Citation
Panama Canal review

Material Information

Title:
Panama Canal review
Creator:
United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Place of Publication:
Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Publisher:
Panama Canal Commission
Frequency:
Semiannual
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
PANAMA CANAL ZONE ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama) ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
periodical ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body:
Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note:
Title from cover.
General Note:
"Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note:
Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
01774059 ( OCLC )
67057396 ( LCCN )
0031-0646 ( ISSN )

Related Items

Related Item:
Panama Canal review en espagñol

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
of Pama Canal Museum
SPAN AMAi___


CANAL


Vol. 3, No. 7 BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE, FEBRUARY 6, 1953 5 cents
I I I I I I I


CARDENAS, GATUI
IF CONGRESS


N,


TO


BE


APPROVES


)MPLETEE
CANAL


FISCAL


HOUSING


1954


ESTIMATES


South


Corozal May


Deferred


Until


L


Be
iter


In Building Program


Completion
developments
Cardenas, in
building progr
for fiscal year
estimates as su
Panama Canal


of the townsite
at Gatun and
the long-range
am is planned
1954 if budget
bmitted by the
Company for


PORT-AU-PRINCE has stretched about 200 acres
farther into the Bay of Gonave since Panama Line
ships stopped there last as a result of the reclamation
from swamp land of the Cite de l'Exposition, in the
forefront in this air view of the city. The fine new.


Reactivation


Ahead


With


Civil
Cvi


Naming


Reactivation of a civil defense organi-


section, which is circled by Harry S. Truman Boule-
vard, houses government buildings and legations as
well as restaurants, folklore theater, casino, and other
tourist attractions. Additional pictures of Haiti and a
story of the "Magic Island" will be found on page 6.


Defense


Moves


Advisory


Group


Zone program. He will return about


the 1953-56 housing construc-
tion program are approved by
Congress.
In addition to those quarters started
during fiscal year 1953, the 1954 program,
as listed in the President's annual budget
message, will provide for the construction
of 65 U. S.-Rate family units in the
Balboa "Flats" area; 67 U. S.-Rate
family units on sites now occupied by
twelve-family buildings at Diablo Heights
scheduled for demolition this year; 15
U. S.-Rate family units to complete the
U. S.-Rate program at Gatun; Local-
Rate community facilities, including
school building, commissary, and com-
munity center; and a planned increase in
the number of houses at Cardenas, and
approximately 50 U. S.-Rate family units
elsewhere on the Pacific side.
The latter project called for construc-
tion at Diablo Terrace at the south end
of the new Corozal townsite. Due to un-





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


February 6,1953


Comptroller's


And


Finance


Office

Bureau


Become


Single


Unit


LINDSLEY H. NOBLE
Comptroller


PHILIP L. STEERS, JR.
Accounting Systems Staff


ARTHUR J. O'LEARY
Accounting Division


JOSEPH V. TURNER
Treasury Branch


IRA L. WRIGHT
Assistant to Comptroller


JOHN D. HOLLEN
Plant Appraisal Staff


FLOYD BALDWIN
Fiscal Division


LEROY B. MAGNUSON
Budgetary Procedures


MARC P. QUINN
Management Staff


GEORGE E. GmIARD
Internal Audit Staff


JOHN F. LEWIS
Rates Analysis


THATCHER A. CLISBEE
Capital Program


The consolidation of the Finance
Bureau and the Office of the Comptroller
into a single entity, known by the latter
title, was effective in mid-January.
The change was an administrative one
and the majority of the 272 men and
women in the organization continued in
the same jobs where they had been work-
ing prior to the merger. There were no
force reductions.
The Office of the Comptroller now
consists of four staff groups and two
operating divisions. It is headed by
Lindsley H. Noble, Comptroller, with Ira
L. Wright as Assistant to the Comptroller.
Mr. Wright is in charge of budget and
administrative matters for the office, and
also serves as a technical adviser.
John F. Lewis, formerly Chief of the
Accounting Division, moves to a staff
position as a rates expert.
The four staff groups are:
Management, Marc P. Quinn, Chief:
Over-all managements functions, plus
budget and rate analysis, and statistics.
Accounting Systems, Philip L.
Steers, Jr., Chief: Development of finan-
cial policies and systems of accounting and
internal control.
Plant Inventory and Appraisal,
John D. Hollen, Chief: Appraisal of
Government-Company fixed assets and
establishment of the amounts of related
reserves.
Internal Audit, George E. Girard,
Acting Chief: Comprehensive audit of the
accounts, financial statements, and busi-
ness records of the Government-Company.
In addition to the staff groups there
are also two operating divisions:
Accounting, headed by Arthur J.
O'Leary, Acting Chief, and Fiscal, with
Floyd H. Baldwin as Chief.
The Accounting Division's main work
is to maintain the Company's general
corporate accounts and appropriations
and fund accounts of the Government,
together with cost accounts of divisions
not maintaining their own accounts.
This division is divided into four
branches.
-'S 4 A 9 - -.


I





February 6, 1953


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Acting Governor

Conducts January

Employee Conference

Subjects ranging from commissary
problems to the disturbance to night
workers of the noon-day siren were cov-
ered January 28 at the monthly Governor-
Employee Conference at Balboa Heights.
The conference was conducted by Col.
Harry O. Paxson, Acting Governor, in
the absence of Gov. J. S. Seybold who
was in Washington to attend House
Committee hearings on the budget.
Colonel Paxson opened the conference
with a report on a number of matters
raised at previous conferences.
These included presentation of "I. C."
cards when entering the commissary inm-
stead of at each counter-not feasible
because of limited authority cards, mul-
tiple entrances, and added expense; the
possibility of firemen, who are trained in
first aid, riding on ambulances, which is
under consideration; surcharges on school
books, to be remedied for official pur-
chases by consolidating orders; parking
space at the Balboa Field Office of the
Electrical Division, which will be provided.
Also acted upon favorably were the
conservation of trees on Empire Street;
a change in plumbing regulations, to elim-
inate assistant plumbers; and the promise
of covered runways at local schools.
He announced that the administration
is studying the possibility of issuing a
new-type identification card, one which
will be useful in cases when an employee
is travelling and needs positive identifi-
cation to cash checks.
In connection with the "I. C. Cards,"
Edward A. Doolan, Personnel Director,
told the conferees that the Canal was
unable to get as good quality of card-
boards as had been used previously and
that the present cards may fray. The
cards, he said, will be replaced by the
Personnel Bureau on request if employees
will turn in their worn cards.
All remaining unlabeled canned goods
in the Commissaries, except for three
items for which there is no adequate
replacement at the moment, are being
removed from retail sales. The small
amount of this merchandise remaining,
which has been the subject of a number


Simp


fied
ecor


Layoff
ne Effee


Reduction in force categories of the
Government- Company -the categories
determining the order in which personnel
are laid off and establishing "bumping"
rights-will be reduced from the present
23 to 6, effective February 15.


Identical simplified layoff procedures
become effective the same date for all
government agencies, as prescribed by
the Civil Service Commission.
The changes, as they relate to present
reduction in force methods in the Govern-
ment-Company, affect generally only the
approximately 1,000 employees occupy-
ing competitive Civil Service positions in
the organization.
The six new categories are: Career


veterans, Career nonvi
conditional veterans, C
nonveterans, Indefinite
Indefinite nonveterans.


veterans, Career-
areer-conditional
veterans, and


Veterans And Nonveterans


Veterans have superior retention rights
in each of the three main groups: Career,
Career-conditional, and Indefinite.
Career employees are described as
those permanent employees who have
permanent jobs and who have completed
the probationary periods in their jobs.
They are not "temporary" or "indefin-


Procedures
active February 15

ite" as the result of promotion, transfer,
or reinstatement.
Career-conditional employees are those
permanent employees serving proba-
tionary periods or those who are "tem-
porary" or "indefinite" because of
promotion, transfer or reinstatement.
Indefinite employees are those whom
the Civil Service describes as serving
under "nonstatus, contemporary appoint-
ments." In other words, they are per-
sons who, since September 1, 1950, have
been occupying positions in the com-
petitive service and who have been re-
employed, promoted, reassigned, or trans-
ferred.
Ascending Credits
Reduction of force will be made in
the ascending number of retention credits,
first for the nonveterans and then for
the veterans, through the Indefinite,
Career-conditional, and Career groups, min
that order.
No person in a higher group, or sub-
group, will be given reduction in force
until all persons in lower groups and
subgroups have been reduced, unless
special circumstances permissible under
the regulations of the Civil Service Cornm-


mission permit the passing over of persons


lower on the retention registers.


NEW RETENTION GROUPS FOR REDUCTION-IN-FORCE PURPOSES


GROUP I
CAREER EMPLOYEES
SUBGROUP A:
Employees with veteran
preference
SUBGROUP B:
Employees without vet-
eran preference


GROUP II
CAREER-CON-
DITIONAL EMPLOYEES
SUBGROUP A:
Employees with veteran
preference
SUBGROUP B:
Employees without vet-
eran preference


GROUP III
INDEFINITE
EMPLOYEES
SUBGROUP A:
Employees with veteran
nrt rn-aT n-31 rp


I


Includes permanent CAREER employees in the
competitive service who have completed a probation-
ary period and who are not "temporary" or "indefinite"
as the result of promotion, transfer, or reinstate-
ment. Career employees serving under conditional
promotions shall be considered in this group with
respect to positions at and below the grade in which
they last served on a permanent basis. This group
also includes employees appointed to positions out-
side the competitive service with no conditions or
restrictions.
Includes career employees in the competitive
service who are conditional because they are serving
probational periods or are "temporary" or "indefin-
ite" as a result of promotion, transfer, or reinstate-
ment, or are subject to a similar limitation. In
positions excepted from the competitive service, it
includes employees who are conditional solely as
the result of promotion or reinstatement.


Includes persons serving under nonstatus non-
temporary appointments in positions in the competi-
tive service. It also includes employees in positions
excepted from the competitive service serving under
-i rr"bi/ nit-ir nrt l^nn-- #"rr 4,.. j -1 --- *'.-


I


r





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 6,1953


Sea


Shells


Are


From The
Hobby Of


Seashore


Zone


Policeman


Ten Years Ago
In January
The Canal Zone Experiment Gardens


bought 182 pounds of dried
taken from wild trees in the
the first results of a Supply
plea to aid the war effort
local wild crude rubber.


crude rubber
Canal Zone,
Department
by gathering


THAT'S A Malea (dolium) Ringens which Police
Officer Stewart H. Jadis is holding in his hand. It
is the largest of its type ever found in the Panama
Canal Zone Police Officer Stewart H.
Jadis picks up sea shells by the seashore
like a lot of other people but he brings his
shells back alive, then extracts the little
shell dwellers.
Because of his special hunting tactics
and "spit and polish" methods, his shells
have a showy color and shine unknown to
ordinary shell collections.
He has about 3,000 shells of about 500
varieties, many of which are slated for
exhibit at the Civil Affairs Building in
Ancon.
They range from little earring-shaped
shells set with coral beads of color that
look like art items that might have been
produced by a skilled ceramist or jeweler,
up to the big pink and ivory conchs in
which you hear the roar of the sea. The
largest of his collection of conchs is about
a foot in diameter.
Some Are Spectacular
In between these extremes of size are
several specimens of the fluted Rose
Murix, lined with rose and banded in
black and used by natives for salad; the
bleeding tooth, marked by three red
"tooth prints," and many others, more
or less showy.


area of the Pacific Ocean. Mr. Jadis is standing
beside a display case in which are exhibited a small
part of his collection of about 3,000 shells.
of his shells for scientific classification.
One of each variety that he sends to
conchologists there is returned to him
with their identification. The other one,
if there are two, or two, if there are four,
are retained for the University collection.
He also has his own source material for
tentative identification of unknown finds.
He does not ordinarily collect shells of
less than an inch in size which are
numerous in many collections.
Shells lose their color when exposed to
light so his make few public appearances.
Those that are frequently picked up on
the beach by desultory collectors have
been bleached by the weather after being
deserted by their former live inhabitants.
The cleaning process begins by boiling


the shells for 20 minutes. Th
die within 24 hours outside t
environment or instantly in i
When the shells are boiled th
picks out the insides with a s
instruments. Or, some shel
served with the organisms
"pickling" in formaldehyde.


e organisms
heir natural
fresh water.
e policeman
et of dental
ls are pre-
inside by


Boiled And Brushed
After they are boiled, the shells are
wire-brushed to remove any remaining
.. .. ..


The first rubber came from James A.
Dorsey, then Panama Railroad track
foreman at Frijoles, who arranged for the
collection with residents in that vicinity.
The crude rubber was turned over to the
local representative of the Rubber Re-
serve Corporation for shipment to the
United States.
Canal employees were subscribing 9.9
percent of their income-almost the 10
percent goal of the Treasury Department-
to the purchase of war bonds, according to
the monthly report on payroll deductions
for December 1942.
The Canal Zone divorce rate was up,
and 55 percent of the divorces were filed
by husbands. Almost a quarter of the
divorce actions were against women who
were not living on the Isthmus.
"Bunny" gas masks for small children
were explained by E. I. P. Tatelman,
Civilian Defense Director. Plans were
being made to provide the masks for small
Canal Zonians, who were too little to fit the
regular adult size. They were to be made
with flour sacks treated with a gas repellent
chemical. Two corners of the sacks were
tied with tape or strips, giving the effect of
rabbit ears and giving rise to the name
"bunny mask."
The 28-inch suction dredge Mindi,
one of the most powerful of its size and
type built to that time, was delivered to
the Canal Zone in January 1943 and pre-
pared for service at the Dredging Divi-
sion headquarters at Gamboa. The
mammoth dredge was built by the Ellicott
Machine Corporation of Baltimore at a
cost of $1,514,000.
War dogs arrived on the Isthmus to help
guard the Canal and vital installations.


The soldiers with whom
work were being trained b1
accompanied them when
iL0, f l'in-'ro.mnoanr P rno.


the dogs were to
the sergeant who
they came from
rvn;fl,,,nn nrnmiit





February 6, 1953


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


FOR YOUR


NTER


GUIDA


DENT


PREVENT


OFF THE JOB ACCIDENTS


Ben Axel


Dent,


the accident-prone


employee, is more likely to have an acci-
dent off the job than when he is working.
On the job he has certain safety rules and
a boss to help him mind his ways, but off
the job even his wife can't stop him from
foolish antics.
Not counting the expense and trouble
he has caused his unit to find another
employee, or some fellow worker to take
over his job while he languishes in the
hospital, the expense and anxiety to his
family is considerable.
The year past has experienced many
such accidents, not counting traffic
accidents, which were usually more severe.
There was the employee who fell down-
stairs over his own milk bottles and other
items left there; there was the aeronaut
in a duplex, who could not walk around to
visit his neighbor; then a husband, or
two, who tried to be the top man in a
balancing act; next, the armchair mechanic


who filled


a gasoline


lantern


with a


lighted cigar in his mouth; a few hunters
with "deeropia" eyes, where at night over
a gun, anything with shining eyes looked
like meat on the table; then that Don
Juan who could not resist helping the
lady close the car door on his fingers.
Therefore, don't leave your safety
precautions at the job this year; take
them home with you to practice in your
spare time.

HONOR ROLL
Bureau Award For
BEST RECORD
December
CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
INDUSTRIAL BUREAU

AWARDS THIS CALENDAR YEAR


Community Services...
Industrial .......
Civil Affairs .... . ... ... .
Engineering and Construction ..
Health ... ...
M arine- ...........
Ranfrnsd and T'ortninal


||





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 6,1953


Stop


In


Vivid


Haiti


Pleasant


Break


For


Passengers


On


Panama


Line


Ships


Vivid and variegated Haiti, .
molded of clashing cultures, can
now be enjoyed by Panama Line
passengers on stopovers at Port-
au-Prince on sailings between
New York and Cristobal.
The first call at Haiti since be-
fore World War II will be made by
the S. S., Ancon when she stops
there February 7, 4 days after "
leaving New York and 2 days out ..
of Cristobal. The Ancon will also "
make the first post-war stop on a r
northbound Panama Line sailing -..
when she docks at Port-au-Prince -
February 15.
On northbound sailings the
ships will leave Cristobal at 10
o'clock Friday morning, dock at
Port-au-Prince at 7 o'clock Sun- O
that
day morning and leave at noon the ritie
same day, arriving min New York pool
at 8 o'clock Thursday morning, soph
Southbound ships will leave New
York at 4 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, dock
at Haiti at 7 o'clock Saturday morning and
leave at 4 the same afternoon, arriving at
Cristobal at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon.
The fare between New York and Haiti
one way will be $130, $140, $150, or $170,
depending on accommodations. The
round trip fare will be $234, $252, $270, or
$306 for transportation between the two
points. All fares are exclusive of the 15
percent United States travel tax, where
applicable.
The rate between Port-au-Prince and
Cristobal will be $70 one way with the
passengers to be assigned to such accom-
modations as are available. No provision
has been made for reduced rates for Canal
employees for travel between Cristobal
and Port-au-Prince.
History Of Violence
The Haitian half of the Caribbean
Island that the country shares with the
Dominican Republic was washed and
warred over for centuries by Spanish,
then French colonials, English and other
buccaneers, and discordant internal fac-
tions, to be won at last in a series of blood
baths by the imported African slaves.
The conflicts and cultures have left the
mark.Q tsh-t manio twho rntormr inicui


NE HAITI that is modern contrasts with another
is near-primitive, providing one of the dihsimila-
s that makes the country unique. This swimming
at one of the resort hotels is typical of the modern,
iisticated attractions Haiti offers visitors.

Haiti's past and present are echoed in the
land itself which is alternately striped by
mountain ranges and low tropical plains.
A 5-minute drive from Port-au-Prince
winds upward through flower splotched
hills to the cool and sophisticated suburb
of Petionville overlooking the capital
city. In 40 minutes more the road ascends
to the resorts of Kenscoff and Furcy,
5,000 feet above sea level in the forested
Haitian "Alps."
Haiti has a gallery of national heroes
in the giant epic style and a history of
infamy and violence on the same colossal
scale, which have combined to mold the
country and capture imaginations around
the world.
Magnificent ruins of the Citadelle
Laferriere and the palace Sans-Souci bear
ghostlike testimony to the stature and
accomplishments of King Henri Cristophe.
His rise from slave to king inspired
the play by Eugene O'Neill entitled
"Emperor Jones."
These architectural masterpieces reflect
this giant of a man and the fantastic


Cardenas, Gatun To Be Completed
l_ r; .n s 1 ,i . ... .. .... ....


WINDING ROADS through flower-splotched hills
lead from tropical lowland plains to cooler forested
highlands. The one shown here leads from Port-au-
Prince to the suburb of Petionville and to the moun-
tain resorts of Kenscoff and Furcy.


nobility he created as they lived and
ruled the country they wrested from
France and modeled in the most splendid
manner of their former masters.
Cap-Haitien, the "Paris" from which
France ruled this richest 18th Century
possession, contains the remnants of the
regal palace of Napoleon's beautiful
sister, Pauline. The attempts of her
husband, General Leclerc, and succeeding
Napoleonic generals, to retain the over-
seas colony only increased the savage
bloodletting of the original slave up-
risings. Kenneth Roberts' novel, "Lydia
Bailey," and the recent movie of the
same name deal with this period of
Haitian history.
United States Marine Faustin Wirkus
provided a comic echo of the emperors
and kings. Stationed on the Island of
Gonave during United States occupation
in the 1920's, the non-commissioned
officer was proclaimed by the natives as
their king with consequences he described
in the book "The White King of La


Gonave."


by Armed Forces personnel.
arrangements for their transfer


Special
to other





February 6,1953


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


S4 L


Official


Panama Canal Company Publication
Published Monthly at
BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE


lPinft by the
Mount Hope,


rintinig Plat
Canal Zan


JOHN S. SEYBOLD, Governor-President
H. O. PAXSON, Lieutenant Governor


E. C. LOMBARD, Executive


Secretary


J. RUFUS HARDY, Editor
ELEANOR H. MCILHENNY
OLEVA HASTINGS
Editorial Assistants
LETTERS TO THE EDlITOR


Letters containing inquiries,


suggestions,


criticisms, or opinions of a general nature
will be welcomed. Those of sufficient interest


will be published but
used unless desired.


signatures


SUBSCRIPTIONS-$1.00


will not be

a year


SINGLE COPIES-5 cents each
On sale at all Panama Canal Clubhouses


Commissaries, and Hotels
publication date.


for 10


SINGLE COPIES BY MAIL-10 cents each
BACK COPIES-10 cents each
On sale when available, from the Vault
Clerk, Third Floor, Administration Building,
Balboa Heights.
Postal money orders should be made pay-
able to the Treasurer, Panama Canal Com-
pany, and mailed to Editor, THE PANAMA
CANAL REVIEW, Balboa Heights, C. Z.


Diablo
liable


Commissary


Renovated,


Compacted


The Diablo Heights Commissary has


been renovated


and compacted-reno-


vated to preclude glare and make the
interior more attractive, and compacted
to provide much needed storage room and
to eliminate drygoods, of which the
limited stocks for which space was avail-
able could not be properly merchandised.
With the renovation, Diablo Heights
Commissary now becomes a food and
essential items store. What drygoods
items were formerly carried have been
transferred to Balboa Commissary, as has
also been done with much of the hard-


SECOND GRADERS at Margarita Elementary
School, ready with the "objets d'art" they have
fashioned in art classes, gather around the kiln where
their pottery will be fired with the help of Mrs. Ernest
A. Karch, left, Supervisor of Art in the Canal Zone
Schools.


Elementary school children in


scale of


A new


one to


rates at the Hotel Wash-


ington for employees of the Government-
Company and other U. S. Government


agencies
new rates


was approved last month. The
are almost identical with the rates


:: :,e,;::. h0


given


discount on the commercial tariff.


With


the new


percent


employee rates, the 25


percent discount is eliminated; employees,
however, now become eligible for the same
long-term 50 percent discount for 5 months


or more of occupancy which is
guests paying the standard tariff.


are learning about clay modeling and pottery making
in their art classes this year for the first time. The


finished pieces


Margarita


are fired in small kilns at Balboa and


Elementary


received samples of the


Schools.
youngsters'


Many parents
ceramics in the


form of ash trays, tea tiles, and clay jewelry for
Christmas presents.


Heavy wire mesh protection for a number
of quarters in the New Cristobal-DeLesseps
and Colon Beach area was ordered January
21 by the Housing Division.
The request for work, to be performed by


th Ma tnanceDjr a


was issued after


a survey of the houses in this section showed
that while 75 percent of the original heavy


mesh on the houses


378 window


was in sound condition,


panels and


94 door


panels


needed the protective heavy mesh.


offered to


Under the old discount an employee paid
$10.12 per day for single occupancy of a
suite for which the standard tariff rate was


$13.5(
same


This becomes


$10 dailyy.


suite, for double occupancy, is $16.50


for standard tariff


guests


and $12.50 for an


employee, as compared to the $12.37 he
paid previously under the discount system.
A corner room with bath, $7.50 for corn-


mercial


guests,


becomes $5


occupancy, instead of the


charged


the discount.


Recently

Boar


Appointed


Directors
Directors.


.50 for single
$5.62 formerly


same


room, $10 at commercial rates for double


occupancy,


is $7.50 for employees,


uList as


OF CURRENT INTEREST


*I I I


'1 ~ ~ m-f n 1 -^-^


........ .


O.


**- i. .:. w- 4: ...n <-1t/* rl^*^^**




THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 6, 1953


Natural

to


History

Serious


Society Dedica

Consideration


ated

ofl


Nature


Doctors ordinarily talk seriously about
medicine only to other doctors. Lawyers
shop talk about their business primarily
in bar associations.
Laymen generally are assumed to lack


the interest
necessary to
work within
if busy pro
explain it to
The Pana
Society was
sumption on
years and sh
It is an ui
of scientists


and specialized knowledge
serious consideration of the
the learned professions-even
fessional men had time to
them.
Lma Canal Natural History
founded on a different as-
which it has flourished for 21
iows no sign of failing.
unusual, if not unique, alliance
and laymen mutually inter-


ested in serious study of fields of
history ordinarily relegated by c
consent to the men of science.
The "ain't nature wonderful"
of thought is notably absent
membership.
Dr. James Zetek and Dr. Her
Clark, world known for their v
science, have been leaders of the
from the time of its founding.


natural
ommon
school
in the


bert C.
york in
Society


Presidency Switched
The Presidency switched back and
forth between them in the early years but
Dr. Zetek says he is President now be-
cause Dr. Clark has become too lazy. Dr.
Clark, who is Vice President, says it isn't
that he's lazy-he's just too old to work.
Studies by W. E. Lundy, Secretary-


Treasurer of the Society, which have been
published by the American Museum of
Natural History, illustrate the serious
scientific purpose of many so-called lay-
men members.
The interest which prompted the papers
and the caliber of the work are termed by
Dr. Zetek "excellent" and "finished" and
used to prove another unique feature of
the Natural History Society.
He says it would be hard to find an-
other area with similar population in
which there are so many people interested
in natural history. His only explanation
is that the Isthmus has so much of it.
Two studies by Mr. Lundy, Assistant
Treasurer of the Panama Canal Company,
will be included in a special volume to be
published by the American Museum of
Natural History, an anthology of out-
standing articles from past publications
of Natural History Magazine.
Member's Article Published
Mr. Lundy's published articles include
studies of the sloth, "The Upside Down
Animal," and Panama potoos (Nyctibius
griseus panamensis), night birds related
to the whippoor-will and nighthawk, pub-
lished under the title "Poor-Me-One."
Another on howler monkeys has been
accepted for publication.
George O. Lee, Professor of Biology at
the Canal Zone Junior College is Li-
brarian of the Natural History Society.


4 L -


He has lectured several times at the
Society's monthly meetings.
Talks by members of the Society and
by other Isthmians have been interspersed
with lectures by a long list of visitors
whose names read like a page from
Who's Who.
A few of the many visiting lecturers
were: Dr. Raymond Ditmars, Ph. D., Cu-
rator of Reptiles for the New York City
Zoological Park; Dr. Charles L. Gazin,
Chief of the Division of Vertebrate
Paleontology of the Smithsonian Institu-
tion; Dr. Emmett R. Dunn, Professor of
Biology at Haverford College; Dr. A. A.
Allen, Professor of Ornithology at Cornell
University; Dr. Frank M. Chapman,
Sc. D., Curator-in-Chief of the Division
of Birds of the American Museum of
Natural History; Dr. Thomas Barbour,
Ph. D., Sc. D., Director of the Museum
of Comparative Zoology of Harvard
University; Dr. Arthur H. Compton,
Ph. D., Sc. D., of the University of
Chicago; Dr. A. G. Price, Master of St.
Mark's College, University of Adelaide,
Australia; Dr. Alexander Petrunkevitch,
Ph. D., of the University of Freiburg;
Professor Arthur M. Chickering, Profes-
sor of Biology at Albion College, Mich.;
Dr. Per Host of Sweden; and Dr. Matthew
M. Stirling, Chief of the Bureau of
American Ethnology of the Smithsonian
Institution.
A list of scientists who have lectured
to the group could be extended almost
indefinitely with the same Who's Who
effect.
220th Meeting
The January meeting was the Society's
220th. The meetings are held on the
fourth Wednesday of the month in the
auditorium of Gorgas Memorial Labora-
tory in Panama City.
Members acknowledge their debt to
their President and Vice President for the
type of lecturers they have had, many or
most of whom might not ordinarily talk
to nonscientific audiences or would com-
mand elsewhere lecture fees that would
be prohibitive.
They consider it possible that the
scientific standing of Dr. Clark and Dr.
7rtok l< t11 s.a fuhn arvineq thonv ncrfnrm





February 6,1953


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


coming meetings, written in a style that is
unmistakably Dr. Zetek's own.
"Personally, I would not exactly say
that this was a 'chance of a life time'," he
wrote about a coming lecture by a visiting
scientist, "but without hesitation I do say
that we will have this Wednesday a peer
among very few equals."
He concluded about another subject to
be dealt with by a visitor, "To me, all of
this is most interesting." Apropos of a
lecture on impressions of Tahiti, Dr.
Zetek reminisced, "I remember many
years ago I hoped that I could establish
myself in Tahiti or in French Oceania."
Many Inquiries Received
The small cost of correspondence
carried on by the Secretary-Treasurer
also is defrayed by the $1 dues paid
annually by the members. The Society
receives inquiries from many individuals
and scientific groups asking all manner of
information from the Panama Canal group.


The queries apparently come from
people, according to Dr. Zetek, who labor
under the impression the local Society
has a full-time secretary and lots of time
and assistance to delve into all manner of
scientific problems.
Officers labor to answer as many m-
quiries as possible but the ones that are
not' replied to are dismissed with the
simple philosophy: If the problem is im-
portant enough, they will write again.
Many of the most interesting lectures


some


the Society's own


membership.
Dr. Clark, Director of the Gorgas
Memorial Institute, the "Jungle Doctor"
featured in the October 4 1952 issue of
the Saturday Evening Post, has spoken
on several occasions.
First Lecture by Dr. Clark
Some of the early phases of his studies
of tropical maladies which have made him
the "Old Man of Tropical Medicine" and
earned him a long list of medical honors
including the Walter Reed Medal, were
discussed at the first meeting of the
Society on August 19, 1931.
The subject of that lecture was "the
influence of animal reservoirs on diseases
of domestic animals and man," illustrated
with microscopic exhibits of germs of
several diseases common to men and
animals.
Dr. Zetek, Curator of the Barro
Colorado Island Biological Laboratory of
the Smithsonian Institution and Ento-
Vr.ofti -;.n4-l fonZnina ?nr r I-ho flanor+...


WHITE,


TALL-PILLARED Gorgas Memorial


Laboratory on Justo Arosemena Avenue in the
Exposition Grounds section of Panama City has been

says that at the time of its founding "it
was believed that there were a sufficient
number of men of science in our midst
and of independent observers to assure
monthly programs of interest and value."
That belief has been well justified.
Several of the members who played a
prominent part in the founding of the


Society later lectures


concerning thei
fields of inquiry.


I


r special


to the group
interests and


Local Lecturers
Karl P. Curtis, former Canal employee
who now lives in Gamboa, is a recognized
authority on archeology on the Isthmus
and has served as guide for most of the
archeological expeditions sent to the Isth-
mus from the United States. He spoke on
more than one occasion to the members
of the Society.
The late Fred McKim, former employee
of the Property Bureau of the Canal
organization, was an authority on the
Indians of the Darien country and San
Blas Islands and spoke to the group on
that subject. He authored two studies on
Indians of the Isthmus: San Blas and The
Forbidden Land: A Reconnaissance of the


the meeting place for the Natural History Society for
21 years. The meetings are held in the building's
auditorium which is usually filled to capacity.


is now in Costa Rica, Mr. Curtis, Mr. and
Mrs. Lee, Dr. H. M. Mitten, Mr. Lundy,
Dr. Clark, and Dr. Zetek.
Lectures do not always deal with
scientific treatment of subjects.
A. I. Bauman, Senior Supervisor of the
Grounds Maintenance Division, talked to
the group on the history of sport fishing
in Panama. F. M. Foore, a former Army
employee in the Canal Zone, spoke on
"Cartagena, Pearl of the Indies."
Edwin F. Rigby, Chief of the Pur-
chasing Section of the Balboa Storehouse,
talked on "Impressions of Tahiti and
French Oceania," after his trip to Tahiti
in the 72-foot ketch Palmosa. Frank
Violette, Panama Contractor, talked to
the Society about fishing off Pifias Bay.
One of Dr. Zetek's few regrets about
the Natural History Society is that there
are so many more members who have
interesting things to say but do not
consider themselves lecturers and do not
talk to the Society.


First Thirty


Apartments


Of New Paraiso Housinif





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


February 6,


1953


Forty

In

A steam sh


ears


January


ovel started


excavation


the entrance basin and Dry Dock


at Balboa.


As excavation


was released from other Canal work, ad-


ditional shovels


were


to be put to work


No. 1


The third case


Canal
Canal
victim,


physicians


r sunstroke
during 85


an Italian laborer, recovered.


workers


reported by


years


CHEZ ELOISE, annual fashion show of
in Balboa High School household arts classes,


50 mannequins for a night modeling


creations


they had made in


sewing


show, named for


anuarv


c


students School lawn


featured


their
lasses.


The models
are, left to r
McGee, and
his accordion,
fashion show.


shown


here in the dress


Mitzi Siegel, Pat
h Willoe. Frankie


made a solo


es they
Steiner,


appearance


on the High


Scotland,
recently
Company


was brought to
organized Pana
and was placed


anama, built in
Panama by the
ma Steamship
in service be-


tween Panama and David and


ate points.
tons burthen


lights,
Canal


baths,
employ


'he new ship
and equipped
and other
ees received 1


counts on fares.


intermedi-


was of "1,000
d with electric
conveniences".
r0 percent dis-


between


houses-are


States.


were


one of


Really fine
or women

Fine
English
Woolens


exact
hard t


woolens


Commissaries


pected


soon.


and more
Almost e


ish boat that arrives has some wool


few concrete lamp posts


exhaustive


studies


arrive.


process starts from scratch-with


were erected


concerning


illumination of the locks had progressed to


of the yarn-when


Expected
worsteds of


soon,


an order is placed.
however, are tropical
litv in about seven shades


the point that the future lighting
was described in the Canal Record.


system


coffee


wrinkles


Explaining that the aim was to approach
sunlight distribution as closely as possible
in the exterior lights at the locks, the Record


stated:
lamp
obtain


"Advances
manufacture
nearly white


during


recent years
it possible


light by the


The Commissary Division


a small supply


product so Canal


a try. It
expected


use of the


come


newest


food line.


ordered
Crop*'


can give


and is


of grey,
subdued
yard 58
green, s


stripes, tli
inches wi
late blue,


overt


gabardine


cost about $7 for a


worsted


navy,


it of brown, for about the


wool
stripes
and c


tan and two
some price; \


d 56 inches
at about $


Ago


equipment


work occurred 40


years ago.


sions-were


Miss Eloise Monroe, instructor


at the


are ex-


very


arrival


redidct


the Commissary
times for specific


Division
orders


because


in the frozen


has o
Snow


of the


people


in 5c-ounce


colors


the end of January.


gabardine,


Botany clo
at $5.50


a yar


6.50


,,(





February 6, 1953


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Training Course Given
To Supervisory Groups
From Five Canal Units
Four groups of Canal employees soon
will complete training courses designed
to teach them to lead planned conferences,
a means of "group thinking" widely
adopted by industry in the United States
as one of the most effective means of
solving certain types of industrial and
business problems.
The courses in conference leadership
are conducted by the Training Section of
the Personnel Bureau under the direction
of C. A. Dubbs, Training Officer.
One of the conference leadership train-
ing groups included nine supervisors from
the Electrical Division. Another group
of nine is composed of police sergeants
and lieutenants. Seven trainees in an-
other group are supervisory employees of
Gatun Locks. The fourth training group
is made up of seven supervisory employ-
ees of the Division of Storehouses, the
Personnel Bureau, and Grounds Mainte-
nance and Electrical Divisions.
The training groups started their meet-
ings in October or November. The
two-hour meetings will continue weekly
up to about the middle of February.
The planned conference is only one of
the techniques that can be used to train
employees in industry and one which has
been proven very effective for solving
certain types of problems.
Training Techniques Differ
The so-called "informational method"
of instruction usually takes the form of
an address or lecture "pouring" many
facts into employees' minds. It is the
method generally used when a large group
of employees with little experience need
to be taught a great deal in a short time.
The "instructional method," another
training technique, is basically a "learn-
ing-by-doing" process in which a qualified
instructor provides either individual or
group instruction. This may be a
demonstration in which the participants
try out the principle that is being taught.
The "conference method," on the other
hand, deals with a specific problem which
is to be solved by the conferees. It
differs from the other types of training
in that conferees generally have a back-
ground of information and experience to
nnnl-.4knfnv 4-n yi-b cnhCtNrlnn^ cml-/' 4-mh Mj-r00


CONFERENCE


LEADERSHIP


ONE TRAINING GROUP is composed of these
supervisory employees of Atlantic Locks: Left to
right: Howard Harris, Richard Danielson, Earl Cas-


ANOTHER OF THE TRAINING GROUPS
includes these employees of the Personnel Bureau,
Electrical Division, Grounds Maintenance Division,
and Division of Storehouses. Seated, left to right:
James R. Doran, John Terry, H. D. Halverson, and


TRAINING


GROUPS


sell, George Poole, and Morris Weich. Other mem-
bers of this group who were absent when the picture
was taken are William Van Sielen and John Ward,


Joseph L. H. Demers. Standing: C. A. Dubbs,
Training Officer in charge of the classes, Boyd M.
Bevington and W. R. Lindsay. A. I. Bauman, an-
other member of this group, was absent when the
picture was taken.


r ---'* -a S -. -





THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


February 6,1953


PACIFIC

GARDEN


EVERGREEN


CLUB


LARGE


ENTHUSIASTIC GROUP
The Pacific Evergreen Garden Club,
which meets monthly in La Boca, is dedi-
cated to the beautification of individual
gardens and the planting, cultivation and
preservation of trees, shrubs and flowers
for the benefit of the entire community.
It is one of the newest organizations in
the La Boca community, having been
organized last September, but has a large
and enthusiastic membership that proves
it a healthy youngster.
The roster now lists 104 members of
the Club, compared with the membership
of 87 when the group was organized.
Enthusiasm for the Club's activities
was evidenced in November when a
crowd of several thousand turned out for
the first flower show held at Pacific
Clubhouse.
There is only one requisite for mem-
bership in the Club and that requirement
leaves plenty of room for the recruitment
of many more members, one of the aims
expressed by officers for the future of the
organization.
Members Completed Classes
Members must have completed one of
the classes in flower arrangement which
have been given during the past year by
Mrs. Charles P. ("Pat") Morgan. She
has held three classes in La Boca so far
and each had about 90 members.
Several present members of the Garden
Club have attended all of the classes
given in La Boca.
In the course of the flower arrangement
classes, Mrs. Morgan enlivened the inter-
est in plants and flowers and provided the
encouragement that resulted in the forma-
tion of the Pacific Evergreen Garden
Club. In view of the enthusiasm for
plants and flowers she encouraged or
developed in those in her classes, it is not
surprising that she was named an honor-
ary board member when the club was
organized.
Other honorary members of the Club
are Mrs. R. K. Morris, who assisted Mrs.
Morgan in the flower arrangement classes
in La Boca; and Mrs. Lemuel B. Shirley,
Honorary President, wife of Archdeacon
Shirley, Rector of St. Paul's Episcopal
Church in Panama and formerly of St.


MRS. CHARLES P. "PAT" MORGAN, whose
classes in flower arrangement resulted in the forma-
tion of the Pacific Evergreen Garden Club, is shown
here with officers of the organization. Mrs. Morgan
is an honorary board member. Lsft to right, front
row: Mrs. Frank S. Wason, President; Mrs. Cornelius
Lefevre, Treasurer, who works in the
hardware section of the Ancon Commis-
sary, and won first prize at the flower
show in the fruit and vegetable arrange-
ments; and Mrs. Isaac W. Ingleton of
La Boca, Chaplain, whose husband works
for the Oil Handling Plant.
Officers of the Club took all top honors
at the flower show with only two excep-
tions: Mrs. Steve Sinclair of Panama, who
won first prize for arrangements of dry


Retired Pilot Expands
Story of Canal Island

Additional light on one of the Canal
Zone's oldest legends has been brought
in a letter to THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW
from Capt. A. R. McDaniel, retired
pilot whose Canal service began in 1909.
The legend, referred to briefly in the
January 1952 issue of THE REVIEW, has
to do with a near-international inci-
dent brought about when a British
flag was planted on an island which
suddenly appeared in Gaillard Cut not
long after the Canal was opened.
From Southern Pines, North Caro-
lina, Captain McDaniel writes:
"Tommy Doran, a dipper tender,
from his elevated seat in the boom of


Lambert, First Vice President; and Mrs. James
Ferguson, Treasurer. Back row: Mrs. Allan Walker,
Second Vice President; Mrs. Eric A. Greene, Assist-
ant Secretary; Mrs. Herbert W. McKenzie, Recording
Secretary; Mrs. Isaac W. Ingleton, Chaplain; and
Mrs. Morgan.
and exotic plants, and Mrs. Leon
Headley, whose husband is an employee
of the Motor Transportation Division in
Gamboa, who won the first prize in
arrangements for special occasions.
Committees Show Club Functions
Special committees of the organization
illustrate some of the functions of the


Club.
Mrs. Ernest Robertson, whose husband
is manager of the Paraiso Clubhouse,
heads the committee in charge of the
exchange of plants among members of
the Club.
Mrs. Wilfred Fraser of Panama, whose
husband works at Fort Gulick, heads the
committee of the Club in charge of garden


tours. The first of
to become a series o
members' gardens wa
her of Mrs. Morgan's
Highway.
The second in the
garden tours was a
"open house" for Cl
home of Mrs. Waso


organization.
Miss Amy


what are expected
f monthly visits to
s a tour in Novem-
gardens on Gaillard

proposed series of
New Year's Day
ub members at the
n, President of the


Webley of


Panama,


works at the La Boca Clubhouse, heads





February 6, 1953


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


Canal Shipping Heads


Toward New


For


Fiscal


Principal commodities shipped through Canal
(All figures in long tons)
Figures in parentheses in 1938 and 1952 columns indicate


Records


Year


relative positions in those years
ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC


1953


Shipping through the Panama Canal,
which has been breaking records steadily
for some time now, is headed for another
new record this fiscal year if the present
volume continues.
A total of 336 more commercial vessels,
large and small, went through the Canal
during the second quarter of fiscal year
1953 than in the corresponding quarter of
fiscal year 1952. For the first two quarters
this fiscal year 3,597 large (300 tons or
over) commercial vessels have transited,
compared to 3,065 for the first two quarters
in fiscal year 1952.
Tolls are correspondingly high. For the
first two quarters of 1953 a total of $15,575,-
000 has been collected, as compared to
$12,902,000 for the same period in 1952.
Statistics just released by the Manage-
ment Division indicate a number of interest-
ming trends in Canal shipping.
Intercoastal Traffic Up
Although intercoastal shipping is still
considerably lower than in fiscal year 1938,
last normal pre-World War II year, it is
again on the increase.
During the quarter just concluded, there
were 65 more large commercial transits in
the intercoastal trade than during the
corresponding period in fiscal year 1952.
Other main trade routes which also show
a marked increase are those between the
United States East Coast and South Amer-
ica, the United States East Coast and the
Far East, and the route between Europe
and the United States and Canadian
West Coast.
Some decline in traffic appears this past
quarter, as compared to fiscal year 1952,
in the following routes: United States East
Coast to Central America, United States
East Coast to Australasia, and between
Europe and Australasia.
The United States continues to hold the
No. 1 spot as the nation whose flag transits
the Canal most frequently. Great Britain
and Norway follow, in that order, as they
did in the corresponding period last year
and in the first quarter this year.
Panamanian-registered ships moved into
the No. 4 spot, with Honduran vessels,
which had been fourth, moving back to
No. 5.
German Shipping Increases


Commodity


Mineral oils....
Coal and Coke -
Manufacturers of
Sugar ........
Phosphates ..
Paper and paper
Machinery..
Sulphur_......
Automobiles ..---
Raw cotton ..
Tinplate----....--
Cement ...


iron and steel


products


Canned food products .
Ammonium compounds -
Ores, various--- --------
All others --------.-. ---


Total .......


Second Quarter-Fiscal Year


1,155
679
405
177
100
88
81
72
64
63
59
46
34
13
9
1.278


1952
909,773 (1)
410,689 (2)
381,639 (3)
124,311 (4)
187,657 (4)
107,185 (5)
70,287 (8)
68,856 (7)
97,693 (6)
98,985 (10)
67,395 (12)
57,850 (9)
26,810 (21)
30,964 (18)
7,109 (28)
952,169
3,599,372


2,286,400


PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC

Second Quarter, Fiscal Year
Commodity
1953 1952 1938
Ores, various_ -----883,220 936,585 (1) 524,191 (3)
Lumber -------864,238 829,215 (2) 671,973 (2)
Wheat ---792,428 413,053 (3) 217,658 (7)
Canned food products__ -- 340,142 285,351 (5) 303,166 (6)
Nitrate- ......--- ------- 330,603 370,334 (4) 306,890 (5)
Bananas -----------220,649 182,532 (7) 4,911 (29)
Metals, various -- --- 195,835 204,389 (8) 179,591 (8)
Sugar ---------179,513 158,607 (6) 302,617 (4)
Refrigerated food products (ex-
cept fresh fruit) -----126,844 95,533 (9) 64,079(10)
Mineral oils -- ------------ 86,715 166,515 (10) 665,884 (1)
Copra ......----- 63,065 66,016 (13) 33,454 (18)
Coffee--.... --- 55,107 44,176 (14) 33,884 (16)
Dried fruit ---------------- 49,481 38,963 (17) 120,664 (12)
Raw cotton- ------48,714 38,368 (16) 32,369 (20)
Scrap metal------- .--- 32,769 7,517 (33) 1,928 (*)
All others.---. -- -------- 583,290 779,083 920,582
Total- -------------4,852,613 4,616,237 4,383,841

MONTHLY COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC AND TOLLS
Vessels of 300 tons net or over
By fiscal years


'- i n-_


STATISTICS ON CANAL TRAFFIC
For the purpose of comparison between pre-war and post-war traffic through the Panama Canal, statistics for
the fiscal year 1938 are used in this section, as being more nearly normal for peace time than those for 1939.





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 6, 1953


FEBRUARY


7th-Track Foreman No.
B & B Shops.
8th-Sheetmetal Workers,
house, 9:30 a. m.
Plumbers No. 606, Balboa
9:30 a. m.
9th-Machinists No. 699,
Margarita, 7:30 p. nm.
American Legion Post 1,


2741, Balboa
Balboa Club-
a Lodge Hall,


K.of


C. Hall.,


Legion Home,


7:30 p. m.
10th-Pipefitters, Margarita C
7:30 p. m.
Electrical Workers No. 39
Memorial, 7:30 p. m.
VFW Post 100, Old Boy Scout
Cristobal, 7:30 p. m.
American Legion Post 7, Fort
7:30 p. m.
Legion Auxiliary Unit 1,
Legion Home, 7:30 p. m.
llth-Carpenters and Joiners
Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m.
Pacific Civic Council, Boar
Administration Building, 7:30


lubhouse


Building,
Clayton,

Balboa
, Balboa

d Room,
p. m.


American Legion Post 2, Legion
Home, Old Cristobal.
13th-Blacksmiths No. 400, Boilermak-
ers Nos. 463 and 471, K. of C. Hall,
Margarita, 7:30 p. m.
15th-CLU-MTC, Balboa Lodge Hall,
8:30 a. m.
16th-Electrical Workers No. 677, Gatun
Masonic Temple, 7:30 p. m.
Truckdrivers, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7:30
p. m.


17th-Operating E
K. of C. Hall, M<
Machinists No. 81
7:30 p. m.
18th-Teachers No.
Balboa High Sch
AFGE No. 14, Ba


engineers No. 595,
margarita, 7 p. m.
1, Balboa Lodge Hall,
227, General Library,
ool, 7 p. m.
lboa Clubhouse, 7:30


p. Im.
American Legion Auxiliary Unit 3,
Gatun Legion Home, 7:30 p. m.
19th-American Legion Auxiliary Unit
6, Gamboa Legion Hall, 7:30 p. m.
22d-Machinists No. 699, K. of C. Hall,
Margarita, 7:30 p. m.
23d-VFW Auxiliary, Post 3822 Home,
7:30 p. m.
24th-Operating Engineers No. 595,
Balboa Lodge Hall, 7 p. m.
American Legion Post 7, Fort Clay-
ton, 7:30 p. m.
25th-Governor Employee Conference,
Board Room, Administration Building,
2p.m.
VFW Post 100, Old Boy Scout Building,
Cristobal, 7:30 p. m.


American
Legion
p. m.


Legion Auxiliary Unit 2,
Home, Old Cristobal, 7:30


MARCH
1st-VFW Post 3857, Cristobal Veterans
Club, 9 a. m.


2d-Postal Employees No. 23160, Bal-
boa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m.


Pedro Miguel Civic Council,
Church, 7 p. m.
Cristobal-Margarita Civic Cot
Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m.
VFW Post 727, Fort Clayton, 7:30
VFWPost 3822, Curundu Road, 7:3(
American Legion Post 3, Gatun L
Hall, 7:30 p. nm.
3d-Meatcutters and Butchers
121, Officers' Home, 7:30 p. m.
Teachers, No. 228, Auditorium, C
bal High School, 3:30 p. m.
Gamboa Civic Council, Comm
Center, 7:30 p. m.
Gatun Civic Council, Gatun
house, 7:30 p. m.
Machinists No. 811, Balboa Lodge
7:30 p. m.
4th-VFW Post 40, Wirz Men
7:30 p. m.


Union
uncil,

p. m.
0 p.m.
region


risto-
unity

Club-
Hall,

orial,


Isthmian Nurses Association, Build-
ing 283, Gorgas Hospital, 8 p. m.
5th-Carpenters and Joiners No. 667,
Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m.
Marine Engineers, Jewish Welfare
Board, 7 p. m.


6th-American Legion Post 6,
Legion Home, 7:30 p. m.


PROMOTIONS


Gamboa


AND


TRANSFERS


December 15 through January 15
The following list contains the names of
those U. S.-rate employees who were trans-
ferred from one division to another (unless
the change is Administrative) or from one
type of work to another. It does not con-
tain within-grade promotions or regradings.
CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
Alan C. Gillespie from Guard, Pacific
Locks, to Postal Clerk, Postal Service.
Mrs. Evelyn M. Taylor from Substitute
Teacher to Kindergarten Assistant, Schools
Division.
Mrs. Beatrice M. Rhyne from Clerk-
Typist, License Section, to Clerk-Stenog-
rapher, Office of the Civil Affairs Director.
Lyon J. Hoard from File Clerk, Record
Section, Administrative Branch, to Postal
Clerk, Postal Service.
Robert L. Jordan # 2 from Heavy Truck
Driver, Motor Transportation Division, to
Fireman, Fire Division.
COMMUNITY SERVICES BUREAU
Mrs. Ellen E. Bailey from Property and
Supply Clerk, Record Section, Administra-


. . -I


n.


tive Branch,
Division.


to Clerk-Typist,


Housing


OFFICE OF COMPTROLLER


Chiquita


C. Cassibry,


Clerk-


Typist, from Terminals Division to Typist,
Office of the Comptroller.
John N. Walker, III from Postal Clerk,
Postal Service, to Cash Accounting Clerk
Accounting Division.
Mrs. Frances A. Hunter from Clerk-
Typist, Contract and Inspection Division,
to Clerk-Stenographer, Plant Inventory and
Appraisal Branch.
Charles L. Nix from Contract Assistant,
Contract and Inspection Division, to Valu-
ation Engineer Plant Inventory and Ap-
praisal Branch.
Mrs. Margaret M. Janssen from
Clerk-Typist, Accounting Division, to Clerk
Stenographer, Management Division.
ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION
BUREAU
Samuel B. Mauldin from Powerhouse
Operator-Dispatcher to Power Dispatcher,
Electrical Division.
Augustus R. Kam from Civil Engineer-
ing Aid, Engineering Division, to Contract
Assistant, Contract and Inspection Division.
Chester R. Boltz from Wireman to
Distribution Foreman, Electrical Division.
William A. Muller from Apprentice
Wireman to Wireman, Electrical Division.
Miss Maria I. Uribe from Typist,
Engineering Division, to Clerk-Typist,
Contract and Inspection Division.

HEALTH BUREAU
Miss Annie L. Allnutt, Dental Hygien-
ist, from Gorgas Hospital, to Pacific Dental
Clinics.
MARINE BUREAU
Victor L. Sanger from Junior Fcrenan,
Ferry Service, to Tractor-Bulldozer Oper-
ator, Dl)redging Division.
John F. Martin, Guard, from Atlantic
to Pacific Locks.
Maurice F. Dunn from Towboat Master
to Senior Towboat Master, Navigation
Division.
Frank D. Harris from Master (Taboga)
to Maintenance Superintendent (Chief,
Aids to Navigation Section).
Charles F. Brown and Heyward A.
Shingler, Lock Operator (Wireman), from
Atlantic to Pacific Locks.
Abe L. Lincoln from Rigger to Lock
Overhaul Foreman, Locks Division.
Carl R. Meissner from Life Guard,
Physical Education and Recreation Branch,
Schools Division, to Checker, Locks Divi-
sion.
RAILROAD AND TERMINALS BUREAU
Mrs. Zulu Lee Smith, Clerk-Typist,
from Electrical Division to Terminals Divi-
sion.
Mrs. Louise K. Allen, from Accounting
Clerk, Printing Plant, to Clerk-Typist,
Terminals Division.
Charles E. Chase from Heavy Truck
Driver, Motor Transportation Division, to


THIS MONTH'S CALENDAR


,s *






February 6, 1953


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


ANNIVERSARIES

Employees who observed important anni-
versaries during the month of January are
listed alphabetically below. The number
of years includes all Government service
with the Canal or other agencies. Those
with continuous service with the Canal are
indicated with (*).
41 YEARS
Gregor Gramlich, Dipper Dredge Mas-
ter, Dredging Division.
35 YEARS
Capt. Lucien A. Skeels, Panama Canal
Pilot, Navigation Division.
25 YEARS
Ruth E. Creasy, Elementary School
Principal, Diablo Heights, Schools Division.
Lela M. Holden, Elementary Teacher,
Balboa, Schools Division.
John A. Knox, Lock Operator-Machin-
ist, Locks Division.
20 YEARS
George T. Darnall, Jr., Hydrographic
Engineer, Dredging Division.
Wilmer L. Downing, Payroll Clerk,
Finance Bureau.
Richard W. Fuller, Voucher Examiner,
Finance Bureau.
Capt. William C. Hearon, Panama
Canal Pilot, Navigation Division.
Carl W. Hoffmeyer, Postal Clerk,
Postal, Customs, and Immigration Divi-
sion.
Noble A. Phillips, Sheetmetal Worker,
Industrial Bureau.
Christian S. Skeie, Sanitation Inspec-
tor, Health Bureau.
Frank D. Spencer, Hydrographic En-
gineer, Dredging Division.
15 YEARS
Edward M. Altman, Magistrate, Bal-
boa Magistrate's Court.
Clarence L. Dimmick, Service Mechan-
ic and Refrigeration and Air Conditioning
Mechanic, Commissary Division.
Russell E. Hileman, Housing Manager,
Pedro Miguel, Housing Division.
Douglas Jordan, Bricklayer and Boiler-
maker, Industrial Bureau.
Ernest P. Muzzio, Construction In-
spector (Plumbing), Contracts and Inspec-
tion Division.


Employees who retired at the end of
January, their birthplaces, titles, length of
service at retirement, and their future
addresses are:
Melville L. Booz, Pennsylvania; Cash
Accounting Clerk, Office of the Comptroller;
26 years, 5 months, 12 days; address
uncertain.
John T. O'Donnell, Pennsylvania;
Civ;! n.norinrlncr AiM M;antsn~anr- fl ;t;-


CANAL TRANSITS-COMMERCIAL AND U. S. GOVERNMENT

Second Quarter-Fiscal Year
*^<<^^<+yAlllllllllllllllllllllllll..~llllQ u ^^^T*T arIllllllllllllllllllll^l^Tte rllllllllllc alllllllIIII^ \v~~^ V^


Commercial vessels:
Ocean-going . ... .... ... ..

*Sm all . ...... ...

Total commercial ...... ...
**U. S. Government vessels:
Ocean-going _
*Sm all . . . . . ..

Total commercial and U. S. Government_


1953


Atlantic
to
Pacific

956

134

1,090

174

43

1,307


Pacific
to
Atlantic

964

136
1,100

84

52

1,236


1952


Total


1,920
270
2,190


258

95*

2,543


Total


1,596
258

1,854


152

84

2,090


1938

Total


1,335
236

1,571
:.:+:+:+:+1 :+4 :::1111I.I I .I IIl ... i*: .. | u|||_


*Vessels under 300 net tons or 500 displacement tons.
**Vessels on which tolls are credited. Prior to July 1, 1951, Government-operated
ships transited free.

Canal commercial traffic by nationality of vessels


Nationality


Argentine
Brazilian . .
British . ..
Chilean .. .
Chinese.....
Colombian ..
Costa Rican ..
Danish ...
Ecuadorean ..
Finnish. ..
French ...
German .....
Greek-..
Honduran
Hungarian ...
Iceland .. .
Irish.. .- .
Italian ..... ..
Japanese ..
Liberian
Mexican .
Moroccan ------
Netherlands .
Nicaraguan ..
Norwegian ...
Panamanian ..
Peruvian --
Philippine . ..
Portuguese ...
Soviet t... .
Spanish ..
Swedish.
Swiss ......
United States .
Venezuelan ...
Yugoslavian ..
T'A**.**


Second Quarter-Fiscal Year


Num-
ber of
transit

2


34
1


1 1
3
8
3


11
49
3
584
16

4.


Tons of
cargo


4,270


153,249
55,900
238,848
141.777


8
178
496
198
15
10
144


53,471
170,340
25,687
3,422,199
20.074


fl 01< oCA


Num-
ber of
transits


2


Tons of
cargo


434
3,070
89,716
154,169
67.049


861,976
491,110
1,986
40,216
11,656


25
168
12
3,400
10


4 mr~fi 0 n ', r fra


Num-
ber of
transits


O


2


464

4
" '4"


Tons of
cargo


447,720
6.127


163,965
384,808
82,437
869
13.235


05,t439

95,486
94,155
1.148


4,990

180.032


I t r/ ^ f\ \ a


RETIREMENTS IN

JANUARY


S





THE PANAMA


CANAL REVIEW


February 6, 1953


Donor


Worries


To


As


His


"Seeing


Boxer


Eye"


School


Goes


new trainers.
Dog's Progress Reported
Then came a series of letters about
Gee's progress at the school.
"He is a handsome Boxer and appears
to have an ideal temperament," came the
first report from Seeing Eye on March
26, 1952. "Of course we can tell much
better about this after he is in training,
which will begin about 3 weeks from now.
In the meantime, he will have a romping
gay time with his canine companions and
get acclimated to his new home."
Later letters assured Mr. Reilly that
Gee was in perfect health, was a "healthy
happy fellow," and "showed promise of
becoming a very successful dog guide."
Training Started Early


THESE POTENTIAL SEEING EYE DOGS are
the pups, Duke, about to make contact with the
bones offered by his master, Charles E. Reilly, and
Crony, shown with her back to the camera. On the


No final grade from a c:
tion ever was awaited w
and apprehension than the
E. Reilly received while
donated to the blind was
"Seeing Eye School."


rucial examma-
ith more hope
reports Charles
the Boxer he
going through


By the time that dog, "Gee," had
made the grade and was graduated with
a new blind owner, Mr. Reilly, Chief
Accountant for the Commissary Division,
was training and worrying about the


potentialities of
candidates.
The present po
are 20-week-old


more


tential Seeinmg
"Crony" (


tentative
Eye dogs
'Gigolo's


Crona"), sister of "Gee" ("Gigolo's
Rubicon" AKC W-256367), and 18-
week-old "Duke" ("Lustig Duke"), half
brother of the successful candidate.
Mr. Reilly has already told The Seeing
*--> O. , ** It *1


right is the Reillys' pet Boxer, Pippin, who sired these
pups and the Boxer, Gee, donated to The Seeing Eye
and recently graduated from guide dog training with
a new, blind owner.

through our separation."
Only German Shepherds are taken at
some of the training centers and are
in the majority at The Seeing Eye, where
some Boxers and Labrador Retrievers
are also used.
The requirements of the training cen-
ters only heighten the little anxieties
inherent in the ownership of fine dogs-
which resemble more than anything else
the pangs of parenthood.
In the case of his personal pet Boxer
"Gigolo" ("Pippin"), who sired the
other pups, Mr. Reilly worried and wrote
to kennel clubs about the dog's "ignoble
timidity." Boxers are supposed to be
fearless, but Gigolo just went away when
threatened by other dogs-even those
that were only about a fourth as big as he.
Gigolo disposed of that worry when he


There were more reports from Morris-
town that Gee was doing well and was
such a mature dog for his age that he was
put in training a little ahead of the usual
schedule of starting training at about 14
weeks and also so he would have no time
to brood or get upset.
Then came the bad and upsetting news
that Gee was not in condition to meet his
sightless, future owner. He had devel-
oped bad hookworms, "which may pos-
sibly be a common problem among dogs
in the Canal Zone," Seeing Eye explained.
So Mr. Reilly wrote Seeing Eye more
of Gee's veterinary history and suggested
using hexylresorcinol pills after the dog
had been without food for 24 hours-if
they had not already been tried. That
was in July and at the end of August both
Mr. Reilly and Seeing Eye were hoping
that Gee would make the grade.
Finally on December 2 came the long-
awaited word that Gee was graduated
and had left the school with his new
sightless master.
"To observe Gee and his young master
working together," Seeing Eye wrote
Mr. Reilly, "one would think they had
been together for years. The young man
wanted a Boxer and I could not possibly
express in written words his joy and feel-
ing of great pride in having handsome


Gee for his dog guide.
"I feel confident everything will go
smoothly for them and that they will
have many years of happiness and har-
mony in their life together."
Outcome Worth The Worry
Apparently that news was worth all
the worry since Mr. Reilly has offered to
go through the same thing with more of
hiq fin* dnoR


wC
^^-2

0 -
ta c
--'-'^^^^--'------

W44)--

-en
-



O .
I



Q. -




Full Text

PAGE 1

Gift of the Panama Canal Museum 9l-/'/*7-Cc.2> Vol. 3, No. 7 BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE, FEBRUARY 6, 1953 5 cents CARDENAS, GATUN, TO BE COMPLETED IN FISCAL 1954 IF CONGRESS APPROVES CANAL HOUSING ESTIMATES South Corozal May Be Deferred Until Later In Building Program Completion of the townsite developments at Gatun and Cardenas, in the long-range building program is planned for fiscal year 1954 if budget estimates as submitted by the Panama Canal Company for the 1953-56 housing construction program are approved by Congress. In addition to those quarters started during fiscal year 1953, the 1954 program, as listed in the President's annual budget message, will provide for the construction of 65 U. S.-Rate family units in the Balboa "Flats" area; 67 U. S.-Rate family units on sites now occupied by twelve-family buildings at Diablo Heights scheduled for demolition this year; 15 U. S.-Rate family units to complete the U. S.-Rate program at Gatun; LocalRate community facilities, including school building, commissary, and community center; and a planned increase in the number of houses at Cardenas, and approximately 50 U. S.-Rate family units elsewhere on the. Pacific side. The latter project called for construction at Diablo Terrace at the south end of the new Corozal townsite. Due to unavoidable legislative delays at the Washington level in clearing agreements with the Army in this connection, the 50 units may be built in the Ancon-Balboa Balboa Heights area in fiscal year 1954 with the Diablo Terrace construction postponed until later in the overall program $8,500,000 In 1954 The budgeted cost of the quarters construction program for fiscal year 1954 will be approximately $8,500,000, of which $6,000,000 will be spent by the Panama Canal Company and the remainder will be provided in the Canal Zone Government expenditures for townsite development. Hearings on the 1954 budgets for the Company and Government were held by the House Appropriations Committee late last month and were attended by Governor Seybold and several members of his staff. Senate hearings on the Canal's appropriations for the 1954 fiscal year have not yet been scheduled. The Congressional hearings on_ the budget estimates for the (See page 6) PORT-AU-PRIXCE has stretched about 200 acres farther into the Bay of Gonave since Panama Line ships stopped there last as a result of the reclamation from swamp land of the Cite de l'Exposition, in the forefront in this air view of the city. The fine new section, which is circled by Harry S. Truman Boulevard, houses government buildings and legations as well as restaurants, folklore theater, casino, and other tourist attractions. Additional pictures of Haiti and a story of the "Magic Island" will be found on page 6. Reactivation Of Civil Defense Moves Ahead With Naming Of Advisory Group Reactivation of a civil defense organization, which began in December with the appointment of Fire Lieutenant William G. Dolan as Civil Defense Chief, moved a step further late in January with the formation of an Advisory Civil Defense Committee, and selection of leaders in warden service. Requests were sent from the office of Governor John S. Seybold that each of the following appoint one person to serve on the Advisory Committee: Each Bureau of the Canal organization; the LawDivision; General Committee of Civic Councils; Central Labor Union; Local 900 of the Government and Civic Employees Organizing Committee— CIO; and the Canal Zone Chapter of the American Red Cross. A local rate community representative will also serve on the Committee. Lieutenant Dolan left January 30 for Washington to attend the Staff College and Warden and Rescue Training Courses of the Federal Civil Defense Administration. He will also discuss with Federal Civil Defense officials the projected Canal Zone program. He will return about March 10 in time to begin the training of wardens. The local program, as now planned, will call for some 4,000 volunteers, 15 percent of the population will man the Civil Defense service teams but everyone will have to participate in one way or another if the program is to be effective. The Advisory Committee will decide what problems would have to be faced in case of a local disaster, "either man or nature-made." Lieutenant Dolan explained, and how these problems would be met. The Committee will also appoint technical staff chiefs who will be responsible for such matters as health, firefighting, utilities, rescue, welfare, etc. Working closely with the Advisory Committee will be a Chief Warden, selected by the Civic Councils, and two District Wardens, who will be known as District Commanders. One will handle the northern and the other the southern end of the Canal Zone. They will also be selected by the Civic Councils. Each will probably be a man, but (See page 15)

PAGE 2

THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW February 6, 1953 P Lindsley H. Noble Comptroller KM Ira L. Wright Assistant to Comptroller Marc P. Quinn Management Staff Philip L. Steers, Jr. Accounting Systems Staff John D. Hollen Plant Appraisal Staff George E. Girard Internal Audit Staff Arthur J. O'Leary Accounting Division Floyd Baldwin Fiscal Division John F. Lewis Rates Analysis Joseph V. Turner Treasury Branch LeRoy B. Magnuson Budgetary Procedures Thatcher A. Clisbee Capital Program Lit Julius 0. Barnes Payroll Branch Russel J. Jones Cost Accounts Branch Miguel Corco General Accounts Branch James R. Johnston Agents Accounts Branch John L. Stephenson Tabulating Machines Branch James L. Fulton Claims Branch Comptroller's Office And Finance Bureau Become Single Unit The consolidation of the Finance Bureau and the Office of the Comptroller into a single entity, known by the latter title, was effective in mid-January. The change was an administrative one and the majority of the 272 men and women in the organization continued in the same jobs where they had been working prior to the merger. There were no force reductions. The Office of the Comptroller now consists of four staff groups and two operating divisions. It is headed by Lindsley H. Noble, Comptroller, with Ira L. Wright as Assistant to the Comptroller. Mr. Wright is in charge of budget and administrative matters for the office, and also serves as a technical adviser. John F. Lewis, formerly Chief of the Accounting Division, moves to a staff position as a rates expert. The four staff groups are: Management, Marc P. Quinn, Chief: Over-all managements functions, plus budget and rate analysis, and statistics. Accounting Systems, Philip L. Steers, Jr., Chief: Development of financial policies and systems of accounting and internal control. Plant Inventory and Appraisal, John D. Hollen, Chief: Appraisal of Government-Company fixed assets and establishment of the amounts of related reserves. Internal Audit, George E. Girard, Acting Chief: Comprehensive audit of the accounts, financial statements, and business records of the Government-Company. In addition to the staff groups there are also two operating divisions: Accounting, headed by Arthur J. O'Leary, Acting Chief, and Fiscal, with Floyd H. Baldwin as Chief. The Accounting Division's main work is to maintain the Company's general corporate accounts and appropriations and fund accounts of the Government, together with cost accounts of divisions not maintaining their own accounts. This division is divided into four branches. General Accounts, headed by Miguel Corco as Chief; Cost Accounts, with Russel J. Jones as Chief; Agents Accounts, James R. Johnston, Chief; Tabulating Machine, John L. Stephenson, Chief. The Fiscal Division is responsible for the collection, custody, and disbursement of funds on the Isthmus and with the U. S. Treasury; prepares all payrolls, other than that of the New York Office, audits and settles claims, reviews contracts and maintains records showing leave credits, retirement, income tax, and other deductions. Its three branches are: Treasury, headed by Joseph C. Turner as Treasurer; Payroll, Julius 0. Barnes, Chief; Claims, James L. Fulton, Chief. Two specialists in the Management Staff, beside Mr. Lewis, are LeRoy B. Magnuson, Budgetary Procedures, and Thatcher A. Clisbee, Capital Program,

PAGE 3

February 6, 1953 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW Acting Governor Conducts January Employee Conference Subjects ranging from commissary problems to the disturbance to night workers of the noon-day siren were covered January 28 at the monthly GovernorEmployee Conference at Balboa Heights. The conference was conducted by Col. Harry 0. Paxson, Acting Governor, in the absence of Gov. J. S. Seybold who was in Washington to attend House Committee hearings on the budget. Colonel Paxson opened the conference with a report on a number of matters raised at previous conferences. These included presentation of "I. C." cards when entering the commissary instead of at each counternot feasible because of limited authority cards, multiple entrances, and added expense; the possibility of firemen, who are trained in first aid, riding on ambulances, which is under consideration; surcharges on school books, to be remedied for official purchases by consolidating orders; parking space at the Balboa Field Office of the Electrical Division, which will be provided. Also acted upon favorably were the conservation of trees on Empire Street; a change in plumbing regulations, to eliminate assistant plumbers; and the promise of covered runways at local schools. He announced that the administration is studying the possibility of issuing a new-type identification card, one which will be useful in cases when an employee is travelling and needs positive identification to cash checks. In connection with the "I. C. Cards," Edward A. Doolan, Personnel Director, told the conferees that the Canal was unable to get as good quality of cardboards as had been used previously and that the present cards may fray. The cards, he said, will be replaced by the Personnel Bureau on request if employees will turn in their worn cards. All remaining unlabeled canned goods in the Commissaries, except for three items for which there is no adequate replacement at the moment, are being removed from retail sales. The small amount of this merchandise remaining, which has been the subject of a number of employee complaints, will be used to fill wholesale orders, Colonel Paxson said. Commissary bread also came in for discussion, with the Acting Governor reporting that bread-slicing machinery has been ordered. The Commissary Division will be asked to survey customers' desires on the matter of fluffier bread. Dairy Under Study Some discussion followed on milk supply, with Colonel Paxson reporting that milk is presently subsidized at about 6 cents a quart. The entire operation of Mindi Dairy is one of several special items on which L. B. Moore, Supply and Service Director, is presently making a special study. Plans have been made to increase the Mindi pasture area, Colonel Paxson said. Chester Luhr of the Central Labor Union asked for a percentage breakdown on Commissary mark-up, i. e., what part of a dollar goes to retirement, local-rate disability relief, etc., similar to the breakSimplified Layoff Procedures Become Effective February 15 Reduction in force categories of the Government Company the categories determining the order in which personnel are laid off and establishing "bumping" rights -will be reduced from the present 23 to 6, effective February 15. Identical simplified layoff procedures become effective the same date for all government agencies, as prescribed by the Civil Service Commission. The changes, as they relate to present reduction in force methods in the Government-Company, affect generally only the approximately 1,000 employees occupying competitive Civil Service positions in the organization. The six new categories are: Career veterans, Career nonveterans, Careerconditional veterans, Career-conditional nonveterans, Indefinite veterans, and Indefinite nonveterans. Veterans And Nonveterans Veterans have superior retention rights in each of the three main groups: Career, Career-conditional, and Indefinite. Career employees are described as those permanent employees who have permanent jobs and who have completed the probationary periods in their jobs. They are not "temporary" or "indefinite" as the result of promotion, transfer, or reinstatement. Career-conditional employees are those permanent employees serving probationary periods or those who are "temporary" or "indefinite" because of promotion, transfer or reinstatement. Indefinite employees are those whom the Civil Service describes as serving under "nonstatus, nontemporary appointments." In other words, they are persons who, since September 1, 1950, have been occupying positions in the competitive service and who have been reemployed, promoted, reassigned, or transferred. Ascending Credits Reduction of force will be made in the ascending number of retention credits, first for the nonveterans and then for the veterans, through the Indefinite, Career-conditional, and Career groups, in that order. No person in a higher group, or subgroup, will be given reduction in force until all persons in lower groups and subgroups have been reduced, unless special circumstances permissible under the regulations of the Civil Service Commission permit the passing over of persons lower on the retention registers. NEW RETENTION GROUPS FOR REDUCTION-IN-FORCE PURPOSES Group I CAREER EMPLOYEES SUBGROUP a: Employees with veteran preference subgroup b: Employees without veteran preference Includes permanent CAREER employees in the competitive service who have completed a probationary period and who are not "temporary" or "indefinite" as the result of promotion, transfer, or reinstatement. Career employees serving under conditional promotions shall be considered in this group with respect to positions at and below the grade in which they last served on a permanent basis. This group also includes employees appointed to positions outside the competitive service with no conditions or restrictions. Group II CAREER-CONDITIONAL EMPLOYEES subgroup a: Employees with veteran preference subgroup b: Employees without veteran preference Includes career employees in the competitive service who are conditional because they are serving probational periods or are "temporary" or "indefinite" as a result of promotion, transfer, or reinstatement, or are subject to a similar limitation. In positions excepted from the competitive service, it includes employees who are conditional solely as the result of promotion or reinstatement. Group III INDEFINITE EMPLOYEES subgroup a: Emp'oyees with veteran preference subgroup b: Employees without veteran preference Includes persons serving under nonstatus nontemporary appointments in positions in the competitive service. It also includes employees in positions excepted from the competitive service serving under any condition or limitation other than a conditional promotion or reinstatement or a specific time limitation of one year or less. down given last year on coffee prices. Colonel Paxson promised some report at a later conference. In connection with high-test gasoline, Colonel Paxson reported that pumps have been ordered and tanks are being refitted to dispense the new product. Some difficulty is being experienced at this time in obtaining the desired high-octane-rating gasoline. Gasoline of higher octane rating than that now used, but lower than that desired, can be had, he said, and asked the conferees whether to defer the change or go ahead. The additional price on this gasoline would not be as high as for higher octane rating, but would still be above that for the present 76-octane rating. It was agreed that the medium rating premium gasoline should be procured if possible. In connection with gasoline, Charles Hammond of the Civic Councils, asked for a modern pump at Pedro Miguelone that will register in dollars and cents. Colonel Paxson spoke briefly on the high cost locally of fire protection. This led to some discussion of the cost of fire, police, and school operations in the Zone. The cost of fire protection was compared to that of a large number of Statesside cities of comparable size. Administrative Costs Jack Rice, of the Cristobal-Margarita Civic Council, said that if local costs were to be compared to those in the United States he would like to see administrative costs also compared. Colonel Paxson said that there was no true comparison for administrative costs but that there was for fire and police protection and for schools and that this (See pagi 15)

PAGE 4

THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW February 6, 1953 Sea Shells From The Seashore Are Hobby Of Zone Policeman THAT'S A Malea (dolium) Ringens which Police Officer Stewart H. Jadis is holding in his hand. It is the largest of its type ever found in the Panama Canal Zone Police Officer Stewart H. Jadis picks up sea shells by the seashore like a lot of other people but he brings his shells back alive, then extracts the little shell dwellers. Because of his special hunting tactics and "spit and polish" methods, his shells have a showy color and shine unknown to ordinary shell collections. He has about 3,000 shells of about 500 varieties, many of which are slated for exhibit at the Civil Affairs Building in Ancon. They range from little earring-shaped shells set with coral beads of color that look like art items that might have been produced by a skilled ceramist or jeweler, up to the big pink and ivory conchs in which you hear the roar of the sea. The largest of his collection of conchs is about a foot in diameter. Some Are Spectacular In between these extremes of size are several specimens of the fluted Rose Murix, lined with rose and banded in black and used by natives for salad; the bleeding tooth, marked by three red "tooth prints," and many others, more or less showy. Policeman Jadis gathers only living mollusks and collects them only at certain times. Those in his Pacific Ocean collection come from the beach flats deserted by the water when the low tide drops to a minus stage during the dry season months. Atlantic side shells can be gathered almost any time because of slight variations in tide. Some of the mollusks that once wore the shells that now are in his collection wander only at night and that is when he found them, usually clinging to porous rocks. He pries them out from their hiding places, illuminated by his Coleman lantern, steering clear of other night beach prowlers like octupi, eels, starfish, sea urchins, and baby sharks, also high but not quite dry on the flats. He usually doesn't know just what he has picked up until the shells are cleaned but he does know by the feel or sight, if the mollusks are alive. Classified At Cornell Cornell University now has about 1,000 area of the Pacific Ocean. Mr. Jadis is standing beside a display case in which are exhibited a small part of his collection of about 3,000 shells. of his shells for scientific classification. One of each variety that he sends to conchologists there is returned to him with their identification. The other one, if there are two, or two, if there are four, are retained for the University collection. He also has his own source material for tentative identification of unknown finds. He does not ordinarily collect shells of less than an inch in size which are numerous in many collections. Shells lose their color when exposed to light so his make few public appearances. Those that are frequently picked up on the beach by desultory collectors have been bleached by the weather after being deserted by their former live inhabitants. The cleaning process begins by boiling the shells for 20 minutes. The organisms die within 24 hours outside their natural environment or instantly in fresh water. When the shells are boiled the policeman picks out the insides with a set of dental instruments. Or, some shells are preserved with the organisms inside by "pickling" in formaldehyde. Boiled And Brushed After they are boiled, the shells are wire-brushed to remove any remaining scales deposited on them in the sea. Then they are dipped in a hydrochloric acid solution to bring out their color and gloss, then dunked in ice water to remove the acid. Policeman Jadis picked up the habit of picking up sea shells from Walter Clark, a shell collector who formerly managed the Balboa Clubhouse, which is one of the policeman's regular duty stations. After four years of collecting sea shells, the policeman pronounces it a satisfying hobby. Shells are beautiful to look at and nearly endless in colors, shapes, and varieties, he explains. Even the largest museums cannot hope to acquire anything like a complete collection. Shells are as nearly indestructible as any of the items ordinarily gathered by hobbyists. They are readily salable, through industrial channels, or to a very large world-wide group of collectors. The fields of study shells open up are nearly endless if one wishes to pursue them, in the realms of natural history, geography, Ten Years Ago In January The Canal Zone Experiment Gardens bought 182 pounds of dried crude rubber taken from wild trees in the Canal Zone, the first results of a Supply Department plea to aid the war effort by gathering local wild crude rubber. The first rubber came from James A. Dorsey, then Panama Railroad track foreman at Frijoles, who arranged for the collection with residents in that vicinity. The crude rubber was turned over to the local representative of the Rubber Reserve Corporation for shipment to the United States. Canal employees were subscribing 9.9 percent of their income — almost the 10 percent goal of the Treasury Department — to the purchase of war bo7ids, according to the monthly report on payroll deductions for December 191^2. The Canal Zone divorce rate was up, and 55 percent of the divorces were filed by husbands. Almost a quarter of the divorce actions were against women who were not living on the Isthmus. "Bunny" gas masks for small children were explained by E. I. P. Tatelman, Civilian Defense Director. Plans were being made to provide the masks for small Canal Zonians, who were too little to fit the regular adult size. They were to be made with flour sacks treated with a gas repellent chemical. Two corners of the sacks were tied with tape or strips, giving the effect of rabbit ears and giving rise to the name "bunny mask." The 28-inch suction dredge Mindi, one of the most powerful of its size and type built to that time, was delivered to the Canal Zone in January 1943 and prepared for service at the Dredging Division headquarters at Gamboa. The mammoth dredge was built by the Ellicott Machine Corporation of Baltimore at a cost of $1,514,000. War dogs arrived on the Isthmus to help guard the Canal and vital installations. The soldiers with whom the dogs were to work were being trained by the sergeant who accompanied them when they came from the Quartermaster Corps training grounds in Front Royal, Ya. It was pointed out that the dogs' sense of smell, sight, and hearing icas more acute than that of humans and that the canine guards did not tire so easily or have to be relieved from duty as often. Bicycles received by the Commissary Division were not for the kids, but for war workers only. Applicants for the small supply of bikes had to show proof that the bicycles were needed for travel to and from work or organized war activities to which there was no other available transportation. legend and folklore, or their economic importance (oysters and teredos, for instance) to many human activities. As a hobby, shell collecting takes its followers to pleasant outdoor surroundings, a main object of many recreational activities. Last, but not least, it is a cheap form of fun, costing Policeman Jadis, for example, about $10 a year.

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February 6, 1953 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW FOR YOUR INTEREST AND 13ML GUIDANCE 1. 1 IN ACCIDENT PREVENTION Uj OFF THE JOB ACCIDENTS Ben Axel Dent, the accident-prone employee, is more likely to have an accident off the job than when he is working. On the job he has certain safety rules and a boss to help him mind his ways, but off the job even his wife can't stop him from foolish antics. Not counting the expense and trouble he has caused his unit to find another employee, or some fellow worker to take over his job while he languishes in the hospital, the expense and anxiety to his family is considerable. The year past has experienced many such accidents, not counting traffic accidents, which were usually more severe. There was the employee who fell downstairs over his own milk bottles and other items left there; there was the aeronaut in a duplex, who could not walk around to visit his neighbor; then a husband, or two, who tried to be the top man in a balancing act; next, the armchair mechanic who filled a gasoline lantern with a lighted cigar in his mouth; a few hunters with "deeropia" eyes, where at night over a gun, anything with shining eyes looked like meat on the table; then that Don Juan who could not resist helping the lady close the car door on his fingers. Therefore, don't leave your safety precautions at the job this year; take them home with you to practice in your spare time. HONOR ROLL Bureau Award For BEST RECORD December CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU INDUSTRIAL BUREAU AWARDS THIS CALENDAR YEAR Community Services 5 Industrial 5 Civil Affairs 4 Engineering and Construction 3 Health 1 Marine Railroad and Terminals Supply and Service Division Awards For NO DISABLING INJURIES December DREDGING DIVISION CLUBHOUSE DIVISION ELECTRICAL DIVISION MOTOR TRANSPORTATION DIVISION RAILROAD DIVISION AWARDS THIS CALENDAR YEAR Grounds Maintenance 8 Motor Transportation 8 Clubhouses 7 Electrical 7 Dredging 5 Hospitalization and Clinics 4 Railroad 4 Maintenance 3 Sanitation 3 Storehouses 3 Commissary 1 Navigation 1 Locks Terminals DECEMBER 1952 Civil Affairs Bureau Industrial Bureau Community Services Bureau Marine Bureau C. Z. Govt.— Panama Canal Co. (This month) Supply and Service Bureau Engineering and Construction Bureau C. Z. Covt.-Panama Canal Co. (1952 to Dale I Health Bureau C. Z. Govt.— Panama Cana !Co. (Best Year) Railroad and Terminals Bureau Number of Disabling Injuries 24 Disabling Injuries per 1,000,000 Man-Hours Worked (Frequency Rale) Man-Hours Worked 2,804,704 LEGEND Amount Better Than Panama Canal Company— Canal Zone Government Best Year Amount Worse Than Panama Canal Company— Canal Zone Government Best Year

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THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW February 6, 1953 Stop In Vivid Haiti Is Pleasant Break For Passengers On Panama Line Ships Vivid and variegated Haiti, molded of clashing cultures, can now be enjoyed by Panama Line passengers on stopovers at Portau-Prince on sailings between New York and Cristobal. The first call at Haiti since before World War II will be made by the S. S, Ancon when she stops there February 7, 4 days after leaving New York and 2 days out of Cristobal. The Ancon will also make the first post-war stop on a northbound Panama Line sailing when she docks at Port-au-Prince February 15. On northbound sailings the ships will leave Cristobal at 10 o'clock Friday morning, dock at Port-au-Prince at 7 o'clock Sunday morning and leave at noon the same day, arriving in New York at 8 o'clock Thursday morning. Southbound ships will leave New York at 4 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, dock at Haiti at 7 o'clock Saturday morning and leave at 4 the same afternoon, arriving at Cristobal at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon. The fare between New York and Haiti one way will be $130, $140, $150, or $170, depending on accommodations. The round trip fare will be $234, $252, $270, or $306 for transportation between the two points. All fares are exclusive of the 15 percent United States travel tax, where applicable. The rate between Port-au-Prince and Cristobal will be $70 one way with the passengers to be assigned to such accommodations as are available. No provision has been made for reduced rates for Canal employees for travel between Cristobal and Port-au-Prince. History Of Violence The Haitian half of the Caribbean Island that the country shares with the Dominican Republic was washed and warred over for centuries by Spanish, then French colonials, English and other buccaneers, and discordant internal factions, to be won at last in a scries of blood baths by the imported African slaves. The conflicts and cultures have left the marks that make the country unique. The language is French but the man in the street speaks a Creole patois and maybe English and Spanish. Voodoo dances and the beat of omnipresent drums echo Haiti's African heritage, which also runs through the country's music and literature and the work of her worldfamous artists. The monetary unit is the gourde but United States money is also in common circulation. One Haiti, that is near primitive, contrasts with another that is modern— with swank resorts, hotels, casinos, and restaurants, featuring international and local Creole cuisine, imposing new public buildings and boulevards and industrial and agricultural developments. Smart modern shops are not far away from the clangorous colorful market, both of which lure bargain hunting visitors in search of hand-crafted mahogany and lignum vitae and other native products, rare French perfumes and other luxuries that come to Haiti from Europe. Drive Into Mountains The dissonances and dissimilarities of ONE HAITI that is modern contiasts with another that is near-primitive, providing one of the dissimilarities that makes the country unique. This swimming pool at one of the resort hotels is typical of the modern, sophisticated attractions Haiti offers visitors. WINDING ROADS through flower-splotched hills lead from tropical lowland plains to cooler forested highlands. The one shown here leads from Port-auPrince to the suburb of Petionville and to the mountain resorts of Kenscoff and Furcv. Haiti's past and present are echoed in the land itself which is alternately striped by mountain ranges and low tropical plains. A 5-minute drive from Port-au-Prince winds upward through flower splotched hills to the cool and sophisticated suburb of Petionville overlooking the capital city. In 40 minutes more the road ascends to the resorts of Kenscoff and Furcy, 5,000 feet above sea level in the forested Haitian "Alps." Haiti has a gallery of national heroes in the giant epic style and a history of infamy and violence on the same colossal scale, which have combined to mold the country and capture imaginations around the world. Magnificent ruins of the Citadelle Laferriere and the palace Sans-Souci bear ghostlike testimony to the stature and accomplishments of King Henri Cristophe. His rise from slave to king inspired the play by Eugene O'Neill entitled "Emperor Jones." These architectural masterpieces reflect this giant of a man and the fantastic nobility he created as they lived and ruled the country they wrested from France and modeled in the most splendid manner of their former masters. Cap-Haitien, the "Paris" from which France ruled this richest 18th Century possession, contains the remnants of the regal palace of Napoleon's beautiful sister, Pauline. The attempts of her husband, General Leclerc, and succeeding Napoleonic, generals, to retain the overseas colony only increased the savage bloodletting of the original slave uprisings. Kenneth Roberts' novel, "Lydia Bailey," and the recent movie of the same name deal with this period of Haitian history. United States Marine Faustin Wirkus provided a comic echo of the emperors and kings. Stationed on the Island of Gonave during United States occupation in the 1920's, the non-commissioned officer was proclaimed by the natives as their king with consequences he described in the book "The White King of La Gonave." Cardenas, Gatun To Be Completed In Fiscal 1954 If Congress Approves {Continued from page l) coming fiscal year will have an important bearing on the long-range quarters construction program which was cut approximately in half in 1952 when Congress effected a revision of the overall program. The revised 1952-56 program, calling for a botal expenditure of slightly over $40,000,000 including work already done, was presented to the Congress for the first time at the January hearings. Two-Year Program In Flats The replacement of the old four-family houses in the Balboa "Flats" an two-year program; approximately half of the units there are to be vacated dining this calendar year, with construction to start promptly thereafter. Occupants of all the twelve-family apartment buildings in Diablo Heights have been notified of the proposed demolition schedule there and have been requested to apply for other quarters. Many of the Diablo units have been occupied by Armed Forces personnel. Special arrangements for their transfer to other accommodations on military reservations are being made jointly by the Panama Canal Company and the military authorities. The completion of the new houses in Ancon and Diablo Heights during recent weeks has made available additional houses on the Pacific side: it is planned that the construction of 192 U. S.-Rate family units in the fiscal year 1953 building program will provide a sufficient number of quarters to meet the demands arising from the clearance of one-half of the Balboa "Flats" area. There is not, and will not be at any time during the 1952 1956 program, a shortage of bachelor quarters. At critical periods during the next two years the housing of all U. S.-Rate employees will require the utmost cooperation and consideration between the Company housing anthoi ilies and the employees concerned. As someone aptly expressed the operation, "Folks will have to lie fitted in with a shoehorn, but it looks as though it can he done."

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February 6, 1953 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW OF CURRENT INTEREST Official Panama Canal Company Publication Published Monthh a1 BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE Printed h the Printing Plata Mount llo[> f 'anal Zant John S. Seybold, Governor-Presideni H. 0. Paxson, Lieutenant Governor E. C. Lombard, Executive Si creta y J. Rjjfus Hardy, Editor Eleanor II. McIlhenny Oleva Hastings Editorial Assistants LETTERS in I ill. I HI rOR Letters containing inquiries, suggestions, criticisms, or opinions ol general nature will be welcomed. I hose <•! sufficient interest will be published but signatures will not be used unless desired. SUBSCRIPTIONS— SI. 00 a year SINGLE COPIES— 5 cents each On sale at all Panama Canal Clubhouses Commissaries, and Hotels for 10 days after publication date. SINGLE COPIES BY MAIL-10 cents each BACK COPIES— 10 cents each On sale when available, from the Vault Clerk, Third Floor, Administration Building, Balboa Heights. Postal money orders should be made payable to the Treasurer, Panama Canal Company, and mailed to Editor, The Panama Canal Review, Balboa Heights, C. Z. Diablo Commissary Renovated, Compacted The Diablo Heights Commissary has been renovated and compacted— renovated to preclude glare and make the interior more attractive, and compacted to provide much needed storage room and to eliminate drygoods, of which the limited stocks for which space was available could not be properly merchandised. With the renovation, Diablo Heights Commissary now becomes a food and essential items store. What drygoods items were formerly carried have been transferred to Balboa Commissary, as has also been done with much of the hardware. Only a few household items, such as polishes, a few pots and pans, etc., remain. Commissary officials explained that the change is a trial in consolidating other than food supplies in larger stores where complete stocks can be carried, and that if it is successful a similar compacting may eventually be done with other stores in the smaller communities. The interior walls have been covered with two coats of paint in a new color scheme. The shelves have been relocated, the office moved to the back wall, directly over the post office sorting room, and the cashier's cage brought forward from its former isolated location to a new vantage point beside the checkout stands. Checkout stands have been moved forward about 10 feet. A vegetable counter and a cabinet for dairy products stand where the office was, with a pastry counter and cold storage cabinets at a right angle. Shopping baskets are being refurbished, six at a time, and the grocery display stands are getting fresh paint. SECOND GRADERS at Margarita Elementary School, ready with the "objeta d'art" they have fashioned in art classes, gather around the kiln where their pottery will be fired with the help of Mrs. Ernest A. Kareh, left, Supervisor of Art in the Canal Zone Schools. Elementary school children in grades one to six are learning about clay modeling and pottery making in their art classes this year for the first time. The finished pieces are fired in small kilns at Balboa and Margarita Elementary Schools. Many parents received samples of the youngsters' ceramics in the form of ash trays, tea tiles, and clay jewelry for Christmas presents. A new scale of rates at the Hotel Washington for employees of the GovernmentCompany and other U. S. Government agencies was approved last month. The new rates are almost identical with the rates to employees who were given a 25 percent discount on the commercial tariff. With the new employee rates, the 25 percent discount is eliminated; employees, however, now become eligible for the same long-term 50 percent discount for 5 months or more of occupancy which is offered to guests paying the standard tariff. Under the old discount an employee paid $10.12 per day for single occupancy of a suite for which the standard tariff rate was $13.50. This becomes $10 daily. The same suite, for double occupancy, is $16.50 for standard tariff guests and $12.50 for an employee, as compared to the $12.37 he paid previously under the discount system. A corner room with bath, $7.50 for commercial guests, becomes $5.50 for single occupancy, instead of the $5.62 formerly charged with the discount. The same room, $10 at commercial rates for double occupancy, is $7.50 for employees, just as it was with the discount. A seaside room, with bath, $6.50 for commercial guests, becomes $5, instead of $4.87 for an employee, and the same room, $9 at commercial rates for double occupancy, is $7 for employees instead of the previous $6.75. Heavy wire mesh protection for a number of quarters in the New CristobalDeLesseps and Colon Beach area was ordered January 21 by the Housing Division. The request for work, to be performed by the Maintenance Division, was issued after a survey of the houses in this section showed that while 75 percent of the original heavy mesh on the houses was in sound condition, 378 window panels and 94 door panels needed the protective heavy mesh. Recently Appointed To Board Of Directors The three and a quarter mile section of Panama Railroad track from Fort Davis to Lake Junction which was part of the Third Locks project is to be dismantled and the track used as replacements elsewhere on the line when needed. The track will be removed by railroad forces during the dry season. It was laid in 1942 as part of the Third Locks work at Gatun. It bypasses Gatun, which would have become an island between the present locks and the proposed Third Locks. Gatun would have been connected to the main railroad by a spur crossing a bridge over the north end of the Third Locks. Except for a few special passenger or freight trains there has never been any appreciable traffic over this piece of track other than the small motor cars used in the maintenance of the electric power transmission line. MELVIN DAVIS HILDRETH, Washington, D. C, attorney, was appointed recently as a member of the Board of Directors of the Panama Canal Company. He replaces Gordon Gray, former Secretary of the Army and present president of the University of North Carolina. A native of Fargo, North Dakota, and a veteran of World War I, Mr. Hildreth has practiced law in the District of Columbia since 1921. A long-time Democrat, he was Chairman of the Truman-Barkley Inauguration Committee in 1949, played a prominent part in earlier inaugural planning, was a delegate to the 1936, 1940, and 1944 Democratic Conventions ami is a member of the Democratic National Committee for the District of Columbia.

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THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW February 6, 1953 Natural History Society Dedicated to Serious Consideration of Nature Doctors ordinarily talk seriously about medicine only to other doctors. Lawyers shop talk about their business primarily in bar associations. Laymen generally are assumed to lack the interest and specialized knowledge necessary to serious consideration of the work within the learned professions — even if busy professional men had time to explain it to them. The Panama Canal Natural History Society was founded on a different assumption on which it has flourished for 21 years and shows no sign of failing. It is an unusual, if not unique, alliance of scientists and laymen mutually interested in serious study of fields of natural history ordinarily relegated by common consent to the men of science. The "ain't nature wonderful" school of thought is notably absent in the membership. Dr. James Zetek and Dr. Herbert C. Clark, world known for their work in science, have been leaders of the Society from the time of its founding. Presidency Switched The Presidency switched back and forth between them in the early years but Dr. Zetek says he is President now because Dr. Clark has become too lazy. Dr. Clark, who is Vice President, says it isn't that he's lazy — he's just too old to work. Studies by W. E. Lundy, SecretaryTreasurer of the Society, which have been published by the American Museum of Natural History, illustrate the serious scientific purpose of many so-called laymen members. The interest which prompted the papers and the caliber of the work are termed by Dr. Zetek "excellent" and "finished" and used to prove another unique feature of the Natural History Society. He says it would be hard to find another area with similar population in which there are so many people interested in natural history. His only explanation is that the Isthmus has so much of it. Two studies by Mr. Lundy, Assistant Treasurer of the Panama Canal Company, will be included in a special volume to be published by the American Museum of Natural History, an anthology of outstanding articles from past publications of Natural History Magazine. Member's Article Published Mr. Lundy's published articles include studies of the sloth, "The Upside Down Animal," and Panama potoos (Nyctibius griseus panamensis), night birds related to the whippoor-will and nighthawk, published under the title "Poor-Me-One." Another on howler monkeys has been accepted for publication. George 0. Lee, Professor of Biology at the Canal Zone Junior College is Librarian of the Natural History Society. DR. JAMES ZETEK, left, and DR. HERBERT C. CLARK, right, have been the only presidents of the Panama Canal Natural History Society. President is Dr. Zetek, Curator of Harm Colorado Island Biological Laboratory of the Smithsonian Institution and Entomologist for the Department of Agriculture. Dr. Clark, Director of Gorgas Memorial Institute, is Vice President. W. E. Lundy, center, Assistant Treasurer of the Panama Canal Company, is Secretary-Treasurer of the Society. The three are looking at a jar of Panama's golden frogs named Aielopus tarius zeteki for Dr. Zetek. He has lectured several times at the Society's monthly meetings. Talks by members of the Society and by other Isthmians have been interspersed with lectures by a long list of visitors whose names read like a page from Who's Who. A few of the many visiting lecturers were: Dr. Raymond Ditmars, Ph. D., Curator of Reptiles for the New York City Zoological Park; Dr. Charles L. Gazin, Chief of the Division of Vertebrate Paleontology of the Smithsonian Institution; Dr. Emmett R. Dunn, Professor of Biology at Haverford College; Dr. A. A. Allen, Professor of Ornithology at Cornell University; Dr. Frank M. Chapman, Sc. D., Curator-in-Chief of the Division of Birds of the American Museum of Natural History; Dr. Thomas Barbour, Ph. D., Sc. D., Director of the Museum of Comparative Zoology of Harvard University; Dr. Arthur H. Compton, Ph. D., Sc. D., of the University of Chicago; Dr. A. G. Price, Master of St. Mark's College, University of Adelaide, Australia; Dr. Alexander Petrunkevitch, Ph. D., of the University of Freiburg; Professor Arthur M. Chickering, Professor of Biology at Albion College, Mich.; Dr. Per Host of Sweden; and Dr. Matthew M. Stirling, Chief of the Bureau of American Ethnology of the Smithsonian Institution. A list of scientists who have lectured to the group could be extended almost indefinitely with the same Who's Who effect. 220th Meeting The January meeting was the Society's 220th. The meetings are held on the fourth Wednesday of the month in the auditorium of Gorgas Memorial Laboratory in Panama City. Members acknowledge their debt to their President and Vice President for the type of lecturers they have had, many or most of whom might not ordinarily talk to nonscientific audiences or would command elsewhere lecture fees that would be prohibitive. They consider it possible that the scientific standing of Dr. Clark and Dr. Zetek, as well as the services they perform for many visiting scientists, make it difficult for the visitors to decline when they are asked to speak to the Society. Since members seldom resign from the Society (it seems they have to die or move away from the Isthmus to leave the group, Dr. Zetek says), the President assumes they think they get their money's worth from the $1 annual dues. Money Matters But the Society, in common with many other groups, has its small money troubles. Members who go along for years are not pressed for payment of dues. Others continue to pay long after they leave the Isthmus. Then every now and then a good sized check is received from a former or present member as a gesture of gratitude to the Natural History Society. "We aren't in it for the money," Dr. Zetek says drily about the non-businesslike attitude toward dues. The dues pay for the monthly letter from the President telling members about

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February 6, 1953 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW coming meetings, written in a style that is unmistakably Dr. Zetek's own. j' Personally, I would not exactly say that this was a 'chance of a life time'," he wrote about a coming lecture by a visiting scientist, "but without hesitation I do say that we will have this Wednesday a peer among very few equals." lie concluded about another subject to be dealt with by a visitor, "To me, all of this is most interesting." Apropos of a lecture on impressions of Tahiti, Dr. Zetek reminisced, "I remember many years ago I hoped that I could establish myself in Tahiti or in French Oceania." Many Inquiries Received The small cost of correspondence carried on by the Secretary-Treasurer also is defrayed by the $1 dues paid annually by the members. The Society receives inquiries from many individuals and scientific groups asking all manner of information from the Panama Canal group. The queries apparently come from people, according to Dr. Zetek, who labor under the impression the local Society has a full-time secretary and lots of time and assistance to delve into all manner of scientific problems. Officers labor to answer as many inquiries as possible but the ones that are not replied to are dismissed with the simple philosophy: If the problem is important enough, they will write again. Many of the most interesting lectures have come from the Society's own membership. Dr. Clark, Director of the Gorgas Memorial Institute, the "Jungle Doctor" featured in the October 4 1952 issue of the Saturday Evening Post, has spoken on several occasions. First Lecture by Dr. Clark Some of the early phases of his studies of tropical maladies which have made him the "Old Man of Tropical Medicine" and earned him a long list of medical honors including the Walter Reed Medal, were discussed at the first meeting of the Society on August 19, 1931. The subject of that lecture was "the influence of animal reservoirs on diseases of domestic animals and man," illustrated with microscopic exhibits of germs of several diseases common to men and animals. Dr. Zetek, Curator of the Barro Colorado Island Biological Laboratory of the Smithsonian Institution and Entomologist in the Canal Zone for the Department of Agriculture, filled the first of several speaking engagements for the group at the third meeting of the Society. Lectures by Dr. Zetek His first lectures to the members also reflected his special scientific interests: termites, fruit flies, teredos, and other marine borers, moltusks, and medical entomology. He is a member of the Washington Academy of Science, the Cosmos Club of Washington, D. C, a corresponding member of the Zoological Society of London, was named an honorary member of Byrd's Second Antartic Expedition and has headed the Section of Biological Sciences at the American Scientific Congress. Not the least of his services to science — and incidentally to the Society—is the assistance he has given to some 500 scientists who have visited and done research at Barro Colorado Island. A brochure published about the Society WHITE, TALL-PILLARED Gorgas Memorial Laboratory on Justo Arosemena Avenue in the Exposition Grounds section of Panama City has been the meeting place for the Natural History Society for 21 years. The meetings are held in the building's auditorium which is usually filled to capacity. says that at the time of its founding "it was believed that there were a sufficient number of men of science in our midst and of independent observers to assure monthly programs of interest and value." That belief has been well justified. Several of the members who played a prominent part in the founding of the Society later lectured to the group concerning their special interests and fields of inquiry. Local Lecturers Karl P. Curtis, former Canal employee who now lives in Gamboa, is a recognized authority on archeology on the Isthmus and has served as guide for most of the archeological expeditions sent to the Isthmus from the United States. He spoke on more than one occasion to the members of the Society. The late Fred McKim, former employee of the Property Bureau of the Canal organization, was an authority on the Indians of the Darien country and San Bias Islands and spoke to the group on that subject. He authored two studies on Indians of the Isthmus: San Bias and The Forbidden Land; A Reconnaissance of the Upper Bayano River. The late R. Z. Kirkpatrick, former Chief Hydrographer and Chief of Surveys in the Canal organization, was an ardent outdoorsman and a capable observer of the natural history around him. He spoke to the group on tides and weather conditions. Other members who were prominent in the founding of the Society were Professor Alejandro Mendez, Director of the National Museum of Panama; 0. T. Marstrand, who retired in 1937 as Chief of the Property Bureau of the Canal; H. H. Evans, who retired in 1943 as Assistant Superintendent of the Mechanical Division; L. H. De Vore, who retired in 1948 as Commissary Accountant; and A. J. Dorn, who retired in 1950 as Lockmaster at Pacific Locks. Nine Charter Members Now Nine of the Society's 70 charter members remain in the organization today: T. Gabriel Duque, Van Allen Lyman, who is now in Costa Rica, Mr. Curtis, Mr. and Mrs. Lee, Dr. H. M. Mitten, Mr. Lundy, Dr. Clark, and Dr. Zetek. Lectures do not always deal with scientific treatment of subjects. A. I. Bauman, Senior Supervisor of the Grounds Maintenance Division, talked to the group on the history of sport fishing in Panama. F. M. Foore, a former Army employee in the Canal Zone, spoke on "Cartagena, Pearl of the Indies." Edwin F. Rigby, Chief of the Purchasing Section of the Balboa Storehouse, talked on "Impressions of Tahiti and French Oceania," after his trip to Tahiti in the 72-foot ketch Palmosa. Frank Violette, Panama Contractor, talked to the Society about fishing off Pinas Bay. One of Dr. Zetek's few regrets about the Natural History Society is that there are so many more members who have interesting things to say but do not consider themselves lecturers and do not talk to the Society. First Thirty Apartments Of New Paraiso Housing To Be Finished This Month The first 30 units of the 244 apartments being built at Paraiso are scheduled for completion early this month. The 30 apartments, in 15 houses, are in the southern end of Paraiso, near the ball park. They will be transferred to the Housing Division after acceptance by the Contract and Inspection Division and will be assigned soon. No more Paraiso quarters are due to be completed before March. After that they will be finished at the rate of several each week. A]] 124 units in south Paraiso will probably be completed before those in north Paraiso are finished. The contract for the Paraiso housing is held by Tucker McClure; its completion date is July 3. A contract for the construction of two new school buildings at Paraiso and for alterations to existing school buildings was opened late last month.

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10 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW February 6, 1953 Forty Years Ago In January A steam shovel started excavation for the entrance basin and Dry Dock No. 1 at Balboa. As excavation equipment was released from other Canal work, additional shovels were to be put to work on this project. The third case of sunstroke reported by Canal physicians during 8yi years of Canal work occurred Ifi years ago. The victim, an Italian laborer, recovered. YMCA workers labored mightily to provide lunches for sailors who inspected Canal installations from special Panama Railroad trains when the Atlantic Fleet visited the Isthmus in January 1913 to become acquainted with the new waterway. The YMCA also provided two information bureaus, one on either side of the Isthmus, and a committee at Gatun to tell the visitors about the Locks. The sailors— from 23 ships in four divisions — were taken from Colon to Panama at a rate of about 1,000 per day for four davs. A new steamship, the Panama, built in Scotland, was brought to Panama by the recently organized Panama Steamship Company and was placed in service between Panama and David and intermediate points. The new ship was of "1,000 tons burthen and equipped with electric lights, baths, and other conveniences". Canal employees received 10 percent discounts on fares. Erection of the east emergency dam at Gatun Locks was started and S40 tons of material were received for the east dam at Pedro Miguel. A few concrete lamp posts were erected and exhaustive studies concerning the illumination of the locks had progressed to the point that the future lighting system icas described in the Canal Record. Explaining that the aim was to approach sunlight distribution as closely as possible in the exterior lights at the locks, the Record stated: "Advances during recent years in lamp manufacture make it possible to obtain nearly white light by the use of the metallic filament lamp, and to obtain nearly uniform distribution of lighting flux by the use of a properly designed reflector." A lecture on "Alcohol," scheduled to be given by a Dr. Orenstein at Isthmian Canal Commission Clubhouses, was indefinitely postponed because the Doctor was ill. Work on a Macadam highway from Gamboa toward Empire, on the cast side of the Canal, was started by convicts who had been busy up to that time on construction of the Canal Zone portion of the Empire-Chorrera Road. Plans were made to extend the Cardenas River bridge on the highway between Corozal and Miraflores because the opening of 30 feet between abutments had proved inadequate during freshets. The road had been washed out twice during the previous rainy season. CHEZ ELOISE, annual fashion show of students in Balboa High School household arts classes, featured 50 mannequins for a night modeling their own creations they had made in sewing classes. The show, named for Miss Eloise Monroe, instructor of household arts, was held January 21 on the Hijh School lawn. The models shown here in the dresses they made are, left to right: Mitzi Siegel, Pat Steiner, Ann McGee, and Janeth Willoe. Frankie Lerchen and his accordion, hft, made a solo appearance at the fashion show. EXTRA LONG shower cuitains, 6 : 2 feet long — long enough to stretch between the shower curtain rods and the floor in all Canal houses — are being made on special order for the Commissary Division by a manufacturer in the United States. So if you have one of the 'outsize' bathrooms that standard shower curtains don't fit, just keep on mopping until about the end of February, when the special shower curtains are expected to arrive. Fresh frozen coffee is one of the newest wrinkles in the frozen food line. rresn j^ e (Commissary Division has ordered Coffee a sma supply of the "Snow Crop" product so Canal people can give it a try. It will come in 5>£-ounce jars and is expected about the end of January. ALUMINUM LAWN furniture, "Perma Gleam," has been ordeied from a Miami manufacturer, and is expected to arrive in Feb.uary. There will be folding contoui chairs, chaise lounge:, juvenile chairs and juvenile rockers. The prices will range from $6.50 to $32.50. A new vitamin solution, ABDEC drops, that can be given to babies, for in[New stance, in their milk or orange Vitamin Solution juice, is one of the new drug products now being sold in the Commissaries. Other new drug products include Parke-Davis hydrogen peroxide and Caladryl lotion, a soothing skin lotion of calamine and benadryl for minor skin irritations. THERE ARE four new fresh frozen vegetablas in the frozen food sections baby pod okra, collards, kale, and butter beans. If you haven't already discovered these new "Snow Crop" products, you should give them a try. Really fine woolens from England, for men's or women's suits, are now available in the Commissaries and more are exc ln ,? L pected soon. Almost every BritEnglish , , Woolens lsn boat that arrives has some wool for the Commissary Division but exact arrival times for specific orders are hard to predict because the manufacturing process starts from scratch — with the purchase of the yarn — when an order is placed. Expected soon, however, are tropical worsteds of fine quality in about seven shades of grey, brown, and blue, in plain colors and subdued stripes, that will cost about $7 for a yard 58 inches wide; worsted gabardine, in green, slate blue, navy, tan and two shades of brown, for about the same price; worsted wool Botany cloth in blue and brown pin stripes at $5.50 a yard 56 inches wide,and covert gabardine at about $6.50 a yard, 58 inches wide. THERE ARE two new Gerbers baby cereals now available in the Commissaries. One is barley and the other is rice. They cost 1 8 cents. Pert little handbags, handwoven of coconut Bags From fibre by natives of the Caroline The Carolines Islands, are new, finely made, and appealing in style as well as price. PLASTIC planters, designed to do the most for African violets and other house plants, are new in the houseware, section;. There are lots of new Honeydeb Italian raffia sandals in the shoe sections now. The Commissary Division is one of the J £" first retail outlets to place the new Raffia tl Sandals snoes on sa e '" e y come in so many color combinations and are so pleasingly cheap — about $3.50 and $4.25 — that women who want sandals are bound to find a pair or more that they consider "cute."

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February 6, 1953 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 11 Training Course Given To Supervisory Groups From Five Canal Units Four groups of Canal employees soon will complete training courses designed to teach thi-ni to lead planned conferences, a means of "group thinking" widely adopted by industry in the United States as one of the most effective means of solving certain types of industrial and business problems. The courses in conference leadership are conducted by the Training Section of the Personnel Bureau under the direction of C. A. Dubbs, Training Officer. One of the conference leadership training groups included nine supervisors from the Electrical Division. Another group of nine is composed of police sergeants and lieutenants. Seven trainees in another group are supervisory employees of Gatun Locks. The fourth training group is made up of seven supervisory employees of the Division of Storehouses, the Personnel Bureau, and Grounds Maintenance and Electrical Divisions. The training groups started their meetings in October or November. The two-hour meetings will continue weekly up to about the middle of February. The planned conference is only one of the techniques that can be used to train employees in industry and one which has been proven very effective for solving certain types of problems. Training Techniques Differ The so-called "informational method" of instruction usually takes the form of an address or lecture "pouring" many facts into employees' minds. It is the method generally used when a large group of employees with little experience need to be taught a great deal in a short time. The "instructional method," another training technique, is basically a 'learning-by-doing" process in which a qualified instructor provides either individual or group instruction. This may be a demonstration in which the participants try out the principle that is being taught. The "conference method," on the other hand, deals with a specific problem which is to be solved by the conferees. It differs from the other types of training in that conferees generally have a background of information and experience to contribute to the solution and the ideas which are propagated come from the participants themselves. One of the primary advantages of the conference system is that a specific problem is solved and accepted by those taking part in the conference, who are also the persons responsible for putting the solution into practice. The planned conference of this type is not a glorified bull session. The conference leader elicits ideas on the specific subject of the conference; acts as an impersonal arbiter in the objective examination of facts; and helps guide the conferees to a solution acceptable to all participants. The leader acts as stimulator and director; never as a teacher. Mr. Dubbs, instructor of the groups, led only the first six meetings of each group, explaining some of the general techniques that can be used by conference leaders. After the original instruction, each member of the training groups conducted a planned conference on a subject of his own choosing. CONFERENCE LEADERSHIP TRAINING GROUPS ONE TRAINING GROUP is composed of these supervisory employees of Atlantic Locks: Left to right: Howard Harris, Richard Danielson, Earl Cassrll, George Poole, and Morris Weich. i ither members of this group who were absent when the picture was taken are William Van Siclen and John Ward. ANOTHER OF THE TRAINING GROUPS includes these employees of the Personnel Bureau, Electrical Division, Grounds Maintenance Division, and Division of Storehouses. Seated, left to right: James R. Doran, John Terry, H. D. Halverson, and L. H. Demers. Standing: C. A. Dubbs, Training Officer in charge of the classes, Boyd M. Bevington and W. R. Lindsay. A. I. Bauman, another member of this group, was absent when the picture was taken. SUPERVISORY PERSONNEL of the Electrical Division made up another training group. Seated, hit U> right: E. 0. Dailey, M. I". Millard, R. R. E. L. Brown, and A. K. Miller. Standing: Mr. Dubbs, C. W. Chase, George C. Dunlap, T. J. Wilber, and J. R. Smith. POLICE DIVISION' TRAINING GROUP. Standing, left to right: Lt. William H. Munyon, Sgt. Edmund C. Fishbough, Sgt. Harvev G. Rhvne. and Lt. Stewart Trail. Seated: Sgt. Jack C. Sutherland, Sgt. James L. Hatcher. Sgt. Morton LeYee, and Mr. Dubbs. Lt. Richard Nichols and Sgt. Jack Morris were absent when the picture was taken.

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12 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW February 6, 1953 PACIFIC EVERGREEN GARDEN CLUB A LARGE ENTHUSIASTIC GROUP The Pacific Evergreen Garden Club, which meets monthly in La Boca, is dedicated to the beautification of individual gardens and the planting, cultivation and preservation of trees, shrubs and flowers for the benefit of the entire community. It is one of the newest organizations in the La Boca community, having been organized last September, but has a large and enthusiastic membership that proves it a healthy youngster. The roster now lists 104 members of the Club, compared with the membership of 87 when the group was organized. Enthusiasm for the Club's activities was evidenced in November when a crowd of several thousand turned out for the first flower show held at Pacific Clubhouse. There is only one requisite for membership in the Club and that requirement leaves plenty of room for the recruitment of many more members, one of the aims expressed by officers for the future of the organization. Members Completed Classes Members must have completed one of the classes in flower arrangement which have been given during the past year by Mrs. Charles P. ("Pat") Morgan. She has held three classes in La Boca so far and each had about 90 members. Several present members of the Garden Club have attended all of the classes given in La Boca. In the course of the flower arrangement classes, Mrs. Morgan enlivened the interest in plants and flowers and provided the encouragement that resulted in the formation of the Pacific Evergreen Garden Club. In view of the enthusiasm for plants and flowers she encouraged or developed in those in her classes, it is not surprising that she was named an honorary board member when the club was organized. Other honorary members of the Club are Mrs. R. K. Morris, who assisted Mrs. Morgan in the flower arrangement classes in La Boca; and Mrs. Lemuel B. Shirley, Honorary President, wife of Archdeacon Shirley, Rector of St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Panama and formerly of St. Peter's Church in La Boca. Officers Of Club President of the organization is Mrs. Frank S. Wason, whose husband works in the Stevedoring Department of the Esso Shipping Company in Balboa. She won first prize for cut flowers in the Club's November flower show with an arrangement of elephant ears from her garden in the San Fernando/ Juan Diaz section of Panama City. First Vice President of the Club is Mrs. Cornelius Lambert of Parque Lefevre who is employed in the Grocery Section of the Ancon Commissary. Mrs. Allan Walker of Panama is Second Vice President and won first prize in the horticultural arrangements at the Club's flower show. Other officers are: Mrs. Herbert W. McKenzie of La Boca, Recording Secretary, whose husband is a boatswain in the Navigation Division; Mrs. Eric A. Greene of La Boca, Assistant Secretary, who works in the Dental Clinic in Ancon; and Mrs. James Ferguson of Parque MRS. CHARLES P. "PAT" MORGAN, whose classes in flower arrangement resulted in the formation of the Pacific Evergreen Garden Club, is shown here with officers of the organization. Mrs. Morgan is an honorary board member. Left to right, front row: Mrs. Frank S. Wason, President; Mrs. Cornelius Lefevre, Treasurer, who works in the hardware section of the Ancon Commissary, and won first prize at the flower show in the fruit and vegetable arrangements; and Mrs. Isaac W. Ingleton of La Boca, Chaplain, whose husband works for the Oil Handling Plant. Officers of the Club took all top honors at the flower show with only two exceptions: Mrs. Steve Sinclair of Panama, who won first prize for arrangements of dry Retired Pilot Expands Story of Canal Island Additional light on one of the Canal Zone's oldest legends has been brought in a letter to The Panama Canal Review from Capt. A. R. McDaniel, retired pilot whose Canal service began in 1909. The legend, referred to briefly in the January 1952 issue of The Review, has to do with a near-international incident brought about when a British flag was planted on an island which suddenly appeared in Gaillard Cut not long after the Canal was opened. From Southern Pines, North Carolina, Captain McDaniel writes: "Tommy Doran, a dipper tender, from his elevated seat in the boom of the dredge PaRAISO, 'discovered' the island and promptly placed a small British flag on its top. Mr. MacFarlane (J. MacFarlane, Superintendent of Dredging) appeared on the scene and wanted to know who had planted the flag. "Tommy answered him, saying 'Oi did it in the name of our auld country.' None of the many men present could agree on just what the Superintendent said, but they were all in accord about the vegetation from the water's edge to near the Old Administration building being seared as if from the flame of a blow torch. "From the foregoing you can readily understand that no part of an 'international incident' could have been raised because Superintendent MacFarlane was wholly capable of handling any local matter that might come up." With his letter, Mr. MacDaniel encloses a note from the "Tommy Doran" referred to. Mr. Doran, who was born in Ireland, worked during construction days as a barge engineer. He retired in 1934, but reported that he had been in World War II from 1942 to 1945. Later he went to India, Africa, and South America. His letter was written from Deer Park, New York. Lambert, First Vice President; and Mrs. James Ferguson, Treasurer. Back row: Mrs. Allan Walker, Second Vice President; Mrs. Eric A. Greene, Assistant Secretary; Mrs. Herbert W. McKenzie, Recording Secretary; Mrs. Isaac W. Ingleton, Chaplain; and Mrs. Morgan. and exotic plants, and Mrs. Leon Headley, whose husband is an employee of the Motor Transportation Division in Gamboa, who won the first prize in arrangements for special occasions. Committees Show Club Functions Special committees of the organization illustrate some of the functions of the Club. Mrs. Ernest Robertson, whose husband is manager of the Paraiso Clubhouse, heads the committee in charge of the exchange of plants among members of the Club. Mrs. Wilfred Fraser of Panama, whose husband works at Fort Gulick, heads the committee of the Club in charge of garden tours. The first of what are expected to become a series of monthly visits to members' gardens was a tour in November of Mrs. Morgan's gardens on Gaillard Highway. The second in the proposed series of garden tours was a New Year's Day "open house" for Club members at the home of Mrs. Wason, President of the organization. Miss Amy Webley of Panama, who works at the La Boca Clubhouse, heads the publicity committee. A housing committee was occasioned by early difficulties about a meeting place. The first meetings were held in the Parish Hall of St. Peter's Church in La Boca. Now the group meets on the second Monday of the month at the study hall at the La Boca Occupational High School. Head of the housing committee is Miss Inez McLean of Panama. Mrs. Floyd Johnson, Librarian at the La Boca Occupational High School, is chairman of the program committee, which is in charge of the programs for the monthly meetings. Another function of the Club-without benefit of special committee -is that of sending flowers to members who are ill. Present members of the Clubstrictly feminine at this point -hope to encourage their husbands to take part in activities of the organization. Thus far, however, the potential male members have taken no part in the proceedings except for a hangup male attendance at the first flower show.

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February 6, 1953 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 13 STATISTICS ON CANAL TRAFFIC For the purpose of comparison between pre war and post-war traffic through the Panama Canal, statistics the fiscal year 1938 are used in this section, as being more nearly normal for peace time than those for 1 cs for 939. Canal Shipping Heads Toward New Records For Fiscal Year 1953 Shipping through the Panama Canal, which has been breaking records steadily for some time now, is headed for another new record this fiscal year if the present volume continues. A total of 336 more commercial vessels, large and small, went through the Canal during the second quarter of fiscal year 1953 than in the corresponding quarter of fiscal year 1952. For the first two quarters this fiscal year 3,597 large (300 tons or over) commercial vessels have transited, compared to 3,065 for the first two quarters in fiscal year 1952. Tolls are correspondingly high. For the first two quarters of 1953 a'tota^l of $15,575,000 has been collected, as compared to $12,902,000 for the same period in 1952. Statistics just released by the Management Division indicate a number of interesting trends in Canal shipping. Intercoastal Traffic Up Although intercoastal shipping is still considerably lower than in fiscal year 1938, last normal preWorld War II year, it is again on the increase. During the quarter just concluded, there were 65 more large commercial transits in the intercoastal trade than during the corresponding period in fiscal year 1952. Other main trade routes which also show a marked increase are those between the United States East Coast and South America, the United States East Coast and the Far East, and the route between Europe and the United States and Canadian West Coast. Some decline in traffic appears this past quarter, as compared to fiscal year 1952, in the following routes: United States East Coast to Central America, United States East Coast to Australasia, and between Europe and Australasia. The United States continues to hold the No. 1 spot as the nation whose flag transits the Canal most frequently. Great Britain and Norway follow, in that order, as they did in the corresponding period last year and in the first quarter this year. Panamanian-registered ships moved into the No. 4 spot, with Honduran vessels, which had been fourth, moving back to No. 5. German Shipping Increases The increase in Japanese shipping continued, with that nation which had only 29 vessels transiting in the second quarter last year now in sixth place with 81 ships. Another marked increase was in the number of German ships, 50 this past quarter, as compared to only one during the corresponding period last year. Other national increases were in the numbers of Liberian, Irish, Italian, Spanish, and Venezuelan registered vessels. Mineral oil continued as the prime commodity carried on the Atlantic-Pacific routes, although it is slightly less this quarter than the last. On the Pacific-Atlantic routes ores now rank first in number of tons carried through the Canal. The only commodities showing a decline in the Atlantic-Pacific trade are sulphur and cement, while a marked increase appears in the number of tons of coal, iron and steel manufactures, sugar, phosphates, and machinery. In the Pacific-Atlantic routes, ores outstripped lumber this quarter as the No. 1 commodity, although lumber, wheat, nitrates, and bananas all show a marked upswing in amount from the previous quarter. Sugar shipped on these routes was considerably less than in the first quarter of fiscal year 1953. Principal commodities shipped through Canal (All figures in long tons) Figures in parentheses in 1938 and 1952 columns indicate relative positions in those years ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC Commodity Mineral oils. Coal and Coke Manufacturers of iron and steel Sugar Phosphates Paper and paper products Machinery Sulphur Automobiles Raw cotton Tinplate Cement Canned food products Ammonium compounds Ores, various All others Total Second Quarter — Fiscal Year 1953 1,155,677 679,396 405,089 177,715 100,529 88,629 81,764 72,283 64,879 63,564 59,342 46,596 34,997 13,062 9,573 1,278,046 1952 909,773 410,689 381,639 124,311 187,657 107,185 70,287 68.856 97,693 98,985(10) 67,395 (12) 57,850 (9) 26,810 (21) 30,964 (18) 7.109 (28) 952,169 4,331.141 3.599,372 1938 287,537 (3) 37.108(14) 479,661 (1) 971 (31) 71,763 (6) 94,572 (5) 40,773(10) 101,599 (7) 81,751 (9) 18,155(13) 54,507 (8) 37,256(11) 38,451 (15) 15,806(22) 24,366(18) 902,124 2,286,400 PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC Commodity Second Quarter, Fiscal Year 1953 1952 1938 883,220 864,238 792,428 340,142 330,603 220,649 195,835 179,513 126,844 86,715 63,065 55,107 49,481 48,714 32,769 583,290 936,585 (1) 829,215 (2) 413,053 (3) 285,351 (5) 370,334 (4) 182,532 (7) 204,389 (8) 158,607 (6) 95,533 (9) 166,515 (10) 66,016 (13) 44,176(14) 38,963 (17) 38,368 (16) 7,517 {ii) 779,083 524,191 (3) 671,973 (2) Wheat 217,658 (7) 303,166 (6) 306,890 (5) 4,911 (29) 179,591 (8) 302,617 (4) Refrigerated food products (ex64,079(10) 665,884 (1) 33,454(18) 33,884(16) 120,664 (12) 32,369 (20) 1,928 (*) 920,582 Total 4,852,613 4,616,237 4,383,841 MONTHLY COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC AND TOLLS Vessels of 300 tons net or over By fiscal years Transits Tolls (In thousands of dollars) 1953 1952 1938 1953 1952 1938 July 529 463 457 $2,343 $1,981 $2,030 533 490 505 2,288 2,103 2,195 615 516 444 2,636 2,188 1,936 674 544 461 2,917 2,230 1,981 620 502 435 2,611 2,053 1,893 626 550 439 2,679 2,347 1,845 522 444 2,121 1,838 507 436 2,082 1,787 613 506 2,512 2,016 \ r'l 601 487 2,423 1,961 May 622 485 2,481 1,887 594 445 2,401 1,801 Totals for first 6 months of 3.597 3,065 2,741 $15,474 $12,902 $11,880

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14 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW February 6, 1953 THIS MONTH'S CALENDAR FEBRUARY 7th — Track Foreman No. 2741, Balboa B & B Shops. 8th Sheetmetal Workers, Balboa Clubhouse, 9:30 a. m. Plumbers No. 606, Balboa Lodge Hall, 9:30 a. m. 9th— Machinists No. 699, K. of C. Hall. Margarita, 7:30 p. in. American Legion Post 1, Legion Home, 7:30 p. m. 10th — Pipefitters, Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m. Electrical Workers No. 397, Wirz Memorial, 7:30 p. m. VFW Post 100, Old Boy Scout Building, Cristobal, 7:30 p. m. American Legion Post 7, Fort Clavton, 7:30 p. m. Legion Auxiliary Unit 1, Balboa Legion Home, 7:30 p. m. 11th — Carpenters and Joiners, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m. Pacific Civic Council, Board Room, Administration Building, 7:30 p. m. American Legion Post 2, Legion Home, Old Cristobal. 13th Blacksmiths No. 400, Boilermakers Nos. 463 and 471, K. of C. Hall, Margarita, 7:30 p. m. 15th CLU-MTC, Balboa Lodge Hall, 8:30 a. m. 16th— Electrical Workers No. 677, Gatun Masonic Temple, 7:30 p. m. Truckdrivers, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m. 17th — Operating Engineers No. 595, K. of C. Hall, Margarita, 7 p. m. Machinists No. 811, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m. 18th— Teachers No. 227, General Library, Balboa High School, 7 p. m. AFGE No. 14, Balboa Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m. American Legion Auxiliary Unit 3, Gatun Legion Home, 7:30 p. m. 19th — American Legion Auxiliary Unit 6, Gamboa Legion Hall, 7:30 p. m. 22d— Machinists No. 699, K. of C. Hall, Margarita, 7:30 p. m. 23d— VFW Auxiliary, Post 3822 Home, 7:30 p. m. 24th — Operating Engineers No. 595, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7 p. m. American Legion Post 7, Fort Clayton, 7:30 p. m. 25th — Governor Employee Conference, Board Room, Administration Building, 2 p. m. VFW Post 100, Old Boy Scout Building, Cristobal, 7:30 p. m. American Legion Auxiliary Unit 2, Legion Home, Old Cristobal, 7:30 p. m. MARCH 1st— VFW Post 3857, Cristobal Veterans Club, 9 a. m. 2d Postal Employees No. 23160, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m. Pedro Miguel Civic Council, Union Church, 7 p. m. Cristobal-Margarita Civic Council, Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m. VFW Post 727, Fort Clavton, 7:30 p. m. VFW Post 3822, Curundu Road, 7 :30 p.m. American Legion Post 3, Gatun Legion Hall, 7:30 p. m. 3d — Meatcutters and Butchers No. 121, Officers' Home, 7:30 p. m. Teachers, No. 228, Auditorium, Cristobal High School, 3:30 p. m. Gamboa Civic Council, Community Center, 7:30 p. m. Gatun Civic Council, Gatun Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m. Machinists No. 811, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m. 4th— VFW Post 40, Wirz Memorial, 7:30 p. m. Isthmian Nurses Association, Building 283, Gorgas Hospital, 8 p. m. 5th — Carpenters and Joiners No. 667, Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m. Marine Engineers, Jewish Welfare Board, 7 p. m. 6th — American Legion Post 6, Gamboa Legion Home, 7:30 p. m. December 15 through January 15 The following list contains the names of those V. S.-rate employees who were transferred from one division to another (unless the change is Administrative) or from one type of work to another. It does not contain within-grade promotions or regradings. CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU Alan C. Gillespie from Guard, Pacific Locks, to Postal Clerk, Postal Service. Mrs. Evelyn M. Taylor from Substitute Teacher to Kindergarten Assistant, Schools Division. Mrs. Beatrice M. Rhyne from ClerkTypist, License Section, to Clerk-Stenographer, Office of the Civil Affairs Director. Lyon J. Hoard from File Clerk, Record Section, Administrative Branch, to Postal Clerk, Postal Service. Robert L. Jordan 2 from Heavy Truck Driver, Motor Transportation Division, to Fireman, Fire Division. COMMUNITY SERVICES BUREAU Mrs. Ellen E. Bailey from Property and Supply Clerk, Record Section, AdministraFebruary Sailings From Cristobal STEAMER Leave Cristobal 10 a. m. Friday Arrive Port-auPrince 7 a. m. Sunday, leave noon Sunday Arrive New York 8 a. m. Thursday A neon _ Panama -. Cristobal February 13 February 20 February 27 March 7 February 15 February 22 March 1 March 9 (Monday) February 19 February 26 March 5 March 13 (Friday) (Saturday 1 From New York STEAMER Leave Neic York 4 p. m. Tuesday Arrive Port-auPrince 7 a. m. Saturday, leave 4 p. m. Saturday Arrive Cristobal 2 p. m. Monday Panama February 10 February 17 February 26 (Thursday) March 3 February 14 February 21 March 2 (Monday) March 7 February 16 February 23 March 4 (Wednesday) March ~ l ) CnstobaF. Ancon Panama . . Schedule changed because of Washington's Birthday holiday. tive Branch, to Clerk-Typist, Housing Division. OFFICE OF COMPTROLLER Mrs. Chiquita C. Cassibry, ClerkTypist, from Terminals Division to Typist, Office of the Comptroller. John N. Walker, III from Postal Clerk, Postal Service, to Cash Accounting Clerk Accounting Division. Mrs. Frances A. Hunter from ClerkTypist, Contract and Inspection Division, to Clerk-Stenographer, Plant Inventory and Appraisal Branch. Charles L. Nix from Contract Assistant, Contract and Inspection Division, to Valuation Engineer Plant Inventory and Appraisal Branch. Mrs. Margaret M. Janssen from Clerk-Typist, Accounting Division, to Clerk Stenographer, Management Division. ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION BUREAU Samuel B. Mauldin from Powerhouse Operator-Dispatcher to Power Dispatcher, Electrical Division. Augustus R. Kam from Civil Engineering Aid, Engineering Division, to Contract Assistant, Contract and Inspection Division. Chester R. Boltz from Wireman to Distribution Foreman, Electrical Division. William A. Muller from Apprentice Wireman to Wireman, Electrical Division. Miss Maria I. Uribe from Typist, Engineering Division, to Clerk-Typist, Contract and Inspection Division. HEALTH BUREAU Miss Annie L. Allnutt, Dental Hygienist, from Gorgas Hospital, to Pacific Dental Clinic^. MARINE BUREAU Victor L. Sanger from Junior Fere nan, Ferry Service, to Tractor-Bulldozer Operator, Dredging Division. John F. Martin, Guard, from Atlantic to Pacific Locks. Maurice F. Dunn from Towboat Master to Senior Towboat Master, Navigation Division. Frank D. Harris from Master {Taboga) to Maintenance Superintendent (Chief, Aids to Navigation Section). Charles F. Brown and Heyward A. Shingler, Lock Operator (Wireman), from Atlantic to Pacific Locks. Abe L. Lincoln from Rigger to Lock Overhaul Foreman, Locks Division. Carl R. Meissner from Life Guard, Physical Education and Recreation Branch, Schools Division, to Checker, Locks Division. RAILROAD AND TERMINALS BUREAU Mrs. Zulu Lee Smith, Clerk-Typist, from Electrical Division to Terminals Division. Mrs. Louise K. Allen, from Accounting Clerk, Printing Plant, to ClerkTypist, Terminals Division. Charles E. Chase from Heavy Truck Driver, Motor Transportation Division, to Ganger and Foreman, Cribtender, Terminals Division. SUPPLY AND SERVICE BUREAU Mrs. Helen T. Bradley from Card Punch Operator, Accounting Division, to Clerk, Division of Storehouses. Kenneth N. Woodcock from Cash Accounting Clerk, to Commissars Assistant, Commissary Division. Samuel Dubin from Cash Accounting Clerk to Storekeeper Division of Storehouses Edward T. Rathgeber from Storekeeper. to Cash Accounting Clerk I tivision of Storehouses, James B. Gilder from Commissary Assistant to Property .uu\ Supply Clerk, Commissary Division. Leo J. Krziza, Accounting Clerk, from Maintenance I >i\ ision to Motor Transportation Division. Earl E. Trout, Safety Inspector, from Commissary Division to Office of Supply and Service Director. Max R. Hart, Safety Inspector, from Motor Transportation Division, in Office of Supply and Service Director. Reed R. Mcllvaine, from Stevedore Foreman, Terminals Division, to Supervisory Steward, Hotel Tivoli.

PAGE 15

February 6, 1953 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 15 ANNIVERSARIES CANAL TRANSITS— COMMERCIAL AND U. S. GOVERNMENT Employees who observed importanl anniversaries during the month of January •'"• li-tcd alphabetical^ below. The numbei of years includes .ill Governmenl service with the (-'anal or other agencies. Those with continuous service with the Canal are indicated with (*). 41 YEARS Gregor Gramlich, Dipper Dredge Master, I dredging I >ivision. <5 YEARS Gapt. Lucien A. Skeels, Panama Canal Pilot, Navigation Division. 25 YEARS Ruth E. Creasy, Elementary School Principal, Diablo Heights, Schools Division, l.ela M. Holden, Elementary Teacher, Balboa, Schools Division. John A. Knox, Lock Operator-Machinist, Locks Division. 20 YEARS George T. Darnall, Jr., Hydrographic Engineer, Dredging Division. VVilmer I.. Downing, Payroll Clerk, Finance Bureau. Richard W. Fuller, Voucher Examiner, Finance Bure m. Capt. William C. Hearon, Panama Canal Pilot, Navigation Division. Carl W. Hoffmeyer, Postal Clerk, Postal, Customs, and Immigration Division. Noble A. Phillips, Sheetmetal Worker, Industrial Bureau. Christian S. Skeie, Sanitation Inspector, Health Bureau. Frank D. Spencer, Hydrographic Engineer, Dredging Division. 15 YEARS Edward M. Altman, Magistrate, Balboa Magistrate's Court. Clarence L. Dimmick, Service Mechanic and Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Mechanic, Commissary Division. Russell E. Hileman, Housing Manager, Pedro Miguel, Housing Division. Douglas Jordan, Bricklayer and Boilermaker, Industrial Bureau. Ernest P. Muzzio, Construction Inspector (Plumbing), Contracts and Inspection Division. RETIREMENTS IN JANUARY Employees who retired at the end of January, their birthplaces, titles, length of service at retirement, and their future addresses are: Melville L. Booz, Pennsylvania; Cash Accounting Clerk, Office of the Comptroller; 26 years, 5 months, 12 days; address uncertain. John T. O'Donnell, Pennsylvania; Civil Engineering Aid, Maintenance Division; 26 years, 9 months, 20 days; Philadelphia, Pa. Acting Governor Conducts Conference {Continued from page 3) comparison was being studied. Sam Roe, of the Pacific Civic Council, asked if the daily air raid siren tests could not be made at some time other than at noon and if the daily tests are necessary. Attending the conference were: Colonel Paxson, Mr. Doolan, F. G. Dunsmoor, Administrative Assistant to the Governor, for the Administration; Henry C. Simpson, Marine Engineers; F. H. Hodges, Locomotive Engineers; S. J. Garriel, Plumbers; Mr. Lovelady; Robert C. Daniel, Conductors; M. J. Goodin, Mr. Rice, Mr. Hammond, and Mr. Roe, Civic Councils; Carl F. Maedl, Walter Wagner, Mr. Luhr, John R. Townsend, E. J. Husted, and Henry Chenevert, Central Labor Union; Otto Hemerichs, a visitor from the Washington office, and C. R. Vosburgh, Schools. Second Quarter — Fisral Year 1953 1952 loss Atlantic to Pai mm to X 1 1 1 1 1 1 i Total Total Total ( Commercial \ essels: ( Icean-going 956 964 1,920 1,596 1,335 Small 134 136 270 258 536 1 (I'M) 1,100 2, ion 1,854 1 S71 **U. S. Government vessels: Ocean-going 174 84 258 152 'Small . 43 52 95. 84 Total commercial and U. S. Government 1,307 1,236 2,543 2.090 *Yessels under 300 net tons or 500 displacement tons. "Vessels on which tolls are credited. Prior to July 1, ships transited free. 1951 < iovernment-operated Canal commercial traffic by nationality of vessels Second Quarter — Fiscal Year Nationality 1953 1952 1938 Number of transits Tons of cargo Number of transits Tons of cargo Number of transits Tons of cargo Argentine 2 4,270 3 297 11 5 25 3 47 31 1 36 1 19 115 1,523 1,871,704 50,899 40,252 29,926 16,676 235.345 26,451 2,200 153,920 9,400 163.541 139,349 British.. 342 13 8 33 4 46 38 1.985,014 80.322 57,113 34,871 20,162 192,353 26,174 297 1 1 447 7?0 Colombian Costa Rican. Danish. Ecuadorean. 56 220,973 38 50 26 99 153,249 55,900 238.848 141,777 28 83 19 1 3 Honduran 869 13 235 2 6 17 29 11 I 434 3,070 89,716 154,169 67,049 Irish : 12 37 81 33 5 2 30 5 229 112 7 5 8,230 178.416 496.489 198,441 15,643 10,837 144,044 2,338 825.438 583,123 14,663 24.268 Italian _. 13 72 46.192 418 525 Liberian Mexican Moroccan Netherlands. Nicaraguan. 23 135,513 74 205,439 Norwegian Panamanian Peruvian Philippine 210 91 6 7 4 861,976 491,110 1.986 40,216 11,656 151 39 1 795,486 94,155 1,148 2 4 990 Spanish.. 11 49 3 584 16 53,471 170,340 25,687 3,422,199 20,074 5 36 2 535 6 25,395 168,738 12,566 3,400,570 10,259 Swedish . Swiss 27 180,032 United States Venezuelan 464 2,583,090 4 21 052 Total 1,920 9,183,754 1,596 8,215,609 1,335 6,670,241 Reactivation Of Civil Defense Moves Ahead (Continued from page 1) will have a woman alternate. The Civic Councils are also selecting a head warden for U. S.-rate townsites who will be known as a Zone Commander. The Zone Commander in turn will select Section Commanders, most of whom will be women and each of whom will be responsible for an average of 25 families. They will organize first aid, child care, light rescue and fire guard teams in their respective neighborhoods. The same procedure will be followed in the local rate townsites with the exception that the local rate school principals of each community are selecting the Zone Commander in lieu of a Canal-wide local rate civic organization. Each warden will be trained in a course to be conducted by Lieutenant Dolan when he returns from Washington and each will be responsible for passing down civil defense information to his neighborhood group. Through this community effort, Lieutenant Dolan said, Civil Defense expects to teach each Canal Zone resident the elements of "self protection." that is, what to do when the siren sounds, what measures to take to protect themselves, how to take care of their families, their neighborhoods and, ultimately, the community. All teams will be mobile, to be called upon in case of need in another area, but the efforts of all will be coordinated to avoid duplication and confusion. First aid and Nurses' Aide training programs will be coordinated with the local chapter of the American Red Cross. In November 1904 the Isthmian Canal Commission's employees on the Isthmus totaled 3,500.

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16 THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW February 6, 1953 Donor Worries As His Boxer Goes To "Seeing Eye" School THESE POTENTIAL SEEING EYE DOGS are the pups, Duke, about to make contact with the bones offered by his master, Charles E. Reilly, and Crony, shown with her back to the camera. On the right is the Reillys' pet Boxer, Pippin, who sired these pups and the Boxer, Gee, donated to The Seeing Eye and recently graduated from guide dog training with a new, blind owner. No final grade from a crucial examination ever was awaited with more hope and apprehension than the reports Charles E. Reilly received while the Boxer he donated to the blind was going through "Seeing Eye School." By the time that dog, "Gee," had made the grade and was graduated with a new blind owner, Mr. Reilly, Chief Accountant for the Commissary Division, was training and worrying about the potentialities of two more tentative candidates. The present potential Seeing Eye dogs are 20-week-old "Crony" ("Gigolo's Crona"), sister of "Gee" ("Gigolo's Rubicon" ARC W-256367), and 18week-old "Duke" ("Lustig Duke"), half brother of the successful candidate. Mr. Reilly has already told The Seeing Eye that either puppy is theirs for the asking and because of his wish to give the dog to that organization has turned down an offer of $200 for the fine young specimen, Duke. It isn't enough that a dog owner is willing to part with his pet for the sake of the blind— even if the pet is some $300 worth of purebred like the handsome, fawn-colored Gee. Physique, health, temperament, and intelligence must be letter-perfect for the purpose if the puppies are to serve as Seeing Eye dogs. Mr. Reilly tentatively offered Gee to several training centers before he decided to send him to The Seeing Eye, Inc., in Morristown, N. J., the first such institution in the United States and still a leader in the field. Hard To Part With Dogs "It would not be easy to part with one of my dogs," he explained in making the offers, "unless it be to a trained beneficiary whose life would be bettered through our separation." Only German Shepherds are taken at some of the training centers and are in the majority at The Seeing Eye, where some Boxers and Labrador Retrievers are also used. The requirements of the training centers only heighten the little anxieties inherent in the ownership of fine dogs — which resemble more than anything else the pangs of parenthood. In the case of his personal pet Boxer "Gigolo" ("Pippin"), who sired the other pups, Mr. Reilly worried and wrote to kennel clubs about the dog's "ignoble timidity." Boxers are supposed to be fearless, but Gigolo just went away when threatened by other dogs— even those that were only about a fourth as big as he. Gigolo disposed of that worry when he outgrew the discouraging faint heart that belied his fine long British Boxer blood line. Mr. Reilly made arrangements to acquire that dog, the first Boxer that he had, while he was on vacation in England, in the summer of 1948. Then Mr. Reilly worried that Gigolo was going to be too big for his breed until he was assured by a kennel club that the dog's dimensions were perfect. Then there are the worries and infinite care that he gives to all his dogs to assure that their living conditions and diet are as nearly perfect as possible and to prevent all the maladies that can afflict dogs, particularly in the tropics. After Gee was accepted by Seeing Eye, came the anxieties of the dog's trip to New Jersey— some 2,500 air miles in a cramping crate in strange and possibly upsetting surroundings. Mr. Reilly made three telephone calls to Morristown and to airline offices before he assured himself that Gee was all right and safe with his new trainers. 5 Dog's Progress Reported I Then came a series of letters about _^i Gee's progress at the school. £J| "He is a handsome Boxer and appears *| to have an ideal temperament," came the g| first report from Seeing Eye on March <*| 26, 1952. "Of course we can tell much oil better about this after he is in training, gj| which will begin about 3 weeks from now.

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