Citation
Robinson Crusoe

Material Information

Title:
Robinson Crusoe
Added title page title:
Story of Robinson Crusoe
Creator:
Defoe, Daniel, 1661?-1731
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
14 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 31 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Castaways -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Shipwrecks -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Imaginary voyages -- 1895 ( rbgenr )
Shaped books -- 19th century ( local )
Genre:
Imaginary voyages ( rbgenr )
shaped books ( aat )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Lovett, R.W. Robinson Crusoe,
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Caption title: The story of Robinson Crusoe.
General Note:
Text begins and ends on inside of front and back covers.
General Note:
Book is cut in the shape of the cover illustration.
General Note:
Part I of Robinson Crusoe, retold.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
27022440 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Copyrighted 1895

MS LouGHLIN Bros.
NEW YORK.







OBINSON CRUSOE wasthe
youngest son of his parents.

His father wasa man of some
wealth, able to give his son a good
home, and to send him to school.
It was his wish that his son should
become a lawyer, but the boy’s head
began very early to be filled with
thoughts of travel, and nothing
would satisfy him but to go to sea,
His father gave him wise and
earnest counsel against it, and fora
time his advice prevailed; but in
: the end the boy’s desire to roam
led him to set his father’s wishes at naught. One day,



being at Hull, a seaport town of England, he met a school-
fellow who was about to sail in his father’s ship, and was
urged by him to go with him. In an evil hour he yielded,
and without asking God’s blessing or his father’s, he went
on board.

One day, when they had been out about two weeks, a
great storm came up, and the ship struck a rock near a
strange coast. The crew launched a boat, and sought to
escape in it, but the waves soon overturned it, and all were
separated in the sea. Robinson Crusoe was carried by a
wave toward the shore, and at length thrown upon the
land senseless.

When he recovered he began to look about to see if any
of his comrades had escaped, but he could see no sign of
any of them.

Night coming on, he climbed into a thick, bushy tree to
sleep, not knowing but that there might be ravenous

beasts there. When he awoke next morning, the sea was calm,
and he could see the ship about a mile from the shore ; and when
the tide ebbed he swam out to her. He found that all the pro-
visions were dry, and being very hunery, filled his pockets with
biscuit, anl ate as he went about other things ; for he saw that he
must lose no time in vetting ashore all that he could from the ship.
First, he threw overboard several] spare yards and spars. Then he
went down the ship’s side and tied them together, and laying a few




The Baldwin Library













short pieces of plank upon

them, he had a raft strong enough

to bear a moderate weight. Next he

lowered upon it three seamen’s chests,

and filled them with provisions. After

a long search he found the carpenter's

chest, which was a great prize to him. He
lowered it upon the raft, and then secured a
supply of guns and gunpowder. With this cargo he >
started for the shore, and succeeded in landing it safe.

His next work was to view the country, and seek a proper place
to stow his goods. He knew not yet where he was, whether on a
continent or an island. Sceing a hill not over a mile away, very
steep and high, he climbed to the top of it, and discovered that
he was on an island, barren, and probably uninhabited, except by
wild animals. |
When Robinson Crusoe realized the lonely, desperate situation

that he was in, his heart sank, and he almost wished that he had
perished with the others. Butsoon perceiving the ingratitude of
this state of mind, he fell upon his knees to thank God for saving
his life,—his alone among so many,—and a feeling of confidence
arose in his breast that He would still protect him in the midst of
the perils by which he was surrounded.








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Every~day for twelve days, he madé-a trip to the vessel, bring-
ing ashore. all that he thought svould: be:useful to him. The night
of the twelfthday there was.a violent wind, and when he awoke in
the morning the ship’was nowhere to be seen.

He then gave his thoughts to providing himself with a safe dwell-
ing-place. Although he had hardly ever handled tools before
in his life, his needs now forced him to find out their use. He set
himself at work to build a hut, or cabin, out of the timbers he had
saved from the wreck. It was a task that took a long time, but
at last, by effort and contrivance, it was finished, and he had a
fairly comfortable house, which he called his castle.

After it was completed, heapplied himself to making other
things that would add to his comfort. First, he made a chair and
a table, with an immense amount of labor, for each board that he
used had to be formed from the trunk of a tree, being hewed flat
on two sides until it wasthin enough. To provide himself with







SAILING AROUND THE ISLAND.

clothes, he saved the skins of all the creatures he shot, and dried
them, and made garments for himself out of them. In addition,
at the cost of a great deal of time and trouble, he made, also of
skins, an umbrella, which he needed greatly to keep off both sun

and rain.
He had found upon the ship two cats anda dog. The cats he





THE FOOT-PRINTS IN THE SAND.

carried ashore on the raft, while the dog swam ashore himself, and
was a trusty servant to Robinson Crusoe for many years, Beside
the company of these pets, he had that of a parrot which he
caught and taught to speak, and its chatter served to while away
many hours that would otherwise have been dreary.

He went out every day with his gun to hunt for food. He














































found that there were goats
running wild on the island, and
he often succeeded in shooting some
of them. But he saw that his powder and
shot would, in time, all be gone, and that
to have a steady supply of goat's flesh, he
must breed them in flocks. So he set a
trap to take some alive, and caught sev.
eral. He enclosed a piece of ground for
them to run in; and in time had a large flock
which furnished him with all the meat he needed.
For a long time he brooded over the idea of making a canoe out
of the trunk of a tree, and at last he succeeded in shaping with his

axe a rough vessel in which he sailed around the island.

Years and years of this lonely life passed away. Although
Crusoe had, to some extent, become contented with his solitary lot
yet at times a terrible sense of loneliness and desolation would
ro to the top of a hill

C
oS

come over him. Many times would. he
where he could look ‘out to sea in hopes
of catching sight of. a ship. Sometimes

























he would fancy that, at a vast distance, he ~
spied a sail. He would
please himself with hope
of it, but after looking at ;
it steadily, till he was al
most blind, would
lose it quite. ‘Then
|
|
in an agony of misery \
and despair he would
sit down and weep and
sob like a child. |

But one day he saw a sight which, while it gave him cause for
alarm, served to turn his thoughts in a new channel. It was the
print of a naked foot upon the sand near the shore. It filled him
with a new fear, for *it showed that the island must sometimes be
visited by savages.

One morning, going out quite early, he could see the light of
a fire about two miles away. He stole up under the cover of trees
and bushes until he was near enough to observe what was going on.
He saw that five canoes were drawn up on the shore, while a
swarm of naked savages were dancing about a fire. Presently they
dragged two poor wretches from the boats. One of them was
knocked down at once, and several of the savages set to work to











































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cut him up. They were evidently cannibals, that is, people who
eat men, and were going to hold one of their horrible feasts upon
their captives. The other captive was left standing for a moment,
and seeing a chance to escape, started to run. Robinson Crusoe
was greatly alarmed when he saw that the runaway was coming
directly toward himself, but when he saw that only two pursued,
and that the runaway gained upon them, he made up his mind to
help him. When they were near enough, Robinson Crusoe stepped
in between the runaway and his pursuers, and advancing on the
foremost of the latter, knocked him down with the stock of his
gun. The other raised his bow and was going to shoot, when
Robinson Crusoe fired at him and killed him. Then he made
signs to the runaway to come to him, and the poor creature did so
in fear and trembling, kneeling at Crusoe’s feet as a sign that he
was his slave. Crusoe took him home to his castle and gave him
something to eat. Robinson Crusoe had now a companion, and
in a short time he began to teach him to speak Englisn. First he
let him know that his name was to be Friday, for that was the day
on which his life had been saved. Then he taught him everything
that he thought would make him useful, handy, and helpful. He
clothed him in a suit made of goatskins, and the poor fellow seem-
ed to be greatly pleased to be dressed like his master.

One day Robinson Crusoe took him with him when he went
hunting, and was much amused at the way his gun mystified him.
He first shot a bird. Friday didn’t see it fall,
and was greatly frightened by the noise of the




gun, but when Robinson Crusoe pointed
to the bird, and made signs for him
to pick it up, he was
filled with wonder and
amazement. It wasa
long time before he
could understand the
nature of fire-arms, or
overcome his fear of
the gun, which he
seemed to think was
endowed with life, and





CRUSOE WATCHING THE SAVAGES,

which he used to address very beseechingly in his own language,
begging it not to kill him.

After he had learned enough English to be able to talk freely,
he told Robinson Crusoe of a party of shipwrecked Spanish sailors,
who had been cast ashore on the mainland, and had been be-
friended by the savages of his tribe. A great desire to see them





GRATITUDE OF THE RESCUED CAPTIVE.

seized Crusoe ; and he set about making, with Friday's assistance,
a boat large enough to carry both over.

3ut one morning, before they had got on very far with the task,
Friday came running ina state of great fright, to tell that three
canoes, full of savages, had landed on the island. Robinson Crusoe
armed himself with a sword and a hatchet, and taking all the guns








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they could carry, he and Friday went to a thicket of trees which
stood near where the savages were. From there they could see
them sitting about fires they had made, eating the flesh of one
victim, while another captive, a white man, lay bound near by.

Perceiving that there was no time to loseif they would save the
captive, Robinson Crusoe took one gun and Friday another, and
both fired into the crowd together. They killed and wounded
several, and the rest were thrown into the wildest confusion. They
continued firing until they had emptied their guns. Then they
rushed forward, and, Friday using the hatchet and Crusoe the
sword, they killed all the remaining savages, except four who suc-
ceeded in reaching their canoes. Bidding Friday‘release the white
captive, Crusoe ran to another of the canoes, intending to pursue
the savages to sea, but in the canoe he was surprised to. find a poor
creature bound handand foot. He cut him free, and helped him to
rise, for he could hardly stand. Friday coming up, Crusoe bid him
speak to the man, and tell him he was saved. When Friday heard
the man answer, he first looked at him with astonishment, then
embraced and kissed him, and laughed, jumped about, and sung,
like one that was mad. When he came a little to himself he told
Crusoe that the captive was his father.

The two rescued men were then taken to the castle ; and Crusoe
learned from the white man that he was one of the Spaniards of
whom Friday had told him. It was proposed that he should return
to the mainland with Friday’s father in the new boat, as soon as it
was completed, and bring the rest of his countrymen to Crusoe’s
island to live. This was agreed to, and all set to work to finish the
boat. Finally everything was ready and they set sail.

One morning, a short time after, Friday brought word to Crusoe
that a ship was in sight. This was news so welcome to Crusoe that
he went nearly wild with joy, but presently the prudent thought
occurred to him that it might be well not to let those aboard see
him, until he could learn something about their business there. So





















































he watched in concealment,
and in a short time saw a boat
leave the ship and make for the shore.
Eleven men landed, and Crusoe saw that
while most of them dispersed about the
island, three kept by themselves and ap-
peared to be much dejected. When the
others were out of hearing,
Crusoe approached these three
and began to question them, and
found that they were English, that one
was the captain of the ship, and that the
others were the mate and a passenger,
that there had been a mutiny on board,
and that the men, as a favor, instead of
killing them, were going to leave them
on the island.

Crusoe offered to aid them to recover
the ship, and going back to the castle,
brought guns and gave them to them.
Then they waited for the men who were
scattered about the island to return,
and when they came, shot two, who, the



captain said, were leaders in the mischief,
and the others, taken by surprise, cried out for pardon. This the cap-
tain granted on condition that they would return to their duty, and
swear to assist him in recovering the ship, to which they all agreed,
many of them gladly, for they had been forced into the mutiny by
some of the bolder and more vicious spirits among them.

The task of taking the ship was postponed until midnight, when
most of those aboard would be asleep. Those on watch, when they
saw the boat approach, supposed it was merely the sailors who had
gone ashore returning after disposing of the prisoners, and they
were heldin chat until the party got aboard, when they were im-

mediately-knocked down and

© : secured. Then all the hat-

ches were fastened, so that

those below decks were made
prisoners.

When this was done, the
captain ordered the mate with
three men to break into the
round-house, where the rebel
captain lay. He _ having
taken the alarm, had got up,
and with two others had
seized fire-arms, with which,
when the mate split open
the door, they fired amengst
the attackers, wounding the
mate, but killing nobody.
The mate calling for help,





lq.
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/
/

So



FRIDAY BRINGS ALARMING NEWS.

rushed into the round-house, wounded as he was, and with his pistol
shot the new captain through the head, so that he never spoke
more. Upon that the rest yielded, and the ship was effectually

taken, without the loss of any more lives.
Then the captain went back to the island, and told Robinson
Crusoe that the ship and all that he had was at his service, in re-





FRIDAY FINDS HIS FATHER.

turn for what he had done for him. Crusoe told him that he asked
nothing more than that he should carry Friday and himself to Eng-
land, and this the captain gladly agreed to do. He provided Cru-
soe with clothing from his own wardrobe, and Crusoe took aboard
with him, in addition to some gold that he had saved from the
wreck. only his goatskin coat and cap and his umbrella, which he







wished to keep for relics.
Everything else on the island
he left for the Spaniards when they
should return from the mainland, and
he wrote out for their benefit a full ac-
count of his way of living, and all his
plans and contrivances. He also induced
the captain to leave a supply of tools that
he knew would be useful to them, and an
assortment of seeds of various kinds. Then they
set sail, and Robinson. Crusoe left the island, twenty-eight
years, two months and nineteen days after he had landed upon it.
Three days after setting sail, as they passed near the coast of an
island, they saw close to.-the shore a great fleet of canoes, full of
savages armed with bows and arrows. They were going through
strange evolutions, and Friday said that they were probably setting
out to make war on some other tribe. When they caught sight of
the ship, and saw that those on board were watching them, they








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came paddling toward it, and soon were swarming about on all
sides, uttering curious cries, and making uncouth gesturés. Those
on the ship were very much puzzled to know what their intentions
could be, and finally Robinson Crusoe told Friday to go on the up-
per deck and speak to them in his own language, which he hoped
they might be able to understand. Friday did as he was bid, but
had spoken only a few words when the savages let fly a great
cloud of arrows athim. So poor was their aimthat only three of
the arrows struck him, but one of the three pierced him through
the heart, and he fell dead.

When Robinson Crusoe saw this he became almost frantic with
rage, and ordered the ship’s guns to be loaded with grapeshot and
fired into the fleet. The effect was tremendous. More than half



























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———S—




















of the canoes were destroyed, and the sea for a time was covered
with the wretched savages, struggling to swim, and uttering the
most frightful howls. The fortunate ones in those of the canoes
that had not been hit did not wait to help their comrades, but
speeded off as fast as they could paddle. One by one the others
sank, and in a short time the sea was as clear of them as if they
had never been there.

Thus a terrible vengeance was taken for Friday's death, but his
master felt little consoled thereby. The poor fellow was so honest,
faithful, and affectionate, and had ways so cheerful and pleasant, that
Robinson Crusoe had grown to be most sincerely attached to him,
and he now mourned him as if he had beena son. He caused his
body to be buried in the sea with all the honors possible, and it
seemed to him as if the delight of being restored to his old home
hardly made up for the loss of one who had beeome so dear to him.

The voyage homeward was continued; and no further mishap
occurring, Robinson Crusoe arrived safe in England after his many
years of absence. He found that his father and mother were dead,
as well as many of his old friends, and for a time he felt almost as
lonely as on his island. But he married a worthy wife before long,
and buying a farm with the sold he had brought home, settled
down to a quiet country life. He was blest with children who
grew up to be his delight and comfort, and his old age was spent
in peace and happiness.









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'2012-06-03T21:24:04-04:00'
describe
'156030' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOUI' 'sip-filesVID0001_0004.QC.jpg'
5e61a3754e5d79391241b470dbd18610
a79cdd58a6747b997dcbcaf6fcf5af6ee8bccf43
describe
'864628' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOUJ' 'sip-filesVID0001_0008.jp2'
2644ba262fd4273a2564cb54245d51f1
da232b67096639cc7d0d40d425149e164b984766
'2012-06-03T21:24:15-04:00'
describe
'694442' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOUK' 'sip-filesVID0001_0001.jpg'
cb2e01412ebaf7e4594b9898169482e9
d96cce3490157d38bcc6e410858d22de5ba16e68
describe
'2866' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOUL' 'sip-filesVID0001_0011.txt'
81d01c9dcf755585ed254a8a8bdde9b5
3bce50c0461de2d7b529643406c74cfe7e3d7bcb
'2012-06-03T21:24:32-04:00'
describe
'8638553' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOUM' 'sip-filesVID0001_0011.tif'
ef73325f87e32634488a3b3e9dfd008b
bd4147de10e48112b8ee63a5534c2d351c0123e8
'2012-06-03T21:24:34-04:00'
describe
'72482' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOUN' 'sip-filesVID0001_0012thm.jpg'
dc166e15c518b87e26d5306ed23a4219
246ce7aa1ff428f1c9682cbeae50969f33c6b2ef
describe
'557203' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOUO' 'sip-filesVID0001_0012.jpg'
b5579c317b77b7213810fe9acf477417
0113b56b7f3758e8a6ffdd4c530cda2f1a1b850c
'2012-06-03T21:24:14-04:00'
describe
'538666' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOUP' 'sip-filesVID0001_0013.jpg'
efb03d67dd127ef7ce87822f7e655b78
fbc63981ccc08a84a01d2ae191c3cd1a8bfd2364
'2012-06-03T21:24:00-04:00'
describe
'169890' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOUQ' 'sip-filesVID0001_0009.QC.jpg'
c3b9428b6f20f28f44cf2dfbde47e5f4
6b605546067652f588d9f69064b50fcd41cb1139
'2012-06-03T21:24:35-04:00'
describe
'58992' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOUR' 'sip-filesVID0001_0003.pro'
f32f4589c491e2d494544f04116d4e4b
f81e0167c8a9da7cd5383b655cb9d36c7026808a
describe
'200673' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOUS' 'sip-filesVID0001_0001.QC.jpg'
f6a7b7aae524021a83456f6d4aab3b70
b7bb9305d00553c4f450fcb78189ce05520435c7
'2012-06-03T21:24:10-04:00'
describe
'115916' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOUT' 'sip-filesVID0001_0016.QC.jpg'
7a335e62c8a31a6ad694c698c9c70071
1b8a34f76d8a5e3ac862cc4f24db067598a0f868
'2012-06-03T21:24:28-04:00'
describe
'43666' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOUU' 'sip-filesVID0001_0006thm.jpg'
78b556f32e4d7a9079c068c3fd3bb325
874f07cf3daecaadd0bed319c2efa515c10ad04d
'2012-06-03T21:24:11-04:00'
describe
'141707' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOUV' 'sip-filesVID0001_0002.QC.jpg'
71c6462ef27a1d8e195bf74e9db98137
c9a4f5832f2c216de4aa36ac72e8a2b86b708888
describe
'453814' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOUW' 'sip-filesVID0001_0014.jpg'
dc9a81dc20c79c91af68f9a46a2ddbcb
30f051f1fd6e6a3565d39c00127075a72da56e8f
describe
'539' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOUX' 'sip-filesVID0001_0008.txt'
6be8103f39fc776332820dd38d3583f3
a8c1229fd8c920ed6c57d3d738583c6bce1769b4
describe
'72669' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOUY' 'sip-filesVID0001_0004thm.jpg'
3a093de0c62d12f206a26f48374d4aab
df0c1cf5c16f37f6e938d680ca1b801d89abd8c4
'2012-06-03T21:24:03-04:00'
describe
'70720' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOUZ' 'sip-filesVID0001_0013thm.jpg'
f41e6a1bc36c9f6efd831bc119152529
2712bf788f3bc06e9fd5df7f01f4f65f9ae0e9f0
'2012-06-03T21:24:22-04:00'
describe
'63960' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVA' 'sip-filesVID0001_0002thm.jpg'
14be4e1d49865b21aec8da20de6f7cb2
f8a883bbb3f5a99b69f41034bca910617c95d083
describe
'124122' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVB' 'sip-filesVID0001_0015.QC.jpg'
a866fdf8e46387648beb51a37bde8019
2052be25d66b66cf7b84aa5e0c150df71ac7898d
'2012-06-03T21:24:23-04:00'
describe
'12488' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVC' 'sip-filesVID0001_0012.pro'
a3b58273860392097d40377c19f1f01b
16fce1130d71b20db658e97c71adaf85b01e4ad9
'2012-06-03T21:24:31-04:00'
describe
'20766260' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVD' 'sip-filesVID0001_0012.tif'
e3d763c011d471bfe1160d167debd957
2552954adcf90d48dab5d590dae1f68dc6326f00
'2012-06-03T21:24:09-04:00'
describe
'1057041' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVE' 'sip-filesVID0001_0006.jp2'
6de8c56e98ac330da4b549ee7fd2b2a6
c14aaba02b6a7b14b0ba2654c2aeca9277ad0f11
'2012-06-03T21:24:18-04:00'
describe
'39368' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVF' 'sip-filesVID0001_0015thm.jpg'
b0e4dc1a6616342dde644de0365e09a2
015990056701073336d4680d8e021d76055fa0e7
describe
'6939012' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVG' 'sip-filesVID0001_0003.tif'
529d0ed19eb4c6d588e4f6d892e5dae2
cd5e922d5dd0ff8deed8cc3695d6c49ba084bb1e
describe
'82045' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVH' 'sip-filesVID0001_0001thm.jpg'
d0c24a46a7cbf6c3cfa081d370b591e5
9ec692bc06e2154d28b51be5a5987d34a216f010
'2012-06-03T21:24:29-04:00'
describe
'10455' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVI' 'sip-filesVID0001_0004.pro'
c41f6d40b7881cdbc4e36e64902fc5ca
7b0f4024c2d92492caa704250b622886a0796808
'2012-06-03T21:24:24-04:00'
describe
'2399' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVJ' 'sip-filesVID0001_0006.txt'
7abfc95868e694cd7429347981f7d5ab
f0c162cb961100a9205039581c531b4d49b1dd67
describe
'42631' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVK' 'sip-filesVID0001_0007thm.jpg'
c3904dd976dd8c8c77390c4217aa6a24
3b9f2222f0c77fca4644cc9d41ca9a2adf6b71ce
'2012-06-03T21:24:30-04:00'
describe
'543' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVL' 'sip-filesVID0001_0005.txt'
67f718e74f1622c7e229f4c6e86a8866
7b5ca80b26b143e67f99f0a6040b6763a3049660
describe
Invalid character
'880916' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVM' 'sip-filesVID0001_0001.jp2'
3ecf73581b3f576b5ab35bd6a10f9b8d
fbaa65320a6810c398b03578a13d452faaf8ee45
describe
'2709' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVN' 'sip-filesVID0001_0002.txt'
bc35cec46377116f76c6584a39a418f2
a8b0e22ebe478009cf06aa9d83a1051c99dab714
describe
'562' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVO' 'sip-filesVID0001_0013.txt'
5813e10dcf4adde9c20bc8f528e7fa56
fb9520030d02b1f970c14a7d7ec367648d7907a8
describe
'159176' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVP' 'sip-filesVID0001_0013.QC.jpg'
d6fe1d94bba9730af2bcdedb0644e1ed
906f6fb4818ef437465b29d7335084f92768b82b
'2012-06-03T21:24:20-04:00'
describe
'566525' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVQ' 'sip-filesVID0001_0008.jpg'
554effaf2bcfb2fd518048abd51bb494
f96c239ac1da65614c05019c5cdd6a4f5be71c7a
describe
'129825' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVR' 'sip-filesVID0001_0010.QC.jpg'
931e3d0909ca4b476fc77a9b52688bf0
89aa0166e98cb55ef7de121aff815961c995ef7e
describe
'864585' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVS' 'sip-filesVID0001_0012.jp2'
ab1fbe461336c766aa4b1bb2f4032c63
1bb8c537e471533b2363eadff1e90c1d33aef940
describe
'27178' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVT' 'sip-filesUF00096275_00001.mets'
cc969fec34cfa00b4d08b9df07087397
198d78898883f22dbd433fce4cba1c884d154e53
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T11:41:03-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'463294' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVW' 'sip-filesVID0001_0003.jpg'
c5f365d83c1f2680eb3006b0c20b0150
a93b733ab6e34a5ac475675126a54fb436533913
describe
'505773' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVX' 'sip-filesVID0001_0004.jpg'
68afffba972dd93b9519290635fe06cf
d876aad987f79123e87f780de17339b07018cacd
describe
'497926' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVY' 'sip-filesVID0001_0007.jpg'
7ae1add0bdead699471222308534bdce
21b613085e2093eaecd3c4d1728297357839d5df
describe
'572389' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOVZ' 'sip-filesVID0001_0009.jpg'
7b2d2c00c5be698a29f7ec32b8fea44a
7416087fd41540f99e4376fbdc40e7b1101ae0a2
describe
'471445' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWA' 'sip-filesVID0001_0011.jpg'
0521170afc4d0abd7e8fb55bdaaec12a
ea5febef5d75a221197c896c8090f911d7dc5979
'2012-06-03T21:24:21-04:00'
describe
'451257' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWB' 'sip-filesVID0001_0015.jpg'
8db37719e0d7b0e5427e4f60b1c47931
60664e15e248cff2a273e4bc0cb2c0dfa9aa7dc4
describe
'864538' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWC' 'sip-filesVID0001_0002.jp2'
c92133c25ebc6ad7c58ae3ff9f1071e1
6aac4d5028c2a702adf70436240d8166647628bc
describe
'864853' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWD' 'sip-filesVID0001_0004.jp2'
c231176265e17965839191bc1b4a59ad
94c1ecabbdbf0a60c75bc364b71f3f3ced52c0b7
describe
'865096' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWE' 'sip-filesVID0001_0005.jp2'
d18cfe6bc73306c429279c4e32d629b6
491105c2974d137b80939765a46a5e98ef53e179
describe
'865065' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWF' 'sip-filesVID0001_0009.jp2'
3cf4c312dea1ed6ecb496fcec1cbbe23
3c9667c33329dbf5013415c4e7b9d35fe1f2d452
'2012-06-03T21:24:27-04:00'
describe
'1079863' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWG' 'sip-filesVID0001_0011.jp2'
aba53d6fc3c4223ae02dec439bb0967b
79a263c792b9a7948719b05a1664295cb1608f9d
describe
'1057085' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWH' 'sip-filesVID0001_0014.jp2'
dc34c205a93d907448bb74d6909ba7c3
7e864fae0e21819a25102e06f36a4aac057c438b
describe
'1079867' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWI' 'sip-filesVID0001_0015.jp2'
04b5078ff63110eef7599c5fccb28774
92de338d5dc2b121aec24f5f99594df444c4ec20
describe
'6933496' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWJ' 'sip-filesVID0001_0002.tif'
9dc60a66895ac96af42ca594e06a009b
8e67abf89c8897a00098302d8485b8bfd6a86978
describe
'20777280' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWK' 'sip-filesVID0001_0005.tif'
18199b5c4b2cc05feb12b37faf8654b1
89ea4ed0208c3ffd3ce80b5f5717ff5d0373f612
'2012-06-03T21:24:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWL' 'sip-filesVID0001_0006.tif'
bd7cd7825885ddb02509645dc0a990b2
c55295fc9f321066b555e68f2ad5084718623102
describe
'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWM' 'sip-filesVID0001_0007.tif'
51776a20009bd971b1830bb69dca369f
e25889df717d0c233e875dbeccea63577c4f3e6c
describe
'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWN' 'sip-filesVID0001_0008.tif'
55b3d7045b0e374021dba6f0c8d10bb4
d01e231e354f6849d58378a88ce1bdb4ffef5010
describe
'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWO' 'sip-filesVID0001_0009.tif'
5020ddfef7c96eb97569f7c69055d7d3
668935dfe2a2ac258d2d43bf2adb5a0424a290cd
describe
'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWP' 'sip-filesVID0001_0010.tif'
c024370c65abf7571cb367062da48b0a
39f1f1d32011a9f3e88de5001fa4a283c9a6d33a
describe
'20782932' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWQ' 'sip-filesVID0001_0013.tif'
8289c95b29e01361d40cba2e995ca4f7
9c9af43416412e3f7983b646c6162222614d8616
'2012-06-03T21:24:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWR' 'sip-filesVID0001_0015.tif'
545c543df0c4923e94d919d2217d722d
1d8a20ec40927420b9ebfbbe8ec2eb223c4d4c80
describe
'1963' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWS' 'sip-filesVID0001_0001.pro'
7ce770f1e94a7282d9ef62d45c4926fc
208b8eb97ef72df44e71697ae41f9f69126929a8
'2012-06-03T21:24:01-04:00'
describe
'53288' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWT' 'sip-filesVID0001_0002.pro'
9e17063ea6088684a4ff0bd39569d5db
34b3cfd40073a8ed1b961bc0fd9037fb06a7399e
describe
'13494' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWU' 'sip-filesVID0001_0005.pro'
b7d670addc297c8c4e1fbd13344d8c64
84f23229099f91b39ae6f585fc4e07365f3ba024
describe
'54697' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWV' 'sip-filesVID0001_0006.pro'
83fc7a67a8de08c241873f2659161034
17b8d265dbb47061a56eec05d3b534464e2d3ca5
describe
'53349' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWW' 'sip-filesVID0001_0007.pro'
76743c69973527b85bbbdf1cae498e3f
b749ab4e71d7ecc7b1eb3c482ff566e5d02448ce
describe
'12002' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWX' 'sip-filesVID0001_0008.pro'
ad7097082160cd2134282c97b48c03ba
7f935c5b3f76c9834f5def720ca6cd660a23ddce
describe
'11721' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWY' 'sip-filesVID0001_0009.pro'
9209b9693d0d7a8ac4bf83fdb9296fe5
c5450ec4517840fc6bcf7b6dc3799e11f8ddeb9a
describe
'57500' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOWZ' 'sip-filesVID0001_0010.pro'
4c4a8b0c4ad4c5a07074f85bca3b8935
1f701fb3a7c7d7d2441194450e85ffefcf5abd87
describe
'58313' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOXA' 'sip-filesVID0001_0011.pro'
e5d7a45c161dfab9f2fdd40a83e27ee1
0863107f3e86927f9a03efe5a1bdc22a469b4432
describe
'47344' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOXB' 'sip-filesVID0001_0014.pro'
88f8ea1e09697e4a035576540cfa5992
e4ea28dd5ab3be06cfcf9f9a868ad885220e8775
describe
'39523' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOXC' 'sip-filesVID0001_0015.pro'
0beb76321e7a4d49be81c3d4690a015b
bfb856efcc38d3b9bc9b9e327894b4fef6939cc5
describe
'2382' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOXD' 'sip-filesVID0001_0003.txt'
6ecd34bb961549e430cafbb55f5a922a
54c0a32d4c75e860c87694d439bd6683c1568513
describe
'474' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOXE' 'sip-filesVID0001_0004.txt'
eb5024014158060ab35f525c6378a205
ab787828435a5b172a4eb94139f97087326a8668
describe
'2123' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOXF' 'sip-filesVID0001_0007.txt'
65437411b9a3567f3ddc644111471dc4
d66e9b73645a1a26857a81ccd27ab80fc142b380
describe
'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOXG' 'sip-filesVID0001_0009.txt'
95d78deae4e48214e92d2b2a3b7fbad4
b864a16c64ca79acebb917ad2be3937ff0b370cc
describe
'2222' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOXH' 'sip-filesVID0001_0010.txt'
0632d3ab48af57194277842dc2dc4403
e3505cf8e1c7e10543fe6fce2cfd935c7f0085e6
describe
'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOXI' 'sip-filesVID0001_0012.txt'
8acb3f709da5bd3046dbe33956a7069f
23fac94e116b6e19353cc2c1d8d427572577455a
describe
Invalid character
'2034' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOXJ' 'sip-filesVID0001_0014.txt'
8d504eaf51732d3eee382736ece557fb
e50c57e27bae5ab9775a2968f32692ab9a33b768
describe
'1555' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOXK' 'sip-filesVID0001_0015.txt'
794b4eb3ee0470ec5bcf14ec98013645
4c834dfdc200fdee4645754366c04a36b83812c0
describe
'74382' 'info:fdaE20100205_AAAAIBfileF20100205_AABOXL' 'sip-filesVID0001_0009thm.jpg'
445e40b350ab7e0127be31ac8ed9d226
05302d6ce658f793c07f08cd3eb3fff9c65d85d2
describe
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Copyrighted 1895

MS LouGHLIN Bros.
NEW YORK.




OBINSON CRUSOE wasthe
youngest son of his parents.

His father wasa man of some
wealth, able to give his son a good
home, and to send him to school.
It was his wish that his son should
become a lawyer, but the boy’s head
began very early to be filled with
thoughts of travel, and nothing
would satisfy him but to go to sea,
His father gave him wise and
earnest counsel against it, and fora
time his advice prevailed; but in
: the end the boy’s desire to roam
led him to set his father’s wishes at naught. One day,



being at Hull, a seaport town of England, he met a school-
fellow who was about to sail in his father’s ship, and was
urged by him to go with him. In an evil hour he yielded,
and without asking God’s blessing or his father’s, he went
on board.

One day, when they had been out about two weeks, a
great storm came up, and the ship struck a rock near a
strange coast. The crew launched a boat, and sought to
escape in it, but the waves soon overturned it, and all were
separated in the sea. Robinson Crusoe was carried by a
wave toward the shore, and at length thrown upon the
land senseless.

When he recovered he began to look about to see if any
of his comrades had escaped, but he could see no sign of
any of them.

Night coming on, he climbed into a thick, bushy tree to
sleep, not knowing but that there might be ravenous

beasts there. When he awoke next morning, the sea was calm,
and he could see the ship about a mile from the shore ; and when
the tide ebbed he swam out to her. He found that all the pro-
visions were dry, and being very hunery, filled his pockets with
biscuit, anl ate as he went about other things ; for he saw that he
must lose no time in vetting ashore all that he could from the ship.
First, he threw overboard several] spare yards and spars. Then he
went down the ship’s side and tied them together, and laying a few




The Baldwin Library










short pieces of plank upon

them, he had a raft strong enough

to bear a moderate weight. Next he

lowered upon it three seamen’s chests,

and filled them with provisions. After

a long search he found the carpenter's

chest, which was a great prize to him. He
lowered it upon the raft, and then secured a
supply of guns and gunpowder. With this cargo he >
started for the shore, and succeeded in landing it safe.

His next work was to view the country, and seek a proper place
to stow his goods. He knew not yet where he was, whether on a
continent or an island. Sceing a hill not over a mile away, very
steep and high, he climbed to the top of it, and discovered that
he was on an island, barren, and probably uninhabited, except by
wild animals. |
When Robinson Crusoe realized the lonely, desperate situation

that he was in, his heart sank, and he almost wished that he had
perished with the others. Butsoon perceiving the ingratitude of
this state of mind, he fell upon his knees to thank God for saving
his life,—his alone among so many,—and a feeling of confidence
arose in his breast that He would still protect him in the midst of
the perils by which he was surrounded.








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Every~day for twelve days, he madé-a trip to the vessel, bring-
ing ashore. all that he thought svould: be:useful to him. The night
of the twelfthday there was.a violent wind, and when he awoke in
the morning the ship’was nowhere to be seen.

He then gave his thoughts to providing himself with a safe dwell-
ing-place. Although he had hardly ever handled tools before
in his life, his needs now forced him to find out their use. He set
himself at work to build a hut, or cabin, out of the timbers he had
saved from the wreck. It was a task that took a long time, but
at last, by effort and contrivance, it was finished, and he had a
fairly comfortable house, which he called his castle.

After it was completed, heapplied himself to making other
things that would add to his comfort. First, he made a chair and
a table, with an immense amount of labor, for each board that he
used had to be formed from the trunk of a tree, being hewed flat
on two sides until it wasthin enough. To provide himself with




SAILING AROUND THE ISLAND.

clothes, he saved the skins of all the creatures he shot, and dried
them, and made garments for himself out of them. In addition,
at the cost of a great deal of time and trouble, he made, also of
skins, an umbrella, which he needed greatly to keep off both sun

and rain.
He had found upon the ship two cats anda dog. The cats he


THE FOOT-PRINTS IN THE SAND.

carried ashore on the raft, while the dog swam ashore himself, and
was a trusty servant to Robinson Crusoe for many years, Beside
the company of these pets, he had that of a parrot which he
caught and taught to speak, and its chatter served to while away
many hours that would otherwise have been dreary.

He went out every day with his gun to hunt for food. He











































found that there were goats
running wild on the island, and
he often succeeded in shooting some
of them. But he saw that his powder and
shot would, in time, all be gone, and that
to have a steady supply of goat's flesh, he
must breed them in flocks. So he set a
trap to take some alive, and caught sev.
eral. He enclosed a piece of ground for
them to run in; and in time had a large flock
which furnished him with all the meat he needed.
For a long time he brooded over the idea of making a canoe out
of the trunk of a tree, and at last he succeeded in shaping with his

axe a rough vessel in which he sailed around the island.

Years and years of this lonely life passed away. Although
Crusoe had, to some extent, become contented with his solitary lot
yet at times a terrible sense of loneliness and desolation would
ro to the top of a hill

C
oS

come over him. Many times would. he
where he could look ‘out to sea in hopes
of catching sight of. a ship. Sometimes

























he would fancy that, at a vast distance, he ~
spied a sail. He would
please himself with hope
of it, but after looking at ;
it steadily, till he was al
most blind, would
lose it quite. ‘Then
|
|
in an agony of misery \
and despair he would
sit down and weep and
sob like a child. |

But one day he saw a sight which, while it gave him cause for
alarm, served to turn his thoughts in a new channel. It was the
print of a naked foot upon the sand near the shore. It filled him
with a new fear, for *it showed that the island must sometimes be
visited by savages.

One morning, going out quite early, he could see the light of
a fire about two miles away. He stole up under the cover of trees
and bushes until he was near enough to observe what was going on.
He saw that five canoes were drawn up on the shore, while a
swarm of naked savages were dancing about a fire. Presently they
dragged two poor wretches from the boats. One of them was
knocked down at once, and several of the savages set to work to








































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cut him up. They were evidently cannibals, that is, people who
eat men, and were going to hold one of their horrible feasts upon
their captives. The other captive was left standing for a moment,
and seeing a chance to escape, started to run. Robinson Crusoe
was greatly alarmed when he saw that the runaway was coming
directly toward himself, but when he saw that only two pursued,
and that the runaway gained upon them, he made up his mind to
help him. When they were near enough, Robinson Crusoe stepped
in between the runaway and his pursuers, and advancing on the
foremost of the latter, knocked him down with the stock of his
gun. The other raised his bow and was going to shoot, when
Robinson Crusoe fired at him and killed him. Then he made
signs to the runaway to come to him, and the poor creature did so
in fear and trembling, kneeling at Crusoe’s feet as a sign that he
was his slave. Crusoe took him home to his castle and gave him
something to eat. Robinson Crusoe had now a companion, and
in a short time he began to teach him to speak Englisn. First he
let him know that his name was to be Friday, for that was the day
on which his life had been saved. Then he taught him everything
that he thought would make him useful, handy, and helpful. He
clothed him in a suit made of goatskins, and the poor fellow seem-
ed to be greatly pleased to be dressed like his master.

One day Robinson Crusoe took him with him when he went
hunting, and was much amused at the way his gun mystified him.
He first shot a bird. Friday didn’t see it fall,
and was greatly frightened by the noise of the




gun, but when Robinson Crusoe pointed
to the bird, and made signs for him
to pick it up, he was
filled with wonder and
amazement. It wasa
long time before he
could understand the
nature of fire-arms, or
overcome his fear of
the gun, which he
seemed to think was
endowed with life, and


CRUSOE WATCHING THE SAVAGES,

which he used to address very beseechingly in his own language,
begging it not to kill him.

After he had learned enough English to be able to talk freely,
he told Robinson Crusoe of a party of shipwrecked Spanish sailors,
who had been cast ashore on the mainland, and had been be-
friended by the savages of his tribe. A great desire to see them


GRATITUDE OF THE RESCUED CAPTIVE.

seized Crusoe ; and he set about making, with Friday's assistance,
a boat large enough to carry both over.

3ut one morning, before they had got on very far with the task,
Friday came running ina state of great fright, to tell that three
canoes, full of savages, had landed on the island. Robinson Crusoe
armed himself with a sword and a hatchet, and taking all the guns





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they could carry, he and Friday went to a thicket of trees which
stood near where the savages were. From there they could see
them sitting about fires they had made, eating the flesh of one
victim, while another captive, a white man, lay bound near by.

Perceiving that there was no time to loseif they would save the
captive, Robinson Crusoe took one gun and Friday another, and
both fired into the crowd together. They killed and wounded
several, and the rest were thrown into the wildest confusion. They
continued firing until they had emptied their guns. Then they
rushed forward, and, Friday using the hatchet and Crusoe the
sword, they killed all the remaining savages, except four who suc-
ceeded in reaching their canoes. Bidding Friday‘release the white
captive, Crusoe ran to another of the canoes, intending to pursue
the savages to sea, but in the canoe he was surprised to. find a poor
creature bound handand foot. He cut him free, and helped him to
rise, for he could hardly stand. Friday coming up, Crusoe bid him
speak to the man, and tell him he was saved. When Friday heard
the man answer, he first looked at him with astonishment, then
embraced and kissed him, and laughed, jumped about, and sung,
like one that was mad. When he came a little to himself he told
Crusoe that the captive was his father.

The two rescued men were then taken to the castle ; and Crusoe
learned from the white man that he was one of the Spaniards of
whom Friday had told him. It was proposed that he should return
to the mainland with Friday’s father in the new boat, as soon as it
was completed, and bring the rest of his countrymen to Crusoe’s
island to live. This was agreed to, and all set to work to finish the
boat. Finally everything was ready and they set sail.

One morning, a short time after, Friday brought word to Crusoe
that a ship was in sight. This was news so welcome to Crusoe that
he went nearly wild with joy, but presently the prudent thought
occurred to him that it might be well not to let those aboard see
him, until he could learn something about their business there. So


















































he watched in concealment,
and in a short time saw a boat
leave the ship and make for the shore.
Eleven men landed, and Crusoe saw that
while most of them dispersed about the
island, three kept by themselves and ap-
peared to be much dejected. When the
others were out of hearing,
Crusoe approached these three
and began to question them, and
found that they were English, that one
was the captain of the ship, and that the
others were the mate and a passenger,
that there had been a mutiny on board,
and that the men, as a favor, instead of
killing them, were going to leave them
on the island.

Crusoe offered to aid them to recover
the ship, and going back to the castle,
brought guns and gave them to them.
Then they waited for the men who were
scattered about the island to return,
and when they came, shot two, who, the



captain said, were leaders in the mischief,
and the others, taken by surprise, cried out for pardon. This the cap-
tain granted on condition that they would return to their duty, and
swear to assist him in recovering the ship, to which they all agreed,
many of them gladly, for they had been forced into the mutiny by
some of the bolder and more vicious spirits among them.

The task of taking the ship was postponed until midnight, when
most of those aboard would be asleep. Those on watch, when they
saw the boat approach, supposed it was merely the sailors who had
gone ashore returning after disposing of the prisoners, and they
were heldin chat until the party got aboard, when they were im-

mediately-knocked down and

© : secured. Then all the hat-

ches were fastened, so that

those below decks were made
prisoners.

When this was done, the
captain ordered the mate with
three men to break into the
round-house, where the rebel
captain lay. He _ having
taken the alarm, had got up,
and with two others had
seized fire-arms, with which,
when the mate split open
the door, they fired amengst
the attackers, wounding the
mate, but killing nobody.
The mate calling for help,


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So



FRIDAY BRINGS ALARMING NEWS.

rushed into the round-house, wounded as he was, and with his pistol
shot the new captain through the head, so that he never spoke
more. Upon that the rest yielded, and the ship was effectually

taken, without the loss of any more lives.
Then the captain went back to the island, and told Robinson
Crusoe that the ship and all that he had was at his service, in re-


FRIDAY FINDS HIS FATHER.

turn for what he had done for him. Crusoe told him that he asked
nothing more than that he should carry Friday and himself to Eng-
land, and this the captain gladly agreed to do. He provided Cru-
soe with clothing from his own wardrobe, and Crusoe took aboard
with him, in addition to some gold that he had saved from the
wreck. only his goatskin coat and cap and his umbrella, which he




wished to keep for relics.
Everything else on the island
he left for the Spaniards when they
should return from the mainland, and
he wrote out for their benefit a full ac-
count of his way of living, and all his
plans and contrivances. He also induced
the captain to leave a supply of tools that
he knew would be useful to them, and an
assortment of seeds of various kinds. Then they
set sail, and Robinson. Crusoe left the island, twenty-eight
years, two months and nineteen days after he had landed upon it.
Three days after setting sail, as they passed near the coast of an
island, they saw close to.-the shore a great fleet of canoes, full of
savages armed with bows and arrows. They were going through
strange evolutions, and Friday said that they were probably setting
out to make war on some other tribe. When they caught sight of
the ship, and saw that those on board were watching them, they








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came paddling toward it, and soon were swarming about on all
sides, uttering curious cries, and making uncouth gesturés. Those
on the ship were very much puzzled to know what their intentions
could be, and finally Robinson Crusoe told Friday to go on the up-
per deck and speak to them in his own language, which he hoped
they might be able to understand. Friday did as he was bid, but
had spoken only a few words when the savages let fly a great
cloud of arrows athim. So poor was their aimthat only three of
the arrows struck him, but one of the three pierced him through
the heart, and he fell dead.

When Robinson Crusoe saw this he became almost frantic with
rage, and ordered the ship’s guns to be loaded with grapeshot and
fired into the fleet. The effect was tremendous. More than half



























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———S—




















of the canoes were destroyed, and the sea for a time was covered
with the wretched savages, struggling to swim, and uttering the
most frightful howls. The fortunate ones in those of the canoes
that had not been hit did not wait to help their comrades, but
speeded off as fast as they could paddle. One by one the others
sank, and in a short time the sea was as clear of them as if they
had never been there.

Thus a terrible vengeance was taken for Friday's death, but his
master felt little consoled thereby. The poor fellow was so honest,
faithful, and affectionate, and had ways so cheerful and pleasant, that
Robinson Crusoe had grown to be most sincerely attached to him,
and he now mourned him as if he had beena son. He caused his
body to be buried in the sea with all the honors possible, and it
seemed to him as if the delight of being restored to his old home
hardly made up for the loss of one who had beeome so dear to him.

The voyage homeward was continued; and no further mishap
occurring, Robinson Crusoe arrived safe in England after his many
years of absence. He found that his father and mother were dead,
as well as many of his old friends, and for a time he felt almost as
lonely as on his island. But he married a worthy wife before long,
and buying a farm with the sold he had brought home, settled
down to a quiet country life. He was blest with children who
grew up to be his delight and comfort, and his old age was spent
in peace and happiness.






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