information or reservations. said. "You don't have to have experience riding The hike to the waterfalls was tricky at times. But Horseback day trips to Pecora River Valley are horses, there are people to help." the scenery at the falls was worth the 30 minutes of available Saturdays and Sundays through the Albrook Since most of the people in the group had never negotiating slippery banks and 6-inch wide trails. Riding Stables. Call 287-4411 for reservations.

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B6 Tropic TimesNo Oct. 23, 1992 I has the following activities. Call 287-5957. Claytone Jewelry box construction, Saturday. Albroo k/Howard Valent Recreation Center and the Outdoor Recreation Center are offering the folHoward The Albrook Early Childhood Enrichlowing tours, for which reservations are The Howard Youth Center, 284-4700, meant Center has openings for 4-year-olds. required. Call Valent, 287-6500/4201 or and Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195, are The Howard Arts and Crafts Center has Hourly care reservations can be made up to Outdoor Recreation Center, 287-3363. offering the following trips and activities. the following events slated. Call 284-6361/ two weeks in advance for 3-year-olds through Contadora weekend trip, Saturday and All trips pick up at Howard at the time 6345. kindergarten-age children. Call 286-3133 Sunday. The fees, $160 per couple and $109 specified and at Albrook 30 minutes later. Free gold application demonstration, to make reservations. per single, include transportation to Paitilla Halloween preteen costume dance -Saturday, 1:30-2 p.m.; beginners ceramic The Howard Preschool and Child DevelAirport. tonight, 7:30-11 p.m., for youth ages 8-12. painting in Spanish, 5-week class begins opment Center has openings for 3-and 4Bass fishing trip for youths 10-18 years The fee is $2.50 for members and $3.50 for Tuesday, 2-4 p.m.; beginners ceramic paintyear olds. Call 284-3711. old, Saturday. The $10 fee includes transnonmembers. Prizes awarded for best cosing in English, 5-week class begins Wedportation, boats, tackle, bait and guide. tumes. Free transportation leaves Albrook nesday, 6-8 p.m.; advanced ceramic paintVolunteer parents go free. at 7 p.m. Reservations required for transporing in English, 5-week class begins ThursClayton Sunset cruise, Thursday, 5-7:30 p.m., tation. day, 6-8 p.m.; advanced ceramic painting The Fort Clayton Child Development Pier 17, $5 fee includes beverage. Afternoon movie and pizza, Monday, in Spanish, 5-week class begins Oct. 30, 10 Services is open Mondays, Wednesdays and Chiriqui trip, Oct. 31-Nov. 3. 3:30 p.m. at Howard, Tuesday, 3:30 p.m. at a.m.-noon. Fridays from 5:30 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. and Chocoe Indian Village trip, Oct. 31, Albrook. The fee is $2.50. Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30 a.m. to The fee is $25 for adults and $15 for chilFree Halloween party, Thursday, 4 p.m. 5:45 p.m. dren. Transportation leaves Albrook at 3:30p.m., There are immediate openings in the Chiriqui white water rafting, Oct. 31and retums at 6:30 p.m. Albrook/Howard hourly programs for infants, pretoddlers, Nov. 3. Cost, to be announced, will include Haunted house, Oct. 30 and 31 at Altoddlers and preschool-age children. Call transportation, cabins and equipment. brook. Entry fee is $1. Transportation to and The Howard Enlisted Members' Club 287-5657/6812. City tour, Nov. 7, 9 a.m. The fees are from Howard will be available., will host DJ "G", from KOOL 105.5 FM in adults $10 and children $6. Denver, Colo., in the Casual Cove Satur-______________ San Bias, Nov. 11. The $110 fee inClayton days at 8 p.m. Call 284-4189. ___________ eludes transportation to the airport, airfare, There will be a Karaoke night, Oct. 30 in guided boat tour to Indian villages and lunch. The Fort Clayton Youth Center is offerthe Main Lounge and Thursday, in the Casual Albrook/Howard Sign-up deadline is Nov. 2. ing the following activities for preteens. Cove. The Information, Tour and Travel Office Call 287-6451. offers a monthly calendar of events and can d man Creative crafts mask making, Monday, Amador arrange special trips for groups of 10 or R d3 p.m. more. Call the Zodiac Recreation Center TheInformation,Tourand TravelOffice Pumpkin pie cooking, Wednesday, 3 Mexican food by Chef Ortiz, Wednes284-6161/6109. is offering the following tours. Call 283p.m. day, 6-9 p.m. Adults $7.95 and children All tours require reservations and leave 5307/4454. Birthday celebrations, Thursday, 3 p.m. under 10 years old 1/2price. Call 282-3837. from the Howard Theater. Bay of Panama moonlight cruise, toHaunted halloween dance, Oct. 30,7-9 Factory outlet shopping, today, 9 a.m.night and Oct. 30, from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m., p.m. for preteens and 9 p.m.midnight for 2 p.m., $4. complimentary snacks. junior teens. Fright Night II at the STRAC Club. Prizes Portobelo and Langosta Beach, SaturPanama City tour, Wednesday. The Fort Clayton Senior Teen Center for best costume. Admission is free if wearday, 6:30 a.m.-5 p.m., $12. Barro Colorado Island, Saturday, inoffers the following activities. Call 287ing a costume or $5 without a costume. El Valle shopping, Sunday, 6:30 a.m.-2 cludes transportation, bilingual guide, lunch, 6451. p.m., $12. binoculars and poncho. Deep sea fishing trip, Saturday, 7 a.m. Rodman Peacock bass fishing in Arenosa, SunSan Jose, Costa Rica, Oct. 31-Nov. 3, Halloween dance and teen DJ contest, The Anchorage Club will host the Labor day, 5 a.m.-2 p.m., $25. includes round trip airfare, three nights hotel Oct. 31, 7 p.m.-midnight, $3 admission. .Day Extravaganza Battle of the Bands firstFree Zone shopping, Oct. 30, 8 a.m.-4 accommodations, city tour and airport transplace winner, "Tempest", tonight. p.m., $12. fers, passport required. Overnight snorkeling in Isla Grande, Montego Bay, Jamaica, Nov. 8-11. Cocoli Oct. 30 and 31. The $45 fee includes accomFee includes hotel accommodations, airfare The Cocoli Community Recreation Center modations. and Montego Bay transfers, passport reisoffering thefollowing activities.Call287program Specials of the week -Barro Colorado quired. 4119/3010. New child care Island Smithsonian Reserve, Wednesday, "Wet, Wild, Wooly," to Contadora, Arts and crafts for children, WednesThe Howard and Albrook youth centers 6 a.m.-3 p.m., fee is $60. Nov. 27-29, includes transportation, two day, 3 p.m. are offering a new before and after school Panamanian dancers and dining, Paitnights hotel, deep-sea fishing, water skiing, Children's Halloween costume party, program. Care is available for children illa Plaza Inn, Wednesday, 6-11 p.m., fee snorkeling and jet skiing. Saturday, 3 p.m. from 6 to 12 years old from 6:30-8:15 a.m. is $2 for transportation. Bass fishing package, includes transand from 2-5:30 p.m. and full-day care on Horseback day trips to Pecora River portation to and from Gamboa, boat and nonschool days. Valley, Saturday and Sunday, 7 a.m. motor, gasoline, lake guide, $5 worth of Fees range from $17 to $34 per week per The $25 fee includes transportation, horse bait, bait bucket, rods and reels, tackle, Clayton child, depending on family income and rental and lunch. Call 287-4411 for reservacoolers and ice. Call the Rodman Marina, includes breakfast and an afternoon snack. tions. 283-3147/3150. The Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts Center Call 284-4700/4817. Sundial center night, $2; haunted house, Thursday-Oct. 31. Pool beginning Nov. 2. Sign up at the Fort Sherman Scuba Shop, 289-6104, or the Outdoor Recreation The Sundial Recreation Center's Thursdays are WonOng in Margarita,289-4077. Course cost is $125. derful program is a program designed for women and will g classes feature Halloween masks. Call 289-3889/3300. Following is a list of recurring classes offered in most Ho id yb a communities. Call Sundial, 289-3889/3300; Ocean Breeze, H bazaar A 289-6402 or Aquativities Center, 289-6104. The Atlantic Community Women's Club is holding its Atlantic tours Spanish; English; piano; guitar; modem dance; shotoannual holiday bazaar Nov. 14 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Sundial Recreation Center: Wine and dine, Fridays, 4kan; cake decorating; gymnastics; juggling and outboard the Fort Davis Community Club. Call Muriel Doyle, 2899 p.m.; Panama City tour, Saturday, 8 a.m.; El Valle, motor boat operation. 4755 or Becky Steigler, 289-4354. Sunday, 8 a.m.; Colon shopping tour, Wednesday. Ocean Breeze Recreation Center: Portobelo, SaturInstructors needed New boat day. Call 289-6402. Aquativity Center: Chagres River canoe trip/picnic, The Directorate of Community Activities Family Support A 21' Mako boat is now available for scuba or snorkelNov. 3, 8 a.m. Fee includes transportation. Call 289-4009/ Division needs instructors for modem dance, piano and ing trips. Price includes gear and guide. Call John 4077. beginner ballet. Call Rory Egger, 289-6104. Stromberg, 289-4409/4077; or the Fort Sherman Scuba shop, 289-6104. Arts and crafts Dinner/show presentation Following is a list of recurring classes offered at The Atlantic Music and Theatre is presenting "The community arts and craft centers. Call Fort Davis Arts and Nerd." The production will take place at the Fort Davis The Fort Davis ComCrafts Center, 289-5201 or Fort Sherman Arts and Crafts Community Center, SundayTuesday. Dinner will be munity Club will host a Center,289-6313 served at 6 p.m. and the show will begin at 7:30 p.m. Halloween costume party, Ceramics; painting; drawing; pottery; air brushing; Tickets for the dinner/show will cost $10. Show only Oct. 31,8 p.m., in the Esadvanced and beginners oil painting from photographs. tickets will be $6 for adults and $3 for children. Call merelda Ball Room. There Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, 289-6402. will be games, door prizes, fun and prizes for the three Youth news best costumes. Cost is The Fort Espinar Youth Center is offering the followScuba diving course $5 ptrpeso stiCall 289ing activities. Call 289-4605. An open-water dive course meets the first Saturday 5160/3298 forreservaTeen costume/bowling party, Oct. 24, 8 p.m.-midof the month at 6 p.m. at the Fort Davis Swimming tions.

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Tropic Times ices Oct. 23,1992B7 Swim team tryouts The Howard and Albrook swim teams e are holding try-outs for youths from 6-18 years old. The Howard Stingrays practice at the Howard Pool Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from 4-5:30 p.m. The Albrook Tiger Sharks practice at the Albrook pool Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and I Friday s from 3:30-5 p.m. Instructors needed The Zodiac Recreation Center needs Ii0 censed instructors to teach shotokan and private pilot's ground school on a contract basis. Call 284-6161/6109. The Howard/Albrook youth centers need a qualified piano instructor to teach classes on a contract basis. Call 284-4700. The Howard Arts and Crafts Center needs qualified instructors to teach advanced pottery wheel throwing and volunteers to demonstrate various crafts. Call 284-6361. Haunted house Valent Recreation Center will host its annual haunted house Thursday -Oct. 31 from 7 to 9 p.m. Admission is $2 for adults and $1 for children under 12 years old Twin Oceans The Twin Oceans Pro Shop, Building -155, Fort Clayton, will temporarily relocate to Building 2060 in the Curundu area. Trail rides The Howard Riding Stables are offering escorted 2 1/2 hour trail rides to Veracruz Beach, Mondays through Fridays. Call 2864920. Evening child care The Howard Child Development Center offers evening child care Friday s and Saturdays from 5:30 p.m. to midnight for children from 6 months to 11 years old. If enough reservations have been made by Wednesday, 4 p.m., care will be provided. Call 284-6135 to make reservations. Theatre Arts Centre The Pacific Theatre Arts Centre is offering a Halloween costume rental. The $7 U.S. Army photo by Sgt Richard Puket rental fee covers Friday-Monday. A 100 STREEEETCH -Whitney Rodaniche stretches during a creative dance class at the Pacific Theatre Arts percent deposit is required. Call 286-3814/ Centre. During the creative dance class students learn the basics of dance and rhythm. Creative dance for 3152. "The Musical Comedy Murders of youths is one of many dance classes offered at the center in Curundu. The center also offers ballet, tap, 1940" is playing Thursdays, Fridays and salsa, merengue, folkloric, modern dance and belly dancing classes on a recurring basis. The classes are Saturdays through Oct. 31. Tickets are $8 available for all ages at various skill levels. Call the center at 286-3814/3152 for informatIon or reservations. for all performances. Tickets are available The youth centers in most communities also offer various dance classes for youths such as modern, jazz, tap, at the center ballet and street/video dancing. For information on the classes available at the various youth centers call Howard Auditions for the "Nutcracker," SunYouth Center, 284-4700; Albrook Youth Center, 286-3195; Fort Clayton Youth Center, 287-6451; Fort Clayton day and Monday, 7:30 p.m. There are parts for four adults, five young adults and 15 Senior Teen Center; or the Fort Espinar Youth Center. children age 8 and up. Scripts can be obtained through the center. offered by arts and crafts centers in most Albrook swimming pool, 286-3555; Fort Ong going classes communities. For information call Howard Clayton swimming pool, 287-6660; Logistics support Following is a list of recurring classes Arts and Crafts Center, 284-6361/6345; the Rodman swimming pool, 283-4253. offered by recreation centers in most Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts Center, 287Scuba classes are available through Logistics Support on Howard AFB rents communities. For information call the 5957. the Zodiac Recreation Center, 284-6161/ recreational items. Call 284-6107. Pacific Theatre Arts Centre, 286-3814/ Stained glass; cross stitch; clay flower, 6109. Classes include intro to scuba, resNew item -Sewing machines are avail3152; Valent, 287-6500/4201 orZodiac, pottery wheel; knitting; framing; air brushcue, dive master and specialty scuba. able, at daily or weekend rates. 284-6161/6109. ing; lamp assembly; leather working; macAn advanced scuba diving class is set Aerobics; piano lessons; taekwondo; rame classes; pottery; throw pottery techforOct. 31 and Nov. 1 at Portobelo on the Family support cake decorating; beginner German; Spannics; glazing; firing; hand building; sculpAtlantic side. The $100 fee includes a ish, beginner and advanced; English, beture; wooden jewelry box construction; night dive, deep dive, navigation dive Cent, ward Albrook Fventas mlupdfor ginner and advanced. acoustic guitar construction; do-it-yourself and two optional dives; a computer dive, this week. Call 284-5650. Following is a list of recurring classes custom framing; fabric painting; watercolor, search and recovery dive and photograFamily Services needs volunteers to asoffered by youth centers in most commuacrylic painting; oil painting; basic drawing phy dive. Call 283-5307/4454. sist with the loan closet, base brochure lities. For information call Howard Youth and charcoal drawing. Basic horsemanship classes for all brary, layette program and airmen's attic. Center, 284-4700; Albrook Youth CenWeekly classes are held in car care and ages are offered at the Albrook Riding Call 284-5860. ter, 286-3195; Fort Clayton Youth or maintenance, arc and gas welding, auto air Stables. The next class will be Saturday Senior Teen Center, 287-6451. conditioning, auto transmission repair and from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The $25 fee inStreet/video dancing; cheerleading; engine rebuilding. Call the Albrook Auto eludes theory and practical sessions. The BOSS program Spanish and English; aerobics; arts and Craft Shop, 286-3613 or Howard Auto Craft class covers safety, stable etiquette, care The Better Opportunities for Single Solcrafts; gymnastics; boys gymnastics; Shop, 284-3370. and welfare of horses, tack and basics of diers program offers recreational activities modem, jazz, tap and ballet dance; The swimming pools in most communihorse handling. Individual, group and for single soldiers and geographical bachepiano lessons; tennis lessons; taek wondo. ties offer recurring classes. For information semi-private lessons are available. Call lors. Call Anne Kelly at the Valent RecreaFollowing is a list of recurring classes call Howard swimming pool, 284-3569; 287-4411 for reservations. tion Center, 287-6500, to volunteer.

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B8 ct. 23,1992 Potpourri Savings Bonds Workshop Soldiers requesting information about The Army Community Services is their U.S. Savings Bonds in safekeepholding a consumers' week workshop ing at the Defense Finance and Acin English and Spanish, Wednesday at counting Service, Indianapolis, Ind., the Margarita Complex. Itis open to all may write to: DFAS-IN, Military Pay military, family members and DepartOperations, Dept. 22, Attn.: Bonds in ment of Defense personnel. Safekeeping, Indianapolis, IN 46249The Atlantic community service is 0833. Include full name, social security having a drawing for several prizes innumber,returnaddress, daytimephone eluding local tours, hams and more. number, and signature. People can get a ticket by donating a Allow four to six weeks to receive canned good to ACS's holiday food the bonds or bond information. Call Fibasket drive. Call Luz M Ballesteros, nance Services, 287-4208/4400. 289-4010. Consumers' Week CCAF graduation Army Community Services is spony The Howard Education Center will soring Operation Wise Buy and Con"TEMPEST" -Evan Rodaniche lead guitarist and vocalist and Walter hold the fall Community College ofthe sumers'Week Sunday through Oct. 31. Crouch, bass guitarist play at Rodman Naval Station's Labor Day ExtavaAir Force graduation ceremony ThursThe Corozal Post Exchange will be ganza. The Battle of the Bands winner, "Tempest," will play at the Anchorday, 3 p.m. at the Howard Enlisted offering free drawings, the commissarMembers' Club ballroom. Graduates ies will have sales and free samples and ag__Cub,_Rdman,_Friday,__:30_pm.-12:30_am._ are reminded to return their DD Form the Army and Air Force Exchange Servwill be sponsoring free expectant parreligious education coordinator, Eng2266 to the education office after the ice will feature discounts at their resent classes, Nov. 5, 12, 19, and Dec. 3, lish mass choir director and English graduation ceremony. Call 284-4863. taurants during this week. Call 2854:30-6;30 pm, at Gorgas Army Commass organist/choir accompanist. 5556. unity Hospital, Section B, first floor. Applications should be submitted to Juvenalia '92 Call 282-5418. the Howard Contracting Office, BuildJuvenalia'92 start Oct. 31 through Football teams ing 715, Wednesday by 4 p.m. Jobs Nov. 10, at the ATLAPA Convention TheDepartmentofDefenseSchools SOS students startNov. 1. CallAndy Gonzales, 284Center,is anactivitytobenefitchildren football teams kick off games at Balboa Students enrolled in Section 2 of /62. with cerebral palsy. Itis the biggest and High School Stadium, Saturday, 4 p.m. Squadron Officer School should make most dynamic event dedicated to chilShriners will parade after the first game. the following changes in 23D: Breast-feeding class dren and youth in Panama. There will Vol. 4, pg. 3, delete Lesson 22 Breast-feeding class, Tuesday, 2:30 be recreation, cultural and sports acHolidays hours Vol. 5, pg. 3, delete Lesson 26 and pm, at Gorgas Army Community Hostivities for all ages. The Defense Commissary Agency readings A-D, pg. 5-41 pital, Section B, first floor. Sponsored holidays hours of operation. SOS non-residentprogramis underby Army Community Health Nursing, CFC goal The Corozal Commissary will be going revision. All test questions are 282-5418. The U.S. Southern Command has open Nov. 2, 10 am-3 pm and closed based on the course materials.Call Linda gotten offto a solid startin pursuit ofits Nov. 3. Will open Nov. 4 on normal Antoine, 284-3263 or stop by the HowMaranatha Church 1992 Combined Federal Campaign goal hours. ard Education Center, Building 708, of $350,000. The Howard AFB and the Fort EspiRoom 109. The Maranatha Baptist church is sponIn the first two weeks, ending Oct. narCommissaries will beclosedNov. 2 soring Awanas, a program for children 16, the command raised $113, 558 or and will open Nov. 3, Panama lndeEducation news to teach the word of God through stoalmost one third of the total goal. The andewce .3 pmEducation s ries,games andactivitiesSunday aftercampaign ends on Nov. 16. pendence Day, 10 am -3 pm. The Howard Education Center will noons at the YMCA Building, Balboa. apig e wn Nhu. f6. 11 etcommissaries wil be ose No. offer the College Level English ProThe church also will hold Mens' quading he way thus far i hea givinggram General English Composition with Bible Study, Thursday, 7 pm. Call252already reached 101 percent ofits goal, essay exam Dec. 9, in Building 708, 6543. while the Air Force has already colRoom 110. All active-duty military, lected 77 percent of its goal. Bank closes family members, and Department of Ag bg club Merchants National Bank and Trust Defense civilians are eligible. Military Company at Corozal will be closed members may test on an unfunded baGraduates of Texas A&M UniverSAC meeting Nov. 3,PanamaIndependence Day and sis. All others must pay $38. Those sity interested in forming an Aggie Club, The Balboa Elementary School is Nov. 10. interested must be scheduled by Wedcall 287-4690 or 261-7121. holding its School Advisory Council nesday. Call 284-4863. meeting, Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. SAC inNew numbers Jobs opportunity Kobbe courses vites interested parents to attend. The Disabled American Veterans Central Texas Collegeis offering an Halloween art office in Building 812, Albrook has The Howard/Albrook chaplains has organization and management course, pa y changed phones numbers from 286openings forthe following,,ositions: Nov. 2-20,8:15 am-12:15pm,Monday TheCurunducommunitywill holda 4349 to 285-6359. Howard Air Force Base -Protestant -Friday. General Testing improvement Halloween party for children 4th grade religious education coordinator, Cathoclasses and other courses are available and younger, Oct. 30, 1-3 p.m. at the lic choir director and 11 o'clock mass at the Fort Kobbe Education Center. Curundu Community Room, Bowling Expectant parents organist/choir accompanist. Call 284-6310/3150 or stop by BuildAlley Building. Call Margo Lewis, 286Army Community Health Nursing Albrook Air Force Station -Catholic ing 801, 2nd floor. 6236. Today .M .f .s ..4:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN San Jose, Costa Rica PC San Salvador, El Salvador PP/CC/V Q. May I call bases for flight informaHoward AFB, PN tion? 5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN A. You are encouraged to call the Tegucigalpa, Honduras PP .passenger terminal youplan on traveling Soto Cano AB, Honduras PP through 30 to 60 days before travel. Howard AFB, P Howard AFB, PN They may then give the most current 5:40am C141 Howard AFB, PN schdul,.pac-A.aclog.retrc.n. Bogota, Colombia PP'iCC 5:10am C130 Howard AFB, FN Hoar bacBlo jetitos San Salvador, El Salvador PP/CC/V et.San lose, Costs Rica PC Saturday Howard AFB, PN 5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN US PP: Tourist Passport Schenectady, NY 5:40am C141 Howard AFB, PN TC: Tourist Card 6:40am C141 Howard AFB, FN La Paz, Bolivia PP V: Visa Roosevelt Road, Puerto Rico PP Montevideo, Uruguay RON/PP PC: Proof of CitzenCharleston, SC PP Asuncion, Paraguay PP hi McGuire AFB, NJ PP Rio de Janeiro, Brazil PP/V S lp Howard AFB, PN US: United States Sunday Passport Holders Only 8:00am C5A Howard AFB, PN 7:50am C-5A Howard AFB, PN CC: Country ClearSoto Cano AB, Honduras PP Charleston AFB, SC PP Charleston AFB, SC RON/PP Dover AB, DEL ance Dover AFB, DE PP RON: Remain Overnight Wednesday Monday 5:10pm C130 Howard AFB, PN additional ight in6:15am C727 Howard APF, P Guatemala City, Guatemala PP/V For adtoaflgti-Charleston tAP, SC PP formation, call 284-5758/ Tuesday Thursday 4306. 5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN 8:00am C5AHoward AFB, PN Tegucigalpa, Honduras PP Soto Cano AB, Honduras Soto Cano AB, Honduras PP Charleston AFB, SC RON

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Tropic Times Oct. 23, 1992 Richard Koechllen finishes off Rueben Cantu while Barbara Klein and Ron Leggiere toast the show. Cast dies laughing, Musical Comedy kills by Maureen Sampson assigned to the case of the "Stage Door Slasher." berly Deane Morse is "simply divoon" as Marjorie y Times Mamter ptic Greg Calhoun (who occasionally is seen or heard on Baverstock, a flamboyant producer. Ron Leggiere Tropic Southern Command Network newscasts) portrays gets a lot of laughs as Roger Hopewell, a flaming CURUNDU (Tropic Times) -Half-naked, dead Patrick O'Reilly, an Irish tenor/Nazi. Richard composer. Barbara Klein completes the cast list as bodies falling from closets.revolving book-cases Koechlien is Ken De La Maize, the bombastic Bernice Roth, an alcoholic lyricist. leading to secret tunnels .a German maid and a Nazi director. Rueben Cantu plays Eddie McCuen, the This colorful group of characters is at the Von spy duelling with a meat cleaver and straightstruggling, yet lovable, comedian who is full of oneGrossenknueten mansion for a backers' audition razor. 10 zany characters stuck in a blizzard at the liners. Maureen Sampson portrays Nikki Crandall, a which turns out to be a set-up to catch the "Stage estate of a batty theater backer. two hours of nonchorus-girl turned naval intelligence officer. KimDoor Slasher." As the plot unwinds, bodies drop like skop laughter. flies and much laughter ensues. These are familiar sights in Pacific The action takes place in the Von Theatre Arts Centre's production of Grossenknueten library. This set is "The Musical Comedy Murders of fabulous. The builders paid much 1940" written by John Bishop and attention to detail, including cobwebs in directed by JoAnne Mitchell and Jerry the secret passages. There are three Brees. The same directing team capbookcases which either slide or revolve, tured several honors in this year's which serve as entrances to the tunnels. Forces Command Festival of the The set also has many levels, making it Performing Arts for their work on the even more interesting. Not often in complay "Chicago." munity theater does one see a set as The show has all the elements of a intricate as this. great theatrical production -a talented Many technical effects, such as cast, an amazing set, good direction, snow flying in when the doors open and realistic technical effects, authentic costotal black-outs, add much believability tumes and a competent behind-theto the production. The technical crew, scenes crew to make it all run smoothly. which is often overlooked during a play, Each performer in the play brings did an outstanding job. Bob Apold, many nuances to his or her role, making David Verdi, Heather Anderson, D.L. them all larger-than-life spoofs of those Sima, Robert Mitchell, Lourdes Bottin corny characters found in many 1940's and Ken Pierzina all deserve mentioning thrillers. as being major contributors to the Traci K. Ferguson plays Helsa, a success of the show. German maid who is four different "The Musical Comedy Murders of people. Rachel Cunningham is Elsa Von 1940" runs Thursday through Oct. 31 at Grossenknueten, ahysterically flighty, Building 2060, Curundu. All shows start yet wealthy, theater patron. Michael W. at 8 p.m. For reservations, call the Beale plays Michael Kelly, a detective Theatre Arts Centre at 286-3152. Micrael phots Michael Beale prepares to stab Kimberly Deane Morse during rehearsals.

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B1o cTo 2e Classified Ads 1979 Chevy Impala, eng just rebuilt, Pioneer stereo/ 1985 Ford Escort, 5-spd,4 cyl, new trans eng, brake, 19" color TV $130, 25" color TV $300, stereo amp cass, grt cond, needs carb work $1950/obo. 283tires, int good, no ac $2200/obo. 223-9426.$150, tape deck $85, VCR $100, more. 264-4104. 4227. Weimaraner puppies, declawed, dewormed, tails Yamaha PSR-12 49 key elec keybd, 48 voices, docked. 252-6747, M-F, days. 1984 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera,4dr,4cyl, ac, ps,pb, rythms, 120V, wall adap incl $100. 236-4366. needs work $3000/neg. 286-4972 after 6pm. Rottweiler, male pups, CCP/AKC, champion bloodSpsn-spk maid, part/full time, live-in/out, honest, Tandy 1400LT IBM compat 768K, 2 built-in 3 1/2 line $600. 289-6243. 1989 Dodge Dakota, 4WD, canopy, carpet, ac, ps, refs, good w/children, hsekeeper, ironing. 285dr, supports mouse, printer, graphics, software, port pb, exr cond, not duty pd, 18,000 miles $14,000. 4323. $600. 285-4532. Chihuahua pups, born Aug. 28, 2 males, 2 females 287-3441. $100. 252-2353. Eng-spk honest, mature, hsekeeper, five days a Tear VCR, exc cond $175. 260-3890. 1982 Toyota Corolla, 2dr hb, 5-spd, ac, AM-FM week. 286-4589. German shepherd, shots, spayed $180. 289-3141. deck, runs good $2000/obo. 283-4684. Sony Trinitron 15" TV, remote $250. 287-5939. Eng-spk maid, babysitter, good w/children. 221German shepherd puppies, males & females $175/ 1987 Montero 4x4,5dr, 5-spd, stereo, ac, tilt wheel, 6897. Pioneer Indash CD player, DEH760 w/detach face obo. 261-7909. tint glass, gas, low miles, exc rood $9750. 286plate $250, Rockford Fosgate 8" subs $150. 2876378. Bilingual good honest live-in maid, good w/chil3622. German shepherd mix puppies, 6 wks old 420.252dren, refs. 287-3282. 2110. 1987 Chevy S-10 p/u, V6, at, ps, pb, tint glass, 2 RCA 20" color TVs $145-$95/obo. 260-5682. chrome wheels, looks grt, cxc cond $7000. 264Span-spk honest, mature, reliable maid. 228-6061. German shepherd, female, good w/children, 1 yrold 6926. Zenith VHS VCR $175, Sony Betamax VCR $200. $175. 287-4293. Bilingual day maid, mature, honest, reliable, refs, 284-4441. 1987 Chrysler Minivan, 4 cyl, AM-FM cass, at, ps, M-F, good w/children. 287-4685 after 5pm. American pitbull,8 mos old, male/females, papers, pb, good cond $7200. 261-6037. Nintendo $75, misc games, assort prices. 287-4685. all shots $400/obo. 220-1095. Eng-apk, responsible, live-in/out day maid, good w/ 1988 Pontiac Grand Am, 2.5 liter, ac, pw, 2dr, tilt children, refs, Clayton only. 287-5696. Sony handycam pro 8mm video camera. 286-4674. Stud services for German shepherd dogs w/pediwheel, exc cond $6200. 284-4389. green. 252-6910. Carpenter/yard worker, honest, reliable, hard workOkimate color printer $150, Sony 10" TV, remote 1977 Honda Accord, 2dr, 5-spd $1200. 284-4430. ing, refs. 226-6848. $300, Panasonic 1.1CF microwave $175. 286Free, kitten,2mos old, looking for good home. 2616378. 8136. 1982 Ford Bronco H, an, pa, pb, 33's, bushwhacker Licensed home day care provider, lots of experiflares, like new, duty pd $9250/obo. 226-7176. ence. 284-5726 ask for Joyce Udell. 25" color console TV, needs work $175/obo. 284Free, kittens, 8 wis old. 284-6263. 4834. 1979 Dodge van, at, extra parts, not duty pd $2500 Bilingual day maid, mature, honest, reliable, hseFree, puppy, 7 mos old, all shots, good for watch firm. 284-4799 after 5pm. keeper, ironing, weekends any hours. 238-5574 aks New fast data 386-40mhz, 170MB HD, 4MB Ram, dog. 284-4681. for Bebe. 5 1/4-3 1/2DD, VGA color mon, fax, modem, more 1988 Pontiac Fiero, 5-apd, exc cond $5000. 226$2000 firm. 269-6208. Free, cat, has shots, litter box, food dish, food, kitty 5446. Maid/babysitter, cleans to U.S. standards, honest, condo, litter incl. 283-4227. reliable, days only, Sat, $10 a day. 287-4137. Swivel mon base w/pwr control surge, spike protec1982 Plymouth Reliant, new paint job, ac, 4dr, gn tion for compu $50, Atari 2600 games $5ea. 282Free, male cat & female kittens, all shots, very lovgas mileage $2500/obo. 287-6583. Bilingual day maid, 2-3 days a week, mature, hon4390. able. 287-4244. est, good w/kids, refs. 224-2367. 1978 Dodge Aspen sta/wgn, special edition $1950. Miranda 35mm camera, wide lens, soligar telephoto 252-2333. Eng-spk honest, reliable, live-in hsekeeper, grt w/ lens, Sony super Betamax. 252-2581. children, refs. 286-4489. 1988 Buick Electra, leather int, all extras, V6, exc Elec typewriter $150, Little Tyke car. 282-4234. 1983 GMC Jimmy 4x4, ac, pb, ps, cass, alarm, duty cond, 7 pwr features $12,000. 261-7398 after 6pm. Bilingual maid, mature, honest, reliable, live-in, Mpd, 5-spd, 2.8L, good cond $6000. 261-6830. F, exc w/children. 286-3397. Nintendo cass, Treasure Island, Lemnings $45ea. 1985 Ford van XLT, low mileage $10,000. 243260-9361. 1990 Gao Storm, 5-spd, an, AM-FM caas,tintglass, 5366. Eng-spk day maid, mature, honest, hard working, low miles $7000 firm. 284-3783. M-W-F, good w/childrem. 287-4824. 386 compu IBM compat, 16mhz, modem, super 1983 Chrysler Imperial, 7,500 miles, mint cond, VGA, 40 Meg HD, programs. 286-4489. 1981 FiatX19 convert, 5-spd, ac, runs good $1000; fully loaded $9000. 261-5535. Bilingual day/night maid, honest, mature, hse1985 Renault Alliance, at, ac, new parts runs grt keeper, any hours, weekends, iron.231-7360 ask for Tandy 1400HD Laptop compu, 40MB HD w/drdos $3,000/neg. 269-8926. 1987 Nissan Sunny, ac, tint glass, stereo, 5-spdnot Aida. 6.0, case, pwr adap, books $575, car phone, bag, duty pd $3800. 260-8165. batt, 3watts $250. 230-0668 after 6pm. Daihatsu Rocky 4x4, gas, 5-spd, an, cass, exc rood, Upholstery, furn construction, maintenance, repair. ps, duty pd $8000/neg. 260-4296. 1990 Nissan Sentra, 5-spd, alarm, w/all extras, 224-6821. Commo colt, IBM compat, 20MB HD, mouse, color 15,000 kins, duty pd, perfect cond $6800. 260mon. 286-4489. 1977 Chevy Nova, 4dr, AM-FM cass, duty pd, 6932. Housekeeping maid, live-out. 260-4668. needs work $1000/obo. 233-5750. Yamaha organ, upright $800, Spiderman game for 1983 Ford Escort, runs good, exc uphols, not duty Bilingual maid, good w/children, animals. 287Game Gear, new $35. 252-5221. 1989 Pontiac Grand Prix, all computerized, ac, elec pd $3300/neg. 220-2421. 3338 after 5pm, M-F. win, many extras $10,000 223-4766 after 5pm. Bose 901 teak special edition series 6 spkers, equal 1991 Toyota Corona, fully loaded, pwr everything, Day maid, part time, exc w/children, has been in my $760. 261-5378. 1981 Subar GLF, runs good, body rough $975/ sr, alarm, AM-FM cass, mx cond $13,000/neg.269home for 2 yrs. 287-4745. obo. 284-4530. 1651. Brother typewriter, alec, good cond $100.223-3739 Eng-spk, honest, responsible, live-out maid, M-F, after 5pm. 1978 Camaro, rebuilt eng, mint cond, new tires, 1981 GMC Jimmy,atd,6cyl,gas,winch$3800/obo. good w/children. 284-4534. AM-FM nasa $1800. 223-4903. 223-7459. Amstrad word processor, hardly used, ribbon, disk, manuals $225/obo. 284-6629. 1981 CJ-7 Jeep 4x4, ps, good cond, runs grt, new 1987 Chevy Spectrum, 2dr hb $3000/obo. 283tires, batt $3500/obo. 286-6181. 4626. IBM compat 386/16mhz, turbo, SVGA, 130MG 25'9" 1991 boat w/1992 225hp Johnson OB motor, HD, loaded $1500. 287-6820 after 6pm. 1980 Honda Accord, pa, exc rood, runs grt, Jensen 1978 Oldsmobile Delta 88, needs work, new tires, VHF, video, fish finder, loaded, duty pd $59,500. stereo sys $2500/obo. 286-6181. brakes $600. 285-4532. 252-2333. Various Nintendo games $20-$25ea. 286-3239. 1978'Honda Civic, needs work $700. 252-2884. 1989 Sunbird SE Turbo, ps,AM-FM cass,sr, 5-spd, 22' North American Offshore boat hull (no OB Montgomery Ward 19", color TV, remote $200, exc rood, 23,000 miles, $500 down/take over motor) w/tandem galv trlr $5500. 252-2243. Nintendo w/gun, 5 games, good cond $100. 2871979 Ford van, good rond $3000/neg. 286-4975. paymts. 227-2970. 3028. 2(' Mako, 200hp Johnson, alum dbl axle trIr, depth 1991 Mustang 5.0 LX hb, showrm cond, low miles, 1981 GMC Convert van, exc cond $5500. 287finder, hydrlic trim tabs, 15hp kicker, bimini top, IBM comp, 286, 40MB 3 1/2, 1.44 extend mem, completely loaded $15,900/obo. 221-8249. 4284. marine radio, 55 pop $13,000. 287-5833. VGA mon comes factory, loaded programs $900/ obo. 287-5977. 1975 Volvo 245DL sta/wgn, an, AM-FM, good 1992 Lads Samara,4dr hb, 5-spd, duty pd, AM-FM 18' Stratos bassboat, 150hp Suzuki, elec trolling rond, new paint $2400/obo. 260-4046. cass, alarm $6300. 261-3486. motor, depth finder, extras, grt cond $10,000. 284Sega Genesis sys w/5 games, or games sold sepa4596. rately. 284-4636. 1991 Hyundai Excel, at, duty pd $7100. 223-4103. 1981 CJ-7 Jeep, AM-FM as, ht, duty pd, exc cond, rebuilt $5200/obo. 287-6312. 17 1/2' Glaston 1/0 4 cyl Chevy, super economical, 1973 Ford 4x4 p/u, 390, 4-spd, runs good, body exc cond, extra eng, many extras $5000. 252-2121. sound, needs work $3000/obo. 284-5968. 1982 Datsun K-cab p/u, 4 cyl, 5-spd, canopy, new parts, ex mech cond, minorbody work$2500.28716 1/2' Fl king fish bassboat, no motor, new equip I.D. bracelet at Howard soccer field, says "Jenny." 1975 VW Beetle, fair cond $1500/obo. 223-7340. 5384. $700/obo. 287-3038. 284-6633. 1986 Chevy Cavalier RS, pw/locks, an, ps, pb, 1970 VW Bug, good body, needs paint$1500.28716" Orlando Clipper w/60hp Yamaha, fish finder, $4400/obo. 282-3095. 6842. extras $4500. 261-5231. 1982 Buick Regal, V8 diesel, 64,500 miles, like 1991 Mitsubishi Lancer, at, radio cass, 4dr, low 12" Achilles, 1992Zodiac, alum floor w/199225hp L-shaped bunk set w/chest of drawers, desk $150, new, an, nasa, one owner, best offer. 268-0621. mileage, exc cond $7500. 268-3960. Mercury, used 5 times w/access, trlr $7950. 264new twin matt $75. 284-3926. 4817. 1985 Toyota Corolla, 4dr, diesel, 5-spd, an, new 1977 Toyota Liftback, 4 cyl, duty pd, looks & Solid walnut hutch, DR tbl, magnificent $3250, Ktires, exe rood, not duty pd $5100. 252-2622. runs good, needs somebody work $750/obo. 287Zodiac Pro 420 inflat boat, poly hull, cap of 50hp sz bed, frame $425, Admiral 16.7 cu.fLt. frzr $530. 6229. motor, new in box $3000/obo. 284-4012. 243-5366. 1986 Oldsmobile Regency, 4dr, 6 ryl, fuel injec, loaded, duty pd $12,000. 260-7574. 1977 Chevy Malibu, boat bitch, new master cyl, 2 new 5-hole rims for boat trier $15 ea. 287-3572. Hotpoint hvy duty dryer, 9/10 mos used $260. 264runs grt, $900. 287-3620. 2233. 1990 Hyundai Stellar, at, an, AM-FM stereo cass, Trailer 4x3x2, closed, removable doors, lights '92 32,000 miles, not duty pd $6000. 260-3183. 1985 Toyota Landcruiser, 4WD, an, std, exn cond, plate, duty pd $400. 226-7679. Sears microwave, digital control, pad, programmed not duty pd $10,000. 252-6990. defrost, manual, temp probe $175. 284-4389. 1991 Chevy Camaro RS coupe, 5-apd, ac, pa, pb, AM-FM cass, 7,300 miles, exn cond $12,000. 2601981 Honda Civic, 5-spd, an AM-FM cass, clean 11I Onoman,footstool,ltbge$50, chair off-white,good 7621. $2000. 286-3327 lv msg. cond $75. 284-4389 after 4pm. Gameboy + 5 games $150, Nintendo NES, pwrpad, 1987 Nissan Sentra, ps, pb, at, an, tint glass, new 1970 Morris Minor 1000, 2dr, rebuilt eng, parts. run $80, 12 games $25-$40. 260-4046. Two Hotpoint 12,000 bin a", exc cond $350ea. tires, chrome rims, alarm $5700. 286-4731. 256-6436 after 7pm. 269-1651. Answer machine $110, phone console w/radio, 1988 VW Fox,4dr,25,000 miles, ac,4-spdAM-FM 1990 Honda Civic EX, fully loaded, $10,000. 285alarm $70, dbl nasa $100, Commo 1541 DO $70, Nisato gas stove, four burners, oven $80, National cass, 4 spkers, like showrm cond $5500. 261-7845. 5935. photocopier $275. 284-6881. refrig, 14 cu.ft $325. 226-6271.

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* Classified Ads Tr Times B 11 Kenmore 15 cu.ft. refrig/frzr, nofrost,2dr$350/obo. Recliner $140, lg 3-oval mirror $180, Ig rec mirror Whirlpool6 cu.ft, like new, elec stove, GE 14' color 233-5750. $30, high chair $60. 284-5538. TV. 229-1848. Whirlpool dishwasher, roll around, exc cond $150. Wooden rocking chair, bought in front of Howard Murray 12-spd ladies bike $60, Sanyo Betamax Qtr 687B, Clayton, Sat 8am-2pm. Misc items. 284-3898 after 4pm. $50. 263-5111 apt 32. VCR $125/obo. 287-3197. Qtra 1140B, Clayton, Sat 8am. Washer, dryer. Sofa sleeper $400, dinette act, 4 chrs $400, custom Whirlpool 15.1 cuft. upright frzr, looks & rns like Evenflo crib w/matt $115, Evenflo play yard $55, made curtains for LR, Dr, BR, dusty rose $300.284new $300. 284-5784. Graco Disney walker $3o. 283-6590. Crossroads Bible Church, Sat Corozal 7-10am. 3573. Dishwasher, fence, stereo. Q-sz matt, box springs, frame, bedspread, matt Elec stove, 24x4 big foot pwr wheels, toys, clothes. Kitchen curtain/rod $10, microwave-convection cover, pillow shams, dust ruffle, rocker/recliner. 260-2580. Qtrs 43, Albrook, Sat 8-1am. oven $150. 284-3573. 236-4809. DR glass tbl w/willow base, 6 chrs, buffet $350, Qtrs 74, Albrook, Sat 7am. Multi-family. Sofa, good cond $200, Q-sz matt, box spring,frame, GE 18 cu.ft. refrig, 2 vertical dra $400. 261-8136. bunk beds w/matt $120, Ig disk w/trunks $150. 252good cond $100. 284-3779. 5093. Qtra 98B, Albrook, Sat 8am-noon. K-az bed, box spring, white rattan, semi-orthopedic Whirlpool 13,000 btu so, good cond $500. 226matt $375. 261-5795. Volt sit-up bench $35. 236-3336. Qtrs 241B, Albrook, Sat only 8-11am. 7679. Limoge vase $250, garb disp $95, radio parts, Qtrs 12B, Howard, Sat 7am-noon. Toy box w/ Dehumid $150, 4 fans, ac cage $40, steering whl ki I if wedding dress $195, R/R LPs, judo suit $20. 252shelves, many toys, hsehold items. lock club, am $30, Ig $35/ 287-5393. 2042. Girl's 24" bike $90, baby stroller $35, high chair Qtr 80A, Howard, Sat 8sam. TV, sewing mach, 2 bug zippers $25ea, 2pr soccer shoes sz 1 1/2 $12 $25, car booster seat $10. 284-3926. New pcs of leather screen printing craft kit, paints, Nintendo, curtains, misc. ea. 287-5393. Toyota repair manual, night dress. 252-2042. Buick Regal parts for 350. eng/trans $700, bunipQnrs 86A, Howard, Sat 8am-noon. GE refrig, side-by-side, 24 cu.ft., 2 1/2 yrs $900, 1 era, other parts still good. 286-4688 eves. Divegearfins,med $20,lt$40,knife$30,speargun 8,000 btu ac $300, 10,000 btu $400, misc appli$20, churchill fins, lg $15, surf, soft racks$20.283Qtra 129B, Howard, Sat 7am. Clothes, baby items, ances. 286-4975. 5 Dunlop grand trak tires 225/70R15 $300/obo. 3644 ask for Tom. electronics. 269-1651. Newborn port crib/changing tbl, mat, circus mobil Armchr, ottoman $125, wood toybox $25, chest of Qtrs 634A, Howard. Sat 8am-? LR, misc items. inel $100. 286-4184. Segavideo games,AlteredBeast,Super Volleyball, drawers $75, vacuum cleaner $40. 286-3645. David Robinson basketball $25-$35. 287-4733. Qtrs 651B, Howard, Sat 8am-noon. Two-family. Day bed w/cover, 2 pillows $50. 236-0811. DR tbl for 8, glass top, Whirlpool acs 18,000 btu Graco stroll-a-bed carriage/stroller, gst cond $45. $300, 16,000 btu $250, carpets 12x15, 9x12, more. Qtrs 1516A, Howard, Sat 8am-7 LR set, sofa, chr, sq cocktail thl, 3 round tbls, axc 287-4734. 252-6990. cond. 252-6668. Qtrs 1527D, Howard, Sat 8am-noon, Port CD playStove extractor $30, four iron twin bed headbds 10-spd bikes, Conmo 64 compu, curtains, couch crs, clothes, books, cass racks, misc. Amana microwave oven $200, boy's 16" bike $90. $35ea, two iron night this $10ca. 226-6271. cover, hampster cage. 287-6675. 260-7025. Qtrs 2037B, Curundo, Sat 7:30am-noon. VW 4 rims, chrome spoke, 14x5 w/caps, lugs,never Lawnmower, 22-inch, Shp, hvy duty, exc cond Recliner, good shape $275, bassinet w/dress $50. used, dune buggy style $350. 236-3253. $175/obo. 252-5872. Qtrs 2030, Curundu, Sat 8am-noon. Multi-fanily, 286-3390. clothes, toys. Gold swivel armchr $60, Smith Corona elec type9x1 1 gr carpet w/pad $80, Nintendo games, exer Bali mini blinds 72x36 $75, coffee-mate percolator writer, case $75, Whirlpool 15,000 btu ac $350. bench, new $175, vacuum $90, oval rugs $27ea, $18. 252-5792. 287-3297. baby horse $35, 2 this $60-$70. 260-5771. Recliner, brn wall-away, plastic bins/stackers, Acoustic guitar, strap, caie, free lesson, for a mo Bike $120, dinette, 2 chrs $130, stroller $45, infant Immediately, full time housekeeper, M-F, lWamblinds, assort sizes. 252-5985. $275. 284-4021. clothes, skatebd $110, deep fryer $12. 260-5771. 6pm, one baby, some weekends, refs required. 284' 4484. 3pc IR set, floral print, blue/rose, good cond $650. Baby stroller, good cond $45, tricycle, axc coed Sofa-sleeper, BR furn, dishwasher, coffee/end this, 283-3092. $15. 284-5229. microwave, patio furn, more. 286-4536. AKC malecolliefor stud service for future breeding to AKC collie female. 252-1041. LR couch, loveseat, chr, ottoman, coffee/end thls, Graco baby swing, new cond $70. 260-3890. Itoh 27" blue, 10-spd, bike, center-pull brakes, axc cond $1000/obo. 287-4244. Suntour GT derailleur, good cond $140. 284-4183. Would like to meet mothers of twins ormoreto form Armoire, dresser w/mirror $250 set, Kenmore resupport group, expecting moms welcome, too. 287Loveseat, overstuffed, blue $250. 252-5568. frig, 3 yrs $600, ladies & men's 10-spd bikes $50ea. Set of 5 radial all weather tires, Goodyear 1953824. 287-5780. 75R15, 3 mos used $180. 287-3844. K-az waterbed, mirror/bookcase, headed, 5-drawer Piano in good cond. 243-5269. pedestal, waveless mat, padded rails $500. 287Triathlon 18-spd 26" bike, hardly used,some access Prom dress, pink satin, lace, worn once $60. 2874685 after Spon. incl $400. 283-5036. 5934. Miniature dachshund would prefer. puppy. 2606482. Whirlpool washer, top of line$400, GE refrig $600, Misc mech accessories, Sony reel-to-reel w/tapes Dryer $360, strolee car seat 0-4 yrs. 284-3720. TV wall unit divider $200. 284-5388. (pre & blank). 284-5693. Ride needed, Balboa to Howard & return, approx Electronic Bible, axc cond $75, works on batt or 7am-4:30pn, M-F. 282-3883. Several kitchen cabinets, exc cond $60-up. 284Ladies scuba gear, BC, boots, fins, snorkel $130. adap, not inclu, Rainbow vacuum sys, all attach. 3930. 236-0811. 287-4745. Air conditioner for parts. 252-2287. Sofa $225, top loading dishwasher $50. 252-7400. E-cel exer bike $100, set of orbatron weights $50. Crown 1-3-5 graphite golf clubs, new $175. 287Used cloths, shoes, all sizes. 289-5159. 226-0730. 4293. JC Penney sewing mach, built-in designer cams, Clown for kids, B-Day party. 283-3690. woodgrain 3-drawer cab, works grt $270. 287Triathletes, profile aero bars $50,profile swiftshift Solid wood triple dresser $350/obo, JVC 13" color 3676. $30, Aerospoke composit racing wheel $300. 284TV $220, 10-spd bike $85. 287-4189. Chinese Shar-pel puppy, male/female or contact 3028 after Spi. with anyone planning to breed same soon. 284Scaly twin matt, very good coed $125, walnut day 12x14 bge carpet $135, 9x12 rose $65 or 175 both. 4636. bed, no tmndle $200, gas dryer, hvy duty cap $150. Fred Bear compound bow model, white tail hunter 287-4293. 286-3778. pull: 651b draw, 30" $80. 282-5630. 4 rims, 6 holes for all terrain tires, good cood. 230Men's Dunlop golf clubs, w-3 irons, 1, 3, 5 woods, 0932. Cherry roll top desk, chair $650, VGA Packard Bell Kirby vacuum, attach, shampooer, sander, extra putter, bag, new $140. 287-5483. mon $275, compu mouse. 284-5726. belts, bags $250 firm. 282-3183. 25-30-hp OB motor, reasonably priced or Jon boat Kenmore washer/dryer, exc cond $450, '91 Wards w/trir. 286-6439. Recliner, exc cond $150. 260-7621. Sears Craftsman 10-inch radial arm saw w/srand, pwr lawnmower $100. 286-6227 after 6pm. extra blade $375/obo. 252-2243. Parts for 1983 Chevy Celebrity, door lock, spare 12x15 blue carpet w/pad, exc cond $130.284-5030. 24' ladies 10-spd $50, 20: Raleigh freestyle $60, tire, rear spkers, chrome moldings. 269-6208. Army off mess white, dress white unifs, coat 46R, tires & wheels for Chevy GMC van. 287-4571. Montgomery Ward microwave/convec oven, waist 40, can be altered $20es/obo. 287-6297. Responsible live-in maid, must speek Eng, full time books, access, grt cond $350/obo. MW stereo w/ New BCA mountain bike, rg price $276, will sell only. 287-5985 ask for Gins after 6pm. spkers $100. 285-4734. Sofa $250, chr & ottoman $100, carpets 12x10 very masonable. 284-4636. $150, 6x12 $75, all like new cond. 261-7845. Exrs large dog travel cage, reasonably priced. 287Gibson 16cu.ft.frzr,verygoodcond$900/obo.28621" Nashbar mountain bike, 18-spd, good coed 5934. 3373. 1987 IROC-Z wheel $500, tires 245/50R16, new $300, wedding dress, veil, slip $300. 252-2080. $250 set. 287-5786 after 6pm. Reasonably priced free-cr to buy for the old folks in Friedrich 16,000 ac $150 & 8,000 $100; Whirlpool Metal desk $60, handy chr $20, microwave $150, Pilon. 289-4050. 8,000 $200 & 10,000 $150; Fedders 12,000 $175. Trlrw/13' wheels, 1/2 ton cap, Sony component sys. Oster kitch ctr$100, file cab $80, blender$30. 252262-1650. 252-5985. 6814. Mature, honest, hsekceper to clr-n, 2 rs, 3 dilays a weck, preferred U.S. depeondeint. $20 a wk. 287LR, DR,household items, children items. 284-4795. Plants, many sizes, colors $1 and 50 cents, Jeep waILI 6841. terpump fits 258-inch eng $25. 286-3871. Oak dinette set, china cab, coffee thl, rattan rocker, Italian tutor, -to 3 hours per week 284-4720. microwave, sewing machine coffee maker. 2842pr boys rollerskates, new sa 3 & 4 $30ea. 2871984 Honda Nighthawk 700cc, 9,000 orig miles, 6321. 3827. exc cond, matching helmet $2500. 284-3685. Resionsilble teenager 14 or older) for orcssional balbysitting otit,/wkeods, Koblb/tioward area. GE24cu.ft.refrig/frzr,2dr,l yrold,likenew $950. Baseball cards for sale or trade. 260-5522. 1983 Suzuki FZSO moped, needs work, will not 2814-S,7 252-2229. start, check it out, make offer. 287-3991. 9x12 It grn rug $75, floor length drapes, gen $75, Ratan .ra. whiit/tai, retsnably prices, will con5pe Q-sz cherrywood BR set, good cond, 3 yrs old recliner chr $150. 252-5887. 1983 Yamaha Virago 500, good shape, less than sirt a ,ei. t,'l181 $1500, 284-4581 after 5pm. 10,000 orig miles $2000. 2874070 ask ror Joe. 2 bet oper Barbie cars, like new $1SOea, clip style 1avy int-a guitar taller for Metallira and Ac, 181X split $775, 18,0W Padders $325, weed eater, elec $35.287-3738. 1981 Montesa 349, 1990 ionda (ill-00,. 198H Mi-ga,tht songi. t87 471. 12,00) GE a $225. 252-2287. Honda TLR 250, all like iew, -u-,a I 1-180 VW running boards $35, Gameboy, 6 games, light, W,,itld like to get ii co ta with AAPHS mclianii Custom seat covers for Honda Civic Suttle, am cleaning kit $135. 287-3738. 1982 Honda NX nopeti. dlty 11. .m 11. unable ,, its ti Coll Vista, iraky seals. 287-3737 9t/00O,. 10,00, 18,000. 252-6246. 285-5935. s nm K-sz waterbed, hvy wood headbd, footbd, inel extra Kearnoc high-efficiency upright fri-, w/ock, key new malt $280. 287-3676. 5.5 cu.ft., got ond $lj00. 214-41813. r F'dhteras noist c,ass ua otft tho titrol sfs ah rpir t, TIee, tpce ved this week, there Girl's BMX bike, bbq, exhaust fan, mleat & llw .rr ir eu al rota next wis -ek, type or write on ta pli CHdrtt ibl, choir $25, Ig vi painting $70. 284 slicer, Mirinda 35mm cal ra, isujr lletamax. 252= whit papsr al, loin Segibty : on ir's 5,, IIitsti. d shi, hs me ads. 553.2 .rankolginliilon .It th, contint or lhe udto 15 words. () not fax ads.

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B 2 ~ Tropic Times B Oct. 23,1992 Super Crosswor6 BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker ACROSS var. dsplay 125 Down East* 33 Get.even game WE SOTH GOETlET BUT yOU I'M AL60 Y YOU 1 re player 43 Marsh 67 Sea nymph State wrth 80 San Diego ORDERS. THE GENERAL ARE OVERSENSITIVE GKINNY OLD mythology 46 Ethan Allen's 89 Heart ot 126 FabrIc 35 Sorrows player 6AYG WE'RE 50E'. WEIGHT, AWHIER' /AGOF UFR. 6 Defrost the state DiIes worker 36 Genus of 81 "Cheers" OVEfWEIG-T. HE's 60 GGT. LUGG Be HURT! WHERED YOUR frozen food 4$ Slow, In 91 Actor Marion 127 The grasses seat CRUEL ANNER6, 10 Herbert music 92 Placed on Untouch. 37 Bibical name 83 Actress ETALOY2 Hoovefe 50 PredtrMine the record ables" 38 Fortified Renck Z stat. 52 Soft. white 94 Patti LuPone protagonist 41 Official seal 86 Maryland 14 Chess and fur role on 128 Actress 43 Discharges 88 Hindu god checkers 53 Where to find Broadway Burstyn 44 January, In 90 Buffalo or 19 'Fiddler on Helena 95 Toscani, for DOWN Malaga wisent the Ro"astar 55 Gazes rudely one I Summers on 45 Snug abodes 91 Island east of 20 Where to find 66 Very poor MRecite the Seine 47 He had a gilt Java the Colos87 ChInese 97 Da before 2 Actor's quest complex? 93 Triangular seum secret hays 30n48 Huey or OS Fireplace 21 1sles off society 99 Japan (equivalent Howie shelves HAGAR the Horrible By Dik Browne Ireland 58 Poet's pond follower to) 49 Unique 98 Having an 22 Spanish 60 Turn away 100 Hardy 4 Like some prson unpleasant province 61 Egyptian cabbage music 51 H letter "odor C .T WJR 23 0Cindk skink lo1Sippery one 5 MassachuS3 Region of 100 DDE's AAKr' c c g -ro V4IERE N A6 -tV L -F antelope 62 Strong 102 Sacred satss Czechoslovabirthplace L, 4iAT ANE LOO 4 6 24 Arrow poison twilled songs 6 PoseIdon's kre 102 Last name of 25 Donated fabric 104 E. Power scepter 54 Where to see 94 Across 26 Orderly 63 Popular Biggs was 7 Frank and the London 103 Vampirearrangehedge shrub one open Bridge killing mants S5Distress call 107 Founder of a : Catkin 57 -Haute weapon 27 Pinnacle of 66 Spanish French 9 Very early 59 Elcit 105 Ouebec ier ice mnssionaryln dynasty 10 Othello vilain 62 Span. matron peninsula 28 ad's America 110 Dakota 11 Praying 64 Compass 106 -Nadu Ihideaway 68 Torrid and Indian figure reading (formerly 29 Sily blunder fIgid 112 Aardvark's 12 Becomes 67 New York Madras) 30 The 70 Psychic's gift snack unsteady 69 Spanish halls 107 Unruffled Afsklitdijk. 73 Prodigy or 113 Card used in 13 Nol using 70 Feudal 10 code or rug and others miracle lortuneting iquid servants 109 Equal: comb. Barney Google and Snuffy Smith By Fred Lasswell 31 Texas 76 Ladder rung 117 Brazilian 14 New Jersey 71 Opera form emblem 78 Elec. units macaw 15 Effective use division 111 Glacial sand 34 Garden tool 82 Sell tickets at 118 Palm leaves 16 Vakuable fur 72 "It's My -ridges CAN YOU SHOOT SHORE if WE G0T TO --THEN WE 36 Proud -a profit: 11OBeing 17 Actress (song) 114 Moslem EMA RBLES our CHOP FIVE CAN PLAY peacock colloq. 120 Love, Itaian Sommer 74 Perry's weight unit MEMARE, BUT CO -E 39 Spring 84 Land of style I8 Impudent tak creator 115 Heraldic JUJHAID? FtRST"ARMLOAS season shamrocks 121 Dormouse 29 Small wild 75 Permission bearing OF KINDLIN' 40 Duct 85 Debussy's 122 Miss Chase 76 Roof worker 116 H.S. student WOOD AN42Hllin Clair de -123 Gem stone 32 awaiian 77 Cougar 119 Ending or Jerusalem: 86 Parade 124 Baron or earl goose 79 Gambling lunch or pig 1 2 45 6 7 r 1 11 12 13 '14 15 F1 17 8 T,5-21 ~ 1 E -RATZ by BEN SMrTH I TI-flr

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