Citation
Bonaire reporter

Material Information

Title:
Bonaire reporter
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince
Publisher:
George DeSalvo
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright George DeSalvo. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Caribbean Newspapers, dLOC
University of Florida

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I I Iel TtPORTER


Real Bonairean cuisine at
the Marshi

It's the 10th Year of Cele-
bration of the Christmas
Market in Rincon on Satur-
day, December 19. During the
traditional Christmas Market in
Rincon there the 10-year anni-
versary will be celebrated with
stand holders, Rinconeros and
visitors. This marshes will re-
place the normal Saturday early
morning market.
During this Christmas Market
there will be stands selling prod-
ucts and articles as gifts espe-
cially for the season, and visitors
will be able to shop among spark-
ing lights. There will also be mu-
sic for the end of the year, krioyo
music and Christmas carols.
The Marshe will be open from 4
pm until 11 pm. As usual the
Christmas Market will have a
festive ambiance, colorful decora-
tion and be full of lights.
Ten years ago the Rinfa
women's club established a per-
manent marsh in the Rincon
barrio square to develop Rincon
socially and economically. Many
area residents have been coming
to the marshes on the first Satur-
day of every month to offer their
products.
If you are interested in having a
stand to participate in the marsh,
contact as soon as possible: Doro-
thy Cecilia (eel 796-9046) or
Raymunda Anthonie (717- 3696).
Maritza San Pedro, translation by
Laura DeSalvo

The Bonaire Hotel and Tour-
ism Association (BONHATA)


zl82h,


A Bonaire Reporter Question


announced its new Board of
Directors for the term 2010 &
2011
Executive Board:
President Ms. Sara Matera,
Divi Flamingo Beach Resort &
Casino
Vice President Mr. Jack
Chalk, Captain Don's Habitat
Secretary/Treasurer Mr. Dirk
Jan Methorst, Jibe City
Directors at Large
Mr. Serge de Groote, Divi Dive
Mr. Martin van Bekkum, Kon-
tiki Beach Bonaire
Mr. Huub Groot, Restaurant It
' Rains Fishes
Mr. Gilberto Lira, Sand Dollar
Condominium Resort
Mrs. Anja Romeijnders, Sunbelt
Realty
Mr. Bart Snelder, Wannadive.
BONHATA has a membership
of 76, comprising resorts, hotels,
apartments, diving companies, car
rentals, restaurants and other tour-
ism related businesses on Bon-
aire.

On Wednesday, December 3,
work on the culvert under Kaya
Grandi was finally completed
and the road reopened to traffic. It
will provide relief from street
flooding in times of heavy rain
and will minimize runoff into the
sea. Additional upstream work is
planned for next year.

Bonaire's Public Li-
brary, Biblioteka publiko, suf-
fers every year because many of
its books get "lost."
Why? The books are not re-
turned or forgotten. After a while
there is the fear of having to pay
high fines or perhaps embarrass-
ment. Since 2007 over 1,200
books have gone missing.
Unfortunately, most people do not
realize how precious a book is.
The average price of a book is
around NAf 50. But it's not only
the material value that is impor-
tant. Knowledge is lost. The
dwindling collection is detrimen-
tal to the library and ultimately
affects the community.
Biblioteka publiko has tried eve-
rything to recover the missing
books. Reminder cards are sent,
fines are cut, but nothing helped.
Until now.


Free Po ll
What type of news best pro-
motes Bonaire?
S All 8
News 89%
Good 3%
News Only
r Good
news and
ONLY the not-
so-good-news
that has been 8%
okayedd" by
island tourism
authorities


What is the most effective way to promote Bonaire?
1. Present only good news
2. Present all news
3. Present good news and only the not-so-good-news that
has been okayedd" by island tourism authorities
The results to date are indicated above and include Internet poll
and other responses. The question will remain open until December
21, 2009. You can go on line to www.bonairereporter.com to click
your answer, email to reporter @bonairenews.com or mail to Re-
porter, Box 407, Bonaire Netherlands Antilles. Phone (599) 790-
6518 or (599) 786-6518.


For that reason, the library created
DRAW BOOKS. How does it
work? Anyone who brings back
library books that should have
been long since returned, receives
a free ticket for each book. The
more books that someone brings
back, the more tickets that person
receives and the greater the chance
to win prizes of great new books.
For additional information, con-
tact Sharon Bol at 717-8944

D The next mountain bike
tour in Washington Slagbaai
National Park is on Sunday,
December 20. This tour is for
riders of all levels of experience,
for beginners, intermediate, and
advanced riders. More advanced/
experienced riders can begin and
end their tour in Kralendijk, about
80 km. There will be assistance in
the Park with a pick-up truck in
case participants get tired so they
can catch a ride. Cost is $14.50


per person and includes a sand-
wich, drinks, and fruit but not the
Park fee. For more information,
visit www.bonairewellness.com,
email info@
bonairewellness.com, or phone
+599 717-4241 or 785-0767.

> For the holidays Chat 'n'
Browse is offering 15 minutes of
free Internet service when cus-
tomers reference "Welcome 2009"
during the holidays. This gives
travelers the perfect opportunity to
stay in touch with those back
home. For more information, visit
www.chatnbrowse.com or email
info@chatnbrowse.com.

What better gift for the
holiday that being able to heal
yourself and others? You can do
it when you master the tech-
niques of Healing Touch. The
Foundation Healing Touch World-
(Continued on page 8)


In the previous edition of The
Reporter we asked our readers
to indicate their preference for
the type of information released
to promote Bonaire. The table at
the right shows the results to
date.
Choosing what information to
release can be difficult. Obvi-
ously, everyone wants to report
the good news.
But what about crime, envi-
ronmental damage, political
shenanigans, or illnesses that all
affect both the island's people
and their important guests, the
tourists.
We posed the question to our
readers:


DENGUE FEVER
If you have some or all of the following symptoms,
you may have Dengue Fever.

High Fever Aching joints and muscles
Severe headache Pain behind the eyes
Backache Nausea with possible vomiting

For more information and advice on treatment &
prevention of Dengue Fever call the helpline.

DENGUE HELPLINE


+599 790 6500
Powered by MO


SCOOTER & BIKE
SALES & REPAIR
Peugeot, Kymco
loekie, Giant
Gazelle Brands
Parts and accessories for
any brand scooter or bike
Bike Clothes for Everyone

e-s" 0 Kaya Grandi #61
l1 Ae Across from INPO
/ O Open: 8:30-12:30, 2:00-5:30
.., ails Owner Operated

freewieler@flamingotv. net

Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009


Page 2


Table of Contents
This Week's Stories
Bonaire Reporter Question 2
Getting Ready For The Referendum
(UN visit) 3
Guest Editorial- Cooperation Not Con-
frontation 6
Eat Healthy (Nature's Way) 6
Santa Family Day/ Hamburger
Contest 8
Christmas Market 8
Straw Poll-Staten and Referendum 9
Tina Woodley Returns 9
Lionfish on Bonaire 10
ReefWindows-Capt. Don's
New Book 11
Swimming World Cup in 2011? 11
Sanikolas Arrives 12
Jan Lambada Bouwman Obituary 13
Letters to the Editor- Nature Above
Money, Cruise Ships, Survey Comments 14
Culture ofthe Indian Art Show (Booi,
Dania) V14
ShelterAuction Dinner 1
Altimira Unjo Moonlight Walk 15
Affordable Homes Expo 19
CIEE Presentations 2C
Klein Bonaire 10 years 2C
10 Years Green Label 22
Polluted Wells 22
Plane Recovery Problems 22
Departments
Flotsam & Jetsam 2
On the Island Since (Ana & Eugene
Makaai 4
Bonairean Voices (School Nutrilon) 7
Sudoku Puzzle 7
Bon Quiz #19 (Fort Oranje) 7
Pet ofthe Week (Oscar) 15
Picture Yourself (South Africa) 16
Classifieds 16
Tide Table 16
Reporter Masthead 17
What's Happening 17
Shopping & Service Guides 18
BonQuiz Answer 19
Sudoku Answer 19
Bonaire On Wheels (Chevy Impala) 21
Sky Park (Geminids, find Neptlune) 23
The Stars Have It 23
How to contact us
Letters to the Editor:
Reporter@bonairenews.com
Story tip or idea:
info@bonairenews.com
The Publisher:
George@bonairenews.com
Box 407, Bonaire,
Neth. Antilles.
Phone 790-8988
Phone 790-6518 / 786-6518
Available on-line at:
www.bonairereporter.com
Printed Every Fortnight,
On-line Every day, 24/7
Next edition printing on
December 22, 2009.
Story and Ad deadline:
December 18, 2009.











Getting Ready For The Referendum


T he Bonaire Government
invited several experts to
provide perspective and advice
on the conduct of the incoming
Referendum on the future type ,
of government that Bonaire ',
voters will select. Despite the fact ....
that the outcome of the Referen-


dum is non binding, it is being
taken very seriously and will be
run under United Nations guide-
lines.


On Saturday, November 28, Dr. Carlyle
Corbin, the former minister in charge of
foreign relations for the US Virgin Islands
and an international advisor on political
structure and UN Caribbean and Pacific
treaty issues, met with Bonaire govern-
ment officials to offer his expertise. He
discussed alternative choices for Bon-
aire's upcoming referendum. He visited at
the invitation of the Executive Council.
Following the closed-door meetings he
was interviewed by the press in a confer-
ence in the Pasangrahan. Representatives
from Papiamentu, Dutch and English lan-
guage newspapers were present.
Dr. Corbin talked at length about the
differences and similarities between inte-
gration of a former colony with the
"mother country" and a free association
following the release of colonial ties. He
said that integration can take several
forms as could a free association which is
also is a legitimate political status recog-
nized in 1960 by the UN under article


Governor Thodd with Dr. Carlyle Corbin


1541. The essence of his message was
"People have a right to be consulted once
again (in a referendum)... after they have
been given more information."
When asked if the present Dutch posi-
tion of "if the past agreement to integrate
(laso direkto) is rejected, then the only
choice Holland will give Bonaire is to
become independent" is legitimate, he
answered, "Well, it is a good bargaining
position to start with." He went on to say
that if Bonaire felt they were unreasona-
bly treated they could appeal to the UN
General Assembly-a very serious step
for both parties. U G.D.
During the following week, Mansour
Sadeghi and Peter Eicher of the UN's
Electoral Support Department held
meetings with members of the Execu-
tive Council, political parties, the press
and others.
The UN advisors said they were NOT
here to approve or disapprove but for ad-
vice. Their goal is to insure that the refer-


Sendum meets minimum interna-
tional standards.
The UN is very interested in
knowing what are the referendum
questions being asked and how are
they phrased. They want to be sure
there are clear definitions of the
- options. They want to know that
the process is impartial, transpar-
ent and neutral.
The UN also wants to know that
the public is adequately informed. UNAt
The advisors feel there needs to be
an unbiased informational program of at
least one month but probably not more
than two months to insure that the public
knows all the options and what they might
mean. Attendees to the stakeholder ses-
sion were also very interested in unbiased
education on the options before the refer-
endum.
Another UN concern is that no citizens
be left out of the voting. This is a question
that the UN is discussing with the local
politicians and feels very strongly that
there should be no disenfranchisement of
Dutch citizens. The UN prefers universal
voting rights and wants to see the voting
with as few limits as possible.
One of the voting restrictions being con-
sidered by the government is that local
Dutch citizens must have five years of
uninterrupted residency on the island be-
fore they can vote. "This is a 'Red Flag"
for the UN," the experts said. The UN
says it recommends against this restriction
and recommends "extreme caution" on


advisors Mansour Sadeghi & Peter Eicher

any limits of citizens. Stakeholders also
pointed out that Antilleans who move to
Holland do not have to wait five years to
vote.
On the question of whether the age limit
should be 16 or 18, the UN did not have a
strong position. The UN feels the commu-
nity should decide at what age a person is
considered an "adult" and that there is no
international standard on this point.
On the question of whether Bonaireans
in other parts of the world should be al-
lowed to vote, the UN said this has be-
come a difficult question because there is
no such thing as "Bonairean" citizenship.
The question arises whether anyone born
on Bonaire would be considered Bo-
nairean vs. someone who moved here
when he was two months old. The UN
seems to feel that this particular question
is too complicated to deal with for the
coming election and that it would not be
included in the options.
(Continued on page 19)


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Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009 Page 3


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^^ 40^ fHW Amr.-S^9 f^ ^ ^ S ^ V ^ f ^ ^ f 9 ^ ^ ^ ^ ^


W'I hen I was a child,
VV my family emigrated
from Portugal to Venezuela to
look for better opportunities. My
father came to Bonaire first as he
was working for Techno Consult,
the company that built the Son-
esta Hotel on Bonaire, which is
now Harbor Village. In 1988 it
became very dangerous in Vene-
zuela and we moved to Bonaire. I
was 14.
It was a beautiful safe haven.
Our upbringing was very strict,
but my dad liked to go to the
casino and he and his friends
would take me with them for
good luck! That's how I met
Eugene. He was a dealer at the
casino at the Flamingo Beach
Hotel and he was 19." She
smiles. "He was very congenial.
When I was 15 I was working for
Bonaire Trading. On weekends
my sisters and I would go swim-
ming at Flamingo Beach and one
day Eugene took us home and
my father called him in. That's
how it started and it became seri-
ous. We were very much in love,


but in a totally innocent way.
However, my parents were
against it.
I was 17 when my dad told me,
'You are going to Portugal for
three months and you forget
about the Negro.' I said, 'No, I
love him.' It was the first time in
my life that I didn't obey my
parents. The next day I went to
see Eugene's mother and told her
we wanted to get married.
Eugene was 21 and I was 17 and
his mom said 'No problem.' So,
Eugene's parents went to see my
parents to ask them if their son
could marry their daughter. My
parents got very angry with me.
They thought I was pregnant. I
didn't say a word. Eugene and I
didn't have any physical relation-
ship. The next day my father told
me, 'Get married before the baby
comes.' My mom flew to Portu-
gal to get my birth certificate, but
when she came back she noticed
that I was as slim as I was before.
Well, to make a long story short,
we did get married."
She looks at Eugene and he


says, "We were
happy, but it was
hard, because
there were many
relatives in both
families who
didn't agree with
it."
Ana gets up to
help a client and
when she comes
back she says,
"Eugene started E
working for
BOPEC and one ,
year after we got
married he be-
came ill. We
went to see all
the doctors on
the island, but
they all thought
it was a stomach
problem. It went rapidly; he be-
came very thin and my mom said
to me, 'Something is really
wrong your husband is going to
die...' Then one day, Eugene and
I and his parents went to the hos-
pital and that's how I see it -


....at the Virgin of Fatima. When we were at that sacred
place, I crawled on my knees to the Virgin and prayed to her
to fulfill our wish and help us with our situation."


Eliana, Eugene and Ana Makaii


our life is determined by God,
because that particular day a
Dutch doctor was visiting this
trainee who was examining
Eugene and while this trainee
was busy with Eugene the doctor
immediately told us, 'Eugene's
kidneys are in very bad shape.'
The next morning Eugene was to
be transported by ambulance
plane to Curaqao. And as always
in our life we barely made it be-
cause the pilot had just broken
his wrist, but nevertheless he did


fly the plane!'
Eugene explains: "We arrived
at Hato airport in Curaqao and I
was already unconscious because
my blood was poisoned and my
lungs were filled with fluid. Then
the ambulance that was supposed
to pick us up was having car
trouble. When it finally arrived,
the pilot and I both got in, to-
gether...!' He laughs. "What a
situation! Ayayay!"
Ana says, "The specialist in
(Continued on page 5)


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International Freight (Car) BV
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Tel 31-(0) 168-40-94 94
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Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009


.. .


Page 4










On the Island Since (Continued from page 4)
Curaqao, Dr. Engels, told me we'd barely
made it. It took the doctors a lot of effort
to get him stabilized and then we dis-
cussed the future with the specialist. He
told us about a method called CAPD: they
put a permanent catheter in the perito-
neum and every four hours, 24 hours per
day, you put another bag of a concen-
trated liquid to flush the person. We could
stay home and live our 'normal' life with
this method without having to go to Cura-
qao three times a week to have him
hooked up to the machine." She looks at
me. "I really, really hope a kidney dialy-
ses centre will be established on the is-
land soon. It's a hard life for the people
suffering from kidney failure."
Ana, Eugene and Eliana are very pure
and absolutely beautiful people. Their
story is one about true love and about
never giving up, never giving in and at
the same time i ...... tr,, the way life
comes to you.
"Ana learned how to take care of me,"
Eugene recalls. "She was my nurse, my
doctor, my wife... my everything. I went
to the States with my sister to see if I
could be a candidate for a transplant. Af-
ter all the tests, they told me I would
make a good candidate, but being a for-
eigner, there was only a small chance I
could get a kidney. So I went back to Dr.
Engels in Curamao and told him I wanted
to go to Holland. Dr. Engels told me I
wouldn't survive the flight and that time
was running out on me. I asked another
doctor for a second opinion and he told
me I would make a good candidate and
that I should go to Holland. Thank God I
had very good insurance with BOPEC. In
November 1993 we flew to Holland."


Ana looks at me quietly. "I still have
Dr. Engels' letter in which he wrote me
that Eugene wouldn't live to be 25, that
he wasn't a good candidate for a trans-
plant and that we never would have chil-
dren..." Tears well up in her eyes and she
smiles.
"It was God who decided differently.
We had been trying to get pregnant for a
long time, but it didn't work out. In De-
cember 1993 we went to see my parents
in Portugal and they told us to see the
Virgin of Fatima. When we were at that
sacred place, I crawled on my knees to
the Virgin and prayed to her to fulfill our
wish and help us with our situation. By
the end of March 1994 I felt sick and
went to see the doctor, he did a test and
told me, 'Mrs. Makaai, you are three
months pregnant! It was a miracle of
God."
"Our beautiful, sweet and healthy
daughter Eliana was born November 10th
1994," Eugene says. "So much happiness,
it made me strong and I felt I will never
give up, never, ever. I still didn't have a
new kidney, but life went on. I started to
study at Nautical College in Katwijk,
Holland, to become a nautical officer -
something I'd dreamed of all my life and
I wanted to make my dream come true. I
was flushing, studying and helping Ana to
take care of the baby as she was working
two, sometimes even three jobs. We did-
n't see much of each other, but it was
always Ana who pulled us through, who
pushed me to go on, and without her -
my wife I wouldn't be anything, I would
not be here anymore."
"May 1995," Ana continues, "Eugene
was offered a kidney, but he couldn't
accept it, because his peritoneum was


infected
and his
blood
pressure
way too
high.
Again I
went to
see the
Virgin of _.
Fatima
and again
I went on "
my
knees. In ,
the be- -.,l
ginning -
of 1996
Eugene's
health
was dete-
riorating Ana
rapidly -
I was desperate and prayed to God. Then
on May 27th, 1996, they called us to say
they had a kidney. That same day Eugene
was operated at the University Hospital in
Leiden. When he came out of the opera-
tion I took his hand. It was pink and warm
and I knew everything was okay.
It took him three months to recover -
the only time he didn't go to school. He
got his diploma in 1999 and from that
time on until 2004 Eugene worked as a
nautical officer, sailing around the
world."
"January 2nd, 2005, I started working at
Curaqao Port Authority as a captain on a
bunker bars," Eugene says. "Two months
later Ana joined me and started working
for an internet company. Eliana was with
Aunt Ruth on Bonaire where she studied


Makaai at the deli


at San Bernardo elementary school, but
almost every weekend she came over. We
stayed for three years on Curaqao and in
2007 we came back to Bonaire. Now we
are both working at Eli Deli, Ana's place
at the traffic circle in Hato. It was her idea
to open a deli. It was her long time dream
and we can only fulfill one dream at a
time and so we're going to do this for
Ana. On January 19th 2010, we will be
married for 20 years. This May I will
have had my kidney
for 14 years. Now it's
Ana's opportunity,
now it's her time..."

Story & Photos by e'
Greta Kooistra


WEWitCOLLEC TON a-


RSTARTSi tFROM FLS: 21(5


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If- ASEb


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TEL' 77.-4"3O717-3S6U,F 4: 717-4650
E-MAIL: FMmoc-rsHapnvtoriA.cO


Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009


Page 5













COOPERATION, NOT CONFRONTATION THE ONLY WAY FOR BONAIRE


Imagine the following situation: A
group of distinguished men is on
their small Caribbean island boarding a
plane which will bring them to a far desti-
nation. Before the take-off, the pilot asks
them if they really wish to fly to Amster-
dam and says that he hopes that they and
their families have thought thoroughly
before taking this decision. The gentle-
men say that they know what's best for
their families and it was therefore not
necessary to involve them in the decision
process. After long hours of flying across
the ocean, approaching the coast of
Europe, the men suddenly ask the pilot
not to continue the flight to Amsterdam
because they have to first ask their fami-
lies if they agree with it. The surprised
pilot informs the passengers that it is not
possible because the plane is low on fuel
and that if they don't want to land in Am-
sterdam, the only possibility is to land at
the first possible airport. The disap-
pointed men react with, "You are arro-
gant and you cannot blackmail us!"

The current political development on
Bonaire is very similar to this story. In
2006, the Dutch submitted the proposal
of a concrete form of a direct link with
the Netherlands to the Bonaire Island
Council, the option chosen by the major-
ity of the Bonairean people in the 2004
referendum. According to this proposal,
Bonaire, Sint Eustatitus and Saba could
get a status of a special municipality
(public body), a possibility established in
the Dutch constitution. It would mean
that these islands would become part of
the Netherlands. Without asking the peo-
ple of Bonaire their opinion, both the
UPB and ADB members of the Island
Council unanimously accepted this pro-
posal. Since that moment in 2006, the
government of the Dutch Kingdom
worked hard during the next three years
on the implementation of this new status.
However, several months ago, the Island
Council surprised the Dutch government
with its decision to ask the people of
Bonaire now, after three years (!), in a
referendum if they agree with the integra-
tion with the Netherlands or if they prefer
another option, e.g. a free association.

Although the people of Bonaire had cho-
sen a "direct link" with the Netherlands
in 2004 and not an "autonomous land in
the Kingdom (in fact a free association
with the Netherlands)", like Curacao and
Sint Maarten, the members of the Island
Council were completely free, before
signing the Slotverklaring (Final Accord)
in 2006, to reject the proposed form of
the direct link, which would mean the
integration of the island with the Nether-
lands. They had a full right to come with
another suggestion concerning the reali-
zation of the "direct link," but they
agreed unanimously with the Dutch inte-
gration proposal. For the Dutch, it does
not matter if the local government was or
is dominated by the red, green or any
other political party. For them it is only
important that the representatives of Bon-
aire, elected freely by the people of the
island, signed a binding contract with the
Netherlands in 2006, and it is not possible
to change it when a new political situa-
Page 6


tion has developed on the island in 2009.
The Dutch were faced with a similar
Antillean problem in 1990 when the gov-
ernment of Aruba changed its binding
decision to become independent with a
transition period of 10 years, beginning in
1986, and asked the Netherlands (without
referendum) to have the possibility of
remaining in the Kingdom. The decision
about the independence has been a taboo
on Aruba since then and 1986 was cele-
brated as the year in which the island got
its "Status Aparte."
We have a similar situation now on Bon-
aire; nobody speaks about the 2006 Slot-
verklaring. Unfortunately, the Dutch have
not forgotten their Aruba experience and
are not prepared to repeat their mistake of
1990 and to start negotiations with the
Island Council about another option for
the status of Bonaire.

"In my opinion, the members
of the Island Council must ad-
mit their responsibility for the
2006 binding Final Accord. "


Miguel Pourier, the Bonairean born ex-
prime minister of the Netherlands Antil-
les, last week gave advice to the Island
Council to cooperate with the Dutch on
the transition to the new status so that it
can be established on 10-10-2010, as
originally planned. There is a possibility,
according to the 2006 Slotverklaring, to
revise the status and to execute necessary
changes after a period of five years.

In my opinion, the members of the Island
Council must admit their responsibility
for the 2006 binding Final Accord. Nev-
ertheless, as the old Dutch proverb says,
De soep wordt nooit zo heet gegeten als
ze wordt opgediend "The soup is never
eaten as hot as it is served."
It is always possible to negotiate an adap-
tation of the agreed status, for instance to
request the Dutch that some laws, par-
ticularly those not being in accord with
the Christian values, would not be intro-
duced on Bonaire. I cannot imagine that
the Dutch government would reject this
request. It fully realizes that the integra-
tion with the Netherlands cannot mean
that on an island, separated by a distance
of 9000 km, all Dutch regulations and
laws, without exception, would be estab-
lished. For instance, the decision not to
use the Euro (former French colonies had
to accept this new currency), but to intro-
duce the US dollar for the BES islands, is
a very important deviation from the
Dutch laws, and there can be many more
changes, according to the wishes of the
people of Bonaire. It is therefore urgent
that the current Island Council start coop-
eration, ending the current confrontation,
and discuss the possible adaptations, ex-
ceptions and changes with the Dutch gov-
ernment instead of stubbornly rejecting to
cooperate with the Dutch, unlike Sint
Eustatitus and Saba. In my opinion, Henk
Kamp, the Queen's Commissioner and
the future representative of the Kingdom
on the island, will be certainly prepared
to discuss all matters with the members
of the Island Council.


The opponents of the I lm '",t!
agreed status and the
local media are feeling significantly bol-
stered by the advice of Judge Bob Wit
and several other Dutch experts concern-
ing the new status of Bonaire. Unfortu-
nately, they completely forget that Wit
also declared (translated from Dutch),
quote: It must be also mentioned, on be-
half of the .j,., ., i. ii option, that, also in
case the Netherlands decides to treat the
inhabitants of the BES islands, integrated
with the Netherlands, less equal than the
inhabitants would consider as correct,
the door to more equal rights would cer-
tainly not be closed.
Perhaps the Dutch inhabitants of Bon-
aire, as an integrated island, could force
greater equality, even against the will of
the Netherlands, ;h, oih judicial proce-
dures or in some other way. Just because
they are part of the Netherlands, they
would have a judicial basis to approach
the national as well as international
courts. They can appeal under the BUPO
Treaty as well as European Treaty for the
Rights of the People and on the principle
of equality and prohibition of discrimina-
tion established in these treaties. un-
quote.
It means that under the new status of the
special municipality the people of Bon-
aire will have a higher possibility of re-
ceiving higher social benefits than they
will be on Curacao and Sint Maarten.
During the recent meeting of Ank Bi-
jleveld with the representatives of Statia
and Saba on Curacao, she already in-
formed them about raising these benefits
on the BES islands. Bonaire was present
only as an observer because it did not
want to sign any document before the
results of the referendum are known.

The Dutch have no problem with the
advice of the experts of the United Na-
tions invited to come to the island. The
options in the 2004 Referendum were in
principle the same as prescribed by the
UN for choosing the status of former
colonies. It is true that at that time it was
not yet clear that the option "Direct link
with the Netherlands" would mean the
integration of Bonaire with the mother
country. However, when the "Special
Dutch Municipality" proposal was pre-
sented as a possible form of the direct
link in 2006, it was, without any referen-
dum, unanimously accepted by the Island
Council.

It is a pity that the results of the recent
survey about the restructuring of the
Dutch Kingdom, executed by the CUR-
ISES students, proved to be worthless
because the questions violated basic rules
of surveying, as stated by an expert in the
previous issue of BR. This occasion
could be better used, for instance, to ask
the people of Bonaire if they agree or
disagree with the three Dutch laws con-
sidered not being in accord with Christian
values. In case the majority of the people
are against the introduction of these laws
on Bonaire, the Island Council could use
this fact in negotiations with the Dutch. U
Jiri Lausman
Opinions expressed are solely those of
the author.


atural Way Health Food Store Opens
Natural Way Health Food Store Opens


Suley-Mae and Glenda Pourier of
Nature's Way

Good News: You no longer have to
travel to Curacao to find healthy
and delicious food products.

"We wanted to have a store that pro-
vides people who care about health with
products that are usually hard to find,"
says Natural Way's owner, Glenda
Pourier. She and her daughter in Curacao
both opened health food stores at the
same time and order and import products
together. Her daughter here on Bonaire,
Suley-Mae, explained that with the preva-
lence of diabetes and obesity on the is-
land, their main goal is to provide prod-
ucts for people to live healthy. "We have
a lot of organic products that you can't
find in supermarkets," she said, "like salt
free, wheat free, things with less sugar,
but products that people like, for instance,
low fat-low salt snacks, bread spreads,
low salt chips, organic chocolate."

Health conscious shoppers may recog-
nize some of the brands they carry. They
have natural herbal teas by Yogi and
Alvita, teas to clean the blood, take care
of coughs, joints and that are high in Vita-
min C. They have 100% juices by R.W.
Knudsen (no sugar added), Nature's Gate
Shampoo and Conditioner.
Lovers of chocolate can find a tasty
replacement made of carob. The shopping
list is endless: whole wheat pasta, dried
soy (a meat replacement, particularly for
vegetarians), organic oatmeals, spices
without salt, soy milk (liquid and dry),
organic dressings, granolas, rice cakes,
cereals, couscous, dried fruits.

Glenda and Suley-Mae are particularly
proud of the local healthy products they
carry. Honey from Bonairean bees, a kal-
bas syrup for coughs and natural coconut
oil

Stop by and say hello. Natural Way is
on the second floor at La Terassa, up the
stairs from Botika Bonaire on the main
street, Kaya Grandi. They're open Mon-
day through Saturday 10 am to 6 pm, non
-stop. Telephone 717-3353 or 510-2318.
U Laura DeSalvo


Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009











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NUTRITION IN
SCHOOL- PART 1

As I was researching
nutrition in schools
I heard some very interest-
ing remarks. Every school
is trying to do its utmost
with good nutrition, but
there are still some very
key questions. Who will
pay for it? Who will pay to
continue the program?
How can we make the
community aware of the
importance of the pro-
gram? I conducted my re-
search in three schools.
At the first one, Papa
Comes Elementary School,
I had the pleasure of talk-
ing with Mr. Rignald Mar-
tinus "Donny" Wout (58),
Principal of the school.


Papa Cornes School students with Principal Rignald Martinus "Donny" Wout
and teacher Barbara Huveneers upon receipt of study materials that were gifts


Principal Wout has worked
for 40 years in education
and has served in Holland, Curaqao and Bonaire.

Mr. Wout explains, "Over the last years we have had
to deal with children between four and five years of age
who've had a lot of behavioral problems. We've had to
help these children fit into the school environment. We
are coping with children who have been badly raised,
are headstrong, have high tempers and disruptive behav-
ior. Besides helping the child to fit into school, we must
teach them how to develop a habit of learning so that
they are able to understand the material that is coming to
them.

Another problem we faced when I started working at
Papa Comes School more than three years ago was con-
fronting a big gap in education because of the introduc-
tion of a new teaching system for elementary schools,
'Ensenansa di Fundeshi' (Foundation Education). To-
gether with the Dutch inspector for education we saw
the problems and made the changes. We had to deviate
from the standards of 'Ensenansa di Fundeshi. In some
classes we had children with a five to six year difference
in ages. Now it's dropped to a two-year age difference.
The following year we formed groups of ages at differ-
ent levels. Teachers, parents and the children were more
receptive to the changes. We've come up with new pro-
grams:


To help the child to learn and behave.
To help the child absorb the material.
Kindergarten groups 1 to 2
Under building groups 1 to 4
Upper building groups 5 to 8
Recess management in groups
Aggression management


With the introduction of the new programs indeed we
could experience a lot of changes. The after school men-
tors are amazed at how our children behave in a very
calm way. They are distinguished from children in other
schools.

Still we can't close our eyes to the social problems

Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009


from Holland


facing our community that affect the children. There is a
lot of poverty in some neighborhoods. We have children
who rebel against the situation that they have to face in
their neighborhood, like child crime, child prostitution
and a lot more. These special children need special care.
We don't have all the methods like in Holland to help
these kids with their social problems. But we try to do
our best to help.

We've introduced a Care Team in school whereby a
coordinator will work as a liaison between students and
parents, and more people will be trained for the team. In
the meantime we are going to start with courses about
this special care and recess coordinators where all teach-
ers are involved. Other elementary schools have also
introduced this method. We have made a schedule
where everyone sacrifices his or her recess time, even
the principal, to take care of the children during their
recess time.

We are very skeptical about starting with a new pro-
gram now. We have seen some programs, like Dr. Hart
introduced for addicted people, to change their eating
habits and have them quit drugs and alcohol. It was a
very expensive program because most of these people
don't have any money. And the program failed. Pro-
grams like 'Nutrition in Schools' are very important,
but it will cost the school budget a lot of money and we
don't know if it can continue. We will stay open
minded. Maybe in the future things will change for edu-
cation here in Bonaire."

Have you had seen the 'Nutrition in Schools' video
yet? Go to http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-
3962219959398908418# U SiomaraAlbertus.


For Siomara's next
column there will be
more interviews with
teachers on the is-
land for their opin-
ions on the Nutrition
program.


Send your com-
ments to The Bon-
aire Reporter, P.O.
Box 407, Bonaire,
or e-mail reporter
a(bonairenews.
com.


To solve the puzzle, enter the numbers 1 through 9
to the partially filled in puzzle without repeating a
number in any row, column or 3 x 3 region. Answer
on page 17. Supplied by Molly Bartikoski-Kearney


8 3 5

4 1 6 5 9

6 81

4 3

9 8 3 6 2

6 1

7 5 2

1 3 2 9 5

7 1 8



BonQuiz #19

Kl ralendijk's
Fort
Oranje was built
around the 1700s..
Each Dutch Island in
the Netherlands An-
tilles has a fort. They
were built to ward
off the enemy and
protect Dutch civil
servants.
This fort housed
the Commander who
lived there until 1837. This official ran the island
before the title was changed to Gezaghebber, which
literally means "authority manager.
Even though this fort was never under siege or saw
any true action, it was armed to the teeth with can-
nons from England. Take a stroll through the
grounds and inspect the cannons. One cannon was
cast in 1808, two inl811 and one in 1812. They are a
reminder of when the island was under British rule.
The fort's original lighthouse was made of wood
and was replaced by the present one, in concrete, in
1932. Its height is 10.25 m (331/2 ft). The fort has
performed many jobs for the Bonaire Government:
as a Government Center, a warehouse for Govern-
ment property and goods, a prison, police and fire
station, Marine park HQ, and now serves as the
courthouse and Harbormaster's office.

Q) In which year was the original light-
house built?
Answer on page 19
BonQuiz appears regularly in
The Reporter. It's prepared by
Christie Dovale of Christie
Dovale Island Tours. Contact
her to arrange a tour, Phone 717
-4435 or 795-3456 or email:
christiedovale@hotmail.com.


Page t












Happy Sinterklaas Famil


at NOS TV


Last Saturday there were about 200
people enjoying themselves on the
grounds of Flamingo/NOS TV on Kaya
Korona. For the adults there was the Tili-
master Hamburger Competition and for
the children lots of games and a Cup-
cakes Decoration Competition with lots of
fine prizes to be won. NOS. TV covered
the whole event and broadcasted it live on
the air.

Even before the start at 3 pm people gath-
ered and were anxious to see what was com-
ing. And they were not disappointed!
Thanks to the event sponsors, Flamingo TV,
More for Less (the hamburger meat, cakes,
toppings and sweets for every child), Lucky
Import & Export (all the presents for the
children), Eco Power, Alpha & Omega (T-
shirts), Martines Import, Firgos and Fla-
mingo party rentals, the space had a com-
plete makeover into a fair/carnival atmos-
phere.
A bouncer and typical Dutch games like
throwing balls at cans, pulling a rope and
"grabbelton" (a box filled with sawdust and
hidden presents) made it a real Sinterklaas
party for every child, especially because
everything was for free and with every game
they won a prize.
The competition, "Who Makes the Best
Hamburger on Bonaire?" had 13 partici-
pants five of them students at the SGB -
and they grilled at their best. Especially
because the judging panel contained well
known persons as Glenn Thode,
(Gezaghebber Bonaire), Herbert Doma-
cass6, (former Gezaghebber Bonaire), Peter
Silberie (alternate Gezaghebber Bonaire),
Onnie Emerenciana (Member of parliament


Sharhin .llelaan. a dilted hr ii ~otn.
,,i lithe lop p? rize ,,ill hi spit r
"Chupa Dede Burger."


Doneness (properly cooked), Use of ingredi-
ents, Originality/Inventiveness, and Presen-
tation. After the first round, five competitors
went into the finals and surprisingly for
them... they all received a wonderful prize.
The first prize of NAf 500, sponsored by
Flamingo TV/NosTV, was won by Sharlon
Melaan with his "Chupa Dede Burger."
How this burger looks and how to prepare it,
he will soon show in a special on NOS TV
The theme of the other prizes was "Be a
Tourist in Your Own Country." Runner Up
Jolimar Mendoza with "Joly Burger" will
spend a night, including dinner and break-
fast at Hotel Roomer. Third place, Arys
Ventura with "Bonaire Burger," will be go-
ing underwater with the Discovery Scuba
Diving at Dive Friends/Yellow Submarine.
No. 4, Leonard Janga with "Loco Burger,"


Bonaire's First Lady, Mechtild Thod4, describes the art of cake decoration to the contestants


Past Governors Domacassd and present Governor Thoddserved as two of the
id'L,' e. Eii iIIand GIabrieL'lla ThinitL MinIggll' Ulp.


Christmas Market

to benefit Family Development Project Foundation


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Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009


Page 8










2009 Straw Poll Results


Bonaire-Dutch Connection


Parliamentary Election


T ina Woodley, a Certified Personal
Trainer on Bonaire, was the 1985
International Female Body Building
Champion and the first woman to become
a champion in both sports -power lifting
and body building at the same time, in the
same year. It took strength of character,
devotion and a positive attitude to achieve
that and her other numerous awards.
Tina, born in St. Eustatius, actually be-
gan her working out here in Bonaire in the
70s. "I loved it," she says. "I was doing
something that no other woman did." She
became the first woman in the whole Car-
ibbean to participate in any such champi- ...
onship and won the first Power Lifting ......
Championship for Women in Elkhart, Indi- .
ana. At the same time she was raising three
step daughters and her own daughter, Sasha van Duyn. In Austria she owned a fit-
ness center and then in Wiesbaden, Germany, she owned an all ladies fitness studio.
She is married to the former mayor of Wiesbaden, Achim Exner.
It is with this background that Tina became a certified Pilates, yoga and physical
fitness coach and a licensed NLP practitioner (Neuro Linguistic Programming, a
system to create your own powerful and practical approach to personal change and
transformation). Tina is working at the Bon Bida Spa as a fitness trainer.
Why have a personal trainer? Tina replies, "You get one-to- one advice, guid-
ance and motivation. The whole reason for paying for your own fitness training is to
get this attention and a training program that's right for you." And it includes nutri-
tional advice, strength, endurance and flexibility training, weight reduction and
more. "You are never too old or too sick to train," she says.
After all these years why has Tina returned to Bonaire? "At a certain age," she
says, "some people want to find a place they can call their home, and Bonaire is the
closest thing to that." She continues, "and I want to use my 30 years of experience
and training as a contribution to the community."
Tina has a website: WWW.ActivoBonaire.com. Email: TW @ActivoBonaire. Her
telephone is 700-5488. 0 Story & photo by Laura DeSalvo


MOUIADWfl


Chart 1


According to a straw poll con-
ducted last week by Arthur
Sealy on behalf of radio station BON
FM the minority party, UPB (green)
would win the most votes in next
month's Central Government Parlia-
mentary election. The results of that
election do not affect the makeup of the
Bonaire Government. See Chart 1.
The second part of the poll tested the
voter feelings about the form the Bon-
aire Government should take. The most
votes were won by Direct Ties (Laso
Director the direction Bonaire was on
prior to the change in Bonaire Govern-
ment earlier this year. See Chart 2.
The results for Bonaire in the 2004
Referendum were quite different, (see
Chart 3). Bonairean voters were not
allowed to be able to choose for
"Integration With Holland" as were
Curaqao voters. U G.D.


4 2004 Referendum Results +
(final vote tally)

Independent D
1% A
C 16%
24%


Kingdom






B
59%
Chart 3


Private Fitness


Training


Tina Woodley








Certified personal trainer
European & World Champion
Over 20 years experience



Services
Body fat reduction
Nutrition coaching
NLP coaching
Fitness packages




tina.woodley@yahoo.com
Tel. (+599) 700 5488
Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles
www.activobonaire.com


(sladys's Art

Shoppe

Custom
U r* W :ma wm l


Bonaire's Largest and Best Stocked supermarket


Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009


Page 9


I











lkSlrsi nlI,'Jij 4R.Olml r gjs4tio4@arld?)


I thought it would never happen, my
unhappiness to report a new species of
fish for Bonaire- but it happened on 26
October, 2009, when two guests of ours at
Bonaire Dive and Adventure returned from
a dive at Nukove and showed me a video
they had just taken of Bonaire's official new
species. They had been given the
information during our mandatory
orientation of what to do if one was spotted.
They went to STINAPA headquarters and
plans were made for Bonaire Marine Park
Rangers, under the leadership of Ramon de
Leon, to go back to Nukove and they made
the capture. Jason Wright and Sean Murray
are the guests that made the record books,
and being advanced divers and concerned
about the health of Bonaire's reefs, did the
correct thing. Other opportunities were
missed at other dive shops on Bonaire when
the inclusion of Lionfish were not included
in their orientation, but, hopefully now,
everyone is on-board.
As of now, 24 November, 2009, Bonaire's
Marine Park Rangers have captured a total
of 20 Lionfish and the sites have been from
the far north, Wayaka, to the far south, Red
Slave, and points in
between. Measurements are taken and the
captured fish are deposited with the
scientists at CIEE here on Bonaire. They
examine the stomach contents and preserve
a sample to be sent for DNA finger printing.
It is hoped that keeping this DNA data will
help us to see some pattern as to where our
lionfish came from. The presence of these
highly trained scientists (beautiful female
marine biologists with at least a Masters in
Marine Biology, with most of them having
earned their Ph Ds.) at CIEE has been a
welcomed addition. They are "right in the


thick of it" when it comes to educating
future marine biologists and collecting and
intepretating data collected here concerning
the environment. Watch their recently
released video on YouTube concerning the
sewage problem here on Bonaire. http://
www.voutube.com/watch?
v=EihWrfOIj 1 g&feature=channel.

With the capture of the first lionfish for
Bonaire, I was proven wrong in my
assessment of our potential for finding these
fish on Bonaire. Transport of the larval form
of creatures born on the coral reefs of the
Caribbean is the customary mode of a
species spreading itself to other islands.
Mature fish are reef-bound, but their newly
hatched larvae are filled with wanderlust at
what the rest of the world might have in
store and can be carried by currents and the
direction that surface winds are
blowing. We here on Bonaire are known as
the Fish Capital of the Caribbean because of
our consistently strong winds blowing from
the east. Looking to the east is a
tremendous fish producing area, the
northern coast of South America, and
Bonaire is perfectly situated to receive these
larval fish as they pass into their settlement
stages after feeding and growing bigger and
stronger as they travel toward
Bonaire. lNi.p .. i ..l.iid.com/
releases/2005/04/050424200603.htm is an
article about how some fish find a new
home.
With this information, I incorrectly
assumed that lionfish would have to become
established along the coast of Venezuela,
east of us, in order for their larvae be able to
"ride the winds and currents to
Bonaire." But there have been no reports of


lionfish found off the Venezuelan coast to
our east, so the question that every biologist
is now asking is, "How did these buggers
get here?"

Jake Montgomery and I have both seen
two lionfish here in Bonaire. Both of us,
as well as the other dive masters carry
bright, yellow tape in our BCs in order to
accurately mark the location of any that
we come across as we lead divers from
our boats. On Thursday, 19 November,
2009, I found my second one at Karpata,
rattled my Rattle-Alert, and showed all
the divers with me what a juvenile


lionfish looked like. I must emphasize
that these young ones are very dark, with
faint stripes which will show more
contrast as they mature. I describe a
juvenile as looking more like a small
individual Long-spined Urchin, and they
are usually under an overhang, in the
shadows during the day time. They feed
at night and rest in dark places during the
day. This particular lionfish was at 60 feet
and I immediately surfaced and swam
back to the boat to call Ramon on my cell.
Their first attempt was unsuccessful in the
(Continued on page 11)


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Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009


Lionfish in Bonaire-7.5 cm in length (2.9 inches) at 20 feet depth
Copyright and Photo by Kathy Beil-Morgan, Keepsake dive site, 18 November, 2009


*1'


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Achim Exner photo


World Champion Swimmer Angela Maurer Checks Out Bonaire
2009 World Champion Swimmer and four-time winner of the Marathon Swim-
ming World Cup, Angela Maurer, will arrive in Bonaire on December 10. She'll
be accompanied by Jennifer Boettcher, one of the best German Dolphin swimmers.
They will be in training for 10 days, from December 10 to 20, sponsored by Buddy
Dive Resort and Bon Bida Spa and Gym. While they're here they'll take a look at the
training and competition conditions on the island because they'd like to support Bon-
aire's bid to have a World Cup Swimming Finals here in 2011. o Achim Exner


Lionfish (Continued from page 10)
afternoon, but they returned on Friday
and made the capture.
In closing, I must brag about us divers
here on Bonaire. Of the more than
100,000 fish surveys conducted through
REEF, throughout the entire Tropical
Atlantic, it is quite remarkable that over
17,000 have been conducted here on
Bonaire, or 17% of the total for the
entire Caribbean/Atlantic. We are
concerned about our Bonairean coral
reefs, and our divers are probably the
most informed divers anywhere, and we
scrutinize the reef better than anyone,
and this, hopefully will keep us on top of
this horrific invasion.
It is not necessary for spear guns or
pole spears to be used because the
current techniques that the rangers are
using are sufficient for the time being.
We ask divers to remain diligent and
carefully scrutinize the reefs when
diving so that we can knock the stuffing
out of the lionfish.
The initial capture, in the Atlantic/
Caribbean, of the first lionfish through a
pet store purchase and subsequent release
was off Dania, Florida, in 1985. Then the
release from a sea-side aquarium after the
passage of Hurricane Andrew, in 1992,
was a further step in setting us up for the
horrific results that we are experienc-
ing. Since then, we can only imagine
many further releases from aquariums up
and down the Atlantic coast by
inconsiderate (read STUPID) humans who
tire of their potentially harmful "pet", who
have no concern about what impact we
humans are having on our planet.
An excellent source of information
about the invasion of lionfish can be found
at http://nas.er.usgs.gov/queries/
FactSheet.asp?speciesID=963
Stay up on the spread of lionfish by vis-
iting the USGS website http://
nas.er.usgs.gov/taxgroup/fish/
lionfishdistribution.asp Double clicking
next to Bonaire continues to enlarge the
map.


LIONFISH Found on Bonaire
As of 24 November, 2009
1 26 Oct, 2009 Nukove 20m
5.0cm (1.9 in)
2 27 Oct Playa Lechi 50 ft 5.7 cm
(2.24 in)
3 30 Oct Red Slave 60ft 4.6cm
(1.8 in)
4 31 Oct Invisibles 70ft 7.3cm
(2.8 in)
5 2 Nov Invisibles (distended belly)
75ft 7.5cm (2.9 in)
6 2 Nov Salt Pier 8ft 5.7cm
(2.4 in)
7 5 Nov, Jeff Davis 60 ft 7.2cm
(2.8 In)
8 5 Nov, Oil Slick, 60ft 6.9cm
(2.7 in)
9 9 Nov Invisibles 60ft 7.3cm
(2.8 in)
10 9 Nov Bonbini Na Kas 18ft
6.2 cm (2.4in)
11 llNov Something Special 30ft
7.3cm (2.8 in)
12 14 Nov Punt Vierkaant 60ft
6.7cm (2.6 in)
13 14Nov Andrea 1 38 ft 7.2cm
(2.8 in)
14 15 Nov, Wayaka 2 30 ft 7.9cm
(3.1 in)
15 17 Nov Small Wall 50 ft
8.4 cm (3.3 in)
16 18 Nov Keepsake 20ft
7.5cm (2.9 in)
17 18 Nov Punt Vierkaant 50ft
8.1cm (3.1 in)
18 18 Nov Witches Hut 35ft
7.7cm (3.0 in)
19 18Nov Bonaventure 50ft
8.5cm (3.3 in)
20 18Nov Eden Beach 60ft
8.3cm (3.2 in)
21 19 Nov North Belnam 25ft
8.4cm (3.3 in)
22 20Nov Karpata 60ft
7.2cm (2.8 in)
23 20Nov Oil Slick 80ft
8.2cm (3.2 in)
24 20Nov Margate Bay 60ft
8.9cm (3.5 in) U
Story by Jerry Ligon


Captain Don presents the first copy off the press of his latest book, "Reef
Windows," to Elsmarie Beukenboom, Director of STINAPA, the manager of
the Bonaire National Marine Park. Captain Don has known Elsmarie since her child-
hood and has followed her path through Cornell Hotel School, Hotel Manager, Tour-
ism Training Center, and past Director of Tourism. Times change, and positions
differ. Elsmarie deserves the honor of this first book because of her support and
long time encouragement of Don's environmental attitudes and writing, while she at
all times persistently fights to protect the total environment and heritage of the Is-
land of Bonaire. U Story & photo by Janet Thibault








Captain Don presents and signs his newest book:
"Reef Windows' on Saturday, December 12th from 4 6:00 pm
at Books & Toys, Kaya Grandi 36.
Captain Don ill autograph his book "Reef Windows" for
friends & the diving community at the "Meet The Captain Night"
at Habitat on Monday, December 14th from 6 8:00 pm.


Travel back to the exciting, early days of Bonaire diving. To make
you part of these adventures, I have included my Captain Don
red ribbon depth gauge as a handy bookmark. Come diving with me
and learn the true stories behind the names of Bonaire's dive sites.


Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009


Page 11





Sanikolas Arrives in Bonaire


Sanikolas kri...
A s has been traditional for
15 years, Sanikolas .
arrived in Bonaire from the sea, '
this time aboard the tugboat,
Tahiti, which docked at the
Chiku Mercelina Wharf. .
Hundreds of children and their
parents or guardians, a record
number, lined the waterside,
eagerly awaiting the arrival. He

attendants, the black faced
Swarte Pieten (Black Petes),
and the soul-stirring beat of the
drum corps. The Gezaghebber
(Lt. Governor) Glenn Thod6 1
welcomed him and wished him
a pleasant stay on Bonaire.
Obeying the law one of the '
Swarte Piet was seen checking -
in with Customs, showing the
officer Sanikolas' book of -
good and bad children. Sanikolas arrives and is escorted by the roi
As Gezaghebber Thod6 had to cadence of the Drum Corps
leave for an important
appointment Interim Lt. ,
Governor Peter Silberie stood
in and accompanied Sanikolas ,j
to Wilhelmina Park for the
festivities. Along the way the ,
Swarte Pieten did tricks,
acrobatics, teased and threw
candy to the children.
There were many Dutch
children and their families there
this year. As one of the Dutch
parents said, "This is
wonderful. In Holland it is so
crowded that you can't even get
near enough to see St. Nicholas
so instead we had to watch him
on television!"
Sanikolas and his Swarte
Pieten return to Spain late on
December 5, after having
visited homes, the hospital, Kas
di Sosiego (old folks' home),
Rose Inn and other places.
Thanks to the hardworking
members of the Foundation Ata
C I Zwartpiet, who have
organized this very popular
event for the last 15 years. Also
great appreciation to SEBIKI Georgina, one of The Reporter staff who
for setting up the games and helps her grandmother deliver the paper, pose
activities at the Park. with a Swarte Piet
It was also an end of an era.
This is the first time in 30 consecutive years that B6i Antoin has not been
Sanikolas. However, his two sons, Franklin and Danielson continue to be Swarte
Piet. And the new Sanikolas did a fine job!E Laura DeSalvo



4"I L::,Is "L. (.
: : ^ ^- *..,


Msing


es


For the Christmas and New Year


Holidays we are offering


We are serving a variety of fresh

Fine Claire Oysters
Until supplies last
(limited availability, reservations recommended)

Raw
on the half shell
Rockefeller
Gratineed with a mixture of Parmesan, anchovies & spinach
Nam Kee
Steamed with a mixture of black bean sauce, sesame, soy and scallions


On the 24th and 25th
We will serve our always surprising

Christmas Menu
(reservations are recommended)
This is in addition to our regular a la carte menu
The pizza temple will be open as usual


We hope to see you at Rum Runners during the holidays"


Rum Runners Restaurant and Bar
at Captain Don's Habitat
Kaya N. Debrot 103 North Hotel Row
Reservations (Hiqhly Recommended) 717-8290 ext 100
Two seatings available: 5:30 pm (17:30-20:00) with a
free glass of bubbles
and second seating at 8:30 pm (20:30- closing)
Email: rumrunners@habitatbonaire.com

At Rum Runners we do our utmost best to work with fresh ingredients only, However being
on small remote island means that these are not always available if this is the case our chef will
adjust the dish accordingly. For this we ask your understanding.


Everyone j...st loves the Swarte Pieten.. What energy and funand they hand out
Everyone just loves the Swarte Pieten. What energy and fun-and they hand out


Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009


Page 12










Jan "Lambada"
Painter and muralist Jan
"Lambada" Bouwman passed
away in the Netherlands on Novem-
ber 25th following a flu-type illness,
perhaps H1N1 swine flu. His nick-
name came from the rhythms of the
lambada that he loved to dance to
anywhere and anytime he heard it
played. Some consider him one of
the Netherlands' most gifted artists
of recent times. His extreme sensi-
tivity made his personal life difficult
and he had a long battle with alcohol
and even drugs for a time. He left
behind many works in Holland and a
few in Bonaire that will immortalize
him.


Jan was born in Amsterdam on
January 7, 1955. He attended secon-
dary school in Friesland and VWO,
(in those days HBS). At 17 he went
to Groningen, moved in with his
grandmother and studied at the Art
Academy 'Minerva.' During this period
he had a job in a hospital for children, and
was very much loved. He attended to sick
patients, played and drew with them.
His parents passed away 25 years ago.
His sister believes Jan had difficulty deal-
ing with their deaths.
Not long after that he and his family
moved to Bonaire at the invitation of
Frans Booi. Jan had a grant to teach art.
Nochie Coffie was one of his students.
Bonaire is where Jan got in touch with
the 'free' lifestyle. He drank reasonably
before the move to Bonaire, but the pain


of a dissolving marriage and his f
death haunted him. The pain he c
reject, but he could soothe it with
and later with drugs. But he kept
at the Bonaire Caribbean Club, C
on Karnaval floats and elsewhere
so alive they captured you and dr
into their setting.
Jan was married to artist Wine I
and they had three children; the o
Myrddyn, his only daughter, an a
in Amsterdam, speaks Papiament
her clients. Son Irin, an engineer,
ried to Valerie, daughter of Roy 1


Bouwman
the Bamali shop. Valarie
delivered Jan a grandson,
Ilan. The youngest is
Maarten, an international
flight pilot, living in Lon-
don. When Maarten was
still a baby they moved to
Bonaire.
Jan left Bonaire around
1996, leaving behind many
Admirers of his art as well
i \ as friends. With the help of
Shis wife. Wine, he returned
to the Netherlands, to
Leeuwarden. He struggled
Switch rehabilitation, kicked
the drug habit and went on
with his life.
The last couple of years
were idyllic for him. His
family was close. He
worked designing furni-
ture, painted canvases and
murals that emphasized the
parent's beauties of nature: the small details of
wouldn't butterflies and flowers. He was a true art-
ialcohol, ist in everything.
painting: When Jan was buried on December 2nd a
,ultimara, bouquet was placed at his grave by his
, scenes sister Kunna on behalf of those who cared
few you and loved him on Bonaire. While many of
his murals and wall paintings have faded
Fransen, away or been painted over his memory
oldest, lives on in the hearts of many of us on
attorney Bonaire.
tu with U This story has contributions from
is mar- Christie Dovale, Wine Fransen and Jan's
Kort, of sister Kunna Dijkstra


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Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009


m


UNITED COLORS
OF RENETTON RI


The Perfect Christmas Present


Page 13











J- Jt o -


PUT NATURE ABOVE THE DOLLAR


Dear Editor:
We are just a couple of weeks away from the
year 2010 and I understand that the general
population of Bonaire still carries that same old
philosophy where the economy has to be fed by
nature. People still believe that tourism is the
subject that values nature and makes it necessary
to protect the environment. For centuries they
were right: value nature for its importance for the
economy.
But we broke an agreement, nature would take
care of the economy and the economy would
take care of nature.
Bonaire was an excellent example starting with
its marine park, the ban on spear fishing, putting
out moorings to protect the reef, the turtle foun-
dation, no diving zones and no fishing zones, but
times have changed and we are encountering a
rapid decrease in the quality of our natural re-
sources with proof of irresponsible abuse and
pollution by the island's capitalism. Still there is
no waste water plant in place. Still we are exca-
vating our coastline, cutting down trees, selling
our international waters to fisheries. We still be-
lieve in cruise ship tourism and we enrich the
rich.
Nature was here long ago even before man.
Nature was a gift. We didn't have to do anything
for it and we never had to pay for it!
So why do we need all these funds to protect it?
Who are they who believe that we need tourism
to value nature? Do we need money to pay off
the greedy people who otherwise will destroy it?
Maybe we are just too late and we need money
from tourism to heal that which is already dam-
aged and to educate the community who even
today are ignorant of the beauty and value that
nature caries as a natural wonder.
Hendrik Wuyts


had a problem until yester- I imO
day, 30 November 2009.
While driving down the
seaside road adjacent to
the town, I was stopped by
some sort of official per-
son who told me that I was
not allowed to drive on
this road. He said there Ifru
was a temporary interna-
tional sign that said so. (I said,) I am sorry and do
apologize for not knowing all the international
signs.
But what made me angry enough to maybe not
come back to Bonaire was that he called me an
idiot. Yes, he used that word and said I should
not be driving a vehicle. I was told that the road
was blocked off so the cruise ship passengers
would see Bonaire as a nice peaceful island
I am sorry again but I pay 1000's of dollars to
stay here and I am called an idiot by someone in
a uniform. These passengers spend a few dollars
and are worshipped? Bonaire, you better watch
out where your priorities are.
Gail W.

COMMENTS ON THE REPORTER SURVEY IN


ABOUT HOW BONAIRE NEWS
SHOULD BE RELEASED

Dear Editor:
Bonaire has the distinction
of being an island where many
people come back year after
year. Although they may not
know the small details, they
are aware of what is going on.
When news is modified, cen-
sored or a positive spin is put
on it, they feel they have been
lied to and credibility is lost.
AB


0!E.-
What type of
news best pro-
motes Bonaire?

All News
-.
Good
News Only
C-.
Good news
and ONLY
the not-so-
good-news


Dear Editor: that has
I agree with the option, pre- okayedd"
sent ALL the news. Whether by island
you like it or not .. "truth al- tourism
ways prevails." authorities
I have been working in the
tourism sector for over 20 I
years. There is no point in a
cover up of the facts. It is better to be up front
and honest rather than have to defend the
"deliberate omissions." Nothing is perfect nor
should it be expected to be that way. Bonaire
should be represented for exactly what it is .. not
something others wish it to be.
Petri Hausmann


Jackie Bernabela and WinfredDania at the opening

K."e MA iSrft. nII oiks by Winfred Dania and Frans Booi were unveiled at
Free web Poll ihc opc ning of the "Culture of the Indian of Bonaire" Ex-
hibition at Kas di Arte on Sunday, December 6.
There are more than 30 pieces from the two artists, including paint-
ings and other artworks.
Dania is considered by many to be the Van Gogh of Bonaire. His
works hang in museums in the Antilles and in the Netherlands and
are owned by collectors throughout the world.
Frans Booi, an artist, historian, inventor, sculptor, musician and
more was head of the Department of Culture and Education from
the 70s to the 90s. He is the expert on the myths of Bonaire.
The two have combined talents before. In 2006 they presented a
program, N I\ i li of Bonaire," with Dania's paintings being ex-
plained by Booi.
This exhibit will continue until January 3, 2010, with Kas di Arte
opening daily from 10 am to noon and from 5:30 to 9 pm, and on the
weekends of December 12, 13, 14, 20, 26 and 27. n Laura DeSalvo


Winfred with fellow artist Ronald Verhoeven


CRUISE SHIP MATH


CRUISE SHIPS RULE!


Dear Editor:
Some may think that means cruise ships are
great. But what it means is that cruise ships dic-
tate all that happens on Bonaire. Once again,
important containers for the businesses on Bon-
aire cannot get off the pier because cruise ships
have priority above everything else. These busi-
ness employ, pay taxes, pay import duties, pay
OB but can't get the goods to sell because cruise
ships come first. When is this going to stop?
AB

MAMA SMILEGETS A BLACK EYE
Dear Editor:
We have been coming to Bonaire for over 10
trips. I have driven all over Bonaire and never


Dear Editor,
I have finally found the time to read the 16-30
October issue of The Bonaire Reporter. On page
11 you note that "a total of 229,000 passengers
are expected during the 2009-2010 cruise ship
season." Further along you note, "This season
cruise ships will have to pay a head tax of $2 per
passenger, which is expected to raise between
$14 to $19 million (TCBfigures, Ed.) in addition
to what passengers spend on the island."
At $2 per head, 229,000 passengers will raise
$458,000 not $14 to $19 million. Please clarify.
FrederickA. Beland
P.S. $2 per head is really pathetic, especially in
view of the fact that the departure tax at the air-
port is $35 per person.


Page 14


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Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009


mil


V",


Ab









Pet of the Week


Shelter's Art Auction A Winner


T he Shelter's 5th Art Auction and Indonesian dinner attracted lots of support-
ers and animal lovers on November 27.
A number of local artists donated art pieces which were auctioned off by Rene
Essing, assisted by Aniek Schouten.
The Indonesian diner was prepared and served by the team of Rosita, "Bous" and
Jerry of the Plaza Resort, together with chef Willem and many helpers. About 120
guests were served. The total result of the evening was over NAJ 14.000. All the
money goes to the Shelter's sterilization project, "Bonnie Superdog." A big thank
you to all artists, volunteers and sponsors, Plaza Resort and Warehouse, for their
contribution to the fundraiser. 0 Story & Photo by Paul Wichers.


Oscar (above and center) and cat cage mates are fascinated (and curious, of course)
with what's going on with volunteer Finn and Shelter Manager Monique who are
cuddling a little puppy, Petunia.
O scar's good friend, Shelter volunteer Jane Madden, wrote his biography this
week:
"That handsome young gentleman is Oscar...and he truly is a gentleman. Although less
than a year old he has the manners and demeanor of a mature, content cat. He gets
along famously with all his roommates, young, old, male or female. No roughhousing
or showing off...Oscar is willing to snuggle up and snooze with anyone who wants to
cuddle with him...including people. His coat is a soft and gorgeous deep orange/red, a
very unusual color for cats on Bonaire. Oscar would make a fine addition to any
home...he is comfortable with other animals and children or would be just as happy to
be an 'only cat.'"' Laura DeSalvo


t was a wonderful evening for story telling and poetry at Altamira UnJo last
Friday, December 4, with a full moon. Twenty-one persons participated in
this event organized by the Skal (Cultural Department) every month at full moon.
Soldachi Tours organizes the walking tour. U Maria Koecks


Plants abfet6

ItroChristmeel


Home Of
Great Taste


Wide selection of cheeses and hams from
around the world, homemade salads &
olives, hot & cold sandwiches, breakfasts
Open M-F: 7-6; Sat. 8-4; Sun. 8-12
At the Bonaire District Shopping Mart, Traffic Circle, Kaya Gob. N. Debrot #66
info(delideli.com /4delivery@elideli.com Tel/Fax 717-3997


Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009


Page 15


Apr
%P 14 :











Bonaire Reporter Classifieds- Are still free
Got something to buy or sell?
Non-Business Classified Ads (up to 4 lines/ 20 words): FREE
Commercial Ads only NAfl per word, for each two-week issue.
Call 790-6518 or 790-6125 or email info@bonairereporter.com


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Bonaire Images
Elegant greeting cards and beautiful
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-N-Browse next to Lover's Ice Cream and
Sand Dollar Grocery. Photography by
Shelly Craig www.bonaireimages.com

GREAT CLEANING SERVICE
For Quality House and Office
Cleaning ....... CALL JRA
Serving Bonaire for more than 15 years
Honest, Reliable, Efficient, Thorough,
Low rates, References. One time or many
Phone 785-9041 ... and relax.

4 LUNCH TO GO
Starting from NAf6 per meal.
Call CHINA NOBO 717-8981.
SWeb site:
www.chinanobobonaire.com


- FELMAR
Cleaning Services
f Apartments, Hotels,
Houses, Offices & More.
Efficient Work,
Good References.
Tel. 786-0019

A Unique Haircut experience at
The Windsurf Place,
Sorobon, with Desiree.
O Open weekdays from 12
noon, Weekends by ap-
pointment.
Phone: 786-6416
info(i aplaceforvoubonaire.com

*** FOR SALE ***
(cleaned out our garage)
Uwatec big display wrist mount bot-
tom timer 25$ Spare air 0.7 Itr 100 $ -
secondhand BCDs medium and small
110$ (only 30 dives )- secondhand
4/5mm BARE Velocity Full wetsuit
Black with dark blue 100$ (only 30
dives ) older type (all steel) scubapro
regset 50$ Black TUSA older type
Platina fins medium 20 $. hard plastic
kayak for two. only the plastic hull no
seats no paddles 50$.- DVD player
Panasonic 30 $- a brand new high qual-
ity blender Philips 600 watt for 40$ -
Life vest, Secumar 16 Itr with extra co2
cartridges 45$ a medium size NEW
European black motor helmet for 50
NAf also a rain and UV cover your mo-
torcycle or scooter 25 NAF- 17 inch
computer monitor 20$ small (2mtr)
house hold stairs 30$- send an e-mail to
marktplaatsbonaire@hotmail.com


8ONAIRE
DO SOMETHING DIFFERENT
KAYAKING CAVING CLIMBING -APPELLJNG
ABSEILEN MOUNTAIN BIKING NATIONAL
PARK TOURS ISLAND TOURS BIRDWATCHING
Tel (599) 791-6272 / 785-6272
hans@'ouldoorbonaire.com
wt,,,,i.ouldoorbonaire.com

For sale: Painting of Anton Heyboer
- 'Boat' in black and yellow, framed, size
1.10 x .79 cm. NAf 5000.-
Hand embroidered antique Indian
tapestry, 1.25 x 1.65 cm, NAf 300.-
Phone 786-3117.

For rent at Hato, 2 studios for 1 per-
son. Minimum stay 4 months. no airco
Incl.; gas/water/electricity/internet/linen/
selibon/furnished/garden/parking place/
terrace/ Rent per month NAf 650,-- or
600,--Deposit NAf 750 or 600,-- 717
2529 or 796 2529

For rent at Hato, studio for 1 per-
son. Minimum stay 4 months, no airco.
Incl.; Gas/water/electricity/internet/
linen/selibon/furnished/garden/parking
place/terrace/ Rent per month NAf
600,-- Deposit NAf 600,-- Call 717-
2529 or 796- 2529

1995 Nissan Sentra for sale asking
price 3.500 but will negotiate! call 795-
3456

1/2 Container to USA. Need to send
something to the USA? I have half a
container going to the U.S. in Dec.
$1,300. Call 795-1277

Free Packing boxes, from the 13th to
20th of December contact me at
info(dsoundfound.com for details.

Looking To Buy-Baby bed/Box
(playpen). Call 790-6518, 786-6518

NexStar 8 GPS Telescope Star gaz-
ing for anyone. All accessories included
- tripod, 4 eye pieces, star finder, AC
adapter. Almost new. Call 717-7278
for more information. NAf 1300

For sale professional high quality
saw table cpl. with extra blade. Used
for the building of one garage. Now it
is over complete. only NAf 320. Call
for an offer to 786-5432

For sale- Mitsubishi Pick-up L200 4
-WD double-cabin, gasoline, 200.000
km, not diving car, not ex rental. Great
for towing your boat or driving in the
kunuku. No rust in a good condition
for 4750,- USD. Call for an offer to
787-0270


Te koop grote collective, meer dan
120 stuks, DVD's (Europees system
en dus Nederlands ondertiteld.) Ge-
noeg voor een levenlang regenachtige
zondagen. Alle DVD's in 1 keer voor
160,- NAF en al onze muziek cd's (350
stuks) alle genres alles voor 250,- NAF
bel voor een aanbod 786-5432

Put your ad here and get results


H-ere is Bonaire's snorkeling pioneer, Renee Leach, with her twin brother, Uys van
Zyl, at Boulder Beach at the southernmost tip of South Africa, reading The Bon-
aire Reporter, as a flock of pushy penguins move in (at lower left).
WIN GREAT PRIZES! Take a copy of The Bonaire Reporter with you on your next trip or when you return
to your home. Then take a photo of yourself with the newspaper in hand. THE BEST PHOTOS OF THE
YEAR WILL WIN THE PRIZES. Mail photos to Bonaire Reporter, Box 407, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles
(AN). E-mail to: info@bonairereporter.com.
KRALENDIJK TIDES (Heights in feet, FT)
Remember: Winds and weather canf,, il ,,, ,...i .. .. the local tide's height and time


DATE Time Ht. Time Ht. Time Ht.


12-10 1:40
12-11 1:07
12-12 0:15
12-13 10:38
12-14 11:17
12-15 11:52
12-16 12:25
12-17 13:04
12-18 13:38
12-19 0:02
12-20 0:32
12-21 0:49
12-22 0:55
12-23 0:42
12-24 0:10


1.OFT.
1.1FT.
1.OFT.
2.1FT.
2.1FT.
2.1FT.
2.1FT.
2.0FT.
1.9FT.
0.8FT.
0.8FT.
0.9FT.
0.9FT.
1.OFT.
1.OFT.


9:07
9:36
10:06
20:02
20:55
21:53
22:35
23:09
23:39
14:06
14:37
15:03
11:30
9:14
8:45


1.8FT.
1.9FT.
2.0FT.
0.8FT.
0.7FT.
0.7FT.
0.7FT.
0.7FT.
0.7FT.
1.8FT.
1.7FT.
1.6FT.
1.5FT.
1.5FT.
1.6FT.


16:32
17:51
18:54


Time Ht. COEF


1.1FT. 20:28
1.OFT. 22:04
0.9FT. 23:45


1.3FT.
1.1FT.
1.OFT.


SaSE flM ICES



WANT TO FEEL SAFER P

SuORerierfUS


*Transport of Money *Vehicle patrols
and Valuables eBurglar Alarms
*Private Investigations *Fire Alarm Systems


-


Kaya Nikiboko Nord 37A, PO Box 225 Tel: (599) 717- 8125
Fax (599) 717- 6125 E-mail sss@bonairelive.com


16 Flights a day
between
Bonaire and
Curagao


Divi Divi Air
Reservations
24 hours a day
Call
(5999 839-1515)
Or (5999


Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009


Page 16












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REGULAR EVENTS )
SBy appointment Rooi
Lamoenchi Kunuku Park Tours $21
(includes tax). Discounts for residents
and local people. Tel. 717-8489, 540-
9800.
Parke Publico children's play-
ground open every day into the cooler
evening hours.
Saturday
Rincon Marsh&--6 am-2 pm.
Enjoy a Bonairean breakfast while you
shop, fresh fruits and vegetables, gifts,
local sweets, snacks, arts, handicrafts,
candles, incense, drinks, music. Big
March first Saturday of the month-
www.infobonaire.com/rincon.
Flea Market at Parke Publico
every first Saturday of the month, 3 to
7 pm. Everyone welcome to buy and to
sell. NAfl0 per selling table.(NAf 5
goes to up-keep the park). NGOs can
have a free table. More information and
reservations for a spot call Vicky Bisses-
sar 786-1592.
Wine Tasting at Antillean Wine
Company's warehouse on Kaya Indus-
tria, second Saturday of the month, 7-9
pm. Snacks and tasting of six wines for
$10 (NAf17,50) per person. Tel. 560-
7539.
Soldachi Tours-See the real
Bonaire and be transported back in time.
Learn about the history, culture and na-
ture by Bonaireans from Rincon. Call
Maria Koeks for more information-796-
7870.
Monday
Soldachi Tours of Rincon, the heart
of Bonaire, 9 am-noon. $20-Call Maria,
717-6435-best island tour value

Friday
Harbour Village Tennis, Social
Round Robin 7-10 pm. $10 per person.
Cash bar. All invited. Call Elisabeth Vos at
565-5225

FREE SLIDE/VIDEO SHOWS
Sunday- Creature Feature- John and
Suzie Wall of Buddy's Digital photo
center present a multimedia slide presen-
tation about Buddy's House Reef pool
bar Buddy Dive, 6:30-7 pm, 717-5080

Tuesday-- Bonaire Land and Ocean
presentation by Fish-Eye Photo staff,
7pm on the big screen inside the Sunset
Bar and Grill at Den Laman Condos.


Wednesday- Sea Turtle Conservation
Bonaire presents the Sea Turtles of Bon-
aire Slide V1 .. .., every 2nd & 4th

2009


plpEM-NI C


Wednesday at Bruce Bowker's Carib Inn
(717-8819) at 7pm.
BONAIRE'S TRADITIONS
Kas Krioyo Rincon-Step into Bonaire's past
in this venerable old home that has been re-
stored and furnished so it appears the family
has just stepped out. Local ladies will tell you
the story. Open Monday thru Friday, 9 -12,2-
4. Weekends by appointment. Call 717-2445.
MangasinadiRei, Rincon. Enjoy the view
from "The King's Storehouse." Learn about
Bonaire's culture. Visit homes from the 17th
century. Daily. Call 7174060 / 790-2018
Bonaire Museum onKaya J. v.d. Ree, behind
the Catholic Church in town. Open weekdays
from 8 am-noon, 1:30-5 pm. Tel. 717-8868
Washington-Slagbaai National Park,
Museum and Visitors' Center. Open
daily 8 am-5 pm. Closed on December
25th. and January 1st. Call 788 9015 or
796 5681

CLUBS and MEETINGS
AA meetings every Wednesday at
7pm. Phone: 786-4651 or 786-7971
Al-Anon meetings every Monday
evening at 7 pm. Call 790-7272
Weekly Bonaire Talker Gathering
and Dinner at Gibi's Tuesday 6:30
pm call 567-0655 for directions.
Bridge Club Wednesdays, 7:15
pm- All levels, NAf2,50, call Renata at
796-5591 to find out the evening's loca-
tion.
Darts Club plays every other Sunday
at City Cafe. Registration at 4, games at
5. Tel. 717-2950, 560-7539.
JCI First Wednesday of the Month-
Junior Chamber International Bonaire
(JCI Bonaire, formerly known as Bonaire
Jaycees) meets at the ABVO building,
Kaminda Jato Baco 36 from 7:30 to 9:30
pm. Everyone is welcome. Contact: Re-
nata Domacass6 516-4252.
Kiwanis Club meets at APNA Plaza,
Kaya International, every other Tues-
day, 7 pm. Tel. 717-5595, Jeannette
Rodriguez.
Lions Club meets every 2nd and 4th
Thursday of the month at 8 pm at Kaya
Sabana # 1. All Lions welcome. For more
information call 510-0710.
Rotary lunch meetings Wednesdays, 12
noon-2 pm Divi Flamingo Beach Re-
sort upstairs in Peter Hughes meeting
room above the dive shop. All Rotarians
welcome. Tel. 717-2066
Toastmasters Club meets every two
weeks. For more information call Crusita
de Palm at 786-3827 or Lucia Martinez
Beck, at 786-2953.


CHURCH SERVICES
Protestant Congregation of Bonaire:
Kralendijk, Wilhelminaplein. In Papia-
mentu, Dutch, English, Sundays, 10 am.
Rincon, Kaya C.D. Crestian, in Papia-
mentu, Sundays, 8:30 am.
Children's club, Saturdays, 5 pm, in
Kralendijk
Sunday School, Sundays, 4 pm, in Rin-
con. Bible Study and Prayer meetings,
Thursday, at 8 pm, Kralendijk.
New Apostolic Church: Centro di
Bario Nord Salifia, Sundays, 10 am.
Services in Dutch. 700-0379.
International Bible Church of Bonaire,
at SGB High School auditorium (Kaya
Frater Odulfinus, off Kaya
Korona.) Sunday services in English at 9
am; Sunday evening prayer meeting at
Pastor's home, 7 pm. Friday, 6 to 8 pm,
Light & Life Club, children 5 to 12
yrs. Tel. 717-8332.
Catholic: San Bernardus in Kralendijk -
Services, Sunday at 8 am and 7 pm in
Papiamentu, 717-8304.
Our Lady of Coromoto in Antriol, Satur-
day at 6 pm in English. Mass in Papia-
mentu on Sunday at 9 am and 6 pm. 717-
4211.
Assembly of God (Asemblea di Dios):
Kaya Triton (Den Cheffi). In English,
Dutch & Papiamentu on Sunday at 10
am. Wednesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30
pm. 717-2194
Ministerio di Kristu Hesus Services
Sunday mornings at 10 am at Jong Bonaire
Youth Center in English, Dutch and Papia-
mentu. Preaching the full gospel. Contact:
786-2557.
Prayer and Intercession Church, in
English. A full Gospel Church located
temporarily at Kaya Alexandrit # 20,
Santa Barbara, Republiek. Services are
held on Sunday mornings from 10am
until 11:30am. Bible studies in English
are on Monday nights from 7 to 8 pm.
Contact: 717-3322
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter
-day Saints: Kaya Sabana #26, Sun-
days: 9 am Sacrament Ser-
vices (Translation to English and Papia-
mentu upon request) 10:20 Sunday
School, 11:15 RS/YM/YW/PH Primary
held from 10:20-12 noon Visitors Wel-
come: 701-9522 for Information


Send event info to:
The Bonaire Reporter
Email reporter@bonairenews.com
Tel:790-6518, 786-6125
or 790-8988


Who's Who on The Bonaire Reporter
Take The Reporter Home-1-year subscription: By mail to US $70; By mail to
Europe $150. By Internet $35 donation. For information about subscriptions, sto-
ries or advertising in The Bonaire Reporter, PO Box 407, Bonaire, Netherlands
Antilles; phone (599) 790-6518, 786-6125, E-mail: info@bonairereporter.com
The Bonaire Reporter, George DeSalvo, Publisher. Laura DeSalvo, Editor in
Chief. Address: P. 0. Box 407, Bonaire, Neth. Antilles. Available on-line at:
www.bonairereporter.com Published every two weeks
Reporters: Siomara E. Albertus, Bruce Bowker, J@n Brouwer, Wooy-Ling Choy,
Christie Dovale, Ackim Exner, Wine Fransen, Jack Horkheimer, Molly Bartikoski-
Kearny, Maria Koecks, Greta Kooistra, Jiri Lausman, Jerry Ligon, Jane Madden,
Maritza San Pedro, Michael Thiessen, Janet Thibault, Jane Townsend, Paul Wichers
Unattributed photos are by the editor or publisher.
Distribution: Yuchi Molina (Rincon), Elisabeth Silberie (Playa), Divi-Divi Air-
line
Housekeeping: JRA. Printed by: DeStad Drukkerij, Curaqao
2009 The Bonaire Reporter

rage I











SHOPPING and SERVICE GUIDE


AIRLINES
Divi Divi Air. Bonaire's "on time airline" with 16
flights a day between Bonaire and Curagao. Your
first choice for inter-island travel. Now flying to
Aruba.

APPLIANCES /TV/ ELECTRONICS and
COMPUTERS
City Shop, the mega store, has the island's widest
selection of large and small home appliances, furni-
ture, TV, computers, cell phones and more. Fast ser-
vice and in-store financing too.

BANKS
Maduro and Curiel's Bank provides the greatest
number of services, branches and ATMs of any Bon-
aire bank. They also offer investments and insur-
ance.

BEAUTY PARLOR
Hair Affair. Expert hair cutting, styling, facials and
facial waxing.

BICYCLE / SCOOTER/ QUADS
De Freewieler sells bikes and all kinds of bike ac-
cessories. They do professional repairs on almost
anything on two wheels. Have your keys made
here too.

CONTRACTOR
Equinox Bonaire-A USA licensed contractor for
hotels, restaurants, residential. On Time-Done
Right.

DELICATESSEN/DINING
Eli Deli -World Class delicatessen with 23 kinds of
cheeses, hams and salamis from around the world.
Have a sandwich or salad there or take it home.
Breakfast too. At the traffic circle at hotel row.
717-3997.

DINING
Bistro di Paris A real French restaurant with af-
fordable prices and friendly Bonairean ambiance
Owned and operated by a French Chef
On Kaya Gob. Debrot mile north of town

Pasa Bon Pizza is Bonaire's best. Freshly prepared
pizzas made with the finest ingredients. Salads, desserts.
Eat in or take away. Nice bar too. 780-1111 Call ahead
to eat-in or take out, Next to Bistro (above)
Lunchroom de Bonairiaan-Breakfast & lunch
prepared and served by Stichting Project students
under professional guidance. Monday-Friday, 9-2.
Kaya Gob. N.Debrot, opposite Divi Flamingo.

DIVING
Carib Inn is the popular 10-room inn with top-notch
dive shop and well stocked retail store. Best book
trade on Bonaire. Good prices on regulator repair,
dive computer H.Q.


ScubaVision Document your Bonaire vacation
above and below the water with a custom DVD by
Bonaire's top videographer, Hendrik Wuyts

FITNESS TRAINER
Tina Woodley is a certified personal trainer, includ-
ing Pilates, Yoga and is an NLP practitioner. She'll
help you improve your body and life! Tel. 700-5488

FRAMING
Gladys's Art Shoppe Fine framing by experienced
craftsmen/artists. Outstanding selection of framing
materials for your treasures. Kaya Rotterdam 10,
Hato.

GARDEN SUPPLIES AND SERVICES
Green Label has everything you need to start or
maintain your garden. They can design, install and
maintain it and offer plants, irrigation supplies and
garden chemicals. Now in new expanded location off
Kaya Industria.

HEALTH
Harmony House-The herb and mineral center.
Help your body heal itself.

Natural Way Health Store-The place where all
the hard to find natural and healthy products are.
Upstairs from Botika Bonaire, on Kaya Grandi.

HOME CARE
Bonaire Second Home Care can handle all the
needs of second home owners on Bonaire including
inspection, management and cleaning.

INTERNET AND CELLULAR SERVICE
Digicel has the most subscribers, widest choice of
calling plans and interesting phones. Visit their of-
fice on downtown Kaya Grandi and see for yourself.

MIO offers by far the clearest, most reliable phone
signal on the island PLUS WIRELESS HIGH-
SPEED INTERNET almost everywhere on Bonaire.

PEST CONTROL
Professional Pest Control. Call Peter to get rid of
all those nasty pets like termites, fleas, ticks and ants
that want to invade your home. Call now and save
your investment in your home.

PHOTO FINISHING
Paradise Photo in the Galeries Shopping Center
downtown offers fast, fine processing for prints,
slides, items and services. Full digital services.

REAL ESTATE / RENTAL AGENTS
Bonaire Sunshine Homes is the realtor with a local
touch. Ask them to show you the good value homes
they list. Call them if you are thinking of selling
your home.


Caribbean Homes, "the Refreshing Realtor," spe-
cializing in luxury homes, condos, lots, rentals and
property management.

4 Sale By Owner -Assistance for selling your house
on your own.

Sunbelt Realty offers full real estate, rental, and
insurance services. If you want a home or to invest
in Bonaire, stop in and see them.

RETAIL
Benetton, world famous designer clothes available
now in Bonaire at prices less than those in US. For
men, women and children.

Best Buddies and Pearls-Stunning fresh water
pearl jewelry, fashion, gifts, t shirts. Wonderful ser-
vice, free gift wrap.

STORAGE
The Storehouse (Mangazina in Papiamentu) offers
Secure Storage For Vehicles, Household Items, Div-
ing And Sporting Gear, Business Files or Inventory.
Across from the northern hotel row.

SECURITY
Special Security Services will provide that extra
measure of protection when you need it. Always
reliable.

SHIPPING
Rocargo Freight Air and sea shipments in/out of
Bonaire. Customs agents. Professional and efficient.
FedEx agent. What would we do without their
superb services?

SUPERMARKETS
Warehouse Supermarket on Kaya Industria-
Biggest air conditioned market with the, largest se-
lection and lowest prices on the island.

WATER TAXI
Get to Klein Bonaire by Ferry. Ride the Kantika
di Amor or /, 'r. Hotel pickup. Easiest landing on
Klein Bonaire with built-in ramp

WINES
Antillean Wine Company. You've tried the rest;
now try the best: best prices, highest quality wines
from around the world, kept in a cooled warehouse.
Free delivery. Kaya Industria 23, Mon.-Sat. 9 am-
noon.
To learn more about these businesses check their ad
in this issue of The Reporter
Fortnightly Advertisers in The Bonaire Reporter are
included in the guides. Free!
Call 790-6518, 786-6518
Or email Reporter@BonaireNews.com


Scuba Sales
Repair Replacement
New Gear Accessories

Check CARIB INN First.
Great Prices -Great Stock

Always Great Values
Dive gear specials t



CARIB INN
Since 1980
PADI 5 STAR GOLD PALM
717-8819 8 am to 5 pm daily
(next to Divi Flamingo Hotel)


Pasa Bon Pizza

&Bar

780-1111
Water Front

To Town j ka)ya Gob Debirl HolL.


Not Just Great Pizzas!


Call ahead
to
Pre Order

Open Wednesday to Sunday
5 PM to 11 PM


AFFORDABLE
* Domain Registrations
* E-mail Hosting
* Anti-Spam & Anti-Virus
* Web Site Design
* Web Site Hosting
* Marketing Consulting
* Internet Consulting
* Photographic Services
* Graphic Design

5 NetTech N.V.
info@NetTech.an
www.NetTech, an
Tel: 717-6773
_ Fax: 717-7854


Hair Affair

We do our best to
make your hair and make-
up wishes come true!!
You can also come in for facials and
facial waxing.
We use and sell L'Oreal products
Is your plan to marry on the island?
We can make you beautiful and stay
beautiful for your happiest day.

Personal attention by Janneke
Appointment by tel: 717-5990
or just walk in.
Downtown, near the waterfront
next to Little Havana
Tues-Fri: 9-12, 2-6 Sat: 9-2 non stop


Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009


Page 18












B onaire Sunshine Homes opened M. ......
their Affordable Homes Expobl Hes Expo
Friday, November 27, with guests b"la I


trom the press, the government, the
construction industry, potential buyers
and friends.
On hand to answer questions about
building these affordable homes was
Kayam Babooloa, the director of
Tiahco of Trinidad, the company that
supplies the prefabricated materials to
build a home for under NAf 100.000.
At the Expo there were one-on-one
meetings with buyers and personnel
from Tiahco Trinidad, product
workshops on the building system and
a Product in Depth discussion with
stakeholders in the industry, including
RBTT and Banco di Caribe.
Bonaire Sunshine Homes Director
Vicky Bissessar declared the Expo a
success with the first home to begin in
January 2010. 0 Laura DeSalvo


At the opening: Kayam Babooloa,
Director of Tiahco; James Fines;
Commissioner Pancho Cicilia; Vicky and
Tulsie Bissessar


Commissioner Pancho Cicilia cuts the ribbon while Sunshine Homes partners,
Vicky Bissessar and James Fines, approve!


Referendum Preparation (Continued from page 3)
Asked if they could help with negotia-
tions between Bonaire and Holland, the
UN representatives said they had not been
invited to join in the negotiation process
and that they must be invited to do so.
Several in the stakeholder group thought
that this might be a productive way to end
the impasse that seems to be in place now.
UN visitors mentioned that while this
referendum is not "legally binding" all the
political parties they have talked with have
agreed to follow the vote of the commu-
nity on this referendum.
Several members from the tourism in-
dustry were present and said they had



Bonu H


I


Question (from page 7):
Q) In which year was the
original light house built?
I Answer:
1868


great concern that the primary industry of
the island, which provides most of the
jobs, could be severely injured in future,
specifically if the airport runway is not
repaired soon. When discussing possible
independence for the island, concern was
voiced because of the proximity of Bon-
aire to Venezuela and also the lack of re-
sources since the primary industry is tour-
ism.

Questions UN asked the stakeholders:
1. Does the public have sufficient
knowledge to make an informed decision?
Answer from stakeholders was a clear
"No." Recent student research supports



Sudoku Solution

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this position. In a separate meeting the
Bonaire press corps agreed with the stake-
holders on this point, emphasizing that
unbiased information was simply not
available to them.
2. Is voting process on the island clean?
Most of the stakeholders said "Yes.
They thought there were no problems like
the UN sees in other countries where there
is intimidation, stuffing of ballot boxes,
etc.
3. Is news media on the island impar-
tial? Stakeholders reported that most of
the print media supported a particular
political party and one of the radio sta-
tions seems to have a clear bias. It was



Regular *


Water Taxi

TO KLEIN BONAIRE
From Bonaire Nautico Manna

HOTEL
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SSERVICE
TRIPS

Day
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Up to 27 people and supported by
a brand new larger sister
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Up to 50 people
Daily trips via resorts 10 am, 12, 2
pm Except Sundays at 10 am only
Also available for group trips
YACHTSMEN!
Tie up dockside
for min. $10/day+tax
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also noted that most media do not have
full time reporter staff to provide in- depth
reporting, a point agreed on by the press.
4. What is the public's view of this UN
visit? Stakeholders were glad to see the
UN on Bonaire and also asked for further
involvement by the UN in phrasing of the
referendum questions) as well as help in
developing and monitoring the educational
process.
5. The UN wanted to know if the Janu-
ary election for Staten (Parliament in Cu-
racao) might have an effect on referen-
dum. Most stakeholders thought it
probably would, for several different
reasons. 0 Jane Townsend


Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009


777


Page 19












ULo- L- ....Klein Bonaire- 10 Years
t has been 10 years
Grnt since Klein Bonaire
was purchased back from a
private owner who wanted
Alyssa Mol li to develop it. Luckily this
Molli L did not happen, because _______
any development would .- -- --._..
damage the reefs surround- =
SMagie ing this unique island. ,am


Through the effort of the
Foundation for the Preser-
vation of Klein Bonaire
(FPKB), the island was
purchased for the people of
Bonaire in 1999. Most of
the money came from a


The CIEE students who presented their research


CIEE provides Bonaire with something it's always needed- a professional aca-
demic research facility and personnel who can carry out research. On Novem-
ber 24, 10 of the students at the CIEE offered very interesting public presentations of
their recent work in Bonaire. It was a valuable contribution to our knowledge of the
land and sea environment.
Alison Masyr (Oberlin College, Ohio) Traditional Datu cactus (Ritterocereus gri-
seus ) fences reduce run-off rates and transport of sediment and nutrients on hillsides
in Bonaire" Showed the importance of the Yatu cactus in the prevention of water run-
off and subsequent reef damage.
Alyssa Adler (Oregon State University) "Habitat use, nocturnal behavior, and dif-
ferences between phases of five common parrotfish species in Bonaire" Described
parrotfish assemblages on a coral reef near Playa Lechi.
Aurora Schramm (Eckerd College, Florida) "The effects of the lunar cycle on
plankton abundance, diversity, and daily , ,a,. ,,0 in the coastal waters of Bonaire"
Checked whether densities of zooplankton are influenced by the phases of the moon.
Carolina "Lina" Yanson (Indiana University) "Determining how coral reef habitat
structure correlates with fish species richness at 6 dive sites in Bonaire" Was a survey
of many dive sites on the leeward side of Bonaire to test whether the diversity of fish
on those reefs is influenced by habitat diversity or complexity.
Chelsey Weathersbee (Wofford College, South Carolina) "Sleeping in a bubble:
unraveling the secrets ofparrotfish at night" Investigated the nighttime mucus cocoon
-making behavior of parrotfish. Her findings show that parrotfish in cocoons are found
on the reef slope more often than the reef flat.
Grant Frank (Colorado College) "Habitat choice, size distribution, color variance,
and feeding behavior of Gymnothorax moringa, in coastal waters of Bonaire" Was an
in-depth study on the spotted moray eel (Gymnothorax moringa) between Playa Lechi
and the Something Special dive site.
Maggie Thomas (Trinity College, Connecticut) "A comparative study of benthic
community composition and habitat utilization by coral reef fish on artificial reefs ver-
sus natural reefs of Bonaire" Described how artificial and natural reef areas affect fish
diversity and number.
Mollie Sinnott (Wake Forest University, North Carolina) "How does water quality
correlate with coral disease, bleaching, and macroalgal growth on reefs? A compara-
tive study of various threats from human activities on Bonaire" Expanded upon the
CIEE faculty and staff monitoring of water quality. A few of her results showed that at
times water quality approached levels almost too polluted for safe swimming.
Noelle Hawthorne (Bucknell University, Pennsylvania) "Hawksbill turtle
(i ,. i ii.... II. / imbricata) nests: nutrient sources and drivers of community structure in
a tropical marine system" worked with Sea Turtle Conservation Bonaire monitoring
hawksbill nest sites on Klein Bonaire.
Pamela Williams (University of Colorado at Boulder) "Christmas tree worms
(Spirobranchus giganteus) and their role as bio-indicators of environmental stress on
coral reefs of Bonaire" was interested in determining whether there was a marine
equivalent to "bioindicators" in the waters of Bonaire. She showed that the Christmas
tree worms have promise to do just that. U G.D.
Page 20


grant from the Netherlands
and the World Wildlife Fund. Money
was also donated by individuals through
FPKB. Very strict conditions were
placed on what could and could not be
done on Klein Bonaire.

Since those 10 years many new faces
have arrived on Bonaire with new ideas
and perhaps they are not aware of the
conditions for Klein.

According to the agreement signed
between the island government and
WNF/FPKB, Klein Bonaire was to be
designated as a protected area by the
island government, which happened
when it was made a part of the National
Park.

It is to be kept in a pristine and unin-
habited condition with no buildings al-


Klein Bonaire as seen by approaching planes


lowed. No docks or piers plus many
other restrictions, all designed to keep
this unique island natural so everyone
can enjoy it for decades to come. There
are monetary fines if any of these condi-
tions are violated.
The tranquility of Klein Bonaire is
being threatened by overuse, especially
during cruise ship season. Most do not
realize it but Klein Bonaire is the largest
uninhabited and undeveloped island in
the Caribbean. Those are really big brag-
ging rights that no one else can claim.
As more and more areas get over devel-
oped, more and more problems are cre-
ated. Let's keep Klein Bonaire natural as
so many of us have known it for so
many years. You won't find another
place like it! That in itself is priceless. U
Bruce Bowker
Bruce Bowker FPKB President.


s Saudy ecme 9-20,73 prn2


**** CAsEAN HOMES ROCARGO
' a - -.. SERVICES N.V.


Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009

















The Blue 1958 Chevrolet Belair Impala
I ie; 5V' o i t.'/ 'riL' Boil.lie Re ii ," ,,h'U I.L/'. hi' i ./ii U Ib'iiL'vr./,,, IIi., %t) ; .'n / lIiiirE,"L''
iiii,'r,'Hi, vehicl, thiit\ l r,' "'M i,,'h,',l' "" If ill he reach 10/0ri t/ts.">


,''-- f.,


I,,'t '//i/III '% t O/f i .t' hhle L' IIIL't'lrI l" II. I/IL l,' ouII I' tf/ it' EiirI fit tl '
IIIdiL'l/Iliii r, L'l" f ht. i; if li'Ihi II'Ifls /iIA'II t.II i/Ih 14 t/ .Ihll' 200/.
Those l/ 1s the, i."11- i ,'paIrk'ed on 11e" w hard o/ fim ,o aion
WmUwherIL' in \ 'Oort.d II.%Iifia. I hen't i/ I L 'ehai /IeId ,iiI/I l hedit) Ip-
peL'r"Iler in Pli/I Pahi o Pltis. Thin i'Etsi ihe /firtime I//he/ Imptlhtl
thowll'L'ld It'l Ilft L' It) IIlt'.


7..
.3.


Noord-Salifia/Playa Pabou
Kralendijk -

So it was on one of those
lazy days back in July that
I drove the reliable black 1987
Jeep Wrangler six-cylinder 4.0
liter over those unpaved small
roads of Antriol, Den Tera, Men-
tor, Nawati and Noord-Salifia. It
was siesta time and hot. Nobody
around. All dogs too sleepy to
bark. It was easy to avoid crush-
ing, flattening and squashing a
bunch of baby chickens unex-
pectedly crossing the road. Sec-
ond gear, a thousand revs and
the miles countable on the fin-
gers of two hands. Clouds of
dust, waving curtains, the sound
of a remote radio, weeds, trunks,
little piles of garbage and piled
up old iron, cars waiting for re-
pair or restoration...


Then I noticed some nice metal
curves and chrome shining in the
sun. It was hard to reach the lo-
cation but finally I was able to
find the entrance and to park the
Jeep. No fence. No living crea-
tures except two dogs. A humble
house, doors and windows shut.
Yelling: "Bon tardi!" did not
help. Honking was useless.
There was the car, but this was
not my property. I yelled again
and again to be sure that nobody
was there. The dogs did not
bother me. No neighbors, no
nothing. Then I grabbed my
camera and with all the courage I
could find I entered the terrain.

There she was: an all American
vehicle, sprayed metallic blue.
Not the original color for sure.
Brand: Chevrolet. Wrap around
windows in the rear and in front.
A coup model. Late 50s.


Checkered flags on the side. Six
round tail lights. And a very spe-
cial and good looking original
air vent on the roof, above the
window. The license plate read:
RCJ 123. I shot some pictures
and later stored them in my com-
puter.

About half a year later I got in
touch with the owner of a Cadil-
lac Eldorado and we got to know
each other better and better. Not
in the least case because of our
love for the metal on wheels. So
I informed him about the Chev-
rolet and I sent him the pictures.
The guy was sure this was a very
rare Chevrolet Biscayne! So on
one hot Sunday we jumped in
the car and went to the hard-to-
find location. In the end we
found out that we had found the
right location but that the vehicle
had disappeared. Some marks


\\c' Ic ll II 111C 'I ,I O 1 ik C,11
ihad piobaibl .Itl 'icccl\ ik.bcc.ii
c n'lllO d. No%\\ tlic 11 ic'll%
Stlei d It 0 Ito iiniLti(tlis FoI il'i llts
I c leckd 111\ books aild hic
inrienil Fiiull I camI Io ih1C
colicluLsion Illi Ih. 1 l,,pc11CI Cji
a\;s ( lic%.\ iolc. Bclj Ii |,i),li
bLili ii 111i5% ()4-II C I IIll i

A fi I ;I l.e \\ cckl ; u '-i led
nie o aniolhici location The cii
was found again! The new loca-
tion was: Playa Pabou. The
owner was Pierre A. Rigaud,
director of Mr. Bug Pest control
services. And the car had a little
sign behind one of the side win-
dows: "For sale 510 5562."
Mister Rigaud really loved the
car but this car was one among
others. On Curaqao Pierre Ri-
gaud also had some special cars
and finally he had to decide to
sell this Impala which is be-
lieved to be unique on the is-
lands of the Netherlands Antil-
les.

The car came all the way from
Colombia. The license plate
reads: "RCJ 123 Barranquilla"
and a sticker on one of the win-
dows tells us that the last time a
Colombian owner paid his pesos
for road tax was in April 1995:
"Certificado de movilizacion."
The body of this Impala is de-


I__'n(d \(1% c .ll Ti. lcunl al'
h.cc.k SOnc hilhlliiui likc k
fioiit I like hc i ici EseIcc Ill%
ilic illp .niiid hk Ill \i llc The C<11
is iI ll ililii_' coidlilioii Thiosc
d ki1s bick III ihc Liilc 5I ,ihc
I llllClcC, 1c ,I cql-II )l)cd%11 lih,
hi tp'hi Ol|llII \ .X ,' block lin-
l 11 OIl ,NIlC OlllCOllC COil%\ Cll CI II
1o ;a ti\-CN\ Ilidel \\ ihi oII cllcd
llcadcI.i SO hlc. $Olllld 01 IlllllIC
liiIc'l hliK bOniici l Iall l, hIi TiK
engine is connected to a three-
speed automatic gearbox. The
cockpit is impressive. Loads of
gauges and hardly any plastic or
vinyl. Wrap-around windows in
the front and in the rear. A coup
version. Four side windows to
roll down completely. No win-
dow sills. Real and look-alike air
scoops on the sides, in the bon-
net and on the roof. Lots of
chrome. A huge rear end. Four
head lamps and six rear lights.
And again: nice curves. Quite a
lot of work to do. Hard to get the
car back to the original or con-
course condition. It
takes a lot of
"elbow grease" but
for sure this Belair
Impala is a nice
project.


Story & photos
by J(@n Brouwer


Why get just half an ad?
All Bonaire Reporter Ads are in
the printed paper and on the
Internet too.

Your advertisement can be here
and reach thousands of people
who are buyers.

3,000 copies every issue, 2 x per month!

Call Laura at 790-6518
Email: info@bonairereporter.com

Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009


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Page 21


I I















t was a festive celebration, November
27, to commemorate 10 years of a
company helping to make the island a
more beautiful place with trees, plants and
flowers.

Agnes and Ap of Green Label just
opened their new shop on Kaya Industria
and invited their colleagues in the agricul-
tural department (LVV) and their faithful
clientele to help celebrate as a family.
Green Label has made a difference on
Bonaire. Gardens are flourishing and more
and more people are learning how to grow
things in this sometimes harsh environ-
ment. And the company has been a fine
friend to their staff, guiding their young- .......- AV
employees in the business.

Here's to many, many more years ofU'A
your "greening" Bonaire, Green Label!
Thanks for being here. MLaura DeSalvo Presentation of a NAf 5.000 check to
STINAPA. Adults: Jeannette, Johan,
Agnes, Ap and Elsmarie




T wo wells near ---


X LVV in Amboina
tested as seriously pol-
luted by bacteria from
human sewage. The
pollution come from
enterococci bacteria,
which originates in the I
human intestinal tract.
The values measured ,
were well above safe '
drinking water stan-
dards,.
Environmental activist Sean Paton com-
missioned the study as part of his efforts to
stop Scientology Church ship Freewinds
from discharging its wastewater in Bonaire.
Paton had the water from nearby sources
analyzed by a competent laboratory.
He believes the pollution comes from the
trenches at LVV where wastewater from the
island's sewage tankers is dumped.
Water from the two wells at Flor di Cuba
and Mi Pasa Kontra are mostly used for
livestock, but no signs are posted saying it
is unfit for human (or animal) consumption.
Paradoxically the tests show that the Mi
Pasa Kontra well is the most polluted even
though it's further away from LVV.


Paton blamed the pollution on the Free-
winds and called for the closure of the two
wells.
The Church of Scientology-owned cruise
ship Freewinds is a frequent caller to Bon-
aire. Its visits are controversial, not only
because of its ownership, but because the
ship's sewage is pumped into trucks that
deposit untreated waste into trenches at
LVV. In its favor the Freewinds supports
numerous Bonaire activities and provides a
free venue for several charitable activities
during its times in port. Many Bonaire resi-
dents are friends with the ship's permanent
personnel and feel the Freewinds is a good
friend to the island. U G.D.


Celebrating 10 years of Green Label-Some of the Green Label Staff and chil-
dren. Agnes (green dress) andAp (white shirt) in front of the
logo on the new building



PEfiMu ijfiMLWQS Pi1Qiitiflllsi


A s we go to
press the
Divi-Divi com-
muter plane that
crashed in October
has yet to be raised.
A broken robot _.
control cable and -
strong currents in m --
the area have hin- .--
dered the operation. -
The robot made a Underwater robot dangling from Smit salvage tug
successful observa-
tion of the aircraft and was able to view When the new cable is installed an-
the pilot Robert Mansell still strapped in other attempt will be made to raise th
his seat. When he ditched the plane he plane. The embargo against on-site n
was knocked unconscious and couldn't coverage was lifted after a complaint
be released. All nine passengers were the Bonaire press corps. We will rep
safely rescued, progress on The Reporter website. (


be
ews
by
ort
G.D.


Ronald
Verhoeven

Paintings
Bonaire



Tel. 7172886
Cel. 7884263


E-mail-
ronaldverhoeven@
fmlsn.com


Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009


J


Page 22











B= "ALNi I RE




*to find it... just look up

Don't Miss the Best Meteor Shower of the Year Next Week! and
How to Find Neptune Using Jupiter as a Finder


Boy oh boy, have we ever got two cosmic goodies for you. On Sunday night, December
13th, and early Monday morning, December 14th, you will have an opportunity to see
the best meteor shower of the entire year, the Geminids. So named because they appear to
come from the constellation Gemini the Twins. Plus the following weekend, the 19th, 20th
and 21 st, Jupiter will be so close to Neptune to find Neptune just find Jupiter.
On this Sunday night about 10 pm face east where you'll see winter's most famous constel-
lation, Orion the Hunter, renowned for the three equally spaced stars, lined up in a row,
which mark his belt. If you shoot an arrow down through those stars you'll land on the bright-
est star we can see, Sirius, which marks the eye of Orion's bigger dog. And close to Sirius is
the bright star, Procyon, which marks the eye of Orion's smaller dog. Plus just to his left two
not-quite-as-bright stars, Castor and Pollux, the two brightest stars of the Gemini Twins.
And it is from this constellation that the Geminid meteor shower will appear to originate.
And this year it should be super good because there will be no moonlight whatsoever to wipe
out even the faintest meteors. In fact when it is at its peak some may actually see up to 75
meteors per hour.
Now the Geminid shower is one of those rare showers, which is frequently good before
midnight as well as after. But this year I'd suggest you watch from about 10 o'clock in the
evening until dawn Monday if you can. It will be better if you get far away from lights, lie
back in a lawn chair or sleeping bag and slowly scan the sky, no binoculars or telescope
needed. And if you stay out for a couple of hours you should be able to see several dozen. As
time goes by Gemini will rise higher and higher in the sky so that by 2 or 3 am it will be
super high above the horizon. Now although we know that almost all meteor showers occur
when our Earth rides through a stream of comet debris left in the orbit of a comet, the Gem-
inids are actually asteroid debris and appear every December when our Earth rides through
the stream of debris from asteroid Phaethon 3200. So we could call the Geminids an asteroid
shower.
And now for you planet aficionados who have never seen the 8th planet, Neptune. Get out
your small telescope on the 19th, 20th and 21st an hour after sunset, face southwest and aim
your telescope directly at super bright, 88,000-mile-wide Jupiter. And right beside it about
half a degree away you'll see a tiny bluish green spot of light and that is 31,000-mile-wide
Neptune. And the reason it appears so tiny is because while Jupiter is only half a billion
miles away, Neptune is six times farther, almost three billion miles away. 0
Jack Horkheimer


:~~ ~7?Z~


By Astrologer Michael Thiessen
For December 2009

ARIES (Mar. 21- April 20) Don't hesitate to go ahead with any plans for entertain-
ment. Your honesty will not only win you points but also respect. Compromise may
be necessary. You will gain knowledge through your adventure.
Your luckiest events this month will occur on a Wednesday.
TAURUS (Apr. 21- May 21) You might not be as reserved on an emotional level
as you'd like. Try looking into new ways to make extra money. Dinner, theater, or a
comedy club may be just the place. You will tend to overeat this month. Your lucki-
est events this month will occur on a Wednesday.
GEMINI (May 22-June 21) Gambling will be a waste of time and money. Sit
back and observe, regardless of how hard that might be. Don't be disappointed if you
don't get your way emotionally. You may find yourself in an opportune position if
you are willing to take a bit of a risk. Your luckiest events this month will occur on a
Tuesday.
CANCER (June 22-July 22) Think hard before going into business with friends
or family. You will be a bit of a spendthrift this month. Do not let them in on your
plans if you want things to run smoothly. You may find yourself in an opportune
position if you are willing to take a bit of a risk. Your luckiest events this month will
occur on a Thursday.
LEO (July 23-Aug 22) Don't try to deal with important issues or make changes
that will upset the apple cart. Opportunities for romance may develop through deal-
ing with groups that have a purpose. You will be able to communicate well this
month. Take a second look; difficulties with appliances, water, or electricity in your
home may be evident. Your luckiest events this month will occur on a Tuesday.
VIRGO (Aug. 23 -Sept. 23) Changes in your residence may be financially favor-
able. Risks will not be profitable. Don't be too pushy or demanding, or you may find
yourself all alone. You may have a hard time relating to children this month. Your
luckiest events this month will occur on a Friday.
LIBRA (Sept. 24 -Oct. 23) Avoid lending or borrowing. Uncertainty regarding
your mate may emerge; reevaluate what you see in each other. You have a real need
to be vocal. You can make money if you put your savings into conservative invest-
ments. Your luckiest events this month will occur on a Sunday.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24 Nov. 22) Avoid getting too close to coworkers or employ-
ers. Mishaps due to preoccupation will be upsetting. Catch up on correspondence.
Don't overspend on luxury items. Your luckiest events this month will occur on a
Thursday.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23 -Dec. 21) Try not to say the wrong thing at the wrong
time. You will get out of shape easily if you don't keep on top of things. Trips will
be exciting. Be cautious who you deal with financially. Your luckiest events this
month will occur on a Tuesday.
CAPRICORN (Dec 22.- Jan. 20) Overindulgence could cause problems for you
with your loved ones. Property deals look good. Self-improvement projects will pay-
off in more ways than one. It's time to get yourself back on track.Your luckiest
events this month will occur on a Friday.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 -Feb. 19) Arguments with relatives may lead to a split in the
family. Someone you least expect may not have your best interests at heart. Make
creative changes to your living quarters. You may have a problem with coworkers if
you try to tell them what to do. Your luckiest events this month will occur on a Fri-
day.
PISCES (Feb. 20-Mar. 20) Don't overindulge in eating. A romantic dinner, fol-
lowed by a quiet evening with the one who is enticing you, should be most satisfy-
ing. You hard work and dedication will payoff, so stick to your guns and do your job
well. Do a little investigating if there is someone at work you don't trust. Your lucki-
est events this month will occur on a Friday.


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Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009


Call For An Appointment 717-2248 or 786-3714
Page 2


eT:


14&*r4o



























W~hinggou a happg & health5


shing you a seasonpp & alt

Holiday season ~


,-HOMEsLtle


Open for evening

WEDNE5DA2 Y2


Shopping on

DECEAM1EK


- OfEN


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pm -


-Love ~ Freedom


Located at Kaga Amsterdam #25,
Tel: (+599) 717 5++9
Fax (+599) 717 +6+9
From Kralendjk center, take Kaga Grandi north towards
Hiato and 5abadeco. At the traffic circle turn right on Kaga
Amsterdam. AfterAkkerman's Togota showroom uou will find
us on the left hand side.


Bonaire Reporter- December 11-25, 2009


I


Page 24











FEMALE LOGGERHEAD 'HAPPY' IS THE


SECOND TURTLE TO BE


TRACKED IN 2005 NESTING SEASON


Volunteers Isaiah J. Pardo, Jose Bernabela, Andy Uhr and STCB staff Gielmon
"Funchi" Egbreghts releasing the adult female loggerhead fitted with a trans-
mitter sponsored by the Rotterdam Zoo.


Piedra So -

Golfing in the Wilds of Bonaire


t all started as
a hobby one
man's hobby. I used
to play golf in Hol-
land before coming
to Bonaire. Then,
when I was plan-
ning a trip back to
Holland after nine
years I wanted to
play golf with my
friends. But since it
had been so long
since I'd played, I
wanted to be pre-
pared. So I thought,
"I'll find a spot
where nobody can
see me practice -
somewhere far
away." I ended up
on the east coast at Punto Blanco where
the chicken farm is. There, in the middle
of nowhere, I saw an old stone wall and
on the other side of the wall there was a
green field! It was perfect! "Piedra
So" ("Just Stones"), the Bonairean Golf
Club was born.
Before I knew it, the word was out and
other people got involved. They started
working hard on making the course pro-
fessional and building a clubhouse. Now
it's an 18-hole golf link by the seaside.
It takes about three to four hours to walk
the whole course. There's a driving
range with driving range balls available.
On the first tee are concrete tee boxes.
The fourth hole has two bunkers on
each side. The fifth hole has a water
hazard, and there are lots of bushes and
cacti to lose your ball in.
While you play, a group of donkeys or
goats may be observing your progress.
It's a unique spot. The environment is
beautiful. It's like playing on the moon.
It can't be compared to anywhere else in
the world.
There are about 40 members. Once a
month a golf pro from Curaqao, Louis
Cannegieter, comes to teach for two
days. He gives clinics for beginners too.
Since the start of the year three instruc-
tors have been teaching 10 teens from
Jong Bonaire. The members would like
to see more people play golf- young-
sters, older people, and tourists of all
nationalities. Golf sets are available for
rent and transport can be arranged to


and from the course.
Piedra So is not trying to compete
with other places. This is not Miami or
Aruba. This is not a smooth terrain, and
it's not a fancy club. But it is a whole
new experience. It's sand and sea grass,
the sound of the sea, an eternal wind.
It's literally out of this world: unusual,
extraordinary and adventurous. If
you've been playing golf in other parts
of the world if you think you've "seen
it all," come to Piedra So and discover
what it feels like to play golf on Bon-
aire. For more information go to our
website: www.piedraso.com_(in Dutch).
Tel. 717-7972. DArtie DeVries


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 22














A VICious ATTACK
Dear Editor:
At 3 a.m. Monday morning, June
20th, I was awakened
by my dog's loud ,,
barking at something
that I assumed was in
our yard. I looked out
toward our side yard
and could see our dog
running back and forth barking into our
neighbor's yard next door. Our neighbor
is a kind elderly man who raises black-
bellied sheep and I could tell that there
was something in his yard chasing the
sheep. I went out and found a large Pit
Bull terrorizing the sheep and had al-
ready taken one down to the ground. I
began to throw rocks to try to get this
vicious animal to leave. That was not
going to work so I ran for my garden
hose and began to squirt the dog to keep
it away from the poor defenseless ani-
mal. The rest of the sheep were huddled
together in a comer. A friend who was
staying with me heard the noise and
came outside, too and she began shout-
ing at the dog. With the noise and wa-
ter continually pelting him, he left, es-
caping through the hole in the fence he'd
entered. I then went over into the yard to
check on the downed sheep. I saw that
its neck was ripped open, blood was
flowing out as it struggled to breathe. Its
right eye had been gouged out as well
and I knew it had little chance of sur-
vival. I also found a newborn lamb, that
had been born the day before, dead of a
broken neck. I then tried to pile some


larger rocks and wood into the hole to
keep the beast out.
I went back into the house about 4 a.
m. and prayed that the animals would be
unharmed but that would not be the case.
About an hour later, I could hear a
ruckus again but did not venture out. I
was trying to keep my dogs from bark-
ing and waking my sleeping husband
and house guest. I sorely regret that now
for at daybreak when I looked out the
window I could see two sheep lying on
the ground with others obviously hurt. A
young man, who lives adjacent to the
elderly neighbor, was now in the yard
yelling and swinging a stick at two
dogs that were in the yard one was the
Pit Bull and the other his dog that had
come through the hole in the fence. By
now, the Pit Bull had completed the fe-
rocious attack and the other dog was just
there to loudly bark. The young man,
who knew this awful dog, picked him up
and threw him over the fence along with
his own dog. He then went to check the
wounded sheep. I went out and looked
over the fence to see 4 sheep down, ob-
viously dead and 3 others near death, 2
of them had their necks snapped, blood
everywhere.
It was now about 6 am and my
neighbor had now come outside because
he had heard the young man's cursing
and loud voice. He too saw the awful
site and returned inside to call the police.
They arrived in about 10 minutes and
began to question those who were there
and to count the sheep that were at-
(Continued on page 5)


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 4


I LETTERS I













DINING GUIDE
RESTAURANT PRICE RANGE / WHEN OPEN FEATURES
Want your restaurant listed here? It's easy and not expensive Call The Reporterat 717-8988 or 791-7252 for info
Bella Vista Restaurant Moderate. Breakfast and Lunch Magnificent Theme Nights: Saturday: Beach Grill; Monday: Caribbean
Sea Side Restaurant at Buddy Dive Resort Dinner during Theme nights only. Night; Friday: Manager's Rum Punch Party
717-5080, ext. 525 Open every day and All-You-Can-Eat B.B.Q
Bistro de Paris Moderate Real French Cooking in an informal setting
Kaya Gob. N. Debrot 46 Lunch and Dinner Superb dishes prepared with care and love by a French chef
(half-way between hotel row and town) 717-7070 Closed Sunday Owner-operated Eat in or Take away
Brasserie Bonaire Low- Moderate Lunch and Dinner Lots of parking in big mall lot
Royal Palm Galleries Open 11 am -2:30 pm 5:30-9 pm Kitchen Open llam-2:30 pm, Dinner 5:30-9 pm
Kaya Grandi 26, Next to Re/Max, 717-4321 Closed Saturday and Sunday Breezy terrace with airco inside-Also serving big sandwiches at dinner
Calabas i Restaurant & Moderate-Expensive Get a view of the beach and turquoise sea while enjoying a breakfast buffet
At th ii aig ea Resran an aerfront Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner or a la carte lunch and dinner at the 'Chibi Chibi' restaurant & bar. Inspiring
At the D17-8285 Flamingo eac Resort. Waterfront Open 7 days vistas and the highest standard of cuisine.
Croccantino Italian Restaurant Moderate-Expensive Tuscan chef prepares exquisite dishes. Authentic ingredients and romantic
Downtown at Kaya Grandi 48 Dinner setting make dining a delight. Be served in a garden setting under floating
717-5025 Closed Monday umbrellas or in air-conditioned comfort. Takeouttoo.
On th Den Laman Moderate-Expensivner Creative cuisine on the seaside. Top chefs from Amsterdam cook in an open
On the water, just off the traffic circle Breakfast, Lunch Dinner modem kitchen featuring induction cooking. Seafood a specialty.
717-4106 Open 7 days modem kitchen featuring indition cooking. Seafood a specialty
The Great Escape Moderate Bar-Restaurant poolside -under the thatched roof. Cuban Chef prepares
EEG Blvd #97-across from Belmar Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner Caribbean cuisine. Champagne brunch on Sundays 10 am to noon.
717-7488 Open 7 days Happy hours 5 to 7 every day.
Hilltop at Caribbean Club Bonaire Moderate-Expensive Quiet country setting, lovely landscaping, friendly staff
On the Tourist Road, 2 mi. north of Town Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Happy Hour from 5-7 pm, BBQ on Tuesdays
717-7901 Closed Sunday Gourmet chef creates unique daily specials
The Last Bite Bakery Low-Moderate Enjoy a delicious dessert or savory baked meal in the comfort of your home
Home Delivery or Take Out Orders taken 8 am-4 pm; Deliveries 6-7:30 or resort. This unique bakery offers gourmet class items -always from
717-3293 pm Closed Sunday scratch- for take out or delivery only.
The Lost Penguin Low-Moderate Watch the bustle of downtown from this street side Caribbean-style bistro
Across from MCB Bank in downtown Kralendijk Breakfast, Lunch, Early Dinner owned and run by a European educated Master Chef
Call 717-8003. Closed Tuesdays & Wednesdays and his wife.
Pasa Bon Pizza Low-Moderate Bonaire's best. The Real Thing! Freshly prepared pizzas made with the finest in-
On Kaya Gob. Debrot Open from 5-11 pm Wednesday-Sunday gredients. Salads, desserts. Eat m or take away. Nice bar too.
1 mile north of town center. 790-1111Open from 5-1pm Wednesday-Sunday Call ahead to eat-in or take out 790-1111


S > 0 P P I N GF G I D E See advertisements in this issue
APPLIANCES/ TV/ ELECTRONICS/ COMPUTERS GARDEN SUPPLIES AND SERVICES RESORTS & ACTIVITIES
City Shop, the mega store, has the island's widest Green Label has everything you need to start or main- Buddy Dive Resort offers diving, Adventure Fun
selection of large and small home appliances. Fast tain your garden. They can design, install and maintain tours including kayaking, mountain biking, cave snor-
service and in-store financing too. it and offer plants, irrigation supplies and garden keling and exploration.
chemicals.
ART GALLERY GIFTS, SOUVENIRS AND LIQUOR RETAIL
Cinnamon Art Gallery non-profit gallery for local art- The Bonaire Gift Shop has an wide selection of Benetton, world famous designer clothes available
ists has continuous shows. Each month a new artist is gifts, souvenirs, liquor, dive watches, digital cameras, now in Bonaire at prices less than those in US. For
featured. Stop by. Free entry. things for the home, T-shirts all at low prices, men, women and children.
BANKS HOTELS SECURITY
Maduro and Curiel's Bank provides the greatest Golden Reef Inn is the affordable alternative with Special Security Services will provide that extra
number of services, branches and ATMs of any Bon- fully equipped studio apartments in a quiet Bonaire measure of protection when you need it. Always reli-
aire bank. They also offer investments and insurance, neighborhood. Just a 3-minute walk to diving and the able.
sea.
BEAUTY PARLOR e SHIPPING
Hair Affair. Expert hair cutting, styling, facials, The Great Escape
Hair Affair. Exsiert h nair care.utt Under new management. Quiet and tranquil setting Rocargo Freight Air and sea shipments in/out of
waxing and prossional nail care withpooland luxuriant garden in Belnem. Cyber Bonaire. Customs agents. Professional and efficient.
BICYCLE I SCOOTER/ QUADS Caf6, DVD rentals, restaurant and bar. FedEx agent.
De Freewieler rents scooters and quads; profession- MEK MAHIN P SUPERMARKETS
ally repairs almost anything on two wheels. Sells top b-Botte Construction Bonaire N., offers Tropical Flamino is convenient, clean, mode,
brand bikes. Have your keys made here. b c b- Botterop Construction Bonaire N.V., offers Toical Flm is convenient, clean, modem,
brand bikes. Have your keys made here. outstanding fabrication of all metal products, includ- efficient and has the lowest prices on Bonaire. Lo-
BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION ing stainless. Complete machine shop too. cated behind NAPA.
APA Construction are professional General Visit Warehouse Bonaire to shop in a large, spotless
Contractors. They also specialize in creating patios PHOTO FINISHING supermarket. You'll find American and European
and walkways with fabulous sprayed and stamped Paradise Photo in the Galeries Shopping Center of- brand products. THE market for provisioning.
concrete pavement. fers fast, fine processing for prints, slides, items and
services for your picture-taking pleasure. VILLAS
DIVING Bonaire Oceanfront villa for up to nine people: five
Carib Inn is the popular 10-room inn with top-notch REAL ESTATE I RENTAL AGENTS kitchens, five bathrooms. Ideal for divers.
dive shop and well stocked retail store. Best book trade Harbourtown Real Estate is Bonaire's oldest real
on Bonaire. Good prices on regulator repair, dive com- estate agent. They specialize in professional cus- WATER TAXI
puter H.Q tomer services and top notch properties. Get to Klein Bonaire by Ferry. Ride the Kantika di
Photo Tours Divers-Yellow Submarine -low Amor or Skiff. Hotel pickup.
prices on the seaside at Kralendijk, at Caribbean Mike Boom & Associates Broad assortment of
Club, Caribbean Court and the Hamlet Oasis. Join homes and properties. View on their website www. WINES
their cleanup dives and BBQ. bonairerealtv.com or office in town Antillean Wine Company. You've tried the rest;
WannaDive They make diving fun while maintain- now try the best: best prices, highest quality wines
ing tihe highest profession sta r. n to at Re/Max Paradise Homes: International/US connec- from around the world, kept in a cooled warehouse.
City Cafe and at Eden Beach. tions. 5% of profits donated to local community. Free delivery.
FITNESS Sunbelt Realty offers full real estate, rental, and in- YOGA
Bonfysio offers comprehensive fitness programs to surance services. If you want a home or to invest in Yoga For You. Join certified instructors Desirde and
suit your needs wheterthey be weight loss, sports or Bonaire, stop in and see them. Don for a workout that will refresh mind and body.
just keeping in shape. Convenient schedule. Private lessons too. Closed during June.
REPAIRS
Fit 4 Life at the Plaza Resort Mall. Classes in Pi- Bon Handyman is here if you need something fixed ATTENTION BUSINESSMENRWOMEN:
lates, Aerobics, TaeBo and more. Professional train- or built. Ultra reliable, honest and experienced. Elec- Put your ad in Theonaire eporter.
ers, fitness machines and classes for all levels. trical, plumbing, woodworking, etc. 717-2345 Phone/Fax 717-8988, Cel 791-7252


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 20







































2005 The Bonaire Reporter
Published weekly. For information about subscriptions, stories or
advertising in The Bonaire Reporter, phone (599) 717-8988, 791-
7252, fax 717-8988, E-mail to: Reporter@bonairenews.com The
Bonaire Reporter, George DeSalvo, Publisher. Laura DeSalvo, Edi-
tor in Chief. Address: Kaya Gob. Debrot 200-6; Bonaire, Neth. An-
tilles. Available on-line at: www.bonairereporter.com
Reporters: Albert Bianculli, Artie DeVries, Dodo, Jack Hork-
heimer, Greta Kooistra, L.M., Mabel Nava, Ann Phelan, Valarie
Stimpson, Michael Thiessen, Elisabeth Vos, Natalie A.C. Wanga
Features Editor: Greta Kooistra Translations: Peggy Bakker,
Sue Ellen Felix
Production: Barbara Lockwood
Distribution: Yuchi Molina (Rincon), Elizabeth Silberie (Playa);
Housekeeping: Jaidy Rojas Acevedo. Printed by: DeStad Druk-
kerij Curacao


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 16












ro Ie e66 T-
Kaa ob Dbot20 -E-al:reorerbna rnes- cm 77-98 SNCS19


Ii&


Th


INSIDE: Table of Contents pg 2
Bonaire Reporter Survey
Holloway Disappearance
& Antilles Law
Bonaire Barracuda News
I am the William Express
Youth Tennis Tourney
2nd Turtle Tracked is
named "Happy"


r/
4"


46- II























































































Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 16


2005 The Bonaire Reporter
Published weekly. For information about subscriptions, stories or
advertising in The Bonaire Reporter, phone (599) 717-8988, 791-
7252, fax 717-8988, E-mail to: Reporter@bonairenews.com The
Bonaire Reporter, George DeSalvo, Publisher. Laura DeSalvo, Edi-
tor in Chief. Address: Kaya Gob. Debrot 200-6; Bonaire, Neth. An-
tilles. Available on-line at: www.bonairereporter.com
Reporters: Albert Bianculli, Artie DeVries, Dodo, Jack Hork-
heimer, Greta Kooistra, L.M., Mabel Nava, Ann Phelan, Valarie
Stimpson, Michael Thiessen, Elisabeth Vos, Natalie A.C. Wanga
Features Editor: Greta Kooistra Translations: Peggy Bakker,
Sue Ellen Felix
Production: Barbara Lockwood
Distribution: Yuchi Molina (Rincon), Elizabeth Silberie (Playa);
Housekeeping: Jaidy Rojas Acevedo. Printed by: DeStad Druk-
kerij Curacao











(Responses to Balance. Continued from page 7)
gress at the expense of those resources,
more sooner than later we will encoun-
ter serious difficulties to find food,
drinkable water, breathable air or just a
nice landscape to enjoy. In other words,
those of us that are alive now, are abus-
ing nature and if we continue with this
model of development, our children and
grandchildren will pay the price and
live in worse conditions than the one
we are in now.

Bonaire doesn't escape to the world
development tendencies but we can
consider our selves in a position of
privilege. People and Government have
always been very proactive when it
comes to environment issues. As early
as 1961, Bonaire was enacting legisla-
tion to protect sea turtle eggs and nests.
In 1971, the Island Government of Bon-
aire banned destructive fishing prac-
tices like spear fishing and in 1975
made it illegal to break coral, take it
from the water or sell it. Since 1979
Bonaire has also a proactive Marine
Park that was declared demonstration
site for the United Nations Educational
Program in 2001.
Coral reefs are in great danger world-
wide, more than 10 % of the coral reefs
in the world are degraded beyond re-
covery and another 30 % are seriously
threatened to disappear in the near fu-
ture if we don't take radical actions.
Bonaire is in a better position than other
islands in the Caribbean and this fact
cannot be considered a coincidence.
Conservationist legislation and many
years of active management of the Ma-
rine Park are the causes of the good


condition of our reefs with out doubt.
The Government launched a strategic
plan for the future of Bonaire. This plan
implies extensive development in a
very sensitive area that can affect our
most valued economical resource, the
coral reef.
Unplanned development can exacer-
bate problems that we already have on
Bonaire. Sedimentation, storm water
runoff, excessive amount of nutrients,
inadequate solid garbage management,
bad construction practices, deforesta-
tion, over fishing are just examples of
what can happen, and the consequences
to the reef are irreversible. What we kill
today is gone forever and is not coming
back in our lifetime.
Economical development and nature
preservation is possible and these two
components can go along together. But
for that, ALL the stakeholders need to
sit together, discuses, decide and state
very clearly what kind of development
we want and who will be beneficiated.
We need to have clear not only
"WHAT" to do but also "HOW" we
want to do it. Where coastal develop-
ment is implemented and how it is man-
aged influence the degree of impact to
coral reef, and everybody knows what
coral reefs mean for Bonaire's people
and economy.
At the end of the day, we are all Man-
agers of the Marine Park. As Cousteau
said, "managing the parks is not about
managing the coral reef, it is about
managing ourselves".
Ramon DeLeon, Manager of the
Bonaire National Marine Park


DCNA Board Meeting on St. Eustatius

T he board of the Dutch Caribbean
Nature Alliance met on St. Eusta-
tius last week for its third meeting this
year. Founded February 2005, DCNA is
an umbrella organization for the Marine ." .
and Terrestrial Protected Areas (Parks) in i-.... -
St. Eustatius, Saba, St. Maarten, Bonaire
and Curaqao. Aruba is contemplating to
join forces with DCNA soon and sent Eg-
bert Boerstra from Parke Nacional Arikok
to the meeting as an observer. .
DCNA s' main goal is to acquire fund-
ing for sustainable Park Management in
order to ensure that the rich biodiversity of
species in the Dutch Caribbean will be
protected for the many years to come. At
the same time, by having all park organi-
zations represented on the board of
DCNA a broad and knowledgeable plat- DCNA Board in Statia
form is created which in turn will provide
a healthy climate for working together, learning from each other's organizations
and ultimately finding the synergy that will have a huge payoff for Nature Conser-
vation and Preservation in the Caribbean.

Funding
DCNA is currently involved in negotiations with the Dutch Ministery of Bin-
nenlandse Zaken and Koninkrijksrelaties to get them involved in financing nature
conservation in the Caribbean as follow-up to a motion to this effect adopted by
Dutch Parliament last year. The Dutch Postcode Loterij (PCL) is presently
DCNA's major contributor. With a 1.9 million Euro grant over three years from
the PCL, the organization will be able to sponsor important nature projects in the
Caribbean, like the sea turtle outreach project on Bonaire and the Windward is-
lands, which was funded through DCNA last year by the Truus en Gerrit van
Riemsdijk Foundation, a private organization
With Nature being one of the Caribbean's most important natural resources,
DCNA is not only an asset to Nature itself but also to the economic well being of
all islands who thrive by the commercial exploitation of Nature. 1 Press release


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 17











Reaction to Balance for Bonaire articles (Continued from page 6)
In "Finding Balance for Bonaire," Part 4, a closer look was taken at the Aruba
Model, presenting conclusions of a Tobago research and of an article of Robertico
Croes and Manuel Vanegas. Mr. "Tico"Croes served as the Finance Minister in the
last government, led by Henny Eman, and was recently interrogated about his pos-
sible involvement in a financial scandal concerning the never realized speedway
race track.. A judge in Miami decided in this matter that the government of Aruba
had to pay $20 million to a US investor. It is hard to understand that during the trial
the former transportation minister in the Eman's cabinet, Glenbert Croes, main pro-
moter of the failed project, testified against his own government(!!!).

Reading the conclusions of the Tobago report and of the mentioned article, one
could believe that the Aruba growth has been the result of strict pursuance of a de-
liberate strategy and a clear development plan and that, with the exception of some
miscalculation, the tourist development has been a big success, and that Aruba can
serve as a model for Bonaire when planning the future tourist development..

The fact is, however, that although Aruba does have a development plan, elabo-
rated more than 20 years ago, all tourist development during the last 20 years has
not been a result of a deliberate strategy and a development plan but rather of bitter
fighting between the two leading political parties, the Christian democratic AVP
and the socialist MEP. Since 1985, there have been three cabinets Eman ( prime
minister of all governments led by AVP) and three cabinets Oduber (prime minister
of all MEP-governments). The Oduber III cabinet is currently at the power and new
elections will come this year. It is a normal practice on Aruba that when the rival
party wins the election, the new government declares that the policy of the preced-
ing administration was completely wrong, that due to irresponsible decisions of the
previous government (mostly in connection with the new hotel construction) the
new administration has to pay millions of dollars to foreign banks and that a com-
pletely new policy has to be followed.

A good example of this practice are the both hotel moratoria (in 1986 and 1996),
mentioned in Finding Balance for Bonaire, Part 4. They were declared by the Eman
governments as reaction to, in their eyes, wrong tourism development under the
Oduber administrations. In 1996, the Eman administration went so far that it de-
cided to demolish three uncompleted large hotels at the Palm beach. The two tow-
ers of a new Ramada hotel were sold to the Divi group under the condition that the
larger tower, almost fully completed, would be demolished. It really happened (!)
and the smaller remaining tower operates now under the name Phoenix resort. It is
a paradox that the neighboring Wyndham hotel (former Concorde and later Hilton)
is currently negotiating with the government to get permission to build an annex to
its existing high rise building, practically at the site of the demolished Ramada
tower (!). The two remaining hotels were ultimately saved and taken over by the
Marriott group which under the current Oduber III administration, completely ig-
noring the moratorium taken by the previous Eman government, not only com-
pleted the construction but started, next to these hotels, to realize the gigantic four
stages time share project Ocean Club and Surf Club. The high buildings of the first
two stages now tower over the neighboring Holiday Inn resort.
Jiri Lausman
Next week the financial scandals that are costing Arubans millions


MAKE ALL DEVELOPMENT SUSTAINABLE

Dear Editor:
Sustainable development is not something
new. History is full of examples of cul-
tures that developed in a sustainable way;
that means, they progressed social and
economically, with out abusing the natural
resources. However, increased interest in
"development" shown by governments,
some world organizations and certain sec-
tors of the society results in the actual state
of deterioration of the planet and the dan-
ger it represent for mankind.
But, what is sustainable development?
It's the development that satisfies the Diver and Turtle at Kai
needs of those of us that inhabit the planet
today, with out compromising the capacity of future generations of satisfy theirs.
It's an alternative to face the crisis that this actual type of development that seeks
economical progress at all cost, has generated. This means that, the model of sus-
tainable development seeks the same economic progress, but controlling the use of
the natural resources.
The sustainable development model, as it was defined in 1992 in the Summit of
the Earth in Rio de Janeiro, stands in three very strong components. Sustainable
development is, of course, interested in a more balanced use of the natural re-
sources; but is also interested in a better distribution of the benefits generated and
more participation of the people in the making of decisions that affect them. This
makes sustainable development the way to a more fair and balanced society, with
less difference between rich and poor.
The actual model has us on the edge of the depletion of important resources, like
water, fossil fuel, fisheries stock, coral reefs, etc. and if we continue to seek pro-
(Continued on page 17)


The Bonaire Reporter Survey.
What do YOU think about Bonaire?


Last hnce tol
sumtfrmt


As a reader of The Bonaire Reporter you must care about the island.
Maybe you could help us with some of the consumer 'needs' research
mentioned in this series. It doesn't matter if you are a tourist or a resident.
Please fill out this questionnaire and mail it to Bonaire Reporter, Kaya Gob. De-
brot 200-6, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles (AN) or go on-line to hip \\ \\
bonairenews.com/survey.htm and e-mail your form to iul c' c boiniiicicpOilci
com. Dozens have already been received but we'd like some more.

1. Your nationality: Antillean US .DNetherlands Other:

2. Your age: Under 25 1.26-40 1.41-60 Over 60
3. Your sex: DM .F
4. Marital status Single []Married Widowed/Divorced In relationship
5. Years Scuba Diving 1 year or less D.2-5 years 5-10 years More than
10 years
6. Years windsurfing 1 year or less 2-5 years 5-10 years More than
10 years
7. Are you a [ Tourist Part time resident [ Full time resident .[Native Bo-
nairean
8. How much time do you spend on Bonaire in an average year?
1-2 weeks 3 to 4 weeks D 1 to 2 months 2 to 6 months
1 6 to 12 months
9. Number of people in your household or group when you are on Bonaire:

10. What year did you first come to Bonaire:
11. Why did you first come to Bonaire? .Dborn here parents moved here
D found a job here scuba diving tourist windsurfing tourist Other


12. What do you like MOST about Bonaire?



13. What do you like LEAST about Bonaire?



14. How satisfied are you with the following? Rate your degree of satisfac-
tions from 1 to 4, where 4 is extremely satisfied and 1 is not at all satis-
fied. Circle the appropriate number for each item.
Satisfaction
Low High


friendliness of the people
number of hotels
quality of hotels
number of restaurants
quality of restaurants
number of cultural activities
quality of cultural activities
activities for children
condition of the reefs
quality of the diving
quality of the environment
cleanliness of the island
quality of the roads
Internet service
telephone service
water and electric service
number of tourists
service attitude at businesses
personal safety
number of activities available
quality of activities available
number of diving locations
airline service to the island
quality of your Bonaire experience
Other
Other


1 2
1 2
1 2


15. What 'needs' do you have that are not currently being met by Bonaire?
Or, said another way, what could Bonaire do to get you to spend more
time on the island or for you to enjoy your time on Bonaire more?


16. What could Bonaire do to improve its tourism product so more people
would want to come to Bonaire? D


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 7












A Force for Good Activities sponsored by



SAMFO and the


NGO Platform

=Il1101 U01P Is lad Part of the continuing series on the


Community Issues in the

Care and Welfare Sector

A Reporter interview with Mr. Godfried 'Boy' Clarenda, the dy-
namic NGO representative for the Care and Welfare Sector of
Bonaire's NGO Platform.


Reporter: The sector Care and Welfare
contains more than just projects for the
senior citizens. The part of the youth and
problem prevention is not as well publi-
cized. Is that accurate?

Boy Clarenda: That's true! There were
indeed many more projects for the eld-
erly. Let me explain the concepts of the
Care and Welfare sector: People have
certain needs. The part of 'Care' reflects
what people require on daily basis to sur-
vive. The part of 'Welfare' is how citi-
zens feel: safe, comfortable, without fear
or anxiety in their daily lives. So you can
imagine how large the area is because
everyone has these needs.

A large part of achieving these two con-
cepts, care and welfare, is based on edu-
cation which should start at a very young
age, otherwise we will keep encountering
what we're dealing with nowadays: trou-
blesome youngsters; or the fact that we're
trying to extinguish those fires that have
started.


Reporter: The organization
'CoCaRi' (Comishon Cuido pa An-
sianonan di Rincon) a daily activity cen-
ter for the elderly in Rincon, in which
you are also the president, urgently
needs a bus. Sharing a bus with other
organizations as the NGO Platform pro-
posed is not an option due to the special
characteristics of Rincon (e.g. the dis-
tance, the needy target group which is
vulnerable etc.). Can you explain?

Clarenda: CoCaRi needs a bus, indeed.
The current bus is old. We're trying to


help groups to reach their goals as much
as possible. Scarcity means we must act
as efficiently as possible. It would be the
ideal situation to have every group in the
community get what they ask for. But if
we find that a group can't share resources
we will help them as best we can.


Reporter: As representative of the sector
you will do your utmost to introduce pro-
jects for youth and prevention (e.g.
AIDS/STD prevention, diabetes among
the youth etc). Right?

Clarenda: Yes. Youngsters have the most
exposure. We should consider how to
fight against the risks that they run. The
plans are to start first with the SGB kids
who don't get enough attention. These
programs should focus on minimizing the
risks they encounter. Education and pre-
vention go hand in hand.
In the area of 'care', the mental develop-
ment of the youngsters should be ad-
dressed (the situation at home, problems
with the parents, teen pregnancy etc). Our
youngsters are very vulnerable.

I mostly combine my work in healthcare
with the activities for the NGO Platform.
(Mr. Clarenda's job is Manager of Qual-
ity at Fundashon Mariadal which includes
San Francisco Hospital). Don't forget that
Mariadal is the largest NGO on the is-
land. One of my departments deals with
juvenile/youth health issues. This in-
cludes all the schools as well. For in-
stance we just hired a social worker who,
as of June 15, will focus on youngsters'
mental health as her daily task, sharing
this duty with a doctor. They will visit all


the schools on Bonaire to investigate the
mental development of the children, to
detect the risks and finally to battle them.


Reporter: What will the effect be of as-
signing a new project leader to the pro-
ject of the elderly (for all the three cen-
ters for the elderly on Bonaire ( CoCaRI,
Villa Antonia, Kai Mimina) ?

Clarenda: We indeed have named a coor-
dinator. Initially we expect short term
results- for instance putting together the
annual report, project information etc.
The people in these organizations, who
initially had trouble doing this kind of
work, now have the coordinator to take it
over. But if we continue this way with
this project it will remain a short-term
project. That's why we need to come up
with a structured program that will lead
us to results in the long run.


Reporter: Can you tell us about some
financed and completed projects both for
the youth as well as for the senior citi-
zens that are continuing?

Clarenda: For the elderly we now have an
activity leader. Our senior citizens are
now receiving more varied activity and
recreation. This leader is working to-
gether with others to exchange knowledge


and experience. So we can consider this a
long-term effect because at some point
these people will take over.

Regarding youngsters, we already dis-
cussed them. I admit they can use
attention. But I'm positive that the social
worker, I mentioned previously, put in
charge of the mental health program for
the youth will have positive results over
the long term.


Reporter: I've heard that the planned
Health Center in Rincon may be at the
southern part of Rincon which the gov-
ernment named an official "'health
area. "Does this mean that the Health
Center should not be placed in the
school-convent area, in the center of
Rincon?

Clarenda; There should be a Health Cen-
ter in Rincon! Keep in mind that space in
Rincon is scarce. I don't want to get into
a discussion where it should be located! It
must be properly equipped and staffed.
For me it's more important that it be well
located, have good personnel, available
24 hours a day etc. Wherever it is it
should be somewhere where the people of
Rincon can reach it easily.


Reporter: Different subsidizers like
AMFO have shown interest in helping to
renovate the convent in Rincon and
make it a historic site (monument). This
way it can also serve as a mobilization
center for the Rincon's elderly. Will you
work to make this happen?

Clarenda: Absolutely! What the senior
citizens require is a building where they
can have recreation. But at the same time
this place should be safe and presentable.
Anyone who would like to consider help-
ing to achieve this is more than welcome!


Reporter: I want you to thank you for
this opportunity.

Clarenda: You're welcome, till a next
time. 1 Natalie A.C. Wanga


CONTACT INFORMATION
AME AMFO: Kaya Gob. N. Debrot #31, Bonaire. Tel. 717-7776, Fax
717-7779, website: www.samfo.org, email: info-bon@samfo.org


9F 0


NGO Platforma Bonaire: Kaya Korona 5-C. Tel. 717-2366,
Fax 7172367, website: www.ngobonaire.org, email: Plat-
form@ngobonaire.org


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 11












VIBT SAI AND1 JETSA


Continental
Airlines t .

Continental Airlines to
fly non-stop
Houston-Bonaire


- . ,...:. 1 --- .---


I t's finally happened: a US airline
flying jets directly to Bonaire from A Boeing 737 This type of aircraft
the USA. Continental Airlines will start will be used on the Bonaire route
flying non-stop
Houston-Bonaire
on Friday, Decem-
ber 16, this year. L
you check the Con-
tinental website you
will see the sched-
ule and fare of
$491.65 has already'
been posted. Reser-
vations are being a -
accepted on-line
and via travel
agents. If you have
money to spare, fly
First Class the fare
is $2,456.65.
It's been along Brian A. Znotins, Manager, International Route Planning for
time in the coming, Continental Airlines signs up tofly weekly to Bonaire begin-

sat down at the ning in December. Commissioner Burney el Hage, Senator
table in Houston to Ramonsito Booi to his left, TCB head Ronella Croes to right.
talk, it took less
than a month nearly the speed of light in airline deals to wrap things up.
The flights from Houston's new Bush Airport will leave Fridays at 11:15 pm and
arrive in Bonaire the following morning, Saturday, at 6:15 am. The "red-eye" sched-
uling enables travelers to get in an extra half day of diving or whatever! The return
flight leaves at 8 am on Saturday, arriving at Houston at 10:50 am. These arrival and
departure times allow passengers to connect easily with other flights. They'll be
using a Boeing 737 with 112 economy and 12 first class seats. Continental is the
world's sixth largest airline, with 41,000 employees, and already serves 25 destina-
tions in the Caribbean. It has hubs in New York, Houston, Cleveland and Guam.
At the press conference last Thursday were officials and representatives from TCB
New York and Holland, TCB Bonaire, Bonaire International Airport Board, Bonaire
Holding, the Island Council-including the Opposition- and the press.
Following the cancellation of Air Jamaica service, Bonaire officials began to ex-
plore getting more airlift from the USA. A month ago to the day of the announce-
ment Ramonsito Booi, Burney el Hage and Larry Gerharts traveled to Houston to
explore the possibility of Continental flights to Bonaire. It was rumored that KLM
put in a good word for Bonaire to help the negotiations. As Continental's Manager
of International Route Planning, Brian Znotins, told The Bonaire Reporter, "It was a
business decision. We already fly to another top dive spot, Roatan, so why not to the
Caribbean's number one dive destination, Bonaire."
Bonaire will not stop its negotiations with Delta Airlines. "Considering the current
interest for Bonaire-flights, I continue to hope that Continental will expand their
flights to Bonaire in 2006. We still have to be on the safe side and continue to ex-
tend our horizons," said Larry Gerharts of Bonaire Air Services.1 G./L.D.


A Our source at the Caribbean Hotel
Association tells us that Air Jamaica
WILL continue it's Saturday Bonaire
flight and NOT stop it at the end of
next month as planned. This is already
reflected on its website. It is part of a re-
evaluation of its cutbacks and also might
include resumption of some flights to the
Eastern Caribbean and Miami. Air Ja-
maica lost US$61 million for the first
five months of this year, as the govern-
ment, struggles to move it into viability.
Last week Air Jamaica's executive
chairman, Dr. Vin Lawrence, said un-
foreseen disruption of services, caused
primarily by an increase in the frequency
of major airframe maintenance from 18
months to 15 months, and route restruc-
turing, had added another US$25 million
in expenses. Air Jamaica cut Bonaire
service to one flight at the end of June.

A Dutch Antilles Express (DAE),
(BonairExpress and CuracaoExpress)
won't use Suriname Airways jets for
flights on the Bonaire-Curacao-St.
Maarten route, said DAE's Chief Ex-
ecutive Officer Floris van Palland Fri-
day. Explained Van Palland, "The load
factors on the route don't justify putting
in a larger aircraft such as the MD-82."
St. Maarten flights have a load factor
of 75 per cent (using the smaller turbo-
props) on the average. The MD-82 has
140 seats, while the ATR-42 that DAE
uses has 46 seats. DAE flies Curagao-St.
Maarten-Curagao twice a day, filling
slightly fewer than 100 seats. By using
the MD-82, the seat capacity would in-
stantly increase by 40 per cent. "An in-
crease of 40 per cent on a load factor of


75 percent doesn't have a positive effect
on the profitability of that route," van
Palland told The St Maarten Daily Her-
ald.

Continued on page 3
IN THIS ISSUE
Grouper Corner 3
Letters (Pit Bull, Leaky Pipes,
3eaur, in Sushi) 5
Finding a Balance for Bonaire
Responses 6
Bonaire Reporter Survey 7
Hollo- ,ay Disappearance
&/ ruba Law 8
Bonaire-New Port Connection 9
Bon. Barracuda Swim News 9
SGB Students Excel at Artebon 10
Bonaire to Culinary Clympics 12
1 Am the William Express 12
Ambassadors (Fulton-Buddy Dive) 15
Goal, Home Run and More 15
DCr at St. Eustatius 17
Youth Tennis Tourney 18
2nd Turtle Tracked is "Happy" 22
Piedra So Golf Course 22
WEEKLY FEATURES:
Flotsam & Jetsam 2
Vessel List & Tide Table 9
AMFO/NGO Platform:
Community Issues in Care & Welfare 11
Picture Yourself (South Africa) 14
Where to Find The Reporter 13
Classifieds 14
Reporter Masthead 18
Pet of the week Palaeiilo 19
What s Happening 19
Dodo i Knd.:.mni of Heaven) 19
Shopping & Dining Guides 20
On the Island Since...
(Hernan Longat) 21
Bonaire Sky Park (rpianeias) 23
The Stars Have It 23 ?)


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 2











I ACHIGAND ATERPORSAGE


Sona i res
Newport Connection
S sometimes dreams do come true. The dream of many LA
Bonairean windsurfers is to follow in the footsteps of
island pros Tonky and Taty Frans and secure an intema-
tional sponsor. Lucky sailor Jose Fajardo Rivera found not
one, not two, not three, but four sponsors to help make his
windsurfing dream a reality. Jose, a 20-something sailor,
began seriously windsurfing in 2001 and advanced quickly I
by putting in long hours of training.
Sponsor scout Ann Phelan saw that he had what was
needed to be a winning competitor. What he needed was
decent gear to train and compete. A few connections were 1
made and Jose secured a limited sponsorship with Gun Sails
USA and Island Sports for discount sails. He also secured a Jose Fajardo Rivera
sponsorship with Car-
ibbean Wind & Sun1
Vacations which allot- .1 r
ted two tickets each .
year for Jose to attend
competition. Coach -
Elvis Martinus used his -
influence and connec- .
tions to help Jose se-
cure a full board spon-
sorship from RRD in
Italy.
The plan was for Jose
to attend King of the
Caribbean and then the
Cape Cod Freestyle
Frenzy. Unfortunately,
lack of wind prevented
any meaningful compe-
tition at both events but Jose Fajardo Rivera and Platt Johnson
that didn't stop Jose
from working it and having some fun while in Cape Cod. He hooked up with Platt
Johnson, owner of Island Sports in Newport Rhode Island and the US distributor for
Gun Sails. Jose attended Windfest, a surf show held during the Frenzy. Jose worked
with Platt selling gear and doing demos. Platt was so impressed with Jose's get-up-
and-go attitude he contacted Gun Sails International and eventually was able to se-
cure a full gear sponsorship for this aspiring talent.
Later in the week, Platt invited Jose to his home turf to see his mega shop and to
tour Newport. When Jose arrived in historic Newport, Rhode Island, he was treated
to a whirlwind day complete with a tour of the beaches, an interview with the New-
port Daily News and an extravagant luncheon at the elegant and renowned New York
Yacht Club hosted by Platt's lovely wife Nancy and sons Will and Chris. The setting
was majestic with pristine views of Newport Harbour. It was a day Jose will never
forget.
An older rider by current windsurf standards, Jose does not have expectations on
attending the PWA Tour. His dream is to finish technical school in Curagao, secure a
great job in Bonaire and windsurf in as many competitions as possible. Part of his
dream is to travel more, and this may become a reality as Platt and Nancy have in-
vited Jose to spend the summer of 2006 in Newport as their guest, volunteering in the
shop and learning more about the retail end of windsurfing. Not bad for an old wind-
surf kid. 1 Ann Phelan www.bonairecaribbean.com

KRALENDIJK TIDES (Heights in feet, FT)
Remember: Winds and weather can further :,I,, ~t i' the local tides
DATE TIME HEIGHT COEF
7-01 6:36 0.9FT. 21:51 2.0FT. 5
7-02 7:39 0.8FT. 22:21 2.0FT. 5
7-03 8:27 0.7FT. 22:53 2.1FT. 6
7-04 9:14 0.7FT. 23:29 2.1FT. 7
7-05 9:59 0.7FT. 7
7-06 0:34 2.1FT. 10:33 0.7FT. 7
7-07 1:05 2.0FT. 11:09 0.7FT. 7
7-08 1:35 1.9FT. 11:43 0.7FT. 7

VESSLS AKIN A ORT ALL


Bonaire Barracuda Swim News

S amson Evertsz,
age 9, is the first
swimmer to represent
Bonaire in the Curagao
"A" Swimming Cham-
pionships. This annual
competition is organ-
ized by the Curagao .
Swim- ,
ming Association and is
open only to local
swimmers who have -
achieved "A" level
times during the current

is the fastest time cate- .
gory recognized in the
Netherlands Antil- Samson Evertsz (yellow swim cap -inset) at the start
les. The "A" Champi- of the Boys 10 and Under 50 meter butterfly race.
onship meet took place
June 9 12 at the Sentro Deportivo Korsow complex in Curagao.
Samson represented the Bonaire Barracudas Swim Team in the presentation of
teams during the "A" Championship opening ceremony held on Saturday, 11 June. A
special welcome was extended to Bonaire and its lone swimmer by the President of
the Curagao Swimming Association during this ceremony. Bonaire swimmers par-
ticipate in Curagao events as exhibition swimmers to receive official times but are
ineligible for awards.
Samson achieved his qualifying times in backstroke, butterfly and freestyle during
the 6th Annual Dutch Caribbean Invitational Swim meet in April. During the "A"
Championships he improved his times in each of his three events demonstrating con-
tinued progress in the sport. Asked for his thoughts on this opportunity Samson
said," I had a great time and learned a lot about setting goals. I can't wait to go
back!" The Netherlands Antilles swimming season runs from September through
June.
Desiree Baaleman, age 10, of the Bonaire Barracudas was the only other Bonaire
swimmer to qualify for this meet. Desiree achieved an "A" time in 50 meter breast-
stroke at the Dutch Caribbean Invitational but was unable to attend the "A" Champi-
onship meet. 1 photo and story by Valarie Stimpson


Antee
Angie
Another World
Angel B
Augustine
Bright Sea
Bounty
Carylar
Camissa, Chan Is.
Cape Kathryn
Endangered
Species


Endorphin
Felicity
Flying Cloud, USA
Freestyle
Guaicamar I, Ven.
Jan Gerardus
L'Quila, BVI
Luna C. USA
Madam
Maggi
Mainly
Moonrise


Mystic Jade
Natural Selection
Pyewacket
Rusty Bucket
Santa Maria
Sandpiper, USA
Scintella
Sea Witch
Sirius
Sola 2
Sylvia K
Sylvester


Ti Amo, USA
T'zadde
Triumphant Lady
Ulu Ulu, USA
Ulysses
Unicorn, Norway
Varedhuni, Ger.
Windancer
Ya-T, BVI
Yanti Paratzi
Zahi, Malta
Zeelander


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 9












DINING GUIDE
RESTAURANT PRICE RANGE / WHEN OPEN FEATURES
Want your restaurant listed here? It's easy and not expensive Call The Reporterat 717-8988 or 791-7252 for info
Bella Vista Restaurant Moderate. Breakfast and Lunch Magnificent Theme Nights: Saturday: Beach Grill; Monday: Caribbean
Sea Side Restaurant at Buddy Dive Resort Dinner during Theme nights only. Night; Friday: Manager's Rum Punch Party
717-5080, ext. 525 Open every day and All-You-Can-Eat B.B.Q
Bistro de Paris Moderate Real French Cooking in an informal setting
Kaya Gob. N. Debrot 46 Lunch and Dinner Superb dishes prepared with care and love by a French chef
(half-way between hotel row and town) 717-7070 Closed Sunday Owner-operated Eat in or Take away
Brasserie Bonaire Low- Moderate Lunch and Dinner Lots of parking in big mall lot
Royal Palm Galleries Open 11 am -2:30 pm 5:30-9 pm Kitchen Open llam-2:30 pm, Dinner 5:30-9 pm
Kaya Grandi 26, Next to Re/Max, 717-4321 Closed Saturday and Sunday Breezy terrace with airco inside-Also serving big sandwiches at dinner
Calabas Restaurant & Moderate-Expensive Get a view of the beach and turquoise sea while enjoying a breakfast buffet
A Chibi Chibi Resaurant and Berfr Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner or a la carte lunch and dinner at the 'Chibi Chibi' restaurant & bar. Inspiring
At the Divi 717-8285 Flamingo eac Resort. Waterfront Open 7 days vistas and the highest standard of cuisine.

Croccantino Italian Restaurant Moderate-Expensive Tuscan chef prepares exquisite dishes. Authentic ingredients and romantic
Downtown at Kaya Grandi 48 Dinner setting make dining a delight. Be served in a garden setting under floating
717-5025 Closed Monday umbrellas or in air-conditioned comfort. Takeout too.
On th water mant th traffic circle Br te-Exensiver Creative cuisine on the seaside. Top chefs from Amsterdam cook in an open
On the water, just off the traffic circle Breakfast, Lunch Dinner modem kitchen featuring induction cooking. Seafood a specialty.

The Great Escape Moderate Bar-Restaurant poolside -under the thatched roof. Cuban Chef prepares
EEG Blvd #97-across from Belmar Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner Caribbean cuisine. Champagne brunch on Sundays 10 am to noon.
717-7488 Open 7 days Happy hours 5 to 7 every day.
Hilltop at Caribbean Club Bonaire Moderate-Expensive Quiet country setting, lovely landscaping, friendly staff
On the Tourist Road, 2 mi. north of Town Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Happy Hour from 5-7 pm, BBQ on Tuesdays
717-7901 Closed Sunday Gourmet chef creates unique daily specials
The Last Bite Bakery Low-Moderate Enjoy a delicious dessert or savory baked meal in the comfort of your home
Home Delivery or Take Out Orders taken 8 am-4 pm; Deliveries 6-7:30 or resort. This unique bakery offers gourmet class items -always from
717-3293 pm Closed Sunday scratch- for take out or delivery only.
The Lost Penguin Low-Moderate Watch the bustle of downtown from this street side Caribbean-style bistro
Across from MCB Bank in downtown Kralendijk Breakfast, Lunch, Early Dinner owned and run by a European educated Master Chef
Call 717-8003. Closed Tuesdays & Wednesdays and his wife.
Pasa Bon Pizza Low-Moderate Bonaire's best. The Real Thing! Freshly prepared pizzas made with the finest in-
On Kaya Gob. Debrot Open from 5-11 m Wednesday-Sunday gredients. Salads, desserts. Eat in or take away. Nice bar too.
1 mile north of town center. 790-1111 OpenCall ahead to eat-in or take out 790-1111


SH 0 PP I NF G G U I>D E See advertisements in this issue
APPLIANCES/ TV/ ELECTRONICS/ COMPUTERS GARDEN SUPPLIES AND SERVICES RESORTS & ACTIVITIES
City Shop, the mega store, has the island's widest Green Label has everything you need to start or main- Buddy Dive Resort offers diving, Adventure Fun
selection of large and small home appliances. Fast tain your garden. They can design, install and maintain tours including kayaking, mountain biking, cave snor-
service and in-store financing too. it and offer plants, irrigation supplies and garden keling and exploration.
chemicals.
ART GALLERY GIFTS, SOUVENIRS AND LIQUOR RETAIL
Cinnamon Art Gallery non-profit gallery for local art- The Bonaire Gift Shop has an wide selection of Benetton, world famous designer clothes available
ists has continuous shows. Each month a new artist is gifts, souvenirs, liquor, dive watches, digital cameras, now in Bonaire at prices less than those in US. For
featured. Stop by. Free entry. things for the home, T-shirts all at low prices. men, women and children.
BANKS HOTELS SECURITY
Maduro and Curiel's Bank provides the greatest Golden Reef Inn is the affordable alternative with Special Security Services will provide that extra
number of services, branches and ATMs of any Bon- fully equipped studio apartments in a quiet Bonaire measure of protection when you need it. Always reli-
aire bank. They also offer investments and insurance, neighborhood. Just a 3-minute walk to diving and the able.
sea.
BEAUTY PARLOR seaSHIPPING
Hair Affair. E ert hair cutting, styling, facialsUnder new management. Quiet and tranquil setting Rocargo Freight Air and sea shipments in/out of
waxing and professional nail care. with pool and luxuriant garden in Belnem. Cyber Bonaire. Customs agents. Professional and efficient.
BICYCLE / SCOOTER/ QUADS Caf6, DVD rentals, restaurant and bar. FedEx agent.
De Freewieler rents scooters and quads; profession- METALWORK AND MACHINE SHOP SUPERMARKETS
ally repairs almost anything on two wheels. Sells top ME b-Botterop Construction Bonaire N., offers Tropical FlaminOo is convenient, clean, modem,
brand bikes. Have your keys made here. outstanding fabrication of all metal products, includ- efficient and has the lowest prices on Bonaire. Lo-
BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION ing stainless. Complete machine shop too. cated behind NAPA.
APA Construction are professional General Visit Warehouse Bonaire to shop in a large, spotless
Contractors. They also specialize in creating patios PHOTO FINISHING supermarket. You' 11find American and European
and walkways with fabulous sprayed and stamped Paradise Photo in the Galeries Shopping Center of- brand products. THE market for provisioning.
concrete pavement. fers fast, fine processing for prints, slides, items and
services for your picture-taking pleasure. VILLAS
DIVING Bonaire Oceanfront villa for up to nine people: five
Carib Inn is the popular 10-room inn with top-notch REAL ESTATE / RENTAL AGENTS kitchens, five bathrooms. Ideal for divers.
dive shop and well stocked retail store. Best book trade Harbourtown Real Estate is Bonaire's oldest real
on Bonaire. Good prices on regulator repair, dive com- estate agent. They specialize in professional cus- WATER TAXI
puter H.Q tomer services and top notch properties. Get to Klein Bonaire by Ferry. Ride the Kantika di
Photo Tours Divers-Yellow Submarine -low Amor or Skiffy. Hotel pickup.
prices on the seaside at Kralendijk, at Caribbean Mike Boom & Associates Broad assortment of
Club, Caribbean Court and the Hamlet Oasis. Join homes and properties. View on their website www. WINES
their cleanup dives and BBQ. bonairerealty.com or office in town Antillean Wine Company. You've tried the rest;
WannaDive They make diving fun while maintain- now try the best: best prices, highest quality wines
ing the highest professional standards. In town at Re/Max Paradise Homes: Intemational/US connec- from around the world, kept in a cooled warehouse.
City Cafe and at Eden Beach. tions. 5% of profits donated to local community. Free delivery.
FITNESS Sunbelt Realty offers full real estate, rental, and in- YOGA
Bonfysio offers comprehensive fitness programs to surance services. If you want a home or to invest in Yoga For You. Join certified instructors Desirde and
suit your needs whether they be weight loss, sports or Bonaire, stop in and see them. Don for a workout that will refresh mind and body.
just keeping in shape. Convenient schedule. Private lessons too. Closed during June.
REPAIRS
Fit 4 Life at the Plaza Resort Mall. Classes in Pi- Bon Handyman is here if you need something fixed ATTENTION BUSINESSMENWR OMEN:
lates, Aerobics, TaeBo and more. Professional train- or built. Ultra reliable, honest and experienced. Elec- Put your ad in The Bonaire reporter.
ers, fitness machines and classes for all levels. trical, plumbing, woodworking, etc. 717-2345 Phone/Fax 717-8988, Cel 791-7252


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 20












SGB Students Exel at ARTEBON


r T can't believe this show
I was put on by young peo-
ple," a tourist exclaimed last Friday
night at the opening of the SGB high
school's "Cultural Growth" art show.
"I've been to so many art openings, but
this is just fantastic! I'm so glad I was
able to be on the island right now."


A whimsicalpuppet


The lady tourist echoed the feelings of
so many who attended the first ever
SGB high school art opening at ARTE-
BON. Speaking for her colleagues, gen-
eral science teacher Mary Ann Koops,
said, "We're so very proud of the stu-
dents. Sometimes they have a low self
esteem and they just throw their designs


I


in the trash. They think they are noth-
ing. But we wanted them to be able to
show their works to their parents and
the public. We've been very privileged
to work with these kids."
Minister of Education Maritza Sil-
berie, who opened the show, said, "It's
very important to show something posi-
tive coming from the SGB. These are
our children and we're very proud of
what they can do."
Challenged by general science teacher
Koops and art and industrial design
teacher Wilna Groenenboom, the stu-
dents had to either come up with a new
product or enhance or embellish one
that's already in use. They had to make
a plan, work two dimensionally with
sketches before creating the final prod-
uct in three dimensions. A third subject,
Papiamentu, was brought into play as
each project manual had to be written in
that language.

Student Ashwant Gonesh explained
that he wanted to design a "guitar of the
future." He had to study an existing one
and decide how to change it and make it
really look like something familiar but
with a whole new design. He had to
think a lot and let his imagination soar.
"I know it may be a little hard to play
with all these points," he says, pointing
to the zigzag design, but he accom-
plished his goal.
Attending the opening and showing
their support were parents, other stu-
dents as well as teachers, staff and


those associated with the SGB: Nolly
Oleana, Artie DeVries, Ann Leong,
Herman Groenenboom, Rob van Lear,
Helen Hoen, Ms. Martijn, Papiamentu
teacher Melina Rameriz, Edy Carolina,
Hilly Gravenhorst and others.


Bonaire's most famous bird


The exhibition continued through the
weekend with the students acting as
docents, showing the public through the
show. OL.D.

Mi C.It was through a
generous grant
from AMFO and
ai the NGO Platform
Bonaire that this "Cultural Growth at
ARTEBON" was made possible.
Stressing the importance of this exhibit
and what it would do the self image of
each student, the teachers asked for
help. Responding, the Platform guided
them in the proper method to apply for
funds. Working together they accom-
plished a monumental feat one that
may have changed the path of a stu-
dent who thinks maybe he or she was
not worthy. Thank you to all teachers
and the NGO Platform personnel -
who made this come true.


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 10


r cofop
Ks9


I Minister of Education, Maritza Sil-
Ashwant Gonesh and Syphard Wil- beri, cuts the ribbon to open the show
lem, the Future Guitar Boys












Youth Tennis Tourney


F our weekends of youth tennis, all
sponsored by RBTT, was on the
agenda of lots of Bonaire kids. Monthly
competition started in September of last
year, and almost 80 kids from 4-17 years-
old participated. On May 29th the top 4 in
each category was decided. The finals
were held on the next two weekends. The Lots of Tennis for Bonaire
winners of the 10, 12, 14 and 18 year old Kids In June
age groups are promised places in the
RBTT Caribbean Tournament in October in Aruba. Nearly 70 kids participated,
and for four days the Harbour Village Tennis Center boomed with children and
proud parents.


The final results:
Winners
Mini: Chananja Zijistra-
Mini: Ties van den Ouweelen-
Tm 8 : Kaile Finies-
Tm 8: Jevon May -
Tm 10: Amanda Thielman -
Tm 10: Denzel el Hage -
Tm 12: Mary-Jo Lendering-
Tm 12: Win Chung Xuan-
Tm 14: Thammy Albertsz -
Tm 14: Daniel Carillo -
Tm 18: Daniella Bissessar
Tm 18: David Conquet-


Runners up
Mavelly Velandia
Constantijn Bottrop
Zaira Groenendal
Jose Alfredo Miranda
Kaile Finies
Amd Chirino
Chelsey Domacasse
Kevin Abdul
Nikita van Ooijen
Lothar May

Quinsy Olij


A/B: 1/2e place: Daniel Carillo beat Francisco Valerio 8-4
A/B: 3e/4e place: Paulo Allee beat Kevin Abdul 8-4
C: 1e/2e place: Nikita van Ooijen beat Denzel el Hage 6-4
C: 3e/4' place: Damian Frans beat Max van Ooijen :6-4
D: 1e/2e place: Nadia Dabboussi beat Kaile Finies 4-0
D: 3i/4' place: Zaira Groenendal beat Keval Bissessar 4-2
E: 1e/2e place: SarahAn Maartense beat Josephine Marshall 10-9
E: 3e/4e place: Ties vd Ouweelen beat Canric Wout 10-9


This competition starts again in September; Elisabeth Vos organizes it at the
Harbour Village Tennis Center. For information you can reach her at tel 717-6907
or 565-5225 or e-mail at elisabeth@flamingotv.net. The competition is open for
all Bonaire children starting from mini-tennis until tournament players (max, 17
years old). D Elisabeth Vos


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 18


4-1
4-2
4-1
4-0
4-0
4-1;4-2
4-1;4-1
4-3;4-1
4-0;4-0
4-1;4-2

4-2;4-2













A Force forGood Activities sponsored by



SAMFO and the


NGO Platform


lp. 8Ut ISla Part of the continuing series on the


Community Issues in the

Care and Welfare Sector

A Reporter interview with Mr. Godfried 'Boy' Clarenda, the dy-
namic NGO representative for the Care and Welfare Sector of
Bonaire's NGO Platform.


Reporter: The sector Care and Welfare
contains more than just projects for the
senior citizens. The part ofthe youth and
problem prevention is not as well publi-
cized. Is that accurate?

Boy Clarenda: That's true! There were
indeed many more projects for the eld-
erly. Let me explain the concepts of the
Care and Welfare sector: People have
certain needs. The part of 'Care' reflects
what people require on daily basis to sur-
vive. The part of 'Welfare' is how citi-
zens feel: safe, comfortable, without fear
or anxiety in their daily lives. So you can
imagine how large the area is because
everyone has these needs.

A large part of achieving these two con-
cepts, care and welfare, is based on edu-
cation which should start at a very young
age, otherwise we will keep encountering
what we're dealing with nowadays: trou-
blesome youngsters; or the fact that we're
trying to extinguish those fires that have
started.


Reporter: The organization
'CoCaRi' (Comishon Cuidopa An-
sianonan di Rincon) a daily activity cen-
terfor the elderly in Rincon, in which
you are also the president, urgently
needs a bus. Sharing a bus with other
organizations as the NGO Platform pro-
posed is not an option due to the special
characteristics of Rincon (e.g. the dis-
tance, the needy target group which is
vulnerable etc.). Can you explain?

Clarenda: CoCaRi needs a bus, indeed.
The current bus is old. We're trying to


help groups to reach their goals as much
as possible. Scarcity means we must act
as efficiently as possible. It would be the
ideal situation to have every group in the
community get what they ask for. But if
we find that a group can't share resources
we will help them as best we can.


Reporter: As representative of the sector
you will do your utmost to introduce pro-
jects for youth and prevention (e.g.
AIDS/STD prevention, diabetes among
the youth etc). Right?

Clarenda: Yes. Youngsters have the most
exposure. We should consider how to
fight against the risks that they run. The
plans are to start first with the SGB kids
who don't get enough attention. These
programs should focus on minimizing the
risks they encounter. Education and pre-
vention go hand in hand.
In the area of 'care', the mental develop-
ment of the youngsters should be ad-
dressed (the situation at home, problems
with the parents, teen pregnancy etc). Our
youngsters are very vulnerable.

I mostly combine my work in healthcare
with the activities for the NGO Platform.
(Mr. Clarenda's job is Manager of Qual-
ity at Fundashon Mariadal which includes
San Francisco Hospital). Don't forget that
Mariadal is the largest NGO on the is-
land. One of my departments deals with
juvenile/youth health issues. This in-
cludes all the schools as well. For in-
stance we just hired a social worker who,
as of June 15, will focus on youngsters'
mental health as her daily task, sharing
this duty with a doctor. They will visit all


Godfried 'Boy' Clarenda


the schools on Bonaire to investigate the
mental development of the children, to
detect the risks and finally to battle them.


Reporter: What will the effect be of as-
signing a new project leader to the pro-
ject of the elderly (for all the three cen-
ters for the elderly on Bonaire (CoCaRI,
Villa Antonia, Kai Mimina)?

Clarenda: We indeed have named a coor-
dinator. Initially we expect short term
results- for instance putting together the
annual report, project information etc.
The people in these organizations, who
initially had trouble doing this kind of
work, now have the coordinator to take it
over. But if we continue this way with
this project it will remain a short-term
project. That's why we need to come up
with a structured program that will lead
us to results in the long run.


Reporter: Can you tell us about some
financed and completed projects both for
the youth as well as for the senior citi-
zens that are continuing?

Clarenda: For the elderly we now have an
activity leader. Our senior citizens are
now receiving more varied activity and
recreation. This leader is working to-
gether with others to exchange knowledge


AME

*FO


MaTN)uw
Hmbvk1b


and experience. So we can consider this a
long-term effect because at some point
these people will take over.

Regarding youngsters, we already dis-
cussed them. I admit that they can use
attention. But I'm positive that the social
worker, I mentioned previously, put in
charge of the mental health program for
the youth will have positive results over
the long term.


Reporter: I've heard that the planned
Health Center in Rincon may be at the
southern part ofRincon which the gov-
ernment named an official "'health
area. Does this mean that the Health
Center should not be placed in the
school-convent area, in the center of
Rincon?

Clarenda; There should be a Health Cen-
ter in Rincon! Keep in mind that space in
Rincon is scarce. I don't want to get into
a discussion where it should be located! It
must be properly equipped and staffed.
For me it's more important that it be well
located, have good personnel, available
24 hours a day etc. Wherever it is it
should be somewhere where the people of
Rincon can reach it easily.


Reporter: Different subsidizers like
AMFO have shown interest in helping to
renovate the convent in Rincon and
make it a historic site (monument). This
way it can also serve as a mobilization
center for the Rincon's elderly. Will you
work to make this happen?

Clarenda: Absolutely! What the senior
citizens require is a building where they
can have recreation. But at the same time
this place should be safe and presentable.
Anyone who would like to consider help-
ing to achieve this is more than welcome!


Reporter: I want you to thank you for
this opportunity.

Clarenda: You're welcome, till a next
time. O Natalie A.C. Wanga


CONTACT INFORMATION
AMFO: Kaya Gob. N. Debrot #31, Bonaire. Tel. 717-7776, Fax
717-7779, website: www.samfo.org, email: info-bon@samfo.org

NGO Platforma Bonaire: Kaya Korona 5-C. Tel. 717-2366,
Fax 7172367, website: www.ngobonaire.org, email: Plat-
form@ngobonaire.org


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 11










IACHT GA AD AGES


SonaM re s
Newpo rt Cionn sectionn
S ometimes dreams do come true. The dream of many "
Bonairean windsurfers is to follow in the footsteps of
island pros Tonky and Taty Frans and secure an interna-
tional sponsor. Lucky sailor Jose Fajardo Rivera found not
one, not two, not three, but four sponsors to help make his
windsurfing dream a reality. Jose, a 20-something sailor,
began seriously windsurfing in 2001 and advanced quickly
by putting in long hours of training.
Sponsor scout Ann Phelan saw that he had what was
needed to be a winning competitor. What he needed was
decent gear to train and compete. A few connections were
made and Jose secured a limited sponsorship with Gun Sails
USA and Island Sports for discount sails. He also secured a Jose Fajardo Rivera
sponsorship with Car-
ibbean Wind & Sun
Vacations which allot- I
ted two tickets each
year for Jose to attend
competition. Coach
Elvis Martinus used his i
influence and connec- k .
tions to help Jose se-
cure a full board spon-
sorship from RRD in
Italy.
The plan was for Jose
to attend King of the
Caribbean and then the
Cape Cod Freestyle
Frenzy. Unfortunately,
lack of wind prevented
any meaningful compe- f
tuition at both events but Jose Fajardo Rivera and Platt Johnson
that didn't stop Jose
from working it and having some fun while in Cape Cod. He hooked up with Platt
Johnson, owner of Island Sports in Newport Rhode Island and the US distributor for
Gun Sails. Jose attended Windfest, a surf show held during the Frenzy. Jose worked
with Platt selling gear and doing demos. Platt was so impressed with Jose's get-up-
and-go attitude he contacted Gun Sails International and eventually was able to se-
cure a full gear sponsorship for this aspiring talent.
Later in the week, Platt invited Jose to his home turf to see his mega shop and to
tour Newport. When Jose arrived in historic Newport, Rhode Island, he was treated
to a whirlwind day complete with a tour of the beaches, an interview with the New-
port Daily News and an extravagant luncheon at the elegant and renowned New York
Yacht Club hosted by Platt's lovely wife Nancy and sons Will and Chris. The setting
was majestic with pristine views of Newport Harbour. It was a day Jose will never
forget.
An older rider by current windsurf standards, Jose does not have expectations on
attending the PWA Tour. His dream is to finish technical school in Curagao, secure a
great job in Bonaire and windsurf in as many competitions as possible. Part of his
dream is to travel more, and this may become a reality as Platt and Nancy have in-
vited Jose to spend the summer of 2006 in Newport as their guest, volunteering in the
shop and learning more about the retail end of windsurfing. Not bad for an old wind-
surf kid. []Ann Phelan www.bonairecaribbean.com


KRALENDIJK TIDES (Heights in feet, FT)
Remember: Winds and weather can further influence the local tides
DATE TIME HEIGHT COEF
7-01 6:36 0.9FT. 21:51 2.0FT. 5
7-02 7:39 0.8FT. 22:21 2.0FT. 5
7-03 8:27 0.7FT. 22:53 2.1FT. 6
7-04 9:14 0.7FT. 23:29 2.1FT. 7
7-05 9:59 0.7FT. 7
7-06 0:34 2.1FT. 10:33 0.7FT. 7
7-07 1:05 2.0FT. 11:09 0.7FT. 7
7-08 1:35 1.9FT. 11:43 0.7FT. 7



Antee Endorphin Mystic Jade Ti Amo, USA
Angie Felicity Natural Selection T'zadde
AnotherWorld Flying Cloud, USA Pyewacket Triumphant Lady
Angel B Freestyle Rusty Bucket Ulu Ulu, USA
Augustine Guaicamar I, Ven. Santa Maria Ulysses
Bright Sea Jan Gerardus Sandpiper, USA Unicorn, Norway
Bounty L'Quila, BVI Scintella Varedhuni, Ger.
Carylar Luna C. USA Sea Witch Windancer
Camissa, Chan Is. Madam Sirius Ya-T, BVI
Cape Kathryn Maggi Sola 2 Yanti Paratzi
Endangered Mainly Sylvia K Zahi, Malta
Species Moonrise Sylvester Zeelander

Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Bonaire Barracuda Swim News
Samson Evertsz,
age 9, is the first
swimmer to represent
Bonaire in the Curagao
"A" Swimming Cham-
pionships. This annual
competition is organ-
ized by the Curagao
Swim-




times during the current
swimming season. "A"
is the fastest time cate-
gory recognized in the ti
Netherlands Antil- Samson Evertsz (yellow swim cap -inset) at the start
les. The "A" Champi- of the Boys 10 and Under 50 meter butterfly race.
onship meet took place
June 9 12 at the Sentro Deportivo Korsow complex in Curagao.
Samson represented the Bonaire Barracudas Swim Team in the presentation of
teams during the "A" Championship opening ceremony held on Saturday, 11 June. A
special welcome was extended to Bonaire and its lone swimmer by the President of
the Curagao Swimming Association during this ceremony. Bonaire swimmers par-
ticipate in Curagao events as exhibition swimmers to receive official times but are
ineligible for awards.
Samson achieved his qualifying times in backstroke, butterfly and freestyle during
the 6th Annual Dutch Caribbean Invitational Swim meet in April. During the "A"
Championships he improved his times in each of his three events demonstrating con-
tinued progress in the sport. Asked for his thoughts on this opportunity Samson
said," I had a great time and learned a lot about setting goals. I can't wait to go
back!" The Netherlands Antilles swimming season runs from September through
June.
Desiree Baaleman, age 10, of the Bonaire Barracudas was the only other Bonaire
swimmer to qualify for this meet. Desiree achieved an "A" time in 50 meter breast-
stroke at the Dutch Caribbean Invitational but was unable to attend the "A" Champi-
onship meet. 1 photo and story by Valarie Stimpson


Page 9







July I t Jl:8 00 olme1,sue2


RTER


I Kaya Gob. De 2 6E I:O 6 onw s 8 81


INSIDE: Table of Contents pg. 2
Bonaire Reporter Survey
Holloway Disappearance
& Antilles Law
Bonaire Barracuda News
I am the William Express
Youth Tennis Tourney
2nd Turtle Tracked is
named "Happy"






















ON THE ISLAND SINCE ..


i [] iL oN .] i


H e arrives with his wife, parme-
san cheese, ham, a bottle of
Merlot and a pizza; "That's what my
father always told me: 'Never come
empty-handed, bring a flower or some
wine!" He sits at the table, opens the
bottle and fills up the glasses, toasts
'salud' and starts telling his story: "I
was having severe health problems in
Venezuela and when the company sent
me to Bonaire it was for a year, to see
how it went. I stayed the year and have
been here ever since!
I came with my wife, Luisa, and our
son Hernan Arturo, who was seven
years old. Luisa was okay the first year,
because she saw herself as a 'tourist,'
but afterwards it was very difficult for
her to adapt." "We came first for a
weekend with little Arturo and we
stayed at the Sunset Beach Hotel,"
Luisa says, "I thought the countryside
was beautiful, but I was very worried
about the quietness; I became anxious
and wondered: 'where are the people?'"
She laughs: No%% I've gotten used to it,
maybe because I myself got quieter
over the years!"
"It's remarkable", Hernan says,
"many times I'm working on Sundays,
sitting at my office at Seguros Ori-
noco's and through the window I see
the street where the post office is; it's
not an exception when I see one car
passing by in a whole hour! Well, when
we came, little Hernan Arturo went to
St. Bernardus School and he did very
well. He spoke English as in Caracas he
had been going to Jefferson, a very well
recommended American School. Her-
nan Arturo already had two languages
in his head, so the third and the fourth
were easy. We lived in Sabana, in a
house that first belonged to the com-
pany, but which I bought later on. I
liked it here very much.
I was born in 1948 in an oil camp in
Quiriquire in the state of Monagas,
Venezuela. I was the eldest, after me
two brothers and two sisters were born.
My father worked for the Creole Petro-
leum Company. For 30 years he was a
welder, underwater in the sea, but also
on land. The company camp was like a
village; thousands of people were living
there, they had the most fantastic hospi-
tal, there was a social club and they or-
ganized everything for the children, like
bowling, baseball and football. There
was only one thing that was wrong: The
children of the people that belonged to
the staff got English classes and the
children of the blue collar workers did-
n't. It was a shame and it was discrimi-
nation. That's why I found it so impor-
tant for my son to learn languages. I
myself have had many problems in my


work and in my travels as I only speak
Spanish. I didn't want that for my son, I
wanted him to be prepared.
When we got the opportunity I bought
the house in Quiriquire; we made it
much bigger and my mother still lives
there several months of the year. I
stayed until 1965, and then I went to
Caracas to study physics and mathemat-
ics at the University. In 1969 the Uni-
versity was closed and June 8th 1970, I
began to work for Seguros Orinoco, an
insurance company. Two weeks ago, 35
years to the day that I joined the com-
pany, I phoned the man who had hired
me, Heman Rebolledo, who is now 80
years old and still working as the presi-
dent of another insurance company. He
was delighted to hear from me, and he
told me I was the only one in all those
years who'd ever done a thing like that.
But my motto is: give receive re-
turn. That's what I go by and if 50% of
the world was like that, life on earth
would be something else.



"My motto is: give -
receive return. That's
what I go by and if 50% of
the world was like that, life
on earth would be some-
thing else."


Another very important person in my
life was the late Dr. Julio Sosa, one of
the three founders of Seguros Orinoco
and the man who brought me here. I
never met anyone like him; I admired
him very much and I will always be
grateful to him. There have been other
people who have been very important
to me and I owe them so much, but I
can't turn this story into a list of
names.'
Hernan Longat is an extremely ener-
getic hard-working man, but also a man
who enjoys all the good ;h,,i in life. If
you know him, you're lucky, because
he 's a person you can always rely on;
by experience I know that's he's some-
one who will go out of his way to help
people. "When I was hired I started do-
ing administration work, but by the
time I arrived on Bonaire I was the di-
rector of the branch on Bonaire and
Curaqao and also director of Seguros
Guyana, a sister company in Venezuela.
I hired Luisa as my secretary when I
was 35. She was 22 and she fell in love
with me, and I loved and still love eve-
rything about her! Fatal attraction!
Within a year we were married! A year


before I'd "
bought my
apartment in
Caracas, now
my mother,
who is 88
years old, lives
there most of
the year, to-
gether with my
sister. That's
what I miss
here; not the
music or the
food, you have
everything on
Bonaire, but I
do miss my .-
mother, my
family and my
friends!"
"Heman has
a lot of per-
sonality,"
Luisa says,
"he wanted to
better himself
and he strug-
gled, doing his utmost to achieve; that's
a big attraction for me somebody with
drive... who gets places. He remembers
everything from years ago, I don't and I
got lazy because I have him!"
"You have to exercise your memory,"
Hernan says, "especially because I earn
my living using my mind. I like every-
thing about my job; it has all kinds of
things: administration, especially the,
buying and selling, P.R., dealing with
the public and the traveling. I'm always
working. If they don't find me for any-
thing at the office, they come to my
house; I know half the island, the other
half knows me! However, the most im-
portant things in my life are number 1,
my family, number 2, my family and
number 3, my family; but I also have a
special place in my heart for my
friends. I'm working for my family, I
am also a workaholic, but if I'm pro-
ducing, they will do better!
Hernan Arturo is now 21 years old,
for three years he's been working and
studying in Curaqao. He lives on his
own and it was good that he went, but
we've been always near. It was very
easy to raise my son. He's a fine exam-
ple with no vices; he doesn't smoke or
drink, no youth problems, and he's very
serious. He can fend for himself wher-
ever he goes, and now that he's going
to Florida to study to become a pilot,
we are very, very proud of him and we
expect a lot from him. I'm seeing him
very often and I give Luisa space; she
can go whenever she wants.
"I like to be at my house", Luisa says,


"Hernan is always working, so I'm
spending a lot of time alone since
Arturo left. I have some friends here,
but not many, as I am very choosy and I
don't like to see somebody every day. I
divide my time between family in Cara-
cas, my son in Curaqao and my hus-
band in Bonaire. Heman and I are com-
pletely different; what I like he doesn't
care for! I like the opera, the movies
and all kinds of music. Before I met
Hernan I was a soprano in the chorale
of the Orquesta Filarmonica de Vene-
zuela and I studied classical harp. He
likes his TV and his computer and he
knows all about European politics! But
he's a great cook, that's his passion and
I love to eat what he cooks!"
"I'm looking for a piano for Luisa,"
Hernan says, '"so if anyone who reads
this knows about a piano, pass by the
office or give me a call!
I cannot imagine retirement as I can-
not imagine my life without work; I'm
used to producing. It always depends
how things are going in Venezuela, the
States and Europe, but seeing the situa-
tion as it is now: Here we have tranquil-
ity; the islands
are good forth .
oldies.., people
are healthy
here... I will
always stay on
Bonaire." 1
Greta Kooistra


Greta Konistra


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 21






















ON THE ISLAND SINCE ..


S[]d L N i


H e arrives with his wife, parme-
san cheese, ham, a bottle of
Merlot and a pizza; "That's what my
father always told me: 'Never come
empty-handed, bring a flower or some
wine!" He sits at the table, opens the
bottle and fills up the glasses, toasts
'salud' and starts telling his story: "I
was having severe health problems in
Venezuela and when the company sent
me to Bonaire it was for a year, to see
how it went. I stayed the year and have
been here ever since!
I came with my wife, Luisa, and our
son Hernan Arturo, who was seven
years old. Luisa was okay the first year,
because she saw herself as a 'tourist,'
but afterwards it was very difficult for
her to adapt." "We came first for a
weekend with little Arturo and we
stayed at the Sunset Beach Hotel,"
Luisa says, "I thought the countryside
was beautiful, but I was very worried
about the quietness; I became anxious
and wondered: 'where are the people?'"
She laughs: "Now I've gotten used to it,
maybe because I myself got quieter
over the years!"
"It's remarkable", Hernan says,
"many times I'm working on Sundays,
sitting at my office at Seguros Ori-
noco's and through the window I see
the street where the post office is; it's
not an exception when I see one car
passing by in a whole hour! Well, when
we came, little Hernan Arturo went to
St. Bernardus School and he did very
well. He spoke English as in Caracas he
had been going to Jefferson, a very well
recommended American School. Her-
nan Arturo already had two languages
in his head, so the third and the fourth
were easy. We lived in Sabana, in a
house that first belonged to the com-
pany, but which I bought later on. I
liked it here very much.
I was born in 1948 in an oil camp in
Quiriquire in the state of Monagas,
Venezuela. I was the eldest, after me
two brothers and two sisters were born.
My father worked for the Creole Petro-
leum Company. For 30 years he was a
welder, underwater in the sea, but also
on land. The company camp was like a
village; thousands of people were living
there, they had the most fantastic hospi-
tal, there was a social club and they or-
ganized everything for the children, like
bowling, baseball and football. There
was only one thing that was wrong: The
children of the people that belonged to
the staff got English classes and the
children of the blue collar workers did-
n't. It was a shame and it was discrimi-
nation. That's why I found it so impor-
tant for my son to learn languages. I
myself have had many problems in my


work and in my travels as I only speak
Spanish. I didn't want that for my son, I
wanted him to be prepared.
When we got the opportunity I bought
the house in Quiriquire; we made it
much bigger and my mother still lives
there several months of the year. I
stayed until 1965, and then I went to
Caracas to study physics and mathemat-
ics at the University. In 1969 the Uni-
versity was closed and June 8th 1970, I
began to work for Seguros Orinoco, an
insurance company. Two weeks ago, 35
years to the day that I joined the com-
pany, I phoned the man who had hired
me, Heman Rebolledo, who is now 80
years old and still working as the presi-
dent of another insurance company. He
was delighted to hear from me, and he
told me I was the only one in all those
years who'd ever done a thing like that.
But my motto is: give receive re-
turn. That's what I go by and if 50% of
the world was like that, life on earth
would be something else.



"My motto is: give -
receive return. That's
what I go by and if 50% of
the world was like that, life
on earth would be some-
thing else."


Another very important person in my
life was the late Dr. Julio Sosa, one of
the three founders of Seguros Orinoco
and the man who brought me here. I
never met anyone like him; I admired
him very much and I will always be
grateful to him. There have been other
people who have been very important
to me and I owe them so much, but I
can't turn this story into a list of
names.'
Hernan Longat is an extremely ener-
getic hard-working man, but also a man
who enjoys all the good things in life. If
you know him, you 're lucky, because
he 's a person you can always rely on;
by experience I know that's he's some-
one who will go out of his way to help
people. "When I was hired I started do-
ing administration work, but by the
time I arrived on Bonaire I was the di-
rector of the branch on Bonaire and
Curaqao and also director of Seguros
Guyana, a sister company in Venezuela.
I hired Luisa as my secretary when I
was 35. She was 22 and she fell in love
with me, and I loved and still love eve-
rything about her! Fatal attraction!
Within a year we were married! A year


before I'd
bought my
apartment in
Caracas, now
my mother,
who is 88
years old, lives
there most of
the year, to-
gether with my
sister. That's
what I miss
here; not the
music or the
food, you have
everything on
Bonaire, but I
do miss my
mother, my
family and my
friends!"
"Heman has
a lot of per-
sonality,"
Luisa says,
"he wanted to
better himself
and he strug-
gled, doing his utmost to achieve; that's
a big attraction for me somebody with
drive... who gets places. He remembers
everything from years ago, I don't and I
got lazy because I have him!"
"You have to exercise your memory,"
Hernan says, "especially because I earn
my living using my mind. I like every-
thing about my job; it has all kinds of
things: administration, especially the,
buying and selling, P.R., dealing with
the public and the traveling. I'm always
working. If they don't find me for any-
thing at the office, they come to my
house; I know half the island, the other
half knows me! However, the most im-
portant things in my life are number 1,
my family, number 2, my family and
number 3, my family; but I also have a
special place in my heart for my
friends. I'm working for my family, I
am also a workaholic, but if I'm pro-
ducing, they will do better!
Hernan Arturo is now 21 years old,
for three years he's been working and
studying in Curaqao. He lives on his
own and it was good that he went, but
we've been always near. It was very
easy to raise my son. He's a fine exam-
ple with no vices; he doesn't smoke or
drink, no youth problems, and he's very
serious. He can fend for himself wher-
ever he goes, and now that he's going
to Florida to study to become a pilot,
we are very, very proud of him and we
expect a lot from him. I'm seeing him
very often and I give Luisa space; she
can go whenever she wants.
"I like to be at my house", Luisa says,


"Hernan is always working, so I'm
spending a lot of time alone since
Arturo left. I have some friends here,
but not many, as I am very choosy and I
don't like to see somebody every day. I
divide my time between family in Cara-
cas, my son in Curaqao and my hus-
band in Bonaire. Heman and I are com-
pletely different; what I like he doesn't
care for! I like the opera, the movies
and all kinds of music. Before I met
Hernan I was a soprano in the chorale
of the Orquesta Filarmonica de Vene-
zuela and I studied classical harp. He
likes his TV and his computer and he
knows all about European politics! But
he's a great cook, that's his passion and
I love to eat what he cooks!"
"I'm looking for a piano for Luisa,"
Hernan says, '"so if anyone who reads
this knows about a piano, pass by the
office or give me a call!
I cannot imagine retirement as I can-
not imagine my life without work; I'm
used to producing. It always depends
how things are going in Venezuela, the
States and Europe, but seeing the situa-
tion as it is now: Here we have tranquil-
ity; the islands
are good for the
oldies... people
are healthy
here... I will
always stay on
Bonaire." 1
Greta Kooistra


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 21















A VICious ATTACK
Dear Editor:
At 3 a.m. Monday morning, June
20th, I was awakened
by my dog's loud
barking at something
that I assumed was in
our yard. I looked out
toward our side yard
and could see our dog
running back and forth barking into our
neighbor's yard next door. Our neighbor
is a kind elderly man who raises black-
bellied sheep and I could tell that there
was something in his yard chasing the
sheep. I went out and found a large Pit
Bull terrorizing the sheep and had al-
ready taken one down to the ground. I
began to throw rocks to try to get this
vicious animal to leave. That was not
going to work so I ran for my garden
hose and began to squirt the dog to keep
it away from the poor defenseless ani-
mal. The rest of the sheep were huddled
together in a comer. A friend who was
staying with me heard the noise and
came outside, too and she began shout-
ing at the dog. With the noise and wa-
ter continually pelting him, he left, es-
caping through the hole in the fence he'd
entered. I then went over into the yard to
check on the downed sheep. I saw that
its neck was ripped open, blood was
flowing out as it struggled to breathe. Its
right eye had been gouged out as well
and I knew it had little chance of sur-
vival. I also found a newborn lamb, that
had been bom the day before, dead of a
broken neck. I then tried to pile some


larger rocks and wood into the hole to
keep the beast out.
I went back into the house about 4 a.
m. and prayed that the animals would be
unharmed but that would not be the case.
About an hour later, I could hear a
ruckus again but did not venture out. I
was trying to keep my dogs from bark-
ing and waking my sleeping husband
and house guest. I sorely regret that now
for at daybreak when I looked out the
window I could see two sheep lying on
the ground with others obviously hurt. A
young man, who lives adjacent to the
elderly neighbor, was now in the yard
yelling and swinging a stick at two
dogs that were in the yard one was the
Pit Bull and the other his dog that had
come through the hole in the fence. By
now, the Pit Bull had completed the fe-
rocious attack and the other dog was just
there to loudly bark. The young man,
who knew this awful dog, picked him up
and threw him over the fence along with
his own dog. He then went to check the
wounded sheep. I went out and looked
over the fence to see 4 sheep down, ob-
viously dead and 3 others near death, 2
of them had their necks snapped, blood
everywhere.
It was now about 6 am and my
neighbor had now come outside because
he had heard the young man's cursing
and loud voice. He too saw the awful
site and returned inside to call the police.
They arrived in about 10 minutes and
began to question those who were there
and to count the sheep that were at-
(Continued on page 5)


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 4


I LETTERS I











Flotsam and Jetsam (Continued from page 2)
Following public demonstrations of
outrage because of unavailable flights,
Minister of Transport and Communica-
tion, Omayra Leeflang, had announced
a few weeks ago that Suriname Airways
would fly the Curagao-St. Maarten
route as of Friday, June 24, but it didn't
happen.

A DAE's Chief Executive Officer
Floris van Palland a former CEO of
several of Royal Dutch Airline KLM's
spin-offs, when asked about the '...
Express Airlines' on-time perform-
ance, one of the major complaints of
passengers, said improving this was
"a number one priority." "We have
already done a lot, although people
wouldn't have noticed it right away. It
is a process," he said, explaining that
several ATRs had been swapped for
new ones from Europe that have just
completed their big check-up. In addi-
tion, the company has been increasing
its spare parts reserve. "The chance that
you don't have that specific part is
much smaller," he said, adding that the
program is almost completed. DAE's
major shareholder is Bonaire resident,
Niek Sandmann, (reports by Suzanne
Koelega- SMH)

A Princess
Maxima, the
wife of Dutch
Crown
Prince Wil-
lem- 0
Alexander,
gave birth
Sunday to a healthy baby daughter.
The new princess was named Alexia
Juliana Marcela Laurentien, and be-
comes third in line to the Dutch throne
after her father and her sister, Princess
Catharina-Amalia, who was born on
Dec. 7, 2003. The newborn, weighed
3.4 kilograms (7.69 pounds).
The prince denied she was named af-
ter the illegitimate French daughter of
his grandfather, the late Queen Juliana's
deceased husband, Prince Bernhard.
Prince Bernhard's offspring's existence
was only recognized in an interview
published last year. "She is named after
me," said Prince Willem-Alexander.

A Central Bank President Emsley
Tromp reported that the Antilles na-
tional debt is NAf2.4 billion. Add
Curagao's NAf 1.5 billion debt and you
get a figure that is more than the entire


country's gross domestic product of
NAf3.7 billion.
Bonaire's share of the national debt is
NAf243.8 million it has no ability to
borrow money on its own as do Cura-
gao and St. Maarten..
If the islands were to split up under
the current circumstances they would
start their new status with those debts.
Since that would be an unworkable sce-
nario for most islands,
On the total Antillean debt of NAf4.8
billion, NAf273 million was paid in
interest alone last year, 23 cents out of
every guilder collected in taxes and 16
per cent of all government expendi-
tures. Another NAf378 million guilders
was borrowed in 2004.
The Central Bank itself made a profit
of NAf 50 million in 2004, which goes
to the Central Government. A consider-
able part of that comes from the 1 per
cent license fee people pay when con-
ducting financial transactions in US
dollars.


Hello tourist preparation


t As is customary this time of year,
6th grade students from the island's
elementary schools will take part in
the "Hello Tourist" program. Hello
Tourist is a TCB initiative to acquaint
Bonaire's children with the tourist
business that powers the local economy.
The children will learn what being a
tourist means by visiting typical
attractions, shops and the various
resorts
Participating in the program are
Flamingo Airport, Taxis, Goddard
Catering, Captain Don's Habitat, Plaza
Resort, Sand Dollar, Divi Flamingo
Beach Resort, Bel Mar and the SGB.
Sponsors of the event are Maduro &
Curiels Bank, TELBO N.V., Consales
Cash & Carry and Panaderia Seruva.

A You can even smell it in Bonaire
when the wind comes from the west;
(Continued on page 8)


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 3















"CopyrightedlMaterial
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"




















Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 Page 13











Reaction to Balance for Bonaire articles (Continued from page 6)
In "Finding Balance for Bonaire," Part 4, a closer look was taken at the Aruba
Model, presenting conclusions of a Tobago research and of an article of Robertico
Croes and Manuel Vanegas. Mr. "Tico"Croes served as the Finance Minister in the
last government, led by Henny Eman, and was recently interrogated about his pos-
sible involvement in a financial scandal concerning the never realized speedway
race track.. A judge in Miami decided in this matter that the government of Aruba
had to pay $20 million to a US investor. It is hard to understand that during the trial
the former transportation minister in the Eman's cabinet, Glenbert Croes, main pro-
moter of the failed project, testified against his own government(!!!).

Reading the conclusions of the Tobago report and of the mentioned article, one
could believe that the Aruba growth has been the result of strict pursuance of a de-
liberate strategy and a clear development plan and that, with the exception of some
miscalculation, the tourist development has been a big success, and that Aruba can
serve as a model for Bonaire when planning the future tourist development..

The fact is, however, that although Aruba does have a development plan, elabo-
rated more than 20 years ago, all tourist development during the last 20 years has
not been a result of a deliberate strategy and a development plan but rather of bitter
fighting between the two leading political parties, the Christian democratic AVP
and the socialist MEP. Since 1985, there have been three cabinets Eman ( prime
minister of all governments led by AVP) and three cabinets Oduber (prime minister
of all MEP-governments). The Oduber III cabinet is currently at the power and new
elections will come this year. It is a normal practice on Aruba that when the rival
party wins the election, the new government declares that the policy of the preced-
ing administration was completely wrong, that due to irresponsible decisions of the
previous government (mostly in connection with the new hotel construction) the
new administration has to pay millions of dollars to foreign banks and that a com-
pletely new policy has to be followed.

A good example of this practice are the both hotel moratoria (in 1986 and 1996),
mentioned in Finding Balance for Bonaire, Part 4. They were declared by the Eman
governments as reaction to, in their eyes, wrong tourism development under the
Oduber administrations. In 1996, the Eman administration went so far that it de-
cided to demolish three uncompleted large hotels at the Palm beach. The two tow-
ers of a new Ramada hotel were sold to the Divi group under the condition that the
larger tower, almost fully completed, would be demolished. It really happened (!)
and the smaller remaining tower operates now under the name Phoenix resort. It is
a paradox that the neighboring Wyndham hotel (former Concorde and later Hilton)
is currently negotiating with the government to get permission to build an annex to
its existing high rise building, practically at the site of the demolished Ramada
tower (!). The two remaining hotels were ultimately saved and taken over by the
Marriott group which under the current Oduber III administration, completely ig-
noring the moratorium taken by the previous Eman government, not only com-
pleted the construction but started, next to these hotels, to realize the gigantic four
stages time share project Ocean Club and Surf Club. The high buildings of the first
two stages now tower over the neighboring Holiday Inn resort.
Jiri Lausman
Next week the financial scandals that are costing Arubans millions


MAKE ALL DEVELOPMENT SUSTAINABLE

Dear Editor:
Sustainable development is not something
new. History is full of examples of cul-
tures that developed in a sustainable way;
that means, they progressed social and
economically, with out abusing the natural
resources. However, increased interest in
"development" shown by governments,
some world organizations and certain sec-
tors of the society results in the actual state
of deterioration of the planet and the dan-
ger it represent for mankind.
But, what is sustainable development?
It's the development that satisfies the Diver and Turtle at Kai
needs of those of us that inhabit the planet
today, with out compromising the capacity of future generations of satisfy theirs.
It's an alternative to face the crisis that this actual type of development that seeks
economical progress at all cost, has generated. This means that, the model of sus-
tainable development seeks the same economic progress, but controlling the use of
the natural resources.
The sustainable development model, as it was defined in 1992 in the Summit of
the Earth in Rio de Janeiro, stands in three very strong components. Sustainable
development is, of course, interested in a more balanced use of the natural re-
sources; but is also interested in a better distribution of the benefits generated and
more participation of the people in the making of decisions that affect them. This
makes sustainable development the way to a more fair and balanced society, with
less difference between rich and poor.
The actual model has us on the edge of the depletion of important resources, like
water, fossil fuel, fisheries stock, coral reefs, etc. and if we continue to seek pro-
(Continued on page 17)


The Bonaire Reporter Survey.
What do YOU think about Bonaire?


Last Chance to
Submit form


As a reader of The Bonaire Reporter you must care about the island.
Maybe you could help us with some of the consumer 'needs' research
mentioned in this series. It doesn't matter if you are a tourist or a resident.
Please fill out this questionnaire and mail it to Bonaire Reporter, Kaya Gob. De-
brot 200-6, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles (AN) or go on-line to http//www.
bonairenews.com/survey.htm and e-mail your form to survey@bonairereporter.
com. Dozens have already been received but we'd like some more.

1. Your nationality: Antillean .US O.Netherlands Other:

2. Your age: DUnder25 .26-40 .041-60 Over60
3. Your sex: DM OF
4. Marital status []Single .Married Widowed/Divorced In relationship
5. Years Scuba Diving l year or less 2-5years 5-10years Morethan
10 years
6. Years windsurfing 1 year or less 2-5 years 5-10 years Morethan
10 years
7. Are you a [OTourist O.Part time resident [OFull time resident [Native Bo-
nairean
8. How much time do you spend on Bonaire in an average year?
1-2 weeks 0 3 to 4 weeks 1 to 2 months 2 to 6 months
1 6 to 12 months
9. Number of people in your household or group when you are on Bonaire:

10. What year did you first come to Bonaire:
11. Why did you first come to Bonaire? .born here Oparents moved here
Found a job here scuba diving tourist windsurfing tourist Other


12. What do you like MOST about Bonaire?



13. What do you like LEAST about Bonaire?



14. How satisfied are you with the following? Rate your degree of satisfac-
tions from 1 to 4, where 4 is extremely satisfied and 1 is not at all satis-
fied. Circle the appropriate number for each item.
Satisfaction
Low High


friendliness of the people
number of hotels
quality of hotels
number of restaurants
quality of restaurants
number of cultural activities
quality of cultural activities
activities for children
condition of the reefs
quality of the diving
quality of the environment
cleanliness of the island
quality of the roads
Internet service
telephone service
water and electric service
number of tourists
service attitude at businesses
personal safety
number of activities available
quality of activities available
number of diving locations
airline service to the island
quality of your Bonaire experience
Other
Other


1 2
1 2
1 2


15. What 'needs' do you have that are not currently being met by Bonaire?
Or, said another way, what could Bonaire do to get you to spend more
time on the island or for you to enjoy your time on Bonaire more?


16. What could Bonaire do to improve its tourism product so more people
would want to come to Bonaire? D


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 7












fflSAII AND JEmII


Continental
Airlines .

Continental Airlines to
fly non-stop
Houston-Bonaire


I t's finally happened: a US airline
flying jets directly to Bonaire from A Boeing 737 This type of aircraft
the USA. Continental Airlines will start will be used on the Bonaire route
flying non-stop
Houston-Bonaire
on Friday, Decem-
ber 16, this year. If
you check the Con-
tinental website you
will see the sched-
ule and fare of
$491.65 has already
been posted. Reser-
vations are being
accepted on-line a
and via travel
agents. If you have
money to spare, fly
First Class the fare
is $2,456.65.
It's been a long
time in the coming Brian A. Znotins, Manager, International Route Planning for
ti in the cn Continental Airlines signs up tofly weekly to Bonaire begin-
but when everyone
sat down at the ning in December. Commissioner Burney el Hage, Senator
table in Houston to Ramonsito Booi to his left, TCB head Ronella Croes to right.
talk, it took less
than a month nearly the speed of light in airline deals to wrap things up.
The flights from Houston's new Bush Airport will leave Fridays at 11:15 pm and
arrive in Bonaire the following morning, Saturday, at 6:15 am. The "red-eye" sched-
uling enables travelers to get in an extra half day of diving or whatever! The return
flight leaves at 8 am on Saturday, arriving at Houston at 10:50 am. These arrival and
departure times allow passengers to connect easily with other flights. They'll be
using a Boeing 737 with 112 economy and 12 first class seats. Continental is the
world's sixth largest airline, with 41,000 employees, and already serves 25 destina-
tions in the Caribbean. It has hubs in New York, Houston, Cleveland and Guam.
At the press conference last Thursday were officials and representatives from TCB
New York and Holland, TCB Bonaire, Bonaire International Airport Board, Bonaire
Holding, the Island Council-including the Opposition- and the press.
Following the cancellation of Air Jamaica service, Bonaire officials began to ex-
plore getting more airlift from the USA. A month ago to the day of the announce-
ment Ramonsito Booi, Burney el Hage and Larry Gerharts traveled to Houston to
explore the possibility of Continental flights to Bonaire. It was rumored that KLM
put in a good word for Bonaire to help the negotiations. As Continental's Manager
of International Route Planning, Brian Znotins, told The Bonaire Reporter, "It was a
business decision. We already fly to another top dive spot, Roatan, so why not to the
Caribbean's number one dive destination, Bonaire."
Bonaire will not stop its negotiations with Delta Airlines. "Considering the current
interest for Bonaire-flights, I continue to hope that Continental will expand their
flights to Bonaire in 2006. We still have to be on the safe side and continue to ex-
tend our horizons," said Larry Gerharts of Bonaire Air Services. G./IL.D.


I


A Our source at the Caribbean Hotel
Association tells us that Air Jamaica
WILL continue it's Saturday Bonaire
flight and NOT stop it at the end of
next month as planned. This is already
reflected on its website. It is part of a re-
evaluation of its cutbacks and also might
include resumption of some flights to the
Eastern Caribbean and Miami. Air Ja-
maica lost US$61 million for the first
five months of this year, as the govern-
ment, struggles to move it into viability.
Last week Air Jamaica's executive
chairman, Dr. Vin Lawrence, said un-
foreseen disruption of services, caused
primarily by an increase in the frequency
of major airframe maintenance from 18
months to 15 months, and route restruc-
turing, had added another US$25 million
in expenses. Air Jamaica cut Bonaire
service to one flight at the end of June.

A Dutch Antilles Express (DAE),
(BonairExpress and CuracaoExpress)
won't use Suriname Airways jets for
flights on the Bonaire-Curacao-St.
Maarten route, said DAE's Chief Ex-
ecutive Officer Floris van Palland Fri-
day. Explained Van Palland, "The load
factors on the route don't justify putting
in a larger aircraft such as the MD-82."
St. Maarten flights have a load factor
of 75 per cent (using the smaller turbo-
props) on the average. The MD-82 has
140 seats, while the ATR-42 that DAE
uses has 46 seats. DAE flies Cura9ao-St.
Maarten-Cura9ao twice a day, filling
slightly fewer than 100 seats. By using
the MD-82, the seat capacity would in-
stantly increase by 40 per cent. "An in-
crease of 40 per cent on a load factor of


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 2


75 percent doesn't have a positive effect
on the profitability of that route," van
Palland told The St Maarten Daily Her-
ald.


Continued on page 3
IN THIS ISSUE
Grouper Corner 3
Letters (Pit Bull, Leaky Pipes,
Beauty in Sushi) 5
Finding a Balance for Bonaire
Responses 6
Bonaire Reporter Survey 7
Holloway Disappearance
& Aruba Law 8
Bonaire-New Port Connection 9
Bon. Barracuda Swim News 9
SGB Students Excel at Artebon 10
Bonaire to Culinary Olympics 12
I Am the William Express 12
Ambassadors (Fulton-Buddy Dive) 15
Goal, Home Run and More 15
DCNA at St. Eustatius 17
Youth Tennis Tourney 18
2nd Turtle Tracked is "Happy" 22
Piedra So Golf Course 22
WEEKLY FEATURES:
Flotsam & Jetsam 2
Vessel List & Tide Table 9
AMFO/NGO Platform:
Community Issues in Care & Welfare 11
Picture Yourself (South Africa) 14
Where to Find The Reporter 13
Classifieds 14
Reporter Masthead 18
Pet of the Week (Rafaello) 19
What's Happening 19
Dodo (Kingdom of Heaven) 19
Shopping & Dining Guides 20
On the Island Since...
(Hernan Longat) 21
Bonaire Sky Park (planets) 23
The Stars Have It 23 y

















*to find it, just look up


The First
Ten Days of
July Are
Fantastic
for Planet
Gazers


Mark
the
first 10 days of
July as fantas-
tic nights for
planet gazing
because we'll
have Mercury,
Venus and
Jupiter in a
spectacular
early evening planet show! On Friday, July 1st, about an hour after sunset during
evening twilight, face west where you'll still be able to see the best planet duo of
the year. Planet #1 out from the sun, the tiny 3,000 mile wide pink planet Mercury,
will be huddled right next to the brightest planet of them all, planet #2, 8,000 mile
wide Venus. And they will be only one degree apart, which means you could well
cover both of them with your pinky finger stretched at arm's length.
In fact, they were less than one degree apart all throughout the last days of June
and will continue to be extremely close through the first week of July. Although
they are absolutely fabulous to see with the naked eye, if you have a pair of bin-
oculars, use them this weekend and all next week because rarely do we have a
chance to see any two planets so close together.
On Saturday they'll be only one and one-tenth of a degree apart, and on Sunday
they'll be only one and a quarter degree apart. On the night of the 4th, before the
fire works start, make sure you see them because they'll still be only one and a
third degrees apart. On Tuesday, the 5th, they're still only one and a half degrees
from each other, and on Wednesday still extremely close. Then on Thursday, the
7th, something new is added to the scene because they are joined by an exquisitely
thin crescent Moon complete with earthshine which will look like a black full
Moon nestled within the crescent.
Then on Friday, the 8th, you'll observe the most spectacular planetary sight of
July. An even more exquisite crescent Moon will be parked right above Venus and
Mercury. They will knock your socks off with just the naked eye, but if you look
at them through a pair of binoculars you won't believe it! By Saturday, the 9th, the
Moon will have moved past Venus and Mercury and will be parked very close to
Regulus the brightest star of Leo the Lion, and by Sunday, the 10th, will have
moved just beyond it.
So start your Mercury, Venus watch this weekend and look for them before the
fireworks on the 4th of July. Then continue watching each night. Remember that
Friday, the 8th is the best night of them all! On Saturday, the 9th, the Moon is
parked to the right of Regulus and on Sunday, the 10th, up to its left. But please,
please don't miss Friday the 8th which I consider the best night for planet gazing
for all of July. And of course we don't want to leave out the planet king Jupiter
who will be well up and to the left of Regulus although not quite as bright as Ve-
nus but will still dazzle you with his brilliance. If you want to appear really smart
on July 4th, casually show your friends planet #1, planet #2 and planet #5. What a
way to begin the month of July. 1 Jack Horkheimer


THE STARI

HAVE IT
For the week:
July 1 to July 8, 2005
By Astrologer Michael Thiessen


ARIES (Mar. 21- April 20) You have to take hold of your life and make some
crucial decisions. Don't hesitate to look for alternatives that will enable you to raise
the kind of donations you need to do the job right. Relatives may be less than easy
to deal with. Don't make large purchases unless you have discussed your choices
with your mate. Your lucky day this week will be Saturday.
TAURUS (Apr. 21- May 21) Now is a good time to ask for favors. Investments
are best left alone this week. You will gain valuable insight and knowledge through
the experiences you have along the way. Enjoy the company of relatives this week.
Your lucky day this week will be Friday.
GEMINI (May 22-June 21) Be careful not to misplace your wallet or belong-
ings. You must try to lay your cards on the table. Talk to your mate and tell them
how you feel. Secret affairs may only cause complications in your life. Your ener-
getic nature and ability to initiate projects will add to your popularity. Your lucky
day this week will be Friday.
CANCER (June 22-July 22) Don't let your partner start any arguments. Passion
should be redirected positively. Arguments with children or friends may leave you
steaming. You may find that your emotional partner will not be too eager to accom-
modate you. You may cause a fuss if you come on too strongly in public. Your
lucky day this week will be Friday.
LEO (July 23-Aug 22) Try to avoid serious discussions with loved ones. You
will be highly sensitive to comments made by your lover. Make decisions about
your professional objectives. Mingle with those who can help you get ahead. Your
lucky day this week will be Monday.
VIRGO (Aug. 23 -Sept. 23) Emotional situations could bring out your stubborn
nature. Be honest with yourself before getting involved with someone who is likely
to lead you on. Organize all the responsibilities that have to be attended to and
make sure everyone knows what to do. This is not the time to lend or borrow
money or possessions. Your lucky day this week will be Wednesday.
LIBRA (Sept. 24 -Oct. 23) Compromise may be necessary. Don't hesitate to
look for alternatives that will enable you to raise the kind of donations you need to
do the job right. You are best to move quickly and to get in good with the boss.
Don't reveal information that is personal or confidential. Your lucky day this week
will be Monday.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24 Nov. 22) Your talent will be recognized. Problems with
appliances or electrical gad gets will drive you crazy. Refrain from overspending on
entertainment or luxury items. Be careful how you handle friends and relatives,
they may take things the wrong way. Your lucky day this week will be Wednesday.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23 -Dec. 21) Get involved in activities that will bring you
knowledge about foreign lands, philosophies, or cultures. Relatives may be less
than easy to deal with. Females may put demands or added responsibilities on you.
Do not get involved with individuals who are already committed to others. Your
lucky day this week will be Tuesday.
CAPRICORN (Dec 22.- Jan. 20) Deception in your home is evident. Don't beat
around the bush. Get involved in volunteer work that will bring you satisfaction,
not an empty wallet. It will do you some good. You will be in the doghouse if you
are being selfish. Your lucky day this week will be Monday.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 -Feb. 19) Watch your weight gain due to water retention.
Visitors may be likely to drop by. You have to let go of your past if you wish to get
out of any sentimental mood that might be hanging over your head. Try to be hon-
est when dealing with your mate. Your lucky day this week will be Wednesday.
PISCES (Feb. 20-Mar. 20) Don't let relatives make demands of you. Your
health may have suffered due to neglect or abuse. Try to be as mellow as possible.
Be prepared to make changes to your personal documents. Your lucky day this
week will be Monday. 1


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 23











Bonair Team Heads for the Culna 0s

B onaire's
dream
team of top
chefs and a
bartender
headed out last l
Sunday to v Lo .
compete in the
"Taste of the
Caribbean" ...
culinary com-
petition in Mi-
ami. This is the
third time that o \
Bonaire hasA
sent a team to
the event.
They'll com-
pete against 12 Taking off from Flamingo airport last Sunday: Brad Conner,
other teams Floris van Loo, Rolando "Ricky" Janzen, Vernon "Nonchi" Mar-
made up of the tijn, Isidoor van Riemsdijk, Tico Marsera, Laura DeSalvo.
best profes-
sional chefs from 12 other Caribbean islands: Anguilla, Aruba, Bahamas, Barba-
dos, British Virgin Island, Cayman Islands, Curaqao, Puerto Rico, St. Lucia, St.
Maarten/St. Martin, Trinidad & Tobago and the US Virgin Islands.
It takes a lot of work and dedication on the part of these professionals who al-
ready put in long hours in their restaurants. The team has had a lot of island sup-
port the people and businesses of Bonaire who've enabled them to put on numer-
ous fund-raising lunches and dinners to hone their culinary skills.
Representing Bonaire are: Rolando "Ricky" Janzen (Divi Flamingo Resort), Pas-
try Chef Isidoor van Riemsdijk and Floris van Loo (Rum Runners Restaurant) and
Tico Marsera (Den Laman). Coach is "Taste" veteran, Vernon "Nonchi" Martijn.
Bartender is Brad Conner (Rum Runners). Accompanying the team will be Coordi-
nator Sara Matera of the Culinar Foundation and Reporter Editor Laura DeSalvo
for on-site reporting.
Find out how the team did in next week's edition. OL.D.


I am the

William

Express
Y ou might say I have a very interest-
ing and active life. It began in an
oil soaked, rodent infested, smelly andding for the bottom
slimy port. As a cargo freighter, I visited
and explored hundreds of similar ports during my life. The men who built my 235
foot long (72 meter) hull and installed the components to control my movement were
rough, dirty and very loud. I was made to roam the oceans of the world and have car-
ried valuable cargo and personal possessions to people around the globe. As time
passed my travels became more limited and, for the next several years, I had the lux-
ury of staying closer to my home port visiting old friends on all the islands in the
Caribbean.
I am not proud of my last sailing adventure. My new owner modified my cargo
hold to carry a new, smaller and lighter cargo. The captain and crew are also new and
are not familiar with all the controls and special handling required to manage a lady
of my maturity and experience. Our final destination was unknown to me, but, judg-
ing by the amount of fuel in my tanks, it may have been a local port or southern
America, perhaps Miami. I was quickly loaded in the dark hours, only a 12 ton cargo,
and went to sea again heading east. Curiously, a new name was painted over my old.
For this voyage, I am now called the "Hilma Hooker," San Andres (Colombia).
The fresh April breeze and the steady waves, beating against the bow, feel soothing
and are in rhythm with the sound of my engine. Suddenly, there is a loud noise be-
low with frantic shouting between the captain and the engineer. We alter course and
make for a small nearby island in the Netherlands Antilles called Bonaire. In the
shelter of Klein Bonaire, a mile off the main coast and near Kralendijk harbor, we
anchor to make the necessary repairs. A group of customs officials come aboard and
the captain sets us adrift. The officials take us in tow and I am placed at the pier for
further inspection.
After several days of some very embarrassing encounters within my empty holds,
the teams of expert investigators depart. Now, with the aid of SCUBA gear, another
pair of specialists is under my bottom, banging and poking around in some very pri-
vate areas. This team has important news for the Island officials that uncover the se-
cret compartment containing my small cargo. The contraband is seized, I am con-
fined to port and the captain, who has damaged a portion of my hull admitting a con-
tinuous flow of seawater, is arrested. I am very distressed and wonder if I will be
(Continued on page 13)


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 12

















*to find it, just look up


The First
Ten Days of
July Are
Fantastic
for Planet
Gazers


Mark
the
first 10 days of
July as fantas-
tic nights for
planet gazing
because we'll
have Mercury,
Venus and
Jupiter in a
spectacular
early evening planet show! On Friday, July 1st, about an hour after sunset during
evening twilight, face west where you'll still be able to see the best planet duo of
the year. Planet #1 out from the sun, the tiny 3,000 mile wide pink planet Mercury,
will be huddled right next to the brightest planet of them all, planet #2, 8,000 mile
wide Venus. And they will be only one degree apart, which means you could well
cover both of them with your pinky finger stretched at arm's length.
In fact, they were less than one degree apart all throughout the last days of June
and will continue to be extremely close through the first week of July. Although
they are absolutely fabulous to see with the naked eye, if you have a pair of bin-
oculars, use them this weekend and all next week because rarely do we have a
chance to see any two planets so close together.
On Saturday they'll be only one and one-tenth of a degree apart, and on Sunday
they'll be only one and a quarter degree apart. On the night of the 4th, before the
fire works start, make sure you see them because they'll still be only one and a
third degrees apart. On Tuesday, the 5t, they're still only one and a half degrees
from each other, and on Wednesday still extremely close. Then on Thursday, the
7th, something new is added to the scene because they are joined by an exquisitely
thin crescent Moon complete with earthshine which will look like a black full
Moon nestled within the crescent.
Then on Friday, the 8t, you'll observe the most spectacular planetary sight of
July. An even more exquisite crescent Moon will be parked right above Venus and
Mercury. They will knock your socks off with just the naked eye, but if you look
at them through a pair of binoculars you won't believe it! By Saturday, the 9t, the
Moon will have moved past Venus and Mercury and will be parked very close to
Regulus the brightest star of Leo the Lion, and by Sunday, the 10th, will have
moved just beyond it.
So start your Mercury, Venus watch this weekend and look for them before the
fireworks on the 4th of July. Then continue watching each night. Remember that
Friday, the 8th is the best night of them all! On Saturday, the 9th, the Moon is
parked to the right of Regulus and on Sunday, the 10th, up to its left. But please,
please don't miss Friday the 8th which I consider the best night for planet gazing
for all of July. And of course we don't want to leave out the planet king Jupiter
who will be well up and to the left of Regulus although not quite as bright as Ve-
nus but will still dazzle you with his brilliance. If you want to appear really smart
on July 4th, casually show your friends planet #1, planet #2 and planet #5. What a
way to begin the month of July. O Jack Horkheimer


THE 3TARS

HAVE IT
For the week:
July 1 to July 8, 2005
By Astrologer Michael Thiessen


ARIES (Mar. 21- April 20) You have to take hold of your life and make some
crucial decisions. Don't hesitate to look for alternatives that will enable you to raise
the kind of donations you need to do the job right. Relatives may be less than easy
to deal with. Don't make large purchases unless you have discussed your choices
with your mate. Your lucky day this week will be Saturday.
TAURUS (Apr. 21- May 21) Now is a good time to ask for favors. Investments
are best left alone this week. You will gain valuable insight and knowledge through
the experiences you have along the way. Enjoy the company of relatives this week.
Your lucky day this week will be Friday.
GEMINI (May 22-June 21) Be careful not to misplace your wallet or belong-
ings. You must try to lay your cards on the table. Talk to your mate and tell them
how you feel. Secret affairs may only cause complications in your life. Your ener-
getic nature and ability to initiate projects will add to your popularity. Your lucky
day this week will be Friday.
CANCER (June 22-July 22) Don't let your partner start any arguments. Passion
should be redirected positively. Arguments with children or friends may leave you
steaming. You may find that your emotional partner will not be too eager to accom-
modate you. You may cause a fuss if you come on too strongly in public. Your
lucky day this week will be Friday.
LEO (July 23-Aug 22) Try to avoid serious discussions with loved ones. You
will be highly sensitive to comments made by your lover. Make decisions about
your professional objectives. Mingle with those who can help you get ahead. Your
lucky day this week will be Monday.
VIRGO (Aug. 23 -Sept. 23) Emotional situations could bring out your stubborn
nature. Be honest with yourself before getting involved with someone who is likely
to lead you on. Organize all the responsibilities that have to be attended to and
make sure everyone knows what to do. This is not the time to lend or borrow
money or possessions. Your lucky day this week will be Wednesday.
LIBRA (Sept. 24 -Oct. 23) Compromise may be necessary. Don't hesitate to
look for alternatives that will enable you to raise the kind of donations you need to
do the job right. You are best to move quickly and to get in good with the boss.
Don't reveal information that is personal or confidential. Your lucky day this week
will be Monday.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24 Nov. 22) Your talent will be recognized. Problems with
appliances or electrical gad gets will drive you crazy. Refrain from overspending on
entertainment or luxury items. Be careful how you handle friends and relatives,
they may take things the wrong way. Your lucky day this week will be Wednesday.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23 -Dec. 21) Get involved in activities that will bring you
knowledge about foreign lands, philosophies, or cultures. Relatives may be less
than easy to deal with. Females may put demands or added responsibilities on you.
Do not get involved with individuals who are already committed to others. Your
lucky day this week will be Tuesday.
CAPRICORN (Dec 22.- Jan. 20) Deception in your home is evident. Don't beat
around the bush. Get involved in volunteer work that will bring you satisfaction,
not an empty wallet. It will do you some good. You will be in the doghouse if you
are being selfish. Your lucky day this week will be Monday.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 -Feb. 19) Watch your weight gain due to water retention.
Visitors may be likely to drop by. You have to let go of your past if you wish to get
out of any sentimental mood that might be hanging over your head. Try to be hon-
est when dealing with your mate. Your lucky day this week will be Wednesday.
PISCES (Feb. 20-Mar. 20) Don't let relatives make demands of you. Your
health may have suffered due to neglect or abuse. Try to be as mellow as possible.
Be prepared to make changes to your personal documents. Your lucky day this
week will be Monday. 1


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 23











NEW BONAIRE AMBASSADORS


Buddy Dive's Lisa Muehlemann and new Ambassadors Sherry and Les Fulton

The two new ambassadors of Bonaire, Sherry and Les Fulton from Illinois,
love Bonaire because it is not overdeveloped. They started coming to the
island in 1995 with their dive shop, then later on came by themselves. When they
first read about the ambassador program in The Bonaire Reporter they decided that
they wanted to be ambassadors too. They still had about four years to go. Last Fri-
day they reached their goal.
Lisa Muehlemann, Operations Manager of Buddy Dive, had the honor of offi-
cially making them ambassadors. Sherry and Les plan on returning to Buddy Dive
and Bonaire for many years to come. O L.M.


GOAL! HOME RUN! and MUCH MORE!


Bonairean Sports Federation and AMFO 'team up'
to study the Bonairean sports world


F ederashon di Deporte Boneriano
(BSF,Bonairiaanse Sport Fed-
eratie Bonairean Sports Federation) re-
cently invested lots of effort and energy in
reorganizing and restructuring itself. Their
aim is to improve the quality of sports on
Bonaire and make them accessible to all.
They've completed registration with the
government through the Notary, produced ,i
a policy plan covering multiple years, and
most recently completed a study of the
sport world on Bonaire. Handing over the report
Natalie Wanga conducted this study
which included an inventory of all the sports, boards and annual programs that
were active on Bonaire and incorporates an extensive computer database with all
vital information.
This report, Federashon di Deporte Boneriano, Resumen i Programa Anual di
Bondnan Deportivo Boneriano (Bonairean Sport Federation, Report and Annual
Program of the Bonairean Sport Confederations) was personally delivered on June
16t by Ms. Wanga to Mr. Hugo Semper, Chairman of the Federashon di Deporte
Boneriano. The Federation wishes to thank all the people, authorities and organi-
zations that contributed to the effort. Special recognition goes to the sport organi-
zations, NGO Platform and AMFO. 1 Natalie A.C. Wanga


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 15

























JANART GALLERY
Kaya Gloria 7, Bonaire Local Art, Art
Supplies, Framing, and Art Classes.
Open Tu-We-Th & Sat 10 am- 5 pm Fri-
day 1- 7 pm; or phone 717-5246 for
appt.


BONAIRENET
The leading consumer and business
information source on Bonaire. Tele-
phone (599) 717-7160. For on-line yel-
low pages directory information go to



CAPT. DON'S ISLAND GROWER
Trees and plants, Bonaire grown.
8000m2 nursery. Specializing in garden/
septic pumps and irrigation. Kaminda
Lagoen 103, Island Growers NV (Capt.
Don and Janet). Phone: 786-0956 or
787-0956


Bonaire Images
Elegant greeting cards and beautiful
boxed note cards are now available at
Chat-N-Browse nest to Lovers Ice
Cream and Sand Dollar.
Photography by Shelly Craig
www.bonaireimages.com


For Sale

For Sale- 4 Extra Large Suitcases
with wheels. Several used one time
only. Paid $100.00 each; will sell for
NAf100,00 each. Call 786-3134

Compaq w i d e screen Laptop
Computer, 512MB,DVD/CDRW,
Wireless LAN, 2.5yr WARRANTY,
FREE CARRYING CASE US$1,500
tel:791-4606 after 5pm




Re nta Is

For Rent: Comfortable 2-bedroom
beach villa-weekly or monthly-choice
location-privacy & security. Phone
(Bon) (599) 717 3293; (US) (570) 586
0098. May 20 until Jan. 8th.
info@pelicanreefbonaire.com or www.
pelicanreefbonaire.com -


W~--a n to aC4
Volunteers needed to index back is-
sues of The Bonaire Reporter (English)
and Extra (Papiamentu). Call George at
717-8988 or 786-6125.


Picture
withr thce


Yourself


Game Reserve, South Africa

I'll ...


Marjon Minderhout, who lives in Switzerland, came to Bonaire for the first
time in 1976 and has holidayed here many more times. Recently she was
in a private game reserve in South Africa and remembered to have her photo taken
with The Bonaire Reporter. After the photo shoot she and her family traveled
through the park and saw a few animals you never see on Bonaire like giraffes,
white rhino, antelope, ostrich and lots of beautiful birds. 1 G.D.
WIN GREAT PRIZES! Take a copy of The Bonaire Reporter with you on your next
trip or when you return to your home. Then take a photo of yourself with the newspaper
in hand. THE BEST PHOTOS OF THE YEAR WILL WIN THE PRIZES. Mail photos
to Bonaire Reporter, Kaya Gob. Debrot 200-6, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles (AN). E-
mail to: picture@bonairereporter.com. i,. .ii 21 1 41 photos are eligible.) D


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 14


Got something to buy or sell?
REACH MORE READERS than any other WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
by advertising in THE BONAIRE REPORTER
Non-Commercial Classified Ads (up to 4 lines/ 20 words):
FREE FREE FREE FREE
Commercial Ads only NAf0.70 per word, per week.
Free adds run for 2 weeks.
Call or fax 717-8988 or email ads@bonairereporter.com












e O I N I Ne n d E TaR S0 .EO pUd A GI


(Pit Bull Letter. Continued from page 4)
tacked. Photographs were taken and the
vet was called to come and put the ani-
mals that were barely alive out of their
misery. Three sheep that lived through
the attack were treated for many wounds
to the face and neck; one sustained a bro-
ken nose as well. They are now slowly
healing. Miraculously, I found another
newborn lamb that didn't have a scratch
on it baa-ing near a hurt sheep. It was
looking for its mother who lay dead
about three feet away. It is doing well
and being bottle-fed. That's the good
news!
The bad news is that the Pit Bull is
still alive, chained in the owner's
yard! The owner said that there was a
new lock on the gate to keep their "pet"
and watchdog in. It was not chained up
the morning of the attack and it got out!
My fear is that if this vicious dog could
kill seven defenseless sheep, what will
keep it from killing again? Why wasn't
this animal killed and taken out of our
neighborhood? A friend who is an emer-
gency room doctor told me that this type
of dog will kill again once it has tasted
blood and that it kills things that are
about its eye level! So, if you live in
Hato, keep an eye on your pets and
kids! I hope we don't read in
The Reporter that a child is seriously
injured or killed by this beast before it is
destroyed. Oh, and perhaps the owners


of this horrible Pit Bull should keep their
young daughter inside, far away from
their 'pet' dog! Maggie Fuller


LEAKY PIPES
Dear Editor,
Attached to this mail are pictures
which I made on June 21st 2005.
The first time I noticed there was a
leak in the pipeline from the WEB, I
called the so called "Departamentu di
Storing" and told the guy on duty there
was a leak at Lima in Belnem. They told
me that they would sendsomeone to fix
the leak. That phone call was Thursday,
June 9th!!!
I called again on Saturday the 11th
early evening. They apparently also do
not work on weekends, because the trees
started to get green.
And to my big surprise when I walked
by several times last week, still no leak
fix. And the trees got greener by the day.
Today, June 21st I walked by again, and
noticed they still haven't done anything!!


Reader comments limited to 500 words will be considered for inclusion in the
"Letters" department. All letters must be signed However, we will withhold
names on request.


That is how serious they take a phone
call from someone who notices while
walking the dogs.
So that is why I send you this mail
with the photos, maybe you are willing
to place them in the reporter and let the
people of Bonaire know what happens
with the increase of the water- and elec-
tricity bill! It for the trees on the side of
the road.
My girlfriend and I are wondering who
is going to pay all this loss of water. In
the end the people of Bonaire are paying
the bill. I am sure the management team
from the WEB doesn't!!
Where is all this? At Lima in Belnem.
Lima is the last sideway left on the long
road to Sorobon, in Belnem. The road
doesn't end but goes in a circle around a
house and goes back to the road to Soro-
bon. In the curve, about 6 meters away
from the road, there lies a pipeline which
goes all the way in to the "knoek" and
feeds construction sides and houses close
to the airport.
Why do I send this to The Reporter.
Because in the first place, I think it is a
waste of good water. The procedure of
making fresh water out of seawater like
the WEB does, is very expensive. And
because we live with just a few here, we
have to pay a lot.
In the second place, if you ask me,
people who are working at the WEB,
doing their "storing" shift, have not
learned anything from the big fire last
Camaval. If there is something wrong,
no matter what, fix it!!
That way you show the people of Bon-
aire that the WEB is serious and worth


every penny! We are a long way from
that! Silvan Henneman
The daily press last week reported that
WEB was ,,i. i, ... -, .- on the pipe
problems in Belnem. Ed.

BEAUTY IN SUSHI
"When one takes a drive along Bon-
aire's east coast, gralliti has shown up
even there. Not spray p.i, but ugly
sculptures of litter and garbage that
someone has left as a monument to their
ego. "BB (from 6/24/ 05 Edition of B.R.)

Dear Editor:
I really fail to see the ugliness in the
"monuments" erected on the south end
of our island. In the 20 plus years I have
lived here, I have always marveled at the
creativity of the mysterious sculptor
whose work has brought many smiles
and even a few laughs to our visitors.
They have even appeared in articles and
newspapers around the world.
Obviously, BB (whoever you are) is a
newcomer and is offended and it is cer-
tainly their right. I might then suggest
since the recycled material is already
conveniently piled up, they can easily
find an old feed bag and remove it to the
landfill. My Bonairean friends have told
me they know who the artist is and they
are not offended a bit. (I also have a
feeling I know who it is as well...) An-
other great place to see the creative use
of "sushi" is at FKPD (Pasa Dia) in Rin-
con. They sell great souvenirs that are
worth the short drive north.
Michael Gaynor


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 5











flotsam and Jetsam
(Continued from page 3) --
Curagao's Venezue-
lan-owned Isla oil re-
finery. Why? It's be-
cause the discharge
of sulfur dioxide
(SO2) by the refinery
is enormous. According to figures the
Foundation for a Clean Environment in
Curagao (SMOC) released last week,
the refinery discharged almost 78 mil-
lion kilo of sulfur dioxide in 2001. The
discharge for the entire country of the
Netherlands was 75 million kilos in that
same year. One refinery, Shell Pernis,
that processes twice as much crude oil
as the Isla, discharged only 16 million
kilos.
The enormous discharges mean that
the refinery's equipment is in need of
repair or replacement, since nothing has
been upgraded to reduce those emis-
sions since the last century. SO2 has a
detrimental effect on the health of peo-
ple living close to the refinery. SMOC
is demanding that the Curagao govern-
ment take action to remedy the problem.


SA Dutch lawayer and translator
made an English translation of Book I
of the Netherlands Antilles Civil
Code, "Family Law and the Law of
Persons.'" He sent the Public Prosecutor
a copy who thinks this is very
interesting for all English speaking
persons living on Bonaire. If you are
interested, please contact him.

A The Antillean Parliament approved
a bill requiring social education duty
for young jobless school dropouts
amid much debate on whether it was
doing so under pressure of the Dutch
Government's plan to introduce an ad-
mittance regulation for Antillean young-
sters traveling to Holland. Antillean
youths have a higher incidence of ar-
rests in Holland than do European
Dutch youngsters. Supposedly, if a per-
son from 16-24 has passed the "social
education program" he/she can be ad-
mitted into Holland without restriction.
The compulsory program has been in
the works for a while and there is a pilot
project underway but not getting much
enrollment.


SA serious effort to speed up im-
migration permits was announced by
Minister of Justice David Dick early
last week. The welcome announcement
followed lengthy talks with the Lt. Gov-
ernors of the respective Island Territo-
ries. Dick says the entire Immigration
System needs streamlining. It's a con-
clusion arrived at years ago by business,
bona fide immigrants, visiting yachts-
men and people who have decided to
reside here. Bonaire's Immigration offi-
cials had already extended the two-week
reporting requirement to four weeks.
Minister Dick, who comes from the
private sector, believes the current sys-
tem is ridiculously bureaucratic and, as
a consequence, frustrates economic
growth and often creates situations bor-
dering on violation of human rights.
One of our island's business leaders
hopes the "reforms" will go beyond the
improvement in issuing permits.
Streamlining the Immigration System
has to change basic thinking about
"immigration." He said that currently a
negative approach dominates. It appears
aimed more at making immigration dif-
ficult rather than at serving the econ-
omy. On Bonaire the argument that the
local labor market needs protection is
often stretching a point and overprotec-
tion reduces productivity.

S Last Sun-
day, 19t of
June, an :
anonymous
caller con-

STINAPA
that people
were spear
fishing at
Bachelor's Beach. According to the
Marine Ordinance, it is forbidden to fish
in the Bonaire Marine Park with a spear
gun or handheld spear. It is also forbid-
den to transport a spear gun or handheld
spear on public ground (or water), to
have in one's possession, or to buy or
sell spear gunned fish.
The rangers arrived at the beach by
boat and picked-up and caught two
spear fishermen in the act. They came
out of the water wearing dive equipment
and carrying a dive bag full of fish, but
left the spear gun behind. The rangers
seized the bag with fish and also sur-
faced the spear gun. Both hunters were
taken to the Police Station with the
spear gun, dive gear and fish. The case
will be handled by the court of justice.
STINAPA wants to thank the anony-
mous caller. Without his help, they said
they would not have been able to stop
this illegal activity.
Whenever you see someone spear
fishing or other illegal activities going
on in the Marine Park, contact
STINAPA at: 717-8444 or 786-9603.

A Now all NGOs ("Non-Profit" Non
Government Organizations) can have
their own Web page and e-mail con-
nection free thanks to an initiative by
Bonaire's NGO Platform via the Plat-
form's new website, www.
NGOBonaire.org. Each NGO will have
a single private e-mail address, even the
Platform will
"We'd like every Bonaire NGO to
have a web site and e-mail address,"
said James Finies President of the Plat-


Page 8


form. "If the NGO doesn't have a com-
puter they can use the one installed for
their use at Platform headquarters."
"For people of our island it is becom-
ing very important to communicate rap-
idly and precisely," said Elsmarie Beu-
kenboom, Platform Secretary. "The
Platform wants each NGO to have a
chance to use this important media."


P On Sunday night between 2 and 8
pm the police zero tolerance team con-
ducted an enforcement action di-
rected at scooters and motorcycles.
They confiscated 10 scooters and a mo-
torcycle and gave out 19 summonses
(proses verbal) for various infractions,
mostly related to not having a license to
operate a two-wheeled vehicle. There
was also an arrest for drug possession
and another for failing to comply with
the order of a policeman. The majority
of drivers stopped did not have the
proper license to operate their scooters
and as a result scooter rental operators
will be encouraged to ensure that their
renters have a license that qualifies them
to operate the vehicles they rent.
A diner at a street-side restaurant won-
dered if they had impounded the ex-
tremely loud motorcycle that had passed
him earlier in the day.


Sharon Bol runs the Bonaire
DCNA office


Natalee Holloway Disappearance and
Antilles/Aruba Law

N atalee Holloway, an 18 year-old
Alabama girl, disappeared May
30 hours before she was to return home
from a trip to Aruba with other students
celebrating graduation. The case has
drawn international attention and has even
tainted Bonaire. At press time four men
are in custody, but not charged with a
crime. According to published reports,
Joran van der Sloot (17) admitted "making
out" with the girl in the back seat of the
car at a beach where the three took her. i
The Dutch teen and his two friends are
still in jail. Three other men arrested and i
held have been released. Investigators Reportedly these three young men
from Aruba and the USA continue to look were the last persons to see Natalee
for evidence behind the disappearance Holloway alive. They are in custody.

The Legal Process
The arrest and detention procedures may be confusing to some as they are based on
principles different from American or English traditions and legal codes. The Nether-
lands Antilles and Aruba are overseas Dutch territories withjudicial systems mod-
eled after the Dutch structure, in which people can be arrested on suspicion of a
crime, but not formally charged until later.
International law expert Theodore Simon explained about the differences between
US and Dutch law in connection with the Natalee Holloway disappearance but it
may prove informative to our readers as the same principles apply in Bonaire.
In the Antilles and Aruba people can be held without any formal charges filed.
All authorities need is some indication that the person may have been involved, and
then they can be arrested and held for a substantial period of time. In the US, a per-
son cannot be arrested unless there's probable cause. And probable cause has been
defined as facts and circumstances based on reasonably trustworthy information that
would warrant a prudent person into believing a crime was committed and the person
to be arrested committed it.
Initially a person can be held by the police for two days. They're not required to
bring them before a magistrate until 72 hours have passed. And the initial two can be
extended for eight days and then two more periods of eight days if the magistrate
concurs. So that's about 26 days; and then another four months. So a person can be
held up to 146 days without being charged with a crime.
Once charged with a crime the accused appears in front of a single judge and is
tried. If convicted, they have the right to a trial de novo, which, in effect, means a do
over, and have a trial in front of a three-judge panel. However, that may seem helpful
to the defense. On the other hand, if they are acquitted at the single judge trial, the
government can appeal -- something that could not happen in the US. There is no
jury trial in the Dutch/Antillean/Aruban system.
While the person charged will appear in front of a single judge, they retain the
same standard of being proven beyond a reasonable doubt. But a single judge will
render judgment of guilt or non-guilt. The verdict can get appealed before at three-
judge tribunal, and finally either party could appeal to The Hague in the Netherlands
for questions of law.
Both in the US and the Dutch system there's the right to be free from self incrimi-
nation. The accused cannot be required to testify against him or herself. And if they
don't testify, no adverse inference can be drawn. 11


A The Dutch Caribbean Nature Al-
liance (DCNA) opened their head-
quarters in Kaya Grandi # 20 this
past week Former Bonaire National
Marine Park Manager Kalli De Meyer's
initiatives and hard work to found an
organization, dedicated to the long term
preservation and conservation of nature
within the Netherlands Antilles have
finally paid off. (See story on page 17
for information.)
After almost two years of preparation
the Dutch Caribbean Nature Alliance
officially started April 1st of 2005 with
Kalli as its Executive Director. She was
recently joined by Sharon Bol, who will
be the Office Manager for DCNA's
headquarters on Bonaire.

A REMINDER-take the fantastic
Lac Bay discovery boat trip on Sunday.
Then attend Art Day. See page 19 -
What's Happening-for details. O G./L.D


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005











Flotsam and Jetsam (Continued from page 2)
Following public demonstrations of
outrage because of unavailable flights,
Minister of Transport and Communica-
tion, Omayra Leeflang, had announced
a few weeks ago that Suriname Airways
would fly the Curagao-St. Maarten
route as of Friday, June 24, but it didn't
happen.

A DAE's Chief Executive Officer
Floris van Palland a former CEO of
several of Royal Dutch Airline KLM's
spin-offs, when asked about the '...
Express Airlines' on-time perform-
ance, one of the major complaints of
passengers, said improving this was
"a number one priority." "We have
already done a lot, although people
wouldn't have noticed it right away. It
is a process," he said, explaining that
several ATRs had been swapped for
new ones from Europe that have just
completed their big check-up. In addi-
tion, the company has been increasing
its spare parts reserve. "The chance that
you don't have that specific part is
much smaller," he said, adding that the
program is almost completed. DAE's
major shareholder is Bonaire resident,
Niek Sandmann, (reports by Suzanne
Koelega- SMH)

A Princess
Maxima, the
wife of Dutch
Crown
Prince Wil-
lem-
Alexander,
gave birth
Sunday to a healthy baby daughter.
The new princess was named Alexia
Juliana Marcela Laurentien, and be-
comes third in line to the Dutch throne
after her father and her sister, Princess
Catharina-Amalia, who was born on
Dec. 7, 2003. The newborn, weighed
3.4 kilograms (7.69 pounds).
The prince denied she was named af-
ter the illegitimate French daughter of
his grandfather, the late Queen Juliana's
deceased husband, Prince Bernhard.
Prince Bernhard's offspring's existence
was only recognized in an interview
published last year. "She is named after
me," said Prince Willem-Alexander.

A Central Bank President Emsley
Tromp reported that the Antilles na-
tional debt is NAf2.4 billion. Add
Curagao's NAf 1.5 billion debt and you
get a figure that is more than the entire


country's gross domestic product of
NAf3.7 billion.
Bonaire's share of the national debt is
NAf243.8 million it has no ability to
borrow money on its own as do Cura-
gao and St. Maarten..
If the islands were to split up under
the current circumstances they would
start their new status with those debts.
Since that would be an unworkable sce-
nario for most islands,
On the total Antillean debt of NAf4.8
billion, NAf273 million was paid in
interest alone last year, 23 cents out of
every guilder collected in taxes and 16
per cent of all government expendi-
tures. Another NAf378 million guilders
was borrowed in 2004.
The Central Bank itself made a profit
of NAf 50 million in 2004, which goes
to the Central Government. A consider-
able part of that comes from the 1 per
cent license fee people pay when con-
ducting financial transactions in US
dollars.


Hello tourist preparation


t As is customary this time of year,
6th grade students from the island's
elementary schools will take part in
the "Hello Tourist" program. Hello
Tourist is a TCB initiative to acquaint
Bonaire's chlidren with the tourist
business that powers the local economy.
The children will learn what being a
tourist means by visiting typical
attractions, shops and the various
resorts
Participating in the program are
Flamingo Airport, Taxis, Goddard
Catering, Captain Don's Habitat, Plaza
Resort, Sand Dollar, Divi Flamingo
Beach Resort, Bel Mar and the SGB.
Sponsors of the event are Maduro &
Curiels Bank, TELBO N.V., Consales
Cash & Carry and Panaderia Seruva.

A You can even smell it in Bonaire
when the wind comes from the west;
(Continued on page 8)


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 3













WHAT'S HAPPENING


WEEKLY MOVIE IHOWTINES

Late Show
Cal/to make sure (Usually 9 pm)
The Hitchhiker's
Guide to the Galaxy
(Martin Freeman)
Early Show (Usually 7 pm)
Kingdom of Heaven
Kaya Prinses Marie
Behind Exito Bakery
Tel. 717-2400
Tickets NAf10,50 (incl. Tax)
High Schoolers NAf7,75
NEW FILMS BEGIN FRIDAY
CLOSED MONDAY TUESDAY
AND WEDNESDAY
SATURDAY 4 PM
Because of Winn-Dixie


THIS WEEK

Friday, July 1-Captain Dons 80thBirth-
day Party Celebration
Saturday, July 2-Rincon Marshe

Sunday, July 3-Lac Bay discovery boat
trip. Meet at Boka di Coco (across from
Mangrove/Kayak Center on dirt road to
Cai) 7 am to mid-afternoon. Sponsored by
"Amigunan di Naturalesa" ("Friends of the
Environment) to benefit Bonaire partici-
pants in Vierdaagse Nijmegen (Four Day
Walk at Nijmegen, Holland). Sign up at
Extra newspaper office. (tel. 717-8482).
Adults, NAf25; Children NAf 15. See page
22.

Sunday, July 3-The Fundashon for Art
and Culture will hold its 13th Annual Art
Day with art exhibits, music, performing
arts, food and drinks. Anyone interested in
exhibiting at the event can contact volun-
teers at 717-6420 cell 786-6420, or email
artandculture65 @hotmail.com.

Monday, July 4-US holiday. Fireworks
at some resorts

COMING
July 17-24 Diva's Women Windsurf
Week- Learn to windsurf clinic Contact
Ann Phelan 786-3134 or email
ann bonairewindsurfing.com www.
bonairecaribbean.com 3 local scholarships
still available for teen or local women. To
apply contact Ann Phelan.

The International Bonaire Sailing
Regatta October 9 15, 2005


MICRO MOVIE REVIEW
Seen recently in
Movieland Cinema:

Kingdom of Heaven by Ridley Scott
starring Orlando Bloom and Liam Neeson.
This is a rich, sometimes overwhelming
and excellent film. Compared with
Gladiator, another great film by Ridley
Scott, it has the same huge scenes, incredi-
ble special effects and fantastic directing
so you leave the cinema wondering what
hit you. It lacks, however, the emotional
attachment you experienced with the main
character Maximus, played by Russel
Crowe. Orlando Bloom as Balian does a
fine job in Kingdom of Heaven but he
never manages to get under your skin. I
was pleased that this film treats religions
equally. There is good and evil, fanaticism
and forgiveness on both sides. I definitely
recommend this film, and I will see it
more than once. 1 Dodo

EVERY WEEK

Saturday Rincon Marshe open 6 am 2
pm. Enjoy a Bonairean breakfast while you
shop: fresh fruits and vegetables, gifts, lo-
cal sweets and snacks, arts and handicrafts,
candles, incense, drinks and music. www.
infobonaire.com/rincon
Sunday -Live music 6 to 9 pm while enjoy-
ing a great dinner in colorful tropical ambi-
ance at the Chibi Chibi Restaurant &
Bar. Open daily 5 to 10 pm. Live Fla-
Bingo-great prizes, 7 pm, Divi Flamingo
Monday -Soldachi Tour of Rincon, the
heart of Bonaire, 9 am-noon. $20-Call
Maria 717-6435
Tuesday -Harbour Village Tennis, Social
Round Robin 7 to 10 pm. $10 per person.
Cash bar. All invited. Call Elisabeth Vos at
565-5225 /717-7500, ext. 14.
Wednesday -Meditation at Donkey Beach
from 7:30 to 8:30 pm. Open to all. Call S.
H.Y. 790-9450
Friday -Manager's Rum Punch Party,
Buddy Dive Resort, 5:30-6:30 pm
Friday- Open House with Happy Hour
at the JanArt Gallery at Kaya Gloria #7,
from 5-7 pm.
Daily- The Divi Flamingo Casino is open
daily for hot slot machines, roulette and
blackjack, Monday to Saturday 8 pm- 4
am; Sunday 7 pm- 3 am.
Every day by appointment -Rooi
Lamoenchi Kunuku Park Tours Bo-
nairean kunuku. $12 (NAf 12 for resi-
dents). Tel 717-8489, 540-9800.

FREE SLIDE/VIDEO SHOWS
Saturday- Discover Our Diversity Slide
Show, pool bar Buddy Dive, 7 pm 717-
5080
Sunday Bonaire Holiday -Multi-media


I -: e->- -t N ctcF-- I


W e mentioned "Rafaello,"
this beautiful white male
kitty, a couple of weeks ago when
we featured "Natasha." It's be-
cause the two of them are such
good pals and so easy going. Su-
premely relaxed Rafaello has sky
blue eyes which go so well with
his snowy white coat. Some say
that blue-eyed white cats are deaf,
but this is certainly not true for
Rafaello. He's alert, can hear eve-
rything and is very much aware of
his surroundings. This handsome
fellow was found in Antriol and
brought into the Bonaire Animal Shel-
ter where he passed all his health and
"sociability" tests! He's had all his
shots and is ready to go.
As we've said so many times, all the
animals who are up for adoption at the
Shelter are in good health, have good
attitudes regarding people and are, or

dual-projector production by Albert Bian-
culli, 8.30 pm, Capt. Don's Habitat.
Monday Dee Scarr's Touch the Sea slide
experience. Aquarius Conference Center,
Capt. Don's Habitat, 8:30-9:30pm.
Wednesday (2nd and 4th) Turtle Conserva-
tion Slide Show by Andy Uhr. Carib Inn
seaside veranda, 7 pm
Thursday from June 16 to July 28, Basic
Fish ID Yellow Submarine Dive Shop at
6:30 pm
Friday- Week in Review Video Presenta-
tion by the Toucan Dive Shop at Plaza's
Tipsy Seagull, 5 pm. 717-2500.


CLUBS and MEETINGS
AA meetings every Wednesday; Phone 717-
6105; 560-7267 or 717- 3902.
Al-Anon meetings every Monday eve-
ning at 7 pm. Call 790-7272
Weekly BonaireTalker Gathering and
Dinner at Gibi's Tuesday 6:30pm call
567-0655 for directions.
Bridge Club Wednesdays, 7:30 pm at
the Union Building on KayaKorona, across
from the RBTT Bank and next to Kooy-
man's. All levels invited NAf5 entry fee. Call
Cathy 566-4056.
Darts Club plays every other Sunday at
City Caf6. Registration at 4, games at 5.
Tel. 717-2950, 560-7539.
JCI. First Wednesday of the Month- Jun-
ior Chamber International Bonaire (JCI
Bonaire or formerly known as Bonaire Jay-
cees) meets at the ABVO building,
Kaminda Jato Baco 36 from 7:30 to
9:30pm. Everyone is welcome. Contact:
Renata Domacasse 516-4252.


"Rafaello"


will be, sterilized. You can't beat a pet
from the Shelter! As of June 24 there
have been 82 adoptions since the first
of the year. Thanks to the staff and the
volunteers for consistently doing such a
fine job with the resident pets! OL.D.



Kiwanis Club meets at APNA Plaza, Kaya
International, every other Tuesday, 7
pm. Tel. 717-5595, Jeannette Rodriguez.
Lions Club meets every 2nd and 4th
Thursday of the month at 8 pm at Kaya
Sabana # 1. All Lions are welcome.
Rotary lunch meetings Wednesday, 12
noon-2 pm Rendez-Vous Restaurant,
Kaya L.D. Gerharts #3. All Rotarians are
welcome. Tel. 717-8454

BONAIRE'S TRADITIONS
Mangasina di Rei, Rincon. Enjoy the view from
"The King's Storehouse."Leam about Bonaire's
culture. Visit typical homes from the 17th cen-
tury. Daily. Call 717-4060 / 790-2018
Visit the Bonaire Museum on Kaya J. v.d. Ree,
behind the Catholic Church intown. Open week-
days from am-noon, 1:30-5 pm. Tel. 717-8868
Washington-Slagbaai National Park,
Museum and Visitors' Center. Open
daily 8 am-5 pm. Closed on some holidays.
717-8444/785-0017
Sunday at Cai- Live music and dancing
starts about 12 noon at Lac Cai. Dance to
the music of Bonaire's popular musicians.
Rincon Marshe- every Saturday 6 am to
3 pm. Open market in Bonaire's historic
town.
Soldachi Tours show you the Rincon
area. Alta Mira Nature Walking Tour at
6:30 am. Town Walking tour at 9:30,
Bus Tour at 10. Call Maria at 717-6435 to
reserve.


Send events to The Bonaire Reporter
Email reporter(abonairenews.com
Tel/Fax. 717-8988, Cel. 791-7252


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 19












Youth Tennis Tourney

Four weekends of youth tennis, all
sponsored by RBTT, was on the
agenda of lots of Bonaire kids. Monthly
competition started in September of last
year, and almost 80 kids from 4-17 years-
old participated. On May 29th the top 4 in
each category was decided. The finals
were held on the next two weekends. The Lots of Tennis for Bonaire
winners of the 10, 12, 14 and 18 year old Kids In June
age groups are promised places in the
RBTT Caribbean Tournament in October in Aruba. Nearly 70 kids participated,
and for four days the Harbour Village Tennis Center boomed with children and
proud parents.

The final results:
Winners Runners up
Mini: Chananja Zijlstra Mavelly Velandia 4-1
Mini: Ties van den Ouweelen- Constantijn Bottrop 4-2
Tm 8 : Kaile Finies- Zaira Groenendal 4-1
Tm 8: Jevon May- Jose Alfredo Miranda 4-0
Tm 10: Amanda Thielman Kaile Finies 4-0
Tm 10: Denzel el Hage Amd Chirino 4-1;4-2
Tm 12: Mary-Jo Lendering- Chelsey Domacasse 4-1;4-1
Tm 12: Win Chung Xuan- Kevin Abdul 4-3;4-1
Tm 14: Thammy Albertsz Nikita van Ooijen 4-0;4-0
Tm 14: Daniel Carillo Lothar May 4-1;4-2
Tm 18: Daniella Bissessar -
Tm 18: David Conquet Quinsy Olij 4-2;4-2

A/B: 1/2e place: Daniel Carillo beat Francisco Valerio 8-4
A/B: 3e/4e place: Paulo Allee beat Kevin Abdul 8-4
C: 1e/2" place: Nikita van Ooijen beat Denzel el Hage 6-4
C: 3"/4' place: Damian Frans beat Max van Ooijen :6-4
D: 1'/2e place: Nadia Dabboussi beat Kaile Finies 4-0
D: 3"/4' place: Zaira Groenendal beat Keval Bissessar 4-2
E: 1I/2" place: SarahAn Maartense beat Josephine Marshall 10-9
E: 3e/4e place: Ties vd Ouweelen beat Canric Wout 10-9

This competition starts again in September; Elisabeth Vos organizes it at the
Harbour Village Tennis Center. For information you can reach her at tel 717-6907
or 565-5225 or e-mail at elisabeth@flamingotv.net. The competition is open for
all Bonaire children starting from mini-tennis until tournament players (max, 17
years old). O Elisabeth Vos


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 18











Bonar Team Heads for te Culna 0 cs

B onaire's
dream
team of top
chefs and a
bartender
headed out last
Sunday to
compete in the
"Taste of the
Caribbean"
culinary com-
petition in Mi-
ami. This is the
third time that
Bonaire has
sent a team to
the event.
They'll com-
pete against 12 Taking offfrom Flamingo airport last Sunday: Brad Conner,
other teams Floris van Loo, Rolando "Ricky" Janzen, Vernon "Nonchi" Mar-
made up of the tijn, Isidoor van Riemsdijk, Tico Marsera, Laura DeSalvo.
best profes-
sional chefs from 12 other Caribbean islands: Anguilla, Aruba, Bahamas, Barba-
dos, British Virgin Island, Cayman Islands, Curaqao, Puerto Rico, St. Lucia, St.
Maarten/St. Martin, Trinidad & Tobago and the US Virgin Islands.
It takes a lot of work and dedication on the part of these professionals who al-
ready put in long hours in their restaurants. The team has had a lot of island sup-
port the people and businesses of Bonaire who've enabled them to put on numer-
ous fund-raising lunches and dinners to hone their culinary skills.
Representing Bonaire are: Rolando "Ricky" Janzen (Divi Flamingo Resort), Pas-
try Chef Isidoor van Riemsdijk and Floris van Loo (Rum Runners Restaurant) and
Tico Marsera (Den Laman). Coach is "Taste" veteran, Vernon "Nonchi" Martijn.
Bartender is Brad Conner (Rum Runners). Accompanying the team will be Coordi-
nator Sara Matera of the Culinar Foundation and Reporter Editor Laura DeSalvo
for on-site reporting.
Find out how the team did in next week's edition. OL.D.


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 12











NEW BONAIRE AMBASSADORS


Buddy Dive's Lisa Muehlemann and new Ambassadors Sherry andLes Fulton

The two new ambassadors of Bonaire, Sherry and Les Fulton from Illinois,
love Bonaire because it is not overdeveloped. They started coming to the
island in 1995 with their dive shop, then later on came by themselves. When they
first read about the ambassador program in The Bonaire Reporter they decided that
they wanted to be ambassadors too. They still had about four years to go. Last Fri-
day they reached their goal.
Lisa Muehlemann, Operations Manager of Buddy Dive, had the honor of offi-
cially making them ambassadors. Sherry and Les plan on returning to Buddy Dive
and Bonaire for many years to come. 1 L.M.


GOAL! HOME RUN! and MUCH MORE!


Bonairean Sports Federation and AMFO 'team up'
to study the Bonairean sports world


F ederashon di Deporte Boneriano
(BSF,Bonairiaanse Sport Fed-
eratie Bonairean Sports Federation) re-
cently invested lots of effort and energy in |
reorganizing and restructuring itself. Their -
aim is to improve the quality of sports on ,
Bonaire and make them accessible to all. p "
They've completed registration with the
government through the Notary, produced .
a policy plan covering multiple years, and SR
most recently completed a study of the
sport world on Bonaire. Handing over the report
Natalie Wanga conducted this study
which included an inventory of all the sports, boards and annual programs that
were active on Bonaire and incorporates an extensive computer database with all
vital information.
This report, Federashon di Deporte Boneriano, Resumen i Programa Anual di
Bondnan Deportivo Boneriano (Bonairean Sport Federation, Report and Annual
Program of the Bonairean Sport Confederations) was personally delivered on June
16t by Ms. Wanga to Mr. Hugo Semper, Chairman of the Federashon di Deporte
Boneriano. The Federation wishes to thank all the people, authorities and organi-
zations that contributed to the effort. Special recognition goes to the sport organi-
zations, NGO Platform and AMFO. 1 Natalie A.C. Wanga


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


I


Page 15


























JANART GALLERY
Kaya Gloria 7, Bonaire Local Art, Art
Supplies, Framing, and Art Classes.
Open Tu-We-Th & Sat 10 am- 5 pm Fri-
day 1- 7 pm; or phone 717-5246 for
appt.


BONAIRENET
The leading consumer and business
information source on Bonaire. Tele-
phone (599) 717-7160. For on-line yel-
low pages directory information go to
http://www.yellowpagesbonaire.com


CAPT. DON'S ISLAND GROWER
Trees and plants, Bonaire grown.
8000m2 nursery. Specializing in garden/
septic pumps and irrigation. Kaminda
Lagoen 103, Island Growers NV (Capt.
Don and Janet). Phone: 786-0956 or
787-0956


Bonaire Images
Elegant greeting cards and beautiful
boxed note cards are now available at
Chat-N-Browse nest to Lovers Ice
Cream and Sand Dollar.
Photography by Shelly Craig
www.bonaireimages.com


For Sale

For Sale- 4 Extra Large Suitcases
with wheels. Several used one time
only. Paid $100.00 each; will sell for
NAf100,00 each. Call 786-3134

Compaq w i d e screen Laptop
Computer, 512MB,DVD/CDRW,
Wireless LAN, 2.5yr WARRANTY,
FREE CARRYING CASE US$1,500
tel:791-4606 after 5pm



Srope rtyr

Re nta Is

For Rent: Comfortable 2-bedroom
beach villa-weekly or monthly-choice
location-privacy & security. Phone
(Bon) (599) 717 3293; (US) (570) 586
0098. May 20 until Jan. 8th.
info@pelicanreefbonaire.com or www.
pelicanreefbonaire.com -


Picture Youtrs elf
witf thRe Reotorter

Game Reserve, South Africa


Marjon Minderhout, who lives in Switzerland, came to Bonaire for the first
time in 1976 and has holidayed here many more times. Recently she was
in a private game reserve in South Africa and remembered to have her photo taken
with The Bonaire Reporter. After the photo shoot she and her family traveled
through the park and saw a few animals you never see on Bonaire like giraffes,
white rhino, antelope, ostrich and lots of beautiful birds. O G.D.
WIN GREAT PRIZES! Take a copy of The Bonaire Reporter with you on your next
trip or when you return to your home. Then take a photo of yourself with the newspaper
in hand. THE BEST PHOTOS OF THE YEAR WILL WIN THE PRIZES. Mail photos
to Bonaire Reporter, Kaya Gob. Debrot 200-6, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles (AN). E-
mail to: picture@Obonairereporter.com. (All 2004 photos are eligible.) D


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 14


Got something to buy or sell?
REACH MORE READERS than any other WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
by advertising in THE BONAIRE REPORTER
Non-Commercial Classified Ads (up to 4 lines/ 20 words):

FREE FREE FREE FREE
Commercial Ads only NAf0.70 per word, per week.
Free adds run for 2 weeks.
Call or fax 717-8988 or email ads@bonairereporter.com











FEMALE LOGGERHEAD 'HAPPY' IS THE


SECOND TURTLE TO BE


TRACKED IN 2005 NESTING SEASON


Volunteers Isaiah J. Pardo, Jose Bernabela, Andy Uhr and STCB staff Gielmon
"Funchi" Egbreghts releasing the adult female loggerhead fitted with a trans-
mitter sponsored by the Rotterdam Zoo.


Piedra So -

Golfing in the Wilds of Bonaire


t all started as
a hobby one
man's hobby. I used
to play golf in Hol-
land before coming
to Bonaire. Then,
when I was plan-
ning a trip back to
Holland after nine
years I wanted to
play golf with my
friends. But since it
had been so long
since I'd played, I
wanted to be pre-
pared. So I thought,
"I'll find a spot
where nobody can
see me practice -
somewhere far
away." I ended up
on the east coast at Punto Blanco where
the chicken farm is. There, in the middle
of nowhere, I saw an old stone wall and
on the other side of the wall there was a
green field! It was perfect! "Piedra
So" ("Just Stones"), the Bonairean Golf
Club was born.
Before I knew it, the word was out and
other people got involved. They started
working hard on making the course pro-
fessional and building a clubhouse. Now
it's an 18-hole golf link by the seaside.
It takes about three to four hours to walk
the whole course. There's a driving
range with driving range balls available.
On the first tee are concrete tee boxes.
The fourth hole has two bunkers on
each side. The fifth hole has a water
hazard, and there are lots of bushes and
cacti to lose your ball in.
While you play, a group of donkeys or
goats may be observing your progress.
It's a unique spot. The environment is
beautiful. It's like playing on the moon.
It can't be compared to anywhere else in
the world.
There are about 40 members. Once a
month a golf pro from Curaqao, Louis
Cannegieter, comes to teach for two
days. He gives clinics for beginners too.
Since the start of the year three instruc-
tors have been teaching 10 teens from
Jong Bonaire. The members would like
to see more people play golf- young-
sters, older people, and tourists of all
nationalities. Golf sets are available for
rent and transport can be arranged to


I


and from the course.
Piedra So is not trying to compete
with other places. This is not Miami or
Aruba. This is not a smooth terrain, and
it's not a fancy club. But it is a whole
new experience. It's sand and sea grass,
the sound of the sea, an eternal wind.
It's literally out of this world: unusual,
extraordinary and adventurous. If
you've been playing golf in other parts
of the world if you think you've "seen
it all," come to Piedra So and discover
what it feels like to play golf on Bon-
aire. For more information go to our
website: www.piedraso.com_(in Dutch).
Tel. 717-7972. DArtie DeVries


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 22











flotsam and Jetsam -
(Continued from page 3) -
Curagao's Venezue-
lan-owned Isla oil re- -
finery. Why? It's be- _
cause the discharge
of sulfur dioxide
(SO2) by the refinery
is enormous. According to figures the
Foundation for a Clean Environment in
Curagao (SMOC) released last week,
the refinery discharged almost 78 mil-
lion kilo of sulfur dioxide in 2001. The
discharge for the entire country of the
Netherlands was 75 million kilos in that
same year. One refinery, Shell Pernis,
that processes twice as much crude oil
as the Isla, discharged only 16 million
kilos.
The enormous discharges mean that
the refinery's equipment is in need of
repair or replacement, since nothing has
been upgraded to reduce those emis-
sions since the last century. S02 has a
detrimental effect on the health of peo-
ple living close to the refinery. SMOC
is demanding that the Cura9ao govern-
ment take action to remedy the problem.


A A Dutch lawyer and translator
made an English translation of Book I
of the Netherlands Antilles Civil
Code, "Family Law and the Law of
Persons.'" He sent the Public Prosecutor
a copy who thinks this is very
interesting for all English speaking
persons living on Bonaire. If you are
interested, please contact him.

A The Antillean Parliament approved
a bill requiring social education duty
for young jobless school dropouts
amid much debate on whether it was
doing so under pressure of the Dutch
Government's plan to introduce an ad-
mittance regulation for Antillean young-
sters traveling to Holland. Antillean
youths have a higher incidence of ar-
rests in Holland than do European
Dutch youngsters. Supposedly, if a per-
son from 16-24 has passed the "social
education program" he/she can be ad-
mitted into Holland without restriction.
The compulsory program has been in
the works for a while and there is a pilot
project underway but not getting much
enrollment.


A A serious effort to speed up im-
migration permits was announced by
Minister of Justice David Dick early
last week. The welcome announcement
followed lengthy talks with the Lt. Gov-
ernors of the respective Island Territo-
ries. Dick says the entire Immigration
System needs streamlining. It's a con-
clusion arrived at years ago by business,
bona fide immigrants, visiting yachts-
men and people who have decided to
reside here. Bonaire's Immigration offi-
cials had already extended the two-week
reporting requirement to four weeks.
Minister Dick, who comes from the
private sector, believes the current sys-
tem is ridiculously bureaucratic and, as
a consequence, frustrates economic
growth and often creates situations bor-
dering on violation of human rights.
One of our island's business leaders
hopes the "reforms" will go beyond the
improvement in issuing permits.
Streamlining the Immigration System
has to change basic thinking about
"immigration." He said that currently a
negative approach dominates. It appears
aimed more at making immigration dif-
ficult rather than at serving the econ-
omy. On Bonaire the argument that the
local labor market needs protection is
often stretching a point and overprotec-
tion reduces productivity.

f Last Sun-
day, 19t of
June, an
anonymous
caller con-
tacted .
STINAPA
that people
were spear .
fishing at
Bachelor's Beach. According to the
Marine Ordinance, it is forbidden to fish
in the Bonaire Marine Park with a spear
gun or handheld spear. It is also forbid-
den to transport a spear gun or handheld
spear on public ground (or water), to
have in one's possession, or to buy or
sell spear gunned fish.
The rangers arrived at the beach by
boat and picked-up and caught two
spear fishermen in the act. They came
out of the water wearing dive equipment
and carrying a dive bag full of fish, but
left the spear gun behind. The rangers
seized the bag with fish and also sur-
faced the spear gun. Both hunters were
taken to the Police Station with the
spear gun, dive gear and fish. The case
will be handled by the court of justice.
STINAPA wants to thank the anony-
mous caller. Without his help, they said
they would not have been able to stop
this illegal activity.
Whenever you see someone spear
fishing or other illegal activities going
on in the Marine Park, contact
STINAPA at: 717-8444 or 786-9603.

A Now all NGOs ("Non-Profit" Non
Government Organizations) can have
their own Web page and e-mail con-
nection free thanks to an initiative by
Bonaire's NGO Platform via the Plat-
form's new website, www.
NGOBonaire.org. Each NGO will have
a single private e-mail address, even the
Platform will
"We'd like every Bonaire NGO to
have a web site and e-mail address,"
said James Finies President of the Plat-


Page 8


form. "If the NGO doesn't have a com-
puter they can use the one installed for
their use at Platform headquarters."
"For people of our island it is becom-
ing very important to communicate rap-
idly and precisely," said Elsmarie Beu-
kenboom, Platform Secretary. "The
Platform wants each NGO to have a
chance to use this important media."


P On Sunday night between 2 and 8
pm the police zero tolerance team con-
ducted an enforcement action di-
rected at scooters and motorcycles.
They confiscated 10 scooters and a mo-
torcycle and gave out 19 summonses
(proses verbal) for various infractions,
mostly related to not having a license to
operate a two-wheeled vehicle. There
was also an arrest for drug possession
and another for failing to comply with
the order of a policeman. The majority
of drivers stopped did not have the
proper license to operate their scooters
and as a result scooter rental operators
will be encouraged to ensure that their
renters have a license that qualifies them
to operate the vehicles they rent.
A diner at a street-side restaurant won-
dered if they had impounded the ex-
tremely loud motorcycle that had passed
him earlier in the day.


Sharon Bol runs the Bonaire
DCNA office


Natalee Holloway Disappearance and
Antilles/Aruba Law


N atalee Holloway, an 18 year-old
Alabama girl, disappeared May
30 hours before she was to return home
from a trip to Aruba with other students 4
celebrating graduation. The case has
drawn international attention and has even I
tainted Bonaire. At press time four men .
are in custody, but not charged with a p
crime. According to published reports, -, J
Joran van der Sloot (17) admitted "making
out" with the girl in the back seat of the .,
car at a beach where the three took her.
The Dutch teen and his two friends are '
still in jail. Three other men arrested and ,
held have been released. Investigators Reportedly these three young men
from Aruba and the USA continue to look were the last persons to see Natalee
for evidence behind the disappearance Holloway alive. They are in custody.

The Legal Process
The arrest and detention procedures may be confusing to some as they are based on
principles different from American or English traditions and legal codes. The Nether-
lands Antilles and Aruba are overseas Dutch territories with judicial systems mod-
eled after the Dutch structure, in which people can be arrested on suspicion of a
crime, but not formally charged until later.
International law expert Theodore Simon explained about the differences between
US and Dutch law in connection with the Natalee Holloway disappearance but it
may prove informative to our readers as the same principles apply in Bonaire.
In the Antilles and Aruba people can be held without any formal charges filed.
All authorities need is some indication that the person may have been involved, and
then they can be arrested and held for a substantial period of time. In the US, a per-
son cannot be arrested unless there's probable cause. And probable cause has been
defined as facts and circumstances based on reasonably trustworthy information that
would warrant a prudent person into believing a crime was committed and the person
to be arrested committed it.
Initially a person can be held by the police for two days. They're not required to
bring them before a magistrate until 72 hours have passed. And the initial two can be
extended for eight days and then two more periods of eight days if the magistrate
concurs. So that's about 26 days; and then another four months. So a person can be
held up to 146 days without being charged with a crime.
Once charged with a crime the accused appears in front of a single judge and is
tried. If convicted, they have the right to a trial de novo, which, in effect, means a do
over, and have a trial in front of a three-judge panel. However, that may seem helpful
to the defense. On the other hand, if they are acquitted at the single judge trial, the
government can appeal -- something that could not happen in the US. There is no
jury trial in the Dutch/Antillean/Aruban system.
While the person charged will appear in front of a single judge, they retain the
same standard of being proven beyond a reasonable doubt. But a single judge will
render judgment of guilt or non-guilt. The verdict can get appealed before at three-
judge tribunal, and finally either party could appeal to The Hague in the Netherlands
for questions of law.
Both in the US and the Dutch system there's the right to be free from self incrimi-
nation. The accused cannot be required to testify against him or herself. And if they
don't testify, no adverse inference can be drawn. I1


A The Dutch Caribbean Nature Al-
liance (DCNA) opened their head-
quarters in Kaya Grandi # 20 this
past week. Former Bonaire National
Marine Park Manager Kalli De Meyer's
initiatives and hard work to found an
organization, dedicated to the long term
preservation and conservation of nature
within the Netherlands Antilles have
finally paid off. (See story on page 17
for information.)
After almost two years of preparation
the Dutch Caribbean Nature Alliance
officially started April 1st of 2005 with
Kalli as its Executive Director. She was
recently joined by Sharon Bol, who will
be the Office Manager for DCNA's
headquarters on Bonaire.

A REMINDER-take the fantastic
Lac Bay discovery boat trip on Sunday.
Then attend Art Day. See page 19 -
What's Happening-for details. C G. L.D


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005











(Responses to Balance. Continued from page 7)
gress at the expense of those resources,
more sooner than later we will encoun-
ter serious difficulties to find food,
drinkable water, breathable air or just a
nice landscape to enjoy. In other words,
those of us that are alive now, are abus-
ing nature and if we continue with this
model of development, our children and
grandchildren will pay the price and
live in worse conditions than the one
we are in now.

Bonaire doesn't escape to the world
development tendencies but we can
consider our selves in a position of
privilege. People and Government have
always been very proactive when it
comes to environment issues. As early
as 1961, Bonaire was enacting legisla-
tion to protect sea turtle eggs and nests.
In 1971, the Island Government of Bon-
aire banned destructive fishing prac-
tices like spear fishing and in 1975
made it illegal to break coral, take it
from the water or sell it. Since 1979
Bonaire has also a proactive Marine
Park that was declared demonstration
site for the United Nations Educational
Program in 2001.
Coral reefs are in great danger world-
wide, more than 10 % of the coral reefs
in the world are degraded beyond re-
covery and another 30 % are seriously
threatened to disappear in the near fu-
ture if we don't take radical actions.
Bonaire is in a better position than other
islands in the Caribbean and this fact
cannot be considered a coincidence.
Conservationist legislation and many
years of active management of the Ma-
rine Park are the causes of the good


condition of our reefs with out doubt.
The Government launched a strategic
plan for the future of Bonaire. This plan
implies extensive development in a
very sensitive area that can affect our
most valued economical resource, the
coral reef.
Unplanned development can exacer-
bate problems that we already have on
Bonaire. Sedimentation, storm water
runoff, excessive amount of nutrients,
inadequate solid garbage management,
bad construction practices, deforesta-
tion, over fishing are just examples of
what can happen, and the consequences
to the reef are irreversible. What we kill
today is gone forever and is not coming
back in our lifetime.
Economical development and nature
preservation is possible and these two
components can go along together. But
for that, ALL the stakeholders need to
sit together, discuses, decide and state
very clearly what kind of development
we want and who will be beneficiated.
We need to have clear not only
"WHAT" to do but also "HOW" we
want to do it. Where coastal develop-
ment is implemented and how it is man-
aged influence the degree of impact to
coral reef, and everybody knows what
coral reefs mean for Bonaire's people
and economy.
At the end of the day, we are all Man-
agers of the Marine Park. As Cousteau
said, "managing the parks is not about
managing the coral reef, it is about
managing ourselves".
Ramon DeLeon, Manager of the
Bonaire National Marine Park


DCNA Board Meeting on St. Eustatius

S he board of the Dutch Caribbean
S Nature Alliance met on St. Eusta-
tius last week for its third meeting this
year. Founded February 2005, DCNA is
an umbrella organization for the Marine
and Terrestrial Protected Areas (Parks) in
St. Eustatius, Saba, St. Maarten, Bonaire
and Curaqao. Aruba is contemplating to
join forces with DCNA soon and sent Eg-
bert Boerstra from Parke Nacional Arikok
to the meeting as an observer.
DCNA s' main goal is to acquire fund-
ing for sustainable Park Management in
order to ensure that the rich biodiversity of
species in the Dutch Caribbean will be
protected for the many years to come. At
the same time, by having all park organi-
zations represented on the board of
DCNA a broad and knowledgeable plat- DCNA Board in Statia
form is created which in turn will provide
a healthy climate for working together, learning from each other's organizations
and ultimately finding the synergy that will have a huge payoff for Nature Conser-
vation and Preservation in the Caribbean.

Funding
DCNA is currently involved in negotiations with the Dutch Ministery of Bin-
nenlandse Zaken and Koninkrijksrelaties to get them involved in financing nature
conservation in the Caribbean as follow-up to a motion to this effect adopted by
Dutch Parliament last year. The Dutch Postcode Loterij (PCL) is presently
DCNA's major contributor. With a 1.9 million Euro grant over three years from
the PCL, the organization will be able to sponsor important nature projects in the
Caribbean, like the sea turtle outreach project on Bonaire and the Windward is-
lands, which was funded through DCNA last year by the Truus en Gerrit van
Riemsdijk Foundation, a private organization
With Nature being one of the Caribbean's most important natural resources,
DCNA is not only an asset to Nature itself but also to the economic well being of
all islands who thrive by the commercial exploitation of Nature. O Press release


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 17











































(IAm the William Express.Cont. from pg. 12)

disemboweled and cut to pieces in an
early visit to the scrap yard!
At last, after months of pumping and
endless debate, I have been liberated
from the confines of the port and, after
hasty repairs, I am floating at anchor off
a beautiful beach swaying in the gentle
waves and cooled by friendly breezes. It
is now September 12, 1984 and today I
am boarded by a small group of strangers
determined to help me accomplish my
final mission. They reposition my anchor
near shore and start to flood my holds. I
gently roll over on my starboard side
and, cradled in the warm embrace of the
sea, slowly drift down to the soft white
sand between two beautiful coral reefs at
100 feet (30 m). Now, I am safe and se-
cure in the pristine sea that once was the
highway that I roamed. My destiny has
been fulfilled and, unlike other ships my
age, I will have a long,
comfortable retirement.
This is a happy end-
ing to a tortured life
and the beginning of
wonderful encounters
with a new purpose: let
me share them with
you.


receive new occupants from the under-
water marine environment and occa-
sional visitors from shore. They will be
equipped with the same SCUBA gear
that my liberators used to expose the
criminal plot of my previous owner. As
the "Hotel Hilma Hooker" my accommo-
dations are spacious and comfortable.
They provide shelter and privacy for inti-
mate encounters when desired by my
guests. Over the past twenty years a few
notable residents have made my passage
ways and the island's surrounding coral
gardens their retreat from the stress of
the open sea.
"Fang", is a traveling executive, with a
sleek, silver, muscular barracuda body
with bold black markings to accent his
distinguished character. He has repeat-
edly occupied the Bridge Suite for
months at a time to use as his base of
operations. He has spent endless hours
observing the unusual activities of our


Here I rest, in the sea,
after being washed
clean and prepared to


short term day-visitors from
shore. He delights in si-
lently hovering above and
behind these unsuspecting
couples while being tickled
by the clouds rising bubbles
from their excited exhale.
"Angel," one of our long-
term guests, joined us after
retiring from a very suc-
cessful career as an actress
on the European stage. She
is always elegant in her
black and yellow designer
patterned attire and provides companion-
ship for all our guests. Her experience,
before many appreciative audiences, has
made her an excellent model for all the
photographers that visit our quarters and
gardens. She is always willing to pose
before the camera lens and be bathed in
the bright light and glitter of their
strobes.
"Napoleon" and "Godiver", a grouper
couple, inhabit the private Stern Cabin
under a long term arrangement. They
enjoy a carefree life of pleasure protected
by our "off-shore" location. Secretive by
nature, interaction among the masses of
visitors is limited to special occasions.
They do enjoy dancing together and can
be observed nuzzling and embracing in
the early evening hours.
We also have a pair of Tarpon couples
that have taken their places in the two
Forward Master Suites. The brothers,
"Chromium" and "Tequila," are paired
with "Quicksilver" and "Tinsel", respec-
tively. Unlike the groupers, they are al-
ways available to our public guests, and,
despite their large size, are very gentle
and easy to approach. They are very at-
tentive and often display a playful side to
their nature by blowing bubbles before
the waiting cameras. If you watch care-
fully you can catch them breaking the
surface of the water to gulp air for this
demonstration.
My last revelation is to remain a secret
between us. To protect their true identity
I will give you their nick-names from our
desk registry. They are a father and son
in semi-permanent residence.
"Gargantuan" and "Tank" have been
known to ambush unsuspecting prey, and
from their names you can guess that they
are of considerable size and girth. As
typical behavior for Jewfish, they do not
seek notoriety nor do they like to be ap-
proached by strangers. You may see
them sitting in the gardens, well camou-
flaged and grumbling to themselves.
Their massive bodies are a testament to
the success rate of their many kills. Do
not disturb them is my only advice to


you.


I hope this short visit has been reveal-
ing and fun for you. I welcome you to
join me at any time, day or night for ad-
venture and the pleasure of your com-
pany at Bonaire's most famous underwa-
ter resort, The Hilma Hooker Hotel. 1
Albert Bianculli 2005


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 13












SGB Students Exel at ARTEBON


r T can't believe this show
I was put on by young peo-
ple," a tourist exclaimed last Friday
night at the opening of the SGB high
school's "Cultural Growth" art show.
"I've been to so many art openings, but
this is just fantastic! I'm so glad I was
able to be on the island right now."
nfl! .....


A whimsical puppet


The lady tourist echoed the feelings of
so many who attended the first ever
SGB high school art opening at ARTE-
BON. Speaking for her colleagues, gen-
eral science teacher Mary Ann Koops,
said, "We're so very proud of the stu-
dents. Sometimes they have a low self
esteem and they just throw their designs


I


in the trash. They think they are noth-
ing. But we wanted them to be able to
show their works to their parents and
the public. We've been very privileged
to work with these kids."
Minister of Education Maritza Sil-
berie, who opened the show, said, "It's
very important to show something posi-
tive coming from the SGB. These are
our children and we're very proud of
what they can do."
Challenged by general science teacher
Koops and art and industrial design
teacher Wilna Groenenboom, the stu-
dents had to either come up with a new
product or enhance or embellish one
that's already in use. They had to make
a plan, work two dimensionally with
sketches before creating the final prod-
uct in three dimensions. A third subject,
Papiamentu, was brought into play as
each project manual had to be written in
that language.

Student Ashwant Gonesh explained
that he wanted to design a "guitar of the
future." He had to study an existing one
and decide how to change it and make it
really look like something familiar but
with a whole new design. He had to
think a lot and let his imagination soar.
"I know it may be a little hard to play
with all these points," he says, pointing
to the zigzag design, but he accom-
plished his goal.
Attending the opening and showing
their support were parents, other stu-
dents as well as teachers, staff and


those associated with the SGB: Nolly
Oleana, Artie DeVries, Ann Leong,
Herman Groenenboom, Rob van Lear,
Helen Hoen, Ms. Martijn, Papiamentu
teacher Melina Rameriz, Edy Carolina,
Hilly Gravenhorst and others.


Bonaire's most famous bird


The exhibition continued through the
weekend with the students acting as
docents, showing the public through the
show. DL.D.

[a G It was through a
generous grant
from AMFO and
e the NGO Platform
Bonaire that this "Cultural Growth at
ARTEBON" was made possible.
Stressing the importance of this exhibit
and what it would do the self image of
each student, the teachers asked for
help. Responding, the Platform guided
them in the proper method to apply for
funds. Working together they accom-
plished a monumental feat one that
may have changed the path of a stu-
dent who thinks maybe he or she was
not worthy. Thank you to all teachers
and the NGO Platform personnel -
who made this come true.


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 10


r coEB
sv^


Minister of Education, Maritza Sil-
Ashwant Gonesh and Syphard Wil- beri, cuts the ribbon to open the show
lem, the Future Guitar Boys












Reporter readers have provided their views on our eight part series Balance
for Bonaire. They will be presented in this issue and next.

If you haven't had a chance to complete the Reporter Survey (page 7) asking
YOUR views on the proper choices for Bonaire's future this is your last op-
portunity. Send by post, e-mail or drop at our office.


GOOGLE GAFFE?
PART 1.

To the Editors:

Your "Finding Balance for Bonaire" series is interesting, but at times I be-
lieve the authors manipulate their "facts" and "results" to push their points
and agendas across, and damn the facts.
In one issue they showed Caribbean island tourism growth rates for only a single
sample, for example, to demonstrate how slow tourism growth was on Bonaire.
They conveniently forgot to include that after 9/11, Bonaire apparently did not suf-
fer nearly as significant a loss in tourism as just about every other Caribbean island
did, which could explain the greater growth in last year's numbers for other islands
as a rebound from much lower post-9/11 levels. Never mind that a number of the
islands listed were not real diver-oriented destinations.
Further massaging of results occurs in another issue under the subject "Take the
Google Test." Some of your readers may be aware that among the many hats I
wear, I also run NetTech N.V. along with my partner Susan Davis. NetTech N.V.
operates and maintains Bonaire's official web site, InfoBonaire, as well as web
sites for dozens of other Bonaire businesses.
I am also, however, a professional researcher, as part of the consulting work I
perform for clients around the world in the field of patent litigation. And a signifi-
cant part of my research involves using search engines such as Google to locate
specific information using both the methodologies that a non-professional
searcher would use, and those known to people who have lots of experience using
search tools.

The basic issues I have with the Take the Google Test are:
1) There is no commentary on how other competing dive destinations faired;
2) the use of quotation marks around search terms;
3) interpreting search results; and
4) the lack of apparent understanding of how automated search engines sort
and filter their data.

Let's take a quick look at these items.
First, when I ran the same search terms as used in the article, the only official
dive destination site I found in the first 100 results for "scuba vacation was an
official diving-oriented site for the Cayman Islands which also offered the ability
to book travel to the Caymans (and thus was selling vacations directly). All other
99 results were understandably for tour operators and travel agents, as well as news
sites, a few scattered dive shops in places ranging from Thailand to Florida, a
bunch of unrelated sites, and one resort at a dive destination (Harbour Village -
turned up twice I'll explain why later). The next hundred results turned up noth-
ing better. Adding +Caribbean (which requires the word "Caribbean" to be in the
search results) resulted in the aforementioned www.DiveCavman.ky site moving
up to 31st place. Otherwise, the results were rather similar to the previous search.
The other search terms produced similarly unspectacular results, when there were
any. The term "snorkel, vacation, Caribbean" produced no results whatsoever, in
contrast to what was reported. In no case did I find an official tourism site in the
top 20 results. Beyond 20 the results are probably meaningless for very broad
searches, although potentially very relevant for targeted searches. As far as I see,
all the searches in the Google Test were very broad ones, and thus the results were
very broad.
That leads to the next issue. Quotations marks around search terms in Google and
other search engines mean that one should search for the phrase in the quotes. Per-
haps the authors of the Google Test were using quotes for emphasis instead of lit-
erally, but that would obviously be wrong if the authors knew anything about
search engines.
For example, if I search for the quoted phrase "official bonaire website ", I get
only 24 relevant results out of a possible 62 (and yes, it's www.InfoBonaire.com at
the top). If I use the same terms, official bonaire website without the quotes I get
54,600 results (and yes, www.InfoBonaire.com still comes up first).
Quotation marks are critical tools that experi-
enced searchers use to narrow down their re-
sults. Similarly, putting a "plus sign" in front of
a particular term requires that term to be in the
search results (otherwise it's optional, meaning
you get very unfocused results the further down
the result list you go).
Jake Richter

Next week- What does a regular, non-
experienced searcher do and how to handle the
search results


Page 6


Responses to



Balance for Bonaire


AIRLIFT MYTHS REACTION


Dear Editor:
I have been following your weekly articles regarding tourism and the "Balance for
Bonaire". The June 10th article was very disturbing as it was very ambiguous and
raised a few glaring questions. The CTO 2004 tourist arrival statistics were a bit
perplexing. Can it really be true that 90,000 visitors to Granada arrived by air-
plane?????? That is how the report comes across. Anyone sitting on the beach in
Granada on any given day will see 4-5 cruise ships lined up waiting to tender the
thousands into town. So this is not a fair evaluation or comparison when discussing
airlift.
There is a second "problem" that seems to be ignored. I don't know if others
have had this problem, or if it is just that we travel to Bonaire frequently that I no-
tice a pattern. I feel part of the reason for the half empty planes to Bonaire is not
lack of demand, but rather no available seats on the first leg, whether it be to SJ or
MoBay. Every flight we have ever taken from the east coast to Mo Bay has been
full. In the past, I have worked directly with the AJ office here 6 months or more in
advance and more times than not, I can't get to Bonaire because the first leg is sold
out.
I believe that one way to determine if the problem is airlift, is to have a direct
flight from the states. Only then can it be determined where the problem
lies. The answer to the low hotel occupancy rate would be to get all the hotels on
Travelocity or Orbitz. With computer access, it would be much easier if all the ho-
tels were located together. Bonaire is not exactly tourist friendly when trying to find
accommodations.
Bonaire should be fixing the small problems now, and not wait for the "big fix".
Nadine Rubin


ARUBA, A MODEL FOR BONAIRE? REACTION
PART 1.
After a recent visit to Aruba, where I lived for 18 years, I was happy to come back
to our island. The publicity around the re-
cent disappearance of the American girl,
Natalee Halloway, has focused on Aruba
and its tourist industry.
Just before I left Aruba, I listened to an
interview on the local TV-station with the
Director of the Chamber of Commerce
about the sustainability of the further hotel
development on Aruba. I was surprised to
hear that no decision has been taken yet
and that various studies are still being con-
ducted. The current uninhibited construction of new gigantic hotel and time share
buildings clearly shows that the government of Aruba is firmly decided to sacrifice
also the few remaining sections of pristine beaches for this disastrous development.
During the interview, the mentioned director complained that while Aruba was still
studying what to do, the people of Bonaire had already taken a firm decision not to
permit any construction of large hotels and to concentrate on improvement of exist-
ing tourist facilities, particularly for the diving industry, in order to preserve the
beautiful nature of the island.
To my horror, after reading the excellent articles Finding Balance for Bonaire in
recent issues of Bonaire Reporter, I found that although the people of this island
really did take the mentioned decision, there are politicians having another opinion.
They probably see, like it has happened on Aruba, a personal profit in the mass
tourist development. They do not mind that the decision of the people is firmly sup-
ported by the official Bonaire government tourist development guidelines. How is
that possible?
(Continued on page 7)
Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005












Reporter readers have provided their views on our eight part series Balance
for Bonaire. They will be presented in this issue and next.

If you haven't had a chance to complete the Reporter Survey (page 7) asking
YOUR views on the proper choices for Bonaire's future this is your last op-
portunity. Send by post, e-mail or drop at our office.


C^ rY^2ZL^" GOOGLE GAFFE?


To the Editors:

Y our "Finding Balance for Bonaire" series is interesting, but at times I be-
lieve the authors manipulate their "facts" and "results" to push their points
and agendas across, and damn the facts.
In one issue they showed Caribbean island tourism growth rates for only a single
sample, for example, to demonstrate how slow tourism growth was on Bonaire.
They conveniently forgot to include that after 9/11, Bonaire apparently did not suf-
fer nearly as significant a loss in tourism as just about every other Caribbean island
did, which could explain the greater growth in last year's numbers for other islands
as a rebound from much lower post-9/11 levels. Never mind that a number of the
islands listed were not real diver-oriented destinations.
Further massaging of results occurs in another issue under the subject "Take the
Google Test." Some of your readers may be aware that among the many hats I
wear, I also run NetTech N.V. along with my partner Susan Davis. NetTech N.V.
operates and maintains Bonaire's official web site, InfoBonaire, as well as web
sites for dozens of other Bonaire businesses.
I am also, however, a professional researcher, as part of the consulting work I
perform for clients around the world in the field of patent litigation. And a signifi-
cant part of my research involves using search engines such as Google to locate
specific information using both the methodologies that a non-professional
searcher would use, and those known to people who have lots of experience using
search tools.

The basic issues I have with the Take the Google Test are:
1) There is no commentary on how other competing dive destinations faired;
2) the use of quotation marks around search terms;
3) interpreting search results; and
4) the lack of apparent understanding of how automated search engines sort
and filter their data.

Let's take a quick look at these items.
First, when I ran the same search terms as used in the article, the only official
dive destination site I found in the first 100 results for "scuba vacation was an
official diving-oriented site for the Cayman Islands which also offered the ability
to book travel to the Caymans (and thus was selling vacations directly). All other
99 results were understandably for tour operators and travel agents, as well as news
sites, a few scattered dive shops in places ranging from Thailand to Florida, a
bunch of unrelated sites, and one resort at a dive destination (Harbour Village -
turned up twice I'll explain why later). The next hundred results turned up noth-
ing better. Adding +Caribbean (which requires the word "Caribbean" to be in the
search results) resulted in the aforementioned www.DiveCayman.ky site moving
up to 31st place. Otherwise, the results were rather similar to the previous search.
The other search terms produced similarly unspectacular results, when there were
any. The term "snorkel, vacation, Caribbean" produced no results whatsoever, in
contrast to what was reported. In no case did I find an official tourism site in the
top 20 results. Beyond 20 the results are probably meaningless for very broad
searches, although potentially very relevant for targeted searches. As far as I see,
all the searches in the Google Test were very broad ones, and thus the results were
very broad.
That leads to the next issue. Quotations marks around search terms in Google and
other search engines mean that one should search for the phrase in the quotes. Per-
haps the authors of the Google Test were using quotes for emphasis instead of lit-
erally, but that would obviously be wrong if the authors knew anything about
search engines.
For example, if I search for the quoted phrase "ontic ial bonaire website ", I get
only 24 relevant results out of a possible 62 (and yes, it's www.InfoBonaire.com at
the top). If I use the same terms, official bonaire website without the quotes I get
54,600 results (and yes, www.InfoBonaire.com still comes up first).
Quotation marks are critical tools that experi-
enced searchers use to narrow down their re-
sults. Similarly, putting a "plus sign" in front of
a particular term requires that term to be in the
search results (otherwise it's optional, meaning
you get very unfocused results the further down
the result list you go).
Jake Richter

Next week- What does a regular, non-
experienced searcher do and how to handle the
search results


Page 6


Responses to



Balance for Bonaire


AIRLIFT MYTHS REACTION


Dear Editor:
I have been following your weekly articles regarding tourism and the "Balance for
Bonaire". The June 10th article was very disturbing as it was very ambiguous and
raised a few glaring questions. The CTO 2004 tourist arrival statistics were a bit
perplexing. Can it really be true that 90,000 visitors to Granada arrived by air-
plane?????? That is how the report comes across. Anyone sitting on the beach in
Granada on any given day will see 4-5 cruise ships lined up waiting to tender the
thousands into town. So this is not a fair evaluation or comparison when discussing
airlift.
There is a second "problem" that seems to be ignored. I don't know if others
have had this problem, or if it is just that we travel to Bonaire frequently that I no-
tice a pattern. I feel part of the reason for the half empty planes to Bonaire is not
lack of demand, but rather no available seats on the first leg, whether it be to SJ or
MoBay. Every flight we have ever taken from the east coast to Mo Bay has been
full. In the past, I have worked directly with the AJ office here 6 months or more in
advance and more times than not, I can't get to Bonaire because the first leg is sold
out.
I believe that one way to determine if the problem is airlift, is to have a direct
flight from the states. Only then can it be determined where the problem
lies. The answer to the low hotel occupancy rate would be to get all the hotels on
Travelocity or Orbitz. With computer access, it would be much easier if all the ho-
tels were located together. Bonaire is not exactly tourist friendly when trying to find
accommodations.
Bonaire should be fixing the small problems now, and not wait for the "big fix".
Nadine Rubin


ARUBA, A MODEL FOR BONAIRE? REACTION
PART 1.
After a recent visit to Aruba, where I lived for 18 years, I was happy to come back
to our island. The publicity around the re-
cent disappearance of the American girl,
Natalee Halloway, has focused on Aruba
and its tourist industry.
Just before I left Aruba, I listened to an A i
interview on the local TV-station with the %
Director of the Chamber of Commerce
about the sustainability of the further hotel
development on Aruba. I was surprised to
hear that no decision has been taken yet
and that various studies are still being con-
ducted. The current uninhibited construction of new gigantic hotel and time share
buildings clearly shows that the government of Aruba is firmly decided to sacrifice
also the few remaining sections of pristine beaches for this disastrous development.
During the interview, the mentioned director complained that while Aruba was still
studying what to do, the people of Bonaire had already taken a firm decision not to
permit any construction of large hotels and to concentrate on improvement of exist-
ing tourist facilities, particularly for the diving industry, in order to preserve the
beautiful nature of the island.
To my horror, after reading the excellent articles Finding Balance for Bonaire in
recent issues of Bonaire Reporter, I found that although the people of this island
really did take the mentioned decision, there are politicians having another opinion.
They probably see, like it has happened on Aruba, a personal profit in the mass
tourist development. They do not mind that the decision of the people is firmly sup-
ported by the official Bonaire government tourist development guidelines. How is
that possible?
(Continued on page 7)
Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005













WHAT'S HPPENING


WELY REINOITIES

Late Show
Callto make sure (Usually 9pm)
The Hitchhiker's
Guide to the Galaxy
(Martin Freeman)

Early Show (Usually 7 pm) I1
Kingdom of Heaven
Kaya Prinses Marie
Behind Exito Bakery
Tel. 717-2400
Tickets NAf10,50 (incl. Tax)
High Schoolers NAf7,75
NEW FILMS BEGIN FRIDAY
CLOSED MONDAY TUESDAY
AND WEDNESDAY
SATURDAY 4 PM
Because of Winn-Dixie


THIS WEEK

Friday, July 1-Captain Dons 80thBirth-
day Party Celebration
Saturday, July 2-Rincon Marshe

Sunday, July 3-Lac Bay discovery boat
trip. Meet at Boka di Coco (across from
Mangrove/Kayak Center on dirt road to
Cai) 7 am to mid-afternoon. Sponsored by
"Amigunan di Naturalesa" ("Friends of the
Environment) to benefit Bonaire partici-
pants in Vierdaagse Nijmegen (Four Day
Walk at Nijmegen, Holland). Sign up at
Extra newspaper office. (tel. 717-8482).
Adults, NAf25; Children NAf 15. See page
22.

Sunday, July 3-The Fundashon for Art
and Culture will hold its 13th Annual Art
Day with art exhibits, music, performing
arts, food and drinks. Anyone interested in
exhibiting at the event can contact volun-
teers at 717-6420 cell 786-6420, or email
artandculture65 @hotmail.com.

Monday, July 4-US holiday. Fireworks
at some resorts

COMING
July 17-24 Diva's Women Windsurf
Week- Learn to windsurf clinic Contact
Ann Phelan 786-3134 or email
ann bonairewindsurfing.com www.
bonairecaribbean.com 3 local scholarships
still available for teen or local women. To
apply contact Ann Phelan.


MICRO MOVIE REVIEW y
Seen recently in
Movieland Cinema:

Kingdom of Heaven by Ridley Scott
starring Orlando Bloom and Liam Neeson.
This is a rich, sometimes overwhelming
and excellent film. Compared with
Gladiator, another great film by Ridley
Scott, it has the same huge scenes, incredi-
ble special effects and fantastic directing
so you leave the cinema wondering what
hit you. It lacks, however, the emotional
attachment you experienced with the main
character Maximus, played by Russel
Crowe. Orlando Bloom as Balian does a
fine job in Kingdom of Heaven but he
never manages to get under your skin. I
was pleased that this film treats religions
equally. There is good and evil, fanaticism
and forgiveness on both sides. I definitely
recommend this film, and I will see it
more than once. 1 Dodo

EVERY WEEK

Saturday Rincon Marshe open 6 am 2
pm. Enjoy a Bonairean breakfast while you
shop: fresh fruits and vegetables, gifts, lo-
cal sweets and snacks, arts and handicrafts,
candles, incense, drinks and music. www.
infobonaire.com/rincon
Sunday -Live music 6 to 9 pm while enjoy-
ing a great dinner in colorful tropical ambi-
ance at the Chibi Chibi Restaurant &
Bar. Open daily 5 to 10 pm. Live Fla-
Bingo-great prizes, 7 pm, Divi Flamingo
Monday -Soldachi Tour of Rincon, the
heart of Bonaire, 9 am-noon. $20-Call
Maria 717-6435
Tuesday -Harbour Village Tennis, Social
Round Robin 7 to 10 pm. $10 per person.
Cash bar. All invited. Call Elisabeth Vos at
565-5225 717-7500, ext. 14.
Wednesday -Meditation at Donkey Beach
from 7:30 to 8:30 pm. Open to all. Call S.
H.Y. 790-9450
Friday -Manager's Rum Punch Party,
Buddy Dive Resort, 5:30-6:30 pm
Friday- Open House with Happy Hour
at the JanArt Gallery at Kaya Gloria #7,
from 5-7 pm.
Daily- The Divi Flamingo Casino is open
daily for hot slot machines, roulette and
blackjack, Monday to Saturday 8 pm- 4
am; Sunday 7 pm- 3 am.
Every day by appointment -Rooi
Lamoenchi Kunuku Park Tours Bo-
nairean kunuku. $12 (NAf12 for resi-
dents). Tel 717-8489, 540-9800.

FREE SLIDE/VIDEO SHOWS


Saturday- Discover Our Diversity Slide
The International Bonaire Sailing Show, pool bar Buddy Dive, 7 pm 717-
Regatta October 9 15, 2005 5080
Sunday Bonaire Holiday -Multi-media


IF-: C> F e *- "4 C


W e mentioned "Rafaello,"
this beautiful white male
kitty, a couple of weeks ago when
we featured "Natasha." It's be-
cause the two of them are such
good pals and so easy going. Su-
premely relaxed Rafaello has sky
blue eyes which go so well with
his snowy white coat. Some say
that blue-eyed white cats are deaf,
but this is certainly not true for
Rafaello. He's alert, can hear eve-
rything and is very much aware of
his surroundings. This handsome
fellow was found in Antriol and
brought into the Bonaire Animal Shel-
ter where he passed all his health and
"sociability" tests! He's had all his
shots and is ready to go.
As we've said so many times, all the
animals who are up for adoption at the
Shelter are in good health, have good
attitudes regarding people and are, or

dual-projector production by Albert Bian-
culli, 8.30 pm, Capt. Don's Habitat.
Monday Dee Scarr's Touch the Sea slide
experience. Aquarius Conference Center,
Capt. Don's Habitat, 8:30-9:30pm.
Wednesday (2nd and 4t) Turtle Conserva-
tion Slide Show by Andy Uhr. Carib Inn
seaside veranda, 7 pm
Thursday from June 16 to July 28, Basic
Fish ID Yellow Submarine Dive Shop at
6:30 pm
Friday- Week in Review Video Presenta-
tion by the Toucan Dive Shop at Plaza's
Tipsy Seagull, 5 pm. 717-2500.


CLUBS and MEETINGS
AA meetings -every Wednesday; Phone 717-
6105; 560-7267 or717- 3902.
Al-Anon meetings every Monday eve-
ning at 7 pm. Call 790-7272
Weekly BonaireTalker Gathering and
Dinner at Gibi's Tuesday 6:30pm call
567-0655 for directions.
Bridge Club Wednesdays, 7:30 pm at
the Union Building on Kaya Korona, across
from the RBTT Bank and next to Kooy-
man's. All levels invited NAf5 eny fee. Call
Cathy 564056.
Darts Club plays every other Sunday at
City Caf6. Registration at 4, games at 5.
Tel. 717-2950, 560-7539.
JCI. First Wednesday of the Month- Jun-
ior Chamber International Bonaire (JCI
Bonaire or formerly known as Bonaire Jay-
cees) meets at the ABVO building,
Kaminda Jato Baco 36 from 7:30 to
9:30pm. Everyone is welcome. Contact:
Renata Domacass6 516-4252.


"Rafaello"


will be, sterilized. You can't beat a pet
from the Shelter! As of June 24 there
have been 82 adoptions since the first
of the year. Thanks to the staff and the
volunteers for consistently doing such a
fine job with the resident pets! OL.D.



Kiwanis Club meets at APNA Plaza, Kaya
International, every other Tuesday, 7
pm. Tel. 717-5595, Jeannette Rodriguez.
Lions Club meets every 2nd and 4th
Thursday of the month at 8 pm at Kaya
Sabana #1. All Lions are welcome.
Rotary lunch meetings Wednesday, 12
noon-2 pm Rendez-Vous Restaurant,
Kaya L.D. Gerharts #3. All Rotarians are
welcome. Tel. 717-8454

BONAIRE'S TRADITIONS
Mangasina diRei, Rincon. Enjoy the view from
"The King's Storehouse." Lear about Bonaire's
culture. Visit typical homes from the 17th cen-
tury. Daily. Call 717-4060/ 790-2018
Visit the Bonaire Museum on Kaya J. v.d. Ree,
behind the Catholic Church in town. Open week-
days from 8 am-noon, 1:30-5 pm. Tel. 717-8868
Washington-Slagbaai National Park,
Museum and Visitors' Center. Open
daily 8 am-5 pm. Closed on some holidays.
717-8444/785-0017
Sunday at Cai- Live music and dancing
starts about 12 noon at Lac Cai. Dance to
the music of Bonaire's popular musicians.
Rincon Marshe- every Saturday 6 am to
3 pm. Open market in Bonaire's historic
town.
Soldachi Tours show you the Rincon
area. Alta Mira Nature Walking Tour at
6:30 am. Town Walking tour at 9:30,
Bus Tour at 10. Call Maria at 717-6435 to
reserve.


Send events to The Bonaire Reporter
Email reporterhbonairenews.com
Tel/Fax. 717-8988, Cel. 791-7252


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 19












eO I I Nen 0. UPAGEI


(Pit Bull Letter. Continued from page 4)
tacked. Photographs were taken and the
vet was called to come and put the ani-
mals that were barely alive out of their
misery. Three sheep that lived through
the attack were treated for many wounds
to the face and neck; one sustained a bro-
ken nose as well. They are now slowly
healing. Miraculously, I found another
newborn lamb that didn't have a scratch
on it baa-ing near a hurt sheep. It was
looking for its mother who lay dead
about three feet away. It is doing well
and being bottle-fed. That's the good
news!
The bad news is that the Pit Bull is
still alive, chained in the owner's
yard! The owner said that there was a
new lock on the gate to keep their "pet"
and watchdog in. It was not chained up
the morning of the attack and it got out!
My fear is that if this vicious dog could
kill seven defenseless sheep, what will
keep it from killing again? Why wasn't
this animal killed and taken out of our
neighborhood? A friend who is an emer-
gency room doctor told me that this type
of dog will kill again once it has tasted
blood and that it kills things that are
about its eye level! So, if you live in
Hato, keep an eye on your pets and
kids! I hope we don't read in
The Reporter that a child is seriously
injured or killed by this beast before it is
destroyed. Oh, and perhaps the owners


of this horrible Pit Bull should keep their
young daughter inside, far away from
their 'pet' dog! Maggie Fuller


^^sB.r


LEAKY PIPES
Dear Editor,
Attached to this mail are pictures
which I made on June 21st 2005.
The first time I noticed there was a
leak in the pipeline from the WEB, I
called the so called "Departamentu di
Storing" and told the guy on duty there
was a leak at Lima in Belnem. They told
me that they would sendsomeone to fix
the leak. That phone call was Thursday,
June 9th!!!
I called again on Saturday the 11th
early evening. They apparently also do
not work on weekends, because the trees
started to get green.
And to my big surprise when I walked
by several times last week, still no leak
fix. And the trees got greener by the day.
Today, June 21st I walked by again, and
noticed they still haven't done anything!!


Reader comments limited to 500 words will be consideredfor inclusion in the
"Letters" department. All letters must be signed However, we will withhold
names on request.


That is how serious they take a phone
call from someone who notices while
walking the dogs.
So that is why I send you this mail
with the photos, maybe you are willing
to place them in the reporter and let the
people of Bonaire know what happens
with the increase of the water- and elec-
tricity bill! It for the trees on the side of
the road.
My girlfriend and I are wondering who
is going to pay all this loss of water. In
the end the people of Bonaire are paying
the bill. I am sure the management team
from the WEB doesn't!!
Where is all this? At Lima in Belnem.
Lima is the last sideway left on the long
road to Sorobon, in Belnem. The road
doesn't end but goes in a circle around a
house and goes back to the road to Soro-
bon. In the curve, about 6 meters away
from the road, there lies a pipeline which
goes all the way in to the "knoek" and
feeds construction sides and houses close
to the airport.
Why do I send this to The Reporter.
Because in the first place, I think it is a
waste of good water. The procedure of
making fresh water out of seawater like
the WEB does, is very expensive. And
because we live with just a few here, we
have to pay a lot.
In the second place, if you ask me,
people who are working at the WEB,
doing their "storing" shift, have not
learned anything from the big fire last
Camaval. If there is something wrong,
no matter what, fix it!!
That way you show the people of Bon-
aire that the WEB is serious and worth


every penny! We are a long way from
that! Silvan Henneman
The daily press last week reported that
WEB was actively working on the pipe
problems in Belnem. Ed.

BEAUTY IN SUSHI
"When one takes a drive along Bon-
aire's east coast, graffiti has shown up
even there. Not spray painting, but ugly
sculptures of litter and garbage that
someone has left as a monument to their
ego. BB (from 6/24/ 05 Edition of B.R.)

Dear Editor:
I really fail to see the ugliness in the
"monuments" erected on the south end
of our island. In the 20 plus years I have
lived here, I have always marveled at the
creativity of the mysterious sculptor
whose work has brought many smiles
and even a few laughs to our visitors.
They have even appeared in articles and
newspapers around the world.
Obviously, BB (whoever you are) is a
newcomer and is offended and it is cer-
tainly their right. I might then suggest
since the recycled material is already
conveniently piled up, they can easily
find an old feed bag and remove it to the
landfill. My Bonairean friends have told
me they know who the artist is and they
are not offended a bit. (I also have a
feeling I know who it is as well...) An-
other great place to see the creative use
of "sushi" is at FKPD (Pasa Dia) in Rin-
con. They sell great souvenirs that are
worth the short drive north.
Michael Gaynor


Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005


Page 5




Full Text

PAGE 1

July 1 to July 8, 2005 Volume 12, Issue 25 SINCE 1994 Kaya Gob. Debrot 200 • E-mail: re porter@bonairenews.com • 717-8988 INSIDE: Table of Contents pg. 2 Bonaire Reporter Survey Holloway Disappearance & Antilles Law Bonaire Barracuda News I am the William Express Youth Tennis Tourney 2nd Turtle Tracked is named “Happy”

PAGE 2

Page 2 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 Our source at the Caribbean Hotel Association tells us that Air Jamaica WILL continue it’s Saturday Bonaire flight and NOT stop it at the end of next month as planned . This is already reflected on its website. It is part of a reevaluation of its cutbacks and also might include resumption of some flights to the Eastern Caribbean and Miami. Air Jamaica lost US$61 million for the first five months of this year, as the government, struggles to move it into viability. Last week Air Jamaica's executive chairman, Dr. Vin Lawrence, said unforeseen disruption of services, caused primarily by an increase in the frequency of major airframe maintenance from 18 months to 15 months, and route restructuring, had added another US$25 million in expenses. Air Jamaica cut Bonaire service to one flight at the end of June. Dutch Antilles Express (DAE), ( BonairExpress and CuraçaoExpress) won’t use Suriname Airways jets for flights on the Bonaire-Curaçao-St. Maarten route, said DAE’s Chief Executive Officer Floris van Palland Friday. Explained Van Palland, "The load factors on the route don’t justify putting in a larger aircraft such as the MD-82." St. Maarten flights have a load factor of 75 per cent (using the smaller turboprops) on the average. The MD-82 has 140 seats, while the ATR-42 that DAE uses has 46 seats. DAE flies Curaçao-St. Maarten-Curaçao twice a day, filling slightly fewer than 100 seats. By using the MD-82, the seat capacity would instantly increase by 40 per cent. “An increase of 40 per cent on a load factor of 75 percent doesn’t have a positive effect on the profitability of that route,” van Palland told The St Maarten Daily Herald . (Continued on page 3) IN THIS ISSUE Grouper Corner 3 Letters (Pit Bull, Leaky Pipes, Beauty in Sushi) 5 Finding a Balance for Bonaire Responses 6 Bonaire Reporter Survey 7 Holloway Disappearance & Aruba Law 8 Bonaire-New Port Connection 9 Bon. Barracuda Swim News 9 SGB Students Excel at Artebon 10 Bonaire to Culinary Olympics 12 I Am the William Express 12 Ambassadors (Fulton—Buddy Dive) 15 Goal, Home Run and More 15 DCNA at St. Eustatius 17 Youth Tennis Tourney 18 2nd Turtle Tracked is “Happy” 22 Piedra So Golf Course 22 WEEKLY FEATURES: Flotsam & Jetsam 2 Vessel List & Tide Table 9 AMFO/NGO Platform: Community Issues in Care & Welfare 11 Picture Yourself (South Africa) 14 Where to Find The Reporter 13 Classifieds 14 Reporter Masthead 18 Pet of the Week (Rafaello) 19 What’s Happening 19 Dodo (Kingdom of Heaven) 19 Shopping & Dining Guides 20 On the Island Since... (Hernan Longat) 21 Bonaire Sky Park (planets) 23 The Stars Have It 23 Continued on page 3 Continental Airlines to fly non-stop Houston-Bonaire I t’s finally happened: a US airline flying jets directly to Bonaire from the USA. Continental Airlines will start flying non-stop Houston-Bonaire on Friday, December 16, this year. If you check the Continental website you will see the schedule and fare of $491.65 has already been posted. Reservations are being accepted on-line and via travel agents. If you have money to spare, fly First Class the fare is $2,456.65. It’s been a long time in the coming, but when everyone sat down at the table in Houston to talk, it took less than a month – nearly the speed of light in airline deals – to wrap things up. The flights from Houston’s new Bush Airport will leave Fridays at 11:15 pm and arrive in Bonaire the following morning, Saturday, at 6:15 am. The “red-eye” scheduling enables travelers to get in an extra half day of diving or whatever! The return flight leaves at 8 am on Saturday, arriving at Houston at 10:50 am. These arrival and departure times allow passengers to connect easily with other flights. They’ll be using a Boeing 737 with 112 economy and 12 first class seats. Continental is the world’s sixth largest airline, with 41,000 employees, and already serves 25 destinations in the Caribbean. It has hubs in New York, Houston, Cleveland and Guam. At the press conference last Thursday were officials and representatives from TCB New York and Holland, TCB Bonaire, Bonair e International Airport Board, Bonaire Holding, the Island Council-including the Oppositionand the press. Following the cancellation of Air Jamaica service, Bonaire officials began to explore getting more airlift from the USA. A month ago to the day of the announcement Ramonsito Booi, Burney el Hage and Larry Gerharts traveled to Houston to explore the possibility of Continental flights to Bonaire. It was rumored that KLM put in a good word for Bonaire to help the negotiations. As Continental’s Manager of International Route Planning, Brian Znotins, told The Bonaire Reporter , “It was a business decision. We already fly to another top dive spot, Roatan, so why not to the Caribbean’s number one dive destination, Bonaire.” Bonaire will not stop its negotiations with Delta Airlines. “Considering the current interest for Bonaire-flights, I continue to hope that Continental will expand their flights to Bonaire in 2006. We still have to be on the safe side and continue to extend our horizons,” said Larry Gerharts of Bonaire Air Services. G./ L.D. A Boeing 737 This type of aircraft will be used on the Bonaire route Brian A. Znotins, Manager, International Route Planning for Continental Airlines signs up to fly weekly to Bonaire beginning in December. Commissioner Burney el Hage, Senator Ramonsito Booi to his left, TCB head Ronella Croes to right.

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Page 3 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 Flotsam and Jetsam (Continued from page 2) Following public demonstrations of outrage because of unavailable flights, Minister of Transport and Communication, Omayra Leeflang, had announced a few weeks ago that Suriname Airways would fly the Curaçao-St. Maarten route as of Friday, June 24, but it didn’t happen. DAE’s Chief Executive Officer Floris van Palland a former CEO of several of Royal Dutch Airline KLM’s spin-offs, when asked about the ‘… Express Airlines’ on-time performance, one of the major complaints of passengers, said improving this was “a number one priority .” “We have already done a lot, although people wouldn’t have noticed it right away. It is a process,” he said, explaining that several ATRs had been swapped for new ones from Europe that have just completed their big check-up. In addition, the company has been increasing its spare parts reserve. “The chance that you don’t have that specific part is much smaller,” he said, adding that the program is almost completed. DAE’s major shareholder is Bonaire resident, Niek Sandmann, (reports by Suzanne Koelega– SMH) Princess Maxima, the wife of Dutch Crown Prince WillemAlexander, gave birth Sunday to a healthy baby daughter. The new princess was named Alexia Juliana Marcela Laurentien, and becomes third in line to the Dutch throne after her father and her sister, Princess Catharina-Amalia, who was born on Dec. 7, 2003. The newborn, weighed 3.4 kilograms (7.69 pounds). The prince denied she was named after the illegitimate French daughter of his grandfather, the late Queen Juliana’s deceased husband, Prince Bernhard. Prince Bernhard’s offspring’s existence was only recognized in an interview published last year. “She is named after me,” said Prince Willem-Alexander. Central Bank President Emsley Tromp reported that the Antilles national debt is NAƒ2.4 billion. Add Curaçao’s NAƒ1.5 billion debt and you get a figure that is more than the entire country’s gross domestic product of NAƒ3.7 billion. Bonaire's share of the national debt is NAƒ243.8 million it has no ability to borrow money on its own as do Curaçao and St. Maarten.. If the islands were to split up under the current circumstances they would start their new status with those debts. Since that would be an unworkable scenario for most islands, On the total Antillean debt of NAƒ4.8 billion, NAƒ273 million was paid in interest alone last year, 23 cents out of every guilder collected in taxes and 16 per cent of all government expenditures. Another NAƒ378 million guilders was borrowed in 2004. The Central Bank itself made a profit of NAƒ 50 million in 2004, which goes to the Central Government. A considerable part of that comes from the 1 per cent license fee people pay when conducting financial transactions in US dollars. As is customary this time of year, 6th grade students from the island’s elementary schools will take part in the “Hello Tourist” program . Hello Tourist is a TCB initiative to acquaint Bonaire’s chlidren with the tourist business that powers the local economy. The children will learn what being a tourist means by visiting typical attractions, shops and the various resorts Participating in the program are Flamingo Airport, Taxis, Goddard Catering, Captain Don’s Habitat, Plaza Resort, Sand Dollar, Divi Flamingo Beach Resort, Bel Mar and the SGB. Sponsors of the event are Maduro & Curiels Bank, TELBO N.V., Consales Cash & Carry and Panaderia Seruva. You can even smell it in Bonaire when the wind comes from the west; (Continued on page 8) Hello tourist preparation

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Page 4 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 A VICIOUS ATTACK Dear Editor: At 3 a.m. Monday morning, June 20th, I was awakened by my dog's loud barking at something that I assumed was in our yard. I looked out toward our side yard and could see our dog running back and forth barking into our neighbor's yard next door. Our neighbor is a kind elderly man who raises blackbellied sheep and I could tell that there was something in his yard chasing the sheep. I went out and found a large Pit Bull terrorizing the sheep and had already taken one down to the ground. I began to throw rocks to try to get this vicious animal to leave. That was not going to work so I ran for my garden hose and began to squirt the dog to keep it away from the poor defenseless animal. The rest of the sheep were huddled together in a corner. A friend who was staying with me heard the noise and came outside, too and she began shouting at the dog. With the noise and water continually pelting him, he left, escaping through the hole in the fence he'd entered. I then went over into the yard to check on the downed sheep. I saw that its neck was ripped open, blood was flowing out as it struggled to breathe. Its right eye had been gouged out as well and I knew it had little chance of survival. I also found a newborn lamb, that had been born the day before, dead of a broken neck. I then tried to pile some larger rocks and wood into the hole to keep the beast out. I went back into the house about 4 a. m. and prayed that the animals would be unharmed but that would not be the case. About an hour later, I could hear a ruckus again but did not venture out. I was trying to keep my dogs from barking and waking my sleeping husband and house guest. I sorely regret that now for at daybreak when I looked out the window I could see two sheep lying on the ground with others obviously hurt. A young man, who lives adjacent to the elderly neighbor, was now in the yard yelling and swinging a stick at two dogs that were in the yard one was the Pit Bull and the other his dog that had come through the hole in the fence. By now, the Pit Bull had completed the ferocious attack and the other dog was just there to loudly bark. The young man, who knew this awful dog, picked him up and threw him over the fence along with his own dog. He then went to check the wounded sheep. I went out and looked over the fence to see 4 sheep down, obviously dead and 3 others near death, 2 of them had their necks snapped, blood everywhere. It was now about 6 am and my neighbor had now come outside because he had heard the young man's cursing and loud voice. He too saw the awful site and returned inside to call the police. They arrived in about 10 minutes and began to question those who were there and to count the sheep that were at-(Continued on page 5) LETTERS

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Page 5 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 (Pit Bull Letter. Continued from page 4) tacked. Photographs were taken and the vet was called to come and put the animals that were barely alive out of their misery. Three sheep that lived through the attack were treated for many wounds to the face and neck; one sustained a broken nose as well. They are now slowly healing. Miraculously, I found another newborn lamb that didn't have a scratch on it baa-ing near a hurt sheep. It was looking for its mother who lay dead about three feet away. It is doing well and being bottle-fed. That's the good news! The bad news is that the Pit Bull is still alive, chained in the owner's yard! The owner said that there was a new lock on the gate to keep their "pet" and watchdog in. It was not chained up the morning of the attack and it got out! My fear is that if this vicious dog could kill seven defenseless sheep, what will keep it from killing again? Why wasn't this animal killed and taken out of our neighborhood? A friend who is an emergency room doctor told me that this type of dog will kill again once it has tasted blood and that it kills things that are about its eye level! So, if you live in Hato, keep an eye on your pets and kids! I hope we don't read in The Reporter that a child is seriously injured or killed by this beast before it is destroyed. Oh, and perhaps the owners of this horrible Pit Bull should keep their young daughter inside, far away from their 'pet' dog! Maggie Fuller LEAKY PIPES Dear Editor, Attached to this mail are pictures which I made on June 21st 2005. The first time I noticed there was a leak in the pipeline from the WEB, I called the so called " Departamentu di Storing " and told the guy on duty there was a leak at Lima in Belnem. They told me that they would sendsomeone to fix the leak. That phone call was Thursday, June 9th!!! I called again on Saturday the 11th early evening. They apparently also do not work on weekends, because the trees started to get green. And to my big surprise when I walked by several times last week, still no leak fix. And the trees got greener by the day. Today, June 21st I walked by again, and noticed they still haven't done anything!! That is how serious they take a phone call from someone who notices while walking the dogs. So that is why I send you this mail with the photos, maybe you are willing to place them in the reporter and let the people of Bonaire know what happens with the increase of the waterand electricity bill! It for the trees on the side of the road. My girlfriend and I are wondering who is going to pay all this loss of water. In the end the people of Bonaire are paying the bill. I am sure the management team from the WEB doesn't!! Where is all this? At Lima in Belnem. Lima is the last sideway left on the long road to Sorobon, in Belnem. The road doesn't end but goes in a circle around a house and goes back to the road to Sorobon. In the curve, about 6 meters away from the road, there lies a pipeline which goes all the way in to the "knoek" and feeds construction sides and houses close to the airport. Why do I send this to The Reporter . Because in the first place, I think it is a waste of good water. The procedure of making fresh water out of seawater like the WEB does, is very expensive. And because we live with just a few here, we have to pay a lot. In the second place, if you ask me, people who are working at the WEB, doing their "storing" shift, have not learned anything from the big fire last Carnaval. If there is something wrong, no matter what, fix it!! That way you show the people of Bonaire that the WEB is serious and worth every penny! We are a long way from that! Silvan Henneman The daily press last week reported that WEB was actively working on the pipe problems in Belnem. Ed. BEAUTY IN SUSHI “When one takes a drive along Bonaire's east coast, graffiti has shown up even there. Not spray painting, but ugly sculptures of litter and garbage that someone has left as a monument to their ego.” BB (from 6/24/ 05 Edition of B.R.) Dear Editor: I really fail to see the ugliness in the “monuments” erected on the south end of our island. In the 20 plus years I have lived here, I have always marveled at the creativity of the mysterious sculptor whose work has brought many smiles and even a few laughs to our visitors. They have even appeared in articles and newspapers around the world. Obviously, BB (whoever you are) is a newcomer and is offended and it is certainly their right. I might then suggest since the recycled material is already conveniently piled up, they can easily find an old feed bag and remove it to the landfill. My Bonairean friends have told me they know who the artist is and they are not offended a bit. (I also have a feeling I know who it is as well...) Another great place to see the creative use of “sushi” is at FKPD (Pasa Dia) in Rincon. They sell great souvenirs that are worth the short drive north. Michael Gaynor OPINIONS and LETTERS:THE Op-Ed PAGE Reader comments limited to 500 words will be considered for inclusion in the “Letters” department. All letters must be signed. However, we will withhold names on request. Belnem leak

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Page 6 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 GOOGLE GAFFE? PART 1. To the Editors: Y our “Finding Balance for Bonaire” series is interesting, but at times I believe the authors manipulate their “facts” and “results” to push their points and agendas across, and damn the facts. In one issue they showed Caribbean island tourism growth rates for only a single sample, for example, to demonstrate how slow tourism growth was on Bonaire. They conveniently forgot to include that after 9/11, Bonaire apparently did not suffer nearly as significant a loss in touris m as just about every other Caribbean island did, which could explain the greater growth in last year’s numbers for other islands as a rebound from much lower post-9/11 levels. Never mind that a number of the islands listed were not real diver-oriented destinations. Further massaging of results occurs in another issue under the subject “Take the Google Test.” Some of your readers ma y be aware that among the many hats I wear, I also run NetTech N.V. along with my partner Susan Davis. NetTech N.V. operates and maintains Bonaire’s official web site, InfoBonaire, as well as web sites for dozens of other Bonaire businesses. I am also, however, a professional researcher, as part of the consulting work I perform for clients around the world in the field of patent litigation. And a significant part of my research involves using s earch engines such as Google to locate specific information – using both the methodologies that a non-professional searcher would use, and those known to people who have lots of experience using search tools. The basic issues I have with the Take the Google Test are: 1) There is no commentary on how ot her competing dive destinations faired; 2) the use of quotation marks around search terms; 3) interpreting search results; and 4) the lack of apparent understanding of how automated search engines sort and filter their data. Let’s take a quick look at these items. First, when I ran the same search terms as used in the article, the only official dive destination site I found in the first 100 results for “scuba vacation” was an official diving-oriented site for the Caym an Islands which also offered the ability to book travel to the Caymans (and thus was selling vacations directly). All other 99 results were understandably for tour operators and travel agents, as well as news sites, a few scattered dive shops in places ranging from Thailand to Florida, a bunch of unrelated sites, and one resort at a dive destination (Harbour Village – turned up twice – I’ll explain why later). The next hundred results turned up nothing better. Adding +Caribbean (which requires the word “Caribbean” to be in the search results) resulted in the aforementioned www.DiveCayman.ky site moving up to 31st place. Otherwise, the results were ra ther similar to the previous search. The other search terms produced similarly unspectacular results, when there were any. The term “snorkel, vacation, Caribbean” produced no results whatsoever, in contrast to what was reported. In no case di d I find an official tourism site in the top 20 results. Beyond 20 the results are probably meaningless for very broad searches, although potentially very relevant for targeted searches. As far as I see, all the searches in the Google Test were very broad ones, and thus the results were very broad. That leads to the next issue. Quotations marks around search terms in Google and other search engines mean that one should search for the phrase in the quotes. Perhaps the authors of the Google Test were using quotes for emphasis instead of literally, but that would obviously be wrong if the authors knew anything about search engines. For example, if I search for the quoted phrase “official bonaire website” , I get only 24 relevant results out of a possible 62 (and yes, it’s www.InfoBonaire.com at the top). If I use the same terms, official bonaire website without the quotes I get 54,600 results (and yes, www.InfoBonaire.com still comes up first). Quotation marks are criti cal tools that experienced searchers use to narrow down their results. Similarly, putting a “plus sign” in front of a particular term requires that term to be in the search results (otherwise it’s optional, meaning you get very unfocused results the further down the result list you go). Jake Richter Next weekWhat does a regular, nonexperienced searcher do and how to handle the search results Reporter readers have provided their views on our eight part series Balance for Bonaire. They will be presented in this issue and next. If you haven’t had a chance to complete the Reporter Survey (page 7) asking YOUR views on the proper choices for Bo naire’s future this is your last opportunity. Send by post, e-ma il or drop at our office. AIRLIFT MYTHS REACTION Dear Editor: I have been following your weekly articles regarding tourism and the "Balance for Bonaire". The June 10th article was very di sturbing as it was very ambiguous and raised a few glaring questions. The CTO 20 04 tourist arrival statistics were a bit perplexing. Can it really be true that 90,000 visitors to Granada arrived by airplane?????? That is how the report comes across. Anyone sitting on the beach in Granada on any given day will see 4-5 cruise ships lined up waiting to tender the thousands into town. So this is not a fair evaluation or comparison when discussing airlift. There is a second "problem" that seems to be ignored. I don't know if others have had this problem, or if it is just that we travel to Bonaire frequently that I notice a pattern. I feel part of the reason for the half empty planes to Bonaire is not lack of demand, but rather no available seats on the first leg, whether it be to SJ or MoBay. Every flight we have ever taken from the east coast to Mo Bay has been full. In the past, I have worked directly wi th the AJ office here 6 months or more in advance and more times than not, I can't get to Bonaire because the first leg is sold out. I believe that one way to determine if the problem is airlift, is to have a direct flight from the states. Only then can it be determined where the problem lies. The answer to the low hotel occupancy rate would be to get all the hotels on Travelocity or Orbitz. With computer access , it would be much easier if all the hotels were located together. Bonaire is not exactly tourist friendly when trying to find accommodations. Bonaire should be fixing the small problems now, and not wait for the "big fix". Nadine Rubin ARUBA, A MODEL FOR BONAIRE? REACTION PART 1. After a recent visit to Aruba, where I live d for 18 years, I was happy to come back to our island. The publicity around the recent disappearance of the American girl, Natalee Halloway, has focused on Aruba and its tourist industry. Just before I left Aruba, I listened to an interview on the local TV-station with the Director of the Chamber of Commerce about the sustainability of the further hotel development on Aruba. I was surprised to hear that no decision has been taken yet and that various studies are still being conducted. The current uninhibited construction of new gigantic hotel and time share buildings clearly shows that the government of Aruba is firmly decided to sacrifice also the few remaining sections of pristine beaches for this disastrous development. During the interview, the mentioned director complained that while Aruba was still studying what to do, the people of Bonaire had already taken a firm decision not to permit any construction of large hotels and to concentrate on improvement of existing tourist facilities, particularly for the diving industry, in order to preserve the beautiful nature of the island. To my horror, after reading the excellent articles Finding Balance for Bonaire in recent issues of Bonaire Reporter , I found that although the people of this island really did take the mentioned decision, ther e are politicians having another opinion. They probably see, like it has happened on Aruba, a personal profit in the mass tourist development. They do not mind that the decision of the people is firmly supported by the official Bonaire government tourist development guidelines. How is that possible? (Continued on page 7)

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Page 7 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 The Bonaire Reporter Survey. What do YOU think about Bonaire? A s a reader of The Bonaire Reporter you must care about the island. Maybe you could help us with some of the consumer ‘needs’ research mentioned in this series. It doesn’t matter if you are a tourist or a resident. Please fill out this questionnaire and mail it to Bonaire Reporter, Kaya Gob. Debrot 200-6, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles (AN) or go on-line to http//www. bonairenews.com/survey.htm and e-mail your form to survey@bonairereporter. com. Dozens have already been received but we’d like some more. 1. Your nationality: Antillean US Netherlands Other: ____________________________ 2. Your age: Under 25 26-40 41-60 Over 60 3. Your sex: M F 4. Marital status Single Married Widowed/Divorced In relationship 5. Years Scuba Diving 1 year or less 2-5 years 5-10 years More than 10 years 6. Years windsurfing 1 year or less 2-5 years 5-10 years More than 10 years 7. Are you a Tourist Part time resident Full time resident Native Bonairean 8. How much time do you spend on Bonaire in an average year? 1-2 weeks 3 to 4 weeks 1 to 2 months 2 to 6 months 6 to 12 months 9. Number of people in your household or group when you are on Bonaire: __________ 10. What year did you first come to Bonaire: ____________ 11.Why did you first come to Bonaire? born here parents moved here found a job here scuba diving tourist windsurfing tourist Other ___________________________________________________________ 12.What do you like MOST about Bonaire? 13.What do you like LEAST about Bonaire? 14.How satisfied are you with the following? Rate your degree of satisfactions from 1 to 4, where 4 is extremely satisfied and 1 is not at all satisfied. Circle the appropriate number for each item. Satisfaction Low High a. friendliness of the people 1 2 3 4 b. number of hotels 1 2 3 4 c. quality of hotels 1 2 3 4 d. number of restaurants 1 2 3 4 e. quality of restaurants 1 2 3 4 f. number of cultural activities 1 2 3 4 g. quality of cultural activities 1 2 3 4 h. activities for children 1 2 3 4 i. condition of the reefs 1 2 3 4 j. quality of the diving 1 2 3 4 k. quality of the environment 1 2 3 4 l. cleanliness of the island 1 2 3 4 m. quality of the roads 1 2 3 4 n. Internet service 1 2 3 4 o. telephone service 1 2 3 4 p. water and electric service 1 2 3 4 q. number of tourists 1 2 3 4 r. service attitude at businesses 1 2 3 4 s. personal safety 1 2 3 4 t. number of activities available 1 2 3 4 u. quality of activities available 1 2 3 4 v. number of diving locations 1 2 3 4 w. airline service to the island 1 2 3 4 x. quality of your Bonaire experience 1 2 3 4 y. Other_______________________ 1 2 3 4 z. Other_______________________ 1 2 3 4 15.What ‘needs’ do you have that are not currently being met by Bonaire? Or, said another way, what could Bonaire do to get you to spend more time on the island or for you to enjoy your time on Bonaire more? 16. What could Bonaire do to improve its tourism product so more people would want to come to Bonaire? Reaction to Balance for Bonaire articles (Continued from page 6) In “Finding Balance for Bonaire,” Part 4, a closer look was taken at the Aruba Model, presenting conclusions of a Tobago research and of an article of Robertico Croes and Manuel Vanegas. Mr. “Tico”Croes served as the Finance Minister in the last government, led by Henny Eman, and was recently interrogated about his possible involvement in a financial scandal concerning the never realized speedway race track.. A judge in Miami decided in this matter that the government of Aruba had to pay $20 million to a US investor. It is hard to understand that during the trial the former transportation minister in the Eman's cabinet, Glenbert Croes, main promoter of the failed project, testified against his own government(!!!). Reading the conclusions of the Tobago report and of the mentioned article, one could believe that the Aruba growth has been the result of strict pursuance of a deliberate strategy and a clear development plan and that, with the exception of some miscalculation, the tourist development has been a big success, and that Aruba can serve as a model for Bonaire when planning the future tourist development.. The fact is, however, that although Aruba does have a development plan, elaborated more than 20 years ago, all tourist development during the last 20 years has not been a result of a deliberate strategy and a development plan but rather of bitter fighting between the two leading political parties, the Christian democratic AVP and the socialist MEP. Since 1985, there have been three cabinets Eman ( prime minister of all governments led by AVP) and three cabinets Oduber (prime minister of all MEP-governments). The Oduber III cab inet is currently at the power and new elections will come this year. It is a normal practice on Aruba that when the rival party wins the election, the new government declares that the policy of the preceding administration was completely wrong, th at due to irresponsible decisions of the previous government (mostly in connectio n with the new hotel construction) the new administration has to pay millions of dollars to foreign banks and that a completely new policy has to be followed. A good example of this practice are the both hotel moratoria (in 1986 and 1996), mentioned in Finding Balance for Bonaire, Part 4. They were declared by the Eman governments as reaction to, in their ey es, wrong tourism development under the Oduber administrations. In 1996, the Eman administration went so far that it decided to demolish three uncompleted large hotels at the Palm beach. The two towers of a new Ramada hotel were sold to the Divi group under the condition that the larger tower, almost fully completed, would be demolished. It really happened (!) and the smaller remaining tower operates now under the name Phoenix resort. It is a paradox that the neighboring Wyndham hotel (former Concorde and later Hilton) is currently negotiating with the government to get permission to build an annex to its existing high rise building, practically at the site of the demolished Ramada tower (!). The two remaining hotels were ultimately saved and taken over by the Marriott group which under the current Od uber III administration, completely ignoring the moratorium taken by the previous Eman government, not only completed the construction but started, next to these hotels, to realize the gigantic four stages time share project Ocean Club and Surf Club. The high buildings of the first two stages now tower over the neighboring Holiday Inn resort. Jiri Lausman Next week the financial scandals that are costing Arubans millions MAKE ALL DEVELOPMENT SUSTAINABLE Dear Editor: Sustainable development is not something new. History is full of examples of cultures that developed in a sustainable way; that means, they progressed social and economically, with out abusing the natural resources. However, increased interest in “development” shown by governments, some world organizations and certain sectors of the society results in the actual state of deterioration of the planet and the danger it represent for mankind. But, what is sustainable development? It’s the development that satisfies the needs of those of us that inhabit the planet today, with out compromising the capacity of future generations of satisfy theirs. It’s an alternative to face the crisis that this actual type of development that seeks economical progress at all cost, has generated. This means that, the model of sustainable development seeks the same economic progress, but controlling the use of the natural resources. The sustainable development model, as it was defined in 1992 in the Summit of the Earth in Rio de Janeiro, stands in three very strong components. Sustainable development is, of course, interested in a more balanced use of the natural resources; but is also interested in a better distribution of the benefits generated and more participation of the people in the maki ng of decisions that affect them. This makes sustainable development the way to a more fair and balanced society, with less difference between rich and poor. The actual model has us on the edge of the depletion of important resources, like water, fossil fuel, fisheries stock, coral reefs, etc. and if we continue to seek pro-(Continued on page 17) Diver and Turtle at Kai Albert Bianculli photo L a s t C h a n c e t o s u b m i t f or m !

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Page 8 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 flotsam and Jetsam (Continued from page 3) Curaçao’s Venezuelan-owned Isla oil refinery. Why? It’s because the discharge of sulfur dioxide (SO2) by the refinery is enormous. According to figures the Foundation for a Clean Environment in Curaçao (SMOC) released last week, the refinery discharged almost 78 million kilo of sulfur dioxide in 2001. The discharge for the entire country of the Netherlands was 75 million kilos in that same year. One refinery, Shell Pernis, that processes twice as much crude oil as the Isla, discharged only 16 million kilos. The enormous discharges mean that the refinery’s equipment is in need of repair or replacement, since nothing has been upgraded to reduce those emissions since the last century. SO2 has a detrimental effect on the health of people living close to the refinery. SMOC is demanding that the Curaçao government take action to remedy the problem. A Dutch lawayer and translator made an English translation of Book I of the Netherlands Antilles Civil Code, "Family Law and the Law of Persons. '" He sent the Public Prosecutor a copy who thinks this is very interesting for all English speaking persons living on Bonaire. If you are interested, please contact him. The Antillean Parliament approved a bill requiring social education duty for young jobless school dropouts amid much debate on whether it was doing so under pressure of the Dutch Government’s plan to introduce an admittance regulation for Antillean youngsters traveling to Holland. Antillean youths have a higher incidence of arrests in Holland than do European Dutch youngsters. Supposedly, if a person from 16-24 has passed the "social education program" he/she can be admitted into Holland without restriction. The compulsory program has been in the works for a while and there is a pilot project underway but not getting much enrollment. A serious effort to speed up immigration permits was announced by Minister of Justice David Dick early last week . The welcome announcement followed lengthy talks with the Lt. Governors of the respective Island Territories. Dick says the entire Immigration System needs streamlining. It's a conclusion arrived at years ago by business, bona fide immigrants, visiting yachtsmen and people who have decided to reside here. Bonaire’s Immigration officials had already extended the two-week reporting requirement to four weeks. Minister Dick, who comes from the private sector, believes the current system is ridiculously bureaucratic and, as a consequence, frustrates economic growth and often creates situations bordering on violation of human rights. One of our island's business leaders hopes the "reforms" will go beyond the improvement in issuing permits. Streamlining the Immigration System has to change basic thinking about “immigration.” He said that currently a negative approach dominates. It appears aimed more at making immigration difficult rather than at serving the economy. On Bonaire the argument that the local labor market needs protection is often stretching a point and overprotection reduces productivity. Last Sunday, 19th of June, an anonymous caller contacted STINAPA that people were spear fishing at Bachelor’s Beach. According to the Marine Ordinance, it is forbidden to fish in the Bonaire Marine Park with a spear gun or handheld spear. It is also forbidden to transport a spear gun or handheld spear on public ground (or water), to have in one’s possession, or to buy or sell spear gunned fish. The rangers arrived at the beach by boat and picked-up and caught two spear fishermen in the act. They came out of the water wearing dive equipment and carrying a dive bag full of fish, but left the spear gun behind. The rangers seized the bag with fish and also surfaced the spear gun. Both hunters were taken to the Police Station with the spear gun, dive gear and fish. The case will be handled by the court of justice. STINAPA wants to thank the anonymous caller. Without his help, they said they would not have been able to stop this illegal activity. Whenever you see someone spear fishing or other illegal activities going on in the Marine Park, contact STINAPA at: 717-8444 or 786-9603. Now all NGOs (“Non-Profit” Non Government Organizations) can have their own Web page and e-mail connection free thanks to an initiative by Bonaire’s NGO Platform via the Platform’s new website, www. NGOBonaire.org. Each NGO will have a single private e-mail address, even the Platform will “We’d like every Bonaire NGO to have a web site and e-mail address,” said James Finies President of the Platform. “If the NGO doesn’t have a computer they can use the one installed for their use at Platform headquarters.” “For people of our island it is becoming very important to communicate rapidly and precisely,” said Elsmarie Beukenboom, Platform Secretary. “The Platform wants each NGO to have a chance to use this important media.” On Sunday night between 2 and 8 pm the police zero tolerance team conducted an enforcement action directed at scooters and motorcycles. They confiscated 10 scooters and a motorcycle and gave out 19 summonses (prosès verbal) for various infractions, mostly related to not having a license to operate a two-wheeled vehicle. There was also an arrest for drug possession and another for failing to comply with the order of a policeman. The majority of drivers stopped did not have the proper license to operate their scooters and as a result scooter rental operators will be encouraged to ensure that their renters have a license that qualifies them to operate the vehicles they rent. A diner at a street-side restaurant wondered if they had impounded the extremely loud motorcycle that had passed him earlier in the day. The Dutch Caribbean Nature Alliance (DCNA) opened their headquarters in Kaya Grandi # 20 this past week. Former Bonaire National Marine Park Manage r Kalli De Meyer’s initiatives and hard work to found an organization, dedicated to the long term preservation and conservation of nature within the Netherlands Antilles have finally paid off. (See story on page 17 for information.) After almost two years of preparation the Dutch Caribbean Nature Alliance officially started April 1st of 2005 with Kalli as its Executive Director. She was recently joined by Sharon Bol, who will be the Office Manager for DCNA’s headquarters on Bonaire. REMINDER—take the fantastic Lac Bay discovery boat trip on Sunday. Then attend Art Day. See page 19 – What’s Happening-for details. G./L.D Natalee Holloway Disappearance and Antilles/Aruba Law N atalee Holloway , an 18 year-old Alabama girl, disappeared May 30 hours before she was to return home from a trip to Aruba with other students celebrating graduation. The case has drawn international attention and has even tainted Bonaire. At press time four men are in custody, but not charged with a crime. According to published reports, Joran van der Sloot (17) admitted “making out” with the girl in the back seat of the car at a beach where the three took her. The Dutch teen and his two friends are still in jail. Three other men arrested and held have been released. Investigators from Aruba and the USA continue to look for evidence behind the disappearance The Legal Process The arrest and detention procedures may be confusing to some as they are based on principles different from American or English traditions and legal codes. The Netherlands Antilles and Aruba are overseas Dutch territories with judicial systems modeled after the Dutch structure, in which people can be arrested on suspicion of a crime, but not formally charged until later. International law expert Theodore Simon explained about the differences between US and Dutch law in connection with th e Natalee Holloway disappearance but it may prove informative to our readers as the same principles apply in Bonaire. In the Antilles and Aruba people can be held without any formal charges filed . All authorities need is some indication that the person may have been involved, and then they can be arrested and held for a substantial period of time. In the US, a person cannot be arrested unless there's probable cause. And probable cause has been defined as facts and circumstances based on reasonably trustworthy information that would warrant a prudent person into believing a crime was committed and the person to be arrested committed it. Initially a person can be held by the police for two days. They're not required to bring them before a magistrate until 72 hours have passed. And the initial two can be extended for eight days and then two more periods of eight days if the magistrate concurs. So that's about 26 days; and then another four months. So a person can be held up to 146 days without being charged with a crime. Once charged with a crime the accused appears in front of a single judge and is tried. If convicted, they have the right to a trial de novo , which, in effect, means a do over, and have a trial in front of a three-judge panel. However, that may seem helpful to the defense. On the other hand, if they are acquitted at the single judge trial, the government can appeal -something that could not happen in the US. There is no jury trial in the Dutch/Antillean/Aruban system. While the person charged will appear in front of a single judge, they retain the same standard of being proven beyond a reasonable doubt. But a single judge will render judgment of guilt or non-guilt. The verdict can get appealed before at threejudge tribunal, and finally either party could appeal to The Hague in the Netherlands for questions of law. Both in the US and the Dutch system there's the right to be free from self incrimination. The accused cannot be required to testify against him or herself. And if they don't testify, no adverse inference can be drawn. Reportedly these three young men were the last persons to see Natalee Holloway alive. They are in custody. Sharon Bol runs the Bonaire DCNA office

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Page 9 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 KRALENDIJK TIDES (Heights in feet, FT) Remember: Winds and weather can further influence the local tides DATE TIME HEIGHT COEF 7-01 6:36 0.9FT. 21:51 2.0FT. 5 7-02 7:39 0.8FT. 22:21 2.0FT. 5 7-03 8:27 0.7FT. 22:53 2.1FT. 6 7-04 9:14 0.7FT. 23:29 2.1FT. 7 7-05 9:59 0.7FT. 7 7-06 0:34 2.1FT. 10:33 0.7FT. 7 7-07 1:05 2.0FT. 11:09 0.7FT. 7 7-08 1:35 1.9FT. 11:43 0.7FT. 7 VESSELS MAKING A PORT CALL : Antee Angie Another World Angel B Augustine Bright Sea Bounty Carylar Camissa, Chan Is. Cape Kathryn Endangered Species Endorphin Felicity Flying Cloud, USA Freestyle Guaicamar I, Ven. Jan Gerardus L’Quila, BVI Luna C. USA Madam Maggi Mainly Moonrise Mystic Jade Natural Selection Pyewacket Rusty Bucket Santa Maria Sandpiper, USA Scintella Sea Witch Sirius Sola 2 Sylvia K Sylvester Ti Amo, USA T’zadde Triumphant Lady Ulu Ulu, USA Ulysses Unicorn, Norway Varedhuni, Ger. Windancer Ya-T, BVI Yanti Paratzi Zahi, Malta Zeelander YACHTING AND WATERSPORTS PAGES S ometimes dreams do come true. The dream of many Bonairean windsurfers is to follow in the footsteps of island pros Tonky and Taty Frans and secure an international sponsor. Lucky sailor Jose Fajardo Rivera found not one, not two, not three, but four sponsors to help make his windsurfing dream a reality. Jose, a 20-something sailor, began seriously windsurfing in 2001 and advanced quickly by putting in long hours of training. Sponsor scout Ann Phelan saw that he had what was needed to be a winning competitor. What he needed was decent gear to train and compete. A few connections were made and Jose secured a limited sponsorship with Gun Sails USA and Island Sports for discount sails. He also secured a sponsorship with Caribbean Wind & Sun Vacations which allotted two tickets each year for Jose to attend competition. Coach Elvis Martinus used his influence and connections to help Jose secure a full board sponsorship from RRD in Italy. The plan was for Jose to attend King of the Caribbean and then the Cape Cod Freestyle Frenzy. Unfortunately, lack of wind prevented any meaningful competition at both events but that didn’t stop Jose from working it and having some fun while in Cape Cod. He hooked up with Platt Johnson, owner of Island Sports in Newport Rhode Island and the US distributor for Gun Sails. Jose attended Windfest, a surf show held during the Frenzy. Jose worked with Platt selling gear and doing demos. Platt was so impressed with Jose’s get-upand-go attitude he contacted Gun Sails International and eventually was able to secure a full gear sponsorship for this aspiring talent. Later in the week, Platt invited Jose to his home turf to see his mega shop and to tour Newport. When Jose arrived in historic Newport, Rhode Island, he was treated to a whirlwind day complete with a tour of the beaches, an interview with the Newport Daily News and an extravagant luncheon at the elegant and renowned New York Yacht Club hosted by Platt’s lovely wife Nancy and sons Will and Chris. The setting was majestic with pristine views of Newport Harbour. It was a day Jose will never forget. An older rider by current windsurf standards, Jose does not have expectations on attending the PWA Tour. His dream is to finish technical school in Curaçao, secure a great job in Bonaire and windsurf in as many competitions as possible. Part of his dream is to travel more, and this may become a reality as Platt and Nancy have invited Jose to spend the summer of 2006 in Newport as their guest, volunteering in the shop and learning more about the retail end of windsurfing. Not bad for an old windsurf kid. Ann Phelan www.bonairecaribbean.com Jose Fajardo Rivera and Platt Johnson Jose Fajardo Rivera S amson Evertsz, age 9, is the first swimmer to represent Bonaire in the Curaçao "A" Swimming Championships. This annual competition is organized by the Curaçao Swimming Association and is open only to local swimmers who have achieved "A" level times during the current swimming season. "A" is the fastest time category recognized in the Netherlands Antilles. The "A" Championship meet took place June 9 12 at the Sentro Deportivo Korsow complex in Curaçao. Samson represented the Bonaire Barracudas Swim Team in the presentation of teams during the "A" Championship opening ceremony held on Saturday, 11 June. A special welcome was extended to Bonaire and its lone swimmer by the President of the Curaçao Swimming Association during this ceremony. Bonaire swimmers participate in Curaçao events as exhibition swimmers to receive official times but are ineligible for awards. Samson achieved his qualifying times in backstroke, butterfly and freestyle during the 6th Annual Dutch Caribbean Invitational Swim meet in April. During the "A" Championships he improved his times in each of his three events demonstrating continued progress in the sport. Asked for his thoughts on this opportunity Samson said," I had a great time and learned a lot about setting goals. I can't wait to go back!" The Netherlands Antilles swimming season runs from September through June. Desiree Baaleman, age 10, of the Bonaire Barracudas was the only other Bonaire swimmer to qualify for this meet. Desiree achieved an "A" time in 50 meter breaststroke at the Dutch Caribbean Invitational but was unable to attend the "A" Championship meet. photo and story by Valarie Stimpson Samson Evertsz (yellow swim cap -inset) at the start of the Boys 10 and Under 50 meter butterfly race.

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Page 10 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 “I can’t believe this show was put on by young people,” a tourist exclaimed last Friday night at the opening of the SGB high school’s “Cultural Growth” art show. “I’ve been to so many art openings, but this is just fantastic! I’m so glad I was able to be on the island right now.” The lady tourist echoed the feelings of so many who attended the first ever SGB high school art opening at ARTEBON. Speaking for her colleagues, general science teacher Mary Ann Koops, said, “We’re so very proud of the students. Sometimes they have a low self esteem and they just throw their designs in the trash. They think they are nothing. But we wanted them to be able to show their works to their parents and the public. We’ve been very privileged to work with these kids.” Minister of Education Maritza Silberie, who opened the show, said, “It’s very important to show something positive coming from the SGB. These are our children and we’re very proud of what they can do.” Challenged by general science teacher Koops and art and industrial design teacher Wilna Groenenboom, the students had to either come up with a new product or enhance or embellish one that’s already in use. They had to make a plan, work two dimensionally with sketches before creating the final product in three dimensions. A third subject, Papiamentu, was brought into play as each project manual had to be written in that language. Student Ashwant Gonesh explained that he wanted to design a “guitar of the future.” He had to study an existing one and decide how to ch ange it and make it really look like something familiar but with a whole new design. He had to think a lot and let his imagination soar. “I know it may be a little hard to play with all these points,” he says, pointing to the zigzag design, but he accomplished his goal. Attending the opening and showing their support were parents, other students as well as teachers, staff and those associated with the SGB: Nolly Oleana, Artie DeVries, Ann Leong, Herman Groenenboom, Rob van Lear, Helen Hoen, Ms. Martijn, Papiamentu teacher Melina Rameriz, Edy Carolina, Hilly Gravenhorst and others. The exhibition continued through the weekend with the students acting as docents, showing the public through the show. L.D. C O V E R S T O R Y It was through a generous grant from AMFO and the NGO Platform Bonaire that this “Cultural Growth at ARTEBON” was made possible. Stressing the importance of this exhibit and what it would do the self image of each student, the teachers asked for help. Responding, the Platform guided them in the proper method to apply for funds. Working together they accomplished a monumental feat – one that may have changed the path of a student who thinks maybe he or she was not worthy. Thank you to all teachers and the NGO Platform personnel – who made this come true. Ashwant Gonesh and Syphard Willem, the Future Guitar Boys Minister of Education, Maritza Silberi, cuts the ribbon to open the show A whimsical puppet Bonaire’s most famous bird

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Page 11 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 Reporter: The sector Care and Welfare contains more than just projects for the senior citizens. The part of the youth and problem prevention is not as well publicized. Is that accurate? Boy Clarenda: That’s true! There were indeed many more projects for the elderly. Let me explain the concepts of the Care and Welfare sector: People have certain needs. The part of ‘Care’ reflects what people require on daily basis to survive. The part of ‘Welfare’ is how citizens feel: safe, comfortable, without fear or anxiety in their daily lives. So you can imagine how large the area is because everyone has these needs. A large part of achieving these two concepts, care and welfare, is based on education which should start at a very young age, otherwise we will keep encountering what we’re dealing with nowadays: troublesome youngsters; or the fact that we’re trying to extinguish those fires that have started. Reporter: The organization ‘CoCaRi’ (Comishon Cuido pa Ansianonan di Rincon) a daily activity center for the elderly in Rincon, in which you are also the president, urgently needs a bus. Sharing a bus with other organizations as the NGO Platform proposed is not an option due to the special characteristics of Rincon (e.g. the distance, the needy target group which is vulnerable etc.). Can you explain? Clarenda: CoCaRi needs a bus, indeed. The current bus is old. We’re trying to help groups to reach their goals as much as possible. Scarcity means we must act as efficiently as possible. It would be the ideal situation to have every group in the community get what they ask for. But if we find that a group can’t share resources we will help them as best we can. Reporter: As representative of the sector you will do your utmost to introduce projects for youth and prevention (e.g. AIDS/STD prevention, diabetes among the youth etc). Right? Clarenda: Yes. Youngsters have the most exposure. We should consider how to fight against the risks that they run. The plans are to start first with the SGB kids who don’t get enough attention. These programs should focus on minimizing the risks they encounter. Education and prevention go hand in hand. In the area of ‘care’, the mental development of the youngsters should be addressed (the situation at home, problems with the parents, teen pregnancy etc). Our youngsters are very vulnerable. I mostly combine my work in healthcare with the activities for the NGO Platform. (Mr. Clarenda’s job is Manager of Quality at Fundashon Mariadal which includes San Francisco Hospital). Don’t forget that Mariadal is the largest NGO on the island. One of my departments deals with juvenile/youth health issues. This includes all the schools as well. For instance we just hired a social worker who, as of June 15, will focus on youngsters’ mental health as her daily task, sharing this duty with a doctor. They will visit all the schools on Bonaire to investigate the mental development of the children, to detect the risks and finally to battle them. Reporter: What will the effect be of assigning a new project leader to the project of the elderly (for all the three centers for the elderly on Bonaire ( CoCaRI, Villa Antonia, Kai Mimina)? Clarenda: We indeed have named a coordinator. Initially we expect short term resultsfor instance putting together the annual report, project information etc. The people in these organizations, who initially had trouble doing this kind of work, now have the coordinator to take it over. But if we continue this way with this project it will remain a short-term project. That’s why we need to come up with a structured program that will lead us to results in the long run. Reporter: Can you tell us about some financed and completed projects both for the youth as well as for the senior citizens that are continuing? Clarenda: For the elderly we now have an activity leader. Our senior citizens are now receiving more varied activity and recreation. This leader is working together with others to exchange knowledge and experience. So we can consider this a long-term effect because at some point these people will take over. Regarding youngsters, we already discussed them. I admit that they can use attention. But I’m positive that the social worker, I mentioned previously, put in charge of the mental health program for the youth will have positive results over the long term. Reporter: I’ve heard that the planned Health Center in Rincon may be at the southern part of Rincon which the government named an official “‘health area.” Does this mean that the Health Center should not be placed in the school-convent area, in the center of Rincon? Clarenda; There should be a Health Center in Rincon! Keep in mind that space in Rincon is scarce. I don’t want to get into a discussion where it should be located! It must be properly equipped and staffed. For me it’s more important that it be well located, have good personnel, available 24 hours a day etc. Wherever it is it should be somewhere where the people of Rincon can reach it easily. Reporter: Different subsidizers like AMFO have shown interest in helping to renovate the convent in Rincon and make it a historic site (monument). This way it can also serve as a mobilization center for the Rincon‘s elderly. Will you work to make this happen? Clarenda: Absolutely! What the senior citizens require is a building where they can have recreation. But at the same time this place should be safe and presentable. Anyone who would like to consider helping to achieve this is more than welcome! Reporter: I want you to thank you for this opportunity. Clarenda: You’re welcome, till a next time. Natalie A.C. Wanga CONTACT INFORMATION AMFO: Kaya Gob. N. Debrot #31, Bonaire. Tel. 717-7776, Fax 717-7779, website: www.samfo.org, email: info-bon@samfo.org NGO Platforma Bonaire : Kaya Korona 5-C. Tel. 717-2366, Fax 7172367, website: www.ngobonaire.org, email: Platform@ngobonaire.org Community Issues in the Care and Welfare Sector Part of the continuing series on the Activities sponsored by Godfried ‘Boy’ Clarenda A Reporter interview with Mr. Godfried ‘Boy’ Clarenda, the dynamic NGO representative for the Care and Welfare Sector of Bonaire’s NGO Platform.

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Page 12 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 Y ou might say I have a very interesting and active life. It began in an oil soaked, rodent infested, smelly and slimy port. As a cargo freighter, I visited and explored hundreds of similar ports during my life. The men who built my 235 foot long (72 meter) hull and installed the components to control my movement were rough, dirty and very loud. I was made to roam the oceans of the world and have carried valuable cargo and personal possessions to people around the globe. As time passed my travels became more limited and, for the next several years, I had the luxury of staying closer to my home port visiting old friends on all the islands in the Caribbean. I am not proud of my last sailing adventure. My new owner modified my cargo hold to carry a new, smaller and lighter cargo. The captain and crew are also new and are not familiar with all the controls and special handling required to manage a lady of my maturity and experience. Our final destination was unknown to me, but, judging by the amount of fuel in my tanks, it may have been a local port or southern America, perhaps Miami. I was quickly loaded in the dark hours, only a 12 ton cargo, and went to sea again heading east. Curiously, a new name was painted over my old. For this voyage, I am now called the “ Hilma Hooker ,” San Andres (Colombia). The fresh April breeze and the steady waves, beating against the bow, feel soothing and are in rhythm with the sound of my engine. Suddenly, there is a loud noise below with frantic shouting between the captain and the engineer. We alter course and make for a small nearby island in the Netherlands Antilles called Bonaire. In the shelter of Klein Bonaire, a mile off the main coast and near Kralendijk harbor, we anchor to make the necessary repairs. A group of customs officials come aboard and the captain sets us adrift. The officials take us in tow and I am placed at the pier for further inspection. After several days of some very embarrassing encounters within my empty holds, the teams of expert investigators depart. Now, with the aid of SCUBA gear, another pair of specialists is under my bottom, banging and poking around in some very private areas. This team has important news for the Island officials that uncover the secret compartment containing my small cargo. The contraband is seized, I am confined to port and the captain, who has damaged a portion of my hull admitting a continuous flow of seawater, is arrested. I am very distressed and wonder if I will be (Continued on page 13) B onaire’s dream team of top chefs and a bartender headed out last Sunday to compete in the “Taste of the Caribbean” culinary competition in Miami. This is the third time that Bonaire has sent a team to the event. They’ll compete against 12 other teams made up of the best professional chefs from 12 other Caribbean islands: Anguilla, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, British Virgin Island, Cayman Islands, Curaçao , Puerto Rico, St. Lucia, St. Maarten/St. Martin, Trinidad & Tobago and the US Virgin Islands. It takes a lot of work and dedication on the part of these professionals who already put in long hours in their restaurants. The team has had a lot of island support the people and businesses of Bonaire who’ve enabled them to put on numerous fund-raising lunches and dinners to hone their culinary skills. Representing Bonaire are: Rolando “Ricky ” Janzen (Divi Flamingo Resort), Pastry Chef Isidoor van Riemsdijk and Floris van Loo (Rum Runners Restaurant) and Tico Marsera (Den Laman). Coach is “T aste” veteran, Vernon “Nonchi” Martijn. Bartender is Brad Conner (Rum Runners). Accompanying the team will be Coordinator Sara Matera of the Culinar Foundation and Reporter Editor Laura DeSalvo for on-site reporting. Find out how the team did in next week’s edition . L.D. Taking off from Flamingo airport last Sunday: Brad Conner, Floris van Loo, Rolando “Ricky” Janzen, Vernon “Nonchi” Martijn, Isidoor van Riemsdijk, Tico Marsera, Laura DeSalvo. Heading for the bottom

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Page 13 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 (I Am the William Express.Cont. from pg. 12) disemboweled and cut to pieces in an early visit to the scrap yard! At last, after months of pumping and endless debate, I have been liberated from the confines of the port and, after hasty repairs, I am floating at anchor off a beautiful beach swaying in the gentle waves and cooled by friendly breezes. It is now September 12, 1984 and today I am boarded by a small group of strangers determined to help me accomplish my final mission. They reposition my anchor near shore and start to flood my holds. I gently roll over on my starboard side and, cradled in the warm embrace of the sea, slowly drift down to the soft white sand between two beautiful coral reefs at 100 feet (30 m). Now, I am safe and secure in the pristine sea that once was the highway that I roamed. My destiny has been fulfilled and, unlike other ships my age, I will have a long, comfortable retirement. This is a happy ending to a tortured life and the beginning of wonderful encounters with a new purpose: let me share them with you. Here I rest, in the sea, after being washed clean and prepared to receive new occupants from the underwater marine environment and occasional visitors from shore. They will be equipped with the same SCUBA gear that my liberators used to expose the criminal plot of my previous owner. As the “Hotel Hilma Hooker” my accommodations are spacious and comfortable. They provide shelter and privacy for intimate encounters when desired by my guests. Over the past twenty years a few notable residents have made my passage ways and the island’s surrounding coral gardens their retreat from the stress of the open sea. “Fang”, is a traveling executive, with a sleek, silver, muscular barracuda body with bold black markings to accent his distinguished character. He has repeatedly occupied the Bridge Suite for months at a time to use as his base of operations. He has spent endless hours observing the unusual activities of our short term day-visitors from shore. He delights in silently hovering above and behind these unsuspecting couples while being tickled by the clouds rising bubbles from their excited exhale. “Angel,” one of our longterm guests, joined us after retiring from a very successful career as an actress on the European stage. She is always elegant in her black and yellow designer patterned attire and provides companionship for all our guests. Her experience, before many appreciative audiences, has made her an excellent model for all the photographers that visit our quarters and gardens. She is always willing to pose before the camera lens and be bathed in the bright light and glitter of their strobes. “Napoleon” and “Godiver”, a grouper couple, inhabit the private Stern Cabin under a long term arrangement. They enjoy a carefree life of pleasure protected by our “off-shore” location. Secretive by nature, interaction among the masses of visitors is limited to special occasions. They do enjoy dancing together and can be observed nuzzling and embracing in the early evening hours. We also have a pair of Tarpon couples that have taken their places in the two Forward Master Suites. The brothers, “Chromium” and “Tequila,” are paired with “Quicksilver” and “Tinsel”, respectively. Unlike the groupers, they are always available to our public guests, and, despite their large size, are very gentle and easy to approach. They are very attentive and often display a playful side to their nature by blowing bubbles before the waiting cameras. If you watch carefully you can catch them breaking the surface of the water to gulp air for this demonstration. My last revelation is to remain a secret between us. To protect their true identity I will give you their nick-names from our desk registry. They are a father and son in semi-permanent residence. “Gargantuan” and “Tank” have been known to ambush unsuspecting prey, and from their names you can guess that they are of considerable size and girth. As typical behavior for Jewfish, they do not seek notoriety nor do they like to be approached by strangers. You may see them sitting in the gardens, well camouflaged and grumbling to themselves. Their massive bodies are a testament to the success rate of their many kills. Do not disturb them is my only advice to you. I hope this short visit has been revealing and fun for you. I welcome you to join me at any time, day or night for adventure and the pleasure of your company at Bonaire’s most famous underwater resort, The Hilma Hooker Hotel. ©Albert Bianculli 2005 “Fang” “Angel” “Tank” ©Albert Bianculli ©Albert Bianculli ©Albert Bianculli

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Page 14 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 For Sale For Sale4 Extra Large Suitcases with wheels . Several used one time only. Paid $100.00 each; will sell for NAƒ100,00 each. Call 786-3134 Compaq w i d e screen Laptop Computer, 512MB,DVD/CDRW, Wireless LAN, 2.5yr WARRANTY, FREE CARRYING CASE US$1,500 tel:791-4606 after 5pm Property, Sales & Rentals For Rent: Comfortable 2-bedroom beach villa -weekly or monthly-choice location-privacy & security. Phone (Bon) (599) 717 3293; (US) (570) 586 0098. May 20 until Jan. 8th. info@pelicanreefbonaire.com or www. pelicanreefbonaire.com Wanted Volunteers needed to index back issues of The Bonaire Reporter (English) and Extra (Papiamentu). Call George at 717-8988 or 786-6125. BIG PORCH SALE July 2-3 from 8 am-2 pm Hilltop (next to the Bonaire Caribbean Club)Take the tourist road north. Sale is across from STINAPA office. If you think you need something, we probably have it: Furniture for living room, lots of kitchenware and gadgets (European), semi-automatic clothes washer, CDs, tools, DVD Karaoke machine, exercise equipment and much more. Put your ads here. Non-business Ads free Got something to buy or sell? REACH MORE READERS than any other WEEKLY NEWSPAPER by advertising in THE BONAIRE REPORTER Non-Commercial Classified Ads (up to 4 lines/ 20 words): FREE FREE FREE FREE Commercial Ads only NAƒ0.70 per word, per week. Free adds run for 2 weeks. Call or fax 717-8988 or email ads@bonairereporter.com JANART GALLERY Kaya Gloria 7, Bonaire Local Art, Art Supplies, Framing, and Art Classes. Open Tu-We-Th & Sat 10 am5 pm Friday 17 pm; or phone 717-5246 for appt. BONAIRENET The leading consumer and business information source on Bonaire. Telephone (599) 717-7160 . For on-line yellow pages directory information go to http://www.yellowpagesbonaire.com CAPT. DON’S ISLAND GROWER Trees and plants, Bonaire grown . 8000m2 nursery. Specializing in garden/ septic pumps and irrigation. Kaminda Lagoen 103, Island Growers NV (Capt. Don and Janet). Phone: 786-0956 or 787-0956 Bonaire Images Elegant greeting cards and beautiful boxed note cards are now available at Chat-N-Browse nest to Lovers Ice Cream and Sand Dollar. Photography by Shelly Craig www.bonaireimages.com MOVING INTO A NEW HOUSE? Make it more livable from the start. FENG SHUI CONSULTATIONS Interior or exterior design advice, clearings, blessings, energy, healing, Chinatrained. Experienced. Inexpensive. Call Donna at 785-9332 . LUNCH TO GO Starting from NAƒ5 per meal. Call CHINA NOBO 717-8981 Salt Treasures Bonaire 100% natural body salts "Scrub Me" 100% natural Bath Salts available at Chat-n-Browse, KonTiki and Jewel of Bonaire or call 786-6416 for more information. M arjon Minderhout, who lives in Switzerland, came to Bonaire for the first time in 1976 and has holidayed here many more times. Recently she was in a private game reserve in South Africa and remembered to have her photo taken with The Bonaire Reporter . After the photo shoot she and her family traveled through the park and saw a few animals you never see on Bonaire like giraffes, white rhino, antelope, ostrich and lots of beautiful birds. G.D. WIN GREAT PRIZES! Take a copy of The Bonaire Reporter with you on your next trip or when you return to your home. Then take a photo of yourself with the newspaper in hand. THE BEST PHOTOS OF THE YEAR WILL WIN THE PRIZES. Mail photos to Bonaire Reporter, Kaya Gob. Debrot 200-6, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles (AN). Email to: picture@bonairereporter.com. (All 2004 photos are eligible.)

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Page 15 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 T he two new ambassadors of Bonaire, Sherry and Les Fulton from Illinois, love Bonaire because it is not overde veloped. They started coming to the island in 1995 with their dive shop, then later on came by themselves. When they first read about the ambassador program in The Bonaire Reporter they decided that they wanted to be ambassadors too. They still had about four years to go. Last Friday they reached their goal. Lisa Muehlemann, Operations Manager of Buddy Dive, had the honor of officially making them ambassadors. Sherry and Les plan on returning to Buddy Dive and Bonaire for many years to come. L.M. Buddy DiveÂ’s Lisa Muehlemann and ne w Ambassadors Sherry and Les Fulton F ederashon di Deporte Boneriano ( BSF,Bonairiaanse Sport Federatie/Bonairean Sports Federation ) recently invested lots of effort and energy in reorganizing and restructuring itself. Their aim is to improve the quality of sports on Bonaire and make them accessible to all. TheyÂ’ve completed registration with the government through the Notary, produced a policy plan covering multiple years, and most recently completed a study of the sport world on Bonaire. Natalie Wanga conducted this study which included an inventory of all the s ports, boards and annual programs that were active on Bonaire and in corporates an extensive co mputer database with all vital information. This report, Federashon di Deporte Boneriano, Resumen i Programa Anual di Bondnan Deportivo Boneriano (Bonairean Sport Federation, Report and Annual Program of the Bonairean Sport Confederations) was personally delivered on June 16th by Ms. Wanga to Mr. Hugo Semper, Chairman of the Federashon di Deporte Boneriano . The Federation wishes to thank all the people, authorities and organizations that contributed to the effort. Speci al recognition goes to the sport organizations, NGO Platform and AMFO. Natalie A.C. Wanga Handing over the report

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Page 16 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 ©2005 The Bonaire Reporter Published weekly . For information about subscriptions, stories or advertising in The Bonaire Reporter , phone (599) 717-8988, 7917252, fax 717-8988, E-mail to: Reporter@bonairenews.com The Bonaire Reporter , George DeSalvo, Publisher. Laura DeSalvo, Editor in Chief. Address: Kaya Gob. Debrot 200-6; Bonaire, Neth. Antilles. Available on-line at: www.bonairereporter.com Reporters: Albert Bianculli, Artie DeVries, Dodo, Jack Horkheimer, Greta Kooistra, L.M., Ma bel Nava, Ann Phelan, Valarie Stimpson, Michael Thiessen, Elisabeth Vos, Natalie A.C. Wanga Features Editor: Greta Kooistra Translations: Peggy Bakker, Sue Ellen Felix Production: Barbara Lockwood Distribution: Yuchi Molina (Rincon), Elizabeth Silberie (Playa); Housekeeping: Jaidy Rojas Acevedo. Printed by: DeStad Drukkerij , Curaçao

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Page 17 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 (Responses to Balance. Continued from page 7) gress at the expense of those resources, more sooner than later we will encounter serious difficulties to find food, drinkable water, breathable air or just a nice landscape to enjoy. In other words, those of us that are alive now, are abusing nature and if we continue with this model of development, our children and grandchildren will pay the price and live in worse conditions than the one we are in now. Bonaire doesn’t escape to the world development tendencies but we can consider our selves in a position of privilege. People and Government have always been very proactive when it comes to environment issues. As early as 1961, Bonaire was enacting legislation to protect sea turtle eggs and nests. In 1971, the Island Government of Bonaire banned destructive fishing practices like spear fishing and in 1975 made it illegal to break coral, take it from the water or sell it. Since 1979 Bonaire has also a proactive Marine Park that was declared demonstration site for the United Nations Educational Program in 2001. Coral reefs are in great danger worldwide, more than 10 % of the coral reefs in the world are degraded beyond recovery and another 30 % are seriously threatened to disappear in the near future if we don’t take radical actions. Bonaire is in a better position than other islands in the Caribbean and this fact cannot be considered a coincidence. Conservationist legislation and many years of active management of the Marine Park are the causes of the good condition of our reefs with out doubt. The Government launched a strategic plan for the future of Bonaire. This plan implies extensive development in a very sensitive area that can affect our most valued economical resource, the coral reef. Unplanned development can exacerbate problems that we already have on Bonaire. Sedimentation, storm water runoff, excessive amount of nutrients, inadequate solid garbage management, bad construction practices, deforestation, over fishing are just examples of what can happen, and the consequences to the reef are irreversible. What we kill today is gone forever and is not coming back in our lifetime. Economical development and nature preservation is possible and these two components can go along together. But for that, ALL the stakeholders need to sit together, discuses, decide and state very clearly what kind of development we want and who will be beneficiated. We need to have clear not only “WHAT” to do but also “HOW” we want to do it. Where coastal development is implemented and how it is managed influence the degree of impact to coral reef, and everybody knows what coral reefs mean for Bonaire’s people and economy. At the end of the day, we are all Managers of the Marine Park. As Cousteau said, “managing the parks is not about managing the coral reef, it is about managing ourselves”. Ramon DeLeon, Manager of the Bonaire National Marine Park T he board of the Dutch Caribbean Nature Alliance met on St. Eustatius last week for its third meeting this year. Founded February 2005, DCNA is an umbrella organization for the Marine and Terrestrial Protected Areas (Parks) in St. Eustatius, Saba, St. Maarten, Bonaire and Curaçao. Aruba is contemplating to join forces with DCNA soon and sent Egbert Boerstra from Parke Nacional Arikok to the meeting as an observer. DCNA s’ main goal is to acquire funding for sustainable Park Management in order to ensure that th e rich biodiversity of species in the Dutch Caribbean will be protected for the many years to come. At the same time, by having all park organizations represented on the board of DCNA a broad and knowledgeable platform is created which in turn will provide a healthy climate for working together, le arning from each ot her’s organizations and ultimately finding the synergy that will have a huge payoff for Nature Conservation and Preservatio n in the Caribbean. Funding DCNA is currently involved in negotiations with the Dutch Ministery of Binnenlandse Zaken and Koninkrijksrelaties to get them involved in financing nature conservation in the Caribbean as follow-up to a motion to this effect adopted by Dutch Parliament last year. The Dutch Postcode Loterij (PCL) is presently DCNA’s major contributor. With a 1.9 mil lion Euro grant over three years from the PCL, the organization will be able to sponsor important nature projects in the Caribbean, like the sea turtle outreach project on Bonaire and the Windward islands, which was funded through DCNA last year by the Truus en Gerrit van Riemsdijk Foundation, a private organization With Nature being one of the Caribbean’s most important natural resources, DCNA is not only an asset to Nature itself but also to the economic well being of all islands who thrive by the commercial exploitation of Nature. Press release DCNA Board in Statia

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Page 18 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 F our weekends of youth tennis, all sponsored by RBTT, was on the agenda of lots of Bonaire kids. Monthly competition started in September of last year, and almost 80 kids from 4-17 yearsold participated. On May 29th the top 4 in each category was decided. The finals were held on the next two weekends. The winners of the 10, 12, 14 and 18 year old age groups are promised places in the RBTT Caribbean Tournament in October in Aruba. Nearly 70 kids participated, and for four days the Harbour Village Te nnis Center boomed with children and proud parents. The final results: Winners Runners up Mini: Chananja Zijlstra – Mavelly Velandia 4-1 Mini: Ties van den OuweelenConstantijn Bottrop 4-2 Tm 8 : Kaile FiniesZaira Groenendal 4-1 Tm 8: Jevon May – Jose Alfredo Miranda 4-0 Tm 10: Amanda Thielman – Kaile Finies 4-0 Tm 10: Denzel el Hage Arnd Chirino 4-1;4-2 Tm 12: Mary-Jo LenderingChelsey Domacasse 4-1;4-1 Tm 12: Win Chung XuanKevin Abdul 4-3;4-1 Tm 14: Thammy Albertsz – Nikita van Ooijen 4-0;4-0 Tm 14: Daniel Carillo – Lothar May 4-1;4-2 Tm 18: Daniella Bissessar -----Tm 18: David Conquet – Quinsy Olij 4-2;4-2 A/B: 1/2e place: Daniel Carillo beat Francisco Valerio 8-4 A/B: 3e/4e place: Paulo Allee beat Kevin Abdul 8-4 C: 1e/2e place: Nikita van Ooijen beat Denzel el Hage 6-4 C: 3e/4e place: Damian Frans beat Max van Ooijen :6-4 D: 1e/2e place: Nadia Dabboussi beat Kaile Finies 4-0 D: 3e/4e place: Zaira Groenendal beat Keval Bissessar 4-2 E: 1e/2e place: SarahAn Maartense beat Josephine Marshall 10-9 E: 3e/4e place: Ties vd Ouweelen beat Canric Wout 10-9 This competition starts again in September; Elisabeth Vos organizes it at the Harbour Village Tennis Center. For inform ation you can reach her at tel 717-6907 or 565-5225 or e-mail at elisabeth@flamingotv.net. The competition is open for all Bonaire children starting from mini-tennis until tournament players (max, 17 years old). Elisabeth Vos Lots of Tennis for Bonaire Kids In June

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Page 19 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 THIS WEEK Friday, July 1 —Captain Dons 80th Birthday Party Celebration Saturday, July 2 —Rincon Marshé Sunday, July 3 — Lac Bay discovery boat trip. Meet at Boka di Coco (across from Mangrove/Kayak Center on dirt road to Cai) 7 am to mid-afternoon. Sponsored by “ Amigunan di Naturalesa ” (“Friends of the Environment) to benefit Bonaire participants in Vierdaagse Nijmegen (Four Day Walk at Nijmegen, Holland). Sign up at Extra newspaper office. (tel. 717-8482). Adults, NAƒ25; Children NAƒ15. See page 22. Sunday, July 3 —The Fundashon for Art and Culture will hold its 13th Annual Art Day with art exhibits, music, performing arts, food and drinks. Anyone interested in exhibiting at the event can contact volunteers at 717-6420 cell 786-6420, or email artandculture65@hotmail.com. Monday, July 4 —US holiday. Fireworks at some resorts COMING July 17-24 Diva’s Women Windsurf Week Learn to windsurf clinic Contact Ann Phelan 786-3134 or email ann@bonairewindsurfing.com www. bonairecaribbean.com 3 local scholarships still available for teen or local women. To apply contact Ann Phelan. The International Bonaire Sailing Regatta October 9 – 15, 2005 EVERY WEEK Saturday Rincon Marshé open 6 am 2 pm. Enjoy a Bonairean breakfast while you shop: fresh fruits and vegetables, gifts, local sweets and snacks, arts and handicrafts, candles, incense, drinks and music. www. infobonaire.com/rincon Sunday Live music 6 to 9 pm while enjoying a great dinner in colorful tropical ambiance at the Chibi Chibi Restaurant & Bar . Open daily 5 to 10 pm. Live Fla Bingogreat prizes, 7 pm, Divi Flamingo Monday -Soldachi Tour of Rincon, the heart of Bonaire, 9 am-noon. $20-Call Maria 717-6435 Tuesday -Harbour Village Tennis, Social Round Robin 7 to 10 pm. $10 per person. Cash bar. All invited. Call Elisabeth Vos at 565-5225 /717-7500, ext. 14. Wednesday Meditation at Donkey Beach from 7:30 to 8:30 pm. Open to all. Call S. H.Y. 790-9450 Friday -Manager’s Rum Punch Party, Buddy Dive Resort, 5:30-6:30 pm FridayOpen House with Happy Hour at the JanArt Gallery at Kaya Gloria #7, from 5-7 pm. DailyThe Divi Flamingo Casino is open daily for hot slot machines, roulette and black jack, Monday to Saturday 8 pm– 4 am; Sunday 7 pm– 3 am. Every day by appointment -Rooi Lamoenchi Kunuku Park Tours Bonairean kunuku. $12 (NAƒ12 for residents). Tel 717-8489, 540-9800. FREE SLIDE/VIDEO SHOWS SaturdayDiscover Our Diversity Slide Show, pool bar Buddy Dive, 7 pm 7175080 Sunday Bonaire Holiday Multi-media dual-projector productio n by Albert Bianculli, 8.30 pm, Capt. Don’s Habitat. Monday Dee Scarr’s Touch the Sea slide experience. Aquarius Conference Center, Capt. Don’s Habitat, 8:30–9:30pm. Wednesday (2nd and 4th) Turtle Conservation Slide Show by Andy Uhr. Carib Inn seaside veranda, 7 pm Thursday from June 16 to July 28, Basic Fish ID Yellow Submarine Dive Shop at 6:30 pm FridayWeek in Review Video Presentation by the Toucan Dive Shop at Plaza’s Tipsy Seagull , 5 pm. 717-2500. CLUBS and MEETINGS AA meetings every Wednesday ; Phone 7176105; 560-7267 or 7173902. Al-Anon meetings every Monday evening at 7 pm. Call 790-7272 Weekly BonaireTalker Gathering and Dinner at Gibi's Tuesday 6:30pm call 567-0655 for directions. Bridge Club Wednesdays , 7:30 pm at the Union Building on Kaya Korona, across from the RBTT Bank and next to Kooyman’s. All levels invited. NAƒ5 entry fee. Call Cathy 566-4056. Darts Club plays every other Sunday at City Café. Registration at 4, games at 5. Tel. 717-2950, 560-7539. JCI. First Wednesday of the MonthJunior Chamber International Bonaire (JCI Bonaire or formerly known as Bonaire Jaycees) meets at the ABVO building, Kaminda Jato Baco 36 from 7:30 to 9:30pm. Everyone is welcome. Contact: Renata Domacassé 516-4252. Kiwanis Club meets at APNA Plaza, Kaya International, every other Tuesday, 7 pm . Tel. 717-5595, Jeannette Rodriguez. Lions Club meets every 2nd and 4th Thursday of the month at 8 pm at Kaya Sabana #1. All Lions are welcome. Rotary lunch meetings Wednesday , 12 noon-2 pm Rendez-Vous Restaurant, Kaya L.D. Gerharts #3. All Rotarians are welcome. Tel. 717-8454 BONAIRE’S TRADITIONS Mangasina di Rei, Rincon . Enjoy the view from “The King’s Storehouse.” Learn about Bonaire’s culture . Visit typical homes from the 17th century. Daily. Call 717-4060 / 790-2018 Visit the Bonaire Museum on Kaya J. v.d. Ree, behind the Catholic Church in town. Open weekdays from 8 am-noon, 1:30-5 pm. Tel. 717-8868 Washington-Slagbaai National Park, Museum and Visitors’ Center. Open daily 8 am-5 pm. Closed on some holidays. 717-8444/785-0017 Sunday at Cai Live music and dancing starts about 12 noon at Lac Cai. Dance to the music of Bonaire’s popular musicians. Rincon Marshéevery Saturday 6 am to 3 pm. Open market in Bonaire’s historic town. Soldachi Tours show you the Rincon area. Alta Mira Nature Walking Tour at 6:30 am. Town Walking tour at 9:30, Bus Tour at 10 . Call Maria at 717-6435 to reserve. ****** Send events to The Bonaire Reporter Email reporter@bonairenews.com Tel/Fax. 717-8988, Cel. 791-7252 Kaya Prinses Marie Behind Exito Bakery Tel. 717-2400 Tickets NAƒ10,50 (incl. Tax) High Schoolers NAƒ7,75 NEW FILMS BEGIN FRIDAY CLOSED MONDAY TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY SATURDAY 4 PM Because of Winn-Dixie Late Show Call to make sure (Usually 9 pm ) The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (Martin Freeman) Early Show (Usually 7 pm) Kingdom of Heaven MICRO MOVIE REVIEW Seen recently in Movieland Cinema: Kingdom of Heaven by Ridley Scott starring Orlando Bloom and Liam Neeson. This is a rich, sometimes overwhelming and excellent film. Compared with Gladiator, another great film by Ridley Scott, it has the same huge scenes, incredible special effects and fantastic directing so you leave the cinema wondering what hit you. It lacks, however, the emotional attachment you experienced with the main character Maximus, played by Russel Crowe. Orlando Bloom as Balian does a fine job in Kingdom of Heaven but he never manages to get under your skin. I was pleased that this film treats religions equally. There is good and evil, fanaticism and forgiveness on both sides. I definitely recommend this film, and I will see it more than once. Dodo W e mentioned “Rafaello,” this beautiful white male kitty, a couple of weeks ago when we featured “Natasha.” It’s because the two of them are such good pals and so easy going. Supremely relaxed Rafaello has sky blue eyes which go so well with his snowy white coat. Some say that blue-eyed white cats are deaf, but this is certainly not true for Rafaello. He’s alert, can hear everything and is very much aware of his surroundings. This handsome fellow was found in Antriol and brought into the Bonaire Animal Shelter where he passed all his health and “sociability” tests! He’s had all his shots and is ready to go. As we’ve said so many times, all the animals who are up for adoption at the Shelter are in good health, have good attitudes regarding people and are, or will be, sterilized. You can’t beat a pet from the Shelter! As of June 24 there have been 82 adoptions since the first of the year. Thanks to the staff and the volunteers for consistently doing such a fine job with the resident pets! L.D. “Rafaello”

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Page 20 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 APPLIANCES/ TV/ ELECTRONICS/ COMPUTERS City Shop, the mega store, has the island’s widest selection of large and small home appliances. Fast service and in-store financing too. ART GALLERY Cinnamon Art Gallery non-profit gallery for local artists has continuous shows. Each month a new artist is featured. Stop by. Free entry. BANKS Maduro and Curiel’s Bank provides the greatest number of services, branches and ATMs of any Bonaire bank. They also offer investments and insurance. BEAUTY PARLOR Hair Affair . Expert hair cutting, styling, facials, waxing and professional nail care. BICYCLE / SCOOTER/ QUADS De Freewieler rents scooters and quads; professionally repairs almost anything on two wheels. Sells top brand bikes. Have your keys made here. BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION APA Construction are professional General Contractors. They also sp ecialize in creating patios and walkways with fabulous sprayed and stamped concrete pavement. DIVING Carib Inn is the popular 10-room inn with top-notch dive shop and well stocked retail store. Best book trade on Bonaire. Good prices on regulator repair, dive computer H.Q. Photo Tours Divers-Yellow Submarine low prices on the seaside at Kralendijk, at Caribbean Club, Caribbean Court and the Hamlet Oasis . Join their cleanup dives and BBQ. WannaDive They make diving fun while maintaining the highest professional standards. In town at City Café and at Eden Beach. FITNESS Bonfysio offers comprehensive fitness programs to suit your needs whether they be weight loss, sports or just keeping in shape. Convenient schedule. Fit 4 Life at the Plaza Resort Mall. Classes in Pilates, Aerobics, TaeBo and more. Professional trainers, fitness machines and classes for all levels. GARDEN SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Green Label has everything you need to start or maintain your garden. They can design, install and maintain it and offer plants, irrigation supplies and garden chemicals. GIFTS, SOUVENIRS AND LIQUOR The Bonaire Gift Shop has an wide selection of gifts, souvenirs, liquor, dive watches, digital cameras, things for the home, T-shirts all at low prices. HOTELS Golden Reef Inn is the affordable alternative with fully equipped studio apartments in a quiet Bonaire neighborhood. Just a 3-minute walk to diving and the sea. The Great Escape Under new management. Quiet and tranquil setting with pool and luxuriant garden in Belnem. Cyber Café, DVD rentals, restaurant and bar. METALWORK AND MACHINE SHOP b c bBotterop Construction Bonaire N.V. , offers outstanding fabrication of all metal products, including stainless. Complete machine shop too. PHOTO FINISHING Paradise Photo in the Galeries Shopping Center offers fast, fine processing for prints, slides, items and services for your picture-taking pleasure. REAL ESTATE / RENTAL AGENTS Harbourtown Real Estate is Bonaire’s oldest real estate agent. They specialize in professional customer services and top notch properties. Mike Boom & Associates Broad assortment of homes and properties. View on their website www. bonairerealty.com or office in town Re/Max Paradise Homes: International/US connections. 5% of profits donated to local community. Sunbelt Realty offers full real estate, rental, and insurance services. If you want a home or to invest in Bonaire, stop in and see them. REPAIRS Bon Handyman is here if you need something fixed or built. Ultra reliable, honest and experienced. Electrical, plumbing, woodworking, etc. 717-2345 RESORTS & ACTIVITIES Buddy Dive Resort offers diving, Adventure Fun tours including kayaking, mountain biking, cave snorkeling and exploration. RETAIL Benetton, world famous designer clothes available now in Bonaire at prices less than those in US. For men, women and children. SECURITY Special Security Services will provide that extra measure of protection when you need it. Always reliable. SHIPPING Rocargo Freight Air and sea shipments in/out of Bonaire. Customs agents. Pr ofessional and efficient. FedEx agent. SUPERMARKETS Tropical Flamingo is convenient, clean, modern, efficient and has the lowest prices on Bonaire. Located behind NAPA. Visit Warehouse Bonaire to shop in a large, spotless supermarket. You’ll find American and European brand products. THE market for provisioning. VILLAS Bonaire Oceanfront villa for up to nine people: five kitchens, five bathrooms. Ideal for divers. WATER TAXI Get to Klein Bonaire by Ferry. Ride the Kantika di Amor or Skiffy . Hotel pickup. WINES Antillean Wine Company. You’ve tried the rest; now try the best: best prices, highest quality wines from around the world, kept in a cooled warehouse. Free delivery. YOGA Yoga For You . Join certified instructors Desirée and Don for a workout that will refresh mind and body. Private lessons too. Closed during June. ATTENTION BUSINESSMEN/WOMEN: Put your ad in The Bonaire Reporter. Phone/Fax 717-8988, Cel 791-7252 RESTAURANT PRICE RANGE / WHEN OPEN FEATURES Want your restaurant listed here? It’s easy and not expensive Call The Reporter at 717-8988 or 791-7252 for info Bella Vista Restaurant Sea Side Restaurant at Buddy Dive Resort 717-5080, ext. 525 Moderate. Breakfast and Lunch Dinner during Theme nights only. Open every day Magnificent Theme Nights : Saturday: Beach Grill; Monday: Caribbean Night; Friday: Manager’s Rum Punch Party and All-You-Can-Eat B.B.Q Bistro de Paris Kaya Gob. N. Debrot 46 (half-way between hotel row and town) 717-7070 Moderate Lunch and Dinner Closed Sunday Real French Cooking in an informal setting Superb dishes prepared with care and love by a French chef Owner-operated Eat in or Take away Brasserie Bonaire Royal Palm Galleries Kaya Grandi 26, Next to Re/Max, 717-4321 LowModerate Lunch and Dinner Open 11 am -2:30 pm 5:30-9 pm Closed Saturday and Sunday Lots of parking in big mall lot Kitchen Open 11am-2:30 pm, Dinner 5:30-9 pm Breezy terrace with airco inside—Also serving big sandwiches at dinner Calabas Restaurant & Chibi Chibi Restaurant and Bar At the Divi Flamingo Beach Resort. Waterfront 717-8285 Moderate-Expensive Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Open 7 days Get a view of the beach and turquoise sea while enjoying a breakfast buffet or à la carte lunch and dinner at the 'Chibi Chibi' restaurant & bar. Inspiring vistas and the highest standard of cuisine . Croccantino Italian Restaurant Downtown at Kaya Grandi 48 717-5025 Moderate-Expensive Dinner Closed Monday Tuscan chef prepares exquisite dishes. Authentic ingredients and romantic setting make dining a delight. Be served in a garden setting under floating umbrellas or in air-conditioned comfort. Take out too. Den Laman On the water, just off the traffic circle 717-4106 Moderate-Expensive Breakfast, Lunch Dinner Open 7 days Creative cuisine on the seaside . Top chefs from Amsterdam cook in an open modern kitchen featuring induction cooking. Seafood a specialty. The Great Escape EEG Blvd #97—across from Belmar 717-7488 Moderate Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner Open 7 days Bar-Restaurant poolside —under the thatched roof. Cuban Chef prepares Caribbean cuisine. Champagne brunch on Sundays 10 am to noon. Happy hours 5 to 7 every day. Hilltop at Caribbean Club Bonaire On the Tourist Road, 2 mi. north of Town 717-7901 Moderate-Expensive Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Closed Sunday Quiet country setting, lovely landscaping, friendly staff Happy Hour from 5-7 pm, BBQ on Tuesdays Gourmet chef creates unique daily specials The Last Bite Bakery Home Delivery or Take Out 717-3293 Low-Moderate Orders taken 8 am-4 pm; Deliveries 6-7:30 pm , Closed Sunday Enjoy a delicious dessert or savory baked meal in the comfort of your home or resort. This unique bakery offers gourmet class items -always from scratchfor take out or delivery only. The Lost Penguin Across from MCB Bank in downtown Kralendijk Call 717-8003. Low-Moderate Breakfast, Lunch, Early Dinner Closed Tuesdays & Wednesdays Watch the bustle of downtown from this street side Caribbean-style bistro owned and run by a European educated Master Chef and his wife. Pasa Bon Pizza On Kaya Gob. Debrot ½ mile north of town center. 790-1111 Low-Moderate Open from 5-11 pm Wednesday-Sunday Bonaire’s best. The Real Thing! Freshly prepared pizzas made with the finest ingredients. Salads, desserts. Eat in or take away. Nice bar too. Call ahead to eat-in or take out 790-1111

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Page 21 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 H e arrives with his wife, parmesan cheese, ham, a bottle of Merlot and a pizza; “That’s what my father always told me: ‘Never come empty-handed, bring a flower or some wine!” He sits at the table, opens the bottle and fills up the glasses, toasts ‘salud’ and starts telling his story: “I was having severe health problems in Venezuela and when the company sent me to Bonaire it was for a year, to see how it went. I stayed the year and have been here ever since! I came with my wife, Luisa, and our son Hernan Arturo, who was seven years old. Luisa was okay the first year, because she saw herself as a ‘tourist,’ but afterwards it was very difficult for her to adapt.” “We came first for a weekend with little Arturo and we stayed at the Sunset Beach Hotel,” Luisa says, “I thought the countryside was beautiful, but I was very worried about the quietness; I became anxious and wondered: ‘where are the people?’” She laughs : “Now I’ve gotten used to it, maybe because I myself got quieter over the years!” “It’s remarkable”, Hernan says , “many times I’m working on Sundays, sitting at my office at Seguros Orinoco’s and through the window I see the street where the post office is; it’s not an exception when I see one car passing by in a whole hour! Well, when we came, little Hernan Arturo went to St. Bernardus School and he did very well. He spoke English as in Caracas he had been going to Jefferson, a very well recommended American School. Hernan Arturo already had two languages in his head, so the third and the fourth were easy. We lived in Sabana, in a house that first belonged to the company, but which I bought later on. I liked it here very much. I was born in 1948 in an oil camp in Quiriquire in the state of Monagas, Venezuela. I was the eldest, after me two brothers and two sisters were born. My father worked for the Creole Petroleum Company. For 30 years he was a welder, underwater in the sea, but also on land. The company camp was like a village; thousands of people were living there, they had the most fantastic hospital, there was a social club and they organized everything fo r the children, like bowling, baseball and football. There was only one thing that was wrong: The children of the people that belonged to the staff got English classes and the children of the blue collar workers didn’t. It was a shame and it was discrimination. That’s why I found it so important for my son to learn languages. I myself have had many problems in my work and in my travels as I only speak Spanish. I didn’t want that for my son, I wanted him to be prepared. When we got the opportunity I bought the house in Quiriquire; we made it much bigger and my mother still lives there several months of the year. I stayed until 1965, and then I went to Caracas to study physics and mathematics at the University. In 1969 the University was closed and June 8th 1970, I began to work for Seguros Orinoco, an insurance company. Two weeks ago, 35 years to the day that I joined the company, I phoned the man who had hired me, Hernan Rebolledo, who is now 80 years old and still working as the president of another insurance company. He was delighted to hear from me, and he told me I was the only one in all those years who’d ever done a thing like that. But my motto is: give – receive – return. That’s what I go by and if 50% of the world was like that, life on earth would be something else. Another very important person in my life was the late Dr. Julio Sosa, one of the three founders of Seguros Orinoco and the man who brought me here. I never met anyone like him; I admired him very much and I will always be grateful to him. There have been other people who have been very important to me and I owe them so much, but I can’t turn this story into a list of names.’ Hernan Longat is an extremely energetic hard-working man, but also a man who enjoys all the good things in life. If you know him, you’ re lucky, because he’s a person you can always rely on; by experience I know that’s he’s someone who will go out of his way to help people. “When I was hired I started doing administration work, but by the time I arrived on Bonaire I was the director of the branch on Bonaire and Curaçao and also director of Seguros Guyana, a sister company in Venezuela. I hired Luisa as my secretary when I was 35. She was 22 and she fell in love with me, and I loved and still love everything about her! Fatal attraction! Within a year we were married! A year before I’d bought my apartment in Caracas, now my mother, who is 88 years old, lives there most of the year, together with my sister. That’s what I miss here; not the music or the food, you have everything on Bonaire, but I do miss my mother, my family and my friends!” “Hernan has a lot of personality,” Luisa says, “he wanted to better himself and he struggled, doing his utmost to achieve; that’s a big attraction for me somebody with drive… who gets places. He remembers everything from years ago, I don’t and I got lazy because I have him!” “You have to exercise your memory,” Hernan says, “especially because I earn my living using my mind. I like everything about my job; it has all kinds of things: administration, especially the, buying and selling, P.R., dealing with the public and the traveling. I’m always working. If they don’t find me for anything at the office, they come to my house; I know half the island, the other half knows me! However, the most important things in my life are number 1, my family, number 2, my family and number 3, my family; but I also have a special place in my heart for my friends. I’m working for my family, I am also a workaholic, but if I’m producing, they will do better! Hernan Arturo is now 21 years old, for three years he’s been working and studying in Curaçao. He lives on his own and it was good that he went, but we’ve been always near. It was very easy to raise my son. He’s a fine example with no vices; he doesn’t smoke or drink, no youth problems, and he’s very serious. He can fend for himself wherever he goes, and now that he’s going to Florida to study to become a pilot, we are very, very proud of him and we expect a lot from him. I’m seeing him very often and I give Luisa space; she can go whenever she wants. “I like to be at my house”, Luisa says , “Hernan is always working, so I’m spending a lot of time alone since Arturo left. I have some friends here, but not many, as I am very choosy and I don’t like to see somebody every day. I divide my time between family in Caracas, my son in Curaçao and my husband in Bonaire. Hernan and I are completely different; what I like he doesn’t care for! I like the opera, the movies and all kinds of music. Before I met Hernan I was a soprano in the chorale of the Orquesta Filarmonica de Venezuela and I studied classical harp. He likes his TV and his computer and he knows all about European politics! But he’s a great cook, that’s his passion and I love to eat what he cooks!” “I’m looking for a piano for Luisa,” Hernan says , ‘”so if anyone who reads this knows about a piano, pass by the office or give me a call! I cannot imagine retirement as I cannot imagine my life without work; I’m used to producing. It always depends how things are going in Venezuela, the States and Europe, bu t seeing the situation as it is now: Here we have tranquility; the islands are good for the oldies… people are healthy here… I will always stay on Bonaire.” Greta Kooistra “ My motto is: give – receive – return. That’s what I go by and if 50% of the world was like that, life on earth would be something else.” Greta Kooistra 1989 Hernan Longat

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Page 22 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 I t all started as a hobby – one man’s hobby. I used to play golf in Holland before coming to Bonaire. Then, when I was planning a trip back to Holland after nine years I wanted to play golf with my friends. But since it had been so long since I’d played, I wanted to be prepared. So I thought, “I’ll find a spot where nobody can see me practice – somewhere far away.” I ended up on the east coast at Punto Blanco where the chicken farm is. There, in the middle of nowhere, I saw an old stone wall and on the other side of the wall there was a green field! It was perfect! “Piedra So” (“Just Stones”), the Bonairean Golf Club was born. Before I knew it, the word was out and other people got involved. They started working hard on making the course professional and building a clubhouse. Now it’s an 18-hole golf link by the seaside. It takes about three to four hours to walk the whole course. There’s a driving range with driving range balls available. On the first tee are concrete tee boxes. The fourth hole has two bunkers on each side. The fifth hole has a water hazard, and there are lots of bushes and cacti to lose your ball in. While you play, a group of donkeys or goats may be observing your progress. It’s a unique spot. The environment is beautiful. It’s like playing on the moon. It can’t be compared to anywhere else in the world. There are about 40 members. Once a month a golf pro from Curaçao, Louis Cannegieter, comes to teach for two days. He gives clinics for beginners too. Since the start of the year three instructors have been teaching 10 teens from Jong Bonaire. The members would like to see more people play golf – youngsters, older people, and tourists of all nationalities. Golf sets are available for rent and transport can be arranged to and from the course. Piedra So is not trying to compete with other places. This is not Miami or Aruba. This is not a smooth terrain, and it’s not a fancy club. But it is a whole new experience. It’s sand and sea grass, the sound of the sea, an eternal wind. It’s literally out of this world: unusual, extraordinary and adventurous. If you’ve been playing golf in other parts of the world – if you think you’ve “seen it all,” come to Piedra So and discover what it feels like to play golf on Bonaire. For more information go to our website: www.piedraso.com (in Dutch). Tel. 717-7972. Artie DeVries A fter receiving a report from Buddy Dive yesterday afternoon that they had seen a large loggerhead turtle at the Monk’s Haven dive site off Klein Bonaire, staff of Sea Turtle Conservation Bonaire and volunteers found the large female later that evening and successfully affixed a satellite transmitter to her carapace. The female loggerhead has a shell length of 99 cm and is estimated to weigh about 130 kg. The turtle was found near the Southwest Corner dive site at approximately 6:20 pm and released back into the water after the tagging, measurement and transmitter application procedures. Adult loggerhead turtles come to Bonaire to breed from May through July. ‘Happy’ is expected to remain in the area and lay one or more nests before departing to her home feeding grounds. Tracking of this turtle is being made possible by a full sponsorship provided by the Rotterdam Zoo. The Zoo has decided to call her ‘Happy’. ‘Happy’ is the second turtle fitted with a satellite transmitter this year. On 8 June, the first of these transmitters was attached on a large adult male hawksbill turtle. The yet to be named turtle is still in the area around Klein Bonaire. Sea Turtle Conservation Bonaire works to ensure the protection and recovery of Bonaire's sea turtle populations throughout their range. Founded in 1992, the STCB is a Bonaire-based, non-governmental (NGO) and non-profit organization, part of the Wider Caribbean Sea Turtle Conservation Network. Contact: Mabel Nava, Sea Turtle Conservation Bonaire, telephone 599 717 2225 and 790 0433, e-mail stcb@bonaireturtles.org for more information. press release Volunteers Isaiah J. Pardo, Jose Bernabela, Andy Uhr and STCB staff Gielmon “Funchi” Egbreghts releasing the adult female loggerhead fitted with a transmitter sponsored by the Rotterdam Zoo. Mabel Nava photo

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Page 23 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 *to find it, just look up For the week: July 1 to July 8, 2005 By Astrologer Michael Thiessen ARIES (Mar. 21April 20) You have to take hold of your life and make some crucial decisions. Don't hesitate to look for alternatives that will enable you to raise the kind of donations you need to do the job right. Relatives may be less than easy to deal with. Don't make large purchases unless you have discussed your choices with your mate. Your lucky day this week will be Saturday. TAURUS (Apr. 21May 21) Now is a good time to ask for favors. Investments are best left alone this week. You will gain valuable insight and knowledge through the experiences you have along the way. Enjoy the company of relatives this week. Your lucky day this week will be Friday. GEMINI (May 22-June 21) Be careful not to misplace your wallet or belongings. You must try to lay your cards on the table. Talk to your mate and tell them how you feel. Secret affairs may only cause complications in your life. Your energetic nature and ability to initiate projects will add to your popularity. Your lucky day this week will be Friday. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Don't let your partner start any arguments. Passion should be redirected positively. Arguments with children or friends may leave you steaming. You may find that your emotional partner will not be too eager to accommodate you. You may cause a fuss if you come on too strongly in public. Your lucky day this week will be Friday. LEO (July 23-Aug 22) Try to avoid serious discussions with loved ones. You will be highly sensitive to comments ma de by your lover. Make decisions about your professional objectives. Mingle with those who can help you get ahead. Your lucky day this week will be Monday. VIRGO (Aug. 23 -Sept. 23) Emotional situations could bring out your stubborn nature. Be honest with yourself before getting involved with someone who is likely to lead you on. Organize all the responsibilities that have to be attended to and make sure everyone knows what to do. This is not the time to lend or borrow money or possessions. Your lucky day this week will be Wednesday. LIBRA (Sept. 24 -Oct. 23) Compromise may be necessary. Don't hesitate to look for alternatives that will enable you to raise the kind of donations you need to do the job right. You are best to move quickly and to get in good with the boss. Don't reveal information that is personal or confidential. Your lucky day this week will be Monday. SCORPIO (Oct. 24 Nov. 22) Your talent will be recognized. Problems with appliances or electrical gad gets will drive you crazy. Refrain from overspending on entertainment or luxury items. Be careful how you handle friends and relatives, they may take things the wrong way. Your lucky day this week will be Wednesday. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23 -Dec. 21) Get involved in activities that will bring you knowledge about foreign lands, philosophies, or cultures. Relatives may be less than easy to deal with. Females may put demands or added responsibilities on you. Do not get involved with individuals who are already committed to others. Your lucky day this week will be Tuesday. CAPRICORN (Dec 22.Jan. 20) Deception in your home is evident. Don't beat around the bush. Get involved in volunteer work that will bring you satisfaction, not an empty wallet. It will do you some good. You will be in the doghouse if you are being selfish. Your lucky day this week will be Monday. AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 -Feb. 19) Watch your weig ht gain due to water retention. Visitors may be likely to drop by. You have to let go of your past if you wish to get out of any sentimental mood that might be hanging over your head. Try to be honest when dealing with your mate. Your lucky day this week will be Wednesday. PISCES (Feb. 20-Mar. 20) Don't let relatives make demands of you. Your health may have suffered due to neglect or abuse. Try to be as mellow as possible. Be prepared to make changes to your personal documents. Your lucky day this week will be Monday. The First Ten Days of July Are Fantastic for Planet Gazers M ark the first 10 days of July as fantastic nights for planet gazing because we'll have Mercury, Venus and Jupiter in a spectacular early evening planet s how! On Friday, July 1st, about an hour after sunset during evening twilight, face west where you'll still be able to see the best planet duo of the year. Planet #1 out from the sun, the tiny 3,000 mile wide pink planet Mercury, will be huddled right next to the brightest planet of them all, planet #2, 8,000 mile wide Venus. And they will be only one degree apart, which means you could well cover both of them with your pinky finger stretched at arm's length. In fact, they were less than one degree ap art all throughout the last days of June and will continue to be extremely close through the first week of July. Although they are absolutely fabulous to see with the naked eye, if you have a pair of binoculars, use them this weekend and all next week because rarely do we have a chance to see any two planets so close together. On Saturday they'll be only one and one-tenth of a degree apart, and on Sunday they'll be only one and a quarter de gree apart. On the night of the 4th, before the fire works start, make sure you see them because they'll still be only one and a third degrees apart. On Tuesday, the 5th, they're still only one and a half degrees from each other, and on Wednesday still extremely close. Then on Thursday, the 7th, something new is added to the scene becau se they are joined by an exquisitely thin crescent Moon complete with earthshine which will look like a black full Moon nestled within the crescent. Then on Friday, the 8th, youÂ’ll observe the most sp ectacular planetary sight of July. An even more exquisite crescent Mo on will be parked right above Venus and Mercury. They will knock your socks off with just the naked eye, but if you look at them through a pair of binoculars you won't believe it! By Saturday, the 9th, the Moon will have moved past Venus and Mercury and will be parked very close to Regulus the brightest star of Leo the Lion, and by Sunday, the 10th, will have moved just beyond it. So start your Mercury, Venus watch this weekend and look for them before the fireworks on the 4th of July. Then continue watching each night. Remember that Friday, the 8th is the best night of them all! On Saturday, the 9th, the Moon is parked to the right of Regulus and on Sunday, the 10th, up to its left. But please, please don't miss Friday the 8th which I consider the best night for planet gazing for all of July. And of course we don't want to leave out the planet king Jupiter who will be well up and to the left of Regulus although not quite as bright as Venus but will still dazzle you with his bril liance. If you want to appear really smart on July 4th, casually show your friends planet #1, planet #2 and planet #5. What a way to begin the month of July. Jack Horkheimer



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July 1 to July 8, 2005 Volume 12, Issue 25 SINCE 1994 Kaya Gob. Debrot 200 • E-mail: re porter@bonairenews.com • 717-8988 INSIDE: Table of Contents pg. 2 Bonaire Reporter Survey Holloway Disappearance & Antilles Law Bonaire Barracuda News I am the William Express Youth Tennis Tourney 2nd Turtle Tracked is named “Happy”

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Page 2 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 Our source at the Caribbean Hotel Association tells us that Air Jamaica WILL continue it’s Saturday Bonaire flight and NOT stop it at the end of next month as planned . This is already reflected on its website. It is part of a reevaluation of its cutbacks and also might include resumption of some flights to the Eastern Caribbean and Miami. Air Jamaica lost US$61 million for the first five months of this year, as the government, struggles to move it into viability. Last week Air Jamaica's executive chairman, Dr. Vin Lawrence, said unforeseen disruption of services, caused primarily by an increase in the frequency of major airframe maintenance from 18 months to 15 months, and route restructuring, had added another US$25 million in expenses. Air Jamaica cut Bonaire service to one flight at the end of June. Dutch Antilles Express (DAE), ( BonairExpress and CuraçaoExpress) won’t use Suriname Airways jets for flights on the Bonaire-Curaçao-St. Maarten route, said DAE’s Chief Executive Officer Floris van Palland Friday. Explained Van Palland, "The load factors on the route don’t justify putting in a larger aircraft such as the MD-82." St. Maarten flights have a load factor of 75 per cent (using the smaller turboprops) on the average. The MD-82 has 140 seats, while the ATR-42 that DAE uses has 46 seats. DAE flies Curaçao-St. Maarten-Curaçao twice a day, filling slightly fewer than 100 seats. By using the MD-82, the seat capacity would instantly increase by 40 per cent. “An increase of 40 per cent on a load factor of 75 percent doesn’t have a positive effect on the profitability of that route,” van Palland told The St Maarten Daily Herald . (Continued on page 3) IN THIS ISSUE Grouper Corner 3 Letters (Pit Bull, Leaky Pipes, Beauty in Sushi) 5 Finding a Balance for Bonaire Responses 6 Bonaire Reporter Survey 7 Holloway Disappearance & Aruba Law 8 Bonaire-New Port Connection 9 Bon. Barracuda Swim News 9 SGB Students Excel at Artebon 10 Bonaire to Culinary Olympics 12 I Am the William Express 12 Ambassadors (Fulton—Buddy Dive) 15 Goal, Home Run and More 15 DCNA at St. Eustatius 17 Youth Tennis Tourney 18 2nd Turtle Tracked is “Happy” 22 Piedra So Golf Course 22 WEEKLY FEATURES: Flotsam & Jetsam 2 Vessel List & Tide Table 9 AMFO/NGO Platform: Community Issues in Care & Welfare 11 Picture Yourself (South Africa) 14 Where to Find The Reporter 13 Classifieds 14 Reporter Masthead 18 Pet of the Week (Rafaello) 19 What’s Happening 19 Dodo (Kingdom of Heaven) 19 Shopping & Dining Guides 20 On the Island Since... (Hernan Longat) 21 Bonaire Sky Park (planets) 23 The Stars Have It 23 Continued on page 3 Continental Airlines to fly non-stop Houston-Bonaire I t’s finally happened: a US airline flying jets directly to Bonaire from the USA. Continental Airlines will start flying non-stop Houston-Bonaire on Friday, December 16, this year. If you check the Continental website you will see the schedule and fare of $491.65 has already been posted. Reservations are being accepted on-line and via travel agents. If you have money to spare, fly First Class the fare is $2,456.65. It’s been a long time in the coming, but when everyone sat down at the table in Houston to talk, it took less than a month – nearly the speed of light in airline deals – to wrap things up. The flights from Houston’s new Bush Airport will leave Fridays at 11:15 pm and arrive in Bonaire the following morning, Saturday, at 6:15 am. The “red-eye” scheduling enables travelers to get in an extra half day of diving or whatever! The return flight leaves at 8 am on Saturday, arriving at Houston at 10:50 am. These arrival and departure times allow passengers to connect easily with other flights. They’ll be using a Boeing 737 with 112 economy and 12 first class seats. Continental is the world’s sixth largest airline, with 41,000 employees, and already serves 25 destinations in the Caribbean. It has hubs in New York, Houston, Cleveland and Guam. At the press conference last Thursday were officials and representatives from TCB New York and Holland, TCB Bonaire, Bonair e International Airport Board, Bonaire Holding, the Island Council-including the Oppositionand the press. Following the cancellation of Air Jamaica service, Bonaire officials began to explore getting more airlift from the USA. A month ago to the day of the announcement Ramonsito Booi, Burney el Hage and Larry Gerharts traveled to Houston to explore the possibility of Continental flights to Bonaire. It was rumored that KLM put in a good word for Bonaire to help the negotiations. As Continental’s Manager of International Route Planning, Brian Znotins, told The Bonaire Reporter , “It was a business decision. We already fly to another top dive spot, Roatan, so why not to the Caribbean’s number one dive destination, Bonaire.” Bonaire will not stop its negotiations with Delta Airlines. “Considering the current interest for Bonaire-flights, I continue to hope that Continental will expand their flights to Bonaire in 2006. We still have to be on the safe side and continue to extend our horizons,” said Larry Gerharts of Bonaire Air Services. G./ L.D. A Boeing 737 This type of aircraft will be used on the Bonaire route Brian A. Znotins, Manager, International Route Planning for Continental Airlines signs up to fly weekly to Bonaire beginning in December. Commissioner Burney el Hage, Senator Ramonsito Booi to his left, TCB head Ronella Croes to right.

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Page 3 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 Flotsam and Jetsam (Continued from page 2) Following public demonstrations of outrage because of unavailable flights, Minister of Transport and Communication, Omayra Leeflang, had announced a few weeks ago that Suriname Airways would fly the Curaçao-St. Maarten route as of Friday, June 24, but it didn’t happen. DAE’s Chief Executive Officer Floris van Palland a former CEO of several of Royal Dutch Airline KLM’s spin-offs, when asked about the ‘… Express Airlines’ on-time performance, one of the major complaints of passengers, said improving this was “a number one priority .” “We have already done a lot, although people wouldn’t have noticed it right away. It is a process,” he said, explaining that several ATRs had been swapped for new ones from Europe that have just completed their big check-up. In addition, the company has been increasing its spare parts reserve. “The chance that you don’t have that specific part is much smaller,” he said, adding that the program is almost completed. DAE’s major shareholder is Bonaire resident, Niek Sandmann, (reports by Suzanne Koelega– SMH) Princess Maxima, the wife of Dutch Crown Prince WillemAlexander, gave birth Sunday to a healthy baby daughter. The new princess was named Alexia Juliana Marcela Laurentien, and becomes third in line to the Dutch throne after her father and her sister, Princess Catharina-Amalia, who was born on Dec. 7, 2003. The newborn, weighed 3.4 kilograms (7.69 pounds). The prince denied she was named after the illegitimate French daughter of his grandfather, the late Queen Juliana’s deceased husband, Prince Bernhard. Prince Bernhard’s offspring’s existence was only recognized in an interview published last year. “She is named after me,” said Prince Willem-Alexander. Central Bank President Emsley Tromp reported that the Antilles national debt is NAƒ2.4 billion. Add Curaçao’s NAƒ1.5 billion debt and you get a figure that is more than the entire country’s gross domestic product of NAƒ3.7 billion. Bonaire's share of the national debt is NAƒ243.8 million it has no ability to borrow money on its own as do Curaçao and St. Maarten.. If the islands were to split up under the current circumstances they would start their new status with those debts. Since that would be an unworkable scenario for most islands, On the total Antillean debt of NAƒ4.8 billion, NAƒ273 million was paid in interest alone last year, 23 cents out of every guilder collected in taxes and 16 per cent of all government expenditures. Another NAƒ378 million guilders was borrowed in 2004. The Central Bank itself made a profit of NAƒ 50 million in 2004, which goes to the Central Government. A considerable part of that comes from the 1 per cent license fee people pay when conducting financial transactions in US dollars. As is customary this time of year, 6th grade students from the island’s elementary schools will take part in the “Hello Tourist” program . Hello Tourist is a TCB initiative to acquaint Bonaire’s chlidren with the tourist business that powers the local economy. The children will learn what being a tourist means by visiting typical attractions, shops and the various resorts Participating in the program are Flamingo Airport, Taxis, Goddard Catering, Captain Don’s Habitat, Plaza Resort, Sand Dollar, Divi Flamingo Beach Resort, Bel Mar and the SGB. Sponsors of the event are Maduro & Curiels Bank, TELBO N.V., Consales Cash & Carry and Panaderia Seruva. You can even smell it in Bonaire when the wind comes from the west; (Continued on page 8) Hello tourist preparation

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Page 4 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 A VICIOUS ATTACK Dear Editor: At 3 a.m. Monday morning, June 20th, I was awakened by my dog's loud barking at something that I assumed was in our yard. I looked out toward our side yard and could see our dog running back and forth barking into our neighbor's yard next door. Our neighbor is a kind elderly man who raises blackbellied sheep and I could tell that there was something in his yard chasing the sheep. I went out and found a large Pit Bull terrorizing the sheep and had already taken one down to the ground. I began to throw rocks to try to get this vicious animal to leave. That was not going to work so I ran for my garden hose and began to squirt the dog to keep it away from the poor defenseless animal. The rest of the sheep were huddled together in a corner. A friend who was staying with me heard the noise and came outside, too and she began shouting at the dog. With the noise and water continually pelting him, he left, escaping through the hole in the fence he'd entered. I then went over into the yard to check on the downed sheep. I saw that its neck was ripped open, blood was flowing out as it struggled to breathe. Its right eye had been gouged out as well and I knew it had little chance of survival. I also found a newborn lamb, that had been born the day before, dead of a broken neck. I then tried to pile some larger rocks and wood into the hole to keep the beast out. I went back into the house about 4 a. m. and prayed that the animals would be unharmed but that would not be the case. About an hour later, I could hear a ruckus again but did not venture out. I was trying to keep my dogs from barking and waking my sleeping husband and house guest. I sorely regret that now for at daybreak when I looked out the window I could see two sheep lying on the ground with others obviously hurt. A young man, who lives adjacent to the elderly neighbor, was now in the yard yelling and swinging a stick at two dogs that were in the yard one was the Pit Bull and the other his dog that had come through the hole in the fence. By now, the Pit Bull had completed the ferocious attack and the other dog was just there to loudly bark. The young man, who knew this awful dog, picked him up and threw him over the fence along with his own dog. He then went to check the wounded sheep. I went out and looked over the fence to see 4 sheep down, obviously dead and 3 others near death, 2 of them had their necks snapped, blood everywhere. It was now about 6 am and my neighbor had now come outside because he had heard the young man's cursing and loud voice. He too saw the awful site and returned inside to call the police. They arrived in about 10 minutes and began to question those who were there and to count the sheep that were at-(Continued on page 5) LETTERS

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Page 5 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 (Pit Bull Letter. Continued from page 4) tacked. Photographs were taken and the vet was called to come and put the animals that were barely alive out of their misery. Three sheep that lived through the attack were treated for many wounds to the face and neck; one sustained a broken nose as well. They are now slowly healing. Miraculously, I found another newborn lamb that didn't have a scratch on it baa-ing near a hurt sheep. It was looking for its mother who lay dead about three feet away. It is doing well and being bottle-fed. That's the good news! The bad news is that the Pit Bull is still alive, chained in the owner's yard! The owner said that there was a new lock on the gate to keep their "pet" and watchdog in. It was not chained up the morning of the attack and it got out! My fear is that if this vicious dog could kill seven defenseless sheep, what will keep it from killing again? Why wasn't this animal killed and taken out of our neighborhood? A friend who is an emergency room doctor told me that this type of dog will kill again once it has tasted blood and that it kills things that are about its eye level! So, if you live in Hato, keep an eye on your pets and kids! I hope we don't read in The Reporter that a child is seriously injured or killed by this beast before it is destroyed. Oh, and perhaps the owners of this horrible Pit Bull should keep their young daughter inside, far away from their 'pet' dog! Maggie Fuller LEAKY PIPES Dear Editor, Attached to this mail are pictures which I made on June 21st 2005. The first time I noticed there was a leak in the pipeline from the WEB, I called the so called " Departamentu di Storing " and told the guy on duty there was a leak at Lima in Belnem. They told me that they would sendsomeone to fix the leak. That phone call was Thursday, June 9th!!! I called again on Saturday the 11th early evening. They apparently also do not work on weekends, because the trees started to get green. And to my big surprise when I walked by several times last week, still no leak fix. And the trees got greener by the day. Today, June 21st I walked by again, and noticed they still haven't done anything!! That is how serious they take a phone call from someone who notices while walking the dogs. So that is why I send you this mail with the photos, maybe you are willing to place them in the reporter and let the people of Bonaire know what happens with the increase of the waterand electricity bill! It for the trees on the side of the road. My girlfriend and I are wondering who is going to pay all this loss of water. In the end the people of Bonaire are paying the bill. I am sure the management team from the WEB doesn't!! Where is all this? At Lima in Belnem. Lima is the last sideway left on the long road to Sorobon, in Belnem. The road doesn't end but goes in a circle around a house and goes back to the road to Sorobon. In the curve, about 6 meters away from the road, there lies a pipeline which goes all the way in to the "knoek" and feeds construction sides and houses close to the airport. Why do I send this to The Reporter . Because in the first place, I think it is a waste of good water. The procedure of making fresh water out of seawater like the WEB does, is very expensive. And because we live with just a few here, we have to pay a lot. In the second place, if you ask me, people who are working at the WEB, doing their "storing" shift, have not learned anything from the big fire last Carnaval. If there is something wrong, no matter what, fix it!! That way you show the people of Bonaire that the WEB is serious and worth every penny! We are a long way from that! Silvan Henneman The daily press last week reported that WEB was actively working on the pipe problems in Belnem. Ed. BEAUTY IN SUSHI “When one takes a drive along Bonaire's east coast, graffiti has shown up even there. Not spray painting, but ugly sculptures of litter and garbage that someone has left as a monument to their ego.” BB (from 6/24/ 05 Edition of B.R.) Dear Editor: I really fail to see the ugliness in the “monuments” erected on the south end of our island. In the 20 plus years I have lived here, I have always marveled at the creativity of the mysterious sculptor whose work has brought many smiles and even a few laughs to our visitors. They have even appeared in articles and newspapers around the world. Obviously, BB (whoever you are) is a newcomer and is offended and it is certainly their right. I might then suggest since the recycled material is already conveniently piled up, they can easily find an old feed bag and remove it to the landfill. My Bonairean friends have told me they know who the artist is and they are not offended a bit. (I also have a feeling I know who it is as well...) Another great place to see the creative use of “sushi” is at FKPD (Pasa Dia) in Rincon. They sell great souvenirs that are worth the short drive north. Michael Gaynor OPINIONS and LETTERS:THE Op-Ed PAGE Reader comments limited to 500 words will be considered for inclusion in the “Letters” department. All letters must be signed. However, we will withhold names on request. Belnem leak

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Page 6 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 GOOGLE GAFFE? PART 1. To the Editors: Y our “Finding Balance for Bonaire” series is interesting, but at times I believe the authors manipulate their “facts” and “results” to push their points and agendas across, and damn the facts. In one issue they showed Caribbean island tourism growth rates for only a single sample, for example, to demonstrate how slow tourism growth was on Bonaire. They conveniently forgot to include that after 9/11, Bonaire apparently did not suffer nearly as significant a loss in touris m as just about every other Caribbean island did, which could explain the greater growth in last year’s numbers for other islands as a rebound from much lower post-9/11 levels. Never mind that a number of the islands listed were not real diver-oriented destinations. Further massaging of results occurs in another issue under the subject “Take the Google Test.” Some of your readers ma y be aware that among the many hats I wear, I also run NetTech N.V. along with my partner Susan Davis. NetTech N.V. operates and maintains Bonaire’s official web site, InfoBonaire, as well as web sites for dozens of other Bonaire businesses. I am also, however, a professional researcher, as part of the consulting work I perform for clients around the world in the field of patent litigation. And a significant part of my research involves using s earch engines such as Google to locate specific information – using both the methodologies that a non-professional searcher would use, and those known to people who have lots of experience using search tools. The basic issues I have with the Take the Google Test are: 1) There is no commentary on how ot her competing dive destinations faired; 2) the use of quotation marks around search terms; 3) interpreting search results; and 4) the lack of apparent understanding of how automated search engines sort and filter their data. Let’s take a quick look at these items. First, when I ran the same search terms as used in the article, the only official dive destination site I found in the first 100 results for “scuba vacation” was an official diving-oriented site for the Caym an Islands which also offered the ability to book travel to the Caymans (and thus was selling vacations directly). All other 99 results were understandably for tour operators and travel agents, as well as news sites, a few scattered dive shops in places ranging from Thailand to Florida, a bunch of unrelated sites, and one resort at a dive destination (Harbour Village – turned up twice – I’ll explain why later). The next hundred results turned up nothing better. Adding +Caribbean (which requires the word “Caribbean” to be in the search results) resulted in the aforementioned www.DiveCayman.ky site moving up to 31st place. Otherwise, the results were ra ther similar to the previous search. The other search terms produced similarly unspectacular results, when there were any. The term “snorkel, vacation, Caribbean” produced no results whatsoever, in contrast to what was reported. In no case di d I find an official tourism site in the top 20 results. Beyond 20 the results are probably meaningless for very broad searches, although potentially very relevant for targeted searches. As far as I see, all the searches in the Google Test were very broad ones, and thus the results were very broad. That leads to the next issue. Quotations marks around search terms in Google and other search engines mean that one should search for the phrase in the quotes. Perhaps the authors of the Google Test were using quotes for emphasis instead of literally, but that would obviously be wrong if the authors knew anything about search engines. For example, if I search for the quoted phrase “official bonaire website” , I get only 24 relevant results out of a possible 62 (and yes, it’s www.InfoBonaire.com at the top). If I use the same terms, official bonaire website without the quotes I get 54,600 results (and yes, www.InfoBonaire.com still comes up first). Quotation marks are criti cal tools that experienced searchers use to narrow down their results. Similarly, putting a “plus sign” in front of a particular term requires that term to be in the search results (otherwise it’s optional, meaning you get very unfocused results the further down the result list you go). Jake Richter Next weekWhat does a regular, nonexperienced searcher do and how to handle the search results Reporter readers have provided their views on our eight part series Balance for Bonaire. They will be presented in this issue and next. If you haven’t had a chance to complete the Reporter Survey (page 7) asking YOUR views on the proper choices for Bo naire’s future this is your last opportunity. Send by post, e-ma il or drop at our office. AIRLIFT MYTHS REACTION Dear Editor: I have been following your weekly articles regarding tourism and the "Balance for Bonaire". The June 10th article was very di sturbing as it was very ambiguous and raised a few glaring questions. The CTO 20 04 tourist arrival statistics were a bit perplexing. Can it really be true that 90,000 visitors to Granada arrived by airplane?????? That is how the report comes across. Anyone sitting on the beach in Granada on any given day will see 4-5 cruise ships lined up waiting to tender the thousands into town. So this is not a fair evaluation or comparison when discussing airlift. There is a second "problem" that seems to be ignored. I don't know if others have had this problem, or if it is just that we travel to Bonaire frequently that I notice a pattern. I feel part of the reason for the half empty planes to Bonaire is not lack of demand, but rather no available seats on the first leg, whether it be to SJ or MoBay. Every flight we have ever taken from the east coast to Mo Bay has been full. In the past, I have worked directly wi th the AJ office here 6 months or more in advance and more times than not, I can't get to Bonaire because the first leg is sold out. I believe that one way to determine if the problem is airlift, is to have a direct flight from the states. Only then can it be determined where the problem lies. The answer to the low hotel occupancy rate would be to get all the hotels on Travelocity or Orbitz. With computer access , it would be much easier if all the hotels were located together. Bonaire is not exactly tourist friendly when trying to find accommodations. Bonaire should be fixing the small problems now, and not wait for the "big fix". Nadine Rubin ARUBA, A MODEL FOR BONAIRE? REACTION PART 1. After a recent visit to Aruba, where I live d for 18 years, I was happy to come back to our island. The publicity around the recent disappearance of the American girl, Natalee Halloway, has focused on Aruba and its tourist industry. Just before I left Aruba, I listened to an interview on the local TV-station with the Director of the Chamber of Commerce about the sustainability of the further hotel development on Aruba. I was surprised to hear that no decision has been taken yet and that various studies are still being conducted. The current uninhibited construction of new gigantic hotel and time share buildings clearly shows that the government of Aruba is firmly decided to sacrifice also the few remaining sections of pristine beaches for this disastrous development. During the interview, the mentioned director complained that while Aruba was still studying what to do, the people of Bonaire had already taken a firm decision not to permit any construction of large hotels and to concentrate on improvement of existing tourist facilities, particularly for the diving industry, in order to preserve the beautiful nature of the island. To my horror, after reading the excellent articles Finding Balance for Bonaire in recent issues of Bonaire Reporter , I found that although the people of this island really did take the mentioned decision, ther e are politicians having another opinion. They probably see, like it has happened on Aruba, a personal profit in the mass tourist development. They do not mind that the decision of the people is firmly supported by the official Bonaire government tourist development guidelines. How is that possible? (Continued on page 7)

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Page 7 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 The Bonaire Reporter Survey. What do YOU think about Bonaire? A s a reader of The Bonaire Reporter you must care about the island. Maybe you could help us with some of the consumer ‘needs’ research mentioned in this series. It doesn’t matter if you are a tourist or a resident. Please fill out this questionnaire and mail it to Bonaire Reporter, Kaya Gob. Debrot 200-6, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles (AN) or go on-line to http//www. bonairenews.com/survey.htm and e-mail your form to survey@bonairereporter. com. Dozens have already been received but we’d like some more. 1. Your nationality: Antillean US Netherlands Other: ____________________________ 2. Your age: Under 25 26-40 41-60 Over 60 3. Your sex: M F 4. Marital status Single Married Widowed/Divorced In relationship 5. Years Scuba Diving 1 year or less 2-5 years 5-10 years More than 10 years 6. Years windsurfing 1 year or less 2-5 years 5-10 years More than 10 years 7. Are you a Tourist Part time resident Full time resident Native Bonairean 8. How much time do you spend on Bonaire in an average year? 1-2 weeks 3 to 4 weeks 1 to 2 months 2 to 6 months 6 to 12 months 9. Number of people in your household or group when you are on Bonaire: __________ 10. What year did you first come to Bonaire: ____________ 11.Why did you first come to Bonaire? born here parents moved here found a job here scuba diving tourist windsurfing tourist Other ___________________________________________________________ 12.What do you like MOST about Bonaire? 13.What do you like LEAST about Bonaire? 14.How satisfied are you with the following? Rate your degree of satisfactions from 1 to 4, where 4 is extremely satisfied and 1 is not at all satisfied. Circle the appropriate number for each item. Satisfaction Low High a. friendliness of the people 1 2 3 4 b. number of hotels 1 2 3 4 c. quality of hotels 1 2 3 4 d. number of restaurants 1 2 3 4 e. quality of restaurants 1 2 3 4 f. number of cultural activities 1 2 3 4 g. quality of cultural activities 1 2 3 4 h. activities for children 1 2 3 4 i. condition of the reefs 1 2 3 4 j. quality of the diving 1 2 3 4 k. quality of the environment 1 2 3 4 l. cleanliness of the island 1 2 3 4 m. quality of the roads 1 2 3 4 n. Internet service 1 2 3 4 o. telephone service 1 2 3 4 p. water and electric service 1 2 3 4 q. number of tourists 1 2 3 4 r. service attitude at businesses 1 2 3 4 s. personal safety 1 2 3 4 t. number of activities available 1 2 3 4 u. quality of activities available 1 2 3 4 v. number of diving locations 1 2 3 4 w. airline service to the island 1 2 3 4 x. quality of your Bonaire experience 1 2 3 4 y. Other_______________________ 1 2 3 4 z. Other_______________________ 1 2 3 4 15.What ‘needs’ do you have that are not currently being met by Bonaire? Or, said another way, what could Bonaire do to get you to spend more time on the island or for you to enjoy your time on Bonaire more? 16. What could Bonaire do to improve its tourism product so more people would want to come to Bonaire? Reaction to Balance for Bonaire articles (Continued from page 6) In “Finding Balance for Bonaire,” Part 4, a closer look was taken at the Aruba Model, presenting conclusions of a Tobago research and of an article of Robertico Croes and Manuel Vanegas. Mr. “Tico”Croes served as the Finance Minister in the last government, led by Henny Eman, and was recently interrogated about his possible involvement in a financial scandal concerning the never realized speedway race track.. A judge in Miami decided in this matter that the government of Aruba had to pay $20 million to a US investor. It is hard to understand that during the trial the former transportation minister in the Eman's cabinet, Glenbert Croes, main promoter of the failed project, testified against his own government(!!!). Reading the conclusions of the Tobago report and of the mentioned article, one could believe that the Aruba growth has been the result of strict pursuance of a deliberate strategy and a clear development plan and that, with the exception of some miscalculation, the tourist development has been a big success, and that Aruba can serve as a model for Bonaire when planning the future tourist development.. The fact is, however, that although Aruba does have a development plan, elaborated more than 20 years ago, all tourist development during the last 20 years has not been a result of a deliberate strategy and a development plan but rather of bitter fighting between the two leading political parties, the Christian democratic AVP and the socialist MEP. Since 1985, there have been three cabinets Eman ( prime minister of all governments led by AVP) and three cabinets Oduber (prime minister of all MEP-governments). The Oduber III cab inet is currently at the power and new elections will come this year. It is a normal practice on Aruba that when the rival party wins the election, the new government declares that the policy of the preceding administration was completely wrong, th at due to irresponsible decisions of the previous government (mostly in connectio n with the new hotel construction) the new administration has to pay millions of dollars to foreign banks and that a completely new policy has to be followed. A good example of this practice are the both hotel moratoria (in 1986 and 1996), mentioned in Finding Balance for Bonaire, Part 4. They were declared by the Eman governments as reaction to, in their ey es, wrong tourism development under the Oduber administrations. In 1996, the Eman administration went so far that it decided to demolish three uncompleted large hotels at the Palm beach. The two towers of a new Ramada hotel were sold to the Divi group under the condition that the larger tower, almost fully completed, would be demolished. It really happened (!) and the smaller remaining tower operates now under the name Phoenix resort. It is a paradox that the neighboring Wyndham hotel (former Concorde and later Hilton) is currently negotiating with the government to get permission to build an annex to its existing high rise building, practically at the site of the demolished Ramada tower (!). The two remaining hotels were ultimately saved and taken over by the Marriott group which under the current Od uber III administration, completely ignoring the moratorium taken by the previous Eman government, not only completed the construction but started, next to these hotels, to realize the gigantic four stages time share project Ocean Club and Surf Club. The high buildings of the first two stages now tower over the neighboring Holiday Inn resort. Jiri Lausman Next week the financial scandals that are costing Arubans millions MAKE ALL DEVELOPMENT SUSTAINABLE Dear Editor: Sustainable development is not something new. History is full of examples of cultures that developed in a sustainable way; that means, they progressed social and economically, with out abusing the natural resources. However, increased interest in “development” shown by governments, some world organizations and certain sectors of the society results in the actual state of deterioration of the planet and the danger it represent for mankind. But, what is sustainable development? It’s the development that satisfies the needs of those of us that inhabit the planet today, with out compromising the capacity of future generations of satisfy theirs. It’s an alternative to face the crisis that this actual type of development that seeks economical progress at all cost, has generated. This means that, the model of sustainable development seeks the same economic progress, but controlling the use of the natural resources. The sustainable development model, as it was defined in 1992 in the Summit of the Earth in Rio de Janeiro, stands in three very strong components. Sustainable development is, of course, interested in a more balanced use of the natural resources; but is also interested in a better distribution of the benefits generated and more participation of the people in the maki ng of decisions that affect them. This makes sustainable development the way to a more fair and balanced society, with less difference between rich and poor. The actual model has us on the edge of the depletion of important resources, like water, fossil fuel, fisheries stock, coral reefs, etc. and if we continue to seek pro-(Continued on page 17) Diver and Turtle at Kai Albert Bianculli photo L a s t C h a n c e t o s u b m i t f or m !

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Page 8 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 flotsam and Jetsam (Continued from page 3) Curaçao’s Venezuelan-owned Isla oil refinery. Why? It’s because the discharge of sulfur dioxide (SO2) by the refinery is enormous. According to figures the Foundation for a Clean Environment in Curaçao (SMOC) released last week, the refinery discharged almost 78 million kilo of sulfur dioxide in 2001. The discharge for the entire country of the Netherlands was 75 million kilos in that same year. One refinery, Shell Pernis, that processes twice as much crude oil as the Isla, discharged only 16 million kilos. The enormous discharges mean that the refinery’s equipment is in need of repair or replacement, since nothing has been upgraded to reduce those emissions since the last century. SO2 has a detrimental effect on the health of people living close to the refinery. SMOC is demanding that the Curaçao government take action to remedy the problem. A Dutch lawayer and translator made an English translation of Book I of the Netherlands Antilles Civil Code, "Family Law and the Law of Persons. '" He sent the Public Prosecutor a copy who thinks this is very interesting for all English speaking persons living on Bonaire. If you are interested, please contact him. The Antillean Parliament approved a bill requiring social education duty for young jobless school dropouts amid much debate on whether it was doing so under pressure of the Dutch Government’s plan to introduce an admittance regulation for Antillean youngsters traveling to Holland. Antillean youths have a higher incidence of arrests in Holland than do European Dutch youngsters. Supposedly, if a person from 16-24 has passed the "social education program" he/she can be admitted into Holland without restriction. The compulsory program has been in the works for a while and there is a pilot project underway but not getting much enrollment. A serious effort to speed up immigration permits was announced by Minister of Justice David Dick early last week . The welcome announcement followed lengthy talks with the Lt. Governors of the respective Island Territories. Dick says the entire Immigration System needs streamlining. It's a conclusion arrived at years ago by business, bona fide immigrants, visiting yachtsmen and people who have decided to reside here. Bonaire’s Immigration officials had already extended the two-week reporting requirement to four weeks. Minister Dick, who comes from the private sector, believes the current system is ridiculously bureaucratic and, as a consequence, frustrates economic growth and often creates situations bordering on violation of human rights. One of our island's business leaders hopes the "reforms" will go beyond the improvement in issuing permits. Streamlining the Immigration System has to change basic thinking about “immigration.” He said that currently a negative approach dominates. It appears aimed more at making immigration difficult rather than at serving the economy. On Bonaire the argument that the local labor market needs protection is often stretching a point and overprotection reduces productivity. Last Sunday, 19th of June, an anonymous caller contacted STINAPA that people were spear fishing at Bachelor’s Beach. According to the Marine Ordinance, it is forbidden to fish in the Bonaire Marine Park with a spear gun or handheld spear. It is also forbidden to transport a spear gun or handheld spear on public ground (or water), to have in one’s possession, or to buy or sell spear gunned fish. The rangers arrived at the beach by boat and picked-up and caught two spear fishermen in the act. They came out of the water wearing dive equipment and carrying a dive bag full of fish, but left the spear gun behind. The rangers seized the bag with fish and also surfaced the spear gun. Both hunters were taken to the Police Station with the spear gun, dive gear and fish. The case will be handled by the court of justice. STINAPA wants to thank the anonymous caller. Without his help, they said they would not have been able to stop this illegal activity. Whenever you see someone spear fishing or other illegal activities going on in the Marine Park, contact STINAPA at: 717-8444 or 786-9603. Now all NGOs (“Non-Profit” Non Government Organizations) can have their own Web page and e-mail connection free thanks to an initiative by Bonaire’s NGO Platform via the Platform’s new website, www. NGOBonaire.org. Each NGO will have a single private e-mail address, even the Platform will “We’d like every Bonaire NGO to have a web site and e-mail address,” said James Finies President of the Platform. “If the NGO doesn’t have a computer they can use the one installed for their use at Platform headquarters.” “For people of our island it is becoming very important to communicate rapidly and precisely,” said Elsmarie Beukenboom, Platform Secretary. “The Platform wants each NGO to have a chance to use this important media.” On Sunday night between 2 and 8 pm the police zero tolerance team conducted an enforcement action directed at scooters and motorcycles. They confiscated 10 scooters and a motorcycle and gave out 19 summonses (prosès verbal) for various infractions, mostly related to not having a license to operate a two-wheeled vehicle. There was also an arrest for drug possession and another for failing to comply with the order of a policeman. The majority of drivers stopped did not have the proper license to operate their scooters and as a result scooter rental operators will be encouraged to ensure that their renters have a license that qualifies them to operate the vehicles they rent. A diner at a street-side restaurant wondered if they had impounded the extremely loud motorcycle that had passed him earlier in the day. The Dutch Caribbean Nature Alliance (DCNA) opened their headquarters in Kaya Grandi # 20 this past week. Former Bonaire National Marine Park Manage r Kalli De Meyer’s initiatives and hard work to found an organization, dedicated to the long term preservation and conservation of nature within the Netherlands Antilles have finally paid off. (See story on page 17 for information.) After almost two years of preparation the Dutch Caribbean Nature Alliance officially started April 1st of 2005 with Kalli as its Executive Director. She was recently joined by Sharon Bol, who will be the Office Manager for DCNA’s headquarters on Bonaire. REMINDER—take the fantastic Lac Bay discovery boat trip on Sunday. Then attend Art Day. See page 19 – What’s Happening-for details. G./L.D Natalee Holloway Disappearance and Antilles/Aruba Law N atalee Holloway , an 18 year-old Alabama girl, disappeared May 30 hours before she was to return home from a trip to Aruba with other students celebrating graduation. The case has drawn international attention and has even tainted Bonaire. At press time four men are in custody, but not charged with a crime. According to published reports, Joran van der Sloot (17) admitted “making out” with the girl in the back seat of the car at a beach where the three took her. The Dutch teen and his two friends are still in jail. Three other men arrested and held have been released. Investigators from Aruba and the USA continue to look for evidence behind the disappearance The Legal Process The arrest and detention procedures may be confusing to some as they are based on principles different from American or English traditions and legal codes. The Netherlands Antilles and Aruba are overseas Dutch territories with judicial systems modeled after the Dutch structure, in which people can be arrested on suspicion of a crime, but not formally charged until later. International law expert Theodore Simon explained about the differences between US and Dutch law in connection with th e Natalee Holloway disappearance but it may prove informative to our readers as the same principles apply in Bonaire. In the Antilles and Aruba people can be held without any formal charges filed . All authorities need is some indication that the person may have been involved, and then they can be arrested and held for a substantial period of time. In the US, a person cannot be arrested unless there's probable cause. And probable cause has been defined as facts and circumstances based on reasonably trustworthy information that would warrant a prudent person into believing a crime was committed and the person to be arrested committed it. Initially a person can be held by the police for two days. They're not required to bring them before a magistrate until 72 hours have passed. And the initial two can be extended for eight days and then two more periods of eight days if the magistrate concurs. So that's about 26 days; and then another four months. So a person can be held up to 146 days without being charged with a crime. Once charged with a crime the accused appears in front of a single judge and is tried. If convicted, they have the right to a trial de novo , which, in effect, means a do over, and have a trial in front of a three-judge panel. However, that may seem helpful to the defense. On the other hand, if they are acquitted at the single judge trial, the government can appeal -something that could not happen in the US. There is no jury trial in the Dutch/Antillean/Aruban system. While the person charged will appear in front of a single judge, they retain the same standard of being proven beyond a reasonable doubt. But a single judge will render judgment of guilt or non-guilt. The verdict can get appealed before at threejudge tribunal, and finally either party could appeal to The Hague in the Netherlands for questions of law. Both in the US and the Dutch system there's the right to be free from self incrimination. The accused cannot be required to testify against him or herself. And if they don't testify, no adverse inference can be drawn. Reportedly these three young men were the last persons to see Natalee Holloway alive. They are in custody. Sharon Bol runs the Bonaire DCNA office

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Page 9 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 KRALENDIJK TIDES (Heights in feet, FT) Remember: Winds and weather can further influence the local tides DATE TIME HEIGHT COEF 7-01 6:36 0.9FT. 21:51 2.0FT. 5 7-02 7:39 0.8FT. 22:21 2.0FT. 5 7-03 8:27 0.7FT. 22:53 2.1FT. 6 7-04 9:14 0.7FT. 23:29 2.1FT. 7 7-05 9:59 0.7FT. 7 7-06 0:34 2.1FT. 10:33 0.7FT. 7 7-07 1:05 2.0FT. 11:09 0.7FT. 7 7-08 1:35 1.9FT. 11:43 0.7FT. 7 VESSELS MAKING A PORT CALL : Antee Angie Another World Angel B Augustine Bright Sea Bounty Carylar Camissa, Chan Is. Cape Kathryn Endangered Species Endorphin Felicity Flying Cloud, USA Freestyle Guaicamar I, Ven. Jan Gerardus L’Quila, BVI Luna C. USA Madam Maggi Mainly Moonrise Mystic Jade Natural Selection Pyewacket Rusty Bucket Santa Maria Sandpiper, USA Scintella Sea Witch Sirius Sola 2 Sylvia K Sylvester Ti Amo, USA T’zadde Triumphant Lady Ulu Ulu, USA Ulysses Unicorn, Norway Varedhuni, Ger. Windancer Ya-T, BVI Yanti Paratzi Zahi, Malta Zeelander YACHTING AND WATERSPORTS PAGES S ometimes dreams do come true. The dream of many Bonairean windsurfers is to follow in the footsteps of island pros Tonky and Taty Frans and secure an international sponsor. Lucky sailor Jose Fajardo Rivera found not one, not two, not three, but four sponsors to help make his windsurfing dream a reality. Jose, a 20-something sailor, began seriously windsurfing in 2001 and advanced quickly by putting in long hours of training. Sponsor scout Ann Phelan saw that he had what was needed to be a winning competitor. What he needed was decent gear to train and compete. A few connections were made and Jose secured a limited sponsorship with Gun Sails USA and Island Sports for discount sails. He also secured a sponsorship with Caribbean Wind & Sun Vacations which allotted two tickets each year for Jose to attend competition. Coach Elvis Martinus used his influence and connections to help Jose secure a full board sponsorship from RRD in Italy. The plan was for Jose to attend King of the Caribbean and then the Cape Cod Freestyle Frenzy. Unfortunately, lack of wind prevented any meaningful competition at both events but that didn’t stop Jose from working it and having some fun while in Cape Cod. He hooked up with Platt Johnson, owner of Island Sports in Newport Rhode Island and the US distributor for Gun Sails. Jose attended Windfest, a surf show held during the Frenzy. Jose worked with Platt selling gear and doing demos. Platt was so impressed with Jose’s get-upand-go attitude he contacted Gun Sails International and eventually was able to secure a full gear sponsorship for this aspiring talent. Later in the week, Platt invited Jose to his home turf to see his mega shop and to tour Newport. When Jose arrived in historic Newport, Rhode Island, he was treated to a whirlwind day complete with a tour of the beaches, an interview with the Newport Daily News and an extravagant luncheon at the elegant and renowned New York Yacht Club hosted by Platt’s lovely wife Nancy and sons Will and Chris. The setting was majestic with pristine views of Newport Harbour. It was a day Jose will never forget. An older rider by current windsurf standards, Jose does not have expectations on attending the PWA Tour. His dream is to finish technical school in Curaçao, secure a great job in Bonaire and windsurf in as many competitions as possible. Part of his dream is to travel more, and this may become a reality as Platt and Nancy have invited Jose to spend the summer of 2006 in Newport as their guest, volunteering in the shop and learning more about the retail end of windsurfing. Not bad for an old windsurf kid. Ann Phelan www.bonairecaribbean.com Jose Fajardo Rivera and Platt Johnson Jose Fajardo Rivera S amson Evertsz, age 9, is the first swimmer to represent Bonaire in the Curaçao "A" Swimming Championships. This annual competition is organized by the Curaçao Swimming Association and is open only to local swimmers who have achieved "A" level times during the current swimming season. "A" is the fastest time category recognized in the Netherlands Antilles. The "A" Championship meet took place June 9 12 at the Sentro Deportivo Korsow complex in Curaçao. Samson represented the Bonaire Barracudas Swim Team in the presentation of teams during the "A" Championship opening ceremony held on Saturday, 11 June. A special welcome was extended to Bonaire and its lone swimmer by the President of the Curaçao Swimming Association during this ceremony. Bonaire swimmers participate in Curaçao events as exhibition swimmers to receive official times but are ineligible for awards. Samson achieved his qualifying times in backstroke, butterfly and freestyle during the 6th Annual Dutch Caribbean Invitational Swim meet in April. During the "A" Championships he improved his times in each of his three events demonstrating continued progress in the sport. Asked for his thoughts on this opportunity Samson said," I had a great time and learned a lot about setting goals. I can't wait to go back!" The Netherlands Antilles swimming season runs from September through June. Desiree Baaleman, age 10, of the Bonaire Barracudas was the only other Bonaire swimmer to qualify for this meet. Desiree achieved an "A" time in 50 meter breaststroke at the Dutch Caribbean Invitational but was unable to attend the "A" Championship meet. photo and story by Valarie Stimpson Samson Evertsz (yellow swim cap -inset) at the start of the Boys 10 and Under 50 meter butterfly race.

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Page 10 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 “I can’t believe this show was put on by young people,” a tourist exclaimed last Friday night at the opening of the SGB high school’s “Cultural Growth” art show. “I’ve been to so many art openings, but this is just fantastic! I’m so glad I was able to be on the island right now.” The lady tourist echoed the feelings of so many who attended the first ever SGB high school art opening at ARTEBON. Speaking for her colleagues, general science teacher Mary Ann Koops, said, “We’re so very proud of the students. Sometimes they have a low self esteem and they just throw their designs in the trash. They think they are nothing. But we wanted them to be able to show their works to their parents and the public. We’ve been very privileged to work with these kids.” Minister of Education Maritza Silberie, who opened the show, said, “It’s very important to show something positive coming from the SGB. These are our children and we’re very proud of what they can do.” Challenged by general science teacher Koops and art and industrial design teacher Wilna Groenenboom, the students had to either come up with a new product or enhance or embellish one that’s already in use. They had to make a plan, work two dimensionally with sketches before creating the final product in three dimensions. A third subject, Papiamentu, was brought into play as each project manual had to be written in that language. Student Ashwant Gonesh explained that he wanted to design a “guitar of the future.” He had to study an existing one and decide how to ch ange it and make it really look like something familiar but with a whole new design. He had to think a lot and let his imagination soar. “I know it may be a little hard to play with all these points,” he says, pointing to the zigzag design, but he accomplished his goal. Attending the opening and showing their support were parents, other students as well as teachers, staff and those associated with the SGB: Nolly Oleana, Artie DeVries, Ann Leong, Herman Groenenboom, Rob van Lear, Helen Hoen, Ms. Martijn, Papiamentu teacher Melina Rameriz, Edy Carolina, Hilly Gravenhorst and others. The exhibition continued through the weekend with the students acting as docents, showing the public through the show. L.D. C O V E R S T O R Y It was through a generous grant from AMFO and the NGO Platform Bonaire that this “Cultural Growth at ARTEBON” was made possible. Stressing the importance of this exhibit and what it would do the self image of each student, the teachers asked for help. Responding, the Platform guided them in the proper method to apply for funds. Working together they accomplished a monumental feat – one that may have changed the path of a student who thinks maybe he or she was not worthy. Thank you to all teachers and the NGO Platform personnel – who made this come true. Ashwant Gonesh and Syphard Willem, the Future Guitar Boys Minister of Education, Maritza Silberi, cuts the ribbon to open the show A whimsical puppet Bonaire’s most famous bird

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Page 11 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 Reporter: The sector Care and Welfare contains more than just projects for the senior citizens. The part of the youth and problem prevention is not as well publicized. Is that accurate? Boy Clarenda: That’s true! There were indeed many more projects for the elderly. Let me explain the concepts of the Care and Welfare sector: People have certain needs. The part of ‘Care’ reflects what people require on daily basis to survive. The part of ‘Welfare’ is how citizens feel: safe, comfortable, without fear or anxiety in their daily lives. So you can imagine how large the area is because everyone has these needs. A large part of achieving these two concepts, care and welfare, is based on education which should start at a very young age, otherwise we will keep encountering what we’re dealing with nowadays: troublesome youngsters; or the fact that we’re trying to extinguish those fires that have started. Reporter: The organization ‘CoCaRi’ (Comishon Cuido pa Ansianonan di Rincon) a daily activity center for the elderly in Rincon, in which you are also the president, urgently needs a bus. Sharing a bus with other organizations as the NGO Platform proposed is not an option due to the special characteristics of Rincon (e.g. the distance, the needy target group which is vulnerable etc.). Can you explain? Clarenda: CoCaRi needs a bus, indeed. The current bus is old. We’re trying to help groups to reach their goals as much as possible. Scarcity means we must act as efficiently as possible. It would be the ideal situation to have every group in the community get what they ask for. But if we find that a group can’t share resources we will help them as best we can. Reporter: As representative of the sector you will do your utmost to introduce projects for youth and prevention (e.g. AIDS/STD prevention, diabetes among the youth etc). Right? Clarenda: Yes. Youngsters have the most exposure. We should consider how to fight against the risks that they run. The plans are to start first with the SGB kids who don’t get enough attention. These programs should focus on minimizing the risks they encounter. Education and prevention go hand in hand. In the area of ‘care’, the mental development of the youngsters should be addressed (the situation at home, problems with the parents, teen pregnancy etc). Our youngsters are very vulnerable. I mostly combine my work in healthcare with the activities for the NGO Platform. (Mr. Clarenda’s job is Manager of Quality at Fundashon Mariadal which includes San Francisco Hospital). Don’t forget that Mariadal is the largest NGO on the island. One of my departments deals with juvenile/youth health issues. This includes all the schools as well. For instance we just hired a social worker who, as of June 15, will focus on youngsters’ mental health as her daily task, sharing this duty with a doctor. They will visit all the schools on Bonaire to investigate the mental development of the children, to detect the risks and finally to battle them. Reporter: What will the effect be of assigning a new project leader to the project of the elderly (for all the three centers for the elderly on Bonaire ( CoCaRI, Villa Antonia, Kai Mimina)? Clarenda: We indeed have named a coordinator. Initially we expect short term resultsfor instance putting together the annual report, project information etc. The people in these organizations, who initially had trouble doing this kind of work, now have the coordinator to take it over. But if we continue this way with this project it will remain a short-term project. That’s why we need to come up with a structured program that will lead us to results in the long run. Reporter: Can you tell us about some financed and completed projects both for the youth as well as for the senior citizens that are continuing? Clarenda: For the elderly we now have an activity leader. Our senior citizens are now receiving more varied activity and recreation. This leader is working together with others to exchange knowledge and experience. So we can consider this a long-term effect because at some point these people will take over. Regarding youngsters, we already discussed them. I admit that they can use attention. But I’m positive that the social worker, I mentioned previously, put in charge of the mental health program for the youth will have positive results over the long term. Reporter: I’ve heard that the planned Health Center in Rincon may be at the southern part of Rincon which the government named an official “‘health area.” Does this mean that the Health Center should not be placed in the school-convent area, in the center of Rincon? Clarenda; There should be a Health Center in Rincon! Keep in mind that space in Rincon is scarce. I don’t want to get into a discussion where it should be located! It must be properly equipped and staffed. For me it’s more important that it be well located, have good personnel, available 24 hours a day etc. Wherever it is it should be somewhere where the people of Rincon can reach it easily. Reporter: Different subsidizers like AMFO have shown interest in helping to renovate the convent in Rincon and make it a historic site (monument). This way it can also serve as a mobilization center for the Rincon‘s elderly. Will you work to make this happen? Clarenda: Absolutely! What the senior citizens require is a building where they can have recreation. But at the same time this place should be safe and presentable. Anyone who would like to consider helping to achieve this is more than welcome! Reporter: I want you to thank you for this opportunity. Clarenda: You’re welcome, till a next time. Natalie A.C. Wanga CONTACT INFORMATION AMFO: Kaya Gob. N. Debrot #31, Bonaire. Tel. 717-7776, Fax 717-7779, website: www.samfo.org, email: info-bon@samfo.org NGO Platforma Bonaire : Kaya Korona 5-C. Tel. 717-2366, Fax 7172367, website: www.ngobonaire.org, email: Platform@ngobonaire.org Community Issues in the Care and Welfare Sector Part of the continuing series on the Activities sponsored by Godfried ‘Boy’ Clarenda A Reporter interview with Mr. Godfried ‘Boy’ Clarenda, the dynamic NGO representative for the Care and Welfare Sector of Bonaire’s NGO Platform.

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Page 12 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 Y ou might say I have a very interesting and active life. It began in an oil soaked, rodent infested, smelly and slimy port. As a cargo freighter, I visited and explored hundreds of similar ports during my life. The men who built my 235 foot long (72 meter) hull and installed the components to control my movement were rough, dirty and very loud. I was made to roam the oceans of the world and have carried valuable cargo and personal possessions to people around the globe. As time passed my travels became more limited and, for the next several years, I had the luxury of staying closer to my home port visiting old friends on all the islands in the Caribbean. I am not proud of my last sailing adventure. My new owner modified my cargo hold to carry a new, smaller and lighter cargo. The captain and crew are also new and are not familiar with all the controls and special handling required to manage a lady of my maturity and experience. Our final destination was unknown to me, but, judging by the amount of fuel in my tanks, it may have been a local port or southern America, perhaps Miami. I was quickly loaded in the dark hours, only a 12 ton cargo, and went to sea again heading east. Curiously, a new name was painted over my old. For this voyage, I am now called the “ Hilma Hooker ,” San Andres (Colombia). The fresh April breeze and the steady waves, beating against the bow, feel soothing and are in rhythm with the sound of my engine. Suddenly, there is a loud noise below with frantic shouting between the captain and the engineer. We alter course and make for a small nearby island in the Netherlands Antilles called Bonaire. In the shelter of Klein Bonaire, a mile off the main coast and near Kralendijk harbor, we anchor to make the necessary repairs. A group of customs officials come aboard and the captain sets us adrift. The officials take us in tow and I am placed at the pier for further inspection. After several days of some very embarrassing encounters within my empty holds, the teams of expert investigators depart. Now, with the aid of SCUBA gear, another pair of specialists is under my bottom, banging and poking around in some very private areas. This team has important news for the Island officials that uncover the secret compartment containing my small cargo. The contraband is seized, I am confined to port and the captain, who has damaged a portion of my hull admitting a continuous flow of seawater, is arrested. I am very distressed and wonder if I will be (Continued on page 13) B onaire’s dream team of top chefs and a bartender headed out last Sunday to compete in the “Taste of the Caribbean” culinary competition in Miami. This is the third time that Bonaire has sent a team to the event. They’ll compete against 12 other teams made up of the best professional chefs from 12 other Caribbean islands: Anguilla, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, British Virgin Island, Cayman Islands, Curaçao , Puerto Rico, St. Lucia, St. Maarten/St. Martin, Trinidad & Tobago and the US Virgin Islands. It takes a lot of work and dedication on the part of these professionals who already put in long hours in their restaurants. The team has had a lot of island support the people and businesses of Bonaire who’ve enabled them to put on numerous fund-raising lunches and dinners to hone their culinary skills. Representing Bonaire are: Rolando “Ricky ” Janzen (Divi Flamingo Resort), Pastry Chef Isidoor van Riemsdijk and Floris van Loo (Rum Runners Restaurant) and Tico Marsera (Den Laman). Coach is “T aste” veteran, Vernon “Nonchi” Martijn. Bartender is Brad Conner (Rum Runners). Accompanying the team will be Coordinator Sara Matera of the Culinar Foundation and Reporter Editor Laura DeSalvo for on-site reporting. Find out how the team did in next week’s edition . L.D. Taking off from Flamingo airport last Sunday: Brad Conner, Floris van Loo, Rolando “Ricky” Janzen, Vernon “Nonchi” Martijn, Isidoor van Riemsdijk, Tico Marsera, Laura DeSalvo. Heading for the bottom

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Page 13 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 (I Am the William Express.Cont. from pg. 12) disemboweled and cut to pieces in an early visit to the scrap yard! At last, after months of pumping and endless debate, I have been liberated from the confines of the port and, after hasty repairs, I am floating at anchor off a beautiful beach swaying in the gentle waves and cooled by friendly breezes. It is now September 12, 1984 and today I am boarded by a small group of strangers determined to help me accomplish my final mission. They reposition my anchor near shore and start to flood my holds. I gently roll over on my starboard side and, cradled in the warm embrace of the sea, slowly drift down to the soft white sand between two beautiful coral reefs at 100 feet (30 m). Now, I am safe and secure in the pristine sea that once was the highway that I roamed. My destiny has been fulfilled and, unlike other ships my age, I will have a long, comfortable retirement. This is a happy ending to a tortured life and the beginning of wonderful encounters with a new purpose: let me share them with you. Here I rest, in the sea, after being washed clean and prepared to receive new occupants from the underwater marine environment and occasional visitors from shore. They will be equipped with the same SCUBA gear that my liberators used to expose the criminal plot of my previous owner. As the “Hotel Hilma Hooker” my accommodations are spacious and comfortable. They provide shelter and privacy for intimate encounters when desired by my guests. Over the past twenty years a few notable residents have made my passage ways and the island’s surrounding coral gardens their retreat from the stress of the open sea. “Fang”, is a traveling executive, with a sleek, silver, muscular barracuda body with bold black markings to accent his distinguished character. He has repeatedly occupied the Bridge Suite for months at a time to use as his base of operations. He has spent endless hours observing the unusual activities of our short term day-visitors from shore. He delights in silently hovering above and behind these unsuspecting couples while being tickled by the clouds rising bubbles from their excited exhale. “Angel,” one of our longterm guests, joined us after retiring from a very successful career as an actress on the European stage. She is always elegant in her black and yellow designer patterned attire and provides companionship for all our guests. Her experience, before many appreciative audiences, has made her an excellent model for all the photographers that visit our quarters and gardens. She is always willing to pose before the camera lens and be bathed in the bright light and glitter of their strobes. “Napoleon” and “Godiver”, a grouper couple, inhabit the private Stern Cabin under a long term arrangement. They enjoy a carefree life of pleasure protected by our “off-shore” location. Secretive by nature, interaction among the masses of visitors is limited to special occasions. They do enjoy dancing together and can be observed nuzzling and embracing in the early evening hours. We also have a pair of Tarpon couples that have taken their places in the two Forward Master Suites. The brothers, “Chromium” and “Tequila,” are paired with “Quicksilver” and “Tinsel”, respectively. Unlike the groupers, they are always available to our public guests, and, despite their large size, are very gentle and easy to approach. They are very attentive and often display a playful side to their nature by blowing bubbles before the waiting cameras. If you watch carefully you can catch them breaking the surface of the water to gulp air for this demonstration. My last revelation is to remain a secret between us. To protect their true identity I will give you their nick-names from our desk registry. They are a father and son in semi-permanent residence. “Gargantuan” and “Tank” have been known to ambush unsuspecting prey, and from their names you can guess that they are of considerable size and girth. As typical behavior for Jewfish, they do not seek notoriety nor do they like to be approached by strangers. You may see them sitting in the gardens, well camouflaged and grumbling to themselves. Their massive bodies are a testament to the success rate of their many kills. Do not disturb them is my only advice to you. I hope this short visit has been revealing and fun for you. I welcome you to join me at any time, day or night for adventure and the pleasure of your company at Bonaire’s most famous underwater resort, The Hilma Hooker Hotel. ©Albert Bianculli 2005 “Fang” “Angel” “Tank” ©Albert Bianculli ©Albert Bianculli ©Albert Bianculli

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Page 14 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 For Sale For Sale4 Extra Large Suitcases with wheels . Several used one time only. Paid $100.00 each; will sell for NAƒ100,00 each. Call 786-3134 Compaq w i d e screen Laptop Computer, 512MB,DVD/CDRW, Wireless LAN, 2.5yr WARRANTY, FREE CARRYING CASE US$1,500 tel:791-4606 after 5pm Property, Sales & Rentals For Rent: Comfortable 2-bedroom beach villa -weekly or monthly-choice location-privacy & security. Phone (Bon) (599) 717 3293; (US) (570) 586 0098. May 20 until Jan. 8th. info@pelicanreefbonaire.com or www. pelicanreefbonaire.com Wanted Volunteers needed to index back issues of The Bonaire Reporter (English) and Extra (Papiamentu). Call George at 717-8988 or 786-6125. BIG PORCH SALE July 2-3 from 8 am-2 pm Hilltop (next to the Bonaire Caribbean Club)Take the tourist road north. Sale is across from STINAPA office. If you think you need something, we probably have it: Furniture for living room, lots of kitchenware and gadgets (European), semi-automatic clothes washer, CDs, tools, DVD Karaoke machine, exercise equipment and much more. Put your ads here. Non-business Ads free Got something to buy or sell? REACH MORE READERS than any other WEEKLY NEWSPAPER by advertising in THE BONAIRE REPORTER Non-Commercial Classified Ads (up to 4 lines/ 20 words): FREE FREE FREE FREE Commercial Ads only NAƒ0.70 per word, per week. Free adds run for 2 weeks. Call or fax 717-8988 or email ads@bonairereporter.com JANART GALLERY Kaya Gloria 7, Bonaire Local Art, Art Supplies, Framing, and Art Classes. Open Tu-We-Th & Sat 10 am5 pm Friday 17 pm; or phone 717-5246 for appt. BONAIRENET The leading consumer and business information source on Bonaire. Telephone (599) 717-7160 . For on-line yellow pages directory information go to http://www.yellowpagesbonaire.com CAPT. DON’S ISLAND GROWER Trees and plants, Bonaire grown . 8000m2 nursery. Specializing in garden/ septic pumps and irrigation. Kaminda Lagoen 103, Island Growers NV (Capt. Don and Janet). Phone: 786-0956 or 787-0956 Bonaire Images Elegant greeting cards and beautiful boxed note cards are now available at Chat-N-Browse nest to Lovers Ice Cream and Sand Dollar. Photography by Shelly Craig www.bonaireimages.com MOVING INTO A NEW HOUSE? Make it more livable from the start. FENG SHUI CONSULTATIONS Interior or exterior design advice, clearings, blessings, energy, healing, Chinatrained. Experienced. Inexpensive. Call Donna at 785-9332 . LUNCH TO GO Starting from NAƒ5 per meal. Call CHINA NOBO 717-8981 Salt Treasures Bonaire 100% natural body salts "Scrub Me" 100% natural Bath Salts available at Chat-n-Browse, KonTiki and Jewel of Bonaire or call 786-6416 for more information. M arjon Minderhout, who lives in Switzerland, came to Bonaire for the first time in 1976 and has holidayed here many more times. Recently she was in a private game reserve in South Africa and remembered to have her photo taken with The Bonaire Reporter . After the photo shoot she and her family traveled through the park and saw a few animals you never see on Bonaire like giraffes, white rhino, antelope, ostrich and lots of beautiful birds. G.D. WIN GREAT PRIZES! Take a copy of The Bonaire Reporter with you on your next trip or when you return to your home. Then take a photo of yourself with the newspaper in hand. THE BEST PHOTOS OF THE YEAR WILL WIN THE PRIZES. Mail photos to Bonaire Reporter, Kaya Gob. Debrot 200-6, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles (AN). Email to: picture@bonairereporter.com. (All 2004 photos are eligible.)

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Page 15 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 T he two new ambassadors of Bonaire, Sherry and Les Fulton from Illinois, love Bonaire because it is not overde veloped. They started coming to the island in 1995 with their dive shop, then later on came by themselves. When they first read about the ambassador program in The Bonaire Reporter they decided that they wanted to be ambassadors too. They still had about four years to go. Last Friday they reached their goal. Lisa Muehlemann, Operations Manager of Buddy Dive, had the honor of officially making them ambassadors. Sherry and Les plan on returning to Buddy Dive and Bonaire for many years to come. L.M. Buddy DiveÂ’s Lisa Muehlemann and ne w Ambassadors Sherry and Les Fulton F ederashon di Deporte Boneriano ( BSF,Bonairiaanse Sport Federatie/Bonairean Sports Federation ) recently invested lots of effort and energy in reorganizing and restructuring itself. Their aim is to improve the quality of sports on Bonaire and make them accessible to all. TheyÂ’ve completed registration with the government through the Notary, produced a policy plan covering multiple years, and most recently completed a study of the sport world on Bonaire. Natalie Wanga conducted this study which included an inventory of all the s ports, boards and annual programs that were active on Bonaire and in corporates an extensive co mputer database with all vital information. This report, Federashon di Deporte Boneriano, Resumen i Programa Anual di Bondnan Deportivo Boneriano (Bonairean Sport Federation, Report and Annual Program of the Bonairean Sport Confederations) was personally delivered on June 16th by Ms. Wanga to Mr. Hugo Semper, Chairman of the Federashon di Deporte Boneriano . The Federation wishes to thank all the people, authorities and organizations that contributed to the effort. Speci al recognition goes to the sport organizations, NGO Platform and AMFO. Natalie A.C. Wanga Handing over the report

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Page 16 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 ©2005 The Bonaire Reporter Published weekly . For information about subscriptions, stories or advertising in The Bonaire Reporter , phone (599) 717-8988, 7917252, fax 717-8988, E-mail to: Reporter@bonairenews.com The Bonaire Reporter , George DeSalvo, Publisher. Laura DeSalvo, Editor in Chief. Address: Kaya Gob. Debrot 200-6; Bonaire, Neth. Antilles. Available on-line at: www.bonairereporter.com Reporters: Albert Bianculli, Artie DeVries, Dodo, Jack Horkheimer, Greta Kooistra, L.M., Ma bel Nava, Ann Phelan, Valarie Stimpson, Michael Thiessen, Elisabeth Vos, Natalie A.C. Wanga Features Editor: Greta Kooistra Translations: Peggy Bakker, Sue Ellen Felix Production: Barbara Lockwood Distribution: Yuchi Molina (Rincon), Elizabeth Silberie (Playa); Housekeeping: Jaidy Rojas Acevedo. Printed by: DeStad Drukkerij , Curaçao

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Page 17 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 (Responses to Balance. Continued from page 7) gress at the expense of those resources, more sooner than later we will encounter serious difficulties to find food, drinkable water, breathable air or just a nice landscape to enjoy. In other words, those of us that are alive now, are abusing nature and if we continue with this model of development, our children and grandchildren will pay the price and live in worse conditions than the one we are in now. Bonaire doesn’t escape to the world development tendencies but we can consider our selves in a position of privilege. People and Government have always been very proactive when it comes to environment issues. As early as 1961, Bonaire was enacting legislation to protect sea turtle eggs and nests. In 1971, the Island Government of Bonaire banned destructive fishing practices like spear fishing and in 1975 made it illegal to break coral, take it from the water or sell it. Since 1979 Bonaire has also a proactive Marine Park that was declared demonstration site for the United Nations Educational Program in 2001. Coral reefs are in great danger worldwide, more than 10 % of the coral reefs in the world are degraded beyond recovery and another 30 % are seriously threatened to disappear in the near future if we don’t take radical actions. Bonaire is in a better position than other islands in the Caribbean and this fact cannot be considered a coincidence. Conservationist legislation and many years of active management of the Marine Park are the causes of the good condition of our reefs with out doubt. The Government launched a strategic plan for the future of Bonaire. This plan implies extensive development in a very sensitive area that can affect our most valued economical resource, the coral reef. Unplanned development can exacerbate problems that we already have on Bonaire. Sedimentation, storm water runoff, excessive amount of nutrients, inadequate solid garbage management, bad construction practices, deforestation, over fishing are just examples of what can happen, and the consequences to the reef are irreversible. What we kill today is gone forever and is not coming back in our lifetime. Economical development and nature preservation is possible and these two components can go along together. But for that, ALL the stakeholders need to sit together, discuses, decide and state very clearly what kind of development we want and who will be beneficiated. We need to have clear not only “WHAT” to do but also “HOW” we want to do it. Where coastal development is implemented and how it is managed influence the degree of impact to coral reef, and everybody knows what coral reefs mean for Bonaire’s people and economy. At the end of the day, we are all Managers of the Marine Park. As Cousteau said, “managing the parks is not about managing the coral reef, it is about managing ourselves”. Ramon DeLeon, Manager of the Bonaire National Marine Park T he board of the Dutch Caribbean Nature Alliance met on St. Eustatius last week for its third meeting this year. Founded February 2005, DCNA is an umbrella organization for the Marine and Terrestrial Protected Areas (Parks) in St. Eustatius, Saba, St. Maarten, Bonaire and Curaçao. Aruba is contemplating to join forces with DCNA soon and sent Egbert Boerstra from Parke Nacional Arikok to the meeting as an observer. DCNA s’ main goal is to acquire funding for sustainable Park Management in order to ensure that th e rich biodiversity of species in the Dutch Caribbean will be protected for the many years to come. At the same time, by having all park organizations represented on the board of DCNA a broad and knowledgeable platform is created which in turn will provide a healthy climate for working together, le arning from each ot her’s organizations and ultimately finding the synergy that will have a huge payoff for Nature Conservation and Preservatio n in the Caribbean. Funding DCNA is currently involved in negotiations with the Dutch Ministery of Binnenlandse Zaken and Koninkrijksrelaties to get them involved in financing nature conservation in the Caribbean as follow-up to a motion to this effect adopted by Dutch Parliament last year. The Dutch Postcode Loterij (PCL) is presently DCNA’s major contributor. With a 1.9 mil lion Euro grant over three years from the PCL, the organization will be able to sponsor important nature projects in the Caribbean, like the sea turtle outreach project on Bonaire and the Windward islands, which was funded through DCNA last year by the Truus en Gerrit van Riemsdijk Foundation, a private organization With Nature being one of the Caribbean’s most important natural resources, DCNA is not only an asset to Nature itself but also to the economic well being of all islands who thrive by the commercial exploitation of Nature. Press release DCNA Board in Statia

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Page 18 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 F our weekends of youth tennis, all sponsored by RBTT, was on the agenda of lots of Bonaire kids. Monthly competition started in September of last year, and almost 80 kids from 4-17 yearsold participated. On May 29th the top 4 in each category was decided. The finals were held on the next two weekends. The winners of the 10, 12, 14 and 18 year old age groups are promised places in the RBTT Caribbean Tournament in October in Aruba. Nearly 70 kids participated, and for four days the Harbour Village Te nnis Center boomed with children and proud parents. The final results: Winners Runners up Mini: Chananja Zijlstra – Mavelly Velandia 4-1 Mini: Ties van den OuweelenConstantijn Bottrop 4-2 Tm 8 : Kaile FiniesZaira Groenendal 4-1 Tm 8: Jevon May – Jose Alfredo Miranda 4-0 Tm 10: Amanda Thielman – Kaile Finies 4-0 Tm 10: Denzel el Hage Arnd Chirino 4-1;4-2 Tm 12: Mary-Jo LenderingChelsey Domacasse 4-1;4-1 Tm 12: Win Chung XuanKevin Abdul 4-3;4-1 Tm 14: Thammy Albertsz – Nikita van Ooijen 4-0;4-0 Tm 14: Daniel Carillo – Lothar May 4-1;4-2 Tm 18: Daniella Bissessar -----Tm 18: David Conquet – Quinsy Olij 4-2;4-2 A/B: 1/2e place: Daniel Carillo beat Francisco Valerio 8-4 A/B: 3e/4e place: Paulo Allee beat Kevin Abdul 8-4 C: 1e/2e place: Nikita van Ooijen beat Denzel el Hage 6-4 C: 3e/4e place: Damian Frans beat Max van Ooijen :6-4 D: 1e/2e place: Nadia Dabboussi beat Kaile Finies 4-0 D: 3e/4e place: Zaira Groenendal beat Keval Bissessar 4-2 E: 1e/2e place: SarahAn Maartense beat Josephine Marshall 10-9 E: 3e/4e place: Ties vd Ouweelen beat Canric Wout 10-9 This competition starts again in September; Elisabeth Vos organizes it at the Harbour Village Tennis Center. For inform ation you can reach her at tel 717-6907 or 565-5225 or e-mail at elisabeth@flamingotv.net. The competition is open for all Bonaire children starting from mini-tennis until tournament players (max, 17 years old). Elisabeth Vos Lots of Tennis for Bonaire Kids In June

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Page 19 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 THIS WEEK Friday, July 1 —Captain Dons 80th Birthday Party Celebration Saturday, July 2 —Rincon Marshé Sunday, July 3 — Lac Bay discovery boat trip. Meet at Boka di Coco (across from Mangrove/Kayak Center on dirt road to Cai) 7 am to mid-afternoon. Sponsored by “ Amigunan di Naturalesa ” (“Friends of the Environment) to benefit Bonaire participants in Vierdaagse Nijmegen (Four Day Walk at Nijmegen, Holland). Sign up at Extra newspaper office. (tel. 717-8482). Adults, NAƒ25; Children NAƒ15. See page 22. Sunday, July 3 —The Fundashon for Art and Culture will hold its 13th Annual Art Day with art exhibits, music, performing arts, food and drinks. Anyone interested in exhibiting at the event can contact volunteers at 717-6420 cell 786-6420, or email artandculture65@hotmail.com. Monday, July 4 —US holiday. Fireworks at some resorts COMING July 17-24 Diva’s Women Windsurf Week Learn to windsurf clinic Contact Ann Phelan 786-3134 or email ann@bonairewindsurfing.com www. bonairecaribbean.com 3 local scholarships still available for teen or local women. To apply contact Ann Phelan. The International Bonaire Sailing Regatta October 9 – 15, 2005 EVERY WEEK Saturday Rincon Marshé open 6 am 2 pm. Enjoy a Bonairean breakfast while you shop: fresh fruits and vegetables, gifts, local sweets and snacks, arts and handicrafts, candles, incense, drinks and music. www. infobonaire.com/rincon Sunday Live music 6 to 9 pm while enjoying a great dinner in colorful tropical ambiance at the Chibi Chibi Restaurant & Bar . Open daily 5 to 10 pm. Live Fla Bingogreat prizes, 7 pm, Divi Flamingo Monday -Soldachi Tour of Rincon, the heart of Bonaire, 9 am-noon. $20-Call Maria 717-6435 Tuesday -Harbour Village Tennis, Social Round Robin 7 to 10 pm. $10 per person. Cash bar. All invited. Call Elisabeth Vos at 565-5225 /717-7500, ext. 14. Wednesday Meditation at Donkey Beach from 7:30 to 8:30 pm. Open to all. Call S. H.Y. 790-9450 Friday -Manager’s Rum Punch Party, Buddy Dive Resort, 5:30-6:30 pm FridayOpen House with Happy Hour at the JanArt Gallery at Kaya Gloria #7, from 5-7 pm. DailyThe Divi Flamingo Casino is open daily for hot slot machines, roulette and black jack, Monday to Saturday 8 pm– 4 am; Sunday 7 pm– 3 am. Every day by appointment -Rooi Lamoenchi Kunuku Park Tours Bonairean kunuku. $12 (NAƒ12 for residents). Tel 717-8489, 540-9800. FREE SLIDE/VIDEO SHOWS SaturdayDiscover Our Diversity Slide Show, pool bar Buddy Dive, 7 pm 7175080 Sunday Bonaire Holiday Multi-media dual-projector productio n by Albert Bianculli, 8.30 pm, Capt. Don’s Habitat. Monday Dee Scarr’s Touch the Sea slide experience. Aquarius Conference Center, Capt. Don’s Habitat, 8:30–9:30pm. Wednesday (2nd and 4th) Turtle Conservation Slide Show by Andy Uhr. Carib Inn seaside veranda, 7 pm Thursday from June 16 to July 28, Basic Fish ID Yellow Submarine Dive Shop at 6:30 pm FridayWeek in Review Video Presentation by the Toucan Dive Shop at Plaza’s Tipsy Seagull , 5 pm. 717-2500. CLUBS and MEETINGS AA meetings every Wednesday ; Phone 7176105; 560-7267 or 7173902. Al-Anon meetings every Monday evening at 7 pm. Call 790-7272 Weekly BonaireTalker Gathering and Dinner at Gibi's Tuesday 6:30pm call 567-0655 for directions. Bridge Club Wednesdays , 7:30 pm at the Union Building on Kaya Korona, across from the RBTT Bank and next to Kooyman’s. All levels invited. NAƒ5 entry fee. Call Cathy 566-4056. Darts Club plays every other Sunday at City Café. Registration at 4, games at 5. Tel. 717-2950, 560-7539. JCI. First Wednesday of the MonthJunior Chamber International Bonaire (JCI Bonaire or formerly known as Bonaire Jaycees) meets at the ABVO building, Kaminda Jato Baco 36 from 7:30 to 9:30pm. Everyone is welcome. Contact: Renata Domacassé 516-4252. Kiwanis Club meets at APNA Plaza, Kaya International, every other Tuesday, 7 pm . Tel. 717-5595, Jeannette Rodriguez. Lions Club meets every 2nd and 4th Thursday of the month at 8 pm at Kaya Sabana #1. All Lions are welcome. Rotary lunch meetings Wednesday , 12 noon-2 pm Rendez-Vous Restaurant, Kaya L.D. Gerharts #3. All Rotarians are welcome. Tel. 717-8454 BONAIRE’S TRADITIONS Mangasina di Rei, Rincon . Enjoy the view from “The King’s Storehouse.” Learn about Bonaire’s culture . Visit typical homes from the 17th century. Daily. Call 717-4060 / 790-2018 Visit the Bonaire Museum on Kaya J. v.d. Ree, behind the Catholic Church in town. Open weekdays from 8 am-noon, 1:30-5 pm. Tel. 717-8868 Washington-Slagbaai National Park, Museum and Visitors’ Center. Open daily 8 am-5 pm. Closed on some holidays. 717-8444/785-0017 Sunday at Cai Live music and dancing starts about 12 noon at Lac Cai. Dance to the music of Bonaire’s popular musicians. Rincon Marshéevery Saturday 6 am to 3 pm. Open market in Bonaire’s historic town. Soldachi Tours show you the Rincon area. Alta Mira Nature Walking Tour at 6:30 am. Town Walking tour at 9:30, Bus Tour at 10 . Call Maria at 717-6435 to reserve. ****** Send events to The Bonaire Reporter Email reporter@bonairenews.com Tel/Fax. 717-8988, Cel. 791-7252 Kaya Prinses Marie Behind Exito Bakery Tel. 717-2400 Tickets NAƒ10,50 (incl. Tax) High Schoolers NAƒ7,75 NEW FILMS BEGIN FRIDAY CLOSED MONDAY TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY SATURDAY 4 PM Because of Winn-Dixie Late Show Call to make sure (Usually 9 pm ) The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (Martin Freeman) Early Show (Usually 7 pm) Kingdom of Heaven MICRO MOVIE REVIEW Seen recently in Movieland Cinema: Kingdom of Heaven by Ridley Scott starring Orlando Bloom and Liam Neeson. This is a rich, sometimes overwhelming and excellent film. Compared with Gladiator, another great film by Ridley Scott, it has the same huge scenes, incredible special effects and fantastic directing so you leave the cinema wondering what hit you. It lacks, however, the emotional attachment you experienced with the main character Maximus, played by Russel Crowe. Orlando Bloom as Balian does a fine job in Kingdom of Heaven but he never manages to get under your skin. I was pleased that this film treats religions equally. There is good and evil, fanaticism and forgiveness on both sides. I definitely recommend this film, and I will see it more than once. Dodo W e mentioned “Rafaello,” this beautiful white male kitty, a couple of weeks ago when we featured “Natasha.” It’s because the two of them are such good pals and so easy going. Supremely relaxed Rafaello has sky blue eyes which go so well with his snowy white coat. Some say that blue-eyed white cats are deaf, but this is certainly not true for Rafaello. He’s alert, can hear everything and is very much aware of his surroundings. This handsome fellow was found in Antriol and brought into the Bonaire Animal Shelter where he passed all his health and “sociability” tests! He’s had all his shots and is ready to go. As we’ve said so many times, all the animals who are up for adoption at the Shelter are in good health, have good attitudes regarding people and are, or will be, sterilized. You can’t beat a pet from the Shelter! As of June 24 there have been 82 adoptions since the first of the year. Thanks to the staff and the volunteers for consistently doing such a fine job with the resident pets! L.D. “Rafaello”

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Page 20 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 APPLIANCES/ TV/ ELECTRONICS/ COMPUTERS City Shop, the mega store, has the island’s widest selection of large and small home appliances. Fast service and in-store financing too. ART GALLERY Cinnamon Art Gallery non-profit gallery for local artists has continuous shows. Each month a new artist is featured. Stop by. Free entry. BANKS Maduro and Curiel’s Bank provides the greatest number of services, branches and ATMs of any Bonaire bank. They also offer investments and insurance. BEAUTY PARLOR Hair Affair . Expert hair cutting, styling, facials, waxing and professional nail care. BICYCLE / SCOOTER/ QUADS De Freewieler rents scooters and quads; professionally repairs almost anything on two wheels. Sells top brand bikes. Have your keys made here. BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION APA Construction are professional General Contractors. They also sp ecialize in creating patios and walkways with fabulous sprayed and stamped concrete pavement. DIVING Carib Inn is the popular 10-room inn with top-notch dive shop and well stocked retail store. Best book trade on Bonaire. Good prices on regulator repair, dive computer H.Q. Photo Tours Divers-Yellow Submarine low prices on the seaside at Kralendijk, at Caribbean Club, Caribbean Court and the Hamlet Oasis . Join their cleanup dives and BBQ. WannaDive They make diving fun while maintaining the highest professional standards. In town at City Café and at Eden Beach. FITNESS Bonfysio offers comprehensive fitness programs to suit your needs whether they be weight loss, sports or just keeping in shape. Convenient schedule. Fit 4 Life at the Plaza Resort Mall. Classes in Pilates, Aerobics, TaeBo and more. Professional trainers, fitness machines and classes for all levels. GARDEN SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Green Label has everything you need to start or maintain your garden. They can design, install and maintain it and offer plants, irrigation supplies and garden chemicals. GIFTS, SOUVENIRS AND LIQUOR The Bonaire Gift Shop has an wide selection of gifts, souvenirs, liquor, dive watches, digital cameras, things for the home, T-shirts all at low prices. HOTELS Golden Reef Inn is the affordable alternative with fully equipped studio apartments in a quiet Bonaire neighborhood. Just a 3-minute walk to diving and the sea. The Great Escape Under new management. Quiet and tranquil setting with pool and luxuriant garden in Belnem. Cyber Café, DVD rentals, restaurant and bar. METALWORK AND MACHINE SHOP b c bBotterop Construction Bonaire N.V. , offers outstanding fabrication of all metal products, including stainless. Complete machine shop too. PHOTO FINISHING Paradise Photo in the Galeries Shopping Center offers fast, fine processing for prints, slides, items and services for your picture-taking pleasure. REAL ESTATE / RENTAL AGENTS Harbourtown Real Estate is Bonaire’s oldest real estate agent. They specialize in professional customer services and top notch properties. Mike Boom & Associates Broad assortment of homes and properties. View on their website www. bonairerealty.com or office in town Re/Max Paradise Homes: International/US connections. 5% of profits donated to local community. Sunbelt Realty offers full real estate, rental, and insurance services. If you want a home or to invest in Bonaire, stop in and see them. REPAIRS Bon Handyman is here if you need something fixed or built. Ultra reliable, honest and experienced. Electrical, plumbing, woodworking, etc. 717-2345 RESORTS & ACTIVITIES Buddy Dive Resort offers diving, Adventure Fun tours including kayaking, mountain biking, cave snorkeling and exploration. RETAIL Benetton, world famous designer clothes available now in Bonaire at prices less than those in US. For men, women and children. SECURITY Special Security Services will provide that extra measure of protection when you need it. Always reliable. SHIPPING Rocargo Freight Air and sea shipments in/out of Bonaire. Customs agents. Pr ofessional and efficient. FedEx agent. SUPERMARKETS Tropical Flamingo is convenient, clean, modern, efficient and has the lowest prices on Bonaire. Located behind NAPA. Visit Warehouse Bonaire to shop in a large, spotless supermarket. You’ll find American and European brand products. THE market for provisioning. VILLAS Bonaire Oceanfront villa for up to nine people: five kitchens, five bathrooms. Ideal for divers. WATER TAXI Get to Klein Bonaire by Ferry. Ride the Kantika di Amor or Skiffy . Hotel pickup. WINES Antillean Wine Company. You’ve tried the rest; now try the best: best prices, highest quality wines from around the world, kept in a cooled warehouse. Free delivery. YOGA Yoga For You . Join certified instructors Desirée and Don for a workout that will refresh mind and body. Private lessons too. Closed during June. ATTENTION BUSINESSMEN/WOMEN: Put your ad in The Bonaire Reporter. Phone/Fax 717-8988, Cel 791-7252 RESTAURANT PRICE RANGE / WHEN OPEN FEATURES Want your restaurant listed here? It’s easy and not expensive Call The Reporter at 717-8988 or 791-7252 for info Bella Vista Restaurant Sea Side Restaurant at Buddy Dive Resort 717-5080, ext. 525 Moderate. Breakfast and Lunch Dinner during Theme nights only. Open every day Magnificent Theme Nights : Saturday: Beach Grill; Monday: Caribbean Night; Friday: Manager’s Rum Punch Party and All-You-Can-Eat B.B.Q Bistro de Paris Kaya Gob. N. Debrot 46 (half-way between hotel row and town) 717-7070 Moderate Lunch and Dinner Closed Sunday Real French Cooking in an informal setting Superb dishes prepared with care and love by a French chef Owner-operated Eat in or Take away Brasserie Bonaire Royal Palm Galleries Kaya Grandi 26, Next to Re/Max, 717-4321 LowModerate Lunch and Dinner Open 11 am -2:30 pm 5:30-9 pm Closed Saturday and Sunday Lots of parking in big mall lot Kitchen Open 11am-2:30 pm, Dinner 5:30-9 pm Breezy terrace with airco inside—Also serving big sandwiches at dinner Calabas Restaurant & Chibi Chibi Restaurant and Bar At the Divi Flamingo Beach Resort. Waterfront 717-8285 Moderate-Expensive Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Open 7 days Get a view of the beach and turquoise sea while enjoying a breakfast buffet or à la carte lunch and dinner at the 'Chibi Chibi' restaurant & bar. Inspiring vistas and the highest standard of cuisine . Croccantino Italian Restaurant Downtown at Kaya Grandi 48 717-5025 Moderate-Expensive Dinner Closed Monday Tuscan chef prepares exquisite dishes. Authentic ingredients and romantic setting make dining a delight. Be served in a garden setting under floating umbrellas or in air-conditioned comfort. Take out too. Den Laman On the water, just off the traffic circle 717-4106 Moderate-Expensive Breakfast, Lunch Dinner Open 7 days Creative cuisine on the seaside . Top chefs from Amsterdam cook in an open modern kitchen featuring induction cooking. Seafood a specialty. The Great Escape EEG Blvd #97—across from Belmar 717-7488 Moderate Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner Open 7 days Bar-Restaurant poolside —under the thatched roof. Cuban Chef prepares Caribbean cuisine. Champagne brunch on Sundays 10 am to noon. Happy hours 5 to 7 every day. Hilltop at Caribbean Club Bonaire On the Tourist Road, 2 mi. north of Town 717-7901 Moderate-Expensive Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Closed Sunday Quiet country setting, lovely landscaping, friendly staff Happy Hour from 5-7 pm, BBQ on Tuesdays Gourmet chef creates unique daily specials The Last Bite Bakery Home Delivery or Take Out 717-3293 Low-Moderate Orders taken 8 am-4 pm; Deliveries 6-7:30 pm , Closed Sunday Enjoy a delicious dessert or savory baked meal in the comfort of your home or resort. This unique bakery offers gourmet class items -always from scratchfor take out or delivery only. The Lost Penguin Across from MCB Bank in downtown Kralendijk Call 717-8003. Low-Moderate Breakfast, Lunch, Early Dinner Closed Tuesdays & Wednesdays Watch the bustle of downtown from this street side Caribbean-style bistro owned and run by a European educated Master Chef and his wife. Pasa Bon Pizza On Kaya Gob. Debrot ½ mile north of town center. 790-1111 Low-Moderate Open from 5-11 pm Wednesday-Sunday Bonaire’s best. The Real Thing! Freshly prepared pizzas made with the finest ingredients. Salads, desserts. Eat in or take away. Nice bar too. Call ahead to eat-in or take out 790-1111

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Page 21 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 H e arrives with his wife, parmesan cheese, ham, a bottle of Merlot and a pizza; “That’s what my father always told me: ‘Never come empty-handed, bring a flower or some wine!” He sits at the table, opens the bottle and fills up the glasses, toasts ‘salud’ and starts telling his story: “I was having severe health problems in Venezuela and when the company sent me to Bonaire it was for a year, to see how it went. I stayed the year and have been here ever since! I came with my wife, Luisa, and our son Hernan Arturo, who was seven years old. Luisa was okay the first year, because she saw herself as a ‘tourist,’ but afterwards it was very difficult for her to adapt.” “We came first for a weekend with little Arturo and we stayed at the Sunset Beach Hotel,” Luisa says, “I thought the countryside was beautiful, but I was very worried about the quietness; I became anxious and wondered: ‘where are the people?’” She laughs : “Now I’ve gotten used to it, maybe because I myself got quieter over the years!” “It’s remarkable”, Hernan says , “many times I’m working on Sundays, sitting at my office at Seguros Orinoco’s and through the window I see the street where the post office is; it’s not an exception when I see one car passing by in a whole hour! Well, when we came, little Hernan Arturo went to St. Bernardus School and he did very well. He spoke English as in Caracas he had been going to Jefferson, a very well recommended American School. Hernan Arturo already had two languages in his head, so the third and the fourth were easy. We lived in Sabana, in a house that first belonged to the company, but which I bought later on. I liked it here very much. I was born in 1948 in an oil camp in Quiriquire in the state of Monagas, Venezuela. I was the eldest, after me two brothers and two sisters were born. My father worked for the Creole Petroleum Company. For 30 years he was a welder, underwater in the sea, but also on land. The company camp was like a village; thousands of people were living there, they had the most fantastic hospital, there was a social club and they organized everything fo r the children, like bowling, baseball and football. There was only one thing that was wrong: The children of the people that belonged to the staff got English classes and the children of the blue collar workers didn’t. It was a shame and it was discrimination. That’s why I found it so important for my son to learn languages. I myself have had many problems in my work and in my travels as I only speak Spanish. I didn’t want that for my son, I wanted him to be prepared. When we got the opportunity I bought the house in Quiriquire; we made it much bigger and my mother still lives there several months of the year. I stayed until 1965, and then I went to Caracas to study physics and mathematics at the University. In 1969 the University was closed and June 8th 1970, I began to work for Seguros Orinoco, an insurance company. Two weeks ago, 35 years to the day that I joined the company, I phoned the man who had hired me, Hernan Rebolledo, who is now 80 years old and still working as the president of another insurance company. He was delighted to hear from me, and he told me I was the only one in all those years who’d ever done a thing like that. But my motto is: give – receive – return. That’s what I go by and if 50% of the world was like that, life on earth would be something else. Another very important person in my life was the late Dr. Julio Sosa, one of the three founders of Seguros Orinoco and the man who brought me here. I never met anyone like him; I admired him very much and I will always be grateful to him. There have been other people who have been very important to me and I owe them so much, but I can’t turn this story into a list of names.’ Hernan Longat is an extremely energetic hard-working man, but also a man who enjoys all the good things in life. If you know him, you’ re lucky, because he’s a person you can always rely on; by experience I know that’s he’s someone who will go out of his way to help people. “When I was hired I started doing administration work, but by the time I arrived on Bonaire I was the director of the branch on Bonaire and Curaçao and also director of Seguros Guyana, a sister company in Venezuela. I hired Luisa as my secretary when I was 35. She was 22 and she fell in love with me, and I loved and still love everything about her! Fatal attraction! Within a year we were married! A year before I’d bought my apartment in Caracas, now my mother, who is 88 years old, lives there most of the year, together with my sister. That’s what I miss here; not the music or the food, you have everything on Bonaire, but I do miss my mother, my family and my friends!” “Hernan has a lot of personality,” Luisa says, “he wanted to better himself and he struggled, doing his utmost to achieve; that’s a big attraction for me somebody with drive… who gets places. He remembers everything from years ago, I don’t and I got lazy because I have him!” “You have to exercise your memory,” Hernan says, “especially because I earn my living using my mind. I like everything about my job; it has all kinds of things: administration, especially the, buying and selling, P.R., dealing with the public and the traveling. I’m always working. If they don’t find me for anything at the office, they come to my house; I know half the island, the other half knows me! However, the most important things in my life are number 1, my family, number 2, my family and number 3, my family; but I also have a special place in my heart for my friends. I’m working for my family, I am also a workaholic, but if I’m producing, they will do better! Hernan Arturo is now 21 years old, for three years he’s been working and studying in Curaçao. He lives on his own and it was good that he went, but we’ve been always near. It was very easy to raise my son. He’s a fine example with no vices; he doesn’t smoke or drink, no youth problems, and he’s very serious. He can fend for himself wherever he goes, and now that he’s going to Florida to study to become a pilot, we are very, very proud of him and we expect a lot from him. I’m seeing him very often and I give Luisa space; she can go whenever she wants. “I like to be at my house”, Luisa says , “Hernan is always working, so I’m spending a lot of time alone since Arturo left. I have some friends here, but not many, as I am very choosy and I don’t like to see somebody every day. I divide my time between family in Caracas, my son in Curaçao and my husband in Bonaire. Hernan and I are completely different; what I like he doesn’t care for! I like the opera, the movies and all kinds of music. Before I met Hernan I was a soprano in the chorale of the Orquesta Filarmonica de Venezuela and I studied classical harp. He likes his TV and his computer and he knows all about European politics! But he’s a great cook, that’s his passion and I love to eat what he cooks!” “I’m looking for a piano for Luisa,” Hernan says , ‘”so if anyone who reads this knows about a piano, pass by the office or give me a call! I cannot imagine retirement as I cannot imagine my life without work; I’m used to producing. It always depends how things are going in Venezuela, the States and Europe, bu t seeing the situation as it is now: Here we have tranquility; the islands are good for the oldies… people are healthy here… I will always stay on Bonaire.” Greta Kooistra “ My motto is: give – receive – return. That’s what I go by and if 50% of the world was like that, life on earth would be something else.” Greta Kooistra 1989 Hernan Longat

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Page 22 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 I t all started as a hobby – one man’s hobby. I used to play golf in Holland before coming to Bonaire. Then, when I was planning a trip back to Holland after nine years I wanted to play golf with my friends. But since it had been so long since I’d played, I wanted to be prepared. So I thought, “I’ll find a spot where nobody can see me practice – somewhere far away.” I ended up on the east coast at Punto Blanco where the chicken farm is. There, in the middle of nowhere, I saw an old stone wall and on the other side of the wall there was a green field! It was perfect! “Piedra So” (“Just Stones”), the Bonairean Golf Club was born. Before I knew it, the word was out and other people got involved. They started working hard on making the course professional and building a clubhouse. Now it’s an 18-hole golf link by the seaside. It takes about three to four hours to walk the whole course. There’s a driving range with driving range balls available. On the first tee are concrete tee boxes. The fourth hole has two bunkers on each side. The fifth hole has a water hazard, and there are lots of bushes and cacti to lose your ball in. While you play, a group of donkeys or goats may be observing your progress. It’s a unique spot. The environment is beautiful. It’s like playing on the moon. It can’t be compared to anywhere else in the world. There are about 40 members. Once a month a golf pro from Curaçao, Louis Cannegieter, comes to teach for two days. He gives clinics for beginners too. Since the start of the year three instructors have been teaching 10 teens from Jong Bonaire. The members would like to see more people play golf – youngsters, older people, and tourists of all nationalities. Golf sets are available for rent and transport can be arranged to and from the course. Piedra So is not trying to compete with other places. This is not Miami or Aruba. This is not a smooth terrain, and it’s not a fancy club. But it is a whole new experience. It’s sand and sea grass, the sound of the sea, an eternal wind. It’s literally out of this world: unusual, extraordinary and adventurous. If you’ve been playing golf in other parts of the world – if you think you’ve “seen it all,” come to Piedra So and discover what it feels like to play golf on Bonaire. For more information go to our website: www.piedraso.com (in Dutch). Tel. 717-7972. Artie DeVries A fter receiving a report from Buddy Dive yesterday afternoon that they had seen a large loggerhead turtle at the Monk’s Haven dive site off Klein Bonaire, staff of Sea Turtle Conservation Bonaire and volunteers found the large female later that evening and successfully affixed a satellite transmitter to her carapace. The female loggerhead has a shell length of 99 cm and is estimated to weigh about 130 kg. The turtle was found near the Southwest Corner dive site at approximately 6:20 pm and released back into the water after the tagging, measurement and transmitter application procedures. Adult loggerhead turtles come to Bonaire to breed from May through July. ‘Happy’ is expected to remain in the area and lay one or more nests before departing to her home feeding grounds. Tracking of this turtle is being made possible by a full sponsorship provided by the Rotterdam Zoo. The Zoo has decided to call her ‘Happy’. ‘Happy’ is the second turtle fitted with a satellite transmitter this year. On 8 June, the first of these transmitters was attached on a large adult male hawksbill turtle. The yet to be named turtle is still in the area around Klein Bonaire. Sea Turtle Conservation Bonaire works to ensure the protection and recovery of Bonaire's sea turtle populations throughout their range. Founded in 1992, the STCB is a Bonaire-based, non-governmental (NGO) and non-profit organization, part of the Wider Caribbean Sea Turtle Conservation Network. Contact: Mabel Nava, Sea Turtle Conservation Bonaire, telephone 599 717 2225 and 790 0433, e-mail stcb@bonaireturtles.org for more information. press release Volunteers Isaiah J. Pardo, Jose Bernabela, Andy Uhr and STCB staff Gielmon “Funchi” Egbreghts releasing the adult female loggerhead fitted with a transmitter sponsored by the Rotterdam Zoo. Mabel Nava photo

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Page 23 Bonaire Reporter July 1 to July 8, 2005 *to find it, just look up For the week: July 1 to July 8, 2005 By Astrologer Michael Thiessen ARIES (Mar. 21April 20) You have to take hold of your life and make some crucial decisions. Don't hesitate to look for alternatives that will enable you to raise the kind of donations you need to do the job right. Relatives may be less than easy to deal with. Don't make large purchases unless you have discussed your choices with your mate. Your lucky day this week will be Saturday. TAURUS (Apr. 21May 21) Now is a good time to ask for favors. Investments are best left alone this week. You will gain valuable insight and knowledge through the experiences you have along the way. Enjoy the company of relatives this week. Your lucky day this week will be Friday. GEMINI (May 22-June 21) Be careful not to misplace your wallet or belongings. You must try to lay your cards on the table. Talk to your mate and tell them how you feel. Secret affairs may only cause complications in your life. Your energetic nature and ability to initiate projects will add to your popularity. Your lucky day this week will be Friday. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Don't let your partner start any arguments. Passion should be redirected positively. Arguments with children or friends may leave you steaming. You may find that your emotional partner will not be too eager to accommodate you. You may cause a fuss if you come on too strongly in public. Your lucky day this week will be Friday. LEO (July 23-Aug 22) Try to avoid serious discussions with loved ones. You will be highly sensitive to comments ma de by your lover. Make decisions about your professional objectives. Mingle with those who can help you get ahead. Your lucky day this week will be Monday. VIRGO (Aug. 23 -Sept. 23) Emotional situations could bring out your stubborn nature. Be honest with yourself before getting involved with someone who is likely to lead you on. Organize all the responsibilities that have to be attended to and make sure everyone knows what to do. This is not the time to lend or borrow money or possessions. Your lucky day this week will be Wednesday. LIBRA (Sept. 24 -Oct. 23) Compromise may be necessary. Don't hesitate to look for alternatives that will enable you to raise the kind of donations you need to do the job right. You are best to move quickly and to get in good with the boss. Don't reveal information that is personal or confidential. Your lucky day this week will be Monday. SCORPIO (Oct. 24 Nov. 22) Your talent will be recognized. Problems with appliances or electrical gad gets will drive you crazy. Refrain from overspending on entertainment or luxury items. Be careful how you handle friends and relatives, they may take things the wrong way. Your lucky day this week will be Wednesday. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23 -Dec. 21) Get involved in activities that will bring you knowledge about foreign lands, philosophies, or cultures. Relatives may be less than easy to deal with. Females may put demands or added responsibilities on you. Do not get involved with individuals who are already committed to others. Your lucky day this week will be Tuesday. CAPRICORN (Dec 22.Jan. 20) Deception in your home is evident. Don't beat around the bush. Get involved in volunteer work that will bring you satisfaction, not an empty wallet. It will do you some good. You will be in the doghouse if you are being selfish. Your lucky day this week will be Monday. AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 -Feb. 19) Watch your weig ht gain due to water retention. Visitors may be likely to drop by. You have to let go of your past if you wish to get out of any sentimental mood that might be hanging over your head. Try to be honest when dealing with your mate. Your lucky day this week will be Wednesday. PISCES (Feb. 20-Mar. 20) Don't let relatives make demands of you. Your health may have suffered due to neglect or abuse. Try to be as mellow as possible. Be prepared to make changes to your personal documents. Your lucky day this week will be Monday. The First Ten Days of July Are Fantastic for Planet Gazers M ark the first 10 days of July as fantastic nights for planet gazing because we'll have Mercury, Venus and Jupiter in a spectacular early evening planet s how! On Friday, July 1st, about an hour after sunset during evening twilight, face west where you'll still be able to see the best planet duo of the year. Planet #1 out from the sun, the tiny 3,000 mile wide pink planet Mercury, will be huddled right next to the brightest planet of them all, planet #2, 8,000 mile wide Venus. And they will be only one degree apart, which means you could well cover both of them with your pinky finger stretched at arm's length. In fact, they were less than one degree ap art all throughout the last days of June and will continue to be extremely close through the first week of July. Although they are absolutely fabulous to see with the naked eye, if you have a pair of binoculars, use them this weekend and all next week because rarely do we have a chance to see any two planets so close together. On Saturday they'll be only one and one-tenth of a degree apart, and on Sunday they'll be only one and a quarter de gree apart. On the night of the 4th, before the fire works start, make sure you see them because they'll still be only one and a third degrees apart. On Tuesday, the 5th, they're still only one and a half degrees from each other, and on Wednesday still extremely close. Then on Thursday, the 7th, something new is added to the scene becau se they are joined by an exquisitely thin crescent Moon complete with earthshine which will look like a black full Moon nestled within the crescent. Then on Friday, the 8th, youÂ’ll observe the most sp ectacular planetary sight of July. An even more exquisite crescent Mo on will be parked right above Venus and Mercury. They will knock your socks off with just the naked eye, but if you look at them through a pair of binoculars you won't believe it! By Saturday, the 9th, the Moon will have moved past Venus and Mercury and will be parked very close to Regulus the brightest star of Leo the Lion, and by Sunday, the 10th, will have moved just beyond it. So start your Mercury, Venus watch this weekend and look for them before the fireworks on the 4th of July. Then continue watching each night. Remember that Friday, the 8th is the best night of them all! On Saturday, the 9th, the Moon is parked to the right of Regulus and on Sunday, the 10th, up to its left. But please, please don't miss Friday the 8th which I consider the best night for planet gazing for all of July. And of course we don't want to leave out the planet king Jupiter who will be well up and to the left of Regulus although not quite as bright as Venus but will still dazzle you with his bril liance. If you want to appear really smart on July 4th, casually show your friends planet #1, planet #2 and planet #5. What a way to begin the month of July. Jack Horkheimer



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P.O. Box 407, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles, Phone 790-6518, 7 86-6518, www.bonairereporter.com email: reporter@bonairenews.com Since 1994 On-line every day, 24/7 Printed every fortnight Laura DeSalvo photo

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Page 2 Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 I t's the 10th Year of Celebration of the Christmas Market in Rincon on Saturday, December 19. During the traditional Christmas Market in Rincon there the 10-year anniversary will be celebrated with stand holders, Rinconeros and visitors. This marshé will replace the normal Saturday early morning market. During this Christmas Market there will be stands selling products and articles as gifts especially for the season, and visitors will be able to shop among sparking lights. There will also be music for the end of the year, krioyo music and Christmas carols. The Marshé will be open from 4 pm until 11 pm. As usual the Christmas Market will have a festive ambiance, colorful decoration and be full of lights. Ten years ago the Rinfa women’s club established a permanent marshé in the Rincon barrio square to develop Rincon socially and economically. Many area residents have been coming to the marshé on the first Saturday of every month to offer their products. If you are interested in having a stand to participate in the marshé, contact as soon as possible: Dorothy Cecilia (cel 796-9046) or Raymunda Anthonie (7173696). Maritza San Pedro, translation by Laura DeSalvo The Bonaire Hotel and Tourism Association ( BONHATA) announced its new Board of Directors for the term 2010 & 2011 Executive Board: President – Ms. Sara Matera, Divi Flamingo Beach Resort & Casino Vice President – Mr. Jack Chalk, Captain Don’s Habitat Secretary/Treasurer – Mr. Dirk Jan Methorst, Jibe City Directors at Large Mr. Serge de Groote, Divi Dive Mr. Martin van Bekkum, Kontiki Beach Bonaire Mr. Huub Groot, Restaurant It Rains Fishes Mr. Gilberto Lira, Sand Dollar Condominium Resort Mrs. Anja Romeijnders, Sunbelt Realty Mr. Bart Snelder, Wannadive. BONHATA has a membership of 76, comprising resorts, hotels, apartments, diving companies, car rentals, restaurants and other tourism related businesses on Bonaire. On Wednesday, December 3, work on the culvert under Kaya Grandi was finally completed and the road reopened to traffic. It will provide relief from street flooding in times of heavy rain and will minimize runoff into the sea. Additional upstream work is planned for next year. Bonaire’s Public Library, Biblioteka publiko, suffers every year because many of its books get “lost.” Why? The books are not returned or forgotten. After a while there is the fear of having to pay high fines or perhaps embarrassment. Since 2007 over 1,200 books have gone missing. Unfortunately, most people do not realize how precious a book is. The average price of a book is around NAƒ 50. But it’s not only the material value that is important. Knowledge is lost. The dwindling collection is detrimental to the library and ultimately affects the community. Biblioteka publiko has tried everything to recover the missing books. Reminder cards are sent, fines are cut, but nothing helped. Until now. Table of Contents This Week’s Stories Bonaire Reporter Question 2 Getting Ready For The Referendum (UN visit) 3 Guest Editorial– Cooperation Not Confrontation 6 Eat Healthy (Nature’s Way) 6 Santa Family Day/ Hamburger Contest 8 Christmas Market 8 Straw Poll -Staten and Referendum 9 Tina Woodley Returns 9 Lionfish on Bonaire 10 Reef Windows-Capt. Don’s New Book 11 Swimming World Cup in 2011? 11 Sanikolas Arrives 12 Jan Lambada Bouwman Obituary 13 Letters to the Editor— Nature Above Money, Cruise Ships, Survey Comments 14 Culture of the Indian Art Show (Booi, Dania) 14 Shelter Auction Dinner 15 Altimira Unjo Moonlight Walk 15 Affordable Homes Expo 19 CIEE Presentations 20 Klein Bonaire 10 years 20 10 Years Green Label 22 Polluted Wells 22 Plane Recovery Problems 22 Departments Flotsam & Jetsam 2 On the Island Since (Ana & Eugene Makaai) 4 Bonairean Voices (School Nutrition ) 7 Sudoku Puzzle 7 Bon Quiz #19 (Fort Oranje) 7 Pet of the Week (Oscar) 15 Picture Yourself (South Africa) 16 Classifieds 16 Tide Table 16 Reporter Masthead 17 What’s Happening 17 Shopping & Service Guides 18 BonQuiz Answer 19 Sudoku Answer 19 Bonaire On Wheels (Chevy Impala) 21 Sky Park (Geminids, find Nepttune) 23 The Stars Have It 23 How to contact us Letters to the Editor: Reporter@bonairenews.com Story tip or idea: info@bonairenews.com The Publisher: George@bonairenews.com Box 407, Bonaire, Neth. Antilles. Phone 790-8988 Phone 790-6518 / 786-6518 Available on-line at: www.bonairereporter.com Printed Every Fortnight, On-line Every day, 24/7 Next edition printing on December 22, 2009. Story and Ad deadline: December 18, 2009. SCOOTER & BIKE SALES & REPAIR Peugeot, Kymco Loekie, Giant Gazelle Brands Parts and accessories for any brand scooter or bike Bike Clothes for Everyone Kaya Grandi #61 Across from INPO Open: 8:30-12:30, 2:00-5:30 Owner Operated freewieler@flamingotv.net A Bonaire Reporter Question In the previous edition of The Reporter we asked our readers to indicate their preference for the type of information released to promote Bonaire. The table at the right shows the results to date. Choosing what information to release can be difficult. Obviously, everyone wants to report the good news. But what about crime, environmental damage, political shenanigans, or illnesses that all affect both the island’s people and their important guests, the tourists. We posed the question to our readers: What is the most effectiv e way to promote Bonaire? 1. Present only good news 2. Present all news 3. Present good news and only the not-so-good-news that has been “okayed” by island tourism authorities The results to date are indicated above and include Internet poll and other responses. The question will remain open until December 21, 2009. You can go on line to www.bonairereporter.com to click your answer, email to reporter@bonairenews.com or mail to Reporter, Box 407, Bonaire Nether lands Antilles. Phone (599) 7906518 or (599) 786-6518. For that reason, the library created DRAW BOOKS. How does it work? Anyone who brings back library books that should have been long since returned, receives a free ticket for each book. The more books that someone brings back, the more tickets that person receives and the greater the chance to win prizes of great new books. For additional information, contact Sharon Bol at 717-8944 The next mountain bike tour in Washington Slagbaai National Park is on Sunday, December 20. This tour is for riders of all levels of experience, for beginners, intermediate, and advanced riders. More advanced/ experienced riders can begin and end their tour in Kralendijk, about 80 km. There will be assistance in the Park with a pick-up truck in case participants get tired so they can catch a ride. Cost is $14.50 per person and includes a sandwich, drinks, and fruit but not the Park fee. For more information, visit www.bonairewellness.com , email info@ bonairewellness.com, or phone +599 717-4241 or 785-0767. For the holidays Chat 'n' Browse is offering 15 minutes of free Internet service when customers reference "Welcome 2009" during the holidays. This gives travelers the perfect opportunity to stay in touch with those back home. For more information, visit www.chatnbrowse.com or email info@chatnbrowse.com. What better gift for the holiday that being able to heal yourself and others? You can do it when you master the techniques of Healing Touch. The Foundation Healing Touch World-(Continued on page 8) What type of news best promotes Bonaire? All News Good News Only Good news and ONLY the notso-good-news that has been “okayed” by island tourism authorities 89% 3% 8% Real Bonairean cuisine at the Marshé

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Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 Page 3 T he Bonaire Government invited several experts to provide perspective and advice on the conduct of the incoming Referendum on the future type of government that Bonaire voters will select . Despite the fact that the outcome of the Referendum is non binding, it is being taken very seriously and will be run under United Nations guidelines. On Saturday, November 28, Dr. Carlyle Corbin, the former mini ster in charge of foreign relations for the US Virgin Islands and an international advisor on political structure and UN Caribbean and Pacific treaty issues, met with Bonaire government officials to offer his expertise. He discussed alternative choices for Bonaire’s upcoming referendum. He visited at the invitation of the Executive Council. Following the closed-door meetings he was interviewed by the press in a conference in the Pasangrahan. Representatives from Papiamentu, Dutch and English language newspapers were present. Dr. Corbin talked at length about the differences and similarities between integration of a former colony with the “mother country” and a free association following the release of colonial ties. He said that integration can take several forms as could a free association which is also is a legitimate political status recognized in 1960 by th e UN under article 1541. The essence of his message was "People have a right to be consulted once again (in a referendum)... after they have been given more information." When asked if the present Dutch position of “if the past agreement to integrate ( laso direkto ) is rejected, then the only choice Holland will give Bonaire is to become independent” is legitimate, he answered, “Well, it is a good bargaining position to start with.” He went on to say that if Bonaire felt they were unreasonably treated they could appeal to the UN General Assembly—a very serious step for both parties. G.D. During the following week, Mansour Sadeghi and Peter Eicher of the UN’s Electoral Support Department held meetings with members of the Executive Council, political parties, the press and others. The UN advisors said they were NOT here to approve or disapprove but for advice. Their goal is to insure that the referendum meets minimum international standards. The UN is very interested in knowing what are the referendum questions being asked and how are they phrased. They want to be sure there are clear definitions of the options. They want to know that the process is impartial, transparent and neutral. The UN also wants to know that the public is adequately informed. The advisors feel there needs to be an unbiased informational program of at least one month but probably not more than two months to insure that the public knows all the options and what they might mean. Attendees to the stakeholder session were also very interested in unbiased education on the options before the referendum. Another UN concern is that no citizens be left out of the voting. This is a question that the UN is discussing with the local politicians and feels very strongly that there should be no disenfranchisement of Dutch citizens. The UN prefers universal voting rights and wants to see the voting with as few limits as possible. One of the voting restrictions being considered by the government is that local Dutch citizens must have five years of uninterrupted residency on the island before they can vote. “This is a ‘Red Flag” for the UN,” the experts said. The UN says it recommends against this restriction and recommends “extreme caution” on any limits of citizens. Stakeholders also pointed out that Antilleans who move to Holland do not have to wait five years to vote. On the question of whether the age limit should be 16 or 18, the UN did not have a strong position. The UN feels the community should decide at what age a person is considered an “adult” and that there is no international standard on this point. On the question of whether Bonaireans in other parts of the world should be allowed to vote, the UN said this has become a difficult question because there is no such thing as “Bonairean” citizenship. The question arises whether anyone born on Bonaire would be considered Bonairean vs. someone who moved here when he was two months old. The UN seems to feel that this particular question is too complicated to deal with for the coming election and that it would not be included in the options. (Continued on page 19) Governor Thodé with Dr. Carlyle Corbin UN Advisors Mansour Sadeghi & Peter Eicher

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Page 4 Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 “W hen I was a child, my family emigrated from Portugal to Venezuela to look for better opportunities. My father came to Bonaire first as he was working for Techno Consult, the company that built the Sonesta Hotel on Bonaire, which is now Harbor Village. In 1988 it became very dangerous in Venezuela and we moved to Bonaire. I was 14. It was a beautiful safe haven. Our upbringing was very strict, but my dad liked to go to the casino and he and his friends would take me with them for good luck! That’s how I met Eugene. He was a dealer at the casino at the Flamingo Beach Hotel and he was 19.” She smiles. “He was very congenial. When I was 15 I was working for Bonaire Trading. On weekends my sisters and I would go swimming at Flamingo Beach and one day Eugene took us home and my father called him in. That’s how it started and it became serious. We were very much in love, but in a totally innocent way. However, my parents were against it. I was 17 when my dad told me, ‘You are going to Portugal for three months and you forget about the Negro.’ I said, ‘No, I love him.’ It was the first time in my life that I didn’t obey my parents. The next day I went to see Eugene’s mother and told her we wanted to get married. Eugene was 21 and I was 17 and his mom said ‘No problem.’ So, Eugene’s parents went to see my parents to ask them if their son could marry their daughter. My parents got very angry with me. They thought I was pregnant. I didn’t say a word. Eugene and I didn’t have any physical relationship. The next day my father told me, ‘Get married before the baby comes.’ My mom flew to Portugal to get my birth certificate, but when she came back she noticed that I was as slim as I was before. Well, to make a long story short, we did get married.” She looks at Eugene and he says, “ We were happy, but it was hard, because there were many relatives in both families who didn’t agree with it.” Ana gets up to help a client and when she comes back she says, “ Eugene started working for BOPEC and one year after we got married he became ill. We went to see all the doctors on the island, but they all thought it was a stomach problem. It went rapidly; he became very thin and my mom said to me, ‘Something is really wrong – your husband is going to die…’ Then one day, Eugene and I and his parents went to the hospital and – that’s how I see it – our life is determined by God, because that particular day a Dutch doctor was visiting this trainee who was examining Eugene and while this trainee was busy with Eugene the doctor immediately told us, ‘Eugene’s kidneys are in very bad shape.’ The next morning Eugene was to be transported by ambulance plane to Curaçao. And as always in our life we barely made it because the pilot had just broken his wrist, but nevertheless he did fly the plane!’ Eugene explains : “We arrived at Hato airport in Curaçao and I was already unconscious because my blood was poisoned and my lungs were filled with fluid. Then the ambulance that was supposed to pick us up was having car trouble. When it finally arrived, the pilot and I both got in, together…!’ He laughs. “ What a situation! Ayayay!” Ana says, “The specialist in (Continued on page 5) “ ….at the Virgin of Fatima. Wh en we were at that sacred place, I crawled on my knees to the Virgin and prayed to her to fulfill our wish and help us with our situation.” ROCARGO SERVICES, N.V. International Freight (Car) BV The ONLY company offering direct weekly consolidation services from Europe/Holland to Bonaire www.ifc-consolidators.nl Jupiterweg 1A (Ecopark) 4761 RW Moerdijk, Holland Tel 31-(0) 168-40-94 94 Fax 31-(0) 168-40 94 70 Offering DAILY Express Services from and to Bonaire For shipment tracking www.fedex.com The World On Time Kaya Industria 12, KralendijkBonaire—N.A. 717-8922 FAX 717-5791 Email:info@rocargo.com Amcar Freight, Inc. The ONLY company offering direct weekly consolidation services from Miami, USA to Bonaire www.amcarfreight.com 7860 N.W. 80th Street Medley, Florida 33166 Tel. (305) 599-8866 Fax (305) 599-2808 For All Your Shipping Needs Full service door to door by air and by sea. Customs clearance, transportation, warehousing. International and local relocation. Packing material in stock. Qualified and professional personnel. Timely, accurate and reliable ISO 9001: 2000 Certified Eliana, Eugene and Ana Makaii

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Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 Page 5 Curaçao, Dr. Engels, told me we’d barely made it. It took the doctors a lot of effort to get him stabilized and then we discussed the future with the specialist. He told us about a method called CAPD: they put a permanent catheter in the peritoneum and every four hours, 24 hours per day, you put another bag of a concentrated liquid to flush the person. We could stay home and live our ‘normal’ life with this method without having to go to Curaçao three times a week to have him hooked up to the machine.” She looks at me. “I really, really hope a kidney dialyses centre will be established on the island soon. It’s a hard life for the people suffering from kidney failure.” Ana, Eugene and Eliana are very pure and absolutely beautiful people. Their story is one about true love and about never giving up, never giving in and at the same time accepting the way life comes to you. “Ana learned how to take care of me,” Eugene recalls . “She was my nurse, my doctor, my wife… my everything. I went to the States with my sister to see if I could be a candidate for a transplant. After all the tests, they told me I would make a good candidate, but being a foreigner, there was only a small chance I could get a kidney. So I went back to Dr. Engels in Curaçao and told him I wanted to go to Holland. Dr. Engels told me I wouldn’t survive the flight and that time was running out on me. I asked another doctor for a second opinion and he told me I would make a good candidate and that I should go to Holland. Thank God I had very good insurance with BOPEC. In November 1993 we flew to Holland.” Ana looks at me quietly. “ I still have Dr. Engels’ letter in which he wrote me that Eugene wouldn’t live to be 25, that he wasn’t a good candidate for a transplant and that we never would have children…” Tears well up in her eyes and she smiles. “ It was God who decided differently. We had been trying to get pregnant for a long time, but it didn’t work out. In December 1993 we went to see my parents in Portugal and they told us to see the Virgin of Fatima. When we were at that sacred place, I crawled on my knees to the Virgin and prayed to her to fulfill our wish and help us with our situation. By the end of March 1994 I felt sick and went to see the doctor, he did a test and told me, ‘Mrs. Makaai, you are three months pregnant! It was a miracle of God.” “Our beautiful, sweet and healthy daughter Eliana was born November 10th 1994,” Eugene says . “So much happiness, it made me strong and I felt I will never give up, never, ever. I still didn’t have a new kidney, but life went on. I started to study at Nautical College in Katwijk, Holland, to become a nautical officer – something I’d dreamed of all my life and I wanted to make my dream come true. I was flushing, studying and helping Ana to take care of the baby as she was working two, sometimes even three jobs. We didn’t see much of each other, but it was always Ana who pulled us through, who pushed me to go on, and without her my wife I wouldn’t be anything, I would not be here anymore.” “May 1995,” Ana continues, “ Eugene was offered a kidney, but he couldn’t accept it, because his peritoneum was infected and his blood pressure way too high. Again I went to see the Virgin of Fatima and again I went on my knees. In the beginning of 1996 Eugene’s health was deteriorating rapidly – I was desperate and prayed to God. Then on May 27th, 1996, they called us to say they had a kidney. That same day Eugene was operated at the University Hospital in Leiden. When he came out of the operation I took his hand. It was pink and warm and I knew everything was okay. It took him three months to recover – the only time he didn’t go to school. He got his diploma in 1999 and from that time on until 2004 Eugene worked as a nautical officer, sailing around the world.” “January 2nd, 2005, I started working at Curaçao Port Authority as a captain on a bunker bars,” Eugene says . “Two months later Ana joined me and started working for an internet company. Eliana was with Aunt Ruth on Bonaire where she studied at San Bernardo elementary school, but almost every weekend she came over. We stayed for three year s on Curaçao and in 2007 we came back to Bonaire. Now we are both working at Eli Deli, Ana’s place at the traffic circle in Hato. It was her idea to open a deli. It was her long time dream and we can only fulfill one dream at a time and so we’re going to do this for Ana. On January 19th 2010, we will be married for 20 years. This May I will have had my kidney for 14 years. Now it’s Ana’s opportunity, now it’s her time…” Story & Photos by Greta Kooistra On the Island Since (Continued from page 4) Ana Makaai at the deli

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Page 6 Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 I magine the following situation: A group of distinguished men is on their small Caribbean island boarding a plane which will bring them to a far destination. Before the take-off, the pilot asks them if they really wish to fly to Amsterdam and says that he hopes that they and their families have thought thoroughly before taking this decision. The gentlemen say that they know what’s best for their families and it was therefore not necessary to involve them in the decision process. After long hours of flying across the ocean, approaching the coast of Europe, the men suddenly ask the pilot not to continue the flight to Amsterdam because they have to first ask their families if they agree with it. The surprised pilot informs the passengers that it is not possible because the plane is low on fuel and that if they don’t want to land in Amsterdam, the only possibility is to land at the first possible airport. The disappointed men react with, “You are arrogant and you cannot blackmail us!” The current political development on Bonaire is very similar to this story. In 2006, the Dutch submitted the proposal of a concrete form of a direct link with the Netherlands to the Bonaire Island Council, the option chosen by the majority of the Bonairean people in the 2004 referendum. According to this proposal, Bonaire, Sint Eustatitus and Saba could get a status of a special municipality (public body), a possibility established in the Dutch constitution. It would mean that these islands would become part of the Netherlands. Without asking the people of Bonaire their opinion, both the UPB and ADB members of the Island Council unanimously accepted this proposal. Since that moment in 2006, the government of the Dutch Kingdom worked hard during the next three years on the implementation of this new status. However, several months ago, the Island Council surprised the Dutch government with its decision to ask the people of Bonaire now, after thr ee years (!), in a referendum if they agree with the integration with the Netherland s or if they prefer another option, e.g. a free association. Although the people of Bonaire had chosen a “direct link” with the Netherlands in 2004 and not an “autonomous land in the Kingdom (in fact a free association with the Netherlands) ”, like Curaçao and Sint Maarten, the members of the Island Council were completely free, before signing the Slotverklaring (Final Accord) in 2006, to reject the proposed form of the direct link, which would mean the integration of the island with the Netherlands. They had a full right to come with another suggestion concerning the realization of the “direct link,” but they agreed unanimously with the Dutch integration proposal. For the Dutch, it does not matter if the local government was or is dominated by the red, green or any other political party. For them it is only important that the representatives of Bonaire, elected freely by the people of the island, signed a binding contract with the Netherlands in 2006, and it is not possible to change it when a new political situation has developed on the island in 2009. The Dutch were faced with a similar Antillean problem in 1990 when the government of Aruba changed its binding decision to become independent with a transition period of 10 years, beginning in 1986, and asked the Netherlands (without referendum) to have the possibility of remaining in the Kingdom. The decision about the independence has been a taboo on Aruba since then and 1986 was celebrated as the year in which the island got its “Status Aparte.” We have a similar situation now on Bonaire; nobody speaks about the 2006 Slotverklaring. Unfortunately, the Dutch have not forgotten their Aruba experience and are not prepared to repeat their mistake of 1990 and to start negotiations with the Island Council about another option for the status of Bonaire. Miguel Pourier, the Bonairean born exprime minister of the Netherlands Antilles, last week gave advice to the Island Council to cooperate with the Dutch on the transition to the new status so that it can be established on 10-10-2010, as originally planned. There is a possibility, according to the 2006 Slotverklaring , to revise the status and to execute necessary changes after a period of five years. In my opinion, the members of the Island Council must admit their responsibility for the 2006 binding Final Accord. Nevertheless, as the old Dutch proverb says, De soep wordt nooit zo heet gegeten als ze wordt opgediend “ The soup is never eaten as hot as it is served.” It is always possible to negotiate an adaptation of the agreed st atus, for instance to request the Dutch that some laws, particularly those not being in accord with the Christian values, would not be introduced on Bonaire. I cannot imagine that the Dutch government would reject this request. It fully realizes that the integration with the Netherlands cannot mean that on an island, separated by a distance of 9000 km, all Dutch regulations and laws, without exception, would be established. For instance, the decision not to use the Euro (former French colonies had to accept this new currency), but to introduce the US dollar for the BES islands, is a very important deviation from the Dutch laws, and there can be many more changes, according to the wishes of the people of Bonaire. It is therefore urgent that the current Island Council start cooperation, ending the cu rrent confrontation, and discuss the possible adaptations, exceptions and changes with the Dutch government instead of stubbornly rejecting to cooperate with the Dutch, unlike Sint Eustatitus and Saba. In my opinion, Henk Kamp, the Queen’s Commissioner and the future representative of the Kingdom on the island, will be certainly prepared to discuss all matters with the members of the Island Council. The opponents of the agreed status and the local media are feeling significantly bolstered by the advice of Judge Bob Wit and several other Dutch experts concerning the new status of Bonaire. Unfortunately, they completely forget that Wit also declared (translated from Dutch), quote: It must be also mentioned, on behalf of the integration option, that, also in case the Netherlands decides to treat the inhabitants of the BES islands, integrated with the Netherlands, less equal than the inhabitants would consider as correct, the door to more equal rights would certainly not be closed. Perhaps the Dutch inhabitants of Bonaire, as an integrated island, could force greater equality, even against the will of the Netherlands, through judicial procedures or in some other way. Just because they are part of the Netherlands, they would have a judicial basis to approach the national as well as international courts. They can appeal under the BUPO Treaty as well as European Treaty for the Rights of the People and on the principle of equality and prohibition of discrimination established in these treaties. unquote. It means that under the new status of the special municipality the people of Bonaire will have a higher possibility of receiving higher social benefits than they will be on Curaçao and Sint Maarten. During the recent meeting of Ank Bijleveld with the representatives of Statia and Saba on Curaçao, she already informed them about raising these benefits on the BES islands. Bonaire was present only as an observer because it did not want to sign any document before the results of the referendum are known. The Dutch have no problem with the advice of the experts of the United Nations invited to come to the island. The options in the 2004 Referendum were in principle the same as prescribed by the UN for choosing the status of former colonies. It is true that at that time it was not yet clear that the option “Direct link with the Netherlands” would mean the integration of Bonaire with the mother country. However, when the “Special Dutch Municipality” proposal was presented as a possible form of the direct link in 2006, it was, without any referendum, unanimously accepted by the Island Council. It is a pity that the results of the recent survey about the restructuring of the Dutch Kingdom, executed by the CURISES students, proved to be worthless because the questions violated basic rules of surveying, as stated by an expert in the previous issue of BR. This occasion could be better used, for instance, to ask the people of Bonaire if they agree or disagree with the three Dutch laws considered not being in accord with Christian values. In case the majority of the people are against the introdu ction of these laws on Bonaire, the Island Council could use this fact in negotiations with the Dutch. Jiri Lausman Opinions expressed are solely those of the author. COOPERATION, NOT CONFRONTATION THE ONLY WAY FOR BONAIRE Natural Way Health Food Store Opens G ood News: You no longer have to travel to Curaçao to find healthy and delicious food products. “We wanted to have a store that provides people who care about health with products that are usually hard to find,” says Natural Way’s owner, Glenda Pourier. She and her daughter in Curaçao both opened health food stores at the same time and order and import products together. Her daughter here on Bonaire, Suley-Mae, explained that with the prevalence of diabetes and obesity on the island, their main goal is to provide products for people to live healthy. “We have a lot of organic products that you can’t find in supermarkets,” she said, “like salt free, wheat free, things with less sugar, but products that people like, for instance, low fat-low salt snacks, bread spreads, low salt chips, organic chocolate.” Health conscious shoppers may recognize some of the brands they carry. They have natural herbal teas by Yogi and Alvita, teas to clean the blood, take care of coughs, joints and that are high in Vitamin C. They have 100% juices by R.W. Knudsen (no sugar added), Nature’s Gate Shampoo and Conditioner. Lovers of chocolate can find a tasty replacement made of carob. The shopping list is endless: whole wheat pasta, dried soy (a meat replacement, particularly for vegetarians), organic oatmeals, spices without salt, soy milk (liquid and dry), organic dressings, granolas, rice cakes, cereals, couscous, dried fruits. Glenda and Suley-Mae are particularly proud of the local healthy products they carry. Honey from Bonairean bees, a kalbas syrup for coughs and natural coconut oil Stop by and say hello. Natural Way is on the second floor at La Terassa, up the stairs from Botika Bonaire on the main street, Kaya Grandi. They’re open Monday through Saturday 10 am to 6 pm, non -stop. Telephone 717-3353 or 510-2318. Laura DeSalvo “In my opinion, the members of the Island Council must admit their responsibility for the 2006 binding Final Accord. “ Suley-Mae and Glenda Pourier of Nature’s Way

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Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 Page 7 Bonairean Voices is sponsored by With 4 branches and 10 ATMs located throughout the island and our Internet Banking, MCB@Home, at your service anytime, any day, anywhere. NUTRITION IN SCHOOLPART 1 A s I was researching nutrition in schools I heard some very interesting remarks. Every school is trying to do its utmost with good nutrition, but there are still some very key questions. Who will pay for it? Who will pay to continue the program? How can we make the community aware of the importance of the program? I conducted my research in three schools. At the first one, Papa Cornes Elementary School, I had the pleasure of talking with Mr. Rignald Martinus “Donny” Wout (58), Principal of the school. Principal Wout has worked for 40 years in education and has served in Holland , Curaçao and Bonaire. Mr. Wout explains, “Over the last years we have had to deal with children between four and five years of age who’ve had a lot of behavioral problems. We’ve had to help these children fit into the school environment. We are coping with children who have been badly raised, are headstrong, have high tempers and disruptive behavior. Besides helping the child to fit into school, we must teach them how to develop a habit of learning so that they are able to understand the material that is coming to them. Another problem we faced wh en I started working at Papa Cornes School more than three years ago was confronting a big gap in educatio n because of the introduction of a new teaching system for elementary schools, ‘ Ensenansa di Fundeshi’ (Foundation Education). Together with the Dutch inspector for education we saw the problems and made the changes. We had to deviate from the standards of ‘ Ensenansa di Fundeshi.’ In some classes we had children with a five to six year difference in ages. Now it’s dropped to a two-year age difference. The following year we formed groups of ages at different levels. Teachers, parents and the children were more receptive to the changes. We ’ve come up with new programs: To help the child to learn and behave. To help the child absorb the material. Kindergarten groups 1 to 2 Under building groups 1 to 4 Upper building groups 5 to 8 Recess management in groups Aggression management With the introduction of the new programs indeed we could experience a lot of changes. The after school mentors are amazed at how our children behave in a very calm way. They are distinguished from children in other schools. Still we can’t close our eyes to the social problems facing our community that aff ect the children. There is a lot of poverty in some neighborhoods. We have children who rebel against the situation that they have to face in their neighborhood, like child crime, child prostitution and a lot more. These special children need special care. We don’t have all the methods like in Holland to help these kids with their social problems. But we try to do our best to help. We’ve introduced a Care Te am in school whereby a coordinator will work as a liaison between students and parents, and more people will be trained for the team. In the meantime we are going to start with courses about this special care and recess coordinators where all teachers are involved. Other elem entary schools have also introduced this method. We have made a schedule where everyone sacrifices his or her recess time, even the principal, to take care of the children during their recess time. We are very skeptical about starting with a new program now. We have seen some programs, like Dr. Hart introduced for addicted peop le, to change their eating habits and have them quit drugs and alcohol. It was a very expensive program because most of these people don’t have any money. And the program failed. Programs like ‘Nutrition in Schools’ are very important, but it will cost the school budget a lot of money and we don’t know if it can continue. We will stay open minded. Maybe in the future things will change for education here in Bonaire.” Have you had seen the ‘Nutrition in Schools’ video yet? Go to http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=3962219959398908418# Siomara Albertus . For Siomara’s next column there will be more interviews with teachers on the island for their opinions on the Nutrition program. Send your comments to The Bonaire Reporter, P.O. Box 407, Bonaire, or email reporter @bonairenews. com . To solve the puzzle, ente r the numbers 1 through 9 to the partially filled in puzzle without repeating a number in any row, column or 3 x 3 region. Answer on page 17. Supplied by Molly Bartikoski-Kearney K ralendijk’s Fort Oranje was built around the 1700s. Each Dutch Island in the Netherlands Antilles has a fort. They were built to ward off the enemy and protect Dutch civil servants. This fort housed the Commander who lived there until 1837. This official ran the island before the title was changed to Gezaghebber , which literally means “authority manager. Even though this fort was never under siege or saw any true action, it was armed to the teeth with cannons from England. Take a stroll through the grounds and inspect the cannons. One cannon was cast in 1808, two in1811 and one in 1812. They are a reminder of when the island was under British rule. The fort’s original lighthouse was made of wood and was replaced by the present one, in concrete, in 1932. Its height is 10.25 m (33½ ft). The fort has performed many jobs for the Bonaire Government: as a Government Center, a warehouse for Government property and goods, a prison, police and fire station, Marine park HQ, and now serves as the courthouse and Harbormaster’s office. Q) In which year was the original lighthouse built? Answer on page 19 BonQuiz appears regularly in The Reporter. It’s prepared by Christie Dovale of Christie Dovale Island Tours . Contact her to arrange a tour, Phone 717 -4435 or 795-3456 or email: christiedovale@hotmail.com. Christie Dovale photo Papa Cornes School students with Principal Rignald Martinus “Donny” Wout and teacher Barbara Huveneers upon receip t of study materials that were gifts from Holland Send your comments to The Bonaire Reporter, P.O. Box 407, Bonaire, or email reporter @bonairenews. com . Christie Dovale photo

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Page 8 Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 wide is a non-profit organization that demonstrated a positive impact in the health care of the global community. Healing Touch is widely respected and increasingly accepted, not only in the US, but in many countries across the world, including The Netherlands. And now Bonaire. Your instructor will be Susan Reed -DeSalvo, LVN, HTCP/I, CMT. Susan Reed is a top Wellness Coach and Nurse with over 25 years experience and an Energy Medicine Instructor. Join one or both classes 1Healing Touch (Level 1 ) Class on Dec. 19 A one-day intensive course for giving you the skills to support good health and heal yourself, loved ones and others. Cost is 25% of US price, just NAƒ 150 ($85) + NAƒ 53 $(30) for class materials 2Energetic Touch Techniques Class , Evenings, Dec. 22 and 29th for advanced practitioners. Tuition is NAƒ 150 ($85) (regular US fee is $350). Register today by emailing Susan at blueskyz@idiom.com or call 700-7416. For more information see ad on page 13 The Reporter series Kwartiermakers and Counterparts is unable to be continued as promised. The RSC has been unable to set up the necessary interviews for our reporter. Perhas it is symptomatic of the “freeze” of progress pending the outcome of the 2010 Referendum on the status of Bonaire? Marjolein Hayden of Antillean Wine Company has a request: please save your wine-bottle corks and bring them to her AWC store on Kaya Industria. STINAPA uses them to make markers for lion fish sighting spots. See the AWC ad on page 10. The Body Talk column by Stephanie Bennett is not in this issue of The Reporter . It will return in the next issue, December 25. Looking for a good professional framer for your photos and art works ? Gladys’s Art Shoppe does extremely fine work, and they’be been doing it for more than 20 years. Gladys Peereboom and Mark Roswell can solve all your framing problems – no matter what size or shape your treasure is and you may choose from a wide selection of framing materials and matting. Their work cannot be beat. They are in Hato, on Kaya Rotterdam 10. Call them at 717-8050 (Gladys) 09-5671143 (Mark). G./L . D. ( Flotsam and jetsam Continued from page 2) W hat is the Family Development Foundation? Many families on Bonaire have different problems: financial and work -related, housing, dropping out of school, lack of communication within the family and problems with the police and /or justice. Help and guidance is offered by the Family Development Foundation project to families who need assistance. An experienced family therapist guides these families towards solutions. The objective of the Project for young people and their families with problems is to make them as effective as possible to enable them to function within our society. Coach JanArnold Franken welcomes any family who is motivated to find solutions with the options av ailable. There are many options to resolve educational barriers, and the guidance will be reviewed and adjusted to the patient’s needs. For information about the Family Project: Contact JanArnold at Family Development Foundation Project Kaya Pohantan 8, Bonaire L ast Saturday there were about 200 people enjoying themselves on the grounds of Flamingo/NOS TV on Kaya Korona. For the adults there was the Tilimaster Hamburger Competition and for the children lots of games and a Cupcakes Decoration Competition with lots of fine prizes to be won. NOS. TV covered the whole event and broadcasted it live on the air. Even before the start at 3 pm people gathered and were anxious to see what was coming. And they were not disappointed! Thanks to the event sponsors, Flamingo TV, More for Less (the hamburger meat, cakes, toppings and sweets for every child), Lucky Import & Export (all the presents for the children), Eco Power, Alpha & Omega (Tshirts), Martines Import, Firgos and Flamingo party rentals, the space had a complete makeover into a fair/carnival atmosphere. A bouncer and typical Dutch games like throwing balls at cans, pulling a rope and "grabbelton" (a box filled with sawdust and hidden presents) made it a real Sinterklaas party for every child , especially because everything was for free and with every game they won a prize. The competition, "Who Makes the Best Hamburger on Bonaire?" had 13 participants five of them students at the SGB and they grilled at their best. Especially because the judging panel contained well known persons as Glenn Thodé, (Gezaghebber Bonaire), Herbert Domacassé, (former Gezaghebber Bonaire), Peter Silberie (alternate Gezaghebber Bonaire), Onnie Emerenciana (Member of parliament of the N.A.) and Ibi Martis (Economics Minister N.A.). All hamburgers were judged on seven aspects: Name of burger, Appearance, Taste, Doneness (properly cooked), Use of ingredients, Originality/Inventiveness, and Presentation. After the first round, five competitors went into the finals and surprisingly for them... they all received a wonderful prize. The first prize of NAƒ 500, sponsored by Flamingo TV/NosTV, was won by Sharlon Melaan with his "Chupa Dede Burger." How this burger looks and how to prepare it, he will soon show in a special on NOS TV The theme of the other prizes was "Be a Tourist in Your Own Country." Runner Up Jolimar Mendoza with "Joly Burger" will spend a night, including dinner and breakfast at Hotel Roomer. Third place, Arys Ventura with "Bonaire Burger," will be going underwater with the Discovery Scuba Diving at Dive Friends/Yellow Submarine. No. 4, Leonard Janga with "Loco Burger," will go Kayaking (for 2 Adults + 2 Kids) at the Mangrove Center, and last but not least No 5., Samantha Clarinda with "Queenish," will have a Windsurf Lesson and lunch at Jibe City. Compliments to the SGB because the numbers 3 to 5 are their students. That promises some more good food in the future! Fifty children participated in the free cupcake (bolo) decorating . And they really made such nice decorations that they gave judges Mechtild Thodé and Nydia Thielman a very hard time to pick out the best! In the end Sinterklaas even had to help them out to divide and give their prizes. The winners will also have their "15 minutes of Fame". NOS TV will follow each winner on the trip/adventure they won. So... during Christmas holidays, stay tuned! Wooy-Ling Choy Bonaire’s First Lady, Mechtild Thodé, describes the art of cake decoration to the contestants Sharlon Melaan, assisted by his son, won the top prize with his spicy "Chupa Dede Burger." Susan Reed Past Governors Domacassé and present Governor Thodéserved as two of the judges. Evita and Gabriella Thodé snuggle up.

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Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 Page 9 Kaya Rotterdam 10 Hato Phones: 717-8050 09 567-1143 Emailgladysfrits @telbonet.an Custom Framing by experienced craftsmen/ artists Gladys Peereboom Mark Roswell Wide selection of frames for every canvas or photograph A ccording to a straw poll conducted last week by Arthur Sealy on behalf of radio station BON FM the minority party, UPB (green) would win the most votes in next month’s Central Government Parliamentary election. The results of that election do not affect the makeup of the Bonaire Government. See Chart 1. The second part of the poll tested the voter feelings about the form the Bonaire Government should take. The most votes were won by Direct Ties ( Laso Directo ), the direction Bonaire was on prior to the change in Bonaire Government earlier this year. See Chart 2. The results for Bonaire in the 2004 Referendum were quite different, (see Chart 3). Bonairean voters were not allowed to be able to choose for “Integration With Holland” as were Curaçao voters. G.D. Bonaire-Dutch Connection Parliamentary Election 2009 Straw Poll Results 2004 Referendum Results (final vote tally) Chart 1 Chart 2 Chart 3 Autonomous in Kingdom T ina Woodley, a Certified Personal Trainer on Bonaire, was the 1985 International Female Body Building Champion and the first woman to become a champion in both sports -power lifting and body building at the same time, in the same year. It took strength of character, devotion and a positive attitude to achieve that and her other numerous awards. Tina, born in St. Eustatius, actually began her working out here in Bonaire in the 70s. “I loved it,” she says. “I was doing something that no other woman did.” She became the first woman in the whole Caribbean to participate in any such championship and won the first Power Lifting Championship for Women in Elkhart, Indiana. At the same time she was raising three step daughters and her own daughter, Sasha van Duyn. In Austria she owned a fitness center and then in Wiesbaden, Germany, she owned an all ladies fitness studio. She is married to the former mayor of Wiesbaden, Achim Exner. It is with this background that Tina became a certified Pilates, yoga and physical fitness coach and a licensed NLP practitio ner (Neuro Linguistic Programming, a system to create your own powerful and prac tical approach to personal change and transformation). Tina is working at the Bon Bida Spa as a fitness trainer. Why have a personal trainer ? Tina replies, “You get one-toone advice, guidance and motivation. The whole reason for paying for your own fitness training is to get this attention and a training program that’s right for you.” And it includes nutritional advice, strength, endurance and flexibility training, weight reduction and more. “You are never too old or too sick to train,” she says. After all these years why has Tina return ed to Bonaire? “At a certain age,” she says, “some people want to find a place they can call their home, and Bonaire is the closest thing to that.” She continues, “and I want to use my 30 years of experience and training as a contri bution to the community.” Tina has a website: WWW.ActivoBonaire.com . Email: TW@ActivoBonaire. Her telephone is 700-5488. Story & photo by Laura DeSalvo Training with Tina

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Page 10 Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 MAKING YOUR SPACE A BETTER PLACE USA LICENSED CONTRACTOR / 30 YEARS WORLDWIDE CONSTRUCTION EXPERIENCE HOURLY RATES – 7 DAYS INSTALLATIONS – RE PAIRS – REMODELS <>HOTELS <> RESTAURANTS <> <>RESIDENTIAL<> TELE 717 -3527 FAX 717-3528 CELL 701-3527 EMAIL: EQUINOXBONAIRE@AOL.COM BONAIRE VENTURES B.V. On time <> Done Right Sunbelt Realty N.V. Kaya L.D. Gerharts 8 717 65 60 info@sunbelt.an|www.sunbelt.an Al Fresco or Air Conditioned Dining Between Downtown and Hotel Row One street inland—Kaya Gob. Debrot 46 Reservations: 717-7070 info@bistrodeparis.com Open Monday -Saturday I thought it would never happen, my unhappiness to report a new species of fish for Bonairebut it happened on 26 October, 2009, when two guests of ours at Bonaire Dive and Adventure returned from a dive at Nukove and showed me a video they had just taken of Bonaire's official new species. They had been given the information during our mandatory orientation of what to do if one was spotted. They went to STINAPA headquarters and plans were made for Bonaire Marine Park Rangers, under the leadership of Ramon de Leon, to go back to Nukove and they made the capture. Jason Wright and Sean Murray are the guests that made the record books, and being advanced divers and concerned about the health of Bonaire's reefs, did the correct thing. Other opportunities were missed at other dive shops on Bonaire when the inclusion of Lionfish were not included in their orientation, but, hopefully now, everyone is on-board. As of now, 24 November, 2009, Bonaire's Marine Park Rangers have captured a total of 20 Lionfish and the sites have been from the far north, Wayaka, to the far south, Red Slave, and points in between. Measurements are taken and the captured fish are deposited with the scientists at CIEE here on Bonaire. They examine the stomach contents and preserve a sample to be sent for DNA finger printing. It is hoped that keeping this DNA data will help us to see some pattern as to where our lionfish came from. The presence of these highly trained scientists (beautiful female marine biologists with at least a Masters in Marine Biology, with most of them having earned their Ph Ds.) at CIEE has been a welcomed addition. They are ''right in the thick of it" when it comes to educating future marine biologists and collecting and intepretating data collected here concerning the environment. Watch their recently released video on YouTube concerning the sewage problem here on Bonaire. http:// www.youtube.com/watch? v=EihWrfOIj1g&feature=channel . With the capture of the first lionfish for Bonaire, I was proven wrong in my assessment of our potential for finding these fish on Bonaire. Transport of the larval form of creatures born on the coral reefs of the Caribbean is the customary mode of a species spreading itself to other islands. Mature fish are reef-bound, but their newly hatched larvae are filled with wanderlust at what the rest of the world might have in store and can be carried by currents and the direction that surface winds are blowing. We here on Bonaire are known as the Fish Capital of the Caribbean because of our consistently strong winds blowing from the east. Looking to the east is a tremendous fish producing area, the northern coast of South America, and Bonaire is perfectly situated to receive these larval fish as they pass into their settlement stages after feeding and growing bigger and stronger as they travel toward Bonaire. http://www.sciencedaily.com/ releases/2005/04/050424200603.htm is an article about how some fish find a new home. With this information, I incorrectly assumed that lionfish would have to become established along the coast of Venezuela, east of us, in order for their larvae be able to "ride the winds and currents to Bonaire." But there have been no reports of lionfish found off the Venezuelan coast to our east, so the question that every biologist is now asking is, "How did these buggers get here?" Jake Montgomery and I have both seen two lionfish here in Bonaire. Both of us, as well as the other dive masters carry bright, yellow tape in our BCs in order to accurately mark the location of any that we come across as we lead divers from our boats. On Thursday, 19 November, 2009, I found my second one at Karpata, rattled my Rattle-Alert, and showed all the divers with me what a juvenile lionfish looked like. I must emphasize that these young ones are very dark, with faint stripes which will show more contrast as they mature. I describe a juvenile as looking more like a small individual Long-spined Urchin, and they are usually under an overhang, in the shadows during the day time. They feed at night and rest in dark places during the day. This particular lionfish was at 60 feet and I immediately surfaced and swam back to the boat to call Ramon on my cell. Their first attempt was unsuccessful in the (Continued on page 11) Lionfish in Bonaire-7.5 cm in length (2.9 inches) at 20 feet depth Copyright and Photo by Kathy Beil-Morgan, Keepsake dive site, 18 November, 2009

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Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 Page 11 C aptain Don presents the first copy off the press of his latest book, “Reef Windows,” to Elsmarie Beukenboom, Director of STINAPA, the manager of the Bonaire National Marine Park. Captain Don has known Elsmarie since her childhood and has followed her path through Co rnell Hotel School, Hotel Manager, Tourism Training Center, and past Director of Tourism. Times change, and positions differ. Elsmarie deserves the honor of this first book because of her support and long time encouragement of Don’s environmental attitudes and writing, while she at all times persistently fights to protect the total environment and heritage of the Island of Bonaire. Story & photo by Janet Thibault afternoon, but they returned on Friday and made the capture. In closing, I must brag about us divers here on Bonaire. Of the more than 100,000 fish surveys conducted through REEF, throughout the entire Tropical Atlantic, it is quite remarkable that over 17,000 have been conducted here on Bonaire, or 17% of the total for the entire Caribbean/Atlantic. We are concerned about our Bonairean coral reefs, and our divers are probably the most informed divers anywhere, and we scrutinize the reef better than anyone, and this, hopefully will keep us on top of this horrific invasion. It is not necessary for spear guns or pole spears to be used because the current techniques th at the rangers are using are sufficient for the time being. We ask divers to remain diligent and carefully scrutinize the reefs when diving so that we can knock the stuffing out of the lionfish. The initial capture, in the Atlantic/ Caribbean, of the first lionfish through a pet store purchase and subsequent release was off Dania, Florida, in 1985. Then the release from a sea-side aquarium after the passage of Hurricane Andrew, in 1992, was a further step in setting us up for the horrific results that we are experiencing. Since then, we can only imagine many further releases from aquariums up and down the Atlantic coast by inconsiderate (read STUPID) humans who tire of their potentially harmful "pet", who have no concern about what impact we humans are having on our planet. An excellent source of information about the invasion of lionfish can be found at http://nas.er.usgs.gov/queries/ FactSheet.asp?speciesID=963 Stay up on the spread of lionfish by visiting the USGS website http:// nas.er.usgs.gov/taxgroup/fish/ lionfishdistribution.asp Double clicking next to Bonaire continues to enlarge the map. LIONFISH Found on Bonaire As of 24 November, 2009 1 26 Oct, 2009 Nukove 20m 5.0cm (1.9 in) 2 27 Oct Playa Lechi 50 ft 5.7 cm (2.24 in) 3 30 Oct Red Slave 60ft 4.6cm (1.8 in) 4 31 Oct Invisibles 70ft 7.3cm (2.8 in) 5 2 Nov Invisibles (distended belly) 75ft 7.5cm (2.9 in) 6 2 Nov Salt Pier 8ft 5.7cm (2.4 in) 7 5 Nov, Jeff Davis 60 ft 7.2cm (2.8 In) 8 5 Nov, Oil Slick, 60ft 6.9cm (2.7 in) 9 9 Nov Invisibles 60ft 7.3cm (2.8 in) 10 9 Nov Bonbini Na Kas 18ft 6.2 cm (2.4in) 11 11Nov Something Special 30ft 7.3cm (2.8 in) 12 14 Nov Punt Vierkaant 60ft 6.7cm (2.6 in) 13 14Nov Andrea 1 38 ft 7.2cm (2.8 in) 14 15 Nov, Wayaka 2 30 ft 7.9cm (3.1 in) 15 17 Nov Small Wall 50 ft 8.4 cm (3.3 in) 16 18 Nov Keepsake 20ft 7.5cm (2.9 in) 17 18 Nov Punt Vierkaant 50ft 8.1cm (3.1 in) 18 18 Nov Witches Hut 35ft 7.7cm (3.0 in) 19 18Nov Bonaventure 50ft 8.5cm (3.3 in) 20 18Nov Eden Beach 60ft 8.3cm (3.2 in) 21 19 Nov North Belnam 25ft 8.4cm (3.3 in) 22 20Nov Karpata 60ft 7.2cm (2.8 in) 23 20Nov Oil Slick 80ft 8.2cm (3.2 in) 24 20Nov Margate Bay 60ft 8.9cm (3.5 in) Story by Jerry Ligon Lionfish (Continued from page 10) World Champion Swimmer Angela Maurer Checks Out Bonaire 2 009 World Champion Swimmer and four-time winner of the Marathon Swimming World Cup, Angela Maurer, will arri ve in Bonaire on December 10. She’ll be accompanied by Jennifer Boettcher, one of the best German Dolphin swimmers . They will be in training for 10 days, from December 10 to 20, sponsored by Buddy Dive Resort and Bon Bida Spa and Gym. While they’re here they’ll take a look at the training and competition conditions on the island because they’d like to support Bonaire’s bid to have a World Cup Swimming Finals here in 2011. Achim Exner Achim Exner photo

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Page 12 Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 A s has been traditional for 15 years, Sanikolas arrived in Bonaire from the sea, this time aboard the tugboat, Tahiti , which docked at the Chiku Mercelina Wharf. Hundreds of children and their parents or guardians, a record number, lined the waterside, eagerly awaiting the arrival. He was accompanied by his attendants, the black faced Swarte Pieten (Black Petes), and the soul-stirring beat of the drum corps. The Gezaghebber (Lt. Governor) Glenn Thodé welcomed him and wished him a pleasant stay on Bonaire. Obeying the law one of the Swarte Piet was seen checking in with Customs, showing the officer Sanikolas’ book of good and bad children. As Gezaghebber Thodé had to leave for an important appointment Interim Lt. Governor Peter Silberie stood in and accompanied Sanikolas to Wilhelmina Park for the festivities. Along the way the Swarte Pieten did tricks, acrobatics, teased and threw candy to the children. There were many Dutch children and their families there this year. As one of the Dutch parents said, “This is wonderful. In Holland it is so crowded that you can’t even get near enough to see St. Nicholas so instead we had to watch him on television!” Sanikolas and his Swarte Pieten return to Spain late on December 5, after having visited homes, the hospital, Kas di Sosiego (old folks’ home), Rose Inn and other places. Thanks to the hardworking members of the Foundation Ata C I Zwartpiet, who have organized this very popular event for the last 15 years . Also great appreciation to SEBIKI for setting up the games and activities at the Park. It was also an end of an era. This is the first time in 30 consecutive years that Bòi Antoin has not been Sanikolas. However, his two sons, Franklin and Danielson continue to be Swarte Piet. And the new Sanikolas did a fine job! Laura DeSalvo For the Christmas and New Year Holidays we are offering some extra special bites We are serving a variety of fresh Fine Claire Oysters Until supplies last (limited availability, reservations recommended) * Raw on the half shell * Rockefeller Gratineed with a mixture of Parmesan, anchovies & spinach * Nam Kee Steamed with a mixture of black bean sauce, sesame, soy and scallions Rum Runners Restaurant and Bar at Captain Don’s Habitat Kaya N. Debrot 103 North Hotel Row Reservations ( Highly Recommended ) 717-8290 ext 100 Two seatings available: 5:30 pm (17:30-20:00) with a free glass of bubbles and second seating at 8:30 pm (20:30– closing) Email: rumrunners@habitatbonaire.com At Rum Runners we do our utmost best to work with fresh ingredients only, However being on small remote island means that these are not alwa ys available if this is the case our chef will adjust the dish accordingly. Fo r this we ask your understanding. On the 24th and 25th We will serve our always surprising Christmas Menu (reservations are recommended) This is in addition to our regular a la carte menu The pizza temple will be open as usual New Years Eve Ends with a big bang & bubbles at The Deco Bar and Habitat When the clock strikes twelve “ We hope to see you at Rum Runners during the holidays" Sanikolas Arrives in Bonaire Georgina, one of The Reporter staff who helps her grandmother deliver the paper, poses with a Swarte Piet Sanikolas arrives and is escorted by the rousing cadence of the Drum Corps Everyone just loves the Swarte Pieten. What energy and fun—and they hand out

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Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 Page 13 Bonaire's First “Personal” Self Storage Facility Storage space from closet size to garage size. Monthly, yearly and long term contracts. Mangasina di Boneiru, B.V. P.O. Box 50 Kaya Gob. Debrot 124B Behind the yellow “Rum Factory” Across from Hamlet Oasis. Call 700-1753 WWW.BONAIRESELFSTORAGE .COM E-mail: info@ bonaireselfstorage.com Secure Storage For Vehicles, Household Items, Diving And Sporting Gear, Business Files or Inventory The Perfect Christmas Present The Gift of Healing For yourself or a loved one Sign up for a one day intensive Healing Touch course at Bonaire Basics for acquiring the skills to support good health and heal yourself and others. See additional information on page 8 Register today by emailing Susan at blueskyz@idiom.com or call (USA) 001 707 928-6565 After 12/12/09 call 700-7416 in Bonaire Bonaire Basics is at Kaya Korona 47 P ainter and muralist Jan “Lambada” Bouwman passed away in the Netherlands on November 25th following a flu-type illness, perhaps H1N1 swine flu. His nickname came from the rhythms of the lambada that he loved to dance to anywhere and anytime he heard it played. Some consider him one of the Netherlands’ most gifted artists of recent times. His extreme sensitivity made his personal life difficult and he had a long battle with alcohol and even drugs for a time. He left behind many works in Holland and a few in Bonaire that will immortalize him. Jan was born in Amsterdam on January 7, 1955. He attended secondary school in Friesland and VWO, (in those days HBS). At 17 he went to Groningen, moved in with his grandmother and studied at the Art Academy ‘Minerva.’ Du ring this period he had a job in a hospital for children, and was very much loved. He attended to sick patients, played and drew with them. His parents passed away 25 years ago. His sister believes Jan had difficulty dealing with their deaths. Not long after that he and his family moved to Bonaire at the invitation of Frans Booi. Jan had a grant to teach art. Nochie Coffie was one of his students. Bonaire is where Jan got in touch with the ‘free’ lifestyle. He drank reasonably before the move to Bonaire, but the pain of a dissolving marriage and his parent’s death haunted him. The pain he couldn’t reject, but he could soothe it with alcohol, and later with drugs. But he kept painting: at the Bonaire Caribbean Club, Cultimara, on Karnaval floats and elsewhere, scenes so alive they captured you and drew you into their setting. Jan was married to artist Wine Fransen, and they had three children; the oldest, Myrddyn, his only daughter, an attorney in Amsterdam, speaks Papiamentu with her clients. Son Irin, an engineer, is married to Valerie, daughter of Roy Kort, of the Bamali shop. Valarie delivered Jan a grandson, Ilan. The youngest is Maarten, an international flight pilot, living in London. When Maarten was still a baby they moved to Bonaire. Jan left Bonaire around 1996, leaving behind many admirers of his art as well as friends. With the help of his wife, Wine, he returned to the Netherlands, to Leeuwarden. He struggled with rehabilitation, kicked the drug habit and went on with his life. The last couple of years were idyllic for him. His family was close. He worked designing furniture, painted canvases and murals that emphasized the beauties of nature: the small details of butterflies and flowers. He was a true artist in everything. When Jan was buried on December 2nd a bouquet was placed at his grave by his sister Kunna on behalf of those who cared and loved him on Bonaire. While many of his murals and wall paintings have faded away or been painted over his memory lives on in the hearts of many of us on Bonaire. This story has contributions from Christie Dovale, Wine Fransen and Jan’s sister Kunna Dijkstra Jan Lambada 1955-2009 Section of mural painted in the ‘90s at the Bonaire Caribbean Club. Additional Topics Advanced Energy Techniques Children's Techniques Chakra repair Supporting the dying process.

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Page 14 Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 Dear Editor: We are just a couple of weeks away from the year 2010 and I understand that the general population of Bonaire still carries that same old philosophy where the economy has to be fed by nature. People still believe that tourism is the subject that values nature and makes it necessary to protect the environment. For centuries they were right: value nature for its importance for the economy. But we broke an agreement, nature would take care of the economy and the economy would take care of nature. Bonaire was an excellent example starting with its marine park, the ban on spear fishing, putting out moorings to protect the reef, the turtle foundation, no diving zones and no fishing zones, but times have changed and we are encountering a rapid decrease in the quality of our natural resources with proof of irresponsible abuse and pollution by the island’s capitalism. Still there is no waste water plant in place. Still we are excavating our coastline, cutting down trees, selling our international waters to fisheries. We still believe in cruise ship tourism and we enrich the rich. Nature was here long ago even before man. Nature was a gift. We didn’t have to do anything for it and we never had to pay for it! So why do we need all th ese funds to protect it? Who are they who believe that we need tourism to value nature? Do we need money to pay off the greedy people who otherwise will destroy it? Maybe we are just too late and we need money from tourism to heal that which is already damaged and to educate the community who even today are ignorant of the beauty and value that nature caries as a natural wonder. Hendrik Wuyts CRUISE SHIPS RULE! Dear Editor: Some may think that means cruise ships are great. But what it means is that cruise ships dictate all that happens on Bonaire. Once again, important containers for the businesses on Bonaire cannot get off the pier because cruise ships have priority above everything else. These business employ, pay taxes, pay import duties, pay OB but can't get the goods to sell because cruise ships come first. When is this going to stop? AB MAMA SMILEGETS A BLACK EYE Dear Editor: We have been coming to Bonaire for over 10 trips. I have driven all over Bonaire and never had a problem until yesterday, 30 November 2009. While driving down the seaside road adjacent to the town, I was stopped by some sort of official person who told me that I was not allowed to drive on this road. He said there was a temporary international sign that said so. (I said,) I am sorry and do apologize for not knowing all the international signs. But what made me angry enough to maybe not come back to Bonaire was that he called me an idiot. Yes, he used that word and said I should not be driving a vehicle. I was told that the road was blocked off so the cruise ship passengers would see Bonaire as a nice peaceful island I am sorry again but I pay 1000's of dollars to stay here and I am called an idiot by someone in a uniform. These passengers spend a few dollars and are worshipped? Bonaire, you better watch out where your priorities are. Gail W. COMMENTS ON THE REPORTER SURVEY IN ABOUT HOW BONAIRE NEWS SHOULD BE RELEASED Dear Editor: Bonaire has the distinction of being an island where many people come back year after year. Although they may not know the small details, they are aware of what is going on. When news is modified, censored or a positive spin is put on it, they feel they have been lied to and credibility is lost. AB Dear Editor: I agree with the option, present ALL the news. Whether you like it or not .. "truth always prevails." I have been working in the tourism sector for over 20 years. There is no point in a cover up of the facts. It is better to be up front and honest rather than have to defend the "deliberate omissions." Nothing is perfect nor should it be expected to be that way. Bonaire should be represented for exactly what it is .. not something others wish it to be. Petri Hausmann CRUISE SHIP MATH Dear Editor, I have finally found the time to read the 16-30 October issue of The Bonaire Reporter . On page 11 you note that "a total of 229,000 passengers are expected during the 2009-2010 cruise ship season." Further along you note, "This season cruise ships will have to pay a head tax of $2 per passenger, which is expected to raise between $14 to $19 million (TCB figures, Ed .) in addition to what passengers spend on the island." At $2 per head, 229,000 passengers will raise $458,000 not $14 to $19 million. Please clarify. Frederick A. Beland P.S. $2 per head is really pathetic, especially in view of the fact that the departure tax at the airport is $35 per person. Jackie Bernabela and Winfred Dania at the opening A rtworks by Winfred Dania and Frans Booi were unveiled at the opening of the “Culture of the Indian of Bonaire” Exhibition at Kas di Arte on Sunday, December 6. There are more than 30 pieces from the two artists, including paintings and other artworks. Dania is considered by many to be the Van Gogh of Bonaire. His works hang in museums in the Antilles and in the Netherlands and are owned by collectors throughout the world. Frans Booi, an artist, historian, inventor, sculptor, musician – and more – was head of the Department of Culture and Education from the 70s to the 90s. He is the expert on the myths of Bonaire. The two have combined talents before. In 2006 they presented a program, “Myths of Bonaire," with Dania’s paintings being explained by Booi. This exhibit will continue until January 3, 2010, with Kas di Arte opening daily from 10 am to noon and from 5:30 to 9 pm, and on the weekends of December 12, 13, 14, 20, 26 and 27. Laura DeSalvo Winfred with fellow artist Ronald Verhoeven Herman van Leeuwen photo Herman van Leeuwen photo What type of news best promotes Bonaire? All News Good News Only Good news and ONLY the not-sogood-news that has been “okayed” by island tourism authorities PUT NATURE ABOVE THE DOLLAR

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Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 Page 15 Oscar (above and center) and cat cage mates are fascinated (and curious, of course) with what’s going on with volunteer Finn and Shelter Manager Monique who are cuddling a little puppy, Petunia. O scar’s good friend, Shelter volunteer Jane Madden, wrote his biography this week: “That handsome young gentleman is Oscar...and he truly is a gentleman. Although less than a year old he has the manners and demeanor of a mature, content cat. He gets along famously with all his roommates, young, old, male or female. No roughhousing or showing off...Oscar is willing to snuggl e up and snooze with anyone who wants to cuddle with him...including people. His coat is a soft and gorgeous deep orange/red, a very unusual color for cats on Bonaire. Oscar would make a fine addition to any home...he is comfortable with other animals an d children or would be just as happy to be an ‘only cat.’” Laura DeSalvo Petunia Wide selection of cheeses and hams from around the world, homemade salads & olives, hot & cold sandwiches, breakfasts Open M-F: 7-6; Sat. 8-4; Sun. 8-12 At the Bonaire District Shopping Mart, Traffic Circle, Kaya Gob. N. Debrot #66 info@elideli.com / 4delivery@elideli.c om Tel/Fax 717-3997 T he Shelter’s 5th Art Auction and Indonesian dinner attracted lots of supporters and animal lovers on November 27. A number of local artists donated art pi eces which were auctioned off by Rene Essing, assisted by Aniek Schouten. The Indonesian diner was prepared and served by the team of Rosita, "Bous" and Jerry of the Plaza Resort, together with chef Willem and many helpers. About 120 guests were served. The total result of the evening was over NAƒ 14.000. All the money goes to the Shelter’s sterilization project, “Bonnie Superdog." A big thank you to all artists, volunteers and sponsors , Plaza Resort and Warehouse, for their contribution to the fundraiser. Story & Photo by Paul Wichers. Shelter photos I t was a wonderful evening for story telling and poetry at Altamira UnJo last Friday, December 4, with a full moon. Twenty-one persons participated in this event organized by the Skal (Cultural Department) every month at full moon. Soldachi Tours organizes the walking tour. Maria Koecks Soldachi Tours photo

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Page 16 Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 Bonaire Reporter Classifieds— Are still free Got something to buy or sell? Non-Business Classified Ads (up to 4 lines/ 20± words): FREE Commercial Ads only NA ƒ 1 per word, for each two-week issue. Call 790-6518 or 790-6125 or email info@bonairereporter.com For sale: Painting of Anton Heyboer 'Boat' in black and yellow, framed, size 1.10 x .79 cm. NAƒ 5000 .Hand embroidered antique Indian tapestry, 1.25 x 1.65 cm, NAƒ 300 .Phone 786-3117. —————————————For rent at Hato, 2 studios for 1 person. Minimum stay 4 months. no airco Incl.; gas/water/electricity/internet/linen/ selibon/furnished/garden/parking place/ terrace/ Rent per month NAƒ 650,-or 600,--Deposit NAƒ 750 or 600,-717 2529 or 796 2529 _____________________________ For rent at Hato , studio for 1 person. Minimum stay 4 months. no airco. Incl.; Gas/water/ electricity/internet/ linen/selibon/furnished/garden/parking place/terrace/ Rent per month NAƒ 600,-Deposit NAƒ 600,-Call 7172529 or 7962529 _____________________________ 1995 Nissan Sentra for sale asking price 3.500 but will negotiate! call 7953456 _____________________________ 1/2 Container to USA. Need to send something to the USA? I have half a container going to the U.S. in Dec. $1,300. Call 795-1277 —————————————— Free Packing boxes, from the 13th to 20th of December contact me at info@soundfound.com for details. ——————————————— Looking To Buy—Baby bed/Box (playpen). Call 790-6518, 786-6518 _____________________________ NexStar 8 GPS Telescope Star gazing for anyone. All accessories included tripod, 4 eye pieces, star finder, AC adapter. Almost new. Call 717-7278 for more information. NAƒ 1300 ——————————————— For sale professional high quality saw table cpl. with extra blade . Used for the building of one garage. Now it is over complete. only NAƒ 320. Call for an offer to 786-5432 ——————————————— For saleMitsubishi Pick-up L200 4 -WD double-cabin, gasoline, 200.000 km, not diving car, not ex rental. Great for towing your boat or driving in the kunuku. No rust in a good condition for 4750,USD. Call for an offer to 787-0270 _____________________________ Te koop grote collectie , meer dan 120 stuks, DVD's (Europees systeem en dus Nederlands ondertiteld.) Genoeg voor een levenlang regenachtige zondagen. Alle DVD's in 1 keer voor 160,NAF en al onze muziek cd's (350 stuks) alle genres alles voor 250,NAF bel voor een aanbod 786-5432 _____________________________ Put your ad here and get results Tel (599) 791-6272 / 785-6272 hans@outdoorbonaire.com www.outdoorbonaire.com Property Services Bonaire B.V. Taking care of your properties (while you are off island). Email for information and prices: propertyservicesbonaire@hotmail.com ———————————————— Bonaire Images Elegant greeting cards and beautiful boxed note cards are now available at Chat -N-Browse next to Lover’s Ice Cream and Sand Dollar Grocery. Photography by Shelly Craig www.bonaireimages.com ——————————————— GREAT CLEANING SERVICE For Quality House and Office Cleaning ……. CALL JRA Serving Bonaire for more than 15 years Honest, Reliable, Efficient, Thorough, Low rates, References. One time or many Phone 785-9041 … and relax. ———————————— LUNCH TO GO Starting from NAƒ6 per meal. Call CHINA NOBO 717-8981. Web site: www.chinanobobonaire.com ________________________________ KRALENDIJK TIDES (Heights in feet, FT) Remember: Winds and weather can further influence the local tide’s height and time 16 Flights a day between Bonaire and Curaçao Divi Divi Air Reservations 24 hours a day Call (5999 839-1515) Or (5999 H ere is Bonaire’s snorkeling pioneer, Renee Leach, with her twin brother, Uys van Zyl, at Boulder Beach at the southe rnmost tip of Sout h Africa, reading The Bonaire Reporter, as a flock of pushy penguins move in (at lower left). Transport of Money and Valuables Private Investigations Vehicle patrols Burglar Alarms Fire Alarm Systems In Business Over 26 years Kaya Nikiboko Nord 37A, PO Box 225 Tel: (599) 7178125 Fax (599) 7176125 E-mail sss@bonairelive.com WIN GREAT PRIZES! Take a copy of The Bonaire Reporter with you on your next trip or when you return to your home. Then take a photo of yourself with the newspaper in hand. THE BEST PHOTOS OF THE YEAR WILL WIN THE PRIZES. Mail photos to Bonaire Reporter , Box 407, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles (AN). E-mail to: info@bonairereporter.com. DATE Time Ht. Time Ht. Time Ht. Time Ht. ` COEF 12-10 1:40 1.0FT. 9:07 1.8FT. 16:32 1.1FT. 20:28 1.3FT. 54 12-11 1:07 1.1FT. 9:36 1.9FT. 17:51 1.0FT. 22:04 1.1FT. 54 12-12 0:15 1.0FT. 10:06 2.0FT. 18:54 0.9FT. 23:45 1.0FT. 60 12-13 10:38 2.1FT. 20:02 0.8FT. 68 12-14 11:17 2.1FT. 20:55 0.7FT. 75 12-15 11:52 2.1FT. 21:53 0.7FT. 80 12-16 12:25 2.1FT. 22:35 0.7FT. 83 12-17 13:04 2.0FT. 23:09 0.7FT. 83 12-18 13:38 1.9FT. 23:39 0.7FT. 80 12-19 0:02 0.8FT. 14:06 1.8FT. 76 12-20 0:32 0.8FT. 14:37 1.7FT. 70 12-21 0:49 0.9FT. 15:03 1.6FT. 63 12-22 0:55 0.9FT. 11:30 1.5FT. 56 12-23 0:42 1.0FT. 9:14 1.5FT. 48 12-24 0:10 1.0FT. 8:45 1.6FT. 41 IS YOUR HOUSE NEW TO YOU? Make it more livable from the start. FENG SHUI CONSULTATIONS Also interior or exterior design advice, clearings, blessings, energy, healing, China-trained. Experienced. Inexpensive. Call Donna at 795-9332 . A Unique Haircut experience at The Windsurf Place, Sorobon, with Desiree. Open weekdays from 12 noon, Weekends by appointment. Phone: 786-6416 info@aplaceforyoubonaire.com FELMAR Cleaning Services Apartments, Hotels, Houses, Offices & More. Efficient Work, Good References. Tel. 786-0019 *** FOR SALE *** (cleaned out our garage) Uwatec big display wrist mount bottom timer 25$ , Spare air 0 .7 ltr 100 $ secondhand BCDs medium and small 110$ (only 30 dives )secondhand 4/5mm BARE Velocity Full wetsuit Black with dark blue 100$ (only 30 dives ) older type (all steel) scubapro regset 50 $ Black TUSA older type Platina fins medium 20 $. hard plastic kayak for two. only the plastic hull no seats no paddles 50$.DVD player Panasonic 30 $a brand new high quality blender Philips 600 watt for 40$ Life vest, Secumar 16 ltr with extra co2 cartridges 45$ a medium size NEW European black motor helmet for 50 NAƒ also a rain and UV cover your motorcycle or scooter 25 NA 17 inch computer monitor 20$ small (2mtr ) house hold stairs 30$send an e-mail to marktplaatsbonaire@hotmail.com

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Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 Page 17 Now until January 3— Exhibition: “ Culture of the Indian of Bonaire” by artists Winfred Dania and Frans Booi, Kas di Arte, open daily 10 am to noon, 5:30 to 9 pm, and on the weekends of December 12, 13, 14, 20, 26 and 27. More details on page 14. Until January 8 – Exhibiton by Hortence Brouwn, “Feelings,” Plaza Resort. Sponsored by Don Andres N.V. Saturday, December 12— Capt. Don presents and signs new book, “Reef Windows,” Addo’s Books & Toys, 4-6 pm. Details on page 11. Saturday, December 12— Wine Tasting at Antillean Wine Company’s warehouse on Kaya Industria. Snacks and tasting of six wines for $10 (NAƒ17,50) per person. Tel. 560-7539 Saturday, December 12 —Christmas Market at Oranje Park, to benefit Family Development Foundation, 2-8 pm. See page 8 for more details. Sunday, December 13 —Best Meteor Shower of the Year—Geminids , 10 pm until dawn, Monday. Details on page 23. Monday, December 14 —Capt. Don signs new book, “Reef Windows,” Habitat, 6-8 pm. Details on page 11. Saturday, December 19 – Rincon Special Christmas Market – 10th Anniversary Celebration – 4 pm midnight. Page 2 for more details. Saturday, December 19 —Holiday Concert , Plaza Resort, 7:30 pm. NAƒ25. See details on page 20. Sunday, December 20 —Mountain Bike Tour, Washington-Slagbaai , all levels. $14.50. Call 717-4241, 785-0767. See page 2 for details. Friday, December 25 —Christmas Saturday, January 16 – Concert: Steven ( cello) and Danielle Bourne (piano). Steven played cello solo at the Queens concert in Amsterdam. Friday, February 12 – Concert: Willem Statius Muller ( piano). This will be a historic concert of the 80-year-old Antillean pianist who was on Bonaire for the last time 25 years ago! REGULAR EVENTS By appointment – Rooi Lamoenchi Kunuku Park Tours $21 (includes tax). Discounts for residents and local people. Tel. 717-8489, 5409800. Parke Publico children’s playground open every day into the cooler evening hours. Saturdays Rincon Marshé —6 am-2 pm. Enjoy a Bonairean breakfast while you shop, fresh fruits and vegetables, gifts, local sweets, snacks, arts, handicrafts, candles, incense, drinks, music. Big Marché first Saturday of the month— www.infobonaire.com/rincon. Flea Market at Parke Publico every first Saturday of the month, 3 to 7 pm. Everyone welcome to buy and to sell. NAƒ10 per selling table.(NAƒ 5 goes to up-keep the park). NGOs can have a free table. More information and reservations for a spot call Vicky Bissessar 786-1592 . Wine Tasting at Antillean Wine Company’s warehouse on Kaya Industria, second Saturday of the month , 7-9 pm. Snacks and tasting of six wines for $10 (NAƒ17,50) per person. Tel. 5607539. Soldachi Tours— See the real Bonaire and be transported back in time. Learn about the history, culture and nature by Bonaireans from Rincon. Call Maria Koeks for more information—7967870. Mondays Soldachi Tours of Rincon, the heart of Bonaire, 9 am-noon. $20-Call Maria, 717-6435-best island tour value Fridays Harbour Village Tennis, Social Round Robin 7-10 pm. $10 per pers on. Cash bar. All invited. Call Elisabeth Vos at 565-5225 FREE SLIDE/VIDEO SHOWS Sunday– Creature Feature– John and Suzie Wall of Buddy’s Digital photo center present a multimedia slide presentation about Buddy’s House Reef pool bar Buddy Dive , 6:30-7 pm, 717-5080 Tuesday -Bonaire Land and Ocean presentation by Fish-Eye Photo staff, 7pm on the big screen inside the Sunset Bar and Grill at Den Laman Condos. Wednesday– Sea Turtle Conservation Bonaire presents the Sea Turtles of Bonaire Slide Show , every 2nd & 4th Wednesday at Bruce Bowker's Carib Inn (717-8819) at 7pm. BONAIRE’S TRADITIONS Kas Krioyo Rincon— Step into Bonaire’s past in this venerable old home that has been restored and furnished so it appears the family has just stepped out. Local ladies will tell you the story. Open Monday thru Friday, 9 –12, 24. Weekends by appointment. Call 717-2445. Mangasina di Rei, Rincon . Enjoy the view from “The King’s Storehouse.” Learn about Bonaire’s culture. Visit homes from the 17th century. Daily. Call 717-4060 / 790-2018 Bonaire Museum on Kaya J. v.d. Ree, behind the Catholic Church in town. Open weekdays from 8 am-noon, 1:30-5 pm. Tel. 717-8868 Washington-Slagbaai National Park, Museum and Visitors’ Center. Open daily 8 am-5 pm. Closed on December 25th. and January 1st. Call 788 9015 or 796 5681 CLUBS and MEETINGS AA meetings every Wednesday at 7pm. Phone: 786-4651 or 786-7971 Al-Anon meetings every Monday evening at 7 pm. Call 790-7272 Weekly Bonaire Talker Gathering and Dinner at Gibi's Tuesday 6:30 pm call 567-0655 for directions. Bridge Club Wednesdays , 7:15 pm— All levels, NAƒ2,50, call Renata at 796-5591 to find out the evening’s location. Darts Club plays every other Sunday at City Café. Registration at 4, games at 5. Tel. 717-2950, 560-7539. JCI First Wednesday of the MonthJunior Chamber International Bonaire (JCI Bonaire, formerly known as Bonaire Jaycees) meets at the ABVO building, Kaminda Jato Baco 36 from 7:30 to 9:30 pm. Everyone is welcome. Contact: Renata Domacassé 516-4252. Kiwanis Club meets at APNA Plaza, Kaya International, every other Tuesday, 7 pm . Tel. 717-5595, Jeannette Rodriguez. Lions Club meets every 2nd and 4th Thursday of the month at 8 pm at Kaya Sabana #1. All Lions welcome. For more information call 510-0710. Rotary lunch meetings Wednesdays , 12 noon-2 pm Divi Flamingo Beach Resort upstairs in Peter Hughes meeting room above the dive shop. All Rotarians welcome. Tel. 717-2066 Toastmasters Club meets every two weeks. For more information call Crusita de Palm at 786-3827 or Lucia Martinez Beck, at 786-2953. CHURCH SERVICES Protestant Congregation of Bonaire: Kralendijk, Wilhelminaplein. In Papiamentu, Dutch, English, Sundays, 10 am. Rincon, Kaya C.D. Crestian, in Papiamentu, Sundays, 8:30 am. Children’s club, Saturdays, 5 pm, in Kralendijk Sunday School, Sundays, 4 pm, in Rincon. Bible Study and Prayer meetings, Thursdays, at 8 pm, Kralendijk. New Apostolic Church: Centro di Bario Nord Saliña , Sundays, 10 am. Services in Dutch. 700-0379 . International Bible Church of Bonaire, at SGB High School auditorium (Kaya Frater Odulfinus, off Kaya Korona.) Sunday services in English at 9 am; Sunday evening prayer meeting at Pastor's home, 7 pm. Fridays, 6 to 8 pm, Light & Life Club, children 5 to 12 yrs. Tel. 717-8332. Catholic: San Bernardus in Kralendijk – Services, Sunday at 8 am and 7 pm in Papiamentu, 717-8304. Our Lady of Coromoto in Antriol , Saturday at 6 pm in English. Mass in Papiamentu on Sunday at 9 am and 6 pm. 7174211. Assembly of God (Asemblea di Dios): Kaya Triton (Den Cheffi). In English, Dutch & Papiamentu on Sunday at 10 am. Wednesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30 pm . 717-2194 Ministerio di Kristu Hesus Services Sunday mornings at 10 am at Jong Bonaire Youth Center in English, Dutch and Papiamentu. Preaching the full gospel. Contact: 786-2557. Prayer and Intercession Church, in English. A full Gospel Church l ocated temporarily at Kaya Alexandrit # 20, Santa Barbara, Republiek. Services are held on Sunday mornings from 10am until 11:30am. Bible studies in English are on Monday nights from 7 to 8 pm. Contact: 717-3322 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter -day Saints : Kaya Sabana #26, Sundays: 9 am Sacrament Services (Translation to English and Papiamentu upon request) 10:20 Sunday School, 11:15 RS/YM/YW/PH Primary held from 10:20-12 noon Visitors Welcome: 701-9522 for Information Send event info to: The Bonaire Reporter Email reporter@bonairenews.com Tel:790-6518, 786-6125 or 790-8988 Who’s Who on The Bonaire Reporter Take The Reporter Home—1-year subscription: By mail to US $70; By mail to Europe $150. By Internet $35 donation. For information about subscriptions, stories or advertising in The Bonaire Reporter , PO Box 407, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles; phone (599) 790-6518, 786-6125, E-mail: info@bonairereporter.com The Bonaire Reporter, George DeSalvo, Publisher. Laura DeSalvo, Editor in Chief. Address: P. O. Box 407, Bona ire, Neth. Antilles. Available on-line at: www.bonairereporter.com Published every two weeks Reporters: Siomara E. Albertus, Bruce Bowker, J@n Brouwer, Wooy-Ling Choy, Christie Dovale, Ackim Exner, Wine Fransen, Jack Horkheimer, Molly BartikoskiKearny, Maria Koecks, Greta Kooistra, Jiri Lausman, Jerry Ligon, Jane Madden, Maritza San Pedro, Michael Thiessen, Janet Thibault, Jane Townsend, Paul Wichers Unattributed photos are by the editor or publisher. Distribution: Yuchi Molina (Rincon), Elisabeth S ilberie (Playa), Divi-Divi Airline Housekeeping: JRA. Printed by: DeStad Drukkerij, Curaçao ©2009 The Bonaire Reporter Cruise Ship Calls -Informati on provided by the TCB Crafts Markets at Wilhelmina Park on Cruise Ship Visiting Days—usually 10am until ship departure. Thursday 12/10/09 Sea Cloud II 09002400 150 Thursday 12/10/09 Ruby Princess 11001900 3100 Friday 12/11/09 Enchantment of the Seas 0700 1530 2446 Monday 12/14/09 AidaAura 08001600 1260 Tuesday 12/15/09 Sea Princess 1200 1900 2016 Tuesday 12/15/09 Ocean Dream 08001600 1422 Friday 12/18/09 Enchantment of the Seas 0700 1530 2446 Tuesday 12/22/09 Ocean Dream 08001600 1422 Thursday 12/24/09 Caribbean Princess 11001900 3100 Date Day Ship name Time PAX

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Page 18 Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 Hair Affair We do our best to make your hair and makeup wishes come true!! You can also come in for facials and facial waxing . We use and sell L’Oreal products Is your plan to marry on the island? We can make you beautiful and stay beautiful for your happiest day. Personal attention by Janneke Appointment by tel: 717-5990 or just walk in. Downtown, near the waterfront next to Little Havana Tues-Fri: 9-12, 2-6 Sat: 9-2 non stop AIRLINES Divi Divi Air. Bonaire’s “on time airline” with 16 flights a day between Bonaire and Curaçao. Your first choice for inter-isla nd travel. Now flying to Aruba. APPLIANCES /TV/ ELECTRONICS and COMPUTERS City Shop , the mega store, has the island’s widest selection of large and small home appliances, furniture, TV, computers, cell phones and more. Fast service and in-store financing too. BANKS Maduro and Curiel’s Bank provides the greatest number of services, branches and ATMs of any Bonaire bank. They also o ffer investments and insurance. BEAUTY PARLOR Hair Affair . Expert hair cutting, styling, facials and facial waxing. BICYCLE / SCOOTER/ QUADS De Freewieler sells bikes and all kinds of bike accessories. They do professional repairs on almost anything on two wheels. Have your keys made here too. CONTRACTOR Equinox Bonaire— A USA licensed contractor for hotels, restaurant s, residential. On Time—Done Right. DELICATESSEN/DINING Eli Deli – World Class delicatessen with 23 kinds of cheeses, hams and salamis from around the world. Have a sandwich or salad there or take it home. Breakfast too. At the traffic circle at hotel row. 717-3997. DINING Bistro di Paris A real French restaurant with affordable prices and friendly Bonairean ambiance Owned and operated by a French Chef On Kaya Gob. Debrot ½ mile north of town Pasa Bon Pizza is Bonaire’s best. Freshly prepared pizzas made with the finest ingredients. Salads, desserts. Eat in or take away. Nice bar too. 780-1111 Call ahead to eat-in or take out, Next to Bistro (above) Lunchroom de Bonairiaan— Breakfast & lunch prepared and served by Stichting Project students under professional guidance. Monday-Friday, 9-2. Kaya Gob. N.Debrot, opposite Divi Flamingo. DIVING Carib Inn is the popular 10-room inn with top-notch dive shop and well stocked retail store. Best book trade on Bonaire. Good pric es on regulator repair, dive computer H.Q. ScubaVision Document your Bonaire vacation above and below the water with a custom DVD by Bonaire’s top videographer, Hendrik Wuyts FITNESS TRAINER Tina Woodley is a certified personal trainer, including Pilates, Yoga and is an NLP practitioner. She’ll help you improve your body and life! Tel. 700-5488 FRAMING Gladys’s Art Shoppe Fine framing by experienced craftsmen/artists. Outstanding selection of framing materials for your treasu res. Kaya Rotterdam 10, Hato. GARDEN SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Green Label has everything you need to start or maintain your garden. They can design, install and maintain it and offer plants, irrigation supplies and garden chemicals. Now in new expanded location off Kaya Industria. HEALTH Harmony House— The herb and mineral center. Help your body heal itself. Natural Way Health Store— The place where all the hard to find natural and healthy products are. Upstairs from Botika Bonaire, on Kaya Grandi. HOME CARE Bonaire Second Home Care can handle all the needs of second home owners on Bonaire including inspection, management and cleaning. INTERNET AND CELLULAR SERVICE Digicel has the most subscribers, widest choice of calling plans and interesting phones. Visit their office on downtown Kaya Grandi and see for yourself. MIO offers by far the clearest, most reliable phone signal on the island PLUS WIRELESS HIGHSPEED INTERNET almost ever ywhere on Bonaire. PEST CONTROL Professional Pest Control . Call Peter to get rid of all those nasty pets like termites, fleas, ticks and ants that want to invade your home. Call now and save your investment in your home. PHOTO FINISHING Paradise Photo in the Galeries Shopping Center downtown offers fast, fine processing for prints, slides, items and services. Full digital services . REAL ESTATE / RENTAL AGENTS Bonaire Sunshine Homes is the realtor with a local touch. Ask them to show you the good value homes they list. Call them if you are thinking of selling your home. Caribbean Homes, “the Refreshing Realtor,” specializing in luxury homes, condos, lots, rentals and property management. 4 Sale By Owner – Assistance for selling your house on your own. Sunbelt Realty offers full real es tate, rental, and insurance services. If you want a home or to invest in Bonaire, stop in and see them. RETAIL Benetton, world famous designer clothes available now in Bonaire at prices less than those in US. For men, women and children. Best Buddies and Pearls —Stunning fresh water pearl jewelry, fashion, gifts, t shirts. Wonderful service, free gift wrap. STORAGE The Storehouse ( Mangazina in Papiamentu ) offers Secure Storage For Vehicles, Household Items, Diving And Sporting Gear, Business Files or Inventory. Across from the northern hotel row. SECURITY Special Security Services will provide that extra measure of protection when you need it. Always reliable. SHIPPING Rocargo Freight Air and sea shipments in/out of Bonaire. Customs agents. Pr ofessional and efficient. FedEx agent. What would we do without their superb services? SUPERMARKETS Warehouse Supermarket on Kaya Industria— Biggest air conditioned market with the, largest selection and lowest prices on the island. WATER TAXI Get to Klein Bonaire by Ferry. Ride the Kantika di Amor or Skiffy . Hotel pickup. Easiest landing on Klein Bonaire with built-in ramp WINES Antillean Wine Company. You’ve tried the rest; now try the best: best prices, highest quality wines from around the world, kept in a cooled warehouse. Free delivery. Kaya Industria 23, Mon.-Sat. 9 amnoon. To learn more about these businesses check their ad in this issue of The Reporter Fortnightly Advertisers in The Bonaire Reporter are included in the guides. Free! Call 790-6518, 786-6518 Or email Reporter@BonaireNews.com Check CARIB INN First. Great Prices –Great Stock Scuba Sales Repair Replacement New Gear Accessories Always Great Values Dive gear specials CARIB INN Since 1980 PADI 5 STAR GOLD PALM 717-8819 8 am to 5 pm daily (next to Divi Flamingo Hotel) AFFORDABLE NetTech N.V.info@NetTech.an www.NetTech.an Tel:717-6773 Fax:717-7854Bonaire’s Official Web Site Developer!Domain Registrations E-mail Hosting Anti-Spam & Anti-Virus Web Site Design Web Site Hosting Marketing Consulting Internet Consulting Photographic Services Graphic Design Bonaire’s Official Web Site Developer

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Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 Page 19 B e pampered for breakfast or lunch by youngsters in training for the world of the professional restaurant business by the Stichting Project. Delicious menu, Good prices On Kaya Gob. N. Debrot – opposite the Divi Flamingo Hotel Open: Weekdays 9.00-14.00 FULL DIGITAL SERVICES FUJI MINI-LAB KODAK & FUJI FILM SLIDES E-6 PROCESSING PASSPORT PHOTOS BATTERIES CAMERAS FRAMES PHOTO ALBUMS GREETING CARDS DIGITAL AND MORE... Les Galeries Shopping Center (Bordering the parking lot) Tel. 717-5890 Open M-F 8:30-12, 2-6 pm, Sat. 9-12 From Bonaire Nautico Marina BONAIRE NAUTICO MARINA At It Rains Fishes Restaurant Call Henk at 560-7254 / Bob 786-5399 www.bonairenauticomarina /VHF 68 info@bonairenauticomarina.com THE ONLY WALKON / WALKOFF Catamaran Kantika di Amor Up to 27 people and supported by a brand new larger sister Catamaran Kantika Too Up to 50 people TRIPS Every Day (max 1.90 meter draft), Dinghy tie up at north-inside dock at US$10 weekly up from Monday till Monday. Water and 115/220 v. Daily trips via resorts 10 am, 12 , 2 pm Except Sundays at 10 am only Also available for group trips Question ( from page 7 ): Q) In which year was the original light house built? Answer: 1868 B onaire Sunshine Homes opened their Affordable Homes Expo Friday, November 27, with guests from the press, the government, the construction industry, potential buyers and friends. On hand to answer questions about building these affordable homes was Kayam Babooloa, the director of Tiahco of Trinidad, the company that supplies the prefabricated materials to build a home for under NAƒ 100.000. At the Expo there were one-on-one meetings with buyers and personnel from Tiahco Trinidad, product workshops on the building system and a Product in Depth discussion with stakeholders in the industry, including RBTT and Banco di Caribe. Bonaire Sunshine Homes Director Vicky Bissessar declared the Expo a success with the first home to begin in January 2010. Laura DeSalvo 982 473 561 413 625 978 765 981 432 278 549 613 159 836 247 634 217 859 396 758 124 841 362 795 527 194 386 Puzzle on page 7 Commissioner Pancho Cicilia cuts the ribbon while Sunshine Homes partners, Vicky Bissessar and James Fines, approve! At the opening: Kayam Babooloa, Director of Tiahco; James Fines; Commisioner Pancho Cicilia; Vicky and Tulsie Bissessar Asked if they could help with negotiations between Bonaire and Holland, the UN representatives said they had not been invited to join in the negotiation process and that they must be invited to do so. Several in the stakeholder group thought that this might be a productive way to end the impasse that seems to be in place now. UN visitors mentioned that while this referendum is not “legally binding” all the political parties they have talked with have agreed to follow th e vote of the community on this referendum. Several members from the tourism industry were present and said they had great concern that the primary industry of the island, which provides most of the jobs, could be severely injured in future, specifically if the airport runway is not repaired soon. When discussing possible independence for the island, concern was voiced because of the proximity of Bonaire to Venezuela and also the lack of resources since the primary industry is tourism. Questions UN asked the stakeholders: 1. Does the public have sufficient knowledge to make an informed decision? Answer from stakeholders was a clear “No.” Recent student research supports this position. In a separate meeting the Bonaire press corps ag reed with the stakeholders on this point, emphasizing that unbiased information was simply not available to them. 2. Is voting process on the island clean? Most of the stakeholders said “Yes. They thought there were no problems like the UN sees in other countries where there is intimidation, stuffing of ballot boxes, etc. 3. Is news media on the island impartial? Stakeholders reported that most of the print media supported a particular political party and one of the radio stations seems to have a clear bias . It was also noted that most media do not have full time reporter staff to provide indepth reporting, a point agreed on by the press. 4. What is the public’s view of this UN visit? Stakeholders were glad to see the UN on Bonaire and also asked for further involvement by the UN in phrasing of the referendum question(s) as well as help in developing and monitoring the educational process. 5. The UN wanted to know if the January election for Staten (Parliament in Curacao) might have an effect on referendum. Most stakeholders thought it probably would, for several different reasons. Jane Townsend Referendum Preparation (Continued from page 3)

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Page 20 Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 C IEE provides Bonaire with something it’s always needed– a professional academic research facility and personnel who can carry out re search. On November 24, 10 of the students at the CIEE offered very interesting public presentations of their recent work in Bonaire. It was a valuable contribution to our knowledge of the land and sea environment. Alison Masyr (Oberlin College, Ohio) " Traditional Datu cactus (Ritterocereus griseus ) fences reduce run-off rates and transport of sediment and nutrients on hillsides in Bonaire" Showed the importance of the Yatu cact us in the prevention of water runoff and subsequent reef damage. Alyssa Adler (Oregon State University) "Habitat use, nocturnal behavior, and differences between phases of five common parrotfish species in Bonaire" Described parrotfish assemblages on a coral reef near Playa Lechi. Aurora Schramm (Eckerd College, Florida) "The effects of the lunar cycle on plankton abundance, diversity, and daily migration in the coastal waters of Bonaire" Checked whether densities of zooplankton are influenced by the phases of the moon. Carolina “Lina” Yanson (Indiana University) "Determining how coral reef habitat structure correlates with fish species richness at 6 dive sites in Bonaire" Was a survey of many dive sites on the leeward side of Bonaire to test whether the diversity of fish on those reefs is influenced by habitat diversity or complexity. Chelsey Weathersbee (Wofford College, South Carolina) "Sleeping in a bubble: unraveling the secrets of parrotfish at night" Investigated the nighttime mucus cocoon -making behavior of parrotfish. Her findings show that parrotfish in cocoons are found on the reef slope more often than the reef flat. Grant Frank (Colorado College) "Habitat choice, size distribution, color variance, and feeding behavior of Gymnothorax moringa , in coastal waters of Bonaire" Was an in-depth study on the spotted moray eel ( Gymnothorax moringa ) between Playa Lechi and the Something Special dive site. Maggie Thomas (Trinity College, Connecticut) "A comparative study of benthic community composition and habitat utilization by coral reef fish on artificial reefs versus natural reefs of Bonaire" Described how artificial and na tural reef areas affect fish diversity and number. Mollie Sinnott (Wake Forest University, North Carolina) " How does water quality correlate with coral disease, bleaching, and macroalgal growth on reefs? A comparative study of various threats from human activities on Bonaire " Expanded upon the CIEE faculty and staff monitoring of water quality. A few of her results showed that at times water quality approached levels almost too polluted for safe swimming. Noelle Hawthorne (Bucknell University, Pennsylvania) "Hawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) nests: nutrient sources and drivers of community structure in a tropical marine system" worked with Sea Turtle Conservation Bonaire monitoring hawksbill nest sites on Klein Bonaire. Pamela Williams (University of Colorado at Boulder) "Christmas tree worms ( Spirobranchus giganteus) and their role as bio-indicators of environmental stress on coral reefs of Bonaire" was interested in determining whether there was a marine equivalent to “bioindicators” in the waters of Bonaire. She showed that the Christmas tree worms have promise to do just that. G.D. The CIEE students who presented their research I t has been 10 years since Klein Bonaire was purchased back from a private owner who wanted to develop it. Luckily this did not happen, because any development would damage the reefs surrounding this unique island. Through the effort of the Foundation for the Preservation of Klein Bonaire (FPKB), the island was purchased for the people of Bonaire in 1999. Most of the money came from a grant from the Netherlands and the World Wildlife Fund. Money was also donated by individuals through FPKB. Very strict conditions were placed on what could and could not be done on Klein Bonaire. Since those 10 years many new faces have arrived on Bonaire with new ideas and perhaps they are not aware of the conditions for Klein. According to the agreement signed between the island government and WNF/FPKB, Klein Bonaire was to be designated as a protected area by the island government, which happened when it was made a part of the National Park. It is to be kept in a pristine and uninhabited condition with no buildings allowed. No docks or piers plus many other restrictions, all designed to keep this unique island natural so everyone can enjoy it for decades to come. There are monetary fines if any of these conditions are violated. The tranquility of Klein Bonaire is being threatened by overuse, especially during cruise ship season. Most do not realize it but Klein Bonaire is the largest uninhabited and undeveloped island in the Caribbean. Those are really big bragging rights that no one else can claim. As more and more areas get over developed, more and more problems are created. Let’s keep Klein Bonaire natural as so many of us have known it for so many years. You won’t find another place like it! That in itself is priceless. Bruce Bowker Bruce Bowker FPKB President . Klein Bonaire as seen by approaching planes

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Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 Page 21 Why get just half an ad? All Bonaire Reporter Ads are in the printed paper and on the Internet too. Your advertisement can be here and reach thousands of people who are buyers. 3,000 copies every issue, 2 x per month! Call Laura at 790-6518 Email: info@bonairereporter.com Noord-Saliña/Playa Pabou Kralendijk – S o it was on one of those lazy days back in July that I drove the reliable black 1987 Jeep Wrangler six-cylinder 4.0 liter over those unpaved small roads of Antriol, Den Tera, Mentor, Nawati and Noord-Saliña. It was siesta time and hot. Nobody around. All dogs too sleepy to bark. It was easy to avoid crushing, flattening and squashing a bunch of baby chickens unexpectedly crossing the road. Second gear, a thousand revs and the miles countable on the fingers of two hands. Clouds of dust, waving curtains, the sound of a remote radio, weeds, trunks, little piles of garbage and piled up old iron, cars waiting for repair or restoration… Then I noticed some nice metal curves and chrome shining in the sun. It was hard to reach the location but finally I was able to find the entrance and to park the Jeep. No fence. No living creatures except two dogs. A humble house, doors and windows shut. Yelling: “Bon tardi!” did not help. Honking was useless. There was the car, but this was not my property. I yelled again and again to be sure that nobody was there. The dogs did not bother me. No neighbors, no nothing. Then I grabbed my camera and with all the courage I could find I entered the terrain. There she was: an all American vehicle, sprayed metallic blue. Not the original color for sure. Brand: Chevrolet. Wrap around windows in the rear and in front. A coupé model. Late 50s. Checkered flags on the side. Six round tail lights. And a very special and good looking original air vent on the roof, above the window. The license plate read: RCJ – 123. I shot some pictures and later stored them in my computer. About half a year later I got in touch with the owner of a Cadillac Eldorado and we got to know each other better and better. Not in the least case because of our love for the metal on wheels. So I informed him about the Chevrolet and I sent him the pictures. The guy was sure this was a very rare Chevrolet Biscayne! So on one hot Sunday we jumped in the car and went to the hard-tofind location. In the end we found out that we had found the right location but that the vehicle had disappeared. Some marks were left in the grass so the car had probably just recently been removed. Now the car really started to intrigue us. For nights I checked my books and the internet. Finally I came to the conclusion that the suspect car was a Chevrolet Belair Impala, built in 1958. Quite a rarity! After a few weeks a guy led me to another location. The car was found again! The new location was: Playa Pabou. The owner was Pierre A. Rigaud, director of Mr. Bug Pest control services. And the car had a little sign behind one of the side windows: “For sale 510 – 5562.” Mister Rigaud really loved the car but this car was one among others. On Curaçao Pierre Rigaud also had some special cars and finally he had to decide to sell this Impala which is believed to be unique on the islands of the Netherlands Antilles. The car came all the way from Colombia. The license plate reads: “RCJ – 123 Barranquilla” and a sticker on one of the windows tells us that the last time a Colombian owner paid his pesos for road tax was in April 1995: “ Certificado de movilizacion. ” The body of this Impala is designed very well. The curves are sleek. Some enthusiasts like the front. I like her rear. Especially the hips and the air vent. The car is in running condition. Those days, back in the late 50s, the muscle car was equipped with a high output V-8 big block. Unfortunately someone converted it to a six-cylinder with so called “headers.” So the sound of music under the bonnet is all right! The engine is connected to a threespeed automatic gearbox. The cockpit is impressive. Loads of gauges and hardly any plastic or vinyl. Wrap-around windows in the front and in the rear. A coupé version. Four side windows to roll down completely. No window sills. Real and look-alike air scoops on the sides, in the bonnet and on the roof. Lots of chrome. A huge rear end. Four head lamps and six rear lights. And again: nice curves. Quite a lot of work to do. Hard to get the car back to the original or concourse condition. It takes a lot of “elbow grease” but for sure this Belair Impala is a nice project. Story & photos by J@n Brouwer The 59th of a series of Bonaire Reporter articles by J@n Brouwer, featuring some of Bonaire’s interesting vehicles that are “on wheels.” Will he reach 100 articles? Two pictures of the blue mystery car. The picture of the attractive and tempting rear of the vehicle wa s taken on the 14 of July 2009. Those days the car was parked on a very hard to find location somewhere in Noord Saliña. Then the vehicle had vanished to appear later in Playa Pabou. This was the first time the Impala showed her face to me.

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Page 22 Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 Celebrating 10 years of Green Label—So me of the Green Label Staff and children. Agnes (green dress) and Ap (white shirt) in front of the logo on the new building Presentation of a NAƒ 5.000 check to STINAPA. Adults: Jeannette, Johan, Agnes, Ap and Elsmarie I t was a festive celebration, November 27, to commemorate 10 years of a company helping to make the island a more beautiful place with trees, plants and flowers. Agnes and Ap of Green Label just opened their new shop on Kaya Industria and invited their colleagues in the agricultural department (LVV) and their faithful clientele to help celebrate as a family. Green Label has made a difference on Bonaire. Gardens are flourishing and more and more people are learning how to grow things in this sometimes harsh environment. And the company has been a fine friend to their staff, guiding their young employees in the business. Here’s to many, many more years of your “greening” Bonaire, Green Label! Thanks for being here. Laura DeSalvo T wo wells near LVV in Amboina tested as seriously polluted by bacteria from human sewage. The pollution come from enterococci bacteria, which originates in the human intestinal tract. The values measured were well above safe drinking water standards,. Environmental activist Sean Paton commissioned the study as part of his efforts to stop Scientology Church ship Freewinds from discharging its wastewater in Bonaire. Paton had the water from nearby sources analyzed by a competent laboratory. He believes the pollution comes from the trenches at LVV where wastewater from the island’s sewage tankers is dumped. Water from the two wells at Flor di Cuba and Mi Pasa Kontra are mostly used for livestock, but no signs are posted saying it is unfit for human (or animal) consumption. Paradoxically the tests show that the Mi Pasa Kontra well is the most polluted even though it’s further away from LVV. Paton blamed the pollution on the Freewinds and called for the closure of the two wells. The Church of Scientology-owned cruise ship Freewinds is a frequent caller to Bonaire. Its visits are controversial, not only because of its ownership, but because the ship’s sewage is pumped into trucks that deposit untreated waste into trenches at LVV. In its favor the Freewinds supports numerous Bonaire activities and provides a free venue for several charitable activities during its times in port. Many Bonaire residents are friends with the ship’s permanent personnel and feel the Freewinds is a good friend to the island. G.D. Tanker loading wastewater from Freewinds A s we go to press the Divi-Divi commuter plane that crashed in October has yet to be raised. A broken robot control cable and strong currents in the area have hindered the operation. The robot made a successful observation of the aircraft and was able to view the pilot Robert Mansell still strapped in his seat. When he ditched the plane he was knocked unconscious and couldn’t be released. All nine passengers were safely rescued. When the new cable is installed another attempt will be made to raise the plane. The embargo against on-site news coverage was lifted after a complaint by the Bonaire press corps. We will report progress on The Reporter website. G.D. Underwater robot dangling from Smit salvage tug Bonaire government photo

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Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 Page 23 Don't Miss the Best Meteor Showe r of the Year Next Week! and How to Find Neptune Using Jupiter as a Finder B oy oh boy, have we ever got two cosmic goodies for you. On Sunday night, December 13th, and early Monday morning, December 14 th, you will have an opportunity to see the best meteor shower of the entire year, the Geminids . So named because they appear to come from the constellation Gemini the Twins . Plus the following weekend, the 19th, 20th and 21st, Jupiter will be so close to Neptune to find Neptune just find Jupiter. On this Sunday night about 10 pm face east wh ere you'll see winter's most famous constellation, Orion the Hunter, renowned for the three equally spaced stars, lined up in a row, which mark his belt. If you shoot an arrow down through those stars you'll land on the brightest star we can see, Sirius , which marks the eye of Orion's bigger dog. And close to Sirius is the bright star, Procyon, which marks the eye of Orion's smalle r dog. Plus just to his left two not-quite-as-bright stars, Castor and Pollux , the two brightest stars of the Gemini Twins. And it is from this constellation that the Gemini d meteor shower will appear to originate. And this year it should be supe r good because there will be no moonlight whatsoever to wipe out even the faintest meteors. In fact when it is at its peak some may actually see up to 75 meteors per hour. Now the Geminid shower is one of those rare showers, which is frequently good before midnight as well as after. But this year I'd suggest you watch from about 10 o'clock in the evening until dawn Monday if you can. It will be better if you get far away from lights, lie back in a lawn chair or sleeping bag and slow ly scan the sky, no binoculars or telescope needed. And if you stay out for a couple of hours you should be able to see several dozen. As time goes by Gemini will rise higher and higher in the sky so that by 2 or 3 am it will be super high above the horizon. Now although we know that almost all meteor showers occur when our Earth rides through a stream of comet debris left in the orbit of a comet, the Geminids are actually asteroid debris and appear every December when our Earth rides through the stream of debris from asteroid Phaethon 3200 . So we could call the Geminids an asteroid shower. And now for you planet aficionados who have ne ver seen the 8th planet, Neptune. Get out your small telescope on the 19th, 20th and 21st an hour after sunset, face southwest and aim your telescope directly at s uper bright, 88,000-mile-wide Jupite r. And right beside it about half a degree away you'll see a tiny bluish gr een spot of light and that is 31,000-mile-wide Neptune. And the reason it appears so tiny is because while Jupiter is only half a billion miles away, Neptune is six times farther, almost three billion miles away. Jack Horkheimer *to find it... just look up ARIES (Mar. 21April 20) Don't hesitate to go ahead with any plans for entertainment. Your honesty will not only win you points but also respect. Compromise may be necessary. You will gain knowledge through your adventure. Your luckiest events this month will occur on a Wednesday. TAURUS (Apr. 21May 21) You might not be as reserved on an emotional level as you'd like. Try looking into new ways to make extra money. Dinner, theater, or a comedy club may be just the place. You w ill tend to overeat this month. Your luckiest events this month will occur on a Wednesday. GEMINI (May 22-June 21) Gambling will be a waste of time and money. Sit back and observe, regardless of how hard th at might be. Don't be disappointed if you don't get your way emotionally. You may find yourself in an opportune position if you are willing to take a bit of a risk. Your luckiest events this month will occur on a Tuesday. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Think hard before going into business with friends or family. You will be a bit of a spendthrif t this month. Do not let them in on your plans if you want things to run smoothl y. You may find yourself in an opportune position if you are willing to take a bit of a risk. Your luckiest events this month will occur on a Thursday. LEO (July 23-Aug 22) Don't try to deal w ith important issues or make changes that will upset the apple cart. Opportunities for romance may develop through dealing with groups that have a purpose. You will be able to communicate well this month. Take a second look; difficulties with appliances, water, or electricity in your home may be evident. Your luckiest even ts this month will occur on a Tuesday. VIRGO (Aug. 23 -Sept. 23) Changes in your residence may be financially favorable. Risks will not be profitable. Don't be too pushy or demanding, or you may find yourself all alone. You may have a hard ti me relating to children this month. Your luckiest events this month will occur on a Friday. LIBRA (Sept. 24 -Oct. 23) Avoid lending or borrowing. Uncertainty regarding your mate may emerge; reevaluate what you see in each other. You have a real need to be vocal. You can make money if you put your savings into conservative investments. Your luckiest events this month will occur on a Sunday. SCORPIO (Oct. 24 Nov. 22) Avoid getting too close to coworkers or employers. Mishaps due to preoccupation will be upsetting. Catch up on correspondence. Don't overspend on luxury items. Your luckiest events this month will occur on a Thursday. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23 -Dec. 21) Try not to say the wrong thing at the wrong time. You will get out of shape easily if you don't keep on top of things. Trips will be exciting. Be cautious who you deal with financially. Your luckiest events this month will occur on a Tuesday. CAPRICORN (Dec 22.Jan. 20) Overindulgence could cause problems for you with your loved ones. Property deals look good. Self-improvement projects will payoff in more ways than one. It's time to get yourself back on track.Your luckiest events this month will occur on a Friday. AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 -Feb. 19) Arguments with relatives may lead to a split in the family. Someone you least expect may not ha ve your best interests at heart. Make creative changes to your living quarters. You may have a problem with coworkers if you try to tell them what to do. Your luckiest events this month will occur on a Friday. PISCES (Feb. 20-Mar. 20) Don't overindulge in eating. A romantic dinner, followed by a quiet evening with the one who is enticing you, should be most satisfying. You hard work and dedication will payo ff, so stick to your guns and do your job well. Do a little investigating if there is someone at work you don't trust. Your luckiest events this month will occur on a Friday. By Astrologer Michael Thiessen For December 2009 N e w DV D A v a i l a b l e B o n a i r e T a Du s h i E.M. Rijswijk Denturist ARE YOUR DENTURES: Loose? Cracked? Missing Teeth? In Your Pocket? Worn? Causing Gum Pain? Call For An Appointmen t 717-2248 or 786-3714 Kaya J.G. Hernandez z/n (Near Botika Korona) New hours: 9 am-12 pm, 2 pm—4 pm Monday-Friday Repairs while you wait.

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Page 24 Bonaire ReporterDecember 11-25, 2009 Wishing you a happy & healthy Holiday season ~ Open for evening shopping on WEDNESDAY 23 DECEMBER ~ OPEN TIL 9pm ~ ~ Peace ~ Love ~ Freedom ~ Located at Kaya Amsterdam #25, Tel: (+599) 717 5449 Fax (+599) 717 4649 From Kralendijk center, take Kaya Grandi north towards Hato and Sabadeco. At the traffic circle turn right on Kaya Amsterdam. After AkkermanÂ’s To yota showroom you will find us on the left hand side.