Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text




Gif of th# Panama Canal Museum


News

Nova University starting
new program. Page 2.


Feature

School teaches ant
ist tactics. Page 8.


i-terror-


Sports

13 local lifters compete at
Howard AFB. Page 11.


the


Tropic


Times


Vol. V. No. 17 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, May 1, 1992



)New Army program battles crime


"'by SgL Joseph J. Johnson
"USARSO Public Affais Office

FORT ClAYTON
(UJSARSO PAO) -
The recent increase in
crime involving U.S.
dtiens in Panama has
prompted the com- .
manding general of
U.S. Army South and -
Task Force Panama
to fight back with
education and height-
ened awareness of
high crime areas.
"Not many people
are aware...of the
increases in crime that Timmons
have troubled us over
the past three months," said Maj. Gen. Richard F.
Timmons.
"A number of individuals have been affected by the
criminal elements that enter our installation communi-
ties and off post, but the general population is unclear
on what has happened."
USARSO Deputy Provost Marshal Lt. Col. Garry L.
Pittman noted 41 incidents in which soldiers and fami-
lies were victimized from December to March. That's
23 incidents more than during the same time period last
year.
An April robbery of a "safe" hotel underscored the
problem. Seven men brandishing pistols forced five


U.S. citizens and several Panamanians to the lobby
floor of the Costa del Sol hotel, where they robbed
them.
Onerobberpistol-whipped victim and anothervic-
tim was kicked in the ribs, Pittman said.
The hotel in downtown Panama City is one of several
used to house newcomers, those preparing to leave and
others on temporary duty.
"There are a whole host of initiatives that has been
undertaken to work this problem from a number of
different directions," Timmons said.
"We have made the Panamanian police aware of the
problem and they agree there has been an increase in
crime and they are taking steps to come to grips with
that problem. And ive find that very positive.
"At the same time we are trying to assess all of those
hotels, restaurants, markets, malls, movie theaters and
bars that have had atrend of criminal difficulty overthe
past year. In other words...to identify locations...not
suitable for our soldiers and dependents to frequent,"
* said Timmons.
The command will aggressively campaign to com-
municate the crime problem through radio, television
and newspaper media.
New personnel will be fully informed as part of their
inprocessing. And the chain of command will ensure
soldiers have the latest information about off-limits
areas, troublesome crime areas, and dangerous routes.
The provost marshal plans to introduce a column in
the Tropic Times called "Crime Scene."
It will featureplaces where crimes have occurred in-
volving U.S. members and family members as a device
to warn people of the seriousness of the problem.
"So it's a multi-phased approach, just now going into


"A number of individuals have been
affected by the criminal elements
that enter our installation communi-
ties and off post, but the general
population is unclear on what has
happened."
Timmons
Commander, U.S. Army South

effect. We hope to have... a clearer picture on where to
go and where not to go in Panama City and Coloh," said
Timmons."
The intent (of the program) is to warn everyone to
stay away from these places so that they don't put
themselves in jeopardy."
Timmons said the effort will also accentuate the
positive; to communicate where people can go to
enjoy themselves and take advantage of some of the op-
portunities for morale, welfare and recreation in Pan-
ama.
"Our intent is not to frighten anyone into remaining
on their installations for fear of being victimized,"
Timmons said.
"Ourrealintentistoidentify (q'iafe)recreational sites
and activities like: beaches, ,f. inning, snorkeling,
boat rides, river rides, sight-seeing... good restaurants
and places where you can truly enjoy the environ-
ment."


Peruvian fighter plane shoots C-130


QUARRY HEIGHTS, Panama (U.S.
Southern Command PAO) - An un-
armed U.S. Air Force C-130 aircraft
on a routine flight was fired upon by
Peruvian aircraft during the afternoon
of April 24. The flight was approved
by the Peruvian government and was
in support ofU.S. Southern Command's
counter-drug mission.
Preliminary reports indicate the C-
130 aircraft, while flying within its ap-
proved operating area, was intercepted
by aPeruvian Tucano aircraft as the C-
130 was nearing completion of its
mission. As the crew was unable to
determine the Tucano's intentions, and
after unsuccessfully trying to call off
the intercept by communicating with
the Peruvians via the U.S. Southern-
Command headquarters, they termi-
nated the mission. The aircraft headed
due west in order to leave Peru and
reach international airspace by the most
expeditious route. Peru claims sover-
eignty over territorial sea and airspace
out to 200 nautical miles from its coast,
but these claims go against interna-
tional law, which does not recognize
claims beyond a 12-mile nautical mile
limit.
After the C-130 entered interna-
tional airspace, it flew to the northeast,
remaining at least 60 nautical miles
from the Peruvian coast as it returned
to its home base in Panama.
At 5:02p.m., about one hour and 20


minutes after reaching international
airspace, and about two hours after
terminating its mission, the C-130 was
intercepted by two Peruvian Soviet-
built SU-22 fighter aircraft.
The intercept occurred in daylight,
in clear weather, and unlimited visi-
bility. The lead intercepting aircraft
flew alongside on the left of the clearly
identifiable and normally marked C-
130 and rocked its wings to get the C-
130 to follow it. In accordance with
established Department of Defense
procedures and the fact the aircraft
was in international airspace, and since
the mission had been pre-approved by
the Peruvian government, the C-130
continued to fly its northerly heading
while monitoring internationally rec-
ognized distress frequencies 121.5 and
243.0 MHz. The crew tried to contact
the Peruvian interceptors and local air
traffic control authorities on both dis-
tress frequencies without success.
A few minutes later, a SU-22 flew
alongside the C-130 on its right side.
The crew observed smoke and un-
identified debris, which they thought
to be chaff, coming from the Peruvian
aircraft. No tracer rounds were seen.
Very shortly thereafter, the C-
130 was strafed along its right side
with gun fire. As a result of the hits,
a rapid decompression occurred,
blowing out an observation window
and a crewmember through the


window opening.
The C-130 aircraft immediately
turned toward the coast and started
descending because of the loss of cabin
pressure. The crew again unsuccess-
fully tried to contact the interceptors
on international distress frequencies.
While descending in a right turn
toward the Peruvian coast, the C-130
aircraft was strafed twice more. These
attacks wounded four crewmembers.
Upon approaching the coast, the
crew was able to contact Talara ap-
proach and control and request per-
mission for an emergency landing. The
Peruvian fighters escorted the C-130
to El Pato Airfield, where it landed.
The wounded airmen were moved
to a local hospital until they were
evacuated early the next day.
Of the four wounded U.S. crew-
men, one received serious wounds to
the neck and chest. He is in Gorgas
Army Community Hospital in serious,
but stable condition. Two received only
minor wounds (scrapes and abrasions).
A third received superficial shrapnel
wounds in the chest and both legs. He
was treated at Gorgas upon return to
Panama and has since been released.
The aircraft sustained damage to
engines, hydraulic and fuel systems,
fuselage and landing gear.
The U. S. Southern Command is
conducting an investigation into the
incident.


-',


Gorgas allows

self-referral
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -
Gorgas Army Community Hospital appoint-
ment system now allows self-referral to
specialty clinics for the treatment of certain
medical conditions.
General Surgery: breast mass, rectal
bleeding in people over 35 years, lumps in
neck, abdomen or chest, ingrown toenails -
282-5236
Urology: blood in urine, mass on tes-
ticle, voluntary sterilization - 282-5250/
5236
ENT:significantinjuries to nose orear-
282-5237/5251
OB/GYN: suspected pregnancy, abnor-
mal vaginal bleeding or discharge, dyspau-
renia (pain with intercourse) - 282-5237/
5251
Opthalmology: eye pain, decreased vi-
sion (sudden), double/partial vision - 282-
5237/5224
Orthopedic: Single joint pain, swel-
ling, or deformity, hand and foot injuries or
bums - 252-5248/5249
Audiology: hearing restriction or de-
crease, Tinnitus - 282-5237/5251
Any patient with apre-existing medical
condition that was treated at another medi-
cal treatment facility may make an ap-
pointment directly with the Gorgas Medi-
cal Clinic, 282-5164/5165.


I










2Tropic Times
May 1, 1992


Air War College program seeks students


HOWARDAFB (24thWG/PA)- Thedrivetorecruit
students for the 1993 Air War College non-resident
seminar program is underway.
The curriculum mirrors that of the resident course at
Maxwell AFB, Ala.
AWC emphasizes joint education and senior leader
development focused on military strategy and the
employment of air power.
The AWC non-resident seminars a way to complete
senior PME. It combines self-study with an informal,
semi-structured meeting environment.
Students not only draw knowledge from course
reading materials, but are able to exchange concepts
and ideas with other senior people.


Gorgas facing
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Despite budget
cuts, Gorgas Army Community Hospital is adding
* doctors, cutting the length of patient stays, andimprov-
ing the quality of care, said hospital officials.
Col. Michael A. McConnell, commander, said that
despite cuts, quality patient care remains his first and
foremost concern.
So McConnell and his staff have begun implenting
programs designed to cut through bureaucracy and save
money. One method is cutting back the time patients
remain in the hospital, with same-day-surgery.
SDS is also called ambulatory surgery, and was
initiated in 1990 to save money by minimizing a num-
ber of functions associated with surgery and subsequent
hospital convalescence, such as nursing, diet and house-
keeping.
Patients receiving minor surgery might spend three
days in the hospital. Now for each SDS patient there
should be a reduction of two hospital days, or a $1,402
savings. The program is expected to save nearly $1
million a year.
Another new dollar-stretching method is coordi-
nated care, a network of military and civilian health
careproviders. '... ..
Medical treatment facilities commanders can now


The program consists of 40 lessons covered in two
volumes of 20 lessons each. An organizational meeting
takes place in late July and Volume I runs from August
to December. Volume II seminars are held January to
March,1993.
Initial enrollments must be in Volume I as the cur-
riculum is designed using a building block approach.
Only students who completed Volume I can enroll in
Volume II in January 93.
People who have completed one volume, either one
or two, but have not completed both volumes, must sign
up to complete the remaining volume requirements
during this academic year.
Failure to do so will cause loss of previous volume


budget crunch
develop coordinated care programs, while maintaining o
responsibility for delivery, cost, and quality of services. n
The Department of the Army calls the transition to a co- P
ordinated care program the Gateway to Care. Gorgas
has initiated its own Gateway to Care via the Partner- v
ship Program by contracting qualified local physicians c
to augment the hospital's regular staff.
"We had our budget slashed $.24 million for fiscal
year 92, but by exercising some additional options such tV
as CHAMPUS (Civilian Health and Medical Program n
forthe Uniformed Service) Partnerships, supplemental
care, and consolidating services, we have been able to si
expand services even with budget reductions," McCon- P
nell said. s
Through the Partnership Program for CHAMPUS
beneficiaries, Gorgas has expanded medical care to b
what officials say are the areas of greatest need and c
patient dissatisfaction, OB/GYN and Pediatrics. These tl
clinics have been augmented at Gorgas by two doctors. f
These services are also available to CHAMPUS benefi-
ciaries at the Fort Clayton clinic. to
The Dermatology and Ear, Nose, and Throat clinics 1
are also under consideration for staff augmentation via h
the program' in the near future.. in
When Gorgas does not have the equipment, technol- v


credit. This applies to both seminar and correspon-
dence students, according to Air Force education offi-
cials
The AWC seminar program is open to active duty
and reserve colonels, lieutenant colonels, and lieu-
tenant colonel selectees of any component of the
U.S. armed Forces, Air Force civilian employees GS/
GM-13 or above, and Air Force (active duty, national
guard or reserve) majors selected on a 1985 or earlier
board - date of rank May 1, 1986 or earlier). At least
five people are needed to form a non-resident seminar.
The base education office is now taking enrollment
applications. Visit the office in Bluilding 708, or call
284-4863 for more details.


'. . ... IW





7 Al

A .-













k.,

U.S. Army photo by SFC Tony Nauroth
YOUTH CONFIRMATION -The most Reverend Marcos G. McGrath, archbishop of the diocese
of Panama City, anoints Angie Romero as a full member of the Catholic Church during the
confirmation of 25 U.S. Pacific community young adults Saturday afternoon at Fort Clayton
Chapel.


ova University


arts programs

ABLO (Nova University) - Registration for two de-
oriented programs kicked off in May and June at Nova
rsity's Panama Center.
va is offering a Master's in Business Administration
Bachelor ofScience in Professional Management with
ness speciality. Registration begins May 25.
e classes are oriented toward working
ssionals and are scheduled in the evenings and on
ends, according to Panama Center's Dean, Dr. Martini
r.
e first two courses of the MBA program offered in May
management: theory and application, and organization
ior and development. Registration continues through
ass starting date, May 8.
th courses address theoretical and practical studies
d to private industry and government service.
BA students will meet every second or third weekend
g the 15-week semester. Students who take the normal
load of two classes per semester can finish the 12
es in 24 months.
va's MBA curriculum is designed to enhance the
iveness and productivity ofpre-managerial and mana-
professionals involved in public and private sector or-
ations, Taylor said.
dents in the undergraduate program meet weekday
ngs, either a Monday and Wednesday, or Tuesday and
day schedule.
dents who present at least 60 semester hours, or an
iate's degree, are eligible for admission. A student
ag in a June, can complete all courses for the B.S. in 26
is without leaving Panama.
plications, information and counselling are available
ese two starting academic groups and other courses in
Mss.
S. personnel can obtain information on tuition assis-
and on Veteran's Administration benefits by
ig their education office or by stopping bytheNova
nistration Office Building 5051, the Diablo Club
, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday.
11252-2071 or 252-2494 for appointments,.


ing challenge

*gy or staff to meet highly specialized or vital medical
eeds, supplemental care can be arranged at hospitals in
'anama City.
This service is usually cost effective to Gorgasand
ital to seriously injured patients who need immediate
are and can't be air evacuated to the states.
Prompt medical evacuation will continue.
In addition to routine air evacuation flights every
wvo weeks to Brooke Army Medical Center, San Anto-
io, emergency flights are scheduled as needed.
Restructuring and consolidating services aims to
stretch budget dollars while improving medical care.
'eriodic patient surveys indicate resources must be
shifted to meet changing demands, said officials.
No services will be eliminated, McConnell stressed,
but delivery methods will be tailored to meet current
community needs. In May, Gorgas plans to consolidate
he Departments of Psychiatry and Social Work on the
fifth floor of the main building.
Col. Felice M. Iapaolo, quality improvement direc-
or, said total quality management was introduced in
992. "TQM is the typical organizational pyramid of
hierarchy, but inverted so the employees are the most
important. Only through action by the employees can
we achieve true improvement in quality."












"U.S. News


Jurors' decision heeds


'thin blue line' defense


SIMI VALLEY, Calif. (AP) - The
jury that acquitted four Los Angeles po-
licemen in the Rodney King beating heeded
defense lawyers' warnings that police
are "the thin blue line" separating the
law-abiding from the lawless.
The lack of testimony from King and
the transfer of the trial from ethnically
diverse Los Angeles to Simi Valley, a
predominantly white suburb known as a
bedroom community for police, may
have tipped the scales toward the de-
fense.
Only six blacks were among 400 pros-
pects summoned for jury duty.
Two blacks who made it into the jury
box were removed by defense chal-
lenges.
King is black; the four officers white.
In powerful closing arguments, de-
fense lawyers portrayed their clients as
guardians of an endangered society.
Defense lawyer Michael Stone, a for-
mer policeman, recalled a sign in a po-
lice gymnasium: "There are no second-
place ribbons in a street fight."
"These officers, these defendants, do
not get paid to lose a street fight," he
argued. "They do not get paid to roll
around in the dirt with the likes of Rod-
ney Glen King.
"That's not their job. That's not their
duty," he said. "And if we as members
of the community demand they do that,
the thin blue line that separates the law-


abiding and the not law-abiding will
disintegrate."
The prosecution asked jurors to
trust their own eyes, relying on the vide-
otape shot by a neighborhood resident to
show that the clubbing and kicking of
King was unnecessary, unreasonable
force.
King, a convicted robber, was not
called by either side as a witness. Prose-
cutors have said the tape spoke for itself.
"Had King been able to talk to us, the
video might have been looked at differ-
ently," a juror who demanded anonym-
ity was quoted as saying on ABC's
"Nightline."
Defense lawyers played the tape so
many times at so many different speeds
that its impact may have been blunted.
And they offered enough explanations
for what it showed to provide reasonable
doubt.
Defense experts said the four did what
they were trained to do: inflict pain and
break bones with their batons if neces-
sary.
Two officers said they believed King
was "dusted," or under the influence of
PCP, and had superhuman strength.
The fact that no trace of PCP was
found in King's system was irrelevant,
the defense contended. Lawyers spoke of
the officers' "reasonable perceptions"
and urged jurors to stand in their shoes
that night.


California disaster officials fear bigger quake


EUREKA, Calif. (AP) - As the cleanup from a
weekend earthquake continued and most schools reo-
pened, the state's disaster officer warned that another
aftershock in the 6-point range was possible along the
northwest coast.
Dick Andrews, director of the California Office of
Emergency Services, said Monday that aftershocks
might continue for several weeks. He said rumbles in
the 4-point range on the Richter scale were probable
and that one or more in the range of 5-point or 6-point
were possible. Several barely discernible aftershocks
were reported late Sunday and Monday as residents
started cleaning up the rubble from Saturday's earth-


quake and two strong aftershocks early Sunday.
Humboldt County officials asked Monday that Presi-
dent Bush declare the quake zone a disaster area. A
similar designation was already made by Gov. Pete
Wilson, who toured the area Tuesday by helicopter and
met with emergency officials. A federal declaration of
disaster would clear the way for federal aid, including
low-interest loans from the Small Business Administra-
tion.
Mike McGuire, Humboldt County emergency serv-
ices director, says most schools in the county were open
Tuesday. He said there were a few schools that were
open Monday and those schools had a lot of absentees;


he didn't have attendance figures for Tuesday.
The quake and the aftershocks caused an estimated
$51 million in damage and about 95 injuries.
Hardest hit was the lumbertown of Scotia, where the
first aftershock caused a fire that destroyed a shopping
center and caused $15 million in damage.
Arlene Mock, who worked in a hardware store that
was leveled in the fire, watched some of the cleanup
efforts Monday, then left to try to get back on track.
"I'm not worried about it. We'll be OK," she said
with a shrug as she and her husband, John, stared at the
blackened earth where the store once stood. "I'm just
going to go file unemployment right now."


Seattle youths film 'Beverly Hills' takeoff


MERCER ISLAND, Wash. (AP) - This is rich.
High school students in the wealthy Seattle suburb of Merber
Island filmed their own version of Fox television's "Beverly
Hills 90210" and manage to make the fictional Californians
look disadvantaged.
But then Mercer Island High School is where one student
fulfilled a cooking-class assignment by bringing in her mother's
caterer. And youngsters at basketball games chant when their
team is losing: "That's all right, that's OK, you're going to
work for us someday," while waving dollar bills.
In the fictional high school of "Mercer Island 98040,"
students enjoy valet parking, glide down halls on Rollerblades
and a disc jockey spins records between classes.


Said sophomore Michal Blum, who worked on the program:
"Mercer Island and Beverly Hills are, like, the stereotype is the
same."
But the 15-minute student production, set to run on a local
access cable channel, is a light takeoff of "Beverly Hills
90210." The Fox show about the travails of students in the ritzy
Los Angeles suburb examines weighty themes like drug use
and teen sex.
The Seattle version created and directed by junior Jason
Merrell concerns such issues as a shortage of student parking
spots, the lack of nighttime hangouts and overconsumption of
latte - the espresso and steamed-milk beverage that courses
thicker than blood through many Seattlites's veins.


Justice Department opposes releasing documents


WASHINGTON (AP) - The Justice
Department "strongly" opposes a con-
gressional resolution calling for the
release of documents relating to the
assassination of President Kennedy,
according to a letter made public
Tuesday.
The Justice Department letter raised
constitutional objections to the proposed
House-Senate resolution, which would
establish a judicially appointed review
board to oversee release of thousands of
secret government documents relating to
the 1963 assassination.
"We strongly object to the resolution


in its current form, and, if it were pre-
sented to the president without amend-
ment, would give serious consideration
to recommending presidential disap-
proval," said W. Lee Rawls, assistant
attorney general.
Rawls' letter was received Monday
night and came as a surprise to sub-
committee chairman John Conyers, D-
Mich.
Conyers said that he and subcommit-
tee staffers negotiated unsuccessfully to
pt rsuade Justice Department officials to
appear at Tuesday's hearing.
The specter of a presidential veto was


criticized Tuesday by Republicans and
Democrats in a hearing of the House
Legislation and National Security sub-
committee.
"I have a tremendous concern that we
not compromise the bill in order to get
something that is veto-proof," said Rep.
Christopher Shays, R-Conn.
Rep. Lee Hamilton, D-Ind., who testi-
fied before the subcommittee, said that if
the president vetoes the measure, the
House should vote independently to re-
lease secret congressional records, "and
at least set an example for the executive
branch."


Tropic Times
May 1,1992 3


APLuaswPhoto
NEVER TOO OLD - David Eugene Ray of Franklin, Tenn., had a very
special day Thursday. Not only did he turn 100, but for the first time in his
life he'll be able to read his birthday cards, Ray never learned to read until
a tutor began teaching him early this year. He is shown Tuesday with his
reading text book.


Nevada man
kills 3, injures 1
RENO, Nev. (AP) - Atenant at
a trailer park who had feuded
with park managers went on a
rampage, killing three people
and wounding three others be-
fore another tenant apparently
shot him to death, authorities
said.
Police said Fermin Mancilla's
shooting spree Monday evening
killed the managers of the Cov-
ered Wagon trailer park where he
lived and another tenant at the
adjoining Bonanza park.

Bird shooting
runs 'afowl'
ANCHORAGE (AP) - The
scream ofjetengines has no effect
and cannons and noise-makers don't,
work, so migrating ducks and geese
that flock to Anchorage's Interna-
tional Airport and endanger planes
are being shot.
So far this year, wildlife offi-
cers and airport maintenance work-
ers have killed about 70 ducks and
geese, officials said.


I









4Tropic Times
May 1,1992


* Hemisphere


Peruvian polls


show support

LIMA, Peru (Reuters) - I I
Most Peruvians, from the
president on down, are keep- ;I
ing a close eye on the polls '
these days as President ' " -
Alberto Fujimori continually '
cites them to show the over-
whemlming support for his
virtual one-man rule.
Political talk shows have
been competing to commis-
sionpolls in abid to take the Fujimori
pulse of the Peruvian popu-
lace, which has enthusiastically applauded Fujimori in
what he calls his campaign to clean up corruption and
inefficiency in the Congress and judiciary.
In the latest surveys, Fujimori's popularity was run-
ning between 70 and 90 percent three weeks after he
abruptly announced he was dissolving Congress and
closing the nation's courts.
"Polls cannot replace the institutional and legal
forms of expression of the popular will. This is not
under discussion," Fujimori said in a televised address
to the nation last week.
"But neither is the fact that they (the polls) reflect
the thinking and feelings of the Peruvian people .... The
popular will must be respected," he added.
A week earlier he invited foreign correspondents to
"go into the streets to verify for yourselves that thepolls
are not lying."
Manuel Torrado, head of the Datum polling firm,


NA CIONAL


AP LaserPhoto
Soldiers stand guard in front of a portrait of party founder Victor Raul Haya de a Torre on the roof of the
opposition Aprista party headquarters in Lima April 18. Armed forces took control of the building after an
anti-government protest.


said the high rating Fujimori has received in the last
year combined with the abysmal image of Congress and
the judiciary was "without a doubt among the twomost
important factors that spurred the president's decision
to carry out the April 5 measures."
Fujimori also appears to have used the polls over the
last three weeks to guide his actions in proposing a
return to constitutional rule by next April, said Alfredo
Torres, manager of Apoyo, considered Peru's leading
polling firm.
"Most of the public has supported the measures
taken but they also want a quick return to a democratic


government. This has brought him to give a shorter
timetable than he originally intended," Torres said.
In a sign of the importance polls have gained in
Peru's constitutional crisis, members of a visiting Or-
ganization of American States delegation requested the
surveys ofthe major polling firms as part ofthe mission
to "listen to all points of view" of Peruvian society.
But Torres warned that using polls as a way of
measuring support and legitimizing a government's ac-
tions, is a "highly risky business" since they are only
an approximate measure of the public's attitude at a cer-
tain moment.


Gas explosion probe snags officials


GUADALAJARA, Mexico (Reuters) - Eight government
officials were imprisoned Monday on negligent homicide
charges stemming from last week's devastating gas explosions
in Guadalajara.
But many Mexicans continued asking themselves who was
really to blame for the tragedy that took over 200 lives.
Victims ofthe blasts and opposition politicians criticized the
results of the government's probe announced Sunday, which
named four officials of the state oil company Petroleos Mexi-
canos, three water department officials, the mayor of Guadalajara
and a state government official as responsible for the disaster.
"It seems to be in the back of the government's mind to cut
off the chain of complicity at a low level so as not to affect
political ties," said Ricardo Pascoe, official spokesman of the
Democratic Revolutionary Party.


"The problem of corruption is also a problem of complicity
at the highest levels," he added.
Rosa Maria Aviles, a member of a group of victims and
homeless, also cast doubt on the official report.
"We all think the most to blame is the governor," she said,
referring to Guillermo Cosio, governor of Jalisco State for
the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party.
An arrest order against Guadalajara Mayor Enrique Dau
Flores, who quit his post Saturday, a day before the report was
issued, could not be executed as his whereabouts were un-
known.
The eight other officials, including Aristeo Mejia Duran,
Urban Planning Secretary to the state of Jalisco of which
Guadalajara is the capital, were being held in a Jalisco correc-
tional facility.


Cuba demands U.S. extradite exiles


UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - Cuba asked the Security
Council Tuesday to condemn alleged United States terrorism
and to demand the extradition of two Cuban exiles it accused
of blowing up a Cuban airlinerin 1976 in which 73 people were
killed.
In a letter to the president of the council requesting a
meeting, Cuban U.N. envoy Ricardo Alarcon drew a parallel
with recent council action demanding that Libya hand over
two agents indicted in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103
over Lockerbie, Scotland, in 1988, and cooperate in an inves-
tigation into the 1989 bombing of a French UTA airliner
over Niger. A total of 441 people were killed in the two
disasters.
Council members said they would hold consultations on


Wednesday on Cuba's request for a meeting.
In his letter, Alarcon said: "The crimes committed by the
United States and particularly its Central Intelligence Agency
against the people of Cuba are innumerable, but undoubtedly
one of the most abominable, repugnant and cruel was the
blowing up of a civilian Cuban airplaneoff Barbados on October
6, 1976 where 73 people were killed."
The letter named the two alleged culprits as Orlando Bosch
and Luis Posada Carriles and said they were "currently under
the protection of the government of the United States."
Alarcon said that while U.S. leaders were tryixi; to portray
themselves as opponents ofinternational terrorism, iey had for
years trained, armed and financed the "terrorist activities"
of those two men and others like them.


Colombian telephone workers end strike


CUCUTA, Colombia (AP) - Telephone workers
agreed Tuesday to end a strike that cut communication
between Colombia and the rest of the world for seven
days.
The 14,000 employees of the state-run Telecom
company acted after the government signaled willing-
ness to modify a plan to privatize the firm.
"The workers have agreed to return to their jobs,"
union leader Eberto Lopez announced on the RCN
radio network.
Most of Colombia's sabotaged long-distance phone
system was still not operating Tuesday evening, how-
ever.
Officials said it was slowly being put back in order.


The strike-ending agreement, mediated by Congress,
also creates a labor-government commission to deter-
mine the fate of 63 fired workers accused of sabotage.
The workers erased Telecom computer programs and
used cooking flour to gum up long-distance transmis-
sion cables.
The sabotage last April 12 cut off all long-distance
telephone service.
The workers argue that the government's sale of
Telecom will cost jobs and sacrifice national sover-
eignty. The government says it will bring efficiency and
modernization.
The telephone strike has cost Colombia millions of
dollars.


Banks have been unable to transfer funds; the For-
eign Ministry lost contact with embassies; some export-
ers set up shop in neighboring Panama so as not to lose
clients.
Port and oil workers have been staging work stop-
pages in sympathy with the Telecom workers, as have
peasants throughout the country. It was not clear if
Tuesday's agreement would head off further labor
strife.
The communications crisis came at an especially bad
time. A prolonged dry spell and government misman-
agement have cut hydroelectric power, forcing the
government to severely ration electricity, with power
cuts of 8-10 hours per day.


Argentina limits
nuclear pace
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina
(AP) - Argentina, leader in Latin
American nuclear development,
has placed new controls on the
export of nuclear materials and
technology and ballistic missile
expertise.
Argentina "has held a histori-
cally ambiguous position" on
proliferation of weapons of mass
destruction, President Carlos
Menem said Monday night in an-
nouncing the restrictions.

Group criticizes
street child killings
PARIS (Reuters) - The Interna-
tional Federation of Human Rights
urged Brazil on Tuesday to crack
down on death squad killings of
thousands of street children.
Two children are being shot
dead every day in Rio de
Janeiro, according to a report from
a judge and a lawyer sent by the
Paris-based human rights group to
Brazil in February to probe the
killings.
The group said police figures
show 4,611 street children were
killed between 1988 and 1990.


~Ftr










SMilitary News


Tropic Times
May 1,1992


Bumper sticker rubs base wrong way


ATLANTA (AP) - A military base mechanic whose
anti-Bush bumper stickers were banned by his Air
Force bosses is going to court for the right to display the
messages on the truck he drives to work.
The American Civil Liberties Union planned to file
a federal lawsuit Tuesday on behalf of Jesse Ethredge,
who was ordered to remove the stickers or keep the
truck off Robins Air Force Base in Warner Robins.
"It's a matter of standing up for your rights," said
Ethredge, civilian employee at the base for 25 years.
"I'm the kind of fella that whenever I know I'm right,
I'm going to fight you 'til I'm shot down."
The ACLU wants base officials to lift the ban on
stickers critical of President Bush's administration, said
Gerry Weber, legal director for the Georgia ACLU,
based in Atlanta. Ethredge isn't seeking damages.


"America has never been a place where the govern-
ment can suppress unfavorable views," Weber said.
"The military has robbed Jesse Ethredge of the very
freedom it is supposed to protect."
Base officials refused to comment. Spokesman Dale
Brinkman refused to say if the base near Macon has a
policy against bumper stickers that criticize Bush.
Ron Fry, a spokesman at the Air Force Logistics
Command in Ohio, which has authority over the base,
said decisions about bumper stickers are left to local
commanders.
"He has the authority to rule on such things like this
that he may deem in poor taste or inappropriate," Fry
said.
Base officials began complaining about Ethredge's
stickers in 1984 when former President Reagan visited


Macon. The sticker said, "To Hell With Reagan."
The stickers on Ethredge's truck now read, "Read
My Lips: To Hell With Geo Bush" and "Forgive Bush
not Egypt. He lied."
In 1990, base security ticketed Ethredge for "pro-
voking speech on a truck." The ticket was thrown out
after Ethredge challenged it.
In October, Robert M. Hail, then base deputy com-
mander, told Ethredge the stickers were demeaning to
the Bush administration and bad for troops.
Hail ordered the stickers removed, saying a military
employee telephoned the base complaint line about
them.
"They said that it was a morale buster," said Ethredge,
who began driving a sticker-free carto workbecause he
feared he would be fired.


Women charge Marines


with sexual harassment


PENSACOLA, Fla. (AP) - Women
accused two Marine drill instructors of
sexual harassment at a school for avia-
tion officer candidates.
Most of the women who testified dur-
ing hearings Tuesday and April 23 have
graduated from the Aviation Officer
Candidate School at Pensacola Naval
Air Station and now are commissioned
officers.
They accused Gunnery Sgts. Mi-
chael E. Wallace and Clifton W. Ford of
violating the Uniform Code of Military
Justice by fraternizing with their stu-
dents and sexually harassing subordi-
nates. One woman charged that Wallace
pulled out her waistband and put his hand
and ice on her buttocks at a party.
Another testified Wallace followed
her into a hotel room during a Navy show
in Chicago and asked for a hug.


Ford was accused of dancing and drink-
ing with officer candidates at class social
events he supervised and going to a
woman's room at 5:30 a.m. to ask that
she get him a bottle of ointment from the
hospital.
Navy Capt. Steve Peterson presided
overthe hearings and will makearecom-
mendation in each case that could range
from general court-martial to dismissal
of the charges.
The school's chief drill instructor,
MSgt. Charles Ryan, disputed allega-
tions the school was rife with rumors of
student-instructor relationships.
He insisted there is a clear division be-
tween instructors and students.
The school began the probe last year
after Wallace's wife complained to school
officials that she thought he was having
an affair.


FORT KNOX, Ky. (AP) - Gunnery
training resumed Tuesday at Fort
Knox, two days afterthree Marines were
killed and nine others were injured when
a truck slid off a wet road and over-
turned.
The 12 Marines from Camp Lejeune,
N.C., were returning from a tank-firing
range Saturday night in a five-ton
truck when the truck slid on wet
and possibly muddy pavement, struck
an embankment and overturned,


officials said.
Training resumed because "we
need to get active again, to get our
focus off the accident. We need to get
back in business for mental-health rea-
sons," said Lt. Col. Don Harlin,
commanding officer of the 2nd Tank
Battalion, 2nd Marine Division out of
Camp Lejeune.
Injuries ranged from cuts and scrapes
to broken bones, Harlin said.
The accident is under investigation.


Anti-terrorism school highlights horrors


HURLBURT FIELD, Fla. (AP) - While an in-
structor has students' attention at a firearms range, a
couple of men who had been working with a shovel
and rake off to the side drop their tools.
Suddenly, they pull automatic weapons from a
wheelbarrow and shoot up several dummies seated
around tables at a mockup of a sidewalk cafe.
The ambush is over before many in the Dynamics
of International Terrorism course realize what has
happened.
The bullets were real and so was the message: Next
time it could be you.
"You've got to accept the fact you are a potential
target," says Maj. Gail Gilbert, anti-terrorism chief at
the Air Force Special Operations School.
The mock massacre, a re-enactment of a terrorist
attack that killed several U.S. Marines and civilians in
El Salvador, is one of the more dramatic lessons taught
at the school, which marked its 25th year April 15. A
faculty reunion to formally celebrate the anniversary
is set for May 1.
The school started at this Florida panhandle base


'Terrorists like soft targets. We teach
them (students) to be hard targets."
Gilbert
School's anti-terrorism chief

during the Vietnam War with a single course to prepare
Air Force personnel for duty in Southeast Asia.
It now offers 13 courses. Among them are orienta-
tion courses on other cultures. Other subjects include
cross-cultural communications, revolutionary warfare,
psychological operations, and crisis response manage-
ment.
Before and during thePersian GulfWarlast year, the
school made special presentations here and at other
bases to about 10,000 military personnel heading to the
Middle East.
About 100,000 men and women from all services
also saw videos the school produced on the Gulf crisis
and Middle East culture.


Regular courses range from three to 10 working days
and class size from a few to more than 100.
Some courses dealing with military planning are
limited to top-ranking officers with top-secret clear-
ances.
Personnel from all military branches and some civil-
ian agencies, including the Central Intelligence Agency,
Secret Service and State Department, attend the school.
Most are headed overseas and many will be working
with foreign nationals, said Col. Michael Flynt, the
school's commandant.
In addition to the cafe massacre, the terrorism course
features demonstrations of guns, explosives and meth-
ods favored by terrorists. They are attention-getters to
make sure students take to heart the survival instruc-
tions.
"Terrorists like soft targets," Gilbert said. "We
teach them to be hard targets."
The primary lesson is to be unpredictable, she said.
Students are urged to avoid getting into a routine and
take such steps as changing daily travel routes and
times.


Gunnery training resumes

after 5-ton truck accident


. - . . .





W.



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APLaswPhoto
GROUNDED BUT OCCUPIED U.S. serviceman Cpl. Rick Knapik from
Berlin, Conn., finds time to slide down snow-covered lava April 18 while
waitingfor Mount Etna to clear. The U.S. is helping residents in Italy divert
the lava flow from the erupted volcano.









WVoices


Mayors' Corner


DEARMAYOR,

What is the rule about maids being
allowed to bring their children with them
onpost/base?
Our housing area is already overflow-
ing with children and the last thing we
need is to have more brought in each day.

Fort Clayton resident

DEAR READER,

According to the supervisor of the
Fort Clayton Installation Pass Office,
regulations do not allow domestics to
sign other visitors on post.
Technically, in order for a domestic's
child to be admitted to the installation,
the sponsor of the maid must sign the
child in.
Passes are not issued to children,
unless they are older and provide a serv-
ice.
However, as a courtesy to military
members who allow their maids to bring
their small children to work, the Mili-
tary Police will generally admit the
young children in the company of their
parent.
The same unofficial policy is prac-
ticed by the Security Police, according
to the noncommissioned officer in
charge of the Howard AFB Pass and
Identification Office.
The Naval Pass and Identification clerk
stated that the Navy and Marines do not
allow these children to be admitted to
theirinstallations.


If, for any reason, you are having a
problem with a child of a domestic, you
should go directly to the sponsor of the
maid. If the situation cannot be resolved
between the two of you, Army residents
should report the problem to their area
coordinator, Air Force residents should
contact the Security Police.

Off-post residents:

There will a Quality of Life Council
Meeting, Wednesday at 5 p.m. for off-
post residents at the Valent Recreation
Center, Fort Clayton.
Representatives will be available from
the telephone, water and electric compa-
nies, the Panamanian National Police
and Merchants National Bank.
A slide presentation will also be shown
by the president of the Panama Chamber
of Commerce.

April yards of the month

Corozal:
George and Margie Steinbager, 684A
800, Fort Clayton: ,
SFC Victor and Maria Martinez, 833B
Editor's note: This column is pro.
vided to allow community members to
submit questions or concerns to be re-
searched and answered by the May-
oral Congress. Letters should be mailed
to: Mayor's Corner, APO AA 34004
(MPS). Anonymity will be granted
upon request. Publicity Chairperson,
Peggy Bordner.


___ Action Line


The action line is a
direct link between Brig.
Gen. David Oakes, 24th
Wing commander, and
Howard AFB and Al-
brook AFS personnel. If
you have a question or
problem that you can't
solve through normal
supervisory channels, call
the Action Line at 284-
5849. Callers should leave
a name, telephone num-
ber and mailing address Oakes
in case questions need to
be clarified. Names will
be kept confidential and used only
to provide callers with a personal
response.

S* I'm wondering if you have
any health code or law governing the
handling of food at your snack bar at
Howard AFB.
Recently, I went and ordered a
hamburger. There were two people
at the snack bar; one was cooking
and the other was working the regis-
ter.
The man at the register left and the
one cooking took over the register and
cooking, handling both money and
food.
I find that to be very unsanitary. I
would like to know if this is an ac-
cepted way to handle food. Thank you.


A . Thank you for your concern
and interest about the food han-
dling procedures at base food
facilities.
I contacted the Army and Air
Force Exchange Service general
manager about your concern and was
informed they do have a policy gov-
erning the handling of food in all food
facilities.
A food handler may operate a cash
register and handle food.
However, between these two duties
they must wash their hands with a
sanitized solution.
The manager of the Howard
AFB Cafeteria is aware of your
concern and will ensure employees
are following proper procedures
when handling cash and food prod-
ucts.


Provost Marshal's Corner


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - The following
incidents were reported to the Fort Clayton Military
Police.

Fore!

An employee of a local golf club was out and about
attending to his daily duties April 17 when he inadver-
tently drove his golf cart into the path of an oncoming
car.
The golf cart struck the car and was turned on its side.
Luckily, no one was seriously hurt in this incident, only
a few scratches.
Whenever you are driving a motor vehicle you
should always look both ways before merging into the
lane of traffic or crossing a roadway. People driving
near golfcourse should also keep their eyes peeled for
those little golf carts.

No one is safe

Sometime between April 8 or 9 the midnight shopper
was out looking for a good sale.
He came upon an unsuspecting and trusting resident
living in Bethania. There the shopper found endless
bargains.
On this individual's patio - unlocked - were ham-
mocks for relaxing, tools for repairing those broken
items, and a sprayer for getting rid of those pesty
insects. It's too bad this resident was so trusting, be-
cause now he doesn't have a hammock to sleep in.
No matter where you live or how safe you may feel
there is always a need to lock up anything you leave
outdoors. If possible, bring those items in at night, or
store them in a secure storage shed.

JUST A LITTLE RESPECT


Recently an individual was looking for a ride. A
taxi stopped to pick him up and after finding out where
theriderwas going, the taxi driverinformed thepassen-
ger that he could not take him there.
Our passenger got extremely upset over this. He
became so upset that he slammed the door of the taxi.
The driver then became upset that the passenger had no
respect for his property and told the passenger not to
slam his door.
Mr. Passenger decided that the best way to handle
this situation was to punch the driver in the face.
If you're ever in a position in which you're request-,
ing services from anotherindividual and those services
for some reason cannot be provided, the solution is not
violence.
Always try to contain yourself and use courtesy
when dealing with others. Not only will violence hurt
someone, it may result in you being charged with
assault.

I can't drive 55

Everyone is aware the Military Police Traffic Sec-
tion has radar patrols.
Sometimes it is hard for drivers to contain their
desire to just let it all out and race that speedometer up
as high as it will go.
Last week someone was unlucky enough to get
caught doing just that.
They must have felt the posted speed limit of 40
mph was just to slow for them and decided to take it
upon themselves to change the speed limit to 60
plus.
The speeder was clockedin at 62 mph. Always obey
the posted speed limit. There is a reason for speed
limits. Like the saying goes "the life you save may be
your own.'


A success story

The Military Police are on patrol 24 hours a day,
seven days a week. It's not very often you read about
the success the military police have in apprehending
subjects.
Recently, at the Gorgas Army Community Hospital,
an employee had his vehicle broken into. After report-
ing the incident to the military police, an all-points
bulletin was put out for the subject.
The MPs noticed an individual who fit the descrip-
tion of the thief and who had been picked up before for
larcenies. The military police stopped the individual,
checked the bag he was carrying and recovered all of the
stolen property.
Hopefully, this incident will help put this person
away for a while. A big hand to the Military Police at
Gorgas.

Editor's note: No one wants to be a crime victim.
In fact most of us will do whatever it takes to protect
ourselves, our families and property.
With this in mind, the Tropic Times staff and the
Provost Marshal's Office are intent on making you
aware of the local crime situation, the types of
crimes committed, when they are committed and
how they are committed.
Armed with this knowledge and some hard les-
sons learned from those who have been crime vic-
tims, we hope to make our community a safer place.
If you've been the victim of a crime and feel the
telling of your story will protect others in our com-
munity, we Invite you to call SFC Robert Cunning-
ham in the Provost Marshal's Office, 287-6762, or
SFC Joseph Ferrare at the Tropic Times, 285-6612.


Commander in Chief................... Gen. George A. Joulwan Editorial Staff.......................... Spec. Richard L. Puckett This authorized unofficial commandinformationpublica-
Director, Public Affairs.............. Col. Joseph S. Panvini Rosemary Chong tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is
Chief................................................SFC Joseph Ferrare Carolyn Coffey published in conjunction with the ArmedForces Information
Editor............................................... MSgt. Rolf Carter U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.................287-3007 Programof the Department of Defense, under the supervision
Assistant Editor...........................Sgt. Deborah E. Williams 24th Wing Public Affairs Office ........................... 284-5459 of the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command.
Sports Editor........................................Spec. John W. Hal 24th Wing Public Affairs Office ..............28-5459 Contents of the Tropic Times ar not necessarily the official
view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or
theU.S.SouthernConmmand.Theaddress is:Unit 0936 APO

* the Tropic Times 34002 Telephone 285-6612.


6 Tropic Times
May 1, 1992


r � --1-








Tropic Times 7
May 1, 1992 /


Letters


'Polly' needs protection


Dear Editor,
The Panama Yellow-Crowned Amazon is one of the
most spectacular ofAmazon parrots. They are loud, ex-
tremely intelligent and beautiful. We see them all over
Panama, in the wild, in zoos and owned by many., It is
with great concern that I have decided to come forward
to help clear up some misunderstandings about these
birds.
Commonly called the yellow-head, they are found
throughout Central America and Colombia.
Yellow-heads are very popular because of their
amazing ability to mimic speech, their easy tamability
and long life span.
Being a parrot owner is a huge responsibility -- one
that should not be taken lightly.
These birds can live for more than 50 years, requir-
ing a lifetime of commitment, expense, medical care
and proper nutrition.
A bird is not a cute little pet that requires minimal
care. They are messy, loud and time consuming.
A parrot can be your best friend -- or a tiring respon-
sibility.
Please research parrots before you decide to buy
one.
The Convention on International Trade in Endan-
gered Species of Wildlife put out by the U.S. Depart-
ment of the Interior-- Fish and Wildlife Service lists all
endangered species. They are listed by categories.
One species is presently threatened with extinction.
Listed in Panama are the hyacinth macaw, greenwing


macaw, scarlet macaw and all toucans.
Not all amazons and blue and gold macaws are
threatened, but may become so iftrade is not regulated.
* In Panama you are required by law to register your
parrot.
It is illegal to buy or sell an unregistered parrot.
Once your parrot is registered he is legally your
pet, and he may leave with you.
The registration office is located near Gamboa.
Directions may be obtained from our vet clinic.
Once your bird is registered, even if the species
does become endangered, he will fall under a grandfa-
ther clause, and will be allowed to leave with you.
I wish it were mandatory for these pets to be listed in
our vet clinic like dogs and cats are now.
This would show a true effort on our part to comply
with Panama's law.
I feel that the novice buyers would think twice ifthey
knew they had to show proof of registration to the vet
clinic for the parrot.
For more information about endangered species write
to: The Fish and Wildlife, 4401 N. Fairfax Drive, Ar-
lington, Va., 22203.
When you are ready to leave Panama pick up a
shipping packet at the vet clinic, or write to: The Port
Veterinarian, Concord Bldg., Suite 102, 8120 N.W.
53rd Street, Miami, Fla., 33166.
Jeri Suarez
bird breeder


NCO suggests Lim memorial


Dear Editor,
I, along with many others in the Atlantic community,
was saddened at the news of the passing of Andrew
"Andy" Lim April 3.
I knew Andy, not real well, but well enough to
know that he was an extremely nice, sincere, honest,
straightforward, and thougthful person.
Andy worked hard, very hard for all the citizens of
the Atlantic community, both military and civilians.
He took a genuine interest in the welfare of this com-
munity.
He would go out of his way to ensure that a wide
variety of activities was available to its residents.
These activities included going on exotic outings to
remote parts of Panama, a country he loved and was
immensely proud of; dinner theater productions, which
he loved to direct, cost-effective trips to Colon's Free
Zone; and a wide variety of other activities.
He always did so with the best interests of this com-
munity in mind.
Andy's enthusiasm and dedication to the commu-
nity, coupled with his love for and pride of country, ex-
posed us to aspects of Panama we (as guests) were
seldom aware of.


Almost every Sunday Andy opened the doors of his
beach house at Maria Chiquita. Everyone was invited
-- everyone.
You could swim, water ski, jet ski, wind surf, eat,
drink, or you could do nothing and just relax and enjoy
the day.
Andy was a doer, a participator and could not
understand how anyone could say, "there's nothing
to do here in Panama."
Andy was a fixture in a wide variety of community
activities here, on the sometimes forgotten Atlantic
side.
He will be missed, but I'm sure not forgotten by
many of us who enjoyed the friendship of this uniquely
gifted and gentle man.
With this in mind, I would like to propose that the
Sundial Recreation Center at Fort Davis be renamed
and rededicated in his memory, "the Andy Lim Recrea-
tion Center."
I believe that this would be a fitting tribute to a
man who gave so much of himself so that we (the
Atlantic community) could better our stay here in
Panama.
MSgt Tim Runfola


Women


's


Army Corps


celebrates 50 years


DoD photo
The Women's Army Corp Museum at Fort McClellan, Ala. pays tribute to the
contributions of the women who served their nation. One display shows the first
WAC uniforms.


Women have contributed to the mis-
sion and professional competence of the
United States Army from the nation's
birth. Fifty years ago this long-standing
relationship was formalized with the es-
tablishment ofthe Women's Army Aux-
iliary Corps, the first milestone in the in-
tegration of women into the Army. This
year we pause to commemorate that
milestone and reflect on the accomplish-
ments of the past 50 years.
The Army has come a long way since
those early days when women could
comprise no more than two percent of
the force and could not aspire to serve as
a general officer.
Through legislative and policy changes,
promotion restrictions have been re-
moved and assignment opportunities are
vastly expanded.
Today, women serve in more than 90
percent of the Army's career fields and
several women have served with distinc-


tion as general officers. Army women
continue to progress as commanders, first
sergeants, and command sergeants ma-
jor in increasing numbers, excelling both
in war and in peace.
The Army will celebrate the 50th
anniversary of the Women's Army Corps
from May 13 through 16, 1992, at the
Corps historic home station, Fort McClel-
lan, Ala.
During this period, we pause to salute
Army women who today serve the nation
proudly and to pay tribute to theirprede-
cessors who first opened the doors of
opportunity by their professionalism and
perseverance.
Gordon R. Sullivan
General, U.S. Army
Chief of Staff

M.P.W. Stone
Secretary of the Army


Law Day

proclamation


WHEREAS, May 1 is Law Day U.S.A.
in the United States of America, and

WHEREAS, The United States of
America has been the citadel of individual
liberty and a beacon of hope and opportu-
nity for more than 200 years to many mil-
lions who have sought our shores, and

WHEREAS, The foundation of indi-
vidual freedom and liberty is the body of
the law that governs us, and

WHEREAS, The Constitution of the
United States of America and the Bill of
Rights are the heart of that body of law,
which guarantees us many freedoms -
including freedom of religious belief,
freedom to have and hold property invio-
late, freedom of assembly, freedom of
speech, freedom of press, freedom of pe-
tition, and due process of the law among
others, and

WHEREAS, This year marks the 35th
annual nationwide observance of Law Day,
and the Congress of the United States and
the president by officalproclamationhave
set aside May 1 as a special day for recog-
nition of the place of law in American life,

NOW, THEREFORE, I, commander
in chief, United States Southern Com-
mand, do hereby designate May 1, 1992,
as Law Day U.S.A. and call upon all
members of the command to commemo-
rate the role of law in our lives.

George A. Joulwan
General, U.S. Army
Commander in Chief









Tropic Times
May 1, 1992


















U.S. Army photos by Spec. JamesYocum
Children from the Youth Services camp try to balance eggs during a
relay race.


Month of the Military Child


features picnics, parades


FORT CLAYTON (USARSOPAO)-
U.S. Army South celebrated the Month
of the Military Child in April with a slew
of events geared towards every age group.
Toddlers and babies enjoyed a Baby
Olympics competition at the Atlantic
and Pacific community child develop-
ment centers. Various competitors vied
for the winning titles of 'best costumed,'
'fastest crawler,' and 'quickest smiler'.
Preschool children also got involved
in the celebration with a parade on Fort
Clayton and tours of military day-care
centers in Panama.
School-age children were given a
chance to answer "What Toodoo" during
an after-school program at Youth Serv-
ices.


During spring break for Department
of Defense Dependent Schools students,
a spring camp featured trips to the inte-
rior, games and crafts.
Teenagers also took part in the cele-
bration during a Teen Bike Ride on the
Amador Causeway in early April. The
youths took off from Fort Clayton by bus
and rented bikes for a leisurely ride down
the scenic causeway.
Parents also participated in some of
the planned events including an old fash-
ioned family picnic day at the Margarita
Complex, where they tookpart in tug-of-
war games.
Parents also received tours of their
children's facilities in the Pacific com-
munity's CDC. They visited the play


Ashanti Bridge finds her way out of the other side of an obstacle at the Baby
Olympics.
areas and viewed art their children had Youth Services soccer opening ceremony
made. held Thursday that noted the beginning
The final activity scheduled for the of another sport season offered to chil-
Month of the Military Child was the dren in Panama.


DoDDS director speaks on state of schools


by Evelyn D. Harris
American Forces Information Service


WASHINGTON - The Department of Defense
Dependent Schools system will continue to spend as
much per pupil as it has in the past, said director Dr.
John Stremple.
"The only cuts we will make will be those involved
in closing schools where there is no longer a military
population to serve," he said. Stremple said he is opti-
mistic because both Christopher Jehn, assistant secre-
tary of defense for force management and personnel,
and Millicent Woods, deputy assistant secretary for
personnel support, families and education, strongly
advocate maintaining a quality school system.
Educators consider cost per pupil an important fac-
tor in maintaining quality, said DoDDS spokeswoman
Marilyn Witcher. In fiscal 1992, the system is spending
$6,012 per pupil. The 1992 average spending level for
stateside public school is $5,119 perpupil, according to
Educational Research Services, a private research group.
Stremple is also working with DoD budget officials
to get a budget authorization for a full school year.
"Currently, we lose teachers when we lose pupils,"
the director said. "If a military community is going
through a gradual drawdown, it could lose students in
the middle of an academic year. Obviously, this is dis-
ruptive for the students and makes planning more
difficult for teachers and administrators."
According to DoD, some 2,000 family members are
out of school in any given week because of their
military parents'reassignments.
Some are not DoDDS students, but enough are to
cause disruption. Also, some teachers are married to
departing military members, adding further problems.
To try to keep teachers' morale up during the
drawdown, Stremple has systemwide and regional
drawdown committees with teacher representatives.
"We try to ensure that any necessary reassignments are
done fairly," he said. There is a transition program
helping displaced teachers.findnewjobs. ;


In line with the Department of Education's "Amer-
ica 2000" goals, the DoD system began a program to
improve instructional techniques, particularly in mathe-
matics. Today's math teachers focus on concept devel-
opment and real-life problem-solving rather than memo-
rization of formulas.
The system's lan-
guage arts program is
already strong, but "The only cuts w
Stremple is trying to
improveit. "Right now, be those involve
an English teachers' schools where the
group is looking at stu-
dents' writing and at a military populate
how teachers are grad- D DD
ing that writing," he
said. "This should bring
more consistency and
quality to language arts."
DoDDS pushes students to take certain subjects.
"We want more students to take advanced algebra,
chemistry, calculus and physics. Before, only the top
students would attempt these courses," Stremple said.
"Now, our guidance counselors are encouraging the av-
erage students to take more difficult courses."
To improve availability of such courses, the system
uses telecommunications, Stremple said.
Students watch teachers on television and ask ques-
tions using electronic mail.
The system has telecommunications courses in Pas-
cal (a computer language), advanced Pascal and ad-
vanced-placement calculus worldwide. DoDDS is
developing more courses.
Thanks to the stepped-up emphasis on taking diffi-
cult courses, Stremple said, 1,301 students took ad-
vanced placement tests during the 1991 school year-
59 percent more than the 869 who took them the year
before.
The director acknowledged progress in some areas
has been slight.
For example, while the verbal Scholastic Aptitude
Test scores were six points higher than the national
average, the math average was three points lower.


Stremple was pleased more students took the test. He
hopes future test scores will reflect some improvements
made this year, one of them'being a longer day.
In 1991, not all high schools in the system had full
seven-period days. This year they do.
Stremple said parents are
an important part of the sys-
tem.
Swill make will They help select school
principals and have a say in
d in closing the selection of other offi-
e is no longer cials.
Parents sit on the Advi-
n to serve.' sory Council on Dependents
director Education. The council meets
twice a year and greatly in-
fluences how the system is


run.
"The council is DoDDS' equivalent of the school
board," Witcher said. "The director acts on its recom-
mendations."
One of the system's most important pushes has been
for parental involvement, the director said.
This emphasis begins even before children reach
school age.
In Lakenheath, England, the pilot program "Sure
Start" began in 1991. Stremple hopes to have the pro-
gram in 29 schools by fall 1994.
Based on the federal Head Start program, Sure Start
works with parents as well as preschoolers. It helps
parents do a better job of filling their role as children's
main teachers.
"So many studies support the importance of par-
ents," the educator said. "Particularly for elementary
school children, parents need to show interest in home-
work. They need to turn the television set off.
"Parents' demands and expectations play a major
role in the success of students in school. When parents
are very interested, if they read to children when they
are little, if they participate in school activities and the
children see that, then you have a child who's favored
to succeeding school. When that's not the case, the chill
pays pricee"


ve
e
Or
io
S
10<
sl*








Tropic Times
May 1, 1992 9


Award winning


reserve cook


takes the heat


by 2nd Lt Robert M. Hart
Florida Army National Guard
SANTIAGO, Panama (Theater Support Element) -
Her experience runs the gamut from award-winning
gourmet chef to first cook for more than 400 soldiers.
But one thing Angie Miller can't seem to escape is the
one thing that is very prevalent in her work place -
heat.
"You know the saying about if you can't stand the
heat... Well, the guy who said it must have worked
here," Miller said.
As a sergeant with the 785th Military Police Com-
pany of Inkster, Mich., the Army Reserve soldier is on
a six-month active-duty tour with Task Force Badgerin
the interior of Panama.
Temperatures outside hover around the 100 degree
mark, while the heat in the kitchen sometimes reaches
130 degrees.
Task Force Badger is made up of U.S. Army Na-
tional Guard and Army Reserve soldiers supporting
.Fuertes Caminos '92 - Panama."
Some of the objectives of this joint U.S. and
Panamanian exercise are to repair schools, clinics,
roads and bridges and to provide other medical
and humanitarian assistance in remote areas of Pan-
ama.
The exercise provides military occupational spe-
cialty training opportunities for approximately 5,000
citizen-soldiers and airmen in their military occupa-
tional specialties.


Sgt. Angle Miller checks her kitchen's supplies.

The last overseas deployment for the Bay City,
Mich., resident also involved some high temperatures
- seven months in the desert of Saudi Arabia during
Operation Desert Storm.
"Believe it or not, it is actually hotter here than in
Saudi Arabia," Miller said. "Here it is more humid and
the heat gets to you more."
Miller, who is the head chef at Amigos' Restaurant
in Bay City, said her work with Task Force Badger is
radically different from her civilian job.
"Here we have quality food, but the emphasis is on
quantity," she said.
"At home I prepare custom sit-down meals for two or
three people."
Miller's culinary expertise has not gone unnoticed.


"I've won several awards for cooking, including
gold and bronze medals in the All-Army competition,"
Miller said.
She was also on an Army team that won a bronze
- medal in the 1988 Culinary Olympics.
The Culinary Olympics is a worldwide cooking
competition sponsored every four years by the German
International Chefs Association.
When her six-month tour with Task Force Badger
ends, Miller will return to Bay City to continue her
.cooking career.
"I've really enjoyed the tour here," she said. "There
is no way I could get this kind of training back home. Of
course, one thing I can get at home is some cool
weather."


Engineers living it up


in 'dust bowl of the world'


Theater Support Bementphoto bySFCGeorgeC.Mrabal


SSgt. Dale Davis (right) and Belize Defense Force Engineer, Pvt. Hugh
Flowers, wire together reinforcement bars before pouring concrete.


by SFC George C. Mirabal
Florida Army National Guard
STANN CREEK DISTRICT, Belize
(Theater Support Element) - U.S. sol-
diers working in this remote region call it
the "dust bowl of the world," but all the
comforts of home can be found at Sol-
diers Creek, 40 miles south of Belize
City.
Company A, 52nd Combat Engineer
Battalion from Fort Carson, Colo., was
given the arduous task of building a World
War II era military bridge spanning more
than 160 feet over the creek that is more
than 12 feet deep during the rainy season.
The project is a humanitarian-assistance
mission sponsored by the U.S. Southern
Command.
It's no easy task for the Operation
Desert Storm veterans, but it is one they
can handle. Bulldozer operators, sol-
diers and Belizean civilians scurry rap-
idly to get the job done in time. It's hot,
dirty and dusty.
Really dusty.
Some soldiers appear to be com-
pletely covered in a thin, red powder.
Belize Defense Force engineers and ci-
vilians supporting the project make the
best of the environment.
"This is an important project for the
Belizeans," said Capt. Mary Spellman,
the unit commander from Marianna, Fla.
"It will provide the Belizeans a year
'round direct route from the western
highway to Dangriga, the second largest
city in Belize.
"Theroad was closed during therainy
season because it was impassable,"
Spellman said. "People had to ford the
river."
"We have poured more than 900 cubic


yards of concrete and moved 280,000
yards of dirt to complete this project,"
said 1st Sgt. Ronald Kercher, a Colorado
Springs resident and 19-year Army vet-
eran.
The Belize Ministry of Works pro-
vides laborers and engineers to supple-
ment Company A.
"We've enjoyed working with the
Belize Defense Force engineers and ci-
vilians," Spellman said. "As a matter of
fact, the finest bulldozer operator I've
seen is a Belizean on this project.
Belize Defense Force engineer Sgt.
Hugh Flowers said: "I've learned a lot
from the North Americans. Especially
how to use new tools like a power wrench,"
he said. "We've been working with manual
tools all our lives."
SSgt. Dale Davis from Salem, Ore.,
was impressed with his Belizean co-
workers.
"These guys picked up the work
quickly. You showed them what to do
and off they went, faster and faster. I
would hire them in a minute," Davis said.
The jungle environment makes the
project difficult, but the soldiers have all
the comforts of home at their nearby base
camp.
Satellite television, washers and dryers
and hot and cold running water can be
found.
Even basketball and volleyball courts
have been made by the engineers for use
during off-duty time.
"The infantry and artillery go to the
field and rough it," Kercher said. "As
engineers we go to the field and live in
comfort."
A Company arrived in Belize two
months ago and are scheduled to return
to the United States at the end of May.









1 O Tropic Times
May 1, 1992


U.S. Army and Honduran engineers work together as they "move mountains"
to make way for a new road in northern Honduras.





Legacy



Joint Task Force 105 keeps

Fuertes Caminos on-line


LAS DELICIAS, Honduras (JTF-105/
PA) - Col. Ralph Howell and the Joint
Task Force 105 staff have been laying
down the 'welcome mat' for the thou-
sands of personnel taking part in Fuertes
Caminos.
JTF 105 is in Honduras and is nearing
last phase of aroad-building project that
began in 1986 to build 55 kilometers of
two-lane gravel road through the moun-
tains of Yoro and San Lorenzo. JTF 105
is building the final 8.2 kilometers of
project down the Macora River Valley,
between the village of Macora and the
AguanRiver.
JTF 105 is a multi-service effort, with
a combination of active, National Guard
and Reserve forces from the Army and
Air Force. The bulk of the personnel are
from the Army National Guard said How-
ell, commander of the 105th Engineer
Group from the North Carolina National
Guard.
Throughout the operation, approxi-
mately 2,000 Air Guard and Reserve, and
more than 6,000 Army National Guard
will serve in Honduras, said Howell. Fort
Kobbe's 536th Engineer Battalion is also
attached to the task force.
The operation was planned for com-
pletion in 1991, but was delayed by Op-


eration Desert Storm, Howell said. Fu-
ertes Caminos is deploying the largest
peacetime contingent of Guard and
Reserve forces outside of the continen-
tal U.S. during recent history, said How-
ell.
Base camp construction began in
November 1991, by an Air Guard Rapid
Engineer Deployable Heavy Operational
Repair Squadron Engineer unit.
RED HORSE built the base village fa-
cilities, which include living quarters,
wells, power and communications set-
ups and camp security facilities.
In addition to billeting tents, there's
an air-conditioned dining facility, awfully
functional deployable medical system
hospital, a provost marshal, chapel, radio
station, water department, sanitation and
waste disposal facilities, small airport,
movie theater with satellite TV, and post
exchange.
"The objectives of the operation are
to enhance readiness of participating
U.S. and host country forces," said Lt.
Col. Barry King, JTF 105's chief of
Public Affairs and Protocol. King also
said to provide reserve component
forces the opportunity to deploy to a
remote location to fulfill their annual
training requirements, and expose them


U.S. Army photos by SFCThomas E. Rusk
A Blackhawk helicopter positions itself over a cement culvert to airlift it to a work
site.


to bare-base tropical training.
"We also want to foster military-to-
military relationships between the United
States and Honduras, and conduct com-
bined engineer training and medical hu-
manitarian civil affairs," he said.
"We have plans for four civic action
projects once we have the bulk of the
road built," said King.
"They include a water upgrade sys-
tem, the addition of one school and repair
of another, and construction of a day-
care center. We are also involved in the
distribution of food, school supplies and
other commodities contributed by our
personnel."
During the exercise the engineers
will move more than 750,000 cubic yards
of dirt, construct 36 concrete and three
steel culverts, place 450,000 cubic yards
of fill, and construct the best 8.2 kilome-
ters of two-lane gravel road that has ever
been built, Howell said.
"When we depart the area in June, we
intend to leave a legacy of a good neigh-


bor and a strong friend," Howell said.
"We want our soldiers to depart with
a greater appreciation of the people of:
this region and a full understanding of
our jobs and missions when undertaking
any future task of this nature."
As of early April the project was ahead
of schedule with more than 65 percent of
the total mission complete. About 40
percent of finished road, or 3.1 kilome-
ters, is finished.
Eighty percent of the concrete cul-
verts are in place and covered over, and
two of the three metal culverts are fin-
ished, Howell said.
"I'm very pleased with the efforts of
our soldiers," Howell said.
"Our engineers are well-trained, hard
workers and really know their jobs. I'm
glad we've been able to complete this
much ahead of the spring rains. With
almost all of the culverts finished, we
feel confident we'll have the road com-
pleted well ahead of the June 19 opening
day ceremony."


Soldier's experience benefits operation


by 2nd LL Carl M. James
658Wh Pubkc Affairs Detachment
LASDELICIAS;Hon-
duras - (Theatre Support
Element) - The Macora
River Valley in Honduras
is a blend of vegetation
and wildlife. The blazing

tropical setting is merci-
less. Hondurans and U.S.
soldiers and airmen are
bearing this heat in order
to make life there a lot
easier by building a road, Nance
bridges, schools, clinics and providing medical care.
The nation-assistance exercise not only provides
the Honduran citizens and farmers better access to
market and medical care, but also offers U.S. citizen-
soldiers and airmen with training in their military
specialities.


The 105th Engineer Group, North Carolina Army
National Guard and the Honduran 1 st Engineer Battal-
ion are participating in "Fuertes Caminos '92-Hondu-
ras."
"Working in a new environment is natonly exciting,
it's at times downright challenging," said Capt. Cecil
Nance of the 105th Engineer Group.
Nance, a civil engineer for McLeod Rigging in Char-
lotte, N.C., draws from his extensive experiences at
home to help guide him through his duties with Joint
Task Force 105. Nance works hand-in-hand with the
Honduran soldiers and civilians to get the job done.
"The Honduran engineers are one of our best assets.
I wish we had another unit like them," said Nance.
Working out of the operations office, Nance is the
officer-in-charge of coordinating and requisitioning the
materials needed to complete the road project. He also
ensures the materials meet the necessary specifications
and are properly used.
"This is without a doubt the best engineering project
I've ever been on," said Nance.
"This type of training just couldn't take place in the


states. I think it's great."
During his six-month tour in Las Delicias, Nance
is coordinating 10 rotations of Army and Air Guard
and Reserve personnel, normally lasting 17 days
each.
Living in a tent and having limited privacy for six
months can take its toll. Nance, who is married and
has two sons is looking forward to going home in
June.
I can't wait to be back home with my family
again," said Nance. "I am just taking it one day at a
time."
The excitement and unpredictability of his job is
keeping him occupied, he said.
The final 8.2 kilometers of the road project is
expected to be the most difficult. Nance must make
quick decisions and use his keen eye in determining
what is mission-essential.
The farm-to-market road is one that will take the
joint effort of dedicated teams. Since his January
arrival, Nance is doing all that he can to make the
exercise a success.


I















-JLL


Sports
SI


May 1, 1992 Quarry Heights, Republic ofPanama Page 11


Moe knows: Football isn't just for boys


Female to play safety
in upcoming season
by SrA. Jackie Ambrose
24th WG/PA
HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA) -
Moe knows...football isn't just a man's
game anymore. But that's not why
Maureen "Moe" Lane is a safety on
the 24th Operational Support Squad-
ron/Air Intelligence Squadron flag
football team.
Lane is the only female who's
signed up to play in the Howard intra-
mural flag football season.
She said she is excited about the
game, but knows it's a far cry from the
days when she'd play stickball and
other games with children in her neigh-
borhood.
"I've always been a tomboy," said
the Philadelphia native. "I love sports
and since the softball season ended, it
seemed only natural for me to tryout
for the football team. It's another way I
could show support for my unit.
"That's the main reason I'm out
here. I don't particularly like all the
drills we go through during our








0


practices, but it comes with the
territory. Since I want to contribute to
the team, I do what the other guys do."
How is her seeming intrusion into a
male sport being handled by her team-
mates?
"I've been treated fine. Whatever
worries some may have had have been
resolved. I think our opposition may
be more uncomfortable with a woman
playing 'their' game.
"This is an intramural game, and
intramural doesn't limit football to just
men," she said.
Lane believes there are other fe-
males who'd like to play football "with
the guys" but who may be a bit wary
about taking that first step. After other
women learn about Lane's foray into
unchartered territory, who knows?
"She shows the same drive and
desire as the rest of the team," said
teammate Arthur Burgess. "Once we
saw how aggressive she was, any doubt
about her intensity was dispelled."
Michael Drummond, the team's
coach, sees it all as business as usual.
He sees team execution and unity as
the key that could take them to the
playoffs.
"I hope we go all the way to the
championship," Lane smiled.


* ...u


Maureen "Moe" Lane


a
~.
V


U.S. Air Force photo by SrA. Jackie Ambroa
discusses moves with coach Michael Drummond.


E



R


Brian-Offerman squats 425 pounds as James Poole spots him. U.S. Air Force photo by Sgt Bil Evans


13 local lifters


compete in meet


HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA) - Thirteen competi-
tors took part in the Howard Sports and Fitness Center
Powerlifting competition Saturday and Sunday.
Participants competed in the squat, bench press and
dead lift. Each person had three attempts in each event.
The totals for each participant were added together and
divided by three. There was a lightweight division for
females, while the men had lightweight, middleweight
and heavyweight divisions.
The overall women's winner was Sandy McMurty in


the female lightweight division with an average lift of
116pounds.
First place in the men's lightweight division, 114 to
149, pounds was Albert Stapleton with an average of
147. Second place was Brian Hand, 143 pounds.
In the medium division, 150 to 199 pounds, James
Poole won with an average of 147, and Danny Kems
was second with 143.
In the heavyweight division, 200 pounds and over,
Isreal Delgado won with 227.


NXI








12 Tropic Times
1. May 1, 1992


DCA stops


617th 52-42


by Spec. John "Gus" Hall
Sports Editor, Tropic Times
FORT CLAYTON (Tropic Times) - The
Directorate of Community Activities Over
30 Men's basketball team used a 19-8 first
half run to take a lead it never relinquished
en route to a 52-42 win over the 617th
Special Operations. Aviation Detachment
here Monday night.
The win improved DCA's record to 3-5..
The 617th fell to 3-4.
The 617th jumped out to a 14-5 advan-
tage led by Antoine Kelley's seven points.
DCA battled back with 6-foot, 6-inch
center Nico de Greefand Lee Weight crash-
ing the boards. DCA's advantage inside
forced the 617th outside. That, and several
traveling calls on the 617th, helped DCA cut
the lead to 18-16 with 6:15 left in the first
half.
DCA had the half's last possession and
took a 25-24 lead when Weight canned a
three-pointer at the buzzer.
Pressure defense by DCA forced the 617th
into bad passes and turnovers. Three con-
secutive baskets by Weight, including a
three-pointer, extended DCA's lead to 37-
26. Jeff Johnson followed Weight's lead,
and scored three in a row, making it 42-27.
That was DCA's biggest lead which forced
the 617th to choose the unsuccessful three-
point route and DCA held on for the 52-42
victory.


U.S. Army photo by Spec. John "Gus Hall
Directorate of Community Activities Lee Weight shoots a jump shot.


Sport Shorts


10K run
A 10Krun will begin at ClubAmador
May 2. Check in time is 6:15 a. m.and the
race begins at 7 a.m. There are eight
categories for men and women. Unit
teams may compete. Trophies will be
awarded for the top three runners in each
category. The first 500 entrants will re-
ceive a race T-shirt. AT&T and the As-
sociation of the U.S. Army are sponsor-
ing the event Call 287-5906/5904/6818,
or stop by Building 212, Fort Clayton for
registration.

Soccer tournament
The Navy Morale Welfare and Rec-
reation Division is sponsoring an End of
Summer Soccer Tournament Saturday
and Sunday at the Rodman soccer field.
Call 283-4222.

Softball tourney
Headquarters and Headquarters
Company, 92nd Military Police Battal-
ion is sponsoring a double-elimination
softball tournament May 8-10 at Fort
Clayton. Call SSgt. Frank Thrower at
287-5349.

Memorial Day sports
Fort Clayton's Reeder Gymnasium is
sponsoring men's and women's open
events in racquetball, table tennis, three-
on-three basketball and free throw/super-
shot May 23-25. Registration ends May
13. Call 287-3861.

Atlantic tourney
Fronius Gymnasium is sponsoring a
Memorial Day double-elimination bas-
ketball tournament May 23-25. Registra-
tion is limited to the first 16 teams to
enter and ends May 19. Call 289-3108.

Mini marathon
Registration for a mini marathon of


the Americas, (13.1 miles) is underway.
The race begins at Fort Davis Gym 7
a.m. May 16. The categories are open,
military, female and over 40. Awards
will be given to the top three runners in
each category.

All-Army golf
All-Army men's and women's golf
trials will be conducted at Fort Gordon,
Ga. Applications must be submitted by
May 15. Applications can be picked up at
the Sports Branch, Building 154 Fort
Clayton. Call 287-4050/5618.

CRD Over-30 Men's
basketball standings
TEAM H L
Posse 9 0
24CS 8 1
H Legit 6 1
106th Night Mix 5 2
1/228thAviators 5 4
24 Supply Flyers 4 3
We're Blessed 4 4
6/17th 3 4
AF All-Stars 3 6
142ndMed. 2 6
DCA 2 5
El Patio 1 6
High Five 0 8
Standings as of Tuesday


Grenald
Menill
Taylor
Brooks
Resse
Gagum

Grenald
Gagum
Wilson
Brooks
Davis
Prudent


Scoring leaders
Posse
II Legit
We're Blessed
1/228thAvn.
142nd Med.
AF All-Stars

Three-pointers
Posse
AF All-Stars
Posse
1/228thAvn.
24 CS
24 CS


26.3
21.4
18.2
15.3
14.4
12.4

17
15
12
10
9
8


j ... -'


U.S. Army photo by Spec. John *Gu" Hall
HIGH DIVE - X-Men third baseman Carl "Stein" Williams Jr. leaps for a line
drive against Wilkie's Warriors during the Desert Storm softball tournament
held Friday and Saturday at Fort Clayton. The Good 01' Boys won the
double-elimination tournament 33-8 over the Marauders.


. . . .. .'
" , ".''. .



i :BB ^^f"'









Tropic Times
May 1, 1992


Gant eyes


3rd straight


30-30 year

ATLANTA (AP) - Ron Gant is trying
to become the first major league player
to have three consecutive seasons of 30
home runs and 30 steals.
If his April output is any indication,
he has a strong shot at reaching that goal.
Willie Mays (1956-57) and Bobby
Bonds (1977-78) are the only other play-
ers to have two consecutive 30-30 years.
Gant, the Atlanta Braves outfielder, did
it in 1990-91.
"I'm not thinking about 30-30, al-
though it's in the back ofmy mind,"
Gant said after Monday night's 5-0 vic-
tory over the Chicago Cubs, in which he
contributed a solo home run and an RBI
single.
"I'm just telling myself to think about
getting base hits. If that happens, the
home runs and stolen bases will come."
Gant, a notoriously slow starter in
past Aprils, is hitting .282 with five home
runs, 17 RBIs and five stolen bases.
Last season, he hit only .162 in April
with one homer and seven RBIs. He
finished the season with a .251 average,
32 homers, 34 stolen bases and 105 RBIs.
In 1990, he hit .200 with no homers
and one RBI in April, but finished the
year at .303 with 32 homers, 33 stolen


AP Lu fPhoto
Willie Mays (1956-57) and Bobby Bonds (1977-78) are the only other players
to have two consecutive 30-30 years. Ron Gant, the Atlanta Braves outfielder,
did it in 1990-91.


bases and 84 RBIs.
Gant, *.right-handed hitter, worked
this spring on hitting the ball to right field
rather than trying to pull everything to
left.
His RBI single Monday night was to
right, and he also had a run-scoring single
to right Saturday in a2-0 win over Hous-
ton.
"I wouldn't have done that last year,
but I worked on it in the spring and feel I
can hit over .300 again if I do those
things," he said.
"I've been especially bad in previous
April ... but I was ready this year to
change that.


"I'm just a little smarter. ... Last year
I wouldn't do things like hit to right."
Gant said Braves batting coach Clar-
ence Jones told him he would be much
more successful if he used the whole
field. "He told me if I did that correctly,
I'd have-better numbers," Gant said.
"I had more than 100 RBIs last year
and had a terrible first month. Now, I'm
almost at 20 RBIs. There's no telling
what I can do. My best months have
always come in the second half.
"The game is to score runs, and every
time I drive in a run it's exciting. RBIs
and runs are the things that should be
looked at. That's money."


NHL playoff notes


STATS
New Jersey's line of Claude
Lemieux, Peter Stastny and Zdeno
Ciger combined for four goals in
the Devils' 5-3 victory over the New
York Rangers in Game 6 on Wednes-
day night. Stastny had two goals
and Lemiuex and Ciger added goals.
The Rangers, who have not won
the Stanley Cup since 1940, have
been in four seven-game series in
their 65-year history and lost every
one.

SWINGS
Pittsburgh beat Washington 6-4
and Buffalo routed Boston 9-3 on
Wednesday night to force seventh
games in their series after trailing 3.
1. Detroit and Vancouver also force
seventh games after trailing 3-1
Only eight teams in.NHL history
have rallied to win a series after
falling behind 3-1.

SLUGFEST
Referee Denis Morel handed out
118 minutes in penalties and game
misconduct penalties to Scott Ste-
vens and Peter Stastny of New Jer-
sey and Jeff Beukeboom and Tie
Domi of New York after a brawl
following the Devils' 5-3 victory in
Game 6 on Wednesday night.

STARS
Mario Lemieux, Penguins, scored
two goals and had three assists as
defending Stanley Cup champion
Pittsburgh beat visiting Washing-
ton 6-4 in Game 6 of the Patrick
Division series.
Frank Pietrangelo and Yvon Cor-
riveau, Whalers. Pietrangelo made
42 saves and Corriveau scored 24
seconds into overtime as Hartford
beat visiting Montreal 2-1 to force
Game 7 in the Adams Division se-
ries.
Chris Terreri, Devils, made 27
saves as New Jersey defeated the


APLaserPhoto
Mario Lemieux, Penguins, scored two goals and had three assists as
defending Stanley Cup champion Pittsburgh beat visiting Washington
6-4 in Game 6 of the Patrick Division series.


visiting New York Rangers 5-3 in
Game 6 of the Patrick Division series.
Pat LaFontaine, Sabres, scored
two second-period goals - his sixth
and seventh of the playoffs - and
added two assists as Buffalo beat
visiting Boston 9-3 to force Game 7
in the Adams Division series.

STOPPED
Ron Fischer, Raimond Hilger,
Andreas Niederberger, Dieter He-
gen and Andreas Brockmann scored
goals as Germany defeated the United
States 5-3 in the World Champion-
ships on Wednesday in Prague,
Czechoslovakia. Chris Winnes, Paul
Ranheim and Joe Sacco scored for
the United States. In other Pool A
games, Finland routed Poland 11-2
and Sweden and Italy played a score-
less tie.

SUIT
NHL president John Ziegler said


he has forbidden Russian players to
join their homeland's national team
while the former Soviet Army team
is suing the Detroit Red Wings. Ziegler
testified Wednesday for nearly six
hours in the U.S. District Court case
in which Russian officials are trying
to have Viacheslav Kozlov's con-
tract with the Red Wings ruled inva-
lid. Ziegler said the NHL allows
foreign players to join their national
teams as "a matter of cooperation,"
and the league is not contractually
bound to do so.

SANCTIONS UPHELD
The NCAA has denied an appeal
from the University of Wisconsin to
overturn penalties imposed after its
5-3 loss to Lake Superior State in the
national championship game. The
NCAA suspended coach Jeff Sauer
and players Blaine Moore and Jason
Zent from the Badgers' next NCAA
tournament game.


13


Baseball standings*

NATIONAL LEAGUE

EAST W L Per. GB
PrrrsauRGH 15 5 .750 --
Nw YoRK 12 9 .571 3.5
ST. Louis 11 10 .524 4.5
PHIm.ADLMA 10 12 .455 6
MONMIsAL 8 14 .364 8
CHICAGO 7 13 .350 8

WEST
SAN Dmoo 12 10 .545 -
CNCINNATI 11 10 .524 .5
S AN FANasco 11 10 .524 .5
AILANrA 11 11 SD 1
HOUSTON 10 10 .500 1
Los ANOmES 9 13 .409 3

AMERICAN LEAGUE
EAST
TORONTO 12 4 .727 -
NEw YoRK 13 8 .619 2.5
BALIMIORB 13 8 .619 2.5
BOSTON 9 9 .500 5
MILWAUKEE 9 9 .500 5
CLEBVLAND 8 14 .364 8
Dm'Rorr 7 13 .350 8

WEST
OAKLAND 13 8 .619 -
TeXAS 13 10 .565 1
CHICAGO 10 8 .556 1.5
CALIFORNIA 10 10 .500 2.5
SBATnoB 10 11 .476 3
MINNESOTA 9 12 .429 4
KAAsA Crry 3 17 .150 9.5
* Through Wednesday's games


Alomar, Pendleton
week's top players
NEW YORK (AP) - All-Star second baseman
Roberto Alomar of the Toronto Blue Jays won his
first American League player of the week award
on Monday.
The 24-year-old Alomar batted .600 with a
league-leading 15 hits during the seven-day pe-
riod ending Sunday. He had a home run and a
double, and scored seven runs.
Alomar also led the league last week with a
.643 on-base percentage and drove in nine runs.
At one point during the week, he hit safely in
seven straight at-bats and reached safely in nine
consecutive plate appearances.
Terry Pendleton of the Atlanta Braves, the
National League's Most Valuable Player last season,
was named on Monday as the league's player of
the week.
Pendleton had 12 hits in 23 at-bats during the
seven-day period ending Sunday. He had four
doubles and a home run, a .500 on-base percent-
age and an .826 slugging percentage.
Pendleton had a career-high six RBI on April
20 at San Diego.

Ruth's 60th HR ball
leaves owner's family
ATLANTA, Ga. (AP) - The baseball that flew
into the stands when Babe Ruth hit his record-
setting 60th home run in 1927 is finally leaving
the family of the fan who caught it.
George Siegel, who inherited the ball from his
father in 1977, said Monday the ball will be auc-
tioned off Saturday in San Francisco.
Siegel said his father, Herb, then 14 years old,
caught the ball in the right field stands at Yankee
Stadium in what he described as a mad scramble
on Sept. 30, 1927. The homer broke the record of
59 Ruth had established in 1921.
"Afterwards he was throwing-it up and playing
catch," Siegel said. When his uncle, who had
taken him to the game, realized it was the record-
setting ball, he took it away, Siegel said.
"They wound up in the dugout with Ruth and
Lou Gehrig," Siegel said.
Ruth offered his father $5 and another base-
ball, Siegel said.
"Dad wanted to take it," Siegel said, but his
uncle wouldn't let him.










1 4 Tropic Times
1 May 1,1992



Bird-less Boston making playoff run

by Spec. John "Gus" Hall
Sports Editor, Tropic Times -M.AI aF d r_ ..


NOBODY ASKED ME,
BUT...How the Boston Celtics
continue to win without Larry
Bird remains a hoops mystery.
Boston won its last eight regular
season games without its star
forward. That streak helped oust
the New York Knicks from first
place - a spot they held for *
most of the year. And now, the
Celtics have swept the Indiana Pacers without so
much as a blink of an eye.
Boston does have Kevin McHale and Robert
Parish. They're past their prime but someone forgot
to tell them.
Other teams could not win without their star
players. Take San Antonio for example. The Spurs
lost center David Robinson late in the season and
have yet to recover. Houston lost center Hakeem
Olajuwon late in the season and couldn't even grasp
the eighth and final playoff spot.
The Bulls may be the only other team that could
win without their star player. Take Michael Jordan
away and Chicago might sweep Indiana. Chicago
didn't always have that luxury. There was a time
when the Bulls couldn't make the playoffs with
Jordan. Those were the days.
The Lakers have showed the same kind of forti-
tude Boston has. The Lakers didn't win their divi-
sion, but the Western Conference is much stronger
than the Eastern. The Lakers were lucky to make the
playoffs, getting there by default, as Houston lost its
last three. The Lakers lost Magic Johnson, James
Worthy and Sam Perkins, yet made the big dance for
the 16th straight year.
What makes the Celtics and Lakers different from
other NBA teams is tradition. Former Lakers' coach
Pat Riley instilled stability at the coaching position
for nearly a decade. Jimmy Rodgers and K.C. Jones
were also well-known coaches for the Celtics around
the league. In the NBA today, if a coach doesn't win
in his first or second year, he gets fired. The Lakers
- I


APLaserPhoto
Boston's Larry Bird (center) has spent the last 11 games watching his team win game after game without;
his services.


and Celtics have kept the tradition of giving their
coaches time. That tradition yields championship
banners.
Good benches filled with players no one else
wants helps too. Every year that Bird gets injured
around playoff time, someone rises to the occasion.
from nowhere. Lately, John Bagley has fit that role.
Bagley scored 14 points and had 11 assists in game
three against Indiana. Reggie Lewis scored 28 of his
32 points in the first half. That wouldn't happen with
Bird in the lineup.
What would happen with Bird in the lineup? If the


Denver chooses


Maddox for future

DENVER (AP) - Can the Denver Broncos' youth move-
ment be far off? Perhaps not.
But don't look for it to begin soon, at least not by design,
despite the team's first-round draft selection Sunday of quar-
terback Tommy Maddox.
Maddox is only 20, having entered the draft after his
sophomore season. And, although his first-round selection is
likely to cost the Broncos dearly in terms of a contract and
signing bonus, the team is content to let Maddox sit on the
bench for several seasons-- perhaps as many as five- until
quarterback John Elway retires. Elway turns 32 this summer.
Coach Dan Reeves made it clear that he wants to bring
Maddox along slowly.
"This is definitely a pick for the future," Reeves said.
"John will be around for a number of years. Tommy won't
have to step in right away and play the way John did. There
will be time for him to learn the system and develop."
Was their selection of Maddox in the first round a reach?
Yes. Most draft analysts had Maddox, because of his youth,
rated as a second- or third-rounder.
But let Reeves explain.
When it came their turn to make the 25th selection in the
first round, the Broncos debated several prospects, but the
choice boiled down between Maddox and Tennessee wide
receiver Carl Pickens.
"It was a tough decision because we thought Pickens could
help us right away," Reeves admitted. "We just feel Tommy
is a franchise-type quarterback we couldn't pass up."
Reeves also said the 6-foot-4,195-pound Maddox was the
highest-rated player left on the the board when Denver made
its selection. "We thought there would be somebody left on
the board above him, but there wasn't," he said.
. After taking Maddox, the Broncos went for another under-
classman in the second round, claiming 21-year-old Shane
Dronett, a 6-5, 270-pound defensive lineman from Texas who
had a total of 19 sacks the last two seasons. Denver had no
third-round choice, having traded it to Detroit last year for
offensive tackle Harvey Salem.
The Broncos took another Texas player with their fourth-
round pick -- 6-3, 280-pound offensive lineman Chuck
,Johnson. '


Celtics can win a division title and playoff series
without Bird's services most of the time, imagine
what they could do with a healthy Bird. In the
Eastern Conference, they might make it to the final.
First thing's first, Boston has to get by the playoff
dark horse Cleveland Cavaliers.
Cleveland may be following the path Boston and
Los Angeles have. The Cavs have been winning
consistently, finishing second only to the Bulls.
Coach Lenny Wilkens' job is very secure. Injuries
have taken their toll on Cleveland. Once they learn to
overcome them maybe they can beat - DA BULLS.


Tommy Maddox had two productive years as UCLA's
starting quarterback. He threw for 2,682 yards, 17 touch-
downs and 14 interceptions as a freshman, then passed for
2,505 yards, 16 TDs and 15 interceptions last season.

With their fifth-round choice, they took 5-10, 176-pound
defensive back Frank Robinson of Boise State, who also will be
tried as a kick returned.
The draft resumed Monday with rounds six through 12, but
the Broncos immediately traded away their No. 6 choice for the
New York Jets' picks in the seventh and eighth rounds.
That gave Denver three choices in the seventh - their own,
the Jets' and a pick obtained from Tampa Bay in the trade of
Ricky Nattiel.
With their first No. 7, the Broncos selected 6-5, 272-pound
defensive lineman Ron Geater of Iowa. Then they went for
another offensive lineman, taking 6-5,300-pound Jim Johnson
of Michigan State. Finally, they claimed 6-1, 190-pound wide
receiver Jon Bostick of Nebraska.
The Broncos entered the draft seeking a quarterback of the
future, an offensive left tackle, a wide receiver, a defensive
lineman and a cornerback. They appeared to have filled four of


Those needs on Sunday,.


Analysts question

Bengals selecting

Klingler in first
CINCINNATI (AP) - The Cin-
cinnati Bengals, who had the NFL's
worst defense last season, said they
expected some second-guessing af-
ter drafting Houston quarterback
David Klingler in the first round.
ESPN draft analysts were puzzled.
Fans at one Cincinnati sports bar
booed.
The Bengals, who already have
one ofthe league's established quar-
terbacks in Boomer Esiason, said
Sunday they're looking ahead but
are committed to their star.
"This is a bit of a daring move, in
a way, on ourpart," general manager
Mike Brown said. "We thought long
and hard about it. It wasn't an easy
choice. We don't expect him to re-
place Boomer. It's going to be a
gradual transition.
"We know that this is a gamble,"
he added. "... Give us a little time to
make it work. In the long haul, it's a
good move for us."
Coach Dave Shula called it a choice
for the long-run. "Boomer is our
guy," he said.
Klingler said he was grateful for
the chance to learn from Esiason.
"It's great to know that the team's
not going to throw you to the lions.
I'm going to get myself ready to play
right away. I've got a lot to learn,"
he said.
Klingler has 51 NCAA records,
including 54 touchdowns and 5,140
yards in 1990. Last season, he had 29
touchdowns and 3,388 yards.


' .










Tropic Times
May 1, 1992 A
"uow


Blazers Duckworth calls


Lakers Divac a wimp


INGLEWOOD, Calif. (AP) - Vlade
Divac knows enough English slang to
understand what the word wimp means.
Not surprisingly, he didn't appreciate
being called one by Kevin Duckworth.
Duckworth outscored Divac 27-15 in
the first two games of the Western Con-
ference first-round playoff series between
Portland and the Los Angeles Lakers,
helping the Blazers win twice decisively.
In between those games at Portland,
Duckworth, the Blazers' center, com-
plained that Divac was flopping in at-
tempts to draw offensive fouls and called
the Lakers' center a wimp.
"I was so mad," Divac, a Yugoslav-
ian, said. "I couldn't believe he called
me that. I never could say that, even if he
was, let's say, a wimp."
The Blazers often double-teamed Divac
in the first two games, a factorin the one-
sided victories. In the Western Confer-
ence finals last year, Divac got the better
of Duckworth and the Lakers won the
series 4-2.
"The way people perceive Vlade, if
they can beat him up early and get to him
early and pound him and pound him, then
he's not going to have a good game,"
Lakers coach Mike Dunleavy said.
"He's got to get through that.
"But I think this has been somewhat


of an aberration. The way they're play-
ing Vlade-in the past it wouldn't have
bothered us because we had guys in the
other spots who could make you pay the
price.
"We're not capable of doing as much
now. It can't be all on his shoulders, but
he's got to play harder and he's got to be
ready for more physical play."
Magic Johnson retired in November
because he had contracted the virus that
causes AIDS, and'James Worthy and
Sam Perkins are unavailable because of
injuries.
So instead of Johnson, Worthy and
Perkins starting along with Divac and
Byron Scott, it's been Divac, Scott, A.C.
Green, Elden Campbell and Sedale Threatt.
The Lakers made the playoffs only
because they won their final two games
of the regular season while the Houston
Rockets were losing their final three.
Only three teams in NBA history have.
come back from a 2-0 deficit to win a
best-of-5 series, and no eighth-seeded
team has beaten a top-seeded team since
the current playoff format was adopted in
1984.
In addition, the Blazers won both games
between the teams at the Forum this
season, and the Lakers weren't excep-
tionally strong at home, going 24-17.


APLawerPhoto
Los Arigeles Lakers Vlade Divac has the ball knocked away from him by Port-
land's Cliff Robinson.-Divac is upset because Robinson's teammate Kevin
Duckworth called him a wimp.


APLwoPhoa
Detief Schrempf (left) tries to shoot over Los Angeles Lakers' Mychal Thompson during a 1988 game.


NBA names Schrempf

league's best 6th man
NEW YORK (AP) - Detlef Schrempf, the versatile
Indiana Pacers forward, was named winner of the
NBA's Sixth Man Award Monday for the second season
in a row.
He and Kevin McHale of the Boston Celtics are the
only players to win the award in consecutive years.
Ricky Pierce of the Milwaukee Bucks is the only
other two-time winner in the award's 10-year history.
McHale won his awards in 1984 and 1985. Pierce
won in 1987 and in 1990.
Schrempf averaged 17.3 points, 9.6 rebounds and
3.9 assists per game and was a key factor late in the
season and helped get the Pacers into the playoffs for a
third straight season.
Schrempf, who is 6-foot-10, received 54 of a pos-
sible 96 votes from a nationwide panel of sportswriters
and broadcasters, three from each league city.
Sarunas Marciulionis of Golden State finished sec-
ond with 21 votes, edging Dan Majerle of Phoenix, last
year's runnerup, by two votes.
Tyrone CorbinofUtah and John Starks of New York
each received one vote.
Schrempf came off the bench in 76 of the 80 games
he played for Indiana this year, his seventhin the NBA.
He led the team in rebounding and established career
highs in rebounding, scoring assists and free throw per-
centage, shooting .828 from the foul line.
"There's not a better sixth man in the world," Pacers
coach Bob Hill said. "If there is, I'd like to see him."


Jordan's 56


buries Heat


119-114


SCORING
Michael Jordan's 56-point perform-
ance on Wednesday night in the Bulls'
119-114 victory at Miami matched the
third-highest scoring total in NBA play-
off history Jordan, whose 63 points against
Boston in double-overtime on April 20,
1986, ranks as the highest, also set a
record by scoring 135pointsinthethree-
game sweep of the Heat, eclipsing his
131 against Boston in 1986.

SWEEPS
With their 121-119 overtime victory
over Portland on Wednesday night, the
LA. Lakers avoided being swept in a
playoff series for the first time since the
1989 NBA Finals, when Detroit beat
them in four straight games.

SOME HORNS FOR BUCK
Portland rebounded a miss by Byron


Scott of the Lakers in the final seconds
and had a sweep within its sights, but
Trail Blazers forward Buck Williams
missed a driving layup in the final sec-
onds and the Blazers couldn't get another
shot off. The Lakers won 121-119 in
overtime.

SWISH!
Chicago was 13 for 13 from the free-
throwlineinthe fourthquarterofits 119-
114 victory at Miami on Wednesday
night. The Heat also made 13 free throws
in the final quarter, but missed seven
others.... Byron Scott of the Lakers was
10 for 10 from the line in LA's 121-119
overtime victory over Portland.

STARS
Kevin Johnson and Jeff Hornacek,
Suns: Johnson had 22 points and 11 as-
sists and Hornacek added 22 points and


three steals as Phoenix completed a three-
game sweep of San Antonio with a 101-
92 victory. Johnson and Hornacek scored
11 points each in the final quarter, when
the rest of the Suns had two points.

DEFENSE AWARD
David Robinson of San Antonio, who
averaged a league-high 4.49 blocks and
ranked fifth with 2.32 steals per game,
was named the NBA's Defensive Player
of the Year on Wednesday. Robinson
received 46 of the 96 votes from a panel
ofswriters and broadcasters to edge two-
time winner Dennis Rodman of Detroit
by seven votes.

SUPERB IN DEFEAT
Clyde Drexlr of Portland had 42points,
including 13 in overtime, 12 assists and
nine rebounds in 46 minutes of the Trail
Blazers' 121-119 loss to the Lakers.










16 Tropic Times
16May 1,F1992


Air Force extends separation program


Officials expect officer RIF

board despite expanded

eligibility requirements

WASHINGTON (AirForce News Service) - The Air
Force will accept voluntary separation incentive and
special separation benefit applications through May 29
because of a lower than needed response to the VSI.
Personnel officials said they're taking the step to
minimize the scope of any involuntary reduction in
forWe.
The programs are also being expanded to include
more people not previously eligible in Phase I of the
program, which ended April 15.
After closing the original VSI and SSB offer, the Air
Force found it still needed nearly 3,800 officer applica-
tions and almost 2,800 enlisted applications. To meet
required end-strengths, the AirForce was hoping to get
7,500 officers and 24,000 enlisted members to take the
offers.
Without extending VSI and SSB, these numbers
would translate to officer and enlisted involuntary re-
duction in force requirements. Officials hope to reduce
or eliminate these RIFs by getting as many volunteers as
possible.
Officials were particularly concerned by the low
officer acceptance of the initial VSI and SSB offers.
The incentive generated only 50 percent of the required
number of separations.
Unless Phase II generates additional applications, an
officer RIF will be necessary, officials said.
"One of the major objectives in attempting to meet
our congressionally mandated end strengths has been to


by Maritza G. Pearce
USARSO Public Affairs Office
SANTA ANA, LOS SANTOS PROV-
INCE (USARSO PAO) - Task Force
Badger has completed 60 percent of their
assigned projects, said Col. Rodger Brill,
Task Force Badger commander.
"With the completion of each project,
we know that we are strengthening the
bonds of friendship between the people
of Panama and the U.S. It gives us great
satisfaction to know that the work we
have done will survive 10 to 12 years,"
Brill told a group of corporate members
of the Association of the U.S. Army who
were visiting two Fuertes Caminos-'9-2
projects in Los Santos Province.
The cost of materials perproject is be-
tween $600 to $1,900, Brill added.
The group was transported by three
helicopters provided by the 128th Avia-
tion Brigade and Task Force Badger to
school construction sites in Santa Ana


avoid involuntarily separating any Air Force mem-
bers," said Brig. Gen. Tony Robertson, Air Force direc-
tor of personnel plans. "Our expectation, on the enlisted
side, is that this expanded program will allow us to
reach our target.
"On the officer side, we are far less optimistic. And
although every application is welcome and willhelp,
and although we continue to search for alternatives, we
have had no choice but to begin preparations for a RIF
board," Robertson said.
A RIF board has been tentatively scheduled to meet
July 20 at the AirForce Military Personnel Center, Ran-
dolph AFB, Texas. The proposed eligible population
includes company grade, reserve, non-line pilot offi-
cers in the 1981 to 1989 year groups and all reserve
captains in the 1980 year group.
Officers in this group who are major selectees, have
approved separation dates prior to Dec. 31, or have 15
or more years of service as of Dec. 31, will not be RIF
eligible. Officers who will be considered by the RIF
board will be notified soon.
Under the expansion of the program, all officers
eligible for VSI or SSB in Phase I remain eligible in
Phase II. Phase II expands eligibility to regular com-
pany grade, non-pilot line officers, and to once-de-
ferred captains and deferred majors in selected medical
and dental skills.
Officers eligible under the original Phase I criteria
may still apply to separate by Dec. 31. To help meet
fiscal year end-strengths, however, new Phase II eli-
gibles must separate from the service by Sept. 29.
With the exception of some enlisted skills that met
their targets in Phase I, orin which furtherlosses cannot
be absorbed, most enlisted people eligible in Phase I
remain eligible in Phase II.
Phase II expands eligibility to sergeants in tier one;


and Llano Largo. The Governor of Los
Santos, Jose Antonio Burgos, met the
visitors at each project. Teachers, chil-
dren and parents also enthusiastically
greeted the visitors.
"I will always keep in my heart my
deepest appreciation," said Burgos. "I
am proud to let everyone know that the
people in Los Santos Province are grate-
ful for the help we are receiving from the
U.S. Army."
Los Santos Educational Director Vir-
gilio Escalona said, "Thanks to the coop-
erative efforts of the government of Pan-
ama and.the U.S., a total of 21 schools
have been repaired in Los Santos Prov-
ince."


Busy at each project site is Capt. John
Novak and hisworkforce of 181 engineer
soldiers, 90 supporting specialists, six
Panamanian government employees and
scores of volunteers. Novak's team is
completing the last nine projects in Los
Santos and Herrera provinces.
"Volunteers are extremely skillful, es-
pecially in the masonry work," said Novak.
"Panamanian volunteers take the lead in
painting and landscaping. We are learn-
ing construction techniques from each
other," he said.
Materials are being purchased locally
which brings cash into the province where
each project is located.
By the end of June, the Fuertes Cami-


"One of the major objec-
tives in attempting to meet
our congressionally mandated
end strengths has been to

avoid involuntarily separating

any Air Force members."
Robertson
Director of personnel plans

therefore, all E-4 with nine through 19 years of service,
regardless of skill or tier, are eligible. Staff sergeants in
tier one non-selective re-enlistment bonus, non-medi-
cal and non-dental skills are also eligible.
Technical sergeants and above in tiers two through
five are also eligible, unless they are in skills which
already met their Phase I target, or from which further
losses cannot be taken.
Personnel officials are cautioning enlisted people in
former tier one skills and in skills near their targets to
apply early.
"Applications in all open, skills will be accepted on
a first-come, first-served basis," Robertson said. "As
the numbers of applications in particular skills reach
their target, we will close those skills to further applica-
tions and notify the field accordingly."
The basic rules and benefits in effect during Phase I
will apply during the extension. Officer separation
dates, however, will differ under each program.


nos '92 program will complete 335 engi-
neer projects and 24 Medical Readiness
Training Exercises in Panama's remote
areas.
The appreciation of these combined
humanitarian efforts were vividly ex-
pressed by members of the AUSA and
the task force commander.
"On behalf of my wife and myself I
would like to express my gratitude for
what you are doing," said corporate
member Paul Smith Alegre. "I congratu-
late you on a job well done."
AUSA members make sure the visit-
ing engineers from the U.S. Army Re-
serves and National Guard are welcomed
to Panama. One of the first signs of hos-
pitality they see is a banner that spells it
out - "Welcome to Panama." Before
any work begins, the AUSA makes sure
that welcome is remembered by throw-
ing a picnic bash for them.
"This is very special to our soldiers,"
said Brill.


Appreciation week recognizes


local Army volunteer workers

by Spe.JmesY u-the majority of the station's work
by Spec. James Yocum force are volunteers, Simmons said.
USARSO Public Affairs Office The Red Cross offices at Gorgas
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO Army Community Hospital and at
PAO) - U.S. Army South recog- Fort Davis are all-volunteer staffs.
nized its shadow work force this Volunteering allows a worker to
week with Volunteer Appreciation . gain experience for resumes as
Week, which ends with a luncheon well as helping others, said Terri
for volunteers at Club Amador to- 3 Johnson, a Red Cross volunteer case
day at 10 a.m. worker.
The USARSO work force has - "I just want to feel helpful,"
approximately 400 volunteers who 7 Johnson said. "I see a lot of people
help fill in the spaces left by down- -stuckinsituations they can't get out
sizing and budget cuts, said Bob-- of and I know how that feels."
Appin, installation volunteer coor- _ t. Volunteers affect the USARSO
dinator for U.S. Army Garrison. - , community in other ways as well.
Volunteers fill roles in many areas U.S.ArmyphotoySp.JamesYocum In the recent Music and Theater
such as the Red Cross office. Mildred Davila, Red Cross volun- children's production of "Robin
"If we didn't have volunteers,ross o Hood," more than 45 volunteers
we wouldn't do a tenth of the work -eer lent their time and experience said
we do now," said Gene Simmons, assistant station Kathey Foote of the Pacific Theatre Arts Centre.
manager for the Red Cross office on Fort Clayton. For information on becoming a volunteer, call 287-
There are a few paid workers at the Red Cross, but 6109.


Task Force Badger's work


'strengthening friendships'


Recertify allowances
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - Sol-
diers that have not recertified either their Basic
Allowance for Quarters or Variable Housing Al-
lowance by June 5 will risk losing them.
Soldiers receiving the allowances are required
to complete recertification forms annually. The
forms are available at each unit's Personnel
Administration Center.

Power outage scheduled
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - There
will be an electrical power outage May 2 from 8
a.m. to 2 p.m. to upgrade the electrical distribu-
tion system.
The areas affected will be:
Building 3 - 17, 22 - 26
Building 100 - 196 (except 154 - 157)
Building 200 - 224
Building 300 - 385
Building 394,452, 454,456,457
Building 804 - 843
Fort Clayton Elementary School, Jarman Field,
Bowling Alley, PX Garage and the Detention Fa-
cility (Building 172).
For more information call Leyroy Skinner,
285-5708/6119.











_ ETropictivities

May 1, 1992 An entertainment guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page B1


Chi-Hsiu Yang leads riders into the river. For story and photos see page B5.


Movies
Radio Flyer cruises into
Howard. See page B2.


Car
Ford Taurus LX: tough to
beat. See page B4.


Inside
TV ....................................... B3
CPO........................................ B4
Ads............. ....................... B10


u.S. Army pnoto y SgtL lpmp u. uark











B2 Tropic Times
- B May 1, 1992

Movies


HOWARD
Today
7pm The Adventures Of The Great Mouse Detective
(G) Animated
9pm The Adventures Of The Great Mouse Detective
(G) Animated
Saturday
2pm The Adventures Of The Great Mouse Detective
(G) Animated
6:30pm The Hand That Rocks The Cradle (R)
Rebecca De Momay
8:30pm The Hand That Rocks The Cradle (R)
Rebecca De Momay
Sunday
2pm The Adventures Of The Great Mouse Detective
(G) Animated
6:30pm The Hand That Rocks The Cradle (R)
Rebecca De Momay
8:30pm The Hand That Rocks The Cradle (R)
Rebecca De Momay
Monday
7pm The Hand That Rocks The Cradle (R)
Rebecca De Mornay
9pm The Hand That Rocks The Cradle (R)
Rebecca De Momay
Tuesday
7pm The Hand That Rocks The Cradle (R)
Rebecca De Momay
9pm The Hand That Rocks The Cradle (R)
Rebecca De Mornay
Wednesday
7pm Radio Flyer (PG-13) Lorraine Bracco, John
Heard
9pm Radio Flyer (PG-13) Lorraine Bracco, John
Heard
Thursday
7pm Star Trek VI (PG) William Shatner, Leonard
Nimoy
9pm Star Trek VI (PG) William Shatner, Leonard
Nimoy
May 8
7pm Star Trek VI (PG) William Shatner, Leonard
Nimoy
9pm Star Trek VI (PG) William Shatner, Leonard
Nimoy

CLAYTON
Today
7pm Juice (R) Omar Epps, Kahill Kain
9pm Juice (R) Omar Epps, Kahill Kain
Saturday
2pm Stop Or My Mom Will Shoot (PG-13)
Sylvester Stallone
6:30pm Stop Or My Mom Will Shoot (PG-13)
Sylvester Stallone
8:30pm Stop Or My Mom Will Shoot (PG-13)
Sylvester Stallone
Sunday
2pm Stop Or My Mom Will Shoot (PG-13)
Sylvester Stallone
6:30pm Stop Or My Mom Will Shoot (PG-13)
Sylvester Stallone
8:30pm Stop Or My Mom Will Shoot (PG-13)
Sylvester Stallone
Monday
7pm Stop Or My Mom Will Shoot (PG-13)
Sylvester Stallone
9pm Stop Or My Mom Will Shoot (PG- 13)
Sylvester Stallone
Tuesday
7pm Father Of The Bride (PG) Steve Martin, Diane
Keaton
9pm Father Of The Bride (PG) Steve Martin, Diane
Keaton
Wednesday
7pm Gate 2 (R) Lewis Tripp, Simon Raynolds


9pm Gate 2 (R) Lewis Tripp, Simon Raynolds
Thursday
7pm Gate 2 (R) Lewis Tripp, Simon Raynolds
9pm Gate 2 (R) Lewis Tripp, Simon Raynolds
May 8
7pm The Adventures Of The Great Mouse Detective
(G) Animated
9pm The Adventures Of The Great Mouse Detective
(G) Animated

DAVIS
Today
7pm Medicine Man (PG-13) Sean Connery, Lorraine
Bracco
Saturday
7pm Hard Promises (PG) Sissy Spacek, William
Peterson
9pm The Prince Of Tides (R) Barbra Streisand, Nick
Nolte
Sunday
7pm The Prince Of Tides (R) Barbra Streisand, Nick
Nolte
Monday
7pm . The Prince Of Tides (R) Barbra Streisand, Nick
Nolte
Tuesday
7pm Into The Sun (R) Anthony Michael Hall,
Michael Pare
Wednesday
7pm Into The Sun (R) Anthony Michael Hall,
Michael Pare
Thursday
7pm Juice (R) Omar Epps, Kahill Kain


May 8
7pm Juice (R) Omar Epps, Kahill Kain

SHERMAN
Today
7:30pm The Last Boy Scout (R) Bruce Willis, Damon
Wayans
Saturday
7:30pm Curly Sue (PG) Jim Belushi, Kelly Lynch
Sunday ,
7:30pm Grand Canyon (R) Danny Glover, Kevin Kline
Thursday
7:30pm Frankie & Johnny (R) Michelle Pfeiffer
May 8
7:30pm Medicine Man (PG-13) Sean Connery, Lorraine
Bracco

AMADOR
Today
7pm The Addams Family (PG-13) Angelica Houston,
Christopher Lloyd
Saturday
7pm Shining Through (R) Michael Douglas, Melanie
Griffith
Sunday
7pm Little Man Tate (PG) Jodie Foster, Dianne West
Thursday
7pm Shining Through (R) Michael Douglas, Melanie
Griffith
May 8
7pm The Last Boy Scout (R) Bruce Willis, Damon
Wayans


Now showing


WAIZqW Ep PICTURES
presents



7&j/ldwt~au 0/


WALT DISNEY PICTURES......."THE ADVENTURES OF THE GREAT MOUSE DETECTIVE" ,,,... ........... SILVER SCREEN PARTNERS II
GENERAL AUDIENCES ...."-""""*.""- .".......,EVE TITUS...PAUL GALDONE ......HENRY MANCINI nm
All0Age AdmittesdA t .1I a ItpUI ITlll PIC I0II U TI 0 lM i e c1 T TIi, Wll i 011w 1 i C r|lll SOUPOh MIIlA Rl 0 1 11SARSA l COMl Cfll SACI I 01lS 1 CUSIE



Howard Theater, today, Saturday, Sunday.

Clayton Theater, May 8.


SCN FM radio schedule


Weekdays
5:05-9am The Morning Show (local,
live)
9:05-10am Charlie Tuna (top 40 hits)
10:05-11am Gene Price (country/western)
11:05-lpm Midday Show (local, live)
1:05-2pm Don Tracy (urban contempo-
rary)
2:05-3pm Laurie Allen (classic rock)
3:05-4pm Harry Newman (country/west-
ern)
4:05-6pm Afternoon Drive (local, live)
6:05-7pm Larita Shelby (urban con-
temporary)
7:05-9pm The Rock Block (local, live)
9:05-10pm Mary Turner (album oriented
rock)


10:05-11pm Joe Reiling New Rock
11:05-11:30pm Jim Pewter Oldies
11:30-Midnight Jazz Beat
Midnight-5am SCN Ovemite - Adult Rock &
Roll (UNISTAR)
Midnight-6am Friday - SCN Overnite

Saturday
6:05-7am Golden Days of Radio (nostal-
gia)
7:05-8am Off the Record (album
oriented rock)
8:05-10am The Countdown (urban con-
temporary)
10:05-Noon Morning Show (local, live)
12:05-4pm American Top 40 (contem-
porary hit radio)


4:05-6pm Saturday Golden Oldies (local,
live)
6:05-8pm Canal Country (local, live)
Country & Western
8:05-11pm American Dance Trax (dance
music)
11:05-Midnight In the Studio (album oriented
rock)
Midnight-6am SCN Overnight


6:05-6:30am
6:30-7:00am
7:05-7:30am
7:30-8am
8:05-9am
9:05-10am


Sunday
In The 1 Gospel (religious)
Roller Coaster
Crosscurrents (religious)
Love on the Rock (religious)
Doug Ordunio (classical)
The Jazz Show


10:05-Noon Morning Show (local, live)
12:05-4pm American Country Count-
down
4:05-6pm Hits of the 80s (local, live
oldies)
6:05-8pm Sunday Night Special (local,
live urban contemporary)
8:05-1 1pm Dick Clark's Rock, Roll and
Remember (oldies)
11.05-Midnight King Biscuit Flower Hour
(live concert)
Midnight-Sam SCN Overnight

SCN FM radio airs 91.5 Pacific and 98.3 Atlan-
ticon the FM dial with fiveminutes ofAPNetwork
news at the top of each hour. Power FM News airs
weekdays at 7:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.










Tropic Times
TV Schedule May 1, 1992B3



Channels 8 & 10

Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday May 8

5:3m NBC News at Sunrise 6:30m Just Por Kidl 6:00am Real Video 5:30n NBC News at Sundi 5:30mn NBC News a Sundse 5:30am NBCNew at Sumise 5:30am NBC News at Sumne 5:30am NBC News at Suads
6:00 GoodMomringAmerica Supefrends 7:00 ChdstianLifestyles 6:00 GoodMorningAmerica 6:00 GoodMomngAmerica 6:00 Good Moming America 6:00 GoodMoming Ameca 6:00 Good Morning America
8:00 Bodybylake Hamunanm Magazine 8:00 Body bylJake 8:00 Body by Jake 8:00 Body by Jake 8:00 Body by Jake 8:00 Body by Jake
8:30 SsameSteat Chadc Brown 7:30 Bomjamin 8:30 SesameStest 8:30 SesameStreet 8:30 SesameSreet 8:30 ScesmeStreet 8:30 SessmeSiest
:30 Nwt A Snoopy 8:00 BSSundyMoing 9:0 H :30 30 SflverSpoons 9:30 Hurmnea 9:30 SilverSpoons 9:30 Newton'sApple
10:00 CatoonCrner Woody Wood- 9:30 Both Sides with Jesse 10:00 CrtoonCoimer 10:00 CatoonConmer 10:00 CatnoonCmer 10:00 CatoonComer 10:00 CanoonComner
1015 CNNNewaon pcker Jackonm 10:15 CNNNewsaon 10:15 CNNNewsrnom 10:15 CONNewammcm 10:15 CNNNewsrocm 10:15 CNNNewroom
10:30 ILoveLucy Roadruner 10:00 MeetThePress 10:30 ILoveLucy 10:30 ILovoLucy 10:30 ILoveLucy 10:30 ILoveLucy 10:30 ILoveLucy
11:00 WhedofFotumne 8:30 CartoonComner 10:30 WallSreetJorumalWeak 11:00 WheelofPortune 11:00 WheelofFPomne 11:00 WheelofForoune 11:00 WheelofFPounme 11:00 WhelofFortunme
11:30 ShowbizToda 8:50 Laurel&-HardyShow 11:00 U.S.Mm's Olympic 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 ShowbizToday
Noon HesdlneNews 10:00 StarTak MaathmonTrials Noon HeadlineNews Noon HeadlineNews Noom HadlineNew. Noon HeadlineNews Noon HeadlineNews
1220 SCNMiddayRpo 11:00 AirFsceNeow Noon AmericanInterests 12:20 SCNMlddayRport 12:20 SCNMiddayReport 12.20 SCNMiddayRepot 12:20 SCNMiddayRepon 12:20 SCNMiddayRepon
12:30 Spos Cmnter 11:30 NavyNews 12:30 McLaughlinOrup 12:30 SportsCenter 12:30 SportsCenter 12:30 SponrtsCeer 12:30 SportsCeter 1230 SportsCenter
1:00 AnotherWord Noan CarolinaMazines 1:00 HeadlineNews 1:00 AntherWorld 1:00 AnotherWodd 1:00 AneoherWozrd 1:00 AnotherWodd 1:00 AnotherWodd
2:00 OprahWnrey 12:30 This WeekInBeball 1:30 SecondOenration 2:00 OprahWtinroy 2:00 Donahue 2:00 OprabWinfey 2:00 Donahue 2:00 OprhWinfrey
3:00 MakeTheGrade 1:00 Komea:TheForgotto 2:00 ThePumgalGOommt 3:00 NickAade 3:00 SquarOnOTV 3:00 ThePeople'sCoua 3:00 SavedBy The Bell 3:00 MakeThe Grade
3:25 Prce Is Right War 2:30 Sunday Afternoon 3:30 Pdce Is Right 3:30 Pdce Is Right 3:30 Price Is Rigt 3:30 Plce Is Right 3:25 Prce Is Right
4:25 GuidingLight 2:00 ProBowleaTour Movie: "SevenAlone" 4:25 GuidingLight 4:25 GuidingLight 4:25 Oniding ght 4:25 GuidingLight 4:25 GuidingLight
5:10 OGoeralHospital 3:30 SaturdayAftemoon 4:05 SundayAftlmoon 5:12 OmeralHospital 5:12 OneralHospital 5:12 GOneralHopilal 5:12 OneralHopital 5:12 GOnralHospital
6:00 SCNEvmningRepo Movie:"BigRed" Movie:"TheProducera" 6:00 SCN EveningRepot 6:00 SCNEvcoingRpnrt 6:00 SCNEvemingRport 6:00 SCNBvmingRepost 6:00 SCNEveningRepor
6:30 WaddNawsTonight 5:00 HeadlinNews Break 5:30 HeadlineNews 6:30 WaddNewaTonight 6:30 WoddNewsTonight 6:30 WoddNewsTonight 6:30 WoddNewsTonight 6:30 WoddNewsTonight
7:00 Jeoprdyl 5.20 Special:IuveFrm 6:00 SupensatofWzesing 7:00 Jeopadyl 7:00 Jeopardy 7:00 Jeopadyl 7:00 Jeopnrdyl 7:00 Jeopandyl
7:30 FerrisBueller AT&TBeILab 7:00 InspectorMnse 7:30 SpecialDeadliest 7:30 MajerDad 7:30 Speal: Answering Ci- 7:30 Coach 7:30 FerdsBueller
8:00 EveningShade 6:00 DatelineNBC 8:00 SundayNightMovie: WepeonInAmnica" 8:00 48Houm den'sQuestions 7:55 Thursday NightMovie: 8:00 EveningShade
8:30 PdrmTimeLive 7:00 StarSearch'92 "NonhShore" 8:30 60Minutes 9:00 Amercan Chronicles 9:00 Special:ImnocentVic. "Yelowbend" 8:30 PdrimenTolAve
9:30 CBSBEveningNews 8:00 Samday Night Movie: 9:35 HeadlineNews 9:30 CBSlEveningNews 9:30 CBSBEvening News ns 9:30 CBS EveingNews 9:30 CBS Evening New
10:00 nteartaionmtTonlght "Creeao" 10:00 EntetainmntThis 10:00 EntetainmaToTaht 10:00 Entertainm t Tonight 9:30 CBS Evming News 10:00 ErentanmntTonight 10:00 EntertainmentTonight
10:30 SCN NewsUpdate 9:40 ShowdimeAtTheApollo Week 10:30 SCN News Update 10:30 SCN News Update 10:00 EntertaimentTonight 10:30 SCNNews Update 10:30 SCN News Update
1035 ToihtShow 10:30 SatudayNightLive 11:00 StreetStodes 10:35 TonightShow 10:35 ToeightShow 10.30 SCNNewsUpdate 10:35 TonightShow 10:35 ToightShow
11:35 Latight MidnightVideolinke MidnightBusinessWorld 11:35 Latnight 11:35 Ltnight 10:35 TonightShow 11:35 Laieoight 11:35 Latmight
12:3.amNlghtline 1:00 AllNightMovies:@Rdo 12:30 HeadlineNews 12:35amNightline 12:35amNlghtline 11:35 Letnight 12:35amNlghtline 12:35amNlghtline
1:05 AlNibtMoviws:"12 Days" 1:00 FixngLine 1:05 InsidePolite '92 1:05 InsidePoltics 12:35amNightline 1:05 InsidePolitic 1:05 AllNigt Movies: The
O'Clock.High" 2:30 ANightMovies:"Py- 1:30 Sports Center 1:30 SportsCenter 1:30 SponsCenter 1:05 InsidePolities 1:30 SposCenter SondfMusic"
3:16 AllNightMovies:L'Ufe cho3" 2:00 CNNContinues 2:00 AamioHall 2:00 AnalioHall 1:30 SponsCenter 2:00 AnenioHallShow 3:00 AnllNightMovies'The
Boat" 3:35 AllNightMovies:All 3:00 HeadlineNews 3:00 TonightShow 3:00 TonightShow 2:00 AnenioHalShow 3:00 TonigbtShow LongestDay"
4:52 AllNightMovil:"Sher- AboutEve" 3:30 CNNWoldReport 4:00 DavidLetermr 4:00 DavidLemeunm 3:00 TonightShow 4:00 LatnightW/Lettenna 6:00 HeadlineNews
lockHolmos:TheSecret 5:30 HeadlineNews 5:00 HeadlineNews 5:00 HeadlineNews 5:00 HeadlineNews 4:00 DavidLettesmm 5:00 HeadlineNews
Weapon" :00 HeadlineNews
6:00 Headlno News




Cable Channel 14

Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday May 8
5:30m NBC News a Stumie 6:30 am Simulcat with Chan- 6:00am OurFriends On Woos- 5:30am NBC News at Sudse 5:30am NBC News at Sumise 5:30am NBC News at Sunde 5:30am NBC News at Sundse 5:30am NBC News at Sumise
6:00 GoodMomning America nel 8b &10 tarSquare 6:00 GoodMorning Amedca 6:00 GoodMorning Amedca 6:00 GoodMorning Amica 6:00 GoodMorningAmedca 6:00 GoodMomingAmerica
8:00 Beetlejuice 10:00 FamilyTheater.Thela- 6:30 MuppetBabies 8:00 Mickey adDonald 8:00 GummnlBem 8:00 Makethe Grade 8:00 TinyToons 8:00 Beetlejuice
8:30 GuamiBem crediblelJoumey 7:00 ChnitianLifestyle 8:30 Hammne 8:30 Beetlejuice 8:30 FunHose 8:30 SquareOneTV 8:30 GtammiBem
9:00 Today 11:30 Buketball:NBA Play- Magazine 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today
11:00 OprahWinfreyShow offsDoubleheader 7:30 Bjammin 11:00 OprahWinfreyShow 11:00 Donahue 11:00 OprahWinfreyShow .11:00 Donahue 11:00 OprahWinfreyShbw
Noon HeadlineNews 5:00pm Headline News 8:00 RealVideoa Noon HeadlineNews Noon HeadlineNews Nomn HeadlineNews Noon HeadlineNews Noon HeadlineNews
12:20 SCNMiddayReport 5:30 TheKentuckyDerby 9:00 WashingtonWek In 12:20 SCNMildayRepmt 12-20 SCNMddayReport 12:20 SCNMiddayRepo 12:20 SCNMiddayReport 12:20 SCNMiddayReport
12:30 AnMyChildren 7:00 TheSimpsons Review 12:30 AllMyChildto 12:30 AnMy Children 12:30 AMyChildmen 12:30 AllMyChilden 12:30 AiMyChildrn
1:30 OneLifetoLive 7:30 Chee e 9:30 Facethe Nation 1:30 OneLifetoLive 1:30 OneLifetoUAve 1:30 OneLifetoLive 1:30 OneLifetoLive 1:30 OneLifetoLive
2:30 BameyMiller 8:00 InLivingColor 10:00 WonderfulWoddof 2:30 BameyMiller 2:30 FraggleRock 2:30 Bamey Mier 2:30 Newton'sApple 2:30. BameyMller
3:00 SesumeStreet 8:30 AmericanDetective Disney 3:00 SesameStreet 3:00 SesameStreet 3:00 SessmeStrcet 3:00 SesameStreet 3:00 SesameStreet
4:00 77SunsetStdp 9:00 Videolinks 11:00 HeadlineNews 4:00 StarTrek 4:00 SavedbyltheoBl 4:00 SlimerandPrieonds 4:00 Alf 4:00 77SunsetStrlp
4:55 aChuaeldOe 10:00 HeadlineNews 11:30 NBABuketballDouble- 4:55 ChandnlOne 4:30 GetSmatl 4:30 ScholasticSportsAmer- 4:30 MySisterSam 4:55 ChannelOne
5:05 SilverSpoons 10:30 SaturdayNight Live header Teams TBA 5:05 SilverSpoons 4:55 ChanuelOne i* 4:55 ChannelOne 5:05 SilverSpoons
5:30 M*A*S*H MidnightScdence&Tchnology 5:00 OnPitRoad 5:30 M*A*S*H 5:05 SilverSpoons . 4:55 ChaSmelOne 5:05 SilverSpoons 5:30 M*A*S*H
6:00 SCNEveningRepot 12:30 HeadlineNews 5:30 CNNHeadlineNews 6:00 SCNBveningReport 5:30 M*A*S*H 5:05 SilverSpoons 5:30 M*A*S*H 6:00 SCNBveningReport
6:30 NBCNightlyNews 1:00 FidfgLine 6:00 LifeGoesOn 6:30 NBC Nightly News 6:00 SCNEvnaingReport 5:30 M*A*S*H 6:00 SCN EveningReport 6:30 NBCNightlyNews
7:00 NBAPlayoffs:Teamsto 1:30 Sports Lenight 7:00 MacGyver 7:00 SledgeHammer 6:30 NBCNightlyNews 6:00 SCNEBvmongReport 6:30 NBCNightly News 7:00 Who'sThcBoss?
beannotuced 2:00 Entertainmoatthis Week 8:00 UnsolvedMyteries 7:30 ThoSlapMaxwellStmy 7:00 Valede 6:30 NBCNightlyNews 7:00 ADifferotWaod 7:30 MarridPeople
7:30 MarriedPeople 3:00 SturdayNightLAve 9:00 SundayNightMovie: 8:00 21 JumpStreet 7:30 DesigningWomen 7:00 Bloasom 7:30 CosbyShow 8:00 MissUniversePagcant
8:00 Movie: "Serpico" 4:30 HeadlineNews Amazing Graceand 9:00 TourofDuty 8:00 -Wiseguy 7:30 GoldenGi s 8:00 TheEqualizer 10:00 Headline News
10:00 HeadlineNews 5:00 HeadlineNews Chuck 10:00 HeadlineNews 9:00 FalconCest 8:00 Hunter 9:00 Daill 10:30 SCN NewsUpdate
10:30 SCN NewsUpdate 5:30 HeadlineNews 11:00 60 Minutes 10:30 SCN News Update 10:00 HeadlineNews 9:00 thitysoameaihng 10:00 HeadlineNews 10:35 AoniloHall
10:35 ArsnioHall Midnight Simulcast with Chan- 10:35 AnenioHaBlShow 10:30 SCN News Update 10:00 HeadlineNews 10:30 SCN News Update 11:35 DavidLetterman
11:35 DavidLetteman els 8 & 10 11:35 DavidLetteman 10:35 Armeio Hall 10:30 SCN News Update 10:35 ArsmioHall 12:35amNightline
12:35amNightline 1:00amnHeadlineNews 11:35 DavidLettemnan 10:35 AsenioHall 11:35 DavidLettermn 1:05 WorldwideUpdate
1:05 WeldwidoUpdate 1:30 ABCNews Nightline 12:35amSimulcastwithn Ch- 11:35 DavidLettermm 12:35amSimulcastwithmChan- 1:30 Sports Latenight
1:30 SporsiLatenight 2:00 SimulcatwithChanels nD 8.& 10 12:30am Simulcastwith Chan- nele 8& 10 2:00 AsenioHall
2:00 Anmio Hall 8 & 10 nel 8 & 10 3:00 TonightShow
3:00 TonightShow 4:00 DavidLettenan
4:00 DvidLetenan 5:00 Videolinks
5:00 Vtdollnka 6:00 HedliecNews
6:00 HmdflincNews


Peter O'Toole in 'The Creator'


Channels 8 & 10


Aldo Ray, Dewey Martin, Anne Collings, Dean Smith,
James Griffith and Stewart Petersen.


MOVIES
The Producers
The Creator Sunday, 4:05 p.m.
Saturday, 8 p.m. An early Mel Brooks farce featuring Zero Mostel as
Peter O'Toole plays a scientist trying to revive his a producer who teams up with an accountant (Gene
long-dead wife through cloning, with the help of an Wilder) to sell shares in a Broadway musical they
impressionable student named Boris (Vincent Spano). believe is guaranteed to fail. Stars Kenneth Mars, Dick
Stars Mariel Hemingway, Virginia Madsen, David Shawn, Estelle Winwood and Renee Taylor.
Ogden Stiers and John Dehner.
North Shore
Seven Alone Sunday, 8 p.m.
Sunday, 2:30 p.m. A surfer heads for Oahu's north shore to compete.
Seven children undertake the hazardous trek from Along the way, he makes a friend and finds love. Stars
Mississippi to Oregon after their parents' death. Stars Matt Alder, Nia Peeples and Gregory Harrison.


Cable Channel 14

MOVIES


decides to stop playing baseball until the world agrees to
complete nuclear disarmament. When a pro basketball
star joins his protest, other athletes around the world
follow suit. Stars Gregory Peck and Jamie Lee Curtis.


The Incredible Journey
Saturday, 10 a.m. SPECIALS
An English bull terrier, a golden Labrador retriever
and a Siamese cat travel 250 miles across rugged The Kentucky Derby
Canadian terrain to return to their owner's home. Stars Saturday, 5:30 p.m.
John Drainie,EmileGenest, TommyTweed andSandra One of the spring's top sporting events, the Kentucky
Scott. Derby, takes place live from Louisville's fabled Churchill
Downs. The nation's top three-year-olds competein the
Amazing Grace and Chuck 118th Run for the Roses, the first - and most highly-
Sunday, 9 p.m. treasured-jewel in thoroughbred horse racing's cov-
A 12-year old Little League whiz (Joshua Zuehike) eted triple crown.


DOORS OPEN - Joy Pupel, supervisor at
the Albrook "Stars and Stripes" bookstore
stocks books. The "Stars and Stripes" book-
stores open today at three locations, at Al-
brook adjacent to the Furniture Store, Build-
ing 804; Howard AFB near the Billeting Of-
,fice in Building 708 and at Fort Davis upstairs
from the shoppette in Building 32. "Stars and
Stripes" will conduct an official grand open-
ing soon.








B4 Tropic Times
B T May 1, 1992



FORD



TAURUS LX


'92 model has


many changes


by Zane Binder
King Features Syndicate


America seems to love the Ford Taurus. In '91, only
the Honda Accord outsold it, but neither marque can
claim dominance at the top of the sales chart.
For '92, Ford is taking an even harder punch at its
rival. The front-drive Taurus has been completely re-
done inside and numerous changes implemented to
fine-tune the chassis. A driver's side air bag is standard,
and now a front passenger companion unit is optional.
Inside the Taurus, there's room up front for three on
the split bench velour seat. In the rear, there's reason-
able space for the same number. The seats are ex-
tremely comfortable, and leather is available as a $515
option. The cargo compartment is nicely finished and
moderately sized; you may, however, need aroof rack.
Interior styling is conservative, and there's been a
recent move away from European accents. Retained,


however, is a paucity of instrumentation. A cupholder,
though not an effective one, is standard.
Objective performance in nearly every area is high,
and the LX's ride is one of its best points. It handles
bumps and frost heave well. There's also no trace of
highway float. Handling, the opposite of ride, is simi-
larly rewarding. The standard power steering (variable
rate on LXs) combines with the suspension to yield rea-
sonably high possibility. Higher marks would be earned
if the marginal mud and snow radials were replaced
with decent tires on this 3,170-pound car. The turning
circle, at just over 38 feet, is average for the class. Anti-
lock brakes are a $985 decision; they could save your
life, but are overpriced.
Under the hood was Ford's standard but ancient 3
liter, 140-HP fuel-injection V-6. Adequate but defi-
nitely uninspired sums up its performance. Zero to 60
takes 11.2 seconds; city mileage was observed at 18,
highway economy 24 (EPA 20/29).
This is well below average; Ford needs new technol-


ogy. For $555, a 3.8 liter unit with 147 HP is available.
It's not worth the extra cost.
Shifting was handled by a standard four-speed over-
drive automatic. It did its job well, and is much better
than the Accord's automatic.
The air conditioner was an extremely powerful unit;
the heater, adequate. Both retain wide margins of supe-
riority over most Japanese challengers.
The AM/FM stereo radio-tape player, an upgraded
version of the standard sound system, was decent and
part of a large option package. If you demand excel-
lence, an aftermarket supplier must be visited.
What's the bottom line? Overall, the Taurus LX is
very good, and at $17,434 base, it's priced slightly more
reasonably than the Accord. Even quality control was
good, though not up to the imports.
Only the powertrain disappoints; though not near as
sophisticated overall as the Accord, the Ford has many
unique strengths. For family transportation, it's tough
to beat Taurus.


Employment


All applicants should be aware that hiring is severely restricted because of the Department of Defense
worldwide hiring freeze. Effective April 6, the freeze allowed one new hire from outside Department of
Army for every four losses to DoD. Placement of current DA employees (including those on leave without
pay) is an exception to the freeze. Current temporary employees may now apply against permanent vacan-
cies unless otherwise noted. Specialized experience, when indicated, must be in duties similar to those
required by the vacancy. Military Spouses: If available, qualified, and within the area of consideration
specified for the vacancy, may be considered subject to the "one-for-four" DA hiring restriction. Panama
Canal Commission employees: U.S. and non-U.S. current permanent employees may apply for permanent
employment subject to the "one-for-four" DA hiring restriction. Current permanent NAF or AAFES em-
ployees who were appointed prior to Nov. 3, 1989 may now also apply.
AMENDMENT ON HOW TO APPLY: Failure to complete USARSO Form 106, when required, could
hinder an applicant's chances of being referred for the vacancy. For information, visit the Civilian
Personnel Office, Building 560, Corozal.
VB# VACANCIES TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 05-01-92 CLOSE: 05-12-92.
ATLANTIC SIDE:
228-92-LA -REPORTS CLERK (TYPING), NM-303.4. Sensitive. DCA, Education Div.,Port Davis. Form 106. Note:
DA employees only.
230-92-NR.- CUSTODIAL CONTRACT INSPECTOR, NM-303-5. Temporary NTE 09-30-92. DEH-ATL, Contract
Mgmt. Br., Fort Davis. Note: Driver's license required. DA employees only.
233-92-LA- RECREATION SPECIALIST (YOUTH ACTIVITIES), NM-188-7. Sensitive. DCA, Youth Svcs., Fort
Espinar. Form 106. Note: Must be able to obtain driver's license. DA employees only.
PACIFIC SIDE:
227-92-LA - REPORTS CLERK (TYPING), NM-303-4. Sensitive. DCA, Education Div., Fort Kobbe. Form 106.
Note: DA employees only.
229-92-LA - EDUCATIONAL AID, NM-1702-4. Part-time 22 hrs. per week. DCA, Child Development Svcs., PFort
Clayton. Form 106. Note: Applicant selected must satisfactory complete background investigation. DA employees only.
231-92-LA - COMPUTER ASSISTANT, NM-335-5. AG, Personnel Automation Br., Fort Clayton. Form 106. Note:
DA employees only.
232-92-CM - SECURITY ASSISTANT (TYPING), GS-086-6. Sensitive. 56th Signal Battalion, Security Office,
Corozal. Form 106. Note: 106th employees only. Excepted Service position. Qualified typist required.


234-92-LA - EDUCATION PROGRAM SPECIALIST, NM-1701-7. DCA, Child Development Svcs., Fort Clayton.
Form 106. Note: Driver's license required. Applicant selected must satisfactory complete backgroundinvestigation. DA
employees only.
235-92-LA - SMALL ENGINE MECHANIC, MG-8610-8. DCA, Outdoor Recreation Br., Fort Clayton. Form 106.
Note: DA employees only.
236-92-SS - CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN, NM-802-9. DEH, Contract Mgmt. Div., Corozal. Form 106.
Note: DA employees only.
237-92-VC - PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST, NM-1035-9. Sensitive. Temporary NTE 1 yr. USSOUTHCOMPAO,
Quarry Hts. Form 106.
238-92-ES - BIOLOGICAL AID (INSECTS), NM-404-4. Temporary NTE 30 Sep. 92. USA MEDDAC-Panama.
Entomology Br., Corozal. Note: Driver's license required.
239-92-ES - PHOTOGRAPHER (LABORATORY), NM-1060-7. Sensitive. DTSC, Photography Br., Fort Clayton.
Note: DA employees only.
240-92-VC - INTELLIGENCE SPECIALIST, GS-132-11/1213. Sensitive (Some may require ability to obtain TOP
Secret clearance). Some may be temporary NTE 1 yr. Form 106. NOTE: Applicant Supply File - No closing date.
241-92-CM - EQUIPMENT SPECIALIST (ELECTRONICS), NM-1670-11. Sacramento Army Depot, Special
Projects Div., Corozal. Form 106.
NOTES: VB#: 177-92-CM, Budget Analyst, NM-560-7/9 is amended to read: Area of consideration limited to 106th
Signal Brigade employees only. Closing date- 05-12-92. VB#: 217-92-ES, Library Technician, NM-1411-7 is amended
to read: Spec Exp: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-5. Applicants who applied need not reapply. Vacancy open until 05-12-92. VB#:
051-92-SS, Electronics Mechanic, MG-2604-10; 090-92-SS, Plumber Helper, MG-4706-5; 091-92-SS, Kitchen
Equipment Mechanic Helper, MG-5310-5 and 108-92-SS, Mechanical Engineer, NM-830-11 are hereby cancelled.
OPEN CONTINUOUS ANNOUNCEMENTS: Closing date: 12-31-92.
OC-M-92 - OFFICE AUTOMATION CLERK, NM-326-4. Form 106. Note: DoD permanent employees only.
OC-N-92- SECRETARY (OFFICE AUTOMATION), NM-318-5. Form 106. Note: DoD permanent employees only.
The Directorate of Civilian Personnel Office is accepting applications for: 1. Nurse Practitioner, NM-610-10.
Temporary. 2. Social Worker, NM-185-11. Temporary NTE: 09-30-92. Coco Solo. 3. Occupational Therapist and
Occupational Therapy Assistant. Temporary-Part Time. For information call Enid Sullivan at 285-4116
4. SalesStoreChecker, NM-2091-03. Temporary/Intermittent CASP Test required. For information call JulitHurtado
at 285-6268.


Kitchen Capers


Baked stuffed fish
2 red snappers, about 2 1/2 pounds each
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 medium onions, finely chopped
1 cup chopped seeded medium hot peppers
8 ounces Jarlsberg or Jarlsberg Lite cheese
12 tomatillos, chopped
1 cup dry white wine or unsweetened apple juice
Lemon wedges


Have fish dealer slit fish and remove center bone.
Saute garlic in olive oil. Add onion and cook over
medium heat until translucent. Add hot and sweet
)eppers. Cook two minutes longer. Transfer mixture to
t bowl. Add Jarlsberg and tomatillos. Spread mixture
m bottom half of fish to about 1/2 inch from edge. Close
ish and tie with string, making ties about two inches
part. On the diagonal, cut 1/4 inch deep slashes in top
flesh of fish. Insert lemon wedges, skin side up, in
slashes. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. In pan in which
vegetables were sauteed, bring wine to a boil. Place fish
In large glass or enamel baking pan. Pour hot wine over
fish. Cover tightly. Bake 30 minutes or until fish flakes
when tested with a fork. Remove to serving platter, snip
ties. Garnish with additional lemon, if desired. Serves
four to six.

Gjetost parfaits
1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/4 cup lemon juice
3 large egg whites, at room temperature
1/2 cup sugar
1 teaspoon almond extract
1 tablespoon grated lemon zest


4 ounces grated Gjetost cheese, chilled
Pink and green food coloring
Slivered almonds
Sliced strawberries
Soften gelatin in lemon juice five minutes. Place
over boiling water or microwave 20 seconds to dis-
solve. Cool slightly. In clean, grease-free bowl, beat
egg whites on high speed until foamy and thick. While
beating, gradually add sugar, by spoonfuls. When whites
form soft peaks, add extract and zest. Beat to blend into
meringue. Stir in slightly cooled gelatin. Gently fold in
Gjetost. Divide mixture into thirds. Tint one third pink,
and another green. Layer green, pink and white dollops
in goblets or sherbet glasses. Cover with plastic wrap
without touching meringue. Chill two to six hours. Top
with almonds and strawberries. Serves four to six. The
Chopping Block recipe by Philomena Corradeno.

Editor's note: People interested in sharing a rec-
ipe or household tip with Tropic Times readers, can
send recipes or tips by MPS to Tropic Times, Unit
0936, APO AA 34002. Your name and base will be
printed with your submission.







Tropic Times
May 1, 1992 B5


(From the left) Chi-Hsiu Yang, Carrie Garza, Altagracia Alvarado and Dawn Lopez lead the riders down the road.





Yeeeeeha


It's not 'Ponderosa,' but


there are plenty of 'Hosses'


by SSgt Phillip D. Clark
Tropic Times
"Yeeeeeeeeeha!"
That's how Altagracia Alvarado described a
recent afternoon of horseback riding in Pecora
Valley sponsored by the Howard/Albrook
Riding Stables.
"This is the best. It's exciting and challeng-
ing. It's not a monotonous ride. There are the
hills, river and valley," said the second-timer
to Pecora. "And the horses got spunk."
The.journey begins at the Albrook swim-
ming pool, where stables manager David
Morris picks up the guests for the hour-long
bus ride to Alfred Bondurant's ranch.
Bondurant greets the riders with hot coffee,
tortillas and fruit, then matches riders to horses
and gets everyone saddled-up. Bondurant's
right hand man and guide, Angel Garrido, then
takes the riders on a one-hour orientation ride
around just a part of the 800-acre ranch.
After this preliminary ride, saddles and


bridles are adjusted, and those in need of a dif-
ferent mount are given one.
The riders are soon back in the saddle and
out for a three-hour ride. Garrido leads the
riders through Kuna grass, along and across
the river, up and down steep hills.
Richard West, a 14-year-old family
member and veteran of the Fort Bragg, N.C.,
trails, was impressed.
"This is a lot more fun. You get to go faster
and you don't have to play follow the leader,"
he said. "I had fun."
"(On this trail ride) you are actually riding,
not following another horse," Carrie Garza
added. "I think it's a great time. You get as
much horse as you can handle. These horses
have character."
Bondurant has a hot meal of chicken, beef,
potato salad and fruit waiting for the riders
upon their return. He then takes the time to ask
the riders how the ride could be better.
For information on future trips, call the
stables at 287-4411.


Richard West guides his horse around the rocks in the river.


Tom Lopez and Wilka Bondurant ride their horses through the
river.









N


Tropic Times
May 1, 1992


Albrook

Albrook Club
Pronto Polio - Fried chicken to go. Call
Albrook Club at 286-4128, Howard Offi-
cers' Club at 284-4680 and Howard En-
listed Members' Club at 284-5832.
Flea market - Sunday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. on
patio. Sellers, buyers welcome. Crafts, used
items, more. Brunch from 10a.m. to 1 p.m.
Selling open to those with authorized base.
access. Call 286-3557.
Mother's Day Buffet Brunch - May 10,
10 a.m.- 2:30 p.m. More than 40 food items
for one set price. Reservations required.
Call 286-4427/3557.

Auto crafts shop
The Albrook Auto Crafts Shop, Build-
ings 441, 442, 443 offers the following
classes: Arc and gas welding, Sundays, 2
p.m.; auto air conditioning, Fridays and
Monday, 6:30 p.m.; wheel alignment,
Friday at 6 p.m.; Auto transmission and
engine rebuilding, Sundays, 10 a.m. Call
286-3613.

Child care
The Albrook Early Childhood Enrich-
ment Center, Building 805, now has an
hourly care program. Hourly, weekly and
after-school rates are available weekdays, 8
a.m.-5 p.m., for children ages 3 and above.
Reservations required. Call 286-3133.


Amador

Club Amador
Brunch - Sundays, 10:30 a.m.-1:30p.m.
enjoy the champagne brunch with Los
Consules "The Strolling Trio."
'The club management reminds it's pa-
trons that social hour has been reinstated in
t he Bridge Lounge Friday nights at 5 p.m.
The main ballroom is temporarily closed for
renovations. Current programs will con-
tinue in the Undergeround Lounge.


Clayton

Valent center
Valent Recreation Center, Building 53,
FortClayton, offers thefollowing activities.
Call Carmen Emiliani at 287-6500/4201.
Event - Dart tournament. Call Anne
Kelly.
Tours - Contadora overnight tour,
Saturday-Sunday; San Blas, May 9; Isla
Grande, May 10.
Classes- at scheduled times throughout
the week or can be arranged for individual
groups: vadic astrology, making money with
your money, real estate seminar, psychophys-
ics gymnastics, prepared childbirth, Span-
ish, English, German, lost art of writing
letters, karate, guitar, piano, and interior
design. Most classes require a nominal fee.
World War II salute, May 23, seeking
all veterans, memorabilia, historical accounts
or anything related to World War II. Call
Anne Kelly, 287-6500.
Earth Day celebration, Saturday, Sun-
day, featuring tree planting, exhibits and in-
formation center, contact Miguel Briceno.

Youth center
The Fort Clayton Youth Center, Build-
ing 155, has varied activities for pre-teens.
Call 287-6451.
Classes: tangsoodo, shotokan and tae-
kwondo; gymnastics Tuesdays and Thurs-
days, 2-7 p.m., dance lessons Tuesdays and
Thursdays,4-7p.m. Ages 3 and above may
register for monthly classes at the center.
Free cooking lessons - all ages, Wed-
nesday, 3:30-4:30 p.m.
Youth Council - Meetings on first and
third Thursday of each month.
Activities - 'Thank God it's Friday'


movies and snacks, today, 3:30 p.m.; sports
cards and comic books expo, Saturday, 11
a.m.; leather link belts, Monday, 3:30p.m.;
Mother's Day flower bouquet, Tuesday,
3:30 p.m.; Mother's Day cards, Thursday,
3:30 p.m.
Senior teens: Building 155, special ac-
tivities for teenagers 15-19 years of age.
Call 287-3252.
Sunset boat cruise, May 8,6 p.m.-mid-
night, with Atlantic senior teens. Those
from the Atlantic side wishing to participate
call 289-4472. Fee, registration required.

Outdoor events
The CRD Outdoor Recreation Branch
offers adventure activities. Register at Build-
ing 154, Fort Clayton. Call 287-3363.
Partial canal transits are available.
Guided tour vessels travel from Balboa to
Pedro Miguel locks and the Bay of Panama.
Train dive, Saturday, Gatun Lake, fee
includes transportation, dive boats, two guided
dives. Bring dive gear, lunch, beverages.
Atlantic divers contact Shennan Rental Cen-
ter.
Contadora Island day cruise, May 10,
7 a.m.-10 p.m. Ticket price includes break-
fast.
sila Mamey snorkel/dive trip, May 9-
10. Fee includes transportation, admission
to dive site, four dives with guide, bohio
lodging, water taxi, snorkel gear for snor-
kelers. Bring dive gear, food, beverages.
San Bias snorkel/dive trip, May 16-17.
Diver/non-diver packages include airfare,
hotel, tank transportation, three meals, three
guided tours, dive guide, boat service, free
snorkel gear, tour of island.
Coiba Island fishing safari, May 22-23.
Fee includes transportation, camping equip-
ment, rod, reel, tackle, boat, guide.
Costa Rica whitewater rafting trip May
23-26. Includes airfare, hotel, transfers, daily
continental breakfast, lunch on river, one
day rafting. Non-rafting packages available
and additional tour can be scheduled.
Clayton Park bohios available for spe-
cial events. Packages including swimming
pool can be arranged.
Swim passes, reciprocal at Fort Clayton
Pool, Amador Pool, Fort Davis and Shim-
mey Beach, are available. Three-week swim-
ming classes are taught at Williford Pool,
Fort Clayton. Register at the center. Ses-
sions start the first Monday of each
month.Three week swimming classes are
available at the Williford Pool, Fort Clay-
ton. Pre-school, beginners, advanced be-
ginners and adults can register at the Out-
door Recreation Center. Call 287-6660.

Boat Shop
The Clayton Boat Shop, located in Build-
ing 178, offers the following activities. Call
287-6453.
Charters can be made for fishing and.
diving trips. Call 287-6453.
Trailer hitch installment - For details
contact the shop.

Twin Oceans
Twin Oceans Pro Shop, Building 155, of-
fers scuba, snorkel, tennis and other recrea-
tional equipment. Armed Forces Day sale,
May 8,9. Call 287-3088.

Arts and crafts
The Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts Center
is located in Building 180. Call 287-5957.
Classes - Photo developing and printing,
guitar-making, fine arts, furniture
construction, handicrafts and pottery.
Do-it-yourself custom framing offered
Wednesday, Thursdays, Fridays; multiple
silk screen, today; wood sculpture and T-
shirt painting, May 13.
Event - Hispanic heritage art exhibit,
Wednesday, 5 p.m.Call 287-5957.

Ceramic center
The center is located in Building 155.
Call 287-4360.


Classes - clay flower making, Sundays;
airbrush techniques, Thursdays, 2 p.m.;
ceramic painting, Thursdays, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Participants must purchase materials, pay
firing fee.
Event - 1992 Army Ceramics Con-
test, entries accepted from May 30-June 6.
Entries exhibited through June 13. Rules at
Fort Clayton Ceramic Shop.

Clayton CDC
The Child Development Center, Build-
ing 39, Fort Clayton, has changed their
opening times. It's open Mondays, Wednes-
days and Fridays from 5:30 a.m. and Tues-
days and Thursdays from 6:30 a.m. Call
287-5657.

Cocoli
Cocoli Community Recreation Center, is
located in Building 2553, Cocoli. For infor-
mation about recreation programs call 287-
4119/3010.

Curundu

Theatre Arts Centre
The Pacific Theatre Arts Centre, located
in Building 2060, Curundu, offers the fol-
lowing classes:
Classes- guitar, Wednesdays, children,
3-4 p.m.; teenagers, 4-5 p.m.; adults, 5-6
p.m.; salsa, Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.;
various levels of ballet, tap and modern
dance, folkloric and creative dance; eve-
ning exercise, forages 13 and older, belly
dancing lessons, Tuesdays and Saturdays,
10-11 a.m.; voice lessons, Mondays, 5:30-
7:30 p.m. and Fridays, 2:30-7:30 p.m. in
half-hour private lessons; merengue and
salsa, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30-7:30p.m.
Registration required. Call Kathy Foote at
286-3814/3152.


Howard

Swimming pools
Both Albrook and Howard swimming
pools are availableforprivate rental. Passes
are available and can be used at Air Force,
Army and Navy pools. Call 284-3569.
Albrook - Moms and tots, preschool,
beginner, advanced beginner, intermedi-
ate, adult, all ages, Mondays, Thursdays,
Friday. Diving board, women water ex-
ercise classes also offered.
Howard - Beginner, advanced begin-


ner, intermediate, adult, all ages, Tues-
days, Wednesdays, Thursdays. Pre-school,
Tuesday and Wednesdays.

Child care center
Family day care providers on Howard
AFB and Albrook AFS have openings for
children of all ages. Fees and hours are
negotiable. Call 286-3133/3313 for a cur-
rent list of providers.
Evening child care is available at How-
ard DevelopmentCenterFridays and Satur-
days, 5:30 p.m.-midnight for children 6
months to 11 years. Reserve space by previ-
ous Wednesdays, 4 p.m Call 284-6135.

Zodiac center
The Zodiac Recreation Center, Building
709, offers tours and other activities. Watch
for weekly and monthly specials. Rent the
activities room or one of the classrooms.
The Information, Tour and Travel Office
will arrange shopping or beach trips.
A guide and transportation will be pro-
vided if available. All tours leave from
Howard AFB Theater. Call 284-6161/6109.
Partial transit of canal tickets - For
information on tickets call the center.
Special of theweek - El Valle shopping,
Sunday, 6:30 a.m.-3 p.m..
Tours ' Panamanian dancing and din-
ing, Plaza Paitilla, Wednesday, 6:30-11 p.m.;
museums of Panama, Thursday, 8 a.m.-2
p.m.
Classes - lunchtime aerobics, Mondays,
Wednesday, Fridays, 11:30 aan.-12:15 p.m.;
piano, on an appointment basis; taekwoudo,
Monday, Wednesdays, Fridays, 6-7:30 p.m.;
shotokan, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6-7:30 pn.m.;
cake decorating, Thursdays, 7-9 p.m., four-
week class begins Thursday; private pi-
lot's ground school,. Monday, Wednes-
days, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m. every six weeks.
Beginner German, Mondays, Wednes-
days, 8-9:30 p.m.; Spanish, 'Mondays, Wed-
nesdays, beginner, 5-6:30p.m.; advanced,
6:30-8 p.m., four-week classes start Monday;
English, Tuesdays, Thursdays, beginner,
5-6:30 p.m.; advanced, 6:30-8 p.m., four-
week classes start Tuesday.

Outdoor center
The Outdoor Center offers weekly and
monthly activities specials. Bohios are avail-
able at Howard and Albrook. The Informa-
tion, Tour and Travel Office can arrange
trips for authorized personnel. Trips leave
from the Howard AFB Theater. A fee is
charged. Call 284-6161/6109
Special of the week - gold panning in
Las Cumbres, May 8, 8 a.m.-3 p.m.

Atla


Sundial Center
The following activities will be held by Sundial Recrea-
tion Center, Fort Davis. Call 289-3309/3889.
Classes - piano lessons, Wednesdays, Fridays,noon-
5:30 p.m.; guitar lessons, Fridays, noon-5:30 p.m.;
taekwondo, Mondays and Fridays, 6:30-8 p.m.; dog obe-
dience training, Saturdays, 11 a.m.- noon, at the center,
registration required; French cooking, Thursdays, 5-7
p.m.; cake decorating, Tuesdays, 5-7 p.m.; Spanish, Mon-
days and Wednesdays, 5-7 p.m.; English, Mondays and
Wednesday or Tuesdays and Thursdays. Both meet 5-7
p.m., six-week course. Registration required.
Six-week French class, Mondays and Wednesdays, 5
p.m.; folkloric dance, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3-4 p.m.;
jazz dance, Mondays and Wednesdays, 7:15-8:15 p.m.;
modeling, Mondays, 7-9 p.m.
Tours - wine and dine, Friday nights; PX shopping,
Saturday, 8 a.m.; El Valle, Sunday, 5:30 a.m.; Colon
shopping, Wednesday, 9 a.m.
Tournaments - pool, Sundays at 1 p.m.; horseshoes,
Saturday, 1-5 p.m.

Ocean Breeze
Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, Fort Sherman, Build-
ing 153, offers the following activities: Call 289-6402.
Tours -" San Lorenzo, Thursdays; El Valle, Sunday;
Historical Panama City, May 9; Portobelo, May 10.
Classes - Nautilus orientation, Wednesdays at7 p.m.;


karate-do, beginning and a
days and Wednesdays, 6:3
Wednesday, 11 a.m.- 1:30p.
6-8 p.m.; free aerobics, Mo
days, 10 a.m. and 5 p.m.; kar
6:30-8:30p.m.
The center offers classes
minimum of 10 people is
The following classes ar
pattern; basic vehicle main
healthy; outdoor gardening
based ceramic painting, am
defense for women, and mo
The center is available for
reserve space.


Arts and crafts
The following activities
Crafts Center, Building 251,
Event - US. Army S
entries will be accepted June
is Sept. 6, gallery exhibit, S
Classes - advanced and
photographs, Thursdays, 11
workshop, May 10. Call 28
Fort Sherman Arts and
offers the following activities
Classes: ceramics, pain








Tropic Times R7
May 1,1992 B7


Tours - snorkel and scuba Drake's Is-
land, Sunday, 7 a.m.-5 p.m.; canoeing and
barbeque Chagres River, Tuesday, 8 a.m.-
2 p.m.; peacock bass fishing in Arenosa,
May 9, 5 a.m.-2 p.m.; snorkel and scuba
Drake's Island, May 10, 7 a.m.-5 p.m.

Scuba classes
The Outdoor Center offers scuba classes
taught by Javier Freiburghaus, a certified
scuba instructor. Classes can be arranged to
fit individual requirements.
Introduction to scuba is a one-night
free class, available on request. Minimum
offourpeople required. Open water scuba,
begins May 11 at Albrook, May 18 at How-
ard. Advanced open water scuba begins
May 25 at Howard. Rescue, dive master
and specialty scuba courses are available at
both pools. Call 284-6161.

Riding stables
The Howard and Albrook Riding Stables
are offering the following trips and pro-
grams. Call 287-4411.
Basic horsemanship classes - include
theory and practical sessions. Covers safety,
stable etiquette, care and welfare of horses,
tack and basics of horse handling. Classes
for children 9 years to adult, individual,
group, semi-private lessons available.
Hourly horse rental at Albrook Stables.
Rental fee includes horse and tack. Riders
must successfully complete the basic horse-
manship class or be evaluated by a stables
instructor.
Tandem utility trailer available for rent.
Fitted with two-foot towing hitch and a Jon
boat light hook-up.

Youth Centers
For information about youth activities
call the Howard Youth Center, Building
696, 284-4700 or the Albrook Youth Cen-
ter, Building 850, 286-3195. All pickups for
trips will be at Howard Youth Center at the
time specified and 30 minutes later at the
Albrook Youth Center.
Pre-teen dance, tonight, 7:30-10:30 p.m.,
Howard, transportation to/from Albrook pro-
vided.
Summit Gardens and lunch, Saturday,
9 a.m.-2 p.m. An outdoor hiking adventure,
exotic animals, followed by lunch at a fast-
food restaurant.
Musical chairs, Tuesday, 3:30 p.m.,
Howard and Albrook.
Make Mother's Day cards, Thursday,
3:30 p.m., Howard and Albrook.
Teen boat cruise, May 8, 6 p.m.-mid-

tic


anced for ages 6-18. Mon-
:30 p.m.; French cooking,
.; juggling, Wednesdays,
days, Wednesdays and Fri-
te, Tuesdays and Thursdays

according to demand. A
ired.
available: make your own
nence; keep indoor plants
in Panama; oil and water-
teur salsa for couples; self-

eeting and classes. Call to




ill be held at the Arts and
ort Davis:
th Photography Contest
1 through Aug. 30. Judging
t. 20-27.
eginner oil painting from
.m.-1 p.m.; pastel painting
-5201.
afts Center, Building 206,

ing, drawing, pottery and


night, aboard the'Fantasia del Mar.' Tour
the Bay of Panama. Open to teens only.
Classes - Monday through Saturday -
street/video dancing; cheerleading teams,
ages 6-18; Spanish and English, ages 6-18
and adults; lunchtime aerobics, for adults,
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; arts and crafts,
Wednesday, 3 p.m.; gymnastics for ages
3-18. Also boys' classes; modem, jazz, tap
and ballet dance at beginner, intermediate
and advanced levels for ages 3-18; piano for
ages 6-18; tennis; taekwondo, ages 4-6.

Arts and crafts
Howard Arts and Crafts, Building 711,
has a frame shop, award shop and ceram-
ics for sale. Everything for arts and crafts
hobbyists. Classes and demonstrations in
English and Spanish. Call 284-6361/6345.
Classes - Intermediate ceramic paint-
ing, Spanish, Tuesday, 2-4 p.m.; beginner
ceramic painting, English, Wednesday, 2-
4 p.m.; beginner ceramic painting, Span-
ish, Thursday, 2-4 p.m.; free ceramic pour-
ing, Spanish, May 8,2-4 p.m.; intermedi-
ate ceramic painting, English, May 9, 10
a.m.-noon; stained glass, Thursdays, 6:30-
8:30 p.m.; cross stitch, Thursdays, 7-8 p.m.;
clay flower class, Saturdays, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Club news
The Casual Cove is now open after
remodeling. Breakfast is from 6:30-9 a.m.;
lunch, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The dining room
kitchen at the clubis closed for renovations.


air brushing. Wood shop is available. The center is
closed Thursdays and Fridays. Call 289-6313.


Youth news
The Fort Espinar Youth Center, Building 219, offers the
following activities. Call 289-4605. Classes - shotokan
karate for adults and children, Mondays and Wednesdays,
5-6 p.m.; arts and crafts, Thursdays, 4-6 p.m.
Events - roller skating, Tuesdays at Fort Espinar
School; boat cruise, Saturday, ages 13 and older, 6 p.m.-
midnight. Van will depart from the center at 4 p.m.,; teen
Jungle adventure, May 9, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Fort Sherman.

Potpourri
Directorate of Engineering and Housing Atlantic U-
DO-IT truck runs the first and third Saturday of each
month from Espinar-Davis and the second and fourth
Saturday from Sherman-Davis from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
"Oliver", a musical for the entire family is being
presented by the Atlantic Music and Theatre, May 15,16,
19,20 at7 p.m. at Cristobal High School Auditorium, with
a special matinee May 17 at 2 p.m. Call 289-6699/3889.
The Atlantic Education Center, Building 32, Fort
Davis, will offer a mini-immersion Spanish class, 8 a.m.-
noon, May 11-29. Soldiers need their commander's ap-
proval to attend. For forms, information and registrations,
stop by the education center.


The Breezeway is also available for break-
fast, Monday-Friday, 6:30-9 a.m.; lunch, 11
a.m.-1 p.m.; dinner, until 11 p.m. Sunday-
Thursday and until 1 a.m. Friday and Satur-
day.
Enlisted members can dine at Howard
Officers' Club from 6-9 p.m. Monday- Sat-
urday. Call 284-3599.
The Top Three Lounge will have a
grand opening May 20. Call 284-4189
Steak night special, Howard Officers'
Club Thursdays, 6-9 p.m. Choose from filet
mignon, New York strip, rib eye or prime
rib, includes soup, salad and potato. Full
menu also available, Monday-Saturday, 6-9
p.m. Call 284-4680.

Logistics support
Logistics support, Building 714, rents
camping, sporting/fishing gear, fumiture and
more. Some items are available for squad-
ron functions at no charge. Call 284-6107.
May weekend special -Rent 6- foot table,
eight chairs at reduced rate.
Mother's Day Weekend special - Bring
in Mom, rent two items for one price. Lowest
rental rate won't be charged.
Memorial Day Weekend special - five-
man tent, four sleeping bags at reduced rate.
Rent card table set, get free deck of cards.

Library
Seashells are on display during May at
the Howard AFB library. A collection of
shells from Panama's Pacific coast will be
labeled with their common and scientific
names. Display will include uncommon
species that are difficult to find in their
habitats. Call 284-6249.


Family support
The Howard/Albrook Family Support
Center, Building 707, hours are 7:30 a.m.-
4:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays. Call 284-5650.
Job search workshop - Tuesdays, 2 p.m.
How to effectively search for a job in Pana-
mas.
Financial counseling - Available by
appointment, call 284-6545.
Checkbook maintenance workshop -
Offered Wednesday, 2 p.m.
Smooth move two-day workshop - Of-
fered Thursday, (Finance, CBPO, 24th Medi-
cal Group); May 8, (TMO, legal and hous-
ing), 9-11 a.m. in Howard Chapel. Guest
speakers available to answer questions about
permanent change of station.
Volunteers wanted - Family services
needs volunteers to assist with loan closet,
base brochure library, layette program and
airman's attic.

Auto Craft Center
The Howard Auto Craft Center is located
in Building 722. Call 284-3370.
Classes - Car care and maintenance,


in Building 722. Call 284-3370.
Classes - Car care and maintenance,
especially for women, May 9, 10, 9 a.m.-
noon, covers oil, filter change, lubrication;
steam cleaning, May 11, 12.


Rodman

Anchorage Club
The Rodman Anchorage Club has food
to go, 5-9 p.m. daily. Fried chicken with all
the trimmings orpizza with a variety of top-
pings. Call 283-4332/3040 to order.
Weekly events - Bingo, Mondays, starts
6:30 p.m., special menu; family night,
Tuesday; social hour, Wednesdays, 4-6
p.m., free hours d'oeuvres; "Country and
Western Night," Wednesdays, 6-9 p.m.,
free dancing lessons from 7-9 p.m.; all-you-
can-eat taco night, Thursdays;
DJ Night, Saturday, 7 p.m.-midnight.
Mother's Day brunch, May 10, 9 a.m.
Flower Child Night, May 9,7 p.m., best
three era costumes get prizes, DJ.

Officers' Club news
A la carte breakfast, Sundays, 8 a.m.-
noon; social hour, Mondays, Wednesdays
and Fridays, 4 p.m., in the Laguna Lounge;
steak-by-the-ounce, Thursdays. "Mr. &
Ms. Physical Fitness," RodmanPool, May
8, 5:30 p.m. Dancing, swimming and eat-
ing.

CPO Club
The Chief Petty Officers' Club will hold
the following activities. Call 283-5475.
All-you-can-eat buffet, Mondays-Fridays,
11 a.m.-1 p.m.; couples night, tonight, May
15; social hour, Wednesdays and Fridays, 4
p.m., with free hors d'oeuvres; club grill
opens Saturdays, noon-4 p.m. with dine in
or take out service. Mother's Day Dinner,
May 9,6 p.m.


MWR notes
Morale, Welfare and Recreation Infor-
mation, Tour and Travel Office, Building
24, Rodman, offers the following activities.
Call 283-5307/4454.
Tours - "Moonlight Happy Hour"
cruises, tonight from Rodman to Taboga
and back. Cost includes hors d'oeuvres.
Pay-as-you-go bar available. Casual dress.
Minimum of 20 people is required.
Free Zone, May 14. Bus will depart
from the Rodman Anchorage Club at 8 a.m.
and will return at approximately 3 p.m.
Panama City, May 15. Includes visit to
colonial Panama, the Golden Altar Church,
the Cathedral, Old Panama and a drive through
the shipping areas of Panama. Bus departs
Rodman Anchorage Club at 8 a.m, returns
about 3 p.m. Minimum of 12 required.
Jungle River Tour, May 16, Includes
bus transportation to San Lorenzo where
you board the river boat. Travel to Lake
Gatun. Refreshments and lunch also in-
cluded. Tour requires minimum of six people.
Cartagena, Colombia, May 24-27. The
price includes round trip airfare, beach front
hotel accommodations, all meals, plus hours
d'oeuvres before lunch and dinner, bever-
ages, water sports, and daily activities.
Transportation to/from Tocumen Airport
for small fee.

Family news
TheFamily Service Center, Building 40,
Rodman, will hold the following activities.
Call 283-5749.
Relocation Assistance Program - Relo-
cation information is now available on disk-
ettes. This reference system can be used to
select future duty stations. Call Suzanne
McGoheyat283-5748
Newcomers Orientation, May 18-22,
lots of information and excitement; culture,
travel, foods and a special tour.


more notices on page B8


tices


AERIAL VIEW - The Ocean Breeze Center at Fort Sherman offers tours to the
old historical fort of San Lorenzo Thursdays.









S* Notices


B8Tropic Times
DO May 1, 1992


continued from page B7


Potpourri


Army workshop
The 5th Annual U.S. Army South Army
Family Action Plan Workshop is May 8.
Issues and delegates must be submitted
by Monday to Army Community Serv-
ice, Building 115, Corozal or call 285-
6518 Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8 a.m. to
noon.

Spot bid sale
Defense Reutilization Marketing Of-
fice-Panama, Building 745, Corozal, will
be holding a local spot bid sale Thursday
at 8 a.m. Inspection days are Monday
through Wednesday from 8 a.m.-2:30
p.m. Call Ada Tweed, 285-4754.

Reservists meeting
The Reserve Officers' Association,
Panama Canal meeting will be held at 5
p.m. May 27 in the Fort Amador Offi-
cers' Club. Guest speaker will be Col.
Raymond Moss, U.S. Southern Com-
mand reserve forces adviser. Officers
who hold commissions in either the U.S.
Army Reserve or National Guard are
eligible to attend. Call 287-3313.

Lock-in
Umoja Community Collective will hold
a pre-teen lock-in starting May 9, 8 p.m.
and ending May 10, 8 a.m. in the Fort
Clayton Youth Center for ages 8-12.
Registration and small fee required. Call
287-6451.

Newcomers meeting
A"Welcometo Panama" newcomer's
orientation will be held at the Albrook
Club from 8:45 a.m. until 2p.m. May 13.
Call Larraine Shingleton, 285-4857.

New signature block
Soldiers need to add a new signature
block in block 20 of their Army TDY
authorization orders, DD Form 1610.
The block should read:
HQ USARSO
APO AA 34004
FOR THE COMMANDER: Lucia
M. Heugh, Cpt. AG, C, POB

Bible school
The Fort Clayton Chapel is holding
registration for the Vacation Bible School
May 15 at the Corozal main exchange
and commissary; May 10, 24 at the chapel.
School dates are June 14-19. Call Anne
Michel, 286-3447.

Spanish GED
Registration for Spanish GED Prepa-
ration, Monday-June 29, Mondays and
Thursday, 3-5 p.m., is open at the Fort
Kobbe Education Center. Call 284-3150.

Road Knights events
The Road Knights Motorcycle Club
will have apokerrun Sunday; it's open to
the public. Call the club house at 286-
3348, or TSgt. Keith Olive at 284-5202
or286-3734.

Registration open
Registration is open for mini-immer-
sion Spanish, basic skills and advanced
skills management skills classes to be
held Monday through May 24 at the Fort
Kobbe Education Center, Building 801.
Panama Canal College is offering gov-
ernment in the U.S. and general sociol-
ogy Sunday through May 23. Call 284-
3150.


'Chicago'
The play, "Chicago " opens Thursday at 8 p.m. at the
Pacific Theatre Arts Centre, Building 2060 in Curundu. The
production will continue through May 31 with Thursday,
Friday and Saturday evening performances.
Included in the 23-member cast are veteran performers.
The play is directed by JoAnne Mitchell and Jerry Brees with
musical direction by Melanie Bales and choreography by
Barbara Berger.
"Chicago" will be entered in the Army's annual Forces
CommandFestival ofthePerforming Arts Competition. Call
for reservations and information at 286-315.

'The Crucible'
The Arthur Miller drama, "The Crucible," will be pre-
sented at Balboa High School auditorium May 8, 9, 15, and
16 at 8 p.m. by the students. The play is about the infamous
Salem witch trials of 1692. Call 252-5176.


'Rumors'
The Theatre Guild of Ancon performs Neil Simon's new
comedy, "Rumors," runs through May 9. The guild pro-
vides security attendants in the parking lot. Reservations can
be made by calling 252-6785.


Trial Defense Service
The Panama Trial Defense Service
Office, Building 154, Fort Clayton, will
be closed Monday through May 10. Call
the Staff Judge Advocate 287-6614 in
case of emergencies during the week.
U.S. Army Trial Defense Service walk-
in-hours are 8 a.m.-noon Tuesdays,
Thursday and Fridays. Soldiers must
bring appropriate documentation for
service. Call Capt. Joseph H. Bestul,
287-6207.

Education center
The Fort Clayton Education Center
will hold two classes Monday through
May 24: training management 1-4:50
p.m. and basic skills education program
8:14 a.m.- 12:15 p.m.
The center will also hold a mini-im-
mersion Spanish class Monday through
May 15, from 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Call
287-5412.

Crime Prevention
Crime Prevention Section will be spon-
soring a Crime Prevention poster contest
Monday through May 8. Department of
Defense Dependents' Schools students,
kindergarten through sixth grade are eli-
gible to submit posters to the students
office. Selection of the winning posters,
first, second and third for each grade,
will be made May 11-15.

Revival services
The Jordan Memorial Church of
the Nazarene, 1 st Street Juan Diaz, wel-
comes military families fortheir Revival
Services, 7 p.m. Thursday through May
10 with evangelists Reverends Arthur
and Nancy Cath from California. Call
Rachel Gooden 282-5418.

Tutor needed
Central Texas College is accepting
applications for a full-time learning cen-
ter instructor/tutor at the Fort Clayton
Education Center. A bachelor's degree
and current teacher's certificate are mini-
mum qualifications. Call 287-3773.

Combined meeting
The Parents Teachers Organization
and School Advisory Council will hold a
combined meeting in the Fort Clayton
Elementary School May 13 at7 p.m. Call
287-6887.

Pre-registration
DoDDS pre-registraion for school year


Courtesy photo
"CELL BLOCK TANGO" - Convicted murderesses
gather in thejailhouse fora lively round of the "Cell Block
Tango" during rehearsals for the musical comedy, Chi-
cago.


1992-93 is being conducted. Registra-
tion packets were given to students,
which parents are requested to return no
later than May 8.
Kindergarten registration is also un-
der way. Children who will be 5 years
old by Oct 31, should register for the
1992-93 school year. Birth certificate,
permanent change of station travel or-
ders or an agency sponsorship letter, shot
records, and identification cards are needed
to register your child.

Red Cross
The American Red Cross will hold a
standard first aid class May 9 in Room
344, Building 519, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Call
287-5509.

Exchange students
The U.S. Agency for International
Development with the help of the private
sector has selected 42 Panamanian stu-
dents to study at U.S. universities. They
are currently studying English at Panama
Canal College.
Call 252-3304/3107, ext. 31.

Community choir
The Community Choir will hold its
first musical May 9 at the Howard Chapel
at 6:30 p.m. Call Jeff Saffold at 287-
3740 or Preston Butler at 285-4929.

Isthmian College Club
The Isthmian College Club will hold a
scholarship tea and install new officers
Saturday at 9:30 a.m. in Residence#103,
Balboa Heights. Scholarships will be
awarded. Call Gretta Vowell 252-5820.

Bed races
The races will be held May 16, at the
Howard Parade Field beginning at 9a.m.
The day will start with a bazaar and
four-person beach volleyball tournament.
Spectators of the parade at 10:30 a.m.
will vote for "best bed." The races start.,
at noon. There will be food, drinks, live
bands (Killer Coatimundi, Tempest), a
DJ and more.

Instructors needed
Volunteers are needed as English in-
structors for a basic writing and speaking
course to the Fort Clayton San Bias food
service employees. Call Robert Appin,
287-6109.

Membership meeting
The Isthmian Chapter of the Associa-


tion of the United States Army will hold
a general membership meeting, 11:30
a.m. Thursday at Club Amador.
Brig Gen. Trent Thomas, Southern
Command J-2, will be the guest speaker.

T-shirt contest
The 1992 Fourth of July T-Shirt De-
sign Contest is now under way.
The contest is open to all active duty
military, civilian employees and their
family members, and Panama Canal
Commission personnel. Rules for the
contest follow: design must incorporate
this year's theme: "Remembering World
War II - Defense of the Panama Canal -
1942" as well as "4th of July."
Entrants may use as many colors as
they wish in the design. Entries become
the property of the community Fourth of
July committee.
The first-place design will be used for
Fourth of July advertising and will ap-
pear on the official 1992 Fourth of July
T-shirts. Deadline for entering the con-
test is May 25. Designs must be submit-
ted to the U.S. Army South Public Af-
fairs Office, Building 95, Fort Clayton or
Magarita Complex in the Atlantic com-
munity. Call 287-3007/3058.

Quality of Life
The next quality of life meeting will
be Wednesday at 5 p.m. in the Valent
Recreation Center.

Sunday socials
The annual Balboa Elementary School
ice cream social/79th Army Band En-
semble (Pieces) concert Sunday, 1-6 p.m.
on the hill by Goethals Memorial and
Balboa Elementary School. The Shriners
will sell refreshments and the Balboa
PTO will sell ice cream sundaes.

Tech Supply Office
The operations at the Tech Supply
Office and Warehouse will be limited
Saturday through May 10 for reware-
housing, inventory and general mainte-
nance purposes. Call 287-5146.

Manning retirement
QUARRY HEIGHTS (USSOUTH-
COM PAO) - The U.S. Southern Com-
mand Sergeant Major CSM Freddie
G. Manning will retire May 8 during a
ceremony to be held at Fort Clayton.
The ceremony for the 30-year vet-
eran will begin at 8:30 a.m. at the
Building 95 Quadrangle. Everyone is
invited to attend.


--









Tropic Times
May 1, 1992 B


Boy Scouts conducting membership drive


WHAT IS THE DEAL? (Advertising wizards) - The
.Boy Scouts of America is conducting a membership
drive in preparation for Summer Camp '92.
Teams of scouts and their leaders will visit Depart-
ment of Defense Dependent schools between now and
the end of the school year to demonstrate Scouting and
invite all eligible boys to join.
Membership is open to any boy who has completed
the fifth grade, or is 11- years-old, no matter what grade
he's in. This is the first "round-up" in Panama in sev-
eral years, said Col. Ray Moss, U.S. Army representa-
tive to the Boy Scout Executive Committee.
"We want every eligible boy to be able to attend
summer camp, which they will miss if we wait to hold
around-up until September."
Boy Scout officials remind every boy that they can
join Scouts any time before their 18th birthday, and
encourage all fifth graders to visit and join a troop on a
provisional basis until they complete the school year.
Summer Camp '92 will be held at the Panama Canal
Commission Recreation Areain Gamboa from July 25-
Aug. 1. Scouts will camp with their troops near the
banks of the Chagres River, and participate in such
traditional activities as swimming, canoeing, rifle shoot-
ing, and campfires.
Scouts will be able to select from 25 merit badge
classes including pioneering, fishing, first aid, and
environmental science. A wilderness survival program
will be offered, and camp officials are trying to coordi-
nate special courses in horsemanship and indian lore,
concentrating on the tribes of Panama. The Scouts of
Panama have been invited to send a provisional troop,
making this camp truly international.
Putting on such an ambitious camp is a real chal-
lenge, according to Maj. Ted Morris of the 24th Opera-
tions Group, who will act as camp director.
"Our goal is to conduct a camp that will rival any
established state-side camp."
Many agencies are offering help. USARSO, 24th
Composite Wing and Rodman Naval Station will join
forces to provide logistic support for transportation,
tents, food preparation and people to provide technical


Photo by Maj. Ted Morris
Scouts climb a signal tower bulit by lashing bohio
poles during the 1991 summer camp.
expertise and merit badge training.
The Panama Canal Commission will provide and
prepare the site, continuing along tradition of support
to the Scout program. But there's lots more to be done,
according to Brig. Gen. Joseph Kinzer, Deputy Com-
mander of USARSO and Chairman of the Boy Scout
Executive Committee.
Preparing for classes, setting up camp, conducting
the program, and putting it all away will take 25 adult


and junior staff members about three weeks of work.
"Here in Panama, the Boy Scouts of America rely
entirely on volunteer adult help," Kinzer said.
"We need waterfront directors, basketry instructors,
naturalists and everything in between. I encourage
commanders at all levels, in all the services, to help us
find those volunteers, and get them to camp. And I urge
every boy who's ever wanted to camp with his friends,
- learn about nature, or build a monkey-bridge to join a
troop now and get ready for this summer camp."
"You don't need to wait for theround-up. Just come
by the office for more information, or better yet, call the
scoutmaster or go to a meeting of the troop near you,"
Below is a list of Troops, meeting times, places, and
Scoutmasters:
Troop 5, Thursday 7 p.m., Balboa Union Church,
Carlos Poveda, 287-3202.
Troop 6, Thursday 7 p.m., Cardenas Ward (LDS),
Jon Strong, 287-6631.
Troop 8, Monday 7 p.m., Fort Espinar Thrift Shop,
Cal Landrum, 243-5398.
Troop 16, Thursday 6:30 p.m., Howard AFB Stables,
SSgt. George Shaw, 284-4961.
Troop 20, Wednesday 7 p.m., Building 812 Albrook
AFS, Nick Unger, 252-7785.
Troop 24, Saturday 10 a.m., Balboa First Baptist
Church, Luis Rodriquez, 252-7427.
Troop 128, Thursday 7 p.m., Building 520 Fort
Clayton, CWO Clay Allison, 286-3267.
The camp will also employ about 15 junior staff
members. Applicants must register with a troop or
explorer post, be at least 16-years-old, and available
from July 15-Aug. 5.
Teenagers interested in applying, and adults in volun-
teeing for SummerCamp should call Carey at the Scout
office at 286-3685, or Morris at 284-5553.
"We aren't just looking for men," explained Morris.
"Women are an important part of leadership in scout-
ing, and we've always had a coed staff."
The Boy Scout office is in Building 806 on Albrook
and is open Mondays and Tuesdays 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri-
days 1-6 p.m., and Saturdays 9-12 a.m..


Aero Modellers " .


take flying act


to Howard AFB
HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA) - They
were at it again, Sunday. The skies above
the Howard Parade Field were filled with
the sounds of helicopters, gliders, and
vintage airplanes.
For yet another year, the Panama.
Association of Aero Modellers pleased
the crowd with its dazzling array of air-
craft flips, 360 turns, and low-flying.
Spot landing and limbo were two new
events this year to challenge radio con-
trollers.
According to Eric Brathwaite, along-
time member of the aero modeller's as-
sociation, adults and children seem to
enjoy the static displays and flying por-
tion of the show just as much.
These aero modellers meet Sundays
at Cocoli. For more information on be-
coming a member, contact Brathwaite at
284-4510.


- 9i


, ..


u.s. Air -orce pnoto oy SrA. JacK1e Ambrose
A team from the Panama Association of Aero Modellers start their engines before letting their aircraft loose in the sky.



SCN AM radio schedule


Below is the SCN AM Radio schedule with
corrected times through October. SCN AM Radio,
780 Pacific and 1420 Atlantic, features a mix of
news on the hour and music from Armed Forces
Radio and Television Service tapes. News blocks
from AFRTS Voice Channel air periodically
throughout the day including sports, business news,
commentary, Paul Harvey News, Commentary, and
Rest of the Story. Also aired are National Public
Radio's Morning Edition, All Things Considered
and Car Talk on AM along with sporting and special
events.


Midnight
12:09am
7:05am
9:05am
9:30am
9:35am


Sunday
Sign on
Music
NPR Weekend Edition
Music
UPI Newscast
ABC World News This Week


10:05am
12:05pm
12:30pm
1:06pm
12:17pm
3:05pm
3:11pm
3:17pm
3:25pm
4:05pm
5:05pm


Music
ABC NBC News
Music
ABC/NBC News
Music
ABC News
NBC News
CBS News
ABC World of Sports
NPR All Things Considered
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eWiClassifid Ads


S1 Tropic Times
11 Mav1 1.012


Airedale, make a good watchdog, $100, 287-5976.

Female bulldog, 3 mos, has shots, $100, price neg,
284-4623.

Rotweiler, AKC, championship bloodline, 6 wks
May 21, $750 female, $800 male, 284-6124.

Collie/mix, 1 1/2 yrs old, all shots, loves kids, free
to good home, 287-5139.

Mixed breed German shepherd puppies, male, 4
wks old, $25, 235-4687.

Pit bulls, registered American Dog Breeders As-
soc., 252-2278.

Male Pomeranian, $100, 252-1052, after 5 p.m.

Male black cock-a-poo, tail docked, shots, de-
wormed, 9 wks, $65, 252-6277.

Femalecocker spaniel,blonde,2yrs old,w/puppies,
$100, 287-3189.




1988 Ford Bronco II, 4x4, a/t, a/c, low mileage, exc
cond, $12,500, 286-6173.

1985 Honda Accord LX, a/c, am/fin/cass, new tires,
new brakes, s/r, runs grt., $4500/obo, 269-3818.

1987 Honda Accord EX, 4dr, good cond, a/t, p/w,
CD player, duty not pd, $7000, 264-6313.

1985 Ford Ranger, runs grt, must sell soon, $3000,
282-4546.

1985 Toyota P/U, a/c, am/fin, long bed, new tires,
exc cond, not duty pd, $4000, 284-4681.

1985 Isuzu Trooper, 4x4, new paint, am/fin/cass, grt
cond, not duty pd, $6000, 284-4681.

1985 Toyota van, a/c, p/s, 5-spd, am/fm/cass, blue
int., exc cond, $5500, 287-4576.

1988 Dodge Caravan, V-6, a/t, a/c, 5 pass, duty pd,
low mileage, $9000/obo, 287-3451.

1990 Ford Ranger XLT, 28,000 miles, ext cab,
camper shell, cruise, 5-spd, $9400, 260-0062.

KIA Minivan, 1988, diesel, dual air, p/w, lug racks,
exc cond, duty pd, $7995/obo, 260-3623.

BMW 728i, 1986, exc cond, a/c, s/r; $17,000, 252-
2228

1981 Fiat Spyder cony, new tires, new shocks, eng
overhaul, runs grt, low mileage, $2800,268-1477.

1987 Nissan Maxima, U.S. specs, full power,
loaded, $6900, 252-5428.

1984 Canari, Z-28, 5 sp., a/c, p/s, p/b, am/fm/cass.,
low mileage, $3400/obo, 283-5619.

1989 BMW 325i, 5 sp., snrf., loaded, $18,000/neg.,
282-3576, after 5p.m.

1966 Land Rover, recent paint, most complete
around, a true classic, $2000, 232-5761.

1981 Mercury Lynx, 2dr, 4-spd, s/r, new tires, am/
fm/cass, $2000/obo, 285-4577.

1978 Ford Fiesta,runs grt, body fair, exc second car,
$800, 289-6150.

1984 Ford Mustang hatchback, 4-spd, a/c, am/fm/
cass, s/r, good cond, duty pd, 269-6558.

1985 Toyota Corolla, exc car, $4300, 289-6150.

1982 Toyota Corolla, std, a/c, alarm, am/fm, exc"
cond, $3500, 221-9622.

1987 Hyundai Stellar, 5-spd, a/c, am/fm/cass, pwr,
full extras, duty pd, $6200, 236-3281.

1990 Chevy Corsica, p/w, p/l, a/c, p/s, $12,000 or
$2000 down, take over payments, 287-4776.

1986 Nissan Bluebird,4dr, 5-spd, cass, a/c, duty pd,
avail June 15, $6000/obo, 287-3319.

1979 Mercury Capri, 2-dr, hatchback, runs exc,
good gas mileage,4-spd, manual, $1800,284-5720.

1983 Chevy sta/wgn, p/s, p/b, p/l, exc cond, $4500,
286-3432.

1985 Ford Mustang GT 5.0, 8-cyl, fm/am/cass, p/s,
a/c, exc cond, $5000, 261-8792.

1987 Voyager Van, a/c, new tires, p/b, p/s, am/fin,
V-6, hvy duty hitch, best offer, 284-3335.

1982 Dodge, 15-pass van, p/b, p/s, 36-gal tank, V8,
good cond, 1 owner, $6000, 287-6291.

1984 Mazda 323, 5-spd,hatchback, a/c, alarm, p/w,
rims, $2800, 221-0534.


1979Buick Regal, p/s, p/b, am/fm/cass,2dr, T-tops,
V6, black and tan, $1200, 287-4973.

1985 Subaru GL, a/c, mint interior, well maintained,
new tires, many miles left, $3500, 287-4139.

1985 Dodge p/u, full size, exc cond,p/s, p/b, am/fm/
cass, a/c, $8500, 260-0228.

1978 Fairmont sta/wgn, auto, 302ci, V8,body needs
some work, $1500/obo, 286-6424.

1982 VW Jeep, fair cond, $1200 firm, 260-3890.

1979 Mercedes Benz, 450SEL, U.S. specs, duty pd,
Blue Book, $11,000, asking $9000, 262-2990.

1978 Mercedes 300CD, diesel, U.S. specs, exc
cond, loaded, avail late May, $9500, 260-0098.

1991 4x4 Daihatsu, a/c, p/s, am/fm/cass, alarm, not
duty pd, avail May 30, $8950, 260-8181.

1982 CJ-7 Jeep, exc cond, hard/soft/bikini tops, new
swampers, winch, duty pd, $6000/obo, 252-2906.

1987 Chevy Beauville van, 8 pass, dual a/c, tinted,
pwr options, am/fm/cass, $16,300, 286-4390.

1972 Mercedes 280SE, eng/brakes overhaul, op-
portunity for person who knows cars, $1800, 252-
6096.

1984 Olds 88 sta/wgn, 9 pass, a/c, cruise, loaded,
runs good, avail May 12, $4500, 287-4834.

1984 Audi 5000, 4dr, exc cond, loaded, orig owner,
a/c, s/r, new tires, extras, $6100, 287-5680.

1985 Chevy Caprice Classic, loaded, extras, 64,000
miles, $5250,252-2180.

1977 Chevy 1/2 ton p/u, short bed, 4x4, camper
shell, $1800, 282-4824.

1984 Nissan Bluebird, exc cond, duty pd, $4400,
226-1158.

1979 VW Beetle, not duty pd, new brakes/paint, am/
fin/cass, good cond, $2000, 223-7104.

1973 Plymouth Duster, 6 cyl, a/t, radio/cass, new
eng, $1250/obo, 252-2287.

1979 Toyota Celica, 5 sp., a/c, fin/am/cass., duty
pd., $2300/obo, 283-5619

1988 customized Caravan, loaded, 34,000 miles,
mint cond, duty pd, $15,000, 236-3815.

1982 VW Quantum SW, 5-spd, p/s, p/b, runs good,
$2800, 260-7133.

1983 Mitsubishi Montero, diesel, $5000/obo, 263-
4321.

1978 Volvo 245 sta/wgn, duty pd, a/c, good cond,
$3500/obo, 223-4546.

1985 Honda Accord LX, a/c, am/fin/cass, 5-spd,
avail May 20, $4000, 289-4550.

1987 Volvo 240 DL sta/wgn, a/c, p/w, am/fm/cass,
duty pd, $13,750, not duty pd, $11,500, 287-6790.

1988 Pontiac Lemans,2dr, hatchback, a/t, a/c, p/s, p/
b, U.S. specs, not duty pd, $4200, 287-3877.

1992 Daihatsu Applause, duty pd, a/t, loaded, mint
cond, $12,000/obo, 252-2546 after 5pm.

1989 Ford Ranger XLT p/u, a/t, a/c, am/fin/cass,
extras, exc cond, $10,000, 286-3284.

1983 Toyota Celica, 5spd, new tires, good cond,
hatchback, $2600, 252-2175/2499.

1988 Peugeot 205, a/c, no duty pd, new tires, $4000/
obo, 226-2438.

.1981 Honda Accord, 4dr, a/c, p/s, p/b, a/t, new tires/
brakes/battery/alt, more, $2995/obo, 260-5771.

1987 Voyager LE, p/s, am/fm/cass, a/t, p/b, not duty
pd, $8200/obo, 261-6037.

1991 Suzuki Samurai, soft top, stereo, no duty pd,
$6600, 226-7176.

1991 Chevy S-10 p/u, V6, 5-spd, a/c, p/s, am/fm/
cass, 7000 miles, duty not pd, $10,500,282-3593.

1985 Subaru GL, exc cond, new tires/shocks/
brakes, $3800, 287-4599.

1986 Mazda 323, hatchback, 4-spd, a/c, am/fm/
cass, no duty pd, runs grt, $3500, 282-3497.

1981 Chevy Malibu Classic, a/t, 6 cyl, exc cond,
duty pd, $2500, 226-7176.

1976 CJ-7 Jeep, turbo, rims, nice rubber, hard/soft
top, good shape, extras, $4000/obo, 284-4135.

1984 Datsun 280ZX, 2dr, 4-spd, U.S. specs, extras,
duty pd, $4500,260-7574.

1985 GMC S-15 p/u, a/c, long bed, camper top, exc
cond, $5450, 287-3584.


1984 Mazda 929 LTD, 2dr, a/t, loaded, exc cond,
duty pd, $5250,236-4254.

1985 Chevy van 20, 6.2L diesel, am/fm/cass, a/t,
p/s, p/b, a/c, duty pd, grt shape, $10,500,266-4631.

1986 Pontiac Grand Am, loaded, grt cond, s/r, new
tires, $5900, 223-7271.

1975 Olds sta/wgn, p/s, p/b, a/c, 8 cyl, duty pd, good
cond, $1000, 252-2906.

1986 Mitsubishi Lancer, 4dr, all extras, like new,
luxury model, duty pd, $4500, 260-3750.

1982 Mitsubishi Galant Super Saloon, duty pd, a/c,
4dr, a/t, p/w, p/s, s/r, $3500/obo, 263-4321.

1983 Nissan, a/c, a/t, pwr everything, good cond,
69,000 km, duty pd, $5000/obo, 286-4820.

1985 B250 Dodge Ram van/wgn, 318, V8, a/t, a/c,
am/fm/cass, new tires, $6200,282-3731 after 6pm.

1978 Olds Cutlass,V6,a/t,p/s,p/b,p/w,dutypd,am/
fnm/cass, $1900/obo, 236-1498.

1989 Isuzu Sunsport coupe, 5-spd, elec ragtop, a/c,
36,000 miles, new tires, $6900,286-4495.

Eagle Talon, TSi 1990, 190HP, 2.o0 Turbo,
$12,000, 223-2550.




Live-in maid, Mon.-Fri., Span-spking, goodw/kids,
irons, refs, reliable, hard wking, 284-6788.

Bilingual maid, full time, live-out, grt cook, grt w/
kids, exp, 282-3969.

Eng-spking mail, honest, grt w/ kids, avail now,
287-4988.




47' Chris Craft, twin V8-53, 3.5 kw,extras,$70,000,
252-5428.

2(9 boat trailer, galvanized black painted, almost
new, $750, 252-2228.

171/2' V174.Glastron, i/o with Volvoeng, Penta leg,
130HP, sporty, exc cond, $4200,287-4821.

15' Starcraft, flat bottom 55HP Evinrude, 2HP
Yamaha, trailer, skis, $2500 firm, 252-6002.

Sailboat for two, good cond, $700, 268-0005, after
6pm.

25HP Johnson outboard, elc. start, extra prop, good
cond, $895, 285-5516, Room 23.

Mariner 8HP, outboard, $600, 287-6580.

16' Glastron tri-hull, 85HP, Johnson, like new, must
see, fully equipped, 287-6227 eves.

Cayuco, "The Most", #1 coed, 1992, #1 female,
1990, $1500, 260-7716.

18' tri-hull, Chevy 4 cyl w/Mercruiser outdrive, elec
trim, many extras, $4200/obo, 286-4932.

16' Hobie cat sailboat, w/ trailer, all access, former
Panama natl champion, $1800, 252-6096.

14 lb. elec. outboard kicker, $45, 252-2428 after 5
pm.





Computer games for Commodore 64, popular selec-
tions, orig materials, $10-$25 ea, 284-6391.

-Nintendo entertainment system, 14 games, 3 extra
controllers, gun, $125, 287-5998.

Sony 19 in. color TV, Hitachi, 14 in. b/w, Akai
spkrs., trumpet, accordions, 223-7437.

Nintendo, 5 games, pool stick w/ case, 283-4464.

Pioneer trntbl, exc cond, $100, 236-2121.

Guitar, fender Gemini II, w/case, never used, $160,
236-4092.

Packard Bell 286 IBM Computer,40 MB HD, 1 MG
RAM, disk drives, $1500, 284-6950, after 6pm.

Canon 620 EOS w/ 35-70, 70-210, lenses, flash,
carrying case, $800, 287-4733.

IBM compatible, 30 Meghd, 5 1/4 and3 1/2floppy,
mono monitor, star printer, $1250, 286-4775.

Technics rcvr, tuner, linear track trntbl, Kenwood
dbl cass deck, $400, 284-3664, Room 7501.

FH-100 Sony multi-system stereo, am/fm/sw; dual
cass, CD hook-up, $350, 264-8541 (Punta Paitilla)

Zenith, 19" color TV, $125; B/W TV, 5"; radio cass.


recorder, Atari Arcade, games, 287-6281.

VCR Beta, $120; VHS VCR, $150; stereo, $95;
equal, $110; rcvr, $85; color TV, more, 264-4104.

IBM compatible, color computer wth software,
modem, $500; 264-4104.

Fisher stereo,tuner, dbl, tape,multi-CD, spkrs,amp,
remote, cabinet, $600/obo, 287-5638.

Piano, good cond, $500, 287-5839.

Panasonic stereo system, $200, soundesign stereo
system, $125, 286-3636.

Olympus OM-10, 35mm, access., $125, 233-3616.

Star Rainbow 24 pin color printer, 2420-NX, like
new, extra color/black ribbons, $325, 252-5593.

Comstar 386-33 computer w/ 125 MB HD, 4 MB
MEM, RAM color VGA monitor, $1500/obo, 260-
7313.

63 mb hard disk, 5 1/4 rll, formatted, new brand,
$250, 233-0933.

Beta movie camera, Betamax sold as set only, $300,
252-2080.

Technics auto reverse stereo cass deck, $110, Tech-
nics am/fin/stereo rcvr, $160, 282-3735.

Nikormat FTN body, Nikon lenses, 230-0571.

Ham radio transceivers, 2KW amplifiers, Yaesu
mic, ant tuner, 287-4778.

Tandy 1000 HX, color monitor, printer, $500,284-
3139.

Seiko portable CD player w/ spkrs, AC adapter,
$100, 284-5537.

RCA video camera w/ access, case, like new, $650,
284-5537.

HP Desk Jet, real letter qual, 300 DPI text, graphics,
new cond, 2 yrs old $395/obo, 282-3197.

IBM PC, 640k, 3.5/5.25 disk drives, 10 MB hard
drive, very good cond, $575, 252-2630.

Magnavox 19" color TV, good c6nd, $125, 286-
4535.

16" TV remote $100, VCR remote, $100, Pioneer
music sec, cass deck, trntbl, 2 Ig spkrs, 221-9070.

Commodore 1802, disk driver, keyboard, joystick,
new, monitor, 8 games, manuals, $500, 283-3374.

Amiga 500 computer, extra disk drive, 1 meg
memory, mouse, printer (needs work), $375, 287-
6878.

Kenwood amp, multi-CD player, tape player, must
sell, very good cond, $450, 263-4321.

Commodore 1287, 1541 DD, RGB color monitor,
modem, joysticks, tons software, $375, 287-3281.

Aiwa compact disk player, $150; Nintendo game, 6
mos, $75,286-3397.

Sony 40-watt spkrs, good cond, 1 pair, $35, 284-
4081.

13" color TV w/remote, $160; portable VCR/tuner
w/camera, batt., $500; microwave, $200,286-3484.

Sony CD player w/battery charger, spkrs, $240;
Sony Walkman, $30; VCR video enhancer, $25,
252-5792.

Canon AE1, reg lens, $150, 260-4096.

Amiga 500 computer, GVP series II, hard disk, 3
MB RAM, extra floppy drive, software, $1600,264-
6282.




Tabletop gas barbeque grill, $25; Braun food proc-
essor w/ attach., $70, 286-6173.

BR set, 5 pieces, solid wood, new, 230-1927.

18,000BTUa/cs: Mitsubishi, $300; Fedders, $325;
12,000 BTU Freidrich a/c, $250, 252-2287.

Hoover Concept H vacuum cleaner, $75; Whirlpool
hvy. duty washer, exc. cond., $250, 252-5766.

Wingback chair, ottoman, $350; Persian carpet, 8 ft.
by 11 ft. w/ pad, $350, 282-5281.

Mini-blinds, 5x6, fits front bedroom, 500 area,
Clayton, mauve, $75,223-4290.

Handprinted Chinesehall chestw/2mirrors,5 1/2 ft.
wide, 1 ft. deep, $1025, 223-4290, evenings.

Kenmore Ige. capacity washer/dryer, exc. cond., 4
yrs., $650, 286-3233.

Sofa, loveseat, $850; BR set, $700; dining set,$450;


May 1 1774


d














end tables, $150; 2 lamps, $70, more, 286-3792.

Dinette, rectangular, chrome, glass, seats 6, chairs
cane back, looks new, $500 firm, 252-6841.

Yamaha piano, full size, exc. cond., almost new,
252-2063.

Whirlpool convertible dishwasher, new model, 6
cycle, used 6 mos., exc. cond., $375,286-4130.

two-piece sectional sofa, blue design, 6 mos., $700,
269-5700

2 Turkish Kilim rugs, $50/ea., gd. cond., 2 Turkish
pipes, $20/ea., Turkish/Greek money, 286-3397.

Mini/micro blinds, new, asstd. sizes, sheet sets for
dbl., qn. size beds, 252-5985.

Curtains, furniture, carpets and pads, 289-3429.

Freezer, $600; rug, $125; elec. guitar, $150; bed w/
matt., $150; 284-5180.

Tappan all oven (elec.), $275; GE dishwasher,
$225; both like new, 284-3930.

Sofa, $400; oak dining chairs, $125; entertain. ctr.,
$350; bed, $225; more, 252-2208, Sat., 6-11 a.m.

Oakbunk bed set, 2 beds, dresser, chest, desk, hutch,
chair, ladder, $1000, 260-7133.

Refrig./freezer, 20.5, exc. cond., coffee tbl., 264-
6713.

Lge. recliner, blue, very gd. cond., $350,286-4563.

Loveseat, like new, $350; Pioneer stereo system,
like new, $250,252-6162.

Washer, dryer, Sanoma waterbed, twin beds, sofa,
loveseat, recliner, more, must sell, 260-5771.

18,000BTUa/c,6mos.,$600; 5950BTUa/c,$300;
baby carseat, $20, 261-3032.

Moog organ synth. w/ amp., amp needs tube, make
offer, Sears Kenmore carpet shampooer, 284-5521.

GE refrig., 2 dr., exc. cond., 22 cu. ft., $560 firm,
230-0571.

Flowered couch, 4 person, exc. cond., extra cush-
ions, $275, 252-1174.

Carpets, med. brown; two 9x12, $60/ea.; one 12x15,
$80, almost new, 264-3830.

Oriental bokada, 7x10, $1200, 263-8579.

Lafer sofa, re-upholstered, loveseat, 2 chairs, has-
sock. exc. cond., $500; 286-6492 after 7 p.m.

King size BR set, Queen size BR set, DR w/ buffet,
2 rocker/recliners, 284-5686.

Antique side-by-side secretary, $200, 282-3735.

Console TV stand, 2 nightstands, twin headboard,
student desk, color TV, needs work, 286-4928.

Full size box spring, $25; full size bed frame, $25;
full size bed brass plate headboard, $25, 287-3087.

Extra-long full size bed w/ sheets, $200; Kenmore
washer, $300, 252-6369.

Twin bed, grt. for kids, gd. cond., $50, 287-3786.

DR sets: Rattan, 6 chair, round tinted glass, $1000;
6 chair, mahogany, w/ buffet, $2500, 268-0235.

Waterbed, queen size, built-in drawers, lighted
headboard, $800, 287-3584.

Teakwood curio cabinet, w/ interior light, $525,
282-3180.

'Girls BR suite: Dresser w/mirror, desk w/hutch and
chair, nightstand, canopy bed, $700, 286-4531.

Combination TV stand, bookcase, oak color, $425,
236-0523.

Lge. blue sleepr couch, grt. shape, asking $400, call
287-3731 after 6 p.m.

Curtains for 4 BR, tropical house, $150; 6 house
plants, some 1g., $50,286-4695.

Elec. drip coffee maker, $25; 2 chest of drawers,
286-4391.

27 in.Zenith TV, $425; complete teakSpanish-style
BR set, $1900 or best offer, 236-0978.

Whirlpool elec. dryer, $350; Sears Coldspot refrig./
freezer, $400; porch furn., 264-8335.

Waterbed: 12-drawer pedestal, mirror, headboard,
$500, 223-7271.

Natural rattan DR set, 72 in. round wooden top table,
4 chairs w/ pastel cushions, $500, 282-3881.

Couch, loveseat, coffee/2 end tables, sofa table,
rattan chair w/ pastel cushions, $1300, 282-3881.


IClassified Ads


Kenmore Ig microwave, $230, car stereo, $120,
IBM compat color comp, more, $500. 264-4104.

3 tires,255/60 R15, all $50. 252-6831.

Baby carrier,2 car seats, bed,wood, rugs. 230-1901.

Woman's set of golf clubs, like new, 4 woods, 9
irons, bag $350. 236-0523.

Window air conditioner $100. 286-4695.

Crib w/mattress $120,4 room wall-to-wall carpet-
ing $400. 252-6829.

Tent house lOx1Ox7 $80, compact foldable picnic
table w/4 seats $100. 233-3616.

Bowling balls #8414 w/carrying case $25 ea, wa-
tersport hydroslide board $75. 282-3180;

Briggs/Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower, 22' cut $125.
287-4597.

Gas grill $75, 30 Nintendo games $10-$30. 287-
3087.

Seed spreader, ceiling fan, Amana convection oven,
planters, more. 223-7437.

Enlisted dress blues (E-9) w/cap, 7ea in-service
strips, sz 32 trous, 36 coat $125. 287-3046.

Boys bike 24", 10-spd $50, weight set w/bench
$100. 287-5535.

Formal wedding gown, veil, slip, sz 5 $300. 252-
2080.

Wedding dress, sz 5/6, pearls, sequins, ember-
oidery, like new $85. 260-4684.

VHS movies orig $9-$4, Kg waterbed set $1800,
children BR set $450, LR set $1100.287-6574.

2 first communion dresses, sz 6/12, used once, 2
prom dresses szs 7 & 8. 287-6297.

Women's 18-spd mountain bike, new $165/obo.
2876424.

Bassett crib $100, changing tbl $60, other baby
items, 3x12 pool w/filter $120. 282-3497.

Curio $400, grn recliner/rocker $300, 7" Xmas tree
w/decoration $70. 287-6790.

Engagement ring, 14k gold .20ct diamond $950/
obo. 252-2916.

White prom dress, sz 3/4, worn once $70/obo. 287-
3879.

Criminal Justice Textbook, $50, Atari 800XL comp
w/1050 hd, books, more 287-3189.

Kenmore washer & dryer $200, Whirlpool $250,
12x16 rug $50 or $500 all. 252-2345 after 5pm.

Weight bench $50, jogging trampoline $35, roaster
oven $75. 252-5829.

Kolcraft stroller, good cond $50. 286-4539.

Mens Huffy 626, 12-spd bike $60. 264-4685.

Wilson '86staff golf clubs 1-3-5wds & 3-SW $360.
236-3443.

Complete suspension lift sys Toyota (4WD), brand
new $189. 287-3944.


1986 Honda Magna, 700cc, duty pd., looks/runs
gd., $2500/obo, 287-6181.

1981 Kawasaki 44f0OLTD, $1200,252-2345, after 5
p.m.

1987 Kawasaki Ninja, 750R, 9k, brakes, tire, just
professionally tuned, $3300, 263-5733, ext. 15.

1983 Yamaha Maxim Midnight Special, like new,
only 3K miles, must see. 2 helmets, $2900, 260-
9987.


Tropic Times Bl
May 1.1992 1.11


LR set, $1200/obo; 2 girls beds, twin, $200/ea.; 3
dressers, $100/ea., 284-3375.

Country blue couch, chair, overstuffed, 20-button
backing, exc. cond., $400, 282-3793.

Kenmore heavy duty washer/dryer, gd. cond., $500,
236-2121.

Whirlppol dryer, 14-18 pounds, almost new, $250,
224-8753.

Carpeting, blue, covers every room of 3 BR, Fort
Clayton, 500 area, 287-6187.

2 sets of twin beds, $270/ea. set; sofa, $900; dryer,
$85; 1 dishwasher, $50. 264-2788.

AntiquewalnutBRP armoire, vanity w/triplemirror,
bench, rocker, dbl. bed, $750, 287-4770.

King size waterbed, mirrors, headboard, sheets, 6-
drawer pedestal, waveless, $450, 287-6187.




Golf clubs: TA845 Silver Scots, 8,5W, LW. Lost at
Amador GC, April 18-19, reward for return., 252-
6970.

Thai Bath 24k necklace w/ Buddha. Reward, 286-
3345.


. .. .. .


Qz BR set $750, 9x12 beige carpet $90, butcher
block dishwasher $325, more, 286-3675 after 5pm.

Century infant car seat $30, Graco swingomatic
$40, AF mess dress, sz 40 $75. 286-3684.

2 dress green pants, sz 30R, 2 dress green coat, sz
37R $40. 289-3828.

Twin bed, bamboo furn, sofa table, microwave,
lamp, sm carpets, chair w/ottoman, Chinese chairs.
263-4321.

Lawn furniture of all types, make an offer. 236-
2815.

Lawn mower $50, dbl bed $100, entertainment
center $100, dehumidifier $90. 286-3684.

Linden surfboard 6' $250. 226-1158.

Recliner, bmn, metal desk, metal typing table. 252-
5985.

Wall unit, sm desk, comp desk, TV, stereo cab,
boy's bike, white table/desk, metal shelf. 282-3698.

Schwinn High Sierra ATB $350, OT outpost ATB
$200, both $500. 282-4938.

Free, trir frame, wheel, axle, needs work, VW en-
gine for Beetle $400. 252-2180.

5pc BR set $250, Gibson elec guitar, new $250, day
bed w/matt $125, bike $60, dresser, new $250.284-
3821.

Microwave, bbq grill, 13" color TV w/remote, di-
nette set, carpets, curtains, tent for 5, remote planes
& access. 286-3484.

Ladies leather shoes, good cond, sz 12M $10-15,
reproductions of pre-Colombian items. 223-4290
eves.

TV table w/wheels $20, Whirlpool 16,000 btu a/c
$295, child's bike training wheels $5. 252-5792.

Two 12lbs bowling balls $25 ca. 252-2428 after
5pm.

Vitamaster elec treadmill $200, stacking tool boxes
$75, metal utility shelves $20. 282-5281.

12x15 rug $55, table $15, office chairs $10 ea, 3pc
sofa $110, Kg-sz matt $25, TV/stereo stand $35.
221-9070.

4 new Dunlop tires 195/50/2R15 $400. 261-7770.

Fedders 14,000 btu a/c, Philco 10,000 a/c, secretary
desk $200, uniforms szs 16-18 $10 ea, nurses shoes
sz 10 $20, sofa, wooden arms. 236-1242.

Parts for '83 Cressida, eng, starter, seats, a/c,alterna-
tor, 284-6195 Iv msg.

Sofa, loveseat, chair, fair cond $200, 13" Zenith
color TV $85. 287-3297.

Lifecycle, computerized professional model, new
$800 firm. 284-4525.

2 prom dresses, sz 3 $50ea, Country blue dining
table $150. 284-3989.

Singer ironing press, variable temp. control, auto
shutoff, safety lock/handle, port $200. 287-3286.

Wedding dress, sz 7/8, veil, rice basket, sm pillow
for rings $500/obo. 261-7519 after 5pm.

6x9 blue carpet w/pad, way-to-go baby stroller,
baby crib, Army maternity uniforms, neg. 287-
3934.

Tricycle w/dump truck $25. 287-6284.

Batt operated 3-wheel motorbike by Tomy, re-
charger incl $60. 284-3482.

Tommy Armour metal wood '92 845s, 1,3, 5, right
hand, regular shaft, used twice $250. 284-4070.

Brn recliner, elec $150, weed eater $35, like new.
284-4322.

New breathable heavy duty vinyl nose protector for
Toyota Celica, '80-87. 285-4731.

'88 Encyclopedia Britannica, exc cond, includes
shelf $500/obo. 264-3830.


841-A, Fort Clayton, Sat, 8am-lpm, furniture, ap-
pliances, toys, Xmas tree, clothes.

5715-A Diablo, Sat, 7-10:30am.

1981B Curundu, Sat, 7:30am, multi-family, family
clothes, toys, jungle gym.

680 Clayton, Sat, Sam-noon, stereos, infant/toddler
clothes, chairs, more.

2622,2624 Cocoll,Sat, kitchen items, clothes,misc.

6243 Los Rios, Sat, clothes, sleeping bags, house-
hold items.

677A, Fort Clayton, Sat, 7am-noon, appliances,
rugs, bikes, clothes, furniture.

111 Albrook, Sat, 8am, designer shoes, clothes,
household, toys, multi-family.

237 Albrook, Sat, 8am-2pm, multi-family, lots of
baby girl items, no early birds.

81, 83 Howard, Sat, Sam-noon, sewing machine,
dishwasher, TV, baby items, misc.

627B Fort Clayton, Sat, 8-10am, furniture, stereo,
odds and ends.

3264A Balboa, Sat, Sam-noon, household goods,
clothes, toys, books.

827A Fort Clayton, household, toys, clothes,
Yamaha keyboard, misc.

907A Fort Clayton, Sat, 9am-lpm, clothes, house-
hold goods, multi-family, no early birds.

2241-A Balboa, Sat, Sam-noon, clothing, kitchen
appliances, BR furniture, TV, more.

2254A Balboa, Sat, 7-11am, many plants, rugs,-
bikes, Carr St.

0754C Williamson Place, Balboa, Sat, 9am-noon.

475B Fort Clayton, multi-family, clothes, books,
etc.

901B Fort Clayton, Sat, 9am-noon, freezer, misc.

335B Fort Clayton, Friday, noon-3pm; Saturday, 8
am-Spm, clothing, etc.

681B Corozal, Sat, 6:30-11am, furniture, misc.
household goods.

414C Amador, Sat, Sam-noon, small appliances,
furniture, bike, clothes.

1991A Curundu, Sun, 8am, children' items,books,
household goods.

82B, 86A, 79A Howard, Sat, 8am-noon, furniture,
toys, clothes, carpet, more.

475B Fort Clayton, Sat, Sam-lpm, multi-family,
clothes, books.

95A Howard, Sat, clothes, shoes, kitchen items.

1110 Amador, Sat, 8am-noon, gas grill, clothes.

302 Kobbe, Sat, 8am-2pm, multi-family, furniture,
clothes, household goods.

2529C Cocoli, Sat, 9am-6pm, household goods, ap-
pliances, rugs, etc..

437B Fort Clayton, Sat, 9am-5pm, fans, TV, lawn-
mower, computer, grill, etc.



Bilingual maid, live-in, must like children. 260-
1912, after 6pm.

Full-time, live-in maid, babysitter for one child,
good Eng, experienced, refs. reqd., 286-3893.

Eng-spking live-in maid, cook, clean, iron, refs,
hard worker, trustworthy, 282-3087.

14" rim, use as full spare,'90 Ford Escort, 284-3990.

Gas mower, will pay $25,286-3245.

Needto rent car monthly. Call 223-8301 after 6pm.

King-sz matt w/o box spring, good cond, 284-6788.

Need camper shell for short bed U.S. p/u, 256-6778.

Eng-spking live-in maid, M-F, refs, 289-3257.

Bookshelves, sm table, desk, CD rack, TV stand.
Call Rob, 263-7229.

someone to refinish furniture, reasonable price,
286-4336, btwn. 5-8 p.m.

Orig. Walt Disney, Cinderella, Sip. Beuty, Pinoc-
chio videos in orig. pkg., 283-5888.














B Tropic Times
May 1, 1992



Super Crossword


ACROSS
1 River in
Spain
5 Two-footed
creature
10 Bowling lane
15 Heavy, noisy
Impact
19 Chicago
district
20 Muse of
poetry
21 Dutch treat?
22 Note to the
boss
23 Start of a
timely
thought
27 He wrote
"Fables in
Slang"
28 "- of the
Desert" ('33
movie)
29 French angel
30 Singer Della
31 Take out
32 Sharp spear
34 Vegas
opener?
36 Legal matter
37 Off the -
(confidential)
40 Birthday
surprise,
often
41 Niamey is its
capital
43 European
river
44 Distinctive
quality
45 First-rate


46 Bitter, in 89 Tenant
Paris contracts
50 Second part 91 Fall behind
of the 94 Museum
thought display
55S Judd Hirsch 95 Scandinavian
TV comedy 96 Very old
56 Installs 97 Model
officers again 99 Platinum wire
57 Family car loop
58 Head cavity 100 Popular
5o Indian veggies
60 Sit on the 101 Alar phrase
heels 104 Conclusion
61 Spill the of thought
beans 110 Trampled
62 "Silas- ". 111 Austrian
65 They psychiatrist
motivate 112 Soprano
horses, so to Lehmann
speak 113 Italian painter
66 Overcome 114 Yellow and
67 French Coral
seaport 115 Summer
68 Tenor Lanza attractions
69 Neighbor of 116 Minor
Brazil: abbr. woodland
70 Chilly deity
71 Former 117 Beasts of
Egyptian VIP burden
72 Burdensome DOWN
76 British gun 1 Isle of exile
77 Third part of 2 "Lucinda
the thought Brayford"
81 Rabbit's author
cousin 3 Went by bus
82 Think deeply 4 WWII org.
and long 5 Look at
83 Like pie? 6 Goodnight
84 Food fish girt
85 River in 7 Dog's "dogs"
France 8 DDE's
87 Rice field command


9 Cole -
(range of hills
in France)
10 Part of CIA
11 Resort hotel
12 Stringed
Instrument
13 Tokyo, once
14 Talk too
much: slang
15 Pintail duck
16 Biblical
outcast
17 Entertain
18 Grandma of
art
24 River in
Belgium
25 German
philosopher
26 Gaelic
31 Univ.
buildings
32 Zhivago's
love
33 Romanian
city
34 It follows
table or bed
35 Like the best
cheeses
37 "Kings --
(movie)
38 Biblical
region
39 Wax
40 Heartbeat
41 Rule for Jack
Sprat
42 Bird such as
the cas-
sowary, or
kiwi


44 Cast member 74 Employs
45 Egyptian 75 Certain
skinks 77 God of love
47 Horse. 78 Williams
blanket and
48 Rejoice Kennedy
greatly 79 Angle of a
49 Advance in fault vein
rank 80 Distress call
51 Brezhnev 86 "Annie -"
52 American (1977 movie)
author 87 Baffling
Elizabeth problems
53 British 88 War god
statesman 89 Comfortable
54 Surgery or shoe
toxin lead-in 90 Bridge
58 African position
hunting trip 91 London
60 Roof prop in elevators
a mine 92 Worship
61 Sandpiper 93 italian
62 Island seaport
country near 95 Staircase
Sicily post
63 Writer of 96 Fairly big
rags-to- 98 Finds the
riches stories sum
64 Actress Luise 99 Northern
65 Maugham capital
heroine 100 Paper size
66 "Yankee 101 Wild goat
Doodle-" 102 English sand
67 "The Man in hill
Black" 103 War god
68 Clergyman's 105 Shrill bark
house 106 - Annie, of
69 Poetry: old "Oklahoma!"
style 107 They loop
71 Daredevil's the Loop?
feat 108 "Ode -
73 Coveted Nightingale"
award 109 Rio de -


BEETLE BAILEY � By Mort Walker


Barney Google and Snuffy Smith a By Fred Lasswell


MAW IF IT OUT
YOU'RE FIXIN'TO OF , TH
'if SNEEZE-- HOUSE!!










HAGAR the Horrible � By Dik Browne


"O1' Rudy, here, has what I
think is a great idea!"


'NOW 1'LLTELLYOU ABOUTSOME OFTHE STUFF
TiAr HAPPENED TO ME WREN 1 WAS YOUNG."


DENNIS THE MENACE


YOU SHOULD TURI1
ON A LIGHT DURING-
YOUR (iDN16HT SNCKS

--rm




Full Text

PAGE 1

Gift of the Panama Canat Museum News Feature Sports A Nova University starting School teaches anti-terror13 local lifters compete at new program. Page 2. ist tactics. Page 8. Howard AFB.Page 11. .~Topic Times. Vol. V. No. 17 -Quarry Heights, Republic ofPanama Friday, May 1, 1992 New Army program battles crime by Sgt. Joseph J. Johnson U.S. citizens and several Panamanians to the lobby usASgt eph J.r ohnson floor of the Costa del Sol hotel, where they robbed "A number of individuals have been USARSO PL61Ac Mum Oft& them. Onerobberpistol-whippedavictimandanothervicaffected by the criminal elements FORT CLAYTON tim was kicked in the ribs, Pittman said. (USARSO PAO) -The hotel in downtown Panama City is one of several that enter our installation communiThe recent increase in used to house newcomers, those preparing to leave and ties and off post, but the general crime involving U.S. others on temporary duty. .is unclear on what has citizens in Panama has "There are a whole host of initiatives that has been popUiation prompted the cornEundertaken to work this problem from a number of happened." manding general of different directions," Timmons said. U.S. Army South and "We have made the Panamanian police aware ofthe Timmons Task Force Panama problem and they agree there has been an increase in Commander, U.S. Army South to fight back with crime and they are taking steps to come to grips with education and heightthat problem. And we find that very positive. ened awareness of "At the same time we are trying to assess all of those effect. We hope to have. a clearer picture on where to high crime areas. hotels, restaurants, markets, malls, movie theaters and go and where not to go in Panama City and Colon,"said "Notmany people bars that have had atrend of criminal difficulty over the Timmons." are aware.of the past year. In other words.to identify locations.not The intent (of the program) is to warn everyone to increases in crime that Timmons suitable for our soldiers and dependents to frequent," stay away from these places so that they don't put have troubled us over said Timmons. .themselves in jeopardy." the past three months," said Maj. Gen. Richard F. The command will aggressively campaign to comTimmons said the effort will also accentuate the Timmons. municate the crime problem through radio, television positive; to communicate where people can go to "A number of individuals have been affected by the and newspaper media. enjoy themselves and take advantage of some of the opcriminal elements that enter our installation communiNew personnel will be fully informed as part of their portunities for morale, welfare and recreation in Panties and off post, but the general population is unclear inprocessing. And the chain of command will ensure ama. on what has happened." soldiers have the latest information about off-limits "Our intent is not to frighten anyone into remaining USARSO Deputy Provost Marshal Lt. Col. Garry L. areas, troublesome crime areas, and dangerous routes. on their installations for fear of being victimized," Pittman noted 41 incidents in which soldiers and famiThe provost marshal plans to introduce a column in Timmons said. lies were victimized from December to March. That's the Tropic Times called "Crime Scene." "Ourrealintentis toidentify ('.fe)recreational sites 23 incidents more than during the same time period last It will feature places where crimes have occurred inand activities like: beaches, -' aning, snorkeling, year. volving U.S. members and family members as a device boat rides, river rides, sight-seeing. good restaurants An April 8Tobbery of a "safe" hotel underscored the to warn people of the seriousness of the problem. and places where you can truly enjoy the environproblem. Seven men brandishing pistols forced five "So it's a multi-phased approach, just now going into ment." Gorgas allows Peruvian fighter plane shoots C-130 elr a QUARRY HEIGHIS, Panama (U.S. minutes after reaching international windowopening. Self-referral Southern Command PAO) -An unairspace, and about two hours after The C-130 aircraft immediately armed U.S. Air Force C-130 aircraft terminating its mission, the C-130 was turned toward the coast and started FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -on a routine flight was fired upon by intercepted by two Peruvian Sovietdescending because of the loss of cabin Gorgas Army Community Hospital appointPeruvian aircraft during the afternoon built SU-22 fighter aircraft. pressure. The crew again unsuccessment system now allows self-referral to of April 24. The flight was approved Theintercept occurredin daylight, fully tried to contact the interceptors specialty clinics for the treatment of certain by the Peruvian government and was in clear weather, and unlimited vision international distress frequencies. medical conditions. in support of U.S. Southern Command's bility. The lead intercepting aircraft While descending in a right turn General Surgery: breast mass, rectal counter-drug mission. flew alongside on the left of the clearly toward the Peruvian coast, the C-130 bleeding in people over 35 years, lumps in Preliminary reports indicate the Cidentifiable and normally marked Caircraft was strafed twice more. These neck, abdomen or chest, ingrown toenails -130 aircraft, while flying withinits ap130 and rocked its wings to get the Cattacks wounded four crewmembers. 282-5236 proved operating area, was intercepted 130 to follow it. In accordance with Upon approaching the coast, the Urology: blood in urine, mass on tesbyaPeruvian Tucano aircraft as the Cestablished Department of Defense crew was able to contact Talara apticle, voluntary sterilization -282-5250/ 130 was nearing completion of its procedures and the fact the aircraft proach and control and request per5236 mission. As the crew was unable to was in international airspace, and since mission for an emergency landing. The ENT:significantinjuries to nose orear -determine the Tucano's intentions, and the mission had been pre-approved by Peruvian fighters escorted the C-130 282-5237/5251 after unsuccessfully trying to call off the Peruvian government, the C-130 to El Pato Airfield, where it landed. OB/GYN: suspected pregnancy, abnorthe intercept by communicating with continued to fly its northerly heading The wounded airmen were moved mal vaginal bleeding or discharge, dyspauthe Peruvians via the U.S. Southernwhile monitoring internationally recto a local hospital until they were renia (pain with intercourse) -282-5237/ Command headquarters, they termiognized distress frequencies 121.5 and evacuated early the next day. nated the mission. The aircraft headed 243.0 MHz. The crew tried to contact Of the four wounded U.S. crew5251 due west in order to leave Peru and the Peruvian interceptors and local air men, one received serious wounds to Opthalmology: eye pain, decreased vireach international airspace by the most traffic control authorities on both disthe neck and chest. He is in Gorgas sion (sudden), double/partial vision -282expeditious route. Peru claims sovertress frequencies without success. Army Community Hospital in serious, 5237/5224 eignty over territorial sea and airspace A few minutes later, a SU-22 flew but stable condition. Two received only Orthopedic: Single joint pain, swelout to 200 nautical miles from its coast, alongside the C-130 on its right side. minor wounds (scrapes and abrasions). ling, ordeformity, hand and foot injuries or but these claims go against internaThe crew observed smoke and unA third received superficial shrapnel burns252-5248/5249 tional law, which does not recognize identified debris, which they thought wounds in the chest and both legs. He Audiology: hearing restriction or declaims beyond a 12-mile nautical mile to be chaff, coming from the Peruvian was treated at Gorgas upon return to crease, Tinnitus -282-5237/5251 limit. aircraft. No tracer rounds were seen. Panama and has since been released. Any patient with apre-existing medical After the C-130 entered internaVery shortly thereafter, the CThe aircraft sustained damage to condition that was treated at another meditional airspace, it flew to the northeast, 130 was strafed along its right side engines, hydraulic and fuel systems, cal treatment facility may make an apremaining at least 60 nautical miles with gun fire. As a result of the hits, fuselage and landing gear. pointment directly with the Gorgas Medifrom the Peruvian coast as it returned a rapid decompression occurred, The U. S. Southern Command is cal Clinic, 282-5164/5165. to its home base in Panama. blowing out an observation window conducting an investigation into the At 5:02p.m., about one hourand20 and a crewmember through the incident.

PAGE 2

2 Tropic Times May 1, 1992 Air War College program seeks students HOWARDAFB (24th WG/PA)The drive to recruit The program consists of 40 lessons covered in two credit. This applies to both seminar and corresponstudents for the 1993 Air War College non-resident volumes of 20 lessons each. An organizational meeting dence students, according to Air Force education offiseminar program is under way. takes placein late July and Volume I runs from August cials The curriculum mirrors that ofthe resident course at to December. Volume II seminars are held January to The AWC seminar program is open to active duty Maxwell AFB, Ala. March,1993. and reserve colonels, lieutenant colonels, and lieuAWC emphasizes joint education and senior leader Initial enrollments must be in Volume I as the curtenant colonel selectees of any component of the development focused on military strategy and the riculum is designed using a building block approach. U.S. armed Forces, Air Force civilian employees GS/ employment of air power. Only students who completed Volume I can enroll in GM-13 or above, and Air Force (active duty, national The AWCnon-resident seminaris awayto complete Volume II in January 93. guard or reserve) majors selected on a 1985 or earlier senior PME. It combines self-study with an informal, People who have completed one volume, either one board -date of rank May 1, 1986 or earlier). At least semi-structured meeting environment. or two, but have not completed both volumes, must sign five people are needed to form a non-resident seminar. Students not only draw knowledge from course up to complete the remaining volume requirements The base education office is now taking enrollment reading materials, but are able to exchange concepts during this academic year. applications. Visit the office in Bluilding 708, or call and ideas with other senior people. Failure to do so will cause loss of previous volume 284-4863 for more details. Nova University starts programs DIABLO (Nova University) -Registration for two degree-oriented programs kicked off in May and June at Nova University's Panama Center. Nova is offering a Master's in Business Administration and a Bachelor of Science in Professional Management with a business speciality. Registration begins May 25. The classes are oriented toward working professionals and are scheduled in the evenings and on weekends, according to Panama Center's Dean, Dr. Martii Taylor. The first two courses ofthe MBA program offered in May are management: theory and application, and organization behavior and development. Registration continues through the class starting date, May 8. Both courses address theoretical and practical studies related to private industry and government service. MBA students will meet every second or third weekend during the 15-week semester. Students who take the normal class load of two classes per semester can finish the 12 courses in 24 months. Nova's MBA curriculum is designed to enhance the effectiveness andproductivity ofpre-managerial and managerial professionals involved inpublic and private sector organizations, Taylor said. Students in the undergraduate program meet weekday evenings, either a Monday and Wednesday, or Tuesday and Thursday schedule. Students who present at least 60 semester hours, or an associate's degree, are eligible for admission. A student starting in aJune, can complete all courses for the B.S. in 26 months without leaving Panama. Applications, information and counselling are available for these two starting academic groups and other courses in progress. US phoo bySFC Tny Nauroth U.S. personnel can obtain information on tuition assisYOUTH CONFIRMATION -The most Reverend Marcos G. McGrath, archbishop of the diocese tance, and on Veteran's Administration benefits by of Panama City, anoints Angie Romero as a full member of the Catholic Church during the visiting their education office or by stopping bytheNova confirmation of 25 U.S. Pacific community young adults Saturday afternoon at Fort Clayton Administration Office Building 5051, the Diablo Club Chapel. house, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday. Call 252-2071 or 252-2494 for appointments. Gorgas facing budget crunching challenge FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Despite budget develop coordinated care programs, while maintaining ogy or staff to meet highly specialized or vital medical cuts, Gorgas Army Community Hospital is adding responsibility for delivery, cost, and quality of services. needs, supplemental care can be arranged at hospitals in doctors, cutting thelength ofpatient stays, and improvThe Department of the Army calls the transition to a coPanama City. ing the quality of care, said hospital officials. ordinated care program the Gateway to Care. Gorgas This service is usually cost effective to Gorgasand Col. Michael A. McConnell, commander, said that has initiated its own Gateway to Care via the Partnervital to seriously injured patients who need immediate despite cuts, quality patient care remains his first and ship Program by contracting qualified local physicians care and can't be air evacuated to the states. foremostconcern. to augment the hospital's regular staff. Prompt medical evacuation will continue. So McConnell and his staff have begun implenting "We had our budget slashed $.24 million for fiscal In addition to routine air evacuation flights every programs designed to cut through bureacracy and save year 92, but by exercising some addtional options such two weeks to Brooke Army Medical Center, San Antomoney. One method is cutting back the time patients as CHAMPUS (Civilian Health and Medical Program nio, emergency flights are scheduled as needed. remain in the hospital, with same-day-surgery. forthe Uniformed Service) Partnerships, supplemental Restructuring and consolidating services aims to SDS is also called ambulatory surgery, and was care, and consolidating services, we have been able to stretch budget dollars while improving medical care. initiated in 1990 to save money by minimizing a numexpand services even with budget reductions," McConPeriodic patient surveys indicate resources must be ber of functions associated with surgery and subsequent nell said. shifted to meet changing demands, said officials. hospital convalescence, such as nursing, diet and houseThrough the Partnership Program for CHAMPUS No services will beeliminated, McConnell stressed, keeping. beneficiaries, Gorgas has expanded medical care to but delivery methods will be tailored to meet current Patients receiving minor surgery might spend three what officials say are the areas of greatest need and community needs. In May, Gorgas plans to consolidate days in the hospital. Now for each SDS patient there patient dissatisfaction, OB/GYN and Pediatrics. These the Departments of Psychiatry and Social Work on the should be areduction of two hospital days, or a $1,402 clinics have been augmented at Gorgas by two doctors. fifth floor of the main building. savings. The program is expected to save nearly $1 These services are also available to CHAMPUS benefiCol. Felice M. Iapaolo, quality improvement direcmillion a year. ciaries at the Fort Clayton clinic. tor, said total quality management was introduced in Another new dollar-stretching method is coordiThe Dermatology and Ear, Nose, and Throat clinics 1992. "TQM is the typical organizational pyramid of nated care, a network of military and civilian health are also under consideration for staff augmentation via hierarchy, but inverted so the employees are the most careproviders. the program in the near future. important. Only through action by the employees can Medical treatment facilities commanders can now When Gorgas does not have the equipment, technolwe achieve true improvement in quality."

PAGE 3

I.) 03 NewsTropic Times U.S. News May,1992 Jurors' decision heeds 'thin blue line' defense SIMI VALLEY, Calif. (AP) -The abiding and the not law-abiding will jury that acquitted four Los Angeles podisintegrate." licemen in the Rodney King beating heeded The prosecution asked jurors to defense lawyers' warnings that police trust their own eyes, relying on the videare "the thin blue line" separating the otape shot by a neighborhood resident to law-abiding from the lawless. show that the clubbing and kicking of The lack of testimony from King and King was unnecessary, unreasonable the transfer of the trial from ethnically force. diverse Los Angeles to Simi Valley, a King, a convicted robber, was not predominantly white suburb known as a called by either side as a witness. Prosebedroom community for police, may cutors have said the tape spoke for itself. have tipped the scales toward the de"Had King been able to talk to us, the fense. video might have been looked at differOnly six blacks were amoug 400 prosently," ajuror who demanded anonympects summoned for jury duty. ity was quoted as saying on ABC's Two blacks who made it into the jury "Nightline." box were removed by defense chalDefense lawyers played the tape so lenges. many times at so many different speeds King is black; the four officers white. that its impact may have been blunted. In powerful closing arguments, deAnd they offered enough explanations fense lawyers portrayed their clients as for what it showed to providereasonable guardians of an endangered society. doubt. Defense lawyer Michael Stone, a forDefense experts said the four did what mer policeman, recalled a sign in a pothey were trained to do: inflict pain and lice gymnasium: "There are no secondbreak bones with their batons if necesplace ribbons in a street fight." sary. "These officers, these defendants, do Two officers said they believed King not get paid to lose a street fight," he was "dusted," or under the influence of argued. "They do not get paid to 'roll PCP, and had superhuman strength. AP LAsIPhoto around in the dirt with the likes of RodThe fact that no trace of PCP was NEVER TOO OLD -David Eugene Ray of Franklin, Tenn., had a very ney Glen King. found in King's system was irrelevant, special day Thursday. Not only did he turn 100, but for the first time in his "That's not their job. That's not their the defense contended. Lawyers spoke of life he'll be able to read his birthday cards, Ray never learned to read until duty," he said. "And if we as members the officers' "reasonable perceptions" a tutor began teaching him early this year. He is shown Tuesday with his of the community demand they do that, and urged jurors to stand in their shoes reading text book. the thin blue line that separates the lawthat night. California disaster officials fear bigger quake EUREKA, Calif. (AP) -As the cleanup from a quake and two strong aftershocks early Sunday. he didn't have attendance figures for Tuesday. weekend earthquake continued and most schools reoHumboldt County officials asked Monday that PresiThe quake and the aftershocks caused an estimated pened, the state's disaster officer warned that another dent Bush declare the quake zone a disaster area. A $51 million in damage and about 95 injuries. aftershock in the 6-point range was possible along the similar designation was already made by Gov. Pete Hardest hit was the lumbertown of Scotia, where the northwest coast. Wilson, who toured the area Tuesday by helicopter and first aftershock caused a fire that destroyed a shopping Dick Andrews, director of the California Office of met with emergency officials. A federal declaration of center and caused $15 million in damage. Emergency Services, said Monday that aftershocks disaster would clear the way for federal aid, including Arlene Mock, who worked in a hardware store that might continue for several weeks. He said rumbles in low-interest loans from the Small Business Administrawas leveled in the fire, watched some of the cleanup the 4-point range on the Richter scale were probable tion. efforts Monday, then left to try to get back on track. and that one or more in the range of 5-point or 6-point Mike McGuire, Humboldt County emergency serv"I'm not worried about it. We'll be OK," she said were possible. Several barely discernible aftershocks ices director, says most schools in the county were open with a shrug as she and her husband, John, stared at the were reported late Sunday and Monday as residents Tuesday. He said there were a few schools that were blackened earth where the store once stood. "I'm just started cleaning up the rubble from Saturday's earthopen Monday and those schools had a lot of absentees; going to go file unemployment right now." Nevada man Seattle youths film 'Beverly Hills' takeoff kills 3, injures 1 MERCER ISLAND, Wash. (AP) -This is rich. Said sophomore Michal Blum, who worked on the program: RENO, Nev. (AP) -Atenant at High school students in the wealthy Seattle suburb of Mercer "Mercerlsland and Beverly Hills are, like, thestereotypeis the a trailer park who had feuded Island filmed their own version of Fox television's "Beverly same." with park managers went on a Hills 90210" and manage to make the fictional Californians But the 15-minute student production, set to run on a local rampage, killing three people look disadvantaged. access cable channel, is a light takeoff of "Beverly Hills and wounding three others beBut then Mercer Island High School is where one student 90210." The Fox show about the travails of students in the ritzy fore another tenant apparently fulfilled a cooking-class assignment by bringing in her mother's Los Angeles suburb examines weighty themes like drug use shot him to death, authorities caterer. And youngsters at basketball games chant when their and teen sex. said. team is losing: "That's all right, that's OK, you're going to The Seattle version created and directed by junior Jason Police said Fermin Mancilla's work for us someday," while waving dollar bills. Merrell concerns such issues as a shortage of student parking shooting spree Monday evening In the fictional high school of "Mercer Island 98040," spots, the lack of nighttime hangouts and overconsumption of killed the managers of the Covstudents enjoy valet parking, glide down halls onRollerblades latte -the espresso and steamed-milk beverage that courses ered Wagon trailer park where he and a disc jockey spins records between classes. thicker than blood through many Seattlites's veins. lived and another tenant at the adjoining Bonanza park. Justice Department opposes releasing documents Bird shooting WASHINGTON (AP) -The Justice in its current form, and, if it were precriticized Tuesday by Republicans and runs 'afowl' Department "strongly" opposes a consented to the president without amendDemocrats in a hearing of the House gressional resolution calling for the ment, would give serious consideration Legislation and National Security subANCHORAGE (AP) -The release of documents relating to the to recommending presidential disapcommittee. scream ofjet engines has no effect assassination of President Kennedy, proval," said W. Lee Rawls, assistant "I have a tremendous concern that we and cannons and noise-makers don't according to a letter made public attorney general. not compromise the bill in order to get work, so migrating ducks and geese Tuesday. Rawls' letter was received Monday something that is veto-proof," said Rep. that flock to Anchorage's InternaThe Justice Department letter raised night and came as a surprise to subChristopher Shays, R-Conn. tional Airport and endanger planes constitutional objections to the proposed committee chairman John Conyers, DRep. Lee Hamilton, D-Ind., who testiare being shot. House-Senate resolution, which would Mich. fied before the subcommittee, said that if So far this year, wildlife offiestablish a judicially appointed review Conyers said that he and subcommitthe president vetoes the measure, the cers and airport maintenance workboard to oversee release of thousands of tre staffers negotiated unsuccessfully to House should vote independently to reers have killed about 70 ducks and secret government documents relating to p, rsuade Justice Department officials to lease secret congressional records, "and geese, officials said. the 1963 assassination. appear at Tuesday's hearing. at least set an example for the executive "We strongly object to the resolution The specter of a presidential veto was branch."

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4Tropic Times -H m s h r May 1,1992Hemisphere Peruvian polls show support LIMA, Peru (Reuters) Most Peruvians, from the president on down, are keeping a close eye on the polls these days as President Alberto Fujimori continually cites them to show the overwhemlming support for his virtual one-man rule. Political talk shows have been competing to commissionpolls in abid to take the Fujimori pulse of the Peruvian populace, which has enthusiastically applauded Fujimori in what he calls his campaign to clean up corruption and inefficiency in the Congress and judiciary. AP La erPhoto In the latest surveys, Fujimori's popularity was runSoldiers stand guard in front of a portrait of party founder Victor Raul Haya de a Torre on the roof of the ning between 70 and 90 percent three weeks after he opposition Aprista party headquarters in Lima April 18. Armed forces took control of the building after an abruptly announced he was dissolving Congress and anti-government protest. closing the nation's courts. said the high rating Fujimori has received in the last government. This has brought him to give a shorter "Polls cannot replace the institutional and legal year combined with the abysmal image of Congress and timetable than he originally intended," Torres said. forms of expression of the popular will. This is not thejudiciary was "without a doubt among the two most In a sign of the importance polls have gained in under discussion," Fujimori said in atelevised address important factors that spurred the president's decision Peru's constitutional crisis, members of a visiting Orto the nation last week. to carry out the April 5 measures." ganization of American States delegationrequested the "But neither is the fact that they (the polls) reflect Fujimori also appears to have used the polls over the surveys ofthe majorpolling firms as part of the mission thethinking and feelings ofthePeruvianpeople .The last three weeks to guide his actions in proposing a to "listen to all points of view" of Peruvian society. popular will must be respected," he added. return to constitutional rule by next April, said Alfredo But Torres warned that using polls as a way of A week earlier he invited foreign correspondents to Torres, manager of Apoyo, considered Peru's leading measuring support and legitimizing a government's ac"gointo the streets to verify foryourselves thatthepolls polling firm. tions, is a "highly risky business" since they are only are not lying." "Most of the public has supported the measures an approximate measure of the public's attitude at a cerManuel Torrado, head of the Datum polling firm, taken but they also want a quick return to a democratic tain moment. Argentinalimits Gas explosion probe snags officials nuclear pace BUENOS AIRES Argentina GUADALAJARA, Mexico (Reuters) -Eight government "The problem of corruption is also a problem of complicity (AP) -Argentina, aleaderinLatin officials were imprisoned Monday on negligent homicide at the highest levels," he added. American nuclear development, charges stemming from last week's devastating gas explosions Rosa Maria Aviles, a member of a group of victims and has placed new controls on the in Guadalajara. homeless, also cast doubt on the official report. export of nuclear materials and But many Mexicans continued asking themselves who was "We all think the most to blame is the governor," she said, technology and ballistic missile really to blame for the tragedy that took over 200 lives. referring to Guillermo Cosio, governor of Jalisco State for expertise. Victims of the blasts and opposition politicians criticized the the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party. Argentina "has held a historiresults of the government's probe announced Sunday, which An arrest order against Guadalajara Mayor Enrique Dau cally ambiguous position" on named four officials of the state oil company Petroleos MexiFlores, who quit his post Saturday, a day before the report was proliferation of weapons of mass canos, three water department officials, the mayor of Guadalajara issued, could not be executed as his whereabouts were undestruction, President Carlos and a state government official as responsible for the disaster. known. Menem said Monday night in an"It seems to be in the back of the government's mind to cut The eight other officials, including Aristeo Mejia Duran, nouncing therestrictions. off the chain of complicity at a low level so as not to affect Urban Planning Secretary to the state of Jalisco of which political ties," said Ricardo Pascoe, official spokesman of the Guadalajara is the capital, were being held in a Jalisco correcGroup criticizes Democratic Revolutionary Party. tional facility. street child killings ddeix PARIS (Reuters) -The InternaCuba demands U.b. extradite exiles tional Federation of Human Rights urged Brazil on Tuesday to crack UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) -Cuba asked the Security Wednesday on Cuba's request for a meeting. down on death squad killings of Council Tuesday to condemn alleged United States terrorism In his letter, Alarcon said: "The crimes committed by the thousands of street children. and to demand the extradition of two Cuban exiles it accused United States and particularly its Central Intelligence Agency Two children are being shot of blowing up aCuban airlinerin 1976in which73 peoplewere against the people of Cuba are innumerable, but undoubtedly dead every day in Rio de killed. one of the most abominable, repugnant and cruel was the Janeiro, according to a report from In a letter to the president of the council reque: ing a blowing up of a civilian Cuban airplane off Barbados on October a judge and a lawyer sent by the meeting, Cuban U.N. envoy Ricardo Alarcon drew a parallel 6, 1976 where 73 people were killed." Paris-based human rights group to with recent council action demanding that Libya hand over The letter named the two alleged culprits as Orlando Bosch Brazil in February to probe the two agents indicted in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 and Luis Posada Carriles and said they were "currently under killings. over Lockerbie, Scotland, in 1988, and cooperate in an investhe protection of the government of the United States." The group said police figures tigation into the 1989 bombing of a French UTA airliner Alarcon said that while U.S. leaders were tryir. to portray show 4,611 street children were over Niger. A total of 441 people were killed in the two themselves as opponents ofinternational terrorism, ey hadfor killed between 1988 and 1990. disasters. years trained, armed and financed the "terrorist activities" Council members said they would hold consultations on of those two men and others like them. Colombian telephone workers end strike CUCUTA, Colombia (AP) -Telephone workers The strikeending agreement, mediated by Congress, Banks have been unable to transfer funds; the Foragreed Tuesday to end a strike that cut communication also creates a labor-government commission to detereign Ministry lost contact with embassies; some exportbetween Colombia and the rest of the world for seven mine the fate of 63 fired workers accused of sabotage. ers set up shop in neighboring Panama so as not to lose days. The workers erased Telecom computer program s and clients. The 14,000 employees of the state-run Telecom used cooking flour to gum up long-distance transmisPort and oil workers have been staging work stopcompany acted after the government signaled willingsion cables. pages in sympathy with the Telecom workers, as have ness to modify a plan to privatize the firm. The sabotage last April 12 cut off all long-distance peasants through-oit the country. It was not clear if "The workers have agreed to return to their jobs," telephone service. Tuesday's agreement would head off further labor union leader Eberto Lopez announced on the RCN The workers argue that the government's sale of strife. radio network. Telecom will cost jobs and sacrifice national soverThe communications crisis came at an especially bad Most of Colombia's sabotaged long-distance phone eignty. The government says it will bring efficiency and time. A prolonged dry spell and government mism ansystem was still not operating Tuesday evening, howmodernization. agement have cut hydroelectric power, forcing the ever. The telephone strike has cost Colombia millions of government to severely ration electricity, with power Officials said it was slowly being put back in order. dollars. cuts of 8-10 hours per day.

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Tropic Times Military News .2 1 Bumper sticker rubs base wrong way ATLANTA (AP) -A military base mechanic whose "America has never been a place where the governMacon. The sticker said, "To Hell With Reagan." anti-Bush bumper stickers were banned by his Air ment can suppress unfavorable views," Weber said. The stickers on Ethredge's truck now read, "Read Force bosses is going to court forthe right to display the "The military has robed Jesse Ethredge of the very My Lips: To Hell With Geo Bush" and "Forgive Bush messages on the truck he drives to work. freedom it is supposed to protect." not Egypt. He lied." The American Civil Liberties Union planned to file Base officials refused to comment. Spokesman Dale In 1990, base security ticketed Ethredge for "proa federal lawsuit Tuesday on behalf of Jesse Ethredge, Brinkman refused to say if the base near Macon has a evoking speech on a truck." The ticket was thrown out who was ordered to remove the stickers or keep the policy against bumper stickers that criticize Bush. after Ethredge challenged it. truck off Robins Air Force Base in Warner Robins. Ron Fry, a spokesman at the Air Force Logistics In October, Robert M. Hail, then base deputy com"It's a matter of standing up for your rights," said Command in Ohio, which has authority over the base, mander, told Ethredge the stickers were demeaning to Ethredge, civilian employee at the base for 25 years. said decisions about bumper stickers are left to local the Bush administration and bad for troops. "I'm the kind of fella that whenever I know I'm right, commanders. Hail ordered the stickers removed, saying a military I'm going to fight you 'til I'm shot down." "He has the authority to rule on such things like this employee telephoned the base complaint line about The ACLU wants base officials to lift the ban on that he may deem in poor taste or inappropriate," Fry them. stickers critical of President Bush's administration, said said. "They said that it was a morale buster," said Ethredge, Gerry Weber, legal director for the Georgia ACLU, Base officials began complaining about Ethredge's who began driving a sticker-free carto workbecause he based in Atlanta. Ethredge isn't seeking damages. stickers in 1984 when former President Reagan visited feared he would be fired. Women charge Marines with sexual harassment PENSACOLA, Fla. (AP) -Women Ford was accused of dancing and drinkaccused two Marine drill instructors of ing with officercandidates at class social sexual harassment at a school for aviaevents he supervised and going to a tion officer candidates. woman's room at 5:30 a.m. to ask that Most ofthe women who testified durshe get him a bottle of ointment from the ing hearings Tuesday and April 23 have hospital. graduated from the Aviation Officer Navy Capt. Steve Peterson presided Candidate School at Pensacola Naval over the hearings and will make arecomAir Station and now are commissioned mendation in each case that could range officers. from ageneral court-martial to dismissal They accused Gunnery Sgts. Miofthe charges. chael E. Wallace and Clifton W. Ford of The school's chief drill instructor, violating the Uniform Code of Military MSgt. Charles Ryan, disputed allegaJustice by fraternizing with their stutions the school was rife with rumors of dents and sexually harassing subordistudent-instructor relationships. nates. One woman charged that Wallace He insisted there is a clear division bepulled out her waistband and put his hand tween instructors and students. and ice on her buttocks at a party. The school began the probe last year Another testified Wallace followed after Wallace's wife complained to school herinto ahotelroom during aNavy show officials that she thought he was having in Chicago and asked for a hug. an affair. Gunnery training resumes after 5-ton truck accident FORT KNOX, Ky. (AP) -Gunnery officials said. training resumed Tuesday at Fort Training resumed because "we Knox, two days afterthree Marines were need to get active again, to get our killed and nine others were injured when focus off the accident. We need to get a truck slid off a wet road and overback in business for mental-health reaturned. sons," said Lt. Col. Don Harlin, The 12 Marines from Camp Lejeune, commanding officer of the 2nd Tank AP LaserPhoto N.C., were returning from a tank-firing Battalion, 2nd Marine Division out of GROUNDED BUT OCCUPIED -U.S. serviceman Cpl. Rick Knapik from range Saturday night in a five-ton Camp Lejeune. Berlin, Conn., finds time to slide down snow-covered lava April 18 while truck when the truck slid on wet Injuries ranged from cuts and scrapes waitingfor Mount Etna to clear. The U.S. is helping residents in Italydivert and possibly muddy pavement, struck to broken bones, Harlin said. the lava flow from the erupted volcano. an embankment and overturned, The accident is under investigation. Anti-terrorism school highlights horrors HURLBURT FIELD, Fla. (AP) -While an inRegular courses range from three to 10 working days structor has students' attention at a firearms range, a 'Terrorists like soft targets. We teach and class size from a few to more than 100. couple of men who had been working with a shovel Some courses dealing with military planning are and rake off to the side drop their tools. them (students) to be hard targets." limited to top-ranking officers with top-secret clearSuddenly, they pull automatic weapons from a ances. wheelbarrow and shoot up several dummies seated Personnel from all military branches and some civilaround tables at a mockup of a sidewalk cafe. School's anti-terrorism chief ian agencies, including the Central Intelligence Agency, The ambush is over before many in the Dynamics Secret Service and State Department, attendthe school. of International Terrorism course realize what has during the Vietnam War with a single course to prepare Most are headed overseas and many will be working happened. Air Force personnel for duty in Southeast Asia. with foreign nationals, said Col. Michael Flynt, the The bullets were real and so was the message: Next It now offers 13 courses. Among them are orientaschool's commandant. time it could be you. tion courses on other cultures. Other subjects include In addition to the cafe massacre, the terrorism course "You've got to accept the fact you are a potential cross-cultural communications, revolutionary warfare, features demonstrations of guns, explosives and methtarget," says Maj. Gail Gilbert, anti-terrorism chief at psychological operations, and crisis response manageods favored by terrorists. They are attention-getters to the Air Force Special Operations School. ment. make sure students take to heart the survival instrucThe mock massacre, a re-enactment of a terrorist Before and during thePersianGulf Warlast year, the tions. attackthat killed several U.S. Marines and civilians in school made special presentations here and at other "Terrorists like soft targets," Gilbert said. "We El Salvador, is one of the more dramatic lessons taught bases to about 10,000 military personnel heading to the teach them to be hard targets." at the school, which marked its 25th year April 15. A Middle East. The primary lesson is to be unpredictable, she said. faculty reunion to formally celebrate the anniversary About 100,000 men and women from all services Students are urged to avoid getting into a routine and is set for May 1. also saw videos the school produced on the Gulfcrisis take such steps as changing daily travel routes and The school started at this Florida panhandle base and Middle East culture. times.

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6Tropic Times ~V ie SMay 1, 1992Voices Mayors' Corner Action Line DEAR MAYOR, If, for any reason, you are having a The action line Is a problem with a child of a domestic, you should go directly to the sponsor of the direct link between Brig. What is the rule about maids being maid. Ifthesituationcannot beresolved Gen. David Oakes,24th allowed to bring their children with them between the two of you, Army residents Wing commander, and onpostibase? should report the problem to their area Howard AFB and AlOur housing area is already overflowcoordinator, Air Force residents should brook AFS personnel. If ing with children and the last thing we contact the Security Police. you have a question or need is to have more brought in each day. problem that you can't Off-post residents: solve through normal Fort Clayton resident supervisory channels, call There will a Quality of Life Council the Action Line at 284DEAR READER, Meeting, Wednesday at 5 p.m. for off5849. Callers should leave post residents at the Valent Recreation a name, telephone numAccording to the supervisor of the Center, Fort Clayton. ber and mailing address Oakes Fort Clayton Installation *Pass Office, Representatives will be available from in case questions need to regulations do not allow domestics to the telephone, water and electric compabe clarified. Names will y .Thank you for your concern sign other visitors on post. .es, the Panamanian National Police be kept confidential and used only and interest about the food hanTechnically, in order for a domestic's and Merchants National Bank. to provide callers with a personal dling procedures at base food child to be admitted to the installation, A slide presentation will also be shown response. facilities. th sponsor of the maid must sign the bythepresident ofthe PanamaChamber I contacted the Army and Air Passes are not issued to children, f I'm wondering if you have Force Exchange Service general unless they are older and po a servany health code or law governing the manager about your concern and was Aroid handling of food at your snack bar at informed they do have a policy govHowever, as a courtesy to military Corozal: Howard AFB. earning the handling offoodinall food members who allow their maids to bring George and Margie Steinbager, 684A Recently, I went and ordered a facilities. their small children to work, the Mili800, Fort Clayton: hamburger. There were two people A food handler may operate a cash tary Police will generally admit the SFC Victor and Maria Martinez, 833B at the snack bar; one was cooking register and handle food. young children in the company of their and the other was working the regisHowever, between these two duties parent. Editor's note: This column Is proter. they must wash their hands with a The same unofficial policy is pracvided to allow community members to The man at the register left and the sanitized solution. ticed by the Security Police, according submit questions or concerns to be reone cooking tookoverthe register and The manager of the Howard to the noncommissioned officer in searched and answered by the Maycooking, handling both money and AFB Cafeteria is aware of your charge of the Howard AFB Pass and oral Congress. Letters should be mailed food. concern and will ensure employees Identification Office. to: Mayor's Corner, APO AA 34004 I find that to be very unsanitary. I are following proper procedures The Naval Pass and Identification clerk (MPS). Anonymity will be granted would like to know if this is an acwhen handling cash and food prodstated that the Navy and Marines do not upon request. Publicity Chairperson, cepted way to handle food. Thank you. ucts. allow these children to be admitted to Peggy Bordner. theirinstallations. Provost Marshal's Corner FORT CLAYTON(USARSO PAO)The following Recently an individual was looking for a ride. A A success story incidents were reported to the Fort Clayton Military taxi stopped to pick him up and after finding out where Police. theriderwas going, the taxi driverinformed thepassenThe Military Police are on patrol 24 hours a day, ger that he could not take him there. seven days a week. It's not very often you read about Fore! Our passenger got extremely upset over this. He the success the military police have in apprehending became so upset that he slammed the door of the taxi. subjects. An employee of a local golf club was out and about The driver then became upset that the passenger had no Recently, at the Gorgas Army Community Hospital, attending to his daily duties April 17 when he inadverrespect for his property and told the passenger not to an employee had his vehicle broken into. After reporttently drove his golf cart into the path of an oncoming slam his door. ing the incident to the military police, an all-points car. Mr. Passenger decided that the best way to handle bulletin was put out for the subject. The golf cart struck the car and was turned on its side. this situation was to punch the driver in the face. The MPs noticed an individual who fit the descripLuckily, no one was seriously hurt in this incident, only If you're ever in a position in which you're request-, tion of the thief and who had been picked up before for a few scratches. ing services from anotherindividual and those services larcenies. The military police stopped the individual, Whenever you are driving a motor vehicle you for some reason cannot be provided, the solution is not checked the bag he was carrying and recovered all of the should always look both ways before merging into the violence. I stolenproperty. lane of traffic or crossing a roadway. People driving Always try to contain yourself and use courtesy Hopefully, this incident will help put this person nearagolfcourseshould also keep theireyes peeled for when dealing with others. Not only will violence hurt away for a while. A big hand to the Military Police at those little golf carts. someone, it may result in you being charged with Gorgas. assault. No one Is safe IEditor's note: No one wants to be a crime victim. Sometime between April 8 or 9 the midnight shopper In fact most ofus will do whatever it takes to protect was out looking for a good sale. Everyone is aware the Military Police Traffic Secourselves, our families and property. He came upon an unsuspecting and trusting resident tion has radar patrols. With this In mind, the Tropic Times staff and the living in Bethania. There the shopper found endless Sometimes it is hard for drivers to contain their Provost Marshal's Office are intent on making you bargains. desire to just let it all out and race that speedometer up aware of the local crime situation, the types of On this individual's patio -unlocked -were hamas high as it will go. crimes committed, when they are committed and mocks for relaxing, tools for repairing those broken Last week someone was unlucky enough to get how they are committed. items, and a sprayer for getting rid of those pesty caught doing just that. Armed with this knowledge and some hard lesinsects. It's too bad this resident was so trusting, beThey must have felt the posted speed limit of 40 sons learned from those who have been crime viccause now he doesn't have a hammock to sleep in. mph was just to slow for them and decided to take it tims, we hope to make our community a safer place. No matter where you live or how safe you may feel upon themselves to change the speed limit to 60 If you've been the victim of a crime and feel the there is always a need to lock up anything you leave plus. telling of your story will protect others in our comoutdoors. If possible, bring those items in at night, or The speeder was clocked in at 62 mph. Always obey munity, we invite you to call SFC Robert Cunningstore them in a secure storage shed. the posted speed limit. There is a reason for speed ham in the Provost Marshal's Office, 287-6762, or limits. Like the saying goes "the life you save may be SFC Joseph Ferrare at the Tropic Times, 285-6612. JUST A LITTLE RESPECT your own. Commander in Chief. Gen. George A. Joulwan Editorial Staff.Spec. Richard L. Puckett This authorizedunofficial command information publicaDirector, Public Affairs. Col. Joseph S. Panvini Rosemary Chong tion is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is Chief. SC Joseph Ferrare Carolyn Coffey published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Editor. MSgt. Rolf Carter U.S. Army South Public Affairs Office.287-3007 Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision Assistant Editor.Sgt. Deborah E. Williams of the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command. Sports Editor.Spec. John W. Hall 24th Ng Pubc Affairs Office ..28-54 Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily the official view of the U.S. government, the l)eparnTent of Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. The address is: Unit 0936 APO AA 34002 Telephone 285-6612. e Topic Times

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Tropic Times 7 May 1, 19927 Letters Law Day 'Polly' needs protection proclamation Dear Editor, macaw, scarlet macaw and all toucans. WHEREAS, May 1 is Law Day U.S.A. The Panama Yellow-Crowned Amazon is one ofthe Not all amazons and blue and gold macaws are in the United States of America, and most spectacular ofAmazonparrots. They areloud, exthreatened, but may become so iftradeis not regulated. tremely intelligent and beautiful. We see them all over -In Panama you are required by law to register your Panama, in the wild, in zoos and owned by many. It is parrot. WHEREAS, The United States of with great concern that I have decided to come forward It is illegal to buy or sell an unregistered parrot. America has been the citadel of individual to help clear up some misunderstandings about these Once your parrot is registered he is legally your liberty and a beacon of ho and opportubirds. pet, and he may leave with you. lo Commonly called the yellow-head, they are found The registration office is located near Gamboa. nity for more than 200 years to many milthroughout Central America and Colombia. Directions may be obtained from our vet clinic. lions who have sought our shores, and Yellow-heads are very popular because of their Once your bird is registered, even if the species amazing ability to mimic speech, their easy tamability does become endangered, he will fall under a grandfaand long life span. there clause, and will be allowed to leave with you. WHEREAS, The foundation of indiBeing a parrot owner is a huge responsibility -one I wish it were mandatory for these pets to be listed in vidual fredom and liberty is the body of that should not be taken lightly. our vet clinic like dogs and cats are now. These birds can live for more than 50 years, requirThis would show a true effort on our part to comply the law that governs us, and ing a lifetime of commitment, expense, medical care with Panama's law. and proper nutrition. I feelthatthe novice buyers would thinktwiceifthey WHEREAS, The Constitution of the A bird is not a cute little pet that requires minimal knew they had to show proof of registration to the vet care. They are messy, loud and time consuming. clinic for the parrot. United States of America and the Bill of A parrot can be your best friend -or a tiring responFor more information about endangered species write Rights are the heart of that body of law, sibility. to: The Fish and Wildlife, 4401 N. Fairfax Drive, ArPlease research parrots before you decide to buy lington, Va., 22203. which guarantees us many freedoms one. When you are ready to leave Panama pick up a including freedom of religious belief, The Convention on International Trade in Endanshipping packet at the vet clinic, or write to: The Port freedom to have and hold property inviogered Species of Wildlife put out by the U.S. DepartVeterinarian, Concord Bldg., Suite 102, 8120 N.W. ment ofthe Interior --Fish and Wildlife Service lists all 53rd Street, Miami, Fla., 33166. late, freedom of assembly, freedom of endangered species. They are listed by categories. Jeri Suarez speech, freedom of press, freedom of peOne species is presently threatened with extinction. bird breeder tition, and due process of the law among Listed in Panama are the hyacinth macaw, greenwing others, and NCO suggests Lim memorial WHEREAS,This earmarks the35th annual nationwide observance of Law Day, Dear Editor, Almost every Sunday Andy opened the doors of his I, along with many others in the Atlantic community, beach house at Maria Chiquita. Everyone was invited and the Congress of the United States and was saddened at the news of the passing of Andrew -everyone. the president by officalproclamationhave "Andy" Lim April 3. You could swim, water ski, jet ski, wind surf, eat, set aside May 1 as a special day for recogI knew Andy, not real well, but well enough to drink, or you could do nothing and just relax and enjoy know that he was an extremely nice, sincere, honest, the day. nation of the place of law in American life, straightforward, and thougthful person. Andy was a doer, a participator and could not Andy worked hard, very hard for all the citizens of understand how anyone could say, "there's nothing NOW, THEREFORE, I, commander the Atlantic community, both military and civilians. to do here in Panama." HetookagenuineinterestinthewelfareofthiscomAndy was afixturein a wide variety ofcommunity in chief, United States Southern Community. activities here, on the sometimes forgotten Atlantic mand, do hereby designate May 1, 1992, He would go out of his way to ensure that a wide side. variety of activities was available to its residents. He will be missed, but I'm sure not forgotten by as Law Day U.S.A. and call upon all These activities included going on exotic outings to many of us who enjoyed the friendship of this uniquely members of the command to commemoremote parts of Panama, a country he loved and was gifted and gentle man. rate the role of law in our lives. immenselyproud of; dinnertheater productions, which With this in mind, I would like to propose that the he loved to direct, cost-effective trips to Colon's Free Sundial Recreation Center at Fort Davis be renamed Zone; and a wide variety of other activities. and rededicated in his memory, "the AndyLim RecreaGeorge A. Joulwan He always did so with the best interests of this comtion Center." General, U.S. Army munity in mind. I believe that this would be a fitting tribute to a Andy's enthusiasm and dedication to the commuman who gave so much of himself so that we (the Commander in Chief nity, coupled with his love for and pride of country, exAtlantic community) could better our stay here in posed us to aspects of Panama we (as guests) were Panama. seldom aware of. MSgt. Tim Runfola I Women's Army Corps celebrates 50 years Women have contributed to the mistion as general officers. Army women sion and professional competence ofthe continue to progress as commanders, first United States Army from the nation's sergeants, and command sergeants mabirth. Fifty years ago this long-standing jor in increasing numbers, excelling both relationship was formalized with the esin war and in peace. tablishment ofthe Women's Army AuxThe Army will celebrate the 50th iliary Corps, the first milestoneintheinanniversary of the Women's Army Corps tegration of womenintothe Army. This from May 13 through 16, 1992, at the year we pause to commemorate that Corps historic home station, Fort McClelmilestone and reflect on the accomplishlan, Ala. ments of the past 50 years. During this period, we pause to salute The Army has come a long way since Army women who today servethe nation those early days when women could proudly and to pay tribute to their predecomprise no more than two percent of cessors who first opened the doors of the force and could not aspire to serve as opportunity by their professionalism and a general officer. perseverance. Through legislative and policy changes, promotion restrictions have been reGordon R. Sullivan moved and assignment opportunities are General, U.S. Army DoD i*'to vastlyexpanded. Chief of Staff The Women's Army Corp Museum at Fort McClellan, Ala. pays tribute to the Today, women servein more than 90 contributions of the women who served their nation. One display shows the first percent of the Army's career fields and M.P.W. Stone WAC uniforms. several women have served with distincSecretary of the Army

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8 Tropic Times May 1, 1992 US Army photosby Spec JamsYoamChildren from the Youth Services camp try to balance eggs during a relay race. Month of the Military Child features picnics, parades FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO)During spring break for Department U.S. Army South celebrated the Month of Defense Dependent Schools students, of the Military Child in April with a slew a spring camp featured trips to the inteof events geared towards every age group. rior, games and crafts. Toddlers and babies enjoyed a Baby Teenagers also took part in the celeOlympics competition at the Atlantic bration during a Teen Bike Ride on the and Pacific community child developAmador Causeway in early April. The ment centers. Various competitors vied youths tookoff from Fort Clayton by bus for the winning titles of'best costumed,' and rented bikes for a leisurely ride down 'fastest crawler,' and 'quickest smiler'. the scenic causeway. Preschool children also got involved Parents also participated in some of in the celebration with a parade on Fort the planned events including an old fashClayton and tours of military day-care ioned family picnic day at the Margarita Ashanti Bridge finds her way out of the other side of an obstacle at the Baby centers in Panama. Complex, wherethey tookpartin tug-ofOlympics. School-age children were given a war games. areas and viewed art their children had Youth Services soccer opening ceremony chance to answer "What Toodoo" during Parents also received tours of their made. held Thursday that noted the beginning an after-school program at Youth Servchildren's facilities in the Pacific comThe final activity scheduled for the of another sport season offered to chilices. munity's CDC. They visited the play Month of the Military Child was the dren in Panama. DoDDS director speaks on state of schools In line with the Department of Education's "AmerStremple was pleased more students took the test. He by Evelyn D. Harris ica 2000" goals, the DoD system began a program to hopes future test scores will reflect some improvements American Forces Information Service improve instructional techniques, particularly in mathemade this year, one of them, being a longer day. matics. Today's math teachers focus on concept develIn 1991, not all high schools in the system had full opment and real-life problem-solving rather than memoseven-period days. This year they do. WASHINGTON -The Department of Defense rization of formulas. Stremple said parents are Dependent Schools system will continue to spend as The system's lanan important part of the sysmuch per pupil as it has in the past, said director Dr. guage arts program is tem. John Stremple. already strong, but "The only cuts we will make will They help select school "The only cuts we will make will be those involved Stremple is trying to principals and have a say in in closing schools where there is no longer a military improve it. "Right now, be those involved in closing the selection of other offipopulation to serve," he said. Stremple said he is optian English teachers' schools where there is no longer cials. mistic because both Christopher Jehn, assistant secregroup is looking at stuParents sit on the Advitary of defense for force management and personnel, dents' writing and at a military population to serve.' sory Council on Dependents and Millicent Woods, deputy assistant secretary for how teachers are gradEducation. The council meets personnel support, families and education, strongly ing that writing," he DoDDS director twice a year and greatly inadvocate maintaining a quality school system. said. "This should bring fluences how the system is Educators consider cost per pupil an important facmore consistency and run. tor in maintaining quality, said DoDDS spokeswoman quality to language arts." "The council is DoDDS' equivalent of the school Marilyn Witcher. In fiscal 1992, the system is spending DoDDS pushes students to take certain subjects. board," Witcher said. "The director acts on its recom$6,012 perpupil. The 1992 average spending level for "We want more students to take advanced algebra, mendations." statesidepublicschoolis $5,119perpupil, according to chemistry, calculus and physics. Before, only the top One of the system's most important pushes has been Educational Research Services, a private research group. students would attempt these courses," Stremple said. for parental involvement, the director said. Stremple is also working with DoD budget officials "Now, our guidance counselors are encouraging the avThis emphasis begins even before children reach to get a budget authorization for a full school year. erage students to take more difficult courses." school age. "Currently, we lose teachers when we lose pupils," To improve availability of such courses, the system In Lakenheath, England, the pilot program "Sure the director said. "If a military community is going uses telecommunications, Stremple said. Start" began in 1991. Stremple hopes to have the prothrough a gradual drawdown, it could lose students in Students watch teachers on television and ask quesgram in 29 schools by fall 1994. the middle of an academic year. Obviously, this is distions using electronic mail. Based on the federal Head Start program, Sure Start ruptive for the students and makes planning more The system has telecommunications courses inPasworks with parents as well as preschoolers. It helps difficult for teachers and administrators." cal (a computer language), advanced Pascal and adparents do a better job of filling their role as children's According to DoD, some 2,000 family members are vanced-placement calculus worldwide. DoDDS is main teachers. out of school in any given week because of their developing more courses. "So many studies support the importance of parmilitary parents' reassignments. Thanks to the stepped-up emphasis on taking diffients," the educator said. "Particularly for elementary Some are not DoDDS students, but enough are to cult courses, Stremple said, 1,301 students took adschool children, parents need to show interest in homecause disruption. Also, some teachers are married to vanced placement tests during the 1991 school yearwork. They need to turn the television set off. departing military members, adding further problems. 59 percent more than the 869 who took them the year "Parents' demands and expectations play a major To try to keep teachers' morale up during the before. role in the success of students in school. When parents drawdown, Stremple has systemwide and regional The director acknowledged progress in some areas are very interested, if they read to children when they drawdown committees with teacher representatives. has been slight. are little, if they participate in school activities and the "We try to ensure that any necessary reassignments are For example, while the verbal Scholastic Aptitude children see that, then you have a child who's favored done fairly," he said. There is a transition program Test scores were six points higher than the national to succeedin school. When thatis not the case, the child helping displaced teachers find new jobs. average, the math average was three points lower. plys a price."

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Tropic Times May 1, 1992 9 Award winning reserve cook takes the heat by 2nd Lt Robert M. Hart Florida Army National Guard SANTIAGO, Panama (Theater Support Element) Her experience runs the gamut from award-winning gourmet chef to first cook for more than 400 soldiers. But one thing Angie Miller can't seem to escape is the one thing that is very prevalent in her work place heat. "You know the saying about if you can't stand the heat. Well, the guy who said it must have worked here," Miller said. As a sergeant with the 785th Military Police Company of Inkster, Mich., the Army Reserve soldier is on Theatr Support Eemwt photo by 2nd Lt. Bob Hart asix-month active-duty tour with TaskForceBadgerin Sgt. Angie Miller checks her kitchen's supplies. the interior of Panama. Temperatures outside hover around the 100 degree The last overseas deployment for the Bay City, "I've won several awards for cooking, including mark, while the heat in the kitchen sometimes reaches Mich., resident also involved some high temperatures gold and bronze medals in the A-Army competition," 130 degrees. -seven months in the desert of Saudi Arabia during Miller said. Task Force Badger is made up of U.S. Army NaOperation Desert Storm. She was also on an Army team that won a bronze tional Guard and Army Reserve soldiers supporting "Believe it or not, it is actually hotter here than in medal in the 1988 Culinary Olympics. .Fuertes Caminos '92 -Panama." Saudi Arabia," Miller said. "Here it is more humid and The Culinary Olympics is a worldwide cooking Some of the objectives of this joint U.S. and the heat gets to you more." competition sponsored every four years by the German Panamanian exercise are to repair schools, clinics, Miller, who is the head chef at Amigos' Restaurant International Chefs Association. roads and bridges and to provide other medical in Bay City, said her work with Task Force Badger is When her six-month tour with Task Force Badger and humanitarian assistance in remote areas of Panradically different from her civilian job. ends, Miller will return to Bay City to continue her ama. "Here we have quality food, but the emphasis is on cooking career. The exercise provides military occupational spequantity," she said. "I've really enjoyed the tour here," she said. "There cialty training opportunities for approximately 5,000 "At home I prepare custom sit-down meals for two or is noway Icould get this kind oftraining back home. Of citizen-soldiers and airmen in their military occupathreepeople." course, one thing I can get at home is some cool tional specialties. Miller's culinary expertise has not gone unnoticed. weather." Engineers living it up in 'dust bowl of the world' by SFC George C. Mirabal yards of concrete and moved 280,000 lornda Army National Guard yards of dirt to complete this project," said 1st Sgt. Ronald Kercher, a Colorado STANN CREEK DISTRICT, Belize Springs resident and 19-year Army vet(Theater Support Element) -U.S. soleran. diers working in this remoteregion call it The Belize Ministry of Works prothe "dust bowl of the world," but all the vides laborers and engineers to supplecomforts of home can be found at Solment Company A. dies Creek, 40 miles south of Belize "We've enjoyed working with the City. Belize Defense Force engineers and ciCompany A, 52nd Combat Engineer vilians," Spellman said. "As a matter of Battalion from Fort Carson, Colo., was fact, the finest bulldozer operator I've given the arduous task of building a Wofld seen is a Belizean on this project. WarlIeramilitary bridge spanning more Belize Defense Force engineer Sgt. than 160 feet over the creek that is more Hugh Flowers said: "I've learned a lot than 12 feet deep during the rainy season. from the North Americans. Especially The project is a humanitarian-assistance how to use new tools like a power wrench," mission sponsored by the U.S. Southern he said. "We've been working with manual Command. tools all our lives." It's no easy task for the Operation SSgt. Dale Davis from Salem, Ore., Desert Storm veterans, but it is one they was impressed with his Belizean cocan handle. Bulldozer operators, solworkers. diers and Belizean civilians scurry rap"These guys picked up the work idly to get the job done in time. It's hot, quickly. You showed them what to do dirty and dusty. and off they went, faster and faster. I Really dusty. would hire them in a minute," Davis said. Some soldiers appear to be comThe jungle environment makes the pletely covered in a thin, red powder. project difficult, but the soldiers have all Belize Defense Force engineers and cithe comforts of home at their nearby base vilians supporting the project make the camp. best of the environment. Satellite television, washers and dryers "This is an important project forthe and hot and cold running water can be Belizeans," said Capt. Mary Spellman, found. the unit commander from Marianna, Fla. Even basketball and volleyball courts "It will provide the Belizeans a year have been made by the engineers for use 'round direct route from the western during off-duty time. highway to Dangriga, the second largest "The infantry and artillery go to the city in Belize. field and rough it," Kercher said. "As "Theroad was closed during therainy engineers we go to the field and live in TheterSuptElemen tphoto byS CGorgeC. FMrab season because it was impassable," comfort." Spellman said. "People had to ford the A Company arrived in Belize two SSgt. Dale Davis (right) and Belize Defense Force Engineer, Pvt. Hugh river." months ago and are scheduled to return Flowers, wire together reinforcement bars before pouring concrete. "We havepoured morethan 900 cubic to the United States at the end of May.

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Tropic Times 10 May 1, 1992 U.S. Army and Honduran engineers work together as they 'move mountains" to make way for a new road in northern Honduras. Legac Joint Task Force 105 keeps Fuertes Caminos on-line LAS DELICIAS, Honduras (JTF-105/ eration Desert Storm, Howell said. FuPA) -Col. Ralph Howell and the Joint ertes Caminos is deploying the largest U.S. Army photos by SFC Thomas E. Rusk Task Force 105 staff have been laying peacetime contingent of Guard and down the 'welcome mat' for the thouReserve forces outside of the continenA Blackhawk helicopter positions itself over a cement culvert to airlift it to a work sands of personnel taking part in Fuertes talU.S. during recent history, said Howsite. Casinos. ell. JTF 105 is in Honduras and is nearing Base camp construction began in to bare-base tropical training. bor and a strong friend," Howell said. last phase of a road-building project that November 1991, by an Air Guard Rapid "We also want to foster military-to"We want our soldiers to depart with began in 1986 to build 55 kilometers of Engineer Deployable Heavy Operational military relationships between the United a greater appreciation of the people of two-lane gravel road through the mounRepair Squadron Engineer unit. States and Honduras, and conduct comthis region and a full understanding of tains of Yoro and San Lorenzo. JTF 105 RED HORSE built the basevillage fabined engineertraining and medical huourjobs and missions when undertaking is building the final 8.2 kilometers of cilities, which include living quarters, manitarian civil affairs," he said. any future task of this nature." project down the Macora River Valley, wells, power and communications set"We have plans for four civic action As of early April the project was ahead between the village of Macora and the ups and camp security facilities. projects once we have the bulk of the of schedule with more than 65 percent of Aguan River. In addition to billeting tents, there's road built," said King. the total mission complete. About 40 JTF 105 is a multi-service effort, with an air-conditioned dining facility, afully "They include a water upgrade syspercent of finished road, or 3.1 kilomea combination of active, National Guard functional deployable medical system tem, the addition of one school and repair ters, is finished. and Reserve forces from the Army and hospital, a provost marshal, chapel, radio of another, and construction of a dayEighty percent of the concrete culAir Force. The bulk of the personnel are station, water department, sanitation and care center. We are also involved in the verts are in place and covered over, and from the Army National Guard said Howwaste disposal facilities, small airport, distribution of food, school supplies and two of the three metal culverts are finell, commander of the 105th Engineer movie theater with satellite TV, and post other commodities contributed by our ished, Howell said. Group from the North Carolina National exchange. personnel." "I'm very pleased with the efforts of Guard. "The objectives of the operation are During the exercise the engineers our soldiers," Howell said. Throughout the operation, approxito enhance readiness of participating will move more than 750,000 cubic yards "Our engineers are well-trained, hard mately 2,000 Air Guard and Reserve, and U.S. and host country forces," said Lt. of dirt, construct 36 concrete and three workers and really know their jobs. I'm more than 6,000 Army National Guard Col. Barry King, JTF 105's chief of steel culverts,place 450,000 cubic yards glad we've been able to complete this will servein Honduras, said Howell.Fort Public Affairs and Protocol. King also of fill, and construct the best 8.2kilomemuch ahead of the spring rains. With Kobbe's 536th Engineer Battalion is also said to provide reserve component ters oftwo-lane gravel road that has ever almost all of the culverts finished, we attached to the task force. forces the opportunity to deploy to a been built, Howell said. feel confident we'll have the road comThe operation was planned for comremote location to fulfill their annual "When we depart the areain June, we pleted well ahead ofthe June19 opening pletion in 1991, but was delayed by Optraining requirements, and expose them intend to leave alegacy of a good neighday ceremony." Soldier's experience benefits operation by 2nd Lt Carl M. James The 105th Engineer Group, North Carolina Army states. I think it's great." 65&h Pubic Affairs Detachment National Guard and the Honduran 1st Engineer BattalDuring his six-month tour in Las Delicias, Nance ion are participating in "Fuertes Caminos '92-Honduis coordinating 10 rotations of Army and Air Guard LASDELICIAS;Honras." and Reserve personnel, normally lasting 17 days duras -(Theatre Support "Working in anew environment is nat only exciting, each. Element) -The Macora it's at times downright challenging," said Capt. Cecil Living inatent and having limited privacy for six River Valleyin Honduras Nance of the 105th Engineer Group. months can take its toll. Nance, who is married and is a blend of vegetation Nance, a civil engineer for McLeod Rigging in Charhas two sons is looking forward to going home in and wildlife. The blazing lotte, N.C., draws from his extensive experiences at June. sun that is constant in this home to help guide him through his duties with Joint I can't wait to be back home with my family tropical setting is merciTask Force 105. Nance works hand-in-hand with the again," said Nance. "I am just taking it one day at a less. Hondurans and U.S. Honduran soldiers and civilians to get the job done. time." soldiers and airmen are "The Honduran engineers are one of our best assets. The excitement and unpredictability of his job is bearing this heat in order I wish we had another unit like them," said Nance. keeping him occupied, he said. to make life there a lot '' Working out of the operations office, Nance is the The final 8.2 kilometers of the road project is easier by building a road, officer-in-charge of coordinating and requisitioning the expected to be the most difficult. Nance must make bridges, schools, clinics and providing medical care. materials needed to complete the road project. He also quick decisions and use his keen eye in determining The nation-assistance exercise not only provides ensures the materials meet the necessary specifications what is mission-essential. the Honduran citizens and farmers better access to and are properly used. The farm-to-market road is one that will take the market and medical care, but also offers U.S. citizen"This is without a doubt the best engineering project joint effort of dedicated teams. Since his January soldiers and airmen with training in their military I've ever been on," said Nance. arrival, Nance is doing all that he can to make the specialities. "This type of training just couldn't take place in the exercise a success.

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S ports May 1, 1992 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Page 11 Moe knows: Football isn't just for boys Female to play safety practices, but it comes with te to tertr.Since I want to contribute t the team, I do what the other guys do." P How is herseeming intrusion into a male sport being handled by her teamby SrA. Jackie Ambrose mates? 24th WG/PA "I've been treated fine. Whatever worries some may have had have been HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA) -resolved. I think our opposition may Moe knows.football isn't just a man's be more uncomfortable with a woman game anymore. But that's not why playing 'their' game. Maureen "Moe" Lane is a safety on "This is an intramural game, and the 24th Operational Support Squadintramural doesn't limit football to just ron/Air Intelligence Squadron flag men," she said. football team. Lane believes there are other feLane is the only female who's males who'd like to play football "with signed up to play in the Howard intrathe guys" but who may be a bit wary mural flag football season. about taking that first step. After other She said she is excited about the women learn about Lane's foray into game, but knows it's a far cry from the unchartered territory, who knows? days when she'd play stickball and "She shows the same drive and other games with children in her neighdesire as the rest of the team," said borhood. teammate Arthur Burgess. "Once we "I've always been a tomboy," said saw how aggressive she was, any doubt the Philadelphia native. "I love sports about her intensity was dispelled." and since the softball season ended, it Michael Drummond, the team's seemed only natural for me to tryout coach, sees it all as business as usual. for the football team. It's another way I He sees team execution and unity as could show support for my unit. the key that could take them to the "That's the main reason I'm out playoffs. here. I don't particularly like all the "I hope we go all the way to the U.S. Air Force photo by SrA. Jackie Ambros. drills we go through during our championship," Lane smiled. Maureen "Moe" Lane discusses moves with coach Michael Drummond. w Brian Offerman squats 425 pounds as James Poole spots him. U.S. Air Force photoby Sgt. Bll Evus HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA) -Thirteen competithe female lightweight division with an average lift of tors took part in the Howard Sports and Fitness Center 116 pounds. 13 local life Powerlifting competition Saturday and Sunday. First place in the men's lightweight division, 114 to Participants competed in the squat, bench press and 149, pounds was Albert Stapleton with an average of dead lift. Each person had three attempts in each event. 147. Second place was Brian Hand, 143 pounds. The totals foreach participant were added together and In the medium division, 150 to 199 pounds, James .c m p t divided by three. There was a lightweight division for Poole won with an average of 147, and Danny Kerns females, while the men had lightweight, middleweight was second with 143. and heavyweight divisions. In the heavyweight division, 200 pounds and over, The overall women's winner was Sandy McMurtyin Isreal Delgado won with 227.

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12 Tropic Times May 1, 1992 DCA stops 617th 52-42 by Spec. John "Gus" Hall Sports Editor, Tropic Times FORT CLAYTON (Tropic Times) -The Directorate of Community Activities Over 30 Men's basketball team used a 19-8 first half run to take a lead it never relinquished en route to a 52-42 win over the 617th Special Operations. Aviation Detachment here Monday night. The win improved DCA's record to 3-5. The 617th fell to 3-4. The 617th jumped out to a 14-5 advantage led by Antoine Kelley's seven points. DCA battled back with 6-foot, 6-inch centerNico deGreefandLeeWeightcrashing the boards. DCA's advantage inside forced the 617th outside. That, and several traveling calls on the 617th, helped DCA cut the lead to 18-16 with 6:15 left in the first half. DCA had the half's last possession and took a 25-24 lead when Weight canned a three-pointer at the buzzer. Pressure defense by DCA forced the 617th into bad passes and turnovers. Three con* secutive baskets by Weight, including a three-pointer, extended DCA's lead to 3726. Jeff Johnson followed Weight's lead, and scored three in a row, making it 42-27. That was DCA's biggest lead which forced the 617th to choose the unsuccessful threepoint route and DCA held on for the 52-42 U.S Army photo by Spec. John Gus Hal victory. Directorate of Community Activities Lee Weight shoots a jump shot Sport Shorts 10K run theAmericas,(13.1 miles)isunderway. AIOKrun will begin at ClubAmador The race begins at Fort Davis Gym 7 May2. Checkintimeis6:l5am.andthe am. May 16. The categories are open, race begins at 7 am. There are eight military, female and over 40. Awards categories for men and women. Unit will be given to the top three runners in teams may compete. Trophies will be each category. awarded for the top threerunners in each category. The first 500 entrants will reAll-Army golf ceive a race T-shirt. AT&TandtheAsAll-Army men's and women's golf sociation of the U.S. Army are sponsortrials will be conducted at Fort Gordon, ing the event Call 287-5906/5904/6818, Ga. Applications must be submitted by orstop by Building 212, Fort Clayton for May 15. Applications can be picked up at registration, the Sports Branch, Building 154 Fort n t Clayton. Call287-4050/5618. 41 Soccer tournament The Navy Morale Welfare and RecCRD Over-30 Men's reaction Division is sponsoring an End of Summer Soccer Tournament Saturday b k a s n g and Sunday at the Rodman soccer field. TEAM H L Call 283-4222. Posse 9 0 24 CS 8 1 Softball tourney I Legit 6 1 Headquarters and Headquarters 1/228thAviators 5 4 Company, 92nd Military Police Battal24 Supply Flyers 4 3 ion is sponsoring a double-elimination We're Blessed 4 4 softball tournament May 8-10 at Fort 6/17th 3 4 Clayton. Call SSgt. Frank Thrower at AF All-Stars 3 6 287-5349. 142nd Med. 2 6 DCA 2 5 Memorial Day sports El Patio 1 6 Fort Clayton's Reeder Gymnasium is High Five 0 8 sponsoring men's and women's open Standings as of Tuesday events in racquetball, table tennis, threeScoring leaders on-three basketball and free throw/super(renald Posse 26.3 shot May 23-25. Registration ends May Merrill II Legit 21.4 13. Call 287-3861. Taylor We're Blessed 18.2 Brooks 1/228th Avn. 15.3 Atlantic tourney Resse 142ndMed. 14.4 Fronius Gymnasium is sponsoring a Gagum AF All-Stars 12.4 Memorial Day double-elimination basU.S. Army photoby Sp c.JohntGus Hal ketball tournament May 23-25. Registra'Three-ponters tion is limited to the first 16 teams to Grenald Posse 17 HIGH DIVE -X-Men third baseman Carl "Stein" Williams Jr. leaps for a line enter and ends May 19. Call 289-3108. Gagum AF All-Stars 15 drive against Wilkie's Warriors during the Desert Storm softball tournament Wilson Posse 12 held Friday and Saturday at Fort Clayton. The Good 01' Boys won the Brooks 1/228thAvn. 10 double-elimination tournament 33-8 over the Marauders. Davis 24 CS 9 Registration for a mini marathon of Prudent 24 CS 8

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Tropic Times May 1, 199213 Gant eyes Baseball standings* NATIONAL LEAGUE 3rd straight EAST W L PcT. GB 3 PrSBURGH 15 5 .750 N33 NeYORK 12 9 .571 3.5 .ST. Louas 11 10 .524 4.5 30-30 ya y e a r PAaOms A 10 12 A5 6 MnAL 8 14 .364 8 ATLANTA (AP) -Ron Gantis trying CHICAGO 7 13 .350 8 to become the first major league player WEST to have three consecutive seasons of 30 SE 1 home runs and 30 steals. sa DIEGO 12 10 .545 If his April output is any indication, ONCNNAT 11 10 .524 .5 he has a strong shot at reaching that goal. S AN FRANcSO 11 10 .524 .5 Willie Mays (1956-57) and Bobby A-iTrA 11 11 S) 1 Bonds (1977-78) are the only other play-HOUSTON 10 10 .500 1 ers to have two consecutive 30-30 years. LOS ANGELES 9 13 .409 3 Gant, the Atlanta Braves outfielder, did APLasPwihoto it in 1990-91. Willie Mays (1956-57) and Bobby Bonds (1977-78) are the only other players AMERICAN LEAGUE "I'm not thinking about 30-30, alto have two consecutive 30-30 years. Ron Gant, the Atlanta Braves outfielder, though it's in the back of~my mind," did it in 1990-91. EAST Gant said after Monday night's 5-0 vicTORONTO 12 4 .727 tory over the Chicago Cubs, in which he bases and 84 RBIs. "I'm just a little smarter. .Last year NEw YORK 13 8 .619 2.5 contributed a solo home run and an RBI Gant, wright-handed hitter, worked I wouldn't do things like hit to right." BAL'SMORE 13 8 .619 2.5 single. this spring on hitting the ball to right field Gant said Braves batting coach ClarBOSTON 9 9 .500 5 "I'm just telling myself to think about rather than trying to pull everything to ence Jones told him he would be much MILWAUEKE 9 9 .500 5 getting base hits. If that happens, the left. more successful if he used the whole CLEVELAND 8 14 .364 8 home runs and stolen bases will come." His RBI single Monday night was to field. "He told me if I did that correctly, DEsorr 7 13 .350 8 Gant, a notoriously slow starter in right, and he also had a run-scoring single I'd have-better numbers," Gant said. past Aprils, is hitting .282 with five home to right Saturday in a 2-0 win over Hous"I had more than 100 RBIs last year WEST runs, 17 RBIs and five stolen bases. ton. and had a terrible first month. Now, I'm OAKLAND 13 8 .619 Last season, he hit only .162 in April "I wouldn't have done that last year, almost at 20 RBIs. There's no telling TExAs 13 10 .565 1 with one homer and seven RBIs. He but I worked on it in the spring and feel I what I can do. My best months have CHIAGO 10 8 .556 1.5 finished the season with a .251 average, can hit over .300 again if I do those always come in the second half. CAUFORNIA 10 10 .500 2.5 32 homers, 34 stolen bases and 105 RBIs. things," he said. "The game is to score runs, and every SEATrmE 10 11 .476 3 In 1990, he hit .200 with no homers "I've been especially bad in previous time I drive in a run it's exciting. RBIs MNNESOTA 9 12 .429 4 and one RBI in April, but finished the Aprils .but I was ready this year to and runs are the things that should be KANSAs Crry 3 17 .150 9.5 year at .303 with 32 homers, 33 stolen change that. looked at. That's money." Through Wednesday's games Alomar, Pendleton NHL playoff notes week's top players STATS NEW YORK (AP) -All-Star second baseman New Jersey's line of Claude Roberto Alomar ofthe Toronto Blue Jays won his Lemieux, Peter Stastny and Zdeno first American League player of the week award Ciger combined for four goals in on Monday. the Devils' 5-3 victory over the New The 24-year-old Alomar batted .600 with a York Rangers in Game 6 on Wednesleague-leading 15 hits during the seven-day peday night. Stastny had two goals riod ending Sunday. He had a home run and a and Lemiuex and Ciger added goals. double, and scored seven runs. The Rangers, who have not won Alomar also led the league last week with a the Stanley Cup since 1940, have .643 on-base percentage and drove in nine runs. been in four seven-game series in At one point during the week, he hit safely in their 65-year history and lost every seven straight at-bats and reached safely in nine one. consecutive plate appearances. Terry Pendleton of the Atlanta Braves, the SWINGS National League's Most Valuable Player last season, Pittsburgh beat Washington 6-4 was named on Monday as the league's player of and Buffalo routed Boston 9-3 or the week. Wednesday night to force seventh Pendleton had 12 hits in 23 at-bats during the games in their series after trailing 3. seven-day period ending Sunday. He had four 1. Detroit and Vancouver also forces doubles and a home run, a .500 on-base percentseventh games after trailing 3-1 APLrPhcto age and an .826 slugging percentage. Only eight teams in.NHL history Mario Lemieux, Penguins, scored two goals and had three assists as 20 at San Diego falling behind 3-win a series aer defending Stanley Cup champion Pittsburgh beat visiting Washington 6-4 in Game 6 of the Patrick Division series. Ruth's 60th HR ball SLUGFEST Referee Denis Morel handed out visiting New York Rangers 5-3 in he has forbidden Russian players to 118 minutes in penalties and game Game 6 of the Patrick Division series. join their homeland's national team ATLANTA, Ga. (AP) -The baseball that flew misconduct penalties to Scott StePat LaFontaine, Sabres, scored while the former Soviet Army team into the stands when Babe Ruth hit his recordvens and Peter Stastny of New Jertwo second-period goals -his sixth is suing the Detroit Red Wings. Ziegler setting 60th home run in 1927 is finally leaving sey and Jeff Beukeboom and Tie and seventh of the playoffs -and testified Wednesday for nearly six the family of the fan who caught it. Domi of New York after a brawl added two assists as Buffalo beat hours in the U.S. District Court case George Siegel, who inherited the ball from his following the Devils' 5-3 victory in visiting Boston 9-3 to force Game 7 in which Russian officials are trying father in 1977, said Monday the ball will be aucGame 6 on Wednesday night. in the Adams Division series. to have Viacheslav Kozlov's contioned off Saturday in San Francisco. tract with the Red Wings ruled invaSiegel said his father, Herb, then 14 years old, STARS STOPPED lid. Ziegler said the NHL allows caught the ball in the right field stands at Yankee Mario Lemieux, Penguins, scored Ron Fischer, Raimond Hilger, foreign players to join their national Stadium in what he described as a mad scramble two goals and had three assists as Andreas Niederberger, Dieter Heteams as "a matter of cooperation," on Sept. 30, 1927. The homer broke the record of defending Stanley Cup champion gen and Andreas Brockmann scored and the league is not contractually 59 Ruth had established in 1921. Pittsburgh beat visiting Washinggoals as Germany defeated the United bound to do so. "Afterwards he was throwing it up and playing ton 6-4 in Game 6 of the Patrick States 5-3 in the World Championcatch," Siegel said. When his uncle, who had Divisionseries. ships on Wednesday in Prague, SANCTIONS UPHELD taken him to the game, realized it was the recordFrank Pietrangelo and Yvon CorCzechoslovakia. Chris Winnes, Paul The NCAA has denied an appeal setting ball, he took it away, Siegel said. nveau, Whalers. Pietrangelo made Ranheim and Joe Sacco scored for from the University of Wisconsin to "They wound up in the dugout with Ruth and 42 saves and Corriveau scored 24 the United States. In other Pool A overturn penalties imposed after its Lou Gehrig," Siegel said. seconds into overtime as Hartford games, Finland routed Poland 11-2 5-3loss to Lake Superior State in the Ruth offered his father $5 and another basebeat visiting Montreal 2-1 to force and Sweden and Italy played a scorenational championship game. The ball, Siegel said. Game 7 in the Adams Division seless tie. NCAA suspended coach Jeff Sauer "Dad wanted to take it," Siegel said, but his nes. and players Blaine Moore and Jason uncle wouldn't let him. Chris Terreri, Devils, made 27 SUIT Zent from the Badgers' next NCAA saves as New Jersey defeated the NHL president John Ziegler said tournament game.

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14 Tropic Times May 1, 1992 Bird-less Boston making playoff run Sports Editor, Tropic Times NOBODY ASKED ME, BUT.How the Boston Celtics continue to win without Larry Bird remains a hoops mystery. Boston won its last eight regular season games without its star forward. That streak helped oust the New York Knicks from first place -a spot they held for most of the year. And now, the Celtics have swept the Indiana Pacers without so much as a blink of an eye. Boston does have Kevin McHale and Robert Parish. They're past their prime but someone forgot to tell them. Other teams could not win without their star players. Take San Antonio for example. The Spurs lost center David Robinson late in the season and have yet to recover. Houston lost center Hakeem Olajuwon late in the season and couldn't even grasp the eighth and final playoff spot. The Bulls may be the only other team that could win without their star player. Take Michael Jordan away and Chicago might sweep Indiana. Chicago didn't always have that luxury. There was a time when the Bulls couldn't make the playoffs with ~ ~ Jordan. Those were the days. AI-ht The Lakers have showed the same kind of fortiBoston's Larry Bird (center) has spent the last 11 games watching his team win game after game without tude Boston has. The Lakers didn't win their divihis services. sion, but the Western Conference is much stronger than the Eastern. The Lakers were lucky to make the and Celtics have kept the tradition of giving their Celtics can win a division title and playoff series playoffs, getting there by default, as Houston lost its coaches time. That tradition yields championship without Bird's services most of the time, imagine last three. The Lakers lost Magic Johnson, James banners. what they could do with a healthy Bird. In the Worthy and Sam Perkins, yet made the big dance for Good benches filled with players no one else Eastern Conference, they might make it to the final. the 16th straight year. wants helps too. Every year that Bird gets injured First thing's first, Boston has to get by the playoff What makes the Celtics and Lakers different from around playoff time, someone rises to the occasion dark horse Cleveland Cavaliers. other NBA teams is tradition. Former Lakers' coach from nowhere. Lately, John Bagley has fit that role. Cleveland may be following the path Boston and Pat Riley instilled stability at the coaching position Bagley scored 14 points and had 11 assists in game Los Angeles have. The Cavs have been winning for nearly a decade. Jimmy Rodgers and K.C. Jones three against Indiana. Reggie Lewis scored 28 of his consistently, finishing second only to the Bulls. were also well-known coaches for the Celtics around 32 points in the first half. That wouldn't happen with Coach Lenny Wilkens' job is very secure. Injuries the league. In the NBA today, if a coach doesn't win Bird in the lineup. have taken their toll on Cleveland. Once they learn to in his first or second year, he gets fired. The Lakers What would happen with Bird in the lineup? If the overcome them maybe they can beat -DA BULLS. Analysts question Denver chooses Bengals selecting Maddox for future Klingler in first DENVER (AP) -Can the Denver Broncos' youth moveCINCINNATI (AP) -The Cinment be far off? Perhaps not. cinnati Bengals, who had the NFL's But don't look for it to begin soon, at least not by design, worst defense last season, said they despite the team's first-round draft selection Sunday of quarexpected some second-guessing afterback Tommy Maddox. ter drafting Houston quarterback Maddox is only 20, having entered the draft after his David Klingler in the first round. sophomore season. And, although his first-round selection is ESPN draft analysts were puzzled. likely to cost the Broncos dearly in terms of a contract and Fans at one Cincinnati sports bar signing bonus, the team is content to let Maddox sit on the booed. bench for several seasons -perhaps as many as fiveuntil The Bengals, who already have quarterback John Elway retires. Elway turns 32 this summer. oneofthe league's established quarCoach Dan Reeves made it clear that he wants to bring terbacks in Boomer Esiason, said Maddox along slowly. Sunday they're looking ahead but "This is definitely a pick for the future," Reeves said. are committed to their star. "John will be around for anumber of years. Tommy won't "This is a bit of a daring move, in have to step in right away and play the way John did. There away,on ourpart,"generalmanager will be time for him to learn the system and develop." AP LaserPhoto Mike Brown said. "We thoughtlong Was their selection of Maddox in the first round a reach? and hard about it. It wasn't an easy Yes. Most draft analysts had Maddox, because of his youth, Tommy Maddox had two productive years as UCLA's choice. We don't expect him to rerated as a secondor third-rounder. starting quarterback. He threw for 2,682 yards, 17 touchplace Boomer. It's going to be a But let Reeves explain. downs and 14 interceptions as afreshman, then passed for gradual transition. When it came their turn to make the 25th selection in the 2,505 yards, 16 TDs and 15 interceptions last season. "We know that this is a gamble," first round, the Broncos debated several prospects, but the he added. ". Give us a little time to choice boiled down between Maddox and Tennessee wide With their fifth-round choice, they took 5-10, 176-pound make it work. In the long haul, it's a receiver Carl Pickens. defensive back Frank Robinson of Boise State, who also will be good move for us." "It was a tough decision because we thought Pickens could tried as a kick returner. Coach Dave Shula called it a choice help us right away," Reeves admitted. "Wejust feel Tommy The draft resumed Monday with rounds six through 12, but for the long-run. "Boomer is our is a franchise-type quarterback we couldn't pass up." the Broncos immediately traded away their No. 6 choice for the guy," he said. Reeves also said the6-foot-4, 195-pound Maddox was the New York Jets' picks in the seventh and eighth rounds. Klingler said he was grateful for highest-rated playerleft on the the board when Denver made That gave Denver three choices in the seventh -their own, the chance to learn from Esiason. its selection. "We thought there would be somebody left on the Jets' and a pick obtained from Tampa Bay in the trade of "It's great to know that the team's the board above him, but there wasn't," he said. Ricky Nattiel. not going to throw you to the lions. .After taking Maddox, the Broncos went for another underWith their first No. 7, the Broncos selected 6-5, 272-pound I'm goingto get myselfready to play classman in the second round, claiming 21-year-old Shane defensive lineman Ron Geater of Iowa. Then they went for right away. I've got a lot to learn," Dronett, a 6-5, 270-pound defensive lineman from Texas who another offensive lineman, taking 6-5, 300-pound Jim Johnson he said. had a total of 19 sacks the last two seasons. Denver had no of Michigan State. Finally, they claimed 6-1, 190-pound wide Klingler has 51 NCAA records, third-round choice, having traded it to Detroit last year for receiver Jon Bostick of Nebraska. including 54 touchdowns and 5,140 offensive tackle Harvey Salem. The Broncos entered the draft seeking a quarterback of the yards in 1990. Last season, he had 29 The Broncos took another Texas player with their fourthfuture, an offensive left tackle, a wide receiver, a defensive touchdowns and 3,388 yards. round pick -6-3, 280-pound offensive lineman Chuck lineman and a cornerback. They appeared to have filled four of I__ __ -__ I Johnson. those needs on Sunday,.

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Tropic Times May 1, 1992 ft. Blazers Duckworth calls Lakers Divac a wimp INGLEWOOD, Calif (AP) -Vlade of an aberration. The way they're playDivac knows enough English slang to ing Vlade-in the past it wouldn't have understand what the word wimp means. bothered us because we had guys in the Not surprisingly, he didn't appreciate other spots who could make you pay the being called one by Kevin Duckworth. price. Duckworth outscored Divac 27-15 in "We're not capable of doing as much the first two games of the Western Connow. It can't be all on his shoulders, but ference first-round playoff series between he's got to play harder and he's got to be Portland and the Los Angeles Lakers, ready for more physical play." helping the Blazers win twice decisively. Magic Johnson retired in November In between those games at Portland, because he had contracted the virus that Duckworth, the Blazers' center, comcauses AIDS, and James Worthy and plained that Divac was flopping in atSam Perkins are unavailable because of tempts to draw offensive fouls and called injuries. the Lakers' center a wimp. So instead of Johnson, Worthy and "I was so mad," Divac, a YugoslavPerkins starting along with Divac and ian, said. "I couldn't believe he called Byron Scott, it's been Divac, Scott, A.C. me that. I never could say that, even if he Green, Elden Campbell and Sedale Tbeatt. was, let's say, a wimp." The Lakers made the playoffs only The Blazers often double-teamed Divac because they won their final two games inthe first two games, a factorin theoneof the regular season while the Houston sided victories. In the Western ConferRockets were losing their final three. ence finals last year, Divac got the better Only three teams in NBA history have. of Duckworth and the Lakers won the come back from a 2-0 deficit to win a series 4-2. best-of-5 series, and no eighth-seeded "The way people perceive Vlade, if team has beaten a top-seeded team since they can beat him up early and get to him the current playoff format was adopted in early and pound him and pound him, then 1984. he's not going to have a good game," In addition, the Blazers won both games APLasrPholo Lakers coach Mike Dunleavy said. between the teams at the Forum this Los Angeles Lakers Vlade Divac has the ball knocked away from him by Port"He's got to get through that. season, and the Lakers weren't excepland's Cliff Robinson.-Divac is upset because Robinson's teammate Kevin "But I think this has been somewhat tonally strong at home, going 24-17. Duckworth called him a wimp. NBA names Schrempf league's best 6th man NEW YORK (AP) -Detlef Schrempf, the versatile Indiana Pacers forward, was named winner of the NBA's Sixth Man Award Monday for the second season in a row. He and Kevin McHale of the Boston Celtics are the only players to win the award in consecutive years. Ricky Pierce of the Milwaukee Bucks is the only other two-time winner in the award's 10-year history. McHale won his awards in 1984 and 1985. Pierce won in 1987 and in 1990. Schrempf averaged 17.3 points, 9.6 rebounds and 3.9 assists per game and was a key factor late in the season and helped get the Pacers into the playoffs for a third straight season. Schrempf, who is 6-foot-10, received 54 of a possible 96 votes from a nationwide panel of sportswriters and broadcasters, three from each league city. Sarunas Marciulionis of Golden State finished second with 21 votes, edging Dan Majerle of Phoenix, last year's runnerup, by two votes. Tyrone CorbinofUtah and John Starks of New York each received one vote. Schrempf came off the bench in 76 of the 80 games heplayed forIndiana this year, his seventhin the NBA. He led the team in rebounding and established career highs in rebounding, scoring assists and free throw percentage, shooting .828 from the foul line. AP LaPth "There's not a better sixth man in the world," Pacers Detlef Schrempf (left) tries to shoot over Los Angeles Lakers' Mychal Thompson during a 1988 game. coach Bob Hill said. "If there is, I'd like to see him." dJySCORING Scott of the Lakers in the final seconds three steals as Phoenix completed a threeo rd a n Michael Jordan's 56-point performand had a sweep within its sights, but game sweep of San Antonio with a 101a ce on Wednesday night in the Bulls' Trail Blazers forward Buck Williams 92 victory, Johnson and Hornacek scored 119-114 victory at Miami matched the missed a driving layup in the final secII points each in the final quarter, when third-highest scoring total in NBA playonds and the Blazers couldn't get another the rest of the Suns had two points. b u rie s H e t rdhgetcin on. Apil2, vetm.DiIE EAWR offhistory.Jordan, whose63points against shot off. The Lakers won 121-119 in 41 oston in double-overtime on April 20, overtime. DEPE NNE AWARD 1986, rarks as the highest, also set a David Robinson of San Antonio, who 119-1 record byscoring 135pointsinthethreeSWISH! averaged a league-high 4.49 blocks and game sweep of the Heat, eclipsing his Chicago was 13 for 13 from the free= ranked fifth with 2.32 steals per game, 131 against Boton in 1986. throw linein the fourth quarterofits 119was named the NBA's Defensive Player 114 victory at Miami on Wednesday of the Year on Wednesday. Robinson SWEEPS night. The Heat also made13 free throws received 46 of the 96 votes from a panel With their 121-119 overtime victory in the final quarter, but missed seven ofswritersandbroadcasterstoedgetwoover Partland on Wednesday night, the others. .Byron Scott of the Lakers was time winner Dennis Rodman of Detroit L.A. Lakers avoided being swept in a 10 for 10 from theline in LA's 121-119 by seven votes, playoff series for the first time since the overtime victory over Portland. 1989 NBA Finals, when Detroit beat SUPERB IN DEFEAT them in four straight games. STARS Clyde Drexler of Portland had 42 points, Kevin Johnson and Jeff Hornacek, including 13 in overtime, 12assists and SOME HORNS FOR BUCK Suns: Johnson had 22 points and 11 asnine rebounds in 46 minutes of the Trail Portland rebounded a miss by Byron sits and Hornacek added 22 points and Blazers' 121-119 loss to the Lakers.

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1 6 Tropic Times May 1, 1992 Air Force extends separation program avoid involuntarily separating any Air Force memOfficials expect officer R IF bers,"saidBrig. Gen.TonyRobertson, AirForcedirec"One of the major objector of personnel plans. "Our expectation, on the enlisted board despite expanded side, is that this expanded program will allow us to tjves in attempting to meet reach our target. eligibility requirements "On the officer side, we are far less optimistic. And our congressionally mandated although every application is welcome and will help, WASHINGTON (AirForce News Service)The Air and although we continue to search for alternatives, we end strengths has been to Force will accept voluntary separation incentive and have had no choice but to begin preparations for a RIF special separation benefit applications through May 29 board," Robertson said. avoid involuntarily separating because of a lower than needed response to the VSI. A RIF board has been tentatively scheduled to meet Personnel officials said they're taking the step to July 20 attheAirForce Military PersonnelCenter, Ranany Air Force members." minimize the scope of any involuntary reduction in dolph AFB, Texas. The proposed eligible population force. includes company grade, reserve, non-line pilot offiRobertson The programs are also being expanded to include cers in the 1981 to 1989 year groups and all reserve Director of personnel plans more people not previously eligible in Phase I of the captains in the 1980 year group. program, which ended April 15. Officers in this group who are major selectees, have After closing the original VSI and SSB offer, the Air approved separation dates prior to Dec. 31, or have 15 therefore, all E-4 with nine through 19 years of service, Force found itstill needed nearly 3,800 officer applicaor more years of service as of Dec. 31, will not be RIF regardless of skill or tier, are eligible. Staff sergeants in tions and almost 2,800 enlisted applications. To meet eligible. Officers who will be considered by the RIF tier one non-selective re-enlistment bonus, non-medirequired end-strengths, the AirForce was hoping to get board will be notified soon. cal and non-dental skills are also eligible. 7,500 officers and 24,000 enlisted members to take the Under the expansion of the program, all officers Technical sergeants and above in tiers two through offers. eligible for VSI or SSB in Phase I remain eligible in five are also eligible, unless they are in skills which Without extending VSI and SSB, these numbers Phase II. Phase II expands eligibility to regular comalready met their Phase I target, or from which further would translate to officer and enlisted involuntary repany grade, non-pilot line officers, and to once-delosses cannot be taken. duction in force requirements. Officials hope to reduce ferred captains and deferred majors in selected medical Personnel officials are cautioning enlisted people in or eliminate these RIFs by getting as many volunteers as and dental skills. former tier one skills and in skills near their targets to possible. Officers eligible under the original Phase I criteria apply early. Officials were particularly concerned by the low may still apply to separate by Dec. 31. To help meet "Applications in all open, skills will be accepted on officer acceptance of the initial VSI and SSB offers. fiscal year end-strengths, however, new Phase II elia first-come, first-served basis," Robertson said. "As The incentive generated only 50 percent of the required gibles must separate from the service by Sept. 29. the numbers of applications in particular skills reach number of separations. With the exception of some enlisted skills that met theirtarget, we will close those skills to furtherapplicaUnless Phase II generates additional applications, an theirtargets in Phase I, orin which furtherlosses cannot tions and notify the field accordingly." officer RIF will be necessary, officials said. be absorbed, most enlisted people eligible in Phase I The basic rules and benefits in effect during Phase I "One of the major objectives in attempting to meet remain eligible in Phase II. will apply during the extension. Officer separation our congressionally mandated end strengths has been to Phase II expands eligibility to sergeants in tier one; dates, however, will differ under each program. by Maritza G. Pearce T Bnos '92program will complete 335 engiUASPublic AfairsOffice Task Force Badger s work neer projects and 24 Medical Readiness Training Exercises in Panama's remote SANTA ANA, LOS SANTOS PROV.f areas. INCE (USARSO PAO) -Task Force strengthening friendships The appreciation of these combined Badger has completed 60 percent of their humanitarian efforts were vividly exassigned projects, said Col. Rodger Brill, pressed by members of the AUSA and Task Force Badger commander. and Llano Largo. The Governor of Los Busy at each project site is Capt. John the task force commander. "With thecompletion of eachproject, Santos, Jose Antonio Burgos, met the Novak and hisworkforce of 181 engineer "On behalf of my wife and myself I we know that we are strengthening the visitors at each project. Teachers, chilsoldiers, 90 supporting specialists, six would like to express my gratitude for bonds of friendship between the people dren and parents also enthusiastically Panamanian government employees and what you are doing," said corporate of Panama and the U.S. It gives us great greeted the visitors. scores of volunteers. Novak's team is memberPaulSmith Alegre. "Icongratusatisfaction to know that the work we "I will always keep in my heart my completing the last nine projects in Los late you on ajob well done." have done will survive 10 to 12 years," deepest appreciation," said Burgos. "I Santos and Herrera provinces. AUSA members make sure the visitBrill told a group of corporate members am proud to let everyone know that the "Volunteers are extremely skillful, esing engineers from the U.S. Army Reof the Association of theU.S. Army who people in Los Santos Province are gratepecially in the masonry work," said Novak. serves and National Guard are welcomed were visiting two Fuertes Caminos-'92 ful for the help we arereceiving from the "Panamanian volunteers take the lead in to Panama. One of the first signs of hosprojects in Los Santos Province. U.S. Army." painting and landscaping. We are learnpitality they see is a banner that spells it The cost ofimaterials perproject is beLos Santos Educational Director Viring construction techniques from each out -"Welcome to Panama." Before tween $600 to $1,900, Brill added. gilio Escalonasaid,"Thanks to the coopother," he said. any work begins, the AUSA makes sure The group was transported by three erative efforts of the government ofPanMaterials are being purchased locally that welcome is remembered by throwhelicopters provided by the 128th Aviaama and the U.S., a total of 21 schools which brings cash into the province where ing a picnic bash for them. tion Brigade and Task Force Badger to have been repaired in Los Santos Proveach project is located. "This is very special to our soldiers," school construction sites in Santa Ana ince." By the end of June, the Fuertes Camisaid Brill. Recertify allowances Appreciation week recognizes FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Soldiers that have not recertified either their Basic Alone fo~atr rVabe BonAl local Army volunteer workers lowance by June 5 will risk losing them. Soldiers receving the allowances are required the majority of the station's work to complete recertification forms annually. The by Spec. James Yocum force are volunteers, Simmons said. forms are available at each unit's Personnel USARSO Public Affairs Office Te re Crss Simes aig Administration Center. The Red Cross offices at Gorgas FORT CLAYTON (USARSO Army Community Hospital and at PAO) -U.S. Army South recogFort Davis are all-volunteer staffs. Power outage scheduled nized its shadow work force this Volunteering allowsaworkerto FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -There week with Volunteer Appreciation gain experience for resumes as will be an electrical power outage May 2 from 8 Week, which ends with a luncheon well as helping others, said Terri a.m. to 2 p.m. to upgrade the electrical distribufor volunteers at Club Amador toJohnson, a Red Cross volunteer case tion system. day at 10 a.m. worker. The areas affected will be: The USARSO work force has "I just want to feel helpful," Building 3 -17, 22 -26 approximately 400 volunteers who Johnson said. "I see a lot of people Building 100 -196 (except 154 -157) help fill in the spaces left by downstuckin situations they can't get out Building 200 -224 sizing and budget cuts, said Bob of and I know how that feels." Building 300 -385 Appin, installation volunteer coorVolunteers affect the USARSO Building 394, 452, 454, 456, 457 dinator for U.S. Army Garrison. community in other ways as well. Building 804 -843 Volunteers fill roles in many areas U.S. Army photo by sp .Jame Yom In the recent Music and Theater Fort Clayton Elementary School, Jarman Field, such as the Red Cross office. Mildred Davila, Red Cross volunchildren's production of "Robi Bowling Alley, PX Garage and the Detention Fa"If we didn't have volunteers, Hood," more than 45 volunteers cility (Building 172). we wouldn't do a tenth of the work teer. lent their time and experience said For more information call Leyroy Skinner, we do now," said Gene Simmons, assistant station Kathey Foote of the Pacific Theatre Arts Centre. 285-5708/6119. manager for the Red Cross office on Fort Clayton. For information on becoming a volunteer, call 287I There are a few paid workers at the Red Cross, but 6109.

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Tropictivities May 1, 1992 An entertainment guide for the U.S. community in Panama Page BI 4k; U.S. Amy photo by SSgt Phillp D. A Chi-Hsiu Yang leads riders into the river. For story and photos see page B5. IMovies ifCar Isd Radio Flyer cruises into Ford Taurus LX: tough to TV .B3 Howard. See page B2. beat. See page B4. CPO.B4 Ads .B 10

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Tropic Times May 1, 1992 Movies HOWARD 9pm Gate 2 (R) Lewis Tripp, Simon Raynolds May 8 Today Thursday 7pm Juice (R) Omar Epps, Kahill Kain 7pm The Adventures Of The Great Mouse Detective 7pm Gate 2 (R) Lewis Tripp, Simon Raynolds (G) Animated 9pm Gate 2 (R) Lewis Tripp, Simon Raynolds SHERMAN 9pm The Adventures Of The Great Mouse Detective May 8 Today (G) Animated 7pm The Adventures Of The Great Mouse Detective 7:30pm The Last Boy Scout (R) Bruce Willis, Damon Saturday (G) Animated Wayans 2pm The Adventures Of The Great Mouse Detective 9pm The Adventures Of The Great Mouse Detective Saturday (G) Animated (G) Animated 7:30pm Curly Sue (PG) Jim Belushi, Kelly Lynch 6:30pm The Hand That Rocks The Cradle (R) Sn day Rebecca De Mornay DAVIS 7:30pm Grand Canyon (R) Danny Glover, Kevin Kline 8:30pm The Hand That Rocks The Cradle (R) Today Thursday Rebecca De Mornay 7pm Medicine Man (PG-13) Sean Connery, Lorraine 7:30pm Frankie & Johnny (R) Michelle Pfeiffer Sunday Bracco May 8 2pm The Adventures Of The Great Mouse Detective Saturday 7:30pm Medicine Man (PG-13) Sean Connery, Lorraine (G) Animated 7pm Hard Promises (PG) Sissy Spacek, William Bracco 6:30pm The Hand That Rocks The Cradle (R) Peterson Rebecca De Mornay 9pm The Prince Of Tides (R) Barbra Streisand, Nick AMADOR 8:30pm The Hand That Rocks The Cradle (R) Nolte Today Rebecca De Momay Sunday 7pm T Addams Family (PG-13) Angelica Houston, Monday 7pm The Prince Of Tides (R) Barbra Streisand, Nick Christopher Lloyd 7pm The Hand That Rocks The Cradle (R) Nolte Saturday Rebecca De Mornay Monday 7pmn Shining Through (R) Michael Douglas, Melanie 9pm The Hand That Rocks The Cradle (R) 7pm .The Prince Of Tides (R) Barbra Streisand, Nick Griffith Rebecca De Mornay Nolte Sunday Tuesday Tuesday 7pm Little Man Tate(FGJoiFstrDaneW t 7pm The Hand That Rocks The Cradle (R) 7pm Into The Sun (R) Anthony Michael Hall, Thursday Rebecca De Mornay Michael Pare 7pm Shining Through (R) Michael Douglas, Melanie 9pm The Hand That Rocks The Cradle (R) Wednesday 7 Sinith Rebecca De Mornay 7pm Into The Sun (R) Anthony Michael Hall, Wednesday Michael Pare May 8 7pm Radio Flyer (PG-13) Lorraine Bracco, John Thursday 7pm The Last Boy Scout (R) Bruce Willis, Damon Heard 7pm Juice (R) Omar Epps, Kahill Kain Wayans 9pm Radio Flyer (PG13) Lorraine Bracco, John Heard Thursday Now showing 7pm Star Trek VI (PG) William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy 9pm Star Trek VI (PG) William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy PICTURES May 8 7pm Star Trek VI (PG) William Shatner, Leonard presents Nimoy 9pm Star Trek VI (PG) William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy CLAYTON Today 7pm Juice (R) Omar Epps, Kahill Kain 9pm Juice (R) Omar Epps, Kahill Kain Saturday 2pm Stop Or My Mom Will Shoot (PG-13) Sylvester Stallone 6:30pm Stop Or My Mom Will Shoot (PG-13) Sylvester Stallone 8:30pm Stop Or My Mom Will Shoot (PG-13) Sylvester Stallone Sunday 2pm Stop Or My Mom Will Shoot (PG-13) Sylvester Stallone 6:30pm Stop Or My Mom Will Shoot (PG-13) Sylvester Stallone 8:30pm Stop Or My Mom Will Shoot (PG-13) Sylvester Stallone Monday 7pm Stop Or My Mom Will Shoot (PG-13) Sylvester Stallone WALT DISNEY PICTURES ,"THE ADVENTURES OF THE GREAT MOUSE DETECTIVE" ..SILVER SCREEN PARTNERS II 9GNERALAUDIENCES "" "'.',EVE TITUS,.PAUL GALDONE .,HENRY MANCINI M *r Sylvester Stallone Tuesday 7pm Father Of The Bride (PG) Steve Martin, Diane Keaton ~*~ 9pm Father Of The Bride (PG) Steve Martin, Diane Howard Theater, today, Saturday. Sunday. Keaton Wednesday Clayton Theater, May 8. 7pm Gate 2 (R) Lewis Tripp, Simon Raynolds SCN FM radio schedule Weekdays 10:05-11pm Joe Reiling New Rock 4:05-6pm Saturday Golden Oldies (local, 10:05-Noon Morning Show (local, live) 5:05-9am e S11:05-11:30pm Jim Pewter Oldies live) 12:05-4pm American Country Count:he Morning Show (local, 11:30-Midnight Jazz Beat 6:05-8pm Canal Country (local, live) down live) Midnight-Sam SCN Overnite -Adult Rock & Country & Western 4:05-6pm Hits of the 80s (local, live 9:05-l0am Charlie Tuna (top 4 hits) Roll (UNISTAR) 8:05-llpm American Dance Trax (dance oldies) 10:05-1lm Gene Price (country/wease) Midnight-6am Friday -SCN Overnite music) 6:05-8pm Sunday Night Special (local, 1l:05-lpm Midday Show (local, live) 11:05-Midnight In the Studio (album oriented live urban contemporary) Trary) Saturdays rock) 8:05-11pm Dick Clark's Rock, Roll and 2:53 lrieA n(casc)ok Midnight-6anm SCN Overnight Remember (oldies) 2:05-pin Lrie Allen (classic rock) 6:05-7am Golden Days of Radio (nostalr11:05-Midnight King Biscuit Flower Hour 3:05-4pm Harry Newman (country/westgia) (live concert) er) 7:05-8am Off the Record (album Sundays Midnight-am SCN Overnight 4:05-6pm Afternoon Drive (local, live) oriented rock) 6:05-6:30am In The 1 Gospel (religious) 6:05-7pm Larits Shelby (urban con8:05-10am The Countdown (urban con6:30-7:00am Roller Coaster temporary) temporary) 7:05-7:30am Crosscurrents (religious) SCN FM radio airs 91.5 Pacific and 98.3 Atlan7:05-9pm The Rock Block (local, live) 10:05-Noon Morning Show (local, live) 7:30-8am Love on the Rock (religious) tic on the FM dial with fiveminutes of AP Network 9:05-lopm Mary Turner (album oriented 12:05-4pm American Top 40 (contem8:05-9am Doug Ordunin (classical) news at the top of each hour. Power FM News airs rock) porary hit radio) 9:05-10am The Jazz Show weekdays at 7:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.

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Tropic Times TV Schedule ay B3 Channels 8 & 10 Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday May 8 5:30,m NBC New Snmise 6:30amJuatFor Id '6:00am Real Videe 5:30am NBC Nowa at Snme 5:30am NBC New Bonde 5:3am NBC Newa at Smie 5:30am NBC Ne1 a Sunoi 5:3a NBC New aSree 6:00 Good Morning America Superfriends 7:00 ChiranLlfeotylea 6:00 GoodlMoming Amereca 6:00 Good Morning America 6:00 Good Moming America 6:00 Good Moming Amenca 6:00 Good Moming Ameca 0:00 Bedy bylJake Hazmmeanr Magzne 8:00 Body by jake 8:00 Body by Jake 8:00 Body by Jake 8:00 Body by Jake 0:00 Body by Jake 8:30 SeameSbeel CharleBeewn& 7:30 Bijamin 8.30 SeoameStree 8:30 SeaameSee 8:30 SeameStein 8:30 SeSameSrein 8:30 SeSametreet 930 NewCo'iApple Soopy 8:00 CBooondayMomlng 9:30 -rnHae 9:30 Sllver~poena 9:30 Hemm 9:30 Silverspome 9:30 Newton'. Apple 10:00 CarroonComer Woody Wood9:30 Both Side with Je 10:00 Carton CC 0:00 Caiton Come, 10:00 CanotomCrmer 10:00 CarionComer 1015 CNlNNewarm pecker Jackm 010 CNNNewsmam 10:15 CNNNewar-m 10:15 CNNNrwar-m 10:15 CNNNewamam 10:15 CNNNewmme 10:30 ILove Locy Readeiner 10:00 MeetThe~ra. 1030 ILoveLrUcy 10:30 ILoveLecy 10:30 ILoveL-cy 00:30 ILoveLucy 10:30 ILoveLecy 11:00 Whedl ofFornim 8:30 Cartomn er 10:30 WalleoutumWeek 11:00 Wheel of rPOnin 11:00 WhleelofFortorne 1:00 Whrel ofFotnie 11:00 Whreel of FoMe 11:00 Wheel of F.-e 11:30 ShowblToday 0 odby 1:30 ShowbizTiday 11:30 Showbi.Teday 11:30 ShowbizToday 11:30 SbowbiUToday Nom HM-dlbNew 10:00 SarTek MaratheTrIala Nom HeadtireNewa Noen HeadlineNews Noe HeallneNew. Norm HeadlneNew. Nor HeadlineNew. 12:20 SCNMidday~qporl 11:00 AlrroroNew. Noer Amelcaenllrraia 12:20 SCNtolddayrori 12:20 SCNfddaysport 12:20 SCNMlddayRnpool 12:20 OCNMlddayRqport 12:20 SCNMiddorayR2por 12:30 Spo Center 11:30 NavyNew. 12:30 McLrAughLro vup 12:30 SpodraConter 12:30 SprraCenter 12:30 SportCener 12:30 OpoooCener 12:30 SporiaCenler 1:00 AnitherWorld No-m CamlleaMerlnea 1:00 HeadlineNewa 1:00 AninberWold 1:00 Anrot.eWold 1:00 AnrtherWorld 1:00 AnehierWoeld 1:00 AerotherWold 2:00 OpalhWinfrey 12:30 ThiaWeekI.fBeball 1:30 SecondGoneertion 2:00 OprabWinfroy 2:00 Donab.c 2:00 OprehWinfrey 2:00 Donahoe 2:00 OprahWinfrey 3:00 Make'1Ge 0:00 KRea:TheForgotte 2:00 The.FgAlGrme 3:00 NickAwead 3:00 SqamOrrneTV 3:00 ThePrnple'aCourt 3:00 Saved1y' e Bell 3:00 MakeTheGradn 3:25 Poice IS Right War 2:30 S-ndoyAftemeen 3:30 Price 1. Right 3:30 PdcebRight 3:30 Pricea Right 3:30 PIceI Right 3:25 PricebRighit 4:25 GUrdgLighit 2:00 Pm Bowler. Ton Movie:'SevnAle" 4 d 4:25 Grddnglhl4 4:25 GuiddiggUghgt 42 0:2GddngLight 420 (lidlr ~ight 4:25 GuidogLight 5:10 GmeralHruprtal 3:30 SalordayAftemoen 4:05 SundayAflernoon 5:12 Ormer.lHapital 5:12 GmneralHcaplal 5:12 ormer.Hepda 5:12 GmendHospital 5:12 Ger-alHospital 6:00 SCNBvrmngRepot Movie:'BigRed" Movie: MeProducer" 6:00 SCN1vrmlgReport 6:00 SCNBvrmingReort 6:00 SCNlvemingReport 6:00 SCNlvmrrgRepoi 6:00 SCNBv EIngReport 6:30 WrddNewaTonighL 5:00 HeadineNew. Break 5:30 Headli.eNew. 630 WaddNewaTonrght 6:30 WrddNewaTonighLrl 6:30 WroddNewaTonlght 6:30 WoddNewTonlght 6:30 WeeddNew.Tonigh 7:00 Jepardyl 0:20 specil:uveFron 6:00 SuptraraofWretlaing 7:00 Jeopardyl 7:00 Jeepardyl 7:00 Jopardyl 7:00 Jeopardyl 7:00 Jeopardyl 7:30 Penn. Bottler AT&T BelLab 7:00 InspectorMone 730 Specdl: "Dealit 7:30 Maj.rDad 7:30 Special: Anawerdng (li7.30 Coach 7:30 FereLa Buoller 8:00 EvenlegShade 6:00 Da""lieNBC 8:00 SundayNgltMovie: WepeirnAmrdlca" 8:00 48HoHdren'aQootia 7:55 ThurrdayNigh'Movie: 0:00 Bveningshade 8:30 PremeTimeLlve 7:00 SiarSealhi"92 "NorthShlor 830 60 Minutes 9:00 American Chrorricle 9:00 Special:InnocentVic. "Yelowbraid" 0:30 PrimeTmeTve 930 CBSEB g ngNeN00 SamdayNigiMovi: 9:30 HeallieNew 930 CBS B1vrmg Nw. 9:30 CB Bvmng Newa ti:3 30 CBSvmtNmw 9: CBSEving New, 10:00 anrocTonight 'Creator" 10:00 EeienainmormThla 0:00 Oeierlarmant Touighl 1000 Onitalnmenr TonTeight 9:30 CBSlBvrmigNewa 10:00 EnrotairznrmTorrnghl 10:00 EnteasomentToright 1030 SCN NewUpdarr 9:40 Showime ATheApo11o Week 10030 SCN Nrw Update 10:30 SCN New Update :10:00 ESertminrmenTonighr 10:30 SCN New Update 10:30 SCNNew. Update 1030 ToighShlow 10:30 SarredayNightLive 11:00 Stertri o 10:35 ToeightShow 10:35 TonghlShow 10:30 SCNNw Updade 10:30 TomghlShow 10:35 Torrigh Sow 11:35 Latoight MidnrghtVideolink. MidrgblBuineWorld 01:315 Lrmig 11:35 Lmeigt 10:35 TonighShow 11:35 Latenight 11:35 La mIght 12:3OamNlghrlie 0:00 AlNIgh8Mevim: "Radle 12:30 HeadleNew. 12:35amNightlne 12:35amNightline 11:30 Latmight 12:35amNighline 12:35 amNigiltne 1:05 AlN*ghtMovita:"12 Day." 1:00 FiringLIno 1:AM 0s idaPoitca'92 1:05 InidePolitca 12:35amNlghtline 1:05 aidePolidce 1:05 AiNi&ghMovitr: "The O'Clock High" 2:30 A1NightIMoviin: "Pay1:30 Sport, Cenrer 1:30 Spota Center 1:30 sponaConer 00 Inalde Pollinc 1:30 Sporn. Center SimndofMusiac" 3:16 ARlNightMovies: -Life Cho 3" 2:00 CNN Cotinues 2:00 AramioHall 2:00 Aramio Ha 1:30 Spoats Center 2:00 Arnem.o Hall Show 3:00 AllNigheMovie:"I'e BoL" 3:35 All Night Movie: 'All 3:00 Headline Newa 3:00 TonightShow 3:00 TonightShow 2:00 Arnlo HalShow 3:00 TonightShow Lageat Day" 402 AllNrghtMovia:"SherAboutlve" 3:30 CNNWorldReport 4:00 DavdLtterman 400 DavidLenrerm. n 3:00 TonightShow 4:00 LatmeightW/Lerormn 6:00 HeadlineNew lWkHolea:ThrScrea 5:30 HearlieoNew 5:00 HeadlineNew. 5:00 HeadlineNew 5:00 HeadlineNew. 4:00 DavldLelerin 5:00 HeadlineNewa Weapon" 0:00 HeadlineNrw. 6:00 HeadlineNew. Cable Channel 14 Today Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday May 8 530am NBC New a Sunr 6:30 am Simulcai with Chin6:00am OurFrienda On We.5:30am NBC New. a Serlae 5:30am NBC New at Soro. 5:30am NBC New at Sormel 5:30am NBC New at Sunrie 5:30am NBC New. a Sunor 6:00 Oood Moming America neli 8 & 10 lerSquare 6:00 Good Moming America 600 Good Meming America 6:00 GoodMoringAmenrica 6:00 GoodlMoming Ameeca 6:00 GoodiMomog Amereco :00 Baetlljice 10:00 FaodlyTeacor:'Ibeln6:30 MippelBablra 8:00 MIckey andDonald 8:00 GurnmiBears :00 MakertheGnade 0:00 TinyToo 000 Bee:lej10 ce 8:30 GumniBeam credibleNmey 7:00 ChdlstiAnifeolyle 8:30 H -rmmm :30 Beitlejinc 0:30 PoHouse 0:30 SquarOneTV .30 GuronflBeari 9:00 Today 11:30 Basketball: NBAPlayMaMg 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 9:00 Today 1100 OprahWirfreyShow off.Doubleheader .7:30 Bnjainin 11:00 OprarWinfreyShow 11:00 Donaho 11:00 OprnhWinfreyShow 11:00 Donahuo 11:00 OprahWinfrnySbow Norm HeadlineNew. 5:00piHeadlineNew, 8:00 RealVideo, Nom HeadlineNew Nom HeadlineNew. Norm HeadlineNew. Nor HeadlineNew. Norm HeadlineNewa 12:20 SCNMlddayRopot 5:30 The Kenroky Derby 9:00 Wahingr Week In 12:20 SCNMidday Rqpor 12:20 SCN Midday Repo 12:20 SCNMiddayRepmo 12:20 SCN hidday Repor 12:20 SCNMiddayRepon 12:30 A11MyCild-r 7:00 The Sipon Review. 12:30 AliMy Chidr 12:30 AlIMyCildr 12:30 AllMy(Childrm 12:30 AllMyChfldrm 12:30 AllMy Childre 1:30 One Life o Live 7:30 Che. 9:30 Face the Natio 1:30 o Life to Live 1:30 0e Life to Live 1:30 OneLfetoLve 1:30 0e Lifeo Live 1:30 OneLifeto Lve 2:30 BamyMiller 8:00 In Lving Color 10:00 Wonderful World of 2:30 BameyMler 2:30 Faggle Rock 2:30 BameyMiller 2:30 Newon' Apple 2:30. Bamey Miler 3:00 OruameSlreet 8:30 AmericrmDetetive Dimey 3:00 SeaameScrrt 3:00 SeaameStreet 3:00 OriameSree r 3:00 SeSameSrel 3:00 OeoameSlreet 4:00 77S.naelStrip 9:00 Videolnko 11:00 HeadlineNew. 4:00 SOeTrek 4:00 Savedby theBell 4:00 SlimeradFrIend.4:00 Alf 4:00 77StnrelStlp 4:55 Channel oe 10:00 HeadlineNew. 11:30 NBA BaakerallDonble4:55 Channel 0ne 4:30 GinStmarl 4:30 ScholauticSporlaAmer4:30 MySiaSeram 4:55 C Oannel Or 5:00 SilveroSpoon 10:30 SatrdayNignt Llve bender Team. TBA 5:05 SilverSpoona 4:55 Channel One ice 4:55 Channel Gee 5:05 SilverSpyon5:30 M*A*S*H MidnightScience &Tecnology 5:00 On Ph Road 5:30 M*A*S-H 5:05 Silverspoona 4:55 ChannelOne 0:05 SilverSpoone 0:30 MAiS-H 6:00 SCNllEingReporl 12:30 HeadlineNew. 5:30 CNNHeadlineNew 6:00 SCNlvrmnigReoL 5:30 MoAnS*H 5:05 SilveSrSpooe 5:30 MA'S*H 6:00 SCNlvymingRori 6:30 NBCNightlyNew 1:00 FiringLine 6:00 LifeGeOn 6:30 NBCNightlyNewa 6:00 SCNlleningReport 5:30 M+ArS*H 6:00 SCNBvrmingRepont 6:30 NBCNigbtlyNew. 700 NBAPIeyoffa:TeamaTo 1:30 SporILatenight 7:00 MacGyver 7:00 SledgeHamner 6:30 NBCNighlryNewa 6:00 SCNlvrmingReort 6:30 NBCNigbtlyNewa 7:00 Whr'nTheBeza? beannorced 2:00 EntetoainentthinWeek 8:00 UnolvedMyiteriro 7:30 TheSlapMaxwellSnoy 7:00 Valerie 6:30 NBCNightlyNew. 7:00 ADifferentWorld 7:30 MarriedPeople 7:30 MarridlPeople 3:00 SarturdayNightlive 9:00 SundayNightMovie: :00 21 JumpStreet 7:30 DesigningWemen 7:00 BS.-m 7:30 CobyShow 8:00 MioaUolveriePageent :.00 Movie "Serpico" 4:30 HeadlineNwa Amazing Grace and 9:00 TourofDury 8:00 -Wirguy 7:30 Good Gidla 0:00 The Equalizee 10:00 HeadlineNewa 10:00 Headline New, 5:00 Headline New Chuck 10:00 HeadlineNew. 9:00 Falcon Creat 0:00 Hner 9:00 Dalla 10:30 SCN New. Update 10-30 SCN New. Update 5:30 Headline Newa 11:00 60 Minutex 10:30 SCN Newl Update 10-00 HeadlineNewa 9:00 thineyaamething 10:00 Headline New. 10:35 Antoio Hall 10:35 A.re.iall MidnighztSimlcat with Chan1035 Arenio Hal Show 10:30 SCN Newa Update 10:00 HeadlineNew. 10:30 SCN New. Update 11:35 DidLeneerman 11:35 Dav.Leneonan nela S& 10 11:35 DavidLettermarn 10:35 Arardi. Halt 10:30 SCN New Update 10:35 Arei Hall 12:35mmNigline 12:3samNightline 1:00 amHeadlineNew 11:35 Davidtteomano 10:35 ArarmioHall 11:35 DavidLeoermon 1:05 WorldwideUpdalte 1:0' WodrdwrdoUpdine 1:30 ABCNewNighnline 12:35am Simrulcaat with Chan11:35 DavidLerterman 12:35amSimoolcaoowih Chan1:30 Spor, Latenighl 1:30 Sp_= Laterighr 2:00 Simulcatwih hiannels nela 6.& 10 12:30amaSdenlciwih CheWit 8 & 10 2:00 Arveno Hall 2:00 Arenioo HalO 9 a to el & 10 3:00 TonightSbew 3:00 TnoirhShow 4:00 DavidLettermr 4:00 DavIdLenerm 5:00 Videlinka 5:00 Videonnk6:00 Headline New. 6:00 HeadlineNew Peter O'Toole in -'The Creator' Channels 8 & 10 Aldo Ray, Dewey Martin, Anne Collings, Dean Smith, James Griffith and Stewart Petersen. MOVIES The Producers The Creator Sunday, 4:05 p.m. Saturday, 8 p.m. An early Mel Brooks farce featuring Zero Mostel as Peter O'Toole plays a scientist trying to revive his a producer who teams up with an accountant (Gene long-dead wife through cloning, with the help of an Wilder) to sell shares in a Broadway musical they impressionable student named Boris (Vincent Spano). believe is guaranteed to fail. Stars Kenneth Mars, Dick Stars Mariel Hemingway, Virginia Madsen, David Shawn, Estelle Winwood and Renee Taylor. Ogden Stiers and John Dehner. North Shore Seven Alone Sunday, 8 p.m. Sunday, 2:30 p.m. A surfer heads for Oahu's north shore to compete. Seven children undertake the hazardous trek from Along the way, he makes a friend and finds love. Stars Mississippi to Oregon after their parents' death. Stars Matt Alder, Nia Peeples and Gregory Harrison. Cable Channel 14 decides to stop playing baseball until the world agrees to complete nuclear disarmament. When a pro basketball U.S. Army photo bySgt. Joseph J. Johnson MOVIES star joins his protest, other atheletes around the world DOORS OPEN -Joy Pupel, supervisor at The Incredible Journey follow suit. Stars Gregory Peck and Jamie Lee Curtis. the Aibrook "Stars and Stripes" bookstore Saturday, 10 a.m. SPECIALS stocks books. The "Stars and Stripes" bookAn English bull terrier, a golden Labrador retriever stores open today at three locations, at Aland a Siamese cat travel 250 miles across rugged The Kentucky Derby brook adjacent to the Furniture Store, BuildCanadian terrain to return to their owner's home. Stars Saturday, 5:30 p.m. ing 804; Howard AFB near the Billeting OfJohn Drainie, Emile Genest, TommyTweed andSandra One of the spring's top sporting events, the Kentucky fice in Building 708 and at Fort Davis upstairs Scott. Derby, takes place live from Louisville's fabled Churchill from the shoppette in Building 32. "Stars and Downs. The nation's top three-year-olds compete in the Stripes" will conduct an official grand openAmazing Grace and Chuck 118th Run for the Roses, the first -and most highlying soon. Sunday, 9 p.m. treasuredjewel in thoroughbred horse racing's covA 12-year old Little League whiz (Joshua Zuehike) eted triple crown.

PAGE 20

B4 Tropic Times May 1, 1992 FORD TAURUS LX.___ '92 model has many changes however, is a paucity of instrumentation. A cupholder, ogy. For $555, a 3.8 liter unit with 147 HP is available. by Zane Binder though not an effective one, is standard. It's not worth the extra cost. King Features Syndicate Objective performance in nearly every area is high, Shifting was handled by a standard four-speed overand the LX's ride is one of its best points. It handles drive automatic. It did its job well, and is much better Americaseems to love theFord Taurus.In '91, only bumps and frost heave well. There's also no trace of than the Accord's automatic. the Honda Accord outsold it, but neither marque can highway float. Handling, the opposite of ride, is simiThe air conditioner was an extremely powerful unit; claim dominance at the top of the sales chart. larlyrewarding. The standard power steering (variable the heater, adequate. Both retain wide margins of supeFor '92, Ford is taking an even harder punch at its rate on LXs) combines with the suspension to yield reariority over most Japanese challengers. rival. The front-drive Taurus has been completely resonably high tossibility. Higher marks would beearned The AM/FM stereo radio-tape player, an upgraded done inside and numerous changes implemented to if the marginal mud and snow radials were replaced version of the standard sound system, was decent and fine-tune the chassis. A driver's side airbag is standard, with decent tires on this 3,170-pound car. The turning part of a large option package. If you demand exceland now a front passenger companion unit is optional. circle, at just over 38 feet, is average for the class. Antilence, an aftermarket supplier must be visited. Inside the Taurus, there's room up front for three on lock brakes are a $985 decision; they could save your What's the bottom line? Overall, the Taurus LX is the split bench velour seat. In the rear, there's reasonlife, but are overpriced. very good, and at $17,434 base, it's priced slightly more able space for the same number. The seats are exUnder the hood was Ford's standard but ancient 3 reasonably than the Accord. Even quality control was tremely comfortable, and leather is available as a $515 liter, 140-HP fuel-injection V-6. Adequate but defigood, though not up to the imports. option. The cargo compartment is nicely finished and nitely uninspired sums up its performance. Zero to 60 Only thepowertrain disappoints; though not near as moderately sized; you may, however, need aroof rack. takes 11.2 seconds; city mileage was observed at 18, sophisticated overall as the Accord, the Ford has many Interior styling is conservative, and there's been a highway economy 24 (EPA 20/29). -unique strengths. For family transportation, it's tough recent move away from European accents. Retained, This is well below average; Ford needs new technolto beat Taurus. Employment All applicants should be aware that hiring is severely restricted because of the Department of Defense 234-92-LA -EDUCATION PROGRAM SPECIALIST, NM-1701-7. DCA, Child Development Svc., Fort Cayton. worldwide hiring freeze. Effective April 6, the freeze allowed one new hire from outside Department of For 106. Note: Driver'slicene required. Applicantselectedmuatsatisfactory complete backgroundinvestigation. DA Army for every four losses to DoD. Placement of current DA employees (including those on leave without employees only. pay) is an exception to the freeze. Current temporary employees may now apply against permanent vacan235-92-LA -SMALL ENGINE MECHANIC, MG-86104. DCA, Outdoor Recreation Br., Fort Clayton. Form 106. cies unless otherwise noted. Specialized experience, when indicated, must be in duties similar to those Note: DA employees only. required by the vacancy. Military Spouses: If available, qualified, and within the area of consideration 236-92-SS -CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN, NM-802-9. DEH, Contract Mgmt. Div., Corozal. Form 106. specified for the vacancy, may be considered subject to the "one-for-four" DA hiring restriction. Panama Nom: DA employees only. Canal Commission employees: U.S. and non-U.S. current permanent employees may apply for permanent 237-92-vC -PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST, NM-1035-9. Sensitive. Temporary NTE 1 yr. USSOUTHCOM PAO, employment subject to the "one-for-four" DA hiring restriction. Current permanent NAF or AAFES emQuarry Ht. Form 106. ployees who were appointed prior to Nov. 3, 1989 may now also apply. AMENDMENT ON HOW TO APPLY: Failure to complete USARSO Form 106, when required, could 238-92-ES -BIOLOGICAL AID (INSECTS), NMA044 Temporary NTE 30 Sep. 92. USA MEDDAC-Panama, hinder an applicant's chances of being referred for the vacancy. For information, visit the Civilian Personnel Office, Building 560, Corozal. 239-92-ES -PHOTOGRAPHER (LABORATORY), NM-1060-7. Sensitive. DTSC, Photography Br., Fort Clayton. Note: DA employees only. VB# VACANCIES TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 05-01-92 CLOSE: 05-12-92. 240-92-VC -INTELLIGENCE SPECIALIST, GS-132-11J12/13. Sensitive (Some may require ability to obtain TOP ATLANTIC SIDE: Secret clearnom). Some may be temporary NTE 1 yr. Form 106. NOTE: Applicant Supply Hile -No closing date. 228-92-LA -REPORTSCLERK(TYPING),NM-303-4. Sensitive. DCA,EducattonDiv.,FortDavis. Form 106. Note: 241-92-CM -EQUIPMENT SPECIALIST (ELECTRONICS), NM-1670-11. Sararnmento Army Depot, Special DA employees only. Projects Div., Corozal. Form 106. 230-92-NR -CUSTODIAL CONTRACT INSPECTOR, NM-303-5. Temporary NTE 09-30-92. DEH-ATL, Contract NOTES: VB#: 177-92-CM, BdgetAnalystNM-560-7/9isamended to read: Areaofconsiderationlimitedto 106th Mgmt. Br., Fort Davis. Note: Driver's license required. DA employees only. Signal Brigade employees only. Closing datwi 05-12-92. VB#: 217-92-ES, Library Technician, NM-1411-7 is amended to read: Spec Exp: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-5. Applicants who applied need not reapply. Vacancy open until 05-12-92. VB#: 233-92-LA -RECREATION SPECIALIST (YOUTH ACTIVITIES), NM-188-7. Sensitive. DCA, Youth Svcs., Fort 051-92-SS, Electronics Mechanic, MG-2604-10; 090-92-SS, Plumber Helper, MG-4'706-5; 091-92-SS, Kitchen Espinar. Form 106. Note: Must be able to obtain driver's license. DA employees only. Equipment Mechanic Helper. MG-5310-5 and 108-92-SS, Mechanical Engineer, NM-30-11 are hereby cancelled. PACIFIC SIDE: 227-92-LA -REPORTS CLERK (TYPING), NM-303-4. Sensitive. DCA, Education Div., Fort Kobbe. Form 106. OPEN CONTINUOUS ANNOUNCEMENTS: Closing date: 12-31-92. Note: DA employees only. OC-M-92 -OFFICE AUTOMATION CLERK, NM-326-4. Form 106. Note: DoD permanent employees only. 229-92-LA -EDUCATIONAL AID, NM-1702-4. Part-time 22 hi. per week. DCA, Child Development Svcs., Fort OC-N-92 -SECRETARY (OFFICE AUTOMATION), NM-318-S. Form 106. Note: DoD permanentemployees only. Clayton. Form 106. Note: Applicantselectedmustsatisfactory complete backgroundinvestigation. DA employeesonly. The Directorate of Civilian Persel Office is accpting applications for: I1. Nurse Practitioner, NM-610-l0. 231-92-IA -COMPUTER ASSISTANT, NM-335-5. AO, Personnel Automation Br., Fort Clayton. Form 106. Note: ThDictrt fCiinPrsneOfc iacpinapicin f: .Nr PciinrN-1-. D319IA -plos COM R ATemporary. 2. Social Worker. NM-185-11. Temporary NTE: 09-30-92. Con Solo. 3. Occupational Therapist and DA employees only. Occupational Therapy Assistant. Temporary-Part Time. For information call Enid Sullivan at 285-4116 232-92-CM -SECURITY ASSISTANT (TYPING), GS-086-6. Sensitive. 56th Signal Battalion, Security Office, 4. Sales StoreChecker, NM-2091-03. Temporazy/ntermittent. CASP Tmstrequired. Forinformation call Julie Hurtado Corozal. Form 106. Note: 106th employees only. Excepted Service position. Qualified typist required. at 285-6268. _Kitchen Capers Have fish dealer slit fish and remove center bone. 4 ounces grated Gjetost cheese, chilled Saute garlic in olive oil. Add onion and cook over Pink and green food coloring nedium heat until translucent. Add hot and sweet Slivered almonds >eppers. Cook two minutes longer. Transfer mixture to Sliced strawberries bowl. Add Jarlsberg and tomatillos. Spread mixture Soften gelatin in lemon juice five minutes. Place m bottom half of fish to about 1/2 inch from edge. Close over boiling water or microwave 20 seconds to disIsh and tie with string, making ties about two inches solve. Cool slightly. In clean, grease-free bowl, beat part. On the diagonal, cut 1/4 inch deep slashes in top egg whites on high speed until foamy and thick. While lesh of fish. Insert lemon wedges, skin side up, in beating, gradually add sugar, by spoonfuls. When whites dashes. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. In pan in which form soft peaks, add extract and zest. Beat to blendinto vegetables were sauteed, bring wine to a boil. Place fish meringue. Stir in slightly cooled gelatin. Gently fold in / in large glass or enamel baking pan. Pour hot wine over Gjetost. Divide mixture into thirds. Tint one third pink, fish. Cover tightly. Bake 30 minutes or until fish flakes and another green. Layer green, pink and white dollops whentested with a fork. Removeto serving platter; snip in goblets or sherbet glasses. Cover with plastic wrap Baked stuffed fish ties. Garnish with additional lemon, if desired. Serves without touching meringue. Chili two to six hours. Top 2 red snappers, about 2 1/2 pounds each four to six. with almonds and strawberries. Serves four to six. The 2 cloves garlic, minced Chopping Block recipe by Philomena Corradeno. 2 tablespoons olive oil Gjetost parfaits 2 medium onions, finely chopped I envelope unflavored gelatin Editor's note: People interested In sharing a rec1 cup chopped seeded medium hot peppers 1/4 cup lemon juice Ipe or household tip with Tropic Times readers, can 8 ounces Jarlsberg or Jarlsberg Lite cheese 3 large egg whites, at room temperature -send recipes or tips by MPS to Tropic Times, Unit 12tomatillos, chopped 1/2 cup sugar 0936, APO AA 34002. Your name and base will be 1 cup dry white wine or unsweetened apple juice 1 teaspoon almond extract printed with your submission. Lemon wedges 1 tablespoon grated lemon zest

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Tropic Times May 1, 1992 .7 (From the left) Chi-Hsiu Yang, Carrie Garza, Altagracia Alvarado and Dawn Lopez lead the riders down the road Yeeeeeh a It's not 'Ponderosa,' but there are plenty of 'Hosses' by SSgt. Phillip D. Clark bridles are adjusted, and those in need of a difTropic Times ferent mount are given one. The riders are soon back in the saddle and "Yeeeeeeeeeha!" out for a three-hour ride. Garrido leads the That's how Altagracia Alvarado described a riders through Kuna grass, along and across recent afternoon of horseback riding in Pecora the river, up and down steep hills. Valley sponsored by the Howard/Albrook Richard West, a 14-year-old family Riding Stables. member and veteran of the Fort Bragg, N.C., "This is the best. It's exciting and challengtrails, was impressed. ing. It's not a monotonous ride. There are the "This is a lot more fun. You get to go faster hills, river and valley," said the second-timer and you don't have to play follow the leader," to Pecora. "And the horses got spunk." he said. "I had fun." The journey begins at the Albrook swim"(On this trail ride) you are actually riding, ming pool, where stables manager David not following another horse," Carrie Garza Morris picks up the guests for the hour-long added. "I think it's a great time. You get as bus ride to Alfred Bondurant's ranch. much horse as you can handle. These horses Bondurant greets the riders with hot coffee, have character." tortillas and fruit, then matches riders to horses Bondurant has a hot meal of chicken, beef, and gets everyone saddled-up. Bondurant's potato salad and fruit waiting for the riders right hand man and guide, Angel Garrido, then upon their return. He then takes the time to ask takes the riders on a one-hour orientation ride the riders how the ride could be better. around just a part of the 800-acre ranch. For information on future trips, call the After this preliminary ride, saddles and stables at 287-4411. Tom Lopez and Wilka Bondurant ride their horses through the Rhhver. Richard West guides his horse around the rocks In the river.

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B6 Tropic Times N May 1, 1992 movies and snacks, today, 3:30 p.m.; sports Classes -clay flower making, Sundays; ner, intermediate, adult, all ages, Tues_____roo_ cards and comic books expo, Saturday, 11 airbrush techniques, Thursdays, 2 p.m.; days, Wednesdays, Thursdays. Pre-school, a.m.;leatherlink belts,Monday,3:30p.m.; ceramicpainting, Thursdays, 5:30-7:30p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Albrook Club Mother's Day flower bouquet, Tuesday, Participants must purchase materials, pay Pronto Polio -Fried chicken to go. Call 3:30 p.m.; Mother's Day cards, Thursday, firing fee. Child care center Albrook Club at 286-4128, Howard Offi3:30 p.m. Event -1992 Army Ceramics ConFamily day care providers on Howard cers' Club at 284-4680 and Howard En.Senior teens: Building 155, special acAm eaisCn aiydycr rvdr nHwr listed Members' Club at 284-5832. tivstiea for teenagers 15-19 years of ag test, entries accepted from May 30-June 6. AFB and Albrook AFS have openings for Flea Mmarets' CSunday, a2-5p. ofCall 287-3252. e' Entries exhibited through June 13. Rules at children of all ages. Fees and hours are Flea market -Sunday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. on Cal2735.Fort Clayton Ceramic Shop. negotiable. Call 286-3133/3313 for a curpatio. Sellers, buyers welcome. Crafts, used Sunset boat cruise, May 8,6 p.m.-midrent list of providers items, more. Brunch from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. night, with Atlantic senior teens. Those Clayton CDC Evening child care is available at HowSelling open to those with authorized base from the Atlantic side wishing to participate Ca t Cevein Center Friday s and S aturaccess. Call 286-3557. call 289-4472. Fee, registration required. The Child Development Center, Builddays. 5:30 p.m.-midnight for children 6 Mother's Day Buffet Brunch -May 10, ing 39, Fort Clayton, has changed their months to 11 years.Reserve space by previ10a.m.-2:30p.m.Morethan40fooditems Outdoor events openingtimes. It's open Mondays, Wednesous Wednesdays, 4 p.m Call 284-6135. for one set price. Reservations required. The CRD Outdoor Recreation Branch days and Fridays from 5:30 a.m. and TuesCall 286-4427/3557. offers adventure activities. Register at Builddays and Thursdays from 6:30 a.m. Call Zodiac center ing 154, Fort Clayton. Call 287-3363. 287-5657. Auto crafts shop Partial canal transits are available. The Zodiac Recreation Center, Building e u-Guided tour vessels travel from Balboa to 709, offers tours and other activities. Watch The Aibrook Auto Crafts Shop, BuildGuddtu. esl rvlfo abat ,JCOI, II for weekly and monthly specials. Rent the ings 441, 442, 443 offers the following Pedro Miguel locks and the Bay of Panama. .activities room or one of the classrooms. classes: Arc and gas welding, Sundays, 2 .Train dive, Saturday, Gatun Lake, fee Cocoli Community Recreation Center, is The Information, Tour and Travel Office p.m.; auto air conditioning, Fridays and includes transportation, dive boats, two guided located in Building 2553, Cocoli.For will arrange shopping or beach trips. Mondays, 6:30 p.m.; wheel alignment, dives. Bring dive gear, lunch, beverages. mation about recreation programs call 287A arade shopprngsor be p Fridays at 6 p.m.; Auto transmission and Atlantic divers contact Sherman Rental Cen4119/3010. vided if available. All tours leave from engine rebuilding, Sundays, 10 a.m. Call ter. vddi vial.Altuslaefo 286-3613. Contadora Island day cruise, May 10 Howard AFB Theater. Call 284-6161/6109. 7 a.m.-10p.m. Ticket price includes break r uun u Partial transit of canal tickets -For Cl information on tickets call the center. Isla Mamey snorkel/dive trip, May 9Theatre Arts Centre Specialof theweek -E Valeshopping, The Albrook Early Childhood Enrich10. Fee includes transportation, admission Sunday, 6:30 a.m-3 p.m. ment Center, Building 805, now has an to dive site, four dives with guide, bohio inThe Pacific Theatre Arts Centre, located Tours Panamanian dancing and din. hourly care program. Hourly, weekly and lodging, water taxi, snorkel gear for snorBuilding 2060, Curundu, offers the foling, plaza Paitilna, Wednesday, 6:30-11 p.m.; after-school rates are available weekdays, 8 kelers. Bring dive gear, food, beverages. lowingclasses: museums of Panama, Thursday, 8 a.m.-2 a.m.-5 p.m., for children ages 3 and above. San Blas snorkel/dive trip, May 16-17. Classes -guitar, Wednesdays, children, p.m. Reservations required. Call 286-3133. Diver/non-diver packages include airfare, 3-4 p.m.; teenagers, 4-5 p.m.; adults, 5-6 Classes -lunchtime aerobics, Mondays, hotel, tank transportation, threemeals tr p.m.; salsa, Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Wednesdays, Fridays, 11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.; guided tours, dive guide, boat service, free various levels of ballet, tap and modern piano, on an appointment basis; taekwondo, snorkel gear, tour of island. dance, folkloric and creative dance; eveMondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 6-7:30 p.m.; A m ad r_ Coibaslad fishing safari, May 22-23. ning exercise, forages 13 and older, belly shotokan, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6-7:30 p.m.; Fee includes transportation, camping -dancing lessons, Tuesdays and Saturdays, cake decorating, Thursdays, 7-9 p.m., fourClub Amador ment, od, ree, tackle, boat, guide. e 10-11 a.m.; voice lessons, Mondays, 5:30week class begins Thursday; private piBunchSudy am n, rCosta Rlcawhitewater raftingtrip 7:30 p.m. and Fridays, 2:30-7:30 p.m. in lot's ground school,. Mondays, WednesBrunch -Sundays, 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. -26. Includes airfare, hotel, transfers daily half-hour private lessons; merengue and days, Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m. every six weeks. enjoy the champagne branch with Los nInelu breakfast, lunch o re salsa,Tuesdays,Thursdays, 6:30-7:30p.m. Beginner German, Mondays, WednesConsules "The Strolling Trio.,, co ng.Non-raft ig packages avail Registration required. Call Kathy Foote at days, 8-9:30 p.m.; Spanish, Mondays, Wed'The club management reminds it's paand additional tour can be scheduled. 286-3814/3152. nesdays, beginner,5-6:30 p.m.; advanced, trons that social hour has been reinstated in C ayton P a bh dle 6:30-8 p.m., four-week classes start Monday; t he Bridge Lounge Friday nights at 5 p.m. Cllayton Park bohlos available for speEgih usas Tusas einr t h Bide ougeFrda mht a 5p~. ial events. Packages including swimming English, Tuesdays, Thursdays, beginner, The main ballroom is temporarily closed for p vn Pa wagediov ard 5-6:30 p.m.; advanced, 6:30-8 p.m., four-. renovations. Current programs will conpool can be arranged.H tinen thens.dCrenrodLungr e. wSwim passes, reciprocal at Fort Clayton week classes start Tuesday. tinue in the Undergeround Lounge. Pool, Amador Pool, Fort Davis and ShimSwimming pools mey Beach, are available. Three-week swimBoth Albrook and Howard swimming Outdoor center ming classes are taught at Williford Pool, pools are availableforprivaterental. Passes The Outdoor Center offers weekly and C layton Fort Clayton. Register at the center. Sesare available and can be used at Air Force, monthly activities specials. Bohios are availsions start the first Monday of each Army and Navy pools. Call 284-3569. able at Howard and Albrook. The InformaValent center month.Three week swimming classes are Albrook -Moms and tots, preschool, tion, Tour and Travel Office can arrange Valent Recreation Center, Building 53 available at the Williford Pool, Fort Claybeginner, advanced beginner, intermeditrips for authorized personnel. Trips leave FortClayton,offersthefollowing activities. ton. Pre-school, beginners, advanced beate, adult, all ages, Mondays, Thursdays, from the Howard AFB Theater. A fee is Call Carmen Emiliani t 287-6500/4201. ginners and adults can register at the OutFridays. Diving board, womens water excharged. Call 284-6161/6109 Event -Dart toumament. Call Anne door Recreation Center. Call 287-6660. ercise classes also offered. Special of the week -gold panning in Kelly. Howard -Beginner, advanced beginLas Cumbres, May 8, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Tours -Contadora overnight tour, Boat Shop Saturday-Sunday; San Blas, May 9; Isla The Clayton Boat Shop, located in BuildA tla Grande, May 10. ing 178, offers the following activities. Call Classes -at scheduled times throughout 287-6453. karate-do, beginning and a the week or can be arranged for individual Charters can be made for fishing and Sundial Center days and Wednesdays, 6:3 groups: vadic astrology, making money with diving trips. Call 287-6453. .The following activities will be held by Sundial RecreaWednesdays, 11 a.m.-1:30p. your money, real estate seminar, psychophysTrailer hitch installment -For details tion Center, Fort Davis. Call 289-3309/3889. 6-8 p.m.; free aerobics, Mo ics gymnastics, prepared childbirth, Spancontact the shop. Classes -piano lessons, Wednesdays, Fridaysnoondays, 10 a.m. and 5 p.m.; kar ish, English, German, lost art of writing 5:30 p.m.; guitar lessons, Fridays, noon-5:30 p.m.; 6:30-8:30p.m. letters, k a se uir ano interior Oj eans taekwondo, Mondays and Fridays, 6:30-8 p.m.; dog obeThe center offers classes karateMos uitasspiano, a ndTwinOceansdience training, Saturdays, 11 a.m.noon, at the center, minimum of 10 people is World War II salute, May 23, seeking Twin Oceans Pro Shop, Building 155, ofregistration required; French cooking, Thursdays, 5-7 The following classes at all veterans, memorabilia, historical accounts fers scuba, snorkel, tennis and other recreap.m.; cake decorating, Tuesdays, 5-7 p.m.; Spanish, Monpattern; basic vehicle main or anything related to World War II. Call tional equipment. Armed Forces Day sale, days and Wednesdays, 5-7 p.m.; English, Mondays and healthy; outdoor gardening Anne Kelly, 287-6500. May 8, 9. Call 287-3088. Wednesdays or Tuesdays and Thursdays. Both meet 5-7 based ceramic painting, am Earth Day celebration, Saturday, Sunp.m., six-week course. Registration required. defense for women, and mo day,featuring tree planting, exhibits and inArts and crafts Six-week French class, Mondays and Wednesdays, 5 Thecenter is availablefor formation center, contact Miguel Bricenoa p.m.; folkloric dance, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3-4 p.m.; reserve space. The Fort Clayton Arts and Crafts Center jazz dance, Mondays and Wednesdays, 7:15-8:15 p.m.; is located in Building 180. Call 287-5957. modeling, Mondays, 7-9 p.m. The Fort Clayton Youth Center, BuildClasses -Photo developing and printing Tours -wine and dine, Friday nights; PX shopping, Arts and crafts Th otCatnYut etr ul-guitar-making, fine arts, furniture Satuday 8rt aam. ElVcraSudyf53tam;soo ing 155, has varied activities for pre-teens. construction, handicrafts and pottery. Sturdy 8 esd y alley, Sunday, 5:30 a.m.; Colon The following activities Call 287-6451. Do-it-yourself custom framing offered shoppn, Wednesday, 9 a.m. Crafts Center, Building 251, Classes: tangsoodo, shotokan and taeWednesdays, Tournaments -pool, Sundays at 1 p.m.; horseshoes, Event -U.S. Army S kwondo; gymnastics Tuesdays and Thurssilk screen, today; wood sculpture and TSaturdays, 1-5 p.m. entries will be accepted June days,2-7 p.m., dancelessons Tuesdays and shirt painting, May 13. is Sept. 6, gallery exhibit, S Thursdays,4-7p.m. Ages 3 and abovemay Event -Hispanic heritage art exhibit, Ocean Breeze Classes -advanced and register for monthly classes at the center. Wednesday, 5 p.m.Call 287-5957. Ocean Breeze Recreation Center, Fort Sherman, Buildphotographs, Thursdays, 11 Free cooking lessons -all ages, Weding 153, offers the following activities: Call 289-6402. workshop, May 10. Call 28 nesday, 3:30-4:30 p.mei of a e center Tours -San Lorenzo, Thursdays; El Valle, Sunday; Fort Sherman Arts and Youth Council -Meetings on first and Historical Panama City, May 9; Portobelo, May 10. offers the following activitie third Thursday of each month. The center is located in Building 155. Classes -Nautilus orientation, Wednesdays at 7 p.m.; Classes: ceramics, pain Activities -'Thank God It's Friday' Call 287-4360.

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Tropic Times J ties May1,199 B7 Tours -snorkel and scuba Drake's Island, Sunday,7 a.m.-5 p.m.; canoeing and in Building 722. Call 284-3370. barbeque Chagres River, Tuesday, 8 am.Classes -Car care and maintenance, 2 p.m.; peacock bass fishing in Arenosa, especially for women, May 9, 10, 9 a.m.May 9, 5 a.m.-2 p.m.; snorkel and scuba noon, covers oil, filter change, lubrication; Drake's Island, May 10, 7 a.m.-5 p.m. steam cleaning, May 11, 12. Scuba classes Rodman The Outdoor Center offers scuba classes taught by Javier Freiburghaus, a certified AnChorage Club scuba instructor. Classes can be arranged to T Anchorage Club fit individual requirements. TeRodman Anchorage Club has food -It ductio sto go,5-9 p.m. daily. Fried chicken with all free class, available on request. Minimum the trimmings orpizza with variety of topoffourpeople required. Openwaterscuba, pings. Call 283-4332/3040 to order. begins May 11 at Albrook, May 18 at How63Weekly events -Bingo, Mondays, starts ard. Advanced open water scuba begins 6:30 p.m. special menu; family night, May 25 at Howard. Rescue, dive master Tuesdays; social hour, Wednesdays, 4-6 and specialty scuba courses are available at p.m.,free horse d'oeuvres; "Country and both pools. Call 284-616 1. Western Night," Wednesdays, 6-9 p.m., free dancing lessons from 7-9 p.m.; all-you. can-eat taco night, Thursdays; Riding stables U-AmiyphotobygtJsephJohn" DJ Night, Saturday, 7 p.m.-midnight. The Howard and AlbrookRiding Stables AERIAL VIEW -The Ocean Breeze Center at Fort Sherman offers tours to the Mother's Day brunch, May 10, 9 a.m. are offering the following trips and proold historical fort of San Lorenzo Thursdays. Flower Child Night, May 9,7 p.m., best grams. Call 287-4411. three era costumes get prizes, DJ. Basic horsemanship classes -include night, aboard the'Fantasia del Mar.' Tour The Breezeway is also available for breaktheory and practical sessions. Covers safety, the Bay of Panama. Open to teens only. fast, Monday-Friday,6:30-9 a.m.;lunch,11 Officers' Club news stable etiquette, care and welfare of horses, Classes -Monday through Saturday -a.m.-1 p.m.; dinner, until 11 p.m. SundayA la carte breakfast, Sundays, 8 a.m.tack and basics of horse handling. Classes street/video dancing; cheerleading teams, Thursday and until 1 a.m. Friday and Saturnoon; social hour, Mondays, Wednesdays group, semi-private lessons available, ages 6-18; Spanish and English, ages 6-18 day. and Fridays, 4 p.m., in the Laguna Lounge; Hourly horse rental at AlbrookStables. and adults; lunchtime aerobics, for adults, Enlisted members can dine at Howard steak-by-the-ounce, Thursdays. "Mr. & Rentalyeeinclushorse ack.ders. 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; arts and crafts, Officers'Club from 6-9p.m. Monday-SatMs. PhysicalFitness," RodmanPool, May must s ccessfy cosplet th basic hoWednesdays, 3 p.m.; gymnastics for ages urday. Call 284-3599.L g 8w 530 p.m. Dancing, swimming and eatmanship dlass or be evaluated by a stables 3-18. Also boys' classes; modem, jazz, tap TeTpTreLug ilhv nsuc sor and ballet dance at beginner, intermediate grand opening May 20. Call 284-4189 Tandem utility trailer available for rent. and advanced levels for ages 3-18; piano for Steak night special, Howard Officers' Fitted with two-foot towing hitch and a Jon ages 6-18; tennis; taekwondo, ages 4-6. Club Thursdays, 6-9 p.m. Choosefromfilet CPO Ft lihthoowk-up. mignon, New York strip, rib eye or prime The Chief Petty Officers' Club will hold boat light hook-up. rib, includes soup, salad and potato. Full the following activities. Call 283-5475. Arts and crafts menu also available, Monday-Saturday, 6-9 All-you-can-eat buffet, Mondays-Fridays, Howard Arts and Crafts, Building 711, p.m. Call 284-4680. 11 a.m.-lp.m.; couples night, tonight, May Youth Centers has a frame shop, award shop and ceram. 15; social hour,Wednesdays andFridays,4 For information about youth activities Ics for sale. Everything for arts and crafts Logistics support p.m., with free hors d'oeuvres; club grill call the Howard Youth Center, Building hobbyists. Classes and demonstrations in opens Saturdays, noon-4 p.m. with dine in 696, 284-4700 or the Albrook Youth CenEnglish and Spanish. Call 284-6361/6345. Logistics support, Building 714, rents or take out service. Mother's Day Dinner, ter, Building 850,286-3195. All pickups for Classes -intermediate ceramic paintcamping, sporting/fishing gear, fumiture and May 9, 6 p.m. trips will be at Howard Youth Center at the ing, Spanish, Tuesday, 2-4 p.m.; beginner more. Some items are available for squadtime specified and 30 minutes later at the ceramic painting, English, Wednesday, 2ron functions at no charge. Call 284-6107. Albrook Youth Center. 4 p.m.; beginner ceramic painting, Span.May weekend special -Rent 6foot table, MWR notes Pre-teen dance, tonight, 7:30-10:30 p.m., ish, Thursday, 2-4 p.m.; free ceramic poureight chairs at reduced rate. Howard, transportation to/from Albrook proing, Spanish, May 8, 2-4 p.m.; intermedi. Mother's Day Weekend special -Bring Morale, Welfare and Recreation Inforvided. ate ceramic painting, English, May 9, 10 in Mom, rent two items for one price. Lowest mation, Tour and Travel Office, Building Summit Gardens and lunch, Saturday, a.m.-noon; stained glass, Thursdays, 6:30rental rate won't be charged. 24, Rodman, offers the following activities. 9 a.m.-2p.m. An outdoorhiking adventure, 8:30 p.m.; cross stitch, Thursdays, 7-8 p.m.; Memorial Day Weekend special -fiveCall 283-5307/4454. exotic animals, followed by lunch at a fastclay flower class, Saturdays, 11 a.m.-I p.m. man tent, four slteping bags at reduced rate. Tours -"Moonlight Happy Hour" food restaurant. Rent card table set, get free deck of cards. cruises, tonight from Rodman to Taboga Musical chairs, Tuesday, 3:30 p.m., Club news and back. Cost includes hors d'oeuvres. Howard and Albrook. Library Pay-as-you-go bar available. Casual dress. Make Mother's Day cards, Thursday, The Casual Cove is now open after Minimum of 20 people is required. 3:30 p.m., Howard and Albrook. remodeling. Breakfast is from 6:30-9 a.m.; Seashells are on display during May at Free Zone, May 14. Bus will depart lunch, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The dining room the Howard AFB library. A collection of from the Rodman Anchorage Club at 8 a.m. Teen boat cruise, May 8, 6 p.m.-midkitchen attheclubis closed for renovations. shells from Panama's Pacific coast will be and will retum at approximately 3 p.m. labeled with their common and scientific Panama City, May 15. Includes visit to names. Display will include uncommon colonial Panama, the Golden Altar Church, tic species that are difficult to find in their the Cathedral, Old Panama and a drive through .habitats. Call 284-6249. the shipping areas of Panama. Bus departs anced for ages 6-18. Monair brushing. Wood shop is available. The center is Rodman Anchorage Club at 8 a.m, retums :30 p.m.; French cooking, closed Thursdays and Fridays. Call 289-6313. about 3 p.m. Minimum of 12 required. .; juggling,Wednesdays, Family support Jungle River Tour, May 16, includes days, Wednesdays and FriF m l u p r ugeRvrTuMy1,Icue te, Tuesdays and Thursdays Youth news The Howard/Albrook Family Support bus transportation to San Lorenzo where TheFor Esinr YuthCeter Buldng 19 he Center, Building 707, hours are 7:30am.you board the river boat. Travel to Lake he Fort Espinar Youth Center, Building 219, offers the 430 p.m. Mondays-Fridays. Call 284-5650. Gatun. Refreshments and lunch also inaccording to demand. A following activities. Call 289-4605. Classes -shotokan Job ser. orssays 26. clouded. Tour requires minimuC m of six people. karate for adults and children, Mondays and Wednesdays, How to ectively sech f Pn Cartagena, Colombia, May 24-27. The available: make your own 5-6 p.m.; arts and crafts, Thursdays, 4-6 p.m. mat pnce ludes round trp airfare, beach front nence; keep indoor plants Events -roller skating, Tuesdays at Fort Espinar m financial counseling -Available by hotel accommodations, all meals, plus hors mn Panama; oil and waterSchool; boat cruise, Saturday, ages 13 and older, 6 P.M.Fiaclconeng-Aiabey d'uvsbfreuchndinreeteur salsa for couples; selfmidnight. Van will depart from the center at 4p.m.,; teen appointment, call 284-6545. d'oeuvres before lunch and diner, beverJungh aentureMay9 9 dp arm he en ort hpm. Checkbook maintenance workshop -ages, water sports, and daily activities. eeting and classes. Call to juge adventure, May 9 a.m.3 p.m., Fort Sherman. Offered Wednesday, 2 p.m. Transportation to/from Tocumen Airport Smooth move two-day workshop -Offor small fee. Potpourri fered Thursday, (Finance, CBPO, 24th MediDirectorate of Engineering and Housing Atlantic Ucal Group); May 8, (TMO, legal and housFamily news DO-IT truck runs the first and third Saturday of each ing), 9-11 a.m. in Howard Chapel. Guest TheFamily Service Center, Building 40, ill be held at the Arts and month from Espinar-Davis and the second and fourth speakers available to answer questions about Rodman, will hold the following activities. ort Davis: Saturday from Sherman-Davis from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. permanent change of station. .Call283-5749. th Photography Contest "Oliver", a musical for the entire family is being Volunteers wanted -Family services Relocation Assistance Program -ReloI through Aug. 30. Judging presented by the Atlantic Music and Theatre, May 15, 16, needs volunteers to assist with loan closet, cation information is now available on disk.20-27. 19,20 at7 p.m. atCristobal High School Auditorium, with base brochure library, layette program and ettes. This reference system can be used to eginner oil painting from a special matinee May 17 at 2 p.m. Call 289-6699/3889. airman's attic. select future duty stations. Call Suzanne .m.-1 p.m.; pastel painting The Atlantic Education Center, Building 32, Fort McGohey at283-5748 -5201. Davis, will offer a mini-immersion Spanish class, 8 a.m.Auto Craft Center Newcomers Orientation, May 18-22, afts Center, Building 206 noon, May 11-29. Soldiers need their commander's aplots of information and excitement; culture, proval to attend. For forms, information and registrations, The Howard Auto Craft Center is located travel, foods and a special tour. Ing, drawing, pottery and stop by the education center. in Building 722. Call 284-3370. _______ce'___re ____ces _____ge _B Classes -Car care and maintenance, more notices on page B8

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T Q Tropic Times B8May1, 1992 Notices continued from page B7 t r 'Chicago' Potpourri The play, "Chicago opens Thursday at 8 p.m. at the Pacific Theatre Arts Centre, Building 2060 in Curundu. The production will continue through May 31 with Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening performances. Army workshop Included in the 23-member cast are veteran performers. The 5th Annual U.S. Army South Army Theplay is directed by JoAnne Mitchell and Jerry Brees with Family Action Plan Workshop is May 8. musical direction by Melanie Bales and choreography by Issues and delegates must be submitted Barbara Berger. by Monday to Army Community Serv"Chicago" will be entered in the Army's annual Forces ice, Building 115, Corozal or call 285CommandFestivalofthePerforming Arts Competition. Call 6518 Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8 a.m. to for reservations and information at 286-315. noon. 'The Crucible' Spot bid sale The Arthur Miller drama, "The Crucible," will be preDefense Reutilization Marketing Ofsented at Balboa High School auditorium May 8, 9, 15, and fice-Panama, Building 745, Corozal, will 16 at 8 p.m. by the students. The play is about the infamous be holding alocal spot bid saleThursday Salem witch trials of 1692. Call 252-5176. at 8 a.m. Inspection days are Monday through Wednesday from 8 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Call Ada Tweed, 285-4754. 'Rumors' C The Theatre Guild of Ancon performs Neil Simon's new "CELL BLOCK TANGO" -Convicted murderesses Reservists meeting comedy, "Rumors," runs through May 9. The guild progather inthejailhouseforalively round of the "Cell Block The Reserve Officers' Association, vides security attendants in the parking lot. Reservations can Tango" during rehearsals for the musical comedy, ChiPanama Canal meeting will be held at 5 be made by calling 252-6785. cago. p.m. May 27 in the Fort Amador Officers' Club. Guest speaker will be Col. Raymond Moss, U.S. Southern ComTrial Defense Service 1992-93 is being conducted. Registration of the United States Army will hold mand reserve forces adviser. Officers The Panama Trial Defense Service tion packets were given to students, a general membership meeting, 11:30 who hold commissions in either the U.S. Tfe Plng T rl aton, ill which parents are requested to return no a.m. Thursday at Club Amador. Army Reserve or National Guard are Office, Building 154, Fort Clayton, will later than May 8. Brig Gen. Trent Thomas, Southern eligible to attend. Call 287-3313. be closed Monday through May 10. Call Kindergarten registration is also unCommand J-2, will be the guest speaker. the Staff Judge Advocate 287-6614 in der way. Children who will be 5 years case of emergencies during the week. old by Oct 31, should register for the T-shirt contest Lock-in U.S. Army Trial Defense Service walk1992-93 school year. Birth certificate, Umoja Community Collective will hold in-hours are 8 a.m.-noon Tuesdays, permanent change of station travel orThe 1992 Fourth of July T-Shirt Dea pre-teen lock-in starting May 9, 8 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays. Soldiers must ders or an agency sponsorship letter, shot sign Contest is now under way. and ending May 10, 8 a.m. in the Fort bring appropriate documentation for records, and identification cards are needed The contest is open to all active duty Clayton Youth Center for ages 8-12. service. Call Capt. Joseph H. Bestul, to register your child. military, civilian employees and their Registration and small fee required. Call 287-6207. family members, and Panama Canal 287-6451. d C Commission personnel. Rules for the Education center Red Cross contest follow: design must incorporate The American Red Cross will hold a this year's theme: "Remembering World Newcomers meeting The Fort Clayton Education Center standard first aid class May 9 in Room War II -Defense of the Panama Canal A"WelcometoPanama"newcomer's will hold two classes Monday through 344, Building 519, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Call 1942" as well as "4th of July." orientation will be held at the Albrook May 24: training management 1-4:50 287-5509. Entrants may use as many colors as Club from 8:45 a.m. until2p.m. May 13. p.m. and basic skills education program they wishin the design. Entries become Call LarraineShingleton, 285-4857. 8:14 a.m.12:15 p.m. Exchange students theproperty ofthecommunity Fourth of The center will also hold a mini-imJuly committee. New signature block mersion Spanish class Monday through The U.S. Agency for International Thefirst-placedesignwillbeusedfor May 15, from 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Call Development withthe help oftheprivate Fourth of July advertising and will apSoldiers need to add a new signature 287-5412. sector has selected 42 Panamanian stupear on the official 1992 Fourth of July block in block 20 of their Army TDY dents to study at U.S. universities. They T-shirts. Deadline for entering the conauthorization orders, DD Form 1610. Crime Prevention are currently studying English at Panama test is May 25. Designs must be submitThe block should read: Canal College. ted to the U.S. Army South Public AfHQ USARSO Crime Prevention Section will be sponCall 252-3304/3107, ext. 31. fairs Office, Building 95,Fort Claytonor APO AA 34004 soaring aCrime Prevention poster contest Magarita Complex in the Atlantic comFOR THE COMMANDER: Lucia Monday through May 8. Department of Community choir unity. Call 287-3007/3058. M. Heugh, Cpt. AG, C, POB Defense Dependents' Schools students, kindergarten through sixth grade are eliThe Community Choir will hold its Bible s h gible to submit posters to the students first musical May 9 at the Howard Chapel Quality of Life e sc ool office. Selection of the winning posters, at 6:30 p.m. Call Jeff Saffold at 287The next quality of life meeting will The Fort Clayton Chapel is holding first, second and third for each grade, 3740 or Preston Butler at 285-4929. be Wednesday at 5 p.m. in the Valent registration for the Vacation Bible School will be made May 11-15. Recreation Center. May 15 at the Corozal main exchange Isthmian College Club and commissary; May 10, 24 at the chapel. Revival services School dates are June 14-19. Call Anne The Isthmian College Clubwillholda Sunday socials Michel, 286-3447. The Jordan Memorial Church of scholarship tea and install new officers The annual Balboa Elementary School the Nazarene, 1st Street Juan Diaz, welSaturday at 9:30 a.m.in Residence#103, ice cream social/79th Army Band Encomes military families fortheirRevival Balboa Heights. Scholarships will be semble (Pieces) concert Sunday, 1-6 p.m. Spanish ED Services, 7 p.m. Thursday through May awarded. Call Gretta Vowell 252-5820. on the hill by Goethals Memorial and Registration for Spanish GED Prepa10 with evangelists Reverends Arthur Balboa Elementary School. The Shriners ration, Monday-June 29, Mondays and and Nancy Cath from California. Call Bed races will sell refreshments and the Balboa Thursdays, 3-5 p.m., is open at the Fort Rachel Gooden 282-5418. Kobbe Education Center. Call 284-3150. The races will be held May 16, at the PTO will sell ice cream sundaes. Tutor needed Howard Parade Field beginning at 9 a.m. .utr n e eThe day will start with a bazaar and Tech Supply Office Road Knights events Central Texas College is accepting four-person beach volleyball tournament. The operations at the Tech Supply The Road Knights Motorcycle Club applications fora full-timelearning cenSpectators of the parade at 10:30 a.m. Office and Warehouse will be limited will haveapokerrunSunday; it's open to ter instructor/tutor at the Fort Clayton will vote for "best bed." The races start. the public. Call the club house at 286Education Center. A bachelor's degree at noon. There will be food, drinks, live Saturday through May 10 for reware3348, or TSgt. Keith Olive at 284-5202 and current teacher's certificate are minibands (Killer Coatimundi, Tempest), a housing, inventory and general mainteor286-3734. mum qualifications. Call 287-3773. DJ and more. nance purposes. Call 287-5146. Registration open Combined meeting Instructors needed Manning retirement Registration is open for mini-immerThe Parents Teachers Organization Volunteers are needed as English inCOM P HEIG U So ut sion Spanish, basic skills and advanced and School Advisory Council willhold a structors for a basic writing and speaking mand Sergeant Major CSM Freddie skills management skills classes to be combined meeting in the Fort Clayton course to the Fort Clayton San Blas food G. Manning will retire May 8 during a held Monday through May 24 at the Fort Elementary School May 13 at7 p.m. Call service employees. Call Robert Appin, ceremony to be held at Fort Clayton. Kobbe Education Center, Building 801. 287-6887. 287-6109. The ceremony for the 30-yearvetPanama Canal College is offering goveran will begin at 8:30 a.m. at the ernment in the U.S. and general sociolPre-registration Membership meeting Building 95 Quadrangle. Everyoneis ogy Sunday through May 23. Call 284DoDDS pre-registration for school year The Isthmian Chapter ofthe Associainvited to attend. 3150._______________

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Tropic Times May 1, 1992 B9 Boy Scouts conducting membership drive WHAT IS THE DEAL? (Advertising wizards) -The and junior staff members about three weeks of work. .Boy Scouts of America is conducting a membership "Here in Panama, the Boy Scouts of America rely drive in preparation for Summer Camp '92. entirely on volunteer adult help," Kinzer said. Teams of scouts and their leaders will visit Depart"We need waterfront directors, basketry instructors, ment of Defense Dependent schools between now and naturalists and everything in between. I encourage the end of the school year to demonstrate Scouting and commanders at all levels, in all the services, to help us invite all eligible boys to join. find those volunteers, and get them to camp. And I urge Membership is open to any boy who has completed every boy who's ever wanted to camp with his friends, the fifth grade, or is 11years-old, no matter what grade learn about nature, or build a monkey-bridge to join a he's in. This is the first "round-up"in Panama in sevtroop now and get ready for this summer camp." eral years, said Col. Ray Moss, U.S. Army representa"You don't need to wait for the round-up. Just come tive to the Boy Scout Executive Committee. by the office for more information, or betteryet, call the "We want every eligible boy to be able to attend scoutmaster or go to a meeting of the troop near you," summer camp, which they will miss if we wait to hold 44 Below is a list of Troops, meeting times, places, and around-up until September." Scoutmasters: Boy Scout officials remind every boy that they can Troop 5, Thursday 7 p.m., Balboa Union Church, join Scouts any time before their 18th birthday, and Carlos Poveda, 287-3202. encourage all fifth graders to visit and join a troop on a Troop 6, Thursday 7 p.m., Cardenas Ward (LDS), provisional basis until they complete the school year. Jon Strong, 287-6631. Summer Camp '92 will be held at the Panama Canal I Troop 8, Monday 7 p.m., Fort Espinar Thrift Shop, Commission Recreation Areain Gamboa from July 25Cal Landrum, 243-5398. Aug. 1. Scouts will camp with their troops near the Troop 16, Thursday 6:30 p.m., Howard AFB Stables, banks of the Chagres River, and participate in such SSgt. George Shaw, 284-4961. traditional activities as swimming, canoeing, rifle shootTroop 20, Wednesday 7 p.m., Building 812 Albrook ing, and campfires. AFS, Nick Unger, 252-7785. Scouts will be able to select from 25 merit badge Troop 24, Saturday 10 a.m., Balboa First Baptist classes including pioneering, fishing, first aid, and Church, Luis Rodriquez, 252-7427. environmental science. A wilderness survival program Troop 128, Thursday 7 p.m., Building 520 Fort will be offered, and camp officials are trying to coordi-Clayton, CWO Clay Allison, 286-3267. nate special courses in horsemanship and indian lore, Photo by Mlj. Ted Morris The camp will also employ about 15 junior staff concentrating on the tribes of Panama. The Scouts of Scouts climb a signal tower bulit by lashing bohio members. Applicants must register with a troop or Panama have been invited to send a provisional troop, poles during the 1991 summer camp. explorer post, be at least 16-years-old, and available making this camp truly international. from July 15-Aug. 5. Putting on such an ambitious camp is a real chalexpertise and merit badge training. Teenagers interested in applying, and adults in volunlenge, according to Maj. Ted Morris of the 24th OperaThe Panama Canal Commission will provide and teerng for Summer Camp should call Carey at the Scout tions Group, who will act as camp director. prepare the site, continuing a long tradition of support office at 286-3685, or Morris at 284-5553. "Our goal is to conduct a camp that will rival any to the Scout program. But there's lots more to be done, "We aren't just looking for men,"explained Morris. established state-side camp." according to Brig. Gen. Joseph Kinzer, Deputy Com"Women are an important part of leadership in scoutMany agencies are offering help. USARSO, 24th mander of USARSO and Chairman of the Boy Scout ing, and we've always had a coed staff." Composite Wing and Rodman Naval Station will join Executive Committee. The Boy Scout office is in Building 806 on Albrook forces to provide logistic support for transportation, Preparing for classes, setting up camp, conducting and is open Mondays and Tuesdays 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Fritents, food preparation and people to provide technical the program, and putting it all away will take 25 adult days 1-6 p.m., and Saturdays 9-12 a.m. Aero Modellers take flying act L to Howard AFB HOWARD AFB (24th WG/PA) -They were at it again,Sunday. The skies above the HowardParadeField were filled with the sounds of helicopters, gliders, and vintage airplanes. For yet another year, the Panama. Association of Aero Modellers pleased the crowd with its dazzling array of aircraft flips, 360 turns, and low-flying. A FI Spot landing and limbo were two new A R FORCE events this year to challenge radio controllers. According to Eric Brathwaite, alongtime member of the aero modeller's association, adults and children seem to enjoy the static displays and flying portion of the show just as much. These aero modellers meet Sundays at Cocoli. For more information on becoming a member, contact Brathwaite at U.S. Air Force photo by SrA. Jackie Ambrose 284-4510. A team from the Panama Association of Aero Modellers start their engines before letting their aircraft loose in the sky SCN AM radio schedule Below is the SCN AM Radio schedule with 10:05am Music 8:05am NPR Weekend Edition 7:05am Music corrected times through October. SCN AM Radio, 12:05pm ABC NBC News 10:05am Car Talk 9:30am CBS World News Roundup 780 Pacific and 1420 Atlantic, features a mix of 12:30pm Music 11:05pm Music 9:45am ABC/APR Sports news on the hour and music from Armed Forces 1:06pm ABC/NBC News 12:05pm ABC, NBC News 10:05am Music Radio and Television Service tapes. News blocks 12:17pm Music 3:12pm Paul Harvey's Rest of the Story 12:05pm Paul Harvey News and Commentary from AFRTS Voice Channel air periodically 3:05pm ABC News 3:17pm Paul Harvey News and Commentary 12:17pm Music throughout the day including sports, business news, 3:11pm NBC News 3:30pm Music 2:35pm Paul Harvey and the Rest of the Story commentary, Paul Harvey News, Commentary, and 3:17pm CBS News 4:05pm NPR All Things Considered 2:40pm Music Rest of the Story. Also aired are National Public 3:25pm ABC World of Sports 5:05pm ABC News 3:05pm Pentagon Newsbreak Radio's Morning Edition, All Things Considered 4:05pm NPR All Things Considered 5:17pm CBS Down to Earth 3:11pm Armed Forces Digest and Car Talk on AM along with sporting and special 5:05pm Music 5:21pm NASA The Space Story 3:17pm Air Force Radio News events. 5:26pm CBS Sports Central 3:23pm APR Business Barometer APRNetworkNews airs onthehour, everyhour 5:30p.m. UPI Roundtable 3:25pm ABC Sportscast Sunday exceptrmidnight. All programs scheduled above are 6:05 p.m. Music 3:28pm ABC Bill Diehl's Spotlight subject to pre-emption due to sports events or news 3:30pm Music Midnight Sign on specials. 4:05pm UPI Sportscast 12:09am Music 4:08pm NPR All Things Considered 7:05am NPR Weekend Edition Weekdays 5:05pm UPI Radio Sports 9:05am Music Satrys Midnight Sign on 5:08pm NPR All Things Considered 9:30am UPI Newscast Midnight Sing on 12:09am Music 5:30pm CBS The World Tonight 9:35am ABC World News This Week 12:09am Music 5:05am NPR Morning Edition 6:05pm Music

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B TropicTmes lassified Ads 1979 Buick Regal, p/s, p/b, am/fn/cass,2dr, T-tops, 1984 Mazda 929 LTD, 2dr, a/t, loaded, exc cond, recorder, Atari Arcade, games, 287-6281. A V6, black and tan, $1200, 287-4973. duty pd, $5250, 236-4254. VCR Beta, $120; VHS VCR, $150; stereo, $95; Airedale, make a good watchdog, $100, 287-5976. 1985 Subaru GL, a/c, mint interior, well maintained, 1985 Chevy van 20, 6.2L diesel, am/fm/cass, at, equal, $110; rcvr, $85; color TV, more, 264-4104. Fernale bulldog, 3 moo, has shots, $100, price neg, new tires, many miles left, $3500, 287-4139. p/s, p/b, a/c, duty pd, grt shape, $10,500, 266-4631. IBM compatible, color computer wth software, 284-4623. 1985 Dodgeplu,full size, exc condp/s,p/b, am/fm/ 1986 Pontiac Grand Am, loaded, grt cond, s/r, new modem, $500; 264-4104. cass, a/c, $8500, 260-0228. tires, $5900, 223-7271. Rotweiler, AKC, championship bloodline, 6 wks Fisherstermo, tuner,dbl,tape,multi-CD, spkrs,amp, May 21, $750 female, $800 male, 284-6124. 1978 Fairmont sta/wgn, auto, 302ci, V8, body needs 1975 Olds sta/wgn, p/s, p/b, a/c,8 cyl, duty pd, good remote, cabinet, $600/obo, 287-5638. some work, $1500/obo, 286-6424. cond, $1000, 252-2906. Collie/mix, 1 1/2 yrs old, all shots, loves kids, free Piano, good cond, $500, 287-5839. to good home, 287-5139. 1982 VW Jeep, fair cond, $1200 firm, 260-3890. 1986 Mitsubishi Lancer, 4dr, all extras, like new, luxury model, duty pd, $4500, 260-3750. Panasonic stereo system, $200, soundesign stereo Mixed breed German shepherd puppies, male, 4 1979 Mercedes Benz, 4"OSBL, U.S. specs, duty pd, system, $125, 286-3636. wks old, $25, 235-4687. Blue Book, $11,000, asking $9000, 262-2990. 1982 Mitsubishi Galant Super Saloon, duty pd, a/c, 4dr, a/t, p/w, p/a, sir, $3500/obo, 263-4321. Olympus OM-10, 35mm, access., $125, 233-3616. Pit bulls, registered American Dog Breeders As1978 Mercedes 300CD, diesel, U.S. specs, exc soc., 252-2278. cond, loaded, avail late May, $9500, 260-0098. 1983 Nissan, a/c, a/t, pwr everything, good cond, Star Rainbow 24 pin color printer, 2420-NX, like 69,000 km, duty pd, $5000/obo, 286-4820. new, extra color/black ribbons, $325, 252-5593. Male Pomeranian, $100, 252-1052, after 5 p.m. 1991 4x4 Daihatsu, a/c, p/s, am/fra/cass, alarm, not duty pd, avail May 30, $8950, 260-8181. 1985 B250 Dodge Ram van/wgn, 318, V8, A/t, a/c, Comstar 386-33 computer w/ 125 MB HD, 4 MB Male black cock-a-poo, tail docked, shots, deam/fro/cass, new tires, $6200, 282-3731 after 6pm. MEM, RAM color VGA monitor, $1500/obo, 260wormed, 9 wks, $65, 252-6277. 1982 CJ-7 Jeep, exc cond,hard/soft/bikini tops,new. 7313. swampers, winch, duty pd, $6000/obo, 252-2906. 1978 Olds Cutlass,V6, a/t,p/s,p/b,p/w, duty pd, am/ Female cocker spaniel, blonde,2 yrs old, w/puppies, fm/cass, $1900/obo, 236-1498. 63 mb hard disk, 5 1/4 rll, formatted, new brand, $100, 287-3189. 1987 Chevy Beauville van, 8 pass, dual a/c, tinted, $250, 233-0933. pwr options, am/fm/cass, $16,300, 286-4390. 1989 Isuzu Sunsport coupe, 5-spd, elec regtop, a/c, 36,000 miles, new tires, $6900, 286-4495. Beta movie camera, Betamax sold as set only, $300, 1972 Mercedes 280SE, cng/brakes overhaul, op252-2080. portunity for person who knows cars, $1800, 252Eagle Talon, TSi 1990, 190HP, 2.oO Turbo, 1988 Ford Bronco 11, 4x4, a/t, a/c, lowmileage, exc 6096. $12,000, 223-2550. Technics auto reversestereo cass deck, $110, Techcond, $12,500, 286-6173. nics am/fm/stereo rcvr, $160, 282-3735. 1984 Olds 88 sta/wgn, 9 pass, a/c, cruise, loaded, *: g 1985 Hands Accord LX, a/c, am/fm/cass, new tires, runs good, avail May 12, $4500, 287-4834. Nikormat FTN body, Nikon lenses, 230-0571. new brakes, s/r, rena grt., $4500/obo, 269-3818. 1984 Audi 5000, 4dr, cxc cond, loaded, orig owner, Live-in maid, Mon.-Fri., Span-spking, goodw/kids, Ham radio transceivers, 2KW amplifiers, Yaesu 1987 Honda Accord EX, 4dr, good cond, a/t, p/w, a/c, s/r, new tires, extras, $6100, 287-5680. irons, refs, reliable, hard wking, 284-6788. mic, ant tuner, 287-4778. CD player, duty not pd, $7000, 264-6313. 1985 Chevy Caprice Classic, loaded, extras, 64,000 Bilingual maid, full time, live-out, grt cook, grt w/ Tandy 1000 HX, color monitor, printer, $500,2841985 Ford Ranger, runs grt, must sell soon, $3000, miles, $5250, 252-2180. kids, exp, 282-3969. 3139. 282-4546. 1977 Chevy 1/2 ton p/u, short bed, 4x4, camper Eng-spking mail, honest, grt w/ kids, avail now, Seiko portable CD player w/ spkra, AC adapter, 1985 Toyota P/U, a/c, am/fm, long bed, new tires, shell, $1800,282-4824. 287-4988. $100, 284-5537. cxc cond, not duty pd, $4000, 284-4681. 1984 Nissan Bluebird, cxc cond, duty pd, $4400, : -:: RCA video camera w/ access, case, like nw, $650, 1985Isuzu Trooper,4x4,new paint, am/fm/nas, grt 226-1158. 284-5537. cond, not duty pd, $6000, 284-4681. 1979 VW Beetle, not duty pd, new brakes/paint, am/ 47' Chris Craft, twin V8-53, 3.5kw, extras,$70,000, HP Desk Jet, real letter qual, 300 DPI text, graphics, 1985 Toyota van, a/c, p/s, 5-spd, am/fm/cass, blue fm/cass, good cond, $2000, 223-7104. 252-5428. new cond, 2 yrs old $395/obo, 282-3197. int., cxc cond, $5500, 287-4576. 1973 Plymouth Duster, 6 cyl, a/t, radio/cass, new 21' boat trailer, galvanized black painted, almost IBM PC, 640k, 3.5/5.25 disk drives, 10 MB hard 1988 Dodge Caravan, V-6, a/t, a/c, 5 pass, duty pd, eng, $1250/obo, 252-2287. new, $750, 252-2228. drive, very good cond, $575,252-2630. low mileage, $9000/obo, 287-3451. 1979 Toyota Celica, 5 sp., a/c, fin/am/cass., duty 171/2'V174.Glastron,i/o with Volvo eng,Pentaleg, Magnavox 19" color TV, good cdnd, $125, 2861990 Ford Ranger XLT, 28,000 miles, ext cab, pd., $2300/obo, 283-5619 130HP, sporty, exc cond, $4200,287-4821. 4535. camper shell, cruise, 5-spd, $9400, 260-0062. 1988 customized Caravan, loaded, 34,000 miles, 15' Starcraft, flat bottom 55HP Evinrude, 2HP 16" TV remote $100, VCR remote, $100, Pioneer KIA Minivan, 1988, diesel, dual air, p/w, lug racks, mint cond, duty pd, $15,000,236-3815. Yamaha, trailer, skis, $2500 firm, 252-6002. music sec, ass deck, trntbl, 2 lg spkrs, 221-9070. exc coed, duty pd, $7995/obo, 260-3623. 1982 VW Quantum SW, 5-spd, p/s, p/b, runs good, Sailboat for two, good rend, $700, 268-0005, after Commodore 1802, disk driver, keyboard, joystick, BMW 728i, 1986, exc cond, a/c, s/r;$17,000, 252$2800, 260-7133. 6pm. new, monitor, 8 games, manuals, $500, 283-3374. 2228 1983 Mitsubishi Montere, diesel, $5000/obo, 26325HP Johnson outboard, edc. start, extra prop, good Amiga 500 computer, extra disk drive, 1 meg 1981 Fiat Spyder conv, new tires, new shocks, eng 4321. cond, $895, 285-5516, Room 23. memory, mouse, printer (needs work), $375, 287overhaul, runs grt, low mileage, $2800, 268-1477. 6878. 1978 Volvo 245 sta/wgn, duty pd, a/c, good coed, Mariner 8HP, outboard, $600, 287-6580. 1987 Nissan Maxima, U.S. specs, full power, $3500/obo, 223-4546. Kenwood amp, multi-CD player, tape player, must loaded, $6900, 252-5428. 16 Glastron tri-hull,85HP, Johnson, likenew, must sell, very good cond, $450, 263-4321. 1985 Honda Accord LX, a/c. am/fm/cass, 5-spd, see, fully equipped, 287-6227 eves. 1984 Canari, Z-28, 5 sp., a/c, p/s, p/b, am/fm/cass., avail May 20, $4000, 289-4550. Commodore 1287, 1541 DD, ROB color monitor, low mileage, $3400/obo, 283-5619. Cayuco, "The Most", #1 coed, 1992, #1 female, modem, joysticks, tons software, $375, 287-3281. 1987 Volvo 240 DL sta/wgn, a/c, p/w, am/fm/cass, 1990,$1500,260-7716. 1989 BMW 325i, 5 sp., snrf., loaded, $18,000/neg., duty pd, $13,750, not duty pd, $11,500,287-6790. Aiwa compact disk player, $150; Nintendo game, 6 282-3576, after 5 p.m. 18' tri-hull, Chevy 4 cyl w/Mercruiser outdrive, elec mos, $75, 286-3397. 1988 Pontiac Lemans,2dr,hatchback, a/t, a/c, p/s, p/ trim, many extras, $4200/obo, 286-4932. 1966 Land Rover, recent paint, most complete b, U.S. specs, not duty pd, $4200, 287-3877. Sony 40-watt spkrs, good cond, 1 pair, $35, 284around, a true classic, $2000, 232-5761. 16' Hobie cat sailboat, w/ trailer, all access, former 4081. 1992 Daihatsu Applause, duty pd, a/t, loaded, mint Panama nati champion, $1800, 252-6096. 1981 Mercury Lynx, 2dr, 4-spd, s/r, new tires, am/ coed, $12,000/obo, 252-2546 after 5pm. 13" color TV w/remote, $160; portable VCR/tuner fm/cass, $2000/obo, 285-4577. 14 lb. lec. outboard kicker, $45,252-2428 after 5 w/camera, bat., $500; microwave, $200,286-3484. 1989 Ford Ranger XLT p/u, a/t,. a/c, am/fm/cass, pm. 1978 Ford Fiesta,runs grtbody fairexc second car, extras, exc cond, $10,000, 286-3284. Sony CD player w/battery charger, spkrs, $240; $800, 289-6150. Sony Wallkman, $30; VCR video enhancer, $25, 1983 Toyota Celica, 5spd, new tires, good cond, Ele 252-5792. 1984 Ford Mustang hatchback, 4-spd, a/c, am/fm/ hatchback, $2600, 252-2175/2499. cass, s/r, good cond, duty pd, 269-6558. Canon AE1, reg lens, $150,260-4096. 1988 Peugeot2O5, a/c, no duty pd,new tires, $4000/ Computergames for Commodore 64, popular selqc1985 Toyota Corolla, cxc car, $4300, 289-6150. obo, 226-2438. tions, orig materials, $10-$25 ea, 284-6391. Amiga 500 computer, GVP series H, hard disk, 3 MB RAM, extra floppy drive, software, $1600,2641982 Toyota Corolla, std, a/c, alarm, am/fm, exc 1981 Honda Accord,4dr, a/c, p/s, p/b, a/t,new tires/ -Nintendo entertaintnat system, 14 games, 3 extra 6282. cond, $3500, 221-9622. brakes/battery/alt, more, $2995/obo, 260-5771. controllers, gun, $125, 287-5998. 1987 Hyundai Stellar, 5-spd, a/c, am/fm/cass, pwr, 1987 Voyager LE, p/s, am/fm/cass, a/t, p/b, not duty Sony 19 in, color TV, Hitachi, 14 in. b/w, Akai H full extras, duty pd, $6200, 236-3281. pd, $8200/obo, 261-6037. spkrs., trumpet, accordions, 223-7437. Tabletop gas barbeque grill, $25; Breun food proc1990 Chevy Corsica, p/w, p/l, a/c, p/a, $12,000 or 1991 Suzuki Samurai, soft top, stereo, no duty pd, Nintendo, 5 games, pool stick w/ case, 283-4464. essor w/ attach., $70,286-6173. $2000 down, take over payments, 287-4776. $6600, 226-7176. Pioneer tretbl, cxc cond, $100, 236-2121. BR set, 5 pieces, solid wood, new, 230-1927. 1986 Nissan Bluebird,4dr,5-spd, cass, a/c, duty pd, 1991 Chevy S-10 p/a, V6, 5-spd, a/c, p/s, am/fm/ avail June 15, $6000/obo, 287-3319. cass, 7000 miles, duty not pd, $10,500,282-3593. Guitar, fender Gemini H, w/case, never used, $160, 18,000BTU a/cs: Mitsubishi, $300; Fedders, $325; 236-4092. 12,000 BTU Freidrich a/c, $250, 252-2287. 1979 Mercury Capri, 2-dr, hatchback, rns mxc, 1985 Subarn GL, exc cond, new tires/shocks/ good gas mileage,4-spd, manual, $1800,284-5720. brakes, $3800, 287-4599. Packard Bell 286 IBM Computer,40MB HD, 1 MG Hoover Concept H vacuum cleaner, $75; Whirlpool RAM, disk drives, $1500,284-6950, after 6pm. hvy. duty washer, exc. cond., $250, 252-5766. 1983 Chevy sta/wgn, p/s, p/b, p/i, exc cond, $4500, 1986 Mazda 323, hatchback, 4-spd, a/c, am/fm/ 286-3432. cass, no duty pd, runs grt, $3500, 282-3497. Canon 620 EOS w/ 35-70, 70-210, lenses, flash, Wingback chair, ottoman,$350; Persian carpet,8 ft. carrying case, $800, 287-4733. by 11I ft. w/ pad, 5350,282-528 1. 1985 Ford Mustang GT 5.0, 8-cyl, fm/am/cass, p/s, 1981 Chevy Malibu Classic, a/t, 6 cyl, exc coed, a/c, exc cond, $5000, 261-8792. duty pd, $2500, 226-7176. IBM compatible, 30 Meg hd, 5 1/4 and 3 1/2floppy, Mini-blinds, 5x6, fits front bedroom, 500 area, mono monitor, star printer, $1250,286-4775. Clayton, mauve, $75,223-4290. 1987 Voyager Van, a/c, new tires, p/b, p/s, am/fm, 1976 CJ-7 Jeep, turbo, rims, nice rubber, hard/soft V-6, hvy duty hitch, best offer, 284-3335. top, good shape, extras, $4000/obo, 284-4135. Technics rrvr, tuner, linear track tretbl, Kenwood Handprinted Chinesehall chestw/2mirrors,5 1/2ft. dbl cass deck, $400, 284-3664, Room 7501. wide, 1 ft. deep, $1025, 223-4290, evenings. 1982 Dodge, 15-pass van, p/b, p/s, 36-gal tank, V8, 1984 Datsun 280ZX, 2dr, 4-spd, U.S. specs, extras, good cond, 1 owner, $6000, 287-6291. duty pd, $4500, 260-7574. FH-100 Sony multi-system stereo, am/fm/sw; dual Kenmore lge. capacity washer/dryer, axc. cond., 4 cas, CD hook-up, $350,264-8541 (Punta Paitilla) yrs., $650,286-3233. 1984 Mazda 323, 5-spd, hatchback, a/c, alarm, p/w, 1985 GMC S-15 p/u, a/c, long bed, camper top, cxc rims, $2800,221-0534. cond, $5450,287-3584. Zenith, 19" color TV,$125;B/W TV, 5;radio cass. Sofa, loveseat,$850; BRset,$700; diningset,$450;

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Ads Tropic Time Ul assiaied Ads 1,19m92 Bl end tables, $150; 2 lamps, $70, more, 286-3792. LR set, $1200/obo; 2 girls beds, twin, $200/ea.; 3 Qz BR set $750, 9x12 beige carpet $90, butcher dressers, $100/en., 284-3375. block dishwasher $325, more, 286-3675 after 5pm. Dinette, rectangular, chrome, glass, seats 6, chairs cane back, looks new, $500 firm, 252-6841. Country blue couch, chair, overstuffed, 20-button Century infant car seat $30, Graco swingomatic 841-A, Fort Clayton, Sat, Sam-lpm, furniture, apbacking, exc. cond., $400, 282-3793. $40, AF mesa dress, sz 40 $75. 286-3684. pliances, toys, Xmas tree, clothes. Yamaha piano, full size, exe. cond., almost new, 252-2063. Kenmoreheavy dutywasher/dryer, gd. cond., $500, 2 dress green pants, sz 30R, 2 dress green coat, aZ 5715-A Diablo, Sat, 7-10:30am. 236-2121. 37R $40. 289-3828. Whirlpool convertible dishwasher, new model, 6 1981B Curundu, Sat, 7:30am, multi-family, family cycle, used 6 mos., exc. cond., $375, 286-4130. Whirlppol dryer, 14-18 pounds, almost new, $250, Twin bed, bamboo furn, sofa table, microwave, clothes, toys, jungle gym. 224-8753. lamp, sm carpets, chair w/ooman, Chinese chairs. two-piece sectional sofa, blue design, 6 mos., $700, 263-4321. 680 Clayton, Sat, 8ain-noon, stereos, infant/toddler 269-5700 Carpeting, blue, covers every room of 3 BR, Fort clothes, chairs, more. Clayton, 500 areas, 287-6187. Lawn furniture of all types, make an offer. 2362 Turkish Kilim rugs, $50/ea., gd. cond., 2 Turkish 2815. 2622,2624 Cocoli,Sat,kitchenitems, clothes,misc. pipes, $20/ea., Turkish/Greek money, 286-3397. 2 sets of twin beds, $270/ea. set; sofa, $900; dryer, $85; 1 dishwasher, $50, 264-2788. Lawn mower $50, dbl bed $100, entertainment 6243 Los Rios, Sat, clothes, sleeping bags, houseMini/micro blinds, new, asstd. sizes, sheet sets for center $100, dehumidifier $90. 286-3684. hold items. dbl., qn. size beds, 252-5985. AntiquewalnutBR: armoire,vanityw/triplemirror, bench, rocker, dbl. bed, $750, 287-4770. Linden surfboard 6' $250. 226-1158. 677A, Fort Clayton, Sat, 7am-noon, appliances, Curtains, furniture, carpets and pads, 269-3429. rugs, bikes, clothes, furniture. King size waterbed, mirrors, headboard, sheets, 6Recliner, brn, metal desk, metal typing table. 252Freezer, $600; rug, $125; elec. guitar, $150; bed w/ drawer pedestal, waveless, $450, 287-6187. 5985. .111 Albrook, Sat, Sam, designer shoes, clothes, ____.,_$__;_284-_18__._.::.:.:.:__._.a.l.n. t household, toys, multi-family. ma, :4 Wall unit, sm desk, comp desk, TV, stereo cab, Tappan all oven (elec.), $275; GE dishwasher, .:.:.*:**$ :*.::*:*: boy'sbike, whitetable/desk, metal shelf. 282-3698. 237 Albrook, Sat, Sam-2pm, multi-family, lots of $225; both like new, 284-3930. aygr tm, oerybrs Golf clubs: TA845 Silver Seats, 8, 5W, LW. Lost at Schwinn High Sierra ATB $350, OT outpost ATh baby girl items, no early birds. Sofa, $400; oak dining chairs, $125; entertain. ctr., Amador GC, April 18-19, reward for return., 252$200, both $500. 282-4938. 81, 83 Howard, Sat, Sam-noon, sewing machine, $350; bed, $225; more, 252-2208, Sat., 6-11 a.m. 6970. dishwasher, TV, baby items, misc. Free, trlr frame, wheel, axle, needs work, VW enOakbunk bed set,2 beds, dresserchest,desk,hutch, Thai Bath 24k necklace w/ Buddha. Reward, 286gine for Beetle $400. 252-2180. 627B Fort Clayton, Sat, 8-10am, furniture, stereo, chair, ladder, $1000, 260-7133. 3345. odds and ends. 5pc BR set$250, Gibson elec guitar, new $250, day Re./freezer, 20.5, exc. condo coffee tbl., 264w/matt$125, bike$60, dresser, new $250. 2843264A Balboa, Sat, 8am-noon, household goods, 6713.3821clothes, toys, books. Lge. recliner, blue, very gd. cond.,$350, 286-4563. Microwave, bbq grill, 13" color TV w/remote, di827A Fort Clayton, household, toys, clothes, Kenmore lg microwave, $230, car stereo, $120, netted set, carpets, curtains, tent for 5, remote planes Yamaha keyboard, misc. Loveseat, like new, $35(; Pioneer stereo system, IBM compat color comp, more, $500. 264-4104. & access. 286-3484. like new, $250. 252-6162. 907A Fort Clayton, Sat, 9am-lpm, clothes, house3 tires, 255/60 R15, all $50. 252-6831. Ladies leather shoes, good cond, sz 12M $10-15, hold goods, multi-family, no early birds. Washer, dryer, Sanoma waterbed, twin beds, sofa, reproductions of pre-Colombian items. 223-4290 loveseat,recliner, more, must sell, 260-5771. Baby carrier,2carseats,bed,wood,rugs.230-1901. eves. 2241-A Balboa, Sat, Sam-noon, clothing, kitchen 18,00BTU a/c, 6mos.,$600; 59SOBTU a/c, $300; Woman's set of golf clubs, like new, 4 woods, 9 TV table w/wheels $20, Whirlpool 16,000 btu a/c appliances, BR furniture, TV, more. baby carseat, $20, 261-3032. irons, bag $350. 236-0523. $295, child's bike training wheels $5. 252-5792. 2254A Balboa, Sat, 7-11am, many plants, rogs,Moog organ synth. w/ amp., amp needs tube, make Window air conditioner $100. 286-4695. Two l2lbs bowling balls $25 ea. 252-2428 after bikes, Carr St. offer, Sears Kenmore carpet shampooer, 284-5521. 5pm. 0754C Williamson Place, Balboa, Sat, 9am-noon. -Crib w/mattress $120,.4 room wall-to-wall carpetGE refrig., 2 dr., axc. cond., 22 cu. ft., $560 firm, ing $400. 252-6829. Vitamaster elec treadmill $200, stacking tool boxes 475B Fort Clayton, multi-family, clothes, books, 230-0571. $75, metal utility shelves $20. 282-5281. etc. Tent house l0xl0x7 $80, compost foldable picnic Flowered couch, 4 person, exc. cond., extra cushtable w/4 seats $100. 233-3616. 12x15 rug $55, table $15, office chairs $10 ea, 3pc 901B Fort Clayton, Sat, 9am-noon, freezer, misc. ions, $275, 252-1174. sofa $110, Kg-sz matt $25, TV/stereo stand $35. Bowling balls #8414 w/carrying case $25 ea, wa221-9070. 335B Fort Clayton, Friday, noon-3pm; Saturday, 8 Carpets,med. brown; two 9x12,$60/ea.; one 12x15, tersport hydroslide board $75. 282-3180; am-5pm, clothing, etc. $80, almost new, 264-3830. 4 new Dunlop tires 195/50/2R15 $400. 261-7770. Briggs/Stratton 3.5 hp lawnmower, 22' cut $125. 681B Corozal, Sat, 6:30-11am, fumiture, misc. Oriental bokada, 7x10, $1200, 263-8579. 287-4597. Fedders 14,000 btu a/c, Philco 10,000 a/c, secretary household goods. desk $200, uniforms szs 16-18 $10 ea, nurses shoes Lafer sofa, re-upholstered, loveseat, 2 chairs, hasGas grill $75, 30 Nintendo games $10430. 287sz 10 $20, sofa, wooden arms. 236-1242 .414C Amador, Sat, Sam-noon, small appliances, sock. exc. cond., $500; 286-6492 after 7 p.m. 3087. furniture, bike, clothes. Parts for '83 Cressida, eng, starter, seats, a/c,alternaKing size BR set, Queen size BR set, DR w/ buffet, Seed spreader, ceiling fan, Amana convection oven, tor, 284-6195 lv msg. 1991A Curundu, Sun, Sam, children' items, books, 2 rocker/recliners, 284-5686. planters, more. 223-7437. household goods. Sofa, loveseat, chair, fair cond $200, 13" Zenith Antique side-by-side secretary, $200, 282-3735. Enlisted dress blues (E-9) w/cap, 7aa in-service color TV $85. 287-3297 82B, 86A, 79A Howard, Sat, Sam-noon, furniture, strips, sz 32 trous, 36 coat $125. 287-3046. toys, clothes, carpet, more. Console TV stand, 2 nightstands, twin headboard, Lifecycle, computerized professional model, new student desk, color TV, needs work, 286-4928. Boys bike 24", 10-spd $50, weight set w/bench $800 firm. 284-4525 475B Fort Clayton, Sat, 8am-lpm, multi-family, $100. 287-5535. ltebos Full size box spring, $25; full size bed frame, $25; 2 prom dresses, sz 3 $S50ea, Country blue dining clothes, books. full size bed brass plate headboard, $25, 287-3087. Formal wedding gown, veil, slip, sz 5 $300. 252table $150. 284-3989 95A Howard, Sat, clothes, shoes, kitchen items. 2080. Extra-long full size bed w/ sheets, $200; Kenmore Singer ironing press, variable temp. control, auto 1110 Amador, Sat, Sam-noon, gas grill, clothes. washer, $300, 252-6369. Wedding dress, sz 5/6, pearls, sequins, emlershutoff, safety lock/handle, port $200. 287-3286. oidery, like new $85. 260-4684. 302 Kobbe, Sat, 8am-2pm, multi-family, furniture, Twin bed, grt. for kids, gd. cond., $50, 287-3786. Wedding dress, sz 7/8, veil, rice basket, sm pillow clothes, household goods. VHS movies orig $944, Kg waterbed set $1800, for rings $500/obo. 261-7519 after 5pm. DR sets: Rattan, 6 chair, round tinted glass, $1000; children BR set $450, LR set $1100. 287-6574. 2529C Cocoli, Sat, 9am-6pm, household goods, ap6 chair, mahogany, w/ buffet, $2500, 268-0235. 6x9 blue carpet w/pad, way-to-go baby stroller, pliances, rugs, etc. 2 first communion dresses, sz 6/12, used once, 2 baby crib, Army maternity uniforms, neg. 287Waterbed, queen size, built-in drawers, lighted prom dresses smn 7 & 8.-287-6297. 3934. 437B Fort Clayton, Sat, 9am-5pm, fans, TV, lawnheadboard, $800, 287-3584. mower, computer, grill, etc. Women's 18-spd mountain bike, new $165/obo. Tricycle w/dump truck $25. 287-6284. Teakwood curio cabinet, w/ interior light, $525, 28726424. 282-3180. Batt operated 3-wheel motorbike by Tomy, re, , ,,,:, Bassett crib $100, changing tbl $60, other baby charger incl $60. 284-3482. Bilingual maid, live-in, must like children. 260'Girls BR suite: Dresserw/mirror, deskw/hutch and items, 3x12 pool w/filter $120. 282-3497. 1912, after 6pm. chair, nightstand, canopy bed, $700, 286-4531. Tommy Armour metal wood '92 845s, 1, 3, 5, right Curio $400, gm recliner/rocker $300, 7" Xmas tree hand, regular shaft, used twice $250. 284-4070 Full-time, live-in maid, babysitter for one child, Combination TV stand, bookcase, oak color, $425, w/decoration $70. 287-6790. good Eng, experienced, refs. reqd., 286-3893. 236-0523. Brn recliner, alec $150, weed eater $35, like new. Engagement ring, 14k gold .20ct diamond $950/ 284-4322 Eng-spking live-in maid, cook, clean, iron, refs, Lge. blue sleepr couch, grt. shape, asking $400, call obo. 252-2916. hard worker, trustworthy, 282-3087. 287-3731 after 6 p.m. New breathable heavy duty vinyl nose protectorfor White prom dress, as 3/4, worn once $70/obo. 287Toyota Celica, '80-87. 285-4731. 14" rim,useas full spare,'90 Ford Escort,284-3990. Curtains for 4 BR, tropical house, $150; 6 house 3879. plants, some 1g., $50, 286-4695. '88 Encyclopedia Britannica, axc cond, includes Gas mower, will pay $25, 286-3245. Criminal Justice Textbook, $50, Atari 800XLcomp shelf $500/oba. 264-3830. Elec. drip coffee maker, $25; 2 chest of drawers, w/1050 hd, books, more 287-3189' Need to rent carmonthly. Call 223-8301 after 6pm. 286-4391. :::X0303 Kenmore washer & dryer $200, Whirlpool $250, .King-sz matt w/o box spring, goodcond, 284-678. 27 in.Zenith TV, $425; complete teak Spanish-style 12x16 rug $50 or $500 all. 252-2345 after 5pm. BR st, 190 or estoffr, 26-078.Need camper shell for abort bed U.S. p/u, 256-6778. Weight bench $50,jogging trampoline $35, roaster 1986 Honda Magna, 700cc, duty pd., looks/runs Whirlpool elec. dryer,$350; Sears Coldspot refrig./ oven $75. 252-5829. gd., $2500/obo, 287-6181. Eng-spking live-in maid, M-F, refs, 289-3257. freezer, $400; porch furn., 264-8335. Kolcraft stroller, good cond $50. 286-4539. 1981 Kawasaki 44fOLTD, $1200,252-2345, after 5 Bookshelves, sm table, desk, CD rack, TV stand. Waterbed: 12-drawer pedestal, mirror, headboard, p.m. Call Rob, 263-7229. $500, 223-7271. Mens Huffy 626, 12-spd bike $60. 264-4685. 1987 Kawasaki Ninja, 750R, 9k, brakes, tire, just someone to refinish furniture, reasonable price, Natural rattan DR set,72 in. round wooden top table, Wilson '86 staff golf clubs 1-3-5wds & 3-SW $360. professionally tuned, $3300, 263-5733, ext. 15. 286-4336, btwn. 5-8 p.m. 4 chairs w/ pastel cushions, $500, 282-3881. 236-3443. 1983 Yamaha Maxim Midnight Special, like new, Couch, loveseat, coffee/2 end tables, sofa table, Complete suspension lift sys Toyota (4WD), brand only 3K miles, must see. 2 helmets, $2900, 260Orig. Walt Disney, Cinderella, SIp. Beuty, Pinocrattan chair w/ pastel cushions, $1300, 282-3881. new $189. 287-3944. 9987. chio videos in orig. pkg. .283-5888.

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Tropic Times BU~May 1, 1992 Super Crossword BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker WHAT THI iS IT' A TELEPHONE HELLO, 5 Crtan THIIHC ON T[4 ANsWERING WHAT'S THE ACROSS 46 Bitter, in 89 Tenant 9 Cole -44 Cast member 74 Employs CAPTAIN MACOTE, ZERO CAPITAL OF 1 River in Paris contracts (range of hils 45 Egyptian 75 Certain CESK, CN ZETAA Spain 50 Second part 91 Fail behind in France) skins 77 God of love PE MONTANA 5 Two-footed of the 94 Museum 10 Part of CIA 47 Horse 78 Williams BE, creature thought display 11 Resort hotel blanket and 10 Bowling lane 55 Judd Hirsch 95 ScandinavIan 12 Stringed 48 Rejoice Kennedy 15 Heavy. noTsy TV comedy 96 Very old Insttument greatly 79 Angle of a impact 56 Installs 97 Model 13 Tokyo. once 49 Advance in fault vein 19 Chicago officers again 99 Platinum wire 14 Talk too rank 90 Distress call district 57 Family car loop much: slang 51 Brezhnev 86 "Annie 20 Muse of SS Head cavity 100 Popular 15 Pintail duck 52 Anerican (1977 movie) poetry 59 indian veggies 16 Biblical author 87 Baffling 21 Dutch treat? 60 Sit on the 101 Altar phrase outcast Elizabeth problems 22 Note to the heels 104 Conclusion 17 Entertain 53 British 88 War god boss 61 Split he of thought 19 Grandma of statesman 89 Comfortable Barney Google and Snuffy Smith By Fred Lasswel 23 Start of a beans 110 Trampled art 54 Surgery or shoe timely 62 'Silas -111 Austrian 24 River in toxin lead-in 90 Bridge thought 65 They psychiatrist Belgium 58 African position 27 He wrote motivate 112 Soprano 25 German hunting trip 91 London MAW ii, ,F "Fables in horses, so to Lehmann philosopher 60 Roof prop in elevators YO'RE FIXIN' TO ; Slang'. speak 113 Italian painter 26 Gaelic a mine 92 WoshiP "R EZTOUE! 28of the 66 Overcome 114 Yellow and 31 Univ. 61 Sandpiper 93 Italian Desert ('33 67 French Coral buildings 62 Island seaport movie) seaport 116 Summer 32 Zhivago's country near 95 Staircase 29 French angel 68 Tenor L-nza attractions love Sicily post 30 Singer Delia 69 Neighbor of 116 Minor 33 Romanian 63 Writer of 96 Fairly big 31 Take out Brazil: abbr. woodland city rags-to98 Finds the 32 Sharp spear 70 Chilly deity 34 It follows riches stories sum 34 Vegas 71 Former 117 Beasts table or bed 64 Actress Luise 99 Northern opener? Egyptian VIP burden 35 Like the best 65 Maugham capital 316 Legal maser 72 Burdensome DOWN cheeses heroine 100 Paper size 37 Off the -76 British gun lisle o voile 37 "Kings --66 "Yankee 101 Wild goat (cnietai77 Third part of 2 'Lucinda (movie) Doodl -102 English sand H A h 40 Birthday the thought Brayfor38 Bibical 67 'The Man in hils HGAR the Horrible By Dik Browne surprise, 61 Rabbit's author region Black' 103 War god often cousin 3 Went by bus 39 Wax 6 Clergyman's 105 Shrill barkt 41 Niamey is its 82 Think deeply 4 WWiI org. 40 Heartbeat house 106 -Annie. of Ag Yol F?"c 't', T'LL dAV TLL HAVO TdAT TOO, UT 6J-TGTITUTO capital and long 5 Look at 41 Rule lot Jack 69 Poetry: old Oklahomal .A1y 7 O 911 ? THO PlET il2O1ci 21E5 FOR 1l cOTT1 0c 43 uropean 83 Like pe? 6 Goodnight Sprat style 107 They loop T F T d river 84 Food Ihsh girl 42 Bird suh as 71 Dardevils. the Loop? fRCALAt P 0I Fi012 TiEtUN FitMH 44 DIstinctive 85 River in 7 Dog's dogs" the casfeat 108 "Ode quality France 8 DDE's sowary. or 73 Coveted Nightingale" C 45 First-rate 87 Rice ield command kiwi award 109 Rio de 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 M in 111 12 113 114 0 15 116 17 1d 19 -20 21 22 24 25 26 27_ -28 29 3y -RATZbBEN SMITH 31 32 33 343h -OWE A G WTT 0A T1-WI OItTCiiK) " cou>S w 38 39 40 -41 -42 -W A *o, QOouT ToWr'A 43 45 46 47 48 491D" 50 1 253 54 6 5 55 62 63 r4 666 BUTCH AND DOUGIE by ALEX HOWELL 6 69 POUIE, L.OOK WHAT MOMMYIM GONfJA MPA! SHE NEVER V. PI IN PAY CA E PUT ITON THE PUTS ANYTHING EEFRIGEsATOR PO ON PAtE~ UP 7071 72 173 74 75P-A 12 V0 01 76 771 78 79 1083 84 85 8687 08 9 90 91 23 94 95 96 79 99 100 101 102 1G3 OUT ON A LIMB by GARY KOPERVAS 1T4 X FINE LOOK EVER BODY/! \ND Boq is LINE BETWN THE EMPEROR'S NOT HE FAT / -isEING 5RAJE VM[ARIN& CLOTHES AMD 0E0MG I 0 HA d 5 T 5 ; 51 N~ 5 ~ ,,'-~ 0rE E I. a 3 A d N HTHE SPATS by JEFF PICKERING InA S I lG H 0 1 N i ON OF IT I& 51L TUR s n I V a N V _9 W S OT l Hi~OLM /! FOR~TR ~ O LT UR5 I V T 1 d. YOUR MIDNIGHT SNACK v______ V 0_DO_____ nrtd 3 ) OIOSI4 SVHAv A "01' Rudy, here, has what I II 0 H think is a great idea!" DENNIS THE MENACE LAFF-A-DAY GUINCY by TED SHEARER .,--J31 N AW! E VER S, E .HAG ARMO, N'5 DPT fuCY 17YCU ,,THEY WAETA HLLYWo Et THINK THESE5 MOVlE, L Thy RIVER'---A.HAKS SARK PROFESSOR PHUMBLE by BILL YATES -wiE Jt wA9 ThEv 0007 OHEtd5 -AL Nwr JIs so sWi Asio CEXC WNro OF cR p 'NOW rLLTELLYOUA8OUTSOME OFTHE STUFF and this is for those days when th TOAT WAPENED )T0OVE WlEN1 WASYOUW3,." sitter calls m sick."


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