Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Southern Command news

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




Gift of the Panama Canal Museum


News

Valent Recreation Center
offers free movies. Page 3.


Features

Reserve military police train
in Panama. Page 10.


Sports

Triathletes to compete in
Las Vegas. Page 11.


I ~. -----


. ~ Photo oW Air
Air Rescue Service MA-60G Pave Hawk helicopters from Nellis AFB like this one will be part of the Air Force Combat
Rescue inventory that will transfer from Air Mobility Command to Air Combat Command Jan. 1, 1993.

Air Force rescue units merge with ACC


by TSgt. Rene Zapata Jr.
OL-I Air Rescue Service
HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA) - The
Air Staff will realign Air Rescue Service
units under the Air Combat Command
Jan. 1, 1993 to more closely align com-
bat missions and simplify command lines.
ARS is the primary Air Force combat
rescue force with global search and res-
cue responsibility in support of Depart-
ment of Defense operations.
Under the realignment, all continen-
tal U.S. rescue forces will transfer to
ACC, except for the 55th Weather
Reconnaissance Squadron, McClellan
AFB, Calif.
The 55th WRS will remain with the
Air Mobility Command. Overseas, ARS
forces will transfer to the control of the


U.S. Air Force theater major commands.
Locally, the U.S. Southern Air Forces
(12th Air Force) will be gaining the 66th
Air Rescue Squadron at Nellis AFB,
Nevada and Operating Location-I ARS
at Howard.
Among other responsibilities, the
commander of ACC will assume duties
as the Air Force chief of staff executive
agent for search and rescue matters and
will be responsible for the development
of multi-command operational procedures
for rescue helicopters, HC-130P tankers,
pararescue jumpers, and theater rescue
coordination centers.
"The ARS has had a proud history
since its establishment March 13, 1946 at
Andrews Field, Md.," Maj. Donald Dunn,
OL-I ARS commander, said. "At the
height of the Korean War, the 3rd Air


Rescue Squadron accounted for a total of
9,898 rescues of United Nations person-
nel, including 996 combat saves. During
the Vietnam War, ARS forces saved the
lives of 4,120 personnel, including a
grand total of 2,780 combat saves. During
this conflict, ARS aircrews and parares-
cue jumpers were the most highly deco-
rated Air Force members with three Medals
of Honor and 10 Air Force Crosses.
"As the Air Rescue Service enters a
new phase of its history, one thing is
remarkably clear," Dunn said. "The men
and women who have been part of ARS's
past have contributed to saving more
than 25,00 lives, nearly 4,000 of these
were combat saves, since the dayin 1946
when ARS was established. The rescue
motto will always continue to be: 'These
things we do that others may live.'"


Panama starts


CFC campaign
COROZAL (Tropic Times)- TheU.S.
Southern Command will begin its Com-
bined Federal Campaign Thursday. The
campaign will continue through Nov. 16.
with a goal of $350,000.
The 24th Wing's share of SOUTH-
COMs goal is $63,000.
"The disasters at Homestead AFB,
Guam, Hawaii and Somalia brought tre-
mendous devastation and loss of lives,"
said Maj. Michael Dillard, 24th Wing
CFC project officer. "A call for human-
ity and help has been made. Answer the
call with your contribution to the CFC,
it's the human thing to do."
Air Force members should call Dil-
lard at 284-3815 for details.
According to U.S. Army South's act-
ing project officer, John Cuite, USARSO's
portion of the goal is $210,000.
The Army's campaign will begin with
an 11:30 a.m. no-host lunch Wednesday
for all commanders, directors, key staff
and CFC project officers and keyper-
sons. The lunch will be held at the Fort
Clayton Noncommissioned Officers' Club
and will be followed by a training session
for the project officers and keypersons.
Each unit will be assigned a key per-
son who can enroll peoplein CFC or give
more information.
Lt. James Morales is the project offi-
cer for U.S. Naval Station Panama Ca-
nal. The naval station has a $31,500 goal
this year.
Morales said Navy keypersons will
be trained this week and there will be
keypersons for all the naval station's di-
visions as well as its tenant commands.
People can contribute through their keyper-
sons.


Story continues on page 16.


WI From street cops to commandos


by Peter Copeland picking organizations, himself about what could go wrong, he keeps a well-
Scripp Howard News Service The new program, which DEA says would cost $11 worn copy of "A Bright Shining Lie," a book about the
million in the first year, would increase the number of tragedy and failure of Vietnam.
es Editor's note: This is the second in a mobile teams from six to 21, replace temporary-duty One year ago, worried about the lack of clear strat-
three part series about the U.S.'s war on drugs as agents with full-time slots and supplement the work of egy to fight the war, Ferrarone sat down with Marilyn
seen by Scripps Howard New Service reporters. It's more than 300 DEA employees already working in McAfee, the State Department's deputy chief of mis-
reprinted with permission from the Scripps Howard Latin America. sion at the U.S. Embassy in La Paz.
News Service. Agents who volunteer for the Snowcap teams are The old strategy was enough to keep the Washington


LA PAZ, Bolivia - The Drug Enforcement Admini-
stration, which provides many of the ground troops for
America's drug war overseas, plans to greatly expand
its roving patrols of combat-trained agents in five Latin
American countries.
The plan, quietly included in the agency's proposed
budget for 1993, would create a permanent "Andean
support team" of 105 people trained in military opera-
tions to rotate through Peru, Bolivia, Guatemala, Ecua-
dor, and Venezuela.
The DEA would use the new team to expand the
existing Snowcap teams in Peru, Bolivia and Guate-
mala, operations staffed by U.S.-based field agefits on
temporary duty.
The Snowcap strike teams lead Latin American'
police forces in paramilitary raids on jungle drug labs
and clandestine airstrips and in operations against traf-


sent to For Benning, Ga., where they are a given aweek-
long evaluation before taking an eight-week course
taught by Army Rangers.
They learn to survive in the jungle, fire an M-16 and
work a field radio. Then there is a 25-week Spanish
course, followed by a 10-week "mount out" at the
Marine base at Quantico, Va., where the agents polish
their skills and pick up diplomatic pointers from the
State Department.
They are formed into self-contained teams of about
a dozen people from DEA and Border Patrol, plus
former Army Special Forces soldiers who serve as
medics and radio operators.
When they hit the ground, the teams come under the
operational control of resident DEA agents in charge,
men like Don Ferrarone.
Ferrarone, who heads the DEA team in Bolivia, sees
his war as a low-intensity conflict. As a reminder to


bean-counters happy - everybody nad "oady counts
of drugs seized and labs discovered - but it wasn't
slowing the flow of cocaine from Bolivia.
A new scheme was hatched - Operation Ghost
Zone.
The target was the Chapare, a remote piece of
Boliviari jungle about the size of New Jersey.
The embassy group mustered 1,000 Bolivian and
American cops, GIs and drug agents, a score of aircraft,
roomful of high-tech hardware and four U.S. military
officers eager to fight a "real war."
On Feb. 23, they kicked off the largest counter-drug
operation ever attempted.
"We're moving enough troops and equipment into
the most active narco-trafficking area in Bolivia so that
we can control the ground, the thousands of waterways


Story continues on page 8.









Tropic Times
Sept. 25, 1990


STOP!


Crossing


guard


keeps walkers safe

by SrA. Jackie Ambrose
24th Wing Group Public Affairs Of fic
HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA) - If you've driven
along Bruja Road on school mornings, chances are,
you've seen him.
Whether waving to passing cars or holding a stop
sign for schoolchildren to cross, Ricardo Ogg has been \
a fixture here for the past three years.
Ogg, a security guard for the Howard Elementary
School, works Mondays through Fridays as a school
crossing guard and as a security guard for the school ..
compound.
"People began waving atme from my first day on the ._
job," Ogg recalled. "It's grown since then and now
people blow their horns at me and even give me sodas
and some snacks. I have 14 kids of my own, so I love -
kids and when the students get to know me, some even -
bring me candy." ..
A resident of San Miguelito, he is at the school by
5:15 a.m., even though his official day runs from7a.m.
to 3 p.m.'"
"Mr. Ogg is always here early," third-grade teacher,
Terrie Haning, said. "He helps teachers with their
books and other loads andis friendly withthekids, who .
really listen to him."
"I come early to relieve whoever is on that shift to ' .. .. ' -
give them more time to rest at home," he said.
Other than one incident last year, he's never had an
accident occur at the crosswalk, Ogg said.
"An 8-year-old boy was on his bicycle and about to
enter the road while traffic was moving. I just reached
out and grabbed him and his bicycle," he said.
Ogg has received an excellence award and certifi- . ,..
cate of appreciation for his work as a security guard, -"
and it's a job he looks forward to every day. Ricardo Ogg stops traffic for schoolchildren and parents. US. A For photo by SA. J Ambr


Military police begin patrolling hospital, parking lots
by Sgt. Jane Usero fc
USARSO Public Affairs Office


GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY
HOSPITAL (USARSO PAO) - Visitors
to Gorgas Army Community Hospital
may have noticed recent increasein the
level of security around the hospital with
identification check points, roving mili-
tary police cars and dog patrols.
"The increased security is not because
of an increased threat," said SSgt. Elieser
Colonroche, hospital security non-com-
missioned officer in charge.
"Our purpose is to ensure safer and
more comfortable surroundings for those
visiting the hospital," he said.
The upgrade of hospital security be-
gan Aug. 19 with the addition of more
military police roving patrols. These
patrols include walking, mobile and K-9
teams between 6 p.m. - 6 a.m.
"These patrols have made a substan-
tial difference," said Colonroche. "Be-
fore the increase in patrols, there were
711 trespassers apprehended between Jan.
1 and July 30. Since they began the new
patrols there has been only one incident,
and the culprits were caught," he said.
"Our job is to check identification of
those parking in the hospital parking
areas and attempting to enter the facil-
ity," said Spec. Thomas Mosher, a member
of the guard force.
During the first day the four-man guard
force was in place, it turned 169 people
away, Colonroche said.
Another place people will find the
guards is the emergency ramp, which
guards will only let emergency vehicles
use.
"Of course, there are exceptions to
this. For example, elderly, handicapped
or people who would have problems
negotiating the stairs will still be able to
be dropped off at the ramp," he said.


.1


U.S. Army photo by Sgt Jane Usro
Sgt. James Myles and his military working dog patrol the parking lot at Gorgas Army Community Hospital.


"But in most cases, people will be di-
rected to the parking areas."
The response to the new guards has
been good, Colonroche said.
"I had one person tell me that this was
the first time in his three years here he
was able to find parking place under the
building," said Mosher.
"People used to park here to go down-
town to work or shop," said Colonroche.
"Now that the guard force is checking,


there are more parking spaces open for
patients and visitors to the hospital.
"I've had people complain when I
turn them away that they have been doing
this for years and can't understand the
sudden change," said Mosher. "But, after
a while, everyone will get used to it."
"For a very long time, Gorgas was
operated as an open, unrestricted and
unsecure installation," Colonreche said.
"This caused conditions that encour-


aged criminal behavior, and many pa-
tients, staff members and the U.S. gov-
ernment were the victims. The new sys-
tem is in place to change this," he said.
The higher security is no more restric-
tive than entering any other military facility
orinstallation, according to Colonroche.
"There will probably be some resis-
tance to this change but, in the long run,
the hospital will be a more secure place
for everyone concerned," he said.















'Movie man' shares



back-to-back hits


by SgL Jane Usero
USARSO Public Affairs Office
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -
Walking through the Valent Recreation
Center these days, visitors may notice
something new. Neatly hand-written
posters hanging here and there, loud
gun fights coming from one of the rooms
and one man dashing in and out of the
room with a stack of fliers in one hand
and what looks like a gold album in the
other.
Once the door opens to this noisy
room and the lights are turned on, scores
of people pour into the hallway smiling
and talking about how impressed they
were. Still others make their way into the
room with the encouragement of their
host, George Kaberline, a distribution
facility manager for the Army and Air
Force Exchange System.
What is going on behind the door to
this room, thanks to Kabedrine, is a chance
to hear the movies. To Kaberline, you
haven't seen a movie until you have
heard the movie and, in the new screen-
ing room at the center, visitors can do
both.
Though Kaberline is not a center
employee, he offers his services, equip-
ment and movies free.
"When I saw the big screen television,
I offered to do this," he said. "It not only
gives the soldiers and their families an
opportunity to see these movies the way
they were meantto be seen, but I havethe
enjoyment of seeing and hearing them
myself. I couldn't do this in my apart-
ment. The speakers are too big for one
thing, but I don't have a television,"
Kaberline said with a grin.
"When George approached us with
his offer, we jumped at the chance," said


Anne Kelly, Valent Recreation Center
director. "A program like his is great, but
one that we couldn't afford if we had to
pay for it. He does an outstanding job.
He does everything from setting up the
schedule and doing the signs to printing
up the hand-outs and setting up the room,"
she said.
Kaberline, the movie man, as some
are calling him these days, is not new to
the world of movies. He was introduced
to movies at a young age by his father and
worked 12 years as a theater manager
and projectionist.
"I love the movies and have been col-
lecting these for about six years now," he
said.
With a collection of more than 500
movies, the movie man has plenty to
choose from for his programming.
"I began choosing films that are ac-
tion type, gearing the program toward
the adult audience," Kaberline said.
"Recently, however, I've noticed alot of
families coming in so I have begun to
schedule family-oriented films as well."
With line-ups such as action-packed
Arnold Schwarzenegger movies one day
and movies like "Ferngully" and "The
Color Purple" the next day, Kaberline's
line-up is likely to have something for
everyone.
"Some of my schedules are requested
by those who come in," he 'said. One
such line-up is the "Star Wars" trilogy
that Kaberline has scheduled for Oct. 11.
Another likely hit is the "Star Trek"
marathon set for Saturday and Sunday.
"I've heard a lot of the people that
come through say they wouldn't miss
that schedule," he said.
- With limited seating in the screening
room, however, Kaberline suggests com-
ing early.


"Our screening
Room seats only 40 -
50 people, but that is
done on purpose. I
wanted to keep the
atmosphere intimate,"
Kaberline said. "With
the smaller room and
comfortable seating ..
and surroundings, -
watching the movies
is a more enjoyable .
experience. Also, the
smaller room offers
better acoustics and
the movies can be
heard better," he
added.
Hearing the mov-
ies the right way is
Kaberline's prime
interest and with his
digital laser disc
player and Dolby ...- -.--:
Surround System, .'d'jtrli*,,ji **.".
consisting of six
speakers strategically
placed around the
room, the audience
does just that. Kaberline
"You don't just see
theactionin gunfight, youareputinthe
middle of it," says the movie man. "You
haven't seen a movie until you have
heard the movie," he said.
To ensure movie goers have the op-
portunity to see what is popular, Kaber-
line has many of the top movies on order
from the states.
"At one point, I scheduled a movie
before I even had it," Kaberline explained.
"I was going on the hopes that it would
make it here in time, and it did."
Another way the movie man ensures
his audiences are seeing what's hot is by
looking through a stateside television
guide.
"I look through the guide and see what
is being shown on the movie channels.
This gives me good ideas for my sched-
uling," he said.
Just a few weeks ago, he was showing


Tropic Times
Sept. 25,1992



. I
CL' \


movies just on Sundays, Kaberline has
had to expand a bit and now he shows
movies most Friday nights and Saturdays
as well.
"I program movies forFridays from 6
p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays usually
from 1 p.m. on," he said.
. Putting all this time and energy into
the screening room seems a lot for free,
but to Kaberline, it's a labor of love. ,
"I get a kick out of it," he says. "I see
people coming in from as far away as
Howard and even the Atlantic side. I
have also had people tell me that having
the opportunity to watch my movies helped
them pass the time and miss their fami-
lies maybe just a bit less."
With a smile and a nod, Kaberline
walks away to hang a new poster. "The
thanks and smiles I get is pay enough,"
he says over his shoulder.


Canal Zone sees money burned, fuel rationed


FORTCLAYTON (USARSOPAO) - The following
are significant World War II events which took place
during September 1942:
Sept 5
Final decision is made for Operation Torch, the
Allied invasion of northwest Africa, to include landings
at Algeria and at Casablanca, Morocco.
Sept. 6
The Executive Secretary of the Panama National
Police announces that Lt. Col. Francisco Aued, third
commander of the institution, and Capt. Bolivar E.
Vallarino, chief, Cavalry Squadron, were invited to
visit the United States by the U.S. secretary of war
and the U.S. Army.
The Canal Zone Chapter of the American Red
Cross and the Civilian Defense Corps coordinate
and give Instruction at Balboa School on incendiary
bombs and the use and care of gas masks.
Germans announce the capture of Novorossisk, lead-
ing port on the east coast of the Black Sea. Fierce
fighting continues around Stalingrad.
Sept. 7
The Panama Canal Department announces the
promotions of Capt. Walter L. Coleman and 1st Lt.
Leonard C. Kincaid, both of Quarry Heights, to the
ranks of major and captain respectively.
Sept. 9
A Japanese plane drops an incendiary bomb on a
mountain slope near Brookings, Ore., causing a small
forest fire. This is the sole bombing by an enemy plane
of the continental U.S. during the war.
Sept. 11
Completion ofarunway on Adak (Aleutian Islands)
permits stepped up air offensive against Kiska Island.
Since Aug. 29 about 6,000 Japanese have arrived at
Guadalcanal.
Sept. 12
U.S. Army infantry troops penetrate the San


Felipe area of Panama City from 12th Street to 3rd
Street. The Foreign Ministry later announced they
were called upon to supervise the transfer of $2
million In old bills to be burned in the Canal Zone as
it was impossible to transfer them to U.S. banks.
Provisional raider-parachute battalion conduct re-
connaissance in force along Edson's ridge, to close the
approach route to Henderson Field, Guadalcanal.
Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower officially announces
assumption of command as commanderin chief, Allied
Expeditionary Force for Torch, and Allied Force Head-
quarters is activated in London.
Sept. 13
Adm. Robert. L. Ghormley orders the 7th Marines to
reinforce the garrison at Guadalcanal.
Sept. 15
The first elements, Co. E and attachments of 126th
Infantry, 32nd Division, fly to Port Moresby from Bris-
bane, Australia. This is the first U.S. infantry force to
arrive in New Guinea.
Japanese submarines attackU.S. warships on patrol
south and east of the Solomon Islands, sinking the
aircraft carrier Wasp and damaging the battleship North
Carolina.
Sept. 16
Cristobal Magistrate, E.I.P. Tateman, who served
as regional director of the Civilian Defense Organi-
zation on the Atlantic side, is appointed Director of
Civil Defense.
Cecil Tilton, senior business analyst of the Re-
search Unit, Fuel Rationing Division of the Office of
Price Administration in Washington, D.C., arrives
to implement gasoline rationing in the Canal Zone.
German Army Group B penetrates the northwest
suburbs of ;talingrad.
Sept. 17
The government of Panama issues a Decree-Law
creating the Gasoline and Tire Rationing Office and


establishes regulations for the rationing of fuel.
Sept. 19
Gen. Alexander A. Vandergrift establishes continu-
ous defense lines, divides the Lunga area of Guadalca-
nal into 10 sectors.
Sept. 20
Maj. Gen. George Brett, commander in chief of
the Allied Air Forces in the Pacific front arivesto in-
spect Panama Canal defenses.
The outline plan for Operation Torch is issued and
D-Day is set for Nov. 8.
Sept. 24
The Honorable Frank Knox, secretary of the
Navy, arrives at Albrook Field to inspect Canal
defenses. He is received by U.S. Ambassador Edwin
Wilson. A reception is given in his honor at the U.S.
Embassy on Balboa Avenue.
Quarry Heights announces that Capt. David Young
Nanney, stationed with the Coast Artillery at Fort
Kobbe, is promoted to the rank of major.
Sept. 27
First Raider Battalion attempts to attack an enemy
strongpoint in the Matanikau Village area of Guadalca-
nal from the rear but is unable to cross the river.
Japanese abandon loribaiwa Ridge in New Guinea
under Australian pressure and are in full retreat.
Sept. 29
The troop strength of the Guadalcanal garrison is
now 19,261; 3,260 troops are on Tulagi. Sixth Naval
Construction Battalion is constructing an airstrip.

Editor's note: This timeline continues a series of
articles relative to U.S. Army defenses in the Pan-
ama Canal areas as a contribution to the commemo-
ration of the 50th anniversary of World War II. The
timeline was complied by Dolores DeMena, U.S.Army
South historian.










4Tropic Times
Sept. 25, 1992


* Hemisphere


Shining Path continues fight


HUAYCAN, Peru (AP) - "Defend the Life of Pre-
sidente Gonzalo! Long Live the People's War!"
The slogan was daubed in fresh red paint on the walls
of a school in this shantytown near Lima. The Shining
Path wants to send a clear message that the capture of
their leader has not ended their battle against the gov-
ernment of President Alberto Fujimori.
Abimael Guzman, known as "Presidente Gonzalo"
to his fanatical followers, was captured Sept. 12. By
Sept. 16, his guerrillas began stalked Huaycan's rocky
streets under cover of darkness, painting schools, a
health clinic and soup kitchens with dozens of revolu-
tionary slogans and praise of their legendary leader.
"Huaycan is one of the Shining Path's bastions," said
community leader Javier Ramon Figueroa. "They con-
trol four of the town's 16 districts, and their presence is
growing."
"People here don't even think about erasing the
writing when walls are painted," Gladys Puente, 20,
said nervously as she prepared to feed 20 small children
in an abandoned bus that had been converted into a soup
kitchen.
Like nearby buildings on Huaycan's main street, the
soup kitchen, where poor women and their children can
get a.hot meal for 10 cents, was smeared with red
lettering: "We Demand that Fujimori's Genocidal
Dictatorship Respect the Health and Life of Presidente
Gonzalo."
Many residents of Huaycan, a shantytown on a
barren mountain slope-12 miles east of Lima, were
afraid Thursday to talk to a visiting journalist. The
town's mudbrick shacks and reed huts are home to large
numbers of refugees from the fighting in the country-
side, and they have learned that a wrong word can bring
death.
"Everyone feels fear. How can we not feel fear?"
said a middle-aged woman, herfront teeth missing, as
she sold apples and bananas in front of the kindergarten.
The people of Huaycan are especially uneasy be-
cause Fujimori, who closed Congress April 5 and as-
sumed near dictatorial powers to fight the guerrillas,
has tried to force them into the battle against the rebels.
Fujimori has promoted civilian patrols as a key
element in his battle against the Shining Path, whose
12-year rebellion has taken 25,000 lives.


APLaerPhoto
A soldier guards the Central Police station in Peru
where rebel leader Abimael Guzman is held.
In July he announced that Huaycan's vigilante pa-
trols, formed to protect its streets from common crimi-
nals, were a model for civilian anti-guerrilla militias
that he planned to form in other shantytowns.
The people of Huaycan protested, saying their clubs
and whistles were no defense against the rebels' weap-
ons.
At midnight on July 15, three hooded men knocked
on the door of Pascuala Rosado Cornejo, Huaycan's top
elected official, and gave her one final warning: Either
disband the vigilante groups or die.
She now is protected day and night by 15 soldiers.
But other community leaders such as Figueroa go
unprotected.


FMLN members stand in formation as their weapons are turned in to U.N. peacekeeping forces. API.rPhoto

Salvadoran rebels hand over weapons


AGUACAYO, El Salvador (AP) -
Leftist guerrillas are turning in their
weapons to U.N. observers under peace
accords that ended a crippling 12-year
civil war. One-fifth of the rebel force is
to be demobilized this week.
"I am not giving up (my weapon), I
am depositing it," Serbelio Nunez said
Monday as some 380 rebels turned in
their arms during a ceremony here, about
20 miles northeast of San Salvador.
Like many rebels, he said he would
not hesitate to take up arms again if the
government of rightist President Alfredo
Cristiani does not fulfill its part of the
peace accord.


Nunez held the rank of major in the
Farabundo Marti National Liberation
Front, or FMLN.
"I feel good because I can say 'mis-
sion accomplished,' " he said. "I have
accomplished the first stage of the struggle,
and now we will enter the political
struggle."
Some 75,000 Salvadorans, mostly
civilians, died in the war. The U.N. agree-
ment, which took effect Feb. 1, provides
for an overhaul of the armed forces,
police, judiciary, electoral system and
for converting the guerrilla army into a
political organization.
Land distribution to former rebels has


become a point of bitter contention in
fulfilling accords signed in Mexico City
in January. The rebels want 1,890 plots
to be distributed now.
Remaining land is to be divided by
Oct. 31, when demobilization of the FMLN
is to be complete and all aspects of the
accords are met by both sides.
Another touchy issue is reform of El
Salvador's politically powerful military,
which stands accused of widespread human
rights abuses. Twenty percent of the origi-
nal FMLN force or about 1,670 rebels is
being demobilized this week. Another 20
percent was demobilized earlier this year.
That leaves about 5,000 rebel fighters.


Three killed during

Columbus protests
SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic (AP)
- Plainclothes policemen fired on 300 people march-
ing to protest upcoming quincentennial celebra-
tions, killing three people, including a human rights
activist.
The shootings Sunday evening were the first
violence connected to government plans to com-
memorate Christopher Columbus' arrival in 1492.
Critics have said the celebrations, including con-
struction of a giant lighthouse, are wasting millions
of dollars.
The nation's police chief, Gen. Rafael Guerrero
Peralta, said a police lieutenant and two agents were
under investigation in the shootings and could face
prosecution.
Police said one of the victims was Rafael Efrain
Ortiz, lawyer who headed the Dominican Commit-
tee of Human Rights. The other two were not i'mme-
diately identified by police.
Ramon Almanzar, leader of the leftist Popular
Organizations Collective, said Ortiz was shot in the
head when he chanted "Columbus! You're Not
Welcome Here!"
Two other people were wounded, and demonstra-
tors scattered after the shootings.
The protest, named the "Cimarrona march" after
a colonial-era escaped slave, attracted 300 people,
including artists and community leaders who have
publicly criticized the October celebrations.
The Popular Organizations Collective and other
groups have scheduled series of protests during the
500th anniversary celebrations Oct. 9-12. The cele-
brations coincide with the visit of Pope John Paul II
to the Dominican Republic to open the Latin Ameri-
can Episcopal Conference.
John Paul will lead a Mass at the Columbus
Lighthouse on Oct. 11, but will not attend govern-
ment celebrations on Oct. 9 and on Oct. 12. '
Government critics accuse President Joaquin
Balaguer of glorifying Columbus. They acknowl-
edge the explorer's accomplishments, but also note
his support of slavery and subjugation and extermi-
nation of Indians.


Panama City

bombs cause

little damage

PANAMA CITY, Panama (Reu-
ters) - Bombs exploded at two Pana-
manian government offices and the
international airport the evening of
Sept. 18. -
The bombs apparently caused no
injuries or serious damage, according
to a police spokesman.
The first explosion occurred in a
men's toilet at Tocumen International
Airport, according to police spokes-
man Daniel Alonso.
Services were not interrupted at
the airport, about 20 miles east of
Panama City.
Approximately ten minutes later a
second bomb exploded at the foreign
ministry building in the capital, Pan-
ama City.
Soon after that a third bomb ex-
ploded at the nearby Electoral Tribu-
nal.
The explosions broke windows but
caused no serious damage, Alonso
said.
A group calling itself Panama So-
berana, or Sovereign Panama, claimed
responsibility for the attacks in a tele-
phone call to a local radio station,
Alonso said.
Three people were detained for
questioning in the incident, Alonso
said.










SMilitary News


Tropic Times
Sept. 25,1992


A - . .



� * m .. '.4 , w


APLaerPhoto
French Pumma transport helicopters come in aligned for landing on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier Clemenceau in Dijbouti Tuesday. The carrier and its
task force joined the U.S. during action in Operation Desert Storm.


Schwarzkopf: not invading Iraq good move


NEW YORK (AP) - Invading Baghdad
in the final days of Operation Desert
Storm to
topple Sad-
dam Hussein
would have
bogged down
the United
States in a ,,
quagmire ::
"like the di- .
nosaur in the
tar pit," ac-
cording to -_ 'K, ,
Desert Storm Schwarzkopf
Commander
H. Norman Schwarzkopf.
"The legitimacy for what we were
doing was the United Nations resolution
which called for us to kick the Iraqis out
of Kuwait," the retired four-star general
said in an interview forNewsweek onAir
carried by The Associated Press radio
network.


"We never considered going to
Baghdad....We'd accomplished our mis-
sion."
Schwarzkopf also defends the deci-
sion to halt the ground war in his forth-
coming biography, It Doesn't Take A
Hero.
He also complains in the book of
being pressured by Bush administration
"hawks" he said had seen too many war
movies and wanted to rush coalition forces
into battle before they were ready.
"The increasing pressure to launch
the ground war early was making me
crazy," he wrote.
"There had to be a contingent of hawks
in Washington who did not want to stop
until we'd punished Saddam. We'd been
bombing Iraq for more than a month, but
it wasn't good enough. These were guys
who had seen John Wayne in "The Green
Berets," they'd seen "Rambo," they'd
seen "Patton," and it was very easy for
them to pound their desks and say, 'By


God, we've got to go in there. Gotta
punish that son of a bitch!' Of course,
none of them was going to get shot at."
Schwarzkopf doesn't identify the ad-
ministration hawks or say whether they
were reflecting the wishes of President
George Bush.
His book will be released later this
month by Linda Grey-Bantam publish-
ers in New York.
In the radio interview, Schwarzkopf
said going to Baghdad would have splin-
tered the fragile 28-member coalition
that ejected Iraq. He also said the cease-
fire saved American lives.
Schwarzkopf also discusses the cease-
fire's timing in his book, excerpts of
which appear in the Newsweek issue
available on newsstands Monday.
In a phone call with Gen. Colin Pow-
ell, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff,
Schwarzkopf said he wanted to keep
going on the advice of his commanders.
"I want to continue the ground


"...it was very easy for
them to pound their desks
and say, 'By God, we've
got to go in there'...none
of them was going to get
shot at."
Retired Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf
Operation Desert Storm commander

attack...drive to the sea and totally de-
stroy everything in our path," Schwarzkopf
told Powell. "In one more day we'll be
done."
But when Powell called back and told
him the White House wanted to stop the
ground war after 100 hours, Schwarzkopf
agreed.
The Iraqi army was in full flight from
Kuwait, and U.S. pilots were bombing
convoys along an escape route called the
Highway of Death.


Military medical ethics under fire


WASHINGTON (AP) - The military uses psychiat-
ric examinations and forced hospitalization in mental
wards to intimidate and discredit people who disclose
wrongdoings, an advocacy group contends.
The Commission on the Reform of Military Medical
Abuses, made up of formerand current militaryperson-
nel who say they were victimized for speaking out, said
that hundreds of people were being "taken against their
will without due process and locked up in psychiatric
hospitals."
During a two-day gathering that ended Friday, members
of the group conferred with members of Congress and
wrote President Bush, urging him to appoint a special
prosecutor to investigate retaliatory psychiatric testing.
The Pentagon, in response to previous charges, has
denied abuses of the medical system and said it is
working hard to protect whistleblowers from reprisals.
Former Navy Lt. Cmdr. Jim Manship of Alexandria,
Va., said retaliatory testing has "resulted in the personal
destruction" of many good performers who were con-
scientious enough to speak out about problems.
Manship said he was ordered to a Navy hospital for
psychological evaluation after complaining about a su-
perior he said obstructed a drug intervention program.
He said after a five-minute interview, he was classi-
fied as an "obsessive compulsive with narcissistic ten-
dencies" and lost his security clearance.
Michael Tufariello of Dallas, a former Navy chief


petty officer, showed the slippers pasted with happy
faces he was forced to wear while locked up in a
medical ward for four days. The 23-year veteran, who
has testified before Congress and appeared in several
television exposes on alleged medical abuses, said he
was hospitalized after reporting payroll fraud at the
Dallas Naval Air Station in 1983 and 1984.
"I was wounded in Vietnam, but that (hospitaliza-
tion) overrode my Vietnam experience," Tufariello
said. "A common criminal has more rights than a man
in uniform." Tufariello, who heads a group called
Wounded Eagles, which is similar to the commission,
said he has documented 280 cases of retaliatory testing.
Others at the conference refused to give their names,
saying the stigma of having psychiatric testing on their
military records has made it difficult to get jobs.
One man said he was administratively discharged in
April after serving 11 years as an Air Force linguist. He
said he was declared to have a personality disorder after
filing five complaints with the military inspector gen-
eral. "We lost our careers, we lost our credibility."
A former Navy doctor said she was suspended from
duty after writing her congressmen about a job dispute.
She said that in the next months she was put in a
psychiatric ward for a week, tied in leather restraints,
diagnosed as having a severe personality disorder and
charged with wounding a member of aSWATteam that
broke into her apartment.


Homosexual airman

loses court decision
TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) - An Air Force hearing
board has recommended the discharge of an airman
who announced on network television that he is gay.
The three-officerpanel rejected apleafrom SSgt.
Thomas P. Paniccia to stay in the service.
"Three words 'I am gay' do not change who I am
and the contribution I have to make to the Air Force
and the country," the 11-year veteran said.
Paniccia, 28, announced his homosexuality on
July 23 on ABC's "Good Morning America" and
made similar statements later in other interviews.
The panel found that the airman had made state-
ments "that he was a homosexual or words to that
effect" and thus was subject to discharge. It recom-
mended an honorable discharge.
The board also rejected arguments that the Penta-
gon ban on homosexuals requires evidence of such
conduct.
The recommendation goes to a brigadier general
at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base.
Paniccia has said he intends to go to court to
overturn the ban. The Pentagon maintains that homo-
sexuality undermines discipline and morale.
. "If you discharge me, you punish me for some-
thing that I am, not for something that I have done,"
he told the hearing board.


"-�---- I .~.~.~~......~______�


.... dc- f


."our-










6Tropic Times
Sept. 25,1992


SVoices


Mayors' Corner


Dear Mayors' Corner,
We only have two radio stations in
Panama; 91.5, which is almost strictly
music that's almost strictly for head
bangers or cowboys, and 790 with (to
paraphrase Carl Sagan) billions ,nd bil-
lions of 'intellectual' stuff.
Can't handle 91.5 but Icanreceiveit.
I want 790 but I can't receive it.
I live within 5 miles of the back gate
and instead of Radio City it's Static City.
What can I do?
Easy listener

Dear Easy,
According to commander, Southern
Command Network, the problems with
AM 790(Pacific) and AM 1420(Atlan-
tic) aren't limited to off-post locations.
The same poor reception you get occurs
in some areas of military installations as
well.
Part of the problem is that SCNis only
allowed to transmit 10 kilowatts of power
on the AM band, compared to the aver-
age 150 kilowatts used by most stateside
stations.
The otherpartoftheproblem is thelo-
cation of the tower. The solution is to
move the AM transmitter to a new loca-
tion that will provide better reception.
SCN
has just
completed
a site sur-
vey and
identified
five new lo-
cations that will be submitted for ap-
proval.
SCN hopes to have that approval within
the next year and to make the move soon
thereafter.
The SCN commander also says to ex-
pect some program changes within the
next 60 days.
Based on data from a survey taken last
December, the preferences of the listen-
ing audience in Panama have changed


dramatically since the last survey and
both AM and FM stations will reflect
those changes.
Six to eight months from now, an-
other survey will be taken to ensure that
SCN is still in tune with its listening
audience.

Dear Mayors' Corner,
Many soldiers are very upset about
the new (no shorts) dress policy at the
Fort Clayton NCO club.
A certain standard of dress should be
required, but it should be left to the
manager's discretion and good taste.
A nice pair of dress shorts and a dress
shirt doesn't bring down the atmosphere
ofthe club like apair of skin-tight, worn-
out jeans.
I know there are clubs downtown we
could go to, but because of safety, trans-
portation and cost, we would rather stay
on post,
With more soldiers downtown, more
unfavorable incidents will occur. Please
tell us what we can do to get this policy
changed.

Dear Mayors' Corner,
I'd like to know what is being done
about the dress codes for the military
clubs here.

Some of the
guests are
wearing very
provocative
and revealing
outfits that make regularpatrons uncom-
fortable.
There aren't any signs posted to say
what is allowed but common sense should
tell you that some of those dresses are
just too short and too low.
Enforce the rules

Dear Readers,
Generally speaking, Navy, Air Force
and Army clubs encourage casual, con-


servative civilian attire with an emphasis
on conservative. They also allow the uni-
form of the day with some restrictions.
According to the individual club
managers, all service clubs allow conser-
vative dress shorts during the day.
Two facilities, the Navy Officers' Club
and the Fort Clayton Army Community
Club, restrict shorts after 7 p.m. and 6
p.m. respectively.
The Navy policy is long-standing and
uncontested, says the Navy club man-
ager.
The Army community club, however,
recently returned to a no-shorts dress
code that was approved by the Sergeants
Major Council before the club ever opened.
Reinstituting the policy coincided with
the reopening of the second floor dining
room in August, according to the Army
Community Operations Division acting
chief.
But the strict no-shorts dress policy
may be too exclusive, the COD acting
chief said.
He agrees that some dress shorts are in
keeping with the conservative intent of
the Council's guidelines.
In response to cldb members' re-
quests, he will ask the Sergeants Major's
Council for an amendment at their next
meeting.
And, yes, club managers agree that
some patrons occasionally test the con-
straints of the dress policies.
At those times, managers may ask
patrons to leave the club and return at a
later date when their attire meets the
standards set by sponsoring committees,
boards, and councils.

Dear Mayors' Corner,
Why won't the Post Office date stamp
letter while I'm standing there waiting?
I send in rebates and sometimes the,
date is very important.
I'm worried about the letter not being
stamped until late in the evening or even
the next day.


And why isn't there a pick-up at Howard
before 4:30 p.m.?
That means the mail truck is stuck in
rush hour traffic to get to Tocumen.
What happens if it misses the plane?
It goes out the next day but that may be
too late.
D.R.

Dear D.R.,
According to the 24th Air Postal
Squadron commander, envelopes are not
hand stamped at the counter because
high speed cancelling machines do the
work in a fraction of the time.
The machines make service faster and
keep the postal workers from being tied
up.
Your rebates are safe, says the postal
commander.
All mail delivered to drop boxes and
post offices before posted cut-off times is
cancelled the same day, to include fourth
class. And all cancelled mail makes that
day's mail flights.
Mail isn't picked up from the boxes
and taken directly to the plane, it has to
be sorted first.
Afterwards it goes to the airport but
exactly when isn't common knowledge,
says the postal commander.
However, it's safe to say they are in no
danger of getting caught in rush hour
traffic, the commander said.
The postal commander reminds pa-
trons to check cut-off times for mail pick
up because they different boxes and post
offices in Panama have different.cut-off
times.
Editor's note: This column is pro-
vided to allow community members to
submit questions or concerns to be re-
searched and answered by the May-
oral Congress. Letters should be mailed
to: Mayors' Corner, APO AA 34004
(MPS). Anonymity will be granted
upon request. Publicity.Chairperson,
Dyana Ellis.


PM Corner


Drunk driver gets caught
A sailor was arrested for drunken driving and at-
tempting to elude last week. The incident began when
security police tried to detain the sailor for drunken
driving. The man refused to stop and fled through the
Howard main gate. A military police courtesy patrol
later caught the sailor off base.
If you find that you have had too much to drink, call
a taxi or let a friend drive.

More unsecure property stolen
A Corozal resident is missing more than $1,300
worth of tools and stereo equipment after thieves stole
the property from his unlocked car. Lock vehicles after
parking them and never leave valuable items inside.

Civilian charged with misappropriation
A civilian employee was charged with misappro-
priation of government property last week. He used a
government vehicle to conduct personal business at the
Gorgas Army Community Hospital.
Military regulations prohibit the use of government
vehicles for personal affairs. Report all misuse to
military police.

Barracks thief strikes
A barracks thief stole $240 from a Fort Clayton
soldier last week. The thief entered the soldiers' room


and tookthe money from an unsecured wallet. Barracks
soldiers should lock all valuables inside their wall
locker. Large amounts of money should be locked in the
unit safe.

Unregistered firearms
Military police charged a Fort Kobbe soldier with
possession of an unregistered weapon last week. The
soldier was found to have apistol inside his wall locker.
Firearms must be registered with the Provost Mar-
shals' Office before they can be stored on post, and reg-
istered with the Panama National Police before they can
be taken off post. For information, contact the military
or security police.

Post Office misuse
Three family members were charged with misuse of
the Army Post Office last week. Contraband Control
Section investigators found that the family members
had used the APO to order items for resale in Panama.
Department of Defense regulations prohibit import-
ing merchandise intended for resale through an APO.
For information, call 286-3303.

Camcorder stolen
A Fort Clayton woman is missing a $900 camcorder
after thieves broke into her car last week.
Anyone with information that may help the military


police catch the thieves should call 287-5252.

Illegal parkers beware
The military police have recently received numer-
ous complaints of abandoned and illegally parked ve-
hicles. In response to these complaints, the military
police have implemented new measures to enforce
parking regulations. All illegally parked and aban-
doned vehicles will be towed to Jarman Field and their
owners will be ticketed. Call 287-3203.

Crime statistics for September 11 - September 17.
Pacific
Fort Clayton 800 area - 1 larceny of secured govern-
ment property
Fort Clayton 900 area -1 larceny of unsecured private
property
Corozal - 2 larcenies of unsecured private property,
1 larceny of secured private property
Curundu - 1 larceny of unsecured government prop-
erty
Atlantic
Fort Davis - 1 larceny of unsecured private property
Fort Sherman - 1 larceny of unsecured government
property, 2 larcenies of unsecured private property, 2
larcenies of secured private property
FortEspinar-1 larceny of unsecured privateproperty,
1 larceny of unsecured government property


Commander in Chief.....................Gen. George A. Joulwan
Director, Public Affairs...............................Col. James L. Fetig
Chief...................................................SFC Joseph Ferrare
Editor................................................... MSgt. Rolf Carter
Assistant Editor...........................Sgt. Deborah E. Williams
Sports Editor.............................................. ...Sgt. John Hall


Acting Sports Editor.............................Sgt. Richard Puckett
Editorial Staff............................................Sgt James Yocum
Rosemary Chong
Carolyn Coffey
U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office..................287-3007
24th Wing Public Affairs Office.........................284-5459
U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office..............283-5644


Tropic Times


U.S. Army South PAO Atlantic...........................289-4312
This authorizedunofficial command informationpublica-
tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is
published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information
Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision
of the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command.
Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official
view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or
the U.S. Southern Command. The address is: Unit 0936 APO
AA 34002 Telephone 285-6612.










* Commentary


Tropic Times P7
Sept. 25,1992


Rude


moviegoers


insult


Native Americans' heritage


by SgL Jane Usero
USARSO Public Affairs Office
I recently sat in front of two men at the theater
watching a movie and was amazed at the ignorance that
two grown men could show.
While watching the movie, which revolved around
life on a
SN at i v e
American
reservation,
these two
men con-
stantly bom-
barded my
"Buried was the bloody ears with
hatchet; Buried was the racist and ig-
dreadful war-club; norant re-
Buried were all warlike marks to-
weapons, and the ward things
weapons, and the they obvi-
war-cry wasforgotten. ously didn't
There was peace among understand.
the nations." At one
Longfellow point in the
Hiawatha, XIII movie, an
elderly Na-
tive Ameri-
can brought out a traditional pipe to smoke with a
visitor.
The men behind me began laughing and making re-
marks about illegal substances being smoked in the
pipe.
If they had any knowledge of the significance of the
pipe to the Native Americans depicted in this movie,
they would have found nothing to laugh about.
The smoking of the pipe is a time of honor and
spiritual importance. It is an act taken seriously by
Native Americans.
Also, the substance traditionally smoked in the pipe
of the Sioux (Lakotas) was the bark of the red willow,
not an illegal substance.
At another point in the movie, "visions," were addressed


and more snickers came from behind and references
being made to "drinking the water."
Visions are also not something taken lightly by
Native Americans.
They are considered to be given from the heavens.
For a better understanding of visions, and many other
Native American traditional values, I suggest these two
men read the book Black Elk Speaks.
All through the movie, remarks were made about
things such as the sweat lodge, a tribal dance and
traditional dress - all things that hold much tradition,
heritage and meaning to the Native American.
My advice to these two men, and all those who have
stereotypical impressions of Native Americans, is to
open some books and learn before opening their mouths
and insulting.
For instance, many people don't understand the
stand being made now against sports team with names
such as the Washington Redskins.
How many actually know where the word redskins
came from?
It originated from a bounty put on Native Ameri-
cans' skin. Yes, money was once paid for the skin torn
from the bodies of Native American men, women and
children.
This is not an act anyone should want immortalized
in the name of a professional football team.
We all know and understand most terms and phrases
considered racist to most ethnic groups and minorities,
but know little or nothing about Native Americans.
Words such as "how" and "squaw" for instance.
How is not a term used by Native Americans and squaw
is actually a very insulting term Wasichus (white men)
used toward Native American women.
In fact, if a child were to use the English equivalent,
he would probably have his mouth washed out with
soap, even today.
It's time all Americans make the commitment to
learn about what our heritage truly consists of.
The more we learn about "the other guys," the more
we will learn about ourselves and the less pain and
degradation we will cause one another, whether inten-
tional or not.


How can we be more sensitive when dealing with

Native Americans?


"Discrimination cannot
be tolerated. American
Indipns should be proud
of their heritage and
treated accordingly."

CMSgt. Ronald Wheelis
24th Wing Senior Enlisted
Adviser


"We need to educate
ourselves on American
Indian culture. That way
we can understand each
other better."

SSgt. Mitch Billups
U.S. Southern Command J-6


"(Football teams)
shouldn't use Indian
names because some
people might find that
offensive."

P03 Frankie Heggins
USNAVSTAPANCANAL Mine
Division


"Native American In-
dians are not draftable,
yet every war we've
fought in, they've vol-
unteered in droves. We
owe them our respect."
Bob Thrush
U.S. Customs, Howard AFB


"Probably treat them as
individuals, treat them
equally, and better edu-
cation for the public."


SSgt. Anna Ellison
Non-Destructive Inspection
Laboratory


Sarge gives small

bills for big cause
by SFC Joe Ferrare
Tropic Times Chief
I ran into the Old Sarge the other day, a-grum-
bling, a-mumbling and a-filling out a CFC card.
"Parting with a few bucks for the betterment of
mankind, eh Sarge?"
"Not hardly, by-products brain," he answered.
I snuck apeek at the form. I was impressed by the
three digits, but only until I saw the decimal point.
"That all you're giving?" I asked.
"Yeah, that's all. And I wouldn't be giving that,
but the commander wants 100 percent participation
so he can look good. I got Mrs. Sarge and Little Sarge
to think about. I can't afford charity."
"Don't give me that, Sarge. We're the same rank.
I know you can give more than that," I said. "In fact,
you've got more time in grade than Lucifer, so you
ought to give more."
"I said I can't afford it! You want my family to
starve so I can give all my money away?" he barked.
I did some quick calculations. "There are about
10,000 GIs in country, and I don't know how many
civilians. If every GI gave $3 that'd be $360,000 a
year, and the goal is $350,000, counting civilians.
You can't make $3 a month?"
"No! Besides, Ineed it more than anybody else."
"I don't want to go into Guilt Induction Mode," I
said. "But you spill more than $3 a month, Saige.
You leave more than $3 in fries on your plate. You
burn more than $3 in gas racing to work late. You'd
never miss $3, especially with payroll deduction."
"But why should I give somebody else my hard-
earned money?" he asked.
"Nobody's asking you to buy one less CD, com-
puter game, or even six less sodas a month. I bet 95
percent of the people in this command could write
off $3 a month without even knowing it."
"OK, OK: quit yer whining," he said grudgingly.
"I'll give more."
"You make a "3" like this, Sarge," I pointed out.
"It's a "l" that goes straight up and down."
"Geez, Mr. Certified Public Accountant all of a
sudden," he groaned. Still, he made extra sure to
show the form to his company commander.
"That's more than you've given your whole tour,"
his CO said.
"Well, I figure if everybody just gave $3..."


The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of Southern Command, the
Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries - or responses to commentaries - to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right
to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon reyqest.










8 Tropic Times
Sept 25, 1992


'Ghost Zone'


haunts dealers

by Andrew Schneider
Scripps Ho ward New Serice
CHIMORE, Bolivia - It's barely dawn. A thick fog soaks
up most of the sun, but the temperature is already pushing
90. Day 66 of "Ghost Zone," the world's largest counter-
narcotics operation, is going to be a hot one.
The jungle base camp, 300 miles east of La Paz, is
starting to show signs of life.
The steady drone of generators and the chatter of jungle
birds is eclipsed but the din of a dozen aging helicopters
coughing to life.
Shrill whistles roust 350 Bolivian policemen and mem-
bers of UMOPAR, the special drug unit, out of their bar-
racks. With metal mess kits clanking, they line up for break-
fast.
At the other end of the 30-acre compound, George
Auflick, the Drug Enforcement Administration's opera-
tions chief, is already having a bittersweet morning.
It's 6:15 and two U.S. Custom Service P-3 radar planes
have already spotted two Cessnas sneaking low and fast
from different directions into the Chapare, the New Jersey-
size hunk of jungle that produces one-third of the world's
coca supply.
If the two small aircraft can make it to their clandestine
airstrips, they will drop off the money orprocessing chemi-
cals they're hauling, load their planes with several hundred
pounds of cocaine base and, within four minutes, be air-
borne again to Columbia.
The fog is preventing the helicopters from taking off
with the ground troops needed to seize the planes and make
the arrests. Auflick is not happy and he uses colorful words
to express that fact.
The 25-by-200-foot operations center reverberates with
the static and din from 10 radios blaring from the adjoining
closet-size communications room. Normal conversation is
impossible.
"Target one's gone to ground," yells Butch Rutt, a
Customs agent from Denver who's talking to one of his
radar planes. He bellows out a stream of numbers which five
men, hunched over maps spread on a big table, plot as the
last known position of the aircraft.
Calling out new coordinates, Rutt adds, "Number two's
down also. They're obviously lost and waiting out the fog."
"At least we're not the only ones in this jungle screwed
by the weather," grumbles Auflick.
Outside on the porch, a dozen new "Snowcaps" -
specially trained DEA agents and Border Patrol officers,
fresh from the United States - try to stay out of the way as
they wait for the boss, the DEA chief in Boliva, Donald
Ferrarone, to brief them.
Comparing notes on the critters they saw during their
first night in camp, they realize the glamour of their new as-
signment as much oversold.
"Honest to God, it was four inches long and when it
flapped its wings is sounded like a fan with a bent blade,"
says one Border Patrol officer.
Auflick sticks his head out the door: "Let's do it. Time to
hear the gospel."
The Snowcaps were given "the big picture" during three
days at the U.S. embassy in La Paz. Now it's time for the
nitty-gritty.
Ferrarone does the honors.
"If you think yourmiddlename is Rambo, you'reproba-
bly in the wrong place," Ferrarone says.
"I know the uniforms, guns, helicopters and military
analysts that we have here paint a vivid picture that this is
a military operation - America at war in the jungle again."
The GI trappings, he explains, are necessary to move and
survive in a jungle environment.
"We are at war, but every American carrying a gun
through these jungles is also carrying a badge, because
they're cops."
Mark Edmondson takes over. A former Birmingham,
Ala., policeman, he has been with DEA for seven years.
He flips though large charts on an easel showing page
after page of targets: "small level buyers," "Major buyers,"
"protection suppliers," "major producers," and "Colom-
bian connection."
Over 400 names are on the pages, each with aliases,
know associates, area of operations and their link to 22
different Bolivian drug trafficking organizations operating
in the jungle. Eighty-eight of the names are crossed out,
either arrested or killed since Ghost Zone began.
"Each day as new intelligence comes in, we add more
names and cross out more." says Edmondson. "You're here
to do police work, pure and simple. These are your targets.
You're to identify, arrest, gather evidence and help convict
them."
Eleven laptop computers crowd the makeshift desks of
the command post The computers, the new arrivals are


'Rambo' attitude doesn't cut


Continued from page 1.
that cut through it and the air traffic above," says Ferrar-
one.
Operation Ghost Zone looks like a military action, but
the agents carry plastic handcuffs and evidence bags and
work closely with local prosecutors to make cases.
They don't have the authority to make the arrests, but
the Bolivian cops do.
That sometimes makes for a strained relationship be-
tween the two sides, and the Bolivians occasionally have
to rerpind the DEA agents that they are the guest, not the
bosses.
So far, the results of Ghost Zone are impressive: 29,544
kilograms of coca leaf and eight aircraft seized, 245 drug
labs and 14 clandestine airstrips destroyed.


told, are packed with information on targets, vehicles,
aircraft, informets, locations of airstrips, storage areas, base
labs and detailed information on all the organizations.
"This is how we figure out who's going to make the
target list and how you people will spend your days and
nights," Ferrarone says.
Auflick starts putting names and jobs with the faces at
the base.
Air Force Maj. Ed Terrazas and Pete Hernandez, a DEA
agent who now is a State Department narcotics adviser,
handle logistics. The duo moved 230 tons of material into
the jungle to set up the base camp and 23 Ghost Zone out-
posts.
They supply 22,000 gallons of fuel every four days to nm
the operation's 26 aircraft, 41 vehicles, 2 "mother" ships and
8 chase boats and dispense boots, uniforms, ammunition,
food, medicine and anti-venomd kits for 1,030 troops spread
over thousands of square
miles.
The "intel," or tacti- G
cal analysis team, is next.
Army Lt. Col. Jim Creek Beni
from Las Cruces, N.M., Media
runs it.
Navy intelligence Chapare
officer Siebe Bandringa, La Paz acimi
a reservist who found
himself "temporarily"
activated from his job
as a cop in Irving, Texas, The targets of Ghost
is also on the team, as zone include the coca
are DEA intelligence growing region of the
specialists John Flem- Chapareandthecocaine
ing of San Francisco and production transport re-
Neal Rubin of Washing- gions of Media and Benl.
ton.
Juan "Ruby" Rutiaga
is next. He's a retired Army aviation officer from Ramon-
ville, Texas, who runs the 24 helicopters in the State Depart-
ment's air wing.
The door to the radio room opens abruptly.
"The P-3 says the fog's lifted and they've tracked one of
the Cessnas to a new strip," says radioman Don Taylor, a
retired Special Forces sergeant major.
Auflick cuts off the introductions. "Six of you get your
gear. I want the Hueys up in 10 minutes.
The men rush to the mess hall, which is decorated with
American and Texas flags. They top off their four canteens,
pick up their freshly charged radios and grab their heavy
backpacks, web gear, 9mm pistols, M-16s and shotguns.
Three minutes later, they and six Bolivians from UMOPAR,
ducking to avoid the spinning blades, climb into two heli-
copters that are older than most of them.
It will do little for their morale if they learn that a State
Department training pilot at Chimore found the same Huey
he flew in Vietnam 26 years ago.
They're airborne 20 minutes when the radio
crackles with a P-3 report that the drug plane has lifted off
and is gone. But they're almost over the area where the
plane landed and there must be a lab nearby. So they look.
The helicopter flies in tight, fast circles, almost on its
side, centrifugal force thrusting the machine gunner and
two men sitting beside him deep into the worn canvas seats.
The landing skids often perilously brush the treetops, but
the technique offers the only hope of a peek through the
thick jungle foliage below.
The intermediate steps that turn the coca leaf into co-
caine need water to operate. The agents look for creeks and
streams shiny with diesel fuel or gasoline.
"Watch for water stained black. It's a sure sign," a DEA
agent screams over the roar of the rotors to a new Snowcap.
But the radio orders them back to base. Something hotter
has come up. A two-man UMOPAR patrol has stumbled
onto seven Colombians, and shooting has been going on for
three hours.
Auflick is waiting at the airstrip and six other choppers
are warming up. They'll carry 60 men to the town on the


While the "Rambo side of the house," as Ferrarone calls
it, attracts the most attention, the bulk of DEA agents
abroad do more traditional work: developing snitches,
drawing "wiring diagrams" of how the drug rings are
organized, building cases for local police.
For example, in the DEA's Operation Screaming Eagle,
Bolivian police use space-age vacuum cleaners to scoop
up micro-bits of cocaine left in airplanes. If the plane is
dirty, it is confiscated. Just ask the owner of a shiny Lear
Jet now parked in a comer of the dusty Presidential Hangar
at the La Paz airport.
The same type of program in Peru, known by the less-
glamorous name Operation Vacuum Cleaner, has failed to
produce any planes, which shows that DEA's ultimate
success overseas depends on the willingness of Latin
American governments to help.


other side of the shootout to try and cut the Colombians off.
Andy Banks, A DEA agent from Chicago and the assis-
tant team leader, will take another 60 men in by ground.
Fifteen minutes later two Americans and 10 Bolivians are
crowded into each of fiye lightweight Toyota pickups.
Everyone stands. It's too rough to sit. Trying to avoid
getting a tooth or an eye knocked out by someone's rifle
barrel, they grasp skimpy rollbars and fight to keep from
getting thrown out as the trucks ricochet through the ruts of
the jungle path.
The Colombians, it turns out, have eluded the ambush,.
but the day will notbe a total loss. Earlier, an informant had
tipped off the drug warriors to a coca lab in the same area.
After three hours of being thrashed around in the trucks,
the team thinks it's impossible to be any more uncomfort-
able.
An hour later, on foot in the jungle, they knew they were
wrong. They've only hiked
about three miles, but the
ost Zone, with more 108-degree heat and humid-
than 1,000 U.S. and ity turn their camouflaged
)livian participants, is uniforms black from sweat.
theThey've also violated
the largest sustained the basic rule of foot sol-
counter-narcotics diers: never let the man with
operation ever thelongestlegs lead. Infront
S attempted. "is 6-foot-4 Brian Donaldson,
attemt. an ex-Special Forces medic
from Fairfax, Va.
There's little talk. It
� takes too much energy and
B oliVia they're deep in thebad guys'
B oliv backyard. Coca bushes crowd
both sdes of the narrow path,
which is marked with fresh
footprints.
Two more streams to
cross. The first is easy, the second more challenging. The 45
pounds of gear and weapons don't make crossing a 20-foot
single-log bridge high above a stream an amusing experi-
ence.
Then there is a waist-deep river.
"Piranha don't attack you if you're not bleed-
ing, do they?" whispers one of the new guys.
"Naw. Not unless they're hungry," reassures Banks.
The trail splits and so does the patrol.
It's almost dark. The sun has dropped behind the tall
trees of the jungle canopy. Cautiously, the two groups circle
a grove of trees split by a stream.
One of the patrols finds a 40-foot-long plastic-lined pit
filled with coca leaves and highly flammable chemicals, the
first step in making cocaine.
The Snowcaps gather chemical labels, shipping lists,
any scrap of paper with writing on it. They torch the pit and
a yellow-red ball of flame rolls into the tree tops.
About 500 yards away, the second patrol surrounds a
raised wooden pole house. Nobody's there, but more docu-
ments are found.
It's almost midnight when they get back to Chimore.
The cook saved them dinner.
They joke with three guys putting black and green
greasepaint on their faces. They're going out on a night
patrol. %
The Border Patrol guys who worked road checkpoints
boast about their first full day on the job, confiscating
chemicals used in drug-making.
There was a 50-pound flour sack filled with lime, a case
of quart beer bottles containing sulfuric acid, a five-gallon
bucket with two gallons of ammonia packed under three
gallons of lard and a large pumpkin filled with dark purple
crystals of potassium permanganate
Auflick breaks up the one-upmanship: "Bring your beer.
We've got to talk about what we found today and what.
we're going to chase in the morning."
It's 2 a.m. before most of them head to bed. It's been 20
hours since they started their day and only four until the next
one begins.


h

3o





'i








Tropic Times
-Sept 25,1992 -


Mom and Pop team dive into 'Shark 3'


Andrew Schneider
Scripps Howard News Service
COCA, Ecuador - A mother of two from
Minneapolis and a great-grandfather from
Tampa, Fla., lean on an M-60 machine gun
mounted in a Boston Whaler that's bar-
relling up a river in the Amazon.
The mom-and-pop duo are with the State
Department's Narcotics Assistance Section
in Ecuador. In fact, Yvonne Thayer and
Thomas Zepeda are the entire NAS team.
"We can't just start a counter-narcotics
program, hand out money, deliver vehicles,
boats, bulletproof vests and check off a box
on a form. We have to see if and how it's
being used, and you can't do that sitting in
an office," says Thayer, a former Latin
American correspondent for Newsweek.
It's earlier the same week. The 42-year-
old NAS director is walking down the dirt
strip that is the main street of the bawdy
border settlement ofLaPunta. Thepresence
late at night of the petite "gringa" sparks
more excitement in this squalid hamlet than
the bullet-riddled body pulled from the river
earlier that day.

S he strides up to the log-walled fort
at the edge of town where an aston
ished sentry nervously fidgets with
his rifle as Thayer bangs on the
heavy gate in 14-foot wall. Waving her
embassy ID, she insists in rapid-fire Spanish
that the corporal of the guard get his com-
manding officer.
"But it's late. He can't be bothered," he
argues.
"I'll wait. He will see me. Get him,
please. Now," she softly prods.
The corporal hurries off, muttering loudly.
"I had to learn how to walk this very
careful line of being diplomatic yet still
tough enough to get the job done. So I just do
what I think I have to do," she says.
Suddenly the stockade gate creaks open
and a very tall, and a very annoyed man
dressed in gym shorts and a T-shirt storms
through. Henry Gordon commands the 50
men at the river garrison and obviously is
puzzled what the U.S. embassy would want
at this time of night.
The 5-foot-2-inch envoy explains she
was "in the neighborhood" and wants to see
how the drug war is going.
For more than an'hour
they sit on a bunker of
crumbling sandbags over- 'We do our
looking the 300 yards of until we can r
river separating Ecuador
from Colombia. demand back
They swat dime-size we can patrol
mosquitoes as Gordon, his w
enthusiasm now un- chasing the b
bridled, zealously explains around the cI
to his willing listener that
the drug traffickers own they'llfind so
the river and move freely
between the two coun- get the drugs
tries, border."
There are too few
troops or aircraft on ei- Rodrig
their side to effectively U.S. Coast
control the border, Gor-
don says, and wistfully talks of the need for
a joint operation with the Colombians across
the river.
"Perhaps some day," Thayer says, smil-
ing. She knows that four days later she will
be in Washington, meeting with the State
Department and Drug Enforcement Admini-
stration officials pushing such a plan.
At that same moment, about 120
miles southwest, deep in the jungle
in the dusty town of Coca, the other
half of the NAS team, Thomas
Zepeda, is also slapping bugs and doing his
part in getting things ready to go after drug
traffickers.
Zepeda, a retired, DEA agent, has help.
Two U.S. Coast Guardsmen, Lt j.g. Ri-
cardo Rodriguez from. San Francisco and
Petty Officer J6rge Medini from Norfolk,


Va., are on loan to the embassy ::.
from the Coast Guard's intema- 555
tional Maritime Law Enforce- uiC:.:.:
ment Team. Unlike their codnter- i.::i= %
parts in the other military serv- :===
ices, Coast Guard personnel are
permitted to go to the front and
mix it up with the bad guys.
The trio goes into battle with
a 40-member Ecuadorian po-
lice riverine unit, funded, trained
and equipped by the United
States.
"Compared to Colombia and "X
Bolivia, this unit is just a drop in
the bucket, but it's something
that works and it's a start," says
Zepeda, who started his 27 years
in law enforcement as a street
cop in Louisville, Ky. He picked
up the badge of a federal drug
fighter in Detroit, worked most
Latin American countries for
DEA and retired soon after the ...iX
agency shipped him to Wash-
ington.
"It was the most boring nine
months of my life, so I quit I
wds too young to sit on a porch, :::::...
so when the State Department
offered me this job I jumped at ::::.::.
it," says the 60-year-old father
of four.
Ecuador has never been a
major player in America's drug
war. Only a smattering of coca
was ever found in the country, ..
and that was quickly eradicated.
But as American-led, mili-
tary-type interdiction efforts
increase in neighboring Colombia, Peru and
Bolivia, Ecuador is becoming an unwitting
host to money-launderers and smugglers.
Thayer and Zepeda have about $1 mil-
lion to run their entire operation- virtually
nothing compared to the more than $50
million that drug warriors get in some other
countries.
Add to that a host government that doesn't
really see drugs as a problem and a six-man
DEA team that concentrates on cases that
lead back to the United States, and it creates
a situation that would prompt most drug
fighters to pack their bags.
Not so in Ecuador.
The diplomatic duo
beg, borrow and cajole
part, but funds, equipment and
educe the government support to
get the job done. They
in the States, are not above bending
like mad, the rules to get Ecua-
' dorian officials on their
ad guys side.
a yd te Thayer stunned
qck, and the State Department
me way to protocol office when she
took Ecuador's attorney
across the general by subway to a
drug halfway house in a
war zone section of the
,uez Bronx, N.Y.
Guardsman Her techniques
obviously work. On his
return, the attorney general created a na-
tional drug council of six cabinet ministers
and produced two volumes of new laws and
regulations aimed at money-laundering
and sale of chemicals used in drug process-
ing.
Thayer and Zepeda are unflappable. They
have to be. Take Operation Shark III, aplan
to use the Ecuadorian drug police river unit
to stop trafficking near the Colombian bor-
der.
Earlier in the week, on the day that Shark
III was to have begun, Zepeda had his pa-
tience tested.
The early morning sun was steaming the
island headquarters of the Ecuadorian Army's
elite 19th Jungle Brigade as Zepeda, the
two Coast Guardsmen and Capt. Jaime Casco,
head of the police riverine team, cool their
heels waiting for an audience w'ith the bri-


gade's commanding officer, Col. J. Ma-
nosalvas.
Although -the arrangements had been
carefully worked out among the police, the
military and the embassy weeks earlier,
Casco's three-dozen police officers have no
beds or food and the army hasn't put the
unit's boats in the water.
It's almost an hour before they are ush-
ered into the brigade's conference room and
seated at one end of a 20-foot, green-felt-
covered oval table.
The Americans stifle their anger. Ma-
nosalvas doesn't. He is livid when he's told
the American-led team is chasing drug traf-
fickers and not insurgents.
The last time a riverine patrol was run in
his region, five Ecuadorians were killed by
Colombians, he says.
"Why waste your time chasing narco-
traffickers?" the jungle commander demands.
Zepeda swallows hard and says nothing.
While with the DEA in Bogota, the drug
cartel bombed his house.
It takes two more hours of wrangling and
the promise of more American money, but
the U.S. team gets food and lodging for its
men and a helicopter available for medical
evacuation.
The Coast Guard won't allow its people
to participate unless there's a way to quickly
evacuate any wounded.
Outside the headquarters, Zepeda, a broad
smile on his face, says: "I'm making a
narcotic cop out of Yvonne and she's mak-
ing a diplomat out of me."
Slapping Casco on the back, he adds,
"Let's get the damn boats in the water."
Thayer arrives from Quito just as the four
Boston Whalers and two small piranhas are
finally getting wet.
Machine guns are mounted, ammo
checked and 43 men, Thayer and a U.S.-
trained drug dog board. Shark III is finally
under way.
"Our goal is training and advising and
then getting out of their way. It's their show
and they've got to run it," says Rodriguez.
The tiny flotilla spreads out across the
swift current of brown water.
"These rivers are like highways leading
into Peru and Colombia. Chemicals and
money go in and drugs come out," Zepeda
says.


Primitive dugouts are the freighters of
this part of the river. Large ones carry 30
men and their baggage to and from the oil
field up river. Most transport one or two
people and a small pile of cargo.
All are stopped and searched.
Drug boats gently close in on the
fragile wooden craft. The dog,
named "Swoop," leaps across to
the long, narrow boats and, to the
entertainment of mostpassengers, sticks his
nose into every nook and bundle.
Other officers, guns at ready, keep wary
eyes on the dense jungle crowding the river's
edge.
Rodriguez and Medina watch their charges
work, while Thayer, Zepeda and Casco huddle
over a map spread on the bow of the com-
mand boat, dickering over how close to the
border the patrols should go.
The group is pragmatic about the effect
their small team-is having on the drug
war.
"We do our part, but until we can reduce
the demand back in the States, we can patrol
like mad, chasing the bad guys around the
clock, and they'll find some way to get the
drugs across the border," says the young
lieutenant.
Thayer has to get back to Quito.
She spends the night in a small hotel with
diesel fuel spread on the floor. They say it
discourages snakes.
Obviously, this is knowledge that
didn't come with her master's degree in
public administration or a fellowship at-
Harvard.
She muscles her way onto an oil com-
pany plane returning to the capital and ar-
rives with just enough time to change out of
her muddy khakis before an early-morning
meeting with top police officials and two
cabinet members.
She rushes to her child's high school,
where she has volunteered to cook ham-
burgers for a fund-raiser, before she heads
home to pack for her flight to Washington
the next morning.
"I'm not a soldier or a DEA agent, but
just a plain old diplomat," she says.
"But it's exciting to get in the middle of
this drug war and .,try-, to .make-a differ-
ence."


*


ro

(
�C
91

l

9'










1 Tropic Times
V Sept. 25,1992


- Theater SupportElementby SgL Brent Pnbil
SSgt. Eugene McCallister (left), Army National Guardsman from Foristell, Mo., and PFC Doug Wright, 534th Military Police Company,
check a car to ensure the doors are locked during a night patrol on Fort Clayton.


Active, Reserve units hit the road together


by Sgt. Brent Pribil
358th Public Affairs Detachment
FORT CLAYTON (Theater Support Element) -
Busting thieves on U.S. military bases in Panama re-
quires military police to hide in the dark surrounding
jungles, waiting for crooks to breach the fence line. So
went annual training for some Missouri Army National
Guardsmen.
The 170-member 3175th Military Police Company
from Warrenton, Mo., deployed to Panama for three
two-week rotations in August and September. Their
mission is to help the local military police in guard and
patrol U.S. bases and property.
SSgt. Eugene McCallister from Foristell, Mo., a
platoon sergeant in the unit, believes the training they
receive here surpasses the quality of the normal training
they do back in Missouri.
"There's a difference between classroom training
versus actual participation in military police duty like
we get down here in Panama; it's actual training,"
McCallister said. "If activated again, like we were in
Desert Storm, this is much like what we would do."
Pvt. 2 Konstantinos N. Damalas from Moscow Mills,
Mo., found Panama to be a completely new experience.
"The jungle's a challenge; everything is different.
They've got all different kinds of animals and poison-
ous frogs; you gotta watch out for warts here," Damalas
joked.


Damalas pulled patrol duty while in Panama, some-
thing he said he could never experience back home.
"It's scary. It's dark. We have two or three-man
walking teams that infiltrate through the jungle. Once
in, we sit and wait and watch. It's a waiting game,"
Damalas said.
The military police play this game hoping to catch
thieves stealing property from the government and
soldiers' homes. According to PFC Mike Mueller from
St. Peters, Mo., they walk these patrols more as a
deterrent to crime than anything else.
"People know we're out here. And hopefully that
gets them to think twice about ripping someone off,"
Mueller said.
Deterring criminals is only half of the problem.
McCallister said people need to remember not to make
it too easy for would-be thieves.
To remind people to secure their property, military
police take on the thieves' perspective and look for
things to steal.
If they find an item they could easily take, they know
a thief would find it irresistible. When they find a poten-
tial problem, they fill out form they call the "gotcha
card" that points out the unsecure situation to the
citizen.
"The gotcha card is a written warning that we could
have stolen your property because it was not secured,"
he said. "We leave the card on the item - usually it's
unsecured autos - and hopefully the owners will be a


little more careful."
While some unit members walk their patrol areas,
others guard the gates of military installations in Pan-
ama. Spec. Tracy J. Skouby from Gerald, Mo., pulled
gate duty several times.
"The hardest day was the first day. There are so
many rules and regulations. It's different here than back
home. Just learning it was the hard part," Skouby said.
Once she learned the new rules, she found the duty
easier to perform.
She found that being a female MP is a continual
challenge.
"Being a woman MP can be a strike against you. It's
not that we can't do the work, it's the attitude some
people take toward us. There are only nine female MPs
in our company, but if anyone does something wrong,
it's a strike against all of us. It's always, 'Oh, those
females,' "Skouby said.
"It's also kind of hard when you need to take in a
huge infantry type who looks at you with a, 'Ya, I can
squash you like a bug' look," she said.
Skouby said that the training she receives prepares
her to handle difficult situations. She credits the non-
commisisoned officers of her company for setting a
good example and teaching her well.
"Our NCOs lead by example, and they teach me a
lot. It's so important because people are always watch-
ing MPs. People look up to MPs; we protect them," she
said.


Total Force helps spawn commander's pride


by MSgt. Philip V. Bernal
358th Public Affairs Detachment
HOWARD AFB (Theater Support
Element) - The role-of the Air National
Guard and Air Force Reserve in support
of the U.S. military's Total Force Policy
is evident in Central and South America.
The Total Force Policy is generally
defined as all branches of the U.S. mili-
tary, including National Guard and Re-
serve, operating as one team.
"We're all part of the CINC's (com-
mander in chief, U.S. Southern Com-
mand) 'one team, one fight,'" said Col.
Norman "Gene" E. Lasater, commander
of operation Volant Oak.
Lasater, an Air Force Reserve Officer
on a 33-month Active Guard and Re-
serve tour, said Volant Oak exemplifies
the importance of the U.S. Air Force
Reserve.
The operation is a year-round airlift


support mission conducted by Air Force
Reserve and Air National Guard C-130
transport units since 1977. It provides
SOUTHCOM with logistic and air sup-
port throughout Central and South Amer-
ica. These responsibilities include air
freight, passenger transportation, mili-
tary missions, and emergency evacuations.
Volant Oak is also the primary life line
for U.S. embassies in the area of opera-
tion (below Mexico) and South America
(except French Guiana).
Because of the operations involved,
the Guard and Reserve airmen have real
mission assignments as part of their train-
ing. "Some folks in the United States
don't realize this," said Lasater.
Volant Oak consists of two teams on
two-week rotations, each bringing at least
threeC-130 Hercules airplanes with four
crews, maintenance teams and support
personnel. The units rotate in overlap-
ping cycles and move from the flying


mission the first week to the administra-
tion mission the second week.
The command of Volant Oak also
rotates between the Air National Guard
and Air Force Reserve and varies in
length.
No stranger to Volant Oak, Lasater
participated in four two-week rotations
as a Reserve officer. "I've seen the mis-
sion change over the years. It's getting
bigger every year," Lasater said.
"These are dedicated people who work
side-by-side. You can't tell who is Guard
and who is Reserve," said Lasater. "In
Desert Storm and Desert Shield we flew
side-by-side with the active-duty units.
They could not distinguish who was who
and we like to keep it that way. We fly
the same equipment, fly the.same mis-
sions and have the same training. Our
only difference is when our folks aren't
flying, they're working in their civilian
jobs," he said.


Lasater















Sports


Sept. 25, 1992 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 11



Local ironmen take on world's best


Sonney wants to be 'on'

by Sgt. Richard Puckett
Acting Sports Editor
COROZAL (Tropic Times) - Thirty-one year-old
Mike Sonney doesn't look like your typical triathlete.
He stands about 6-feet tall, is slender and muscles
aren't bulging through his Air Force service dress
uniform. Yet he may be one of the best all-around ath-
letes in Panama.
Sonney, from 310th Airlift Squadron, is one of two
local athletes sponsored by the U.S. Military Associa-
tion packing his bags and heading to Las Vegas for-
Saturday's Bud Lite Triathlon. Sonney and Norman
Stiegler will be competing in the military triathlon
championship which is run simultaneously.
For Sonney this is first "prime time" opportunity to
test his stuff against the best, including professionals,
top amateurs and fellow military athletes.
"This is areal challenge," he said. "IthinkI'm ready
for this opportunity. There will be alot of great athletes
there. I just hope I'm on that day and can use the extra
adrenaline to my advantage."
Sonney's career as athree-event star began just four
years ago while he was stationed at Dyess AFB in
Abilene, Texas.
"It started as kind of a dare," he said. "A friend said
he was was in better shape than me and dared me to
enter this triathlon, so I did. It was a nightmare getting
through it, but I got hooked on the feeling and just kept
with the sport."
One thing that lures Sonney to the sport is the
complexity that the three-sport training requires.
"You can't be just a good swimmer, biker or runner
and win," Sonney added. "You have to be good or
decent at all three to be competitive. Everybody has
their strong spot, but it is the weak spot that always
catches you in the end."
It's that complexity that requires a lot of training
time, and it's time the husband, and father of a 10-
month-old son doesn't have to spare.
"Trying to balance training with family and work is
hard," he said. "No matter how hard I try sometimes
one of the three does suffer at times. Usually it's my
training."
"My wife, Linda, is very understanding," he added.
"But she needs a break too, so I try and help out
with Taylor (our son) on the weekends and in the eve-
nings."
So he finds himself running late in the evenings,
getting up early to bike and swimming at lunch.
Sonney's schedule calls for alternating training for
each event every day with one off-day a week. The
rainy season in Panama has played havoc with his
afternoon training.
"I haven't had as much time to prepare as I'd like,"
he said. "But I think training in the heat and humidity
here will really help."
Sonney is also looking forward to competing against


K -




U.S. Army photoby SgL Richad Puckett
Sonney


u. . S.my pnot oy 9,t. Mi-ip u. CarK
Norman Stiegler and his son Daniel head out on a
daily run.
Norman Stiegler, Panama's Navy representative.
"He's tough," Sonney said. "He's a much better
runner than I am, so I have to get off to a good start or
he'll catch me. He's done it before."


Stiegler aiming for best

by SSgt. Phillip D. Clark
USARSO Public Affairs Office-Atlantic
FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO-Atlantic) - Tomor-
row morning, Norman Stiegler will be pitted against
world class and top military triathletes as he lines up to
swim, bike and run in the Bud Lite Triathlon in Las
Vegas.
Stiegleris in Vegas with Sonney to participate in the
military triathlon championship which is run at the
same time of this championship race.
Stiegler, a Navy lieutenant, has been taking part in
triathlons for several years. He has kept his training up
in Panama and has one fourth-place, a third-place and
three first-place finishes here.
He's been training diligently for the 1.5k swim, 40k
bike and a 10k run and had help from several people.
"I had two good workouts this weekend. A 45-mile
bike ride Saturday at about 23-24 miles per hour, and
Sunday I went for a 10-mile run with Geof Doyle, whb
is training for the Marine Corps Marathon," Stiegler
said.
"If I read correctly, part of the run goes through sand,
and the first seven miles of the bike is uphill, so it is not
an easy race" he continued.
Stiegler knows it will take his best to beat Sonney.
"I'm not a real good swimmer, Mike's a better
swimmer than me. We have a friendly competition and
I'd like to beat him, but I'd have to have an excellent
race to beat Mike."
Stiegler has been trying to get in two good workouts
a day, but with family and military priorities as the
officer in charge of Department 50, Public Works, here,
two workouts is sometimes hard to do.
"I've been trying to get up early (about 4:30 or 5
a.m.) to get a decent run in and swim or bike the other
part of the afternoon." he said.
Stiegler knows the time he has to take to train for
triathlons, and right away that his family sacrifices
personal time with him so he can train. He's trie to
include his children more in his training lately by taking
them out in a baby jogger (a stroller made for running).
He also appreciates his commands understanding
and willingness to give him permissive temporary duty
so he can compete for the Navy in the military champi-
onship part of the race.
Stiegler and Sonney both decided to apply for the
competition and had to put together a packet to send to
the U.S. Military Sports Association which agreed to
pay for both racers plane tickets and entry fees.
Stiegler's goal is to finish in the top 20 percent.
"I haven't run in an ultra-competitive triathlon like
this in a long time. A lot of how I finish will depend on
how my legs feel. Mike and I are hoping that training in
Panamain the heat and humidity will be beneficial to us
as we run in the dry heat. It should be easier in that
aspect," he said. "He and I have a perspective on this.
The best will be there. We want to go and do our best."


3 U.S. Army South soldiers earn All-Army rugby spots


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -
Three soldiers from U.S. Army South
made the All-Army rugby team
during tryouts and the Interservice
Championship in Pensacola Florida last
week.
Eight players from U.S. Army South
went to the tryouts and participated in
games against the Division One Atlanta
Renegades and a Florida team from
Okaloosa before the final cut was made
for the All Army team and the inters-


service games.
During the week of practice sessions
and games, four members of the
USARSO team played in the game against
Atlanta.
With the help of Chuck May of the 7th
Engineer Dive Detachment; Steve Duck-
worth of Headquarters Company,
USARSO; Jim Minahl from the 106th
Signal Brigade; and Chris Mincey of the
59th Engineers, the Army team beat
Atlanta 22-7.


At the practice game against Oka-
loosa, seven of the eight USARSO
team players contributed to a 68-0 vic-
tory.
In addition to the four who played
against Atlanta, the team consisted of
Kevin Wimbley 7th Engineer Dive
Detachment; Ron Sallis Headquarters
Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne),
508th Infantry; and David Sch-
negelberger, 747th Military Intelligence
Battalion.


Also part of the USARSO team was
Ray Malphurs of 3rd Special Operations
Support Command.
Shortly after the practice games, it
was announced that May, Wimbleyand
Sallis would play in the All-Armyinters-
ervice games
Although the Army team didn't take
the title, USARSO did its part, said May.
No other command sent more players or
had as many players make the team, he
added.








1 Tropic Times
1A2 uSept. 25,1992


1-228th Aviation



earns hoops title


by SSgt Steve Hicks
24th Wing Public Affairs


HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA) -
Things got a little spooky for the 1st
Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment on
the way to its second straight Howard
Intramural Basketball Championship.
This was the 228th's second straight
championship.
Faced with a game against the last
qualifying playoff team on the road to
the title game, the 24th Mission Support
Squadron, might have seemed to be a
cakewalk for the running' and gunnin'
Express. But the MSSQ team, which fin-
ished its season at 8-4, wasn't ready to
concede and battled the Express down to
the wire Sept. 18.
They lost the game 68-62, it served as
a warning to the Express that reputation
alone does not win games - defense
does. And defenses what won that game
and the tournament for the Express.
After being down by 11 points to
MSSQ, the Express put on a press that
created numerous turnovers and pro-
pelled them to a five point lead which
they never relinquished enroute to the
victory.
The Express won the rest of its games
with relative ease, including a 66-55 victory
overthe617th Special Operations Avia-


Express's Lucius Harpe (left) passes
the ball around 617th's Levi Bennett.
tion Detachment, and a 56-40 win over
the 617th Airlift Support Squadron.
The championship game was also
against the 617th ALSS, and while
617th put up abetter struggle, they were
defeated 63-50.
The 228th outscored the 617th 31-18
in the first half, but in the second half
of the game both teams scored 32
points. But it was too little too late for
the 617th.


U.. Air Fore photo by TSgL Ron Kimberiin
Express's Nate Moore (15) tries to outjump 617th's Nate Gagom during the tip-
off of the 1992 Howard AFB intramural'basketball championship Sept.. 18.


Sport Shorts


Winter bowling leagues
Fort Clayton Lanes are now starting sign ups for
winter leagues. Stop by Clayton Lanes for informa-
tion.
Curundu Bowling Center is also beginning sign ups
for its winter leagues. Call 286-3914.

Powerlifting competition
A powerlifting competition will be held Saturday at
Reeder Physical Fitness Center.
An organizational meeting will be today at 6 p.m.,
Building 154. There will be three categories: dead lift,
squat, bench press. Call 287-4050.

Crossed Flags 10k
The 154th Signal Battalion is sponsoring a
Crossed Flags 1 0-kilometer road race begins at Johnson
Field, Building 208, Fort Clayton, 7 a.m. Saturday. In-
dividual and team categories will be offered. Ten-
person teams must start and finish together. Register at
Building 208. Call Capt. Millie Daniels at 287-5906/
5904.

No tap event
Howard Bowling Center will be hosting a no tap
tournament Sunday at 3-p.m. The handicap is 80 percent
of a 200 average and when a bowler knocks down nine
pins it's a strike. Ladies get one free strike per game.

Volleyball program
The Rodman Naval Station intramural volleyball
program will begin Oct. 1. Units must submit letters of
intent to the Rodman Sports Office by Monday. A
coaches' meeting will be held Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. at
the Rodman Fitness Center. Call 283-4222.

Women's basketball
Women's Community Basketball registration is under
way until Oct. 6. Call 287-4050.

Columbus fun run
A Columbus Day funrun will be held Oct. 12,at7:15
a.m., registration ends Oct. 8. Early registration fee is
$7 and late registration fee, $10.


Boxing, wrestling trials
All-Army Boxing Trials will be conducted at Fort
Huachuca, Jan. 5-March 91993. Applications must be
submitted to the Sports Branch by Oct. 9.
All-Army Wrestling Trials will conducted at Fort
Benning, Jan. 10-March 15. Applications must be
submitted to the Sports Branch by Oct. 16.

Flag football tourney
A Columbus Day Flag Football Tournament will be
held Oct. 10-12. The team entry fee is $75. Call 289-
3294.

Turkey Bowl tryouts
Tryouts for the 1992 Army Turkey Bowl football
tournament will be held Oct. 17 and 24, 9 a.m., at
Jarman Field, Fort Clayton, and Oct. 18, 9 a.m., at
Fairground Field, Fort Davis. Call Eva Foster at 287-
4050.

Columbus Day events
Columbus Day Sports Event registration is under-
way. Wednesday. Open racquetball, volleyball and
basketball tournaments. Call Reeder Physical Fitness
Center, 287-4713.

Sprint triathlon
The Navy MWR has scheduled a sprint triathlon at 7
a.m. at Rodman Pool Oct. 18. Events will be: a 500-yard
swim, a 16k bike ride and a 5k run.
Registration fee is $8 if paid by Oct. 15 at the
Rodman Sports Office. The race day fee will be $10
from 6-6:45 a.m. at Rodman Pool.
A biking helmet is required. Call Morise Conerly at
283-4222/4061 or Hank Baltar at 282-4651.

Women's softball
A women's invitational softball tournament will be
held Oct. 10-12. Entry fee is $85. The tournament will
be at Symington Field, Rodmanr Naval Station, starting
at 9 a.m. Oct. 10.
Entry will be limited to the first 10 teams. A
coaches' meeting will be held Oct. 5 at 5:30 p.m. at
Rodman Fitness Center. Call Morise Conerly at 283-
4222/4061.


Fort Clayton standings*
Flag football
Red League


TEAM
106th Signal
Co. E, 1-228th Avn
534th MP Co.
Co. E, 154th Signal
92nd MPBn
HHC, 1-228th Avn
92nd PSC


White League
TEAM
HHC, 193rd
Co. B, 193rd Spt
HHC, 41st Spt
SOUTHCOM
HHC, 142nd
Co. A, 193rd Spt


5'11" a
TEAM
19rdSptBn
41st ASG
Moore Team
Let's Get Bussey
106th Sig Bn
MEDDAC


nd above bask


w L
2 1
1 0
1 1
1 1
1 1
0 1
0 0


W L
4 1
2 1
2 3
1 1
1 3
0 3

;etball
W L
3 1
2 0
1 0
1 1
1 2
0 3


5'10 and under basketball


TEAM
The Slep Rock
Hustle
We're Blessed
The Untouchables
Guard Plus
106th Signal
79th Army Band
The Gansters
*As of Tuesday's games


W L
3 0
2 0
2 1
1 1
1 1
0 3
0 1
0 0


SCN radio schedule*
Sat: San Diego State at UCLA 2:3.0 p.m.
ML Baseball: to be announced
Sun: Atlanta Falcons at Chicago Bears, noon
Miami Dolphins at Seattle Seahawks, 3 p.m.
San Francisco 49ers at New Orleans, 7 p.m.
Mon:L.A. Raiders at Kansas City Chiefs 8 p.m.


II








Tropic Times
Sept. 25,1992-1


Ditka criticizes



tentative players


LAKE FOREST, Dl. (AP) - Mike
Ditka isn't looking for any miracles. All
he wants is a win for his Chicago Bears to
turn around their 1-2 record.
That's their worst start since 1983
when they were 1-3 but finished strong
for a respectable 8-8 record.
"It looks like we're waiting for some-
one to do something miraculous," Ditka
said Tuesday after the Bears dropped a
27-14 decision to the New York Giants
Monday night.
Asked if he was looking for someone
to step up and take charge, Ditka said he
thought his running backs - Neal An-
derson and Brad Muster - started out
that way, "but it didn't happen."
Quarterback Jim Harbaugh was un-
able to turn the tide once the Bears blew
a 14-7 lead. Harbaugh threw a pair of
touchdown passes in the first half, when
he completed 9 of 13 passes for 122
yards, but finished with 17 of 28 for 183
yards.
"Harbaugh made some bad reads,"
said Ditka. "When he plays good, I say
he played good, but he made bad reads."
Ditka also questioned the play of the
secondary when asked if the defensive
backs had become gun shy.
"That's part of it. You can't play foot-
ball tentatively," he said.
The slide started in New Orleans when


the Bears held a 6-0 halftime lead but lost
28-6 on big plays both against the de-
fense and the offense.
And they were totally outplayed in the
second half by the Giants, especially in
the third quarter when the Giants held the
ball for more than 12 minutes and had a
155-3 edge in total yards.
"We came out ready in the second
half, the plays were there, but we didn't
execute," said Ditka. "We kicked off
with the wind and wanted to make them
go 80 yards. They went 80 yards. We had
some foolish penalties, but I didn't think
they could make 80 yards."
With the help of a 15-yard penalty
against Richard Dent for hitting quarter-
back Phil Simms after a short comple-
tion, the Giants scored on a 13-yard pass
from Simms to Stephen Baker for a 21-
14 lead.
The Bears then ran three plays and
had to punt, and the Giants held the ball
for nearly seven more minutes before
Matt Bahr booted a 31-yard field goal
and a 24-14 lead.
Bahr booted a32-yarder as the Giants
controlled the ball for more than 22 minutes
of the second half.
"Things have to change," said Ditka.
"Everybody has to go out with theideaof
shutting out the opponents and scoring
50 points."


APLaserPhoto


Ditka


Young guns making early impressions


YOUNG GUNS TAKE OVER THE NFL - This
weekend is the one-fourth mark of the NFL season
and already the new Young Guns have established
themselves. Nine teams fielded new coaches for the
1992 NFL season, and after three weeks they have
combined for a 13-13 record. Big deal, you might
say. What's .500?
Consider that Mike Ditka's Bears, Jerry Glan-
ville's Falcons and Wayne Fontes' Lions are 1-2. Art
Shell's Raiders are 0-3. These four 1991 playoff
teams that combined for a 65% winning percentage
last season are off to a lowly 25% start in 1992.
One of the biggest factors affecting the outcome of
games this season is the injury rate of the starting
quarterback. Currently there are 13 starters who have
been benched because of injuries and/or lackluster
play. If you're looking for a winner in 1992, pick a
team with a competent backup quarterback.
Last week's games: After having been out-picked
by my wife, the Peg Bundy of the football world, I
am happy to say that I rebounded this week with an
11-3 record, she finished 9-5.
I have to give her credit though. She correctly
gave you the 49er-Jets score (31-14); picked the
Saints over the Falcons by three, final score 10-7; and
Pittsburgh to beat San Diego 23-7, the actual score
was 23-6.
She came close on three others, picking Miami to
beat the Rams 20-10, the final was 26-10; the Bills to
beat the Colts 38-14, the actual score being 38-0; and
Seattle to beat the Patriots by four, 14-10. The final
score was 10-6. >
This week's five star games:

FALCONS FLY IN THE WINDY CITY
The Bears are a team on the way down. Two
straight losses for a combined score of 55-20 to the
Saints and the Giants. The Falcons have played three
playoff teams from 1991, beating the Jets and losing
close to both the Saints and Redskins. Who will lose


APLaseiPhoto
Los Angeles Raiders head coach Art Shell hasn't much too cheer about so far in 1992, but is hoping that
second-year quarterback Todd Marinovich will provide some spark.


this game? Da Bears. Falcons 24, Bears 13.
49ERS STRIKE GOLD IN NEW ORLEANS
Both teams are 2-1, both have lost by a field goal
or less to outstanding teams, and both have smart
quarterbacks. But the 49ers have scored 31 points a
game for three weeks in a row. They won't get it this
week, but they will have enough tq win. 49ers 27,
Saints 20.
BENGALS TANGLE WITH THE VIKES
David Shula and Dennis Green are new coaches
with 2-1 records. Minnesota's opponents so far are 4-
4. Cincinnati's opponents are 2-7. The Vikings only
loss is to Detroit; the Bengals to Green Bay in a close
game. The Vikings are winning games but not by big
margins - 9 points in two games. Minnesota's
biggest fan in Panama, Fort Kobbe's 12-year-old B.J.
Solhjem, assures me of a Viking win. I have to agree
with him. Vikings 24, Bengals 20.
CLOWNS ARE FOR REAL
After two tough losses, Cleveland stopped the


unimpressive Raiders this past week. The Broncos,
meanwhile, are looking sad. A 30-0 drubbing by the
high-flying Eagles showed that they might as well
lay down and die. The magic is not there. Cleveland
has nothing to lose, and won't as Eric Metcalf
will shine again. Browns 27, Broncos 17.
CHIEFS BATTLE RAIDERS
The Raiders are the NFL's best team on Monday
Night Football. They are 0-3 without a team leader.
Kansas City has Dave Krieg, the former Seattle
quarterback at the helm. Al Davis says, "Just win,
baby!" Forget it, Al. Chiefs 24, Raiders 17.
Rounding out the rest of the league: The Jets 23,
the Rams 16; Pittsburgh 20, Green Bay 17; Detroit
31, Tampa Bay 17; Houston 24, San Diego 13;
Miami 24, Seattle 14; and Buffalo 41, New England
10, in a close one.
Dallas won't win this week, the NFC East has the
week off, as does Indianapolis. Season record: 27-
14.









1 Tropic Times
4T Sept. 25,1992


Jays' Winfield


swings away

NEW YORK (AP) - It was in early April, about an
hour before game time, and Dave Winfield was relax-
ing in the dugout at SkyDome, surveying the scene at
his new home.
Then, he spotted a few familiar faces. The Yankees
were in Toronto that night, and a couple of writers
who used to cover him in New York were wandering
by.
"They said he was too old, couldn't play anymore,"
Winfield said, breaking into a big smile and his best
Muhammad Ali imitation. "He was all done, they said.
Couldn't do the job."
Well, hee-haw, because the joke is on the Yankees
and the Angels and everyone else who believed that
Winfield was washed up.
He is old, that part is true. As in the oldest player to
hit three home runs in a game and the oldest playerto hit
for the cycle.
And, in the next few days, Winfield might add an
even more meaningful accomplishment - the only
40-year-old player ever to drive in 100 runs in one
season. In fact, if Winfield waits until Oct. 3, the next-
to-last day of the season, he can do it on his 41st
birthday.
Winfield and the AL East-leading Blue Jays began a
three-game series in Baltimore on Tuesday night. Winfield
went into Thursday night with 99 RBIs.
"I don't normally dwell on the statistics, we've got
a pennant race to worry about," Winfield said Sunday.
"But I'll take a lot of satisfaction in getting the 100th."
"The next one is special," he said. "A lot of
ballplayers have had 100 RBIs in a season, but I'll be the
old man on that list."
Since 1900, only twice has a player 40 or older


Winfield
driven in as many as 90 runs. Ty Cobb had 93 RBIs in
1927 at age 40 and Darrell Evans had 99 RBIs in 1987,
also at 40.
Evans thought he had gotten his 100th in the final
week of the season. He had 99 RBIs when he singled
and Bill Madlock scored, but the play was scored an
error on Baltimore catcher Terry Kennedy because
Madlock's hard slide knocked the ball loose.
Evans did not drive in a run in Detroit's last three
games, and finished one short.
The oldest players with 100 RBIs in modem history
are Babe Ruth, Honus Wagner, Ernie Banks, Tony
Perez and Cobb, who each did it at age 38. Banks' total
of 106 in 1969 leads the list.


APLaserPhoto


Several other players reached 100 RBIs at age 37,
including Hank Aaron, Carl Yastrzemski, Mike Schmidt,
Carlton Fisk and Dwight Evans.
Winfield got his 99th RBI on Sunday in Toronto.
The Blue Jays play in Baltimore and New York before
returning home.
"The 100th will probably come on the road, which is
unfortunate for the fans up here," he said. "They've
always been Dave Winfield fans and I would have liked
to do it here.This park has had a lot to do with it. I've
enjoyed hitting here from day one."
The Blue Jays have enjoyed having him since last
Dec. 19, when they signed Winfield as a free agent to a
one-year contract for $2.3 million.


Bay area residents

nix Giants' tax idea
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Residents in the seven-county
San Francisco Bay area are opposed to spending their tax
dollars on keeping the Giants from moving to Florida,
according to a poll paid for by the city of St. Petersburg,
Fla.
Seventy-four percent of those polled responded
negatively when asked, "Are you in favor of spending
taxpayer money to keep the San Francisco Giants baseball
team," according to a recent poll conducted by Walker
Research of Princeton, N.J.
The survey asked 229 people in the San Francisco Bay area
on Sept. 19-20. No margin of error was given.
"This is a political poll question. It's not good survey
methodology. The question is too generalized and the struc-
ture is faulty," Bob Forsyth, a spokesman for Mayor Frank
Jordan said in an interview published in Tuesday's editions of
the San Francisco Examiner.
"I suspect the intent of the poll was aPR device hoping that
the San Francisco media picks up on it without questioning the
faulty methodology and without questioning the context of
the question," Forsyth said.
The issue of using tax dollars to build the Giants a new
ballpark has already failed four times at the ballot box in the
San Francisco Bay area.
A group of St. Petersburg investors have offered owner
Bob Lurie $115 million to move the team to the Suncoast
Dome.
But Floridians admitted that a competing proposal to keep
the team local, headed by NBA Charlotte Hornets owner
George Shinn, has them a bit nervous.
"To say we're eager to get this settled is probably an
understatement," said St. Petersburg councilwoman Leslie
Curran.
"Ithink we're going to prevail, but if I had my way it would


/LT . i









St. Petersburg Assistant City Manager Rick Dodge, who
lead the effort to bring a major league baseball team to St.
Petersburg for nearly a decade is still confident that the
Giants will be heading South.
have been settled yesterday."
National League President Bill White has told San Francisco
investors they have until the end of the month to submit their
proposal.


Clemens



leads


All-Stars


NEW YORK (AP) - Roger Clemens,
Ozzie Smith and Cecil Fielder will lead a
team of major league All-Stars who will
play a Japanese All-Star team in eight
games from Oct. 30 to Nov. 8.
The series, to be played in Tokyo,
Osaka and Fukuoka, will mark the fourth
time in six years a major league All-Star
team has traveled to Japan. The major
league All-Stars went 3-4-1 in 1990.
The team will be managed by Tom
Kelly of the Minnesota Twins, and Rod


Carew will serve as hitting coach. Each
player will receive $65,000 plus an addi-
tional $8,000 in expense money.
Joining Clemens on the pitching staff
will be Norm Charlton and Greg Swin-
dell of Cincinnati, Mark Langston of
California, Dennis Martinez of Montreal,
Jack McDowell of the Chicago White
Sox, Gregg Olson of Baltimore, Bob
Patterson of Pittsburgh, Bob Tewksbury
of St. Louis and Duane Ward of Toronto.
Infielders besides Smith and Fielder


are Cleveland's Carlos Baerga, Wade
Boggs of Boston, Craig Biggio of Hous-
ton, Travis Fryman of Detroit, Mark Grace
of the Chicago Cubs and Terry Pendleton
of Atlanta.
The team's catchers are Darren Daul-
ton of Philadelphia and Mickey Tettleton
of Detroit. The outfielders are Ron Gant
of Atlanta, Ken Griffey Jr. of Seattle,
Shane Mack of Minnesota, Ruben Sierra
of Oakland and Larry Walker of Mon-
treal.


Baseball standings*
NATIONAL
EAST W L Per. GB
PrITSBURGH 89 63 .586 -
MOmNTRAL 83 69 .546 6
ST. Louis 76 75 .503 12
CHICAGO 75 77 .493 14
NEw YoRK 69 82 .457 19.5
PHILADELPHIA 62 88 .413 26

WEST
ATLANTA 91 60 .603 -
cINCINNATI 85 67 .559 6.5
SAN DimGo 78 73 .517 13
HousTON 73 79 .480 18.5
SAN FRANcisco 67 85 .441 24.5
Los ANGELES 61 91 .401 30.5

AMERICAN
EAST W L .Pct GB
ToRoNTo 89 64 .582 -
MILWAUKEE 85 67 .559 3.5
BALUTiORE 83 68 .550 5
CLEVELAND 72 79 .477 16
NEW YORK 72 80 .474 '16.5
D Rorr . 72 81 .471 17
BOSTON 67 85 .441 21.5

WEST
OAKLAND 92 60 .605 --
MINNESOTA 84 68 .553 8 -
CHICAGO 82 69 .543- 9.5
TEXAS 73 80 .477 19.5
CAUFORNIA 67 84 .444 24.5
KANSAS Crry 67 84 .444 24.5
SEATTLE 58 94 .382 34
* Through Wednesday's games














New NFL coaches


earning high marks


Tropic Times 1
Sept. 25, 1992 1A%


NEW YORK (AP) - The early returns
are in ...
Consider the new generation of coaches
a success.
Bill Cowher has Pittsburgh unbeaten
in three games and fans eagerly antici-
pating a new football dynasty.
Cincinnati's Dave Shula looks like
he'll be a better head coach than an
assistant. His Bengals are 2-1 despite a
last-minute loss at Green Bay.
Dennis Green has Minnesota think-
ing playoffs again after an undefeated
preseason and 2-1 start.
Green Bay's Mike Holmgren is 1-2,
but the Packers' 24-23 victory on Sunday
may do a lot to get the team back on
track.
The Steelers' 23-6 victory over San
Diego marked the first time since 1979
the team has won its first three games,
and everyone in western Pennsylvania
remembers what happened then - the
fourth Super Bowl win in six years.
"It's nice to bein this position," Cowher
said. "But you can't get caught up in
looking at the big picture yet."
Cowher is inspirational rather than
tactical.
His disclaimer isn't necessarily
CoachSpeak- young teams with young
coaches often start well, then fade when
the enthusiasm wears off.
Still, excluding San Diego's Bobby
Ross, who lost quarterback John Friesz
in preseason and is 0-3, the four other
first-timers are a combined 8-4.
The group is 8-2 against coaches other


than themselves Shula's first loss was to
Holmgren on Sunday and Holmgren's
firstloss, on opening day, was to Green's
Vikings.
There's one common denominator
running throughthe gang of four youth.
Cowher is 35, Green 42, Homgren 42
and Shula is the baby of the bunch at 33
- the common perception when he got
his job is that it was only because of his
surname.
Add second-year coaches Bill Beli-
chick (39) of Cleveland and Rich
Kotite of Philadelphia (an ancient 50)
and you may have the coaches of the
'90s.
They're also different guys for differ-
ent team: Cowher and Green are gung-
ho motivators: Shula, Holmgren, Beli-
chick and Kotite more the tacticians.
And they have help: Shula from de-
fensive coordinator Ron Lynn, who makes
up for mediocre personnel with an at-
tacking defense, and Kotite from Bud
Carson, 61, the former Cleveland coach,
who gambles less than Buddy Ryan with
just as effective results.
Moreover, the new guys are willing to
disregard inflated reputations.
Green dumped such fixtures as Joey
Browner, Wade Wilson and Keith Mil-
lard and Cowher got rid of Huey
Richardson, last year's No. 1 pick, pre-
ferring to keep Elnardo Webster, aninth-
round pick this year.
"I judge on performance," Cowher
said. "Huey wasn't one of my top 47
guys."


APLaUPhoto
CRYING FOUL - All-Pro defensive lineman Reggie White reacts to a
penalty called against him during a Raiders-Eagles game. White cried foul
Monday when he and two others filed a class-action lawsuit, seeking
"freedom" for about 280 NFL players without a contract after the 1992
season. The suit comes two weeks after a jury in Minneapolis fund for eight
players who brought an antitrust suit against the league.


Colts using bye week to regroup after losses


INDIANAPOLIS (AP) - The Indianapolis Colts
are idle this week, and coach Ted Marchibroda wants
to use the extra time to get everyone healthy again,
particularly quarterbacks Jeff George and Jack Trudeau.
George stretched a ligament in the thumb of his
throwing hand in the third preseason game. He threw
the ball in practice Sept. 16 but apparently felt some
soreness and did not practice the rest of the week.
Trudeau, a preseason holdout who did not play in the
season-opening victory over Cleveland, was hospital-
ized two days last week after bruising his back in a loss
to Houston.
"We go back to the basics at this point," Marchibroda
said Monday. "We've had Jeff out for three games,
and he needs the work, and this also gives Jack more


time to learn the system better."
The only other quarterback on the active roster is
third-stringer Tom Tupa. The Colts signed Jeff Graham
to the practice squad last week, and Marchibroda said
once George is healthy, the third quarterback - pre-
sumably Tupa- would be one of the two designated
inactive players each week, to be used only if the other
two were hurt.
Marchibroda also said there might be some roster
changes before the Oct. 4 game at Tampa Bay.
"There are a couple I'm thinking about, but I have
two weeks to decide, so I don't want to say anything
now,"'Marchibroda said.
The Colts (1-2) are looking for something to kick
start their offense. Through three games, Indianapolis


ranks dead last in the NFL in rushing and next-to-last in
total offense.
The Colts made their worst showing of the young
season in Sunday night's 38-0 shellacking by
Buffalo.
"A good football team beat us, but we contributed to
that defeat ourselves a great deal," Marchibroda said.
"Without question, it was our worst offensive game of
the year."
The Colts are averaging 52.3 rushing yards a game
after netting 37 yards against the Bills. Buffalo's Henry
Jones returned two interceptions for touchdowns, and
defensive end Bruce Smith had 2 1/2 sacks; seven
unassisted tackles - five of which came behind the
line - and four assisted tackles.


AP LawPhoto
Cleveland Browns running back Eric Metcalf (21) showed a flash of his expected potential Sunday
with four touchdowns as the Browns upset the Raiders 28-16.


Metcalf dazzles


after 4 TD show
BEREA, Ohio (AP) - No new wrinkles were added to the
Cleveland Browns' offense last week. No innovative plays
were drawn up designed to vault Eric Metcalf to instant
celebrity.
"We did a lot of things in this game that we've done in a
lot of other games. They just worked out this time," coach
Bill Belichick said Monday, reflecting on Metcalf's four
touchdowns in Sunday's 28-16 victory over the Los Angeles
Raiders.
Metcalf ran for a touchdown and caught passes for three
more, a performance surpassed in Browns' history only by
Dub Jones, who scored six touchdowns against the Bears in
1951, and Jim Brown, who scored five in a 1959 game
against the Colts.
It was the type of big-play game the Browns have hoped
Metcalf could provide ever since they traded up in the 1989
draft to select him 13th overall.
A running back at Texas, his size (5-10, 185 pounds) and
lack ofpower have raised questions about his ability to make
it as a running back in the NFL.
He scored 10 touchdowns as a rookie four of them on
receptions, but his production has dropped off sharply
since, partly because a shoulder injury sidelined him for half
of last season.










16 Tropic Times
S Sept. 25, 1992


Family member attends Citadel


COROZAL (Tropic Times) - It's quite an achieve-
ment to graduate from the Citadel - especially when
it's with honors.
It's even more impressive when the graduates a 10-
year-old Army family member.
While his classmates waded through the surf of the
Panama beaches during their summer break, Eddie
Krynicki, son of Maj. Gary Krynicki, was attending a
two-week summer camp at the prestigious military
college.
Krynicki said when he first decided to go to the
Citadel, he wasn't sure how he would like it.
"I was like-they're going to be real strict," he said.
"I knew we were going to learn sports like soccer, but
I didn't know exactly what it would be like."
Krynicki said he was pleasantly surprised to find the
summer camp was more fun than work.
"One day we would do something like swimming,
sailing and soccer and the next day we'd learn wrestling
and something else," he said.
Of course, the military school did have it's rules. "At
Mark Clark (the school's founder) Hall, they told us
about the seal - that's what they call it, the seal - and
if you stepped on it, you had to get down and scrub it
with a toothbrush. They said it's like stepping on the
president's face."
Of course none of the students were assigned to such
a task, because they heeded the warning, Krynicki said.
It was the Gen. Mark Clark award that Krynicki
found himself bringing back to his Fort Clayton home
after the camp. The award is given to four or five young
men from each section of about 25 boys.
"I wasn't exactly trying to win," he said. "But I
wanted to get it. You have to see how good you are in
sports and they watch your manners at breakfast, lunch


photocourimy Ih Ci4tad
Eddie Krynicki receives the Mark Clark Award from
Lt. Gen. Claudius Watts III, president of the Citadel.
and dinner."
Krynicki said he wants to continue attending sum-
mer camp and someday attend the Citadel for college,
like his father did.
"I thinkkids my age should go," he said. "It's alot of
fun."


CFC campaign begins Thursday


Continued from page 1.
People who want to know who theirkeyperson is can
get the name from the Plan of the Day or on the
computer Local Area Network, Morales said.
The keypersons, project officers, community/area
project officers and numerous logistical support people
provide important volunteer services to help produce a
successful campaign, according to an American Forces
Information Service press release.
The agencies participating in the campaign are de-
scribed in the campaign booklet. The booklet also
includes a breakdown of each organization's admini-
stration and fund-raising costs. This booklet will be
distributed to all federal and military people by CFC
campaign officers.
The booklet also lists information about how to
designate a contribution, the different ways a person
can give, how the contributions are distributed, a sample
contributor's card and the recognition program and the
Gold and Silver Eagle awards.
One of the easiest and most popular ways to contrib-
ute is through payroll deduction, officials said.
The contributor acknowledgement form is a screened
area at the bottom of the contributor's card.
Those who want their names and addresses released
to the agencies they designate must complete this
portion of the card.
This fall, there will be more agencies and federations
to choose from than ever before. Contributors will be
able to give to any of 778 national agencies and 11
federations.


The office of personnel management added three
new federations to the campaign: the World Service
Organizations of America, Children's Charities of
America and the National Black United Federation of
Charities.
These federations were added to the federations that
have been part of the Combined Federal Campaign -
Overseas for many years, which are the International
Service Agencies - Overseas, American Red Cross,
National/United Service Agencies, Earth Share,
USO, United Way of America, National Voluntary
Health Agencies and the Independent Charities of
America.
In addition to the agencies and federations that
benefit from this campaign, U.S. service members and
their families also benefit.
Up to six percent of the money raised during the
campaign will be returned to support overseas family
support and youth activities programs.
The amount returned to support these local pro-
grams is based upon total contributions raised in the
campaign by the military installation, activity or com-
munity.
Last year, Department of Defense people serving
overseas donated more than $10 million.
More than 94 cents of every dollar donated in
the campaign went directly to those who needed
help.
This year, the principal combined fund organization,
appointed each year by DoD to administer the overseas
campaign, is a partnership between the National Volun-
tary Health Agencies and the American Red Cross.


AMC fee increases
COROZAL (Tropic Times) - The fee to travel
space available on military flights will increase
from $10 to $15 Thursday to cover cost increases
in fuel, administration and other areas of the Air
Mobility Command according to AMC officials.
The current fee was set in 1979, when fees for
traveling space available were first charged, offi-
cials said.

Tops in Blue arrive
HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA) - The Air Force
variety show Tops in Blue will offer two free
shows at the Howard AFB theater Thursday and
Oct. 2 at 7:30 p.m.
The 90-minute show tours Air Force bases world-
wide. For more information, call 284-6109.

Health fairs planned
COROZAL (Tropic Times) - The U.S. Southern
Command Health Promotion office recently teamed
up with Department of Defense Dependent School
system health officials to kick of a series of health
fairs in Panama schools under the Fit to Win
program.
The fairs "consist of different learning areas
that involve good nutrition, fitness and health
issues," said Virginia Smith, health promotion
specialist.
Each school created a health fair committee
composed of school nurses, physical education
teachers, classroom teachers and parents to teach
the children about health concerns, Smith said.
While each school is approaching the fair dif-
ferently, the overall concept will be the same,
Smith said.
The committees will have booths dealing with
subjects like nutrition, tobacco use, grooming,
dental care, flexibility and even an entomology
booth that will talk about the dangers of African-
ized bees, she said.
For the elementary schools, special programs
like puppet shows on healthy snacks, visits by
McGruff and ambulance tours will round out the
program.
High school students will see a wrecked car and
hear about the dangers of drunk driving, Smith
said.
The program is part of an overall plan to teach
DoDDS students about all facets of health.
"Usually, the students have health classes be-
fore and after the fair, with this just being apart of
the learning experience for them," she said.
Smith said the program wouldn't have been
possible if it weren't for the organizations and
individuals who volunteered for the program.
Any parents who wouldliketo volunteer forthe
health fair programs should contact their child's
school nurse for information, Smith said.

Schedule
Howard Elementary Tuesday
Balboa High School Oct. 15-16
Curundu Jr. High Oct. 27-29
Diablo Elementary Nov. 19
Cristobal High School Dec. 3
Curundu Elementary Jan. 13-14
Fort Clayton Elementary Feb. 25-26
Balboa Elementary March 18
Fort Gullick/Fort Davis March 25
Los Rios Elementary April 22
Fort Kobbe May 13


DEH, preventive medicine address lead paint


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -
Old layers of paint cracking and peeling
off the wall may be no more than an
unsightly inconvenience. But, what you
can't see, can hurt you, especially when
that unseen hazard is lead.
Recent medical studies indicate that
even small amounts of lead in children
may adversely affect their health. Subtle
decreases in mental ability, behavioral
changes, hearing problems and growth
retardation have been associated with
chronic low-level lead exposure, accord-
ing to the U.S. Center for Disease Con-
trol.
To ensure the safety of families in
Panama, the Directorate of Engineering
and Housing monitors the health hazards
caused by exposure to lead-based paint.


During the past six months, more than
500 samples from 120 family housing
quarters have been taken and analyzed
for lead content, said Daniel Muschett,
DEH environmental officer. Testing is
also performed on administrative build-
ings to find areas with high levels oflead
and begin programs to reduce the hazard
for children and adults.
Common sources of lead exposure in
children include eating lead paint par-
ticles, exposure to exhaust from cars that
use leaded gasoline and consumption of
water contaminated by lead-soldered pipes,
said Maj. William Candler, chief of pre-
ventive medicine. In most places, how-
ever, the most common source is lead
paint, Candler said.
Virtually all family housing units built


before 1950, in both U.S. Army South
and the U.S., have coats of paint contain-
ing lead, Muschett said. An undisturbed
wall that contains lead paint is not a
health hazard.
Lead-based paint is only a hazard if
eaten, or if paint dust containing high
amounts of lead is inhaled, Candler said.
U.S. Army Engineering and Housing
Support Center and the U.S. Department
of Housing and Urban Development
guidance requires that a Lead Exposure
Risk Assessment be conducted for
USARSO housing areas.
Before work begins, engineers deter-
mine the scope of work and the best way
to fix the problem.
Then repair work is scheduled and
housing residents informed. Residents


might be asked to stay out of certain
rooms or move into temporary quarters
that will be provided if necessary, Muschett
said.
The problem is usually fixed in one of
three ways: enclosure, encapsulation, or
removal. Enclosure involves sealing off
the contaminated area, but also prevents
that area from being used by occupants.
Encapsulation is presently being used
in Cocoli Housing Area, which involves
coating and sealing surfaces with spe-
cially developed coatings that are resis-
tant to cracking, peeling and deteriora-
tion by algae and fungi, Muschett said.
Gorgas Army Community Hospital
provides lead screening through the Well
Baby Clinic, Candler said. For informa-
tion, call 282-5419.










Tropictivitie


Sept. 25, 1992 An entertainment guide for the U.S. co


Page B 1


Navy MWR photo by Monique Chefe
Hannia Woodman (left) and Nathan Cohen get a survival lesson from Eco-Tour guide Rich Cahil on Barro Colorado Island. See story, photos page B5.

Movie Car Inside
Batman Returns at Howard Prelude shows Honda cares TV.......................................B3
Monday. See page B2. about quality. See page B9. CPO........................................ B9
Ads.................................... ...... B10


mim A-mm












B2Tropic Times
B Sept. 25, 1992 Movies

Movies


HOWARD
Today
7pm Cool World (PG-13) Kim Basinger, Gabriel Byrne
9 pm Sister Act (PG-13) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie
Smith


2pm

6:30pm

8:50pm


2pm

6:30pm

8:30pm


7pm

9:20pm


Saturday
Honey, I Blew Up the Kid (PG) Rick Moranis,
Marcia Strassman
Batman Returns (PG-13) Michael Keaton, Danny
DeVito, Michelle Pfeiffer
Universal Soldier (R) Jean Claude Van Damme,
DolphLundgren
Sunday
Honey, I Blew Up the Kid (PG) Rick Moranis,
Marcia Strassman
Honey, I Blew Up the Kid (PG) Rick Moranis,
Marcia Strassman
Universal Soldier (R) Jean Claude Van Damme,
DolphLundgren
Monday
Batman Returns (PG-13) Michael Keaton, Danny
DeVito, Michelle Pfeiffer
Man Trouble (PG-13) Jack Nicholson, Ellen
Barkin


Tuesday
7pm Honey, I Blew Up the Kid (PG) Rick Moranis,
Marcia Strassman
9pm Universal Soldier (R) Jean Claude Van Damme,
DolphLundgren
Wednesday
7pm Batman Returns (PG-13) Michael Keaton, Danny
DeVito, Michelle Pfeiffer
9:20pm Man Trouble (PG-13) Jack Nicholson, Ellen
Barkin
Thursday
7pm Man Trouble (PG-13) Jack Nicholson, Ellen
Barkin
9pm Batman Returns (PG-13) Michael Keaton, Danny
DeVito, Michelle Pfeiffer
Oct. 2
7pm Man Trouble (PG-13) Jack Nicholson, Ellen
Barkin
9pm Batman Return (PG-13) Michael Keaton, Danny
DeVito, Michelle Pfeiffer

CLAYTON
Today
7pm Housesitter (PG) Goldie Hawn, Steve Martin
9 pm Housesitter (PG) Goldie Hawn, Steve Martin
Saturday
2pm Mom And Dad Save The World (PG) Teri Garr,
Jeffrey Jones
6:30pm Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith
8:30pm Boomerang - Eddie Murphy, Robin Givens
Sunday
2pm Mom And Dad Save The World (PG) Teri Garr,
Jeffrey Jones
6:30pm Cool World (PG-13) Kim Basinger, Gabriel Byrne
8:30pm Boomerang - Eddie Murphy, Robin Givens
Monday
7pm Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie
Smith
9pm Lethal Weapon 3 - Mel Gibson, Danny Glover
Tuesday
7pm Cool World (PG-13) Kim Basinger, Gabriel Byme
9pm Boomerang - Eddie Murphy, Robin Givens
Wednesday
7pm Mom And Dad Save The World (PG) Teri Garr,
Jeffrey Jones
9pm Lethal Weapon 3 - Mel Gibson, Danny Glover


7pmr

7pm

6:30pm
8:30pm

7pm

7pm


Thursday
Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith
Boomerang - Eddie Murphy, Robin Givens
Oct.,2
Cool World (PG-13)Kim Basinger, Gabriel Byrne
Sister Act (PG)yWhoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith


DAVIS
Today
Folks (PG-13) Tom Selleck, Don Ameche
Saturday
Alien 3 (R) Sigourney Weaver, Charles Dutton
Sunday
Pinocchio (G) Animated
Pinocchio (G) Animated
Monday
Housesitter (PG) Goldie Hawn, Steve Martin
Tuesday
ACES: Iron Eagle III (R) Louis Gossett Jr., Horst
Buccholz


Wednesday
9pm Housesitter (PG) Goldie Hawn, Steve Martin
Thursday
7pm ACES: Iron Eagle III (R) Louis Gossett Jr., Horst
Buccholz
Oct. 2
7pm Housesitter (PG) Goldie Hawn, Steve Martin


7pm

7pm


SHERMAN
Today
Patriot Games (R) Harrison Ford, Anne Archer
-Saturday
The Cutting Edge (PG) D.B. Sweeney, Moira
Kelly


Sunday
7pm Thunderheart (R) Val Kilmer, Graham Greene
Thursday
7pm Wild Orchid II (R) Wendy Hughes, Tom Skerritt
Oct. 2
7pm Folks (PG-13) Tom Selleck, Don Ameche


AMADOR
Today
7pm Year Of The Comet (PG-13) Penelope Ann
Miller, Tim Daly
Saturday
7pm Patriot Games (R) Harrison Ford, Anne Archer
Sunday
7pm Batman Returns (PG-13) Michael Keaton, Danny
DeVito, Michelle Pfeiffer
Thursday
7pm Femgully: The Last Rainforest (G) Animated
Oct. 2
7pm Patriot Games (R) Harrison Ford, Arm Archer


Now showing


__ Howard Theater Saturday, Monday, Wednesday and Thursday I


Club calendar


Club Amador
Reservations: 282-4025, 282-3837/3534. Lunch:
Tues.-Fri., ll1:30am-lpm. La Concha Restaurant:
Tues.-Sat., 6-10pm; Bridge Lounge: Tues-Thurs.,
5-10pm; Fri., social hour, 5pmn-midnight; Sat., 6pm-
midnight; punch brunch for children, first Sun. each
month, 10:30am-1:30pm. Champagne brunch,
Sun., 10:30am-1:30pm. Beef & burgundy, Tues., 6-
10pm; pasta pizazz, Wed., 6-9pm; Mongolian
BBQ, Thurs., 6-9pm. Bingo: Tues.&Wed., 7pm.
Howard Enlisted Members' Club
Building 710, 284-4189/5832. Cashier's cage:
Sun.-Thurs., 9am-9pm; Fri.&Sat., 9am-llpm; holi-
days, 4-9pm. Dining: Casual Cove/Tropical
Breezeway, Mon.-Fri., 6-30-9am, 11am-11pm,
Fri.&Sat., until lam. Dining room closed for reno-
vation, members may dine at Howard O'Club Mon.-
Sat.Ballroom: variety disco Sun., Tues.,Thurs., Fri.,
Sat. 8pm-midnight. Casual Cove: variety disco
Wed.,:8pm-midnight, country&western Tues.&Fri.
8pm-midnight, rock&roll, 8pm-lam. Main lounge:
Fri.&Sat., 5:30pm-midnight, Wed., 5:30-10pm.
Social hour: Mon.,Wed.&Fri.,reduced price drinks.
Bingo: Sun., 2pm; Wed., 7pm; bar bingo, Mon.-Fri.,
5-6:30;m
Howard O'Club
Building 707,284-3089. Cashier's cage: Mon.-Fri.,
1Oam-lpm. Dining: Lunch, Mon.-Fri., llam-lpm.
Full menu Tues., Fri., Sat., and mini-menu Mon.,
Wed., Thurs., 6-9pm. Thurs., tacos. Fri.&Sat.,prime
rib/seafood. Dining open to Enlisted Club Me-


members while enlisted Dining Room under renova-
tion. Disco: Fri., 7pm-midnight. Lounge: Mon.-
Thurs., 4-9pm, Fri., 4pm-midnight, Sat., 6-9pm.
Social hour: Fri. 5-6pm. Bingo: Wed., 6pm. Closed
Sun.,&holidays.
Top Three Lounge
Building 707,284-3089. Open: Mon.-Thurs., 4-10
pm, Fri., 4pm-lam, Sat., 5-11lpm, Sun.&holidays,
closed. Social hour: Mon.&Fri., 4:30-6pm.
Albrook Club
Building 13, 286-4128/3547. Cashier's cage:
Mon.-Fri., llam-1:30pm. Mon., Thurs., Fri., 2-
4:30pm, Wed., 2:30-4:30pm. Dining: Lunch,
Slam-lpm. Dinner: Mon., Wed.,Thurs., 6-8:30pm,
Fri.-Sat., 6-9pm. Sun., champagne brunck, 10am-
1pm. Mon., MongolianBBQ.Thurs., Mexican. Fri.,
prime rib/seafood. Sat., steak. Italian 2nd/4th Wed.
each month; mini-gourmet, lst/3rd Wed. each
month. Tues., dining room closed, bar menu avail-
able in lounge. Disco, Fri., 8pm-lam. Loungeopen:
Mon.-Thurs., 4:30-10pm; Fri., 4:30pm-lam; Sat.,
5:30pm-midnight. Social hour: Fri., 4-6pm. Closed
1st Tues. each month at 2pm. Flea market 1st Sun.
each month, 9am-4pm. Texas BBQ last Sat. each
month 6:30-9pm, country&western dancing until
lam.
STRAC Club
Mon.-Wed., 4:30-10pm. Thurs., 4:30-midnight,
oldies and classic rock. Fri., TGIF, 4:30pm-lam.
Sat., 4:30pm-midnight, variety music, free pizza.
Call 286-3511.


Quarry Heights O'Club
282-4380/3439. Breakfast Mon.-Fri., 6:30-8:30am,
Sat., 8-10am. Lunch: Mon.-Fri., 11:30am-lpm.
Dinner. Tues.-Thurs. 6-9pm; Fri.-Sat. 8-10pm. Bar
lounge: Tues.-Fri.,4-10pm; Sat. 6-10pm; Fri., social
hour, 4-7pm.
CPO Club
Open to E-7 through E-9, civilians NM-6 and above,
and family members. Call 283-5475. Lunch: Mon.-
Fri., lam-lpm, all-you-can-eat buffet; Sat., grill
open, noon-4pm. Dinner: Fri.&SaL, 6-9pm. Social
hour: Wed.&Fri, 4pm, complimentary snacks.
Anchorage Club
Open to all ranks. Call 283-4332/3040. Breakfast:
Mon.-Fri., 6:30-9:30am Sat, 8-10:30am. Lunch:
Mon.-Fri., llam-1:30pm. Dinner. Mon.-Fri., 6-
9pm, a la carte dining. Grill: Mon.-Sat., 11-1:30pm;
Sun.&hoL, 3:30-9:30pm. Pizza&fried chicken to
go, 5-9pm daily. Bingo, Mon., 5:30pm, special
menu. Family night, Tues., 5:30-9pm. Social hour,
Wed.,4-6pm. Country&western night, steak dinner,
Wed., 6-9pm. All-you-can-eat taco night, Thurs.
Bar hours: Tues.-Fri., 4-1 1pm; Fri.&Sat.,4pm-mid-
night; Sun.&hol., 3:30-10pm.

Rodman Officers' Club
Open to officers, warrant officers, civilians grade
NM-7 and above, and family members. Call 283-
4498. Lunch: Mon.-Fri., llam-1:30pm. Dinner.
Sun.-Thurs., 6-8:30pm.; Fri.&Sat., 6-9:30pm. Din-


ing room bar open, 4-9pm. Laguna Lounge open
Mon., Wed. and Fri., 4-lOpm, complimentary
snacks. Pool bar: Mon.-Thurs., noon-6pm; Fri.,
noon-8pm; Sat.&Sun., 10am-6pm. Thurs: steak-by-
the-ounce; Fri.&Sat., prime rib.
Acey-Deucey Club
Open to E-5 through E-6 Mon., Wed.&Fri., 5-10pm
only. Call 283-4332.
Clayton NCO Club
287-4343/4716/5692. Main corral: Mon.-Thurs., 7-
llpm; Fri.-Sat., 7pm-2am; Sun., 1-11:30pm. Fo-
rum: Tues., steak night, 5-9pm; Wed., international
buffet, 5-9pm; Thurs., ladies night, 5-9pm; Fri.-Sat.,
fine dining, 4:30-10pm; entertainment, 9pm-2am.
Bingo: Sun., 2-5pm; Tues., 6-10pm. The Under-
ground: Mon.-Thurs., 4:30-llpm; Fri., 5pm-2am;
Sat., lpm-2am. Midnight buffet: Wed., Fri., Sat.,
lOpm-1:30am. Casa Maria, Mon.-Sun., 5-10pm.
Davis Community Club
289-3289/5160. Breakfast Mon.-Fri., 6:30-9am.
Lunch: Mon.-Fri., ll1:30am-lpm. Dinner:
Wed.&Thurs., 6-9pm; Fri.&SaL, 6-10pm. Brunch:
Sun., 10:30am-1:30pm. Bingo: Sun., 3-6pm.
Red Door Club
287-4343.Mon.,progressive music, 7-10pm. Tues.,
special night, 7-11pm. Wed., oldies, 7-11pm.
Thurs., ladies night, 7-lOpm. Fri., social hour, pro-
gressive music, 7pm-midnight. Sat., rock 'n roll,
7pm-midnight.











Tropic Times
*TV Schedule S,1B3



Channels 8 & 10

Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Oct. 2

5:30m NBC New atSunBdi 6:30 am Headli News 6:00amHomrotPower 5:30m NBC New Su :30m NBCe 5:300, NBC New m n 5:30mNBC Newm atSundie :30m NBCNew aSumie 5:30:m NBC New a Suiud
6:00 GoodMomnig Amrdca 7:00 CamlroaMadne 6:30 Volice of Faith 6;00 Good Morning Amerca 6:00 GoodMomrningAmerica 6:00 Good Moring Ameca 6:00 Good Morning Amer9c 6:00 OoodMomrnng Amne ia
8:00 Bodyby Jako 7:30 Navy New ThaWek 7:00 Studio7 8:00 Bodyby Jake 8:00 BodybyJake 8:00 Bodyby Jak 8:00 Bodyby Jke 8:00 Body by Jakk
8:30 SesmeStret 8:300CatomoCarer 7:30 The700Cub 8:30 Seumertmet 8:30 Sesmtreet 8:30 ScmmoStrat 8:30 SesmneStmet 8:30 SeameStreet
9:30 KidaIcorporated 8:30 JuasForKidal 8:00 CBS Sunday Morning 9:30 Family Duble Dar 9:30 SlverSpoone 9:30 BackToTheFuture 9:30 SilverSpoons 9:30 Kids hIcoporated
10:00 CNNNewaro WoodyWoopecker 9:30 FaceThe Nion 10:00 CNN Newarocm 10:00 CNNNewaromn 10:00 CNNNowarom 10:00 CNNNewmuo 10:00 CNNNmwno=m
10:15 HeadloNeews Break Blikit 10:00 MetgThoPnes 10:15 ILoveLucy 10:15 Headle Newa Break 10:15 HeadlineNew sBreak 10:15 HeadlnNew. Break 10:15 HeadleNewsBreak
10:30 ILoveLucy BackToThoPuture 10:30 ThisWeek w/David Bri- 11:00 WhcolPorune 10:30 ILoveLucy 10:30 ILoveLucy 10:30 ILoveLocy 10:30 ILoveLocy
11:00 WbedofForame SuperPdn& kley 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:00 WbeeofFortune 11:00 WbldoafFornmo 11:00 Whe lfPorrune 11:00 WboedoForomo
11:30 ShowbizToday 10:30 HeadlineNews 11:30 HeadllueNews Noan Headlne News Break 11:30 ShowBizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 SowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizTody
No HeadieNew Bk 11:00 This Week In Baseball No NFL Foodall: hargea 1220 SCNMidday Report Now Headline NewBrak No Headle News Break No HeadlieNoew Brk NoM HeadlineNewBreak
1220 SCNMiddayRqpow 11:30 CFAPFootba Mlou d vs.Hmtaon 12:30 SposMachine 12:20 SCNMiddayRqpoa 12:20 SCNMiddayRepoz 12:20 CN MiddayReport 1220 SCNMiddayRepost
12:30 SpmLat-udght V. tndian 3:00 Both bSki w/Ile 1:00 AntherWodd 12:30 SportsLaelght 12:30 SporsLtenight 12:30 SpontLAeighb 12.30 Sporta Ltenlght
1:00 AnotherWadd 2:30pmuidoutheNFL Jacksb 2:00 OprahWinfry 1:00 AnotharWadd 1:00 AnotherWodd 1:00 AnabtherWod . 1:00 AnoherWordd
2:00 OprilWinbayf 3:30 Specil:TheDaiytooer- 3:30 Ebony JetSbowcm 3:00 NkikAmaim 2:00 Donahu 2:00 OpnhWintey 2:00 DoUimh 2:00 OprabWinfiey
3:00 ThinkFPti natil Atr Show 4:00 StarTrek 3:30 PdcolsRight 3:00 SquareOneTV 3:00 FihtBackl 3:00 FanmilyDoubsDre 3:00 ThinkFurl
325 Pdice bRight 4:30 Todqh'srOomet 5:00 HemelineNews 425 OGudingLiht 3:30 Price IsRibt 3:30 Pricoe I eight 3:30 Price IsRigh 325 PicoIs Right
4:25 GuidlgLUght 5:00 SoulTrain 5:30 OnStage 5:15 Genral Hspital 425 GulidingLght 425 GuidingLight 4:25 GuidingLight 4:25 GudingLight
5:15 GeneralHaq)lpa 6:00 HealineNew. 6:00 SuipaatsUofWreatllg 6:00 SCNBva&gRqpot 5:15 Omneram spital 5:15 OmnralHopital 5:15 Omnra Hpidta 5:15 OenralHoyital
600 SCNBvainRegRpo 6:30 CPAFoelbal: Cloanmvs. 7:00 S retstmima 6:30 WaddNewsTonight 6:00 SCNlvuinfgRepo 6:00 SCNEvmingRepon 6:00 SCNBvenigRepon 6:00 SCNBveningReport
6:30 WaddNewaTonight GeoriaTech 8:00 Movie "Manmldd" 7:00 Jeopudyl 6:30 WaddNewmTonight 6.30 WaddNewdToight 6:30 HeadlineNewsBreak 6:30 WoddNewsTonight
7:00 Jioopmyl 9:30 Videoinks 10:00 BntearainmmtTlbiWeak 7:30 uadie& Company 7:00 JopadyIl 7:00 Jeopaudyl 6:45 CPAPFoeball:Floriddav. 7:00 Jeopnldyl
730 Speci:"RockThi 10:00 HeadlineNew 11:00 "elCaeaofSh dock 8:00 Tadi 7:30 FdlOGy 7:30 SdimcaATechnology MissipplSt. 7:30 Speclal:"COaumbus:
Vae" 10:30 SaudayNightLive Holmns 8:30 60Mlnutes 8:00 48Homa 8:00 SpectalCountryMusic 10:00 Btat minmnTodgbt Coblnb sWodd"
8:30 PdmrTIneLive Mlkidals ridy Night Video Mldgl Buwine waodd 9:30 Eveng New 930 CBS Evming News Amaocia on Awadls 10:30 SCN NewsUpdate 8:30 PriDmTime Live
10.30 HoedlineNws 1:00m Movie:"Wbo'lAhfid 12:30 HeadlneNews 10:00 BaS nmeau Tonlght 10:00 Bntaldnmnt Tonight, 11:00 tsnlmtTonlght 10:35 ToTlotbhhow 10:30 HeadlineNews
11:00 BStaertmnatTonlght atVigivlaWod" 1:00 FiringLine 10:30 SCNNewsUpdate 10.30 3CN News Update 11:30 SC News Update 11:35 Latnightw/LLtamnan 11:00 Bteratinamnt Tonlght
11:30 SCNNewaUpdat 3:10 Movie'RobinndMadln 1:30 SpoIrtMsctne 10:35 TonightShow 10:35 TouightShow 11:35 ToolghtShow 1235mnNightline 11:30 SCNNwsBUpdate
10-35 Tonight Show 5:00 HeadlfeNews 2:00 CNN Caontes 11:35 Lamightw/LAtemanm 11:35 LeanightwLatenam 11:35 Lat1nightw/Ltammm 1:05 InsidePolitic '92 10:35 Toonibt Show
11:35 Latldghtw/LAetmm 5:30 HamilikeNewmBreak 3:00 HeadlineNews 12:35amNightllne 12:35mrNigbhine 12:35amNightlline 130 SposTonight 11:35 LTenlgigw/Lattean
12:35amNightline 3:30 CNNWaddRepot 1:05 InsidePolltics 92 1:05 IdaldePolti '92 1:05 hIidePolitics'92 2:00 AeonioHall 12:35amNilghtlin
1:05 Movie'Utbba 5:00 HeadlieNewsBreak 1:30 SpomuLaelght 1:35 SpormtTmght 1:30 SportsTight 3:00 TonlghtShow 1:05 Movie:'PFflr"
Cowboy" 2:00 AnanioHall 2:00 AsacioHall 2:00 AatoloHia 4:00 Ltenightw/Ltarmm 2:45 Movi: "Whaie"
3:40 Movio: "Samachng 3:00 ToightShow 3:00 ToolghtShow 3:00 TonightShow 5:00 HeadlineNews 4:25 Movie: "Conquet of
W1d" 4:00 Iatolghtw/Lattnmin 4:00 Lgunightw/LL1tmnna 4:00 Laenlghtw/Leatomnn 5:00 HeadlineNewsBreak thboPlmetofTbhApes"
5:30 HeadlkeNews 5:00 HeadlinoNowsBreak 5:00 HeadlinoNewsBreak 5:00 HeadlimNowaBreak 6:00 Headlin NowsBreak
6:00 Headlio News Bmak




Cable Channel 14

Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Oct. 2

5:30m NBCNewr ai Surin 6:30amSimuilcaowith Canels 6:OanmSupeotfieds 5:30am NBC News at Suai 5:30am NBC Nmew atSaude S:30m NNBC Newa atSunise 8& 10 5:30mm NBCNewa Sumndae
6:00 GoodlMoringAmerica 8& 10 6:30 MqapetBab.ie 6:00 GoodMorningAmerica 6:00 GoodMConingAmdeSca 6:00 GoodMomingrAmedca 5:30m NBC News atSmdae 6:00 GoodMoming Amcrca
8:00 MuppetBabiol 10:30 PamdlyThetr"The 7:00 MickeyandDonald 8:00 Mickey and Doald 8:00 WinnicthePooh 8:00 TeengeMutatNinja 6:00 GoodMomingAmerica 8:00 MuppetBabis
8:30 LambChop'sPlayAlmong hzd" 7.25 WinnicthePooh 8:30 BacktotheFumre 8:30 CqmtainPlmnt Intles 8:00 Widget 8:30 Lamb Chop'sPlayAlong
9:00 Today 12:l0pinHeadlineNews Break 7:50 LampChop 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 8:30 FamllyDoubleDare 8:30 Square OneTV 9:00 Today
11:00 OprahWinfreyShow 12:30 AmericOmGladito 820 Widget 11:00 OprehWinfreyShow 11:00 Donahue 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 11:00 OprAhWintfyShow
Non HeadlkieNew Break 1:30 MotorWeek 8:40 BackToTheFutms Noon HeadlieNews Noon HeadineNews 11:00 OprhWinftryShow 11:00 Donahuo Noon HeadlineNewBreak
12:20 SCNMiddayRepo 2:00 Bueball:NewYorkv. 9:05 NinjaTmtle 12:20 SCNMidddayReport 1220 SCMiddayReport Noon HeadlinNewmBreak Noon HadlineNew.Break 1220 SCNMiddayRepon
12:30 ABMyChildren Pitutbghor Chicagov. 9:30 CptainPlnet 12:30 AllMyChildim 12:30 AnMyChildrn 12:20 SCNMiddayRpoat 12:20 SCNMiddayRcpon 12:30 AIlMyChildr
1:30 OnlUfeatoLive Montreal 10:00 Mveidck 1:30 OneLifeToLivo 1:30 OnolifetoLive. 12:30 AllMyCChfldrm 12:30 AllMy Childrm 1;30 OneLifetoLve
2:30 The Young adRestlea 5:30 OnPitRoad 11:00 StarTrek 2:30 The Youngm dRales 2:30 The Young ad Realsam 1:30 One Ufa toLive 1:30 OneLifetoLive 2:30 The Young ind Rtlss
3:30 SesimeSteet 6:00 CNNHeadlieNws Noon CNNHecadeNewm 3:30 SeoStree 3:30 SesameStreet 2:30 The Young dRestlems 2:30 The Young adReslme 3:30 SsmuStreet
4:30 KidIncoipoated 6:00 WhyAnAnny? 12:15 Movie:"TheOGro Is 4:30 SavedByTh Bell 4:30 ThinkFutl 3:30 SemeSureet 3:30 SeumSetreet 4:30 Kid Incoxporated
4:55 CNNNewroonm 6:30 Dinomaurm Grenu" 4:55 OSamelOne 4:55 C ilndOne 4:30 ScholustcSpoatsAmridca 4:30 LeavoetToBeaver 4:55 ChadelOne
5:10 AfterSchoolSpecial 7:00 StarTnk:The Next 2:00 MagicalWordlafDlmuy 5:10 AfterSchoolSpecial 5:10 AiterSchoolSpecial 4:55 MaueldOne 4:55 ChancelOne 5:10 AfterSchoolSpecial
6:00 SCNBvaningRlpot Generation 3:00 FootballSteelmnva. 6:00 SCNEvmingReport 6:00 SCNBvaing Rcpon 5:10 AfterSchoeSpecial 5:10 AfterScholSpecial 6:00 SCNEveningRepor
6:30 NBCNightlyNews 8:00 MardedWithChildrm Packe 6:30 NBCNightlyNews 6:30 NBCNghtlyNews 6:00 SCNEBvmingRepom 6:00 SCNEBv ing Report 6:30 NBCNighlyNews
7:00 EmptyNtat 8:30 Rosemne 6:00 CNNHeadlineoNew 7:00 MacGrudcerLoud 7:00 Amretica'Funntit 6:30 NBCNightlyNews 6:30 NBCNightlyNcws 7:00 EmptyNowst
7:30 PrehPrinceOfBelAir 9:00 Cops 6:30 ThIWooderYearm 8:00 Footbal: Ridammvs. Homa Videos 7:00 FulnHouse 7:00 PerfecStramnge 7:30 FPreihPnceOfBalAir
8:00 Murphy Bown 9:30 Videollks 7:00 Football:49cnvs.Saint Ciefs 7:30 Homelmprovemmt 7:30 OoMmldOifd 7:30 PamilyMateo 8:00 MurphyBrown
8:30 NightCou 10:30 SatudayNightLive 10:00 BeverlyHli90210 11:00 CNNHeadlineNews 8:00 L-A.Law 8:00 MmderSheWrote 8:00 TheEqualizer 8:30 NightCout
9:00 QuarumLemp MidnightScience&Technology 11:00 60Minute. 11:30 SCNLae Night Update 9:00 FalconCrest 9:00 Sistes 9:00 Knot'sLanding 9:00 QuintumLeap
10:00 CNN-HeadlineNews 12�30 HeallkneNews Midnight Simlcst withChm- 11:35 AnurioHall 10:00 CNNHeadlineNew 10:00 CNNHealineNews 10:00 CNNHeiadi eNew 10:00 CNNHeadli-eNew
10:30 SCNLaeNkeUpdte . 1:00 McLaughlin Group nel8&10 12:35amrSimulc.twithChamnamb 10:30 SCNLateNkeUpdate 10:30 S La Nke Update 10:30 SCN L Nee Update 10:30 SCNLaeNiteUpdate
10:35 AnmtioHall 1:30 SporntLatenght 8&10 10:35 ArsenioHall 10:35 AemioHa]l 10:35 Aneto Hall 10:35 AntoioHall
11:35 DavidLeumenm 2:00 EnnimuisatThisWeek 11:35 DtlidLeaemmn 11:35 Davidklcatenn 11:35 DavidLefemmn 11:35 DavidLeatemoa
12:35amNightline 3:00 SamnlayNightLive 12:35mnSimnulcastwilhChma- 12:35amSimulcatwithChanCnel 12:35amSimulcamtwUthcmn- 12:35amNightline
1:05 WoddwideUpdate 4:30 Both Side w/Jeeio neo 8&10 l 8 & 10 1:05 WoddwideUpdate
1:30 Sports Ltenight Jacks 1:30 SportsLTe ight
2:00 AaeioHall 5:00 HealineNews 2:00 AmnioHlHal
3:00 Larry King Livel 5:30 HeadlineNews 3:00 TonightShow
4:00 CNN HeadlineNew 4:00 Latright
4:30 CNNCromsfire 5:00 Videolinks
5:00 Videolinks 6:00 HeadlineNewsBreak
6:00 HeadlinNews Break


Channels 8 & 10

SPECIALS

Dayton International Air Show
Saturday, 3:30 p.m.
Enjoy a day of chills and thrills at the air show as acts
such as the U.S. Army's elite parachute team, The
Golden Knights, the Navy's amazing Blue Angels and flying teams V
from around the world gather at America's premiere aviation event.

Country Music Association Awards
Wednesday, 8 p.m.
The biggest names from Nashville and the Country Music Association gather
for this annual gala event. Vince Gill and Reba McEntire host the event.


MOVIES


Cable Channel 14

SPECIALS

Sports: NFL Football/Major League Baseball

Saturday
New York vs. Pittsburgh or Chicago vs. Montreal - 2:30 p.m.
S Sunday

Steelers vs. Packers - 3 p.m.
49ers vs. Saints - 7 p.m.
Monday Night Football
Chiefs vs. Raiders, 8 p.m.


NEW SERIES


Widget
Mermaids - PG-13 Thursdays, 8 a.m.
Sunday, 8 p.m. He's back. Widget the World Watcher is back to continue his mission of
Set in New England in the early '60s, a saucy, sexy single mother of two provides protecting the Earth's environment.
her older daughter who wants to be a nun, with no end of embarrassment as the
teenager tries to deal with her own sexual awakening. Stars Cher, Winona Ryder, MOVIES
Michael Schoeffling and Bob Hoskins.


ALL NIGHT MOVIE BLOCKS


The Wizard - PG
Saturday, 10:30 a.m.
A young man named Corey, his traumatized video game-wizard brother and their


Urban Cowboy - PG friend are pursued across the Southwest by various relatives and other grownups.
Today, 1:05 a.m. Stars Fred Savage, Luke Edwards, Jenny Lewis, Beau Bridges, Christian Slater.
A young Texas farmer comes to Houton to work in a refinery and learns about the
incredible honky-tonk named Gilley's with its easy women, macho ambiance and The Grass Is Greener - G
mechanical bull. Sunday, 12:15 p.m.
Something Wild - R AnAmerican millionaireinvades the private chambers ofa straight-laced English
Today, 3:40 a.m. Earl's mansion and falls in love with the lady of the house. Stars Robert Mitchum,
A businessman accepts a lift from a flaky, sexy girl and his life turns inside out. Deborah Kerr, Cary Grant and Jean Simmons.









B 4 Tropic Times
T Sept. 25, 1992


HONDA



Prelude Si


Quality control is superb

by Zane Binder
King Features Syndicate

Among youthful enthusiasts cars, such as the Old-
smobile Achieva, Nissan 240SX, Toyota Celica, and
Chevrolet Cavalier Z24 count substantial followings.
Honda's entry in this sport class is the new for '92
Prelude, the fourth North American generation to carry
the nameplate. It's a well-built vehicle of about the
same dimensions as last year. It offers contemporary
styling and a much more rigid body, but needs refine-
ment to match the stellar sophistication of the previous
generation.
Hondas have always been known for space utiliza-
tion and interior designs others widely copy. The new
Prelude Si (the top of the line) is a departure from
tradition: it's not easy to climb into the front seats
because of the leg-intrusive underdash design and large
side seat bolsters. The rear bench offers so little knee
room, no one can use it. A large center console divides
the twin front cloth buckets; it actually extends to the
rear seat. It's handy, but for some reason doesn't in-
clude a cupholder. The dash design is a strange combi-
nation of analog and digital instruments; worse, some
are placed on the passenger side. Controls such as the


', '.:: ,. .


7'
L. S3..~


standard power door locks and power windows don't
readily "fall to hand"; the built-in tilt steering column
has limited adjustment range, too. The trunk is surpris-
ingly roomy and well finished, and safety is a bright
spot too: a driver's side airbag, five mile per hour front
(not rear) bumpers, and anti-lock four-wheel power disc
brakes are standard. Other features include variable
assist power steering, a power sunroof, air conditioning,
and much more.
The Prelude Si's engine is a 2.3 liter, dual overhead
cam, 16-valve "4." It boasts 160HP, fuel injection, and
dual balance shafts for smoothness. It moves this 2,866-
pound car from 0-60 in nine seconds, about average for
the class. Fuel efficiency was observed at 23 city and 25
highway (EPA, 22/26), slightly below par forthe genre.
It's a decent, quiet engine with adequate, torque that's
smooth, too. But it isn't nearly as smooth (the degree is
the key), tractible, or economical as last year's power-
plant, though its extra 20HP gives it considerably more
zip.
The engine was mated to a short-throw five-speed.
manual transmission and light clutch. Both worked
well, and you'll have no complaints, but again, weren't
quite an equal of the previous generation. A modem
automatic transmission is optionally available.
The Si's handling, with its four-wheel independent


suspension, rates good and about a average for the class.
Its Michelin MXV-4 all-season tires are decent quality,
but not the performance rubber this $20,000 car should
wear. Ride, sometimes a compromise with handling,
was definitely stiffened on this vehicle to increase
possibility and perceived sportiness. In most situations,
the ride is satisfactory, but certain types of large bumps
and dips will have you wishing for increased compli-
ance. The turning circle was nearly 36 feet acceptable
but not notable. A four-wheel steering option is avail-
able that cuts the turning circle by four feet; I didn't test
it on this year's model, but haven't found it a "must
have" on any automaker's vehicle. Again, the previous
generation Prelude offered slightly better balance in all
aspects of the ride/handling equation.
Quality control throughout the vehicle was superb.
It's definitely a bright spot. Overall, the new Prelude
isn't as refined or sophisticated as the last generation
despite technical specifications that promise more. Its
straight-line performance is much better, but smooth-
ness, economy, ride space utilization (the '91s were
only slighty better in this regard), and particularly
comfort may leave you wishing for more. It's a decent
car, but doesn't excel in any area and ranks nowhere
near the class leaders - the place where Honda's still
now seemed to have a permanent lock.


Employment


All applicants should be aware that hiring is severely restricted because of the De-
partment of Defense worldwide hiring freeze. Beginning April 6, the freeze allowed
one new hire from outside Department of Army for every four losses to DoD.
Placement of current DA employees (including those on leave without pay) is an
exception to the freeze. Current temporary employees may now apply against
permanent vacancies unless otherwise noted. Specialized experience, when indi-
cated, must be in duties similar to those required by the vacancy.
Military Spouses: If available, qualified, and within the area of consideration
specified for the vacancy, may be considered subject to the "one-for-four" DA
hiring restriction.
Panama Canal Commission employees: U.S. and non-U.S. current permanent
employees may apply for permanent employment subject to the "one-for-four" DA
hiring restriction. Current permanent NAF or AAFES employees who were ap-
pointed before Nov. 3, 1989 may now also apply.
AMENDMENT ON HOW TO APPLY: Failure to complete U. S. Army South
Form 106, whenrequired, could hinder an applicant's chances of being referred for
the vacancy. For information, visit the Civilian Personnel Office, Building 560,
Corozal.

VB# Vacancies Title and Location Open: 09-25-92 Close: 10-06-92

PACIFIC:
478-92-VC - MILITARY PERSONNEL CLERK (TYPING), NM-204-4. Tem-


porary NTE 1 yr. SENSITIVE. ARPERCEN, Liaison South, Bldg 95, Fort Clayton.
Gen Exp: 1 yr. Note: Knowledge of DBase. Limited to current DA civilian
employees.

479-92-MW- GENERAL ENGINEER, NM-801(21)-13. Competitive Temporary
Detail NTE 120 days. Sensitive. USARSO, Office of the CG, Treaty Implementa-
tion Office, Fort Clayton. Limited to current DA civilian employees.

480-92-NR - SUPPLY TECHNICIAN (PROPERTY BOOK OFFICER), NM-
2005-7. Sensitive. DEH,Supply & Storage Division, Property Control Br., Corozal.
Spec Exp: 1 yr. equiv to NM-6. TIG: NM-5. Form 106. Limited to current DA
civilian employees.

481-92-NR - SERVICE ORDER CLERK, NM-303-4. Temporary NTE 01-31-93.
HQ, USAG-DEH, ERMD, Work Mgmt Br., Corozal. Gen Exp: 1 yr. Bilingual
(English/Spanish). Written test (CASP). Shift work.

The Directorate of Civilian Personnel Office is accepting applications for the
following positions:

Clinical Nurse positions. For information call Enid Sullivan at 285-4116.
Store Worker, MG-6914-4, Temporary/intermittent. Materials Handler, MG-
6907-5, Temporary/Intermittent. For information call Julie Hurtado at 285-6268.


Kitchen Capers


Outdoor cooking has come a long way from the
caveman's spit and the iron cauldron. There's an in-
credible variety of grills, from the simplest grid over
coals to the more sophisticated, large, multiple-grill,
models that are almost like kitchens. There are com-
pact, easy-clean, portables that fold and fit into small
fabric carrying cases with handles for easy toting to
camps, beaches or tailgate picnics.
And there are all sorts of cooking tools and accesso-
ries, fire-starters, aromatic wood chips and chunks and
flavorizers that enhance taste and aroma. Relatively
new are herb packets like tea bags that are first soaked
in water then added to hot coals. If you plan to use wood
chips or chunks, soak them in water for 20 to 30 minutes
before tossing them into the hots coals, otherwise they
will burn before providing their unique flavor and
aroma.
Try soaking plain chips in Angostura aromatic bit-
ters in a wide-mouthed jar, perhaps overnight. Toss
them wet on the fire for a unique flavor. The bitters can
be reused - for soaking chips, not for cooking.
Pork ribs are a favorite barbecue meat. Dripping
with a honey-sweet, slightly vinegary-tart sauce, they're
just made for finger-eating - not to be served to sophis-
ticates. Get the meaty cut and serve with peachy vege-
table kabobs.


Country rib barbecue
2 zucchini, cut into thick diagonal slices
1 large (16 oz.) can cling peach halves in Juice
or extra light syrup
3 pounds country pork spare ribs
3/4 cup catsup
1/3 cup honey
3 tablespoons prepared mustard
2 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
1 large clove garlic, minced
2 firm tomatoes
6 large mushrooms


Blanch zucchini in boiling water three minutes;
drain well; set aside.
Drain peaches, reserving all liquid. Place ribs on
charcoal grill about six inches from source of heat;
cover and cooks slowly, about one hour, turning occa-
sionally. Or place ribs on oven broiler rack and bake at
350 degrees one and one half hours, turning occasion-
ally.
Combine reserved peach liquid with catsup, honey,
mustard, vinegar, ginger and garlic. Bring to a boil in
small saucepan, boil five minutes, stirring frequently.
Brush ribs with sauce last 20 minutes of grilling or 3/4
hour of baking. Cut each tomato into six wedges and
thread them on metal or WET bamboo skewers, along
with zucchinii slices, peach halves, and mushrooms.
Grill or bake last 10 minutes of ribs' cooking time,
brushing generously with sauce.
Make five or six servings. The Chopping Block
recipe by Philomena Corradeno

Editor's note: People interested in sharing a rec-
ipe or household tip with Tropic Times readers, can
send recipes or tips by MPS to Tropic Times, Unit
0936, APO AA 34002. Your name and base will be
printed with your submission.









Tropic Times f
Sept. 25, 1992 A"


Rich Cahill, Eco-Tours guide, shows Nathan Cohen and Hania Woodman, 24th Civil Engineering Squadron, some of the jungle flora during a tour of Barro
Colorado Island.


Island hop


Navy MWR, Eco-To
BARRO COLORADO ISLAND
(Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation)
- Our Lady of the Rainforest sat on still
smooth waters in the early morning as
we gazed intently at a mist-shrouded
island. It took only a few minutes before
we were welcomed to the jungle.
We weren't listening to the Guns and
Roses tune, but rather the trills of a
"Froot Loops" bird establishing his ter-
ritorial branch, the coyote-like noises of
black mantle howler monkeys, the chirp-
ing of thousands of creepy crawlers, the
video arcade music from hundreds of
frogs occasionally broken by the grunt
of a wild pig.
We were a mixed group that de-
scended on Barro Colorado Island -
some city slickers curious to see jungle Marge Evans
up close and personal; others, like Sandy
Toothman, 24th Civil Engineering Squadron, who grew
up in Panama, who had spent plenty of time in jungle
areas but was looking for greater insight about her
"great backyard."
We were not equipped with butterfly nets, but we did
have binoculars. We were not "birders," per se, but after
a dozen or more sightings of colorful toucans and
trogans, our enthusiasm grew with each recognition.
The bilingual Eco-Tours guides' enthusiasm was
contagious. Group leaders Rich Cahill and Archibaldo
Kirchman pointed out animals and plants while rapidly
explaining habitats, traits and distinctions.
The Eco-Tours Barro Colorado tour, booked through
Navy Morale Welfare and Recreation, was a learning
experience from the start. Boarding Our Lady of the
Rainforest boats we headed down the Panama Canal
listening to our guides' historical notes about the build-
ing of the canal, stories about the birds spotted en route,
like the cormorant and kingfisher, and about plants on
the bank, such as Kuna grass.
When the way became narrower, Cahill skillfully
guided the boat through obstacle-marked waters to a
quiet cove.
"Watch for the bubbles," he said. Hannia Woodman
looked for"Wally" the alligator, but he chose to remain


urs show city slickers jungle environment


- r,'ninz ~ ~ ~ *. ~


submerged during our trip.
Cahill guided our eyes upward, and the cameras and
binoculars were turned to the treetops. After several
sightings of toucans, kell-billed (Froot Loops type) and
the brown-chested mandible variety, we headed to
shore to begin our jungle trek.
Walking through the jungle, it seems plants and
animals grow to science fiction-size proportions. The
giant blue butterflies - Cahill explained they were
claustrophobic and domineering. If someone was wear-
ing blue (we sneakily glanced at each other) the butter-
fly was wearing blue (we sneakily glanced at each
other) the butterfly would fly toward him for fear the in-
sect's space was being invaded.
Other overgrown items - anthills. One was at least
4-feet tall and hung from a tree.
And of course the plants- the threadlikelianas that
grew to gnarly trunk-size ropes literally choking the life
from trees, Cahill said.
We got lessons on jungle survival. Cahill took a
piece from the palmetto tree (hearts of palm) and passed
it among our group to sample. He pointed out which
plants to use for water sources.
story and photos by Monique Chere
Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation


Then we had a quick "handicraft class."
As he tore strands from a palma sombrero
- tree, Cahill explained how the Chocoe In-
dians wove their baskets, often dying the
strands.
During our lessons the jungle noises
continued unabated. The overriding sound
. was that of the howler monkeys. We strained
to see them, but we spied them only from
a distance high in the trees.
� ^ Kirchman's group was luckier. They
saw white-faced capuchin and howlers.
"We saw five or six white-faced
NJ monkeys jumping from tree to tree, then
they started following us," said Barbara
Dalle-Molle, family member.
"No," said Kirchman, there were 10
or 15."
Sighting comparisons were made at
the muddy trail's end, Some of us lay in
hammocks, others thirstily drank bottled water and
juices and most ate the hearty sandwiches provided.
We discussed our morning's adventure.
"It was one thing to go to a simulated rain forest like
I did in Florida, but it's something else again to see
everything in its natural surroundings," said Ernest
Dalle-Molle, 24th Wing. "You have to concentrate and
respect their (animals') habitats to see them."
Others, like Marge Evans, wanted to take the tour
again.
"Next time, I'm going to stay in oneplacelongerand
be very quiet so I can see more," she said.
Often there may not be time for that. Many people
trekthroughthejungle because they haveto, especially
the military. There's no time to stop to see let alone
appreciate what the rain forest has to offer. Only time to
feel too hot, wield a machete to get through the tall
grass, avoid snakes and scratch more bug bites.
But we had time to learn some great things about our
backyard and the uniqueness of apart of Panama. Barro
Colorado Island, so close, brought us back to the class-
room.
As we puttered away in our boats, we continued to
watch for a branch to tremble, a movement in the brush,
or a flash of color from the treetops.








B6 /Tropic Times
B6 Sept. 25, 1992


Albrook
Albrook Club
The club will hold officers' member-
ship night Saturday. Barbecued chicken or
beef brisket will be served 6:30-9 p.m.,
followed by country/western music until
1:30 a.m.
Child care
The Albrook Early Childhood Enrich-
ment Center has openings for 4 year olds.
Hourly care reservations can be made up to
2 weeks in advance for 3 year olds through
kindergarten-age children. Call 286-3133
to make reservations.

Clayton
Valent center
Valent Recreation Center is located in
Building 53. Call 287-6500/4201.
Tours - Darien's museum, Gamboa
and Miraflores Locks, Wednesday, 1-5
p.m.
Special tour: a cruise to the Galapagos
Islands, Ecuador, Oct. 9-15. Reservations
with payments must be made, space is lim-
ited.
Anew bird watching and nature tour is
available.
Hit movies in Dolby surround sound are
a new feature at the center. Films are shown
Friday evenings, Saturdays and Sundays.
Movies and time listings are at the center.
Piano recital, Monday, 7-9 p.m. "Dis-
plays, vendors, live entertainment, refresh-
ments and food.
Valent offers recreational and educa-
tional classes. Call for classes and times.
Volunteers are needed to start set con-
struction for the annual Haunted House.
Characters, make-up'and decorations are
also needed. Volunteers must be 18 years
old. Call Miguel Briceno at the center.

BOSS program
The Better Opportunities for Single Sol-
diers program offers recreational activities
for single soldiers and geographical bache-
lors. Call Anne Kelly at Valent Recreation
Center, 287-6500, to volunteer.

Youth centers
The Fort Clayton Youth Center, Build-
ing 155, has varied activities for preteens.
Call 287-6451.


Atlantic education center moves,

offers varied classes, schedules


FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO-AT-
LANTIC) - Bigger and better is the
way the Fort Davis Education Center
staff sees its new location in Building
235 here.
The center officially moved in late
August, but workers are still putting
finishing touches on the building's in-
terior. The only major item left is the
carpet, said Patricia BJorneby, educa-
tion services specialist.
Even though the center is not as
easy to find as it was in Building 32,
above the post exchange, its new loca-
tion will be more beneficial to it users,
said Bjorneby.
The center now boasts four class
rooms which will allow for more classes
being offered and hold more people -
up to 25, she said.
Three different colleges will use these
classrooms, said Bjorneby. Florida State
University and Panama Canal College
will both teach college courses and
Central Texas College is teaching
Advanced Skills Education Program
in the rooms. Other courses such as the


Aerobic/fitness awareness program, 1-
2:30 p.m. and 3-4:30 p.m. Monday, Wed-
nesdays and Fridays. The program is free
and features low-impact aerobics, nutrition
tips, step aerobics, seminars and guest speak-
ers.
Junior teen council meetings, 3 p.m.,
first and third Thursdays of each month at
the Youth Center. All youths may attend.
The Senior Teen Center, Building 155,
offers activities for teenagers 15-19 years
old. Call 287-6451.

Outdoor events
The CRD Outdoor Recreation Branch
offers various adventure activities each month.
Register at Building 154, Fort Clayton. Call
287-3363.
Partial canal transits consist of a guided
tour vessel from Balboa to Pedro Miguel
Locks and cruise to the Bay of Panama.
San Blas snorkel/dive, Saturday-Sun-
day, $140 for non divers and $175 for di-
vers' packages. Packages include airfare,
hotel, equipment transport, three meals, three
guided dives and boat service.


next mini-emersion Spanish class will
also be taught in the rooms.
The center offers several improve-
ment programs, said Bjorneby.
General technical improvement is'
one such program. Soldiers can come
in at their convenience and work with
a tutor to improve their GT score.
ASEP is program for noncommissioned
officers. NCOs use this course to en-
hance their training skills to make them
better NCOs, Bjorneby said.
The center's staff knows the sched-
uling problems infantry soldiers have
with continuing their education, and
have a program to teach four-week
college classes when the soldiers are
not in the field, she said.
The center recently finished a morn-
ing class for a unit that worked eve-
nings.
Center officials said there are many
ways the education center can help
military and family members improve
and advance their education. For more
information, see a counselor at Build-
ing 235.


Twin Oceans~
The Twin Oceans Pro shop, Building
155, Fort Clayton.offers scuba, snorkel,
tennis and other outdoor recreational equip-
ment. Call 287-3088.

Boat shop
The Fort Clayton Boat shop, Building
178, offers weekly specials. Charters canbe
made fishing and diving trips. Call 287-
6453.

Auto crafts
The Albrook Auto Crafts Shop is located
in Buildings 441,442 and 443 on Albrook
AFS. The shop holds weekly classes in arc
and gas welding, auto air conditioning, auto
transmission repair and engine rebuilding.
Call 286-3613.

Arts and crafts
The Arts and Crafts Center is located in
Building 180. Call 287-5957.


Classes offered are pottery, throwing
pottery techniques, glazing and firing, hand
building and sculpture, wooden jewelry box
construction, stained glass, acoustic guitar
construction, do-it-yourself custom fram-
ing, fabric painting, basic leather crafts,
acrylic and oil painting, basic drawing,
charcoal drawing. Registration is required.

Ceramic center
The center is located in Building 155,
Fort Clayton. Call 287-4360.
Sessions offered are day flower making,
air brush techniques and ceramic paint-
ing classes. Participants must buy materials
and pay firing fee. Registration is required.

Curundu
Theatre Arts Centre
The center, located in Building 2060,
offers a variety of classes. Registration is
required. Call 286-3814/3152.
"The Musical Comedy Murders of
1940" will open at the center Oct. 16 and
will play Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays
through Oct. 31.
The 1993 Army Soldier Show audi-
tions will be held in September. Singers,
dancers, musicians, technicians are needed.
Nominee packages must have name, rank,
social security number, unit address, ETS
date, and speciality, a written release, from
unit commander for 179 days temporary
duty beginning March 5. Technicians must
send a resume of experience and training,
full length photo and recommendations from
local Morale, Welfare and Recreation rep-
resentative, forms 2 and 2-1, must have a
minimum of nine days time in service re-
maining after Oct. 31. Nominees must be
deployable because the show may tour
overseas.

Howard
Zodiac center
The Zodiac Recreation Center, Building
709, offers many activities. The Informa-
tion, Tour and Travel Office section will
arrange special trips. All tours leave from
the Howard Theater. Call 284-6161/6109.
Special of the week - Contractor's Hill
and Miraflores Locks- Sunday, 9 a.m.- 2
p.m.
Vista Panama - Saturday, 7-9 p.m. An
evening at the center includes a slide show,
traditional dancers and Panamanian food.


j Atlantic


Sundial center
The Sundial Recreation Center is located in
Building 42, Fort Davis. Call 289-3889/3300.
Classes are available in music, juggling, pi-
ano, guitar, dog obedience training, cake deco-
rating, Spanish, English, French, folkloric dance,
modern dance. Other classes are also available.
Events: Wine and dine, Fridays, 4-9 p.m.
Thursday are wonderful, a program for
women, will feature weight training.

Ocean Breeze center
Ocean Breeze Recreation Center is located in
Building 153, Fort Sherman, 289-6402, offers
fun education classes and adult education classes
for free or a nominal fee.
Classes: Nautilus orientation, aerobics, begin-
ning and advanced karate, gymnastics, health
cooking, juggling classes.

Arts and crafts centers
The Fort Davis Arts and Craft Center is lo-
cated in Building 251. Call 289-5201.
Auto arid multicrafts shop, ceramic shop, ad-
vanced and beginners oil painting from photo-
graphs.


The Fort Sherman Arts and Crafts Center
is located in Building 206,. Call 289-6313.
Wood shops, ceramics, painting, drawing,
pottery and air brushing are available.
The center is closed Thursdays and Fridays.
Youth news
The Fort Espinar Youth Center is located in
Building 219. Call 289-4605.
Events: Roller skating Tuesdays at
the Espinar School.
Flag football and cheerleading reg-
istration is under way for youths 6-15.
Requirements: registration, physical,
$10 registration fee. Coaches are also
needed.

Sherman

Rental
Sherman Rental, Building 31, is open
Monday, Thursdays and Fridays, 10
a.m.-6 p.m.; Saturdays and Sundays,
7 a.m.-6 p.m.; holidays, 9 a.m.-6 p.m.
Call 289-6104.
Classes - Outboard motor boat
operation, Saturdays, 10 a.m., at Fort
Sherman Lagoon.


Christmas bazaar
The Atlantic Community Women's Club is spon-
soring its annual holiday bazaar Nov. 14 from 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Fort Davis Community Club.
Vendors are needed.
Call Muriel Doyle at 289-4755 or Becky Steigler
at 289-4354.


No


i


I








Tropic Times
Sept. 25, 1992 U


Colonial Panama tour - Monday, 9 a.m.-
3 p.m. Historical sites of Panama including
the French Plaza, National Cathedral, Church
of the Golden Altar and National Theater.
Special family colonial Panama tour-
Oct. 3, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Free Zone shopping - Wednesday and
Oct. 2, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
Gorgona Beach trip - Oct. 4, 7 a.m.-4
p.m. Fee includes lunch and use of facilities.

Outdoor adventures
The Zodiac Recreation Center has tick-
ets for sailing tours on 41- and 47-foot
yachts for parties of 10-15 people including
Panama Bay, partial canal transits, Ta-
boga Island and Contadora Island. All
tours leave from the Balboa Yacht Club.
Special of the week - Gold panning in
Las Cumbres, Oct. 3, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Hunt
for the legendary underwater grave and treas-
ure of Sir Frances Drake.
Sailing trip around Panama Bay - Today,
6-11 p.m. Fee includes snack, dinner and re-
freshments.
Partial canal transit- Saturday, 8 a.m.-
12:30 p.m.
Horseback riding in El Valle - Satur-
day, 7 a.m.-4 p.m.
Peacock bass fishing in Arenosa - Sun-
day and Oct. 4, 5 a.m.-2 p.m. Catch the
biggest fish and receive a biggest peacock
bass T-shirt.
Snorkel and scuba Drake's Island -
Oct. 1, 7 a.m.-5 p.m.
San Blas Islands - Leaves Oct. 9 at 6
a.m. and returns Oct. 11 at 6 p.m. Price
includes transportation, air fare, meals,
snorkeling/scuba equipment, dive master,
charter boat and five dives. Scuba divers
must have an open water dive certification
card.

Family support
The Howard/Albrook Family Support
Center, Building 707, has a variety of events
scheduled each month. Hours of operation
are: Mondays-Fridays, 7:30a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Call284-5650.
Financial counseling, appointment, 7:30
a.m.-4:30 p.m. Call 284-6545.
Volunteers wanted - Family Services
needs volunteers to assist with the loan
closet, base brochure library, layette pro-
gram and airman's attic. Call 284-5860.

Riding stables
Basic horsemanship classes will be held
at Albrook Riding Stables Saturday from 8
a.m. to 2 p.m.

Youth centers
The Howard Youth Center, Building 696,
284-4700 and the Albrook Youth Center,
Building 850,286-3195, offer trips, classes
and activities for youths.
Annual membership renewal for the
youth centers and the new Teen Center is
due by Oct. 1. Fee is $15 per year for the
first child and reduced for families with two
or more children. Children who haven't
paid fee by Oct. 16 must pay $1 each time
they visit the center. Call 284-4700 or 286-
3195.
Smithsonian Institute botanical tour -
Monday, 2:45-5 p.m. for youths 5-18 years
old. Fee includes transportation and super-
vision.
Pre-teen dance contest - Oct. 2, 7:30-
10:30 p.m. at Howard Youth Center for
children 8-12 years old. Transportation
from Albrook at 7 p.m.., returning at 11 p.m.
There is no additional cost, but reservations
must be made in advance.
Great American Crab Races - Tues-
day, 3:30 p.m. Race a crab down a 4-foot
track to victory. Bring a crab or rent one
from the center. The races are open to youths
5-18.
Babysitter's class - Teens sign up Oct. 4.
Arts and crafts - Wednesday at Howard
and Thursday at Albrook, 3:30 p.m.. Scratch
for color for children 5-18 years old.


7....


U.S. Aimy photo by Aprl Rainbo
PANAMA CITY TOUR - The Valent Recreation Center, Building 53, Fort Clayton, will conduct a walking tour through
colonial Panama Oct. 10 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The tour includes a visit to the Cathedral of Plaza Mayor (above), the
Presidential palace, National Theatre, French Plaza, the Golden Altar and Panama Viejo. Lunch at a local restaurant is
also included in the tour. Call 287 4201/6500 for reservations. There is a $10 fee for adults and $6 for children.


Swimming pools
Albrook and Howard swimming pools
are available for private rental. Passes are
available and can be used at Air Force,
Army and Navy pools. Call 284-3569.
Albrook pool offers classes for moms
and tots, preschoolers, beginners, advanced
beginners, intermediates and adults.
Howard pool offers classes for pres-
choolers, beginners, advanced beginners,
intermediates and adults. Call for days and
times.

Enlisted Club
Enlisted membership night will be
held at the Albrook club Tuesday. Prime rib
buffet will be served from 6-8 p.m. and is
free for members. There will be a Koraoke
contest, prizes, a DJ and dancing. Members
may bring one guest over 18 years old. Call
284-4189or286-4128.
DJ G, from KOOL 105.5 FM in Denver,
Colo., will be starring at theHoward En-
listed Club's Casual Cove Friday and Satur-
day evenings during October.

Officers' club
Club members and their family members
over 18 years old may play bingo at the
Howard Enlisted Club Wednesdays from 7-
10 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m.

Arts and Crafts
Howard Arts and Crafts, Building 711,
has a frame shop and award shop. Leather
kits, belts, leather by the square foot and
ceramics are for sale. Call 284-6361/6345.
Free mold pouring during September.
Free demonstration halo copper appli-
cation, Saturday, 1:30-2 p.m.
Center closed for inventory Thursday
and Oct. 2.
Registration for the Oct. 17 Arts and
Crafts Bazaar begins Oct. 3.

Rodman
Anchorage Club


Specials - DJ night, tonight and Satur-
day at 7 p.m.; a "poor sailor's night" Wed-
nesday. Call 283-4332.

Officers' Club
Special - People with September birth-
dates can eat at free buffet Tuesday. Call
283-4498.

Tours, leisure news
The Information, Tour and Travel Office
is located in Building 24, (Pizza Hut Build-
ing) Rodman and is open 8 a.m.-6 p.m.
Monday through Friday. Call 283-5307/4454.
Upcoming tours:
Moonlight cruises, tonight, 6:30-10:30
p.m. Cruise the Bay of Panama on the Black
Stallion. Pay-as-you-go bar and complimen-
tary snacks.
Panama City tour, Wednesday. Includes
tour and bilingual guide.
Bambito Resort Hotel in Chiriqui -
Oct. 9-12. Tour includes transportation, three
nights at the hotel and tours of El Volcan,
Cerro Punta and Boquete. Deadline for res-
ervations is Oct. 5.
"Wet, Wild, Wooly Weekend" to Con-
tadora, Oct. 10-12. Tour includes transpor-
tation on Black Stallion yacht, two nights
hotel, deep-sea fishing, water skiing, snor-
keling and use of MWR's jet skis.
Montego Bay, Jamaica, Oct. 11-14. In-
cludes hotel accommodations, airfare and
Montego Bay transfers.
Costa Rica tour, Oct. 31-Nov. 3. In-
cludes round-trip airfare, hotel accommo-
dations, city tour and air port transfers in
San Jose.
Deep-sea fishing charters/private moon-
light cruises: leave the driving to us. Fee
includes captain, fuel, rods, reels, coolers,
ice. Charter a 61-foot yacht and a 25-foot
Bertram for fishing or moonlight cruise.
Rates vary. Call the ITT office for details.
Transportation available: 26-passen-
ger bus and an 11-passenger van available
for rent. A driver is included in the rental of
either vehicle.
Bohio rental: use for group functions or
private parties. Equipped with electricity,
grills, water. Bohios are located at Rodman


Officers Club, Rodman Marina and behind
the barber shop at Rodman. There is also a
bohio at Farfan.
Pool rental: The Rodman and Farfan
pools can be rented for private functions
after pools close in the evenings. Call for
rates.

Rodman Marina
The marina offers a variety of boats for
rent and a bass fishing package. Call 283-
3147/3150.
The marina bass fishing package includes
transportation to Gamboa and return, boat
and motor, gasoline, lake guide, $5 worth of
bait, a bait bucket, rods and reels, tackle,
coolers and ice. Food and drink is not pro-
vided.

Scuba diving classes
An open water scuba diving course will
be offered Oct. 19 through Nov. 1. The
course will include five class and pool ses-
sions at Rodman pool and open water dives
Oct. 25 and Nov. 1. The price is $145 and
includes instruction, complete equipment,
boat trips and certification fees. A minimum
of four and a maximum of 10 people are
required for the class.
An advanced scuba diving class is set
for Oct. 31-Nov. 1 at Portobelo on the At-
lantic side. The class includes a night dive,
deep dive, navigation dive and two optional
dives.
Options include a computer dive, search
and recovery dive, photography dive and
more. The cost is $100. There will be a pre-
dive meeting before the class. Call 283-
5307/4454.

Sail/power boat classes
Boating classes will be held Monday and
Wednesday. The classes are from 6 to 9
p.m. at the Family Services Center, Build-
ing 40. The cost is $25 for a power boating
class or $50 for the sailing and power boat-
ing class. Payment is made at the class.
After completing the classroom instruc-
tion, on-the-water training will be held. Call
283-3147/3150.


ices










Potpourri


B Tropic Times
00 Sept. 25,1992


Spot bid sale
The Defense Reutilization and Mar-
keting Office - Panama, Building 745,
Corozal, will hold a local spot bid sale
Thursday at 8 a.m. Items for bid will be
available for inspection Sept. 28 through
30 from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in Building
745. Call Ada Tweed at 285-4754.

Learning center
The Fort Clayton Learning Resource
Centeris offering general technical score
improvement classes, College Level
Examination Program, audio/video courses,
American college test, scholastic apti-
tude test booklets and English as a second
language materials, Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-
4 p.m. Call Mrs. Ayala-Rosa, 287-5412
or stop by Building 129.

Speech instructor
Central Texas College needs a quali-
fied speech instructor for an upcoming
class at the Fort Kobbe Education Center.
A master's degree from an accredited
U.S. college or university and 18 hours of
graduate study in speech are required.
Call 287-3773.

Thrift shop open
The Howard and Albrook Officers'
Wives' Club Thrift Shop is now open in
Building 809, Albrook AFS, Mondays
and Thursdays and every third Saturday
of each month, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. The
shop also opens for consignments Mon-
days and Thursdays, 9:30 a.m.-noon.

Scholarship offer
The Family Support Group of Head-
quarters and Headquarters Company, Law
Enforcement Activity, is offering a $300
scholarship to a family member of that
company. Anyone from HHC, LEA, in-
terested in applying for the scholarship
should call Adrienne Levy at 287-3402/
5386 evenings. Applications must be re-
turned no later than Thursday.

American Red Cross
The American Red Cross office at Fort
Davis will be temporarily closed. For
Atlantic community Red Cross service,
call the Fort Clayton office at 287-6306/
5647.

Jewish services
The Corozal Chapel announces the
following schedule for the upcoming Jewish
holidays: Kol Nidre service, Oct. 6, 6:20
p.m.; Yom Kippur service, Oct. 7, 9:30
a.m.; Rosh Hashanah service, Sunday,


7:30 p.m. and Monday, 9:30 a.m. Call
Bruce Topletz, 287-5909.

Square dancing
Square dancing classes are being of-
fered by the Panama Canal Square Ups
starting Oct. 2 at 7 p.m. at the Curundu
Elementary School, Fort Clayton. Call
Lavern Campbell at 282-3735 or Mary
Woolard at 224-8114.

Classes available
The Fort Clayton Education Center
is offering the following classes:
Training management, Oct. 5-23,4:30
p.m. and basic skills education program,
8:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m; and mini-immer-
sion Spanish class, Oct. 5-19,8:30-3:30
p.m. All classes will be held in Building
128, Fort Clayton. Call 287-5412.

Family portraits
The Church of God Christian Serv-
icemen's Center is offering family por-
traits Oct. 9, 5-9 p.m. and Oct. 10, 9
a.m.-9 p.m., at 0603 Gaillard Highway
in Balboa. Call Virginia McCree. 287-
3727.

Sunday school
The Fort Clayton Chapel offers three
adult Sunday school classes in bible dis-
cussion, marriage enrichment and the
responsibility of Christians as citizens.


Registration is required and there is no
fee. Volunteers are welcome to help in
the program. Call Chap. (Lt. Col.) Mark
Fentress, 287-5859.

Equal opportunity
The Equal Opportunity Office will be
offering an equal opportunity represen-
tative course Oct. 19-23, 8 a.m.-4:30
p.m. at Building 155, Fort Clayton,
Registration must be submitted by
Oct. 5. Call 287-4260.

Office closed
The Troop Issue Subsistence Activity
in Building 550 and 300, Corozal, will be
closed Tuesday, Wednesday and Thurs-
day for quarterly inventory.

Optometry clinic
The Howard Optometry Clinic, How-
ard AFB, will be closed Oct. 2,7,9, 13,
15, 19, 22, 26 and 29. Clinic members
will be conducting vision screenings at
the Department of Defense Elementary
Schools.

Football team
The Air Force is looking for cheer-
leaders for the Turkey Bowl football
team. Call TSgt. Annette Henry, 284-
5650. Coaches are also needed for the
football team. Submit resumes to Wayne
Clapp,284-3451.


Holiday greetings
The Howard, Fort Kobbe and Rodman
military members and their families are
invited to send free radio greetings home
for the holiday season. Greetings can
be sent Oct. 22 from the Howard Zo-
diac Recreation Center. To sign up, call
284-5459.

Position available
There is a position available for an
engineer. Applicants must be Panama-
nian citizens, have a bachelor's degree
or equivalent university degree in civil
engineering/architectural field; five to
seven years of design and construction
experience as a professional engineer/
architect; must speak and write fluent
English and have a valid professional
Panamanian engineer/architect license.
Minimum salary $27,677, maximum
$41,517 annual.
Interested peoplesend curriculum
vitae and references to: Personnel Of-
fice, P.O. Box 6969, Panama 5, Pan-
ama

Education news
The Panama Canal Branch Florida
State University, Albrook AFS,. an-
nounces that beginning Oct. 19 will
offer American defense policy, an eight
week undergraduate international rela-
tions course during term II. For regis-
tration call 285-6922 or 227-4661.


AMC flight schedule

* Traveling Tips for Space-A:
Q:As a Reservist, where can I fly?
A: Reserve members in uniform with
DD Form 2 identification (red) and DD
Form 1853 may fly to, from and be-
tween Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, the
Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa
and the Continental United States.


PP: Tourist Passport
TC: Tourist Card
V: Visa
.: PC: Proof of Citzenship
US: United States
Passport Holders Only
< CC: Country Clearance
RON: Remain Overnight

For additional flight
information, call 284-5758/
4306.


Today
4:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN
San Jose, Costa Rica PC
San Salvador, El Salvador PP/CC/V
Howard AFB, PN
5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN
Soto Cano AB, Honduras PP
Tegucigalpa, Honduras PP
Howard AFB, PN
8:40am C141 Howard AFB, PN
Bogota, Colombia PP/CC/V
Howard AFB, PN
Saturday
5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN US
Savannah, GA
6:15am B727 Howard AFB, PN
Charleston IAP, SC
6:40am C141 Howard AFB, PN
Charleston AFB, SC
Sunday
7:45am C5A Howard AFB, PN
Charleston AFB, SC RON
Dover APB, DE
Monday
6:15am C727 Howard AFB, PN PP/CC/V
Charleston IAP, SC
Tuesday
5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN
Tegucigalpa, Honduras


Soto Cano AB, Hondura
Howard AFB, PN
5:40am C141 Howard APB, PN
La Paz, Bolivia
Montevideo, Uruguay
Asuncion, Paraguay
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil I
Howard AFB, PN


s PP


PP
RON/PP
PP
RON/PP/V


6:10am C130 Howard APB, PN
San Salvador, El Salvador PP/CC/V
San Jose, Costa Rica PC
Howard AFB, PN
7:45am CSA Howard AFB, PN
Charleston AFB, SC
Dover AFB, DE
Wednesday
No scheduled flights
Thursday
8:00am CSAHoward APFB, PN
Soto Cano AB, Honduras
Charleston APB, SC RON
Dover AFB, DE


o HuYispanic Heritage Month .

1The Hispanic Heritage
Committee invites the
public to the Hispanic Heritag
Mass, Oct. 2, 7 p.m. at the Albroo
Chapel. The Spanish Catholic service
will be officiated by Monsignor Osc
Mario Brown from the Archdiocese
of Panama. A reception will be hel
after the mass in the chapel annex
People can cooperate by bring-
ing cake, cookies, or
astiesfor the dessert
potluck.* Coffee, soft drinks
d hor d'eouvres will be
provided as well as a pinata
for the kids. Call TSgt.
Rene Zapata, 284-3397.
The committee will also
host a luncheon Oct. 9 at
the Howar listed Members' Club, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. and the Hispanic Heritage Ball will be held Oct. 10.
The committee is accepting donations of baby clothing, money and other items for baby layettes. For
tickets and donations, all Capt. Jose Rivera, 284-5546 or SSgt. Reuben Martinez, 284-5164.


-- -








Tropic Times
Sept. 25, 1992


- T . . .* , ,. .. .
-, , _..


A relaxing way to see the downtown Charleston area
is by horse and carriage.





Wafkroung





through


, U.S. Army Photos by SgL Richard Puckett
Historical architecture is on display at the Drayton Hall, a plantation that has survived the Civil War
and Hurricane Hugo.


Charfeston offers peeklat past


N estled on a small peninsula
cradled between the Ashley
and Cooper Rivers lies
Charleston - a city seem-
ingly suspended in time, still vibrant
with sights and sounds of its early
colonial days.
Today Charleston stands as living
postcard from the past. The city was
nearly devastated by Hurricane Hugo
in September, 1989 that whipped the
coastal city with winds reaching 87
miles per hour. It left $700 billion in
total damage in its wake. Charleston
took the brunt of the destruction.
Although the scars of Hugo are still
visible, Charleston has nearly recov-
ered and still offers a unique and well-
preserved glimpse into the past.
It can also serve as a getaway for
military members here in Panama who
are looking for a quick, relaxing and
enjoyable stateside excursion.
Thanks to the Air Mobility Com-
mand's Space-A flights, Charleston can
be reached for about $10 a person. ($15
as of Oct. 1)
AMC officials estimate that on the
average about 4-5 flights leave Howard
AFB enroute to Charleston every week
with space-available room. Calling
ahead and arriving at the terminal at
least two hours before the flight is also
recommended. (See weekly Space-A
listing on page B8.)
Upon arriving in Charleston, check


with AMC terminal at Charleston AFB
for flight availability back to Panama.
The best bet is to make sure you-don't
fall short with leave or money. Com-
merical flights vary between $400 to
$600 for one-way return flights.
Once you're on the ground, a car is
a must. If you plan to rent one, make a
reservation.
Accomodations are also easy to
find. Besides for the standard hotels in
the city, check with Charleston AFB or
the Naval Station for availability at the
military guest lodges. It is possible to
make reservations before you leave,
but flight crews and members on orders
have priority. Call ahead.
Once you get settled in it's tough to
find a place to start. The mulitude of
malls isn't a bad place to try, though.
There are several shopping centers just
off the highway that can provide hours
of shopping pleasure. Not to forget the
long-list of restaurants that serve
everything from fresh sea food,
Mexican entrees to fast food.
If you're in the mood to sight-see,
Charleston is rich in historical won-
ders.
There are more than a dozen
historical sites to be found. Some of
the more beautiful include standing
plantations such as Drayton Hall and
Calhoun Mansion just outside the city.
The Citadel is also within 15 or so
minutes of downtown. The downtown


-41
" '"' - , ' " ' '" -, e � jl",, . -'

Basket weavers at the Charleston's Market Place produce their wares whil


Basket weavers at the Charleston's Market Place produce their wares while


you wait.
area provides another shopping
excursion thanks to the city's prized
Market Place. Crafts, paintings,
candies, souveniors and more line the
center's district
No visit to Charleston would be
complete without seeing Fort Sumter.
The famous outpost located on an
island just off the coast. A quick ferry
ride out to the island is like taking a
time machine back to 1861.
Fort Sumter is the site of where the
first shots of the Civil War were fired
in April 1861. Only one level of the
original structure still remains, but
many of the cannons and other relics
remain.
These are just a few of things
Charleston has to see. Haunted house


tours, dinners by the bay and the USS
Yorktown also Besides for a quick taste
of America, Charleston is truly a
national treasure.
In order to really experience the city
and the surrounding area, plan ahead
and be prepared. Most of all, take time
to enjoy the visit
For a complete picture and informa-
tion about Charleston, write to: South
Carolina Department of Parks, Recrea-
tion and Tourism, Box 71 Columbia,
SC 29202 or call 803-734-0127.


by Sgt. !4kichard Puckett
Tropic Times staff











1 Tropic Times
Bl O Sept. 25,1992


FClassified Ads


Doberman, purebred, declawed, tails docked,
males $200, females $150. 284-6184.

Doberman, male, obedience trained ', 2 yrs
old, good gaurd dog $200. 282-4135.

Rottweiler puppies, CCP reg, 2 mos old,
males $600, females $500. 286-3693. after
3pm.

Bichon friese, 16 mos old, AKC, grt w/chil-
dren $400/neg. 261-5579.

16.1 thoroughbred horse, well trained Eng-
lish, needs experienced rider $300. 260-
9848.

Pomeranian male, 3 yrs old, AKC reg $100.
286-4971.

Labrador, AKC reg, avail for stud service.
268-1914.

Labrador/retrievers, reg, all shots, de-
wormed. 252-5096.

Boxer, female, all shots, ear cropped, house
trained, friendly w/children $125. 289-3689.

Free, kittens, spayed, neutering incl. 287-
5420 after 6pm.

Free, kittens, need a loving family and home.
283-5422.




1991 Toyota 4x4 p/u, ext cab, sport tires, capt
bedliner, 11,400, 10 mos old, duty not pd
$18,500. 288-4084.

1989 Mercury Tracer, 2dr, hatchbk, AM-FM
cass, alarm, new tires, brakes, bat, grt cond
$4500. 226-5079.

1987 Chrysler Voyager, 4 cyl, ps, pb, at, ac,
cass, not duty pd $7500/obo. 261-6037.

1987 Montero, 4dr, 5-spd, ac, stereo, tint
glass, alarm, exc cond, duty pd $10,750.286-
6378 after 6 pm.

1983 Pontiac Bonneville sta/wgn, full pwr,
ac, fully loaded $3500. 286-6337.

1985 GMC Jimmy, good cond $4500. 284-
4885 ask for Glen.

1976 Plymouth Volare, 6 cyl, pb, ps, ac
$1200. 252-1189.

1984 Buick Skyhawk, 53,000 mi, ps, pb, ac,
at, exc cond. 287-3523.

1986 Chevy Astro van, 8 pass, ps, pb, ac,
stereo cass, tilt wheel, cruise, trir pkg, low mi,
exc cond $8000. 286-3441.

1983 Chevy Camaro, AM-FM cass, ac, good
tires, exc cond $5000. 252-5733 after 6pm.

1986 Chevy Suburban 4x4, 6.2 diesel, dual
ac, silverado options $13,000. 226-4090.

1991 Chevy Camaro, t/tops, low mi, needs ac,
exc cond, sale or trade $10,200. 236-0923.

1982 Isuzu Trooper, 4WD, diesel, ac, good
cond, not duty pd $4300. 252-2138.

1980 Saab 900 Turbo, 5-spd, needs minor
work $1000/obo. 287-5786.

1989 Dodge Dakota 4x4 p/u, ac, ps, pb, 5-spd,
V6, AM-Fm cass, canopy, carpet $15,000.
287-3441.

1987 Subaru, loaded, exc cond $6500/obo.
284-3821.

1977 Mercury Marquis, 4dr, ac, at, pb, ps,
runs good $850. 284-4287.

1979 Chevy Impala, rebuilt eng, Pioneer ste-
reo cass, new parts, needs minor carb/choke
work $2375/obo. 283-4227.

1988 Hyundai GL, at, ac, FM cass, 4dr, Alloy
rims, tint glass, duty pd $5500/obo. 284-
6431.

1979 Ford F-100 p/u, ac, AM-FM stereo cass,
runs grt $3000. 282-4129.

1986 Isuzu Trooper 4x4, diesel, 2dr, ps, lpb,
ac, AM-FM cass, exc cond, not duty pd
$6900/obo. 283-3721.

1991 Jeep Wrangler 4x4, 2.5L, 5-spd, soft
top, 22,000 .mi, exc cond, not duty pd
$10,500. 260-2037.

1981 Honda Civic, 4dr, 4 cyl, at, 40mpg, runs
grt $2100. 260-5148.


1983 AMC Jeep Wagoneer, 6 cyl, 4WD, re-
upholstered, new tires, good cond $3850/obo.
282-4582.

1979 Jeep CJ-7, duty pd, exc cond $3900.
283-3431..

1986 Chevy Camaro, 6 cyl, 5-spd, very nice
$3700/neg. 284-3923.

1985 Toyota model F van, 4 cyl, dual ac, 5-
spd, duty pd $6000. 252-6869.

1989 VW Golf GL, 4dr sedan, hatchbk, 5-spd,
ac, AM-FM, tint glass, exc cond, low mi
$8500/obo. 287-6936.

1979 Chevy van, trlr hitch, needs tune-up
$1350. 282-4280.

1982 Toyota p/u truck, ac, cass player, exc
cond $3500. 287-3340.

1991 GMC Jimmy 4x4, 4dr, at, ps, pb, AM-
FM, pw, ac, low mi, exc cond, duty not pd
$18,000/oao. 286-4884.

1989 Aerostar XLps, ps, pbcri, tilt, ac, AM-
FM cass, extras, 7 pass $12,500/obo. 287-
4075.

1981 Mercury Cougar, 6 cyl, ac, ps, pb, AM-
FM cass, duty pd, exc cond $3200. 252-6705.

1980 Volvo 244 GLE, new tires, AM-FM
cass, at, pw, good cond $2800. 264-0106.

1986 Bronco II 4x4, 5-spd, ac, AM-FM, low
mi, exc cond, well maintained $9500/obo.
269-0417.

1984 Toyota Corolla 1600 RS, ac, AM-FM
cass, good cond $3850. 230-0932.

1978 GMC p/u, 3-spd, 1/2ton shortbed, 6cyl,
one owner, duty pd, exc mech cond $2500.
286-4834.

1991 Dodge D-150 p/u, ps, pb, ac, AM-FM
stereo, pw & locks, tint glass $10,000. 260-
6523 after 4pm.

1990 Ford Tempo GLS, 4dr, low mi, AM-FM
cass, ac, ps, pb, pw, pl, more $11,000. 264-
9187.

1975 Audi Fox, 4 cyl, at, good running cond
$600/obo. 287-4598.

1978 Ford Fairmont sta/wgn, V8, at, body
needs work $1000/obo. 286-6424.

1983 GMC Jimmy 4x4, sr, ac, pb, ps, radio
cass, alarm duty pd, 5-spd, 2.8L $6800/obo.
261-6830.

1988 Chevy p/u, at, ps, pb, shell bed liner,
350,53,000 mi, new brakes $9000.287-4386.

1983 Nissan Pulsar, 5-spd, ac, AM-FM radio
cass, exc cond, tint glass, not duty pd $3500.
287-5153.

1984 Chevy Cavalier, 2.0L, 4 cyl, good run-
ning eng, no rust, good tires $2000/obo. 284-
5122.

1986 Buick Skylark, ac, ps, pb, AM-FM, avail
now, good cond $4000/obo. 283-6425.

1982 Subaru sta/wgn, at, ps, pb, AM-FM cass,
tow bar $2000/neg. 287-5586.

1989 Nissan Pulsar NX, ps, pb, ac, 5-spd,
AM-FM, 2dr t/tp, remove hatchbk, 23,000
mi, nose bra include $9600/obo. 286-3239.

1983 Honda Accord, ac, new tires, good run-
ning cond, will need body work, paint job
$1900. 289-3430.

1983 Mitsubishi Saporo, duty pd, ps, pb, ac,
tr, extras, runs well, new uphols $2500. 221-
9173.

1985 Volvo 740, all extras, exc cond $6800.
268-1526.

1978 Monte Carlo, V8 305, pb, ps, new
shocks, tires, u-joints $2200/obo. 282-4997.

1978 Buick Estate sta/wgn, V8, at, ac, full
pwr, 8 pass $1600. 284-4935.

1986 VW Jetta, 5spd, ac, sr, low mi, new tires,
exc cond $5000/obo. 284-3940 Rm 55.

1991 Mitsubishi Galant, full extras, AM-FM
cass, not duty pd $9000/obo. 252-6794.

1982 Buick Skylark, V6, at, ps, pb, AM-Fm
stereo radio, exc cond $3000/obo. 285-4385.

1983 Honda Prelude, exc con: all extras, not
duty pd, no U.S. specs $370( 264-0118.

1987 Ford Tempo, 4 dr, 4 c, ., ac, at, AM-FM
cass, pb, ps, rust treat, e .c cond, duty pd,
$7900. 268-2193.


1981 Subaru coupe, 2dr, 5-spd, no ac, duty pd
$2200. 287-6312.

1987 GMC Safari Custom, AM-FM cass, at,
ac, cruise, good cond. 284-4391.



Day maid/babysitter, T-Th, prefers Kobbe,
Howard, Farfan. 284-5398.

Eng-spk live-in maid, 15 yrs experi, respon-
sible, hard working, good w/children, avail
now. 284-3133.

Bilingual live-in/out maid, M-F, refs. 268-
3720 ask for Ruth.

Eng-spk day maid/babysitter, honest, reli-
able. 269-8908 ask for Valerie.

Eng-spk live-in maid, honest, good w/chil-
dren, refs, dependable. 284-4698.

Span-spk live-in/out maid, honest, depend-
able, refs. 252-1035.

Span-spk live-out maid, weekdays, week-
ends, general hsework, babysitting. 262-/
3923 ask for Francisca.

Eng-spk maid, weekends, babysits, cleans or
irons. 260-0356.

Eng-spk live-in/out maid, refs, experienced.
287-5595.

Eng-spk maid, hsekeeping, child care, M-F
days. 284-4737 ask for Ida.

Reliable, honest, grt w/children, day maid,
speaks little Eng. 282-3344.

Bilingual day maid, 1-2 days per week, refs.
220-2125 ask for Louise.

Honest, dependable live-in maid, babysits,
good w/children. 287-3293 ask for Georgina.

Bilingual honest, babysitter/hsekeeper, good
w/children, live-in/out, refs. 228-6940.

Bilingual reliable maid, cleans, irons, good
w/children, live-out only, refs. 245-4784 ask
for Dorine.

Bilingual dependable, honest babysitter/hse-
keeper, refs. 287-3839.

Eng-spk honest, responsible maid, 3 days a
week, avail now. 287-4072.

Eng-spk live-in hsekeeper, honest, depend-
able, exc w/children. 287-4725.

Span-spk live-out maid, honest, reliable, T-
Th, Howard, Kobbe, Rodman. 284-3980.

Span-spk honest, dependable live-in/out
maid. 269-8845.

Eng-spk maid, M-W-Th-F, Howard, Kobbe,
Rodman, refs. 284-5374.

Eng-spk honest, reliable, hard working maid,
2 days a week. 284-6392.

Eng-spk live-in/out maid, good w/children,
hardworker, refs. 224-6602.

Span-spk honest, hard working maid, How-
ard, refs., 284-4933.

Eng-spk live-in maid, good w/children. 260-
1994 ask for Rose.

Family child care provider. 252-2637 ask for
Rena.



23' Sportfisherman, hardtop, Volvo-Penta, I/
O diesel $8000/obo. 260-6429.

20' grady white Openfisherman, 200hp Mari-
ner, like new $12,000, 2 14' alum boats
$700ea. 220-7080 day.

20'2" Bayliner center console, 1991 boat mo-
tor, trlr, exc cond, many extras $11,500. 269-
4459.

19' Rinkerbuilt, 140hp I/O, exc cond, safety
equip, make offer. 282-3095.

19' V-hull, built-in gas tank, 135hp, OB re-
cenlty rebuilt, exc trlr $3295. 289-4856.

15' Chaparral boat, 75hp Mercury, exc cond,
bimini top, pink trim, skis, fish finder $3950.
260-9615.

12' wood/fiberglass jon boat $600, 9.9 Evin-
rude motor, long shaft $650. 286-4736 after
5pm.
Panga w/trlr, good cond $1500. 252-5395.


Windsurfer, Masterclass 360, 12' carbon
board, 3 Mylar sails $500. 284-3108 msg for
Chris.

Johnson 25hp OB, motor transom and dec
controls, 6 gal, fuel cell $950. 289-4748.

Ski-Delta, 6' wide wAtowing bridle $12. 252-
2138.



Pioneer stereo recvr SX8 $300, PS-S50
tumtbl $100, cass deck $225, spkers $300 pr.
252-6941.

Fisher dbl cass $100, photocopier $275,
CB40 chan handheld trans/recvr $90, printer
$100. 284-6881.

Zenith b/w TV $50, MGA stereo sys $75.223-
4276.

Technics stereo cass deck M228X, auto play,
full auto stop, dbx, exc cond $75/obo. 284-
5839.

XT comp, 2FD, Math Coprocessor, Mono
mon $300, Panasonic 9-pin printer $80. 252-
5185.

Sony 8mm handycam, Sony underwater
housing, Sonny 8mm cass recorder w/batt, 20
tapes $1200./obo. 260-7313.

Commo Amiga 500, IMeg Ram, 1084S mon,
50Meg HD, extra 3.5 dr, color printer, pro-
grams $900. 236-1223.

Nintendo, 2 controllers, gun, Tetris, Duck
Hunt, Mario Bros, 12 transmitters, recevrs.
286-4638.

Tandy 1000SX, color mon, Tandy printer,
3.5-5.25 floppies, mouse, joysticks, software,
30Meg hard cord $600. 284-5625.

Epson EX800, 9-pin color printer, little use
$350. 223-6530.

Gameboy w/It, carrying case, one game $80,
other games $15 ea. 252-6707.

Apple He comp, xtr DD, Mono color mon,.
printer, Appleworks, games, joystick, desk
chair, exc cond $850. 286-3441.

Commo 128 $150, printer $175, VCR $100,
Sony 19" TV $325, microwave $175. 286-
6378 after 6pm.

Panasonic phone/answer machine, 10" radial
arm saw, extra attach. 252-5985.

19" Sony Trinitron color TV, remote, exc
cond $400. 262-1251 after 5pm.

Sony port cdplayer, 4 yrs old $100, Nikon
camera, lens, flash $500/obo, Realistic scan-
ner $150. 282-4138.

JVC 260w chan car stereo amp, pre-amps
$250/obo. 230-1519.

Hasselbald 1000F, 80mm lens, A12 film
magazine, flash adapter filters, cable release,
extras $700. 284-3097.

386SX 16Mhz, 42M HDD, 2Meg Ram,
SVGA mon, mouse, IBM compat, 4 mos old,
games $999. 252-2998.

Mitsubishi 45" TV, solid oak cabinet $1800,
Epson FX85 printer $300. 252-2582.

27" Zenith stereo TV sys, 3 w/remote, 2 yrs
old, on-screen menus $500. 289-4748.

Packard Bell 286-12/360 FD/20M HD, Mono
mon $700/obo. 230-0186 Iv msg.

Wharfedale W60D spkers, wood cased, exc
cond $250. 252-6990.

Chinon 20PXL Super 8mm movie camera
$125. 287-3882.

Sears, 2 keyboard home electronic organ w/
rythmatic $900. 236-3191.

Printer, Star Micronics NX1000, 8 fonts, trac-
tor, friction, paper parking $125. 286-3444.

Sansui recvr, Sharp dual cass, Realistic
spkers $200. 286-3444.

Commo 64, comp, 2 DD, color mon, joys-
ticks, software $275. 287-4598.

PC Epson 286, FDD 1.2, color mon, 40HD,
mouse, camp desk, dust cover, more $800/
obo. 261-6830.

Commo video color mon $100. 284-5308 Iv
msg for Flaquer.
13" RCA color TV $75, 19" Magnavox color
TV $160. 284-6694.













Classified Ads


Tropic Times 11
Sept. 25,1992 Il


286 IBM compat, VGA color mon, Rainbow
printer, sound blaster, compu desk $1000.
287-5481.

Nintendo w/seven games, power glove. 286-
3174.

Epiphone-Gibson dec guitar, special effects
lever, brand new case $225. 221-9173 ask
for Henry.

Amstad word processor, green mon, extra
ribbon, disks, manuals $225. 284-6629.

Nintendo entertainment center, zapper,
deck, good cond, games $250. 252-5260.

Magnavox phone/clock radio, tone pulse
dial, pwr backup, features hold $40. 289-
4424.

Hitachi full size VHS camcorder $400. 289-
4424.

Commo 64K keyboard, printer, disc drive,
software $350. 233-1417.

Kenwood 125w amp, exc cond $200. 284-
3156 ask for Jeff.

Nintendo sys, deck, gun paddles, hookups, 2
cart, Super Mario Bros, Duck Hunt, Super
Mario 3 $100. 289-5063.

Yamaha linear tracking turntbl (may need
needle) $125, Apple Imagewriter printer
$125, all obo. 287-4896 after 5pm.



Kenmore microwave 700w, multi-pwr, temp
controlled, program defrost $150. 284-5532.

GE hvy duty-washer & dryer, 2 mos old,
$700 set, dryer $325, washer $450. 284-
4094.

Whirlpool 15,000 btu ac, 3 mos old, seldom
used $450/obo. 284-4094.

Twin bed, metal frame, matt $120, comp
table w/storage, shelves $120, metal frame
swing set, slide $100, plants. 284-6881.

Twin matt, box spring, frame $100, DR glass
top tbl, 4 chairs $50. 284-4681.

GE washer, Ig hvy duty, access, exc cond
$500/obo. 286-6333.

Q-sz sleeper sofa, chr, recliner, exc cond
$850, rattan DR tbl w/smoke glass, 6 chrs,
exc cond $850. 286-3441.

Hotpoint washer & dryer $150 both, comics,
records. 233-5028.

Q-sz waterbed, waveless, oak headbd w/6
drawers, cushioned rails, heater, liner $525.
260-2037.

Magic Chef microwave, exc cond, touch
pad, digital $185/obo, Whirlpool 21.6 cu.ft
frzer, ice maker, dispenser $880/obo. 289-
4381.

Carpeting, med brn, cab for wall mounting,
bamboo blinds. 260-4463.

GE washer & dryer, perfect cond $600,
18,000 btu ac $320. 284-3124.

DR tbl, 6 chairs, china cab, 2 leafs $600/obo,
3pc LR set $600 firm, 5pc stereo equip $300
firm. 223-5709.

3 sets curtains, 84x72 $225, 3 sets 52x105.
$175. 286-4783.

Dishwasher, top leading $60, sofa and chair
$295. 252-6968.

Q/K-sz bed, GE fridge/frzr, water/ice disp,
23.5 cu.ft. GE cooking center (oven, micro,
range, air ext), chair w/footstool. 263-4321.

Whirlpool 10,000 btu ac, 1 yr old $200,
designer model ac 10,000 btu, 3 mos old
$350, Whirlpool washing mach $200. 263-
4321.,

Whirlpool fridge/frzr $450, 3 bikes, various
sizes, prices. 252-6986.

Lg vanity dresser, solid pecan, w/dbl mirror
$650. 252-2582.

DR tbl, smoke glass top, rectangle, 6 chairs
w/bamboo base, exc cond $750. 225-2197.

Sofa, loveseat, old hvy duty, needs minor
repair $350/obo. 286-4582.

Roper washer, full size, 3 mos old $250. 261 -
9672.

Walnut daybed w/matt, exc cond, $400. 286-
3778.


Crib, access $250, port crib, playpen $130,
sterilizer $25, elec wing $100, 2 carseats $90-
$50/obo. 252-1227.

Entertainment ctr, stereo, TV, custom cabinet
$250, 19" color TV $100. 287-5998.

Tappan 27,000 btu ac, 220volts, little used
$550. 230-0932.

Dinette set, 4 chrs $225, deep rose 6x9 rug $20.
287-4180.

Admiral 23cu.ft side-by-side nofrost frige/
fizr, ice & water disp, exc cond $725. 252-
6547.

8pc Early American LR set, exc cond, pine
wood, velour $2400. 286-3345.

Fum, household, carpets, curtains, more. 286-
4337.

Whirlpool washer & dryer set $550 both. 229-
1706 10am-10pm.

12x15 beige carpet $150, 9x12 pink carpet
$75. 284-4386.

French Prov desk, chr, nite stand, 9-drawer
dresser, mirror $1000. 252-5395.

Westinghouse 15cu.ft. fridge, 2dr, 2 mos old
$675. 260-3903.

End tblis, leather sofabed, tbl, china cab, Canon
video camera, best offer. 260-6280.

White wicker loveseat w/cushion $100. 284-
3685.

Sharp microwave $150, cobra cordless phone,
new $90, Sentry safety deposit box $50. 287-
6284.

Recliner chr, exc cond $350, coffee tbl, 2 end
tbls $400, card tbl, chairs $85. 287-6284.

12x15 rose pink carpet w/pad, good cond $95.
264-0118.

Kenmore stackable, all in one, washer & dryer,
med capacity $550. 284-3739.

Burnt bamboo set, 6-fold screen, octagonal tbl,
2 arm chrs (need minor repairs), 5x7 Oriental
design mach made rug, exc cond $50. 260-
5684 after 5pm.



Motorolla Pageboy mII Pager. If found call 286-
6121 Iv msg.




Freezer $75, set of side step pipes for jeep or
truck $65, parrot cage $25. 284-6694.

Exercise equipment. 284-3821.

Sewing mach w/cab $300, rattan loveseat
$400, glass dinette, 4 chairs $400, 9pc wall unit
$1400. 252-6941.

Several kitchen cabinets, exc cond $50-up.
284-3930.

Desk roll-top solid oak $1100, playpen $50,
single folding bed, matt $75, Yamaha guitar
$200. 260-5102.

Lg bird cage $80, encyclopedia Britannica set,
like new $800, twin trundle bed, wood $450.
223-4276.

2 Barbie Corvettes, batt operated, new $150 ea,
Barbie Dream House, assembled, new $150.
287-3738.

Whirlpool 18,000 btu ac $160, Mr. Coffee
maker. 252-5185.

Wedding dress $195, playpen $40, R&R LPs,
sm judo suit $25, shoes sz 3, new, pieces of
leather. 252-2042.

Dog carrier, old U.S. coins, Budweiser memo-
rabilia, compu desk, books. 287-3486.

Crib, matt, bedding $100, 5 white alum blinds
31'W $20 ea, high chair $15, Little Tykes pool
$20. 284-5332.

McCullough 750W gen $300. 286-3441.

Ping pong tbl $275. 286-3156.

Pro-Form T50 pulse Ergometer treadmill, ad-
just spd, incline, like new $475. 256-6356.

Riding mower, MTD, 8hp, 30" wide, 5-spd,
good cond $550. 287-5632.

Mini & macro blinds, assor. sizes, new, bmrn re-
cliner. 252-5985.


Sm pet/cat carrier, cat food & kitty litter,
scratching post $110 all, Fenwick 3 compart
tackle box, V fix latch $5. 223-2193.

2 twin beds, matt $100, swing set $70, wed-
ding rings, female $200 all neg. 284-6431.

41 vol encyclopedia Britannica, yearbooks
until 1987, 15 vol Britannica Jr, English.
$1000.obo. 262-1251 after 5pm.

Potted house plants, indoor/outdoor, various
sizes, types. 286-4783.

Century baby walker, Gerry backpack, play-
pen, high chair. 282-4138.

Gold carpet to fit std BOQ, 15x15 & 15x30
$200/obo. 287-6936.

12volt childs elec sports car, stereo/CD
player, jogging, stroller, misc. 285-4236.

Bike, port AM-FM cass radio, aquarium, var-
porizer, port organ. 286-4478.

Gameboy, light, 6 games, cleaning kit $130,
cordless delec lipstick weed eater $25. 287-
3738.

JVC 20" TV, like new $350, SC mem type-
writer $200, 4 Nissan truck sport rims, 14x5,
steel $80 set. 252-5829.

7-drawer dresser $100. 252-5829.

Cosco baby swing,'brand new-$30, Evenflo
baby carrier $20. 264-9180.

Barbie Corvette $150, washer & dryer,
wicker blind. 285-4692.

6,000 btu ac $150, complete set NIV Bible on
cass $60. 287-3882.

Northwestern golf clubs, 1-3-5 woods w/
cover, 3-9 irons, Pina Putter, balls, bag, tees
$350/obo. 287-3270.

Treadmill Proform w/heart rate, pulse comp,
like new. 252-6592.

Plants, palms, Bouganvillas, ferns, others.
232-5258.

Fuji Palisade men's racing bike, access $200.
287-3738.

Limoges vase $250, garbage disposal $195,
paper back novels, radio electronic parts.
252-2042.

Ladies 18K three color gold necklace $1000.
rattan porch set $1500. 287-3340.

Baby swing $28, deluxe stroller everr
handle, like new $75. 287-6382.

Four Firestone all terrain tires 31x10.5x15, 4
15x8 WW $250/obo, AF Blues dbl knit 43R,
new $75. 269-4343.

Metal frame for twin bed $13. 282-3575.

Asst colors prom dresses, sz 5 $70ea/neg.
286-3570.

Lg rear storage container for Jeep CJ-7 or
Wrangler $50. 268-2144.

Maternity clothes, szs 8/12, best offer,
Acoustic guitar, case $200/obo, Ig dog ken-
nel. 260-5148.

Wetsuit, men's shorty, 2mm sz 1g, never used
$75. 286-4571.

Kolcraft deluxe stroller, adjust $45, baby
swing $15, both grt cond. 283-4227.

Bumper pool/card tbl, 4 chrs $250, K-sz
matt, top only $100, Lloyds AM-FM cass,
recvr, 4 spkrs $85. 252-2540.

Nintendo sys, 9 cartridges $120, sm pet car-
rier, never used $15. 223-4575.

Gold clubs, asst metal/woods, Mizuno irons,
std irons, negotiable. 287-6820.

Whirlpool 10,000 btu ac, used 1 yr $290.
269-8845.

Graco walker $25, Dazey hair dryer $20,
boy's bike $35. 287-4083.

Parrot cage, and parrot seed. 284-3799.

60 original Beta movies $2ea or $90 for alL
287-5896.

Ladies cocktail dress, sz 12, pink, like new
$50, ladies suit sz 12 $120. 282-3577 after
6pm.

Brother electric typewriter $100, answer ma-
chine $50. 223-3739.

Police leather gear, belt hold 9 diff access,


basket weave finish $150. 289-5063.

Seed sprayer, assorted pot planters, reel-to-
reel w/2 spkers, exc cond. 223-7437 after
6pm.

Wedding dress, veil, slip, sz 5 $300, 21"
mountain bike, 18-spd, good cond $300. 252-
2080.



1990 Honda GB-500, '91 Montesa 345, '88
Honda TLR-250, like new, extras. 261-3485.

1985 Suzuki Madura 700cc, V5 motor, water
cooled, shaft drive, many extras $2500. 289-
4748.

1985 Honda Shadow, 700cc, good cond
$1400. 268-1526.

1984 R-100RS BMW, exc running cond,
needs cosmetic work on fairing $1500. 252-
5100.

1984 Honda Nighthawk 700c, 9,000 mi, exc
cond, 2 helmets $2500. 284-3685.

Vespa Giande Moped, recently rebuilt, runs
good $250. 286-4971.

Harley drag bars $25, light fairing $60, '78
650 engine 90% comp $150. 286-4638.



Qtrs 305B, Clayton, Sat. 8am-noon. Clothes,
computer, auto parts, twin beds.

Qtrs 669A, Clayton. Sat. 7:30-11am. Multi-
family.

Qtrs 544C, Clayton. Sat. 7am. Clothes, toys,
misc household items.

Qtrs 105B, Howard. Sat. 7am-noon. Clothes,.
fishing gear, microwave, stereo equip, file
cab, more.

Qtrs 605B, Howard. Sat. Household items,
girls/women clothing, stereo equip.

Qtrs 767B, Balboa. Sat. 6:30-1 lam. House-
hold, clothes, misc.

Qtrs 60D, Espinar. Sat. 8-7

Qtrs 195, Gatun. Sat. 10am-2pm. Multi-fam-
ily.



Lamp, floor/table in working cond, low price.
236-0981 after 5pm.

Bassett hound puppies. 233-5028.

Eng-spk mature maid, babysit, cook, clean,
laundry, occasional overnight, refs, 7am-
4:30pm, M-F, $110. 286-3385.

Live-in maid, very mature, honest, must
speak English well, refs, cook, clean. 236-
4408 after 6pm.

Eng-spk gymnastics coach to temporary
teach classes at Howard, Albrook, Clayton.
286-3772.

To train our puppy to be a guard dog, must
speak English. 261-5579.

To buy book shelf unit for encyclopedias.
287-3441.

75-1001b dog travel cage, 5-10 lb cat travel
cage. 252-6990.

Baby crib w/mattress. 261-4338.

Person with p/u truck to move DR fum from
Howard to Panama. 284-4995.

Mechanic for 1985 Cadillac Coupe Deville,
knowledge in computer readout, will supply
parts & handbook for the car. 282-5584.

Bilingual live-in maid, days, take care of a 3
yr old. 286-3197.

Piano in good cond. 243-5269.

Baseball, football, basketball, hockey cards,
all variety, will pay reasonable price. 260-
7997 5-10pm.

Military patches, old or new, foreign, U.S.
284-3945 Rm 215.

Mature bilingual maid, good w/children, M-
F, occasional overnight work, $120 mo. 260-
6342.

Hospital bed in good cond. 260-6450 Iv msg
in answering machine.













B1 Tropic Times
BA1 Sept. 25,1992



Super Crossword _


ACROSS
1 Master. in
song
6 Farmer s
future?
10 Nursery word
14 Grape jefly
18 British
actress Eli-
zabeth
19 Frog genus
20 Philippine
dyewood tree
21 Addis -
23 John Way-
ne's classic
western
25 Alfred Hitch-
cock thriller
27 Noel Cow-
ard's 1933
AA winner
28 Minstrel, in
India
29 Treated
badly
30 Splinter
group
31 Fertilizes, in
a way
32 Western
movies
33 - Paolo
36 "The Night of
the - '
39 Slugger's
need
40 Robert
Young 1972
TV movie
50 Renew or
restore
51 Motel's fore-
runners
52 Part of


Bozo's 92 Smell a -
get-up (suspect)
53 Sister of 93 Small hollow
Ares biol.
54 - Green 94 American
(elopers ' humorist
destination) 95 Oranges and
55 Glasgow Indians
negative 90 Church
56 Female areas
parent * 101 Pro -
57 Evening TV 105 Job-hunt.. s
soap need
59 French con- 106 Cul-de- -
nections (dead-end
60 Advance, in streets)
cribbage 107 Dumas hero
62 " - Town" 112 Bogart/Berg -
63 Depends man classic
64 Julie 114 Oscar-winner
Andrews hit based on
musical Shaw's "Pyg-
69 Large scis- malion"
sors 115 Growl tier-
71 One of the cely
Caesars 116 Look closely
72 Kimono sash 117 Pickler's
73 Girl of song plant
76 Sufficient 118 Brave s
supply shelter
77 It might be 119 "West -
electric Story"
78 The heart 120 Makes a
80 Jerusalem boo-boo
thorn 121 Parisian
83 Home of the papa
leprechaun 122 Onset
84 "Long - and DOWN
Far Away" 1 Not fem.
85 Sergeant's 2 Canadian
command prov.
86 Repossessor's 3 Serb or Bul-
document gar
87 David Niven 4 Scandinavian
1946 hit tales


5 Anoint
6 Former Euro-
pean king-
dom
7 Electric cat-
fish
8 At- !
(pronto)
9 New Zealand
native fort
10 Kitchen cloth
11 Dismay (alt.
spelling)
12 Reduces the
calories
13 Whole
14 Day of rest
15 "All - Eve"
16 Hesitate
17 One of the
Doubledays
22 Says further
24 New Deal
org.
26 River and
town in
Luzon
28 Wedding
proclama-
tions
31 Battleship to
remember
33 Top kick
34 Air raid
warning
35 Leather oil
flasks
37 Foreigner, in
Latin
America
38 Arm bone
39 Electronic
listener
41 It may say
"Welcome"


BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker














HAGAR the Horrible �ByDik Browne
T HAGAR t he 1 HorileBy 4 pMrwe

;z6e1AV, Im*mmu [ -A e

42 Yang's com-
plement 79 Bread
43 Window spread
dressing 81 Old times,
44 Doc or once
Dopey 82 Golf gadget
45 Goal 84 Actor Carney
46 Purposive 85 Engages
47 Perry's crea- 88 Quiver
tor 89 Atelier stand
48 Narrow inlets 90 Native sail-
49 Draft org. ors. in India
56 Couple 91 Tell a story
57 Had a crav- 95 Grampuses
ing 96 Connery and
58 Once called O'Casey
Clay 97 Brazilian
61 Kind of curve palm
62 Like 3, 7. 29, 98 Word after
etc. color or
63 Polish vigor- Coast
ously 99 He was "Lou
64 Doctrine Grant"
65 Under one's 100 Expectant
- (secret) father, once?
66 "What is the 102 New Zealand
- bre- tribe
vity...?" 103 Fruit pies
67 Nothing 104 Metal tip at
68 "More safe I end of shoe-
sing with - lace
voice..." 107 Unit of force
69 Pickens or 108 Southwest
Summerville wind
70 Queen of the 109 California
gods valley
73 Novelist 110 Biblical name
Francoise 111 No, in Mos-
74 Friendship cow
75 Machine tool 113 Tarzan's fol-
76 Fowl or hen lower
lead-in 114 Motorist's
77 One kind of need
trip?
78 Coffeehouses


DENNIS THE MENACE


LAFF-A-DAY


"You sure know how to hurt a guy!
Meatloaf and fruitcake in
- the same meal!" � .


Barney Google and Snuffy Smith By Fred Lasswell


I4


9120' 6507:10r- M P M P
"MiFimp "Emm gwo
I-IMMINFi-P-1 PAN krj-l-:l ""MIRr-
Bil!R Ldlui-i Ngopzwl
wo
pwK AMP ;:i"P
I9-01WIRM @I NMil Im-OK MEW- Pol
2P wul


L411 FW�"kjIc IIFAM�


-, 11 ji'l ore
wurn MOCAP ClMllrli
CF,-1




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E5KCK2CP8_BW6P8V INGEST_TIME 2011-04-29T13:07:08Z PACKAGE UF00098947_00110
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

Gift of the Panama Canal Museum News Features Sports Valent Recreation Center Reserve military police train Triathletes to compete in offers free movies. Page 3. in Panama. Page 10. Las Vegas. Page 11. Vol. V. No. 38 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, Sept. 25, 1992 Panama starts CFC campaign COROZAL(TropicTimes)TheU.S. Southern Command will begin its Combined Federal Campaign Thursday. The campaign will continue through Nov. 16. with a goal of $350,000. The 24th Wing's share of SOUTHCOMs goalis $63,000. "The disasters at Homestead AFB, Guam, Hawaii and Somalia brought tremendous devastation and loss of lives," said Maj. Michael Dillard, 24th Wing CFC project officer. "A call for humanity and help has been made. Answer the call with your contribution to the CFC, k eit's the human thing to do." Air Force members should call DilPhoo lard at 284-3815 for details. Air Rescue Service MA-60G Pave Hawk helicopters from Nellis AFB like this one will be part of the Air Force Combat According to U.S. Army South's actRescue inventory that will transfer from Air Mobility Command to Air Combat Command Jan. 1, 1993. ing project officer, John Cuite, USARSO's portion of the goal is $210,000. The Army's campaign will begin with Air Force rescue units merge with ACC a 13 a n o-otlnc ensday for all commanders, directors, key staff by TSgt. Rene Zapata Jr. U.S. Air Force theater majorcommands. Rescue Squadron accounted for a total of and CFC project officers and keyperOLb .Air Rescue Service Locally, the U.S. Southern Air Forces 9,898rescuesof UnitedNationspersonsons. The lunch will be held at the Fort (12th Air Force) will be gaining the 66th nel, including 996 combat saves. During Clayton Noncommissioned Officers' Club HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA)The Air Rescue Squadron at Nellis AFB, the Vietnam War, ARS forces saved the and will be followed by a training session Air Staff will realign Air Rescue Service Nevada and Operating Location-I ARS lives of 4,120 personnel, including a for the project officers and keypersons. units under the Air Combat Command at Howard. grand total of 2,780 combat saves. During Each unit will be assigned a key perJan. 1, 1993 to more closely align comAmong other responsibilities, the this conflict, ARS aircrews and pararesson who can enrollpeoplein CFC or give bat missions and simplify command lines. commander of ACC will assume duties cue jumpers were the most highly decomore information. ARS is the primary Air Force combat as the Air Force chief of staff executive rated Air Force members with three Medals Lt. James Morales is the project offirescue force with global search and resagent for search and rescue matters and of Honor and 10 Air Force Crosses. cer for U.S. Naval Station Panama Cacue responsibility in support of Departwill be responsible for the development "As the Air Rescue Service enters a nal. The naval station has a $31,500 goal ment of Defense operations. of multi-command operational procedures new phase of its history, one thing is this year. Under the realignment, all continenfor rescue helicopters, HC-130P tankers, remarkably clear," Dunn said. "The men Morales said Navy keypersons will tal U.S. rescue forces will transfer to pararescue jumpers, and theater rescue and women who havebeenpart ofARS's be trained this week and there will be ACC, except for the 55th Weather coordination centers. past have contributed to saving more keypersons for all the naval station's diReconnaissance Squadron, McClellan "The ARS has had a proud history than 25,00 lives, nearly 4,000 of these visions as well as its tenant commands. AFB, Calif. since its establishment March 13, 1946 at were combat saves, since the dayin 1946 People can contribute through their keyperThe 55th WRS will remain with the Andrews Field, Md.," Maj. Donald Dunn, when ARS was established. The rescue sons. Air Mobility Command. Overseas, ARS OL-I ARS commander, said. "At the motto will always continue to be: 'These forces will transfer to the control of the height of the Korean War, the 3rd Air things we do that others may live."' Story continues on page 16. From street cops to commandos by Peter Copeland ficking organizations. himself about what could go wrong, he keeps a wellScripp Howard News Service The new program, which DEA says would cost $11 worn copy of "A Bright Shining Lie," a book about the a million in the first year, would increase the number of tragedy and failure of Vietnam. le Editor's note: This is the second in a mobile teams from six to 21, replace temporary-duty One year ago, worried about the lack of clear stratthree part series about the U.S.'s war on drugs as agents with full-time slots and supplement the work of egy to fight the war, Ferrarone sat down with Marilyn seen by Scripps Howard New Service reporters. It's more than 300 DEA employees already working in McAfee, the State Department's deputy chief of misreprinted with permission from the ScrippsHoward Latin America. sion at the U.S. Embassy in La Paz. News Service. Agents who volunteer for the Snowcap teams are The old strategy was enough to keep the Washington sent to For Benning, Ga., where they are agiven a weekbean-counters happy -everybody had "body counts" LA PAZ, Bolivia -The Drug Enforcement Adminilong evaluation before taking an eight-week course of drugs seized and labs discovered -but it wasn't stration, which provides many of the ground troops for taught by Army Rangers. slowing the flow of cocaine from Bolivia. America's drug war overseas, plans to greatly expand They learn to survive in the jungle, fire an M-16 and A new scheme was hatched -Operation Ghost its roving patrols of combat-trained agents in five Latin work a field radio. Then there is a 25-week Spanish Zone. Americancountries. course, followed by a 10-week "mount out" at the 'The target was the Chapare, a remote piece of The plan, quietly included in the agency's proposed Marine base at Quantico, Va., where the agents polish Bolivian jungle about the size of New Jersey. budget for 1993, would create a permanent "Andean their skills and pick up diplomatic pointers from the The embassy group mustered 1,000 Bolivian and support team" of 105 people trained in military operaState Department. American cops, GIs and drug agents, a score of aircraft, tions to rotate through Peru, Bolivia, Guatemala, EcuaThey are formed into self-contained teams of about a roomful of high-tech hardware and four U.S. military dor, and Venezuela. a dozen people from DEA and Border Patrol, plus officers eager to fight a "real war." The DEA would use the new team to expand the former Army Special Forces soldiers who serve as On Feb. 23, they kicked off the largest counter-drug existing Snowcap teams in Peru, Bolivia and Guatemedics and radio operators. operation ever attempted. mala, operations staffed by U.S.-based field agents on When they hit the ground, the teams come under the "We're moving enough troops and equipment into temporary duty. operational control of resident DEA agents in charge, the most active narco-trafficking areain Bolivia so that The Snowcap strike teams lead Latin American men like Don Ferrarone. we can control the ground, the thousands of waterways police forces in paramilitary raids on jungle drug labs Ferrarone, who heads the DEA team in Bolivia, sees and clandestine airstrips andin operations against trafhis war as a low-intensity conflict. As a reminder to Story continues on page 8.

PAGE 2

2 Tropic Times Sept. 25,1990 STOP! Crossing guard keeps walkers safe by SrA. Jackie Ambrose 24th Wing Group Public Affairs Offic. HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA) -If you've driven along Bruja Road on school mornings, chances are, you've seen him. Whether waving to passing cars or holding a stop sign for schoolchildren to cross, Ricardo Ogg has been a fixture here for the past three years. \ Ogg, a security guard for the Howard Elementary School, works Mondays through Fridays as a school crossing guard and as a security guard for the school compound. "People began waving at me from my first day on the job," Ogg recalled. "It's grown since then and now people blow their horns at me and even give me sodas and some snacks. I have 14 kids of my own, so I love kids and when the students get to know me, some even bring me candy." A resident of San Miguelito, he is at the school by 5:15 a.m., even though his official day runs from7 a.m. to 3 p.m. h "Mr. Ogg is always here early," third-grade teacher, Terrie Haning, said. "He helps teachers with their books and other loads andis friendly withthekids, who really listen to him." "I come early to relieve whoever is on that shift to give them more time to rest at home," he said. Other than one incident last year, he's never had an accident occur at the crosswalk, Ogg said. "An 8-year-old boy was on his bicycle and about to enter the road while traffic was moving. I just reached out and grabbed him and his bicycle," he said. Ogg has received an excellence award and certificate of appreciation for his work as a security guard, and it's ajob he looks forward to every day. Ricardo Ogg stops traffic for schoolchildren and parents. U ArF.ptobiS A JclA. Military police begin patrolling hospital, parking lots by Sgt. Jane Usero USARSO Public Affairs Office GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL (USARSO PAO) -Visitors to Gorgas Army Community Hospital may have noticed arecent increase in the levelofsecurity aroundthehospital with identification check points, roving milltary police cars and dog patrols. "The increased security is not because of an increased threat," said SSgt. Elieser Colonroche, hospital security non-commissioned officer in charge. "Our purpose is to ensure safer and more comfortable surroundings for those visiting the hospital," he said. The upgrade of hospital security began Aug. 19 with the addition of more military police roving patrols. These patrols include walking, mobile and K-9 teams between 6 p.m. -6 a.m. "These patrols have made a substantial difference," said Colonroche. "Before the increase in patrols, there were 711 trespassers apprehended between Jan. 1 and July 30. Since they began the new patrols there has been only one incident, and the culprits were caught," he said. "Our job is to check identification of those parking in the hospital parking areas and attempting to enter the facility," said Spec. Thomas Mosher, a member us Amy phoec by Sgt. Jan. Usaro of the guard force. Sgt. James Myles and his military working dog patrol the parking lot at Gorgas Army Community Hospital. During the first day the four-man guand force was in place, it turned 169 people "But in most cases, people will be dithere are more parking spaces open for aged criminal behavior, and many paaway, Colonroche said. rected to the parking areas." patients and visitors to the hospital. tients, staff members and the U.S. govAnother place people will find the The response to the new guards has "I've had people complain when I ernment were the victims. The new sysguards is the emergency ramp, which been good, Colonroche said. turn them away that they have been doing tem is in place to change this," he said. guards will only let emergency vehicles "I had one person tell me that this was this for years and can't understand the The higher security is no more restricuse. the first time in his three years here he sudden change," said Mosher. "But, after tive than entering any other military facility "Of course, there are exceptions to was abletofind a parking place under the a while, everyone will get used to it." orinstallation, according to Colonroche. this. For example, elderly, handicapped building," said Mosher. "For a very long time, Gorgas was "There will probably be some resisor people who would have problems "People used to park here to go downoperated as an open, unrestricted and tance to this change but, in the long run, negotiating the stairs will still be able to town to work or shop," said Colonroche. unsecure installation," Colonreche said. the hospital will be a more secure place be dropped off at the ramp," he said. "Now that the guard force is checking, "This caused conditions that encourfor everyone concerned," he said.

PAGE 3

Tropic Times Sept. 25,1992 3 "Our screening re S Room seats only 40Movie man share 50 p done on purpose. I itS wanted to keep the back-to-back h its si." the smaller roorm and by Sgt. Jane Usero Anne Kelly, Valent Recreation Center comfortable seating USARSO Publ/ic Affairs Office director. "A program like his is great, but and surroundings, one that we couldn't afford if we had to watching the movies FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO)pay for it. He does an outstanding job. is a more enjoyable Walking through the Valent Recreation He does everything from setting up the experience. Also, the Center these days, visitors may notice schedule and doing the signs to printing smaller room offers something new. Neatly hand-written up the hand-outs and setting up the room," better acoustics and popsters hanging here and there, loud she said. .the movies can be gun fights coming from one ofthe rooms Kaberline, the movie man, as some heard better," he and one man dashing in and out of the are calling him these days, is not new to added. room with a stack of fliers in one hand the world of movies. He was introduced Hearing the movand what looks like a gold album in the to movies at a young age by his father and ies the right way is other. worked 12 years as a theater manager Kaberline's prime Once the door opens to this noisy andprojectionist. interest and with his room and the lights are turned on, scores "I love the movies and have been coldigital laser disc of people pour into the hallway smiling lecting these forabout six years now,"he player and Dolby and talking about how impressed they said. Surround System, ( ] were. Still others maketheir wayinto the With a collection of more than 500 consisting of six room with the encouragement of their movies, the movie man has plenty to speakers strategically host, George Kaberline, a distribution choose from for his programming. placed around the facility manager for the Army and Air "I began choosing films that are acroom, the audience Force Exchange System. tion type, gearing the program toward does just that. Kaberline What is going on behind the door to the adult audience," Kaberline said. "You don't just see this room, thanks to Kaberline, is a chance "Recently, however, I'venoticed alotof theactionin agunfight, youareputinthe movies just on Sundays, Kaberline has to hear the movies. To Kaberline, you families coming in so I have begun to middle ofit," says the movie man. "You had to expand a bit and now he shows haven't seen a movie until you have schedule family-oriented films as well." haven't seen a movie until you have movies most Friday nights and Saturdays heard the movie and, in the new screenWith line-ups such as action-packed heard the movie," he said. as well. ing room at the center, visitors can do Arnold Schwarzeneggermovies one day To ensure movie goers have the op"I program movies forFridays from 6 both. and movies like "Ferngully" and "The portunity to see what is popular, Kaberp.m. and Saturdays and Sundays usually Though Kaberline is not a center Color Purple" the next day, Kaberline's line has many ofthe top movies on order from 1 p.m. on," he said. employee, he offers his services, equipline-up is likely to have something for from the states. Putting all this time and energy into ment and movies free. everyone. "At one point, I scheduled a movie the screening room seems a lot for free, "When I saw the big screen television, "Some ofmy schedules are requested before I even had it," Kaberline explained. but to Kaberline, it's a labor of love. I offered to do this," he said. "It not only by those who come in," he said. One "I was going on the hopes that it would "I get a kick out of it," h& says. "I see gives the soldiers and their families an such line-up is the "Star Wars" trilogy make it here in time, and it did." people coming in from as far away as opportunity to see these movies the way that Kaberline has scheduled for Oct. 11. Another way the movie man ensures Howard and even the Atlantic side. I they were meant to be seen, but Ihave the Another likely hit is the "Star Trek" his audiences are seeing what's hot is by have also had people tell me that having enjoyment of seeing and hearing them marathon set for Saturday and Sunday. looking through a stateside television the opportunity to watch my movies helped myself. I couldn't do this in my apart"I've heard a lot of the people that guide. them pass the time and miss their famiment. The speakers are too big for one come through say they wouldn't miss "I look through the guide and see what lies maybe just a bit less." thing, but I don't have a television," that schedule," he said. is being shown on the movie channels. With a smile and a nod, Kaberline Kaberline said with a grin. With limited seating in the screening This gives me good ideas for my schedwalks away to hang a new poster. "The "When George approached us with room, however, Kaberline suggests comuling," he said. thanks and smiles I get is pay enough," his offer, wejumped at the chance," said ing early. Just a few weeks ago, he was showing he says over his shoulder. Canal Zone sees money burned, fuel rationed FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -The following Felipe area of Panama City from 12th Street to 3rd establishes regulations for the rationing of fuel. are significant World War II events which took place Street. The Foreign Ministry later announced they Sept.19 during September 1942: were called upon to supervise the transfer of $2 Gen. Alexander A. Vandergrift establishes continuSept. 5 million in old bills to be burned in the Canal Zone as ous defense lines, divides the Lunga area of GuadalcaFinal decision is made for Operation Torch, the it was impossible to transfer them to U.S. banks. nal into 10 sectors. Allied invasion of northwest Africa, to include landings Provisional raider-parachute battalion conduct reSept.20 at Algeria and at Casablanca, Morocco. connaissance in force along Edson's ridge, to close the Maj. Gen. George Brett, commander in chief of Sept. 6 approach route to Henderson Field, Guadalcanal. the Allied Air Forces in the Pacific front arives to inThe Executive Secretary of the Panama National Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower officially announces spect Panama Canal defenses. Police announces that Lt. Col. Francisco Aued, third assumption of command as commanderin chief, Allied The outline plan for Operation Torch is issued and commander of the institution, and Capt. Bolivar E. Expeditionary Force forTorch, and Allied Force HeadD-Day is set for Nov. 8. Vallarino, chief, Cavalry Squadron, were invited to quarters is activated in London. Sept.24 visit the United States by the U.S. secretary of war Sept.13 The Honorable Frank Knox, secretary of the and the U.S. Army. Adm. Robert. L. Ghormley orders the 7th Marinesto Navy, arrives at Albrook Field to inspect Canal The Canal Zone Chapter of the American Red reinforce the garrison at Guadalcanal. defenses. He is received by U.S. Ambassador Edwin Cross and the Civilian Defense Corps coordinate Sept. 15 Wilson. A reception is given in his honor at the U.S. and give instruction at Balboa School on Incendiary The first elements, Co. E and attachments of 126th Embassy on Balboa Avenue. bombs and the use and care of gas masks. Infantry, 32nd Division, fly to Port Moresby from BrisQuarry Heights announces that Capt. David Young Germans announce the capture of Novorossisk, leadbane, Australia. This is the first U.S. infantry force to Nanney, stationed with the Coast Artillery at Fort ing port on the east coast of the Black Sea. Fierce arrive in New Guinea. Kobbe, is promoted to the rank of major. fighting continues around Stalingrad. Japanese submarines attack U.S. warships on patrol Sept. 27 Sept. 7 south and east of the Solomon Islands, sinking the First Raider Battalion attempts to attack an enemy The Panama Canal Department announces the aircraft carrier Wasp and damaging the battleship North strongpointinthe MatanikauVillage areaof Guadalcapromotions of Capt. Walter L. Coleman and 1st Lt. Carolina. nal from the rear but is unable to cross the river. Leonard C. Kincaid, both of Quarry Heights, to the Sept.16 Japanese abandon Ioribaiwa Ridge in New Guinea ranks of major and captain respectively. Cristobal Magistrate, E.I.P. Tateman, who served under Australian pressure and are in full retreat. Sept. 9 as regional director of the Civilian Defense OrganiSept.29 A Japanese plane drops an incendiary bomb on a zation on the Atlantic side, is appointed Director of The troop strength of the Guadalcanal garrison is mountain slope near Brookings, Ore., causing a small Civil Defense. now 19,261; 3,260 troops are on Tulagi. Sixth Naval forest fire. This is the sole bombing by an enemy plane Cecil Tilton, senior business analyst of the ReConstruction Battalion is constructing an airstrip. of the continental U.S. during the war. search Unit, Fuel Rationing Division of the Office of Sept. 11 Price Administration in Washington, D.C., arrives Editor's note: This timeline continues a series of Completion ofarunway on Adak (Aleutian Islands) to implement gasoline rationing in the Canal Zone. articles relative to U.S. Army defenses in the Panpermits stepped up air offensive against Kiska Island. German Army Group B penetrates the northwest ama Canal areas as a contribution to the commemoSince Aug. 29 about 6,000 Japanese have arrived at suburbs of ialingrad. ration of the 50th anniversary of World War II. The Guadalcanal. Sept. 17 timeline was complied by Dolores DeMena, U.S.Army Sept. 12 The government of Panama issues a Decree-Law South historian. U.S. Army infantry troops penetrate the San creating the Gasoline and Tire Rationing Office and

PAGE 4

Sept.25,1992 Hemisphere Shining Path continues fight Three killed during HUAYCAN, Peru (AP) -"Defend the Life of Pret C olum bus protests sidente Gonzalo! Long Live the People's War! The slogan was daubed in fresh red paint on the walls SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic (AP) of a school in this shantytown near Lima. The Shining --Plainclothes policemenfired on300 peoplemarchPath wants to send a clear message that the capture of .ing to protest upcoming quincentennial celebratheir leader has not ended their battle against the govtions,killing three people, including human rights ernment of President Alberto Fujimori. activist. Abimael Guzman, known as "Presidente Gonzalo" The shootings Sunday evening were the first to his fanatical followers, was captured Sept. 12. By violence connected to government plans to comSept. 16, his guerrillas began stalked Huaycan's rocky memorate Christopher Columbus' arrival in 1492. streets under cover of darkness, painting schools, a Critics have said the celebrations, including conhealth clinic and soup kitchens with dozens of revolustruction of a giant lighthouse, are wasting millions tionary slogans and praise of their legendary leader. of dollars. "Huaycan is one of the Shining Path's bastions," said The nation's police chief, Gen. Rafael Guerrero community leader Javier Ramon Figueroa. "They conPeralta, said apolice lieutenant and two agents were trol four of the town's 16 districts, and their presence is under investigation in the shootings and could face growing." ~prosecution. "People here don't even think about erasing the Police said one of the victims was Rafael Efrain writing when walls are painted," Gladys Puente, 20, Ortiz, alawyerwho headedthe Dominican Commitsaidnervouslyas shepreparedto feed 20 small children tee of Human Rights. Theothertwo were notimmein an abandoned bus that had been converted into a soup diately identified by police. kitchen. Ramon Almanzar, leader of the leftist Popular Like nearby buildings on Huaycan's main street, the Organizations Collective, said Ortiz was shot in the head when he chanted "Columbus! You're Not soup kitchen, wherepoor women and their children can get a hot meal for 10 cents, was smeared with red Welcome Here!" lettering: "We Demand that Fujimori's Genocidal Two other people were Wounded, and demonstraDictatorship Respect the Health and Life of Presidente tors scattered afterthe shootings. Gonzalo." -The protest, named the "Cimarrona march" after Many residents of Huaycan, a shantytown on a AsolAPLarPhoto -a colonial-era escaped slave, attracted 300 people, barren mountain slope 12 miles east of Lima, were soldier guards the Central Police station in Peru including artists and community leaders who have afraid Thursday to talk to mist ofrias The where rebel leader Abimael Guzman is held. publicly criticized the October celebrations. town's mudbrick shacks and reed huts are home to large In July he announced that Huaycan's vigilante paThe Popular Organizations Collective and other numbers of refugees from the fighting in the countrytrols, formed to protect its streets from common crimigroups havescheduledaseries of protests duringthe side, and they have learned that a wrong word can bring nals, were a model for civilian anti-guerrnilla militias 500th anniversary celebrations Oct. 9-12. The celedeath. that he planned to form in other shantytowns. rations coincide with the visit ofPope John Paul II "Everyone feels fear. How can we not feel fear?" The people of Huaycan protested, saying their clubs to the Dominican Republic to open the Latin Amerisaid a middle-aged woman, her-front teeth missing, as and whistles were no defense against the rebels' weapJohn Paul will lead a Mass at the Columbus she sold apples and bananas in front of the kindergarten. ons. Jo n ab will noM atte CoverbThe people of Huaycan are especially uneasy beAt midnight on July 15, three hooded men knocked Lighthouse on Oct. 11, but will not attend governcause Fujimori, who closed Congress April 5 and ason the door of Pascuala Rosado Cornejo, Huaycan's top ment celebrations on Oct. 9 and on Oct. 12.J sumed near dictatorial powers to fight the guerrillas, elected official, and gave her one final warning: Either Government critics accuse President Joaquin has tried to force them into the battle against the rebels. disband the vigilante groups or die. Balaguer of glorifying Columbus. They acknowlFujimori has promoted civilian patrols as a key She now is protected day and night by 15 soldiers. edge the explorer's accomplishments, but also note element in his battle against the Shining Path, whose But other community leaders such as Figueroa go his support of slavery and subjugation and extermi12-year rebellion has taken 25,000 lives. unprotected. nation of Indians. Panama City bombs cause little damage PANAMA CITY, Panama (Reuters) -Bombs exploded at two Panamanian government offices and the international airport the evening of Sept. 18. The bombs apparently caused no injuries or serious damage, according to a police spokesman. The first explosion occurred in a men's toilet at Tocumen International Airport, according to police spokesman Daniel Alonso. Services were not interrupted at the airport, about 20 miles east of Panama City. 'AF L.W.o Approximately ten minutes later a FMLN members stand in formation as their weapons are turned In to U.N. peacekeeping forces. second bomb exploded at the foreign minist build in the capital, PanSalvadoran rebels hand over weapons ama City. Soon after that a third bomb exAGUACAYO, El Salvador (AP) -Nunez held the rank of major in the become a point of bitter contention in ploded at the nearby Electoral TribuLeftist guerrillas are turning in their Farabundo Marti National Liberation fulfilling accords signed in Mexico City nal. weapons to U.N. observers under peace Front, or FMLN. in January. The rebels want 1,890 plots The explosions broke windows but accords that ended a crippling 12-year "I feel good because I can say 'misto be distributed now. civil war. One-fifth of the rebel force is sion accomplished,' he said. "I have Remaining land is to be divided by caused no serious damage, Alonso to be demobilized this week. accomplished the first stage of the struggle, Oct. 31, when demobilization of the FMLN said. "I am not giving up (my weapon), I and now we will enter the political is to be complete and all aspects of the A group calling itself Panama Soam depositing it," Serbelio Nunez said struggle." accords are met by both sides. berana, or Sovereign Panama, claimed Monday as some 380 rebels turned in Some 75,000 Salvadorans, mostly Another touchy issue is reform of El responsibility forthe attacks in a teletheir arms during a ceremony here, about civilians, died in the war. The U.N. agreeSalvador's politically powerful military, phone call to a local radio station, 20 miles northest of San Salvador. ment, which took effect Feb. 1, provides which stands accused of widespread human Alonso said. Like many rebels, he said he would for an overhaul of the armed forces, rights abuses. Twenty percent of the origiThree people were detained for not hesitate to take up arms again if the police, judiciary, electoral system and nal FMLN force or about 1,670 rebels is in the incident, government of rightist President Alfredo for converting the guerrilla army into a being demobilized this week. Another 20 questioning Alonso Cristiani does not fulfill its part of the political organization. percent was demobilized earlier this year. said. peace accord. Land distribution to formerrebels has That leaves about 5,000 rebel fighters.

PAGE 5

Tropic Times L Military News Sept. 25,1992 A4 ~11 AP Las Photo French Pumma transport helicopters come in aligned for landing on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier Clemenceau in Dibouti Tuesday. The carrier and its task force joined the U.S. during action in Operation Desert Storm. Schwarzkopf: not invading Iraq good move NEW YORK (AP) -Invading Baghdad "We never considered going to God, we've got to go in there. Gotta in the final days of Operation Desert Baghdad.We'd accomplished our mispunish that son of a bitch!' Of course, ".it was very easy for Storm to sion." none of them was going to get shot at." them to pound their-desks topple SadSchwarzkopf also defends the deciSchwarzkopf doesn't identify the addam Hussein sion to halt the ground war in his forthministration hawks or say whether they and say, 'By God, we've would have coming biography, It Doesn't Take A were reflecting the wishes of President got to go in there'.none bogged down Hero. George Bush. the United He also complains in the book of His book will be released later this of them was going to get States in a being pressured by Bush administration month by Linda Grey-Bantam publishshot at." qua g mire "hawks" he said had seen too many war ers in New York. Retired Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf "like the dimovies and wanted to rush coalition forces In the radio interview, Schwarzkopf operation Desert Storm commander nosaur in the into battle before they were ready. said going to Baghdad would have splintar pit," ac"The increasing pressure to launch tered the fragile 28-member coalition attack.drive to the sea and totally decording to the ground war early was making me that ejected Iraq. He also said the ceasestroy everything in our path," Schwarzkopf Desert Storm Schwarzkopf crazy," he wrote. fire saved American lives. told Powell. "In one more day we'll be Commander "There had to be a contingent of hawks Schwarzkopf also discusses the ceasedone." H. Norman Schwarzkopf. in Washington who did not want to stop fire's timing in his book, excerpts of But when Powell called back and told "The legitimacy for what we were untilwe'dpunished Saddam. We'dbeen which appear in the Newsweek issue him the White House wanted to stop the doing was the United Nations resolution bombing Iraq for more than a month, but available on newsstands Monday. ground war after 100 hours, Schwarzkopf which called for us to kick the Iraqis out it wasn't good enough. These were guys In a phone call with Gen. Colin Powagreed. of Kuwait," the retired four-star general who had seen John Waynein "The Green ell, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, The Iraqi army was in full flight from saidin aninterview forNewsweek onAir Berets," they'd seen "Rambo," they'd Schwarzkopf said he wanted to keep Kuwait, and U.S. pilots were bombing carried by The Associated Press radio seen "Patton," and it was very easy for going on the advice of his commanders. convoys along an escaperoute called the network. them to pound their desks and say, 'By "I want to continue the ground Highway of Death. Military medical ethics under fire Homosexual airman WASHINGTON (AP) -The military uses psychiatpetty officer, showed the slippers pasted with happy loses court decision ric examinations and forced hospitalization in mental faces he was forced to wear while locked up in a wards to intimidate and discredit people who disclose medical ward for four days. The 23-year veteran, who TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) -An Air Force hearing wrongdoings, an advocacy group contends. has testified before Congress and appeared in several board has recommended the discharge of an airman The Commission on theReform of Military Medical television exposes on alleged medical abuses, said he who announced on network television that he is gay. Abuses, made up of formerand current militarypersonwas hospitalized after reporting payroll fraud at the The three-officerpanel rejected apleafrom SSgt. nel who say they werevictimized for speaking out, said Dallas Naval Air Station in 1983 and 1984. Thomas P. Paniccia to stay in the service. that hundreds of people were being "taken against their "I was wounded in Vietnam, but that (hospitaliza"Three words 'I am gay' do not change who I am will without due process and locked up in psychiatric tion) overrode my Vietnam experience," Tufariello and the contribution I have to make to the Air Force hospitals." said. "A common criminal has more rights than a man and the country,n the 11-year veteran said. During atwo-day gathering that ended Friday, members in uniform." Tufariello, who heads a group called Paniccia, 28, announced his homosexuality on of the group conferred with members of Congress and Wounded Eagles, which is similar to the commission, July 23 on ABC's "Good Morning America" and wrote President Bush, urging him to appoint a special said he has documented 280 cases ofretaliatory testing. made similar statements later in other mterviews. prosecutor to investigate retaliatory psychiatric testing. Others atthe conference refused to givetheirnames, The panel found that the airman had made stateThe Pentagon, in response to previous charges, has saying the stigma of having psychiatric testing on their ments that he was a homosexual or words to that denied abuses of the medical system and said it is military records has made it difficult to get jobs. effect' and thus was subject to discharge. It recomworking hard to protect whistleblowers from reprisals. One man said he was administratively discharged in mended an honorable discharge. FormerNavyLt. Cmdr. Jim Manship of Alexandria, April after serving 11 years as an Air Force linguist. He The board also rejected arguments that thePentaVa., said retaliatory testing has "resulted in the personal said he was declared to have apersonality disorder after gon ban on homosexuals requires evidence of such destruction" of many good performers who were confiling five complaints with the military inspector genTonduct. scientious enough to speak out about problems. eral. "We lost our careers, we lost our credibility." The recommendation goes to a brigadier general Manship said he was ordered to a Navy hospital for A former Navy doctor said she was suspended from at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. psychologicalevaluationaftercomplaining aboutasuduty after writing hercongressmenabout ajobdispute. Paniccia has said he intends to go to court to perior he said obstructed a drug intervention program. She said that in the next months she was put in a overturn the ban. The Pentagon maintains that homoHe said after a five-minute interview, he was classipsychiatric ward for a week, tied in leather restraints, sexuality undermines discipline and morale. fied as an "obsessive compulsive with narcissistic tendiagnosed as having a severe personality disorder and ."If you discharge me, you punish me for somedencies" and lost his security clearance. charged with wounding a member of a SWAT team that thing that I am, not for something that I have done," Michael Tufariello of Dallas, a former Navy chief broke into her apartment. he told the hearing board.

PAGE 6

6 Tropic TimesVoices YJSept. 25, 1992 A ~ ie Mayors' Corner Dear Mayors' Corner, dramatically since the last survey and servative civilian attire with an emphasis And why isn't there a pick-up at Howard We only have two radio stations in both AM and FM stations will reflect on conservative. They also allow the unibefore 4:30 p.m.? Panama; 91.5, which is almost strictly thosechanges. form of the day with some restrictions. That means the mail truck is stuck in music that's almost strictly for head Six to eight months from now, anAccording to the individual club rush hour traffic to get to Tocumen. bangers or cowboys, and 790 with (to other survey will be taken to ensure that managers, all service clubs allow conserWhat happens if it misses the plane? paraphrase Carl Sagan) billions nd bilSCN is still in tune with its listening vative dress shorts during the day. It goes out the next day but that may be lions of 'intellectual' stuff. audience. Two facilities, the Navy Officers' Club too late. Ican't handle 91.5 but Icanreceiveit. and the Fort Clayton Army Community D.R. I want 790 but I can't receive it. Dear Mayors' Corner, Club, restrict shorts after 7 p.m. and 6 I live within 5 miles of the back gate Many soldiers are very upset about p.m. respectively. Dear D.R., and instead ofRadio Cityit's StaticCity. the new (no shorts) dress policy at the The Navy policyis long-standing and According to the 24th Air Postal What can I do? Fort Clayton NCO club. uncontested, says the Navy club manSquadron commander, envelopes are not Easy listener A certain standard of dress should be ager. hand stamped at the counter because required, but it should be left to the TheArmycommunityclub, however, high speed cancelling machines do the Dear Easy, manager's discretion and good taste. recently returned to a no-shorts dress work in a fraction of the time. According to commander, Southern A nice pair of dress shorts and a dress code that was approved by the Sergeants The machines make service faster and Command Network, the problems with shirt doesn't bring down the atmosphere Major Council before the club ever opened. keep the postal workers from being tied AM 790(Pacific) and AM 1420(Atlanofthe clublike apair ofskin-tight, wornReinstituting the policy coincided with up. tic) aren't limited to off-post locations. out jeans. the reopening of the second floor dining Your rebates are safe, says the postal The same poor reception you get occurs I know there are clubs downtown we room in August, according to the Army commander. in some areas of military installations as could go to, but because of safety, transCommunity Operations Division acting All mail delivered to drop boxes and well. portation and cost, we would rather stay chief. post offices before posted cut-off times is Part oftheproblem is that SCNis only on post. But the strict no-shorts dress policy cancelled the same day, to include fourth allowed to transmit 10 kilowatts of power With more soldiers downtown, more may be too exclusive, the COD acting class. And all cancelled mail makes that on the AM band, compared to the averunfavorable incidents will occur. Please chief said. day's mail flights. age 150 kilowatts used by most stateside tell us what we can do to get this policy He agrees that some dress shorts are in Mail isn't picked up from the boxes stations. changed. keeping with the conservative intent of and taken directly to the plane, it has to The otherpart oftheproblem is thelothe Council's guidelines. be sorted first. cation of the tower. The solution is to Dear Mayors' Corner, In response to chib members' reAfterwards it goes to the airport but move the AM transmitter to a new locaI'd like to know what is being done quests, he will askthe Sergeants Major's exactly when isn't common knowledge, tion that will provide better reception. about the dress codes for the military Council for an amendment at their next says the postal commander. S C N clubs here. meeting. However, it's safe to say they are in no has just And, yes, club managers agree that danger of getting caught in rush hour completed Some of the some patrons occasionally test the contraffic, the commander said. a site sur--_guests are straints of the dress policies. The postal commander reminds pavey and wearing very At those times, managers may ask trons to check cut-off times for mail pick identified a provocative patrons to leave the club and return at a up because they different boxes and post five new loand revealing later date when their attire meets the offices in Panama have different.cut-off cations that will be submitted for apoutfits that makeregularpatrons uncomstandards set by sponsoring committees, times. proval. fortable. boards, and councils. Editor's note: This column is proSCN hopes to have that approval within There aren't any signs posted to say vided to allow community members to the next year and to make the move soon what is allowed but common sense should Dear Mayors' Corner, submit questions or concerns to be rethereafter. tell you that some of those dresses are Whywon'tthePostOfficedatestamp searched and answered by the MayThe SCN commander also says to exjust too short and too low. aletter while I'm standing there waiting? oral Congress. Letters should be mailed pect some program changes within the Enforce the rules I send in rebates and sometimes the to: Mayors' Corner, APO AA 34004 next 60 days. date is very important. (MPS). Anonymity will be granted Based on data from a survey taken last Dear Readers, I'm worried about the letter not being upon request. Publicity Chair person, December, the preferences of the listenGenerally speaking, Navy, Air Force stamped until late in the evening or even Dyana Ellis. ing audience in Panama have changed and Army clubs encourage casual, conthe next day. PM Corner Drunk driver gets caught and tookthemoney from an unsecured wallet. Barracks police catch the thieves should call 287-5252. A sailor was arrested for drunken driving and atsoldiers should lock all valuables inside their wall tempting to elude last week. The incident began when locker. Large amounts of money should be locked in the Illegal parkers beware security police tried to detain the sailor for drunken unit safe. The military police have recently received numerdriving. The man refused to stop and fled through the ous complaints of abandoned and illegally parked veHoward main gate. A military police courtesy patrol Unregistered firearms hicles. In response to these complaints, the military later caught the sailor off base. Military police charged a Fort Kobbe soldier with police have implemented new measures to enforce If you find that you have had too much to drink, call possession of an unregistered weapon last week. The parking regulations. All illegally parked and abana taxi or let a friend drive. soldier was found to have apistol inside his wall locker. doned vehicles will be towed to Jarman Field and their Firearms must be registered with the Provost Marowners will be ticketed. Call 287-3203. More unsecure property stolen shals'Office before they can be stored on post, and regA Corozal resident is missing more than $1,300 istered with the Panama National Police before they can Crime statistics for September 11 -September 17. worth of tools and stereo equipment after thieves stole be taken off post. For information, contact the military Pacific the property from his unlocked car. Lock vehicles after or security police. Fort Clayton 800 area -1 larceny of secured governparking them and never leave valuable items inside. ment property Post Office misuse Fort Clayton 900 area -1 larceny of unsecured private Civilian charged with misappropriation Three family members were charged with misuse of property A civilian employee was charged with misapprothe Army Post Office last week. Contraband Control Corozal -2 larcenies of unsecured private property, priation of government property last week. He used a Section investigators found that the family members 1 larceny of secured private property governmentvehicle to conduct personal business at the had used the APO to order items for resale in Panama. Curundu -1 larceny of unsecured government propGorgas Army Community Hospital. Department of Defense regulations prohibit importerty Military regulations prohibit the use of government ing merchandise intended for resale through an APO. Atlantic vehicles for personal affairs. Report all misuse to For information, call 286-3303. Fort Davis -1 larceny of unsecured private property military police. Fort Sherman -1 larceny of unsecured government Camcorder stolen property, 2 larcenies of unsecured private property, 2 Barracks thief strikes A Fort Clayton woman is missing a $900 camcorder larcenies of secured private property A barracks thief stole $240 from a Fort Clayton after thieves broke into her car last week. FortEspinarI larceny of unsecured privateproperty, soldier last week. The thief entered the soldiers' room Anyone with information that may help the military 1 larceny of unsecured government property Commander in Chief.Gen.George A. Joulwan Acting Sports Editor.Sgt Richard Puckett U.S. Army South PAO Atlantic.289-4312 Director, Public Affairs.Col. James L. Fetig Editorial Staff.Sg. James Yocum This authorizedunofficialcommandinformationpublicaChief.SFC Joseph Ferrare Rosemary Chong tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is D bistahtEdWtoU.S.A.y.P.b.s Sgt.cD. published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Asitatdio.St DbraE Williams U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.287-3007 Sports Editor.Sgt. John Hall 24th Wing Public Affairs Office.284-5459 Program of the Department ofDefense,under the supervision U.S. Naval Station Public Affairs Office.283-5644 of the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command. Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or k the 00 lC T itheU.S.SouthernCommand.Theaddressis: Unit0936 APO .,rj u p1i Tim es AA 34002 Telephone 285-6612.

PAGE 7

Tropic Times Commentary Spt. 25,1992 Rude moviegoers insult Sarge gives small Native Americans'heritage bills for big cause by SFC Joe Ferraro by Sgt. Jane Usero and more snickers came from behind and references Tropic Times Chief USARSO Public Affairs Office being made to "drinking the water." I ran into the Old Sarge the other day, a-grumVisions are also not something taken lightly by bling, a-mumbling and a-filling out a CFC card. I recently sat in front of two men at the theater Native Americans. "Parting with a few bucks for the betterment of watching a movie and was amazed at the ignorance that They are considered to be given from the heavens. mankind, eh Sarge?" two grown men could show. For a better understanding of visions, and many other "Not hardly, by-products brain," he answered. While watching the movie, which rovolved around Native American traditional values, Isuggestthesetwo I snuck apeek at the form. I was impressed by the life on a men read the book Black Elk Speaks. three digits, but only until I saw the decimal point. "That all you're giving?" I asked. N a t i v e All through the movie, remarks were made about a at's nd d be giving that, American things such as the sweat lodge, a tribal dance and but the commander wants 100 percent participation reservation, traditional dress -all things that hold much tradition, so hecan lookgood. I got Mrs. Sarge and Little Sarge these two heritage and meaning to the Native American. to think about. I can't afford charity." men conMy advice to these two men, and all those who have "Don't give me that, Sarge. We're the same rank. stantly bomstereotypical impressions of Native Americans, is to I know you can give more than that," I said.,"In fact, barded my open some books and learn before opening their mouths you've got more time in grade than Lucifer, so you "Buried was the bloody ears with andinsulting. ought to give more." hatchet; Buried was the racist and igFor instance, many people don't understand the "I said I can't afford it! You want my family to dreadful war-club; norant restand being made now against sports team with names starve sos can give all my money away?" he barked. dreafulwarclumrksto-suchas he ashngtn Rdskns.I did some quick calculations. "There are about Buried were all warlike mard tiug s He an tonyskn s. 10,000 GIs in country, and I don't know how many weapons,ward things How many actually know where the word redskins civilians. If every GI gave $3 that d be $360,000 a w a pons a n te they obvicame from? year, and the goal is $350,000, counting civilians. war-cry was forgotten ously didn't It originated from a bounty put on Native AmeriYou can't make $3 a month?" There was peace among understand. cans' skin. Yes, money was once paid for the skin torn "No! Besides, Ineed it more than anybody else." the nations." At one from the bodies of Native American men, women and "I don't want to go into Guilt Induction Mode," I Longfellow point in the children. said. "But you spill more than $3 a month, Sarge. Hiawatha, X111 movie, an This is not an act anyone should want immortalized You leave more than $3 in fries on your plate. You elderly Nain the name of a professional football team. burn more than $3 in gas racing to work late. You'd tive AmeriWe allknow and understand most terms and phrases never miss $3, especially with payroll deduction." can brought out a traditional pipe to smoke with a considered racist to most ethnic groups and minorities, "But why should I give somebody else my hardvisitor. but know little or nothing about Native Americans. earned money?" he asked. The men behind me began laughing and making reWords such as "how" and "squaw" for instance. pu Nobody's askng ou to buy one ss Conth bet marks about illegal substances being smoked in the How is not aterm used by Native Americans and squaw percent of the people in this command could write pipe. is actually a very insulting term Wasichus (white men) off $3 a month without even knowing it." If they had any knowledge of the significance of the used toward Native American women. "OK, OK: quit yer whining," he said grudgingly. pipe to the Native Americans depicted in this movie, In fact, if a child were to use the English equivalent, "I'll give more." they would have found nothing to laugh about. he would probably have his mouth washed out with "You make a "3" like this, Sarge," I pointed out. The smoking of the pipe is a time of honor and soap, even today. "It's a "1" that goes straight up and down." spiritual importance. It is an act taken seriously by It's time all Americans make the commitment to "Geez, Mr. Certified Public Accountant all of a Native Americans. learn about what our heritage truly consists of. sudden," he groaned. Still, he made extra sure to Also, the substance traditionally smoked in the pipe The more we learn about "the other guys," the more show the form to his company commander. of the Sioux (Lakotas) was the bark of the red willow, we will learn about ourselves and the less pain and "That's more than you've given your whole tour," his CO said. not an illegal substance. degradation we will cause one another, whether inten"Well, I figure if everybody just gave $3. At another point in the movie, "visions," were adressed tional or not. We_,____gref__erydyjsga __$. How can we be more sensitive when dealing with Native Americans? "Discrimination cannot "We need to educate "(Football teams) "Native American In"Probably treat them as be tolerated. American ourselves on American shouldn't use Indian dians are not draftable, individuals, treat them Indipns should be proud Indian culture. That way names because some yet every war we've equally, and better eduof their heritage and we can understand each people might find that fought in, they've volcation for the public." treated accordingly." other better." offensive." unteered in droves. We owe them our respect." CMSgt. Ronald Wheelis SSgt. Mitch Billups P03 Frankie Heggins Bob Thrush SSgt. Anna Ellison 24th Wing Senior Enlisted U.S. Southern Command J-6 USNAVSTAPANCANAL Mine U.S. Customs, Howard AFB Non-Destructive Inspection Adviser Division Laboratory The opinions expressed on this page are those of the commentary writers and Direct Quotes respondents only. They do not reflect the views of Southern Command, the Department of Defense or the U.S. government. Readers may submit commentaries -or responses to commentaries -to the Tropic Times. The staff reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and appropriateness. All submissions must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

PAGE 8

8 Trbpic Times Sept. 25, 1992 'Ghost Zone' 'Rambo' attitude doesn't cut While the "Rambo side of the house," as Ferrarone calls SContinued from page 1. it, attracts the most attention, the bulk of DEA agents h a u n ts d e a le rs that cut through it and the air traffic above," says Ferrarabroad do more traditional work: developing snitches, one. drawing "wiring diagrams" of how the drug rings are by Andrew Schneider Operation Ghost Zone looks like a military action, but organized, building cases for local police. Scrpps HowadNew Sermc. the agents carry plastic handcuffs and evidence bags and For example, in the DEA's Operation Screaming Eagle, work closely with local prosecutors to make cases. Bolivian police use space-age vacuum cleaners to scoop CHIMORE, Bolivia -It's barely dawn. A thickfog soaks They don't have the authority to make the arrests, but up micro-bits of cocaine left in airplanes. If the plane is up most of the sun, but the temperature is already pushing the Bolivian cops do. dirty, it is confiscated. Just ask the owner of a shiny Lear 90. Day 66 of "Ghost Zone," the world's largest counterThat sometimes makes for a strained relationship beJet now parked in a comer of the dusty Presidential Hangar narcotics operation, is going to be a hot one. tween the two sides, and the Bolivians occasionally have at the La Paz airport. The jungle base camp, 300 miles east of La Paz, is to rerpind the DEA agents that they are the guest, not the The same type of program in Peru, known by the lessstarting to show signs of life. bosses. glamorous name Operation Vacuum Cleaner, has failed to The steady drone of generators and the chatter of jungle So far, the results of Ghost Zone are impressive: 29,544 produce any planes, which shows that DEA's ultimate birds is eclipsed but the din of a dozen aging helicopters kilograms of coca leaf and eight aircraft seized, 245 drug success overseas depends on the willingness of Latin coughing to life. labs and 14 clandestine airstrips destroyed. American governments to help. Shrill whistles roust 350 Bolivian policemen and members of UMOPAR, the special drug unit, out of their barracks. With metal mess kits clanking, they line up for breaktold, are packed with information on targets, vehicles, other side of the shootout to try and cut the Colombians off. fast. aircraft, informers, locations of airstrips, storage areas, base Andy Banks, A DEA agent from Chicago and the assisAt the other end of the 30-acre compound, George labs and detailed information on all the organizations. tant team leader, will take another 60 men in by ground. t Enforcement Administration's opera"This is how we figure out who's going to make the Fifteen minutes later two Americans and 10 Bolivians are Auflick, the Drug target list and how you people will spend your days and crowded into each of fiye lightweight Toyota pickups. tions chief, is already having a bittersweet morning. nights,"Ferrarone says. Everyone stands. It's too rough to sit. Trying to avoid It's 6:15 and two U.S. Custom Service P-3 radar planes Auflick starts putting names and jobs with the faces at getting a tooth or an eye knocked out by someone's rifle have already spotted two Cessnas sneaking low and fast the base. barrel, they grasp skimpy rollbars and fight to keep from from different directions into the Chapare, the New JerseyAir Force Maj. Ed Terrazas and Pete Hemandez, a DEA getting thrown out as the trucks ricochet through the ruts of size hunk of jungle that produces one-third of the world's agent who now is a State Department narcotics adviser, the jungle path. coca supply. ir clandestine handle logistics. The duo moved 230 tons of material into The Colombians, it turns out, have eluded the ambush,. If the two small aircraft can make it to thein ceithe jungle to set up the base camp and 23 Ghost Zone outbut the day will not be a total loss. Earlier, an informant had cals they're hauling, load their planes with several hundred posts. tipped off the drug warriors to a coca lab in the same area. pouns hof cocaine base and, within four minutes, be airThey supply 22,000 gallons of fuel every four days to run After three hours of being thrashed around in the trucks, pounds o Colmba the operation's 26 aircraft, 41 vehicles, 2 "mother" ships and the team thinks it's impossible to be any more uncomfortbome again to Columbia. 8 chase boats and dispense boots, uniforms, ammunition, able. with the ground troops needed to seize the planes and make food, medicine and anti-venomd kits for 1,030 troops spread An hour later, on foot in thejungle, they knew they were wihtegon rosnee osietepae n aeover thousands of square wrong. They've only hiked the arrests. Auflick is not happy and he uses colorful words miles. wbont Thee ol he to express that fact. IThe "intel,"or tactiGhost Zone, with more abodtthree miles, but the The 25-by-200-foot operations center rever berates with Th itl"o at-GotZnwt oe 108-degree heat and humidthe static and dinfrom 10 radios blaring from the adjoining cal analysis team, is next. than 1,000 U.S. and ity turn their camouflaged te omunic atndidron rodims bomarn romneratong Ary Lt. Col. Jim Creek Bolivian participants, is uniforms black from sweat. closet-size communications room. Normal conversation is from Las Cruces, N.M., Media They've also violated impossible. rums it. the largest sustained the basic rule of foot sol"Target one's gone to ground," yells Butch Runt, a rn t Customs agent from Denver who's talking to one of his Navy intelligence chapare counter-narcotiCS diers: never lettheman with CastlmsHe bellows out a stream of numbers which five officer Siebe Bandringa, La Paz 0 operation ever the longest legs lead. Infront radar planes. Hbeosouastemonubswhhfie a reservist who found A is 6-foot-4 Brian Donaldson, men, hunched over maps spread on a big table, plot as the himself "temporarily" attempted. an ex-Special Forces medic last known position of the aircraft. activated from his job from Fairfax, Va. Calling out new coordinates, Rutt adds, "Number two's down also. They're obviously lost and waiting outthe fog." as acopinIrving, Texas, The targets of Ghost There's little talk. It "At least we're not the only ones in this jungle screwed is also on the team, as Zone include the coca takes too much energy and by the weather," grumbles Auflick. are DEA intelligence growing region of the they're deepin thebad guys' Outside on the porch, a dozen new "Snowcaps" -specialists John FlemChapare and the cocaine B olvia backyard. Coca bushes crowd specially trained DEA agents and Border Patrol officersing of San Francisco and production transport reboth sdes of the narrow path, fresh from the United States-try to stay out of the way as Neal Rubin of Washing_ glons of Media and Beni. which is marked with fresh they wait for the boss, the DEA chief in Boliva, Donald ton. footprints. Ferrarone, to brief them. E Juan "Ruby" Rutiaga Two more streams to Comparing notes on the critters they saw during their is next. He's a retired Army aviation officer from Ramoncross. Thefirstis easy, the secondmore challenging. The 45 Cirstpighing cam, the realize the glamourof theirnew asville, Texas, who runs the 24 helicopters in the State Departpounds of gear and weapons don't make crossing a 20-foot firstnmght in camp, theyrl ment's air wing. single-log bridge high above a stream an amusing experi"Honest to God, it was four inches long and when t The door to the radio room opens abruptly. ence. flapped its wings is sounded like a fan with a bent blade' "The P-3 says the fog's lifted and they've tracked one of Then there is a waist-deep river. says one Border Patrol officer. the Cessnas to a new strip," says radioman Don Taylor, a "Piranha don't attack you if you're not bleedAuflick sticks his head out the door: "Let's do it. Time to retired Special Forces sergeant major. ing, do they?" whispers one of the new guys. hear the gospel." Auflick cuts off the introductions. "Six of you get your "Naw. Not unless they're hungry," reassures Banks. The Snowcaps were given "the big picture" during three gear. I want the Hueys up in 10 minutes. The trail splits and so does the patrol. days at the U.S. embassy in La Paz. Now it's time for the The men rush to the mess hall, which is decorated with It's almost dark. The sun has dropped behind the tall nitty-gritty. American and Texas flags. They top off theirfour canteens, trees of the jungle canopy. Cautiously, the two groups circle Ferrarone does the honors. pick up their freshly charged radios and grab their heavy a grove of trees split by a stream. "If you think your middle name is Rambo, you're probabackpacks, web gear, 9mm pistols, M-16s and shotguns. One of the patrols finds a 40-foot-long plastic-lined pit bly in the wrong place," Ferrarone says. Three minutes later, they and six Bolivians from UMOPAR, filled with coca leaves and highly flammable chemicals, the "I know the uniforms, guns, helicopters and military ducking to avoid the spinning blades, climb into two helifirst step in making cocaine. analysts that we have here paint a vivid picture that this is copters that are older than most of them. The Snowcaps gather chemical labels, shipping lists, a military operation -America at war in thejungle again." It will do little for their morale if they leam that a State any scrap of paper with writing on it. They torch the pit and The GI trappings, he explains, are necessary to move and Department training pilot at Chimore found the same Huey a yellow-red ball of flame rolls into the tree tops. survive in a jungle environment. he flew in Vietnam 26 years ago. About 500 yards away, the second patrol surrounds a "We are at war, but every American carrying a gun They're airborne 20 minutes when the radio raised woodenpolehouse.Nobody'sthere,butmore docuthrough these jungles is also carrying a badge, because crackles with a P-3 report that the drug plane has lifted off ments are found. they're cops." and is gone. But they're almost over the area where the It's almost midnight when they get back to Chimore. Mark Edmondson takes over. A former Birmingham, plane landed and there must be a lab nearby. So they look. The cook saved them dinner. Ala., policeman, he has been with DEA for seven years. The helicopter flies in tight, fast circles, almost on its They joke with three guys putting black and green He flips though large charts on an easel showing page side, centrifugal force thrusting the machine gunner and greasepaint on their faces. They're going out on a night after page of targets: "small level buyers," "Major buyers," two men sitting beside him deep into the worn canvas seats. patrol. "protection suppliers," "major producers," and "ColomThe landing skids often perilously brush the treetops, but The Border Patrol guys who worked road checkpoints bian connection." the technique offers the only hope of a peek through the boast about their first full day on the job, confiscating Over 400 names are on the pages, each with aliases, thick jungle foliage below. chemicals used in drug-making. know associates, area of operations and their link to 22 The intermediate steps that turn the coca leaf into coThere was a 50-pound flour sack filled with lime, a case different Bolivian drug trafficking organizations operating caine need water to operate. The agents look for creeks and of quart beer bottles containing sulfuric acid, a five-gallon in the jungle. Eighty-eight of the names are crossed out, streams shiny with diesel fuel or gasoline. bucket with two gallons of ammonia packed under three either arrested or killed since Ghost Zone began. "Watch for water stained black. It's a sure sign," a DEA gallons of lard and a large pumpkin filled with dark purple "Each day as new intelligence comes in, we add more agent screams over the roar of the rotors to a new Snowcap. crystals of potassium permanganate names and cross outmore." says Edmondson."You'rehere But the radio orders them back to base. Something hotter Auflick breaks up the one-upmanship: "Bring your beer. to do police work, pure and simple. These are your targets. has come up. A two-man UMOPAR patrol has stumbled We've got to talk about what we found today and what. You're to identify, arrest, gather evidence and help convict onto seven Colombians, and shooting has been going on for we're going to chase in the morning." them." three hours. It's 2 a.m. before most of them head to bed. It's been 20 Eleven laptop computers crowd the makeshift desks of Auflick is waiting at the airstrip and six other choppers hours since they started their day and only four until the next the command post. The computers, the new arrivals are are warming up. They'll carry 60 men to the town on the one begins.

PAGE 9

Tropic Times Sept. 25, 1929 Mom and Pop team dive into 'Shark 3' Andrew Schneider Va., are on loan to the embassy &rppsHowardNewsService from the Coast Guard's intema--tional Maritime Law EnforceCOCA, Ecuador -A mother of two from ment Team. Unlike their coiinter-X Minneapolis and a great-granafather from parts in the other military servTampa, Fla., lean on an M-60 machine gun ices, Coast Guard personnel are mounted in a Boston Whaler that's barpermitted to go to the front and relling up a river in the Amazon. mix it up with the bad guys. Themom-and-pop duo are with the State The trio goes into battle with QUito. Department's Narcotics Assistance Section a 40-member Ecuadorian po in Ecuador. In fact, Yvonne Thayer and lice riverine unit, funded, trained Rio Thomas Zepeda are the entire NAS team. and equipped by the United Rio apo "We can't just start a counter-narcotics States. program, hand out money, deliver vehicles, "Compared to Colombia and boats, bulletproof vests and check off a box Bolivia,this unit isjust a dropin on a form. We have to see if and how it's the bucket, but it's something being used, and you can't do that sitting in that works and it's a start," says an office," says Thayer, a former Latin Zepeda, who started his 27 years American correspondent for Newsweek. in law enforcement as a street ECUADOR It's earlier the same week. The 42-yearcop in Louisville, Ky. He picked old NAS director is walking down the dirt up the badge of a federal drug strip that is the main street of the bawdy fighter in Detroit, worked most border settlement of La Punta. The presence Latin American countries for late at night of the petite "gringa" sparks DEA and retired soon after the ------more excitementin this squalid hamletthan agency shipped him to Washthe bullet-riddled body pulled from the river ington. A mom and pop team of U.S. earlier that day. "It was the most boring nine :.*'omatS, With help from the months of my life, so I quit. I C he strides up to the log-walled fort was too young to sit on a porch, Coast Guard, arm and train an at the edge of town where an aston so when the State Department elite Ecuadorian police riverine ished sentry nervously fidgets with offered me this job I jumped at S his rifle as Thayer bangs on the it," says the 60-year-old father unit. Pressure on Colombia and heavy gate in 14-foot wall. Waving her of four. Peru is driving traffickers to ship embassy ID, she insists in rapid-fire Spanish Ecuador has never been a that the corporal of the guard get his commajor player in America's drug their chemicals and ft sX manding officer. war. Only a smattering of coca cocaine through eastern Ecuador. "But it's late. He can't be bothered," he was ever found in the country, argues. and that was quickly eradicated. K "I'll wait. He will see me. Get him, But as American-led, mili please. Now," she softly prods. tary-type interdiction efforts The corporal hurries off, muttering loudly, increase in neighboring Colombia, Peru and gade's commanding officer, Col. J. MaPrimitive dugouts are the freighters of "I had to learn how to walk this very Bolivia, Ecuador is becoming an unwitting nosalvas. this part of the river. Large ones carry 30 careful line of being diplomatic yet still host to money-launderers and smugglers. Although the arrangements had been men and their baggage to and from the oil tough enough to get the job done. So I just do Thayer and Zepeda have about $1 milcarefully worked out among the police, the field up river. Most transport one or two what I think I have to do," she says. lionto run theirentire operation -virtually military and the embassy weeks earlier, people and a small pile of cargo. Suddenly the stockade gate creaks open nothing compared to the more than $50 Casco's three-dozen police officers have no All are stopped and searched. and a very tall, and a very annoyed man million that drug warriors get in some other beds or food and the army hasn't put the dressed in gym shorts and a T-shirt storms countries. unit's boats in the water. rug boats gently close in on the through. Henry Gordon commands the 50 Add to that a host government that doesn't It's almost an hour before they are ushfragile wooden craft. The dog, men at the river garrison and obviously is really see drugs as a problem and a six-man ered into the brigade's conference room and named "Swoop," leaps across to puzzled what the U.S. embassy would want DEA team that concentrates on cases that seated at one end of a 20-foot, green-feltthe long, narrow boats and, to the at this time of night. lead back to the United States, and it creates covered oval table. entertainment of most passengers, sticks his The 5-foot-2-inch envoy explains she a situation that would prompt most drug The Americans stifle their anger. Manose into every nook and bundle. was "in the neighborhood" and wants to see fighters to pack their bags. nosalvas doesn't. He is livid when he's told Other officers, guns at ready, keep wary how the drug war is going. Not so in Ecuador. the American-led team is chasing drug trafeyes on the dense jungle crowding the river's Formore than anhour I The diplomatic duo fickers and not insurgents. edge. they sit on a bunker of beg, borrow and cajole The last time a riverine patrol was run in Rodriguez and Medina watch their charges crumbling sandbags over"We do our part, but funds, equipment and his region, five Ecuadorians were killed by work, while Thayer, Zepeda and Casco huddle looking the 300 yards of until we can reduce the government support to Colombians, he says. over a map spread on the bow of the comriver separating Ecuador get the job done. They "Why waste your time chasing narcomand boat, dickering over how close to the from Colombia. demand back in the States, are not above bending traffickers?" the jungle commander demands. border the patrols should go. They swat dime-size we can patrol like mad the rules to get EcuaZepeda swallows hard and says nothing. The group is pragmatic about the effect mosquitoes as Gordon, his dorian officials on their While with the DEA in Bogota, the drug their small teamis having on the drug enthusiasm now unchasing the bad guys side. cartel bombed his house. war. bridled, zealously explains aThayer stunned It takes two more hours of wrangling and "We do our part, but until we can reduce to his willing listener that around the clock, and the State Department the promise of more American money, but the demand back in the States, we can patrol the drug traffickers own they'llfind some way to protocol office when she the U.S. team gets food and lodging for its like mad, chasing the bad guys around the the river and move freely took Ecuador's attomey men and a helicopter available for medical clock, and they'll find some way to get the between the two counget the drugs across the general by subway to a evacuation. drugs across the border," says the young tries. border" drug halfway house in a The Coast Guard won't allow its people lieutenant. There are too few war zone section of the to participate unless there's a way to quickly Thayer has to get back to Quito. troops or aircraft on eiRodriguez Bronx, N.Y. evacuate any wounded. She spends thenight in a small hotel with ther side to effectively U.S. Coast Guardsman Her techniques Outside the headquarters, Zepeda, a broad diesel fuel spread on the floor. They say it control the border, Gorobviously work. On his smile on his face, says: "I'm making a discourages snakes. don says, and wistfully talks of the need for return, the attorney general created a nanarcotic cop out of Yvonne and she's makObviously, this is knowledge that a joint operation with the Colombians across tional drug council of six cabinet ministers ing a diplomat out of me." didn't come with her master's degree in the river. and produced two volumes of new laws and Slapping Casco on the back, he adds, public administration or a fellowship at"Perhaps some day," Thayer says, smilregulations aimed at money-laundering "Let's get the damn boats in the water." Harvard. ing. She knows that four days later she will and sale of chemicals used in drug processThayer arrives from Quito just as the four She muscles her way onto an oil combe in Washington, meeting with the State ing. Boston Whalers and two small piranhas are pany plane returning to the capital and arDepartment and Drug Enforcement AdminiThayer and Zepeda are unflappable. They finally getting wet. rives with just enough time to change out of stration officials pushing such a plan. have to be. Take Operation Shark III, a plan Machine guns are mounted, ammo her muddy khakis before an early-moming to use the Ecuadorian drug police river unit checked and 43 men, Thayer and a U.S.meeting with top police officials and two A t that same moment, about 120 to stop trafficking near the Colombian bortrained drug dog board. Shark III is finally cabinet members. miles southwest, deepinthejungle der. under way. She rushes to her child's high school, in the dusty town of Coca, the other Earlier in the week, on the day that Shark "Our goal is training and advising and where she has volunteered to cook hamhalf of the NAS team, Thomas III was to have begun, Zepeda had his pathen getting out of their way. It's their show burgers for a fund-raiser, before she heads Zepeda, is also slapping bugs and doing his tience tested. and they've got to run it," says Rodriguez. home to pack for her flight to Washington part in getting things ready to go after drug The early morning sun was steaming the The tiny flotilla spreads out across the the next morning. traffickers. island headquarters of the Ecuadorian Army's swift current of brown water. "I'm not a soldier or a DEA agent, but Zepeda, a retired DEA agent, has help. elite 19th Jungle Brigade as Zepeda, the "These rivers are like highways leading just a plain old diplomat," ghe says. Two U.S. Coast Guardsmen, Lt. j.g. Ritwo Coast Guardsmen and Capt. Jaime Casco, into Peru and Colombia. Chemicals and "But it's exciting to get in the middle of cardo Rodriguez from San Francisco and head of the police riverine team, cool their money go in and drugs come out," Zepeda this drug war and try to make a differPetty Officer Jorge Medina from Norfolk, heels waiting for an audience with the brisays. ence."

PAGE 10

Tropic Times 10t.125,1992 Theater supportElementby Sgt. Brent PNbil SSgt. Eugene McCallister (left), Army National Guardsman from Foristell, Mo., and PFC Doug Wright, 534th Military Police Company, check a car to ensure the doors are locked during a night patrol on Fort Clayton. Active, Reserve units hit the road together by Sgt. Brent Pribil Damalas pulled patrol duty while in Panama, somelittle more careful." 358h Public Affairs Detachment thing he said he could never experience back home. While some unit members walk their patrol areas, "It's scary. It's dark. We have two or three-man others guard the gates of military installations in PanFORT CLAYTON (Theater Support Element) -walking teams that infiltrate through the jungle. Once ama. Spec. Tracy J. Skouby from Gerald, Mo., pulled Busting thieves on U.S. military bases in Panama rein, we sit and wait and watch. It's a waiting game," gate duty several times. quires military police to hide in the dark surrounding Damalas said. "The hardest day was the first day. There are so jungles, waiting for crooks to breach the fence line. So The military police play this game hoping to catch many rules and regulations. It's different here than back went annual training for some Missouri Army National thieves stealing property from the government and home. Just learning it was the hard part," Skouby said. Guardsmen. soldiers' homes. According to PFC Mike Mueller from Once she learned the new rules, she found the duty The 170-member 3175th Military Police Company St. Peters, Mo., they walk these patrols more as a easier to perform. from Warrenton, Mo., deployed to Panama for three deterrent to crime than anything else. She found that being a female MP is a continual two-week rotations in August and September. Their "People know we're out here. And hopefully that challenge. mission is to help the local military police in guard and gets them to think twice about ripping someone off," "Being a woman MP can be a strike against you. It's patrol U.S. bases and property. Mueller said. not that we can't do the work, it's the attitude some SSgt. Eugene McCallister from Foristell, Mo., a Deterring criminals is only half of the problem. people take toward us. There are only nine female MPs platoon sergeant in the unit, believes the training they McCallister said people need to remember not to make in our company, but if anyone does something wrong, receive here surpasses the quality of the normal training it too easy for would-be thieves. it's a strike against all of us. It's always, 'Oh, those they do back in Missouri. To remind people to secure their property, military females,' "Skouby said. "There's a difference between classroom training police take on the thieves' perspective and look for "It's also kind of hard when you need to take in a versus actual participation in military police duty like things to steal. huge infantry type who looks at you with a, 'Ya, I can we get down here in Panama; it's actual training," Ifthey find an item they could easily take, they know squash you like a bug' look," she said. McCallister said. "If activated again, like we were in a thief would find it irresistible. When they find a potenSkouby said that the training she receives prepares Desert Storm, this is much like what we would do." tial problem, they fill out form they call the "gotcha her to handle difficult situations. She credits the nonPvt. 2 Konstantinos N. Damalas from Moscow Mills, card" that points out the unsecure situation to the commisisoned officers of her company for setting a Mo., found Panama to be a completely new experience. citizen. good example and teaching her well. "The jungle's a challenge; everything is different. "The gotcha card is a written warning that we could "Our NCOs lead by example, and they teach me a They've got all different kinds of animals and poisonhave stolen yourproperty becauseit was not secured," lot. It's so important becausepeople are always watchous frogs; you gotta watch out for warts here," Damalas he said. "We leave the card on the item -usually it's ing MPs. People look up to MPs; we protect them," she joked. unsecured autos -and hopefully the owners will be a said. TotaI Force helps spawn commander's pride by MSgt. Philip V. Bernal support mission conducted by Air Force mission the first week to the administra358th Public Affairs Detachment Reserve and Air National Guard C-130 tion mission the second week. transport units since 1977. It provides The command of Volant Oak also HOWARD AFB (Theater Support SOUTHCOM with logistic and air suprotates between the Air National Guard Element) -The role of the Air National port throughout Central and South Amerand Air Force Reserve and varies in Guard and Air Force Reserve in support ica. These responsibilities include air length. of the U.S. military's Total Force Policy freight, passenger transportation, miliNo stranger to Volant Oak, Lasater is evident in Central and South America. tary missions, and emergency evacuations. participated in four two-week rotations The Total Force Policy is generally Volant Oak is also the primary life line as a Reserve officer. "I've seen the misdefined as all branches ofthe U.S. milifor U.S. embassies in the area of operasion change over the years. It's getting tary, including National Guard and Retion (below Mexico) and South America bigger every year," Lasater said. serve, operating as one team. (except French Guiana). "These are dedicated people who work "We're all part of the CINC's (comBecause of the operations involved, side-by-side. You can't tell who is Guard mander in chief, U.S. Southern Comthe Guard and Reserve airmen have real and who is Reserve," said Lasater. "In 0 mand) 'one team, one fight,"' said Col. mission assignments as part of their trainDesert Storm and Desert Shield we flew Norman "Gene" E. Lasater, commander ing. "Some folks in the United States side-by-side with the active-duty units. of operation Volant Oak. don't realize this," said Lasater. They could not distinguish who was who Lasater, an Air Force Reserve Officer Volant Oak consists of two teams on and we like to keep it that way. We fly on a 33-month Active Guard and Retwo-week rotations, each bringing at least the same equipment, fly the same misserve tour, said Volant Oak exemplifies three C-130 Hercules airplanes with four sions and have the same training. Our the importance of the U.S. Air Force crews, maintenance teams and support only difference is when our folks aren't Reserve. personnel. The units rotate in overlapflying, they're working in their civilian The operation is a year-round airlift ping cycles and move from the flying jobs," he said. Lasater

PAGE 11

Sports Sept. 25, 1992 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 11 Local ironmen take on world's best Sonney wants to be 'on' Stiegler aiming for best by Sgt. Richard Puckett by SSgt. Phillip D. Clark Acting Sports Editor USARSO Pubic Affairs Officea-Atlantic COROZAL (Tropic Times) -Thirty-one year-old FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO-Atlantic) -TomorMike Sonney doesn't look like your typical triathlete. row morning, Norman Stiegler will be pitted against He stands about 6-feet tall, is slender and muscles world class and top military triathletes as he lines up to aren't bulging through his Air Force service dress swim, bike and run in the Bud Lite Triathlon in Las uniform. Yet he may be one of the best all-around athVegas. letes in Panama. Stiegleris in Vegas with Sonneyto participatein the Sonney, from 310th Airlift Squadron, is one of two military triathlon championship which is run at the local athletes sponsored by the U.S. Military Associasame time of this championship race. tion packing his bags and heading to Las Vegas fora Stiegler, a Navy lieutenant, has been taking part in Saturday's Bud Lite Triathlon. Sonney and Norman triathlons for several years. He has kept his training up Stiegler will be competing in the military triathlon in Panama and has one fourth-place, a third-place and championship which is run simultaneuosly. three first-place finishes here. For Sonney this is first "prime time" opportunity to He's been training diligently for the 1.5k swim, 40k test his stuff against the best, including professionals, U.S. Amy photoby sL FlCh.d Pucett bike and a 10k run and had help from several people. top amateurs and fellow military athletes. Sonney "I had two good workouts this weekend. A 45-mile "This is areal challenge,"he said. "Ithink I'mready bike ride Saturday at about 23-24 miles per hour, and for this opportunity. There will be alot of great athletes Sunday I went for a 10-mile run with Geof Doyle, whb there. I just hope I'm on that day and can use the extra is training for the Marine Corps Marathon," Stiegler adrenaline to my advantage." said. Sonney's career as athree-event star beganjust four "if I read correctly, part of the run goes through sand, years ago while he was stationed at Dyess AFB in and the first seven miles of the bike is uphill, so it is not Abilene, Texas. an easy race" he continued. "It started as kind of a dare," he said. "A friend said Stiegler knows it will take his best to beat Sonney. he was was in better shape than me and dared me to "I'm not a real good swimmer, Mike's a better enter this triathlon, so I did. It was a nightmare getting swimmer than me. We have a friendly competition and through it, but I got hooked on the feeling and just kept I'd like to beat him, but I'd have to have an excellent with the sport." race to beat Mike." One thing that lures Sonney to the sport is the Stiegler has been trying to get in two good workouts complexity that the three-sport training requires. a day, but with family and military priorities as the "You can't be just a good swimmer, biker or runner officer in charge of Department 50, Public Works, here, and win," Sonney added. "You have to be good or two workouts is sometimes hard to do. decent at all three to be competitive. Everybody has "I've been trying to get up early (about 4:30 or 5 their strong spot, but it is the weak spot that always a.m.) to get a decent run in and swim or bike the other catches you in the end." part of the afternoon." he said. It's that complexity that requires a lot of training Stiegler knows the time he has to take to train for time, and it's time the husband, and father of a 10triathlons, and right away that his family sacrifices month-old son doesn't have to spare. personal time with him so he can train. He's trie to "Trying to balance training with family and work is include his children more in his training lately by taking hard," he said. "No matter how hard I try sometimes them out in a babyjogger (a stroller made for running). one of the three does suffer at times. Usually it's my He also appreciates his commands understanding training." and willingness to give him permissive temporary duty "My wife, Linda, is very understanding," he added. so he can compete for the Navy in the military champi"But she needs a break too, so I try and help out onship part of the race. with Taylor (our son) on the weekends and in the eveStiegler and Sonney both decided to apply for the nings." competition and had to put together a packet to send to So he finds himself running late in the evenings, the U.S. Military Sports Association which agreed to getting up early to bike and swimming at lunch. pay for both racers plane tickets and entry fees. Sonney's schedule calls for alternating training for Stiegler's goal is to finish in the top 20 percent. eac evnt v~r da wih ne ff-ay wek. heU.S. Army photo by SS gt. Ph ilip D. Clark "I haven't run in an ultra-competitive triathlon like each event every day with one off-day a week. The Norman Stiegler and his son Daniel head out on a ."s ae' u na lr-cmeiietitlnlk rainy season in Panama has played havoc with his daily n this in a long time. A lot of how I finish will depend on afternoon training. y run. how my legs feel. Mike and I are hoping that training in "I haven't had as much time to prepare as I'd like," Norman Stiegler, Panama's Navy representative. Panamain the heat and humidity will be beneficial to us he said. "But I think training in the heat and humidity "He's tough," Sonney said. "He's a much better as we run in the dry heat. It should be easier in that here will really help." runner than I am, so I have to get off to a good start or aspect," he said. "He and I have a perspective on this. Sonney is also looking forward to competing against he'll catch me. He's done it before." The best will be there. We want to go and do our best." 3 U.S. Army South soldiers earn All-Army rugby spots FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO)ervice games. At the practice game against OkaAlso part of the USARSO team was Three soldiers from U.S. Army South During the week of practice sessions loosa, seven of the eight USARSO Ray Malphurs of 3rd Special Operations made the All-Army rugby team and games, four members of the team players contributed to a 68-0 vicSupport Command. during tryouts and the Interservice USARSO team played in the game against tory. Shortly after the practice games, it Championship in Pensacola Florida last Atlanta. In addition to the four who played wasannounced that May,Wimbley and week. Withthe help ofChuckMayofthe7th against Atlanta, the team consisted of Sallis would play in theAll-Army intersEight players from U.S. Army South Engineer Dive Detachment; Steve DuckKevin Wimbley 7th Engineer Dive ervice games went to the tryouts and participated in worth of Headquarters Company, Detachment; Ron Sallis Headquarters Although the Army team didn't take games against the Division One Atlanta USARSO; Jim Minahl from the 106th Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), the title, USARSO did its part, said May. Renegades and a Florida team from Signal Brigade; and Chris Mincey of the 508th Infantry; and David SchNo othercommand sent more players or Okaloosa before the final cut was made 59th Engineers, the Army team beat negelberger, 747th Military Intelligence had as many players make the team, he for the All Army team and the intersAtlanta 22-7. Battalion. added.

PAGE 12

'12 Tropic Times Sept. 25, 1992 1-228th Aviation earns hoops title by SSgL Steve Hicks 24th Wing Pubic Affairs HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA) Things got a little spooky for the 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment on the way to its second straight Howard Intramural Basketball Championship. This was the 228th's second straight championship. Faced with a game against the last qualifying playoff team on the road to the title game, the 24th Mission Support Squadron, might have seemed to be a cakewalk for the runnin' and gunnin' Express. But the MSSQ team, which finished its season at 8-4, wasn't ready to concede and battled the Express down to the wire Sept. 18. Theylost the game68-62,it served as Express's Lucius Harpe (left) passes a warning to the Express that reputation the ball around 617th's Levi Bennett. alone does not win games -defense does. And defenseis what won that game tion Detachment, and a 56-40 win over and the tournament for the Express. the 617th Airlift Support Squadron. After being down by 11 points to The championship game was also MSSQ, the Express put on a press that against the 617th ALSS, and while created numerous turnovers and pro617th put up abetter struggle, they were pelled them to a five point lead which defeated63-50. they never relinquished enroute to the The 228th outscored the 617th 31-18 victory. in the first half, but in the second half The Express won the rest ofits games of the game both teams scored 32 U.s. Air Force photo by TSgL Ron KimbQ.rin withrelativeease,including a66-55victory points. But it was too little too late for Express's Nate Moore (15)triestooutjump61 7th's Nate Gagom during thetipoverthe617thSpecialOperations Aviathe 617th. off of the 1992 Howard AFB intramural basketball championship Sept. 18. Sport Shorts Winter bowling leagues Boxing, wrestling trials Fort Clayton standings* Fort Clayton Lanes are now starting sign ups for All-Army Boxing Trials will be conducted at Fort Flag football winter leagues. Stop by Clayton Lanes for informaHuachuca, Jan. 5-March 9 1993. Applications must be Red League tion. submitted to the Sports Branch by Oct. 9. TEAM R L Curundu Bowling Centeris also beginning sign ups All-Army Wrestling Trials will conducted at Fort 106th Signal 2 1 for its winter leagues. Call 286-3914. Benning, Jan. 10-March 15. Applications must be Co. E, 1-228th Avn 1 0 submitted to the Sports Branch by Oct. 16. 534th MP Co. 1 1 Co. E, 154th Signal 1 1 Powerlifting competition 9;d Bn I I ApowerliftingcompetitionwillbeheldSaturdayat Flag football tourney HHC,1-228thAvn 0 1 Reeder Physical Fitness Center. A Columbus Day Flag Football Tournament will be 92nd PSC 0 0 An organizational meeting will be today at 6 p.m., held Oct. 10-12. The team entry fee is $75. Call 289Building 154. There will be three categories: dead lift, 3294. White League squat, bench press. Call287-4050. TEAM H L Turev ow trout HC, 193rd 4 1 Crossed Flags 10k Turkey Bowl tryouts CB193rd Spt 2 1 Tryouts for the 1992 Army Turkey Bowl football HHC, 41st Spt 2 3 The 154th Signal Battalion is sponsoring a tournament will be held Oct. 17 and 24, 9 a.m., at SOUTHCOM 1 1 Crossed Flags 10-kilometer road race begins at Johnson Jarman Field, Fort Clayton, and Oct. 18, 9 am., at HHC, 142nd 1 3 Field, Building 208, Fort Clayton, 7 a.m. Saturday. InFairground Field, Fort Davis. Call Eva Foster at 287Co. A, 193rd Spt 0 3 dividual and team categories will be offered. Ten4050. personteams must start and finish together. Registerat 5'11" and above basketball Building 208. Call Capt. Millie Daniels at 287-5906/ TEAMDay R.S L 5904. Columbus Dyevents l9rdSptBn 3 1 Columbus Day Sports Event registration is under41st ASG 2 0 No tap event way. Wednesday. Open racquetball, volleyball and Moore Team 1 0 basketball tournaments. Call Reeder Physical Fitness Let's Get Bussey 1 1 Howard Bowling Center will be hosting a no tap Center, 287-4713. 106th Sig Bn 1 2 tournament Sunday at 3-p.m. The handicap is 80 percent MEDDAC 0 3 ofa200 averageand when a bowlerknocks down nine Sprint triathad s pins it's a strike. Ladies get one free strike per game. ron 5'10 and under basketball The Navy MWR has scheduled a sprinttriathlon at 7 TEAM R L a.m.atRodmanPoolOct. 18.Eventswillbe:a500-yard The Slep Rock 3 0 Volleyball program swim, a 16k bike ride and a 5k run. Hustle 2 0 The Rodman Naval Station intramural volleyball Registration fee is $8 if paid by Oct. 15 at the We're Blessed 2 1 program will begin Oct. 1. Units must submit letters of Rodman Sports Office. The race day fee will be $10 The Untouchables 1 1 intent to the Rodman Sports Office by Monday. A from 6-6:45 a.m. at Rodman Pool. Guard Plus 1 1 coaches' meeting will be held Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. at A biking helmet is required. Call Morise Conerly at 106th Signal 0 3 the Rodman Fitness Center. Call 283-4222. 283-4222/4061 or Hank Baltar at 282-4651. 79th Army Band 0 1 The Gansters 0 0 Women's basketball Women's softball *AsofTuesday'sgames Women's Community Basketball registration is under A women's invitational softball tournament will be way until Oct. 6. Call 287-4050. held Oct. 10-12. Entry fee is $85. The tournament will SCN radio schedule* be at Symington Field, Rodman Naval Station, starting Sat: San Diego State at UCLA 2:30 p.m. Columbus fun run at 9 am. Oct. 10. ML Baseball: to be announced Entry will be limited to the first 10 teams. A Sun: Atlanta Falcons at Chicago Bears, noon A Columbus Day funrun will beheld Oct.12, at7:15 coaches' meeting will be held Oct. 5 at 5:30 p.m. at Miami Dolphins at Seattle Seahawks, 3 p.m. a.m., registration ends Oct. 8. Early registration fee is Rodman Fitness Center. Call Morise Conerly at 283San Francisco 49ers at New Orleans, 7 p.m. $7 and late registration fee, $10. 4222/4061. Mon:L.A. Raiders at Kansas City Chiefs 8 p.m.

PAGE 13

Tropic Times Sept. 25, 1992 X.) Ditka criticizes tentative players LAKE FOREST, Ill. (AP) -Mike theBearshelda6-0halftimeleadbutlost Ditka isn't looking for any miracles. All 28-6 on big plays both against the dehe wantsis a win for his Chicago Bears to fense and the offense. turn around their 1-2 record. And they were totally outplayed in the That's their worst start since 1983 second half by the Giants, especially in when they were 1-3 but finished strong the third quarter when the Giants held the for a respectable 8-8 record. ball for more than 12 minutes and had a "It looks like we're waiting for some155-3 edge in total yards. one to do something miraculous," Ditka "We came out ready in the second said Tuesday after the Bears dropped a half, the plays were there, but we didn't 27-14 decision to the New York Giants execute," said Ditka. "We kicked off Monday night. with the wind and wanted to make them Asked if he was looking for someone go 80 yards. They went 80 yards. Wehad to step up and take charge, Ditka said he some foolish penalties, but I didn't think thought his running backs -Neal Anthey could make 80 yards." derson and Brad Muster -started out With the help of a 15-yard penalty that way, "but it didn't happen." against Richard Dent for hitting quarterQuarterback Jim Harbaugh was unback Phil Simms after a short compleable to turn the tide once the Bears blew tion, the Giants scored on a 13-yard pass a 14-7 lead. Harbaugh threw a pair of from Simms to Stephen Baker for a 21touchdown passes in the first half, when 14 lead. he completed 9 of 13 passes for 122 The Bears then ran three plays and yards, but finished with 17 of 28 for 183 had to punt, and the Giants held the ball yards. for nearly seven more minutes before "Harbaugh made some bad reads," Matt Bahr booted a 31-yard field goal said Ditka. "When he plays good, I say and a 24-14 lead. heplayed good, but he made bad reads." Bahrbooted a32-yarder asthe Giants Ditka also questioned the play of the controlled the ball for more than 22 minutes secondary when asked if the defensive of the second half. backs had become gun shy. "Things have to change," said Ditka. "That's part of it. You can't play foot"Everybody has togo out withtheideaof ball tentatively," he said. shutting out the opponents and scoring AP LaPhot The slide started in New Orleans when 50 points." Ditka Young guns making early impressions ~ NOBODY ASKED Sports WreYOUNG GUNS TAKE OVER THE NFL -This weekend is the one-fo urth mark of the NFL seasonand already the new Young Guns have established themselves. Nine teams fielded new coaches for the 1992 NFL season, and after three weeks they have combined for a 13-13 record. Big deal, you might say. What's .500. Consider that Mike Ditka's Bears, Jerry Glanyulle's Falcons and Wayne Fontes' Lions axe 1-2. Art Shell's Raiders are 0-3. These four 1991 playoff teams that combined for a 65% winning percentage last season are off to a lowly 25% start in 1992. One of the biggest factors affecting the outcome of games this season is the injury rate of the starting quarterback. Currently there are 13 starters who have been benched because of injuries and/or lackluster play. If you're looking for a winner in 1992, pick a AP Lase team with a competent backup quarterback. Los Angeles Raiders head coach Art Shell hasn't much too cheer about so far in 1992, but is hoping that Last week's games: After having been out-picked second-year quarterback Todd Marinovich will provide some spark. by my wife, the Peg Bundy of the football world, I am happy to say that I rebounded this week with an this game? Da Bears. Falcons 24, Bears 13. unimpressive Raiders this past week. The Broncos, 11-3 record, she finished 9-5. 49ERS STRIKE GOLD IN NEW ORLEANS meanwhile, are looking sad. A 30-0 drubbing by the I have to give her credit though. She correctly Both teams are 2-1, both have lost by a field goal high-flying Eagles showed that they might as well gave you the 49er-Jets score (31-14); picked the or less to outstanding teams, and both have smart lay down and die. The magic is not there. Cleveland Saints th e fo by three, final score 10-7; and quarterbacks. But the 49ers have scored 31 points a has nothing to lose, and won't as Eric Metcalf Pittsburgh to beat San Diego 23-7, the actual score game for three weeks in a row. They won't get it this will shine again. Browns 27, Broncos 17. was 23-6. week, but they will have enough to win. 49ers 27, CHIEFS BATTLE RAIDERS She came close on three others, picking Miami to Saints 20. The Raiders are the NFL's best team on Monday beat the Rams 20-10, the final was 26-10; the Bills to BENGALS TANGLE WITH THE VIKES Night Football. They are 0-3 without a team leader. beat the Colts 38-14, the actual score being 38-0; and David Shula and Dennis Green are new coaches Kansas City has Dave Krieg, the former Seattle Seattle to beat the Patriots by four, 14-10. The final with 2-1 records. Minnesota's opponents so far are 4quarterback at the helm. Al Davis says, "Just win, score was 10-6. bk4. Cincinnati's opponents are 2-7. The Vikings only baby!" Forget it, Al. Chiefs 24, Raiders 17. This week's five star games: loss is to Detroit; the Bengali to Green Bay in a close Rounding out the rest of the league: The Jets 23, game. The Vikings are winning games but not by big the Rams 16; Pittsburgh 20, Green Bay 17; Detroit FALCONS FLY IN THE WINDY CiT margins --9 points in two games. Minnesota's 31, Tampa Bay 17; Houston 24, San Diego 13; The Bears are team on the way down. Two biggest fan in Panama, Fort Kobbe's 12-year-old B.J. Miami 24, Seattle 14; and Buffalo 41, New England straight losses for a combined score of 55-20 to the Solhjem, assures me of a Viking win. I have to agree 10, in a close one. Saints and the Giants. The Falcons have played three with him. Vikings 24, Bengals 20. Dallas won't win this week, the NFC East has the playoff teams from 1991, beating the Jets and losing CLOWNS ARE FOR REAL week off, as does Indianapolis. Season record: 27Slose to both the Saints and Redskins. Who will lose A fter two tough losses, Cleveland stopped the 14.

PAGE 14

14 Tropic Times Sept. 25,1992 Jays'Winfield swings away NEW YORK (AP) -It was in early April, about an hour before game time, and Dave Winfield was relaxing in the dugout at SkyDome, surveying the scene at his new home. Then, he spotted a few familiar faces. The Yankees were in Toronto that night, and a couple of writers who used to cover him in New York were wandering by. "They said he was too old, couldn't play anymore," Winfield said, breaking into a big smile and his best Muhammad Ali imitation. "He was all done, they said. Couldn't do the job." Well, hee-haw, because the joke is on the Yankees and the Angels and everyone else who believed that Winfield was washed up. He is old, that part is true. As in the oldest player to hit three homeruns in a game and the oldest playerto hit for the cycle. And, in the next few days, Winfield might add an Winfield APLarPhoto even more meaningful accomplishment -the only 40-year-old player ever to drive in 100 runs in one driven in as many as 90 runs. Ty Cobb had 93 RBIs in Several other players reached 100 RBIs at age 37, season. In fact, if Winfield waits until Oct. 3, the next1927 at age 40 and Darrell Evans had 99 RBIs in 1987, including Hank Aaron, Carl Yastrzemski, Mike Schmidt, to-last day of the season, he can do it on his 41st also at 40. Carlton Fisk and Dwight Evans. birthday. Evans thought he had gotten his 100th in the final Winfield got his 99th RBI on Sunday in Toronto. Winfield and the AL East-leading BlueJays began a week of the season. He had 99 RBIs when he singled The Blue Jays play in Baltimore and New York before three-game series in Baltimore on Tuesday night. Winfield and Bill Madlock scored, but the play was scored an returning home. went into Thursday night with 99 RBIs. error on Baltimore catcher Terry Kennedy because "The 100th will probably come on the road, which is "I don't normally dwell on the statistics, we've got Madlock's hard slide knocked the ball loose. .unfortunate for the fans up here," he said. "They've a pennant race to worry about," Winfield said Sunday. Evans did not drive in a run in Detroit's last three always been Dave Winfield fans andIwould haveliked "But I'll take a lot of satisfaction in getting the 100th." games, and finished one short, to do it here.This park has had a lot to do with it. I've "The next one is special," he said. "A lot of The oldest players with 100 RBIs in modem history enjoyed hitting here from day one." ballplayers have had 100 RBIs in a season, but I'll be the are Babe Ruth, Honus Wagner, Ernie Banks, Tony The Blue Jays have enjoyed having him since last old man on that list." Perez and Cobb, who each did it at age 38. Banks' total Dec. 19, when they signed Winfield as a free agent to a Since 1900, only twice has a player 40 or older of 106 in 1969 leads the list. one-year contract for $2.3 million. Baseball standings* Bay area residents NATIONAL EAST W L PCT. GB nix Giants'tax idea PrITSBURGH 89 63 .586 MONTREAL 83 69 .546 6 SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -Residents in the seven-county ST. Louts 76 75 .503 12 San Francisco Bay area are opposed to spending their tax CHICAGO 75 77 .493 14 dollars on keeping the Giants from moving to Florida, Nnw YORK 69 82 .457 19.5 according to a poll paid for by the city of St. Petersburg, PHILADELPHIA 62 88 .413 26 Fla. Seventy-four percent of those polled responded WEST negatively when asked, "Are you in favor of spending ATLANrA 91 60 .603 -taxpayer money to keep the San Francisco Giants baseball CINCINNATI 85 67 .559 6.5 team," according to a recent poll conducted by Walker SAN DIEGO 78 73 .517 13 Research of Princeton, N.J. HousTON 73 79 .480 18.5 The survey asked229peopleinthe San Francisco Bayarea SAN FRANCISCO 67 85 .441 24.5 on Sept. 19-20. No margin of error was given. I.s ANGELEs 61 91 .401 30.5 "This is a political poll question. It's not good survey methodology. The question is too generalized and the strucAMERICAN ture is faulty," BobForsyth, a spokesman for Mayor Frank Jordan said in aninterview published in Tuesday's editions of EAST W L .Pct GB the San Francisco Examiner. Tosouro 89 64 .582 "Isuspect theintent ofthe poll was aPR device hoping that MKwARE 83 67 .559 5 the San Francisco media picks up on it without questioning the CL 72 79 .477 i6 faulty methodology and without questioning the context of NEW YORK 72 80 .474 16.5 the question," Forsyth said. Dmrxorr 72 81 .471 17 The issue of using tax dollars to build the Giants a new BOSTON 67 85 .441 21.5 ballpark has already failed four times at the ballot box in the San Francisco Bay area. WEST A group of St. Petersburg investors have offered owner oAKLAND 92 60 .605 -Bob Lurie $115 million to move the team to the Suncoast St. Petersburg Assistant City Manager Rick Dodge, who CIGO 9 9.5 DBu Floridians admitted that a competing proposal to keep lead the effort to bring a major league baseball team to St. CHICGO 2 6 .54 9. Bu Flridins dmitedthata cmpeingpropsalto eep Petersburg for nearly a decade is still confident that the TEXAs 73 80 .477 19.5 the team local, headed by NBA Charlotte Hornets owner Patsbwillfbe heaiy S duth. CALIFORNIA 67 84 .444 24.5 George Shinn, has them a bit nervous. Giants will be heading South. KANSAS CIrY 67 84 .444 24.5 "To say we're eager to get this settled is probably an have been settled yesterday." SATTLE 58 94 .382 34 understatement," said St. Petersburg councilwoman Leslie NationalLeaguePresident Bill White has toldSanFrancisco Curran. investors they have until the end of the month to submit their Through Wednesday's games "Ithink we're going to prevail, butif Ihad my wayit would proposal. NEW YORK (AP) -Roger Clemens, Carew will serve as hitting coach. Each are Cleveland's Carlos Baerga, Wade Ozzie Smith and Cecil Fielder willlead a player willreceive $65,000 plus an addiBoggs of Boston, Craig Biggio of HousC le m e n s team of major league All-Stars who will tional $8,000 in expense money. ton, Travis Fryman of Detroit, Mark Grace play a Japanese All-Star team in eight Joining Clemens on the pitching staff of the Chicago Cubs and Terry Pendleton games from Oct. 30 to Nov. 8. will be Norm Charlton and Greg Swinof Atlanta. The series, to be played in Tokyo, dell of Cincinnati, Mark Langston of The team's catchers are Darren DaulIe a d s Osakaand Fukuoka, will markthe fourth California, Dennis Martinez of Montreal, ton of Philadelphia and Mickey Tettleton time in six years a major league All-Star Jack McDowell of the Chicago White of Detroit. The outfielders are Ron Gant team has traveled to Japan. The major Sox, Gregg Olson of Baltimore, Bob of Atlanta, Ken Griffey Jr. of Seattle, league All-Stars went 3-4-1 in 1990. Patterson of Pittsburgh, Bob Tewksbury ShaneMackof Minnesota, Ruben Sierra A l -r e team will be managed by Tom ofSt. Louis and Duane Ward of Toronto. of Oakland and Larry Walker of MonKelly of the Minnesota Twins, and Rod Infielders besides Smith and Fielder treal.

PAGE 15

Tropic Times Sept. 25, 1992 %. New NFL coaches earning high marks NEW YORK (AP) -The early returns than themselves Shula's first loss was to are in .Holmgren on Sunday and Holmgren's Consider the new generation of coaches first loss, on opening day, was to Green's success. Vikings. Bill Cowher has Pittsburgh unbeaten There's one common denominator in three games and fans eagerly anticirunning throughthegang of four youth. rating a new football dynasty Cowher is 35, Green 42, Homgren 42 Cincinnati's Dave Shula looks like and Shula is the baby of the bunch at 33 he'll be a better head coach than an -the common perception when he got assistant. His Bengals are 2-1 despite a his job is that it was only because of his last-minute loss at Green Bay. surname. Dennis Green has Minnesota thinkAdd second-year coaches Bill Behing playoffs again after an undefeated chick (39) of Cleveland and Rich preseason and 2-1 start. Kotite of Philadelphia (an ancient 50) Green Bay's Mike Holmgren is 1-2, and you may have the coaches of the but the Packers' 24-23 victory on Sunday '90s. may do a lot to get the team back on They're also different guys for differtrack. ent team: Cowher and Green are gungThe Steelers' 23-6 victory over San ho motivators: Shula, Holmgren, BeliDiego marked the first time since 1979 chick and Kotite more the tacticians. the team has won its first three games, And they have help: Shula from deand everyone in western Pennsylvania fensive coordinator Ron Lynn, who makes remembers what happened then -the up for mediocre personnel with an atfourth Super Bowl win in six years. tacking defense, and Kotite from Bud "It's nice to be in this position," Cowher Carson, 61, the former Cleveland coach, said. "But you can't get caught up in who gamblesless than BuddyRyanwith looking at the big picture yet." just as effective results. Cowher is inspirational rather than Moreover, the new guys are willing to tactical. disregardinflated reputations. His disclaimer isn't necessarily Green dumped such fixtures as Joey CoachSpeak -young teams with young Browner, Wade Wilson and Keith MilAPLasrPhoto coaches often start well, then fade when lard and Cowher got rid of Huey CRYING FOUL -All-Pro defensive lineman Reggie White reacts to a the enthusiasm wears off. Richardson, last year's No. 1 pick, prepenalty called against him during a Raiders-Eagles game. White cried foul Still, excluding San Diego's Bobby ferringtokeepElnardoWebster,aninthMonday when he and two others filed a class-action lawsuit, seeking Ross, who lost quarterback John Friesz round pick this year. ,freedom" for about 280 NFL players without a contract after the 1992 in preseason and is 0-3, the four other "I judge on performance," Cowher sedom. for sut 280 NFL plaer wiut a cntact fter e 19 firs-tiersare cobind 8-. sid."Hue wan'tone f m to 47 season. The suit comes two weeks after ajury in Minneapolis found for eight first-timers are a combined 8-4. said. "Huey wasn't one of my top 47 plyr h ruh nattutsi gis h ege The group is 8-2 against coaches other guys." players who brought an antitrust suit against the league. Colts using bye week to regroup after losses INDIANAPOLIS (AP) -The Indianapolis Colts time to learn the system better." ranks dead lastin the NFLin rushing and next-to-last in are idle this week, and coach Ted Marchibroda wants The only other quarterback on the active roster is total offense. to use the extra time to get everyone healthy again, third-stringerTom Tupa. The Colts signed Jeff Graham The Colts made their worst showing of the young particularly quarterbacks Jeff George and Jack Trudeau. to the practice squad last week, and Marchibroda said season in Sunday night's 38-0 shellacking by George stretched a ligament in the thumb of his once George is healthy, the third quarterback -preBuffalo. throwing hand in the third preseason game. He threw sumably Tupawould be one of the two designated "A good football team beat us, but we contributed to the ball in practice Sept. 16 but apparently felt some inactive players each week, to be used only if the other that defeat ourselves a great deal," Marchibroda said. soreness and did not practice the rest of the week. two were hurt. "Without question, it was our worst offensive game of Trudeau, a preseason holdout who did not play in the Marchibroda also said there might be some roster the year." season-opening victory over Cleveland, was hospitalchanges before the Oct. 4 game at Tampa Bay. The Colts are averaging 52.3 rushing yards a game ized two days last week after bruising his back in a loss "There are a couple I'm thinking about, but I have afternetting37 yards against the Bills. Buffalo's Henry to Houston. two weeks to decide, so I don't want to say anything Jones returned two interceptions for touchdowns, and "We go back to the basics at this point," Marchibroda now," Marchibroda said. defensive end Bruce Smith had 2 1/2 sacks; seven said Monday. "We've had Jeff out for three games, The Colts (1-2) are looking for something to kick unassisted tackles -five of which came behind the and he needs the work, and this also gives Jack more start their offense. Through three games, Indianapolis line -and four assisted tackles. Metcalf dazzles after 4 TD show BEREA, Ohio (AP) -No new wrinkles were added to the Cleveland Browns' offense last week. No innovative plays were drawn up designed to vault Eric Metcalf to instant celebrity. "We did a lot of things in this game that we've done in a lot of other games. They just worked out this time," coach Bill Belichick said Monday, reflecting on Metcalf's four touchdowns in Sunday's 28-16 victory over the Los Angeles Raiders. Metcalf ran for a touchdown and caught passes for three more, a performance surpassed in Browns' history only by Dub Jones, who scored six touchdowns against the Bears in 1951, and Jim Brown, who scored five in a 1959 game against the Colts. It was the type of big-play game the Browns have hoped Metcalf could provide ever since they traded up in the 1989 draft to select him 13th overall. A running back at Texas, his size (5-10, 185 pounds) and lack ofpower have raised questions about his ability to make it as a running back in the NFL. He scored 10 touchdowns as a rookie four of them on APLewPhoIo receptions, but his production has dropped off sharply Cleveland Browns running back Eric Metcalf (21) showed a flash of his expected potential Sunday since,partly because ashoulderinjury sidelined him forhalf with four touchdowns as the Browns upset the Raiders 28-16. of last season.

PAGE 16

16Tropic Times U Sept. 25, 1992 Family member attends Citadel AMCfee increases COROZAL (Tropic Times) -The fee to travel COROZAL (Tropic Times) -It's quite an achievespace available on military flights will increase ment to graduate from the Citadel -especially when from $10 to $15 Thursday to cover cost increases it's with honors. in fuel, administration and other areas of the Air It's even moreimpressive when the graduateis a 10Mobility Command according to AMC officials. year-old Army family member. The current fee was set in 1979, when fees for While his classmates waded through the surf of the traveling space available were first charged, offiPanama beaches during their summer break, Eddie cials said. Krynicki, son of Maj. Gary Krynicki, was attending a two-week summer camp at the prestigious military Tops in Blue arrive college. HOWARD AFB (24thWG/PA)TheAirForce Krynicki said when he first decided to go to the variety show Tops in Blue will offer two free Citadel, he wasn't sure how he would like it. shows at the Howard AFB theater Thursday and "Iwaslike--they'regoingto bereal strict,"hesaid. Oct. 2 at 7:30 p.m. "I knew we were going to learn sports like soccer, but The 90-minute show tours Air Force bases worldI didn't know exactly what it would be like." wide. For more information, call 284-6109. Krynicki said he was pleasantly surprisedto find the summer camp was more fun than work. "One day we would do something like swimming, Health fairs planned sailing and soccerand the next day we'd learn wrestling OZAL(Tropic'Times)-TheU.S. Southern and something else," he said. Command Health Promotion office recently teamed Of course, the military school did have it's rules. "At up with Department of Defense Dependent School Mark Clark (the school's founder) Hall, they told us system health officials to kick of a series of health about the seal-that's whattheycallit,the seal-and fairs in Panama schools under the Fit to Win if you stepped on it, you had to get down and scrub it program. with a toothbrush. They said it's like stepping on the The fairs "consist of different learning areas president's face." that involve good nutrition, fitness and health Of course none of the students were assigned to such Eddie Krynicki receives the Mark Clark Award from issues," said Virginia Smith, health promotion atask, because they heeded the warning, Krynicki said. Lt. Gen. Claudius Watts Ill, president of the Citadel. specialist. It was the Gen. Mark Clark award that Krynicki Each school created a health fair committee found himself bringing back to his Fort Clayton home and dinner." composed of school nurses, physical education after the camp. The award is given to four or five young Krynicki said he wants to continue attending sumteachers, classroom teachers and parents to teach men from each section of about 25 boys. mer camp and someday attend the Citadel for college, the children about health concerns, Smith said. "I wasn't exactly trying to win," he said. "But I like his father did. While each school is approaching the fair difwanted to get it. You have to see how good you are in "I thinkkids my age should go," he said. "It's alot of ferently, the overall concept will be the same, sports and they watch your manners at breakfast, lunch fun." Smith said. The committees will have booths dealing with CFCF cam paig bs ua subjects like nutrition, tobacco use, grooming, F C ampaign begins Thursday dental care, flexibility and even an entomology booth that will talk about the dangers of AfricanThe office of personnel management added three ized bees, she said. Continued from page 1. new federations to the campaign: the World Service For the elementary schools, special programs People who wantto know whotheirkeypersonis can Organizations of America, Children's Charities of like puppet shows on healthy snacks, visits by get the name from the Plan of the Day or on the America and the National Black United Federation of McGruff and ambulance tours will round out the computer Local Area Network, Morales said. Charities. program. The keypersons, project officers, community/area These federations were addedtothefederations that High school students will seeawrecked car and project officers and numerous logistical support people have been part of the Combined Federal Campaign -hear about the dangers of drunk driving, Smith provide important volunteer services to help produce a Overseas for many years, which are the International said. successful campaign, according to an American Forces Service Agencies -Overseas, American Red Cross, The program is part of an overall plan to teach Information Service press release. National/United Service Agencies, Earth Share, DoDDS students about all facets of health. The agencies participating in the campaign are deUSO, United Way of America, National Voluntary "Usually, the students have health classes bescribed in the campaign booklet. The booklet also Health Agencies and the Independent Charities of fore and after the fair, with this just being apart of includes a breakdown of each organization's adminiAmerica. the learning experience for them," she said. stration and fund-raising costs. This booklet will be In addition to the agencies and federations that Smith said the program wouldn't have been distributed to all federal and military people by CFC benefit from this campaign, U.S. service members and possible if it weren't for the organizations and campaign officers. their families also benefit. individuals who volunteered for the program. The booklet also lists information about how to Up to six percent of the money raised during the Any parents who would liketo volunteer forthe designate a contribution, the different ways a person campaign will be returned to support overseas family health fair programs should contact their child's can give, how the contributions are distributed, a sample support and youth activities programs. school nurse for information, Smith said. contributor's card and the recognition program and the The amount returned to support these local proGold and Silver Eagle awards. grams is based upon total contributions raised in the Schedule One of the easiest and most popular ways to contribcampaign by the military installation, activity or comHoward Elementary Tuesday ute is through payroll deduction, officials said. munity. Balboa High School Oct. 15-16 The contributor acknowledgement form is a screened Last year, Department of Defense people serving Curundu Jr. High Oct. 27-29 area at the bottom of the contributor's card. overseas donated more than $10 million. Diablo Elementary Nov. 19 Those who want their names and addresses released More than 94 cents of every dollar donated in Cristobal High School Dec. 3 to the agencies they designate must complete this the campaign went directly to those who needed Curundu Elementary Jan.13-14 portion of the card. help. Fort Clayton Elementary Feb. 25-26 This fall, there will be more agencies and federations This year, the principal combined fund organization, Balboa Elementary March 18 to choose from than ever before. Contributors will be appointed each year by DoD to administer the overseas Fort Gullick/Fort Davis March 25 able to give to any of 778 national agencies and 11 campaign, is a partnership between the National VolunLos Rios Elementary April 22 federations. tary Health Agencies and the American Red Cross. Fort Kobbe May 13 DEH, preventive medicine address lead paint FORT CLAYTON (USARSOPAO) -During the past six months, more than before 1950, in both U.S. Army South might be asked to stay out of certain Old layers of paint cracking and peeling 500 samples from 120 family housing and the U.S., have coats of paint containrooms or move into temporary quarters off the wall may be no more than an quarters have been taken and analyzed ing lead, Muschett said. An undisturbed that will be provided if necessary, Muschett unsightly inconvenience. But, what you for lead content, said Daniel Muschett, wall that contains lead paint is not a said. can't see, can hurt you, especially when DEH environmental officer. Testing is health hazard. Theproblem is usually fixed in one of that unseen hazard is lead. also performed on administrative buildLead-based paint is only a hazard if three ways: enclosure, encapsulation, or Recent medical studies indicate that ings to find areas with high levels of lead eaten, or if paint dust containing high removal. Enclosure involves sealing off even small amounts of lead in children and begin programs to reduce the hazard amounts of lead is inhaled, Candler said. the contaminated area, but also prevents may adversely affect their health. Subtle for children and adults. U.S. Army Engineering and Housing that area from being used by occupants. decreases in mental ability, behavioral Common sources of lead exposure in Support Center and the U.S. Department Encapsulation is presently being used changes, hearing problems and growth children include eating lead paint parof Housing and Urban Development in Cocoli Housing Area, which involves retardation have been associated with tiles, exposureto exhaust from cars that guidance requires that a Lead Exposure coating and sealing surfaces with spechronic low-level lead exposure, accorduse leaded gasoline and consumption of Risk Assessment be conducted for cially developed coatings that are resising to the U.S. Center for Disease Conwater contaminated by lead-soldered pipes, USARSO housing areas. tant to cracking, peeling and deterioratrol. said Maj. William Candler, chief of preBefore work begins, engineers detertion by algae and fungi, Muschett said. To ensure the safety of families in ventive medicine. In most places, howmine the scope of work and the best way Gorgas Army Community Hospital Panama, the Directorate of Engineering ever, the most common source is lead to fix the problem. provides lead screening through the Well and Housing monitors the health hazards paint, Candler said. Then repair work is scheduled and Baby Clinic, Candler said. For informacaused by exposure to lead-based paint. Virtually all family housing units built housing residents informed. Residents tion, call 282-5419.

PAGE 17

i4* 192Tro pictivities Sept. 25,1992 An entertainment guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page B 1 1W -k dAi Navy MWR photo by Mmniqu. Che,. Hannia Woodman (left) and Nathan Cohen get a survival lesson from Eco-Tour guide Rich Cahil on Barro Colorado Island. See story, photos page B5. Movie jCar Ins ide Batman Returns at How ard *Prelude shows Honda cares TV.B3 IMonday. See page B2. About quality. See page B9. CPO.B9 __ _ _* Ads.10

PAGE 18

B2 Tropic Times Sept. 25,1992 M movies HOWARD 7pm Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith SHERMAN Today 9pm Boomerang -Eddie Murphy, Robin Givens Today 7pm Cool World (PG13) Kim Basinger, Gabriel Byrne Oct. 2 7pm Patriot Games (R) Harrison Ford, Anne Archer 9 pm Sister Act (PG-13) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie 7pm Cool World (PG13) Kim Basinger, Gabriel Byrne -Saturday Smith 9pm Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith 7pm The Cutting Edge (PG) D.B. Sweeney, Moira Saturday Kelly 2pm Honey, I Blew Up the Kid (PG) Rick Moranis, Sunday Marcia Strassman DA VIS 7pm Thunderheart (R) Val Kihner, Graham Greene 6:30pm Batman Returns (PG-13) Michael Keaton, Danny Today Thursday DeVito, Michelle Pfeiffer 7pm Folks (PG13) Tom Selleck, Don Ameche 7pm Wild Orchid II (R) Wendy Hughes, Tom Skerritt 8:50pm Universal Soldier (R) Jean Claude Van Damme, Saturday Oct. 2 Dolph Lundgren 7pm Alien 3(R) Sigourey Weaver, Charles DUtOn 7pm Folks (PG13) Tom Selleck, Don Ameche Sunday Sunday 2pm Honey, I Blew Up the Kid (PG) Rick Moranis, 6:30pm Pinocchio (G) Animated Marcia Strassman .83pPnociG)nmtdAMADOR 6:30pm Honey, I Blew Up the Kid (PG) Rick Moranss, Monday -Today 8:30pM Unveal Sdie (R) Jean Claude Van Damme, 7prn Housesitter (PG) Goldie Hawn, Steve Martin 7pm Year Of The Comet (PG-13) Penelope Ann 8:0m Dovslp L der R enCaueVnDme Tuesday P YerOIlCoe(G-1)enopAn Tuhsdry Miller, Tim Daly Monday 7pm ACES: Iron Eagle III (R) Louis Gossett Jr., Horst Saturday 7pm Batman Returns (PG-13) Michael Keaton, Danny Buccholz Wednesday 7Pm Patriot Games (RunHarrison Ford, Anne Archer 9:20pm Man Tro ble (PG3) ack Nicholson, Ellen 9pm Housesitter (PG) Goldie Hawn, Steve Martin 7pm BatmanRetums (PG-13) Michael Keaton, Danny 9:20 M n TThursday DeVito, Michelle Pfeiffer Tuesday 7pm ACES: Iron Eagle III (R) Louis Gossett Jr., Horst Thursday 7pm Honey, I Blew Up the Kid (PG) Rick Moranis, Buccholz 7pm Femgully: The Last Rainforest (G) Animated Marcia Strasiman .Oct. 2 Oct. 2 9pm Universal Soldier (R) Jean Claude Van Damme, 7pm Housesitter (PG) Goldie Hawn, Steve Martin 7pm Patriot Games (R) Harrison Ford, Ann Archer Dolph Lundgren Wednesday Now showing 7pm Batman Returns (P-13) Michael Keaton, Danny DeVito, Michelle Pfeiffer 9:20pm Man Trouble (P0-13) Jack Nicholson, Ellen Barkin Thursday 7pm Man Trouble (P0-13) Jack Nicholson, Ellen Barkin 9pm Batman Returns (PG-13) Michael Keaton, Danny DeVito, Michelle Pfeiffer Oct.2 7pm Man Trouble (PG-13) Jack Nicholson, Ellen Barkin 9pm Batman Return (PG-13) Michael Keaton, Danny DeVito, Michelle Pfeiffer CLAYTON Today 7pm Housesitter (PG) Goldie Hawn, Steve Martin 9 pm Housesitter (PG) Goldie Hawn, Steve Martin Saturday 2pm Mom And Dad Save The World (PG) Teri Garr, Jeffrey Jones 6:30pm Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith 8:30pm Boomerang -Eddie Murphy, Robin Givens Sunday 2pm Mom And Dad Save The World (PG) Teri Garr, Jeffrey Jones 6:30pm Cool World(PG-13) Kim Basinger, Gabriel Byrne 8:30pm Boomerang -Eddie Murphy, Robin Givens K Monday 7pm Sister Act (PG) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith 9pm Lethal Weapon 3 -Mel Gibson, Danny Glover Tuesday 7pm Cool World(PG-13) Kim Basinger, Gabriel Byrne 9pm Boomerang -Eddie Murphy, Robin Givens Wednesday 7pm Mom And Dad Save The World (PG) Tern Garr, Jeffrey Jones 9pm Lethal Weapon 3 -Mel Gibson, Danny Glover Howard Theater Saturday, Monday, Wednesday and Thursday Club calendar Club Amador mebers while enlisted Dining Room under renovaQuarry Heights O'Club ing room bar open, 4-9pm. Laguna Lounge open Reservations: 282-4025, 282-3837/3534. Lunch: tion. Disco: Fri., 7pm-midnight. Lounge: Mon.282-4380/3439. BreakfastMon.-Fri., 6:30-8:30gm, Mon., Wed. and Fri., 4-10pm, complimentary Tues.-Fri., 11:30am-lpm. La Concha Restaurant: Thurs., 4-9pm, Fri., 4pm-midnight, Sat., 6-9pm. Sat., 8-l0am. Lunch: Mon-Fri., 1130gm-1pm snacks. Pool bar: Mon-Thurs., noon-6pm; Fri., Tues.-Sat., 6-10pm; Bridge Lounge: Tues-Thurs., Social hour: Fri. 5-6pm. Bingo: Wed., 6pm. Closed Dinner. Tues.-Thurs. 6-9pm; Fri.-Sat. 8-10pm. Bsr noon-8pm; Sat.&Sun., 10am-6pm. Thurs: steak-by5-10pm; Fri., social hour, 5pm-midnight; Sat., 6pmSun.,&holidays. lounge: Tues.-Fri.,4-10pm; Sat.6-10pm; Fri.,socisl the-ounce; Fri.&Sat., prime rib. midnight; punch brunch for children, firstSun. each Top Three Lounge hour, 4-7pm. Acey-Deucey Club month, 10:30am-1:30pm. Champagne brunch, Building 707,284-3089. Open: Mon.-Thurs., 4-10 Open to B-5 through E-6 Mon., Wed.&Fri., 5-10pm Sun., 10:30am-1:30pm. Beef& burgundy, Tues., 6pm, Fri., 4pm-l am, Sat., 5-1 1pm, Sun.&holidays, CPO Club only. Call 283-4332. 10pm; pasta pizazz, Wed., 6-9pm; Mongolian closed. Social hour: Mon.&Fri., 4:30-6pm. Opento E-7 through E-9, civiliansNM-6 and above, BBQ,Thurs., 6-9pm. Bingo: Tues.&Wed., 7pm. Albrook Club and family members. Call 283-5475. Lunch: Mon.Clayton NCO Club Howard Enlisted Members' Club Building 13, 2864128/3547. Cashier's cage: Fri., lam-ipm, all-you-can-eat buffet; Sat., grill 287-4343/4716/5692. Main corral: Mon.-Thurs., 7Building 710, 284-4189/5832. Cashier's cage: B i 28-43 47. Cnhrs Fr.,: open, noon-4pm. Dinner: Fri.&Sat., 6-9pm. Social 11pm; Fri.-Sat., 7pm-2am; Sun., 1-11:30pm. FoBuiing 7r,28-9/5F32S.,Cas-lmhos :Mon.-Fri., W am-1:30pm. Mon., Thurs., Fri., 2hour. Wed.&Fri, 4pm, complimentary snacks. rum: Te., steak night, 5-9pm; Wed., international Sun.-'hurs.,9am-9pm; Fri.&Sat., 9am-l pm; holi4:30pm, Wed., 2:30-4:30pm. Dining: Lunch, buffet,5-9pm;Thurs.,ladiesnight,5-9pm; Fri.-Sat., days, 4-9pm. Dining: Casual Cove/Tropical 1Iam-1pro.Dinner:Mon.,Wed.,Trs.,6-8:30pm, Anchorage Club fine dining, 4:30-10pm; entertainment, 9pm-2am. Breezeway, Mon.-Fri., 6-30-9am, lam-ltpm, Fri.-Sat., 6-9pm. Sun., champagne brunck, l0amOpen to all ranks. Call 283-4332/3040. Breakfast: Bingo: Sun., 2-5pm; Tues., 6-10pm. The UnderFri.&Sat., until lam. Dining room closed for renolpm. Mon., MongolianBBQ.Thurs., Mexican. Fri., Mon.-Fri., 6:30-9:30am Sat., 8-10:30am. Lunch: ground: Mon.-Thurs., 4:30-1lpm; Fri., Spm-2am; vation, members may dine at Howard O'Club Mon.prime rib/seafood. Sat., steak. Italian 2nd/4th Wed. Mon.-Fri., llam-1:30pm. Dinner: Mon.-Fri., 6Sat., lpm-2am. Midnight buffet: Wed., Fri., Sat., Sat.Ballroom:varietydiscoSun.,Tuea.,Thurs.,Fri., each month; mini-gourmet, lst/3rd Wed. each 9pm,alacartedining. Grill: Mon.-Sat., 11-1:30pm; lopm-l:30am. Casa Maria, Mon.-Sun., 5-10pm. Sat. 8pm-midnight. Casual Cove: variety disco month. Thea., dining room closed, bar menu availSun.&hol., 3:30-9:30pm. Pizza&fried chicken to Wed.,8pm-midnight, country&weatem Tues.&Fri. ableinlounge. Disco,Fri.,8pm-lam.Loungeopen: go, 5-9pm daily. Bingo, Mon., 5:30pm, special Davis Community Club 8pm-midnight, rock&roll, 8pm-lam. Main lounge: Mon.-Thurs., 4:30-lOpm; Fri., 4:30pm-1am; Sat., menu. Family night, Tues., 5:30-9pm. Social hour, 289-3289/5160. Breakfast: Mon.-Fri., 6:30-9am. Fri.&Sst., 5:30pm-midnight, Wed., 5:30-10pm. 5:30pm-midnight.Socialhour:Fri.,4-6pm.Closed Wed.,4-6pm.Country&westernnight,steakdinner, Lunch: Mon.-Fri., 11:30am-lpm. Dinner: Social hour: Mon.,Wed.&Fri., reduced price drinks. 1st Tues. each month at 2pm. Flea market 1st Sun. Wed., 6-9pm. All-you-can-eat taco night, Thurs. Wed.&Thurs., 6-9pm; Fri.&Sst., 6-lopm. Brunch: Bingo: Sun.,2pm; Wed.,7pm; bar bingo, Mon.-Fri., each month, 9am-4pm. Texas BBQ last Sat. each Barhours: Tues.-Fri.,4-llpm; Fri.&Sat.,4pm-midSun., 10:.30am-1:30pm. Bingo: Sun., 3-6pm. 5-6:30;m month 6:30-9pm, country&westem dancing until night; Sun.&hol., 3:30-l0pm. Howard O'Club Iam. Red Door Club Building707,284-3089. Cashier's cage: Mon.-Fri., STRAC Club Rodman Officers' Club 287-4343.Mon.,progressivemusic,7-10pm.Toem., 10am-lpm. Dining: Lunch, Mon.-Fri., llam-lpm. Mon.-Wed., 4:30-10pm. Thurs., 4:30-midnight, Open to officers, war-ant officers, civilians grade special night, 7-llpm. Wed., oldies, 7-llpm. Full menu Tues., Fri., Sat., and mini-menu Mon., oldies and classic rock. Fri., TGIF, 4:30pm-lam. NM-7 and above, and family members. Call 283Thurs., ladies night, 7-10pm. Fri., social hour, proWed.,Thurs.,6-9pm.Thurs.,tacos. Fri.&Sat.,prime Sat., 4:30pm-midnight, variety music, free pizza. 4498. Lunch: Mon.-Fri., llam-1:30pm. Dinner: gressive music, 7pm-midnight. Sat., rock 'n roll, rib/seafood. Dining open to Enlisted Club MeCall 286-3511. Sun.-Thurs., 6-8:30pm.; Fri.&Sat., 6-9:30pm. Din7pm-midnight.

PAGE 19

Tropic Times'D 2 TV Schedule St B3 Channels 8 & 10 Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Oct. 2 5:30. NBC New agtaSiao 6:30 ueHead.neNewa 6:O0ueHurrof Power 5:30.m NBCNewe ASureee 5:30a. NBC New a Smiae 5:30, NBC NewSude 5:30-, NBC New a Suandse 5:30-, NBC New-aSori.e 6:00 GOcd Momlng Amaxca 7:00 CarolkraMerlne 6:30 Vxice of alh 6;00 OoodMomlngAmedka 6:00 Good MomngAmedca 6:00 ood Momng Amed6:00 Good Moing Amedia 6:00 0odMomingAmedk a 8:00 Body by Jake 7:30 NavyNewoThlaWek 7:00 Studlo7 8:00 Body by Jake 8:00 Body byJake 8:00 BedybyJake 8:00 BodybyJake 8:00 BodybyJake 830 SeamlSo 8:300 CetoonCoamer 7:30 Tbhe700Club 8:30 Se.a-eStee 8:30 S3Sameeereel 830 eaneStoeet 8:30 SMd.eStr0 8:30 oaoereeoto 9:30 idalncoeperad 30 0 Ju orIidal 8:00 CBSSundayMoring 9:30 FarnlyDrubleDare 9:30 SilverSporne 9:30 Bk To The1 F e 9:30 SilverSpoona 9:30 Kldalocoepralad 10:00 CNNNewaro, WoodyWoodpeaker 9:30 FacoTheNaio 10:00 CNNNewareeO 10:00 CNNNewaom 10:00 CNNewarorm 10:00 CNNNewareom 1000 CNNNewarcn 10:15 HeallkaNeweBreak Blakifo 10:00 MeeThePreeu 10:15 ILOYCLUCy 10.15 HemdWeeNew freak 10.15 HeadleNews Break 10:15 HedllreNewflBreak 1015 HoadleeNeWufreak 10:30 ILovoLWcy BackTo'heI'oooe 10.30 ThloWeekw/Davadfdn1100 Whee1eeonA e 1030 ILoveLacy 10-30 ILaveL-cy 10:30 ILoveLucy 10.30 ILoveLacy 11:00 W eetcFortue ItprF ded kloy 11.30 ShowbixTodAy 11:00 WbeoloFornem 11:00 WheefFof p e 11:00 Whe81oFo0,me 11:00 WbeddfFome 11:30 ShowbifTode 10.30 HedllneNewa 11:30 Hel Newa Norn HemdlreNewiBreak 11:30 ShowBloToday 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 Showbi-Today 11:30 ShowboToday None HeedlneNewu 8reak 11:00 ThlSWaeklenflaabal Noo NFLFoobalr Chagers 12:20 SCNMidday Rpon No, HoalboeNew. Break Her HeadkieNewa Break Ner. Heod Newe Break Nor. HedlkoNew Reak 1:20 BCNMlddayRqran 11:30 C-AFoetba0:Miaaoe,1 va.Hruraen 1:30 SpriuMahIne 1:20 SCNMiddayRapot 12:20 SCNMiddayRnort 1:20 SCN MddayRapon 12 SCNMldday~opoe 1:30 SpeoaNs aolnb va.Ondino 3:00 BrlbSidm wIu .1:00 An-therWodd 1:30 SpeffaL-Igb1 12:30 Spona Latenight 12:30 Spod gh1 12:30 Spoa L texighO 1:00 AzearWodd 2:30pel.tdelheNFL Jacke,. 2:00 OprabWlnfey 1:00 AnrherWodd 1:00 AnoherWod 1:00 An-.berWedd 1:00 AnroberWd 2:00 OpraWhtfrey 3:30 SpeiaLTheDaytoIer3:30 EbeeyJetSbowvuo 3:00 NiakA.-de 2:00 Doiae 2:00 OpraWinf.y 2:00 Doeahae 2:00 OpraWbinFey 3:00 TWnk FMI naioonaAirShow 4:00 S&arTrk 3:30 Pola R8ht 3:00 SqOareoeoTV 3:00 FighIB.aki 3:00 PemilyDouldDm 3:00 'hiok~eelI 3:25 Pdoa RWgh 4:30 Teda'.Gyubome S:00 HeedlNewe 4:25 O.dingUIgh 3:30 Prioe la Rg 3:30 Pco RbIght 3:30 Pcela Right 3:25 P. 1; Right 4:25 GoidlgLAgbl 5:00 SrelTradl 5:30 OnStage 5:15 n.ralHopIqaI 4:25 OuldingLight 4:25 GuidingLight 4:25 GuidingLghI 4:25 OuidlegLight 5:15 OenlHepRal 6:00 HeafikteNewa 6:00 COpDeatauefWrea10eg 6:00 SCNBvmIngRWpMn 1:15 OmerilHOiVa1 5:15 GOerHalOmp"IaI 5:15 OureruHeepItaI 5:15 OGeraeldHpital 6:00 SCBvIng Rpona 6:30 CPAFoodam: Creeenve. 7:00 SteeetStod 6:30 WMdNewaToedghi 6:00 SCNBVUng RWpOI 6:00 SCNEvoing Rper. 6:00 SCN Bvming Reprn 6:00 SCNBanflg Repon 6:30 WoddNewaTrudght 0eerglaTeeh 8:00 Mcvi :"Mtonawd" 7:00 Jeopordyl 6:30 WoddNeweTangt 6:30 WmddNewaTrnegbl 6:30 He-M1NewaBreak 6:30 WmddNewaTeafgbl 7:00 JeopearyI 9.30 Vidoeeklin 10:00 008r.11rtnelThhWeak 7:30 Chadla&Cmp, 7:00 Jlapa7dyI 7:00 Jeoperdyl 6:45 CFAFortbal:Floddava. 7:00 Jepqedyl 7:30 Special: "Rockbe 10:00 Headla Newa 11:00 T1eCaaeabShbdock 8:00 Taxi 7:30 8aflGxy 7:30 Soc-&Teodey M"alaalp0dS. 7:30 SpecIal: "Calaee.: Veto" 10:30 SaturdayNigluived lme. 8:30 60 Minuea 8:00 4OIHo9 a 8:00 Spec-L Coertty Muc 10.00 &drTaboetTeatgh CoArtbeaWodW' 8:30 Pe T eA. Mid r FlddayNWAVident Mild& Buaineawo dd 9:30 Bveneing Newa 9:30 CBSBvmIngNewa AanedIdIOAward; 1030 SCN Ne Update 8:30 Prime ToeLve 10:30 HmPkeTNewa 1:O0ueMeri,:"Whb'aAfruld 12:30 Heat"tNewe 10:00 OetalomeTeolt 10:00 Tndshmner Toetgbt 11:00 ButsahuetTunight 10:35 ToaghtShow 1030 Hem.1nNew 11:00 Hr1aeoINmew.Tmnlght ,iVlnglohWotd" 1:00 Eideg1 r Ne 1030 SCNNew Updte 10:30 SCONew Update 11:30 SCN Newa Updae 11:35 1 .-relgltlW/mEIn 11:00 Emgeondenent Teaeght 11:30 SCNNewaUpdaat 3:10 Mo,4.:"ob,,.,dMadao" 1:30 SpeelaCerhtne 10:35 TeNUghS ew 10:35 TonightShow 11:35 TordghtShew 12:35-mNightlie 11:30 SCNNewaUpdate 1035 TenighShbow 5:00 HedllkeNew. 2:00 CNN ContIme. 11:30 Locmljow/Letreoo.1 11:35 Le.mwht acaw 11:35 gr .tighrwLento 1:05 lSedePoliica'92 1035 ToexlgtbShow 11:35 LareonlgtwjAomn 5:30 HM,m New Break 3:00 HemlieeNewa 12:35amNIgtlie 12:35amN&gH.lae 12:3SamNlghIlee 1:30 Sp.z~r.,gbO 11:35 L~oelgtrw1Aeare 12:35a~m~lghblie 3:30 CNN Wr.Iddepee 1:05 lide Pollidea 52 1:05 ResIde Polida '92 1:05 side PoIIcA '92 2:00 Ajomio HOa 12:35am Nigbtie. 1:05 M vle:"Uob. 5:00 SneoNewaBreak 1:30 SpootzL.aolgbo 1:35 SpeonsTuaigia 1:30 SpendaTuaght 3:00 TonoglShow 1:05 Movl:"Foore" Cowboy" 2:00 Ao.neOHa 2:00 ArmenioHal 2:00 Anuro Han 4:00 Leraaot-,twLmemn 2:43 Morle:"Whor." 3:40 Mevlre:"SanetbIg 3:00 TonighrShw 3:00 ToedIghow 3:00 TmolJt&Show 5:00 Ha.ib.N-wa 4:25 Movie "Conquaeatof W d" 4:00 T-Ighwietwrman 4:00 1 m-IgltrwjM aan 4:00 LgrlTgi'w/Llatann 5:00 lHedntNowaBreak thPlaethfeApea" 5:30 Hae.dtkoNew' 5:00 HedlineNewa Bre 5: 5:00 HeodlbnoNewa Break 5:00 He.ke New Break 6:00 Heedlbe Newa Break 6:00 H.lbmONewa Break Cable Channel 14 Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Oct. 2 5:30=1 NBC New a Bonre 6:30axmSmolcaatwithChanela 6:00-arSupenfeIenda 5:30m NBC Newa a e1. 5:30NBC NewaK Sand.e 5:30m NBC New a Sunrdae 8 & 10 5:30NBC Newea Siea 6:00 Good Momre Ameda S "10 6:30 Muppertable 6:00 God MorelgArelc 6:00 Good Monlg Amernca 6:00 GoodMomilngAmerca 530at NBC Newa aSun.e 6:00 Good MoMrdg A-1edc 0:00 MoppetBabdee 10:30 FamiyTheamer: "The 7:00 MickeyatdDonald 8:00 Mickey Md Dooald 8:00 WinlethePoob 8:00 T=ageMuttNiuj& 6:00 GoodMoeningAmerdca 8:00 MppeBabiem 8:30 LmbChop'aPlyAt-g WzAee" 7:25 WoiielbePeo 8:30 BacktonthePuo 8:30 Captainplanet TInrls 8:00 Widget 8:30 L-nb Chp'PayAlog 9:00 Today 12:10peHeoteadliNewBreak 7:50 LampChwp 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 8:30 Family Double Dare 8.30 SqOare OeTV 9:00 Toda y 11:00 OprhWinfreyshow 1230 Amedcwn(ladgotr. 8:20 Widged 11:00 OprahWinfreyShow 11:00 Doehue 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 11:00 OprebWnreySbow Nor. HeodlbeNewaBreak 1:30 MotorWeak 8:40 BackToThe,1 e No. HeadlineNews Noo HedfineNew 11:00 OpratWnfreyShow 11:00 Donahoe Nor. HedlteNew=Break 12:20 SCNMlddayRepoo 2:00 Baaebel: New York va. 9:05 NIej.Tuea 1 :20 SCN Middey Rpon 12:20 SCN Mdday RepO No,. Headline New Break No-n HdIke New Break 1220 SCNMiddayRpoet 12:30 An My Cbdo, PiemhghboCohcagov. 9:30 Cpua. PLe 1230 A2lMy-dree 1 30 Af1MyChildron 1 20 SCNMidday Rer 12:20 SCN MiddayRepi 1 30 AReMypChidre 1:30 One I.fe to Lve Montreal 10:00 Movrdk 1:30 OneLlfeToLive 1.30 O. Ife to Lve 1230 A1My C.dre 12:30 AflMy Childrre L;30 OnoLtfe Lave 2:30 Th Young and Regleas 5:30 OnPitRoad 11:00 StarTek 2:30 The Young and Restles 2:30 The Young and Restl 1:30 OnoLlferoLive 1:30 One LIfetoLIve 2:30 The Young and Reales. 3:30 Seamer 6:00 CNNHeadlceNewa No-e CNNH.edc,4eNewa 3:30 Sra.orStreee 3:30 Se-mellenet 2:30 The Young andRealre 2:30 The Young andRele 3:30 SesameStreet 4:30 bIdalncepVraeed 6:00 WkyAfAmry7 1215 Movie: "Theor Ia 4:30 SavedBy ThBe 4:30 ThinkFastlI 3:30 Se.aweStret 3:30 S-eureStreet 4:30 Kdolncop reaoed 4:05 CNNNewromom 6:30 Dleeaurn Grerere" 4:55 ChauedOne 4:55 Chdae -One 4:30 SchnlullcSpxrtAmeica 4:30 LevelToBeover 4:53 Channd Doe 5:10 AfterShleboSp-e4al 7:00 StarTrak:TheN.et 2:00 MagicalWoldofDaeey 5:10 AftrSchoolSpecial 5:10 AfterSchoodSpeelol 4:55 Chao nlOe 4:35 ChannelOwe 5:10 AfterSebooSpecial 6:00 SCNyeoingReo" Gemalion 3:00 Foorbell:Sbrelezva. 6:00 SCN BvrngRaporn 6:00 SCNEveningReport 5:10 AfterScboolSpecial 5:10 AfterScboolSpecal 6:00 SCNEveningReport 6:30 NBCNIghlyNew 8:00 MarlodWil,0hdr, Parke. 6:30 NBCNIgh1lyNowa 6:30 NBCN ghllyNew 6:00 SCNEvreingRpor 6:00 SCNB-eingRoporl 630 NBCNigtlyNewe 7:00 OaemyNac 8:30 R.e-eone 6:00 CNN HeadlbneNew 7:00 MacoGrde&Loud 7:00 Amecxbasoodeat 6:30 NBCNigtlyNew 6:30 NBCN4ghtlyNew. 7:00 E.MpyNowo1 7:30 PE2hNPrknceOfBelA r 9:00 Cope 6:30 TheWooderYears 8:00 Footbal:R.dorv. Home Videoe 7:00 OFuHoujo 7:00 PerfntStregere 7:30 FrerhPrceOfBelAr 8:00 MuophyBrown 9:30 Videeo"ke 7:00 Foobal:49erye. SanOW Chiers 7:30 Homelrpenvert 7:30 Gold. Gids 7.30 PareIlyMate 8:00 MurphyBrewe 8:30 NightCouet 10:30 SeorodayNightLive 1000 BeverlyHilla90210 11:00 CNNHeadtkreNewa 8:00 LALaw 8:00 MdoerSbeWreto 8:00 Thekqualizer 830 NigbtCoorol 9:00 QeaemLeqp MldnLghtScleneo&Tewbnolgy 11:00 60Minutea 11:30 SCNLateNIg&Update 9:00 FalcoeCret 9:00 Staer 9:00 Keot'Landing 900 Quaoarnemap 10:00 CNN ead InrNewa 12:30 Heaibe New MideightSnomiceaawitbCh11:35 Aomio Ha0 10:00 CNN Headie New 10:00 CNN Headlte New 10:00 CNN HRadIMe New 1000 CNN Headlne Nw 10:30 SCN Lete N Updao .1:00 Mo awNgbO Group nel 8 10 12:35annSIoilcaltwith Ch.rnei 10:30 SCN Late e Update 1030 SCN LAe N Update 10:30 SCN Lt Nke Updae 10:30 SCN Lat Nke. Update 10:35 Aar"etoHon 1:30 SporettLateoght 8&10 10:35 AraeoHa 10:35 ArtereoHall 10:35 AnmoeHal 10:33 ArereoHall 11:33 DavidLeoroema 2:00 Figer.LtainoeThleWeek 11:35 DgvIdL reeran 11:35 DvidLoeerre 11:35 DevLdLbetrertan 11:35 DavidLenmm 12:35amNigbline 3:00 SmtdayNghtUve 12:353mSimloaawih (3,12:35tamnStilcatwithChrela 12:35MSimlaaole Ohan12:35ameNightaIce 1:05 WaddwidoUpdane 4:30 Both Side w/Jeie nel. 8& 10 ela 8 & 10 1:05 WeidwidoUpdate 1:30 SportLAteedgbt Jacklow 1:30 SpelIoLIght 2:00 A"r'eroHell 5:00 HeadleNew 2:00 Ame&oHaw 3:00 LarryKlog FvOl 5:30 HeadineNew 3:00 Tengh&Show 4:00 CNNHeoadlieNewa 4:00 iodengart 4:30 CNN Cauoafire 500 Vldooloko 5:00 Vidbelrk 6:00 Headlae New Beak 6:00 HeadliteNewa Break Channels 8 & 10 Cable Channel 14 SPECIALS .SPECIALS Dayton International Air Show Sports: NFL Football/Major League Baseball Saturday, 3:30 p.m. Enjoy a day of chills and thrills at the air show as acts Saturday such as the U.S. Army's elite parachute team, The .r 'New York vs. Pittsburgh or Chicago vs: Montreal -2:30 p.m. GoldenKnights, the Navy's amazing BlueAngels and flying teams -Sunday from around the world gather at America's premiere aviation event. Steelers vs. Packers -3 p.m. Country Music Association Awards 49ers vs. Saints -7 p.m. Wednesday, 8 p.m. Monday Night Football The biggest names from Nashville and the Country Music Association gather Chiefs vs. Raiders, 8 p.m. for this annual gala event. Vince Gill and Reba McEntire host the event. NEW SERIES MOVIES Widget Mermaids -PG-13 Thursdays, 8 am. Sunday, 8 p.m. He's back. Widget the World Watcher is back to continue his mission of Set in New England in the early '60s, a saucy, sexy single mother of two provides protecting the Earth's environment. her older daughter who wants to be a nun, with no end of embarrassment as the teenager tries to deal with her own sexual awakening. Stars Cher, Winona Ryder, MOVIES Michael Schoeffling and Bob Hoskins. The Wizard -PG ALL NIGHT MOVIE BLOCKS Saturday, 10:30 am. A young man named Corey, his traumatized video gaie-vimard brother and their Urban Cowboy -PG friend are pursued across the Southwest by vaio rcIatives and other grownups. Today, 1:05 a.m. Stars Fred Savage, Luke Edwards, Jenny Lewis, Beau Bridges, Christian Slater. A young Texas farmer comes to Houton to work in arefinery and learns about the incredible honky-tonk named Gilley's with its easy women, macho ambiance and The Grass Is Greener -G mechanical bull. Sunday, 12:15 p.m. Something Wild -R An American millionaireinvades the private chambersof a straight-lacedEnglish Today, 3:40 a.m. Earl's mansion and falls in love with the lady of the house. Stars Robert Mitchum, A businessman accepts alift from a flaky, sexy girl and his life turns inside out. Deborah Kerr, Cary Grant and Jean Simmons.

PAGE 20

B 4 Tropic Times Sept. 25, 1992 HONDA Prelude Si. Quality control is superb standard power door locks and power windows don't suspension, rates good and about a average for the class. by Zane Binder readily "fall to hand"; the built-in tilt steering column Its MichelinMXV-4 all-season tires are decent quality, King Features Syndicate has limited adjustment range, too. The trunk is surprisbut not the performance rubber this $20,000 car should ingly roomy and well finished, and safety is a bright wear. Ride, sometimes a compromise with handling, Among youthful enthusiasts cars, such as the Oldspot too: a driver's side airbag, five mile per hour front was definitely stiffened on this vehicle to increase smobile Achieva, Nissan 240SX, Toyota Celica, and (not rear) bumpers, and anti-lock four-wheel power disc tossibility and perceived sportiness. In most situations, Chevrolet Cavalier Z24 count substantial followings. brakes are standard. Other features include variable the ride is satisfactory, but certain types of large bumps Honda's entry in this sport class is the new for '92 assist power steering, a power sunroof, air conditioning, and dips will have you wishing for increased compliPrelude, the fourth North American generation to carry and much more. ance. The turning circle was nearly 36 feet acceptable the nameplate. It's a well-built vehicle of about the The Prelude Si's engine is a 2.3 liter, dual overhead but not notable. A four-wheel steering option is availsame dimensions as last year. It offers contemporary cam, 16-valve "4." It boasts 1601P, fuel injection, and ablethat cuts the turning circle by fourfeet; I didn'ttest styling and a much more rigid body, but needs refinedual balance shafts for smoothness. It moves this 2,866it on this year's model, but haven't found it a "must ment to match the stellar sophistication of the previous pound car from 0-60 in nine seconds, about average for have" on any automaker's vehicle. Again, theprevious generation. the class. Fuel efficiency was observed at 23 city and 25 generation Prelude offered slightly better balance in all Hondas have always been known for space utilizahighway (EPA, 22/26), slightly below parforthe genre. aspects of the ride/handling equation. tion and interior designs others widely copy. The new It's a decent, quiet engine with adequate torque that's Quality control throughout the vehicle was superb. Prelude Si (the top of the line) is a departure from smooth, too. But it isn't nearly as smooth (the degree is It's definitely a bright spot. Overall, the new Prelude tradition: it's not easy to climb into the front seats the key), tractible, or economical as last year's powerisn't as refined or sophisticated as the last generation because of the leg-intrusive underdash design and large plant, though its extra 201P gives it considerably more despite technical specifications that promise more. Its side seat bolsters. The rear bench offers so little knee zip. straight-line performance is much better, but smoothroom, no one can use it. A large center console divides The engine was mated to a short-throw five-speed. ness, economy, ride space utilization (the '91s were the twin front cloth buckets; it actually extends to the manual transmission and light clutch. Both worked only slighty better in this regard), and particularly rear seat. It's handy, but for some reason doesn't inwell, and you'll have no complaints, but again, weren't comfort may leave you wishing for more. It's a decent elude a cupholder. The dash design is a strange combiquite an equal of the previous generation. A modem car, but doesn't excel in any area and ranks nowhere nation of analog and digital instruments; worse, some automatic transmission is optionally available. near the class leaders -the place where Honda's still are placed on the passenger side. Controls such as the The Si's handling, with its four-wheel independent now seemed to have a permanent lock. Employment All applicants should be aware that hiring is severely restricted because ofthe Deporary NTE 1 yr. SENSITIVE. ARPERCEN, Liaison South, Bldg 95, Fort Clayton. partment of Defense worldwide hiring freeze. Beginning April 6, the freeze allowed Gen Exp: 1 yr. Note: Knowledge of DBase. Limited to current DA civilian one new hire from outside Department of Army for every four losses to DoD. employees. Placement of current DA employees (including those on leave without pay) is an exception to the freeze. Current temporary employees may now apply against 479-92-MWGENERAL ENGINEER, NM-801(21)-13. Competitive Temporary permanent vacapcies unless otherwise noted. Specialized experience, when indiDetail NTE 120 days. Sensitive. USARSO, Office of the CG, Treaty Implementacated, must be in duties similar to those required by the vacancy. tion Office, Fort Clayton. Limited to current DA civilian employees. Military Spouses: If available, qualified, and within the area of consideration specified for the vacancy, may be considered subject to the "one-for-four" DA 480-92-NR -SUPPLY TECHNICIAN (PROPERTY BOOK OFFICER), NMhiring restriction. 2005-7. Sensitive. DEH, Supply & Storage Division, Property Control Br., Corozal. Panama Canal Commission employees: U.S. and non-U.S. current permanent Spec Exp: 1 yr. equiv to NM-6. TIG: NM-5. Form 106. Limited to current DA employees may apply for permanent employment subject to the "one-for-four" DA civilian employees. hiring restriction. Current permanent NAF or AAFES employees who were appointed before Nov. 3, 1989 may now also apply. 481-92-NR -SERVICE ORDER CLERK, NM-303-4. Temporary NTE 01-31-93. AMENDMENT ON HOW TO APPLY: Failure to complete U. S. Army South HQ, USAG-DEH, ERMD, Work Mgmt Br., Corozal. Gen Exp: 1 yr. Bilingual Form 106, when required, could hinder an applicant's chances of being referred for (English/Spanish). Written test (CASP). Shift work. the vacancy. For information, visit the Civilian Personnel Office, Building 560, Corozal. The Directorate of Civilian Personnel Office is accepting applications for the following positions: VB# Vacancies Title and Location Open: 09-25-92 Close: 10-06-92 Clinical Nurse positions. For information call Enid Sullivan at 285-4116. PACIFIC: Store Worker, MG-6914-4, Temporary/intermittent. Materials Handler, MG478-92-VC -MILITARY PERSONNEL CLERK (TYPING), NM-204-4. Tem6907-5, Temporary/Intermittent. For information call Julie Hurtado at 285-6268. Kitchen Capers Outdoor cooking has come a long way from the Blanch zucchini in boiling water three minutes; caveman's spit and the iron cauldron. There's an indrain well; set aside. credible variety of grills, from the simplest grid over Drain peaches, reserving all liquid. Place ribs on coals to the more sophisticated, large, multiple-grill charcoal grill about six inches from source of heat; models that are almost like kitchens. There are comcover and cooks slowly, about one hour, turning occapact, easy-clean, portables that fold and fit into small sionally. Or place ribs on oven broiler rack and bake at fabric carrying cases with handles for easy toting to 350 degrees one and one half hours, turning occasioncamps, beaches or tailgate picnics. ally. And there are all sorts of cooking tools and accessoCombine reserved peach liquid with catsup, honey, ries, fire-starters, aromatic wood chips and chunks and .mustard, vinegar, ginger and garlic. Bring to a boil in flavorizers that enhance taste and aroma. Relatively small saucepan, boil five minutes, stirring frequently. new are herb packets like tea bags that are first soaked Brush ribs with sauce last 20 minutes of grilling or 3/4 in water then added to hot coals. If you plan to use wood hour of baking. Cut each tomato into six wedges and chips orchunks, soakthemin water for20 to 30 minutes thread them on metal or WET bamboo skewers, along before tossing them into the hots coals, otherwise they Country rib barbecue with zucchini slices, peach halves, and mushrooms. will burn before providing their unique flavor and 2 zucchini, cut into thick diagonal slices Grill or bake last 10 minutes of ribs' cooking time, aroma. 1 large (16 oz.) can cling peach halves in juice brushing generously with sauce. Try soaking plain chips in Angostura aromatic bitor extra light syrup .ae y Ph isenaiCgrrad e C n ters in a wide-mouthed jar, perhaps overnight. Toss 3 pounds country pork spare ribs recipe by Philomena Corradeno them wet on the fire for a unique flavor. The bitters can 3/4 cup catsup be reused -for soaking chips, not for cooking. 1/3 cup honey Editor's note: People interested in sharing a recPork ribs are a favorite barbecue meat. Dripping 3 tablespoons prepared mustard ipe or household tip with Tropic Times readers, can with a honey-sweet, slightly vinegary-tart sauce, they're 2 tablespoon grated fresh ginger send recipes or tips by MPS to Tropic Times, Unit just made for finger-eating -not to be served to sophis1 large clove garlic, minced 0936, APO AA 34002. Your name and base will be ticates. Get the meaty cut and serve with peachy vege2 firm tomatoes printed wth your submission. table kabobs. 6 large mushrooms

PAGE 21

Tropic Times Sept. 25,1992 Rich Cahill, Eco-Tours guide, shows Nathan Cohen and Hania Woodman, 24th Civil Engineering Squadron, some of the jungle flora during a tour of Barro Colorado Island. Island hop Navy MWR, Eco-Tours show city slickers jungle environment BARRO COLORADO ISLAND Then we had a quick "handicraft class." (Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation) As he tore strands from a palma sombrero -Our Lady of the Rainforest sat on still tree, Cahill explained how the Chocoe Insmooth waters in the early morning as dians wove their baskets, often dying the we gazed intently at a mist-shrouded strands. island. It took only a few minutes before During our lessons the jungle noises we were welcomed to the jungle. continued unabated. The overriding sound We weren't listening to the Guns and was that of the howler monkeys. We strained Roses tune, but rather the trills of a to see them, but we spied them only from "Froot Loops" bird establishing his tera distance high in the trees. ritorial branch, the coyote-like noises of Kirchman's group was luckier. They black mantle howler monkeys, the chirpsaw white-faced capuchin and howlers. ing ofthousands of creepy crawlers, the "We saw five or six white-faced video arcade music from hundreds of monkeys jumping from tree to tree, then frogs occasionally broken by the grunt they started following us," said Barbara of a wild pig. Dalle-Molle, family member. We were a mixed group that de"No," said Kirchman, there were 10 scended on Barro Colorado Island 3 or 15." some city slickers curious to see jungle Marge Evans looks through binoculars for signs of toucans. Sighting comparisons were made at up close and personal; others, like Sandy the muddy trail's end, Some of us lay in Toothman, 24th Civil Engineering Squadron, who grew submerged during our trip. hammocks, others thirstily drank bottled water and up in Panama, who had spent plenty of time in jungle Cahill guided our eyes upward, and the cameras and juices and most ate the hearty sandwiches provided. areas but was looking for greater insight about her binoculars were turned to the treetops. After several We discussed our morning's adventure. "great backyard." sightings oftoucans, kell-billed (Froot Loops type) and "It was one thing to go to a simulated rain forest like We were not equipped with butterfly nets, but we did the brown-chested mandible variety, we headed to I did in Florida, but it's something else again to see have binoculars. We were not "birders," per se, but after shore to begin our jungle trek. everything in its natural surroundings," said Ernest a dozen or more sightings of colorful toucans and Walking through the jungle, it seems plants and Dalle-Molle, 24th Wing. "You have to concentrate and trogans, our enthusiasm grew with each recognition. animals grow to science fiction-size proportions. The respect their (animals') habitats to see them." The bilingual Eco-Tours guides' enthusiasm was giant blue butterflies -Cahill explained they were Others, like Marge Evans, wanted to take the tour contagious. Group leaders Rich Cahill and Archibaldo claustrophobic and domineering. If someone was wearagain. Kirchman pointed out animals and plants while rapidly ing blue (we sneakily glanced at each other) the butter"Next time, I'm going to stay in one place longer and explaining habitats, traits and distinctions. fly was wearing blue (we sneakily glanced at each be very quiet so I can see more," she said. The Eco-Tours Barro Colorado tour, booked through other) the butterfly would fly toward him for fear theinOften there may not be time for that. Many people Navy Morale Welfare and Recreation, was a learning sect's space was being invaded. trekthrough thejungle because they haveto, especially experience from the start. Boarding Our Lady of the Other overgrown items -anthills. One was at least the military. There's no time to stop to see let alone Rainforest boats we headed down the Panama Canal 4-feet tall and hung from a tree. appreciate what the rain forest has to offer. Only time to listeningto ourguides' historical notes aboutthe buildAnd of course theplants-the threadlike lianas that feel too hot, wield a machete to get through the tall ingof thecanal, stories aboutthebirds spottedenroute, grew to gnarly trunk-size ropes literally choking the life grass, avoid snakes and scratch more bug bites. like the cormorant and kingfisher, and about plants on from trees, Cahill said. But we had time to learn some great things about our the bank, such as Kuna grass. We got lessons on jungle survival. Cahill took a backyard and the uniqueness ofapart of Panama. Barro When the way became narrower, Cahill skillfully piece from the palmetto tree (hearts of palm) and passed Colorado Island, so close, brought us back to the classguided the boat through obstacle-marked waters to a it among our group to sample. He pointed out which room. quiet cove. plants to use for water sources. As we puttered away in our boats, we continued to "Watch forthe bubbles," he said. HanniaWoodman watch for a branch to tremble, a movement in the brush, looked for "Wally"the alligator, but he chose to remain story and photos by Monique Chere or a flash of color from the treetops. Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation

PAGE 22

Tropic Times Sept. 25, 1992 Albrook Classes offered are pottery, throwing roo Atlantic education center moves, pr m ; agan construction, stained glass, acoustic guitar The club will hold officers' memberoffers varied classes, schedules construction, do-it-yourself custom framship night Saturday. Barbecued chicken or FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO-ATnext mini-emersion Spanish class will mng, fabric painting, basic leather crafts, beef brisket will be served 6:30-9 p.m., LANTIC) -Bigger and better is the also be taught in the rooms. acrylic and oil painting, basic drawing, followed by country/western music until way the Fort Davis Education Center The center offers several improvecharcoal drawing. Registration is required. 1:30 a.m. staff sees its new location in Building ment programs, said Bjorneby. Child care 235 here. General technical Improvement is Ceramic center The center officially moved In late one such program. Soldiers can come The Albrook Early Childhood EnrichAugust, but workers are still putting in at their convenience and work with The center is located 4 Building 155, meant Center has openings for 4 year olds. finishing touches on the building's ina tutor to improve their GT score. Fort Clayton. Call 287-4360. Hourly care reservations can be made up to teror. The only major item left is the ASEP is program for noncommissioned Sessions offered ae clay flower making, 2 weeks in advance for 3 year olds through carpet, said Patricia Bjorneby, educaofficers. NCOs use this course to enair brush techniques and ceramic paint. kindergarten-age children. Call 286-3133 tion services specialist. hance their training skills to make them iag classes. Participants mustbuy materials to make reservations. Even though the center is not as better NCOs, Bjorneby said. and pay firing fee. Registration is required. easy to find as it was in Building 32, The center's staff knows the schedClayton above the post exchange, its new locaruling problems infantry soldiers have Curundu tion will be more beneficial to it users, with continuing their education, and Valent center said Bjorneby. have a program to teach four-week Theatre Arts Centre Valent Recreation Center is located in The center now boasts four class college classes when the soldiers are The center, located in Building 2060, Building 53. Call 287-6500/4201. rooms which will allow for more classes not in the field, she said. offers a variety of classes. Registration is Tours -Darien's museum, Gamboa being offered and hold more people -The center recently finished a mornrequired. Call 286-3814/3152. and Miraflores Locks, Wednesday, 1-5 up to 25, she said. ing class for a unit that worked eve'[he Musical Comedy Murders of p.m.Three different colleges will use these nings. 1940" will open at the center Oct. 16 and Special tour: a cruise to the Galapagos classrooms, said Bjorneby. Florida State Center officials said there are many will play Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays sands, Ecuador, Oct. 9-15. Reservations University and Panama Canal College ways the education center can help through Oct. 31. 'iad s u t 95 eseis will both teach college courses and military and family members improve th Oct. 31. with payments must be made, space is urnCentral Texas College is teaching and advance their education. For more The 1993 Army Soldier Show audiitednce tionss wiltio beora heldaton ine September.rSingers, A new bird watching and nature tour is Advanced Skis Education Program iomation, see a counselor at Builddancers, musicians, technicians are needed. available. i t r Nominee packages must have name, rank, Hit movies in Dolby surround sound are social security number, unit address, ETS a new feature at the center. Films are shown Aerobic/fitness awareness program, 1date, and speciality, a written release from Friday evenings, Saturdays and Sundays. 2:30 p.m. and 3-4:30 p.m. Mondays, Wedunit commander for 179 days temporary Movies and time listings are at the center. nesdays and Fridays. The program is free The Twin Oceans Pro shop, Building duty beginning March 5. Technicians must Piano recital, Monday, 7-9 p.m. 'Disand features low-impact aerobics, nutrition 155, Fort Clayton.offers scuba, snorkel, send a resume of experience and training, plays, vendors, live entertainment, refreshtips, step aerobics, seminars and guest speaktennis and other outdoor recreational equipfull length photo and recommendations from ments and food. ers. ment. Call 287-3088. local Morale, Welfare and Recreation repValent offers recreational and educaJunior teen council meetings, 3 p.m., resentative, forms 2 and 2-1, must have a tional classes. Call for classes and times. first and third Thursdays of each month at Boat minimum of nine days titne in service reVolunteers are needed to start set conthe Youth Center. All youths may attend. shop maining after Oct. 31. Nominees must be struction for the annual Haunted House. The Senior Teen Center, Building 155, The Fort Clayton Boat shop, Building deployable because the show may tour Characters, make-up and decorations are offers activities for teenagers 15-19 years 178, offers weekly specials. Charters can be overseas. also needed. Volunteers must be 18 years old. Call 287-6451. made fishing and diving trips. Call 287old. Call Miguel Briceno at the center. 6453. Howard Outdoor events BOSS program The CRD Outdoor Recreation Branch Auto crafts Zodiac center The Better Opportunities for Single Soloffers various adventure activities each month. The Albrook Auto Crafts Shop is located The Zodiac Recreation Center, Building diers program offers recreational activities Register at Building 154, Fort Clayton. Call in Buildings 441, 442 and 443 on Albrook 709, offers many activities. The Informafor single soldiers and geographical bache287-3363. AFS. The shop holds weekly classes in arc tion, Tour and Travel Office section will lors. Call Anne Kelly at Valent Recreation Partial canal transits consist of a guided and gas welding, auto air conditioning, auto arrange special trips. All tours leave from Center, 287-6500, to volunteer. tour vessel from Balboa to Pedro Miguel transmission repair and engine rebuilding. the Howard Theater. Call 284-6161/6109. Locks and cruise to the Bay of Panama. Call 286-3613. Special of theweek -Contractor's Hill San Blas snorkel/dive, Saturday-Sunand Miraflores LocksSunday, 9 a.m.2 day, $140 for non divers and $175 for dip.m. The Fort Clayton Youth Center, Buildvers' packages. Packages include airfare, Arts-and crafts Vista Panama -Saturday, 7-9 p.m. An ing 155, has varied activities for preteens. hotel, equipment transport, three meals, three The Arts and Crafts Center is located in evening at the center includes a slide show, Call287-6451. guided dives and boat service. Building 180. Call 287-5957. traditional dancers and Panamanian food. I Atlantic Sundial center The Fort Sherman Ars and Crafts Center Christmas bazaar Sundial center is located in Building 206,. Call 289-6313. C rsm sb z a The Sundial Recreation Center is located in Wood shops, ceramics, painting, drawing, The Atlantic Community Women's Club is sponBuilding 42, Fort Davis. Call 289-3889/3300. pottery and air brushing are available. soring its annual holiday bazaar Nov. 14 from 10 Classes are available in music, juggling, piThe center is closed Thursdays and Fridays. a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Fort Davis Community Club. ano, guitar, dog obedience training, cake decoVendors are needed. rating, Spanish, English,French, folkloricdance, Youth news Call Muriel Doyle at 289-4755 or Becky Steigler modern dance. Other classes are also available. The Fort Espinar Youth Center is located in at 289-4354. Events: Wine and dine, Fridays, 4-9 p.m. Building 219. Call 289-4605. Thursdays are wonderful, a program for Events: Roller skating Tuesdays at women, will feature weight training. the Espinar School. Flag football and cheerleading regOcean Breeze center istration is under way for youths 6-15. Requirements: registration, physical, Ocean Breeze Recreation Center is located in $10 registration fee. Coaches are also Building 153, Fort Sherman, 289-6402, offers needed. fun education classes and adult education classes for free or a nominal fee. Classes: Nautilus orientation, aerobics, beginSherman ning and advanced karate, gymnastics, health Rental cooking, juggling classes. R Sherman Rental, Building 31, is open Arts and crafts centers Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Saturdays and Sundays, The Fort Davis Arts and Craft Center is to7 a.m.-6 p.m.; holidays, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. cated in Building 251. Call 289-5201. Call 289-6104. Auto and multicrafts shop, ceramic shop, adClasses -Outboard motor boat vanced and beginners oil painting from photooperation, Saturdays, 10 a.m., at Fort graphs. Sherman Lagoon.

PAGE 23

Tropic Times B 7 ic s Sept. 25, 1992B 7 Colonial Panama tour -Monday, 9 a.m.3 p.m. Historical sites of Panama including the French Plaza, National Cathedral, Church of the Golden Altar and National Theater. Special family colonial Panama tourOct. 3,9 a.m.-3 p.m. Free Zone shopping -Wednesday and Oct. 2, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Gorgona Beach trip -Oct. 4, 7 a.m.-4 p.m.Fee includes lunch and use of facilities. Outdoor adventures The Zodiac Recreation Center has tickets for sailing tours on 41and 47-foot yachts for parties of 10-15 people including Panama Bay, partial canal transits, Taboga Island and Contadora Island. All tours leave from the Balboa Yacht Club. Special of the week -Gold panning in Las Cumbres, Oct. 3, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Hunt for the legendary underwater grave and treasure of Sir Frances Drake. Sailing trip around Panama Bay -Today, 6-11 p.m. Fee includes snack, dinner and refreshments. Partial canal transit -Saturday, 8 a.m.12:30 p.m. Horseback riding in El Valle -Saturday, 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Peacock bass fishing inArenosa -Sunday and Oct. 4, 5 a.m.-2 p.m. Catch the biggest fish and receive a biggest peacock bass T-shirt. Snorkel and scuba Drake's Island Oct. 1, 7 a.m.-5 p.m. San Blas Islands -Leaves Oct. 9 at 6 a.m. and returns Oct. 11 at 6 p.m. Price U.S. Amy photo by Apri Rnbolt includes transportation, air fare, meals, PANAMA CITY TOUR -The Valent Recreation Center, Building 53, Fort Clayton, will conduct a walking tour through snorkeling/scuba equipment, dive master, colonial Panama Oct. 10 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The tour includes a visit to the Cathedral of Plaza Mayor (above), the charter boat and five dives. Scuba divers Presidential palace, National Theatre, French Plaza, the Golden Altar and Panama Viejo. Lunch at a local restaurant is must have an open water dive certification also included in the tour. Call 287 4201/6500 for reservations. There is a $10 fee for adults and $6 for children. card. F Specials -DJ night, tonight and SaturOfficers Club, Rodman Marina and behind Family support Swimming pools day at 7 p.m.; a "poor sailor's night"Wedthe barber shop at Rodman. There is also a The Howard/Albrook Family Support Albrook and Howard swimming pools nesday. Call 283-4332. bohio at Farfan. Center, Building 707, has a variety of events are available for private rental. Passes are Pool rental: The Rodman and Farfan scheduled each month. Hours of operation available and can be used at Air Force, pools can be rented for private functions are: Mondays-Fridays, 7:30a.m.-4:30 p.m. Army and Navy pools. Call 284-3569. Officers' Club after pools close in the evenings. Call for Call 284-5650. Albrook pool offers classes for moms Special -People with September birthrates. Financial counseling, appointment, 7:30 and tots, preschoolers, beginners, advanced dates can eat at free buffet Tuesday. Call a.m.-4:30 p.m. Call 284-6545. beginners, intermediates and adults. 283-4498. Rodman Marina Volunteers wanted -Family Services Howard pool offers classes for presneeds volunteers to assist with the loan choolers, beginners, advanced beginners, The marina offers a variety of boats for closet, base brochure library, layette prointermediates and adults. Call for days and Tours, leisure news rent and a bass fishing package. Call 283gram and airman's attic. Call 284-5860. times. The Information, Tour and Travel Office 3147/3150. is located in Building 24, (Pizza Hut BuildThe marina bass fishing package includes ing) Rodman and is open 8 a.m.-6 p.m. transportation to Gamboa and return, boat Riding stables Enlisted Club Monday through Friday. Call 283-5307/4454. and motor, gasoline,take guide,$5 worth of Basic horsemanship classes will be held Enlisted membership night will be Upcoming tours: bait, a bait bucket, rods and reels, tackle, at Albrook Riding Stables Saturday from 8 held at the Albrook club Tuesday. Prime rib Moonlight cruises, tonight, 6:30-10:30 coolers and ice. Food and drink is not proa.m. to 2 p.m. buffet will be served from 6-8 p.m. and is p.m. Cruise the Bay of Panama on theBlack vided. free for members. There will be a Koraoke Stallion. Pay-as-you-go bar and complimenYouth centers contest, prizes, a DJ and dancing. Members tary snacks. Scuba diving classes may bring one guest over 18 years old. Call Panama City tour, Wednesday. Includes The Howard Youth Center, Building 696, 284-4189 or286-4128. tour and bilingual guide. An open water scuba diving course will 284-4700 and the Albrook Youth Center, DJ G, from KOOL 105.5 FM in Denver, Bambito Resort Hotel in Chiriqui -be offered Oct. 19 through Nov. 1. The Building 850, 286-3195, offer trips, classes Colo., will be starring at theHoward EnOct. 9-12. Tour includes transportation, three course will include five class and pool sesand activities for youths. listed Club's Casual CoveFriday and Saturnights at the hotel and tours of El Volcan, sions at Rodman pool and open water dives Annual membership renewal for the day evenings during October. Cerro Punta and Boquete. Deadline for resOct. 25 and Nov. 1. The price is $145 and youth centers and the new Teen Center is ervations is Oct. 5. includes instruction, complete equipment, due by Oct. 1. Fee is $15 per year for the OfficerS'"Wet, Wild, Wooly Weekend" toConboat trips and certification fees. A minimum first child and reduced forfamilies with two O c clu. tadora, Oct. 1012. Tour includes transporof four and a maximum of 10 people are or more children. Children who haven't Club members and their family members tation on Black Stallion yacht, two nights required for the class. paid fee by Oct. 16 must pay $1 each time over 18 years old may play bingo at the hotel, deep-sea fishing, water skiing, snorAn advanced scuba diving class is set they visit the center. Call 284-4700 or 286Howard Enlisted Club Wednesdays from7keling and use of MWR's jet skis. for Oct. 31-Nov. 1 at Portobelo on the At3195. 10 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. Montego Bay, Jamaica, Oct. 11-14. Inlantic side. The class includes a night dive, Smithsonian Institute botanical tour -cludes hotel accommodations, airfare and deep dive, navigation dive and two optional Monday, 2:45-5 p.m. for youths 5-18 years Montego Bay transfers. dives. old. Fee includes transportation and superArts a I C s Costa Rica tour, Oct. 31-Nov. 3. InOptions include a computer dive, search vision. Howard Arts and Crafts, Building 711, cludes round-trip airfare, hotel accommoand recovery dive, photography dive and Pre-teen dance contest -Oct. 2, 7:30has a frame shop and award shop. Leather dations, city tour and air port transfers in more. The cost is $100. There will be a pre10:30 p.m. at Howard Youth Center for kits, belts, leather by the square foot and San Jose. dive meeting before the class. Call 283children 8-12 years old. Transportation ceramics are for sale. Call 284-6361/6345. Deep-sea fishing charters/private moon5307/4454. from Albrook at 7p.m., retuming at 11 p.m. Free mold pouring during September. light cruises: leave the driving to us. Fee There is no additional cost, but reservations Free demonstration halo copper appliincludes captain, fuel, rods, reels, coolers must be made in advance. cation, Saturday, 1:30-2 p.m. ice. Charter a 61-foot yacht and a 25-foot Sail/power boat classes Great American Crab Races -TuesCenter closed for inventory Thursday Bertram for fishing or moonlight cruise. Boating classes will be held Monday and day, 3:30 p.m. Race a crab down a 4-foot and Oct. 2. Rates vary. Call the ITT office for details. Wednesday. The classes are from 6 to 9 track to victory. Bring a crab or rent one Registration for the Oct. 17 Arts and Transportation available: 26-passenp.m. at the Family Services Center, Buildfrom the center. The races are open to youths Crafts Bazaar begins Oct. 3. ger bus and an 11-passenger van available ing 40. The cost is $25 for a power boating 5-18. for rent. A driver is included in the rental of class or $50 for the sailing and power boatBabysitter's dcass -Teens sign up Oct. 4. an either vehicle. ing class. Payment is made at the class. Arts and crafts -Wednesday at Howard Bohio rental: use for group functions or After completing the classroom instrucand Thursday at Albrook, 3:30 p.m. Scratch Club private parties. Equipped with electricity, tion, on-the-water training will be held. Call for color for children 5-18 years old. Anchorage grills, water. Bohios are located at Rodman 283-3147/3150.

PAGE 24

B 8 Tropic Times iP tour Sept. 25,1992 Potpourri Spot bid sale The Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office -Panama, Building 745, ft -Oivallic r-eritLaae MVothU C i).$ Corozal, will hold a local spot bid sale C Thursday at 8 am. Items for bid will be M available forinspection Sept. 28 through The Hispanic Heritage 30 from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in Building Committee invites the 745. Call Ada Tweed at 285-4754. public to the Hispanic Heritag Mass, Oct. 2,7 p.m. atthe Albroo Learning center r Chapel. The Spanish Catholic service The Fort Clayton Learning Resource will be officiated by Monsignor Osc Centeris offering general technical score Mario Brown from the Archdiocese improvement classes, College Level of Panama. A reception will be hel Examination Program, audio/video courses, after the mass in the chapel annex American college test, scholastic aptiPeople can cooperate by bringtude test booklets and English as second ing cake, cookies, or language materials, Monday-Friday, 8 am.pastries for the dessert 4 p.m. Call Mrs. Ayala-Rosa, 287-5412 otluck. Coffee, soft drinks or stop by Building 129. d hor d'eouvres will be provided as well as a pinata for the kids. Call TSgt. Speech instructor Rene Zapata, 284-3397. Central Texas College needs a qualiThe committee will also fied speech instructor for an upcoming host a luncheon Oct. 9 at class at theFort Kobbe Education Center. the Howar listed Members' Club, 11:30 am.-1 p.m. and the Hispanic Heritage Ball will be held Oct. 10. A master's degree from an accredited The committee is accepting donations of baby clothing, money and other items for baby layettes. For U.S. college or university and 18 hours of tickets and donations, call Capt. Jose Rivera, 284-5546 or SSgt. Reuben Martinez, 284-5164. graduate study in speech are required. Call 287-3773. 7:30 p.m. and Monday, 9:30 a.m. Call Registration is required and there is no Holiday greetings Bruce Topletz, 287-5909. fee. Volunteers are welcome to help in Thrift shop open the program. Call Chap. (Lt. Col.) Mark Ihe Howard, Fort Kobbe and Rodman Fentress 287-5859. military members and theirfamilies are The Howard and Albrook Officers' Square dancing invited to send free radio greetings home Wives' Club Thrift Shop is now open in Square dancing classes are being offor the holiday season. Greetings can Building 809, Albrook AFS, Mondays Sr e danin case are U s Equal opportunity be sent Oct. 22 from the Howard Zoand Thursdays and every third Saturday fered by the Panama Canal Square UPSbesnOc.2frmteHwdZo of each month, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. The starting Oct. 2 at 7 p.m. at the Curundu The Equal Opportunity Office will be diac Recreation Center. To sign up, call shop also opens for consignments MonElementary School, Fort Clayton. Call offering an equal opportunity represen284-5459. days and Thursdays, 9:30 a.m.-noon. Lavern Campbell at 282-3735 or Mary tative course Oct. 19-23, 8 a.m.-4:30 Woolard at 224-8114. p.m. at Building 155, Fort Clayton, Position available Registration must be submitted by T position available Scholarship offer Oct. 5. Call287-4260. There is a position available for an hleFariy p ofe Classes available engineer. Applicants must be Panamatean H q Com y The Fort Clayton Education Center nian citizens, have a bachelor's degree quates ndHedqurtrsCopayLaw Th FrtClytn Euctin enerOff ice closed orqivalent university degree in civil Enforcement Activity, is offering a $300 is offering the following classes: or equi scholarship to a family member of that Training management, Oct. 5-23, 4:30 TheTroop Issue Subsistence Activity engineering/architectural field; five to company. Anyone from HHC, LEA, inp.m. and basic skills education program, in Building 550 and300, Corozal, will be seven years of design and construction terested in applying for the scholarship 8:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m; and mini-immerclosed Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursexperience as a professional engineer/ should call Adrienne Levy at 287-3402/ sion Spanish class, Oct. 5-19,8:30-3:30 day for quarterly inventory. architect; must speak and write fluent 5386 evenings. Applications must be rep.m. All classes will be held in Building English and have a valid professional turned no later than Thursday. 128, Fort Clayton. Call 287-5412. Panamanian engineer/architect license. pomery inic Minimum salary $27,677, maximum a R The Howard Optometry Clinic, How$41,517 annual. ard AFB, will be closed Oct. 2, 7, 9, 13, Interested peoplesend curriculum The American Red Cross office atFort The Church of God Christian Serv15, 19, 22, 26 and 29. Clinic members vitae and references to: Personnel OfDavis will be temporarily closed. For icemen's Center is offering family porwill be conducting vision screenings at fice, P.O. Box 6969, Panama 5, PanAtlantic community Red Cross service, traits Oct. 9, 5-9 p.m. and Oct. 10, 9 the Department of Defense Elementary ama call the Fort Clayton office at 287-6306/ a.m.-9 p.m., at 0603 Gaillard Highway Schools. 5647. in Balboa. Call Virginia McCree. 287Education news 3727. Football team The Panama Canal Branch Florida Jewish services The Air Force is looking for cheerState University, Albrook AFS, anThe Corozal Chapel announces the Sunday school leaders for the Turkey Bowl football nounces that beginning Oct. 19 will following schedule for the upcoming Jewish The Fort Clayton Chapel offers three team. Call TSgt. Annette Henry, 284offer American defense policy, an eight holidays: Kol Nidre service, Oct. 6, 6:20 adult Sunday school classes in bible dis5650. Coaches are also needed for the week undergraduate international relap.m.; Yom Kippur service, Oct. 7, 9:30 cussion, marriage enrichment and the football team. Submitresumes to Wayne tions course during term II. For regisa.m.; Rosh Hashanah service, Sunday, responsibility of Christians as citizens. Clapp,284-3451. tration call 285-6922 or 227-4661. Today 4:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN AMC flight schedule SanJow PC San Salvador, El Salvador PP/CC/V Traveling Tips for Space-A: Howard AFB, PN Q:As a Reservist, where can I fly? 5:40am C130 Howard AMB, PN A:Reservemembers in uniform with Soto Cano AB, Honduras PP DD Form 2 identification (red) and DD THe alpa, Honduras PP Soto CanAB, Honduras PP Form 1853 may fly to, from and beHoward AFB, PN tween Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, the 8:40am C141 Howard AFB, PN Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa Bogota, Colombia PP/CC/V 5:40am C141 Howard AFB, PN and the Continental United States. Howard AFB, PN La Paz, Bolivia PP Saturday Montevideo, Umguay RON/PP 5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN US Asuncion, Paraguay PP Savannh, GARio de Janeiro, Brail RON/PP/V -Howard APIS, PM PP: Tourist Passport 6:15am B727 Howard AFB, PN TC: Tourist Card Charleston 1AP, SC 6:10am C130 Howard AFB, PN V: Visa San Salvador, El Salvador PP/CC/V PC: Proof of Citzenship 6:40am C141 Howard AFB, PN San Jose, Costa Rica PC US: United States Charleston AFB, SC Howard AFB, PN Passport Holders Only Sunday 7:45am C5A Howard AFB, PN 7:45am C5A Howard AFB, PN Charleston AFB, SC CC: Country Clearance Charleston AFB, SC RON Dover AFB, DE RON: Remain Overnight Dover AFB, DE Wednesday Monday No scheduled flights For additional flight 6:15am C727 Howard AFB, PN PP/CC/V information, call 284-5758/ Charleston AP, SC 8:00am C5AHoward AP, PM 4306. Tuesday Soto Cano AB, Honduras 5:40am C130 Howard AFB, PN Charleston APE, SC RON Tegucigalpa, Honduras Dover AFB, DE

PAGE 25

Tropic Times Sept. 25, 1992 A relaxing way to see the downtown Charleston area is by horse and carriage. throu f 0 U.S. Army Ph~otos by Sgt. Rchard Puckett Historical architecture is on display at the Drayton Hall, a plantation that has survived the Civil War and Hurricane Hugo. Charfeston offers peekat past I estled on a small peninsula with AMC terminal at Charleston AFB cradled between the Ashley for flight availability back to Panama. and Cooper Rivers lies The best bet is to make sure you-don't Charleston -a city seemfall short with leave or money. Comingly suspended in time, still vibrant medical flights vary between $400 to with sights and sounds of its early $600 for one-way return flights. colonial days. Once you're on the ground, a car is Today Charleston stands as living a must. If you plan to rent one, make a postcard from the past. The city was reservation. nearly devastated by Hurricane Hugo Accomodations are also easy to in September, 1989 that whipped the find. Besides for the standard hotels in coastal city with winds reaching 87 the city, check with Charleston AFB or miles per hour. It left $700 billion in the Naval Station for availability at the total damage in its wake. Charleston military guest lodges. It is possible to took the brunt of the destruction. make reservations before you leave, Although the scars of Hugo are still but flight crews and members on orders Basket weavers at the Charleston's Market Place produce their wares while visibile, Charleston has nearly recovhave priority. Call ahead. you wait. ered and still offers a unique and wellOnce you get settled in it's tough to area provides another shopping tours, dinners by the bay and the USS preserved glimpse into the past. find a place to start. The mulitude of excursion thanks to the city's prized Yorktown also Besides for a quick taste It can also serve as a getaway for malls isn't a bad place to try, though. Market Place. Crafts, paintings, of America, Charleston is truly a military members here in Panama who There are several shopping centers just candies, souveniors and more line the national treasure. are looking for a quick, relaxing and off the highway that can provide hours center's district In order to really experience the city enjoyable stateside excursion. of shopping pleasure. Not to forget the No visit to Charleston would be and the surrounding area, plan ahead Thanks to the Air Mobility Comlong-list of restaurants that serve complete without seeing Fort Sumter. and be prepared. Most of all, take time mand's Space-A flights, Charleston can everything from fresh sea food, The famous outpost located on an to enjoy the visit be reached for about $10 a person. ($15 Mexican entrees to fast food. island just off the coast. A quick ferry For a complete picture and informaas of Oct. 1) If you're in the mood to sight-see, ride out to the island is like taking a tion about Charleston, write to: South AMC officials estimate that on the Charleston is rich in historical wontime machine back to 1861. Carolina Department of Parks, Recreaaverage about 4-5 flights leave Howard ders. Fort Sumter is the site of where the tion and Tourism, Box 71 Columbia, AFB enroute to Charleston every week There are more than a dozen first shots of the Civil War were fired SC 29202 or call 803-734-0127. with space-available room. Calling historical sites to be found. Some of in April 1861. Only one level of the ahead and arriving at the terminal at the more beautiful include standing original structure still remains, but least two hours before the flight is also plantations such as Drayton Hall and many of the cannons and other relics by Sgt. !ichard'Puzkett recommended. (See weekly Space-A Calhoun Mansion just outside the city. remain. listing on page B8.) The Citadel is also within 15 or so These are just a few of things 'Tropic 'Times staff Upon arriving in Charleston, check minutes of downtown. The downtown Charleston has to see. Haunted house

PAGE 26

B OTropic Times ~C asfe B Sept. 25, 1992Cassiied Ads 1983 AMC Jeep Wagoneer, 6 cyl, 4WD, re1981 Subaru coupe, 2dr, 5-spd, no ac, duty pd Windsurfer, Masterclass 360, 12' carbon $2200 287-312.board, 3 Mylar sails $500. 284-3108 msg for upholstered, new tires, good cond $3850/obo. $2200. 2876312. Doberman, purebred, declawed, tails docked, 282-4582. 1987 GMC Safari Custom, AM-FM cass, at, males $200, females $150. 284-6184. 1979 Jeep CJ-7, duty pd, exc cond $3900. ac, cruise, good condo. 284-4391. Johnson 25hpaR, motor tran -4 48 dec 283-3431. Doberman, male, obedience trains 2 yrs Ski-Delta, 6' wide w/towing bridle $12. 252old, good gaurd dog $200. 282-4135. 1986 Chevy Camaro, 6 cyl, 5-spd, very nice 2138 Rottweiler puppies, CCP reg. 2 mos old, $3700/neg. 284-3923. Day maid/babysitter, T-Th, prefers Kobbe, males $600, females $500. 286-3693. after 1985 Toyota model F van, 4 cyl, dual ac, 5Howard, Farfan. 284-5398. 3pm.L spd, duty pd $6000. 252-6869. -Eng-spk live-in maid, 15 yrs experi, responBichon friese, 16 mos old, AKC, grt w/chil1989 VWGolf GL,4drsedan,hatchbk,5-spd, sible, hard working, good w/children, avail Pioneer stereo recvr SX8 $300, PS-S50 dren $400/neg. 261-5579. ac, AM-FM, tint glass, exc cond, low mi now. 284-3133. tumtbl $100, cass deck $225, spkers $300 pr. 16.1 thoroughbred horse, well trained Eng$8500/obo. 287-6936. Bilingual live-in/out maid, M-F, refs. 268lish, needs experienced rider $300. 2601979 Chevy van, trlr hitch, needs tune-up 3720 ask for Ruth. Fisher dbl Cass $100, photocopier $275, 9848.CR40 chan handheld trnsfrecvr $90, printer 9848. $1350. 282-4280. Eng-spk day maid/babysitter, honest, roli$100. 284-6881. Pomeranian male, 3 yrs old, AKC reg $100. 1982 Toyota p/u truck, ac, Cass player, exc able. 269-8908 ask for Valerie. Zenith b/w TV $50, MGA stereo sys $75.223286-4971. cond $3500. 287-3340. Eng-spk live-in maid, honest, good w/chil4276. Labrador, AKC reg, avail for stud service. 1991 GMC Jimmy 4x4, 4dr, at, pa, pb, AMdren, refs, dependable. 284-4698. Technics stereo Cass deck M228X, auto play, 268-1914. FM, pw, ac, low mi, exc cond, duty not pdehissee iadekM28,at ly $18,000/obo. 286-4884. Span-spk live-in/out maid, honest, dependfull auto stop, dbx, exc cond $75/obo. 284Labrador/retrievers, reg, all shots, deable, refa. 252-1035. 5839. wormed. 252-5096. 1989 Aerostar XI, pa, pb, cruse, tilt, ac, AMFM Cass, extras, 7 pass $12,500/obo. 287Span-spk live-out maid, weekdays, weekXT comp, 2FD, Math Coprocessor, Mono Boxer, female, all shots, ear cropped, house 4075. ends, general hsework, babysitting. 262mon $300, Panasonic 9-pin printer $80. 252trained, friendly w/children $125. 289-3689. 3923 ask for Francisca. 5185. 1981 Mercury Cougar, 6 cyl, ac, ps, ph, AMFree, kittens, spayed, neutering incl. 287FM Cass, duty pd, 6xc condo $3200. 252-6705. Eng-spk maid, weekends, babysits, cleans or Sony 8mm handycam, Sony underwater 5420 after 6pm. irons. 260-0356. housing, Sonny 8mm Cass recorder w/batt, 20 1980 Volvo 244 GLE, new tires, AM-FM tapes $1200./obo. 260-7313. Free, kittens, need a loving family and home. cass, at, pw, good cond $2800. 264-0106. Eng-spk live-in/out maid, refs, experienced. 283-5422. 287-5595. Commo Amniga 500, lMeg Ramn, 1084S mon, 1986 Bronco 11 4x4, 5-spd, ac, AM-FM, low 5OMeg HD, extra 3.5 dr, color printer, promi, exc cond, well maintained $9500/obo. Eng-spk maid, hsekeeping, child care, M-F grams $900. 236-1223. 26904, days. 284-4737 ask for Ida. 269-0417. dyNintendo, 2 controllers, gun, Tetris, Duck 1991 Toyota 44 p, ext cab, sport tires, capt 1984 Toyota Corolla 1600 RS, ac, AM-FM Reliable, honest, grt w/children, day maid, Hunt, Mario Bros, 12 transmitters, recevrs. 1991Toyta x4 /u, xt abspot tiescap y acspeks itte En. 22-344.286-4638. bedliner, 11,400, 10 mos old, duty not pd cass, good cond $3850. 230-0932. speaks little Eng. 282-3344. $18,500. 288-4084. 1978 GMC p/u,3-spd, 1/2ton shortbed,6 cyl, Bilingual day maid, 1-2 days per week, refs. Tandy 1000SX, color man, Tandy printer, 1989 Mercury Tracer, 2dr, hatchbk, AM-FM one owner, duty pd, cxc mech condo $2500. 220-2125 ask for Louise. 3.5-5.25 floppies, mouse, joysticks, software, 1989MeruryTraer,2dr hathbk AMFM ne wne, duy p, ec mch ond 00.3OMeg hard cord $600. 284-5625. cass, alarm, new tires, brakes, batt, grt cond 286-4834. Honest, dependable live-in maid, babysits, $4500. 226-5079. 1991 Dodge D-150 p/u, ps, pb, ac, AM-FM good w/children. 287-3293 ask for Georgina. Epson EX800, 9-pin color printer, littl use 1987 Chrysler Voyager, 4 cyl, pa, pb, at, ac, stereo, pw & locks, tint glass $10,000. 260Bilingual honest, babysitter/hsekeeper, good cass, not duty pd $7500/obo. 261-6037. 6523 after 4pm. w/children, live-in/out, refs. 228-6940. Gameboy w/lt, carrying case, one game $80, 1987 Montero, 4dr, 5-spd, ac, stereo, tint 1990 Ford Tempo GLS, 4dr, low mi, AM-FM other games $15 ea. 252-6707. glass, alarm, exc cond, duty pd $10,750. 286cass, ac, ps, pb, pw, p1, more $11,000. 264Bilingual reliable amid, cles-s, irons, good 638atr6p.9187. w/children, live-out only, refs. 245-4784 ask Apple Hec comp, xtr DD, Mono color mon,, 6378 after 6 pm. for Dorine. printer, Appleworks, games, joystick, desk 1983 Pontiac Bonneville sta/wgn, full pwr, 1975 Audi Fox, 4 cyl, at, good running cond Biingual'dependable, honest babysitter/hsechair, exc cond $850. 286-3441. ac, fully loaded $3500. 286-6337. $600/obo. 287-4598. keeper, refs. 287-3839. Common 128 $150, printer $175, VCR $100, 1985 GMC Jimmy, good cand $4500. 2841978 Ford Fairmont sta/wgn, V8, at, body Sony 19" TV $325, microwave $175. 2864885 ask for Glen. needs work $1000/obo. 286-6424. Eng-spk honest, responsible maid, 3 days a 6378 after 6pm. week, avail now. 287-4072. Panasonic phone/answer machine, 10" radial 1976' Plymouth Volare, 6 cyl, pb, ps, ac 1983 GMC Jimmny 4x4, sr, ac, ph, pa, radio Pnsncpoease ahn,1"rda $1200. 252-1189. Cass, alarm duty pd, 5-spd, 2.8L $6800/obo. Eng-apk live-in hsekeeper, honest, dependarm saw, extra attach. 252-5985. ---261-6830. able, exc w/children. 287-4725. 19' Sony Trinitron color TV, remote, cxc 1984 Buick Skyhawk, 53,000 mi, ps, p, ac,b, shell bed liner Span-spk live-out maid, honest, reliable, Tcond $400. 262-1251 after 5pm. at, cxc cond. 287-3523. 350 n3i new brakes $9000. 287-4386. Th, Howard, Kobbe, Rodman. 284-3980. Sony port cdplaye, 4 yrs old $IGO, Nikon 1986 Chevy Astro van, 8 pass, ps, pb, ac, Span-spk honest, dependable live-in/out camera, lens, flash $500/obo, Realistic scanstereo Cass, tilt wheel, cruise, tr1r pkg, low mi, 1983 Nissan Pulsar, 5-spd, ac, AM-FM radio San-. honest, der lens, fs2/4e3c. exc cond $8000. 286-3441. cass, exc cond, tint glass, not duty pd $3500. maid. 269-8845. ner $150. 282-4138. 287-5153. Eng-spk maid, M-W-Th-F, Howard, Kobbe, JVC 260w chan car stereo amp, pre-amps 1983 Chevy Camaro, AM-FM cass, ac, good Rodman, refs. 284-5374. $250/obo. 230-1519. tires, exc cond $5000. 252-5733 after 6pm. 1984 Chevy Cavalier, 2.OL, 4 cyl, good running eng, no rust, good tires $2000/obo. 284Eng-spk honest, reliable, hard working maid, Hasselbald 1000F, 80mm lens, A12 film 1986 Chevy Suburban 4x4, 6.2 diesel, dual 5122. 2 days a week. 284-6392. magazine, flash adapter filters, cable release, ac, silverado options $13,000, 226-4090. extras $700. 284-3097. l986Buick Skylark, ac, pa, ph, AM-FM, avail* now, good condo $4000/obo. 283-6425. Eng-spk live-in/out maid, good w/children, 1991 Chevy Camarh, t/tops, low mi, needs ac, wardworker, refs. 224-6602. 386SX 16Mhz, 42M HDD, 2Meg Ram, exc cond, sale or trade $10,200. 236-0923. 1982 Subaru sta/wgn, at, ps, pb, AM-FM cass, SVGA mon, mouse, IBM compat, 4 mos old, 1982 Isuzu Trooper, 4WD, diesel, ac, good tow bar $2000/neg. 287-5586. Span-spk honest, hard working maid, Howgames $999. 252-2998. cond, not duty pd $4300. 252-2138. 1989 Nissan Pulsar NX, pa, ph, ac, 5-spd ard, refs., 284-4933., Mitsubishi 45" TV, solid oak cabinet $1800, 1980 Saab 900 Turbo, 5-spd, needs minor AM-FM, 2dr, t/op, remove hatchbk, 23,006 Eng-spk live-in maid, good w/children. 260Epson FX85 printer $300. 252-2582. work $1000/obo. 287-5786. mi, nose bra includ $9600/obo. 286-3239. 1994 ask for Rose. 27" Zenith stereo TV sys, 3 w/remocte, 2 yos 1989 Dodge Dakota 4x4 p/u, ac, ps, pb, 5-,spd, 1983 Honda Accord, ac, new tires, good runFamily child care provider. 252-2637 ask for old, on-screen menus $500. 289-4748. V6, AM-Fm cass, canopy, carpet $15,000. ning cond, will need body work, paint job ena. Packard Bell 286-12/360 FD/20M HD, Mono 287-3441. $1900. 289-3430. mon $700/obo. 230-0186 lv msg. 1987 Subaru, loaded, exc cond $6500/obo. 1983 Mitsubishi Saporo, duty pd, ps, pb, ac, Wharfedale W60D spkers, wood cased, cxc 284-3821. extras, runs well, new upholds $2500. 22123' Sportfisherman, hardtop, Volvo-Penta, I/ cond $250. 252-6990. 9173.a 0 diesel $8000/obo. 260-6429. 1977 Merury Marquis, 4dr, ac, at, ph, ps, Chinon 20PXL Super 8mm movie camera runs good $850. 284-4287. 985 Volvo 740, all extras, cxc cond $6800. 20' grady white Openfisherman, 200hp Mari$125. 287-3882. ner, like new $12,000, 2 14' alum boats 1979 Chevy Impala, rebuilt eng, Pioneer ste$700ea. 220-7080 day. Sears, 2 keyboard home electronic organ w/ r cass, new parts, needs minor carb/choke 1978 Monte Carlo, V8 305, ph, ps, new ryhmatic $900. 236-3191. work $2375/obo. 28324227. 20' Bayliner center console, 1991 boat mo1988 Hyundai GL, at, ac, FM cass, 4dr, Alloy 1978 Buick Estate sta/wgn, V8, at, ac, full tor, trlr, cxc condo, many extras $11,500. 269Printer, StarMicronics NXlpap8 fonts, trcrims, tint glass, duty pd $5500/obo. 284pwr, 8 pass $1600. 284-4935. 4459. tor, friction, paper parking $125. 286-3444. 6431. 1986 VW Jetta, 5spd, ac, sr, low mi, new tires, 19' Rinkerbuilt, 140hp I/O, exc cond, safety Sansui recvr, Sharp dual cass, Realistic 1979 Ford F-100 p/u, ac, AM-FM stereo cass, exc cond $5000/obo. 284-3940 Rm 55. equip, make offer. 282-3095. spkers $200. 286-3444. runs grt $3000. 282-4129. 1991 Mitsubishi Galant, full extras, AM-FM 19' V-hull, built-in gas tank, 135hp, OB reCommo 64, comp, 2 DD, color mon, joys1986 Isuzo Trooper 4x4, diesel, 2dr, ps, Ip, cass, not duty pd $9000/obo. 252-6794. centy rebuilt, exc trlr $3295. 289-4856. ticks, software $275. 287-4598. ac, AM-FM cass, exc cond, not duty pd 1982 Buick Skylark, V6, at, ps, pb, AM-Fm 15' Chaparral boat, 75hp Mercury, exc cond, PC Epson 286, FDD 1.2, color mon, 40H1, $6900/obo. 283-3721. stereo radio, exc cond $3000/obo. 285-4385. bimini top, pink trim, skis, fish finder $3950. mouse, comp desk, dust cover, more $800/ 260-9615. obo. 261-6830. 1991 Jeep Wrangler 4x4, 2.5L, 5-spd, soft 1983 Honda Prelude, exc con1 all extras, not top, 22,000 mi, exc cond, not duty pd duty pd, no U.S. specs $370( 264-0118. 12' wood/fiberglass jon boat $600, 9.9 EvinCommo video color mon $100. 284-5308 lv $10,500. 260-2037. rude motor, long shaft $650. 286-4736 after msg for Flaquer. 1987 Ford Tempo, 4 dr, 4 c, ac, at, AM-FM 5pm. 1981 Honda Civic, 4dr, 4 cyl, at, 40mpg, runs cass, pb, ps, rust treat, s cond, duty pd, 13" RCA colorTV $75, 19" Magnavox color grt $2100. 260-5148. $7900. 268-2193. Pangs w/trlr, good cond $1500. 252-5395. TV $160. 284-6694.

PAGE 27

Tropic Ties 0l Classified Ads Set. 25,B199 286 IBM compat, VGA color mon, Rainbow Crib, access $250, port crib, playpen $130, Sm pet/cat carder, cat food & kitty litter, basket weave finish $150. 289-5063. printer, sound blaster, compu desk $1000. sterilizer $25, elec wing $100, 2 carsents $90scratching post $110 all, Fenwick 3 compart 287-5481. $50/obo. 252-1227. tackle box, V fix latch $5. 223-2193. Seed sprayer, assorted pot planters, reel-toreel w/2 spkers, exc cond. 223-7437 after Nintendo w/seven games, power glove. 286Entertainment ctr, stereo, TV, custom cabinet 2 twin beds, matt $100, swing set $70, wed6pm. 3174. $250, 19" color TV $100. 287-5998. ding rings, female $200 all neg. 284-6431. Wedding dress, veil, slip, sz 5 $300, 21" Epiphone-Gibson elec guitar, special effects Tappan 27,000 btu ac, 220volts, little used 41 vol encyclopedia Britannica, yearbooks mountain bike, 18-spd, good cond $300. 252lever, brand new case $225. 221-9173 ask $550. 230-0932. until 1987, 15 vol Britannica Jr, English. 2080. for Henry. $1000.obo. 262-1251 after 5pm. Dinette set, 4 chrs $225, deep rose 6x9 tug $20. Amstad word processor, green mon, extra 287-4180. Potted house plants, indoor/outdoor, various ribbon, disks, manuals $225. 284-6629. sizes, types. 286-4783. Admiral 23cu.ft. side-by-side nofrost frige/ 1990 Honda GB-500, '91 Montesa 345, '88 Nintendo entertainment center, zapper, frzr, ice & water disp, exc cond $725. 252Century baby walker, Gerry backpack, playHonda TLR-250, like new, extras. 261-3485. deck, good cond, games $250. 252-5260. 6547. pen, high chair. 282-4138. 1985 Suzuki Madura 700cc, VS motor, water Magnavox phone/clock radio, tone pulse 8pc Early American LR set, exc cond, pine Gold carpet to fit std BOQ, 15x15 & 15x30 cooled, shaft drive, many extras $2500. 289dial, pwr backup, features hold $40. 289wood, velour $2400. 286-3345. $200/obo. 287-6936. 4748. 4424. Fum, household, carpets, curtains, more. 286l2volt childs elec sports car, stereo/CD 1985 Honda Shadow, 700cc, good cond Hitachi full size VHS camcorder $400. 2894337. player, jogging, stroller, misc. 285-4236. $1400. 268-1526. 4424. Whirlpool washer & dryer set $550 both. 229Bike, port AM-FM cass radio, aquarium, var1984 R-l00RS BMW, exc running cond, Common 64K keyboard, printer, disc drive, 1706 l0am-lOpm. porizer, port organ.-286-4478. needs cosmetic work on fairing $1500. 252software $350. 233-1417. 5100. 12x15 beige carpet $150, 9x12 pink carpet Gameboy, light, 6 games, cleaning kit $130, Kenwood 125w amp, exc cond $200. 284$75. 284-4386. cordless elec lipstick weed eater $25. 2871984 Honda Nighthawk 700c, 9,000 mi, exc 3156 ask for Jeff. 3738. cond, 2 helmets $2500. 284-3685. French Prov desk, chr, nite stand, 9-drawer Nintendo sys, deck, gun paddles, hookups, 2 dresser, mirror $1000. 252-5395. JVC 20" TV, like new $350, SC mem typeVespa Giande Moped, recently rebuilt, rnsa cart, Super Mario Bros, Duck Hunt, Super writer $200,4 Nissan truck sport rims, 14Y5, good $250. 286-4971. Mario 3 $100. 289-5063. Westinghouse 15cu.ft. fridge, 2dr, 2 mos old steel $80 set. 252-5829. $675. 260-3903. Harley drag bars $25, light fairing $60, '78 Yamaha linear tracking turntbl (may need 7-drawer dresser $100. 252-5829. 650 engine 90% comp $150. 286-4638. needle) $125, Apple Imagewriter printer End tbls, leather sofabed, tbl, china cab, Canon $125, all obo. 287-4896 after 5pm. video camera, best offer. 260-6280. Cosco baby swing, brand new -$30, Evenflo baby carrier $20. 264-9180. _:::_::::::^:::::::'-::::::::::: White wicker loveseat w/cushion $100. 284; | 0 3685. Barbie Corvette $150, washer & dryer, Qtrs 305B, Clayton, Sat. 8am-noon. Clothes, wicker blind. 285-4692. computer, auto parts, twin beds. Kenmore microwave 700w, multi-pwr, temp Sharp microwave $150, cobra cordless phone, controlled, program defrost $150. 284-5532. new $90, Sentry safety deposit box $50. 2876,000 btu ac $150, complete set NIV Bible on Qtrs 669A, Clayton. Sat. 7:30-1lam. Multi6284. cass $60. 287-3882. family. GE hvy duty washer & dryer, 2 mos old, $700 set, dryer $325, washer $450. 284Recliner chr, exc cond $350, coffee tbl, 2 end Northwestern golf clubs, 1-3-5 woods w/ Qtrs 544C, Clayton. Sat. 7am. Clothes, toys, 4094. tb1s $400, card tbl, chairs $85. 287-6284. cover, 3-9 irons, Pins Putter, balls, bag, tees misc household items. $350/obo. 287-3270. Whirlpool 15,000 btu ac, 3 mos old, seldom 12x15 rose pink carpet w/pad, good cond $95. Qtrs 105B, Howard. Sat. 7am-noon. Clothes, used $450/obo. 284-4094. 264-0118. Treadmill Proform w/heart rate, pulse comp, fishing gear; microwave, stereo equip, file like new. 252-6592. cab, more. Twin bed, metal frame, matt $120, comp Kenmore stackable, all in one, washer & dryer, table w/storage, shelves $120, metal frame med capacity $550. 284-3739. Plants, palms, Bouganvillas, feins, others. Qtra 605B, Howard. Sat. Household items, swing set, tlide $100, plants. 284-6881. 232-5258. girls/women clothing, stereo equip. Bumt bamboo set, 6-fold screen, octagonal tbl, Twinmatt, box spring, frame $100, DR glass 2 arm chrs (need minor repairs), 5x7 Oriental FujiPalisade men's racing bike, access $200. Qtrs 767B, Balboa. Sat. 6:30-1lam. Housetop tbl, 4 chairs $50. 284-4681. design mach made rug, exc cond $50. 260287-3738. hold, clothes, misc. GE washer, lg hvy duty, access, exc cond 5684 after pm Limoges vase $250, garbage disposal $195, Qtrs 60D, Espinar. Sat. 8-? $500/obo. 286-6333. -paper back novels, radio electronic parts. 252-2042 Qtrs 195, Gatun. Sat. l0am-2pm. Multi-famQ-sz sleeper sofa, chr, recliner, exc cond ily. $850, rattan DR tbl w/smoke glass, 6 chrs, Motorolla Pageboy III Pager. If found call 286. Ladies 18K three color gold necklace $1000. exc cond $850. 286-3441. 6121 lv msg. rattan porch set $1500. 287-3340. Hotpoint washer & dryer $150 both, comics, Baby swing $28, deluxe stroller (rever records. 233-5028. *. g handle, like new $75. 287-6382. Lamp, floor/table in working cond, low price. 236-0981 after 5pm. Q-sz waterbed, waveless, oak headbd w/6 Four Firestone all terrain tires 31x10.5x15, 4 drawers, cushioned rails, heater, liner $525. Freezer $75, set of side step pipes for jeep or 15x8 WW $250/obo, AF Blues dbl knit 43R, Bassett hound puppies. 233-5028. 260-2037. truck $65, parrot cage $25. 284-6694. new $75. 269-4343. Eng-spk mature maid, babysit, cook, clean, Magic Chef microwave, exc cond, touch Exercise equipment. 284-3821. Metal frame for twin bed $13. 282-3575. laundry, occasional ovemight, refs, 7ampad, digital $185/obo, Whirlpool 21.6 cu.ft 4:30pm, M-F, $110. 286-3385. frzer, ice maker, dispenser $880/obo. 289Sewing mach w/cab $300, rattan loveseat Asst colors prom dresses, sz 5 $70ea/neg. 4381. $400, glass dinette, 4 chairs $400, 9pc wall unit 286-3570. Live-in maid, very mature, honest, must $1400. 252-6941. speak English well, refs, cook, clean. 236Carpeting, med brn, cab for wall mounting, Lg rear storage container for Jeep CJ-7 or 4408 after 6pm. bamboo blinds. 260-4463. Several kitchen cabinets, exc cond $50-up. Wrangler $50. 268-2144, 284-3930. Eng-spk gymnastics coach to temporary GE washer & dryer, perfect cond $600, Matemity clothes, szs 8/12, best offer, teach classes at Howard, Albrook, Clayton. 18,000 btu ac $320. 284-3124. Desk roll-top solid oak $1100, playpen $50, Acoustic guitar, case $200/obo, lg dog ken286-3772. single folding bed, matt $75, Yamaha guitar nel. 260-5148. DR tbl, 6 chairs, china cab, 2 leafs $600/obo, $200. 260-5102. To train our puppy to be a guard dog, must 3pc LR set $600 finn, 5pc stereo equip $300 Wetsuit, men's shorty, 2mm sz lg, never used speak English. 261-5579. firm. 223-5709. Lg bird cage $80, encyclopedia Britannica set, $75. 286-4571. like new $800, twin trundle bed, wood $450. To buy book shelf unit for encyclopedias. 3 sets curtains, 84x72 $225, 3 sets 52x105. 223-4276. Kolcraft deluxe stroller, adjust $45, baby 287-3441. $175. 286-4783. swing $15, both grt cond. 283-4227. 2 Barbie Corvettes, batt operated, new $150 ea, 75-1001b dog travel cage, 5-10 lb cat travel Dishwasher, top leading $60, sofa and chair Barbie Dream House, assembled, new $150. Bumper pool/card tbl, 4 chrs $250, K-sz cage. 252-6990. $295. 252-6968. 287-3738. matt, top only $100, Lloyds AM-FM cass, recvr, 4 spkrs $85. 252-2540. Baby crib w/mattress. 261-4338. QJK-sz bed, GE fridge/frzr, water/ice disp, Whirlpool 18,000 btu ac $160, Mr. Coffee 23.5 cu.ft. GE cooking center (oven, micro, maker. 252-5185. Nintendo sys, 9 cartridges $120, sm pet carPerson with p/u truck to move DR fum from range, air ext), chair w/footstool. 263-4321. rier, never used $15. 223-4575. Howard to Panama. 284-4995. Wedding dress $195, playpen $40, R&R LPs, Whirlpool 10,000 btu ac, 1 yr old $200, sm judo suit $25, shoes sz 3, new, pieces of Gold clubs, asst metal/woods, Mizuno irons, Mechanic for 1985 Cadillac Coupe Deville, designer model ac 10,000 btu, 3 mos old leather. 252-2042. std irons, negotiable. 287-6820. knowledge in computer readout, will supply $350, Whirlpool washing mach $200. 263parts & handbook for the car. 282-5584. 4321. Dog carrier, old U.S. coins, Budweiser memoWhirlpool 10,000 btu ac, used 1 yr $290. rabilia, compu desk, books. 287-3486. 269-8845. Bilingual live-in maid, days, take care of a 3 Whirlpool fridge/frzr $450, 3 bikes, various yr old. 286-3197. sizes, prices. 252-6986. Crib, matt, bedding $100, 5 white alum blinds Graco walker $25, Dazey hair dryer $20, 31'W $20 ea, high chair $15, Little Tykes pool boy's bike $35. 287-4083. Piano in good cond. 243-5269. Lg vanity dresser, solid pecan, w/dbl mirror $20. 284-5332. $650. 252-2582. Parrot cage, and parrot seed. 284-3799. Baseball, football, basketball, hockey cards, McCullough 750W gen $300. 286-3441. all variety, will pay reasonable price. 260DR tbl, smoke glass top, rectangle, 6 chairs 60 original Beta movies $2ea or $90 for all. 7997 5-10pm. w/bamboo base, exc cond $750. 225-2197. Ping pong tbl $275. 286-3156. 287-5896. Military patches, old or new, foreign, U.S. Sofa, loveseat, old hvy duty, needs minor Pro-Form T50 pulse Ergometer treadmill, adLadies cocktail dress, sz 12, pink, like new 284-3945 Rm 215. repair $350/obo. 286-4582. just spd, incline, like new $475. 256-6356. $50, ladies suit sz 12 $120. 282-3577 after 6pm. Mature bilingual maid, good w/children, MRoper washer, full size, 3 mos old $250. 261Riding mower, MTD, 8hp, 30" wide, 5-spd, F, occasional ovemight work, $120 m. 2609672. good cond $550. 287-5632. Brother electric typewriter $100, answer ma6342. chine $50. 223-3739. Walnut daybed w/matt, exc cond, $400. 286Mini & macro blinds, assor sizes, new, bm reHospital bed in good cond. 260-6450 lv msg 3778. liner. 252-5985. Police leather gear, belt hold 9 diff access, in answering machine.

PAGE 28

1 Tropic Times B 12~ Sept. 25, 1992 Super Crossword | BEETLE BAILEY By MortWalker STICK OUT YOUR U.I PON'T THINK ACROSS Bozo's 92 Siel a -5 Ano nt 42 Yang s com. TONGUE, ZERO YOU GET THE PEA 1 Master. in ge-up (suspect) 6 Former Europlement 79 Bread so~rn, 3 Aisro 93 small hollow Pean king43 Window spread 6 Farmers Aes biol. dom dressing 81 Old times, future? 54 -Green 94 American 7 Electric cat44 Doc or once 1a urery word (eoes uoit fish Dopey 82Got.gage 14 Grape jelly destination) 95 Oranges and 8 At -t 45 Goal 84 Actor Carney 18 British 55 Glasgow Indians (pronto) 46 Purposive 85 Engages 10~~~~~~~~~ Nusr or'eaer' hmrit ts oe 828atgdgt7z actress Elinegative 99 Church 9 New Zealand 47 Perry's crea8Q uiver zabe t 56 Female areas native tort tor 89 Atelier stand 19 Frog genus parent -101 Pro -10 Kitchen cloth 48 Narrow inlets 90 Native sail 20 Philippine 57 Enening TV 105 Job-huntr s 11 Dismay (alt. 49 Draft org. ors, in India dyewoodId -re sa edo selg) 6COuP' 91 Tell a story 21 Addis -59 French con106 Cul-de-12 Reduces the 57 Had a cray95 Grampuses 23 Jo ,hn Waynectians dea-ed "1 caore ing 96 Canner G and n S classic 60 Advance. in streets 13 holes 58 Once called Onery d HAGAR the Horrible By Dik Browne western cribbage 107 Dumas hero 14 Day of rest Clay 97 Brazilian 25 Altred Hitch 82Town 112 Bogart/Berg15 -All -Ee" 61 Kind of curve palm cock thriller 63 Depends man classic 16 Hesitate 62 Like 3, 7. 29, 98 Word aAVer 27 Noel Cow64 Julie 114 Oscar-inner 17 OnH he et.Woord oftr% I ari 33 Andrews hit based on Doubledays 63 Polish vigorCoast AA winner musical Shaw's "Pyg' 22 Says further ously 99 He was "Lou 28 Minstrel, in 69 Large sc0marlin 24 New Deal 64 Doctrine Grant' India sos 115 Growl tierorg. 65 Under one s 100 Expectant 29 Treated 71 One of the rely 26 River and -(secret) lather, once? badly Caesars 116 Look closely town in 66 "What is the 102 New Zealand 30 Splinter 72 Kimono sash 117 Pickler's LuIon -b2tribe group 73 Girl It song plant 28 Wedding vity.?" 103 Ft ies 31 Fertilizes. in 76 Sufficient 118 Braves proclama67 Nothing 104 Metal tip at a way supply shelter ions 68 More sate I end of shoe 32 Western 77 It might be 119 'West -31 Battleship to sing with -lace movies electric Story" remember voice.107 Unit .t torce 33Paolo 78 The heart 120 Makes a 33 Top kick 69 Pickens or 108 Southwest 36 -The Night of 80 Jerusalem boo-boo 34 Air raid Summerville wind the -' thorn 121 Parisian wrig 7 ue tte19Cttri n mt 39 Slugger's 83 Ho at the papa 3aher oil 0 val Barney Google 70andee y By Fred Lasswell need leprechaun 122 Onset flasks 73 novelist 110 Biblical name F _ByFred__ _ _ _ 40 Robert 84 'Long -and DOWN 37 Foreigner, in Francoise 111 No, in MosYoung 1972 Far Away" 1 Not fem. Latin 74 Friendship cow AUNT TV movie 85 Sergeants 2 Canadian America 75 Machine tool 113 Tarzan's otLEEZy -THAT'LL LARN YOU A 50 Renew or command prove. 38 Arm bone 76 Fowl or hen lower YYORE NAPS restore 86 Repossessor's 3 Serb or But39 Electronic lead-in 114 Motorist s STAY OUT OF MY 51 Moterls oredocument gar listener 77 One kind of need TREE HOUSE -ELSE runners 87 David Niven 4 Scandinavian 41 1i may say trip? E 52 Part at 1946 hit tales -Welcome" 78 Ccfleehrouses 1 34 5 6 7 8 9 1011 12 13 14 15 16 17 I 18 922 22 23 2 62 272----RATZ by BEN SMITH Z T 11ER115 A -THERCS A WOL T.E) 30 3 29hEI R C w1 l DON' CARE 8 MERETE3E1 CAUSE THIEV'RE 3331316 73 31 1K~ 1 bESi CALN SEC rf ALL' WEARWID UNDE R 40 414243 445 46 47 4849 111 142 111 59so 1 52 53 64 6 66 67 168 1 1 1 BUTCH AND DOUGIE by ALEX HOWELL 69 70 7 2 73 74 7I rN-T 777 76 79 9D 11 82* 83 4 85 8 87 88 89 90 91 M 92 M93 -99 100 1 1-2YR 104 05 116 107 108 109 110 ill THE SPATS by JEFF PICKERING 112113114 WEY TIFF. 5Y E&DOLL P-__N CK__\_ 1191221 22 (Y. t I& KNNKL -A UYW PLAY BETTER GOLF with JACK NICKLAUS YOUR P T oR p5~ GZLUS CLONERDEL --E ER -PUTTER PRO OEPE unm-O c Trc'ri "Hide!" -. OUT ON A LIMB by GARY KOPERVAS DENNIS THE MENACE LAFF-A-DAY r CARp W-AT ITS LATiN GATA DaOD DigN\! TAll? FOR (Ze Z)Z\NeRL S -. TWDW." GT GEORGE by MARK SZORADY HOROSCOPE. LO D' IC(AY* Oul "You sure know how to hurt a guy! Meatloaf and fruitcake in 'I' RATHER HAVE THE FLES the same meal!"__._-~.--._-._---. -"n""i