Citation
Panama Canal review

Material Information

Title:
Panama Canal review
Creator:
United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Place of Publication:
Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Publisher:
Panama Canal Commission
Creation Date:
March 1953
Frequency:
Semiannual
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
PANAMA CANAL ZONE ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama) ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
periodical ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body:
Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note:
Title from cover.
General Note:
"Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note:
Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not protected by copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
01774059 ( OCLC )
67057396 ( LCCN )
0031-0646 ( ISSN )
23584335 ( ALEPH )

Related Items

Related Item:
Panama Canal review en espagñol

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Gift of the Panama Canal Museum


PANAMA


CANAL


11


Vol. 3, No. 8 BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE, MARCH 6, 1953 5 cents


Cunard


Liner


Transits


Canal


Construction Projects


For


This


Fiscal


Year

SStudy


No curtailment is planned in
the quarters construction proj-
ects at Corozal and on Empire
Street in Balboa for which


contracts


have


been


awarded


school


scheduled
program,


proposed
t Corozal,


elementary
originally


for this fiscal year's
will not be built this


ONLY CRUISE
during this tourist
.. Tine.
po~M 3,183? tobs

O
l Personnel


LINER to transit the Canal
season .was the S. S. Caronia of
The handsome big ship-she
and is 715 feet overall length-


1


Ceilings


SForce ceilings have been fixed not only
: for the .overall Government-Company
S organization, but also for each Bureau in
:, the organization, Gov. J. S. Seybold has
, : informed all Bureau directors.
i The ceilings were set in accordance with
1 : ""the personnel limitation order of President


was southbound February 15.
She had aboard 525 passengers for the cruise
which is to take her completely around South
America.


Each


Bureau

iy Organization


carried on the rolls at the end of January.
These figures include the New York
and Washington offices and temporary
locks overhaul employees.
The Canal Zone Government figure,


also a
level,


arrived at from the late January
is 1,223 full time U. S.- and 1,415


year.
The Canal's entire construction pro-
gram for this fiscal year and next, as well
as the operating programs for the Com-
pany and Government, has been under
careful review in conformity with the
economy program of the national admin-
istration.
In addition to the postponement of the
construction of the school at Corozal,
three street improve pro ota :
proposed for elimination from this years
program. These are the widening of
Thatcher Highway from the ferry to
Bruja Road, and the repaving of La
Boca Road and a section of Hains Street
in Diablo Heights.
The various construction projects
scheduled under this fiscal year's pro-
gram which have not been started are
still under study and the decision on any
curtailment or postponement of these will
be made individually.
A report on the proposed construction
projects for the coming fiscal year was
submitted this week to the Bureau of the
Budget by Governor Seybold. He left
last Saturday for Washington to attend
Ii 1A I r'' I 1 V *-


Are Still Underi


Government-Compan





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


March 6,1953


Diablo
Fire
To


Heights
Station
Be Closed


More


Than


Are


Thousand

Upgraded


Local-Rate


Result


Workers


Job


Studies


Announcement that the Diablo Heights
fire station is to be closed was made last
week by Governor Seybold at the Febru-
ary Governor-Employee conference.
The Governor told the conference that
the action is an economy measure in
accordance with the Federal directive to
reduce expenditures.
The work of fire protection in this
Pacific side settlement, he said, has been


"very, very light."
area will be covered
Central Station. TI
not been decided,
expected within the
During the subseq
Governor told the c
is no present plan
Panama Canal Fire
units of the armed se
conferees apparently
The announcement
made by Governor
conference. He alsi
crease in water rates


The Diablo Heights
Ad from the Balboa
he effective date has
but the change is
next 90 days.
uent discussion, the
conference that there
to consolidate the
Division with fire
rvicis as some of the


feared.
t was one of sev
Seybold during
o announced an


eral
the
in-


Early in August 1952, Governor John
S. Seybold initiated an intensive review
of more than 3,000 local-rate jobs at
grade 7 and above.
As a result of this study more than
1,000 local-rate employees of the Panama


Canal
ment
one to
A si
made
release
The
appro:
crease
genera
tion, p
Since
Canal
graded
study


Company-Canal Zone Govern-
have received upgradings of from
Ssix grades.
summary of the results of the study
by the Personnel Bureau was
ed today from the Governor's Office.
upgradings represent a total of
ximately $120,000 in salary in-
s annually. There has been a
l upward increase in grade distribu-
articularly in grades 11 through 15.
ce the inauguration by The Panama
in February 1948 of the present
d local-rate wage scale a continuing
of local-rate graded positions has


been made. This study gives recognition
to special duties, assignments and respon-
sibilities.


but said that while


this would affect commercial concerns
and the armed services it would have no
affect on Canal households.
Budget Conference
Governor Seybold told the conference
that he was leaving the following Satur-
day for Washington where, in addition to
attending the Board of Directors' meet-
ing, he would confer with the Bureau
of the Budget on the 1954 fiscal year
program.
The conference was necessary because


An 1m t 1 1


1 -


o federal orders to economize wherever
possible in government units.
At the time, the Governor said, he
could not foresee what action the Budget
Bureau would take, nor what projects
would be considered indispensable.
As customary, the conference opened
with a discussion of items raised at pre-
vious conferences. One of these was
Commissary products, bread especially.


The Governor said that I
sary is taking action toward
a better bread, but caution
ference that in a recent
Commissary operations it
that the retail stnrns have


lhe Commis-
d producing
ed the con-
appraisal of
was evident
carried ton


Former Grades


Totals-


During the first 4 years of the pro-
gram-that is, between 1948 and last
August-it-was necessary to study posi-
tions in groups, or in large occupational
categories with a minimum of time spent
on individual positions. This procedure
generally produced good results in occu-
pations min which each employee's work
is identical with others in the group.
Positions at grade 7 and above,
however, have individual characteristics
which are not found, to as large a degree,


in positions bel
As examples


upper
ary 1!
grade
none
In
figures
grade
and 4
The
study


brackets
952, their
11; 11 in
n grade 1
February
were 1


ow this grade level.
of the promotions in the
of the pay scale, in Febru-
e were 48 employees in
grade 12; 2 in grade 13;
4 and 1 in grade 15.
1953 the corresponding
50 in grade 11; 363 in


12; 7 in grade 13; 11 in grade 14;
in grade 15.
increases which resulted from the
are shown in the following table.


Grade to Which Promoted


58


58


3
149


152


10

165
135


169


1
334
34


369


27


6
26.
4

36


2
1
3


Totals
75
224
179
458
41
30
6
1,014
1,014


The table below illustrates the distribution of total force in each grade in com-
parison with one year ago.
Percent of Total Graded Full-Time Force, Grades 1-15
Grade February 25, 1952 !February 7, 1953
Number Percent Number Percent
7 ---- ------- 1,761 15.14 1,654 15.50
8 -----------973 8.37 613 5.74
9 ....... .--.--- 242 2.08 272 2.55
10 .- ----------- 472 4.06 234 2.19
11 ......--- 48 .41 150 1.40
12- .....----- 11 .09 363 3.40
13 .. .-----2 .02 7 .07
14 . . .---- 0 .00 11 .10
15---.---------- 1 .00 4 .04
Totals .. 3,510 30.17 3,308 30.99
(Grades 7-15) (of 1-15) (Grades 7-15) (of 1-15)


. J .. > ** . .


. .


p




March 6, 1953


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


$27,000


For


Goal


Zone


Chapter s


Trim- Uniformed Fore
Security Of Panama


e


Enforces
Canal Locks


Red


Cross Campaign


March i
Zone, as i
chapters i
Zone goal
set at $27


s Red Cross month in
t is for hundreds of ]
n the United States.
for this year's drive
,000.


the Canal
Red Cross
The Canal
has been


Of this sum, 75 percent will remain on
the Isthmus for the use of the Canal Zone
Chapter. The remaining 25 percent will
be sent to the Unitedc States to finance
the national program which provides
assistance for such disasters as floods and
fires. Victims of last year's floods in
Oklahoma and this year's floods in
Holland and England have received Red
Cross assistance.
In addition, the national program this
year is being enlarged in two important
activities: Provision of additional recre-
ational facilities for U. S. troops overseas
and expansion of the National Blood
Program to obtain plasma for a serum to
protect children from the paralyzing
effects of polio.
Funds, retained locally are used for
many worthwhile causes. Food pack-
ages for some 120 persons are provided
weekly, in most cases their only certain
supply of food. The Canal Zone Chap-
ter is also maintaining seven persons at
Corozal Hospital and two at Gorgas
Hospital.
Last year $2,000 of the $33,000 col-


elected
relief
depen
vided
latter
sonne
geney


during the drive was allotted to
of service personnel and their
dents and another $3,700 was pro-
for emergency loan funds. This
money is available to service per-
l or civilians who must make emer-
trips to the United States, for


instance m cases
their families.


of death or illness in


R. W. Collinge Is Chairman
This year's drive is headed by Roger
W. Collinge, Director of Elementary
Education for the Division of Schools.
A Red Cross campaign will be conducted
simultaneously in military establishments,
and will be part of the Canal Zone drive.
Mr. Collinge is being assisted on the
Atlantic side by Neil H.,Wilson, Chief
Admeasurer, who is General chairman
of ths Atlantic sid& Wnrking with Mr.


JAMES G. SLICE, a senior patrolman in the
Locks Security Force, and the new uniform designed
by a committee from the Force are inspected by Sgt.
L. R. Moist, left, and Capt. Edward H. Halsal.

Enforcement of the internal physical
security of the Panama Canal locks is now


entirely in the hands
ized Locks Security
Roy C. Stockham,
Division.
The organization
completed; its 58 o
on round-the-clock


of the newly organ-
Force, according to
Chief of the Locks
of the force is now
officers and men are
details at the three


Sergeant Moist is Security Commander for the
Pedro Miguel lock area. Captain Halsall heads
the Locks Security Force which was authorized
about a year ago.

pass a basic qualification test which in-
cludes the proper and legal use of fire-
arms. At the end of (See page 12)


ENDS


LONG CAREER


I :


. -


flights of locks. Two of the 58 are tem-
porary during overhaul. Its headquar-
ters are at Pedro Miguel locks where the
force's captain, Edward H. Halsall, has
his office.




THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


March 6,1953


Traffic Und


Study Durir
Special attention is being given to the
movement of traffic and the handling of
ships in the Canal during the overhaul
of the Pacific Locks during this dry
season because of the high level of Canal
traffic.
One of the principal topics under con-
sideration by the special committee of
the Canal's Board of Directors during its
meeting last month in the Canal Zone
was ship traffic and the overhaul project.
Aside from their extensive study of
statistical data on the subject, all mem-
bers of the committee spent a full morning
at Pedro Miguel Locks to make a first-
hand inspection of the work and to confer
with operating personnel on the handling
of shipping while one traffic lane is out
of service.
The committee was composed of
Matthew Robinson, Chairman, Lt. Gen.
Lewis Pick, W. R. Pfizer, and Edward
D. McKim. On their visit to the Locks
they were accompanied by Governor
Seybold, Capt. Marvin J. West, Marine
Director, and Roy C. Stockham, Chief
of the Locks Division.
Although considerable concern had
been expressed over possible delays to


er
Li


Special
ocks Overhaul


shipping during the present overhaul
period because of the high level of traffic,
no extraordinary delays have occurred
and comparatively few ships have been
delayed in transit as much as 24 hours.
The expeditious handling of ship
traffic, which has been at the highest
level in the Canal's history during recent
weeks, has been largely due to careful
advance planning and the adoption of
time-saving operations not normally em-
ployed under regular operating conditions.
Delays have also been minimized by
an unusually even flow of traffic during
the overhaul period up to now and the
relatively few peak days when an abnorm-
ally high number of ships arrive for tran-
sit at the same time.
Traffic Is High


Ocean-going commercial


(See page 12)


SOME OF THE WORK in progress 70 feet below
on the floor of Pedro Miguel Locks is being explained
by Roy C. Stockham, Chief of the Locks Division,
left, to Lt. Gen. Lewis A. Pick, center, and Governor
Seybold.


WITH THE EMERGENCY GATES as a back-
drop, two members of the Board of Directors pause
for a picture with Captain Marvin J. West, Marine
Director, during their inspection of the overhaul
work at Pedro Miguel Locks. Left to right are:
Captain West, Edward D. McKim, and Matthew
Robinson,.


MEMBERS OF THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE
of the Board of Directors examine in detail some of
the work required duringg an overhaul of the Panama


Canal Locks. In the picture above, Governor
Seybold, center, is explaining some of the work.


Canal


zg





March 6,1953


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


FOR YOUR


NTER


GUIDANCE


IDENT


PREVENT


AWARD OF MERIT Presentation Ceremony


The Maintenance Division of the Engi-
neering and Construction Bureau has
received an AWARD OF MERIT from
the National Safety Council for having
worked more than 1,000,000 man hours
without any disabling injuries.
This is the first Panama Canal Com-
pany unit to receive such recognition
under an award plan now officially adop-
ted by the National Safety Council for
recognizing good industrial safety records.
The AWARD OF MERIT is the
second highest award of recognition given
by the National Safety Council and can
only be obtained by a perfect record of
no disabling injuries between 1,000,000
to 3,000,000 man hours of exposure, or
by a prescribed and outstanding per-


centage
records.


of improvement


over


The highest recognition that may be
received is the AWARD OF HONOR,
which is given for a perfect record of
3,000,000 or more man hours, or a pre-
scribed higher outstanding percentage of
improvement over prior records.
Naturally such a record requires the
combined efforts and 100% cooperation
of all employees, so our compliments and
congratulations are extended to all em-
plobes of the Maintenance Division for
this excellent achievement.


AN AWARD OF MERIT from the National
Safety Council, the second highest given in industrial
accident prevention, was awarded last month to the
Canal's Maintenance Division. Shown above is the
presentation ceremony in Governor Seybold's office.
Left to right: Gayl O. Kellar, Chief, Safety Branch;
Nelson W. Magner, Chief of the Maintenance Divi-
sion's Northern District; Lt. Gov. Harry 0. Paxson;
M. F. Millard, Safety Representative for the Engin-


eering and Construction Bureau; Frank H. Lerchen,
Maintenance Engineer; Carl J. Browne, Chief of the
Maintenance Division's Southern District; Governor
Seybold; E. W. Zelnick, Chief of the Water and
Laboratories Branch of the Maintenance Division;
Edward M. Browder, Jr., Assistant Engineering and
Construction Director; John E. Winklosky, Main-
tenance Division Safety Inspector; and Col. Craig
Smyser, Engineering and Construction Director.


HONOR ROLL
Bureau Award For
BEST RECORD
January
CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU


W. H. Russon has been appointed
Safety Inspector for the Terminals
Division.


Emmett Zemer, Housing Division,
has been appointed Safety Inspector for
the Community Services Bureau vice
J. W. Hare.


AWARDS THIS CALENDAR YEAR
Civil Affairs .


Community


Services


Engineering and Construction
Health ---- ------------
Industrial- ----------.-----
Marine-----------------
Railroad and Terminals-----


Supply and Service -------
Swt m n t i


JANUARY 1953


Disabling Injuries per 1,000,000 Man-Hours Worked
(Frequency Rate)


___ 0


Civil Affairs Bureau
Supply and Service Bureau


I tJ I


|




THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


March 6, 1953


It Happened So:

Tivoli Wedding

Story Retold
Fact was separated from Isthmian
fiction last month by a lady who knows.
The lady is Mrs. Harry Harwood
Rousseau (she says it rhymes with trous-
seau), who was the heroine of one of the
Canal Zone's most romantic weddings.
For many years the Rousseau wedding
story has been told and retold in the
Canal Zone. Novelist Rex Beach used
the episode as.material in his story of
Panama, "The Neler-Do-Well," although,
of course, with different characters.
As legend had it, the dashing Admiral,
a member of the Isthmian Canal Com-
mission, waltzed his prospective bride,
the daughter of the American Minister to
Panama, out of the Tivoli ballroom one
April night in 1908 while her parents, who
did not approve of the marriage, sat
unsuspectingly by. In a secluded corner,
the story went, the bridal couple was
hurriedly surrounded by a protective
shield of sympathetic friends while a local
magistrate read a brief marriage ceremony.


Actually, Mrs. Rc
month during her first
Zone in 36 years, it was
There may have bee
program but the dance
the "bunny hug," the
its popularity.
Bridegroom Di
Instead of being
dance in her bridegroo
Admiral Rousseau did
or after the ceremony.
ped quietly out of the 1
intermission, into a rc
north wing. There
Rousseau were married


A. Gudger in
group of frien
she was back,
happened. He
G. Squiers, wa
Within a fey
ily became su
away from the
tral Plaza, at
She made her
streets-she r
they were-to
M. Cooke, Ch
Customs, and


d
d


the pr
s. A
ancing


usseau said last
Strip to the Canal
not Quite that way.
n waltzes on the
of the evening was
n at the height of

don't Appear
whisked from the
m's arms, she said,
not appear before
Instead, she slip-
ballroom, during an
om in the Tivoli's
she and Admiral
d by Judge Herman
esence of a small
few minutes later
, as if nothing had


.r stepmother, Mrs. Herbert
s at the Tivoli that evening.
r days, she recalls, her fam-
ispicious, and she slipped
SLegation, then near Cen-
5 o'clock one morning.
way through the deserted
ecalls how bare of people
the Ancon home of Tom
ief of the Division of Posts,
Revenues, whose sister,


ABRAHAM JARVIS, left, a chauffeur for
the Motor Transportation Division, was working
at Culebra when the Rousseau family was living
there. He accompanied Mrs. Rousseau on a trip to


(called Pete), and


I Culebra during her recent visit here and with her
and her son, H. H. Rousseau, Jr., identified old
familiar locations. The walls of the Cut appear in
the background.


Mrs. Rousseau, Jr.,


combed the grass-grown site
humming town which had
quarters for Canal construct
They found traces of a
which had run beside their ho


tions of
identify,
bamboo
planted b
As they
Canal, M
early life


ol
a


d buildings
garden wall,


they
and


of the once
been head-
on.
paved walk
use, founda-
r could not
a clump of


vhich Mrs. Rousseau recalls was
y Mrs. Gaillard.
Stood high above the now busy
rs. Rousseau reminisced on her
in Culebra. She talked of trips


into the jungle, wearing wrap]
leggings and a heavy khaki ski
lect orchids.
Walked In The Cut
Both she and her son rememb
as a very young boy, he took ref
the house whenever a blast weni


ped khaki
rt, to col-


ered that,
uge under
t off in the


nearby Cut and how, some days, he spent
a good deal of his time under the quarters.
She recalled that she was the last Ameri-
can woman to walk in the dry Cut before
the water was let in and both mother and
son remembered many details of the first


official trip through the Canal.


MRS. MARIE GORE, standing, President of the
Caribbean Stamp Club, had her stamp album auto-
graphed by Mrs. Rousseau. Twenty-cent stamps
were issued in 1932 honoring Admiral Rousseau, a
member of the ITthmian Canal Commiusion.






March 6, 1953


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Official
Panama Canal Company Publication
Published Monthly at
BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE
Printed by the Printing Plant
Mwwi Hope. Canal Zone

JOHN B. SEraoLw, Governor-President

H. O. PAxsoN, Lieutenant Governor

E. C. LunMBARD, Executive Secretary

J. Ruius HARDY, Editor

ELEANOR H. MclLHENNY
OLEVA HASTINGS
Editorial Assistants

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters containing inquiries, suggestions,
criticisms, or opinions of a general nature
will be welcomed. Those of sufficient interest
will be published but signatures will not be
used unless desired.

SUBSCRIPTIONS-S1.00 a year

SINGLE COPIES-5 cents each
On sale at all Panama Canal Clubhouses,
Commissaries, and Hotels for 10 days after
publication date.

SINGLE COPIES BY MAIL-10 centseach
BACK COPIES-10 cents each
On sale when available, from the Vault
Cerk, Third Floor, Administration Building,
Bafl ht egs.
Postal money orders should be made pay-
able to the Treasurer, Panama Canal Com-
pany, and mailed to Editor, THE PANAMA
CANAL REVIEW, Balboa Heights, C. Z.


Taxpayers Take Notice:

March 16 Is Filing Date


For Income


Tax Returns


Because March 15 falls this year on a
Sunday, the following day, March 16,
will be the due date of income tax returns
for 1952 and for returns on estimated
income tax for 1953.
Wendell L. Lindsay, Internal Revenue


A FIRST-HAND A
was presented last mo
The account is the loj
topher O'Connor, who
tamn Robert G. Rennie
It is being shown in a
floor reading room of
Affairs building, tog
material.
The log-note book i
Captain O'Connor's sfa
Philadelphia on Marc,
Persia, New Holland,
Present plans
contemplate the
Erik J. Eriksen,
line and skipper
as the Panama
according to W.
change would p
May.
Mr. Pfizer, Vic
ama Canal Comr
head of its steam
Haiti several moi
Eriksen to arran
the Line's saihing
W. M. Lloyd,
Line in New Yor
tming up the offi
will be headed b2
Captain Erikse
Panama Line f
began his service
S. S. "Guayaquil
her master in 19
the old "Cristoba
When the newv
was made mast


CCOUNT of sailing ship days the Arabian Gulph." Written in a fine copperplate
nth to the Canal Zone library, hand, the log is a combination of ship and personal
g-note book of Captain Chris- history.
se great-great-grandson, Cap- On Sept. 17, 1810, after reporting the purchase of
, gave the book to the library, the same list of stores which he had bought the
n exhibition case in the second previous week, Captain O'Connor added: "And I
the main library in the Civil married a young wife."
ether with some background The book is in excellent condition, considering its
age, but its pages are so brittle that it may not be
s an account of the voyage of freely handled and will not be put into circulation.
ip, the Prince of Wales, out of Above, Mrs. Eleanor D. Burnham, Librarian, and
h 29, 1786, to "India, China, Captain Rennie, who is a Canal pilot, examine some
and New South Wales, and of the entries.
of the Panama Line units of the CommunityServices Bureau and
appointment of Capt. the Commissary Division who had been
senior master of the paid on Thursday are now being paid on
of the SS "Cristobal," Wednesday.
Line Agent in Haiti, Thursday has been eliminated as a pay-
R. Pfizer who said the day for all employees except weekly dock
probably take place in workers.
SIncidental to this change the unlimited
e President of the Pan- cashing of employees' pay checks by the
pany in New York and Treasurer will be discontinued, although
ship activities, visited there are certain hours on paydays when
nths ago with Captain checks may be cashed.
ge for resumption of Local banks, however, in addition to their
s into Port-au-Prince. regular ours, wi now be open from 4 to
freight agent for the 5 p. m. the Wednesday of local-rate pay
k, is now in Haiti set- weeks for the convenience of these em-
ce organization which ployees
.- N.--_ ._ _- f,_l - ploy ees.


y captain EriKsen.
n has been with the
For many years. He
e as an officer on the
I," being promoted to
30. He transferred to
il" as captain in 1935.
v ships were built he
er of the "Panama,"


The SS "Panama" of the Panama
Line has been designated the "School-
teachers' Special" for its northbound
sailing on June 5. At the end of the
summer vacation and for the south-
bound trip the SS "Cristobal," sailing
from New York on August 25, will be
themt "T olm o C nnr:n1 '


OF CURRENT INTEREST


i





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


March 6, 1953


Commissary


Industrial


Laboratory


Saves


Patrons


Over


$100,000


Annually


April 11, 1911
MEMORANDUM FOR COL. GEORGE W. GOETHALS
Chairman and Chief Engineer, Isthmian Canal Commission
*
We bought some vanilla beans in
London and have them stored there
in proper storage, having enough to
last us for a year and are making our
own vanilla extract. This will save
about $2,000 a year and will give us a
much better extract.
It will be very profitable to add to
our laboratory and turn it into a
commercial industrial laboratory and
make such articles as bay rum, tal-
cum powder, Florida water, Cologne,
etc. We have obtained samples of
various essential oils, etc., direct
from manufacturers through our
Paris representative, and there will
be good savings in this work.
*
EUGENE WILSON (Major)
Subsistence Officer
The suggestion of 42 years ago was
made in a lengthy memorandum on the
Commissary Division and its operation.
Today, the "good savings" predicted
by Major Wilson amounts to probably
more than $100,000 a year for Canal
employees, and the Industrial Labora-
tory, although one of the least known, is
one of the most economically important
units of the Commissary Division.
There are few households in the Canal
Zone which are not well stocked with
Industrial Laboratory products bearing
the familiar Commissary labels. And it
is doubtful if a single thrifty housewife
fails to economize and help splice out
the family budget by savings made in
buying Industrial Laboratory items.
Located in a three-story building back
of the big cold storage warehouse at
Mount Hope the Industrial Laboratory
now manufactures, mixes, bottles, or
re-packages approximately 200 items.
These include foodstuffs, cosmetics, phar-
maceutical products, cleaning compounds,
insecticides, polishes, and many others
difficult to classify. In addition it main-
tains a stock of more than 100 other items
which can be supplied on special order.
Native Zonian Heads Laboratory
The Industrial Laboratory is run by a
native-born Canal Zone boy, Earl C.


handles the correspondence and clerical
work in the office, and 23 local-rate
employees. Some of the latter have been
working in the Industrial Laboratory
since before it moved to its present
location 33 years ago.
No accurate estimate of the amount of
savings effected for Commissary cus-
tomers by the operation of the Industrial
Laboratory is possible because of the
wide range of prices in comparable pro-
prietary articles. However, Commissary
Division officials believe the $100,000 a
year figure is on the conservative side.
Net sales of laboratory products are
now running slightly over $30,000 a
month, and it is estimated that these
products would cost at least one-third
more if bought from individual manufac-
turers or producers. In many cases the
difference in prices between "brand name"
products and those produced at the
laboratory are as much as 100 percent.
This percentage figure, naturally, ranges
downward but there are few items on
which the difference is not as high as
30 percent.
Bulk Purchases Lower Cost
Factors which contribute largely to
these savings for the Commissary cus-
tomers are the lack of advertising costs,


BRUSHLESS SHAVING CREAM


is bottled by


the gross by this funnel-shaped filling machine.
The machine is being operated by Hortense Newball.
Like many other mixing or filling machines, this one


EARL C. ORR, CHEMIST, heads the Industrial
Laboratory and closely supervises the production of
every one of its 200 or more items sold under the
"Commissary" label. He is a Canal Zone boy, one
of many who now hold responsible positions in the
Canal organization. Mr. Orr has a many-faceted job
and he is shown here making an "alcoholic determin-
ation" on a sample of beer to make sure the alcoholic
content is not above the legal limit.
inexpensive labels and containers, and
economical packaging by hand-operated
equipment. In addition, many items
can be sold at materially lower costs if
purchased in bulk and re-packaged rather
than buying and selling in packaged form.
Savings are also effected on many items
by the purchase of raw materials and
compounding the finished products.
There are, of course, many products
which the Industrial Laboratory is not
equipped to handle economically or can-
not produce or re-package as cheaply as
proprietary brands readily available.
These are either not attempted or the
lines are eliminated when it is found that
they are as expensive as name-brand
products.
The Industrial Laboratory conducts a
continuous experimental program and the
list of its products is frequently changed.
This program includes not only the


production
ment of t
suggestion
1 1 i


i of new items but the improve-
hose already on sale. At the
Sof a Commissary patron the
ii 9 I 1





March 6,1953


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


being completed and the space to have
been allotted for canning beef was as-


OLDEST EMPLOYEE, OLDEST MACHINE.
Johnny Walker, shown above operating one of the
first automatic bottling machines ever brought to the
Isthmus, has been employed in the Industrial Lab-
oratory snce before the time it was an individual
Commissary Division unit. When he came to work
for the laboratory, the products were then made or
packaged in the old Commissary Division warehouse
in Cristobal.
the Americans who came to the Isthmus
to help build the Canal demanded some
of the refreshments to which they were
accustomed at home. These included
such things as "soda pop" and ice cream.
To meet this demand the Comndss&ry
Division ordered the necessary machinery,
and two of the first automatic bottling
machines ever brought to the Isthmus
were installed at the Cristobal Commis-
sary plant. One of these antiques is still
in use at the Industrial Laboratory for
filling and capping a special type bottle
for one of its products. It is operated
by foot pedal and resembles a late model
automatic bottling machine about as
much as the first airplane resembles a
jet airliner.
Many products such as "Florida
water" were added to the laboratory lines
during the years soon after Major Wil-
son in 1911 suggested the expansion of
the laboratory. However, it was not
until the end of the first World War that


signed to the ,making of the
Commissary products.
Shortly before the move to
Hope, Joseph V. Cariffe, who ha
employed as a pharmacist in the
Bureau, was transferred to the C


various
Mount
d been
Health
ommis-


sary Division as a foreman and placed
in charge of the work. Soon after his
transfer his title was changed to that of
chemist and in the following year, 1920,
after the transfer of the work to Mount
Hope, the name "Industrial Laboratory"
was used for the first time to designate
the unit.
For many years the Commissary Divi-
sion put fancy, multi-colored labels on its
products and during the sleek-hair age of
the 1920's no hair dressing on the market
had a sleeker-haired young man on its
label than the one which advertised its
coconut oil pomade.
The expensive labels were used until
the latter part of the 1930's when it was
decided that they simply increased the
cost of the products without adding to
their value. Consequently, less expen-
sive labels have been designed and the
name "Commissary" has been used to
designate and guarantee the quality and
purity of the articles sold.
A change in the labels was recently
made at the suggestion of employee
representatives who attend the monthly
conferences with the Governor. At their
suggestion the ingredients of each product
are printed on the labels. This change
required the redesign and reprinting of
all labels for its more than 200 individual
products and the work was only recently
completed.
Royalty On DDT
Many people are puzzled over the fact
that many of the Commissary items have
ingredients identical with proprietary ar-
ticles sold alongside them, and Mr. Orr
says they have many inquiries about this.
The confusion generally results by the
application of the public of the term
"patent" to proprietary articles of various
kinds. Most of these products are not, as
a rule, of such a nature or composition as
to be patentable. Generally they are only
protected by a registered trade name and
these, naturally, are not used on Com-
missary products. There are a few chem-
ical compounds which for certain purposes
are patentable and when these are used,


such as DDT for
missary Division
every pound used.
The mixing or
various Industria
is an interesting
which Mr. Orr clo


insecticides, the Cornm-
pays a royalty on


compounding
I Laboratory p
and individual
sely supervises.


of the
products
process
Some


of the articles, of course, are simply
bought in bulk and re-packaged. Some
of the better known of these include
aspirin, moth balls, vitamin tablets, olive
oil, and cod liver oil. Aspirins, for
example, are bought in lots of 2,000,000
tablets at a time and are re-packaged 50
to a bottle. These also happen to be one
of the products which is just half the
price of some name-brand products.
Not all of the Industrial Laboratory


products
these Mr
pounding
oratory
and this,
which re
ment, is
makes all
such proc
an exact t


are so simple and for many of
'. Orr does the mixing or cornm-
of them personally. The lab-
still produces "Florida Water"
* as well as all the perfumes
quire very accurate measure-
done by the chemist. He also
of the shaving creams and other
ducts, which must be heated to
temperature for proper blending.


He also closely supervises all of the
other operations and particularly those
which have ingredients which are poison-
ous or highly volatile. Among these are
household ammonia and lavelle water,
which are two of the fastest selling
products of the laboratory. The am-
monia is made by mixing the strongest
aqua ammomnia available with a proper
amount of water, containing soap and
borax, to give it a cloudy effect
Ice Keeps Bleach Cool
The essence of lavelle water is speci-
ally produced and is so dangerous that


it is made in a shed adjoi:
in a concrete tank. The pr
is chlorine which is bubblel
acid in the stone or concr
several hours. Because of
combination creates, 1,400
are used to keep a batch
concentrated bleach cooled
trate is later diluted to the
and the lavelle water is


ning the plant
ime ingredient
led" in caustic
'ete mixer for
Sthe heat this
pounds of ice
of 300-gallon
. The concen-
proper degree
taken to the


machines for bottling, corking with rubber
stoppers, and labeling before it is ready
for sale.
The raw materials for many of the
products of the Industrial Laboratory
come from the far corners (See page is)





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Railroad
During



I


Worker
Bustling


/1W


Was


Really


Construction


Upset
Days


later held the same job at the Balboa "Y."
Sometime later he was transferred to
the Panama City railroad station. While
working there in 1925 he was injured
when a trunk and a heavy tool box fell
from a truck, breaking his right ankle.
He made a claim against the railroad and,
he says, was promised a lifetime job by
the then governor, Harry Burgess. His
latest job has been as a janitor at the
Panama City station.
Mr. Moulton lives alone in a room on
Central Avenue in Panama City. He is
a devout churchman although he holds no
office in his church. Most of his off-duty
time, he says, he spends reading, or think-
ing about the days when he had a part in
the building of the Panama Canal.


March 6,1953


Clubhouse At Cocoli
Transferred To Navy

The Cocoli Clubhouse ceased to be a
Panama Canal Company operation on
March 1 when it was transferred to the
U. S. Navy.
George Fears, the clubhouse manager,
has been assigned to other duties in the
Clubhouse Division. The only other U. S.-
rate employee was on temporary status
and her employment has terminated.
Most of the 28 local-rate employees
have been transferred to other units in the
Clubhouses through standard reduction-
in-force procedure which has caused the
termination of an equivalent number of
local-rate workers with less service.
The Clubhouse at Cocoli began oper-
ation under the Special Engineering Div-
ision in 1940. It became a Panama Canal
Clubhouse in March 1943.


SATURDAY


MUSIC


DAY


wI. a


HEZEKIAH MOULTON

The unique distinction of having been
spilled, together with his place of em-
ployment, into the bottom of the Canal
excavation belongs to Hezekiah Moulton
of the Panama City Railroad station
staff. He is now winding up over 35
year's service, all of which has had to do,
in some way or another, with the railroad.
Mr. Moulton remembers very little of
his upside-down experience, understand-
ably, as he was knocked unconscious
during the mixup. It happened on Au-
gust 2, 1909, while he was working in a
elen honn shack alongside excavation


work
He
filled
section
shovel
shack,
attach
tioned
35 fee
He
his tel
was k
his pli
frnm t


near Bas Obi


spo.


was keeping a record of all trains-
and empty-passing along that
n of the railroad track. Steam-
I No. 228 was working near the
. Its boom caught on the wire
ted to the tower where he was sta-
I, toppling him, shack and all, some
t to the bottom of the digging.
remembers that he grabbed for
lephone to call the yardmaster but
knocked out before he could report
eight. The train which was loading
:he shovel took him to an emergency


J


.l a v/ --





March6,1953


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Forty

In


Ar


ears


Ago


February


The oddities of Gatun Lake after its
at rainy season were the subject of indi-


vidual curiosity and comment


as well


official attention as the future source of
the Canal water supply.
The Canal Record waxed almost lyrical
about its "varying shades of blue," etc.,
after noting that the lake had commercial
value although it was still 30 feet below
its final height.


The lake was then being used by a man


in Gatun who had fitted out


a launch on


which he conducted Sunday sightseeing
trips;,the lighthouse service was using the
rising water to tow sand and other ma-
terial to the "very spots" where the range
lights were being erected; and three gaso-
line launches and six canoes were making
"venturesome trips on the wind-swept
surface."


Water Highway


"Every


that formerly


poured into the Chagres has become a
water highway through the woods,"
The Record reported.
It was also explained, for the benefit of
"strangers to the Canal work," that the
trees in the area covered by the lake were
left standing for the simple reason that


the cost of cutting them w
amounted to about $2,000,000.


)uld have


THE DYING


JUNGLE,


slowly being covered by the rising
when the lake had risen to 524 feet


water of Gatun Lake,


above


looked like this in


mean sea level.


Anyway, The Record pointed out, a
tree smothers when its roots are covered
with water and "what with decay, insect


attack, and


wave


motion, it is probable


that within a decade the soft wood trees
that new stand soMaked and ghostike
above the water will have been uprooted
and will have floated downstream."
Floating Islands


Other oddities were the "floating
ands," masses of vegetation and earth


loosened from the bottom of Gatun Lake
by the rising water, that were moved
about by the winds, effecting fast and


uncanny changes in the
largest then floating was


mn area.
to Gatun


The islands
Spillway


scenery.
i about 3


were
where


being towed


were


floated over the dam.
The tops of orange and lemon trees
were sticking out of the water at Taber-
nilla where the fruit could be picked from
a cayuco. Orchid hunters could tie up
to the limb of a tree and load a cayuco
a It S It I I 1 (1 fl 1


GOOD


AND


GOOD-looking


electric


clocks which operate on 25 cycle current-
an item which the Commissary Division finds
difficult to obtain from manufacturers-will
arrive from the United States early in March


and will be in the retail


stores


soon after.


There will be three types of alarms and two


styles of kitchen


clocks-in a variety


pretty colored plastic or birch cases and good


looking


For whatever


comfort the


feminine than the basic moccasin toe oxford
that has been the only style in this make


available in the shoe sections.


The new


shoes sell for $5.95 or $6.50, depending or
the size range.


Four new


Here's


Meatless
"Meat"


names might offer rudely-awakened sleepers
the names of the styles of the alarm clocks


are "Serenade," "Beckoner," and "Wink
The Kitchen clocks sound almost as nic
They are the "Helper" and the "Epicure."


Olives


stuffed with fillets


Anchovy
stuffed olives


for the


grocer


be in the ret


after arrival from Madrid


anchovies,
y sections,
ail stores


, Spain.


Miller
addec
They


vegetarian
d to the
are all me


on a soy oean
"soyloin steaks,


choplet


" SMALL FRY


.


:e.


burgers,


foods have been


grocery


sections.


atless meat built


There


meatless
roasts.


e are
wein-
"I


angles can now get in the


fishing act with fiberglass rod fishing sets that


are new in the Commissaries.


The sets have


a spun glass fishing rod, hooks, reel Hoat,
leader and line-as the manager of Whole-
sale Housewares put it, "everything but the
fish." "Little Analer" is the name of the


set and it


KRILIUM -that caused one of the horticultu-


ral world's biggest recent stirs,


Commissaries


where local


is now in the


gardeners


flower lovers can buy it for their lawns and


costs $3.25.


ood looking


low h


Fish
kA..I.


g new styles


eeled shoe:


now in the


s for
stores.


of Penalijo


women


are


One is


eb-ij +;, ,-S .rt rr ran rrIf / A4I


is'


r


k


ift;sdt tck





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


March 6, 1953


Canal Increases


Purchase Of Panama Fruit And


Vegetables


Canal Traffic Under Spedal Study


The Panama Canal organization, dur-
ing the first 6 months of this fiscal year,
more than quadrupled its purchases in
Panama of agricultural items as against
the purchase of similar items during the
corresponding period of the previous
fiscal year.
The great increase is shown by the
following figures: $247,644 worth of such
products including over 2,900,000 lbs. of
sugar worth $183,611 was purchased from
July 1 to December 31, 1952, while only
$53,000 worth was bought between July
1 and December 1 of the previous year.
The figures indicate the growing trend
toward purchasing in Panama as much as
possible of native-grown fruit and vege-
tables. Leaders in these purchases in
addition to the sugar are such items as:
Bananas, oranges, tangerines, cabbage,
cucumbers, green peppers, squash, and
yams.
Other increases during the first half of
the present fiscal year over the previous
year are shown in beverages, a 10 percent
increase; industrial products, such as
cement and medical supplies, a 100 per-
cent increase; and meat products, up

Personnel Ceiling Set For Each Bureau
In Government-Company Organization
(Continued from page 1) less than at the
end of June 1952 when the past fiscal


year closed.
The number of U
at the end of Januar
the Isthmus and in
At the end of the pas
June 30, the U. S.-rat


the
4,860.


united


This figu
employees o0
ington office
employees o:
figures, until
Local-rate
the end of J
on June 30,
Both U. S


States,


. S.-rate employees
y totalled 4,729 on
the United States.
't fiscal year, or last
;e force, here and in
was approximately


re is approximate be
Sthe New York and \
es were not grouped
n the Isthmus, in pers
early last Fall.
employees totaled 13,2
anuary, compared to 1
1952.
.- and Local-rate work


cause
Wash-
with
onnel


91 at
3,881

rs are


at present numerically far below the peak
of the past decade. In June 1942 when


the force was greatly swollen
World War II activities, there
U. S.-rate and 28,686 Local-rate
on the rolls, to make a total


because of
were 8,550
employees
of 37,236.


from $344,000 in 1951 to $409,954.
The value of the total purchases made
in Panama during the second quarter this
fiscal year is $213,771 less than during
the first quarter this year. This drop,
however, is attributed to the fact that
sugar and beef supplies were reduced con-
siderably during the first quarter. The
overall picture of the first 6 months of
the 2 years showed between July 1 and
December 31, 1952, purchases in Panama
amounted to $1,243,457, or $338,457
more than for the corresponding period
in 1951.
The following table shows the amount
of purchases in Panama for the first half
of the present and previous fiscal years:
First half First half
fiscal year fiscal year
1953 1952
Meat products $409,954 $344,000


Agricultural products (fruits
and vegetables).
Other agricultural products.
Other food products ..-
Beverages .. .
Forest products. ..
Industrial products .. .
Miscellaneous... ..
Total..............


Zone
houses


247,644
23,019
16,527
77,497
29,444
235,313
203,851
$1,243,457


towns; reroofing of a group of
in Cristobal; replacement of tile


roofs on nine
boa; and the
on a group of
Two street
ned for this
Maintenance
repaying and
intersections
Bolivar High
Front and El
Bids for this
February and


quarters buildings in Bal-
construction of roof hoods
16 houses in Balboa.
improvement projects plan-
year will be done by the
Division. These are the
improvement of the street
at Margarita Avenue and
hway in Margarita, and
seventh Streets in Cristobal.
work were opened late in
the sole bid received was


rejected as being too high.


Diablo Heights Fire Station To Be Closed
(Continued from page 2) on the danger
of children crossing the tracks near the
Balboa Railroad Station, rather than
further up at Corozo Street.
Safety Code Asked
Mr. Rice asked that a building fire-
and safety-code be enacted and enforced,
pointing out that there was exposed and
defective electric cables in some locations.
He said that safety of the citizens is


(Continued from page 4) traffic in Jan-
uary was the second highest of any month


since the Canal was
of 632 transits. In
97 transits by large
vessels. This high
tinued throughout
daily average number
month was slightly


opened with a total
addition there were
Government-owned
level of traffic con-
February and the
r of transits for the
higher than in the


previous month.
The overhaul of the locks is the biggest
single maintenance job the Canal has to
perform at regular intervals. The over-
haul of the Pacific locks started early in
January at Pedro Miguel and the work on
the east chamber was completed Febru-
ary 14. The unwatering of the west chain-


ber at Pedro Miguel bega
The overhaul work is sli
schedule and it is expe
work on the west chan


n February 16.
lightly ahead of
acted that the
iber at Pedro


Miguel will be completed by March 21.
The equipment will then be moved to
Miraflores locks and it is planned to
begin emptying the west chambers there
on March 23. The work at Miraflores
is expected to require about 4 weeks for
each set of chambers, and normal service
will be resumed before the end of May.
The number of lockages normally pos-
sible at Miraflores locks during an over-
haul period is less than the maximum
attainable at Pedro Miguel because of the
longer lockage time. Based on past
experience, the 24-hour capacity of Mira-
flores is 21 blockages with one lane out of
service, but it is planned to step this up
to a possible maximum of 24 a day with
special operating procedures in effect.
If this goal is attained and the flow of
traffic continues without serious fluctua-
tions, no excessive delays to shipping are
expected.


Trim-Uniformed Force Enforces Security
At All Three Sets Of Panama Canal Locks

(Continu4d from page 3) his first month he
is examined on rules and regulations of
the force and during his second and third
months he is examined on such matters
as pertinent phases of criminal law, rules
of evidence, and criminal investigation.
At the end of his 90-day probationary
period, each guard is given a written
examination covering the various phases
of his training. Not until he haspassed





March 6, 1953


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


ANNIVERSARIES

Employees who observed important anni-
versaries during the month of February are
listed alphabetically below. The number
of years includes all Government service
with the Canal or other agencies. Those
with continuous service with the Canal
are indicated with (*).
48 YEARS
*Willjam Jump, Timekeeper, industrial
Bureau.


42 YEARS
*Ernest C. Cotton,
Plant.


Printer


, Printing


35 YEARS


John W. Towery, Claims Examiner,
Fiscal Division.
John A. Wright, General Storekeeper,
Division of Storehouses.
30 YEARS
Harry F. Cody, General Foreman, Main-
tenance Division.
Troy Hayes, Sergeant, Police Division.
James E. Heady, Assistant Chief Ac-
countant, Accounting Division.
Nicolas E. Palat, Postal Clerk, Balboa.
Joseph J. Wood, Government Systems
Accountant, Accounting Division.
25 YEARS
John F. Hern, Sheetmetal Worker,
Maintenance Division.
P. Byrne Hutchings, Housing Manager,
Gamboa, Housing Division.
William F. Long, Policeman, Police
Division.


20 YEARS
Nathan W. Ashton, Foreman, Shipping
and Receiving, Commissary Division.
Henry C. Hotz, Track Foreman, Rail-
road Division.
David F. Mead, Records Administrator,
Administrative Branch.
Herbert W. Roses Locomotive Engineer,
Railroad Division.
William L. Willumsen, Customs In-
spector, Cristobal.
15 YEARS
Arch D. Bishop, General Investigator,
Office of the Comptroller.
Walter E. Colclasure, Administrative
Assistant, Contracts and Inspection Divi-
sion.
*Helen L. Dudak, Appointment Clerk,
Personnel Bureau.
Harry D. Foster, Filtration Plant Oper-
ator, Maintenance Division.
William T. Halvosa, Jr., Postmaster,
Diablo Heights.
James L. Hatcher, Sergeant, Police
Division.
Edward G. Moran, Postal Clerk, Air
Mail Section.
Gilbert A. Reynolds, Foreman, Elec-
trical Division.
Frederick H. Smith, Jr., Supervisory
Construction Engineer, Electrical Division.


THOUSANDS OF ISTHMIANS turned out 10 years ago last month to attend the War Bond
Carnival in Balboa. The carnival was such a success that it was extended an extra day; when it
finally closed, bond sales totaled close to $650,000.


Isthmians by the tl
around the Balboa stad
ago in February at a 1
biggest affair of the sortn
considerably more than
Just about anything a
for a carnival-except a
The Governor, Glen E.
entrance ribbon. Army
meant was on display.
wagged messages. The
Balboa High School's I


thousands swarmed
ium area 10 years
Tar Bond Carnival,
Sto be held here in
a decade.
anyone ever heard of
zoo-was available.
Edgerton, cut the
and Navy equip-
Searchlights wig-
S511 members of
victory Corps made


their first public appearance min an opening
parade. Taxi-dancers wore out their shoes.
Paratroopers jumped from three planes
over Albrook Field. Give-away prizes were
headed by a round trip by air to Costa Rica.
Bond purchasers stood in line, headed by
the Governor, and sales finally totaled
some $650,000, well over the half-million
dollar goal.

A young lieutenant from the Army Air
Force was killed, three other men hurt
when an observation plane hit a protec-
tive net cable suspended over the north
end of Pedro Miguel locks and crashed
in flames in a ravine hbhind the Pedro


using'gasoline obtained through "B" rations
to make pleasure trips to the Interior.
From Balboa Heights came word that
car owners applying for "B" books would
be refused the extra gasoline when they
were known to have been making such
pleasure trips in their cars. Periodic
checks were being made at points in the
Interior where trips were likely to be taken.

a
Commissary customers were told that
there would be no serious food or drygoods
shortage if patrons bought only as much
as they needed, when it was needed.
Sales of some articles were limited; in the
Commissaries shoes could be obtained
only at the rate of three pairs a year per
member of a family, although shoes could
be ordered by mail from the States.
Commissary officials, however, backed
up a Civil Defense suggestion that each
household keep in reserve a 2 weeks' sup-
ply of nonperishable food-stuffs. Spam,
for instance.

George W. Green, Municipal Engineer,
roilrmnod frrm a nlnno nid hihinnnl fr n


Ten


ears


Ago


February





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


March 6,1953


MARCH


APRIL


Barry H. Kenealy from Policeman,
Police Division, to Customs Guard, Postal,
Customs, and Immigration Division.
Stuart M. Fisk from Machinist, Locks
Division Overhaul, to Policeman, Police
Division.


7th-Track Foreman
B & B Shops.


No. 2741, Balboa


Sth-Sheetmetal Workers, Balboa Club-
house, 9:30 a. m.


Plumbers No. 606, Balboa
9:30 a. m.


9th-Machinists No. 699, K. of
Margarita, 7:30 p. m.


Lodge Hall,


C. Hall,.


American Legion Post 1, Balboa Legion
Home, 7:30 p. m.


10th--Pipefitters,
7:30 p. m.


Margarita


Electrical Workers No.
Memorial, 7:30 p. m.
VFW Post 100, Old Boy S
Cristobal, 7:30 p. m.
American Legion Post 7,
7:30 p. m.
Legion Auxiliary Unit
Legion Home, 7:30 p. m.


Clubhouse,


cout Building,

Fort Clayton,


llth-Carpenters and Joiners,
Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m.


Balboa

Balboa


Pacific Civic Council, Board Room,
Administration Building, 7:30 p. m.


American Legion 3
Home, Old Cristobal.


Legion


13th-Blacksmiths No. 400, Boilermak-
ers Nos. 463 and 471, K. of C. Hall,
Margarita, 7:30 p. m.


S15th-CLU-MTC,
8:30 a. m.


Balboa


16th-Electrical Workers


Lodge

No. 677,


Hall,

Gatun


Masonic Temple, 7:30 p. m.


Truckdrivers, Balboa Lodge Hall,
p. m.
17th-Operating Engineers No.
K. of C. Hall, Margarita, 7 p. m.


Machinists No. 811, Balboa
7:30 p. inm.


18th-AFGE No.
7:30 p. m.


7:30


Lodge


Balboa Clubh


American Legion Auxiliary Unit 3,
Gatun Legion Home, 7:30 p. m.
19th-American Legion Auxiliary Unit
6, Gamboa Legion Hall, 7:30 p. m.


23d-Machinists No. 699, K. of
Margarita, 7:30 p. m.
VFW Auxiliary, Post 3822
7:30 p. m.


C. Hall,

Home,


24th-Operating Engineers No. 595,
Balboa Lodge Hall, 7 p. nm.
American Legion Post 7, Fort Clay-
ton, 7:30 p. nm.
25th-Governor Employee Conference,
Board Room, Administration Building,
2p.m.


VFW Post 100, Old Boy
Cristobal, 7:30 p. m.


Scout


Building,


American Legion Auxiliary Unit 2,
Legion Home, Old Cristobal, 7:30 p. nm.


Ist-VFW Post 3857,
Club. 9 a. m.


VFW Post
7:30 p. m.


Crist

Wirz


obal Veterans

Memorial.


2d-Carpenters and Joiners No. 667,
Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m.


3d-American Legion Post 6,
Legion Home, 7:30 p. m.


Gamboa


January 15 Through February 15
The following list contains the names of
those U. S.-rate employees who were trans-
ferred from one division to another (unless
the change is administrative) or from one
type of work to another. It does not con.
tain within-grade promotions or regradings
ADMINISTRATIVE BRANCH
John J. Alexaitis from Helper, Indus-
trial Bureau, to File Clerk, Record Section.
George K. Hudgins, Jr. from Mail Clerk
to File Clerk, Record Section.
Mrs. Beatrice E. Lee from File Clerk
to Records Administrator, Record Section.
Mrs. Lois A. Mansberg from Personnel
Clerk (Typist), Employment and Utiliza-
tion Division, to File Clerk, Record Section.
George G. Graffman from File Clerk
to Property and Supply Clerk, Record
Section.
Walter J. Allen from File Clerk to File
Supervisor, Record Section.
Vincent Leaver from Doorman, Club-
house Division, to File Clerk, Record
Section.
CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
Mrs. Nancy L. Gamble from Kinder-
garten Assistant to Elementary School
Teacher, Schools Division.
Rex O. Knight from Assistant Motor
Inspector to Motor Inspector, Police Divi-


sion..
Charles
man, Ferr
Customs,
Jacob
tion Divis
toms, and
A. Ed
Administr
Postal Ci


s A. Thomas from Junior Fore-
y Service, to Postal Clerk, Postal,
and Immigration Division.
Rand from Signalman, Naviga-
ion, to Postal Clerk, Postal, Cus-
Immigration Division.
win Wilson from File Clerk,
native Branch, to Postal Clerk,
istoms and Immigration Division.


Richard M. Hir


ons from Policeman to


Assistant Motor Inspector, Police Division.
John M. Mallia from Helper, Locks
Division Overhaul, to Customs Guard,
Postal, Customs, and Immigration D)ivision.


COMMUNITY SERVICES BUREAU


Mrs. Annie R. Rathgeber from Clerk-
Typist, Office of the Director, to Clerk-
Stenographer, Clubhouse Division.
Emmet Zemer, from General Supply
Clerk, Housing Division, to Safety Inspec-
tor, Office of the Director.
John W. Hare from Safety Inspector to
Realty Assistant, Office of the Director.
Jack W. Clarke from Helper, Locks
Division, to Superintendent, Refuse Collec-
tion and Disposal, Grounds Maintenance
Division.
OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER
John F. Lewis from Chief Accountant
to Business Analyst, Management Staff.
Floyd H. Baldwin from Auditor, Claims
Division, to Chief, Fiscal Division.
James L. Fulton from Governmental
Accountant, Accounting Division, to Chief,
Claims Branch.
George E. Girard from Assistant to
Finance Director, Internal Audit Division,
to Acting Chief, Internal Audit Staff.
Arthur J. O'Leary from Assistant to
Finance Director, Accounting Division, to
Acting Chief Accountant, Accounting Divi-


sion.
Willard D. Strode, Frank R. Mother
from Structural Engineer, Engineering Div-
ision, to Valuation Engineer, Plant Inven-
tory and Appraisal Branch.
Frank A. Baldwin, from Accountant,
Accounting Division, to Construction Cost
Accountant, Plant Inventory and Appraisal


Staff.
Morris Waxman from Governmental
Accountant, Accounting Division, to Con-
struction Cost Accountant, Plant Inventory
and Appraisal Staff.
John R. White, Noel C. Farnsworth
from General Construction Inspector, Con-
tract and Inspection Division, to Valuation
Engineer, Plant Inventory and Appraisal
Staff.
Bertha I. Frensley, Clerk-Stenographer,
from Claims Branch to Accounting Systems
Staff.
Mrs. Anna H. Ballou, Clerk-Typist,
from Personnel Records Division to Treas-
ury Branch.
Mrs. Chiquita C. Cassibry from Typist,
Cost Accounts Branch, to Clerk-Stenog-
rapher, Internal Audit Staff.
Mrs. Evelyn R. Reynolds from Clerk-
Typist, Personnel Records Division, to
Typist, Cost Accounts Branch.
Charles H. McKeon from Tabulating
Equipment Operation Supervisor to Ac-
countant, Accounting Systems Staff.
Harry E. Musselman from Cash Ac-
counting Clerk, Treasury Branch, to
Tabulation Planner, Accounting Division.
Arthur J. Wynne, from Accounting


Clerk, Agents Accounts Branch,
countant, Cost Accounts Branch.


to Ac-


71 .a^ Na Cn uliaa. n


ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION


THIS MONTH'S CALENDAR


PROMOTIONS AND


TRANSFERS






March 6, 1953


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


MARINE BUREAU
Walter R. Malone from Floating Crane
Operator to General Foreman, Excavators
and Tractors, Dredging Division.
Claud M. Kreger from Principal Fore-
man to Rotary Drill Operator, Dredging
Division.
George G. Felps from Rotary Drill
Operator to Drill Foreman, Dredging
Division.
Robert B. Vache from Wireman, Elec-
trical Division, to Lock Opera'or Wireman,
Locks Division.
Julian O. Russell from Pump Operator,
Pipeline Suction Dredge, to Small Tug
Operator, Dredging Division.
James O. King from Plant Electrician,
Commissary Division, to Lock Operator
Wireman, Pacific Locks.
James C. Thomas from Boilermaker to
Boilermaker Leader, Dredging Division.
Mirt Bender from Combination Welder
to Boilermaker, Dredging Division.
Everett E. Branstetter from First Mate
to Master, Tug Taboga, Aids to Navigation.
David W. Ellis from General Operator
to Floating Crane Operator, Dredging
Division.
Ralph E. Garfield from Helper to Com-
bination Welder, Locks Division.
Thomas J. Ebdon, Jr. from General
Electrical Engineer, Office of Chief, Locks
Division, to Assistant to Superintendent,
Pacific Locks.
Leon D. Herring, Jr. from Junior Fore-
man, Ferry Service, to Pump Operator,
Pipeline Suction Dredge, Dredging Division.
Lloyd G. Moore from Machinist, Indus-
trial Bureau, to Lock Operator Machinist,
Atlantic Locks.
Gordon E. Walbridge from Hydro-
graphic Engineer (Dredging), to Hydro-
graphic Engineer, Dredging Division.
PERSONNEL BUREAU
Mrs. Rita H. Fritz from Clerk-Typist
to Personnel Clerk (Typikt), Employment
and Utilization Division.
Mrs. Joanne E. Robinson, Clerk-
Typist, from Office of the Director to
Employment and Utilization Division.
RAILROAD AND TERMINALS BUREAU
Robert S. Wood from Signals Super-
visor to Supervisory Signal Engneer, Rail-
road Division.
Clair E. Ewing from Traffic Clerk to
Supervisory Administrative Assistant, Ter-
minals Division.
Mrs. Gloria M. DeRaps from Traffic
Clerk, Terminals Division, to Clerk-Typist,
Railroad Division.
Irwin K. Meier from Gauger, Division
of Storehouses, to Agent-Operator, Railroad
Division.
SUPPLY AND SERVICE BUREAU
Grady G. Galley from Automobile
Serviceman to Automobile Serviceman and
Special Heavy Truck Driver, Motor Trans-
portation Division.
George L. Cain from Commissary
Assistant to Commissary Manager.
Edmund R. MacVittie from Assistant
Chief, Northern District, Maintenance
Division, to Assistant to Superintendent,
r*-> ,. a. *Sm


Commissary's Industrial Laboratory Saves Patrons Over $100,000 Annually


THIS DISPLAY OF INDUSTRIAL LABOR-
ATORY products is kept on exhibition in the office
of R. L. Sullivan, General Manager of the Commis-
sary Division. Mr. Sullivan is explaining how some
of the products are made to Mrs. Roberta Egolf, an
employee in the Mount Hope Commissary offices.
(Continued from page 9) of the world.
The vanilla beans from which the vanilla
extract is made come from Mexico and
the French island of Madagascar. Al-
though the first vanilla beans, back in
1911, were bought in London and stored
there, the supply is now bought in the


United States.
Vanilla extract is made
as you percolate your
of coffee. The chopped
into a percolator holding


much the same
morning's cup
beans are put
40 gallons and


are permitted to percolate for several
hours at an exact temperature before the
extract is ready for use as flavoring. An
entire year's supply is made at one time
and this requires 600 gallons.
Bay Rum Is Popular
Just as World War I provided a home
for the Industrial Laboratory, World
War II made one of its products famous.
The product made popular during the
past war was bay rum. Although its
manufacture was begun soon after Major
Wilson made his suggestion 42 years ago,
the product never proved highly popular
because the many natives of the West
Indies Islands who work for the Canal
preferred a certain type produced in the
West Indies. When the war started and
shins bean to be sunk in the Caribbean


The display here shows only a few of the more than
200 products sold under the familiar "Commissary"
label. Employees, not only in the Industrial Labor-
atory but throughout the Commissary Division, are
justifiably proud of these products which are of
highest quality and sell at very low cost.
Laboratory products which are vitally
affected by the changing times or popular
taste of Commissary customers. The
number of pharmaceutical products has
recently been increased.
Most Have Long Service
Most of the personnel who work at the
Industrial Laboratory are employees with
many years of service and they are highly


proud of their work.
rate employees bega
before it was moved
tion and given an
Reccia is one of the
in point of service
3 years of service


A few of the local-
n with the unit well
Sto its present loca-
official name. Mrs.
"babies" of the unit
and can boast only
with the Industrial


Laboratory.
Mr. Orr, who heads the unit as chemist,


is one of many boys who grew
Canal Zone and have made
their life work. His father, ]
was a former Superintender
Panama Railroad. All of
children are now Canal empl
addition to Earl, his brother,


up in
the Ca
E. F. O
it of t
the th
oyees.
Elmer,


he
nal
rr,
he
ree
In
is


employed in the Office of the Comptroller,
and his sister, Mrs. Juanita Jones, is
employed in the Engineering Division.
Mr. Orr attended elementary school in
the Canal Zone and is a graduate of
Balboa High School. Like many Canal





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


March 6,1953


Signalman
Watches


At


Lone


World's


THIS VIEW of the Panama Canal from the Gam-
boa Signal Station stretches to the south end of
Mamei Curve beyond the town of Gamboa. That

Juan Hidalgo and his family live in a
house with a view-perched all alone on
a high hill about 150 feet above Gamboa.
The "office side" of the hilltop house,
where Mr. Hidalgo serves as Signalman,
looks down on about a seven-mile stretch
of the Canal which he has almost memo-
rized in 20 years at the Gamboa Signal
Station.
The Gamboa station-like the other
Canal signal stations, at La Pita, Cuca-
racha, and on Sosa Hill in Balboa-stands
all alone, but could not be considered
isolated. From their high houses, Canal
signalmen watch the world's commerce
go by, each of them keeping an eye on the
part of the Canal that can be seen from
his signal station.
The section in view of the Gamboa
Station extends from about midway in
Las Cascadas Reach a short distance
southeast of Gamboa to the bend between
(,hmhna Roneh and Mamni Curve where


Hilltop


Post


Commerce Go


By


is where Juan Hidalgo, Signalman shown here, first
sights southbound vessels and raises the big signal
shapes that instruct ships entering Gaillard Cut.

frequently given to friends as presents.
A road built to wind in a hairpin curve
around one of their treasured avocado
pear trees now connects the hilltop
house with the highway at the foot of
the hill. Mr. Hidalgo worked on that
himself in 16 years of vacations.


There are also 142 st
the Hidalgos have cou
times-which were us
signal station before th
Mr. Hidalgo first ca
Zone in construction
after he left his native
going to sea. He wo
and later on the old
ships, the Generals Go


eps tc
nted
;ed t
roadc
ame t
lays,
Chil
rked
Pana
rgas


Sthe house-
them many
o reach the
Swas built.
:o the Canal
a few years
e and started
on tugboats
ma Railroad
and Goethals


and the Allianca. Later, he went to the
United States where he acquired citizen-
ship in 1922.
Visited Canal Zone Regularly
Starting in about 1921 he came to the
reoyiol 7ra nforilo.ir wr Qhin h0 nY OQrr


Cut-the transmission of instructisons to
speed up, slow down, keep on schedule,
etc., which the ships receive when they
come in sight of the station.
.The signalman also keeps a lookout for
slides, aircraft, fires, fog, or any unau-
thorized craft in the Canal. He keeps a
record ot the Dredging Division equip-
ment in the Canal that can be seen from
the Gamboa Station and signals to ships
of the approach of a tug or barge outside
the vessel's line of vision. He is also the
man behind the fog horn or loudspeaker
when they are used in "'his part" of the
Canal.
The Hidalgos' home stands all alone
but it is not lonely. It has long been a
favorite gathering place for friends and
neighbors in Gamboa, particularly the
youngsters for whom Mrs. Hidalgo usu-
ally finds a sandwich or a freshly picked
orange. She likes to have people around
her and is busy with community activities.
Her daughter Wilma, a typist in the
Correspondence Section of the Canal,
recalls the time an entire church circle
gathered at their home. The house was
so full there must have been a few heads
sticking out the windows, she says. The
minister made a fitting talk on "The
Sermon on the Mount."
The Hidalgos' 22-year-old son, William,
is a motorcycle enthusiast. He started
with a motorscooter in high school, then
graduated to motorcycles and has had
lots of practice on both up and down the
hill to his home.


Civil


w^I
K-
a
--

"".*."""
e d
-
O> -
W -
UI


Defense Committee
Appointments Announced


Fifteen members have been appointed
to the Civil Defense Advisory Committee
according to an announcement from the
Civil Defense Office.
The first meeting of the group will be
held about March 15 when Lt. W. G.
Dolan, Civil Defense Chief, returns from
Olney, Md., where he is attending Civil
Defense Staff College.
The members are: William T. Craig,
Canal Zone Civic Councils; Robert T.
Ellis, Local-rate Labor; Walter Wagner,
U. S.-rate Labor; William Jump, Local-
rate Communities; Mrs. Dorothy Thorn-
ton, Canal Zone Chapter, Red Cross;
B. I. Everson, Railroad and Terminals
uKflnrnn. Cord, Pnrt W flrffit- inih val




Full Text

PAGE 1

IHt Gift of the Panama Canal Muse urn Vol. 3, No. 8 BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE, MARCH 6, 1953 5 cents Cunard Liner Transits Canal ONLY CRUISE LINER to transit the Canal during this tourist season was the. S. S. Caronia of the Cunard Line. The handsome big ship — she grosses 34,183 tons and is 715 feet overall length — was southbound February 15. She had aboard 525 passengers for the cruise which is to take her completely around South America. Personnel Ceilings Set For Each Bureau In Government-Company Organization Force ceilings have been fixed not only for the overall Government-Company organization, but also for each Bureau in the organization, Gov. J. S. Seybold has informed all Bureau directors. The ceilings were set in accordance with the personnel limitation order of President Eisenhower and the Bureau of the Budget and limit both U. S.and Local-rate positions. As long as the order, which affects all federal units, remains effective the ceilings will not be exceeded. In the Government-Company, personnel may drop below the ceiling— fixed on the late January level. In line with the directive which calls for the strictest possible economy, a study is being made which may result in the lowering of the number of employees. The lowering of the personnel numbers is expected to be accomplished through normal attrition, such as retirements and resignations, and the combination of duties of some of the positions which so become vacant. Company-Government Figures For the overall ceiling covering the Panama Canal Company, the figure is approximately the 3,496 full-time U. S.rate and 11,876 Local-rate employees carried on the rolls at the end of January. These figures include the New York and Washington offices and temporary locks overhaul employees. The Canal Zone Government figure, also arrived at from the late January level, is 1,223 full time U. S.and 1,415 Local-rate workers. While Governor Seybold has set a ceiling for each Bureau, he has permitted the Directors flexibility within the Bureaus. The Civil Affairs Director, for instance may lose an employee from the Police Division and add one to the Schools Division (an example only), provided he does not exceed his Bureau ceiling and the change is agreed to by the Management staff. Replacement recruiting will be permitted as will transfers, provided that neither the recruiting nor the transfers cause the employing Bureau to go over its personnel ceiling, E. A. Doolan, Personnel Director explained. Daily Record Kept The Personnel Bureau is responsible for maintaining a daily running record of all positions which are filled, both U. S.and Local-rate, in all Bureaus. Government-Company personnel at the end of January, when the ceiling figures were derived, was slightly (See page is) Construction Projects For This Fiscal Year Are Still Under Study No curtailment is planned in the quarters construction projects at Corozal and on Empire Street in Balboa for which contracts have been awarded but the proposed elementary school at Corozal, orginally scheduled for this fiscal year's program, will not be built this year. The Canal's entire construction program for this fiscal year and next, as well as the operating programs for the Company and Government, has been under careful review in conformity with the economy program of the national administration. In addition to the postponement of the construction of the school at Corozal, three street improvement projects are proposed for elimination from this year's program. These are the widening of Thatcher Highway from the ferry to Bruja Road, and the repaving of La Boca Road and a section of Hains Street in Diablo Heights. The various construction projects scheduled under this fiscal year's program which have not been started are still under study and the decision on any curtailment or postponement of these will be made individually. A report on the proposed construction projects for the coming fiscal year was submitted this week to the Bureau of the Budget by Governor Seybold. He left last Saturday for Washington to attend the meeting of the Board of Directors of the Panama Canal Company and to confer with Budget officials on Canal appropriations for the fiscal year 1954 for which he submitted a revised report. No announcement on the revised budget will be made until the new figures are submitted to Congress by the President. The quarters construction program constitutes the bulk of the capital expenditures planned for this fiscal year. A total of 168 family apartments are to be built in the new townsite development at Corozal and 24 family apartments will be built on Empire Street in Balboa. The quarters construction program at Cardenas is one of the projects still under study and bids for the work there, which are now being advertised, are scheduled to be opened April 15. The other principal new construction projects slated under this year's program include a new elementary school and kindergarten at Paraiso, for which a contract has already been awarded; a sewage pump station at (See pose 12)

PAGE 2

THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW March 6, 1953 Diablo Heights Fire Station To Be Closed Announcement that the Diablo Heights fire station is to be closed was made last week by Governor Seybold at the February Governor-Employee conference. The Governor told the conference that the action is an economy measure in accordance with the Federal directive to reduce expenditures. The work of fire protection in this Pacific side settlement, he said, has been "very, very light." The Diablo Heights area will be covered from the Balboa Central Station. The effective date has not been decided, but the change is expected within the next 90 days. During the subsequent discussion, the Governor told the conference that there is no present plan to consolidate the Panama Canal Fire Division with fire units of the armed services, as some of the conferees apparently feared. The announcement was one of several made by Governor Seybold during the conference. He also announced an increase in water rates but said that while this would affect commercial concerns and the armed services it would have no affect on Canal households. Budget Conference Governor Seybold told the conference that he was leaving the following Saturday for Washington where, in addition to attending the Board of Directors' meeting, he would confer with the Bureau of the Budget on the 1954 fiscal year program. The conference was necessary because of Federal orders to economize wherever possible in government units. At the time, the Governor said, he could not foresee what action the Budget Bureau would take, nor what projects would be considered indispensable. As customary, the conference opened with a discussion of items raised at previous conferences. One of these was Commissary products, bread especially. The Governor said that the Commissary is taking action toward producing a better bread, but cautioned the conference that in a recent appraisal of Commissary operations it was evident that the retail stores have carried too much variety in their stock. Can Bring Cost Cut Elimination of varieties and concentration on fewer good items can reflect in a cost cut which will be to the customers advantage, he said. The Commissaries, the Governor continued, are taking "corrective action" regarding dented cans and packaging of potatoes and onions. Flour of a standard brand is now being used in the pastry products. Governor Seybold asked the employees present if they would prefer that the Commissaries carry standard brands of canned goods or nonstandard brands of good quality which, because they are not nationally advertised, might be cheaper for the customer. Consensus of opinion of the conference was a preference for standard brands with the desire that some nonstandard brands be also carried. The conference was also told that a 7-foot extension had been made to each More Than Thousand Local-Rate Workers Are Upgraded As Result Of Job Studies Early in August 1952, Governor John S. Seybold initiated an intensive review of more than 3,000 local-rate jobs at grade 7 and above. As a result of this study more than 1,000 local-rate employees of the Panama Canal Company-Canal Zone Government have received upgradings of from one to six grades. A summary of the results of the study made by the Personnel Bureau was released today from the Governor's Office. The upgradings represent a total of approximately $120,000 in salary increases annually. There has been a general upward increase in grade distribution, particularly in grades 11 through 15. Since the inauguration by The Panama Canal in February 1948 of the present graded local-rate wage scale a continuing study of local-rate graded positions has been made. This study gives recognition to special duties, assignments and responsibilities. During the first 4 years of the program — that is, between 1948 and last August— it was necessary to study positions in groups, or in large occupational categories with a minimum of time spent on individual positions. This procedure generally produced good results in occupations in which each employee's work is identical with others in the group. Positions at grade 7 and above, however, have individual characteristics which are not found, to as large a degree, in positions below this grade level. As examples of the promotions in the upper brackets of the pay scale, in February 1952, there were 48 employees in grade 11; 11 in grade 12; 2 in grade 13; none in grade 14 and 1 in grade 15. In February 1953 the corresponding figures were 150 in grade 11; 363 in grade 12; 7 in grade 13; 11 in grade 14; and 4 in grade 15. The increases which resulted from the study are shown in the following table. Grade to Which Promoted 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Totals 7 58 3 149 65 135 12 10 42 105 2 75 8 224 9 1 334 34 1 19 1 4 179 10 458 11 6 26 4 2 1 41 12 30 13 6 14 1 58 152 200 169 369 27 36 3 1,014 The table below illustrates the distribution of total force in each grade in comparison with one year ago. Percent of Total Graded Full-Time Force, Grades 1-15 February 25, 1952 February 7, 1953 Number Percent Number Percent 7 1,761 973 242 472 48 11 2 (1 1 15.14 8.37 2.08 4.06 .41 .09 .02 .00 .00 1,654 613 272 234 150 363 7 11 4 15.50 8 5.74 9 2.55 10 2.19 11 .. 1.40 12 3.40 13 .07 14 .10 15 .04 3,510 (Grades 7-15) 30.17 (of 1-15) 3,308 (Grades 7-15) 30.99 (of 1-15) It will be noted that there has been a general upward increase in grade distribution, particularly in grades 11 through 15. In future reviews of local-rate graded jobs, it is planned to extend the individual position detailed study program to more positions, both at the grade 7 and above level and to certain selected occupations below grade 7 where individual position responsibilities are clearly identified. end of the eaves at the Balboa clubhouse entrance to eliminate downdrip; that replacement of the five noncomputing gasoline pumps used in Canal gas stations would cost between $3,000 and $4,000; that a qualified lifeguard is stationed at the Hotel Washington swimming pool; and that, because telephones are available to most U. S.-rate employees, fire alarm boxes will not be installed in new U. S.-rate communities. Ancon To Have Cafeteria The Governor also reported that because of declining business and rising costs, the Ancon Clubhouse restaurant will be converted to a cafeteria. The decision was made to convert to the cafeteria system rather than increase prices. This was protested and a reconsideration asked by Charles Hammond of the Pedro Miguel Civic Council. The conferees held a long discussion on the new method of application for quarters, a number feeling that the system to go into effect March 1, whereby only three choices were allowed, is restrictive. The Governor said he would investigate this. Jack Rice of the Cristobal-Margarita Civic Council asked that an investigation be made of the short time between the warning bell and the closing of the gates at railroad crossings in Cristobal. Sam Roe of the Pacific Civic Council, F. H. Hodges of the Locomotive Engineers, and Robert C. Daniel of the Railway Conductors, all commented {See page 12)

PAGE 3

March 6, 1953 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW $27,000 Goal Is Set For Zone Chapter's Red Cross Campaign March is Red Cross month in the Canal Zone, as it is for hundreds of Red Cross chapters in the Dinted States. The Canal Zone goal for this year's drive has been set at $27,000. Of this sum, 75 percent will remain on the Isthmus for the use of the Canal Zone Chapter. The remaining 25 percent will be sent to the United States to finance the national program which provides assistance for such disasters as floods and fires. Victims of last year's floods in Oklahoma and this year's floods in Holland and England have received Red Cross assistance. In addition, the national program this year is being enlarged in two important activities: Provision of additional recreational facilities for U. S. troops overseas and expansion of the National Blood Program to obtain plasma for a serum to protect children from the paralyzing effects of polio. Funds retained locally are used for many worthwhile causes. Food packages for some 120 persons are provided weekly, in most cases their only certain supply of food. The Canal Zone Chapter is also maintaining seven persons at Corozal Hospital and two at Gorgas Hospital. Last year $2,000 of the $33,000 collected during the drive was allotted to relief of service personnel and their dependents and another $3,700 was provided for emergency loan funds. This latter money is available to service personnel or civilians who must make emergency trips to the United States, for instance in cases of death or illness in their families. R. W. Collinge Is Chairman This year's drive is headed by Roger W. Collinge, Director of Elementary Education for the Division of Schools. A Red Cross campaign will be conducted simultaneously in military establishments, and will be part of the Canal Zone drive. Mr. Collinge is being assisted on the Atlantic side by Neil H. Wilson, Chief Admeasurer, who is General chairman of the Atlantic side. Working with Mr. Wilson are William E. Adams, General Agent for the United Fruit Company, who is handling commercial firms on the Canal Zone's Atlantic side and who will be assisted by E. J. Didier of United Fruit, and Clifford B. Maduro of the Colon Import and Export Company, handling gifts from Colon. Sam Friedman is chairman for Panama City and E. S. Baker, assisted by F. W. Hohmann, is receiving contributions from commercial firms on the Pacific side of the Canal Zone. Emmet Zemer, assisted by Mrs. Jean Anderson Karch and Miss Sadie Springer, is in charge of public displays, and Harold I. Perantie, Publicity Chairman for the Canal Zone Chapter, is in charge of newspaper and radio publicity. General chairman for the drive in local rate communities is William Jump. His Atlantic side chairman is Harold W. Williams, and the Pacific side chairman is Stanley Loney. Mr. Loney is being assisted by Carl L. Harris. TrimUniformed Force Enforces Security Of Panama Canal Locks JAMES G. SLICE, a senior patrolman in the Locks Security Force, and the new uniform designed bv a committee from the Force are inspected by Sgt. L. R. Moist, left, and Capt. Edward H. Halsall! Sergeant Moist is Security Commander fur the Pedro Miguel lock area. Captain Halsall heads the Locks Security Force which was authorized about a year ago. Enforcement of the internal physical security of the Panama Canal locks is now entirely in the hands of the newly organized Locks Security Force, according to Roy C. Stockham, Chief of the Locks Division. The organization of the force is now completed; its 5S officers and men are on round-the-clock details at the three flights of locks. Two of the 58 are temporary during overhaul. Its headquarters are at Pedro Miguel locks where the force's captain, Edward H. Halsall, has his office. Its mission, Captain Halsall said, may be described as "protection of the locks against wanton damage, espionage, sabotage, or any situation which might prove detrimental to the normal and efficient operation of the locks or any unit in the locks enclosures." Carefully selected, the locks force are, to a man, well qualified and trained for their jobs. With only a few exceptions all have had some military service and some hold such high decorations as the Bronze or Silver Stars. Five, including Captain Halsall, are former Canal Zone police officers and one is a former Massachusetts state trooper. Four of the men are still in the preliminary training and are probationary. The remainder have taken, or are taking, the 40 hours of training which include classes given by the Canal Zone police, the Internal Security Branch, and the Personnel Bureau. During his first 10 days on the job, the probationary locks patrolman must pass a basic qualification test which includes the proper and legal use of firearms. At the end of (See page 12) ENDS LONG CAREER DR. JESSE L. BYRD, one of the Isthmus' bestknown residents, wound up his Canal Zone service the end of February. He and Mrs. Byrd expect to sail about April 3 to make their home in Decatur, Ga. As a First Lieutenant in the Medical Corps, Doctor Byrd was assigned to the Canal Zone soon after the outbreak of World War I. After a few months at Gorgas i then Ancon) Hospital, he was transferred to Colon as Health Officer. That was in 1917 and he has made the Atlantic side his headquarters almost continuously ever since. After he was relieved from active duty in 1919 he remained in the Colon Health Office and with the exception of 5 years at the Panama Office, between 1930 and 193.5, all of his service was in Colon. He was recalled to active duty with the Army's Medical Corps for the period between 1942 and 1947 and is now a colonel, retired, in the Medical Reserves.

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THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW March 6, 1953 Canal Traffic Under Special Study During Locks Overhaul Special attention is being given to the movement of traffic and the handling of ships in the Canal during the overhaul of the Pacific Locks during this dry season because of the high level of Canal traffic. One of the principal topics under consideration by the special committee of the Canal's Board of Directors during its meeting last month in the Canal Zone was ship traffic and the overhaul project. Aside from their extensive study of statistical data on the subject, all members of the committee spent a full morning at Pedro Miguel Locks to make a firsthand inspection of the work and to confer with operating personnel on the handling of shipping while one traffic lane is out of service. The committee was composed of Matthew Robinson, Chairman, Lt. Gen. Lewis Pick, W. R. Pfizer, and Edward D. McKim. On their visit to the Locks they were accompanied by Governor Seybold, Capt. Marvin J. West, Marine Director, and Roy C. Stockham, Chief of the Locks Division. Although considerable concern had been expressed over possible delays to shipping during the present overhaul period because of the high level of traffic, no extraordinary delays have occurred and comparatively few ships have been delayed in transit as much as 24 hours. The expeditious handling of ship traffic, which has been at the highest level in the Canal's history during recent weeks, has been largely due to careful advance planning and the adoption of time-saving operations not normally employed under regular operating conditions. Delays have also been minimized by an unusually even flow of traffic during the overhaul period up to now and the relatively few peak days when an abnormally high number of ships arrive for transit at the same time. pi 1 &£ T Traffic Is High Ocean-going commercial {See page 1?) SOME OF THE WOKK in progress 70 feet below on the floor of Pedro Miguel Locks is being explained by Roy C. Stockham, Chief of the Locks Division, left, to Lt. Gen. Lewis A. Pick, center, and Governor Seybold. WITH THE EMERGENCY GATES as a backdrop, two members of the Board of Directors pause for a picture with Captain Marvin J. West, Marine Director, during their inspection of the overhaul work at Pedro Miguel Locks. Left to right are: Captain West, Edward D. McKim, and Matthew Robinson. MEMBERS OF THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE of the Board of Directors examine in detail some of the work required during an overhaul of the Panama Canal Locks. In the picture above. Governor Seybold, venter, is explaining some of the work. METAL HELMETS AND SUN GL Vdonned by members of the special committee of the Board of Directors during their visit to Pedro Miguel Locks to observe the overhaul work. In the picture above, left to right, are: W. R. Pfizer, Capt. Marvin Marine Director, Governor Seybold, Stockham, Chief of the Locks Division, Lt. Gen. Lewis A. Pick, Edward D. McKim, and Matthew Robinson. The Board members here are examining one of the rising stem valve3 which has been lifted to the Lock wall for cleaning, repainting, and replacement of worn parts. Each of these valve3 weighs 15 tons. They control the flow of water in the main tunneb which empty and fill the lock chambers. Members of the Committee of the Board of Directors spent 2 weeks in the Canal Zone in February to study various Canal problems. One of the principal topics under consideration was the handling of traffic during an overhaul period when the capacity of the Canal is more than cut in half with one lane of traffic out of service. The Directors spent one entire morning at Pedro Miguel to observe the overhaul work.

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March 6, 1953 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW FOR YOUR INTEREST AND GUIDANCE '<£ CCIDENT PREVENTION AWARD OF MERIT The Maintenance Division ofthe Engineering and Construction Bureau has received an AWARD OF MERIT from the National Safety Council for having worked more than 1,000,000 man hours without any disabling injuries. This is the first Panama Canal Company unit to receive such recognition under an award plan now officially adopted by the National Safety Council for recognizing good industrial safety records. The AWARD OF MERIT is the second highest award of recognition given by the National Safety Council and can only be obtained by a perfect record of no disabling injuries between 1,011(1.000 to 3,000,000 man hours of exposure, or by a prescribed and outstanding percentage of improvement over prior records. The highest recognition that may be received is the AWARD OF HONOR, which is given for a perfect record of .'3,000,000 or more man hours, or a prescribed higher outstanding percentage of improvement over prior records. Naturally such a record requires the combined efforts and 100% cooperation of all employees, so our compliments and congratulations are extended to all employees of the Maintenance Division for this excellent achievement. HONOR ROLL Bureau Award For BEST RECORD January CIVIL AFFAIRS BURFAU AWARDS THIS CALENDAR YEAR Civil Affairs 1 Community Services Engineering and Construction Health Industrial Marine Railroad and Terminals Supply and Service Division Awards For NO DISABLING INJURIES January MAINTENANCE DIVISION HOSPITALIZATION AND CLINICS DREDGING DIVISION CLUBHOUSE DIVISION MOTOR TRANSPORTATION DIVISION DIVISION OF STOREHOUSES AWARDS THIS CALENDAR YEAR Clubhouses 1 Dredging 1 Hospitalization and Clinics 1 Maintenance 1 Motor Transportation 1 Storehouses 1 Commissary Electrical Grounds Maintenance Locks Navigation Railroad Sanitation Terminals Presentation Ceremony AN AWARD OF MERIT from the National Safety Council, the second highest given in industrial accident prevention, was awarded last month to the Canal's Maintenance Division. Shown above is the presentation ceremony in Governor Seybold's office. Left to right: Gayl O. Kellar, Chief, Safety Branch; Nelson \V. Magner, Chief of the Maintenance Division's Northern District; Lt. Gov. Harry O. Paxson; M. F. Millard, Safety Representative for the Engineering and Construction Bureau; Frank H. Lerchen, Maintenance Engineer; Carl J. Browne, Chief of the Maintenance Division's Southern District; Governor Seybold; E. W. Zelnick, Chief of the Water and Laboratories Branch of the Maintenance Division; Edward M. Browder, Jr., Assistant Engineering and Construction Director; John E. Winklosky, Maintenance Division Safety Inspector; and Col. Craig Smyser, Engineering and Construction Director. W. H. Russon has been appointed Emmett Zemer, Housing Division, Safety Inspector for the Terminals has been appointed Safety Inspector for Division. the Community Services Bureau vice J. W. Hare. JANUARY 1953 Civil Affairs Bureau Supply and Service Bureau Engineering and Construction Bureau Community Services Bureau C. Z. Govt.— Panama Canal Co. (This month) C. Z. Govt.— Panama Canal Co. (Best Year) Marine Bureau Railroad and Terminals Bureau Industrial Bureau Health Bureau Number of Disabling Injuries 30 Disabling Injuries per 1,000,000 Man-Hours Worked (Frequency Rale) Man-Hours Worked .2,834,070 LEGEND I I Amount Better Than Canal Zone Government — Panama Canal Company Beat Year I 1 Amount Worse Than Canal Zone Government— Panama Canal Company Best Year [' ''''' : : ::| Accumulative frequency Rate This Year

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THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW March 6, 1953 It Happened So: Tivoli Wedding Story Retold Fact was separated from Isthmian fiction last month by a lady who knows. The lady is Mrs. Harry Harwood Rousseau (she says it rhymes with trousseau), who was the heroine of one of the Canal Zone's most romantic weddings. For many years the Rousseau wedding story has been told and retold in the Canal Zone. Novelist Rex Beach used the episode as. material in his story of Panama, "The Ne'er-Do-Well," although, of course, with different characters. As legend had it, the dashing Admiral, a member of the Isthmian Canal Commission, waltzed his prospective bride, the daughter of the American Minister to Panama, out of the Tivoli ballroom one April night in 190S while her parents, who did not approve of the marriage, sat unsuspectingly by. In a secluded corner, the story went, the bridal couple was hurriedly surrounded by a protective shield of sympathetic friends while a local magistrate read a brief marriage ceremony. Actually, Mrs. Rousseau said last month during her first trip to the Canal Zone in 36 years, it was not quite that way. There may have been waltzes on the program but the dance of the evening was the "bunny hug," then at the height of its popularity. Bridegroom Didn't Appear Instead of being whisked from the dance in her bridegroom's arms, she said, Admiral Rousseau did not appear before or after the ceremony. Instead, she slipped quietly out of the ballroom, during an intermission, into a room in the Tivoli's north wing. There she and Admiral Rousseau were married by Judge Herman A. Gudger in the presence of a small group of friends. A few minutes later she was back, dancing, as if nothing had happened. Her stepmother, Mrs. Herbert G. Squiers, was at the Tivoli that evening. Within a few days, she recalls, her family became suspicious, and she slipped away from the Legation, then near Central Plaza, at 5 o'clock one morning. She made her way through the deserted streets — she recalls how bare of people they were — to the Ancon home of Tom M. Cooke, Chief of the Division of Posts, Customs, and Revenues, whose sister, Harriet, was a close friend. Mrs. Rousseau stayed with the Cookes until April 11, when she and the Admiral were remarried in a religious ceremony held in the rectory of the Catholic chapel in the Ancon hospital grounds. All of the members of the Commission were at the religious ceremony, although the bride's parents did not appear. A couple of weeks later the Minister relented and gave a dinner for the bridal couple. Bride In A Bucket When the story reached the newspapers, there was excitement here and in the United States. A New York newspaper carried a cartoon, showing Admiral Rousseau at the controls of a steam shovel, with his bride in the shovel's bucket. The Star & Herald headlined its story "Cupid Again Victorious." Admiral Rousseau took his bride to their new home in Culebra, on a hilltop in a cluster of official quarters occupied by Commission members. Last month Mrs. Rousseau, her son Henry Harwood, Jr. n ^F^'v^ L j 1 1 N K ABRAHAM JARVIS, left, a chauffeur ior\ ICulebra during her recent visit here and with her the Motor Transportation Division, was working and her son, H. H. Rousseau, Jr., identified old at Culebra when the Rousseau family was living familiar locations. The walls of the Cut appear in there. He accompanied Mrs. Rousseau on a trip to the background, j (called Pete), and Mrs. Rousseau, Jr., combed the grass-grown site of the once humming town which had been headquarters for Canal construction. They found traces of a paved walk which had run beside their house, foundations of old buildings they could not identify, a garden wall, and a clump of bamboo which Mrs. Rousseau recalls was. planted by Mrs. Gaillard. As they stood high above the now busy Canal, Mrs. Rousseau reminisced on her early life in Culebra. She talked of trips into the jungle, wearing wrapped khaki leggings and a heavy khaki skirt, to collect orchids. Walked In The Cut Both she and her son remembered that, as a very young boy, he took refuge under the house whenever a blast went off in the nearby Cut and how, some days, he spent a good deal of his time under the quarters. She recalled that she was the last American woman to walk in the dry Cut before the water was let in and both mother and son remembered many details of the first official trip through the Canal. As construction neared completion, the Rousseaus moved to Balboa Heights, to the house now occupied by the Health Director.* Some of the shrubbery she planted is still around the house but a plaque which marked the building as the one-time home of the Rousseaus is no longer there. As a Canal Commissioner, Admiral Rousseau bore the cumbersome title of Head of the Department of Municipal Engineering, Motive Power, and Machinery, and Building Construction. He was later Assistant to the Chief Engineer and became Engineer of Terminal Construction when the Canal organization was formed in 1914. He was transferred back to the United States in July. In 1930 he was on his way to the Isthmus for his first visit since 1916 when he died suddenly aboard ship. Mrs. Rousseau is now living in Fairfield, Conn. Mr. and Mrs. "Pete" Rousseau and their four small children live in West Redding, Conn. MRS. MARIE CORE, standing, President of the Caribbean Stamp Club, had her stamp album autographed by Mrs. Rousseau. Twenty-cent stamps were issued in 1932 honoring Admiral Rousseau, a member of the Isthmian Canal Commission. New Ice Cream, Milk Plant Is Completed This Month Completion of the new ice cream and milk bottling plant of the Commissary Division was scheduled for early this month. The new plant provides modern facilities for two of the Commissary Division's oldest activities. An ice cream plant has been in operation by the Division since June 16. 1908, and milk has been bottled by the Commissaries since December 1916. The new building has one floor and a basement. Located north of the bakery and dry storage warehouse, it is a steel frame structure with walls of concrete and hollow tile and glass block panels. Bids for the construction of the ice cream and milk bottling plant were opened in January 1952. Low bidder was Manuel Calderon who was awarded the contract.

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March 6, 1953 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW Official Panama Canal Company Publication Published Monthly at BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE Printed by the Printing Plan! Mount Hope, Canal Zone John S. Seybold, Governor-President II. 0. Paxson, Lieutenant Governor E. C. Lombard, Executive Secretary J. Rufus Hardy', Editor Eleanor H. McIlhenny Oleva Hastings Editorial Assistants LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Letters containing inquiries, suggestions, criticisms, or opinions of a general nature will be welcomed. Those of sufficient interest will be published but signatures will not be used unless desired. SUBSCRIPTIONS— SI. 00 a year SINGLE COPIES— 5 cents each On sale at all Panama Canal Clubhouses, Commissaries, and Hotels for 10 days after publication date. SINGLE COPIES BY MAIL-lOcentseach BACK COPIES— 10 cents each On sale when available, from the Vault Clerk, Third Floor, Administration Building, Balboa Heights. Postal money orders should be made payable to the Treasurer, Panama Canal Company, and mailed to Editor, The Panama Canal Review, Balboa Heights, C. Z. Taxpayers Take Notice: March 16 Is Filing Date For Income Tax Returns Because March 15 falls this year on a Sunday, the following day, March 16, will be the due date of income tax returns for 1952 and for returns on estimated income tax for 1953. Wendell L. Lindsay, Internal Revenue Agent, said that so far this year the business of his office has been steady, but, with the exception of about 2 days in mid-February, not excessively heavy at any one time. A number of Canal Zone residents have brought their returns in for checking and then returned the following pay day to make their tax payments. The balance of the 1952 tax must be paid in full when the return is made and at least one-quarter of the 1 953 estimated tax is due with that return. The office hours in Balboa Clubhouse will remain 8:30 a. m. to 5 p. m., Monday through Friday, and 9 a. m. to 4 p. m., Mondays only in Cristobal inasmuch as people in the Canal Zone have an automatic extension to June 15 for final returns for 1952, since they reside outside the continental United States. However, interest will accrue on the unpaid balance of any taxes due at the rate of 6 percent per annum or \]/ 2 percent for this 90-day period, Mr. Lindsav said. A FIRST-rHND ACCOUNT of sailing ship days was presented last month to the Canal Zone library. The account is the log-note book of Captain Christopher O'Connor, whose great-great-grandson. Captain Robert G. Rennie, gave the book to the library. It is being shown in an exhibition case in the second floor reading room of the main library in the Civil Affairs building, together with some background material. The log-note book is an account of the voyage of Captain O'Connor's ship, the Prince of Wales, out of Philadelphia on March 29, 1786, to '"India, China, Persia, New Holland, and New South Wales, and the .Arabian Gulph." Written in a fine copperplate hand, the log is a combination of ship and personal history. On Sept. 17, 1810, after reporting the purchase of the same list of stores which he had bought the previous week, Captain O'Connor added: "And I married a young wife." The book is in excellent condition, considering its age, but its pages are so brittle that it may not be freely handled and will not be put into circulation. Above, Mrs. Eleanor D. Burnham, Librarian, and Captain Rennie, who is a Canal pilot, examine some of the entries. Present plans of the Panama Line contemplate the appointment of Capt. Erik J. Eriksen, senior master of the line and skipper of the SS "Cristobal," as the Panama Line Agent in Haiti, according to W. R. Pfizer who said the change would probably take place in May. Mr. Pfizer, Vice President of the Panama Canal Company in New York and head of its steamship activities, visited Haiti several months ago with Captain Eriksen to arrange for resumption of the Line's sailings into Port-au-Prince. W. M. Lloyd, freight agent for the Line in New York, is now in Haiti setting up the office organization which will be headed by Captain Eriksen. Captain Eriksen has been with the Panama Line for many years. He began his service as an officer on the S. S. "Guayaquil," being promoted to her master in 1930. He transferred to the old "Cristobal" as captain in 1935. When the new ships were built he was made master of the "Panama," remaining as her captain until she was taken over by the Army in June 1941. He then transferred to the "Cristobal" as master, serving aboard her during the war and since her return to passenger service. units of the Community Services Bureau and the Commissary Division who had been paid on Thursday are now being paid on Wednesday. Thursday has been eliminated as a payday for all employees except weekly dock workers. Incidental to this change the unlimited cashing of employees' pay checks by the Treasurer will be discontinued, although there are certain hours on paydays when checks may be cashed. Local banks, however, in addition to their regular hours, will now be open from 4 to 5 p. m. the Wednesday of local-rate pay weeks for the convenience of these employees. Effective this week, the schedule of localrate paydays has been changed. Local-rate employees of the Health Bureau. Pacific Locks and Clubhouse Division, who were formerly paid on Wednesday of local-rate pay week are now paid on Tuesday. Local-rate employees of the Schools and Dredging Divisions and of miscellaneous The SS "Panama" of the Panama Line has been designated the "Schoolteachers' Special" for its northbound sailing on June 5. At the end of the summer vacation and for the southbound trip the SS "Cristobal," sailing from New York on August 25, will be the "Teachers' Special." Designation of the June 5 and August 25 sailings of the Panama Line as those on which teachers normally utilize all space was made in a circular issued last month regarding transportation during the 1953 varation season. On the four northbound sailings between May 22 and June 19 (exclusive of the Teachers' Special) and those southbound between August 11 and September 8 (again excluding the August 25 sailing), preference will be given to teachers and employees and families with children of school age. PANAMA RAILROAD TRAIN SCHEDULE NORTHBOUND Panama Leave Colon Arrive Daily a. m. 7:10 8:35 Daily p. m. 12:30 1:55 4:50 6:15 10:10 11:35 SOUTHBOUND Colon Leave . J Panama ArriveJ 7:00 8.-25 12:20 1:45 4:40 6:05 10:00 11:25 Northbound freight train leaves Diablo Crossing at 9:15 a. m. daily, except Saturday, Sunday, and holidays. Southbound freight train leaves Mount Hope at 9:15 a. m. daily, except Saturday, Sunday, and holidays.

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THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW March 6, 1953 Commissary's Industrial Laboratory Saves Patrons Over $ 100,000 Annually April 11, 1911 MEMORANDUM FOR COL. GEORGE W. GOETHALS Chairman and Chief Engineer, Isthmian Canal Commission We bought some vanilla beans in London and have them stored there in proper storage, having enough to last us for a year and are making our own vanilla extract. This will save about $2,000 a year and will give us a much better extract. It will be very profitable to add to our laboratory and turn it into a commercial industrial laboratory and make such articles as bay rum, talcum powder, Florida water, Cologne, etc. We have obtained samples of various essential oils, etc., direct from manufacturers through our Paris representative, and there will be good savings in this work. EUGENE WILSON (Major) Subsistence Officer The suggestion of 42 years ago was made in a lengthy memorandum on the Commissary Division and its operation. Today, the "good savings" predicted by Major Wilson amounts to probably more than $100,000 a year for Canal employees, and the Industrial Laboratory, although one of the least known, is one of the most economically important units of the Commissary Division. There are few households in the Canal Zone which are not well stocked with Industrial Laboratory products bearing the familiar Commissary labels. And it is doubtful if a single thrifty housewife fails to economize and help splice out the family budget by savings made in buying Industrial Laboratory items. Located in a three-story building back of the big cold storage warehouse at Mount Hope the Industrial Laboratory now manufactures, mixes, bottles, or re-packages approximately 200 items. These include foodstuffs, cosmetics, pharmaceutical products, cleaning compounds, insecticides, polishes, and many others difficult to classify. In addition it maintains a stock of more than 100 other items which can be supplied on special order. Native Zonian Heads Laboratory The Industrial Laboratory is run by a native-born Canal Zone boy, Earl C. Orr, who is employed as chemist. The other personnel consists of one U. S.-rate employee, Mrs. Carmela Reccia, who handles the correspondence and clerical work in the office, and 23 local-rate employees. Some of the latter have been working in the Industrial Laboratory since before it moved to its present location 33 years ago. No accurate estimate of the amount of savings effected for Commissary customers by the operation of the Industrial Laboratory is possible because of the wide range of prices in comparable proprietary articles. However, Commissary Division officials believe the $100,000 a year figure is on the conservative side. Net sales of laboratory products are now running slightly over $30,000 a month, and it is estimated that these products would cost at least one-third more if bought from individual manufacturers or producers. In many cases the difference in prices between "brand name" products and those produced at the laboratory are as much as 100 percent. This percentage figure, naturally, ranges downward but there are few items on which the difference is not as high as 30 percent. Bulk Purchases Lower Cost Factors which contribute largely to these savings for the Commissary customers are the lack of advertising costs, BRUSHLESS SHAVING CREAM is bottled by the gross by this funnel-shaped rilling machine. The machine is being operated by Hortense Newball. Like many other mixing or filling machines, this one is easy and inexpensive to operate and helps to keep down the cost of Industrial Laboratory products. After being filled the bottles are capped and labeled on the same table by another employee. CIDER VINEGAR IS BOTTLED eight at a time by this automatic filling machine. Vinegar is one of the many Industrial Laboratory products which is bought in bulk and packaged locally for the retail trade. The Commissary Division buys 40 barrels of vinegar ever}* 6 weeks to supply the demand. EARL C. ORR. CHEMIST, heads the Industrial Laboratory and closely supervises the production of even,' one of its 200 or more items sold under the "Commissary" label. He is a Canal Zone boy, one of many who now hold responsible positions in the Canal organization. Mr. Orr has a many -faceted job and he is shown here making an "alcoholic determination" on a sample of beer to make sure the alcoholic content is not above the legal limit. inexpensive labels and containers, and economical packaging by hand-operated equipment. In addition, many items can be sold at materially lower costs if purchased in bulk and re-packaged rather than buying and selling in packaged form. Savings are also effected on many items by the purchase of raw materials and compounding the finished products. There are, of course, many products which the Industrial Laboratory is not equipped to handle economically or cannot produce or re-package as cheaply as proprietary brands readily available. These are either not attempted or the lines are eliminated when it is found that they are as expensive as name-brand products. The Industrial Laboratory conducts a continuous experimental program and the list of its products is frequently changed. This program includes not only the production of new items but the improvement of those already on sale. At the suggestion of a Commissary patron the laboratory recently conducted over a period of several months experiments in the production of a non-settling milk of magnesia. After much experimenting a suspension agent which would not affect the quality of the milk of magnesia was found and non-settling milk of magnesia is now on the shelves of the retail stores. During recent weeks an experimental program has been underway for the production of a more satisfactory type of liquid starch. The Industrial Laboratory has a long and interesting history as a Commissary Division unit although the story is somewhat indistinct during its early years. Water Came First It is believed to have had its beginning during the early Canal construction period and one of its first products was plain spring water. At that time pure drinking water was a scarce item and the famous water of the Paraiso Springs was bottled and sold to residents in the new construction towns. Not long after this

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March 6, 1953 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW OLDEST EMPLOYEE, OLDEST MACHINE. Johnny Walker, shown above operating one of the first automatic bottling machines ever brought to the Isthmus, has been employed in the Industrial Laboratory since before the time it was an individual Commissary Division unit. When he came to work for the laboratory, the products were then made or packaged in the old Commissary Division warehouse in Cristobal. the Americans who came to the Isthmus to help build the Canal demanded some of the refreshments to which they were accustomed at home. These included such things as "soda pop" and ice cream. To meet this demand the Commissary Division ordered the necessary machinery, and two of the first automatic bottling machines ever brought to the Isthmus were installed at the Cristobal Commissary plant. One of these antiques is still in use at the Industrial Laboratory for filling and capping a special type bottle for one of its products. It is operated by foot pedal and resembles a late model automatic bottling machine about as much as the first airplane resembles a jet airliner. Many products such as "Florida water" were added to the laboratory lines during the years soon after Major Wilson in 1911 suggested the expansion of the laboratory. However, it was not until the end of the first World War that the Industrial Laboratory became an independent unit housed in its own plant. From 1911 until about 1920 the number of products was gradually increased and during this time the work was done in one end of the old Commissary warehouse in Cristobal. The building in which the Industrial Laboratory is located also has something of the flavorful history of the early Canal history. It was built for a beef canning factory during the World War I period. At that time the cattle industry was a big business on the Isthmus, not only to supply meat to the Canal workers but to the Army. The demand for canned beef by the Army during the war days was so great that a special plant was built here to help supply the demand. War Ended Cannery The building itself had been completed and the machinery for canning beef was on the Isthmus but the war ended and the machinery was never installed. At that time the big plant at Mount Hope was being completed and the space to have been allotted for canning beef was assigned to the jnnlfing of the various Commissary products. Shortly before the move to Mount Hope, Joseph V. Cariffe, who had Keen employed as a pharmacist in the Health Bureau, was transferred to the Commissary Division as a foreman and placed in charge of the work. Soon after his transfer his title was changed to that of chemist and in the following year, 1920, after the transfer of the work to Mount Hope, the name "Industrial Laboratory" was used for the first time to designate the unit. For many years the Commissary Division put fancy, multi-colored labels on its products and during the sleek-hair age of the 1920's no hair dressing on the market had a sleeker-haired young man on its label than the one which advertised its coconut oil pomade. The expensive labels were used until the latter part of the 1930's when it was decided that they simply increased the cost of the products without adding to their value. Consequently, less expensive labels have been designed and the name "Commissary" has been used to designate and guarantee the quality and purity of the articles sold. A change in the labels was recently made at the suggestion of employee representatives who attend the monthly conferences with the Governor. At their suggestion the ingredients of each product are printed on the labels. This change required the redesign and reprinting of all labels for its more than 200 individual products and the work was only recently completed. Royalty On DDT Many people are puzzled over the fact that many of the Commissary items have ingredients identical with proprietary articles sold alongside them, and Mr. Orr says they have many inquiries about this. The confusion generally results by the application of the public of the term "patent" to proprietary articles of various kinds. Most of these products are not, as a rule, of such a nature or composition as to be patentable. Generally they are only protected by a registered trade name and these, naturally, are not used on Commissary products. There are a few chemical compounds which for certain purposes are patentable and when these are used, such as DDT for insecticides, the Commissary Division pays a royalty on every pound used. The mixing or compounding of the various Industrial Laboratory products is an interesting and individual process which Mr. Orr closely supervises. Some of the articles, of course, are simply bought in bulk and re-packaged. Some of the better known of these include aspirin, moth balls, vitamin tablets, olive oil, and cod liver oil. Aspirins, for example, are bought in lots of 2,000,000 tablets at a time and are re-packaged 50 to a bottle. These also happen to be one of the products which is just half the price of some name-brand products. Not all of the Industrial Laboratory products are so simple and for many of these Mr. Orr does the mixing or compounding of them personally. The laboratory still produces "Florida Water" and this, as well as all the perfumes which require very accurate measurement, is done by the chemist. He also makes all of the shaving creams and other such products, which must be heated to an exact temperature for proper blending. He also closely supervises all of the other operations and particularly those which have ingredients which are poisonous or highly volatile. Among these are household ammonia and lavelle water, which are two of the fastest selling products of the laboratory. The ammonia is made by mixing the strongest aqua ammonia available with a proper amount of water, containing soap and borax, to give it a cloudy effect Ice Keeps Bleach Cool The essence of lavelle water is specially produced and is so dangerous that it is made in a shed adjoining the plant in a concrete tank. The prime ingredient is chlorine which is "bubbled" in caustic acid in the stone or concrete mixer for several hours. Because of the heat this combination creates, 1,400 pounds of ice are used to keep a batch of 300-gallon concentrated bleach cooled. The concentrate is later diluted to the proper degree and the lavelle water is taken to the machines for bottling, corking with rubber stoppers, and labeling before it is ready for sale. The raw materials for many of the products of the Industrial Laboratory come from the far corners (See page 15 ) SEVERAL HUNDRED BOTTLES of alcohol rub are filled at one time and several of the 23 localrate employees at the Industrial Laboratory are assigned to the task when orders are ready to be filled. Last year the laboratory bottled and sold more than 0,000 gallons of denatured alcohol which is prepared from grain alcohol now purchased in the Panama market on bids. The alcohol rub, which is a standard item in most Canal Zone households, is bottled, capped, labeled, and packed in cases in an "assembly line" operation. Rubbing alcohol is only one of the many uses made of the Panama product and thousands of gallons are used in many other products of the Industrial Laboratory.

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10 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW March 6, 1953 Railroad Worker Was Really Upset During Bustling Construction Days Clubhouse At Cocoli Transferred To Navy HEZP2KIAH MOULTON The unique distinction of having been spilled, together with his place of employment, into the bottom of the Canal excavation belongs to Hezekiah Moulton of the Panama City Railroad station staff. He is now winding up over 35 year's service, aU of which has had to do, in some way or another, with the rai'road. Mr. Moulton remembers very little of his upside-down experience, understandably, as he was knocked unconscious during the mixup. It happened on August 2, 1909, while he was working in a telephone shack alongside excavation work near Bas Obispo. He was keeping a record of all trainsfilled and empty— passing along that section of the railroad track. Steamshovel No. 228 was working near the shack. Its boom caught on the wire attached to the tower where he was stationed, toppling him, shack and all, some 35 feet to the bottom of the digging. He remembers that he grabbed for his telephone to call the yardmaster but was knocked out before he could report his plight. The train which was loading from the shovel took him to an emergency hospital and rest home at Bas Obispo where he spent over a month. Born in Jamaica something over 60 years ago, he came to the Canal Zone in 1906 when his father, Charles R. Moulton, went to work for the Isthmian Canal Commission as a machinist's helper in the tin shop at Matachin. The son's first job was in 1907 as a porter at the Matachin railroad station; later that year he became a telephone operator checking trains at Juan Grande below Gorgona. The work was about the same as he was doing at Bas Obispo at the time of the accident 2 years later. His later railroad experience included acting as assistant yardmaster to a succession of bosses, practically all of whom are no longer on the Isthmus. At one time he was among those responsible for keeping the track clear of construction equipment for the frequent passenger and freight trains. When the excavation was nearly completed he worked as a "cabin man" throwing switch levers near Matachin and later held the same job at the Balboa "Y." Sometime later he was transferred to the Panama City railroad station. While working there in 1925 he was injured when a trunk and a heavy tool box fell from a truck, breaking his right ankle. He made a claim against the railroad and, he says, was promised a lifetime job by the then governor, Harry Burgess. His latest job has been as a janitor at the Panama City station. Mr. Moulton lives alone in a room on Central Avenue in Panama City. He is a devout churchman although he holds no office in his church. Most of his off-duty time, he says, he spends reading, or thinking about the days when he had a part in the building of the Panama Canal. The Cocoli Clubhouse ceased to be a Panama Canal Company operation on March 1 when it was transferred to the U. S. Navy. George Fears, the clubhouse manager, has been assigned to other duties in the Clubhouse Division. The only other U. S.rate employee was on temporary status and her employment has terminated. Most of the 28 local-rate employees have been transferred to other units in the Clubhouses through standard reductionin-force procedure which has caused the termination of an equivalent number of local-rate workers with less service. The Clubhouse at Cocoli began operation under the Special Engineering Division in 1940. It became a Panama Canal Clubhouse in March 1943. SATURDAY IS MUSIC DAY N( >Bi IDY'S TALKING! Everyone's too busj in the Saturday morning music classes which arc being attended In'aboiit 120 fourth, fifth, and sixth graders on both sides of the Canal Zone. The Schools Division furnishes the instruction, the children the instruments. Above, Victor A. Kerr works with embryo-musicians Paul Kenyon, David Browne. Arthur Edwards, Curtiss Schwarzrock, and Douglas Crooks. Below, instructor Wallace E. Woodruff guides violinists Carol Zelnick, Ruth Thompson,. Clary Glaze, Dorothy Rose, Pat Dempsey, Mar) Rose, Ray Caldwell, Richard Morris, and Gloria Ely,

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March 6, 1953 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 11 Forty Years Ago In February The oddities of Gatun Lake after its first rainy season were the Subject of individual curiosity and comment as well as official attention as the future source of the Canal water supply. The Canal Record waxed almost lyrical about its "varying shades of blue," etc., after noting that the lake had commercial value although it was still 30 feet below its final height. The lake was then being used by a man in Gatun who had fitted out a launch on which he conducted Sunday sightseeing trips; the lighthouse service was using the rising water to tow sand and other material to the "very spots" where the range lights were being erected; and three gasoline launches and six canoes were making "venturesome trips on the wind-swept surface." Water Highway "Every little creek that formerly poured into the Chagres has become a water highway through the woods," The Record reported. It was also explained, for the benefit of "strangers to the Canal work," that the trees in the area covered by the lake were left standing for the simple reason that the cost of cutting them would have amounted to about $2,000,000. Anyway, The Record pointed out, a tree smothers when its roots are covered with water and "what with decay, insect attack, and wave motion, it is probable that within a decade the soft wood trees that now stand so naked and ghostlike above the water will have been uprooted and will have floated downstream." Floating Islands Other oddities were the "floating islands," masses of vegetation and earth loosened from the bottom of Gatun Lake by the rising water, that were moved about by the winds, effecting fast and uncanny changes in the scenery. The largest then floating was about 3 acres in area. The islands were being towed to Gatun Spillway where they were floated over the dam. The tops of orange and lemon trees were sticking out of the water at Tabernilla where the fruit could be picked from a cayuco. Orchid hunters could tie up to the limb of a tree and load a cayuco full of orchids at points along the Gatun and Trinidad Rivers. Forced to Leave One effect of the rise of the water was to shake the skepticism of the bush dwellers who formerly could not be made to believe that it would be necessary for them to leave the area to be flooded by the lake. "Altogether," The Canal Record concluded, "the impression one gets today from a trip on Gatun Lake is that in the very near future it will be renowned as of the most beautiful places on the beaten tracks of travel." The postal money order system in the Canal Zone was organized June 1, 1906. "> In 1906 residents of the Canal Zone paid taxes which were devoted to municipal improvements, such as the construction of market houses, schoolhouses, jails for municipal prisoners, installation of street lamps. THE DYING JUNGLE, slowly being covered by the rising water of Gatun Lake, looked like this in 1912, when the lake had risen to 52 K feet above mean sea level. GOOD AND GOOD-looking electric clocks which operate on 25 cycle current an item which the Commissary Division finds difficult to obtain from manufacturers — will arrive from the United States early in March and will be in the retail stores soon after. There will be three types of alarms and two styles of kitchen clocks -in a variety of pretty colored plastic or birch cases and good looking dials. For whatever comfort the names might offer rudely-awakened sleepers the names of the styles of the alarm clocks are "Serenade," "Beckoner," and "Wink." The Kitchen clocks sound almost as nice. They are the "Helper" and the "Epicure." Olives stuffed with fillets of anchovies, new Anchovy for the grocery sections, will stuffed olives be in the retail stores soon after arrival from Madrid, Spain. Here's Meatless "Meat" KRILIUM -that caused one of the horticultural world's biggest recent stirs, is now in the Commissaries where local gardeners and flower lovers can buy it for their lawns and house plants. Hailed after research expeiments as a revolutionary means of making the meanest soils pliable and productive, the new product has gone to market in a wide variety of commercial preparations. That in the Commissaries is called Krilium Soil Conditioner, "special Merloam formulation," which sells for $1.60 a pound or five pounds for $6.45. Articles in "Business Week" and "Harper's" magazines detailed the development of Krilium. Fish fanciers, Lenten menu makers and grocery shoppers who like to hang on For to as many of their pennies as posLenten sible now can try canned smoked Meals and baked shad that is new in Commissary grocery sections. The 7K-ounce tins will cost about 40 cents. "PRO-TEK-TIVS," the fine health shoe for children sold by the Commissaries has proven so popular with customers that a new style has been added, particularly for little girls. The new "Pro-tek-tiv" is a moccasin toe strap in brown that is considerably more feminine than the basic moccasin toe oxford that has been the only style in this make available in the shoe sections. The new shoes sell for $5.95 or $6.50, depending or the size range. Four new Miller vegetarian foods have been added to the grocery sections. They are all meatless meat built on a soy bean base. There are soyloin steaks,' "meatless weiners," "choplet burgers," and "proast." SMALL FRY anglers can now get in the fishing act with fiberglass rod fishing sets that are new in the Commissaries. The sets have a spun glass fishing rod, hooks, reel float, leader and line -as the manager of Wholesale Housewares put it, "everything but the fish." "Little Angler" is the name of the set and it costs $3.25. Two good looking new styles of Penaljo low heeled shoes for women are Fish now in the retail stores. One is a Mouth side tie of tan or red calf with fish Shoes mouth (wide open, that is) toe and open heel. The other is a cross tie in white, brown, or tan calf. A NEW gadget that deodorizes refrigerator or garbage cans has been added to the Housewares stocks. It is called "Charo" deodorizer. Practical and pretty household mats of multiPractical colored rubber links are also new and in the Housewares sections. They Pretty come in five sizes that range in price from $2.10 to $6.25. A LOT OF NEW denim play clothes some with embroidery and bows, stripes, and burton decoration and in a wide variety of gay and pretty colors — will arrive in the retail stores in March. There will be many in misses sizes, 1 to 1 8, and some in womens' s'zes, 32 to 38. There will be pedal pushers, skirts, blouses, bras, shorts, caps, and camisoles in colors such as charcoal, melon, gold, lime, pink, rust, black, brown, navy, faded blue, and green.

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12 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW March 6, 1953 Canal Increases Purchase Of Panama Fruit And Vegetables Canal Traffic Under Special study The Panama Canal organization, during the first 6 months of this fiscal year, more than quadrupled its purchases in Panama of agricultural items as against the purchase of similar items during the corresponding period of the previous fiscal year. The great increase is shown by the following figures: $247,644 worth of such products including over 2,900,000 lbs. of sugar worth $183,611 was purchased from July 1 to December 31, 1952, while only $53,000 worth was bought between July 1 and December 1 of the previous year. The figures indicate the growing trend toward purchasing in Panama as much as possible of native-grown fruit and vegetables. Leaders in these purchases in addition to the sugar are such items as: Bananas, oranges, tangerines, cabbage, cucumbers, green peppers, squash, and yams. Other increases during the first half of the present fiscal year over the previous year are shown in beverages, a 10 percent increase; industrial products, such as cement and medical supplies, a 100 percent increase; and meat products, up from $344,000 in 1951 to $409,954. The value of the total purchases made in Panama during the second quarter this fiscal year is $213,771 less than during the first quarter this year. This drop, however, is attributed to the fact that sugar and beef supplies were reduced considerably during the first quarter. The overall picture of the first 6 months of the 2 years showed between July 1 and December 31, 1952, purchases in Panama amounted to $1,243,457, or $338,457 more than for the corresponding period in 1951. The following table shows the amount of purchases in Panama for the first half of the present and previous fiscal years: First half First half fiscal vear fiscal year 1953 1952 Meat products.. _. $409,954 $344,000 Agricultural products (fruits and vegetable^ ......... 247 644 53 000 Other agricultural products. 23 019 26 000 Other food products 16,527 13,000 Beverages 77,497 70,000 Forest products 29,444 92,000 Industrial products 235,313 123,000 Miscellaneous 203,851 179,000 Total $1,243,457 $905,000 Personnel Ceiling Set For Each Bureau In Government-Company Organization (Continued from page 1 ) less than at the end of June 1952 when the past fiscal year closed. The number of U. S.-rate employees at the end of January totalled 4,729 on the Isthmus and in the United States. At the end of the past fiscal year, or last June 30, the U. S.-rate force, here and in the United States, was approximately 4,860. This figure is approximate because employees of the New York and Washington offices were not grouped with employees on the Isthmus, in personnel figures, until early last Fall. Local-rate employees totaled 13,291 at the end of January, compared to 13,881 on June 30, 1952. Both U. S.and Local-rate workers are at present numerically far below the peak of the past decade. In June 1942 when the force was greatly swollen because of World War II activities, there were 8,550 U. S.-rate and 28,686 Local-rate employees on the rolls, to make a total of 37,236. This figure excluded both New York and Washington offices. Even the World War II peak, however, was considerably less than the greatest number employed during the Canal construction period. This peak figure was 43 400 in 1913. Construction Projects For This Fiscal Year Are Still Under Study (Continued from page i) Margarita; a school building at Margarita; and an elementary school at Rainbow City. Bids for the two Margarita projects have already been opened, and bids for the Rainbow City school will be opened March 26. Other work for this fiscal year which will be done under contract are general maintenance projects. Each of these is being given careful review to determine whether they are in compliance with the President's policy on economy. Among the projects in this category are exterior painting of quarters in most of the Canal Zone towns; reroofing of a group of houses in Cristobal; replacement of tile roofs on nine quarters buildings in Balboa; and the construction of roof hoods on a group of 16 houses in Balboa. Two street improvement projects planned for this year will be done by the Maintenance Division. These are the repaving and improvement of the street intersections at Margarita Avenue and Bolivar Highway in Margarita, and Front and Eleventh Streets in Cristobal. Bids for this work were opened late in February and the sole bid received was rejected as being too high. Diablo Heights Fire Station To Be Closed (Continued from page 2) on the danger of children crossing the tracks near the Balboa Railroad Station, rather than further up at Corozo Street. Safety Code Asked Mr. Rice asked that a building fireand safety-code be enacted and enforced, pointing out that there was exposed and defective electric cables in some locations. He said that safety of the citizens is more important than economy in such cases. Other matters brought up at the February conference included repair of refrigerators; rents on quarters at Pedro Miguel; physical examinations for Canal employees applying for drivers' licenses in Panama; cashing of paychecks in the smaller towns; Commissary charge accounts for all employees; enlargement of the parking lot at Gatun community center; boarding of the unused section of the Gamboa clubhouse, and the cleaning of the Gamboa flagpole. Attending the conference were the usual representatives of the Administration: The Governor, E. A. Doolan, Personnel Director; and F. G. Dunsmoor, Administrative Assistant in the Governor's Office; and the following employee representatives: Sherman Brooks, M. J. Goodin, Carl Nix, Mr. Hammond, Mr. Roe, and Mr. Rice, Civic Councils; Henry ('. Simpson, Marine Engineers; S. J. Garriel, [Continued from page 4) traffic in January was the second highest of any month since the Canal was opened with a total of 632 transits. In addition there were 97 transits by large Government-owned vessels. This high level of traffic continued throughout February and the daily average number of transits for the month was slightly higher than in the previous month. The overhaul of the locks is the biggest single maintenance job the Canal has to perform at regular intervals. The overhaul of the Pacific locks started early in January at Pedro Miguel and the work on the east chamber was completed February 14. The unwatering of the west chamber at Pedro Miguel began February 16. The overhaul work is slightly ahead of schedule and it is expected that the work on the west chamber at Pedro Miguel will be completed by March 21. The equipment will then be moved to Miraflores locks and it is planned to begin emptying the west chambers there on March 23. The work at Miraflores is expected to require about 4 weeks for each set of chambers, and normal service will be resumed before the end of May. The number of lockages normally possible at Miraflores locks during an overhaul period is less than the maximum attainable at Pedro Miguel because of the longer lockage time. Based on past experience, the 24-hour capacity of Miraflores is 21 lockages with one lane out of service, but it is planned to step this up to a possible maximum of 24 a day with special operating procedures in effect. If this goal is attained and the flow of traffic continues without serious fluctuations, no excessive delays to shipping are expected. Trim-Uniformed Force Enforces Security At All Three Sets Of Panama Canal Locks (Continued from page 3) his first month he is examined on rules and regulations of the force and during his second and third months he is examined on such matters as pertinent phases of criminal law, rules of evidence, and criminal investigation. At the end of his 90-day probationary period, each guard is given a written examination covering the various phases of his training. Not until he has passed this examination is he assigned as a regular member of the force. Working directly under Captain Halsail are three sergeants, one for each set of locks. They are considered Security Commanders for their areas. Four senior patrolmen are also stationed at each set of locks. Their headquarters or control points are the main gates in their areas. The guards wear khaki uniforms which were designed by a committee from the security force and approved by Mr. Stockham. Distinguishing features of the uniform are its semi-rolled collar shirt, the black stripe down the trouser legs and the insignia "LSF" for Locks Security Force. Plumbers; Herschel Gandy, AFGE; Mr. Hodges, Locomotive Engineers; Mr. Daniel, Conductors; Chester Luhr, Locks Employees; and Walter Wagner, Henry Chenevert, W. E. Percy, Carl Maed'l, Ralph Curies and E. .1. Husted, Central Labor Union.

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March 6, 1953 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 13 ANNIVERSARIES Ten Years Ago In February Employees who observed important anniversaries during the month of Februarj are listed alphabetically below. The number of years includes .ill Government service with thf Canal or other agencies. ["hose with continuous service with ih>' Canal arc indicated with (*). 48 YEARS •William Jump, Timekeeper, Industrial Bureau. 42 YEARS 'Ernest C. Cotton, Printer, Printing Plant. 35 YEARS John W. Towery, ClaimExaminer, Fiscal I >i\ ision. John A. Wright, Genera] Storekeeper, Division of Storehouses. .50 YEARS Harry F. Cody, General Foreman, Maintenance Division. Troy Hayes, Sergeant, Police Division. James E. Heady, Assistant Chief Accountant, Accounting; Division. Nicolas E. Palat, Postal Clerk, Balboa. Joseph J. Wood, Government Systems Accountant, Accounting Division. 25 YEARS John F. Hern, Sheetmetal Worker, Maintenance Division. P. Byrne Hutchings, Housing Manager, Gamboa, Housing Division. William F. Long, Policeman, Police Division. 20 YEARS Nathan W. Ashton, Foreman, Shipping and Receiving, Commissary Division. Henry C. Hotz, Track Foreman, Railroad Division. David F. Mead, Records Administrator, Administrative Branch. Herbert W. Rose, Locomotive Engineer, Railroad Division. William L. Willumsen, Customs Inspector, Cristobal. 15 YEARS Arch D. Bishop, General Investigator, Office of the Comptroller. Walter E. Colclasure, Administrative Assistant, Contracts and Inspection Division. *Helen L. Dudak, Appointment Clerk, Personnel Bureau. Harry D. Foster, Filtration Plant Operator, Maintenance Division. William T. Halvosa, Jr., Postmaster, Diablo Heights. James L. Hatcher, Sergeant, Police Division. Edward G. Moran, Postal Clerk, Air Mail Section. Gilbert A. Reynolds, Foreman, Electrical Division. Frederick H. Smith, Jr., Supervisory Construction Engineer, Electrical Division. Time-Payment Plan Set Up For New Canal Employees U. S.-rate employees of the Canal organization with less than 6 months of service are now able to purchase such household equipment as refrigerators, washing machines, electric ironers, and other equipment costing over $60, on a credit plan through the Commissary Division. Employees with over 6 months service may make arrangements for financing of such purchases through their local credit unions. This means that the former plan for selling refrigerators on a 12-month payment plan through the Commissary Division is now superseded by the new arrangement. It also means that new employees or those here only a short time who have not yet established credit union affiliations will be able to purchase THOUSANDS OF ISTHMIAN'S turned out 10 years ago last month to attend the War Bond Carnival in Balboa. The carnival was such a success that it was extended an extra day; when it finally closed, bond sales totaled close to $650,000. Isthmians by the thousands swarmed around the Balboa stadium area 10 years ago in February at a War Bond Carnival, biggest affair of the sort to be held here in considerably more than a decade. Just about anything anyone ever heard of for a carnival — except a zoo^was available. The Governor, Glen E. Edgerton, cut the entrance ribbon. Army and Navy equipment was on display. Searchlights wigwagged messages. The 511 members of Balboa High School's Victory Corps made their first public appearance in an opening parade. Taxi-dancers wore out their shoes. Paratroopers jumped from three planes over Albrook Field. Give-away prizes were headed by a round trip by air to Costa Rica. Bond purchasers stood in line, headed by the Governor, and sales finally totaled some $650,000, well over the half-million dollar goal. A young lieutenant from the Army Air Force was killed, three other men hurt when an observation plane hit a protective net cable suspended over the north end of Pedro Miguel locks and crashed in flames in a ravine behind the Pedro Miguel Gun Club. An enlisted passenger in the plane jumped just before it crashed, pulled from the wreckage a severely injured sergeant. The net cable fell onto three high tension wires, shutting off electric current to the Pacific side for 3 hours. One of the falling high tension wires hit a truck in which a West Indian driver was sitting, knocking him unconscious. using'gasoline obtained through "B" rations to make pleasure trips to the Interior. From Balboa Heights came word that car owners applying for "B" books would be refused the extra gasoline when they were knoicn to have been making such pleasure trips in their cars. Periodic checks were being made at points in the Interior where trips were likely to be taken. Commissary customers were told that there would be no serious food or drygoods shortage if patrons bought only as much as they needed, when it was needed. Sales of some articles were limited; in the Commissaries shoes could be obtained only at the rate of three pairs a year per member of a family, although shoes could be ordered by mail from the States. Commissary officials, however, backed up a Civil Defense suggestion that each household keep in reserve a 2 weeks' supply of nonperishable food-stuffs. Spam, for instance. George W. Green, Municipal Engineer, returned from a plane and highway trip between Mexico and the Isthmus with news that it would be at least 1945 before the Inter-American Highway would be ready for general use. Army Engineers were in charge of the road construction, with much actual building being let to U. S. contractors and the Public Roads Administration doing the bridges and culverts. Authorities clamped down on the misuse of rationed gasoline. Three men were fined $100 each in the District Court for household equipment on the time-payment plan. The plan calls for complete payment in a 12-month period. Interest and a carrying charge of 5 percent of the original selling price are added to the selling price. The total sum is to be repaid in 26 equal consecutive payments, made bi-weekly through payroll deductions. The Panama Canal Clubhouses took over the Diablo Heights Restaurant and the clubhouses at Diablo Heights, Margarita, and Cocoli. They had been operated as a separate unit of the Special Engineering Division. The month's visitors included H. V. Kaltenborn, well-known radio commentator, just in from a speedy round trip to Africa. He announced that the major problem facing the Allied forces in Africa was that of combating Axis submarines.

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14 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW March 6, 1953 THIS MONTH'S CALENDAR MARCH 7th — Track Foreman No. 2741, Balboa B & B Shops. 8th— Sheetmetal Workers, Balboa Clubhouse, 9:30 a. m. Plumbers No. 606, Balboa Lodge Hall, 9:30 a. m. 9th Machinists No. 699, K. of C. Hall. Margarita, 7:30 p. m. American Legion Post 1, Balboa Legion Home, 7:30 p. m. 10th — Pipefitters, Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m. Electrical Workers No. 397, Wirz Memorial, 7:30 p. m. VFW Post 100, Old Boy Scout Building, Cristobal, 7:30 p. m. American Legion Post 7, Fort Clayton, 7:30 p. m. Legion Auxiliary Unit 1, Balboa Legion Home, 7:30 p. m. Uth — Carpenters and Joiners, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m. Pacific Civic Council, Board Room, Administration Building, 7:30 p. m. American Legion Post 2, Legion Home, Old Cristobal. 13th— Blacksmiths No. 400, Boilermakers Nos. 463 and 471, K. of C. Hall, Margarita, 7:30 p. m. 15th— CLU-MTC, Balboa Lodge Hall, 8:30 a. m. 16th — Electrical Workers No. 677, Gatun Masonic Temple, 7:30 p. m. Truckdrivers, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m. 17th — Operating Engineers No. 595, K. of C. Hall, Margarita, 7 p. m. Machinists No. 811, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m. 18th— AFGE No. 14, Balboa Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m. American Legion Auxiliary Unit 3, Gatun Legion Home, 7:30 p. m. 19th — American Legion Auxiliary Unit 6, Gamboa Legion Hall, 7:30 p. m. 23d— Machinists No. 699, K. of C. Hall, Margarita, 7:30 p. m. VFW Auxiliary, Post 3822 Home, 7:30 p. m. 24th — Operating Engineers No. 595, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7 p. m. American Legion Post 7, Fort Clayton, 7:30 p. m. 25th — Governor Employee Conference, Board Room, Administration Building, 2 p. m. VFW Post 100, Old Boy Scout Building, Cristobal, 7:30 p. m. American Legion Auxiliary Unit 2, Legion Home, Old Cristobal, 7:30 p. m. APRIL 1st— VFW Post 3857, Cristobal Veterans Club, 9 a. m. VFW Post 40, Wirz Memorial. 7:30 p. m. 2d — Carpenters and Joiners No. 667, Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m. 3d — American Legion Post 6, Gamboa Legion Home, 7:30 p. m. PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS January 75 Through February 75 The following list contains the names of those U. S.-rate employees who were transferred from one division to another (unless the change is administrative) or from one type of work to another. It does not con. tain within-grade promotions or regradings ADMINISTRATIVE BRANCH John J. Alexaitis from Helper, Indus" trial Bureau, to File Clerk, Record SectionGeorge K. Hudgins, Jr. from Mail Clerk to File Clerk, Record Section. Mrs. Beatrice E. Lee from File Clerk to Records Administrator, Record Section. Mrs. Lois A. Mansberg from Personnel Clerk (Typist), Employment and Utilization Division, to File Clerk, Record Section. George G. Graffman from File Clerk to Property and Supply Clerk, Record Section. Walter J. Allen from File Clerk to File Supervisor, Record Section. Vincent Leaver from Doorman, Clubhouse Division, to File Clerk, Record Section. CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU Mrs. Nancy L. Gamble from Kindergarten Assistant to Elementary School Teacher, Schools Division. Rex O. Knight from Assistant Motor Inspector to Motor Inspector, Police Division. Charles A. Thomas from Junior Foreman, Ferry Service, to Postal Clerk, Postal, Customs, and Immigration Division. Jacob Rand from Signalman, Navigation Division, to Postal Clerk, Postal, Customs, and Immigration Division. A. Edwin Wilson from File Clerk, Administrative Branch, to Postal Clerk, Postal, Customs and Immigration Division. Richard M. Hirons from Policeman to Assistant Motor Inspector, Police Division. John M. Mallia from Helper, Locks Division Overhaul, to Customs Guard, Postal, Customs, and Immigration Division. March Sailings From Cristobal STEAM Kit Leave Cristobal 10 a. m. Friday Arrive Port-auPrince 7 a.m. Sunday; /rate noon Sunday Arrive New York 8 a. m. Thursday Ancon* Panama. Cristobal. Ancon. March 7 (Saturday) March' 13 March 20 March 27 March 9 (Monday) March 15 March 22 March 29 March 13 (Friday) March 19 March 20 April -' • From New York STEAUEIt Leave New Yuri; 4 p. m. Tuesday Arrive Port-aul'rinre 7 a. m. Saturday; leave 4 p. m. Saturday Arrive Cristobal 2 p. m. Monday Panama . March 3 March 10 March 17 March 24 March 31 March 7 March 14 March 21 March 28 April 4 March 9 March 16 March 23 March 30 April t> Cristobal __ Ancon. Panama Cristobal Schedule changed because of Was rington's Birthday holiday. Barry H. Kenealy from Policeman, Police Division, to Customs Guard, Postal, Customs, and Immigration Division. Stuart M. Fisk from Machinist, Locks Division Overhaul, to Policeman, Police Division. COMMUNITY SERVICES BUREAU Mrs. Annie R. Rathgeber from ClerkTypist, Office of the Director, to ClerkStenographer, Clubhouse Division. Emmet Zemer, from General Supply Clerk, Housing Division, to Safety Inspector, Office of the Director. John W. Hare from Safety Inspector to Realty Assistant, Office of the Director. Jack W. Clarke from Helper, Locks Division, to Superintendent, Refuse Collection and Disposal, Grounds Maintenance Division. OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER John F. Lewis from Chief Accountant to Business Analyst, Management Staff. Floyd H. Baldwin from Auditor, Claims Division, to Chief, Fiscal Division. James L. Fulton from Governmental Accountant, Accounting Division, to Chief, Claims Branch. George E. Girard from Assistant to Finance Director, Internal Audit Division, to Acting Chief, Internal Audit Staff. Arthur J. O'Leary from Assistant to Finance Director, Accounting Division, to Acting Chief Accountant, Accounting Division. Willard D. Strode, Frank R. Molther from Structural Engineer, Engineering Division, to Valuation Engineer, Plant Inventory and Appraisal Branch. Frank A. Baldwin, from Accountant, Accounting Division, to Construction Cost Accountant, Plant Inventorv and Appraisal Staff. Morris Waxman from Governmental Accountant, Accounting Division, to Construction Cost Accountant, Plant Inventory and Appraisal Staff. John R. White, Noel C. Farnsworth from General Construction Inspector, Contract and Inspection Division, to Valuation Engineer, Plant Inventory and Appraisal Staff. Bertha I. Frensley, Clerk-Stenogiapher, from Claims Branch to Accounting Systems Staff. Mrs. Anna H. Ballou, ClerkTypist, from Personnel Records Division to Treasury Branch. Mrs. Chiquita C. Cassibry from Typist, Cost Accounts Branch, to Clerk-Stenographer, Internal Audit Staff. Mrs. Evelyn R. Reynolds from ClerkTypist, Personnel Records Division, to Typist, Cost Accounts Branch. Charles H. McKeon from Tabulating Equipment Operation Supervisor to Accountant, Accounting Systems Staff. Harry E. Musselman from Cash Accounting Clerk, Treasury Branch, to Tabulation Planner, Accounting Division. Arthur J. Wynne, from Accounting Clerk, Agents Accounts Branch, to Accountant, Cost Accounts Branch. ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION BUREAU Mrs. Dorothy S. Parsons from Clerk Typist to Cash Accounting Clerk, Electrical Division. John G. Haky from Clerk to Supervisory Clerk, Electrical Division. Mrs. Ellen P. Castles from Cash Accounting Clerk to Accounting Clerk, Electrical Division. William L. Brooks from Accounting Clerk to Clerk, Electrical Division. HEALTH BUREAU Mrs. Juliet H. de Leon from ClerkTypist, License Section, to Clerk-Typist, Gorgas Hospital. Mara Salcedo J. from Storekeeper to Clerk-Typist, Gorgas Hospital. Dr. David Senzer, Medical Officer, from Gorgas Hospital to Division of Quarantine. Clifford V. Russell from Clerk, Colon Health Office, to Hospital Administrative Assistant, Gorgas Hospital. Roy F. Burr from Cash Accounting Clerk, Treasury Branch, to Clerk, Colon Health Office. MAGISTRATES COURT Rex E. Beck from Customs Inspector, Postal, Customs, -ion, to Constab Court. Immigration DiviBalboa Magistrate's

PAGE 15

March 6, 1953 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 15 MARINE BUREAU Walter R. Malone from Floating Crane Operator to General Foreman, Excavators and Tractors, Dredging Division. Claud M. Kreger from Principal Foreman to Rotary Drill Operator, Dredging I )i\ ision. George G. Kelps from Rotary Drill Operator to Drill Foreman, Dredging I (tvision. Robert B. Vache from Wireman, Electrical Division, to Lock Operator Wireman, Locks Division. Julian 0. Russell from Pump Operator, Pipeline Suction Dredge, to Small Tug Operator, Dredging Division. James O. King from Plant Electrician, Commissary Division, to Lock Operator Wireman, Pacific Lock-. James C. Thomas from Boilermaker to Boilermaker Leader, Dredging Division. Mirt Bender from Combination Welder to Boilermaker, Dredging Division. Everett E. Branstetter from First Mate to Master, Tug Taboga, Aids to Navigation. David W. Ellis from General Operator to Floating Crane Operator, Dredging Division. Ralph E. Garfield from Helper to Combination Welder, Locks Division. Thomas J. Ebdon, Jr. from General Electrical Engineer, Office of Chief, Locks Division, to Assistant to Superintendent, Pacific Locks. Leon D. Herring, Jr. from Junior Foreman, Ferry Service, to Pump Operator, Pipeline Suction Dredge, Dredging Division. Lloyd G. Moore from Machinist, Industrial Bureau, to Lock Operator Machinist, Atlantic Locks. Gordon E. Walbridge from Hydrographic Engineer (Dredging), to Hydrographic Engineer, Dredging Division. PERSONNEL BUREAU Mrs. Rita H. Fritz from ClerkTypist to Personnel Clerk (Typirt), Employment and Utilization Division. Mrs. Joanne E. Robinson, ClerkTypist, from Office of the Director to Employment and Utilization Division. RAILROAD AND TERMINALS BUREAU Robert S. Wood from Signals Supervisor to Supervisory Signal Engineer, Railroad Division. Clair E. Ewing from Traffic Clerk to Supervisory Administrative Assistant, Terminals Division. Mrs. Gloria M. DeRaps from Traffic Clerk, Terminals Division, to ClerkTypist, Railroad Division. Irwin K. Meier from Gauger, Division of Storehouses, to Agent-Operator, Railroad Division. SUPPLY AND SERVICE BUREAU Grady G. Gailey from Automobile Serviceman to Automobile Serviceman and Special Heavy Truck Driver, Motor Transportation Division. George L. Cain from Commissary Assistant to Commissary Manager. Edmund R. MacVittie from Assistant Chief, Northern District, Maintenance Division, to Assistant to Superintendent, Division of Storehouses. Arthur S. Miller from Meat Cutterin-Charge, to Purchasing Agent, Commissary Division. Commissary's Industrial Laboratory Saves Patrons Over $100,000 Annually RETIREMENTS IN FEBRUARY Employees who retired at the end of February, their birthplaces, titles, length of service at retirement, and their future addresses are: Sylvester B. Bubb, Pennsylvania; Admin. Asst., Locks Division; 32 years, 5 months, 7 days; Montoursville, Pa. Dr. Jesse L. Byrd, Georgia; Health Officer, Colon; 28 years, 9 months, 17 days; Atlanta, Ga. John F. Frensley, Tennessee; Conductor, Panama Railroad; 22 years, 2 months; Titusville, Fla. Eddie Holgerson, Colombia; Stevedore Foreman, Terminals Division; 19 years, 10 months, 5 days; Colon, R. P. Adam S. Miller, New York; Special Painter Leadingman, Industrial Bureau; 39 years, 10 months, 17 days; Canal Zone for present. THIS DISPLAY OF INDUSTRIAL LABORATORY products is kept on exhibition in the office of R. L. Sullivan, General Manager of the Commissary Division. Mr. Sullivan is explaining how some of the products are made to Mrs. Roberta Egolf, an employee in the Mount Hope Commissary offices. The display here shows only a few of the more than 200 products sold under the familiar "Commissary" label. Employees, not only in the Industrial Laboratory but throughout the Commissary Division, are justifiably proud of these products which are of highest quality and sell at very low cost. (Continued from page 9) of the World. The vanilla beans from which the vanilla extract is made come from Mexico and the French island of Madagascar. Although the first vanilla beans, back in 1911, were bought in London and stored there, the supply is now bought in the United States. Vanilla extract is made much the same as you percolate your morning's cup of coffee. The chopped beans are put into a percolator holding 40 gallons and are permitted to percolate for several hours at an exact temperature before the extract is ready for use as flavoring. An entire year's supply is made at one time and this requires 600 gallons. Bay Rum Is Popular Just as World War I provided a home for the Industrial Laboratory, World War II made one of its products famous. The product made popular during the past war was bay rum. Although its manufacture was begun soon after Major Wilson made his suggestion 42 years ago, the product never proved highly popular because the many natives of the West Indies Islands who work for the Canal preferred a certain type produced in the West Indies. When the war started and ships began to be sunk in the Caribbean by Nazi submarines, bay rum from the West Indies could not be easily obtained and the Commissary product became a fast seller. As soon as it came into common use the West Indies product lost favor and for a time it became necessary to take the Commissary bay rum off the market to sell the remaining supply in stock from the West Indies. Commissary bay rum is now one of the fastest-selling products of the Industrial Laboratory and. last year 24,000 pints and 4,600 quart bottles were sold. There are many other of the Industrial Laboratory products which are vitally affected by the changing times or popular taste of Commissary customers. The number of pharmaceutical products has recently been increased. Most Have Long Service Most of the personnel who work at the Industrial Laboratory are employees with many years of service and they are highly proud of their work. A few of the localrate employees began with the unit well before it was moved to its present location and given an official name. Mrs. Reccia is one of the "babies" of the unit in point of service and can boast only 3 years of service with the Industrial Laboratory. Mr. Orr, who heads the unit as chemist, is one of many boys who grew up in the Canal Zone and have made the Canal their life work. His father, E. F. Orr, was a former Superintendent of the Panama Railroad. All of the three children are now Canal employees. In addition to Earl, his brother, Elmer, is employed in the Office of the Comptroller, and his sister, Mrs. Juanita Jones, is employed in the Engineering Division. Mr. Orr attended elementary school in the Canal Zone and is a graduate of Balboa High School. Like many Canal Zone boys he worked for the Canal at various times during school vacation periods. After graduating from high school, he entered Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute and was graduated with a bachelor of science degree in chemistry. His first job after receiving his degree was at the Board of Health Laboratory. He transferred to the Commissary Division as a student recorder and a year later was made Assistant to the Chemist. He was promoted to Chemist and placed in charge of the Industrial Laboratory just 9 years ago this month One-Cent Increase Planned In Filtered Water Rate An increase in water rental rates of 1 cent a 100 cubic feet in most categories will become effective early in May. The revision of rates will not affect Canal employees nor the water supplied to the Cities of Panama and Colon. Charges for water for Canal employees are included in the rental of quarters, and filtered water supplied to Panama and Colon is under rates set by contractual arrangement. The latter does not cover suburban areas of Panama City and rates in these areas will be increased. No change will be made in the commercial tariff rates for water supplied to vessels.

PAGE 16

16 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW March 6, 1953 Signalman At Lone Hilltop Post Watches World's Commerce Go By THIS VIEW of the Panama Canal from the Gamboa Signal Station stretches to the south end of Mamei Curve beyond the town of Gamboa That is where Juan Hidalgo, Signalman shown here, first sights southbound vessels and raises the big signal shapes that instruct ships entering Gaillard Cut. Juan Hidalgo and his family live in a house with a view—perched all alone on a high hill about 150 feet above Gamboa. The "office side" of the hilltop house, where Mr. Hidalgo serves as Signalman, looks down on about a seven-mile stretch of the Canal which he has almost memorized in 20 years at the Gamboa Signal Station. The Gamboa station— like the other Canal signal stations, at La Pita, Cucaracha, and on Sosa Hill in Balboa — stands all alone, but could not be considered isolated. From then high houses, Canal signalmen watch the world's commerce go by, each of them keeping an eye on the part of the Canal that can be seen from his signal station. The section in view of the Gamboa Station extends from about midway in Las Cascadas Reach a short distance southeast of Gamboa to the bend between Gamboa Reach and Mamei Curve where south-bound vessels first come in sight of the signal station. About 11 years of seafaring and 20 as signalman, plus another six years in the Dredging Division have given Mr. Hidalgo a knowledge of ships that almost matches his intimate acquaintance with "his part" of the Canal. He says he can guess — and not miss far— the size and capacity of any vessel almost as soon as she can be seen from the Gamboa Signal Station. View From Gamboa Station The porch that opens off the Hidalgos' living room looks out over the Chagres River and over and beyond the town of Gamboa which they watched being built in 1939. From the other sides of the house, there are views of more hills like their own and, in one direction, a glimpse of the road to Gamboa. Scattered over the signal station hill are many fruits and flowers planted and cultivated by the Hidalgos in the years that they have lived there. Their fine avocados, oranges, and mangoes are frequently given to friends as presents. A road built to wind in a hairpin curve around one of their treasured avocado pear trees now connects the hilltop house with the highway at the foot of the hill. Mr. Hidalgo worked on that himself in 16 years of vacations. There are also 142 steps to the house — the Hidalgos have counted them many times — which were used to reach the signal station before the road was built. Mr. Hidalgo first came to the Canal Zone in construction days, a few years after he left his native Chile and started going to sea. He worked on tugboats and later on the old Panama Railroad ships, the Generals Gorgas and Goethah and the AHianca. Later, he went to the United States where he acquired citizenship in 1922. Visited Canal Zone Regularly Starting in about 1921 he came to the Canal Zone regularly when he was serving as quartermaster on a United Fruit Company vessel on runs between New Orleans and Cristobal. He later served as third and second mate on other ships that took him to many of the world's major ports. In 1927, he decided he wanted to work for the Canal and left his ship in New York and paid his own passage to the Canal Zone. He was employed in the Dredging Division and worked there until 1933 when he became a signalman. His seafaring experience has stood him in good stead in his job as signalman, particularly in the days up to the end of World War II before radio was used to transmit instructions to ships in the Canal direct from the dispatchers. However, Mr. Hidalgo explains, radio sometimes fails and the visual signals he transmits are more sure and certain in some cases. Signals Southbound Vessels One of the main responsibilities of the Gamboa Signal Station is the control of south-bound vessels entering Gaillard Cut — the transmission of instructions to speed up, slow down, keep on schedule, | etc., which the ships receive when they w| come in sight of the station. j*| ^jThe signalman also keeps a lookout for o>| slides, aircraft, fires, fog, or any unau1 thorized craft in the Canal. He keeps a gjf record of the Dredging Division equip**l ment in the Canal that can be seen from *| the Gamboa Station and signals to ships wf of the approach of a tug or barge outside S; the vessel's line of vision. He is also the \ man behind the fog horn or loudspeaker ; when they are used in "his part" of the Canal. The Hidalgos' home stands all alone but it is not lonely. It has long been a favorite gathering place for friends and neighbors in Gamboa, particularly the youngsters for whom Mrs. Hidalgo usually finds a sandwich or a freshly picked orange. She likes to have people around her and is busy with community activities. Her daughter Wilma, a typist in the Correspondence Section of the Canal, recalls the time an entire church circle gathered at their home. The house was so full there must have been a few heads sticking out the windows, she says. The minister made a fitting talk on "The Sermon on the Mount." The Hidalgos' 22-year-old son, William, is a motorcycle enthusiast. He started with a motorscooter in high school, then graduated to motorcycles and has had lots of practice on both up and down the hill to his home. Civil Defense Committee Appointments Announced Fifteen members have been appointed to the Civil Defense Advisory Committee according to an announcement from the Civil Defense Office. The first meeting of the group will be held about March 15 when Lt. W. G. Dolan, Civil Defense Chief, returns from Olney, Md., where he is attending Civil Defense Staff College. The members are: William T. Craig, Canal Zone Civic Councils; Robert T. Ellis, Local-rate Labor; Walter Wagner, U. S.-rate Labor; William Jump, Localrate Communities; Mrs. Dorothy Thornton, Canal Zone Chapter, Red Cross; B. I. Everson, Railroad and Terminals Bureau; Capt. Rodger W. Griffith, Civil Affairs Bureau; Melvin F. Millard, Engineering and Construction Bureau; E. L. Payne, Personnel Bureau; Daniel H. Rudge, Marine Bureau; A. T. Schmidt, Supply and Service Bureau; J. P. Smith, Jr., Health Bureau; Joseph C. Turner, Office of the Comptroller; Lt. Comdr. Walter M. Vincent, Industrial Bureau; Emmet Zemer, Community Services Bureau. The Advisory Committee will appoint the technical staff chiefs who will be responsible for such various Civil Defense matters as health, fire fighting, utilities, and rescues. This committee will work closely with a chief warden to be selected by the Civic Councils, and two Zone commanders, one for the northern and the other for the southern ends of the Canal Zone. Section commanders, similar to the "block wardens" in some U. S. communities, will also be appointed and trained in courses which Lieutenant Dolan will organize when he returns from the United States. OI-9C-I C$C)


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