Citation
The tropic times

Material Information

Title:
The tropic times
Creator:
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
United States -- Army. -- Southern Command
Place of Publication:
Quarry Heights Republic of Panama
Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama
Publisher:
United States Southern Command
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 43 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Military bases, American -- Newspapers -- Panama -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Armed Forces -- Newspapers -- United States -- Panama ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Canal Zone

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 5, 1988)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Repeated number, vol. 2, no. 45, for Dec. 11 and Dec. 15, 1989.
Issuing Body:
"Published in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the Director of Public Affairs, U.S. Southern Command."
General Note:
"This authorized unofficial command information publication is for U.S. Armed Forces overseas."
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 10, no. 41 (Oct. 24, 1997).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105
Resource Identifier:
21092434 ( OCLC )
2007240275 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Southern Command news

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text



Gift of the Paapa Canal Musemn


4


the


Tropic


Times


Vol. 111, No. 19 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, June 15, 1990


~f-~-. aj


Four OA-37B Dragonfly aircraft fly in formation over Howard AFB. The tactical air support aircraft is being drawn down
from 21 to 10 because of Air Force structural and budgetary restraints. (U.S. Air Force photo by Sgt. Kathy Huffman)


Dragonfly loses to structure changes


Soldier injured
FORT CLAYTON, PAN-
AMA (USARSO PAO) -- A U.S.
Army soldier was seriously in-
jured Wednesday when a tree
fell on him during a training
exercise at Fort Sherman.
The name of the soldier is
being withheld pending notifi-
cation of next of kin.
The accident occurred at about
3 a.m. Wednesday. The soldier
was training at the Jungle Op-
erations Training Center at the
time.
A medical evacuation heli-
copter transported the soldier to
Gorgas Army Community Hos-
pital.
He is being treated for seri-
ous head injuries, according to
officials at Gorgas.
U.S. Army officials are in-
vestigating the incident.
Father's Day calls
HOWARD AFB (1978TH
CG) - The 1978th Communica-
tions Group's Military Affiliate
Radio Systems station and the
Sprint Telephone Company are
offering toll-free calls for Fa-
ther's Day.
The MARS station is offer-
ing the service to the continen-
tal United States, Puerto Rico
and the Virgin Islands for all
U.S. military, family members
and Department of Defense
civilians stationed in Panama.
Calls will be placed until Sun-
day from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Travel restriction

FORT CLAYTON (41st ASG)
- All persons traveling TDY to
the Philippines via commercial
conveyance, i.e. those who are
not arriving at or departing from
U.S. military bases, must obtain
prior travel clearance. Except
where there is an absolute, short-
notice operational necessity as
determined by CINCPAC or
CINCPACREP, Philippines,
there will be no exceptions.
For further information con-
tact Irving B. Parnther at 287-
4254/4752.


The number of operating OA-37Bs
is dropping from 21 to 10. As part of
the reduction, two aircraft are being
reassigned to the Inter-American Air
Forces Academy at Homestead AFB,
Fla. The rest are being sold to foreign
nations.
The reduction is expected to have
little affect on the 830th Air Division's
mission in Latin America or the fre-


quency of normal deployment training
exercises.

The "Dragonfly" is a forward air
control aircraft used for combat escort,
search and rescue, and reconnaissance.
It was first introduced to the Air Force
in 1967; the 24th TASS remains the
only active-duty Air Force unit flying
them.


Panama reopens Amador Causeway


QUARRY HEIGHTS (USSOUTH-
COM) --Panamanian government offi-
cials have announced the Amador
Causeway which was returned to
Panama May 28 will be opened to the
general public today following a 3 p.m.
opening ceremony at the entrance to
the Causeway.
Starting Saturday, the Causeway and
beach areas will be open from 6 a.m. to
7 p.m. daily toepedestrian and bicycle
traffic. Only official vehicles on offi-


cial business will be allowed on the
Causeway.
Designated public parking areas will
be located across the road from the
Amador Officers Club and across the
road from the theater and gas station.
The Amador Officers Club parking lot
will continue to be reserved for use by
club patrons.
Panamanian policemen will be on
hand to monitor the parking areas.


Because of anticipated increased traf-
fic on Amador Road, U.S. military
policemen will be checking identifica-
tion cards at entrances to housing ar-
eas. Joint U.S.-Panama patrols will
continue to provide security to the
Military Areas of Coordination.
Other details remain to be worked
out between Panamanian and U.S.
officials and will be announced when
finalized.


JTF-Panama Marines return home


QUARRY HEIGHTS (USSOUTH-
COM PAO) U.S. Marine Corps forces
that have been serving in Panama since
early 1988 departed the Pacific side by
ship at 6 a.m. Wednesday. The Marines
cleared the Atlantic side at 4 p.m. The
Marine redeployment is part of the
scheduled drawdown of troops an-
nounced in late May.
This redeployment will help reduce
U.S. military forces in Panama to pre-
1988 levels; primarily by redeploying
the security augmentation forces now
serving in Panama.
As part of Joint Task Force-Panama


since their arrival, this group of 478
Marines augmented Panama-based U.S.
military forces in protecting U.S. citi-
zens and U.S. property in Panama during
the political crisis in Panama. They
also participated in Operation Just Cause
and Operation Promote Liberty, as well
as other humanitarian assistance ac-
tivities.
Marine infantry and logistics units
based at Camp Lejeune, N. C., have
been rotated to Panama for three-month
periods during the Marines' commit-
ment in Panama. Additionally, three-
and six- month individual positions


have been filled by officers and Ma-
rines from Fleet Marine Force Com-
mand at Camp Lejeune; Norfolk, Va;
Cherry Point and New River, N. C. and
Beaufort, S.C.
Thd Marine Forces are currently
commanded by Col. J. M. Hayes of
Milwaukee, Wis.
The redeployment of Marine Forces
does not include the permanently as-
signed Marine Corps Security Force
Company which provides security for
the facilities of the U.S. Naval Station
Panama Canal and its supported and
tenant activities.


WASHINGTON (Reuter) - Defense Secretary Dick
Cheney has extended a worldwide freeze on $7 bil-
lion in U.S. military construction projects and will ask
Congress to cancel many of them, the Pentagon said
Thursday.
Defense Department spokesman Pete Williams
said Cheney was studying a list of some 200 projects
and planned to make proposals to Congress as early as
next week in response to military budget pressures
and improving East-West relations.
"The secretary feels that funding should be can-
celed for a substantial number of projects," Williams
told reporters.

Inside...News

USARSO medical team saves
4 Panamanians after vehicle
accident. See page 3.


Cheney


extends


worldwide


construction moratorium
Congress, which has already approved funding for
a large number of the projects, would have to vote on
whether to rescind its earlier decisions.
Cheney ordered the military construction freeze
earlier this year. Williams said Thursday he had
decided to extend the freeze until Nov. 15, partly
because of delays in reaching an East-West agree-
ment on cutting conventional forces in Europe (CFE).
Among the projects that were earlier singled out

...Features

Snipers attack Advanced Long-
Distance Marksmanship Train-
ing Course. See page 9.


for Pentagon review were four of six locations planned
by the Navy for new' 'strategic home ports" for ships:
Ingleside, Texas; Mobile, Ala.; Pascagoula, Miss.,
and Staten Island, N.Y.
But Williams refused to say what projects might be
on Cheney's final list, noting only that both domestic
and foreign projects were under study.
The projects on the original list also included $110
million for a large rocket test facility at Arnold,
Tenn.; $60 million for improvements at Fort Hood
and the Red River Army Depot in Texas, and $37
million for a consolidated maintenance facility
at Tooele, Utah.


...Sports

Pistons ra
deficit to
NBA title


HOWARD AFB Panama (24th
COMPW/PA) - A phased drawdown of
Air Force OA-37B "Dragonfly" air-
craft assigned to the 24th Tactical Air
Support Squadron here is nearing com-
pletion.

The drawdown, which began April
1, is in response to Air Force structural
changes and budgetary restraints.


lly from 7-point
win second straight
. See page 18.


_


'1 _ 1 13 1


3'


. �tt^S'


- ,t" �p.







2Tropic Times
June 15, 1990


New Reserve DCINC


arrives for orientation


QUARRY HEIGHTS, (US-
SOUTHCOM PAO) - Maj. Gen.
Felix A. Santoni, Who recently
assumed duties as the new deputy
commander in chief for
Mobilization and Reserve Affairs,
Individual Mobilization
Augmentee for U.S. Southern
Command, arrived Wednesday
for a two-week orientation visit.
Santoni's first visit to the
command will familiarize him
with the integration of the Reserve
Components into USSOUTH-
COM day-to-day operations. He
will be responsible to the
commander in chief on all
reservist matters encompassing all
countries in Southern Com-
mand's area of tesponsiblity.
The general has served in
various assignments during his 34-
year career. He served as the
deputy commander of Adminis-
tration and Logistics, the
Logistics Operations Officer, and
was assigned to the Office of
Training and Evaluation for the
166th Support Group.
In the Quartermaster Corps, his
career began as a platoon leader


for the 565th Quartermaster
Company of the 56th Quarter-
master Battalion, 7th U.S. Army,
U.S. Army Europe, and later, he
was procurement officer and
deputy commander of the 20th
Detachment, SF 1495.
His assignments also included
instructor duty with the 2979th
USAR School; then, he was
appointed the deputy commander
of the 7581st U.S Army Garrison
in 1981. In 1984, he became the
commander.
He is a graduate from the
Wharton School of Business,
University of Penn., with a degree
in Economics. His military
awards include the Legion of
Merit, the Army Commendation
Medal, the Army Reserve
Component Achievement Medal
with two oak leaf clusters, the
Armed Forces Reserve Medal
with two hourglass devices, the
Army Service Ribbon and the
National Defense Service Medal.
Santoni is married to the
former Carmen Irene Sein (Nani),
and currently resides in
Guaynabo, Puerto Rico.


Voting

DoD starts information center

by Tim Downey

(AFIS) - "People who don't vote don't care." Most people have probably
heard that observation, but it doesn't square with the facts, said the Federal
Voting Assistance Program director.
"Our surveys indicate that more than 23 percent of the service members
who didn't vote in the last election cited a lack of information as the primary
reason for not voting," Henry Valentino said. "Essentially, they didn't know
enough about the candidates and the issues."
Rather than throw up their hands and say that sounds like a personal
problem, Valentino and his staff in the Pentagon came up with a solution: the
DoD Voting Information Center.
Service members and their dependents worldwide can access the center free
from any military installation 24 hours a day by calling Autovon 223-6500 on
a push-button phone. The commercial number is 1-202-693-6500; this call is
not free.
"The center provides information on the next scheduled elections,
candidates and issues, and includes recorded messages from members of
Congress and state governors," said Valentino. It's computerized. After
dialing the number and getting in, a recording walks you through available
options.
Those wanting information on upcoming state elections, for instance,
would be told to push the "1" button for a list of dates. Callers who want to
hear recorded messages from home-state officials would enter the state's two-
letter postal abbreviation - for example, CA for California - and continue
to follow instructions. The system guides callers through extra steps if states
share the same buttons - for instance, Alaska (AK) and Alabama (AL), and
Utah (UT) and Vermont (VT).
Valentino noted the voting information center accepts tapes from
incumbents and challengers within 60 days of a primary or general election.
The tapes are usually 30 to 60 seconds long and express the candidates'views
on issues they feel are important. He said tapes are changed as often as the
candidates like, but most run for a few weeks to ensure the message gets out to
many people.


Commander-in-Chief .......... Gen. Maxwell R. Thurman Editorial Staff ...................... Cpl. John Moreland This authorized unofficial command information publication
Director, Public Affairs............ Col. Joseph S. Panvini Spec. John Hall is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is published
NCOIC ......................... SMSgt. George Prince Editorial Assistants ................... Rosemary Chong in conjunction with the Armed IForces Information Program of
Editor.............................. SFC Cecil Stack - Carolyn Coffey the Depairtmentof defense, ndet the supervision ofthe director
Assistant EditOr .................... Sgt. Monique Chere Laura de la Guardia of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command. Contents of the
Elena Costarangos Tropic Times ate not necessarily the official view of the U.S.
government, the Department of Defense or the U.S. Southern
r Command. The address is: APO Miami, 34002, Albrook Post
the T ropi T m 'Office. Telephone 285-6612.


S:3,0 i




















AROUND THE COMMUNITY
SFC Daryl Kane, left, U.S. Army Garrison, U.S. Army South,
marks the ongoing Army Emergency Relief fund drive's
progress on the AER thermometer near Fort Clayton's front
gate. The drive will continue through June 3A. (U.S. Army
photo by Spec. Paul L. Sweeney) Ada Sanders, above,
gardens in her front yard (Yard of the Month) at Howard Air
Force Base. (U.S. Air Force photo)


"









Tropic Times
June 15, 1990


USARSO medical team


saves 4 Panamanians


by Spec. Paul L. Sweeney

COCO SOLO (USARSO PAO)
- A U.S. Army South medical team
saved four Panamanians after their
truck flipped on the Transisthmian
Highway near Coco Solo Medical
Clinic May 28.
The victims were loaded onto
another truck and taken to the clinic.
The clinic's staff had no advance
warning.
"The janitor heard a knock at the
door, opened it, and people started
hauling patients into the emergency
room," said Maj. Luis Henriquez,
Coco Solo's chief physician.
The four-man emergency room
team immediately prioritized the
patients according to their injuries.
"The emergency room is only set up
to handle two or three seriously
injured patients at a time during off-
duty hours," Henriquez explained.
To help handle the flood of patients a


backup medical team was called.
After isolating the most seriously
injured, Dr. (Capt.) Issac Thomas
and his medical team began
stabilizing victims. Meanwhile,
janitor Rodrigo Accosta applied
pressure bandages to other patients.
The emergency room staff's
response was extraordinary,
Henriquez said. "By the time the
backup team arrived, the on-site
team had stabilized the seriously
injured, prepared them for transport
to the local hospital and began work
on the other patients." The team's
quick action saved the victims' lives,
Henriquez said.
The patients were transported to a
local civilian hospital.
"We're the closest medical facility
to the Transisthmian highway, so we
get a lot of accident victims from
there," Henriquez said. "But this has
to be the most people we've ever had
to handle with such a small staff."


CPO

WHO CAN APPLY: Current permanent employees of US Army South and
Serviced Activities and other U.S. Government agency employees. If any other
source if applicable, specific vacancy will indicate this. Only U.S. Citizens will
be considered for sensitive positions.

HOW TO APPLY: Applicants must submit to the CPO, Bldg. 560, Room 306,
Corozal by the close of business on the closing date of announcement. Applica-
tion is a signed copy of SF-171, Application �for Federal Employment; SF-50,
Notification of Personnel Action; USARSO Form 106 if applicable, and current/
last performance appraisal. Qualification standards may be reviewed at CPO.
For further information call 285-5201.

NOTE: ALL APPLICANTS SHOULD BE AWARE THAT HIRING IS SE-
VERELY RESTRICTED DUE TO DOD WORLD WIDE HIRING FREEZE
WHICH IS EXPECTED TO LAST THROUGH 30 SEPT. 1990. INTERNAL
PLACEMENT IS NOW PERMITTED AND IS RESTRICTED TO DOD CUR-
RENT EMPLOYEES. CURRENT TEMPORARY EMPLOYEES MAY NOW
APPLY AGAINST PERMANENT VACANCIES & REFERRALS ARE SUB-
JECT TO MANAGEMENT'S DECISION TO FILL WITH TEMPORARIES.
SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT EQUIVALENT TO DU-
TIES SIMILAR TO THOSE REQUIRED BY THE VACANCY.

MILITARY SPOUSES: USARSO HAS PERMITTED, AS AN EXCEPTION
TO THE DOD HIRING FREEZE, THE HIRING OF QUALIFIED MILITARY
SPOUSES ON A LIMITED BASIS. MILITARY SPOUSES, IF AVAILABLE
AND QUALIFIED MAY BE HIRED ON A "ONE FOR TWO VACANCIES"
RATE. THAT IS FOR EVERY TWO VACANCIES BEING FILLED ONE
MAY BE FILLED BY A MILITARY SPOUSE AS AN EXCEPTION TO THE
DOD HIRING FREEZE.

VB# PERMANENT VACANCIES & LOCATION OPEN: 06-15-90
CLOSE: 06-26-90

508-90 ANIMAL HEALTH TECH., NM-704-5, USA MEDDAC-Panama,
Veterinary Svc., ADPAC, Corozal, Panama. Spec. Exp 1 yr. equiv to NM-4,
Bilingual. Job Rel Crit: None. However, candidates must have type of
experience as listed under duties.
NOTE: Area of consideration limited to USA MEDDAC/DENTAC.
509-90 SECRETARY (STENO), NM-318-5,.41ST ASG, DOM, Maintenance
Div, FL Davis, Panama. Sensitive. Spec. Exp 1 yr. at NM-4. Job Rel Crit: 1..
Ability to work independently. 2. Knowledge of administrative procedures. 3.
Knowledge of grammar, punctuation rules and medical terminology. 4. Ability
to instruct clerical personnel in administrative procedures.
510-90 SOCIAL SVCS. REP., NM-187-5 dev to NM-8, USAG, DCA, Family
Support Div, ACS, Ft. Clayton, Panama. Gen Exp: 4 yrs. of college. Job Rel Crit:
1. Knowledge of community affairs regulations. 2. Knowledge of budget proce-
dures & regulations. 3. Skill in working with people in a one-to-one relationship.
4. Ability to work closely with commanders at all levels. 5. Ability to prepare
training materials and conduct workshop or seminars.
NOTE: Completed background investigation will be required of applicant
selected.
511-90 (2) TRANSLATOR, NM-1040-5 dev to NM-9, HQ USSOUTHCOM,
Public Affairs Office, Quarry Hts., Panama. Sensitive. Gen Exp: 3 yrs of which
one is equiv to NM-4. Job Rel Crit: 1. Ability to translate into Spanish or English
relatively simple, non-technical material. 2. Skill in reference research proce-
dures. 3. Skill in the use of Word Processing equipment and computerized data
base.


NOTE: Positions will be filled at NM-5 level.
512-90 COMMUNITY SVCS ASST (TYPING),, NM-303-5, USAG, DCA,
CFA, Family Support Div, ACS, FL Clayton, Panama. Spec. Exp: 1 yr. equiv to
NM-4. Job Rel Crit: 1. Skill in applying accounting techniques and reconcili-
ation procedures. 2. Ability to compile, research and analyze data. 3. Ability to
interpret and apply regulatory policies and directives. 4. Skill in communicating
orally and in writing in the English language.
513-90 SUPPLY TECHNICIAN, NM-2005-6, USA MEDDAC-Panama, GACH,
Logistics Div, Stock Control, Ancon, Panama. Spec. Exp: 1 yr. equiv to NM-5,
TIG: NM-5. Job Rel Crit: Knowledge of inventory management procedures. 2.
Knowledge of Army Medical Supply System. 3. Skill in use of ADP equipment.
4. Ability to interpret and apply medical supply regulations and guidelines.
NOTE: Area of consideration is limited to USA MEDDAC/DENTAC.
514-90 MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT (TYPING), NM-344-6, TEMPORARY
NTE 09-30-90, ODCS Engineer, Plans & Management Div, Ft. Clayton,
Panama. Sensitive. Spec. Exp: 1 yr. at NM-5. TIG: NM-5.
515-90 INTELLIGENCE ASSISTANT, NM-134-6, TEMPORARY NTE I
YR., HQ USSOUTHCOM, Intelligence Directorate, Analysis Br., J2, Quarry
Hts., Panama. Sensitive. Spec. Exp: 1 yr. at NM-5.
516-90 SECURITY ASSISTANT (TYPING), GS-086-6, 1109TH Signal Bri-
gade, Security Office, Corozal, Panama. Sensitive. Spec. Exp: 1 yr. equiv to the
next lower grade.
NOTE: This position is in the excepted service.
517-90 MANAGEMENTASSISTANT,NM-344-7, DRM, Manpower&Man-
agement Div, Ft Clayton, Panama. Sensitive. Spec. Exp 1 yr. equiv to NM-6.
TIG: NM-6.
518-90 HOUSING MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT, NM-1173-7, DEH, Hous-
ing Div, Family Housing-Atlantic, Ft. Davis, Panama. Spec. Exp: 1 yr. equiv to
NM-5. TIG: NM-5.
519-90 SUPERVISORY INVENTORY MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST, NM-
2010-9, USA MEDDAC-Panama, GAH, Medical Materiel Br, Logistics Div,
Ancon, Panama. Spec. Exp: 1 yr. equiv to NM-7, TIG: NM-7. Job Rel Crit: 1.
Ability to supervise. 2. Knowledge of inventory management principles and
procedures. 3. Knowledge of Army Medical Stock Supply System. 4. Knowl-
edge of stock fund acquisition and stock fund budgeting procedures.
NOTE: Area of consideration limited to USA MEDDAC/DENTAC.
520-90 CLINICAL NURSE, NM-610-10, USA MEDDAC-Panama, GAH,
Dept. of Nursing, Mix Medical Ward, Ancon, Panama. Shift Work Required
(primarily nights & weekends). U.S. License Required. Gen Exp: ADN 30
months + or BSN. Spec. Exp: 6 months equiv to NM-9. TIG: 6 months at NM-
9. Job Rel Crit: 1. Ability to supervise. 2. Ability to communicate orally and in
writing. 3. Ability to use the nursing process. 4. Ability to deal with persons at
all levels within the hospital.
521-90 MILITARY PERSONNEL CLERK, NM-204-3, TEMPORARY NTE
6 MONTHS, USA MEDDAC-Panama, Personnel Div, Medical Holding, An-
con, Panama. Gen Exp: 6 months.
522-90 CLINICAL NURSE, NM-610-9, USA MEDDAC-Panama, GAH, Dept
of PC & CM, Emergency Room, Ancon, Panama. Shift Work. U.S. License
Required. Gen Exp: ADN 30 months + or BSN. Spec Exp: 1 yr. equiv to NM-7.
TIG: NM-7. Job Rel Crit 1. Skill in Emergency Room techniques and proce-
dures. 2. Ability to communicate orally and in , writing. 3. Ability to utilize
resources effectively (e.g., human, material, equipment). SELECTIVE FAC-
TOR: Candidate must have current Advanced Cardiac Life Support certificate.
NOTE: VB# 470-90, Management Assistant, NM-344-7 is hereby cancelled


RECURRING CPO VACANCIES
CLINICAL NURSE-All Specialties, U.S. License Required.
LICENSE PRACTICAL NURSE: U.S. License Required.
Interested persons should contact Ms. Enid L. Sullivan, 285-4116


.... ....

....,... ..










MAKING THE GRADE - U.S. Army and Panamanian engineers grade the
road from Llano Grande to Llano de la Cruz. U. S. Army South's 536th
Engineer battalion and Panama's Ministry of Public Works are currently
working to upgrade roads as part of U.S. assistance projects to Panama.
(U.S. Army photo)


Employment


----I








Tropic Times
June 15, 1990


- MAC investing $500k


^ in terminal renovation


Amn. Bridget Barto, 6th Aerial Port Squadron, checks baggage as it pade
along a newly-installed conveyor belt. The new conveyor belt is one of the
upgrades the squadron is making to improve services. (U.S. Air Force
photo by A1C Janel Schroeder)


by TSgt. Gene D. Henry


HOWARD AFB (24th COMPW
PA) - Military Airlift Command is
investing $500,000 to upgrade
Howard's 6th Aerial Port
Squadron's passenger terminal. The
upgrade includes new carpeting, wall
paper, a family members lounge, a
special category lounge, command
section, and television monitors
displaying flight arrivals and
departures.
Along with a new baggage
conveyor system to speed baggage
handling, APS is also fitting the main
entrance with automatic electronic
doors to help ease the burden of
passengers entering the building.


The cargo warehouse, where
service members temporarily store
their household goods and hold
baggage, had its storage capability
expanded by 300 tons. This
improvement will allow the
squadron not only to take in more
personal goods shipments, but will
speed up the movement of these
goods to and from the United States.
According to the superintendent
of Aircraft Services, SMSgt. Eric R.
Tucker, "Sometimes it takes hard
work and long hours to get the
mission completed, but it's worth the
effort and provides a true sense of
accomplishment to the young men
and women of our squadron. The
motto of APS is 'Anywhere,
Anytime!'


Valent


to celebrate


its 15th


birthday


by Spec. Daniel L. Bean

FORT CLAYTON (USARSO
PAO) -Valent Recreation Center
here celebrates its 15th birthday at 6
p.m. June 27. Cake and refreshments
will be served.
The center opened June 27, 1975,
replacing the old facility that is now
the Fort Clayton library and
Education Center.
The center was named after CSM
Othon 0. Valent, command sergeant
major of U.S. Army Forces Southern
Command from August 1969 to May
1973. He served on active duty for 32
years. A World War II, Korea and
Vietnam veteran, his career ended
with a lost battle against cancer on
Veterans Day 1973.
Carrying on Valent's belief of
caring for his soldiers, the center's
staff caters to U.S. Army South


soldiers and families, paying close
attention to geographical bachelors.
"We target single and unaccom-
panied soldiers --especially the lower
enlisted," said Anne Kelly, Valent
Recreation Center director.
The center has several new
programs to continue its service to
soldiers. "We're trying to get away
from the routine of billiards and
board games," Kelly said.
One of the new programs being
developed is a quiet, relaxing lounge
area for barracks soldiers. The
lounge will be sponsored by U.S.
Army South's "Better Opportunity
for Single Soldiers" program.
"It's not a club, library or day-
room," Kelly said. "It'll be a place to
read, write letters, eat or visit with
friends away from the barracks."The
center's staff is waiting for funds and
approval to convert the back


recreation room into the lounge.
Another new program is the
"Daily Fun Events." Soldiers can
choose from a different variety of
activities each day. "We don't want a
soldier to walk through and not see
something happening," Kelly said.
"If they're not interested in today's
activity, there's another one
tomorrow.
In addition to new activities, tours
and travel events are available to the
El Valle market, Gorgona beach,
'Portobello and other !areas in
Panama. Any group of 10 or more
people can request a tour to a
location not scheduled. The center's
staff will make arrangements and
conduct the tour if possible.
"I want to hear more people say
'111 meet you at the Rec Center,"'
Kelly said.


'Spirit of '76' design


wins T-shirt contest


by Spec. James Yocum


FORT CLAYTON (USARSO
PAO) - Howard Phelps won the
1990 Fourth of July T-shirt com-
petition with a two-year-old
design.
"I worked it out a couple years
ago and didn't use it because I
came up with a better one," Phelps
said.
The Panama Canal Commis-
sion employee was right. The
design he chose over this year's
entry won first place in 1988.
Phelps has won the contest
three times, including the first
time he entered in 1986.
This year's design is not new to
most Americans, either. "It's
basically like the painting 'The
Spirit of '76,' " Phelps said.
Phelps did the drawing at home
during his free time. The design
was drawn free hand, but Phelps is
interested in doing it differently in
the future.
"I've been interested in using
computers, but I haven't gotten
around to it yet," he said. "It
would make it a lot easier."
Phelps has the knowledge to do
the design on a computer, since he
manages on-line networks at


PCC's Management Information
Systems office.
He chose the design because of
what "The Spirit of '76" inspires.
"It sort of embodies the idea of the
Panamanian people being
liberated without a direct
reference to Operation Just
Cause," he said.
The T-shirts may be purchased
at the Howard Post Office and the
Corozal Main Exchange. In the
Atlantic community, shirts can be
purchased from Boy Scout Troop
8 or Pack 3.
The, program was coordinated
through the U.S. Army South
Public Affairs Office and the Boy
Scouts. All proceeds benefit local
packs.
The second place entry in this
year's contest - drawn by Matt
Osborne, a Diablo Elementary
School student - will be used as the
cover for the Fourth of July
ceremony's program.
Two other contest entries
drawn by Spec. Marvin Jones, 8th
Psychological Operations
Support; and Tito Thomas, a
Cristobal High School senior,
were selected as honorable
mention.


S1 U- 5- n < =q -





















a . -'-F.- .- , . A ' .


Howard Phelps' 1990 Fourth of July winning T-shirt design.


I


I


I


v
4f1









Tropic Times
June 15, 1990



Guardsman brings magic to Guatemala


by 1st Lt. Robert 0. Giblin
112th Public Affairs Detachment

CHIMALTENANGO, Guate-
mala - A magician will tell you there
are three types of magic tricks: the
known, the unknown, and the
impossible.
But there is another type of magic
- the warm feeling that comes from
a delighted child, or bringing a smile
to someone's face.
Reaching into his bag of tricks, a
Kentucky Army National
Guardsman, SFC Gerald Mays,
practiced his magic tricks and
warmed the hearts of Guatemalan
medical and dental patients during
his unit's two-week annual training.
Mays, a Waddy, Ky., native, is an
operations sergeant with the 475th
Mobile Army Surgical Hospital,
based in Frankfort.
He was among 45 members of the
475th MASH who provided free
medical, dental and veterinary care
in Paxorotut, Puerto Rico and El
Rejon, in the highlands about 35 to
50 miles northwest of Guatemala
City.
The unit operated out of a
Guatemalan military camp centrally
located in the town of Chimalte-
nango.
"My roles here are mostly public
relations, crowd control and easing
the tensions of patients who came
here for treatment," said Mays,
whose normal military duties are
similar to those of a licensed practical
nurse.


SFC Gerald Mays, Kentucky Army National Guard, amused Guatemalans with magic. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt.
jseph Whitford)


"At the town of Puerto Rico, we've
been seeing 300 to 500 patients a
day," he explained. "Many of them
have never seen a doctor or dentist
before, so they tend to crowd around
the buildings and tents where we set
up our clinics.
"When the crowds start to become
overwhelming, I come out with my
red scarf, signaling the start of the
show. I just do a few simple tricks -
prestidigitation, or sleight of hand,
and rope tricks - but it's the quality,
not the quantity. Patients enjoy
watching them, and when I'm doing
magic tricks, managing the crowds is
a little easier," he added.


Mays learned his first magic trick
more than 30 years ago, as a young
sailor in the U.S. Navy. "I was
walking down the street in Norfolk,
Va., and passed a magic shop," he
said. "There wasn't much to do
during our spare time at sea, so I
bought the 'appearing cane'trick and
practiced over and over again. The
next time we were in Norfolk, I
bought another trick. I've been at it
ever since."
Mays often meets other magicians,
who share new tricks or new twists to
tricks he already knows. However, he
won't tell anyone else how tricks are
done. "If I told you how a trick


worked, I wouldn't be fascinating
any more," he said.
The soldier-magician says people
all over the world enjoy magic, even
where the people speak Cakchiquel,
one of the 23 native languages of
Guatemala.
"Magic is an international
language. It breaks down language
barriers: I have my own lingo in my
bag of tricks," said Mays.
"If you show me any group of kids,
I can communicate with them. These
ninos are the same as kids at home.
And kids - of all ages - are still
kids."


TSA keeps food supply safe


FORT LEE, Va.(Troop Support Agency) -
For some reason you're up before dawn and your
errand takes you past the comissary loading dock.
In the dim light you see a white-coated person
with a clipboard poking around some crates of
fruit and vegetables. Then you are past.
You might never see again the person
responsible for your safe and fresh produce. And
your milk and meat, bread and so on.
The food supply in the United States is the
safest in the world. You have just seen a tiny part
of why: A veterinary food inspector was checking
salad makings for U.S. Army Troop Support
Agency commissary shoppers. Do you know how
much you rely on veterinarians for the safety of
the food you buy?
Army and all Defense Department food
inspections, are supervised by the Veterinary
Corps, part of the Army Medical Department
since 1916.
Federal authorities, concerned with public
health as affected by food safety, turned to the
veterinary profession at the turn of the century.
Veterinarians'expertise in animal pathology and
the hazards of animal disease transmission to man
qualifies them to determine what is sage,
wholesome food.
Celebrating its 84th birthday this month, the
U.S. Army Veterinary Corps came into being in
order to protect the health of humans from animal
diseases. Veterinarians first saw service in the
Army Quartermaster Corps, treating the draft
animals. Now the specialty corps oversees food
safety.
In the TSA headquarters on Fort Lee, the
Veterinary Staff Office of two veterinarians and
one environmental science officer maintain a link
with a small group of food quality experts posted
around the world.
Army food. inspectors have the task of
guaranteeing that all food bought, transported,
stored and issued by the Department of Defense
has been surveyed, inspected, passed and certified
with its seal of approval before being sold or


; L . -. s5-aa.i X

_ _ _ _- _
a47 --


issued. This requires timely and accurate
information.
Food-related information in the form of advice
from federal agencies, queries and food inspection
reports from many post inspectors is received in
the VSO every day. Also, the VSO deals directly
with the Army's Surgeon General, the Army
Medical Department's chief physician. His office
sets standards of food quality.
Since food safety information goes two ways,
the VSO is like a collecting and clearing house.
Notices on potential problems, corrective
measures, actual warnings and recalls are passed
down an informational chain from the VSO to the
local food inspectors. Also, VSO shares food
safety news with federal agencies, military posts
and with others who need to know.
These include the U.S. Department of
Agriculture Food Safety Inspection Service,
Environmental Protection Agency, Food and


Drug Administration and the National Marine
Fisheries Service. With them, the VSO
coordinates food recalls and other actions
concerning overall food safety.
The information flows through VSO to those
who look at commissaries and the Army dining
facilities - the post veterinarians, enlisted food
inspectors and preventive medicine personnel.
The VSO, the federal agencies and the food
inspectors on the loading docks provide a good
working example of Total Quality Management.
That is, every food item for sale in a commissary is
safe because of careful attention at every step in
the production process by persons who feel
personally responsible for food safety.
Remember that dawn food delivery? When that
trailer was opened, first impressions told a story.
A bad odor, warm temperature, puddles of water
or insects on the fly would indicate problems.
Conversely, good impressions come from
temperatures within the correct range, dry floors
and clean well-packed goods on pallets.
The inspector looks for the U.S. Department of
Agriculture seal on products. Dairy, chilled and
frozen merchandise is checked for wholesomeness
and expiration dates. Meat and dairy products
have special contract specifications. If inspectors
determine contract nonconformance, they do not
take delivery.
Commissaries get a formal sanitary inspection
every month. Areas and methods of food
preparation and storage conditions must meet
high standards. Customer returns are inspected.
The commissary's markdown section often has
some merchandise in damaged packagings.
Everything is inspected for safety and
wholesomeness before placement there.
Their inspection reports are received in the
VSO and common or unusual defects identified.
The VSO then issues corrective advice to
commissaries.
You depend on your commissary products
because safety is the commitment of the people in
the Veterinary Staff Office. Many others have a
part in providing safe food to TSA commissaries.
The VSO guides them all.


i I �II I 1 I I � I � �









Military News


ACS commander: Family members are 'heroes'


WASHINGTON (ARNEWS) -- When soldiers go
to war, they usually leave their families behind,
buffered from the danger of combat by time and
distance.
For U.S. soldiers stationed in Panama, however,
the Dec. 20, 1989, trip to the battlefield for Operation
Just Cause was a short one, and their families on
nearby U.S. installations found themselves ducking
for cover. That's why Brig. Gen. Tom Jaco, com-
mander of the Army's Community and Family Sup-
port Center in Alexandria, Va., went to Panama
during May -- to find out what those families went
through and what the Army did to help them.
"They're heroes, no question about it," Jaco said
on his return.
Jaco spoke with three groups of family members
during his May 8-11 stay in Panama-- spouses of staff
sergeants through majors; spouses of senior officers;
and teenagers. He said the families "kept coming
back to this theme, that there was a great need for
information" about the battle raging close by. That's
-also why the networking skills taught by Army
Community Service centers became so important, he
said.
"They took the experiences from their unit family
support group and quickly organized their own sup-
port group within the housing area," Jaco said, re-,
counting one woman's story in her own words:
"I had no information and I didn't know where to
get any information. There was no one to give me any
information.
"And then I saw the telephone and picked it up,
and it was alive...it was working. So I dialed my
neighbor, and she answered, and she also thought she
was the only one in the area, (that) everyone had been
evacuated but her."
The vacuum of information became even more
acute when howitzer blasts began rocking the hous-
ing areas.


55


tI .


Besides forming support groups during Operation Just Cause, family members gave troops moral
support. (Photo courtesy of TASC)


"Some soldiers came in and told them that all hell
was going to break loose in a few minutes, (to) move
to the center of the house, lie down on the floor and
tell the children to keep their shoes on because there's
going to be a lot of flying glass," Jaco said. "That's
about all they really needed to know."
Jaco lauded ACS and morale, welfare and recrea-
tion workers in the area, many of whom worked
around the clock, driving through hazardous areas to
wherever they were needed. He also said family


support plans and housing mayoral programs proved
invaluable. But, he said, the lessons learned from
Operation Just Cause show there's work to be done.
"We've got to have enough vision to know thal
sometimes there are operations that are not traditional
in nature," Jaco said. "This may be Monday-morn-
ing quarterbacking, but two, three months ago, we
could have told the families what to do in the evenI
that (they) come under hostile fire."


Army to extend some lieutenants


WASHINGTON (ARNEWS) --
The Army will extend more than 850
first and second lieutenants so their
records can be reviewed by a
projected fiscal year 1991
Conditional Voluntary Indefinite-
Regular Army Probationary Board.
Officials at the U.S. Total Army
Personnel Command in Alexandria,
Va., say other than Regular Army
lieutenants from year group 1988
who have or will have first lieutenant
temporary dates of rank between
Oct: 1, 1989, and Sept. 30, 1990, and
who have an expiration of current
service between Oct. 1, 1990, through
July 30, 1991, will be given short-
term extensions until July 31, 1991.
"This short-term extension will be
automatically 'top loaded' here,"


Navy plans


painless


reduction

WASHINGTON (NNS) - With
recent reports of personnel cuts in the
military services, many sailors have
expressed concern over their future.
But, in a recent interview, Chief of
Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Mike
Boorda said that the Navy plans to
make personnel reductions in future
years without hurting Navy men and
women.
"Our strategy is to size and balance
personnel to the force structure that
is determined right for the Navy,"
explained Boorda. "If the number of
sailors is tied directly to the number
of ships and squadrons, we can
reduce the size of the Navy without


says Maj. Lois Faires, a PERSCOM
spokeswoman. "Officers who do not
desire this extension need to decline
the extension through their chain of
command in writing to their
appropriate career management
division at PERSCOM."
Officers who decline the extension
will be separated on their original
expiration of current service, she
adds.
Faires explains that installation
personnel service centers will provide
a list of the eligible officers to the first
colonel in the chain of command.
The colonel then will screen the list,
counsel the officer and request
removal of any officer's extension
because of substandard performance
or misconduct.


creating turmoil among Navy people
and without reducing the readiness
of the fleet."
Boorda outlined plans for future


This request for removal of
extension, she says, must be
approved before the officer enters the
extension. The appeal authority is
the first general officer in the chain of
command, and any appeals must be
processed before forwarding the
request for removal.

"Officers having questions should
contact their local personnel service
center," Faires concludes. "This
information has been provided to the
field by military personnel message
number 90-167 with a date-time
group of 231200 May 1990."
For more information, contact
CWO 2 Sutterfield at PERSCOM,
AUTOVON 221-9765.


promotion opportunities, pay and
benefits, schooling and transfers
consistent with today's patterns.
Reductions will be accomplished
mainly by recruiting fewer sailors,
commissioning fewer officers, and
using the Defense Officer Personnel
Management Act and high-year
tenure to encourage retirement of
those-eligible. The Navy does not
plan to rely an involuntary
separations.
"We intend to take care of our
people and their families," said
Boorda, describing plans for some
improvements in sea-shore rotation
and quality of Navy life. "Only
drastic, short-term cuts would force
us to depart from our strategy and
consider involuntary separations."
Boorda said that Navy leaders,
from the Secretary of the Navy and
Chief of Naval Operations down, are
strongly committed to protesting the
interests of Navy personnel and their
families.


Tropic Times
June 15, 1990


Baggage shipment

Soldiers who shipped
unaccompanied baggage to
Panama are strongly urged to
make arrangements to have
shipments delivered as soon as
possible.
The Transportation Division is
running out of space in which to
store inbound unaccompanied
baggage. For delivery arrange-
ments call 287-3365/4813/3868.
For further details call Roosevelt
Edwards at 287-6465/6759.

NCO promotions
The following Air Force people
in Panama have recently been
selected for promotion to the rank
of master sergeant for cycle 90:
Bruce E. Albright, Todd W.
Armstrong, Terry L. Ballew,
Joseph C. Beard Jr., Eduardo C.
Bedoya, Robert B. Bender, Daniel
C. Brown, Edgar E. Castro,
Jimmy D. Clark, William
Coddington, Jimmy L. Coley,
Jesus Cruz, Larry D. Dyer, Larry
D. Eskridge, David P. Farmer,
James R. Faulkner, Edward W.
Ferrick, Curtis W. Flamm, Perlita
R. Fosdick, Albert Gonzalez.
Also selected are: Michael D.
Hamp, Keith R. Harris, Marcus
A. Harris, Joey B. Hatcher,
Gordon R. Hewell, William R.
Hines, Perry M. Hogsten, Enoch
Johnson, Roy C. Johnson, Bobby
F. Jones, Jack A. King Jr.,
Stephen T. Mazurek, Jeffrey J.
McMillan, John W. Moran,
Richard J. Piech, Irving
Rodriguez, Jose M. Segovia,
Murray Smith, Daniel A.
Spencer, Phillip Stillwagon,
Marilyn J. Stewart, Jeffrey L.
Strout, Kathi J. Sutton, and
George L. Vega.


r


I


~;i�







Tropic Times
June 15, 1990


Heart Disease


No. 1 adult killer in U.S.


Wanted by CID



Name: Unknown
Age: 20-25 years old
Weight: 120-150 pounds
Height: 5 feet 4 inches
. Build: Medium
Hair: Black
Complexion: Dark brown
Race: Cuna Indian

Individual was last seen
I wearing tan baggy pants and a
Just Cause T-shirt. He was
accompanied by a black male.




Name: Unknown
Age: 20-25
Weight: 140-150 pounds
Height: 5 feet 9 inches
Build: Medium
* Hair: Black
. ....Complexion: Dark
Race: Black

Individual wears a gold stud
earring in his left ear. He may be
traveling with .a Cuna Indian.
Individual is believed to be a
Panamanian national.


These men are wanted for questioning by the U.S. Army Criminal
Investigation Division Command, Panama -Field Office. They are
considered armed and dangerous. Information concerning these men
should be provided to CID, 285-6817 or 285-43.14.


by Dr. (Capt.) Grover K. Yamane
24th Medical Group


HOWARD AFB (24th COMPW/
PA) - A plague is stalking us,
bringing suffering and premature
death. Each year, more American
adults die from coronary artery
disease than from any other illness.
The trend for this modern day
pestilence seems to be going strong as
we enter the new decade.
The heart's muscle cells rely on a
network of small- arteries for
nourishment and oxygen. In heart
disease, this network becomes
scarred with cholesterol crystals.
Much three major coronary arteries
no longer allow free passage of blood
to muscle cells.
The choked-off muscle can die
suddenly, as in a heart attack, or
become weakened and flabby,
causing congestive heart failure.
Over the past decade, -several
studies have shown that high blood
cholesterol is a villain in this
potentially lethal disease. The greater
the amount of cholesterol dissolved
in the blood stream, the easier it is for
cholesterol crystals to inVade the.
walls of the coronary arteries.
The chance of getting heart disease
rises steadily as the blood cholesterol
level climbs above 200. As the level
rises above 200, there is an explosive
increase in the probability of
developing early disease. Indeed, in
certain rare metabolic disorders
causing cholesterol levels in the
several hundred range, death from


Pacific Community Chapel Schedule


AMADOR CHAPEL
Building 108, Phone: 282-3610
9 a.m. Catholic Mass
10 a.m. Episcopal Holy Eucharist
11:15 a.m.General Protestant Service

CLAYTON CHAPEL
Building 64, Phone: 287-5859
11:30 a.m. Daily Catholic Mass
5 p.m. Catholic Mass (Saturday)
9 a.m. General Protestant Service
10:30 a.m. Sunday School.(Protestant, at Education Center)
10:30 a.m. Catholic Mass
10:30 Sunday School
noon Gospel Service


7 p.m.
10 a.m.
11:30 a.m.
12:30 p.m.
7 p.m.


GORGAS HOSPITAL
Building 254
12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass (2nd floor, Thursday)
Sun. Protestant Worship (To be announced at hospital) ,

ALBROOK CHAPEL


8 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
11 a.m.


4:30 p.m.
5 p.m.
11 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
9 a.m.
10 a.m.
12:30 p.m.


COROZAL CHAPEL
Building 112, Phone: 285-6717
Jewish 1st Fridays
Hispanic Catholic Mass
Pentecostal Sunday School
Pentecostal Fellowship-Worship
Evening Worship


8 a.m.
10 a.m.
7 p.m.


Building 860, Phone: 286-4256
Hispanic Catholic Mass & CCD
Protestant Sunday School
Catholic Mass
General Protestant service
HOWARD CHAPEL
Building 500, Phone: 284-3940
Confessions (Saturday)
Catholic Mass (Saturday)
Catholic Mass
CCD (Kobbe School)
General Protestant Service
Protestant Sunday School (Howard School)
Gospel Service

USNAVSTAPANCANAL CHAPEL
Building 88, Phone: 283-4148
Catholic Mass
General Protestant
Bible- Study (Wednesday)


Atlantic Community Chapel Schedule


8 a.m.
4:30 p.m.
5 p.m.
9 a.m.


DAVIS CHAPEL
Building 32, Phone: 289-3319
Catholic Mass M, W, Th, F
Catholic Confession (Saturday)
Catholic English Mass (Saturday)
Protestant Sunday School


10 a.m. General Protestant Service (Sunday)
SHERMAN CHAPEL
Building 152, Phone: 289-6481
10 a.m. Protestant Service (Sunday)
6 p.m. Catholic English Mass (Sunday)


GULICK CHAPEL
Sunday
Building 224, Phone: 289-4616
9 a.m. Catholic English Mass
10 a.m. Catholic Hispanic Mass/CCD
11:15 a.m. Gospel Service


heart attacks often occurs in youth,
and even in early childhood.
But, less well-publicized is .the
influence of several other health
conditions.
These other risk factors include
high blood pressure, diabetes, male
gender, family history of early heart
disease and smoking.
Unfortunately, the effects of these
risk factors are cumulative. The
number of risk factors one. has
decides the end result. For example,
a person with a high cholesterol level
has twice the chance of dying early
from heart disease, compared to
someone with a low cholesterol level.
If there is smoking and high blood
pressure combined with a high
cholesterol level, the chance of early
death is nearly six times the normal.
Thus, the more risk factors there
are, the greater the need for early and
aggressive medical investigation and
treatment to prevent heart disease.
To get the full benefit of
cholesterol testing, the profile of
other risk factors must be known and
considered. Only then can a
particular cholesterol level be put in
perspective, and a reasonable course
charted, for diagnostic work or
medical therapy.
In the prevention of this common
and deadly disease, good strategy
will be the patient's best weapon. For:
an evaluation of your potential for
heart problems, see your health care
provider. Contact the 24th Medical
Group at 284-3014 for more
information. Free cholesterol testing
is available.







8 Tropic Times
June 15, 1990


Bomb ruins


art museum

MIAMI (UPI) - A bomb exploded
Thursday at the Cuban Museum of
Arts and Culture causing extensive
damage but no injuries, and the FBI
said the attack was the latest in a series
of terrorist bombings apparently com-
mitted by a group of anti-Castro mili-
tants.
The museum, which has been at the
center of a political controversy within
Miami's large Cuban community, was
rocked by the explosion, which oc-
curred at 1:09 a.m. EDT, said FBI
special agent Paul Miller.
The FBI classified the bombing as a
terrorist act.
"This is the 17th device that either
has been defused or has exploded since
May 1987, which we believe would be
attributed to individuals who have tar-
geted individuals, businesses and
museums who they believe for some
reason may be advocating a better re-
lationship with (dictator Fidel) Cas-
tro's Cuba," Miller said.
"We believe from our investigation
that we may be talking about the same
group of individuals," Miller said.
Miller said that although FBI agents
did not know what type of explosive
was used in the blast, the device was
more powerful than those used in similar
bombings that have rocked Miami's
Cuban community in the past.
"It wasn't a pipe bomb, and it was
more sophisticated than some of the
other devices that we have seen re-
cently," he said. "If anyone had been
inside the building, they could have
been seriously injured or killed."
Miller said evidence gathered at the
scene, including debris from the blast
and other items which he declined to
identify, will be sent to an FBI labora-
tory in Washington, D.C., for analysis.
The debris will be compared with


Cuban President Fidel Castro looks at photos during the inauguration of the Museum of Mexican-Cuban Friendship
in Tuxpan, Mexico. The Miami bombing was against musuems or businesses believed to be advocating better relations
with Castro. Castro launched his 25-month guerrilla war 34 years ago from Tuxpan. (AP Laserphoto)


material gathered at the scene of other
bombings, the most recent of which
occurred at an optical store in Hialeah
in September 1989, he said.
Miller said no arrests have been
made in any of the bombings or at-
tempted bombings.
"We are hopeful that further inves-
tigation will result in arrests at some
future date," he said.
The blast, which awakened people


in the residential neighborhood sur-
rounding the museum, could be heard
from several miles away, officials said.
"My husband and I were sleeping
and were awakend by the blast We
heard the huge explosion and thought,
'Oh, my God.' We knew it was the
museum," said Amparo Lazo, who
lives across from the museum.
The blast shattered windows in the
front of the building and damaged the


roof, as well as three works of art
inside, valued at $10,Q00. Osvaldo
Monzon, the museum's executive di-
rector, estimated the structural dam-
age at $20,000.
A bomb exploded outside the mu-
seum once before, in 1988, he said.
"This is much more extensive. The
FBI described it as a high density
bomb. The other was a projectile," he
said.


Cardinal warns pro-choice Catholic politicians


NEW YORK (UPI) - Cardinal John
O'Connor warned Catholic politicians
Thursday they risk excommunication
if they continue to support abortion
rights.
"Where Catholics are perceived not
only as treating churchteaching on
abortion with contempt, but helping to
multiply abortions by advocating leg-
islation supporting abortion, or by
making public funds available for
abortion, bishops may decide that ...
such Catholics must be warned that
they are at risk of excommunication,"
O'Connor' statement said.
Writing in the archdiocesan newspa-
perCatholic New York, O'Connor said
if such actions persist, "bishops may
consider excommunication the only
option."
New York has a number of nation-
ally prominent Catholic politicians who
support legal abortion, including Gov.
Mario Cuomo, who immediately termed
O'Connor's statement "upsetting ...
disconcerting."
"The church leadership, led by the
cardinal, the college of cardinals and
the pope - we defer to them, respect
them and let them speak for certain
authority," said Cuomo, who person-
ally opposes abortion.
"But I'm a layman and I speak for
myself. It's about people having the
choice in our democracy and the free-
dom to have the choice.
"I have not changed my mind, nor
will I," Cuomo said.


"It must be remembered that we're not talking about a public
office holder demanding that Americans go to mass on
Sunday or not eat meat on Friday. We are talking about an
individual who bases his decision not simply on the desires
of the majority, but on what he or she believes is right and
just." Cardinal O'Connor


Cardinal O'Connor


An excommunicated Catholic is cut
off from the sacraments of the church
with the exception of penance, which
gives him a chance to confess his sins
and reconcile with the church. A woman
who has an abortion is automatically
considered excommunicated.
O'Connor said Catholic politicians
cannot separate their faith from their
policies.
"It must be remembered that we're
not talking about a public officeholder
demanding that Americans go to mass
on Sunday or not eat meat on Friday,"
he said.
"We are talking about an individual
who bases his decision not simply on
the desires of the majority, but on what"
he or she believes is right and just"


O'Connor's warning came just days
after the archdiocese rescinded an in-
vitation to Rep. Charles Rangel, D-
N.Y., a Catholic, to speak at a Catho-
lic high school commencement be-
cause of his support for legal abortion. -
The cardinal said that kind off action
served as a warning and "to help
reduce scandal." Rangel said the car-
dinal's statement would not "sidetrack"
him.
"I think this type of language is
intemperate, mean-spirited and in
contempt of Christian and Catholic
belief," Rangel said.
"Intimidating and threatening people
is not the sensitive and churchly thing
to do."
The warning also drew immediate
fire from Catholics for a Free Choice,
an independent group of Catholics that
supports abortion rights.
"We find this extremely disturb-
ing," said Frances Kissling, president
of the group.
"We had hoped that the example of


Archibishop Rembert Weakland would
mark some change in the bishop's at-
tack on politicians by O'Connor and
the pro-life committee of the National
Conference of Catholic Bishops."
In the reference to Weakland,
Kissling drew attention to a statement
by Weakland in mid-March suggest-
ing a Catholic could, in conscience,
support legal abortion.
O'Connor's statement stressed that
he was speaking in his capacity as
archbishop of New York and not in his
role as chairman of the bishops' com-
mittee for anti-abortion activities.
Another Catholic congressman, Rep.
Jose Serrano, D-N.Y., said O'Connor's
statement "just saddens you to the
point where you wonder where it is
we're headed as a Catholic church."
Rep. Susan Molinari, D-N.Y., said
the statement would not change her
mind. "It deepens the sadness that you
feel to think that they have raised the
stakes so high," she said.







Tropic Times
June 15, 1990


1st Battalion, 508th Infantry (Airborne) snipers fire during a night-fire exercise on Empire Range.


Snipers meet the challenge


story and photo by Spec. John Sell

EMPIRE RANGE (USARSO PAO) -- Contempo-
rary warfare is often fought at night, but most marks-
manship training is done during the day. This pres-
ents a problem.
Snipers from the 193rd Infantry Brigade (L) have
a solution thanks to experts from the 41st Area Sup-
port Group's Marksmanship Training Unit.
It's called the Advanced Long-Distance Marks-
manship Training Course. Part of a multi-phase
training program, the two-week course was taught by
SFC Dewey Hardison and SSgt. Manny Fleitas of the
41st's MTU.
In March, they put 10 sniper teams through the
course -- five each from the 5th Battalion, 87th
Infantry and the 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry (Air-
borne).
The students were taught to use two specialized
weapons, the M-21 and M-24 sniper systems. The
fundamentals of shooting and long-distance marks-
manship, taught during Initial Entry and Advanced
Individual Training, were also reemphasized.
"The initial course gave them the basic skills,"
said Hardison," but without practical application the
value of the course would be lost. That's where
sustainment training comes in."
"Sustainment training helps them hone their skills
to perfection," Hardison said. "We ran the course,
and advise units during their own sustainment train-
ing programs."
Sniper teams from the 1/508th and two Marine
teams recently conipleted a two-week sustainment
training program. During sustainment training, the
snipers were instructed on basic sniper movements;


judged, charted and fired on unknown distance tar-
gets; and fired sniper weapons and M-16A2s during
night training.
While the initial course stressed marksmanship,
the sustainment stressed practical application.
"A guy can be the world's greatest marksman, but
if he can't move from point A to point B to take the
shot, he's ineffective," Fleitas said. "Likewise, if he
can make the movement without detection, but can't
make the shot he's ineffective. Field craft and marks-
manship go hand-in-hand for snipers."
The field craft portion of the training was an
example of intense, realistic training. The snipers
low-crawled 250 meters using tall grass and brush as
their cover. They had to get within 200 meters of a
truck and take two shots using blanks. Their goal was
to remain undetected throughout the three-hour exer-
cise.
The snipers moved slowly, snipping blades of cuna
grass and slowly pulling them to the ground before
moving ahead. They also camouflaged themselves
once they got to their firing position.
The snipers set up in a variety of positions to take
their shots. Some were sitting; some stood, using a
fork in a tree as a brace; and some steadied their rifles
on their partner's shoulders. Some hid in the trees,
some behind small bushes and others stayed in the tall
grass. All the teams were undetected, even though as
many as eight people were trying to find them using
binoculars.
"It's best to move when the wind is blowing. The
cuna grass is already moving, so our tunneling move-
ment through it isn't noticeable," said Sgt. Joseph
Kananowicz.
Kananowicz, an honor graduate during the train-


up, worked with a new partner in the sustainment
training.
"At the beginning, there was a difference in my
shooting because he hadn't been trained in observ-
ing," Kananowicz said. "He picked up on a lot
during the sustainment training and by the end of the
course there was no difference between him and my
first partner."
Training new snipers during the sustainment train-
ing helps build the program, Hardison said. "If you
just train the same people each time, when they leave
Panama, you lose all your snipers and have to start
over."
The night-fire exercise gave the newcomers a
chance to fire under simulated combat conditions,
and gave the snipers the chance to practice at night.
The snipers fired in darkness using M-16A2s with
ANPVS-4 night-vision scopes, which illuminated the
targets.
They also fired the sniper weapons at known-
distance silhouettes with red-filter flashes being the
only light on the target.
"The filtered flashlight simulates a muzzle flash,
and that split-second flash is all the time they have to
zero in on the target," Fleitas said. "We had shooters
making 10 hits on 10 shots."
Overhead flares were the only light source in the
third portion of the night fire exercise. Again, many
of the snipers were perfect on their 10 shots.
"We try to make all training as real as possible,
while always keeping safety as the top priority,"
Hardison said. "That's one reason I like inverted
training, where you sleep during the day and train at
night"
Sustainment training for the 1/508th will continue
with two-week training sessions every couple of
months, according to 2nd Lt. Kerry Trent, sniper
employment officer for 1/508th.
"We are already on the training schedule for
August. We'll do more distance judgement, advance
movements, snap shots and increased night train-
ing," Trent said.
Everything taught comesfrom TC 23-14, which is
the new sniper manual, Hardison said.
However, just teaching the soldier about marks-
manship doesn't make him a sniper. "To be a sniper
a soldier has to be willing to lay motionless for hours
and let insects bite him without moving. It takes a
great deal of self-discipline," Hardison said. "We
can give him the techniques, but we can't give him the
will."
Kananowicz said the training could help all sol-
diers -- not just snipers.
"Every soldier should go through a course like this
and learn how to shoot better," Kananowicz said.
"As soldiers we're supposed to shoot, move and
communicate. That's exactly what this training
stresses."


READY TO GO - Two hundred fifty-one vehicles donated to Panama from U.S. stocks in England recently arrived
at Cristobal port here. The vehicles will be fitted with lights and repainted for use by Panama's new public force.
(U.S. Army photo)


Cisneros opens

Belize bridge

"...a symbol of ties
between two areas."

by Spec. James Yocum

MULLINS RIVER, Belize
(USARSO PAO) -- Belize and U.S.
officials opened the Mullins River
Bridge during a ceremony here May
30.
The bridge, a 140-foot structure in
Southern Belize, was built earlier by
engineers from the 20th Engineer
Battalion, Fort Campbell, Ky. Flood
waters destroyed the bridge in Octo-
ber 1988. The new bridge opened a
route through southern Belize, a rural
area cut off from the nation's urban
centers since the old bridge was de-
stroyed.
Maj. Gen. Marc A. Cisneros, U.S.
Army South commander, talked to the
soldiers, detailing the friendly rela-
tions America and Belize share.
"A bridge is a symbol of a tie
between two areas," Cisneros said.
"This bridge is symbolic of the tie
between the United States and the
country of Belize.
The five-month project ended with
the bridge opening, andFort Campbell's
20th Engineers returning home. June 5.


r � � I I L- I I I I-- � I







0 Tropic Times
June 15, 1990


Military working dogs compete

Air Force squadron dogs capture top kennel honors


CLOCKWISE (from above) Army Sgt. John
Spivey has Gorson sniff high in Fort Clayton's
theater. Spivey motivates Mentor before com-
peting in the competition's narcotics detection
portion. Army SSgt. Manuel Santana and Ivan
search deserted vehicles during the competition's
explosive detection.


College awards degrees


HOWARD AFB (24th
COMPWPA) - Howard enlisted
people were awarded the associates
in Applied Science degree from the
Community College of the AirForce
recently. The associate in Applied
Science signifies completion of two
years of collegiate-level study re-
lated to. the graduates' Air Force
specialties.
The graduates attending the cere-
mony in the 24th Composite Wing
conference room were: MSgt. Tho-
mas C. Bowens, MSgt. Timothy
Gipson and SSgt. Kenneth McBeth.
Also receiving their degrees, but
unable to attend due to permanent-
change-of-station or temporary duty
were: TSgt. Joseph Beard, SSgt.
SamuelBradley, SSgt. Willie Dumas,


story and photos by Spec. John Sell

FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -- Military
working dogs attacked, sniffed and snooped their way
through obstacle courses, buildings and vehicles during
the first U.S. Southern Command military working
dog competition June 4-6.
The Air Force's 24th Security Police Squidron
took top kennel honors and will keep the "Victory
Cup" until the next competition in six months.
The competition was broken down into three divi-
sions: patrol dogs, explosive-detection dogs and nar-
cotic-detection dogs.
In the patrol-dog division, SrA Barbara Smither-
man directed her dog, Vanna, through the obstacle
course, ordered it to attack and to search a building.
The tandem worked so efficiently they compiled
1,330 out of a possible 1,500 points.
Air Force Sgt. Robert Killen and his dog, Joe,
placed second with 1,316 points. Spec. Franklin Wallace
and his dog, Breston, of Fort Clayton's kennel placed
third with 1,293 points.
Eight teams competed in the patrol dog division at
Howard Air Force Base, but only four tandems com-
peted in the explosive detection and narcotic por-
tions. Each dog worked only in its specialty area.
"The patrol dogs were judged on obedience, working
the obstacle course, aggression, scouting and their
ability to search a building," said SFC Kenneth
Smith, competition director.
Each competitor was evaluated by three judges.
Each judge could award up to 500 points for patrol
dogs. The final score was the combined total.
The judges were kennel masters from participating
kennels: Howard Air Force Base, U.S. Naval Station
Panama Canal, Forts Davis and Clayton.
"The judging was consistent and fair. No judge
evaluated teams from his kennel," Smith said. "That's
why we had four judges but only three scoring each
competitor."


McConnell assumes

MEDDAC command

GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY
HOSPITAL (USARSO PAO) -- Dr.
(Col.) Michael A. McConnell assumed
command of the U.S. Medical Depart-
ment Activity and Gorgas Army
Community Hospital from Dr. (Col.)
Prentice Thompson Jr. during a cere-
mony here June 5.
Thompson, who took command in
June, 1988, leaves Panama to com-
mand the U.S. MEDDAC at Fort Ord,
Calif.
McConnell received his doctorate
of medicine from Trinity College,
Dublin, Ireland. His major assignments
include surgeon, 1st Cavalry Division
in Vietnam; chief of pathology, Brooke
Army Medical Center, San Antonio,
Texas. He most recently served as
command surgeon, U.S. Southern
Command.
His military awards include the Silver
Star and Legion of Merit.


MSgL Michael Fusco, SrA Buehler
Garcia, SSgt. William Lossner, SSgt.
David Morgan, TSgt. William
Pressgrove, Sgt John Reid III, Sgt
Pedro Sanchez, SSgt. Gregory Sch-
malfield, TSgt. Donald Tinder, and
MSgt Michael Tripp.
Col. Wayne P. Skora, 24th Com-
posite Wing deputy commander for
operations, presented the graduates
with their diplomas.

The Community College of the
Air Force provides educational pro-
grams which reflect personal and
professional growth consistent with
Air Force requirements. The col-
lege is accredited by the Commis-
sion on Colleges of the Southern
Association of Colleges and Schools.


Scoring was based on the dog and handler's abili-
ties. In the explosive and narcotics divisions, points
were given for the number of correct finds,, complete
search procedures and how the handler worked with
the dog. Points were taken away for false finds or
handler errors when the trainer miscued the dog.
Fort Clayton's theater was the first stop for the
explosive detection dogs. The dogs were tasked to
find nine types of explosive training devices. The
teams also searched through a variety of junk vehicles
at Corozal. The final stop was to search a building.'
SrA Benson McCallister led his dog, Bresto, to
enough training aids to allow the duo to claim top
honors in the explosive detection portion. The team
scored 318 out of a possible 405 points.
Army Sgt. John Spivey and his dog, Gorson, HHC,
Law Enforcement Activity-Atlantic, placed second
with 278 points. Army SSgL Manuel Santana and his
dog, Ivan from HHC LEA-Pacific, placed third with
260 points.
"I was more nervous during the competition than
working an actual mission," Santana said. "Nor-
mally when we search a building, its me, the dog, a
spotter and someone who knows the building. Here
we had several people watching, including judges and
media, which can distract the dog and me."
The narcotics division was conducted at Fort Davis.
The dogs searched the theater, vehicles and a build-
ing. Four types of narcotic training aids were planted
for the dogs to find.
Santana and his other canine partner, Rex, won the
narcotics portion scoring 322 out of 375 points. Fort
Davis' Spec. Billy Crosby and his dog, Lion, finished
second with 309 points, while Petty Officer 3rd Class
Scott Thompson and his dog, Rebel, finished third
with 297 points.
"The competition was fantastic. Next time we
hope to have more dogs compete," Smith said. "The
handlers liked it because it was good training and they
were able to exchange techniques and ideas."


Dr. (Col.) McConnell


He will bejoined by his wife, Carol,
and three daughters: Ann, Judy and
Flonnuale.


- I- - --- ~-- - ---- L-































Music program at Balboa Elementary School. (Photos by DODDS)


dl


Field day participant.


Tug-of.war event during a field day. Making Christmas decorations.

1989-1990


E DoDDS in review


Checking out books from the library.


Future computer programmers.


ALBROOK AFS (DoDD S) - The "Year in
Review" and what a year! 1989-1990 in Panama
will be remembered not only for Operation Just
Cause and the restoration of democracy to
Panama but also for the strong academic
climate that prevailed in all the schools during
the crisis. The accomplishments of students,
teachers and parents during this time of turmoil
contributed to a year of educational excellence.
The Apple II GS computer fast became an
integral part of the education process in every
elementary classroom in DoDDS-Panama.
Students from kindergarten through grade six
had daily opportunities for hands-on use of the
computer. Written composition became a high
priority for students in .our schools, creating
products that are professional in appearance,
Other uses included reinforcing basic facts and
skills, using graphic programs, and encouraging
creative thinking in problem solving situations,
Macmillan Connections reading program was
also implemented in all the elementary schools
this year. Identified as strengths of this program
are the high interest level and challenges for all
students, higher levels of thinking expected from
the children and the excellent selection of
literature included in the textbooks.
Several internationally known educational
leaders and authors traveled to Panama to
provide training for teachers and administrators
during the past school year. They included Dr.
Bruce Joyce and Dr, Beverly Showers on
Models of Teaching, Dr. Carol Cummings on
Classroom Management, Dr. Anita Archer on
Study Skills, Dr. James Olivero on Curriculum
Alignment, Dr. Paula Rutherford on The Study
of Teaching, Dr. Charles Wolfgang on
Strategies for Classroom Discipline and Drs.
Clarence and Sharon Johnson on Counseling.
Additionally, DoDDS staff development
training provided courses for teachers on a
variety of topics such as Cooperative Learning,
Computer Education, Mathematical Problem
Solving and Peer Coaching.
Students, teachers and parents at all schools
implemented the "Skills for School Success"


study skills program. Skills included teaching
the students the criteria for the heading,
organization and writing of papers. Students
were taught to take their folders or binders
home every day with their assignments recorded
on a monthly calendar. Parents did their part by
checking to insure the assignments listed
matched the completed homework assignments.
The program also focused on test-taking,
memorization and notetaking, all skills which
give children an advantage throughout their
lifetime. These will be stressed again in 1991.
"Kids on the Block," a group of specially
trained DoDDS teachers who use nearly life-
sized puppets toured the elementary schools
again. This time, the puppets addressed
personal safety and living with physical
handicaps. After each show, students had the
opportunity to ask questions of the puppets, the
puppets responded with clarity and candor.
The Schoolwide Enrichment Program
provided three types of enrichment to all
elementary school students. The first type
included a wide variety of general exploratory
activities such as presentations on astronomy
using the Star Lab Planetarium, tie-dying, the
Panama Canal, munitions, and tropical plants.
Speakers for these activities included Maj. Gen.
Cisneros, Dr. Borham, and Omar Moreno. Type
II activities included regularly scheduled lessons
on brainstorming, communication and decision
making as well as a math enrichment program
(Math Olympiads) and a variety of mini-courses
in logic, newspaper publishing, creative writing
and leadership. Thirty-two Type III projects
which are individual or small group projects
based on the students' interest, task
commitment and creativity were completed in the
elementary schools.
The juggling program is a recent addition to
the physical education curriculum. In 1988 and
1989, jump rope was introduced as an excellent
aid for physical fitness. This year, David
Finnegan, the founder of the Juggling Institute,
visited DoDDS and taught students that
juggling is fun, reduces stress and builds eye-
hand coordination.


Tropic Times
June 15, 1990
lk i .tA. '- , - 4


11









Not'


12 Tropic Times
June 15, 1990


ALBROOK

Youth centers
LESSONS - Pre-ballet,
intermediate ballet and modern
dance are offered at both centers.
For more information, call 284-4700
or 286-3195.
Karate lessons are offered for ages
6 to 18 years old.
Piano lessons are offered. Sign up
now for private lessons.
TEACHERS, VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED - Teachers are needed in
areas such as chorus, modeling,
youth aerobics, guitar, and acting,
Volunteers are needed for the
summer magic program. For
information, call 284-4700/5615,

Bowling activities
The Howard and Albrook bowling
center monthly calendar has listed
various telephone numbers from the
local community. If your number is
listed, bowl one game free. The snack
bar caters your special bowling
parties with discount prices. If your
register receipt is drawn, bowl one
game free.


Arts, crafts center

Today -- Drybrush class 3 - 5 p.m.
Saturday -- Twenty-five percent off
greenware 10 a.,m. - 6 p.m.
Monday -- Five-week beginner's
painting ceramic classes in English 6 -
8 p.m.
Friday -- Fifty percent off firing 10
a.m. - 6 p.m.
June 23 -- Free halo copper demon-
stration 3 - 4 p.m.
June 24 --Free pouring 1 - 3:30p.m.
June 30 -- Free gold halo demon-
stration 3 - 4 p.m.
July 1 -- Free pouring 1 - 3:30 p.m.
July 2 -- Beginner's ceramic paint-
ing class in English 6 - 8 p.m.
All activities take place in Building
806, Albrook AFS. For information,
call 286-3279.


Auto classes
The Automotive Self-Help Facil-
ity, Building 442-443, Albrook, will
have minor tune-up instruction 6 p.m.
Monday. Students must provide parts.
Instruction includes how to adjust
timing.

ATLANTIC


Puppet theater
The Music and Theatre program
will offer a six-week puppet theater
and magic program for beginners.
Registration is underway at The Loft
Theatre, Fort Espinar. For more infor-
mation call Andy Lim at 289-4302.


Ocean Breeze center
The following events will be held at
Ocean Breeze, Fort Sherman. For
information call 298-6402.
TOURS - The center will sponsor a
tour to Portobelo Saturday.


The center will conduct a day trip to
Langosta beach June 23.
CLASS - A cooking session is sched-
uled for 1 p.m. Sunday. Topics in-
clude how to prepare yuca, plantain
and sancocho soup.

Sherman Arts Crafts
The following classes are held at
Building 206, Fort Sherman. For in-
formation call 289-6313.
CLASSES -Easy wood projects for
children 6 and older will be held 1-3
p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday. Class
fee includes materials.
Macrame and latch-hook technique
classes for children 8-12 will be of-
fered at the center. The space is lim-
ited to five participants, so early regis-
tration is encouraged. Class fee in-
cludes materials.
The center will hold a five-session
basic ceramic painting class beginning
July 2. Instruction covers the applica-
tion of glazes, crystal tones and decals.
Advanced registration is under way.

Davis Arts & Crafts

The following classes are held at
Building 251, Fort Davis. For infor-
mation and reservations call 289-5104.
CLASSES - A class on how to use
ceramic glazes deemed incompatible
will be held on Thursday.
TOUR - The center will sponsor a
photo tour of Panama City June 23.
CLASSES - Plaque making ses-
sions are available every Monday from
6-8 p.m. Participants must provide the
wood.
Alfredo Isaac will conduct paint-
from-slide sessions 5-7:30 p.m. Thurs-
days. A fee will be charged.

CLAYTON

Valent rec center
The following events willbe held at
Valent Recreation Center, Building 53,
Fort Clayton. For more information/
reservations call 287-4201/6500.
EVENTS - Local and foreign crafts
will be on sale during a mini bazaar at
the center 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday and
Sunday.
The center has programs every
evening.
CLASSES - The center will host a
circus 11 a.m.- 5 p.m. June 23. Clowns,
live animals, entertainment, pony rides
and tasty foods will be featured.
The center will hold classes on how
to make pictures to decorate homes, 6-
8 p.m. June 28. Reservations are re-
quired.
Introductory and intermediate
computer classes are held monthly at
the center. The two-week classes meet
6-8 p.m. Monday through Fridays.
Advanced registration is required.
A six-week prepared childbirth class
begins Monday at the center. The
class meets Mondays from 7-8:30 p.m.
Topics include relaxation, breathing
and diet.


A marshmallow eating contest will
be held at the center 6 p.m. today.
Registration is under way for the
basic cake decorating class which starts
June 25. Topics include making roses
and borders.
A new modeling course begins early
July. Space is limited. Advance
registration is required. Sessions are
1-3 p.m. Saturday.
TOURS - A free-zone tour is sched-
uled to depart 8 a.m. Friday.
The center will sponsor a day trip to
the El Valle market Sunday. The group
will stop at Coronado Beach prior to
returning. El Valle market features
handicrafts, fruits and vegetables.
SHOW - A fashion dance show
starts 7 p.m. Tuesday.


FREE AEROBICS - Low
impact workouts are held at 11:30
a.m. Call in advance.
COMPUTER INSTRUCTION
- Classes available range from
beginners to DOS and advance level.
Evening sessions. Reserve your space
early.

Youth events
The Fort Clayton Youth Center, Build-
ing 155. offers the following:
CLASSES - The center, Building
155, offers cooking lessons 3:30-4:30
p.m. every Wednesday.
Monthly gymnastics classes are held
Monday and Wednesdays. Beginner-
and advance-beginner levels are avail-
able. Registration is conducted at the
center. For more information call Benny
Boza at 287-6451.
Karate sessions for adults and youths
are available at the center.
EVENTS - All-night movies, games
and tournaments will round off with a
hearty breakfastduring apre-teen lock-
in Saturday at the center.


LIBRARY PROGRAM - The Fort
Clayton Library will have its annual
reading program for grade-school chil-
dren with the theme "Go Wild for
Books." Crafts, story telling and guided
assistance will be featured during the
June 25 - Aug. 3 program. Call 287-
3853 for information.

CDS news
Child Development Center, Build-
ing 156, Fort Clayton, offers the fol-
lowing programs. For information call
287-5507/5104.
The Fort Clayton School Program
will be offering its Enchanted Summer
III-Summer Camp. Themed weekly
sessions will provide children, 3 - 5,
different learning experiences. The
program will run 9 a.m.-noon, Mon-
days through Fridays, June 25 to
Aug, 3.Enrollment is under way at the
center.
A part-day or full-day School-Age
Fun and Enrichment (SAFE) program
for children 5 to 12 will be offered
beginning Monday. The program is
based on weekly and bi-weekly themes,
and will include games, hikes, cooking
experiences and field trips. In addi-
tion, arts and crafts and swimming will
be scheduled on a regular basis.
CDS will conduct an orientation
and training session 1-3 p.m. June 26 -
27 at the center, for people interested
in volunteering at the Child Develop-
ment Center, Part-day Preschool or the
SAFE Program. To register call 287-
3301.
A father's day lunch will be held
today at the Child Development Cen-
ter, Building 39, Fort Clayton. For
information call 287-6812.

ACS events
ACS will have its next "Welcome
to Panama" orientation at the Fort
Clayton NCO Club 8 a.m.-noon June
26. For reservations call 287-6518 or
287-5556.


RESOURCE LIBRARY - ACS has
a Military Installation Resource library
for soldiers being reassigned. Infor-
mation packets are available from your
next duty station. Requests must be
made eight weeks in advance. Copies
are available for viewing at Building
115, Corozal. Some videos are on
hand also. For information, call Irma
Avery at 285-6518. Atlantic informa-
':in is available at the Margarita com-
piex (289-4187).

Bowling center
FATHER'S DAY - The Clayton
Bowling Center will host a Father's
Day Singles Saturday,
SUMMER SPECIALS - Youths
are invited to enjoy the School
Summer Special being featured 9
a.m.-6 p.m. Monday to Fridays at
the Fort Clayton Bowling Center.
Special rates are offered.

Arts, crafts center
The facility is located in Building
180. For information call 287-4369.
CLASSES - Oval mat sessions are
available Tuesdays at 7 p.m. or by
appointment. The frame shop also
features custom framing.
Country bunny demonstrations are
held 10 a.m. Thursday, 7 p.m. Tues-
days and 2 p.m. Sunday at the center.
Pottery classes are held regularly at
the center. Instruction includes basic
techniques and use of the potter's wheel.
Entry is open for a ceramic contest
at the Ceramics Center, Building 155,
Fort Clayton. Entries will be displayed
June 27. Awards will be presented.

CURUNDU

Theatre Arts Centre
The following activities are held at
Building 2060, Curundu. For more
information and reservations call 286-
3814 or 286-3152.
CLASS - A nine-week violin and
viola course will begin Monday. Ses-
sions are Mondays, Wednesdays and
Friday. Classes are available for
beginner:, intermediate and advanced
levels. Students will learn the basics
of standard string pieces. Advance
enrollment is required.
INSTRUCTORS - The center is
seeking voice and ballet/tap instruc-
tors. References are required. Quali-
fied applicants may contact Barbara
Berger at the center.
CAMP - A seveh-week youth thea-
ter camp will be offered by the center
beginning June 25. Instruction will
cover the facets of theatre, from props
and costumes to lights and backstage
work. Registration will be held Monday
- Friday at the center.
EXERCISE - Exercise classes meet
6:30 p.m. Monday, Wednesdays and
Thursday at the center. "Large and
Lovely Dancercise" is also available.
Registration is on a monthly basis.

Bowling center
The Curundu Lanes will be
starting a Summer Fun Bowling
League Tuesday. Sign up today!

HOWARD

Arts, crafts center
Today -- Twenty-five percent off
greenware 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Wednesday -- Five-week beginner's
painting class in English 5 - 7 p.m.
Thursday -- Five-week beginner's
painting ceramic class in Spanish 2 - 4
p.m.
Thursday -- Beginner's stained glass
class in English 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.








Tropic Times
June 15, 1990


Friday -- Beginner's cross-stitch class
English and Spanish-2 - 4 p.m.
June 26 -- Learn how to paint eyes
ceramic projects in one session 2 -
.m.
June 27 -- "Brushwork, the Liner,"
"Brushwork, the Shader," videos
)wn from 7 - 8 p.m.
June 29 -- Beginner's knitting class
English and Spanish 2 - 4 p.m.
July 3 -- Free lamp assembly dem-
stration 2 - 3 p.m.
July 5 -- Free "Learn How to Paint
es on Ceramic Projects" demon-
tion 2 - 3 p.m.
These activities will take place in
ilding 711 at Howard. For informa-
n, call 284-6361.

CAF counselor
The Howard Education Center has
iew Community College of the Air
rce advisement counselor, Eva Lind-
rg. Enlisted people working on a
AF degree or who need to register
CCAFare encouraged to stop by
ilding 708, Monday or Tuesday from
.m. - noon or call 284-3263 to make
appointment.

AT tests
If you need an SAT score report
fore Nov. 1, you need to take the test
fore July 6. No SAT answer sheets
'11 be scored July 31 - Sept. 10 due to
stem changes that need to be made to
comodate the new test and registra-
)n forms. For details, call 284-3264/
63.

ase library
The Howard Library story hour and
mmer reading program begin July 9
d continues through Aug. 7. Parents
ay register their children at the li-
ary beginning Monday. Children ages
6 will meet Mondays at 9 a.m. for
ry hour, beginning July 9. Children
es 7-10 meet Thursdays at 9 a.m. for
o summer reading program begin-
ng July 10. Participants will receive
rtificates and awards at the last
eating. Call 284-6249 for informa-
n.

odiac rec center
TOURS - Do-it-yourself Gorgona
-ach tour. Get away from it all by
ending a relaxing night or weekend
the Gorgona Jayes, one of Panama's
cest beach hotels. Stop in the center
make a reservation.
Monday & Thursday -- Free Zone
opping tour 8 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Tuesday -- Colonial Panama and
iraflores Locks tour 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.
isit colonial Panama and tour histori-
I sights in the area such as the French
aza, and National Theater.
June 23 -- San Carlos Beach trip 7
m. -.4 p.m.
June 24 -- El Valle shopping tour
30 a.m. - 3 p.m.
All tours depart from the Howard
featcr. A small fee is charged. For
formation, call 284-6161/6109.
TOURNAMENTS - Monday --
illiards 6 - 10 p.m.
Friday -- Pinochle 6 - 10 p.m.
Cash prizes will be awarded and
e-registration is required. For infor-
ation, call 284-6161/6109.
OUTDOOR REC SECTION -
TOURS - Gold panning at Sala-
anca 7 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Sunday --Scuba trip to Playa Blanca
a.m. - 6 p.m.
Wednesday -- Canoeing and barbe-
e on the Chagres river 7 a.m. - 3 p.m.
ike time out for this exciting trip and
e Monkey Mountain and enjoy a
rbecue with fresh-cut tropical fruit
Gamboa Beach.


All trips depart from the Howard
base theater. A small fee will be charged.
For information, call 284-6161/6109.

Open containers
Air Force Regulation 215-7 is the
governing regulation concerning the
control, procurement, sale and use of
alcoholic beverages. The Howard
supplement is as follows:
Alcoholic beverages may be
consumed during sanctioned
activities at the following Howard
and Albrook facilities:
Officers'/NCO Club open messes,
military family housing, dormitories,
Zodiac Recreation Center, bohios,
outdoor athletic fields, bowling
centers, AAFES cafeterias, stable
clubhouses, and other areas
specifically approved in writing by
the 24th Combat Support Group
commander.
This is a correction to the March
23 Commander's News which stated
the immediate area around the NCO
Club and the picnic tables between
the club and Building 708 are the
only extensions of this policy. The
immediate area around the NCO
Club and the picnic tables between
Building 708 are not authorized areas
for consumption of alcoholic
beverages.

Frequent fliers
Many airlines have numerous
incentive programs based on accrued
mileage. The mileage credits accrued
by an individual performing official
government travel may be used by
people to defray official travel costs.
However, credits may not be used for
service upgrades, such as seat
upgrades, nor under any
circumstances may credits be applied
toward personal travel. If you
accrue mileage credits while on
official travel, the mileage coupons
must be turned in to Accounting and
Finance for disposition. Call 284-
4505 for details.

Ed. center testing
GENERAL TESTING SESSION
- The Howard Education Center is
giving general testing sessions every
Wednesday and Thursday from 8-10
a.m. For more information, call
284-3263.
SPECIAL TESTING SESSIONS
- The Graduate Management
Admission Test will be given June 21.
Only one administration of the
GMAT can be funded to eligible
military -people. Interested active-
duty military people or civilians can
call the Howard Education Center
for an appointment. For more
information, call 284-3264.

MAC phones
These are the phone numbers
people can call to get Military Airlift
Command flight and travel
information from the Howard
Passenger Terminal: 284-5703 or
284-4306/3608/5758.

FSC June events
JOB SEARCH WORKSHOP -
This 1 1/2 hour workshop provides
information for developing good job
search skills and shows where to
apply for jobs. Tuesday at 9 a.m.
CHECKBOOK MANAGE-
MENT - Learn to maintain a
checkbook Wed. ,9:30-11:30 a.m.
RELATIONSHIP BUILDING -
This program provides tips on
positive relationships with spouses,
children, friends, or supervisors.


Wednesday at 2 p.m. and continues
for five weekly sessions.
SPOUSE EMPLOYMENT
RESOURCE PROGRAM - If
interested in employment in
Panama, FSC offers this ongoing
program designed to help spouses
enhance job search skills. Make an
appointment with the FSC spouse
employment counselor. For more
information, call 284-5650.

Child center
The Child Development Center
offers family day care programs.
Individuals living on Albrook or
Howard that provide more than 10
hours of child care in their home per
week are required by Air Force
regulation 215-27 to be enrolled in
this program. Licensing require-
ments include:
F'rst aid training, cardiopulmonary
resuscitation, fire, safety and
environmental health training and
inspections, child care training and
orientation class. For more
information, call 284-3711.

NAVY


Waterfront movies
Movies will be shown on a big
screen TV at the Waterfront Inn
Mon. and Wed. at 6 p.m.. Bring your
movies or make a request.

MWR events
U.S. Naval Station Panama Canal
MWR offers the following activities.
For information, call 283-5307 or
number listed with activity.
CLASSES - Sailing, motor boat,
& scuba diving classes are offered as
follows: Motor Boat - Saturday &
June 24, Basic Sailing - Sunday,
Crew Sailing - June 23 & Scuba


Diving - June 18-July 1. For more
information call 283-5307.
TRAP RANGE - Visit the Trap
Range! Schedule: Thurs.-Fri. 4 p.m.
to dusk; Sat., Sun. & holidays, 11
a.m.-6 p.m. Firearms are rental-free.
MOVIES - Free movies for ALL
HANDS and dependents. One
feature each evening will be played at
the Crews Lounge, Building 88
(Rodman). Show begins at 7 p.m.
WATER AEROBICS - Join us
at Farfan Pool every Mon., Wed. &
Thursday, 5-6 p.m. Have fun and
stay fit!
TOUR OF PANAMA CITY - Fri-
day we will take a tour around the the
city to see Old Panama, Las Bovedas,
a private tour of the Presidential Pal-
ace and other historic places in the
area. We will also stop for lunch. Bring
your cameras! Bus will leave NAVSTA
at 8 p.m. and returns at about 2 p.m.
Price: $10 per person.
SCUBA DIVING TRIP TO POR-
TOBELO - Spend a day diving Sun-
day at Portobelo, on the Caribbean
coast of Panama. Leaving NAVSTA,
Building 65 at 6 a.m. and returning at
about 5 p.m. Price: $10 includes bus
transportation only.
CONTADORA WEEKEND - Sat-
urday and Sunday take a weekend to
relax and get away. Swimming, snor-
keling, scuba diving, golf, tennis and
more are available. Leave NAVSTA
at 7 a.m. Saturday and returning about
5 p.m. Sunday. Couple $155; single
$135.
SAN BLAS TRIP - Join us for a
weekend get away to the exclusive
Panamanian island resort of San Blas.
Depart 6 a.m., June 29. Return 6 a.m.
July 1. Spend 2 nights and 3 days in
one of Panama's loveliest hotels, "San
Blas." All meals, transportation, hotel
and island tours included for only $110
per person. Make reservations by close
of business Wednesday.
MORE


I.
-~ N.


\ \.


-/


/ . .:* y
" . ' ro


;.'
/
.1

xi



~:.,: / . './
I,


N
N
'S
...-~ --.'








.5.-
~


ces


13


S


I


I _ _ I


?4-~-










14 Tropic Times
14 June 15, 1990


Notices


NAVY


Swimming pool

The Rodman Swimming Pool is a
5-Star facility! Featuring a
refurbished pool, new furniture, and
an outstanding snack bar, Fleet
Landing, the pool is open every day
from 10 a.m.-8 p.m.


Bonanza sale

Rainy season is here, and the
roads are wet and slippery. Do you
need new tires or rims? Or how about
a battery? If you do, don't wait till it's
Loo late. Visit MCX's Tire, Wheel, &
Battery Bonanza Sale Thursday-
Aug. 18, in Building 4, aboard
USNAVSTAPANCANAL.

Father's day sale

Marine Corps Exchange is having
a sale on men's dress slacks, 18K
gold, pre-Colombian emeralds,
Caribe diamonds, and various items
in their Sight and Sound Department
in honor of all fathers Saturday

Youth program
Beginning Monday, MWR will of-
fer a Youth Program for 6-17 year old
children of Navy and Marine Corps
personnel. A variety of activities will
be scheduled from 9 a.m.-4 p.m.,
Monday through Friday, Monday -
August 17. Parents must register chil-
dren on their first visit in the basement
of Building 40, Family Services Cen-
ter, at the U.S. Naval Station. This is a
free service.

Orientation
U.S. Navy Family Service Center
is sponsoring a Panama Orientation
for all newcomers to the area
Thursday & Friday, at the Navy
Family Center Building 40, aboard
USNAVSTAPANCANAL. For
information call 283-5749.


'Talent Potpourri'

U.S. Naval Station Panama Canal
invites everyone to their annual din-
ner/talent show Saturday. This show
to be held at the naval station's An-
chorage Club will include categories
in dance, song, comedy, drama, and
fashion. Dinner will be served at 7
p.m., and show time is at 8 p.m. For
tickets and/or information call 283-
4464/5751.


Jungle jam

Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, incorpo-
rated, will hold a "Que June Jungle
Jam" 8 p.m. June 29 to 1 a.m. June 30
at the Fort Amador Officers Club. All
proceeds will go toward school sup-
plies for Cunalndians.

Office closing
The Finance and Accounting Of-
fice, Building 519, Fort Clayton, will
close at 3 p.m. today. For emergency
service, call the charge of quarters at
287-4400 or 287-4208.


: Fashion show


POTPOURRI


AUSA luncheon
The Association of the United
States Army will hold a general
membership meeting/luncheon at
Amador Officers' Club from 11:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday.
Gen. Maxwell Thurman,
USSOUTHCOM commander-in-
chief will be the guest speaker. The
meeting is open to all who wish to
attend.


"My Name Is Panama" casual
summer clothes will be modeled by
Syddia Lee's Modeling Agency at the
Howard Officers' Open Mess June 26
at 7:30 p.m. Call 284-4680/4896
for reservations for the dinner
showing.

Summer activities
DoDDS will have five elementary
schools open Monday-July 13 for
recreational activities in the
playshelters and media centers.
Schools that will be open are: Balboa
Elementary School, Fort Clayton
Elementary School, Curundu
Elementary School, Fort Davis
Elementary School and Howard
Elementary School.
Hours for the media center will be
8 - noon; hours for the playshelters
will be 8 - noon, and 12:30 - 3:30 p.m.
Special playshelter activities will
include basketball clinics, a
basketball tournament, a kickball.
tournament, and a basketball Hoop
Shoot. Special media center
activities include arts and crafts,
Read .Aloud, and computer
program ms.
Registration for the playshelter
program will be open today at each
school. Schedules for both programs
are available in each school office.
For more information, call one of the
schools mentioned above.


AWARD WINNER - Alyson
Milburn, a student in Ms.
Vasquez's 6th grade class at
Diablo Elementary School was
recently honored by having her
award winning story published
in "Rainbow Collection," an
anthology of children's writing.
The winners were announced in
the USA Today newspaper.


Admissions test
The Army Education Center will
hold a Graduate Management Admis-
sions Test 9 a.m. Monday and Tuesday
at buildings 128, Fort Clayton (287-
5856); and 801, Fort Kobbe (284-3150).

Office closing
The AG Passport and Visa office,
Building 519, Fort Clayton, will close
1:45 p.m. Monday. For information
call Harmodio Diaz Grunados at 287-
4503 or 287-5207.

Spot-bid sale
The Defense Reutilization Manage-
ment Office - Panama will hold a local
spot-bid sale 8 a.m. June 28 at Build-
ing 745, Corozal. Items will be avail-
able for public inspection June 25 - 27.
For information, call Jose F. Gonzalez
at 285-4808.


PANAMA CANAL COLLEGE

Summer Session 1990



[ Registration Schedule ]

June 20.21, "(Wed T irs i.). \

Registration
8-5 p.m.
College Auditorium

, June 25 (Monday) ,

Classes Begin

August 2 (Thursday) '

Summer Session Ends
r ----------------- -1
| NOTE: Classes for the Summer Session will I
I be held at Balboa High School unless oth- I
I erwise stated due to renovations at the I.
I Panama Canal College La Boca Campus. I
L -- - - ---- - J


Crs & (CEU)
Section CourseTitle Days Time SemHrs Instructor Room


BA 121 A
BA 121 B
BA 125 A
BA 283 A
CHE 110 LA
CHE 110 LB
CHE 110 RA
CS 101 A
CS101 B
CS 102 A
CS 104 A
ESD 101 A
ESD 103 A
ESD 103 B
ESD 104 A
ESD 151 A
ESL 91 A
ESL 91 B
ESL 92 A
ESL 92 B
ESL 92 C
ESL 93 A
ESL 93 B
ESL 93 C
ESL 94 A
ESL 94 B
ESL 94 C
ESL 95 A
ESL 95 B
ESL 95 C
ESL 96 A
ESL 96 B
ESL 96 C
GOV 220 A
GOV 220 B
HIS 200 A
HIS 201 A
HIS 211 A
MA 101 A
MA 102 A
MUS 121 A
OA 113 A
OA 140 A
PSY 150 A
PSY 150 B
SPA 101 A
VT 100 A
VT 101 A


INTRO TO BUSINESS
INTRO TO BUSINESS
MICRO ECONOMICS
BUSINESS LAW
INTRO TO CHEM LAB
INTRO TO CHEM LAB
INTRO TO CHEM
INTRO TO COMPUTERS
INTRO TO COMPUTERS
INTRO TO PROGRAMMING
WORD PROCESSING
BASIC COMPOSITION
FRESH COMP I
FRESH COMP I
FRESH COMP II
SPEECH
LEVEL ONE
LEVEL ONE
LEVEL TWO
LEVEL TWO
LEVEL TWO
LEVEL THREE
LEVEL THREE
LEVEL THREE
LEVEL FOUR
LEVEL FOUR
LEVEL FOUR
LEVEL FIVE
LEVEL FIVE
LEVEL FIVE
LEVEL SIX
LEVEL SIX
LEVEL SIX
GOV. IN THE U.S.
GOV. IN THE U.S.
U.S. HIS TO PRESENT
U.S. HIS SINCE 1876
LAT AME HIS SINCE 1825
MATH FOR GEN EDUCATION
COLLEGE ALGEBRA
MUSIC APPRECIATION
COMPUTER KEYBOARDING
EXECUTIVE ACCOUNTING
INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY
INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY
ELEM SPANISH I
INTRO ELECTRICfTY/ELEC
INTRO MECHANICAL DRAW


MTWTH
TTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
TTH
MW
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH
MTWTH

TTrH


10:00-12:00
5:30-9:30
10:00-12:00
6:00-8:00
1:00-4:00
1:00-4:00
10:00-12:00
8:00-10:00
5:00-7:00
5:00-7:00
5:00-7:00
8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00
6:00-8:00
10:00-12:00
8:00-10:00
11:00-2:00
5:00-:00
8:00-11:00
11:00-2:00
5:00-8:00
8:00-11:00
11:00-2:00
5:00-8:00
8:00-11:00
11:00-2:00
5:00-8:00
8:00-11:00
11:00-2:00
5:00-8:00
8:00-11:00
11:00-2:00
5:00-8:00
10:00-12:00
6:00-8400-
6:00-8:00
8:00-10:00
6:00-8:00
6:00-8.00
5:00-7.00
6:00-8:00
12:00-1:00
6:00-8.00
10:00-12:00
5:00-7*00
5:00-8400
5:00-8:00
5:00-8.00


ROBINSON
AHRENS
AKERS
TOTH
GEORGE
GEORGE
GEORGE
AKERS
ESTRIBI
LOAIZA
TBA
ALVARADO
RAMOS
TBA
RAMOS
TBA
AROSEMENA
SPAULDING
CIGARRUISTA
ALVARADO
RAMOS
HERN
HERN
LEWIS
BISHOP
BISHOP
O'DONNELL
CARR
CARR
MCFARLANE
BUSSIERE
BUSSIERE
LOPEZ
TUCKER
WALL
JACKSON
TUCKER
MENDEZ
GEORGE
LUCK
MONLOUIS
ROBINSON
ROBINSON
ANDERSON
ANDERSON
CIGARRUISTA
CHEN
CHEN


417
FT. DAVIS
416
415
602
G134
604
801
801
801
809
701
706
701
707
707
415
416
408
408
408
410
410
417
412
412
418
413
413
413
414
414
412
807
CLAYTON
KOBBE
807
803
HOWARD
605
CLAYTON
801
CLAYTON
811
811
706
BLDG.74
BLDG.74


dl'.T


I ,


I


/�


. .









Movies


Tropic Times
June 15, 1990


Howard


Today
7 p.m. CRAZY PEOPLE (R) Dudley Moore
9 p.m. HARD TO KILL (R) Steven Seagal
Saturday
2 & 6:30 p.m. NUNS ON THE RUN (PG-13) Eric
Idle
9 p.m. STANLEY & IRIS (PG-13) Robert DeNiro
11:45 p.m. THE FIRST POWER (R) Tracy
Griffith
Sunday
2 & 6:30 p.m. THE FIRST POWER (R) Tracy
Griffith
9 p.m. DOWNTOWN (R) Forest Whitaker
Monday
7 p.m. NUNS ON THE RUN (PG-13) Eric Idle
9 p.m. DOWNTOWN (R) Forest Whitaker
Tuesday
7 p.m. MADHOUSE (PG-13) Kirstie Alley
9 p.m. THE FIRST POWER (R) Tracy Griffith
Wednesday
7 p.m. MADHOUSE (PG-13) Kirstie Alley
9 p.m. A SHOCK TO THE SYSTEM (R) Michael
Caine
Thursday
7 p.m. CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS (PG-13)
Alan Alda
9 p.m. FAR OUT MAN (R) Tommy Chong

Clayton

Today
7 p.m. THE BLOOD OF HEROES (R) Joan
Chen
9 p.m. THE WAR OF THE ROSES (R) Michael
Douglas
Saturday
2 & 6:30 p.m. TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA
TURTLES (PG) Animated
9 p.m. MORTAL PASSION (R) Zach Galligan
11:45 p.m. THE FOURTH WAR (R) Roy Scheider
Sunday
2 & 6 p.m. TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA
TURTLES (PG) Animated
9 p.m. SKI PATROL (PG) Roger Rose
Monday
7 p.m. TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES
(PG) Animated
9 p.m. SKI PATROL (PG) Roger Rose
Tuesday
7 p.m. BLIND FURY (R) Lisa Brount
9 p.m. NIGHTBREED (R) Craig Shefer
Wednesday
7 p.m. LORD OF THE FLIES (R) Paul Bathazar
9 p.m. NIGHTBREED (R) Craig Shefer
Thursday
7 p.m. THE FOURTH WAR (R) Roy Scheider
9 p.m. NIGHTBREED (R) Craig Shefer


Amador


Today
7 p.m. REVENGE (R) Kevin Costner
Saturday
7 p.m. LAMBADA (PG) Eddie Peck
Sunday
7 p.m. BORN ON THE 4TH OF JULY (R) Tom
Cruise
Monday
7 p.m. BORN ON THE 4TH OF JULY (R) Tom
Cruise
Tuesday
7 P.M. JOE VS THE VOLCANO (PG) Tom Hanks
Wednesday
7 p.m. THE FORBIDDEN DANCE (PG-13) Jeff
James
Thursday
7 p.m. ENEMIES, A LOVE STORY (R) Ron
Silver

Quarry Heights
Today
7 p.m. WHERE THE HEART IS (R) Dabney
Coleman
Saturday
7 p.m. MUSIC BOX (PG-13) Jessica Lange
Sunday
7 p.m. THE LAST OF THE FINEST (R) Brian
Dennehy


Monday
7 p.m. THE LAST OF THE FINEST (R) Brian
Dennehy
Tuesday & Wednesday
CLOSED
Thursday
7 p.m. HEART CONDITION (R) Bob Hoskins

Davis

Today
7 p.m. BLUE STEEL (R) Jamie Lee Curtis
9 p.m. LOOSE CANNONS (R) Gene Hackman
Saturday
2 & 7 p.m. DRIVING MISS DAISY (PG) Jessica
Tandy
9:30 p.m. NIGHTBREED (R) Craig Shefer
Sunday
7 p.m. COURAGE MOUNTAIN (PG) Leslie
Caron
9:30 p.m. GLORY (R) Morgan Freeman
Monday
7 p.m. DRIVING MISS DAISY (PG) Jessica
Tandy
Tuesday
7 p.m. GLORY (R) Morgan Freeman
Wednesday
7 p.m. GLORY (R) Morgan Freeman
Thursday
7 p.m. THE HANDMAID'S TALE (R) Robert
Duvall


Those heroes on the half shell stage an attack on the big screen in a live action adventure
based on the popular TV series. Created by Jim Henson's Creature Shop, TURTLES
enlarges the action to theater size entertainment. PG ...Animotronic Characters


CeClub


Calendar


Amador O'Club
Club will be open for lunch every
Wed., Thurs., & Fri. from 11:30
a.m.-I p.m. A Daily Hot Special as
well as a salad bar will be served.
Mongolian BBQ, Thurs., 6-8:30
p.m.; Social Hour with disco, Fri, 5-9
p.m.; Sunday brunch, 10a.m.-l p.m.;
Private rooms available for special
functions by calling 282-3534.

Howard NCO Club
Breakfast: Mon.-Fri., 6:30-9 a.m.;
Lunch: Mon.-Fri., 11 a.m.-I p.m.;
Dinner: 5:30-9 p.m., Membership
night last Mon. of each month;
Games: Sun. & Wed.; Brunch: Every
3rd Sun. of each month, 10 a.m.- 1
p.m.; Variety disco in ballroom: Fri.,
Sat., Sun., Mon.; Casual Cove disco:
Tues. & Wed.; Rock & Roll, Salsa:
Mon. & Tues.; Variety, Western:
Wed. & Thurs.

Howard O'Club'
Lunch: 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Dinner
6:00 - 8:30 p.m.Tue-Thu and 6:00-


9:30 Fri. & Sat; Club closes every
Mon at 1 p.m.; Hungry Hour 1700
Fri; Dancing Fri & Sat 8:00 - 12.:00.
Albrook O'Club
Lunch: 11 a.m.-I p.m.; Dinner: 5-
8:30 p.m.; Tues., bar menu available'
in the lounge; Fri., Hungry Hour, 4-6
p.m., music, 9:30 p.m.-1 a.m.;
Sunday: Champagne brunch, 10
a.m.-1 p.m.
STRAC Club
Open Mon.-Sat., 4:30-11 p.m.; Fri. &
Sat., snacks, music with Judy Upton.
Quarry Heights O'Club
Breakfast: Mon.-Fri., 6:30-8:30 a.m.,
Sat., 8-10 a.m.; Lunch: Mon.-Fri.,
11:30 a.m.-I p.m.; Dinner A La
Carte: Mon.-Sat., 6-9 p.m.; Live
entertainment: 6-10 p.m.; Sun.,
closed
CPO Club
Open to all E7-E9, civilians NM6 &
above, and their dependents. Also
offers a full menu and services 7 days
a week. Lunch: Tues.-Sun., 11 a.m.-l
p.m.; Dinner: Mon.-Sat., 6-9:30 p.m.


Anchorage Club
Open 7 days a week. Offers services
to everyone. Breakfast: Mon.-Fri.,
6:30-10 a.m.; Lunch: Mon.-Fri., 11
a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Dinner: Mon.-Sat.,
5-10 p.m.; Grill: Sat., Sun. and
holidays, 1-9:30 p.m.

USNavSta O'Club
Open to all officers, civilians NM7 &
above, and their dependents. Offers
full menu & services 7 days a week.
Lunch: Mon.-Sat., 11 a.m.-2 p.m.;
Sunday Brunch: 10:30 a.m.-l:30
p.m.; Dinner: Sun.-Wed., 5-9 p.m.,
Thurs.-Sat., 5-10 p.m.

Waterfront Inn
Movies will be shown on a big screen
TV Mon. & Wed. at 6 p.m. Bring
your movies or make a request;
Thurs., games, free snacks, 7 p.m.;
Fri., Hungry Hour, 4-5 p.m., music 6
p.m.-I a.m. Bayview Room: Lunch
11 a.m.-I p.m. daily; Dinner, Thurs.
& Sat., 6-10 p.m.; Father's Day
Lunch 11 a.m.-2 p.m., call 289-5109
or 241-5578 for reservations.


15


I I - � - � I I


I I -


,, I __ I �












1 6 Tropic Times
1 June 15, 1990


,MTV Guide


6:00 a.m.
8:00
8:25
8:50
9:20
9:50
10:45
11:00
11:30
Noon
12:20 p.m.
12:30
1:00
2:10
2:50
3:40
3:55
4:20
5:10
6:00
6:30
7:00
7:30
8:25
9:20
9:50
10:20
10:30
11:30
12:30 a.m.
1:00
2:35
4:15
6:00


Saturday

7:00 a.m. CNN Headline News
7:30 Just For Kids!
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
Huckleberry Hounds & Friends
Denver, The Last Dinosaur
Maxie And The New Archies
Kissyfur
9:55 SCN Morning Movie..."McHale's Navy."
11:30 You Can't Do That On Television
Noon America's Top Ten
1:00 p.m. Pro Bowlers Tour
2:30 This Week In Baseball
3:30 Variety Special..."The Magic Of Music."
5:10 Star Search
6:00 CNN Headline News
6:30 Rescue 911
7:25 48 Hours
8:25 SCN Saturday Night Movie..."Claudia."
10:00 CNN Headline News
10:30 Saturday Night Live
12:00 a.m. Videolink
1:00 SCN All Night Movie..."Silent Movie."
2:35 SCN .All Night Movie..."The Warrior And
The Sorceress."'
4:20 Austin City Limits
5:20 Share The Word -

Sunday


CNN Headline News
Catch The Spirit
Benjamin.
Coral Ridge Ministries
CBS Sunday Morning
America's Black Forum
Washington Week In Review
This Week With David Brinkley
CNN Headline News
For Vets Only
ESPN Sports Magazine
PBS Motor Week
On Pit Road
Remote Control
Reaching For The Skies
CNN Headline News
WWF Survivor Series 1989
CNN Headline News
Family Special..."Hacksaw" (Part 2)
SCN Sunday Night Movie..."Centennial."(Part4)
L.A. Law
Entertainment This Week
Comedy Tonight
Meet The Press
CNN Headline News
McLaughlin Group
George Michael's Sports Machine
60 Minutes
World Report
CNN Headline News

Monday

NBC Today Show
Morning Stretch
Sesame Street
Eureeka's Castle
The A-Team
CNN Headline Newsbreak
Showbiz Today
Wheel Of Fortune
CNN Headline News
SCN Midday Report
Sports Machine
Remington Steele,
Oprah Winfrey...Three-Way Soap Operas


Today

NBC Today Show
Morning Stretch
C.O.P.S.
Saved By The Bell
Yan Can Cook
Masterpiece Theater
CNN Headline Newsbreak
Showbiz Today
Wheel Of Fortune
CNN Headline News
SCN Midday Report
CNN Sports Latenight
Remington Steele
Oprah Winfrey...The Secrets Men Keep (mature
Star Trek
CNN Headline Newsbreak
M-A-S-H
Guiding Light
General Hospital
SCN Evening Report
ABC World News Tonight
Jeopardy
Crazy Like A Fox
Thirtysomething"
NBC Nightly News
Entertainment Tonight
SCN Late Night Report
NBC Tonight Show
Late Night With David Letterman
Nightline
SCN All Night Movie..."Centennial." (Part 2)
SCN All Night Movie..."Centennial."(Part 3)
SCN All Night Movie..."I Love A Mystery."
Videolink


2:50
3:40
3:55
4:20
5:10
6:00
6:30
7:00
7:25
7:50
8:50
9:20
9:50
10:20
10:30
11:30
12:30 a.m.
1:00
1:30
2:00
3:00
4:00
5:00


Star Trek
CNN Headline Newsbreak
M-A-S-H
Guiding Light
General Hospital
SCN Evening Report
ABC World News Tonight
Jeopardy
Head Of The Class
Sixty Minutes
Married With Children (mature)
NBC Nightly. News
Entertainment Tonight
SCN Late Night Report
NBC Tonight Show
Late Night With David Letterman
Nightline
World Monitor
Sports Latenight
Arsenio Hall
Tonight Show
Late Night
CNN Headline News

Tuesday

NBC Today Show
Morning Stretch
Super Mario Brothers
Square One Television
3-2-1 Contact
Magnum P.I.
CNN Headline Newsbreak
Showbiz Today
Wheel Of Fortune
CNN Headline News
SCN Midday Report
CNN Sports Latenight
Remington Steele
Donahue...Children With Progeria
Star Trek
CNN Headline Newsbreak
M-A-S-H
Guiding Light
General Hospital
Community Bulletin
SCN Evening Report
ABC World News Tonight,
Jeopardy
Throb
Major Dad
In The Heat Of The Night
NBC Nightly News
Entertainment Tonight
SCN Late Night Report
NBC Tonight Show
Late Night With David Letterman
Nightline
World Monitor
Sports Latenight "
Arsenio Hall
Tonight Show
Late Night
CNN Headline News

Wednesday

NBC Today Show
Morning Stretch
Sesame Street
What's up, Dr.Ruth?
Fantasy Island
CNN Headline Newsbreak
Showbiz Today
. Wheel Of Fortune
CNN Headline News
SCN Midday Report
CNN Sports Latenight�
Remington Steele
Oprah Winfrey...Your Worst Divorce Nightmare
Star Trek
CNN Headline Newsbreak
M-A-S-H
Guiding Light
General Hospital
SCN Evening Report
ABC World News Tonight
Jeopardy
Mork And Mindy
SCN Wednesday Night Movie..."Brideshead
Revisited." (mature)
NBC Nightly News
Entertainment Tonight
SCN Late Night Report
NBC Tonight Show
Late Night With David Letterman
Nightline
World Monitor
Sports Latenight
Arsenio Hall
Tonight Show
Late Night
CNN Headline News

Thursday

NBC Today Show
Morning Stretch
Porky Pig Show
Mr. Roger's Neighborhood
Mr. Wizard's.World
Ripley's Believe It or Not
CNN Headline Newsbreak
Showbiz Today


SCN cable channel 14

Saturday.

7:00 a.m. CNN Headline News
7 30 Just For Kids
7-31 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
7:55 Huckelberry Hound & Friends
Huckelberry Hound
Augie Doggie
Yogi Bear
Touche Turtle
Lippy The Lion
s:30 Denver, The Last Dinosaur
8:35 Maxie & The New Archies
9:25 Kissyfur
9:55 SCN Morning Movie..."McHals Nay
11.30 Great Circuses O'The World
12:30p.m. CNN Headline News '
I 00 CBS Sports...NCAA Mens & Womens Track
& Field Champ.ionship
2.00 CBS Sports.. Major League Baseball
5s00 CNN Headline Newsbreak
. 5:10 The Waltons
6o05 What's Happening Now!
6:30 CNN Headline News
7:00 Full House
7:30 Paradise
8:20 The Golden Girls
8:50 Empty Nlest
9. 10 Doctor, Doctor
9:40 Tour Of Duty
10.30 NBC Saturday Nite Live
12:00oom CNN Sports Tonight
12.30 CNN Headline News
In.o CNN Week In Japan /
130o CNN Sports Latenight
2.00 Entertainment This Week
3:0 CBS Saturday Night With Connie Chung
4:00 Videolink
5.00 CNN Headline News
5:25 Benjamin..."Power of Praise."
(Pan 3)

Sunday


6:00 a.m.
8:00
8:25
8:50
9:25.
9:55
10:45
11:00
11:30
Noon
12:20 p.m.
12:30
1:00
2:00
2:50
3:40
3:55
4:20
5:10
5:55
6:00
6:30
7:00
7:25
7:55
8:25
9:20
9:50
10:20
10:30
11:30
12:30 a.m.
1:00
1:30
2:00
3:00
4:00
5:00



6:00 a.m.
8:00
8:25
9:25
9:55
10:45
11:00
11:30
Noon
12:20 p.m.
12:30
1:00
2:00
2:50
3:40
3:55
4:20
5:10
6:00
6:30
7:00
7:30
7:50

9:20
9:50
10:20
10:30
11:30
12:30 a.m.
1:00
1:30
2:00
3:00
4:00
5:00



6:00 a.m.
8:00
8:25
8:50
9:20
9:50
10:45
11:00


CNN Headline News
Coral Ridge Ministries
Share The Word
Catch The Spirit
Merrie Melodies Show
Kids Incorporated
The Littles
Gummi Bears
Dinosaucers
Sunday Morning Movie..."Herbic Goes To
Monte Carlo." :
CNN Headline Newsbreak
Strange But True
Sunday Afternoon Movie...Wholly Moses."
CBS Sports...NBA Championship Finals
Game 6. Portland vs Detroit
Airwolf
CNN Headline News
Life Goes On
My Two Dads
21 Jump Street
Anything But Love
Murder She Wrote
Spearfield's Daughter
It's Gary Shandling's Show
CNN Headline Newsbreak
CBS Face The Nation
Meet The Press
CNN Headline News
McLaughlin Group
George Michael's Sports Machine
60 Minutes
World Report

Monday

NBC Today Show
Mister Rogers' Neighborhood
C.O.P.S.
CBS This Morning
The Oprah Winfrey Show
CNN Headline News
SCN Midday Report
General Hospital
Guiding Light
Wheel Of Fortune
Jeopardy
CNN Headline News .
Star Trek...The Next Generation
Double Dare
The Munsters
Flintstone Frolic
Scooby Doo & Scrappy Doo
SCN Evening Report
CBS Evening News
The Hogan Family
Alf
Monday Nite Movie...-Dynasty."
Miami Vice
Arsenio Hall
Latenight With David Letterman
Nightline
World Monitor
Sports Latenight
Arsenio Hall
Tonight Show
Late Night
CNN Headline News


11:30
1:00
2:00

2:50
3:45
3:55
4:20
5:10
5:55
6:00
6:30
7:00
7:25
7:50

8:50
9:20
9:50
10:29
10:30
11:30
12:30 a.m.
1:00
1:30
2:00
3:00
4:00
5:00


6:00 a.m.
6:30
7:00
7:30
8:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:30
Noon
12:30 p.m.
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:30
4:00
6:45
7:15
8:00
9:40
10:35
11:35
12:00 a.m.
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
3:00
5:00



6:00 a.m.
8:00
8:25
9:25
9:50
10:45
11:00
11:30
Noon
12:20 p.m.
12:30
1:00
2:00'


I -- I


Wheel of Fortune
Remington Steele
Donahue...Unusual Talk Show Hosis On
Cable Access (mature)
Star Trek
CNN Headline Newsbreak
M-A-S-H
Guiding Light
General Hospital
Community Bulletin
SCN Evening Report
ABC World News Tonight
Jeopardy
People's Court
National Geographic...Those Wonderful
Dogs
Murphy Brown
NBC Nightly News
Entertainment Tonight
SCN Late Night Report
NBC Tonight Show
Late Night With David Letterman
Nightline
World Monitor
Sports Latenight
Arsenio Hall
Tonight Show
Late Night
CNN Headline News


6.00 a.m.
6:30
7:00
7:30
8:00
8:25
8:50
9:15
9:40
10:10
Noon
12:15
12:40
2:30
5:00
6:00
6:30
7:20
7:50
8:40
905
10:00
10:50
11:20
11:30
12:00 a.m.
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00.
3:00



6:00 a.m.
8:00
8:30
9:00
11:00
Noon
12:20 p.m.
12:30
1:15
2:00
2:25
2:50
3:20
4:15
4:40
5:10
6:00
6:30
7:00
7:25
7:55
940
10:30
11:30
12:30 a.m.
1:00
1.30
2:00
3:00
4:00
5:00







Tropic Times 1
June 15, 1990 1



Madonna show too racy for Canadians


by United Press International

MADONNA AND MORALS:
Madonna's show was a little too racy
from some people in Toronto.
Warner Bros. Records said the police
morality squad and a government
attorney tried to reach. Madonna
before her third and final show
Tuesday with a legal orderto clean
up her act because of complaints
from people who had seen the first
two shows. Police at the show merely
watched, however, and determined
no charges were warranted.
"Nobody went there with the
intention of charging Madonna,"
said Detective Frank Trovato.
"However, we have a responsibility
to any citizen to make sure our laws
are upheld." Madonna later had
some high-flown words on the
matter: "I would rather have
cancelled the show than let anybody
dictate how I can or can't express
myself as an artist.
"This is certainly a cause for which
I am willing to be arrested." Warner
Bros. spokesman Bob Merlis said
Madonna has never been charged
with any form of lewdness. "On this


Field to produce
HOLLYWOOD (UPI) -
Academy Award winner Sally
Field, seeking to star in her own
productions, is developing two
movies at Columbia Pictures
where she has a development
contract.

Lorimar tops list

HOLLYWOOD (UPI) -
Lorimar Television emerged the
top provider of programming for
the coming season with a total of
11 series for the major TV
networks.
Lorimar's output represents the
fourth consecutive year it has led
other TV producers, this time
representing eight hours of,
programming on ABC, CBS,
NBC and Fox Broadcasting.


tour she's played Houston and
Dallas, both in the bible belt, and
there wasn't a problem," he said.
HOLLYWOOD,FLA.: Orlando,
Fla., will be the entertainment capital
of the world next Thursday. The
occasion is the opening of Universal
Studios Florida and the headliners
will include Michael Jackson,
Sylvester Stallone, Bill Cosby and
Michael J. Fox with Steven
Spielberg on hand to cut the ribbon
at the movie studio-amusement park.
Also confirmed for the gala are Bill
Murray, Jimmy Stewart, Charlton
Heston, Sissy Spacek, Linda Blair,
Ernest Borgnine, Beau Bridges, Dom
Deluise, Tippi Hedren, Janet Leigh,
Anthony Perkins, Jill St. John, Telly
Savalas, Jane Seymour, Philip
Michael Thomas, Ben Vereen,
Robert Wagner and "Star Trek"
creator Gene Roddenberry. The
theme park and movie studio has
been open to paying customers since
last week but large sections remained
roped off as construction crews
continued to work. The park features
more than a dozen attractions - all
based on movies or television shows.
T-BIRD LEAVING THE NEST:


Fabulous Thunderbirds guitarist
Jimmie Vaughan is tired of touring
and is leaving the band after playing
a blues festival at Fort Hood, Texas,
on June 16. Vaughan's hand-picked
successor will be Duke Robillard,
meaning the band will now have
three former members of Roomful of
Blues teaming with Kim Wilson, the
only remaining original Thunderbird.
Vaughan wants a break from the
Thunderbirds' fierce touring
schedule, which had them playing as
many as 340 dates a year, so he can
spend more time at home in Texas
and work on projects like the album
he is making with his brother, Stevie
Ray Vaughan.
GARN ON GORBACHEV: Sen.
Jake Garn, R-Utah, is immune to
Gorbymania. Garn says he may not
read Time again because the
magazine named Soviet President
Mikhail Gorbachev its man of the
decade for the '80s. "He's still a
dictator - despite whatever you want
to call him - of a bankrupt system
that is incredibly corrupt and
bureaucratic," Garn said this week in
an-appearance in St. George, Utah,
"and has not fulfilled any of the


promises that (Nikolai) Lenin talked
about. So give Mr. Gorbachev credit
for this? He had nothing to do with
it." Garn says Ronald Reagan would
have been a better choice for man of
the decade.
GLIMPSES: The New Kids on the
Block are on a roll. Parker Brothers
has purchased the rights to make a
Nintendo video game based on the
pop group. The game is still in the
early stages of development but will
be on the market in about a year.
Parker Brothers won't say how much
was paid for the licensing rights ...
Willie Nelson has rounded up the
usual suspects for another of his
Fourth of July "picnics." The show,
set for the shores of Town Lake in
Austin, Texas, will feature Nelson's
longtime associates Kris Kristofferson,
Waylon Jennings and Johnny Cash
along with Asleep at the Wheel and
Kinky Freidman. "He loves to
promote shows and get his friends
together and have a good concert and
do something for the community,"
said Lana Nelson, Willie's daughter.
"It's certainly not a profitable
venture for him. It never has been
and probably never will be."


A --
-I i7 - _---
NAME THAT TUNE - Tom Potter, left, and Larry Heidel of the Carl Fisher Sheet Music Store in Chicago stand
ready to help find the many strange requests the store gets. They often help customers by listening to them hum a
few bars. (AP Laserphoto)


Filming costs no concern to producers


LOS ANGELES (AP) - The huge production
costs and star salaries of the summer films have
aroused fears that the film industry is. headed
down the same road as America's savings and
loans.
Don't worry, advise the makers of the $50
million "Total Recall."
Says Arnold Schwarzenegger, whose salary was
reportedly $10 million: "As long as'you can bring
the money back, that's the key thing. In
Hollywood, if someone would pay me $100
million in salary and they would get back $400
million, they would do it with pleasure. Wouldn't
you? I would.
"The numbers don't matter. The only thing that
matters is: Can you return this money twice or
three times over? Sometimes studios make a
movie for $5 million, then they put $10 million in
for promotion and they lose it all, because it's a
bad picture. This is how studios eventually go
bankrupt."
Adds director Paul Verhoeven, "We made it
pretty cheap by going to Mexico City. Shooting in
Los Angeles, I'm sure that the movie would have
cost $70 million or something like that. We started
(the budget) at $43 million, and I think I went over
15 percent. So it's probably up to $50 million. I
always go over 15 percent, even in Europe, where I
made films for half a million.
"I always seem to go over a bit more than the


"In Hollywood, if someone would
pay me $100 million in salary and
they would get back $400 million,
they would do it with pleasure.
Wouldn't you? I would."

producers want to give. But it's all on the screen.
It's not something that fell in the water or
disappeared into somebody's pocket. It's all there.
"I don't think you feel the (fiscal) responsibility
as a director. You know that you can't make it for
$5 million or even $40 million. The decision is
economic. The producers must decide: Can we do
this movie with all the special effects and by
adding Arnold Schwarzenegger make our money
back? If that possibility exists, they go for it.
"A company like Carolco makes a lot of pre-
sales. With a name like Arnold's and my name,
which is pretty well known in Europe, they can
say, 'Look what we have: the director of
'Robocop' and Arnold Schwarzenegger, can we
please sell this movie to you?' So they get a lot of
money already from the pre-sales. Then they can
say, 'We can do it."
"Total Recall" has been in the works for 10
years, originating in a short story by Phillip K.
Dick, "We Can Remember It for You Wholesale."


Dino De Laurentiis developed the script, which
intrigued Schwarzenegger in the mid-1980s.
"It was the best script I had read in years," he
recalls. "When I picked up the script the first time,
I couldn't put it down. I read it all the way
through, then I read it again. The whole business
of memory being erased and another memory
implanted was fascinating."
Set in the year 2084, "Total Recall" depicts
Schwarzenegger as an Earth laborer who enrolls
for a memory-implant vacation and soon finds
himself enmeshed -in a civil war on Mars. De
Laurentiis was unable to find a director for the
film and sold the project to the enterprising
Carolco, maker of the "Rambo" films.
Schwarzenegger agreed to the choice of
Verhoeven as director: "He has the right mentality
for it, the discipline, the know-how."
The Martian world was created on the stages of
Churubusco studios in Mexico City with the
designs of William Sandell. Included is the tawdry
red-light district of Venusville with its glaring
neon and an occasional touch of whimsy, such as a
Jack-in-the-Box sign. Mexico City itself provided
the locations for Earth 100 years from now.
"There will be new things in the 2080s, but there
will be things that you can compare with today.
Especially when you come from Europe, where in
every city you can see buildings that are four-,
five-, 600-years old. So there is always a
combination of the old and new.


IL .N. ....
� \ ....t









1 Tropic Times
1 June 15, 1990


'Sports


'The Same But Better'captures 2-on-2


by Cpl. Bob Blocher

FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO)
-- Heads-up play and a slick floor helped
The Same But Better shut down PTJ's
big man, Guillermo Cousins, and pull
off a 21-20 win during the Community
Recreation Division Soldier Apprecia-
tion Week 2-on-2 Volleyball Tourna-
ment Tuesday at Reeder Physical Fit-
ness Center, here.
PTJ and The Same each defeated
two teams in 21-point, single-game


matches to reach the tournament's final
round.
PTJ built an early 19-11 lead in the
championship game on Cousins' skying
spikes and ruthless blocks.
Trailing 20-17, The Same's Edgardo
Terrero dug several volleys out of the
net to avoid defeat, then served up four
straight points to clinch the tourna-
ment. Sweltering heat and furious
action made players sweat, causing a
slick floor. This left the 6-foot-3-inch
Cousins sitting on his tail.


Earlier, PTJ cut an easy path through
the single-elimination bracket, trounc-
ing SOS and Kefe by 21-14 scores.
The Same faced stiff opposition early
on from the Spies. Mike Ortwein led
the Spies attack, pounding sinking serves
just over the net, and just inside the
back line. Dan Frey reinforced
Ortwein's serves with bazooka-like
spikes, but smart play allowed The
Same to pick apart the Spies defense.
Amidst cries of dinkingg," The


Same lobbed shots to the Spies' back
comers and managed a 21-18 victory.
According to tournament directorRick
Velasco, The Same's two-handed taps
were not dinkss," which are illegal in
2-on-2 volleyball.
The Same then faced 29th MI's
powerhouse, Chad Jackson. However,
Jackson's erratic spikes ended up feed-
ing the net or slamming the far wall.
The Same let the wild shots fly by for
an easy 21-11 victory, which set up
their meeting with PTJ.


Macho survives scare,


downs upstart Recovery


by Spec. John Sell

CURUNDU (USARSO PAO) --
Macho D' Monte struggled but man-
aged to hang onto first place in Com-
munity Recreation Division's Over-30
Volleyball League with an 11-15, 16-
14, 15-11 three-set victory over Re-
covery Tuesday at Curundu Junior High
School Gymnasium.
In other league action Tuesday, the
Navy and DCA remained tied for sec-
ond place with wins. DCA received a
forfeit from the Panama Islanders,
who dropped to. fourth place in the
standings. The Navy helped the Spik-
ing Vikings extend their losing streak
to six games by defeating them 15-11,
16-14.
Navy plays DCA at 6 p.m. Tuesday
in a key matchup to decide second
place. In other Tuesday games, the
Islanders face Recovery and the Spik-
ing Vikings look for their first win
when they play league-leading Ma-
cho.


Over-30 Volleyball


Teams
Macho D' Monte
Navy
DCA
Panama Islanders
Recovery
Spiking Vikings


W L
5 1
4 2
4 2


Tuesday
Macho def. Rec. 11-15, 16-14, 15-11
DCA def. Islanders forfeit
Navy def. Vikings 15-11, 16-14

Women's Volleyball


Teams
440
Las Cumbres
Calidonia
Zonies
Meddac
Las Jugadoras
Pumas


Pistons win title


PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) Tho-
mas was the unanimous MVP.
The Pistons also became the first
team ever to win five consecutive
road games in the NBA Finals. In
addition to winning the three at
Portland, they, completed a four-
game sweep against the Los Ange-
les Lakers last season by capturing
the final two games at the Forum.
Detroit is now 30-7 in its playoff
runs to consecutive championships.
Five of the losses were to Chicago
in the 1989 and 1990 Eastern Con-
ference finals. They lost once each
to New York and Portland this
year.
The only franchises besides De-
troit to win consecutive titles are
the Boston Celtics and Minneapo-
lis-Los Angeles Lakers. Minnea-
polis did it in 1949-50 and 1953-
�54, the Celtics from 1959-1966
and 1968-69 for Los Angeles.
The Pistons, the third franchise


to repeat as champions, trailed 90-
83 with 2:07 left, then scored the
last nine points to clinch the cham-
pionship in five games.
Johnson, who scored 15 of his 16
points in the final quarter, had seven
of those nine. Isiah Thomas scored
the other two, a jumper with 36 sec-
onds left that tied the score at 90-90
and finished with 29 points.
The Pistons, who lost 20 straight
games in Portland since 1974, won
three straight on the Trail Blazers'
court.
The Trail Blazers took the lead by
scoring the first five points of the
second quarter. But the Pistons went
bn an 11-2 run, led by Thomas' five
points, and went ahead 37-29 with
7:34 left in the half.
Then Kevin Duckworth, who led
Portland with 14 points in the first
half, sparked a 12-4 surge with eight
points as the Blazers tied the game
41-41 on a layup by Clyde Drexler
with 1:36 to go in the half.


Sport shorts


Espinar bowling
The Fort Espinar Bowling Center
will hold a no-tap bowling
tournament 3-10 p.m. Saturday.

Curundu bowling
The Curundu Bowling Center will
holds its monthly no-tap tournament
Saturday. Prices include a dinner for
two. For information call 286-3914.


and 24. The trip includes lodging,
boat, guide, bait and fish cleaning.
Signups are. under way at Building
154, Fort Clayton. The last day of
registration is Wednesday. For
information call 287-3363.

Pro shop sale
Twin Oceans Pro Shop today will
have a sale 11 a.m.-6 p.m. at Building
155, Fort Clayton.


Bass fishing trip Father/son fishing
The CRD Outdoor Recreation The Aquativity Center will hold a
Branch will sponsor an overnight father and son fishing tournament
bass fishing trip at Arenosa June 23 Sunday.


Panamanian baseball opens


by Cynthia Robles
U.S. Military Support Group

CHEPO, Panama (PAO) -
The 1990 Panamanian baseball
season officially began here June
3. Local dignitaries, baseball
officials, players and U.S.
Southern Command officials
attended the opening ceremony.
The games followed a parade
from Chepo's municipal building
to the stadium, led by Mayor
Rafael Mendieta, Legislator


Roberto Garibaldo and the local
fire department band.
Jose Calazan Perez, president
of Metropolitan Baseball of
Panama, expressed appreciation
for U.S. repairs to the stadium
roof. The roof was damaged in
December 1989 when a U.S.
helicopter landed in a nearby
field.
U.S. troops also painted
Chepo's central park and youth
recreation hall.


Swim program
The Fort Clayton swimming pool
will have a summer swim program
July 12 through 19. Registration will
begin Monday. The class will meet
Monday through Thursday
mornings. Seven levels of instruction
are available, from preschool to basic
water safety. For information call
287-6660.

Sherman dive trip
The Fort Sherman Rental Center
will sponsor a dive trip to Orange
Island June 24 and 25. Space is
limited to 10 people. Fee will include
equipment, boat operator and diving
guide. For more information call
Donald Ponce at 289-6104.

Open soccer tourney
The CRD Sports Branch is
accepting registration for an open
soccer tournament to be held June 30
to July 4 at Mother's Field, Fort
Clayton. Signups are under way at
Building 154, Fort Clayton. For
information call Eva Foster at 287-
4050.

Reeder tourneys
Reeder Fitness Center, Fort
Clayton, will host open volleyball,
racquetball and men's basketball
tournament Sunday to June 23.
Registration for open and coed


volleyball, and open and over-30
basketball events is underway at
Reeder Fitness Center. Space is
limited. Signups conclude Monday.
For information call Valencio
Thomas at 287-3861.

Youth bicycle race
Registration is under way at the
Fort Clayton Youth Center for a
bicycle race to be held June 30.
Children 5-14 may sign up, call 287-
6451.

Soccer camp
Registration for the upcoming
Youth Soccer Camp is under way'at
the Sports Office, Building 155, Fort
Clayton. The non-resident one-
week camp begins June 25. For
additional details call Dave Fultz at
287-3252.

Sport camps

Family Support Division, Youth
Services, presents summer sports
camps. The schedule follows:
Session 1, baseball/softball,
Mon.-Fri. (limited to 100).
Session 2, June 25-29, soccer,
(limited to 100).
Session 3, basketball, July 9-13,
(limited to 100).
Session 4, golf, July 16-20, (limited
to 50).


I








Tropic Times
June 15, 1990


Mets smash Cubs 15-10, collect 20 hits


CHICAGO (AP) Kevin Elster's bloop RBI single
broke a ninth-inning tie and Howard Johnson added a
grand slam as the New York Mets continued their
offensive onslaught by beating the Chicago Cubs 15- i "
10 Wednesday in the first game of a doubleheader. *...B.....
The Mets, who had 19 runs and 21 hits in Tuesday's "
victory, added 20 more hits against four Cub pitchers,
enabling them to overcome five Chicago homers on
another windy day at Wrigley Field.
Daryl Boston led off the ninth with a double to left
off Les Lancaster (5-3). Mackey Sasser reached on a
.fielder's choice when Boston beat second baseman
Ryne Sandberg's throw to third. A walk to Gregg
Jefferies loaded the bases.
Elster then blooped his tie-breaking hit to short
right field. After Orlando Mercado hit into a forceout
at home plate, Johnson hit the first pitch into the right- 4
field seats for his fifth career grand slam.

White Sox sink Mariners 11-2
Dan Pasqua and Ron Kittle hit back-to-back home
runs in the third inning and Jack McDowell pitched a
four-hitter Wednesday as the Chicago White Sox
routed the Seattle Mariners 11-2.

Athletics beat Rangers in 11th
Walt Weiss' single scored Doug Jennings with anK
unearned run with two outs in the 11th inning Wednes-
day as the Oakland Athletics defeated the Texas ,
Rangers 3-2 to avoid a series sweep.

Reds trounce Braves 13-4b2
The Cincinnati Reds broke a five-game losing streak
Wednesday night, pounding Steve Avery in his ma-
jor-league debut and routing the Atlanta Braves 13-4.


Red Sox stifle Yankees 4-1
Roger Clemens scattered six hits in eight innings to
win his seventh straight decision and become base-
ball's first 11-game winner as the Boston Red Sox
beat the New York Yankees 4-1 Wednesday night.

Tigers slip by Indians 5-4
Lloyd Moseby's tie-breaking single in the eighth
inning gave the Detroit Tigers a 5-4 victory over
Cleveland on Wednesday night, ending the Indians'
three-game winning streak.

Astros defeat Dodgers 5-1
Glenn Davis hit a three-run homer, his 19th of the
season, and Mike Scott held Los Angeles to three hits
over seven innings, leading Houston to a 5-1 victory
Wednesday night that extended the Astros' longest
winning streak of the season to six.


New York Mets' second baseman Gregg Jefferies attempts a double play forcing out Chicago Cubs'
Shawon Dunston. (AP Laserphoto)


Expos beat Phillies 4-3 in 10
Spike Owen hit a sacrifice fly in the 10th inning
Wednesday night and the Montreal Expos seesawed
past Philadelphia 4-3, the Phillies' sixth loss in seven
games.

Brewers down Orioles 7-2
Dave Parker homered and drove in three runs
Wednesday night as the Milwaukee Brewers beat the
Baltimore Orioles 7-2 for only their sixth victory in 21
games.

Blue Jays roll over Twins 10-1
Junior Felix, Glenallen Hill and Fred McGriff homered
and left-hander John Cerutti held Minnesota's all-
righty lineup to one run in seven innings-plus Wednes-


day night as the Toronto Blue Jays won 10-1 and
handed the Twins their sixth straight loss.

Giants blank Padres 6-0
Trevor Wilson, bidding for baseball's fourth no-
hitter of the season and second in three days, lost it on
Mike Pagliarulo's leadoff single in the ninth inning
Wednesday night as the San Francisco Giants beat the
San Diego Padres 6-0:

Royals crush Angels 11-4
The Kansas City Royals snapped an eight game
losing streak with season highs in runs and hits, four
by Kurt Stillwell and beat the California Angels 11-
4 Wednesday night.


Argentina blanks Soviets; Uruguay, Spain tie


NAPLES, Italy (AP) New-look
Argentina overcame the early loss of
injured goalkeeper Nery Pumpido to
beat the Soviet Union 2-0 Wednesday,
keeping alive its chances of defending
the World Cup.
After a shocking loss in its opener to
Cameroon, Argentina desperately
needed to beat the Soviets. Led by star
Diego Maradona playing before the
fans who idolize him for his role in
carrying Napoli to the Italian League
championship the Argentines did so
convincingly and severely damaged
the Soviets' chances of advancing.
Coach Carlos Bilardo made five. lineup


changes, and they paid off.
Pedro Troglio, one of the new start-
ers, scored the first goal in the 27th
minute, heading home a clever pass
from Julio Olarticoechea, another new
starter.
Jorge Burruchaga made it 2-0 when
he pounced on a defensive error in the
80th minute.
The Soviet Union played the final 42
minutes with 10 men after Vladimir
Bessonov was ejected for first pulling,
then pushing, Argentine striker Clau-
dio Caniggia.
Pumpido, who backstopped Argen-
tina to the 1986 title, was carried off on


a stretcher with a double fracture of his
right leg early in the first half. Sergio
Goygochea replaced him and did well.
The injury occurred on a crossing
pass by Soviet attacker Igor Dobro-
volsky in the ninth minute. As Pumpido
came out to challenge, Oleg Protasov
collided with him and the ball went
past. Pumpido stayed down.


Uruguay, Spain, Tie 0-0
UDINE, Italy (AP) Uruguay missed
a second-half penalty kick and was
held to a 0-0 draw by Spain in a World
Cup Group E match on Wednesday.


Uruguay, which created most of the
scoring opportunities, had its chance
to win the game in the 71st minute, but
Ruben Sosa blasted his penalty kick
over the bar. The penalty was awarded
after Francisco Villaroya handled the
ball on the goal line.
Spanish goalkeeper Andoni Zubi-
zarreta was in commanding form and
made a number of crucial saves.
It was the first scoreless tie in the 12
World Cup games this year.
Uruguay and Spain are paired with
Belgium and South Korea. Belgium
defeated South Korea 2-0 on Tuesday
and leads the group.


Tyson says he's still the best heavyweight


LAS VEGAS (AP) Mike Tyson
knows who the best heavyweight in
the world is.
"Basically, I still am," Tyson said.
"My record speaks for itself." I had
one bad night, but I had 37 good ones."
That one bad night, actually it was a
Sunday afternoon in Tokyo, cost him
the heavyweight championship on a
10th-round knockout to James
"Buster" Douglas in arguably the


biggest upset in boxing history.
Saturday night at Caesars Palace,
Tyson returns to the ring for the first
time since the knockout in a scheduled
10-rounder against 'Henry Tillman,
who denied him a berth on the 1984
Olympic team.
In another scheduled 10-rounder,
George Foreman, a 41-year-old for-
mer champion, tries to run his record
to 22-0 since beginning a comeback in


1987 after a 10-year layoff. His oppo-
nent will be Brazil's Adilson Rodrigues.
Tyson, denied a berth on the 1984
Olympic team by Tillman, was a 25-1
favorite, but Foreman said Wednesday
he thought Tyson is making a mistake.
"If I were managing Tyson, I'd let
him take off two years 18 months,
minimum, let him get hungry again,"
Foreman said.
When Foreman lost the title on an


eighth-round knockout to Muhammad
Ali in 1974, he boxed only exhibi-
tions the following year. He won four
fights in 1976 and one in 1977 before
losing to Jimmy Young in March of
that year and announcing his retire-
ment. "I can't wait to get back in front
of a crowd again," Tyson said.
What led to Tyson's defeat as been
a topic of discussion and argument
among boxing fans since it happened.


19









0 Tropic Times
20 June 15, 1990


Off the wire
by The Associated Press

FANS BOO, CHEER RIPKEN: Cal Ripken
continued two streaks Tuesday. He was given a
standing ovation for one and booed for the other.
Ripken moved past Everett Scott and into sec-
ond place behind Lou Gehrig ornbaseball's "Iron
Man" list when he played in his 1,308th con-
secutive game.
The fans stood and cheered for the 29-year-old
shortstop in the bottom of the first inning, and he
emerged from the dugout to acknowledge the
ovation.
But later, after Ripken had gone 0-for-4 and left
four men stranded, many in the crowd of 27,599
booed him. Although he has shined defensively,
Ripken is batting just. 144 at home and only .213
overall.
Ripken wasn't around his locker after the game,
but before the contest he addressed his slump.
"The easiest thing to say when you're not
going well is that you have to find a reason, and
usually that reason is the streak," he said. "I try
to dismiss that because I don't think that's the
reason for anything especially 50 games into the
season."
Ripken, who started the streak on May 30,
1982, needs 823 more games to break Gehrig's
record of 2,130. That means Ripken would need
to play every day until mid-1995 to set the mark.


PENGUINS NAME NEW COACH: ThePitts-
burgh Penguins Tuesday named Bob Johnson
head coach and Scott Bowman director of player
development and recruitment.
Penguins General Counsel J. Paul Martha said
he hoped the hirings would help turn around the
team's "mediocre performance over the last
decade."
General Manager Craig Patrick said he had
been considering Johnson for the post since Pat-
rick took the reins in December, when Edward
DeBartolo Jr., son of the Penguins' owner, fired
his hand-picked general manager, Tony Espos-
ito, and his coach, Gene Ubriaco.
"He's a great teacher, a great communicator,
a great motivator," Patrick'said at a news confer-
ence. "He has great knowledge of every aspect
of the game."
Johnson, 59, executive director of USA Hockey,
coached the University of Wisconsin for 15 years
and the Calgary Flames for five before joining
USA Hockey in 1987.

OWNERS APPROVE PADRES SALE: Base-
ball owners unanimously approved the sale of the
San Diego Padres to a group headed by Los
Angeles television producer Tom Werner on Wed-
nesday.
Werner is general managing partner of the group,
which was expanded from 10 members to 15
members on Monday. They are buying the Padres
for $75 million from Joan B. Kroc, who purchased
the franchise with her late husband, Ray, in 1974.
Ray Kroc died in January 1984.
The Padres joined the National League as an ex-
pansion team in 1969 with the Montreal Expos.
The National and American leagues approved
the sale in separate meetings Wednesday after-
noon on the first of two days of meetings. The
main topic at the meetings is the expansion of the
NL into two more cities, targeted for 1993 or
1994.
A three-quarters favorable vote by NL owners
and a simple majority among AL owners was
required for approval of the Padres sale. There
were no dissenting votes in either league.
Werner's group signed a letter of intent to pur-
chase the team April 2.
The city of San Diego, which leases San Diego
Jack Murphy Stadium to the Padres, previously
approved the sale.
Werner, 40, is co-producer of "The Cosby
Show" and other highly rated television series.
He has said the new owners plan no immediate
changes when they assume control. Manager Jack
McKeon and team president Dick Freeman will
bothseport directly to Werner.
The group will take over operation of the team
today.


NL to add 2 teams in '93


CLEVELAND (AP)- The National League will
add two teams in 1993 and their rosters will be built
from an expansion draft to be conducted in November
1992, NL president Bill White said Thursday
The two expansion cities, however, won't be named
until late summer of next year, White said at the end
of two days of meetings by owners from both major
leagues.
The NL may have to realign its two divisions if two
cities from the same region of the country are chosen,
said Pittsburgh Pirates chairman Douglas Danforth,
who chairs the league's four-man expansion commit-
tee.
"We're not going to worry about the relative
geographic locations at this point," Danforth said.
"We're not limited in that way."
Suggestions that St. Petersburg-Tampa and Denver
have a lock on the two franchises were premature, he
said.
"Everybody is starting from the gate at the same
time," Danforth said. "No one has a leg up at this
time."
He also said the expansion committee will spend
the next month gathering information about inter-
ested cities and groups. Questionnaires will be sent to
those groups, and once the responses are evaluated,
the most serious candidates will give presentations to
the committee later this summer.
Applicants will be charged a fee, probably about
$100,000, that will be refundable if they do not win a
franchise, Danforth said.
Expansion committee members will visit the cities
of the finalists during the first three months of next


year and will give their final recommendations next
June. The final choice is due by Sept. 30, 1991, but the
date could be moved up if the process moves along
more quickly, Danforth said.
Groups in more than a dozen metropolitan areas
have expressed interest in getting one of the NL
franchises. Those considered highest on the league's
list are Tampa-St. Petersburg, Denver and Buffalo.
The final decision may hinge on the financial stabil-
ity of the prospective owners, Danforth said.
"We're interested in the quality of the people, the
financial strength of the people, what kind of support
they have from the public sector, be it the governor or
the mayor," he said. "We're looking for stability.
"We'll also look at the demographics of the area:
-Will it support a major league team? What kind of
cable TV operation do they have? It wouldn't make
sense to put a major league franchise in Peoria."
The AL's Seattle Mariners and Toronto Blue Jays
were baseball's last expansion teams, in 1977. The
Mariners paid $6.25 million and the Blue Jays $7
million as their entry fees.
The NL entries are likely to pay between $50
million and $75 million. When asked if they could go
as high as $100 million Danforth said, "Anything's
possible."
The entry fee will be announced when the question-
naires go out, he said.
The NL last expanded in 1969, when Montreal and
San Diego were added.
Denver has 1.8 million people and St. Petersburg-
Tampa has 2 million; neither is near another big-
league team.


All-Star voting by position


NEW YORK (AP)--Voting through Sunday for the
National and American League teams for the July 10
All-Star game.


National
Catcher
1, Benito Santiago, San Diego, 455,694. 2, Mike
Scioscia, Los Angeles, 144,691. 3, Terry Kennedy,
San Francisco, 142,088. 4, Todd Zeile, St. Louis,
128,520. 5, Craig Biggio, Houston, 104,058. 6, Joe
Girardi, Chicago, 77,849. 7, Mike LaValliere, Pitts-
burgh, 68,692. 8, Ernie Whitt, Atlanta, 65,368.
First Base
1, Will Clark, San Francisco, 566,497. 2, Mark
Grace, Chicago, 176,085. 3, Pedro Guerrero, St. Louis,
111,597.4, Jack Clark, San Diego, 97,667. 5, Glenn
Davis, Houston, 83,159. 6, Andres Galarraga, Mon-
treal, 76,858.7, Eddie Murray, Los Angeles, 75,455.
8, Todd Benzinger, Cincinnati, 57,265.
Second Base
1, Ryne Sandberg, Chicago, 496,126. 2, Roberto
Alomar, San Diego, 135,786. 3, Robby Thompson,
San Francisco, 119,890.4, Mariano Duncan, Cincin-
nati, 86,993. 5, Delino DeShields, Montreal, 85,428.
6, Gregg Jefferies, New York, 80,644. 7, Tom Herr,
Philadelphia, 70,618. 8, Jose Oquendo, St. Louis,
64,041.
Third Base
1, Chris Sabo, Cincinnati, 299,799. 2, Howard
Johnson, New York, 221,483. 3, Matt Williams, San
Francisco, 214,855.4, Tim Wallach, Montreal, 129,802.
5, Terry Pendleton, St. Louis, 100,293.6, Luis Salazar,
Chicago, 95,325.7, Bip Roberts, San Diego, 64,259.
8, Ken Caminiti, Houston, 61,342.
Shortstop
1, Ozzie Smith, St. Louis, 323,826.2, Barry Larkin,
Cincinnati, 277,883. 3, Shawon Dunston, Chicago,
186,854. 4, Jose Uribe, San Francisco, 139,637. 5,
Garry Templeton, San Diego, 81,149. 6, Alfredo
Griffin, Los Angeles, 77,395.7, Jay Bell, Pittsburgh,
58,284. 8, Spike Owen, Montreal, 57,984.
. Outfield
1, Kevin Mitchell, San Francisco, 362,279.2, Andre
Dawson, Chicago, 330,789. 3, Tony Gwynn, San
Diego, 304,478. 4, Darryl Strawberry, New York,
256,145. 5, Bobby Bonilla, Pittsburgh, 250,061. 6,
Len Dykstra, Philadelphia, 207,901. 7, Andy Van
Slyke, Pittsburgh, 189,516. 8, Eric Davis, Cincinnati,
142,023.
9, Barry Bonds, Pittsburgh, 136,567.10, BrettButler,
San Francisco, 133,926. 11, Joe Carter, San Diego,
126,821. 12, Jerome Walton, Chicago, 123,413. 13,
Willie McGee, St. Louis, 119,928. 14, Tim Raines,


Montreal, 113,949.' 15, Vince Coleman, St. Louis,
104,047. 16, Kevin Bass, San Francisco, 96,815.

American

Catcher
1, Terry Steinbach, Oakland, 250,272. 2, Sandy
Alomar, Cleveland, 195,404. 3, Tony Pena, Boston,
150,788. 4, Carlton Fisk, Chicago, 140,703. 5, Pat
Borders, Toronto, 91,792. 6, Lance Parrish, Califor-
nia, 83,505. 7, Bob Boone, Kansas City, 59,216. 8,
Gino Petralli, Texas, 53,434.
First Base
1, Mark McGwire,'Oakland, 323,865. 2, Don Mat-
tingly, New York, 222,496. 3, Cecil Fielder, Detroit,
163,318.4, Fred McGriff, Toronto, 132,738. 5, George
Brett, KansasCity, 78,003.6, Rafael Palmeiro, Texas,
67,497. 7, Wally Joyner, California, 66,605. 8, Kent
Hrbek, Minnesota, 62,857.
Second Base
1, Steve Sax, New York, 274,212. 2, Julio Franco,
Texas, 190,007. 3, Mike Gallego, Oakland, 163,054.
4, Bill Ripken, Baltimore, 115,150. 5, Willie Ran-
dolph, Oakland, 92,742. 6, Nelson Liriano, Toronto,
91,912. 7, Lou Whitaker, Detroit, 82,138. 8, Harold
Reynolds, Seattle, 66,545.
Third Base
1, Wade Boggs, Boston, 290,851. 2, Carney Lans-
ford, Oakland, 259,278. 3, Kelly Gruber, Toronto,
239,685.4, Paul Molitor, Milwaukee, 84,416.5, Gary
Gaetti, Minnesota, 78,106.6, Steve Buechele, Texas,
58,111.7, Robin Ventura, Chicago, 42,194. 8, Kevin
Seitzer, Kansas City, 40,755.
Shortstop
1, Cal Ripken, Baltimore, 305,812.2, Walt Weiss,
Oakland, 235,678.'3, Tony Fernandez, Toronto,
193,064. 4, Alan Trammell, Detroit, 105,110. 5,
Ozzie Guillen, Chicago, 89,580. 6, Kurt Stillwell,
Kansas City, 67,920. 7, Greg Gagne, Minnesota,
47,334. 8, Jeff Kunkel, Texas, 41,672.
Outfield
1, Jose Canseco, Oakland, 534,812. 2, Rickey
Henderson, Oakland, 471,151. 3, Ken Griffey, Jr.,
Seattle, 427,514.4, Bo Jackson, Kansas City, 315,567.
5, Kirby Puckett, Minnesota, 257,231. 6, Dave Hen-
derson, Oakland, 160,246. 7, Ruben Sierra, Texas,
135,692. 8, George Bell, Toronto, 127,928.
9, Robin Yount, Milwaukee, 110,002. 10, Junior
Felix, Toronto, 89,479. 11, Mookie Wilson, Toronto,
75,415. 12, Candy Maldonado, Cleveland, 63,498.
13, Pete Incaviglia, Texas, 58,214. 14, Mike Greenwell,
Boston, 54,566. 15, Tom Brunansky, Boston, 53,050.
16, Dan Gladden, Minnesota, 49,667.








Tropic Times
June 15, 1990


21


Camp helps players with entrance exams


AMHERST, Mass. (AP)-A private,
experimental college best known for
its prowess in team Frisbee is sponsor-
ing a basketball camp aimed at tutor-
ing black high school players in col-
lege entrance exams so they can get
athletic scholarships at other schools.
"On the surface it seems a startling
juxtaposition," .Hampshire College
President Gregory Smith Prince Jr. said
Tuesday. "We are not involved in
intercollegiate athletics. And we don't
believe in Scholastic Aptitude Tests as
a crucial way to measure education
progress."
"But we also know the rest of the
world uses them," he said. "And the
way we teach can help students master
all different kinds of standardized tests."
Prince said the college's primary goal
was to give the young men more edu-


national choices and exposure to an
institution that has no intercollegiate
athletic program.
"But there are a whole group of
individuals involved with slightly dif-
ferent motives," he said.
Dennis Jackson the college's sports
director and also an assistant basket-
ball coach at Central Connecticut
University, said as a recruiter for Divi-
sion I schools he is trying to "combat
a national crisis."
Jackson maintained that too many
athletes, particularly blacks, are un-
able to meet the minimum NCAA stan-
dards of a C average in their high
school classes and a combined score of
700 on the SATs to qualify for an
athletic scholarship.
Prince said the college became in-
volved after asking officials of North-


em Educational Services, a private non-
profit social agency, how it could as-
sist the financially-pressed Springfield
city schools.
"They said this is what they want
and we had the personnel available to
do it," Prince said.
The city's high schools have been
perennial contenders for the state high
school basketball championships. And
its black community has been active in
pressing for educational reforms. In
1985 at the urging of the local chapter
of the NAACP, Springfield became
the first community in the state to
require students to maintain a C-aver-
age in order to participate in high school
sports.
The two-week free pilot program for
about 15 high school.juniors and sen-
iors is scheduled to start at the college


on July 1, Prince said.
"In the long run, we would seek a
larger, more diverse group," he said.
"But at the moment we want to try
this and see if it works."
Hampshire College, tuition $20,000,
was founded 20 years by four sur-
rounding colleges and universities. Its
students follow a program in which
traditional classes and grades are op-
tional. In order to graduate, students
complete a series of individual research
projects.
"Our youngsters need all the educa-
tion they can get," said Norma Baker,
executive director of NES. "With
financial aid being cut back athletic
scholarships are the only means for
many young black males to enter col-
lege."


Davis tentatively approves Oakland's plan


Fans from Oakland, Calif. cheer when Oakland city council and Alameda
county supervisors were meeting to decide if the Raiders would return to
Oakland. (AP Laserphoto)


OAKLAND, Calif. (AP)- A new
proposal to bring the Raiders back to
Oakland that limits the risk to public
funds and contains no financial guar-
antees has been tentatively approved
by the NFL club's managing partner,
Al Davis, it was reported Thursday.
The agreement must be approved by
the Oakland City Council, the Alameda
County Board of Supervisors and
Oakland Coliseum board members.
'The deal is basically the same but
the risk has been reversed," said City
Council member Wilson Riles Jr.
"There is no public participation on
the so-called upside of the deal, but the
public sector's hide is covered first."
Unlike previous proposals, the city
and county will not have to guarantee
any ticket revenue to the team, which
will market all tickets, the newspaper
said in Thursday's editions.
The revised 15-year contract is ex-
pected to recoup costs of renovating


the Coliseum, estimated at $60 mil-
lion, and a $31.9 million "operating
loan," or franchise fee.
The Raiders, who moved to Los
Angeles from Oakland in 1982, are
expected to pay approximately $500,000
a year in rent to the Coliseum starting
in 1992.
In another switch from previous
proposals, the city and county would
get the first crack at revenue from
premium seats to ensure the payoff of
public-sector debt, anticipated to reach
about $92 million.
Negotiators are expected to take the
proposal to the city council for the first
time next Tuesday.
In March, the city council and board
of supervisors approved a $602 mil-
lion, 15-year offer to the Raiders that
included a $54 million franchise fee,
public guarantees of ticket revenues
and about $53 million in Coliseum
renovations.


-- Major League Baseball notes


by The Associated Press

STATS
Toronto leads the majors with 81 home runs, but has
only 28 on the road.... St. Louis is last in the National
League with 27 home runs, but has outhomered
opponents 19-16 at home.

STREAKS
The New York Mets scored at least three runs in
their first 14 games in June. They have raised their
batting average 20 points to .257 in the last week.

SWINGS
Willie McGee, St. Louis' three-time Gold Glove
center fielder, made three errors Wednesday night.
He has five errors this. season after making three last
year.

SLUGGERS
Glenn Davis is tied for second place on Houston's
all-time homer list with 163.

SLUMPS
Philadelphia's Lenny Dykstra went 0-for-4 Wednes-
day, his third straight hitless game after his 23-game
hitting streak ended. His 0-for-12 slump is his longest
of the season and his National League-leading aver-
age has dropped from .407 to .384.

STARTERS
Atlanta's Steve Avery, one of the most highly
regarded pitching prospects in the minors, got pounded
in his major-league debut Wednesday. The 20-year-
old gave up eight runs on eight hits and three walks in
2 1-3 innings.


STOPPERS
Frank DiPino's stretch of 14 straight victories ended
Wednesday night in St. Louis' 6-5 loss to Pittsburgh.

STARTING
Vince Coleman led off the game for St. Louis with
* a home run Wednesday, the first Cardinals player to
do it since Curt Ford on June 20, 1986.

STEALS
Otis Nixon has 21 stolen bases, but just 47 at-bats
for Montreal. Most of those steals have Come as a
pinch runner.

STAR
Trevor Wilson, Giants, pitched a one-hitter as San
Francisco beat San Diego 6-0. He struck out nine,
walked none and only allowed Mike Pagliarulo's
leadoff single in the ninth inning.

SIDELINED
Jose Canseco was put on the 15-day disabled list
Wednesday because of a disc problem. Oakland made
the move retroactive to June 8.
Cubs reliever Mitch Williams will be out for six to
eight weeks after undergoing surgery Wednesday for
a torn ligament in his knee.

SPEAKING
"No one on the bench was saying anything about
my pitching but the fans were. They said, 'Hey, Trev,
you've got a no-hitter going. Don't think about it" '
San Francisco's Trevor Wilson, who lost a no-hitter
on Mike Pagliarulo's leadoff single in the ninth in-
ning.


Oakland Athletics' Jose Canseco holds his
shoulder after taking a swing. Canseco has
been placed on the 15-day disabled list. (AP
Laserphoto)











2 Tropic Times
22 June 15, 1990


BEETLE BAILEY


By Mort Walker


I casifedads 7S


Stud services available, German Shepherd dogs, best in the
country. 252-6910

4 adorable kittens, males and females, 8 wks old, black with
wh boots. Free. 282-3398

Free 4 mths old Calico kittens. 284-3037

Puppies 6 wks old, white long hair, 2 females, I male. $20/ea
252-1194

2 yellow head parrots, fabulous birds, pair registered, 9 yrs.
old. $200. 262-1262

Free to good home, lovable 5 mth old kitten, male grey and
white, litter trained. 252-2807 from 9-5 only

Mid-size poodles puppies, tail cut, dewormed, 2 males, 2
females, 1 1/2 mth. $130/obo. 220-2421

German short hair puppies, born May 7, CCP registered, exc.
price, ready to go, gd with kids. 252-5430

AKC miniature Dachsund puppies, just wiened, gd. house
pet, gd. with kids. $150/and up. 284-3896

German Shepard puppies, 4 1/2 wks, blk/silver, 5 males, 2
females. $200. 261-3325

Toy poodle puppies, I male, I female(white). $200.261-3325

Afgan hounds, male and female, great guards, but gentle with
kids. 284-4278

Beautiful black labrador puppies, born 5-16-90, two left,
CCP registered. 252-6272

Pit-bull puppies, 11 wks, have shots, great watchdogs and
house dogs. $250. 252-1277,




2 glass pack mufflers I 7/8"-2 pipe $56 new. $15. 252-6831

1978 Chevy Chevette. $1,500. 284-4074 after 7 p.m.

1988 Nissan Sunny, 4 dr., 5 spd, a/c, am/fm, dty not paid.
$4,200. 252-2670

1984 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera, ps/pb, a/c, 4 cyl. $5,000.
286-4972

Must sell 1982 Chrysler La Baron, 4 cyl, auto, ps, pb, exc.
cond., 2 dr. dty not paid. $4,000/obo. 236-0691

1987 Ford Taurus LX 3.0 cu. in. eng. V-6. Fully loaded.
$11,000. 252-1182

1978 Dodge Aspen SW, 6 cyl., AT, ps, pb, not pretty but
reliable. $700/obo. 242-3841

1985 Volvo GLS, 360, 5 spd., a/c, am/fm radio cass., exc.
cond. $7,500/obo. 252-5430

1978 Toyota Corolla Japanese Style. 286-3498


1975 Lincoln Continental towncar I owner, exc. cond. all
extras. $3,000. 252-1252/4215

1973 Jaguar, beautiful, good cond., new paint, new seats, ps,
pb, tinted windows. $3,500/obo. 287-5599

1979 Audi Fox, fuel injection, dty paid, manual transmission:
$1,800. 260-4296

1980 Honda Accord, a/c, U.S. specs. $3,000. 252-1143

1985 Honda DX Hatchback, a/c, am/fm cass., exc. cond.
Duty not paid. $4,000/obo. 252-1181

1988 Nissan Sunny, 4 dr., 5 spd., a/c, am/fm radio, 29,000
kms, exc. cond. $4,800. 282-4585

1982 Chev. Chevette, a/c. auto, new tires. $.1,800. 284-3230

1987 Cadillac Sedan de Ville, beautiful car, saphire blue.
$18,000. 284-3230

1985 Toyota 4 dr., 4WD p/u; fact a/c, diesel, roof rack, 8000
winch, bed tool box $9,500. 252-2622.

1986 Toyota Corolla S.R. 1.6, good cond., a/c, radio cass.,
am/fm, sunroof elect., ring deluxe, dty paid. $5,000 neg.
285-5460

1983 Olds Ciera, V-6, ps/pb, a/c, am/fm cass., 2 dr., exc.
cond. $4,700. 283-6140 call after 6 p.m.

1982 Mazda 323, great cond., a/c dly paid. $3,200. 287-3493

1977 Bronco Ranger 302 cu. in., 3 spd., FWD, runs great.
$3,000. 287-3493

1981 Mazda 626, 2 dr.-coupe std, dty paid, non-U.S. specs.
original owner, runs good. $2,200. 226-2605

1979 Jeep J 10 pick-up 360 engine, 4 wheel drive, auto. $2,800.
$284-6129

One tire Firestone S/S, P235/70R-15, very good cond. $30.
252-6831

1987 Honda Civic DX, Hatchback, am/fm, exc. cond. dty
not paid. $3,900. 289-4535

1987 Nissan Sunny Coupe, a/c, tinted windows, 5 spd, exc.
cond., $5,000. 286-4936

1988 Susuzi Forsa GTI, Twin Cam, 16V, a/c, Kenwood
stereo, AMP equalizer, alarm, rims, tinted windows. $7,250.
286-3674

1987 Nissan S/w, auto, a/c, pb, am/fm cass., exc. cond. dty
not paid. $5,300. 236-0691

1979 Plymouth Horizon, Hatchback, auto, good cond.
$1,700. 286-4680

1989 VW Golf $2,500 down take over payments 24 months to
go. Only 9500 miles. 226-7209

1981 Audi diesel, a/c, exc. cond. $3.500. 287-1730


1983 Renault Fuego, 5 spd. not duty paid, low miles, a/c, very
good cond. $3,500. 269-5700

1985 Honda Civic H-Back' DX, a/c, new stereo, low miles,
pb, ps. Avail. 6 Jul. $3,500. 286-3424

1979 Thunderbird, auto, a/c, ps, pb, am/fm cass. dty paid,
exc. cond. $2,200 neg. 286-4384

1985 Mazda 323 GT, 5 spd., am/fm cass., sunroof, deluxe
interiors, sport rims and new tires. $5,800/obo. 261-7376

Toyota pick-up vehicle may be seen at the Howard auto
hobby shop Thursday thru Monday. Sealed bid. 284-4189

1978 CJ-7 Jeep with hard top. $2,500/obo. 286-3471

1983 Mitsubishi Galiant Super Saloon, w/sunroof, a/c, 4 dr.,
5 spd., tape deck, runs good, duty paid. 284-5479

1981 Honda Prelude, auto, sunroof elect., a/c, new seats, new
battery, good cond. $3,000 neg. 267-3951

1970 VW Van Camper, exc. cond., 3 beds, closet, refrig.
dishwasher, cabinets, table & bar. Negotiable. 232-5627

1977 Chevy, 9 pass van. runs good $850. 264-3990.

1973 Jeep Commando V8. 4x4. duty paid. great condition
$3000. 282-3783.

1985 Mazda 323 GT, ac. 1500cc. 5spd. sunroof. am-fm cass.
sports rims $5800, obo. 261-7376.



1984 Ford Ltd 6 cyl. auto; station wagon, $2,750/obo.
260-4184

1986 Honda Prelude, auto, sunroof, a/c, exc. condition.
$6,500. 234-1545

1978 Datsun 280Z, 5 speed, a/c, good condition. $2,500.
286-3543

1985 4x4 Jeep Cherokee. 2dr, ac. am/fm cassette, luggage
rack & more. $8,350 firm. 282-4234

1983 Honda Accord 4 dr., AT, a/c. PS, am/fm stereo, all
electric, 80,000 kms, good cond., dty paid. $4,000. 260-9848

1985 Nissan Suny, runs, looks good, not dty paid. $2,700.
Avail. mid-July. 287-5037

1985 GMC Leisure Van, a/c. am/fm cassette, pw, exc. cond.
286-3471
1979 Funmobile Ford Van, a/c. ps, customized, good cond.
$4,000. 252-2936 after 5 p.m.

1983 Mazda B-2000 Sundowner pick-up, 4 ,pd., stereo,
am/fm, runs great. $4,000. 286-3687

1983 Buick Skylark, 4 dr., a/c, am/fm, 6 cyl., exc. cond., very
reliable. $3.500. 282-3977/3273

PCSing must sell, 6 month old 1989 VW Santana GIs, 7,000
miles. Many x-tras. Dty pd. Non-U.S. specs. $7,000.
287-4635


1987 Ford Bronco 11, 4x4, V-6, 5 spd., a/c, ps, am/fm cass.,
gd tires, good cond. $9,500. 284-3294
1984 Chevette, AT, a/c, am/fm cass, dependable. $2,895 obo.
Bra for 83-86 Celica $50. 284-3386

1979 Toyota Celica GT, dty paid, a/c. clean, runs strong, 5
speed. $2,400. 286-6237
1972 Mercedes 230,6 cyl., recent valve job, new battery. body
rough. $1500/obo. 284-3039
1981 Honda Prelude, good cond., auto, sunroof, electric a/c,
new seats & battery. $3000/negotiable. 267-3951

1979 Plymouth Volare, good cond., a/c, radio, new battery.
$2500. 225-3071


Apple II-GS computer, system saver, Imagewriter II printer,
desk, some programs $1800. 261-2840.

Yaesu FT-209RH 2M ham radio, mike & rapid charger $250
firm. 260-2883.

Baldwin organ in good condition, recently tuned $600.
223-9141.

Hitachi VCR pop up top excellent condition $200/obo.
284-6830.

Onkyo stereo amplifier, 40 watts/channel, separate 10 band
equalizer $175 all. 287-5526.

Cable ready 19" color tv, digital tuning, remote control, like
new $250/obo. 287-5526.

Yaesu radio transmitter, amp, VFO. phone patch, frequency
counter, spker, micro, ant w/30 in tower. 261-7734.

Electric guitar, red, Hondo Les Paul remake w/case $175.
287-3295.
Kimball piano, exc. condition w/heat rod, good finish $1S200.
252-1194.

Atari computer set, printer, keyboard, disc drive, great for
beginners $350. 286-3498.

National Quintrix 15" color tv, w/remote control, swivel
base, like new $225. 284-5685.

Sony Betamax camera model BMCI00, excellent condition
$500. 252-2080.

Kenwood stereo receiver, Teak top of line cass deck,
turntable, 2 Bose spkers $1250. 284-4430.

Stereophonic tuner am-fm Marantz model 115B $125. 261-
1734 after 5.

Commodore 64C computer, keyboard, 1541 disk drive,
mouse, joysticks, geos, lots of software $295. 286-6398.

Nasa entertainment system, works with Nintendo, new $80.
264-9196.

Yamaha 120 watt/channel stereo w/cass, CD, tuner, Adc Eq,
Technic turntable, Panasonic timer $1000. 284-5596.

Stereo cabinet, glass doors, 3 adjustable shelves 44x23x19
$100. 236-0727.










Tropic Times 23
June 15, 1990 3J




cla si se a s


Macintosh Clone PC, dual disk drive, Imagewriter printer,
assorted software $1700. 283-6140.

Sanyo Betamax video cassette player, 40 tapes included S$150.
287-3338.

Stereo sys, w/digital timer, cass deck, equalizer, Pioneer
receive, turntable, 4 spkers $1000/obo. 284-6830.

Computer 80286/ '0mhz, 40MB HD, 640k ram Modem, 1.2
&1.44 DD. software. 80287 CoPro $3200/obo. 289-4654.

Commodore 64/128 software and hardware. 284-3386.

Atari computer great for beginners. 286-3498.

19" color tv $185. 287-4379.

Sansui stereo amp/tuner $150. 286-4680.

Sansui stereo $350. 286-3535.

Atari 800XL printer, disc drive $400. 284-5490.

Music keyboard, rhythm, 6 orchestra opts, Yamaha PSR 15
$150. 287-4730.

Sony Trinitron 27' color tv $550, Sanyo 19' color tv $250.
233-2851.

Digital rhythm programmer Yamaha RXI7, w/drum and
percussion sounds $300. 264-7375.

Stereo equipment low prices. 284-3293.

Sony 25"color tv. stereo VHS recorder, Sansui stereo, Apple
lIE dual disk drive computer. 282-3186.

Sanyo 18" b/w tv, screen very good condition $80, Fisher
turntable with cover $90. 224-3992.
......... . . .................. ........... .
Auto Zenza Bronica 4x6 w/2 filmbacks $700,3-unit elec flash
w/umbrellas, access $450. 287-4932.





Spanish-speaking maid for general housework, honest, loves
kids, references, 223-2646.

Bilingual maid, exc. worker, great with kids, references. 284-
6371.

Exc. bilingual maid, available M-T-TH-F, dependable,
honest, great references. 287-4088.

Exc. day maid, iron, cook, clean, loves kids, wash, available
anytime. 232-4872

Mature dependable live-out maid, great babysitter,
trustworthy, available June 25. 284-4935

Part or full time day maid, exc. worker references. 282-5537
*after 5 p.m.

Exc. day maid, understands little English, available any days
(M-F), has references. 221-5641

Maid, honest gd worker, cleans houses per day, irons, and
works per month. Male worker also, cleans house, washes car
and does garden work, live-in. 287-4379

Bilingual day maid, honest, reliable, hardworker. 287-5497
after 5 p.m.

Exc. day maid, available M-W-TH, ref., available, honest,
hard working. 267-7174
...... . . . .. . ...... . . . . . . . . . . .....
Live-in English speaking, honest, reliable, good with kids.
284-3326 ask for Hilda

Dependable, honest, hard working, bilingual daymaid, exc,
with kids. 238-5900 ask Julia
.......... ............... ..........
Exc. live-in maid available, highly recommended, speaks
Spanish some English. 284-3739

Mature, responsible, dependable, live-in/out, gd. w/kids,
available June 16. , gd. references. 224-3545/282-4337

Hard working English speaking live-in maid, gd. with kids,
available now. 266-4060

German instructor, available for tutoring. AIP levels.
282-3027

Honest bilingual day maid, hard working reliable; references.
221-6641




Fresh and saltwater rods and reels-Penn reels, over 20 to
choose from. 282-5630

U.S. diver's tank with boot regulator and back, recently
inspected, full. $175. 282-5494

14' Jonboat w/25hp Yamaha engine, new electric motor,
and access. $2500. 284-5490

22' North American "Offshore" boat w/trailer, new
Armstrong, 300hp outboard bracket, no motor $4500. 287-
5729.

Must sell, 27' Hunter sailboat, diesel engine, 4 sails, extras,
$16,000/obo. 252-6825.





Teak dining rm. set, 8 chairs, china cabinet. $2900. Teak
entertainment. $800. 252-6825

8pc black laquer bedroom suit $1200, sofa/sleeper $699,
loveseat $599, recliner $200. 284-480.

Toddlers bed mattress, drawer and bookshelf $60. 264-1825
after 6 p.m. Friday.


4-drawer wooden chest B16 drawers with metal insides, exc.
cond. $50/obo. 261-7376


Sanyo refrigerator $160, rattan dresser $100, Crown 16" tv
$150, plants. 287-4932.

Rattan double bed $250. 286-3535.

8,000 btu ac $115, brown dresser w/mirror $45. 286-4680.

2 night stands $180, boy bed $175, solidwood bunkbed, no
mattress $220, 287-4379.

Livingroom set $400, plants, clothes. 286-3498.

Ranch oak livingrm set $750/obo. 284-3386.

3-pc Western style livingrm set, good condition $300.
284-4335.

Washer & dryer, old model, works good $100. 224-3992.

Lge livingrm sofa, matching chair, big soft cushions $500.
286-3687.

Trundle bed set w/mattress, dresser, nite table & desk
w/hutch $500. 6,000 ac $200, 21" color tv $200. 252-2936.

Queen mattress w/box spring $150, girls bike 21' nego.
286-6388.

11,000 btu ac, cools, some rust, available now $100/obo.
287-5899.

Full size mattress/box springs, under cabinet blender/can
opener, Carebears full comforter/curtains. 287-4685.

Mahogany furniture, lamps, iron/ brass beds, curio cabinets.
262-1262.

Lge brown sofa $425, entertainment center $150/negotiable.
284-5192.

Kenmore 15.2 frostless freezer, perfect condition $375.
282-4884.

Loveseat, sofa set, excellent condition $750. 264-6747.

17.2' refrigerator/freezer w/ice maker, washer, dryer,
bookcase w/glass doors. 287-4820 after 6.

5pc BR set, queen size bed included, excellent condition $850.
284-4430.

Dishwasher $100, beige rugs 10x12, 9x12, venetian blinds.
287-4088.
........................................
Oriental rug 6x9 beig/brown $70, original Peruvian alpaca
rug $85. 284-5685.

18,000 btu ac $325, 12,000 btu ac $225, 10,000 btu ac $200.
252-2287.

Sears microwave 1.4 cubic feet $150, house plants, all sizes
and prices. 286-4725.

Stairs carpet for tropical house $50, plants in all sizes.
284-4283.

Mahogany wood/wicker diningrm set, 8 chairs $1550.
241-4135.

Large party table 3x7' $135, 8 setting dinnerware set $50
260-4184.

Sofa, 2 chairs, room divider, 2 carpets 9x12, tea cart, 2 end
tables, lamps. 260-6066.
............................... ........
Closed type bar, glass and bottle storage, marble top $550.
252-5898.

Twin bedrm suite, special order, Teak, Spanish style,
complete, exc. cond. $3000. 252-5898.
................................... ....
2 sets twin mattress $75 set. 286-6345.

King size frame, box spring, mattress, nine months use $375.
261-1734.
........... ... ... I................. .....
Household goods, draperies, bed covers, clay flower pots.
287-4439.
.... ........................... . ........
Admiral freezer, like new $500, 9x12 Oriental rug $2700,
rosewood grandfather clock $1900. 286-4023.

Misc. household goods, furniture, clothes, 252-5643 after 6,
appointments only.

I I' freezer, Teakwood bar, Teakwood stereo cabinet, 4pc
bedrm set, 5pc breakfast table. 286-3471.
.................... .. .. ..... .. o.........
L shape sectional w/queen size bed, recliner $2000, 48" tv $800.
252-1277.

Queen size bed w/frame and headbd $200. 282-3985.

White 12x12 white carpet. 286-3743.

King size water bedrm set, boys bunk bedrm set, DR, room
furniture, Sears vacuum cleaner, carpets. 282-3186.

Four occasional chairs, linen material, castors $80 ea.
2864828.

Washer & dryer $575, crystal, chandelier, full bedrm set,
mahogany diningrm. 226-7209.

Amana freezer 17' $200, Whirlpool dishwasher $100.
252-6985.

Whirlpool refrigerator/freezer 19.1' side by side $600.
252-1182

Redwood patio furniture, 12 pcs $400, gas grill $100.
252-6985.

GE dishwasher $55, recliner chair, heeds repair $25, Spanish
teachers encyclopedia $60. 252-6020.


Diningrm sideboard $40, curtains, drapes for tropical.
284-6785.

2 Sealy twin mattresses practically new, with trundle bed
$180. 225-4758.

3pc sectional couch/sleeper bed $1000, microwave oven,
exercise bicycle, more. 287-5770.

Whirlpool 7,800 btu ac, 2 years old $150/obo. 287-3178.

Dining room set w/6 chairs, a side table $550. 252-6110.

5-drawer wooden chest, metal insides $50/obo. 261-7376.





Yellow head parrot, Amador area, needs medicine, will cry
like a child. Reward. 282-3794 after 5 p.m.



Plants, all sizes. Webber BBQ grill. 286-3498

4-bdrm. tropical curtains and rugs. 8000 BTU a/c. Atari 800
XL printer, disk drive. 284-5490

Clothes, household items, many paper back books, 6 x 9
carpet. 286-4298

Gas grill. $50. Schlage keepsafer plus alarm system, 7-
window sensors, 2 area sensors, power siren, remote. $500.
282-5535

MG, Sprite, Austin-Healy Triumph owners, British car club
now forming. 252-2807 9-5 only

Ride-on Little Tike railroad train, w/tracks, battery and
recharger. $75/obo. 286-4622

Baby crib w/mattress and spring. $100. Suitcases, various
sizes, hot-water heater, 30 gal., new clothes dryer. 286-4384

2 - 215 x 75 r15 radial tires, gd. cond. 284-5720 call 6 p.m.

10 gal. or 30 gal. aquarium complete with cabinet and
accessories. $50 and $250/obo. 287-4918

Twin size mattress and boxspring. $60. BBQ grill. $40. Items
in gd. cond. $100. 284-3093

PCS sale, baby items, bottles/bath/changing dresser, plants
and curtains. 284-3293

Catylitic convertor, from a Ford Mustang. Make offer.
284-3976

2 GoodYear P21560 R14 tires. $30. 35mm Yashica TL
Electro camera outfit. $125. New Eye of the Storm. $60.
284-3010

Paintings in oil of International and National painters. Prices
vary. 232-5627

321 Singer Memomatic; knitting and ribbon,
w/computerized card (all colors). Negotiable. 232-5627

Books, maps on Panama Canal and Panama, various prices.
228-0458

Dishwasher, need work. $30. Ladies shoes size 3, cork
paneling I x 3 with 36 pcs. $10. 252-2042

16" Huffy boys bike, exc. cond. $70. 252-1097.

Girl's bike. $40. Ice maker for ref. $60. Work/toy bench. $15.
A/c. $200./ 284-6785
................... .....................
Seiko divers 150 mt. watch with rubber protector. $150.
224-3992

Rock-saw, good cond. With 4 blades and a rock collection.
$350. 287-3677 evenings


Shower door. $100. Fm antenna. $40. Wedding dress. $100.
Tecknics K350 keyboard. $500. 252-2781

Ceiling fan w/lamp and speed control. $65. Home spa for the
bathtub. $65. 252-5356

26" ladies bike, childs shoes, kitchen access., house misc. $30.
224-3992

Saddle for roping. $475. 252-2143

Golf clubs, Lynx USA, 3-pw, 1345 Woods. $275. 286-4297

1978 parts for Honda Accord. 287-4439

Metal work table. $50.4-dr. storage cabinet. $200.8000 BTU
a/c. $200. 286-3532

Twin mattress. $25. Old female bike. $15. Table games:
PacMan, Upwords, Stay Alive, HongMan, Trust Me,
Golden Trivia Game Major League edition. $5/ea. 226-5279

Brand new Panasonic 4 color graphic typewriter with
,auto correction memory, more $200. 285-4190.





Pirelli rear tire 150/80/16 new V-rated, perfect for racing
bikes. $100. 224-3992

Dunlop rear tire 130/90/16 V-rated good for racing bikes.
$50. 224-3992

1988 Yamaha Virago, duty paid, 1028 miles, maroon, like
new. $4000. 284-3294 after 5 p.m.

1986 Yamaha FZ 750, Kerker white, tip exhaust, duty paid.
$2800. 252-2180

1984 CR 80, gd. cond., needs a home, little use, must see, new
engine. $400. 287-6743

1986 Honda CB-70-SC Nighthawk, like new, with a lot of
extras, duty paid. $4000/obo. 224-3992

Shoei helmet with shield (I extra) and carrier bag. $80.
224-3992





3222 Empire St. Balboa. 7 - noon. Saturday.
.............. ........... ...............
6583-B, Los Rios. 7-10 a.m. (clothes, ceramics, plants, misc.
Saturday.

2473 Motgan Ave. 8- 11 a.m. Saturday.

1109 Ft. Amador, diningrm, livingrm, bedrm, tv, stereo,
microwave and more) 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Saturday.





Lionel or American Flyer electric trains. 286-3375 after 7
p.m.

To single beds with mattresses, good cond. $100 both. 287-
4379.

Extra large, 2 piece long sleeve wet suit, dive weights and
belts. 286-4896 after 5 p.m.

Looking for a nice car for about. $1000. run good and
reasonable year, Will pay cash. 284-3867

6" mini-lathe, 8 ft. ladder. 252-2042.

Boat trailer for 12-15 ft. boat. 243-5452

35mm camera (new) brands (Canon, Nikon, Pentax, or
others. 224-3992


the TROPIC TIMES Ad Form


Advertising in the Tropic Times is offered on a space available basis to U.S. military members, civilian
DoD employees and employees of other U.S. government agencies. Ads will be accepted only for NON-
COMMERCIAL services or goods offered by the advertiser or an immediate family member. Offerings of
real estate or personal ads will not be accepted. The Tropic Times reserves the right to edit any
advertisement. Questions regarding non-publication of submitted ads may be directed to the editor at
285-6613.
Submissions must be typed or legibly printed and limited to 15 words. Only two submissions per family
per week will be accepted. Each submission must indicate only one category for publication. Ads for services
will be accepted once per quarter as will ads for the Wanted category. Patio Sale ads must indicate date and
location. Submitted ads will be published only once and must be resubmitted for further publication. Ads
not run because of late receipt or lack of space need not be resubmitted; they will be run the following week
unless a specific date is involved.
Deadline for the receipt of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for the following Friday's edition. If Monday is an
official holiday, the deadline is 9 a.m. Tuesday. Ads may be mailed to the Tropic Times, APO 34002 or
deposited in a drop box at the Albrook Post Office. Advertisers should allow seven to 14 days for
processing.

O ANIMALS
D AUDIO-VISUAL
1o AUTOMOBILES


O AVAILABLE
1 BOA TS & CAMPERS
o FOUND
o HOUSEHOLD

O LOST
O MISCELLANEOUS
0 MOTORCYCLES
o PA TO SALES
o WANTED


PRICE HOME PHONE

Check onty o. tegMoryper adfoem. Only two adsperpeanM e* wmk
allowed. Ewch d fmm is mkited to IS words. Please type or pAW .af*.
Information Wed below Is not included idthe ad, buit Is rev" for
publictiLn. This Iformmaton w not be o rel ed to At"pu m

lpf[lNgnND- NAMEI_ . -.. .1AN -BAM -

ORG. ...D.......... .UTY PRONE-









4 Tropic Times
24 June 15, 1990


Court upholds sobriety checkpoints


WASHINGTON (UPI) - The Supreme
Court, boosting local efforts to combat
drunken driving, Thursday upheld 6-3
the constitutionality of sobriety check-
points.
Chief Justice William Rehnquist,
ruling in a Michigan case, balanced
the goals of the widely used tactic
against the impact on motorists of police
checks and concluded the stops do not
violate the Constitution's ban against
unreasonable search and seizure.
Rehnquist noted the "magnitude of
the drunken driving problem" and said
that reports of "death and mutilation
on the nation's roads are legion."
"Conversely, the weight bearing on
the other scale - the measure of the
intrusion on motorists stopped briefly
at sobriety checkpoints - is slight," he
wrote.
Rehnquist also said there is little
concern that the stops will "generate
fear and surprise" among motorists.
"The 'fear and surprise' to be con-
sidered are not the natural fear of one

by United Press International

Prices rise
WASHINGTON - Wholesale
prices nationwide edged up 0.3
percent in May on higher food
costs after three consecutive
monthly declines, the Labor De-
partment reported Thursday. The
increase was generally in line with
forecasts by private economists.

Sanctions continue
STRASBOURG, France - The
European Parliament, in a major
victory for black nationalist leader
Nelson Mandela, easily adopted a
resolution Thursday urging that
full economic sanctions be main-
tained against South Africa. The
177 to 47 vote with five absten-
tions came one day after Mandela
told the Parliament that even a
partial lifting of sanctions would
be unacceptable to his country's
black majority.

Flag designer bitter
NAPOLEON, Ohio - The man
whose design for the American
flag was adopted almost 30 years
ago says he is outraged at Mon-
day's Supreme Court ruling pro-
tecting flag burning. "Just once, I
would like to see some of those
Supreme Court justices face eye-
ball-to-eyeball with some of the
families and relatives of Vietnam
vets who visit the Vietnam Veter-
ans Memorial in Washington,"
Bob Heft said.

3 million gallons spill
GALVESTON, Texas - A brief
flare-up of the fire aboard the bum-
ing tanker Mega Borg was "not
considered a major setback," and
firefighters were ready Thursday
to again douse hot spots with a
chemical foam, Coast Guard offi-
cials said. The ship has spilled an
estimated 3 million gallons of light
crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico,
officials said.

Israelis protest
JERUSALEM - More than
800,000 Israeli workers seeking
higher wages staged a one-day
strike Thursday, closing Israel's
airport, banks and government
offices and halting regular broad-
casting by all but Army Radio.


"...a great victory...we must begin to make checkpoints a key
element of an all-out campaign to finally rid our roads of the
menace posed by drunk drivers." MADD president


who has been drinking over the pros-
pect of being stopped at a sobriety
checkpoint, but, rather, the fear and
surprise engendered in law-abiding
motorists by the nature of the stop," he
said.
Rehnquist was joined in his ruling by
Justices Byron White, Sandra Day
O'Connor, Antonin Scalia and Anthony
Kennedy.
In dissent, Justice William Brennan,
joined by Justice Thurgood Marshall,
disagreed that the intrusion was mini-
mal.
"I do not dispute the immense so-
cial cost caused by drunken drivers,
nor do I slight the government's efforts
to prevent such a tragic loss," he wrote.
"Indeed, I would hazard a guess that


today's opinion will be received fa-
vorably by a majority of our society,
who would willingly suffer the mini-
mal intrusion of a sobriety checkpoint
stop in order to prevent drunken driv-
ing."
Headded, however, that "consensus
that a particular law enforcement tech-
nique serves a laudable purpose has
never been the touchstone of constitu-
tional analysis."
Justice John Paul Stevens also wrote
a dissent:
"Unfortunately, the court is trans-
fixed by the wrong symbol - the illu-
sory prospect of punishing countless
intoxicated motorists - when it should
keep its eyes on the road plainly marked
by the Constitution."


Michigan Attorney General Frank
Kelley said he is pleased with the U.S.
Surpreme Court's ruling to uphold his
state's right to operate sobriety check-
lanes on its roads and highways.
"I welcome this decision by the
United States Supreme Court which
allows Michigan to take strong steps to
protect the public from drunken driv-
ers," he said. Unfortunately, public
education is not enough; sometimes
strong enforcement measures provide
the only effective answer."
Howard Simon, executive director
of the Michigan chapter of the Ameri-
can Civil Liberties Union, said the
ruling doesn't mean the "case is over."
He said a lower court order was based
on the Michigan Constitution, which
could be used as a basis to continue
fighting sobriety checklanes in Michi-
gan.
Micky Sadoff, national president of
Mothers Against Drunk Driving, called
the ruling a "great victory" and said
"we must begin to assure that every
community will make checkpoints a
key element of an all-out campaign to
finally rid our roads of the menace
posed by drinking drivers."


SUICIDE MACHINE - Dr. Jack Kevorkian, 62, a retired Royal Oak, Mich., pathologist shown in a file photograph with
his "suicide device." The apparatus involves hooking a person to an intravenous solution. The person then can kill
himself by pressing a button that stops the saline solution and injects thiopental, a coma inducing drug. Janet Adkins,
54, of Portland, Ore., who suffered from Alzheimer's disease, used the machine to take her life recently. (AP
Laserphoto)



Barry will not seek fourth term


WASHINGTON (UPI) - The drug
and perjury trial of Mayor Marion Barry
went forward Thursday, overshadowed
by his announcement that he would not
seek re-election and by a vigil outside
the court for the man who has led the
city for 12 years.
Pressure mounted for U.S. Attorney
Jay Stephens to reach a plea agreement
with Barry before testimony in the
case begins next week.
Barry, in a televised address to city
residents Wednesday night, said he
would not be a candidate for a fourth
term.
Speaking five months after his co-
caine arrest in an FBI-police sting


operation, Barry told his constituents
it is "a time for healing - for me
personally and for you politically."
"Whatever I can do to help you
heal, I'm willing to do it," Barry said.
I'm willing to go to any length. ...
Marion Barry will not be a candidate
for re-election for my fourth term."
Attorneys Thursday asked prospec-
tive jurors if the announcement altered
their assessment of his guilt or inno-
cence. Most said no.
About 40 Barry supporters, wearing
black wristbands and calling them-
selves the Coalition for Equal Justice
Under the Law, held a noon vigil out-
side U.S. District Court, carrying signs


reading: "Entrapment is illegal. Who
should be on trial?" "Fight the Power,"
and "Conspiracy. Conspiracy. Con-
spiracy."
Many remained silent. Others said
they were protesting Barry's prosecu-
tion.
"Damn right I'm angry," said Johnnie
Johnson, 75. "They gave him illegal
drugs to entrap him."
About 40 others, including Barry's
mother, later joined the vigil.

Barry was allegedly videotaped
smoking crack cocaine in the Jan. 18
undercover operation that led to his
arrest




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EWTLFQL8G_5V8V8Z INGEST_TIME 2011-04-29T13:58:07Z PACKAGE UF00098947_00107
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

Gift ofrhe a a CanaliMuseg the Trop Tmes Vol. III, No. 19 Quarry Heights, Republic of Panama Friday, June 15, 1990 Soldier injured FORT CLAYTON, PANAMA (USARSO PAO) -A U.S. Army soldier was seriously injured Wednesday when a tree fell on him during a training exercise at Fort Sherman. The name of the soldier is being withheld pending notification of next of kin. The accident occurred at about 3 a.m. Wednesday. The soldier Four OA-37B Dragonfly aircraft fly in formation over Howard AFB. The tactical air support aircraft is being drawn down was training at the Jungle Opfrom 21 to 10 because of Air Force structural and budgetary restraints. (U.S. Air Force photo by Sgt. Kathy Huffman) erations Training Center at the time. Medical evacuation heiDragonfly loses to structure changes copter transported the soldier to Gorgas Army Community Hospital. HOWARD AFB Panama (24th The number of operating OA-37Bs quency of normal deployment training He is being treated for seriCOMPW/PA) -A phased drawdown of is dropping from 21 to 10. As part of exercises. ous head injuries, according to Air Force OA-37B "Dragonfly" airthe reduction, two aircraft are being officials at Gorgas. craft assigned to the 24th Tactical Air reassigned to the Inter-American Air The "Dragonfly" is a forward air U.S. Army officials are inSupport Squadron here is nearing comForces Academy at Homestead AFB, control aircraft used for combat escort, vestigating the incident. pletion. Fla. The rest are being sold to foreign search and rescue, andreconnaissance. nations. It was first introduced to the Air Force Father's Day calls The drawdown, which began April The reduction is expected to have in 1967; the 24th TASS remains the HOWARD AFB (1978TH 1, is in response to Air Force structural little affect on the 830th Air Division's only active-duty Air Force unit flying CG) -The 1978th Communicachanges and budgetary restraints. mission in Latin America or the frethem. tions Group's Military Affiliate Radio Systems station and the Panama reopens Amador Causeway Sprint Telephone Company are offering toll-free calls for Father's Day. QUARRY HEIGHTS (USSOUTHcial business will be allowed on the Because of anticipated increased trafThe MARS station is offerCOM) -Panamanian government offiCauseway. fic on Amador Road, U.S. military ing the service to the continencials have announced the Amador Designated public parking areas will policemen will be checking identificatal United States, Puerto Rico Causeway which was returned to be located across the road from the tion cards at entrances to housing arand the Virgin Islands for all Panama May 28 will be opened to the Amador Officers Club and across the eas. Joint U.S.-Panama patrols will U.S. military, family members general public today following a 3 p.m. road from the theater and gas station. continue to provide security to the and Department of Defense opening ceremony at the entrance to The Amador Officers Club parking lot Military Areas of Coordination. civilians stationed in Panama. the Causeway. will continue to be reserved for use by Calls will be placed until SunStarting Saturday, the Causeway and club patrons. Other details remain to be worked day from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. beach areas will be open from 6 a.m. to out between Panamanian and U.S. 7 p.m. daily tospedestrian and bicycle Panamanian policemen will be on officials and will be announced when Travel restriction traffic. Only official vehicles on offihand to monitor the parking areas. finalized. FORT CLAYTON(41stASG) JTF-Panama Marines return home -All persons traveling TDY to the Philippines via commercial QUARRY HEIGHTS (USSOUTHsince their arrival, this group of 478 have been filled by officers and Maconveyance, i.e. those who are COM PAO) U.S. Marine Corps forces Marines augmented Panama-based U.S. rines from Fleet Marine Force Comnot arriving at or departing o that have been serving in Panama since military forces in protecting U.S. citimand at Camp Lejeune; Norfolk, Va; U.S. military bases, mustobtain early 1988 departed the Pacific side by zens and U.S. property in Panama during Cherry Point and New River, N. C. and prior travel clearance. Except ship at 6 a.m. Wednesday. The Marines the political crisis in Panama. They Beaufort, S.C. where there is an absolute, shortcleared the Atlantic side at 4 p.m. The also participated in Operation Just Cause The Marine Forces are currently notice operational necessity as Marine redeployment is part of the and Operation Promote Liberty, as well commanded by Col. J. M. Hayes of determined by CINCPAC or scheduled drawdown of troops anas other humanitarian assistance acMilwaukee, Wis. CINCPACREP, Philippines, nounced in late May. tivities. Theredeployment of MarineForces there will be no exceptions. This redeployment will help reduce Marine infantry and logistics units does not include the permanently asFor further information conU.S. military forces in Panama to prebased at Camp Lejeune, N. C., have signed Marine Corps Security Force tact Irving B. Parther at 2871988 levels; primarily by redeploying been rotated to Panama for three-month Company which provides security for 4254/4752. the security augmentation forces now periods during the Marines' committhe facilities of the U.S. Naval Station serving in Panama. meant in Panama. Additionally, threePanama Canal and its supported and As part of Joint Task Force-Panama and sixmonth individual positions tenant activities. WASHINGTON (Reuter) -Defense Secretary Dick C e e sdw forPentagon review were fourof six locationsplanned Cheney has extended a worldwide freeze on $7 bilCheney extends worldwide by theNavy fornew "strategic home ports" forships: lion in U.S. military construction projects and will ask -truction moro rium Ingleside, Texas; Mobile, Ala.; Pascagoula, Miss., Congress to cancel many of them, the Pentagon said coU and Staten Island, N.Y. Thursday. Congress, which has already approved funding for But Williams refused to say what projects might be Defense Department spokesman Pete Williams a large number of the projects, would have to vote on on Cheney's final list, noting only that both domestic said Cheney was studying a list of some 200 projects whether to rescind its earlier decisions. and foreign projects were under study. and planned to make proposals to Congress as early as Cheney ordered the military construction freeze The projects on the original list also included $110 next week in response to military budget pressures earlier this year. Williams said Thursday he had million for a large rocket test facility at Arnold, and improving East-West relations. decided to extend the freeze until Nov. 15, partly Tenn.; $60 million for improvements at Fort Hood "The secretary feels that funding should be canbecause of delays in reaching an East-West agreeand the Red River Army Depot in Texas, and $37 celed for a substantial number of projects," Williams menton cutting conventional forces in Europe (CFE). million for a consolidated maintenance facility told reporters. Among the projects that were earlier singled out at Tooele, Utah. Inside. .News .Features .Sports USARSO medical team saves Snipers attack Advanced LongPistons rally from 7-point 4 Panamanians after vehicle Distance Marksmanship Traindeficit to win second straight accident. See page 3. ing Course. See page 9. NBA title. See page 18.

PAGE 2

Tropic Times June 15, 1990 300 AROUND THE COMMUNITY SFC Daryl Kane, left, U.S. Army Garrison, U.S. Army South marks the ongoing Army Emergency Relief fund drive's progress on the AER thermometer near Fort Clayton's front gate. The drive will continue through June A. (U.S. Army photo by Spec. Paul L. Sweeney) Ada Sanders, above, gardens in her front yard (Yard of the Month) at Howard Air Force Base. (U.S. Air Force photo) New Reserve DCINC Voting for orientation DoD starts information c ent er by Tim Downey QUARRY HEIGHTS, (USfor the 565th Quartermaster (AFIS) -"People who don't vote don't care." Most people have probably SOUTHCOM PAO) -Maj. Gen. Company of the 56th Quarterheard that observation, but vt doesn't square with the facts, said the Federal Felix A. Santoni, who recently master Battalion, 7th U.S. Army, Voting Assistance Program director. assumed duties as the new deputy U.S. Army Europe, and later, he "Our surveys indicate that more than 23 percent of the service members commander in chief for was procurement officer and who didn'tvote inthelast electioncited lack of information asthe primary Mobilization and Reserve Affairs, deputy commander of the 20th reason for not voting," Henry Valentino said. "Essentially, they didn't know In div i d u a1 M o b ili z a tio n Detachment, SF 1495. enough about the candidates and the issues." Augmentee for U.S. Southern His assignments also included Rather than throw up their hands and say that sounds like a personal Command, arrived Wednesday instructor duty with the 2979th Rte hntrwu hi ad n a htsud ieaproa on a ri en sd.y Sco th he was problem, Valentino and his staff in the Pentagon came up with a solution: the for a two-week orientation visit. USAR School; then, he was DDVtn nomto etr Santoni's first visit to the appointed the deputy commander DoD Voting Information Center. command will familiarize him of the 7581st U.S Army Garrison Service members and their dependents worldwide can access the center free with the integration of the Reserve in 1981. In 1984, he became the from any military installation 24 hours a day by calling Autovon 223-6500 on Components into USSOUTHcommander. a push-button phone. The commercial number is 1-202-693-6500; this call is COM day-to-day operations. He He is a graduate from the not free. will be responsible to the Wharton School of Business, "The center provides information on the next scheduled elections, commander in chief on all University of Penn., with a degree candidates and issues, and includes recorded messages from members of reservist matters encompassing all in Economics. His military Congress and state governors," said Valentino. It's computerized. After countries in Southern Coiawards include the Legion of dialing the number and getting in, a recording walks you through available mand's area of responsiblity. Merit, the Army Commendation options. The general has served in Medal, the Army Reserve Those wanting information on upcoming state elections, for instance, various assignments during his 34Component Achievement Medal would be told to push the "1" button for a list of dates. Callers who want to year career. He served as the with two oak leaf clusters, the hear recorded messages from home-state officials would enter the state's twodeputy commander of AdminisArmed Forces Reserve Medal letter postal abbreviation -for example, CA for California -and continue tration and Logistics, the with two hourglass devices, the to follow instructions. The system guides callers through extra steps if states Logistics Operations Officer, and Army Service Ribbon and the share the same buttons -for instance, Alaska (AK) and Alabama (AL), and was assigned to the Office of National Defense Service Medal. Utah (UT) and Vermont (VT). Training and Evaluation for the Santoni is married to the Valentino noted the voting information center accepts tapes from 166th Support Group. former Carmen Irene Sein (Nani), incumbents and challengers within 60 days of a primary or general election. In the Quartermaster Corps, his a n d currently resides in The tapes are usually 30 to 60 seconds long and express the candidates' views on issues they feel are important. He said tapes are changed as often as the career began as a platoon leader Guaynabo, Puerto Rico. candidates like, but most run for a few weeks to ensure the message gets out to many people. Commander-in-Chief .Gen. Maxwell R. Thurman Editorial Staff .Cpl. John Moreland This authorized unofficial command information publication Director, Public Affairs .Col. Joseph S. Panvini Spec. John Hall is for U.S. armed forces overseas. The Tropic Times is published NCOIC .SMSgt. George Prince Editorial Assistants .Rosemary Chong in conjunction with the Armed Forces Information Program of Editor .SFC Cecil Stack -Carolyn Coffey the Department of Defense, under the supervision of the director Assistant Editor ...Sgt. Monique Chere Laura de la Guardia of public affairs, U.S. Southern Command. Contents of the Elena Costarangos Tropic Times are not necessarily the official view of the U.S. government, the Department of Defense or the U.S. Southern th e roCommand. The address is: APO Miami, 34002, Albrook Post the~ r p ic im esOffice. Telephone 285-6612.

PAGE 3

Tropic Times June 15, 1990 USARSO medical team saves 4 Panamanians by Spec. Paul L. Sweeney backup medical team was called. After isolating the most seriously COCO SOLO (USARSO PAO) injured, Dr. (Capt.) Issac Thomas -A U.S. Army South medical team and his medical team began saved four Panamanians after their stabilizing victims. Meanwhile, -truck flipped on the Transisthmian janitor Rodrigo Accosta applied Highway near Coco Solo Medical pressure bandages to other patients. Clinc May 28. The emergency room staff's The victims were loaded onto response was extraordinary, another truck and taken to the clinic. Henriquez said. "By the time the The clinic's staff had no advance backup team arrived, the on-site warning. team had stabilized the seriously "The janitor heard a knock at the injured, prepared them for transport door, opened it, and people started to the local hospital and began work hauling patients into the emergency on the other patients." The team's room," said Maj. Luis Henriquez, quick action saved the victims' lives, Coco Solo's chief physician. Henriquez said. The four-man emergency room The patients were transported to a team immediately prioritized the local civilian hospital. MAKING THE GRADE -U.S. Army and Panamanian engineersgradethe patients according to their injuries. "We're the closest medical facility road from Llano Grande to Llano de ]a Cruz. U. S. Army South's 536th "The emergency room is only set up to the Transisthmian highway, so we Engineer battalion and Panama's Ministry of Public Works are currently to handle two or three seriously get a lot of accident victims from wEnineer ttuga rads Panaas MinfU.sistranPc Wrks ar cunty injured patients at a time during offthere," Henriquez said. "But this has working to upgrade roads as part of U.S. assistance projects to Panama. duty hours," Henriquez explained. to be the most people we've ever had (U.S. Army photo) To help handle the flood of patients a to handle with such a small staff." Employment NOTE: Positions will be filled at NM-5 level. C P O 512-90 COMMUNITY SVCS ASST (TYPING),, NM-303-5, USAG, DCA, CFA, Family Support Div, ACS, FL Clayton, Panama. Spec. Exp: 1 yr. equiv to WHO CAN APPLY: Current permanent employees of US Army South and NM-4. Job Rel Crit: 1. Skill in applying accounting techniques and reconciliServiced Activities and other U.S. Government agency employees. If any other ation procedures. 2. Ability to compile, research and analyze data. 3. Ability to. source if applicable, specific vacancy will indicate this. Only U.S. Citizens will interpret and apply regulatory policies and directives. 4. Skill in communicating be considered for sensitive positions. orally and in writing in the English language. 513-90 SUPPLY TECHNICIAN, NM-2005-6, USA MEDDAC-Panama, GACH, HOW TO APPLY: Applicants must submit to the CPO, Bldg. 560, Room 306, Logistics Div, Stock Control, Ancon, Panama. Spec. Exp: 1 yr. equiv to NM-5, Corozal by the close of business on the closing date of announcement. ApplicaTIG: NM-5. Job Rel Crit: Knowledge of inventory management procedures. 2. tion is a signed copy of SF-171, Application for Federal Employment; SF-50, Knowledge of Army Medical Supply System. 3. Skill in use of ADP equipment. Notification of Personnel Action; USARSO Form 106 if applicable, and current/ 4. Ability to interpret and apply medical supply regulations and guidelines. last performance appraisal. Qualification standards may be reviewed at CPO. NOTE: Area of consideration is limited to USA MEDDAC/DENTAC. For further information call 285-5201. 514-90 MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT (TYPING), NM-344-6, TEMPORARY NTE 09-30-90, ODCS Engineer, Plans & Management Div, Ft. Clayton, NOTE: ALL APPLICANTS SHOULD BE AWARE THAT HIRING IS SEPanama. Sensitive. Spec. Exp: 1 yr. at NM-5. TIG: NM-5. VERELY RESTRICTED DUE TO DOD WORLD WIDE HIRING FREEZE 515-90 INTELLIGENCE ASSISTANT, NM-134-6, TEMPORARY NTE I WHICH IS EXPECTED TO LAST THROUGH 30 SEPT. 1990. INTERNAL YR., HQ USSOUTHCOM, Intelligence Directorate, Analysis Br., J2, Quarry PLACEMENT IS NOW PERMITTED AND IS RESTRICTED TO DOD CURHts., Panama. Sensitive. Spec. Exp: 1 yr. at NM-5. RENT EMPLOYEES. CURRENT TEMPORARY EMPLOYEES MAY NOW 516-90 SECURITY ASSISTANT (TYPING), GS-086-6, 1109TH Signal BriAPPLY AGAINST PERMANENT VACANCIES & REFERRALS ARE SUBgade, Security Office, Corozal, Panama. Sensitive. Spec. Exp: 1 yr. equiv to the JECT TO MANAGEMENT'S DECISION TO FILL WITH TEMPORARIES. next lower grade. SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT EQUIVALENT TO DUNOTE: This position is in the excepted service. TIES SIMILAR TO THOSE REQUIRED BY THE VACANCY. 517-90 MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT,NM-344-7,DRM, Manpower& Management Div, Ft. Clayton, Panama. Sensitive. Spec. Exp 1 yr. equiv to NM-6. MILITARY SPOUSES: USARSO HAS PERMITTED, AS AN EXCEPTION TIG: NM-6. TO THE DOD HIRING FREEZE, THE HIRING OF QUALIFIED MILITARY 518-90 HOUSING MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT, NM-1173-7, DEH, HousSPOUSES ON A LIMITED BASIS. MILITARY SPOUSES, IF AVAILABLE ing Div, Family Housing-Atlan'tic, Ft. Davis, Panama. Spec. Exp: 1 yr. equiv to AND QUALIFIED MAY BE HIRED ON A "ONE FOR TWO VACANCIES" NM-5. TIG: NM-5. RATE. THAT IS FOR EVERY TWO VACANCIES BEING FILLED ONE 519-90 SUPERVISORY INVENTORY MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST, NMMAY BE FILLED BY A MILITARY SPOUSE AS AN EXCEPTION TO THE 2010-9, USA MEDDAC-Panama, GAH, Medical Materiel Br, Logistics Div, DOD HIRING FREEZE. Ancon, Panama. Spec. Exp: 1 yr. equiv to NM-7, TIG: NM-7. Job Rel Crit: 1. Ability to supervise. 2. Knowledge of inventory management principles and VB# PERMANENT VACANCIES & LOCATION OPEN: 06-15-90 procedures. 3. Knowledge of Army Medical Stock Supply System. 4. KnowlCLOSE: 06-26-90 edge of stock fund acquisition and stock fund budgeting procedures. NOTE: Area of consideration limited to USA MEDDAC/DENTAC. 508-90 ANIMAL HEALTH TECH., NM-704-5, USA MEDDAC-Panama, 520-90 CLINICAL NURSE, NM-610-10, USA MEDDAC-Panama, GAH, Veterinary Svc., ADPAC, Corozal, Panama. Spec. Exp 1 yr. equiv to NM-4, Dept. of Nursing, Mix Medical Ward, Ancon, Panama. Shift Work Required Bilingual. Job Rel Crit: None. However, candidates must have type of (primarily nights & weekends). U.S. License Required. Gen Exp: ADN 30 experience as listed under duties. months + or BSN. Spec. Exp: 6 months equiv to NM-9. TIG: 6 months at NMNOTE: Area of consideration limited to USA MEDDAC/DENTAC. 9. Job Rel Crit: 1. Ability to supervise. 2. Ability to communicate orally and in 509-90 SECRETARY (STENO), NM-318-5, 41ST ASG, DOM, Maintenance writing. 3. Ability to use the nursing process. 4. Ability to deal with persons at Div, Ft. Davis, Panama. Sensitive. Spec. Exp 1 yr. at NM-4. Job Rel Crit: 1. all levels within the hospital. Ability to work independently. 2. Knowledge of administrative procedures. 3. 521-90 MILITARY PERSONNEL CLERK, NM-204-3, TEMPORARY NTE Knowledge of grammar, punctuation rules and medical terminology. 4. Ability 6 MONTHS, USA MEDDAC-Panama, Personnel Div, Medical Holding, Anto instruct clerical personnel in administrative procedures. con, Panama. Gen Exp: 6 months. 510-90 SOCIAL SVCS. REP., NM-187-5 dev to NM-8, USAG, DCA, Family 522-90 CLINICAL NURSE, NM-610-9, USA MEDDAC-Panama, GA, Dept. Support Div, ACS, Ft. Clayton, Panama. Gen Exp: 4 yrs. of college. Job Rel Crit: of PC & CM, Emergency Room, Ancon, Panama. Shift Work. U.S. License 1. Knowledge of community affairs regulations. 2. Knowledge of budget proceRequired. Gen Exp: ADN 30 months + or BSN. Spec Exp: 1 yr. equiv to NM-7. dures & regulations. 3. Skill in working with people in a one-to-one relationship. TIG: NM-7. Job Rel Crit1. Skill in Emergency Room techniques and proce4. Ability to work closely with commanders at all levels. 5. Ability to prepare dures. 2. Ability to communicate orally and in writing. 3. Ability to utilize training materials and conduct workshop or seminars. resources effectively (e.g., human, material, equipment). SELECTIVE FACNOTE: Completed background investigation will be required of applicant TOR: Candidate must have current Advanced Cardiac Life Support certificate. selected. NOTE: VB# 470-90, Management Assistant, NM-344-7 is hereby cancelled 511-90 (2) TRANSLATOR, NM-1040-5 dev to NM-9, HQ USSOUTHCOM, Public Affairs Office, Quarry Hts., Panama. Sensitive. Gen Exp: 3 yrs of which one isequiv to NM-4. Job Rel Crit: 1. Ability to translate into Spanish or English RECURRING CPO VACANCIES relatively simple, non-technical material. 2. Skill in reference research proceCLINICAL NURSE-All Specialties, U.S. License Required. dures. 3. Skill in the use of Word Processing equipment and computerized data LICENSE PRACTICAL NURSE: U.S. License Required. base. Interested persons should contact Ms. Enid L. Sullivan, 285-4116

PAGE 4

4 Tropic Times June 15, 1990 MAC investing $500k in terminal renovation by TSgt. Gene D. Henry The cargo warehouse, where service members temporarily store their household goods and hold HOWARD AFB (24th COMPW baggage, had its storage capability PA) -Military Airlift Command is expanded by 300 tons. This investing $500,000 to upgrade improvement will allow the Howard's 6th Aerial Port squadron not only to take in more Squadron's passenger terminal. The personal goods shipments, but will upgrade includes new carpeting, wall speed up the movement of these paper, a family members lounge, a goods to and from the United States. special category lounge, command According to the superintendent section, and television monitors of Aircraft Services, SMSgt. Eric R. displaying flight arrivals and Tucker, "Sometimes it takes hard departures. work and long hours to get the Along with a new baggage mission completed, but it's worth the conveyor system to speed baggage effort and provides a true sense of Amn. Bridget Barto, 6th Aerial Port Squadron, checks baggage as it pare:, handling, APS is also fitting the main accomplishment to the young men along a newly-installed conveyor belt. The new conveyor belt is one of the entrance with automatic electronic and women of our squadron. The upgrades the squadron is making to improve services. (U.S. Air Force doors to help ease the burden of motto of APS is 'Anywhere, photo by A1C Janel Schroeder) passengers entering the building. Anytime!' by Spec. Daniel L. Bean soldiers and families, paying close recreation room into the lounge. attention to geographical bachelors. Another new program is the FORT CLAYTON (USARSO "We target single and unaccom"Daily Fun Events." Soldiers can PAO) -eale ndt Recreation Center panied soldiers --especially the lower choose from a different variety of t here celebrates its 15th birthday at 6 enlisted," said Anne Kelly, Valent activities each day. "We don't want a .to eleb ate p.m. June 27. Cake and refreshments Recreation Center director. soldier to walk through and not see will be served. The center has several new something happening," Kelly said. The center opened June 27, 1975, programs to continue its service to "If they're not interested in today's its 15th replacing the old facility that is now soldiers. "We're trying to get away activity, there's another one the Fort Clayton library and from the routine of billiards and tomorrow. uEducation Center. board games," Kelly said. In addition to new activities, tours b irth d ay3 The center was named after CSM One of the new programs being and travel events are available to the Othon 0. Valent, command sergeant developed is a quiet, relaxing lounge En tale are Gvailabeah, major of U.S. Army Forces Southern area for barracks soldiers. The Porto bello and other are as in Command from August 1969 to May lounge will be sponsored by U.S. Panama. Any group of 10 or more 1973. He served on active duty for 32 Army South's "Better Opportunity people can request a tour to a years. A World War II, Korea and for Single Soldiers" program. location not scheduled. The center's Vietnam veteran, his career ended "It's not a club, library or daystaff will make arrangements and with a lost battle against cancer on room, Kelly said. "It'll be a place to staff the rangemessibae. Veterans Day 1973. read, write letters, eat or visit with conduct the tour if possible. Carrying on Valent's belief of friends away from the barracks."The "I want to hear more people say caring for his soldiers, the center's center's staff is waiting for funds and 'I'll meet you at the Rec Center,"' staff caters to U.S. Army South approval to convert the back Kelly said. 'Spirit of '76' design wins T-shirt contest by Spec. James Yocum PCC's Management Information Systems office. He chose the design because of FORT CLAYTON (USARSO what "The Spirit of '76" inspires. PAO) -Howard Phelps won the "It sort of embodies the idea of the 1990 Fourth of July T-shirt comPanamanian people being n, petition with a two-year-old liberated without a direct V ~ design. reference to Operation Just "I worked it out a couple years Cause," he said. ago and didn't use it because I came up with a better one," Phelps The I -shirts may be purchased at the Howard Post Office and the saidhe Panama Canal CommisCorozal Main Exchange. In the sion employee was right. The Atlantic community, shirts can be design he chose over this year's purchased from Boy Scout Troop entry won first place in 1988. 8 or Pack 3. Phelps has won the contest The, program was coordinated three times, including the first through the U.S. Army South time he entered in 1986. Public Affairs Office and ihe Boy This year's design is not new to Scouts. All Proceeds benefit local most Americans, either. "It's packs. basically like the painting 'The The second place entry in this Spirit of '76,' Phelps said. year's contest -drawn by Matt Phelps did the drawing at home Osborne, a Diablo Elementary during his free time. The design School student -will be used as the was drawn free hand, but Phelps is cover for the Fourth of July interested in doing it differently in ceremony's program. the future. "I've been interested in using Two other contest entries computers, but I haven't gotten drawn by Spec. Marvin Jones, 8th around to it yet," he said. "It Psychological Operations would make it a lot easier." Support; and Tito Thomas, a ~ Phelps has the knowledge to do Cristobal High School senior, the design on a computer, since he were selected as honorable Howard Phelps' 1990 Fourth of July winning T-shirt design. manages on-line networks at mention.

PAGE 5

Tropic Times June 15, 1990 5 Guardsman brings magic to Guatemala by 1st Lt. Robert 0. Giblin 112th Public Affairs Detachment CHIMALTENANGO, Guatemala -A magician will tell you there are three types of magic tricks: the known, the unknown, and the impossible. But there is another type of magic -the warm feeling that comes from a delighted child, or bringing a smile to someone's face. Reaching into his bag of tricks, a Kentucky Army National Guardsman, SFC Gerald Mays, practiced his magic tricks and warmed the hearts of Guatemalan medical and dental patients during his unit's two-week annual training. Mays, a Waddy, Ky., native, is an operations sergeant with the 475th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital, SFC Gerald Mays, Kentucky Army National Guard, amused Guatemalans with magic. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. based in Frankfort. )seph Whitford) He was among 45 members of the 475th MASH who provided free "At the town of Puerto Rico, we've Mays learned his first magic trick worked, I wouldn't be fascinating medical, dental and veterinary care been seeing 300 to 500 patients a more than 30 years ago, as a young any more," he said. in Paxorotut, Puerto Rico and El day," he explained. "Many of them sailor in the U.S. Navy. "I was The soldier-magician says people Rejon, in the highlands about 35 to have never seen a doctor or dentist walking down the street in Norfolk, all over the world enjoy magic, even 50 miles northwest of Guatemala before, so they tend to crowd around Va., and passed a magic shop," he where the people speak Cakchiquel, City. the buildings and tents where we set said. "There wasn't much to do one of the 23 native languages of The unit operated out of a up our clinics. during our spare time at sea, so I Guatemala. Guatemalan military camp centrally "When the crowds start to become bought the 'appearing cane'trick and "Magic is an international located in the town of Chimalteoverwhelming, I come out with my practiced over and over again. The language. It breaks down language nango. red scarf, signaling the start of the next time we were in Norfolk, I langae. I baks own lnguage "My roles here are mostly public show. I just do a few simple tricks -bought another trick. I've been at it bag of tricks," said Mays. relations, crowd control and easing prestidigitation, or sleight of hand, ever since." the tensions of patients who came and rope tricks -but it's the quality, Mays often meets other magicians, "If you show me any group of kids, here for treatment," said Mays, not the quantity. Patients enjoy who share new tricks or new twists to I can communicate with them. These whose normal military duties are watching them, and when I'm doing tricks he already knows. However, he ninos are the same as kids at home. similar to those of a licensed practical magic tricks, managing the crowds is won't tell anyone else how tricks are And kids -of all ages -are still nurse. a little easier," he added. done. "If I told you how a trick kids." Drug Administration and the National Marine Fisheries Service. With them, the VSO TSA keeps food supply safe staetetn TSA eep foo su ply afe coordinates food recalls and other actions concerning overall food safety. FORT LEE, Va.(Troop Support Agency) /The information flows through VSO to those For some reason you're up before dawn and your who look at commissaries and the Army dining errand takes you past the comissary loading dock. facilities -the post veterinarians, enlisted food In the dim light you see a white-coated person inspectors and preventive medicine personnel. with a clipboard poking around some crates of The VSO, the federal agencies and the food fruit and vegetables. Then you are past. inspectors on the loading docks provide a good You might never see again the person working example of Total Quality Management. responsible for your safe and fresh produce. And That is, every food item for sale in a commissary is your milk and meat, bread and so on. safe because of careful attention at every step in The food supply in the United States is the the production process by persons who feel safest in the world. You have just seen a tiny part I personally responsible for food safety. of why: A veterinary food inspector was checking -Remember that dawn food delivery? When that salad makings for U.S. Army Troop Support trailer was opened, first impressions told a story. Agency commissary shoppers. Do you know how A bad odor, warm temperature, puddles of water much you rely on veterinarians for the safety of or insects on the fly would indicate problems. the food you buy? Conversely, good impressions come from Army and all Defense Department food temperatures within the correct range, dry floors inspections, are supervised by the Veterinary and clean well-packed goods on pallets. Corps, part of the Army Medical Department a since 1916. ~The inspector looks for the U.S. Department of Federal authorities, concerned with public Agriculture seal on products. Dairy, chilled and health as affected by food safety, turned to the frozen merchandise is checked for wholesomeness veterinary profession at the turn of the century. and expiration dates. Meat and dairy products Veterinarians'expertise in animal pathology and have special contract specifications. If inspectors the hazards of animal disease transmission to man issued. This requires timely and accurate determine contract nonconformance, they do not -qualifies them to determine what is sage, information. take delivery. wholesome food. Food-related information in the form of advice Commissaries get a formal sanitary inspection Celebrating its 84th birthday this month, the from federal agencies, queries and food inspection every month. Areas and methods of food U.S. Army Veterinary Corps came into being in reports from many post inspectors is received in preparation and storage conditions must meet order to protect the health of humans from animal the VSO every day. Also, the VSO deals directly high standards. Customer returns are inspected. diseases. Veterinarians first saw service in the with the Army's Surgeon General, the Army The commissary's markdown section often has Army Quartermaster Corps, treating the draft Medical Department's chief physician. His office some merchandise in damaged packagings. animals. Now the specialty corps oversees food sets standards of food quality. Everything is inspected for safety and safety. Since food safety information goes two ways, wholesomeness before placement there. In the TSA headquarters on Fort Lee, the the VSO is like a collecting and clearing house. Their inspection reports are received in the Veterinary Staff Office of two veterinarians and Notices on potential problems, corrective VSO and common or unusual defects identified. one environmental science officer maintain a link measures, actual warnings and recalls are passed The VSO then issues corrective advice to with a small group of food quality experts posted down an informational chain from the VSO to the commissaries. around the world. .local food inspectors. Also, VSO shares food Army food. inspectors have the task of safety news with federal agencies, military posts You depend on your commissary products guaranteeing that all food bought, transported, and with others who need to know. because safety is the commitment of the people in stored and issued by the Department of Defense These include the U.S. Department of the Veterinary Staff Office. Many others have a has been surveyed, inspected, passed and certified Agriculture Food Safety Inspection Service, part in providing safe food to TSA commissaries. with its seal of approval before being sold or Environmental Protection Agency, Food and The VSO guides them all.

PAGE 6

6 Tropic Times j Mity June 15, 1990 ACS commander: Family members are'heroes' WASHINGTON (ARNEWS) -When soldiers go to war, they usually leave their families behind, buffered from the danger of combat by time and distance. For U.S. soldiers stationed in Panama, however, the Dec. 20, 1989, trip to the battlefield for Operation Just Cause was a short one, and their families on nearby U.S. installations found themselves ducking for cover. That's why Brig. Gen. Tom Jaco, commander of the Army's Community and Family Support Center in Alexandria, Va., went to Panama during May -to find out what those families went through and what the Army did to help them. "They're heroes, no question about it," Jaco said on his return. Jaco spoke with three groups of family members duringhisMay 811 stayinPanama -spouses of staff sergeants through majors; spouses of senior officers; and teenagers. He said the families "kept coming back to this theme, that there was a great need for information" about the battle raging close by. That's ,also why the networking skills taught by Army Community Service centers became so important, he said. "They took the experiences from their unit family support group and quickly organized their own support group within the housing area," Jaco said, reBesides forming support groups during Operation Just Cause, family members gave troops moral counting one woman's story in her own words: support. (Photo courtesy of TASC) "I had no information and I didn't know where to get any information. There was no one to give me any "Some soldiers came in and told them that all hell support plans and housing mayoral programs proved information. was going to break loose in a few minutes, (to) move invaluable. But, he said, the lessons learned from "And then I saw the telephone and picked it up, to the center of the house, lie down on the floor and Operation Just Cause show there's work to be done. and it was alive. it was working. So I dialed my tell the children to keep their shoes on because there's neighbor, and she answered, and she also thought she going to be a lot of flying glass," Jaco said. "That's "We've got to have enough vision to know thai was the only one in the area, (that) everyone had been about all they really needed to know." sometimes there are operations that are not traditional evacuated but her." Jaco lauded ACS and morale, welfare and recreain nature," Jaco said. "This may be Monday-momThe vacuum of information became even more tion workers in the area, many of whom worked ing quarterbacking, but two, three months ago, we acute when howitzer blasts began rocking the housaround the clock, driving through hazardous areas to could have told the families what to do in the event ing areas. wherever they were needed. He also said family that (they) come under hostile fire." Baggage shipment Army to extend some lieutenants Soldiers who shipped unaccompanied baggage to WASHINGTON (ARNEWS) -says Maj. Lois Faires, a PERSCOM This request for removal of Panama are strongly urged to The Army will extend more than 850 spokeswoman. "Officers who do not extension, she says, must be make arrangements to have first and second lieutenants so their desire this extension need to decline approved before the officer enters the shipments delivered as soon as records can be reviewed by a the extension through their chain of extension. The appeal authority is possible. projected fiscal year 1991 command in writing to their the first general officer in the chain of The Transportation Division is Conditional Voluntary Indefiniteappropriate career management command, and any appeals must be running out of space in which to Regular Army Probationary Board. division at PERSCOM." processed before forwarding the store inbound unaccompanied Officials at the U.S. Total Army Officers who decline the extension request for removal. baggage. For delivery arrangePersonnel Command in Alexandria, will be separated on their original ments call 287-3365/4813/3868. Va., say other than Regular Army expiration of current service, she "Officers having questions should For further details call Roosevelt lieutenants from year group 1988 adds. contact their local personnel service Edwards at 287-6465/6759. who have or will have first lieutenant Faires explains that installation center," Faires concludes. "This temporary dates of rank between personnel service centers will provide information has been provided to the NCO promotions Oct. 1, 1989, and Sept. 30, 1990, and a list of the eligible officers to the first field by military personnel message who have an expiration of current colonel in the chain of command, number 90-167 with a date-time The following Air Force people service between Oct. 1, 1990, through The colonel then will screen the list, group of 231200 May 1990." in Panama have recently been July 30, 1991, will be given shortcounsel the officer and request selected for promotion to the rank term extensions until July 31, 1991. removal of any officer's extension For more information, contact of master sergeant for cycle 90: "This short-term extension will be because of substandard performance CWO 2 Sutterfield at PERSCOM, Bruce E. Albright, Todd W. automatically 'top loaded' here," or misconduct. AUTOVON 221-9765. Armstrong, Terry L. Ballew, Joseph C. Beard Jr., Eduardo C. Bedoya, Robert B. Bender, Daniel N av la n s promotion opportunities, pay and C. Brown, Edgar E. Castro, benefits, schooling and transfers Jimmy D. Clark, William 01 consistent with today's patterns. Coddington, Jimmy L. Coley, p ain le Reductions will be accomplished Jesus Cruz, Larry D. Dyer, Larry mainly by recruiting fewer sailors, D. Eskridge, David P. Farmer, commissioning fewer officers, and James R. Faulkner, Edward W. r i using the Defense Officer Personnel Ferrick, Curtis W. Flamm, Perlita r d c i Management Act and high-year R. Fosdick, Albert Gonzalez. tenure to encourage retirement of Also selected are: Michael D. WASHINGTON (NNS) -With those-eligible. The Navy does not Hamp, Keith R. Harris, Marcus recent reports of personnel cuts in the e plan to rely an involuntary A. Harris, Joey B. Hatcher, military services, many sailors have separations. Gordon R. Hewell, William R. expressed concern over their future. "We intend to take care of our Hines, Perry M. Hogsten, Enoch But, in a recent interview, Chief of people and their families," said Johnson, Roy C. Johnson, Bobby Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Mike Boorda, describing plans for some F. Jones, Jack A. King Jr., Boorda said that the Navy plans to improvements in sea-shore rotation Stephen T. Mazurek, Jeffrey J. make personnel reductions in future and quality of Navy life. "Only McMillan, John W. Moran, years without hurting Navy men and drastic, short-term cuts would force Richard J. Piech, Irving women. us to depart from our strategy and Rodriguez, Jose M. Segovia, "Our strategy is to size and balance consider involuntary separations." Murray Smith, Daniel A. personnel to the force structure that Boorda said that Navy leaders, Spencer, Phillip Stillwagon, is determined right for the Navy," from the Secretary of the Navy and Marilyn J. Stewart, Jeffrey L. explained Boorda. "If the number of creating turmoil among Navy people Chief of Naval Operations down, are Strout, Kathi J. Sutton, and sailors is tied directly to the number and without reducing the readiness strongly committed to protesting the George L. Vega. of ships and squadrons, we can of the fleet." interests of Navy personnel and their reduce the size of the Navy without Boorda outlined plans for future families.

PAGE 7

Tropic Times June 15, 1990 7 Wanted by CID Heart Disease Name: Unknown No. 1 adult killer in U.S. Age: 20-25 years old by Dr. (Capt.) Grover K. Yamane heart attacks often occurs in youth, Weight: 120-150 pounds 24th Medica Group and even in early childhood. Height: 5 feet 4 inches But, less well-publicized is the Build: Medium influence of several other health H OWARD AFB (24th C OMPW/ conditions. Hair: Black PA) -A plague is stalking us, Complexion: Dark brown bringing suffering and premature These other risk factors include R death. Each year, more American high blood pressure, diabetes, male Race:adults die from coronary artery gender, family history of early heart disease than from any other illness. disease and smoking. Individual was last seen The trend for this modern day Unfortunately, the effects of these wearing tan baggy pants and a pestilence seems to be going strong as risk factors are cumulative. The Just Cause T-shirt. He was we enter the new decade. number of risk factors one has decides the end result. For example, accompanied by a black male. The heart's muscle cells rely on a deds th d r esto le, network of smallarteries for a person with a high cholesterol level netorhment al xygen hart f has twice the chance of dying early nourishment and oxygen. In heart from heart disease, compared to disease, this network becomes frm eatdsscmpedt dsared wth nhetrk bcas. someone with a low cholesterol level. scarred with cholesterol crystals. If there is smoking and high blood Much three major coronary arteries Name: Unknown no longer allow free passage of blood pesterollevel, the c nce of earl Age: 20-25 to muscle cells. death is nearly six times the normal. Weight: 140-150 pounds The choked-off muscle can die Thus, the more risk factors there Height: 5 feet 9 inches suddenly, as in a heart attack, or are, the greater the need for early and become weakened and flabby, aggressive medical investigation and Build: Medium causing congestive heart failure. treatment to prevent heart disease. Hair: Black Over the past decade, -several To get the full benefit of Complexion: Dark studies have shown that high blood cholesterol testing, the profile of Race: Black cholesterol is a villain in this other risk factors must be known and potentially lethal disease. Thegreater considered. Only then can a the amount of cholesterol dissolved particular cholesterol level be put in in the blood stream, the easier it is for perspective, and a reasonable course Individual wears a gold stud cholesterol crystals to invade the charted, for diagnostic work or earring in his left ear. He may be walls of the coronary arteries, medical therapy. traveling with .a Cuna Indian. Individual is believed to be a The chance of getting heart disease In the prevention of this common Panamanian national. rises steadily as the blood cholesterol and deadly disease, good strategy level climbs above 200. As the level will be the. patient's best weapon. For, rises above 200, there is an explosive an evaluation of your potential for These men are wanted for questioning by the U.S. Army Criminal increase in the probability of heart problems, see your health care Investigation Division Command, Panama Field Office. They are developing early disease. Indeed, in provider. Contact the 24th Medical considered armed and dangerous. Information concerning these men certain rare metabolic disorders Group at 284-3014 for more should be provided to CID, 285-6817 or 28543,14. causing cholesterol levels in the information. Free cholesterol testing several hundred range, death from is available. Pacific Community Chapel Schedule AMADOR CHAPEL GORGAS HOSPITAL Building 108, Phone: 282-3610 Building 254 12:15 p.m. Catholic Mass (2nd floor, Thursday) 9 a.m. Catholic Mass Sun. Protestant Worship (To be announced at hospital) 10 a.m. Episcopal Holy Eucharist 11:15 a.m.General Protestant Service ALBROOK CHAPEL Building 860, Phone: 286-4256 CLAYTON CHAPEL 8 a.m. Hispanic Catholic Mass & CCD 9:30 a.m. Protestant Sunday School Building 64, Phone: 287-5859 9:30 a.m. Catholic Mass 11:30 a.m. Daily Catholic Mass 11 a.m. General Protestant service 5 p.m. Catholic Mass (Saturday) HOWARD CHAPEL 9 a.m. General Protestant Service Building 500, Phone: 284-3940 10:30 a.m. Sunday School (Protestant, at Education Center) 4:30 p.m. Confessions (Saturday) 10:30 a.m. Catholic Mass 5 p.m. Catholic Mass (Saturday) 10:30 Sunday School 11 a.m. Catholic Mass noon Gospel Service 9:30 a.m. CCD (Kobbe School) 9 a.m. General Protestant Service COROZAL CHAPEL 10 am. Protestant Sunday School (Howard School) 12:30 p.m. Gospel Service Building 112, Phone: 285-6717 7 p.m. Jewish 1st Fridays USNAVSTAPANCANAL CHAPEL 10 a.m. Hispanic Catholic Mass Building 88, Phone: 283-4148 11:30 a.m. Pentecostal Sunday School 8 a.m. Catholic Mass 12:30 p.m. Pentecostal Fellowship-Worship 10 a.m. General Protestant 7 p.m. Evening Worship 7 p.m. Bible Study (Wednesday) Atlantic Community Chapel Schedule DAVIS CHAPEL 10 a.m. General Protestant Service (Sunday) GULICK CHAPEL Building 32, Phone: 289-3319 SHERMAN CHAPEL Sunday 8 a.m. Catholic Mass M, W, Th, F Building 224, Phone: 2894616 4:30 p.m. Catholic Confession (Saturday) Building 152, Phone: 289-6481 9 a.m. Catholic English Mass 5 p.m. Catholic English Mass (Saturday) 10 a.m. Protestant $ervice (Sunday) 10 a.m. Catholic Hispanic Mass/CCD 9 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 6 p.m. Catholic English Mass (Sunday) 11:15 a.m. Gospel Service

PAGE 8

8 Tropic Times June 15, 1990 Bomb ruins art museum MIAMI (UPI) -A bomb exploded Thursday at the Cuban Museum of Arts and Culture causing extensive damage but no injuries, and the FBI said the attack was the latest in a series of terrorist bombings apparently committed by a group of anti-Castro militants. The museum, which has been at the center of a political controversy within Miami's large Cuban community, was rocked by the explosion, which ocV cured at 1:09 a.m. EDT, said FBI special agent Paul Miller. The FBI classified the bombing as a terrorist act. "This is the 17th device that either has been defused or has exploded since May 1987, which we believe would be attributed to individuals who have targeted individuals, businesses and museums who they believe for some reason may be advocating a better relationship with (dictator Fidel) Castro's Cuba," Miller said. "We believe from our investigation that we may be talking about the same group of individuals," Miller said. Miller said that although FBI agents did not know what type of explosive was used in the blast, the device was more powerful than those used in similar Cuban President Fidel Castro looks at photos during the inauguration of the Museum of Mexican-Cuban Friendship bombings that have rocked Miami's in Tuxpan, Mexico. The Miami bombing was against musuems or businesses believed to be advocating better relations Cuban community in the past. with Castro. Castro launched his 25-month guerrilla war 34 years ago from Tuxpan. (AP Laserphoto) "It wasn't a pipe bomb, and it was more sophisticated than some of the material gathered at the scene of other in the residential neighborhood surroof, as well as three works of art other devices that we have seen rebombings, the most recent of which rounding the museum, could be heard inside, valued at $10,QOO. Osvaldo cently," he said. "If anyone had been occurred at an optical store in Hialeah from several miles away,officialssaid. Monzon, the museum's executive diinside the building, they could have in September 1989, he said. "My husband and I were sleeping rector, estimated the structural dambeen seriously injured or killed." Miller said no arrests have been and were awakend by the blast. We age at $20,000. Miller said evidence gathered at the made in any of the bombings or atheard the huge explosion and thought, A bomb exploded outside the muscene, including debris from the blast tempted bombings. 'Oh, my God.' We knew it was the seum once before, in 1988, he said. and other items which he declined to "We are hopeful that further invesmuseum," said Amparo Lazo, who "This is much more extensive. The identify, will be sent to an FBI laboratigation will result in arrests at some lives across from the museum. FBI described it as a high density tory in Washington, D.C., for analysis. future date," he said. The blast shattered windows in the bomb. The other was a projectile," he The debris will be compared with The blast, which awakened people front of the building and damaged the said. Cardinal warns pro-choice Catholic politicians NEW YORK (UPI) -Cardinal John O'Connor warned Catholic politicians "It must be remembered that we're not talking about a public Thursday they risk excommunication if they continue to support abortion office holder demanding that Americans go to mass on rights Sunday or not eat meat on Friday. We are talking about an "Where Catholics are perceived not only as treating churchteaching on individual who bases his decision not simply on the desires abortion with contempt, but helping to of the majority, but on what he or she believes is right and multiply abortions by advocating legislation supporting abortion, or by just." Cardinal O'Connor making public funds available for abortion, bishops may decide that such Catholics must be warned that O'Connor's warning came just days Archibishop Rembert Weakland would they are at risk of excommunication," after the archdiocese rescinded an inmark some change in the bishop's atO'Connor' statement said. vitation to Rep. Charles Rangel, Dtack on politicians by O'Connor and Writing in the archdiocesan newspaN.Y., a Catholic, to speak at a Cathothe pro-life committee of the National perCatholicNew York, O'Connorsaid Cardinal O'Connor lic high school commencement beConference of Catholic Bishops." if such actions persist, "bishops may cause of his support for legal abortion. -In the reference to Weakland, consider excommunication the only The cardinal said that kind off action Kissling drew attention to a statement option." An excommunicated Catholic is cut served as a warning and "to help by Weakland in mid-March suggestNew York has a number of nationoff from the sacraments of the church reduce scandal." Rangel said the caring a Catholic could, in conscience, ally prominent Catholic politicians who with the exception of penance, which dinal's statement would not "sidetrack" support legal abortion. support legal abortion, including Gov. gives him a chance to confess his sins him. O'Connor's statement stressed that Mario Cuomo, who immediately termed and reconcile with the church. A woman "I think this type of language is he was speaking in his capacity as O'Connor's statement "upsetting .who has an abortion is automatically intemperate, mean-spirited and in archbishop of New York and not in his disconcerting." considered excommunicated. contempt of Christian and Catholic role as chairman of the bishops' com"The church leadership, led by the O'Connor said Catholic politicians belief," Rangel said. mittee for anti-abortion activities. cardinal, the college of cardinals and cannot separate their faith from their "Intimidating and threatening people Another Catholic congressman, Rep. the pope -we defer to them, respect policies. is not the sensitive and churchly thing Jose Serano, D-N.Y., said O'Connor's them and let them speak for certain "It must be remembered that we're to do." statement "just saddens you to the authority," said Cuomo, who personnot talking about a public officeholder The warning also drew immediate point where you wonder where it is ally opposes abortion. demanding that Americans go to mass fire from Catholics for a Free Choice, we're headed as a Catholic church." "But I'm a layman and I speak for on Sunday or not eat meat on Friday," an independent group of Catholics that Rep. Susan Molinari, D-N.Y., said myself. It's about people having the he said. supports abortion rights. the statement would not change her choice in our democracy and the free"We are talking about an individual "We find this extremely disturbmind. "It deepens the sadness that you dom to have the choice. who bases his decision not simply on ing," said Frances Kissling, president feel to think that they have raised the "I have not changed my mind, nor the desires of the majority, but on what of the group. stakes so high," she said. will I," Cuomo said. he or she believes is right and just." "We had hoped that the example of

PAGE 9

Tropic Times June 15,1990 9 j Cisneros opens Belize bridge ".a symbol of ties between two areas." by Spec. James Yocum MULLINS RIVER, Belize (USARSO PAO) -Belize and U.S. officials opened the Mullins River Bridge during a ceremony here May 30. The bridge, a 140-foot structure in Southern Belize, was built earlier by engineers from the 20th Engineer Battalion, Fort Campbell, Ky. Flood waters destroyed the bridge in October 1988. The new bridge opened a route through southern Belize, a rural area cut off from the nation's urban centers since the old bridge was destroyed. Maj. Gen. Marc A. Cisneros, U.S. Army South commander, talked to the soldiers, detailing the friendly relations America and Belize share. "A bridge is a symbol of a tie between two areas," Cisneros said. "This bridge is symbolic of the tie between the United States and the READY TO GO -Two hundred fifty-one vehicles donated to Panama from U.S. stocks in England recently arrived country of Belize. at Cristobal port here. The vehicles will be fitted with lights and repainted for use by Panama's new public force. The five-month project ended with (U.S. Army photo) the bridge opening, andFort Campbell's 20th Engineers returning home. June 5. up, worked with a new partner in the sustainment training. "At the beginning, there was a difference in my shooting because he hadn't been trained in observing," Kananowicz said. "He picked up on a lot during the sustainment training and by the end of the A course there was no difference between him and my first partner." Training new snipers during the sustainment training helps build the program, Hardison said. "If you just train the same people each time, when they leave Panama, you lose all your snipers and have to start over." The night-fire exercise gave the newcomers a chance to fire under simulated combat conditions, and gave the snipers the chance to practice at night. L The snipers fired in darkness using M-16A2s with 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry (Airborne) snipers fire during a night-fire exercise on Empire Range. ANPVS-4 night-vision scopes, which illuminated the targets. They also fired the sniper weapons at knownSnipers m eet the cha lenge distance silhouettes with red-filter flashes being the only light on the target. "The filtered flashlight simulates amuzzle flash, story and photo by Spec. John Sell judged, charted and fired on unknown distance tarand that split-second flash is all the time they have to gets; and fired sniper weapons and M-16A2s during zero in on the target," Fleitas said. "We had shooters EMPIRE RANGE (USARSO PAO) -Contemponight training. making 10 hits on 10 shots." rary warfare is often fought at night, but most marksWhile the initial course stressed marksmanship, Overhead flares were the only light source in the manship training is done during the day. This presthe sustainment stressed practical application. third portion of the night fire exercise. Again, many ents a problem. "A guy can be the world's greatest marksman, but of the snipers were perfect on their 10 shots. Snipers from the 193rd Infantry Brigade (L) have if he can't move from point A to point B to take the "We try to make all training as real as possible, a solution thanks to experts from the 41st Area Supshot, he's ineffective," Fleitas said. "Likewise, if he while always keeping safety as the top priority," port Group's Marksmanship Training Unit. can make the movement without detection, but can't Hardison said. "That's one reason I like inverted It's called the Advanced Long-Distance Marksmake the shot he's ineffective. Field craft and markstraining, where you sleep during the day and train at manship Training Course. Part of a multi-phase manship go hand-in-hand for snipers." night." training program, the two-week course was taught by The field craft portion of the training was an Sustainment training for the 1/508th will continue SFC Dewey Hardison and SSgt. Manny Fleitas of the example of intense, realistic training. The snipers with two-week training sessions every couple of 41st's MTU. low-crawled 250 meters using tall grass and brush as months, according to 2nd Lt. Kerry Trent, sniper In March, they put 10 sniper teams through the their cover. They had to get within 200 meters of a employment officer for 1/508th. course -five each from the 5th Battalion, 87th truck and take two shots using blanks. Their goal was "We are already on the training schedule for Infantry and the 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry (Airto remain undetected throughout the three-hour exerAugusL We'll do more distance judgement, advance borne). cise. movements, snap shots and increased night trainThe students were taught to use two specialized The snipersmoved slowly, snipping bladesof cuna ing," Trent said. weapons, the M-21 and M-24 sniper systems. The grass and slowly pulling them to the ground before Everything taught comesfrom TC 23-14, which is fundamentals of shooting and long-distance marksmoving ahead. They also camouflaged themselves the new sniper manual, Hardison said. manship, taught during Initial Entry and Advanced once they got to their firing position. However, just teaching the soldier about marksIndividual Training, were also reemphasized. The snipers set up in a variety of positions to take manship doesn't make him a sniper. "To be a sniper "The initial course gave them the basic skills," their shots. Some were sitting; some stood, using a a soldier has to be willing to lay motionless for hours said Hardison," but without practical application the fork in a tree as a brace; and some steadied their rifles and let insects bite him without moving. It takes a value of the course would be lost. That's where on their partner's shoulders. Some hid in the trees, great deal of self-discipline," Hardison said. "We sustainment training comes in." some behind small bushes and others stayed in the tall can give him the techniques, but we can't give him the "Sustainment training helps them hone their skills grass. All the teams were undetected, even though as will." to perfection," Hardison said. "We ran the course, many as eight people were trying to find them using Kananowicz said the training could help all soland advise units during their own sustainment trainbinoculars. diers -not just snipers. ing programs." "It's best to move when the wind is blowing. The "Every soldier should go through a course like this Sniper teams from the 1/508th and two Marine cuna grass is already moving, so our tunneling moveand learn how to shoot better," Kananowicz said. teams recently completed a two-week sustainment ment through it isn't noticeable," said Sgt. Joseph "As soldiers we're supposed to shoot, move and training program. During sustainment training, the Kananowicz. communicate. That's exactly what this training snipers were instructed on basic sniper movements; Kananowicz, an honor graduate during the trainstresses."

PAGE 10

1 Tropic Times June 15, 1990 Military working dogs compete Air Force squadron dogs capture top kennel honors story and photos by Spec. John Sell Scoring was based on the dog and handler's abilities. In the explosive and narcotics divisions, points FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) -Military were given for the number of correct finds, complete working dogs attacked, sniffed and snooped their way search procedures and how the handler worked with through obstacle courses, buildings and vehicles during the dog. Points were taken away for false finds or the first U.S. Southern Command military working handler errors when the trainer miscued the dog. dog competition June 4-6. Fort Clayton's theater was the first stop for the The Air Force's 24th Security Police Squadron explosive detection dogs. The dogs were tasked to took top kennel honors and will keep the "Victory find nine types of explosive training devices. The Cup" until the next competition in six months. teams also searched through a variety ofjunk vehicles The competition was broken down into three diviat Corozal. The final stop was to search a building. sions: patrol dogs, explosive-detection dogs and narSrA Benson McCallister led his dog, Bresto, to cotic-detection dogs. enough training aids to allow the duo to claim top In the patrol-dog division, SrA Barbara Smitherhonors in the explosive detection portion. The team man directed her dog, V.anna, through the obstacle scored 318 out of a possible 405 points. course, ordered it to attack and to search a building. Army Sgt. John Spivey and his dog, Gorson, HHC, The tandem worked so efficiently they compiled Law Enforcement Activity-Atlantic, placed second 1,330 out of a possible 1,500 points. with 278 points. Army SSgt. Manuel Santana and his Air Force Sgt. Robert Killen and his dog, Joe, dog, Ivan from HHC LEA-Pacific, placed third with placed second with 1,316 points. Spec. Franklin Wallace 260 points. and his dog, Breston, of Fort Clayton's kennel placed "I was more nervous during the competition than third with 1,293 points. working an actual mission," Santana said. "NorEight teams competed in the patrol dog division at mally when we search a building, its me, the dog, a Howard Air Force Base, but only four tandems comspotter and someone who knows the building. Here peted in the explosive detection and narcotic porwe had several people watching, including judges and tions. Each dog worked only in its specialty area. media, which can distract the dog and me." "The patnil dogs were judged on obedience, working The narcotics division was conducted at Fort Davis. the obstacle course, aggression, scouting and their The dogs searched the theater, vehicles and a buildability to search a building," said SFC Kenneth ing. Four types of narcotic training aids were planted Smith, competition director. for the dogs to find. Each competitor was evaluated by three judges. Santana and his other canine partner, Rex, won the Each judge could award up to 500 points for patrol narcotics portion scoring 322 out of 375 points. Fort CLOCKWISE (from above) Army Sgt. John dogs. The final score was the combined total. Davis' Spec. Billy Crosby and his dog, Lion, finished The judges were kennel masters from participating second with 309 points, while Petty Officer 3rd Class Spivey has Gorson sniff high in Fort Clayton's kennels: Howard Air Force Base, U.S. Naval Station Scott Thompson and his dog, Rebel, finished third theater. Spivey motivates Mentor before comPanama Canal, Forts Davis and Clayton. with 297 points. peting in the competition's narcotics detection "The judging was consistent and fair. No judge "The competition was fantastic. Next time we portion. Army SSgt. Manuel Santana and Ivan evaluated teams from his kennel," Smith said. "That's hope to have more dogs compete," Smith said. "The search deserted vehicles during the competition's why we had four judges but only three scoring each handlers liked it because it was good training and they explosive detection. competitor." were able to exchange techniques and ideas." McConnell assumes College awards degrees MEDDAC command GORGAS ARMY COMMUNITY HOWARD AFB (24th MSgL Michael Fusco, SrA Buehler HOSPITAL (USARSO PAO) -Dr. COMPWPA) -Howard enlisted Garcia, SSgt. William Lossner, SSgt. (Col.) Michael A. McConnell assumed people were awarded the associates David Morgan, TSgt. William command of the U.S. Medical Departin Applied Science degree from the Pressgrove, Sgt. John Reid III, SgL ment Activity and Gorgas Army Community College of the AirForce Pedro Sanchez, SSgt. Gregory SchCommunity Hospital from Dr. (Col.) recently. The associate in Applied malfield, TSgt. Donald Tinder, and Prentice Thompson 'Jr. during a cereScience signifies completion of two MSgt. Michael Tripp. mony here June 5. years of collegiate-level study reCol. Wayne P. Skora, 24th ComThompson, who took command in lated to. the graduates' Air Force posite Wing deputy commander for -June, 1988, leaves Panama to comspecialties. operations, presented the graduates mand the U.S. MEDDAC at Fort Ord, The graduates attending the cerewith their diplomas. Calif. mony in the 24th Composite Wing McConnell received his doctorate conference room were: MSgt. ThoThe Community College of the of medicine from Trinity College, mas C. Bowens, MSgt. Timothy Air Force provides educational proDublin, Ireland. His major assignments Gipson and SSgt. Kenneth McBeth. grams which reflect personal and include surgeon, 1st Cavalry Division Also receiving their degrees, but professional growth consistent with in Vietnam; chief of pathology, Brooke unable to attend due to permanentAir Force requirements. The colArmy Medical Center, San Antonio, change-of-station or temporary duty lege is accredited by the CommisTexas. He most recently served as Dr. (Col.) McConnell were: TSgt. Joseph Beard, SSgt. sion on Colleges of the Southern command surgeon, U.S. Southern SamuelfBradley, SSgt. Willie Dumas, Association of Colleges and Schools. Command. He will be joined by his wife, Carol, His military awards include the Silver and three daughters: Ann, Judy and Star and Legion of Merit. Flonnuale.

PAGE 11

Tropic Times June 15, 1990 LP11AL, Music program at Balboa Elementary School (Photos by DODDS) Field day participant. Tug-of-war event during a field day. Making Christmas decorations. 1989-1990 DoDDS in review ALBROOK AFS (DoDD S) -The "Year in study skills program. Skills included teaching Review" and what a year! 1989-1990 in Panama the students the criteria for the heading, will be remembered not only for Operation Just organization and writing of papers. Students Cause and the restoration of democracy to were taught to take their folders or binders Panama but also for the strong academic home every day with their assignments recorded climate that prevailed in all the schools during on a monthly calendar. Parents did their part by the crisis. The accomplishments of students, checking to insure the assignments listed teachers and parents during this time of turmoil matched the completed homework assignments. contributed to a year of educational excellence. The program also focused on test-taking. The Apple II GS computer fast became an memorization and notetaking, all skills which integral part of the education process in every give children an advantage throughout their elementary classroom in DoDDS-Panama. lifetime. These will be stressed again in 1991. Students from kindergarten through grade six "Kids on the Block," a group of specially had daily opportunities for hands-on use of the trained DoDDS teachers who use nearly lifecomputer. Written composition became a high sized puppets toured the elementary schools priority for students in our schools, creating again. This time, the puppets addressed products that are professional in appearance. personal safety and living with physical Checking out books from the library. Other uses included reinforcing basic facts and handicaps. After each show, students had the skills, using graphic programs, and encouraging opportunity to ask questions of the puppets, the creative thinking in problem solving situations. puppets responded with clarity and candor. Macmillan Connections reading program was The Schoolwide Enrichment Program also implemented in all the elementary schools provided three types of enrichment to all this year. Identified as strengths of this program elementary school students. The first type are the high interest level and challenges for all included a wide variety of general exploratory students, higher levels of thinking expected from activities such as presentations on astronomy the children and the excellent selection of using the Star Lab Planetarium, tie-dying, the literature included in the textbooks. Panama Canal, munitions, and tropical plants. Speakers for these activities included Maj. Gen.Several internationally known educational Cisneros, Dr. Borham, and Omar Moreno. Type leaders and authors traveled to Panama to II activities included regularly scheduled lessons provide training for teachers and administrators on brainstorming, communication and decision during the past school year. They included Dr. making as well as a math enrichment program Bruce Joyce and Dr. Beverly Showers on (Math Olympiads) and a variety of mini-courses Models of Teaching, Dr. Carol Cummigs on in logic, newspaper publishing, creative writing Classroom Management, Dr. Anita Archer on and leadership. Thirty-two Type III projects Study Skills, Dr. James Olivero on Curriculum which are individual or small group projects Alignment, Dr. Paula Rutherford on The Study based on the students' interest, task of Teaching, Dr. Charles Wolfgang on commitment and creativity were completed in the Strategies for Classroom Discipline and Drs. elementary schools. Clarence and Sharon Johnson on Counseling. The juggling program is a recent addition to Additionally, DoDDS staff development the physical education curriculum. In 1988 and training provided courses for teachers on a 1989, jump rope was introduced as an excellent variety of topics such as Cooperative Learning, aid for physical fitness. This year, David Computer Education, Mathematical Problem Finnegan, the founder of the Juggling Institute, Solving and Peer Coaching. visited DoDDS and taught students that Students, teachers and parents at all schools juggling is fun, reduces stress and builds eyeFuture computer programmers. implemented the "Skills for School Success" hand coordination.

PAGE 12

A 12 Jun Tie Not A LB R O O K The center will conductaday trip to FREE AEROBICS -Low RESOURCE LIBRARY -ACS has Langosta beach June 23. impact workouts are held at 11:30 a MilitaryInstallationResourcelibrary in CLASS -A cooking session is scheda.m. Call in advance. for soldiers being reassigned. InforYouth centers uled for I p.m. Sunday. Topics inCOMPUTER INSTRUCTION mation packets are available from your fo clude how to prepare yuca, plantain -Classes available range from next duty station. Requests must be 3 L E S S O N S -P r e -b all e t, and sancocho soup. beginners to DOS and advance level. made eight weeks in advance. Copies intermediate ballet and modern fts Evening sessions. Reserve your space are available for viewing at Building a dance are offered at both centers. Sherman Arts Craft aai.15 oa.Soevdo r ns Fo oeifrain al2470early. 115, Corozal. Some videos are on sh For more information, call 284-4700 The following classes are held at hand also. For information, call Irma or 286-3e95Building 206, Fort Sherman. For inYouth events Avery at 285-6518. Atlantic informain Karate lessons are offered forages formation call 289-6313. The Fort Clayton Youth C is available at the Margarita com6 to 18 years old. CLASSES -Easy wood projectsfor ing 155. offers the following(2894187). 01 Piano lessons are offered. Sign up children 6 and older will be held 1-3 CLASSES -The center, Building E now ER, OLNE for. private lesons Bowlingay Els LSE hecneBidn TEACER S, OL UNTEERS p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday. Class 155, offers cooking lessons 3:30-4:30 Bowling center NEEDED -Teachers are needed in fee includes materials. p.m. every Wednesday. FATHER'S DAY -The Clayton areas such as chorus, modeling, Macrame and latch-hook technique Monty Wnesda ael Bowling Center will host a Father's B youth aerobics, guitar, and acting. ces f hen -12 will be ofMondays and Wednesdays. Beginner Day Singles Saturday, ti Volunteers are needed for the space is limand advance-beginner levels are availSUMMERSPECIALSYouths summer magic pr ogram. For ited to five participants, so early regisable. Registration is conducted at the are invited to enjoy the School information, call 284-4700/5615 .ration is encouraged. Class fee incenter. Formominformationca Benny Summer Special being featured 9 eludes materials. Boza at 287-6451. a.m.-6 p.m. Monday to Fridays at The center will hold a five-session Karate sessions for adults and youths the Fort Clayton Bowling Center. a Bowling activities basic ceramic painting class beginning are available at the center. SaF July 2. Instruction covers the applicaEVENTS -All-night movies, games b The Howard and Albrook bowling tion of glazes, crystal tones and decals. and tournaments will round off with a Arft t C center monthly calendar has listed Advanced registration is under way. hearty breakfastduring apre-teenlockvoaiou iy telephone number ro thetrdya tecntr loai ow tempyone Ifurnumberm i .A in Saturday at the center. The facility is located in Building B lal c o ne gam r The r b sna a&180. For information call 287-4369. 8 pais wth dion m ie. h syauk fCLASSES -Oval mat sessions are a bar caters your special bowling The following classes are held at available Tuesdays at 7 p.m. or by parties with discount prices. If your Building 251, Fort Davis. For inforappointment. The frame shop also register receipt is drawn, bowl one mation and reservations call 289-5104. features custom framing. game free. CLASSES -A class on how to use Country bunny demonstrations are ceramic glazes deemed incompatible uheld 10 am. Thursday, 7 p.m. Tues. b will be held on Thursday. days and 2 p.m. Sundays at the center. b Arts, crafts center TOUR -The center will sponsor a day Pottery classes are held regularly at photo tour of Panama City June 23. the center. Instruction includes basic s Today -Drybrush class 3 -5 p.m. CLASSES -Plaque making sestechniques and use of the potter's wheel, a Saturday -Twenty-five percertoff sions are available every Monday from tcEnry is open for a ceramic contest greenware 10 a.pi. -6 p.m. 6-8 p.m. Participants must provide the at the Ceramics Center, Building 155, 3 Monday -Five-week beginner's wood. Fort Clayton. Entries will be displayed painting ceramic classes in English 6 -Alfredo Isaac will conduct paintJune 27. Awards will be presented. 8 P.m. from-slide sessions 5-7:30 p.m. ThursFriday -Fifty percent off firing 10 days. A fee will be charged. am. -6 p.im. ____________________ June23 -Free halo copper denonLIBRARY PROGRAM -TheFort a stration 3 -4 p.a. cpprdmnC L AYT O N Clayton Library will have its annual Theatre Arts Centre June 24 --Freepouring I -3:30p.m. reading program for grade-school chilb June 30 -Free gold halo demonValent rec center dren with the theme "Go Wild for The following activities are held at 2 station The following events will be Books." Crafts, story telling and guided Building 2060, Curundu. For more July 1 -Free pouring p -3:30 p.m. VT e tiong center Bwild at assistance will be featured during the information and reservations call 286a July 2-Beginner's ceramic paintFort Clayton. For more information/ June 25 -Aug. 3 program. Call 2873814 or 286-3152. a ing class in English 6 -8 p.m. reservations call 287 3853 for information. CLASS -A nine-week violin and All activities take place in Building EVENTS -Local and foreign crafts viola course will begin Monday. Sesc 806, Albrook AFS. For information,news sions are Mondays, Wednesdays and call 286-3279 will be on sale during a mini bazaar at Fridays. Classes are available for the center 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday andFrdyCassrevilbefr t Sunday. Child Development Center, Buildbeginner, intermediate and advanced Auo c s The center has programs every ing 156, Fort Clayton, offers the follevels. Students will learn the basics -UTO cA sses evef-Helpasarigamsevninge lowing programs. For information call of standard string pieces. Advance The Automotive Self-Help FacilCLASSES -The center will host a 287-5507/5104. enrollment is required. icy, Building 442-443, Albrook, will circus 11 a.m.-5 p.m. June 23. Clowns, The Fort Clayton School Program INSTRUCTORS -The center is B have minor tune-up instruction 6p.m. live animals, entertainment, pony rides will be offering its Enchanted Summer seeking voice and ballet/tap instrucs Monday. Students must provide parts. and tasty foods will be featured. III-Summer Camp. Themed weekly tors. References are required. Qualia Instruction includes how to adjust The center will hold classes on how sessions will provide children, 3 -5, field applicants may contact Barbara timing. to make pictures to decorate homes, 6different learning experiences. The Berger at the center. 8 p.T June 28. Reservations are reprogram will run 9 a.m.-noon, MonCAMP -A seven-week youth theat A TULAiN T IC quired. days through Fridays, June 25 to ter camp will be offered by the center Introductory and intermediate Aug. 3. Enrollment is under way at the beginning June 25. Instruction will computer classes are held monthly at center. cover the facets of theatre, from props Puppet theater the center. The two-week classes meet A part-day or full-day School-Age and costumes to lights and backstage 6-8 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. Fun and Enrichment (SAFE) program work. Registration will be held Monday w The Music and Theatre program Advanced registration is required. for children 5 to 12 will be offered -Friday at the center. p will offer a six-week puppet theater A six-week prepared childbirth class beginning Monday. The program is EXERCISE -Exercise classes meet and magic program for beginners, begins Monday at the center. The based on weekly and bi-weekly themes, 6 ''d d a Registration is underway at The Loft class meets Mondays from 7-8:30 p.m. and will include games, hikes, cooking Thursdays at the center. "Large and Theatre, Fort Espinar. For more inforTopics include relaxation, breathing experiences and field trips. In addiLovely Dancercise" is also available. 6 nation call Andy Lim at 289-4302. and diet. tion, arts and crafts and swimming will Registration is on a monthly basis. A marshmallow eating contest will be scheduled on a regular basis. Bowlin ay Bowlig center be held at the center 6 p.m. today. CDS will conduct an orientation Registration is under way for the and training session 1-3 p.m. June 26 basic cake drtin cl hh tars 27 at the center, for people interested The Curundu Lanes will be Jun 25. ecoag class which strt striga umrFu oln Juneb25d Topics include making roses in volunteering at the Child DevelopLeague Tuesday. Sign up today! and borders. ment Center, Part-day Preschool or the Lau usa.Sg ptdy A new modeling course begins early SAFE Program. To register call 287H W JAR D July. Space is limited. Advance 3301. registration is required. Sessions are A father's day lunch will be held 1-3 p.m. Saturdays. today at the Child Development CenArts, crafts center TOURS-A free-zone tour is schedter, Building 39, Fort Clayton. For Today -Twenty-five percent off uled to depart 8 a.m. Friday. information call 287-6812. greenware 10 a.m. -6 p.m. The center will sponsora day trip to ArWednesday--Five-week beginner's 6 Ocean Breeze center the El VallemarketSunday. Thegroup ACS events painting class in English 5-7 p.m. The following events will be held at will stop at Coronado Beach prior to ACS will have its next "Welcome Thursday -Five-week beginner's c Ocean Breeze, Fort Sherman. For retuming. El Valle market features to Panama" orientation at the Fort painting ceramic class in Spanish 2 -4 T information call 298-6402. handicrafts, fruits and vegetables. Clayton NCO Club 8 a.m.-noon June p.m. s TOURS -The center will sponsor a SHOW -A fashion dance show 26. For reservations call 287-6518 or Thursday -Beginner's stained glass b tour to Portobelo Saturday. starts 7 p.m. Tuesday. 287-5556. class in English 6:30 -8:30 p.m. a

PAGE 13

Tropic Times ces June 15, 1990 Friday -Beginner's cross-stitch class All trips depart from the Howard Wednesday at 2 p.m. and continues Diving -June 18-July 1. For more English and Spanish 2 -4 p.m. base theater. A small fec will be charged. for five weekly sessions. information call 283-5307. June 26 -Learn how to paint eyes For information, call 284-6161/6109. SPOUSE EMPLOYMENT TRAP RANGE -Visit the Trap ceramic projects in one session 2 -RESOURCE PROGRAM -If Range! Schedule: Thurs.-Fri. 4 p.m. .m. Open containers interested in employment in to dusk; Sat., Sun. & holidays, II June 27 -"Brushwork, the liner," Panama, FSC offers this ongoing a.m.-6 p.m. Firearms are rental-free. "Brushwork, the Shader," videos Air Force Regulation 215-7 is the program designed to help spouses MOVIES -Free movies for ALL >wn from 7 -8 p.m. governing regulation concerning the enhance job search skills. Make an HANDS and dependents. One June 29 -Beginner's knitting class control, procurement, sale and use of appointment with the FSC spouse feature each evening will be played at English and Spanish 2 -4 p.m. alcoholic beverages. The Howard employment counselor. For more the Crews Lounge, Building 88 July 3 -Free lamp assembly demsupplement is as follows: information, call 284-5650. (Rodman). Show begins at 7 p.m. itration 2 -3 p.m. Alcoholic beverages may be WATER AEROBICS -Join us July 5 -Free "Learn How to Paint consumed during sanctioned Child center at Farfan Pool every Mon., Wed. & es on Ceramic Projects" demonactivities at the following Howard Thursday, 5-6 p.m. Have fun and tion 2 -3 p.m. and Albrook facilities: The Child Development Center stay fit! These activities will take place in Officers'/NCO Club open messes, offers family day care programs. TOUR OF PANAMA CITY -Friilding 711 at Howard. For informamilitary family housing, dormitories, Individuals living on Albrook or day we will take a tour around the the n, call 284-6361. Zodiac Recreation Center, bohios, Howard that provide more than 10 city to see Old Panama, Las Bovedas, outdoor athletic fields, bowling hours of child care in their home per a private tour of the Presidential PalCAF counselor centers, AAFES cafeterias, stable week are required by Air Force ace and other historic places in the clubhouses, and other areas regulation 215-27 to be enrolled in area.We willalsostop forlunch.Bring The Howard Education Center has specifically approved in writing by this program. Licensing requireyour cameras! Bus will leave NAVSTA iew Community College of the Air the 24th Combat Support Group ments include: at 8 p.m. and returns at about 2 p.m. rce advisement counselor, Eva Lindcommander. SFrst aid training, cardiopulmonary Price: $10 per person. rg. Enlisted people working on a resuscitation, fire, safety and SCUBA DIVING TRIPTOPORr geed opl whokng ton aise This is a correction to the March environmental health training and TBL pn a iigSn AF degree or who need to register 23 Commander's News which stated etionental he training and TOBELO -Spend a day diving SunCCAF are encouraged to stop by the immediate area around the NCO inspections, child care training and day at Portobelo, on the Caribbean in. -noon or call 284-3263 to make Club and the picnic tables between orientation cass. For more coast of Panama. Leaving NAVSTA, appointment, the club and Building 708 are the information, call 284-3711 Building 65 at 6 a.m. and returning at only extensions of this policy. The about 5 p.m. Price: $10 includes bus immediate area around the NCO N A V Y transportation only. AT tests Club and the picnic tables between CONTADORA WEEKEND -SatIf you need an SAT Building 708 are not authorized areas urday and Sunday take a weekend to fore Nov. 1 youneedtotakethetest for consumption of alcoholic W aterfront movies relax and get away. Swimming, snorbeverages. keling, scuba diving, golf, tennis and fore July 6. No SAT answer sheets Movies will be shown on a big more are available. Leave NAVSTA stem changes that need to be made to Frequent fliers screen TV at the Waterfront Inn at 7 a.m. Saturday and returning about somohae th ne tt madegitMon. and Wed. at 6 p.m. Bring your 5 p.m. Sunday. Couple $155; single comodate the new test and rgistraMany airlines have numerous movies or make a request. $135. >n forms. For details, call 284-3264/ incentive programs based on accrued SAN BLAS TRIP -Join us for a 63. mileage. The mileage credits accrued M W R events weekend get away to the exclusive by an individual performing official Panamanian island resort of San Blas. ase library government travel may be used by U.S. Naval Station Panama Canal Depart 6 a.m., June 29. Return 6 a.m. people to defray official travel costs. MW R offers the following activities. July 1. Spend 2 nights and 3 days in The Howard Library story hour and However, credits may not be used for For information, call 283-5307 or oneof Panama's loveliest hotels, "San mmer reading program begin July 9 service upgrades, such as seat number listed with activity. Blas." All meals, transportation, hotel d continues through Aug. 7. Parents up grad e s, n o r u n d e r any CLASSES -Sailing, motor boat, and island tours included for only $110 ay register their children at the hicircumstances may credits be applied & scuba diving classes are offered as per person. Make reservations by close ary beginning Monday. Children ages toward personal travel. If you follows: Motor Boat -Saturday & of business Wednesday. 6 will meet Mondays at 9 a.m. for accrue mileage credits while on June 24, Basic Sailing -Sunday, ry hour, beginning July 9. Children official travel, the mileage coupons Crew Sailing -June 23 & Scuba MORE es 7-10 Meet Thursdays at 9 a.m. for must be turned in to Accounting and e summer reading program beginFinance for disposition. Call 284ng July 10. Participants will receive 4505 for details. rtificates and awards at the last eating. Call 284-6249 for informaEd. center testing n. GENERAL TESTING SESSION odiac rec center -The Howard Education Center is giving general testing sessions every TOURS -Do-it-yourself Gorgona Wednesday and Thursday from 8-10 'ach tour. Get away from it all by a.m. For more information, call ending a relaxing night or weekend 284-3263. the Gorgona Jayes, one of Panama's SPECIAL TESTING SESSIONS chest beach hotels. Stop in the center -The Graduate Management make a reservation. Admission Test will be given June 21. Monday & Thursday -Free Zone Only one administration of the popping tour 8 a.m. -3 p.m. GMAT can be funded to eligible Tuesday -Colonial Panama and military people. Interested activeiraflores Locks tour 10 a.m. -3 p.m. duty military people or civilians can isit colonial Panama and tour historicall the Howard Education Center I sights in the area such as the French for an appointment. For more aza, and National Theater. information, call 284-3264. June 23 -San Carlos Beach trip 7 in. -4p.m. M AC phones June 24 -El Valle shopping tour 30 a.m. -3 p.m. These are the phone numbers All tours depart from the Howard people can call to get Military Airlift icater. A small fee is charged. For Command flight and travel formation, call 284-6161/6109. information from the Howard TOURNAMENTS -Monday -Passenger Terminal: 284-5703 or illiards 6 -10 p.m. 284-4306/3608/5758. Friday -Pinochle 6 -10 p.m. Cash prizes will be awarded and FSC June events c-registration is required. For inforJ ation, call 284-6161/6109. JOB SEARCH WORKSHOP OUTDOOR REC SECTION -This 1 1/2 hour workshop provides TOURS -Gold panning at Salainformation for developing good job anca 7 a.m. -3 p.m. search skills and shows where to Sunday --Scuba trip toPlaya Blanca apply for jobs. Tuesday at 9 a.m. a.m. -6 p.m. CHECKBOOK MANAGEWednesday -Canoeing and barbeMENT -Learn to maintain a e on the Chagres river 7 a.m. -3 p.m. checkbook Wed. 9:30-11:30 a.m. ike time out for this exciting trip and RELATIONSHIP BUILDING e Monkey Mountain and enjoy a This program provides tips on P rbecue with fresh-cut tropical fruit positive relationships with spouses, Gamboa Beach. children, friends, or supervisors.

PAGE 14

1ATropic Times o ie '9 June 15, 1990 NAVY 'Talent Potpourri' Jungle jam U.S. Naval Station Panama Canal Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, incorpoSwimming pool invites everyone to their annual dinrated, will hold a "Que June Jungle ner/talent show Saturday. This show Jam" 8 p.m. June 29 to 1 a.m. June 30 The Rodman Swimming Pool is a to be held at the naval station's Anat the Fort Amador Officers Club. All 5-Star facility! Featuring a chorage Club will include categories proceeds will go toward school suprefurbished pool, new furniture, and in dance, song, comedy, drama, and plies for CunaIndians. an outstanding snack bar, Fleet fashion. Dinner will be served at 7 Landing, the pool is open every day p.m., and show time is at 8 p.m. For Office closing from 10 a.m.-8 p.m. tickets and/or information call 283The Finance and AccountingOf4464/5751. fice, Building 519, Fort Clayton, will Bonanza sale close at 3 p.m. today. For emergency service, call the charge of quarters at Rainy season is here, and the 287-4400 or 287-4208. roads are wet and slippery. Do you need new tires or rims? Or how about Fashion show a battery? If you do, don't wait till it's toolate.Visit MCX's Tire,Wheel, & "My Name Is Panama" casual Battery Bonanza Sale Thursdaysummer clothes will be modeled by AWARD WINNER -Alyson Aug. 18, in Building 4, aboard Syddia Lee's Modeling Agency at the Milburn, a student in Ms. USNAVSTAPANCANAL. Howard Officers'Open Mess June 26 Vasquez's 6th grade class at at 7:30 p.m. Call 284-4680/4896 Diablo Elementary School was Fater's day sale for reservations for the dinner recently honored by having her showing. award winning story published Marine Corps Exchange is having in "Rainbow Collection," an a sae o me's ressslaks,18KSummer activities anthology of children's writng. gold, pre-Colombian emeralds, -DoDDS will have five elementary The winners were announced in Caribe diamonds, and various items schools open Monday-July 13 for the USA Today newspaper. in their Sight and Sound Department recreation a s t in honor of all fathers Saturday playshelters and media centers. Admissions test Schools that will be open are: Balboa The Army Education Center will Youth program Elementary School, Fort Clayton hold a Graduate Management AdmisBeginning Monday, MWR will ofElementary Schoo, Curundu sions Test 9 a.m. Monday and Tuesday fer a Youth Program for 6-17 year old \ Elementary School, Fort Davis at buildings 128, Fort Clayton (287children of Navy and Marine Corps Elementary School and Howard 5856);aln 801, Fort Kobbe (284-3150). personnel. A variety of activities will Elementary School. be scheduled from 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Hours for the media center will be Monday through Friday, Monday -8 -noon; hours for the playshelters Office closing August 17. Parents must register chil' will be 8 -noon, and 12:30 -3:30 p.m. The AG Passport and Visa office, dren on their first visit in the basement P O PO R I Special playshelter activities will Building 519, Fort Clayton, will close of Building 40, Family Services Ceninclude basketball clinics, a 1:45 p.m. Monday. For information ter, at the U.S. Naval Station. This is a ATUSA basketball tournament, a kickball. call Harmodio Diaz Grinados at 287free service. A luncheon tournament, and a basketball Hoop 4503 or 287-5207. The Association of the United Shoot. Special media center Orientation States Army will hold a general activities include arts and crafts, Spot-bid sale membership meeting/luncheon at Read Aloud, and computer p U.S. Navy Family Service Center Amador Officers' Club from 11:30 programs. The DefenseReutilization Manageis sponsoring a Panama Orientation a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday. Registration for the playshelter ment Office -Panama will hold a local for all newcomers to the area Gen. Maxwell Thurman, program will be open today at each spot-bid sale 8 a.m. June 28 at BuildThursday & Friday, at the Navy USSOUTHCOM commander-inschool. Schedules for both programs ing 745, Corozal. Items will be availFamily Center Building 40, aboard chief will be the guest speaker. The are available in each school office. able for public inspection June2527. USNAVSTAPANCANAL. For meeting is open to all who wish to For more information, call one of the For information, call Jose F.Gonzalez information call 283-5749. attend. schools mentioned above. at 285-4808. Crs & (CEU) PANAMA CANAL COLLEGE setn Course Title Days Time Sem Hrs Instructor Room BA 121 A INTRO TOBUSINESS MTWTH 10:00-12:00 N 3.0 ROBINSON 417 Summer Session 1990 BA 121 B INTRO TO BUSINESS TTH 5:30-9:30 PM 3.0 AHRENS FT. DAVIS BA 125 A MICRO ECONOMICS MTWTH 10:00-12:00 N 3.0 AKERS 416 BA 283 A BUSINESS LAW MTWTH 6:00-8:00 PM 3.0 TOTH 415 [ ............CHE 110 LA INTRO TO CHEM LAB TTH 1:00-4:00 PM 0.0 GEORGE 602 Registration Schedule CHE 110 LB INTRO TO CHEM LAB MW 1:00-4:00 PM 0.0 GEORGE G134 CHE l1 RA INTROTOCHEM MTWTH 10:00-12:00 N 4.0 GEORGE 604 CS 101 A INTRO TO COMPUTERS MTWTH 8:00-10:00 AM 3.0 AKERS 801 Jun 2,21,22 (Wed.,'ThusFri.) CS101 B INTROTO COMPUTERS MTWTH 5:00-7:00 PM 3.0 ESTRIB 801 CS 102 A INTROTOPROGRAMMING MTWTH 5:00-7:00 PM 3.0 LOAIZA 801 CS 104 A WORD PROCESSING MTWTH 5:00-7:00 PM 3.0 TBA 809 Registration ESD 101 A BASIC COMPOSON MTWTH 8:00-10:00 AM 3.0 ALVARADO 701 ESD 103 A FRESH COMP I MTWTH 8:00-10:00 AM 3.0 RAMOS 706 85 p.m. ESD 103 B FRESH COMPI MTWTH 6:00-8:00 PM 3.0 TBA 701 College Auditorium ESD 104 A FRESH COMP I MTWTH 10:00-12:00 N 3.0 RAMOS 707 ESD 151 A SPEECH MTWTH 8:0.-10:00 AM 3.0 TBA 707 ESL 91 A LEVEL ONE MTWTH 11:00-2:00 PM 0.0 AROSEMENA 415 June 25 (Monday) ESL 91 B LEVEL ONE MTTH 5:00-8:00 PM 0.0 SPAULDING 418 ESL 92 A LEVEL TWO MTWTH 8:00-11:00 AM 0.0 CIGARRUISTA 408 ESL 92 B LEVEL TWO MTWTH 11:00-2:00 PM 0.0 ALVARADO 408 Classes Begin ESL 92 C LEVEL TWO MTWTH 5:00.8:00 PM 0.0 RAMOS 408 ESL 93 A LEVELTHREE MTWTH 8:00-11:00 AM 0.0 HERN 410 ESL 93 B LEVELTHREE MTWTH 11:00-2:00 PM 0.0 HERN 410 ESL 93 C LEVELTHREE MTWTH 5:00-8:00 PM 0.0 LEWIS 417 ugust 2 (Thursday ESL 94 A LEVEL FOUR MTWTH 8:00-11:00 AM 0.0 BISHOP 412 ESL 94 B LEVEL FOUR MTWTH 11:00-2:00 PM 0.0 BISHOP 412 ESL 94 C LEVEL FOUR MTWTH 5:00-8:00 PM 0.0 O'DONNELL 418 Summer Session Ends ESL 95 A LEVEL FIVE MTWTH 8:00-11:00 AM 0.0 CARR 413 r ------------------ESL 95 B LEVEL FIVE MTWTH 11:00-2:00 PM 0.0 CARR 413 NOTE: Classes for the Summer Session will I ESL 95 C LEVEL FIVE MTWTH 5:00-8:00 PM 0.0 MCFARLANE 413 ESL 96 A LEVELSIX MTWTH 8:00-11:00 AM 0.0 BUSSIERE 414 be held at Balboa High School unless othI ESL 96 B LEVEL SIX MTWTH 11:00-2:00 PM 0.0 BUSSIERE 414 I erwise stated due to renovations at the .ESL 96 C LEVEL SIX MTWTH 5:00-8:00 PM 0.0 LOPEZ 412 GOV 220 A GOV. IN THE U.S. MTWTH 10:00-12:00 N 3.0 TUCKER 807 I Panama Canal College La BoCa Campus. I GOV 220 B GOV. IN THE U.S. MTWTH 6:00-8:00PM 3.0 WALL CLAYTON L -----------------.J HIS 200 A U.S. HIS TO PRESENT MTWrH 6:00-8:00 PM 3.0 JACKSON KOBBE HIS 201 A U.S. HIS SINCE 1876 MTWTH 8:00-10:00 AM 3.0 TUCKER 807 HIS 211 A LAT AME HIS SINCE 1825 MTWTH 6:00-8:00 PM 3.0 MENDEZ 803 ME MA 101 A MATH FOR GEN EDUCATION MTWTH 6:00-8:00 PM 3.0 GEORGE HOWARD MA 102 A COLLEGE ALGEBRA MTWTH 5:00-7:00 PM 3.0 LUCK 605 MUS 121 A MUSIC APPRECIATION MTWTH 6:00-8:00 FM 3.0 MONLOUIS CLAYTON OA 113 A COMPUTER KEYBOARDING MTWTH 12:00-1:00 PM 1.0 ROBINSON 801 OA 140 A EXECUTIVE ACCOUNTING MTWTH 8:00-8:00 PM 3.0 ROBINSON CLAYTON PSY 150 A INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY MTWTH 10:00-12:00 N 3.0 ANDERSON 811 PSY 150 B INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY MTWTH 5:00-7:00 PM 3.0 ANDERSON 811 IRA__ __ _ SPA 101 A ELEM SPANISH I MTWTH 5:00-8:00 PM 4.0 CIGARRUISTA 706 VT 100 A INTRO ELECTRICITY/ELEC MW 5:00-8:00 PM 2.0 CHEN BLDG.74 VT 101 A INTRO MECHANICAL DRAW TTH 5:00-8:00 PM 2.0 CHEN BLDG.74

PAGE 15

Tropic Times M ovies June 15, 1990 15 Howard Amador Monday 7 p.m. THE LAST OF THE FINEST (R) Brian Dennehy Today Today Tuesday & Wednesday 7 p.m. CRAZY PEOPLE (R) Dudley Moore 7 p.m. REVENGE (R) Kevin Costner CLOSED 9 p.m. HARD TO KILL (R) Steven Seagal Saturday Thursday Saturday 7 p.m. LAMBADA (PG) Eddie Peck 7 p.m. HEART CONDITION (R) Bob Hoskins 2 & 6:30 p.m. NUNS ON THE RUN (PG-13) Eric Sunday Idle 7 p.m. BORN ON THE 4TH OF JULY (R) Tom Davis 9 p.m. STANLEY & IRIS (PG-13) Robert DeNiro Cruise 11:45 p.m. THE FIRST POWER (R) Tracy Monday Today Griffith 7 p.m. BORN ON THE 4TH OF JULY (R) Tom 7 p.m. BLUE STEEL (R) Jamie Lee Curtis Sunday Cruise 9 p.m. LOOSE CANNONS (R) Gene Hackman 2 & 6:30 p.m. THE FIRST POWER (R) Tracy Tuesday Saturday Griffith 7 P.M. JOE VS THE VOLCANO (PG) Tom Hanks 2 & 7 p.m. DRIVING MISS DAISY (PG) Jessica 9 p.m. DOWNTOWN (R) Forest Whitaker Wednesday Tandy Monday 7 p.m. THE FORBIDDEN DANCE (PG-13) Jeff 9:30 p.m. NIGHTBREED (R) Craig Shefer 7 p.m. NUNS ON THE RUN (PG-13) Eric Idle James Sunday 9 p.m. DOWNTOWN (R) Forest Whitaker Thursday 7 p.m. COURAGE MOUNTAIN (PG) Leslie Tuesday 7 p.m. ENEMIES, A LOVE STORY (R) Ron Caron 7 p.m. MADHOUSE (PG-13) Kirstie Alley Silver 9:30 p.m. GLORY (R) Morgan Freeman 9 p.m. THE FIRST POWER (R) Tracy Griffith Monday Wednesday Quarry Heights 7 p.m. DRIVING MISS DAISY (PG) Jessica 7 p.rm. MADHOUSE (PG-13) Kirstie Alley Today Tandy 9 p.m. A SHOCK TO THE SYSTEM (R) Michael 7 p.m. WHERE THE HEART IS (R) Dabney Tuesday Caine Coleman 7 p.m. GLORY (R) Morgan Freeman Thursday Saturday Wednesday 7 p.m. CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS (PG-13) 7 p.m. MUSIC BOX (PG-13) Jessica Lange 7 p.m. GLORY (R) Morgan Freeman Alan Alda Sunday -Thursday 9 p.m. FAR OUT MAN (R) Tommy Chong 7 p.m. THE LAST OF THE FINEST (R) Brian 7 p.m. THE HANDMAID'S TALE (R) Robert Clayton Dennehy Duvall Today 7 p.m. THE BLOOD OF HEROES (R) Joan Chen 9 p.m. THE WAR OF THE ROSES (R) Michael Douglas Saturday 2 & 6:30 p.m. TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES (PG) Animated 9 p.m. MORTAL PASSION (R) Zach Galligan 11:45 p.m. THE FOURTH WAR (R) Roy Scheider Sunday 2 & 6 p.m. TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES (PG) Animated 9 p.m. SKI PATROL (PG) Roger Rose Monday 7 p.m. TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES (PG) Animated 9 p.m. SKI PATROL (PG) Roger Rose Tuesday 7 p.m. BLIND FURY (R) Lisa Blount 9 pim. NIGHTBREED (R) Craig Shefer Wednesday 7 p.m. LORD OF THE FLIES (R) Paul Bathazar 9 p.m. NIGHTBREED (R) Craig Shefer Those heroes on the half shell stage an attack on the big screen in a live action adventure 7p.m. THEFOURThW (R)RoyScheider based on the popular TV series. Created by Jim Henson's Creature Shop, TURTLES 9 p.m. NIGHTBREED (R) Craig Shefer enlarges the action to theater size entertainment. PG .Animotronic Characters Amador O'Club 9:30 Fri. & Sat; Club closes every Anchorage Club Mon at I p.m.; Hungry Hour 1700 Open 7 days a week. Offers services Club will be open for lunch every Fri; Dancing Fri &Sat 8:00 -12:00. to everyone. Breakfast: Mon.-Fri., Wed., Thurs., & Fri. from 11:30 a.m.-l p.m. A Daily Hot Special as Albrook O'Club 6:30-10 a.m.; Lunch: Mon.-Fri., I well as a salad bar will be served. am.-1:30 p.m.; Dinner: MSn.-a, Mongolian BBQ Thurs., 6-8:30a.m.p.m.; Dinner: 55-10 p.m.; Grill: Sat., Sun. and p.m.; Social Hour with disco, Fri, 5-9 8:30 p.m.; Tues., bar menu available holidays, 1-9:30 p.m. p.m.; Sunday brunch, 10 a.m.-l p.mthe lounge; Fri., Hungry Hour, 4-6 Private rooms available for spemia p.m., music, 9:30 p.m.-l a.m.; USNavSta O'Club Priat romsavalale special Sunday: Champagne brunch, 10 functions by calling 282-3534. Sundy Cm p e bOpen to all officers, civilians NM7 & C alen d ar above, and their dependents. Offers Howard NCO Club STRAC Club full menu & services 7 days a week. Open Mon.-Sat., 4:30-11 p.m.; Fri. & Lunch: Mon.-Sat., 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; Breakfast: Mon.-Fri., 6:30-9 a.m.; Sat., snacks, music with Judy Upton. Sunday Brunch: 10:30 a.m.-l:30 Lunch: Mon.-Fri., 11 a.m.-l p.m.; p.m.; Dinner: Sun.-Wed., 5-9 p.m., Dinner: 5:30-9 p.m., Membership Quarry Heights O'Club Thurs.-Sat., 5-10 p.m. night last Mon. of each month; Breakfast: Mon.-Fri., 6:30-8:30 a.m., Games: Sun. & Wed.; Brunch: Every Sat., 8-10 a.m.; Lunch: Mon.-Fri., Waterfront Inn 3rd Sun. of each month, 10 a.m.1 11:30 a.m.-l p.m.; Dinner A La Movies will beshown onabigscreen p.m.; Variety disco in ballroom: Fri., Carte: Mon.-Sat., 6-9 p.m.; Live Mon. & ed, a 6 p.rin Sat., Sun., Mon.; Casual Cove disco: entertainment: 6-10 p.m.; Sun., your movies or make a request; Tues. & Wed.; Rock & Roll, Salsa: closed Thur mes fr sak 7 pue; Mon. & Tues.; Variety, Western: CPO Club Thurs., games, free snacks, 7 p.n). Wed. & Thurs. Fri., Hungry Hour, 4-5 p.m., music 6 Open to all E7-E9, civilians NM6 & p.m.-l a.m. Bayview Room: Lunch Howard O'Club above, and their dependents. Also II a.m.-1 p.m. daily; Dinner, Thurs. offers a full menu and services 7 days & Sat., 6-10 p.m.; Father's Day Lunch: 11:30 a.m. -I p.m. Dinner aweek. Lunch: Tues.-Sun., 11 a.m.-l Lunch I 1 a.m.-2 p.m., call 289-5109 6:00 -8:30 p.m. Tue-Thu and 6:00 -p.m.; Dinner: Mon.-Sat., 6-9:30 p.m. or 241-5578 for reservations.

PAGE 16

Tr6 i Tie TV Guide Today 2:50 Star Trek 11:30 Wheel of Fortune 3:40 CNN Headline Newsbreak 1:00 Remington Steele 6:00 am. NBC Today Show 3:55 M-A-S-H 2:00 Donahue.Unusual Talk Show Hosts On 8:00 Morning Stretch 4:20 Guiding Light Cable Access (mature) 8:25 C.O. .S. 5:10 General Hospital 2:50 Star Trek 8:50 Saved By The Bell 6:00 SCN Evening Report 3:45 CNN Headline Newsbreak 9:20 Yan Can Cook 6:30 ABC World News Tonight 3:55 M-A-S-H 9:50 Masterpiece Theater 7:00 Jeopardy 4:20 Guiding Light 10:45 CNN Headline Newsbreak 7:25 Head Of The Class 5:10 General Hospital 11:00 Showbiz Today 7:50 Sixty Minutes 5:55 Community Bulletin 11:30 Wheel Of Fortune 8:50 Married With Children (mature) 6:00 SCN Evening Report Noon CNN Headline News 9:20 NBC Nightly News 6:30 ABC World News Tonight 12:20 p.m. SCN Midday Report 9:50 Entertainment Tonight 7:00 Jeopardy 12:30 CNN Sports Latenight 10:20 SCN Late Night Report 7:25 People's Court 1:00 Remington Steele 10:30 NBC Tonight Show 7:50 National Geographic. Those Wonderful 2:10 Oprah Winfrey.The Secrets Men Keep (mature) 11:30 Late Night With David Letterman Dogs 2:50 Star Trek 12:30 a.m. Nightline 8:50 Murphy Brown 3:40 CNN Headline Newsbreak 1:00 World Monitor 9:20 NBC Nightly News 3:55 M-A-S-H 1:30 Sports Latenight 9:50 Entertainment Tonight 4:20 Guiding Light 2:00 Arsenio Hall 10:29 SCN Late Night Report 5:10 General Hospital 3:00 Tonight Show 10:30 NBC Tonight Show 6:00 SCN Evening Report 4:00 Late Night 11:30 Late Night With David Letterman 6:30 ABC World News Tonight 5:00 CNN Headline News 12:30 a.m. Nightline 7:00 Jeopardy 1:00 World Monitor 7:30 Crazy Like A Fox Tuesday 1:30 Sports Latenight 8:25 Thirtysomething' 2:0 Arsenio Hall 9:20 NBC Nightly News 6:00 a.m. NBC Today Show 3:00 Tonight Show 9:50 Entertainment Tonight 8:00 Morning Stretch 4:00 Late Night 10:20 SCN Late Night Report 8:25 Super Mario Brothers 500 CNN Headline News 10:30 NBC Tonight Show 8:50 Square One Television 11:30 Late Night With David Letterman 9:25 3-2-1 Contact 12:30 a.m. Nightline 9:55 Magnum P.1. S N cbec a n l1 1:00 SCN All Night Movie."Centennial."(Part 2) 10:45 CNN Headline Newsbreak SCN cable channel 14 2:35 SCN All Night Movie."Cetennial."(Parl 3) 11:00 Showbiz Today .at 4:15 SCN All Night Movie.I Love A Mystery." 11:30 Wheel Of Fortune 6:00 Videolink Noun CNN Headline News c:ew CNN Hadulie News 12:20 p.m. SCN Midday Report 7:: Just Fur Kids Saturday 12:30 CNN S[orts Latenight neeagc Mutant Ninja Tartle, -tdSot g : Huckelbry Hcound& Fincds 1:00 Remington Steele Huckelbenry b Hnd 7:00 am. CNN Headline News 2:00 Donahue.Children with Progeria Auvin luggie 7:30 Just For Kids! 2:50 Star Trek Tohg T5 rt Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3:40 CNN Headline Newsbreak Lippy The Lien Huckleberry Hounds & Friends 3:55 M-A-S-H DMa f Ln -Ne -ccev Denver, The Last Dinosaur 4:20 Guiding Light 12, Kis yfn Maxie And The New Archies 5:10 General Hospital SCNM c ss hec [cc C OcaChcccncOflhW-cld Kissyfur 5:55 Community Bulletin N .CNN Headn N 9:55 SCN Morning Movie.McHale's Navy." 6:00 SCN Evening Report 11:30 You Can't Do That On Television 6:30 ABC World News Tonight m COs Sports.Macu Noon America's Top Ten 7:00 Jeopardy adhne Nwsbrek 1:00 p.m. Pro Bowlers Tour 7:25 Throb I07 What's Happeieg Nuw 2:30 This Week In Baseball 7:55 Major Dad CN CN iea N 2:30 cm Full H.a3:30 Variety Special."The Magic Of Music. 8:25 In The Heat Of The Night 737 Pacadie 5:10 Star Search 9:20 NBC Nightly News ce The denGirs 6:00 CNN Headline News 9:50 Entertainment Tonight ca Iocrur. 7Tr 6:30 Rescue 911 10:20 SCN Late Night Report e Tear OOat rune,, NBC Satudavy NiteLv 7:25 48 Hours 10:30 NBC Tonight Show :mm. CNN Spnts Tuight 8:25 SCN Saturday Night Movie.-claudia." 11:30 Late Night With David Letterman 12:1 CNN Headli New 0:00 CNN Headline News 12:30 a.m. Nightline -CNN Week Lapeng 10:00 c CNN Spores Lacnight 10:30 Saturday Night Live 1:00 World Monitor 2qv tercluentet This Week 12:00 am. Videolink 1:30 Sports Latenight C anday Night With Cenniu Chang 1:00 SCN All Night Movie.-Silent Movie." 2:00 Arsenio Hall cue CNN Headline News 2:35 SCN All Night Movie."The warrior And 3:00 Tonight Show r Pein-een eP The Sorceress." 4:00 Late Night 4:20 Austin City Limits 5:00 CNN Headline News Sunday 5:20 Share The Word Sund vewea~. CNN Headline News Sunday 6 Coral Ridge Mimnins 6:00.m. NBC Today Show cue Shae The Weed 6:00 a.m. CNN Headline News :00 MorningStretch Cah The Spirit 8:0 orin erec Mer.rie Meodis Shoe 6:30 Catch The Spirit -8:25 Sesame Street n 25 Kids ncerporatnd 7:00 Benjamin 9:25 What's up, Dr.Ruth? are The Litks 7:30 Coral Ridge Ministries 9:55 Fantasy Island ce Dinmo auBert 8:00 CBS Sunday Morning 10:45 CNN Headline Newsbreak It Sunday Morning Muie.-seie ve r 9:30 America's Black Forum 11:00 Showbiz Today N-e CNN Headline Newsberak 10:00 Washington Week In Review 11:30 Wheel Of Fortune tIr Strange But True 10:30 This Week With David Brinkley Noon CNN Headline News CBS Sponts .NBA Championship Fials 11:30 CNN Headline News 12:20 p.m. SCN Midday Report Gae 6. Portland vs Deroit :0 Airwolf Noon For Vets Only 12:30 CNN Sports Latenight -:00 CNN Headline News 12:30 p.m. ESPN Sports Magazine 1:00 Remington Steele 00 Life Gocs 0. 1:00 PBS Motor Week 2:00 Oprah Winfrey.Your Worst Divorce Nightmare t 2Jump Stees 1:30 On Pit Road 2:50 Star Trek .:a4 Anything But Love 2:00 Remote Control 3:40 CNN Headline Newsbreak eo Spereds Daughter 2:30 Reaching For The Skies 3:55 M-A-S-H ve ; It's Gary Shandling's Show 3:30 CNN Headline News 4:20 Guiding Light ||7 CNN Headline Nwstreak 4:00 WWF Survivor Series 1989 5:10 General Hospital 12:-a.n Meet The Peess 6:45 CNN Headline News 6:00 SCN Evening Report .2 CLN HealinrNepws 7:15 Family Special."Hacksaw"(Part 2) 6:30 ABC World News Tonight G:30 eorge Michael's Sports Machine 8:00 SCN Sunday Night Movie."Centennial."(Part 4) 7:00 Jeopardy:0. 60 Minutes 9:40 L.A. Law 7:30 Mork And Mindy 10:35 Entertainment This Week 7:50 SCN Wednesday Night Movie."Brideshead Monday 11:35 Comedy Tonight Revisited." (mature) 12:00 am. Meet The Press 9:20 NBC Nightly News 6:O. NBC Today Show 12:30 CNN Headline News 9:50 Entertainment Tonight S:00 Mister Rogers'Neighborhood (:00 McLaughlin Group 10:20 SCN Late Night Report nn COS. 1:30 George Michael's Sports Machine 10:30 NBC Tonight Show 00:0 The Oprah Winfrey Show 2:00 60 Minutes u:30 Late Night With David Letterman Coon CNN Headline News Night2 IO: POCH Midday Repnr 3:00 World Report 12:30 a.m. Nightline 1 e0 General Hospital 5:00 CNN Headline News 1:00 World Monitor :1 Guiding Light 2:00 Wheel Of Fartner 1:30 Sports Latenight 22n Jeopardy 2:00 Arsenio Hall 7:53 CNN Headline News M o d y::0 AreioHl St.r Trek.ThNetGnrin 3:00 Tonight Show 4:In Double Dare 6:00 a.m. NBC Today Show 4:00 Late Night: The Mensters 8:00 -Morning Stretch Nig0:0 Flinsstone Frolic :0: Sesamg Stretch 5:00 CNN Headline News 5un Scooby Doo & Scrappy Do 8:25 Sesame Street 6:00 SCN Evenig Report 9:25 Eureeka's Castle Thursday 6:30 CBS Evening News 3:A e The Hogan Family 9:50 The A-Team c-or1 Alt~ 10:45 CNN Headline Newsbreak 6:00 am. NBC Today Show n:nn Monday Nite Movie.'oneoty.n1:0a1 Miami vice (:00 Showbiz Today 8:00 Morning Stretch 1.one Aesni Hall ((:30 Wheel Of Fortune 8:25 Porky Pig Show 'l:ue tatenight With Dasid Lesserman 77:70an Nightlire Noon CNN Headline News 8:50 Mr. Roger's Neighborhood : World Monitor 12:20 p.m. SCN Midday Report 9:20 Mr. Wizard's World 1:30 Spers Laenigho 7:0 Aeneoto Hall 12:30 Sports Machine 9:50 Ripley's Believe It or Not I Tnight Show 1:00 Remington Steele 10:45 CNN Headline Newsbreak 0:00 Late Night 2:00 Oprah Winfrey.Three-way Soap Operas 11:00 Showbiz Today :00 CNN Headline News

PAGE 17

Tropic Times 1y June 15, 199017 Madonna show too racy for Canadians by United Press International tour she's played Houston and Fabulous Thunderbirds guitarist promises that (Nikolai) Lenin talked Dallas, both in the bible belt, and Jimmie Vaughan is tired of touring about. So give Mr. Gorbachev credit MADONNA AND MORALS: there wasn't a problem," he said. and is leaving the band after playing for this? He had nothing to do with Madonna's show was a little too racy HOLLYWOOD,FLA.: Orlando, a blues festival at Fort Hood, Texas, it." Garn says Ronald Reagan would from some people in Toronto. Fla., will be the entertainment capital on June 16. Vaughan's hand-picked have been a better choice for man of Warner Bros. Records said the police of the world next Thursday. The successor will be Duke Robillard, the decade. morality squad and a government occasion is the opening of Universal meaning the band will now have GLIMPSES: The New Kids on the attorney tried to reach Madonna Studios Florida and the headliners three former members of Roomful of Block are on a roll. Parker Brothers before her third and final show will include Michael Jackson, Blues teaming with Kim Wilson, the has purchased the rights to make a Tuesday with a legal order to clean Sylvester Stallone, Bill Cosby and only remaining originalThunderbird. Nintendo video game based on the up her act because of complaints Michael J. Fox with Steven Vaughan wants a break from the pop group. The game is still in the from people who had seen the first Spielberg on hand to cut the ribbon Thunderbirds' fierce touring early stages of development but will two shows. Police at the show merely at the movie studio-amusement park. schedule, which had them playing as be on the market in about a year. watched, however, and determined Also confirmed for the gala are Bill many as 340 dates a year, so he can Parker Brothers won't say how much no charges were warranted. Murray, Jimmy Stewart, Charlton spend more time at home in Texas was paid for the licensing rights "Nobody went there with the Heston, Sissy Spacek, Linda Blair, and work on projects like the album Willie Nelson has rounded up the intention of charging Madonna," Ernest Borgnine, Beau Bridges, Dom he is making with his brother, Stevie usual suspects for another of his said Detective Frank Trovato. Deluise, Tippi Hedren, Janet Leigh, Ray Vaughan. Fourth of July "picnics." The show, "However, we have a responsibility Anthony Perkins, Jill St. John, Telly GARN ON GORBACHEV: Sen. set for the shores of Town Lake in to any citizen to make sure our laws Savalas, Jane Seymour, Philip Jake Garn, R-Utah, is immune to Austin, Texas, will feature Nelson's are upheld." Madonna later had Michael Thomas, Ben Vereen, Gorbymania. Garn says he may not longtime associates Kris Kristofferson, some high-flown words on the Robert Wagner and "Star Trek" read Time again because the Waylon Jennings and Johnny Cash matter: "I would rather have creator Gene Roddenberry. The magazine named Soviet President along with Asleep at the Wheel and cancelled the show than let anybody theme park and movie studio has Mikhail Gorbachev its man of the Kinky Freidman. "He loves to dictate how I can or can't express been open to paying customers since decade for the '80s. "He's still a promote shows and get his friends myself as an artist. last week but large sections remained dictator -despite whatever you want together and have a good concert and "This is certainly a cause for which roped off as construction crews to call him -of a bankrupt system do something for the community," I am willing to be arrested." Warner continued to work. The park features that is incredibly corrupt and said Lana Nelson, Willie's daughter. Bros. spokesman Bob Merlis said more than a dozen attractions -all bureaucratic," Garn said this week in "It's certainly not a profitable Madonna has never been charged based on movies or television shows. an appearance in St. George, Utah, venture for him. It never has been with any form of lewdness. "On this T-BIRD LEAVING THE NEST: "and has not fulfilled any of the and probably never will be." Field to produce HOLLYWOOD (UPI) Academy Award winner Sally Field, seeking to star in her own productions, is developing two movies at Columbia Pictures where she has a development contract. Lorimar tops list HOLLYWOOD (UPI) Lorimar Television emerged the top provider of programming for the coming season with a total of 11 series for the major TV networks. Lorimar's output represents the fourth consecutive year it has led other TV producers, this time representing eight hours of, NAME THAT TUNE -Tom Potter, left, and Larry Heidel of the Carl Fisher Sheet Music Store in Chicago stand programming on ABC, CBS, ready to help find the many strange requests the store gets. They often help customers by listening to them hum a NBC and Fox Broadcasting. few bars. (AP Laserphoto) Filming costs no concern to producers LOS ANGELES (AP) -The huge production Dino De Laurentiis developed the script, which costs and star salaries of the summer films have "In Hollywood, if someone would intrigued Schwarzenegger in the mid-1980s. aroused fears that the film industry is. headed "It was the best script I had read in years," he down the same road as America's savings and pay me $100 million in salary and recalls. "When I picked up the script the first time, loans. they would get back $400 million, I couldn't put it down. I read it all the way Don't worry, advise the makers of the $50 ..through, then I read it again. The whole business million "Total Recall," they would do it with pleasure. of memory being erased and another memory Says Arnold Schwarzenegger, whose salary was Wouldn 't you? I would. implanted was fascinating." reportedly_$10_mllion:_"AslongsyoucanbringSet in the year 2084, "Total Recall" depicts reportedly $10 million: "As long as you can bring .Schwarzenegger as an Earth laborer who enrolls the money back, that's the key thing. In Shaznge sa at aoe h nol H ollyod baik, s ham 'e ouldey meg $100 producers want to give. But it's all on the screen. for a memory-implant vacation and soon finds million in salary and they would get back $400 It's not something that fell in the water or himself enmeshed in a civil war on Mars. De million, they would do it with pleasure. Wouldn't disappeared into somebody's pocket. It's all there. Laurentiis was unable to find a director for the yo t would. "I don't think you feel the (fiscal) responsibility film and sold the project to the enterprising you? I as a director. You know that you can't make it for Carolco, maker of the "Rambo" films. "The numbers don't matter. The onlythingthat $5 million or even $40 million. The decision is Schwarzenegger agreed to the choice of matters is: Can you return this money twice or economic. The producers must decide: Can we do Verhoeven as director: "He has the right mentality three times over? Sometimes studios make a this movie with all the special effects and by for it, the discipline, the know-how." movie for $5 million, then they put $10 million in adding Arnold Schwarzenegger make our money The Martian world was created on the stages of for promotion and they lose it all, because it's a back? If that possibility exists, they go for it. Churubusco studios in Mexico City with the bad picture. This is how studios eventually go "A company like Carolco makes a lot of predesigns of William Sandell. Included is the tawdry bankrupt." sales. With a name like Arnold's and my name, red-light district of Venusville with its glaring Adds director Paul Verhoeven, "We made it which is pretty well known in Europe, they can neon and an occasional touch of whimsy, such as a pretty cheap by going to Mexico City. Shooting in say, 'Look what we have: the director of Jack-in-the-Box sign. Mexico City itself provided Los Angeles, I'm sure that the movie would have 'Robocop' and Arnold Schwarzenegger, can we the locations for Earth 100 years from now. cost $70 million or something like that. We started please sell this movie to you?' So they get a lot of "There will be new things in the 2080s, but there (the budget) at $43 million, and I think I went over money already from the pre-sales. Then they can will be things that you can compare with today. 15 percent. So it's probably up to $50 million. I say, 'We can do it." Especially when you come from Europe, where in always go over 15 percent, even in Europe, where I "Total Recall" has been in the works for 10 every city you can see buildings that are four-, made films for half a million. years, originating in a short story by Phillip K. five-, 600-years old. So there is always a "I always seem to go over a bit more than the Dick, "We Can Remember It for You Wholesale." combination of the old and new.

PAGE 18

18Tropic Times-* S o t June 15, 1990t 'The Same But Better'captures 2-on-2 by Cpl. Bob Blocher matches to reach the tournament's final Earlier, PTJ cut an easy path through Same lobbed shots to the Spies' back round. the single-elimination bracket, trounccorners and managed a 21-18 victory. FORT CLAYTON (USARSO PAO) PTJ built an early 19-11 lead in the ing SOS and Kefe by 21-14 scores. According to tournament director Rick -Heads-up play and a slick floor helped championship game on Cousins' skying The Same faced stiff opposition early Velasco, The Same's two-handed taps The Same But Better shutdown PTJ's spikes and ruthless blocks. on from the Spies. Mike Ortwein led were not "dinks," which are illegal in big man, Guillermo Cousins, and pull Trailing 20-17, The Same's Edgardo the Spies attack, pounding sinking serves 2-on-2 volleyball. off a 21-20 win during the Community Terrero dug several volleys out of the just over the net, and just inside the The Same then faced 29th MI's Recreation Division Soldier Apprecianet to avoid defeat, then served up four back line. Dan Frey reinforced powerhouse, Chad Jackson. However, tion Week 2-on-2 Volleyball Tournastraight points to clinch the tournaOrtwein's serves with bazooka-like Jackson's erratic spikes ended up feedment Tuesday at Reeder Physical Fitment. Sweltering heat and furious spikes, but smart play allowed The ing the net or slamming the far wall. ness Center, here. action made players sweat, causing a Same to pick apart the Spies defense. The Same let the wild shots fly by for PTJ and The Same each defeated slick floor. This left the 6-foot-3-inch an easy 21-11 victory, which set up two teams in 21-point, single-game Cousins sitting on his tail. Amidst cries of "dinking," The their meeting with PTJ. Macho survives scare, Pistons win title downs upstart Recovery PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) Thoto repeat as champions, trailed 90by Spec. John Sell Over-30 Volleyball mas was the unanimous MVP. 83 with 2:07 left, then scored the The Pistons also became the first last nine points to clinch the chamCURUNDU (USARSO PAO) -Teams W L team ever to win five consecutive pionship in five games. Macho D' Monte struggled but manMacho D' Monte 5 1 road games in the NBA Finals. In Johnson, who scored 15 of his 16 aged to hang onto first place in ComNavy 4 2 addition to winning the three at points in the finalquarter, had seven unity Recreation Division's Over-30 acn -A 4 2 Portland, they completed a fourof those nine. Isiah Thomas scored Volleyball League with an 11-15, 16Recovery 2 4 game sweep against the Los Angethe other two, ajumper with 36 see14, 15-11 three-set victory over ReSpiking Vikings 0 6 les Lakers last season by capturing onds left that tied the score at 90-90 cover Tuesday at Curundu Junior High the final two games at the Forum. and finished with 29 points. School Gymnasium. Detroit is now 30-7 in its playoff The Pistons, who lost 20 straight In other league action Tuesday, the runs to consecutive championships.since 1974, won Navy and DCA remained tied for seeTuesday Five of the losses were to Chicago three straight on the Trail Blazers' ond place with wins. DCA received a Macho def. Rec. 11-15, 16-14, 15-11 in the 1989 and 1990 Eastern Concourt. forfeit from the Panama Islanders, DCA def. Islaers forfeit The Trail Blazers took the lead by foreitfro th PaamaNavy def. Vilkingi 15-11, 16-14 ference finals. They lost once each who dropped to, fourth place in the to New York and Portland this scoring the first five points of the standings. The Navy helped the Spikyear. second quarter. But the Pistons went ing Vikings extend their losing streak Women's Volleyball on an 11-2 run, led by Thomas' five to six games by defeating them 15-11, The only franchises besides DePoints, and went ahead 37-29 with 16-14. Ttroit to win consecutive titles are 7:34 left in the half. Navy plays DCA at 6 p.m. Tuesday Teams the Boston Celtics and MinneapoThen Kevin Duckworth, who led in a key matchup to decide second Las Cuibres 2 ls-Los Angeles Lakers. MinneaPortland with 14 points in the first place. In other Tuesday games, the Calidonia 2 1 polis did it in 1949-50 and 1953half, sparked a 12-4 surge with eight Islanders face Recovery and the SpikZonies 1 1 54, the Celtics from 1959-1966 points as the Blazers tied the game ing Vikings look for their first win Meddac 1 2 and 1968-69 for Los Angeles. 41-41 on a layup by Clyde Drexler when they play league-leading MaLas Jugadoras 0 2 The Pistons, the third franchise with 1:36 to go in the half. cho. Pumas 0 2 Sport shorts Espinar bowling and 24. The trip includes lodging, Swim program volleyball, and open and over-30 T g boat, guide, bait and fish cleaning. basketball events is underway at The Fort Espinar Bowling Center Signups are, under way at Building The Fort Clayton swimming pool Reeder Fitness Center. Space is will hold a no-tap bowling 154, Fort Clayton. The last day of will have a summer swim program limited. Signups conclude Monday. tournament 3-10 p.m. Saturday. registration is Wednesday. For July 12 through 19. Registration will For information call Valencio information call 287-3363. begin Monday. The class will meet Thomas at 287-3861. Curundu bowling Monday through Thursday mornings. Seven levels of instruction The Curundu Bowling Center will Pro shop sale are available, from preschool to basic Youth bicycle race holds its monthly no-tap tournament water safety. For information call Registration is under way at the Saturday. Prices include a dinner for Twin Oceans Pro Shop today will 287-6666. Fort Clayton Youth Center for a two. For information call 286-3914. have a sale 11 a.m.-6 p.m. at Building bicycle race to be held June 30. 155, Fort Clayton. Sherman dive trip Children 5-14 may sign up, call 287Bass fishing trip Father/son fishing The Fort Sherman Rental Center 6451. will sponsor a dive trip to Orange The CRD Outdoor Recreation The Aquativity Center will hold a Island June 24 and 25. Space is occer camp Branch will sponsor an overnight father and son fishing tournament limited to 10 people. Fee will include Registration for the upcoming bass fishing trip at Arenosa June 23 Sunday. equipment, boat operator and diving Youth Soccer Camp is under way'at guide. For more information call the Sports Office, Building 155, Fort Donald Ponce at 289-6104. Clayton. The non-resident onePanamanian baseball opens week camp begins June 25. For Open soccer tourney additional details call Dave Fultz at by Cynthia Robles Roberto Garibaldo and the local The CRD Sports Branch is 287-3252. U.i. Msilitay Supprt Group fire department band, accepting registration for an open soccer tournament to be held June 30 Sport c mps CHEPO, Panama (PAO) -Jose Calazan Perez, president to July 4 at Mother's Field, Fort HEP0 Panaman (as l of Metropolitan Baseball of Clayton. Signups are under way at The 1990 Panamanian baseball Panama, expressed appreciation Building 154, Fort Clayton. For Family Support Division, Youth seasonal d gare Juse for U.S. repairs to the stadium information call Eva Foster at 287Services, presents summer sports 3. Local dignitaries, baseball roof. The roof was damaged in 4050. camps. The schedule follows: officials, players and U.S. December 1989 when a U.S. Session 1, baseball/softball, Southern Command officials in a nearby Mon.-Fri. (limited to 100). attended the opening ceremony. field tourneys Session 2, June 25-29, soccer, The games followed a parade f Reeder Fitness Center, Fort (limited to 100). from Chepo's municipal building U.S. troops also painted Clayton, will host open volleyball, Session 3, basketball, July 9-13, to the stadium, led by Mayor Chepo's central park and youth racquetball and men's basketball (limited to 100). Rafael Mendieta, Legislator recreation hall. tournament Sunday to June 23. Session 4, golf, July 16-20, (limited Registration for open and coed to 50).

PAGE 19

Tropic Timesi1 June 15, 1990 Mets smash Cubs 15-10, collect 20 hits CHICAGO (AP) Kevin Elster's bloop RBI single broke a ninth-inning Lie and Howard Johnson added a grand slam as the New York Mets continued their offensive onslaught by beating the Chicago Cubs 1510 Wednesday in the first game of a doubleheader. The Mets, who had 19 runs and 21 hits in Tuesday's victory, added 20 more hits against four Cub pitchers, enabling them to overcome five Chicago homers on another windy day at Wrigley Field. Daryl Boston led off the ninth with a double to left off Les Lancaster (5-3). Mackey Sasser reached on a fielder's choice when Boston beat second baseman Ryne Sandberg's throw to third. A walk to Gregg Jefferies loaded the bases. Elster then blooped his tie-breaking hit to short right field. After Orlando Mercado hit into a forceout at home plate, Johnson hit the first pitch into the rightfield seats for his fifth career grand slam. White Sox sink Mariners 11-2 Dan Pasqua and Ron Kittle hit back-to-back home iX4 runs in the third inning and Jack McDowell pitched a four-hitter Wednesday as the Chicago White Sox routed the Seattle Mariners 11-2. Athletics beat Rangers in 11th Walt Weiss' single scored Doug Jennings with an unearned run with two outs in the 11th inning Wednesday as the Oakland Athletics defeated the Texas Rangers 3-2 to avoid a series sweep. Reds trounce Braves 13-4 The Cincinnati Reds broke a five-game losing streak Wednesday night, pounding Steve Avery in his major-league debut and routing the Atlanta Braves 13-4. Red Sox stifle Yankees 4-1 New York Mets' second baseman Gregg Jefferies attempts a doub e play forcing out Chicago Cubs' Roger Clemens scattered six hits in eight innings to Shawon Dunston. (AP Laserphoto) win his seventh straight decision and become baseball's first 11-game winner as the Boston Red Sox Expos beat Phillies 4-3 in 10 day night as the Toronto Blue Jays won 10-1 and beat the New York Yankees 4-1 Wednesday night. Spike Owen hit a sacrifice fly in the 10th inning handed the Twins their sixth straight loss. Wednesday night and the Montreal Expos seesawed past Philadelphia 4-3, the Phillies' sixth loss in seven Giants blank Padres 6-0 Tigers slip by Indians 5-4 games.GatsbakP rs6Lloyd Moseby's tie-breaking single in the eighth Trevor Wilson, bidding for baseball's fourth noinning gave the Detroit Tigers a 5-4 victory over Brewers down Orioles 7-2 hitter of the season and second in three days, lost it on Cleveland on Wednesday night, ending the Indians' Dave Parker homered and drove in three runs Mike Pagliarulo's leadoff single in the ninth inning three-game winning streak. Wednesday night as the Milwaukee Brewers beat the Wednesday night as the San Francisco Giants beat the Baltimore Orioles 7-2 for only their sixth victory in 21 San Diego Padres 6-0. Astros defeat Dodgers 5-1 games. Glenn Davis hit a three-run homer, his 19th of the Royals crush Angels 11-4 season, and Mike Scott held Los Angeles to three hits Blue Jays roll over Twins 10-1 The Kansas City Royals snapped an eight game over seven innings, leading Houston to a 5-1 victory Junior Felix, Glenallen Hill and Fred McGriff homered losing streak with season highs in runs and hits, four Wednesday night that extended the Astros' longest and left-hander John Cerutti held Minnesota's allby Kurt Stillwell and beat the California Angels 11winning streak of the season to six. righty lineup toonerun in seven innings-plus Wednes4 Wednesday night. Argentina blanks Soviets; Uruguay, Spain tie NAPLES, Italy (AP) New-look changes, and they paid off. a stretcher with a double fracture of his Uruguay, which created most of the Argentina overcame the early loss of Pedro Troglio, one of the new startright leg early in the first half. Sergio scoring opportunities, had its chance injured goalkeeper Nery Pumpido to ers, scored the first goal in the 27th Goygochea replaced him and did well. to win the game in the 71st minute, but beat the Soviet Union 2-0 Wednesday, minute, heading home a clever pass The injury occurred on a crossing Ruben Sosa blasted his penalty kick keeping alive its chances of defending from Julio Olarticoechea, another new pass by Soviet attacker Igor Dobroover the bar. The penalty was awarded the World Cup. starter. volsky in the ninth minute. As Pumpido after Francisco Villaroya handled the After a shocking loss in its opener to Jorge Burruchaga made it 2-0 when came out to challenge, Oleg Protasov ball on the goal line. Cameroon, Argentina desperately he pounced on a defensive error in the collided with him and the ball went Spanish goalkeeper Andoni Zubineeded to beat the Soviets. Led by star 80th minute. past. Pumpido stayed down. zarreta was in commanding form and Diego Maradona playing before the The Soviet Union played the final 42 made a number of crucial saves. fans who idolize him for his role in minutes with 10 men after Vladimir It was the first scoreless tie in the 12 carrying Napoli to the Italian League Bessonov was ejected for first pulling, Uruguay, Spain, Tie 0-0 World Cup games this year. championship the Argentines did so then pushing, Argentine striker ClauUDINE, Italy (AP) Uruguay missed Uruguay and Spain are paired with convincingly and severely damaged dio Caniggia. a second-half penalty kick and was Belgium and South Korea. Belgium the Soviets' chances of advancing. Pumpido, who backstopped Argenheld to a 0-0 draw by Spain in a World defeated South Korea 2-0 on Tuesday Coach Carlos Bilardo made five lineup tina to the 1986 title, was carried off on Cup Group E match on Wednesday. and leads the group. Tyson says he's still the best heavyweight LAS VEGAS (AP) Mike Tyson biggest upset in boxing history. 1987 after a 10-year layoff. His oppoeighth-round knockout to Muhammad knows who the best heavyweight in Saturday night at Caesars Palace, nent will be Brazil's Adilson Rodrigues. Ai in 1974, he boxed only exhibithe world is. Tyson returns to the ring for the first Tyson, denied a berth on the 1984 tions the following year. He won four "Basically, I still am," Tyson said. time since the knockout in a scheduled Olympic team by Tillman, was a 25-1 fights in 1976 and one in 1977 before "My record speaks for itself." I had 10-rounder against 'Henry Tillman, favorite, but Foreman said Wednesday losing to Jimmy Young in March of onebad night,butl had 37 goodones." who denied him a berth on the 1984 he thought Tyson is making a mistake. that year and announcing his retireThat one bad night, actually it was a Olympic team. "If I were managing Tyson, I'd let ment. "I can't wait to get back in front Sunday afternoon in Tokyo, cost him In another scheduled 10-rounder, him take off two years 18 months, of a crowd again," Tyson sad. the heavyweight championship on a George Foreman, a 41-year-old forminimum, let him get hungry again," What led to Tyson's defeat has been 10th-round knockout to James mer champion, tries to run his record Foreman said. a topic of discussion and argument "Buster" Douglas in arguably the to 22-0 since beginning a comeback in When Foreman lost the title on an among boxing fans since it happened.

PAGE 20

20 Tropic Times June 15, 1990 Off the wire NL to add 2 teams in '93 by The Associated Press CLEVELAND (AP)The National League will year and will give their final recommendations next add two teams in 1993 and their rosters will be built June. The final choice is due by Sept. 30, 1991,butthe FANS BOO, CHEER RIPKEN: Cal Ripken from an expansion draft to be conducted in November date could be moved up if the process moves along continued two streaks Tuesday. He was given a 1992, NL president Bill White said Thursday more quickly, Danforth said. standing ovation for one and booed for the other. The two expansion cities, however, won't be named Groups in more than a dozen metropolitan areas Ripken moved past Everett Scott and into secuntil late summer of next year, White said at the end have expressed interest in getting one of the NL ond place behind Lon Gehrig on.baseball's "Iron of two days of meetings by owners from both major franchises. Those considered highest on the league's Man" list when he played in his 1,308th conleagues. list are Tampa-St. Petersburg, Denver and Buffalo. secutive game. The NL may have to realign its two divisions if two The final decision may hinge on the financial stabilThe fans stood and cheered for the 29-year-old cities from the same region of the country are chosen, ity of the prospective owners, Danforth said. shortstop in the bottom of the first inning, and he said Pittsburgh Pirates chairman Douglas Danforth, "We're interested in the quality of the people, the emerged from the dugout to acknowledge the who chairs the league's four-man expansion commitfinancial strength of the people, what kind of support ovation. tee. they have from the public sector, be it the governor or But later, after Ripken had gone 0-for-4 and left "We're not going to worry about the relative the mayor," he said. "We're looking for stability. four men stranded, many in the crowd of 27,599 geographic locations at this point," Danforth said. "We'll also look at the demographics of the area: booed him. Although he has shined defensively, "We're not limited in that way." -Will it support a major league team? What kind of Ripken is batting just .144 at home and only .213 Suggestions that St. Petersburg-Tampa and Denver cable TV operation do they have? It wouldn't make overall, have a lock on the two franchises were premature, he sense to put a major league franchise in Peoria. Ripken wasn't around his locker after the game, said. The AL's Seattle Mariners and Toronto Blue Jays but before the contest he addressed his slump. "Everybody is starting from the gate at the same were baseball's last expansion teams, in 1977. The "The easiest thing to say when you're not time," Danforth said. "No one has a leg up at this Mariners paid $6.25 million and the Blue Jays $7 going well is that you have to find a reason, and time." million as their entry fees. usually that reason is the streak," he said. He also said the expansion committee will spend The NL entries are likely to pay between $50 to dismiss that because I don't think that's the the next month gathering information about intermillion and $75 million. When asked if they could go reason for anything especially 50 games into the ested cities and groups. Questionnaires will be sent to as high as $100 million Danforth said, "Anything's season. those groups, and once the responses are evaluated, possible." Ripken, who started the streak on May 30, the most serious candidates will give presentations to The entry fee will be announced when the question1982, needs 823 more games to break Gehrig's the committee later this summer. naires go out, he said. record of 2,130. That means Ripken would need Applicants will be charged a fee, probably about The NL last expanded in 1969, when Montreal and to play every day until mid-1995 to set the mark. $100,000, that will be refundable if they do not win a San Diego were added. franchise, Danforth said. Denver has 1.8 million people and St. PetersburgExpansion committee members will visit the cities Tampa has 2 million; neither is near another bigPENGUINSNAMENEW COACH: ThePittsof the finalists during the first three months of next league team. burgh Penguins Tuesday named Bob Johnson head coach and Scott Bowman director of player development and recruitment. Alltar voing b position Penguins General Counsel J. Paul Martha said he hoped the hirings would help turn around the team's "mediocre performance over the last NEW YORK (AP)-Voting through Sunday for the Montreal, 113,949.' 15, Vince Coleman, St. Louis, decade." National and American League teams for the July 10 104,047. 16, Kevin Bass, San Francisco, 96,815. General Manager Craig Patrick said he had All-Star game. been considering Johnson for the post since Patrick took the reins in December, when Edward A m erican DeBartolo Jr., son of the Penguins' owner, fired his hand-picked general manager, Tony EsposCatcher ito, and his coach, Gene Ubriaco. Catcher 1, Terry Steinbach, Oakland, 250,272. 2, Sandy He's a great teacher, a great communicator, 1, Benito Santiago, San Diego, 455,694. 2, Mike Alomar, Cleveland, 195,404. 3, Tony Pena, Boston, a great motivator," Patricksaid at a news conferScioscia, Los Angeles, 144,691. 3, Terry Kennedy, 150,788. 4, Carlton Fisk, Chicago, 140,703. 5, Pat fence. He has great knowledge of every aspect San Francisco, 142,088. 4, Todd Zeile, St. Louis, Borders, Toronto, 91,792. 6, Lance Parrish, Califorof the game.x 128,520. 5, Craig Biggio, Houston, 104,058. 6, Joe nia, 83,505. 7, Bob Boone, Kansas City, 59,216. 8, Johnson, 59, executive director of USAHockey, Girardi, Chicago, 77,849. 7, Mike LaValliere, PittsGino Petralli, Texas, 53,434. coached the University of Wisconsin for 15 years burgh, 68,692. 8, Ernie Whitt, Atlanta, 65,368. First Base and the Calgary Flames for five before joining First Base 1, Mark McGwire; Oakland, 323,865. 2, Don MatUSA Hockey in 1987. 1, Will Clark, San Francisco, 566,497. 2, Mark tingly, New York, 222,496. 3, Cecil Fielder, Detroit, Grace, Chicago, 176,085. 3, Pedro Guerrero, St. Louis, 163,318. 4, Fred McGriff, Toronto, 132,738. 5, George OWNERS APPROVE PADRES SALE: Base111,597. 4, Jack Clark, San Diego, 97,667. 5, Glenn Brett, Kansas City, 78,003.6, RafaelPalmeiro, Texas, ball owners unanimously approved the sale of the Davis, Houston, 83,159. 6, Andres Galarraga, Mon67,497. 7, Wally Joyner, California, 66,605. 8, Kent San Diego Padres to a group headed by Los treal, 76,858. 7, Eddie Murray, Los Angeles, 75,455. Hrbek, Minnesota, 62,857. Angeles television producer Tom Werner on Wed8, Todd Benzinger, Cincinnati, 57,265. Second Base nesday. Second Base 1, Steve Sax, New York, 274,212. 2, Julio Franco, Werner is general managing partner of the group, 1, Ryne Sandberg, Chicago, 496,126. 2, Roberto Texas, 190,007. 3, Mike Gallego, Oakland, 163,054. which was expanded from 10 members to 15 Alomar, San Diego, 135,786. 3, Robby Thompson, 4, Bill Ripken, Baltimore, 115,150. 5, Willie Ranmembers on Monday. They are buying the Padres San Francisco, 119,890.4, Mariano Duncan, Cincindolph, Oakland, 92,742. 6, Nelson Liriano, Toronto, for $75 million from Joan B. Kroc, who purchased nati, 86,993. 5, Delino DeShields, Montreal, 85,428. 91,912. 7, Lou Whitaker, Detroit, 82,138. 8, Harold the franchise with her late husband, Ray, in 1974. 6, Gregg Jefferies, New York, 80,644. 7, Tom Herr, Reynolds, Seattle, 66,545. Ray Kroc died in January 1984. Philadelphia, 70,618. 8, Jose Oquendo, St. Louis, Third Base The Padres joined the National League as an ex64,041. pansion team in 1969 with the Montreal Expos. Third Base 1, Wade Boggs, Boston, 290,851. 2, Carney LansThe National and American leagues approved 1, Chris Sabo, Cincinnati, 299,799. 2, Howard ford, Oakland, 259,278. 3, Kelly Gruber, Toronto, the sale in separate meetings Wednesday afterJohnson, New York, 221,483. 3, Matt Williams, San 239,685.4, Paul Molitor, Milwaukee, 84,416. 5, Gary noon on the first of two days of meetings. The Francisco, 214,855. 4, Tim Wallach, Montreal, 129,802. Gaetti, Minnesota, 78,106. 6, Steve Buechele, Texas, main topic at the meetings is the expansion of the 5, Terry Pendleton, St. Louis, 100,293. 6, Luis Salazar, 58,111. 7, Robin Ventura, Chicago, 42,194. 8, Kevin NL into two more cities, targeted for 1993 or Chicago, 95,325. 7, Bip Roberts, San Diego, 64,259. Seitzer, Kansas City, 40,755. 1994. 8, Ken Caminiti, Houston, 61,342. Shortstop A three-quarters favorable vote by NL owners Shortstop 1, Cal Ripken, Baltimore, 305,812. 2, Walt Weiss, and a simple majority among AL owners was 1, Ozzie Smith, St. Louis, 323,826. 2, Barry Larkin, Oakland, 235,678.' 3, Tony Fernandez, Toronto, required for approval of the Padres sale. There Cincinnati, 277,883. 3, Shawon Dunston, Chicago, 193,064. 4, Alan Trammell, Detroit, 105,110. 5, were no dissenting votes in either league. 186,854. 4, Jose Uribe, San Francisco, 139,637. 5, Ozzie Guillen, Chicago, 89,580. 6, Kurt Stillwell, Werner's group signed a letter of intent to purGarry Templeton, San Diego, 81,149. 6, Alfredo Kansas City, 67,920. 7, Greg Gagne, Minnesota, chase the team April 2. Griffin, Los Angeles, 77,395. 7, Jay Bell, Pittsburgh, 47,334. 8, Jeff Kunkel, Texas, 41,672. The city of San Diego, which leases San Diego 58,284. 8, Spike Owen, Montreal, 57,984. Outfield Jack Murphy Stadium to the Padres, previously Outfield 1, Jose Canseco, Oakland, 534,812. 2, Rickey approved the sale. 1, Kevin Mitchell, San Francisco, 362,279. 2, Andre Henderson, Oakland, 471,151. 3, Ken Griffey, Jr., Werner, 40, is co-producer of "The Cosby Dawson, Chicago, 330,789. 3, Tony Gwynn, San Seattle, 427,514. 4, Bo Jackson, Kansas City, 315,567. Show" and other highly rated television series. Diego, 304,478. 4, Darryl Strawberry, New York, 5, Kirby Puckett, Minnesota, 257,231. 6, Dave HenHe has said the new owners plan no immediate 256,145. 5, Bobby Bonilla, Pittsburgh, 250,061. 6, derson, Oakland, 160,246. 7, Ruben Sierra, Texas, changes when they assume control. Manager Jack Len Dykstra, Philadelphia, 207,901. 7, Andy Van 135,692. 8, George Bell, Toronto, 127,928. McKeon and team president Dick Freeman will Slyke, Pittsburgh, 189,516. 8, Eric Davis, Cincinnati, 9, Robin Yount, Milwaukee, 110,002. 10, Junior both report directly to Werner. 142,023. Felix, Toronto, 89,479. 11, Mookie Wilson, Toronto, The group will take over operation of the team 9, Barry Bonds,Pittsburgh, 136,567. 10, Brett Butler, 75,415. 12, Candy Maldonado, Cleveland, 63,498. today. San Francisco, 133,926. 11, Joe Carter, San Diego, 13, Pete Incaviglia, Texas, 58,214.14, Mike Greenwell, J 126,821. 12, Jerome Walton, Chicago, 123,413. 13, Boston,54,566. 15, Tom Brunansky, Boston,53,050. Willie McGee, St. Louis, 119,928. 14, Tim Raines, 16, Dan Gladden, Minnesota, 49,667.

PAGE 21

Tropic Times June 15, 1990 Camp helps players with entrance exams AMHERST, Mass. (AP) -A private, cational choices and exposure to an em Educational Services, a private nonon July 1, Prince said. experimental college best known for institution that has no intercollegiate profit social agency, how it could as"In the long run, we would seek a its prowess in team Frisbee is sponsorathletic program. sist the financially-pressed Springfield larger, more diverse group," he said. ing a basketball camp aimed at tutor"But there are a whole group of city schools. "But at the moment we want to try ing black high school players in colindividuals involved with slightly dif"They said this is what they want this and see if it works." lege entrance exams so they can get ferent motives," he said. and we had the personnel available to athletic scholarships at other schools. Dennis Jackson the college's sports do it," Prince said. Hampshire College, tuition $20,000, "On the surface it seems a startling director and also an assistant basketThe city's high schools have been was founded 20 years by four surjuxtaposition," .Hampshire College ball coach at Central Connecticut perennial contenders for the state high rounding colleges and universities. Its President Gregory Smith Prince Jr. said University, said as a recruiter for Divischool basketball championships. And tditollaw a grad ar opTuesday. "We are not involved in sion I schools he is trying to "combat its black community has been active in traditional classes and grades are opintercollegiate athletics. And we don't a national crisis." pressing for educational reforms. In tional. In order to graduate, students believe in Scholastic Aptitude Tests as Jackson maintained that too many 1985 at the urging of the local chapter complete a series of individual research a crucial way to measure education athletes, particularly blacks, are unof the NAACP, Springfield became projects. progress." able to meet the minimum NCAA stanthe first community in the state to "Our youngsters need all the educa"But we also know the rest of the dards of a C average in their high require students to maintain a C-avertion they can get," said Norma Baker, world uses them," he said. "And the school classes and a combined score of age in order to participate in high school executive director of NES. "With way we teach can help students master 700 on the SATs to qualify for an sports. financial aid being cut back athletic all different kinds of standardized tests." athletic scholarship. The two-week free pilot program for scholarships are the only means for Prince said the college's primary goal Prince said the college became inabout 15 high school.juniors and senmany young black males to enter colwas to give the young men more eduvolved after asking officials of Northiors is scheduled to start at the college lege." Davis tentatively approves Oakland's plan OAKLAND, Calif. (AP)A new the Coliseum, estimated at $60 milproposal to bring the Raiders back to lion, and a $31.9 million "operating Oakland that limits the risk to public loan," or franchise fee. funds and contains no financial guarThe Raiders, who moved to Los antees has been tentatively approved Angeles from Oakland in 1982, are by the NFL club's managing partner, Axect torpay a in 19 Al ~ Al Davis, it was reported Thursday. a ep et to ay approximt50,0g The agreement must be approved by e n rent to the Coliseum starting the Oakland City Council, the Alameda In another switch from previous alCounty Board of Supervisors and proposals, the city and county would Oakland Coliseum board members. t get the first crack at revenue from The deal is basically the same but premium seats to ensure the payoff of the risk has been reversed," said City public-sector debt, anticipated toreach Council member Wilson Riles Jr. about $92 million, "There is no public participation on aot$2mlin the so-called upie ofteat he Negotiators are expected to take the the so-called upside of the deal, but the proposal to the city council for the first public sector's hide is covered first." time next Tuesday. Unlike previous proposals, the city In March, the city council and board and county will not have to guarantee of supervisors approved a $602 milany ticket revenue to the team, which lion, 15-year offer to the Raiders that will market all tickets, the newspaper included a $54 million franchise fee, Fans from Oakland, Calif. cheer when Oakland city council and Alameda said in Thursday's editions. public guarantees of ticket revenues county supervisors were meeting to decide if the Raiders would return to The revised 15-year contract is exand about $53 million in Coliseum Oakland. (AP Laserphoto) pected to recoup costs of renovating renovations. Major League Baseball notesby The Associated Press STOPPERS Frank DiPino's stretch of 14 straight victories ended STATS Wednesday night in St. Louis' 6-5 loss to Pittsburgh. Toronto leads the majors with 81 home runs, but has only 28 on the road. .St. Louis is last in the National STARTING League with 27 home runs, but has outhomered Vince Coleman led off the game for St. Louis with opponents 19-16 at home. a home run Wednesday, the first Cardinals player to do it since Curt Ford on June 20, 1986. STREAKS The New York Mets scored at least three runs in their first 14 games in June. They have raised their STEALS batting average 20 points to .257 in the last week. Otis Nixon has 21 stolen bases, but just 47 at-bats for Montreal. Most of those steals have come as a SWINGS pinch runner. Willie McGee, St. Louis' three-time Gold Glove center fielder, made three errors Wednesday night. STAR He has five errors this season after making three last Trevor Wilson, Giants, pitched a one-hitter as San year. Francisco beat San Diego 6-0. He struck out nine, walked none and only allowed Mike Pagliarulo's SLUGGERS leadoff single in the ninth inning. Glenn Davis is tied for second place on Houston's all-time homer list with 163. SIDELINED Jose Canseco was put on the 15-day disabled list SLUMPS Wednesday because of a disc problem. Oakland made Philadelphia's Lenny Dykstra went 0-for-4 Wednesthe move retroactive to June 8. day, his third straight hitless game after his 23-game Cubs reliever Mitch Williams will be out for six to hitting streak ended. His 0-for-12 slump is his longest eight weeks after undergoing surgery Wednesday for of the season and his National League-leading avera torn ligament in his knee. age has dropped from .407 to .384. SPEAKING STARTERS "No one on the bench was saying anything about Atlanta's Steve Avery, one of the most highly my pitching but the fans were. They said,'Hey, Trev, regarded pitching prospects in the minors, got pounded you've got a no-hitter going. Don't think about it." Oakland Athletics' Jose Canseco holds his in his major-league debut Wednesday. The 20-yearSan Francisco's Trevor Wilson, who lost a no-hitter shoulder after taking a swing. Canseco has old gave up eight runs on eight hits and three walks in on Mike Pagliarulo's leadoff single in the ninth inbeen placed on the 15-day disabled list. (AP 2 1-3 innings. ning. Laserphoto)

PAGE 22

Tropic Times 2 June 15, 1990 Buz Sawyer BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker CHT THEE UI.i' R TOM AH)ISx JUST STALLION WHITE PONY --L E iMA Wb k EEILE, YOU'RE f'ARG GE .U. _7 .U L KWS HiM: SWEPT OUT p F AN P T BUT TAKE -I'N TAAK ZMP SIBLE I' HS S THE BEYR SH T EATLLO K EI 8M 64 FOBr UNE COON E TEOE STALL EER AGEU T MU GNEALU WHY2 MSN BUKLEY HERES THE HTUFF FOR -UTRALYWALKEE BY AND OUR ST FE HECKSIR HL TRNL THAKS WHATAREYOU olN RES RES AAREYOU AC CAESAR1 TTHE ZERO, YOUR 1N kPH NG0-HO 'Y0U GET AN ECHO HN YOUR STUP V '/ HAS NEAE WHEN YOU TAL OES REALL SOTE TE W N WH STE THROUGH STAL YOUR EARS Prof. Phumble YES, NE'S OUT YOU MEAN BECAUSE OP NO-I MEAN HE' STOOPED IS PH-INEAS BACK PUT TING A WEED NE'S STOOPED TO CALLING IT NAMES! STILL FRGNTING A CURSE ON TO COMMN SUPERSTITION 5 PNUMBLUS IT! '?C 11 APOPLE7(U5 W R APES I E WE ON HE \E WANT HAO THE PHONE TO BIKY PHO N 4 1TAL OFE A*m StOH hie U *g l 1987 Ford BoncOO 1I,4x4, V-h, Sspd. Uac Pt ps ammcaoss gd tres, good cond. $9,500. 204.3294 H984 Chotte, AT, a/c, a/cass,dpendable. $2,095 obo. Stud services availablE, German Shepherd dUgs, bosst n shE 1975 Lisscoln ConinentaUI IOwnEUr I ownero, sxc. Eod. all l9H3 RenaUoI FUegO, 5 spd. notdoty paid, Uow mies, U/E, Nery BrU EOr 83-86 CeliEa $50. 284-3386 coUntry. 252-6910 extras. $3,000. 252.-l252/42l5 goUd EAnd. $3,500. 209-5700 4 Udorble kittes, mUles anod fEmales, 8 sks old, black sith 1973 Jagoar, beautifal, good cond., 0ew painl, Onw soals, ps, 1905 Honda CiviE H-Book DX, a/c, sew stereo, low silos, speed. $2,400. 286-6237 sh boots. Foes. 282-339H ph. listed sisdoss. 03,500/obo. 287-5599 pb, pa. Asail. H Jol. $3,500. 280-3424 -972-Meroodes 230, yl., ecool valvejob o baleoy. body Frss 4 stbs old Calic kilteos. 284-3037 1979 Aadi Fox, fool injeotion, dsypaid. sasoal srasmoissios. 1979 Thooderbiod, aslo, a/c, ps, p b, am/ fm cans. doy poid, .--. .SIOHO ...$.0. 200-4296 OEc coed. $2,200 leg. 286.-4384 1981 H osdH Prelde, good cond., aulo,osunrooE, electrica/ c, 252-I 194 1980 H osda Aesood, U/E, U.S. specs. $3,000. 252-I 143 1983 Mazda 323 GT. 5 spd., as/Esm coos., sosroof, delux .oo 2 yellow head pareals, Eaboloas birds, pain registered, 9 yrs. 1 905 H onda DX Holocback, U/c, as /Ifm cats. oxo. scond. .................$2500. 225-307 old. $200. 2H2-12H2 Daly eol paid. 04,000/060. 252-I1I81 Tatyola piok--up vehicle say be sse at 16e Howard auato ~ Freoceloog moo vbdhosheldkitnmae relndo9oabsalSnno d.s5sp.,a/,amdkirdi,29l0o.s .sa.leg.ro.yan.d ..l9. 8.Ni. saApseIIG cmptesy,4esd,/~sEodo2,0 pOl Op ste saver, Isagowrse IPritr shite, litter teaittod. 252-2807 froes 9-5 only ks, exc. cood. $4,800. 282-4505 1978 CJ-7 Jeep sith hard lop. $2,500/aba. 286-3471I desk, eso programs $ 800. 26 -2840. Mid-size poodles poppies, tail cot, dewoosod, 2 salos, 2 1982 Cbeo. Cbevello, a/le. asto, new tires. $1I,800. 284-3230 1983 Mitsobishi Galiat SupoerSaloos,sw/susroof, a/e.4 d., Yanso FT-209R H 2M bas radio, miko&oapid cbarger $250 females, ll1/2smth. 0130/oba. 228-2421 -'-'--'-''-'--''''--'-'--'-''-'--'-''''----'-----5spd., tape dock, rHns good, daly paid. 284-5479 firm. 260-2883. Germasbortbaipppios,bornMay7,CCPregisteed,oc. $18,000. 284-3230 1981 HondaPrelode~asto,sroofelect.,a/c,sesseatssnes Baldsis orgasm is good condition, recently toned $608. price, ready lo go, gd witb kids. 232-5438 ---------'---'''---''--' -. battery, good cood. $3,000 neg. 267--3951I 223-9141l. AKC misaure Dachtsund poppies, just siosod, gd. hose sinob, bed loot has 09,500. 252-2622. 1970 VW Vas Camper, exo. coed. 3 beds, closet, refrdg Hitacbi VCR popn op top excettost condition $288/obo. pot, gd. with kids. $150/and ap. 284-3898 -'--'-''---'--''--'--'--'-----'---' -'-' ditswasher, cabinets, table & has. Negotiable. 232-5627 284-6830. Gemas Shepard puppies, 4 1 /2 whs, blk/ailver, 5 sales, 2 as/Es, soseooE elect., sing deloxe, dsp paid. $3,080 neg. 1977 Chesy. 9 pass van, reso goad 0050. 204-3990. Oskyo stereo asplifte, 40 wants/ehannl, separate tO band Emsales. $200. 281-3325 285-5460 .equalizer $1l75 all. 287-5526. Toy poodle poppies, I sale. I emale(wbite).$200.261I-3325 1983 Olds Ciero, V-6, ps/ pb, a/c, as/Psm cans., 2 do., exc. 53000. 282-3703. Cable ready l9"color to, digital toning, resale control, like .........cond. $4,700. 283-6148 call after 6 p.s. ............ew $250/ebo. 287.-5526. kids. 204-4278 1982 Mazda323, great ceod., a/c dty paid. $3,200, 287-3493 sports lists $500 cbe. 261-7376. YaOsH radio trasmiter, asp, VFO. phone path, frequency Beaatiful black labrador poppies, boon 5-16-98, Iwo loft, 1977 Bronco Ranger 382 OH. in., 3 spd., FW D, eons great. H gggb. CCP registered. 252-6272 $3,080. 287-3493 -Electric guitar, red. Hondo Les PasI remake s/ease $175. Pit-boll poppies, II who, base shots, great watchdogs and 1981 Mazda 626, 2dr.-coopenstd, dip paid, non-U.S. specs. 260-4184 Kimball piano, exc. codition /eat rd, godfinish $20. boase degs. $258. 252-1277 HeigisHI owner, eons good. $2,200. 226-2605 ''.' .''.'.''.'' .-..-..-...-. .---252-1194. ................1986 H oedo Prelode, aato, sunroof, H/ec, eec. condition. A__________ m_________ es________,__ l J0pick-op 360 engine,4 weeldise, aoto. 02,800 $6,500 734-1945 Atari computer set, printer, keyboard, disc drice, great Ear ..84-6. .----9 ---beginsers $350. 286-3498. speed, a/c, good $2,500. 2 glass paok sofflers I 7/8"-2 pipe $56 new. $15. 252-6831 Use lie Firestone 0/0, P235/70R-t5. sery good cond. $30. 286-3543 Natiooal Qaistrix I5' color ts, w. resole control. wie 252.-68.31 ...base,. ..like268 new. ...2.25. --.284-56.b85.lk nw $2 5 2456 5 1978 Chesy Cheretto. $1,500. 284-4074 after 7p.s. --''--'-----'-'-' --'--------1985 4x4 Jeep Cherokee, 2dr. ac, as, fm casscte, luggage ........1987 Hosda Cisic DX, H atchbaek, am/ fs, exE. cood. dty rack & sore. $8,350 firm. 282-4234 Sany Betamax camera sode BMCI00, exetlest condition 1988 Nissan Saney, 4dr., S op4. a/c, as/fs, dty set paid. sot paId. $3,900. 289-4535 ''''''''. .'.'.'.'.'.'. .'.'.'.'. ....---------------588. 252-288. $4,200. 252-2670 --------------------------------------1983 H onda Accord 4 do., AT, a/e. P0, as/Esm stereo, all ................1987 Nissan Seony Coape, a/c, tinted windows, S spd, eec. electric, 80,860 kms, good cend., dty paid. $4,000. 260-9848 Kensood steero receiver, Teak top sE line case drok, 1984 Oldsobite Cotlass Ciera, ps/ph, a/c, 4 cyl. $5,000. send., $5,000. 286-4936 .'.''.''.'.'.'.''.''.'. .' ..' .'. .' ...' ---toestab ale, 2 Be spkers $1250. 284-4438. 286-4972 .1985 Nissan 000y, ross, looks good, sot dty paid. 02,700. -..1I988 Sasoei Foesa OTt, Twin Cas, 16V, a/c, Kenwood Asail. sid-Jaly. 287-5037 Stereophsonio noer as-oo Marantz mode I S5B $125. 261Most sell 1982 Chrysler La Baron, 4 cyl, Huoe, ps, pb, exc stereo, AM P eqaalizer, atarm, risos, listed sindoss. $7,250. --------------------1734 after 5. cond., 2 do. dty oot paid. $4,000/obo. 236-6691 286-3074 1985 GOMC Leisare Van, H/c. am/ fm cassette, pw, exc. cond. 1987 Ferd Taurus Lx 3.o co. in. ong. V-6. Folly loaded. 1907 Nissos S/s., auto, a/c, pb, ams fmcass.,nexc. ccsd. dty 1979 Fasmcbile Ford Vas, a/c. ps, costomied, geed cod. soose. joysticks, gos, lets of softsare $295. 286-6398 $11,000. 252-1182 501 paid. $5,300. 236-0691 04.008. 252-2936 after 5 p~m 1978 Dedge Aspee SW, hocyt. AT. ps, pb, eat pretty bat 1979 Plymouth Horion, Halehback, ats. geed ceod. 1983 Maeda 8-2000 Saodewsee pick-op. 4 ppd., stereo, 264-9196. reliable. 0700/0b0. 242-3841 51,700. 286-4680 omsjls. sans greot. $4,000. 286-3687. Yasha 20attohaoe stre s/ae EC O t Ad YOUR 1985 VolvoGLO. 360,5spd.,,a/c, amifmreadie cats.,exoc. I989VWGof2,00dewntakeoverpaymens24monsthst l983BickSkylark,4dr.a/ c~am/f,6yl.,ec.cod.,ery~ Technie teestable, Panasenie timer$000. 264-5596. coed. $7,500/obc. 252-5430 go. Oely 9500 miles. 226-7209 reliabte. $3,500. 282-3977,3273. 1978 Toyota Corolla Japanese Style. 286-3498 1981 Aadi diesel. a. c. sxc. ceed. $3,500. 207-1730 PCSiog mst sell,.6 weoth old 19895VW Saotaoa Gls. 7,000 $100. 236.6727. silos. Many s-teas. Dty pd. Non-U.S. specs. 07,000. 287-4635

PAGE 23

Tropic Times June 15,1990 Classified ads Audiovisual Household o ho Miscellaneous Maclolosh Clone PC, duel disk drive, Imeagewriter printer, ansoreed software $1700. 283-6140. 4-drawer wooden chest B16 drawrs with metal insides, x,. Diningrm sideboard $4, curtains, drpes for tropical. Shower door. $100. Fm antenna. $41. Wedding dress. $100. .., ..coad. $50/oho. 261-7376 284-6785 Tcoknics K350 keyboard. $500. 252-2781 Sanyo Betateanvideo casetteplayre, 40 tapes included $150. ....................I. ............ 287-3338 2 Scaly twin mattress practically new, with tradle bed Ceiling fan w/lamp and speedconteol. $65. Homespifarthe .....Sanyo reafigneato $160, eatan dresser $100, Crown 16" Ev $180. 225-4758. bathtub. $65. 252--5356 Ste nys, widi .gital timee, con deck, equaliazer, Pioneer $150, plants. 287-4032. ...1. .................................. receives tuntable, d pke.a $100/oh. 284s68s d 0.k P.P. 3, Ptional .a.h /s2 9er bed 1000, micea.eve v26" ladie bike, child shoes,. kitchen a. .e. 30. ...' Ratn dable bed $200. 286-3535. exercise bicycle, morn. 207-5770. 224-3992 Campater 60280 l1tmhe. 45M8 H D.6410k rant. Macdaer. 12 W2 1.44 h*,*;s 1311 41;hoats Ra0287 daucle 03201 c2ha. 209,4654. &, 14 D, 9r0287 CPr, S3200 ob,0 289-4654. 8 115, bro sser / i $45. 286-4680. Whirlpool 7,600 htu ac, 2 years old $155/abs. 287-3178 Saddle for roping. $475. 252-2143 Commodore 64/128 software and hardware, 284-3386. 2 eight steds 18 by ed 175, .lid.d bakbed, n Dining rm nt w/ chairs, a side table $550. 252-6110. Golf clubs, Lynn USA, 3-pw 1345 Woods. $275. 286-4297 Atari cmpeter great for beginners. 286-3498. mt5-drawer wooden het, metal insides 050,obo. 261-7376. 1978 parts for Honda Accord. 287-4439 .9"colo .5185 .9 ........t .......4..r. .....plats, clothes. 286-3498. 19' colortcv$105. 287-4379. __________________________ Metal work table. $504-dr. storage cabinet. $200. 8000 BTU R .a. i. .R ch oak livingrm art $750/o. 294-3386. a/c. $200. 286-3532 Sansi stems amp/tuner $150. 286-4680. .3-pc Western style liviagem set goad condition $300. Y Twin m -ttress. $25. Old female bike. $15. Table games: Suasi stre. 350. 286-3535. 284--4335 Yellow head patrol, Amidr area, needs medicine, will cry Pacan, Upwords, Stay Alive, HoegMan, Trust Me, .....like a child. Reward. 282-3794 after 5 p.m. Golden Trivia Game Major League edition. S5/eu. 226-5279 Atari 800XL printer, disc drive $400. 284-5490. .aer & de, old modl, w ks good 100. 22 92.---. .e ..ryer .ld .odel .alk .ood $1W 224-3992.M iscellaneousBa ......P. .......4. ...Pnonic 4 color graphic typewriter with Music keyboard, rhythm, 6 orchestra opts, Yamaha PSR 15 .auto catetion memory, more 5200. 285-4190. $150. 2874730. Lge Plants, all sires. Webber BBQ grill. 286-3498 Sony Trisitron 27" color tv 0550, Sanyo 19" color v $250. .bdse./. ,drse.d.s 4-bdrm. tropical curtains and rugs. 8000 BTU a/c. Atari 800 Trundle bed set w/asatrras, dmesser, one table & desk 233-2851. XL printer, disk drive. 284-540 w.hutIh 0500. 6,000 ac $200 21. color mv 200. 252-2936. Digital rhythm programmer Y amah RX17, /dmm and ..'. ....Clothes, houseltold ites, many paper back hook, 6 Ptrellc rear tire 150/80/16 new V-rated perfect foe racing percussion sounds $300. 264-7375. Queen mattress w, bo spring $150. girls hike 21' vega. carpet. 286-4298 bikes. $100. 224-3992 286-6388. Sre eqpent low prices. 284-3293. 11,00 t ac, cools, some rust available now 100/o Gas grill. 50. Schlage keepsafer plus ularm system, 7 Dul. r43r tire 3 V g f r hi.992 ...287-58 wdow sensors, 2 area sensors, power siren, remote. $500. Sony 25' color s I. stereo VHS recorder, Sansui streo, Apple 202-5535 HIE dual disk drive computer. 282-3186. ...1988 Yamaha Virago, duty paid, 1028 miles, maroon, like Full sire mattress/box springs, under cabinet blender/cn new. $4000. 284-3294 after 5 p.m. ..G, Sprite, Austin-Healy Trimph owners, British car club Sanyo 16' "/w v, screen very good condition 580, Fisher mo, Corher fullnow forming. 252-2807 9-5 only '.8.Ymaa.0,K.k.wit,.ip.uhu.,.ut.pid turntable with cover $90. 224-3992. ..'. '' 1.1''1 -'.'.'.' '.' '' ..19.66. .....750., ....wh9itemhatZi7pexrk rawustti ex uts, d py id.d Mahogany furniture, lamps, iron/ bras beds, curio cabinets. Ride-sn2Little ..t. ......................262-1262 Ride-on Lit;e Tike railroad train, i/tracks, battery and $2800. 252-2180 AutoZenzaaBroica4x6w/2 filmacks $700, 3-nit elcfash .recharger. $75/ohs. 286-4622 w/umbrellas, access $450. 287-4932. .....1984CR 80, gd. coed., eedsahome, litlete, musse, a Lge brown sofa $425, entertainment center S150/negotiable. By ..d s engine. $400. 287-6743 284-5192. -Baby crib w/mettress and spring. $100. Suitcases, various A2114i519b2e sizes, hot-water heater, 30 gal., new clothes dryer. 286-4384 ..--. 1986 Honda CB-70-SC Nighthawk, like new, with a lot of Kenmoe 15.2 feasalese freezee, perfect condition $375. ...utadypi.$40/h.2-39 2s2-48s4 2215 75 r15 radial tires, gd. coed. 284-5720 call 6 p.m. extras, duty paid. 54000/obo. 224-3992 Spanish-speaking maid for general h.usrwork, honest, loves .....0 ..3 10 gal .q qari. r. tc cplet vi h 1 ' and Shuei helmet with shield (I extra) and carrier bag. $80. kids, references, 223-2646. Lovesea, sofa s., excellent condition $750. 264-6747. ..$r0 an. aqurim o pe i h 224-3992 accessories. $50 and $250/ohs. 287-4918 Bilingual maid, exc. worker, great with kids, reference. 28417.2' refrigerator/fereer w/ire maker, washer, dryer,. .. 6371. ubokase w/glass doors. 287-4820 after 6. Twin size mattress and bouxpring. S60. BBQ grill. $40. Items i gd. coed. $100. 284-3093 Exc. bilingual maid, available M-T-TH-F, depeuduble, 5pBRset,qumnsizebdicludd,excelleatondition$850. honest, great references. 287-4088, 284-4430. PCS sale, baby items, bottles/ bath/ changing dresser, plants 3222 Empire St. Balboa. 7 -noo. Saturday. and curtains. 284-3293 ..... .......I. ..* 6583-B, Los Rios. 710 .(chuthes,zeramics, plants isr. Ex. day maid, iron, cook, clean, loves kids, wash, available Dishwasher $100, beige rugs lx12, 9x12, venetian blinds. 6583-Btictciertor,0frm.aFlrd Musca.mMakepfe. turdiy. anytime. Catylitic conveyor, from a Ford Mustang. Make offer Sa-.day. 284-3976 ..-----. ..........o,. ...8 ..I .I .*a47 M.ga AS.aturdam.Sa yr.y Mature dependable live-out maid, great babysitter, Oriasal rug 6x9 beig/brown $70, original Peruviaa aipaca ..* .2 R .s.2473 Ma-gunAe .81 -. trustworthy, available Jose 25. 284-4935 rug 85. 284-5685. 2 GoodrorP21560 R14 tires. $58. 35mm Yashico TL Eletro camera outfit. $25. New Eye of the Storm. $60. 1109 Ft. Amador, disingem, livimgm, bedm, t, stereo, Paru e full time day maid, ce. worker references. 282-5537 18,800 ta ac $325, 12,0101 tu ac $225, 10,006 btu ac S208. pafter 5 P.m. 252-2287. -. ...........7. ..o.ilof ntern ti alandNationalpainters.Prices .e dy maid, erstans little sh, avail y dys Sears microwave 1.4 cubic fret $150, house plants, all sizes vary. 232-5627 (M-F), has references. 221-5641 and prices. 286-4725. 3 .' .S .g .M .' ' 321 Singer Memomatic; knitting and ribbon, .computerizedd card (all colors). Negotiable. 232-5627 Lionel or American Flyer electric trains. 286-3375 after 7 Maid, honest gd worker, cleans houses per day, irons, and Stairs carpet for tropical house $50, plants in all sizes.p.m. works per month. Male worker also, cleans house, washes car 2844283. ks, mops n nama aal ad ana, vais prices. -. and does garden work, live-in. 287-4379 .......228-0,458 To single beds with matteresss, good cond. $100 both. 287....Ma. .gany wood/wicker diningrt set, 8 chairs $1550. 4379. Bilingual day maid, honest, reliable, hardworker. 287-5497 2414135. Ds .sh.r,.d. r. ds ss,. ...._. Dishwaher, need work. $30. Ladies shoes ai. 3, cork after 5 Ppart. .ale -$135 .-. .settin .d.n ..panrlihg I x 3 with 36 pe. S10. 252-2042 Extra large, 2 piece long sleeve wr suit, dive weights and ................,. ....Is ge party table 3x7' $135, 8 setting dinnerware set $50 ....................belts. 286-4896 after 5 p.m. Ex. day maid, available M-W-TH, ref., available, honest, 260-4184. b c .$7 52-1097. -.-.-.-.-.-.-.--.-. hard working. 267-7174 ...6 .Hufkiboy.hik.n.g.$70 .r. .rn good and .Sofa, 2 chairs, room divider, 2 carpets 9x f2, tea cart, 2 end Gi Ls firai e40. Iceookike for aie ear fash. 80 Live.in English speaking, honest, reliable, good with kids. tables, lamps. 260-6066. A .maker frref. $0. W-k/ta ybe-ch. $15. reasonable year, will pay cash. 24-3867 284-3326 ask for Hilda A/c. ............" i -he, 8 ft. ladder. 252-2042. .Closed type bar, glass and bottle storage, marble top $550. ..0. 6 -m 8 f l -2 --2. Seiko divers 150 ml. watch with rubber protector. $150. .* -* -. Dependable, honest, hard working, bilingual daymaid, exr. 252-5898. 224-3992 Boat trailer for 12-15 ft. host. 243-5452 with kids. 238-5900 ask Julia .I .. .Twi beili sutTwineialbedremaksuite.hstyepesial g' ardcm,"ionTeaknd (Spanishik,, style o E. live-in maid available, highly recommended, speaks complete, exe. cnd. $3000. 252-5898. 350. 287-3677 evenings gthers. c24-3(9 Spanish some English. 284-3739 .$.0. 0 .2.7.-.7.7.e.v.e. .2 sets twin mates $75 net. 286-6345. Mature, responsible, dependable, live-in/out, gd. w/kids, .available June 16. gd. references. 224-3545/282-4337 King size frame, box spring, mattress, nine months use $375. the TR O PIC TI E S Ad Form ........261-1734. Hard working English speaking live-in maid, gd. with kids, .. available now. 266-4060 -Household goods, draperies, bed covers, clay powerr pat. Advertising in the Tropic Times is offered on a space available basis to U.S. military members, civilian .287-4439. DoD employees and employees of other U.S. government agencies. Ads will be accepted only for NONGerman instructor, available for tutoring. AIP levels. .COMMERCIAL services or goods offered by the advertiser or an immediate family member. Offerings of 282-3027 Admiral freezer, like new $500, 9x12 Oriental rug $2700, real estate or personal ads will not be accepted. The Tropic Times reserves the right to edit any -.s.g .r.w.r. Rosewood grandfather clock $1900. 286-4023. advertisement. Questions regarding non-publication of submitted ads may be directed to the editor at H.nes .ili.gual d.y maid. .hrd working .eli.le, .ef.rences ....285-6613 221-6641 Misc. boasebold goods, furuitace, clothes. 252-5643 after 6, 22_ __1 ___-6641___ __Mi.__housppuietme gs only. Submissions must be typed or legibly printed and limited to 15 words. Only two submissions per family per week will1 be accepted. Eacht sabm ission must id icole only one category for pablicati on. Ads for series II' freezer, Teakwsod bar. Teakwood stereo cabinet. 4pc will be accepted once per quarter as will ads for the Wanted category. Patio Sale ads must indicate date and bedrm set, Spc breakfast table. 286-3471. location. Submitted ads will be published only once and must be resubmitted for further publication. Ads Fresh and saltwater rods and reels-Pen rels, over 20 to .not run because of late receipt or lack of space need not be resubmitted; they will be run the following week choose from. 282-5650 L shape sertisnal w/qen size bed, recliner $2000, 48" v $800. unless a specific date is involved. ....252-1277. Deadline for the receipt of ads is 9 a.m. Monday for the following Friday's edition. If Monday is an U.S. diver's tank with boot regulator and back, recently ....official holiday, the deadline is 9 a.m. Tuesday. Ads may be mailed to the Tropic Times, APO 34002 or inspected, full. S175.282-5494 Queen size bd w/frame and heodbd $200. 282-3985. deposited in a drop box at the Albrook Post Office. Advertisers should allow seven to 14 days for 14' Joboat w/25hp Yamaha engine. new electric motor, White 12x12 white carpet. 286-3743. .processing. and accs. $2500. 284-5490 .. ..Kingsize water bedrm set, hys bn k bedr set, DRrsm 0 ANIM A4Ls 22' North American "Offshore' hoot w/trailer. new furniture, Sears vacuum cleanrer, carpets. 282-3186. 1 AIYO1Y0 ISUAL Armstrong, 300hp outboard bracket, no motor $4500. 287.... 5729. Four occasional chairs, linen material, ceastors $80 en. I A ITOMORILES .....286-4828. 0 A9 V L lA lLL___ Must sell, 27' Hunte sailboat. diesl engine, 4sils, extras, .. Sl,000/obo. 252-6825. Washer & dryer $575, crystal,. chandelier, full bed-m set, n BOA TS & CMPERS mahogany dining-m. 226-7209. PRI8I/ HOME PHONE U Ff3/NI) Amass fener 17' $200, Whirlpeol dishwasher $100. 0 RjgSEHOLD Cheekonlynste oryperadiom. Onytwoadsperpersonechwekr 252-6985. E LOST allowed. Lach adfors limited to 15 words. Please type orpriat evts'. Teak dining em. set, 8 chairs, china cabinet. $2900. Teak Whirlpool refrigerator freezer 19.side hy side 60 MISCELLANEOUSd bow is -included n the d, b eaired fr entertainment. $800. 252-6825 252-1182. publication. This izformalion will fog be released to third parties. ....M O TORC YCLES 8p, black lsaer bedroom sail $1200, sofa/sleeper $699, Redwood patio furniture. 12 pet $400, gas grill $100. 1 PA TIC SALES NPON0OR' NAMF RANWIGRAnk lovessa $599, recliner $200. 284-6480 252-6985. .1.1. I .--.--0 W AN TED ORG. DUTY PHONE Toddlers hed massres, drawer and bokshelf 60. 264-1825 GE dishwasher $55, recliner chair, needs repair $25, Spanish after 6 p.m. Friday. teachers enryclapedin S60. 252-6020.

PAGE 24

Tropic Times 2'4 June 15, 1990 -~ ~L4.Michigan Attorney General Frank C o u rt Kelley said he is pleased with the U.S. Surpreme Court's ruling to uphold his state's right to operate sobriety checkWASHINGTON (UPI) -The Supreme lanes on its roads and highways. Court, boosting local efforts to combat .a great victory. .we must begin to make checkpoints a key "I welcome this decision by the drunken driving, Thursday upheld 6-3 United States Supreme Court which the constitutionality of sobriety checkelement of an all-out campaign tofinally rid our roads of the allows Michigan to take strong steps to points. menace posed by drunk drivers." MADD president protect the public from drunken drivChief Justice William Rehnquist, ers," he said. Unfortunately, public ruling in a Michigan case, balanced education is not enough; sometimes the goals of the widely used tactic who has been drinking over the prostoday's opinion will be received fastrong enforcement measures provide against the impact on motorists of police pect of being stopped at a sobriety vorably by a majority of our society, the only effective answer." checks and concluded the stops do not checkpoint, but, rather, the fear and who would willingly suffer the miniHoward Simon, executive director violate the Constitution's ban against surprise engendered in law-abiding mal intrusion of a sobriety checkpoint of the Michigan chapter of the Ameriunreasonable search and seizure. motorists by the nature of the stop," he stop in order to prevent drunken drivcan Civil Liberties Union, said the Rehnquist noted the "magnitude of said. ing." ruling doesn't mean the "case is over." the drunken driving problem" and said Rehnquist was joined in his ruling by H6 added, however, that "consensus He said a lower court order was based that reports of "death and mutilation Justices Byron White, Sandra Day that a particular law enforcement techon the Michigan Constitution, which on the nation's roads are legion." O'Connor, Antonin Scalia and Anthony nique serves a laudable purpose has could be used as a basis to continue "Conversely, the weight bearing on Kennedy. never been the touchstone of constitufighting sobriety checklanes in Michithe other scale -the measure of the In dissent, Justice William Brennan, tional analysis." gan. intrusion on motorists stopped briefly joined by Justice Thurgood Marshall, Justice John Paul Stevens also wrote Micky Sadoff, national president of at sobriety checkpoints -is slight," he disagreed that the intrusion was minia dissent: Mothers Against Drunk Driving, called wrote. mal. "Unfortunately, the court is transthe ruling a "great victory" and said Rehnquist also said there is little "I do not dispute the immense sofixed by the wrong symbol -the illu"we must begin to assure that every concern that the stops will "generate cial cost caused by drunken drivers, sory prospect of punishing countless community will make checkpoints a fear and surprise" among motorists. nor do I slight the government's efforts intoxicated motorists -when it should key element of an all-out campaign to "The 'fear and surprise' to be contopreventsuch a tragic loss," he wrote. keep its eyes on the road plainly marked finally rid our roads of the menace sidered are not the natural fear of one "Indeed, I would hazard a guess that by the Constitution." posed by drinking drivers." by United Press International Prices rise WASHINGTON -Wholesale prices nationwide edged up 0.3 percent in May on higher food costs after three consecutive monthly declines, the Labor Department reported Thursday. The increase was generally in line with forecasts by private economists. Sanctions continue STRASBOURG, France -The European Parliament, in a major victory for black nationalist leader Nelson Mandela, easily adopted a f resolution Thursday urging that full economic sanctions be maintained against South Africa. The 177 to 47 vote with five abstentions came one day after Mandela told the Parliament that even a partial lifting of sanctions would be unacceptable to his country's black majority. Flag designer bitter NAPOLEON, Ohio -The man whose design for the American flag was adopted almost 30 years ago says he is outraged at Monday's Supreme Court ruling protecting flag burning. "Just once, I would like to see some of those Supreme Court justices face eyeu-, ball-to-eyeball with some of the families and relatives of Vietnam vets who visit the Vietnam VeterSUICIDE MACHINE -Dr. Jack Kevorkian, 62, a retired Royal Oak, Mich., pathologist shown in a file photograph with ans Memorial in Washington," his "suicide device." The apparatus involves hooking a person to an intravenous solution. The person then can kill Bob Heft said. himself by pressing a button that stops the saline solution and injects thiopental, a coma inducing drug. Janet Adkins, 54, of Portland, Ore., who suffered from Alzheimer's disease, used the machine to take her life recently. (AP 3 millon gallons spill Laserphoto) GALVESTON, Texas -A brief flare-up of the fire aboard the burning tanker Mega Borg was "not considered a major setback," and Bfo u rth te firefighters were ready Thursday to again douse hot spots with a WASHINGTON (UPI) -The drug operation, Barry told his constituents reading: "Entrapment is illegal. Who chemical foam, Coast Guard offiand perjury trial of Mayor Marion Barry it is "a time for healing -for me should be on trial?" "Fight the Power," cials said. The ship has spilled an went forward Thursday, overshadowed personally and for you politically." and "Conspiracy. Conspiracy. Conestimated 3 million gallons of light by his announcement that he would not "Whatever I can do to help you spiracy." crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico, seek re-election and by a vigil outside heal, I'm willing to do it," Barry said. Many remained silent. Others said officials said. the court for the man who has led the I'm willing to go to any length. .they were protesting Barry's prosecucity for 12 years. Marion Barry will not be a candidate tion. Israelis protest Pressure mounted for U.S. Attorney for re-election for my fourth term." "Damn right I'm angry," said Johnnie JERUSALEM -More than Jay Stephens to reach apleaagreement Attorneys Thursday asked prospecJohnson, 75. "They gave him illegal 8 ERU, ALM Ie More skng with Barry before testimony in the tive jurors if the announcement altered drugs to entrap him." 800,000 Israeli workers -day case begins next week. their assessment of his guilt or innoAbout 40 others, including Barry's higher wages staged a one-day Barry, in a televised address to city cence. Most said no. mother, later joined the vigil. strike Thursday, closing Israel's residents Wednesday night, said he About 40 Barry supporters, wearing airport, banks and government would not be a candidate for a fourth black wristbands and calling themBarry was allegedly videotaped offices and halting regular broadterm. selves the Coalition for Equal Justice smoking crack cocaine in the Jan. 18 casting by all but Army Radio. Speaking five months after his coUnder the Law, held a noon vigil outundercover operation that led to his caine arrest in an FBI-police sting side U.S. District Court, carrying signs arrest.