Citation
Caribbean Compass

Material Information

Title:
Caribbean Compass the Caribbean's monthly look at sea & shore
Place of Publication:
Bequia St. Vincent and the Grenadines
Bequia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines
Publisher:
Compass Pub.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 35 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Boats and boating -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area ( lcsh )
Yachting -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Compass Pub. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
54085008 ( OCLC )
1605-1998 ( ISSN )

Full Text






















1'



















';rB S ga-
H~vJ!h\ sky^VVV~rJf

























































Made from a hard-wearing
water-repellent ripstop material.
This stylish winch handle bag
will look great on any boat.

Designed to hold 1-2 winch
handles at a time. This pocket
can be used to keep a number
of different items out of harm's
way, such as a handheld GPS,
radio or even keys.





TORTOLA
ST. THOMAS ;ANNCYM ST MAARTENI
S-ST MARTIN
ST. CROIX ANTIGUA




ARUBA GRENADA
I ,BONAIRE
CURAQAO TRINIDAO
cuna~o mlll-S


Navi light 3600 is waterproof
and has a versatile magnetic
attachment system made to be
fastened almost everywhere (on
your clothes, on your boat).

Recreational boats have more
horsepower today than ever
before. High speed collisions
after dark are more common
these days, therefore your
visibility on the water is of
outmost importance.


The Must for every tactician
from Ronstan.

Specialist Sailing Timer
Functions including:
* Countdown repeat option or
countdown and up to show elapsed
time for handicap races
* 5, 4, 1, 0 ISAF start sequence pre-
programmed with audible warning
signals (can be silenced if preferred)
* 5 minute, 3 minute and multiples of
1 minute programs as well
* "Synd" button for instant
synchronisation If a gun Is missed
* Large 65mm (2 9/16") overall
ABS case


GILL KNEE PADS


US$ 48.50
Available in black. One size.


Caribbean Duty Free List Prices. Check your local store for final pricing.
CARIU BEAN CHAN EDLERII ES




BUDGET MARINE
ANTIGUA * ARUBA * BONAIRE * CURAAO * GRENADA * ST. CROIX * ST. MAARTEN * ST. MARTIN * ST. THOMAS * TORTOLA * TRINIDAD


I The Caribbean's LeadingCha111 ndlery wwwbudgetmarinecom


















C+M PASS

The Caribbean's Monthly Look at Sea & Shore
www.caribbeancompass.com

FEBRU oARY 2011 J * NUMBER185


Get Down...
...to Santa Marta, Colombia!.. 16

Grenadines
Baguette and internet........... 18








Smidig Katt
Norwegians' sailing escape.... 22


All Ashore...
A rainforest hike with horses.. 24


Tripping Out
Top field trips for boat kids... 26


II DEPARTMENT


Info & Updates.................... 4
Business Briefs................... 8
Caribbean Eco-News........... 11
Regatta News.................... 12
This Cruising Life.................. 20
Meridian Passage................. 28
Fun Page ............................. 30
Cruising Kids' Corner............ 31
Dolly's Deep Secrets............ 31


r " ' . . I I ,, . . ..h,
Tel: (784) 4573409, Fax: (784) 457 3410

Editor................ ......... .... .... Sally Erdle
sally@caribbeancompass.com
Assistant Editor...................Elaine Ollivierre
jsprat@vincysurf.com
Advertising & Distribution........Tom Hopman
tom@caribbeancompass.com
Art, Design & Production......Wilfred Dederer
wlde@carlbbeancompass.com
Accounting.................................Debra Davis
debra@caribbeancompass.com
Compass Agents by Island:
AI;, .,,i .. . .. . .. Tulloch


. ...... ,,, ,,,, i ...... .


Book Review ........................ 32
The Caribbean Sky............... 34
Cooking with Cruisers.......... 35
Readers' Forum.................... 36
What's on My Mind............... 40
Calendar of Events...............41
Caribbean Marketplace......42
Classified Ads .................... 46
Advertisers' Index................. 46


Grenada/Carriacou/Petite Martinique:
compassgrenada@gmil.com


7 I II V A, I
7', . ' . . r . .] rl.... .. . .




A.. . , ,i 1 1 , i .i i ., i .
i .. j. ,, ,, ,i, i. . ..i . 1



..i, J 1 1 i , II ,,I, ,, i,,, Bissondath,
chrisblss@yahoo.com


113i.anm'ln
Ipk


TSSN 605 - 1998


Coverphoto: Kay Wilson of Indigo Dive in St. Vincent & the Grenadines captured this thriving reef scene

Floor J CoIpas coer i.e Car.bbean FromT Cuba o Tr.n.dd. IroT.
P n3~r3 o1 B3rbud3. wi e e gol ine nevfs 3nd v.wis Ina31 3.10or
Gufof - im cn ue We re ine Car.bbean 5 mor.nilry look s se3 3and .nore
m - .- ~7 nie Balamas
Mexico , ld .Il The Co.rpa.-. 5 gres. i v. y o l eep.ng up w.nr. currer.l
i m i . e a lq evenls.r rg Ilan n f.ew . lop.CI1 .nlorT.-.n.or.. e r..ror..l. 31
I _ ** .sueS. r.d re co.T..ngs rnd gor.gs Inh. per r.n Io I.e
-. . .- M.....t Cru.s.r.g COlT uun.ry I tI.e Car.bbern
- Readers SueLC Re�,pocrdCei
Mex-koiD . - = IM a
k a& Cuba - a cCa nra C*Ia.

a. .~ *Hamn/ Donniican

-gynia klVir gn IuiMf


Pwroo 2 sX. 9
S'amic -ia &A1"w UO



Caribbean Sea wrie,,e


Smh F^U4a.
I"e of k.ef


9 " Imfti*

Fufu Geflms -


>>%O- M - - e
^ - ' A k % - w w . M . P . " -


ocean . / A v'- .I...ana
Click Google Map link below to find the Caribbean Compass near you!
http://maps.googlecom/maps/ms?th&hl=en&ieUTF8&msa--&msid=11277661243999037380.000470658db371bf3282d&11=14.54105 65.830078&spn=10.196461,14.0625&z=6&sourceembed
















Info


safety of our visitors." He said that in comparison to last year, there was a noticeable
increase in the number of yachts moored in Clifton Harbour for the recent New
Year's Eve celebrations, being one of the nights the service was offered. He believes
that the level of support offered by local business will determine the effectiveness of
the oroiect and also the life of it.


In addition to Clifton Harbour, Union Island, pretty Salt Whistle Bay on Mayreau
also benefits from security patrols
Night Patrols for Two Grenadine Harbours
Marslyn Lewis reports: Sailors visiting Union Island can now do so with peace of
mind, feeling free to enjoy the pristine beauty and hospitality found in the
Grenadines. A new effort of the Tobago Cays Marine Park (TCMP) management, in
collaboration with the Union Island Tourist Board and the local police, aims to pro-
vide nightly patrol service in Clifton Harbour during the peak tourism season.
The patrol service starts at 7:00PM nightly. This time was chosen since it is the time
that most guests go ashore to have evening cocktails and dinner and their boats
are left unattended. There is no set cut-off time, as it can vary based on the amount
of time visitors spend ashore before returning aboard.
Lesroy Noel, Project Coordinator with the TCMP, says, "I think the initiative is an
excellent one, one that is long overdue, and I would like to appeal to the businesses
to come on board and get involved. They should see this drive as an investment,
because the yachting tourism industry is not what it used to be in the '80s and early
'90s. In order to secure the future of this industry we need to start by ensuring the


./'



DO LEADERS
SAILMAKERS ,


Nightly patrols during high season add to the attractions of Clifton, the hub of the
Southern Grenadines
The neighboring island of Mayreau has also launched a patrol service; it has been
in operation since April 2010. According to Owen Forde, an auxliary policeman and
a patrol volunteer, so far TCMP is the only contributor to this patrol. "We have seen
some improvements since the service started," he says, "and we will continue to do
our best to offer our visitors a safe environment to spend their vacation. This impor-
tant drive, however, needs the support of the business communities on both islands
to keep it going." He agrees that the service is much needed and believes that
once more funding becomes available, Mayreau will be a safe haven.
Amid many challenges, the TCMP and the Union Island and Mayreau patrol groups
endeavour to provide safety, security and solace to yachtsmen visiting Union Island,
Mayreau and the Tobago Cays.
For more information contact Lesroy Noel at (784) 485-8191 or info@tobagocays.org.
Chateaubelair, St. Vincent, Update
The northernmost anchorage on the island of St. Vincent, Chateaubelair, has seen
a revival of interest among cruisers lately after a few years on the "no go" list owing
to a series of violent crimes that occurred from 2006 to 2008.
Continued on next page


reAction
Lagoon 55


Barbados British Virgin Islands
Doyle Sailmakers Doyle Sailmakers
6 Crossroads Road Reef Marina
St. Philip Tortola
Tel: (246) 423 4600 Tel: (284) 494 2569
andy@doylecaribbean.com bob@doylecaribbean.com


Antigua & Barbuda Colombia Curacao Dominica
Star Marine Resales Marina Kapiteinsweg #4 Dominica Marine Center
Jolly Harbour Cartegena Netherland Antilles Roseau
Puerto Rico St. Crox, USVI Grenada
Atlantic Sails and Canvas Wilsons' Cruzan Canvas Turbulence Ltd.
Fajardo Christiansted Spice Island Boat Works
St. Lucia St. Vincent Trinidad & Tobago
The Sail Loft, St. Lucia Barefoot Yacht Charters Soca Sails, Ltd.
Rodney Bay Blue Lagoon Chaguaramas


~i--@


i: _ A fe amp!-
$.N term.* -4












-ontinued from previous page
A port of entry, Chateaubelair is attractive as a jumping-off point to shorten the
northbound passage to St. Lucia and also as a base from which to explore the








O - RI ' -


. ". ...-.
..-.. ". . � , -





\ .I ,** * ...)/,


A.E


L e

I / �


aimed at boat buyers, www.seedealercost.com, has sent shock waves through the
US dealer network. The website, expected to soon go live, will provide consumers
with detailed information about specific boat models, including the manufacturer's
suggested retail price and "invoice" pricing that the dealer pays to the manufactur-
er. Phil Keeter, Marine Retailers Association of America president responded to the
news, saying, "We believe that the harmful effects that will result from the publica-
tion of actual dealer costs to the retail public are self-evident... It is axiomatic that
dealer profit margins will shrink to marginal levels as consumers, armed with actual
dealer costs, will 'low ball' dealers with purchase offers slightly above the dealer's
actual costs." Keeter added that the effect in still tough economic times could be
"catastrophic" to dealers, who will be forced to sell at lower profit margins while still
maintaining high overhead costs. "The last thing you want is for consumers coming
into the dealership knowing what the cost of the boat is," Keeter told IBI. The invoice
price does not include shipping from the manufacturer, dealer prep, taxes, title,
license or other fees, and it does not reflect any wholesale incentives the manufac-
turer may be offering to the dealer.

Cruisers Support 'Meals From Keels'
The Carriacou Children's Education Fund, through its annual fundraising efforts, has


I .\.; " e , V /I a
unspoiled natural beauty of the island. However, some caution is still advised. The St.
Vincent & the Grenadines Coast Guard, which patrols the coast from its base in
Calliaqua on the south coast as far north as Chateaubelair on a regular basis, advis-
es yachts not to anchor at Chateaubelair alone, especially overnight. It is suggested
that yachts visiting there anchor in groups, or otherwise anchor at one of the bays
farther south on St. Vincent's Leeward Coast.
The SVG Coast Guard base at Calliaqua can be reached at (784) 457-4578.

Cruisers' Site-ings
* Sailor, poet and author of Adventures in the Tradewinds, Richard Dey, has a
newly expanded website at www.richorddey.com.
* International Boat Industry (IBI) reports that a new consumer-oriented website


v-
Lizzy Conegn (S/V Horta) andJudy Evans (S/V Dreamcatcher), representing CCEF,
present this year's donation to Ms. Bedeau, in charge of the lunch program,
and Vice Principal Mrs. Mills
again this year made a contribution to the Harvey Vale Government School's
Feeding Program through CCEF's Meals From Keels efforts. This is the fourth year that
CCEF has helped to provide hot lunches for a number of Harvey Vale students
unable to pay for their lunch.
Continued on next page


H lpi.* ti I4 E'r.j'.,ai'r JAi ll b -. JL I w .' ' c L a jri

Lm'I I.I ' 1 .. Ol' . nI h . nJ.. n RAJr , . d . r .i " -.-I
IruaOi4 m�nr, -1rt f thR-a s ruba RJno tI C1, iA lstntit&
jvyr n%,~ # phis O uEr WA!Srr n qwm -,r ty Wrt-inEf i Irh 1


f.'r.1lh,* ..* '.I oi' )".:''Ut .l If - &'..j ..tr..ne J' ., ru'w i l tr.

Ir- *-, "I Irilp,� 'r '." "r-'.-" *aIs.. J-n I I..;.? I.r, I-.(.p m*t '. 1l
vI'r *p F. - 'n " fl r CL.h.J' ; ".di d.1 '- u . JJ


To (0291f 5$03*MOb FAtr z9) 52W02151 I 14.t Mlaaui wlr< I CKnnr416 I Rtnaimwc MarldpWt, "LMnijtatd AIl.Jh


RENAISSANCE
MARINA











... ... ; ... . . . page
-- :, : :: : I., :Mi:i i', Education Fund is an informal, voluntary group of individu-
als from visiting yachts from around the world, and a number of concerned local
businessmen and women. Since 2000, CCEF has conducted fund raising activities
during the last week of July and/or the first week of August at the Carriacou Yacht
Club in Hermitage, Carriacou coinciding with the Carriacou Regatta Festival.
During this time, CCEF has raised more than $125,000 to provide uniforms, necessary
school supplies and other educational assistance to the children of Carriacou. The
mission is to help as many children as possible and to fill the gap between what is
required for a child to receive a proper education and what the families can provide.
Since its inception, CCEF has provided assistance towards this goal in more than
500 cases. Success is due primarily to the hard work and generosity of the visiting
yachts and the local population who support CCEF, and is the yachts' way of say-
ing "thank you" to the people of Carriacou for the warm welcome always received.
For more information contact ccefinfo@gmai. com.
Jamaica Marina's Free Art Show Every Sunday
Every Sunday, from noon to nightfall, a free art show is open to the public on the
swimming pool patio at Errol Flynn Marina, Port Antonio, Jamaica. The show features
the original works of many Port Antonio and regional artists, in many various forms.
For more information visit www errolflynnmarina.com.
Charitable Writers
Who says cruisers are cheap?
" Compass contributors who have
donated their writing fees to
SI charity over the past year
include Nan Hatch, Nicola
Cornwell, Michelle Fleming,
Michael Howorth, David Lyman,
Peter Bernfeld and Frank
Virgintino, who donated to St.
Benedict's Children's Home in St.
Vincent; Penelope Bliss-Delpy,
who donated to My Charity:
Water; Jim Hutchinson, who
donated to the Bequia Mission;
Jack Russell, who donated to the
Carriacou Museum; Celia Mason,
who donated to Hands Across
the Sea; Laurie Corbett, who
donated to the Mayreau Primary
School; Ellen Birrell, who donated
to the Bequia Reading Club:
Davina Menudo, Amanda
Delaney and Constance Elson
who donated to relief efforts in
Haiti; Steve Siguaw, who donated
to the Bequia Casualty Hospital;
Steve Brett, who donated to


Nicola Conwell (left) and John Pompa (above) are just two of the many Compass
contributors who have donated to Caribbean based charities

GrenSave (Grenada Save the Children); and John and Melodye Pompa who
donated to the Carriacou Children's Educational Fund. Your generosity
is appreciated.
Another Sailor Gives Back
Canadian sailor Pearl Mitchell, a well-known face in the Windward Islands after
cruising her 33-foot Nonsuch wishbone cat, Legacy, in the area for 14 years, recently
revisited Bequia bearing medical supplies for the small hospital there. Staff at the
Bequia Casualty Hospital received the donation of medicines, bandages and more
with appreciation, and Pearl gladly reports that neither Air Canada nor SVG Air
charged her for carrying the large extra suitcase of supplies.
The items were collected by Not Just Tourists, a 100-percent voluntary non-profit
organization based in Canada that provides donated medical supplies to countries
in need worldwide via ordinary travelers. People flying or sailing from Canada to
underdeveloped countries can contact Not Just Tourists and volunteer to take a
suitcase or bag of medical supplies (no narcotics are included) to a clinic or hospi-
tal at their destination. Not Just Tourists has affiliates in Toronto and other key
Canadian cities.
For more information visit www.notjusttourists.org.
Welcome Aboard!
In this issue of Compass we welcome new advertisers Adventure High School of
Grenada, on page 29; ARC Europe/World Cruising Club, on page 16; Marina Royale
of St. Martin, on page 17; and La Playa Beach Bar & Bistro of Carriacou, in the
Market Place section pages 42 through 45.
Good to have you with us!


A Family of Generators with
Relatives throughout the Caribbean





94 Q; %


SAQ
'^


~H~d~


Q%


B~i


>


".00











MINI


0 ; HErN LIGHTS

















www.mercurymarinelac.com R If 'RY



i LIGHTWEIGHT DESIGN
Unmatched power-to-weight ratio
contributes to impressive fuel
etliciency and speed.
' BEST-IN-CLASS
FUEL EFFICIENCY
Exclusive direct infected system
delivers better fuel economy than
4r Even most four-strokes.

SALTWATER RELIABILITY
More stainless steel translates into
saltwater durabilry., longer maintenance
intervals and lower cost of ownership.
SUPERIOR PERFORMANCE
Consistently ranks first in its class
in holeshot, mid-range acceleration
- and lop-end speed.














Business Briefs

Reusable Bags: Think Eco and Fair!
Island Water World encourages recycling in the


Caribbean and is introducing Eco bags, made from
100-percent natural fabrics. The bags are strong,
beautifully hand-made Township� Fair Trade bags
and produced by previously disadvantaged women
in Cape Town, South Africa. The bag is sold at the sub-
sidized cost of US$5.00 and each bag sold at Island
Water World directly improves their lives.
Township is a dynamic social enterprise and cen-
tered on a thriving network of seven worker-owned
sewing co-operatives, supporting some 70 women
and their families.
Managing Director of Island Water World, Sean
Kennelly, says: "We wanted to introduce a true Eco
bag, made from natural fibers, strong enough to hold
our merchandise - but we did not want the bag to
be produced cheaply in some 'sweatshop'. It needed
to be a fair trade bag, where everybody benefits and
we found the perfect match in South Africa!"
In 2010 Island Water World introduced an Eco label,
developed to promote ecologically sound marine
products sold at their six shops around the Caribbean.
For more information on Island Water World see ad
on page 48.


Special Two-Island Dive Experience
Aquanauts of Grenada and Lumbadive of Carriacou
have teamed up to provide dive travellers with a two-
island experience in a seven-day vacation. Get the
best of the wreck capital of the Caribbean and the
island of the reefs! A daily ferry service is convenient
for divers, as they do not have to interrupt their dive
package for travelling between the two islands.
"In Carriacou, you are surrounded by greenery and
native wildlife for an adventurer's vacation above
and below the surface. No mass tourism, no industries,


no pollution, but sublime diving," says Richard, owner
of Lumbadive Carriacou.
Grenada has the airport with non-stop services from
Miami, New York, London, Frankfurt and Toronto. It
boasts a great variety of wreck diving and a lush inter-
ior. "This seven-night Grenadine Dive Experience gives
divers the best of both islands," says Peter, owner of
Aquanauts Grenada (www.aquanautsgrenada.com).
Accommodation partner in Grenada is True Blue Bay
Resort, while in Carriacou travellers have the choice
between Grand View Inn and Villa Longevue.
A typical itinerary starts with three nights and five
boat dives in Grenada. On the fourth morning it is
time to pack up and enjoy the two-hour ferry ride up
the west coast of Grenada and past Isle de Ronde to
Carriacou. A transfer will bring the diver to the chosen
lodging. The next three days are spent diving "the
island of the reefs" - the translation of "Carriacou" -
with Lumbadive. On the last day the afternoon ferry
brings guests back to Grenada for one more night at
True Blue Bay Resort before the next morning's depar-
ture. The resort is only ten minutes from the airport. A
seven-night package including ten boat dives and all


transfers start at US$1,350 for the summer period 2011.
Customized packages are also available. Packages
can be booked securely online at
www.grenadadiveresorts.com/packages/product/
tabid/64/p-4-Grenada-Carriacou-2-island-holiday.aspx
For more information on Lumbadive see ad in the
Market Place section, pages 42 through 45.
Opportunity Knocks for Antigua Sailing Week
Entries are coming in fast and plans are well under-
way to make Antigua Sailing Week 2011, April 24th
through 29th, a truly memorable
event. If you want to take part,
there are many charter opportu-
nities for groups of friends or indi-
viduals to enjoy sailing and party-
ing in one of the best places in
the world.
Gold sponsor, OnDeck has a
range of easy solutions to get
you racing whether you are a
beginner or a seasoned racer.
Based in Antigua, OnDeck are
Caribbean specialists, providing
top quality, whole boat yacht
charters and places for individu-
als to sail in the official Antigua
Sailing Week programme.
As well as great service on the
water, OnDeck pride themselves
on the best possible shore support
by using their own local mainte-
nance team along with the help
of trusted local Antiguan contrac-
tors. The hospitality side is not for-
gotten with complimentary happy
hour frozen cocktails, Chivas whis-
ky and cold Carib beer being
served to their guests each eve-
ning after sailing, from their hospi-
tality tent right in the heart of the
action at Nelson's Dockyard.
Business Development manager
Simon Hedley commented, "We
are looking forward to a fantastic regatta in 2011 and
will be working with the organizers and other supporting
sponsors to help maintain this regatta's reputation for








'-I


CARIBBEAN SAILING SCHEDULE
Through June 2011
IS]i::1rV~P I11 -' I -


St. Thomas 4
St. Thomas 4


Toulon
Toulon
Taranto
Palma de Mallorca
Toulon


Newport
Port Everglades


DOCKW/ISE
YyACHTr
WA' ,THRAVSPORT

WORLD CLASS YACHT LOGISTICS
DYT Martinique Tel +596 596 741 507
E-mail nadine@dockwise-yt com


WWW.YACHT-TRANSPORT.COM * 1 888 SHIP DYT


Martinique
Martinique
Martinique
St. Thomas
St. Thomas


IT THESCATU


03/2011
06/2011
06/2011
04/2011
03/2011


05/2011
04/2011


Y













-ri" i i :, :,i : :, hi-i: l :,i :..'.1 of individual places
available on one of our Farr 65s if you are quick. The
recent addition of two beautiful Shipman 63s, under man-
agement to OnDeck, will also be a great addition to the
regatta and we are looking for charters for these yachts."
OnDeck are also the official merchandiser for the
event and as well as having a merchandise tent in
Nelson's Dockyard during the event, they also have
gear available online and are actively taking
advance orders for your own team branded kit.
For more information on Antigua Sailing Week visit
www.sailingweek.com.
For more information about OnDeck see ad in the
Market Place section, pages 42 through 45.
Port Louis Marina Goes to Venezuela's Boat Show
Port Louis Marina has recently introduced itself to a
wider audience with attendance at Salon Ndutico,
Venezuela's premier boat show. Danny Donelan, Port
Louis Marina Sales & Marketing Manager, returned from
the Salon Ndutico Venezuela 2010 with a positive feeling
about the potential of the Venezuelan yachting market.
Danny says, "We think this can be a great market for
us due to the close proximity and the number of boat-
ers involved. The Venezuelan yachting community is a
large and vibrant one with lots of potential for business
in Grenada. We have work to do in highlighting
Grenada and the Grenadines to the Venezuelan
community and providing information about the won-
derful and affordable sailing available to them."
Port Louis attended the Caracas show in partnership
with Oscar Hernandez, Director General of Fresh Ideas
from Venezuela. Oscar grew up in Grenada and invit-
ed Danny as his guest to explore the Venezuelan mar-
ket. Camper & Nicholsons say, "It is a market which
we will be exploring a lot more."
For more information on Port Louis Marina visit www.
cnmarinas com/marinas/port-louis.
Carriacou's New Eatery is Steps from Dinghy Dock
Jerry Stewart reports: Anyone who has been around
Carriacou for a few years will remember Kate when


she cooked at the Round House in Bogles and then at
The Garden Restaurant in Hillsborough. They will also
remember Daniela, one of the original Turtle Dove
Pizza girls.


The good news is that they have teamed up to open
the Slipway Restaurant in the old workshop of
Carriacou Boat Builders, next to the Yacht Club in
Tyrrel Bay. The location is classic Caribbean.
I have always had a high regard for both these
American/Italian restaurant operators and plan to be
a regular customer!
The Tyrrel Bay Yacht Haulout dinghy dock, on the
south side of Tyrrel Bay, is a short walk along the
beach from The Slipway. Customers may leave their
tenders on a secure dock. The Slipway is open for
lunch and dinner; bookings are advised.
For more information phone (473) 443-6500 or call on
VHF channel 16.

St. Lucia: Working on Yachting
In 2004, the Economic Commission for Latin America
and the Caribbean (ECLAC) report on "Yachting in
the Eastern Caribbean: A Regional Overview" stated,
"In recent years there has been much anguish about
weaknesses in the region's mainstream tourism and


St. Lucian yacht skipper Nico Philip says, 'Yachting is
a very, very, very good business'

calls for a rejuvenation of the product have been fre-
quent. At the same time yachting has been develop-
ing in relative obscurity. Unrecognized, its needs and
contributions are often discarded as unimportant and
of no significance to the region."
St. Lucia, however, is one of the countries that has
strongly recognized the value of yacht tourism, has
nurtured it, and is seeing the benefits.
St. Lucia's Minister of Tourism, Allen Chastenet tells


Compass, "We are constantly reviewing the yachting
sector and our overall tourism product. Regarding the
year-round yachting sector, maintenance-and-repair
is something we are now working on, to develop lev-
els of expertise. We are looking at becoming a hub for
yachting in the Windward Islands, promoting our
neighbors as well; each island has its own attributes,
and we're in the middle, so we are well placed."
The Atlantic Rally for Cruisers (ARC), which delivers
thousands of recreational sailors to St. Lucia's door-
step each December, is a bright jewel in the island's
tourism crown. John Emmanuel, public relations man-
ager of the St. Lucia Tourist Board, says, "We've tried
over the past 20 years to develop the ARC arrival into
the ideal yachting event, with many spin-offs. It's
always nice when we really see the trickle-down
effect. Yachtspeople patronize all aspects of the tour-
ism economy: they come on yachts, but their eco-
nomic impacts are not limited to sailing. Yachting is
another way of getting visitors to our shores, and
that's always of paramount importance."
St. Lucian professional yacht skipper Nico Philip has
worked on day-charter cats, on private yachts, and
for charter companies in St. Lucia, and completed a
world circumnavigation as crew with an Italian skip-
per. He is the holder of an RYA Yachtmaster's certifi-
cate and was the only St. Lucian skipper in ARC 2010.
He adds, "Yachting is a very, very, very good business,
and St. Lucia is in the center of the yachting action. It
has a lot of nice anchorages and two well-protected
hurricane holes, plus charters can sail south and
depart from airports in the Grenadines or Grenada.
But our government needs to change the "permit to
moor" policy - just give a cruising permit like other
CSME countries do."
Get Ahead
One of the worst jobs aboard a boat is dealing with
a clogged marine toilet. To save you from this task,
Raritan offers the Atlantes Freedom marine toilet with
anti-clog, power-shred discharge technology. A
unique macerator, consisting of powerful bronze
blades, shreds most materials and ends reoccurring
maintenance issues. "I have a total of eight Atlantes
Freedom toilets onboard three boats," says Captain
Allen Desilva from Fish Bermuda. "I've had these units
for four years and they're totally trouble-free."
Available in integral, remote seawater and freshwa-
ter solenoid pump styles, the Atlantes Freedom pro-
vides fill, dry flush or fill and flush operation. An aerobic
system, it helps to eliminate odors. To reach the hold-
ing tank, the powerful pump can force wastewater up
to four metres high and a distance of 52 metres. It
features a microprocessor control and a solid-state cir-
cuit breaker that never needs replacing. Offered in
three control options, the manual version is activated
by a sturdy, stainless steel handle. The heavy-duty
handle can be combined with an electric timer for
timed operation. A state-of-the-art wall touch pad
allows for a water-saver feature.
Cost-effective, the Atlantes Freedom requires less
than half the amperage to run than traditional models
and uses only three liters of water per flush. Available
in 12-, 24- or 32-volt DC and 120- or 240-volt AC, the
versatile toilet is simple to install above or below the
water line.
For more information visit www.raritaneng.com.


22% more (sea) horses

The Perkins Sabre M225Ti is designed to replace the Perkins
M200 and M235 and provides more than 22% additional available
horsepower in the same package.
This large capacity 6 liter engine comes in a compact package and only takes out 225 hp.

By comparison, our nearest competition takes that out of a 4 liter engine. Running at a low 2500 rpm
versus the competition's 3300 rpm or higher, the M225Ti will have a longer life (minimum 12,000 hour
TBO) and quieter operation.

The gear-driven fresh water pump has a longer life and less to go wrong while the waste gate turbo
charger gives better performance at lower rpms. An integral plate-type oil cooler combines fewer hoses
with longer life and better efficiency.

With Perkins' outstanding marinization, excess hoses and belts have been engineered away and
everything has easy access for stress-free maintenance.
Call Parts & Power for your nearest dealer: (284) 494 2830


P A PadRTS&POWIR

W^ www.partsandpower.com


WmPerkeins Sabre M225Ti
POWERING A BETrER FUTURE











































































































", .' ".I" :*" . , � . i ,* . . n l~.l :- f -" " . , . .

f *- L' I . . ,lli , LI . LJ .1 .1
L- . ,' I L! U' I "

S . I . '.' I f i' i. , ' '. . .


., , . , .. " , , , , . ,' . , , , a


F I Cr.wsp
- ~ 1: r


: 1 -
:1


HOTEL & YACHTING CENTRE

' ,',, I . . - i , i . 1 1'1. , ', 3
T r I .1 1 . 1 'i ' 1 i n -.�.


. I



I. j1.,


i . 1...


r. ..


I . I


,I



.i 1.


PO bag 518 Carenaga Tnnidad WI Tel 18681 63A-48405 FaL 186B 634-4175 VHF Standby Ch 77
WEbsile WWW crwlnnr. cowrf


Crewslnn Hotel and Yachting Centre is a safe and peaceful harbour outside of the hurricane belt, naturally protected by

the lush mountains o[f the Northern Range. As one of the mo stI modern Marinas in the region, it is a fond :favourite for

I yearly and transient guests due to its first class service and community appeal. Excellent repair facility on site, with the

largest capacity travel lift in the southern caribbean 1 200 metric tons) with covered space up to 7, '.", sq ft.


I . ., I .


I . . I I I . ' '... . I . . . . I I I


.















Caribbean


ECO-News

WANTED: Whale Researchers. You Qualify!
Individual humpback whales are identified by the
black and white patterns on the underside of their
flukes (tails). When humpbacks dive, they raise their


'Compass' is a female humpback whale first sighted
off Cape Cod in 1984. Since then, she has had nine
calves and is now a great grandmother. She is named
for the marking on her fluke that resembles the
geometry tool

flukes above the water's surface and provide research
ers the opportunity to photograph the markings on the
underside. Natural markings captured on film have
allowed researchers to monitor the movements, health,
and behavior of individual humpbacks since this
res-r-it ,-n in th. 1970s.
P. I , I ,ili. .I. .. is a technique that enables sci
entists to follow an individual whale anywhere it may
, i.... -i. .. its life by comparing natural color
Sii .".- i ' . 'pes, and other distinguishing marks
that appear in its photographs. The Catalogue of
Humpback Flukes for the North Atlantic presently
contains more than 6,000 individual whales, identified
L-- rh-t-.r.rh' -f the underside of the fluke and/or
o - .1 .... 1. 11- I The catalogue is the result of col
laboration between scientists, naturalists and tourists
who have contributed photographs of humpbacks
from regions including North America, Norway, Iceland,
Greenland and the Caribbean.
See a whale, save a whale -be a citizen scientist!
The Eastern Caribbean and Dutch Antilles are areas
where there has been minimal research on humpback
whales. The Caribbean Humpback Fluke Project,
sponsored by the Eastern Caribbean Cetacean Network
(ECCN), is an international project investigating move
ments of humpback whales between the breeding
populations in the Eastern Caribbean and the North
Atlantic feeding populations.
If you are interested in participating in the project,
go to the ECCN website, www.eccnwhale.org, to learn
how to take and submit your images to contribute to
the Caribbean -.t .1-; -f Humpback Flukes. Photos
can be taken : ... 1.11 . ..I angles and fluke . .
above the water; in many cases a partial view of 11 i
is still important.

No-Fishing Zones Established in Jamaica
Jamaica's Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries and
seven state and non-governmental bodies signed an
agreement in December to institute a ban on fishing in
some coastal communities. Under the new partner


ship, the ministrywill invest approximately US$270,000
in the sanctuaries up to the end of this fiscal year. In
return, community-based groups will monitor the
sanctuaries, which will be designated no-fishing zones
for the protection of juvenile fish.
The seven parties signing the memorandum of
understanding with the ministry were Alloa
Fishermen Cooperative Limited, Bluefield's Bay
Fishermen's Friendly Society, the Caribbean Coastal
Area Management Foundation, the Montego Bay
Marine Park Trust, the Oracabessa Foundation, the
Negril Environment Protection Trust, and the
Sandals Foundation.
The nine fish sanctuaries are located at Orange Bay,
Hanover; Bluefields Bay in Westmoreland; Galleon in St.
Elizabeth; Salt Harbour in Clarendon; parts of Galleon
Harbour and the Three Bays area in Old Harbour, St.
Catherine; Montego Bay Marine Park, St. James;
Discovery Bay, St. Ann; and Oracabessa Bay, St. Mary.
The sanctuaries cover more than 5,000 hectares.
Aii.-ii ltil.- Minister Christopher Tufton said at the
. II i, agreement that successive administra
tions had failed to protect Jamaica's marine resources
even while reef fish stocks continued to decline. He
stated that 11 ... . .I, implications of overfishing
affected a :,,,,, . I interests and stakeholders:
"Starting with our fishers and their families who
depend on the resources of the sea to survive, over
time we have seen where they are catching less in
terms of weight and also in terms of quality, and that
has impacted on their capacity to survive and to earn
a living from our marine resources.
The more than 3,000 fishers in the sanctuary areas
have been asked to cooperate with the ban. The min-
ister says, "We have -n; ;r--I thase communities and
we are working with tl ...*-- . that the relationship
of securing those sanctuaries is not an adversarial
one, but is one that r---ni- the need to preserve
those areas in the :,. .- i the very fishers who
depend on those marine resources to survive. With
proper surveillance and compliance we believe it rep
resents a tremendous opportunity for our marine
resources to replenish themselves."

US Proposes Controls on Air Pollution from Large
Ships in Puerto Rico and USVI Waters
Tankers, container vessels and cruise ships are major
sources of air pollution in Puerto Rico and the US
Virgin Islands. The United States government has pro
posed controls on large ships that operate in the waters
off these coastlines to reduce air pollution. The pro
p osal to ,i. i�,, .. .. . .. . i . , ..i... .. . . .. ... ,, (IM O )
callsfor I I -... . i,, . i 1 - . - .. . mission



.-=-
"- - - . ....








control area". The designation would require -.- 1.;-
ship operating in these areas to use much i ... . ' . I
or install better pollution control technology.
"The sulfur, soot and other harmful air pollutants from
large ships reach from ports to inland communities,"
explains Judith Enck, E " . " ..... .1 I i . i i. .. ,
RegionalAdministrator. I -.... I " 1 ." ..1 - 1 . ..
large ships -nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and par
ticulate matter -can cause respiratory illnesses, such
as lung disease and asthma, and heart disease.
The Port of San Juan in Puerto Rico moves approxi


mately 11 million metric tons of goods on nearly 3,800
vessel trips annually. It is also a major destination for
more than one million cruise ship passengers. The
asthma death rate in Puerto Rico is 2.5 times higher
than the rate in the continental United States. Puerto
Rico and the US Virgins also have many highly sensi
tive ecosystems that are already vulnerable and
threatened by pollution.
The northern and southern boundaries of the pro
posed emission control area would extend roughly 50
nautical miles and 40 nautical miles, respectively,
from the main island of Puerto Rico. Having been
approved by the IMO, a treaty amendment for the
emission control area will now circulate until July
2011 prior to a final vote by the organization. The EPA
estimates that by 2020, the requirements for the
emission control area will have reduced sulfur diox
ides from ships by 96 percent, fine particles by 86
percent and nitrogen oxides by nearly 30 percent from
the levels they would otherwise have been at without

www.epa.gov/otaq/oceanvessels.htm.

Lionfish: Eat 'em to Beat 'em!
The non-profit marine conservation organization
Reef Environmental Education Foundation (REEF)
announces the release of The Lionfish Cookbook, a col
election of 45 recipes designed to encourage the remove


a


n r2 n11M I I


al and consumption of invasive lionfish in the Atlantic.
Lionfish have a delicate, mild-flavored, white meat.
Red Lionfish, native to the Indo-Pacific, are thought to
be the first non-native marine fish to successfully invade
Atlantic waters. Lionfish densities in the Caribbean,
Gulf of Mexico, and the East Coast of the United States
are on the rise due to their lack of predators and prolific,
year-round reproduction. Thriving lionfish populations
pose a serious risk to marine ecosystems through their
predation on native marine life including both commer
cially and ecologically important species.
"Many countries are encouraging consumption of
lionfish to create demand and incentive for lionfish
removals," says Lad Akins of REEF. "The Lionfish
Cookbook makes a great gift because it not only offers
great recipes, but also gives detailed information on
the background of the invasion, lionfish biology/ecol
ogy and impacts, and how to effectively collect and
handle lionfish."
The cookbook can be purchased at www.reeforg.
















REGATTA


NEWS

Virgin Islands Girls Place 6th in 420 Worlds
Carol Bareuther reports: Young US Virgin Islands sail-
ors Nikki Barnes of St. Thomas and Agustina Barbuto of
St. John finished sixth in the International 420 World







� - . . . - ....







Championship held in Buenos Aires, Argentina from
December 27th, 2010 through January 5th, 2011. The
USVI Girls Team contended with more than 20 knots of
breeze for most of the event and improved their score
throughout. The girls competed against 40 other
teams from 18 nations and five continents.
Helmswoman Barnes, now a junior in high school,
began sailing at age seven at the St. Thomas Yacht
Club. She competed in the eight-foot Optimist dinghy
class until age 15, where her accomplishments includ-
ed Second Best Girl at the 2006 US Optimist National
Championships in Florida, Top North American Girl at
the 2007 Optimist North American Championships in
Mexico, and a placing of 35th out of 255 competitors
at the 2008 Optimist World Championships in Turkey.
At the International 420 Worlds, the USVI Boys Team
of Alex Coyle and Jozsi Nemeth finished a respect-


able 22 out of 56 total Open/Men's Teams.
For complete results visit www.420worlds201 1. org. or.
Entries In for Around St. Maarten
St. Martin Multihull Regatta
The second edition of the St. Maarten St. Martin
Multihull Regatta takes place on February 26th, for all
boats with more than one hull.
The organization committee of the Multihull Regatta
is happy to announce that Budget Marine has
become involved with the event, supporting the race
with trophies for the winners in each class, as well as
technical equipment for the race committee. "With
the regatta in its second year, the event is building
and does not have a huge financial backing yet. So
we are grateful for every contribution we receive,"
says coordinator Mirian Ebbers.
Last year 15 multihulls, ranging from beach cats to
impressive trimarans like Karibuni participated in four
classes. Participants came from St. Maarten, St. Martin,
St. Barth's and Canada.
As of this writing 11 boats have committed to racing
in the 2011 event. The target for this year is 20 boats,
including participants from the surrounding islands.
With a course around the island, the second edition
of the St. Maarten St. Martin Multihull Regatta has
record breaking potential. The start and finish will be in
Simpson Bay and can be viewed from the beach at
Kim Sha, Mary's Boon and Karakter.
For more information visit www.mulfihullregafta.com.
Match This!





1b







With places for eight teams, the Budget Marine Match
Racing Cup will use identical Jenneau SunFast 20s
from Lagoon Sailboat Rentals in St. Maarten


The Budget Marine Match Racing Cup, taking place
in St. Maarten on March 1st, will once again showcase
the skills of professional skippers from around the
world. This third edition of the Match Racing Cup,
which is a pre-event for the 31st St. Maarten Heineken
Regatta, will again host sailors from around the world.
In the past, teams from Poland, USVI, the United States
and Russia have participated. Peter Holmberg of the
USVI has won the Cup for the first two years, and
many wonder if he will take home first place for a third
time. Budget Marine is the title sponsor and is offering
US$10,000 in prize money this year.
For more information visit www.heinekenregatt. com.

Gill Commodore's Cup at the
St. Maarten Heineken Regatta
The Commodore's Cup 2011 will take place on
March 3rd. This spinnaker-class only event is a pre-
event to the St. Maarten Heineken Regatta, and gives
the boats an additional day of racing. It allows the
crews and boats the opportunity to warm up for the
weekend of sailing, offering them challenging wind-
ward-leeward courses. In its fifth year, this event has
held its ground and kept a steady entry field of about
40 boats each year.
Last year's competitors included Titan 15, skip-
pered by Tom Hill, one of the top class boats at the
St. Maarten Heineken Regatta last year, and Sin
Duda, skippered by Lindsey Duda, which started her
2010 Caribbean tour with the Commodore's Cup
and continued a very successful season at other
regional regattas.
After a successful inaugural year as the title spon-
sor for the Gill Commodore's Cup, Gill, an apparel
and accessories leader in the worldwide marine
industry, signed on for two more years
of sponsorship.
For more information about this one-day pre-event
visit www.heinekenregatta. com.
31 Years of Serious Fun
St. Maarten's Heineken Regatta is the biggest sailing
event in the Caribbean. Last year, 237 yachts, includ-
ing 99 bareboats, participated in 20 classes. The
event's musical performances and parties are equal-
ly impressive. This year's edition, starting on March
4th, will surely continue the serious fun, both on and
off the water.
For more information visit wwwheinekenregafta.com.
-Continued on next page













Continued from previous page
ClubSwan Caribbean Rendezvous for BVI
The 9th ClubSwan Caribbean Rendezvous will take
place from the 14th through the 19th of March in the
British Virain Islands. The oroaramme has been


designed to fit with the Caribbean racing calendar,
following the RORC Caribbean 600, held during late
February in Antigua, and the Heineken Regatta at St.
Maarten in the beginning of March and the organizers
hope it will provide a welcome week of relaxed cruis-
ing following the two regattas and before Antigua
Sailing Week at the end of April. ClubSwan provides
an opportunity for Swan owners from all over the
world to share their enjoyment of and pride in their
yacht. Cruising events are a focal point in the Nautor's
Swan calendar owing to the high popularity of these
events with Swan owners.
For more information
visit www. nautorswan. com/ClubSwan.

Cutting-Edge Competition for
Puerto Rico Heineken Regatta
There will be top-notch yacht racing off Puerto Rico's
beautiful southeast shores in racing classes that
attract sailors from the Caribbean and from around
the world. Shoreside parties boast the best of island
hospitality. This is what makes the Puerto Rico
Heineken International Regatta (PRHIR), set for March
18th through 20th, and held out of Palmas del Mar
Yacht Club, the island's premier sailing event of the
year. Add to this the organizer's ability to incorporate
the latest racing trends, and you have an event that


offers something for everyone.
"New this year we will offer a one-day stand-up pad-
dle board (SUP) exhibition and competition," says
regatta organizer, Angel Ayala. Jaime Torres of Vela
Uno in San Juan will orchestrate the SUP event.
Torres is also one of the sailors that will heat up the
competition in the big boat classes with his new Tripp
40. Other local talent to watch will be Sergio
Sagramossa, formerly of Lazy Dog, who will be racing
his new Grand Soleil 54. Puerto Rico now boasts a third
J/105, Jonathan Lipuscek's Dark Star III, and OnDeck
Ocean Racing, based in Antigua, will offer charters for
the regatta.
Classes will include CSA Spinnaker Racing, CSA
Spinnaker Racer-Cruiser, CSA J/24, IC24, CSA
Performance Cruiser, CSA Jib & Main and Beach Cat.
Kite-boarders from Puerto Rico and the Dominican
Republic will compete in their own classes. "We'll offer
a mix of windward-leeward courses for the one-design
and racing classes," says Ayala. "There will be reach-
ing courses for the cruising classes. We may run a dis-
tance race to Vieques for some classes."
The one-design J/24 and Hobie 16 fleets will especial-
ly be out in force. Teams in both fleets will be coming
from the Dominican Republic and Mexico in order to
train for the Pan American Games, set for
Guadalajara, Mexco, this summer.
"We will also host the Puerto Rico International
Dinghy Regatta at the same time," says Ayala. "The
Snipes, Optimists, Lasers and Laser Radials will sail right
off the beach."
For more information visit wwwprheinekenregatta.com.

St. Thomas's Rolex Regatta 2011: 'Quality and Fun'
The International Rolex Regatta 2011 is set for March
25th through 27th. For 38 years, the event has been
attracting racing sailors and their families to St.
Thomas, where the St. Thomas Yacht Club opens its
doors to welcome guests to three days of racing
through the US Virgin Islands. The International Rolex
Regatta is a part of the US-IRC Gulf Stream Series, with
a professional race management team and an inter-
national jury. Nightly beach parties, a reggae music/
food festival, and an unforgettable prizegiving hosted
by Rolex lend spirit and color to the occasion.
One return competitor is New Englander Phil Lotz,
who two years ago finished second in class with his
Swan 42 Arethusa. He went on to make headlines with
victories at the Swan 42 Nationals and the NYYC
Invitational Cup in 2009. "We decided to come again


because the event is of international quality, it's a
nice, fun place to be, and it's easy to get Arethusa in
and out of St. Thomas," said Lotz. His crew and family
plan to move on from the International Rolex Regatta
to the BVI Spring Regatta and Sailing Festival, which
starts on March 28th and is linked to the Rolex Regatta
to make Virgin Islands Race Week.


._ - -



Fraito Lugo's IC24 Orion ofPuerto Rico on the way to
a win in the International Rolex Regatta 2010

Regatta Co-Director Bill Canfield says, "One of our
traditions is the 'town race' on Friday, where the entire
fleet races from the east end of St. Thomas right to the
heart of the bustling commercial harbour of Charlotte
Amalie. It gives us a chance to share the spectacle of
a mass of colorful spinnakers with the people who live
on St. Thomas and others who are visiting, and it gives
the racers an opportunity to see St. Thomas's beautiful
and historic capital. Racing is rounded out on the
weekend by a mix of island races and windward-
leewards designed to test skills and showcase the
stunning shoreline."
The international Rolex Regatta typically hosts classes
for IRC, CSA (Spinnaker Racing, Spinnaker Racing/
Cruising and Non-Spinnaker Racing), One-Design IC24s
and Beach Cats. It has been hosted by St. Thomas
Yacht Club since 1974, making it the oldest regatta in
Rolex's portfolio of international sailing events.
Continued on next page


\ Netherlands
/1 Inwsunce


JOIN US FOR THREE RACES ALONG THE

SOUTH COAST OF CRENADA

6REAT PRIZES. FUN PARTIES LIVE MUSIC

FREE BERTHING AND MUCH MORE

COMPETITIVE BUT FUNr


h , IC IRM � ,













S1 : :1: , :,,, I r ,,:,. : -,: and
grand-prix events such as the Rolex Sydney Hobart
Yacht Race, Rolex Fastnet Race, Giraglia Rolex Cup,
Rolex Middle Sea Race, Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup and
the Rolex Farr 40 World Championship.
For more information, visit www.rolexcupregaft. com.

BVI Spring Regatta Celebrates 40 Years
Held annually on the first weekend of April, the BVI
Spring Regatta & Sailing Festival will be celebrating its
40th anniversary from March 28th through April 3rd.
Now among the top three Caribbean sailing events,
the week encompasses two events back-to-back
attracting an average of 125 yachts per year with 80
percent of the competitors coming from overseas.
New for 2011 are the Gill BVI International Match
Racing Championship, taking place March 30th and
31st off the waters of Nanny Cay, and a classics class
for the BVI Spring Regatta, April 1st through 3rd.
The Gill BVI International Match Racing
Championship will be raced in IC24s. The Inter
Caribbean 24, or IC24, is a class of modified J/24s that
is endemic to the Caribbean. IC24s use old J/24 hulls
and rigs, but with a significant twist. "We needed a
platform to get active sailors into something that was
economical," says Chris Rosenberg, the co-inventor of
the IC24 class. "We came up with the idea that if we
put a Melges 24-style cockpit on a J/24, we'd have
the perfect boat." The result is a strict one design boat
that is ergonomic, economic, and fun to sail. Because
of this, the IC24 class consistently draws some of the
top sailors in the entire Caribbean. The event has
been given Grade 3 status by ISAF, allowing interna-
tional challengers to earn points towards their ISAF
World Match Race Rankings.
This being the 40th Anniversary of the BVI Spring
Regatta and Sailing Festival, featured will be plenty of
other racing for sailors of all levels. The Sailing Festival,
the traditional warm-up for the Spring Regatta, kicks
off on March 28th with registration and Welcome
Party at Nanny Cay Marina. The first leg is the Bitter
End Cup, which races up the Sir Francis Drake
Channel to the Bitter End Yacht Club, followed by a
lay day full of fun activities, and then the Nanny Cay
Cup race, which brings the fleet back down the
channel to Nanny Cay. Sailors then switch gears,
beginning Thursday night with the BVI Spring Regatta
Mount Gay Rum Welcome Party, before getting down
to the main event, the 40th Anniversary BVI Spring


Regatta, which takes place from April 1st through 3rd.
For more information visit www.bvispringregatta.org.

Instant Hit: Les Voiles de St. Barth
It took only one run - its debut in 2010 - for Les
Voiles de St. Barth to become a fixture for American
sailors who compete in the multi-event Caribbean
racing circuit. For the 2011 edition of the Les Voiles de
St. Barth, scheduled for April 4th through 9th, two US


George David's Rambler shows its winning ways at
the 2010 Les Voiles de St. Barth. George and his crew
will return in 2011 with Rambler 100, a Juan K
design meant for breaking distance records

teams - Vesper/Team Moneypenny and Rambler 100
-will headline.
"We participated in the inaugural Les Voiles de St.
Barth and knew immediately we would return for 2011;
we will have many of the same crew we had last
time," said Jim Swartz, a Utah-based venture capitalist
who has been circling the globe for years seeking
new adventures aboard his various yachts named
Moneypenny His latest acquisition, a TP52 (formerly
named Quantum Racing, the 2010 TP52 world cham-
pion), replaces his 2010 entry, the Swan 601
Moneypenny, and will have aboard it some of the
world's finest sailors, including Gavin Brady, Ben Beer,
Jamie Gale, Brett Jones, Ken Keefe, Matt Waikowicz,
and Swartz himself, who, as always, will take the helm.
Another owner/driver, George David of Connecticut,
former United Technologies Chairman and CEO, will
also be campaigning on a new platform at the 2011


Les Voiles de St. Barth. His 90-foot Rambler won last
year, and he's back in 2011 with Rambler 100, formerly
known as Speedboat and subsequently Virgin
Atlantic, when Alex Jackson and Richard Branson,
respectively, aspired to break the transatlantic record.
According to project manager Mick Harvey, Rambler
100, like Vesper/Moneypenny, is undergoing modifica-
tions, "to bring it up to speed as an IRC racer as well
as an all-around record breaker."
As early as December 2010 there were already 33
boats entered in five classes: Super-Maxi Yacht,
Racing, Racing/Cruising, Classic, and Racing Multihull.
Among some other notables are Mike Slade's 100-foot
Farr design Leopard 3, the 105-foot classic Herreshoff
schooner Atrevida, the 76-foot W-Class boat White
Wings, and Patrick Demarchellier's Swan 45 Puffy.
For more information,
visit www lesvoilesdesaintbarth. com.


I : .^


Changes Planned for Antigua Sailing Week 2011
Antigua Sailing Week was born in 1967, and it has
been going strong ever since. What does Antigua
Sailing Week 2011, running from April 24th through
29th, have to offer that is new? The regatta team,
having canvassed participants from the past few
years, discovered that most sailors want to be in the
same port every night, or at a minimum in a marina.
The main reasons stated were ease of provisioning,
embarking and disembarking the yachts, and securi-
ty. Of course the obvious choice from which to base
the event therefore is English Harbour.
Continued on next page














- : . - i -, :i [ : be stopping
overnight at Dickinson Bay. Races will be based out of
English and Falmouth Harbours each day, apart from
the Thursday when there will be a race to Jolly
Harbour where boats will stay overnight at the marina,
with the exception of some of the bigger boats,
which will return to English Harbour.
On the water, the biggest changes will be to classifi-
cations and course lengths. Courses are being
designed to ensure that boats of all sizes will race on
courses appropriate to them, with a focus on having
all boats racing for approximately three to four hours
each day. That means the crew will not be exhausted
by extended times on the water, and hence will have
more energy to party!
Bernie Evan-Wong, who races his modified Cal 40,
Huey Too, says, "I believe this will be my 29th regatta
and I can safely say no two Sailing Weeks have ever
been the same; each one is a new challenge.
Winning your class at Antigua Sailing Week is a defi-
nite must for any serious sailor. The 2011 edition promis-
es to be friendlier to the smaller boats and crews, as
you can race, win and still have energy to come
ashore afterwards and have some fun partying, relax-
ing and enjoying the beauty of the island."
The entire week will deliver fantastic racing for the
sailors, and also be the jump-up everyone expects.
Parties will include the new Galleon Beach Bash on
Sunday, April 24th, the big party at Shirley Heights on
the Tuesday night (the night before Lay Day) and the
Friday will see an evening prizegiving with free entry to
participating sailors. The traditional Dockyard Day and
Beating of the Retreat will be held once again on the
Saturday and will end with the English Harbour Street
Party. And, finally, on the Sunday, the Big Chill Out:
The Dickenson Bay Beach Bash.
In addition, 2011 will be a year when Antiguans and
Barbudans will have time to participate as Easter Day
is the first day of racing, followed by Bank Holiday
Monday, and the day after the Dickenson Bay Beach
Bash is Labour Day.
For more information visit www.sailingweek com.

Havana Good Time!
The Hemingway International Yacht Club (HIYC)
invites you to participate in the Morro Castle Race of
Havana from May 18th through 20th.
The racecourse is an 18-mile circuit from Marina
Hemingway to the entrance of historic Havana


Harbor, which allows residents to enjoy the sight of
participants a few hundred metres from the fabulous
Havana waterfront.
Dozens of US vessels are expected to participate in
this event, via the Sarasota-Havana Regatta, being
held May 12th through 18th. They will join members of
the Hemingway International Yacht Club and other
sailors from around the world docked at Marina
Hemingway for the regatta. Commodore Escrich of
HIYC says that all participants in the regatta will enjoy
a week of free berthing at Marina Hemingway.
For more information on the Sarasota-Havana
regatta visit
www.sarasotayachtclub.org/Sarasota-Havana-Regatta.
For more information on the Morro Castle Race of
Havana contact yachtciub@cnih.mh tur.cu.

End of Season Sail!
Leaving the Caribbean after a fun season's cruising
can sometimes be a daunting prospect - the first
long passage after six months of day sailing. Making
the passage back to the US or Europe needn't mean
saying goodbye to cruising friends and sailing alone if
you join a rally.
Rallies are a great way to sail in company with like-
minded cruisers, enjoying social activities ashore and
support at sea. World Cruising Club, organizers of the
most popular sailing rally in the world, the ARC (Atlantic
Rally for Cruisers), also arrange two end-of-season ral-
lies heading north from Tortola BVI to Bermuda.
The Atlantic Cup sails from Tortola to Bermuda in
early May, before heading west to Hampton, Virginia
on the Chesapeake. Also leaving from Tortola in the
same week, the ARC Europe rally makes a rendezvous
in Bermuda, before heading east across the Atlantic
to the Azores archipelago and then Europe.
Whether heading back to the US or Europe, joining
these rallies means making the 850nm passage to
Bermuda with a group of 30 or so yachts. Sailing in
company can make the experience more enjoyable,
and provides peace of mind and practical support at
sea.
Safety is paramount on World Cruising Club rallies;
before departure each yacht undergoes a safety
check and skippers receive a briefing on the expect-
ed conditions, plus weather routing advice. At sea
bespoke daily weather forecasts are provided by
e-mail, and a daily radio net maintains contact
between the yachts. Every yacht is fitted with an
automatic tracking device, and progress can be fol-


lowed on the 'fleet viewer' on the rally website. This is
a great comfort to friends and family at home, as well
as being valuable in an emergency situation.
Rallies are also about having fun and meeting other
cruisers. In Tortola, sailors can enjoy parties and social
activities as well as the excellent facilities at Nanny
Cay marina and resort. Rally Bermudan hosts at St.
George's Sports and Dinghy Club offer a warm wel-
come and a great venue for the fun rally prize-giving
celebration. Other activities in Bermuda include a very
popular rum-tasting session!





















ARC Europe 2010 departing Bermudafor the Azores

Shazam (GBR) J/130, ARC Europe 2010: "We found
the rally extremely enjoyable, an excellent way of get-
ting the boat from the Caribbean to Europe. It was
extremely good value for money and we would rec-
ommend it to anybody."
Key Facts
Atlantic Cup start: 1 May 2011
ARC Europe start: 5 May 2011
Minimum boat size: 27 feet (8.23m)
Minimum crew: two including skipper
Booking deadline: 1 April 2011
Contact www woidcruising comr or www carib1500com
For more information see ad on page 16.


Yac't [IrV5icos /cIumd ad f7ago: 76sTe3'Y-TH�s 6 6-r3q-- 4 .It








































the question is: how should one sail from Curacao to Cartagena? In the past the standard solution was to
launch from Curacao or Aruba and sail the 350 or 400 miles in one straight shot, hoping the weather
t;----1 nn-1 If iTt -i ln't, it could be a rough trip.
Then a number I ....- . -... - i . I ... Curacao, began stopping at and exploring numerous places along the north
ern Colombian coast. A nice set of cruising notes about the entire coast of Colombia (also Curacao and Aruba) was written
up by Lourae and Randy on S/Y Pizzazz they are happy to send copies on request (sypizazz@yahoo.com). And most
recently the new IGY-affiliated Marina Santa Marta opened its docks in summer 2010. Suddenly there are many options
for cruising the Caribbean coast of Colombia with a number of intermediate stops available.
In November 2010 we left Curacao on S/V Tashtego, our Lord Nelson 41, and arrived in Santa Marta, Colombia, after
making stops in Los Monjes and Cabo de Vela and lucking into a breathtaking passage along the Sierra Nevada de Santa
Marta 30 miles north of Santa Marta. The serendipitous timing (ust before dawn) and location (about 15 miles offshore)
meant that we could see the 18,000-foot peaks with their amazing snowfields (ust 11 degrees north of the equator!) rising
directly up from the sea. Everything disappeared into haze once the sun rose.
Ours was among the first sailboats to arrive in the marina ar 1 f-.. 1 --- . - - - to be of assistance, if not exactly sure
what our needs might be. The marina developers knew their ... I . . . . I I .1 i luring hurricane season and they ini
tially envisioned a primarily South American clientele who would berth sportfishing boats and y. -thtl 1 - t -r. "nL-t they did
not realize was how much their location will simplify the trip from the ABCs to Cartagena or the - .,, i - I . I ..... i I- i cruis
ing sailors everyyear. In any event, it is now the case that when it comes to th 1 . -li:t.,-- -r;;-i::' needs, the marina and
the community are on a fast learning curve. There has been a big investment ... .. ... I I . ... making this marina safe
and beautiful. The marina has been very welcoming: all the cruisers on the docks were invited to the opening event, a sportfish
ing tournament. In addition, management generously hosted a traditional Colombian Christmas dinner for all the marina
guests and staff; the food was unusual and excellent. There is excellent security -the affluent in Latin America know how to
protect their property -with one or more guards on duty at the entrance 24 hours per day and three Coast Guard boats based
in the marina. For more information on the marina visit www.marinasantamarta.com.co/bienvenidos_:. 1 . 1.... 1
The marina was constructed at the southern end of the seaside promenade; this means that all I 11 I i attractions
are an easy walk. The city of Santa Marta is tranquil and peaceful. Compared with Cartagena and Spanish Waters, the
seawater in the marina is fairly clean except after rainstorms. Colombia endured :--- 1- i - .1-i rains and flooding all
through December 2010. Santa Marta was not strongly affected but in mid-Deceml . 11 , .1 I. urs of very high waves
from the west, the marina seawall showed some damage. Repairs and some re-design were underway within ten days.
Continued on next page


Fun Cruising Rallies!

Join us in May 2011

from Nanny Cay to Bermuda then to USA or Europe

O www.caribl500.com or www.worldcruising.com

41 Atlafngtic ARC
up Europ
A ,41ovt7 640 20)%4

*�-Vllny MI4'Iantic Rallyt













-Continuedfrom previous page
The weather soon returned to normal, which is to say
lovely: sunny, dry, very warm in the afternoon and cool
all evening, night and morning.
Abig concern for potential Colombian cruisers are the
entry procedures. The process is murky indeed and
exact details seem to depend on whom you speak with.
Everyone agrees that a) you are required by Colombian
law to use an official maritime agent who collects your
passports, zarpe and boat papers and presents them to


-,i P. -B - ,





,, - N.. , .-.--, . -
_ ' = - - -H - "
Ewi .. _._.









V " ENEZU





Above: For those sailing from Curacao or Aruba to
Cartagena, Santa Marta provides a welcome stop on
the Colombian coast


Right: Directly behind the seafront
is an extensive historic district

the authorities to do their thing; b) when you leave port,
your agent fee includes the zarpe for your next destina-
tion in Colombia or Panama or wherever; c) if any official
has to visit your boat, your agent will be present.
If you enter Colombia at Santa Marta, here is the entry process as laid out by our
agent, Sr. Edgar Romero (www.RomovelaLtda@hotmail.com). If you will be in
Colombian waters fewer than 15 days the only payment required is US$30 for the
Temporary Importation permit (a.k.a. DIAN) and this is included in your Santa Marta
agent fee of US$100. If you will' -1 ;, 'olombian waters longer than 15 days
you need the 60-day Certificate i ....... (a.k.a. DIMAR), which will cost you
US$80. The Certificate of Permanence is paid only in one port, either Santa Marta or
Cartagena. We are making sure that this is the case by using the same agency in
both ports (for an additional US$70). If you will be using separate agencies in the
two ports, you should check how the Certificate will be handled. All payments are
cash only, US dollars or Colombian pesos; they do not need to be made on the day
of arrival. Cruisers can remain in Colombian waters longer than 60 days by applying
ard pwin. f-r the appropriate extensions.
'1 I I IF YOU INTEND TO STOP IN SANTA MARTA, BE SURE YOUR
ARRIVAL ZARPE SAYS SANTA MARTA, NOT CARTAGENA. If you don't do this, it will
cost you aggravation and money.
It is possible to anchor in the bay outside the marina, although there is less room
than one might think because the ship channel for the very busy commercial port
takes up most of the space. Be warned that the anchorage is untenable if there is a
strong wind from the west. For boats at anchor the marina provides a dinghy dock
on the innermost slip of Dock A. There is a small weekly fee for use of iI, 1..1.
dock, which includes disposal of garbage. Services provided to marina ,.. -- .
fee are also available to outside boats, however the bathhouse showers are not.
To date, two groups of boaters have obtained propane and the supplier is working
out the kinks to expedite the process. The price is good and the tanks come back
very full. Until the service dock is completed, fuel has to be arranged through the
marina office; a tanker will drive to the service dock and supply gasoline or eight
percent biodiesel. Clean those fuel tanks and carry fuel filters, spare hoses and
gaskets! Everywhere in Colombia all diesel is biodiesel.


A chandlery and fully developed recreational marine industry lie in the future but
it is quite amazing how many repairs, supplies and services cruisers have ferreted
out in the local community already.
Other amenities like phone calls and phone cards, grocery stores, DHL, laundry and
newspapers are all less than a seven-minute walk away. Taxis and (crowded) minibuses
are present everywhere and are really cheap. The marina intends to offer WiFi internet
access at reasonable rates. For now, Tashtego is enjoying the luxury of an unlocked
router somewhere nearby. Tim's Cafe, 50 metres south of the marina entrance, offers
cruisers free WiFi, a bookswap and breakfast, lunch or just a cup of coffee.
The town of Santa Marta:- . - i.. J i I i..i...i i ..nded in 1525 it is the oldest
city in South America. The I I I 1 ..i .- . ,,� .......... and the principal industries
are the commercial port and local tourism. The seafront avenue features "modern"
hotels of indifferent architecture but directly behind them is an extensive historic
district full of classic Spanish col-ni .l 1-il-li; n many beautifully restored, others
undergoing restoration and even I I. . ..- i , - for sale bargains of a lifetime.
For travel-loving Colombians, Santa Marta and environs have long been a tourist
destination so there are many attractive pocket hotels and a wide variety of afford
able restaurants and quiet bars. Be warned: international tourism is new here and
very few people speak English. This linguistic inconvenience will doubtless improve
considerably within a year or two.
Local attractions include venerable churches with beautiful altars and several
interesting museums. The Museo de Oro and San Pedro Alejandrino, a well-main
trained country estate where Simon Bolivar died in 1830, are particularly worth visit
ing and offer written explanations in Spanish and English. For beach time you can
join the throngs at Rodadero Beach or enjoy quirkier and quieter Taganga, each a
60-cent bus ride away. Taganga has several dive shops. Or take your boat for the
r.


day to one of the Five Bays. Tour buses will take you to local areas to enjoy "la
naturaleza" and Tayrona National Park offers serious backpacking, including a six
day hike to Ciudad Perdida. Outside the park, solo backpacking in the Sierra Nevada
is not a good idea. We rented a car for one day but compared to other Caribbean
locations, it was more expensive and definitely more hair-raising. In the future we
will leave 1. I...... to the professionals.
The tow , - ...I . Marta feels very safe and the people are friendly and helpful.
After two days of getting my bearings, I began walking alone everywhere in the his
toric district and shopping areas, completely at ease even into the early evening.
"Samarios" as local residents call themselves greet you politely and do not treat you
as a walking dollar bill. There are two big police stations (state and local) one block
away from the marina and yellow-vested policia every block or two. This heavy-fire
power presence is a legacy from the violence of past decades but no doubt contrib
utes to the calm and order that prevails.
Perhaps the greatest delight that Santa Marta offers is the evening paseo: after
sunset everyone strolls along the handsome seaside promenade -grandmothers,
children, families and lovers. Low-key party sounds of people chatting, children
laughing, a few street musicians playing are in the air. Vendors are mellow and only
inquire once. You sit at one of the outdoor bar/cafes across the street sipping a beer
or mojito, totally content to be exactly where you are at that moment.
Already I am thinking -Santa Marta might be the perfect place to spend hurri
cane season....


In the center oJ i/.. -igot,
surrounded by the best restaurants
and shops in town


MARINA PORT

L D
A I X(J"Y A L E
�MNT �IARFHN
� %V 1,

















Revisiting the Grenadines


U. .4






Lnd Grena


In February 2010 we decided to sail north from
Tobago to revisit the Grenadines and Grenada. The
early morning hours found us passing Mustique. To
our surprise we counted 18 yachts there. We did not
want to throw even more money into the millionaires'
hat, so we went on to Bequia, where we -ni--d th-
season's first ripe Julie mangoes, sweet .i Ii.I
and breadfruit.
Folks, be careful from whom you buy your veggies
when you are in Bequia. In the past, we had been
cheated three times at the public vegetable market with
old and rotten stuff at high prices, and got totally green
mangoes with the promise they would ripen, which they
never did. Although there are honest vendors among
those at the market, we now prefer to buy our fruit and
veggies at the various individual vendors on the side of
the road. They get fresh, 11t ;-1- vegetables and
fruits delivered nearly every i i' '. - L Vincent.
In Bequia we also -ni-"d a visit to the model-boat
builders. With lots i I they carefully carve and
paint the boats. They like visitors, and it is hard to
withstand buying one of their boats.
With good sailing conditions we sailed south to
Canouan and then Mayreau with its busy Salt Whistle
Bay. We remembered our stays there when ours was
the only yacht; now we counted up to 27!


On Union Island, on the jetty in front of the
Bougainvillea Hotel early in the morning, freshly
baked baguettes are available for EC$7. On the main
street, we can compare a local supermarket and a
French one. There is internet available for EC$23 per
hour, or 150 metres further down the main road on
the first floor, for EC$10 per hour. My eyes had a feast
in t I , .. 1 1 . I . . I . - I .. 1 .I , nt. Opposite
are I I .b..I . .' I . .. I . .... I llI andvegeta
ble stalls with good quality veggies. Apart from the
main road, Clifton Harbour kept its pretty local style.
Checking out of St. Vincent & the Grenadines in
Union Island was fast and very relaxing, as was the
check-intoGrenada, . - .. .11 ii- . .. . * ..... DU.
W e still remember o .. .... I - -. ..- i i 1 l-1 . .i.. in
1990: the beach was loaded with discarded washing
machines, cars, motors, and other rubbish, waiting
maybe for a huge swell to take it all away. Behind
Customs and Immigration, under a big mango tree,
was a huge heap of rusty scrap, and on top of that a
man was sleeping in the shade!
Now, nothing of this is found. The beach is fabu
lously clean, as is the water. The houses are well main
trained; the supermarkets are verywell stocked. Internet
is available for EC$7 per hour on a fast running line.
We were so impressed with the changes in that charm
ing little town that we stayed longer than planned.
Noticeable on the main street to the south is an old
house with wooden shingles on the walls. "Patty's Deli"
is proclaimed in light green letters on a small sign.
-ontinued on next page


Above: The beach at Hillsborough, Carria . ,. .
clean. We were so impressed with that ch .... i i I
town that we stayed longer than planned


Right: Christine welcomes custom .' ' i ! '


In Mayreau you'll meet "boat boys"
selling fresh fish and lobster. They
also offer freshly baked baguettes,
which they pick up on Union Island
and sell for EC$15 out of their
-i : in the morning -just in
.. i cruisers' breakfasts. The
boys are very kindly, not annoying,
just offering their stuff.
The anchorage farther south on
Mayreau, Saline Bay, lost its former
charm for us. Smoke from daily fires,
maybe from burning garbage, drifting
with the easterly wind through the
anchorage, was annoying and after
three days it chased us away to
Union Island.


B & C FUELS ENTERPRISE
Petite Martinique
The best fuel dock in the Grenadines for:
FUEL * OIL * WATER * ICE


0* !'l cri ,rorrinertolly fircr.dly houlout
* 50-ton hoist, 18ft beam, 8ft draft
* Water
* Do it yourself or labour available Tel/Fax: 473.443.8175
* Mini - Marina VHF: 16 tbyh@usa.net
* Chandlery www.carriacouboatyard.com


1..--


C~,~C, ;AJr

1













Continuedfrom previous page
In the tiny little shop you'll find Christine with a
.. ....le behind her spotlessly clean, modern
I counter. Behind her a brilliantly shining,
hand-operated cutting machine to slice your ham in

- . ' " .
, ' - '


any desired thickness. Christine has fresh I .... 1
(EC$5.50 each), which are flown in frozen .. I ,. ...
Martinique and taste even better than those in Union
Island. Various types of croissants, French pates and
different hams are available, as well as French wine,


all for an acceptable price. Christine explained to me
that the house is about a hundred years old, withstood
all hurricanes, and her grandmother ran a bakery in
that building. She named her shop after her granny,
whose name was Patty.
With easterly winds we sailed down the windward
side of Grenada to the south coast. Hearing an
announcement on the VHF, we booked a tour around
the island. After a refreshing bath under a waterfall
-fresh water! - we went up into the rainforest to feed
the monkeys with bananas, and then continued on
farther north to visit an old rum factory where every
bottle is still filled by hand. On the way back, our
guide drove us to the largest nutmeg factory in
Grenville. It was a fun-filled day trip and good value.
If you like to eat fish, a visit at the market in
Grenada's capital, St. George's, is a must -it is the
best in all the Windward Islands. You can choose
between marlin, yellowfin tuna, mahi-mahi, swordfish,
shark, and all the smaller fish. From the large fish you
can get just one slice or one pound, whatever you
want. It's really worthwhile to visit Grenada for its fish
market -and also for its nice, relaxed, friendly and
kindly Customs and Immigration officers.

Angelika Griner is cruising the Caribbean aboard
S/Y Angelos.

Top left: Fresh produce with a big smile on Union Island

Bottom left: The nutmeg factory at Grenville, Grenada

Below: Craftsmen at work at Sargeant's Model Boat
Shop on Bequfa


Delivers a Gripping Performance


Bnrrnrd' your ^*s,', wpMid and [Ail! r4 | |h oi , ffK-T a w d e- ain gei of S ' Hrav an ltfl i, rg
Lpilw < i-"l a wfuvr en d uJia % r le. rJ9 Oei '*2 -p ithing
PL b1e.r.iin ecrcd *int' r : i4N Eald or 'QIviPromer Sl P

:pl lun*l' pno. We gulrante itll



It Works Better. We Guarantee it!


HSt Hne-k pi-masm r16i , 1,Mnlouling palnt* a-" s i- ! rt n i 5 .A.
:1ti tlry thH -rilc rrr Flri, l. Vith S-,� Havk yOi. hrh 'Si hii I .Arnd
fnnrr f el r fe fttwrC prceclKd lt rofn cen fLhe mI t dLs ,itu'; of
mnrnrn fc!{n9 org any~r.


We* i-v~'i? ' ?nK resr,�r,'i1,a
Vt r Nr 'lfZ Y~.lJ lld
E1d4iU: 4.wo ur^C^ SC1t r4S1 CO LvC' riI

Enrieayour ~atasa~ran Corporation
I). -*� * h, i .fibrl


1KM" 1ft MNi6iMU-Mf i *4 3N I lli c

ItWll CALCSAtIrto�n��IGS taiNC tlwM--IIn
m sel catdePetaiah s feateelgnsml














are-l[I dr eamsthatIuilses S INs rF


fair wind and a fair current to move
us along the way. Beautiful islands
with temperatures that neither
e r e freeze nor burn. White sand beaches
.. 1 --;-- -.-- 1--.:. and exotic cultures. These are among our favorite things.
- i .. i i - ailing and cruising is our sense of freedom and wellbeing. We
make a very large investment of time and money to make our dreams come true and,
while sometimes we do not encounter the conditions that we want, we steadfastly pur
sue what we have conjured up in our minds.
The Good
Ask any sailor from New York, Montreal, London, Oslo or any point north what
runs through his mind during those cold, bleak days of winter and he will tell you
i ...1 .. - i . ,i .. , i he Caribbean are the equivalent of sugar plums dancing in
. i i i . 111I is so compelling about cruising in warm climates? At its
essence it is freedom, freedom to go where we please, when we please and to be out
there as long as we please.
It has been more than 50 years since we have come to dream about the Caribbean
as a place to escape to and, better yet, to escape to on a boat. The Andrews Sisters
were singing "Rum and Coca Cola" in 1944:
If you ever go down Trinidad
They make you feel so very glad,
Calypso sing and make-up rhyme
Guarantee you one real good fine time!
Culturally, the Caribbean includes Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, East
Indians, Chinese, and people from the Middle East and from the rest of all the
Americas. Such .... - I ..... .11. . .. history, music, food and products so diverse
as to boggle the i .... i I i. �. . .. - your mind when you think of the Caribbean
is only clear water, blue sky, a fair wind and coconut trees, think again.
ii ; -z ......ic- ~ ,-yr-ri


Among 'the bad': the economic gap. To visitors, this aging cottage might look picture
esque. To those who call it home, a yacht might 'appear to be a floating palace'
Starting in Trinidad, we can celebrate East Indian culture and its food, music and
art without traveling to India. As we continue north and west up the island chain, we
can explore French culture in many different applications -from the subtle nuances
of French Creole in Grenada to the "joie de vivre" of St. Barth's. We can take note of
the impact of English culture ranging from the islands when i.i i ,,
those islands that are still part of the British Commonwealth. : *, i . ... ..
up in St. Maarten and Saba. In the Greater Antilles we discover the two largest islands
in the Caribbean, Hispaniola and Cuba -with Spanish-speaking cultures that mix
Latino, African and Native American features into a very pleasant motif. We must not


- .-t tlh t tie western third of Hispaniola is Haiti, which is decidedly French and

Jamaica has a motto that reads "out of many, one people". If you visit there it will
not take you '-n,; t- --- that it is so, but at the same time you sense that Jamaica
is the center ci i..... Caribbean culture. All you need do is listen to Reggae music
and visit the Bob Marley Museum to understand what it means and the impact it
has had around the world.


Avoiding 'the ugly': 'anchor in an area that does not single your boat out
as being vulnerable'
In fact, the cultural diversity of the Caribbean is not just good -it is excellent!
Another tick in the "good" category is the fact that there are places where we
can really get away from the rat race and relax profoundly.
When we come to the Caribbean, if we want to see the good, we must get beyond
our own definition of it. In most of the Caribbean, if it is raining hard people do not
go out. Rain is a time for one to stay home, safe and dry. If someone is supposed
to come to work on your boat, notwithstanding that the work may be inside in the
cabin, if it is raining, do not get your hopes up that your contractor will show up.
Continued on next page







PICK UP!
Ahoy, Compass Readers! When in Bequia, pick up your free monthly copy of
the Caribbean Compass at any of these locations (advertisers in this issue
appear in bold):





Bequia Bookshop
Bequia Post Office
Bequia Tourism Assn.
De Reef Restaurant
Fernando's Hideaway
Frangipani Hotel
Friendship Rose Office
Grenadines Sails
GYE
Lulley's Tackle
Mac's Pizzeria
PortHole Restaurant
Tradewinds Cruise Club
W&W Supermarket
Wallace & Co












continued from previous page
Add these insights to the constancy of the tradewinds and a very pleasant climate
for most of the year, and you have the Caribbean. Add a boat that (supposedly) gets
its power from the wind to the equation and you have a "ticket to ride"! Let the good
times roll, but do not forget to go with the flow.
The Bad
What do you think the Caribbean countries really have to export? What do you
think drives their economies and creates livelihoods? Manufacturing for export had
a brief run in the Caribbean: there were free trade zones in many Caribbean coun
tries up to just a decade ago, but those factory jobs have been lost to India and
China. Venezuela and Trinidad have oil. But the main engine of the Caribbean
economy today is Tourism with a capital T. Tourism is not just hotels, cruise ships
and marinas; it is agriculture and food preparation, arts and crafts, car rentals,



















Among 'the good':
The Caribbean's
diverse culture
'brings with it art,
history, music,
food and products
so diverse as to
boggle the mind'




casinos, fishing expeditions, inland tours, and a plethora of interconnected jobs right
down to the person who supplies the beach chairs. However, tourism is subject to
economic fluctuation and in a worldwide recession, jobs are easily lost.
It is simply not easy to find ajob in the Caribbean and even harder to find a career.
Opportunities are few and far between. The -iri of jobs are low paying and sub
ject to seasonal fluctuation. Perhaps if the , I ,. aribbean Basin organized itself
like the European Common Market, it:... 1. . more leverage. Such organization
has been attempted, but the hurdles I I ", - and economics have made it an
impossible task to date.
Even in the most developed islands with the greatest infrastructure, the average
income is often still no higher than the minimu-* - . in the United States. Yet
the cost of living in many respects is not very I,' , ,,I from what it is in more
developed countries.
When cruising sailboats made their debut in the Caribbean, life was simpler.
People made do with less and the expectation level was lower. Cruising boats, still a
rarity, were accorded a place of honor and respect. At that time bananas were still
being exported and fishing in local waters yielded an abundant harvest. Today the


banana economy has been lost and fish are no longer abundant. When today's
cruiser calls at most Caribbean countries, he is arriving on what appears to be a
i .',,. i alace supported by an income (even if a retirement income) that is, in most
S- - I . greater than what entire local working families earn. It is little wonder that
reports of thefts have increased so dramatically over the last 20 years. The crime rate
is exacerbated by the loss of jobs caused by the worldwide recession and compound
ed by the illegal drug trade. Whereas one once could put an anchor down and sleep
with the hatches wide open, today there are many areas of the Caribbean where
strict security measures must be taken. Dinghies and outboard motors are most
prized on the theft scale. Beyond that there are items of boat gear and personal
property that are often seen as a month's wages, if not more.
Theft is the mainstay of "the bad" in the Caribbean and cruisers need to be con
scious of this. We must be aware of the risks and reputations of each country in the
Caribbean, just as we are aware of weather patterns and the value of a secure
anchorage. We must cruise through the Caribbean with the same focus that we have
when we prepare our boat for a voyage. The old axiom that an "ounce of prevention
is worth a pound of cure" can make all the difference in what we experience.
The Ugly
It is never easy to speak of the ugly. No one wants to go to a gathering and discuss
in any detail events that strike fear in our hearts. There are, however, always exam
ples of such events, and websites such as www.noonsite.com and www.safetyandse
curitynet.com are excellent sources of information.
On December 21st, 2009 the yacht Triton, a 56-foot sloop with three German
nationals on board, was en route from Trinidad to Grenada. At around noon, approx
imately 40 miles north of Trinidad (position 11�27N 61�52W), it was approached
from the south by a pirogue. The seven or eight Spanish-speaking men aboard the
pirogue fired shots at the yacht and commanded the crew to stop. Four or five of
these men boarded I.. . 111. ., i. I one was harmed, the boat was stripped of its
equipment and the I- - - -. .. I i crew.
On April 3rd,' 2010 a German couple abo:.. i ..i.... - - -, irit of Cologne II
were attacked by assailants one mile off the :. . 1. . -1 .. .. I . along the Paria
Peninsula. Mr. Ropke was shot and killed; his wife, Angelica was left unharmed and
eventually rescued.
On June 28th, 2010, singlehanded American sailor Mike Harker was anchored in
Simpson Bay Lagoon, St. Martin. Two assailants swam out, boarded the boat and
robbed Harker, whom they beat unconscious and left for dead.
This list can go on and on but the point is that there are incidents of piracy and
murder. Acts of this type are not frequent, but one must take note of where they
occur and what conditions might provoke such an attack.
It takes .1i - i . , i . ,I .. .. , , , , , i ,. r. ... . - - , I ..I n , ,1 ,s w orth-
w while and ,ll , ,, . . lII .... i ... I ... 1 . I I I .... -... ,. D o the
research and do it in detail. For example, it is no secret that the northeastern coast
of Venezuela, especially the Paria Peninsula, is not secure and incidents are now
Tr, .'l t- tin-1;1 b the waters around some offshore islands, such as I
i .i.. i ., i , i "safe". We should avoid sailing within "pirogue I.- ..
about 50 miles, from such coastlines. On the other hand, Jamaica has the worst
reputation for crime in the Caribbean, yet my experience of cruising Jamaica is one
of reasonable safety. Most of the crime in that country is in the ghettos of Kingston,
and tourists are not often involved.
We must avoid anchorages with a proven bad history. We must also avoid danger
ous spots in "good anchorages": in all large anchorages there are areas that are less
secure than others. Anchor in an area that does not single your boat out as being
vulnerable.
Always be polite to those who come alongside to s ii - ... i,,. , offerr a service.
Rudeness may well incur someone's anger and you :-. , i ' I ,, - II at 2:00AM in
a tough situation. Being reactive and judgmental serves no purpose, and can
increase your risk. Never criticize a country or the people of a country openly. If you
make fun of the locals or their country, you may get laughs from your friends but
the last laugh will most often be on you.
Act sensibly and responsibly and you will improve your chances of avoiding "the ugly".
Being prepared for "the bad" or "the ugly" is important and should be taken into
account in all ways possible. Remember: we have the power to actually "grow the
good" when we go cruising, by the way we go about it.
Frank Virgintino is the author of Free Cmising Guides
(www.freecruisingguide.com).


Tel: (599) 544 5231
Fax: (599) 544 6044

Email: nfo@sntaartensails.com
Cole Bay - SL Murten
- oppose Island Water World


GRENADINES


SAILS & CANVAS

BEQUIA


Come in and see us

for all your SAILS & CANVAS needs
including CUSTOM-MADE stainless steel

BIMINI & DODGER frames at competitive prices




Located opposite G.Y.E.
(northern side of Admiralty Bay) REPRESENTATIVE

Tel (784) 457-3507 / 457-3527 (evenings)
e-mail: gsails@vincysurf.com VHF Ch16/68














by Tom Minder
The Fort de Saint Pierre stands in front of me, 198
metres long, 30 metres wide, depth 11 metres, 40,000
tons, and a capacity for 2,300 containers. My name is
entered in the logbook as an officer opens the combi
nation-locked door into the warm inside of the ship.
One of the crew pilots me through the long corridor
to the ship's office and introduces me to the com-
mander, and then the steward leads me up on the lift
to Deck E. My cabin is situated two floors under the
command bridge. Great! Just as I had wished! The
room is on the starboard side with one porthole to the
front and one to the side: no containers to block the
view to the sea. Two beds, a desk, a soft carpet, show
er, toilet, all like in a real hotel.
I sit down and reflect on how I finally came to be
here, crossing the Atlantic on a ship. My Plan A,
--- a crew on a yacht, did not work out, not
SI the ARC (Atlantic Rally for Cruisers) at Las
Palmas on the Canary Islands. More than 200 boats
start the Atlantic crossing from there. Unlike other
years, there was too much crew available. It was not to
be for me. I wanted to circumnavigate the world once
again and this time westwards, but I couldn't find a
ride on a sailing vessel.
So I Googled shipping companies and diligently
wrote a load of e-mails. My work paid off. I boarded the
Fort de St. Pierre at Le Havre. The steward knocks and
gives me the meal schedule: breakfast and dinner 7 to
8, lunch 12 to 1, in the officers' dining room. At the
ship's office I get a personal badge with my photo and
then go for an exploring tour.
By nightfall I have met the other four passengers:
.. r,, i.i....... around 30 with Indian roots, a car
. . I . -Iame age from the Pyrenees, a French
professor from La Rochelle and an elderly woman
from Brittany.
The first two meals at the officers' mess are excellent,
real French cuisine. The steward serves the entree and
main course with white and red wines, followed by
several different cheeses and finally a dessert. And it
stays like this, except on Christmas, when everything
gets even better.
Outside it is snowing. Several cranes are '. 1.... ... I
unloading the ship in the brightness of 11 11,.,1-
Eight containers go down into the belly of the ship,



" --
no

igwmma 1


then the deck plates are lowered, then six or seven
containers come on top of the deck. The dockworkers
in the cranes do precision work. Some containers have
a weight of 30 tons and more. The crew of the ship is
standing outside in the cold, securing and cabling the
huge containers.
Finally, we sail. Outside the command bridge I am
just about 40 metres above the water. Inside every
thing reminds of Captain Kirk's spaceship Enterprise:
a number of monitors and switches, the steering wheel
merely the size of a soup plate. Scotty and his team are
down with the machines.
And just like in the movie, he is reporting a problem
merely eight miles out of Le Havre. The injection pump
of the eighth cylinder is defective. The commander is
not happy.
I immediately descend the stairs from F Deck down
to A Deck and farther down to the machine room.
Room? Thi: = -. .iii.' The MAN engine is running
and the cl. I -1i.11 ,- limning. In fact, the propeller,
8.5-metres in diameter, mustbe turning too. Incredible!
Did the engineers dismount the injection pump while
the engine was running? The pump is not there any
more and a new one is hanging on a crane in front of
it, ready to be installed.
The work goes on professionally and without haste.
The tools are enormous. Just do not stand in their
way, I think, putting away my ear mufflers and step
ping back up to the command bri.I - -.i-
However, the engine must be -I 1I I I . about one
hour. The black cone is hoisted as 1 i;n.l to other
ships that our 40,000-ton ship is I.. .... Then the
entire ship is vibrating and everybody knows that the
engine is running again. In half an hour, the time it
takes to bring such a monster to full speed, we should
be plowing the sea at the usual 24 knots.
For starting, the engine is brought up to specific
rotation speed with compressed air. At first the
machine runs with expensive diesel, then the com-


A Yachtie Ships t:


puter switches it automatically to heavy oil. Once far
out at sea 1 . ..... . ii change to sulfurized heavy
oil. This oil .- .... II. . cheaper. Fuel consump
tion is reduced to 91 tons per 24 hours. Tons!
The pumps of the ballast tanks are run to change all
the ballast water. No fauna or flora shall be dispersed
into other harbours or continents. Even the wastewa
ter of our ship is cleared internally.
I fill my notebook with everything I can pick up. I
ask: what happens to containers that fall off ships and
will mean certain death if hit by a yacht? Here is the
answer: "This is a rare happening and never happened
in my career so far. Such a disaster is reported to sev
eral coast guards with a pan-pan call. The position of

Top: Some foredeck! Sailor Tom Minder shares
a different passage perspective

Right: Flying fish are found on any Atlantic crossing

Left: I couldn't find a ride on a sailing vessel... so I
boarded the Fort de St. Pierre'

the potentially floating container is marked on all
weather faxes. Countless other actions are taken, such
as entries in the 1 1-1- preparations for authorities
and insurance, i i -
We correct course several times for sailing boats on
the open sea, even if they are hardly visible on the
radar and not equipped with AIS.
The work in navigation, on charts, and weather-faxes
is not much different from the work I did on yachts. I
always feel safe, in good hands, and also fully accepted.

a ,, i ,ll , , h ,I I .... i,,- 1 h . .. . ..I , I h1 I ....
Once the ship is at sea it is quieter for the crew. All
work is done with ' i;; .;- routine. However, none of
the seamen has '.. i . 1 l-n.-r chat. I am quietly
amazed about the - '..'.. -- the sailors. There is
always a minimum of one officer on the command bridge
during the day, two at night. Everybody down to the
lowest level of the hierarchy is workir . .... 1 ... 1
They work 9.5 hours per day. The .-....i .I - ii ...
hours overlap by at least 15 minutes. And I am amazed
what they do: the anchors must be secured; a couple of
sailors make their way around with pots and brushes
to grease everything that could rust or already does.
The painter always has an overload of work, even if he
gets help. Every 24 hours all containers must be
checked. Some of them are cooled to below 24 degrees
Celsius. Once per day the electrician raises a weather
balloon for Meteo France v-- ; -rt-r r- ru,-
constantly in the engine r ... i . i . .1i 1 . i 11.
ship. They must be monitored, otherwise alarms go up
to the command bridge and even to the officers' mess.
Several filters are cleaning the 45 7 1-' . lIsius pre
heated heavy oil for the engine. 1 - 1.11 . - must be
maintained periodically. There is a fully equipped work
shop on A Deck and somebody is always there.
In the evenings, there is drinking at the officers' bar
and at the crew bar. Being at sea makes the body
pretty tired though, and many are moving on to their
cabins soon. Older seamen say they miss the good old
times, the times when DVDs did not exist. Then, they
sat together for longer and discussed much more.
Then, when debarkation took several days, they had
time to go out in the town. Today, . i..... - ....
ed in hours. Big ports like Rott( I .i. . -I. ..... ..
unload and reload a ship of more than 3,000 contain
ers with several cranes in six to eight hours. There is
just enough time to shop for some souvenirs and for a


beer or two at the pub.
Time has not stopped on cargo ships. All is go, go,
go. But the sea and the weather still have their last
word and give the pace.
The third night I almost fall off my bed three or four
times. The wind picks up continuously and is now
blowing 40 to 45 knots from 15 degrees over the star
board bow. The swell is far above 10 metres. The ship
is rolling from one side to the other. Now and then big
breakers thunder over the bow and shake the entire
vessel. Loose containers would have fallen over the
side long ago. Two of the passengers do not come down
for lunch anymore.
To my surprise, I have no difficulties at all. I knew
about my sea legs on yachts, and I'm glad they also
work on big ships. Lucky me! It is Christmas and
the smell out of the galley has been promising for
hours already.
The Christmas tree in the officers' mess is hanging
sideways in its support lines. Everybody is dressed in
their Sunday clothes or uniform. We are dining like
French gods and enjoy selected wines. It is superb!
Only a few of the 28 crew are on duty. Much later, we
arrived at the dessert; none of the white tablecloths is
without stains. It is the wild sea! We not only had to
hold on to tl. ... 1 . . i. . time to time even the
plates were :I .. . . i . .. the other side of the
table. Merry Christmas!
Outside the winds are howling and nobody goes out
side unless necessary. The saltwater spray is washing
the ship right up to the chimneys, 48 metres above the
sea. Christmas is passing by, as are the Azores about
100 miles north of us.
The commander has decided to change our route for
a more southerly course. A low system, dark red on
the weather fax, would have hit us with 60 and more
knots. The winds would have reduced the speed to 15
knots. We are all happy about the decision.
As we approach the Caribbean, every day gets a bit
warmer. Soon the jackets remain in the closets and a
short-sleeved shirt is enough to wear, even outside on
the bridge in the breeze.
For one day the wind blows from astern and the
most admirable place becomes the front of the ship. No
wind. No engine noise. Just silence. I sit at ti ,... i,,,
and let my legs hang over the bow. It feels .i 1
silently over the water. From time to time a :I ,. ,-
joins me.
Suddenly I see the cook with a basket hanging on his
arm. Fishing with a hook is not his business, he tells me.
Continued on next page


9k~i~ ~













Continuedfrom previous page ...A different voyage
Too boring! Just picking them up is all different, mate. The flying fish with the open
ears flap themselves back to the sea. All others make their very last landing in the fry
pan for dinner. There is mon 1 .. .. 1. ,.1. ir , v and passengers.
After ten days at sea the :. -1 -....- i i... I . I .. It is Guadeloupe! Not just the
- -r- -ttn -li, ; --ited at the railing. I can smell land, or at least the smoke
Si ......... i .. i, - Land! It is still there. The sea has not swallowed it in
the meantime.
.i MW


Some hours later we have a pilot aboard. He takes over the responsibility of the
commander, guiding the ship through the dogleg entry and, with centimetre accu
racy, under the cranes of the Port de Guadeloupe. Passengers and some of the crew
are permitted to go out. Very soon we are -Ir;l-i n- ri-bhean beer with the natives,
talking about the world and the sea. The :.... II... - - . 1. which we are welcomed is
almost embarrassing for us, and I must think how we sometimes dare treat foreign
ers in my country.
It is afternoon when a massive cruise ship docks right at the quayside. What a
sight! A skyscraper, painted in white, lying down right at the edge of the village. A
cloud of tourists is flooding the small town. The apparent dress code is white shorts,
white T-shirt, white hat and ..... 1 .... th two or more cameras hanging from
their necks to dance in front 1I, ,, I II. - The women in the market, dressed in
beautiful colours with a matching headscarf, have waited for this kind of customer.
Herbs and spices from :ui, .- to vanilla, fruit syrups in rum, and so much more
-it is like bait. And the '- I. .. hungry.
Although I am a tourist too, I feel much better looking at it from some distance. I
have more time here than just a few hours. Many questions to my new friends are
not answered yet, and they also want to know a lot about me. I am shouting anoth
er round of beers. My ship is not sailing until tomorrow morning.
Leaving the waters of Guadeloupe, I look back in some melancholy. The last leg of
my voyage has started. By drinking large amounts of Caribbean coffee, I try to keep
awake to enjoy the last hours to the maximum. I stand in the wind and try to store
the magic of 11t ... 1.1 r at sea and the Southern Cross in my heart. Tomorrow we
will arrive at :. ... .i I - nation.
Entering the harbour of Fort-de-France, capital of Martinique, on the way to the
container terminal, we pass the town to port. The gigantic fort, which gives the town
its name, dominates the view of the lower city. Some musicians have gathered and
happy Creole music is drifting over the sea. It is the last day of the year, a good
reason to celebrate. By lunchtime the Fort de Saint Pierre is docked under the cranes
and the unloading starts. But soon the dockworkers go home to celebrate, too.
My cabin is cleaned up, my backpack is ready, the last Swiss chocolate is given
away. I say good-bye to the commander and the crew. Adieu, Fort de Saint Pierre.
Some days later, I sit in a hotel room and see my ship sailing away. I am sure she
is full of bananas and other goodies of the Caribbean. Tradewind clouds are travel
ling in the sky, promising her a quiet voyage for the first few days. A New Year and
new adventures await me, at sea, I hope, away with a cargo ship.


CRUISERS' PROFILES


NORWEGIANS WOULD!

"At work we saw men at their computers all day, with no time for their families
or for fun. We didn't want that to happen to us, so we decided to go sailing."
Hedvig Meidell, Cornelia Bull and Julie Haugli, a trio of 25-year-old Norwegian
women, didn't waste time leaving the shipbroker's business and heading out to
sea. They quit their jobs in July 2010, bought a used GibSea 364 in Las Palmas,
Gran Canaria on November 1st, and set sail across the Atlantic just three weeks
later. "Our parents were overwhelmed," they admit. Why select the GibSea? "There
weren't many boats there to choose from, and it was ready to go." They renamed
the boat -*'" J., I ,' I .I , .11 Fortunately, the previous owner, a singlehander,
was very I' II .I .... I .."....i... them with the boats systems, and the young
women, who had grown up by the sea but hadn't grown up sailing, engaged an
experienced sailor, Olav Aleksander, to assist them during the crossing.
Crossing the Atlantic in 24 days, searching for weather systems where there
might be more favorable winds, they broke the forestay but jury-rigged a substi
tute and arrived in Rodney Bay Marina, St. Lucia simultaneously with the ARC,
although not part of it. A day or so after arrival, the now all-girl crew said fare
well to Olav, who flew back to Norway, and settled into island time. "On the
crossing, it seems like we would never get to St. Lucia, but now it seems like
we've been here forever.
Their plans - "to explore the islands spontaneously" - have so far included a
Christmas beach barbecue and barefoot New Year's celebrations in Bequia with
many of the Norwegian crews who participated in the most recent Atlantic Rally
for Cruisers. ARC 2010 boasted 27 Norway-flagged boats, making. '-
for the first time ever, the second-largest national group in the e ,i .11 , ,I
UK. Why so many Norwegians this time? Some say that because the economy is
slow to rebound from the recession it's a good time to get away. Other's say it's
because of positive publicity from past ARCs in the Norwegian press. All agree
it's simply excellent to be sailing in the Caribbean in the winter.
Heddy, Cornelia and Julie have since been enjoying the Grenadines, visiting
Mayreau, Union Island and the Tobago Cays. Th-ir -;-r;l ;im for the season
is to cruise up the island chain, maybe as far as ( .. - ... .... other boats and
making friends", and then to return to Norway v. 11. I - I - Coast.
But Heddy notes, "We're open to change."
Follow Smidig Katt's adventures at http://skippertaket.com/. The crew says,
"Sorry this page will be in Norwegian. We highly recommend using Translate'; the
translation is rather amusing, and be especially aware of heavy Norwegian slang!"
_A . I


NEW 24 V SOLAR PANEL

DOUBLE YOUR ENERGY











a n . Higher productivity by 20 to 30% compared to a 12 V solar panel due to 24 V panels
*< . installed with the mppt Xantrex regulator.
* . Improved charging time: works with less sun.
* . Improved efficiency: the 3 stage regulator and 2 programmable outputs (gel or acid) do not
** lower the batteries' tension.
SIncreased gain at cable level: losses are divided by two.
CP-Solar . Reinforced efficiency as two sets of batteries can be loaded at one time.


CATANA .'k 1. k- re- ,E ANNI


AfterSaleServic


MARINE


I = 0 - -
















The Richmond Vale Nature Center, located at the
northern end of the road along St. Vincent's west coast
at the foot of the Soufriere volcano is a new attraction
for nature lovers. Visitors from around the world arrive
at the center by road or by sea to climb the volcano and
also to hike with a herd of horses in the rainforest.
Jesper Friis from Denmark and I, Stina Herberg from
Norway, have resided in St. Vincent for the last four
years and have seen an increasing number of people
discovering the North Leeward side of the island. In
spite of some earlier safety issues regarding anchoring
in Chateaubelair, we personally have not experienced I 'j i , . I I. . -. k
any incidents during the past four years.
Richmond Vale Academy is a Vincentian-registered
non-profit organization that trains local and interna-
tional volunteers to do development work in Africa,
South America and St. Vincent. The Academy's Nature
and FIi 1., Center is an income-generating activity to
raise I,,, i- for the volunteers' program and for school
warships for Caribbean students who do not have the
means to pay tuition. Since 2007, more than 120
international and national volunteers have been


trained to carry out humanitarian work in Mozambique,
Malawi, South Africa, St. Vincent and Ecuador.
Cruisers who wish to hike can anchor at
Chateaubelair. If you e-mail us at gugu@richmond
vale.org or call (784) 492-4058, we can arrange to pick
you up and, if you have any concerns about security,
we can also arrange for a boat guard while the crew is
out on hikes. It is an advantage to call a day or two
days before you wish to hike the volcano, as you will
need to start early in the morning (around 0700
hours), and the guide needs to be ready with snacks.
Hiking Soufriere Volcano
The Soufriere volcano is the youngest volcanic fea
ture on St. Vincent. It occupies the northernmost third
of the island. The volcanic crater is two and a half
kilometres in diameter. During the past 4,000 years
the volcano has had an average of one explosive erup
tion every hundred years.
Climbing up the leeward side of the 3,000-foot vol
cano is a challenge and a very special nature experi
ence. The paths are :*" ..... ii . .. ii,
station, occasionally .11 '''. - i I I 1 I .'''h
views of the sea and surrounding mountains. Just at
the halfway point you pass the biggest tree you possi
bly have ever seen. It is a fig (ficus) tree and, according
to the guide Franklyn, it is about 300 years old. It has
an amazing trunk made up of intricately entangled
bark. There are loads of vines hanging from it and lots
of plants gr-"din n-n its branches.
The top c I - .. . . - ... amazing sight. It is covered
in small l-.t. .1 1. - l --- f-n1 ..ti- I -fi;-i.1 obable
shape. T -... 11 -I, ,I - I . . . . ... . atthe
ash-stre .. ..... ..- -... . .. vill be
amazed by its immensity. An active lava dome is located
at its centre, although Soufriere hasn't erupted since
1979. After a short break you will start to descend from
the rim down into the crater. A thick rope stretches all
the way down a steep trail to the crater floor.


I


m -4

. ............ .. - -


SO

WK*


At the end of the rope you put your feet at the bottom
of the crater and start exploring. It is like walking on
another planet. The dome is smoking, and in certain
places you can knock and hear the hollow ground. You
walk around in complete silence. There is no noise or
wind inside the crater.
Hiking the Rainforest with a Herd of Horses
At the Center we have a herd of horses that love to
hike in the rainforest. This is not a traditional trail
ridir : i ' .';- but a different concept with focus on
the "...i 11. horses, people and nature. You walk
with the horses instead of riding them. The herd has
seven members -one male and six females -and one
of the center's horse guides will take you on a three or
four-hour trail.
You hike with the herd in the green intense forest,
dense and thick with trees. Plants grow on other plants
and part of the trail is along the Richmond River. The
horses,' i i .... i ., i 11 ... togetherwith
people. -. 1 ' . 1 - .. '. i. ..i . vide openings
in the fore- , i . i .. - I , break. The horses
will walk '.. .. i i, i ... I ' I heir favorite herbs
and eat the rich grass, while the hikers can sit down at
the riverside and enjoy -n:- -- rax apples, avoca
does and :; - picked: ,h II i1 trees.
Flocks i .111 egrets might greet you as you arrive
with the horses on the beach close to sunset. At the
beach you will rest, swim and play with the horses.
You do not need former experience with horses to
enjoy this trail. Your guide will explain the language of
horses and how they talk to each other and to you with
their body language.
It is possible to take lessons at the center on how to
work with and train a free horse. This means to speak
to the horse with your body '-. -;;:- and work with
the horse without ropes, bits, -. II - halters or any
other forms of tack.
We look forward to welcoming you to join our
special nature experiences in this unique corner of
the Caribbean.
Stina Herberg is the manager of the Richmond Vale
Nature and Hiking Center. For more information visit
www.richmondvalehiking.com.

Top: Hiking the volcano, with Chateaubelair Bay at
the left side of the picture
Left and center Interacting with the Nature Center's
herd of horses
Bottom left: The Richmond Vale Academy


BAREBOAT CHARTERS - FULLY CREWED CHARTERS - ASA SAILING SCHOOL

* Doyle Sail Loft & Canvas Shop * Raymarine Electronics * Refrigeration Work
* Mechanical & Electrical Repairs * Fibreglass Repairs * Laundry
* Vehicle Rentals * Showers * Air Travel
* Ice & Water * Diesel & Propane * Moorings
* Island Tours * Surftech Surf Shop * Hotel Reservations
* Quiksilver Surf Wear * Restaurant & Bar * Boutique
* On-site Accommodation * Wi-Fi / Internet Cafe * Book Exchange

PO Box 39, Blue Lagoon, St Vincent, West Indies
Tel. 1-784-456-9526 / 9334 / 9144 Fax. 1-784-456-9238

barebum@vincysurf. cor www. barefootyachts. cor

































I' ' is a ',in? "tnyp and smell the roses". In
1. world I -.. .I I ... this translates to "swim
I ly, he . , .1 ;. " P ,,- .n one small
coral reef cluster ... i .11 . I i ... ... .. the invisible
becomes visible, life appears and seems to multiply.
Searching out marine camouflage experts can be
particularly -r.-lrdin. I was snorkeling in Francis
Bay, St. Joh' I - I i I first time I came across the
i i .. i .i I' .i. 1.. 1 I thought I was seeing two
i1 , , *I .. .-I. that is, until I observed
one "'nimmini from the sandy seabed to feed on the
reef. . .. . sand, the stoplight parrotfish pales to
a ghostly, greyish white. As it leaves the sandy bottom
to feed on the reef, its color shifts to a vivid mixture of
orange-red, green and brown checkerboard.
Another :* ...... ,,,. ..... e e species is the pea
cock flouncy . ... . . these in a number of
places, but one of the more fun spots to search for


them is in the Tobago Cays where they are plentiful.
Peacock flounders like sandy seabeds where they hide
beneath a thin covering of sand. If you know what to
look for, though, you can discover them. When snorkel
ing over sand, keep your eyes peeled for pairs of small,


closely spaced bumps in the sand. These are the tell
tale signs of the eyes of a camouflaged peacock floun
der. Dive down for a closer inspection and chances are,
they will scoot out from under their san1 li: ;;i to
reveal their lovely blue rings or peacock "
I I 'i .... .. . marvel is the octopus. Octopi
ar I- .. i. .... . .... to observe and study. Our
first encounter with an octopus remains my favorite.
We'd been fortunate to get a mooring ball just off
Waterlemon Cay in St. John, USVI and chose to snor
kel directly from Daniell Storey.
My husband, Dave, brought
along our underwater camera.
As we approached the shallow
water on the south side of 4
Waterlemon, I startled a small
octopus and it darted off ahead
of me. N-t -1-.;:r to take my
eyes offol 1 i . .. a moment,
I swam after it, doing my best to
slow the growing distance
between us. Then, as I watched,
the little octopus wrapped itself
around a small rock and
"poofl" -disappeared! Staring
steadily, I slowly approached
the rock. As I watched, two
antenna-like eyes rose above
the rock, watching me. It was
so funny! Dave had not seen
the octopus and caught up to
me with a questioning look in
his eyes. I pointed to the rock.
He shrugged his shoulders. The
little octopus blended perfectly
with the mottling of the rock.
Dave photographed what he
could not see while I carefully
picked up the rock and trans


ferred the octopus to my fist where it seemed quite
content to rest while checking me out. It altered its
coloring to chestnut brown. For the next minute, the
three of us floated with the current while studying
each other. Then, just as suddenly as it had appeared,


the little octopus darted off my fist to a rock below,
perfectly camouflaging itself again.
One trick I've learned to increase my odds of finding
an octopus is identifying its den. Look for small piles
of whitewashed shells lying in front of crevices of large
rocks or coral. The cleaner the shells, the more recent
ly the octopus has dined on their contents. You might
even discover some shells with a perfectly round, small
hole drilled 1.. ...i. in m by the octopus, which has a
sin le tooth ,..I I . I... task


Above: The author with an octopus
resting on her glove


Left: Beyond camouflage, Stoplight Parrotfish can
also begin life as red colored females and change
to green males

My next favorite encounter with an octopus was in
Benure's Bay, Norman Island, BVI. I'd noticed a pile of
freshly harvested shells next to a large rock and dove
down to peer around the rock, but did not see any
octopus in the den under the rock. As I floated up,
sleeping on top of that very rock was a large octopus!
Again, it was so perfectly camouflaged that I had been
within inches of it and not seen it. I got Dave's atten
tion and he came over with the camera. This big fella
seemed to be in dreamland. We took a few pictures
and the camera flash finally aroused it from its sleep.
Unconcerned, it lazily made its way off the rock and
slowly moved across the seabed, fanning itself out
while morphing its color to a vivid robin's egg blue. I
was spellbound.
When scouting octopi, a few of my more successful
locations have included Grand Anse, Martinique;
Waterlemon Cay, St. John, USVI; Christmas Cove, St.
James, USVI; Benure's Bay, Norman Island, BVI; and
Tobago Cays, Grenadines.
Other marine camouflage experts we've sighted
include pigmy filefish hiding in gor.--
a seahorse anchored to a sea rod, - ,, i, , -,,,
stone-still on the scrabble seabed and a banded jaw
fish peeking its head through a hole lined with small
rocks. One ...... . .. - .-t that continues to elude
me, however. .- '11. I .i,- I that blends so perfectly
into surrounding orange, yellow or red sponges.
Maybe, just maybe some day I'll pause long enough,
and gaze steadily enough to get lucky.


Tl/From To Frem To/Fnim 1V i
RBBADOS GRENADA ST. VINCENT " PKI\ \TTE JI. I HANDLING SERVICES
* HEQUI|IIEQIIA MUNSTIQUE Private Jet rCarters ai.able
*CANOUAN * CANOUAN CANOUAN
*CARRIACIU I I NIN *UNION to undfrom allpoalns within Ihe
* NESTrIQl *CARRIACOU CARIBlE:AN & SMtTl ANMERICA















SGRENADA MARINE


il LMAU"IN@
SRIlINO
ELECTRONICS



TURBULENCE Ltd.


Deck layout specialist - Gears & Furlers in Stock
*New Sails * Repairs & Alterations *Custom Canvas
*Rigging: Spars \ Slanding and Running rigging
*Navtec hydraulic repair station *All seal kits in stock
*Yocht electricity and electronics
SPICE ISLAND MARINE - GRENADA MARINE - PORT LOUIS
Tel: (473} 439 4495
turbsail@spiceisle.com www-urtbulencliniled.com

The nmul in slling a buying a yac
Yral tUrirasn. wWmbe.ntMrd-a-llagIem


Top Cruising Kids' Field Trips

in the Caribbean

and How to Make

the Most of Them

by Nadine Slavinski

The Caribbean is not
just a great place to sail
it can also be a great
place to learn. Kids learn
(and remember what they
learn) best when they are
interested, active, and
involved. So take a field
trip and kindle the fire of
your cruising child's curi
osity: see a volcano in
action, hold a baby tur
tie, or climb over centu
ries of history.
A field trip is a great way
to link formal education
with real life experiences.
The problem with formal
learning alone is that it is
often too abstract to truly
captivate children. The
problem with a casual field '
trip on the i n elated, Defending the fort! Trips ashore can educational and
that it remains an isolated
experience without a link funfor sailors of all ages
to the big picture. That is
why a good field trip should be the middle of three steps.
First comes the preparation. Have your children list what they know or think
they know about the topic. Read background information to find out more and
dispel any misconceptions. If you pack the right books, you can read while underway
from one anchorage to the next (books suggested below are all slim volumes aimed
at readers in grades 1 1 ...- i. ). Generate a checklist of points to observe and ques
tions to answer during 1I 1 1 I I trip. A thorough checklist will turn your child into a
focused researcher rather than a casual tourist.
During the field trip, have your children take notes that answer their own ques
tions as well as the guiding questions listed. These are open ended questions that
can be pursued in various directions.
Finally, follow up afterwards with a small project that reinforces the lesson. This
could be a simple journal entry, a fictional story inspired by the field trip, or a hand
made "Kids' Field Guide to Volcanoes / Turtles / Plantations of the Caribbean." The
idea is to reconcile the child's previous knowledge with the new and to build connect
tons to academic subjects where possible.
So let's get going!
Volcano Field Trip
GUIDING QUESTION: What are the forces at work behind a volcano?
LOCATIONS: Sulphur Springs (St. Lucia), Soufriere (St. Vincent), St. Pierre
(Martinique)
SUGGESTED READING: Volcanoes! by Anne Schreiber (National Geographic Kids,
2008) or The Magic School Bus Blows its Top by Gail Herman (Scholastic, 1996).
Our planet is not simply a lump of rock but an active, changing, dynamic ball of
energy (a little like our kids!). For too many children, this concept is too abstract to
really internalize. But not if you visit a site like -.. i .... I ' ..... on St. Lucia, where
you can see boiling, bubbling mud, or Soufriere I - I ... ..I ere you can hike up
and peer into a steaming crater. Guides or park information boards can help you
turn the spectacle into a comprehensive lesson in Earth Science.
St. Pierre (Martinique) is a fascinating site because it shows the destructive power
of a volcanic eruption; ruins still dot the town and the museum there does a good
job documenting the 1902 event. If you are sailing near Montserrat, that would be
another chance to observe volcanic activity, though many cruisers avoid the island
because of reported problems such as ash clogging the engine exhaust.
Prepare with a book that covers types of volcanoes, lava, and eruptions, and the
environmental and social impacts of volcanoes. During the field trip, note the details
of your particular volcano. What type is it? Children can sketch what they see and
add subsurface features using their reading as a guide. Follow up by making your
own "Field Guide to Sulphur Springs." This lesson can be extended to consider the
Caribbean as a whole: Which islands were created by volcanic activity (Montserrat,
for instance) and which were not (Antigua)?
Turtle Field Trip
GUIDING QUESTION: How can we protect migratory sea animals?
LOCATIONS: i 1i i I .. I'urtle Sanctuary (Bequia); Tobago Cays
SUGGESTED II I 'I , Turtle: WatchMe Grow by Lisa Magloff (DK Publishing, 2006).
Many sea turtles call the Caribbean home, or at least include a stop there in their
vastmi* .ti-f. ".:t :.ji: ., ;.i... . 1 ... I i. I s suchasbeach develop
ment, e,,i ., , ... . I, .h-,,, ,, I- . ' I. , I ..- I i trip to a place where you
are likely to see turtles can be an excellent opportunity not only to learn more about
this interesting animal in particular, but also about environmental conservation.
On Bequia's windward shore, former fisherman Orton "Brother" King has estab
lished a turtle sanctuary where you can study turtles up close. Mr. King is very
personable and enjoys educating visitors. Although the scientific jury is out as to
whether captive reared turtles stand a better chance of survival than wild turtles
(suggesting that efforts to help 1 ,,i I I I I I I . I I at protecting nesting beach
es), the sanctuary demonstrate' ii, .1' I ',, 'I - I ' both visitors and locals and
therefore garners sympathy for the cause. (An article that considers the effectiveness
of the sanctuary can be found at: http://www.caribbeancompass.com/turtleok.
htm.) During their field trip, children can list, describe, and even sketch different
species, ask about tracking turtles, and inquire about conservation efforts.
The Tobago Cays Marine Park is a reliable location to view wild sea turtles: one
grassy area off Baradal Island is a sea turtle reserve, although I had more luck spot
ting turtles while snorkelling over sandy patches nearby.
-Continued on next page













continued from previous page
Keep your distance and note the turtles' features, activities, and pattern of move
ment. Afterwards, follow up with a report on turtles or a "Kids' Field Guide to Turtles
of the Caribbean."
Columbus Landing Field Trip
GUIDING QUESTION: What were the consequences of Columbus' "discovery?"
LOCATIONS: San Salvador (Bahamas), Cockburn Town (Grand Turk), Sainte
Marie (Guadeloupe)
SUGGESTED READING: The Story of Columbus by Anita Ganeri (Dorling
Kindersley, 2001) or the excellent website www.columbusnavigation.com by
Keith Pickering.
Too often, Columbus' "discovery" of the New World is presented as if it were an
isolated act. In fact, his arrival set a series of events in motion that had far-reaching
an1 t1 - -- --,- -;--- especially from the perspective of indigenous populations.
A .,i i i . * i.....us' landing sites can be the starting point for a broad
reaching inquiry.
Historians do not agree on the location of Columbus' first landfall in the New World
and in fact several places claim that distinction. Based on Columbus' description,
his route across the Atlantic, and backwards calculations from other islands, many
believe Europeans first touched the New World on Watlings Island (renamed San
Salvador) in the Bahamas. Others argue that Cat Island, Samana Cay, and Grand
Turk are also candidates. Today, monuments stand on these and other, confirmed
landing spots (including Sainte Marie, Guadeloupe).
Prepare for the field trip with background reading on Columbus and his four jour
neys. What were his goals and motives? How did he navigate? During the field trip,
find the context of that particular site. Is it a confirmed or a c. .., I I i ... i '
During which of his four journeys did Columbus land at thai i i i i.
stop before this spot and where did he go next?
A good follow-up to this field trip is to study place names of the Caribbean. Some
retain indigenous names, while others have European roots, reflecting changing
influences.
Indigenous Cultures Field Trip
GUIDING QUESTION: Who were the original inhabitants of the Caribbean and
what is their story?
LOCATIONS: Kalinago Cultural Center (Dominica), Trois Rivieres (Guadeloupe),
Carib's Leap (Grenada)
Imagine visiting Japan, but meeting only Koreans. Sounds silly, doesn't it? But
that is essentially the case in today's Caribbean, where the original inhabitants have
all but disappeared. The word Caribbean comes from the Carib i I . 11 . i, ...
was a European misunderstanding and not the correct term, i.... i ... .. .
Indian"). The earliest Caribbean settlers were the Siboney, followed later by the
Arawaks: among them, the Lucayo, Taino, and Kalinago. All perished as a direct or
indirect result of European contact. Some were killed or enslaved; most succumbed
to European diseases. They left few traces behind, and it is worth seeking the
remaining sites out as poignant reminders of the past.
On mountainous Dominica, however, a group of "Caribs" (properly called Kalinago)
held out and their descendants live on today. The fascinating Kalinago Cultural
Center is your only chance in the Caribbean to frame indigenous history within a
present-day context. The site is located on windward Dominica; you will need a
rental car or hired driver to get there. Tours are conducted by the Kalinago them
selves; the experience is unique and unforgettable.
If you can't make it to Dominica, visit southern Guadeloupe's Trois Rivieres, where
outstanding examples of rock art have been brought together in a beautiful garden
setting. Near Sauteurs in northern Grenada is an excellent visitor's center at Carib's
Leap, where the last indigenous islanders jumped off cliffs to their deaths rather
than be enslaved. Throughout the Caribbean, you can find examples of rock art,
though little else has survived the test of time.
Prepare by -- n.; the history of the "Caribs" in your Caribbean guidebook,
although you :.. i... I many gaps in the chapter -something your children can
later correct themselves! During the field trip, answer questions such as: What dis
tinguished the different indigenous groups from one another? Who are the Kalinago?
What was their culture like? Why are most of the indigenous islanders gone? Why
does history so often overlook native people? Follow up the visit by writing a more
detailed paragraph to be inserted into the history section of your guidebook.
Colonial Superpowers and Plantations Field Trip
GUIDING QUESTION: What was life like in the Caribbean two centuries ago?
LOCATI * - ...i.-i. Harbour ,,I,., ..i i rt Napoleon (Terre de Haut, Les
Saintes), .....I .. 11.11 (St. Kitts), I .1 - ...i (Dominica), Chateau Murat (Marie
Galante), Belmont Estate (Grenada)
SUGGESTED READING: Now Let Me Fly by Dolores Johnson (Macmillan, 1993).
This is the fictional story of a young girl stolen into slavery and taken to the New
World. Despite its North American setting, the story provides a good view into plan
station life and slavery.
Early Spanish explorers quickly passed by the outer islands on their quest to find
riches in the Greater Antilles and the Americas. However, the French, English, and
Dutch quickly recognized and exploited the agricultural potential of the islands.
They established plantations using African slave labor, growing spices and sugar,
Si ..ii... rum. Economic and political rivalry between the superpowers on the
ii ... i the Atlantic spilled over into the Caribbean, where forts were built to
protect their possessions.
Today, stone fortifications dot nearly every island. Several historic plantations are
also open for viewing, some of them as ruins (such as Chateau Murat on Marie
Galante), others still operating (such as the Belmont Estate on Grenada). The list
above is by no means complete; nearly every island has historic sites you can visit.
Prepare for your field trip by reading and discussing Caribbean history as related
in your guidebook. This can turn into a lesson on European history since many
1i- 1 -in-.-i1 h-nii - a result of wars and treaties written in a seemingly arbi
I ...... ... . Sometimes, slavery was abolished under French occupa
tion but re-established under the English! During the field trip, take notes on key
dates, including when the fort or plantation changed hands and the outside events
influencing them. What was life like in that era, for settlers and slaves? What inter
ests were being fought over? What was grown on this island? What was the pattern
of colonial trade? Consider who writes history and whether there is such a thing as
a neutral opinion.
Follow up by writing a historical fiction story from the point of view of a plantation
worker, settler, or soldier. Students can pick a real event as the background for the
fictional story.
This is only a short list of suggested field trips; it should give you many ideas as
to how to turn a casual visit into a valuable learning experience. Not only will your
children gain a deeper impression of the Caribbean, they will also be able to make
wider connections when back in school.

Nadine Slavinski is the author of Lesson Plans Ahoy! Hands * ... ........ , - .1,,..
Children and Home Schooling Sailors. Visit her website, .. .. .." .
many more educational things to do aboard.


- ABC M" A rfJlE









All you need for boating and fishing

for the best prices on Curacao.











) LCRISTEC


Your bottom is our concern


* Yacht storage maintenance and repair
* Teakworks, stainless and aluminum fabrication curacao
* AWL grip application and many other services I| 3 J U i j


phone.+ (5999) 4658936 email. info@curacaomarine.com


visit. www.curacaomarine.com














Sailor Samantha

Docks in St. Lucia

for Her First

Classroom Experienc

by Christy Recaii
If you saw school student Samantha Gray on cam-
pus, you probably ..1i i i .i. . . I ii. - not
bycarpool,butby I...I. i 1 I .. .1 - would
not know is that she has lived more than 99 percent
of her 14 years on a boat, and her stint at the
International School of St. Lucia (ISSL) is her very first
classroom experience.
"Generally on the first day of school when a mom
sends her kid off, usual ii ... ...... ...i
taller than the student," . .. ' - - - . .... .... .
first day of school. This was clearly not the case here,
as Samantha's first day happened a few weeks shy of
her 14th birthday, when she was just a few inches
shorter than her mom.
Mom and daughter, Karen and Samantha Gray,
along with Samantha's stepdad, Michael Hill, are a
cruising family sailing from Florida through the
Caribbean on their Rafiki 37 sailboat, Msichana. So
where are they from? Originally, Florida, but Sam, as
she is affectionately called, though born in Florida,
has spent the last 14 years cruising the Eastern
Caribbean. She and Karen had never planned to leave
the Eastern Caribbean, but when Sam's dad became
ill, they returned to Florida. After he passed away,
mom and daughter were looking to return to sailing,
which is when they met Michael, and it became a
serendipitous arrangement.
As a practical choice during hurricane season they
would typically find a secure harbour and utilize the time
on schooling, routine maintenance and cosmetic work
on the boat, as it is easier to do dockside. So why choose
St Lucia to spend hurricane season 2010? In 2000, they
spent about two years docked in St. Lucia and came to
favour the protection and facilities that the Rodney Bay
Marina (now under IGY) offers. The premiere reason
however, was Sam's attendance at 'land school'.


Samantha doing her homework in 'the hobbit hole'
aboard Msichana


Sam begins, "Somehow, somewhere, we knew I had
to take some kind of actual classroom schooling
because I never had that experience before. Mom and
I were both of the idea that if I am to go off to college
in two years..."
Karen finishes, "I didn't want her first classroom
experience to be as a freshman in college. I felt like she
should have some experience sitting in a classroom
with other students in a communal learning environ
ment with an actual teacher."
In 2008, before they left Florida to come cruising
again, Karen researched the International School of
St. Lucia online and thought it might be a good
'land schooling' choice. Samantha always home
schooled through the Calvert School, a private
school in Baltimore, Maryland, popular for home
schooling in the boating community. She usually
works along a calendar year versus a traditional
school schedule, which starts in September and
ends in June. The transition from her usual home
school to the new 'land school' schedule was not
smooth sailing for Sam when she arrived in St.
Lucia in June 2010.
"I finished my ninth grade work a week and half
before I stared tenth grade at ISSL. When I changed
grades in home-schooling, generally I didn't have
much of a break; it didn't matter because it would
be the same programme, just different material,"
she said.
Where as at ISSL she really needed that week to prepare.
"Something I had to get used to going to the
International School, was getting up at 6:15 every
morning. My mom has to iron my school clothes [uni
form], and I grab breakfast and head off to school."
Contrast that to the more relaxed schedule of home
schooling on Mshicana. She would get out her text
books and start school after breakfast, whenever
breakfast happened to be. Whenever she was hungry
she would have lunch.
"If I had done everything I was supposed to do for
that day I would stop. Or, if I had nothing else to do
for the next couple of hours I would start on the next
day's work." Samantha explained her home-schooling
daily schedule.
The home-schooling programme measures the
progress of a student by a week so Samantha would
sometimes crunch three days worth of work into
one day so she could take a couple of days off -free
of schoolwork.
Continued on next page


6JOTUN








TROPICAL WATERS:

Jotun :vdtl he BEST In sI polishlng only
Jotun 86:3l1~)Ti 0.7F 2 l UNu sd In life time

Jolun -ii .ai- ,ial tfhe ULTMAT comblnaton
of efficiency and service life
Jotun P.'.'.; copperfree for Aluminum vessels


JOTUN OFFERS ALSO A FuIL RANGE OF PRIMERS.
INmERMEDIATE-, W PCL AND TOPCOATS.
Technical InfonaRlli and Dealer Inquires
ECHO-MARINE - QUALITY COATINGS.
TRINIDAD
Te.:+1 868 634 4144 or 1072
eml: jotun@ecio-manne own
JOTUN is also available all Trn an lan t
shipyards as well as all branches of
ISLAND WATER WORLD * * * *
BEQUIA VENTURE In the GRENADINES
bequlaventure@vincysurf corn (7184) 458 3319


make your ': f. :;- and more comfortable. The table below, courtesy Don
Street, aut, , I -',.. I -. Guides and compiler of Imray -Iolaire charts, which
shows the time of the meridian passage (or zenith) of the moon for this AND next
month, will help you calculate the tides.
Water, Don explain -�nrnll- i tries to run toward the moon. The tide starts
running to the east - .. .11 . noonrise, continues to run east until about an
hour after the moon reaches its zenith (see TIME below) and then runs westward.
From just after the moon's setting to just after its nadir, the tide runs eastward;
and from just after its nadir to soon after its rising, the tide runs westward; i.e.
tide the floods from west to east. Timo- .i--n Ir local.
Note: the maximum tide is 3 or 4 I . - .11 ' 11i new and full moons.
For more information, see "Tides and Currents" on the back of all Imray Iolaire
charts. Fair tides!


February
DATE TIME
1 1055
2 1143
3 1227
4 1310 (new)
5 1351
6 1431
7 1512
8 1554
9 1638
10 1724
11 1814
12 1907
13 2002
14 2059
15 2157
16 2253
17 2349
18 0000 (full)
19 0043


20 0136
21 0230
22 0324
23 0419
24 0516
25 0612
26 0708
27 0801
28 0852
March
DATE TIME
1 0940
2 1025
3 1108
4 1150
5 1230 (new)
6 1311
7 1352
8 1435
9 1520
10 1604


1658
1751
1846
1941
2036
2131
2225
2319
000 (full)
0013
0108
0205
0304
0402
0500
0556
0649
0738
0824
0907
0949











-ontinued from previous page
"It's the difference between ---l-i;-n t ---r Dwn pace
and working at a communal p . i .. - .. I compare
ing the home-schooling and 'land school' learning styles.
Though on the ISSL schedule, Samantha has not
turned her back on her home-schooling days.


Simultaneously witn the ISSL, sne is still enrolled in
French and Geometry with the home-schooling pro
. from Calvert School, which she will resume
i,11 i.... at the end of the semester of ISSL. Normally
Karen, Sam and Michael would be on their way sail
ing at the latest December 1st, when the hurricane
season is over, but they had a change in plan when
they met International School of St. Lucia's Principal,
June Harkness.
"The International School celebrates diversity for the


island. We have made it something now that is expect
ed. When she comes to school on her scooter or in her
dinghy, the kids don't react as if that is unusual. The
kids came up with our motto 'Diversity. Unity.
Excellence.', and Samantha Gray represents all that,"
June Harkness said.
To complement her classroom experience, the ISSL
has afforded Sam a social one, through working in
Left: Msichana is Sam's full time home
and usual classroom
Below: Dinghy pooling
Right: Living aboard can be a science project.
Samantha plans on entering college when she turns 16


debate and even a Halloween Party. The family made a
commitment to stay dockside until the school semes
ter ended in January 2011.
As for life on Msichana? In a compact space every
thing has to be condensed. There is one central cabin,


including the galley and living space which doubles as
Samantha's work space, which the avid reader refers
to as her hobbitt hole" from the classic series The Lord
of the Rings. As Samantha gets older, home-schooling
becomes more of a challenge while living on a boat. It
becomes more demanding in terms of school supplies
and Internet access, as the Internet becomes an essen





I"^


tial home-schooling tool. Since a student's computer
use will quickly drain the boat's batteries, the family
installed an additional four solar panels just to keep
up with it. Moreover, Samantha plans on entering col
lege in the US to study computer graphics when she
turns 16, which is two years earlier than the average
college freshman in the US.
Samantha is thankful that her classroom experience
has provided experts to guide her i 1. ...
work with home-schooling she he - I i..... I .i1
on her own. Karen is interested in seeing her transition
back to home-- 1 i... ii .. .... But for now, they are
looking forward I 11. .. 1 ... i . 2011, which is head
ing south to Grenada and sticking to a sailing schedule
almost entirely dependent on the weather.
Christy Recaii is a Saint Lucian journalist who has
a passion for sailing. She is a Hunter College gradu
ate with a BA in Media Studies. You can find her
either on the water or the docks seeking out the next
marine scoop!


Better Boat Insurance















. &.
RI S ON







It's about time!!

Any Boat. Anywhere. Anytime.


www. BetterBoatlnsurance.corn
800-773-0105 or 284-494-8925
Camfen * North America * Bahamas * Si * Ewom


THE WORLDS FINEST HIGH SCHOOL
AND COLLEGE PREP PROGRAM
HAS NOW OPENED IN THE CARIBBEAN

www.AdventureHighSchool.org











* Full High School Grades 9,10,11 & 12
* University and College Prep
* Individualized Student Programs so that faster students are not held
back while students that need more attention are not left behind
* Individual and group tutoring
* Special Guided Education Programs for Boat Owners, Cruisers,
Travelers, or Anyone Doing Home Schooling With Limited Access
to Educational Guidance and Materials.
* Full four year programs, Single year programs, One month booster
or tutoring programs. Individual tailored programs as needed.
Due to personalized programs, midterm enrollment is possible.
Summer catch up or advancement programs available.
Graduates receive a US DIPLOMA
www.AdventureHighSchool.org Phone: (800) 927-9503
adventurehighschool@ gmail.com




























FEBRUARY 2011
Y ARIES (21 Mar - 20 Apr)
Jupiter, the planet of positivism and good humor, has
I;--- I1 I .t -.- I I1 should make this month a
S.. . e1 . i 1. perfect time to have a party
on the poop deck and spread some joy around.
STAURUS (21 Apr - 21 May)

your creative cruising projects.
I GEMINI (22 May - 21 Jun)
While boat business is in the doldrums it's a good time
to do some preventative maintenance on board to be pre
pared for the time when aspects improve.
CANCER 0 (22 Jun - 23 Jul)
Romance ill .. . . - - - .- - - - -. - -if
of the month. I ...
you back on course.
Q LEO (24 Jul - 23 Aug)
Your . ... . . .... . second
two wee I I . ... . . i . I. i 1 i i I i .. your
spirit a is . I
TH VIRGO (24 Aug - 23 Sep)
Any choppy waves in your love life will be smoothed by
the calm seas of patience and good humor, and these will
also help you deal with any fluky winds in unusual ship
board projects.
_ LIBRA (24 Sep - 23 Oct)
Boat business is still in the doldrums and you will find
difficulty in seeing the humorous side of sailing life.
Concentrate on creative stimulation to distract you, and it
will be fresh breezes and clear skies before you know it.
TUi SCORPIO (24 Oct - 22 Nov)
Frustrating winds in creative boat prrl-to "11 switch
direction to make you tack onto a ... 11. I ,1 bring
S i .... I .. m then on it
S111 i II I I a i . I i firm hand
SSAGITTARIUS (23 Nov - 21 Dec)
'l11l 1 f l - - .-- -i --.-f;1 -. .-;-.. ; tl. . :.ti.l
I-, I N I . .......1 fl, ,

SCAPRICORN (22 Dec - 20 Jan)
The dominant aspect this month for you is romance.
Clear the decks before the 4th and welcome the winds of
love into your sails.
^ AQUARIUS (21 Jan - 19 Feb)
While business is suffering slack sails, redirect your
energies on a course to complete inventive projects
aboard. Then you'll be prepared when aspects are more
positive; they're just over the horizon.
S PISCES (20 Feb - 20 Mar)
iI i .... . I I I . the dock, there will be other
S.n. i ... nth to express your cruising
i, a positive way that will pay off before


DARWIN,


THE


BOAT DOG



All of a sudden the sky turned dark
For Caribbean sailors Liesbet and Mark
Their happy family consisting of three
Would not remain the way it used to be
Multiple trips to the vet didn't lie
Their beloved dog was going to die
Malignant tumors while still in his prime
It would only be a matter of time
They cried and hoped and did their best
But all that occurred was his final rest
Nothing else they could have done
Darwin, the boat dog, is forever gone
These cruisers never wanted to find out
What life without dogs would be about
Who will protect them out at sea?
Who will greet visitors on S/VIrie?
No more Darwin to hug and to pet
No more good times at the beach to be let
No more dog kisses right in the face
No more barking to guard his space
The Caribbean Sea is salty from tears
'i ... ...I I i . vill last for years
S,, i onto the beach
"Time heals all wounds" is what they preach
Darwin, the boat dog, was special and smart
He found a spot in many people's heart
He sailed and walked all over the place
Wagging his tail and a smile on his face
Wherever he went, whatever the joy,
He always looked like a comfy boy
He lived a great life before passing away
He'll be missed and remembered every day!


- Liesbet Collaert



Liesbet Collaert wrote an information packed two part series on 'Cruising the Eastern Caribbean with Your
Dog', which was published in the November and December 2010 issues of Caribbean Compass. The information
was based on S/V Irie's first-hand experiences checking in at various ports of entry from the Virgin Islands to
Trinidad with Darwin aboard.


Johnson Hardware Ltd

FOR YOUR MARINE HARDWARE, AND MORE


Chain & Rope
Anchors & Fenders
Electric Wire
Marine Hoses
Bilge Pumps
Lubricants & Oils


Stainless Fasteners
Stainless Fittings
VHF Radios
Flares & Life Jackets
Snorkeling Equipment
Fishing Gear


Antifouling Paint
Paint Brushes
Epoxy Resins
Sanding Paper & Discs
Hand & Power Tools
Houseware & Cookware


R o d n e y B ay[--]Lil [ , iii ." L u ci a I I T e l : ( 7 8 5 2 9-Ia : ( 5):5 3 1e - a-I I I *, : ,I ] -' ]l7 II


'sI
a Tc

oe



















Slittl- irl *out ... . ",Granny
F IR E On e n .... .. . ...... tot" I . weusedto

FIRE ON boys run'."
"Is that the mountain we can see behind your cottage?"
'The very one. And during the dry season, here in Trinidad, we often saw
--OE M O U U T A IN fires on that very mountain and in other places too. We could see the flames
Leaping high, blood red at night and when the wind blew this way we could
U smell the smoke."
S"Weren't you frightened, Granny? I would be."
B.*M iO S R UNN B BeYhli Re "I shivered in bed at night, doux-doux, I was so scared."
I "I hope we don't have any fires while I'm staying with you, Granny, and if we
* did, would we have to run away like in the game?"
t Beth lived in a suburb of Port of Spain and her parents had sent her to stay
with her grandmother in the high Northern Range during her school break.
S-- * . - -. "I hope not, doux-doux, but you never can tell. Anyhow, after I've made us a
Sn- mug of cocoa tea, I'll tell you about a brave little girl who lived even closer to
the mountain."
1 , Beth went into the kitchen with her granny and watched the old lady as she
S " r '' , grated the hard stick of cocoa to add to the pot o' ---rin. milk. The cocoa
melted and rich globules of cocoa butter floated on I -... I . Granny bought
her cocoa sticks from the village women who collect the cocoa beans, grind them and roll them between their palms, and Beth
S- that granny's cocoa was much better than the cocoa her mother made from the powder in the tin.
i- .. Granny was settled in her big, comfy armchair with Beth on a cushion at her feet, she began, "Totty was just six years
old when a big fire blazed up on the mountain."
"But how did it start?" interrupted Beth.
"Sometimes boys on walks to the waterfall below the mountain break bottles on the trail just for fun and when the sun falls
on the glass it sets the dry grass smoldering until it bursts into flame and the wind carries it up the mountain. Sometimes
people light fires to barbecue their chicken and just an ember left behind will blaze -r 7 "
I ii. i i .i . iter a drink of the cocoa tea she said, "Go on with the story
Si . i the fire all night until, just as dawn was breaking, she burst into tears at the thought of all the poor
little animals caught in the blaze. So, drying her eyes, she dressed and ran out of the house. She ran all the way up the moun
tain and arrived just as the sun came up. Totty heard the cries from the little animals that were caught with the fire raging
behind them, so she rushed through the smoke and picked up as many of the small ones as she could carry and stumbled
down the path, hoping that the others would follow. But all of a sudden Totty saw that another fire had started lower down
the mountain and was racing towards her. Trapped! There was only one thing that poor, terrified Totty could do and she did
it. She leaped over the waterfall, animals and all, 'in -1-lin 1; 11 that had followed, just like the Pied Piper of Hamlin. They all
S.. 1 1 I '1ie shallows and were safe behind the I .11- i" the fire passed over their heads."
S..... what a wonderful story -.. . i I i. "I like happy endings, don't you?"
"All my stories have happy endings, i
THE END

"Fire on the Mountain, Run, Boys, Run" is one of a number of ring or circle games, similar to Ring Around the Rosie and Brown
Girl in the Ring, that originated in Africa and came to the Caribbean with the slaves. The person standing in the centre of the
circle calls out "Fire on the mountain, run, boys, run." The children in the outer circle turn and run around the circle. Those on the
inner circle stand with arms raised representing trees. When the person standing in the centre says, "Fire is out", all runners and
the centre player try tofind a partner by standing behind a tree. The one who does notfind a partner becomes the centre caller.
Al partners change places and the game goes on.
"Fire on the mountains, run, boys, run" is also a well knownfiddle tune with Scots Irish origins. Scots-Irish people came to the
Eastern Caribbean as indentured servants after the prohibition of slavery. String band music is still popular on many islands,
and Carriacou features string bands at its annual Maroon Festival.







-----------------------------------
I them. As the water recedes, the air can expand suddenly and crack the rock *
I (hydraulic action).
1 - The waves pick up small rocks and stones and debris from the sea bottom and
''" from the beach and fling them at the cliffs. The stones gradually knock off pieces
. p (u of rock and wear away the rock face in a process called abrasion or corrasion.
SSome rocks will dissolve as they are hit by acidic sea water (corrosion).
S ,1Powerful waves can move around the stones already on a beach so that they
S ' grind against each other and become worn down to smooth pebbles (attrition).
S || VThe amount of erosion which occurs in any place depends on the geology of that
iJ / IDO L Y place. Hard rocks like granite do not erode as easily as softer rocks like chalk or
limestone. Coastal formations like caves, arches and stacks are more usually
I T [7 T h 01 ~DI C> found in areas of softer rock.
1DE E P S E C R E T FFdmIHuman try to halt the movement ofsand 1 1.... 1 from beaches by building
Sgroynes (breakwaters). While these may be -.. -. II for a particular location, |
by Elaine Ollivierre they can have a detrimental effect on other places. For example, sand may be col
1-t I t- hi-nd .r-� -n one beach while further down-current, the next beach
... I I I I - ... Mangroves can help to hold the sand and prevent ero-
sion so it's important not to cut them down.
We have looked at the ways in which coastal shores can be protected. What do
we need to protect them from? We need to manage coastal erosion so that our
beaches do not disappear. DOLLY'S W ORD QUIZ
Coastal erosion is a natural process and occurs continuously as a result of
weathering of the coastal rocks. The action of wind, rain and waves gradually
wears away the rocks. Bits of land (stones, rock shards, soil, etc.) are carried away Match te words to their meanings
from the shoreline and deposited elsewhere. Erosion occurs when sediments are Match e words to ther
lost from a particular area but sometimes, the opposite happens and deposits 1. Abrasion/corrasion a) wearing away of soil and rock by forces of nature
actually add to the shoreline. This is called accretion. 2 Accreon b wearing away of rocks by her
How do wind and rain cause coastal erosion? The wind picks up tiny particles 2 Accretion ) wearing away of rocks by - n t h nd ar
of dust and whips them against the coastal cliffs. This sandblasting eventually Hydraulic action ) growing in size
wears away the rocks. Acid rain eats away at te rocks. 5. Erosion e) wearing away of rocks by chemical action
SHow do waves cause coastal erosion? There are four main ways.
* The waves hit the coastal rocks and cliffs with great force, especially in
Storms and tsunamis. The force of the waves pounds the rocks and can break I
them up. If there are air pockets in cracks in the rocks, the wave compresses -Answers on page 45
I---------------------------------m













Basil's Bar " """ " 1 'g ''L.
Mustique GUEVARA, THE MAN
Che Guevara, by Nick Caistor, MacMillan Education, ISBN 978-0-230-0125-9,
�2009, paperback 152 pages, plus index.
Visitors to Mustiqu ar invited to: . of Rocinante," Emesto'Che' Guevara wrote
Id',... .. . 1.e. Don Quixote's broken down nag. It was on
TTT '.i , ".l, F-T "Ti -.I i 1 i . , 1 f,1 Id'sTen
I II I I I I I 1 tew face
11 I I I I II I I I I I L and
I I ,1 II II i I II I , I, Iand
catch hupontLe 1 i I . 1 1chl0am o- 6m, and D-ner 7 30
ntllate. Come I I , attend the 1 ,1
and BBQ. Basl's Bar s home of the onlBlues Festval m the Canbb I
Festal takes place from Jary 26 - February 9, 2011. Call (784) 4888350 or VHF 68.
- l- �,I I1 1 i i I , ,I i i, ,,erfectfor island oy
tIp I I , I plu ots of T s tsto

BASIES GREAT GENERAL STORE: There is nothing general about Basal's Great General
Store. B. f 1 1 rench wines, cheese from Euope, gomet ams and saues.
" + t I nusu l,,ilecion of books not to e sed. Fne foods m Paradise.

ACROSS FORE\TF i 1 , 1 wth anhtques from Bah and India.
Across Forever has ; II II from Asia and beyond, contemporary
S- ms, ll I , accessories and more. Slhppin s easily a
I I Call
Visitors to St Vincent are invited to:
BASIESBA', 1i I 18th , 111 1111 , Air
cond.honed, II I 1 1 1 1 I II i 1 eals are
some ofthe est on the sla I I I II II,
S- I , I II SPAlocated m Villa across from Young Island. Also At
II , II I I , furnture, contemporary pieces from Asia and beyond,
and r I ra new coffee shop by the sea.
Call '
V'sit Basil's in Mustique or St. 'Vncent
www.basilsbar.com basils@vincysurf com


the eve of his giving up a comfortable desk job in Havana and striking out to make
revolution in the Congo with 16 other Cubans. The excursion was a disaster. He would
be shot dead in Bolivia two years later at the age of 39 -a martyr to his idea of a
united socialist Latin America, a romantic fool with a gun who tilted at deadly windmills
once too often, or an evil lapdog of ri 1 1 -'. .t;- 1: .i. 1 the death warrants of hun
dreds of counter-revolutionaries. i . I , I i .- I i .. , i. cannot help but be biased
by his or her own political views, but the author tries to give us glimpses of Guevara,
the man. In an ironic twist, Che's name may be synonymous with revolutionary, but in
the 21st Century his visage has been used to sell a wide range of corporate products
aimed at the 'rebel' consumer. Mike Tyson and Diego Maradona sport Che tattoos.
Che's life began in 1928 in Rosario, - . ,, ... I . I. 1 m Cuba where he fought
Batista's troops and achieved the ran} ...... I ... (the revolution's highest)
before being granted Cubar. I .. - .. I ...... . ... .... .stro's cabinet.
His mother was well-to-do .. �1.- .11 . .. .. 1 ..- ... i - . .... to better their
lives. As a child, Ernesto was stricken with asthma and was home-schooled until
nine, which caused him to be close to his mother and gave him a love of books. His
family moved to the hills outside Cordoba in an effort to give him a better climate for
his lungs, and when Ernesto was a teen he played rugby with abandon and was
known as a fearless daredevil, though he would suffer asthma attacks all his life.
As a young man, Ernesto studied medicine at the University of Buenos Aires and
longed to see the world outside of the city. His parents separated and an early love
affair with a wealthy young heiress fell apart, so Err.l -t- .;n . t-ries of travels
during his summers when he was off school. First he '. I _ ..... - in six weeks
on a powered bicycle, and later rode a Norton 500 motorcycle with an old friend from
Cordoba, Dr. Alberto Granada. On this second trip they traveled to the copper mines
of Chile and witnessed the exploitation of the workers; it was the beginning of the
awakening of Ernesto's social conscience. They traveled to a leper colony in the
Amazon region of Peru where on his 24th birthday the young medical student spoke
eloquently of a united Latin America, before heading downriver into Brazil. They
stopped in Letitia, Colombia, where the two Argentines coached the local football
team, and Che played goalie. The two then went by plane, bus, and truck to Caracas,
Venezuela, where Dr. Granada stayed to work. The diary Che kept during this trip
was the basis for the 2004 film 'The Motorcycle Diaries'.
Che went back to Buenos Aires to complete his medical degree at age 25. After he
graduated, he set off by train with another childhood friend, Carlos Ferrer, to Bolivia,
Peru and Ecuador. Carlos continued on to Caracas to meet Dr. Granada according to
plan, but Ernesto changed his mind. He had met new Argentine friends and he trav
eled with them by ship to Costa Rica, a thriving democracy in 1953, where he met
exiled Cuban revolutionaries for the first time. These Cubans had fled after unsuc
cessfully attacking the Moncado barracks in July, 1953. Sixty-one of their comrades
had been taken prisoner and executed, but their leader, a young lawyer named Fidel
Castro, defended himself in court and was given 15 years. A year later Castro was
released, however, and he fled to Mexico City to join his brother Raul.
Ernesto, meanwhile, hitchhiked into Guatemala City, where the democratically
elected President Arbenz wished to introduce leftist reforms. Che suffered asthma
attacks and was nursed by a Peruvian revolutionary, Hilda Gadea, about whom he
wrote: "Hilda declared her love in epistolary and practical form. I was feeling very bad
with asthma, otherwise I might have made love to her. I warned her that all I could
offer her was a casual contact, nothing definitive. She seemed very put out. The short
letter she left me when she went is very good. Too bad she is so ugly."
-ontinued on next page


FREE CRUISING GUIDES


m. kJ - DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
IRepu blice
� i Cude CRUISING GUIDE
www.dominicanrepubliccruisingguide.com

34aiti HAITI

Cus CRUISING GUIDE
www.naiticruisingguide.com

Siam.ica JAMAICA

u'I:g CRUISING GUIDE
www.lamaicacruisingguide.com

j rnidAJ TRINIDAD
Cruise CRUISING GUIDE
www.trinidad ruisingguide.com

.. ` CAYMAN ISLANDS

"" " CRUISING GUIDE
www.caymanislandscruisingguide.com
COMPLIMENTS OF


t MARINA ZAR-PAR
Boca Chica, Dominican Republic
www.marinazarpar.com












Continuedfrom previous page
In June of 1954, President Arbenz was ousted in a CIA-backed coup for the ben
efit of the United Fruit Company; Hilda was arrested as a member of the Peruvian
Communist party. Ernesto fled with other exiles to Mexico City where she joined him
in November. When Hilda became pregnant Ernesto married her, but rather than
settle down, he became a revolutionary, too. Ernesto had met Raul and Fidel Castro
-both were at his I i.... . I i. .. and he began guerilla and weapons training
with them and their , . I .1 -I ...I nding to be their physician. He acquired the
nickname Che, which is Cuban slang for an Argentine.
Che worked at the general hospital until the exiles moved to a ranch in May 1956
to pursue full-time training. He said good-bye to Hilda and their three-month-old
daughter and wrote in his diary that her birth had "put a stop to a disastrous mar
riage" and had freed him to leave: "My inability to live with her mother is even
greater than the affection with which I look on her. For a while I was worried that a
combination of my delight with the child and consideration for her mother (who in
many ways is a fine woman, and who loves me in an almost unhealthy way) would
end up turning me into the boring father of a family.... But now I know it isn't so."
In November 1956, 81 men set out from Tuxpan, Mexico on the leaky 60-foot cabin
cruiser Granma; most were seasick on the crossing to Cuba. They encountered hos
tile fire upon landing but managed to flee into the Sierra Maestra mountains, where
their discipline and a sympathetic peasantry allowed them to thrive, grow, and even
tually defeat Batista's forces of 15,000 well-equipped men.
Che was promoted to captain for his leadership and guerrilla skills, and a crucial
moment came when the small band he led were on the run and he chose to carry a
box of ammunition instead of his doctor's kit. Before the revolutionaries began their
offensive, Che was promoted to comandante; he led his troops in a decisive battle on
their march to Havana, which he entered before Fidel. Batista fled on January 1st,
1959, and in the first months of th- n--- f--~rnm.nt .h- 71n-- ti- -l-.t. sen
tences of hundreds of "torturers" *.. I ...... - i ' ' i I. '.. i 11. I .1...-.".He
also toiled as Minister of Industry, trying without much luck to diversify Cuba's
manufacturing base. He was appointed chairman of the Cuban National Bank after
Fidel burst into a late night meeting of his advisors and demanded, "Who here is a
good economist?" Che alone raised his hand and later confessed, "I thought he said,
'WI- -1.- i. :- 1 --n;n :t'" The anecdote indicates how decisions were made
in - . . I. - I i.I - . i I. . Che also se i . i . . .. . .
and wrote and published Reminiscences of the ..... ii i i .i I i, .i i i I'
had published in Castro's Cuba was Cervantes' Don Quixote.
The rest of Che's story is now history. Relations quickly soured with the USA after
the CIA's disastrous incursion at the Bay of Pigs in 1961. Soviet Premier Khruschev
welcomed his new comrades in Cuba with open arms, establishing nuclear missiles
in Cuba before removing them in October 1962 and making a secret pact with
Kennedy that the USA wouldn't invade Cuba. It was the closest that the two super
powers would come to nuclear war, and Cuba was but a pawn in the middle. As
Castro was pulled closer to the USSR, Che's militant ideology clashed with the
Soviets' more cautious approach, and some suggest that Castro sent Che abroad in
1965 to get rid of a potential troublemaker.
Che's secret mission to aid other Marxist rebels in the Afric , '-,, ---- dismal
failure. He wrote in his diary that the rebel troops were I I I .'' oherent
political education: "They consequently lack revolutionary awareness or any forward
looking perspective beyond the traditional horizon of their tribal territories. Lazy and
undisciplined, they are without any spirit of combat or self-sacrifice... (and are) the
poorest example of a fighter I have ever come across." In six months Che had
returned to Cuba incognito, where he planned another secret mission to Bolivia. The
Bolivian experience was even worse. Che's ragtag band was turned in to the author
ities by the local peasants, and after enduring great hardship on the run, Che was
captured and executed in October 1967. His body was returned for a ceremonial re
burial in Cuba in 1997.
In Cuba, Che had remarried and fathered at least four children, but he was not in
any way a family man. His r- .t- t 1--- . served for the world's oppressed, but
his idea that a small band I ..... I ...-.. . ,,� - �ould successfully pull off a Marxist
revolution now seems quai: .I . I .. I
The author, a Latin American expert for the BBC, presents his facts with great
sympath-- ----n r-f-r-ri- to the poet Robert Lowell's description of Che as "the last
armed ' I I . .. ' 1 I 1 of the Introduction. Yet he concludes that Che's style of
armed insurrection failed miserably in El Salvador and Guatemala. In Nicaragua, the
Marxists were eventually voted out of power after the US-backed ''"rt;. ' . 1
usi: . 1. .. 1 ,, 1. i. ... . ... (Though he doesn't mention it, I . ... . i - i i
in ... i i .I . i I I ard-liners murdered the more moderate Maurice
Bishop, his loyal cabinet members, and many innocent civilians in October 1983.)
Through it all, Che's angry visage still adorns many T-shirts worldwide, a testa
ment to his ferocious will and his legend as a true revolutionary. Nick Caistor pres
ents all of this and more in a lucid and compact paperback, with excellent, if some
what grainy, black-and-white photographs.
This book is available from bookstores or from www.macmillan caribbean.com.




DIESEL OUTFITTERS N.y.
Marine Engineers
St. Nlaaricnl

Pcrklnf -,l. D...",
. . .. 'I ItI . T




Overhauls, and Service to all Diesel I
Marine and Industrial Generators
Hurth & Borg-Warner Gearboxes
Fuel Injectors Service
S 'Donaldson Filters

Cel: +599 7 - . 7
: Ti, 1. . - +599 544 ' '."-


the frangipani

hotel, bar & restaurant, bequia
Warm & friendly atmosphere
Spectacular views * Quality accommodation
Fine dining * Excellent selection of wines


Don't miss our Thursday BBQ &Jump up
RO. Box 1 BQ, Bequia, St.Vincent& the Grenadines, W.I.
Tel: (784) 458-3255 * Fax:(784)458-3824
reservations@frangipanibequia.com * www.frangipanibequia.com


ANTGUMA_ ...
wmw . .lUIq ,, ,,,-" .-


ME m fw D "ME

Tel: 481.3200 * Fax: 481.3202


6 aUMOO SONY 1 cosco Er
SPanasonic SAP l COSCO ter


Quokity "Wct

























































W` REMEMBER

to tell our advertisers you

saw their ad in Compass!


THE SKY IN FEBRUARY

by Scott Welty

The Planets in February
MERCURY -Very near the sun... No Mercury for you this month!
VENUS - ....... - .. all month, rising at approximately 0400 hours.
EARTH - ... II..... on the stove.
MARS -See Mercury... same story!
JUPITER -Sets between 2000 and 2100 hours all month.
SATURN -In Virgo and rising between 2030 and 2200 hours.
Sky Events This Month
2nd New Moon
7th Jupiter setting with the crescent moon at approximately 2100 hours.
18th Full Moon
20th Saturn rises with the moon at approximately 2200 hours.
28th - Venus rises with the pretty crescent moon (see Figure 1).


Venus and crescent Moon -February 28th at 0530 hours


n Ovet. Lu� urlu tVuuumorf. nuLurly ulrz uw r uflutrypuotJtutr rtI
structure of the telescope

Below: The Winter Triangle and using Orion's belt to find Sirius.
Looking southeast in the early evening


Y


Real sailors use Street's Guides for inter-island and harbor
piloting directions, plus interesting anecdotes of people,
places and history. Street's Guides are the only ones that
describe ALL the anchorages in the Eastern Caribbean.
NEW! Street's videos, first made in 1985,
are now back as DVDs.
* "Transatlantic with Street" documents a sailing passage
from Ireland to Antigua via the Cape Verdes. 2 hours
* "Antigua Week '85" is the story of the engineless yawl lolaire
rang round the buoys to celebrate her 80th birthday. 1 hour
S"Street on Knots" demonstrates the essential knots and
line-handling skills every sailor should know. 1 hour
* "Streetwise 1 and 2" give tps that appeared in the popular vdeo
Sailing Quarterly, plus cruises in the Grenadines, Venezuela and
southwest coast of Ireland
DVDs available at Imray, Kelvn Hughes, Armchair Sailor/
Bluewater Books, and www.street-lolaire.com.
Full information on DVDs at www.street-lolaire.com
HURRICANE TIPS! Visit www.street-lolaire.com for a wealth of
information on tracking and secunng for a storm.
Street's Guides and DVDs are available
at all Island Waterworld stores and at Johnson's Hardware,
or from www.iUniverse.com and www.seabooks.com


The Brightest Star in the Sky
SThe brightest star in the sky (not count
ing our sun of course) is Sirius, also called
the Dog Star as it is the brightest star in
the constellation Canis Major. It's easy to
find Sirius now. Look east. Look up. Find
Orion. Follow the three stars of his belt
back downward to the bright star (See
Figure 3). That's Sirius. Its rising in the
early --rn ;n days of summer led to the
phrase I . days of summer". This also
was a signal to the ancient Egyptians that
the yearly Nile floods (both a good and bad
event) were about to recommence.
No wonder it is the brightest star in our
sky... It is twice as big as our sun and
ONLY nine light years away. That's close!
Like about half of the stars in the sky,
Sirius is a double star. Its companion is
actually a white dwarf. A white dwarf is a
remnant of a star that has burned up its
nuclear fuel and collapsed down on itself.
This will be the future of our good old sun
in about two billion years* (maybe it's time
to quit putting stuff offi). This particular
dwarf has about the same mass as our
sun in a package the size of the Earth.
That makes the density of the 'stuff crazy
big such that if you could stand on this
thing you'd weigh 400,000 times your
Earth weight! So, no, you wouldn't be
standing. You'd be a puddle. You won't be
able to see the companion with your
Steiners. It's to close to Sirius and gets
washed out. A large telescope can resolve
the two, though. Figure 2 shows Sirius
and its companion photographed in the
x-ray region of the spectrum.
Sirius is also one member of the Winter
Triangle asterism. An asterism is a shape
that can be seen by connecting stars
together that are actually members of other
constellations. The summer triangle is
another such example. The winter triangle
is made up of Sirius (in Canis Major),
Betelgeuse (in Orion) and Procopyon (in
Canis M:.. . - ..... 3.
In the - .. I . I . . I -ight stars such as
Sirius wer ... i i .,.i i i, .ii . .
tion. The ., 1 I - .... . i . I I . ,
--. -lictly overhead on the island of
Sii. i 17� S).
To Contemplate While Having a Glass
of Wine on Deck
Yes, our sun is doomed. In a billion years
or so it will inflate to become a red giant. All
our seas will boil away. No more - ..i...
Rocks will melt. Then it will blow
outer layers in a nova explosion and col
5 lapse down to a white dwarf. Everything
ever written, built or accomplished here on
Earth will be gone. Will we have migrated to
another star system before that, and more
importantly will the Chicago Cubs have
won even one stinking World Series?
* I --- .i--in. - t- lk one time and relating
the:...... 1 . - .... when a listener raised
his hand and asked, "Did you say billion or
million?" "Billion," I responded. The gentle
man wiped his brow and let out a, "Whew....
I just looked at him and asked, "Whats the
matter, did you have a haircut appoint
ment or something?"

Scott Welty is the author of The Why Book
of-i. I'',ii
( . . .. . . . , . .. . Science"?
E mail Scott at weltysail@gmail.com.














I1 �]- T E SP*ICE LOCKER I B SIRI' Y H'AILi


Seeing RED?


It's Roucou!

During your off the-boat explorations have you ever
seen a bottle filled with what looks like pure red paint
at a vegetable stand? No, it is not local island ketchup,
tomato sauce, or even make-up. It is roucou.
- v.a : I � i


Not so many years ago, roucou (or "oucou") was used
throughout the islands to color and flavor many foods.
Now, as with many traditional foods that take some
time to prepare, it is seldom seen unless at vending
stands along the less-traveled roads, although recently
some islands were preparing a banana ketchup using
roucou for the red color. It was difficult to discern it
from traditional tomato ketchup.
Roucou, sometimes known as annatto, comes from
the fruit of the achiote, botanically the bixa orelana
tree, native to Central and South America. The
Caribbean has two types of roucou trees, the most
common is the red, but there is a green variety that
never gets red even when it dries.
Roucou is usually a short, attractive evergreen
shrub, but it can grow to more than 20 feet with shiny
heart shaped leaves that sometimes have reddish
veins. The three inch pale pink blossoms bear a
strange, hairy fruit that is heart-shaped with prickly
spines. It may be yellow, red or maroon. Red is the
most common variety. When ripe, the pod splits in half
to reveal about 50 seeds encased in a red pulp.
The pulp is termed bidn and Amerindians used it as
war paint an' I -. . -1 ..1....i ..1. .tive color to
theirbodies v l. i . I .... i ... II. -.... and insects.
Amerindians -"i "ii ,- I , - I- as an aphro
disiac. After the explorers encountered Amerindians
Mayans, Incas, and Aztecs -colored in brilliant
red, achiote was imported to Europe in the 1500s and
commercial cultivation began in India two centuries
later.
The pulp is processed to produce a commercial dye
and the seeds are dried to make a rust-colored paste,
used for coloring foods such as rice, smoked fish, oil,
and cheese. Blocks of this achiote paste can be bought
in Mexican markets.
As an herbal remedy, a mixture of roucou pulp and
seeds boiled in oil makes a salve that helps heal small
cuts and burns, preventing scarring .,, i , ....
decoction of the leaves and pulp : I ,
stomach disorders such as indigestion and will help
asthma. Roucou leaves in a bath will be refreshing.
Leaves heated in oil will reduce the pain of a headache
when pressed to the forehead.
If you want to impress friends at your next cockpit or
beach gathering, tr- ---1-;; ---ith a bit of roucou oil.
Everyone has had II - .11. .. rice, but use roucou
to create a pink rice dish by adding a tablespoon to the
water when you are boiling the rice.
Roucou Oil
1/2 Cup cooking oil
2 Tablespoons roucou seeds
I;.; ;; r-r t- f.-i" r .t the-t ile oil over medium
. I , ........ , , stirringcontinu


ously. Heat for one more minute. Allow to cool. Strain
or not depending on the intended use. Refrigerate.
Roucou Seasoning
This is what you see bottled at roadside stands.
Pick at least a gallon of roucou pods, cut and scrape
out the seeds. Do this carefully with a teaspoon
because everything stains! 1 i. 11.... . 1 an
bucket and cover with ck .,, i, -1., I . 11 to
soak for at least a day. Strain the water into another
bucket. Rub the seeds between the palms of your
hands to remove any remaining pulp; I recommend
wearing latex gloves and not getting too splashy.
Strain again and repeat until the seeds fail to give off
any color. In a cast iron or stainless steel pot (it may
stain) bring the strained roucou liquid to a boil and
simmer for ten minutes. Add salt and any herbs you
desire for your personal taste. Cover and let sit for a
few hours to cool before pouring into bottles. Keep
refrigerated. If you were neat -as few roucouians are
-1--: 11p is easy. If not, use diluted bleach to
I ...i . - and hands.
Red Baked Fish
1 Cup boiling water
1 Tablespoon roucou seeds
2 Tablespoons fresh orange juice
2 Tablespoons vinegar
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 hot pepper, seeded and minced
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
pinch of salt
4 fish fillets or steaks (about two pounds)
oil to coat pan
This takes some time to prepare but is worth it!
Grouper or kingfish is good.
Combine boiling water and roucou seeds in a cup
and let stand overnight to soften the seeds. When
ready to prepare this meal, drain the seeds and com-
bine the softened seeds with the orange juice, vinegar,
garlic, hot pepper, cumin, allspice and salt in a blend
er container; process until it forms a smooth paste.
Cover both sides of fish pieces with roucou paste and
place in a well-oiled baking dish. Refrigerate covered
for at least two hours to blend flavors. Bake fish cov
ered at 350 F for 20 minutes. Uncover and bake
another ten to 15 minutes.
For the Home Gardener
Roucou can be grown from a ,,'II,,. or from seeds.
If you find a vendor selling it, . -I I. some seeds. It
will grow almost anywhere as long as the soil is well
drained and it doesn't get very cold. Be the only one on
your block with a roucou shrub as a remembrance of
your island travels! Start this shrub in a sizeable con
trainer and keep the growing medium slightly damp
until it catches when new leaves appear. It needs the
usual starter fertilizer until it begins to show pods.
Then switch to a bearing salt. Transplant when it is
too big for your container. In the cockpit it will make a
great conversation starter. If you carry it to your shore
abode, these shrubs make nice ornamental bushes at
the entrance to driveways, sidewalks, or paths.

Above left: An open pod showing pulp-covered seeds

Below: The hairy roucou pod, and seeds
packaged for sale


New to the Roseau
. ..... r I1 ,�11, Iw ,r. r i. r

. r.. Ir u -W ..I.

a , ..... l l. .] , .. I f.il 'r
a ...L. r..I ,.I r..

* r i.I ,r r h r.s- i n - 1






.. . f ll rr .... ..

NMnlloring VHP i6
Dsi.Anvclwr(lhl.ulSni
wwn. nAndsfofoDuullrcLiiui


Qr Sq* Qph!

UNION ISLAND, SAINT VINCENT S THE GRENADINES
VHF 08 - TEL-FAX (784) 458 8918 - capgounnmetcarlbsurf com




TREASURE ISLAND

CAINO




Located at
the Tamarind Beach Hotelt
oto Ca ld

OME %ND .ICII THE N WITH UIJs'
wE H' E l.IE R IC- NR IJ LETTE'F

L CK. K ND 2-EN SLCL'TS





.. , r. ca.I I . r i, C C'i-C'rr.

FK.i tui he'.rIirt E.. rn .E n :.;11l
'r4 4r rC.44 lear 4!1 ; il ei
















DIGINAV

Marine electronics
Aidhnimd dmlr d wmao owdmwf




EBG Raymarine

T~ t CRISTEC



$LMLEEWJNDEWNERACR.



superwindM

MARINA DU MARIN - MARTINIQUE
Phone: +B58 598 747 862
Emalfl digln v'iwanrdide.f


Don Street always thought that Nen's Bay, just off the
airstrip at the right hand side of this photo, would be
a good location for a marina in Canouan

I convinced him that the best thing to do was to buy
Secret Harbor Hotel at Mt. Hartman Bay in Grenada
and expand the small marina there. This they did, but
I was never able to convince the base's managers (all
of whom were new to the area) to send the boats up to
Carriacou in stages via Grenada's east coast. They
sent the boats up the west coast instead, which entails
a run downwind from Mt. Hartman Bay to Point
Saline, a long haul up Grenada's lee side to Carriacou,
and then on to the ultir. -t - .1 of the Tobago Cays.
This used up at least a "1 I I days.
Then someone came up with the bright idea of mov
ing The Moorings base from Mt. Hartman Bay to
Canouan, as Canouan was only a couple of hours' sail
to the ever-popular Tobago Cays. Those who made that
decision obviously had not spent any time in Canouan's
Charleston Harbour in the winter, or consulted with
experienced local sailors and fishermen who would
have told them the harbor was infamous as a rocky
and rolly anchorage. The winter ground swell made it
impractical to build a marina there, and often the swell
made it impossible to even bring a boat alongside the
dock for the charter party to board. Occasionally the
ground swell would be so bad that the charter party
had to be put up in a hotel the first night, rather than
et-nin. aboard at anchor or on a mooring.
' , ,, Glossy Hill was knocked down a few years ago
to allow extension of the runway at Canouan's airport,
there was the chance to build a perfect charter base. If
rubble that was knocked off Glossy Hill had been used
to build a breakwater on the north side of Nen's Bay
(as I urged in a letter to Compass at the time) they
could have built a beautiful, sheltered marina right
next to the airport.
Unfortunately this was not done, the ground swell
won out, The Moorings gave up on the Canouan base,
and has finally moved back to Grenada.
With the new base being in St George's Lagoon, sailing
up Grenada's east coast to Carriacou isn't a logical option.
To sail from St George's to the Grenadines via the
west coast, strap her down flat, pull the traveler to
windward, run the engine at one-third throttle, and
motorsail up the lee coast of Grenada. Tack as neces
sary to stay close to shore to stay in calm water and


v�~-i�-


Dear Compass,
I read with interest in the October 2010 issue of
Compass that The Moorings will be operating a new
charter base out of Port Louis Marina in St.
George's, Grenada.
In the early 1980s The Moorings was getting so big
in the BVI that Charlie and Ginny Carey started think
ing of opening a new base somewhere in the southern
islands. In April '84 Charlie contacted me and asked
me for advice on the subject.


I have been connected with the marine insurance
business for 47 years. I have developed a rapport
with brokers and underwriters at Lloyds and am
able to introduce boat owners to specialist brokers
in the Lloyds market.
e-mail: streetiolaire@hotmail.com
www.street-iolaire.com


enjoy the shoreside scenery. Whe.. I .... . i ... . point
is reached, tack to the east to - ...i ...- I I . you
head north -unless the wind is south of east and you
can lay 065 1 . ..... . -. i ) allow for the set of the
current to tb -1 II , .. I. calculated correctly to
pick up a .1, . . .. , i . Tanga I -nn 1-rinc
course of( ' - .'' i ' , i,, . to the - , ,,. i1, i ii,
weather going tide) will be sufficient.
Another thing that many sailors (and especially
bareboat managers) forget is that you can spend a
pleasant week or ten days cruising and never leave
Grenada. Leave St. George's, enjoy a wonderful quiet
anchorage at Morne Rouge Bay, and then explore all
the wonderful anchorages on the south and southeast
coasts. Proceed up the windward side to Grenville and
Sandy Island (not to be confused with the Sandy
Island off Carriacou), and then sail on back down the
lee side to Port Louis Marina.
I wonder how many Moorings charterers will follow
my advice?
Don Street
Glandore, Ireland

Dear Compass,
As of today, December 18th, the meeting between
concerned yachts and the Sandy Island Oyster Bed
Marine Protected Area (SIOBMPA) committee suggest
ed in Martin Barriteau's letter in the December 2010
issue of Compass has not taken place and it appears
unlikely that it will.
I, along with several others, received an advance
copy of Mr. Barriteau's letter in mid-November and I
immediately responded in favor of such a meeting,
indicating that we would re-arrange our sailing sched
ule to be in Carriacou in early December. Shortly
thereafter, I received an e-mail from Mr. Davon Baker,
chairman of SIOBMPA, (who was copied on both the
advance issue of Mr. Barriteau's letter and my
response) suggesting that we should work through
him to schedule. I responded to Mr. Baker saying that,
out of courtesy, I would work with Mr. Barriteau since
he initiated the idea of such a meeting.
I then e-mailed Mr. Barriteau with a list of discussion
items for the agenda (copy attached), and followed that
e-mail up a week later with a request for the status of
the proposed meeting. All told, I have sent three e-mails
to Mr. Barriteau and one to Mr. Baker, and copied each
of those :*- - ': = to the other. To date, aside from the
message i, .. I, Baker -,,.. -1,,,. . ,, i,,,. and an
acknowledgement from h.... I * ,, i I , , to deal
with Mr. Barriteau, I have had no response relative to
a meeting, and, in the case of Mr. Barriteau, not even
an* -1- 1 --;-.-.t -f; it of mye-mails.
In II .. . ... ' .... Ii .- . i d Mr. Barriteau's letter
to a number of other concerned yachts and have had
responses from several, as well as others who received
a copy forwarded to them by someone on my original
distribution. ',, 1i, i,,, . , . originally copied on the
advance copy I i, ' .... .. - letter, there have been
various responses: some yachts had arranged their
schedules to be in Carriacou in early December to
attend the proposed meeting; some have contacted Mr.
Barriteau and Mr. Baker directly; and some have indi
cated that their plans prohibit their attendance at the
proposed meeting but they would like to be kept
informed of progress.
Today, more than a month since I responded to Mr.
Barriteau's letter, there has been no notification to any
of us as to the scheduling of the proposed meeting. On
December 17th, I sent letters to Mr. Barriteau and Mr.
Baker saying that since I had heard nothing further
from them about scheduling a meeting, I could only
assume that they were not serious about meeting with
the yachting community. I also told them that because
of other commitments I was no longer available to
meet with them in Carriacou.
There has been no official release to the yachting
community of the rules and regulations for the park,
including fees, boundaries, exceptions and no-anchor
zones. Of interest is that there have been no yachts
anchored on the north side of Tyrrel Bay, allegedly in
the park zone, since the beginning. -f i';;i:'t idica
tion of the respect which yachts , I i ....i - even
those with which they disagree or don't understand
the logic behind. Nor have any yachts gone into the
mangroves, except with the threat of Hurricane Tomas,
despite the four local boats which have been there for
several years.
This respect for regulations as well as the environ
ment is in sharp contrast to the press release of July
21st, 2010, which announced the installation of the
moorings at Sandy Island and the imminent opening
of the park, and which was propagated in newsletters
and on websites. The press release states that prior to
the moorings at Sandy Island, "yachts have been low
ering their anchors directly onto the seabed, causing
significant damage to the reef'.
The above statement is blatantly untrue. There are
no reefs where yachts anchor at Sandy Island; the bot
tom is sand. How can yachts be expected to provide
the revenue for running the SIOBMPA if we are not
given the opportunity, as stakeholders, to discuss the
issues and if we are maligned by remarks such as the
one cited in the press release above?
Continued on next page













-ontinued from previous page

I can honestly say that we tried to work with
SIOBMPA to resolve issues. Can the people associated
with SIOBMPA say the same?
John Pompa
S/V Second Millennium
Boston, Massachusetts
Post Script -December 21, 2010: Today, just four
days after informing Messrs Barriteau and Baker that
I was no longer available to meet with them, I (coinci
dentally?) received an e-mail from Martin Barriteau
informing me of a workshop that will be held in
Carriacou on January 27th and 28th and that they
will invite the yachting community to attend these
meetings. Sorry, Mr. Barriteau, too late. I find it very
hard to believe that those associated with SIOBMPA
could not find any time to meet with members of the
yachting community until the yachting community
said that because of other commitments they were no
longer available.
I hope that Mr. Barriteau and others do not use our
unavailability to make a case for yachts not being sin
cere in their concerns or to i... i. ... .... yachting.
Objectives of meeting of -I *'I I ... I members of
the Carriacou yachting community:
I - ,,,. line of communications between
- i , Carriacou yachting community
* Recognition of the Carria ... 1, ..... community
as a valuable stakeholder in - I, , 1
* Resolution by SIOBMPA that yacht tourists will not
be portrayed to the public as damaging reefs or other
eco-structures, and therefore necessitating moorings
and/or other anchoring restrictions
* Consensus between SIOBMPA and the Carriacou
yachting community on moorings, their number and
placement, and anchoring privileges at Sandy Island.
* Consensus between SIOBMPA and the Carriacou
yachting community on anchoring privileges in the
Tyrrel Bay portion of SIOBMPA.

Dear Compass,
I'm writing in reaction to Bernard Logan's amazing
saga about riding out Hurricane Tomas, which was
published in the January issue of Compass. He
wrote, "I became aware that, if I were to remain cov
ered by insurance, we would have to put to sea." Is it
a sign of the times that boat owners now will elect to
set out to sea when a hurricane approaches because
insurance companies will pay full compensation for
boats lost at sea in named storms, but won't do so for
boats lost while anchored or docked in the same
storm?!? It used to be that vessels only put to sea to
attempt to ride out a hurricane when there was abso
lutely no other alternative, and even then seamen
faced the prospect with dread.
Surely it isn't the intention of insurance compa
nies to put people's lives at risk. But although a boat
can be left unattended on storm anchors or moor
ings, in the -n'nr-'--- -r in m-rri- --hile the
crewmembers I I .11 . 11. . .. -.. I . . 1 aboat
can't be sent to sea by itself. We've all heard tales of
cruisers staying on their boats in harbor during a
hurricane and having to swim ashore after the boat
sinks at its moorings. How will you swim ashore if
the boat sinks when you're underway in a storm?
Some yacht insurance policies specify a certain
number of crew for ocean passages - how many
crew should you have aboard when underway in a
hurricane? Should they all have life insurance? If
everyone starts getting underway for hurricanes
because of their insurance policies, will it increase
the likelihood of collisions at sea?
A huge part of good seamanship is common sense
and a sense of responsibility. Is it responsible to go to
sea to weather a named storm, not because it's the
safest course of action for the boat and the people
aboard, but for insurance purposes? Interesting times
we live in, when the uninsured boats probably take the
best hurricane precautions, and the insured boats
take the biggest risks.
Ava Weaver
S/V Alan's Albatross

Dear Compass,
I'd like to say a big thank you to all the boaters who
helped get a recent shipment of books from the US into
the hands f - :r young Caribbean readers. David
and Amy - i. i . the crew of the yacht Taza Mas,
made a special trip to Antigua to pick up books and
deliver them to Bequia, where Sandra Ollivierre of
Challenger Taxi distributed them to schools and to the
Bequia Reading Club. The books had been collected
from generous donors in Newport, Rhode Island;
Annapolis Maryland; and New Jersey, and sailed from
the 1i - I .. ..... .11i. aptain John Spenlinhauer
and i i. I i. .I1 . .... I - -... aboard the yacht Tivoli In
Antigua the books were kindly stored by Dr. Murphy
at the Dockyard Museum. It takes a .i1
That is the story of just one batch 1 i i -
For more information about this book program
visit www.BIG-Books.org.
Ann-Wallis White
Ann-Wallis White Yacht Charters
Annapolis, Maryland


Dear Compass,
After many years in Venezuela hoping to see the
security problems solved, I decided to see how things
were going in Colombia.
Visiting boats no longer have to go down to Cartagena
for their entry into the country. The new international
marina at Santa Marta opened its pontoons two
months ago. The facilities are nearing completion and
should be fully operational in April 2011.
Santa Marta is located near centers of tourist inter
est. The lost city of the Indians, Tayrona National
Park, the Five Bays and the historic town itself make
it an ideal stopover. Safety is the major concern of
Colombians whr -;n--r .:- f-r-irers to come, and I
guarantee you I, l. I i '1 11 safe. I've been in
~ i i ... ... ... . . . . i ..1-, . . . i .... i .-ed to help

Jean Noel
Former captain, Adagio IV

Dear Compass,
Many yachtsmen are all too ready to blame theft for
the loss of their possessions, particularly dinghies and
outboards. In Prince Rupert Bay, Dominica on the
morning of January 5th, an antipodean voice
announced on the VHF that during the night his din
ghy had disappeared from the stern of his yacht
either drifted or stolen, he knew not which.
The Indian River Guides were immediately on the case,
doubting that it had been stolen as the usual security
patrols had been in action all night. Those anchored
close to the yacht knew that the crew had returned, obvi
ously very drunk, in the early hours of the morning.
The Indian River Guides spontaneously went off in
search of the missing 1...1. in their fast patrol boat
and eventually it was : .... Irifting towards Panama.


In Prince Rupert Bay, Dominica, local boat operators
recently rescued a lost dinghy

It was returned to the owner, who by all accounts
showed little financial thanks for its retrieval.
The Indian River Guides should be congratulated for
their speedy and generous action. Donations to the
cost of their security patrols, which are funded by
their association, are gratefully received.
John Lytle
S/Y Oriole

Dear Compass Readers,
We want to hear from YOU!
Be sure to include your name, boat name or shoreside
address, and a way we can contact you (preferably by
e-mail) ifclarification is required.
We do not publish individual consumer complaints or
individual regatta results complaints. (Kudos are okay!)
We do not publish anonymous letters; however, your
name may be withheld from print at your request.
Letters may be edited for length, clarity and fair play.
Send your letters to:
sally@caribbeancompass.com
or
Compass Publishing Ltd.
Readers' Forum
Box 175BQ
Bequia VC0400
St. Vincent & the Grenadines


For a ast sale to rop buyers,

list yow boat with us in US






rffi- ws w


SBoat Insurance

Any Craf Any Use Any Age, Anywhere!


~JUODBD083wff


Pat - Rpar - .er..c
Oultboa r~dITQQ l Engne 2HP-2E50H l













CREW VACANCIES!
Semail: crew@tradewindscruiseclub.com
TradeWinds Cruise Club operate a fleet of catamarans across
TRADEWNDS six destinations in the Caribbean.
We are the fastest growing charter company,
operating TERM CHARTERS, all inclusive, 7 days.
We are looking for crew, mainly teams in the form of a Captain and a Chef/Hostess.
We prefer couples that are married OR have been living together for at least a year.
The nature of the job is such that the better the understanding and teamwork
between Captain and Chef the more successful your charters will be.
Requirements: Captain with a Skipper's licence.
Chef/Hostess with a basic understanding of cooking.
Dive master/ instructor for either the Captain and/or Chef is a plus.
We offer full training onsite in the Caribbean.
This is a FUN job with great earning potential. If you are willing to work hard and
have a positive disposition to life this could be your DREAM job.
Anyone with an interest is welcome to apply.
If you would like more information about this job or send your CV to us, please
use this email address:
crewttradewindscruiseclub.com
or by mail to: Bequia Marina, P.O.Box 194BQ, Port Elizabeth,
Bequia, St Vincent & the Grenadines
Tel. St Vincent +784 457 3407 Tel. St Maarten +599 5510550


THE CRUISING SAILOR'S CHANDLERY SINCE 1990
AMERON ABC 3 TIN FREE SELF POLISHING ANTIFOULING PAINT
CORNER: MIRANDA & GUARAGUAO, PUERTO LA CRUZ, VENEZUELA
TEL: 58 (281) 265-3844 - E-MAIL : xanadumarine@cannv.net



WALLILABOU PORT OF ENTRY
ANCHORAGE MOORING FACILITIES
WALLILABOU BAY HOTEL WATER, ICE, SHOWERS
S C 1 CARIBEE BATIK - BOUTIQUE
< \ VHF Ch 16 & 68
(range limited by the hills) BAR AND RESTAURANT
TOURS ARRANGED
P.O. Box 851, St. Vincent & the Grenadines, CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
West Indies.
Tel: (784) 458-7270 Fax: (784) 457-9917 HAPPY HOUR 5-6
E-mail: wallanch@vincysurf.com



Read in Next Month's Compass:

Why Rally?

A Cruiser's Report on Trinidad and Tobago

How We Decided Where to Refit in the Caribbean

... and more!


Letter of



the Month


Dear Compass,
It was a strange i1.,. 1 i .... at the bottom of my boat. Black with white dots, it
was looking much , i , I i a spotted eagle I, , -I ,, i,,. iwo hours scrap
ing and then scrubbing the bottom there was : ..... i of accomplish
ment. I knew that I would have to do all of this again in just a few weeks. This isn't
what I expected after having the bottom of the boat just painted two months prior.
How is this possible, you might ask? It could all be summed up in three words:
"phony bottom paint."
My wife, Lou, and I have owned our boat since 2004 and almost every season we
have done the bottom work ourselves. This year, the wife and I saved up just enough
money to spoil ourselves and have someone else do it for a change. There had been
about 15 years of bottom paint built up in some spots and worn down in others, so
I thought it was time to take it all the way down to gel-coat. As many of you know,
this is a labor-intensive job so it only made sense to make the sail down to Trinidad
where labor is relatively inexpensive and have it done there.
We hauled out at a boatyard in Chaguaramas and consulted the front desk as to
whom we should have do the bottom. They recommended using the yard's contractor
and assured us he would do -- 1 job; also 1-- f -r him we would not be obli
gated to pay a workpass fee. I I our boat' i i sixweek period, and went
back to the States to visit family.





























When we came back the boat had been stripped and sanded down to gel-coat and
was awaiting the first layers of barrier coat. We were happy with . - ... i.... i i they
had completed and were looking forward to soon having the II ... i ...-1. I We
watched as the workers applied three coats of barrier coat and then the contractor
and I discussed which paint to use as anti-fouling. We discussed our options with
others in the yard, did a little internet research, and decided on an anti-fouling paint
that friends of mine had been using for years with great results. The contractor told
me he would not have a problem acquiring the paint, in fact, he informed me that
he could even get it for us at a discount.
I looked at the paint can to make sure it was the correct paint and the bottom of
the boat was painted with two and a half coats.
After a few weeks in Grenada we started making our way home back to the
, ., i.i .,, i. To my surprise, by the time we got there, less than a month and a
S.11 1.1 ,I , , were already baby barnacles covering every square inch of the
bottom of our boat. After realizing this, I decided to go down and attempted scrub
bing the paint with a black scotch-brite pad, but the paint was as hard as a rock
and absolutely none came off. The paint we thought had been applied was sup
posed to be ablative!
In Trinidad, there is only one distributor for the paint I requested. Feeling upset
and confused, I contacted them asking if they had any clue as to what could have
caused this to happen? The gentleman explained to me about a scam that he said is
going on in ma: 1i ' i . .. .. .... I- . .,. i.- r ..,, . ,. .. . ,ly usedupinthe
shipyards and I.-... Il ... .. .. I I ... I . . I - I - .1 paint that looks
like bottom paint, but is not, is poured back into the can. The can is resealed giving
it the appearance of the true product. After which the paint is sold "under the table".
When discussing the characteristics of the paint, the distributor assured me that is
what I ended up with.
I don't think the distributor made up this story. The reason for this is that the paint
that was applied to our boat isn't ablative. No amount of scrubbing makes any of it
come off. I would think that even if the paint had expired or just had poor anti-fouling
performance it would still retain its ablative properties. Several friends painted their
boat with the same stuff I 11. ...1.1 I - . II.... .1 ,ie same time, and they have had
good results. I have had a i ,I .- . I - -, . check out my paint.
-Continued on next page












-ontinued from previous page
They tell me that there is no way what we got is any sort of bottom paint. There are
not only barnacles growing on my bottomt.. . 11..... ..........., It's a forest
down there and continues to grow as fast .- I ... .... i .... f St. John's
busiest day sail boats; we are sailing almost every day. You would think that would
help keep things from growing, but it doesn't. We now have to scrape and scrub the
bottom every three weeks.
After many attempts, the boatyard has refused any responsibility for the paint
their contractor applied and, in fact, they have denied that their contractor is even
affiliated with them. As for the contractor himself, he returned one of our calls but
now fails to respond to us entirely. I also contacted YSATT, and although they were
kind and helpful, it doesn't seem there is much they can do.
I asked a boatyard in Tortola for an estimate to repaint our boat and they told me
theyhavehadtoredoseveralboats tl.t 1..1 it --t i .i-t i .Ti-i.1.1 - T'mnot
the only one this has happened to. E, , , , 1 .1... i,,,, 1, ... i . I -,, ,,. paint
can, you would never have known that what was in it is fake.
Jason Carter
S/V Survivan

Editor's note: Compass has a policy of not publishing individual consumer comr
plaints. However, in light of the fact that this might be a more widespread problem, we
are sharing Jason's letter and we asked yachting industry contacts in Trinidad for
their comments. We were told that, without the boat being in Trinidad so the paint in
question could be examined, it is very difficult to identify whether Jason's problem
was the result of a scam, a case of badly mixed or improperly applied paint, or a prob
lem with the paint itself
In any case, it might be prudent to personally purchase your paint from a reliable
chandlery or paint store, or direct from the manufacturer. Check the expiration date
and make a note of the batch number ifthis information is given on the paint can. Then
ensure that the application instructions are followed to the letter. It's worth Googling
"[paint name] data sheet" for additional information.
We also asked Chris Doyle, who hauls out annually in Trinidad and has reported in
Compass on his own comparative anti fouling paint tests over the years, for his com
ments, which follow.

Dear Compass,
I very much I , ,i ' .....,I ..i.... - ts qualify me to comment on this letter, how
everthathas : . i 11 I... I I . '
Jason's letter mentioned the hardness of the paint. Self polishing paints can vary
enormously in how hard they are: some are very soft and will brush off with a rope
passing over them, others you can scrub.
So what about the barnacles? In all my tests of the more expensive self polishing
modern (non-tin) antifoulings, I found they all grew barnacles like mad, especially
after the first month or so. How many barnacles you got would depend on where you
anchored; enclosed lagoons such as Simpson Bay or Rodney Bay were very bad, but
so was the big open bay of Schoelcher in Martinique. The Grenadines seem rela
tivelybenig, -' .. . i i . md I� .1 i I I I . ..... . the barnacles when they were
verysmall I 1 I .1 I I the I 11 1. .. i111 i,, pads) they did not appear to
grow so readily after the third month onwards. In other words, the antifouling
became more effective with time.
I have tested the paint Jason was supposed to have gotten more than once and got
barnacles, but never weed in that time. I am less sure about the ablative bit -it is
a self polishing paint, but as I remember it is quite hard.





' once tested a blue paint that worked very well.

I had forgotten I had tested it once

and tested it again some years later...'





The letter describes the color of the antifouling as black. My experience was that
red antifoulings of any make always worked better than their colored brethren.
This is not surprising, as one of the main ingredients is copper, which is red and
provides the color. To make copper-based paint another color, you have to add
another colorant, which is very unlikely to aid, and quite likely to hinder, the anti
,h. I I rties.
,,,, .I. is very variable. In the years of tin paints, when the antifoulings were
more effective though very detrimental to the environment, I once tested a blue paint
that worked very well. I had forgotten I had tested it once and tested it again some
years later; it sucked, and it was only when ' i-nt --nt i-;1nt - 1 -t I had tested
it before with good results that I leafed back 1. ...I. ... . i - ... I' .... I out he was
right. He said there had been no change in I. I ...... i I . ..... I md have no
explanation. The red paint of the same manufacture was still working very well.
Do I think the results Jason got could have happened had the ,� , ..1.... >een a
legitimate product? If his boat had just gotten barnacles, then I i..,,I -' Time
and time again I was amazed at having to deal with many barnacles on expensive
paints in the early months, which is why no one seems to want to give me paint to
test any more (probably because I have not had very good results since the remov
al of tin). I personally use one of the cheaper paints, namely Jotun Sea Queen. My
boat stays in the water only about seven months a year, and for this time this paint
gives as good a protection as the more expensive paints and is way better in the
early months. This may well change over a longer time period, with the more expen
sive paints giving better long-term protection as long as you nurse them though the
early months.
If the paint is as he described, with rapid growth of all types including weed, it was
either a bad lot of paint, there was a problem with application, or it was not what it
was labeled.
I hope this may shed some light.
I might add that I think we have got to the stage where modern antifoulings work
really well on ships that are constantly moving at a good speed and spend very little
time in port. For our slow moving yachts, nature is way ahead of paint technology.
Best wishes,
Chris Doyle
Ti Kanot


THE MULTIHULL COMPANY
[ 1I , W'C)R LDS LEADER I\ MU1 I IIUitSA.i % AM\ ) iR VI'


I ...il . I a l eRn . .- R


1k'n rr*by ld'*te| ae * IMd40 ooo sz,ooo, ooo
un ..... . r Mu l 4 s.... iai


Ao r r i.ne rrTa r r n N h i






diti . c c.t kt c lk ' b w 99960 F anePa3ot 2007 0' Catana
SU6D,000 S950,000
F wwa sh r.hn pntp.uci
%Ibtubse .ndp!i cfln f m sod rtwa*i 11w











ZAR-PAR ..



l. t I( 1 I[' Il\l [l l[. 1 k I "l'1\ ( 1 NI11111
la 1,.- ,


* High Quality Sheltered Moorings
* Slips to 120' with depth 10'
*70 Ton Travelift (30' beam)
*ABYC certified mechanics
* Shore power 30, 50 and 100 amps
*All slips with fingers


* Showers, Laundry, Restaurant, 24 hr security
* Immigration office in the marina for clearance
* Free WIFI and Free Internet
* Dinghy Dock
* 12 miles East of Santo Domingo
& 7 miles East of International Airport


R R -
ftf n/ ffr ^ -- -- --^B -B^ *^' -
ffERC UR Y Transport has never been easier -with no floor boards
Irffr a I f BoRtkera Air Deck boats can be stowed most anywhere.
FEATURES:
SAir filled floor makes kneeling or sitting extremely comfortable
SEasy to carry 25% lighter than wooden-floor inflatables


AVAILABLE: ENGINES:
6'7" (200cm) 461b(21kg) 2.5-350hp (2-Stroke
7'10" (240cm) 751b(34kg) & 4-Stroke)
8'10" (270cm) 861b(39kg) @ DUTY-FREE Prices
10'2" (310cm) 921b(42kg)
11'2" (340cm) 991b(45kg)

MERCURY
LUrYNER
cr 0*)""* ~'e

K<� y YAHVMAR


Visit: mrinazarpr*com eail: infOmarinazrpar-co


DOMINICA MARINE CENTER
18 Victoria Street, Roseau
Dominica, All
767-448-2705 Ext Marine
Fax: 767-448-7701 VHF 16
info@dominicamarinecenter.com
Agent:
Budget Marine, Doyle
Sailmaker, SeaChoice Products
Dealer:
Mercury Marl ne, Yanmar Marine


















%.=OF 7 fft fY-f fT

T7N[cE PA�(F^E 'G K E 9


WE BUILD ONE OF THE MOST FUEL EFFICIENT
PASSENGER VESSELS N THE WORLD


MI nMnew4rx 1&&cwtauwun
-(13S0 StabWy test lor up
1.70 pwy
* ritrdulsry bus, ~acs
.5129000P prs poar

* 0assa Borotn evlms
* Set up me bec Jodig
I*Fast delvery


As evening came, I noticed that a yacht anchored more than a hundred metres
toPrn "1q ehn'lrinf lq rm lthPod 'trnhp i,� In n'ohnr liht As it became dark, the
i I . i i i i .... I i i 11I.- 1 iI i i i . . 'easecond. Every time our
I., . i , . . i , , i . i , . i I I .. the companionway, all the
S i , , i i , I , , i i, , ,, i ,,i - flashes - the yacht was
anchored at about three timi - 11i i ' .,1,... ... . 1 ,.. the bay, which is a generous
interval the kind of place tl i i.... .. i .. i ;e neighbor turns on a strobe,
it is intense and can't be ignored anywhere on the boat, including below. A vessel
that is flashing a masthead strobe doesn't see it at all unless they notice that the
hulls of their neighbors are flashing back at them. The neighbors, however, will be
seeing the flashes even when looking away from them.
The use of strobes as anchor lights was thoroughly shouted down in the Compass
Readers' Forum back in '07 -March through October. I reckoned the score at nine to
three. Then strobe lights all but disappeared. But now they seem to be creeping back.
The return of the strobe seems weighted towards non-masthead strobes and
weaker strobes, perhaps believers in strobes who, nonetheless, see their nuisance
* ..1 ...' ii. , ,, configurations I've seen is one mounted on a plate that shields
I i ... 1 ,. i . .. .i nearbyy vessels -it was only visible from well beyond the range
i II ... I - I1' .t. Another was a yacht anchored off our bow with an intense
strobe mounted low. It would have reflected off my open hatch onto the head of my
bed all night except for one thing: something on the yacht flashing the strobe
obstructed its view from astern - I couldn't see it at all. These are bad jokes in terms
of collision avoidance, of course. I've also seen arrangements that were much better
thought out.
Here's some fodder for "sea lawyers". Flashers say that tl ' ...1i . ..- only say
white, not whether it is flashing. Therefore, they maintain, -.... I .-1..... lights as
anchor lights is not illegal... despite the facts that strobes are used as an emergency
signal on the water and that flashing white is a specific navigation aid .1r.l-i;;
hazard. My sea-lawyer answer is a quote from the Collision Regulations: 1 ' .. i
light' means a light showing an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of 360
1 -' :, "-nd I'll argue that where the Collision Regulations mean "flashing", they
I-. I . .... .". On the other hand, maybe some flashers could use the next definition
in the same section, which says that "flashing," means 120 times a minute or more,
to say that a slower strobe isn't even flashing!














But for those whose concern is collision avoidance, let me offer these thoughts.
Masthead lights are good at a distance and in a seaway where the hull disappears
in the troughs. But in close quarters, from the height of a yacht cockpit or a dinghy,
a much lower light is more noticeable. Also, strobes have a quality that makes their
distance difficult to judge. Ironically, the masthead location partly answers that if
you can visualize the mast height and judge the angle. If you can't guess the height
of a light in the rigging, above the water, you don't have that clue. But the person
most likely to run into you at night won't be that good a night navigator anyway.
r' 1 ,1: :,; aboard for more than 20 years, the vast majority of that at anchor,
,. 1 i i ..1 eight. I haven't been run into by a boat that didn't see me at night.
I've used various anchor lights including a kerosene lantern, but never a strobe.
What I have - ..in.t :t;-- for any intense light in the anchorage) is aesthetics.
They diminish I1. 1 .1 I 1I night. But aesthetics, nowadays, can be trumped by
money, regulation, security, and/or convenience. That's why I mention that using
strobes as anchor lights is illegal.
Over the years, I've been aboard a number of yachts when the question of an
' fr.i:..-rnt -n a neighbor was answered with, "Oh, if they don't like it, they'll say
- I- 1.. i - ) Is it, then, a reasonable and expected thing to go over to someone
who can't be bothered to say that you are being bothered? Is it even, perhaps, a civic
duty - *.. .. .,ii..... 11. .. .-. 11 iat someone else do their thinking for them?
In ln . . II. ...... . I .,- I athand, while Ipondered a 1;... .... 1
the boat (full speed, without any sort of light). Then the strobe w .- i..... II i , I
of problem.
I woke at my usual time, before first light. Their strobe was back on and flashing
on the foot of my berth as I lay there. I sipped my coffee in the cockpit with the
1 ,l 1 .1h I I I "].1 .... 1Iite,
I I I1 I I h i1111 1- .11 before pulling up my dinghy and sailing over. I made a pass
under their stern to read the boat's name. Nobody was in the cockpit and the com-
panionway was open. On the next pass, I gave a loud hail. "Aboard the [Whatever]!
Ahoy!" and watched for a response as I sailed out far enough to tack back. I made
several more passes, adding words like "Hola!", "Yo!", and "Oui!". Loud enough to
wake them if they were asleep. No response. I made a final pass and tried an
approach suggested by Chris Doyle. "Ahoy [Whatever]! Do you have an emergency!?"
Good and loud. I'm sure the guy on the neighboring boat, who was now on deck,
heard it well.
One kind of hates to do this sort of thing. If they don't respond, one must then
decide whether to go aboard to investigate or go to the authorities. But if they were
just laying low until I gave up, as some yachts do with vendors, they might see a
need to respond to that question -after all, they were flashing an emergency signal.
Never mind that they and their fellow flashers have made the signal meaningless.
Whether they had been hiding or I finally woke them, he appeared in the cockpit.
I'm limited to English and their flag is French. So I illustrated my statement (no
profanity profanity doesn't help) with sign language, i ,,,,,,,. I 1..- masthead,
using the hand opening and closing sign for "yak, yak, .1 i i' i'. I the flash
ing, pointed to my boat, moved the yakking strobe under my other hand to show
it entering my boat, to the berth where I sleep, indicated by tilting my head onto
my hands.
Anyway, I did my duty. I checked to see if there was an emergency.
So tell everybody you know who has a strobe. If they have an emergency in the
anchorage and turn their strobe .. ... 1 1 ....1. , -i ,, 1 ,i 1 -. happen. This
should be a comfort to anyone I .........I . ..


















FEBRUARY

2 World Wetlands Day
3 Chinese New Year (Rabbit)
4 - 6 Club Ndutico de San Juan International Regatta, Puerto Rico.
www.nauticodesanjuan.com
4 - 6 Digicel Workboat Regatta, Grenada. www.grenadasailingfestival.com
5 Pineapple Cup Montego Bay Race, Florida to Jamaica.
www.montegobayrace.com
5 - 6 Lowell Wheatley Anegada Pursuit Race. www.royalbviyc.org
5-6 Interlux One Design Regatta, St. Maarten. www.smyc.com
6 Women's Cup Race, Martinique. ycmq@wanadoo.fr
7 Public holiday in Grenada (Independence Day)
10- 13 Trinidad Carnival Regatta. www.sailweek.com
11 - 13 St. Croix Yacht Club Hospice Regatta. www.stcroixyc.com
12 - 13 Jolly Harbour Valentines Regatta, Antigua. www.jhycantigua.com
13 Island Hopper Race, USVI. jamesswanstj@yahoo.com
13 Sailor's & Landlubber's Auction, Bequia. bequiasunshineschool.org
13-20 Holetown Festival, Barbados
15 Public holiday in Puerto Rico and USVI (Presidents' Day)
18 FULL MOON
18 - 20 Sweethearts of the Caribbean and Classic Yacht Regatta, Tortola. WEYC
18 - 20 Tobago Carnival Regatta (beach events), www.sailweek.com
19 - 20 St. Francois Regatta, Guadeloupe. organisation@triskellcup.com
19-20 Bonaire Carnival Tumba Festival
20 - 21 Independence Day Round St Lucia Race/Cruise.
www.stluciayachtclub.com
21 Start of RORC Caribbean 600, Antigua. www.caribbean600.rorc.org
22 Public holiday in St. Lucia (Independence Day)
25 - 26 Around St. Maarten Multihull Race. www.multihullregatta.com
25- 27 South Grenada Regatta. www.southgrenadaregatta.com
26 BVI Dinghy Championships. www.rbviyc.org
27 - 5 March BVI Kte Jam (kiteboarding). www.bvikitejam.com
27 - 8 March 6th La Route du Carnival rally, Martinique to Trinidad.
www.transcaraibes.com
TBA Around Martinique Race. www.clubnautiqueneptune.com





MARCH

1 Budget Marine Match Racing Cup. www.smyc.com
2- 12 Santo Domingo Music Festival, Dominican Republic
3 Gill Commodore's Cup, St. Maarten. www.heinekenregatta.com
4 Children's Carnival Parade, St. Barth's
4-6 St. Maarten Heineken Regatta. www.heinekenregatta.com
4 - 7 Dark and Stormy Regatta, BVI. mcmechanics@surfbvi.com
5 - 7 Martinique Carnival Regatta. www.carnival-regatta.com
5 - 9 Semaine Nautique Schoelcher, Martinique. www.cnschoelcher.webou.net
5 - 10 Caribbean Arts and Crafts Festival, Tortola. dreadeye@surfbvi.com
7 Public holiday in the BVI (H Lavity Stoutt's Birthday)
7-8 Carnival Monday and Tuesday in most Dutch and French islands, Haiti,
Puerto Rico, Dominica, Carriacou, Trinidad & Tobago, Venezuela,
and other places
8 International Women's Day
9 Public holiday in many places (Ash Wednesday)
and in Belize (Baron Bliss Day)
12 - 13 Annual Laser Open, Antigua. yachtclub@candw.ag
12 - 13 Banana's Cup Regatta, Martinique. ycmq@wanadoo.fr
12- 19 St. Patrick's Week celebrations, Montserrat
14 Public holiday in St. Vincent & the Grenadines (National Heroes' Day)
14 Public holiday in some Commonwealth countries (Commonwealth Day)
14- 19 ClubSwan Caribbean Rendezvous. www.nautorswan.com/ClubSwan
16-20 Caribbean Superyacht Regatta & Rendezvous, BVI.
www.superyachtregattaandrendezvous.com
16 - 20 St. John Blues Festival, USVI. http://stevesimonpresents.com
17 Public holiday in Montserrat (St. Patrick's Day).
St. Patrick's Day Festival, Grenada
17 - 19 Race Cayman Islands. www.sailing.ky
18 - 20 Puerto Rico Heineken International Regatta. www.prheinekenregatta.com
19 FULL MOON
20 Vernal Equinox
19 - 20 HRH Prince Edward's Regatta, Barbados. www.sailbarbados.com
24-27 St. Barth's Bucket. www.bucketregattas.com/stbarths
25 - 27 International Rolex Regatta, St. Thomas, USVI. www.rolexcupregatta.com
26 - 2 April Tobago Billfish Bonanza. www.ttgfa.com
28 - 3 April BVI Spring Regatta and Sailing Festival. www.bvispringregatta.org
30 Public holiday in Trinidad & Tobago
(Spiritual Baptist "Shouter" Liberation Day)
TBA Grenada Round-the-Island Race. www.aroundgrenada.com
TBA Grenada Classic Yacht Regatta. www.grenadaclassicregatta.gd

All information was correct to the best of our knowledge
at the time this issue of Compass went to press - but plans change,
so please contact event organizers directly for confirmation.
If you would like a nautical or tourism event listed FREE in our monthly calendar,
please send the name and dates) of the event and the name
and contact information of the organizing body to
sallyccaribbeancompass. corn


82'DufourNautitech'95,10cab/10hd 795K 4II 11 .,r ..r',, ..i 1. llMirr.r -?j 120K
58'Voyage 5802005;LuxuryCat 990K 40"Auroa' 71.,Needs TL(,Great Pice 35K
6i rOn.nn,n P.i.;:l 1.inuiti �- 750K 0'8 tnTei uM40 41. - .1r : "; . 85K
4.. L .13.,4, ., ~ . Ai, 1 ,li a 495K 40'Balvaa 2002 Grear Pirce 99K
41'Lagoon410s2'O05/'2Available 299K -? , in .-,:._-... S .- Ji. L ,l... 79K
37 Maxim Yachts 99, Strong and Fast 160K 37' Nautor Swan 371'85, Beautiful 119K
SAIL 36'Beneteau 361'00,VeryGood Cond. 75K
,; l t. -. . M. ,.l . h i � [I ! IX 3E'Moody 36CC'97 Strona ruie R 99K
54 121 H�as 99 00. Luxury Ocean Crsr I WK : F- -.nj g. O ..- L, !r !.1,.1e L 149K
-' :l.r. :.Y,n hs:..er i. -.r R.I'.I 19' 15" Camrper Nicnl I'on i78 Pebpjil Eng 39K
S5'8eneteauFrersidylle153J86 149K i rl.cru:u.r, hanl.i ,; -ii " F. r 69K
47'Beneteau 473 2004, Private 229K 12'Jeanneau Analia 85.Budge Cruiser 34K
46 SleelKetch.DutchBuild Strong 35K 'i 1 i f rlj. i ,r r :::ndilr.,,'., 37K
o %.-.1 M' 11 ".':, ! ".' : no : .-sGBP
46 Oyltei 07 LururyOceanCru.ier 790K POWER:
4'. C 1:, ' ':r- . : J..alT, 1.:mi -.T, 449K '% I :.r . - :.:,.- , 1 , -1 1 . Lu , 375K
44 CSY Wdkover 79:2 Avalable Startr 65K 52 JeHerson Tra*ler 89 4cabt 4 hd 120K
4: B.-r..' i. aua,. 4� M.e'r.Cru. er 140K 48'Sunseeker Manhattan 97.3cb/2hd 289K
42'LeisueYacs Pacer'6'Fast Ciser 175K 143 Marine radnq Intl Tradewlndl 69K
42'Contest Ketch 1982; Solid Cruiser 124K -i. Ha, -. :n ,iir.l- . , IF. hr..i. En2 69K
42'Endeavwi'90Great Liveaboard 99K 33'Pufuit 3070CC;Fast Center Console 89K
42'Albin Nimbus'81 Cutter 75K 27'Chaparral 270 Signature'09;Clean 89K
428eneteau rst42s7'95,Fast 95K www.bviyachtsales.com




ST. THOMAS YACHT SALES
Compass Point Marina, 6300 Est. Frydenhoj, Suite 28,
St. Thomas, U.S.V.I. 00802

Tel: (340) 779-1660
Fax: (340) 779-2779
yachts@lslands.vl


Southern Comfort Plum Crazy
60' 1982 Nautical Ketch, 45' 2003 Silverton MY
4 strms, excellent charter boat 3 strms, excellent condition
$199,900 $260,000
Sail
36' 1980 Albin Stratus, daysail business separate $45,000
38' 1967 Le Comte, Northeast 38, classic, excellent cond. $80,000
41' 1980 Morgan O/I '04 Yanmar, A/C $69,000
50' 1978 Nautor MSailer, refit, excellent cruiser $325,000

Power
37' 1986 CML Trawler, Great liveaboard, needs engs. $20,000
38' 1977 Chris-Craft Corinthian, roomy, cockpit $30,000
40' 1997 Carver MY, Cockpit for diving, twin Crusaders $89,900
58' 1974 Hatteras MY, Classic, DD's, 3 strms $110,000

Call, fax or visit our website for a complete list of boats for sale
www.stthomasyachts.com


YACHT MANAGEMENT SERVICES
SKINNER'S YARD, CHAGUARAMAS. T INIDAO. WI.
TEL U868634 683 634,8FA. i 8681 F 63 269
Conlact Frances at dynamileunarinncgmnail.comn A
www.yachtworld.com/dynamitebrokcrage J C
www.dynamitemarine.com

Large selection of Yachts & Power Boats




Eg * *'""UJ: *H










4D I I I
Cirt ea Com as Iare I IIe


S Antigua


S1011 I YIIARIBOUR
L� 'Matilli & Boatyud, AituliIR -w
A Safe iHaenfor Yachtsmen
* Full service. ellered mnui
* Efficln t irtyiur wtlh 24 Wiu srty
* . Isr of crdli pio 70 feet
* Seciure togre area oi coflele
* [Diccl rlltglkr lo I iop & Nonrt Autenca
* D'iscmilnl loii lcmu rate, at S ierypuacbl Vck
A d. '.... 1t41m 11.. .. 1 . " I. .a .n . l . . a.
T ' 1 26t 462 6~( 2


onJF=c


Azores


MID ATLANTIC
YACHT SERVICES
PT-9900-144 HORTA I FAIAL, AZORES
Providing all vital services to
Trans-Atlantic Yachts!
Incl. Chandlery, Charts, Pilots, Rigging
EU-VAT (16%) importation
Duty free fuel (+10.000lt)
TEL +351 292 391616 FAX +351 292 391656
mays@mail.telepac.pt
www.midatlanticyachtservices.com

Bequia


KI FISHER

I _ FUEL
WATER
MOORINGS
-. *GARBAGE
DISPOSAL
EMAIL: 1 vyc i.,, . , 1[ @hotmail.com
PHONE: 1 (784) 532 8006
Quality Services & the Best Prices
in the Caribbean


LULLETS TACKLE SHOP
#1 CHOICE IN FISHING &
SNORKELING & SCUBA DIVING GEAR
FRONT ST, BEQUIA ISLAND
McCOY ST, KINGSTOWN, ST. VINCENT
UNION ISLAND
TEL: (784) 458-3420 / (784) 485-6255
FAX: (784) 458-3797
E-mail: lulley@vincysurf.com


Bequia

PORTHOLE RESTAURANT & BAR
& Shoreline Mini-Market
We serve breakfast,
lunch and dinner
VHF CH68
Phone (784) 458-3458
A friendly atmosphere where you can sit and meet people.
Admiralty Bay, Bequia
Noelina & Lennox Taylor welcome you!


Bequia

DAY SKIPPER
& YACHTMASTER
Shore based courses over 10 days
EC$1950
Write John Cawsey,
Yacht Master Instructor,
C/O Postoffice
Port Elizabeth, Bequia
Tel (784) 455-7631



* ,.,',- Gourmet Ice Cream
Fresh Yogurt
Frozen Yogurt
-. , Fresh Fruit Sorbets
Toppings
Sundaes
SQts.& Half Gal. Tubs


T BEQUIA
Tel: (784) 593 7264
Located at Gingerbread Cafe

Tel: 458 3485 * VHF 68
Situated just below Coco's Restaurant
) i tl (I Specialising in chilled,
S * frozen & canned foods
Great selection of Cold Meats, Salami,Turkey, Prosciutto,
Cheese, Cream,Juices etc.
Seafood, Shrimp, Prawns, smoked & fresh Salmon, Fish, Lamb,
Steaks, Baguettes baked freshly every day.
Enjoy our popular Baguette Sandwiches made to order on
or off the premises or takeaway.Try our Smoothies!
Provisioning forYacht Charters, large or small orders
for Restaurants, Hotels,Villas or simply to enjoy at home.
Call us on VHF for our delivery service to your yacht
We are also situated in Calliaqua, St. Vincent 456 2987
Experience ourfriendly service as always!

PIPER IARIINE STORE
Bequia - Port Elizabeth
Rigging, Lifelines
Stocked with lots of marine hardware,
filters, nuts & bolts, impellers,
bilge pumps, varnish & much more.
(784) 457 3856 - Cell: (784) 495 2272 - VHF 68

THIS COULD BE


YOUR
MARKET PLACE AD
tom @ caribbeancompass.com
r contact your local island agent

continued on next page -


L .1 In


I Tel:(8)4837










I Cairibbean Compass I irket Ilaee


Carriacou

CARRIACOU REAL ESTATE
Land and houses for sale
For full details see our website:
www.carriacou.net
or contact Carolyn Alexander at
Carrlacou Real Estate Ltd
e-mail: Islander@splcelsle.com
Tel: (473) 443 8187 Fax: (473) 443 8290

We also handle Villa Rentals &
Property Management on Carriacou



...h . -
.taa l � ' nwli
fci s wiu Et�M rriSSSB
T**c^&^r .fkgMr ,^l~u t/ ^ ^,^^
�iii� iihwctrrt* t & f 'tT wtrl- ^^^^^!S


C.>,


jgeach jgar BJistro
5illsborough, Carriacou
The Pink & Blue Place on Hillsborough Beach
Pull up your dinghy on the sand right next to it
& enjoy a light lunch and cocktail or a BBQ at night
Danish chefin the house!
Tel (473) 410-4216


We are on-line:
www.caribbeancompass.com


Grenada









S-
,1 'm-- .........u i 41 .-701N
04IN70fllf


TechNick Ltd.
Engineering, fabrication and
welding. Fabrication and repair of
stainless steel and aluminium items.
Nick Williams, Manager
Tel: (473) 536-1560/435-7887
S.I.M.S. Boatyard, True Blue, Grenada
technick@spiceisle.com


Martinique


A ,




Dominique AMICE
Port de Plaisance, 97290 Le Marin, Martinique, F.W.I.
Tel: + (596) 596 74 94 02 * Fax: + (596) 596 74 79 19
Mobile: + (596) 696 28 70 26 * acyb@mediaserv.net
www.acyachtbrokers.com * www.bateaux-antilles.fr


hipchandl
Le Man. I


er An emr -
MarIn nque

- U
~" ~ !W -10,*

,4'^^Za"P


' Martinique

L: oWoN a GFLGs?


Installation / Repair
Zac artimer - Le Marin, Martinique FWI
Tel: + (596) 596 650 524 Fax: + (596) 596 650 053
yescaraibes@hotmail.com


Sea Seiices
SHIPCHANDLER

Contact us at
aeaservices972 0@orange.fr
We're glad to help

109 rue finet DEPROGC
97200 FORT-DE-Fi NCE - MA ,hei ,.- t
On rhe pag feint
Tot +596 5970 26 69 - Fax +596 96 71 60 53
continued on next page -


mmrrrm


I











Cribba Cops Mare PIe


S Martinique




Fr6d6dc Moser
Electro-MEcanlque & RfriSgration Marine
M.4nr d. Marit. Marfh4i iu


TO -*5 10156 J4 Of 03Fu *596 101W MI466
CSM *590101696221989
nwmJvwlgeac a-innul- -.ml : tamuWmnido

f? uMarin, Martinique
Mq Bar
6_ *1 Restaurant
* Deli
Opening Hours Happy Hour Every Day
from 7AM -11PM from 6- 7PM
Telephone: 0596 74 60 89
WIFI Connection for our Guests
%u.reisauranl nmangoba\.conm



Voiles Assistance
Didier and Maria
LE MARIN/MARTINIQUE
Sails & Canvas (repairs & fabrication]
located at Carenantilles dockyard
Open Monday to Friday 8- 1 2am 2-6pm
Saturday by appointment
tel/fax: (596] 596 74 88 32
e-mail: didier-et-maria@wanadoo.fr


St. Lucia


L'Essence Massage
y Karens special Yacht Crew Massage"




Rodney Bay Marina, Tel: (758) 715 - 4661
E-Mail: Lessencemassage@spray.se
Karen O. Roberts
Diploma in Massage/SPA Therapy from Sweden


1R3 .NEY Sail repairs, biminis,
awnings, new sails,
rigging, splicing,
cockpit cushions,
S L S servicing of winches.
Agents for Doyle,
Furlex & Profurl
Call KENNY
s. Lc Tel: (758) 452-8648 or
St. Lucia (758) 584- 0291


St. Lucia

CHATEAU MYGO
HOUSE OF SEAFOOD-.
Steaks * Seafood * Pizzas
Marigot Bay, St Luci
Third Generation locally. ,
owned & operated.
Happy Hour All Day & -II IJq1 ht
on our cocktails & b..r'
Free docking for yachts dining with us!
Free Water Taxi Pick Up
from your yacht to our dock!
5 and more people & captain eats for free!
Phone: 758-451-4772 VHF 16

C DYNAMIC
' 1,.in 11,,,
- I c- ? fabrication
I....... . Director
Lawrence Lim Chee Yung
aka Chinaman .
Rell andrepaira pes mac iney
Fa rcatio 0p plpts, staion p Jat, n L=anplates,
anLhor nralzt1, solarpanael arhe . ..re
Rodney Bay Boatyard, Gros Islet, St. Lucia
Tel: (758) 485-0665 or (758) 384-0665
e-m ail: ..... . . - I. ,1 .


TWO BEDROOM
APARTMENT
FOR RENT
OVERLOOKING
RODNEY BAY MARINA,
ST. LUCIA
US$30.00 PER NIGHT
ALL AMENITIES
CALL (758) 452-0147 OR (758) 720-8432


St. IMaarten




E RfElNM COMillOfSIATIEras U
cm1 RHE i * 1WICMlUUlA FIMM
HiEMR PIuWER FMT a PMEi 5 A PNNTS
UI1DERM11N6 PAINT ETC ANI1FUJUNG PLEIGLASS
CONTRACTOR
Mangun 971 insure lMarn
Tel. *590 690 674 270
Email carillcomposl ePilno Ii


,�-


SSt. Maarten

* CIRExpress
COURIER SERVICES
St. Maarten/ St. Martin, collect
and deliver door to door
ST. MAARTEN
Packages Pick- up call:
Tel/Fax: + (599) 544-3276
Tel/Fax:+1(305) 515-8388
info@cirexpresslogistics.com
www.cirexpresslogistics.com


Trinidad


CARIBBEAN MARINE
ELECTRICAL LIMITED O
. -- AC & DC SYSTEMS
On if Inaillatkm L U ass
- High Output AllMmacni , & Rutlosn
. -- Chiaru a In l.tl+, charer
-So--- l & Win d Sy .1
S Baeries - Bepcyck Boaters in









1, - V_ i I Hel I I I
Saints Steel Apart Flents
* Sern-t ODkirckn

* Boaters snop





\1.\[. S ii II 1 .11 ^ I I !

* Stainless Steel Beat Fitifngs
E.. poxy Resins
-. Polyester Resins









arrow
sails & Cdri'va
iB_ D 3Ms I "piu-,.- N',-w M RU Cuiatln � 9 nwria AV I
" 1i r68� 4 41? l7 I . ;+.P I VHFCi i a;n-nB
continued on next page -












IAC A I r eI Compass Mair et


Trinidad Caribbean-wide


2002, Fresh water-cooled
5-liter EFI Bravo 3 x 2 Mercury engines.
Generator, Air-conditioning, 190 engine hours.
Boat is in perfect condition * Needs nothing.
US$ 59,000.00
Lying in St. Maarten * Will deliver to neighboring islands.
Contact: Don Robertson * E-mail: baja2010don@gmail.com
Phones: (599) 527- 8208


FSSON .... -
PLANS AHOY! .......
KXeep ialhng k's









Vamac c- c gag through e











Av. Raul Leonr Playa Concorde, &ade Asovene
tearmt n e 1.1 i rits ih
Scienre, Math,







r anezuer lara



v1,58s-c- , CA.A.
Marine Distrbutors

vemascajlc-yr, rmnel e


Av. Raul LeonL. Paya Concrde, Sede AsOavBU
Poran',ar ;sJ Msrmgaila
I'B ZY .'52iU?
F 58 295 2647293


BREAKING NEWS:

Trinidad Yachting Industry Gets Positive Results From December Meeting

In December 2010, the Yacht Services Association of Trinidad & Tobago (YSATT) held an important
industry. The meeting was called by the Honourable Stephen Cadiz, Minist I i ,
special invitees included the Deputy Commissioner of Police, senior officers in the Trinidad & Tobago
Coast Guard, the Comptroller of Customs, the General Manager of the Chaguaramas Development
Authority (CDA) and senior representatives from the Immigration Department.
During the question and answer period, the very strong sentiments expressed by members of the
yachting industry gave the government representatives a clear indication of the frustrations being
encountered by the sector. As a result, the following steps have been taken to immediately remedy
the situation:
The Comptroller of Customs has introduced special provisions for the yachting sector, including:
* An extension, from 4 hours to 24 hours, has been made of the time allowance between outbound
clearance at Customs and departure from Trinidad.
* Henceforth, no overtime fees will be charged for the examination of boat parts, spares and equip
ment, even when this procedure is conducted during traditional overtime hours.
* No overtime fees will be charged when a yacht arrives in Trinidad outside of normal working hours
but arrives at Customs during normal working hours. Overtime fees will, however, be charged on week
ends and public holidays.
In addition, both the Trinidad & Tobago Coast Guard and the CDA have established security patrols
at night in the bays. YSATT now augments these patrols through the employment of a security patrol
boat in Chaguaramas Bay. It is noteworthy that there have been no incidents of theft in the bays over
the past several weeks.
High level meetings with representatives of the Trinidad & Tobago Police Service have also taken place,
Yachting matters. Changes were made when top -,i... in regular patrols inside the marinas and boatyards, especially at night.
Trinidad & Tobago officials met with yacht services I I is extremely appreciative of all government representatives for their concern and for the steps
representatives to address problems affecting that have been taken to rectify the problems that have beset the industry in the recent past and looks
the yachting sector forward to continued collaboration with the government to strengthen the yachting industry.


ELECTRDPICS




MASI RVOLT SKy"'.."'
ACR
PURUMO sl


DOLLY'S ANSWERS
1. b) 2. d) 3. e) 4. c) 5. a)


r


r ~


I Po


SPOTLESS STAINLESS
MAKES STAINLESS STEEL SPARKLE
No Rubbing. No Scrubbing. No Polishing.


I ��� iiX
Removes rust and "surface iron" that causes rust
Great for hard to reach places
Protects Stainless Steel
Less Time, Less Effort, Super Results!
Available at Island Water World or
www.spotiessstainiess.com















CLASSIFIED


1982CATALINA32 19.000 US
1986 OYSTER 435 35.000 GBP
1987 IRWIN 44 119.500 US
1999 BAVARIA 38 Caribic
55.000 US. 2006 BAHIA 46
Exclusive 435.000 US.
2009HUNIER45DS 239.000 US
S- j.







YOUNG SUN 461 VENUS 1984 KEICH

cruiser GPS, RADAR, VHF. Auto
Pilot,. EPIRB,. SSB. Water Maker,
Air-Con, Solar Panels, Wind

US AN
or Tel:
(596) 696 90 74 29
BOATSFORSALE INTRINIDAD
Tel (868) 739-6449
www.crackajacksailing.com


work TestdueOctober 2010.
EC$4800/offers considered
.::. CLUTCH PUMP, brand new DECKHAND/MATEavailable. SAIL-LOFT, UPHOLSTERY
with fittings. EC$2300/offers Chapman School of 100m2. established since
considered. Bequia Tel: Seamanship graduate. 2002 located Carenantilles
(784)432-5201 STCW-5. First AidCPR SVG Dockyard. Le Marin.
50T Masters License, also a Martinique. New sewing
Tohalsu30HP long shftUS 2000 good cook! Photos/experi- machines (less than 4 years
Sail boat props 3 blade 13 to ence/references available. Price 120 ODD Euros Tel: (596)
C AniC COi. I LOO 6 0.c: COBEC ii ee ir, 22" from US200. Winches. SVG/Bequia national. E-mail 596 74 88 32 E-mail didier-et-
PP - :....- ..- :- : Barlow, Brient, Lewmar from kellee 435@hotmail.com maria@wandoo.fr
all. New cockpit, deck etc. Caribbean) and elegant live US 250. Yanmar 3HM35F best
Re-planked & re-fastened aboard yacht was painted offer 10ft Valliant RB US890. *-- e ANTIGUA BASED TOWING,
in bronze. Quick boat. Lying Nov.2310 and is ready for future Aries Circumnavigator wind SALVAGE, DIVING Long
Antigua. Become part of passages. More photos on www. vane best offer E-mail NE FLORIDA, OCEAN ACCESS established business includes
W.Indian sail. A non-profit apdloduck.comorbytheowners. Yachtsales@dl-yachfing.com House. deepwater dock, boat twn-engine diesel work boat
heritage rebuild. Lying Trinidad. E-mail Tel (758) 452 8531 liftmooring.1.65acresUS$325K & equipment. US$95k. Tel:
US$29.000.0 Offers. E-mail ohnstreth46@hotmail.co.uk. www.bustedbike.com (268) 464-3164 E-mail john-
rayinnington@hotmail.com SAILS AND CANVAS bentiey890@hotmail.com
GIBSEA 33, Price negotiable, EXCEPTIONALLY SPECIAL GRENADA PRIME PLOT over
needs work wel equipped & DEALS athttp://dovecarib- loolng La Sagesse Bay with
documented located at bean.com/specials.htm beach access. 30167 sq ft.
Grenada Marhe Tel: (473) 405- E-mdl tim.amoldryca-orline.net TIME FOR WELLNESSI! Feel the
3947 Emnalarthurban@gmal.com TACKTICK WIRELESS/SOLAR benefits of magnet therapy
INSTRUMENTSDiscountprices: with our fabulous range of
Jewellery for adults, kids &
SLA POMPE, BEQUIA pets. Distributors wanted.
Large 2 bedroom house and/ Tel (868) 299-5565
epeen.,eAfn.d e eo a 1 bed studio apart ent. www.sbs.energetix.tv
Excellent condition I through HMARINE TECHNICIAN Marine Big verandah and patio. 1 -
out. 5 cabins.4 electric head Enineerng Co in Grenada is stning vie cool breeze .j
new riin 08. new ea seeing technicians with wok Interne cable TV 2 weeks
de ks I xchatplofe r iESng exeriencenmdnea edi minimum, excellent long U 50 per wd - include nme,
GPSauto plot w aker en anderaton term rates, Tel (784) 4951177 odd e and numbers in count
GPne ato pio, ERB H electrical, electronics, water- email: louisjan@vincysurf.com Line drawings/photos occompany-
e4or P :.- makers & wind generators. IngclasOsfledSareUS$1O Pre-paold
s more. 41500GBP offs l in Blue Lagoon Ideal for cruiser independ- RODNEY BAY, 2 BEDROOM APT by e 15th of themonth No replies
considered. Lying Bequia. St. intent, US$75ho ent tech. Pease E-mail CV to Overlooking Rodney Bay
ul da 7otmaco E-mail wiscuai.com.br enzamanespi Marina, St Lucia. US$30.00 per
pauldakin1978@hoimal.com night, all amenities. Y C -
LOOKING TO BUY 38 to 45' Tel(758) 4520147/720-8432
I sailboat in Caribbean.
$75.000 max. E-mail REMEMBER
captbill1212@hotmail.com to tell our advertisers you
F i saw their ad in Compass!


I- , I I -, I I-
I ' " ,! - ,- - ,I ,,- .. t.. -
com/belize

46' PETERSON PERFORMANCE
CRUISER 1988 Center cock-
pit, single owner lovingly
maintained. Sailed through
out the Caribbean and now
located in Trinidad. Ready
for you to start cruising tomor-
row. USD 189,999 E-mail
SailingOnFree~aol.com M
SangOnFreeao.com MODIFIED6M BIWI MAGIC, lan
HowettDesign wing keel, built
1989. She is modified with a
Cuddy, inboard engine, and
accommodation. She has
been campaigned success
fully across the Caribbean win
ning class at ASW 2009,
Antiua Classic 2010, Rolex
2004 BVM 2004 and several
OI . 6.S1,.tL'100 : : - HeinekenRegattas.BiwiMagic
�. ,is simplified, easy to sail and
1, : ri. , :r ,, .I race single handed or under
,i,, spinnakerwith a crewof three.
: : -rs ,', : -, . .... r JollyHabourAnfigua Geoffrey
accommodations electric D. Pidduck Tel (268) 725-7702
toilet, double bed, stove, E-mail pidduckg~candw.ag
fridge, computer. Tel (473)
415-8271 E-mail Richard.
turbulence@spiceisle.com


CARRIACOU SLOOP SWEETHEART
Massive price reduction due
to owner relocation. Race
ready, incl. 6 sails and inboard
30hp Yanmar.Lying Antigua.
US$35, ODD (ONO)
Tel: (268) 464-0845


WASI 60KG STAINLESS 361
ANCHOR. Lying Grenada,
brand new, unused, half
price. USD1600. E-mail
tim.arnold@rya-online.net
BOAT STUFF Two Barient 36 self
tailing winches. These are suit-
able for a 45-6 boat ($7000
new) $3000 for pair. New, 2
lengths Hard black rubber rub
rail. 23/8 wide xl 1/2 high x
1@ 451ong and 14 51 long
$350. Sailboat 3 blade prop.
left rotation x 19 diam x 19
pitch. $225. Garhauer hard
oom vang fits 45 - 50 boat
$275. radar reflector. $50. Tel:
(340) 244-0605. (401) 965-1284
SPINNAKER POLE, 16ft good
condition. EC$2000/offers
considered. UFERAFT, 8 per-
son SOLAS rated with paper-


I ADVERTISER IN E


ADVERTISER


LOCATION PG#


ABC Manne Curacao
Adventure High School Grenada
Anjo Insurance Antigua
Apt for Rent St Lucia
ARC Dynamic St Lucia
ARC Europe C/W
Art & Design Antigua
Art Fabnk Grenada
B & C Fuel Dock Petite Martinique
Barefoot Yacht Charters St Vincent
Barrow Sails & Canvas Tnnidad
Basil's Bar Mustique
Bay Island Yachts Tnnidad
Bequia Venture Bequla
Blue Water Sailing USA
Budget Manne Sint Maarten
Business Development Co Tnnidad
BVI Yacht Sales Tortola
Captain Gourmet Union Island
Caralbe Greement Martinique
Caralbe Greement Martinique
Caralbe Yachts Guadeloupe
Caribbean Manne Electncal Trinidad
Caribbean Propellers Ltd Tnnidad
Caribbean Sailing Associaton Canbbean Wide
Caribe Composite St Maarten
Carnacou Silver Diving Carnacou
Chateau Mygo Restaurant St Lucia
CIRExpress St Maarten


ADVERTISER LOCATION PG#
Clippers Ship Martinique MP
Cooper Marine USA 40
Crews Inn Trinidad 10
Curagao Marine Curagao 27
Diesel Outfitters St Maarten 33
Diginav Martinique 36
Dockwise Yacht Transport Martinique 8
Dominica Manne Center Dominica 39
Down Island Real Estate Carriacou MP
Doyle Offshore Sails Tortola 4
Doyle's Guides USA 20
Drop Anchor Dominica 35
Echo Marine - Jotun Special Trinidad 28
Edward William Insurance International 37
Electropics Trinidad MP
Femando's Hideaway Bequla MP
Food Fair Grenada 34
Franglpani Hotel Bequla 33
Free Cruising Guides C/W 32
Golden Taste St Lucia MP
Gourmet Foods Bequla MP
Grenada Manne Grenada 26
Grenadines Sails Bequla 21
lolaire Enterprises Canbbean Wide 34/36
Island Water World Sint Maarten 48
Johnson Hardware St Lucia 30
Jolly Harbour Antigua MP
Jones Mantime St Crolx 36
Kerry Manne Services Bequla MP


ADVERTISER LOCATION PG#
Kingfisher Manne Services Bequla MP
La Playa Carnacou MP
Lagoon Marina St Maarten 11
L'Essence Massage St Lucia MP
Lulley's Tackle Bequla MP
LumbaDive Carnacou MP
Mango Bay Martinique MP
Maranne's Ice Cream Bequla MP
Marc One Manne Tnnldad MP
Margot Beach Club St Lucia 33
Marina Royale St Maarten 17
Marina Zar-Par Dominican Rep 39
Mclntyre Bros Ltd Grenada 37
Mercury Marine Canbbean Wide 7
Multihull Company Canbbean Wide 39
Mid Atlantic Yacht Services Azores MP
Nature Conservatory Canbbean Wide 10
Northern Lights Generators Tortola 6
Off Shore Risk Management Tortola 29
On Deck Antigua MP
Perkins Engines Tortola 9
Piper Marine Bequla MP
PJ's Laundry Service Grenada MP
Porthole Restaurant Bequla MP
Power Boats Tnnldad MP
Quantum Sails Tortola 21
Renaissance Manna Aruba 5
Sea Hawk Paints CW 19
Sea Services Martinique MP


ADVERTISER LOCATION I
Ship's Carpenter Tnnldad
South Grenada Regatta Grenada
Spice Island Marine Grenada
SpotlessStainless Canbbean Wide
St Maarten Sails St Maarten
St Thomas Yacht Sales St Thomas
SVG Air St Vincent
SVG Tounsm St Vincent
Technick Grenada
Tikal Arts & Crafts Grenada
Tilikum Martinique
Townhouse Mega Store Antigua
Trade Winds Cruising Bequla
Trans Caralbes Rallies St Maarten
Treasure Island Casino Canouan
Turblence Sails Grenada
Turbulence Sails Grenada
Tyrrel Bay Yacht Haulout Carnacou
Venezuelean Manne Supply Venezuela
Virgin Gorda Yacht Harbour Virgin Gorda
Volles Assistance Martinique
Wallilabou Anchrorage St Vincent
WIND Martinique
WIND Martinique
Xanadu Manne Venezuela
YES Martinique
MP = Market Place pages 42 to 45
C/W = Caribbean Wide


J








iU __/ IIi
teS












shop

islandwaterworld.,


S feigh
'rates


;om


ALL MAS EPOXIES
A safer epoxy that features no -
blushing, easy mix ratios, blen-
dable hardeners, lower viscosity
and most importantly no volatile
organic compounds. Great value
per mixed Gallon, 2 Resin to
1 Hardener Mix. A superior epoxy
that is the choice of top builders.
Resins from as low as 527.20 a Quart


WHAT'S ON SALE

IN STORE?


ALL PETTIT EASYPOXY
The top-side paint of choice for ease of appli-
cation, durability and high gloss. Easypoxy is a
single package blend of urethane, silicone, and
alkyd products. It flows out to a smooth, sleek
finish with excellent hiding characteristics.
Even brushed or rolled, it gives the appearance
of being sprayed on. Ideal on fiberglass, wood or
metal surfaces.
Priced from S32.50 a Quart


I/


I --


ALL C & H LURES 4
A line of salt water lures that
have been proven tournament
winners for years. Great lures that
you can troll plain or with strip
bait.
Priced from as low as S4.50
f w
MRQ^^^^B ~ CT^^'


t
-


Store prices good while stocks last and lor the month ol February only.
Prices In Curacao may be 10% higher.


WHAT'S NEW?
DOMESTIC
AIR-CONDITIONERS
These 'Envirocool' systems use
9 R-417A refigerant and come ready
�J a. - t to install with a seawater pump (incl.
- - seawater intake, supply air grill, etc).
Duct routing is made easy by blowers that rolate to horizontal or
vertical positions. Operation is simple, with a two-knob mechanical
switch for reliable control over air-conditioner functions.
Models from 5,000 to 11,000 btu per hour.
Priced from 52,250.00


AQUASIGNAL LED
NAVIGATION LIGHTS
Completely sealed and waterproof with IP66,
IP67, IP68 testing and certification; abso-
lutely maintenance free; long lifetime and
low power consumption (only 0.18 amps).
Certified USCG for 2 mile visibility for vessels
up to 65'.
Priced from S63.50

PACIFICA PLUS
o.. ANTIFOULING
- *M -r J Designed by Intedlux for those looking for
a copper free antifouling - recommended
for aluminum boats. Pacifica Plus is a dual
S biocide antifouling that uses 'Biolux' Slime
Pu Blocking Technology to combat slime and
'Econea' to ward off barnacles and zebra
mussels. Available in Black, Blue and Red.
- Priced at S230.95 per Gallon

. . .


Island

Water Worldl

keeps you salkE


St. Maarten, Cole Bay: + 599.544.5310 * Bobby's Marina: + 599.543.7119
St Lucia: + 758.452.1222 * Grenada: + 473.435.2150 * Curacao: + 599.9.461.2144




Full Text

PAGE 1

C A R I B B E A N C MPASS FEBRUARY 2011 NO. 185The Caribbeans Monthly Look at Sea & Shore KAY WILSON / INDIGO DIVE SVG WHAT CAN WE SEE UNDER THE SEA? — see story on page 25 On-line

PAGE 2

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 2

PAGE 3

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 3 Click Google Map link below to Þ nd the Caribbean Compass near you!http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?t=h&hl=en&ie=UTF8&msa=0&msid=112776612439699037380.000470658db371bf3282d&ll=14.54105,-65.830078& spn=10.196461,14.0625&z=6&source=embedCompass covers the Caribbean! From Cuba to Trinidad, from Panama to Barbuda, we've got the news and views that sailors can use. We're the Caribbean's monthly look at sea and shore. FEBRUARY 2011 € NUMBER 185www.caribbeancompass.com The Caribbeans Monthly Look at Sea & ShoreGet Downƒƒto Santa Marta, Colombia! ..16GrenadinesBaguette and internet ...........18Smidig KattNorwegians sailing escape ....22All AshoreƒA rainforest hike with horses ..24Tripping OutTop field trips for boat kids ...26 DEPARTMENTS Info & Updates ......................4 Business Briefs .......................8 Caribbean Eco-News...........11 Regatta News........................12 This Cruising Life ....................20 Meridian Passage .................28 Fun Page ...............................30 Cruising Kids Corner ............31 Dollys Deep Secrets ............31 Book Review .........................32 The Caribbean Sky ...............34 Cooking with Cruisers ..........35 Readers Forum .....................36 Whats on My Mind ...............40 Calendar of Events ...............41 Caribbean Marketplace......42 Classified Ads .......................46 Advertisers Index .................46Caribbean Compass welcomes submissions of short articles, news items, photos and drawings. See Writers Guidelines at www.caribbeancompass.com. Send submissions to sally@caribbeancompass.com. We support free speech! But the content of advertisements, columns, articles and letters to the editor are the sole responsibility of the advertiser, writer or correspondent, and Compass Publishing Ltd. accepts no responsibility for any statements made therein. Letters and submissions may be edited for length and clarity. ©2011 Compass Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. No reproduction, copy or transmission of this publication, except short excerpts for review purposes, may be made without written permission of Compass Publishing Ltd. Caribbean Compass is published monthly by Compass Publishing Ltd., P.O. Box 175 BQ, Bequia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Tel: (784) 457-3409, Fax: (784) 457-3410 compass@vincysurf.com www.caribbeancompass.comEditor...........................................Sally Erdle sally@caribbeancompass.com Assistant Editor...................Elaine Ollivierre jsprat@vincysurf.com Advertising & Distribution........Tom Hopman tom@caribbeancompass.com Art, Design & Production......Wilfred Dederer wide@caribbeancompass.com Accounting.................................Debra Davis debra@caribbeancompass.comCompass Agents by Island:Antigua: Ad Sales & Distribution Lucy Tulloch Tel (268) 720-6868 lucy@thelucy.com Barbados: Distribution Doyle Sails Tel/Fax: (246) 423-4600 Curaçao: Distribution Budget Marine Curaçao curacao@budgetmarine.com Tel: (5999) 462 77 33 Dominica: Distribution Hubert J. Winston Dominica Marine Center, Tel: (767) 448-2705, info@dominicamarinecenter.com Grenada/Carriacou/Petite Martinique: Ad Sales & Distribution Karen Maaroufi Cell: (473) 457-2151 Office: (473) 444-3222 compassgrenada@gmail.com Martinique: Ad Sales & Distribution Isabelle Prado Tel: (0596) 596 68 69 71, Mob: + 596 (0) 696 93 26 38 isabelle.prado@wanadoo.fr St. Lucia: Ad Sales & Distribution Maurice Moffat Tel: (758) 452 0147 Cell: (758) 720 8432. mauricemoffat@hotmail.com St. Maarten/St. Barths/Guadeloupe: Ad Sales Stéphane LegendreMob: + 590 690 760 100steflegendre@wanadoo.fr Distribution Eric Bendahan Tel: (599) 553 3850, ericb@cirexpresslogistics.com St. Thomas/USVI: Distribution Bryan Lezama Tel: (340) 774 7931, blezama1@earthlink.net St. Vincent & the Grenadines: Ad Sales Debra Davis Tel: (784) 457-3527, debra@caribbeancompass.com Tortola/BVI: Distribution Gladys Jones Tel: (284) 494-2830, Fax: (284) 494-1584 Trinidad: Ad Sales & Distribution Chris Bissondath, Tel: (868) 222-1011, Cell: (868) 347-4890, chrisbiss@yahoo.com Venezuela: Ad Sales & Distribution Patty Tomasik Tel: (58-281) 265-3844 Tel/Fax: (58-281) 265-2448 xanadumarine@hotmail.comISSN 1605 1998Cover photo: Kay Wilson of Indigo Dive in St. Vincent & the Grenadines captured this thriving reef scene CONSTANCE ELSONSALLY ERDLE NADINE SLAVINSKI "The Compass is a great way of keeping up with current events, regatta news, topical information, environmental issues, and the comings and goings that pertain to the cruising community of the Caribbean." Ñ Reader's Survey Respondent

PAGE 4

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 4 Night Patrols for Two Grenadine Harbours Marslyn Lewis reports: Sailors visiting Union Island can now do so with peace of mind, feeling free to enjoy the pristine beauty and hospitality found in the Grenadines. A new effort of the Tobago Cays Marine Park (TCMP) management, in collaboration with the Union Island Tourist Board and the local police, aims to provide nightly patrol service in Clifton Harbour during the peak tourism season. The patrol service starts at 7:00PM nightly. This time was chosen since it is the time that most guests go ashore to have evening cocktails and dinner and their boats are left unattended. There is no set cut-off time, as it can vary based on the amount of time visitors spend ashore before returning aboard. Lesroy Noel, Project Coordinator with the TCMP, says, I think the initiative is an excellent one, one that is long overdue, and I would like to appeal to the businesses to come on board and get involved. They should see this drive as an investment, because the yachting tourism industry is not what it used to be in the 80s and early 90s. In order to secure the future of this industry we need to start by ensuring the safety of our visitors.Ž He said that in comparison to last year, there was a noticeable increase in the number of yachts moored in Clifton Harbour for the recent New Years Eve celebrations, being one of the nights the service was offered. He believes that the level of support offered by local business will determine the effectiveness of the project and also the life of it. The neighbouring island of Mayreau has also launched a patrol service; it has been in operation since April 2010. According to Owen Forde, an auxiliary policeman and a patrol volunteer, so far TCMP is the only contributor to this patrol. We have seen some improvements since the service started,Ž he says, and we will continue to do our best to offer our visitors a safe environment to spend their vacation. This important drive, however, needs the support of the business communities on both islands to keep it going.Ž He agrees that the service is much needed and believes that once more funding becomes available, Mayreau will be a safe haven. Amid many challenges, the TCMP and the Union Island and Mayreau patrol groups endeavour to provide safety, security and solace to yachtsmen visiting Union Island, Mayreau and the Tobago Cays. For more information contact Lesroy Noel at (784) 485-8191 or info@tobagocays.org. Chateaubelair, St. Vincent, Update The northernmost anchorage on the island of St. Vincent, Chateaubelair, has seen a revival of interest among cruisers lately after a few years on the no goŽ list owing to a series of violent crimes that occurred from 2006 to 2008. „Continued on next page Info & Updates In addition to Clifton Harbour, Union Island, pretty Salt Whistle Bay on Mayreau also benefits from security patrols Nightly patrols during high season add to the attractions of Clifton, the hub of the Southern Grenadines MARSLYN LEWIS CHRIS DOYLE

PAGE 5

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 5 „ Continued from previous page A port of entry, Chateaubelair is attractive as a jumping-off point to shorten the northbound passage to St. Lucia and also as a base from which to explore the unspoiled natural beauty of the island. However, some caution is still advised. The St. Vincent & the Grenadines Coast Guard, which patrols the coast from its base in Calliaqua on the south coast as far north as Chateaubelair on a regular basis, advises yachts not to anchor at Chateaubelair alone, especially overnight. It is suggested that yachts visiting there anchor in groups, or otherwise anchor at one of the bays farther south on St. Vincents Leeward Coast. The SVG Coast Guard base at Calliaqua can be reached at (784) 457-4578. Cruisers Site-ings € Sailor, poet and author of Adventures in the Tradewinds , Richard Dey, has a newly expanded website at www.richarddey.com . € International Boat Industry (IBI) reports that a new consumer-oriented website aimed at boat buyers, www.seedealercost.com , has sent shock waves through the US dealer network. The website, expected to soon go live, will provide consumers with detailed information about specific boat models, including the manufacturers suggested retail price and invoiceŽ pricing that the dealer pays to the manufacturer. Phil Keeter, Marine Retailers Association of America president responded to the news, saying, We believe that the harmful effects that will result from the publication of actual dealer costs to the retail public are self-evidentƒ It is axiomatic that dealer profit margins will shrink to marginal levels as consumers, armed with actual dealer costs, will low ball dealers with purchase offers slightly above the dealers actual costs.Ž Keeter added that the effect in still tough economic times could be catastrophicŽ to dealers, who will be forced to sell at lower profit margins while still maintaining high overhead costs. The last thing you want is for consumers coming into the dealership knowing what the cost of the boat is,Ž Keeter told IBI. The invoice price does not include shipping from the manufacturer, dealer prep, taxes, title, license or other fees, and it does not reflect any wholesale incentives the manufacturer may be offering to the dealer. Cruisers Support Meals From Keels The Carriacou Childrens Education Fund, through its annual fundraising efforts, has again this year made a contribution to the Harvey Vale Government Schools Feeding Program through CCEFs Meals From Keels efforts. This is the fourth year that CCEF has helped to provide hot lunches for a number of Harvey Vale students unable to pay for their lunch. „Continued on next page Lizzy Conegn ( S/V Horta ) and Judy Evans ( S/V Dreamcatcher ), representing CCEF, present this years donation to Ms. Bedeau, in charge of the lunch program, and Vice Principal Mrs. Mills SAILORS GUIDE TO THE WINDWARD ISLANDS

PAGE 6

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 6 Reliability. Durability. Simplicity. Antigua: Marine Power Svcs: 268-460-1850 Seagull Yacht Svcs: 268-460-3049 Bequia: Caribbean Diesel: 784-457-3114 Dominica: Dominica Marine Center: 767-448-2705 Grenada: Grenada Marine: 473-443-1667 Enza Marine: 473-439-2049 Martinique: Inboard Diesel Svcs: 596-596-787-196 St. Croix: St. Croix Marine: 340-773-0289 St. John: Coral Bay Marine: 340-776-6665 St. Lucia: Martinek: 758-450-0552 St. Maarten: Electec: 599-544-2051 St. Thomas: All Points Marine: 340-775-9912 Trinidad & Tobago: Engine Tech Co. Ltd: 868-667-7158 Dockyard Electrics: 868-634-4272 Tortola: Cay Electronics: 284-494-2400Marine Maintenance Svcs: 284-494-3494 Parts & Power: 284-494-2830 www.CaribbeanNorthernLights.com Reliability. Durability. Simplicity. A Family of Generators with Relatives throughout the CaribbeanC001 www.CaribbeanNorthernLights.com „ Continued from previous page The Carriacou Childrens Education Fund is an informal, voluntary group of individuals from visiting yachts from around the world, and a number of concerned local businessmen and women. Since 2000, CCEF has conducted fund raising activities during the last week of July and/or the first week of August at the Carriacou Yacht Club in Hermitage, Carriacou coinciding with the Carriacou Regatta Festival. During this time, CCEF has raised more than $125,000 to provide uniforms, necessary school supplies and other educational assistance to the children of Carriacou. The mission is to help as many children as possible and to fill the gap between what is required for a child to receive a proper education and what the families can provide. Since its inception, CCEF has provided assistance towards this goal in more than 500 cases. Success is due primarily to the hard work and generosity of the visiting yachts and the local population who support CCEF, and is the yachts way of saying thank youŽ to the people of Carriacou for the warm welcome always received. For more information contact ccefinfo@gmail.com. Jamaica Marinas Free Art Show Every Sunday Every Sunday, from noon to nightfall, a free art show is open to the public on the swimming pool patio at Errol Flynn Marina, Port Antonio, Jamaica. The show features the original works of many Port Antonio and regional artists, in many various forms. For more information visit www.errolflynnmarina.com. Charitable Writers Who says cruisers are cheap? Compass contributors who have donated their writing fees to charity over the past year include Nan Hatch, Nicola Cornwell, Michelle Fleming, Michael Howorth, David Lyman, Peter Bernfeld and Frank Virgintino, who donated to St. Benedicts Childrens Home in St. Vincent; Penelope Bliss-Delpy, who donated to My Charity: Water; Jim Hutchinson, who donated to the Bequia Mission; Jack Russell, who donated to the Carriacou Museum; Celia Mason, who donated to Hands Across the Sea; Laurie Corbett, who donated to the Mayreau Primary School; Ellen Birrell, who donated to the Bequia Reading Club; Davina Menudo, Amanda Delaney and Constance Elson who donated to relief efforts in Haiti; Steve Siguaw, who donated to the Bequia Casualty Hospital; Steve Brett, who donated to GrenSave (Grenada Save the Children); and John and Melodye Pompa who donated to the Carriacou Childrens Educational Fund. Your generosity is appreciated. Another Sailor Gives Back Canadian sailor Pearl Mitchell, a well-known face in the Windward Islands after cruising her 33-foot Nonsuch wishbone cat, Legacy , in the area for 14 years, recently revisited Bequia bearing medical supplies for the small hospital there. Staff at the Bequia Casualty Hospital received the donation of medicines, bandages and more with appreciation, and Pearl gladly reports that neither Air Canada nor SVG Air charged her for carrying the large extra suitcase of supplies. The items were collected by Not Just Tourists, a 100-percent voluntary non-profit organization based in Canada that provides donated medical supplies to countries in need worldwide via ordinary travelers. People flying or sailing from Canada to underdeveloped countries can contact Not Just Tourists and volunteer to take a suitcase or bag of medical supplies (no narcotics are included) to a clinic or hospital at their destination. Not Just Tourists has affiliates in Toronto and other key Canadian cities. For more information visit www.notjusttourists.org. Welcome Aboard! In this issue of Compass we welcome new advertisers Adventure High School of Grenada, on page 29; ARC Europe/World Cruising Club, on page 16; Marina Royale of St. Martin, on page 17; and La Playa Beach Bar & Bistro of Carriacou, in the Market Place section pages 42 through 45. Good to have you with us! Nicola Cornwell (left) and John Pompa (above) are just two of the many Compass contributors who have donated to Caribbean-based charities

PAGE 7

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 7

PAGE 8

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 8 WWW.YACHT-TRANSPORT.COM € 1 888 SHIP DYT DYT Martinique : Tel. +596 596 741 507 E-mail: nadine@dockwise-yt.com Photo by Onne van der Wal Yacht at Rest, Mind at Ease CARIBBEAN SAILING SCHEDULE Through June 2011 TO THE MEDITERRANEAN Martinique Toulon 03/2011 Martinique Toulon 06/2011 Martinique Taranto 06/2011 St. Thomas Palma de Mallorca 04/2011 St. Thomas Toulon 03/2011 TO THE EAST COAST USA St. Thomas Newport 05/2011 St. Thomas Port Everglades 04/2011 Nadine MassalyDYT Representative Le Marin, Martinique Business BriefsReusable Bags: Think Eco and Fair! Island Water World encourages recycling in the Caribbean and is introducing Eco bags, made from 100-percent natural fabrics. The bags are strong, beautifully hand-made Township® Fair Trade bags and produced by previously disadvantaged women in Cape Town, South Africa. The bag is sold at the subsidized cost of US$5.00 and each bag sold at Island Water World directly improves their lives. Township is a dynamic social enterprise and centered on a thriving network of seven worker-owned sewing co-operatives, supporting some 70 women and their families. Managing Director of Island Water World, Sean Kennelly, says: We wanted to introduce a true Eco bag, made from natural fibers, strong enough to hold our merchandise „ but we did not want the bag to be produced cheaply in some sweatshop. It needed to be a fair trade bag, where everybody benefits and we found the perfect match in South Africa!Ž In 2010 Island Water World introduced an Eco label, developed to promote ecologically sound marine products sold at their six shops around the Caribbean. For more information on Island Water World see ad on page 48. Special Two-Island Dive Experience Aquanauts of Grenada and Lumbadive of Carriacou have teamed up to provide dive travellers with a twoisland experience in a seven-day vacation. Get the best of the wreck capital of the Caribbean and the island of the reefs! A daily ferry service is convenient for divers, as they do not have to interrupt their dive package for travelling between the two islands.  In Carriacou, you are surrounded by greenery and native wildlife for an adventurers vacation above and below the surface. No mass tourism, no industries, no pollution, but sublime diving,Ž says Richard, owner of Lumbadive Carriacou. Grenada has the airport with non-stop services from Miami, New York, London, Frankfurt and Toronto. It boasts a great variety of wreck diving and a lush interior. This seven-night Grenadine Dive Experience gives divers the best of both islands,Ž says Peter, owner of Aquanauts Grenada (www.aquanautsgrenada.com). Accommodation partner in Grenada is True Blue Bay Resort, while in Carriacou travellers have the choice between Grand View Inn and Villa Longevue. A typical itinerary starts with three nights and five boat dives in Grenada. On the fourth morning it is time to pack up and enjoy the two-hour ferry ride up the west coast of Grenada and past Isle de Ronde to Carriacou. A transfer will bring the diver to the chosen lodging. The next three days are spent diving the island of the reefsŽ „ the translation of CarriacouŽ „ with Lumbadive. On the last day the afternoon ferry brings guests back to Grenada for one more night at True Blue Bay Resort before the next mornings departure. The resort is only ten minutes from the airport. A seven-night package including ten boat dives and all transfers start at US$1,350 for the summer period 2011. Customized packages are also available. Packages can be booked securely online at www.grenadadiveresorts.com/packages/product/ tabid/64/p-4-Grenada-Carriacou-2-island-holiday.aspx For more information on Lumbadive see ad in the Market Place section, pages 42 through 45. Opportunity Knocks for Antigua Sailing Week Entries are coming in fast and plans are well underway to make Antigua Sailing Week 2011, April 24th through 29th, a truly memorable event. If you want to take part, there are many charter opportunities for groups of friends or individuals to enjoy sailing and partying in one of the best places in the world. Gold sponsor, OnDeck has a range of easy solutions to get you racing whether you are a beginner or a seasoned racer. Based in Antigua, OnDeck are Caribbean specialists, providing top quality, whole boat yacht charters and places for individuals to sail in the official Antigua Sailing Week programme. As well as great service on the water, OnDeck pride themselves on the best possible shore support by using their own local maintenance team along with the help of trusted local Antiguan contractors. The hospitality side is not forgotten with complimentary happy hour frozen cocktails, Chivas whisky and cold Carib beer being served to their guests each evening after sailing, from their hospitality tent right in the heart of the action at Nelsons Dockyard. Business Development manager Simon Hedley commented, We are looking forward to a fantastic regatta in 2011 and will be working with the organizers and other supporting sponsors to help maintain this regattas reputation for great sailing and serious partying! We have a limited amount of yacht availability with 40.7s, one last Farr 40. „Continued on next page Diving in Carriacou with a hawksbill turtle

PAGE 9

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 9 Sabre M225Ti The Perkins Sabre M225Ti is designed to replace the Perkins M200 and M235 and provides more than 22% additional available horsepower in the same package.This large capacity 6 liter engine comes in a compact package and only takes out 225 hp. By comparison, our nearest competition takes that out of a 4 liter engine. Running at a low 2500 rpm versus the competitions 3300 rpm or higher, the M225Ti will have a longer life (minimum 12,000 hour TBO) and quieter operation. The gear-driven fresh water pump has a longer life and less to go wrong while the waste gate turbo charger gives better performance at lower rpms. An integral plate-type oil cooler combines fewer hoses with longer life and better efficiency. With Perkins outstanding marinization, excess hoses and belts have been engineered away and everything has easy access for stress-free maintenance.22% more (sea) horses www.partsandpower.comCall Parts & Power for your nearest dealer: (284) 494 2830 M92B M135 M225Ti „ Continued from previous page There are also a limited amount of individual places available on one of our Farr 65s if you are quick. The recent addition of two beautiful Shipman 63s, under management to OnDeck, will also be a great addition to the regatta and we are looking for charters for these yachts.Ž OnDeck are also the official merchandiser for the event and as well as having a merchandise tent in Nelsons Dockyard during the event, they also have gear available online and are actively taking advance orders for your own team branded kit. For more information on Antigua Sailing Week visit www.sailingweek.com. For more information about OnDeck see ad in the Market Place section, pages 42 through 45. Port Louis Marina Goes to Venezuelas Boat Show Port Louis Marina has recently introduced itself to a wider audience with attendance at Salón Náutico, Venezuelas premier boat show. Danny Donelan, Port Louis Marina Sales & Marketing Manager, returned from the Salón Náutico Venezuela 2010 with a positive feeling about the potential of the Venezuelan yachting market. Danny says, We think this can be a great market for us due to the close proximity and the number of boaters involved. The Venezuelan yachting community is a large and vibrant one with lots of potential for business in Grenada. We have work to do in highlighting Grenada and the Grenadines to the Venezuelan community and providing information about the wonderful and affordable sailing available to them.Ž Port Louis attended the Caracas show in partnership with Oscar Hernandez, Director General of Fresh Ideas from Venezuela. Oscar grew up in Grenada and invited Danny as his guest to explore the Venezuelan market. Camper & Nicholsons say, It is a market which we will be exploring a lot more.Ž For more information on Port Louis Marina visit www. cnmarinas.com/marinas/port-louis. Carriacous New Eatery is Steps from Dinghy Dock Jerry Stewart reports: Anyone who has been around Carriacou for a few years will remember Kate when she cooked at the Round House in Bogles and then at The Garden Restaurant in Hillsborough. They will also remember Daniela, one of the original Turtle Dove Pizza girls. The good news is that they have teamed up to open the Slipway Restaurant in the old workshop of Carriacou Boat Builders, next to the Yacht Club in Tyrrel Bay. The location is classic Caribbean. I have always had a high regard for both these American/Italian restaurant operators and plan to be a regular customer! The Tyrrel Bay Yacht Haulout dinghy dock, on the south side of Tyrrel Bay, is a short walk along the beach from The Slipway. Customers may leave their tenders on a secure dock. The Slipway is open for lunch and dinner; bookings are advised. For more information phone (473) 443-6500 or call on VHF channel 16. St. Lucia: Working on Yachting In 2004, the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) report on Yachting in the Eastern Caribbean: A Regional OverviewŽ stated, In recent years there has been much anguish about weaknesses in the regions mainstream tourism and calls for a rejuvenation of the product have been frequent. At the same time yachting has been developing in relative obscurity. Unrecognized, its needs and contributions are often discarded as unimportant and of no significance to the region.Ž St. Lucia, however, is one of the countries that has strongly recognized the value of yacht tourism, has nurtured it, and is seeing the benefits. St. Lucias Minister of Tourism, Allen Chastenet tells Compass , We are constantly reviewing the yachting sector and our overall tourism product. Regarding the year-round yachting sector, maintenance-and-repair is something we are now working on, to develop levels of expertise. We are looking at becoming a hub for yachting in the Windward Islands, promoting our neighbors as well; each island has its own attributes, and were in the middle, so we are well placed.Ž The Atlantic Rally for Cruisers (ARC), which delivers thousands of recreational sailors to St. Lucias doorstep each December, is a bright jewel in the islands tourism crown. John Emmanuel, public relations manager of the St. Lucia Tourist Board, says, Weve tried over the past 20 years to develop the ARC arrival into the ideal yachting event, with many spin-offs. Its always nice when we really see the trickle-down effect. Yachtspeople patronize all aspects of the tourism economy: they come on yachts, but their economic impacts are not limited to sailing. Yachting is another way of getting visitors to our shores, and thats always of paramount importance.Ž St. Lucian professional yacht skipper Nico Philip has worked on day-charter cats, on private yachts, and for charter companies in St. Lucia, and completed a world circumnavigation as crew with an Italian skipper. He is the holder of an RYA Yachtmasters certificate and was the only St. Lucian skipper in ARC 2010. He adds, Yachting is a very, very, very good business, and St. Lucia is in the center of the yachting action. It has a lot of nice anchorages and two well-protected hurricane holes, plus charters can sail south and depart from airports in the Grenadines or Grenada. But our government needs to change the permit to moorŽ policy „ just give a cruising permit like other CSME countries do.Ž Get Ahead One of the worst jobs aboard a boat is dealing with a clogged marine toilet. To save you from this task, Raritan offers the Atlantes Freedom marine toilet with anti-clog, power-shred discharge technology. A unique macerator, consisting of powerful bronze blades, shreds most materials and ends reoccurring maintenance issues. I have a total of eight Atlantes Freedom toilets onboard three boats,Ž says Captain Allen Desilva from Fish Bermuda. Ive had these units for four years and theyre totally trouble-free.Ž Available in integral, remote seawater and freshwater solenoid pump styles, the Atlantes Freedom provides fill, dry flush or fill and flush operation. An aerobic system, it helps to eliminate odors. To reach the holding tank, the powerful pump can force wastewater up to four metres high and a distance of 52 metres. It features a microprocessor control and a solid-state circuit breaker that never needs replacing. Offered in three control options, the manual version is activated by a sturdy, stainless steel handle. The heavy-duty handle can be combined with an electric timer for timed operation. A state-of-the-art wall touch pad allows for a water-saver feature. Cost-effective, the Atlantes Freedom requires less than half the amperage to run than traditional models and uses only three liters of water per flush. Available in 12-, 24or 32-volt DC and 120or 240-volt AC, the versatile toilet is simple to install above or below the water line. For more information visit www.raritaneng.com. St. Lucian yacht skipper Nico Philip says, Yachting is a very, very, very good business

PAGE 10

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 10

PAGE 11

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 11 WANTED: Whale Researchers. You Qualify! Individual humpback whales are identified by the black and white patterns on the underside of their flukes (tails). When humpbacks dive, they raise their flukes above the waters surface and provide researchers the opportunity to photograph the markings on the underside. Natural markings captured on film have allowed researchers to monitor the movements, health, and behavior of individual humpbacks since this research began in the 1970s. Photo-identification is a technique that enables scientists to follow an individual whale anywhere it may travel throughout its life by comparing natural color patterns, fin shapes, and other distinguishing marks that appear in its photographs. The Catalogue of Humpback Flukes for the North Atlantic presently contains more than 6,000 individual whales, identified by photographs of the underside of the fluke and/or dorsal fin and flank. The catalogue is the result of collaboration between scientists, naturalists and tourists who have contributed photographs of humpbacks from regions including North America, Norway, Iceland, Greenland and the Caribbean. See a whale, save a whale „ be a citizen scientist! The Eastern Caribbean and Dutch Antilles are areas where there has been minimal research on humpback whales. The Caribbean Humpback Fluke Project, sponsored by the Eastern Caribbean Cetacean Network (ECCN), is an international project investigating movements of humpback whales between the breeding populations in the Eastern Caribbean and the North Atlantic feeding populations. If you are interested in participating in the project, go to the ECCN website, www.eccnwhale.org, to learn how to take and submit your images to contribute to the Caribbean Catalogue of Humpback Flukes. Photos can be taken from different angles and fluke height above the water; in many cases a partial view of a fluke is still important. No-Fishing Zones Established in Jamaica Jamaicas Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries and seven state and non-governmental bodies signed an agreement in December to institute a ban on fishing in some coastal communities. Under the new partnership, the ministry will invest approximately US$270,000 in the sanctuaries up to the end of this fiscal year. In return, community-based groups will monitor the sanctuaries, which will be designated no-fishing zones for the protection of juvenile fish. The seven parties signing the memorandum of understanding with the ministry were Alloa Fishermen Cooperative Limited, Bluefields Bay Fishermens Friendly Society, the Caribbean Coastal Area Management Foundation, the Montego Bay Marine Park Trust, the Oracabessa Foundation, the Negril Environment Protection Trust, and the Sandals Foundation. The nine fish sanctuaries are located at Orange Bay, Hanover; Bluefields Bay in Westmoreland; Galleon in St. Elizabeth; Salt Harbour in Clarendon; parts of Galleon Harbour and the Three Bays area in Old Harbour, St. Catherine; Montego Bay Marine Park, St. James; Discovery Bay, St. Ann; and Oracabessa Bay, St. Mary. The sanctuaries cover more than 5,000 hectares. Agriculture Minister Christopher Tufton said at the signing of the agreement that successive administrations had failed to protect Jamaicas marine resources even while reef fish stocks continued to decline. He stated that the negative implications of overfishing affected a number of interests and stakeholders: Starting with our fishers and their families who depend on the resources of the sea to survive, over time we have seen where they are catching less in terms of weight and also in terms of quality, and that has impacted on their capacity to survive and to earn a living from our marine resources.Ž The more than 3,000 fishers in the sanctuary areas have been asked to cooperate with the ban. The minister says, We have engaged those communities and we are working with the NGOs so that the relationship of securing those sanctuaries is not an adversarial one, but is one that recognizes the need to preserve those areas in the interest of the very fishers who depend on those marine resources to survive. With proper surveillance and compliance we believe it represents a tremendous opportunity for our marine resources to replenish themselves.Ž US Proposes Controls on Air Pollution from Large Ships in Puerto Rico and USVI Waters Tankers, container vessels and cruise ships are major sources of air pollution in Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands. The United States government has proposed controls on large ships that operate in the waters off these coastlines to reduce air pollution. The proposal to the International Maritime Organization (IMO) calls for the designation of these waters as an emission control areaŽ. The designation would require any large ship operating in these areas to use much cleaner fuel or install better pollution control technology. The sulfur, soot and other harmful air pollutants from large ships reach from ports to inland communities,Ž explains Judith Enck, Environmental Protection Agency Regional Administrator. Exposure to air pollutants from large ships „ nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and particulate matter „ can cause respiratory illnesses, such as lung disease and asthma, and heart disease. The Port of San Juan in Puerto Rico moves approximately 11 million metric tons of goods on nearly 3,800 vessel trips annually. It is also a major destination for more than one million cruise ship passengers. The asthma death rate in Puerto Rico is 2.5 times higher than the rate in the continental United States. Puerto Rico and the US Virgins also have many highly sensitive ecosystems that are already vulnerable and threatened by pollution. The northern and southern boundaries of the proposed emission control area would extend roughly 50 nautical miles and 40 nautical miles, respectively, from the main island of Puerto Rico. Having been approved by the IMO, a treaty amendment for the emission control area will now circulate until July 2011 prior to a final vote by the organization. The EPA estimates that by 2020, the requirements for the emission control area will have reduced sulfur dioxides from ships by 96 percent, fine particles by 86 percent and nitrogen oxides by nearly 30 percent from the levels they would otherwise have been at without the designation. For more information visit www.epa.gov/otaq/oceanvessels.htm. Lionfish: Eat em to Beat em! The non-profit marine conservation organization Reef Environmental Education Foundation (REEF) announces the release of The Lionfish Cookbook , a collection of 45 recipes designed to encourage the removal and consumption of invasive lionfish in the Atlantic. Lionfish have a delicate, mild-flavored, white meat. Red Lionfish, native to the Indo-Pacific, are thought to be the first non-native marine fish to successfully invade Atlantic waters. Lionfish densities in the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and the East Coast of the United States are on the rise due to their lack of predators and prolific, year-round reproduction. Thriving lionfish populations pose a serious risk to marine ecosystems through their predation on native marine life including both commercially and ecologically important species. Many countries are encouraging consumption of lionfish to create demand and incentive for lionfish removals,Ž says Lad Akins of REEF.  The Lionfish Cookbook makes a great gift because it not only offers great recipes, but also gives detailed information on the background of the invasion, lionfish biology/ecology and impacts, and how to effectively collect and handle lionfish.Ž The cookbook can be purchased at www.reef.org.Caribbean ECO-News Compass is a female humpback whale first sighted off Cape Cod in 1984. Since then, she has had nine calves and is now a great-grandmother. She is named for the marking on her fluke that resembles the geometry toolWDCS / L. GIGLIOTTI

PAGE 12

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 12 REGATTA NEWS Virgin Islands Girls Place 6th in 420 Worlds Carol Bareuther reports: Young US Virgin Islands sailors Nikki Barnes of St. Thomas and Agustina Barbuto of St. John finished sixth in the International 420 World Championship held in Buenos Aires, Argentina from December 27th, 2010 through January 5th, 2011. The USVI Girls Team contended with more than 20 knots of breeze for most of the event and improved their score throughout. The girls competed against 40 other teams from 18 nations and five continents. Helmswoman Barnes, now a junior in high school, began sailing at age seven at the St. Thomas Yacht Club. She competed in the eight-foot Optimist dinghy class until age 15, where her accomplishments included Second Best Girl at the 2006 US Optimist National Championships in Florida, Top North American Girl at the 2007 Optimist North American Championships in Mexico, and a placing of 35th out of 255 competitors at the 2008 Optimist World Championships in Turkey. At the International 420 Worlds, the USVI Boys Team of Alex Coyle and Jozsi Nemeth finished a respectable 22 out of 56 total Open/Mens Teams. For complete results visit www.420worlds2011.org.ar. Entries In for Around St. Maarten St. Martin Multihull Regatta The second edition of the St. Maarten St. Martin Multihull Regatta takes place on February 26th, for all boats with more than one hull. The organization committee of the Multihull Regatta is happy to announce that Budget Marine has become involved with the event, supporting the race with trophies for the winners in each class, as well as technical equipment for the race committee. With the regatta in its second year, the event is building and does not have a huge financial backing yet. So we are grateful for every contribution we receive,Ž says coordinator Mirian Ebbers. Last year 15 multihulls, ranging from beach cats to impressive trimarans like Karibuni participated in four classes. Participants came from St. Maarten, St. Martin, St. Barths and Canada. As of this writing 11 boats have committed to racing in the 2011 event. The target for this year is 20 boats, including participants from the surrounding islands. With a course around the island, the second edition of the St. Maarten St. Martin Multihull Regatta has record breaking potential. The start and finish will be in Simpson Bay and can be viewed from the beach at Kim Sha, Marys Boon and Karakter. For more information visit www.multihullregatta.com. Match This! The Budget Marine Match Racing Cup, taking place in St. Maarten on March 1st, will once again showcase the skills of professional skippers from around the world. This third edition of the Match Racing Cup, which is a pre-event for the 31st St. Maarten Heineken Regatta, will again host sailors from around the world. In the past, teams from Poland, USVI, the United States and Russia have participated. Peter Holmberg of the USVI has won the Cup for the first two years, and many wonder if he will take home first place for a third time. Budget Marine is the title sponsor and is offering US$10,000 in prize money this year. For more information visit www.heinekenregatta.com. Gill Commodores Cup at the St. Maarten Heineken Regatta The Commodores Cup 2011 will take place on March 3rd. This spinnaker-class only event is a preevent to the St. Maarten Heineken Regatta, and gives the boats an additional day of racing. It allows the crews and boats the opportunity to warm up for the weekend of sailing, offering them challenging windward-leeward courses. In its fifth year, this event has held its ground and kept a steady entry field of about 40 boats each year. Last years competitors included Titan 15 , skippered by Tom Hill, one of the top class boats at the St. Maarten Heineken Regatta last year, and Sin Duda , skippered by Lindsey Duda, which started her 2010 Caribbean tour with the Commodores Cup and continued a very successful season at other regional regattas. After a successful inaugural year as the title sponsor for the Gill Commodores Cup, Gill, an apparel and accessories leader in the worldwide marine industry, signed on for two more years of sponsorship. For more information about this one-day pre-event visit www.heinekenregatta.com. 31 Years of Serious Fun St. Maartens Heineken Regatta is the biggest sailing event in the Caribbean. Last year, 237 yachts, including 99 bareboats, participated in 20 classes. The events musical performances and parties are equally impressive. This years edition, starting on March 4th, will surely continue the serious fun, both on and off the water. For more information visit www.heinekenregatta.com. „Continued on next page With places for eight teams, the Budget Marine Match Racing Cup will use identical Jenneau SunFast 20s from Lagoon Sailboat Rentals in St. Maarten

PAGE 13

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 13 THE OLDEST CONTINUOUSLY USED RATING RULE IN THE SAILING WORLDCOINCIDENCE? NO WAY!THE STAGETurquoise blue waters, warm consistent trade winds and scenic islands... the Caribbean Sailing Association Rating Rule has been in continuous use in the Caribbean for almost 50 years. It is used in 16 territories by over 35 international regattas, from relaxed local events to hard-core round the buoys racing! The Rule is tailored to the conditions and the racing fleets. THE PERFORMERSExpert, friendly and helpful third party measurers, fluent in many languages, are conveniently on hand at all CSA regattas for pre-regatta measurement, rating advice, class allocation and to assist owners with optimization for specific events and conditions. This hands-on approach and active network of measurers allow the Rule to respond to measurement issues rapidly and effectively. THE AUDIENCEThe Caribbean has long been the preferred destination for racing sailors. The conditions, the variety and the multitude of cultures and events offer you, the sailors, the best possible experience. The CSA Rating Rule is proud to have done its part for almost 50 years. CSA right rule, right place!Visit www.caribbean-sailing.com for details of the CSA Rating Rule and more information on the Caribbean Sailing Association. „ Continued from previous page ClubSwan Caribbean Rendezvous for BVI The 9th ClubSwan Caribbean Rendezvous will take place from the 14th through the 19th of March in the British Virgin Islands. The programme has been designed to fit with the Caribbean racing calendar, following the RORC Caribbean 600, held during late February in Antigua, and the Heineken Regatta at St. Maarten in the beginning of March and the organizers hope it will provide a welcome week of relaxed cruising following the two regattas and before Antigua Sailing Week at the end of April. ClubSwan provides an opportunity for Swan owners from all over the world to share their enjoyment of and pride in their yacht. Cruising events are a focal point in the Nautors Swan calendar owing to the high popularity of these events with Swan owners. For more information visit www.nautorswan.com/ClubSwan. Cutting-Edge Competition for Puerto Rico Heineken Regatta There will be top-notch yacht racing off Puerto Ricos beautiful southeast shores in racing classes that attract sailors from the Caribbean and from around the world. Shoreside parties boast the best of island hospitality. This is what makes the Puerto Rico Heineken International Regatta (PRHIR), set for March 18th through 20th, and held out of Palmas del Mar Yacht Club, the islands premier sailing event of the year. Add to this the organizers ability to incorporate the latest racing trends, and you have an event that offers something for everyone. New this year we will offer a one-day stand-up paddle board (SUP) exhibition and competition,Ž says regatta organizer, Angel Ayala. Jaime Torres of Vela Uno in San Juan will orchestrate the SUP event. Torres is also one of the sailors that will heat up the competition in the big boat classes with his new Tripp 40. Other local talent to watch will be Sergio Sagramossa, formerly of Lazy Dog , who will be racing his new Grand Soleil 54. Puerto Rico now boasts a third J/105, Jonathan Lipusceks Dark Star III , and OnDeck Ocean Racing, based in Antigua, will offer charters for the regatta. Classes will include CSA Spinnaker Racing, CSA Spinnaker Racer-Cruiser, CSA J/24, IC24, CSA Performance Cruiser, CSA Jib & Main and Beach Cat. Kite-boarders from Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic will compete in their own classes. Well offer a mix of windward-leeward courses for the one-design and racing classes,Ž says Ayala. There will be reaching courses for the cruising classes. We may run a distance race to Vieques for some classes.Ž The one-design J/24 and Hobie 16 fleets will especially be out in force. Teams in both fleets will be coming from the Dominican Republic and Mexico in order to train for the Pan American Games, set for Guadalajara, Mexico, this summer. We will also host the Puerto Rico International Dinghy Regatta at the same time,Ž says Ayala. The Snipes, Optimists, Lasers and Laser Radials will sail right off the beach.Ž For more information visit www.prheinekenregatta.com. St. Thomass Rolex Regatta 2011: Quality and Fun The International Rolex Regatta 2011 is set for March 25th through 27th. For 38 years, the event has been attracting racing sailors and their families to St. Thomas, where the St. Thomas Yacht Club opens its doors to welcome guests to three days of racing through the US Virgin Islands. The International Rolex Regatta is a part of the US-IRC Gulf Stream Series, with a professional race management team and an international jury. Nightly beach parties, a reggae music/ food festival, and an unforgettable prizegiving hosted by Rolex lend spirit and color to the occasion. One return competitor is New Englander Phil Lotz, who two years ago finished second in class with his Swan 42 Arethusa . He went on to make headlines with victories at the Swan 42 Nationals and the NYYC Invitational Cup in 2009. We decided to come again because the event is of international quality, its a nice, fun place to be, and its easy to get Arethusa in and out of St. Thomas,Ž said Lotz. His crew and family plan to move on from the International Rolex Regatta to the BVI Spring Regatta and Sailing Festival, which starts on March 28th and is linked to the Rolex Regatta to make Virgin Islands Race Week. Regatta Co-Director Bill Canfield says, One of our traditions is the town race on Friday, where the entire fleet races from the east end of St. Thomas right to the heart of the bustling commercial harbour of Charlotte Amalie. It gives us a chance to share the spectacle of a mass of colorful spinnakers with the people who live on St. Thomas and others who are visiting, and it gives the racers an opportunity to see St. Thomass beautiful and historic capital. Racing is rounded out on the weekend by a mix of island races and windwardleewards designed to test skills and showcase the stunning shoreline.Ž The international Rolex Regatta typically hosts classes for IRC, CSA (Spinnaker Racing, Spinnaker Racing/ Cruising and Non-Spinnaker Racing), One-Design IC24s and Beach Cats. It has been hosted by St. Thomas Yacht Club since 1974, making it the oldest regatta in Rolexs portfolio of international sailing events. „Continued on next page Fraito Lugos IC24 Orion of Puerto Rico on the way to a win in the International Rolex Regatta 2010WWW.ROLEXCUPREGATTA.COM

PAGE 14

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 14 „ Continued from previous page The Rolex portfolio includes famous offshore and grand-prix events such as the Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race, Rolex Fastnet Race, Giraglia Rolex Cup, Rolex Middle Sea Race, Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup and the Rolex Farr 40 World Championship. For more information, visit www.rolexcupregatta.com. BVI Spring Regatta Celebrates 40 Years Held annually on the first weekend of April, the BVI Spring Regatta & Sailing Festival will be celebrating its 40th anniversary from March 28th through April 3rd. Now among the top three Caribbean sailing events, the week encompasses two events back-to-back attracting an average of 125 yachts per year with 80 percent of the competitors coming from overseas. New for 2011 are the Gill BVI International Match Racing Championship, taking place March 30th and 31st off the waters of Nanny Cay, and a classics class for the BVI Spring Regatta, April 1st through 3rd. The Gill BVI International Match Racing Championship will be raced in IC24s. The Inter Caribbean 24, or IC24, is a class of modified J/24s that is endemic to the Caribbean. IC24s use old J/24 hulls and rigs, but with a significant twist. We needed a platform to get active sailors into something that was economical,Ž says Chris Rosenberg, the co-inventor of the IC24 class. We came up with the idea that if we put a Melges 24-style cockpit on a J/24, wed have the perfect boat.Ž The result is a strict one design boat that is ergonomic, economic, and fun to sail. Because of this, the IC24 class consistently draws some of the top sailors in the entire Caribbean. The event has been given Grade 3 status by ISAF, allowing international challengers to earn points towards their ISAF World Match Race Rankings. This being the 40th Anniversary of the BVI Spring Regatta and Sailing Festival, featured will be plenty of other racing for sailors of all levels. The Sailing Festival, the traditional warm-up for the Spring Regatta, kicks off on March 28th with registration and Welcome Party at Nanny Cay Marina. The first leg is the Bitter End Cup, which races up the Sir Francis Drake Channel to the Bitter End Yacht Club, followed by a lay day full of fun activities, and then the Nanny Cay Cup race, which brings the fleet back down the channel to Nanny Cay. Sailors then switch gears, beginning Thursday night with the BVI Spring Regatta Mount Gay Rum Welcome Party, before getting down to the main event, the 40th Anniversary BVI Spring Regatta, which takes place from April 1st through 3rd. For more information visit www.bvispringregatta.org. Instant Hit: Les Voiles de St. Barth It took only one run „ its debut in 2010 „ for Les Voiles de St. Barth to become a fixture for American sailors who compete in the multi-event Caribbean racing circuit. For the 2011 edition of the Les Voiles de St. Barth, scheduled for April 4th through 9th, two US teams „ Vesper/Team Moneypenny and Rambler 100 „ will headline. We participated in the inaugural Les Voiles de St. Barth and knew immediately we would return for 2011; we will have many of the same crew we had last time,Ž said Jim Swartz, a Utah-based venture capitalist who has been circling the globe for years seeking new adventures aboard his various yachts named Moneypenny. His latest acquisition, a TP52 (formerly named Quantum Racing, the 2010 TP52 world champion), replaces his 2010 entry, the Swan 601 Moneypenny, and will have aboard it some of the worlds finest sailors, including Gavin Brady, Ben Beer, Jamie Gale, Brett Jones, Ken Keefe, Matt Waikowicz, and Swartz himself, who, as always, will take the helm. Another owner/driver, George David of Connecticut, former United Technologies Chairman and CEO, will also be campaigning on a new platform at the 2011 Les Voiles de St. Barth. His 90-foot Rambler won last year, and hes back in 2011 with Rambler 100 , formerly known as Speedboat and subsequently Virgin Atlantic , when Alex Jackson and Richard Branson, respectively, aspired to break the transatlantic record. According to project manager Mick Harvey , Rambler 100 , like Vesper/Moneypenny , is undergoing modifications, to bring it up to speed as an IRC racer as well as an all-around record breaker.Ž As early as December 2010 there were already 33 boats entered in five classes: Super-Maxi Yacht, Racing, Racing/Cruising, Classic, and Racing Multihull. Among some other notables are Mike Slades 100-foot Farr design Leopard 3 , the 105-foot classic Herreshoff schooner Atrevida , the 76-foot W-Class boat White Wings , and Patrick Demarchelliers Swan 45 Puffy . For more information, visit www.lesvoilesdesaintbarth.com. Changes Planned for Antigua Sailing Week 2011 Antigua Sailing Week was born in 1967, and it has been going strong ever since. What does Antigua Sailing Week 2011, running from April 24th through 29th, have to offer that is new? The regatta team, having canvassed participants from the past few years, discovered that most sailors want to be in the same port every night, or at a minimum in a marina. The main reasons stated were ease of provisioning, embarking and disembarking the yachts, and security. Of course the obvious choice from which to base the event therefore is English Harbour. „Continued on next page George Davids Rambler shows its winning ways at the 2010 Les Voiles de St. Barth. George and his crew will return in 2011 with Rambler 100 , a Juan K design meant for breaking distance recordsTIM WRIGHT CHRISTOPHE JOUANY

PAGE 15

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 15 „ Continued from previous page As a result, in 2011 the yachts will not be stopping overnight at Dickinson Bay. Races will be based out of English and Falmouth Harbours each day, apart from the Thursday when there will be a race to Jolly Harbour where boats will stay overnight at the marina, with the exception of some of the bigger boats, which will return to English Harbour. On the water, the biggest changes will be to classifications and course lengths. Courses are being designed to ensure that boats of all sizes will race on courses appropriate to them, with a focus on having all boats racing for approximately three to four hours each day. That means the crew will not be exhausted by extended times on the water, and hence will have more energy to party! Bernie Evan-Wong, who races his modified Cal 40, Huey Too , says, I believe this will be my 29th regatta and I can safely say no two Sailing Weeks have ever been the same; each one is a new challenge. Winning your class at Antigua Sailing Week is a definite must for any serious sailor. The 2011 edition promises to be friendlier to the smaller boats and crews, as you can race, win and still have energy to come ashore afterwards and have some fun partying, relaxing and enjoying the beauty of the island.Ž The entire week will deliver fantastic racing for the sailors, and also be the jump-up everyone expects. Parties will include the new Galleon Beach Bash on Sunday, April 24th, the big party at Shirley Heights on the Tuesday night (the night before Lay Day) and the Friday will see an evening prizegiving with free entry to participating sailors. The traditional Dockyard Day and Beating of the Retreat will be held once again on the Saturday and will end with the English Harbour Street Party. And, finally, on the Sunday, the Big Chill Out: The Dickenson Bay Beach Bash. In addition, 2011 will be a year when Antiguans and Barbudans will have time to participate as Easter Day is the first day of racing, followed by Bank Holiday Monday, and the day after the Dickenson Bay Beach Bash is Labour Day. For more information visit www.sailingweek.com. Havana Good Time! The Hemingway International Yacht Club (HIYC) invites you to participate in the Morro Castle Race of Havana from May 18th through 20th. The racecourse is an 18-mile circuit from Marina Hemingway to the entrance of historic Havana Harbor, which allows residents to enjoy the sight of participants a few hundred metres from the fabulous Havana waterfront. Dozens of US vessels are expected to participate in this event, via the Sarasota-Havana Regatta, being held May 12th through 18th. They will join members of the Hemingway International Yacht Club and other sailors from around the world docked at Marina Hemingway for the regatta. Commodore Escrich of HIYC says that all participants in the regatta will enjoy a week of free berthing at Marina Hemingway. For more information on the Sarasota-Havana regatta visit www.sarasotayachtclub.org/Sarasota-Havana-Regatta. For more information on the Morro Castle Race of Havana contact yachtclub@cnih.mh.tur.cu. End of Season Sail! Leaving the Caribbean after a fun seasons cruising can sometimes be a daunting prospect „ the first long passage after six months of day sailing. Making the passage back to the US or Europe neednt mean saying goodbye to cruising friends and sailing alone if you join a rally. Rallies are a great way to sail in company with likeminded cruisers, enjoying social activities ashore and support at sea. World Cruising Club, organisers of the most popular sailing rally in the world, the ARC (Atlantic Rally for Cruisers), also arrange two end-of-season rallies heading north from Tortola BVI to Bermuda. The Atlantic Cup sails from Tortola to Bermuda in early May, before heading west to Hampton, Virginia on the Chesapeake. Also leaving from Tortola in the same week, the ARC Europe rally makes a rendezvous in Bermuda, before heading east across the Atlantic to the Azores archipelago and then Europe. Whether heading back to the US or Europe, joining these rallies means making the 850nm passage to Bermuda with a group of 30 or so yachts. Sailing in company can make the experience more enjoyable, and provides peace of mind and practical support at sea. Safety is paramount on World Cruising Club rallies; before departure each yacht undergoes a safety check and skippers receive a briefing on the expected conditions, plus weather routing advice. At sea bespoke daily weather forecasts are provided by e-mail, and a daily radio net maintains contact between the yachts. Every yacht is fitted with an automatic tracking device, and progress can be followed on the fleet viewer on the rally website. This is a great comfort to friends and family at home, as well as being valuable in an emergency situation. Rallies are also about having fun and meeting other cruisers. In Tortola, sailors can enjoy parties and social activities as well as the excellent facilities at Nanny Cay marina and resort. Rally Bermudan hosts at St. Georges Sports and Dinghy Club offer a warm welcome and a great venue for the fun rally prize-giving celebration. Other activities in Bermuda include a very popular rum-tasting session! Shazam (GBR) J/130, ARC Europe 2010: We found the rally extremely enjoyable, an excellent way of getting the boat from the Caribbean to Europe. It was extremely good value for money and we would recommend it to anybody.Ž Key Facts Atlantic Cup start: 1 May 2011 ARC Europe start: 5 May 2011 Minimum boat size: 27 feet (8.23m) Minimum crew: two including skipper Booking deadline: 1 April 2011 Contact: www.worldcruising.com or www.carib1500.com For more information see ad on page 16. ARC Europe 2010 departing Bermuda for the AzoresWORLD CRUISING CLUB

PAGE 16

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 16 SO the question is: how should one sail from Curaçao to Cartagena? In the past the standard solution was to launch from Curaçao or Aruba and sail the 350 or 400 miles in one straight shot, hoping the weather stayed manageable. If it didnt, it could be a rough trip. Then a number of cruisers, mostly based in Curaçao, began stopping at and exploring numerous places along the northern Colombian coast. A nice set of cruising notes about the entire coast of Colombia (also Curaçao and Aruba) was written up by Lourae and Randy on S/Y Pizzazz ; they are happy to send copies on request (sy_pizazz@yahoo.com). And most recently the new IGY-affiliated Marina Santa Marta opened its docks in summer 2010. Suddenly there are many options for cruising the Caribbean coast of Colombia with a number of intermediate stops available. In November 2010 we left Curaçao on S/V Tashtego , our Lord Nelson 41, and arrived in Santa Marta, Colombia, after making stops in Los Monjes and Cabo de Vela and lucking into a breathtaking passage along the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta 30 miles north of Santa Marta. The serendipitous timing (just before dawn) and location (about 15 miles offshore) meant that we could see the 18,000-foot peaks with their amazing snowfields (just 11 degrees north of the equator!) rising directly up from the sea. Everything disappeared into haze once the sun rose. Ours was among the first sailboats to arrive in the marina and we found everyone eager to be of assistance, if not exactly sure what our needs might be. The marina developers knew their anchorage would be safe during hurricane season and they initially envisioned a primarily South American clientele who would berth sportfishing boats and yachts long term. What they did not realize was how much their location will simplify the trip from the ABCs to Cartagena or the San Blas for hundreds of cruis ing sailors every year. In any event, it is now the case that when it comes to the long-distance cruisers needs, the marina an d the community are on a fast learning curve. There has been a big investment of money and effort in making this marina safe and beautiful. The marina has been very welcoming: all the cruisers on the docks were invited to the opening event, a sportfish ing tournament. In addition, management generously hosted a traditional Colombian Christmas dinner for all the marina guests and staff; the food was unusual and excellent. There is excellent security „ the affluent in Latin America know how to protect their property „ with one or more guards on duty at the entrance 24 hours per day and three Coast Guard boats based in the marina. For more information on the marina visit www.marinasantamarta.com.co/bienvenidos_ingles.html. The marina was constructed at the southern end of the seaside promenade; this means that all of the town attractions are an easy walk. The city of Santa Marta is tranquil and peaceful. Compared with Cartagena and Spanish Waters, the seawater in the marina is fairly clean except after rainstorms. Colombia endured record-breaking rains and flooding all through December 2010. Santa Marta was not strongly affected but in mid-December, after 40 hours of very high waves from the west, the marina seawall showed some damage. Repairs and some re-design were underway within ten days. „Continued on next page A M O N T H I N A MONTH IN S A N T A M A R T A SANTA MARTA Local attractions include venerable churches Tashtego docked at the newest marina in Colombia by Constance Elson DESTINATIONS Fun Cruising Rallies!Join us in May 2011 from Nanny Cay to Bermuda then to USA or Europewww.carib1500.com or www.worldcruising.com

PAGE 17

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 17 „ Continued from previous page The weather soon returned to normal, which is to say lovely: sunny, dry, very warm in the afternoon and cool all evening, night and morning. A big concern for potential Colombian cruisers are the entry procedures. The process is murky indeed and exact details seem to depend on whom you speak with. Everyone agrees that a) you are required by Colombian law to use an official maritime agent who collects your passports, zarpe and boat papers and presents them to the authorities to do their thing; b) when you leave port, your agent fee includes the zarpe for your next destination in Colombia or Panama or wherever; c) if any official has to visit your boat, your agent will be present. If you enter Colombia at Santa Marta, here is the entry process as laid out by our agent, Sr. Edgar Romero (www.Romovela_Ltda@hotmail.com). If you will be in Colombian waters fewer than 15 days the only payment required is US$30 for the Temporary Importation permit (a.k.a. DIAN) and this is included in your Santa Marta agent fee of US$100. If you will be staying in Colombian waters longer than 15 days you need the 60-day Certificate of Permanence (a.k.a. DIMAR), which will cost you US$80. The Certificate of Permanence is paid only in one port, either Santa Marta or Cartagena. We are making sure that this is the case by using the same agency in both ports (for an additional US$70). If you will be using separate agencies in the two ports, you should check how the Certificate will be handled. All payments are cash only, US dollars or Colombian pesos; they do not need to be made on the day of arrival. Cruisers can remain in Colombian waters longer than 60 days by applying and paying for the appropriate extensions. IMPORTANT: IF YOU INTEND TO STOP IN SANTA MARTA, BE SURE YOUR ARRIVAL ZARPE SAYS SANTA MARTA, NOT CARTAGENA. If you dont do this, it will cost you aggravation and money. It is possible to anchor in the bay outside the marina, although there is less room than one might think because the ship channel for the very busy commercial port takes up most of the space. Be warned that the anchorage is untenable if there is a strong wind from the west. For boats at anchor the marina provides a dinghy dock on the innermost slip of Dock A. There is a small weekly fee for use of the dinghy dock, which includes disposal of garbage. Services provided to marina guests for a fee are also available to outside boats, however the bathhouse showers are not. To date, two groups of boaters have obtained propane and the supplier is working out the kinks to expedite the process. The price is good and the tanks come back very full. Until the service dock is completed, fuel has to be arranged through the marina office; a tanker will drive to the service dock and supply gasoline or eightpercent biodiesel. Clean those fuel tanks and carry fuel filters, spare hoses and gaskets! Everywhere in Colombia all diesel is biodiesel. A chandlery and fully developed recreational marine industry lie in the future but it is quite amazing how many repairs, supplies and services cruisers have ferreted out in the local community already. Other amenities like phone calls and phone cards, grocery stores, DHL, laundry and newspapers are all less than a seven-minute walk away. Taxis and (crowded) minibuses are present everywhere and are really cheap. The marina intends to offer WiFi internet access at reasonable rates. For now, Tashtego is enjoying the luxury of an unlocked router somewhere nearby. Tims Café, 50 metres south of the marina entrance, offers cruisers free WiFi, a bookswap and breakfast, lunch or just a cup of coffee. The town of Santa Marta is absolutely delightful. Founded in 1525 it is the oldest city in South America. The population is about 600,000 and the principal industries are the commercial port and local tourism. The seafront avenue features modernŽ hotels of indifferent architecture but directly behind them is an extensive historic district full of classic Spanish colonial buildings, many beautifully restored, others undergoing restoration and even a few fixer-uppers for sale „ bargains of a lifetime. For travel-loving Colombians, Santa Marta and environs have long been a tourist destination so there are many attractive pocket hotels and a wide variety of affordable restaurants and quiet bars. Be warned: international tourism is new here and very few people speak English. This linguistic inconvenience will doubtless improve considerably within a year or two. Local attractions include venerable churches with beautiful altars and several interesting museums. The Museo de Oro and San Pedro Alejandrino, a well-maintained country estate where Simon Bolivar died in 1830, are particularly worth visiting and offer written explanations in Spanish and English. For beach time you can join the throngs at Rodadero Beach or enjoy quirkier and quieter Taganga, each a 60-cent bus ride away. Taganga has several dive shops. Or take your boat for the day to one of the Five Bays. Tour buses will take you to local areas to enjoy la naturalezaŽ and Tayrona National Park offers serious backpacking, including a sixday hike to Ciudad Perdida. Outside the park, solo backpacking in the Sierra Nevada is not a good idea. We rented a car for one day but compared to other Caribbean locations, it was more expensive and definitely more hair-raising. In the future we will leave the driving to the professionals. The town of Santa Marta feels very safe and the people are friendly and helpful. After two days of getting my bearings, I began walking alone everywhere in the historic district and shopping areas, completely at ease even into the early evening. SamariosŽ as local residents call themselves greet you politely and do not treat you as a walking dollar bill. There are two big police stations (state and local) one block away from the marina and yellow-vested policia every block or two. This heavy-firepower presence is a legacy from the violence of past decades but no doubt contributes to the calm and order that prevails. Perhaps the greatest delight that Santa Marta offers is the evening paseo: after sunset everyone strolls along the handsome seaside promenade „ grandmothers, children, families and lovers. Low-key party sounds of people chatting, children laughing, a few street musicians playing are in the air. Vendors are mellow and only inquire once. You sit at one of the outdoor bar/cafés across the street sipping a beer or mojito, totally content to be exactly where you are at that moment. Already I am thinking „ Santa Marta might be the perfect place to spend hurricane seasonƒ. Tel : + 590 590 872 043 € Fax: + 590 590 875 595 € semregine1@wanadoo.fr € www.marina-port-la-royale.com € VHF: 16/12 MARINA PORT LA ROYALE Marigot … 97150 Saint Martin … F.W.I € In the center of Marigot, surrounded by the best restaurants and shops in town € 90 dock spaces and 48 buoys € Hurricane protected € Saint Martin customs clearances at marina office Above: For those sailing from Curaçao or Aruba to Cartagena, Santa Marta provides a welcome stop on the Colombian coast Right: Directly behind the seafront is an extensive historic district

PAGE 18

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 18 TYRREL BAY YACHT HAULOUT CARRIACOU New environmentally friendly haulout 50-ton hoist, 18ft beam, 8ft draft Water Do it yourself or labour available Mini Marina ChandleryTel/Fax: 473.443.8175 VHF: 16 tbyh@usa.net www.carriacouboatyard.com B & C FUELS ENTERPRISE Petite Martinique The best fuel dock in the Grenadines for: FUEL € OIL € WATER € ICE Cheapest prices in the Grenadines Unobstructed dock in calm water 16-18 feet of water alongside Suitable for Large Power Yachts Easily approached from Carriacou, Union I., Palm I. & PSV Contact: Glenn Clement or Reynold Belmar Tel/Fax: (473) 443-9110 email: bandcfuels@gmail.com In February 2010 we decided to sail north from Tobago to revisit the Grenadines and Grenada. The early morning hours found us passing Mustique. To our surprise we counted 18 yachts there. We did not want to throw even more money into the millionaires hat, so we went on to Bequia, where we enjoyed the seasons first ripe Julie mangoes, sweet grapefruits, and breadfruit. Folks, be careful from whom you buy your veggies when you are in Bequia. In the past, we had been cheated three times at the public vegetable market with old and rotten stuff at high prices, and got totally green mangoes with the promise they would ripen, which they never did. Although there are honest vendors among those at the market, we now prefer to buy our fruit and veggies at the various individual vendors on the side of the road. They get fresh, first-grade vegetables and fruits delivered nearly every day from St. Vincent. In Bequia we also enjoyed a visit to the model-boat builders. With lots of love they carefully carve and paint the boats. They like visitors, and it is hard to withstand buying one of their boats. With good sailing conditions we sailed south to Canouan and then Mayreau with its busy Salt Whistle Bay. We remembered our stays there when ours was the only yacht; now we counted up to 27! In Mayreau youll meet boat boysŽ selling fresh fish and lobster. They also offer freshly baked baguettes, which they pick up on Union Island and sell for EC$15 out of their pirogues in the morning „ just in time for cruisers breakfasts. The boys are very kindly, not annoying, just offering their stuff. The anchorage farther south on Mayreau, Saline Bay, lost its former charm for us. Smoke from daily fires, maybe from burning garbage, drifting with the easterly wind through the anchorage, was annoying and after three days it chased us away to Union Island. On Union Island, on the jetty in front of the Bougainvillea Hotel early in the morning, freshly baked baguettes are available for EC$7. On the main street, we can compare a local supermarket and a French one. There is internet available for EC$23 per hour, or 150 metres further down the main road on the first floor, for EC$10 per hour. My eyes had a feast in the French boutique just on the waterfront. Opposite are the colourful and nicely arranged fruit and vegetable stalls with good quality veggies. Apart from the main road, Clifton Harbour kept its pretty local style. Checking out of St. Vincent & the Grenadines in Union Island was fast and very relaxing, as was the check-in to Grenada waters in Hillsborough, Carriacou. We still remember our impressions of Hillsborough in 1990: the beach was loaded with discarded washing machines, cars, motors, and other rubbish, waiting maybe for a huge swell to take it all away. Behind Customs and Immigration, under a big mango tree, was a huge heap of rusty scrap, and on top of that a man was sleeping in the shade! Now, nothing of this is found. The beach is fabulously clean, as is the water. The houses are well maintained; the supermarkets are very well stocked. Internet is available for EC$7 per hour on a fast running line. We were so impressed with the changes in that charming little town that we stayed longer than planned. Noticeable on the main street to the south is an old house with wooden shingles on the walls. Pattys DeliŽ is proclaimed in light green letters on a small sign. „Continued on next page Baguette and Internet: Revisiting the Grenadines and Grenada by Angelika Grüner DESTINATIONS Above: The beach at Hillsborough, Carriacou is fabulously clean. We were so impressed with that charming little town that we stayed longer than planned Right: Christine welcomes customers to Pattys Deli

PAGE 19

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 19 „ Continued from previous page In the tiny little shop youll find Christine with a bright smile behind her spotlessly clean, modern refrigerated counter. Behind her a brilliantly shining, hand-operated cutting machine to slice your ham in any desired thickness. Christine has fresh baguettes (EC$5.50 each), which are flown in frozen direct from Martinique and taste even better than those in Union Island. Various types of croissants, French pâtés and different hams are available, as well as French wine, all for an acceptable price. Christine explained to me that the house is about a hundred years old, withstood all hurricanes, and her grandmother ran a bakery in that building. She named her shop after her granny, whose name was Patty. With easterly winds we sailed down the windward side of Grenada to the south coast. Hearing an announcement on the VHF, we booked a tour around the island. After a refreshing bath under a waterfall „ fresh water! „ we went up into the rainforest to feed the monkeys with bananas, and then continued on farther north to visit an old rum factory where every bottle is still filled by hand. On the way back, our guide drove us to the largest nutmeg factory in Grenville. It was a fun-filled day trip and good value. If you like to eat fish, a visit at the market in Grenadas capital, St. Georges, is a must „ it is the best in all the Windward Islands. You can choose between marlin, yellowfin tuna, mahi-mahi, swordfish, shark, and all the smaller fish. From the large fish you can get just one slice or one pound, whatever you want. Its really worthwhile to visit Grenada for its fish market „ and also for its nice, relaxed, friendly and kindly Customs and Immigration officers. Angelika Grüner is cruising the Caribbean aboard S/Y Angelos. Top left: Fresh produce with a big smile on Union Island Bottom left: The nutmeg factory at Grenville, Grenada Below: Craftsmen at work at Sargeants Model Boat Shop on Bequia

PAGE 20

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 20 PICK UP! Ahoy, Compass Readers! When in Bequia, pick up your free monthly copy of the Caribbean Compass at any of these locations (advertisers in this issue appear in bold ): Bequia Bookshop Bequia Post Office Bequia Tourism Assn. De Reef Restaurant Fernandos Hideaway Frangipani Hotel Friendship Rose Office Grenadines Sails GYE Lulleys Tackle Macs Pizzeria PortHole Restaurant Tradewinds Cruise Club W&W Supermarket Wallace & Co There are dreams that cruisers share. A fair wind and a fair current to move us along the way. Beautiful islands with temperatures that neither freeze nor burn. White sand beaches and secure anchorages and exotic cultures. These are among our favorite things. A very large part of sailing and cruising is our sense of freedom and wellbeing. We make a very large investment of time and money to make our dreams come true and, while sometimes we do not encounter the conditions that we want, we steadfastly pursue what we have conjured up in our minds. The Good Ask any sailor from New York, Montreal, London, Oslo or any point north what runs through his mind during those cold, bleak days of winter and he will tell you that visions of sailing in the Caribbean are the equivalent of sugar plums dancing in his head. What is it that is so compelling about cruising in warm climates? At its essence it is freedom, freedom to go where we please, when we please and to be out there as long as we please. It has been more than 50 years since we have come to dream about the Caribbean as a place to escape to and, better yet, to escape to on a boat. The Andrews Sisters were singing Rum and Coca ColaŽ in 1944: If you ever go down Trinidad They make you feel so very glad, Calypso sing and make-up rhyme Guarantee you one real good fine time! Culturally, the Caribbean includes Native Americans, Africans, Europeans, East Indians, Chinese, and people from the Middle East and from the rest of all the Americas. Such a mix brings with it art, history, music, food and products so diverse as to boggle the mind. If what comes to your mind when you think of the Caribbean is only clear water, blue sky, a fair wind and coconut trees, think again. Starting in Trinidad, we can celebrate East Indian culture and its food, music and art without traveling to India. As we continue north and west up the island chain, we can explore French culture in many different applications „ from the subtle nuances of French Creole in Grenada to the joie de vivreŽ of St. Barths. We can take note of the impact of English culture ranging from the islands where English is spoken to those islands that are still part of the British Commonwealth. Dutch influence shows up in St. Maarten and Saba. In the Greater Antilles we discover the two largest islands in the Caribbean, Hispaniola and Cuba „ with Spanish-speaking cultures that mix Latino, African and Native American features into a very pleasant motif. We must not forget that the western third of Hispaniola is Haiti, which is decidedly French and West African. Jamaica has a motto that reads out of many, one peopleŽ. If you visit there it will not take you long to see that it is so, but at the same time you sense that Jamaica is the center of African-Caribbean culture. All you need do is listen to Reggae music and visit the Bob Marley Museum to understand what it means and the impact it has had around the world. In fact, the cultural diversity of the Caribbean is not just good „ it is excellent! Another tick in the goodŽ category is the fact that there are places where we can really get away from the rat race and relax profoundly. When we come to the Caribbean, if we want to see the good, we must get beyond our own definition of it. In most of the Caribbean, if it is raining hard people do not go out. Rain is a time for one to stay home, safe and dry. If someone is supposed to come to work on your boat, notwithstanding that the work may be inside in the cabin, if it is raining, do not get your hopes up that your contractor will show up. „Continued on next page THIS CRUISING LIFE Caribbean Cruising in the New Millennium:THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY by Frank Virgintino Among the bad: the economic gap. To visitors, this aging cottage might look picturesque. To those who call it home, a yacht might appear to be a floating palaceCHRIS DOYLEAvoiding the ugly: anchor in an area that does not single your boat out as being vulnerable

PAGE 21

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 21 G R E GRE N N A D I N E S ADINES S S A A I I L S & C A N V A S LS & CANVAS B E Q U I A BEQUIA Come in and see us for all your SAILS & CANVAS needs including CUSTOM-MADE stainless steel BIMINI & DODGER frames at competitive pricesLocated opposite G.Y.E. (northern side of Admiralty Bay) Tel (784) 457-3507 / 457-3527 (evenings) e-mail: gsails@vincysurf.com VHF Ch16/68 REPRESENTATIVE „ Continued from previous page Add these insights to the constancy of the tradewinds and a very pleasant climate for most of the year, and you have the Caribbean. Add a boat that (supposedly) gets its power from the wind to the equation and you have a ticket to rideŽ! Let the good times roll, but do not forget to go with the flow. The Bad What do you think the Caribbean countries really have to export? What do you think drives their economies and creates livelihoods? Manufacturing for export had a brief run in the Caribbean: there were free trade zones in many Caribbean countries up to just a decade ago, but those factory jobs have been lost to India and China. Venezuela and Trinidad have oil. But the main engine of the Caribbean economy today is Tourism with a capital T. Tourism is not just hotels, cruise ships and marinas; it is agriculture and food preparation, arts and crafts, car rentals, casinos, fishing expeditions, inland tours, and a plethora of interconnected jobs right down to the person who supplies the beach chairs. However, tourism is subject to economic fluctuation and in a worldwide recession, jobs are easily lost. It is simply not easy to find a job in the Caribbean and even harder to find a career. Opportunities are few and far between. The majority of jobs are low paying and subject to seasonal fluctuation. Perhaps if the Wider Caribbean Basin organized itself like the European Common Market, it might have more leverage. Such organization has been attempted, but the hurdles of politics and economics have made it an impossible task to date. Even in the most developed islands with the greatest infrastructure, the average income is often still no higher than the minimum wage in the United States. Yet the cost of living in many respects is not very different from what it is in more developed countries. When cruising sailboats made their debut in the Caribbean, life was simpler. People made do with less and the expectation level was lower. Cruising boats, still a rarity, were accorded a place of honor and respect. At that time bananas were still being exported and fishing in local waters yielded an abundant harvest. Today the banana economy has been lost and fish are no longer abundant. When todays cruiser calls at most Caribbean countries, he is arriving on what appears to be a floating palace supported by an income (even if a retirement income) that is, in most cases, far greater than what entire local working families earn. It is little wonder that reports of thefts have increased so dramatically over the last 20 years. The crime rate is exacerbated by the loss of jobs caused by the worldwide recession and compounded by the illegal drug trade. Whereas one once could put an anchor down and sleep with the hatches wide open, today there are many areas of the Caribbean where strict security measures must be taken. Dinghies and outboard motors are most prized on the theft scale. Beyond that there are items of boat gear and personal property that are often seen as a months wages, if not more. Theft is the mainstay of the badŽ in the Caribbean and cruisers need to be conscious of this. We must be aware of the risks and reputations of each country in the Caribbean, just as we are aware of weather patterns and the value of a secure anchorage. We must cruise through the Caribbean with the same focus that we have when we prepare our boat for a voyage. The old axiom that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cureŽ can make all the difference in what we experience. The Ugly It is never easy to speak of the ugly. No one wants to go to a gathering and discuss in any detail events that strike fear in our hearts. There are, however, always examples of such events, and websites such as www.noonsite.com and www.safetyandsecuritynet.com are excellent sources of information. On December 21st, 2009 the yacht Triton , a 56-foot sloop with three German nationals on board, was en route from Trinidad to Grenada. At around noon, approximately 40 miles north of Trinidad (position 11°27N 61°52W), it was approached from the south by a pirogue. The seven or eight Spanish-speaking men aboard the pirogue fired shots at the yacht and commanded the crew to stop. Four or five of these men boarded Triton . Although no one was harmed, the boat was stripped of its equipment and the possessions of the crew. On April 3rd, , 2010 a German couple aboard the sailing vessel Spirit of Cologne II were attacked by assailants one mile off the north coast of Venezuela along the Paria Peninsula. Mr. Ropke was shot and killed; his wife, Angelica was left unharmed and eventually rescued. On June 28th, 2010, singlehanded American sailor Mike Harker was anchored in Simpson Bay Lagoon, St. Martin. Two assailants swam out, boarded the boat and robbed Harker, whom they beat unconscious and left for dead. This list can go on and on but the point is that there are incidents of piracy and murder. Acts of this type are not frequent, but one must take note of where they occur and what conditions might provoke such an attack. It takes work to separate fact from fiction, truth from gossip, but the work is worthwhile and will significantly improve your enjoyment and safety while cruising. Do the research and do it in detail. For example, it is no secret that the northeastern coast of Venezuela, especially the Paria Peninsula, is not secure and incidents are now spreading to include the waters around some offshore islands, such as Los Testigos, formerly considered safeŽ. We should avoid sailing within pirogue distanceŽ, or about 50 miles, from such coastlines. On the other hand, Jamaica has the worst reputation for crime in the Caribbean, yet my experience of cruising Jamaica is one of reasonable safety. Most of the crime in that country is in the ghettos of Kingston, and tourists are not often involved. We must avoid anchorages with a proven bad history. We must also avoid dangerous spots in good anchoragesŽ: in all large anchorages there are areas that are less secure than others. Anchor in an area that does not single your boat out as being vulnerable. Always be polite to those who come alongside to sell something or offer a service. Rudeness may well incur someones anger and you may find yourself at 2:00AM in a tough situation. Being reactive and judgmental serves no purpose, and can increase your risk. Never criticize a country or the people of a country openly. If you make fun of the locals or their country, you may get laughs from your friends but the last laugh will most often be on you. Act sensibly and responsibly and you will improve your chances of avoiding the uglyŽ. Being prepared for the badŽ or the uglyŽ is important and should be taken into account in all ways possible. Remember: we have the power to actually grow the goodŽ when we go cruising, by the way we go about it. Frank Virgintino is the author of Free Cruising Guides (www.freecruisingguide.com). Among the good: The Caribbeans diverse culture brings with it art, history, music, food and products so diverse as to boggle the mindRUTH ROSS-THOMSON

PAGE 22

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 22 by Tom MinderThe Fort de Saint Pierre stands in front of me, 198 metres long, 30 metres wide, depth 11 metres, 40,000 tons, and a capacity for 2,300 containers. My name is entered in the logbook as an officer opens the combination-locked door into the warm inside of the ship. One of the crew pilots me through the long corridor to the ships office and introduces me to the commander, and then the steward leads me up on the lift to Deck E. My cabin is situated two floors under the command bridge. Great! Just as I had wished! The room is on the starboard side with one porthole to the front and one to the side: no containers to block the view to the sea. Two beds, a desk, a soft carpet, shower, toilet, all like in a real hotel. I sit down and reflect on how I finally came to be here, crossing the Atlantic on a ship. My Plan A, becoming a crew on a yacht, did not work out, not even for the ARC (Atlantic Rally for Cruisers) at Las Palmas on the Canary Islands. More than 200 boats start the Atlantic crossing from there. Unlike other years, there was too much crew available. It was not to be for me. I wanted to circumnavigate the world once again and this time westwards, but I couldnt find a ride on a sailing vessel. So I Googled shipping companies and diligently wrote a load of e-mails. My work paid off. I boarded the Fort de St. Pierre at Le Havre. The steward knocks and gives me the meal schedule: breakfast and dinner 7 to 8, lunch 12 to 1, in the officers dining room. At the ships office I get a personal badge with my photo and then go for an exploring tour. By nightfall I have met the other four passengers: an Englishman around 30 with Indian roots, a carpenter of the same age from the Pyrenees, a French professor from La Rochelle and an elderly woman from Brittany. The first two meals at the officers mess are excellent, real French cuisine. The steward serves the entree and main course with white and red wines, followed by several different cheeses and finally a dessert. And it stays like this, except on Christmas, when everything gets even better. Outside it is snowing. Several cranes are loading and unloading the ship in the brightness of floodlights. Eight containers go down into the belly of the ship, then the deck plates are lowered, then six or seven containers come on top of the deck. The dockworkers in the cranes do precision work. Some containers have a weight of 30 tons and more. The crew of the ship is standing outside in the cold, securing and cabling the huge containers. Finally, we sail. Outside the command bridge I am just about 40 metres above the water. Inside everything reminds of Captain Kirks spaceship Enterprise : a number of monitors and switches, the steering wheel merely the size of a soup plate. Scotty and his team are down with the machines. And just like in the movie, he is reporting a problem merely eight miles out of Le Havre. The injection pump of the eighth cylinder is defective. The commander is not happy. I immediately descend the stairs from F Deck down to A Deck and farther down to the machine room. Room? This is a hangar! The MAN engine is running and the direct shaft is turning. In fact, the propeller, 8.5-metres in diameter, must be turning too. Incredible! Did the engineers dismount the injection pump while the engine was running? The pump is not there anymore and a new one is hanging on a crane in front of it, ready to be installed. The work goes on professionally and without haste. The tools are enormous. Just do not stand in their way, I think, putting away my ear mufflers and stepping back up to the command bridge again. However, the engine must be stopped for about one hour. The black cone is hoisted as a signal to other ships that our 40,000-ton ship is drifting. Then the entire ship is vibrating and everybody knows that the engine is running again. In half an hour, the time it takes to bring such a monster to full speed, we should be plowing the sea at the usual 24 knots. For starting, the engine is brought up to specific rotation speed with compressed air. At first the machine runs with expensive diesel, then the computer switches it automatically to heavy oil. Once far out at sea the engineer will change to sulfurized heavy oil. This oil is more efficient, cheaper. Fuel consumption is reduced to 91 tons per 24 hours. Tons! The pumps of the ballast tanks are run to change all the ballast water. No fauna or flora shall be dispersed into other harbours or continents. Even the wastewater of our ship is cleared internally. I fill my notebook with everything I can pick up. I ask: what happens to containers that fall off ships and will mean certain death if hit by a yacht? Here is the answer: This is a rare happening and never happened in my career so far. Such a disaster is reported to several coast guards with a pan-pan call. The position of the potentially floating container is marked on all weather faxes. Countless other actions are taken, such as entries in the logbook, preparations for authorities and insurance, etcetera.Ž We correct course several times for sailing boats on the open sea, even if they are hardly visible on the radar and not equipped with AIS. The work in navigation, on charts, and weather-faxes is not much different from the work I did on yachts. I always feel safe, in good hands, and also fully accepted. Having passengers onboard brings a change to the crew, and after a while I am just like a member of the team. Once the ship is at sea it is quieter for the crew. All work is done with a regular routine. However, none of the seamen has time for a longer chat. I am quietly amazed about the seriousness of the sailors. There is always a minimum of one officer on the command bridge during the day, two at night. Everybody down to the lowest level of the hierarchy is working painstakingly. They work 9.5 hours per day. The usual shifts of four hours overlap by at least 15 minutes. And I am amazed what they do: the anchors must be secured; a couple of sailors make their way around with pots and brushes to grease everything that could rust or already does. The painter always has an overload of work, even if he gets help. Every 24 hours all containers must be checked. Some of them are cooled to below 24 degrees Celsius. Once per day the electrician raises a weather balloon for Meteo France. Six generators are running constantly in the engine room for electrical power of the ship. They must be monitored, otherwise alarms go up to the command bridge and even to the officers mess. Several filters are cleaning the 45-degrees Celsius preheated heavy oil for the engine. These filters must be maintained periodically. There is a fully equipped workshop on A Deck and somebody is always there. In the evenings, there is drinking at the officers bar and at the crew bar. Being at sea makes the body pretty tired though, and many are moving on to their cabins soon. Older seamen say they miss the good old times, the times when DVDs did not exist. Then, they sat together for longer and discussed much more. Then, when debarkation took several days, they had time to go out in the town. Today, everything is counted in hours. Big ports like Rotterdam or Shanghai unload and reload a ship of more than 3,000 containers with several cranes in six to eight hours. There is just enough time to shop for some souvenirs and for a beer or two at the pub. Time has not stopped on cargo ships. All is go, go, go. But the sea and the weather still have their last word and give the pace. The third night I almost fall off my bed three or four times. The wind picks up continuously and is now blowing 40 to 45 knots from 15 degrees over the starboard bow. The swell is far above 10 metres. The ship is rolling from one side to the other. Now and then big breakers thunder over the bow and shake the entire vessel. Loose containers would have fallen over the side long ago. Two of the passengers do not come down for lunch anymore. To my surprise, I have no difficulties at all. I knew about my sea legs on yachts, and Im glad they also work on big ships. Lucky me! It is Christmas and the smell out of the galley has been promising for hours already. The Christmas tree in the officers mess is hanging sideways in its support lines. Everybody is dressed in their Sunday clothes or uniform. We are dining like French gods and enjoy selected wines. It is superb! Only a few of the 28 crew are on duty. Much later, we arrived at the dessert; none of the white tablecloths is without stains. It is the wild sea! We not only had to hold on to the wineglasses, from time to time even the plates were looking for a place on the other side of the table. Merry Christmas! Outside the winds are howling and nobody goes outside unless necessary. The saltwater spray is washing the ship right up to the chimneys, 48 metres above the sea. Christmas is passing by, as are the Azores about 100 miles north of us. The commander has decided to change our route for a more southerly course. A low system, dark red on the weather fax, would have hit us with 60 and more knots. The winds would have reduced the speed to 15 knots. We are all happy about the decision. As we approach the Caribbean, every day gets a bit warmer. Soon the jackets remain in the closets and a short-sleeved shirt is enough to wear, even outside on the bridge in the breeze. For one day the wind blows from astern and the most admirable place becomes the front of the ship. No wind. No engine noise. Just silence. I sit at the railing and let my legs hang over the bow. It feels like flying silently over the water. From time to time a flying fish joins me. Suddenly I see the cook with a basket hanging on his arm. Fishing with a hook is not his business, he tells me. „Continued on next page A Yachtie Ships Out: A Different Voyage to the Caribbean Top: Some foredeck! Sailor Tom Minder shares a different passage perspective Right: Flying fish are found on any Atlantic crossing Left: I couldnt find a ride on a sailing vesselƒ so I boarded the Fort de St. Pierre

PAGE 23

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 23 CRUISERS PROFILESNORWEGIANS WOULD!At work we saw men at their computers all day, with no time for their families or for fun. We didnt want that to happen to us, so we decided to go sailing.Ž Hedvig Meidell, Cornelia Bull and Julie Haugli, a trio of 25-year-old Norwegian women, didnt waste time leaving the shipbrokers business and heading out to sea. They quit their jobs in July 2010, bought a used GibSea 364 in Las Palmas, Gran Canaria on November 1st, and set sail across the Atlantic just three weeks later. Our parents were overwhelmed,Ž they admit. Why select the GibSea? There werent many boats there to choose from, and it was ready to go.Ž They renamed the boat Smidig Katt (Agile Cat). Fortunately, the previous owner, a singlehander, was very helpful in acquainting them with the boats systems, and the young women, who had grown up by the sea but hadnt grown up sailing, engaged an experienced sailor, Olav Aleksander, to assist them during the crossing. Crossing the Atlantic in 24 days, searching for weather systems where there might be more favorable winds, they broke the forestay but jury-rigged a substitute and arrived in Rodney Bay Marina, St. Lucia simultaneously with the ARC, although not part of it. A day or so after arrival, the now all-girl crew said farewell to Olav, who flew back to Norway, and settled into island time. On the crossing, it seems like we would never get to St. Lucia, but now it seems like weve been here forever.Ž Their plans „ to explore the islands spontaneouslyŽ „ have so far included a Christmas beach barbecue and barefoot New Years celebrations in Bequia with many of the Norwegian crews who participated in the most recent Atlantic Rally for Cruisers. ARC 2010 boasted 27 Norway-flagged boats, making Norwegians, for the first time ever, the second-largest national group in the event after the UK. Why so many Norwegians this time? Some say that because the economy is slow to rebound from the recession its a good time to get away. Others say its because of positive publicity from past ARCs in the Norwegian press. All agree its simply excellent to be sailing in the Caribbean in the winter. Heddy, Cornelia and Julie have since been enjoying the Grenadines, visiting Mayreau, Union Island and the Tobago Cays. Their general aim for the season is to cruise up the island chain, maybe as far as Cuba, meeting other boats and making friendsŽ, and then to return to Norway via the US East Coast. But Heddy notes, Were open to change.Ž Follow Smidig Katts adventures at http://skippertaket.com/. The crew says, Sorry this page will be in Norwegian. We highly recommend using Translate; the translation is rather amusing, and be especially aware of heavy Norwegian slang!Ž „ Continued from previous page ƒA different voyageToo boring! Just picking them up is all different, mate. The flying fish with the open ears flap themselves back to the sea. All others make their very last landing in the fry pan for dinner. There is more than enough fish for crew and passengers. After ten days at sea the first signs of land appear. It is Guadeloupe! Not just the passengers are standing excited at the railing. I can smell land, or at least the smoke that is rising from the fields. Land! It is still there. The sea has not swallowed it in the meantime. Some hours later we have a pilot aboard. He takes over the responsibility of the commander, guiding the ship through the dogleg entry and, with centimetre accuracy, under the cranes of the Port de Guadeloupe. Passengers and some of the crew are permitted to go out. Very soon we are drinking Caribbean beer with the natives, talking about the world and the sea. The friendliness with which we are welcomed is almost embarrassing for us, and I must think how we sometimes dare treat foreigners in my country. It is afternoon when a massive cruise ship docks right at the quayside. What a sight! A skyscraper, painted in white, lying down right at the edge of the village. A cloud of tourists is flooding the small town. The apparent dress code is white shorts, white T-shirt, white hat and sunglasses, with two or more cameras hanging from their necks to dance in front of their bellies. The women in the market, dressed in beautiful colours with a matching headscarf, have waited for this kind of customer. Herbs and spices from nutmeg to vanilla, fruit syrups in rum, and so much more „ it is like bait. And the fish are hungry. Although I am a tourist too, I feel much better looking at it from some distance. I have more time here than just a few hours. Many questions to my new friends are not answered yet, and they also want to know a lot about me. I am shouting another round of beers. My ship is not sailing until tomorrow morning. Leaving the waters of Guadeloupe, I look back in some melancholy. The last leg of my voyage has started. By drinking large amounts of Caribbean coffee, I try to keep awake to enjoy the last hours to the maximum. I stand in the wind and try to store the magic of the night sky at sea and the Southern Cross in my heart. Tomorrow we will arrive at my final destination. Entering the harbour of Fort-de-France, capital of Martinique, on the way to the container terminal, we pass the town to port. The gigantic fort, which gives the town its name, dominates the view of the lower city. Some musicians have gathered and happy Creole music is drifting over the sea. It is the last day of the year, a good reason to celebrate. By lunchtime the Fort de Saint Pierre is docked under the cranes and the unloading starts. But soon the dockworkers go home to celebrate, too. My cabin is cleaned up, my backpack is ready, the last Swiss chocolate is given away. I say good-bye to the commander and the crew. Adieu, Fort de Saint Pierre . Some days later, I sit in a hotel room and see my ship sailing away. I am sure she is full of bananas and other goodies of the Caribbean. Tradewind clouds are travelling in the sky, promising her a quiet voyage for the first few days. A New Year and new adventures await me, at sea, I hope, away with a cargo ship. The Smidig Katt crew, including Olav, on arrival in St. Lucia

PAGE 24

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 24 BAREBOAT CHARTERS FULLY CREWED CHARTERS ASA SAILING SCHOOL PO Box 39, Blue Lagoon, St Vincent, West Indies Tel. 1-784-456-9526 / 9334 / 9144 Fax. 1-784-456-9238 barebum@vincysurf.com www.barefootyachts .com Barefoot Yacht Charters & Marine Centre € Doyle Sail Loft & Canvas Shop € Raymarine Electronics € Refrigeration Work € Mechanical & Electrical Repairs € Fibreglass Repairs € Laundry € Vehicle Rentals € Showers € Air Travel € Ice & Water € Diesel & Propane € Moorings € Island Tours € Surftech Surf Shop € Hotel Reservations € Quiksilver Surf Wear € Restaurant & Bar € Boutique € On-site Accommodation € Wi-Fi / Internet Café € Book Exchange Since 1984 The Richmond Vale Nature Center, located at the northern end of the road along St. Vincents west coast at the foot of the Soufriere volcano is a new attraction for nature lovers. Visitors from around the world arrive at the center by road or by sea to climb the volcano and also to hike with a herd of horses in the rainforest. Jesper Friis from Denmark and I, Stina Herberg from Norway, have resided in St. Vincent for the last four years and have seen an increasing number of people discovering the North Leeward side of the island. In spite of some earlier safety issues regarding anchoring in Chateaubelair, we personally have not experienced any incidents during the past four years. Richmond Vale Academy is a Vincentian-registered non-profit organization that trains local and international volunteers to do development work in Africa, South America and St. Vincent. The Academys Nature and Hiking Center is an income-generating activity to raise funds for the volunteers program and for scholarships for Caribbean students who do not have the means to pay tuition. Since 2007, more than 120 international and national volunteers have been trained to carry out humanitarian work in Mozambique, Malawi, South Africa, St. Vincent and Ecuador. Cruisers who wish to hike can anchor at Chateaubelair. If you e-mail us at gugu@richmondvale.org or call (784) 492-4058, we can arrange to pick you up and, if you have any concerns about security, we can also arrange for a boat guard while the crew is out on hikes. It is an advantage to call a day or two days before you wish to hike the volcano, as you will need to start early in the morning (around 0700 hours), and the guide needs to be ready with snacks. Hiking Soufriere Volcano The Soufriere volcano is the youngest volcanic feature on St. Vincent. It occupies the northernmost third of the island. The volcanic crater is two and a half kilometres in diameter. During the past 4,000 years the volcano has had an average of one explosive eruption every hundred years. Climbing up the leeward side of the 3,000-foot volcano is a challenge and a very special nature experience. The paths are fairly narrow through thick vegetation, occasionally allowing sight of the beautiful views of the sea and surrounding mountains. Just at the halfway point you pass the biggest tree you possibly have ever seen. It is a fig (ficus) tree and, according to the guide Franklyn, it is about 300 years old. It has an amazing trunk made up of intricately entangled bark. There are loads of vines hanging from it and lots of plants growing on its branches. The top of Soufriere is an amazing sight. It is covered in small plants and large rock formations of improbable shape. The smell of sulfur is everywhere. Arriving at the ash-strewn rim of this awesome crater, you will be amazed by its immensity. An active lava dome is located at its centre, although Soufriere hasnt erupted since 1979. After a short break you will start to descend from the rim down into the crater. A thick rope stretches all the way down a steep trail to the crater floor. At the end of the rope you put your feet at the bottom of the crater and start exploring. It is like walking on another planet. The dome is smoking, and in certain places you can knock and hear the hollow ground. You walk around in complete silence. There is no noise or wind inside the crater. Hiking the Rainforest with a Herd of Horses At the Center we have a herd of horses that love to hike in the rainforest. This is not a traditional trailriding program, but a different concept with focus on the unity of the horses, people and nature. You walk with the horses instead of riding them. The herd has seven members „ one male and six females „ and one of the centers horse guides will take you on a threeor four-hour trail. You hike with the herd in the green intense forest, dense and thick with trees. Plants grow on other plants and part of the trail is along the Richmond River. The horses are well trained and enjoy walking together with people. A couple of places on the trail provide openings in the forest and good locations for a break. The horses will walk around freely and pick their favorite herbs and eat the rich grass, while the hikers can sit down at the riverside and enjoy mangoes, wax apples, avocadoes and guavas picked right off the trees. Flocks of cattle egrets might greet you as you arrive with the horses on the beach close to sunset. At the beach you will rest, swim and play with the horses. You do not need former experience with horses to enjoy this trail. Your guide will explain the language of horses and how they talk to each other and to you with their body language. It is possible to take lessons at the center on how to work with and train a free horse. This means to speak to the horse with your body language and work with the horse without ropes, bits, saddles, halters or any other forms of tack. We look forward to welcoming you to join our special nature experiences in this unique corner of the Caribbean. Stina Herberg is the manager of the Richmond Vale Nature and Hiking Center. For more information visit www.richmondvalehiking.com. ALL ASHOREƒ Hikes, Heights and Horses in St. Vincent by Stina Herberg Top: Hiking the volcano, with Chateaubelair Bay at the left side of the picture Left and center: Interacting with the Nature Centers herd of horses Bottom left: The Richmond Vale Academy

PAGE 25

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 25 NEW JET ADDED TO THE FLEET!New Services: AIR AMBULANCE FLIGHTS TO & FROM ST. LUCIA T here is a saying, stop and smell the rosesŽ. In the world of snorkeling this translates to swim slowly, hover and gazeŽ. Focus on one small coral reef cluster and after a few moments, the invisible becomes visible, life appears and seems to multiply. Searching out marine camouflage experts can be particularly rewarding. I was snorkeling in Francis Bay, St. John, USVI, the first time I came across the stoplight parrotfish. At first, I thought I was seeing two different species of parrotfish; that is, until I observed one swimming from the sandy seabed to feed on the reef. When over sand, the stoplight parrotfish pales to a ghostly, greyish white. As it leaves the sandy bottom to feed on the reef, its color shifts to a vivid mixture of orange-red, green and brown checkerboard. Another fascinating camouflage species is the peacock flounder. Weve come across these in a number of places, but one of the more fun spots to search for them is in the Tobago Cays where they are plentiful. Peacock flounders like sandy seabeds where they hide beneath a thin covering of sand. If you know what to look for, though, you can discover them. When snorkeling over sand, keep your eyes peeled for pairs of small, closely spaced bumps in the sand. These are the telltale signs of the eyes of a camouflaged peacock flounder. Dive down for a closer inspection and chances are, they will scoot out from under their sand disguise to reveal their lovely blue rings or peacock eyesŽ. My favorite camouflage marvel is the octopus. Octopi are fascinating creatures to observe and study. Our first encounter with an octopus remains my favorite. Wed been fortunate to get a mooring ball just off Waterlemon Cay in St. John, USVI and chose to snorkel directly from Daniell Storey . My husband, Dave, brought along our underwater camera. As we approached the shallow water on the south side of Waterlemon, I startled a small octopus and it darted off ahead of me. Not daring to take my eyes off of it for even a moment, I swam after it, doing my best to slow the growing distance between us. Then, as I watched, the little octopus wrapped itself around a small rock and „ poof!Ž „ disappeared! Staring steadily, I slowly approached the rock. As I watched, two antenna-like eyes rose above the rock, watching me. It was so funny! Dave had not seen the octopus and caught up to me with a questioning look in his eyes. I pointed to the rock. He shrugged his shoulders. The little octopus blended perfectly with the mottling of the rock. Dave photographed what he could not see while I carefully picked up the rock and transferred the octopus to my fist where it seemed quite content to rest while checking me out. It altered its coloring to chestnut brown. For the next minute, the three of us floated with the current while studying each other. Then, just as suddenly as it had appeared, the little octopus darted off my fist to a rock below, perfectly camouflaging itself again. One trick Ive learned to increase my odds of finding an octopus is identifying its den. Look for small piles of whitewashed shells lying in front of crevices of large rocks or coral. The cleaner the shells, the more recently the octopus has dined on their contents. You might even discover some shells with a perfectly round, small hole drilled through them by the octopus, which has a single tooth just for this task. My next favorite encounter with an octopus was in Benures Bay, Norman Island, BVI. Id noticed a pile of freshly harvested shells next to a large rock and dove down to peer around the rock, but did not see any octopus in the den under the rock. As I floated up, sleeping on top of that very rock was a large octopus! Again, it was so perfectly camouflaged that I had been within inches of it and not seen it. I got Daves attention and he came over with the camera. This big fella seemed to be in dreamland. We took a few pictures and the camera flash finally aroused it from its sleep. Unconcerned, it lazily made its way off the rock and slowly moved across the seabed, fanning itself out while morphing its color to a vivid robins egg blue. I was spellbound. When scouting octopi, a few of my more successful locations have included Grand Anse, Martinique; Waterlemon Cay, St. John, USVI; Christmas Cove, St. James, USVI; Benures Bay, Norman Island, BVI; and Tobago Cays, Grenadines. Other marine camouflage experts weve sighted include pigmy filefish hiding in gorgonia or sargassum, a seahorse anchored to a sea rod, scorpion fish resting stone-still on the scrabble seabed and a banded jawfish peeking its head through a hole lined with small rocks. One camouflage expert that continues to elude me, however, is the frogfish that blends so perfectly into surrounding orange, yellow or red sponges. Maybe, just maybe some day Ill pause long enough, and gaze steadily enough to get lucky. Snorkeling with Camouflage Expertsby Michelle Daniels Above: The author with an octopus resting on her glove Left: Beyond camouflage, Stoplight Parrotfish can also begin life as red-colored females and change to green males

PAGE 26

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 26 The Caribbean is not just a great place to sail „ it can also be a great place to learn. Kids learn (and remember what they learn) best when they are interested, active, and involved. So take a field trip and kindle the fire of your cruising childs curiosity: see a volcano in action, hold a baby turtle, or climb over centuries of history. A field trip is a great way to link formal education with real-life experiences. The problem with formal learning alone is that it is often too abstract to truly captivate children. The problem with a casual field trip, on the other hand, is that it remains an isolated experience without a link to the big picture. That is why a good field trip should be the middle of three steps. First comes the preparation. Have your children list what they know „ or think they know „ about the topic. Read background information to find out more and dispel any misconceptions. If you pack the right books, you can read while underway from one anchorage to the next (books suggested below are all slim volumes aimed at readers in grades 1 through 4). Generate a checklist of points to observe and questions to answer during the field trip. A thorough checklist will turn your child into a focused researcher rather than a casual tourist. During the field trip, have your children take notes that answer their own questions as well as the guiding questions listed. These are open-ended questions that can be pursued in various directions. Finally, follow up afterwards with a small project that reinforces the lesson. This could be a simple journal entry, a fictional story inspired by the field trip, or a handmade Kids Field Guide to Volcanoes / Turtles / Plantations of the Caribbean.Ž The idea is to reconcile the childs previous knowledge with the new and to build connections to academic subjects where possible. So lets get going! Volcano Field Trip GUIDING QUESTION: What are the forces at work behind a volcano? LOCATIONS: Sulphur Springs (St. Lucia), Soufriere (St. Vincent), St. Pierre (Martinique) SUGGESTED READING: Volcanoes! by Anne Schreiber (National Geographic Kids, 2008) or The Magic School Bus Blows its Top by Gail Herman (Scholastic, 1996). Our planet is not simply a lump of rock but an active, changing, dynamic ball of energy (a little like our kids!). For too many children, this concept is too abstract to really internalize. But not if you visit a site like Sulphur Springs on St. Lucia, where you can see boiling, bubbling mud, or Soufriere (St. Vincent) where you can hike up and peer into a steaming crater. Guides or park information boards can help you turn the spectacle into a comprehensive lesson in Earth Science. St. Pierre (Martinique) is a fascinating site because it shows the destructive power of a volcanic eruption; ruins still dot the town and the museum there does a good job documenting the 1902 event. If you are sailing near Montserrat, that would be another chance to observe volcanic activity, though many cruisers avoid the island because of reported problems such as ash clogging the engine exhaust. Prepare with a book that covers types of volcanoes, lava, and eruptions, and the environmental and social impacts of volcanoes. During the field trip, note the details of your particular volcano. What type is it? Children can sketch what they see and add subsurface features using their reading as a guide. Follow up by making your own Field Guide to Sulphur Springs.Ž This lesson can be extended to consider the Caribbean as a whole: Which islands were created by volcanic activity (Montserrat, for instance) and which were not (Antigua)? Turtle Field Trip GUIDING QUESTION: How can we protect migratory sea animals? LOCATIONS: Old Hegg Turtle Sanctuary (Bequia); Tobago Cays SUGGESTED READING: Turtle: Watch Me Grow by Lisa Magloff (DK Publishing, 2006). Many sea turtles call the Caribbean home, or at least include a stop there in their vast migrations. Most species are endangered, owing to factors such as beach development, entrapment in fishing nets, or predation of eggs. A field trip to a place where you are likely to see turtles can be an excellent opportunity not only to learn more about this interesting animal in particular, but also about environmental conservation. On Bequias windward shore, former fisherman Orton BrotherŽ King has established a turtle sanctuary where you can study turtles up close. Mr. King is very personable and enjoys educating visitors. Although the scientific jury is out as to whether captive-reared turtles stand a better chance of survival than wild turtles (suggesting that efforts to help would be better targeted at protecting nesting beaches), the sanctuary demonstrates the value of turtles to both visitors and locals and therefore garners sympathy for the cause. (An article that considers the effectiveness of the sanctuary can be found at: http://www.caribbeancompass.com/turtleok. htm.) During their field trip, children can list, describe, and even sketch different species, ask about tracking turtles, and inquire about conservation efforts. The Tobago Cays Marine Park is a reliable location to view wild sea turtles: one grassy area off Baradal Island is a sea turtle reserve, although I had more luck spotting turtles while snorkelling over sandy patches nearby. „Continued on next pageTop Cruising Kids’ Field Trips in the Caribbean and How to Make the Most of Them by Nadine Slavinski Defending the fort! Trips ashore can educational and fun for sailors of all ages

PAGE 27

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 27 „ Continued from previous page Keep your distance and note the turtles features, activities, and pattern of movement. Afterwards, follow up with a report on turtles or a Kids Field Guide to Turtles of the Caribbean.Ž Columbus Landing Field Trip GUIDING QUESTION: What were the consequences of Columbus discovery?Ž LOCATIONS: San Salvador (Bahamas), Cockburn Town (Grand Turk), Sainte Marie (Guadeloupe) SUGGESTED READING: The Story of Columbus by Anita Ganeri (Dorling Kindersley, 2001) or the excellent website www.columbusnavigation.com by Keith Pickering. Too often, Columbus discoveryŽ of the New World is presented as if it were an isolated act. In fact, his arrival set a series of events in motion that had far-reaching and tragic consequences, especially from the perspective of indigenous populations. A visit to one of Columbus landing sites can be the starting point for a broadreaching inquiry. Historians do not agree on the location of Columbus first landfall in the New World and in fact several places claim that distinction. Based on Columbus description, his route across the Atlantic, and backwards calculations from other islands, many believe Europeans first touched the New World on Watlings Island (renamed San Salvador) in the Bahamas. Others argue that Cat Island, Samana Cay, and Grand Turk are also candidates. Today, monuments stand on these and other, confirmed landing spots (including Sainte Marie, Guadeloupe). Prepare for the field trip with background reading on Columbus and his four journeys. What were his goals and motives? How did he navigate? During the field trip, find the context of that particular site. Is it a confirmed or a contested landing spot? During which of his four journeys did Columbus land at that point? Where did he stop before this spot and where did he go next? A good follow-up to this field trip is to study place names of the Caribbean. Some retain indigenous names, while others have European roots, reflecting changing influences. Indigenous Cultures Field Trip GUIDING QUESTION: Who were the original inhabitants of the Caribbean and what is their story? LOCATIONS: Kalinago Cultural Center (Dominica), Trois Rivieres (Guadeloupe), Caribs Leap (Grenada) Imagine visiting Japan, but meeting only Koreans. Sounds silly, doesnt it? But that is essentially the case in todays Caribbean, where the original inhabitants have all but disappeared. The word Caribbean comes from the Carib people (although this was a European misunderstanding and not the correct term, much like American IndianŽ). The earliest Caribbean settlers were the Siboney, followed later by the Arawaks: among them, the Lucayo, Taino, and Kalinago. All perished as a direct or indirect result of European contact. Some were killed or enslaved; most succumbed to European diseases. They left few traces behind, and it is worth seeking the remaining sites out as poignant reminders of the past. On mountainous Dominica, however, a group of CaribsŽ (properly called Kalinago) held out and their descendants live on today. The fascinating Kalinago Cultural Center is your only chance in the Caribbean to frame indigenous history within a present-day context. The site is located on windward Dominica; you will need a rental car or hired driver to get there. Tours are conducted by the Kalinago themselves; the experience is unique and unforgettable. If you cant make it to Dominica, visit southern Guadeloupes Trois Rivieres, where outstanding examples of rock art have been brought together in a beautiful garden setting. Near Sauteurs in northern Grenada is an excellent visitors center at Caribs Leap, where the last indigenous islanders jumped off cliffs to their deaths rather than be enslaved. Throughout the Caribbean, you can find examples of rock art, though little else has survived the test of time. Prepare by reading the history of the CaribsŽ in your Caribbean guidebook, although you may find many gaps in the chapter „ something your children can later correct themselves! During the field trip, answer questions such as: What distinguished the different indigenous groups from one another? Who are the Kalinago? What was their culture like? Why are most of the indigenous islanders gone? Why does history so often overlook native people? Follow up the visit by writing a more detailed paragraph to be inserted into the history section of your guidebook. Colonial Superpowers and Plantations Field Trip GUIDING QUESTION: What was life like in the Caribbean two centuries ago? LOCATIONS: English Harbour (Antigua), Fort Napoleon (Terre de Haut, Les Saintes), Brimstone Hill (St. Kitts), Fort Shirley (Dominica), Chateau Murat (Marie Galante), Belmont Estate (Grenada) SUGGESTED READING: Now Let Me Fly by Dolores Johnson (Macmillan, 1993). This is the fictional story of a young girl stolen into slavery and taken to the New World. Despite its North American setting, the story provides a good view into plantation life and slavery. Early Spanish explorers quickly passed by the outer islands on their quest to find riches in the Greater Antilles and the Americas. However, the French, English, and Dutch quickly recognized and exploited the agricultural potential of the islands. They established plantations using African slave labor, growing spices and sugar, and distilling rum. Economic and political rivalry between the superpowers on the other side of the Atlantic spilled over into the Caribbean, where forts were built to protect their possessions. Today, stone fortifications dot nearly every island. Several historic plantations are also open for viewing, some of them as ruins (such as Chateau Murat on Marie Galante), others still operating (such as the Belmont Estate on Grenada). The list above is by no means complete; nearly every island has historic sites you can visit. Prepare for your field trip by reading and discussing Caribbean history as related in your guidebook. This can turn into a lesson on European history since many islands changed hands as a result of wars and treaties written in a seemingly arbitrary manner so far away. Sometimes, slavery was abolished under French occupation but re-established under the English! During the field trip, take notes on key dates, including when the fort or plantation changed hands and the outside events influencing them. What was life like in that era, for settlers and slaves? What interests were being fought over? What was grown on this island? What was the pattern of colonial trade? Consider who writes history and whether there is such a thing as a neutral opinion. Follow up by writing a historical fiction story from the point of view of a plantation worker, settler, or soldier. Students can pick a real event as the background for the fictional story. This is only a short list of suggested field trips; it should give you many ideas as to how to turn a casual visit into a valuable learning experience. Not only will your children gain a deeper impression of the Caribbean, they will also be able to make wider connections when back in school. Nadine Slavinski is the author of Lesson Plans Ahoy! Hands-On Learning for Sailing Children and Home Schooling Sailors . Visit her website, www.sailkidsed.net, for many more educational things to do aboard.

PAGE 28

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 28 Crossing the channels between Caribbean islands with a favorable tide will make your passage faster and more comfortable. The table below, courtesy Don Street, author of Streets Guides and compiler of Imray-Iolaire charts, which shows the time of the meridian passage (or zenith) of the moon for this AND next month, will help you calculate the tides. Water, Don explains, generally tries to run toward the moon. The tide starts running to the east soon after moonrise, continues to run east until about an hour after the moon reaches its zenith (see TIME below) and then runs westward. From just after the moons setting to just after its nadir, the tide runs eastward; and from just after its nadir to soon after its rising, the tide runs westward; i.e. tide the floods from west to east. Times given are local. Note: the maximum tide is 3 or 4 days after the new and full moons. For more information, see Tides and CurrentsŽ on the back of all Imray Iolaire charts. Fair tides! February DATE TIME 1 1055 2 1143 3 1227 4 1310 (new) 5 1351 6 1431 7 1512 8 1554 9 1638 10 1724 11 1814 12 1907 13 2002 14 2059 15 2157 16 2253 17 2349 18 0000 (full) 19 0043 20 0136 21 0230 22 0324 23 0419 24 0516 25 0612 26 0708 27 0801 28 0852 March DATE TIME 1 0940 2 1025 3 1108 4 1150 5 1230 (new) 6 1311 7 1352 8 1435 9 1520 10 1604 11 1658 12 1751 13 1846 14 1941 15 2036 16 2131 17 2225 18 2319 19 0000 (full) 20 0013 21 0108 22 0205 23 0304 24 0402 25 0500 26 0556 27 0649 28 0738 29 0824 30 0907 31 0949 MERIDIAN PASSAGE OF THE MOONFEBRUARY & MARCH 2011 If you saw school student Samantha Gray on campus, you probably would not know she got there „ not by carpool, but by dinghy-pool. What you also would not know is that she has lived more than 99 percent of her 14 years on a boat, and her stint at the International School of St. Lucia (ISSL) is her very first classroom experience. Generally on the first day of school when a mom sends her kid off, usually the mother is significantly taller than the student,Ž Karen Gray said of Samanthas first day of school. This was clearly not the case here, as Samanthas first day happened a few weeks shy of her 14th birthday, when she was just a few inches shorter than her mom. Mom and daughter, Karen and Samantha Gray, along with Samanthas stepdad, Michael Hill, are a cruising family sailing from Florida through the Caribbean on their Rafiki 37 sailboat, Msichana. So where are they from? Originally, Florida, but Sam, as she is affectionately called, though born in Florida, has spent the last 14 years cruising the Eastern Caribbean. She and Karen had never planned to leave the Eastern Caribbean, but when Sams dad became ill, they returned to Florida. After he passed away, mom and daughter were looking to return to sailing, which is when they met Michael, and it became a serendipitous arrangement. As a practical choice during hurricane season they would typically find a secure harbour and utilize the time on schooling, routine maintenance and cosmetic work on the boat, as it is easier to do dockside. So why choose St. Lucia to spend hurricane season 2010? In 2000, they spent about two years docked in St. Lucia and came to favour the protection and facilities that the Rodney Bay Marina (now under IGY) offers. The premiere reason however, was Sams attendance at land school. Sam begins, Somehow, somewhere, we knew I had to take some kind of actual classroom schooling because I never had that experience before. Mom and I were both of the idea that if I am to go off to college in two yearsƒŽ Karen finishes, I didnt want her first classroom experience to be as a freshman in college. I felt like she should have some experience sitting in a classroom with other students in a communal learning environment with an actual teacher.Ž In 2008, before they left Florida to come cruising again, Karen researched the International School of St. Lucia online and thought it might be a good land schooling choice. Samantha always homeschooled through the Calvert School, a private school in Baltimore, Maryland, popular for homeschooling in the boating community. She usually works along a calendar year versus a traditional school schedule, which starts in September and ends in June. The transition from her usual home school to the new land school schedule was not smooth sailing for Sam when she arrived in St. Lucia in June 2010. I finished my ninth grade work a week and half before I stared tenth grade at ISSL. When I changed grades in home-schooling, generally I didnt have much of a break; it didnt matter because it would be the same programme, just different material,Ž she said. Where as at ISSL she really needed that week to prepare. Something I had to get used to going to the International School, was getting up at 6:15 every morning. My mom has to iron my school clothes [uniform], and I grab breakfast and head off to school.Ž Contrast that to the more relaxed schedule of homeschooling on Mshicana . She would get out her textbooks and start school after breakfast, whenever breakfast happened to be. Whenever she was hungry she would have lunch. If I had done everything I was supposed to do for that day I would stop. Or, if I had nothing else to do for the next couple of hours I would start on the next days work.Ž Samantha explained her home-schooling daily schedule. The home-schooling programme measures the progress of a student by a week so Samantha would sometimes crunch three days worth of work into one day so she could take a couple of days off „ free of schoolwork. „Continued on next page Sailor Samantha Docks in St. Lucia for Her First Classroom Experienceby Christy RecaiiSamantha doing her homework in the hobbit hole aboard MsichanaALEX FOSTER

PAGE 29

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 29 „ Continued from previous page Its the difference between working at your own pace and working at a communal pace.Ž Karen said, comparing the home-schooling and land school learning styles. Though on the ISSL schedule, Samantha has not turned her back on her home-schooling days. Simultaneously with the ISSL, she is still enrolled in French and Geometry with the home-schooling programme from Calvert School, which she will resume full time at the end of the semester of ISSL. Normally Karen, Sam and Michael would be on their way sailing at the latest December 1st, when the hurricane season is over, but they had a change in plan when they met International School of St. Lucias Principal, June Harkness. The International School celebrates diversity for the island. We have made it something now that is expected. When she comes to school on her scooter or in her dinghy, the kids dont react as if that is unusual. The kids came up with our motto Diversity. Unity. Excellence., and Samantha Gray represents all that,Ž June Harkness said. To complement her classroom experience, the ISSL has afforded Sam a social one, through working in groups as well as extra curricular activities like band, debate and even a Halloween Party. The family made a commitment to stay dockside until the school semester ended in January 2011. As for life on Msichana ? In a compact space everything has to be condensed. There is one central cabin, including the galley and living space which doubles as Samanthas work space, which the avid reader refers to as her hobbit holeŽ from the classic series The Lord of the Rings . As Samantha gets older, home-schooling becomes more of a challenge while living on a boat. It becomes more demanding in terms of school supplies and Internet access, as the Internet becomes an essential home-schooling tool. Since a students computer use will quickly drain the boats batteries, the family installed an additional four solar panels just to keep up with it. Moreover, Samantha plans on entering college in the US to study computer graphics when she turns 16, which is two years earlier than the average college freshman in the US. Samantha is thankful that her classroom experience has provided experts to guide her though the coursework „ with home-schooling she has to figure it out all on her own. Karen is interested in seeing her transition back to home-schooling fulltime. But for now, they are looking forward to their plan for 2011, which is heading south to Grenada and sticking to a sailing schedule almost entirely dependent on the weather. Christy Recaii is a Saint Lucian journalist who has a passion for sailing. She is a Hunter College graduate with a BA in Media Studies. You can find her either on the water or the docks seeking out the next marine scoop! Left: Msichana is Sams full-time home and usual classroom Below: Dinghy-pooling Right: Living aboard can be a science project. Samantha plans on entering college when she turns 16 TH E WO R L D S FI N E S T HI G H SC H O O L THE WORLDS FINEST HIGH SCHOOL A N D CO L L E G E PR E P PR O G R A M AND COLLEGE PREP PROGRAM HA S NO W OP E N E D IN TH E CA R I B B E A N HAS NOW OPENED IN THE CARIBBEAN www.AdventureHighSchool.org€ Full High School Grades 9,10,11 & 12 € University and College Prep € Individualized Student Programs so that faster students are not held back while students that need more attention are not left behind € Individual and group tutoring € Special Guided Education Programs for Boat Owners, Cruisers, Travelers, or Anyone Doing Home Schooling With Limited Access to Educational Guidance and Materials. € Full four year programs, Single year programs, One month booster or tutoring programs. Individual tailored programs as needed. Due to personalized programs, midterm enrollment is possible. Summer catch up or advancement programs available. Graduates receive a US DIPLOMAwww.AdventureHighSchool.org Phone: (800) 927-9503 adventurehighschool@gmail.com CHRISTY RECAII (3)

PAGE 30

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 30 FEBRUARY 2011 ARIES (21 Mar 20 Apr) Jupiter, the planet of positivism and good humor, has just sailed into your sign and should make this month a fun one. The first week is the perfect time to have a party on the poop deck and spread some joy around. TAURUS (21 Apr 21 May) Your love life will become more interesting after the 5th, and this will help to distract you from contrary currents in your creative cruising projects. GEMINI (22 May 21 Jun) While boat business is in the doldrums its a good time to do some preventative maintenance on board to be prepared for the time when aspects improve. CANCER (22 Jun 23 Jul) Romance will meet some rough seas in the second half of the month. Use the rising fair winds of ingenuity to blow you back on course. LEO (24 Jul 23 Aug) Your creative energies will be in irons during the second two weeks. Let romance help you hold the helm of your spirit as it steers into fair winds and following seas. VIRGO (24 Aug 23 Sep) Any choppy waves in your love life will be smoothed by the calm seas of patience and good humor, and these will also help you deal with any fluky winds in unusual shipboard projects. LIBRA (24 Sep 23 Oct) Boat business is still in the doldrums and you will find difficulty in seeing the humorous side of sailing life. Concentrate on creative stimulation to distract you, and it will be fresh breezes and clear skies before you know it. SCORPIO (24 Oct 22 Nov) Frustrating winds in creative boat projects will switch direction to make you tack onto a course that will bring you to a breakthrough in the third week. From then on it will be smooth sailing for several weeks. Keep a firm hand on the helm to make the most of it. SAGITTARIUS (23 Nov 21 Dec) Youll be feeling very cheerful and romantic this month, especially in the beginning of the month. This energy will stay aboard for several weeks if you concentrate on it and not allow outside influences to distract you from the glow. CAPRICORN (22 Dec 20 Jan) The dominant aspect this month for you is romance. Clear the decks before the 4th and welcome the winds of love into your sails. AQUARIUS (21 Jan 19 Feb) While business is suffering slack sails, redirect your energies on a course to complete inventive projects aboard. Then youll be prepared when aspects are more positive; theyre just over the horizon. PISCES (20 Feb 20 Mar) Though romance is tied to the dock, there will be other opportunities during the month to express your cruising creativity in a positive way that will pay off before months end. Johnson Hardware Ltd. Chain & Rope Anchors & Fenders Electric Wire Marine Hoses Bilge Pumps Lubricants & Oils Stainless Fasteners Stainless Fittings VHF Radios Flares & Life Jackets Snorkeling Equipment Fishing Gear Antifouling Paint Paint Brushes Epoxy Resins Sanding Paper & Discs Hand & Power Tools Houseware & Cookware FOR YOUR MARINE HARDWARE, AND MORE Rodney Bay, St. Lucia Tel: (758) 452 0299 Fax: (758) 452 0311 e-mail: hardware@candw.lc DARWIN, THE BOAT DOGAll of a sudden the sky turned dark For Caribbean sailors Liesbet and Mark Their happy family consisting of three Would not remain the way it used to be Multiple trips to the vet didnt lie Their beloved dog was going to die Malignant tumors while still in his prime It would only be a matter of time They cried and hoped and did their best But all that occurred was his final rest Nothing else they could have done Darwin, the boat dog, is forever gone These cruisers never wanted to find out What life without dogs would be about Who will protect them out at sea? Who will greet visitors on S/V Irie ? No more Darwin to hug and to pet No more good times at the beach to be let No more dog kisses right in the face No more barking to guard his space The Caribbean Sea is salty from tears This empty feeling will last for years Waves of sorrow lap onto the beach Time heals all woundsŽ is what they preach Darwin, the boat dog, was special and smart He found a spot in many peoples heart He sailed and walked all over the place Wagging his tail and a smile on his face Wherever he went, whatever the joy, He always looked like a comfy boy He lived a great life before passing away Hell be missed and remembered every day!„ Liesbet CollaertLiesbet Collaert wrote an information-packed two-part series on Cruising the Eastern Caribbean with Your Dog, which was published in the November and December 2010 issues of Caribbean Compass . The information was based on S/V Iries first-hand experiences checking in at various ports of entry from the Virgin Islands to Trinidad with Darwin aboard. I s l a n d Island P o e t s Poets

PAGE 31

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 31 Hello! My name is Dollyand my home is in the sea.DOLLYS DEEP SECRETSby Elaine OllivierreWe have looked at the ways in which coastal shores can be protected. What do we need to protect them from? We need to manage coastal erosion so that our beaches do not disappear. Coastal erosion is a natural process and occurs continuously as a result of weathering of the coastal rocks. The action of wind, rain and waves gradually wears away the rocks. Bits of land (stones, rock shards, soil, etc.) are carried away from the shoreline and deposited elsewhere. Erosion occurs when sediments are lost from a particular area but sometimes, the opposite happens and deposits actually add to the shoreline. This is called accretion . How do wind and rain cause coastal erosion? The wind picks up tiny particles of dust and whips them against the coastal cliffs. This sandblasting eventually wears away the rocks. Acid rain eats away at the rocks. How do waves cause coastal erosion? There are four main ways. € The waves hit the coastal rocks and cliffs with great force , especially in storms and tsunamis. The force of the waves pounds the rocks and can break them up. If there are air pockets in cracks in the rocks, the wave compresses them. As the water recedes, the air can expand suddenly and crack the rock ( hydraulic action ). € The waves pick up small rocks and stones and debris from the sea bottom and from the beach and fling them at the cliffs. The stones gradually knock off pieces of rock and wear away the rock face in a process called abrasion or corrasion . € Some rocks will dissolve as they are hit by acidic sea water ( corrosion ). € Powerful waves can move around the stones already on a beach so that they grind against each other and become worn down to smooth pebbles ( attrition ). The amount of erosion which occurs in any place depends on the geology of that place. Hard rocks like granite do not erode as easily as softer rocks like chalk or limestone. Coastal formations like caves, arches and stacks are more usually found in areas of softer rock. Human try to halt the movement of sand and shingle from beaches by building groynes (breakwaters). While these may be successful for a particular location, they can have a detrimental effect on other places. For example, sand may be collected behind a groyne on one beach while further down-current, the next beach becomes depleted of sand. Mangroves can help to hold the sand and prevent erosion so its important not to cut them down.DOLLYS WORD QUIZMatch the words to their meanings: 1. Abrasion/corrasion a) wearing away of soil and rock by forces of nature 2. Accretion b) wearing away of rocks by scraping together 3. Corrosion c) wearing away of rocks by effects of water and air 4. Hydraulic action d) growing in size 5. Erosion e) wearing away of rocks by chemical action „ Answers on page 45 When I was a little girl about your ageŽ, Granny Lovenia leaned forward to tell Beth, we used to jump about playing fire on the mountain, run boys run.Ž Is that the mountain we can see behind your cottage?Ž The very one. And during the dry season, here in Trinidad, we often saw fires on that very mountain and in other places too. We could see the flames leaping high, blood red at night and when the wind blew this way we could smell the smoke.Ž Werent you frightened, Granny? I would be.Ž I shivered in bed at night, doux-doux, I was so scared.Ž I hope we dont have any fires while Im staying with you, Granny, and if we did, would we have to run away like in the game?Ž Beth lived in a suburb of Port of Spain and her parents had sent her to stay with her grandmother in the high Northern Range during her school break. I hope not, doux-doux, but you never can tell. Anyhow, after Ive made us a mug of cocoa tea, Ill tell you about a brave little girl who lived even closer to the mountain.Ž Beth went into the kitchen with her granny and watched the old lady as she grated the hard stick of cocoa to add to the pot of warming milk. The cocoa melted and rich globules of cocoa butter floated on the surface. Granny bought her cocoa sticks from the village women who collect the cocoa beans, grind them and roll them between their palms, and Beth agreed that grannys cocoa was much better than the cocoa her mother made from the powder in the tin. When Granny was settled in her big, comfy armchair with Beth on a cushion at her feet, she began, Totty was just six years old when a big fire blazed up on the mountain.Ž But how did it start?Ž interrupted Beth. Sometimes boys on walks to the waterfall below the mountain break bottles on the trail just for fun and when the sun falls on the glass it sets the dry grass smoldering until it bursts into flame and the wind carries it up the mountain. Sometimes people light fires to barbecue their chicken and just an ember left behind will blaze up again.Ž Beth sighed, then after a drink of the cocoa tea she said, Go on with the story Granny.Ž Well, Totty watched the fire all night until, just as dawn was breaking, she burst into tears at the thought of all the poor little animals caught in the blaze. So, drying her eyes, she dressed and ran out of the house. She ran all the way up the mountain and arrived just as the sun came up. Totty heard the cries from the little animals that were caught with the fire raging behind them, so she rushed through the smoke and picked up as many of the small ones as she could carry and stumbled down the path, hoping that the others would follow. But all of a sudden Totty saw that another fire had started lower down the mountain and was racing towards her. Trapped! There was only one thing that poor, terrified Totty could do and she did it. She leaped over the waterfall, animals and all, including all that had followed, just like the Pied Piper of Hamlin. They a ll struggled to the shallows and were safe behind the falls while the fire passed over their heads.Ž Oh Granny, what a wonderful story!Ž sighed Beth. I like happy endings, dont you?Ž All my stories have happy endings, doux-doux.Ž THE END Fire on the Mountain, Run, Boys, RunŽ is one of a number of ring or circle games, similar to Ring Around the Rosie and Brown Girl in the Ring, that originated in Africa and came to the Caribbean with the slaves. The person standing in the centre of the circle calls out Fire on the mountain, run, boys, run.Ž The children in the outer circle turn and run around the circle. Those on the inner circle stand with arms raised representing trees. When the person standing in the centre says, Fire is outŽ, all runners and the centre player try to find a partner by standing behind a tree. The one who does not find a partner becomes the centre calle r. All partners change places and the game goes on. Fire on the mountains, run, boys, runŽ is also a well-known fiddle tune with Scots-Irish origins. Scots-Irish people came to t he Eastern Caribbean as indentured servants after the prohibition of slavery. String band music is still popular on many islands, and Carriacou features string bands at its annual Maroon Festival. FIRE ON THE MOUNTAIN, RUN BOYS RUN! by Lee Kessell CRUISING KIDS CORNER

PAGE 32

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 32 Basils Bar Mustique WE SHIP AROUND THE WORLD! Visit Basil’s in Mustique or St. Vincentwww.basilsbar.com basils@vincysurf.comVisitors to Mustique are invited to:BASIL’S BAR AND RESTAURANT: Basil’s Bar in Mustique was named one of the World’s Ten Best Bars in 1987 by Newsweek and today lives up to that tradition. Recently renovated, the new face of Basil’s Bar in Mustique is all that and more: offering fresh seafood, lobster in season, steaks and the best beefburger in the Caribbean. Now equipped with WIFI, you can enjoy sunset cocktails and catch up on the web. Breakfast service begins at 8:00am. Lunch 11:00am 6pm, and Dinner 7:30 until late. Come to Basil’s for cocktails anytime and plan to attend the Wednesday Night Jump Up and BBQ. Basil’s Bar is home of the only Blues Festival in the Caribbean. The Mustique Blues Festival takes place from January 26 February 9, 2011. Call (784) 488-8350 or VHF 68. BASIL’S BOUTIQUE : Fabrics as bright as the sea and as light as air... perfect for island joy. Elegant island evening and playful day wear. For women, men and children, plus lots of T-shirts to take home. Basil’s Boutique also offers silver and gemstone jewelry. BASIL’S GREAT GENERAL STORE: There is nothing general about Basil's Great General Store. Bountifully stocked with fine French wines, cheese from Europe, gourmet jams and sauces. Imported cigars and an unusual collection of books not to be missed. Fine foods in Paradise. Call (784) 488-8407. ACROSS FOREVER: Imagine decorating your home with antiques from Bali and India. Across Forever has a magnificent collection of furniture from Asia and beyond, contemporary pieces, home furnishings, fabulous lighting accessories and more. Shipping is easily and efficiently arranged. Call (784) 488-8407.Visitors to St Vincent are invited to:BASIL’S BAR: Located in Kingstown in an 18th century building named Cobblestone. Air conditioned, you will enjoy cocktails most delightful, the staff most welcoming and the meals are some of the best on the island. Now offering full catering services. Call (784) 457-2713. AT BASIL’S: Newly opened full service SPA located in Villa across from Young Island. Also At Basil’s is a collection of beautiful bamboo furniture, contemporary pieces from Asia and beyond, and more. Opening of a new coffee shop by the sea. Call (784) 456-2602 Dominican Republic Cruising Guide www.dominicanrepubliccruisingguide.com Haiti Cruising Guidewww.haiticruisingguide.comJamaica Cruising Guidewww.jamaicacruisingguide.comTrinidad Cruising Guidewww.trinidadruisingguide.comCayman Islands Cruising Guidewww.caymanislandscruisingguide.com FREE CRUISING GUIDES Marina Zar-Par M Compliments of Boca Chica, Dominican Republic www.marinazarpar.com Che Guevara , by Nick Caistor, MacMillan Education, ISBN 978-0-230-0125-9, ©2009, paperback 152 pages, plus index. Once again I feel under my heels the ribs of Rocinante,Ž Ernesto Che Guevara wrote to his mother, in a mock-heroic reference to Don Quixotes broken-down nag. It was on the eve of his giving up a comfortable desk job in Havana and striking out to make revolution in the Congo with 16 other Cubans. The excursion was a disaster. He would be shot dead in Bolivia two years later at the age of 39 „ a martyr to his idea of a united socialist Latin America, a romantic fool with a gun who tilted at deadly windmills once too often, or an evil lapdog of Fidel Castro who signed the death warrants of hundreds of counter-revolutionaries. A reader of this biography cannot help but be biased by his or her own political views, but the author tries to give us glimpses of Guevara, the man. In an ironic twist, Ches name may be synonymous with revolutionary, but in the 21st Century his visage has been used to sell a wide range of corporate products aimed at the rebel consumer. Mike Tyson and Diego Maradona sport Che tattoos. Ches life began in 1928 in Rosario, Argentina, far from Cuba where he fought Batistas troops and achieved the rank of comandante (the revolutions highest) before being granted Cuban citizenship and becoming a member of Castros cabinet. His mother was well-to-do and his father was middle class and striving to better their lives. As a child, Ernesto was stricken with asthma and was home-schooled until nine, which caused him to be close to his mother and gave him a love of books. His family moved to the hills outside Cordoba in an effort to give him a better climate for his lungs, and when Ernesto was a teen he played rugby with abandon and was known as a fearless daredevil, though he would suffer asthma attacks all his life. As a young man, Ernesto studied medicine at the University of Buenos Aires and longed to see the world outside of the city. His parents separated and an early love affair with a wealthy young heiress fell apart, so Ernesto began a series of travels during his summers when he was off school. First he traveled 250 miles in six weeks on a powered bicycle, and later rode a Norton 500 motorcycle with an old friend from Cordoba, Dr. Alberto Granada. On this second trip they traveled to the copper mines of Chile and witnessed the exploitation of the workers; it was the beginning of the awakening of Ernestos social conscience. They traveled to a leper colony in the Amazon region of Peru where on his 24th birthday the young medical student spoke eloquently of a united Latin America, before heading downriver into Brazil. They stopped in Letitia, Colombia, where the two Argentines coached the local football team, and Che played goalie. The two then went by plane, bus, and truck to Caracas, Venezuela, where Dr. Granada stayed to work. The diary Che kept during this trip was the basis for the 2004 film The Motorcycle Diaries. Che went back to Buenos Aires to complete his medical degree at age 25. After he graduated, he set off by train with another childhood friend, Carlos Ferrer, to Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador. Carlos continued on to Caracas to meet Dr. Granada according to plan, but Ernesto changed his mind. He had met new Argentine friends and he traveled with them by ship to Costa Rica, a thriving democracy in 1953, where he met exiled Cuban revolutionaries for the first time. These Cubans had fled after unsuccessfully attacking the Moncado barracks in July, 1953. Sixty-one of their comrades had been taken prisoner and executed, but their leader, a young lawyer named Fidel Castro, defended himself in court and was given 15 years. A year later Castro was released, however, and he fled to Mexico City to join his brother Raul. Ernesto, meanwhile, hitchhiked into Guatemala City, where the democratically elected President Arbenz wished to introduce leftist reforms. Che suffered asthma attacks and was nursed by a Peruvian revolutionary, Hilda Gadea, about whom he wrote: Hilda declared her love in epistolary and practical form. I was feeling very bad with asthma, otherwise I might have made love to her. I warned her that all I could offer her was a casual contact, nothing definitive. She seemed very put out. The short letter she left me when she went is very good. Too bad she is so ugly.Ž „Continued on next page BOOK REVIEW BY BOB BERLINGHOF GUEVARA, THE MAN

PAGE 33

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 33 Warm & friendly atmosphere Spectacular views • Quality accommodation Fine dining • Excellent selection of winesP.O. Box 1 BQ, Bequia, St.Vincent & the Grenadines, W.I. Tel: (784) 458-3255 € Fax: (784) 458-3824 reservations@frangipanibequia.com € www.frangipanibequia.com Dont miss our Thursday BBQ & Jump up the frangipani hotel, bar & restaurant, bequia „ Continued from previous page In June of 1954, President Arbenz was ousted in a CIA-backed coup for the benefit of the United Fruit Company; Hilda was arrested as a member of the Peruvian Communist party. Ernesto fled with other exiles to Mexico City where she joined him in November. When Hilda became pregnant Ernesto married her, but rather than settle down, he became a revolutionary, too. Ernesto had met Raul and Fidel Castro „ both were at his wedding reception „ and he began guerilla and weapons training with them and their group of exiles, intending to be their physician. He acquired the nickname Che, which is Cuban slang for an Argentine. Che worked at the general hospital until the exiles moved to a ranch in May 1956 to pursue full-time training. He said good-bye to Hilda and their three-month-old daughter and wrote in his diary that her birth had put a stop to a disastrous marriageŽ and had freed him to leave: My inability to live with her mother is even greater than the affection with which I look on her. For a while I was worried that a combination of my delight with the child and consideration for her mother (who in many ways is a fine woman, and who loves me in an almost unhealthy way) would end up turning me into the boring father of a family.ƒ But now I know it isnt so.Ž In November 1956, 81 men set out from Tuxpan, Mexico on the leaky 60-foot cabin cruiser Granma ; most were seasick on the crossing to Cuba. They encountered hostile fire upon landing but managed to flee into the Sierra Maestra mountains, where their discipline and a sympathetic peasantry allowed them to thrive, grow, and eventually defeat Batistas forces of 15,000 well-equipped men. Che was promoted to captain for his leadership and guerrilla skills, and a crucial moment came when the small band he led were on the run and he chose to carry a box of ammunition instead of his doctors kit. Before the revolutionaries began their offensive, Che was promoted to comandante; he led his troops in a decisive battle on their march to Havana, which he entered before Fidel. Batista fled on January 1st, 1959, and in the first months of the new government Che signed the death sentences of hundreds of torturersŽ and enemies of the revolution without qualmsŽ. He also toiled as Minister of Industry, trying without much luck to diversify Cubas manufacturing base. He was appointed chairman of the Cuban National Bank after Fidel burst into a late night meeting of his advisors and demanded, Who here is a good economist?Ž Che alone raised his hand and later confessed, I thought he said, Who here is a good communist?Ž The anecdote indicates how decisions were made in the early days of Fidels revolution. Che also set up the Prensa Latina News Agency and wrote and published Reminiscences of the Guerrilla War. But the first book he had published in Castros Cuba was Cervantes Don Quixote . The rest of Ches story is now history. Relations quickly soured with the USA after the CIAs disastrous incursion at the Bay of Pigs in 1961. Soviet Premier Khruschev welcomed his new comrades in Cuba with open arms, establishing nuclear missiles in Cuba before removing them in October 1962 and making a secret pact with Kennedy that the USA wouldnt invade Cuba. It was the closest that the two superpowers would come to nuclear war, and Cuba was but a pawn in the middle. As Castro was pulled closer to the USSR, Ches militant ideology clashed with the Soviets more cautious approach, and some suggest that Castro sent Che abroad in 1965 to get rid of a potential troublemaker. Ches secret mission to aid other Marxist rebels in the African Congo was a dismal failure. He wrote in his diary that the rebel troops were devoid of any coherent political education: They consequently lack revolutionary awareness or any forwardlooking perspective beyond the traditional horizon of their tribal territories. Lazy and undisciplined, they are without any spirit of combat or self-sacrificeƒ (and are) the poorest example of a fighter I have ever come across.Ž In six months Che had returned to Cuba incognito, where he planned another secret mission to Bolivia. The Bolivian experience was even worse. Ches ragtag band was turned in to the authorities by the local peasants, and after enduring great hardship on the run, Che was captured and executed in October 1967. His body was returned for a ceremonial reburial in Cuba in 1997. In Cuba, Che had remarried and fathered at least four children, but he was not in any way a family man. His greatest love was reserved for the worlds oppressed, but his idea that a small band of armed insurgents could successfully pull off a Marxist revolution now seems quaint, deadly, and naïve. The author, a Latin American expert for the BBC, presents his facts with great sympathy, even referring to the poet Robert Lowells description of Che as the last armed prophetŽ in the title of the Introduction. Yet he concludes that Ches style of armed insurrection failed miserably in El Salvador and Guatemala. In Nicaragua, the Marxists were eventually voted out of power after the US-backed Contras waged war using weapons bought from Iran. (Though he doesnt mention it, Marxism also failed in Grenada when a group of hard-liners murdered the more moderate Maurice Bishop, his loyal cabinet members, and many innocent civilians in October 1983.) Through it all, Ches angry visage still adorns many T-shirts worldwide, a testament to his ferocious will and his legend as a true revolutionary. Nick Caistor presents all of this and more in a lucid and compact paperback, with excellent, if somewhat grainy, black-and-white photographs. This book is available from bookstores or from www.macmillan-caribbean.com.

PAGE 34

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 34 Stock Upon the widest selection and the best prices in Grenada at our two conveniently located supermarkets. Whether its canned goods, dairy products, meat, fresh vegetables or fruits, toiletries, household goods, or a fine selection of liquor and wine, The Food Fair has it all and a lot more.HubbardsJONAS BROWNE & HUBBARD (Gda.) Ltd. The Carenage: Monday Thursday 8 am to 5:30 pm Friday until 8:45 pm Saturday until 1:00 pm Tel: (473) 440-2588 Grand Anse: Monday Thursday 9 am to 5:30 pm Friday & Saturday until 7:00 pm Tel: (473) 444-4573 Real sailors use Streets Guides for inter-island and harbor piloting directions, plus interesting anecdotes of people, places and history. Streets Guides are the only ones that describe ALL the anchorages in the Eastern Caribbean.NEW! Streets videos, first made in 1985, are now back as DVDs. € Transatlantic with StreetŽ documents a sailing passage from Ireland to Antigua via the Cape Verdes. 2 hours € Antigua Week 85Ž is the story of the engineless yawl Iolaire racing round the buoys to celebrate her 80th birthday. 1 hour € Street on KnotsŽ demonstrates the essential knots and line-handling skills every sailor should know. 1 hour € Streetwise 1 and 2Ž give tips that appeared in the popular video Sailing Quarterly, plus cruises in the Grenadines, Venezuela and southwest coast of Ireland DVDs available at Imray, Kelvin Hughes, Armchair Sailor/ Bluewater Books, and www.street-iolaire.com. Full information on DVDs at www.street-iolaire.com HURRICANE TIPS! Visit www.street-iolaire.com for a wealth of information on tracking and securing for a storm.Streets Guides and DVDs are available at all Island Waterworld stores and at Johnson's Hardware, or from www.iUniverse.com and www.seabooks.com GOOD GUIDES ARE TIMELESSRocks dont move „ or if they do they are shown on up-to-date Imray charts. Regarding marine infrastructure, virtually every island puts out a free marine trade guide every year, which is much more up-to-date than any guide; similarly, the tourist departments put out a free annual guide for bars, restaurants and hotels. With all these updates readily available, Streets guides are timeless. REMEMBER to tell our advertisers you saw their ad in Compass! THE SKY IN FEBRUARY by Scott WeltyThe Planets in February MERCURY Very near the sunƒ No Mercury for you this month! VENUS Morning starŽ all month, rising at approximately 0400 hours. EARTH Left something on the stove. MARS See Mercuryƒ same story! JUPITER Sets between 2000 and 2100 hours all month. SATURN In Virgo and rising between 2030 and 2200 hours. Sky Events This Month 2nd New Moon 7th Jupiter setting with the crescent moon at approximately 2100 hours. 18th Full Moon 20th Saturn rises with the moon at approximately 2200 hours. 28th Venus rises with the pretty crescent moon (see Figure 1). The Brightest Star in the Sky The brightest star in the sky (not counting our sun of course) is Sirius, also called the Dog Star as it is the brightest star in the constellation Canis Major. Its easy to find Sirius now. Look east. Look up. Find Orion. Follow the three stars of his belt back downward to the bright star (See Figure 3). Thats Sirius. Its rising in the early morning days of summer led to the phrase, Dog days of summerŽ. This also was a signal to the ancient Egyptians that the yearly Nile floods (both a good and bad event) were about to recommence. No wonder it is the brightest star in our skyƒ It is twice as big as our sun and ONLY nine light years away. Thats close! Like about half of the stars in the sky, Sirius is a double star. Its companion is actually a white dwarf. A white dwarf is a remnant of a star that has burned up its nuclear fuel and collapsed down on itself. This will be the future of our good old sun in about two billion years* (maybe its time to quit putting stuff off!). This particular dwarf has about the same mass as our sun in a package the size of the Earth. That makes the density of the stuff crazy big such that if you could stand on this thing youd weigh 400,000 times your Earth weight! So, no, you wouldnt be standing. Youd be a puddle. You wont be able to see the companion with your Steiners. Its too close to Sirius and gets washed out. A large telescope can resolve the two, though. Figure 2 shows Sirius and its companion photographed in the x-ray region of the spectrum. Sirius is also one member of the Winter Triangle asterism. An asterism is a shape that can be seen by connecting stars together that are actually members of other constellations. The summer triangle is another such example. The winter triangle is made up of Sirius (in Canis Major), Betelgeuse (in Orion) and Procopyon (in Canis Minor). See Figure 3. In the South Pacific, bright stars such as Sirius were important to traditional navigation. The location of Sirius in the sky has it passing directly overhead on the island of Fiji (latitude 17° S). To Contemplate While Having a Glass of Wine on Deck Yes, our sun is doomed. In a billion years or so it will inflate to become a red giant. All our seas will boil away. No more sailing. Rocks will melt. Then it will blow off its outer layers in a nova explosion and collapse down to a white dwarf. Everything ever written, built or accomplished here on Earth will be gone. Will we have migrated to another star system before that, and more importantly will the Chicago Cubs have won even one stinking World Series? * I was giving a talk one time and relating the future of the sun when a listener raised his hand and asked, Did you say billion or million ?Ž Billion,Ž I responded. The gentleman wiped his brow and let out a, Whewƒ.Ž I just looked at him and asked, Whats the matter, did you have a haircut appointment or something?Ž Scott Welty is the author of The Why Book of Sailing , Burford Books, ©2007 Got a question for Captain ScienceŽ? E-mail Scott at weltysail@gmail.com. THE CARIBBEAN SKY: FREE SHOW NIGHTLY! Venus and crescent Moon „ February 28th at 0530 hours Above: Sirius and companion. Radiating lines are an artifact from the structure of the telescope Below: The Winter Triangle and using Orions belt to find Sirius. Looking southeast in the early eveningFIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3CHANDRA OBSERVATORY/NASA

PAGE 35

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 35 T R E A S U R E I S L A N D TREASURE ISLAND C A S I N O CASINO Located at the Tamarind Beach Hotel on Canouan Island C O M E A N D J O I N T H E F U N W I T H U S COME AND JOIN THE FUN WITH US W E H A V E A M E R I C A N R O U L E T T E , WE HAVE AMERICAN ROULETTE, B L A C K J A C K A N D 2 5 C E N T S S L O T S . BLACKJACK AND 25CENTS SLOTS. Open daily from 6.00pm For further information call 784.458.8044 (ext. 431 after 6.00pm) Seeing RED ? Its Roucou!During your off-the-boat explorations have you ever seen a bottle filled with what looks like pure red paint at a vegetable stand? No, it is not local island ketchup, tomato sauce, or even make-up. It is roucou. Not so many years ago, roucou (or oucouŽ) was used throughout the islands to color and flavor many foods. Now, as with many traditional foods that take some time to prepare, it is seldom seen unless at vending stands along the less-traveled roads, although recently some islands were preparing a banana ketchup using roucou for the red color. It was difficult to discern it from traditional tomato ketchup. Roucou, sometimes known as annatto, comes from the fruit of the achiote, botanically the bixa orellana tree, native to Central and South America. The Caribbean has two types of roucou trees, the most common is the red, but there is a green variety that never gets red even when it dries. Roucou is usually a short, attractive evergreen shrub, but it can grow to more than 20 feet with shiny heart-shaped leaves that sometimes have reddish veins. The three-inch pale pink blossoms bear a strange, hairy fruit that is heart-shaped with prickly spines. It may be yellow, red or maroon. Red is the most common variety. When ripe, the pod splits in half to reveal about 50 seeds encased in a red pulp. The pulp is termed bixin and Amerindians used it as war paint and to give a startlingly attractive color to their bodies while protecting from the sun and insects. Amerindians supposedly used the seeds as an aphrodisiac. After the explorers encountered Amerindians „ Mayans, Incas, and Aztecs „ colored in brilliant red, achiote was imported to Europe in the 1500s and commercial cultivation began in India two centuries later. The pulp is processed to produce a commercial dye and the seeds are dried to make a rust-colored paste, used for coloring foods such as rice, smoked fish, oil, and cheese. Blocks of this achiote paste can be bought in Mexican markets. As an herbal remedy, a mixture of roucou pulp and seeds boiled in oil makes a salve that helps heal small cuts and burns, preventing scarring and blistering. A decoction of the leaves and pulp reportedly relieves stomach disorders such as indigestion and will help asthma. Roucou leaves in a bath will be refreshing. Leaves heated in oil will reduce the pain of a headache when pressed to the forehead. If you want to impress friends at your next cockpit or beach gathering, try cooking with a bit of roucou oil. Everyone has had yellow saffron rice, but use roucou to create a pink rice dish by adding a tablespoon to the water when you are boiling the rice. Roucou Oil 1/2 Cup cooking oil 2 Tablespoons roucou seeds In an appropriate frying pan, heat the oil over medium heat for three minutes. Add the seeds, stirring continuously. Heat for one more minute. Allow to cool. Strain or not depending on the intended use. Refrigerate. Roucou Seasoning This is what you see bottled at roadside stands. Pick at least a gallon of roucou pods, cut and scrape out the seeds. Do this carefully with a teaspoon because everything stains! Place everything in a clean bucket and cover with clean fresh water. Allow to soak for at least a day. Strain the water into another bucket. Rub the seeds between the palms of your hands to remove any remaining pulp; I recommend wearing latex gloves and not getting too splashy. Strain again and repeat until the seeds fail to give off any color. In a cast iron or stainless steel pot (it may stain) bring the strained roucou liquid to a boil and simmer for ten minutes. Add salt and any herbs you desire for your personal taste. Cover and let sit for a few hours to cool before pouring into bottles. Keep refrigerated. If you were neat „ as few roucouians are „ cleaning up is easy. If not, use diluted bleach to clean surfaces and hands. Red Baked Fish 1 Cup boiling water 1 Tablespoon roucou seeds 2 Tablespoons fresh orange juice 2 Tablespoons vinegar 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 hot pepper, seeded and minced 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1/2 teaspoon ground allspice pinch of salt 4 fish fillets or steaks (about two pounds) oil to coat pan This takes some time to prepare but is worth it! Grouper or kingfish is good. Combine boiling water and roucou seeds in a cup and let stand overnight to soften the seeds. When ready to prepare this meal, drain the seeds and combine the softened seeds with the orange juice, vinegar, garlic, hot pepper, cumin, allspice and salt in a blender container; process until it forms a smooth paste. Cover both sides of fish pieces with roucou paste and place in a well-oiled baking dish. Refrigerate covered for at least two hours to blend flavors. Bake fish covered at 350°F for 20 minutes. Uncover and bake another ten to 15 minutes. For the Home Gardener Roucou can be grown from a cutting or from seeds. If you find a vendor selling it, ask for some seeds. It will grow almost anywhere as long as the soil is well drained and it doesnt get very cold. Be the only one on your block with a roucou shrub as a remembrance of your island travels! Start this shrub in a sizeable container and keep the growing medium slightly damp until it catches when new leaves appear. It needs the usual starter fertilizer until it begins to show pods. Then switch to a bearing salt. Transplant when it is too big for your container. In the cockpit it will make a great conversation starter. If you carry it to your shore abode, these shrubs make nice ornamental bushes at the entrance to driveways, sidewalks, or paths. THE SPICE LOCKER BY SHIRLEY HALL Above left: An open pod showing pulp-covered seeds Below: The hairy roucou pod, and seeds packaged for sale

PAGE 36

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 36 Dear Compass , I read with interest in the October 2010 issue of Compass that The Moorings will be operating a new charter base out of Port Louis Marina in St. Georges, Grenada. In the early 1980s The Moorings was getting so big in the BVI that Charlie and Ginny Carey started thinking of opening a new base somewhere in the southern islands. In April 84 Charlie contacted me and asked me for advice on the subject. I convinced him that the best thing to do was to buy Secret Harbor Hotel at Mt. Hartman Bay in Grenada and expand the small marina there. This they did, but I was never able to convince the bases managers (all of whom were new to the area) to send the boats up to Carriacou in stages via Grenadas east coast. They sent the boats up the west coast instead, which entails a run downwind from Mt. Hartman Bay to Point Saline, a long haul up Grenadas lee side to Carriacou, and then on to the ultimate goal of the Tobago Cays. This used up at least a couple of days. Then someone came up with the bright idea of moving The Moorings base from Mt. Hartman Bay to Canouan, as Canouan was only a couple of hours sail to the ever-popular Tobago Cays. Those who made that decision obviously had not spent any time in Canouans Charleston Harbour in the winter, or consulted with experienced local sailors and fishermen who would have told them the harbor was infamous as a rocky and rolly anchorage. The winter ground swell made it impractical to build a marina there, and often the swell made it impossible to even bring a boat alongside the dock for the charter party to board. Occasionally the ground swell would be so bad that the charter party had to be put up in a hotel the first night, rather than staying aboard at anchor or on a mooring. When Glossy Hill was knocked down a few years ago to allow extension of the runway at Canouans airport, there was the chance to build a perfect charter base. If rubble that was knocked off Glossy Hill had been used to build a breakwater on the north side of Nens Bay (as I urged in a letter to Compass at the time) they could have built a beautiful, sheltered marina right next to the airport. Unfortunately this was not done, the ground swell won out, The Moorings gave up on the Canouan base, and has finally moved back to Grenada. With the new base being in St. Georges Lagoon, sailing up Grenadas east coast to Carriacou isnt a logical option. To sail from St. Georges to the Grenadines via the west coast, strap her down flat, pull the traveler to windward, run the engine at one-third throttle, and motorsail up the lee coast of Grenada. Tack as necessary to stay close to shore to stay in calm water and enjoy the shoreside scenery. When Tanga Langa point is reached, tack to the east to Sauteurs before you head north „ unless the wind is south of east and you can lay 065 degrees magnetic to allow for the set of the current to the west. If you have calculated correctly to pick up a weather-going tide at Tanga Langa, laying a course of 050 or 045 (according to the strength of the weather going tide) will be sufficient. Another thing that many sailors (and especially bareboat managers) forget is that you can spend a pleasant week or ten days cruising and never leave Grenada. Leave St. Georges, enjoy a wonderful quiet anchorage at Morne Rouge Bay, and then explore all the wonderful anchorages on the south and southeast coasts. Proceed up the windward side to Grenville and Sandy Island (not to be confused with the Sandy Island off Carriacou), and then sail on back down the lee side to Port Louis Marina. I wonder how many Moorings charterers will follow my advice? Don Street Glandore, Ireland Dear Compass , As of today, December 18th, the meeting between concerned yachts and the Sandy Island Oyster Bed Marine Protected Area (SIOBMPA) committee suggested in Martin Barriteaus letter in the December 2010 issue of Compass has not taken place and it appears unlikely that it will. I, along with several others, received an advance copy of Mr. Barriteaus letter in mid-November and I immediately responded in favor of such a meeting, indicating that we would re-arrange our sailing schedule to be in Carriacou in early December. Shortly thereafter, I received an e-mail from Mr. Davon Baker, chairman of SIOBMPA, (who was copied on both the advance issue of Mr. Barriteaus letter and my response) suggesting that we should work through him to schedule. I responded to Mr. Baker saying that, out of courtesy, I would work with Mr. Barriteau since he initiated the idea of such a meeting. I then e-mailed Mr. Barriteau with a list of discussion items for the agenda (copy attached), and followed that e-mail up a week later with a request for the status of the proposed meeting. All told, I have sent three e-mails to Mr. Barriteau and one to Mr. Baker, and copied each of those messages to the other. To date, aside from the message from Mr. Baker suggesting a meeting and an acknowledgement from him of my preference to deal with Mr. Barriteau, I have had no response relative to a meeting, and, in the case of Mr. Barriteau, not even an acknowledgement of receipt of my e-mails. In the meantime, I forwarded Mr. Barriteaus letter to a number of other concerned yachts and have had responses from several, as well as others who received a copy forwarded to them by someone on my original distribution. Including those originally copied on the advance copy of Mr. Barriteaus letter, there have been various responses: some yachts had arranged their schedules to be in Carriacou in early December to attend the proposed meeting; some have contacted Mr. Barriteau and Mr. Baker directly; and some have indicated that their plans prohibit their attendance at the proposed meeting but they would like to be kept informed of progress. Today, more than a month since I responded to Mr. Barriteaus letter, there has been no notification to any of us as to the scheduling of the proposed meeting. On December 17th, I sent letters to Mr. Barriteau and Mr. Baker saying that since I had heard nothing further from them about scheduling a meeting, I could only assume that they were not serious about meeting with the yachting community. I also told them that because of other commitments I was no longer available to meet with them in Carriacou. There has been no official release to the yachting community of the rules and regulations for the park, including fees, boundaries, exceptions and no-anchor zones. Of interest is that there have been no yachts anchored on the north side of Tyrrel Bay, allegedly in the park zone, since the beginning of August: indication of the respect which yachts have for rules, even those with which they disagree or dont understand the logic behind. Nor have any yachts gone into the mangroves, except with the threat of Hurricane Tomas, despite the four local boats which have been there for several years. This respect for regulations as well as the environment is in sharp contrast to the press release of July 21st, 2010, which announced the installation of the moorings at Sandy Island and the imminent opening of the park, and which was propagated in newsletters and on websites. The press release states that prior to the moorings at Sandy Island, yachts have been lowering their anchors directly onto the seabed, causing significant damage to the reefŽ. The above statement is blatantly untrue. There are no reefs where yachts anchor at Sandy Island; the bottom is sand. How can yachts be expected to provide the revenue for running the SIOBMPA if we are not given the opportunity, as stakeholders, to discuss the issues and if we are maligned by remarks such as the one cited in the press release above? „Continued on next page Marine Insurance The insurance business has changed. No longer can brokers talk of low rates. Rather, the honest broker can only say, Ill do my best to minimize your increase!Ž There is good insurance, there is cheap insurance, but there is no good cheap insurance. You never know how good your insurance is until you have a claim. My claims settlement record cannot be matched.I have been connected with the marine insurance business for 47 years. I have developed a rapport with brokers and underwriters at Lloyds and am able to introduce boat owners to specialist brokers in the Lloyds market.e-mail: streetiolaire@hotmail.com www.street-iolaire.com R E A D E R S ' READERS' F O R U M FORUM Don Street always thought that Nens Bay, just off the airstrip at the right-hand side of this photo, would be a good location for a marina in CanouanCHRIS DOYLE

PAGE 37

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 37 YAMAHAParts Repairs Service Outboard Engines 2HP-250HP Duty-Free Engines for Yachts McIntyre Bros. Ltd.TRUE BLUE, ST. GEORGES, GRENADA W.I. PHONE: (473) 444 3944/1555 FAX: (473) 444 2899 email: macford@caribsurf.com TOURS & CRUISES CAR & JEEP RENTAL „ Continued from previous page I can honestly say that we tried to work with SIOBMPA to resolve issues. Can the people associated with SIOBMPA say the same? John Pompa S/V Second Millennium Boston, Massachusetts Post Script … December 21, 2010: Today, just four days after informing Messrs Barriteau and Baker that I was no longer available to meet with them, I (coincidentally?) received an e-mail from Martin Barriteau informing me of a workshop that will be held in Carriacou on January 27th and 28th and that they will invite the yachting community to attend these meetings. Sorry, Mr. Barriteau, too late. I find it very hard to believe that those associated with SIOBMPA could not find any time to meet with members of the yachting community until the yachting community said that because of other commitments they were no longer available. I hope that Mr. Barriteau and others do not use our unavailability to make a case for yachts not being sincere in their concerns or to further malign yachting. Objectives of meeting of SIOBMPA and members of the Carriacou yachting community: € Establishing a line of communications between SIOBMPA and the Carriacou yachting community € Recognition of the Carriacou yachting community as a valuable stakeholder in SIOBMPA € Resolution by SIOBMPA that yacht tourists will not be portrayed to the public as damaging reefs or other eco-structures, and therefore necessitating moorings and/or other anchoring restrictions € Consensus between SIOBMPA and the Carriacou yachting community on moorings, their number and placement, and anchoring privileges at Sandy Island. € Consensus between SIOBMPA and the Carriacou yachting community on anchoring privileges in the Tyrrel Bay portion of SIOBMPA. Dear Compass , Im writing in reaction to Bernard Logans amazing saga about riding out Hurricane Tomas, which was published in the January issue of Compass . He wrote, I became aware that, if I were to remain covered by insurance, we would have to put to sea.Ž Is it a sign of the times that boat owners now will elect to set out to sea when a hurricane approaches because insurance companies will pay full compensation for boats lost at sea in named storms, but wont do so for boats lost while anchored or docked in the same storm?!? It used to be that vessels only put to sea to attempt to ride out a hurricane when there was absolutely no other alternative, and even then seamen faced the prospect with dread. Surely it isnt the intention of insurance companies to put peoples lives at risk. But although a boat can be left unattended on storm anchors or moorings, in the mangroves or in a marina while the crewmembers look after their personal safety, a boat cant be sent to sea by itself. Weve all heard tales of cruisers staying on their boats in harbor during a hurricane and having to swim ashore after the boat sinks at its moorings. How will you swim ashore if the boat sinks when youre underway in a storm? Some yacht insurance policies specify a certain number of crew for ocean passages „ how many crew should you have aboard when underway in a hurricane? Should they all have life insurance? If everyone starts getting underway for hurricanes because of their insurance policies, will it increase the likelihood of collisions at sea? A huge part of good seamanship is common sense and a sense of responsibility. Is it responsible to go to sea to weather a named storm, not because its the safest course of action for the boat and the people aboard, but for insurance purposes? Interesting times we live in, when the uninsured boats probably take the best hurricane precautions, and the insured boats take the biggest risks. Ava Weaver S/V Alans Albatross Dear Compass , Id like to say a big thank you to all the boaters who helped get a recent shipment of books from the US into the hands of eager young Caribbean readers. David and Amy Schafer, the crew of the yacht Taza Mas , made a special trip to Antigua to pick up books and deliver them to Bequia, where Sandra Ollivierre of Challenger Taxi distributed them to schools and to the Bequia Reading Club. The books had been collected from generous donors in Newport, Rhode Island; Annapolis Maryland; and New Jersey, and sailed from the States to Antigua with Captain John Spenlinhauer and Chef Katharina Reissin aboard the yacht Tivoli . In Antigua the books were kindly stored by Dr. Murphy at the Dockyard Museum. It takes a village! That is the story of just one batch of books. For more information about this book program visit www.BIG-Books.org. Ann-Wallis White Ann-Wallis White Yacht Charters Annapolis, Maryland Dear Compass , After many years in Venezuela hoping to see the security problems solved, I decided to see how things were going in Colombia. Visiting boats no longer have to go down to Cartagena for their entry into the country. The new international marina at Santa Marta opened its pontoons two months ago. The facilities are nearing completion and should be fully operational in April 2011. Santa Marta is located near centers of tourist interest. The lost city of the Indians, Tayrona National Park, the Five Bays and the historic town itself make it an ideal stopover. Safety is the major concern of Colombians who encourage foreigners to come, and I guarantee you that I feel perfectly safe. Ive been in Colombia since August 2010 and I am pleased to help with information (suchetjean@hotmail.com). Jean Noel Former captain, Adagio IV Dear Compass , Many yachtsmen are all too ready to blame theft for the loss of their possessions, particularly dinghies and outboards. In Prince Rupert Bay, Dominica on the morning of January 5th, an antipodean voice announced on the VHF that during the night his dinghy had disappeared from the stern of his yacht „ either drifted or stolen, he knew not which. The Indian River Guides were immediately on the case, doubting that it had been stolen as the usual security patrols had been in action all night. Those anchored close to the yacht knew that the crew had returned, obviously very drunk, in the early hours of the morning. The Indian River Guides spontaneously went off in search of the missing dinghy in their fast patrol boat and eventually it was found drifting towards Panama. It was returned to the owner, who by all accounts showed little financial thanks for its retrieval. The Indian River Guides should be congratulated for their speedy and generous action. Donations to the cost of their security patrols, which are funded by their association, are gratefully received. John Lytle S/Y Oriole Dear Compass Readers , We want to hear from YOU! Be sure to include your name, boat name or shoreside address, and a way we can contact you (preferably by e-mail) if clarification is required. We do not publish individual consumer complaints or individual regatta results complaints. (Kudos are okay!) We do not publish anonymous letters; however, your name may be withheld from print at your request. Letters may be edited for length, clarity and fair play. Send your letters to: sally@caribbeancompass.com or Compass Publishing Ltd. Readers Forum Box 175BQ Bequia VC0400 St. Vincent & the Grenadines CHRIS DOYLEIn Prince Rupert Bay, Dominica, local boat operators recently rescued a lost dinghy

PAGE 38

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 38 CREW VACANCIES!email: crew@tradewindscruiseclub.comTradeWinds Cruise Club operate a fleet of catamarans across six destinations in the Caribbean. We are the fastest growing charter company, operating TERM CHARTERS, all inclusive, 7 days. We are looking for crew, mainly teams in the form of a Captain and a Chef/Hostess. We prefer couples that are married OR have been living together for at least a year. The nature of the job is such that the better the understanding and teamwork between Captain and Chef the more successful your charters will be. Requirements: Captain with a Skippers licence. Chef/Hostess with a basic understanding of cooking. Dive master/ instructor for either the Captain and/or Chef is a plus. We offer full training onsite in the Caribbean. This is a FUN job with great earning potential. If you are willing to work hard and have a positive disposition to life this could be your DREAM job. Anyone with an interest is welcome to apply. If you would like more information about this job or send your CV to us, please use this email address: crew@tradewindscruiseclub.comor by mail to: Bequia Marina, P.O.Box 194BQ, Port Elizabeth, Bequia, St Vincent & the Grenadines Tel. St Vincent +784 457 3407 Tel. St Maarten +599 5510550 THE CRUISING SAILOR`S CHANDLERY SINCE 1990 AMERON ABC 3 TIN FREE SELF POLISHING ANTIFOULING PAINT CORNER: MIRANDA C O R N E R : M I R A N D A& GUARAGUAO, PUERTO LA CRUZ, VENEZUELA & G U A R A G U A O , P U E R T O L A C R U Z , V E N E Z U E L A TEL: 58 (281) 265-3844 E-MAIL : xanadumarine@cantv.net T E L : 5 8 ( 2 8 1 ) 2 6 5 3 8 4 4 E M A I L : x a n a d u m a r i n e @ c a n t v . n e t WALLILABOU ANCHORAGEWALLILABOU BAY HOTEL VHF Ch 16 & 68(range limited by the hills) ... PORT OF ENTRY MOORING FACILITIES WATER, ICE, SHOWERS CARIBEE BATIK BOUTIQUE BAR AND RESTAURANT TOURS ARRANGED CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED HAPPY HOUR 5-6 P.O. Box 851, St. Vincent & the Grenadines, West Indies. Tel: (784) 458-7270 Fax: (784) 457-9917 E-mail: wallanch@vincysurf.com Read in Next Months Compass : Why Rally? A Cruisers Report on Trinidad and Tobago How We Decided Where to Refit in the Caribbean ƒ and more! Dear Compass , It was a strange feeling looking at the bottom of my boat. Black with white dots, it was looking much like the top of a spotted eagle ray. After spending two hours scraping and then scrubbing the bottom there was not much of a sense of accomplishment. I knew that I would have to do all of this again in just a few weeks. This isnt what I expected after having the bottom of the boat just painted two months prior. How is this possible, you might ask? It could all be summed up in three words: phony bottom paint.Ž My wife, Lou, and I have owned our boat since 2004 and almost every season we have done the bottom work ourselves. This year, the wife and I saved up just enough money to spoil ourselves and have someone else do it for a change. There had been about 15 years of bottom paint built up in some spots and worn down in others, so I thought it was time to take it all the way down to gel-coat. As many of you know, this is a labor-intensive job so it only made sense to make the sail down to Trinidad where labor is relatively inexpensive and have it done there. We hauled out at a boatyard in Chaguaramas and consulted the front desk as to whom we should have do the bottom. They recommended using the yards contractor and assured us he would do a good job; also by using him we would not be obligated to pay a work-pass fee. We left our boat there for a six-week period, and went back to the States to visit family. When we came back the boat had been stripped and sanded down to gel-coat and was awaiting the first layers of barrier coat. We were happy with the sanding job they had completed and were looking forward to soon having the bottom finished. We watched as the workers applied three coats of barrier coat and then the contractor and I discussed which paint to use as anti-fouling. We discussed our options with others in the yard, did a little internet research, and decided on an anti-fouling paint that friends of mine had been using for years with great results. The contractor told me he would not have a problem acquiring the paint, in fact, he informed me that he could even get it for us at a discount. I looked at the paint can to make sure it was the correct paint and the bottom of the boat was painted with two and a half coats. After a few weeks in Grenada we started making our way home back to the Virgin Islands. To my surprise, by the time we got there, less than a month and a half later, there were already baby barnacles covering every square inch of the bottom of our boat. After realizing this, I decided to go down and attempted scrubbing the paint with a black scotch-brite pad, but the paint was as hard as a rock and absolutely none came off. The paint we thought had been applied was supposed to be ablative! In Trinidad, there is only one distributor for the paint I requested. Feeling upset and confused, I contacted them asking if they had any clue as to what could have caused this to happen? The gentleman explained to me about a scam that he said is going on in many of the Chaguaramas boatyards. Paint is apparently used up in the shipyards and the empty cans are carefully cleaned and some sort of paint that looks like bottom paint, but is not, is poured back into the can. The can is resealed giving it the appearance of the true product. After which the paint is sold under the tableŽ. When discussing the characteristics of the paint, the distributor assured me that is what I ended up with. I dont think the distributor made up this story. The reason for this is that the paint that was applied to our boat isnt ablative. No amount of scrubbing makes any of it come off. I would think that even if the paint had expired or just had poor anti-fouling performance it would still retain its ablative properties. Several friends painted their boat with the same stuff I thought I was getting, at the same time, and they have had good results. I have had a few other seasoned sailors check out my paint. „Continued on next page Letter of the Month JANE GIBB

PAGE 39

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 39 Visit: marinazarpar.com email: info@marinazarpar.com Tel: 809 523 5858 VHF Channel 5 € High Quality Sheltered Moorings € Slips to 120 with depth 10 € 70 Ton Travelift (30' beam) € ABYC certified machanics € Shore power 30, 50 and 100 amps € All slips with fingers € Showers, Laundry, Restaurant, 24 hr security € Immigration office in the marina for clearance € Free WIFI and Free Internet € Dinghy Dock € 12 miles East of Santo Domingo & 7 miles East of International Airport Marina Zar-Par M M M M a a a a a r r r r r i i i i i Z THE FOCAL POINT FOR CRUISING YACHTSMEN 18.25.50N 69.36.67W DOMINICA MARINE CENTER18 Victoria Street, Roseau Dominica, WI 767-448-2705 Ext Marine Fax: 767-448-7701 VHF 16 info@dominicamarinecenter.com Agent: Budget Marine, Doyle Sailmaker, SeaChoice Products Dealer: Mercury Marine, Yanmar Marine Transport has never been easier … with no floor boards Air Deck boats can be stowed most anywhere. FEATURES : € Air filled floor makes kneeling or sitting extremely comfortable € Easy to carry 25% lighter than wooden-floor inflatables AVAILABLE: 6 7Ž (200cm) 46lb(21kg) 710Ž (240cm) 75lb(34kg) 810Ž (270cm) 86lb(39kg) 102Ž (310cm) 92lb(42kg) 112 (340cm) 99lb(45kg) ENGINES: 2.5-350hp (2-Stroke & 4-Stroke) @ DUTY-FREE Prices „ Continued from previous page They tell me that there is no way what we got is any sort of bottom paint. There are not only barnacles growing on my bottom but everything you can imagine. Its a forest down there and continues to grow as fast as I can scrub it. We are one of St. Johns busiest day-sail boats; we are sailing almost every day. You would think that would help keep things from growing, but it doesnt. We now have to scrape and scrub the bottom every three weeks. After many attempts, the boatyard has refused any responsibility for the paint their contractor applied and, in fact, they have denied that their contractor is even affiliated with them. As for the contractor himself, he returned one of our calls but now fails to respond to us entirely. I also contacted YSATT, and although they were kind and helpful, it doesnt seem there is much they can do. I asked a boatyard in Tortola for an estimate to repaint our boat and they told me they have had to re-do several boats that had just got painted in Trinidad. So Im not the only one this has happened to. Even by carefully inspecting the anti-fouling paint can, you would never have known that what was in it is fake. Jason Carter S/V Survivan Editors note: Compass has a policy of not publishing individual consumer complaints. However, in light of the fact that this might be a more widespread problem, we are sharing Jasons letter and we asked yachting industry contacts in Trinidad for their comments. We were told that, without the boat being in Trinidad so the paint in question could be examined, it is very difficult to identify whether Jasons problem was the result of a scam, a case of badly mixed or improperly applied paint, or a problem with the paint itself. In any case, it might be prudent to personally purchase your paint from a reliable chandlery or paint store, or direct from the manufacturer. Check the expiration date and make a note of the batch number if this information is given on the paint can. Then ensure that the application instructions are followed to the letter. Its worth Googling [paint name] data sheetŽ for additional information. We also asked Chris Doyle, who hauls out annually in Trinidad and has reported in Compass on his own comparative anti-fouling paint tests over the years, for his comments, which follow. Dear Compass , I very much doubt my antifouling tests qualify me to comment on this letter, however that has never stopped me before! Jasons letter mentioned the hardness of the paint. Self-polishing paints can vary enormously in how hard they are: some are very soft and will brush off with a rope passing over them, others you can scrub. So what about the barnacles? In all my tests of the more expensive self-polishing modern (non-tin) antifoulings, I found they all grew barnacles like mad, especially after the first month or so. How many barnacles you got would depend on where you anchored; enclosed lagoons such as Simpson Bay or Rodney Bay were very bad, but so was the big open bay of Schoelcher in Martinique. The Grenadines seem relatively benign. Strangely, I found that if I kept removing the barnacles when they were very small (preferably before they left their little white pads) they did not appear to grow so readily after the third month onwards. In other words, the antifouling became more effective with time. I have tested the paint Jason was supposed to have gotten more than once and got barnacles, but never weed in that time. I am less sure about the ablative bit „ it is a self-polishing paint, but as I remember it is quite hard. The letter describes the color of the antifouling as black. My experience was that red antifoulings of any make always worked better than their colored brethren. This is not surprising, as one of the main ingredients is copper, which is red and provides the color. To make copper-based paint another color, you have to add another colorant, which is very unlikely to aid, and quite likely to hinder, the antifouling properties. Antifouling is very variable. In the years of tin paints, when the antifoulings were more effective though very detrimental to the environment, I once tested a blue paint that worked very well. I had forgotten I had tested it once and tested it again some years later; it sucked, and it was only when the paint agent pointed out I had tested it before with good results that I leafed back through my files and found out he was right. He said there had been no change in the formula. I was amazed and have no explanation. The red paint of the same manufacture was still working very well. Do I think the results Jason got could have happened had the antifouling been a legitimate product? If his boat had just gotten barnacles, then definitely yes! Time and time again I was amazed at having to deal with many barnacles on expensive paints in the early months, which is why no one seems to want to give me paint to test any more (probably because I have not had very good results since the removal of tin). I personally use one of the cheaper paints, namely Jotun Sea Queen. My boat stays in the water only about seven months a year, and for this time this paint gives as good a protection as the more expensive paints and is way better in the early months. This may well change over a longer time period, with the more expensive paints giving better long-term protection as long as you nurse them though the early months. If the paint is as he described, with rapid growth of all types including weed, it was either a bad lot of paint, there was a problem with application, or it was not what it was labeled. I hope this may shed some light. I might add that I think we have got to the stage where modern antifoulings work really well on ships that are constantly moving at a good speed and spend very little time in port. For our slow-moving yachts, nature is way ahead of paint technology. Best wishes, Chris Doyle Ti Kanot ‘I once tested a blue paint that worked very well. I had forgotten I had tested it once and tested it again some years later…’ 2008 89 Catana  4.900.000 2007 73 Executive $ 2,000,000 1999 60 Fountaine Pajot $619,000 2007 50 Catana $950,000 2008 50 Lagoon $749,000 2000 47 Catana  340,000

PAGE 40

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 40 World Cruisers Online Resource w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w . . . . . . . . . . . . b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g . . . . . . . . . . c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m .bwsailing.co n n n n n n n n n c c c c c c c m m m m m m m g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g w w w w w w w. w. w . . b b b b w w w s s s s a a a a a i i i i i i l l i i i i n n n g g g g g . . c c o o o o o o m m m m 2 Free Issues of Blue Water Sailing magazine 100s of Boat Reviews Latest Cruising News & Notes Exclusive Link to Yachts for Sale BWSs Cruising Classi“eds Worldwide Marine Weather Forecasts The Worlds Best Cruising Magazine As evening came, I noticed that a yacht anchored more than a hundred metres astern was showing a masthead strobe as an anchor light. As it became dark, the cockpit face of my cabin began to flash white once or twice a second. Every time our stern swung by them, a set of flashes went straight down the companionway, all the way to the foot of the V-berth. They werent intense flashes „ the yacht was anchored at about three times the prevailing interval in the bay, which is a generous interval „ the kind of place that I hang out. When a close neighbor turns on a strobe, it is intense and cant be ignored anywhere on the boat, including below. A vessel that is flashing a masthead strobe doesnt see it at all unless they notice that the hulls of their neighbors are flashing back at them. The neighbors, however, will be seeing the flashes even when looking away from them. The use of strobes as anchor lights was thoroughly shouted down in the Compass Readers Forum back in 07 „ March through October. I reckoned the score at nine to three. Then strobe lights all but disappeared. But now they seem to be creeping back. The return of the strobe seems weighted towards non-masthead strobes and weaker strobes, perhaps believers in strobes who, nonetheless, see their nuisance value. Among the new configurations Ive seen is one mounted on a plate that shields it from flashing onto nearby vessels „ it was only visible from well beyond the range of any collision threat. Another was a yacht anchored off our bow with an intense strobe mounted low. It would have reflected off my open hatch onto the head of my bed all night except for one thing: something on the yacht flashing the strobe obstructed its view from astern „ I couldnt see it at all. These are bad jokes in terms of collision avoidance, of course. Ive also seen arrangements that were much better thought out. Heres some fodder for sea lawyersŽ. Flashers say that the regulations only say white, not whether it is flashing. Therefore, they maintain, using flashing lights as anchor lights is not illegal... despite the facts that strobes are used as an emergency signal on the water and that flashing white is a specific navigation aid marking a hazard. My sea-lawyer answer is a quote from the Collision Regulations: All-round light means a light showing an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of 360 degrees.Ž And Ill argue that where the Collision Regulations mean flashingŽ, they say flashingŽ. On the other hand, maybe some flashers could use the next definition in the same section, which says that flashing,Ž means 120 times a minute or more, to say that a slower strobe isnt even flashing! But for those whose concern is collision avoidance, let me offer these thoughts. Masthead lights are good at a distance and in a seaway where the hull disappears in the troughs. But in close quarters, from the height of a yacht cockpit or a dinghy, a much lower light is more noticeable. Also, strobes have a quality that makes their distance difficult to judge. Ironically, the masthead location partly answers that if you can visualize the mast height and judge the angle. If you cant guess the height of a light in the rigging, above the water, you dont have that clue. But the person most likely to run into you at night wont be that good a night navigator anyway. Ive been living aboard for more than 20 years, the vast majority of that at anchor, half of that at night. I havent been run into by a boat that didnt see me at night. Ive used various anchor lights including a kerosene lantern, but never a strobe. What I have against strobes (or any intense light in the anchorage) is aesthetics. They diminish the quality of the night. But aesthetics, nowadays, can be trumped by money, regulation, security, and/or convenience. Thats why I mention that using strobes as anchor lights is illegal. Over the years, Ive been aboard a number of yachts when the question of an infringement on a neighbor was answered with, Oh, if they dont like it, theyll say so.Ž Is that so? Is it, then, a reasonable and expected thing to go over to someone who cant be bothered to say that you are being bothered? Is it even, perhaps, a civic duty? Or even fulfilling their wish that someone else do their thinking for them? In the case of the masthead strobe at hand, while I pondered a dinghy returned to the boat (full speed, without any sort of light). Then the strobe was turned off. End of problem. I woke at my usual time, before first light. Their strobe was back on and flashing on the foot of my berth as I lay there. I sipped my coffee in the cockpit with the bulkhead flashing white. I waited for full light before pulling up my dinghy and sailing over. I made a pass under their stern to read the boats name. Nobody was in the cockpit and the companionway was open. On the next pass, I gave a loud hail. Aboard the [ Whatever ]! Ahoy!Ž and watched for a response as I sailed out far enough to tack back. I made several more passes, adding words like Hola!Ž, Yo!Ž, and Oui!Ž. Loud enough to wake them if they were asleep. No response. I made a final pass and tried an approach suggested by Chris Doyle. Ahoy [ Whatever ]! Do you have an emergency!?Ž Good and loud. Im sure the guy on the neighboring boat, who was now on deck, heard it well. One kind of hates to do this sort of thing. If they dont respond, one must then decide whether to go aboard to investigate or go to the authorities. But if they were just laying low until I gave up, as some yachts do with vendors, they might see a need to respond to that question „ after all, they were flashing an emergency signal. Never mind that they and their fellow flashers have made the signal meaningless. Whether they had been hiding or I finally woke them, he appeared in the cockpit. Im limited to English and their flag is French. So I illustrated my statement (no profanity „ profanity doesnt help) with sign language, pointing to his masthead, using the hand opening and closing sign for yak, yak, yakŽ to indicate the flashing, pointed to my boat, moved the yakking strobe under my other hand to show it entering my boat, to the berth where I sleep, indicated by tilting my head onto my hands. Anyway, I did my duty. I checked to see if there was an emergency. So tell everybody you know who has a strobe. If they have an emergency in the anchorage and turn their strobe on, somebody might respond „ it does happen. This should be a comfort to anyone whose paramount concern is safety. WHATS ON MY MIND THE RETURN OF THE STROBEby Jim Hutchinson

PAGE 41

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 41 CALENDARFEBRUARY 2 World Wetlands Day 3 Chinese New Year (Rabbit) 4 6 Club Náutico de San Juan International Regatta, Puerto Rico. www.nauticodesanjuan.com 4 6 Digicel Workboat Regatta, Grenada. www.grenadasailingfestival.com 5 Pineapple Cup Montego Bay Race, Florida to Jamaica. www.montegobayrace.com 5 … 6 Lowell Wheatley Anegada Pursuit Race. www.royalbviyc.org 5 … 6 Interlux One Design Regatta, St. Maarten. www.smyc.com 6 Womens Cup Race, Martinique. ycmq@wanadoo.fr 7 Public holiday in Grenada (Independence Day) 10 … 13 Trinidad Carnival Regatta. www.sailweek.com 11 13 St. Croix Yacht Club Hospice Regatta. www.stcroixyc.com 12 … 13 Jolly Harbour Valentines Regatta, Antigua. www.jhycantigua.com 13 Island Hopper Race, USVI. jamesswanstj@yahoo.com 13 Sailors & Landlubbers Auction, Bequia. bequiasunshineschool.org 13 … 20 Holetown Festival, Barbados 15 Public holiday in Puerto Rico and USVI (Presidents Day) 18 FULL MOON 18 … 20 Sweethearts of the Caribbean and Classic Yacht Regatta, Tortola. WEYC 18 … 20 Tobago Carnival Regatta (beach events), www.sailweek.com 19 … 20 St. François Regatta, Guadeloupe. organisation@triskellcup.com 19 … 20 Bonaire Carnival Tumba Festival 20 … 21 Independence Day Round St Lucia Race/Cruise. www.stluciayachtclub.com 21 Start of RORC Caribbean 600, Antigua. www.caribbean600.rorc.org 22 Public holiday in St. Lucia (Independence Day) 25 … 26 Around St. Maarten Multihull Race. www.multihullregatta.com 25 … 27 South Grenada Regatta. www.southgrenadaregatta.com 26 BVI Dinghy Championships. www.rbviyc.org 27 … 5 March BVI Kite Jam (kiteboarding). www.bvikitejam.com 27 … 8 March 6th La Route du Carnival rally, Martinique to Trinidad. www.transcaraibes.com TBA Around Martinique Race. www.clubnautiqueneptune.com MARCH 1 Budget Marine Match Racing Cup. www.smyc.com 2 … 12 Santo Domingo Music Festival, Dominican Republic 3 Gill Commodores Cup, St. Maarten. www.heinekenregatta.com 4 Childrens Carnival Parade, St. Barths 4 … 6 St. Maarten Heineken Regatta. www.heinekenregatta.com 4 … 7 Dark and Stormy Regatta, BVI. mcmechanics@surfbvi.com 5 7 Martinique Carnival Regatta. www.carnival-regatta.com 5 … 9 Semaine Nautique Schoelcher, Martinique. www.cnschoelcher.webou.net 5 … 10 Caribbean Arts and Crafts Festival, Tortola. dreadeye@surfbvi.com 7 Public holiday in the BVI (H Lavity Stoutts Birthday) 7 … 8 Carnival Monday and Tuesday in most Dutch and French islands, Haiti, Puerto Rico, Dominica, Carriacou, Trinidad & Tobago, Venezuela, and other places 8 International Womens Day 9 Public holiday in many places (Ash Wednesday) and in Belize (Baron Bliss Day) 12 13 Annual Laser Open, Antigua. yachtclub@candw.ag 12 13 Bananas Cup Regatta, Martinique. ycmq@wanadoo.fr 12 … 19 St. Patricks Week celebrations, Montserrat 14 Public holiday in St. Vincent & the Grenadines (National Heroes Day) 14 Public holiday in some Commonwealth countries (Commonwealth Day) 14 … 19 ClubSwan Caribbean Rendezvous. www.nautorswan.com/ClubSwan 16 … 20 Caribbean Superyacht Regatta & Rendezvous, BVI. www.superyachtregattaandrendezvous.com 16 … 20 St. John Blues Festival, USVI. http://stevesimonpresents.com 17 Public holiday in Montserrat (St. Patricks Day). St. Patricks Day Festival, Grenada 17 … 19 Race Cayman Islands. www.sailing.ky 18 … 20 Puerto Rico Heineken International Regatta. www.prheinekenregatta.com 19 FULL MOON 20 Vernal Equinox 19 … 20 HRH Prince Edwards Regatta, Barbados. www.sailbarbados.com 24 … 27 St. Barths Bucket. www.bucketregattas.com/stbarths 25 … 27 International Rolex Regatta, St. Thomas, USVI. www.rolexcupregatta.com 26 2 April Tobago Billfish Bonanza. www.ttgfa.com 28 … 3 April BVI Spring Regatta and Sailing Festival. www.bvispringregatta.org 30 Public holiday in Trinidad & Tobago (Spiritual Baptist ShouterŽ Liberation Day) TBA Grenada Round-the-Island Race. www.aroundgrenada.com TBA Grenada Classic Yacht Regatta. www.grenadaclassicregatta.gd All information was correct to the best of our knowledge at the time this issue of Compass went to press „ but plans change, so please contact event organizers directly for confirmation. If you would like a nautical or tourism event listed FREE in our monthly calendar, please send the name and date(s) of the event and the name and contact information of the organizing body to sally@caribbeancompass.com ST. THOMAS YACHT SALESCompass Point Marina, 6300 Est. Frydenhoj, Suite 28, St. Thomas, U.S.V.I. 00802 Tel: (340) 779-1660 Fax: (340) 779-2779 yachts@islands.vi Sail36 1980 Albin Stratus, daysail business separate $45,000 38 1967 Le Comte, Northeast 38, classic, excellent cond. $80,000 41 1980 Morgan O/I 04 Yanmar, A/C $69,000 50 1978 Nautor MSailer, refit, excellent cruiser $325,000 Power37 1986 CML Trawler, Great liveaboard, needs engs. $20,000 38 1977 Chris-Craft Corinthian, roomy, cockpit $30,000 40 1997 Carver MY, Cockpit for diving, twin Crusaders $89,900 58 1974 Hatteras MY, Classic, DDs, 3 strms $110,000Call, fax or visit our website for a complete list of boats for sale www.stthomasyachts.com Southern Comfort 60 1982 Nautical Ketch, 4 strms, excellent charter boat $199,900 Plum Crazy 45 2003 Silverton MY 3 strms, excellent condition $260,000

PAGE 42

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 42 continued on next page Caribbean Compass Market Place PORTHOLE RESTAURANT & BAR& Shoreline Mini-MarketA friendly atmosphere where you can sit and meet people.Admiralty Bay, Bequia Noelina & Lennox Taylor welcome you! VHF CH68 Phone (784) 458-3458 We serve breakfast, lunch and dinner MID ATLANTIC YACHT SERVICESPT-9900-144 HORTA / FAIAL, AZORESProviding all vital services to Trans-Atlantic Yachts! Incl. Chandlery, Charts, Pilots, Rigging EU-VAT (16%) importation Duty free fuel (+10.000lt)TEL +351 292 391616 FAX +351 292 391656 mays@mail.telepac.pt www.midatlanticyachtservices.com BEQUIA VENTURE CO. LTDappointed agents in St. Vincent & the Grenadines for Primer, Epoxy, Top Coat, Antifouling, ThinnersPORT ELIZABETH, BEQUIA Tel: 784 458 3319 € Fax: 784 458 3000 Email: bequiaventure@vincysurf.com € SPRAY PAINTS € ROLLERS € BRUSHES € TOOLS €€ CLEANING SUPPLIES €€ NAILS € HOSE CLAMPS €€ FILLERS € STAINLESS FASTENERS € ADHESIVES € KINGFISHER MARINE SERVICE€ FUEL € WATER € MOORINGS € GARBAGE DISPOSAL EMAIL: bequiaboy01@hotmail.com PHONE: 1 (784) 532 8006Quality Services & the Best Prices in the Caribbean FRONT ST, BEQUIA ISLAND McCOY ST, KINGSTOWN, ST. VINCENT UNION ISLANDTEL: (784) 458-3420 / (784) 485-6255 FAX: (784) 458-3797 E-mail: lulley@vincysurf.com LULLEYS TACKLE SHOP# 1 CHOICE IN FISHING & SNORKELING & SCUBA DIVING GEAR F RONT ST , BEQUIA ISLAND M c COY ST, KINGSTOWN, ST. VINCE NT U NI O N I S LAN D TEL: (784) 458-3420 / (784) 485-6255 FAX: (784) 458-3797 E -mail: lulle y@ vinc y surf.com Y L L ULL E Y S T ACKLE SHOP T T # 1 C H O I C E IN FI S HIN G & S N O RKELIN G & SC UBA DIVIN G G EAR KERRYS MARINE SERVICES Marine/Land Mechanical Service € Diesel / Outboard repair € Welding / Electrical € Refrigeration Moorings available VHF 68 KMSŽ Tel: (784) 530-8123/570-7612 E-mail: vanessa_kerry_1@hotmail.com Tel: 458 3485  VHF 68 Situated just below Coco’s Restaurant Specialising in chilled, frozen & canned foodsGreat selection of Cold Meats, Salami, Turkey, Prosciutto, Cheese, Cream, Juices etc. Seafood, Shrimp, Prawns, smoked & fresh Salmon, Fish, Lamb, Steaks, Baguettes baked freshly every day. Enjoy our popular Baguette Sandwiches made to order on or off the premises or takeaway. Try our Smoothies! Provisioning for Yacht Charters, large or small orders for Restaurants, Hotels, Villas or simply to enjoy at home. Call us on VHF for our delivery service to your yacht We are also situated in Calliaqua, St. Vincent 456 2987 Experience our friendly service as always! Bequia Port ElizabethRigging, Lifelines Stocked with lots of marine hardware, filters, nuts & bolts, impellers, bilge pumps, varnish & much more.(784) 457 3856 € Cell: (784) 495 2272 € VHF 68 P i p e r M a r i n e S t o r e Piper Marine Store BEQUIATel: (784) 593 7264Located at Gingerbread Café on deckRYA/MCA Professional Certication Sailing courses from Day Skipper to Yachtmaster Coastal, Oshore and Ocean Powerboat Level 2, SRC, First Aid STCW95 Coming SoonMaritime Training antigua@ondeckoceanracing.com +1 (268) 562-6696 DAY SKIPPER & YACHTMASTERShore based courses over 10 daysEC$1950Write John Cawsey, Yacht Master Instructor, C/O Postof“ ce Port Elizabeth, Bequia Tel (784) 455-7631 THIS COULD BE YOUR MARKET PLACE AD tom@caribbeancompass.comor contact your local island agent

PAGE 43

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 43 Caribbean Compass Market Place continued on next page LE MARIN, MARTINIQUE € GRENADAwww.caraibe-greement.fr cgmar@wanadoo.frPhone: +(596) 596 74 8033 Cell: (596) 696 27 66 05 R I G G I N GS H I P C H A N D L E R clippers-ship@wanadoo.frTel: (0) 596 71 41 61 Fax: (0) 596 71 77 Shipchandler, Artimer Le Marin, Martinique Marine Electrics WatermakersInstallation / Repair Zac artimer Le Marin, Martinique FWITel: + (596) 596 650 524 Fax: + (596) 596 650 053 yescaraibes@hotmail.com A&C Yacht BrokersUSED AND NEW BOATS FOR SALE Dominique AMICEP ort de Pl ai s ance , 9 7 29 0 L e M arin , M artini q ue , F . W . I .T e l: + (596) 596 74 9 4 0 2 • F a x: + (596) 596 74 7 9 19 M o b i l e : + (596) 696 28 70 26 • ac yb @media s er v .net www .ac y ac h t b roker s .com • www . b ateau x -anti ll e s . f r TechNick Ltd.Engineering, fabrication and welding. Fabrication and repair of stainless steel and aluminium items. Nick Williams, Manager Tel: (473) 536-1560/435-7887 S.I.M.S. Boatyard, True Blue, Grenada technick@spiceisle.com tel: (473) 440-2310 fisher@caribsurf.com  rare exotic arts + crafts  jewelry  wooden-ware  hammocks + more unique gifts for your boat, home + friendsyoung street st. george's grenada just steps from the carenage CARRIACOU REAL ESTATELand and houses for sale For full details see our website: www.carriacou.net or contact Carolyn Alexander atCarriacou Real Estate Ltd e-mail: islander@spiceisle.comTel: (473) 443 8187 Fax: (473) 443 8290We also handle Villa Rentals & Property Management on Carriacou The Pink & Blue Place on Hillsborough Beach. Pull up your dinghy on the sand right next to it & enjoy a light lunch and cocktail or a BBQ at night. Danish chef in the house! Tel (473) 410-4216 NEW on Carriacou! Beach Bar & Bistro Hillsborough, Carriacou We are on-line:www.caribbeancompass.com

PAGE 44

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 44 Opening Hours from 7AM 11PM € € B a r Bar € € R e s t a u r a n t Restaurant € € D e l i Deli M a r i n , Marin, M a r t i n i q u e Martinique T e l e p h o n e : 0 5 9 6 7 4 6 0 8 9 Telephone: 0596 74 60 89 W I F I C o n n e c t i o n f o r o u r G u e s t s WIFI Connection for our Guests w w w . r e s t a u r a n t m a n g o b a y . c o m www.restaurant-mangobay.com Happy Hour Every Day from 6 7PM Caribbean Compass Market Place Packages Pick – up call: Tel/Fax: + (599) 544-3276 Tel/Fax: +1(305) 515-8388 info@cirexpresslogistics.com www.cirexpresslogistics.com CIRExpress COURIER SERVICES St. Maarten/ St. Martin, collect and deliver door to door L'Essence Massage Try Karens special Yacht Crew MassageŽRodney Bay Marina, Tel: (758) 715 4661 E-Mail: Lessencemassage@spray.se Karen O. Roberts Diploma in Massage/SPA Therapy from Sweden A ARC DYNAMIC Specialist in welding, machining & fabrication Managing Director Lawrence Lim Chee Yung aka ‘Chinaman’. Rodney Bay Boatyard, Gros Islet, St. Lucia Tel: (758) 485-0665 or (758) 384-0665 e-mail: limcheyung34@yahoo.com Rebuild and repair all types of machinery Fabrication of pulpits, stanchions, davits, chainplates, anchor brackets, solar panel, arches & more C H A T E A U M Y G O CHATEAU MYGO H O U S E O F S E A F O O D HOUSE OF SEAFOOD Steaks € Seafood € Pizzas Marigot Bay, St. Lucia Third Generation locally owned & operated. Happy Hour All Day & All Night on our cocktails & beer! Free docking for yachts dining with us! Free Water Taxi Pick Up from your yacht to our dock! 5 and more people & captain eats for free! Phone: 758-451-4772 VHF 16 continued on next page Voiles AssistanceDidier and MariaLE MARIN/MARTINIQUESails & Canvas (repairs & fabrication) located at Carenantilles dockyardOpen Monday to Friday 8-12am 2-6pm Saturday by appointment tel/fax: (596) 596 74 88 32 e-mail: didier-et-maria@wanadoo.fr TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT FOR RENToverlooking Rodney Bay Marina, St. Lucia US$30.00 per night all amenitiesCall (758) 452-0147 or (758) 720-8432 R O D N E Y RODNEY B A Y BAY S A I L S SAILS St. LuciaSail repairs, biminis, awnings, new sails, rigging, splicing, cockpit cushions, servicing of winches. Agents for Doyle, Furlex & Profurl Call KENNY Tel: (758) 452-8648 or (758) 5840291

PAGE 45

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 45 Caribbean Compass Market Place C R U I S E R S Y A C H T 3 0 7 5 CRUISERS YACHT 3075 2 0 0 2 , F r e s h w a t e r c o o l e d 2002, Fresh water-cooled 5 l i t e r E F I B r a v o 3 x 2 M e r c u r y e n g i n e s . 5-liter EFI Bravo 3 x 2 Mercury engines. G e n e r a t o r , A i r c o n d i t i o n i n g , 1 9 0 e n g i n e h o u r s . Generator, Air-conditioning, 190 engine hours. B o a t i s i n p e r f e c t c o n d i t i o n € N e e d s n o t h i n g . Boat is in perfect condition € Needs nothing. U S US $ 5 9 , 0 0 0 . 0 0 $ 59,000.00 L y i n g i n S t . M a a r t e n € W i l l d e l i v e r t o n e i g h b o r i n g i s l a n d s . Lying in St. Maarten € Will deliver to neighboring islands. C o n t a c t : D o n R o b e r t s o n € Contact: Don Robertson € E m a i l : b a j a 2 0 1 0 d o n @ g m a i l . c o m E-mail: baja2010don@gmail.com P h o n e s : ( 5 9 9 ) 5 2 7 8 2 0 8 Phones: (599) 5278208 Available at Island Water World or www.spotlessstainless.com Removes rust and surface ironŽ that causes rustGreat for hard to reach places Protects Stainless Steel Less Time, Less Effort, Super Results! Spotless StainlessMakes Stainless Steel SparkleNo Rubbing. No Scrubbing. No Polishing. Spotless StainlessMakes Stainless Steel SparkleNo Rubbing. No Scrubbing. No Polishing. DOLLYS ANSWERS1. b) 2. d) 3. e) 4. c) 5. a) BREAKING NEWS: Trinidad Yachting Industry Gets Positive Results From December MeetingIn December 2010, the Yacht Services Association of Trinidad & Tobago (YSATT) held an important meeting with top government officials to discuss the problems facing the twin island republics yachting industry. The meeting was called by the Honourable Stephen Cadiz, Minister of Trade and Industry, and special invitees included the Deputy Commissioner of Police, senior officers in the Trinidad & Tobago Coast Guard, the Comptroller of Customs, the General Manager of the Chaguaramas Development Authority (CDA) and senior representatives from the Immigration Department. During the question-and-answer period, the very strong sentiments expressed by members of the yachting industry gave the government representatives a clear indication of the frustrations being encountered by the sector. As a result, the following steps have been taken to immediately remedy the situation: The Comptroller of Customs has introduced special provisions for the yachting sector, including: € An extension, from 4 hours to 24 hours, has been made of the time allowance between outbound clearance at Customs and departure from Trinidad. € Henceforth, no overtime fees will be charged for the examination of boat parts, spares and equipment, even when this procedure is conducted during traditional overtime hours. € No overtime fees will be charged when a yacht arrives in Trinidad outside of normal working hours but arrives at Customs during normal working hours. Overtime fees will, however, be charged on weekends and public holidays. In addition, both the Trinidad & Tobago Coast Guard and the CDA have established security patrols at night in the bays. YSATT now augments these patrols through the employment of a security patrol boat in Chaguaramas Bay. It is noteworthy that there have been no incidents of theft in the bays over the past several weeks. High-level meetings with representatives of the Trinidad & Tobago Police Service have also taken place, resulting in regular patrols inside the marinas and boatyards, especially at night. YSATT is extremely appreciative of all government representatives for their concern and for the steps that have been taken to rectify the problems that have beset the industry in the recent past and looks forward to continued collaboration with the government to strengthen the yachting industry. Yachting matters. Changes were made when top Trinidad & Tobago officials met with yacht services representatives to address problems affecting the yachting sector

PAGE 46

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 46 ABC Marine Curacao 27 Adventure High School Grenada 29 Anjo Insurance Antigua 39 Apt for Rent St. Lucia MP ARC Dynamic St. Lucia MP ARC Europe C/W 16 Art & Design Antigua MP Art Fabrik Grenada MP B & C Fuel Dock Petite Martinique 18 Barefoot Yacht Charters St. Vincent 24 Barrow Sails & Canvas Trinidad MP Basils Bar Mustique 32 Bay Island Yachts Trinidad 41 Bequia Venture Bequia MP Blue Water Sailing USA 40 Budget Marine Sint Maarten 2 Business Development Co. Trinidad 15 BVI Yacht Sales Tortola 41 Captain Gourmet Union Island 35 Caraibe Greement Martinique 23 Caraibe Greement Martinique MP Caraibe Yachts Guadeloupe 37 Caribbean Marine Electrical Trinidad MP Caribbean Propellers Ltd. Trinidad MP Caribbean Sailing Association Caribbean Wide 13 Caribe Composite St. Maarten MP Carriacou Silver Diving Carriacou MP Chateau Mygo Restaurant St. Lucia MP CIRExpress St. Maarten MP Clippers Ship Martinique MP Cooper Marine USA 40 Crews Inn Trinidad 10 Curaçao Marine Curaçao 27 Diesel Outfitters St. Maarten 33 Diginav Martinique 36 Dockwise Yacht Transport Martinique 8 Dominica Marine Center Dominica 39 Down Island Real Estate Carriacou MP Doyle Offshore Sails Tortola 4 Doyle's Guides USA 20 Drop Anchor Dominica 35 Echo Marine Jotun Special Trinidad 28 Edward William Insurance International 37 Electropics Trinidad MP Fernando's Hideaway Bequia MP Food Fair Grenada 34 Frangipani Hotel Bequia 33 Free Cruising Guides C/W 32 Golden Taste St. Lucia MP Gourmet Foods Bequia MP Grenada Marine Grenada 26 Grenadines Sails Bequia 21 Iolaire Enterprises Caribbean Wide 34/36 Island Water World Sint Maarten 48 Johnson Hardware St. Lucia 30 Jolly Harbour Antigua MP Jones Maritime St. Croix 36 Kerry Marine Services Bequia MP Kingfisher Marine Services Bequia MP La Playa Carriacou MP Lagoon Marina St. Maarten 11 LEssence Massage St. Lucia MP Lulley's Tackle Bequia MP LumbaDive Carriacou MP Mango Bay Martinique MP Maranne's Ice Cream Bequia MP Marc One Marine Trinidad MP Marigot Beach Club St. Lucia 33 Marina Royale St. Maarten 17 Marina Zar-Par Dominican Rep 39 McIntyre Bros. Ltd Grenada 37 Mercury Marine Caribbean Wide 7 Multihull Company Caribbean Wide 39 Mid Atlantic Yacht Services Azores MP Nature Conservatory Caribbean Wide 10 Northern Lights Generators Tortola 6 Off Shore Risk Management Tortola 29 On Deck Antigua MP Perkins Engines Tortola 9 Piper Marine Bequia MP PJ's Laundry Service Grenada MP Porthole Restaurant Bequia MP Power Boats Trinidad MP Quantum Sails Tortola 21 Renaissance Marina Aruba 5 Sea Hawk Paints CW 19 Sea Services Martinique MP Ship's Carpenter Trinidad MP South Grenada Regatta Grenada 13 Spice Island Marine Grenada 47 SpotlessStainless Caribbean Wide MP St. Maarten Sails St. Maarten 21 St. Thomas Yacht Sales St. Thomas 41 SVG Air St. Vincent 25 SVG Tourism St. Vincent 14 Technick Grenada MP Tikal Arts & Crafts Grenada MP Tilikum Martinique MP Townhouse Mega Store Antigua 33 Trade Winds Cruising Bequia 38 Trans Caraibes Rallies St. Maarten MP Treasure Island Casino Canouan 35 Turblence Sails Grenada MP Turbulence Sails Grenada 26 Tyrrel Bay Yacht Haulout Carriacou 18 Venezuelean Marine Supply Venezuela MP Virgin Gorda Yacht Harbour Virgin Gorda 12 Voiles Assistance Martinique MP Wallilabou Anchrorage St. Vincent 38 WIND Martinique MP WIND Martinique MP Xanadu Marine Venezuela 38 YES Martinique MP ADVERTISERS INDEX ADVERTISER LOCATION PG# ADVERTISER LOCATION PG# ADVERTISER LOCATION PG# ADVERTISER LOCATION PG#MP = Market Place pages 42 to 45C/W = Caribbean Wide CLASSIFIEDS BOATS FOR SALE 1982 CATALINA 32 19.000 US 1986 OYSTER 435 35.000 GBP 1987 IRWIN 44 119.500 US1999 BAVARIA 38 Caribic 55.000 US, 2006 BAHIA 46 Exclusive 435.000 US, 2009 HUNTER 45DS 239.000 USE-mail Yachtsales@dsl-yachting.com Tel (758) 452 8531 YOUNG SUN 46ft VENUS 1984 KETCH fiberglass, vgc, new engine 2007, excellent live aboard and cruiser. GPS, RADAR, VHF, Auto Pilot, EPIRB, SSB, Water Maker, Air-Con, Solar Panels, Wind Generator & more. Full specs at www.freewebs.com/venus46forsale US$179,000 or MAKE US AN OFFER!! Lying St Lucia. Email venus46@live.com or Tel: (596) 696 90 74 29BOATS FOR SALE IN TRINIDAD Tel (868) 739-6449 www.crackajacksailing.com 46 PETERSON PERFORMANCE CRUISER 1988 Center cockpit, single owner, lovingly maintained. Sailed throughout the Caribbean and now located in Trinidad. Ready for you to start cruising tomorrow. USD 189,999 E-mail SailingOnFree@aol.com OPEN 45 BUILT 2000 , wood/ West system,Twin rudders, Hydro auto pilot, Profurl furlers, Dyform rigging, Kevlar code 0. Fast cruiser with accommodations, electric toilet, double bed, stove, fridge, computer. Tel (473) 415-8271 E-mail Richard. turbulence@spiceisle.com CARRIACOU SLOOP 'PIPEDREAM' 1984. 39' overall. New cockpit, deck etc. Re-planked & re-fastened in bronze. Quick boat. Lying Antigua. Become part of W.Indian sail. A non-profit heritage rebuild. US$29,000.00 Offers. E-mail raylinnington@hotmail.com DYNAMIQUE 63' 1985 sloop. Excellent condition throughout. 5 cabins, 4 electric heads, new rigging '08, new teak decks '08, 2 x chartplotters/ GPS, auto pilot, watermaker, generator, air-con, EPIRB, VHF & lots more. 415,000GBP offers considered. Lying Bequia. for full details/photos E-mail pauldakin1978@hotmail.com BELIZE 43, 2005 , 175,000 Euros. Lying Martinique Détails www. location-catamaran-antilles. com/belize MODIFIED 6M BIWI MAGIC , Ian Howlett Design, wing keel, built 1989. She is modified with a Cuddy, inboard engine, and accommodation. She has been campaigned successfully across the Caribbean winning class at ASW 2009, Antigua Classic 2010, Rolex 2004, BVI 2004 and several Heineken Regattas. Biwi Magic is simplified, easy to sail and race single handed or under spinnaker with a crew of three. Jolly Habour, Antigua Geoffrey D. Pidduck, Tel (268) 725-7702 E-mail pidduckg@candw.ag BRUCE ROBERTS 53, Steel . This safe cruising (Singapore to Caribbean) and elegant live aboard yacht was painted Nov.2010 and is ready for future passages. More photos on www. apolloduck.com or by the owners. Lying Trinidad. E-mail johnstretch46@hotmail.co.uk.GIBSEA 33 , Price negotiable, needs work, well equipped & documented located at Grenada Marine Tel: (473) 4053947 E-mail arthurbain@gmail.com 2003 JEANNEAU SO 35 Fully equipped, ready to sail, GPS,VHF, and much more, lying in Blue Lagoon, St. Vincent, US$75,000 E-mail wisc@uai.com.br CARRIACOU SLOOP SWEETHEARTMassive price reduction due to owner relocation. Race ready, incl. 6 sails and inboard 30hp Yanmar.Lying Antigua. US$35, 000 (ONO) Tel: (268) 464-0845 MISC. FOR SALE WASI 60KG STAINLESS 361 ANCHOR. Lying Grenada, brand new, unused, half price. USD1600. Email tim.arnold@rya-online.net BOAT STUFF Two Barient 36 self tailing winches. These are suitable for a 45'-60' boat ($7,000 new) $3,000 for pair. New, 2 lengths Hard black rubber rub rail, 2 3/8" wide x 1 1/2" high x 1@ 45'long and 1@ 51' long $350. Sailboat 3 blade prop, left rotation x 19 "diam x 19" pitch. $225. Garhauer hard boom vang, fits 45' 50' boat. $275. radar reflector, $50. Tel: (340) 244-0605, (401) 965-1284 SPINNAKER POLE, 16ft, good condition, EC$2000/offers considered. LIFERAFT, 8 person SOLAS rated with paperwork. Test due October 2010, EC$4800/offers considered. CLUTCH PUMP, brand new with fittings, EC$2300/offers considered. Bequia Tel: (784) 432-5201 Tohatsu 30HP long shaft US 2000, Sail boat props 3 blade 13" to 22" from US200, Winches, Barlow, Barient, Lewmar from US 250, Yanmar 3HM35F best offer, 10ft Valliant RIB US890, Aries Circumnavigator wind vane best offer E-mail Yachtsales@dsl-yachting.com Tel (758) 452 8531 SAILS AND CANVAS EXCEPTIONALLY SPECIAL DEALS at http://doylecaribbean.com/specials.htm TACKTICK WIRELESS/SOLAR INSTRUMENTS , Discount prices: www.northernrockiesassociates.com WANTED MARINE TECHNICIAN Marine Engineering Co. in Grenada is seeking technicians with working experience in marine diesel engines, AC and refrigeration, electrical, electronics, watermakers & wind generators. Ideal for cruiser or independent tech. Please E-mail CV to enzamarine@spiceisle.com LOOKING TO BUY 38 to 45 sailboat in Caribbean. $75,000 max. E-mail captbill1212@hotmail.com CREW POSITIONS DECKHAND/MATE available. Chapman School of Seamanship graduate. STCW-5, First Aid/CPR, SVG 50T Masters License, also a good cook! Photos/experience/references available. SVG/Bequia national. E-mail kellee_435@hotmail.com PROPERTY FOR SALE NE FLORIDA, OCEAN ACCESS House, deepwater dock, boat lift, mooring.1.65 acres US$325K www.bustedbike.comGRENADA PRIME PLOT over looking La Sagesse Bay with beach access. 30167 sq ft. E-mail tim.arnold@rya-online.net RENTALS LA POMPE, BEQUIA Large 2 bedroom house and/ or 1 bed studio apartment. Big verandah and patio, stunning view, cool breeze. Internet, cable TV. 2 weeks minimum, excellent longterm rates. Tel: (784) 495 1177 email: louisjan@vincysurf.comRODNEY BAY, 2 BEDROOM APTOverlooking Rodney Bay Marina, St. Lucia. US$30.00 per night, all amenities. Tel (758) 452-0147/720-8432 BUSINESS FOR SALE SAIL-LOFT, UPHOLSTERY 100m2, established since 2002 located Carenantilles Dockyard, Le Marin, Martinique. New sewing machines (less than 4 years) Price 120 000 Euros Tel: (596) 596 74 88 32 E-mail didier-etmaria@wandoo.fr ANTIGUA BASED TOWING, SALVAGE, DIVING Long established business includes twin-engine diesel work boat & equipment. US$95k. Tel: (268) 464-3164 E-mail johnbentley890@hotmail.com SERVICES TIME FOR WELLNESS!! Feel the benefits of magnet therapy with our fabulous range of Jewellery for adults, kids & pets. Distributors wanted. Tel (868) 299-5565 www.sbs.energetix.tv CLASSIFIED ADS US 50¢ per word … include name, address and numbers in count. Line drawings/photos accompanying classifieds are US$10. Pre-paid by the 15th of the month. No replies. Your Classi“ ed is on the Internet REMEMBER to tell our advertisers you saw their ad in Compass! CASIMIR HOFFMANN

PAGE 47

FEBRUARY 2011 CARIBBEAN COMPASS PAGE 47

PAGE 48

Published by Compass Publishing Limited, St. Vincent & the Grenadines, and printed by Guardian Media Limited, Trinidad & Tobago


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ESADBDYZZ_PIK4RY INGEST_TIME 2011-04-25T17:57:24Z PACKAGE UF00095627_00048
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES