Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

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Full Text



Gifi of the Panama Canal Museum


Inside...News.
Open season for
changing 1991
health insurance
began Tuesday.
See page 5.


...Sports
The Pirates' Doug
Drabek and the A's
Bob Welch win bas-
ball's Cy Young
awards. See page 18.


1Ethe


Tropic Times


Vol. III, No. 41 Quarry Heights, Republic ofPanama Friday, Nov. 16, 1990


Marines launch practice invasion


by United Press International

American Marines launched a practice beach inva-
sion Thursday along the Saudi Arabian coast, appar-
ently near the Kuwaiti border, as Egypt and Syria
accused Iraq of foiling a peaceful settlement of the
Persian Gulf crisis by setting conditions for an Arab
summit.
The Pentagon said the beach drill, dubbed "Immi-
nent Thunder," involved 16 ships, about 1,000 Ma-
rines and 1,100 aircraft and is to continue through
Nov. 21.
They declined to say where in the Persian Gulf it
was taking place but it was believed to be near Iraq-
occupied Kuwait.
The Pentagon also said U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force
and Marines would exercise with Saudi air, naval and


marine units to "conduct Desert Shield training in
joint and combined operations for participating forces
and to enhance amphibious warfare skills."
The remarks directed at Iraq by Egyptian President
Hosni Mubarak and his Syrian counterpart, Hafez
Assad appeared to dim the chances for an Arab
summit to deal with the Persian Gulf crisis, but other
Arab and Soviet envoys pressed their shuttle diplo-
macy to sound out prospects of a summit.
Mubarak and Assad said in a joint communique
after two days of talks in Damascus, Syria, that they
too would continue consultations with other Arab
leaders "to preserve the interests and unity of the
Arab nation."
But they emphasized that "because of what has
been issued directly from Baghdad, setting precondi-
tions, it makes it difficult to hold such a summit."


Leningradto begin food rationing


MOSCOW (AP) - Leningrad's
City Council voted Thursday to
begin wide-scale food rationing
Dec. 1 for the first time since the
Nazi blockade in World War II.
Leningrad Mayor Anatoly
Sobchak, one of the nation's lead-
ing reformist politicians, pushed
hard for the severe measure.
Without rationing, he warned the
council on Monday, the city of
nearly 5 million people could face
hunger and unrest this winter.


In recent weeks, Leningrad
residents have had to stand in
two-and three-hour lines for read.
Many other necessities - includ-
ing eggs, sugar, cheese and sau-
sage - have virtually disappeared
from store shelves, according to
Maxim Korzhov, a Leningrad
journalist covering the City
Council session.
"People here are upset and
worried about food," Korzhov
said in a telephone interview.


"The atmosphere is tense." Hun-
ger is a political specter in Lenin-
grad because of the tragic memory
of the 1941-1944 blockade, when
an estimated 600,p00 people died,
many from starvation.
Korzhov said public support for
rationing increased after stores
throughout the city ran out of bread
on Nov. 5 and 6, when residents
stocked up for the Nov. 7 holiday,
the 73rd anniversary of the Bol-
shevikRevolution.


Thanksgiving
commissary hours
COROZAL - Commissary
officials have announced a change
in the Corozal and Fort Espinar
commissaries' operating hours
for Thanksgiving week.
The commissaries will open
Monday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
However, they will be closed
Thanksgiving Day and Friday.
The Howard Air Force Base
Commissary will be open for
regular hours daily except
Thanksgiving Day, when it is
closed.

Baker to meet
foreign ministers

WASHINGTON (AP) - Sec-
retary of State James A. Baker
II is beginning a new round of
consultations with other nations
as the Bush administration tries
to solidify support for its tough-
ening stand against Iraq.
Baker will meet over the
weekend with the foreign min-
isters of three African countries
as well as Romania and Finland.
All are members of the U.N.
Security Council.


Ethics Committee opens S&L hearings


WASHINGTON (UPI) -
Senate Ethics Committee
Chairman Sen. Howell
Heflin opened unusual
hearings Thursday into al-
leged influence-peddling by
five senators on behalf of
an accused savings and loan .
kingpin with a warning to
the lawmakers that many
Americans believe they
traded their "honor and
good names" for cash. Glenn
The ethics panel began
the trial-like hearings examining the activities of the so-
called Keating Five senators accused of improperly exerting
pressure on federal- bank regulators to go easy on S&L


operator Charles Keating Jr., in proceedings that promise to
givethe nation ararepeekinto largely hidden and unseemly
side of politics. All five senators claim innocence of any
wrongdoing.
Before a packed hearing room, Heflin, D-Ala., told Sens.
Dennis DeConcini, D-Ariz., John Glenn, D-Ohio, John McCain,;
R-Ariz., and Donald Riegle, D-Mich., that the "purpose of
the hearings is to find the facts" and that he hoped the
evidence presented would produce "the whole story" of the
affair. Sen. Alan Cranston, D-Calif., who announced Tuesday
he would miss most of the hearings in order to undergo
radiation treatment for prostate cancer, was absent at the start
of the hearings.
All of the Keating Five senators will have the chance to
present evidence and witnesses and cross-examine accusing
witnesses in the unprecedented public ethics hearings.


NATO, Warsaw Pact may reduce arms


VIENNA, Austria (AP) - NATO
and Warsaw Pact negotiators reached
tentative agreement Thursday on re-
ducing non-nuclear weapons in Eu-
rope, diplomats said.
Hungary's chief negotiator, Ambas-
sador Istvan Gyarmati, said the last
minor disagreements were worked out
at a plenary meeting of the 22 nations
belonging to the two military alliances.
Other diplomats, who spoke on con-
dition of anonymity, also said a tenta-
tive agreement had beei reached.


The treaty allows each side to keep
20,000 battle tanks. It also limits each
to 30,000 armored combat vehicles,
20,000 pieces of artillery, 6,800 com-
bat aircraft and 2,000 attack helicop-
ters.
With the treaty scheduled for sign-
ing in Paris on Monday - the first day
of the 34-nation Conference on Secu-
rity and European Cooperation - dip-
lomats at the Vienna talks had been
under pressure to reach agreement.
U.S. officials said in Washington on


Wednesday that substantive questions
remained, including verification that
the North Atlantic Treaty Organiza-
tion and Warsaw Pact actually were
destroying tanks, anti-aircraft guns and
other non-nuclear weaponry.
But negotiators in Vienna said the
issues were relatively minor, and U.S.
officials predicted the treaty would be
ready for signing on Monday.
Gyarmati said negotiating teams had
sent copies of the draft agreement to
their capitals and senior officials.


I


VETERANS DAY - The joint-service color
guard presents the colors during Veterans
Day ceremonies Monday. The services, hon-
oring American veterans were held at Corozal
American Cemetery. (U.S. Army photo by
Spec. James Yocum)


m








Tropic Times
Nov. 16, 1990


Quitting smoking can turn back health clock


(AFIS) - Quitters never win, unless
what they're quitting is smoking, said
U.S. Surgeon General Antonia C. Nov-
ello.
In the first report on smoking
issued since she became the nation's
surgeon general, Novello focused on
the good news for people who quit
smoking. Some highlights of her Sep-
temberreport:
*After five to 15 years, quitters' risk
of stroke drops to the same as that of
those who never smoked; smokers have
about twice the risk of dying from stroke
as non-smokers.
*After five years, quitters' risk of
cancers of the mouth, throat and eso-
phagus is half that of those who still
smoke.
*After only one year, the risk of
heart disease is half that of those who
keep smoking. After 15 years, the risk is
equal to that of those who had never
smoked. Smokers havetwicetheriskof
dying from heart disease compared with
lifetime non-smokers.
*The risk of lung cancer 10 years
after quitting drops to half that of those
who keep smoking.
*The risk of dying from lung cancer
is 22 times higher for male smokers and
12 times higher for female smokers
compared with persons who have never
smoked.
"*Within afew years, the risk of blad-
der cancer becomes half that of those
who keep smoking.
*Persons who quit smoking before


When you feel a
urge to smoke.







Sa. .


Say Stop!


k Ac �-


age 50 have half the risk of dying in the
next 15 years as do those who continue
smoking.
*While studies have shown people
gain an average of five pounds after
quitting smoking, the health benefits of
quitting still exceed the risks of the
slight weight gain.
*Ifa woman quits smoking as late as
the third or fourth month of pregnancy,
the riskof alow birthweight baby drops


I,


4 Think:


* Of why I want to quit.
* I can wait out the urge.


to the same as if she had never smoked.
Smokers have double the rate of low
birthweight babies as non-smokers and a
25 to 50 percent higher rate of fetal and
infant deaths. One fourth of American
women continue to smoke throughout
pregnancy.
Although no study has looked at rates
of illness in children whose parents have
quit smoking, the report proposed that
lack of exposure to smoke would result in


SAct:

* Sip, eat, chew
* Keep hands busy
* Move/get up
* Talk to a friend
* Sigh, yawn, or
breathe deeply


less frequent illness. Smokers' children
have higher rates of respiratory dis-
eases and middle ear infections than do
children whose parents don't smoke.
"Passive smoking-induced infections
in infants and young children can cause
serious and even fatal illness," added
Novello in her report. "Moreover, chil-
dren whose parents smoke are much
more likely to become smokers them-
selves."


Parents bring learning to life


when reading aloud to kids


by Ron Ferland
Howard AFB Librarian

HOWARD AFB (24TH COMPW/PA) - As par-
ents, why should we read aloud to children? In
short, because youngsters really need to read to
succeed. Reading is universally recognized as one
of the key skills we need to enjoy meaningful and
productivelives.
Just as "literacy empowers," illiteracy slows
down or even blocks our learning process. Accord-
ing to the U.S. Department of Education, functional
illiteracy is a real problem in the U.S. One in five
adults can't read a daily newspaper.
Preventing adult illiteracy begins by making
sure our children get a "headstart" on reading
abilities. Educators emphasize that reading aloud
to children helps them mimic sounds and associate
those sounds with the written word. This ability to
mimic exists in infants so we might begin reading
to children when they're less than a year old.


It's important from age two to five years. Re-
search done in New Zealand showed when teach-
ers explained new words as they read, children
doubled the rate at which they increased their
vocabulary.
Military Family Week is a great time to encour-
age reading. Here are a few suggestions:
Limit television viewing, then set aside a "spe-
cial" time and place to read aloud.
Start reading picture books with large-print
"sightwords." Some parents reinforce word/pic-
ture association by making big flashcards that match
household furniture.
Gradually, move on to first readers and Mother
Goose rhymes. Don't be afraid to ask a librarian or
teacher for help in choosing books.
If you're checking out books from a local li-
-brary, ask for a copy of "The Read-Aloud Hand-
book" by Jim Trelease. It's the best advice avail-
able on how we can pass on to our children the
lifetime gift of reading..


Provost Marshal's Corner


Here we are again at the Provost Marshal's Comer
with another week of housing area statistics.
These are the statistics from Nov. 2 - 8.

Larceny Housebreaking Burglary
Secured Unsecured
3 3 2 0
As you can see the amount of crimes are staying
about the same. Let's do our best to get zeroes in the
unsecured column.


I have some statistics for October. Of 36 larcenies,
burglaries and housebreakings, 19 were unsecured,
that's 53 percent of the larcenies including six stolen
bikes, five of which were unsecure.
Now let's open our crime files and see what we
have.
Recently one of our "Bruce Lee fanatics", while
traveling downtown, decided to practice his martial
arts.
After becoming involved in an argument with local


citizens, he decided to pull his handy nunchucks and
assault one. He was apprehended by a joint patrol. In
the process of apprehension the individual resisted and
was injured. The individual was then transported to
Gorgas Army Community Hospital where he was
treated for several lacerations and bruises.
Remember, when traveling in Panama, don't be the
UGLY American.
That's all for this week, everybody pitch in and
TAKE A BITE OUT OF CRIME!


Commander-in-Chief............... Gen. Maxwell R. Thurman Editorial Staff................................Sgt. Phillip D. Clark This authorized unofficial command information publi-
Director, Public Affairs.............. Col. Joseph S. Panvini Spec. John Hall cation is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times
NCOIC......................................... SMSgL George Prince Spec. Richard Puckett is published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Informa-
Editor................................................. SFC Cecil Stack tion Program of the Department of Defense, under the
Assistant Editor..............................Sgt. Monique Chere Editorial Assistants.............................Rosemary Chong supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern
Carolyn Coffey Command. Contents of the Tropic Times are not necessarily
Laura de la Guardia the official view of the U.S. government, the Department of
Elena Costarangos Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. The address is:
the lTrop ic TiIm es APO Miami, 34002, Albrook Post Office. Telephone 285-
6612.







































Lump-sum


payouts to end

COROZAL (USARSO PAO) -
Federal employees covered under Civil
Service Retirement Systems (CSRS
and FERS) who retire on or before
Nov. 30, may still elect the lump-sum
payout.
The plan is also known as the alter-
native form of annuity on a 50/50 per-
cent payout over a two-year period.
After Dec. 1, the AFA benefit will be
suspended for five years with these ex-
ceptions:


Transfer of function employees who
are 48 years old and have 18 years of
service are eligible for retirement and
the lump-sum option as are employees
with 23 years of service.
Employees serviced by the U. S.
Army South Directorate of Civilian
Personnel, seeking further informa-
tion may contact Catalina Ledesma at
285-5745 or 285-5941.
Anyone considering retirement
should submit a Standard Form 52,
Request for Personnel Action, to the
Benefits Section, Building 560, Corozal,
as soon as possible to avoid a delay in
receiving the retirement check.


Tropic Times
Nov. 16,1990


'Serenade in Blue'


* Retirements resulting from invol-
untary separation actions (but not for
cause).
* Employees who elect optional
(immediate) retirement and are deemed
terminally ill.
* Employees called up as reservists
for active military duty in support of
Desert Shield and retire by Nov. 30.
* Employees in certain positions
certified as essential in support of Desert
Shield and who were eligible to retire
on or before Nov. 30 and subsequently
retire by Nov. 30, 1991.
This exception may require Secre-
tary of Defense level approval.
To be eligible for retirement and
the lump-sum option employees must
meet the following criteria:

Minimum age Minimum service
(years)
62 5


Employment


CPO

NOTE: ALL APPLICANTS SHOULD BE AWARE THAT HIRING IS SEVERELY RESTRICTED
DUEB TO DOD WORLD WIDE HIRING FREEZE WHICHIS EXPECTED TO LASTTHROUGH 31
DEC 90. INTERNAL PLACEMENT IS NOW PERMITTED & IS RESTRICTED TO DOD CUR-
RENT EMPLOYEES. CURRENT TEMPORARY EMPLOYEES MAY NOW APPLY AGAINST
PERMANENT VACANCIES & REFERRALS ARE SUBJECT TO MANAGEMENT'S DECISION
TO FILL WITH TEMPORARIES. SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT TO DUTIES
SIMILAR TO THOSE REQUIRED BY THE VACANCY. MILITARY SPOUSES: USARSO HAS
PERMITTED, AS AN EXCEPTION TO THE DOD HIRING FREEZE, THE HIRING OF QUALIFIED
MILITARY SPOUSES ON A LIMITED BASIS. MILITARY SPOUSES, IF AVAILABLE &
QUALIFIED MAY BE HIRED ON A "ONE FOR TWO VACANCIES" RATE. THAT IS FOR
EVERY TWO VACANCIES BEING FILLED ONE MAY BE FILLED BY A MILITARY SPOUSE AS
AN EXCEPTION TO THE DOD HIRING FREEZE.

AMENDMENT ON HOW TO APPLY: FAILURE TO COMPLETE USARSO FORM 106, WHEN
REQUIRED, COULD HINDER AN APPLICANT'S CHANCES OF BEING REFERRED FOR THE
VACANCY.

VB# VACANCIES TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 11-16-90 CLOSE: 11-27-90

072-91 MESSENGER (MVO), NM-302-2. SENSITIVE. TEMPORARY NTE 1 YR. US-
SOUTHCOM,SCJl-Admin Svcs. Div., Ft. Amador. Gen Exp: 3 months. NOTE: Position is restricted
to person entitled to veteran's preference. Driver's license required.
073-91 NURSING ASSISTANT, NM-621-4. USA MEDDAC-PANAMA, GAH, Dept. of Nurs-
ing, Ancon. Gen Exp: 6 months. Spec Exp: 6 months. Job Rel Crit: None. However, applicants must
possess at least 6 months of experience described under duties. NOTE: Only permanent DOD
employees will be considered. Shift work: 12-hrs shift work req.

074-91 MEDICAL CLERK, NM-679-5. USA MEDDAC-PANAMA, GAH, Dept. of PC&CM,
Ancon. Bilingual (English/Spanish). Shift Work. Spec Exp: l yr. equiv. toNM-4. JobRel Crit: None.
However, candidates must show at least one year of experience as described under "duties". NOTE:
Only permanent DOD employees will be considered for this position.

075-91 SECRETARY (TYPING), NM-318-5. DCA, CFA, CRD, Ft. Clayton. Spec Exp: 1 yr. at
NM-4. TIG: NM-4. Knowledge of Spanish required.

076-91 SUPERVISORY SUPPLY TECHNICIAN, NM-2005-7. USA MEDDAC-PANAMA.
Logistics Div., Ancon. Spec Exp: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-6. TIG: NM-6. Job Rel Crit: 1. Ability to
supervise. 2. Knowledge of stock fund document control operations. 3. Knowledge of personnel
management principles and procedures. 4. Knowledge of DOD Supply System. NOTE: Incumbent
may be required to work day, evening or night shifts, and perform weekend or holiday work. Only
permanent DOD employees will be considered for this position.

077-91 SUPERVISORY RANGE OPERATIONS COORDINATOR, NM-303-7. DPTM,
Range Branch, Cocoli. SENSITIVE. SpecExp: NM-5. TIG: NM-5. Drivers license required. SOPR
Form 1177 required. NOTE: Only permanent DOD employees will be considered for this position.
078-91 BUDGET ANALYST, NM-560-7/9. 1109th USA Signal Bde., Support Div., Financial
Sect., Corozal. Spec Exp for NM-7: 1 yr equiv to NM-5. TIG for NM-7: NM-5. Spec Exp for NM-
9:. yr equiv to NM-7. TIG for NM-9: NM-7. Position may be filled at either grade. Job Rel Crit: 1.
Knowledge of the organizational structure, programs and work methods of components budgeted. 2.
Skill in identifying, categorizing and analyzing quantitative data. 3. Knowledge of budgetary and
financial relationships. SOPR FORM 1177 REQUIRED.


079-91 INTERDISCIPLINARY, NM-9. USA MEDDAC-PANAMA, ADAPC Div., Pacific
Community. SOCIAL WORKER,NM-185-9 Spec Exp: MS-SocialWork. TIG: NM-7. PSYCHOLO-
GIST, NM-180-9 Spec Exp: BA/2yrs. TIG: NM-7. SOCIAL SCIENCE, NM-101-9 Gen Exp: 3yrs.
Spec Exp: 2 yrs. TIG: NM-7. Job Rel Crit: None. (A)**This pos. requires that selectee take an
urinalysis test for illegal drug use prior to appointment. (B)* *This pos. requires that selectee obtain the
ADAPCP clinical certification. (C)**This pos. may be filled in any of the three specialties. NOTE:
Applications will be accepted for both permanent and temporary appointment.

080-91 INTERDISCIPLINARY, NM-9. TEMPORARY NTE 30 SEP 1991. USA MEDDAC
PANAMA, ADAPC Div., Pacific Community. SOCIAL WORKER, NM-185-9 Spec Exp: MS-
Social Work. TIG: NM-7. PSYCHOLOGIST, NM-180-9 Spec Exp: BA/2 yrs. TIG: NM-7.
SOCIAL SCIENCE, NM-101-9 Gen Exp: 3 yrs. Spec Exp: 2 yrs. TIG: NM-7. Job Rel Crit: None.
(A)**This pos. requires that selectee take an urinalysis test for illegal drug use prior to appointment.
(B)**This pos. requires that selected obtain the ADAPCP clinical certification. (C)**This pos. may be
filled in any of the three specialties.

081-91 LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST, NM-346-9. SENSITIVE. USAG,
DPTM, Ft. Clayton. Spec Exp: NM-7. TIG: NM-7.
082-91 SUPERVISORY TRANSPORTATION SPECIALIST, NM-2101-1L SENSITIVE.
41st ASO, DOS, Transportation Div., Corozal. Spec Exp: NM-9. TIG: NM-9. Job Rel Crit 1.
Knowledge of DA policies and procedures relating to management and control of Transportation Motor
Pool. 2. Ability to plan, control and coordinate several diverse activities simultaneously. 3. Ability to
communicate orally and in writing. 4. Skill in applying management statistical trends and information.
NOTE: SOPR Form 1177 required.

083-91 (2) EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST, NM-235-11. USAG, DCP, Training
& Development Div., Corozal. Spec Exp 1 yr at NM-9. TIG: NM-9. Job Rel Crit: 1. Skill in designing,
developing, conducting and evaluating adult training programs. 2. Ability to interpret policy, plan,
control and manage training and development programs. 3. Ability to counsel employees regarding
individual development and training opportunities. 4. Ability to consult with and counsel management
on short and long term training needs. NOTE: Position required lifting items weighing up to 70 pounds.

084-91 SECRETARY (TYPING), NM-318-4/5. USA MEDDAC-PANAMA, GAH, Clinical
Support Div., Ancon. BILINGUAL. Gen Exp: 1 yr. Job Rel Crit: None. However, candidates must
show at least one year of experience as described under "duties". NOTE: Only permanent DOD
employees will be considered for this position. Position may be filled at either grade level.

085-91 CLERK TYPIST, NM-322-3. Provost Marshal Office (Atlantic), Ft. Davis. Gen Exp: 6
months. NOTE: Clerical & Administrative Support Positions (CASP) Test is required.

NOTE: VB# 536-90, Tractor Operator, MG-5705-6 is suspended until further notice.

VB# 751-90, Supervisory Training Program Specialist, NM-301-11; VB# 049-91, Medical
Technician, NM-645-6; and VB# 062-91, Technologist, NM-644-7 are hereby cancelled.



RECURRING VACANCIES:
The CPO is accepting applications for the following positions:
CLINICAL NURSE - All Specialties. U.S. license required.
LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSE - U.S. license required.
NURSE ANESTHETIST, NM-610-11 - U. S. license required.
FOR INFO CALL: Ms Sullivan at 285-4116


Howard AFB Theater, Nov. 19,
6:30 and 9:30 p.m.



Guest appearance by
country singer Roy Clark









Tropic Times
Nov. 16, 1990


Air Force regulations govern firearm possession


HOWARD AFB (24TH COMPW/
PA) - Military members who come to
Panama with personal firearms should
be mindful of the rules concerning the
storing of weapons on the base.
Local laws, military regulations and
Department of Defense rules govern-
ing the registration, bearing, posses-
sion and use of privately owned fire-
arms should be followed closely,
according to local law enforcement
officials.
According to Air Force Regula-
tion 125-37, which clarifies the rules,
members must register their firearms
regardless if it is stored in an approved
designated area or in military family
housing.
Firearms must be registered on Air
Force Form 1314, if the firearm is
maintained in a designated facility or
in the member's family housing. This


form should be maintained in unit
orderly rooms. Howard Air Force Base
Regulation 125-37, paragraph seven,
outlines firearms registration proce-
dures.
Base housing occupied by unac-
companied members are considered
bachelor living quarters. People resid-
ing in these quarters must store their
firearms in the security police armory
located in Building 237.
Members living in dormitories,
transient quarters, and guest housing
are not authorized to retain possession
of their firearms and ammunition. The
security police armory is designated as
the storage facility for firearms not
authorized for retention by the owner.
People who want to take their
weapons off base must have a license
issued by the Republic of Panama. The
license is based on the intended use of


the firearm, such as competition,
personal protection or other valid reason.
To obtain a license from the Re-
public of Panama, go to the Judicial
Technical Police central office located
on Fourth of July and Avenida Nacional
and obtain a police check. Two copies
of the member's bilingual identifica-
tion card and two photographs must be
provided.
Members requesting permits fof
handguns are required to turn in the
firearm along with two rounds for a
ballistic test. When carrying a firearm
in the Republic of Panama for per-
sonal protection, members must have
their license in their possession and
keep the firearm concealed at all times.
However, while on any military base,
registered firearms must be transported
unloaded and secured out of the reach
of occupants. No one may carry a


firearm concealed on their person on
any local base.
Civilian members are not author-
ized to carry firearms for personal pro-
tection while on Howard AFB or Al-
brook AFS. Civilians without permits
who want to transport their firearms
from the Howard AFB orAlbrookAFS
areas to another defense site should
contact the 24th Security Police liai-
son at 284-3515, for proper coordina-
tion with Panama's public forces.
Firearms will not be transported
on motorcycles, bicycles, or any other
two-wheeled or three-wheeled vehicles.
Weapons registration procedures are a
serious matter affecting the safety and
security of the base, say security police
officials.
For more information concerning
registration, call SSgt. Steven Rivera
at 284-4755.


SgL Maurice Howard gets down and dirty beneath a concertina
wire obstacle.


tackle


'Green Hell'

story and photos by SFC Robert Waggoner

FORT SHERMAN (USARSO PAO ATLANTIC) - Escaping
from their typewriters, computers and office drudgery, garrison
soldiers recently slipped and slid their way through the "Green
Hell" Confidence Course.
At 7a.m. Oct. 25,29 Company D U.S. Army Garrison and six
Atlantic Detachment, 1190th Signal Battalion soldiers used the
confidence course to develop their teamwork skills and endur-
ance in a jungle environment.
Spaced five minutes apart, groups of five had to negotiate 13
obstacles as a team.
"I wanted to show our soldiers there are other things in the
Army besides sitting behind a desk," said SFC Bryce Fox,
Company D first sergeant.
The first barrier to face the team was a five-foot wall. Once
over the wall, they scrambled up a narrow, slippery trail infested
with rocks, tree roots and vines to the second station.
There they entered the "Bushmaster," a course consisting of
belly-crawling underneath a low rail, high-stepping through a
tire lane and low-crawling beneath two low rails.
Teams at obstacle three teetered and tottered across two bal-
ancing logs spanning a 10-foot ditch.
Next came a stomach-tightening 40-foot embankment de-
scent using a knotted rope and the hand-over-hand technique.
After reaching the bottom, one soldier was carried on a
stretcher by the four remaining teammates. The team traveled
around an island cove through knee-deep water and back to the
beach.
After staggering along the beach, the tired participants looked
up at the next challenge - a cargo net anchored to a 40-foot cliff
which needed to be climbed. Their fear of heights couldn't be laid
to rest at the top of the long climb, because the next task was de-
scending another cargo net on the other side.
With arms already burning from the rope climbs, stations
eight and nine further tested the participants. At station eight,
soldiers climbed a knotted rope and then inched across a two-
rope bridge located 15 feet above the ground. Once on the
ground, the soldiers hustled to station nine to climb an inclined
ladder and used the commando crawl to cross a horizontal rope


Spec. Chitany Johnson and a teammate scale the 40-foot cliff at the cargo
net obstacle.


to a vertical pole before sliding to the ground.
Just around the corner from station nine loomed station 10 - the
34-foot wooden vertical ladder. Using the buddy system the unit
encouraged each other to scale over the 34-foot obstacle. Some
participants needed to be talked through their fear of heights.
Greeting weary members next was objective 11, a crawl
through cool muddy water beneath concertina wire. The water
momentarily refreshed the soldiers for the last two obstacles,
With the finish line in sight and only two more tests of
endurance to go, the teams high-stepped through the hip-overs
and clambered over a six-foot wall to finish their "Green Hell"
experience.
"It was very challenging and helped me overcome my fear of
heights," said Sgt. Rayfeen Green after the course. "My main
concern was safety for myself and the squad and to get through
that sucker alive."


Soldiers









Tropic Times
Nov. 16, 19905


Hospital commander urges


parents to vaccinate children


GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY
HOSPITAL (USARSO PAO) - A
measles outbreak has recently hap-
pened in Panama, according to Gorgas
Army Community Hospital officials.
Children under 15 months are the
ones primarily affected by the out-
break.
"Measles is a highly contagious
disease. Gorgas has recently docu-
mented six patients with measles, and
three of those were hospitalized for
complications," said Dr. (Col.) Mi-
chael McConnell, hospital commander.
Measles can be prevented though
vaccination.
"I would strongly urge parents to
vaccinate their children ages six to 12
months," McConnell said. "All chil-
dren above 12 months should be vacci-


nated with the Measles, Mumps, Ru-
bella - or MMR - vaccine."
Children who received a measles
innoculation before age one should
receive a second MMR at 15 months,
he said.
McConnell said complications fre-
quently occur in cases of measles. There
is also a two percent mortality rate in
infants.
"Parents should be certain their
children are immunized against
measles," he stressed.

The current measles outbreak started
in the United States in 1989, spreading
south through Central America.
For information about the outbreak
or vaccinations call Dr. Byron at the
Gorgas pediatric clinic, 282-5171.


Safe houses protect children


by Spec. James Yocum

FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO)
- Sometimes, the road home from school
can be scary for a child. Suspicious
looking strangers, a fall that bloodies
the knee and many other hazards often
make the trip seem endless.
U.S. Army South's Safe House
program will give children a place to
go when they find themselves in
trouble - all they have to do is look for
the sign.
"There's aposter that will be given
out to volunteers," said Sarah Hunt,
Safe House project officer. "Volun-
teers put this posterin the window, and
ifa child needs assistance, they can go
there."
Hunt, a secretary in contraband
control, got the idea from a similar
program in the United States, called
the Helping Hand.

The Safe House program is being
pushed by USARSO's Mayoral Con-
gress, in conjunction with the garrison
commander's office, Hunt said.
So far, the program is lacking in
volunteers. Only six families have
offered their houses as havens for lost
or scared children.
For safety reasons a background
check will be done on volunteers.


Likewise, posters will be controlled
items to keep them from falling into
the wrong hands, Hunt said.
Volunteers will be briefed on what
actions to take in different situations,
but generally the process is common
sense, Hunt said.
The garrison commander's office
hopes to have a high number of safe
houses - maybe even every other house
in the neighborhood, Hunt said.
"We really need a lot of volun-
teers," Hunt said. "All they have to do
is call their mayor, and we will take
care of the rest."
To reach your mayor, contact the
garrison commander's office at 287-
6668.


TURKEY LEADERS - Teresa Elvin (front) and Cristina Brandenburg
practice cheerleading at Curundu Elementary School for the upcoming
Turkey Bowl 90. (U.S. Army photo by Spec. Eric Vetesy)


Host a sailor for holiday dinners


(NAVSTAPANCANAL - PAO) -
This holiday season, U.S. Naval Sta-
tion Panama Canal will have its usual
amount of sailors here on temporary
assignment, who will be separated from
their families and friends.
The Navy Public Affairs Office is
currently soliciting volunteers to host
one or more servicemembers at their
homes for Thanksgiving and Christ-
mas dinner.


Most people in the military have
been away from home during the holi-
day season and know how appreciative
these servicemembers will feel to be
hosted by your family. Also, this pro-
gram will provide them with a whole-
some break from their ships.
If you are interested in hosting a
sailor for this holiday season, please
call the Navy Public Affairs Office at
283-5641/5644.


Health benefits open season gets under way


(AFIS) - Open season for 1991 health insurance
began Tuesday for federal civilian employees and
retirees.
The annual open season, which ends Dec. 10,
allows employees to compare plans and switch ifthey
wish, said Office of Personnel Management officials.
Underthe Federal Employee Health Benefit Program
civilian employees pay about 25 percent of the bi-
weekly premiums and the government pays the rest.
Retirees are also eligible for the health insurance
coverage but pay their premiums monthly.
According to OPM officials, the average bi-weekly
premium in, 1991 will increase 6.6 percent - average
premiums jumped 13 percent in 1990 and 20 percent
in 1989. Of the more than 300 plans participating in
the program, they said, 89 offer premium reductions
for 1991.
The government, expecting to pay more than $9.8
billion in 1991 health benefits premiums, has insti-
tuted two changes in the plans to help cut costs:
precertification and large-case management.
Under precertification, the employee or doctor
contacts the health plan before the employee is admit-
ted to a hospital for non-emergency care. Based on the
information provided, the plan may certify the admis-
sion for a specified time period.
If necessary, stays may be extended. However,
OPM officials said, the plan may deny admission if it


determines alternative treatment exists. Individuals
who disagree with their plan's decisions and obtain
impatient treatment without precertification may face
a $500 penalty.
Large-case management looks for alternative
therapies or treatments for terminal or chronic condi-
tions. According to OPM officials, all factors in the
patient's condition are thoroughly checked before the
type of care is decided. Alternative methods can in-
clude home care, outpatient treatment and skilled
nursing. They stressed cost cutting does not mean
diminished quality care.
Five health plans won't be available next year, so
the 45,000 individuals enrolled in them need to pick
new plans. Dropped are the American Federation of
Government Employees, National Federation of Federal
Employees, National Association of Government
Employee, Government Employees Benefit Associa-
tion, and Postal Supervisors plans.
Some plans are open to federal employees in
general; a few others may first require membership in
a union or association.
Most plans are health maintenance organization-
type packages, which generally means they serve a
limited geographical area and limit patients to partici-
pating doctors and facilities in exchange for covering
a wide range of services at little or no cost above the
premium.


Examples of non-geographical plans and biweekly
1991 premiums (retirees pay the same rates but on a
monthly basis) are:

*Blue Cross and Blue Shield: high self, $95.80, up
$9.12; high family, $199.93, up $19.02; standard self,
$16.92, same; and standard family, $35.55, same;

*Alliance Health Benefit Plan: high self, $145.79,
up $70.45; high family, $248.60, up $21.68; standard
self, $16.94, up $1.64; and standard family, $40.83,
up $3.94;
*American Postal Workers Union Plan: self, $18.85,
up 71 cents; and family, $39.93, up $2.62;
*Foreign Service Benefit Plan: self, $18.69, down
$3.74; and family $55.96, down $13.26;
*GEHA Benefit Plan: self, $20.14, up 98 cents;
and family, $41.38, up $3.43; and
*Mailhandlers Benefit Plan: high self, $14.66, up
57 cents high family, $32.67, up $1.25 standard self,
$11.95, up 68 cents; and standard family, $25.94, up
$1.47.

Officials advise individuals to compare their cur-
rent coverage with other plans to see if they are
getting the best coverage for the money. For more
information on specific health plans, contact local
civilian personnel offices.









Tropic Times
Nov.16,1990


- Military News


GREETS TROOPS - President Bush greets members of a Tinker Air Force Base AWACS squadron as he arrives
in Oklahoma City. (AP Laserphoto)


Company


delays


shipments


FALLS CHURCH, Va. (ARNEWS)
- Unsatisfactory performance by a con-
tract carrier has resulted in delayed
property shipments for soldiers and DoD
civilians, and action against the com-
pany.
Property shipments from the United
States to Europe will be held up for up
to three weeks because American En-
sign Van Service, Inc., failed to com-
plete movement of consigned shipments.
Military Traffic Management Com-
mand officials say the company was
put on worldwide non-use Oct. 24 for
the failure. MTMC is arranging for
other carriers to complete shipments
stranded by American Ensign.
Soldiers and DoD civilians should
contact their local personal property
shipping office to determine the status
of American Ensign shipments.


Energy savers receive awards


WASHINGTON (ARNEWS) - Several Army per-
sons and organizations have won recognition in this
year's Federal Energy Efficiency Awards Program.
For their efforts in conserving energy, reducing
energy consumption and making greater use of alter-
native energy sources, this year's recipients stand as
examples of what others can do in these times of high-
cost energy and dependence on foreign energy sources,
said Lt. Col. Harry Corley in the Army Energy Office
at the Pentagon.
He identified the individual awardees along with a
summary of their accomplishments as follows:

-Lawrence Chenkin, chief of the energy manage-
ment branch at Fort Eustis, Va. His development of a
"shared energy savings contract" with the local gas
company has saved scarce federal government funds,
and has (in the words of the award citation) "given


Fort Eustis an energy option that will allow for in-
creased savings in the future."
-William J. DeJournett, chief of the energy branch
at Fort Rucker, Ala. "One of his most significant
achievements," explains the award citation, "was the
introduction and testing of a ground-coupled heat
pump system for base housing." Use of the system has
produced a 41-percent reduction in consumption of
electricity and natural gas in conventional houses.
It also has led to reduced gas peak demand in the
winter and reduced electrical peak demand in the
summer. -
-Peter Fludovich of the Energy Management Of-
fice at New Cumberland Army Depot, Pa. Under his
direction, consumption and costs for fiscal years 1987
through 1989 reflected a savings of more than $627
thousand.
-Robert G. O'Brien, chief of the utilities engineer-


ing division at Fort Belvoir, Va. In the category of
Special Awardee, he was cited for, among other ef-
forts, "his skillful promotion of third-party contracting
that resulted in the award of the first shared energy
savings contract in the Department of Defense.
This project is expected to save $3.5 million in
energy costs over 25 years at one installation."
Individual recipients in the Small Group category
were Francis W. Sands and Raymond Leece of the
47th Area Support Group in England.
Leece "was responsible for the installation of nu-
merous energy-saving measures, such as recirculating
electrostatic air cleaners in vehicle maintenance shops,
motion-detecting lighting controls in unoccupied housing
units, lighting retrofits in numerous buildings, and
insulation and double-glazed windows in housing units."
At the center of the energy-awareness program devel-
oped by Sands was "an aggressive campaign to reduce
mobility fuels consumption.
On the organizational side, the award went to Fort
Carson and the 4th Infantry Division, Colo. and to
the Army Ammunition Plant at Milan, Tenn.


Teams' neighbors not only ones with 'stingers'


by Steve Davis
12th Aviation Brigade

SAUDI ARABIA (ARNEWS) - You
can't see them, but Stinger missile teams
are hidden in nearby foxholes that blend
with the desert.
Walk too close by and a guard will
pop up from a clump of sand and scrag-
gly brush and give you a hand sign to
stop.
His weapon is loaded, so you'd bet-
ter move slowly.
Go ahead. Tell him why you're at the
end of nowhere looking for him.
Satisfied with your answer, he'll invite
you to his bunker, dug deep into the
desert floor and lined with sandbags.
You'll be glad if he doesn't ask you in;
it's nothing fancy.
Only a bunker, a firing position and a
bunch of concealed Stinger anti-air-
craft missiles are out here in the sand
with each team of soldiers from Com-
pany D, 3rd Battalion, 5th Air Defense
Artillery.
The only neighbors the Spearhead
Division soldiers from Budingen, Ger-
many, have are scorpions, snakes and
lots of flies.
They hope their creepy neighbors
never drop by. The same goes for Iraqi
neighbors further north.
Butif they come anyway, the air de-
fense soldiers have something for them.


Their "surprise" is a Stinger, a
tube-launched, heat-seeking missile that
can chase down a plane quicker than
you can say "Saddam Hussein."
"Our mission is to make positive
identification of aircraft as friendly or
hostile and to take appropriate ac-
tion," said Sgt. Roy Martin, a Stinger
team chief.

"If it's hostile, we'll engage that
aircraft and prevent it from succeeding
in its mission."
Martin and his gunner, Pvt. Scott
Shepherd, keep a 24-hour-a-day vigil
near the 12th Aviation Brigade helicop-
ter assembly area.
They spend a week or more at their
position before rotating to a more com-
fortable living area for a few days be-
tween missions.
That job includes being able to visu-
ally identify most of the world's aircraft
and determine if they are friend or foe.
First, a Stinger crew visually acquires
a target and electronically interrogates
it.
This missile notifies the gunner
whether the target is a true friend, pos-
sible friend or an unknown.
"We should get a "true friend" re-
sponse," said Spec. Jeffrey L. Brogdon.
"If not, we're going to be on edge. We
would definitely be on edge."
If the aircraft is visually and elec-


ironically confirmed as unfriendly and
on a hostile mission, the gunner could
be ordered to fire.
The missile tells the gunner when it
has locked onto the target. Then, all the
gunner has to do is squeeze the trigger.
"After that, it's up to the weapon,"
Shepherd said.
A small launch motor would propel
the Stinger from its tube. Once clear of


the gunner, the main engine would ig-
nite and the Stinger would streak to-
ward its target and blast it from the air.
"It was pretty effective in Afghani-
stan," Shepherd said, "and I have a lot
of confidence in it here."
At another Stinger position, one air
defense poet put it in desert terms -
"They may be bad, but scorpions ain't
the only ones with Stingers."








Tropic Times
Nov. 16, 1990 I


AF offers activities during Military Family Week


HOWARD AFB (24TH COMPW/PA) - The fol-
lowing is a synopsis of events that take place during
the National Military Family Week celebration at
Howard AFB and Albrook AFB. Military Family
Week runs Sunday through Nov. 24.
The week's events include a Kodak Kolorkins
presentation at the Zodiac Recreation Center Nov. 24
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., 3rd floor of Building 709.
Kodak Kolorkins are Disney-like characters, with
whom you can take pictures.
Also Nov. 24, the Panama Canal "Square Ups"
square dancing team performs at the Zodiac Recrea-
tion Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. These couples
perform the traditional and modern steps to country
and rock and roll music and invite audience participa-
tion. The week's other events include:
Sunday - Pony rides, free drawing for T-shirts, 10
a.m. to noon. Ongoing eventsat the Howard AFB and
Albrook AFB Bowling Centers and swimming spe-
cial at the Albrook Pool until Wednesday.
Monday - Air Force Band special recognition to
the Air Force military family at the Howard Theater,
7 p.m.
Tuesday - Parent and child communication work-
shop by Sandy Wallace, an experienced family work-
shop conductor at the Howard Youth Center at 7 p.m.
For sign-ups and information, call 286-4663/3195, or
284-4700/6135.
Wednesday - Turkey Bowl at Balboa Stadium.
Thursday - Thanksgiving buffet, at Albrook, 11
a.m. and 2 p.m. family Thanksgiving lunch, 11 a.m.
at the Howard Officers' Club. Thanksgiving buffet at
the NCO Club, 1 to 5 p.m. Thanksgiving weekend
tour to Chiriqui Province until Nov. 25. There will be
$2 per family swimming all day at the Albrook Pool
through Nov. 24.
Friday - This is a "down day" for military and the


MVilitary

FAMILY


18-24- Nov 90





doing good things ifor people

kids are out of school, and there will be plenty of
activities all day.
At 8 a.m. there is a parent/child select shot golf
tournament at the Horoko Golf Course. There will be
prizes, free T-shirts and refreshments.
From 9 a.m. to noon there will be an aerobics
marathon at the Howard gym, featuring base and


Community Chapel Schedule


Pacific


AMADOR CHAPEL
Building 108, Phone: 282-3610

9 a.m. Catholic Mass
10 a.m. Episcopal Holy Eucharist
11:15 a.m. General Protestant Service
11:30 a.m. Daily Catholic Mass (Monday - Friday)

CLAYTON CHAPEL
Building 64, Phone: 287-5859

11:30 a.m. Daily Catholic Mass
5 p.m. Catholic Mass (Saturday)
9 a.m. General Protestant Service
9 a.m. CCD Classes (at Clayton Elementary School)
9 am. Catholic Adult Classes (at Clayton Education Center)
10:30 a.m. Catholic Mass
10:30 Sunday School (Protestant, at Education Center)
Noon Gospel Service
6 p.m. Evening Service (Youth Meeting)
8 a.m. Men's Prayer Breakfast (last Saturday of the month)
9:30 a.m Protestant Women of the Chapel (each Thursday)

COROZAL CHAPEL
Building 112, Phone: 285-6717

7 p.m. Jewish 1st Fridays
10 a.m. Hispanic Catholic Mass
11:30 a.m. Pentecostal Sunday School
12:30 p.m. Pentecostal Fellowship-Worship
7 p.m. Evening Worship

GORGAS HOSPITAL
Building 254

12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass (2nd floor, Thursday)
Sun. Protestant Worship (To be announced at hospital)
Weekday Worship (As announced)

ALBROOK CHAPEL
Building 860, Phone: 284-3948

8 a.m. Hispanic Catholic Mass & CCD
9:30 a.m. Protestant Sunday School
9:30 a.m. Catholic Mass
11 a.m. General Protestant Service


HOWARD CHAPEL
Building 500, Phone: 284-3948


11:30 a.m. Daily Catholic Mass
4:15 p.m. Confessions (Saturday)
5 p.m. Catholic Mass (Saturday)
11 am. Catholic Mass
9:30 a.m. CCD (Howard School) Oct. - May 1991
9:30 a.m. General Protestant Service
10:45 a.m. Sunday School (Howard School) Oct. - May 1991
12:30 p.m. Gospel Service

USNAVSTAPANCANAL CHAPEL
Building 40, Phone: 283-4148

8 a.m. Catholic Mass
10 a.m. General Protestant
7 p.m. Bible Study (Wednesday)


Atlantic
DAVIS CHAPEL
Building 32, Phone: 289-3319

8 a.m. Catholic Mass M-W-Th, F
7:30 p.m. Bible Study (Wednesday)
4:30 p.m. Catholic Spanish Mass (Thursday)
6 p.m. Catholic Charismatic Prayer Group (Thursday)
7 p.m. Catholic Bible Study (Thursday)
4:30 p,.m. Catholic Confession (Saturday)
5 p.m. Catholic English Mass (Saturday)
9 a.m. Protestant Sunday School
10 a.m. General Protestant Service (Sunday)

SHERMAN CHAPEL
Building 152, Phone: 289-6481.

9 a.m. Sunday School (Sunday)
10 a.m. Protestant Worship
6 p.m. Gospel Choir Practice
7 p.m. Bible Study (Wednesday)
6:30 p.m. Catholic English Mass (Saturday)

GULICK CHAPEL
Building 224, Phone: 289-4616

9 a.m. Catholic English Mass
10:30 a.m. Catholic Hispanic Mass /CCD
11:30 a.m. Gospel Service
3 p.m. Pre-Baptismal classes (Thursday - by appt only)


local aerobic instructors, a fashion show of the latest
aerobic gear and drawings for prizes.
From 10 am. to 1 p.m. there are pony rides
sponsored by the MWR riding stables in the field
between the NCO club and youth center, the Breeze-
way Ice Cream Parlor will be open, and there will be
a clown sculpting balloons, Panamanian handicrafts
on sale, and a DJ playing music.
At 1 p.m. there will be a family pet show at the
Howard Youth Center. From 1 to 3 p.m. there will
be a small craft and water safety course at the Albrook
pool given by the American Red Cross team.
Nov. 24 - From 9 until 11 am. there will be a
family soccer game at the Howard parade field.
Certificates will be awarded.
From 10-10:30 a.m., there will be a 20-minute
lecture on the Three L's: Limits, Learning and Love
by Dr. Byron Efimaides, Gorgas Army Community
Hospital chief of pediatrics, at the Howard Youth
Center.
At the Zodiac Recreation Center there will be
many events taking place. From 10-10:30 a.m. and
12:30 to 1 p.m., there will be slide shows on Panama.
From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., there will be a Panamanian
food tasting and sale. From 11 to 11:30 a.m. there will
be a square dancing show by the Panama Canal
"Square Ups." From 12:30 to 1 p.m. there will be a
Panamanian "Pollera" dance, featuring musicians
and native instruments.
At 3 p.m. in the Howard AFB Youth Center, there
will be a recital and performance by students in
dance, gymnastics, and piano.
Ongoing special events from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
the Zodiac Recreation Center include Panamanian
brochures and posters free to military families; a
Panamanian handicraft display, handicraft sale by
MWR, and an arts and crafts frame shop display.








Tropic Times
Nov. 16,1990


Dining facilities welcome



families for Thanksgiving

FORT CLAYTON (41ST ASG) - Sharing a Thanks- HHC, 41st ASG Dining Facility, Building 132,
giving with family members in the dining facility has Fort Clayton, noon-3:30 p.m. single soldiers and their
been a longstanding Army tradition. guests; 1:30-3 p.m. families and guests.
Officers and family members may purchase the HHC, 193d Support Dining Facility, Building 201,
1990 Thanksgiving dinner at the food cost only. The Fort Clayton, 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m. single soldiers and
requirements to pay a holiday meal surcharge are their guests; 1-3:30 p.m. families and guests.
waived. Family members refers to dependent chil- 470th Military Intelligence, Building 009, Corozal,
dren and spouses. Exemptions are not applicable to 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. single soldiers and their guests; 1-
guests of military members or personnel collecting 3:30 p.m. families and guests.
per diem. 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry Dining Facility, Build-
Food S/C ing 019, Fort Davis, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. single soldiers
Cost Cost Total and their guests; 1-3 p.m. families and guests.
Enlisted E-1 - E-9 not 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment Dining
receiving per diem $2.45 N/A $2.45 Facility, Building818,FortKobbe, 11:30a.m.-12:30
Officers not receiving p.m. single soldiers and their guests; 1-2:30 p.m.
per diem $2.45 N/A $2.45 families and guests.
Family members of officers
and enlisted personnel of the 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry (Abn.) Dining Facil-
uniformed services $2.45 N/A $2.45 ity, Building 805, Fort Kobbe, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.
Children under 12-years-old $1.25 N/A $1.25 single soldiers and their guests; 1:30-3 p.m. families
Officers and enlisted and guests.
receiving per diem will pay 92nd PSC Dining Facility, Building 519, Fort
food costs and surcharge $2.45 $3.15 $5.60 Clayton, noon-2 p.m., all personnel.
Guests over 12-years-old $2.45 $3.15 $5.60 1097th Transportation Dining Facility, Building
Guests under 12-years-old $1.25 $1.55 $2.80 18, Fort Davis, 11:30a.m.-12:45 p.m. single soldiers
and guests; 12:45-2:30 p.m. families and guests.
The meal hours for the USARSO dining facilities For furtherinformation call SGM Goffer or MSgt.
are as follows: Flowers at 285-4002.


..^^ -.. -.S
'n ' : tw .'_Z; "" . .."* _ .. .... - . ,: .,'A-"" :":,.-'. 'S.'.


The experienced cancer knows how to make the trip work - lay in the front
of the canoe and drink beverages while the others do the work.


Sailing clubs go canoeing


story and photos'
by Sgt. Phillip D. Clark

CHAGRES RIVER (TropicTimes)
- The chase boat darted up and down
the line of canoes. Two young boys in
a canoe raised their paddles in the air to
get the attention of the boat's driver.
As the driver pulled up alongside the
boys, they asked in mixed Spanish and
English if the driver would tow them
further down the river and give their
arms a rest.
The boys had reason to be tired.
Their day started early and they had
paddled about four miles in 2 1/2 hours.
"I wish there was more of this,"
said Capt. Fred Edwards, U.S. Coast
Guard liaison officer. "I have been
here for four years and this is the first
year people could get out, be friendly
and have a good time together."
Edwards and the boys were part of
a family day on the Chagres River
Sunday sponsored by the Panama Sail-
ing Club.
Since November is the rainiest month


of the year, the club decided to do
something different from sailing yet
related to water activities families could
enjoy, said Jaime Arias, commodore
of the Panama Sailing Club.
To make the day more enjoyable
and improve relations with other clubs,
the Panama Sailing Club joined three
other clubs for the outing - the U.S.
Navy Yacht Club - Panama, Pedro
Miguel Boat Club and Gatun Yacht
Club.
The day started at 7 a.m. with a
meeting at the finishing point - the
Gamboa Recreation Site- before a bus
trip to the canoes.
At the canoes, the group of about
95 gathered around Fred Clark, Fort
Clayton Outdoor Recreation Branch
chief, for a safety briefing.
After the briefing, the group manned
their canoes to start their adventure. A
few experienced canoers took off down
the river, while others worked to get
their canoes in the right direction.
To help keep up with the boaters
and maintain safety, two Jon boats


Tired canoers get a lift from a chase boat helping them further down the
river to finish the trip.


with motors were on hand scooting
around the canoes. Also, the Red Cross
supplied a boat with lifeguards to help
in an emergency.
Some of the canoers gave out along
the way and were towed to the front of
the pack to encourage and help them
finish the trip.
After the canoers made it to the
end, the clubs ate lunch and played
volleyball, horseshoes and frisbee.
The club wants to generate more
interest among the military and is


opening a sailing school soon, Arias
said. Thirty per cent of the Panama
Sailing Club is military members.
The club also schedules its events
in conjunction with the U.S. Navy Yacht
Club - Panama.
"They hold regattas we go to, and
we hold regattas they come to," said
CWO 2 David Bandel, U.S. Navy Yacht
Club - Panama treasurer.
The next event is the Thanksgiving
Regatta Nov. 24, at 9 a.m. at Balboa
Yacht Club. Everyone is invited.


Excercise common sense,
caution when traveling
FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - In
light ofthe increasing incidence of crime and
frequent demonstrations occurring in Pan-
ama City, individuals are reminded to exer-
cise caution and common sense while travel-
ing outside U.S. Department of Defense sites.
The U.S. Army South deputy chief of staff
for intelligence suggests individuals remain
alert to surroundings and anticipate isolated
instances of criminal activity that may affect
U.S. military or civilian personnel in off-post
establishments. These include: restaurants,
fast food chains, sidewalk cafes, movie thea-
ters, open-air markets and other locations fre-
quented by U.S. personnel.

TMO changes office hours

HOWARD AFB (24TH COMPW/PA) -
The Traffic Management Office has new op-
erating hours. The hours are Monday through
Friday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.. Airline tickets
are available for pickup between 8 a.m. and
noon only.
A customer self-service center will start
Monday. It will enable customers to make
travel arrangements without having to speak
to apassengertravel clerk. For more informa-
tion on travel arrangements through TMO,
call 284-3069/4503.


-..; . -.,.,: ...... . , ...,j-J -,- a. , .6 - , , ... .. .,.








Tropic Times
Nov. 16, 1990.


Drinking and driving


can cost career, money


by Sgt Robert Turner
Social Action .Office

HOWARD AFB (24TH COMPW/
PA) - This is the city, Howard AFB.
Alcohol is prevalent and used to a
great extent. On any given night, you
can find the NCO club roaring, the
package store crowded, or a dorm room
buzzing with people using alcohol.
The problem is many times it gets
abused. I know; I work here. I am a
drug and alcohol counselor.
The story you are about to read is
true. The names have been changed to
protect the innocent.
It's March 23, 1989. Bill has been
in the Air Force for 16 years and has
managed to attain the rank of master
sergeant. During his career, he had
been in and out of social actions pro-
grams three times, once at an alcohol
rehabilitation center. The last time he
actually did admit he was an alcoholic
and was working on correcting the
problem.
But after completing the program,
he went back to his old ways.
March 23, Bill is TDY to Offutt
AFB, Neb. He is away from everyone
who knows he is an alcoholic.
"Maybe I can drink again and not
have any problems. If I just drink one
or two, I will be alright," he thinks to
himself.
He didn't stop at one or two. He
went all night until he was too intoxi-
cated to stand, let alone drive. But he
did drive and was stopped at the main
gate by security police for erratic driv-
ing. His troubles had just begun.
He received an Article 15 with the
loss of a stripe. Now he is a technical


sergeant. Eight hundred dollars was
taken from his paycheck over a two-
month pay period. His insurance doubled
and he lost his driving privileges for
one year. He was also processed for
discharge, but the discharge board
showed mercy and decided to retain
him in the Air Force.
He figured up what that night of
drinking cost him in tangible dollar
amounts. It was more than $5,000, and
that is if he gets his stripe back the first
time testing.
Bill's alcoholic problem only ac-
counts for 7 percent of drivers, but
these drivers are responsible for more
than 50 percent of highway deaths. A
larger percentage is made up of those
who don't necessarily have a problem
with alcohol, but don't use proper
planning when they use alcohol.
Drinking alcohol is a privilege.
Driving an autoniobile is also a privi-
lege, and along with any privilege,
comes responsibility. Handling that
responsibility takes proper planning.
If you drink, how are you getting home?
Do you plan to have someone drive?
Do you plan to stay overnight after the
party? Proper planning is the key.
Most people think, "It will never
happen to me." But why not? Your
chances are better than the person who
is not drinking and driving. After one
or two drinks, a person's inhibitions
are broken down enough to. cause
them to do things behind the wheel of
a carthat they wouldn't normally do. It
slows down reaction time, increasing
your chances of becoming involved in
a serious accident. One or two drinks
does not make anyone a better driver.
"I'll drink two cups of hot, black


coffee and splash cold water on my-
self. That will sober me up." Wrong
again. Hot, black coffee and cold wa-
ter makes you a wet, wide awake
drunk. Time is the only thing that will
help sober someone up.
"Beer doesn't have as much alco-
hol as hard liquor so I'll just have a
couple of beers before driving." Re-
member this; a 12-ounce can of beer, a
two-ounce glass of wine, and a shot of
whiskey, contain the same amount of
alcohol. The only difference is volume
of the drink itself.
In the four years I have worked in


social actions, I have seen what com-
manders can do to someone who gets
arrested for DWI. Most persons over-
come the Article 15s, but it slows their
career. Many have been separated,
which is the equivalent of being fired.
I have seen one court-martial for DWI
where a passenger in the driver's car
was injured. That is tough to over-
come.
What I am saying is, a taxi ride,
asking someone who has not been drink-
ing to drive, or leaving your car and
catching a ride with someone is a cheaper
alternative to drinking and driving.


Chinese artist brings wildlife to Clayton


story and photo by Spec. James Yocum

FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) - A monkey
glares from behind the slender artist. You can almost
see a reflection in the animal's glossy eyes.
Beside the monkey perches a majestic eagle, bathed
in a shower of flowers, his beak immaculate and his
feathers gently preened to a gloss.
Xie Da-Jun smiles and thanks the people for
compliments on his work. Not as an animal trainer,
but as an animal painter.
"Art is not the original," the Chinese painter ex-
plained through his interpreter. "It's not a reproduc-
tion of the original. It's better than the original."
The artist will exhibit his art Saturday and Sunday
at Valent Recreation Center.
The prime characters that have made Da-Jun's
paintings famous throughout the Far East are the
wildlife of China; subjects not easy to find, he says.
"In order to find the subjects, I had to go all over
China. It's very difficult to go through China; the
roads are not good. Sometimes I have to walk or
become a mountain climber," he says.
It's been a long road for the artist; one that began
in Sanshui County, Guangdong Province, Peoples
Republic of China.

Da-Jun has been painting animals, and other sub-
jects; since age 7. He became part of the Lim Nan
Artist Group at age 12 and began learning from the
greatest traditional Chinese artist alive - Zhao Shao
Ang.
To the prestigious Lin Nan group, the 41-year-old
painter represents a new age of Chinese art. During
his years as a professional artist, he has been perfect-
ing a blend between modern art and the traditional
style he studied.
Da-Jun came to Panama for an exhibition more
than a year ago. He has made his home here since
then, kept from his homeland by unsettling political
times. Although married, Da-Jun is alone here. His


L V9 *
Xie Da-Jun stands in front of two of his paintings
which will be on display at Valent Recreation
Center.

wife and 15-year-old son have been unable to leave
China.
Da-Jun plans to have his wife and son join him and
move to the United States, where he hopes to find a
market for his painting styles. That's one reason he
agreed to give an exhibition on Fort Clayton. He
wants to see if Americans will buy his paintings.
"I am a famous traditional painter in China, but I
have to introduce my paintings to the whole world,"
he said. "I want to go abroad in other countries
and use my eyes to see the world and my brush to paint
it."
While Da-Jun's comments may sound conceited,
his self-confidence is one reason his paintings are
beautiful, said Zhang Bo Liang, the governor of
Sanshui County.
"He is modest and conceited," Liang said in a book


"Art is not the original. It's not a repro-
duction of the original. It's better than
the original."
Da-Jun

dedicated to Da-Jun's paintings. "He studies from all
the successful men, while he is self-confident in his
paintings ... one should be modest as a man and
conceited as an artist. One will not have his own
painting style if he is not confident in his paintings."
Although he no longer lives in China, Da-Jun can
still paint scenes from his homeland.
"If I see something I want to paint, I remember it.
If I go anywhere, I keep those things in my mind and
I can paint when I get home," he said. "My brain is
like a computer. I see something and I capture it in my
mind. Then I can paint it."

In his most recent exhibition atATLAPA Conven-
tion Center, he demonstrated this ability. A bird
flying past the window became a subject for his art.
The audience was amazed when the bird returned
later and the painting was an almost identical match,
Da-Jun said.
Da-Jun wants to move on and find more subjects
for his paintings. This is one reason he wants to visit
the United States, he explained.
His dream may become a reality, he adds. He
received an offer from a group of New York business-
men to show his paintings in Manhattan. He is just
waiting for paperwork to be approved by U.S. offi-
ciali.
For now, the soldiers and civilians in Panatna can
enjoy his efforts at the Valent Recreation Center.
Even if Da-Jun leaves Panama, he will leave some-
thing for the soldiers of the U.S. Army South to
remember him. He's donating a painting, the majestic
eagle, showered in flowers.


3 Shots ...


. . and a Chaser








1 Tropic Times
A Nov. 16, 1990


Cooking


tips


keep


holiday turkey safe


(AFIS) - Family and friends are just
sitting down to the holiday dinner, and
everything, from the turkey to the
dessert, has to be just right.
By following a few simple guide-
lines, the turkey placed on the table
will be nicely browned and succulent,
instead of underdone or overdone, say
U.S. Department of Agriculture poul-
try experts.
Also, common sense and a little
extra care will ensure a happy holiday
season, the department's experts said.
Otherwise, overlooking basic health
precautions when preparing a turkey
and its accompanying dishes can cause
food poisoning.
Wash anything that touches raw
poultry with soapy water before it's
used again to prevent the spread of any
bacteria. This includes hands, utensils
and kitchen counters.
Picking out a turkey for the meal is
not as simple as it used to be. Now the
decision is whether to buy a fresh,
frozen and stuffed, or precooked bird.
Each type has specific time require-
ments for thawing and cooking.
The department's tips include tem-
peratures to store the birds at and how
long to allow for thawing and cooking.
Buy a fresh turkey and refrigerate
it at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or colder
for no more than one to two days
before cooking. A frozen bird should
stay in the freezer at 0 degrees or
colder until it's time to thaw it. Cook it


as soon as it is thawed, officials say.
Don't keep it in the refrigerator after
thawing.
Thawing a frozen turkey in the re-
frigerator can take from one to five
days, while thawing it in cold water
may take anywhere from four to 12
hours. The length of time and the power
level for thawing the bird in a micro-
wave oven are provided with its in-
struction manual.
After thawing the bird, remove the
neck and giblet package from inside it,
and wash the bird inside and outside
with cold water. Allow it to drain well.
Stuff the turkey loosely just before
cooking, allowing about three-quar-
ters of a cup of stuffing per pound of
bird. The dressing's dry ingredients
may be mixed ahead of time, with the
perishable ones added just before stuff-
ing the bird. As soon as the turkey is
done, remove the dressing.
The turkey's inside temperature
should reach at least 180 degrees Fahr-
enheit, which will cook the dressing.
Directions for cooking times and tem-
peratures are available in basic cook-
books or on the bird's wrapper.
Roasting times vary, depending on
the bird's size and if it's stuffed. A
stuffed bird takes longer to cook. For
example, at 325 degrees Fahrenheit,
an unstuffed, 16-pound turkey takes
from 3 1/2 to 4 1/2 hours to cook,
while a stuffed bird the same size
needs 4 1/2 to 51/2 hours inthe oven.


Refrigerate leftover turkey within
two hours after cooking, Department
of Agriculture experts say. The best
way to store turkey is to divide left-
overs into portions and store in several
containers. Turkey stored in the re-
frigerator will keep for three or four
days, but leftover dressing should be
eaten within two days. Eat frozen left-
over poultry or dressing within a month.
For information locally regarding
food preparation and storage call


Preventive Medicine Service at 285-
5643/5602.
However, the Department of Agri-
culture has atoll-free, year-round hot-
line on how to buy, cook, carve and use
leftoverturkey call 1-800-535-4555.
The hotline is open Monday through
Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Eastern
time. From Nov. 1 through Nov. 30,
the hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and
Thanksgiving Day, the lines will be
answered from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.


Air Force helps Santa meet deadline


(AFIS) - Every year at this time, the post office
delivers thousands of letters to Santa Claus from
children telling him what they want to find under the
tree on Christmas morning.
An Air Force weather detachment in Alaska has
helped Santa answer his mail for more than 20 years.
Located eight miles from North Pole, Alaska, mem-
bers of Detachment 2, 11th Weather Squadron, saw
the North Pole post office was getting more mail for
Santa than it could handle. They decided to step in and
help Santa answer his mail.
"It's become kind of a family affair," said TSgt.
Royce Chapman, Eielson Air Force Base public af-
fairs office. The detachment's members bring in their
spouses, children and friends to help with the more


than 3,000 letters received annually. Night after night,
as letters come in, the detachment works on mail
received that day and readies it for next-day dispatch.
If you know a child who would like to receive a
letter from Santa postmarked from the North Pole,
send the child's letter, the letter you want the child to
receive from Santa and a stamped envelope addressed
to the child to:

Detachment 2
11th Weather Squadron
Eielson AFB, AK 99702-5000
Letters need to reach Eielson before Dec. 10 to
make sure Santa's letter with the North Pole postmark
is delivered in time.


Commissaries offer food for special meals


FORT LEE, Va. (Troop Support
Agency) - Thanksgiving and Christ-
mas are rapidly approaching, instilling
in us a spirit of celebration and invok-
ing an appetite for certain types of food
that are traditionally associated with
the holiday season.
According to U.S. Army Troop
Support Agency officials, this is the
busiest time of the year for Army
commissaries.
Commissaries will stock items for
the cook who prepares from "scratch"
or the host or hostess who wants a
special cut of meat for the holidays.
Turkeys, geese, ducks and Rock
Cornish hens will be plentiful, along
with your favorite stuffing ingredients
or mixes.
For those who want something dif-
ferent, ham or standing ribs of beef are
recommended. And don't forget the
party platters and special cuts of meat
which can be special ordered.


Sweets, appetizers, main course tie-
ins and desserts will be stocked for
your holiday pleasure.
A variety of items will be displayed:
hard candy and striped candy canes for
decorating trees or for use as stocking
fillers; boxed candy dressed in bright,
holiday sleeves and containers; and a
large selection of Christmas cookie


baking ingredients, including differ-
ent colored sugar sprinkles, decors and
spices.
Fresh holiday eggnog, cheese spreads
and special fruitcakes, including all
the necessary ingredients to bake your
own will be available. The party giver
will be able to buy cider mixes, cocoa
and extra large cans of nuts and vari-


ous dried fruits. Look for holiday fruit
and fresh cranberries, pumpkins, squash
and mixed nuts.
Paper plates, cups and napkins with
a holiday motif, candles, economy packs
of batteries, plus flowers and greenery
such as Indian corn, mistletoe and
poinsettias will also be sold.
Customers will also notice special
prices on some of their favorite holi-
day items during November's "Thanks-
giving Sale" and December's "Happy
Holidays" sale. Use a coupon to buy a
sale item and reap even greater sav-
ings. November will also mark the
beginning of a promotion to benefit
Special Olympics, providing savings
to customers and donations to the or-
ganization.
Shop early; commissaries are ex-
pected to be crowded with customers.
Commissary management can help you
determine the best time to shop when
the commissary isn't so busy.


I �








Tropic Times 11
Nov. 16,1990--


Thanksgiving regatta set


Sailboat "Hot Fudgle" in the heat of competi-
tion. Skipper/owner is Lt. Col. John P. Stoble.
(photo courtesy of U.S. Navy Yacht Club-Pan-
ama)


(U.S. Navy Yacht Club-Panama) - The U.S. Navy
Yacht Club-Panama will participate in a Thanksgiv-
ing Interclub Regatta, sponsored by Balboa Yacht
Club Nov. 24. Racing competition will include Catal-
ina 22s, catamarans, and open (no vessels less than 10
feet in length) classes. This will be an open water race
along the canal and in the inner Bay of Panama.
Handicapping will be used and spinnakers are permit-
ted.
Skippers' meeting is at 9 a.m. The race starts at 10
a.m. from the U.S. Naval Station Panama Canal,
Rodman.
Spectators can view the first race start from the
Rodman Marina. Intermediate viewpoints for the first
race include the Scenic Lookout at the Bridge of the
Americas and the Farfan Lighthouse.
The first race finish will be the second race start,
which can be viewed from Farfan Beach, Balboa
Yacht Club, or the Amador Causeway. The second
race finish will be near Flamenco Island.
The third race will begin where the second race
ends and terminate at the Balboa Yacht Club. This


race can be viewed from the Amador Causeway and
Balboa Yacht Club;
The Amador Causeway and Farfan Beach will also
be excellent areas to view the finish of the first race
and subsequent races.
An awards ceremony will be held at the Balboa
Yacht Club Nov. 27 at 7 p.m. Dinner will be pay-as-
you-go.
Registration will be at the Balboa Yacht Club, For
more information, contact 228-5446. An entry fee
will be charged, with a discounted fee for early regis-
tration (prior to close of business Monday).

Anyone wishing to join the fun is invited: no
experience required. the U.S. Navy Yacht Club is
opento members and dependents oftheU.S. military,
civilian component, and U.S. citizen employees of
the Panama Canal Commission.
Club meetings are held the first and third Thursday
of each month at the Soloy Balseriain Cocoli and the
Marco Polo Restaurant in Balboa respectively, at
6:30 p.m. The next meeting will be Dec. 6.


Dinner theater comes to Fort Davis


by Spec. Daniel L. Bean

FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO
ATLANTIC) - A glass of fine wine,
tuxedo with tails, top hat and cane,
dining and after-dinner theater- this is
off-Broadway at its best.
Althoughit was way off-Broadway
and less formal, therecent dinnerthea-
ter production of "Sorry, Wrong
Number" by Atlantic Music and Thea-
ter and the Fort Davis Community
Club, was as enjoyable and successful
for the Atlantic community as any big
city production.


"It's been this way every night,"
said Andrew Lim, Atlantic Music and
Theatre director, while double check-
ing the stage lights in the packed din-
ing room. "We've had a full house
every night and had to setup additional
tables for people who didn't have res-
ervations."

The evening began with a buffet-
style dinner prepared by the club staff.
Diners enjoyed roast beef, glazed car-
rots, potatoes with gravy, rolls, salad
bar and orange sherbet for dessert.
Following dinner, the house lights


dimmed and the spotlight focused on
center stage. The 45-minute one-act
comedy is set in the New York City
bedroom of Mrs. Stevenson, portrayed
by Cythia Furtado, a bedridden woman
who relies entirely on her phone for
security and comfort while her hus-
band is away.
"We're going to do dinner theatre
again," said Lim. "We have an great
location and the interest is there."

The next scheduled production is a
Christmas Pageant and tree lighting
Dec. 19.


AF Sergeants Association seeks members


CMSgt. Michael R. Heath
24th Composite Wing
senior enlisted advisor

HOWARD AFB (24TH COMPW/
PA) - As our world and our Air Force
change around us, our rights and enti-
tlements are increasingly important to
our lives. We need the kind of support
the Air Force Sergeants Association
provides.
Through the continual lobbying ef-
forts of the AFSA, we have gained
legislative victories such as basic al-


lowance for subsistence, and increased
funding that has helped improve the
quality of base housing and dormito-
ries. AFSA has also been helping those
in need in our communities for years
and is taking care of our future with
scholarships for our dependents and a
post-military employment program for
our career changes. Yes, during these
times of budget constraints, most ev-
eryoneis taking hits, but AFSA unifies
the enlisted voices presenting our needs
to Congress and helping take care of
our own.


I stand behind Chief Master Ser-
geant of the Air Force Gary R. Pfing-
ston who says, "Support your profes-
sional association by being informed
and taking the time to care about the
'people behind the stripes.' "The larger
AFSA's membership, the more we can
do on Capitol Hill and in our commu-
nities. I urge you, as enlisted members,
to help strengthen the "Voice of the
Enlisted" by joining AFSA during its
1991 membership drive. AFSA is our
association. Together, we can take care
of our own.


Mayors' Corner


EDITOR'S NOTE: AS A SERVICE TO THE
COMMUNITY THE TROPIC TIMES OFFERS THIS
COLUMN TO ALLOW COMMUNITY MEMBERS
TO WRITE IN AND HAVE THEIR QUESTIONS
RESEARCHED AND ANSWERED BY USARSO'S
MAYORAL CONGRESS. QUESTIONS AND
PROBLEMS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO:
GARRISON COMMANDER - PACIFIC, ATTN:
SOCO-CR, BUILDING 519, FORT CLAYTON AND
SHOULD BE SENT THROUGH MPS. BE SURE
TO INCLUDE YOUR NAME, UNIT/QTRS NUM-
BER, PHONE NUMBERANDSIGNATURE. ANO-
NYMITY WILL BE GRANTED TO THOSE DE-
SIRING IT. LETTERS SELECTED FOR PUBLI-
CATION WILL BE THOSE WITH THE WIDEST
INTEREST TO OUR READING AUDIENCE.
ZELMIRA SINCLAIR-SNYDER, PUBLICITY
CHAIRPERSON, 500 AREA MAYOR.


DEAR MAYOR:
I have a daughter who just turned 17 and is dying
to get her driver's license like kids her age arriving
from the states. Unfortunately, things are different in
Panama and you can't get a license at the age of 16.
This seems unfair, but that's the way it goes. My real
concern is that I have heard there is a way to get a
"Cinderella license" but have no idea how to get it.
There must be a way to get a high school senior a


driver's permit without having to go back to the
states! Help!
Harrassed Mom, Clayton

DEAR HARASSED MOM:
Good news! It can be done. The "Cinderella
license" you refer to is a driver's permit that allows a
dependent to operate a vehicle from 6 a.m. until 9
p.m. Here are the requirements and items needed at
the licensing office to get the license:
1. Must be at least 17 years of age.
2. Copy of birth certificate.
3. Bilingual ID card.
4. A blood test and results.
5. A letter, with the school stamp/seal, from Balboa
High School stating that applicant is a student there.
6. Aletterfrom your sponsor giving permission to get
your permit and that sponsor assumes responsibility
and liability for your actions while operating a ve-
hicle.
7. Your sponsor needs to be present.
8. $5.50 to pay for the permit.
9. a. Either a Driver's Education certification card
andpaperworkindicating results ofa hearing and eye
exam.
b. Or if you didn't take driver's education, you
have to take a driving exam which is conducted at
Albrook Field (Panamanian side). Exams are given
only Friday mornings for new people. Go to the


window on the right with hardly anyone standing in
it. The long lines on the left are for those renewing
theirlicenses.
10. Know your blood type.
LOCATION OF LICENSING OFFICE: second
floor of Diablo Heights building, adjacent to the 24-
Hour store. Hours are 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday. The permit is restricted to the hours of
6 a.m.-9 p.m. Itis only good for six months; after that
a valid driver's license may be obtained.
Zelmira Snyder,
Publicity Committee,
500 Area Clayton Mayor

DEAR MAYOR:
How much should I tip the bagger who carries my
groceries out at the commissary?
Just Asking, Kobbe

DEAR JUST ASKING:
The baggers at the commissary are not govern-
ment employees. They work strictly for tips. Al-
though there is no formula for tipping, most patrons
tip somewhere between 25 cents (15 items or less
line) to $1 per grocery cart. The amount is strictly up
to you and depends on the courtesy, efficiency and
service of the bagger, and your willingness to pay.
Olda Genreau,
800 Area Clayton Vice Mayor


Postal Service sets
mailing dates
Members wanting to send
mail to the United States for
Christmas must send priority and
parcel airlift mail by Dec. 7,
letters by Dec. 10, fourth class
mail by Dec. 1. For more infor-
mation contact your local post
office.

Food drive' needs
your support
The Alpha Phi AlphaFrater-
nity is sponsoring a Thanksgiv-
ing Food Drive for soldiers and
families in our military com-
munity.
The drive 'will run through
Tuesday and drop points for
canned and packaged food items
are: the Corozal Commissary,
Corozal Main Exchange, Al-
brook Shoppette, Clayton-Build-
ing 95, Howard Commissary and
Howard Base Exchange.
The drive is to support the
ACS Food Locker during the
Thanksgiving period. Your
support is needed to make this a
memorable Thanksgiving for all
military parties.









2 Tropic Times
Nov. 16, 1990


Not


ALBROOK


Swimming pool
The Albrook swimming pool
offers the following classes:
- Water aerobics for men and
women 5:30-6:30 p.m.
- Free introduction to scuba 6-9
p.m.
- Open water scuba 6-10 p.m.
- Advanced open water scuba 6-10
p.m.
Rescue, dive master and specialty
courses are also available.
All classes are Monday through
Friday.
A qualified instructor is needed to
teach mom and tots swimming
classes for ages 12 and up.
For more information, call the
Albrook Swimming Pool at 286-
3555, or the Zodiac Recreation
Center at 284-6161.

Sports & Fitness
The Howard and Albrook SFCs
are offering aerobics classes. Howard
classes begin 4:45 p.m., Monday
through Friday; Albrook classes are
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
and begin at 5 p.m. A fee is charged.
For more information, call 286-3307
or 284-3451.
Howard SFC locker reservations
are now being accepted on a first-
come-first-served basis. Gym
renovation is scheduled for
completion sometime this month or
next month, and reservations are
currently being accepted; subsequent
requests will be placed on a waiting
list. For more information, call
284-3451.

Youth centers

Today - A youth bowling pizza
party will be held at the Howard
Bowling Center 3-6:30 p.m. The fee is
$3.75 for members and $4.75 for non-
members. The fee includes two
games, two slices of pizza, small
soda, shoes, transportation and
supervision. Other programs at the
Howard/Albrook youth centers
include:


- Panamanian folklore dancing
lessons for ages 6-18
-Puppeteering for all ages
- Spanish classes for ages 6-18
-Tumbling and beginners
gymnastics
- Family aerobics classes
Monday, Wednesday and Friday,
noon-1 p.m.
- Modern, jazz and tap dance
classes
- Tennis classes for all ages
Because coaching is as demanding
as it is rewarding, we urge you to take
advantage of the many volunteer
coaching positions the Howard and
Albrook Youth Centers have
available. Applications are now
being accepted for the upcoming
boys baseball/girls softball
programs, scheduled to start Jan. 12.
For more information, call 284-4700
or 286-3195.

Bowling centers
Bowling Center leagues are now
open. Available leagues include mens
and women; singles; mixed doubles;
mixed adult; mixed youth; and
seniors. For more information on
league schedules and times,contact
Dick Shingary at 284-4818.

ATLANTIC


Volunteers needed
Volunteers are needed to work for
the Army Community Services-
Atlantic. Volunteers are needed for
many programs and child care is
provided. For more information call
Michelle Moosey at 289-4091.

Sundial activities
The Sundial Recreation Center,
Building 42, Fort Davis, is offering
the following tours and trips during
November. For more information
and reservations call the center at
289-3300/3889.
Panama City night tour, 7 pm.-
midnight Saturday.
Taboga Island beach trip, 6 a.m.-5
p.m. Sunday.
Panama City shopping tour, 8
a.m.-5 p.m. Nov. 24.


Gold panning trip, 7 a.m.-5 p.m.
Nov. 24.
Isla Grande beach trip, 8 a.m.-5
p.m. Nov. 25.
Two new classes, health food
cooking and Belgian/French
cooking, will be offered at the center
in December. Dates and times will be
determined by interest and
reservations.
The center also offers classes
including: Tang So Do karate, cake
decorating, folkloric dancing,
English, Spanish, Panamanian
cooking, piano lessons and Lapidary
classes. Call for details.
Graduate class
The University of Oklahoma is
interested in offering a graduate
level course in Political Science at the
Atlantic Education Center, second
floor, Building 32, Fort Davis.
Projected class dates are Feb. 10-
16 at 5-9 p.m. Monday-Friday, 9
a.m.-noon Saturdays and 8:30 a.m.-
3:30 p.m. Sunday. For more
information and applications, call or
stop by the center at 289-3308/3417.

Gruelthon
Ocean Breeze Community
Recreation Center, Fort Sherman,
will hold a Gruelthon, 11-mile fun
run, 7 a.m. Nov. 24. Registrations
begin at 6:30 a.m. and a fee will be
charged. For more information call
Mr. Bringas at 289-6402/6699.

Davis Club
The Fort Davis Community Club,
Building 87, is offering the following
specials:
An "all-you-can-eat" family
dinner buffet, 6-9 p.m. every
Wednesday.
Thursday night dinner special
featuring cuisine from around the
world, such as Mexican, Italian,
Oriental, etc. , 6-9 p.m. Thursday.
Pre-Thanksgiving brunch, 10:30
a.m.-l:30 p.m. Sunday.
For more information and
reservations call 289-5160/3298.


Youth Center
Atlantic Youth Services will hold
the following activities during
November at the Fort Espinar Youth
Center, Building 219. For more-
information and reservations call
289-4472/4605.
Teen dance (ages 13-19), 6 p.m.
today.
Turkey trot parent/child run, 9
a.m. Saturday.
Turkey special luncheon, noon
Wednesday.
Teen beach trip to Palmar Beach, 8
a.m. Nov. 24.
Domino tournament (ages 6-19), 3
p.m. Nov. 28.
Monthly birthday celebration, 6
p.m. Nov. 30.
Arts and crafts (ages 6-12), 3 p.m.
every Thursday.


CLAYTON

Valent Center
The following activities will be
held at Valent Recreation Center,
Building 53, Fort Clayton. Classes
require pre-registration. All tours
require advance reservation; for
information call Carmen Emiliani.
CHINESE ART EXHIBIT -
"Nature's Heavenly Song" by Xie Da
Jun, will be exhibited at the center.
Opening ceremony will be today at 7
p.m. Paintings can be viewed 11
a.m.-8 p.m., Saturday and Sunday.
THANKSGIVING - Thanks-
giving day, Valent. will be open 9
a.m.-9:45 p.m., and will feature
plenty of games, refreshments,
tournaments and fun activities.
JEWELRY SHOW - A jewelry
show and sale will be held Friday 5-8
p.m. Event includes special designs
that can be ordered.
CLASSES - Introductory and
intermediate computer courses are
held on a regular basis. The two week
course meets Monday through
Friday evenings.
A four week basic modeling course
will begin Saturday 1-3 p.m. Class
includes make-up and walking
techniques. In addition, dance
aerobics begin at 5:30 p.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Thursday. The four-
week class includes ballet and salsa
techniques, weights and jump rope
use.
Guitar lessons begin Dec. 4. The
monthly course is taught between
6:30 and '9 p.m. Tuesday or
Thursday.
Beginners Spanish is an ongoing
class at the center. Instruction is
available from 6-7 p.m., Monday and
Wednesday or Tuesday and
Thursday.
A class on making greeting cards
with parchment paper will begin
Dec. 3. Group will meet at 6 p.m.
twice weekly to learn the special
techniques.

Arts & crafts
The Fort Clayton Arts & Crafts
Center, located in Building 180, has a
wood shop, photography lab, frame
shop, pottery area, an art gallery, and
b an area for multiple crafts. A wide
variety of instructional sessions are
available for skill development. Call
287-4369.
For persons interested in getting
started in wood work, step by step
guidance is available by
appointment. Sessions range from
cabinet making, refinishing, machine
use to project planning. Contact
LaRue AveLallemant.
In the photography area, classes


) J









Tropic Times
Nov. 1.6, 1990


include film developing, enlarging
and printing. Both lack and white
and color photography are taught.

Turkey Bowl '90
GO ARMY!
Saturday - Army Pep Rally
7 p.m. - Street Dance
Hawkins Avenue, Fort Clayton
DJs/Refreshments

Wednesday - TURKEY BOWL
6:30 p.m. - Pre-game festivities
7 p.m. - Championship game
Balboa Stadium

Tickets: Adults $5 -Children $2

Tickets purchased for the play-off
games also allow entrance to the
Championship game.













Outdoor Center
A San Blas snorkel and dive trip
will be conducted Dec. 1-2.
.Participants will experience the
Cuna indian culture, lodge in rustic
style hotel and eat typical foods. Fee
includes air fare, hotel, meals and
boat services. Reservations will
continue at Building 154, Fort
Clayton,through Nov. 28.
A boater safety licensing class will
be held Nov. 24 at the large bohio in
Fort Clayton Park. Registration is at
Building 154, Fort Clayton, and ends
Wednesday. For more information,
call Lee Groce at 287-3363.

Ceramics Center
A Ceramics Center is located in
Building 155, Fort Clayton. Pouring
and basic painting are regular
classes. In addition, the center offers
various techniques and clay flower
making sessions. Call 287-4360.

Youth Center
The Fort Clayton Youth Center,
Building 155, Fort Clayton, will offer
the following activities. For
information call Benny Boza at
287-6451.
BIRTHDAYS - November
birthdays will be celebrated with a
Turkey Pinata Bash today.
TRIP - Reservations are being
accepted for an early Christmas
shopping tour Friday. Participants
will visit the Via Espana area and eat
lunch at a local restaurant.
PET SHOW - Youths are invited
to enter the pet show Nov. 24. The
show begins at 2:30 p.m. and includes
categories ranging from longest tail
to shortest ears. Prizes will be
awarded. Pre-re'gistration is
required; with a small fee.

CURUNDU

Theatre Arts Center
The Pacific Theatre Arts Center,
Building 2060, Curundu, offers a
variety of classes under the
supervision of qualified, professional
instructors. For information call
Barbara Berger at 286-3152.


CLASSES - A ballet program
features Ballet I for beginners, taught
by Graciela Newsam. Three
subsequent levels are conducted by
Beth Story. Sessions meet twice
weekly, featuring convenient
afternoon hours.
Also available is tap dance by
Janet Jones, held monthly on a first-
come, first-served basis.
PLAY - Final performances of
the production "Love Letters" will be
presented today and Saturday at the
center. Curtain time is 8 p.m. Call
286-3814 for reservations.

HOWARD


Zodiac Center
TRIPS - Today - Japanese
dining 6:30-9 p.m.
Tomorrow - Portobelo and
Langosta Beach 7 a.m.-4 p.m.
Monday - Air Force Band,
Howard Theater 6:30-9 p.m.
Wednesday-Nov. 25
Thanksgiving at Chiriqui Nov. 27
Christmas shopping on Central
Avenue 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
Nov. 30 -Panamanian dining 6:30-
9:30 p.m.
All tours depart from the Howard
Base Theater. A fee is charged. For
more information, call
284-6161/6109.
TOURNEYS - Saturday - Eight-
ball pool tournament, 4-8 p.m.
Nov. 24 - Ping-Pong tournament,
4-8 p.m.
CLASSES - Monday - Beginner
Spanish Monday and Wednesdays,
5-6:30 p.m. Class lasts four weeks.
Monday - Four-week intermediate
Spanish class, 6:30-8 p.m., Tuesday
and Thursday.
Tuesday - Beginner English
Tuesday and Thursdays, 5-6:30 p.m.
Intermediate English, 6:30-8 p.m.
WEEKLY CLASSES -
Lunchtime aerobics Monday,
Wednesday and Friday, 11:30 a.m.-
12:15 p.m.
- Piano lessons on an
appointment basis Tuesday,
Thursday, and Saturday.
-, Tae Kwon Do classes Monday,
Wednesday and Friday, 6-7:30 p.m.
- Shotokan class Tuesday and
Thursday, 6-7:30 p.m.
INSTRUCTOR NEEDED -
Martial arts instructor needed for
Tang-Soo-Do. For more infor-
mation, call 284-6161/6109.
All active-duty and retired
military, DoD civilians and family
members can participate. A fee is
charged. For details, call
284-6161/6109.

Outdoor Center
TRIPS - Saturday - Peacock
bass fishing trip to Arenosa. 5 a.m.-2
p.m.
Sunday - Fresh and salt water
scuba trip 6 a.m.-6 p.m.
Tuesday - Gold panning to Las
Cumbres. 8 a.m.-3 p.m.
Nov. 24 - Snorkeling trip to Isla
Mamey. 7 a.m.-6 p.m.
Nov. 25 -Hiking trip to El Valle


waterfall. 7 a.m.-6 p.m.
Nov. 27 - Jungle photography
adventure. 7 a.m.-6 p.m.
Nov. 28 - Peacock bass fishing to
Arenosa. 5 a.m.-2 p.m.
All trips depart from the Howard
Base Theater. A fee is charged. For
more information, call
284-6161/6109.

Arts & Crafts

Tuesday - Brushstrokes in four
weeks, 2-4 p.m.
Wednesday - Wheel throwing in
six weeks, 3-5 p.m.
Friday - Pouring class in Spanish,
2-4 p.m.
Nov. 27 -Drybrush in four weeks,
2-3 p.m.
Nov. 28 - Video: "The Liner," 7-
7:30 p.m.
Nov. 29 - Video: "The Shader,"
7-7:30 p.m.
Nov. 30 - Fifty percent off firing
fee, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
These activities will take place in
Building 711 at Howard. For more
information, call 284-6361.

Respite program

The Howard Child Development
Center is offering a Respite Care
Program for military members with
exceptional family members. Care is
available every Saturday, 8:30 a.m.-
5:30 p.m., for children enrolled. This
gives parents an opportunity to shop,
do errands or relax while their child
enjoys quality playtime in a well-
supervised, safe environment.
Reservations must be made no later
than 5:30 p.m., Thursdays, to ensure
child-to-teacher ratios can be
maintained. For more information,
call 284-6135.

NAVY

MWR notes
The U.S. Naval Station Panama
Canal offers the following MWR
activities. For more information and
to make reservations, call 283-5307.
TRAP RANGE - Visit our naval
station trap range! Revised hours
are: Thursdays and Fridays -4 p.m.-
dusk. Saturday, Sundays and
holidays - 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Arms
rentals are free.
PANAMA CITY TOUR -
(Saturday) Let's tour Old Panama,
Las Bovedas and other historic
places. We'll stop for lunch. The bus
leaves the naval station at 8 a.m. and
will return at 2 p.m.
FISHING TRIP - (Saturday)
Trolling in the Pacific Ocean. Leave
the NAVSTA marina at 7 a.m. and
return at 3 p.m.
EL VALLE/BEACH TOUR -
(Sunday) We will leave the naval
station at 7 a.m. and travel to El Valle
de Anton where you will be able to
shop until noon. The trip will then
continue to Coronado Gaviota
Resort where you can swim and
enjoy the beach until 4 p.m. Price
includes lunch.


PAN FOR GOLD ON THE
SALAMANCA BOQUERON RIVER
Strike it Rich! on this exciting Gold Panning Expedition to the
Salamanca Boqueron River. This river is a proven Gold-
producer, "we guarantee it". Plan on getting wet and lots of fun!
We provide use of gold pans, panning instructions and trans-
portation. You provide lunch, change of clothing, toiletries,
and don't forget your suntan lotion. Bus leaves Howard Theater
1' / at 7 a.m. and returns at 3 p.m. Cost: $14 per person
.M For more info contact Zodiac Rec Ctr at 284-6161/6109


THANKSGIVING TRIP -
(Thursday-Nov. 25) Spend
Thanksgiving at Boquete. Enjoy
your Thanksgiving dinner and party
at your hotel, the Panamonte Hotel.
Tours will be to Volcan Baru, the city
of David, Bambito, Cerro Punta and
a coffee plantation.
5K TURKEY CHALLENGE -
NAVSTA MWR will be hosting a
5k run to be held Thanksgiving
morning. Race time will be 7 a.m.
and race day registration will be held
6-6:45 a.m. There is a $5 entry fee and
all runners will receive T-shirts. Call
283-4222 now to pre-register and join
the fun Thanksgiving Day.
OPEN BASKETBALL -
NAVSTA MWR will be hosting a
two-day Open Basketball
Tournament-this weekend. Double
elimination, awards for the two top
finishers. All games are to be held at
the NAVSTA Rodman Gym. Call
283-4222 for more information.
NAVY ITT - The Navy MWR
Information Tours & Travel office is
now located at Building 655 next to
the marina. Our new schedule is 10
a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Friday and 9
a.m.-l p.m. Saturday. For further
information call 283-5307.
EDUCATION COUNSELOR -
Eva Lindberg, our education
counselor, is able to help you with
identifying earned college credits,
external degree programs, exams
and tuition assistance. Stop by any
Monday-Thursday 11 a.m.-3 p.m. or
call for an appointment.

Family Services
The Navy Family Service Center is
located in Building 40. For more
information, call 283-5748/5749.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED! -
We need an information & referral
specialist and a Welcome Baby
Program manager and clerk
typist/receptionist. No experience
required. Gain valuable work
experience and training while setting
your own hours. If you are
independent and enjoy working with
people this is the right place for you!

SPOUSE EMPLOYMENT - If
you are new to the community, or if
you have been here awhile and are
just now deciding to join the work
force, the Spouse Employment
Assistance Program is designed
especially for you. Military spouses
and family members can receive
assistance at the Family Service
Center Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10
a.m.-l p.m, or call for an
appointment.
WHY WEIGHT -Service-
members, their dependents and DoD
employees are invited to attend
weight loss meetings to be held
Monday at 6 p.m. Weigh-ins,
lectures, and a food exchange
program will be included. Take
advantage of this group support!
WELCOME BABY PROGRAM
- If you and your spouse are
expecting your first child, and you
are E-5 or below, you may be eligible
to participate in our Welcome Baby
Program. As a participant you will
receive a beautiful baby basket,
support services and more. Please
call us for more information.
RED CROSS COURSE - NFSC
and the Red Cross will be offering a
free 16-hour course with
certification, for all DoD
dependents, civilians, active duty
personnel and their spouses.
Reservations required no later than
Wednesday. Call us for more
information.
continued on page 14


ces


13










Tropic Times
Nov. 16, 1990


Notices


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
- AA meetings on the west bank are
now being held at our center
Tuesday and Thursdays, 11:30 a.m.
and Saturdays 8 p.m. Give AA -and
yourself - a chance. It works!!
Chaplain on board
A full-time, active-duty Navy
chaplain has reported to the naval
station. Chaplain (Lt.) Bill Wildhack
is conducting Sunday services,
providing counseling and developing
the command's religious program.
For information or assistance, call
283-4148.


Cocoli Library
The Cocoli Library, located in
Building 2553, is now open 1-4 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays. Patrons
may reserve and request books
through inter-library loans.

Crossroads movie
The Crossroads Bible Church will
present "A Man Called Norman"
Sunday at 6 p.m. The movie will be,
held at Crossroads Bible Church at
Corozal. For more information, call
252-6480.


POTPOURRI Christmas bazaar


Women's Aglow meet
Women's Aglow will hold a
meeting at PCC Training Center
(near Balboa Train Station)
Saturday at 9 a.m.
The guest speaker is Cilinia Prada
who was crowned Miss Panama and
Miss Asia Pacific as Panama's
representative. For information, call
Linda Dany at 252-6095.

FSU meeting
The FSU Alumni Association
invites all alumni to a happy hour at
the Fort Amador Officers' Club Nov.
30, 6:30-8-30 p.m. The $7 fee covers
admission and hors d'oeuvres.
Elections for association officers will
be conducted. Call 286-4470 for
reservations -before Nov. 26. Help
spread the word among fellow
alumni and participate in making
this a worthwhile association!.

Review council
The USARSO Disabled &
Handicapped Review Council
monitors affirmative actions and
hiring of disabled and handicapped
people. For information, call Rick
Medina, 287-4260.


The Inter-American Women's
Club will hold a Christmas Bazaar 10
a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday at the
ATLAPA Convention Center. For-
information, call 252-1213. An
admission fee will be charged.

Bake sale
The Curundu community will hold
a Patio Bake Sale Saturday 8 a.m.-
noon in the parking lot opposite the
bowling alley. To enter a table, call
Inez Clark at 286-4298.
Protestant lunch
The Protestant Women of Clayton
Chapel will hold an organizational
luncheon Nov. 29 at 9:30 a.m. at the
Amador Officers' Club. Child care
will be provided. Reservations are
due by Nov. 26. For child care, call
Glenys Ruff at 287-6887.

Have puppies?
The Howard Vet Clinic is now
conducting this very successful
program of finding adoptive parents
for your available puppies. If you
have available puppies, call Linda
Day at the Howard Vet Clinic
Tuesday or Thursdays 10:30 a.m.-
2:30 p.m.


Cocoli meeting
The Coccoli community will hold
a meeting Nov. 28, 7-8 p.m., at the
Coccoli Chapel. The meeting will be
for mayoral elections.

AF bowling events
TDY BOWLING DAY - Meet
the very special TDY crowd during
the Howard/Albrook TDY bowling
day Saturday. All TDY personnel
that show up at bowling centers will
play for 75 cents a game! For
information, call 284-4818 or
286-4260.
"KING OF THE HILL"
TOURNAMENT - A "King of the
Hill" tournament will be held at the
Howard and Albrook bowling
centers, Dec. 3 and Nov. 25
respectively. Both the Howard and
Albrook events will start at 2 p.m.
For information, call 284-4818 or
286-4260.
"NOVEMBER LUNCH TIME
SPECIAL" - A 25 cents lunch time
bowling special will take place
throughout the month of November
at the Howard and Albrook Bowling
Centers 11 a.m.-I p.m.

OWC lunch
The Quarry Heights OWC will
hold their November luncheon at the
Quarry Heights Officers' Club
Wednesday. The theme is
"Panamanian Day!" To make
reservations, call 282-3091.

Special brunch
The 41st Area Support Group
serves a special brunch meal every
Sunday 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. All
personnel are invited to the brunch.
For more information, call SFC
Betts at 287-4811.

JROTC events
Saturday there will be two JROTC
sponsored events, the turkey shoot
and a car wash. Both will be held at
Balboa High School 8 a.m.-3 p.m.
The Turkey Shoot will be held in
Room 401 and the price per ticket
will be $2 for each team (team will
consist of two people). The car wash
tickets will be priced $2 and $3. For
more information, call SFC Puryear
at 252-3520.

Spanish class
The Fort Kobbe Education Center
will hold a Headstart Spanish Class
Monday-Tuesday 9 a.m.-I p.m. at
Building 801, Fort Kobbe. For more
information, call Kimberly Johnson
at 284-3150.


Auto cross
The Isthmian Four Wheeler
Club invites you and your family
to our annual Fun Mud Rodeo
Sunday at 10 a.m. in the new
Albrook Mud Track. Tickets are
$2 per person. Practice will be
Saturday.


CPO classes


The Department of Civilian
Personnel, Training and Develop-
ment Division, Building 6523,
Corozal, is offering the following
courses during December:
ABSENTEEISM AND DIS-
CIPLINE - Dec. 3-4, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
and Dec. 5, 8 a.m.-noon. The course
highlights the need for line
supervisors to assure employees
understand and observe the rules for
attendance. Provides know-how in
administering leave, controlling the
use of and abuse of annual and sick
leave, recognizing employee rights
and privileges, and labor relations.
Course is designed for managers,
supervisors and other officials.
MANAGING THE POOR
EMPLOYEE - Dec. 5, noon-4 p.m.
and Dec. 6-7, 8 a.m.-noon. The
course is designed to enable
participants to identify and evaluate
strategies for dealing with
performance problems, to include
determining causes and selecting
alternative solutions. Workshop is
open to those who have
responsibility for the analysis of
performance problems, such as
supervisors, managers, and those
involved with human performance in
organizations.
DEVELOPING MANAGERIAL
SKILLS FOR SUPERVISORS -
Dec. 10-14, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. The course
is designed to provide supervisors
with tools to improve their
leadership, human relations and
management skills. Topics include:
making the vision work,
understanding, valuing and
managing diversity, leadership
strategies, and synergy at work. This
course is designed for managers and
supervisors.


DoDDS' Corner


B^' , ^L __
PARENT INVOLVEMENT - Balboa Elementary School's Parent Involvement program involves many
parents in varied activities. First grader Jordana Fasano is on her way to becoming a "Super Reader" as
she gets practice reading with the guidance of parent volunteer, Victoria Nightingale.


GOOD BEHAVIOR - Howard Elementary
School students from Gilbert Murillo's bus
(Route R11) celebrate "Good Bus Behavior"
with an ice cream party and certificates
awarded by bus monitor, Ernesto Cox.
(photos by DoDDS)


14


Thanksgiving Worship Services
Howard AFB Chapel
7 p.m. Tuesday Ecumenical Thanksgiving Service
Albrook AFS Chapel
9 a.m. Thursday Thanksgiving Day Mass
Fort Davis Chapel
8 a.m. Thursday Thanksgiving Day Mass
7 p.m. Thursday Community Thanksgiving Service
Fort Amador Chapel
9 a.m. Thursday Thanksgiving Day Mass
Fort Clayton Chapel
9:30 a.m. Thursday Thanksgiving Day Mass
10:30 a.m. Thursday Community Thanksgiving Service
For additional information contact the listed chapel.


I - L I


EI










* Movies


Tropic Times g
Nov. 16, 1990 k.)


Howard Theater

Today
7 p.m. THE WITCHES (PG) Anjelica Huston
9 p.m. EVERYBODY WINS (R) Nick Nolte
Saturday
2 p.m. YOUNG GUNS II (PG-13) Emilio Estevez
6:30 and 8:30 p.m. DESPERATE HOURS (R) Mickey
Rourke
10:45 p.m. STATE OF GRACE (R) Sean Penn

Sunday
2 p.m. YOUNG GUNS II (PG-13) Emilio Estevez
6:30 and 8:30 p.m. DESPERATE HOURS (R) Mickey
Rourke
Monday
7 p.m. PUMP UP THE VOLUME (R) Christian Slater
9 p.m. YOUNG GUNS II (PG-13) Emilio Estevez
Tuesday
7 p.m. PUMP UP THE VOLUME (R) Christian Slater
9 p.m. YOUNG GUNS II (PG-13) Emilio Estevez
Wednesday
7 p.m. STATE OF GRACE (R) Sean Penn
9 p.m. BACK TO THE FUTURE III (PG) Michael J.
Fox
Thursday
7 p.m. STATE OF GRACE (R) Sean Penn
9 p.m. BACK TO THE FUTURE III (PG) Michael J.
Fox

Clayton Theater

Today
7 p.m. GREMLINS II: THE NEW BATCH (PG-13)
Phoebe Cates
9 p.m. MY BLUE HEAVEN (PG-13) Steve Martin
Saturday
2 p.m. THE WITCHES (PG) Anjelica Huston
6:30 and 8:30 p.m. DARKMAN (R) Liam Neeson
10:30 p.m. DIE HARD II (R) Bruce Willis
Sunday
2 p.m. THE WITCHES (PG) Anjelica Huston
6:30 and 8:30 p.m. DARKMAN (R) Liam Huston
Monday
7 p.m. DARKMAN (R) Liam Neeson
9 p.m. DIE HARD II (R) Bruce Willis
Tuesday
7 p.m. DARKMAN (R) Liam Neeson
9 p.m. DIE HARD II (R) Bruce Willis
Wednesday
7 p.m. THE WITCHES (PG) Anjelica Huston
9 p.m. DIE HARD HII (R) Bruce Willis
Thursday
7 p.m. THE WITCHES (PG) Anjelica Huston
9 p.m. DIE HARD II (R) Bruce Willis
Amador Theater
Today
7 p.m. THE ADVENTURE OF MILO & OTIS (G)
Animated
Saturday
7 p.m. DAYS OF THUNDER (PG-13) Tom Cruise


Sunday
7 p.m. DAYS OF THUNDER (PG-13) Tom Cruise
Monday
CLOSED
Tuesday
7 p.m. EXORCIST III: LEGION (R) George C. Scott
Wednesday
7 p.m. EXORCIST III: LEGION (R) George C. Scott
Thursday
CLOSED

Quarry Heights Theater

Today
7 p.m. DUCKTALES: THE MOVIE (G) Animated
Saturday
7 p.m. YOUNG GUNS II (PG-13) Emilio Estevez
Sunday
7 p.m. YOUNG GUNS II (PG-13) Emilio Estevez
Monday
7 p.m. THE FRESHMAN (PG) Marion Brando
Tuesday and Wednesday
CLOSED
Thursday
7 p.m. THE FRESHMAN (PG) Marlon Brando


Davis Theater
Today
7 p.m. THE TWO JAKES (R) Jack Nicholson
Saturday
7 p.m. MY BLUE HEAVEN (PG-13) Rick Moranis
Sunday
7 p.m. PRESUMED INNOCENT (R) Harrison Ford
Monday
7 p.m. ROBOCOP II (R) Peter Weller

Tuesday
7 p.m. PRESUMED INNOCENT (R) Harrison Ford
Wednesday
7 p.m. ROBOCOP II (R) Peter Weller
Thursday
7 p.m. MY BLUE HEAVEN (PG-13) Rick Moranis

Sherman Theater

Today
7 p.m..MEN AT WORK (PG-13) Charles Sheen
Saturday
7 p.m. ARACHNOPHOBIA (PG-13) Jeff Daniels
Sunday
7 p.m. MO' BETTER BLUES (R) Denzel Washington


LClub


Calendar


Amador O'Club
Club opens for lunch Wed., Thurs. & Fri. from
11:30 a.m.-1 a.m. A Daily Hot Special as well as a
salad bar will be served. Mongolian BBQ, Thurs.,
6-8:30 p.m.; Social Hour with disco. Fri., 5-9 p.m.;
Sunday Brunch, 10 a.m.-I p.m.; Private rooms
available for functions by calling 282-3534.
Howard NCO Club
Breakfast: Mon.-Fri., 6:30-9 a.m.; Lunch: Mon.-
Fri., 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Dinner. 5:30-9 p.m.; Member-
ship night last Mon. of each month; Games: Sun. &
Wed.; Brunch: every 3rd Sun. of each month, 10
a.m.-1 p.m.; Variety disco in ballroom: Fri., Sat.,
Sun., Mon.; Casual Cove disco: Tues. & Wed.;
Rock & Roll, Salsa: Mon. & Tues.; Variety, West-
erm: Wed. & Thurs.
Howard O'Club
Lunch. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; Dining room: Fri., nor-
mal duty hours; Sat., 6-9 p.m.; Tues.-Thurs.,
closed; Bar: Tues.-Thurs,4:30-9p.m.; Fri.,4p.m.-
midnight, Sat., 6-10 p.m., closed Sun. & Mon.
Albrook O'Club
Lunch: 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Dinner. 5-8:30 p.m.; Tues.,
bar menu available in the lounge; Fri., Hungry
Hour, 4-6 p.m., Music, 9:30 p.m.-1 a.m.; Sunday
Champagne Brunch: 10 a.m.-1 p.m.


STRAC Club
Open Mon.-Sat.,4:30-11 p.m.; Fri. & Sat., snacks,
music with Judy Upton.

Quarry Heights O'Club
Breakfast: Mon.-Fri., 6:30-8:30 a.m., Sat., 8-9
a.m.; Lunch: Mon.-Fri., 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; Dinner
A La Carte: Mon.-Sat., 6-9 p.m.; Live entertain-
ment: 6-9 p.m.; Sun., closed.
CPO Club
Open to all E7-E9, civilians NM6 & above, and
their dependents. Also offers a full menu and
services 7 days a week. Lunch: Tues.-Sun., 11
a.m.-I p.m.; Dinner. Mon.-Sat., 6-9 p.m.
Anchorage Club
Open 7 days a week. Offers services to everyone.
Breakfast: Mon.-Fri., 6:30-10 a.m.; Lunch: Mon.-
Fri., 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Dinner: Mon.-Sat., 5-10
p.m.; Grill: Sat., Sun. & holidays, 1-9:30 p.m.
USNavSta O'Club
Open to officers, civilians NM7 & above, and their
dependents. Offers full menu & services 7 days a
week. Lunch: Mon.-Sat., 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sunday
Brunch: 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Dinner.Sun.-Wed.,
5-9 p.m., Thurs.-Sat., 5-10 p.m.


Clayton NCO Club
Mon.: Comer Post Lounge, variety music, 7-
11:30 p.m.;
Tues.: Corral, Country n' Western;
Wed.: Main Ball Room, disco, 9 p.m.-I a.m.,
Corral, Country n' Western, 7-11:30 p.m., Comer
Post Lounge, salsa, 7-11:30 p.m., Midnight buffet,
9 p.m.-1 a.m.;'
Thurs.: Main Ballroom, disco, 9p.m.-midnight,
Corral, Country n' Western, 7-11:30 p.m.;
Fri.: Main Ball Room, disco, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.,
Corral, Country n' Western, 7 p.m.-1 am., Comer
Post Lounge, salsa, 7 p.m.-2 a.m., Dining Room,
steak night, 5-9 p.m.;
Sat.: Main Ball Room, disco, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.,
Corral, Country n' Western, 7 p.m.-I a.m., Comer
Post Lounge, salsa, 7 p.m.-2 am., Dining Room
open, 5 p.m.;
Sun.: Brunch, 10 a.m.-I p.m., Comer Post
Lounge, variety music, 7-11:30 p.m.;
Daily: Casa Maria Mexican Food, 5 p.m.,
Lunch, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Bar, opens 4:30 p.m.

Davis Community Club
Two daily lunch specials, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Mon.-
Fri. For information, call 289-5160/3298 or stop
by Building 87, Fort Davis.


PUMP UP THE VOLUME
A teenager starts up a pirate radio station to whip up morale and reunite class members In their
struggle against an autocratic high school principal. (R)
Christian Slater

STATE OF GRACE
A police officer is sent undercover to his old neighborhood to observe his childhood friends, who now'
belong to a notorious Irish gang In Hell's Kitchen. (R)
Sean Penn

DESPERATE HOURS
Mickey Rourke is the leader of a group of escaped convicts who manage to seize an all-American
family's home and terrorize its members until the time is right for their escape. (R)
Mickey Rourke

DAYS OF THUNDER
An ambitious young race driver is determined to make his mark in the competitive world of
NASCAR racing - where the lives of drivers, crew chiefs and car owners are governed by the pulse-
pounding excitement of this grueling sport. (PG-13)
Tom Cruise - Robert Duvall

MY BLUE HEAVEN
A charming silver-tongued organized crime informant turns life upside down In a quiet town that
he relocated in. Along the way he makes things difficult for the FBI agent assigned to protect him
and the district attorney trying to put him in Jail. (PG-13)
Steve Martin, Rich Moranis














3�TV Guide


SCN Channels 8 & 10


Friday

5:30 a.m. CNN Headline News
6:00 CNN Headline News
6:30 NBC News At Sunrise
7:00 NBC Today Show
9:00 Morning Stretch
9:30 Porky Pig
10:00 Let's Make A Deal
10:30 Classic Concentration
11:00 People's Court
11:30 Showbiz Today
Noon CNN Headline News
12:20 p.m. SCN Midday Report
12:30 Sports Latenight
1:00 Oprah Winfrey
2:00 Another World
3:00 Mr. Wizard's World
3:30 Barney Miller
4:00 M-A-S-H
4:25 Guiding Light
5:15 General Hospital
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:30 ABC World News Tonight
7:00 Jeopardy
7:30 Perfect Strangers
:oo00 COPS
8:30 Murder, She Wrote
9:30 CBS Evening News
10:00 Cover-Up
11:00 Entertainment Tonight
11:30 NBC Tonight Show
12:30 a.m. Latenight With David Letterman
1:30 , Nightline
2:00 SCN All Night Movie..."Dead Man
Out."
3:30 SCN All Night Movie..."Caroline?."
5:15 SCN All Night Movie..."The Fighting
Kentuckian."
7:00 CNN Headline News


Saturday


11:00 Videolink
11:30 Saturday Night Live
1:00 a.m. SCN All Night Movies..."The Longest
Day."
4:00 Videolink
5:00 CNN Headline News


Sunday

5:30 a.m. Grand Ole Opry
6:00 On Stage
6:30 Share The Word
7:00 CNN Headline News
7:30 The 700 Club
8:00 Benjamin
8:30 Real Videos
9:00 CBS Sunday Morning
10:30 Ebony/Jet Showcase
11:00 Washington Week In Review
11:30 This Week With David Brinkley
12:30 p.m. CNN Headline News
1:00 NFL Football...Teams TBA
4:00 Nova
5:00 Remote Control
5:30 Fight Back! With David Horowitz,
6:00 . WWF Wrestling
7:00 60 Minutes
8:00 SCN Sunday Night Movie..."The
Kennedys Of Massachusetts."
9:30 CNN Headline News
10:oo00 Entertainment This Week
11:00 Comedy Tonight
11:30 Sports Tonight
12:00 a.m. Firing Line
12:30 Face The Nation
1:00 Meet The Press
1:30 CNN Headline News
2:00 McLaughlin Group
2:30 George Michael's Sports Machine
3:00 60 Minutes
4:00 World Report
5:00 CNN Headline News


7:30 a.m. Just For Kids!
7:31 Woody Woodpecker M monday
7:55 Huckleberry Hound & Friends
Huckleberry Hound 5:30a.m. CNN Headline News
Augie Doggie 6:00 CNN Headline News
Yogi Bear 6:30 NBC News At Sunrise
8:15 Roadrunner 7:00oo NBC Today Show
8:40 Jem 9:00 Morning Stretch
9:05 Garfield 9:30 Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood
9:30 SCN Morning Movie..."Punt, Pass, 10:00 Let's Make A Deal.
And A Prayer." . 10:30 Classic Concentration
11:00 America's Top 100 Family Feud
11:30 Fun House 11:30 Showbiz Today
Noon TBA Noon CNN Headline News
4:00 p.m. National Geographic 12:30 p.m. Sports Machine
5:00 Ringling Bros./Barnum & Bailey Circus 1:00 Oprah Winfrey
6:00 Blondie And Dagwood 2:00 Another World
6:30 CNN Headline News 3:00 Kids Inc.
7:00 48 Hours 3:30 Barney Miller
8:00 SCN Saturday Night Movie..."Challenger." 4:00 M-A-S-H
10:30 CNN Headline News 4:25 Guiding Light


5:15 General Hospital
6:00 CNN Headline News
6:30 ABC World News Tonight
7:00 Jeopardy
7:30 Head Of The Class
8:00 Charles In Charge
8:30 After The War
9:30 CBS Evening News
10:00 Frontline
11:00 Entertainment Tonight
11:30 NBC Tonight Show
12:30 a.m. Latenight With David Letterman
1:30 Nightline
2:00 World Monitor
2:30 Sports Latenight
3:00 Arsenio Hall
4:00 Tonight Show
5:00 CNN Headline News


Tuesday

5:30 a.m. CNN Headline News
6:00 CNN Headline News
6:30 NBC News At Sunrise
7:00 NBC Today Show
9:00 Sesame Street
10:00 Let's Make A Deal
10:30 Classic Concentration
11:00 Family Feud
11:30 Showbiz Today
Noon CNN Headline News
12:20 p.m. SCN Midday Report
12:30 Sports Latenight
1:00 Donahue
2:00 Another World
3:00 Square One TV
3:30 Barney Miller
4:00 M-A-S-H
4:25 Guiding Light
5:15 General Hospital
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:30 ABC World News Tonight
7:00 Jeopardy
7:30 Growing Pains
8:00 Night Court
8:30 In The Heat Of The Night
9:30 CBS Evening News
10:00 Miami Vice
11:00 Entertainment Tonight
11:30 NBC Tonight Show
12:30 a.m. Latenight With David Letterman
1:30 Nightline
2:00 World Monitor
2:30 Sports Latenight
3:00 Arsenio Hall
4:00 Tonight Show
5:00 CNN Headline News


Wednesday

5:30 a.m. CNN Headline News
6:00 CNN Headline News


6:30 NBC News At Sunrise
7:00 NBC Today Show
9:00 Morning Stretch
9:30 Gerbert
10:00 Let's Make A Deal
10:30 Classic Concentration
11:00 Family Feud
11:30 Showbiz Today
Noon CNN Headline News
12:20 p.m. SCN Midday Report
12:30 Sports Latenight
1:00 Oprah Winfrey
2:00 Another World
3:00 What's Up Dr. Ruth?
3:30 Barney Miller
4:00 M-A-S-H
4:25 Guiding Light
5:15 General Hospital
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:30 ABC World News Tonight
7:00 Jeopardy
7:25 Amen
7:50 Doogie Howser, M.D.
8:20 Wednesday Night Movie..."Broadcast
News."
10:30 CBS Evening News
11:30 NBC Tonight Show
12:30 a.m. Latenight With David Letterman
1:30 Nightline
2:00 World Monitor
2:30 Sports Latenight
3:00 Arsenio Hall
4:00 Tonight Show
5:00 CNN Headline News

Thursday


5:30 a.m.
6:00
6:30
7:00
9:00
Noon
12:30
3:30
7:00
7:30
8:00
8:30
10:00
11:00
11:30
12:30 a.m.
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
4:00
5:00


CNN Headline News
CNN Headline News
NBC News At Sunrise
NBC Today Show
Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade
CNN Headline News
NFL Football...Denver/Detroit
NFL Football...Redskins/Cowboys
CNN Headline News
Bugs Bunny Thanksgiving Diet
Christopher's Story Laboratory
SCN Thanksgiving Movie..."The
Thanksgiving Promise."
Thirtysomething
Entertainment Tonight
NBC Tonight Show
Latenight With David Letterman
Nightline
World Monitor
Sports Latenight
Arsenio Hall
Tonight Show
CNN Headline News


* "SCN programming subject to change"


Friday


5:30 a.m. CNN Headline News
6:00 CNN Headline News
6:30 NBC News At Sunrise
7:00 NBC Today Show
9:00 Oprah Winfrey Show
10:00 CBS This Morning
Noon CNN Headline News
12:20 p.m. SCN Midday Report
12:30 To Tell The Truth
1:00 All My Children
2:00 One Life To Live
3:00 The Price Is Right
4:00 Beetlejuice
4:30 The Brady Bunch
5:00 12 O'Clock High
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 Mission...Impossible
8:00 TNT...NBA Basketball: Teams TBA
11:00 CNN Headline News
11:30 Arsenio Hall
12:30 a.m. Late Night With David Letterman
1:30 Nightline
2:00 CNN World Monitor
2:30 CNN Sports Latenight
3:00 Fox Arsenio Hall
4:00 NBC Tonight Show
5:00 NBC Late Night
6:00 CNN Headline News
6:30 CNN Headline News
7:00 Washington Week In Review

Saturday

7:30 a.m. Just For Kids!
Woody Woodpecker
Huckleberry Hound And Friends
Roadrunner Show
Jem
Garfield
Saturday Morning Movie
11:00 3-2-1 Contact
11:30 CNN Headline News
Noon Saturday Afternoon Movie..."Combat
Academy."
1:45 p.m. Saturday Afternoon Movie..."Three
On A Match."
3:30 The Waltons
4:30 Airwolf
5:30 CNN Headline News
6:00 The Disney Movie
7:00 Star Trek...The Next Generation
8:00 Roseanne
8:30 Married...With Children
9:00 Paradise
10:00 Videolink
11:00 CNN Headline News
11:30 NBC Saturday Night Live
1:00 a.m. CNN Sports Tonight


S CN cable channel 14


5:30 a.m.
6:00
6:30
7:00
7:30
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
11:00


L.jl J l %W, l 1, 6 ll ! .lV J �A* 12:20p.m. SCN Midday Report
12:30 To Tell The Truth
CNN Headline News 6:00 SCN Evening Report :00 All My Children
East Meets West 6:30 NBC Nightly News 2:00 One Life To Live
CNN Sports Latenight 7:00 Alf 3:00 The Price Is Right
Entertainment This Week 7:30 Hooperman 4:00 Scooby Doo
CBS Saturday Night With Connie Chung 8:00 NBC News Specials 4:30 Out Of This World
Videolink 9:00 Monday Night Football...Raiders/Dolphins 5:00 I Spy
12:00 a.m. CNN Headline News 6:00 SCN Evening Report
Sunday 12:30 Latenight With David Letterman 6:30 NBC Nightly News
1:30 a.m. Nightline 7:00 Barbara Walters' Special
CNN Headline News 2:00 World Monitor 8:00 Quantum Leap
CNN Headline News 2:30 Sports Latenight 9:00 Hunter
Benjamin 3:00 Arsenio Hall 10:00 China Beach
CNN Headline News 4:00 Tonight Show 11:00 CNN Headline News
Real Videos 5:00 CNN Headline News 11:30 Arsenio Hall
Share The Word 12:30 a.m. Late Night With David Letterman
700 Club Tuesday 1:30 Nightline
Merry Melodies Show 2:00 World Monitor
Dinosaucers 5:30 a.m. CNN Headline News 2:30 Sports Latenight
Wonderworks 6:00 CNN Headline News 3:oo0 Arsenio Hall
Sunday Morning Movie..."Platinum 6:30 NBC News At Sunrise 4:00 Tonight Show
Blonde." 7:00 NBC Today Show 5:00 CNN Headline News


Noon Rainbow Specials
1:30 p.m. ESPN Sports Magazine
2:00 On Pit Road
2:30 Motor Week
3:00 American Racing Series
3:30 This Is The NFL
4:00 NFL Football...Teams TBA
7:00 CNN Headline News
7:30 America's Funniest Home Videos
8:00 NFL Football...Teams TBA
11:00 It's Gary Shandling's Show
11:30 CNN Headline News
12:00 a.m. Firing Line
12:30 CBS Face The Nation
1:00 Meet The Press
1:30 CNN Headline News
2:00 McLaughlin Group
2:30 George Michael's Sports Machine
3:00 60 Minutes
4:00 World Report
5:00 CNN Headline News

Monday

5:30 a.m. CNN Headline News
6:00 CNN Headline News
6:30 NBC News At Sunrise
7:00 NBC Today Show
9:00 Oprah Winfrey Show
10:00 CBS This Morning
Noon CNN Headline News
12:20 p.m. SCN Midday Report
12:30 To Tell The Truth
1:00 All My Children
2:00 One Life To Live
3:00 The Price Is Right
4:00 Shirt Tales
4:30 Facts Of Life
5.00 Star Trek...The Next Generation


9:00 Donahue
10:00 CBS This Morning
Noon CNN Headline News
12:20 p.m. SCN Midday Report
12:30 To Tell The Truth
1:00 All My Children
2:00 One Life To Live
3:00 The Price Is Right
4:00 Star Trek
4:30 Degrassi High
5:00 The Real Ghostbusters
5:30 Police Academy
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 Mr. Belvedere
7:30 Designing Women
8:00 Tuesday Night Movie..."The Next
Man."
10:00 Knots Landing
11:00 CNN Headline News
11:30 Arsenio Hall
12:30 Latenight with David Letterman
1:30 a.m. Nightline
2:00 World Monitor
2:30 Sports Latenight
3:00 Arsenio Hall
4:00 Tonight Show
5:00 CNN Headline News

Wednesday

5:30 a.m. CNN Headline News
6:00 CNN Headline News
6:30 NBC News At Sunrise
7:00 NBC Today Show
9:00 Oprah Winfrey
10:00 CBS This Morning
Noon CNN Headline News


Thursday

5:30 a.m. CNN Headline News
6:00 CNN Headline News
6:30 NBC News At Sunrise
7:00 NBC Today Show
9:00 Donahue
10:00 CBS This Morning
Noon CNN Headline News
12:20 p.m. SCN Midday Report
12:30 To Tell The Truth
1:00 All My Children
2:00 One Life To Live
3:00 The Price Is Right
4:00 Ducktales
4:30 F-Troop
5:00 National Geographic
6:00 SCN Evening Report
6:30 NBC Nightly News
7:00 Cosby Show
7:30 Different World
8:00 Thursday Night Movie..."Once Upon
A Spy."
10:00 Falcon Crest *
11:00 CNN Headline News
11:30 Arsenio Hall
12:30 Late Night With David Letterman
1:30 Nightline
2:00 World Monitor
2:30 Sports Latenight
3:00 Arsenio Hall
4:00 Tonight Show
5:00oo CNN Headline News


* "SCN programming subject to change"


STropic Times
SNov. 16, 1990


I I


I








Tropic Times
Nov. 16, 1990


300ZX Turbo:


Extremely smooth

and quiet; its 'sports

car firm'

by Zane Binder
Sophistication is hard to define. It's not just a
single item; it's the sum of numerous, sometimes
tiny performance parameters. It's how the shifter
engages, and how the clutch applies the power. It's
in the feel of seemingly insignificant things such as
the turn signal lever, and in the "feel" of the entire
car. Is it European-type solid? Is it American
"floaty"? And, above all, does the sum of the
vehicle's parts work harmoniously together? It's in
every one of these areas the new-for-1990 Nissan
300ZX Turbo excels, and that makes it one of the
best sports cars, and sports car values, you can
buy.
Inside, the 300ZX Turbo's twin buckets were
covered in Nissan's optional leather (cloth is
standard) and the seats themselves are from the
school of modern design. If you prefer futuristic
furniture, you'll be comfortable in the ZX's cabin.
Luggage space is surprisingly large for a sports car
(but small in absolute terms), a consideration for
traveling. Interior storage areas, such as the glove
box, are small, and a cup holder is inexcusably
absent. A T-top is standard.
Instrumentation quantity along with the
equipment level in the test car was high; anti-lock
brakes, power steering, power windows, and just
about every other option is included. You won't
lack amenities!
For '90, the rear-drive ZX uses a new 3.0 liter,
300 HP, aluminum head engine. It is a fuel-
injected, twin-turbocharged, intercooled "6" with
four valves per cylinder and four cams. It's
extremely smooth and quiet, and without getting


Nissan 300ZX Turbo


too technical, has numerous built-in features to
make the engine and turbochargers live as long as
a normally aspirated engine. It's mated to a five-
speed transmission; it employs a better than
average shifter and clutch mechanism, but it's not
quite world-class. It does, however, help the
engine provide stellar acceleration: 0-60 in this
3,474 pound car (that's quite porky) comes up in
just 6.5 seconds (8.3 with the non-turbo
automatic). This car is, however, by no means a
Corvette-beater (its natural enemy) in any speed
range or gear, despite what you may read
elsewhere. There are times, too, when the engine's
relatively small displacement shows with a lack of
instantaneous response, and only part of this can
be attributed to turbo lag. There's more power
than you'll ever need for normal driving, but you
don't spend $34,000 to drive normally. Just one
more word about horsepower: that 300 rating is
too high. About 240 is more realistic, and unlike
large displacement engines (such as in the
Corvette), that figure is only produced in a narrow
RPM range. There's just no substitute for cubic
inches!
Efficiency-wise, the ZX returned 21 highway
and 17 city miles per gallon, just average for the
class. As the car was driven exceptionally hard


during the test period, two-three miles per gallon
more overall may be possible.
Handling, though, is outstanding. Standard
power-assisted steering offers good road feel; the
ZX has few peers and no superiors when rounding
corners. This vehicle inspires confidence, far more
than in back-to-back comparisons with
Chevrolet's Corvette. Part of this is due to the
adjustable suspensions switch, which basically
firms up the shocks. It makes a real difference (the
ride gets more jittery too), but I wonder if it's
really necessary since so many other
manufacturers (BMW, Mercedes, etc.) don't use
such a system and achieve similar results.,
Ride is one of the ZX's best features. Its "sports
car firm," and over bad roads you definitely know
it. It's far superior to the Corvette and Mazda
RX-7 Turbo, though, but not as good as Porsche.
What's the bottom line on the ZX? It's definitely
not a Corvette-beater in acceleration, though
overall, it's a much superior car. It's extremely
comfortable, and sets a new class/price standard
in every area except all-out objective
performance. This .car, either with manual 'or
automatic, is a best in class buy for about $34,000.
Having one in your driveway clearly reflects
sophistication!


GOVERNMENT LOOKS TO
"TRIM" WEIGHT LOSS CLAIMS:
The Federal Trade Commission is
taking a good, long, hard look at
some of the advertising and promo-
tional claims made by over a dozen
companies in behalf of their weight
loss programs. The purpose is to
assess the validity of their claims,
and to see if they live up to them.
Referring to the cited companies,
Representative Ron Wyden (D.-
Ore.), chairman of the House Small
Business Subcommittee on Regula-
tion, Business Opportunities and
Energy said, "These programs are
built on false promises and false
hopes with claims of medical super-
vision when there is none, medical
endorsements when they don't exist,
deceptive use of before and after
ads."
Some firms have agreed to change
their advertising and promotional
claims. One firm, however, has had
its assets frozen and a restraining
order has been issued because of
false advertising.
If it were only a matter of lying
about how much weight can be lost
in how short a time, that would be
bad enough in terms of being
unethical. But the health and even,
in some instances,. the lives of
people could be jeopardized if the
claims are false or misleading.
Another important factor is keep-
ing the weight off after the dieter has
reached her or his desired weight
level. According to the government
investigators, the stated success rate
is often exaggerated, and the actual
failure rate is much higher than
potential dieters are led to believe.
Rapid weight loss causes changes in
the body chemistry that almost
always results in the dieter not just
regaining the lost weight, but also
regaining more poundage than had
been taken off. If the dieter goes on
another rapid weight loss program,
the regained weight is, again, more
than the amount lost. Successful
weight loss and continuing weight
maintenance are possible. But you
must work with your doctor.


w:sz


How green are you?
There is more to being green than
recycling newspapers and using
unleaded fuel. Test your
ecological intelligence:


1. Which of the following does
not pollute indoor air?
a) Carpets made of artificial fiber
b) Electrical equipment'
c) Household solvents
d) Chipboard furniture
2. Which uses the most energy?
a) Refrigerator
b) Stove
c) Washing machine
3. What is the best way to
reduce auto emissions?
a) Install a catalytic converter
b) Use unleaded fuel
c) Buy a fuel-efficient car
4. Which uses the most water in
your home?
a) Toilet
b) Bath
c) Washing machine
d) Dishwasher
5. Which of the following is not
associated with destruction of
the Amazon rain forest?
a) Cattle ranchers
b) Western paper-consumption
c) soft drink cans
d) Greenhouse effect


6. Which is the most
environmentally friendly
form of energy?
a) Nuclear power
b) Coal
c) Natural gas
d) Oil
7. Which of the following
has not been associated
with increased rates of
miscarriage?
a) Sleeping under electric
blankets
b) Working with x-rays
c) Too much sex
d) VDTs (visual display terminals)
e) Coffee consumption
8. Which of the following of
statements about plastic
cling-wrap is untrue?
a) May cause cancer
b) Soaks into fatty foods like
cheese and meat
c) Is less harmful at lower
temperatures
d) Contains bacteria which can
cause salmonella
*_p ... n_ *p_ futo_ 1 lx


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uaAuoo Jo elleo esrej oi peAo.isep eme isoy *(q *g *(e *t" *%06 Aq suoissiue
ewos sino *((e * 'A io.upole uet ueploa ejou sl seB ng *(q -( 'pAeepfeuJio
sulaeuoo pjeoqdiqo 'euozo eonpoid ueo luouJdinbe goAelup3 '(e L
sJaMsyv


Awareness 7-8-Dark Green
level: 5-6-Light Green

SOURCE: The New Internationalist


3-4-Transparent Green
0-2-Head in the sand


17


Cc









* Sports


18 Tropic Times
1 Nov. 16,1990


Red Devil Dash runners scorch


FORT KOBBE (USARSO PAO) - A light overcast
in the morning sky protected 167 runners from the hot
Panama sun during the first running of the Red Devil
Dash here Saturday. The 1-mile, 5-kilometer and 10-
kilometer races were sponsored by 1st Battalion, 508th
Infantry (Airborne).
In the 1-mile race, Mark Pegher won the male
division and was closely followed by Oscar Cedino
and Luis Perozo. Oritta Essien was the first overall
competitor across the finish line in the one-mile event.
Ana Guzman placed second among the females, and
Tara Fitzgerald was third.
In the 5k female race, Elizabeth Castillo won the
19- and-under category, and Rosana Valldeperas placed
second. In the 20-30 age category, Laura Beal was the
top finisher with Sheila Flynn second. Susan Wajda
took top honors in the 31-40 age category with Yo-
landa Pegher finishing second.
In the women's 10k race, Sara Garcia outran her
sister Linda to win the 19-and-under division. Susan
Sine competed in the 20-30 age division and was the
top female finisher.
In the men's 5k, Shawn Fitzgerald won the 19-and-
under category followed by Terrance Lee and Paul
Fincher. Joginder Dhillon tooktop honors in the 20-30
age category. David Clontz placed second and Ted
Mauzey finished third. Ray Evanoff won the 5k over-
all, also winning the 31-40 age division. Tom Jackson
finished second, and Edward McAller finished third.
Robert McIntosh sprinted to top honors in the 41-50
group and was followed by John Corson. In the 50-plus
category, Alfredo Pasamante finished first, Richard
Bjorneby finished second and John Plant was third.
In the men's 10k, Raul Garcia was the only com-
petitor in the 19-and-under category. Reuben Tull Jr.
took top honors in the race and the 20-30'age division.
He was followed by Kenneth Riggsbee and Kevin
Huggins. Fred Lassiter won the 31-40 category fol-


Willie Freeman, right, and Jiggs Rawls, carrying
the guideon, lead the way for the Company A
"Moatengators" during the 5-kilometer portion of
the Red Devil Dash Saturday at Fort Kobbe. The
"Moatengators" won the team event in the 5k.
(U.S. Army photo by Cpl. John Sell)
lowed by Rauer in second and David Erchull in third.
B. R. Fitzgerald was the first competitor to cross the
finish line in the 41-50 age division with Ricardo Agui-
lar second and Joe Parker third.
In the team events, the Company A, 1/508th "Ga-
tors" won the 5k and were followed by the" Mortars "
from HHC 1/508th. The HHC 1/508th "Medics" were
the only team competing in the 10k.


Soldier makes run for All-Army spot


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO)
- In October, U.S. Army South's 10-
miler team placed ninth out of 143 en-
tries in the All-Army 10-milerrace held
in Washington.
USARSO's team consisted of B.R.
Fitzgerald, Kevin Huggins, Lawrence
Damore, Reuben Tull, Fred Lassiter
and Jose Figueroa.
"As coach and runner, I was ex-
tremely pleased with how we did... but,
not as happy as I would've been if we'd
placed first," said Fitzgerald.
Fitzgerald also wanted to thank Rick
Velasco, of Community Recreation Di-
vision Sports, for his support of the race.
"It was absolutely superb, and the best
the team had ever seen," said Fitzger-
ald.
The fastest person on the USARSO
team was Tull who placed 50th out of
5,400 runners, posting a time of 56:05;


for a 5:36 per mile average time. This -
year's results represented a substantial
improvement over 1989's for Tull and
the team.
In 1989, Tull, then stationed at Fort
Bragg, placed 156th out of 4,500, while
USARSO placed 13th out of 147 teams
competing.
Tull, who has run the race twice, said
the course was altered this year. It was
more to the flat side.
"It was hot this time. Once we started,
about five miles into the course it started
getting real hot," he said.
"I was in better shape than last year,
and the times were faster," said Tull,
who is submitting his application for the
All-Army team.
If his application is accepted, he
will go to a two- to three- week training
camp, where they will have tryouts and
a final meet to determine the team.


Should Tull make the All-Army team,
he will compete around the globe.
"For training, I get out of bed at 4:30
a.m. to do calisthenics and run five to
six miles. Then I attend the company
physical training formation, and do
regular PT with the company. After
that, I run another quick five or six
miles," Tull said.
Tull has few dietary requirements.
"I try not to get a lot of cholesterol.
I take yolks out of my eggs, and eat high
fiber foods and salads and not too much
meat.
"About an hour before every race I
have a banana with some honey on it.
I've done that since high school," said
the 30-year-old, who has been running
for 18 years.
Tull said he is thinking about the
Olympics, but his first concern is mak-
ing the All-Army 10-miler team.


Reuben Tull kicks in the speed to-
wards the end of the race. (U.S.
Army photo by Col. Larry Gragg)


Sports Shorts


Race registration begins
Registration for the eighth annual Transisthmian
Relay Race have begun at the CRD Sports offices
located in Building 154, Fort Clayton and the Marga-
rita complex. Rosters will include 10 runners and two
alternates. Relay race categories are U.S. military,
females, open, and over-40 years. A team entry fee is
being charged. For additional information call Eva
Foster at 287-4050.

Civilian softball swings away
A civilian softball program will begin in Decem-
ber. Registration continues through Dec. 3 at Build-
ing 154, Fort Clayton. For information call 287-
4050.

Company golf league tees off
Registration for company-level golf concludes
Nov. 27 at Building 154, Fort Clayton.
The round robin championship will have a four-
person best ball format, with a blind draw elimination
for three holes.


Shuttle buses on line for game
Shuttle buses will be available Wednesday, to
transport spectators to the annual Turkey Bowl event.
Buses will depart at 5 p.m. from Cocoli community
Center, with a stop at Amador Officers' Club; the
Kobbe Burger King via Quarry Heights; the Fort
Clayton Burger King, and Building 19, Corozal. Buses
return at 9:30 p.m.

Turkey Bowl tickets on sale
Advance tickets are on sale at Valent Recreation
Center, Fort Clayton; Sundial Center at Fort Davis;
Building 65 at U.S. Naval Station Panama Canal
(Rodman)-and Building 248 at Howard AFB. There
is a special rate for E-4s and below. For more infor-
mation call 287-6109.

D.D.U Band to rock crowd
Turkey Bowl '90 will feature the D.D.U. Band, a
Department of Defense touring show that performs
jazz, rock, and rhythm and blues sounds. The six-
member Philadelphia group has recording experi-


ence, and performs high energy level music with
audience participation. The D.D.U. Band will offer
pre-game entertainment, starting at 6 p.m. Half-time
entertainment includes the Balboa High School JROTC
Drill Team, and'the JV, Varsity and Officers' Wives
Club cheerleaders.
No coolers
Persons attending Turkey Bowl '90 are informed
that coolers are not allowed.

Fun Run Sprints off
The Howard Sports and Fitness Center will spon-
sor a five kilometer Fun Run Saturday. The run will
start at Building 248 at 7 a.m. The runis free and sign-
ups are currently under way. For more information
call284-3451.

AF needs cheerleaders
Cheerleaders are needed for the Air Force Turkey
Bowl team. Women interested in being cheerleaders
for the team are asked to call the Sports and Fitness
Center at 284-3451 or 3602.


Cy Young winners

Drabek takes NL honor
PITTSBURGH (AP) - Doug Drabek, who
pitched the Pittsburgh Pirates within one step
of the World Series, came within one vote
Wednesday of unanimous selection as the
National League Cy Young Award winner.
Drabek, who led the league with 22 victo-
ries against six losses while leading his team
to its first division title since 1979, became
the first Pirate in 30 years to win the award.
He received 23 of 24 first-place votes and
118 of a possible 120 points in balloting by
the Baseball Writers Association of Amer-
ica.

Welch takes AL honor
NEW YORK (AP) - Bob Welch had the
success, if not the stats, of Roger Clemens
and Dave Stewart. On Tuesday, he got the Cy
Young to go with it.
Welch was the American League's biggest
winner in 22 seasons, going 27-6 for the
Oakland Athletics. And wins are what usu-
ally win the award for the best pitcher.
In a strange and split vote in which no one
was named on all 28 ballots, Welch got 15
first-place votes and a total of 107 points.
Clemens, with an earned-run average more
than full run betterthan Welch, was second
with eight first-place votes and 77 points.
Stewart also had a better ERA than Welch,
his teammate, and won 20 games for the
fourth straight season, but again failed to win
the Cy Young.







Tropic Times 19
Nov. 16, 1990 -


Pack is back, Krieg spent Sunday on his


by Spec. John
"Gus" Hall

COROZAL
(Tropic Times) -
NOBODY
ASKED ME.
BUT... Kansas
City Chiefs' line-
backer Derrick
Thomas experi-
enced the most G
bittersweet game a
defensive player could Sunday. Thomas stuffed Se-
attle quarterback Dave Krieg seven times to set an
NFL record for sacks. On the game's final play, the
Chiefs (5-4) led 16-10 and Thomas had his grasp on
Kreig again. This time, the Seahawks' QB squirmed
free and tossed a 25-yard touchdown to winthe game.
As predicted, the New Orleans Saints (4-5) rolled
over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers 35-7 Sunday. For the
second straight game, running backs Rueben Mayes
and Craig Heyward both topped the 100-yard mark.
In the "Repus Bowl," (that's Super backwards)
New England (1-8) held the Colts (3-6) to five first
downs, a 2.1-yard rushing average and 6-of-24 pass-
ing. So the Pats destroyed the Colts right? Wrong.
Rookie QB Jeff George tossed a 26-yard TD with 2:07
left to edge the Patsies, I mean Pats, 13-10.
The Pack is back. The iRaiders (6-3) blew it


against (4-5) Green Bay Sunday. Los Angeles could
have taken a two-game lead in AFC West over Kansas
City. TheRaiders led 13-3 at home where they hadn't
lost in 10 tries under head coach Art Shell. The
Packers deserve some credit for the 29-16 win. They
held Bo Jackson to 25 yards on 10 carries and Don
Majkowski connected on two TD passes.
49ers 24, Dallas 6. Like I said in the last column,
this one isn't worth discussing.
It seems Jeff Rutledge was a one-game wonder.
The Redskins' QB fell to the wrath of Reggie White
and the Eagles' defense 28-14 Monday night. Rut-
ledge completed a disgusting 6 of 19 for 63 yards
before leaving with a thumb injury.
Philadelphia (5-4) found someone other than QB
Randall Cunningham who could run. Heath Sher-
man netted 124 yards on 35 yar-ds.-The Eagles'
defense played tough. Defensive end Reggie White
not only intercepted the first pass of his career, but ran
33 yards with it to set up a TD. William Frizzell did
score with an interception for the game's first points.
Now for the moment you've been waiting for. No,
I'm not done, it's prediction time. Houston (4-5) has
the unenviable task of traveling to Cleveland (2-7).
This is a game of numbers. Houston has the AFC's
best offense. Cleveland is next to last. The Oilers
have four of the top five receivers in the conference
for receptions. The Browns have nothing to lose, after
the 42-0 drubbing of the Bills except this game.
Oilers 31, Browns 13.


Now for the lightweights. Dallas (3-7) and the L.A.
Rams (3-6) face off in Anaheim. This one is worth
talking about. Both teams were thrashed Sunday by
theleague'stwo unbeaten teams by combined score
of 55-13. Sounds like the last Super Bowl score. Both
teams are hopping mad. The Rams offense can hop a
little higher. Rams 27, Cowboys 21.
In abattleof "dome-bodies," Minnesotatravels to
Seattle. The Vikings (3-6) are on atwo-game winning
streak which doubles the rest of their wins. The
Seahawks (4-5) are back in the playoff race, but who
isn't? Krieg is hot one week and cold the next player.
Minnesota needs this win to stay in the wildcard hunt.
Minnesota, give up hunting; try a new hobby. Seahawks
26, Vikings 10.
I couldn't pass up the Sunday night game. Pitts-
burgh travels to Riverfront in a battle for first place in
the AFC Central. Being a Pittsburgh native, I should
always pick the Steelers to win. That's bad luck.
Bengals 24, Steelers 17.
For the second straight week, there's a good Monday
night match up. The Los Angeles Raiders (6-3), losers
of two straight meet the Miami Dolphins (8-1) at Joe
Robbie Stadium.
The Raiders have owned Monday night annually.
Miami has looked phenomenal on defense but it
hasn't faced a tough offense except Buffalo. The
Raiders will not lose three in a row. Raiders 28,
Dolphins 23. Last week, 3-2. Season against spread
73-55, 57.0%. Monday night 7-3.


RAIDER ROMP - Fullback Curtis Collier of the Fort Clayton Raiders runs for a touchdown as teammate Jomoore
Toney throws a block in youth football action Saturday. The Raiders beat the Cristobal Tigers 36-0 to set up a match
up of rivals as the Raiders face the Clayton Wildcats Saturday. (U.S. Army photo by Lt. Col. Bruce K. Bell)



Smith leads Clippers past Suns


NIT

round-up

Duke edges-Marquette
DURHAM, N.C. (AP) - Chris-
tian Laettner scored 24 points
and had 12 rebounds Wednes-
day night to lead No. 6 Duke to
an 87-74 victory over Mar-
quette in the opening round of
the Big Apple NIT.
The Blue Devils will play
host today to Boston College,
which beat Memphis State 82-
78 Wednesday night, in the
second round of the tourna-
ment.
Billy McCaffrey added 19
points for Duke, which lost to
UNLV in the NCAA champi-
onship game last season, while
freshman Grant Hill and sopho-
more guard Bobby Hurley
scored 12 each.

Oklahoma beats N'Orleans

NORMAN, Okla. (AP) -
Oklahoma used a 16-0 run early
in the first half to take control
against New Orleans and the
15th-ranked Sooners rolled to
a sloppy 95-65 victory Wed-
nesday night in the first round
of the Big Apple NIT.

Arkansas slams Vandy

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP)
- Lee Mayberry scored eight
points during a 23-6 run and
the Arkansas defense did the
rest as the second-ranked Ra-
zorbacks beat Vanderbilt 107-
70 Wednesday night in the first
round of the Big Apple NIT.

Arizona routs Austin Peay

TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) - Chris
Mills led No. 3 Arizona's bal-
anced scoring with 17 points
as the Wildcats overwhelmed
shorter Austin Peay with a 59-
point first half and cruised to a
122-80 first-round Big Apple
NIT victory Wednesday night.


24-5 run in the second quarter as the Cleveland Cavaliers built
a 22-point first-half lead and beat the Indiana Pacers 113-95
, Wednesday night.
Celts swat Hornets 135-126
BOSTON (AP) - One night after his lowest point total in
four years, Larry Bird scored 45 points and the Boston Celtics
survived a late Charlotte comeback for a 135-126 victory over
the Hornets on Wednesday night.

Nets top Bucks 112-95
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. (AP) - Derrick Coleman scored
a season-high 20 points and Mookie Blaylock got 8 of his 18
points in the fourth quarter Wednesday night as the New
Jersey Nets snapped the cold-shooting Milwaukee Bucks' win
streak at five games with a 112-95 decision.
Sixers turn back Hawks 112-104
PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Charles Barkley scored 34 points
and grabbed 13 rebounds as the Philadelphia 76ers turned
back a late rally and defeated the Atlanta Hawks 112-104
Wednesdaynight.
Seikaly 30 puts "Heat" on Mavs 105-93
MIAMI (AP) - Rony Seikaly had 30 points and 21 rebounds
and rookie Bimbo Coles sparked a decisive fourth-quarter
spurt as Miami beat Dallas 105-93 Wednesday night, the
Heat's first-ever victory over the Mavericks.


Norman scores 20,

adds 2 crucial blocks
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Charles Smith scored 27 points
and Ken Norman added 20 points and two key blocks down
the stretch Wednesday night as the Los Angeles Clippers
beat the Phoenix Suns forthe first timein 10 tries with a 108-
102victory.
Benoit Benjamin, slowed down the past few weeks by a
tender shoulder, added 19 points and 16 rebounds to help the
Clippers end their four-game losing streak and Phoenix's
three-game winning streak. Tom Chambers paced the Suns
with 24 points.
After a pair of missed free throws by Benjamin, Mark
West cut the Suns' deficit to 104-100 on a slam dunk with
three minutes to play. But Clippers rookie Bo Kimble beat
the 24-second clock with a 20-foot shot and then followed
two misses foul shots by West with a driving layup for a 108-
100 lead with 1:04 left.

Cavs drub Pacers 113-95
RICHFIELD, Ohio (AP) - Rookie Danny Ferry hit two
quick baskets and passed to Craig Ehlo for a third during a








0 Tropic Times
20Nov. 16,1990


Skins lose more than game to Eagles


HERNDON, Va. (AP) - The Washington Redskins
practice site resembled a field hospital after the team's
beating at the hands of the Philadelphia Eagles.
"This is about as beat up as we've ever been,"
coach Joe Gibbs said Tuesday, surveying damage that
left nine players injured, including two quarterbacks.
Stan Humphries, running back Gerald Riggs and
kick returned Walter Stanley are expected to miss
several weeks and others could miss time with inju-
ries sustained in the 28-14 loss Monday night to the
Eagles.
"They hit us hard and they hit us often and we got
hurt," said trainer Bubba Tyer. "I can't remember a
game any worse."
Several players were hobbling badly at Redskin
Park on Tuesday, one was still in the hospital, trainers
and the team doctor were busy all day and scouts were
working to fill gaping holes in the roster.
"We're in for a tough haul here," said Gibbs. "I
don't thinkit could be any worse... We're in as much
trouble as we've ever been."
Humphries arrived at Redskin Park on crutches
with a sprained knee and Jeff Rutledge had his sprained
right thumb heavily bandaged, leaving the Redskins
scrambling at the position that has given them the
most trouble this season.


Gibbs said he hopes to start Mark Rypien this
Sunday against New Orleans if he is recovered enough
from a seven-week-old knee injury. Journeyman Gary
Hogeboom, signed as an emergency backup when
Rypien was hurt, would start if neither Rypien nor
Rutledge are ready.
"IfRypien looks like he's 100 percent, we'll proba-
bly give him a shot. If not, we'll go with Hogeboom,"
Gibbs said. "The miracle would be if Jeffcould come
back."
Rutledge, who started only his 10th game in a 12-
year NFL career, ended the night with his throwing
hand swollen to twice its normal size. Humphries'
injury wasn't as bad as feared, said trainer Bubba
Tyer, but coach Gibbs said he would still miss four
weeks.
"I'm about as healthy as I can be at this point," said
Rypien, who planned to take his first snaps in practice
this week since his sprained knee. "I think this is my
week to get back in there and get going."
Riggs will be placed on the injured list with a
sprained foot arch, the same injury that idled him part
of last season. The Redskins planned to sign running
back Reggie Dupard, who played for Washington last
season and was released in training camp, as a re-
placement.


Ryan explains team's early losses


PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Now
that his Philadelphia Eagles are
above.500, coach BuddyRyanis
willing to talk about what he thinks
caused the team's slow start.
The Eagles (5-4) lost their first
two and then dropped to 2-4, los-
ing to teams they were heavy
favorites to beat Some said Ryan's
job was in jeopardy.

But the Eagles have won three
straight, including a 28-14 triumph
over the Washington Redskins
Monday night. They are tied for
second with the Skins behind the
runaway New York Giants (9-0)
in the NFC East.
Ryan steadfastly has defended


his team, apre-season favorite to
contend for the division title and
the Super Bowl. He has refused
to make excuses, insisting the
club would turn things around.
Ryan at his weekly news con-
ference Tuesday was pressed to
explain the team's tardy start.
At first he was mysterious.
"A lot of things go into it," he
began. "Some of the things will
get me in troubleif I said 'em. So,
I'm going to stay like I am. You
(sports writers) have been around
long enough to know what I
mean."
No, the reporters didn't really
know what he meant. So they
kept pressing.


"We put in a new offense with
two new wide receivers," Ryan
said. "Guys were holding out. The
tight end (Keith Jackson) was
not in camp.

"You can make all kinds of
excuses. If I'd have told you this
three weeks ago, it would've still
been the truth, but you'd have said,
'Oh, he's alibiing.' But that's not
alibiing, that's thewayitis. That's
the slow start.
"I have a good feel for our team
now," Ryan added. "I've had a
good feel all along. It's taken us a
while to get our offense down. I
think we're as good as any team in
the NFL."


WBA will sanction Holyfield-Foreman fight


NEW YORK (AP) - Evander Holyfield will not
surrender the World Boxing Council's piece of his
heavyweight championship without a fight.
Holyfield, who won the undisputed title from James
"Buster" Douglas Oct. 25, is signed to defend it
against 42-year-old George Foreman April 19.
"The fight is happening April 19 because Evander
Holyfield is the undisputed heavyweight champion of
the world, and there's nothing (WBC president) Jose
Sulaiman can do to change that," Dan Duva, Holy-
field's promoter, said Wednesday.
He spoke at a news conference called to officially
announce that the World Boxing Association had
changed its stance and will sanction the match.
The WBC, WBA and International Boxing Federa-
tion all ruled that Holyfield's first defense had to be


against Mike Tyson, who lost the title to Douglas.
At the news conference, James Binns, counsel for
the WBA, read a letter from WBA President Gilberto
Mendoza to Holyfield in which Mendoza said the
WBA would sanction the fight with Foreman "upon
the condition that the winner must defend the title
against the then leading available contender, by no
later than June 11, 1991."
Tyson, who is to fight Alex Stewart Dec. 8 at
Atlantic City, N.J., currentlyis the No. 1 contender of
all three governing bodies.
The IBF Executive Committee reportedly is lean-
ing toward sanctioning the match, and President Bob
Lee said by telephone that he will have an announce-
ment by the end of the week. Should the fight be
sanctioned, Lee said, the winner would have 30 days


to negotiate with the leading contender for a defense
by next Oct. 25.
Duva threatened court action against the WBC
and to take his case to the public and to advertisers
who sponsor WBC fights on television, adding: "I
believe the WBC is going to sanction this fight or get
out of boxing.
"I see the possibility of a congressional investiga-
tion into boxing if they steal Holyfield's title."
Asked why he would press for WBC recognition
since the fight will happen even if it's withheld, Duva
said: "Why it is important is Evander Holyfield
earned it."
Duva said the WBC sanctioning fees for the Holy-
field-Douglas fight were more than $300,000, with
$150,000 coming from Holyfield.


R.J. Reynolds (right) celebrates with teammate Barry Bonds after the Pi-
rates clinched the National League East. Reynolds signed a contract with a
Japanese baseball team Monday. (AP Laserphoto)


Pirates' Reynolds signs


with Japanese team


TOKYO (AP) - The Yokohama Taiyo
Whales said Wednesday they have
signed former Pittsburgh Pirates out-
fielder R.J. Reynolds to a one-year
contract.
Tadahiro Ushigome, the Whales' pub-
lic relations director, said Reynolds
signed the contract in Tokyo on Mon-
day to play for the Japanese team next
season.
Reynolds was a member of the major
league all-star team that lost an eight-
game series to the Japanese 4-3-1 ear-
lier this month. He played in three


games, going 4-for-9.
Japanese newspapers said the con-
tract was for $1.3 million, but Ushigome
declined to comment in accordance
with Japan's usual practice of not dis-
closing contract amounts.
The 30-year-old Reynolds batted .288
in 95 games for Pittsburgh this year.
Ushigome said that Reynolds would
return to Tokyo on Jan. 29 to join the
team in training on the southern island
of Okinawa.
Ushigome said the Whales have re-
tained the Brewers' Jim Paciorek.


NFL standings

AFC East
W L T PF PA

Miami 8 1 0 192 96
Buffalo 8 1 0 274 150
N.Y. Jets 4 6 0 178 216
Indianapolis 3 6 0 125 196
New England 1 8 0 130 257

AFC Central

Cincinnati 5 4 0 212 225
Pittsburgh 5 4 0 171 147
Houston 4 5 0 194 169
Cleveland 2 7 0 128 235

AFC West
L.A. Raiders 6 3 0 170 137
Kansas City 5 4 0 193 138
San Diego 5 5 0 214 163
Denver 3 6 0 197 224
Seattle 4 5 0 175 183

NFC East
W L T PF PA
N.Y. Giants 9 0 0 226 110
Washington 5 4 0 199 169
Philadelphia 5 4 0 227 186
Dallas 3 7 0 125 204
Phoenix 2 7 0 110 240

NFC Central
Chicago 8 1 0 229 126
Green Bay 4 '5 0 176 196
Tampa Bay 4 6 0 170 243
Detroit 3 6 0 213 237
Minnesota 3 6 0 194 189

NFC West
San Francisco 9 0 0 198 138
New Orleans 4 5 0 171 164
Atlanta 3 6 0 232 251
Los Angeles 3 6 0 198 258


I �I I I








Tropic Times
Nov. 16,1990


Giants, 49ers downplay


Dec. 3 'Super' match-up


-- J

San Francisco quarterback Joe Montana faces a tough New York Giants'
defense Dec. 3, but isn't looking past Sunday's game against Tampa Bay.
(AP Laserphoto)


by The Associated Press

Ask Bill Parcells THE QUESTION
and you get THE ANSWER.
"We're not on a collision course
with the 49ers," the New York Giants'
coach says. "We're on a collision
course with Detroit.
Yeah. Sure. OK.
But try telling that to ABC, which
televises Super Bowl XXIV I-II on
Dec. 3.
Try telling that to talk show hosts
and callers in the two cities that house
the first teams to start the season 9-0 in
tandem since the Bears and Lions did it
in 1934. And who were the Joe Mon-
tana and Phil Simms of that year?
The Giants-49ers contest has become
a special spectacle in this odd season
when the main topics of discussion are
the loony schedule and the even loon-
ier officiating. In fact, because parity
now refers only to the 23 teams below
the Giants, 49ers, Bears, Bills and
Dolphins, a meeting of two good teams
is a rarity and a meeting of two 11-0
teams unheard of.
Yes, next Monday night's Raiders-
Dolphins game in Miami could be a
good one. But it would have been a
better one if the Raiders hadn't stumbled
over Kansas City and Green Bay the
past two weeks.
Which is what Parcells and George
Seifert have to worry about the next
two weeks against Detroit and Phila-
delphia (New York) and Tampa Bay


and the Rams (in San Francisco). You
can probably scratch Detroit (it's out-
doors) and Tampa Bay but the Rams
and Eagles are another story, particu-
larly the Eagles, whose defense looked
its ferocious self for the first time this
season against the Washington Redskins
on Monday night.
Typically for the 1990 season, the
Giants-49ers game means very little in
a tangible way. It gives the winner an
edge for home-field advantage in an
NFC title game (both have to get there
first) and it also helps the winner stave
off the Bears in the fight to avoid
having to play in the first round of the
playoffs.
But as for anything else?
The Giants lead the Eagles and
Redskins by four games in the East;
the Bears lead the Packers by four in
the Central and the 49ers lead the Saints
by five in the West.
With seven games to go, that means
the races are over - the 49ers' magic
number is two; for the Bears and Giants,
it's three.
So despite what Parcells and Seifert
say, their meeting Dec. 3 is the game
that saves the season (decade? year?
century?) for the NFL.
Parcells even went so far as to hint
Monday that trying to become the first
team to go unbeaten since the 1972
Dolphins has its positive aspects.
"Yes, at this point it's aplus factor,"
he said. "The players really want;to do
this."


NFL underdogs jockeying for playoff spots


by The Associated Press

Just to remind people that 16 games is a long season
... Here cometheSaints, Packers and Chargers. There
go the Bucs and, to a lesser extent, the Raiders.
While the Giants, 49ers, Bears, Dolphins and Bills
continue to sail along at the top of the NFL with a
combined record of 42-3, the jockeying for secondary
playoff positions is changing every week.
A lot of the action Sunday was on the West Coast,
where the Packers handed the Raiders their first home
loss of the Art Shell regime. The Raiders, who had
won 10 straight at the Coliseum under Shell, now are
6-3 and officially out of the elite.
And the Packers (4-5) are back in the NFC wild-
card race, along with the 4-5 Saints, who have un-


leashed Craig "Ironhead" Heyward and the defense
in two straight wins by a total of 56-14.
Heyward, who had 35 yards in 11 carries in his first
seven games, gained 277 yards in 39 carries the past
two weeks, including 155 yards in Sunday's 35-7
destruction of the sliding Bucs.
Tampa Bay, which started 4-2, now has lost four
straight and has been outscored 102-23 in the last
three.
Then there are the Chargers, who improved to, 5-5
with a 19-7 win over Denver.
San Diego is only 1 1/2 games behind the Raiders
and a half-game behind the Chiefs in the AFC West
and the difference is quarterbacking.
Steve DeBerg of the Chiefs and Jay Schroeder of
the Raiders have had predictable off-days the past two


weeks, while the Chargers' Billy Joe Tolliver hasn't
thrown an interception in four games (121 attempts),
after throwing eight in the first six games. Kansas
City hasn't scored an offensive touchdown in 10
quarters.
But the key is defense for the Chargers, who are 5-
5 after a 2-5 start. In their first five games, they
allowed 322 yards per game and were minus-4 in
turnover ratio; in their last five, they've allowed
199.8 yards and are plus-15 in turnovers, as Burt
Grossman, Lee Williams, Leslie O'Neal have all
demonstrated Pro Bowl capabilities.
"They'are as good up front as any team we've
played this year," quarterback John Elway of Denver
(3-6), another team going south fast, said of the
Chargers.


Manley ready to make comeback


WASHINGTON (AP) - A year after being banned from the
NFL, Dexter Manley is ready to resume a career that has
taken him from the Super Bowl to drug and alcohol treatment
centers.
But the former Pro Bowl defensive end says he has also
used his time in rehabilitation to prepare himself for rejection
from the league and the Washington Redskins.
"My skin has grown tough," said Manley, banished last
Nov. 18 after violating the league's substance abuse policy
for the third time. "The most important thing for me is to stay
focused on my recovery."
NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue will meet with Manley
in New York today before deciding whether the defensive
lineman could return. The commissioner had said he would
review the case after one year.
If Manley were reinstated, the Redskins would have to
decide whether to take him back for the final six weeks of his
contract. Team officials, however, have said privately that
isn't likely to happen.
"I'm hoping the commissioner does what's best for the
league and for the game, and I hope I play again," Manley
said from Houston, where he did volunteer work at the John
Lucas New Spirit substance abuse clinic. "If not, life goes
on. I will accept whatever will be."
Manley has said if the Redskins don't want him, he'd be
interested in playing for Miami, Denver or the Raiders.


Two players who were also banned by the NFL were later
reinstated after a year off, though they are not playing now.
Tony Collins, who played for the New England Patriots, was
cut by Miami this summer; Stanley Wilson has not played
since going to the Super Bowl with the Cincinnati Bengals.
Manley's attorney, Bob Woolf, said he was confident his
31-year-old client will play again somewhere.
"You don't have that kind of talent around," Woolf said.
"There have got to be teams that could use him."
In nine years, Manley had 97 sacks, including a team-
record 18 in 1986.
Just as important, he provided some spark to an otherwise
bland team.
He called himself "Dr. D" and sported a Mohawk haircut.
When San Francisco quarterback Joe Montana came to town
shortly after returning from major back surgery, Manley
showed no sympathy. "I'll ring his clock," he said.
But the emotions he showed on the field also took a toll on
his private life.
He was treated for drug and alcohol abuse in 1987 and was
suspended for 30 days in July 1988 after testing positive for
cocaine. It was cocaine again that did him in a year ago, and
he admitted it at a news conference.
Yet he became a hero to many when he went before a
congressional committee and acknowledged another prob-
lem - illiteracy.


NFL names


top players

NEW YORK (AP) - Seattle
quarterback Dave Krieg, who
threw the winning touchdown pass
as time expired, and Kansas City
linebacker Dererick Thomas, who
sacked him seven times before
that, were named AFC Players
of the Week Tuesday.
Running back Craig Heyward
of the New Orleans Saints and
defensive end Richard Dent of
the Chicago Bears won honors in
the NFC.:
Krieg completed 16 of 23 passes
for 306 yards and two touch-
downs, including a 25-yarder to
Paul Skansi in the final seconds
as Seattle edged Kansas City 17/
16.
Thomas set an NFL record with
his seven sacks.












22 Tropic Times
22- Nov. 16, 1990


YOUR HOROSCOPE

by Charles King Cooper


ARIES (March 21 to April 19)
You'll make a point of saving more
time for study and other mental
pursuits now and in the coming
weeks. Legal, publishing and school
concerns are favored. Research on a
financial matter is indicated. Once
you get unfinished tasks out of the
way, your social life soars.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20)
Both old and new friends play a part
in the week's activities. Focus on
career plans. Favors are asked of
you, but you in turn receive benefits.
Because your drive is backed by
self-discipline and original thought
now, you'll make notable career
progress.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20)
Don't simply rely on the muse for
creative stirring, but ,prepare the
wE.y with solid concentration. Some
make plans to take the children on a
special trip. Clearing the air in a
heart-to-heart talk with a close tie is
akin to.making a new start.
CANCER (June 21 to July 22)
First, attend to -what needs to be
done at home base. Then, you'll be in
a better position to judge what
innovations to include on your
agenda. You're on a roll in your
career. Once you finish a project,
you'll come up with new ideas to
increase income.
LEO (July 23 to August 22) How a
child handles a responsibility will be
the factor in judging what additional
freedoms to extend. Home life is


highlighted now. Though you may
not be in the mood for social life,
you'll do your shar of talking on the
phone now. Some nome duties also
keep you busy.
VIRGO (August 23 to September
22) You'll be planning some impor-
tant financial moves now and in the
near'future. You have the courage of
your beliefs and may become
involved in some cause. You make a
good appearance before others now.
Hard work on a career project
consumes much of your time.
LIBRA (September 23 to October
22) Your follow-up timing on deals is
excellent, though you and a close tie
may have difficulty coming to an
agreement about a financial matter.
You should be able to complete your
research now. Travel soon will be on
your agenda. A partner may not
budge on a personal matter just yet.
SCORPIO (October 2K to Novem-
ber 21) Loved ones are busy making
plans for continued happiness. You
might want to take a breather from
excessive activity to catch your
breath lacer. A career matter is
settled to your satisfaction. A friend
or child seems unduly stubborn. Be
patient.
SAGITIARIUS (Novemaber 22 to
December 21) You're motivated to
achieve now, but mustn't expect
immediate feedback for your new
ideas. Continued work on them,
though, br tigs a great sens a of well


being. ThLigs should be proceeding
nicely in domestic affairs. Dating
and recreation should be on the
upswing now.
CAPRICORN (December 22 to
January 19) You work well as a team
now, but con't fuss over mutters of
investment and spending. Plan for
more homr entertaining. You live up
to your reputation as a hard worker
now. Social graces too help you win
support of others. Intuition is the
key to relationships.
AQUARIUS (January 20 to
February 18) A romance becomes
more serious now. Couples make
intelligent moves regarding the wel-
fare of offspring. Petty jealousy
could arise at the office. Rise above
it. You're the mastermind of effi-
ciency in domestic interests now. A
cycle of increased personal magnet-
ism begins now.
PISCES (February 19 to March
20) Continued popularity is yours,
although some of you may be
wanting to spend more time Julone
with a romantic interest. Well
thought-out career plans begin to
pay off. Your timing is excellent.
Friends are behind you. Avoid
ideological disagreements.

|H '-


KSingCrossword


ACROSS
1. Reporter's
question
5. Monk's title
8. Water
12. First-rate
13. Constellation
14. Operates
15. Portion
17. Calcutta
measure
18. Certain
chickens
(var.)
19. Catacomb
figures
21.Japanese
porgy

22. Fruit peel
23. Abbr. on
letters
26. European
gull
28. Size of type
31. Praise
33. Doleful
35. Emerald Isle
36. Murdered
38. City in
Serbia
40. An affirma-
tive
41. A failure
43. A bribe
45. Hunting
expedition
47. Fastidious
51. Discharge
52. Lodgings
54. Great source
of supply
55. Swiss cantor
56. Indian
57. Units of
energy
58. Poet's word
59. Garden
worker


DOWN
1. Moslem grant
of property
2. Unit of
academic
credit
3. Philippine
termite
4. Dogma
5. Field
flowers
6. Table scrap
7. Municipal
official


8. Classify
9. Dilemma
10. Distinct part
11. Inquires
16. British
streetcar
20. Inlet
23. Overhead
railways
24. Girl of song
25. Drinking
thirstily
27. Pallid
29. Even the
score
30. Alfonso's

queen
32. Expands
34. Reject with
contempt
37. And not
39. Fly
42. Ruffled pride
44. Roofing
substance
45. Sown (Her.)
46. Moslem
prince
48. Pianist Peter
49. To comer
50. Belgian river
53. Suffix of
agency


� 1990 by King Features Syndicate. Inc.


I Is e s


Stud's services from AKC Cocker Spaniels, buff color, great
disposition. 226-1348

AKCRottweiler stud services, champion pedigree, show
quality. 287-3114

Miniature Pincher puppy, male, black and tan, pure bred.
(looks like little Doberman pinchers. $180. 261-3325

German shepherd female puppy, CCP registered, excellent
pedigree, 8 wks old. $300/firm. 252-1190

Peek-a-poo puppies, I male, 2 females, 5 wks. old. $115/obo.
261-3325

10 weeks old Dachshund puppies, pure bred, no papers. $125.
252-2081 '

Large dog kennel. $60. 286-4828

Pit bull puppies, born Oct. 7. $100. 252-6073


Free Siamese cats, 2 year old male, 8 year old female.
226-4885/0335





17" Sharp color TV, picture in a picture with remote, cable
ready. $350/obo. 284-4093

New Canon lenses; 135 mm f/2.5. $125. 80-200 mm f/4.0.
$175. 200 mm telephoto f/4.0. $140. 252-2656

Pioneer amp., teac cass. player, advent mini spkrs and stereo
stand. $250. 284-5427

Commodore 128 with floppy drive and modem, cp/m
software and manuals, used five times only. 284-6222

Sharp 25 in. color TV w/remote, exc. cond. $350. 284-4985

Nikon Action touch 35 mm, water resistant, auto focus
camera. $100. 264-4159 Chris

10" black and white National TV, model TR-12 17 It. $35.
269-1651

Apple I1 GS w/756 K memory, various software, good cond.,
must sell. $1500/!obo. 287-3788

Sansui solid state stereo phonic amplifier model AU-777-A
(365 V.A.) $225. 261-1734 after 5 p.m..

Stereophonic tuner fm/am, Marantz model 115-B. $75. 261-
1734 after 5 p.m.

Yamaha SR-30 surround. $150/obo. MCS
speakers.$S100/obo. 286-4286

35 mm Olympus camera w/500 mm lens, filters, flash case.
$350. 284-5517 call Jean between 7 a.m. - 4 p.m.

21" Sony Trinitron TV. $350. Microwave Sharp carrousel.
$215. Hammond organ. $1500. 252-5898

19" color TV Zenith, no remote control. $250. 287-4290

Camera 35 mm Pentax K-1000 1:2 50 mm lens; macro
zoom f/4.5 80-200 mm; Vivitar flash. $300. 287-6582

Zenith 161 "transportable" computer 640-K; dual disk; built
in monitor new printer all with manuals. $950. 236-2643

Cannon AE-I camera w/xtra lens, filters and numerous
accessories. 282-3495

New Epson LX-810 printer w/3 new cartridges ribbons. $175.
282-3495

Tandy 1000 TX computer, desk, 5 1/4" and 3.5 disk drive,
printer, joystick, software, smartwatch. $1000. 287-3027

Entertainment center, 19" color TV, turntable, tuner,
equalizer, dual cassette deck, speakers, cabinet. $1000.
287-3027


25" console color TV. $450. Kimball organ.. See at 7208
Cardenas. 252-2155
VHS, 2 years old, cost new. $400. Excellent condition. $185.
252-1143

Magnavox color EGA monitor with EGA graphics card.
$425. 286-3524

Video camera G.U.-25 J.V.C. 8 mm with accessories, color
TV. 264-3437

Honda electric guitar. $200. Kimball organ music. $650.
252-6051

Complete Pioneer stereo system, good cond. $1000 Zenith
19" color TV w/antenna and TV stand. $190. 284-3720

Pioneer amp, teac cass., deck, advent mini speakers and
stereo stand. $250. 284-5427

Cannon A-1 35 mm camera 50 mm and 135 mm telephoto
lens, speedlite and leather case. $400. 252-2582

IBM clone, 640 RAM, 20 meg. hd, 1-5 1/4 disk drive, amber
monitor. $675. EGA color monitor, new. $370. 287-3293

Pioneer KT-7X tuner, MCS integrated amp. $100/both. 284-
6186 after 5 p.m.

Sony Betamovie camera, model BMC #100, exc. cond. $500.
252-2080

24" color TV, good condition. $250. 226-0415

XT turbo, 25/ IP/ IGP, 768JB RAM 360 KB floppy, 20 mb
hd, CGA monitor, NX-1000 11 printer. $1250. 260-2157

VCR - Sony Betamax SL-2400, need adjustment and fine
tuning. 1/2 of original price. $240. 223-2643

Sony FH-203, compact component system, 280 PM PO.
$225. 233-1229

Nintendo with 10 games. 287-5934

2 Technics spkers, 4 way, 5 spker system, 300 watts, 16"
woofer, 7" tweeter, 3 midrange, spectrum power output
meter, 4 setting power output. Leaving soon. $400/neg.
284-6590

Symphonic small stereo, good for kids. $125. 252-2943 after 5
p.m.



Well preserved 1976 Mercury 4-dr. w/all elec. doors, a/c, etc.
See to appreciate:. 5089-A Diablo. $2500. 252-1194

1975 Jeep Wagoneer automatic transmission, overdrive,
am/fm/cass a/c, cb, greatcondition $2300/obo. 287-3114

1984 Ford Escort 4-dr, auto, a/c, p/s, p/b,. cruise, tinted
windows, good condition . $2200. 284-6675

1982 Renault Fuego, 1,600cc, automatic, p/w, p/1, p/s, a/c,
radio. $2000. 225-1313

1975 Monte Carlo, newly rebuilt engine. $2500. 287-4992

1984 BMW, 4-dr, dark green, a/c, shift, duty paid, exc. cond.
$10,000/negotiable. 252-6454

1980 Jaguar X-J6. $7100. 252-5530

1982 Datsun 280ZX, exc. cond., new interior, low miles.
$5500. 284-5491

1978 VW (German) convertible, a/c, customized. 224-7671

1987 Nissan Sunny station wagon, auto, a/c, am/fm/cass.,
no duty paid. $5000/obo. 260-3533 leave message

Rescue my car from the Clayton garage (1975 Chevy Bel Air)
because I'm PSCing. $500/obo. 283-5586

1974 VW Bug, very good condition, radio am/fm. $1550.
287-6631

Mitsubishi - Gallant - Turbo, diesel, duty paid, 5-spd, anti-
rust, Zeibert treatment. $7500. 266-4885/0335


1984 Ford Escort L, 4-dr, 1.6 It. engine automatic, a/c, p/s,
p/b, cruise, everything works, runs great. $2200. 284-6675

1980 Buick Le Sabre, 6 cyl., duty free, am/fm/cass., new
tires, very good cond. $1700. 252-1241

1986 Buick Somerest, impeccable cond. 25 mpg, 5-spd,
power. $7500/obo. 287-6494 after 6 p.m.

1978 Buick Electra, all power (and it works, too), stereo, new
rubber. $3000/firm. 287-6494 after 6 p.m.

1987 Mazda B-200 p/u, I/b, US spec. 1984 Dodge Daytona
"as is". Best offer. 236-3051/260-9833

1984 Toyota Cressida, 4-dr, p/s, p/l, p/w, a/c, am/fm/cass.
Best offer. 252-6845

1978 VW van, 9 passengers, exc. cond. $1500. Rotor tiller.
$200. 287-3983

1981 Oldsmobile Toronado, diesel, loaded, great cond.
$3000/obo. 287-4290

1978 VW, blue, Brazilian, good cond., new radio w/speakers.
$2100. 252-6879

1977 Buick Century, 4-dr, 6 cyl., auto, needs work. $300.
252-2287

1953 - 1964 Bestop tiger top for CJ3B Jeep, w/doors
hardware, new in box. $275. 286-6524

1983 Nissan 4 x 4 kingcab, shell, brushguards, a/c, alarm,
tint, hitch, 6 speaker Kenwood, exc. cond. $6900. 284-3632

1984 1.6 S.R. Toyota Corolla, good cond., radial tires, duty
paid. $4900. 232-5139 call after 5 p.m.

1988 Nissan Sunny station wagon, good cond. $6300. 1988
p/u Nissan Double cab. $8500 good cond. 226-0415

1990 Mazda MX-6 GT, fully loaded, with bra, must see.
287-5934
1982 Dodge Aries station wagon, auto, a/c, p/s, p/b, 4-cyl,
good tires, must see, duty not paid. $2700. 252-2772

1987 Nissan van XE, blue, low miles, tinted windows, am/fm.
$9500. 287-4998

1986 Mitsubishi Montero, 4 x 4, hi-top, diesel, duty paid, a/c,
p/s, am/fm/cass, 5-spd, excellent cond. $12,500. 287-3293

1984 Dodge Omni, 4-dr, 2.2 L, new tires, a/c, am/fm, exc.
cond. in and out. $3400. 260-2157

1979 Plymouth Horizon, a/c, perfect running condition, duty
paid. $2000. 260-2932

1983 Jeep CJ-7 Renegade, 4 cyl, 5-spd., 3500 pounds, elec.
winch, new soft top, new chairs. $4800. 268-0586

1983 Jeep CJ-7 hardtop, good cond., duty not paid. $6000.
260-7769

1970 Chevelle Malibu V-8 307, 2-dr. $1000/obo. 284-5696

1980 Dodge Omni, auto, a/c, am/fm, duty paid, looks good,
runs good. $2900/negotiable. 223-0064

1980 VW bug, sun roof, exc. cond. $ 1850/ obo. 286-3382 after
6 p.m.

1988 Nissan Sunny, with a/c, 5-spd., am/fm, only 17,000
miles. $4800. 284-6186 after 5 p.m.

1983 Nissan Pulsar, very good cond., sunroof, 5-spd, good
gas mileage, one owner. $3800/obo. 282-3605/4472 ask for
Crit

1986 Datsun kingcab p/u, w/topper, 75,000 miles, 4 cyl,
5-spd. $3500 sell by Dec. 3rd. 287-6936

1978 Ford Granada, 2-dr, not duty paid. $1000. 252-6241

1985.Roky Daihatsu turbo diesel, full extras, duty paid, best
offer. $8600. 261-6584

1978 Plymouth Volare, pis, p/b, at, runs good, body has rust.
$500. 284-3366 ask for Fink


1976 Ford Mustang II, duty paid, 4-cyl., new battery, needs
body work. $1000. 230-0847

1980 AMC Concord, good cond., dependable. $2000/obo.
269-3926 evenings

1988 Ford XLT 150 p/u truck, like new, low mile, loaded.
252-6838

1975 Volvo 245, 4cyl, sw, a/ c, standard shift,.good tires, good
mechanical cond. $1700. 252-6838


Country crafts for Christmas or special occasions. (Country
bunnies, Santa and Mrs. Claus. 287-4771
Responsible Army dependent will babysit my home Kobbe
area, newborn welcome. 284-4089


Spanish speaking maid, available M-F. 287-4379


Excellent bi-lingual maid/housekeeper part-time. (M-W-
Th). 286-4232 after 5 p.m.

Live-in Spanish speaking maid, responsible and good with
children. 228-6386

Spanish speaking lady offers her efficient services as a full or
part time maid/tutor/babysitter. 224-9348

Spanish maid, very honest, good with kids, good references.
250-0181 ask for Isabel after 6:30 p.m.

Piano lessons at student's home, all ages, open time. $8 an
hour. 262-7741

Excellent honest Spanish speaking maid, excellent
housekeeper, child care, excellent references. 228-4852 call
after 6:30 p.m.

English speaking day maid, reliable honest. with references,
mature, cooks. 221-6641

Mature and honest, live-in maid, English speaking, great with
kids all ages. 220-0418

,Excellent bilingual maid, cooks, cleans, wash, irons, loves
kids, available anytime. 1-2-3 days per-week. 232-4872

42 year old Spanish speaking live-in maid, cleans, irons,
cooks and babysits. $110. 238-1172

Spanish speaking maid on/off post, Mon.-Fri. 287-4322

Mature, reliable, experienced housekeeper, English
speaking, by the day. 228-1680

Excellent honest Spanish maid with little English, cleaning,
ironing, cooking, care for children, references. 284-5429

Typist available for term papers, etc. $1 / $2 a page. 287-4535
ask for Patty

Spanish speaking maid. 228-0506

English speaking maid available anytime. 287-4538

Mature bilingual woman babysitter most evenings and
weekends, references available are excellent. 287-3735

Excellent Spanish speaking day maid, honest, reliable,
trustworthy, hard worker, references, salary negotiable.
252-2129

Best day maid in Panama, Jamaican, fluent English,
references provided. 287-3188

Spanish maid, good with kids, available immediately.
234-0930/ 267-8495




New 19'Cobia fully loaded. 150 hp Johnson outboard, arrow
trailer, duty paid. $18,950/ make offer. 269-5173

18" fish-n-ski w/trailer, 120 h.p. Mercruiser, must sell this
month. PCS. $4500. 284-3332









Tropic Times
Nov. 16, 1990 A2


VHF radio SMR ST-8200, aun/fm/VHF, new in box
w/antenna. $220. 252-5162

21' Paramount Open fisherman, 225 Evinrude, 1989, depth
finder, stereo. $18,500. 256-6410

18' Glastron boat with 130 h.p. Volvo Penta engine, exc.
cond. $4500. 232-5322

23 ft. sail boat (1974) Columbia w/trailer, 7.5 h.p. outboard,
many extras. 228-2331 after 5 p.m.

18' Glasstream Pro Bass boat, 140 h.p. Suzuki, motor guide
brute, trolling motor, trailer, etc. /$9800/obo. 284-4892

34' fiberglass diesel yacht in good condition, reduced to,
$48,000. 252-6073

14 ft. Abernathy boat and trailer, t-top, central console, 30
hp, automatic Evinrude motor (1990). $3500. 225-1372




Patio furniture. $225. Electric portable typewriter. $125.
Drapes and rods. All in exc. cond. 282-3728

2 twin beds with box springs "Like new". $95 each. 260-0778

12" electric desk fan. $19. I1" Penny electric desk fan. $15.
269-1651

Bentwood Rocker and matching table. $50. Glass top coffee
table. $20. 287-6585

Several electric stoves, one clothes dryer. Negotiable.
261-5531

Washer: General Electric, white, heavy duty, 4 month use,
like new. $550. 264-2437

Refrigerator, sofa tables (2), coffee table, mattresses (2),
bicycle. 224-7671

Couch and loveseat, black and mauvetbeautiful set. $1300.
Smoked glass top table w/4 black chairs. $550. 236-1218

Full size waterbed with padded sideboards. Needs minor
repair. $150. 286-3524

Padding for carpets. Brand new. 40 sq. yds. Pads 2 rooms.
$75. 287-5887

Rattan glass top table w/6 chairs. $400. 2 fans 12" & 16"
282-3330

Heavy duty dryer, good cond. $150. 287-3173

Sleeper sofa, leather, tan. $600. Carpet, Oriental, 6 x 9. $30.
Dishwasher, Whirlpool. $70. 287-6494 call after 6 p.m.

Solid hardwood American dining set large table 4 regular, 2
captains chair additional glass top condition new cost $2495
will accept. $1995. 235-4854

Wooden sofa, 2 arm chairs, center table, all white pine,
country style. $250. 284-6683

Magic Chef stove, 20", good condition with connection. $125.
264-6025

Whirlpool heavy duty dryer, exc. cond. $295. 287-6522

Kenmore washer and dryer. $650. A man and womans 10
speeds. $25 each. Traves curtain rods. $10 each. 287-3446
after 5 p.m.

17 cu. ft. Whirlpool, no-frost upright freezer. $250. Kenmore
refrigerator. $450. Small/medium size dog traveling kennel
$20. 264-4371 after 5 p.m.

White bedroom set w/1 chest of drawers, I night stand,
canopy and pink canopy cover and poster curtains, mattress
and box spring. $600. 282-3720

A.C. 20,000 BTU. $150. One year old Frigidaire washer and
dryer. $550. Sunbean iron. $10. 284-3923

Household items and appliances for immediate sale.
252-6241

Whirlpool 18,000 BTU a/c, almost new, avail. o/a Dec 16.
$375. Desk, metal w/fitted glass top. $70 (43" x 33"). 252-6029

Twin size mattress with box spring and frame exc. cond. $85.
252-5179

Beautiful five piece bedroom set w/mattress & boxspring. 8
month old. $850

1-pastel vertical blind new 63" wide 78" long. $100. 252-1111

Cocktail table and two side tables. Like new. U.S. made.
$495/obo. 252-5177

Kenmore dryer. $150. Westinghouse washer. $200. 282-3930

White wrought iron table, glass top, 6 chairs. $250. 286-4390

King size mattress and box spring. $300. 252-2080

Fedders 12,000 BTU, cleaned and painted 30 days guarantee.
$175. 252-1032

Dining room table & China cabinet. $3000. Sofa & loveseat.
$1000. Patio furniture, mirrors, tables, desks, more. 252-6459

Admiral 2 year old white refrigerator, 2 door side by side. 21.7
of capacity. $850. 260-6159

Six piece rattan living room set. Like new. $850. 252-6440

Whirlpool G.E. dishwashers, need repairs. $30 each or two
for $50. 252-2379

Like new freezer, 21 cu. ft. frost free. 233-2002

G.E. 11,000 a/c. $235. Whirlpool 10,000 a/c. $250. Fedders
22,000 a/c $350. 252-2287

G.E. Refrigerator, 17 ft. mustard/gold color, exc. $525 firm.
252-2397


Full size matt & boxspring. $175. Dining room set. $250.
Living room set. $450. Dryer. $350 (1 yr. old). End tables.
$50. 286-3778

Solid wood cherry queen bedroom set - four poster bed,
dresser/mirror, chest. $2000/obo. 287-3790 after 6 p.m.

9 piece dinnette set w/60" table w/chairs and 66" China
cabinet. $1200. 261-8305

Sectional sofa. $650. Armchair. $150. Recliner. $300. Office
swivel chair. $100. Curtains & rods. 252-6454

Frost free General Electric refrigerator like new. $650.
287-4992

Large capacity G.E. microwave oven. $300. Oster kitchen
center. $100. Oskar food processor. $40. 287-3340

5,000 BTU a/c used 2 months. $200. 287-3794

2 Swivel chairs, gold color. $180 each. 252-5301

Refrigerator Admiral 17". $500. Dishwasher G.E. $125.
Three table set. $450. Loveseat. $225. Sofa. $350. Twin bed
w/drawers, etc. 225-1313

Mauve carpet 14'xl8', 8'xlO'. $75.4 blue upholstered chairs.
$75 ea. Programmable cassette deck. $75. Turntable. $40. 2
light blue mini blinds 60" wide. $35 ea. 286-4828
Beautiful five piece bedroom set w/ mattress and boxspring, 8
months old. $850. 287-4157 ask for Davidson




Brendel boxer, full grown, 1 1/2 year old, name; Duran,
special pet...Reward. 252-2383

Large green parrot, talks, special pet. 252-6829/3557




Girl's 12" tricycle, girl's 20" bicycle, ladies 10 spd. bike,
Singer's sewing machine 110/220 V. 287-4886

Hydro-slide, exc. cond. $75. 282-3180

GE washer. $450. Like new, Oak Davenport. $150. Console
TV. $385. 287-6631

20" girl's bike. $30. Lawnmower needs work. $75. Child
skateboard. $10. 287-3087

Tow bar. $100. 287-4992

Sears washer and dryer, like new. Cobra radar detector.
287-5934

Train set, games, toys, etc. 287-3173

Benotto racing bike, 12 spd., slightly used. $180. Eureka
vacuum cleaner, good cond. $40. Philco a/c, 220 V. $85.
252-2397

Baby cradle. $60. Baby swing, clothes 0-9 mths, baby towels,
blankets, socks and shoes. 284-4895

Very special limited edition encyclopedia Britannica. $1000.
286-3473

2 Beach Cruiser bikes; I Penn fishing reel; Tasco telescope,
world class zoom lens with adaptor. 252-1111

Air compressor, gasoline motor, 80 gallon tank. $2300. Air
hoses. $150. 256-6410

Sandblaster, pressure 20 gallon tank with all equipment, new
hose, helmet. $650. 256-6410

PCSing; I coffee table. $100. Coffee and two end tables. $250.
Washer machine. $225. 284-4490

Lamps, bedsheets, bedspreads, towel ornaments, bar cart,
tablecloths, patio sale, Nov. 10. 266-0102

Baby car seat. $15. Infant toddler car seat. $20. Baby carrier.
$10. 260-3485

Maternity dresses, size 16. Sheer curtains, light green and
white. 287-6244

General Electric 6,000 btu 120 V., needs leak repair.
$125/obo. 233-1229

A/c compressor and clutch for Honda Accord. $395/obo.
.Smith Corona portable typewriter, new. $125. 252-5177

Kenmore frostless, large capacity refrigerator, almost new,
with glass shelves and ice maker. $700. 286-4286

Barbie dream house. $70. Barbies. $7. Barbie furniture and
Barbie clothes. Trap set including cymbals, top hat. $450.
287-3294

Baby swing, 2 baby walkers, baby Snuggli carrier,
miscellaneous baby items. 171 Howard. 284-4485 call Becky

Baby walker. $20. Car seat w/cover. $20. Bicycles. $40.
252-6829

50 gal., aquarium w/stand and accessories. $95. Table lamp.
$25. Two scooter. $20. 252-6707

Boys bicycle w/training wheels. $40. 286-3484

500 capacity weight lifting bench, exc. cond. $40. 252-2379

Ladies dresses, new, size 3-4, rose/ floral, cost $102. Sell. $75.
Ladies shoes, 9-AAA. 282-3495

Playskool playtime with baby. $30. Denim Snuggli baby
carrier. $30. 287-4778

Waterbed, full size, mirror headboard w/shelfs, heater, exc.
cond. $100. 284-5394

Tropical rose bushes and other tropical plants. $1.00-$3.00.
284-3332

Armoire. Washer and dryer set. 14k gold jewelry. Radar
detector. Other prices. Good prices. 289-3236


Baby bathtub, bottle warmers, carrier, clothes, cordless iron,
everything excellent cond. and reasonably priced. 287-6722
from 4 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Ironing board. $5. Toaster. $5. Rowing machine. $40.
287-4092

37 gal., aquarium, new, complete set up w/stand. $200/ obo.
284-6484 between 5 p.m. - 9 p.m. only

Beautiful wedding dress by Bianchi, w/veil, size 8-10, like
new. $450. 252-1126

Boy's bikes; Redline 600 c. $100/obo. Team Murray 2-spd.
$80. 252-6929.

Wedding dress. $100. Shower door. $100. Beam box antena.
$30. Keyboard. $400. 252-2781

Bicycle boy 20". $30. Bicycle stationary. $30. 287-6582

Living room curtain gold and blue design with lining, 98" x
102", almost new. Negotiable. 252-6454

New English tan/black broken stripe tweed sport coat, cost.
$235, size 42 regular, tan woolen overcoat, will sell for $125.
252-5643

Surfboard; 5'11", Rip Curl with Tri-Fins, comes with top
freight bag. $300/with bag. 225-6929

Baby walker. $15. 16" and 12" bikes. $40/$30. 252-1257

Corner unit bookshelf, luggage, oriental rugs 6 x 9. 252-2676

Mushroom roll bar, like new. $150. 287-4992

Leroy set used once. $40. Airbrush set never used. $50.
Epilady shaver like new. $10. 252-2138

Canon calculator, needs repair,.2 girls bike. Magic Chef
stove. $175. 260-8850

Riding breeches, ladies 7, rust. $20. Bicycle Bianchi
foldable/adjustable. $45. Ladies small jeans to evening
dresses. 252-2138

Satin bridalgown - exquisite, embroidered cutwork, enhanced
with sequins and pearls, size 10, never worn. $700. 252-6231

Grass cutter, 5 hp, 22" blade, high wheel. $170. 252-5872

Two r/c cars, many extras, wheels, chargers, etc. $250.
252-1201

Ladies bicycle, good.condition. $45. Boys 5-8 bicycle, good
condition. $25. 287-6222

Water skiing slalom with cover. $75. Bronze dinnerware 102
piece set. $75. New PVC plumbing pipes. 252-2760
Infant/toddler clothes, great cond., girls and boys.
Negotiable. 285-4190

Entertainment center, solid wood, great cond. $650. Roll top
desk, solid wood. $625. Baby changing table. $300. 236-1218

7 ft. Sears Christmas tree. $45. Sharp Carousel microwave.
$150. All exc. condition and prices firm. 252-3397

Kenmore heavy duty dryer. $400. Penny wedding dress. $175.
Sofa sleeper. $400. Floral sofa. $400. Kenmore upright
vacuum cleaner. $100. 284-3397




Yamaha Riva 200, excellent condition, low mileage,
w/helmet and vest, 93 mpg. $1900/obo. 287-3788

1988 Yamaha 650, U.S. spec., duty paid, 857 miles, exc.
cond., helmets included. $3000. 284-4082 from II a.m. - 7
p.m.

1982 Honda Nighthawk 650, exc. cond. $1400. 1982 Suzuki
DR 500., exc. cond. $850. 287-4036

1981 Honda custom CX-500, duty paid, looks great, runs like
new. $1650. 287-4988


1978 Kawasaki 650-SR, red color, 17500 mileage. $1000.
283-4404




3222 Empire St. Balboa. 7 a.m. - noon Saturday

6457 Los Rios (clothes, vacuum cleaner, ceramics, etc.)
Saturday

764-B Balboa, multi-family. 7 a.m. - noon Saturday

1009-B La Boca (assorted kids clothes, miscellaneous
articles) Saturday

662-B Howard, 8 a.m. - I p.m. (household items, winter &
summer clothes, adult & baby, $1-S10) Saturday

2364 Balboa. Saturday

2304 Balboa 7 a.m. - 11 a.m. Saturday

145-B Clark St. Albrook 8 a.m. (3 family, household items,
furniture, clothing) Saturday

2473 Morgan Ave. Balboa (electric stove, clothes, chairs) 7
a.m. - 11 a.m. Saturday

7224-A-B Cardenas 7 a.m. - 10 a.m. (coffee and end tables,
household items) Saturday

7224-A-B Cardenas 7 a.m. - I p.m. Saturday

2300-A Balboa 8 a.m. - I11 a.m. (household goods, toys, stereo
console, clothes) Saturday

6348 Los Rios 7 a.m. - noon. (household items, toys, clothing)
Saturday

2422 Morgan Ave, Balboa 7 a.m. - 11 a.m. (clothing,
miscellaneous, new PVC plumbing pipes. Saturday

1522-C Howard 7 a.m. - noon (clothes, toys, misc.) Saturday

5775 Apt. A Diablo 6 a.m. - I p.m. Saturday

2315-A Balboa. Saturday

763 Balboa. Saturday

117 Howard 8 a.m. - noon. (adult, teenage, baby girl clothes,
pajamas, dresses, jeans, formals) Saturday





Siamese kittens for small buy. 252-1110

La Leche League leader interested in reforming Panama
group. 287-6585

One slide projection in good working condition. 252-6193

Lady who bought mola bears at Ft. Amador,bazaar, please
call, I have your bear. 252-6425

PCSing? Tired of mess, noise? We give birds a good home,
live inside not outside. 284-3799

Ping golf clubs, red dot size. 263-9906

Bilingual maid with references must iron and clean, good
with kids. 286-3135

Live-in maid, must be fluent in English, to care for 2 children
of sole parent. 287-3188

To buy double bedroom set, firm mattress, stove 30'
electrical or gas and washing machine, plus table and lamps.
286-4232 after 5 p.m.

Cockatiels, parakeets, budgies for breeding program, best of
care, top dollar paid. 284-3799

To locate Nancy Egbert of Cocoli, reference pekingese
puppy. 252-6989


the TROPIC TIMES Ad Form


Advertising in the Tropic Times is offered on a space available basisto U.S. military members, civilian
DOD employees and employees of other U.S. government agencies. Ads will be accepted only for
NON-COMMERCIAL services or goods offered by the advertiser or an immediate family member.
Offerings of real estate, firearms or personal ads will not be accepted. The Tropic Times reserves the right to
edit any advertisement. Questions regarding non-publication of submitted ads may be directed to the
Editor at 285-6612.
Submissions must be typed or legibly printed and limited to 15 words. Only two submissions per family
per week will be accepted. Each submission must indicate only one category for publication. Ads for
services will be accepted once per quarter as will ads for the Wanted category. Patio Sale ads must indicate
date and location. Submitted ads will be published only once and must be resubmitted for further
publication. Ads not run because of late receipt or lack of space need not be resubmitted; they will be run
the following week unless a specific date is involved.
Deadline for the receipt of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for the following Friday's edition. If Monday is an
official holiday, the deadline is 9 a.m. Tuesday. Ads may be mailed to the Tropic Times, APO 34002 or
deposited in a drop box at the Albrook Post Office. Advertisers should allow seven to 14 days for
processing.

O ANIMALS
O AUDIO-VISUAL
O AUTOMOBILES
O AVAILABLE
O BOA TS & CAMPERS
O FOUND PRICE HOME PHONE
O HOUSEHOLD Check only one category per ad form. Only two adsper person each week
O LOST are alowed.aEchadformis lmitedtolS words. Plessetype orprktneatly.
Information listed below is not bIlded in the b lvbt is requerre for
1o MISCELLANEOUS publication. This information will not be released to third parties.

O MOTORCYCLES
o PATIO SALES SPONOa'S NAME aN cAn


O WANTED


ORG. DUTY PHONE





9g./- IV s- i


4 Tropic Times
4 Nov. 16,1990


Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, with Chancellor of the Exchequer John Major (left), listen to former
Deputy Prime Minister Sir Geoffrey Howe's resignation speech in the House of Commons in London.
Howe launched a devastating attack on Thatcher and opened the door for a leadership change. (AP
Laserphoto)


Conservative confronts Thatcher


LONDON (UPI) - Former Defense Secretary Mi-
chael Heseltine said he will challenge Prime Minister
Margaret Thatcher for the leadership of the Conserva-
tive Party, bringing to a head the political infighting
that has caused the party's deepest division in 15
years.
Heseltine's bid Wednesday to move into Downing
Street had been widely expected amid an escalating
public split within the government over Thatcher's
policy on Europe, which former Deputy Prime Min-
ister Sir Geoffrey Howe called a "nightmare vi-
sion."
Heseltine, 57, said in a television interview that
more than 100 members of the Conservative Party
had urged him to challenge Thatcher for the vote to be
held next Tuesday. "I have a better chance now than
Mrs. Thatcher of leading the Conservative Party into
a fourth electoral victory and avoiding the ultimate


calamity of a Labor government," he said.
Analysts said if Heseltine can get at least 120 votes,
with some 40 abstentions, he would seriously under-
mine Thatcher's leadership mantle. There are 372
Conservative members of Parliament, and Thatcher
must get at least 15 percent more than the majority, or
214 votes, to win. Otherwise a second vote will follow
one week later in which other contenders may stand.
Heseltine said if he won, he would have an
"immediate and fundamental review" of the Thatcher
government's poll tax, a flat fee levied on every
taxpayer regardless of income that has been widely
criticized as inequitable. Voter disillusionment with
the governing party has been reflected in a string of
by-election defeats, even in traditional Conservative
strongholds, fueling concern among junior members
about their prospects in elections that must be called
bymid-1991.


KGB reveals assassination plans


MOSCOW (UPI) - A Leningrad pipe
fitter accused of firing shots at a Red
Square parade last week has told in-
vestigators that he intended to assassi-
nate President Mikhail Gorbachev, the
KGB said Thursday.
The KGB also disclosed that Alex-
ander Shmonov, who is being held in
custody of the security police, stood
only 150 feet away from Gorbachev
and other Soviet leaders when he al-
legedly fired two shots during the
Revolution Day celebrations. Earlier
reports said 650 feet separated the
gunman from the president.
Police Sgt. Andrei Mylnikov, who
claims to have helped disarm the gun-


man at the annual Nov. 7 parade, said
that Shmonov stated during a prelimi-
nary interrogation: "I wanted to kill
Gorbachev."
KGB Col. Pyotr Sokolov said that
Shmonov had written a note describ-
ing his intentions, which was found in
his pocket after the incident in which
two shots were fired at Red Square in
the heart of Moscow.
"The note was prepared in advance
in case of his death during the assassi-
nation attempt," the official Tass news
agency said. "In the note Shmonov
explictly set out his criminal inten-
tions as regards the Soviet president."
Shmonov, described over the week-


end as an anti-Communist active in
radical political causes, had prepared
for the alleged assassination attempt
for two years and practiced rapid-fire
target shooting, Tass said.
Gorbachev, Russian Federation leader
Boris Yeltsin and other dignitaries had
just led a civilian march across Red
Square and returned to their viewing
stand atop the mausoleum of Soviet
state founder Vladimir Lenin when
two shots rang out.
Shmonov, 38, has been charged with
trying to commit a terrorist act under a
criminal code that specifies assassina-
tion of "a state or social figure or
representative of authority."


Bush signs bill to clean U.S. skies


WASHINGTON (UPI) - President
Bush, fulfilling a campaign pledge to
clear America's polluted skies, signs
into law Thursday a historic clean air
bill that touches virtually every major
industry in requiring deep and costly
cuts in emissions causing urban smog,
acid rain, toxic hazards or ozone de-
pletion.
The bill largely follows the outlines
of the clean air plan Bush sent to Capitol
Hill last June - an initiative cited by
environmentalists and industry alike
as the key factor in breaking the 13-
year stalemate in Congress over strength-
ening and updating the 1977 Clean Air


Act. However, environmental groups
criticized Bush for weakening his own
proposal during congressional delib-
erations, particularly in regard to re-
ducing automobile pollution, the larg-
est single cause of smog.
Industry officials, meanwhile,
charged the White House was more
interested in burnishing the image of
the "environmental president" than
in crafting cost-effective legislation.
They said the massive bill would be
much more expensive than the admini-
stration would admit.
The legislation, approved 89-10 by
the Senate and 401-25 by the House


last month, will tighten pollution con-
trols over the next two decades at a
vast array of industrial and commer-
cial facilities, ranging from steel mills
to power plants to the comer dry cleaner
and gasoline station.
It also forces carmakers to build
less-polluting automobiles and the oil
industry to make cleaner-burning "re-
formulated" gasoline, a double
whammy expected to raise the cost of
driving. Bush decided to sign the bill
despite warnings from industry and
several prominent economists that it
will cost thousands of jobs and accel-
erate the nation's economic downturn.


by United Press International

Agencies file $68b claim
NEW YORK - Two government agencies
filed a $6.8 billion claim against Drexel
Burnham Lambert, accusing the former
employer of junk bond czar Michael Milken
of having "plundered" at least 40 savings
and loan institutions in securities deals.

Trump faces deadline
NEWYORK - With aThursday night dead-
line looming for payment of $47 million
interest on bonds for his Taj Mahal casino,
Donald J. Trump asked to return to the nego-
tiating table with bondholders, an attorney
said, but the possibility of bankruptcy re-
mained strong.

Eastern gets reprieve
NEW YORK - Eastern Airlines won a
reprieve from liquidation when a federal
bankruptcy court allowed the beleaguered
carrier to take more money from an escrow
fund to meet its operating expenses. The
judge said $30 million could be withdrawn
from an escrow account in two increments of
$15 million.

Record temperatures set,
Northwest remains cool
Sunny skies and record warm tempera-
tures spread across the Great Plains, Midwest
and eastern United States as fog socked in
New Orleans and the Pacific Northwest
remained soggy and cool. Indian summer
was expected to send temperatures soaring
into the 70s as far north as Chicago.

Typhoon kills 103
MANILA, Philippines - Super typhoon Mike
severely damaged Cebu city, the country's
second most important commercial center,
and a senator Thursday likened the damage
to the blast of an atomic bomb.
Military officials said 103 people were
killed, 84 missing and presumed dead, and
107 injured when Mike slammed into the
central Philippines Tuesday.


Aviation experts
investigate crash

ZURICH, Switzerland (UPI) -
Italy sent teams of aviation ex-
perts and police to Switzerland
Thursday to help authorities find
what caused an Alitalia DC-9 to
crash near Zurich, killing all 40
passengers and six crew members
aboard.
According to Alitalia, the Ital-
ian state airline, the passengers
included six Italians, six Ameri-
cans, two Japanese officials of
the OKI electric company and the
remainder were apparently all
Swiss. The crew, which included,
two pilots, two cabin stewards
and two hostesses, were Italian.
Alitalia identified the six U.S.
citizens as William Briggs, Karol
Forman, John Stuckey, Paul
Vaughan, Stephen Ritter and a
passenger named Bass. It did not
say whether Bass was a man or a
woman.
Both Swiss police and Alitalia
confirmed around midnight that
all 46 aboard the plane were killed
as the DC-9 broke into small pieces
and burned.
Italian Minister of Transport
Carlo Bernini sent a special in-
quiry commission to Zurich to
investigatethe crash and the inte-
rior ministry sent ateam of police
experts to help Swiss authorities
identify the victims.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Gift ofthe Panama Canal M lseum Sections Inside.News .Sports .se dtigns Open season for The Pirates' Doug Classified page 22 changing 1991 Drabek and the A's M iNews page 6 health insurance Bob Welch win basMovies page 15 began Tuesday. ball's Cy Young Notices page 12 See page 5. awards. See page 18. 0AWTpage 16 ~ Trpic Times the TroD *meT Vol. HII, No.41 Quarry Heights, Republic ofPanana Friday, Nov. 16, 1990 Marines launch practice invasion by United Press International marine units to "conduct Desert Shield training in joint and combined operations for participating forces American Marines launched a practice beach invaand to enhance amphibious warfare skills." sion Thursday along the Saudi Arabian coast, apparThe remarks directed at Iraq by Egyptian President gently near the Kuwaiti border, as Egypt and Syria Hosni Mubarak and his Syrian counterpart, Hafez accused Iraq of foiling a peaceful settlement of the Assad appeared to dim the chances for an Arab Persian Gulf crisis by setting conditions for an Arab summit to deal with the Persian Gulf crisis, but other summit. Arab and Soviet envoys pressed their shuttle diploThe Pentagon said the beach drill, dubbed "Immimacy to sound out prospects of a summit. nent Thunder," involved 16 ships, about 1,000 MaMubarak and Assad said in a joint communique rines and 1,100 aircraft and is to continue through after two days of talks in Damascus, Syria, that they Nov. 21. too would continue consultations with other Arab They declined to say where in the Persian Gulf it leaders "to preserve the interests and unity of the was taking place but it was believed to be near IraqArab nation." occupiedKuwait. But they emphasized that "because of what has The Pentagon also said U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force been issued directly from Baghdad, setting precondiand Marines would exercise with Saudi air, naval and tons, it makes it difficult to hold such a summit." Leningrad to begin food rationing -OSCOW (AP) -Leningrad's In recent weeks, Lemingrad "The atmosphere is tense." HunX_ City Council voted Thursday to residents have had to stand in ger is a political specter in Leninbegin wide-scale food rationing two-and three-hour lines for bread. grad because of thetragic memory Dec. 1 for the first time since the Many other necessities -includof the 1941-1944 blockade, when Nazi blockade in World War II. ing eggs, sugar, cheese and sauan estimated600,OO people died, Leningrad Mayor Anatoly sage -have virtually disappeared many from starvation. VETERANS DAY -The joint-service color Sobchak, one of the nation's leadfrom store shelves, according to Korzhov said public support for guard presents the colors during Veterans ing reformist politicians, pushed Maxim Korzhov, a Leningrad rationing increased after stores Day ceremonies Monday. The services, honhard for the severe measure. journalist covering the City throughout the city ran out of bread oring American veterans were held at Corozal Without rationing, he warned the Council session. on Nov. 5 and 6, when residents American Cemetery. (U.S. Army photo by council on Monday, the city of "People here are upset and stocked up forthe Nov. 7 holiday, Spec. James Yocum) nearly 5 million people could face worried about food," Korzhov the 73rd anniversary of the Bolhunger and unrest this winter. said in a telephone interview. shevikRevolution. Ethics Committee opens S&L hearings Thanksgiving WASHINGTON (JPI) -operator Charles Keating Jr., in proceedings that promise to commissary hours Senate Ethics Committee givethenationararepeekintoalargelyhiddenandunseemly COROZAL -Commissary Chairman Sen. Howell side of politics. All five senators claim innocence of any officials have announced a change Heflin opened unusual wrongdoing. in the Corozal and Fort Espinar hearings Thursday into alcommissaries' operating hours leged influence-peddling by Before a packed hearing room, Heflin, D-Ala., told Sens. for Thanksgiving week. five senators on behalf of Dennis DeConcini, D-Ariz., John Glenn, D-Ohio, John McCain The commissaries will open an accused savings and loan R-Ariz., and Donald Riegle, D-Mich., that the "purpose of Monday from 10 am. to 6 p.m. kingpin with a warning to the hearings is to find the facts" and that he hoped the However, they will be closed the lawmakers that many evidence presented would produce "the whole story" of the Thanksgiving Day and Friday. Americans believe they affair. Sen. Alan Cranston, D-Calif., who announced Tuesday The Howard Air Force Base traded their "honor and he would miss most of the hearings in order to undergo Commissary will be open for good names" for cash. Glenn radiation treatment for prostate cancer, was absent at the start regular hours daily except The ethics panel began of the hearings. Thanksgiving Day, when it is the trial-like hearings examining the activities of the soAll of the Keating Five senators will have the chance to closed. called Keating Five senators accused ofimproperly exerting present evidence and witnesses and cross-examine accusing pressure on federal bank regulators to go easy on S&L witnesses in the unprecedented public ethics hearings. Baker to meet NATO, Warsaw Pact may reduce arms foreign ministers WASHINGTON (AP) -SecVIENNA, Austria (AP) -NATO The treaty allows each side to keep Wednesday that substantive questions retary of State James A. Baker and Warsaw Pact negotiators reached 20,000 battle tanks. It also limits each remained, including verification that III is beginning a new round of tentative agreement Thursday on reto 30,000 armored combat vehicles, the North Atlantic Treaty Orgamizaconsultations with other nations ducing non-nuclear weapons in Eu20,000 pieces of artillery, 6,800 comtion and Warsaw Pact actually were as the Bush administration tries rope, diplomats said. bat aircraft and 2,000 attack helicopdestroying tanks, anti-aircraft guns and to solidify support forits toughHungary's chief negotiator, Ambasters. othernon-nuclear weaponry. ening stand against Iraq. sador Istvan Gyarmati, said the last With the treaty scheduled for signBut negotiators in Vienna said the Baker will meet over the minor disagreements were worked out ing in Paris on Monday -the first day issues were relatively minor, and U.S. weekend with the foreign minat a plenary meeting of the 22 nations of the 34-nation Conference on Secuofficials predicted the treaty would be sisters of three African countries belonging to the two military alliances. rity and European Cooperation -dipready for signing on Monday. as well as Romaniaand Finland. Other diplomats, who spoke on conlomats at the Vienna talks had been Gyarmati said negotiating teams had All are members of the U.N. dition of anonymity, also said a tentaunder pressure to reach agreement. sent copies of the draft agreement to Security Council. tive agreement had been reached. U.S. officials said in Washington on their capitals and senior officials.

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2 Tropic Times Nov. 16, 1990 Quitting smoking can turn back health clock (AFIS) -Quitters never win, unless what they're quitting is smoking, said When you feel an U.S. Surgeon General AntoniaC. Novurge to smoke. ello. In the first report on smoking issued since she became the nation's surgeon general, Novello focused on the good news for people who quit smoking. Some highlights of her Septemberreport: *After five to 15 years, quitters'risk K of stroke drops to the same as that of those who neversmoked; smokers have about twice the risk of dying from stroke as non-smokers. *After five years, quitters' risk of Think: Act: cancers of the mouth, throat and esophagus is half that of those who still Sip, eat, chew *After only one year, the risk of O whyn want to uit. iKeep hands busy heart disease is half that of those who .Move/get up keep smoking. After 15 years, the risk is Move/et up equal to that of those who had never Talktoafriend smoked. Smokers havetwicetheriskof .Sigh, yawn, or dying from heart disease compared with breathe deeply lifetime non-smokers. *The risk of lung cancer 10 years after quitting drops to half that of those age 50 have half the risk of dying in the to the same as if she had never smoked. less frequent illness. Smokers' children who keep smoking. next 15 years as do those who continue Smokers have double the rate of low have higher rates of respiratory dis*The risk of dying from lung cancer smoking. birthweight babies as non-smokers and a eases and middle earinfections than do is 22times higher for male smokers and *While studies have shown people 25 to 50 percent higher rate of fetal and children whose parents don't smoke. 12 times higher for female smokers gain an average of five pounds after infant deaths. One fourth of American "Passive smoking-induced infections compared with persons who have never quitting smoking, the health benefits of women continue to smoke throughout in infants and young children can cause smoked. quitting still exceed the risks of the pregnancy. serious and even fatal illness," added '*Within a few yearsthe risk ofbladslight weight gain. Although no study has looked atrates Novello in her report. "Moreover, childer cancer becomes half that of those *If a woman quits smoking as late as of illness in children whose parents have dren whose parents smoke are much who keep smoking. the third or fourth month of pregnancy, quit smoking, the report proposed that more likely to become smokers them*Persons who quit smoking before the risk of alow birthweight baby drops lack of exposure to smoke would result in selves." Parents bring learning to life when reading aloud to kids by Ron Ferland It's important from age two to five years. ReHoward AFB Librarian search done in New Zealand showed when teachers explained new words as they read, children HOWARD AFB (24TH COMPW/PA) -As pardoubled the rate at which they increased their ents, why should we read aloud to children? In vocabulary. short, because youngsters really need to read to Military Family Week is a great time to encoursucceed. Reading is universally recognized as one age reading. Here are a few suggestions: of the key skills we need to enjoy meaningful and Limit television viewing, then set aside a "speproductivelives. cial" time and place to read aloud. Just as "literacy empowers," illiteracy slows Start reading picture books with large-print down oreven blocks our learning process. Accord"sightwords." Some parents reinforce word/picing to the U.S. Department of Education, functional ture association by making big flashcards that match illiteracy is a real problem in the U.S. One in five household furniture. adults can't read a daily newspaper. Gradually, move on to first readers and Mother Preventing adult illiteracy begins by making Goose rhymes. Don't be afraid to ask alibrarian or sure our children get a "headstart" on reading teacher for help in choosing books. abilities. Educators emphasize that reading aloud If you're checking out books from a local lito children helps them mimic sounds and associate -brary, ask for a copy of "The Read-Aloud Handthose sounds with the written word. This ability to book" by Jim Trelease. It's the best advice availmimic exists in infants so we might begin reading able on how we can pass on to our children the J to children when they're less than a year old. lifetime gift of reading. Provost Marshal's Corner Here we are again at the Provost Marshal's Corner I have some statistics for October. Of 36 larcenies, citizens, he decided to pull his handy nunchucks and with another week of housing area statistics. burglaries and housebreakings, 19 were unsecured, assault one. He was apprehended by ajoint patrol. In These are the statistics from Nov. 2 -8. that's 53 percent of the larcenies including six stolen the process of apprehension the individual resisted and bikes, five of which were unsecure. was injured. The individual was then transported to Larceny Housebreaking Burglary Now let's open our crime files and see what we Gorgas Army Community Hospital where he was Secured Unsecured have. treated for several lacerations and bruises. 3 3 2 0 Recently one of our "Bruce Lee fanatics", while Remember, whentravelinginPanama, don't bethe As you can see the amount of crimes are staying traveling downtown, decided to practice his martial UGLY American. about the same. Let's do our best to get zeroes in the arts. That's all for this week, everybody pitch in and unsecured column. Afterbecominginvolvedinan argument with local TAKE A BITE OUT OF CRIME! Commander-in-Chief. Gen. Maxwell R. Thurman Editorial Staff.Sgt. Phillip D. Clark This authorized unofficial command information publiDirector, Public Affairs. Col. Joseph S. Panvini Spec. John Hall cation is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times NCOIC. SMSgt. George Prince Spec. Richard Puckett is published in conjunction with the Arime Prces InformaEditor. SFC Cecil Stack tion Program of the Department of Defense, under the Assistant Editor.,.Sgt. Monique Chere Editorial Assistants.Rosemary Chong supervision of the director of public affairs, U.S. Southern Carolyn Coffey Command. Contents of theTropicTimes are not necessarily Laura de 1a Guardia the official view of the U.S. government, the Department of E lena Costarangos Defense or the U.S. Southern Command. The address is: the o D ic T im es APO Miami, 34002, Albrook Post Office. Telephone 2856612.

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Tropic Times Nov. 16,1990 Retirements resulting from invol(k untary separation actions (but not for cause). Employees who elect optional (immediate) retirement and are deemed terminally ill. Employees called up asreservists Howard AFB Theater, Nov. 19, for active military duty in support of 6:30 and 9:30 p.m. Desert Shield and retire by Nov. 30. Employees in certain positions certified as essential in support of Desert Shield and who were eligible to retire onorbefore Nov. 30 and subsequently Guest appearance by retire by Nov. 30, 1991. This exception may require Secrecountry singer Roy Clark tary of Defense level approval. To be eligible for retirement and the lump-sum option employees must meet the following criteria: Free tickets at Valent, Minimum age Minimum service Zodiac and Sundial (years) recreation centers 62 5 60 20 Lumpsum 55 30 Transfer of function employees who are 48 years old and have 18 years of payouts to den service are eligible for retirement and p o tthelump-sum option as are employees COROZAL (USARSO PAO) -with 23 years of service. Federal employees covered under Civil Employees serviced by the U. S. Service Retirement Systems (CSRS Army South Directorate of Civilian and FERS) who retire on or before Personnel, seeking further informaNov. 30, may still elect the lump-sum tion may contact Catalina Ledesma at payout. 285-5745 or285-5941. The plan is also known as the alterAnyone considering retirement native form of annuity on a 50/50 pershould submit a Standard Form 52, cent payout over a two-year period. Request for Personnel Action, to the After Dec. 1, the AFA benefit will be Benefits Section, Building 560, Corozal, suspended for five years with these exas soon as possible to avoid a delay in ceptions: receiving the retirement check. Employment 079-91 INTERDISCIPLINARY, NM-9. USA MEDDAC-PANAMA, ADAPC Div., Pacific Community. SOCIAL WORKER,NM-185-9 Spec Exp: MS-Social Work. TIG: NM-7. PSYCHOLOGIST,NM-180-9Spec Exp: BA/2yrs. TIG: NM-7. SOCIAL SCIENCE, NM-101-9 Gen Exp: 3yrs. Spec Exp: 2 yrs. TIG: NM-7. Job Rel Crit: None. (A)**This pos. requires that selectee take an urinalysis test forillegal drug use prior to appointment. (B)**This pos. requires that selectee obtain the NOTE: ALL APPLICANTS SHOULD BE AWARE THAT HIRING IS SEVERELY RESTRICTED ADAPCP clinical certification. (C)**Tbis pos. may be filled in any of the three specialties. NOTE: DUE TO DOD WORLD WIDE HIRING FREEZE WHICH IS EXPECTED TO LAST THROUGH 31 Applications will be accepted for both permanent and temporary appointment. DEC 90. INTERNAL PLACEMENT IS NOW PERMITTED & IS RESTRICTED TO DOD CURRENT EMPLOYEES. CURRENT TEMPORARY EMPLOYEES MAY NOW APPLY AGAINST 080-VI INTERDISCIPLINARY, NM-9. TEMPORARY NTE 30 SEP 1991. USA MEDDAC PERMANENT VACANCIES & REFERRALS ARE SUBJECT I MANAGEMENT'S DECISION PANAMA, ADAPC Div., Pacific Community. SOCIAL WORKER, NM-185-9 Spec Exp: MSTO FILL WITH TEMPORARIES. SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT TO DUTIES Social Work. TIG: NM-7. PSYCHOLOGIST, NM-180-9 Spec Exp: BA/2 yrs. TIG: NM-7. SIMILAR TO THOSE REQUIRED BY THE VACANCY. MILITARY SPOUSES: USARSO HAS SOCIAL SCIENCE, NM-101-9 Gen Exp: 3 yrs. Spec Exp: 2 yrs. TIG: NM-7. Job Re Crit: None. PERMITITED, AS AN EXCEPTION TO THE DOD HIRING FREEZE, THE HIRING OF QUALIFIED (A)**This pos. requires that selectee take an urinalysis test for illegal drug use prior to appointment. MILITARY SPOUSES ON A LIMITED BASIS. MILITARY SPOUSES, IF AVAILABLE & (B)**Thig pos. requires that selected obtain the ADAPCP clinical certification. (C)**Thispos. maybe QUALIFIED MAY BE HIRED ON A "ONE FOR TWO VACANCIES" RATE. THAT IS FOR filled in any of the three specialties. EVERY TWO VACANCIES BEING FILLED ONE MAY BE FILLEDBY A MILITARY SPOUSE AS AN EXCEPTION TO THE DOD HIRING FREEZE. 081-91 LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST, NM-346-9. SENSITIVE. USAG, AMENDMENT ON HOW TO APPLY: FAILURE TO COMPLETE USARSO FORM 106, W DPTM, Ft. Clayton. Spec Exp: NM-7. TIG: NM-7. REQUIRED, COULD HINDER AN APPLICANT'S CHANCES OF BEING REFERRED FOR THE 082-91 SUPERVISORY TRANSPORTATION SPECIALIST, NM-2101-11. SENSITIVE. VACANCY. 41st ASG, DOS, Transportation Div., Corozal. Spec Exp: NM-9. TIO: NM-9. Job Rel Crit: 1. Knowledge of DA policies and procedures relatingto management and control of TransportationMotor VB# VACANCIES TITLE AND LOCATION OPEN: 11-16-90 CLOSE: 11-27-90 Pool. 2. Ability to plan, control and coordinate several diverse activities simultaneously. 3. Abilityto communicate orally and in writing. 4. Skill in applying management statistical trends and information. 072-91 MESSENGER (MVO), NM430242 SENSITIVE TEMPORARY NTE 1 YR. UsNOTE: SOPR Form 1177 required. SOUTHCOM,SCJl-Admin Sycs. Div., Ft. Amador. Gen Exp: 3months. NOTE: Position is restricted to person entitled to veteran's preference. Driver's license required. 083-91 (2) EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST, NM-235-11. USAG, DCP, Training &Development Div., Corozal. SpecExp: 1 yratNM-9. TIG: NM-9. JobRelCrit: 1. Skill in designing, 073-91 NURSING ASSISTANT, NM-621-4. USA MEDDAC-PANAMA, GAH, Dept. of Nuradeveloping, conducting and evaluating adult training programs. 2. Ability to interpret policy, plan, ing, Ancon. Gen Exp: 6 months. Spec Exp: 6 months. Job Rel Crit: None. However, applicants must control and manage training and development programs. 3. Ability to counsel employees regarding possess at least 6 months of experience described under duties. NOTE: Only permanent DOD individual development and trainingopportunities. 4. Abilityto consultwith and counsel management employees will be considered. Shift work: 12-hra shift work req. onshortand longterm trainingneeds. NOTE: Position required lifting items weighing up to 70pounds. 074-91 MEDICAL CLERK, NM-679-5. USA MEDDAC-PANAMA, GAH, Dept. of PC&CM, 084-91 SECRETARY (TYPING), NM-318-4/5. USA MEDDAC-PANAMA, GAH, Clinical Ancon. Bilingual(English/Spanish). Shift Work. Spec Exp: I yr. equiv. to NM-4. JobRel Crit: None. Support Div., Ancon. BILINGUAL. Gen Exp: 1 yr. Job Rel Crit: None. However, candidates must However, candidates must show at least one year of experience as described under "duties". NOTE: show at least one year of experience as described under "duties". NOTE: Only permanent DOD Only permanent DOD employees will be considered for this position. employees will be considered for this position. Position may be filled at either grade level. 075-91 SECRETARY (TYPING), NM-318-5. DCA, CFA, CRID, FL Clayton. Spec Exp: 1 yr. at 085-91 CLERK TYPIST, NM-322-3. Provost Marshal Office (Atlantic), Ft. Davis. Gen Exp: 6 NM-4. TIG: NM-4. Knowledge of Spanish required. months. NOTE: Clerical & Administrative Support Positions (CASP) Test is required. 076-91 SUPERVISORY SUPPLY TECHNICIAN, NM-2005-7. USA MEDDAC-PANAMA. NOTE: VB# 536-90, Tractor Operator, MG-5705-6 is suspended until further notice. Logistics Div., Ancon. Spec Exp: 1 yr. equiv. to NM-6. TIG: NM-6. Job Rel Crit: 1. Ability to supervise. 2. Knowledge of stock fund document control operations. 3. Knowledge of personnel VB# 751-90, Supervisory Training Program Specialist, NM-301-11; VB# 049-91, Medical management principles and procedures. 4. Knowledge of DOD Supply System. NOTE: Incumbent Technician, NM-645-6; and VB# 062-91, Technologist, NM-644-7 are hereby cancelled. may be required to work day, evening or night shifts, and perform weekend or holiday work. Only permanent DOD employees will be considered for this position. 077-91 SUPERVISORY RANGE OPERATIONS COORDINATOR, NM-303-7. DPTM, Range Branch,Cocoli. SENSITIVE. Spec Exp: NM-5. TIG: NM-5. Drivers licenserequired. SOPR RECURRING VACANCIES: Form 1177 required. NOTE: Only permanent DOD employees will be considered for this position. The CPO is accepting applications for the following positions: 078-91 BUDGET ANALYST, NM-560-7/9. 1109th USA Signal Bde., Support Div., Financial CLINICAL NURSE -All Specialties. U.S. license required. Sect., Corozal. Spec Exp for NM-7: 1 yr equiv to NM-5. TIG for NM-7: NM-5. Spec Exp for NMLICENSED PRACTICAL NURSE -U.S. license required. 9: lyrequivtoNM-7. TIGforNM-9: NM-7. Position maybe filled at either grade. JobRelCrit: 1. NURSE ANESTHETIST, NM-610-11 -U. S. license required. Knowledge of the organizational structure, programs and work methods of components budgeted. 2. Skill in identifying, categorizing and analyzing quantitative data. 3. Knowledge of budgetary and FOR INFO CALU Ms Sullivan at 285-4116 financial relationships. SOPR FORM 1177 REQUIRED.

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STropic Times Nov. 16, 1990 Air Force regulations govern firearm possession HOWARD AFB (24TH COMPW/ form should be maintained in unit the firearm, such as competition, firearm concealed on their person on PA) -Military members who come to orderly rooms. Howard Air Force Base personal protection or other valid reason. any local base. Panama with personal firearms should Regulation 125-37, paragraph seven, To obtain a license from the ReCivilian members are not authorbe mindful of the rules concerning the outlines firearms registration procepublic of Panama, go to the Judicial ized to carry firearms for personal prostoring of weapons on the base. dures. Technical Police central office located tection while on Howard AFB or AlLocal laws, military regulations and Base housing occupied by unacon Fourth of July and Avenida Nacional brook AFS. Civilians without permits Department of Defense rules governcompanied members are considered and obtain a police check. Two copies who want to transport their firearms ing the registration, bearing, possesbachelor living quarters. People residof the member's bilingual identificafrom the Howard AFBor AlbrookAFS sion and use of privately owned fireing in these quarters must store their tion card and two photographs must be areas to another defense site should arms should be followed closely, firearms in the security police armory provided, contact the 24th Security Police liaiaccording to local law enforcement located in Building 237. Members requesting permits for son at 284-3515, for proper coordinaofficials. Members living in dormitories, handguns are required to turn in the tion with Panama's public forces. According to Air Force Regulatransient quarters, and guest housing firearm along with two rounds for a Firearms will not be transported tion 125-37, which clarifies the rules, are not authorized to retain possession ballistic test. When carrying a firearm onmotorcycles, bicycles, or any other members must register their firearms of their firearms and ammunition. The in the Republic of Panama for pertwo-wheeled or three-wheeled vehicles. regardless if it is stored in an approved security police armory is designated as sonal protection, members must have Weapons registration procedures are a designated area or in military family the storage facility for firearms not their license in their possession and serious matter affecting the safety and housing. authorized for retention by the owner. keep the firearm concealed at all times. security of the base, say security police Firearms must be registered on Air People who want to take their However, while on any military base, officials. Force Form 1314, if the firearm is weapons off base must have alicense registered firearms must be transported For more information concerning maintained in a designated facility or issued by theRepublic of Panama. The unloaded and secured out of the reach registration, call SSgt. Steven Rivera in the member's family housing. This license is based onthe intended use of of occupants. No one may carry a at284-4755. Sgt, Maulice Howard gets down and dirty beneath a concertina wire obstacle. .Soldiers tackle 'Green Hell' story and photos by SFC Robert Waggoner FORT SHERMAN (USARSO PAO ATLANTIC)Escaping from their typewriters, computers and office drudgery, garrison soldiers recently slipped and slid their way through the "Green Hell" Confidence Course. At7a-m.Oct.25,29 Company D US.Army Garrisonandsix Atlantic Detachment, 1 90th Signal Battalion soldiers used the confidence course to develop their teamwork skills and endurance in ajungle environment, Spaced five minutes apatt groups of five had to negotiate 13 obstacles as a leam, "I wanted to show our soldiers there are other things in the Army besides sitting behind a desk," said SFC Bryce Fox, Company D first sergeant. The first barrier to face the team was a five-foot wall. Once over the wall, they scrambled up a narrow, slippery trail infested with rocks, tree roots and vines to the second station. There they entered the "Bushmaster," a course consisting of belly-crawling underneath a low rail, high-stepping through a tire lane and low-crawling beneath two low rails. Teams at obstacle three teetered and tottered across two balSpec, Chitany Johnson and a teammate scale the 40-foot cliff at the cargo ancing logs spanning a 10-foot ditch, net obstacle. Next came a stomach-tightening 40-foot embankment descent using a knotted rope and the hand-over-hand technique. to a vertical pole before sliding to the ground, After reaching the bottom, one soldier was carried on a Just around the corner from station nine loomed station 10 -the stretcher by the four remaining teammates, The team traveled 34-foot wooden vertical ladder, Using the buddy system the unit around an island cove through knee-deep water and back to the encouraged each other to scale over the 34-foot obstacle. Some beach. participants needed to be talked through their fear of heights. After staggering along the beach, the tired participants looked Greeting weary members next was objective 11, a crawl up at the next challenge -a cargo net anchored to a 40-foot cliff through cool muddy water beneath concertina wire. The water which needed to be climbed. Their fear of heights couldn't be laid momentarily refreshed the soldiers for the last two obstacles, to rest at the top of the long climb, because the next task was deWith the finish line in sight and only two more tests of scending another cargo net on the other side, endurance to go, the teams high-stepped through the hip-overs With arms already burning from the rope climbs, stations and clambered over a six-foot wall to finish their "Green Hell" eight and nine further tested the participants. At station eight, experience. soldiers climbed a knotted rope and then inched across a two"It was very challenging and helped me overcome my fear of rope bridge located 15 feet above the ground. Once on the heights," said Sgt. Rayfeen Green after the course, "My main ground, the soldiers hustled to station nine to climb an inclined concern was safety for myself and the squad and to get through ladder and used the commando crawl to cross a horizontal rope that sucker alive."

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Tropic Times Nov. 16, 19905 Hospital commander urges parents to vaccinate children GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY nated with the Measles, Mumps, RuHOSPITAL (USARSO PAO) -A bella -or MMR -vaccine." measles outbreak has recently hapChildren who received a measles pened in Panama, according to Gorgas innoculation before age one should Army Community Hospital officials. receive a second MMR at 15 months, Children under 15 months are the he said. ones primarily affected by the outMcConnell said complications frebreak. quently occur in cases of measles. There "Measles is a highly contagious is also a two percent mortality rate in disease. Gorgas has recently docuinfants. mented six patients with measles, and "Parents should be certain their three of those were hospitalized for children are immunized against complications," said Dr. (Col.) Mimeasles," he stressed. chael McConnell, hospital commander. Measles can be prevented though The current measles outbreak started vaccination. inthe United States in 1989, spreading "I would strongly urge parents to south through Central America. vaccinate their children ages six to 12 For information about the outbreak months," McConnell said. "All chilor vaccinations call Dr. Byron at the dren above 12 months should be vacciGorgas pediatric clinic, 282-5171. Safe houses protect children by Spec. James Yocum FORT CLAYTON (USARSOPAO) -Sometimes, the road home from school can be scary for a child. Suspicious looking strangers, a fall that bloodies the knee and many other hazards often make the trip seem endless. U.S. Army South's Safe House program will give children a place to go when they find themselves in trouble -all they have to do is look for the sign. "There's a poster that will be given out to volunteers," said Sarah Hunt, Safe House project officer. "VolunTURKEY LEADERS Teresa Elvin (front) and Cristina Brandenburg teersputthisposterinthe window,and Likewise, posters will be controlled practice cheerleading at Curundu Elementary School for the upcoming ifachildneeds assistance,they cango items to keep them from falling into Turkey Bowl 90. (U.S. Army photo by Spec. Eric Vetesy) there." the wrong hands, Hunt said. Hunt, a secretary in contraband Volunteers will be briefed on what control, got the idea from a similar actions to take in different situations, program in the United States, called but generally the process is common H ost a sailor for holiday dinners the Helping Hand. sense, Hunt said. The garrison commander's office (NAVSTAPANCANAL -PAO) -Most people in the military have The Safe House program is being hopes to have a high number of safe This holiday season, U.S. Naval Stabeen away from home during the holipushed by USARSO's Mayoral Conhouses -maybe even every other house tion Panama Canal will have its usual day season and know how appreciative gress, in conjunction with the garrison in the neighborhood, Hunt said. amount of sailors here on temporary these servicemembers will feel to be commander's office, Hunt said. "We really need a lot of volunassignment, who will be separated from hosted by your family. Also, this proSo far, the program is lacking in teers," Hunt said. "All they have to do their families and finds. gram will provide them with a wholevolunteers. Only six families have is call their mayor, and we will take The Navy Public Affairs Office is some break from their ships. offered their houses as havens for lost care of the rest." currently soliciting volunteers to host If you are interested in hosting a or scared children. To reach your mayor, contact the one or more servicemembers at their sailor for this holiday season, please For safety reasons a background garrison commander's office at 287homes for Thanksgiving and Christcall the Navy Public Affairs Office at check will be done on volunteers. 6668. mas dinner. 283-5641/5644. Health benefits open season gets under way (AFIS) -Open season for 1991 health insurance determines alternative treatment exists. Individuals Examples of non-geographical plans and biweekly began Tuesday for federal civilian employees and who disagree with their plan's decisions and obtain 1991 premiums (retirees pay the same rates but on a retirees. impatient treatment without precertification may face monthly basis) are: The annual open season, which ends Dec. 10, a $500 penalty. allows employees to compareplans and switch ifthey Large-case management looks for alternative *Blue Cross and Blue Shield: high self, $95.80, up wish, said Office ofPersonnel Management officials. therapies or treatments forterminal or chronic condi$9.12; high family, $199.93, up $19.02; standard self, Underthe Federal Employee Health BenefitProgram tions. According to OPM officials, all factors in the $16.92, same; and standard family, $35.55, same; civilian employees pay about 25 percent of the bipatient's condition are thoroughly checked before the weekly premiums and the government pays the rest. type of care is decided. Alternative methods can in*Alliance Health Benefit Plan: high self, $145.79, Retirees are also eligible for the health insurance clude home care, outpatient treatment and skilled up $70.45; high family, $248.60, up $21.68; standard coverage but pay their premiums monthly. nursing. They stressed cost cutting does not mean self, $16.94, up $1.64; and standard family, $40.83, According to OPM officials, the average bi-weekly diminished quality care. up $3.94; premium in 1991 will increase 6.6 percent -average Five health plans won't be available next year, so *American Postal Workers Union Plan: self, $18.85, premiums jumped 13 percent in 1990 and 20 percent the 45,000 individuals enrolled in them need to pick up 71 cents; and family, $39.93, up $2.62; in 1989. Of the more than 300 plans participating in new plans. Dropped are the American Federation of *Foreign Service Benefit Plan: self, $18.69, down the program, they said, 89 offer premium reductions Government Employees, National Federation of Federal $3.74; and family $55.96, down $13.26; for 1991. Employees, National Association of Government *GEHA Benefit Plan: self, $20.14, up 98 cents; The government, expecting to pay more than $9.8 Employee, Government Employees Benefit Associaand family, $41.38, up $3.43; and billion in 1991 health benefits premiums, has instition, and Postal Supervisors plans. *Mailhandlers Benefit Plan: high self, $14.66, up tuted two changes in the plans to help cut costs: Some plans are open to federal employees in 57 cents high family, $32.67, up $1.25 standard self, precertification and large-case management. general; afew others may first require membership in $11.95, up 68 cents; and standard family, $25.94, up Under precertification, the employee or doctor a union or association. $1.47. contacts the health plan before the employee is admitMost plans are health maintenance organizationted to a hospital for non-emergency care. Based on the type packages, which generally means they serve a Officials advise individuals to compare their curinformation provided, the plan may certify the admislimited geographical area and limit patients to particirent coverage with other plans to see if they are sion for a specified time period. paying doctors and facilities in exchange forcovering getting the best coverage for the money. For more If necessary, stays may be extended. However, a wide range of services at little or no cost above the information on specific health plans, contact local OPM officials said, the plan may deny admission if it premium. civilian personnel offices.

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6 Tropic Times M ltr 6o.619 Military News Company delays shipments FALLS CHURCH, Va. (ARNEWS) -Unsatisfactory performance by a contract carrier has resulted in delayed property shipments for soldiers and DoD civilians, and action against the company. Property shipments from the United States to Europe will be held up for up to three weeks because American Ensign Van Service, Inc., failed to complete movement of consigned shipments. Military Traffic Management Command officials say the company was put on worldwide non-use Oct. 24 for the failure. MTMC is arranging for other carriers to complete shipments stranded by American Ensign. GREETS TROOPS -President Bush greets members of a Tinker Air Force Base AWACS squadron as he arrives contact their loal persons phrope In Oklahoma City. (AP Laserphoto) shipping office to determine the status of American Ensign shipments. ing division at Fort Belvoir, Va. In the category of SeilAwardee, he was cited for, among other efEnergy savers receive aw ards forts, "his ski]fllpromotion of third-party contracting that resulted in the award of the first shared energy WASHINGTON (ARNEWS) -Several Army perFort Eustis an energy option that will allow for insavings contract in the Department of Defense. sons and organizations have won recognition in this creased savings in the future." This project is expected to save $3.5 million in year's Federal Energy Efficiency Awards Program. -William J. DeJournett, chief of the energy branch energy costs over 25 years at one installation." For their efforts in conserving energy, reducing at Fort Rucker, Ala. "One of his most significant Individual recipients in the Small Group category energy consumption and making greater use of alterachievements," explains the award citation, "was the were Francis W. Sands and Raymond Leece of the native energy sources, this year's recipients stand as introduction and testing of a ground-coupled heat 47th Area Support Group in England. examples of what others can do in these times of highpump system forbase housing." Use ofthe system has Leece "was responsible for the installation of nucost energy and dependence on foreign energy sources, produced a 41-percent reduction in consumption of merous energy-saving measures, such as recirculating said Lt. Col. Harry Corley in the Army Energy Office electricity and natural gas in conventional houses. electrostatic air cleaners in vehicle maintenance shops, at the Pentagon. It also has led to reduced gas peak demand in the motion-detecting lighting controls in unoccupied housing He identified the individual awardees along with a winter and reduced electrical peak demand in the units, lighting retrofits in numerous buildings, and summary of their accomplishments as follows: summer. -insulation and double-glazed windows in housing units." -Peter Fludovich of the Energy Management OfAt the center of the energy-awareness program devel-Lawrence Chenkin, chief of the energy managefice at New Cumberland Army Depot, Pa. Under his oped by Sands was "an aggressive campaign to reduce ment branch at Fort Eustis, Va. His development of a direction, consumption and costs for fiscal years 1987 mobility fuels consumption. "shared energy savings contract" with the local gas through 1989 reflected a savings of more than $627 On the organizational side, the award went to Fort company has saved scarce federal government funds, thousand. Carson and the 4th Infantry Division, Colo. and to and has (in the words of the award citation) "given -Robert G. O'Brien, chief of the utilities engineerthe Army Ammunition Plant at Milan, Tenn. Teams' neighbors not only ones with 'stingers' by Steve Davis Their "surprise" is a Stinger, a 12th Aviaon Brigade tube-launched, heat-seeking missile that can chase down a plane quicker than SAUDI ARABIA (ARNEWS) -You you can say "Saddam Hussein." can't see them, but Stinger missile teams "Our mission is to make positive are hidden in nearby foxholes that blend identification of aircraft as friendly or with the desert. hostile and to take appropriate acWalk too close by and a guard will tion," said Sgt. Roy Martin, a Stinger pop up from a clump of sand and scragteam chief. gly brush and give you a hand sign to stop. "If it's hostile, we'll engage that His weapon is loaded, so you'd betaircraft and prevent it from succeeding ter move slowly. in its mission." Go ahead. Tell him why you're at the Martin and his gunner, Pvt. Scott end of nowhere looking for him. Shepherd, keep a 24-hour-a-day vigil Satisfied with your answer, he'll invite near the 12th Aviation Brigade helicopyou to his bunker, dug deep into the ter assembly area. desert floor and lined with sandbags. They spend a week or more at their You'll be glad if he doesn't ask you in; position before rotating to a more comit's nothing fancy. fortable living area for a few days beOnly a bunker, a firing position and a tween missions. bunch of concealed Stinger anti-airThat job includes being able to visucraft missiles are out here in the sand ally identify most of the world's aircraft with each team of soldiers from Comand determine if they are friend or foe. pany D, 3rd Battalion, 5th Air Defense First, aStingercrew visually acquires Artillery. a target and electronically interrogates tronically confirmed as unfriendly and the gunner, the main engine would igThe only neighbors the Spearhead it. on a hostile mission, the gunner could nite and the Stinger would streak toDivision soldiers from Budingen, GerThis missile notifies the gunner be ordered to fire. ward its target and blast it from the air. many, have are scorpions, snakes and whether the target is a true friend, posThe missile tells the gunner when it "It was pretty effective in Afghanilots of flies. sible friend or an unknown. has locked onto the target. Then, all the stan," Shepherd said, "and I have a lot They hope their creepy neighbors "We should get a "true friend" regunner has to do is squeeze the trigger. of confidence in it here." never drop by. The same goes for Iraqi sponse," said Spec. Jeffrey L. Brogdon. "After that, it's up to the weapon," At another Stinger position, one air neighbors further north. "If not, we're going to be on edge. We Shepherd said. defense poet put it in desert terms But if they come anyway, the air dewould definitely be on edge." A small launch motor would propel "They may be bad, but scorpions ain't fense soldiers have something for them. If the aircraft is visually and electhe Stinger from its tube. Once clear of the only ones with Stingers."

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Tropic Times P7 Nov. 16,1990 AF offers activities during Military Family Week HOWARD AFB (24TH COMPW/PA) -The fol--a .-, -L local aerobic instructors, a fashion show of the latest lowing is a synopsis of events that take place during aerobic gear and drawings for prizes. the National Military Family Week celebration at From 10 am. to 1 p.m. there are pony rides Howard AFB and Albrook AFB. Military Family sponsored by the MWR riding stables in the field Week runs Sunday through Nov. 24. between the NCO club and youth center, the BreezeThe week's events include a Kodak Kolorkins way Ice Cream Parlor will be open, and there will be presentation at theZodiacRecreation Center Nov.24 a clown sculpting balloons, Panamanian handicrafts from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., 3rd floor of Building 709. on sale, and a DJ playing music. Kodak Kolorkins are Disney-like characters, with At 1 p.m. there will be a family pet show at the whom you can take pictures. Howard Youth Center. From I to 3 p.m. there will Also Nov. 24, the Panama Canal "Square Ups" be asmall craft and watersafety course atthe Albrook square dancing team performs at the Zodiac Recrea4 pool given by the American Red Cross team. tion Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. These couples Nov. 24 -From 9 until 11 a.m. there will be a perform the traditional and modern steps to country family soccer game at the Howard parade field. and rock and roll music and invite audience participaIm ilitary Certificates will be awarded. tion. The week's other events include: From 10-10:30 a.m., there will be a 20-minute Sunday -Pony rides, free drawing for T-shirts, 10 lecture on the Three L's: Limits, Learning and Love a.m. to noon. Ongoing events at the Howard AFB and by Dr. Byron Efimaides, Gorgas Army Community Albrook AFB Bowling Centers and swimming speHospital chief of pediatrics, at the Howard Youth cial at the Albrook Pool until Wednesday. NA 1. Center. MondayAir Force Band special recognitionto 18 4-24 N yv 90 At the Zodiac Recreation Center there will be the Air Force military family at the Howard Theater, many events taking place. From 10-10:30 am. and 7 p.m. 12:30 to 1 p.m., there will be slide shows on Panama. Tuesday -Parent and child communication work&ZOIX From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., there will be a Panamanian shop by SandyWallace, an experienced family workfoodtasting and sale.From 11 to 11:30 am. therewill shop conductor at the Howard Youth Center at 7 p.m. be a square dancing show by the Panama Canal For sign-ups and information, call 286-4663/3195, or "Square Ups." From 12:30 to 1 p.m. there will be a 284-4700/6135. doing doung o r reWle Panamanian "Pollera" dance, featuring musicians Wednesday -Turkey Bowl at Balboa Stadium. I 1 .and native instruments. Thursday -Thanksgiving buffet, at Albrook, 11 At 3 p.m. in the Howard AFB Youth Center, there a.m. and 2 p.m. family Thanksgiving lunch, 11 a.m. kids are out of school, and there will be plenty of will be a recital and performance by students in at the Howard Officers' Club. Thanksgiving buffet at activities all day. dance, gymnastics, and piano. the NCO Club, 1 to 5 p.m. Thanksgiving weekend At 8 am. there is a parent/child select shot golf Ongoing special events from 10 am. to 1 p.m. at tourto Chiriqui Province until Nov. 25. There will be tournament at the Horoko Golf Course. There will be the Zodiac Recreation Center include Panamanian $2 per family swimming all day at the Albrook Pool prizes, free T-shirts and refreshments. brochures and posters free to military families; a through Nov. 24. From 9 a.m. to noon there will be an aerobics Panamanian handicraft display, handicraft sale by Friday -This is a "down day" for military and the marathon at the Howard gym, featuring base and MWR, and an arts and crafts frame shop display. Community Chapel Schedule HOWARD CHAPEL Pacific Building 500, Phone: 284-3948 11:30 am. Daily Catholic Mass AMADOR CHAPEL 4:15 p.m. Confessions (Saturday) 5 p.m. Catholic Mass (Saturday) Building 108, Phone: 282-3610 11 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:30 am. CCD (Howard School) Oct. -May 1991 9 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:30 a.m. General Protestant Service 10 a.m. Episcopal Holy Eucharist 10:45 am. Sunday School (Howard School) Oct. -May 1991 11:15 am. General Protestant Service 12:30 p.m. Gospel Service 11:30 a.m. Daily Catholic Mass (Monday -Friday) USNAVSTAPANCANAL CHAPEL CLAYTON CHAPEL Building 40, Phone: 283-4148 Building 64, Phone: 287-5859 8 a.m. Catholic Mass 11:30 a.m. Daily Catholic Mass 10 a.m. General Protestant 5 p.m. Catholic Mass (Saturday) 7 p.m. Bible Study (Wednesday) 9 am. General Protestant Service 9 a.m. CCD Classes (at Clayton Elementary School) 9 am. Catholic Adult Classes (at Clayton Education Center) A tlantic 10:30 a.m. Catholic Mass 10:30 Sunday School (Protestant, at Education Center) DAVIS CHAPEL Noon Gospel Service Building 32, Phone: 289-3319 6 p.m. Evening Service (Youth Meeting) 8 a.m. Men's Prayer Breakfast (last Saturday of the month) 8 a.m. Catholic Mass M-W-Th, F 9:30 a.m Protestant Women of the Chapel (each Thursday) 7:30 p.m. Bible Study (Wednesday) 4:30 p.m. Catholic Spanish Mass (Thursday) COROZAL CHAPEL 6 p.m. Catholic Charismatic Prayer Group (Thursday) Building 112, Phone: 285-6717 7 p.m. Catholic Bible Study (Thursday) 4:30 p,.m. Catholic Confession (Saturday) 7 p.m. Jewish 1st Fridays 5 p.m. Catholic English Mass (Saturday) 10 a.m. Hispanic Catholic Mass 9 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 11:30 a.m. Pentecostal Sunday School 10 am. General Protestant Service (Sunday) 12:30 p.m. Pentecostal Fellowship-Worship 7 p.m. Evening Worship SHERMAN CHAPEL GORGAS HOSPITAL Building 152, Phone: 289-6481 Building 254 9 a.m. Sunday School (Sunday) 10 am. Protestant Worship 12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass (2nd floor, Thursday) 6 p.m. Gospel Choir Practice Sun. Protestant Worship (To be announced at hospital) 7 p.m. Bible Study (Wednesday) Weekday Worship (As announced) 6:30 p.m. Catholic English Mass (Saturday) ALBROOK CHAPEL GULICK CHAPEL ,Building 860, Phone: 284-3948 Building 224, Phone: 289-4616 8 a.m. Hispanic Catholic Mass & CCD 9 am. Catholic English Mass 9:30 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 10:30 am. Catholic Hispanic Mass /CCD 9:30 a.m. Catholic Mass 11:30 am. Gospel Service 11 a.m. General Protestant Service 3 p.m. Pre-Baptismal classes (Thursday -by appt only)

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8 Tropic Times Nov. 16, 1990 Dining facilities welcome Excercise common sense, caution when traveling FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -In families for Thanksgiving reuntdmosrainsocurngi famiiesforThan sgi inglight of the increasing incidence of crime and frequent demonstrations occurring in Panama City, individuals are reminded to exerFORT C[AYTON (41ST ASG) -Sharing aThanksHHC, 41st ASG Dining Facility, Building 132, cise caution and common sense while travelgiving with family members in the dining facility has Fort Clayton, noon-3:30 p.m. single soldiers and their ing outsideU.S. Departmentof Defense sites. been a longstanding Army tradition. guests; 1:30-3 p.m. families and guests. The U.S. Army South deputy chief of staff Officers and family members may purchase the HHC, 193d Support Dining Facility, Building 201, for intelligence suggests individuals remain 1990 Thanksgiving dinner at the food cost only. The Fort Clayton, 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m. single soldiers and alert to surroundings and anticipate isolated requirements to pay a holiday meal surcharge are their guests; 1-3:30 p.m. families and guests. instances of criminal activity that may affect waived. Family members refers to dependent chil470th Military Intelligence, Building 009, Corozal, U.S. military orcivilian personnel in off-post dren and spouses. Exemptions are not applicable to 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. single soldiers and their guests; 1establishments. These include: restaurants, guests of military members or personnel collecting 3:30 p.m. families and guests. fast food chains, sidewalk cafes, movie theaper diem. 5th Battalion, 87th Infantry Dining Facility, Buildters, open-air markets and other locations freFood S/C ing 019, Fort Davis, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. single soldiers quented by U.S. personnel. Cost Cost Total and their guests; 1-3 p.m. families and guests. Enlisted E-1 -E-9 not 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment Dining TMO office hours receiving per diem $2.45 N/A $2.45 Facility, Building 818, FortKobbe, 11:30 a.m.-1 2:30 changes Officers not receiving p.m. single soldiers and their guests; 1-2:30 p.m. per diem $2.45 N/A $2.45 families and guests. HOWARD AFB (24TH COMPW/PA) Family members of officers The Traffic Management Office has new opand enlisted personnel of the 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry (Abn.) Dining Facilerating hours. The hours are Monday through uniformed services $2.45 N/A $2.45 ity, Building 805, Fort Kobbe, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Friday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Airline tickets Children underI2-years-old $1.25 N/A $1.25 single soldiers and their guests; 1:30-3 p.m. families are available for pickup between 8 a.m. and Officers and enlisted and guests. noon only. receiving per diem will pay 92nd PSC Dining Facility, Building 519, Fort A customer self-service center will start food costs and surcharge $2.45 $3.15 $5.60 Clayton, noon-2 p.m., all personnel. Monday. It will enable customers to make Guests over 12-years-old $2.45 $3.15 $5.60 1097th Transportation Dining Facility, Building travel arrangements without having to speak Guests under12-years-old $1.25 $1.55 $2.80 18, Fort Davis, 11:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m. single soldiers to apassengertravel clerk. For more informaand guests; 12:45-2:30 p.m. families and guests. tion on travel arrangements through TMO, The meal hours for the USARSO dining facilities For furtherinformation call SGM Goffer orMSgt. call 284-3069/4503. are as follows: Flowers at 285-4002. The experienced cancer knows how to make the trip work -lay In the front of the canoe and drink beverages while the others do the work. Sailing clubs go canoemg story and photos of the year, the club decided to do by Sgt. Phillip D. Clark something different from sailing yet related to water activities families could CHAGRESRIVER (TropicTimes) enjoy, said Jaime Arias, commodore -The chase boat darted up and down of the Panama Sailing Club. the line of canoes. Two young boys in To make the day more enjoyable a canoe raised their paddles in the air to and improve relations with other clubs, get the attention of the boat's driver. the Panama Sailing Club joined three As the driver pulled up alongside the other clubs for the outing -the U.S. boys, they asked inmixedSpanish and Navy Yacht Club -Panama, Pedro English if the driver would tow them Miguel Boat Club and Gatun Yacht further down the river and give their Club. Tired cancers get a lift from a chase boat helping them further down the arms a rest. The day started at 7 a.m. with a river to finish the trip. The boys had reason to be tired. meeting at the finishing point -the Their day started early and they had GamboaRecreation Sitebefore a bus with motors were on hand scooting opening a sailing school soon, Arias paddled about four miles in 2 1/2 hours. trip to the canoes. around the canoes. Also, the Red Cross said. Thirty per cent of the Panama "I wish there was more of this," At the canoes, the group of about supplied a boat with lifeguards to help Sailing Club is military members. said Capt. Fred Edwards, U.S. Coast 95 gathered around Fred Clark, Fort in an emergency. The club also schedules its events Guard liaison officer. "I have been Clayton Outdoor Recreation Branch Some of the canoers gave out along in conjunction with the U.S. Navy Yacht here for four years and this is the first chief, for a safety briefing. the way and were towed to the front of Club -Panama. year people could get out, be friendly After the briefing, the group manned the pack to encourage and help them "They hold regattas we go to, and and have a good time together." theircanoes to start their adventure. A finish the trip. we hold regattas they come to," said Edwards and the boys were part of few experienced canoers took off down After the canoers made it to the CWO 2 David Bandel, U.S. Navy Yacht a family day on the Chagres River the river, while others worked to get end, the clubs ate lunch and played Club -Panama treasurer. Sunday sponsored by the Panama Sailtheir canoes in the right direction. volleyball, horseshoes and frisbee. The next event is the Thanksgiving ing Club. To help keep up with the boaters The club wants to generate more Regatta Nov. 24, at 9 a.m. at Balboa Since November is the rainiest month and maintain safety, two Jon boats interest among the military and is Yacht Club. Everyone is invited.

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Tropic Times Nov. 16, 19909 Drinking and driving 3 Shots .A can cost career, money by Sgt. Robert Turner sergeant. Eight hundred dollars was .--_-_Social Acton, office taken from his paycheck over a twomonth pay period. His insurance doubled HOWARD AFB (24TH COMPW/ and he lost his driving privileges for PA) -This is the city, Howard AFB. one year. He was also processed for Alcohol is prevalent and used to a discharge, but the discharge board great extent. On any given night, you showed mercy and decided to retain can find the NCO club roaring, the him in the Air Force. package store crowded, or a dorm room He figured up what that night of buzzing with people using alcohol. drinking cost him in tangible dollar The problem is many times it gets amounts. It was more than $5,000, and abused. I know; I work here. I am a that is if he gets his stripe back the first drug and alcohol counselor. time testing. The story you are about to read is Bill's alcoholic problem only actrue. The names have been changed to counts for 7 percent of drivers, but protect the innocent. these drivers are responsible for more It's March 23, 1989. Bill has been than 50 percent of highway deaths. A -in the Air Force for 16 years and has larger percentage is made up of those 0 managed-to attain the rank of master who don't necessarily have a problem sergeant. During his career, he had with alcohol, but don't use proper been in and out of social actions proplanning when they use alcohol. grams three times, once at an alcohol Drinking alcohol is a privilege, rehabilitation center. The last time he Driving an automobile is also a priviactually did admit he was an alcoholic lege, and along with any privilege, and was working on correcting the comes responsibility. Handling that .and a Chaser problem. responsibility takes proper planning. But after completing the program, If you drink, how are you getting home? he went back to his old ways. Do you plan to have someone drive? March 23, Bill is TDY to Offutt Do you plan to stay overnight after the coffee and splash cold water on mysocial actions, I have seen what comAFB, Neb. He is away from everyone party? Proper planning is the key. self. That will sober me up." Wrong manders can do to someone who gets who knows he is an alcoholic. Most people think, "It will never again. Hot, black coffee and cold waarrested for DWI. Most persons over"Maybe I can drink again and not happen to me." But why not? Your ter makes you a wet, wide awake come the Article 15s, but it slows their have any problems. If I just drink one chances are better than the person who drunk. Time is the only thing that will career. Many have been separated, or two, I will be alright," he thinks to is not drinking and driving. After one help sober someone up. which is the equivalent of being fired. himself. or two drinks, a person's inhibitions "Beer doesn't have as much alcoI have seen one court-martial for DWI He didn't stop at one or two. He are broken down enough to, cause hol as hard liquor so I'll just have a where a passenger in the driver's car went all night until he was too intoxithem to do things behind the wheel of couple of beers before driving." Rewas injured. That is tough to overcated to stand, let alone drive. But he acarthatthey wouldn'tnormally do. It memberthis; a 12-ounce can of beer, a come. did drive and was stopped at the main slows down reaction time, increasing two-ounce glass of wine, and a shot of What I am saying is, a taxi ride, gate by security police for erratic drivyour chances of becoming involved in whiskey, contain the same amount of asking someone who has not been drinking. His troubles had just begun. a serious accident. One or two drinks alcohol. The only difference is volume ing to drive, or leaving your car and He received an Article 15 with the does not make anyone a better driver. of the drink itself. catching aride with someone is a cheaper loss of a stripe. Now he is a technical "I'll drink two cups of hot, black In the four years I have worked in alternative to drinking and driving. Chinese artist brings wildlife to Clayton story and photo by Spec. James Yocum "Art is not the original. It's not a reproFORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -A monkey duCtion of the original. It's better than glares from behind the slender artist. You can almost see a reflection in the animal's glossy eyes. the original." Beside the monkey perches a majestic eagle, bathed in a shower of flowers, his beak immaculate and his feathers gently preened to a gloss. Xie Da-Jun smiles and thanks the people for dedicated to Da-Jun's paintings. "He studies from all compliments on his work. Not as an animal trainer, the successful men, while he is self-confident in his but as an animal painter. paintings .one should be modest as a man and "Art is not the original," the Chinese painter exconceited as an artist. One will not have his own planned through his interpreter. "It's not a reproducpainting style if he is not confident in his paintings." tion of the original. It's better than the original." Although he no longer lives in China, Da-Jun can The artist will exhibit his art Saturday and Sunday still paint scenes from his homeland. at Valent Recreation Center. "If I see something I want to paint, I remember it. The prime characters that have made Da-Jun's If I go anywhere, I keep those things in my mind and paintings famous throughout the Far East are the I can paint when I get home," he said. "My brain is wildlife of China; subjects not easy to find, he says. like a computer. I see something and I capture it in my "In order to find the subjects, I had to go all over China. It's very difficult to go through China; the Xie Da-Jun stands in front of two of his paintings mind. Then I can paint it." Clua. t sver dificlt o g thoug Clna;the which will bo on display at Valont Rocroation roads are not good. Sometimes I have to walk or wi his bs rn dxhbiay at A TLcrACtion becoe amounainclimer, he ays Cener.In his most recent exhibition at AThAPA Convenbecome a mountain climber," he says. Contor. tion Center, he demonstrated this ability. A bird It's been a long road for the artist; one that began flying past the window became a subject for his art. in Sanshui County, Guangdong Province, Peoples wife and 15-year-old son have been unable to leave The audience was amazed when the bird returned Republic of China. China. later and the painting was an almost identical match, Da-Jun plans to have his wife and sonjoin him and Da-Jun said. Da-Jun has been painting animals, and other submove to the United States, where he hopes to find a Da-Jun wants to move on and find more subjects jects, since age 7. He became part of the Lim Nan market for his painting styles. That's one reason he for his paintings. This is one reason he wants to visit Artist Group at age 12 and began learning from the agreed to give an exhibition on Fort Clayton. He the United States, he explained. greatest traditional Chinese artist alive -Zhao Shao wants to see if Americans will buy his paintings. His dream may become a reality, he adds. He Ang. "I am a famous traditional painter in China, but I received an offer from a group of New York businessTo the prestigious Lin Nan group, the 41-year-old have to introduce my paintings to the whole world," men to show his paintings in Manhattan. He is just painter represents a new age of Chinese art. During he said. "I want to go abroad in other countries waiting for paperwork to be approved by U.S. offihis years as a professional artist, he has been perfectand use my eyes to see the world and my brush to paint ciali. ing a blend between modern art and the traditional it." For now, the soldiers and civilians in Panama can style he studied. While Da-Jun's comments may sound conceited, enjoy his efforts at the Valent Recreation Center. Da-Jun came to Panama for an exhibition more his self-confidence is one reason his paintings are Even if Da-Jun leaves Panama, he will leave somethan a year ago. He has made his home here since beautiful, said Zhang Bo Liang, the governor of thing for the soldiers of the U.S. Army South to then, kept from his homeland by unsettling political Sanshui County. remember him. He's donating a painting, the majestic times. Although married, Da-Jun is alone here. His "Heis modestandconceited,"Liang saidinabook eagle, showered in flowers.

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Tropic Times Nov. 16, 1990 Cooking tips keep holiday turkey safe (AFIS)-Family and friends arejust as soon as it is thawed, officials say. sitting down to the holiday dinner, and Don't keep it in the refrigerator after everything, from the turkey to the thawing. dessert, has to be just right. Thawing a frozen turkey in the reBy following a few simple guidefrigerator can take from one to five .', lines, the turkey placed on the table days, while thawing it in cold water ., will be nicely browned and succulent, may take anywhere from four to 12 -' instead of underdone or overdone, say hours. The length of time and the power U.S. Department of Agriculture poullevel for thawing the bird in a microtry experts. wave oven are provided with its inAlso, common sense and a little struction manual. extra care will ensure a happy holiday After thawing the bird, remove the season, the department's experts said. neck and giblet package from inside it, Otherwise, overlooking basic health and wash the bird inside and outside precautions when preparing a turkey with cold water. Allow it to drain well. and its accompanying dishes can cause Stuff the turkey loosely just before food poisoning. cooking, allowing about three-quarWash anything that touches raw ters of a cup of stuffing per pound of poultry with soapy water before it's bird. The dressing's dry ingredients used again to prevent the spread of any may be mixed ahead of time, with the bacteria. This includes hands, utensils perishable ones added just before stuffand kitchen counters. ing the bird. As soon as the turkey is Picking out a turkey for the meal is done, remove the dressing. not as simple as it used to be. Now the The turkey's inside temperature decision is whether to buy a fresh, should reach at least 180 degrees Fahrfrozen and stuffed, or precooked bird. enheit, which will cook the dressing. Refrigerate leftover turkey within Preventive Medicine Service at 285Each type has specific time requireDirections for cooking times and temtwo hours after cooking, Department 5643/5602. ments for thawing and cooking. peratures are available in basic cookof Agriculture experts say. The best However, the Department of AgriThe department's tips include tembooks or on the bird's wrapper. way to store turkey is to divide leftculture has a toll-free, year-round hotperatures to store the birds at and how Roasting times vary, depending on overs into portions and store in several line on how to buy, cook, carve and use long to allow forthawing and cooking. the bird's size and if it's stuffed. A containers. Turkey stored in the releftover turkey call 1-800-535-4555. Buy a fresh turkey and refrigerate stuffed bird takes longer to cook. For frigerator will keep for three or four The hotline is open Monday through it at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or colder example, at 325 degrees Fahrenheit, days, but leftover dressing should be Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Eastern for no more than one to two days an unstuffed, 16-pound turkey takes eaten within two days. Eat frozen lefttime. From Nov. 1 through Nov. 30, before cooking. A frozen bird should from 3 1/2 to 4 1/2 hours to cook, over poultry or dressing within a month. the hours are 9 am. to 5 p.m., and stay in the freezer at 0 degrees or while a stuffed bird the same size For information locally regarding Thanksgiving Day, the lines will be colder until it's time to thaw it. Cook it needs 4 1/2 to 51/2hoursin the oven. food prepartation and storage call answered from 8 am. to 2 p.m. Air Force helps Santa meet deadline -(AFIS) -Every year at this time, the post office than 3,000 letters received annually. Night after night, delivers thousands of letters to Santa Claus from as letters come in, the detachment works on mail -children telling him what they want to find under the received that day and readies it for next-day dispatch. tree on Christmas morning. If you know a child who would like to receive a An Air Force weather detachment in Alaska has letter from Santa postmarked from the North Pole, helped Santa answer his mail for more than 20 years. send the child's letter, the letter you want the child to Located eight miles from North Pole, Alaska, memreceive from Santa and a stamped envelope addressed bers of Detachment 2, 11th Weather Squadron, saw to the child to: the North Pole post office was getting more mail for Santa than it could handle. They decided to step in and Detachment 2 help Santa answer his mail. 11th Weather Squadron "It's become kind of a family affair," said TSgt. Eielson AFB, AK 99702-5000 Royce Chapman, Eielson Air Force Base public afLetters need to reach Eielson before Dec. 10 to fairs office. The detachment's members bring in their make sure Santa's letter with the North Polepostmark spouses, children and friends to help with the more is delivered in time. Commissaries offer food for special meals FORT LEE, Va. (Troop Support ous dried fruits. Look for holiday fruit Agency) -Thanksgiving and Christand fresh cranberries, pumpkins, squash mas are rapidly approaching, instilling and mixed nuts. in us a spirit of celebration and invokPaper plates, cups and napkins with ing an appetite for certain types of food a holiday motif, candles, economy packs that are traditionally associated with of batteries, plus flowers and greenery the holiday season. .y. a such as Indian corn, mistletoe and According to U.S. Army Troop ( \R poinsettias will also be sold. Support Agency officials, this is the Customers will also notice special busiest time of the year for Army prices on some of their favorite holicommissaries. day items during November's "ThanksCommissaries will stock items for giving Sale" and December's "Happy the cook who prepares from "scratch" Holidays" sale. Use a coupon to buy a or the host or hostess who wants a sale item and reap even greater savspecial cut of meat for the holidays. ings. November will also mark the Turkeys, geese, ducks and Rock Sweets, appetizers, main course tiebaking ingredients, including differbeginning of a promotion to benefit Cornish hens will be plentiful, along ins and desserts will be stocked for ent colored sugar sprinkles, decors and Special Olympics, providing savings with your favorite stuffing ingredients your holiday pleasure. spices. to customers and donations to the oror mixes. A variety of items will be displayed: Fresh holiday eggnog, cheese spreads ganization. For those who want something difhard candy and striped candy canes for and special fruitcakes, including all Shop early; commissaries are exferent, ham or standing ribs of beef are decorating trees or for use as stocking the necessary ingredients to bake your pected to be crowded with customers. recommended. And don't forget the fillers; boxed candy dressed in bright, own will be available. The party giver Commissary management can help you party platters and special cuts of meat holiday sleeves and containers; and a will be able to buy cider mixes, cocoa determine the best time to shop when which can be special ordered. large selection of Christmas cookie and extra large cans of nuts and varithe commissary isn't so busy.

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Tropic Times Nov. 16, 1990.&Thanksgiving regatta set (U.S. Navy Yacht Club -Panama)The U.S. Navy race can be viewed from the Amador Causeway and Yacht Club-Panama will participate in a ThanksgivBalboa Yacht Club. ing Interclub Regatta, sponsored by Balboa Yacht The AmadorCauseway andFarfan Beach willalso Club Nov.24. Racing competition will include Catalbe excellent areas to view the finish of the first race ina22s, catamarans, andopen (no vessels lessthan 10 and subsequent races. feet in length) classes. This will be an open water race An awards ceremony will be held at the Balboa along the canal and in the inner Bay of Panama. Yacht Club Nov. 27 at 7 p.m. Dinner will be pay-asHandicapping will be used and spinnakers are permityou-go. ted. Registration will be at the Balboa Yacht Club. For Skippers' meeting is at 9 a.m. The race starts at 10 more information, contact 228-5446. An entry fee a.m. from the U.S. Naval Station Panama Canal, will be charged, with a discounted fee for early regisRodman. tration (prior to close of business Monday). Spectators can view the first race start from the Rodman Marina. Intermediate viewpoints for the first Anyone wishing to join the fun is invited: no race include the Scenic Lookout at the Bridge of the experience required. the U.S. Navy Yacht Club is Americas and the Farfan Lighthouse. opento members and dependents of the U.S. military, The first race finish will be the second race start, civilian component, and U.S. citizen employees of which can be viewed from Farfan Beach, Balboa the Panama Canal Commission. Sailboat "Hot Fudgle" In the heat of competiYacht Club, or the Amador Causeway. The second Club meetings are held the first and third Thursday tion. Skipper/owner is Lt. Col. John P. Stable. race finish will be near Flamenco Island. of each month at the Soloy Balseria in Cocoli and the (photo courtesy of U.S. Navy Yacht Club-PanThe third race will begin where the second race Marco Polo Restaurant in Balboa respectively, at amna) ends and terminate at the Balboa Yacht Club. This 6:30 p.m. The next meeting will be Dec. 6. Dinner theater comes to Fort Davis Postal Service sets by Spec. Daniel L. Bean "It's been this way every night," dimmed and the spotlight focused on mailing dates said Andrew Lim, Atlantic Music and center stage. The 45-minute one-act Members wanting to send FORT DAVIS (USARSO PAO Theatre director, while double checkcomedy is set in the New York City mail to the United States for ATLANTIC) -A glass of fine wine, ing the stage lights in the packed dinbedroom of Mrs. Stevenson, portrayed Christmas must send priority and tuxedo with tails, top hat and cane, ing room. "We've had a full house by Cythia Furtado, a bedridden woman parcel airlift mail by Dec. 7, dining and after-dinner theater -this is every night and had to setup additional who relies entirely on her phone for letters by Dec. 10, fourth class off-Broadway at its best. tables for people who didn't have ressecurity and comfort while her husmail by Dec. 1. For more inforAlthoughit was way off-Broadway ervations." band is away. mation contact your local post andless formal, therecent dinnerthea"We're going to do dinner theatre office. ter production of "Sorry, Wrong The evening began with a buffetagain," said Lim. "We have an great Number" byAtlanticMusic and Theastyle dinnerprepared bytheclubstaff. location and the interest is there." Food drive needs ter and the Fort Davis Community Diners enjoyed roast beef, glazed carClub, was as enjoyable and successful rots, potatoes with gravy, rolls, salad The next scheduled production is a your support for the Atlantic community as any big bar and orange sherbet for dessert. Christmas Pageant and tree lighting TheAlphaPhiAlphaFratercityproduction. Following dinner, the house lights Dec. 19. ityis sponsoring Aphanksgiving Food Drive for soldiers and AF Sergeants Association seeks members n our The drive will run through CMSgt. Michael R. Heath lowance for subsistence, and increased I stand behind Chief Master SerTuesday and drop points for 24th Composite Wing funding that has helped improve the geant of the Air Force Gary R. Pfingcanned and packaged food items senior enlisted advisor quality of base housing and dormitoston who says, "Support your profesare: the Corozal Commissary, ies. AFSA has also been helping those sional association by being informed Corozal Main Exchange, AlHOWARD AFB (24TH COMPW/ in need in our communities for years and taking the time to care about the brook Shoppette, Clayton-BuildPA) -As our world and our Air Force and is taking care of our future with 'people behind the stripes.' The larger ing 95, Howard Commissary and change around us, our rights and entischolarships for our dependents and a AFSA's membership, the more we can Howard Base Exchange. tlements are increasingly important to post-military employment program for d> on Capitol Hill and in our commuThe drive is to support the our lives. We need the kind of support our career changes. Yes, during these nities. I urge you, as enlisted members, ACS Food Locker during the the Air Force Sergeants Association times of budget constraints, most evto help strengthen the "Voice of the Thanksgiving period. Your provides. eryoneis taking hits, but AFSA unifies Enlisted" by joining AFSA during its support is needed to make this a Through the continual lobbying efthe enlisted voices presenting our needs 1991 membership drive. AFSA is our memorable Thanksgiving for all forts of the AFSA, we have gained to Congress and helping take care of association. Together, we can take cam military parties. legislative victories such as basic alour own. of our own. Mayors' Corner EDITOR'S NOTE: AS A SERVICE TO THE driver's permit without having to go back to the window on the right with hardly anyone standing in COMMUNITY THE TROPIC TlIvIES OFFERS THIS states! Help! it. The long lines on the left are for those renewing COLUMN TO ALLOW COMMUNITY MEMBERS Harrassed Mom, Clayton theirlicenses. TO WRITE IN AND HAVE THEIR QUESTIONS 10. Know your blood type. RESEARCHED AND ANSWERED BY USARSO'S DEAR HARRASSED MOM: LOCATION OF LICENSING OFFICE: second MAYORAL CONGRESS. QUESTIONS AND Good news! It can be done. The "Cinderella floor of Diablo Heights building, adjacent to the 24PROBLEMS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO: license"you refer to is a driver's permit that allows a Hour store. Hours are 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Monday GARRISON COMMANDER -PACIFIC, ATTN: dependent to operate a vehicle from 6 a.m. until 9 through Friday. The permit is restricted to the hours of SOCO-CR, BUILDING 519, FORT CLAYTON AND p.m. Here are the requirements and items needed at 6 a.m.-9 p.m. It is only good for six months; after that SHOULD BE SENT THROUGH MPS. BE SURE the licensing office to get the license: a valid driver's license may be obtained. TO INCLUDE YOUR NAME, UNIT/QTRS NUM1. Must be at least 17 years of age. Zeimira Snyder, BER, PHONE NUMBERANDSIGNATURE. ANO2. Copy of birth certificate. Publicity Committee, NYMITY WILL BE GRANTED TO THOSE DE3. Bilingual ID card. 500 Area Clayton Mayor SIRING IT. LETTERS SELECTED FOR PUBLI4. A blood test and results. CATION WILL BE THOSE WITH THE WIDEST 5. A letter, with the school stamp/seal, from Balboa DEAR MAYOR: INTEREST TO OUR READING AUDIENCE. High School stating that applicant is a student there. How much should I tip the bagger who carries my ZELMIRA SINCLAIR-SNYDER, PUBLICITY 6. A letter from your sponsor giving permission to get groceries out at the commissary? CHAIRPERSON, 500 AREA MAYOR. your permit and that sponsor assumes responsibility Just Asking, Kobbe and liability for your actions while operating a vehicle. DEAR JUST ASKING: DEAR MAYOR: 7. Your sponsor needs to be present. The baggers at the commissary are not governI have a daughter who just turned 17 and is dying 8. $5.50 to pay for the permit. ment employees. They work strictly for tips. Alto get her driver's license like kids her age arriving 9. a. Either a Driver's Education certification card though there is no formula for tipping, most patrons from thestates. Unfortunately,things aredifferentin andpaperworkindicatingresultsofahearing andeye tip somewhere between 25 cents (15 items or less Panama and you can't get a license at the age of 16. exam. line) to $1 per grocery cart. The amount is strictly up This seems unfair, but that's the wayit goes. My real b. Or if you didn't take driver's education, you to you and depends on the courtesy, efficiency and concern is that I have heard there is a way to get a have to take a driving exam which is conducted at service of the bagger, and your willingness to pay. "Cinderella license" but have no idea how to get it. Albrook Field (Panamanian side). Exams are given Olda Genreau, There must be a way to get a high school senior a only Friday mornings for new people. Go to the 800 Area Clayton Vice Mayor

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N Tropic Times N ot 12Nov. 16, 1990 A LBR O O K Panamanian folklore dancing Gold panning trip, 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Youth Center lsosfor ages 6-18 Nov. 24. -Puppeteering for all ages Isla Grande beach trip, 8 a.m.-5 Atlantic Youth Services will hold -Spanish classes for ages 6-18 p.m. Nov. 25. the following activities during Swimming pool -Tumbling and beginners Two new classes, health food November at the Fort Espinar Youth The Albrook swimming pool gymnastics cooking and Belgian/French Center, Building 219. For more, offers the following classes -Family aerobics classes cooking, will be offered at the center information and reservations call -Water aerobics for men and Monday, Wednesday and Friday, in December. Dates and times will be 289-4472/4605. women 5:30-6:30 p.m. noon-l p.m. determined by interest and Teen dance (ages 13-19), 6 p.m. -Free introduction to scuba 6-9 -Modern, jazz and tap dance reservations. today. classes The center also offers classes Turkey trot parent/child run, 9 Open water scuba 6-10 p.m. -Tennis classes for all ages including: Tang So Do karate, cake a.m. Saturday. -Advanced open water scuba6-10 Because coaching is as demanding decorating, folkloric dancing, Turkey special luncheon, noon as it is rewarding, we urge you to take English, Spanish, Panamanian Wednesday. Rescue, dive master and specialty advantage of the many volunteer cooking, piano lessons and Lapidary Teen beach trip to Palmar Beach, 8 courses are also available, coaching positions the Howard and classes. Call for details. a.m. Nov. 24. All classes are Monday through Albrook Youth Centers have Graduate class Domino tournament (ages 6-19),3 Friday. available. Applications are now Grada te p.m. Nov. 28. A qualified instructor is needed to being accepted for the upcoming The University of Oklahoma is Monthly birthday celebration, 6 teach mom and tots swimming boys baseball/girls softball interested in offering a graduate p.m. Nov. 30. classes for ages 12 and up. programs, scheduled to start Jan. 12. level course in Political Science at the Arts and crafts (ages 6-12), 3 p.m. For more information, call the For more information, call 284-4700 Atlantic Education Center, second every Thursday. Albrook Swimming Pool at 286or 286-3195. floor, Building 32, Fort Davis. 3555, or the Zodiac Recreation Projected class dates are Feb. 10Center at 284-6161. Bowling centers 16 at 5-9 p.m. Monday-Friday, 9 _CLA Y TO N Bowling Center leagues are now a.m.-noon Saturdays and 8:30 a.m.Sports & Fitness open. Available leagues include mens 3:30 p.m. Sundays. For more Valent Center and womens; singles; mixed doubles; information and applications, call or The Howard and Albrook SFCs mixed adult; mixed youth; and stop by the center at 289-3308/3417. The following activities will be are offering aerobics classes. Howard seniors. For more information on held at Valent Recreation Center, classes begin 4:45 p.m., Monday league schedules and times,contact Gruelthon Building 53, Fort Clayton. Classes leaguer schedulesaion and timsuonac through Friday; Albrook classes are Dick Shingary at 284-4818. Oceanrequire pre-registration. All tours Monday, Wednesday and Friday require advance reservation; for and begin at 5 p.m. A fee is charged. Recreation Center, Fort Sherman, information call Carmen Emiliani. For more information, call 286-3307 A TL A N TIC will hold a Gruelthon, 11-mile fun CHINESE ART EXHIBIT or 284-3451. run, 7 a.m. Nov. 24. Registrations "Nature's Heavenly Song" by Xie Da Howard SFC locker reservations begin at 6:30 a.m. and a fee will be Jun, will be exhibited at the center. are now being accepted on a firstVolunteers needed charged. For more information call Opening ceremony will be today at 7 come-first-served basis. Gym Mr. Bringas at 289-6402/6699. p.m. Paintings can be viewed 11 renovation is scheduled for Volunteers are needed to work for a.m.-8 p.m., Saturday and Sunday. completion sometime this month or the Army Community ServicesDavis Club THANKSGIVING -Thanksnext month, and reservations are Atlantic. Volunteers are needed for The Fort Davis Community Club giving day, Valent.will be open 9 currently being accepted; subsequent many programs and child care is Building87,is omnity a.m.-9:45 p.m., and will feature requests will be placed on a waiting provided. For more information call .offering the following plenty of games, refreshments, list. For more information, call Michelle Moosey at 289-4091. specials: f tournaments and fun activities. 284-3451. An "all-you-can-eat" family JEWELRY SHOW -A jewelry Sundial activities dinerbuay. 6-9 p.m. every show and sale will be held Friday 5-8 Youth centers The Sundial Recreation Center, Thursday night dinner special p.m. Event includes special designs Building 42, Fort Davis, is offering featuring cuisine from around the tha can be ordered oductory and Today -A youth bowling pizza the following tours and trips during world, such as Mexican, Italian, intermediate computer courses are party will be held at the Howard November. For more information Oriental, etc. 6-9 p.m. Thursdays. held on a regular basis. The two week Bowling Center 3-6:30 p.m. The fee is and reservations call the center at Pre-Thanksgiving brunch, 10:30 course meets Monday through $3.75 for members and $4.75 for non289-3300/3889. a.m.-1:30 p.m. Sunday. Friday evenings. members. The fee includes two Panama City night tour, 7 p.m.For more information and A four week basic modeling course games, two slices of pizza, small midnight Saturday. reservations call 289-5160/3298. will begin Saturday 1-3 p.m. Class soda, shoes, transportation and Taboga Island beach trip, 6 a.m.-5 includes make-up and walking supervision. Other programs at the p.m. Sunday. techniques. In addition, dance Howard /Albrook youth centers Panama City shopping tour, 8 aerobics begin at 5:30 p.m. Monday, include: a.m.-5 p.m. Nov. 24. Wednesday and Thursday. The fourweek class includes ballet and salsa techniques, weights and jump rope use. Guitar lessons begin Dec. 4. The monthly course is taught between 6:30 and '9 p.m. Tuesday or Thursday. Beginners Spanish is an ongoing class at the center. Instruction is available from 6-7 p.m., Monday and Wednesday or Tuesday and Thursday. A class on making greeting cards with parchment paper will begin Dec. 3. Group will meet at 6 p.m. twice weekly to learn the special techniques. Arts & crafts The Fort Clayton Arts & Crafts Center, located in Building 180, has a wood shop, photography lab, frame shop, pottery area, an art gallery, and an area for multiple crafts. A wide variety of instructional sessions are available for skill development. Call 287-4369. For persons interested in getting started in wood work, step by step guidance is available by appointment. Sessions range from cabinet making, refinishing, machine use to project planning. Contact LaRue AveLallemant. In the photography area, classes

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Tropic Times 1 ces Nov. 1.6, 1990 include film developing, enlarging CLASSES -A ballet program waterfall. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. THANKSGIVING TRIP and printing. Both lack and white features Ballet I for beginners, taught Nov. 27 -Jungle photography (Thursday-Nov. 25) Spend and color photography are taught. by Graciela Newsam. Three adventure. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Thanksgiving at Boquete. Enjoy subsequent levels are conducted by Nov. 28 -Peacock bass fishing to your Thanksgiving dinner and party Beth Story. Sessions meet twice Arenosa. 5 a.m.-2 p.m. at your hotel, the Panamonte Hotel. Turkey Bowl '90 weekly, featuring convenient All trips depart from the Howard Tours will beto Volcan Baru, the city GO ARMY! afternoon hours. Base Theater. A fee is charged. For of David, Bambito, Cerro Punta and Saturday -Army Pep Rally Also available is tap dance by m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n, c a l1 a coffee plantation. 7 p.m. -Street Dance Janet Joneg, held monthly on a first284-6161/6109. 5K TURKEY CHALLENGE Hawkins Avenue, Fort Clayton come, first-served basis. NAVSTA MWR will be hosting a DJs/Refreshments PLAY -Final performances of Arts & Crafts 5k run to be held Thanksgiving the production "Love Letters"will be morning. Race time will be 7 a.m. Wednesday -TURKEY BOWL presented today and Saturday at the Tuesday -Brushstrokes in four and race day registration will be held .center. Curtain time is 8 p.m. Call weeks, 2-4 p.m. 6-6:45 a.m. There is a $5 entry fee and 6730 m. -Pre-game festivi s 286-3814 for reservations. Wednesday -Wheel throwing in all runners will receive T-shirts. Call Balboa Stadium Hsix weeks, 3-5 p.m. 283-4222 now to pre-register and join H O W R DFriday -Pouring class in Spanish, the fun Thanksgiving Day. Tickets: Adults $5-Children $2 24p.m. OPEN BASKETBALL Nov. 27 -Drybrush in four weeks, NAVSTA MWR will be hosting a Zodiac Center 2-3 p.m. two-day Open Basketball Tickets purchased for the play-off Nov. 28 -Video: "The Liner," 7Tournament-this weekend. Double games also allow entrance to the TRIPS -Today -Japanese 7:30 p.m. elimination, awards for the two top Championship game. dining 6:30-9 p.m. Nov. 29 -Video: "The Shader," finishers. All games are to be held at Tomorrow -Portobelo and 7-7:30 p.m. the NAVSTA Rodman Gym. Call Langosta Beach 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 30 -Fifty percent off firing 283-4222 for more information. Monday -Air Force Band, fee, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. NAVY ITT -The Navy MWR Howard Theater 6:30-9 p.m. These activities will take place in Information Tours & Travel office is IrIt Wednesday-Nov. 25 Building 711 at Howard. For more now located at Building 655 next to Thanksgiving at Chiriqui Nov. 27 information, call 284-6361. the marina. Our new schedule is 10 Christmas shopping on Central i a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Friday and 9 Avenue 9 a.m.-2 p.m. a.m.-l p.m. Saturday. For further Nov. 30 -Panamanian dining 6:30Respite program information call 283-5307. 9:30 p.m. EDUCATION COUNSELOR All tours depart from the Howard The Howard Child Development Eva Lindberg, our education Base Theater. A fee is charged. For Center is offering a Respite Care counselor, is able to help you with m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n, c a l1 Program for military members with identifying earned college credits, 284-6161/6109. exceptional family members. Care is external degree programs, exams Outdoor Center TOURNEYS -Saturday -Eightavailable every Saturday, 8:30 a.m.and tuition assistance. Stop by any ball pool tournament, 4-8 p.m. 5:30 p.m., for children enrolled. This Monday-Thursday 11 a.m.-3 p.m. or A San Blas snorkel and dive trip Nov. 24 -Ping-Pong tournament, gives parents an opportunity to shop, call for an appointment. will be conducted Dec. 1-2. 4-8 p.m. do errands or relax while their child Participants will experience the CLASSES -Monday -Beginner enjoys quality playtime in a wellFamily Services Cuna indian culture, lodge in rustic Spanish Monday and Wednesdays, supervised, safe environment. style hotel and eat typical foods. Fee 5-6:30 p.m. Class lasts four weeks. Reservations must be made no later The Navy Family Service Center is includes air fare, hotel, meals and Monday -Four-week intermediate than 5:30 p.m., Thursdays, to ensure located in Building 40. For more boat services. Reservations will Spanish class, 6:30-8 p.m., Tuesday child-to-teacher ratios can be information, call 283-5748/5749. continue at Building 154, Fort and Thursday. maintained. For more information, VOLUNTEERS NEEDED! Clayton, hrough Nov. 28. Tuesday -Beginner English call 284-6135. We need an information & referral A boater safety licensing class will Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5-6:30 p.m. specialist and a Welcome Baby be held Nov. 24 at the large bohio in Intermediate English, 6:30-8 p.m. Program manager and clerk Fort Clayton Park. Registration is at WEEKLY CLASSES -A VY typist/receptionist. No experience Building 154, Fort Clayton, and ends Lunchtime aerobics Monday, required. Gain valuable work Wednesday. For more information, Wednesday and Friday, 11:30 a.m.M W R notes experience and training while setting call Lee Groce at 287-3363. 12:15 p.m. your own hours. If you are -Piano lessons on an The U.S. Naval Station Panama independent and enjoy working with Ceramics Center appointment basis Tuesday, Canal offers the following MWR people this is the right place for you! A Ceramics Center is located in Thursday, and Saturday. activities. For more information and Building 155, Fort Clayton. Pouring -Tae Kwon Do classes Monday, to make reservations, call 283-5307. SPOUSE EMPLOYMENT -If and basic painting are regular Wednesday and Friday, 6-7:30 p.m. TRAP RANGE -Visit our naval you are new to the community, or if bas. I aitin te eeroer -Shotokan class Tuesday and station trap range! Revised hours you have been here awhile and are classes. In addition, the center offers Thursday, 6-7:30 p.m. are: Thursdays and Fridays -4 p.m.just now deciding to join the work various techniques and clay flower INSTRUCTOR NEEDED -dusk. Saturdays, Sundays and force, the Spouse Employment making sessions. Call 287-4360. Martial arts instructor needed for holidays -11 a.m.-6 p.m. Arms Assistance Program is designed Tang-Soo-Do. For more inforrentals are free. especially for you. Military spouses Youth Center mation, call 284-6161/6109. PANAMA CITY TOUR -and family members can receive The Fort Clayton Youth Center, All active-duty and retired (Saturday) Let's tour Old Panama, assistance at the Family Service Building 155, Fort Clayton, will offer military, DoD civilians and family Las Bovedas and other historic Center Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 the following activities. For members can participate. A fee is places. We'll stop for lunch. The bus a.m.-1 p.m, or call for an information call Benny Boza at c h a r g e d. F o r details, call leaves the naval station at 8 a.m. and appointment. 287-6451. 284-6161/6109. willreturn at 2p.m. WHY WEIGHT -ServiceBIRTHDAYS -November FISHING TRIP -(Saturday) members, theirdependents and DoD birthdays will be celebrated with a Outdoor Center Trolling in the Pacific Ocean. Leave employees are invited to attend Turkey Pinata Bash today. the NAVSTA marina at 7 a.m. and weight loss meetings to be held TRIP -Reservations are being TRIPS -Saturday -Peacock return at 3 p.m. Mondays at 6 p.m. Weigh-ins, accepted for an early Christmas bass fishing trip to Arenosa. 5 a.m.-2 EL VALLE/BEACH TOUR -lectures, and a food exchange shopping tour Friday. Participants p.m. (Sunday) We will leave the naval program will be included. Take will visit the Via Espana area and eat Sunday -Fresh and salt water station at 7 a.m. and travel to El Valle advantage of this group support! lunch at a local restaurant. scuba trip 6 a.m.-6 p.m. de Anton where you will be able to WELCOME BABY PROGRAM PET SHOW -Youths are invited Tuesday -Gold panning to Las shop until noon. The trip will then -If you and your spouse are to enter the pet show Nov. 24. The Cumbres. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. continue to Coronado Gaviota expecting your first child, and you show begins at 2:30 p.m. and includes Nov. 24 -Snorkeling trip to Isla Resort where you can swim and are E-5 or below, you may be eligible categories ranging from longest tail Mamey. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. enjoy the beach until 4 p.m. Price to participate in our Welcome Baby to shortest ears. Prizes will be Nov. 25 -Hiking trip to El Valle includes lunch. Program. As a participant you will awarded. Pre-registration is receive a beautiful baby basket, required; with a small fee. PAN FOR GOLD ON THE support services and more. Please PAN OR G LD O THEcall us for more information. CURUNDU SALAMANCA BOQUERON RIVER RED CROSS COURSE -NFSC Strike it Rich! on this exciting Gold Panning Expedition to the and the Red Cross will be offering a Salamanca Boqueron River. This riverisa prven Goldfree 16-hour course with producer,"weguaranteeit". Planongettingwetandlotsoffun! certification, for all DoD dependents, civilians, active duty The Pacific Theatre Arts Center, We provide use of gold pans, panning instructions and transpersonnel and their spouses. Building 2060, Curundu, offers a portation. You provide lunch, change of clothing, toiletries, Reservations required no later than variety of classes under the and don't forget your suntan lotion. Bus leaves Howard Theater Wednesday. Call us for more supervision of qualified, professional // at 7a.m. and returns at 3 p.m. Cost: $14 per person information. instructors. For information call For more info contact Zodiac Rec Ctr at 284-6161/6109 continued on page 14 Barbara Berger at 286-3152.

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Tropic Times Notices Nov. 16, 1990 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Cocoli Library Cocoli meeting -AA meetings on the west bank are Auto cross now being held at our center The Cocoli Library, located in The Coccoli community will hold Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:30 a.m. Building 2553, is now open 1-4 p.m. a meeting Nov. 28, 7-8 p.m., at the The Isthmian Four Wheeler and Saturdays 8 p.m. Give AA -and Tuesdays and Thursdays. Patrons Coccoli Chapel. The meeting will be Club invites you and your family yourself -a chance. It works!! may reserve and request books for mayoral elections. to our annual Fun Mud Rodeo through inter-library loans. Sunday at 10 a.m. in the new Chaplain on board AF bowling events Albrook Mud Track. Tickets are A full-time, active-duty Navy Crossroads movie TDY BOWLING DAY -Meet $2 per person. Practice will be chaplain has reported to the naval the very special TDY crowd during Saturday. station. Chaplain (Lt.) Bill Wildhack The Crossroads Bible Church will the Howard/ Albrook TDY bowling is cndutin Sudaypresent "A Man Called Norman" day Saturday. All TDY personnel~ ig counng ndy services, Sunday at 6 p.m. The movie will be that show up at bowling centers wil the command's religious program. held at Crossroads Bible Church at play for 75 cents a game! For the cnomad's rssistaprra. Corozal. For more information, call information, call 284-4818 or For information or assistance, call 252-6480. 286-4260. 283-4148.22-4-2842. "KING OF THE HILL" POTPOURRI Christmas bazaar TOURNAMENT -A "King of the Hill" tournament will be held at the The Inter-American Women's Howard and Albrook bowling W omen's Aglow meet ClubwillholdaChristmasBazaar10 centers, Dec. 3 and Nov. 25 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday at the respectively. Both the Howard and Women's Aglow will hold a ATLAPA Convention Center. ForAlbrook events will start at 2 p.m. meeting at PCC Training Center information, call 252-1213. An For information, call 284-4818 or CPO classes (near Balboa Train Station) admission fee will be charged. 286-4260. Saturday at 9 a.m. "NOVEMBER LUNCH TIME The Department of Civilian The guest speaker is Cilinia Prada SPECIAL" -A 25 cents lunch time Personnel, Training and Developwho was crowned Miss Panama and Bake sale bowling special will take place ment Division, Building 6523, Miss Asia Pacific as Panama's throughout the month of November Corozal, is offering the following representative. For information, call The Curundu community will hold at the Howard and Albrook Bowling courses during December: Linda Dany at 252-6095. a Patio Bake Sale Saturday 8 a.m.Centers 11 a.m.-1 p.m. ABSENTEEISM AND DISnoon in the parking lot opposite the CIPLINE -Dec. 3-4,8 a.m.-4 p.m. bowling alley. To enter a table, call OW C lunch and Dec. 5, 8a.m.-noon.Thecouse higSihtsmheetding in FSU meeting I~~~nez Clark at 286-4298. W lu canDe.58amon Teors The FSU Alumni Association r lunch The Quarry Heights OWC will highlights the need for line invites all alumni to a happy hour at P hold their November luncheon at the supervisors to assure employees the Fort Amador Officers'Club Nov. The Protestant Women of Clayton Quarry Heights Officers' Club understand and observe the rules for 30, 6:30-8-30 p.m. The $7 fee covers Chapel will hold an organizational Wed n es d a y. The theme is attendance. Provides know-how in admission and hors d'oeuvres, luncheon Nov. 29 at 9:30 a.m. at the "Panamanian Day!" To make administering leave, controlling the Elections for association officers will. Amador Officers' Club. Child care reservations, call 282-3091. leave, recognizing employee rights be conducted. Call 286-4470 for will be provided. Reservations are and privileges, and labor relations. reservations before Nov. 26. Help due by Nov. 26. For child care, call Special brunch Course is designed for managers, spread the word among fellow Glenys Ruff at 287-6887. supervisors and other officials. alumni and participate in making The 41st Area Support Group MANA GING TH E POOR this a worthwhile association!. Have up ies? serves a special brunch meal every EMPLOYEE -Dec. 5, noon-4 p.m. puppie Sunday 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. All and Dec. 6-7, 8 a.m.-noon. The Review council The Howard Vet Clinic is now personnel are invited to the brunch. course is designed to enable conducting this very successful For more information, call SFC participants to identify and evaluate The USARSO Disabled & program of finding adoptive parents Betts at 287-4811. strategic s for dealing with Handicapped Review Council for your available puppies. If you performance problems, to include monitors affirmative actions and have available puppies, call Linda JROTC events determining causes and selecting hiring of disabled and handicapped Day at the Howard Vet Clinic alternative solutions. Workshop is people. For information, call Rick Tuesdays or Thursdays 10:30 a.m.Saturday there will be two JROTC altenat oltios. W ho is Medina, 287-4260. 2:30 p.m. sponsored events, the turkey shoot open to those who have Medina,_287-426_._2:30___m._ and a car wash. Both will be held at responsibility for the analysis of Balboa High School 8 a.m.-3 p.m. performance problems, such as Thanksgiving W orship Services The Turkey Shoot will be held in supervisors, managers, and those Room 401 and the price per ticket involved with human performance in Howard AFB Chapel will be $2 for each team (team will organizations. 7 p.m. Tuesday Ecumenical Thanksgiving Service consist of two people). The car wash DEVELOPING MANAGERIAL Albrook AFS Chapel tickets will be priced $2 and $3. For SKILLS FOR SUPERVISORS 9 a.m. Thursday Thanksgiving Day Mass more information, call S C Puryear Dec. 10-14, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. The course Fort Davis Chapel at 252--352o. is designed to provide supervisors 8 a.m. Thursday Thanksgiving Day Mass at 252-3520. with tools to improve their 7 p.m. Thursday Community Thanksgiving Service Spanish class leadership, human relations and Fort Amador Chapel management skills. Topics include: 9 a.m. Thursday Thanksgiving Day Mass The Fort Kobbe Education Center making the vi s i o n work, Fort Clayton Chapel will hold a Headstart Spanish Class understanding, valuing and 9:30 a.m. Thursday Thanksgiving Day Mass Monday-Tuesday 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at managing diversity, leadership 10:30 a.m. Thursday Community Thanksgiving Service Building 801, Fort Kobbe. For more strategies, and synergy at work. This For additional information contact the listed chapel. information, call Kimberly Johnson course is designed for managers and I at 284-3150. supervisors. DoDDS' Corner GOOD BEHAVIOR -Howard Elementary School students from Gilbert Murillo's bus -_ _(Route R11) celebrate "Good Bus Behavior" PARENT INVOLVEMENT -Balboa Elementary School's Parent involvement program involves many with an ice cream party and certificates parents in varied activities. First grader Jordana Fasano is on her way to becoming a "Super Reader" as awarded by bus monitor, Ernesto Cox. she gets practice reading with the guidance of parent volunteer, Victoria Nightingale. (photos by DoDDS)

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Tropic Times 15 Movies Nov. 16, 1990 Howard Theater Sunday Davis Theater 7 p.m. DAYS OF THUNDER (PG-13) Tom Cruise Today Today Monday 7 p.m. THE TWO JAKES (R) Jack Nicholson 7 p.m. THE WITCHES (PG) Anjelica Huston CLOSED Saturday 9 p.m. EVERYBODY WINS (R) Nick Nolte Tuesday 7 p.m. MY BLUE HEAVEN (PG-13) Rick Moranis Saturday 7 p.m. EXORCIST III: LEGION (R) George C. Scott Sunday 2 p.m. YOUNG GUNS II (PG-13) Emilio Estevez Wednesday 7 p.m. PRESUMED INNOCENT (R) Harrison Ford 6:30 and 8:30 p.m. DESPERATE HOURS (R) Mickey 7 p.m. EXORCIST III: LEGION (R) George C. Scott Monday Rourke Thursday 7 p.m. ROBOCOP I (R) Peter Weller 10:45 p.m. STATE OF GRACE (R) Sean Penn CLOSED Tuesday Sunday Quarry Heights Theater 7 p.m. PRESUMED INNOCENT (R) Harrison Ford 2 p.m. YOUNG GUNS II (PG-13) Emilio Estevez Wednesday 6:30 and 8:30 p.m. DESPERATE HOURS (R) Mickey Today 7 p.m. ROBOCOP 1 (R) Peter Weller Rourke 7 p.m. DUCKTALES: THE MOVIE (G) Animated Thursday Monday Saturday 7 p.m. MY BLUE HEAVEN (PG-13) Rick Moranis 7 p.m. PUMP UP THE VOLUME (R) Christian Slater 7 p.m. YOUNG GUNS II (PG-13) Emilio Estevez 9 p.m. YOUNG GUNS II (PG-13) Emilio Estevez Sunday Sherman Theater Tuesday 7 p.m. YOUNG GUNS II (PG-13) Emilio Estevez 7 p.m. PUMP UP THE VOLUME (R) Christian Slater Monday Today 9 p.m. YOUNG GUNS II (PG-13) Emilio Estevez 7 p.m. THE FRESHMAN (PG) Marlon Brando 7 p.m.MEN AT WORK (PG-13) Charles Sheen Wednesday Tuesday and Wednesday Saturday 7 p.m. STATE OF GRACE (R) Sean Penn CLOSED 7 p.m. ARACHNOPHOBIA (PG-13) Jeff Daniels 9 p.m. BACK TO THE FUTURE III (PG) Michael J. Thursday Sunday Fox 7 p.m. THE FRESHMAN (PG) Marlon Brando 7 p.m. MO' BETTER BLUES (R) Denzel Washington 7 p.m. STATE OF GRACE (R) Sean Penn 9 p.m. BACK TO THE FUTURE III (PG) Michael J. Fox Clayton Theater PUMP UP THE VOLUME A teenager starts up a pirate radio station to whip up morale and reunite class members in their Today struggle against an autocratic high school principal, (R) 7 p.m. GREMLINS II: THE NEW BATCH (PG-13) Chrstan Slater Phoebe Cates 9 p.m. MY BLUE HEAVEN (PG-13) Steve Martin STATE OF GRACE Saturday SAEO RC 2 p.m. THE WITCHES (PG) Anjelica Huston A police oficer is sent undercover to his old neighborhood to observe his childhood friends, who now' 6:30 and 8:30 p.m. DARKMAN (R) Liam Neeson belong to a notoriousIrish gang In Hell's Kltchen, (R) 10:30 p.m. DIE HARD II (R) Bruce Willis Sean Penn Sunday 2 p.m. THE WITCHES (PG) Anjelica Huston DESPERATE HOURS 6:30 and 8:30 p.m. DARKMAN (R) Liam Huston Mickey Rourke is the leader of a group ofescaped convicts who manage to seize an Ull-Amerlan Monday fatnily'shome and terrorize Its members until the time is right for their escape. (R) 7 p.m. DARKMAN (R) Liam Neeson Mickey Rourke 9 p.m. DIE HARD II (R) Bruce Willis Tuesday DAYSF THUNDER 7 p.m. DARKMAN (R) Liam Neeson OF 9 p.m. DIE HARD 1I (R) Bruce Willis An ambitious young race driver Is determined to make his mark in the competitive world of Wednesday NASCAR racing -where the lives of drivers, crew chiefs and car owners are governed by the pulse7 p.m. THE WITCHES (PG) Anjelica Huston pounding excitement of this grueling sport. (PG.13) p~m.THE ITCHS (G) Ajelia HutonTom Cruise -R~obert Duvall 9 p.m. DIE HARD 11 (R) Bruce Willis Thursday 7 p.m. THE WITCHES (PG) Anjelica Huston MY BLUE HEAVEN 9 p.m. DIE HARD II (R) Bruce Willis A charming silver-tongued organized crime informant turns life upside down in a quiet town that Amador Theater he relocated in. Along the way he makes things difficult for the FBI agent assigned to protect him Today and the district attorney trying to put him in jail. (PG-13) 7 p.m. THE ADVENTURE OF MILO & OTIS (G) Steve Martin, Rich Moranis Animated Saturday 7 p.m. DAYS OF THUNDER (PG-13) Tom Cruise Amador O'Club STRAC Club Clayton NCO Club Club opens for lunch Wed., Thurs. & Fri. from Open Mon.-Sat.,4:30-11 p.m.; Fri. & Sat., snacks, Mon.: Corner Post Lounge, variety music, 711:30 am.-I a.m. A Daily Hot Special as well as a music with Judy Upton. 11:30 p.m.; salad bar will be served. Mongolian BBQ, Thurs., Tues.: Corral, Country n' Western; 6-8:30 p.m.;Social Hour with disco.FrL,5-9p.m.; Quarry Heights O'Club Wed.: Main Ball Room, disco, 9 pm.-I a.m., S Sunday Branch, 10 am.-1 p.m.; Private rooms Brafs:Mn-r. :083 ~. U,89 Corral, Country n' Western. 7-11:30 p.m. Corne available for functions by calling 282-3534. Bakfash Mon.-Fri., 60:30 a.m. p., 8-9 PostLounge, salsa,7-11:30p.m.,Midnight buffet, c lu b a~~~m.; Lunch: Mon-Fri., 11:30 am.-1 p.m.; Dinner 9pm~. Howard NCO Club A La Carte: Mon.-Sat., 6-9 p.m.; Live entertain9Tu.: Main Ballroom, disco, 9p.m.-midnight, Breakfast Mon.-Fri., 6:30-9 a.m.; Lunch: Mon.meant: 6-9 p.m.; Sun., closed. Corral, Country n' Western, 7-11:30 p.m.; Fri., 11 a.m.p.m.; Dinner. 5:30-9 p.m.; MemberCPO Club Fri.: Main Ball Room, disco, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., C a len d arI Wed.; Brunch: every 3rd Sun. of each month, 10 Open to all E7-E9, civilians NM6 & above, and Corrl unr n est7 p2m-in m, a.m.-1 p.m.; Variety disco in ballroom: Fri., SUL, their dependents. Also offers a full menu and Post Lounge, salsa, 7 pm. Sun., Mon.; Casual Cove disco: Tues. & Wed.; services 7 days a week. Lunch: Tues.-Sun., sa ni mp.m.-2 a.m., Rock & Roll, Salsa: Mon. & Tues.; Variety, Westa.m.-1 p.m.; Dinner: Mon.-Sat., 6-9 p.m. Corral, Country n' WesteRm, 7pm.a.m., Comer ern: Wed. & Thurs. Anchorage Club Post Lounge, salsa, 7 p.m.-2 a.m., Dining Room Howard O'Club Open7 days a week. Offers services to everyone. open,5 p.m.; Lunch: 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; Dining room: Fri., nBreakfast: Mon.-Fri., 6:30-10 a.m.; Lunch: Mon.Sun.: Brunch, 10 am.-I p.m., Corner Post mal duty hours; Sat., 6-9 p.m.; Tues.-Thurs. Fri., 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Dinner: Mon.-Sat., 5-10 Lounge, variety music, 7-11:30 p.m.; closed;Bar Te.-Thurs,4:30-9 p.m.; Fri.,4p.m.' p.m.; Grill: Sat., Sun. & holidays, 1-9:30 p.m. Daily: Casa Maria Mexican Food, 5 p.m., midnight, Sat., 6-10 p.m., closed Sun. & Mon. USNavSta O'Club Lunch, 11:30 am-i p.m., Bar, opens 4:30 p.m. Albrook O'Club Opento officers, civilians NM7 & above, and their Lunch: 11 am.-i p.m.; Dinner: 5-8:30p.m.; Tues., dependents. Offers full menu & services 7 days a Davis Community Club bar menu available in the lounge; Fri., Hungry week. Lunch: Mon.-Sat., 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sunday Two daily lunch specials,11:30 a.m.-l p.m., Mon.Hour, 4-6 p.m., Music, 9:30 p.m.-1 a.m.; Sunday Brunch: 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Dinner:Sun.-Wed., Fri. For information, call 289-5160/3298 or stop Champagne Brunch: 10 am.-i p.m. 5-9 p.m., Thurs.-Sat., 5-10 p.m. by Building 87, Fort Davis.

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Tropic TimesGu d 16 Nov.TV Guide SCN Channels 8 & 10 F"o Videolink 5:15 General Hospital 6:30 NBC News At Sunrise 1:30 Saturday Night Live 6:00 CNN Headline News 7:00 NBC Today Show 5:30 .CNN Headline News i:00 SCN All Night Movies.The Looget 6:30 ABC World News Tonight 9:00 Morning Stretch 00 CNN Headline News Day" 00 Jeopardy 9:30 Gerbert 030 NBC News At Sunrise 400 Videolink 7:30 Head Of The Class low Let's Make A Deal ,00 NBC Today Show 5.00 CNN Headline News 00 Charles In Charge 10:10 Classic Concentration 00 Morning Stretch :30 After The War 11:00 Family Feud 030 Porky Pig 9:10 CBS Evening News 11:30 Showbiz Today 1o:aw Let's Make A Deal Sunday 10:00 Frontline Noon CNN Headline News 10:30 Classic Concentration 11:00 Entertainment Tonight 12:20 p. SCN Midday Report iso People's Court 5:30a. Grand Ole Opry li:3t NBC Tonight Show 12:0 Sports Latenight 11:30 Showbiz Today 600 On Stage 230 a. Latenight With David Letterman 00 Oprah Winfrey Noon CNN Headline News 630 Share The Word 1:30 Nightline 2:00 Another World 1220 p.m. SCN Midday Report 700 CNN Headline News 2:00 World Monitor 300 What's Up Dr. Ruth? 1230 Sports Latenight 7:30 The 700 Club 2:30 Sports Latenight 1:30 Barney Miller 00 Oprah Winfrey 8.00 Benjamn 3;00 Arsenio Hall 400 MA-S-H 2 Another World 8:30 Real Videos 4:00 Tonight Show 4:25 Guiding Light 300 Mr. Wizard's World 00 CBS Sunday Morning 5:00 CNN Headline News 5s General Hospital 3:30 Barney Miller 10:30 Ebony/Jet Showcase 600 SCN Evening Report 4:00 M-A-S-H 1.00 Washington Week In Review 0:30 ABC World News Tonight 4:25 Guiding Light 11:30 This Week With David Brinkley Tuesday 700 Jeopardy 5:15 General Hospital 12:0 p.o. CNN Headline News 7:25 Amen Io SCN Evening Report s:on NFL Football.Teams TBA 5:30 CNN Headline News ,:a D-91. Hawser, M.D. :30 ABC World News Tonight 4.00 Nova 6:0 CNN Headline News 8:20 Wednesday Night Mi. : Jeopardy 5:N Remote Control s:30 NBC News At Sunrise News. 7:30 Perfect Strangers 5:30 Fight Back! With David Horowitz, 7:00 NBC Today Show 10:310 CBS Evening News o:lo COPS 600 WWF Wrestling :00 Sesame Street 1:30 NBC Tonight Show :30 Murder, She Wrote 7.00 60 Minutes 10:00 Let's Make A Deal 12:30 ant. Latenight With David Letterman 9S0 CBS Evening News 00 SCN Sunday Night Movie.The 10:30 Classic Concentration 30 Nightline o00 Cover-Up Ken)edyt O Msshss. 1:00 Family Feud 2 00 World Monitor 1100 Entertainment Tonight 9:01 CNN Headline News 11:30 Showbiz Today 2:30 ors Latenight 1130 NBC Tonight Show 1000 Entertainment This Week NN30 3:0 Arsenio Hall 12:30 a. Latenight With David Letterman I100 Comedy Tonight 12:0 p. .SCN Midday Report 4w Tonight Show 130 Nightline 11:30 Sports Tonight 2:30 Sports Laeight CNN Headline News :00 SCN All Night Movie.'Dead Mon 1200 a. Firing Line : D a e out 12:30 Face The Nation 0) Donahue 3:0 SCN All Night Movie."crlie?. 100 Meet The Press 2:00 Another World Thu sd y 15 SCN All Night Movie.-The Fighting 130 CNN Headline News 3:00 Square One TV Kentockio." 200 McLaughlin Group 030 Barney Miller 530 an. CNN Headline News 700 CNN Headline News 230 George Michael's Sports Machine 4:01 M-A-S-H 600 CNN Headline News 3:00 60 Minutes 425 Guidig Light 6:30 NBC News At Sunrise 4.00 World Report 515 General Hospital 700 NBC Today Show 500 CNN Headline News 00 SCN Evening Report 9:ow Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade Saturday :30 ABC World News Tonight Noon CNN Headline News 73 i.o. Just For Kids!: Jeopardy 12:30 NFL Football.Denver/Detroit 7:31 Woody Woodpecker 730 Growing Pains :30 NFL Football.Redskins/ Cowboys 7 Huckleery Hound & Friends 00 Night Court 7:0 CNN Headline News Huckleberry Hound &30 ito CNN Headline News 0:e In The Heat Of The Night 7:30 Bugs Bunny Thanksgiving Diet Augie Doggie o0. CNN Headline News 9:30 CBS Evening News 800 Christopher's Story Laboratory Yogi Bear 6:30 NBC News At Sunrise : Miami Vice 8:30 SCN Thanksgiving Movie."The o:s Roadrunner 7:00 NBC Today Show low Entertanment Tonight Thaoksgioing Peomite." :40 Jem 0.00 Morning Stretch 1:30 NBC Tonight Show 0:00 Thirtysomethinig :11 Garfield 930 Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood 12:30 ate. Latenight With David Letterman i :w Entertainment Tonight :30 SCN Morning Movie.'P-st. Pant, 000 Let's Make A Deal. :30 Nightline 1:30 NBC Tonight Show And A Praye." .1030 Classic Concentration .00 World Monitor 1230 ate. Latenight With David Letterman 2:30 Sports Latenight 130 Nightline i:0 America's Top 10 1w Family Feud 3:00 Arsenio Hall 2:00 World Monitor 1130 Fn House 130 Showiz Today 4:00 Tonight Show 2:30 Sports Latenight Noon TBA Noon CNN Headline News 500 CNN Headline News 3:00 Arsenio Hall 400 p. National Geographic 12:30 p.o. Sports Machine 5:00 Ringling Bros./ Barnum & Bailey Circus 100 Oprah Winfrey 4:00 Tonight Show o00 Blondie And Dogwood 200 Another World 5:00 CNN Headline News 6.30 CNN Headline News 300 Kids Inc. Wednesday 000 48 Hours 3:30 Barney Miller 800 SCN Saturday Night Movie.-Chlnger" 4. M-A-S-H 5:s a3 .CNN Headfine News "SCN programming subject to change" 030 CNN Headline News 4:25 Guiding Light 600 CNN Headline News .dSCN cable channel 14 220p.-. SCN Midday Report Friday 2:30 To Tell The Truth 5:30t. CNN Headline News 1:30 CNN Headline News 6:00 SCN Evening Report 1:00 All My Children o .CNN Headline News 200 East Meets West 630 NBC Nightly News 00 One Life To Live 6:o NBC News At Sunrise 2:30 CNN Sports Latenight 7:00 Alf 3:00 The Price Is Right 70 NBC Today Show 3:00 Entertainment This Week 7:30 Hooperman 4:00 Scooby Doo 00 Oprah Winfrey Show 4:w CBS Saturday Night With Connie Chung ow NBC News Specials 430 Out Of This World 1:0 CBS This Morning 00 Videolink 900 Monday Night Footbal.Raiders/Dolpis 5:00 1 Spy Noon CNN Headline News 12:00. CNN Headline News w:00 SCN Evening Report 220 p.o. SCN Midday Report Sunday 1230 Latenight With David Letterman 030 NBC Nightly News :1,31 ofl hTuh130 -.0 Nightline 7sw Barbara Walters' Special 120 To Tell The Truth 5,30 .CNN Headline News 200 World Monitor 8:00 Quantum Leap 200 All My Children I:wn CNN Headline News 2:30 Sports Latenight o:w Hunter 300 The Price Is Right 630 Benjamin 3:00 Arsenio Hall 100 China Beach ow BePerice si s CNN Headline News 4:00 Tonight Show :o CNN Headline News 4:30 Brtlej u nc h 7:30 Real Videos sw CNN Headline News 1130 Arsenio Hall 430 The Brady Bunch ow Share The Word 1230 .0. Late Night With David Letterman 5.00 12 O'Clock High :1 700 Club Tuesday 1:30 Nightfine 6: SCN Evening Report 60 Merry Melodies Show :00 World Monitor : B Nightly osoe 930 Dinosaucers 5:30 a. CNN Headline News 2:30 Sports Latenight Tw Mission.lmpossihle 10:00 Wonderworks 600 CNN Headline News 300 Arsenio Hall ow NN ase e ams T I: Sunday Morning Movie.Platinm 6:30 NBC News At Sunrise :00 Tonight Show S o CNN Headline News 7aonde." :w NBC Today Show 500 CNN Headline News 030 Arsenio Hall Noon Rainbow Specials ow Donahue 1230 anm. Late Night With David Letterman 130 p.m. ESPN Sports Magazine ow CBS This Morning Thursday 0:30 Nightline .2:00 On Pit Road Noon CNN Headline News 2:00 CNN World Montor 230 Motor Week 12:20 p.o. SCN Midday Report 5:30 0. CNN Headline News 2:31 CNN Sports Latenght 000 American Racing Series 1230 To Tell The Truth 00 CNN Headline News :00 Fox Arseno Hall :3 This Is The NFL owe All My Children 6:30 NBC News At Sunrise 4:00 NBC Tonight Show 4:w NFL Football.Teams TBA :w One Life To Live sw. NBC Today Show 500 NBC Late Night 700 CNN Headline News :w The Price Is Right s00 Donahue 6:o CNN Headline News 7:30 America's Funniest Home Videos :00 Star Trek 0:w CBS This Morning 630 CNN Headline News 00 NFL Football.Teams TBA a:30 Degrassi High Noon CNN Headline News 700 Washington Week In Review 11:00 It's Gary Shandling's Show 5: The Real Ghostbusters 12:20 p.-. SCN Midday Report i30 CNN Headline News 5:30 Police Academy 12:30 To Tell The Truth Saturday 12.O .m. Firing Line 00 All My Children 12:30 CBS Face The Nation 6W SCN Evening Report 200 One Life To Live 730 -. Just For Kids! I:00 Meet The Press o:30 NBC Nightly News 3:00 The Price Is Right Woody Woodpecker :30 CNN Headline News 700 Mr' Belvedere 4W Ducktales Huckleberry Hound And Friends 200 McLaughlin Group 7:10 Designing Women 430 F-Troop Roadrunner Show 2:30 George Michael's Sports Machine 8:00 Tuesday Night Movie.-The Ne 500 National Geographic Jem 3,w 60 Minutes Msn. : SCN Evening Report Garfield 4:ow World Report ow Knots Landing 630 NBC Nightly News Saturday Morning Movie 5:00 CNN Headline News Hoy CNN Headline News 7 Cosby Show 1.0 3-2-1 Contact.' '' 1130 Asenioh Havid Letrmn70 Different World 30 CNN Headline News M monday 3nh ith David Leftermanow Thursday Night Movie.'on Upon Noon Saturday Afternoon Movie."Cobai :30 .Nighthne A Spy." Aodemy." 5:30 a. CNN Headline News 200 World Monitor 10 Falcon Crest 145 p.-. Saturday Afternoon Movie."Thrn ow CNN Headline News 2:30 Sports Lateight 1w00 CNN Headline News 0n A Match." o:30 NBC News At Sunrise 3:w Arsenio Hall 1130 Arsenio Hall s1:3 The Waltons 700 NBC Today Show 4:00 Tonight Show 12:30 Late Night With David Letterman 430 Airwolf 900 Oprah Winfrey Show 5.00 CNN Headline News 1:30 Nightline :30 CNN Headline News amw CBS This Morning W edn sa v 2=0 World Monitor ow The Disney Movie Noon CNN Headline News W ed s2:30 Sports Latenight 701 Star Trek.The Nest Generation 12:20 p.m. SCN Midday Report 300 Arsenio Hall ':s Roseanne 12:3o To Tell The Truth 5:30 as. CNN Headline News 400 Tonight Show o3a Married.With Children :00 All My Children 600 CNN Headline News o00 CNN Headline Nnws :00 Paradiso 200 One Life To Live 630 NBC News At Sunrise o: Videolink :O The Price Is Right :00 NBC Today Show 1110 CNN Headline News 4:00 Shirt Tales 00 Oprah Winfrey "SCN programming subject to change" 1130 NBC Saturday Night Live 430 Facts Of Life 0:w CBS This Morning 1:00.m. CNN Soorts Tonight :w Star Trek.The Nest Generation Noon CNN Headline News

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Tropic Times P7 Nov. 16, 1990 I 300ZX Turbo: Extremely smooth and quiet; its 'sports car firm' by Zane Binder Sophistication is hard to define. It's not just a single item; it's the sum of numerous, sometimes ., tiny performance parameters. It's how the shifter engages, and how the clutch applies the power. It's in the feel of seemingly insignificant things such as Nissan 300ZX Turbo the turn signal lever, and in the "feel" of the entire car. Is it European-type solid? Is it American too technical, has numerous built-in features to during the test period, two-three miles per gallon "floaty"? And, above all, does the sum of the make the engine and turbochargers live as long as more overall may be possible. vehicle's parts work harmoniously together? It's in a normally aspirated engine. It's mated to a fiveHandling, though, is outstanding. Standard every one of these areas the new-for-1990 Nissan speed transmission; it employs a better than power-assisted steering offers good road feel; the 300ZX Turbo excels, and that makes it one of the average shifter and clutch mechanism, but it's not ZX has few peers and no superiors when rounding best sports cars, and sports car values, you can quite world-class. It does, however, help the corners. This vehicle inspires confidence, far more buy. engine provide stellar acceleration: 0-60 in this than in back-to-back comparisons with Inside, the 300ZX Turbo's twin buckets were 3,474 pound car (that's quite porky) comes up in Chevrolet's Corvette. Part of this is due to the covered in Nissan's optional leather (cloth is just 6.5 seconds (8.3 with the non-turbo adjustable suspensions switch, which basically standard) and the seats themselves are from the automatic). This car is, however, by no means a firms up the shocks. It makes a real difference (the school of modern design. If you prefer futuristic Corvette-beater (its natural enemy) in any speed ride gets more jittery too), but I wonder if it's furniture,you'llbecomfortableintheZX'scabin. range or gear, despite what you may read really necessary since so many other Luggage space is surprisingly large for a sports car elsewhere. There are times, too, when the engine's .manufacturers (BMW, Mercedes, etc.) don't use (but small in absolute terms), a consideration for relatively small displacement shows with a lack of such a system and achieve similar results. traveling. Interior storage areas, such as the glove instantaneous response, and only part of this can Ride is one of the ZX's best features. Its "sports box, are small, and a cup holder is inexcusably be attributed to turbo lag. There's more power car firm," and over bad roads you definitely know absent. A T-top is standard. than you'll ever need for normal driving, but you it. It's far superior to the Corvette and Mazda Instrumentation quantity along with the don't spend $34,000 to drive normally. Just one RX-7 Turbo, though, but not as good as Porsche. equipment level in the test car was high; anti-lock more word about horsepower: that 300 rating is What's the bottom line on the ZX? It's definitely brakes, power steering, power windows, and just too high. About 240 is more realistic, and unlike not a Corvette-beater in acceleration, though about every other option is included. You won't large displacement engines (such as in the overall, it's a much superior car. It's extremely lack amenities! Corvette), that figure is only produced in a narrow comfortable, and sets a new class/price standard For '90, the rear-drive ZX uses a new 3.0 liter, RPM range. There's just no substitute for cubic in every area except all-out objective 300 HP, aluminum head engine. It is a fuelinches! performance. This .car, either with manual or injected, twin-turbocharged, intercooled "6" with Efficiency-wise, the ZX returned 21 highway automatic, is a best in class buy for about $34,000. four valves per cylinder and four cams. It's and 17 city miles per gallon, just average for the Having one in your driveway clearly reflects extremely smooth and quiet, and without getting class. As the car was driven exceptionally hard sophistication! Health & Nutrition by Judith Sheldon GOVERNMENT LOOKS TO "TRIM" WEIGHT LOSS CLAIMS: o renaeyu The Federal Trade Commission is gy taking a good, long, hard look at There is more to being green than some of the advertising and promorecycling newspapers and using tional claims made by over a dozen unleaded fuel. Test your companies in behalf of their weight loss programs. The purpose is to 24 i 300 ecological intelligence: assess the validity of their claims, C_3ne and to see if they live up to them. 1 5.00 1. Which of the following does 6. Which Is the most Referring to the cited companies, 9 epresentaive Ron Wyden (0 60 100 not pollute indoor air? environmentally friendly Ore.), chairman of the House Small 0 a) Carpets made of artificial fiber farm of energy? Business Subcommittee on Regulab) Electrical equipment' a) Nuclear power tion, Business Opportunities and Potato Choc chip Pretzel c) Household solvents b) Coal Energy said, "These programs are chips cookies (Dutch) d) Chipboard furniture c) Natural gas built on false promises and false (1 oz.) (2 small) 2. Which uses the most energy? d) Oil hopes with claims of medical superChocolate Ice cream Apple a) Refrigerator 7. Which Of the following vision when there is none, medical (1.5 oz.) (1/2 cup) (medium) b) Stove has not been associated endorsements when they don't exist,hantbensoctd deceptive use of before and after c) Washing machine with Increased rates of Some firms have agreed to change 3. What is the best way to miscarriage? their advertisg agd promil reduce auto emissions? a) Sleeping under electric claims. One firm, however, has had a) Install a catalytic converter blankets its assets frozen and a restraining b) Use unleaded fuel b) Working with x-rays order has been issued because of c) Buy a fuel-efficient car c) Too much sex false advertising. 4. Which uses the most water In d) VDTs (visual display terminals) If it were only a matter of lying your home? e) Coffee consumption about how much weight can be lost sodium a) Toilet 0. Which of the following of in how short a time, that would be Salty so ) Bat s.ateent ot latic bad enough in terms of being McDonaid'q 385 (Mg b) Bath statements about plastic unethical. But the health and even, apple Pie c) Washing machine cling-wrap is untrue? in some instances, the lives of Hardee's hot dog d) Dishwasher a) May cause cancer people could be jeopardized if the M,),nald's : g 5. Which of the following Is not b) Soaks into fatty foods like claims are false or misleading. McMuf i Which ofthesollon ot b) ant fat Another important factor is keepky Fried associated with destruction of cheese and meat ing the weight off after the dieter has icken dinner the Amazon rain forest? c) Is less harmful at lower reached her or his desired weight su er King 83O a) Cattle ranchers temperatures level. According to the government euihoPPer q79 b) Western paper-consumption d) Contains bacteria which can investigators, the stated success rate Mcoonald's C) soft drink cans cause salmonella is often exaggerated, and the actual 3sig Mac failure rate is much higher than Gt-(p .(3 '(o 9 wnuiwnie ol eixneq potential dieters are led to believe. ueAuoo Jo eiueo esiei o peAoJlsep eae 1soVq(q '(L V%06 Aq suotssiwe Rapid weight loss causes changes in SJCE: ewos sino *(e tuol uetn lueiolue wow si se6 iris *(q -Z epAlep euol. the body chemistry that almost Nutna 'lp i euozoeon o | ue3 ianb ( ieoitel I, always results in the dieter not just Seiieen suieiuoo peoqdiqo euozo sonpoid L= juawdnbe lpo!4(a regaining the lost weight, but also regaining more poundage than had been taken off. If the dieter goes on Awareness 7-8-Dark Green 3-4-Transparent Green another rapid weight loss program, the regained weight is, again, more level: 5-&-Ught Green 0-2-Head in the sand than the amount lost. Successful weight loss and continuing weight SOURCE: The Now lnternaionahst maintenance are possible. But you must work with your doctor.

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18Tropic Times S o t 18 Sports 1Nov. 16, 1990 Red Devil Dash runners scorch Cy Young winners FORT KOBBE (USARSO PAO) -A light overcast in the morning sky protected 167 runners from the hot Drabek takes NL honor Panama sun during the first running of the Red Devil Dash here Saturday. The 1-mile, 5-kilometer and 10PITTSBURGH (AP) -Doug Drabek, who kilometer races were sponsored by 1st Battalion, 508th pitched the Pittsburgh Pirates within one step Infantry (Airborne). of the World Series, came within one vote In the 1-mile race, Mark Pegher won the male Wednesday of unanimous selection as the division and was closely followed by Oscar Cedino National League Cy Young Award winner. and Luis Perozo. Oritta Essien was the first overall Drabek, who led the league with 22 victocompetitor across the finish line in the one-mile event. ries against six losses while leading his team Ana Guzman placed second among the females, and to its first division title since 1979, became Tara Fitzgerald was third. the first Pirate in 30 years to win the award. In the 5k female race, Elizabeth Castillo won the He received 23 of 24 first-place votes and 19and-under category, and Rosana Valldeperas placed 118 of a possible 120 points in balloting by second. In the 20-30 age category, Laura Beal was the the Baseball Writers Association of Amertop finisher with Sheila Flynn second. Susan Wajda ica. took top honors in the 31-40 age category with YolandaPegherfinishing second. Welch takes AL honor In the women's 10k race, Sara Garcia outran her sister Linda to win the 19-and-under division. Susan NEW YORK (AP) -Bob Welch had the Sine competed in the 20-30 age division and was the success, if not the stats, of Roger Clemens top female finisher. andDaveStewart. On Tuesday, he gotthe Cy Inthe men's 5k, ShawnFitzgerald wonthe 19-andYoung to go with it. under category followed by Terrance Lee and Paul Willie Freeman, right, and Jiggs Rawls, carrying Welch was the American League's biggest Fincher.JoginderDhillontooktophonorsinthe20-30 the guideon, lead the way for the Company A winner in 22 seasons, going 27-6 for the age category. David Clontz placed second and Ted "Moatengators" during the 5-kilometer portion of Oakland Athletics. And wins are what usuMauzey finished third. Ray Evanoff won the 5k overthe Red Devil Dash Saturday at Fort Kobbe. The ally win the award for the best pitcher. all, also winning the 31-40 age division. Tom Jackson "Moatengators" won the team event in the 5k. In a strange and split vote in which no one finished second, and Edward McAller finished third. (U.S. Army photo by Cpl. John Sell) was named on all 28 ballots, Welch got 15 Robert McIntosh sprinted to top honors in the 41-50 first-place votes and a total of 107 points. group and was followed by John Corson. In the 50-plus lowed by Rauer in second and David Erchull in third. Clemens, with an earned-run average more category, Alfredo Pasamante finished first, Richard B. R. Fitzgerald was the first competitor to cross the than a fullrun better than Welch, was second Bjorneby finished second and John Plant was third. finish line in the 41-50 age division with Ricardo Aguiwith eight first-place votes and 77 points. In the men's 10k, Raul Garcia was the only comlar second and Joe Parker third. Stewart also had a better ERA than Welch, petitor in the 19-and-under category. Reuben Tull Jr. In the team events, the Company A, 1/508th "Gahis teammate, and won 20 games for the took top honors in the race and the 20-30 age division. tors won the 5k and were followed by the "Mortars fourth straight season, but again failed to win He was followed by Kenneth Riggsbee and Kevin from HHC 1/508th. The HHC 1/508th "Medics" were the Cy Young. Huggins. Fred Lassiter won the 31-40 category folthe only team competing in the 10k. Soldier makes run for All-Army spot FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) for a 5:36 per mile average time. This -Should Tull make the All-Army team, -In October, U.S. Army South's 10year's results represented a substantial he will compete around the globe. miler team placed ninth out of 143 enimprovement over 1989's for Tull and "Fortraining, Iget out of bed at 4:30 triesin theAll-Army 10-milerrace held the team. a.m. to do calisthenics and run five to in Washington. In 1989, Tull, then stationed at Fort six miles. Then I attend the company USARSO's team consisted of B.R. Bragg, placed 156th out of 4,500, while physical training formation, and do Fitzgerald, Kevin Huggins, Lawrence USARSO placed 13th out of 147 teams regular PT with the company. After Damore, Reuben Tull, Fred Lassiter competing. that, I run another quick five or six and Jose Figueroa. Tull, who hasrun theracetwice, said miles," Tull said. "As coach and runner, I was exthe course was altered this year. It was Tull has few dietary requirements. tremely pleased with how we did. but, more to the flat side. "I try not to get alot of cholesterol. notas happy as I would've beenif we'd "It was hot this time. Once we started, I take yolks out of my eggs, and eat high placed first," said Fitzgerald. about five miles into the course it started fiber foods and salads and not too much Fitzgerald also wanted to thank Rick getting real hot," he said. meat. Velasco, of Community Recreation Di"I was in better shape than last year, "About an hour before every race I vision Sports, for his support of the race. and the times were faster," said Tull, have a banana with some honey on it. "It was absolutely superb, and the best who is submitting his application for the I've done that since high school," said the team had ever seen," said FitzgerAll-Army team. the 30-year-old, who has been running aid. If his application is accepted, he for 18 years. The fastest person on the USARSO will go to a twoto threeweek training Tull said he is thinking about the Reuben Tull kicks in the speed toteam was Tull who placed 50th out of camp, where they will have tryouts and Olympics, but his first concern is makwards the end of the race. (U.S. 5,400 runners, posting a time of 56:05; a final meet to determine the team. ing the All-Army I0-miler team. Army photo by Col. Larry Gragg) Sports Shorts Race registration begins Shuttle buses on line for game ence, and performs high energy level music with audience participation. The D.D.U. Band will offer Registration for the eighth annual Transisthmian Shuttle buses will be available Wednesday, to pre-game entertainment, starting at 6 p.m. Half-time Relay Race have begun at the CRD Sports offices transport spectators to the annual Turkey Bowl event, entertainment includes the Balboa High School JROTC located in Building 154, Fort Clayton and the MargaBuses will depart at 5 p.m. from Cocoli community Drill Team, and'the JV, Varsity and Officers' Wives rita complex. Rosters will include 10 runners and two Center, with a stop at Amador Officers' Club; the Club cheerleaders. alternates. Relay race categories are U.S. military, Kobbe Burger King via Quarry Heights; the Fort females, open, and over-40 years. Ateam entryfeeis Clayton Burger King, and Building 19, Corozal. Buses No coolers being charged. For additional information call Eva return at 9:30 p.m. Persons attending Turkey Bowl '90 are informed Foster at 287-4050. that coolers are not allowed. Turkey Bowl tickets on sale Civilian softball swings away Advance tickets are on sale at Valent Recreation Fun~Run Sprints off A civilian softball program will begin in DecemCenter, Fort Clayton; Sundial Center at Fort Davis; The Howard Sports and Fitness Center will sponber. Registration continues through Dec. 3 at BuildBuilding 65 at U.S. Naval Station Panama Canal sor a five kilometer Fun Run Saturday. The run will ing 154, Fort Clayton. For information call 287(Rodman) and Building 248 at Howard AFB. There start at Building 248 at 7 a.m. Therunis free and sign4050. is a special rate for E-4s and below. For more inforups are currently under way. For more information mation call 287-6109. call 284-3451. Company golf league tees off Registration for company-level golf concludes D.D.U Band to rock crowd AF needs cheerleaders Nov. 27 at Building 154, Fort Clayton. Turkey Bowl '90 will feature the D.D.U. Band, a Cheerleaders are needed for the Air Force Turkey The round robin championship will have a fourDepartment of Defense touring show that performs Bowl team. Women interested in being cheerleaders person best ball format, withablinddraw elimination jazz, rock, and rhythm and blues sounds. The sixfor the team are asked to call the Sports and Fitness for three holes. member Philadelphia group has recording experiCenter at 284-3451 or 3602.

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Tropic Times 10 Nov. 16, 1990 Pack is back, Krieg spent Sunday on his by Spec. John against (4-5) Green Bay Sunday. Los Angeles could Now for the lightweights. Dallas (3-7) and the L.A. "Gus" Hall have taken a two-game lead in AFC West over Kansas Rams (3-6) face off in Anaheim. This one is worth City. TheRaidersled 13-3 athome wherethey hadn't talking about. Both teams were thrashed Sunday by C OR OZA L lost in 10 tries under head coach Art Shell. The the league's two unbeaten teams by a combined score (Tropic Times) -Packers deserve some credit for the 29-16 win. They of 55-13. Sounds like the last Super Bowl score. Both NOBODY held Bo Jackson to 25 yards on 10 carries and Don teams are hopping mad. The Rams offense can hop a ASKED ME. Majkowski connected on two TD passes. -little higher. Rams 27, Cowboys 21. BUT. Kansas 49ers 24, Dallas 6. Like I said in the last column, In a battle of "dome-bodies," Minnesotatravels to City Chiefs' linethis one isn't worth discussing. Seattle. The Vikings (3-6) are onatwo-game winning backer Derrick It seems Jeff Rutledge was a one-game wonder. streak which doubles the rest of their wins. The Thomas experiThe Redskins' QB fell to the wrath of Reggie White Seahawks (4-5) are back in the playoff race, but who enced the most UW and the Eagles' defense 28-14 Monday night. Rutisn't? Krieg is hot one week and cold the next player. bittersweet game a ledge completed a disgusting 6 of 19 for 63 yards Minnesotaneeds this win to stayin the wildcard hunt. defensive player could Sunday. Thomas stuffed Sebefore leaving with a thumb injury. Minnesota, give up hunting; try a new hobby. Seahawks attle quarterback Dave Krieg seven times to set an Philadelphia (5-4) found someone other than QB 26, Vikings 10. NFL record for sacks. On the game's final play, the Randall Cunningham who could run. Heath SherI couldn't pass up the Sunday night game. PittsChiefs (5-4) led 16-10 and Thomas had his grasp on man netted 124 yards on 35 yards.-The Eagles' burgh travels to Riverfront in a battle for firstplace in Kreig again. This time, the Seahawks' QB squirmed defense played tough. Defensive end Reggie White the AFC Central. Being a Pittsburgh native, I should freeandtosseda25-yardtouchdowntowinthegame. not only intercepted the first pass of his career, but ran always pick the Steelers to win. That's bad luck. As predicted, the New Orleans Saints (4-5) rolled 33 yards with it to set up a TD. William Frizzell did Bengals 24, Steelers 17. over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers 35-7 Sunday. For the score with an interception for the game's first points. For the second straight week, there's a good Monday second straight game, running backs Rueben Mayes Now for the moment you've been waiting for. No, night match up. The Los Angeles Raiders (6-3), losers and Craig Heyward both topped the 100-yard mark. I'm not done, it's prediction time. Houston (4-5) has of two straight meet the Miami Dolphins (8-1) at Joe In the "Repus Bowl," (that's Super backwards) the unenviable task of traveling to Cleveland (2-7). Robbie Stadium. New England (1-8) held the Colts (3-6) to five first This is a game of numbers. Houston has the AFC's The Raiders have owned Monday night annually. downs, a 2.1-yard rushing average and 6-of-24 passbest offense. Cleveland is next to last. The Oilers Miami has looked phenomenal on defense but it ing. So the Pats destroyed the Colts right? Wrong. have four of the top five receivers in the conference hasn't faced a tough offense except Buffalo. The Rookie QB Jeff George tossed a 26-yard TD with 2:07 for receptions. The Browns have nothing to lose, after Raiders will not lose three in a row. Raiders 28, left to edge the Patsies, I mean Pats, 13-10. the 42-0 drubbing of the Bills except this game. Dolphins 23. Last week, 3-2. Season against spread The Pack Is back. The Raiders (6-3) blew it Oilers 31, Browns 13. 73-55, 57.0%. Monday night 7-3. NIT round-up Duke edges-Marquette DURHAM, N.C. (AP) -Christian Laettner scored 24 points and had 12rebounds Wednesday night tolead No.6 Duketo an 87-74 victory over Marquette in the opening round of the Big Apple NIT. The Blue Devils will play host today to Boston College, which beat Memphis State 8278 Wednesday night, in the second round of the tournament. Billy McCaffrey added 19 points for Duke, which lost to UNLV in the NCAA championship game last season, while freshman Grant Hill and sophomore guard Bobby Hurley scored 12 each. RAIDER ROMP -Fullback Curtis Collier of the Fort Clayton Raiders runs for a touchdown as teammate Jomoore Toney throws ablock in youth football action Saturday. The Raiders beat the Cristobal Tigers 36-0 to set up amatch Oklahoma beats N'Orleans up of rivals as the Raiders face the Clayton Wildcats Saturday. (U.S. Army photo by Lt. Col. Bruce K. Bell) NORMAN, Okla. (AP) Oklahoma used a 16-0 rim early in the first half to take control Smith leads Clippers past Suns 15th-ranked Sooners rolled to a sloppy 95-65 victory Wednesday night in the first round 24-5 run in the second quarter as the Cleveland Cavaliers built of the Big Apple NIT. N orm an scores 20, a 22-point first-half lead and beat the Indiana Pacers 113-95 Wednesday night. Arkansas slams Vandy Celts swat Hornets 135-126 adds 2 crucial blocks BOSTON (AP) -One night after his lowest point total in FAYETTEVILLE,Ark.(AP) LOS ANGELES (AP) -Charles Smith scored 27 points four years,Larry Bird scored 45points and theBostonCeltics -Lee Mayberry scored eight and Ken Norman added 20 points and two key blocks down survived a late Charlotte comeback for a 135-126 victory over points during a 23-6 run and the stretch Wednesday night as the Los Angeles Clippers the Hornets on Wednesday night. the Arkansas defense did the beat the Phoenix Suns forthe first timein10 tries with a 108rest as the second-ranked Ra102 victory. Nets top Bucks 112-95 zorbacks beat Vanderbilt 107Benoit Benjamin, slowed down the past few weeks by a EASTRUTHERFORD, N.J. (AP) -Derrick Coleman scored 70 Wednesday night in the first tender shoulder, added 19 points and 16 rebounds to help the a season-high 20 points and Mookie Blaylock got 8 of his 18 round of the Big Apple NIT. Clippers end their four-game losing streak and Phoenix's points in the fourth quarter Wednesday night as the New three-game winning streak. Tom Chambers paced the Suns Jersey Nets snapped the cold-shooting Milwaukee Bucks' win Arizona routs Austin Peay with 24 points. streak at five games with a 112-95 decision. After a pair of missed free throws by Benjamin, Mark Sixers turn back Hawks 112-104 TUCSON, Ariz. (AP)-Chris West cut the Suns' deficit to 104-100 on a slam dunk with PHILADELPHIA (AP) -Charles Barkley scored 34 points Mills led No. 3 Arizona's balthree minutes to play. But Clippers rookie Bo Kimble beat and grabbed 13 rebounds as the Philadelphia 76ers turned anced scoring with 17 points the 24-second clock with a 20-foot shot and then followed back a late rally and defeated the Atlanta Hawks 112-104 as the Wildcats overwhelmed two misses foul shots by West with a driving layup for a 108Wednesday night. shorter Austin Peay with a 59100 lead with 1:04 left. Selkaly 30 puts "Heat" on Mavs 105-93 point first half and cruised to a MIAMI (AP) -Rony Seikaly had 30 points and 21 rebounds 122-80 first-round Big Apple Cavs drub Pacers 113-95 and rookie Bimbo Coles sparked a decisive fourth-quarter NIT victory Wednesday night. RICHFIELD, Ohio (AP) -Rookie Danny Ferry hit two spurt as Miami beat Dallas 105-93 Wednesday night, the quick baskets and passed to Craig Ehlo for a third during a Heat's first-ever victory over the Mavericks.

PAGE 20

2 Tropic Times Nov. 16, 1990 Skins lose more than game to Eagles NFL standings HERNDON, Va. (AP) -The Washington Redskins Gibbs said he hopes to start Mark Rypien this AFC East practice site resembled a field hospital after the team's Sunday against New Orleans if he is recovered enough W L T PF PA beating at the hands of the Philadelphia Eagles. from a seven-week-old knee injury. Journeyman Gary "This is about as beat up as we've ever been," Hogeboom, signed as an emergency backup when Miami 8 1 0 192 96 coach Joe Gibbs said Tuesday, surveying damage that Rypien was hurt, would start if neither Rypien nor Buffalo 8 1 0 274 150 leftnineplayersinjured,includingtwoquarterbacks. Rutledge are ready. N.Y. Jets 4 6 0 178 216 Stan Humphries, running back Gerald Riggs and "If Rypienlooks like he's I100percent, we'llprobaIndianapolis 3 6 0 125 196 kick returner Walter Stanley are expected to miss bly give him a shot. If not, we'll go with Hogeboom," New England 1 8 0 130 257 several weeks and others could miss time with injuGibbs said. "The miracle would beif Jeff could come ries sustained in the 28-14 loss Monday night to the back." AFC Central Eagles. Rutledge, who started only his 10th game in a 12"They hit us hard and they hit us often and we got year NFL career, ended the night with his throwing Cincinnati 5 4 0 212 225 hurt," said trainer Bubba Tyer. "I can't remember a hand swollen to twice its normal size. Humphries' Pittsburgh 5 4 0 171 147 game any worse." injury wasn't as bad as feared, said trainer Bubba Houston 4 5 0 194 169 Several players were hobbling badly at Redskin Tyer, but coach Gibbs said he would still miss four Cleveland 2 7 0 128 235 Park on Tuesday, one was still in the hospital, trainers weeks. and the team doctor were busy all day and scouts were "I'm about as healthy as I can be at this point," said working to fill gaping holes in the roster. Rypien, who planned to take his first snaps in practice "We're in for a tough haul here," said Gibbs. "I this week since his sprained knee. "I think this is my L.A. Raiders 6 3 0 170 137 don't thinkit could be any worse. We're in as much week to get back in there and get going." Kansas City 5 4 0 193 138 trouble as we've ever been." Riggs will be placed on the injured list with a San Diego 5 5 0 214 163 Humphries arrived at Redskin Park on crutches sprained foot arch, the same injury that idled him part Denver 3 6 0 197 224 with a sprained knee and Jeff Rutledge had his sprained of last season. The Redskins planned to sign running Seattle 4 5 0 175 183 right thumb heavily bandaged, leaving the Redskins back Reggie Dupard, who played for Washington last scrambling at the position that has given them the season and was released in training camp, as a reNFC East most trouble this season. placement. W L T PF PA Ryan explains team's early losses N.Y. Giants 9 0 0 226 110 Washington 5 4 0 199 169 .Philadelphia 5 4 0 227 186 PHILADELPHIA (AP) -Now his team, apre-season favorite to "We put in a new offense with Dalas 3 7 0 125 204 that his Philadelphia Eagles are contend for the division title and two new wide receivers," Ryan Phoenix 2 7 0 110 240 above.500, coachBuddyRyan is the Super Bowl. He has refused said. "Guys were holding out. The willing to talk about what he thinks to make excuses, insisting, the tight end (Keith Jackson) was NFC Central caused the team's slow start. club would turn things around. not in camp. The Eagles (5-4) lost their first Ryan at his weekly news conChicago 8 1 0 229 126 two and then dropped to 2-4, losference Tuesday was pressed to "You can make all kinds of Green Bay 4 '5 0 176 196 ing to teams they were heavy explain the team's tardy start. excuses. If I'd have told you this Tampa Bay 4 6 0 170 243 favorites to beat. Some said Ryan's At first he was mysterious. three weeks ago, it would've still Detroit 3 6 0 213 237 job was in jeopardy. "A lot of things go into it," he been the truth, but you'd have said, Minnesota 3 6 0 194 189 began. "Some of the things will 'Oh, he's alibiing.' But that's not But the Eagles have won three get mein troubleifIsaid'em. So, alibiing, that's thewayit is. That's NFC West straight, including a 28-14 triumph I'm going to stay like I am. You the slow start. ________ over the Washington Redskins (sports writers) have been around "I have a good feel for our team San Francisco 9 0 0 198 138 Monday night. They are tied for long enough to know what I now," Ryan added. "I've had a New Orleans 4 5 0 171 164 second with the Skins behind the mean." good feel all along. It's taken us a Atlanta 3 6 0 232 251 runaway New York Giants (9-0) No, the reporters didn't really while to get our offense down. I Los Angeles 3 6 0 198 258 in the NFC East. know what he meant. So they think we're as good as any team in Ryan steadfastly has defended keptpressing. the NFL." WBA will sanction Holyfield-Foreman fight NEW YORK (AP) -Evander Holyfield will not against Mike Tyson, who lost the title to Douglas. to negotiate with the leading contender for a defense surrender the World Boxing Council's piece of his At the news conference, James Binns, counsel for by next Oct. 25. heavyweight championship without a fight. the WBA, read a letter from WBA President Gilberto Duva threatened court action against the WBC Holyfield, who won the undisputed title from James Mendoza to Holyfield in which Mendoza said the and to take his case to the public and to advertisers "Buster" Douglas Oct. 25, is signed to defend it WBA would sanction the fight with Foreman "upon who sponsor WBC fights on television, adding: "I against 42-year-old George Foreman April 19. the condition that the winner must defend the title believe the WBC is going to sanction this fight or get "The fight is happening April 19 because Evander against the then leading available contender, by no out of boxing. Holyfield is the undisputed heavyweight champion of later than June 11, 1991." "I see the possibility of a congressional investigathe world, andthere's nothing (WBC president) Jose Tyson, who is to fight Alex Stewart Dec. 8 at tion into boxing if they steal Holyfield's title." Sulaiman can do to change that," Dan Duva, HolyAtlantic City, N.J., currentlyis theNo. 1 contenderof Asked why he would press for WBC recognition field's promoter, said Wednesday. all three governing bodies. sincethe fight will happen evenifit's withheld, Duva He spoke at a news conference called to officially The IBF Executive Committee reportedly is leansaid: "Why it is important is Evander Holyfield announce that the World Boxing Association had ing toward sanctioning the match, and President Bob earned it." changed its stance and will sanction the match. Lee said by telephone that he will have an announceDuva said the WBC sanctioning fees for the HolyThe WBC, WBA and International Boxing Federament by the end of the week. Should the fight be field-Douglas fight were more than $300,000, with tion all ruled that Holyfield's first defense had to be sanctioned, Lee said, the winner would have 30 days $150,000 coming from Holyfield. Pirates' Reynolds signs with Japanese team TOKYO (AP)-The YokohamaTaiyo games, going 4-for-9. Whales said Wednesday they have Japanese newspapers said the consigned former Pittsburgh Pirates outtract was for $1.3 million, but Ushigome fielder R.J. Reynolds to a one-year declined to comment in accordance contract. with Japan's usual practice of not disTadahiro Ushigome, the Whales' pubclosing contract amounts. lic relations director, said Reynolds The 30-year-old Reynolds batted .288 signed the contract in Tokyo on Monin 95 games for Pittsburgh this year. day to play for the Japanese team next Ushigome said that Reynolds would season. return to Tokyo on Jan. 29 to join the Reynolds was a member of the major team intraining on the southern island R.J. Reynolds (right) celebrates with teammate Barry Bonds after the Pileague all-star team that lost an eightof Okinawa. rates clinched the National League East. Reynolds signed a contract with a game series to the Japanese 4-3-1 earUshigome said the Whales have reJapanese baseball team Monday. (AP Laserphoto) lier this month. He played in three tamed the Brewers' Jim Paciorek.

PAGE 21

Tropic Times Nov. 16, 1990 Giants, 49ers downplay Dec. 3 'Super' match-up by The Associated Press and the Rams (in San Francisco). You can probably scratch Detroit (it's outAsk Bill Parcells THE QUESTION doors) and Tampa Bay but the Rams and you get THE ANSWER. and Eagles are another story, particu"We're not on a collision course larly the Eagles, whose defense looked with the 49ers," the New York Giants' its ferocious self for the first time this coach says. "We're on a collision season against the Washington Redskins course with Detroit. on Monday night. Yeah. Sure. OK. Typically for the 1990 season, the But try telling that to ABC, which Giants-49ers game means verylittlein televises Super Bowl XXIV I-II on a tangible way. It gives the winner an Dec. 3. edge for home-field advantage in an Try telling that to talk show hosts NFC title game (both have to get there and callers in the two cities that house first) and it also helps the winner stave the first teams to start the season 9-0 in off the Bears in the fight to avoid tandem since the Bears and Lions did it having to play in the first round of the in 1934. And who were the Joe Monplayoffs. tana and Phil Simms of that year? But as for anything else? TheGiants-49ers contest has become The Giants lead the Eagles and a special spectacle in this odd season Redskins by four games in the East; when the main topics of discussion are the Bears lead the Packers by four in the loony schedule and the even loonthe Central and the 49ers lead the Saints ier officiating. In fact, because parity by five in the West. now refers only to the 23 teams below With seven games to go, that means the Giants, 49ers, Bears, Bills and the races are over -the 49ers' magic Dolphins, a meeting of two good teams number is two; for the Bears and Giants, is a rarity and a meeting of two 11-0 it's three. teams unheard of. So despite what Parcells and Seifert Yes, next Monday night's Raiderssay, their meeting Dec. 3 is the game Dolphins game in Miami could be a that saves the season (decade? year? good one. But it would have been a century?) for the NFL. better one if the Raiders hadn't stumbled Parcells even went so far as to hint over Kansas City and Green Bay the Monday that trying to become the first past two weeks. team to go unbeaten since the 1972 Which is what Parcells and George Dolphins has its positive aspects. San Francisco quarterback Joe Montana faces a tough New York Giants' Seifert have to worry about the next "Yes, at this point it's aplus factor," defense Dec. 3, but isn't looking past Sunday's game against Tampa Bay. two weeks against Detroit and Philahesaid. "The players really wantto do (AP Laserphoto) delphia (New York) and Tampa Bay this." NFL underdogs jockeying for playoff spots by The Associated Press leashed Craig "Ironhead" Heyward and the defense weeks, while the Chargers' Billy Joe Tolliver hasn't in two straight wins by a total of 56-14. thrown an interception in four games (121 attempts), Just to remind people that 16 games is along season Heyward, who had 35 yards in 11 carries in his first after throwing eight in the first six games. Kansas .Herecome the Saints, Packers and Chargers. There seven games, gained 277 yards in 39 carries the past City hasn't scored an offensive touchdown in 10 go the Bucs and, to a lesser extent, the Raiders. two weeks, including 155 yards in Sunday's 35-7 quarters. While the Giants, 49ers, Bears, Dolphins and Bills destruction of the sliding Bucs. But the key is defense for the Chargers, who are 5continue to sail along at the top of the NFL with a Tampa Bay, which started 4-2, now has lost four 5 after a 2-5 start. In their first five games, they combined record of 42-3, the jockeying for secondary straight and has been outscored 102-23 in the last allowed 322 yards per game and were minus-4 in playoff positions is changing every week. three. turnover ratio; in their last five, they've allowed A lot of the action Sunday was on the West Coast, Then there are the Chargers, who improved to, 5-5 199.8 yards and are plus-15 in turnovers, as Burt wherethePackers handedtheRaiderstheirfirst home with a 19-7 win over Denver. Grossman, Lee Williams, Leslie O'Neal have all loss of the Art Shell regime. The Raiders, who had San Diego is only 1 1/2 games behind the Raiders demonstrated Pro Bowl capabililties. won 10 straight at the Coliseum under Shell, now are and a half-game behind the Chiefs in the AFC West "They'are as good up front as any team we've 6-3 and officially out of the elite. and the difference is quarterbacking. played this year," quarterbackJohn Elway of Denver And the Packers (4-5) are back in the NFC wildSteve DeBerg of the Chiefs and Jay Schroeder of (3-6), another team going south fast, said of the card race, along with the 4-5 Saints, who have unthe Raiders have had predictable off-days the past two Chargers. NFL names Manley ready to make comeback WASHINGTON (AP) -A year after being banned from the Two players who were also banned by the NFL were later top players NFL, Dexter Manley is ready to resume a career that has reinstated after a year off, though they are not playing now. taken him from the SuperBowl to drug and alcohol treatment Tony Collins, who played for the New England Patriots, was centers. cut by Miami this summer; Stanley Wilson has not played NEW YORK (AP) -Seattle But the former Pro Bowl defensive end says he has also since going to the Super Bowl with the Cincinnati Bengals. quarterback Dave Krieg, who used his time in rehabilitation to prepare himself for rejection Manley's attorney, Bob Woolf, said he was confident his threw the winning touchdown pass from the league and the Washington Redskins. 31-year-old client will play again somewhere. as time expired, and Kansas City "My skin has grown tough," said Manley, banished last "You don't have that kind of talent around," Woolf said. linebacker Dererick Thomas, who Nov. 18 after violating the league's substance abuse policy "There have got to be teams that could use him." sacked him seven times before forthe third time. "The most important thing for me is to stay In nine years, Manley had 97 sacks, including a teamthat, were named AFC Players focused on my recovery." record 18 in 1986. of the Week Tuesday. NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue will meet with Manley Just as important, he provided some spark to an otherwise Running back Craig Heyward in New York today before deciding whether the defensive bland team. of the New Orleans Saints and lineman could return. The commissioner had said he would He called himself "Dr. D" and sported a Mohawk haircut. defensive end Richard Dent of review the case after one year. When San Francisco quarterback Joe Montana came to town the Chicago Bears won honors in If Manley were reinstated, the Redskins would have to shortly after returning from major back surgery, Manley the NFC. decide whetherto takehim backforthefinal six weeks of his showed no sympathy. "I'll ring his clock," he said. Krieg completed 16 of 23 passes contract. Team officials, however, have said privately that But the emotions he showed on the field also took a toll on for 306 yards and two touchisn't likely to happen. his private life. downs, including a 25-yarder to "I'm hoping the commissioner does what's best for the He was treated for drug and alcohol abuse in 1987 and was Paul Skansi in the final seconds league and for the game, and I hope I play again," Manley suspended for 30 days in July 1988 after testing positive for as Seattle edged Kansas City 17/ said from Houston, where he did volunteer work at the John cocaine. It was cocaine again that did him in a year ago, and 16. Lucas New Spirit substance abuse clinic. "If not, life goes he admitted it at a news conference. Thomas setan NFLrecord with on. I will accept whatever will be." Yet he became a hero to many when he went before a his seven sacks. Manley has said if the Redskins don't want him, he'd be congressional committee and acknowledged another probinterested in playing for Miami, Denver or the Raiders. lem -illiteracy.

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2 Tropic Times Nov. 16, 1990 YOUR HOROSCOPE King Crossword by CharLes King Cooper ACROSS DOWN 1 2 7 8 9 10 1t ARIES (March 21 to April 19) highlighted now. Though you may being. Things should be proceeding 1.Repors 1. Molem grant Sncey n omstc ffir Dtig i.qmofe oI roperty You'll make a point of saving more not be io the mood for social life, nicely in domestic r g .Machr title 2. Unitof 12 13 14 time for study and other mental you'll do your shar of talking on the and recreation should be on the K. Wa-er ocademie pursuits now and in the coming phone now. Some nome duties also upswing n w. Fit-. credit ME weeks. Legal, publishing and school keep you busy. CAPRICORN (December 22 to 13. C amellatio 3. Philippine 15 16 17 concerns are favored. Research on a VIRGO (August 23 to September January 19) You work well as a team 14. Operate term financial matter is indicated. Once 22) You'll be planning some impornow, but don't fuss over matters of 17. Cacuona 5. Field 1 --19 28 you get unfished tanks out of the tant financial moves now and in the investment and spending. Plan for measure foers way, your social life soars. nearfuture. You have the courage of more homa entertaining. You live up 18. Certain 6. Table scrap 21 1 22 TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) your beliefs and may become to your reputation an a hard worker (vir.) 7. Mciaje-l Both old and new friends play a part involved in some cause. You make a now. Social graces too help Ou win 19. Cataromb 23 24 25 26 1 27 28 29 30 in the week's activities. Focus on good appearance before others now, support of others. Intuition is the ngures career plans. Favors are asked of Hard work on a career project key to relationships. 1 J pry 8 Classify 31 32 33 34 35 you, but you im receive benefits, consumes much of your time. AQUARIUS (January 20 to 9. Dilemma Because your drive is backed by LIBRA (September 23 to October February 18) A romance becomes tO In s 6 37-38 39 4 self-discipline and original thought 221 Your follow-up timing on deals in more serious now. Couples make 22. Fmr pe 11. tis 3 now, you'll make notable career .,intelligent moven regarding the wet' letes streetcar progress. excellent, enough you and a close tie fare of offspring. Petty jealousy 26. Luopein 20. In41 GEMINI (May 2t to June 20) may have difficulty coming to an could arise at the office. Iie above gall 2. Overhead Don't simply rely or the muse for agreement. about a financial matter. it. You're 'he mastermind of effi28 Sue of type ratays 45 46 47 4 149 creative stirrings, but .prepare the You should be able to complete your ciency in domestic interests now. A .3. DOteful 25. Drinkieg wi. with solid concentration. Some research cow. Travel soon will be on cycle of increased personal magnet3. Emerald Isle thirstily 51 52 53 make pas ty take the children on your agenda. A partner may not ism begins now. 36. Murdered 27. Pallid special trip. Clearing the air an a budge on a personal matter just yet. PISCES (February 19 to March 38. Ciae 295 ve 6 heart-to-heart talk with a close tie in SCORPIO (October22 to Novem 20) Continued popularity is yours, 40. As airmu20. Alfoso's akin tomaking a sew start. ber 21) Loved ones are busy making although some of you nay be nive CANCER (June 21 to July 22) plans for continued happiness. You wanting to spend more time Joe 41. A failure Queen irsattend to 'n-bar needs to be might want to take a breather from with a romantic interest. Well 43. A bribe 32. Eaeds done at home base. Then, you'll be in excessive activity to catch your thought-out career plane begi 1 4 Itice 34. Reject wtul 8 9 0 H N 8 5 0 5 8 better position to judge what breath la-r. A career matter is pFasditios conlompt S 8 2 I 8 0 5 N I innovations to include on your settled to your satisfaction, A friend Friends are behind you. Avoid 51. Discharge 29. Fly n a u u 8 e n o I agenda. You're on a roll in your or child seems unduly stubborn. Be ideological disagreements. 52. Ladgoigs 42. Raufflied pride A I N I V 0 X 6 8 V carer. nce ou niharo patient. 54. Great source 44. Rasfing ot 401, career. Once y u finish a project, 1A1ERU Nvcbr2 oo supply mubrtanme V 3 A a I N NI S m you'll come up with new ideas to SAG.ITTwAR.S (Nctc4ober 22 to (pHnue. 8 09 s 51515 increase income. December 21) You're motivated to 50. Iodian 40. Meslom S N 9 5 9 5 5 C 0 n a LEO (July 23 to August 22) How a achieve row, but mustn't expect 57. Units st primn o N I I I V I child handles a responsibility will be immediate feedback for y-our new 5.certwr 48. Pianist Peter n 0 N e a o S 8 I thelfactorinjudgingnwhatladditioal ideas. Coratinue work cn them, 58. Pet's ward 49. To comer s I v 8 A t I 1 N V n o m judginwhat additional 50 Belgian r N 3 N freedoms to extend. Home life is though, br.xgs a great sen ofwell9. desinuo ag92y ( 1990 by King Featues Syndicate. Inc. classified ads 25" conle Colar T1984 Ford Escort L, 4-dr, 1.6 It. engine automatic, a/c, p/s, Cardnas.e rV 2-ba2l organ. See at 7208 pb, cruise, everything works, runs great. $2200. 284-6675 1976 Ford Mustang 11, duty paid, 4-cyl., arm battery, needs Cardenas, 252-2155 body work. $1000. 230-0847 VHS, 2 years old, cost sew. $400. Excellent condition. $185. 1980 Buick Le Sabre, 6 cyl., duty free, am/ fm/cass., new Stud's services front AKC Cocker Spaniels, huff calor, great 252-1143 tires, very good cond. $1700. 252-1241 1980 AMC Concord, good cond. dependable. $2000/obo. disposition. 226-1348 269-3926 evenings Magnasox oloc EGA monitor with EGA graphics card. 1986 Buick Samerest, impeccable cund. 25 mpg, 5-spd, AKCRatlweiter clad services, champion pedigree, show $425. 286-3524 power. $7500/obo. 287-6494 after 6 p.m. 1988 Ford XLT 150 p/u truck, like new, low mile, loaded. quality. 287-31 14 252-6838 Video camera G.U.-25 JV.C. 8 mm with accessories, color 1978 Buick Electra,all power(and itworks, too),stero, new Mitiatue Pincher puppy, male, black and tan, pure bred. TV. 264-3437 rubber. $3000/firm. 287-6494 after 6 p.m. 1975 Volvo 245,14cyl, s,a, standard shift,god tires, good (looks like little Doberman pitchers. $188. 261-3325 mechanical cod. SP70. 252-6838 Honda electric guitar. $200. Kimball organ music. $650. 1987 Mazda B-200 p/u, I/b, US spec. 1984 Dodge Daytona German shepherd female puppy, CCP registered, excellent 252-6051 "as is". Best offer. 236-3051/260-9833 a pedigree, 8 wks old. $300/fiom. 252-1190 Complete Pioneer stereo system, good cond. $1008 Zenith 1994 Toyota Cressida, 4-dr, p/s, p/l, p/w, a/c, am/fm/cans. Peek-a-poo puppies, I male, 2 females, 5 wks. old. $115/obo. 19" color TV w/antenna and TV stand. 1190.284-3720 Best offer. 252-6845 Country crafts far Christmas or special occasions. (Country 261-3325 bunnies, Sanla and Mrs. Claus. 287-4771 Pionrer amp, teach cans., deck, advent mini speakers and 1978 VW van, 9 passengers, exc. coad. $1500. Rotor tiller. Responsible Army dependent will babysit my home Kobbe 208weeks old Dachshand poppies, pare brd, n papers. $125. stereo stand. $250. 284-5427 $200. 287-3983 area, newborn welcome. 284-4089 252-2081 Cannon A-1 35 mm camera 50 mm and 135 mm telephoto 1981 Oldsmobile Toronado, diesel, loaded, great cond. .. Large dog kennel. $60. 286-4828 lens, speedlite and leather case. $400. 252-2582 $3000/aba. 287-4290 Spanish speaking maid, available M-P. 287-4379 Pit bull puppies, barn Oct. 7. $100. 252-6073 IBM clone, 640 RAM, 20 meg. hd, 1-5 1/4 disk drive, amber 1978 VW, blue, Brazilian, good cond., new radio w/speakers. Excellent bi-lingual maid/housekeeper part-time. (M-Wmonitor. $675. EGA color monitor, new. $370. 287-3293 $2100. 252-6879 Th). 286-4232 after 5 p.m. Free Siamese cats, 2 year old maI, 8 year old female. Pioneer KT-7Xtuner, MCS integrated amp.$100/both. 2841977 Buick Century, 4-dr, 6 cyl., auto, needs work. $300. Lice-in Spanish speaking maid, responsible and good with 226-4885/0335 6186 after 5 p.m. 252-2287 children. 228-6386 Audio-Visual Sony Betamovie camera, model BMC #100,exc. cond. $500. 1953 -1964 Bestop tiger top for CJ3B Jeep, w/doors Spanish speaking lady offers her rfficien services as a full or 252-2080 hardware, new in box. $275. 286-6524 part time maid/tutor/ babysitter. 224-9348 17" Sharp color TV, picture in a picture with remote, cable 24" color TV, good condition. $250. 226-0415 1983 Nissan 4 x 4 kingcab, shell, brushguards, a/c, alarm, Spanish maid, very honest, good with kids, good references. ready. $350/obo. 284-4093 tint, hitch, 6 speaker Keawood, exc. cond. $6900. 284-3632 258-0181 ask for Isabel after 6:30 p.m. XT turbo, 25/ IP/ IGP, 768JB RAM 360 KB floppy, 20 mb New Canon lenses; 135mm f/2.5. $125. 80-200 mm f/4.0. hid, CGA monitor, NX-1000 I I printer. S1250. 260-2157 1984 1.6 SR. Toyota Corolla, good cond., radial tires, duty Piano lessons at student's home, all ages, open time. $8 an $175. 200 mm telephoto f/4. $140. 252-2656 paid. $4900. 232-5139 call after 5 p.m. hour. 262-7741 VCE -Sony Betamax $L-24116, needl adjustment and fiar Pioneer amp., teac cas,. player, advent mini spkrs and stereo toning. 1/2 of original price. $240. 223-2643 1988 Nissan Sonny station sagan, good cond. $6300. 1988 Excellent honest Spanish speaking maid, excellent and. $250. 284-5427 p/u Nissan Double cab. $8500 good cond. 2260415 housekeeper, child care, excellent references. 228-4852 call Sony FH-203, compact component system, 280 PM PO. after 6:30 p.m. Commodore 128 with floppy drive and modem, cp/m $225. 233-1229 1990 Mazda MX-6 GT, fully loaded, with bra, must see. software and manuals, used five times only. 284-6222 287-5934 English speaking day maid, reliable honest with references, Sharp 25 inlo TV /m exc. condo. $350. 2844985 1982 Dodge Aries station wagon, auto, a/c, p/s b, yl, mature, cooks. 22 1 -1 Sharpg25din.rcolor TV s/remote, nac.ptoad. 1358. 284.4965 2 Technics spkers, 4 way, 5 spker system, 300 watts, 16 good irs, mast se, duty ne paid. $2700. 252-2772 Mature and honest, live-in maid, English speaking, great with Nikon Action touch 35 ma, water resistant, -in focus woofer, 7" tweeter, 3 midrange, spectrum power 0ulpa 1987NissanvanXEblalowmilra~lintdwiaduwaam/fm. kids all ages. 220-0418 camera. $100. 264-4159 Chris meter, 4 setting power output. Leaving soon. $400/neg. $9500. 287-4998 284-6590 Excellent bilingual maid, cooks, cleans, wash, irons, loves 10" black and white National TV, model TR-12 17 It. $35. kids, available anytime. 1-2-3 days per-week. 232-4872 269-1651 Symphonic small stereo, good for kids. $125. 252-2943 after 1986 Mitsubishi Moner, 44, hi-top, diesel, duty paid, a/c, P.m. p/s, am/fm/cans, 5-spd, excellent cond. $12,500. 287-3293 42 year old Spanish speaking live-ia maid, cleans, irons, Apple I GS ,/756 K memory, various software, good cond., -cooks and babysits. $110. 238-1172 must se__. $_500 __obo. 287-788 ______ _______________ -1984 Dodge Ommi, 4-dc, 2.2 L, ne w tires, a/ce, am/ fm, ru, cosxncayit.$1.37 most sell. $15001.b. 287-3788 Auscond. i and out. $3408. 264-2157 Spanish speaking inaid on/off post, Mon.-F. 287-4322 Sansui solid state stereo phonic amplifier model AU-777-A Well preserved 1976 Mercry4-dr. w/allelec. doors, a/c, etc. (365 V.A.) $225. 261-1734 after 5 p.m. See to appreciate.:. 5089-A Diablo. $2500. 252-1194 1979 Plymouth Hrizon, a/c, prfectnning9cnditin, duty Mature, reliable, experienced housekeeper, English speaking, by the day. 228-1680 Stereophonic tuner fm/am, Marantz model 115-B. $75. 2611975 Jeep Wagoneer automatic transmission, overdrive, 1734 after 5 p.m. amnt/fm/iass a/c, cb, greatcondition $2300/obo. 287-3114 1983 Jeep CJ-7 Renegade, 4 cyl, 5-spSn., 3500 poatds, eec. winch, new soft top, new chairs. $4800. 268-8586 S haid with little English, cleaning, ironing, cooking, care for children, references. 284-5429 Y amaha SR-30 surround. $150/obo. MCS 1984 Ford Escort 4-dr, auto, a/c, p/s, p/bc cruise, tinted sprakers.$100loabo. 286-4286 windows, good condition .$2200. 284-6675 193 Jeep CJ-7 hardtop, godpapers, e. $1$2 a page. 287-4535 ask for Patty 35 mm Olympus camera w/500 mm lens, filters, flash case. 1982 Rernault Fuego, 1,600 cc, automatic, p/w, p/l, p/s, a/c, 1970 Chevelte Malibu V-8 307, 2-dr. $1000/nba. 284-5696 1350. 284-5517 call Jean between 7 a.m. -4 p.m. radio. $2000. 225-1313 Spanish speaking maid. 228-0506 21" Sony Trinitron TV. $350. Microwave Sharp carrousel. 1975 Monte Carlo, newly rebuilt engine. $2500. 287-4992 1988 Dodge Omni, auto, a/c, am/fm, duty paid, looks good, English speaking maid available anytime. 287-4538 $215. Hammond organ. S1500. 252-5898 runs good. $2900/negotiable. 223-0064 1984 BMW, 4-dr,dark green, a/c, shift, duty paid, ext. cond. Mature bilingual woman babysitter most evenings and 19" color TV Zenith, no remote control. 1250. 2874290 $10,000/negotiable. 252-6454 'f weekends, referencestdvil/ble are .x.fent. 287-3735 Camera 35 mm Pentax K-1000 1:2 50 mm lens; macro 1980 Jaguar X-J6. $7100. 252-5530 198E Nissan Sunny, silk a/c, 5-spxc., amnfm, only 17,000 Excellent Spanish speaking day maid, honest, reliable, rem 4.5 80-200 mm; Vivia flsh. $300. 287-6582 truswrhy, hard worker, references, salary negotiable 1982 Datsun 280ZX, ex. cord., new interior, low miles. miles. $4800. 204-6186 after 5 p.m. 252-2129 Zenith 161 "transportable" computer 640-K; dual disk; built 15500. 284-5491 in monitor new printer all with manuals. $950. 236-2643 9 Best day mid in Panama, Jamaican, F Eglish 1978 VW (German) cassertibie, a/c, customized. 224-7671 gas mileage, one owner. $3800/abo. 282-3605/4472 ask for references provided. 287-31 8 Canaan AE-I camera w/xtra lens, Otlters and numerous Cril eeecspoie.2738 accessories. 282-3495 1987 Nissan Sanny station wagon, auto, a/c, am/fm/cass. Datn kigca copperr, 75,000 miles, 4 cyl Spanish maid good with kids, available immediately. no duty paid. $5000/oba, 260-3533 leave message 59pd $5sel k b Dec. w7-0936 7 234-0970 267-495 New Epson LX-810 printerw/3 ewcartridgrs ribbees. $175. 5-spd. $3500 s11 by Dee. 3rd. 287-936 2 282-3495 Rescue mycarfrom the Claytongarage(1975 Chevy Bel Air) 1978 Ford Granada, 2-dc, eel duty paid. $1000. 252-6241 B because I'm PSCing. $500/obo. 203-5586 Tandy 1000 TX computer, desk, 5 114" and 3.5 disk drive, printer,jystick, software, smartwateh. $1000. 207-3027 1974 VW Bug, very good coedilion, radio amlfm. $1550. 1985Roky Daihatsu urba diesel, fall estras,duy paid, best New 19'Cobia fully loaded. 150 hp Johsorouutboard. rrOw 287-6631 offer. $600. 261-6584 trailer, doy paid. 18,95 make off. 269-5173 Entertainment cente, 19" color TV, tonable, laner, equalizer, d dal cssetit dcck, speakers, cabinet. $1000. Mitsubishi -Gallunt -Turbo, diesel, duty paid. 5-spd, anti197 Plymouth Volure, p s. p bat, runsgoud, body han rust. /6' fisk-e-ski w trailer. 122 h.p. Mcrcruiser. must sell thi 287-3027 rust, Zeibert treatment. $7500. 266-4885:0335 500. 284-3366 ask for Fink month. PCS. 545h. 284-3332

PAGE 23

Tropic Times Nov. 16, 1990 classif ied ads VH F radio SMR ST-8200, am/fm/VHF, new in box Full size mail & boring. $175. Dining room se. $250. Baby bathtub, bottle warmers, carrier, clothes, cordless iron, 1978 Kawasaki 650-SR, red color, 17500 mileage. $1000. a .Living room s. $450. Drye 350 (I yr. old). End tables. everything excellent cond. and rasonably priced. 287-6722 283-4404 m0010000. $220. 252-5162 $50. 286-3778 from 4 p.m. -8 p.m. 21' Paramount Open fisherman, 225 Evinrude, 1989, depth Solid wood cherry queen bedroom srt -four poster bed, Ironing board. $5. Toaser. $5. Rowing machine $40.les finder, slrrr. $18,500. 256-6410 dresser/mirror, chest. $2000/obo. 287-3790 after 6 p.m. 287-4092 18' Glaitron boat with 130 h.p. Volvo Penta engine, exc. 9 piece dinnete set w/60" table w/chairs and 66" China 37 gal., aquarium, new, complete s i7 a.m -noon Saturday condo. $4500. 232-5322 cabinet. $1200. 261-8305 284-6484 between 5 p.m. -9 p.m. only 6457 Los Rios (clothes, vacuum cleaner, ceramics, etc.) 23 ft. sail b 1at ([974) Columbia w/ trailer, 7.5 h.p. outboard, Sectional sofa. $650. Armchair. $150. Recliner. $300. Office ...Saturday 23 8-2.3sail teoal Breauiful wedding dress by giancbi, w/veii, size 8-16, like many extras. 228-2331 after 5 p.m. swivel chair. $100. Cortains & rOds. 252-6454 new. $450. 252-1126 764-B Balboa, motti-family. 7am. -noon Saurday b8', Glasosram Pro Bass boat, 140 b.p. Suzuki, ot. guide Frost free General Electric refrigerator like new. $650. Boy's bikes; Redline 600 c. $100/bo. Team Murray 2-spd. 1009-B La Boca (assorted kids clothes, miscellaneous trolling motor, iler, et /98 obo.287-499 $80. 252-6929 34 e .articles) Saturday 34' fiberglass diesel yacht in good condition, reduced to, Large capacity G.E. microwave oven. $300. oter kitchen Wedding drss. $100. Showrdoo. $100. Beam bow untena. 642-B Howard, 8 a.m. -I p.m. fhousehold items, winter $48,000. 252-6073 center. $100. Oskar food processor. $40. 287-3340 $30. Keyboard. $400. 252-2781 summer clothes, adult & baby, $1 0) Sturduy 14 ft. Abernathy boaoandstradler,&s-topycentral consolea3 1, f.Abernathy beat and trailer, tp, central console, 30 5,000 BTU a/c used 2 months. $200. 287-3794 Bicycle bay 20". $30. Bicycle stationary. $30. 287-6582 2364 Balboa. Saturday hp, automatic Evinrode motor (1990). $3500. 225-1372234Blo.Stra 2 Swivel chais, gold color. $180 each. 252-5301 Living room curtain gold and blue design with lining, 98" x 2304 Balboa 7 a.m. -I I a.m. Saturday 102", almost new. Negotiable. 252-6454 Refrigerator Admiral 17". $500. Dishwasher G.E. $125. Patio furniture. $225. Electric portable typewriter. $125. three table set. $450. Loveseas. $225. Sofa. $350. Twin bed New English tan/ black broken stripe tweed sport coal, cost. furniture, clothing) Saturday Drapes and rods. All in c. rand. 282-3720$235, size 42 regular, tan woolen overcast, will sell for $125. Mauve carpet 14'x8', 8'xlO'. $75. 4 blue upholstered chairs. 252-5643 2473 Morgan Ave. Balboa (electric stove, clothes, chairs) 7 sprngsam. -I I a.m. Saturday 2 twin beds with box springs "Like new". $95 each. 260-0778 $75 aa. Programmable cassette deck. $75. Turntable. $40. 2 Surfboard; 5'm -, Rip Carl wit. Tri-Fins, comes with lop 12" electric desk fan. $19. I1" Penny electric desk fan. $15. light blue mini blinds 60" wide. $35 ca. 2864828 freight bag. $300/with bag. 225-6929 7224-A-B Cardenas 7 a.m. -10 a.m. (coffee and end tables, 269-1651 Beautiful five piece bedroomsetw/mattress and boxspring, 8 household items) Saturday months aid. $850. 287-4157 ask for Davidson Baby walke. $15. 16" and 12" bikes. $40/$30. 252-1257 Bentwood Rocker and matching table. $50. Glass top coffee C 7224-A-B Cardenas 7 a.m. -I p.m. Saturday table. $20. 207-6585 Corner oni bookshelf, luggage, oriental rugs 6sx9. 252-2676 2300-A Balboa 8 a.m. -I I a.m. (household goods, toys, stereo Several electric stoves, one clothes dryer. Negotiable. Brandel boxer, full grown, 1 1/2 yea, old, name; Duran, Mshroumrl bar, like new. $150. 287-4992 console, clothes) Saturday 261-5531 Bnehs o g n yada e uncnoe lte)Stra special pet.Rrward. 252-2383 Leroy set used once. $40. Airbrush set never used. $50. 6348 Los Rios 7a.m. -noon. (household items,toys, clothing) Washer: General Electric, white, heavy duty, 4 month use, Epilady shaver like new. $10. 252-2138 Saturday like new. $550. 264-2437 Large green parrot, talks, special pet. 252-6829/3557 C anon calculator, needs repair, .2 girls bike. Magic Chef 2422 Morgan Ave, Balboa 7 a.m. -11 a.m. (clothing, Refrigerator, sofa tables (2), coffee table, mattresses (2), isce a stove. $175. 260-8850 miscellaneous, new PVC plumbing pipes. Saturday bicycle. 224-7671I Girl's 12" tricycle, girl's 20" bicycle, ladies 10 spd. bike, Riding breeches, ladies 7, rust. $20. Bicycle Bianchi 1522-C Howard 7 a.m. -noon (clothes, toys, misc.) Saturday Couch and loveseat, black and mauvalbeuutiful set. $1300. Singer's sewing machine 110/220 V. 287-4886 foldable/adjustable. $45. Ladies small jeans to evening Smoked glass top table w/4 black chalet. $550. 236-1210 dresses. 252-2138 5775 Apt. A Diablo 6a.m. -I p.m. Saturday Hydro-slide, exc. cond. $75. 282-3190 Full size waterbed with padded sideboards. Needs minor Satin bridalgown-exquisite, emroideredoutwork,enhanced 2315-A Balboa. Saturday repair. $150. 286-3524 GE washer. $450. Like new, Oak Davenport. $150. Console with sequins and pearls, size 10, never worn. $700. 252-6231 TV. $385. 287-6631I 763 Balboa. Saturday Padding for carpets. Brand new. 40 sq. yds. Pads 2 rooms. Grass cutter, 5 hp, 22" blade, high wheel. $170. 252-5872 $75. 287-5887 20" girl's bike. $30. Lawnmower needs work. $75. Child 17 Howard 8 a.m. -noon. (adult, teenage, baby girl clothes, skateboard. $10. 287-3087 .Tmwa r/c cars, many extras, wheels, chargers, etc. $250. pajamas, dresses, jeans, furmals) Saturday Rattan glass top table w/6 chairs. $400. 2 fans 12" & 16" -252-1201 262-3330 Tow bar. 8100. 287.4992 ________________________ Ladies bicycle, good.condition. $45. Boys 5-8 bicycle, good Heavy duty dryer, good cnd. $150. 287-3173 Sears washer and dryer, like new. Cobra radar detector. condition. $25. 287-6222 287-5934 Sleeper sofa, leather, tan. $600. Carpet, Oriental, 6 x 9. $30. Water skiing slalom with cover. $75. Bronze dinnerware 102 Siamese kittens for small buy. 252-1 I10 Dishwasher, Whirlpool. $70. 287-6494 call after 6 p.m. Train set, games, toys, etc. 287-3173 piece set. $75. New PVC plumbing pipes. 252-2760 La Lithe League leader interested in reforming Panama Infant/toddler clothes, great cond., girls and boys. La L e ar s em n Solid hardwood American dining set large table4 regular, 2 Benotto racing bike, 12 spd., slightly used. $180. Eureka Negotiable. 285-4190 captains chair additional glass sop cunditi on newc as$2495 vacuum cleaner, good cond. $40. Philco u/c, 220 V. $85. captinschar aditona glss op ondtio ne cot $495 vacum leaergoo end W.Phico /c,220V. 85. Entrtanmet cnte, slidwoo, gsteid.$65One slide projection in good working condition. 252-6193 will accept. $1995. 2354854 252-2397 Entertainmentcentrr,slidwod,greatcOnd.$ n0. Roll top desk, solid wood. $625. Baby changing table. $300. 236-12108 aywohuh o er tF.Aaohzapes Wooden sofa, 2 arm chairs, center table, all white pine, Baby cradle. $60. Baby swing, clothes 0-9 mths, baby towels, ..Lady who bought o bears at Ft. Amadorbazaar, plae country style. $250. 284-6683 blankets, socks and shoes. 284-4895 7 ft. Sears Christmas tree. $45. Sharp Carousel microwave. call, I have your bear. 252-6425 $150. All exc. condition and prices firm. 252-3397 ..PCSing? Tired of mess, noise? We give hirds a good bome, MagicChef stove, 20",gmod conditionmwithconnection. S125. Very special limited edition encyclopedia Britannica. $1000. $1ve insid Of outs 2 e4-3799 264-6025 286-3473 Kenmoeeheavyduty dryer. $400. Penny weddnig dress. $175. live inside ot outside 284-3799 Sofa sleeper. $400. Funda sofa. $400. Kenmore upright Whirlpool heavy duty dryer, exc. cond. $295. 287-6522 2 Beach Cruiser bikes; I Penn fishing reel; Tasco telescope, Sa. cleaner. $100. 284-3397 Ping golf clubs, red dot size. 263-9906 world~vauu cleaner $100. 204-3397ptr.25-1 Kenmoreworld class oom lens with adaptor. 252-1111 Bilingual maid with references must iron and clean, good speeds. $25 each. Traves curtain rods. $10 each. 287-3446 Air compressor, gasoline motor, 80 gallon tank. $2300. Air with kids. 286-3135 after 5p.m. hoses. $150. 256-6410 Vamaha Rica 200, .excelln condition, low mileage, Live-i maid, mus efluen inknglish,carefor2 children 17 cu. ft. Whirlpool, n-frost upright freezer. $250. Kenmore Sandblaster, pressure 20 gallon tank with all equipment, new w/helmet and vest, 93 mpg. $1900/obo. 287-3788 of sole parent. 287-3188 refrigerator. $450. Small/medium s e dug traveling kenl hose, helmet. $650. 256-6410p. 1988 Yamaha 650, U.S. spec., duty paid, 057 miles, cc. To buy double bedroom set, firm mattress, stove 30' PCSing; I coffee table.$100. Cffendtwedtables.$250. cnd., helmets included. $3000. 284-4082 from II a.m. -7 electrical or gas and washing machine, plus table and lamps. White bedroom set w/I chest of drawers, I night stand, Washer machine. $225. 284-4490 p.m. 2864232 after 5 p canopy and pink canopycover and postercurtains, mattress 1982 Honda Nighthawk 650,exc. cond. $1400. 1982 Suzuki Cockatiels, parakeets, budgies for breeding program, best of and box spring. $600. 282-3720 Lamps, bedsheets, bedspreads, towel ornaments, bar cart DR 500., ext. condo. $950. 2874036 car,, top dollar paid. 284-379 tablecloths, patio sale, Nov. 10. 266-0102 A.C. 20,000 BTU. $150. One year old Frigidaire washer and 1981 Honda custom CX-500, duty paid, looks great, runs like To locate Nancy Egbert of Cucoli, reference pekingese dryer. $550. Sunbean iron. $10. 28-3923 Babycarseat. $5. Infant toddler car seat. $20. Baby carrier new. $1650. 287-4988 puppy. 252-6989 $10. 260-3485 Household items and appliances far immediate sale. 252-6241 Maternity dresses, size 16. Sheer curtains, light green and white. 287-6244 theTROPIC TIMES Ad Form Whirlpool 18,000 BTU a/c, almost new, avail. u/a Dec 16. $375. Desk,metalw/fittedglasstop.$70(43"x33").252-6029 General Electric 6,000 bu 120 V., needs leak repair. $125/hu. 233-1229 Advertising in the Tropic Times is offered on a space available basis~to U.S. military members, civilian Twin sie mattress with box spring and framexc. cond. $85. DOD employees and employees of other U.S. government agencies. Ads will be accepted only for 252-5179 A/c compressor and clutch for Honda Accord. $395/obo. NON-COMMERCIAL services or goods offered by the advertiser or an immediate family member. Smith Corona portable typewriter, new. $125. 252-5177 Offerings of real estate, firearms or personal ads will not be accepted. TheTropicTimes reservesthe right to Bmouthfld. S850 Kenmor brudtless, serge w/mpa & b .t-, almosedit any advertisement. Questions regarding non-publication of submitted ads may be directed to the month old. S850 Kenmore frostless, largercapuciiy refrigeratou, almost new, Eio t2561 with glass shelves and ice maker. $700. 286-4286 Editor at 285-6612. 1 -pastel vertical blind new 63" wide 78"long. $100. 252-1111 Submissions must be typed or legibly printed and limited to 15 words. Only two submissions per family Burbie dream house. $70. Barbirs. $7. Barbie furniture and per week will be accepted. Each submission must indicate only one category for publication. Ads for Cocktail table and two side tables, Like nr. U.S. made. Barbie clothes. Trap set including cymbals, top hat. 8450. services will be accepted once per quarter as will ads for the Wanted category. Patio Sale ads must indicate $495/obo. 252-5177 287-3294 date and location. Submitted ads will be published only once and must be resubmitted for further publication. Ads not run because of late receipt or lack of space need not be resubmitted; they will be run Kemcore dryer. $150. Westinghouse washer. $200. 282-3930 Baby swing, 2 baby walkers, baby Scaggli carrier, the following week unless a specific date is involved. miscellaneous baby items. 171 Howard. 284-4485 call Becky Deadline for the receipt of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for the following Friday's edition. If Monday is an Bugy walker. r20. Car ssato/covc.$ $20. Bicycles. $s. official holiday, the deadline is 9 a.m. Tuesday. Ads may be mailed to the Tropic Times, APO 34002 or King size mattress and box spring. $300. 252-2080 252-6829 deposited in a drop box at the Albrook Post Office. Advertisers should allow seven to 14 days for processing. Fedders 12,000 BTU,cleanedand painted 30 days guarantee. 50 gal., aquaiumw/staud and accessories. $95. Table lamp. S175. 252-1032 $25. Two scooter. $20. 252-6707 0 ANIMALS Dining room table & China cabinet. S3000. Sofa & loceseat. Buys bicycle w/trainivg wheels. $40. 286-3484 0 AUDIO-VISUAL SISOS. Patio furniture, mirrors, tables, desks, more. 252-6459 0 A UTOMOBILES 500 capacity weight lifting bench, exc. cond. $40. 252-2379 1 A VAILABLE Admiral2yeoaldwhiterefrigerator,2doorsidebyside.2.7 of capacity. 5850. 260-6159 Ladiesdresses,vew,size3-4,rose/floral,costS102.Sell.$75. 0 BOA TS& CAMPERS Sx piece ,it-an lvng .set. Like new. $850. 252-6440 Ladies shoes, 9-AAA. 282-3495 l FOUND PRICE HOME PHONE Playskcol playtime with baby. $30. Devic Scuggli bby Q HOUSEHOLD Check only one category per adform. Only two adsper person each week Whiolool G.E. is ashes, ced repairs. $30 each or twu carrier. $30. 287-4778 rallowed.EachadformisIhnitedlo15words.Pke typeorpri" estly. for $50. 257-2379 0 LOST ir lowd ahalr nlmtdli odPe~etp rtet. Information listed below is not included bn the ad, but I requked for Likeremfrezer 21cu.ft. ros fre. 33-002Waebed, fall size, mirror headbuard w/ shrift, heater, vxc. Q MISCELLANEOUS pblato Thnfmtinwlntbeeeadtoh'pate. Like nefreezer, 21 o u. ft. frost free. 233-2002 cond. $i00. 284-5394 M Ablicasl, Tis Wormadon wiffnot bekvWd thirdpirii. o MOTORCYCLES G.E. 11,000 a/c. $235. Whirlpoul 10,000 a/c. $250. Fedders Tropical rose bashes and other tropical plants. $1.00-$3.00. o PA TIO SALES RPtNtil'S NAMF ANV/CDADE 22,000 a/c $350. 252-2287 284-3332 o WANTED ORG. DUTY PHONE G.E. Refrigerator, 17 ft. mustard/gold color, exc. $525 firm. Armoire. Washer and dryer set. I4k gold jewelry. Radar 252-2397 detector. Other prices. Good prices. 289-3236

PAGE 24

2 4 Tropic Times Nov. 16, 1990 by United Press International Agencies file $68b claim NEW YORK -Two government agencies filed a $6.8 billion claim against Drexel Burnham Lambert, accusing the former employer ofjunk bond czar Michael Milken of having "plundered" at least 40 savings and loan institutions in securities deals. Trump faces deadline NEWYORK-With aThursday night deadline looming for payment of $47 million interest on bonds for his Taj Mahal casino, Donald J. Trump asked to return to the negotiating table with bondholders, an attorney said, but the possibility of bankruptcy remained strong. Eastern gets reprieve NEW YORK -Eastern Airlines won a reprieve from liquidation when a federal bankruptcy court allowed the beleaguered carrier to take more money from an escrow fund to meet its operating expenses. The Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, with Chancellor of the Exchequer John Major (left), listen to former judge said $30 million could be withdrawn Deputy Prime Minister Sir Geoffrey Howe's resignation speech in the House of Commons in London. fromanescrow accountintwoincrementsof Howe launched a devastating attack on Thatcher and opened the door for a leadership change. (AP $15 million. Laserphoto) Record temperatures set, Conservative confronts Thatcher Northwest remains cool Sunny skies and record warm temperatures spread across the Great Plains, Midwest LONDON (UPI) -Former Defense Secretary Micalamity of a Laborgovernment," he said. and eastern United States as fog socked in chael Heseltine said he will challenge Prime Minister Analysts said if Heseltine can get at least 120 votes, New Orleans and the Pacific Northwest Margaret Thatcher for the leadership of the Conservawith some 40 abstentions, he would seriously underremained soggy and cool. Indian summer tive Party, bringing to a head the political infighting mine Thatcher's leadership mantle. There are 372 was expected to send temperatures soaring that has caused the party's deepest division in 15 Conservative members of Parliament, and Thatcher into the 70s as far north as Chicago. years. must get at least 15 percent more than the majority, or Heseltine's bid Wednesday to move into Downing 214 votes, to win. Otherwise a second vote will follow Typhoon kills 103 Street had been widely expected amid an escalating one week later in which other contenders may stand. public split within the government over Thatcher's Heseltine said if he won, he would have an MANILA, Philippines -Super typhoon Mike policy on Europe, which former Deputy Prime Min"immediate and fundamental review" of the Thatcher severely damaged Cebu city, the country's ister Sir Geoffrey Howe called a "nightmare vigovernment's poll tax, a flat fee levied on every second most important commercial center, sion." taxpayer regardless of income that has been widely and a senator Thursday likened the damage Heseltine, 57, said in a television interview that criticized as inequitable. Voter disillusionment with to the blast of an atomic bomb. more than 100 members of the Conservative Party the governing party has been reflected in a string of Military officials said 103 people were had urged him to challenge Thatcherfor thevoteto be by-election defeats, evenin traditional Conservative killed, 84 missing and presumed dead, and held next Tuesday. "Ihave abetter chancenow than strongholds, fueling concern among junior members 107 injured when Mike slammed into the Mrs. Thatcher ofleading the Conservative Party into about their prospects in elections that must be called central Philippines Tuesday. a fourth electoral victory and avoiding the ultimate by mid-1991. Aviation experts KGB reveals assassination plans investigate crash MOSCOW (UPI)A Leningrad pipe man at the annual Nov. 7 parade, said end as an anti-Communist active in ZURICH, Switzerland (UPI) -fitter accused of firing shots at a Red that Shmonov stated during a prelimiradical political causes, had prepared Italy sent teams of aviation exSquare parade last week has told innary interrogration: "I wanted to kill for the alleged assassination attempt perts and police to Switzerland vestigators that he intended to assassiGorbachev." for two years and practiced rapid-fire Thursday to help authorities find nate President Mikhail Gorbachev, the KGB Col. Pyotr Sokolov said that target shooting, Tass said. what caused an Alitalia DC-9 to KGB said Thursday. Shmonov had written a note describGorbachev, Russian Federation leader crash near Zurich, killing all 40 The KGB also disclosed that Alexing his intentions, which was found in Boris Yeltsin and otherdignitaries had passengers and six crew members ander Shmonov, who is being held in his pocket after the incident in which just led a civilian march across Red aboard. custody of the security police, stood two shots were fired at Red Square in Square and returned to their viewing According to Alitalia, the Italonly 150 feet away from Gorbachev the heart of Moscow. stand atop the mausoleum of Soviet ian state airline, the passengers and other Soviet leaders when he al"The note was prepared in advance state founder Vladimir Lenin when included six Italians, six Amerilegedly fired two shots during the in case of his death during the assassitwo shots rang out. cans, two Japanese officials of Revolution Day celebrations. Earlier nation attempt," the official Tass news Shmonov, 38, has been charged with theOKI electriccompanyandthe reports said 650 feet separated the agency said. "In the note Shmonov trying to commit aterrorist act undera remainder were apparently all gunman from the president. explictly set out his criminal intencriminal code that specifies assassinaSwiss. The crew, which included Police Sgt. Andrei Mylnikov, who tions as regards the Soviet president." tion of "a state or social figure or two pilots, two cabin stewards claims to have helped disarm the gunShmonov, described over the weekrepresentative of authority." and two hostesses, were Italian. Alitalia identified the six U.S. citizens as William Briggs, Karol Vaugan, Sthn ter anu Bush signs bill to clean U.S. skies Vaughan, Stephen Ritue and a passenger named Bass. It did not say whether Bass ass a man or a WASHINGTON (UPI) -President Act. However, environmental groups last month, will tighten pollution conwoman. Bush, fulfilling a campaign pledge to criticized Bush for weakening his own trols over the next two decades at a Both Swiss police and Alitalia clear America's polluted skies, signs proposal during congressional delibvast array of industrial and commerconfirmed around midnight that into law Thursday a historic clean air erations, particularly in regard to recial facilities, ranging from steel mills all 46 aboard the plane were killed bill that touches virtually every major ducing automobile pollution, the largto power plants to the corner dry cleaner as the DC-9 broke into small pieces industry in requiring deep and costly est single cause of smog. and gasoline station. and burned. cutsinemissions causing urban smog, Industry officials, meanwhile, It also forces carmakers to build Italian Minister of Transport acid rain, toxic hazards or ozone decharged the White House was more less-polluting automobiles and the oil Carlo Bernini sent a special inpletion. interested in burnishing the image of industry to make cleaner-burning "requiry commission to Zurich to The bill largely follows the outlines the "environmental president" than formulated" gasoline, a double investigatethe crash and the inteof the clean air plan Bush sent to Capitol in crafting cost-effective legislation. whammy expected to raise the cost of rior ministry sent ateam ofpolice Hill last June -an initiative cited by They said the massive bill would be driving. Bush decided to sign the bill experts to help Swiss authorities environmentalists and industry alike much more expensive than the adminidespite warnings from industry and identify the victims, as the key factor in breaking the 13stration would admit. several prominent economists that it year stalemate in Congress over strengthThe legislation, approved 89-10 by will cost thousands of jobs and accelening andupdating the1977 CleanAir the Senate and 401-25 by the House erate the nation's economic downturn.


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