Citation
Panama Canal review

Material Information

Title:
Panama Canal review
Creator:
United States -- Panama Canal Commission
Panama Canal Company
Place of Publication:
Balboa Heights Republic of Panama
Publisher:
Panama Canal Commission
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Semiannual
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : col. ill. ; 28-34 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
PANAMA CANAL ZONE ( unbist )
Periodicals -- Panama Canal (Panama) ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Canal Zone ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
periodical ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1 (May 1950).
Issuing Body:
Vols. for 19 -19 issued by Panama Canal Co.; <Oct. 1, 1980-> by Panama Canal Commission.
General Note:
Title from cover.
General Note:
"Official Panama Canal publication"--19 -19 .
General Note:
Description based on: Oct. 1, 1980.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
01774059 ( OCLC )
67057396 ( LCCN )
0031-0646 ( ISSN )

Related Items

Related Item:
Panama Canal review en espagñol

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text














UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA
LIBRARIES




















Digitized by the Internet Archive


University


in 2010 with funding from
of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries


http://www.archive.org/details/panamacanalrevie142pana






T- __ N AL_
n. .?,
/a-"L^^,


IN THIS ISSUE
Raking Canal Waters
Alliance For Progress
Moving Job: King Size
Isthmus Industry


- 1


ii
44 -

JmFw








K .Nw


II


b


,A


.. .


-,V I


.' I

~-*.&J
~& c


AMonumental tfabor c4 Aonument Zo tiabor


r


Ii
.~B~C;r
1


-3~c ii:


9-1w


tl


r --







ROBERT J. FLEMING, JR., Governor-President
DAVID S. PARKER, Lieutenant Governor
FRANK A. BALDWIN
Panama Canal Information Officer


Official Panama Canal Publication
Published monthly at Balboa Heights, C.Z.
Printed at the Printing Plant, Mount Hope, C. Z.
Distributed free of charge to all Panama Canal Employees


JOSEPH CONNOR, Press Officer
Publications Editors
ROBERT D. KERR and Julo E. BRICENO
Editorial Assistants
EUNICE RICHARD, TOBI BITTEL,and TOMAs A. CUPAS


Power 7or Progre-d
MANPOWER AND BRAINPOWER of working men
and women hold the key to our future as they have
created the present from struggles, success, and failures
of the past.
This is the message of Labor Day, which some of us
paused to observe this week. First laws officially recogniz-
ing Labor Day date back nearly 80 years. The Labor Day
message is a message of tribute to contributions to
progress and security; of recognition of the need to dedi-
cate ourselves to the effort to solve still pressing problems;
to urge that we crystallize our thinking as to goals; to
make certain of the validity of the goals.
With growth of power came recognition of labor's
responsibility to serve not only the interests of the
working force, but also to serve and protect national
interests. This recognition has been made evident in many
ways, among them expanded and expanding support of
civic and national causes.
Social consciousness for social progress has helped
knock down the barriers of geographical and social isola-
tion, illiteracy, and lack of educational opportunities.
Broad participation by labor in economic growth has
helped cure these economic diseases. It has helped kill
the seeds sown in the fertile soil of ignorance and poverty
by cynical foes of the basic ideas and ideals of democracy.
It has been said that freedom will be lost the day we
lose the ability to defend it. Labor has proven its strength
and power for progress in both war and peace. It cant
prove them further in freedom's future.

Index
Raking Canal Waters ---------------------- 3
Alliance for Progress-------------_---_----- 4
Printing Plant Moving Soon_-------_---------- 6
Isthmus Industry_---------------------_-- 8
Promotions and Transfers -------_- _--____- 10
Canal History, Retirements -------------------- 12
Fiscal Year Shipping Tables-__________________ 14
Shipping ------------------ ------__-- 16

ON OUR COVER is a portion of the story of the Twen-
tieth Centurv miracle of tlie building of the Panama
Canal, one of the most gigantic projects on which a labor
force ever was engaged. The scene shows the construc-
tion of part of Miraflores Locks, with attention centered
on one of the huge culverts that gravity feeds the water
to raise and lower ships transiting from ocean to ocean.
This is part of one of the four main mural panels decorat-
ing the rotunda of the Administration Building. They
have been a major Canal Zone attraction for years.


New Marine Director
NEWLY ABOARD as Marine Director of the Panama
Canal is Capt. M. J. Prince, USN, below, who comes
here from duty as commanding officer of the U.S.S.
Plymouth Rock, a large landing ship, dock, amphibious
type.
Prior to that command, for 3 years he was assistant
division director of the Navy Command Systems Divi-
sion, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. His previous
service record also lists command of a destroyer and other
line and staff assignments in operations, intelligence,
communications, gunnery, personnel, and training.
He was commissioned an ensign in the Naval Reserve
in 1940 and his regular Navy commission is dated 1946.
Captain Prince saw duty on the seaplane tender Hulbert,
the battleship Iowa, and as commanding officer of an
LST during World War II.
He holds the Commendation Medal with Combat "V"
in addition to campaign ribbons, Victory Medal, and
a European Occupation ribbon.
A native of Seattle, Wash., his official residence is
California, and he has resided mainly in the San Diego,
Calif., and Washington, D.C., areas. He attended school
in Los Angeles and is a graduate of UCLA; later, while
in the service, also attending the General Line Officer's
School and Senior School of the Marine Corps at
Quantico, Va.
Captain Prince succeeds Capt. Richard G. Jack, who
was reassigned in July as commanding officer of the
U S Nax\:il Recei'ing Stjtion at Brooklyn. N.Y


pr lb~






















SI





--_- -- r -- -- '-
^ -=.

._ -


Raking Canal Waters

CLEARING PANAMA CANAL waters isn't merely for the sake of appearance.
Aquatic growth could become a threat to Canal traffic if not controlled. Large masses
float out and get in locks operating valves. They could be sucked into the water
intakes of transiting ships and plug condensers. The attractive water hyacinth, which
in the past has caused about 80 percent of the problem, still is prevalent. Growth of
aquatic grasses such as coontail, fanwort, and elodea grass, however, has been so
rapid that these now account for approximately half the difficulty.

This is the business end of the rake system, 30 feet wide, 16 feet deep, and 10 feet across
from the teeth, as it was being fabricated at Dredging Division. No, that man isn't holding
it up. It was securely shored up with two 12 x 12-inch blocks. He's at work helping wire
the heavy mesh screen to the rake framework.


The rake above, operated from a derrick
barge, has been removing about 120 tons
of aquatic grass daily from Canal waters.
One type, a recent intruder, has a stem as
much as 50 feet long and grows so dense
small fish can't penetrate it to destroy culex
and mansonia mosquito larvae which cling
to it. When the rake was put to work, there
was an estimated 4 million square feet of
aquatic growth, some of it apparently
moving into deeper waters.
A rakeful of "grass" ready to be unloaded
into a scow. Some comes out roots and all.
Loaded 1,000-cubic yard scows are taken
through the locks out into the Pacific and
dumped. The aquatic growth won't propa-
gate in salt water and deteriorates rapidly.
An estimated 10,600,000 floating and
anchored aquatic plants were removed in
fiscal year 1963 at a cost of $67,500.







Alliance Boosts Panama's



Accelerating Growth Rate


Farm to market road project in Code
Province.


THE ALLIANCE for Progress is pick-
ing up momentum in Panama, where it
contributed substantially to a healthy
acceleration in the economic growth
rate during the past year.
Panama's industrial production,
foreign and domestic trade, and con-
struction activities reached encouraging
levels during the final quarter of 1962.
Output of the major food crops was
also larger than a year earlier, due to
expansion in the area cultivated.
All indications are that the country's
economic growth rate accelerated
during the year, according to the U.S.
Embassy in Panama City. Tentative
estimates of Panama's aggregate 1962
output indicate that the gross national
product amounted to approximately
$500 million at current prices, an in-
crease of roughly 8.5 percent over 1961,
and that per capital GNP was approxi-
mately $445, a gain of about 5.5
percent.
One of the major contributing factors
was the expanding public investment
under the Alliance for Progress. Ten
additional rural schools were completed
during the fourth quarter, making a
total of 19 built under the Community
Aided Rural School Construction Pro-
gram since its inception early in 1962.


Contracts had been awarded for 8 more
school plants totaling 168 classrooms,
representing an investment of about
$1.5 million.
Five integrated health centers had
also been contracted for by the end of
1962. Resource surveys were under
way for hydroelectric power, minerals,
forestry, and fisheries, and a study on
the development of chemical industries
is also being prepared.
Work was started on the construction
of a terminal fish market which will
include facilities for the refrigeration,
storage, and processing of fish. It will
service recently established fishing
cooperatives in the commercially un-
developed Central Provinces area on
the Gulf of Panama, which are jointly


This article is a condensation of
one appearing in a recent issue of
International Commerce, a publica-
tion of the U.S. Department of Com-
merce. Since it was published, as
an additional factor in Panama's
economy, U.S. Embassy reports indi-
cate that expenditures in Panama
originating in the Canal Zone
amounted to $82 million in calendar
year 1962.


rIN LATIN AMERICA THERE ARE BIG DIFFERENCES IN PER CAPITAL INCOME ... AS WElA T
IN LATIN AMERICA THERE ARE BIG DIFFERENCES IN PER CAPIIA INCOME ... AS W;EIIA THErtio-T. ff CHOW"


.A rail Laits .m r.- I r ? i


Argeoliea
Bolivia
Branil
Chlil
Colomhbia
Cosla Rica
Dominicao Republic

El Sal.ador
Gualemala
Honduras

Panama
f Paiaguay
Peru
Veneureli


Argeolina
Bolivia
Braril
Chile
Colaslbia
Costa Rida
Dominican Repnuhlic
Ecuador
El Salkador
Gualemala
Honduras
Menico
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Veneruela


0 100 200 300 400 500
GDP (WIr., dr.mstlir pr.iu't.m)l ,per cipr.i in "tfeal r ens-19C0 $
.ci.aee I'.V. eron'.micC'mu,:,cm'i.n .;r L.aiin Aomen am f\I


-2 -1


SEPTEMBER 1963






sponsored by AID, CARE, and the
Pan-American National Agency for
Economic Development (ANDE).
An outstanding 1962 accomplish-
ment was the completion of 180 kilo-
meters of farm-to-market roads, which
will serve an estimated 10,000 rural
people in previously isolated commu-
nities and should stimulate a transition
from subsistence farming to small-scale
commercial production.
During 1962 Panama negotiated ex-
ternal loans totaling $20.2 million, the
major share of which was unobligated
at the end of the year and will be avail-
able to help finance economic and social
development projects in 1963.
Other major factors in Panama's
accelerated economic growth rate were
a rising income from transactions in
goods and services with the Canal Zone,
as a pick-up in business activity in the
Colon area due to an increase in the
Colon Free Zone's trade, and the opera-
tion of the new $30 million petroleum
refinery, beginning in the second
quarter of 1962.
The Colon Free Zone's trade, which
slipped in the third quarter, rebounded
to a record high in the fourth quarter.
The total 1962 trade turnover reached
an all-time peak of $177.4 million. The
favorable balance rose to $35.7 million,
an increase of $4.6 million over the
1961 figure.
The value of building permits issued
in Panama City dropped toward the
end of the year, but the $5.7 million
total reported for the second half of
1962 was the highest second semester
figure of any recent year. A large part
of this gain was in permits issued to
private firms and individuals. The
shortage of mortgage money is being
ca3jsd through the resumption of home
rmortgag,: lending by the Social Security
Fund. ri:ulting in good prospects for
an ircrcase in private residential
co-nructior: in 1963.
Another development which holds
promise of stimulating private con-
struction was the enactment on Jan-
uary 31, 1963 of a law authorizing the
establishment of an Institute of Insured
Mortgages. Press reports indicate that
it will provide for insuring business
and professional construction up to,
$500,000 and private housing up to
$10,000. They also indicate that a
savings and loan association will form
part of the organization.
To give more consideration to the
new budget presented by the President
last October 16, the fiscal year which
formerly coincided with the calendar
year, was changed. Law No. 47 of
November 15, 1962, adopted a fiscal
year which begins March 1. On
(See p. 11)


Demonstration
of use of
animal-drawn
plow.
Many campesinos
now are using
only sticks
for plowing.











*fr
'4


-. ..
6" -: ". "' '



';5.: .. ,, ;C_ i.
.


#' 7 ,


ESTA CONSTRUCCION
ES EL RESULTED DE LA COOPEo:C.ON
ENTPU LOS PUfBir.f lr I.
REPUELICA DE PANA"


-~ -s ----
.e~
~L~ ji~-~iC~C_
rC r.~s I I?.~

.....


One of the many new school buildings constructed in the Republic of Panama with Alliance
for Progress funds.


In an Alliance
fishing cooperative
organized in
Panama,
70 fishermen in
the villages
El Farall6n and
El Higo are
replacing their old
equipment and
establishing a new
marketing system,
with a $40,000
refrigerated
processing plant
part of the
package. At right
is one of the
old cayucos
previously used.


T'HE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW





I- -. -.--. |
-'4 &*

6~ 4
.:;1.IF

l~ Ii7 L i


r-
-- --i


JAW

This view gives an idea of the size of the job ahead when the Printing Plant is moved across the Isthmus from Mount Hope to Building
911, La Boca, on the Pacific side starting next month.


3- .-- --


it r

p~a


The composing room. Here is where the type for all sorts
of jobs is assembled, locked in forms, and prepared for
printing on one of the presses.

A collator-,
in the form
FOR PRINTING PLANT sees i
rynhv for ti


The pressroom, showing several of the 18 presses used for all types and
sizes of work which require different technical treatment.


stitcher, one of the largest pieces of equipment to be moved into a new home
er La Boca retail store. This machine places the previously printed and folded
oper order on the conveyer, gathers, and stitches them into a finished pamphlet
rimming. The new Printing Plant quarters are being remodeled and converted
at a cost of more than $150,000, including air conditioning.


Moving Days


Coming Up


r_-
-
I
Al
~1


... J .. .




-' Ui lL-c-


The big offset press at right prints The
Panama Canal Review. Jack Purvis, press-
room foreman, makes an adjustment. The
task of moving huge pieces of equipment
like this necessitated planning for a three-
phase moving job expected to take in all
about 6 weeks.









In the background below is a huge knife
grinder to sharpen paper cutter blades. The
machine in the foreground folds and slits
pages of brochures and similar printing
jobs. The Printing Plant will stay in busi-
ness during the entire move, with parts of
the work being done on both sides of the
Isthmus at the same time.



0


0.l


A big power cutter edge-trimming copies of The Panama
Canal Review. Mario Torres, cutter, mans the controls.
Bases are being prepared, and electrical circuits readied, for
all machinery to be put into place in the new location.
A collator-gluer, similar to the one at the bottom of the
opposite page. This one, however, glues printed matter into
pads. Donald LaBeach inspects adjustments. All the
Printing Plant equipment will be moved by the Industrial
Division via the Panama Railroad.


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW





-wY~


Night view of process area showing the crude furnace and distilla-
tion tower with the pilot flare stack in background. The furnace
chimney stack in foreground is approximately 1% times the height
of the Panama Hilton Hotel.


9J twmui

Jndwutry


Original jungle, swamps and snake pits
were cleared, filled hydraulically with coral
to form a site for the process plant, storage
tanks, shops, offices, and laboratories.

RIM i


Aerial view of the refinery. Tanker dock and barge loading dock are in fo;
Panama's first deep water pier. The 3S/ million barrels of tank storage el
proper is in the center and the pilot



One of the most spectacular installa-
tions is for storage. The tanks-among
them four of the world's largest-have
a total capacity of 332 million barrels
(1 barrel equals 42 gallons), of which
a million barrels is in storage tanks
built in the last few months.
The refinery's salt-water pumping in-
stallation for cooling purposes requires
53 million gallons of water daily,
approximately the amount needed for
transiting a ship from ocean to ocean
through the Panama Canal.
The two steam turbine generators
required to serve the refinery, each of
3,000 kilowatts, supply enough electric
power for a city the size of Colon.


REF1NERIA PANAMA'S plant on Las
Minas Bay 5 miles east of Colon, built
at an original cost of $30 million, is
the largest industrial installation in the
Republic of Panama.
It also represents the largest foreign
investment in industry in the Republic.
The firm is owned by Continental Oil
Co. and National Bulk Carriers. The
refinery was officially dedicated by
President Don Roberto F. Chiari on
April 24, 1962.
Work was begun in September 1959
with the clearing and filing of a 200-
acre site in Las Minas Bay, where the
processing, storage, and port installa-
tions were erected. Six million cubic
yards of material were dredged from
the bottom of the bay to open a deep-
water channel. The material was used
to raise the refinery site about 10 feet
above sea level.
Construction of the refinery itself
began in September 1960.
More than 100 miles of steel pipe,
more than 10,000 tons of steel, and
more than 120,000 bags of Panamanian
cement have gone into the plant.


l
35FtMRIIA :,





" A '1


und. To extreme left center is the dry cargo dock,
to the right, out of the picture. The refinery
to the left.



With construction of the refinery,
Panama had its first deep-water cargo
pier (28 feet) for ocean-going ships.
The refinery operates its own deep
water pier (40 feet) for super-tankers.
At the peak of construction activity,
more than 1,300 workers, 95 percent of
them Panamanians, were employed on
the project. Refineria Panama now em-
ploys 320 persons and the percentage
of Panamanian personnel is above 86
percent, notwithstanding the technical
nature of most operations.
This reflects a policy established by
the company long before it started
operations: training the largest possible
number of Panamanians, with the ulti-


K. H. Dunbar, president and chairman of
the Board of Directors of Refineria Panama.

THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW 9


The refinery is highly automated. All process units are operated from a single control room.
A semigraphic flow diagram is above the electronic units and in the foreground an operator
is at the central control desk.


Super-tanker
unloading crude i *"
across Refineria
PanamA's dock at -- '''
Las Minas Bay
directly into lft"- Wj
storage tanks for I I
later processing 'w.. 7q
into various
refined fuel oil
products.






mate goal of operating a plant run by
Panamanian personnel. Training has
consisted of not only on-site instruction,
but also of scholarship grants to enable
personnel to become specialists in
various phases of engineering.
Refineria PanamA has a processing
capacity of 55,000 barrels of petroleum
products per day-enough to supply the
entire Republic of Panama, the Canal
Zone, transiting ships, and leaving
some for export. Products are tested
for quality under exacting interna-
tional standards in the refinery's own
laboratory.
The products are: Gasoline of all
octane ratings for automobiles, kero-
sene, jet aviation fuel, diesel oil for
trucks, tractors and industrial motors,
marine diesel fuel, asphalt and asphalt
products, and liquified petroleum gas
for domestic and commercial use.
The refinery operates two areas for
bunkering ocean-going ships by barge,
and also uses facilities available at the


refinery pier itself and at the Cristobal
and Balboa piers. The bunkering area
in the Atlantic is in Colon harbor, inside
the Cristobal breakwater. The other is
off Taboga Island, in the Pacific.
The fact that additions to storage
facilities and plant improvements
became necessary only 15 months after
operations began is evidence of the
wide acceptance of the refinery's
products in Panama's market and the
growing demand.
Since Refineria PanamA began opera-
tions, the prices of a number of petro-
leum products have decreased as a
direct benefit to consumers in Panama.
The contribution of Refineria Pana-
mA to the country's economy is felt not
only in employment, but also in pur-
chases by the firm from other Panama-
nian industries and commerce. And the
large investment made is evidence of
confidence in the future industrial
development and economic stability of
Panama.


~i~-~in ;-::II
~: 51~.~~fre~EI I
~~ :'LI, .
7k~..*:

~~' .f
-;~FCI r~
~ -I~ i. ''
irrl .







PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS


EMPLOYEES promoted or transferred
between July 5 and August 5 (within-
grade promotions and job reclassifica-
tions are not listed):
CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
Postal Division
Walter C. Reed, Clerk, Railroad Division,
to Distribution Clerk, Substitute.
Stanford Levy, Jr., Apprentice (Painter,
3d Year), Maintenance Division, to
Distribution Clerk, Substitute.
Ashton A. Brown, Jr., Laborer (Cleaner),
Maintenance Division, to Window Clerk,
Substitute.
Alfredo T. Brooks, Waiter, Supply Divi-
sion, to Distribution Clerk, Substitute.
ENGINEERING AND
CONSTRUCTION BUREAU
Joanne L. Allen, Geologist (General) to
Geologist (Engineering).
Simeon Blake, Louis A. Browne, Juan
Melony, Navigational Aid Worker, to
laintenanceman (Distribution Systems).
Electrical Division
George H. Egger, Jr., Electrician, to
Test Operator-Foreman (Electrical-
Power System).
Arlington A. Petro, Clerk, Navigation Divi-
sion, to Apprentice (Electrician, Ist
Year).
Winston H. Forde, Surveying Aid, to
Apprentice (Electrician-Telephone, 1st
Year).
Maintenance Division
Carl L. Simons, Lead Foreman (Public
Works Road Paving), to Lead Foreman
(Public Works Road Construction).
Norman H. Pedersen, Jr., Apprentice
(Sheetmetal Worker, 4th Year), to Sheet-
metal Worker.
Harold M. Meyer, Apprentice (Plumber,
4th Year), to Plumber.
Joseph L. Cicero, Apprentice (Plumber,
4th Year), to Pipefitter.
Ricardo Chen, Apprentice (Welder, 4th
Year), to Welder.
Cecil G. Callender, Clerk-Typist to Clerk.
Winfield Ford, Timekeeper to Clerk.
Gilbert Myers, Clerk to Procurement Clerk.
Rupert V. Arthur, Leader Asphalt or
Cement Worker to Lead Foremen
(Public Works Road Paving).
Esteban Justavino, Laborer (Heavy) to
Helper Welder.
Joaquin E. Triana, Laborer (Cleaner),
Supply Division, to Laborer.
IIEALTI BUREAU
Jack E. Van Hoose, Housing Project
Assistant, Office of Chief, Community
Services Division, to Graduate Intern
(Administrative Services), Office of the
Director.
Gorgas Hospital
Clotilde Benavides, Staff Nurse (Medicine
and Surgery), to Staff Nurse (Surgery).
Mary M. Quigley, Staff Nurse to Staff
Nurse (Medicine and Surgery).
Dr. Edward W. Healey, Hospital Resident,
2d Year, to Hospital Resident, 3d Year.


Carmen Ho, Clerk (Stenographer), Coco
Solo Hospital, to Clerk-Dictating Ma-
chine Transcriber.
Howard A. Thompson, Office Machine
Operator to Clerk.
Coco Solo Hospital
Nicolas D. Bishop, Counterman, Supply
Division, to Messenger.
Simeon N. Senior, Laborer (Cleaner), Divi-
sion of Schools, to Laborer.
Corozal Hospital
Joan W. Thompson, Staff Nurse (Pedia-
trics), Gorgas Hospital, to Head Nurse
(Psychiatry).
Rosaura Cardoze, Clinical Social Worker
to Supervisory Clinical Social Worker.
MARINE BUREAU
Navigation Division
William E. Weigle, Jr., Marine Traffic
Controller to Supervisory Marine Traffic
Controller.
Herbert S. Driscoll, James H. Hagan,
General Foreman (Docking and Undock-
ing) to General Foreman (Harbor)
(Assistant Harbormaster).
Industrial Division
Burton E. Davis, General Engineer (Plant
Engineer, Plant Branch) to Supervisory
General Engineer (Plant).
Raul A. Swalm, Apprentice (Shipfitter,
4th Year) to Shipfitter.
Rodolfo C. Soley, Seaman, Dredging Divi-
sion, to Apprentice (Sheetmetal Worker,
1st Year).
Locks Division
Leslie W. Croft, Control House Operator
to General Foreman (Lock Operations).
Oliver H. Hendrickson, Lead Foreman
(Lock Operations) to General Foreman
(Lock Operations).
Lloyd M. Smith, Leader Lock Operator
(Electrician) to Control House Operator.
Woodrow W. Rowland, Lock Operator
(Electrician) to Leader Lock Operator
(Electrician).
Richard N. Phillips, Apprentice (Machinist,
4th Year) to Machinist.
Robert L. Webb, Machinist to Lock Oper-
ator (Machinist).
Roswell D. Boston, Jr., Electrician to Lock
Operator (Electrician).
Hubert J. Jordan, Apprentice (Electrician,
3d Year) from Electrical Division.
Cornelio Trotman, Helper Lock Operator
to Painter.
Antonio Castro, Painter (Maintenance) to
Painter.
Arnold South, Helper Lock Operator to
Leader Maintenanceman (Rope and
Wire Cable).
Jerome E. Steiner, Jr., Distribution Clerk,
Substitute, Postal Division, to Appren-
tice (Electrician, Ist Year).
Joseph D. Powlett, Carpenter (Nlainte-
nance) to Maintenanceman.
James E. Scott, Helper Lock Operator to
Maintenanceman.
Leonardo A. Illueca, Helper Lock Operator
to Painter (Maintenance).
Cesario Rujano, Seaman (Launch), Dredg-
ing Division, to Linchandler.


Claude C. Jesse, Oiler (Floating Plant),
Dredging Division, to Linehandler.
Clement A. Griffiths, Amott B. Julien,
Samuel Walker, Linehandler to Helper
Lock Operator.
Basilio Acosta, Jose C6rdoba, Alfred Hall,
Fireman (Floating Plant), Dredging
Division, to Linehandler.
OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER
Duane A. Rigby, Accountant, to Cost
Accountant, Accounting Division.
SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY SERVICE
BUREAU
Jesus M. Mena, Field Tractor Operator, to
Lead Foreman (Grounds), Community
Services Division.
Supply Division
Joseph B. Burgoon, Laundry and Dry
Cleaning Plant Superintendent (Laundry
Manager) to Laundry and Dry Cleaning
Plant Manager.
Frank E. Day, Assistant Commissary Store
Manager to Laundry and Dry Cleaning
Plant Superintendent.
Norma E. Hamilton, Secretary (Stenog-
raphy), Office of the Director, to Admin-
istrative Assistant, Office of General
Manager.
Alfred A. Cox, Guest House Clerk to Guest
House Assistant.
Hilda F. Mootoo, Clerk-Typist to Teller
(Typing).
Bernice C. Barnett, Grocery Attendant to
Sales Clerk.
Mildred Z. Johnson, Clerk to Sales
Checker.
Edna L. Tipton, Clerk-Typist, from Divi-
sion of Preventive Medicine and Quaran-
tine.
Kermit Pusey, Assistant Cook to Cook.
Nicomedes Fria, Messenger to Storekeep-
ing Clerk.
Ignacio G6ndola, Garbage Collector, Com-
munity Services Division, to Truck
Driver.
Wilfort B. Gordon, Duncan S. Wil-
liams, Jr., Laborer (Heavy) to Ware-
houseman.
Ralph H. Worme, Laborer to Milk Plant
Worker.
Vivian E. Brooks, Laundry Worker (Heavy)
to Extractor and Tumblerman.
Gilberto Anaya, Railroad Trackman, Ter-
minals Division, to Laborer (Heavy).
Llewellyn J. Bowen, Package Boy to
Laborer.
Rubon Olmos, Foods Service Worker to
Utility Worker.
TRANSPORTATION AND TERMINALS
BUREAU
Terminals Division
William D. MeArthur, Leader Liquid
Fuels Wharfman to Liquid Fuels Dis-
patcher.
Leyton B. Ellis, Pablo Galvin, Medardo
Ovalle, Enrique Pich6n, Albert iM.
Rowe, Dock Worker to Stevedore.
George M. Ottey, Milk Plant Worker,
Supply Division, to Cargo Marker.
Percival McLenan, Laborer, Maintenance
Division, to Stevedore.
George C. Clarke, Alfred F. Madeam,


SEPTEMBER 1963






Hugo Salazar, Arnold C. Sandiford, Utility
Worker, Supply Division, to Cargo
Marker.
Motor Transportation Division
Minnie B. Burton, Clerk-Stenographer,
Office of Director, Engineering and
Construction Bureau, to Clerical Assist-
ant (Stenography).
Ivan E. Haywood, Motor Vehicle Dis-
patcher to Supervisory Motor Vehicle
Dispatcher.
Albert D. Lord, School Bus Driver to
Motor Vehicle Dispatcher.
Courtney E. Jarvis, Apprentice (Auto-
motive Mechanic, 3d Year) to Auto-
motive Mechanic.
Lorenzo Barrera, Linehandler (Deckhan),
Navigation Division, to Truck Driver.
Joseph Lancelot, Utility Worker, Supply
Division, to Truck Driver.
Thomas L. J. Rowe, Waiter, Supply Divi-
sion, to Automotive Equipment Service-
man.
Railroad Division
Calvin M. Landrum, Lead Foreman (Rail-
road Track) to Lead Foreman (Railroad
Yard).
OTHER PROMOTIONS which did
not involve changes of title:
James P. MacLaren, Supervisory Sanitary
Engineer (Chief, Division of Sanitation)
Health Bureau.
Roscoe M. Collins, Raymond R. Will,
Chief Foreman (Harbor) (Harbormaster)
Navigation Division.
Ralph L. Stinson, Jr., Digital Computer
Systems Analyst, Accounting Policies
and Procedures Staff.
Robert L. Siedle, Clinical Social Worker,
Corozal Hospital.
Gilbert M. Smith, Accountant, Accounting
Division.
Louis E. Egea, Construction Inspector
(General), Contract and Inspection Divi-
sion.
Jacob C. Baker, James A. Jones, Joseph A.
Maganini, Admeasurer, Navigation Divi-
sion.
Maria del C. Hernfndez, Secretary
(Stenography), Office of Governor-
President.
Margaret L. Canavaggio, Cargo Claims
Clerk, Terminals Division.
Thelma M. Sasso, Clerk-Stenographer,
Maintenance Division.
Julio Aponte, Jr., Cafeteria Manager,
Supply Division.
Margaret F. Evans, Accounts Maintenance
Clerk (Stenography), Office of the
Director, Engineering and Construction
Bureau.
Herman J. Feurtado, Supervisory Time-
keeper, Terminals Division.
Ovid A. Laurie, Clerk, Community Serv-
ices Division.
Cristobal A. Buddle, Nicholas J. Ford,
Clayton F. Osborne, Guard, Terminals
Division.
Epifanio Zamora, Grounds Maintenance
Equipment Operator, Community Serv-
ices Division.
Carlyle S. Babb, Clerk (Work Orders),
Maintenance Division.
Ashton Brooks, Aroldo A. Young, Book-
keeping Machine Operator, Accounting
Division.
Diamantina E. Davis, Card Punch Oper-
ator, Accounting Division.
Myrtle 0. Campbell, Edith C. Harper,
Leonora C. John, Sales Clerk, Supply
Division.
Dawson Jolley, Storekeeping Clerk, Supply
Division.


~~1.


;~~'~-


1E PUBLIC DE PA N A
FTADlOLU UN'OOS DE AMIicIa


'V-.............I

-- EL~
~, ~YI 'L 2c -


The self-help housing program in Panama envisages a total of 540 homes in the suburbs of
Panama City and the interior. A total of $600,000 has been allocated for this program.
Future tenant-owners provide the labor and some of the materials, while the Panama
government provides the land.


Alliance Boosts Panama's Growth Rate
(Continued from p. 5)
January 30 the National Assembly
approved an ordinary budget of $77.3
million for the fiscal year, a $10.5
million increase over 1962. Receipts for
1962 totaled $67.9 million, an in-
crease of $5.8 million over 1961. Indi-
cations are that the 1962 budget was
more nearly in balance than in most
recent years, when sizeable deficits
were incurred. The 1963 budget,
however, is expected to have a deficit
of approximately $3 million.
The only general tax change
approved by the National Assembly
during the last session involved a
surtax of 1 percent on all imports. This
measure is designed to supplement
Government revenues and keep the
deficit as low as possible.
Banana exports were off sharply in
the fourth quarter, reflecting the after-
effects of the third quarter blowdowns.
A part of this decline also was due to
the December shipment stoppage
resulting from the dock strike in the
United States.
Fourth quarter shrimp exports,
though down seasonally, are estimated
at $2 million, bringing the yearly total
to an estimated record high of approxi-
mately $8 million, an increase of more
than one-third over 1961.
Incomplete trade figures indicate
that during the first quarter of 1962,
the United States took close to 90
percent of Panama's exports and
supplied slightly less than 50 percent of
its imports.
Roughly 13 percent of the Free
Zone's outgoing shipments in 1962
represented deliveries to Panama,
which totaled $14.1 million, or $2.9
million more than in 1961.
In response to an invitation to join


the Central American integration move-
ment, Panama has expressed a desire
for closer economic association with
members of the Organization of Central
American States (OCAS) but says that
it is not yet in a position to take a deci-
sion on full membership. It has been
implied that Panama will carefully
evaluate the effects that membership
could have on her international rela-
tions and economic structure, which is
based on the country's situation as a
place of international transit.
Although moderate increases in rice
and corn production appear likely due
to increased plantings, agriculture is
lagging behind other sectors of the
economy. This has been attributed to
continuing relatively low yields of both
rice and corn, and the general lack
of progress in raising agricultural
productivity.
The coffee situation also deteriorated
in 1962, with the new crop estimated
to be at least 25 percent smaller than
1961. One improvement has been in
beef cattle production, which has risen
in both quantity and quality.
Although Panama's imports seem
likely to increase more than exports, the
general outlook for 1963 holds promise
of a further rise in Panama's economic
growth rate.
A large increase in public works is
planned, utilizing funds now available
from grants and loans previously nego-
tiated under the Alliance for Progress
and receipts from the sale of newly
authorized bond issues by the Govern-
ment of Panama. Prospects also are
favorable for expansion of private
construction. The $9 million loan
which the Government of Panama
negotiated with private American in-
vestors in December reportedly will
be used to stimulate private investment
in construction and industry.


THF PANAMA CANAL REVIEW








CANAL HISTORY


50 ?earJ dAgo
CONSTRUCTION of temporary wing
dams was approved to curb erosion
taking place on the shore of Limon Bay
immediately to the west of the west
channel. A considerable section of the
shore had worn away. Studies of effects
of the temporary dams were planned to
determine whether permanent structure
would be needed.
An official circular extended the
territory within which hunting was per-
mitted to include all the area in the
Zone west of the Canal between the
Atlantic Ocean and the Mandingo
River. Hunting of birds remained pro-
hibited by Executive order pending
issuance of regulations.
An Executive order declared it to be
unlawful for any person to operate an
"aeroplane, balloon, or flying machine
of any kind" in or across the Canal Zone
without authority from the Chief
Executive of the Canal Zone.


25 Year. cago
PRESIDENT Franklin D. Roosevelt
arrived at Balboa August 4 aboard the
U.S. Houston. In press conferences he
said he felt the good neighbor policy
was working out very well and found
things in the Canal Zone "running
awfully well."
During an informal interview later,
the President said a vast roadbuilding
program here would be recommended
to Congress as a Canal defense measure.
An outline of plans being considered
for increasing Canal capacity included
construction of a third set of locks,
1,200 by 125 feet, and raising the level
of Gatun Lake 5 feet or so to permit
transiting ships of deeper draft.


10 yearS a4go
THE MONTH of August went down
on the records as one of the hottest.
Temperatures on the Pacific side
reached 92 on 3 days before mid-
month. The long weather record for
Balboa Heights showed that an August
day with a temperature that high
occurred only about once every 3 years.
Plans were announced for reorganiza-
tion to make the Industrial Bureau a
division of the Marine Bureau and to
transfer the Dredging Division from
the Marine Bureau to the Engineering
and Construction Bureau.
Assignments were made to the 20
one-family houses on Empire Street in
Balboa, and residents of Ridge Road,
Balboa Heights, and 20 additional four-
family houses in Balboa Flats were
notified that those areas were to be
cleared for new quarters construction.


EMPLOYEES who retired in July, with
their positions at time of retirement and
years of Canal service:
James J. Belcourt, Lead Foreman (Railroad
Yard), Railroad Division, Pacific Side;
19 years, 3 months, 14 days.
George A. Bennard, Helper, Locomotive
Engineer, Railroad Division, Atlantic
Side; 22 years, 5 months, 28 days.
William Black, Maintenance Superinten-
dent, Locks Division, Pacific Side; 34
years, 7 months, 10 days.
Lionel Brown, Deckhand, Navigation Divi-
sion, Pacific Side; 20 years, 7 months,
12 days.
James F. Dougherty, Associate Supervisory
Inspector, Railroad Division, Atlantic
Side; 31 years, 11 months, 22 days.


-ACCIDENTS


FOR

THIS MONTH

AND

THIS YEAR


JULY

ALL UNIT:


( \SES


63 62
i31 206


YEAR TO DATE 1729


DIN
A I~--


"63 '62 '63 '62
14 12 148 121


1742 115(9) 72 15395 998 7667
I) -ck Overhaul injuries Includedl in total,


One year c4go
GOVERNOR FLEMING addressed a
group at the Pedro Miguel townsite for
the dedication of the streets of Jamaica,
Trinidad, and Tobago, named in honor
of the newly-independent West Indian
nations.
Canal Zone Police Lodge No. 1798,
American Federation of Government
Employees, was the first employee
organization granted formal recognition
by the Panama Canal organization
under the new Employee-Management
Corporation program.
The Reina Manuelita I, a Panama
Canal tourist launch, was officially
christened by Panama's first official Car-
nival Queen for whom the craft is
named: Dofia Manuelita Vallarino de
Morrice.


Allen R. Flinn, Leader Lock Operator
(Electrician), Locks Division, Atlantic
Side; 22 years, 5 months, 12 days.
Clarence A. Greene, Control House Oper-
ator, Locks Division, Atlantic Side; 25
years, 6 months, 21 days.
Bellccl A. Harris, Dock Worker, Terminals
Division, Atlantic Side; 4 years, 10
months, 24 days.
William G. Hoelzle, Police Private, Police
Division, Pacific Side; 22 years, 5
months, 22 days.
Mrs. Borghild H. Misenheimer, Teacher,
Junior High, U.S. Schools, Schools Divi-
sion, Pacific Side; 26 years, 4 months,
7 days.
Milton L. Nash, General Foreman, Lock
Operations, Locks Division, Atlantic
Side; 28 years, 9 months, 8 days.
Joseph J. Paul, Lead Foreman Stevedore
(Dock), Terminals Division, Atlantic
Side; 40 years, 5 months, 12 days.
Arthur B. Rigby, Locomotive Engineer,
Yard and Road, Railroad Division,
Pacific Side; 15 years, 1 months, 18 days.
Mrs. Carol G. Rigby, Accounting Clerk,
Electrical Division, Pacific Side; 18
years, 4 months, 22 days.
Luis A. Rodriguez, Leader Maintenance-
man (Rope and Wire Cable), Locks
Division, Pacific Side; 34 years, 6
months, 2 days.
Mahnga Singh, Stevedore, Terminals Divi-
sion, Atlantic Side; 33 years, 1 month,
27 days.
Subert Turbyfill, Instructor, Schools Divi-
sion, Pacific Side; 29 years, 7 months,
16 days.
Walter J. Wilkinson, Water System Con-
trolman, Maintenance Division. Atlantic
Side; 21 years, 10 months, 22 days.
Leonard Wolford, Supervisory Marine
Traffic Controller, Port Captain's Office,
Pacific Side; 23 years, 9 months, 5 days.


SEPTEMBER 1963


RETIREMENTS








ANNIVERSARIES

(On the basis of total Federal Service)


,MARINE BUR
Fed A. ewhar
/ ear Forea cks
ratio

SU;L A OMMUNIT
SE ICE BUREAU
Ernt lliams
St re.eeping Cle'

TRANSPORTATION AND
TERMINALS BUREAU
Egbert A. Williams
Helper Locomotive
Engineer


CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
Bernhard I. Everson
Civil Affairs Director

ENGINEERING AND/
CONSTRUCTION
BUREA
Nita B. Hartman
Supervisory Administra ve
Assistant
Bertie E. Allen
Wharfbuilde
Joseph Granger
Painter
Catalino Tuui6n
Blaster

MARINE BUREAU
Yane Leves
Towing Locomotive
Operator
Wilfred H. Anderson
Painter


SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY
SERVICES BUREAU
aron Mason


Utility VWrker
S Dudley H. TSotman
Serve Sation Attendant

T SRSPORTATION AND
TERMINALS BUREAU
Gerald L. Neal
Conductor,Yard
Cliff Sanders
Inspector carmann, wood,
and steel)
Harvey L. Jones
School Bus Driver


CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU
Edward C. Blount
Police Private
Clara Kelsay
Window Clerk
Margaret V. Whitman
Instructor (College)
Earl W. Wrenn
Fire Sergeant, Class 3

ENGINEERING AND
CONSTRUCTION
BUREAU
Lloyd M. Kent
Master, Towboat
Ewald A. Wiberg, Jr.
Electronics Mechanic
Eugenio Arauz
Sandblaster
Alfred W. Browne, Jr.
Oiler (Floating Plant)
Richard A. Lindo
Helper (General)
Pastor Marcelino
Helper Refrigeration and
Air Conditioning
Mechanic
Alberto McKenzie
Oiler (Floating Plant)
Maxwell S. Morgan
Stockman
Martin G. Naar
Helper Plumber
Joaquin NM. Ponce
Engineering Draftsman
(Electrical)
Edmond Smith
Leader Seaman
Luther B. Ward
Seaman

THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW


HEALTH BUREAU
Flora R. Hack
Staff Nurse (Medicine
and Surgery)
Amy I. Andrewn
General Supply Clerk
Jos6 D. Barrios
Ward Service Aid
Enrique Dominguez
Diet Cook
Alfonso Dutary
Laborer (Heavy, Pest
Control)
Clinton J. Everett
Ward Service Aid
Eugenio Heminde'
Hospital Att.dant
Vincent H. King /
Chauffeur
Lloyd B. McCoy
Nursing Assistant (Medicn e
and Surgery)
Jose A. Ramirez
Food Servic or r
Julian Rodri ez
Assistant bok I
Tombs Rodriguez
Boatman
Ger6nimo Rodriguez
Laborer (Heavy, Pest
Control)
MARINE BUREAU
Maurice F. Dunn
Master, Towboat
Hubert Hart
Towing Locomotive
Operator
Warren E. Ledoux
Lock Operator (Rigger)
George Bell
Linehandler (Deckhand)
Oliver H. Brathwaite
Helper Lock Operator
Hubert E. Brown
Truck Driver
Jose Cerda
Helper Lock Operator
Juan B. Gochez
Linehandler


Jose R. Gonzalez
Linehandler (Deckhand)
Emiliano Hall
Painter (Maintenance)
Osbourne Hoy
Seaman
Henry Madeam
Motor Launch Captain
Hubert L. Marie Rose
Linehandler (Deckhand)
Wilfred McQueen
Helper Lock Operator
Joel 4,.i
launch Dis cher
Sher

/ seaman Cx
janiel C. Thomr on
Linehandler ( iec and)
oy M. Wheatle
.lader Seapn /
irvin'WfTte
an eckhand)
Desmond Williams
Toolroom Attendant

OFFICE OF THE
COMPTROLLER
Edward H. Appin
Time Leave and Payroll
Clerk

SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY
SERVICES BUREAU
William D. McGowin
Commissary Store
Department Manager
(Supermarket)
Jose A. Arias
Lead Foreman
Eugene Burrell
Sales Checker


Ophelia Mh. Burrowes
Sales Checker (Retail
Store)
David L. Donaldson
Grounds Maintenance
Equipment Operator
Egbert N. Francis
Warehouseman
Aura Garcia
Presser (Garment)
Jacinto Jaramillo
Laborer (Cleaner)
Dorothy E. McDonald
Sales Clerk
Alejandro Ruiz
Crane Hookman
Stanley V. Waterman
Lead Foreman (Grounds)
Ethel C. Yearwood
Clerk-Typist

TRANSPORTATION AND
TERMINALS BUREAU
Luis De Gracia
Railroad Trackman
George H. Long
Stevedore
Oliver Maxwell
School Bus Driver
Jose F. Quifiinez
Clerk
Matthew E. Scott
Truck Driver
Edward G. Thomas
Leader Stevedore (Dock)
Rupert A. Vaughn
Truck Driver (Heavy)
Asisclo Zambrano A.
Linehandler


C ~











Transits
Month
1963 1962

July 1962_------- 978 931
August ------ ----- 950 934
September_------- 909 892
October--------- 882 935
November------- 924 891
December-------- 947 938
January 1963------ 769 917
February -------- 841 841
March ------- 991 980
April----------- 919 942
May---- ----- 988 984
June_ --------- 919 964
Total for
Fiscal year ---__ 11,017 11,149


Gross Tolls *
(In thousands of dollars)
Avg. No. Average
Transits 1963 1962 Tolls
19S1-5S 1951-5S
557 $4,980 $4,776 $2,432
554 4,926 4,749 2,403
570 4,617 4,523 2,431
607 4,411 4,646 2,559
568 4,684 4,443 2,361
599 4,983 4,870 2,545
580 3,871 4,735 2,444
559 4,313 4,388 2,349
632 5,084 5,098 2,657
608 4,761 4,961 2,588
629 4,991 5,122 2,672
599 4,747 4,979 2,528
7,062 $56,368 $57,290 $29,969


Before deduction of any operating expenses.

TRAFFIC MOVEMENT OVER MAIN TRADE ROUTES
The following table shows the number of transits of large, commercial vessels (300 net
tons or over) segregated into eight main trade routes:
Fiscal Year 1963
Avg. No.
1963 1962 Transits
1951-5S
United States intercoastal----- ------------ -- 384 468 656
East coast of United States and South America ---- 2,339 2,419 1,716
East coast of United States and Central America----- 485 368 508
East coast of United States and Far East -------- 2,049 2,404 1,028
United States/Canada east coast and Australasia ---- 316 276 204
Europe and west coast of United States/Canada----- 945 911 702
Europe and South America -- ------ ------ 1,260 1,140 474
Europe and Australasia -------------------- 388 409 341
All other routes _-- --------------------- 2,851 2,754 1,432
Total traffic_ __------- ------------1 11,017 11,149 7,061


CANAL COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC BY NATIONALITY
Fiscal Year 1963
1963 1 1962 1951-55
Nationality
Number Tons Number! Tons Average Average
of of of of number tons
transits cargo transits cargo transit of cargo
Belgian_ 47 120,779 50 168,559 6 8,086
British (& Can.)- 1,309 8,051,828 1,276 8,433,971 1,209 7,376,805
Chilean -----. 124 766,800 124 873,898 60 307,398
Chinese-----. 83 570,535 83 632,035 25 194,403
Colombian 236 359,721 269 i 445,870 146 167,759
Danish .------ 308 1,542,625 314 1,633,093 240 904,561
Ecuadorean 55 40,173 47 47,796 141 91,373
French - 118 718,913 132 948,314 130 575,637
German .---- 1,095 3,535,540 1,094 3,315,855 192 434,847
Greek ---- 603 5,752,927 771 7,338,271 110 943,600
onduran --- 219 149,695 83 117,075 399 514,150
Israeli------- 85 197,677 69 307,336 -------
Italian------- 168 857,769 220 1,439,806 -134 712,038
Japanese ----- 846 4,848,858 844 4,712,900 263 1,742,551
Lebanose----- 23 175,632 25 190,583 --- -
Liberian ----. 833 7,115,414 848 7,289,510 174- 1,083,735
Netherlands --- 692 2,947,898 558 2,904,548 120 595,178
Nicaraguan ..-- 60 77,959 18 32,522 21 19,465
Norwegian 1,441 9,956,686 1,491 11,111,031 791 3,221,592
Panamanian..-- 464 1,907,158 393 1,826,034 436 2,415,123
Peruvian ------ 76 355,802 126 568,476 22 46,665
Philippine ----- 67 225,808 70 317,484 24 137,745
Swedish------ 364 2,124,252 339 1,852,480 186 754,127
United States -- 1,593 9,182,392 1,783 10,350,852 2,122 13,215,379
All others-- -- 108 664,253 122 666,253 111 441.833
Total_ -- 11,017 62,247,094 11.149 67.524.552 7,062 35,904.050


MONTHLY COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC AND TOLLS
Vessels of 300 tons net or over
(Fiscal Years)


Stevedoring, general, per
ton- -__---
I landing, general, per ton -
Handling autos (5 tons or
less) -
Handling autos (more than
5 tons)_----------
Transferring general, per
ton __---_- -----
Rchlandling, per ton ----
Constructive handling, per
ton


$1.00
2.60
12.00
30.00
3.30
2.60
2.60


$1.15
2.85
13.00
33.00
3.65
2.85
2.85


14 SEPTEMBER 1963


Another New Customer
ANOTHER of the Canal's new cus-
tomers is the Aeijyusan Maru, Japanese
cargo ship, which transited the end of
last month en route from New Orleans
and Houston to Japan.
The ship, which makes the round
trip from the States to Japan through
the Panama Canal in about 3 months,
is a 483-foot general cargo vessel with
a gross tonnage of 8,688. She is handled
locally by the United Fruit Co.

Rate Changes Due
SLIGHT INCREASES will be made in
tug, deckhand, and pilotage rates to
Canal users, effective October 1, due to
increased costs to the Panama Canal for
labor, material, and contractual serv-
ices. Notice of the increased tariff for
certain Canal services to shipping was
sent to Canal customers in July.
Tug hire will increase from $80 to
$85 per hour for large tug of not more
than 1,500 horsepower. Large tugs of
1,500 horsepower or more will increase
from $80 to $95 per hour. Fixed rates
for docking, assisting at the Locks,
and in Gaillard Cut will be increased
correspondingly.
Harbor pilotage rates will continue
to be based on the using vessel's maxi-
mum draft. New rates will be:
Up to and including
14 feet ------- -$3.75 per foot
15 feet to 19 feet $4.25 per foot
20 feet to 24 feet -$5.00 per foot
25 feet to 29 feet -$5.50 per foot
30 feet and over $6.25 per foot
Rates for deckhands placed aboard
transiting vessels to assist in handling
towing locomotive cables at the Locks
have been increased to $130 for a
9-man gang, $195 for a 13-man gang,
and $255 for a 17-man gang.
Because of higher labor costs, the
Terminals Division rates for services to
shipping also are to be increased effec-
tive October 1, and memoranda with
the new rates have been sent to all
steamship agents.
The basic rates will be increased as
follows, with specific commodity rates
to be increased proportionately:
Present New
Rate Rate







Ketch On World Cruise
AROUND THE WORLD in a 42-foot
ketch, Kismet, is the objective of two
U.S. couples. Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth
Wunderlich and Mr. and Mrs. James
Wales plan a 2-to-3-year around the
world sail from Boston, through the
Panama Canal, across the Pacific, up
through the Suez Canal, up the Rhine
and Rhone Rivers in France, and back
across the Atlantic to Scituate Harbor.
Hardly a spur-of-the-moment ven-
ture, the two couples have been
planning the trip for almost 5 years.
The Kismet, which sailed last month
from Chesapeake Bay, has a pointed
stern, which means she can take rough
seas with a minimum of pounding, is
equipped with an inboard engine, a
fathometer, a ship-to-shore radio and
radio direction finder. Principal means
of navigation, the couples say, will be
celestial.
On starting their world trip, and
heading for the Panama Canal, the
couples estimated costs at $1,500 a year
per couple. Most of that, they figure,
will go into maintenance, for they plan,
every few months, to haul out, scrape
and repaint the bottom of the vessel.

4th Santa Launched

A NEW Canal Customer and another
ship in the American merchant fleet was
launched at Sparrow's Point, Md., when
the Santa Mercedes, fourth of the Grace
Line's 20,000-ton cargo-passenger
liners, went down the ways in the
Bethlehem Steel Co.'s shipyard.
Like her sister ships, the Santa Mag-
dalena and Santa Mariana, now in
service, and the Santa Maria, scheduled
to enter service this fall, the Santa
Mercedes will sail in Grace Line's route
from New York to the Caribbean,
transit the Panama Canal, and visit the
Pacific coast of South America.
The Santa Magdalena transited just
a week ago on her return voyage after
visiting Buenaventura, Colombia, and
Guayaquil, Ecuador. The Santa Ma-
riana transited August 24 on her return
voyage to New York.
The Santa Maria, dedicated to the
Republic of Panama, will make her
maiden voyage to Panama in October.
The four ships cruise at 20-knot
speeds. Each has first class accommoda-
tions for 125 passengers. The Panama
Agencies Co. acts as the ships' agents
in the Canal.


CANAL TRANSITS COMMERCIAL AND U.S. GOVERNMENT

I Fiscal Year 1963


Commercial vessels:
Ocean-going-- _--__-_____
Small --------_
Total commercial _____-
U.S. Government vessels: **
Ocean-going _-___ -
Small *--------


Total commercial and U.S. Gov-
ernment ------


1963
Atlantic Pacific
to to
Pacific Atlantic

5,633 5,384
225 205
5,858 5,589

156 144
62 77

6,076 5,810


Total


11,017
430
11,447

300
139

11,886


1962


Avg. No.
Transits
1951-55


Total Total


11,149
473
11,622

191
190

12,003


7,061
1,236
8,297

667
305

9,269


Vessels under 300 net tons or 500 displacement tons.
"*Vessels on which tolls are credited. Prior to July 1, 1951, Government-operated
ships transited free.


PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES SHIPPED THROUGH THE CANAL
Pacific to Atlantic

(All cargo figures in long tons)

Fiscal Year 1963
Commodity
Commodity 1963 1962 Average
1951-55
Ores, various ---------------- 7,036,105 7,759,690 3,981,996
Lumber ------------------------ 3,833,465 3,617,207 3,562,206
Petroleum and products (excludes asphalt) 1,805,341 1,747,537 969,165
Wheat --------------------- 778,625 1,092,285 1,858,229
Sugar-------------------------- 2,120,639 2,475,783 1,137,168
Canned food products--------------- 1,011,232 936,561 1,210,878
Nitrate of soda ----------------- 697,318 884,151 1,258,138
Barley --------------- 438,170 1,064,406 132,480
Bananas ------------------ ----- 1,083,334 1,082,372 748,782
Metals, various -------------------- 1,106,316 1,217,501 529,991
Food products in refrigeration (except fresh
fruit)- - - - --- 950,048 822,423 575,190
Coffee ------------------ 432,029 399,434 253,692
Pulpwood ----------------------- 496,270 476,367 195,494
Iron and steel manufactures --------- 856,391 477,949 224,859
Fishmeal------- --------------- 1,042,261 --------------
All others ---- ----------- 5,473,345 5,763,490 3,188,329
Total------------ 29,160,889 29,817,156 19,826,597


Atlantic to Pacific

Fiscal Year 1963
Commodity Average
1963 1962 151-55

Petroleum and products (excludes asphalt)__- 10,828,308 10,228,063 3,838,198
Coal and coke ------------- ---- 5,172,360 6,816,646 2,514,297
Iron and steel manufactures ------------ 1,282,039 1,689,512 1,674,314
Phosphates----------------------- 1,803,436 1,878,251 713,733
Sugar - --- ------ 773,746 2,105,352 525,470
Soybeans---- -- -- --- 1,446,018 1,195,952 425,681
Metal, scrap -- -- ------ -------- 1,699,824 3,215,000 53,593
Corn ------- -- 1,309,817 1,104,808 88,222
Wheat -..--_------------------ 467,447 704,538 127,709
Paper and paper products ------- ---- 339,952 358,678 384,452
Ores, various ___- -----_ --------- 771,300 717,748 111,895
Machinery -- -------------- 421,668 403,675 281,062
Cotton- --------------- 341,275 397,088 264,151
Chemicals, unclassified------ -------- 564,945 638,138 182,804
Fertilizers, unclassified --------------- 333,607 396,324 144,211
All others -------- ---------- 5,530,463 5,857,623 4,747,661
Total___------- ---------- 33,086,205 37,707,396 16,077,453


THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW







41




r- r I


Honors


For


( ii' :.ii


-jAh----


Capt. A. C. Jones


WITHIN A SPACE of a dozen day
an Honorary Pilot's License, Unlimite
for all Canal waters, was presented t\\
sea captains who have been takin
their vessels through the Panama Can
almost from the time the Canal wa
opened to shipping.
The captains themselves came froi
two different hemispheres, two diffe
ent oceans.
One was Capt. Tasuke Kawai o
Kobe, Japan, who is retiring after bein
employed by Osaka Shosen Kaisha
Ltd., since 1915. The other was Cap
A. C. Jones, Commodore of the Shay
Savill fleet, who made his 91st and final
voyage through the Canal in the S
Corinthic His first transit was in 191
The August transit was Captain Jone
56th transit in the SS Corinthic, which
he joined in September 1951. The S
Corinthic is a sister ship to the S
Gothic, which was used by Britain
Queen Elizabeth on the latter's last tri
through the Canal.
Captain Jones is an avid photo
grapher and is the proud owner of
most extensive set of slides that sho\
Canal improvements since such im
provements began. He carried a cor
plete Canal pictorial record with hir
in his cabin, neatly catalogued in boxe
and files, and usually had the answer t
any question pertaining to the Panam
Canal, its maintenance, its improve
ments, and the dates when any change
were made.

Capt. Tasuke Kawai



i |A^


__ .- .- -_ t l -

... And It Has Gold Plated Plumbing Fixtures


s,
d,
o
g
al
as

n
r-

)f
g
a,
t.
w
l
S
9.
S
s
h
S
S
's
p

O-
a
,v
I-
I-
n
*s
0
a
-s
:s


THE ALETA, above, a sleek, trim,
white beauty owned by Daniel Peter-
kin, Jr., of Chicago, has become a
familiar sight in Canal waters-and the
envy of fresh water and blue water
fishermen. After being anchored in
Catun Lake for some weeks, the Aleta
now is spending some time in the
David area, trying the fishing grounds
thereabouts.
Capt. Olin L. Williams of Miami,
Fla., is master of the Aleta, and the
local agent is L. K. Cofer.
The vessel is completely air con-
ditioned, is carpeted all through
the owner's quarters, has telephones
throughout, and has music piped all
through the yacht. The Aleta's stereo
plays no matter what the weather.
Guests are quartered in four state-
rooms, each stateroom with large closet
space. Italian marble and gold plated
plumbing fixtures are features in the
bathrooms.
On the aft deck is an electric organ,
and in a couple of big freezers is a stock
of $4 per pound sirloin strip steaks.
The Aleta carries all sorts of electronic
gadgets, and ship captains who have
visited the vacht have stated that many
big ships are not so well equipped


electronically as is this one. The vessel
has power steering, and has two diesel
generators besides the main engines;
two hot water heaters, one electric and
one diesel fuel; and two pressure
systems for hot and for cold water.
Four boats are carried "on top" for
fishing, one a 20-foot inboard launch
and three Boston Whaler skiffs.



TRANSITS BY OCEAN-GOING
VESSELS IN JULY


Commercial. ...
U.S. Government


1963 19rS
. .. .... 944 978
i. ......... 25 28
...7 7
. . ... 976 1,013


Total. ...


Comme Ciad
U'S, (,(,*. r


Fre Cve:
Free .


TOLLS *
i .... $4,902,286 $4,981,987
nment '27 168,056
l .... 8$5,040,113 $5,150,043
CARGO"O
1 ... 5,495,623


1nt '12
36,"


al .. (i. 3-
*1n -, "N
t re 11 Ms.


764 175,507
970 35,016
5,706,146
,n-Roinr and small.


From the inside looking out, on the Aleta, one sees the white electric organ on the aft deck.



Sfil P.



r1|









.I.'".. ....




Full Text

PAGE 2

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES

PAGE 3

Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2010 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries http://www.archive.org/details/panamacanalrevie142pana

PAGE 7

IN THIS ISSUE Raking Canal Waters Alliance For Progress Moving Job: King Size sthmus Industry Vol. 14, No. 2 SEPTEMBER 1963 Monumental J^abor^c4 Monument Uo J^abor 9t6.Stn& D ) til

PAGE 8

Robert J. Fleming, Jr.. Governor-President David S. Parker. Lieutenant Governor Ftunk A. Baldwin Panama Canal Information Officer Official Panama Canal Publication Published monthly al Balboa Heights. C.Z. Printed at the Printing Plant, Mount Hope, C.Z. Distributed free of charge to all Panama Canal Employees Joseph Connor, Press Officer Publications Editors Robert D. Kerr and Julio E. Briceno Editorial Assistants Eunice Richard, Tobi Bittel, and Tomas A. Cupas Power 3or Prog,reA5 MANPOWER AND BRAINPOWER of working men and women hold the key to our future as they have created the present from struggles, success, and failures of the past. This is the message of Labor Day, which some of us paused to observe this week. First laws officially recognizing Labor Day date back nearly 80 years. The Labor Day message is a message of tribute to contributions to progress and security; of recognition of the need to dedicate ourselves to the effort to solve still pressing problems; to urge that we crystallize our thinking as to goals; to make certain of the validity of the goals. With growth of power came recognition of labor's responsibility to serve not only the interests of the working force, but also to serve and protect national interests. This recognition has been made evident in many ways, among them expanded and expanding support of civic and national causes. Social consciousness for social progress has helped knock down the barriers of geographical and social isolation, illiteracy, and lack of educational opportunities. Broad participation by labor in economic growth has helped cure these economic diseases. It has helped kill the seeds sown in the fertile soil of ignorance and poverty by cynical foes of the basic ideas and ideals of democracy. It has been said that freedom will be lost the day we lose the ability to defend it. Labor has proven its strength and power for progress in both war and peace. It carl prove them further in freedom's future. Index Raking Canal Waters 3 Alliance for Progress 4 Printing Plant Moving Soon 6 Isthmus Industry 8 Promotions and Transfers 10 Canal History, Retirements 12 Fiscal Year Shipping Tables 14 Shipping 16 ON OUR COVER is a portion of the story of the Twentieth Century miracle of the building of the Panama Canal, one of the most gigantic projects on which a labor force ever was engaged. The scene shows the construction of part of Miraflores Locks, with attention centered mi one of the huge culverts that gravity feeds the water to raise and lower ships transiting from ocean to ocean. This is part of one of the four main mural panels decorating the rotunda of the Administration Building. They have been a major Canal Zone attraction for years. New Marine Director NEWLY ABOARD as Marine Director of the Panama Canal is Capt. M. J. Prince, USN, below, who comes here from duty as commanding officer of the U.S.S. Plymouth Rock,' a large landing ship, dock, amphibious type. Prior to that command, for 3 years he was assistant division director of the Navy Command Systems Division, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. His previous service record also lists command of a destroyer and other line and staff assignments in operations, intelligence, communications, gunnery, personnel, and training. He was commissioned an ensign in the Naval Reserve in 1940 and his regular Navy commission is dated 1946. Captain Prince saw duty on the seaplane tender Hulberi, the battleship Ioua, and as commanding officer of an LST during World War II. He holds the Commendation Medal with Combat "V" in addition to campaign ribbons, Victory Medal, and a European Occupation ribbon. A native of Seattle, Wash., his official residence is California, and he has resided mainly in the San Diego, Calif., and Washington, D.C., areas. He attended school in Los Angeles and is a graduate of UCLA; later, while in the service, also attending the General Line Officer's School and Senior School of the Marine Corps at Quantico, Va. Captain Prince succeeds Capt. Richard G. Jack, who was reassigned in July as commanding officer of the U.S.^Naval Receiving Station at Brooklyn, N.Y.

PAGE 9

Raking Canal Waters CLEARING PANAMA CANAL waters isn't merely for the sake of appearance. Aquatic growth could become a threat to Canal traffic if not controlled. Large masses float out and get in locks operating valves. They could be sucked into the water intakes of transiting ships and plug condensers. The attractive water hyacinth, which in the past has caused about 80 percent of the problem, still is prevalent. Growth of aquatic grasses such as coontail, fanwort, and elodea grass, however, has been so rapid that these now account for approximately half the difficulty. This is the business end of the rake system, 30 feet wide, 16 feet deep, and 10 feet across from the teeth, as it was being fabricated at Dredging Division. No, that man isn't holding it up. It was securely shored up with two 12 x 12-inch blocks. He's at work helping wire the heavy mesh screen to the rake framework. The rake above, operated from a derrick barge, has been removing about 120 tons of aquatic grass daily from Canal waters. One type, a recent intruder, has a stem as much as 50 feet long and grows so dense small fish can't penetrate it to destroy culex and mansonia mosquito larvae which cling to it. When the rake was put to work, there was an estimated 4 million square feet of aquatic growth, some of it apparently moving into deeper waters. A rakeful of "grass" ready to be unloaded into a scow. Some comes out roots and all. Loaded 1,000-cubic yard scows are taken through the locks out into the Pacific and dumped. The aquatic growth won't propagate in salt water and deteriorates rapidly. An estimated 10,600,000 floating and anchored aquatic plants were removed in fiscal year 1963 at a cost of $67,500.

PAGE 10

*t Alliance Boosts Panama's Accelerating Growth Rate Farm to market road project in Code Province. THE ALLIANCE for Progress is picking up momentum in Panama, where it contributed substantially to a healthy acceleration in the economic growth rate during the past year. Panama's industrial production, foreign and domestic trade, and construction activities reached encouraging levels during the final quarter of 1962. Output of the major food crops was also larger than a year earlier, due to expansion in the area cultivated. All indications are that the country's economic growth rate accelerated during the year, according to the U.S. Embassy in Panama City. Tentative estimates of Panama's aggregate 1962 output indicate that the gross national product amounted to approximately $500 million at current prices, an increase of roughly 8.5 percent over 1961, and that per capita GNP was approximately $445, a gain of about 5.5 percent. One of the major contributing factors was the expanding public investment under the Alliance for Progress. Ten additional rural schools were completed during the fourth quarter, making a total of 19 built under the Community Aided Rural School Construction Program since its inception early in 1962. Contracts had been awarded for 8 more school plants totaling 168 classrooms, representing an investment of about $1.5 million. Five integrated health centers had also been contracted for by the end of 1962. Resource surveys were under way for hydroelectric power, minerals, forestry, and fisheries, and a study on the development of chemical industries is also being prepared. Work was started on the construction of a terminal fish market which will include facilities for the refrigeration, storage, and processing of fish. It will service recently established fishing cooperatives in the commercially undeveloped Central Provinces area on the Gulf of Panama, which are jointly This article is a condensation of one appearing in a recent issue of International Commerce, a publication of the U.S. Department of Commerce. Since it was published, as an additional factor in Panama's economy, U.S. Embassy reports indicate that expenditures in Panama originating in the Canal Zone amounted to $82 million in calendar year 1962. IN LATIN AMERICA THERE ARE BIG DIFFERENCES IN PER CAPITA INCOME Average Latin America $3Si AS WELL AS THE RATE OF GROWTH OF INCOME Argentina Bolivia Brazil Chile Colombia Costa Rica Dominican Republic Ecuador El Salvador Guatemala Honduras Mexico Panama E Paraguay Peru Venezuela i Argentina Bolivia Brazil Chile Colombia Costa Rica Dominican Republic Ecuador El Salvador Guatemala Honduras Mexico Panama Paraguay Peru Venezuela 100 200 300 400 500 GDP (Grau domalie production) per cipita in "real" terms — 1960 f I irnomic Commission for Latin America, i -10 1 2 3 4 5 6 average annual increase (decrease') 195090 September 1963

PAGE 11

: ^Vf^ sponsored by AID, CARE, and the Pan-American National Agency for Economic Development (ANDE). An outstanding 1962 accomplishment was the completion of 180 kilometers of farm-to-market roads, which will serve an estimated 10,000 rural people in previously isolated communities and should stimulate a transition from subsistence farming to small-scale commercial production. During 1962 Panama negotiated external loans totaling $20.2 million, the major share of which was unobligated at the end of the year and will be available to help finance economic and social development projects in 1963. Other major factors in Panama's accelerated economic growth rate were a rising income from transactions in goods and services with the Canal Zone, as a pick-up in business activity in the Colon area due to an increase in the Colon Free Zone's trade, and the operation of the new $30 million petroleum refinery, beginning in the second quarter of 1962. The Colon Free Zone's trade, which slipped in the third quarter, rebounded to a record high in the fourth quarter. The total 1962 trade turnover reached an all-time peak of $177.4 million. The favorable balance rose to $35.7 million, an increase of $4.6 million over the 1961 figure. The value of building permits issued in Panama City dropped toward the end of the year, but the $5.7 million total reported for the second half of 1962 was the highest second semester figure of any recent year. A large part of this gain was in permits issued to private firms and individuals. The shortage of mortgage money is being eased through the resumption of home mortgage lending by the Social Security Fund, resulting in good prospects for an increase in private residential consruction in 1963. Another development which holds promise of stimulating private construction was the enactment on January 31, 1963 of a law authorizing the establishment of an Institute of Insured Mortgages. Press reports indicate that it will provide for insuring business and professional construction up to $500,000 and private housing up to $10,000. They also indicate that a savings and loan association will form part of the organization. To give more consideration to the new budget presented by the President last October 16, the fiscal year which formerly coincided with the calendar year, was changed. Law No. 47 of November 15, 1962, adopted a fiscal year which begins March 1. On (Seep. 11) The Panama Canal Review 5 Demonstration of use of animal-drawn plow. Many campesinos now are using only sticks for plowing. Ik w rf, ';* i \ x VV ESTA CONSTRUCCIOlT" ENTM LOS PUEBLOS D£ LA REPUBLICA DE PANAMA ESTAD0S UNID0S DE AMERICA aS*' IST4 0UI !S „TM DSHOSIMOO, TfV L BT I L. Mm m ir sunt eutik mms nm% One of the many new school buildings constructed in the Republic of Panama with Alliance for Progress funds. In an Alliance fishing cooperative organized in Panama, 70 fishermen in the villages El Farallon and El Higo are replacing their old equipment and establishing a new marketing system, with a $40,000 refrigerated processing plant part of the package. At right is one of the old cayucos previously used. •

PAGE 12

— .This view gives an idea of the size of the job ahead when the Printing Plant is moved across the Isthmus from Mount Hope to Building 911, La Boca, on the Pacific side starting next month. The composing room. Here is where the type for all sorts The pressroom, showing several of the 18 presses used for all types and of jobs is assembled, locked in forms, and prepared for sizes of work which require different technical treatment, printing on one of the presses. FOR PRINTING PLANT Moving Days Coming Up A collator-stitcher, one of the largest pieces of equipment to be moved into a new home in the former La Boca retail store. This machine places the previously printed and folded sheets in proper order on the conveyer, gathers, and stitches them into a finished pamphlet ready for trimming. The new Printing Plant quarters are being remodeled and converted at a cost of more than $150,000, including air conditioning. *[ ** & \
PAGE 13

The big offset press at right prints The Panama Canal Review. Jack Purvis, pressroom foreman, makes an adjustment. The task of moving huge pieces of equipment like this necessitated planning for a threephase moving job expected to take in all about 6 weeks. In the background below is a huge knife grinder to sharpen paper cutter blades. The machine in the foreground folds and slits pages of brochures and similar printing jobs. The Printing Plant will stay in business during the entire move, with parts of the work being done on both sides of the Isthmus at the same time.

PAGE 15

Nieht view of process area showing the crude furnace and distillation tower with the pilot flare stack in background. The furnace chimney stack in foreground is approximately IV* times the height of the Panama Hilton Hotel. 3ithmu5 3nauAtry, Original jungle, swamps and snake pits were cleared, filled hydraulically with coral to form a site for the process plant, storage tanks, shops, offices, and laboratories. REFINER1A PANAMA'S plant on Las Minas Bay 5 miles east of Colon, built at an original cost of $30 million, is the largest industrial installation in the Republic of Panama. It also represents the largest foreign investment in industry in the Republic. The firm is owned by Continental Oil Co. and National Bulk Carriers. The refinery was officially dedicated by President Don Roberto F. Chiari on April 24, 1962. Work was begun in September 1959 with the clearing and filling of a 200acre site in Las Minas Bay, where the processing, storage, and port installations were erected. Six million cubicyards of material were dredged from the bottom of the bay to open a deepwater channel. The material was used to raise the refinery site about 10 feet above sea level. Construction of the refinerv itself began in September 1960. More than 100 miles of steel pipe, more than 10,000 tons of steel, and more than 120.000 bags of Panamanian cement have gone into the plant. v -. REFINERIA PANAMA Aerial view of the refineryTanker dock and barge loading dock are in fo|und Panama's first deep water pier. The VA million barrels of tank storage e, rmidiiii ma proper is in the center and the pilot One of the most spectacular installations is for storage. The tanks-among them four of the world's largest-have a total capacity of 3J£ million barrels (1 barrel equals 42 gallons), of which a million barrels is in storage tanks built in the last few months. The refinery's salt-water pumping installation for cooling purposes requires 53 million gallons of water daily, approximately the amount needed for transiting a ship from ocean to ocean through the Panama Canal. The two steam turbine generators required to serve the refinery, each of 3,000 kilowatts, supply enough electric power for a city the size of Colon. To extreme left center is the dry cargo dock, to the right, out of the picture. The refinery to the left. With construction of the refinerv, Panama had its first deep-water cargo pier (28 feet) for ocean-going ships. The refinery operates its own deep water pier (40 feet) for super-tankers. At the peak of construction activity, more than 1,300 workers, 95 percent of them Panamanians, were employed on the project. Refineria Panama now employs 320 persons and the percentage of Panamanian personnel is above 86 percent, notwithstanding the technical nature of most operations. This reflects a policv established bv the company long before it started operations: training the largest possible number of Panamanians, with the ultiK, H. Dunbar, president and chairman of the Board of Directors of Refineria Panama. The Panama Canal Review 9 The refinery is highly automated. All process units are operated from a single control room. A semigraphic flow diagram is above the electronic units and in the foreground an operator is at the central control desk. Super-tanker unloading crude across Refineria Panama's dock at Las Minas Bay directly into storage tanks for later processing into various refined fuel oil products. mate goal of operating a plant run by Panamanian personnel. Training has consisted of not only on-site instruction, but also of scholarship grants to enable personnel to become specialists in various phases of engineering. Refineria Panama has a processing capacity of 55,000 barrels of petroleum products per dav— enough to supply the entire Republic of Panama, the Canal Zone, transiting ships, and leaving some for export. Products are tested for quality under exacting international standards in the refinery's own laboratory. The products are: Gasoline of all octane ratings for automobiles, kerosene, jet aviation fuel, diesel oil for trucks, tractors and industrial motors, marine diesel fuel, asphalt and asphalt products, and liquified petroleum gas for domestic and commercial use. The refinerv operates two areas for bunkering ocean-going ships by barge, and also uses facilities available at the refiners pier itself and at the Cristobal and Balboa piers. The bunkering area in the Atlantic is in Colon harbor, inside the Cristobal breakwater. The other is off Taboga Island, in the Pacific. The fact that additions to storage facilities and plant improvements became necessary only 15 months after operations began is evidence of the wide acceptance of the refinery's products in Panama's market and the growing demand. Since Refineria Panama began operations, the prices of a number of petroleum products have decreased as a direct benefit to consumers in Panama, The contribution of Refineria Panama to the country's economy is felt not only in employment, but also in purchases bv the firm from other Panamanian industries and commerce. And the large investment made is evidence of confidence in the future industrial development and economic stabilitv of Panama.

PAGE 16

PROMOTIONS AND TRANSFERS EMPLOYEES promoted or transferred between July 5 and August 5 (withingrade promotions and job reclassifications are not listed ) : CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU Postal Division Walter C. Reed, Clerk, Railroad Division, to Distribution Clerk, Substitute. Stanford Levy, Jr., Apprentice (Painter, 3d Year), Maintenance Division, to Distribution Clerk, Substitute. Ashton A. Brown, Jr., Laborer (Cleaner), Maintenance Division, to Window Clerk, Substitute. Alfredo T. Brooks, Waiter, Supply Division, to Distribution Clerk, Substitute. ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION BUREAU Joanne L. Allen, Geologist (General) to Geologist (Engineering). Simeon Blake, Louis A. Browne, Juan Melony, Navigational Aid Worker, to Maintenanceman (Distribution Systems). Electrical Division George H. Egger, Jr., Electrician, to Test Operator-Foreman (ElectricalPower System). Arlington A. Petro, Clerk, Navigation Division, to Apprentice (Electrician, 1st Year). Winston H. Forde, Surveying Aid, to Apprentice (Electrician-Telephone, 1st Year). Maintenance Division Carl L. Simons, Lead Foreman (Public Works Road Paving), to Lead Foreman (Public Works Road Construction). Norman H. Pedersen, Jr., Apprentice (Sheetmetal Worker, 4th Year), to Sheetmetal Worker. Harold M. Meyer, Apprentice (Plumber, 4th Year), to Plumber. Joseph L. Cicero, Apprentice (Plumber, 4th Year), to Pipefitter. Ricardo Chen, Apprentice (Welder, 4th Year), to Welder. Cecil G. Callender, Clerk-Typist to Clerk. Winfield Ford, Timekeeper to Clerk. Gilbert Myers, Clerk to Procurement Clerk. Rupert V. Arthur, Leader Asphalt or Cement Worker to Lead Foremen (Public Works Road Paving). Esteban Justavino, Laborer (Heavy) to Helper Welder. Joaquin E. Triana, Laborer (Cleaner), Supply Division, to Laborer. HEALTH BUREAU Jack E. Van Hoose, Housing Project Assistant, Office of Chief, Community Services Division, to Graduate Intern (Administrative Services), Office of the Director. Gorgas Hospital Clotilde Benavides, Staff Nurse (Medicine and Surgery), to Staff Nurse (Surgery). Mary M. Quigley, Staff Nurse to Staff Nurse (Medicine and Surgery). Dr. Edward W. Healey, Hospital Resident, 2d Year, to Hospital Resident, 3d Year. Carmen Ho, Clerk (Stenographer), Coco Solo Hospital, to Clerk-Dictating Machine Transcriber. Howard A. Thompson, Office Machine Operator to Clerk. Coco Solo Hospital Nicolas D. Bishop, Counterman, Supply Division, to Messenger. Simeon N. Senior, Laborer (Cleaner), Division of Schools, to Laborer. Corozal Hospital Joan W. Thompson, Staff Nurse (Pediatrics), Gorgas Hospital, to Head Nurse (Psychiatry). Rosaura Cardoze, Clinical Social Worker to Supervisory Clinical Social Worker. MARINE BUREAU Navigation Division William E. Weigle, Jr., Marine Traffic Controller to Supervisory Marine Traffic Controller. Herbert S. Driscoll, James H. Hagan, General Foreman (Docking and Undocking) to General Foreman (Harbor) (Assistant Harbormaster). Industrial Division Burton E. Davis, General Engineer (Plant Engineer, Plant Branch) to Supervisory General Engineer (Plant). Raul A. Swalm, Apprentice (Shipfitter, 4th Year) to Shipfitter. Rodolfo C. Soley, Seaman, Dredging Division, to Apprentice (Sheetmetal Worker, 1st Year). Locks Division Leslie W. Croft, Control House Operator to General Foreman (Lock Operations). Oliver H. Hendrickson, Lead Foreman (Lock Operations) to General Foreman (Lock Operations). Lloyd M. Smith, Leader Lock Operator (Electrician) to Control House Operator. Woodrow W. Rowland, Lock Operator (Electrician) to Leader Lock Operator (Electrician). Richard N. Phillips, Apprentice (Machinist, 4th Year) to Machinist. Robert L. Webb, Machinist to Lock Operator (Machinist). Roswell D. Boston, Jr., Electrician to Lock Operator (Electrician). Hubert J. Jordan, Apprentice (Electrician, 3d Year) from Electrical Division. Comelio Trotman, Helper Lock Operator to Painter. Antonio Castro, Painter (Maintenance) to Painter. Arnold South, Helper Lock Operator to Leader Maintenanceman (Rope and Wire Cable). Jerome E. Steiner, Jr., Distribution Clerk, Substitute, Postal Division, to Apprentice (Electrician, 1st Year). Joseph D. Powlett, Carpenter (Maintenance) to Maintenanceman. James E. Scott, Helper Lock Operator to Maintenanceman. Leonardo A. Illueca, Helper Lock Operator to Painter (Maintenance). Cesario Rujano, Seaman (Launch), Dredging Division, to Linehandler. Claude C. Jesse, Oiler (Floating Plant), Dredging Division, to Linehandler. Clement A. Griffiths, Amott B. Julien, Samuel Walker, Linehandler to Helper Lock Operator. Basilio Acosta, Jose Cordoba, Alfred Hall, Fireman (Floating Plant), Dredging Division, to Linehandler. OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER Duane A. Rigby, Accountant, to Cost Accountant, Accounting Division. SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY SERVICE BUREAU Jesus M. Mena, Field Tractor Operator, to Lead Foreman (Grounds), Community Services Division. Supply Division Joseph B. Burgoon, Laundry and Dry Cleaning Plant Superintendent (Laundry Manager) to Laundry and Dry Cleaning Plant Manager. Frank E. Day, Assistant Commissary Store Manager to Laundry and Dry Cleaning Plant Superintendent. Norma E. Hamilton, Secretary (Stenography), Office of the Director, to Administrative Assistant, Office of General Manager. Alfred A. Cox, Guest House Clerk to Guest House Assistant. Hilda F. Mootoo, Clerk-Typist to Teller (Typing). Bernice C. Barnett, Grocery Attendant to Sales Clerk. Mildred Z. Johnson, Clerk to Sales Checker. Edna L. Tipton, Clerk-Typist, from Division of Preventive Medicine and Quarantine. Kermit Pusey, Assistant Cook to Cook. Nicomedes Fria, Messenger to Storekeeping Clerk. Ignacio Gondola, Garbage Collector, Community Services Division, to Truck Driver. Wilfort B. Gordon, Duncan S. Williams, Jr., Laborer (Heavy) to Warehouseman. Ralph H. Worme, Laborer to Milk Plant Worker. Vivian E. Brooks, Laundry Worker (Heavy) to Extractor and Tumblerman. Gilberto Anaya, Railroad Trackman, Terminals Division, to Laborer (Heavy). Llewellyn J. Bowen, Package Boy to Laborer. Ruben Olmos, Foods Service Worker to Utility Worker. TRANSPORTATION AND TERMINALS BUREAU Terminals Division William D. McArthur, Leader Liquid Fuels W'harfman to Liquid Fuels Dispatcher. Leyton B. Ellis, Pablo Galvan, Medardo Ovalle, Enrique Pichon, Albert M. Rowe, Dock Worker to Stevedore. George M. Ottey, Milk Plant Worker, Supply Division, to Cargo Marker. Percival McLenan, Laborer, Maintenance Division, to Stevedore. George C. Clarke, Alfred F. Madeam, 10 September 1963

PAGE 17

Hugo Salazar, Arnold C. Sandiford, Utility Worker, Supply Division, to Cargo Marker. Motor Transportation Division Minnie B. Burton, Clerk-Stenographer, Office of Director, Engineering and Construction Bureau, to Clerical Assistant (Stenography). Ivan E. Haywood, Motor Vehicle Dispatcher to Supervisory Motor Vehicle Dispatcher. Albert D. Lord, School Bus Driver to Motor Vehicle Dispatcher. Courtney E. Jarvis, Apprentice (Automotive Mechanic, 3d Year) to Automotive Mechanic. Lorenzo Barrera, Linehandler (Deckhan), Navigation Division, to Truck Driver. Joseph Lancelot, Utility Worker, Supply Division, to Truck Driver. Thomas L. J. Bowe, Waiter, Supply Division, to Automotive Equipment Serviceman. Railroad Division Calvin M. Landrum, Lead Foreman (Railroad Track) to Lead Foreman (Railroad Yard). OTHER PROMOTIONS which did not involve changes of tide: James P. MacLaren, Supervisory Sanitary Engineer (Chief, Division of Sanitation) Health Bureau. Roscoe M. Collins, Raymond B. Will, Chief Foreman (Harbor) (Harbormaster) Navigation Division. Balph L. Stinson, Jr., Digital Computer Systems Analyst, Accounting Policies and Procedures Staff. Bobert L. Siedle, Clinical Social Worker, Corozal Hospital. Gilbert M. Smith, Accountant, Accounting Division. Louis E. Egea, Construction Inspector (General), Contract and Inspection Division. Jacob C. Baker, James A. Jones, Joseph A. Maganini, Admeasurer, Navigation Division. Maria del C. Hernandez, Secretary (Stenography), Office of GovernorPresident. Margaret L. Canavaggio, Cargo Claims Clerk, Terminals Division. Thelma M. Sasso, Clerk-Stenographer, Maintenance Division. Julio Aponte, Jr., Cafeteria Manager, Supply Division. Margaret F. Evans, Accounts Maintenance Clerk (Stenography), Office of the Director, Engineering and Construction Bureau. Herman J. Feurtado, Supervisory Timekeeper, Terminals Division. Ovid A. Laurie, Clerk, Community Services Division. Cristobal A. Buddie, Nicholas J. Ford, Clay-ton F. Osborne, Guard, Terminals Division. Epifanio Zamora, Grounds Maintenance Equipment Operator, Community Services Division. Carlyle S. Babb, Clerk (Work Orders), Maintenance Division. Ashton Brooks, Arnoldo A. Young, Bookkeeping Machine Operator, Accounting Division. Diamantina E. Davis, Card Punch Operator, Accounting Division. Myrtle O. Campbell, Edith C. Harper, Leonora C. John, Sales Clerk, Supply Division. Dawson Jolley, Storekeeping Clerk, Supply Division. CONSTRUCCION REPUBLICA DE PANAMA ESTAOOS UNIOOS OE AMERICA The self-help housing program in Panama envisages a total of 540 homes in the suburbs of Panama City and the interior. A total of $600,000 has been allocated for this program. Future tenant-owners provide the labor and some of the materials, while the Panama government provides the land. Alliance Boosts Panama's Growth Rate (Continued from p. 5) January 30 the National Assembly approved an ordinary budget of $77.3 million for the fiscal year, a $10.5 million increase over 1962. Receipts for 1962 totaled $67.9 million, an increase of $5.8 million over 1961. Indications are that the 1962 budget was more nearly in balance than in most recent years, when sizeable deficits were incurred. The 1963 budget, however, is expected to have a deficit of approximately $3 million. The only general tax change approved by the National Assembly during the last session involved a surtax of 1 percent on all imports. This measure is designed to supplement Government revenues and keep the deficit as low as possible. Banana exports were off sharply in the fourth quarter, reflecting the aftereffects of the third quarter blowdowns. A part of this decline also was due to the December shipment stoppage resulting from the dock strike in the United States. Fourth quarter shrimp exports, though down seasonally, are estimated at $2 million, bringing the yearly total to an estimated record high of approximately $8 million, an increase of more than one-third over 1961. Incomplete trade figures indicate that during the first quarter of 1962, the United States took close to 90 percent of Panama's exports and supplied slightly less than 50 percent of its imports. Roughly 13 percent of the Free Zone's outgoing shipments in 1962 represented deliveries to Panama, which totaled $14.1 million, or $2.9 million more than in 1961. In response to an invitation to join the Central American integration movement, Panama has expressed a desire for closer economic association with members of the Organization of Central American States (OCAS) but says that it is not yet in a position to take a decision on full membership. It has been implied that Panama will carefully evaluate the effects that membership could have on her international relations and economic structure, which is based on the country's situation as a place of international transit. Although moderate increases in rice and corn production appear likely due to increased plantings, agriculture is lagging behind other sectors of the economy. This has been attributed to continuing relatively low yields of both' rice and corn, and the general lack of progress in raising agricultural productivity. The coffee situation also deteriorated in 1962, with the new crop estimated to be at least 25 percent smaller than 1961. One improvement has been in beef cattle production, which has risen in both quantity and quality. Although Panama's imports seem likely to increase more than exports, the general outlook for 1963 holds promise of a further rise in Panama's economic growth rate. A large increase in public works is planned, utilizing funds now available from grants and loans previously negotiated under the Alliance for Progress and receipts from the sale of newly authorized bond issues by the Government of Panama. Prospects also are favorable for expansion of private construction. The $9 million loan which the Government of Panama negotiated with private American investors in December reportedly will be used to stimulate private investment in construction and industry. The Panama Canal Review 11

PAGE 18

CANAL HISTORY 50 1/earJ cAg.o CONSTRUCTION of temporary wing dams was approved to curb erosion taking place on the shore of Limon Bay immediately to the west of the west channel. A considerable section of the shore had worn away. Studies of effects of the temporary dams were planned to determine whether permanent structure would be needed. An official circular extended the territory within which hunting was permitted to include all the area in the Zone west of the Canal between the Atlantic Ocean and the Mandingo River. Hunting of birds remained prohibited by Executive order pending issuance of regulations. An Executive order declared it to be unlawful for any person to operate an "aeroplane, balloon, or flying machine of any kind" in or across the Canal Zone without authority from the Chief Executive of the Canal Zone. 25 yeard cAg.o PRESIDENT Franklin D. Roosevelt arrived at Balboa August 4 aboard the U.S. Houston. In press conferences he said he felt the good neighbor policy was working out very well and found things in the Canal Zone "running awfully well." During an informal interview later, the President said a vast roadbuilding program here would be recommended to Congress as a Canal defense measure. An outline of plans being considered for increasing Canal capacity included construction of a third set of locks, 1,200 by 125 feet, and raising the level of Gatun Lake 5 feet or so to permit transiting ships of deeper draft. 10 IfearJ c4ffo THE MONTH of August went down on the records as one of the hottest. Temperatures on the Pacific side reached 92 on 3 days before midmonth. The long weather record for Balboa Heights showed that an August day with a temperature that high occurred only about once every 3 years. Plans were announced for reorganization to make the Industrial Bureau a division of the Marine Bureau and to transfer the Dredging Division from the Marine Bureau to the Engineering and Construction Bureau. Assignments were made to the 20 one-family houses on Empire Street in Balboa, and residents of Ridge Road, Balboa Heights, and 20 additional fourfamily houses in Balboa Flats were notified that those areas were to be cleared for new quarters construction. OnelJ, ear f 9 o GOVERNOR FLEMING addressed a group at the Pedro Miguel townsite for the dedication of the streets of Jamaica, Trinidad, and Tobago, named in honor of the newly-independent West Indian nations. Canal Zone Police Lodge No. 1798, American Federation of Government Employees, was the first employee organization granted formal recognition by the Panama Canal organization under the new Employee-Management Corporation program. The Reina Manuelito I, a Panama Canal tourist launch, was officially christened by Panama's first official Carnival Queen for whom the craft is named: Dona Manuelita Vallarino de Morrice. RETIREMENTS EMPLOYEES who retired in July, with their positions at time of retirement and years of Canal service: James J. Belcourt, Lead Foreman (Railroad Yard), Railroad Division, Pacific Side; 19 years, 3 months, 14 days. George A. Bennard, Helper, Locomotive Engineer, Railroad Division, Atlantic Side; 22 years, 5 months, 28 days. William Black, Maintenance Superintendent, Locks Division, Pacific Side; 34 years, 7 months, 10 days. Lionel Brown, Deckhand, Navigation Division, Pacific Side; 20 years, 7 months, 12 days. James F. Dougherty, Associate Supervisory Inspector, Railroad Division, Atlantic Side; 31 years, 11 months, 22 days. .ACCIDENTSFOR THIS MONTH AND THIS YEAR JULY ALL UNITS CASES •63 '62 231 206 CASES DAYS ABSENT YEAR TO DATE 1729<36i 1742 l.ockH •63 '62 63 "62 14 12 148 121 115(9) 72 15395 998 7667 Overhaul injuries Included In total. Allen R. Flinn, Leader Lock Operator (Electrician), Locks Division, Atlantic Side; 22 years, 5 months, 12 days. Clarence A. Greene, Control House Operator, Locks Division, Atlantic Side; 25 years, 6 months, 21 days. Bellcel A. Harris, Dock Worker, Terminals Division, Atlantic Side; 4 years, 10 months, 24 days. William G. Hoelzle, Police Private, Police Division, Pacific Side; 22 years, 5 months, 22 days. Mrs. Borghild H. Misenheimer, Teacher, Junior High, U.S. Schools, Schools Division, Pacific Side; 26 years, 4 months, 7 days. Milton L. Nash, General Foreman, Lock Operations, Locks Division, Atlantic Side; 28 years, 9 months, 8 days. Joseph J. Paul, Lead Foreman Stevedore (Dock), Terminals Division, Atlantic Side; 40 years, 5 months, 12 days. Arthur B. Rigby, Locomotive Engineer, Yard and Road, Railroad Division, Pacific Side; 15 years, 1 months, 18 days. Mrs. Carol G. Rigby, Accounting Clerk, Electrical Division, Pacific Side; 18 years, 4 months, 22 days. Luis A. Rodriguez, Leader Maintenanceman (Rope and Wire Cable), Locks Division, Pacific Side; 34 years, 6 months, 2 days. Mahnga Singh, Stevedore, Terminals Division, Atlantic Side; 33 years, 1 month, 27 days. Subert Turbyfill, Instructor, Schools Division, Pacific Side; 29 years, 7 months, 16 days. Walter J. Wilkinson, Water System Controlman, Maintenance Division, Atlantic Side; 21 years, 10 months, 22 days. Leonard Wolford, Supervisory Marine Traffic Controller, Port Captain's Office, Pacific Side; 23 years, 9 months, 5 days. 12 September 1963

PAGE 19

ANNIVERSARIES (On the basis of total Federal Service) RINE BURE ed A. Newhard e: al Foramaiy^Cocks Dp :ration/) / SUI PL If AND \ Erne Stc lOMMUNm SERVICE BUREAU illiams eeping Cler TRANSPORTATION AND TERMINALS BUREAU Egbert A. Williams Helper Locomotive Engineer CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU Bernhard I. Everson Civil Affairs Director ENGINE ERING A ND, CONSTRUCTION BUREA Nita B. Hartman Supervisory Administra Assistant Bertie E. Allen Wharfbuild Joseph Granger Painter Catalino Tuiion Blaster MARINE BUBEAU Yane Leves Towing Locomotive Operator Wilfred H. Anderson Painter SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY ERVICES BUREAU :lton A. Mason Timekeeper Charles A. Thomas Utility jWSrker Dudley H. T&otman Servire SAtion Attendant Trc Stat TRANSPORTATION AND ERMINALS BUREAU Gerald L. Neal Conductor.Yard Cliff Sanders Inspector (carman, wood, and steel) Harvey L. Jones School Bus Driver CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU Edward C. Blount Police Private Clara Kelsay Window Clerk Margaret V. Whitman Instructor (College) Earl W. Wrenn Fire Sergeant, Class 3 ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION BUREAU Lloyd M. Kent Master, Towboat Ewald A. Wiberg, Jr. Electronics Mechanic Eugenio Arauz Sandblaster Alfred W. Browne, Jr. Oiler (Floating Plant) Richard A. Lindo Helper (General) Pastor Marcelino Helper Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Mechanic Alberto McKenzie Oiler (Floating Plant) Maxwell S. Morgan Stockman Martin G. Naar Helper Plumber Joaquin M. Ponce Engineering Draftsman (Electrical) Edmond Smith Leader Seaman Luther B. Ward Seaman HEALTH BUREAU Flora R. Hack Staff Nurse (Medicine and Surgery) Amy I. Andrewn General Supply Clerk Jos£ D. Barrios Ward Service Aid Enrique Dominguez Diet Cook Alfonso Dutary Laborer (Heavy, Pest Control) Clinton J. Everett Ward Service Aid Eugenio Hernam Hospital At Vincent H. Kii Chauffeur Lloyd B. McCoy Nursing Assistant and Surgery) Jose A. Ramire Food Servic Julian Rudri Assistant Tomas Rodriguez Boatman Geronimo Rodriguez Laborer (Heavy, Pest Control) MARINE BUREAU Maurice F. Dunn Master, Towboat Hubert Hart Towing Locomotive Operator Warren E. Ledoux Lock Operator (Rigger) George Bell Linehandler (Deckhand) Oliver H. Brathwaite Helper Lock Operator Hubert E. Brown Truck Driver Jose Cerda Helper Lock Operator Juan B. Gochez Linehandler Jose R. Gonzalez Linehandler (Deckhand) Emiliano Hall Painter (Maintenance) Osbourne Hoy Seaman Henry Madeam Motor Launch Captain Hubert L. Marie Rose Linehandler (Deckhand) Wilfred McQueen Helper Lock Operator Joel. aunch DispMcher and) Linehandler (Deckhand) Desmond Williams Toolroom Attendant OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER Edward H. Appin Time Leave and Payroll Clerk SUPPLY AND COMMUNITY SERVICES BUREAU William D. McGowin Commissary Store Department Manager (Supermarket) Jose A. Arias Lead Foreman Eugene Burrell Sales Checker Ophelia M. Burrowes Sales Checker (Retail Store) David L. Donaldson Grounds Maintenance Equipment Operator Egbert N. Francis Warehouseman Aura Garcia Presser (Garment) Jacinto Jaramillo Laborer (Cleaner) Dorothy E. McDonald Sales Clerk Alejandro Ruiz Crane Hookman Stanley V. Waterman Lead Foreman (Grounds) Ethel C. Yearwood Clerk-Typist TRANSPORTATION AND TERMINALS BUREAU Luis De Gracia Railroad Trackman George H. Long Stevedore Oliver Maxwell School Bus Driver Jose F. Quinonez Clerk Matthew E. Scott Truck Driver Edward G. Thomas Leader Stevedore (Dock) Rupert A. Vaughn Truck Driver (Heavy) Asisclo Zambrano A. Linehandler The Panama Canal Review 13

PAGE 20

MONTHLY COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC AND TOLLS Vessels of 300 tons net or over (Fiscal Years) Month July 1962 August September October November December January 1963 February March April May June Total for Fiscal year_ Transits 1963 978 950 909 882 924 947 769 841 991 919 988 919 1962 931 934 892 935 891 938 917 841 980 942 984 964 11,017 11,149 Avg. No. Transits 1951-55 557 554 570 607 568 599 580 559 632 608 629 599 7,062 Gross Tolls (In thousands of dollars) 1963 $4,980 4,926 4,617 4,411 4,684 4,983 3,871 4,313 5,084 4,761 4,991 4,747 1962 $4,776 4,749 4,523 4,646 4,443 4,870 4,735 4,388 5,098 4,961 5,122 4,979 $56,368 $57,290 $29,969 Average Tolls 1951-55 $2,432 2,403 2,431 2,559 2,361 2,545 2,444 2,349 2,657 2,588 2,672 2,528 Before deduction of any operating expenses. TRAFFIC MOVEMENT OVER MAIN TRADE ROUTES The following table shows the number of transits of large, commercial vessels (300 net tons or over) segregated into eight main trade routes: United States intercoastal East coast of United States and South America East coast of United States and Central America East coast of United States and Far East United States/Canada east coast and Australasia Europe and west coast of United States/Canada Europe and South America Europe and Australasia All other routes Total traffic Fiscal Year 1963 1963 384 2,339 485 2,049 316 945 1,260 388 2,851 11,017 1962 468 2,419 368 2,404 276 911 1,140 409 2,754 11,149 Avg. No. Transits 1951-55 656 1,716 508 1,028 204 702 474 341 1,432 7,061 CANAL COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC BY NATIONALITY

PAGE 21

Ketch On World Cruise AROUND THE WORLD in a 42-foot ketch, Kismet, is the objective of two U.S. couples. Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Wunderlich and Mr. and Mrs. James Wales plan a 2-to-3-year around the world sail from Boston, through the Panama Canal, across the Pacific, up through the Suez Canal, up the Rhine and Rhone Rivers in France, and back across the Atlantic to Scituate Harbor. Hardly a spur-of-the-moment venture, the two couples have been planning the trip for almost 5 years. The Kismet, which sailed last month from Chesapeake Bay, has a pointed stern, which means she can take rough seas with a minimum of pounding, is equipped with an inboard engine, a fathometer, a ship-to-shore radio and radio direction finder. Principal means of navigation, the couples say, will be celestial. On starting their world trip, and heading for the Panama Canal, the couples estimated costs at $1,500 a year per couple. Most of that, they figure, will go into maintenance, for they plan, every few months, to haul out, scrape and repaint the bottom of the vesse.l. 4th Santa Launched A NEW Canal Customer and another ship in the American merchant fleet was launched at Sparrow's Point, Md., when the Santa Mercedes, fourth of the Grace Line's 20,000-ton cargo-passenger liners, went down the ways in the Bethlehem Steel Co.'s shipyard. Like her sister ships, the Santa Magdalena and Santa Mariana, now in service, and the Santa Maria, scheduled to enter service this fall, the Santa Mercedes will sail in Grace Line's route from New York to the Caribbean, transit the Panama Canal, and visit the Pacific coast of South America. The Santa Magdalena transited just a week ago on her return voyage after visiting Buenaventura, Colombia, and Guayaquil, Ecuador. The Santa Mariana transited August 24 on her return voyage to New York. The Santa Maria, dedicated to the Republic of Panama, will make her maiden voyage to Panama in October. The four ships cruise at 20-knot speeds. Each has first class accommodations for 125 passengers. The Panama Agencies Co. acts as the ships' agents in the Canal. CANAL TRANSITS COMMERCIAL AND U.S. GOVERNMENT

PAGE 22

Honors For Captains Capt. A. C. Jones WITHIN A SPACE of a dozen days, an Honorary Pilot's License, Unlimited, for all Canal waters, was presented two sea captains who have been taking their vessels through the Panama Canal almost from the time the Canal was opened to shipping. The captains themselves came from two different hemispheres, two different oceans. One was Capt. Tasuke Kawai of Kobe, Japan, who is retiring after being employed by Osaka Shosen Kaisha, Ltd., since 1915. The other was Capt. A. C. Jones, Commodore of the Shaw Savill fleet, who made his 91st and final voyage through the Canal in the SS Corinthic His first transit was in 1919. The August transit was Captain Jones' 56th transit in the SS Corinthic, which he joined in September 1951. The SS Corinthic is a sister ship to the SS Gothic, which was used by Britain's Queen Elizabeth on the latter's last trip through the Canal. Captain Jones is an avid photographer and is the proud owner of a most extensive set of slides that show Canal improvements since such improvements began. He carried a complete Canal pictorial record with him in his cabin, neatly catalogued in boxes and files, and usually had the answer to any question pertaining to the Panama Canal, its maintenance, its improvements, and the dates when any changes were made. Capt. Tasuke Kawai And It Has Gold Plated Plumbing Fixtures THE ALETA, above, a sleek, trim, white beauty owned by Daniel Peterkin, Jr., of Chicago, has become a familiar sight in Canal waters— and the envy of fresh water and blue water fishermen. After being anchored in Gatun Lake for some weeks, the Aleta now is spending some time in the David area, trying the fishing grounds thereabouts. Capt. Olin L. Williams of Miami, Fla., is master of the Aleta, and the local agent is L. K. Cofer. The vessel is completely air conditioned, is carpeted all through the owner's quarters, has telephones throughout, and has music piped all through the yacht. The Agfa's stereo plays no matter what the weather. Guests are quartered in four staterooms, each stateroom with large closet space. Italian marble and gold plated plumbing fixtures are features in the bathrooms. On the aft deck is an electric organ, and in a couple of big freezers is a stock of $4 per pound sirloin strip steaks. The Aleta carries all sorts of electronic gadgets, and ship captains who have visited the vacht have stated that many big ships are not so well equipped electronically as is this one. The vessel has power steering, and has two diesel generators besides the main engines; two hot water heaters, one electric and one diesel fuel; and two pressure systems for hot and for cold water. Four boats are carried "on top" for fishing, one a 20-foot inboard launch and three Boston Whaler skiffs. TRANSITS BY OCEAN-GOING VESSELS IN JULY 1963 19€! Commercial 944 978 U.S. Government 25 28 Free 7 7 Total 976 1,013 TOLLS Commercial $4,902,286 $4,981,987 U.S. Government 137,827 168,056 Total $5,040,113 $5,150,043 CARGO 00 Commercial 5,924,862 5,495,623 U.S. Government 172,764 175,507 Free 36,970 35,016 Total 6,134,596 5,706,146 'Includes tolls on all vessels, ocean-going and small. Cargo figures are in long tons. From the inside looking out, on the Aleta, one sees the white electric organ on the aft deck.

PAGE 27

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 3 1262 07150 0341